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National Year Book 

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Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution 



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NATIONAL YEAR BOOK 
1916 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF THE 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



CONTAINING LIST OF THE GENERAL OFFICERS AND OF 
NATIONAL COMMITTEES FOR 1916; NATIONAL CHARTER; 
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS; OFFICERS OF STATE 
SOCIETIES AND LOCAL CHAPTERS; PROCEEDINGS OF 
NEWARK CONGRESS, MAY 15, 16; BANQUET, MAY 16; MEET- 
INGS OF TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE; REC- 
ORDS OF MEMBERS ENROLLED FROM MAY 16, 1915, TO 
APRIL 30, 1916. 



COMPILED BY 

A. HOWARD CLARK 
Secretary General and Registrar General 



PRESS OF JUDD & DETWEILER, INC., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 



http://archive.org/details/nationalyearbook1916sons 



1623352 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF THE 

Sons of the American Revolution 



ORGANIZED APRIL 30, 1889 
INCORPORATED BY ACT OF CONGRESS, JUNE 9, 1906 



GENERAL OFFICERS 
Elected at the Annual Congress, May 16, 1916 



President General: 
Elmer Marston Wentworth, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Vice-Presidents General: 

Orison J. C. Dutton, 309 Securities Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
Frederick E. Emerson, N. Y., P. & N. R. R., Norfolk, Va. 
Thomas W. Williams, 78 N. Arlington Ave., East Orange, N. J. 
Philip F. Turner, 40 Exchange Street, Portland, Me. 
William K. Boardman, Cumberland Tel. & Tel. Co., Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary General and Registrar General: 
A. Howard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer General: 
John H. Burroughs, 15 William Street, New York City. 

Historian General: 
David L. PiErson, 21 Washington Street, East Orange, N. J. 

Chaplain General: 
Rev. John Onesimus Foster, D. D., Seattle, Wash. 



SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

The General Officers, together with one member from each State 
Society, constitute the Board of Trustees of the National Society. The 
following Trustees for the several States were elected at the Newark 
Congress, May 16, 1916, to serve until their successors are elected at 
the Congress to be held at Nashville, Tenn., in May, 1917: Alabama, 
Maj. William Frye Tebbetts, Mobile; Arizona, Everett E. EHinwood, 
Bisbee; Arkansas, George W. Clark, Little Rock; California, Bethuel 
M. Newcomb, 2309 Vine St., Berkeley; Colorado, Simpson D. Butler, 
1748 High St., Denver ; Connecticut, Dr. Geo. C. F. Williams, Hartford ; 
Delaware, Col. George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg., Wilmington ; District 
of Columbia, Philip F. Larner, 918 F St., Washington ; Florida, John 
Hobart Cross, Pensacola; France, Gen. Horace Porter, 277 Madison 
Ave., New York City ; Hawaii, Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes, Honolulu ; 
Idaho, Lieut. Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise; Illinois, Henry W. 
Austin, 217 Lake St., Oak Park; Indiana, Theodore Stein, Jr., Indian- 
apolis ; Iowa, Elmer M. Wentworth, Des Moines ; Kansas, John M. 
Meade, Topeka ; Kentucky, George T. Wood, 417 W. Main St., Louis- 
ville ; Louisiana, Col. Elmer E. Wood, 323 Whitney-Central Bldg., New 
Orleans; Maine, Hon. Wainwright Gushing, Foxcroft; Maryland, Hon. 
Henry Stockbridge, 75 Gunther Bldg., Baltimore ; Massachusetts, Moses 
Greeley Parker, M. D., Lowell ; Michigan, Clarence M. Burton, 20 
Home Bank Bldg., Detroit; Minnesota, Gideon L. Ives, N. Y. Life 
Bldg., St. Paul ; Mississippi, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell, Jackson ; 
Missouri, Hon. John L. Ro Bards, Hannibal; Montana, Cornelius 
Hedges, Jr., Helena ; Nebraska, Herbert M. Bushnell, Lincoln ; Nevada, 
Hon. Albert D. Ayres, Reno; New Hampshire, S. Howard Bell, Derry; 
New Jersey, C. Symmes Kiggins, 78 W. Grand St., Elizabeth; New 
Mexico, Col. Ralph Emerson Twitchell, Santa Fe ; New York (Empire 
State), Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, 12 W. I22d St., New York City; 
North Carolina, Henry Clark Bridges, Tarboro ; North Dakota, Charles 
Andrew Pollock, Fargo; Ohio, Col. Moulton Honk, Toledo; Oklahoma, 
Harlan T. Deupree, Oklahoma City; Oregon, Wallace McCamant, Port- 
land ; Pennsylvania, Col. R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburgh ; 
Philippines, Frank Lee Strong, Manila; Rhode Island, Maj. Henry V. A. 
Joslin, Providence ; South Carolina, Paul Trapier Hayne, Greenville ; 
South Dakota, F. M. Mills, Sioux Falls ; Tennessee, E. A. Lindsey, 
Nashville; Texas, Edward Franklin Harris, Galveston; Utah, Albert 
Raymond Barnes, Salt Lake City; Vermont, Redfield Proctor, Proctor; 
Virginia, Arthur B. Clarke, 39 Merchants' Nat. Bank Bldg., Richmond; 
Washington, George A. Virtue, Seattle; Wisconsin, Rev. Frederick S. 
Penfold, Racine; Wyoming, William Bradford Dodge Gray, Cheyenne. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GF y NFRAF OFFICERS. 
BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 



ELMER MARSTON WENTWORTH, 
President General. 

Elmer Marston Wentworth, of Des Moines, Iowa, elected President 
General at the Newark Congress, was born at Newfield, York County, 
Maine, May 8, 1861, only son of John Norris and Nancy (Titcomb) 
Wentworth. Compatriot Wentworth's ancestry includes both the first 
Pilgrim and the earliest Puritan immigration to Massachusetts and the 
first settlers of New Hampshire. 

His membership in the Society is based upon the activities of Benja- 
min Titcomb (great-great-grandfather), who was commissioned by the 
New Hampshire Provincial Congress, May 24, 1775, to raise a company, 
of which he was to be Captain, for Col. Enoch Poor's Second New 
Hampshire Regiment, which was mustered in June 13, 1775. January 1, 
1776, under the reorganization, the regiment was known as the Eighth 
Continental Infantry, and on the 8th of November, 1776, it was again 
changed, and thereafter known as the First New Hampshire Conti- 
nental Infantry. April 2, 1777, Captain Titcomb was promoted to the 
rank of Major, and on March 24, 1780, to Lieutenant Colonel of the 
same regiment. After five years and seven months' service, Colonel 
Titcomb was retired, January 1, 1781, on half pay "for distinguished 
service," having been severely wounded three times and honored on 
several occasions by the thanks of the Provincial Congress for gallantry 
in action. 

Mr. Wentworth has four other Revolutionary ancestors with civil or 
short-term military service, and became a member of the Iowa Society 
April 16, 1906, serving as Vice-President from April 19, 1909, to April 
19, 191 1, and as President from April 19, 191 1, to April 19, 1912. Since 
1907 he has been delegate to and attended every Congress of the Na- 
tional Society; has served as National Trustee for Iowa since 1909 and 
been a member of the National Executive Committee five years during 
the administrations of Presidents General Marble, Parker, Thruston, 
and Woodworth. 

Mr. Wentworth married, November 5, 1884, Elizabeth Tilton Towne, 
of and at Peabody, Mass. They have eight children. Edward Norris 
and Walter Allerton are members of this Society. Mrs. Wentworth 
and four daughters are members of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

ORISON JAMES CHARLES DUTTON, 

Vice-President General. 

Orison J. C. Dutton, of Seattle, Washington, elected Vice-President 
General at the Newark Congress, was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, May 4, 



SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

The General Officers, together with one member from each State 
Society, constitute the Board of Trustees of the National Society. The 
following Trustees for the several States were elected at the Newark 
Congress, May 16, 1916, to serve until their successors are elected at 
the Congress to be held at Nashville, Term., in May, 1917: Alabama, 
Maj. William Frye Tebbetts, Mobile; Arizona, Everett E. Ellinwood, 
Bisbee; Arkansas, George W. Clark, Little Rock; California, Bethuel 
M. Newcomb, 2309 Vine St., Berkeley; Colorado, Simpson D. Butler, 
1748 High St., Denver; Connecticut, Dr. Geo. C. F. Williams, Hartford; 
Delaware, Col. George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg., Wilmington; District 
of Columbia, Philip F. Larner, 918 F St., Washington ; Florida, John 
Hobart Cross, Pensacola; France, Gen. Horace Porter, 277 Madison 
Ave., New York City ; Hawaii, Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes, Honolulu ; 
Idaho, Lieut. Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise; Illinois, Henry W. 
Austin, 217 Lake St., Oak Park; Indiana, Theodore Stein, Jr., Indian- 
apolis; Iowa, Elmer M. Wentworth, Des Moines; Kansas, John M. 
Meade, Topeka ; Kentucky, George T. Wood, 417 W. Main St., Louis- 
ville ; Louisiana, Col. Elmer E. Wood, 323 Whitney-Central Bldg., New 
Orleans; Maine, Hon. Wainwright Cushing, Foxcroft; Maryland, Hon. 
Henry Stockbridge, 75 Gunther Bldg., Baltimore; Massachusetts, Moses 
Greeley Parker, M. D., Lowell; Michigan, Clarence M. Burton, 20 
Home Bank Bldg., Detroit; Minnesota, Gideon L. Ives, N. Y. Life 
Bldg., St. Paul; Mississippi, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell, Jackson; 
Missouri, Hon. John L. Ro Bards, Hannibal ; Montana, Cornelius 
Hedges, Jr., Helena; Nebraska, Herbert M. Bushnell, Lincoln; Nevada, 
Hon. Albert D. Ayres, Reno; New Hampshire, S. Howard Bell, Derry; 
New Jersey, C. Symmes Kiggins, 78 W. Grand St., Elizabeth; New 
Mexico, Col. Ralph Emerson Twitchell, Santa Fe ; New York (Empire 
State), Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, 12 W. i22d St., New York City; 
North Carolina, Henry Clark Bridges, Tarboro ; North Dakota, Charles 
Andrew Pollock, Fargo; Ohio, Col. Moulton Honk, Toledo; Oklahoma, 
Harlan T. Deupree, Oklahoma City ; Oregon, Wallace McCamant, Port- 
land ; Pennsylvania, Col. R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburgh; 
Philippines, Frank Lee Strong, Manila; Rhode Island, Maj. Henry V. A. 
Joslin, Providence ; South Carolina, Paul Trapier Hayne, Greenville ; 
South Dakota, F. M. Mills, Sioux Falls; Tennessee, E. A. Lindsey, 
Nashville; Texas, Edward Franklin Harris, Galveston; Utah, Albert 
Raymond Barnes, Salt Lake City ; Vermont, Redfield Proctor, Proctor ; 
Virginia, Arthur B. Clarke, 39 Merchants' Nat. Bank Bldg., Richmond; 
Washington, George A. Virtue, Seattle ; Wisconsin, Rev. Frederick S. 
Penfold, Racine; Wyoming, William Bradford Dodge Gray, Cheyenne. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF G3NERAI, OFFICERS. 
BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 



ELMER MARSTON WENTWORTH, 

President General. 

Elmer Marston Wentworth, of Des Moines, Iowa, elected President 
General at the Newark Congress, was born at Newfield, York County, 
Maine, May 8, 1861, only son of John Norris and Nancy (Titcomb) 
Wentworth. Compatriot Wentworth's ancestry includes both the first 
Pilgrim and the earliest Puritan immigration to Massachusetts and the 
first settlers of New Hampshire. 

His membership in the Society is based upon the activities of Benja- 
min Titcomb (great-great-grandfather), who was commissioned by the 
New Hampshire Provincial Congress, May 24, 1775, to raise a company, 
of which he was to be Captain, for Col. Enoch Poor's Second New 
Hampshire Regiment, which was mustered in June 13, 1775. January 1, 
1776, under the reorganization, the regiment was known as the Eighth 
Continental Infantry, and on the 8th of November, 1776, it was again 
changed, and thereafter known as the First New Hampshire Conti- 
nental Infantry. April 2, 1777, Captain Titcomb was promoted to the 
rank of Major, and on March 24, 1780, to Lieutenant Colonel of the 
same regiment. After five years and seven months' service, Colonel 
Titcomb was retired, January 1, 1781, on half pay "for distinguished 
service," having been severely wounded three times and honored on 
several occasions by the thanks of the Provincial Congress for gallantry 
in action. 

Mr. Wentworth has four other Revolutionary ancestors with civil or 
short-term military service, and became a member of the Iowa Society 
April 16, 1906, serving as Vice-President from April 19, 1909, to April 
19, 191 1, and as President from April 19, 191 1, to April 19, 1912. Since 
1907 he has been delegate to and attended every Congress of the Na- 
tional Society ; has served as National Trustee for Iowa since 1909 and 
been a member of the National Executive Committee five years during 
the administrations of Presidents General Marble, Parker, Thruston, 
and Woodworth. 

Mr. Wentworth married, November 5, 1884, Elizabeth Tilton Towne, 
of and at Peabody, Mass. They have eight children. Edward Norris 
and Walter Allerton are members of this Society. Mrs. Wentworth 
and four daughters are members of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

ORISON JAMES CHARLES DUTTON, 

Vice-President General. 

Orison J. C. Dutton, of Seattle, Washington, elected Vice-President 
General at the Newark Congress, was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, May 4, 



6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

1868. He became a member of the Iowa Society, December 18, 1896, as 
great-grandson of James Dutton (1741-1839), private in Capt. Seth 
Oaks's Company of Artificers, and great-grandson of Gideon Bailey, 
First Mate of frigate "Boston" in 1778. 

Mr. Dutton transferred his membership to the Washington State 
Society in 1901, and was elected its President on February 22, 1916. 

FREDERICK ELTON EMERSON, 

Vice-President General. 

Fred. Elton EmErson, of Norfolk, Va., was elected Vice-President 
General at the Newark Congress. He was born at Columbus, Wis., 
July 14, 1856. In November, 1908, he became a member of the Virginia 
Society through the service of his great-grandfather, Gershom Beach, 
who distinguished himself at the taking of Fort Ticonderoga, under 
Col. Ethan Allen. "As a mark of recognition for his services there was 
presented to him a silk vest, on which the portrait of Washington was 
woven in silk." He was private in Captain Smith's Company of Ver- 
mont Militia at the Battle of Hubbardton and was promoted to Captain, 
and at the Surrender of Burgoyne he was made a Major. Mr. Emer- 
son's father moved from Vermont to Wisconsin in 1850 and in 1865 
became a farmer in Delaware. Mr. Emerson has been in railway service 
for nearly 40 years and is now in charge of the Commissary Depart- 
ment of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Norfolk. In February, 1914, 
he became Vice-President of the Virginia Society, which office he 
still holds, taking active part in promoting the work and growth of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

THOMAS WRIGHT WILLIAMS, 
Vice-President General. 

Thomas Wright Williams, of East Orange, N. J., elected Vice- 
President General at the Newark Congress, was born at Princeton, 
N. J., January 31, 1854, a son of George Washington and Amy Olden 
(Wright) Williams. He joined the New Jersey Society May 20, 1893, 
through the services of his great-grandfather, John Van Tassel, of 
Tarrytown, N. Y., a private in Col. James Hammond's Regiment of 
New York Militia. 

Thomas Wright Williams received his education in Grammar School 
No. 35, New York City (the famous Thomas Hunter School), and en- 
tered the College of the City of New York in 1870. He then engaged 
in commercial business in New York City, and in 1878 assisted in organ- 
izing the Bissel Carpet Sweeper Company, of Grand Rapids, Mich., of 
which company he is Vice-President, Eastern and Foreign Manager, 
with offices in New York City. 

Mr. Williams served on the National Executive Committee in 1912 
and 1914. He was Trustee to the National Society from New Jersey in 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL, OFFICERS. 

1913; Vice-President of the New Jersey Society in 1909, 1910, 1911, and 
1912, and President of the Orange Chapter in 1905. He served on the 
National Committee of Fifteen on the Celebration of Washington's 
Journey from Philadelphia to Cambridge, 1775. Mr. Williams is a 
member of the Council of the New Jersey Society of the Colonial W T ars, 
member of the New Jersey Historical Society, member of the Board 
of Managers of the New England Society of Orange, and of the Board 
of Managers of the Thomas Hunter Association of New York City; 
member of the Hardware Club of New York City and of the Republi- 
can Club of Orange. 

Mr. Williams's son, Thomas Wright Williams, Jr., and his sons-in- 
law, Graham King and Phillip Osborne, became members of the Society 
in 1911. 

PHILIP FOSTER TURNER, 

Vice-President General. 

Philip F. Turner, of Portland, Me., elected Vice-President General 
at the Newark Congress, was born in Portland June 24, 1853; joined 
the Maine Society in 1895. His ancestors in the Revolutionary War 
were Corporal Consider Turner, of Col. Thomas Marshall's Mass. 
Regt; Second Lieutenant Joshua Merrill, of Col. Edmund Phinney's 
Mass. Regt; First Lieutenant Nathaniel Springer, of Colonel McCobb's 
First Lincoln County Regt., and Joseph Foster, Member of the Com- 
mittee of Safety, Correspondence, and Inspection at Topsham, Me. 

Mr. Turner was elected President of the Maine Society on February 

22, I915. 

For several years he has been engaged in general insurance business 
at Portland. He is interested in many civic and patriotic activities; 
as President of the Cumberland Loan and Building Association (the 
largest in Maine) ; Governor of the Maine Society of Mayflower De- 
scendants, as descendant of Elder William Brewster and Edward Doty, 
of the Plymouth Colony; Senior Vice-President of Maine Society of 
American Wars, and a member of the Order of Washington. 

WILLIAM KELLOGG BOARDMAN, 

Vice-President General. 

William Kellogg Boardman, of Nashville, Tenn., elected Vice-Presi- 
dent General at the Syracuse Congress May 19, 1914, and re-elected at 
the Portland and Newark Congresses, was born in Shelton, Fairfield 
County, Conn., on November 5, 1870, the son of Capt. Daniel W. and 
Mary (Young) Boardman. 

He became a member of the Kentucky Society in 1909, and a few 
months later was elected its Secretary. 

After moving to Tennessee he was elected Secretary of the Tennes- 
see Society, and holds that office at the present time. 



8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mr. Boardman entered the service of the Bell Telephone interests in 

1888, and has filled various positions in that organization, now being 
Commercial Superintendent for the State of Tennessee. 

Mr. Boardman is a member of commercial organizations in several 
cities in Tennessee — a member of the Cumberland and Country Clubs 
at Knoxville, of the Commercial Club, the Hermitage Club, and Nash- 
ville Golf and Country Club at Nashville, and of the Filson Club at 
Louisville, Ky. 

A. HOWARD CLARK, 
Secretary General and Registrar General. 

A. Howard Clark became a member of the District of Columbia 
Society at its organization, in 1890, was elected Assistant Registrar 
May 5, 1890, and was one of its Secretaries from 1891 to 1893. He was 
Secretary General of the National Society in 1892, and has been Regis- 
trar General since 1893. Since 1904 he has also served as Secretary 
General 

He was born in Boston April 13, 1850. His ancestors in the Revolu- 
tion were Enoch Clark, Enoch Hall, Capt. Thomas Jenner Carnes, and 
Maj. Edward Carnes, of the Massachusetts Militia and Continental 
Army. 

Chester Morrow Clark, his older son, is also a member of the Society; 
and his younger son, Howard Sears Perry Clark, is a member of The 
Washington Guard. His wife, Alice Morrow Clark, was one of the 
eighteen original organizers of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, October 11, 1890; its Registrar General, 1890-1892; Correspond- 
ing Secretary General, 1893; Vice-President General, 1894, and in 1895 
was elected Honorary Vice-President General for life. 

Mr. Clark was of the class of 1881 at Wesleyan University, Middle- 
town, Conn., and that university gave him the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts in 1906. 

He engaged in commercial business in New York City from 1867 to 
1875 ; in 1879 was assistant on the United States Fish Commission and 
later expert on the Tenth Census. Since 1881 he has been connected 
with the Smithsonian Institution as Curator of the Division of History 
in the National Museum and as editor of the publications of the Insti- 
tution. In 1883 he served on the Executive Staff of the United States 
Commission at the International Fisheries Exposition in London, and 
was United States Expert Commissioner to the Paris Exposition of 

1889, by appointment of President Cleveland, when he was honored by 
order of President Carnot with the decoration of Officier du Merite 
Agricole of France. He was a member of the International Geograph- 
ical Congress at Paris in 1889. 

He is Herald of the Baronial Order of Runnymede (descendants of 
sureties of the Magna Charta), Archivist General of the National So- 
ciety of Americans of Royal Descent, Deputy Governor of the District 
of Columbia Society of Mayflower Descendants, member of the Society 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL, OFFICERS. 9 

of Colonial Wars, corresponding member of the California Genealogical 
Society, and a member of The Cosmos Club at Washington ; from 1889 
to 1908 was Secretary, and is now Curator, of the American Historical 
Association. 

JOHN HARRIS BURROUGHS, 

Treasurer General. 

John Harris Burroughs was born at Trenton, N. J., April 17, 1849, 
son of Charles Burroughs, who served as mayor of Trenton for fifteen 
consecutive years — from 1832 until 1847 — who was also judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for Mercer County, N. J., for sixteen years. 
John Burroughs, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
active in the Revolutionary War from the latter part of 1776 until the 
surrender of Cornwallis at the battle of Yorktown, in 1781. Mr. Bur- 
roughs is descended from John Burroughs, who settled in Newtown, 
Long Island, in 1653, with other English colonists. In the capacity of 
Treasurer, Vice-President, and President, he has served the Union 
League Club, Brooklyn. N. Y., in which city he has resided since 1865. 
He was President of the Empire State Society in 191 1. Pie has asso- 
ciated with him his son, Harris S. Burroughs, dealing in commercial 
paper and bank stocks in New York City, in which business Mr. Bur- 
roughs has been engaged since 1874. 

He was elected Treasurer General at the Baltimore Congress, in 1909, 
and re-elected at the Toledo and each succeeding Congress. 

DAVID L. PIERSON, r 
Historian Generae. 

David Lawrence Pierson, elected Historian General at the Toledo 
Congress and re-elected at each subsequent Congress, was born at 
Orange, N. J., February 3, 1865, son of Samuel Dodd Pierson and 
Louisa Mann. He is a direct descendant of Thomas Pierson, brother 
of the Rev. Abraham Pierson, who came to the banks of the Passaic 
River and settled the town of Newark, in 1666, with a company of 
Connecticut people. 

His ancestor from whom he claims membership in the Sons of the 
American Revolution is Caleb Pierson, a private in the Second New 
Jersey Rifle Corps. 

Mr. Pierson is chairman of the local History Committee of the New 
England Society, Orange; ex-President of the Orange Chapter, S. A. R. ; 
Historian of Battery A (N. G. N. J.) Veteran Association; honorary 
member of Uzal Dodd Post, G. A. R., and other veteran associations ; 
member of Hope Lodge, F. A. A. M. He is also President of the Old 
Burying Ground Association of Orange, and was instrumental in having 
the cemetery reclaimed and beautified after sixty years of neglect. He 
also formed the Revolutionary Monument Association, which resulted 



10 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

in the placing of the Dispatch Rider statue in the cemetery to the 
memory of the men and women who assisted in establishing American 
independence. 

He is also interested in many patriotic enterprises in his community, 
and it was through his efforts that Flag Day was publicly observed in 
the community; and has also started a movement for the placing of 
flag-poles in the public parks in Essex County, N. J. 

REV. JOHN O. FOSTER, D. D. 
Chaplain General. 

Rev. John O. Foster, of Seattle, elected Chaplain General at the 
Newark Congress, was born at La Porte, Ind., December 14, 1833. He 
became a member of the Washington State Society in January, 1904, 
through his maternal grandfather, Henry Batten, born 1750 and who 
died in 1845, who served as Orderly Sergeant in the Pennsylvania 
Troops near Pittsburgh and was pensioned. 

Doctor Foster is deeply interested in the patriotic work of the Sons 
of the American Revolution; has served one year as State Chaplain of 
Washington and two years as President of the Seattle Chapter, which 
has had a phenomenal growth in the past three years. 

The Foster family moved to Iowa in 1840, where the doctor grew to 
manhood. Attended Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa, 1854-1860; 
graduated at the Evanston, 111., Garrett Biblical Institute in 1862; mar- 
ried Caroline A. Bolles, of Colonial stock, in 1863 ; served in the U. S. 
Christian Commission in the Civil War in 1865 ; graduated in the first 
normal class of Chautauqua in 1874, and of the C. L. S. and C. in 1882. 
Caroline Bolles Foster died January 18, 1902, at Newark, N. J. He 
went to the west coast in 1904, took up his residence at Seattle, and in 
1905 began teaching Biblical themes in the College of Puget Sound, 
Tacoma, Wash., where he is still one of the professors, probably the 
oldest regular college teacher in the United States, doing more than 
four hours' work a week. He has received the following degrees : 
Diploma for normal work, diploma for literary studies, A. M., B. D., 
and D. D. He is the author of several books and still engaged 
as a book editor. The latest, "The Heart of the Bible," is in the hands 
of the printers. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES, 1916. 

Executive Committee. 

Elmer Marston Wentworth, President General, Chairman, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Newell B. Woodvvorth, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Albert M. Henry, 1201 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Chancellor L,. Jenks, 30 No. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

John Lenord Merrill, 517 Park Ave., East Orange, N. J. 

Lewis B. Curtis, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Louis Annin Ames, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. Y. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 

Advisory Committee. 

The Executive Committee. 

Wallace McCamant, Portland, Ore. 

Hon. Eddy Orland LEE, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 

The Secretary General. 

Committee on Credentials. 

Teunis D. Huntting, Chairman, 220 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

John C. Brown, V ice-Chairman, Nashville, Tenn. 

John D. Vandercook, Lombard, 111. 

William J. Conkling, Orange, N. J. 

Alex. Woodruff Tippett, 43 U. S. Trust Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 

Maj. John W. Faxon, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James N. Cox, Cookeville, Tenn. 

William Lawson Wilhoite, 1403 Vinton Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Dr. Paul De Witt, Nashville, Tenn. 

W. E. Metzger, Nashville, Tenn. 

Committee on Auditing and Finance. 

George D. Bangs, Chairman, Huntington, N. Y. 

Norman P. Heffley, 1350 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Seymour C. Loomis, New Haven, Conn. 

C. Symmes Kiggins, 96 W. Grand St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Albert J. Squier, Gray Oaks, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Memorial Committee. 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. 

A. Howard Clark, Secretary General, Secretary of Committee. 

Prof. William C Armstrong, 363 Jersey Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A. (retired), The Wadsworth, Boston, Mass. 

Otis G. Hammond, State Library, Concord, N. H. 

William Chace Greene, Providence, R. I. 

Gen. Edward E. Bradley, New Haven, Conn. 

Col. John W. Vrooman, Herkimer, N. Y. 

Thomas Wynne, 5100 Lancaster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Col. George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg., Wilmington, Del. 

Arthur B. Bibbins, 2600 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

William Henry Sargeant, Jr., Norfolk, Va. 

Stephen C. Bragaw, Washington, N. C. 

Committee on Organization (Atlantic States). 

Lewis B. Curtis, Chairman, Bridgeport, Conn. 

t 

New England. 

Philip F. Turner, Vice-Chairman, 40 Exchange St., Portland, Me. 

Wainwright Cushing, Foxcroft, Me. 

Franklin W. McKinley, Manchester, N. H. 

Frank Ernest Woodward, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Redfield Proctor, Proctor, Vt. 

Frederick Dickman Carr, 49 Medway St., Providence, R. I. 

Clarence H. Wickham, Hartford, Conn. 



12 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Middle Atlantic. 

Thomas W. Williams, Vice-Chairman, 78 No. Arlington Ave., East Orange, N. 

Louis Annin Ames, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. Y. 

W. I. Lincoln Adams, Montclair, N. J. 

Thomas Stephen Brown, Berger Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Col. George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg., Wilmington, Del. 

Jno. Milton ReiFsnider, Westminster, Md. 

Philip F. Larner, 918 F St., Washington, D. C. 

South Atlantic. 

Frederick E. Emerson, Vice-Chair man, N. Y., P. & N. R. R., Norfolk, Ya. 
Arthur B. Clarke, 39 Merchants Nat. Bk. Bldg., Richmond, Va. 
Frank H. Bryan, Washington, N. C. 
David Arnold Henning, Greenville, S. C. 
Dr. Frank G. Renshaw, Pensacola, Fla. 

Committee on Organization (Mississippi Valley — East). 
Albert M. Henry, Chairman, 1201 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

North. 

George 0. Dix, Vice-Chairman, Terre Haute, Ind. 

James P. Goodrich, Winchester, Ind. 

Henry W. Austin, 217 Lake St., Oak Park, 111. 

Clarence M. Burton, 20 Home Bank Bldg,, Detroit, Mich. 

George E- Pomeroy, Toledo, Ohio. 

Hon. James H. Stover, 744 Van Buren St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

South. 

George T. Wood, V ice-Chairman, 417 W. Main St., Louisville, Ky. 
Allen R. Carter, Herndon-Carter Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Edward A. Lindsey, Nashville, Tenn. 
William Frye Tebbetts, Mobile, Ala. 
Archibald McDowell Pepper, Lexington, Miss. 

Committee on Organization (Mississippi Valley — West). 
Elmer M. Wentworth, Chairman, Des Moines, Iowa. 

North. 

F. M. Mills, Vice-Chairman, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 
Charles Andrew Pollock, Fargo, N. Dak. 
Charles O. Bailey, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 
Gideon L. Ives, N. Y. Life Bldg., St. Paul, Minn. 
Rev. John Edward Kirbye, D. D., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Herbert M. Bushnell, Lincoln, Nebr. 
John M. Meade, Topeka, Kans. 

South. 

Robert E. Adreon, Vice-Chairman, 1932 N. Broadway, St. Louis, Mo. 

Frank W. Rawles, Little Rock, Ark. 

Col. Elmer E. Wood, 339 Carondelet St., New Orleans, La. 

Harlan T. DeupreE, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Wilber H. Young, Austin, Texas, 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. T3 

Committee on Organization (Mountain States). 
Judge Eddy Orland Lee, Chairman, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

North. 

Daniel S. Spencer, Vice-Chairman, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Cornelius Hedges, Jr., Helena, Mont. 

Lieut. Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Boise, Idaho. 

Wm. Bradford Dodge Gray, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Hon. Albert D. Ayres, Reno, Nev. 

South. 

Col. Ralph Emerson Twitchell, Vice-Chairman, Santa Fe, N. Mex. 
Simpson D. Butler, 1748 High St., Denver, Colo. 
Dr. John Dennett, Jr., Phoenix, Ariz. 

Committee on Organization (Pacific). 

Wallace McCamant, Chairman, Northwestern Bank Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Orison J. C. Dutton, Vice-Chairman, Seattle, Wash. 

Rawlins CadwalladER, M. D., Schroth Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes, Honolulu, H. T. 

Frank Lee Strong, Manila, P. I. 

Committee on Education. 

Louis Annin Ames, Chairman, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. Y. 

Wallace McCamant, Vice-Chair man, Northwestern Bank Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

George A. Brennan, V ice-Chairman, 24 W. 110th Place, Chicago, 111. 

Luther Atwood, 8 Sagamore St., Lynn, Mass. 

Judge Ernest C. Simpson, New Haven, Conn. 

Prof. Wm. K. Wickes, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Dr. Wm. F. PeircE, Gambier, Ohio. 

H. M. Bushnell, Lincoln, Nebr. 

Prof. Levi Edgar Young, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Menton Bradley Terrill, 4217 Swiss Ave., Dallas, Texas. 

George T. Wood, 417 W. Main St., Louisville, Ky. 

Committee on Americanization and Aliens. 

Chancellor L. Jenks, Chairman, 30 No. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Commander John H. Moore, U. S. N. (retired), Jlce-Chairman, East, The Wy- 
oming, Washington, D. C. 

Samuel Judd Holmes, M. D., V ice-Chairman, West, Burke Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Thomas Stephen Brown, iioi Berger Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Judge Harvey F. Remington, Rochester, N. Y. 

Rev. Frederick S. PenEold, D. D., Racine, Wis. 

Edwin S. Crandon, Evening Transcript, Boston, Mass. 

Edward M. Hall, Jr., Engineers' Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Alfred CoiT, New London, Conn. 

Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes, Honolulu, H. T. 

W. I. Lincoln Adams, Montclair, N. J. 

Gideon L. Ives, N. Y. Life Bldg., St. Paul, Minn. 

Clarkson N. Guyer, Wyoming Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Rawlins Cadwalader, M. D., Schroth Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Committee on Investment of Permanent Fund. 

The President General. 
The Treasurer General. 
Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, 12 W. i22d St., New York, N. Y. 



14 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Flag Committee. 

W. V. Cox, Chairman, Second National Bank, Washington, D. C. 
Col. George V. Lauman, 54 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Brig. Gen. Charles A. Woodruff, U. S. A., 2701 Larkin St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Brig. Gen. James Rush Lincoln, Ames, Iowa. 
J. D. Iglehart, M. D., 211 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 
Neal M. Leach, New Orleans, La. 

Capt. Joshua Atwood, 280 Foster St., Brighton, Mass. 
Allen R. Carter, Herndon-Carter Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Charles Lincoln Nichols. Grand Junction. Colo. 

Rear Adm. George W. Baird, U. S. N. : (retired), 1505 Rhode Island Ave., 
Washington, D. C. 

Lieut. Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A. (retired), Boise, Idaho. 

Committee on Military and Naval Records. 

Charles W. Stewart, Chairman, Navy Dept., Washington, D. C. 

Maj. Gen. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. (retired), Portland, Ore. 

Gen. Charles Wheaton Abbot, Jr., 12 Cole Ave., Providence, R. I. 

Gen. John B. Castlemak, Louisville, Ky. 

Rear Adm. Colby M. Chester, IL S. N. (retired), 1736 K St., Washington, D. C. 

Rear Adm. T. F.,Jewell, U. S. N. (retired), 2135 R St., Washington, D. C 

Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, Pension Office, Washington, D. C. 

Brig. Gen. Philip ReadE, U. S. A. (retired), The Wadsworth, Boston, Mass. 

Col. R. W. Guthrie, 434 Diamond St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jno. Milton Reifsnider. Westminster, Md. 

Dr. Geo. C. F. Williams, 990 Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Press Committee. 

A. Howard Clark, Chairman, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

William K. Boardman, Cumberland Tel. & Tel. Co., Nashville, Tenn. 

Edwin S. Crandon, Evening Transcript, Boston, Mass. 

Arthur S. Thompson, Associated Press, 51 Chambers St., New York, N. Y. 

David L. PiERSON, 21 Washington St., Fast Orange, N. J. 

H. C. Capwell, 1 2th and Washington Sts., Oakland, Cal. 

William M. Finck, 145 Van Dyke Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Louis A. Bowman, 30 N. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Arthur Henry Bennett, Topeka, Kans. 

Committee on Local Chapters. 

Newell B. Woodworth, Chairman, Syracuse, N. Y. 

John R. Weeks, 756 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 

Henry F. Punderson, 21 Riverview St., Springfield, Mass. 

Edward L. Howe, Superior Savings and Trust Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Clarence M. Burton, 20 Home Bank Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Capt. Elbridge Drew Hadley, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Thomas Stephen Brown, Berger Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Committee on National Archives Building. 

Lieut. Col. Frederick C. Bryan, Chairman, Colorado Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Nathan Warren, Waltham, Mass. 

James P. Goodrich, Winchester, Ind. 

Amedee B. Cole, 3705 Lindell Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Edward D. Baldwin, The Dalles, Oregon. 

Commander J. H. Moore, U. S. N. (retired), The Wyoming, Washington, D. C 

Dr. Edgar Erskine Hume, Frankfort, Ky. 

Hon. George J. Gibson, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Gen. G. Barrett Rich, 1305 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 



Committee on Arrangements eor Twenty-eighth Annual Concress. 

Albert M. Henry, Chairman, 1201 Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

William K. Boardman, Vice-Chairman, Cumberland Tel. & Tel. Co., Nashville. 
Tenn. 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, 1000 Columbia Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 

E. A. Lindsey, President Tennessee Society, Nashville, Tenn. 

Frank IT. Bryan, President North Carolina Society, Washington, N. C. 

Frank G. Renshaw, M. D., President Florida Society, Pensacola, Fla. 

Wm. Frye Tebbetts, President Alabama Society, Mobile, Ala. 

Judge Gordon Garland Lyell, President Mississippi Society, Jackson, Miss. 

Col. Elmer E. Wood, President Louisiana Society, 323 Whitney Central Bldg., 
New Orleans, La. 

Frank W. RawlES, President Arkansas Society, Little Rock, Ark. 

Harlan T. Deupree, President Oklahoma Society, Oklahoma City, Okla. 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE WASHINGTON 
GUARD. 

Honorary Commander-in-Chief, Elmer M. Wentworth, President General. 
Governor General, John Lenord Merrill, East Orange, N. J. 
Lieutenant Governors General, Benjamin C. Allin, 1215 E. 52d St., Chicago, 
111., and Webster Bruce, 80 Baker St., Lynn, Mass. 

Secretary General, John Thornley Nefe, 26 Beech St., East Orange, N. J. 
Registrar. General, Luther Atwood, 8 Sagamore St., Lynn, Mass. 
Treasurer General, Albert J. Squier, Gray Oaks, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Chaplain General, Rev. J. Edward Kirbye, D. D., Des Moines, Iowa. 



l6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



NATIONAL CHARTER 



Public — No. 214.] 



H. R. 15332. 
FIFTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; 

At the First Session, 

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Monday, the fourth day 
of December, one thousand nine hundred and five. 



AN ACT 



To Incorporate the National Society of the Sons of the American 

Revolution. 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That Francis Henry 
Appleton, of Massachusetts ; Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut ; William 
Seward Webb, of Vermont; Horace Porter, of New York; Joseph C. 
Breckinridge, of Washington, District of Columbia; Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey; Walter S. Logan, of New York; Edwin Warfield, of 
Maryland; Edwin S. Greeley, of Connecticut; James D. Hancock, of 
Pennsylvania; Morris B. Beardsley, of Connecticut; John C. Lewis, of 
Kentucky; Henry Stockbridge, of Maryland; Nelson A. McClary, of 
Illinois; A. Howard Clark, of Washington, District of Columbia; Isaac 
W. Birdseye, of Connecticut; William K. Wickes, of New York; J. W. 
Atwood, of Ohio; J. W. Whiting, of Alabama; Ricardo E. Miner, of 
Arizona; Joseph M. Hill, of Arkansas; Alexander G. Eells, of Cali- 
fornia; Clarkson N. Guyer, of Colorado; Jonathan Trumbull, of Con- 
necticut; Thomas F. Bayard, of Delaware; William H. Bayly, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia; William S. Keyser, of Florida; Charles 
M. Cooke, of Hawaii; Inman H. Fowler, of Indiana; Eugene Secor, of 
Iowa; John M. Meade, of Kansas; Peter F. Pescud, of Louisiana; 
Waldo Pettengill, of Maine; James D. Iglehart; of Maryland; Moses 
G. Parker, of Massachusetts; Rufus W. Clark, of Michigan; James C. 
Haynes, of Minnesota; Ashley Cabell, of Missouri; Ogden A. South- 
mayd, of Montana; Amos Field, of Nebraska; Daniel C. Roberts, of 
New Hampshire; J. Franklin Fort, of New Jersey; William A. Marble, 



I 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 17 

of New York; Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio; Henry H. Edwards, of Okla- 
homa; Thomas M. Anderson, of Oregon; William L. Jones, of Penn- 
sylvania; John E. Studley, of Rhode Island; Theodore G. Carter, of 
South Dakota; J. A. Cartwright, of Tennessee; I. M. Standifer, of 
Texas; Fred A. Hale, Utah; Henry D. Holton, of Vermont; Luns- 
ford L. Lewis, of Virginia; Cornelius H. Hanford, of Washington; 
J. Franklin Pierce, of Wisconsin; Trueman G. Avery, of New York; 
William W. J. Warren, of New York; Henry V. A. Joslin, of Rhode 
Island; John Paul Earnest, of Washington, District of Columbia; A. S. 
Hubbard, of California, and all such other persons as may from time 
to time be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby con- 
stituted a body corporate and politic, in the city of Washington, in the 
District of Columbia, by the name of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Sec. 2. That the purposes and objects of said corporation are de- 
clared to be patriotic, historical, and educational, and shall include those 
intended or designed to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by 
their services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, 
achieved the independence of the American people; to unite and pro- 
mote fellowship among their descendants; to inspire them and the com- 
munity at large with a more profound reverence for the principles of 
the government founded by our forefathers ; to encourage historical 
research in relation to the American Revolution; to acquire and pre- 
serve the records of the individual services of the patriots of the war, 
as well as documents, relics, and landmarks ; to mark the scenes of the 
Revolution by appropriate memorials ; to celebrate the anniversaries of 
the prominent events of the war and of the Revolutionary period; to 
foster true patriotism ; to maintain and extend the institutions of 
American freedom, and to carry out the purposes expressed in the pre- 
amble to the Constitution of our country and the injunctions of Wash- 
ington in his farewell address to the American people. 

Sec. 3. That said corporation shall have power to receive, purchase, 
hold, sell, and convey real and personal estate, so far only as may be 
necessary or convenient for its lawful purposes, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding at any one time in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars ; 
to sue and be sued, complain and defend in any court; to adopt a com- 
mon seal, and to alter the same at pleasure; to make and adopt a con- 
stitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations for admission, government, 
suspension, and expulsion of its members, and from time to time to 
alter and repeal such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations, and 
to adopt others in their places ; to provide for the election of its officers 
and to define their duties ; to provide for State Societies or Chapters 
with rules for their conduct, and to regulate and provide for the man- 
agement, safe-keeping, and protection of its property and funds: 
Provided always, That such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regula- 
tions be not inconsistent with the laws of the United States or any 
of the States thereof. 



l8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Sec. 4. That the property and affairs of said corporation shall be 
managed by not more than sixty nor less than forty trustees, who shall 
be elected annually at such time as shall be fixed in the by-laws, and at 
least one trustee shall be elected annually from a list of nominees to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to this Society at 
least thirty days before the annual meeting, in accordance with general 
provisions regulating such nominations as may be adopted by this 
Society. 

Sec. 5. That the first meeting of this corporation shall be held on a 
call issued by any fifteen of the above-named corporators by a written 
notice signed by them, stating the time and place of meeting, addressed 
to each of the corporators personally named herein and deposited in 
the post-office at least five days before the day of meeting. 

Sec. 6. That this charter shall take effect upon its being accepted by a 
majority vote of the corporators named herein who shall be present at 
said meeting, or at any other meetings specially called for that purpose; 
and notice of such acceptance shall be given by said corporation by 
causing a certificate to that effect signed by its President and Secretary 
to be filed in the office of the Secretary of State. 

Sec. 7. That Congress reserves the right to alter, amend, or repeal 
this act. 

J. G. Cannon, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
Chas. W. Fairbanks, 
Vice-President of the United States 

and President of the Senate. 
Approved June 9, 1906. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution 

(Adopted at the Denver Congress, June 3, 1907; amended at Toledo 
Congress, May 2, 1910, and at Louisville Congress, May 2, ign.) 



Article I. — Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution." 

Article II. — Purposes and Objects. 

The purposes and objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, 
historical, and educational, and shall include those intended or designed 
to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their services or sacrifices 
during the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence 
of the American people; to unite and promote fellowship among their 
descendants ; to inspire them and the community at large with a more 
profound reverence for the principles of the government founded by 
our forefathers ; to encourage historical research in relation to the 
American Revolution; to acquire and preserve the records of the indi- 
vidual services of the patriots of the war, as well as documents, relics, 
and landmarks ; to mark the scenes of the Revolution by appropriate 
memorials ; to celebrate the anniversaries of the prominent events of 
the war and of the Revolutionary period; to foster true patriotism; to 
maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom, and to carry 
out the purposes expressed in the preamble of the Constitution of our 
country and the injunctions of Washington in his farewell address to 
the American people. 

Article III. — Membership. 

Section i. Any man shall be eligible to membership in the Society 
who, being of the age of twenty-one years or over, and a citizen of 
good repute in the community, is the lineal descendant of an ancestor 
who was at all times unfailing in his loyalty to, and rendered active 
service in, the cause of American Independence, either as an officer, 
soldier, seaman, marine, militiaman, or minute man, in the armed forces 
of the Continental Congress, or of any one of the several Colonies or 
States, or as a signer of the Declaration of Independence; or as a 
member of a Committee of Safety or Correspondence; or as a member 

(19) 



20 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

of any Continental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature; 
or as a recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts 
of resistance to the authority of Great Britain. 

Section 2. No one shall be entitled to membership in any State 
Society who has previously been a member of any other State Society 
and dropped for the non-payment of dues, until the indebtedness of 
such individual to the first Society shall have been adjusted. 

Section 3. Applications for membership shall be made to any State 
Society, in duplicate, upon blank forms prescribed by the Board of 
Trustees, and shall in each case set forth the name, occupation, and 
residence of the applicant, line of descent, and the name, residence, and 
services of his ancestor or ancestors in the Revolution, from whom he 
derives eligibility. 

The applicant shall make oath that the statements of his application 
are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

Upon the approval of an application by the State Society to which it 
is made, one copy shall be transmitted to the Registrar General of the 
National Society, who shall examine further the eligibility of the appli- 
cant. If satisfied that the member is not eligible, he shall return the 
application for correction. 

Until the State Society shall satisfy the Registrar General of the 
eligibility of such applicant, his name shall not be placed on the roll 
of membership. 

Section 4. The official designation of the members of The National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be "Compatriots." 

Articxe IV. — National and State Societies. 

Section i. The National Society shall embrace all the members of the 
State Societies of the Sons of the American Revolution now existing 
or which may hereafter be established under this Constitution. 

Section 2. Whenever in any State or Territory in which a State 
Society does not exist, or in which a State Society has become inactive, 
or failed for two years to pay its annual dues to the National Society, 
fifteen or more persons duly qualified for membership in this Society 
may associate themselves as a State Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and organize in accordance with this Constitution, they 
may be admitted by the Board of Trustees to the National Society as 

"The Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and shall 

thereafter have exclusive local jurisdiction in the State or Territory or 
in the District in which they are organized, subject to the provisions of 
this Constitution, but this provision shall not be construed so as to 
exclude the admission of candidates residing in other States. 

Section 3. Each State Society shall judge of the qualifications of its 
members and of those proposed for membership, subject to the pro- 
visions of this Constitution, and shall regulate all matters pertaining to 
its own affairs. It shall have authority to establish local Chapters 
within its own jurisdiction, and to endow the Chapters with such power 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION. 21 

as it may deem proper, not inconsistent with the charter of the Na- 
tional Society or with this Constitution. It shall have authority, after 
due notice and impartial trial, to expel any member who, by conduct 
unbecoming a gentleman, shall render himself unworthy to remain a 
member of the Society. 

Section 4. Each State Society shall submit to the Annual Congress 
of the National Society a report, setting forth by name the additions, 
transfers and deaths, and any other changes in the membership, and the 
progress of the State Society during the preceding year, and making 
such suggestions as it shall deem proper for the promotion of the 
objects of the National Society. 

Section 5. Whenever a member in good standing in his Society shall 
change his residence from the jurisdiction of the State Society of which 
he is a member to that of another, he shall be entitled, if he so elects, 
to a certificate of honorable demission from his own State Society, in 
order that he may be transferred to the State Society to whose juris- 
diction he shall have changed his residence : Provided, That his mem- 
bership shall continue in the former until he shall have been elected a 
member of the latter. 

Each State Society shall, however, retain full control of the admis- 
sion of members by transfer. 

Section 6. Whenever the word "State" occurs in this Constitution, it 
shall be held to include within its meaning the District of Columbia 
and the Territories of the United States. 

Section 7. A Society may be formed in any foreign country by fif- 
teen or more persons who are eligible to membership under this Con- 
stitution, which shall bear the same relation to the national organization 
as the State Society, subject to the provisions of this Constitution. 

Articee V. — Officers and Trustees. 

Section i. The General Officers of the National Society shall be a 
President General, five Vice-Presidents General, the order of seniority 
among whom shall be determined by lot at the time of their election, 
a Secretary General, Treasurer General, Registrar General, Historian 
General, and Chaplain General, who shall be elected by ballot by a vote 
of a majority of the members present and entitled to vote at the annual 
meeting of the Congress of the National Society, and shall hold office 
for one year and until their successors shall be elected. 

Section 2. The General Officers provided for in section 1, together 
with one member from each State Society, shall constitute the Board 
of Trustees of the National Society. Such Trustees from each of the 
several State Societies shall be elected annually at the Congress of the 
National Society, upon the nomination, or from a list of nominees, to 
be made by each of the State Societies and submitted to the National 
Society by the filing thereof with the Secretary of the National Society 
at least thirty days before the meeting of the Annual Congress of the 
National Society. And in the event that any one or more of the State 



22 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Societies shall omit or neglect to make such nominations or submit said 
list of nominees, by the time herein required, then the President of the 
State Society so in default shall, virtute officii, be chosen as and become 
the representative of his State Society upon said Board. 

Section 3. The Board of Trustees shall have charge of, and be 
charged with the care and custody of, all property belonging to the 
National Society, and to that end shall be vested with the powers con- 
ferred by section 3 of the Act of Incorporation of the National Society : 
Provided, however, That it shall not have the power to sell, convey, or 
in anywise encumber any real estate belonging to the Society without 
the assent of three-fourths of the members of said Board. The Board 
of Trustees shall also have authority to adopt and promulgate the 
By-Laws of the National Society, to prescribe the duties of the General 
Officers, to provide the seal, to designate and make regulations for the 
issue of the insignia, and to transact the general business of the Na- 
tional Society during the intervals between the sessions of the Congress. 

Meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held at the call of the 
President General, or in case of his absence or inability, at the call of 
the Senior Vice-President General, certified by the Secretary General. 
Meetings shall be called at the request of seven members. At such 
meetings seven shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 4. An executive committee of seven, consisting of the Presi- 
dent General as chairman, and six members to be nominated by him and 
approved by the Board of Trustees, shall, in the interim between the 
meetings of the Board, transact such business as may be delegated to 
it by a Congress of the Society or the Board of Trustees. 

Article VI.— Dues. 

Each State Society shall pay annually to the Treasurer General, to 
defray the expenses of the National Society, fifty cents for each active 
member thereof, unless intermitted by the National Congress. 

All such dues shall be paid on or before the first day of April in each 
year for the ensuing year, in order to secure representation in the 
Congress of the National Society. 

Article VII. — Meetings and Elections. 

Section i. The Annual Congress of the National Society for the 
election of the General Officers and for the transaction of business shall 
be held on the third Monday of May in each year. The place of such 
meeting shall be designated by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Congress may be called by the 
President General, and shall be called by him when directed so to do by 
the Board of Trustees, or whenever requested in writing so to do by at 
least five State Societies, on giving thirty days' notice, specifying the 
time and place of such meeting and the business to be transacted. 

Section 3. The following shall be members of all such annual or 
special meetings of the Congress, and shall be entitled to vote therein: 

(1) All the General Officers and the ex-Presidents General of the 
National Society. 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION. 23 

(2) The members of the Board of Trustees and the President or 
Senior Vice-President of each State Society. 

(3) One delegate at large from each State Society. 

(4) One delegate from every fifty members of the Society within a 
State and for a fraction of twenty-five or over. 

Section 4. After the adjournment of the Eighteenth Annual Con- 
gress of this Society, State Societies shall be represented at meetings 
of the National Society only by members of their own State Society, 
either duly elected, or who in the absence of regularly elected delegates, 
may be chosen by the regularly elected attending delegates of such 
State Society from the members of such State Society who may be 
present at any meeting of the National Society. 

Article VIII. — Permanent Fund. 

Section i. There shall be created and maintained a Permanent Fund 
of the Society, the income or interest from which shall be covered into 
the general treasury of the Society and available for the general pur- 
poses of the Society, but the principal of which shall be maintained 
intact, and shall only be used or diminished upon the unanimous recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee, approved by the Board of 
Trustees, and ratified by a four-fifths vote of the delegates present at 
the annual or special Congress to which such recommendation of the 
Executive Committee shall be reported. 

Section 2. The Permanent Fund shall be composed of all legacies or 
donations to the Society, where no other application of the funds is 
designated by the testator or donor, all commissions received from the 
sales of badges, rosettes and ribbon, and such sum or sums as may 
from time to time by the Executive Committee be transferred to such 
fund from the general funds of the Society. 

Section 3. The permanent fund shall be invested in securities author- 
ized to be held by Savings Banks in Massachusetts, Connecticut, or 
New York, and any premium paid in purchasing such securities shall 
be repaid from the first income received. 

Article IX.— Amendments. 

This Constitution may be altered or amended at any meeting of the 
Congress of the National Society: Provided, That sixty days' notice of 
the proposed alterations or amendments, which shall first have been 
recommended by a State Society, or by a prior Congress, or by the 
Board of Trustees, or by the Executive Committee of the National 
Society, shall be sent by the Secretary General to the President of each 
State Society. 

A vote of two-thirds of those present shall be necessary to their 
adoption. 

Article X. 

This Constitution shall take effect upon its adoption. 



BY-LAWS 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution 

{Adopted at Denver Congress, June 3, 1907 ; amended at Boston 

Congress, May 20-22, 1912, and at Portland Congress, 

July 20, 19 1 5.) 

Article; I. — Election of Officers. 

All nominations of General Officers shall be made from the floor, and 
the election shall be by ballot. A majority shall elect. The nomina- 
tions may be acted upon directly or may be referred to a committee to 
examine and report. 

Article II. — Officers. 

The duties of the General Officers shall be such as usually appertain 
to their offices, and they shall have such other duties as are hereinafter 
imposed or shall be delegated to them by an annual Congress or by the 
Board of Trustees. 

They shall report at the annual meeting, and at such other times as 
they may be required to do so by the Board of Trustees. 

Article III. — President General. 

Section i. The President General, in addition to his general duties, 
shall be ex officio chairman of the Board of Trustees, and of the Execu- 
tive Committee, and a member of every other committee. 

Section 2. He shall appoint the following committees: 

Committee on Auditing and Finance. 
Committee on Credentials. 
Committee on Resolutions. 
Memorial Committee. 
Committee on Organization. 
Committee on Education. 

The duties of the above committees shall be such as usually pertain 
to committees of like character. He may also appoint such other com- 
mittees as in his judgment may be deemed necessary or advisable. 

Article IV.— Vice-Presidents General. 

Section i. In the absence of the President General, the Senior Vice- 
President General present shall preside at the Annual Meeting. 

(24) 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS. 25 

Section 2. In the prolonged absence or inability to act of the Presi- 
dent General, the executive authority shall be vested in the Vice-Presi- 
dents General in order ot precedence. 

Article V. — Secretary General. 

The Secretary General, in addition to his general duties, shall have 
charge of the seal, and give due notice of all meetings of the National 
Society or Board of Trustees. He shall give due notice to all General 
Officers and State Societies of all votes, orders, and proceedings affect- 
ing or appertaining to their duties. He shall distribute all pamphlets, 
circulars, rosettes, and supplies, as directed by the Board of Trustees. 

Article VI. — Treasurer General. 

Section i. The Treasurer General shall collect and receive the funds 
and securities of the National Society. He shall deposit the same to 
the credit of the "Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and 
shall draw them thence for the use of the National Society, as directed 
by it or by the Board of Trustees, upon the order of the President 
General, countersigned by the Secretary General. His accounts shall 
be audited by a committee to be appointed at the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. He shall give bond for the safe custody and application of 
the funds, the cost of such bond to be borne by the National Society. 

Article VII. — Registrar General. 

The Registrar General shall keep a register of the names and dates 
of the election, resignation, or death of all members of the several State 
Societies, and shall have the care and custody of all duplicate appli- 
cations for membership. He shall issue upon the requisition of the 
Secretary or Registrar of the several State Societies certificates of 
membership and insignia to every member entitled thereto, through 
such Secretary or Registrar. 

Article VIII. — Historian General. 

The Historian General shall have the custody of all the historical 
and biographical collections of which the National Society may become 
possessed and shall catalogue and arrange the same, and shall place 
the same in a fireproof repository for preservation. 

Article IX. — Chaplain General. 

The Chaplain General shall be a regularly ordained minister, and 
shall open and close all general meetings of the National Society with 
the services usual and proper on such occasions. 

Article X.— State Societies. 

Each State Society shall — 

(1) Notify the Secretary General of the election and appointment of 
all officers, nominees for Board of Trustees, and delegates. 



26 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(2) Transmit to the Registrar General duplicate applications of alt 
accepted members, and promptly notify him of the resignation or death 
of all members thereof, and the names of those dropped from the roll 
for non-payment of dues. 

(3) Transmit to the Registrar General, on April 1 of each year, the 
report required by section 4, Article, IV, of the Constitution, such re- 
ports to cover the changes in membership occurring between April 1 
of the previous year and March 31 of the current year, and to be made 
on the blank forms furnished for the purpose by the Registrar GeneraL 

(4) Pay to the Treasurer General on April 1 of each year the annual 
dues of such Society, computed at the rate of fifty cents for every 
member carried on the rolls of such Society on that date. 

(5) Cause the Treasurer of such Society, when remitting funds for 
any purpose to the Treasurer General, to use the blank form of letter 
of transmittal prescribed by the Board of Trustees or Executive Com- 
mittee, and furnished by the Treasurer General for the purpose. 

Article XI. — Board of Trustees. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall prepare and carry out plans 
for promoting the objects and growth of the Society; shall generally 
superintend its interests, and shall execute such other duties as shall be 
committed to it at any meeting of the National Society. It shall have 
charge of the printing of the Diploma and the manufacturing of the 
Insignia, and shall determine the price at which the same shall be issued. 

Section 2. It shall have the authority to admit or reorganize as a 
State Society any association of fifteen or more persons duly qualified 
for membership in the Society. 

Section 3. It shall have power to fill any vacancy occurring among 
the General Officers, and an officer so elected shall act until the follow- 
ing annual election and until his successor shall be elected. 

Section 4. It shall have authority to make, alter, and amend the By- 
Laws as hereinafter provided. 

Section 5. The President General may call meetings of the Board of 
Trustees at any time he may deem necessary, and shall call such meet- 
ings upon the written request of any five members thereof, provided 
that of any meeting, other than such as may be called during the session 
or immediately upon the adjournment of an annual or special Congress 
of the National Society, not less than five days' notice of the time and 
place of such meeting shall be given. 

Article XII. — Executive Committee. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee may be called at any time by 
the President General, and such meeting shall be called upon the written 
request of three members thereof. It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to exercise the powers and perform the duties committed to 
it by any annual or special Congress or by the Board of Trustees; to 
control and supervise all arrangements for the holding of the annual or 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS. 27 

any special Congress, and the social and other functions connected 
therewith; it shall, upon the request of the proper committee of the 
National Society or of the Board of Trustees, assist in the organization 
of new State Societies, and increasing the membership of weak State 
Societies, and for these purposes may incur its necessary expenses, 
limited to such amounts as may be in the Treasury unappropriated, and 
not required for the current expenses of the National Society during 
the year. 

Article XIII.— Seal. 

The seal of the Society shall be two and three-eighths of an inch in 
diameter, charged with the figure of a minute man grasping a musket 
in his right hand, and surrounded by a constellation of thirteen stars, 
who shall be depicted in the habit of a husbandman of the period of the 
American Revolution, and as in the act of deserting the plough for the 
service of his country; the whole encircled by a band three-eighths of 
an inch wide, within which shall appear the legend, "National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, organized April 30, 1889." 

Article XIV.— Certificates. 

All members of this Society, wherever admitted, shall be entitled to 
a certificate of membership duly attested by the President General, 
Secretary General, and Registrar General, countersigned by the Presi- 
dent, Secretary, and Registrar of the State Society to which such mem- 
ber shall have been admitted. 

Article XV. — Insignia. 

The insignia of the Society shall comprise (1) a cross surmounted 
by an eagle in gold, (2) a rosette. 

Section i. The cross shall be of silver, with four arms, covered with 
white enamel and eight gold points, same size as a Chevalier's Cross of 
the Legion of Honor of France, with a gold medallion in the center 
bearing on the obverse a bust of Washington in profile, and on the 
reverse the figure of a minute man, surrounded by a ribbon enameled 
blue, with the motto "Libertas et Patria" on the obverse, and the legend 
"Sons of the American Revolution" on the reverse, both in letters of 
gold. The cross shall be surmounted by an eagle in gold and the whole 
decoration suspended from a ring of gold by a ribbon of deep blue, 
with white and buff edges, and may be worn by any member of the 
Society on ceremonial occasions only, and shall be carried on the left 
breast, or at the collar if an officer or Past President General of the 
National Society, or the President, active or past, of a State Society. 

The President General, during his term of office and while acting in 
that capacity on official and ceremonial occasions, shall wear the dis- 
tinctive badge of his office. It may be carried at the left breast or 
suspended from the neck ribbon. In full dress he shall wear a sash 
of the Society colors, three and one-half inches in width, extending 
from the right shoulder to the left hip, with the badge pendant at the 
crossing of the sash over the hip. 



28 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Section 2. The rosette shall be seven-sixteenths of an inch in diam- 
eter, of usual pattern, displaying the colors of the Society — blue, white, 
and buff — and may be worn by all members at discretion in the upper 
left-hand buttonhole of the coat. 

Section 3. The badge of the Society may be purchased by members 
in accordance with the following agreement, to be signed by the pur- 
chasing member before delivery of same: 

In purchasing the badge of the Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, I hereby agree that it will be worn or used in accordance 
with the regulations of the Society; that I will not pledge, part with, 
or transfer the same except with the written authority of the Society. 
It is further agreed for myself, heirs, executors, administrators, and 
any and all persons asserting any claim through me that upon demand 
of the Society and tender of the purchase price of said badge, or other 
regalia, the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be 
entitled to immediate possession thereof. 

Article XVI. — Indebtedness. 

No debts shall be contracted on behalf of the National Society. 
Every obligation for the payment of money, except checks drawn 
against deposits, executed in the name or on behalf of the National 
Society shall be null and void. 

Article XVII. — Order oe Business of the Annual Congress. 

1. Calling the Congress to order by the President General. 

2. Opening prayer by the Chaplain General. 

3. Appointment of a Committee on Credentials. 

4. Remarks by the President General on condition and needs of the 
Society. 

5. Report of Committee on Credentials. 

6. Reading of minutes of the last Congress. 

7. Report of Board of Trustees. 

8. Reports of General Officers. 

9. Reports of standing committees. 

10. Reports of special committees. 

11. Reports of State Societies. 

12. Old and unfinished business. 

13. New business, including election of officers and Trustees. 

14. Adjournment. 

15. Provided, That for a special purpose the Congress may, by a vote 
of two-thirds of those present and voting, suspend the above order of 
business. 

Article XVIII.— Amendments. 

These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a vote of three-fourths 
of the members present at any meeting of the Board of Trustees, notice 
thereof having been given at a previous meeting. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 29 

OFFICERS OF STATE SOCIETIES AND CHAPTERS. 



ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

15 Members. 

Organized June 27, 1903. Admitted into National Society November 
18, 1903. 

Officers. 

President, Maj. Wm. Frye Tebbetts Mobile 

Vice-President, Dr. R. B. du Mont, 70 St. Michael St Mobile 

Registrar, W. H. Oates, M. D., State Factory Inspector. . .Montgomery 



ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

39 Members. 
Organized June 13, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 19x6. 

President, Dr. John Dennett, Jr Phcenix 

Vice-President, Dwight Bancroft Heard Phcenix 

Secretary, Dr. Chas. A. Van der Veer Phcenix 

Treasurer, Lloyd B. Christy Phcenix 

Registrar, Prosper P. Parker Phcenix 

Historian, Richard E. Sloan , Phcenix 

Chaplain, Rev. J. Rockwood Jenkins Prescott 



ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

50 Members. 
Organized April 29, 1889. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Frank W. Rawles. Little Rock 

Vice-President, Frank W. Tucker Little Rock 

Secretary-Registrar, Fay Hempstead Little Rock 

Treasurer, Philander Keep Roots Little Rock 

Historian, John R. Gibbons .Little Rock 



CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

405 Members. 

Instituted October 22, 1875, as Sons of Revolutionary Sires. Consti- 
tution adopted August 7, 1876. Name changed to Sons of the American 
Revolution March 22, 1890. Annual meeting April 19. 



30 SONS OE THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Rawlins Cadwallader, M. D San Francisco 

Senior Vice-President, E. J. Mott, LL. B., Grant Bldg..San Francisco 
Junior Vice-President, Thomas M. Earl, 2823 Benvenue Ave. .Berkeley 
Secretary-Registrar, Thos. A. Perkins, M. A., Mills Bldg. San Francisco 

Treasurer, Col. John C. Currier, 333 Kearney St San Francisco 

Historian, Edmund J. Shortlidge, M. D .San Francisco 

Chapter Officers. 

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER. 

President, George W. Marston ; First Vice-President, Harry S. 
Comly; Second Vice-President, E. M. Burbeck; Treasurer, John P. 
Burt; Registrar, Putnam Field; Historian, E. C. Hickman; Secretary, 
Allen H. Wright, City Hall. 



COLORADO SOCIETY. 

242 Members. 
Organized July 4, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Simpson D. Butler, 1748 High St Denver 

First Vice-President, Charles B. Toppan, 3905 Zenobia St Denver 

Vice-President, Ernest Benjamin Beeson Colorado Springs 

Vice-President, Charles L. Nichols Grand Junction 

Vice-President, John T. Jacobs Greeley 

Vice-President, Charles Wakefield Cadman Fort Collins 

Secretary- Registrar, Dr. James P. Willard, 210 Masonic Temple. Denver 
Treasurer, Walter D. Wynkoop, Mountain States Telephone Co. Denver 

Historian, Willson W. Kirby, 1239 Downing St Denver 

Chaplain, Rev. John H. Houghton, 1215 Sherman St Denver 

Chapter Officers. 

DENVER CHAPTER. 189 MEMBERS. 

President, James Fayette Hadley; Vice-President, Edward V. Dunk- 
lee; Secretary, George T. Huling; Treasurer, Walter D. Wynkoop; 
Chaplain, Rev. Jesse Penny Martin ; Historian, Willson W. Kirby. 

COLORADO SPRINGS CHAPTER. 19 MEMBERS. 

President, Oliver Edwin Collins; Vice-President, Ernest Benjamin 
Beeson; Secretary-Registrar, Joseph Fulton Humphrey; Treasurer, 
Francis B. Rothrock; Chaplain, Rev. William A. Phillips; Historian, 
Col. Charles A. White; Orator, Victor E. Keyes. 

EORT COLLINS CHAPTER. 10 MEMBERS. 

President, Lathrop E. Taylor; Vice-President, Dr. Edgar L. Morrill; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Thomas J. Warren. 






STATE SOCIETIES. 31 

GREELEY CHAPTER. 9 MEMBERS. 

President, Victor E. Keyes ; Vice-President, George E. Home ; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, Charles E. Littell; Chaplain, Dr. William H. Del- 
hridge; Historian, Col. Charles Augustus White ; Orator, John T.Jacobs. 

GRAND JUNCTION CHAPTER. l6 MEMBERS. 

President, Charles Lincoln Nichols; Vice-President, Walter Ernest 
Page; Secretary, Charles B. Rich; Treasurer, Walter M. Merrill; Reg- 
istrar, Charles B. Rich; Historian, Dr. Joseph P. Roberts. 



CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

1,057 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1889. Annual meeting June 14, to commemorate 
the anniversary of Connecticut's Declaration of Independence. 

Officers elected June 15, 1916. 

President, Clarence H. Wickham , Hartford 

Vice-President, George F. Burgess New Haven 

Secretary, Charles G. Stone, P. O. Box 847 Hartford 

Treasurer, Henry C. Sherwood Bridgeport 

Registrar, Frederick Bostwick, 144 Grove St New Haven 

Historian, Frank B. Gay Hartford 

Necrologist, Leverett Belknap Hartford 

Chaplain, Rev. Wm. De Loss Love Hartford 

Chapter Officers. 

GENERAL DAVID HUMPHREYS BRANCH, NO. I, NEW HAVEN. 

President, George F. Burgess; Vice-President, Arthur E. Woodruff; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Frederick S. Ward; Historian, A. McClellan 
Mathewson ; Chaplain, Rev. George L. Paine ; Chairman Standing Com- 
mittee, Frederick T. Bradley. 

CAPTAIN JOHN COUCH BRANCH, NO. 2, MERIDEN. 

President, H. Wales Lines; Vice-President, Walter Hubbard; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, ; Historian, Judge J. P. Piatt; Chaplain, Rev. 

W. S. Perkins. 

GENERAL SILLIMAN BRANCH, NO. 3, BRIDGEPORT. ORGANIZED 1893. 

President, Frank E. Blakeman, Oronoque ; Vice-President, William T, 
Macfarlane, Bridgeport; Secretary, Frederick A. Doolittle, 117 Middle 
St.; Registrar, William A. Barnes; Treasurer, George C. Peet ; His- 
torian, Buckingham Marsh; Chaplain, Rev. George M. Brown. 

ISRAEL PUTNAM BRANCH, NO. 4, NORWICH. 

Secretary, Henry F. Parker. 



3 2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NORWABK BRANCH, NO. 5. 

Secretary, Charles A. Quintard. 

NATHAN HABE BRANCH, NO. 6, NEW LONDON. 

President, Morton F. Plant; Vice-President, Carey Congdon ; Treas- 
urer, Frank H. Chappell, Jr. ; Historian, Dr. Edward Prentis. 

THE COLONEB JEREMIAH WADSWORTH BRANCH, NO. 7, HARTFORD. 

President, Andrew J. Sloper; Vice-President, Herbert H. White; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Charles G.Stone; Historian, Frank B. Gay; Chap- 
lain, Rev. Dr. Francis Goodwin; Necrologist, Leverett Belknap; Au- 
ditor, Edward W. Beardsley. 



DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

52 Members. 

Organized January 29, 1889. Annual meeting December 7, to com- 
memorate the ratification of the Federal Constitution by Delaware. 

Officers elected April 15, 19x6. 

President, Col. George A. Elliott, Equitable Bldg Wilmington 

Vice-President, Robert H. Richards, 1415 Delaware Ave ... Wilmington 

Vice-President, James H. Hughes Dover 

Vice-President, Edwin C. Marshall. Lewes 

Sec'y-Treas.-Reg., Harry J. Guthrie, 612 Harrison St Wilmington' 

Chaplain, Rev. William Henry Laird .Wilmington 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

(Washington, D. C.) 
490 Members. 
Organized April 19, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Philip F. Larner, 918 F St Washington 

Vice-President, Henry L. Bryan, State Dept Washington 

Vice-President, Ira W. Dennison, The Wyoming Washington 

Vice-President, Rear Adm. T. F. Jewell, 2135 R St Washington 

Secretary, John B. Torbert, U. S. Geological Survey Washington 

Treasurer, William A. Domer, Columbia Nat'l Bank Washington 

Registrar, Albert D. Spangler, ^2 S St. N. W Washington 

Assistant Registrar, Henry P. Holden, Pension Office Washington 

Historian, Prof. Selden M. Ely, 50 S St. N. W Washington 

Librarian, Charles W. Stewart, Navy Dept Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. George H. McGrew Woodside, Md„ 



I 



STATE SOCIETIES. 33 

FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

43 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1896. Animal meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate the birthday of Washington. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Frank G. Renshaw, M. D Pensacola 

Vice-President, R. M. Cary Pensacola 

Secretary, John Hobart Cross Pensacola 

Treasurer-Registrar, F. F. Bingham Pensacola 

Chaplain, Right Rev. E. G. Weed Jacksonville 



SOCIETY IN FRANCE. 

15 Members. 
Organized in Paris, France, September 16, 1897. 

Officers. 

President, Gen. Horace Porter, 277 Madison Ave .New York 

Vice-President, Gaston de Sahune de la Fayette. Paris 

Treasurer, J. D. Stickney Paris 

Registrar, Col. Charles Chaille-Long Clarendon, Va. 



HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

86 Members. 

Organized June 17, 1896. Annual meeting June 17, to commemorate 
the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Officers elected June 17, 1915. 

President, Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes Honolulu 

Vice-President, Gerrit P. Wilder Honolulu 

Secretary, James Townsend Taylor Honolulu 

Treasurer, Wm. Joseph Forbes Honolulu 

Registrar, Rev. Henry P. Judd Honolulu 



IDAHO SOCIETY. 

78 Members. 
Organized April 8, 1909. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, M. W. Wood, Lieut. Col. U. S. Army (retired) Boise 

Vice-President, Harry Keyser Boise 



34 SONS OF THIv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Vice-President, Miles S. Johnson Lewiston 

Vice-President, Asher A. Getchell Silver City 

Vice-President, Frank S. Harding Weiser 

Vice-President, Bowen Ctirley Idaho Falls 

Vice-President, Daniel W. Church Pocatello 

Vice-President, William H. Eldridge Twin Falls 

Vice-President, Stanley A. Easton Kellogg 

Vice-President, Rev. Winfield S. Hawkes Caldwell 

Vice-President, Marion H. Brownell Hailey 

Secretary-Treasurer-Registrar, Frank G. Ensign Boise 

Historian, Allen B. Eaton Boise 

Chaplain, Rev. Reuben B. Wright. D. D Boise 



ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

1,053 Members. 

Organized January 14, 1890. Annual meeting December 3, to com- 
memorate the admission of Illinois into the Union. 

Officers elected December 3, 1915. 

President, Henry W. Austin, 217 Lake St Oak Park 

First Vice-President, Fred A. Smith Wilmette 

Second Vice-President, Hugh S. Magill, Jr Springfield 

Secretary, Louis A. Bowman, Room 1333, 30 N. La Salle St. . . .Chicago 

Treasurer, Henry R. Kent, Fort Dearborn Nat'l Bank Chicago 

Historian, George A. Brennan, 24 W. 110th Place Chicago 

Registrar, James Edgar Brown, 1253 Conway Bldg Chicago 

Chaplain, Rev. John Timothy Stone, D. D Chicago 

Sergeant-at-Arms, Earnest F. Manrose, 3045 N. Western Ave . . Chicago 

Chapter Officers. 

SPRINGFIELD CHAPTER, NO. I. ORGANIZED FEBRUARY I, l80/. 

President, Hon. Wm. A. Northcott ; Secretary, Isaac R. Diller; Treas- 
urer, Chas. S. Andrus; Historian, J. D. Roper; Chaplain, Nelson L. 
Allyn ; Sergeant-at-Arms, Albert Carver. 

OAK PARK CHAPTER, NO. J. ORGANIZED JUNE, IOO3. 

President, W. H. Hatch ; Vice-President, Addison L. Gardaer ; Sec- 
retary, F. B. Caldwell ; Treasurer, Louis A. Bowman : Historian. Wil- 
liam G. Moore. 

Geo. Rogers Clark Chapter, No. 2, Bloomington ; Evanston Chapter, 
No. 3 ; Rock Island Chapter, No. 5 ; Monmouth Chapter, No. 6, are not 
now actively maintained, although there are members in each of these 
cities and the charters still exist. 



1623352 

st ATi-; societies. 35 

INDIANA SOCIETY. 

275 Members. 

Organized January 15, 1890. Annual meeting February 25, to com- 
memorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes, J rid., by Gen. 
George Rogers Clark. 

Officers elected February 25, 1916. 

President, James P. Goodrich Winchester 

First Vice-President, S. S. Fish South Bend 

Second Vice-President, F. F. Hildreth Terre Haute 

Third Vice-President, Guy Dinwiddie Lowell 

Secretary (S. S. Miller, resigned July, 1916, for military service). 

Acting Secretary, Edward J. Bennett Kokomo 

Treasurer, Earl Paine Rushville 

Registrar, Joseph E. Vaile Kokomo 

Chaplain, Rev. M. C. Wright Terre Haute 

Chapter Officers. 

JOHN MORTON CHAPTER, TERRE HAUTE. 

President, Lieut. Col. C. T. Jewett; Vice-President, Judge James 
Hugh Swango ; Secretary, Edward Gilbert ; Treasurer, Horace Tune ; 
Registrar, James B. Harris ; Chaplain, Dr. E. T. Spottswood. 



IOWA SOCIETY. 

349 Members. 

Organized September 5, 1893. Annual meeting April 19, except when 
19th is Sunday. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Rev. John Edward Kirbye, D. D Des Moines 

First Vice-President, Dr. Edward Elisha Dorr Des Moines 

Second Vice-President, Hon. Edward David Chassell Wyoming 

Treasurer, William E. Barrett, Esq Des Moines 

Secretary, Capt. Elbridge Drew Hadley Des Moines 

Registrar, William G. Hamlin, Esq Des Moines 

Historian, Prof. Ezra C. Potter Ames 

Chaplain, Rev. William B. Sand ford Des Moines 

Chapter Officers. 

BEN FRANKEIN CHAPTER, DES MOINES. 

President, Elbridge Drew Hadley; Vice-President, Dr. Gershom 
Hyde Hill ; Secretary-Treasurer, Lowell H. Stone. 



$6 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

BUNKER HILL CHAPTER, WATERLOO. 

President, G. C. Kennedy; First Vice-President, John C. Hartman; 
Secretary-Treasurer, F. B. Ballou ; Historian, Dr. Lafayette W. Case. 

LEXINGTON CHAPTER, KEOKUK. 

President, William J. Fulton; Vice-President, D. B. Hamill ; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Frederic C. Smith. 

WASHINGTON CHAPTER, AMES. 

President, Gen. James R. Lincoln ; Vice-President, A. F. Allen ; His- 
torian-Registrar, Chas. E. Taylor ; Secretary, Ezra C. Potter ; Treas- 
urer, Charles Hamilton. 

WOODBURY CHAPTER, SIOUX CITY. 

President, Alpheus B. Beall ; Vice-President, Orville B. Talley ; Sec- 
retary, George H. Bliven; Treasurer, Edwin G. Dilley. 

POWESHEIK CHAPTER, GRINNELL. 

President, Prof. Frank A. Almy ; Secretary, Rev. Dwight P. Breed, 
D. D. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, SHELDON. 

President, George T. Wellman ; Secretary-Treasurer, Carl Orson 
Button. 



KANSAS SOCIETY. 

79 Members. 

Organized March 31, 1892. Annual meeting the third Wednesday in 
January. 

Officers elected January 16, 1916. 

President, John M. Meade Topeka 

Vice-President, Henry W. McAfee Topeka 

Secretary-Historian, Daniel W. Nellis Topeka 

Treasurer, Col. J. D. Norton Topeka 

Registrar, Arthur Henry Bennett Topeka 



KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

185 Members. 

Organized April 8, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemo- 
rate the surrender of Cornwallis. 

Officers elected October 20, 191 5. 

President, Allen R. Carter, Herndon-Carter Co Louisville 

First Vice-President, Dr. Edgar Erskine Hume Frankfort 

Second Vice-President, J. Ross Todd. Todd Bldg Louisville 



STATE SOCIETIES. %] 

Third Vice-President, John C. Strother, Intersouthern Bldg. .Louisville 

Fourth Vice-President, Frank G. Maus, Penn. Lines Louisville 

Secretary, Alex. Woodruff Tippett, U. S. Trust Bldg Louisville 

Treasurer, Geo. T. Wood, 417 W. Main St Louisville 

Registrar, Benj. La Bree, 201 Starks Bldg Louisville- 
Historian, Geo. D. Todd, Belgravia Ap'ts Louisville 

Surgeon, Dr. Richard H. Coke, 1425 St. James Court Louisville 

Chaplain, Rev. Frank M. Thomas, 526 W. St. Catherine St. . .Louisville 



LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

76 Members. 

Organized May 16, 1893. Annual banquet April 13, Jefferson's Birth- 
day. 

Officers elected January 14, 1916. 

President, Elmer E. Wood, 339 Carondelet St New Orleans 

Vice-President, C. Robt. Churchill, 410 Canal St New Orleans 

Vice-President, Samuel A. Trufant, 731 Gravier St New Orleans 

Vice-President, C. S. Mathews, 409 Hibernia Bldg New Orleans 

Secretary, Thos. D. Dimitry, N. O. Post-Office New Orleans 

Financial Secretary, Robt. T. Burwell, 833 Gravier St New Orleans 

Treasurer, Chas. A. Larendon, 815 Union St New Orleans 

Registrar, H. P. Benton, 713 Whitney Bldg New Orleans 

Chaplain, Rev. A. E. Otis, S. J., Loyola University New Orleans 

Historian, Dr. V. K. Irion, 935 Maison Blanche New Orleans 



MAINE SOCIETY. 

365 Members. 

Organized March 14, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Wainwright Cushing Foxcrof t 

Senior Vice-President, Wm. B. Kendall Bowdoinham 

Vice-Presidents for Counties : Androscoggin County, E. P. Ricker, 
South Poland ; Aroostook County, R. F. Gardiner, Houlton ; Cum- 
berland County, Hon. Joseph W. Symonds, Portland; Franklin 
County, Hon. Joseph C. Holman, Farmington; Hancock County, 
Hon. Pascal P. Gilmore, Bucksport ; Kennebec County, Hon. C. L. 
Andrews, Augusta ; Knox County, Harry I. Hix, Rockland ; Lin- 
coln County, Capt. E. P. Webber, Westport ; Oxford County, Joseph 
S. Thompson, Norway; Piscataquis County, E. C. Smith, Foxcrof t ; 
Penobscot County, Hon. W. W. Talbot, Bangor; Somerset County, 
Charles F. Jones, Skowhegan; Waldo County, Ralph Emery. Bel- 
fast ; Washington County, Lincoln H. Newcomb, Eastport ; York 
County, Hon. John C. Stewart, York Village. 



38 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary, Frederic Brunei, 419 Cumberland Ave Portland 

Treasurer, Enoch O. Greenleaf Portland 

Registrar, Francis L. Littlelield Portland 

Librarian, William L- Cousins Portland 

Historian, Augustus F. Moulton Portland 

Chaplain, Rev. Wm. G. Mann Westbrook 

Chapter Officers. 

ROCKLAND CHAPTER, ROCKLAND, ;ME. ORGANIZED OCTOBER 21, I913. 

President, H. I. Hix; Vice-President, E. B. MacAllister; Secretary, 
W. O. Fuller; Treasurer, Fred R. Spear; Historian, E. A. Butler. 

ANDROSCOGGIN CHAPTER. ORGANIZED AT EEWISTON, ME.,, NOVEMBER 5, I913. 

President, Judge George C. Wing, of Auburn; Vice-President, Hon. 
Wallace H. White, Lewiston; Secretary, John L. Reade, Lewiston; 
Treasurer, A. M. Penley, Auburn; Chaplain, Rev. R. F. Johonnot, Au- 
burn ; Historian, Jesse M. Libby, Mechanic Falls. 

WATERVILEE CHAPTER, WATERVIEEE, ME. ORGANIZED NOVEMBER, I913. 

President, Silas Adams; Vice-President, Horace Purinton; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Rev. E. C. Whittemore. 



MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

307 Members. 
Organized April 20, 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Jno. Milton Reif snider Westminster 

Vice-President, T. M. Maynadier, 217 W. Lafayette Ave Baltimore 

Vice-President, Charles E. Sadtler, M. D., 1415 Linden Ave. .Baltimore 
Vice-President, Jas. D. Iglehart, M. D., 211 W. Lanvale St. . .Baltimore 

Secretary, J. Frank Supplee, Jr., 626 Equitable Bldg Baltimore 

Treasurer, Ira H. Houghton, 12 E. Lexington St Baltimore 

Registrar, Edward F. Arthurs, 628 Equitable Bldg Baltimore 

Historian, James E. Hancock, 4 S. Howard St Baltimore 

Chaplain, Rev. Henry Branch, D. D Ellicott City 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

1,700 Members. 

Organized April 19, 1889. Annual meeting April 19, to commemorate 
battles of Lexington and Concord. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Frank Ernest Woodward Wellesley Hills 

Vice-President, Vernon Ashley Field Wollaston 



STATE SOCIETIES. 39 

Vice-President, Charles French Read, Old State House Boston 

Vice-President, Webster Bruce, 80 Baker St Lynn 

Secretary-Registrar, Herbert W. Kimball, 439 Tremont Bldg. . . . Boston 

Treasurer, Charles M. Green, M. D., 78 Marlboro St Boston 

Historian, Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A., The Wads worth. . . Boston 
Chaplain, Rev. Lewis Wilder Hicks Wellesley 

Chapter Officers. 

OLD SALEM CHAPTER, SALEM. CHARTERED OCTOBER 31, 1 895. 

President, George B. Sears, of Danvers; Vice-Presidents, Frank S. 
Beckford, of Beverly, and Osborn Leach, of Danvers ; Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Frank S. Perkins, of Middleton; Registrar, Andrew Nichols, of 
Hathorne. 

BOSTON CHAPTER. CHARTERED OCTOBER 31, 1 895. 

President, Capt. Charles Brooks Appleton; Vice-President, Marshall 
Putnam Thompson; Secretary, Charles Clement Littlefield; Treasurer, 
Frank Rumrill; Historian, Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A., retired. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, SPRINGFIELD. CHARTERED OCTOBER 31, 1895. 

President, Henry F. Punderson; Vice-President, Richard H. Stacy; 
Secretary, Henry A. Booth; Treasurer, Paul I. Lombard; Chaplain, 
Rev. John L. Kilbon ; Historian, Charles H. Barrows ; Registrar, Henry 
L- Gardner; Auditor, H. Curtis Rowley. 

OLD MIDDLESEX CHAPTER, LOWELL. CHARTERED JANUARY 17, 1896. 

President, Burton H. Wiggin; Vice-President, H. C. Taft; Registrar, 
Geo. L. Van Deursen, M. D. : Historian, Rev. Allan C. Ferrin; Secre- 
tary, Chas. T. Upton ; Treasurer, Clarence B. Livingston, M. D. ; Chap- 
lain, Rev. Wilson Waters ; Auditor, Edw. W. Clark. 

OLD ESSEX CHAPTER, LYNN. CHARTERED FEBRUARY /, 1896. 

President, Charles Frederic Smith; Vice-Presidents, Henry Fuller 
Tapley, Webster Bruce; Secretary, Luther Atwood, 8 Sagamore St.; 
Treasurer, Henry Morris Kelley, 20 Sagamore St. ; Historian, Charles 
Howard Bangs, M. D. ; Chaplain, Rev. Frederic Williams Perkins. D. D. 

OLD COLONY CHAPTER, WHITMAN. CHARTERED APRIL 17, 1896. 

President, (vacant); Vice-President, Horatio F. Copeland, M. D. ; 
Secretary, Charles E. Lovell, M. D. ; Treasurer, Randall W. Cook; 
Historian, Charles H. Edson. 

OLD SUFFOLK CHAPTER, CHELSEA. CHARTERED FEBRUARY 3, 1897. 

President, Harry W. James; Vice-President, Thomas U. Follansbee; 
Secretary, William J. McClintock, 62 Garland St. ; Treasurer, Elmer H. 
Snow ; Historian, Frank E. Parlin. 

WORCESTER CHAPTER. CHARTERED APRIL 2, 1897. 

President, Alfred F. Powers ; Vice-Presidents, Geo. M. Rice, Paul B. 
Morgan, U. Waldo Cutler ; Secretary, Eugene H. Powers ; Treasurer, 
Edward F. Mann ; Historian. John K. Warren, M. D. 



40 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY CHAPTER, PITTSFIEED. CHARTERED JUNE 4, 1897. 

President, Win. L. Root ; Vice-Presidents, Judge E. T. Slocum, A. H. 
Bagg, and W. C. Stevenson; Secretary-Registrar, Howard P. Brown; 
Treasurer, Charles S. Shaw ; Historian, Dorvil L. Wilcox. 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE CHAPTER, TAUNTON. CHARTERED SEPTEMBER 3, 1897. 

President, Enos D. Williams ; First Vice-President, Lewis E. Hig- 
gins ; Second Vice-President, F. Arthur Walker ; Secretary, Louis B. 
Walker; Treasurer, Frank C. Walker, M. D. ; Registrar, James E. 
Seaver; Historian, William M. Emery; Chaplain, Rev. J. Francis 
Cooper. 

MALDEN CHAPTER. CHARTERED APRIL 6, IOX)0. 

President, Horace Chester; First Vice-President, A. Warren Patch; 
Second Vice-President, Spencer T. Williams ; Secretary, Walter K. 
Watkins ; Treasurer, Willard Welsh ; Historian, William B. Snow. 

CAMBRIDGE CHAPTER. CHARTERED MARCH 7, ICj02. 

President, John Amee ; Secretary, Shepard Howland ; Treasurer, Al- 
bert F. Amee ; Historian, Edward B. Hutchinson. 

SETH P0MER0Y CHAPTER, NORTHAMPTON. CHARTERED OCTOBER 13, I905. 

President, Thomas M. Shepherd; Vice-President, Arthur L. Kings- 
bury; Secretary, Chas. H. Chase; Treasurer, Harry E. Bicknell; His- 
torian, George W. Cable ; Chaplain, Rev. Henry G. Smith. D. D. ; 
Auditor, S. D. Drury. 

BOX BURY CHAPTER, BOSTON. CHARTERED APRIE 13, I906. 

President, William C. Briggs ; Vice-President, Frank S. Waterman; 
Secretary, John S. Richardson; Treasurer, Arthur L. Foster; Historian, 
C. E. Wiggin. 

DUKES COUNTY CHAPTER, EDGARTOWN. CHARTERED MARCH 12, I915. 

President, William C. Nevins ; Secretary-Treasurer, Arthur W. Davis, 
Edgartown. 

FRANCIS LEWIS CHAPTER, WALP0EE, MASS. CHARTERED AUGUST 13, I915. 

President, Isaac Newton Lewis, East Walpole; Vice-Presidents, Louis 
E. Vose, F. Percyval Lewis, and Wm. A. Millard ; Secretary, Philip R. 
Allen ; Treasurer, Walter B. Allen ; Auditor, H. Raymond Lewis ; 
Registrar, John H. Allen. 



MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

450 Members. 

Organized January 18, 1890. Annual meeting April 15. 

Officers elected May 10, 1916. 

President, Clarence M. Burton, 20 Home Bank Bldg Detroit 

Vice-President, Jacob S. Farrand, Jr., 457 Woodward Ave Detroit 



STATE) societies. 41 

Secretary, Raymond E. Van Syckle, 1729 Ford Bldg .Detroit 

Treasurer, Frank G. Smith, 89 Hancock Ave Detroit 

Registrar, Franklin S. Dewey, Majestic Bldg Detroit 

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D., 21 Edmund Place Detroit 

Historian, Charles Moore, Security Trust Co Detroit 

Chapter Officers. 

DETROIT CHAPTER. ORGANIZED NOVEMBER I, I913. 

President, Harry A. Lockwood ; First Vice-President, Dr. Stephen 
H. Knight; Second Vice-President, William P. Holliday; Secretary, 
Raymond E. Van Syckle; Treasurer, Frank G. Smith; Historian, Wil- 
liam Stocking ; Chaplain, Rev. Joseph A. Vance. 

KENT CHAPTER, GRAND RAPIDS. 

President, Charles Carroll Folmer; Vice-President, Charles E. 
Leonard ; Secretary, Charles N. Remington ; Treasurer, Henry Taylor 
Stanton. 

WASHTENAW COUNTY CHAPTER, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

President, Prof. Warren W. Florer; Vice-President, Junius E. Beal; 
Secretary, Wolcott H. Butler; Treasurer, J. J. Goodyear; Chaplain, 
George W. Patterson; Historian, Harlan PI. Johnson. 

ISABELLA COUNTY CHAPTER, MT. PLEASANT, MICH. 

President, Walter Franklin Newberry; Vice-President, Kendall Page 
Brooks; Secretary, Dr. Sheridan Ellsworth Gardiner; Treasurer, War- 
ren Charles Perry; Historian, Harry Graves Miller. r 

KALAMAZOO CHAPTER. 

Provisionally organized February 22, 1915, under the chairmanship of 
Edward C. Parsons. 



MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

199 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1889. Annual meeting December 26, to com- 
memorate the anniversary of the Battle of Trenton. 

Officers elected January 10, 1916. 

President, Gideon L. Ives, N. Y. Life Bldg St. Paul 

Vice-President, Robert D. Cone, Met. Life Bldg Minneapolis 

Vice-President, Clifford L. Hilton, 687 Ashland Ave St. Paul 

Secretary, Charles H. Bronson, 48 East Fourth St .St. Paul 

Assistant Secretary, Earnest A. Countryman, Globe Bldg St. Paul 

Treasurer, Charles W. Eddy, 404 Capitol Bank St. Paul 

Registrar, Charles Stees, 165 East Seventh St St. Paul 

Historian, Rev. Samuel W. Dickinson, 457 Ashland Ave St. Paul 

Chaplain, Rev. M. D. Edwards, D. D., 423 Laurel Ave St. Paul 



4^ SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Chapter Officers. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

President, Dr. Latham A. Crandall ; Vice-President, Dr. Charles A. 
McCollom ; Secretary-Treasurer, Robert D. Cone. 



MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

34 Members. 
Organized May 10, 1909. 

Officers, 1916. 

President, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell Jackson 

Vice-President, Hon. W. D. Anderson Tupelo 

Vice-President, Col. Chalmers M. Williamson Jackson 

Secretary-Registrar, Wm. H. Pullen, Mechanics' Bank Bldg Jackson 

Treasurer, Philip Stevens Merrill Jackson 



MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

123 Members. 

Organized April 23, 1889. Annual meeting March 4, to commemorate 
taking effect of the Constitution of the United States. Annual dinner 
April 19, to commemorate battles of Concord and Lexington. 

Officers elected March 4, 1916. 

President, Robert E. Adreon, 1932 N. Broadway St. Louis 

First Vice-President, Edwin T. Miller, 825 Frisco Bldg St. Louis 

Second Vice-President, John L. Ro Bards Hannibal 

Third Vice-President, C. P. Walbridge, 501 Clara Ave St. Louis 

4th Vice-President, Peyton H. Skipwith, 4105 Westminster PI. St. Louis 

Secretary, F. G. Williamson, 1932 N. Broadway St. Louis 

Treasurer, I. Shreve Carter, 803 Merchants' Laclede Bldg.... St. Louis 

Registrar, Linn Paine, Mermod-Jaccard Bldg St. Louis 

Historian, W. H. H. Tainter, 6141 McPherson Ave St. Louis 

Chaplain, Rev. W. W. Boyd, 300 N. Fourth St St. Louis 

Chapter Officers. 

KANSAS CITY CHAPTER. 

President, George P. Gross; Vice-Presidents, Wm. H. Williams, E. 
Mont. Reily; Secretary, David S. Harriman, 16th and "Broadway ; Treas- 
urer, W. H. H. Tainter; Historian, James M. Greenwood; Registrar, 
George R. Jones. 

ST. EOUIS CHAPTER. 

(Officers same as State Society.) 



I 



state; societies. 43 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

29 Members. 

Organized June 5. 1894. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Cornelius Hedges, Jr Helena 

Vice-President, Hon. Wm. W. McDowell Butte 

Secretary-Treasurer, Leslie Sulgrove Helena 

Registrar, Wm. Rush Burroughs Helena 

Historian, Leslie Berry Sulgrove Helena 

Librarian, J. Scott Harrison Helena 

Chaplain, Robert H. Howey Helena 



NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

234 Members. 

Organized April 26, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers, 1916. 

President, Herbert M. Bushnell Lincoln 

Senior Vice-President, Charles J. Bowlby Crete 

Junior Vice-President, Clarendon E. Adams Omaha 

Secretary-Registrar, Addison E. Sheldon. Legislative Reference 

Bureau, University of Nebraska Lincoln 

Treasurer, Charles E. Bardwell Lincoln 

Chapter Officers. 

ETHAN ALLEN CHAPTER, OMAHA, NEB. 

President, James Richardson; Vice-President, Ralph W. Emerson; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Charles L. Ransom ; Historian, Andrew K. Gault. 

FREMONT CHAPTER, FREMONT, NEB. 

President, Fred Hills Richards; Vice-President, Burnell Colsen ; Sec- 
retary, Charles Hills Lyman ; Treasurer, William Moulton Dame. 

LINCOLN CHAPTER, NO. 3, LINCOLN, NEB. INSTALLED MAY 10, I915. 

President (vacant); First Vice-President, Jesse B. Strode; Second 
Vice-President, Walton G. Roberts; Secretary, Henry Alden Lindly; 
Registrar, J. Reid Green ; Treasurer, Paul Goss ; Historian, Addison E. 
Sheldon. 



NEVADA SOCIETY. 

19 Mfmbers. 
Organized February 19, 1910. 

Officers. 
President, Hon. Albert D. Ayre> Reno 



44 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

228 Members. 

Organized April 24, 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected June 13, 1916. 

President, F. W. McKinley Manchester 

Vice-President, Harry T. Lord Manchester 

Vice-President, Henry H. Metcalf Concord 

Vice-President, Gen. J. N. Patterson Concord 

Secretary-Treasurer, Howard F. Hill Concord 

Registrar, Charles C. Jones Concord 

Historian, Hon. William F. Whitcher . Woodsville 

Chaplain, Rev. Lucius Waterman, D. D Hanover 

Chapter Officers. 

KEENE CHAPTER, NO. I. gi 

President, Hon. James S. Taft; Vice-President, Rev. Alfred H. 
Wheeler ; Secretary-Treasurer, Charles Gale Shedd ; Historian. Rev. 
Josiah L. Seward, D. D. 



NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

1,100 Members. 

Organized March 7, 1889. Annual meeting usually January 3 (Battle 
of Princeton), or at such other time as the Society at any annual meet- 
ing may designate. 

Officers elected January 8, 1916. 

Pres., Washington Irving Lincoln Adams, 32 Llewellyn Rd . . Montclair 

First Vice-President, Samuel Craig Cowart Freehold 

Second Vice-President, Chester N. Jones, 299 Broadway New York 

Secretary, John Randel Weeks, 756 Broad St Newark 

Treasurer, Edwin Allen Smith, 747 Broad St Newark 

Registrar, Dr. G. Herbert Richards, 424 Main St Orange 

Historian, Prof. W. C. Armstrong, 363 Jersey Ave Elizabeth 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Edwin S. Lines, 21 Washington St Newark 

Chapter Officers. 

EUZABETHTOWN CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, Sidney W. EMridge ; Secretary, Harry F. Brewer, 208 
Broad St., Elizabeth. 



STATE SOCIETIES. 45 

ORANGE) CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, S. Carl Downs; Secretary, Rev. S. Ward Righter, 12 Essex 
St., East Orange. 

MONTCIvAIR CHAPTER, NO. 3. 

President, Frank L. Dyer; Secretary, Philip Goodell, 215 Park St., 
Montclair. 

NEWARK CHAPTER, NO. 4. 

President, Henry M. Doremus; Secretary, S. Albert Clark, 6\ Wee- 
quahic Ave., Newark. 

MONMOUTH CHAPTER, NO. 5. 

President, Hon. Walter Taylor; Secretary, Wm. A. Squire, 301 Sec- 
ond Ave., Asbury Park. 

PARAMUS CHAPTER, NO. 6. 

President, Judge Cornelius Doremus ; Secretary, Joseph B. Roberts, 
17 Heights Road, Ridgewood. 

MORRIS COUNTY CHAPTER, NO. 7. 

President, Horace Holden; Secretary, S. Chudleigh Hicks, Morris- 
town. 

PASSAIC YALUEY CHAPTER, SUMMIT, NO. 8. 

President, George Vail Muchmore; Secretary, Alfred W. Alesbury, 
20 Maple St., Summit. 

WASHINGTON ROCK CHAPTER, NO. 9. ORGANIZED JUNE 14, I916. 

President, Charles La C. Hoff; Secretary, Harvey R. Linbarger, 197 
North Ave., Plainfield. 



NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 

68 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1908. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Col. Ralph Emerson Twitchell Santa Fe 

First Vice-President, Thomas Paul Martin Taos 

Second Vice-President, Meldrum Keplinger Wylder Albuquerque 

Third Vice-President, Keith W. Edwards Fort Sumner 

Fourth Vice-President, Elmer E. Studly Raton 

Secretary, Pearce C. Rodey Albuquerque 

Registrar, Frank W. Clancy Albuquerque 

Treasurer, Orville Arthur Matson Albuquerque 

Historian, Dean Amory Worcester Albuquerque 

Chaplain, John Wilson Elder Albuquerque 



46 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(NEW YORK) 
THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

1,458 Members. 

Organized February it, 1890. Annual meeting March 17. 

Officers elected April 18, 1916. 

President, Louis Annin Ames, 99 Fulton St New York City 

1st Vice-Pres., Norman P. Heffley, 1350 Bedford Ave. .Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2d Vice-Pres., Martin S. Allen, 81 North Moore St New York City 

3d Vice-Pres., Hon. Horace S. Van Voast Schenectady, N. Y. 

Secretary, Jesse H. Clute, 220 Broadway New York City 

Treasurer, James de la Montanye, 220 Broadway New York City 

Registrar, Teunis D. Huntting, 220 Broadway New York City 

Historian, Dr. William K. Wickes Syracuse, N. Y. 

Chaplain, Rev. Frank O. Hall, D. D., 4 W. 76th St New York City 

Chapter Officers. 

ADIRONDACKS CHAPTER, FORT EDWARD. 

President, Robert R. Law; Secretary, Archibald S. Derby. 

BUFFALO CHAPTER, BUFFALO 

President, Capt. Hamilton Ward ; Secretary, Frank B. Steele. 

FORT JOHNSTOWN CHAPTER, JOHNSTOWN. 

President, ; Secretary, Rev. W. W. Ellsworth. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER, HUNTINGTON. 

President, Frederick M. Hazzard ; Secretary, Everest Sammis. 

MOHAWK VALLEY CHAPTER. HERKIMER. 

President, Col. John W. Vrooman ; Secretary, F. W. Cristman. 

NEWBURCH CHAPTER, NEWBURGH. 

President, Samuel L. Stewart; Vice-Presidents, Dr. W. M. Stan- 
brough and Charles F. Burnett; Secretary, A. E. Layman; Treasurer, 
F. E. Forsyth; Registrar, Rev. Albert S. Stewart; Historian, James W. 
Barnes ; Chaplain, Rev. M. Seymour Purdy. 

NEWTOWN-BATTLE CHAPTER, ELMIRA. 

President, Dr. Arthur W. Booth; Secretary, Jabin A. Secor. 

THE PAINTED POST CHAPTER, CORNING. ^ 

President, Alanson B. Houghton; Secretary, John L. Chatfield. 

ROCHESTER CHAPTER, ROCHESTER. 

President, Charles E. Ogden ; Vice-President, W. H. H. Rogers ; Sec- 
retary, Raymond G. Dann; Treasurer, John B. Howe; Registrar-His- 
torian, Col. F. Judson Hess; Chaplain, Rev. M. R. Webster. 



STATU SOCIETIES. 47 

SARATOGA CHAPTER, SARATOGA SPRINGS. 

President, Thomas R. Kneil ; Secretary, Dr. Karl H. King. 

SYRACUSE CHAPTER, SYRACUSE. 

President, Dr. William K. Wickes ; Vice-President, Giles H. Stilwell; 
Secretary, Charles C. Cook; Treasurer, Francis H. McChesney ; Regis- 
trar, J. Frank Durston ; Historian, Hon. William G. Cady; Chaplain, 
Rev. Walter B. Ferris. 

COI,. CORNELIUS VAN DYCK CHAPTER, SCHENECTADY. 

President, George Church Moon ; Vice-Presidents, Gen. Charles L. 
Davis, U. S. A., Horace S. Van Voast; Secretary, Hanford Robison ; 
Treasurer, John W. Collamer ; Registrar, Charles H. Huntley; His- 
torian, F. R. Champion ; Chaplain, Charles P. Sanders. 



NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

48 Members. 
'Organized February 22, 191 1. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers elected February 21, 1916. 

President, Frank H. Bryan Washington 

Vice-President. Maj. York Coleman Rutherfordton 

Secretary-Registrar, R. T. Bonner Aurora 

Treasurer, W. B. Harding Washington 

Historian, John G. Bragaw, Jr Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. F. B. Rankin . Rutherfordton 



NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

46 Members. 

'Organized February 4, 191 1. 

Officers, 1916. 

President, Charles Andrew Pollock Fargo 

Vice-President, George F. Rich Grand Forks 

Vice-President, Charles E. Batcheller Fingal 

Secretary-Registrar, Herbert Clay Fish Minot 

Treasurer, John Leonard Bell : Bismarck 

Historian, Vernon P. Squires Grand Forks 

Chaplain, Wallace N. Stearns Fargo 



48 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

OHIO SOCIETY. 

608 Members. 

Organized April 11-22, 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 

Officers elected May 6, 1916. 

President, George E. Pomeroy Toledo 

Vice-President, Hermon A. Kelley, Western Reserve Bldg. . .Cleveland 

Secretary, E. M. Hall, Jr., Engineers' Bldg Cleveland 

Registrar, Col. W. L. Curry Columbus 

Treasurer, Col. Stimpson G. Harvey. 650 Oak wood Ave Toledo 

Historian, Joseph B. Doyle Steubenville 

Chaplain, Dr. William F. Pierce Gambier 

Chapter Officers. 

WESTERN RESERVE SOCIETY, CEEVEEAND. 

President, Edward E. Howe, Superior Savings and Trust Co.; Vice- 
Presidents, W. G. Wilson, F. H. Gates, Victor Slayton, Mozart Gallup, 
Sandusky; Secretary, Edward M. Hall, jr., 825 Engineers Bldg.; Treas- 
urer, Dr. Frederick C. Waite, 1353 East Ninth St.; Registrar, Jesse A. 
Fenner, 609 Society for Savings; Historian, A. T. Brewer; Chaplain, 
Rev. Minot O. Simons. 

BENJAMIN ERANKEIN CHAPTER, COEUMBUS. 

President, James M. Hengst, Harrison Bldg. ; Vice-President, Ralph 
E. Westf all ; Flistorian, Stanley Sells ; Registrar, John E. W. Henney, 
State House ; Chaplain, William G. Benham ; Secretary-Treasurer,. 
Hugh Huntington, 305-311 Hayden-Clinton Bank Bldg. 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, TOEEDO. 

President, Hon. Horace N. Allen, 2248 Parkwood Ave., Toledo, Ohio ;. 
First Vice-President, S. O. Richardson, Jr., 2051 Collingwood Ave.: 
Second Vice-President, Gen. J. Kent Hamilton, 2317 Scottwood Ave.; 
Secretary, F. W. Whittlese)^, 2036 Glenwood Ave. ; Treasurer, CoL 
Stimpson G. Harvey, 65c Oakwood Ave. ; Registrar, Dr. Edward D_ 
Gardiner, 2247 Rosewood Ave.; Historian, Judge Herbert P. Whitney, 
2224 Rosewood Ave. ; Chaplain, Rev. Nathan N. Clark, Petersburg,. 
Mich. 

NATHAN HAEE CHAPTER, YOUNGSTOWN. 

President, Hon. Benjamin F. Wirt; Vice-Presidents, Jno. H. Ruhl- 
man and E. W. Alexander ; Registrar-Historian, H. R. Baldwin ; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. John J. Brant, Stambaugh Bldg. ; Chaplain, Rev. A. E 
Frazier. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, NEWARK. 

(Inactive.) 

SIMON KENTON CHAPTER, KENTON. 

(Inactive.) 



STATE SOCIETIES. 49 

CINCINNATI CHAPTER. 

President, Dr. E. R. Booth; Vice-Presidents, Dr. Arthur J. Whallon, 
Rev. G. S. J. Browne; Secretary-Treasurer-Registrar, Rev. E. P. 
Whallon. 

NATHANAEL GREENE CHAPTER, XENIA. 

President, Charles C. Shearer ; Corresponding Secretary, William A. 
Galloway; Recording Secretary-Treasurer, Finley D. Torrence; Regis- 
trar, Clark M. Galloway. 

OLENTANGY VALLEY CHAPTER, DELAWARE. 

President, R. PI. Kellogg; Vice-President, J. F. Dodd ; Registrar, 
E. D. Van Deman; Secretary, Robert B. Powers; Treasurer, B. P. 
Benton. 

RICHARD MONTGOMERY CHAPTER, DAYTON. 

President, Col. Robert Cowden; Secretary, Miles S. Kuhns; Regis- 
trar, Sidney S. King; Treasurer, J. Owen Britton. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, COSHOCTON. 

President, Dr. William P. Reeves ; Secretary, Harry S. Lybarger. 



OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 

50 Members. 

Organized February 22, 1905. Admitted into the National Society 
May 18, 1905. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Harland T. Deupree, Amer. Bk. Bldg Oklahoma City 

Vice-President, C. A. Cleveland Anadarko 

Vice-President, J. M. Hall .Tulsa 

Vice-President, Geo. L. Bowman Kingfisher 

Sec.-Treas., Arthur N. Leecraft, 305 Mercantile Bldg. . .Oklahoma City 

Registrar, E. G. Spilman Oklahoma City 

Historian, Prof. J. B. Thoburn Norman 

Chaplain, M. L. Blackwelder Oklahoma City 



OREGON SOCIETY. 

206 Members. 

Organized June 6, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, W r allace McCamant, Northwestern Bank Bldg Portland 

Vice-President, D. W. Wakefield, Henry Bldg Portland 



50 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary, B. A. Thaxter, 994 Bryce Ave. . . Portland 

Treasurer, A. A. Lindsley, Henry Bldg Portland 

Registrar, Alfred F. Parker. Northwestern Bank Bldg Portland 

Chaplain, Rev. John H. Boyd, D. D Portland 

Chapter Officers. 

SAEEM CHAPTER. 

President, Winthrop HammoncL; Vice-Presidents, Frank J. Miller and 
R. E. Miller (of Albany) ; Secretary, George M. Post; Registrar, F. S. 
Gannett ; Treasurer. W. F. Foster. 



PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

608 Members. 
Organized November 23, 1893. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Thomas Stephen Brown, Berger Bldg Pittsburgh 

Senior Vice-Pres., Herman W. Fernberger, Empire Bldg. .. Philadelphia 

2d Vice-President, Omar S. Decker, 715 Amberson Ave Pittsburgh 

3d Vice-Pres., Rev. C. E. Snyder, 1028 Cabinet St., N. S Pittsburgh 

Honorary Vice-President, Frank G. Paulson, 515 Wood St. . Pittsburgh 

Secretary, Francis Armstrong, Jr., 515 Wood St Pittsburgh 

Registrar, John W. Grove, 4263 Fifth Ave Pittsburgh 

Treasurer. Clifford F. McCombs. Third National Bank Pittsburgh 

Historian. Thomas Wynne, 5100 Lancaster Ave Philadelphia 

Chaplain, Rev. William E. Howard, 3323 Ward St Pittsburgh 

Chapter Officers. 

WAYNE CHAPTER, ERIE, PA. CHARTERED 1899. 

President. Dr. David N. Dennis; Vice-President, John W. Little; 
Secretary, George Burton; Treasurer, William Spencer; Registrar, 
Douglas Benson; Historian, Charles S. Clarke. 

NEW CASTEE CHAPTER. 

President, W. A. Stritmater ; Vice-President, Arthur L. Russell; Sec- 
retary, vS. D. Long; Treasurer, Maj. G. W. Gageby; Registrar, J. S. 
Du Shane. 

PHILADELPHIA CHAPTER. 

President, Maj. Moses Veale, J27 Walnut St. ; Vice-President, Eu- 
gene C. Jjonniwell ; Secretary-Treasurer, Plerman W. Fernberger, Em- 
pire Bldg. ; Registrar, Thomas Wynne, S2d St. and Lancaster Ave. ; 
Historian, James K. Helms, 152 Lauriston .St. 

FORT BEDFORD CHAPTER. BEDFORD, PA. 

President, Dr. Americus Enfield; Vice-Presidents. S. Albert Cessna 
and Tames C. Russell; Secretary, J. Reed Irvine, Bedford; Treasurer, 



s'i'a'i "■!•; societies. 51 

William E. Beam; Registrar, Abram Weisel ; Historian, Howard 
Cessna, Rainsburg. 

SHENANG0 CHAPTER, SHARON, PA. 

President, A. C. McLean, Sharon; Vice-President, G. E. Boyd, Fre- 
donia; Secretary, Guy Thorne, Greenville; Treasurer, W. D. McCart- 
ney, Sharon; Registrar, L. D. Runser, Sharpsville; Historian, Capt. 
W. A. McCormick, Mercer. 



PHILIPPINE SOCIETY. 

19 Members. 

Charter granted February 17, 1911. Organization perfected October 
19, 191 1. 

Officers elected October 23, 1916. 

President, Frank Lee Strong Manila 

Honorary President, Judge Charles Sumner Lobingier. .Shanghai, China 

Vice-President, Austin Craig Manila 

Sec'y-Registrar-Treasurer, H. Lawrence Noble, P. O. Box 940. . .Manila 



RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

330 Members. 

Organized February 1, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Frederick Dickman Carr, 49 Medway St. . . .' Providence 

Vice-President, Howard Vernon Allen East Greenwich 

Secretary, Christopher Rhodes, 290 Benefit St Providence 

Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner, 639 Grosvenor Bldg. . . .Providence 

Registrar, Francis Eliot Bates, P. O. Box 1254 Providence 

Historian, William Chace Greene, 44 Alumni Ave Providence 

Chaplain, Rev. Charles Fremont Roper River Point 

Poet, Dr. George Thurston Spicer, 306 Olney St Providence 

Chapter Officers. 

BRISTOE CHAPTER, NO. I. 

President, William Leonard Manchester; Vice-President, Hezekiah 
Church Wardwell ; Secretary, Joseph Franklin Farrally ; Treasurer. 
Frederic Fillmore Gladding; Historian, George Ulric Arnold: Poet. 
Orrin Luther Bosworth. 

PROVIDENCE CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, Robert Perkins Brown; Vice-President, Frederick Willard 
Easton ; Secretary-Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner; Historian. Wil- 
fred Harold Munro. 



52 SONS OF THF AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PAWTUCKET CHAPTER, NO. 3. 

President, Henry Clinton Dexter; Vice-President, Charles Henry 
French; Secretary, Nicholas Howard Easton ; Treasurer. Theodore 
Everett Dexter. 

KENT COUNTY CHAPTER, NO. 4. 

President, Howard Vernon Allen; Vice-President, Thomas Wilson 
Chace; Secretary-Treasurer, Elisha Waterman Bucklin; Registrar. Wil- 
liam Arnold Browning; Historian, Herbert Morton Clarke; Chaplain. 
Rev. Charles Fremont Roper. 



SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

18 Members. 
Organized March 22, 191 1. 

Officers. 

President, Paul Trapier Hayne Greenville 

Vice-President, Oscar K. Mauldin Greenville 

Secretary, David Arnold Henning Greenville 



SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

62 Members. 

Preliminary meeting January 31, 191 1. Permanently organized March 
27, 191 1. Replaces Society organized in 1899. 

Officers elected April 19, 1916. 

President, Charles O. Bailey Sioux Falls 

Vice-President, H. C. Sessions Sioux Falls 

Vice-President, Judge J. Howard Gates Sioux Falls 

Secretary-Registrar, T. W. Dwight Sioux Falls 

Treasurer, B. H. Requa Sioux Falls 

Historian, Willis C. Cook Plankinton 

Chaplain, Rev. Lucius Kingsbury Sioux Falls 



TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 

72 Members. 

Organized December 2, 1889. Annual meeting October 7, to com- 
memorate Battle of Kings Mountain. 

Officers elected October 18, 1915. 

President, Edward A. Lindsey Nashville 

Vice-President for East Tennessee, Maj. John W. Faxon. .Chattanooga 



STATE SOCIETIES. 53 

Vice-President for Middle Tennessee, Jas. N. Cox Cookeville 

Vice-President for West Tennessee, William L. Wilhoite Memphis 

Secretary, Wm. K. Boardman, Cumberland Tel. and Tel. Co. .Nashville 

Treasurer, W. E. Metzger Nashville 

Registrar, John C. Brown Nashville 

Historian, Prof. St. George Sioussat Nashvill< 

Chaplain, Rev. Jas. I. Vance, D. D Nashville 

Surgeon, Dr. Paul De Witt Nashville 



TEXAS SOCIETY. 

86 Members. 

< )rganized December 8, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers, 1916. 

President, Edward Franklin Harris Galveston 

Senior Vice-President, J. T. Trezevant Dallas 

Second Vice-President, F. F. Downs Temple 

Secretary, Walter S. Mayer Galveston 

Treasurer, Wilber H. Young Austin 

Historian-Registrar, E. E. Rice Galveston 

Chaplain, J. T. Huffmaster Galveston 



UTAH SOCIETY. 

133 Members. 

Organized January 29, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected December 27, 1915. 

President, Albert Raymond Barnes Salt Lake City 

Vice-President, Joseph Willis Bishop Salt Lake City 

Secretary, Gordon Lines Hutchins, 522 Dooly Bldg Salt Lake City 

Treasurer, Alfred Holmes Peabody, 1064 3d Ave Salt Lake City 

Registrar, William Dalton Neal. 290 Centre St Salt Lake City 

Historian, Edmund Ross Leis Salt Lake City 

Chaplain, Prof. Levi Edgar Young Salt Lake City 



VERMONT SOCIETY. 

236 Members. 

Organized April 2, 1889. Annual meeting second Wednesday in 
November. 

Officers, 1916. 

President. Redfield Proctor Proctor 

Vice-President, W. H. Jeffrey East Burke 



54 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary-Historian, Walter Hill Crockett Montpelier 

Registrar, Dorman Bridgman Eaton Kent Montpelier 

Treasurer, Clarence L. Smith , Burlington 

Chaplain, Rev. Homer Abial Flint Montpelier 



VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

109 Members. 

Organized July 7, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Arthur B. Clarke, 39 Merchants' Nat'l Bk. Bldg. . .Richmond 

Vice-President, Hon. Henry R. Pollard. Richmond 

Vice-President, Frederick E. Emerson, N. Y., P. & N. R. R.... Norfolk 

Vice-President, Dr. George Ross Richmond 

Sec'y-Reg.-Treas., Win. E. Crawford, 700 Travelers' Bldg. . . .Richmond 

Historian, Hon. L. L. Lewis, Mutual Bldg Richmond 

Chaplain, Norton R. Savage Richmond 

Chapter Officers. 

TIDEWATER CHAPTER, NO. I, NORFOLK. 

President, Judge A. C. Ackin ; Vice-President, Capt. Harry A. Brink- 
ley; Treasurer, Tench F. Tilghman; Secretary-Registrar-Historian, 
William Henry Sargeant, Jr. 



WASHINGTON STATE SOCIETY. 

319 Members. 
Organized June 17, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Orison J. C. Dutton, 309 Securities Bldg Seattle 

First Vice-President, John Drummond Fletcher Tacoma 

Second Vice-President, Carlos Herbert Weeks Spokane 

Third Vice-President, Rev. Granville Lowther North Yakima 

Secretary. Paul B. Phillips, 622 Central Bldg Seattle 

Treasurer, Cullen Kittredge Sturtevant, 312 Boston Bldg Seattle 

Registrar, Joseph Phelps Totten, 653 New York Bldg Seattle 

Historian, Ovid A. Byers, 507 Colman Bldg Seattle 

Chaplain. Rev. Frederick L. Forbes Seattle 



STATE SOCIETIES. 55 

Chapter Officers. 

SPOKANE) CHAPTER, NO. T. 

President, Carlos Herbert Weeks; Vice-President, Roberl Oliver Mc- 
Clintock ; Secretary-Treasurer, Edwin Charlton At water; Registrar, 
Samuel Roland Dishman ; Trustee, William Harry Shields. 

SEATTLE CHAPTER, NO. 2. 

President, John Onesimus Foster, D. D. ; Vice-President, Harry Den- 
ton Moore; Secretary, Irving- T. Cole; Treasurer-Historian. Warren 
Lucas; Chaplain, John Harrington Edwards, D. D. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, TACOMA, NO. 3. 

President, Harry Grant Rowland; Vice-President, Herbert Stanton 
Griggs ; Secretary. Palmer Kennedy ; Treasurer, Arther E. Grafton ; 
Registrar, Willard Vaughn Morse. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, NORTH YAKIMA, NO. 4. 

President, Frederick F. W. Jackson : Vice-President, Frederick Clark 
Hall; Secretary, William Ward de Veaux ; Treasurer, Joseph Lamm 
Gift; Registrar-PIistorian, Robert Bruce Milroy; Chaplain, Rev. Gran- 
ville Lowther. 

HOOUIAM CHAPTER, NO. 5. 

President, William Leidy Adams; Vice-President, Josiah Onslow 
Stearns: Secretary, Fred Thomson Dean; Treasurer, Walter L. Wells; 
Historian, Jeremiah Walker: Chaplain, Franklin Harley Bassett. 

ROBERT GRAY CHAPTER. OLYMPIA. 

Preliminary organization : President. Jesse Martin Hitt ; Secretary, 
Clinton Brown Jaynes. 



WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

161 Members. 
Organized February 25, 1890. Annual meeting May 29. 

Officers elected May 29, 1916. 

President, Hon. James H. Stover, 744 Van Buren St Milwaukee 

Vice-President, W. H. Bishop Milwaukee 

Secretary, Hon. Charles C. Benson, City Hall Milwaukee 

Treasurer, Wm. Stark Smith, 306 Royal Place Milwaukee 

Registrar, Wm. Ward Wight, Wells Bldg Milwaukee 

Historian, Herbert N. Laflin, Northwestern Mut. L. Bldg. . .Milwaukee 



56 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WYOMING SOCIETY. 

31 Members. 

Organized March 28, 1908. Admitted into the National Society April 
30. 1908. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1916. 

President, Win. Bradford Dodge Gray Cheyenne 

Vice-President, Maurice Groshon Cheyenne 

Secretary, William Levi Whipple Cheyenne 

Treasurer, William Edwards Chaplin Cheyenne 

Registrar, James Hazard Walton Cheyenne 

Historian, Leander Corning Hills Chevenne 



Jr 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF THE 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF 
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

* 

Held at Newark, New Jersey 
May 15 and 16, 1916 

(57) 



S8 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



COMMITTEES OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 

Committee on Arrangements Appointed by the National Executive 
Committee. 

John Eenord Merrill, Chairman. 
Hon. Franklin Murphy. 
Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley. 
Frank B. Steele* 
Thomas W. Williams. 



Special Committees of the New Jersey Society". 



Neil' Jersey Committee on Arrangements 

and Banquet Committee. 
W. I. L/incbln -Adams. Chairman 
John R. Weeks, Secretary 
Chester N. Jones 
Frank E. Dyer 
Herbert R. Crane 

Fina n ce Com m it tee. 
John T. Neff, Chairman 
Fred B. Bassett 
Carl S. Downs 
Frank E. Dyer 
George V. Muchmore 
lion. Cornelius Doremus 
E. Allen Smith 
Horace Holden 
Hon. Walter Taylor 
Charles IE K. Halsey 
Clarence II. Potter 
John B. Wight 
I. Franklin Haas 
Everett E. Zabriskie 
S. Albert Clark 
Edward P. Holden. 
Samuel C. Cowart 
Col. Henry A. Potter 

Printing Committee. 
John R. Weeks 
John Eenord Merrill 

Publicity Committee. 
David E. Pierson, Chairman 
William T. Hunt 

Augustus Crane 

Presidential Committee. 

E. Mien Smith 
John R. Weeks 
f. Henrv Huntington, Tr. 



Music Committee. 
J. Henry Huntington, Jr. 
Frederick D. Hahn 
S. Carl Downs 

Sum/ay Afternoon Service. 
Rt. Rev. Wilson R. Steady. D. D. 
Rt. Rev. Edwin S. Eines, D. D. 
Rev. Eyman W. Allen. D. D. 
Rev. Wm. F. Whittaker. D. D. 
Rev. Minot C. Morgan 
Rev. Mercer G. Johnston 
John Eenord Merrill 
Herbert R. Crane 

Sunday Evening Service. 
Percy W. Crane, Chairman 

Monday livening Reception. 
John Eenord Merrill, Chairman 
S. Albert Clark, Vice-Chairman 

Automobile Trip. 
Wm. H. Sutton, Jr., Chairman 
IE Donald Holmes 
S. Albert Clark 
Moses M. Crane 
S. Carl Downs 
Richard T. Wilson 
George E. D. Tompkins 

Princeton Committee. 
Rev. Sylvester W. Beach, D. D. 
Alexander M. Hudnut 

Trent oil Committee. 
S. Albert Clark, Chairman 
Hon. John A. Bergen 
Rev. Milton A. Craft 
Alexander C. Yard 
Hon. Walter Edge 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

HELD AT THE ROBERT TREAT HOTEL 
NEWARK, N. J., MAY 15 AND 16, 1916 



The Congress was called to order at 9.30 o'clock, May 15, by A. 
Howard Clark, Secretary General. 

Mr. John Lenord Merrile: I have the honor of announcing President 
General Woodworth, of the National Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. 

(The members of the Congress rose and applauded as President Gen- 
eral Woodworth entered, escorted by the Color Guard and a delegation 
of members with drum and fife music.) 

The President General: The Twenty-seventh Annual Congress of 
the Sons of the American Revolution is in session. Compatriots will 
please rise and salute the Flag. Flag of our great Republic, hallowed 
by noblest deeds and loving sacrifice, guardian of our homes and in- 
spiration in every battle for the right, whose stars and stripes stand 
for beauty, purity, truth, patriotism, and the Union, we salute thee. For 
thy defense, the protection of our country, and the conservation of the 
liberty of the American people, we pledge our hearts, our lives, and our 
sacred honor. 

In the absence of the Chaplain General we will have the invocation 
by Rev. Dr. Kirbye, of Iowa. 

Rev. Dr. Kirbye: Oh God our Father, for the flag which is our 
symbol of liberty, we give Thee thanks. For the fathers who fought 
for it, for the mothers who sacrificed for it, for their children who are 
true to it, we give Thee thanks. May it ever remain as our symbol of 
liberty, guaranteeing that the rights of humanity shall not perish from 
the earth. Amen ! 

The Chairman: The Chair would ask the Past Presidents General 
to take seats on the platform. 

Secretary Weeks: I have the honor of announcing the President of 
the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

(The members rose.) 

President Adams: T have the honor of announcing the presence of 
the Governor of the State of New Jersey, His Excellency Mr. Fielder; 
and the presence of his honor the Mayor of Newark, Compatriot 
Thomas Lynch Raymond. (Applause.) 

(The members again rose.) 

(59) 



6o SONS OT THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Chairman : Compatriots, we are honored this morning by the 
presence of the Governor of the State of New Jersey, and it is with 
great pleasure that I present to you Governor Fielder, of New Jersey. 
(Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR FIELDER. 

Governor Fielder: Mr. President General and members of this won- 
derful organization, part of the official duty of the Governor of the 
State is to attend gatherings such as this and extend, on the part of 
the State, a welcome to the delegates. It is not always that in perform- 
ing that duty I do so with the extreme pleasure that I have today in 
welcoming the members of this Society in convention assembled. We 
feel highly honored that you should have chosen the State of New 
Jersey as the place for your National Congress, and it is our desire 
and our aim to do for you all that we can to make your stay with us 
pleasant and enjoyable, feeling that it would be a very small thing on 
our part to make what effort was necessary to accomplish that end be- 
cause of the wonderfully good effect upon the spirits, upon the patriot- 
ism of the people of other States who come to your meeting within our 
borders. We feel that our State is peculiarly fitted or qualified for a 
meeting, a national congress, of an organization such as this. We trace 
our patriotic lineage back to the early beginning of this Republic. New 
Jersey, as you know, was the third State to sign the Constitution of the 
United States, and it was upon the soil of New Jersey that many an 
important drama was played in that Revolutionary War which achieved 
for the United States, the Thirteen Colonies and those who should 
come with them afterward, the independence that we now enjoy; and 
I am sure that you who have not visited the historic places and the 
historic fields of the State of New Jersey will have even your patriotic 
feeling and spirit stirred when you do visit them. There is recounted 
to you the scenes, the important scenes, that were there played. It is 
peculiarly fitting, too, that you should choose the city of Newark as 
your place of meeting, because at this time we are celebrating the 250th 
anniversary of its settlement. You will find Newark a typical New 
Jersey city. You will find the spirit of these early settlers still per- 
vading in a very large degree the citizenship of this city, and as you 
find it here, so you will find it in the other cities and towns and hamlets 
of the State of New Jersey. A society such as yours is an institution 
of which any country should be proud, fostering, as it does, and keep- 
ing alive the spirit of patriotism, the love of country, showing to our 
newer citizens what liberty and what Americanism means, bringing up 
the younger generation with a proper understanding of the years that 
have gone before and the things that were accomplished by our fore- 
fathers which make this country a happy country for them to live in. 
We appreciate again, I say, the honor you have done us in meeting here, 
and T extend to you, on behalf of all the citizens of the State of New 
Tersev, the warmest welcome and the warmest greeting. Mav vour stav 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 6 1 

here be as pleasant for you as we believe it will be profitable and en- 
joyable for us. (Applause.) 

RESPONSE BY PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

The Chairman : Governor, on behalf of this Congress, 1 would thank 
you, sir, for the hearty words of welcome to this great State of yours 
and with the inspiration that you have given us in your words. There 
is no more appropriate place for the Sons of the American Revolution 
to meet than in the State of New Jersey, which was almost the con- 
testing ground of the Revolution. We appreciate the honor of your 
presence here ; we appreciate the opportunity of meeting in New Jersey, 
and I know that I convey the sincere thanks of this Congress and 
Society to you, sir, for your presence. (Applause.) We are also hon- 
ored, compatriots, by the presence of the Chief Executive of this great 
city, wonderful in its development from that little Puritan town of 250 
years ago. He is one of our members, a compatriot, and I would in- 
troduce to you Compatriot Raymond, the Chief Executive of the city 
of Newark. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY MAYOR RAYMOND. 

Mayor Raymond: Mr. President General, Governor Fielder, and 
Compatriots, I welcome you to Newark today on behalf of the people 
of this city, and in doing so I cannot help expressing the feeling that I 
have of the great appropriateness of your meeting here at this time. 
Newark is in a reminiscent mood these days. She is commemorating 
now the 250th anniversary of her foundation, but she is also looking" 
back at the pageant of her history; and just outside the door of this 
building were scenes of the Revolution, thrilling and important. This 
old military common was a training ground for the men who went to 
war and fought and died in it. Washington and his army of Conti- 
nentals passed this site, and in this town there burned many hearts 
aglow with love of country, not only in that crisis, but in the other 
crises in which this city has taken its part. And now, gentlemen, I feel 
that this Society is not formed or maintained as a self-perpetuating 
sort of aristocracy of birth. I take it rather that it is formed to take 
and pass on the torch of liberty ; that it is formed to perpetuate, through, 
the generations to come, the great ideal, not the ideal of the king or 
the mother country or the English Constitution, but the ideal of Amer- 
ica. (Applause.) That is why it thrills me and warms my heart to 
wear this button and this badge, because today, today we need to show- 
forth our Americanism. (Applause.) We can do it with the blood of 
ancestors coursing through our veins who went through the war and 
fought for our liberty, and in doing that we can show forth to those 
who have come later, but who are as true Americans, who I believe 
are as much in love with her ideals and her traditions as we are. to 
carrv on, send down to the generations that are to come, that wonder- 



C)2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN INVOLUTION. 

ful ideal. I often think, were there ever two written documents which 
were generated with life and vigor more than the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence and the Constitution of the United States? Were there ever 
two sign posts that pointed the way of a nation's destiny as they have? 
Those monuments on paper, it is true, were made vital and living by 
the men of the Revolution whose sons we are. Now, gentlemen, it 
affords me the greatest pleasure to welcome you to Newark, and I trust 
that your stay here will be successful and pleasant, and that if there is 
anything you feel you have not mat the city can give you, it is at your 
disposal. (Applause.) 

RESPONSE BY PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

The Chairman: Mr. Mayor, I think you voiced the sentiment of this 
Congress and of all compatriots, sir, when you stated that we did not 
assemble because of social intercourse or pride in an individual ances- 
try, or become members with the hope of political influence or self- 
interest, or for any other superficial reason, but that we are members of 
this Society because we intend, and our presence here is indicative of 
that, to carry out the purposes of our Society as expressed in those 
words, to maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom. 
We appreciate your welcome here, sir. We are glacl of the opportunity 
of meeting here, and I assure you that we appreciate the honor of your 
presence, sir, upon this occasion, and the words which you have given 
us in reference to the city and the purposes of our organization. I 
thank you on behalf of the Congress. (Applause.) Compatriots, we 
were fortunate in having as our host today the State Society of New 
Jersey, that progressive Society, progressive in its membership, pro- 
gressive in all its action, and I am sure we are glad of the opportunity 
this morning of hearing from the President of the New Jersey State 
Society a word or two of welcome, which the}' have already shown us 
by their acts, but now would convey it in official words. I have the 
pleasure of presenting, not introducing, the President of the New Jersey 
Society, Mr. W. I. Lincoln Adams. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME BY PRESIDENT ADAMS. 

Mr. Adams: Mr. President General and Compatriots, it is a proud 
day for the State of New Jersey and the city of Newark when the visit- 
ing delegates from all over this great Republic of ours come to New 
Jersey and this city to hold their Annual Congress. The Governor of 
our Commonwealth and the Mayor of this city have extended to you 
the official welcome to the State and the city. It is my privilege, in 
behalf of more than one thousand compatriots — yes, more than eleven 
hundred compatriots in the State of New Jersey — to bid you welcome 
to this historic Commonwealth and city. It is true that New Jersey 
more than any other of the original thirteen colonics was the principal 
battle ground of the Revolutionary struggle. There were actually 
fought on the Jersey soil more than eighty different engagements, large 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 63 

and small. In New Jersey occurred the darkest days of the Revolution, 
as pointed out by our eloquent State Chaplain yesterday afternoon in 
his most interesting address. Across the Jerseys, as they were then 
called, our great Commander-in-Chief conducted that masterly retreat, 
almost a flight, after the reverses on Long Island and in Ww York, 
when only his unfaltering confidence in the righteousness of our cause 
and his unfailing faith in the God of battles kept heart in the struggling 
Continentals and preserved our little band of patriots from utter anni- 
hilation. But, compatriots, let us not forget that while the darkest days 
occurred in New Jersey, here occurred also that brilliant victory at 
Trenton, followed by Princeton and Monmouth, and the tide in the 
affairs of our devoted colonies turned to the flood which later led on to 
the complete triumph of our cause. We are naturally proud of the 
soil, the blood-stained soil, of New jersey. To us it is sacred ground. 
we Sons of the American Revolution in the State of New Jersey. We 
are proud of the history of our State and of its Revolutionary heroes, 
but, my compatriots, we are most proud today that you, from all over 
this great country, from all the States of the Union, have chosen our 
State and our city for the purpose of holding your Annual Congress 
this year, and in behalf of New Jersey, the State Societ) of which I 
have the honor to be President, I extend to you all our most cordial 
greetings, and we wish for you the most successful Congress in the 
history of this national organization. (Applause.) 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

The Chairman : Mr. President, we appreciate your words of wel- 
come. You have demonstrated your hospitality already, and I know 
that I am voicing what will be officially recorded later when I say that 
we thank you, the National Societ}' thanks the State of New Jersey, 
for the invitation and for the hospitality which you are giving us. I 
will ask if the Committee on Credentials is ready to report? 

(Mr. T. D. Huntting, chairman of the Credential Committee, reports 
162 accredited delegates duly registered.) 

The Chairman: If there is no objection, the report will be accepted 
and the committee continued with power to register and report later. 

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 

Dr. Parker: I would like to offer the following motion, that Cush- 
ing's Manual govern the procedure of this Congress, and that all reso- 
lutions to be offered in this meeting be offered in writing and be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Resolutions without debate. 

(Motion seconded.) 

The Chairman : The motion is to the effect that Cushing's Manual 
should govern the legislative proceedings of this Congress : that all 
resolutions should be offered in writing and referred to the Committee 
on Resolutions, which is a standing committee, without debate. 

(The motion was adopted.) 



64 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Chairman : The Chair would announce the appointment of the 
Committee on Resolutions, provided for by the By-Laws, as Compa- 
triots Pugsley of New York, Bradley of Connecticut, and Wood of 
Kentucky. 

PRESIDENT GENERAL'S REPORT. 

President General Wood wort h : In accordance with the provisions of 
the By-Laws of the Society, it is incumbent upon the general officers to 
report at the annual meeting of the Society. In compliance with this 
provision, omitting any detailed statements as to those matters that will 
be fully covered in the reports of the various standing committees, your 
President General would render the following report : 

The Twenty-sixth Annual Congress was held at Portland, Oregon,, 
being the first Congress ever held on the Pacific coast. It is believed 
that every delegate who attended that Congress came away with the 
deep feeling that the meeting had been of great benefit to the Society 
and had drawn the East and the West into a closer fellowship. From, 
the activity of the Pacific States in matters pertaining to the purposes, 
of this Society since the Congress, we can feel as though our meeting 
had inspired them to even a greater degree of effort than had marked 
their activity in previous years. The adjourned meeting in San Fran- 
cisco was most appropriate as recognizing a State wherein the origin 
of this Society had its inception. Particularly fortunate were we in 
having the presence at San Francisco of the founder of this organiza- 
tion, Dr. James La Fayette Cogswell, who was President of the Sons 
of the Revolutionary Sires in 1875. All who were fortunate to par- 
ticipate in the events which commenced in Seattle on July 17, and end- 
ing in San Francisco on July 26, were deeply grateful to the thoughtful 
and warm hospitalities and courtesies extended during this very inter- 
esting week by the hosts of the Twenty-sixth Congress. 

National Archives Building. 

At the Portland Congress the following resolution referring to 2c 
National Archives Building in Washington was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Executive Committee be instructed to keep in 
touch with this matter and to urge upon Congress, whenever in its 
judgment the time be opportune, the appropriation of a sum sufficient 
for the purchase of a suitable site for a National Archives Building in 
the city of Washington and for the early beginning and construction 
thereof. 

This resolution was predicated upon the report of the Committee on 
National Archives Building, which was appointed at the Syracuse Con- 
gress, and was in effect a summary of the report presented by the com- 
mittee. Your President General, from information derived from the 
various members of Congress with whom the subject of Archives Build- 
ing was discussed, believed it would be advantageous to have the matter 
brought directly to the attention of as many as possible of the Repre- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 65 

sentatives in both Houses of Congress. To accomplish this, under date 
of January 1, 1916, your President General, through a circular letter, 
called this subject to the attention of all State Societies and local Chap- 
ters with the request that these bodies should adopt resolutions in effect 
the same as the one adopted in Portland, and copies of these favoring 
resolutions should be sent to each member of the House of Representa- 
tives of the acting State as well as to each United States Senator from 
that State and the Speaker of the House of Representatives ; the 
resolutions adopted by the Chapters to be forwarded to the local Rep- 
resentatives as well as to the Senators of the State. 

It was further communicated to the Committee on Archives Building, 
which was continued by reappointment, that your President General 
would appear at any time before any committee of Congress consider- 
ing this subject. Owing to the unusual conditions prevailing in Con- 
gress during its present session, the subject has not received the con- 
sideration we desire. From the reports of the State Societies and local 
Chapters, it can be stated that many of our units of organization have 
acted favorably upon the request of January 1, 1916; and, further, that 
a large percentage of the Representatives and Senators have received 
copies of resolutions bearing upon this subject. It is to be regretted 
that all of our units did not act upon this subject, as legislation is 
usually responsive only to an expressed public opinion. 

National Preparedness. 

The Portland Congress adopted the following important resolution : 

Resolved, That the Sons of the American Revolution, in Congress 
assembled, indorse the sentiment for a system of preparedness on the 
part of the government and the people, and the guarantee of peace with 
honor, in accordance with the traditions and policy of our Revolutionary 
ancestry. 

In the circular letter of your President General of January 1, 1916, 
he referred to this resolution and requested action on the part of the 
State Societies and local Chapters as regards adopting resolutions of 
similar purport, and likewise forwarding these to their various Repre- 
sentatives and Senators in Congress. From the reports received from 
the State Societies and local Chapters, it can be stated that many of 
these units have acted favorably upon this resolution of national pre- 
paredness, and that their views have been communicated to members 
of both Houses of Congress through the forwarding of copies of the 
resolutions adopted. In many instances copies of these resolutions 
have likewise been sent to the Speaker of the House of Representatives 
and to the President of the United States. Thus has the Society act- 
ively participated in one of the most important national movements of 
recent years. It is to be hoped that those who have not acted upon this 
vital question will do so at an early date in the future. 



66 sons of the; American revolution. 

The Commissioner of Education and School Peace League. 

At the Portland Congress the following resolution was adopted, re- 
ferring to the United States Commissioner of Education : 

Whereas the United States Commissioner of Education, Philander 
P. Claxton, is reported to have expressed sentiments derogatory to the 
American flag and criticized its defenders in an address delivered be- 
fore the American School Peace League at Boston ; and 

Whereas, although his attention has been repeatedly called to the 
matter, he appears to regard it of little importance and has never, so 
far as we can learn, denied the accuracy of the report as the expression 
of his opinion, nor repudiated its sentiments ; and 

Whereas the Sons of the American Revolution take particular pride 
in the work of the builders of the Republic and hold in highest honor 
the defenders of the flag that symbolizes the Linked States of America; 
and 

WhEREas no man is worthy of the privileges of American citizenship 
who insults the flag or defames its defenders : Be it 

Resolved, That the Executive Committee of the National Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution be instructed to present the 
matter to the attention of the President of the United States, with the 
firm belief that his high patriotism and devotion to duty will permit no 
man holding such sentiments to remain at the head of one of the most 
important bureaus of our government. 

Resolved, That we protest against any further printing or reprinting 
of the publications of the American School Peace League under the 
authority of Commissioner Claxton at the expense of the nation. 

It will be noticed that this resolution embodied the referring of the 
resolution itself to the Executive Committee of the National Society to 
present the matter to the attention of the President of the United 
States. This important resolution was considered at length by the 
Executive Committee, both at its meeting in Portland on July 21 and 
at its meeting in New York City on November 29. In order that the 
matter might be properly placed before the President of the United 
States, photo-stat copies were secured of the various articles appearing 
in the public press upon which the resolution was based, as well as 
copies of the pamphlets referred to in the resolution as publications of 
the American School Peace League. It required some little time to 
secure these exhibits, and it was not possible to forward these in proper 
form to the President of the United States until February 22, 1916. the 
receipt of these being acknowledged by the President under that date. 

On March 13, 1916, the President, further referring to a letter of 
February 22, inclosed a copy of letter received from Commissioner 
Claxton, addressed to the Secretary of the Interior, who in turn trans- 
mitted it to the President with the statement that "he does not see that 
the Commissioner has been guilty of saying anything unworthy of an 
American citizen." The letter of Commissioner Claxton is dated March 
4, and it refers to the request of the Secretary of the Interior, under 
date of March 2. that he submit in substance what he said in his address 
at Boston in the summer of 1910, referred to in the resolutions of our 
Society. In substance, the Commissioner states the address was not 
written, and therefore he could not submit a verbatim copy. In sub- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 6/ 

stance, he advocated a patriotism large enough to make one keep in 
mind the welfare of his country, a patriotism which would make a citi- 
zen vote honestly and always for the good of his country, and one 
broad enough to understand that the interests of the various nations of 
the world are closely interwoven, and that the time had come for recog- 
nition for the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. Fur- 
ther, he stated, "A flag, rightly considered, is not merely the material, 
a piece of bunting of which it is made, or merely a combination of 
colors. It is rather what it symbolizes and stands for * * *. I also 
called attention to the 40,000 people (this is about the number at that 
time) who, through migration from the Northwestern States, crossed 
the Canadian border, leaving the territory of the American flag, and 
seemed to be reasonably happy under another combination of the same 
colors, symbolizing many of the best things for which our own flag 
stands. This last phrase seemed to be the objectionable part of my 
subject, but I am still unable to see that it implies any suspicion of 
treason, if rightly understood." 

He further asserts, referring to the resolutions, that they appear to be 
based on a distorted interpretation (Boston address), and further as- 
serts his sacred reverence for the flag of the United States. He ex- 
plains his neglect to answer the questions of the Army and Navy 
Journal as due to a disinclination for newspaper controversy. As to 
the publications of the American School Peace League, it is stated that 
these were issued under the administration of his predecessor, except 
as regards Bulletins Nos. 8 and 12, which contain suggestions for the 
observance for Peace Day in the schools and the brief account of the 
agencies and associations for peace. 

This whole subject was again considered by the Executive Committee 
at its meeting on May 13, and the following resolution was adopted by 
the said committee: 

Whereas at the Twenty -sixth Annual Congress of the National Soci- 
ety of the Sons of the American Revolution resolutions were unani- 
mously adopted instructing the Executive Committee to present to the 
President of the United States the matter of certain sentiments deroga- 
tory to the American flag and its defenders, accredited by the press ro 
United States Commissioner of Education, Philander P. Claxton, and 
not repudiated by him, said resolutions protesting against any further 
printing or reprinting of the publications of the American School Peace 
League under the authority of Commissioner Claxton at the expense of 
the nation; and 

Whereas, also, said Executive Committee has complied with the in- 
structions of said resolutions ; and 

Whereas, also, said Commissioner Claxton's attention having been 
called to said resolutions, he has in writing expressly repudiated the 
sentiments objected to and has declared that he never gave utterance 
to the same, and has further stated that no publications of the Ameri- 
can School Peace League have been printed at the expense of the nation 
during his term of office as United States Commissioner of Education : 
Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved in the judgment of the Executive Committee, That the ex- 
planation of said Commissioner of Education be accepted, and that the 
incident be considered closed. 



68 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Washington Guard. 

The National Congress at Portland adopted a resolution approving 
the report of the special committee on the organization of The Wash- 
ington Guard, and this committee, by virtue of the resolution, was con- 
tinued as a committee on permanent organization of the Guard. This 
committee rendered a report to the Executive Committee, which was 
accepted ; and, further, the Executive Committee appointed a special 
committee to consider the draft of the Constitution of the Guard. 

During the past winter this special committee acted upon the draft 
of the Constitution and approved the same in the form in which this 
instrument was printed in the March Bulletin. By virtue of the au- 
thority vested in the President General by Article 5 of the Constitution 
of The Washington Guard as adopted, your President General appointed 
as the first Governor General of the National Commandery of The 
Washington Guard Compatriot John Lenord Merrill. Still acting under 
virtue of said Article 5, your President General and the Governor Gen- 
eral of the National Commandery have appointed Compatriots Webster 
Bruce and Benjamin C. Allin as the two Lieutenant-Governors General. 
There will be appointed later a Secretary General, Treasurer General, 
Registrar General, and Chaplain General. 

The organization of The Washington Guard is now perfected and its 
future success depends on the activity of our members in organizing 
State Commanderies and local Posts throughout the various States 
where this Society is now organized. The opportunities to make this 
a most valuable auxiliary of our Society are very great. It takes a 
boy at the age when he is susceptible to all influences and seeks to in- 
culcate a spirit of patriotism. It should be likewise a most valuable 
recruiting bureau for future members of this Society. Already there 
has been a large number of enrolments in the States of New Jersey, 
Massachusetts, and Illinois, and there appears to be no good reason why 
this enrolment should not develop in all the States. Your President 
General would recommend to the State Societies where State Com- 
manderies are being organized that they should so amend their By-Laws 
as to admit a member of The Washington Guard, upon reaching his 
majority, to membership in this Society without the payment of any 
initiation fee. 

The hearty thanks of this Society are due to the committee having 
had this subject in charge for the time and energy devoted to its per- 
fection. It has involved considerable study and work, all of which has 
been most faithfully done by the committee. 

Co-OPERATION WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS. 

During the past year your President General has been in receipt of 
many invitations from various organizations interested in different ways 
in the subject of "preparedness," as well as relief work, to co-operate 
with these associations through the appointment of representatives to 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 69 

serve on their various executive committees or boards of managers. 
Your President General has considered that it was inadvisable to ally 
this Society in this manner and beyond his vested power to bind the 
Society to any such action. However, as regards the national meeting 
of the National Security Defense League in Washington on January 
19, 1916, which convention was composed of delegates from various 
parts of the country and various organizations, your President General 
requested our compatriot the Hon. David Jayne Hill to represent the 
Society and state our position on the subject; also, at the national meet- 
ing of the Navy League in Washington, on April 19, 1916, your Presi- 
dent General appointed Admirals Colby M. Chester and T. F. Jewell to 
represent the Society. 

Americanization Work. 

In connection with our Americanization work, your President Gen- 
eral and several members of the Executive Committee had an instruct- 
ive conference with some of the members of the National Americaniza- 
tion Committee in November, and since that time we have further 
aided this committee in some of its work and received some assistance 
along our lines of work in this direction. Your President General 
likewise brought this important subject to the attention of all the State 
Societies and local Chapters, suggesting local co-operation by our vari- 
ous units with local boards of trade or chambers of commerce and 
associations of manufacturers, as experience has demonstrated that by 
working in conjunction with local organizations of this character, while 
taking the leadership, we have been able to secure much more effective 
results. The subject also has been brought to the attention of the State 
Societies and local Chapters of the co-operation which they can secure 
from the Bureau of Naturalization of the United States Department of 
Labor, both as regards work in the public schools and as regards lists 
of those being naturalized or taking out their first papers for naturali- 
zation. In this important work of Americanization — and it is perhaps 
the most important subject now before the American people, as upon 
an effective solution of the problem depends the future national unity 
of the United States — your President General cannot too strongly rec- 
ommend the attention of the State Societies and local Chapters in this 
direction. It is very gratifying indeed to report that many of our 
Societies have been active in this field, and their activity can only result 
in accomplishing much good for the welfare of our country, as well as 
giving satisfaction to those engaged in this work of aiding in a very 
practical beneficial purpose. 

The Chapter System. 

As the extent of the influence of this Society naturally depends on 
its membership, there is no more important subject to be considered- 
than the methods of increasing membership. The assertion will hardly 
be challenged that we probably have not more than one-fifth of the 



JO SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

membership that should be enrolled. The method, then, of extending 
the membership is a most important one. From the observations which 
your President General has been able to make and the information 
which he has been able to secure from compatriots in all portions of 
the country, he is convinced that the development of the local Chapter 
is the best method of increasing our membership, through stimulating 
local interest. While this subject of Chapters is entirely within the 
control of the State Societies under our present form of organization, 
yet, as we are all working for a common purpose, namely, the welfare 
of our country, suggestions along lines of improvement can appro- 
priately, it would seem, come from the National Society to the State 
Societies. Your President General, then, earnestly recommends that 
this subject be considered, both with a view of extending the Chapters 
in the States where they exist as well as extending the system in States 
where at present there are no Chapters. 

Further, in connection with this subject, a study of the situation and 
consultation with many compatriots leads to the belief that where our 
Chapter system is adopted by a State it is advisable that all members 
of the State Society be enrolled in some one of the Chapters of the 
State. Indeed, a general reorganization of our present State system 
along the lines adopted successfully by some of our kindred Societies 
and along the same lines upon which the National Society has been 
conducted since its inception, namely, the holding of the annual meeting 
in different cities and action at such meetings through the medium of 
duly elected delegates, is an important subject, deserving of careful and 
mature consideration by all who are looking forward alone to the fu- 
ture welfare of this Society. Local effort and local interest can alone 
build up the Society. Whatever action that encourages this interest 
should be adopted. This belief of your President General is shared by 
many other compatriots who have given the subject careful study, and 
it is respectfully recommended that this Congress consider the subject 
of the appointment of a suitable committee to thoroughly examine this 
subject and to report its findings and conclusions to the following 
Congress. 

The Permanent Fund. 

The Society will be interested in the report of the Treasurer General 
on the Permanent Fund, that it has been increased during the past year 
by the generous gift of a thousand-dollar bond by my distinguished 
predecessor in office, Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston. This makes the 
amount of the Permanent Fund eight thousand dollars. 

In connection with this subject, it would be well if the compatriots 
would give a method of increasing this fund their careful consideration, 
as, so far, no plan seems to have been formulated to this end, though 
the desirability of a larger Permanent Fund is unquestionable, as the 
demands made upon us as a leading patriotic organization are con- 
stantly increasing and much work that we should properly do is left 
undone because of the lack of income. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. J I 

The National Year Book. 

In connection with the subject of the National Year Book, published 
by the Society, particular attention is called to the valuable information 
contained in this book and the desirability of extending its circulation 
as far as possible among the members of the Society. Last year the 
innovation was made of having the Secretary General send a letter to 
the State Societies and Chapters asking for subscriptions to the Year 
Book for their respective organizations, at the price of twenty-five 
cents per volume, delivered. Owing to the lateness of the Congress, it 
was impossible to send this letter out until just before the book was 
published; yet the response to this letter was gratifying, in that the 
edition for 1915 was fifteen hundred copies, which was five hundred 
more than in the previous edition. This edition of 1915 was completely 
exhausted and many requests for copies made since last December re- 
main unfilled. It is a question whether it would not well repay any 
State Society or Chapter to purchase a quantity of these Year Books 
each year for distribution to their members. This has been done in 
the past year in a few instances, and the reports indicate an appreciation 
on the part of the members receiving the book. It is trusted the same 
plan will be followed the present year, and that with an early issuing 
of a letter from the Secretary General that even a greater increase will 
be made to the edition necessary to fill the orders for the coming 
volume. 

While your President General appreciates that what he is about to 
say is not germane in this report as called for by the By-Laws, never- 
theless he wishes to take this opportunity of expressing his deep sense 
of appreciation of the honor bestowed upon him by his election as your 
presiding officer; also he is very grateful for the opportunity of having 
had the privilege of extending his active work over a larger field. It 
is a privilege that any American could well value. He would also ex- 
press at this time his appreciation of the many courtesies that have 
been extended to him through his term of office. He regrets he has 
been unable to accept some of the invitations which have been ex- 
tended, on account of having previous engagements for those dates. 

In conclusion, your President General would again thank you for the 
honor of the ' privilege of making this report, and would assure the 
members of this Society there is a strong active interest in our ranks 
at the present time, and your President General is confident the future 
holds forth greater promises than ever before of an opportunity to in- 
crease our membership on the valid reasons of the Society giving- 
greater aid than ever before toward the welfare of our country. Like- 
wise he would have recorded the very valuable and efficient services, 
rendered to the Society by the members of the Executive Committee 
and the members of other committees. No inquiry has been made for 
information or call for service made that has not received prompt re- 
sponse. The appreciation of the Society at large is due to these com- 



J 2 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

patriots who have so cheerfully given both of their time and means to 
advancing the purposes of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Neweee B. Woodworth, 

President General. 

REPORT OF TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

The Chairman : The report of the Trustees and Executive Commit^ 
tee is next in order. 

The Secretary General : Mr. President General, on account of the 
large body of material contained in the several reports to be presented 
today, I will abbreviate them unless there is call for a full statement. 
The report of the Board of Trustees is an abstract of the proceedings 
of its meetings at Portland, Oregon, on July 20, 1915, and at Newark 
May 15, 1916, and of meetings of the Executive Committee at Portland 
on July 21, 191 5, at New York on November 29, 1915, and at Newark 
on May 13, 1916. 

At the meeting of July 20 the Trustees confirmed the appointment of 
the Executive Committee, accepted the invitation of the New Jersey 
Society for the Twenty-seventh Congress, and made appropriations for 
the publication of the Year Book and the Official Bulletin. Amend- 
ments were made to the By-Laws by establishing a standing Committee 
on Resolutions, regulating the wearing of the President General's 
badge, and requiring that, upon the purchase of a badge, every member 
shall sign an agreement as to return of the badge to the Society under 
certain conditions. 

The Executive Committee, at its meeting on July 21, arranged for 
carrying on the general activities of the year through the office of the 
Secretary General and Registrar General and the several National Com- 
mittees. The President General was authorized to transmit to the 
President of the United States certain resolutions adopted by the Con- 
gress in regard to the United States Commissioner of Education and 
the American School Peace League. The President General has re- 
ported what was done by him and by the Committee in this connection. 

At the November meeting the Executive Committee received reports 
from the several National Committees, particularly with reference to 
organization work and the formation of local Chapters. The Ameri- 
canization Committee submitted a resolution recommending the issu- 
ance of a manual of citizenship by the U. S. Department of Labor, 
which was adopted. At this meeting the committee accepted in behalf 
of the entire Society a $1,000 5 per cent bond presented by Compatriot 
Thruston as an addition to the Permanent Fund, thus increasing the 
investment to $8,000; and on May 13 the committee voted to appropriate 
from the general fund such amount as may be necessary, when added 
to the sum of $491.66 in cash on hand to the credit of that fund, to 
purchase another $1,000 bond, thereby increasing the investment to 
$9,000. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. /3 

At the Portland Congress, Compatriots John Lenord Merrill, of New- 
Jersey; Benjamin C. Allin, of Illinois, and Webster Bruce, of Massa- 
chusetts, the Committee on Organization of The Washington Guard, 
presented a report which was adopted, thereby instituting The Wash- 
ington Guard of the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. The committee was authorized to adopt a Constitution, to 
be submitted to the Executive Committee of the National Society for 
approval or correction, and at its meeting on November 29, 191 5, the 
Executive Committee adopted a form of Constitution thus submitted, 
subject to the approval of a special committee, consisting of the Presi- 
dent General, the Secretary General, Mr. Merrill, and Judge Henry 
Stockbridge, appointed with power to act. The special committee hav- 
ing agreed upon a form of Constitution, it was promulgated in the 
Official Bulletin for March, 1916, by order of the President General, 
ex officio the Honorary Commander-in-Chief of The Washington 
Guard, and by authority of Article V, Section 1, he appointed John 
Lenord Merrill, of New Jersey, the first Governor General. Compa- 
triots Benjamin C. Allin and Webster Bruce have since been appointed 
as the Lieutenant Governors General. 

The full proceedings of the several meetings of the Trustees and the 
Executive Committee at Portland and New York appear in the Official 
Bulletins for June and December, 1915. 

MINUTES OF TWENTY-SIXTH CONGRESS. 

The Chairman: The minutes of the last Congress have not been yet 
formally approved. They have been published in the Year Book, how- 
•ever. What is your pleasure as regards them? 

Mr. Thruston : I move that the minutes of the previous Congress 
.as published in the National Year Book for 1915 be approved. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted.) 

The Chairman : Next is the report of the Secretary General. 

(At this point ex-Governor Franklin Murphy, Past President General 
of the Society, entered and the Congress rose and received him with 
applause.) 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL. 

Compatriots : Your Secretary General has the honor to report that 
the steady increase in the general business of his office during the past 
year indicates healthy activity in patriotic work throughout the Society. 
There has been constant inquiry for suggestions as to what new lines 
of work might be undertaken, work of immediate practical importance 
in preserving and advancing those real American institutions and prin- 
ciples established by the patriots whose deeds are revered by this or- 
ganization. There is an eagerness to be doing something more than the 
marking of graves and erection of tablets, however important and com- 
mendable that work may be. And important activities of present-day 



74 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

importance have been found in several directions, notably in the Amer- 
icanization of our alien population. This work was inaugurated by the 
Sons of the American Revolution about ten years ago and is now being 
rapidly advanced by many organizations. There is practical patriotic 
work being done also by this Society in educating the youth of the 
land to heed the call of the hour and to stand by the flag of the United 
States — to follow that standard whose history was so beautifully told 
to us yesterday by our honored former President General, R. C. Ballard 
Thruston. 

But it is not the duty of the Secretary to exhort the members of this 
Congress, nor do you need exhortation. In the usual line of his official 
duties there has been edited the tenth volume of the Official Bulletin, 
issued in four numbers — in June, October, and December, 1915, and 
March, 1916. This volume, aggregating 212 pages, cost $2,396.03 for print- 
ing and distribution to every member of the Society (and to about 100 
libraries), or an expense to the National Society of 17 cents per mem- 
ber. The Bulletin records the doings of the National Committees and 
of the State Societies and Chapters, gives a list of members deceased, 
and the names and ancestral records of new members during each quar- 
ter. It is neither a literary nor historical magazine ; it is embellished 
in no way, but facts are stated in concrete form, and those members 
who examine it may thus keep posted in what is being done by the 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

And likewise there was prepared by the Secretary and Registrar Gen- 
eral in his dual capacity the National Year Book for 1915 — a work of 
402 pages, containing the usual general information and the proceedings 
of the Congress at Portland and San Francisco. The total cost of 
printing and distributing 1,500 copies of this Year Book was $1,661.50. 
The usual official edition of about 800 copies was distributed as ordered 
by the Executive Committee and Trustees, and about 700 copies were 
sold at much less than cost to State Societies, Chapters, and individual 
members. As an extract from the Year Book, there was also issued a 
special edition of Compatriot Thruston's address on the "Origin and'. 
Evolution of the United States Flag.'' 

One of the important achievements at the Portland Congress was the 
institution of The Washington Guard of the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution for the training of our sons and 
grandsons in American history and American principles and in love for 
their native land. The movement was inaugurated in the Common- 
wealth where we are now assembled, and the Guard already numbers 
several hundred members. It must result in great good as an auxiliary 
to our Society. The Constitution of the National Commandery was 
recently promulgated and State Commanderies and Posts are being or- 
ganized. The President General of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, ex officio the Honorary Commander-in-Chief, has appointed John 
Lenord Merrill, of New Jersey, as the first Governor General, and he 
will show this Congress what has already been accomplished in this- 
new patriotic activity. 



PROCEEDINGS OP NEWARK CONGRESS. 75 

It is expected that there will be presented to this Congress another 
important proposition concerning the young men of our country who 
are to take upon themselves the privileges and the responsibilities and 
duties of American citizens. I will not tell in advance the nature of 
this new activity, but leave you in anxious suspense until at the proper 
time those compatriots who are authorized to do so shall make the 
details public. 

In the spring of 191 1 a letter from the Secretary of the Louisiana 
Society called attention to an incident observed by him at New Orleans, 
when an alien who was about to be naturalized was asked by the court 
if he could read and understand the meaning of the Constitution of the 
United States. He replied, "I think so." "Let me see," said the judge, 
and called for a copy of the Constitution. It was some time before the 
clerk of the court could find the document in print, but it was finally 
located in the Revised Statutes of the United States. 

The Louisiana Secretary suggested that the Sons of the American 
Revolution print and distribute pamphlet copies of the Constitution 
throughout the land, that every one might become familiar with its 
terms. A first edition of 10,000 copies was therefore printed at once, as 
Leaflet No. 3, for the use of the Committee on Information for Aliens. 
In 1912, 10,000 more were distributed ; in 1913 another 10,000, followed 
in 1914-1915 by two editions of 20,000 each, or an aggregate of 70,000 
copies sent during the last live years, free of charge, chiefly to night 
schools and centers of alien instruction. But it is not the foreign-born 
alone who need knowledge of those fundamentals. It has been found 
that to a vast number of Americans the Constitution is really unknown, 
and our people generally are sadly ignorant of those principles with 
which every American should be familiar. 

Our compatriot, Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, in an address a few 
days ago, urged the study of the Constitution, of the reason for its 
existence, and of the dangers it has survived. Judge Sanders, of Ohio, 
suggests that the children of the United States should be required to 
study and understand that compact which sets the bounds of govern- 
ment and safeguards their liberty. 

Our Society is therefore doing practical patriotic work of the very 
highest importance in distributing copies of the Constitution and urg- 
ing every one to give to it most careful study. 

At the Detroit Congress, on May I, 1899, the fi rst anniversary of the 
Battle of Manila Bay, congratulations were cabled to Compatriot Ad- 
miral Dewey, and a resolution was adopted establishing a medal to be 
awarded, with a suitable diploma, to compatriots who may have ren- 
dered patriotic service in the Army or Navy of the United States dur- 
ing the War with Spain. Under that resolution 735 medals have so far 
been bestowed upon active soldiers and sailors in our ranks — men who 
in that brief but eventful war hastened to repay in part what they owed 
their country. 



y6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The reports of the several National Committees will show what has 
"been done in various activities under the immediate direction of the 
National Society, and I will therefore not attempt to review them here. 

The doings of the State Societies have been told to you through the 
medium of the Official Bulletin — accounts of hundreds of patriotic gath- 
erings during the year, of memorials erected to perpetuate the story of 
events and the deeds of men of the Revolutionary War, of work in 
many lines of effort to make better citizens. Much has been done dur- 
ing the years past, but much more work lies before us would we accom- 
plish what we should. 

One of the interesting outgrowths of the Portland Congress was the 
eagerness of the Oregon Society to do some immediate good with the 
surplus fund remaining after the committees had done everything that 
could be thought of for the pleasurable entertainment of the delegates — 
they could do no more This surplus was most wisely expended in fur- 
nishing to each of the Federal and county courts of Oregon a beautiful 
silk flag of the United States for use in naturalization ceremonies. And 
the presentations of these flags throughout the State were made occa- 
sions for patriotic addresses and good advice to those of foreign birth 
who had gathered to take the oath of allegiance to their adopted country. 

From year to year there has been indicated a growing of appreciation 
of the great advantage of local Chapters in broadening the influence of 
the Society, until there are now one hundred and three Chapters, an 
increase of eleven during the last twelve months. Petitions for the 
formation of Chapters and charter blanks are issued to State Societies 
by the Secretary General free of charge. 

The Portland Congress was held in the month of July, and may there- 
fore be reported on as an occurrence of the past year. It was a notable 
event, carried out in all details with enthusiasm and perfect manage- 
ment. It practically began at Seattle on Friday evening, July 16, with 
the arrival of the President General and about forty other members and 
ladies. At Portland, Oregon, from Sunday morning to Wednesday 
evening there was a constant round of social functions and business 
sessions. On the train from Portland to San Francisco there was con- 
tinued entertainment, under the direction of a special committee of 
California members, and from Friday morning to Monday afternoon 
the California Society extended most generous hospitality in many ways. 
The banquet at the Palace Hotel on Friday evening was elaborate, with 
most superb floral decorations. A most interesting feature of that ban- 
quet was the presence of Dr. James Lafayette Cogswell, the sole sur- 
vivor of the group of men who on October 22, 1875, met at his home 
in San Francisco and founded the National Society of the Sons of 
Revolutionary Sires, which in 1889 united with other organizations in 
several States in establishing the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

Saturday at San Francisco was "Sons of the American Revolution 
Dav" at the Exposition, when a patriotic meeting was held at the Court 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. /7 

of Abundance, an incident of the program being the presentation to the 
Society of the official medal of the Exposition, appropriately inscribed. 
On its journey across the continent the Liberty Bell was enthusi- 
astically received everywhere. As President General Woodworth said 
of its reception at Syracuse, "The demonstration showed that citizens 
of the United States still have hearts that are capable of dee]) senti- 
ment, for the demonstration was one of sentiment only." The Sons of 
the American Revolution at many places along the route were called 
upon to serve as a guard of honor of that revered and historic relic. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

The Chairman: If there is no objection, the report of the Secretary 
General will be received and placed on file. Hearing no objection, the 
report is accepted. Next is the report of the Registrar General. 

REPORT OF REGISTRAR GENERAL. 

Compatriots : Your Registrar General has the honor to report that 
during the official year ending March 31, 1916, there were enrolled 
1,176 new members and 46 who had formerly belonged to the Society 
were reinstated, showing an increase of 32 new names over the pre- 
ceding year and 24 per cent above the annual average enrollment of the 
last decade. The new year began April r, 1916, with 14,045 active mem- 
bers, and during the six weeks since that date 275 more names have 
been added, making the present total 14,320 members, and a total enroll- 
ment of 28,268 members in the 27 years since the National Society was 
organized, in 1889. The detailed statistics for each State Society are 
herewith presented in the usual form. The Massachusetts Society is 
still in the lead, with 1,700 members; next comes the Empire State 
Society, 1,458 members; New Jersey, 1,100; Connecticut. 1,057; Illinois, 
1,053; Ohio and Pennsylvania, each 608; the District of Columbia, 490; 
Michigan, 450, and California, 405. 

Statistics of State Societies, Showing Number oe New Members 

Enrolled erom April i, 1915, to March 31, 1916, and 

Active Membership April i, 1916. 

New members. Active roll. 

Alabama o 15 

Arizona 1 39 

Arkansas 5 5° 

California 16 405 

Colorado 27 242 

Connecticut 33 !>°57 

Delaware 3 52 

District of Columbia 35 490 

Florida n 43 

France o 15 

Hawaii 86 



78 



SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York (Empire State). 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Philippines 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



w members. 


Active roll 


4 


78 


107 


1,053 


19 


275 


34 


349 


6 


79 


12 


185 


3 


76 


14 


365 


17 


307 


155 


1,700 


42 


45o 


9 


199 





34 


3 


123 


1 


29 


27 


234 





19 


7 


228 


207 


1,100 


4 


68 


106 


i,458 


8 


48 


3 


46 


35 


608 


10 


50 


32 


206 


39 


608 


2 


19 


16 


330 





18 


10 


62 


3 


72 


5 


86 


17 


133 


11 


236 


22 


109 


3i 


319 


16 


161 


1 


31 



I 



1,176 



14.045 



The losses by death during the year were 302. including some of our 
earliest members and many men who had achieved eminence in their 
professions. Among these may be here recorded : 

Rear Admiral Albert S. Barker, U. S. Navy, retired. 

Andrew W. Bray, of New Jersey. 

Richard Harding Davis, of New York. 

Benjamin R. English, of Connecticut. 

Governor Winfield Scott Hammond, of Minnesota. 

Hon. William Peters Hepburn, of Iowa, former Member of Con- 
gress. 

Christopher W. Horr, Vice-President of the Washington State 
Society. 



PROCEEDINGS Of NEWARK CONGRESS. 7<j 

Brig. Gen. Walter Howe. U. S. Army, retired. 

Judge Selden Bingham Kingsbury, of Hawaii. 

Moii. John Davis Long, former Governor of Massachusetts, Mem- 
ber of Congress, and Secretary of the Navy. 

Hon. Edward Bruce Moore, former President of the District of 
Columbia Society. 

Rev. Samuel J. Niccolls, D. D., former President of the Michigan 
Society. 

Hon. George H. Noyes, of Wisconsin. 

Rear Admiral Thomas S. Phelps, U. S. Navy, retired. 

Hon. Frank W. Rollins, former Governor of New Hampshire. 

George M. Sternberg, Surgeon General of U. S. Army. 

Col. Origen Seymour Storrs, of Colorado. 

Judge John N. Van Deman, former President of the Ohio Society. 

It is unnecessary to review the routine work of the office of the Reg- 
istrar General further than to state that there were engrossed and dis- 
tributed to the State Societies 588 of the large membership certificates ; 
badge permits were issued to all new members, and hundreds of letters 
were written concerning applications for membership and in answering 
genealogical inquiries. 

At the last Congress the Board of Trustees amended the By-Laws 
so as to require every purchaser of the Society's badge to sign an 
agreement whereby under specified conditions the badge may become 
the property of the Society when membership shall cease. 

For insertion in the Official Bulletin the Registrar General prepared 
records of names and other data for each new member, and for the 
Year Book the data was expanded to include the full pedigree in each 
case. There has been published to the world in the large Register of 
1901 and in the Year Book from 1902 to 1915 the full pedigree and a 
"brief statement of the Revolutionary ancestor's service for every mem- 
ber of the organization. 

The Society at its first Congress, at Louisville, in 1890, urged the 
collection, preservation, and publication of the official muster-rolls and 
pay-rolls of the Revolution, and at each of the twenty-six succeeding 
Congresses some steps have been taken to expedite that important work. 
Much has been done by the governments of most of the original thir- 
teen States. There is still, however, much left undone by the Federal 
"Government. There is now gathered in the War Department, the Navy 
Department, and the Bureau of Pensions a mass of material that should 
"be published, particularly the names of soldiers and sailors who served 
in the struggle for independence. 

Committee after committee has been appointed to advance this work, 
and report after report, often full of interest, has been made as to 
seeming progress ; resolution after resolution has been adopted, appeal 
after appeal has been made to the Congress of the Lmited States, but a 
quarter of a century has now passed without securing the actual publi- 
cation of the records. An earnest aggressive effort should now be 
.made to accomplish something promptly. 



8o sons of the; American revolution. 

In conclusion, your Registrar General will report what some of you 
are anxiously waiting to hear — the results of the competitions for the 
Traveling Banner and the Syracuse Banner. The former was the gift 
of the Colorado Society, to be awarded at each Congress to the Society 
of ioo members or more that showed the greatest percentage of gain in? 
membership. That banner has been held by Iowa, Maryland, New 
Jersey, Kentucky, again by Maryland, by Nebraska, again by New 
Jersey, and last year it crossed the Rocky Mountains and amid much 
enthusiasm at the Portland Congress was awarded to the Washington 
State Society. This year the honor comes to the Atlantic shores once 
more ; it comes to a State which has gained 20 per cent during the past 
year, and will be awarded to the hosts of the present Congress, the New 
Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

At the Congress on the Pacific coast last July many good things were 
done ; it was in some respects the most earnest Congress in our history. 
Every one felt inspired to do something for one another and for the 
common welfare of the Society. Not the least result of the occasion 
was the establishment of another prize banner, the gift of the Syracuse 
Chapter of the Empire State Societ}% to be known as the Syracuse 
Banner, and to be awarded at each Congress to the State enrolling the 
greatest number of new members, regardless of percentage. From 
April 1, 1915, to March 31, 1916, several of the States did good recruiting 
work : Virginia, long quiet, added 26 names ; Colorado, 27 ; Washington 
State, 31; Oregon, 32; Connecticut, 33; Iowa, 34; District of Columbia, 
35; Ohio, 39; Michigan, 42; Empire State, 106; Illinois, 107, and Massa- 
chusetts, 155, while another has surpassed them all by registering 207 
new names, and is therefore entitled to the honor of the Syracuse 
Banner ; this one is likewise the host of today, the New Jersey Society. 

With renewed thanks to the officers of the several States who have- 
so courteously co-operated with him in his work, your Registrar Gen- 
eral herewith presents his twenty-fourth annual report. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. Howard Clark, 

Registrar General. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Registrar General.. 
If there is no objection, the report will be received and placed on file. 
Hearing no objection, the report is accepted. 

Mr. Read: Air. President General and Compatriots, for the State 
Society of Massachusetts I wish to felicitate the State which will re- 
ceive the banner tomorrow. We in Massachusetts felt that we had a 
good field to begin our operations in and early last year a committee 
to increase our membership was formed, and I had the honor to be 
appointed chairman. I believe, from the results, that we have come 
out number 2, so that I wish to extend my felicitations to the successful 
State, and I want to relate a rather humorous incident. At the meeting 
of the Board of Managers last Friday the Board of Managers elected 
a goodly number of new candidates, and one of the candidates was 
from the State which is to receive the banner, and an audible smile- 



PROCEEDINGS OP NEWARK CONGRESS. 8l 

went around the audience and we all said to ourselves, "How did he 
escape the recruiting- committee of that State?" (Laughter and ap- 
plause.) 

The Chairman : We will now receive the report of the Treasurer 
General. 

REPORT OF TREASURER GENERAL. 

Office of Treasurer General, 15 William Street, 

New York, N. Y., May 11, 1916. 
President General and Compatriots: 

The Treasurer General has the honor to submit the following report 
of the receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending May n, 
1916. 

Respectfully submitted, John H. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements. 
May 14, 1915, balance on hand $7,969.42 

receipts. 
Annual dues : 

1912 $17-50 

1913 17.50 

1914 17.25 

1915 732.00 

1916 6.501.50 

— $7,285.75 

Application and supplemental blanks 137.98 

Certificates 508. 25 

Interest on balances 152.87 

Interest on investments 167.50 

Rebates on insignia and rosettes credited to Per- 
manent Fund 491 . 66 

Medals 197.81 

Year Books 254 . 85 

"Washington Journey" Books 25.00 

Postage and collection for checks 1 .56 

Flag pamphlets 24 . 50 

Facsimile of Declaration of Independence 2.00 

Engraving of Declaration of Independence 5.00 

Rebate on indemnity bond 8.50 

Contribution for restoration of U. S. Flag in 

Chapel at Governor's Island, New York 16.56 

9,279.79 

$17,249.21 
disbursements. 

Salary of Secretary General and Registrar General $1,450.00 

Printing and mailing Year Book 1,568.92 

Copper half-tones for Year Book 92.58 

Printing and mailing Official Bulletins : 

June $581 . 97 

October 662 . 94 

December 443 . 98 

March 707 . 14 

2.396.03 



8-' SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Sundry printing, postage, and expressage $617.72 

Sundry printing, Committee on Americanization 

and Aliens 368 . 00 

Sundry expenses, Committee on Americanization 

and Aliens 14,00 

Sundry expenses. Committee on Flag 30.06 

Sundry expenses. Committee on Education for 

1015 29.60 

Sundry expenses, Treasurer General 16.52 

Sundry expenses, Historian General 16.75 

Contribution toward expenses, Portland Congress. 500.00 

Reporting proceedings, Portland Congress 144.00 

Expenses, Secretary General, to Portland Congress 241.40 
Expenses, Secretary General, in preparation for 

Portland Congress, including clerical assistance, 

freight, telegraphing, etc 53- 00 

Express charges to and from Portland for flags 

and "Traveling Banner" 15.00 

Certificates 122.50 

Engrossing certificates, work on records, clerical 

help to Registrar General, and postage 422.97 

Work on archives and indices of National Society. 154-40 

Indemnity bond 35 .00 

Expenses. Secretary General, attending meeting of 

Executive Committee at New York 16.25 

Rosettes and ribbons 19. 50 

Chamois bags and boxes for medals 26.90 

Floral wreath placed on statue of Gen. Nathanael 

Greene, Guilford Court House, N. C 5.37 

Safe-deposit rent 5 . 00 

Book shelves for Secretary General's office 14.00 

Clerical services on October Bulletin 20.00 

Gold seals 4-75 

Collection checks for May, 1915 1 .40 

Restoring U. S. Army flag in chapel on Governors 

Island, New York 16.56 

Contribution toward expenses of National Con- 
gress at Newark, N. 1 500.00 

■ 8,918.18 



Balance on hand May 11, 1916 $8,331.03 

In U. S. Mortgage & Trust Co $7,954.46 

Tn Broadway Savings Institution 376*57 



Examined and found correct. 



$8,331.03 

Jo H N H . B URROUG H S , 

Treasurer General. 

Geo. D. Bangs, Chairman, 
Francis L. Wandell, 
Committee on Auditing and Finance. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 



83 



Details of Receipts for Fiscal Year Ending May ii, 1916. 



Annual dues. 
A 



Alabama 
Arizona .... 
Arkansas . . . 
California . . 
Connecticut . 

Colorado 

Dist. of Col.. 
Delaware . . . 
Empire State, 

Florida 

Hawaii , 

fdaho 



1 innois 

Indiana 

fowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 
Louisiana .... 

Maine 

Maryland .... 
Massachusetts 
Michigan .... 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi . . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshi 
New Jersey . . 
New Mexico. 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma . . . 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Philippines . . 
Rhode Island. 
South Carolin, 
South Dakota 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont .... 

Virginia 

Washington . 
Wisconsin . . . 
Wyoming .... 



$586 



[6, 



50 



20.00 



1916. 

$19.50 

25.00 

202 . 50 

528.50 

247.50 

26 . 00 

729 . 00 

43.00 

39.00 

526.50 

100.00 

174.50 

39oO 

93.00 

182.50 
153.50 
850.00 
225.00 



6 1 . 50 

N.50 



114.00 

548 . 00 

29.00 

24.00 

23.00 

312.50 



Blanks 



$4. 



14-25 
6-35 

3.60 



1 5 . 20 
14.25 



Certs. 



$3.00 
25 . 00 

4.00 

3.00 

87.00 

15.00 

4.00 

82,00 

44.00 

2.00 

1 2 . 00 

3 • 00 
9 . 00 
1 1 .00 
26.00 
4 1 . 00 
6.00 

2 . 00 

2.00 

33.oo 



4-43 



4-75 



102.00 

303.00 7.20 

9-50 

165 . 00 2./^ 



4 
14 


00 
00 


> 
1 


00 
00 


9 


00 



30.50 

36 . 00 

32.50 
66 . 50 
107.00 
54.50 
168 . 00 
80.50 
15.50 



5.40 
3.60 



5.50 

9-95 



22.00 

2 . 00 

T4.00 



3.00 
6.00 

1 2 . 00 

T-25 
3.0O 

I .OO 



Total. 



$19.50 

25.OO 

209.75 

T, 1 40. 00 



25I.5O 

29 . 00 

830.25 

22.60 
47.00 

42.60 
608 . 50 
100.00 
224 . 00 

41.50 

107.75 
21.75 
191.50 
167.25 
891.20 
280 . 25 
122.50 

^>3 • 50 
16.50 
33-no 

118.00 

586.43 
58.00 
26.00 
24.00 

317-25 
9.00 

102.00 

332 . 20 
11.50 

i8i.75 

35-90 
42 . 60 
38.50 
69.25 

119.00 
61.25 

180.95 
80 . 50 
16.50 



$17.25 $732.00 $6,501.50 $137.98 $508.25 $7,896.98 



Annual dues from Florida Society for 1912 and 1913' 
Interest 



$35.00 

320.37 



84 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Rebates $491 . 66 

Medals 197.81 

Year Books -254.85 

Washington journey Books 25 . 00 

Postage 1 . 36 

Flag pamphlets 24 . 50 

Facsimile of Declaration of Independence 2.00 

Engraving of Declaration of Independence 5.00 

Collection for checks .20 

Contribution of ex-President Thruston 16.56 

Rebate on indemnity bond 8.50 

$9,279.79 

Details of Disbursements of the Treasurer General of the 

National Society, S. A. R., for the Fiscal Year 

Ending May ii, 1916. 

I0I 5- 

May 26. Benedict & Benedict, indemnity bond $35. 00 

26. David L. Pierson, sundry expenses as Historian Gen. 9-50 

June 2. A. Howard Clark, salary for May, Reg. Gen. . $50.00 
2. A. Howard Clark, salary for May, Sec. Gen.. 50.00 

100.00 

2. Rev. E. B. Smith, expenses incurred in restoring in 

chapel on Governors Island U. S. Army flag 16. 56 

7. W. F. Roberts Co., printing pamphlets for Committee 

on Information for Aliens. 18.00 

8. Clarkson N. Guyer, sundry expenses as chairman of 

Committee on Education 29.60 

17. J. E. Caldwell & Co., chamois bags and boxes for 

medals 26.90 

17. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing and envelopes for 

Official Bulletin 255 . 00 

" 30. U. S. Mortgage & Trust Co., collection for May 1.40 

July 1. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing June Official 

Bulletin 581.97 

6. A. Howard Clark, salary for June, Reg. Gen. $50.00 
" 6. A. Howard Clark, salary for June, Sec. Gen. 50.00 

100.00 

6. A. A. Lindsley, Treasurer, Oregon Society, contribu- 
tion toward expenses National Congress, Portland 500.00 

14. Gude Bros. Co., floral wreath 5 . 37 

14. R. S. Rosemond, work on archives and indices, April 

5 to July 7 34-40 

14. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work. 

and postage 88 . 60 

14. S. C. Brown, express charges to and from Portland. 

Oregon, for flags and "Traveling Banner" I5-00 

" 26. A. Howard Clark, expenses attending Annual Con- 
gress at Portland, Oregon 170.90 

" 26. A. HoAvard Clark, sundry expenses in preparation for 

the Congress 24.00 

" 26. Henry W. Samson, expenses Flag Committee 27.19 

Aug. 6. A. Howard Clark, salary for July, Reg. Gen.. $50.00 
6. A. Howard Clark, salary for July, Sec. Gen.. 75.00 

125.00 

Sept. 7. Equitable Safe Deposit Co., rent for safe 5.00 

" 7. A. Howard Clark, salary for Aug., Reg. Gen. $50.00 
" 7. A. Howard Clark, salary for Aug., Sec. Gen. 75.00 

125.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 85 

Sept. 20. Alva W. Person, reporting proceedings of Twenty- 
sixth Annual Congress $144.00 

25. A. Howard Clark, balance expenses attending Port- 
land Congress 70 . 50 

25. A. Howard Clark, clerical assistance, freight, tele- 
graphing, etc 29 . 00 

30. A. Howard Clark, salary for Sept., Reg. Gen. $50.00 
" 30. A. Howard Clark, salary for Sept., Sec. Gen. 75.00 

125.00 

Oct. 26. The Maurice Joyce Eng. Co., copper half-tones 85.08 

Nov. 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Oct., Reg. Gen. $50.00 
3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Oct., Sec. Gen. 75.00 

■ 125.00 

3. American Bank Note Co., certificates 52.50 

12. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, 

and postage 87 . 90 

" 13. Annin & Co., ribbon 15. 1 1 

" 13. The Globe-Wernicke Co., book shelves for Sec. Gen. 14.00 

13. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing October Offi- 

cial Bulletin 662 . 94 

" 13. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 106.59 

13. Henry W. Samson, expenses Flag Committee 2.87 

17. The Maurice Joyce Eng. Co., copper half-tones 7.50 

17. R. S. Rosemond, work on archives and indices, July 8 

to November 15 55-20 

17. W. F. Roberts Co., printing pamphlets for account 

Committee on Americanization and Aliens 243.00 

24. Albert D. Spangler, clerical services on October Of- 
ficial Bulletin 20.00 

Dec. 2. A. Howard Clark, salary for Nov., Reg. Gen. $50.00 
" 2. A. Howard Clark, salary for Nov., Sec. Gen. 75.00 

■ 125.00 

" 2. A. Howard Clark, expenses attending Executive Com- 
mittee meeting at New York r 16.25 

18. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing Year Book.. 1,568.92 
" 18. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 68.35 

18. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, 

and postage 65.55 

1916. 
Jan. 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Dec, Reg. Gen. $50.00 
" 3. A. Howard Clark, salary for Dec, Sec. Gen. 75.00 

■ — 125.00 

20. Annin & Co., rosettes 4-39 

20. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing and expressage. .. 12.55 

20. R. P. Andrews Paper Co., gold seals. 4.75 

Feb. 1. A. Howard Clark, salary for Jan., Reg. Gen.. . $50.00 
1. A. Howard Clark, salary for Jan., Sec. Gen.. 75.00 

125.00 

1. W. F. Roberts Co., printing pamphlets on Naturaliza- 
tion, account Committee on Americanization and 

Aliens 87 . 00 

16. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing December 

Official Bulletin. 443-9§ 

" 16. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 37-48 

Mar. r. A. Howard Clark, salary for Feb., Reg. Gen. $50.00 
1. A. Howard Clark, salary for Feb., Sec Gen. 75.00 

— 125.00 

13. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, 

and postage 88 . 89 



86 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mar. 13. American Bank Note Co., certificates $70.00 

13. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing. 25.25 

" 31. A. Howard Clark, salary for March, Reg. Gen. $50.00 

" 31. A. Howard Clark, salary for March. Sec. Gen. 75.00 

125.00 

Apr. 12. W. F. Roberts Co., printing pamphlets, account Com- 
mittee on Americanization and Aliens 20.00 

14. Judd & Detweiler, sundry printing 112.50 

25. Judd & Detweiler, printing and mailing March Official 

Bulletin 707. 14 

May 1. A. Howard Clark, salary for April, Reg. Gen. $50.00 
1. A. Howard Clark, salary for April, Sec. Gen. 75.00 

125.00 

5. E. Allen Smith, Treasurer, New Jersey Society, con- 
tribution toward expenses National Congress, 
Newark 500 . 00 

5. David L. Pierson, expenses, Historian General, to 

May 2 7 . 25 

5. S. C. Brown, engrossing certificates, clerical work, and 

postage 92 .03 

5. J. H. Burroughs, sundry expenses as Treasurer Gen- 
eral, May 7, 1915, to April 29, 1916 16.52 

5. John H. Moore, sundry expenses, account Committee 

on Americanization and Aliens. 14.00 

5. R. S. Rosemond, clerical work on archives and indices 

to April 29, 1916 64.80 

Total $8,918. 18 

REPORT ON PERMANENT FUND. 

Office of Treasurer General 
15 William Street, New York, N. Y., May 11, 1916. 
President General and Compatriots: 

The Treasurer General has the honor to submit the following report 
on the Permanent Fund. At the last Annual Congress his report 
showed that there was on hand : 
$2,000 State of New York Canal 4's, 1961. 
$2,000 New York City 4's, 1958. 
$1,000 New York City 4's, 1959. 
$1,000 New York City 4^'s, 1963. 
$1,000 Atch., T. & S. Fe 4's, 1995. 

There have been added to the Permanent fund account rebates on in- 
signia, rosettes, and ribbons amounting to $491.66. 

Through the generosity of your ex-President General, R. C. Ballard 
Thruston, there has been added to this fund $1,000 bond of the Keokee 
Consolidated Coke Co., guaranteed by the Virginia Coal & Iron Co., 
bearing interest at 5 per cent. There is therefore in the Permanent 
Fund $8,000 of securities and $491.66 on deposit. 
Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 

Mr. Burroughs : I have here a check received as dues from the Ne- 
braska Society since my report closed. I mention it in order that record 
may appear of this payment for 1916 dues. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of Treasurer General 
Burroughs. Tf there is no objection, the report will be received and 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 87 

placed on file. Hearing no objection, the report will take that course. 
Next is the report of the Historian General. 

Judge Remington: Before that report is read, I will move that when 
we take a recess it be from 12.30 to 2 o'clock, so that we will know just 
what time is at our disposal. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted.) 

GREETINGS TO GEN. EDWIN S. GREELEY. 

The Historian General : Mr. President General, former Presidents 
General and Compatriots, before reading' my report, which will be very 
brief. I would like to make a suggestion. M'any of us remember in 
past years the presence of our former President General, Gen. Edwin S. 
Greeley, of New Haven, Conn., a dear, kindly, enthusiastic, patriotic, 
Christian gentleman. He is now very ill and his birthday will occur in 
a day or two. I would suggest that our good friend, Judge Beardsley, 
former President General, draft a letter and as many of us as can sign 
it and send it to him. I am sure it will give him a great deal of com- 
fort in the latter days of his life. T make that as a motion. 

(Motion seconded.) 

Ex-Governor Murphy : We all know General Greeley ; lie was one 
of the men who was around when we started this organization, and he 
has been with us every time since that he could be. I suggest, as a sub- 
stitute, if the Historian General will pardon me, that the Chairman 
appoint a committee of one — that is the most efficient committee — to 
prepare a resolution expressing the sympathy of this Congress with 
General Greeley in his illness and expressing the hope that he will 
speedily be restored to perfect health. 

The Chairman : You have heard the motion, that a committee of 
one be appointed to properly phrase the expression of our sentiment to 
General Greeley at this time, and that it be sent by wire. 

(The motion was unanimously adopted.) 

The Chairman: The Chair will appoint as a committee of one ex- 
Governor Murphy. 

Ex-Governor Murphy: I accept that with pleasure. 

(Ex-Governor Murphy prepared the following telegram, which was 
at once sent to General Greeley:) 

Gen. Edwin S. GrEEeEy, New Haven, Conn.: 

The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
Congress assembled send affectionate greetings to their former Presi- 
dent General at New Haven. They greatly regret that the result of 
injuries prevent his presence at this Congress. They hope for his speedy 
restoration to health, and that his life may be spared for many years. 

Neweee B, Woodworth, 

President General. 

Secretary General Clark : In this connection I will state that I have 
received the following letter from General Greeley, extending his greet- 
ings to this Congress and regretting that he cannot be present: 



88 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

15 Trumbull Street. 
New Haven, Conn., May 9, 1916. 
Mr. A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General National Society, S. A. R., Washington, D. C. 
Dear Compatriot: I very much regret that owing to illness I will not 
be able to attend the National Congress to be held at Newark next week. 
Through you I extend my greetings to the members of the Society. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Edwin S. GrEELEy. 

The Chairman: The Chair would suggest that the letter be acknowl- 
edged by a rising vote of acceptance. 

(All the members rose.) 

Historian General PiErson : I now move that the Past Presidents 
General here present be appointed a committee to draft a letter to Gen- 
eral Greeley, to be signed by all the delegates, and that it be placed in 
the office of the Historian General, so that it will be accessible to all. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the motion, that a com- 
mittee be appointed to draft a letter to send to General Greeley. 

(Motion seconded and carried.) 

GIFT FROM MOSES GREELEY PARKER, M. D. 

The Chairman: We are now ready to proceed with the report of 
the Historian General, and there is a very welcome announcement to be 
made at the conclusion of this report by one of the compatriots. 

The Secretary General : Make it now. 

Dr. Moses GrEELEy Parker: Mr. President General and Compatriots, 
I think the Permanent Fund ought to be made $10,000, and, as we are 
lacking about $1,000, I would like to donate to the Society a New York 
Adjustment Bond. It is not selling for quite $1,000 now, but if you 
will keep it long enough it will sell for that amount. 

(The members of the Society rose and applauded the speaker.) 

Mr. Adams : May I offer a vote of thanks of the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution in Congress assembled for this very gener- 
ous gift of our former President General? 

(The vote of thanks was adopted by a rising vote.) 

The Chairman : I wish to extend to you, Dr. Parker, the thanks of 
the Society. We will now receive the report of the Historian General. 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN GENERAL. 

Mr. President General and Compatriots of the Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution: 
Many, many times you have been greeted upon your visit to New 
Jersey and to this city of Newark, to a soil enriched and glorified by 
valorous deeds of noble men and women in the national hour of dis- 
tress, even long before the birth of our institutions, into which has 
been sealed precious lives dedicated to the eternal principles upon which 
our country was founded. 



PROCEEDINGS OE NEWARK CONGRESS. H(j 

You have come to one of the oldest settlements in the colonies, dating 
to the time of Puritan occupation, in May, 1666. It is hoped that you 
will feel the strength of the tie that binds our New Jersey Society with 
the parent organization, of no uncertain quality of patriotism, let me 
assure you. 

Here the Sons of the American Revolution had its birth, on March 7, 
1889, and here you have come in the vigor of manhood, at the age of 
twenty-seven years, to assist in the patriotic work of the country through 
the various agencies established by our Society. 

Opposite this meeting place is the training ground, about the same 
proportions as when laid out in the era now 250 years in the past. 
Hither came the Puritans and their descendants of several generations 
for annual training. They believed in preparedness, though the methods 
of acquiring military knowledge were limited in the earlier period. 

On June 5, 1671, "at the beat of the drum, every man between the 
.ages of sixteen and sixty" was required to repair to the training ground 
"to show arms and ammunition and to spend the day in exercising their 
arms as they shall agree among themselves." This we read from New- 
ark town records. 

Puritanism, or close fellowship, required adequate military prepara- 
tion, the best of the times, against possible Indian uprisings. Buttresses 
were placed about the old meeting-house, which stood many years at the 
four corners, a few rods from this place, where in this busy day ebbs 
and flows a tide of humanity, with one or two exceptions, greater than 
that passing at any other point in the country. 

The training ground was an important place in colonial life. Uni- 
formed and non-uniformed civilians met on common plane, but the 
latter were somewhat obscured in public exercises by those more fortu- 
nate in equipment for the fray. Sons of Liberty, in the stirring period 
preceding" the Revolutionary War and during its progress, met in this 
public place when alarm was sounded. It was the rendezvous of the 
militia when responding to an alarm on approach of enemy. 

Our forebears of the pre-Revolutionary period met here on Novem- 
ber 1, 1765, when the stamp act went into effect, and debated "what was 
best to be done," while the village church bell tolled a requiem for the 
foolish act of an unwise King. The old Puritan spirit upon which the 
town was founded was again finding expression in popular will. 

In Elizabeth town, four miles southward, where Alexander Hamilton 
attended school at the home of William Livingston, first Governor of 
New Jersey under the Statehood regime, a penalty of death was pro- 
vided for any person discovered using any of the obnoxious^ stamps. 

New Jersey had its tea party, too. In Greenwich, near Bridgeton, on 
the Cohansey River, the Sons of Liberty were very active on the even- 
ing of December 22, 1774. They confiscated a cargo of tea hidden in a 
Tory home and consigned it to a bonfire, which had been ignited by a 
torch, verily a torch of Liberty. In Boston Harbor the tea was con- 
sumed by water and in New Jersey by fire — two mighty elements used 
to impress the vigor of colonial opposition to kingly usurpation of indi- 
vidual rights. 

Our State had its full share of patriotic men and women, though we 
-did have many Tories. Two days before the Declaration of Independ- 
ence had its birth our New Jersey Constitution was promulgated, July 
2, 1776, and remained in service for nearly threescore years. 

Newark had a committee on observation selected by the people at 
town meeting, December 7, 1774. Before the winter had far advanced 
the attitude of every man of voting age upon the question of the hour 
was officially known. Was he for or against the Continental govern- 
ment established two months before at Philadelphia? 

Let me impress upon vou the fact that Newark and New Jersey re- 
sponded noblv to the calls made by Washington. Homes were sacri- 



9° SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ficed, fortunes wasted, and life itself went into the seething caldron of 
war. 

Gratifying reports have been received from many of the Societies of 
constructive work in their respective localities. Notable indeed is the 
continued enthusiastic interest displayed in the reading of United 
States history. Youth especially is encouraged to read by the offer of 
prizes, and excellent results show the wisdom of further activity in this 
direction. 

Knowledge of one's country, whether birthright or adopted, is a fun- 
damental of every well-ordered life. Committee work has been instru- 
mental in older States in strengthening the links connecting the colo- 
nial period. This is achieved in a remarkable degree in searching rec- 
ords for applicants desiring membership in our Society. 

Musty archives have yielded rich returns. Our Society has been 
marching steadily forward in this regard, brushing away cobwebs and 
layers of dust, under which have been buried precious records of heroic 
service. 

Recently it was my good fortune to resurrect from hidden recesses 
the complete record and roster of Capt. Robert Nichols' Company, Sec- 
ond Essex County, New Jersey, Regiment. Thus was brought to light 
and of service a number of names forgotten and never enrolled upon 
the scroll of honor. 

Encouragement can worthily be given all our people to read and 
digest thrilling narratives, biographies of the men and women, and the 
entire story of the nation's birth, its emerging out of the storm of war, 
and its laudible progress to its present high state of efficiency. 

Our school days are never over. Strength of service is on trial. Our 
Revolutionary fathers felt it, and as a sequence conquered in their 
struggle for liberty. We are too prone in these days to go along the 
lines of least resistance. 

We must assist in making our history desirable reading. Prized 
household, as well as public, library volumes should be those pertaining 
to our nation. History nourishes the intellect, and constant perusing of 
its pages stimulates and makes for the best type of citizenship. In our 
complex relationship of this twentieth century existence we need every 
possible ounce of manly strength in the support of our institutions. 

Memorials and tablets have been placed in a number of historical 
environments during the past year. The action of the Utah Society in 
placing a tablet in the State House at Salt Lake City, in 1914. and so 
graphically reported in the 1916 Year Book, is commended as worthv 
of repetition in other places. 

Every State House and county building in the United States could well 
be used for the patriotic purposes so worthily inaugurated by the com- 
patriots of Utah. Tablets properly inscribed with suitable sentiment 
and advantageously placed inside public buildings, as well as outside 
(which has been done in several instances), will create more respect by 
unthinking citizens and admiration by the foreigner in our heritage. 

Principal of all the memorials erected by a Society during the year 
was the General Mordecai Gist monument, in St. Michael's P. E. church- 
yard at Charleston, S. C, gift of the Maryland Society. Dedicatory 
exercises were held on November 6, 1915- 

A handsome bronze equestrian statue of General von Steuben, drill- 
master of the Revolutionary War, was dedicated at Valley Forge in 
November. 1915, gift of citizens of German descent. 

One of the most productive methods in arousing latent patriotic 
spirit and of inculcating the American ideal into the foreign-born is in 
liberty pole dedication and flag raising. Would that we had more of 
them. 

Two thousand employees of the Pennsylvania Railroad shouted till 
their voices refused further utterance, on the meadows between Newark 



PROCEEDINGS OJ? NEWARK CONGRESS. (Jl 

and New York, in New Jersey, October 4, 1915, when the flag of stars 
and stripes was thrown to the breeze for the first time over the car 
shops. Says an account written by one who was horn in a European 
country : 

"Many of the men had never saluted the i 1 a *4 before — probably had 
never thought of it as their flag. Their thoughts had harked back to the 
land of their birth they had left five, ten, or twenty years ago, when 
with tear-dimmed eyes they paid their last salute to the home of their 
fathers. . . . The orator drove home the lesson taught bv the flag. 
We worship the flag, but we must not forget to worship it righteously. 
. . . American citizens, especially foreign-born, should be undivided 
in allegiance, no matter how they stand in their sympathies, more so at 
the present time than ever before." 

Washington's Birthday continues to be the most observed by our 
State organizations. The memory of the First Citizen of the Country 
grows deeper in the hearts of the people with the passing of the years. 
Our compatriot, United States Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, gave a 
stirring address at Washington's Headquarters, Morristown, N. J., on 
February 22, on "Neutrality." 

Many courtesies have been extended this office during the year, which 
are acknowledged with profound appreciation and with the earnest 
hope that association now strongly identified in the annual exhibit will 
increase }^early in its usefulness to delegates and citizens at large. 

Our flag of stars and stripes and the S. A. R. emblem of buff, white, 
and blue are moving forward, leading in the march of progress during 
these uncertain days. Our organization, compactly knit with stalwart 
sons of noble sires, will not be found wanting in the future in the fore- 
front of active citizenship as in the past, upholding the institutions 
erected by the fathers and having faith in the final mission of our be- 
loved country, in evolving" a type of civilization helpful to all the people 
all the years and assisting in the world's progress for humanity's better- 
ment. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Historian General. 
If there is no objection, it will be received and filed. Hearing no ob- 
jection, the report will take that course. Next in the regular order of 
business come the reports of standing committees. I would ask if the 
Memorial Committee is prepared to report at this time? 

General Bradley : Mr. President General and Compatriots, I fancy 
you have heard about all you wish of reports. They are hard to read 
many times, and perhaps harder still to listen to, but I will assure you 
at the outset that this one is very brief indeed. 

REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL COMMITTEE. 

Compatriots : During the past year further investigation has been 
attempted concerning the burial places of certain Signers of the Dec- 
laration of Independence, but no additional facts of importance have 
been ascertained. All the data may be found in the National Year 
Book, 1914, pages 1 19-123, and the National Year Book, 1915, pages 
101-102. 

We have reached the conclusion that not much more can be done by 
the writing of letters. But the matter should not be dropped ; the in- 
vestigation should be continued by a different method. 

We suggest that the matter be referred to the National Executive 
Committee, and that, if said committee deem it wise, the services of 
some competent person be secured to visit and inspect the burial places 



92 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

of certain Signers, and that said person make a written report stating 
the location and condition of the cemetery, the material and size of the 
tombstone, and giving an exact copy of any inscription, and obtaining 
such photographic views as may be desirable. 

Our Society already possesses such data concerning many of the 
Signers, but there are other Signers concerning whose burial places 
definite and reliable information should be obtained at once. We are 
deeply grateful to every correspondent who has aided us in any way, 
but our Society should itself be an authority on these matters. 

Your committee would also report concerning the proposed Memorial 
Volume on the Lives of the Signers. The original resolution under 
which this part of the work is being carried on was passed by the 
National Executive Committee on November 24, 1914. The joint com- 
mittee consists of six members. The Society of the Descendants of 
the Signers is represented by Mr. Charles Thornton Adams, Mr. 
Gordon Woodbury, and Judge Albert McClellan Mathewson, and the 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution is represented by Mr. 
Edward Hagaman Hall, Prof. William C. Armstrong, and Gen. Edward 
E. Bradley. Several meetings of the joint committee have been held. 
The work has been mapped out and some of it has been completed, but 
there is still much work to be done. We report substantial progress. 

WiW/iAM C. Armstrong, 

Chairman. 

Doctor Grindaix : Mr. President General, we have a gentleman in 
Baltimore who has written about the Signers, Professor Bibbens, for- 
merly chairman of the Memorial Committee; he has delivered some 
lectures about the burial places of the Signers. 

The Chairman : The Chair would suggest that if the Memorial Com- 
mittee has certain recommendations, they incorporate those in the form 
of a resolution, to be introduced later. 

(See report of Committee on Resolutions.) 

The Chairman : Next is the report of the Committee on Organiza- 
tion for the Pacific. In the absence of the chairman of that committee 
the Secretary General will read the report, which is in writing. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION (PACIFIC). 

Mr. A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Secretary General: On behalf of the Committee on Or- 
ganization (Pacific), I have to say that immediately after the commit- 
tee was appointed your Chairman got in communication with them and 
learned with regret that the Nevada Society has practically ceased to 
exist, and that the Los Angeles Chapter is also dead. It seemed to be 
impossible to do anything to revive the organization in these communi- 
ties. Gov. W. W. McDowell, of Montana, is of the opinion that much 
could be accomplished in the State of Montana if an organizer familiar 
with methods of securing new members could be sent to that State 
with instructions to travel from town to town and endeavor to hunt up 
and interview eligible gentlemen. It did not seem possible to carry out 
this plan, and therefore nothing has been done in the way of extending 
the organization of the Montana Society. The California Society is 
vigorous, progressive, and growing in membership. The San Diego 
Chapter is also prosperous. The most tangible thing which has been 
accomplished under the direction of your committee has been the tenta- 






1 



PROCEKDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 93 

tive organization of a Chapter at Salem, Oregon. The success of this 
enterprise is now assured. A dinner was held at Salem on the 19th of 
April, 1916, on the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Con- 
cord, at which sixty-seven gentlemen were present. Ten residents of 
Salem and vicinity have presented applications which have been ap- 
proved by the Registrar General, and the formal organization of the 
Chapter will probably take place on the 24th of May. The organization 
has been delayed because of the desire of a number of gentlemen to 
come in as charter members. Many of those desiring to be charter 
members have not yet succeeded in putting their papers in shape. The 
success of this enterprise is due chiefly to the zeal and activity of Com- 
patriot Winthrop Hammond, of the Oregon Society. 

We recommend that the next committee in charge of this work in 
this part of the Union put forth effort looking to the organization of a 
Chapter at Walla Walla. W r e suggest that if the Washington Society 
is represented on the next committee charged with this work the mem- 
ber be chosen from some part of the State east of the Cascades, to the 
end that attention may be directed to the city of Walla Walla and the 
possibility of organizing a Chapter there. 

Respectfully submitted, Wallace McCamant, 

Chairman. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the report. If there are 
no objections, it will be received and placed on file. Hearing none, the 
report will take that course. Next is the report of the Committee on 
Organization for the West, Mr. E. M. Wentworth, chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION (WEST). 

Mr. Wentworth : Mr. President General and Compatriots, the past 
year has shown a real revival of interest along patriotic lines, which is 
bound to have an excellent effect upon the future growth and useful- 
ness of our Society. 

The war in Europe, despite efforts both at home and abroad to ob- 
scure the vital issue, is bringing home to the minds of all Americans 
that the real basic principle "of the subjects of government participating 
in the operations of government" is on trial ; that the great problem of 
the reconciliation of government and liberty is being fought out on the 
battlefields of France. The American theory of a government of the 
people, by the people, for the people has been and is being subjected 
to the assaults of Germanic theorists, wherein the horizon of the citi- 
zen's opportunity is circumscribed by the benevolence of a government 
predicated upon the theory that might makes right and the divine right 
of a given family to rule. In the letters received from the committee- 
men in the various States there is a general feeling of optimism, which 
is expressed in the following from Compatriot Branson, of the Minne- 
sota Society : "Interest seems to be improving through the State. Am 
inclined to think the war has stirred the blood, and we look for a good 
increase during 1916.'' Compatriot Nellis reports from Kansas : "We 
are having many inquiries that I think will bring us many new members. 
more than in any year heretofore. We have also had inquiries regard- 
ing the formation of new Chapters and attention will be given thereto. 



94 sons of the; American revolution. 

Kansas is also interesting the schools in patriotic work by means of 
the medals which have proven so successful in other States." 

Nebraska and South Dakota are showing much interest in the pro- 
motions of our patriotic work, and these Societies are also to be highly 
commended for their spirit of enthusiastic loyalty to Societies' ideals. 

Compatriot Kennan reports a quiet year in Wisconsin, but has high 
hopes for the future. There is no State in the Union where conditions 
are known to be as delicate, and no State where, once aroused, better 
work will be done. 

The Sons of the American Revolution met a very serious loss in the 
death of Compatriot W. S. Hammond, President of the Minnesota 
Society and Governor of the State. Governor Hammond was a true 
American and splendid type of citizenship. Iowa has shown her faith 
by works and organized two new Chapters, with two or three practically 
ready. The State Presidents in every instance are men of affairs, 
ability, and high patriotic purpose, heartily interested in the work. 
Their courtesy and co-operation with your committee promises much 
in the years to come. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the report of the Com- 
mittee on Organization for the West. If there is no objection, the 
report will be received and placed on file. Hearing no objection, the 
report will take that course. Next is the report of the Committee on 
Organization for the Middle States, of which Mr. Albert M. Henry is 
chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION (MIDDLE 

STATES). 

Mr. Henry : Mr. President General and Compatriots, the Middle 
States, being Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Maryland, Indiana, Pennsylvania, 
New York, New Jersey, and Delaware, cover a pretty large field, but 
from all of these States I have received replies to my inquiries in regard 
to the situation in those States. First, I reported to the Executive 
Committee last November, and these first letters are in response to a 
request to get replies, to report at that time. Mr. Louis A. Bowman, 
of Chicago, the Secretary of the Society there, says : "In a general way, 
we are pushing it to such extent as is possible by correspondence. We 
find, however, that it is practically impossible to accomplish very much 
through the mails in this regard. The fact also remains that there are 
almost none of our Chicago men who have the leisure, inclination, and 
ability to visit the different cities in the State to effect organization 
through personal contact." The purpose of these committees is to find 
out the best way of pushing this organization into popular favor, 
Avhether it be by messengers sent through the different States, either 
employed by the General Society or by the individual States or cities, 
or whether it should be done, as the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution are doing it, by establishing Chapters in the various cities of the 
different States. Now, Mr. Bowman goes on and says: "This was the 



PROCEEDINGS oi NEWARK CONGRESS. 95 

reason for my written recommendation to the National Society, recom- 
mending that a permanent traveling or Held secretary be employed by 
the National Society, who would visit the different States and strengthen 
the existing organization and bring about the formation of new ones — 
for instance, the time of such a man, giving a month in Illinois, would, 
I am sure, bring about the organization of five or six local Chapters, 
etc." — giving his idea of the method of increasing our organization. 

Hon. Neweee B. Woodworth, 

President General: 

As Chairman of the Committee on Organization in the Middle States, 
I desire to make to you and the Twenty-seventh Congress a report as 
to what has been done by the committee. 

At the meeting of the Executive Committee in New York last No- 
vember I made a full report up to that date, which is filed in the Secre- 
tary General's office. 

Since the meeting of the Executive Committee we have been more or 
less busy in extending our work in Michigan and keeping in touch with 
what has been done in the other Middle States. In Michigan we have 
pushed the work in Ann Arbor, Mt. Pleasant, Grand Rapids, and Kala- 
mazoo, and have increased our membership in various parts of the 
State. 

We engaged Professor Florer, a professor in the University of Mich- 
igan, to deliver a lecture at these various places, accompanied by pic- 
tures thrown upon the canvas showing the various stages of the Revo- 
lutionary War and the various localities and personages made famous 
"by said war. This course of procedure and the results thereof were 
communicated to the various compatriots who make up the Committee 
on Organization of the Middle States. 

[For filing with the report, Mr. Henry appended letters from Presi- 
dent Brown, of the Pennsylvania Society; Secretary Weeks, of the New 
Jersey Society; President Mills, of the South Dakota Society; Secretary 
Bowman, of the Illinois Society; Vice-President General Boardman, 
of Tennessee; Mr. Wentworth, of Iowa, and Mr. Sidway, of Buffalo; 
also newspaper accounts of the lecture given by Professor Florer at 
Grand Rapids.] 

There is still a great variety of opinion as to the proper plan for 
increasing the membership in the different States, all of which have 
their merits and demerits. 

A somewhat amusing incident occurred in my own State, arising from 
the engagement of Professor Florer, who happens to be a professor of 
German. My correspondent was very much exercised for fear that the 
propaganda for ''Americanization" which we had started was more like 
a propaganda for "Germanization." 

The work, however, which we have done has been an educational one 
rand I think will go down to the benefit of our organization. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Aij'.ert M. Henry, 

Chairman. 

In his lecture on ''The American Revolution by Picture and Word," 
Professor Florer shows a collection of pictures of the Revolution, many 
of which are reproductions of old paintings and prints of Revolutionary 
days, and which show America as it was then rather than as the his- 
toric spots appear today. 



96 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Pictures not only of such eminent men as Washington, Franklin,. 
John Paul Jones, and Patrick Henry are shown, but also of men who, 
by their actual help or sympathy, aided the Revolution, but who are 
little remembered. Emphasis is laid on the fact that it was a revolution 
in which young men were engaged — men between the ages of twenty 
and twenty-five — rather than one of old men, as generally supposed. 
Jt was not a revolution born in Boston and the New England States 
alone, but one in which all the thirteen colonies took an active interest, 
as illustrated by scenes of old meeting places and pictures of leaders in 
Maryland, Philadelphia, South Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia. 

The Polish, French, Dutch, and German leaders and soldiers in the 
struggle and the sympathy of the leaders of Russia, Prussia, and France 
are discussed by Mr. Florer, thus bringing out a sweeping survey of 
the struggle and its meaning to the people of the United States and to- 
the world. The story of the struggle ends with a brief account of the 
amalgamation of the divided States and w T ith ideals and work of 
America of the present day. The youth of today has the innate right 
to be educated so he may make the best of his powers. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Committee on Or- 
ganization of the Middle States. If there is no objection, the report 
will be received and placed on file. Hearing none, the report will take 
that course. Next is the report of the Committee on Organization for 
New England, Mr. Punderson, chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION (NEW 
ENGLAND). 

The six State Societies of New England are in an excellent condition. 

While each State reports an increase in membership, there has also- 
been brought about by the Societies a much keener interest in historical 
beginnings, as well as national problems of the day. 

The increased membership of the Massachusetts Society has been 
unusual. It is the result of an elaborate and systematic plan of follow- 
ing up eligibles by correspondence. This system has not only proved 
favorable in securing members in the larger cities, but has brought 
about the enrollment of members in the smaller towns in all parts of 
the State. 

The present showing seems to be but a forecast of the probable re- 
sults of the future. 

The Connecticut Society has continued the plan of awarding medals 
and prizes through the schools of the State. The amount of time and 
money expended in this work speaks well for the Society. 

Chapters in the larger cities have followed closely the work suggested 
by the National Society. Meetings have been held to welcome the new 
citizens, and much time has been spent in the endeavor to instruct them 
in their duties and responsibilities. 

Considerable has been accomplished by the Chapters toward prepared- 
ness at home and relief abroad. 

The letters of the President General have proved an excellent help in 
planning the work of State Societies and Chapters and have brought 
about a uniform endeavor that has undoubtedly resulted in increased 

influence. _ 

Henry F. Punderson, 

Chairman,. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 97 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Committee on 
Organization in the New England States. If there is no objection, the 
report will be received and placed on file. Hearing no objection, the 
report will take that course. Next is the report of the Committee on 
Organization for the South, Mr. Boardman. Is Mr. Boardman present? 
The Chairman of that committee is attending the Congress, but is not 
present just now. We will pass his report and proceed to the next re- 
port, that of the Committee on Education, Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston, 
chairman. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 

Mr. Thruston : I have had, in the correspondence with the members 
of my committee, many letters recommending education along this, that, 
or the other line. Every one of those letters is a treatise in itself and 
is worth being studied and thought over seriously. I have them all 
here, s-o that any member who desires to look over them may do so. 
They will be left for the benefit of my successor as Chairman of the 
Committee on Education. I have, in addition to that, received from one 
of the members of my committee since this report was prepared a play 
written and suited to the children of the Van Vlessengen High School 
in Chicago. It is a dramatization of Edward Everett Hale's story, 
"The Man Without a Country." It is a patriotic play in the extreme, 
and any such plays or any such data that any member of our Society 
knows of and will call to the attention of the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Education will be circulated throughout the country, where 
they will do real good, patriotic service, in addition to the service they 
are now doing. We are trying to obtain such plays for the school chil- 
dren to use in their various celebrations. 

Mr. President General and Compatriots: 

Your Committee on Education begs to report : 

First. What our National Society is doing for the cause of education. 

Second. In a brief way, what the various State Societies and Chapters 
are doing. 

Third. The recommendations of your committee. 

what the; national society is doing. 

Our National Society has done and is doing a tremendous amount of 
work along the line of education of the foreign-born in preparing him 
for American citizenship. The resume of this work belongs to another 
committee. However, the results over our whole country have been so 
beneficial that even if we did nothing else we would be entitled to wear 
a laurel crown as a reward of merit for this work alone. 

In addition to that, the work which we are doing toward gathering 
together a full and true history regarding our Declaration of Independ- 
ence and all matters connected therewith is so meritorious that we 
mention it here as a part of the educational work, even though it be- 
longs to still another committee. 

A thing which we are doing for the information of our members, and 
which very few of us appreciate as we should, is issuing the Year Book, 



98 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

with which those who attend our Congresses are familiar, and the quar- 
terly Bulletin, which four times a year goes to each member of our 
organization. These Bulletins tell us of the activities of the various 
State Societies. A perusal of them will give us much information that 
we desire and their study will be very beneficial to all of us. 

ACTIVITIES OF STATE SOCIETIES AND CHAPTERS. 

Many of our State Societies and Chapters are doing magnificent work, 
both individually and in co-operation with other organizations, especially 
along the lines of naturalization, and in several movements that have 
been far-reaching in their educational and patriotic influences. Promi- 
nent among these would be the celebration of the District of Columbia 
Society on July 4 last, but especially in connection with the trip of the 
Liberty Bell from Philadelphia to the Pacific coast and back again. In 
every State through which it passed our members were prominent on 
committees which had charge of its reception and display. In some of 
the States, notably New York, Oregon, and Kentucky, many thousand 
folders bearing upon the history of the Liberty Bell and its connection 
with the Declaration of Independence were printed by the local Socie- 
ties, publicly distributed and greatly in demand. 

Many of our State Societies issue annual Bulletins or Year Books, 
and some of them, especially Colorado and Iowa, monthly or quarterly 
publications relating more particularly to their activities. Arkansas has 
published an address by their Secretary, Mr. Fay Hempstead, on the 
Expedition of Galvez, in 1779, which had material influence on our 
western history, and Pennsylvania has published another pamphlet, giv- 
ing us much desired data regarding five of the Signers. There are 
other publications dealing with matters of local history. 

In some of our Chapters, notably the Boston Chapter of the Massa- 
chusetts Society, monthly meetings are held, and a regular progressive 
program for the study of our American Revolutionary history along 
certain well-defined lines is followed, which has proven intensely inter- 
esting to its members. 

One of our State Societies, Oregon, is very much pleased with the 
result obtained through a carefully selected series of works on Amer- 
ican history that has been bought by them and circulated throughout 
their State, under the management and control of the State Library 
Association. 

According to our Bulletins, in ten of our State Societies (Arizona, 
Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Oak Park Chapter of Illinois, Louisiana, 
New Jersey, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Hawaii) prizes are being offered for 
essays or oratorical contests along historical and patriotic lines. In 
some instances medals alone are given ; in others accompanied by cash 
prizes. In one State (Connecticut) the amount expended in medals and 
cash prizes nearly equals $1,000 annually. In some of our State Socie- 
ties it is interesting to note that the majority of these prizes are won by 
others than those of Revolutionary descent, and even in Connecticut, 
with her great educational institutions, last year the winner of the 
second prize was a girl in the eighth grade, who herself emigrated from 
Russia five years before. We believe, therefore, that it is safe to say 
that all of us, while in favor of continuing the work we are doing for 
the foreign-born, feel that we must not neglect the native-born, and 
especially those of our own kith and kin. 

RECOMMENDATIONS OE THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 

The above is all very good so far as it goes. We would not have any 
of these activities curtailed ; but the history of the past two years shows 
that there has not been implanted into the hearts of all our American 



Si 



PROCEEDINGS OE NEWARK CONGRESS. Q9 

people that love and devotion to our country and its interests that we 
think should be there, and we all agree that the development of the 
spirit of patriotism is what we should more strongly advocate, and that 
that should be the ultimate object of our efforts. But how bring it 
about? Could, the teaching of civics through practically the whole 
school system, but more deeply as the student advances in age and ex- 
perience, accomplish the inculcating into him that spirit of truth, that 
sense of justice, and that development of character which tends to make 
him not only a good citizen, but demand those same virtues in others, 
we think that such would develop the patriotic spirit, and we should 
insist that whatever is necessary to accomplish this result be introduced 
into our schools. 

We therefore recommend that each of our State Societies and Chap- 
ters hold one or two educational meetings each year. We would sug- 
gest that at these meetings those who are prominent in national, State, 
or local educational matters, such as school commissioners, trustees, 
professors, and instructors, be invited to attend the meeting as guests 
of the Society for a thorough and full discussion of the topic agreed 
upon. By such process we will educate ourselves as to what is being 
done, become acquainted with those who have the education of the 
youth in hand, and have an opportunity to make suggestions which may 
help to improve the system. Experience has shown that educators want 
the thinking public to interest themselves in these subjects. It acts both 
as a balance-wheel and a spur to them in their work, and furthermore 
you will find an increasing number of our members visiting the schools 
and educational centers to the material benefit of all parties concerned. 
Respectfully submitted, 

R. C. Ballard Thruston, 

Chairman. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the instructive and ex- 
haustive report of the Committee on Education. If there is no objec- 
tion, the report will be received and placed on file. Hearing no objec- 
tion, the report will take that course. The Chair would suggest to the 
Chairman of the committee that the recommendations of that committee 
be embodied in resolutions and offered at a subsequent time for the 
consideration of this Congress. We will now have the report of the 
Committee on Organization in the South. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION (SOUTH). 

Mr. Boardman : Mr. President General and Compatriots, the Socie- 
ties in the States of Kentucky and Tennessee are alive with progress, 
particularly in Kentucky. In the other States in the Southern group 
there are Societies in all but one, and that State is Georgia. We have 
been making efforts for two years to stimulate the growth in all of the 
States south of us, east of us, and southwest of us. Mr. Thruston has 
spent a considerable time in some of the Southern States endeavoring 
to stimulate them, but so far without very much success. The Tennes- 
see Society has been from time to time enrolling members from other 
States, particularly South Carolina and Georgia, with the idea of get- 
ting enough members in the Tennessee Society from those respective 
States to enable us to organize live, active State Societies. I believe 



IOO SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

that in the course of the next year or two years we will be able to get 
some results from that plan. I am sorry that I cannot report greater 
results. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Committee on 
Organization in the South. If there is no objection, the report will be 
accepted and placed on file. Hearing no objection, the report will take 
that course. The time has now come that we determined on for a re- 
cess, and before declaring the session adjourned the Chair will ask the 
delegates to be prompt in assembling here at 2 o'clock, so that we may 
go ahead with our work rapidly. 

(The Congress then took recess until 2 p. m., and shortly after that 
time Chairman Woodworth called the meeting to order and the program 
was resumed as follows:) 



Afternoon Session, May 15. 

The Chairman : The Chair apologizes for calling the session a little 
late, but, unfortunately, from the standpoint of promptness, I was 
drafted by a committee to appear at the lunch for the ladies for a 
moment. I trust the Congress will accept the explanation. 

Mr. Ames : We have here in our midst today one of the two surviving 
members who organized the National Society of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution ; he was also the first Secretary of the New Jersey So- 
ciety and its second President. Therefore, Mr. President General, I 
move that not only the courtesy of the floor be extended to Compatriot 
Josiah C. Pumpelly, but that he be escorted to the platform. (Applause.) 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you heard the motion made by the gen- 
tleman from New York. I assume there is no debate about the resolu- 
tion. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted, and the Chairman appointed 
Mr. Ames to escort Mr. Pumpelly to the platform, the audience rising 
and applauding as this was done.) 

Mr. PumpkUvY : Mr. President General and Compatriots all, I am 
very grateful to you for this privilege that you have granted to me ; it 
is right in line with all the beautiful tonic influences I have had coming 
in upon me lately, especially that big parade over in New York. I have 
made up my mind that patriotism is the best tonic for old people (ap- 
plause), and the words "seventy-six" is just my age — seventy-six. 
(Laughter and applause.) Seventy-six! but this morning I heard a 
grand old man of eighty-two. Oh, I haven't got any more to say. I 
thought I was doing pretty well; but look at him! My dear friends, 
I can't say anything about it, only I want you all to believe there is no 
better tonic on this earth than patriotism, especially when it means pre- 
paredness. (Applause.) I think the Mayor of New York City said a 
pretty good thing the other day. When he saw 141,000 men marching 
in that parade he said : "I think this is enough to raise the dead, even 
in Washington." (Laughter.) Great God, if we could wake them up! 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. IOI 

if they could be waked up without any trouble! We may have to get 
that man in there with a club; I don't know; we will have to do some- 
thing. I tell you frankly it is a great thing for me to come back here 
and stand very near to the place where we formed this Society, and in 
the very same State. I had a rebirth. I was born in New York, but, 
thank God, I got a rebirth of patriotism in Morristown. I lived in 
Morristown ten years, in the shadow of the headquarters, and I had a 
rebirth. New York has too much Tory in it. I remember in 1889, 
when we formed this Society, it was the same old fight of democracy 
against aristocracy; — too much aristocracy in New York, too much 
democracy in the Society. We fought the battle for democracy and 
equality in all the Societies, in all the States, and came out ahead, and 
here we are today with more than 14,000 members. But there is no 
time now for reminiscences; things are moving too fast. I just simply 
want to present this resolution on preparedness, and I hope it will be 
adopted. 

The Chairman : This will take the usual course and be referred to 
the Committee on Resolutions. 

GREETINGS TO JUDGE HANCOCK. 

Charles H. Wight: Our ex-President General, James Denton Han- 
cock, has been prevented by the infirmities of age from attending this 
Congress. No one has excelled him in his love for all that our organ- 
ization stands for. I move that the Secretary General be instructed to 
send a telegram to ex-President General Hancock expressing our good 
wishes. 

(Motion seconded and adopted, and the following telegram was sent 
to Judge Hancock:) 

To James Denton Hancock, Franklin, Pa.: 

Twenty-seventh Congress, Sons American Revolution, regrets being 
deprived of inspiration of presence of Compatriot Hancock and hopes 
he may have many more years of usefulness among us. 

Neweee B. Woodworth, 

President General. 

The Chairman : To return to our regular order of business, the next 
committee to report is the very important one on Americanization and 
Aliens, Mr. Chancellor L. Jenks, of Illinois, chairman. 

REPORT ON AMERICANIZATION AND AUENS. 

Mr. Jenks : Mr. President General, I desire to preface my report by 
saying that it is impossible to make a report of the patriotism of this 
Society comprehensive of all its activities. Every State Society, every 
Chapter, is a school of patriotism, and every loyal member of this 
Society is a teacher of patriotism in that school. This report covers 
simply those activities in the cause of the education of the aliens, the 
preparation of the prospective citizen for citizenship, which have come 



102 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

under the immediate observation and co-operation of the members of 
this Society. 

To the Twenty-seventh Annual Congress of the National Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution: 

The scope of your Committee on Americanization and Aliens, as 
understood by its members, is the inculcating of a love of Americanism 
among naturalized citizens, assisting prospective citizens in acquiring a 
sufficient understanding of the spirit of our institutions to enable them 
to vote intelligently, and investing the legal ceremony of conferring 
citizenship with impressive and lasting dignity. 

The distribution of the members of this committee is such as to 
extend its work and influence over most of the United States. 

Never in the history of our land has there been such great need of 
a baptism of pure Americanism. The birth of our national spirit was 
amid the throes of the War for Independence. A few great ideals of 
popular government took possession of the souls of our forefathers and 
lifted them out of the miasma of self-interest into the purer atmosphere 
of practical altruism, proclaiming the supremacy of the individual as 
opposed to the domination of Church and State. The splendid growth 
of our country has proven these ideals to be sound. Abuses have re- 
tarded that growth. Mistakes which are always incident to experi- 
ments in nation building have caused delays in our development. Yet 
America has demonstrated to the world that a nation whose king is the 
individual voter is not a nation of few days, but possesses the elements 
of vitality and strength which insure long life to its social structure 
and the fullest possible scope of action to the individual. The peoples 
of the earth know that this is true and flock to our shores in numbers 
so overwhelming that our welcome is beginning to show signs of strain. 
The quality of the citizenship of these immigrants has become of para- 
mount national importance. As long as a large mass of this foreign 
population remains unassimilated into our citizenship, our land is not 
only inconvenienced beyond all reasonable demand upon our hospitality, 
but is menaced by serious danger. To assist in removing this danger 
is the hope of this committee. 

The forms of activity assumed by the committee are as various as 
the homes of its members. In Seattle, where Dr. Samuel Judd Holmes, 
one of our Vice-Presidents General, is in charge, there has been most 
effective co-operation with the local Y. M. C. A. Classes have been 
formed for aliens having an enrolment of over one hundred. Teachers 
have been obtained from the ranks of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, and prominent men both within and without the Society have 
presented the ideals of our government in the form of popular ad- 
dresses. Examinations in citizenship close the course, which is of ten 
weeks duration. As soon as one class is completed, another begins. 
At the end of the year there is a public dinner in honor of the gradu- 
ates. The work of the committee has been commented upon favorably 
by the press. On Washington's Birthday a celebration was held by the 
Sons of the American Revolution, working with the Y. M. C. A., under 
the name of "Citizenship Night." Doctor Holmes was one of four 
members of the Sons of the American Revolution who made addresses. 
While the headquarters of this patriotic work is at Seattle, it is carried 
on over the whole State. Subcommittees from the Society are at work 
with the aliens in different cities. Plans for a monster Americanization 
Day celebration are under way, to be held on the Fourth of July. 

Another far-away point of gratifying activity is Honolulu, under the 
enthusiastic guidance of Compatriot Dr. Samuel Denham Barnes, Pres- 
ident of our Hawaiian Society. He writes interestingly of the peculiar 



PROCEEDINGS OF" NEWARK CONGRESS. IO3 

conditions existing there affecting American citizenship. Residing in 
the territory are five thousand Porto Ricans, fifteen thousand Filipinos, 
and seventy-five thousand Japanese. A joint committee _ of the Sons 
and Daughters of the American Revolution have established a prize 
essay contest, open to pupils of high schools and other schools of sim- 
ilar grade and to citizens under twenty-two years of age not attending 
school. Patriotic subjects are assigned and eight prizes are awarded 
at each contest — one of ten dollars, two of five dollars, and five of two 
dollars each. So successful have these contests been, and so intense 
the resulting interest in Americanism, that Doctor Barnes recommends 
increasing the amount or number of the prizes and encouraging the 
Japanese to participate. The Japanese are frantically patriotic as to 
their home land and eager to give expression to their views. They 
confidently expect to become naturalized Americans, but certainly need 
a heavy dose of Americanism now. 

One of the incidents of the Mid-Pacific Carnival, held at Honolulu 
on Washington's Birthday, was a patriotic program presided over bv 
Doctor Barnes. 

Compatriot Alfred Coit, of New London, Conn., a valued member of 
this committee, writes of an interesting program of the Americaniza- 
tion Day exercises conducted in a public park, in which he took part. 
A Russian, Ismar Baruch, made the principal address. He is a grad- 
uate of the New London schools and of Brown University, at which 
latter place he obtained the highest standing ever awarded there. He 
spoke on the opportunity this country offers to the alien. At a meeting 
of the State Board of Managers of the Connecticut Society, held Jan- 
uary 29, a committee was appointed to co-operate with the Commissioner 
of Naturalization of the United States Department of Labor in encour- 
aging the education of prospective citizens. 

Letters from Compatriot Edward M. Hall, Jr., in charge of the work 
of this committee at Cleveland, described medal essay contests in the 
schools and the distribution of our pamphlets. Of especial interest 
have been three naturalization receptions, attended by a large number 
of gratified new citizens and addressed by the President of the Western 
Reserve Society and the presiding judges. Certificates of citizenship 
were presented and pledges of allegiance given, the entire audience 
standing and repeating the pledge in unison, as follows : 

"I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for 
which it stands ; One Nation, indivisible, with Liberty and 
Justice for all." 

From Rochester, N. Y., Judge Harvey F. Remington writes of the 
establishment by the local Chapter of Patriots' Day in the public schools 
and the address of Hon. C. E. Ogden, President of the Chapter and 
editor of the Rochester Daily Times. He is keenly alive to everything 
tending to uplift mankind and has directed the Chapter to effective 
work in behalf of Americanization and Aliens. In this work the Chap- 
ter has enjoyed the enthusiastic co-operation of Prof. Charles E. Finch, 
principal of Washington Junior High School. This gentleman and 
Compatriot Ogden delivered addresses at the patriotic exercises in the 
interest of aliens on Washington's Birthday. 

Rev. Frederick S. Penfold, of Racine, Wis., President of the Wis- 
consin Society, has been most active in behalf of new and prospective 
citizens in the many factories which crowd the shore-line of his State. 
Through his efforts Americanism has a place upon the curricula of the 
night schools, and our pamphlets are in constant and increasing demand 
as primers of patriotism. Doctor Penfold is much sought after as an 
orator, his addresses this year being devoted to the problem of rapid 
assimilation of the alien into our citizenship. 



104 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Commander John H. Moore, of Washington, D. C, is never idle and 
during the past year has distributed many thousands of pamphlets. 
Several enthusiastic meetings have been attended and participated in 
by him, and his zeal and long experience in the line of work taken up 
by this committee have made him a most valuable and efficient member. 

Commander Moore writes: "For nine years our Society nas been work- 
ing for the alien. We were the pioneers in this work. Other societies 
have gradually taken up the work and great changes ' have .been made, 
so that now the principal work is to educate the alien n\ me^English 
language, which is the foundation stone for his greates'wflenent. The 
Board of Education of the State of New York, th^' "Bureau of- Natural- 
ization of the Department of Labor, and the Bureau of Education of 
the Interior Department have been the principal factors in this change. 

"During the year there has been a greater demand', for the Constitution 
than usual. Hundreds of single copies have been sent to the Ea*st and 
West, while clerks of courts and naturalization officers have beerf sup- 
plied by the thousands. The demand for Leaflet No. I in English re- 
mains about constant, but the demand for it in foreign languages has 
fallen off very materially, caused, it would appear, from the greater 
opportunities for learning the English language. The demand for 
Leaflet No. 2 is about the same. We have filled requests for our leaflets 
for individuals, from night schools, from patriotic societies, for social 
workers, from various Y. M. C. A.'s, and latterly from large industries." 

Compatriot Thomas S. Brown, of Pittsburgh, reports a very large 
demand for and circulation of our three pamphlets in the social centers 
of Pittsburgh largely inhabited by aliens. Several thousand copies of 
Pamphlet No. 1, published in fourteen languages, were ordered, usually 
in one hundred lots in each language desired, for the Irene Kauffmann 
Settlement, the Soho Baths, the Lawrenceville Baths, Kingsley House, 
Woods Run Settlement House, and the Associated Charities in Woods 
Run, as well as for Dr. G. W. Montgomery, of the Presbyterian Board 
for the Education of Foreigners and the local officer of the Immigra- 
tion Bureau. The public schools of Pittsburgh have initiated a far- 
reaching work in this direction, with which it seemed better for this 
committee to offer to co-operate than to voluntarily try to supplement 
when it might only hinder. 

In the school years 1914-1915, 4,977 pupils of foreign birth were regis- 
tered in the evening schools of Pittsburgh, in all the departments, of 
which number 245 were in the high-school department. This year, so 
far, 3,679 foreign-born pupils are registered, of whom 279 are natural- 
ized citizens, 135 are candidates for their second papers, and 595 are 
declarants, while there are 1,432 men over 18 who have not made their 
declaration for first papers. The evening schools are furnishing oppor- 
tunities for education to many young men and women who work by day 
and need these opportunities to supplement their education, and the 
opportunity they offer to foreigners of meager education is striking. 
That there is a lively hunger in the minds of these foreigners for such 
opportunities is evident from the number of registered students quoted 
above. 

In the Middle West the committee has been represented by its Chair- 
man. He has enjoyed the companionship and hearty co-operation of 
Mr. John D. Shoop, superintendent of the Chicago schools, who has 
recognized the value in the night school of our pamphlets as text-books 
of citizenship. Many thousands have been used by him and distributed 
among the foreigners. The Chairman wishes to acknowledge the cour- 
teous attitude of the judges of the courts having naturalization affairs 
under their jurisdiction. Dignity and impressiveness have been imparted 
to the ceremony of conferring citizenship, and no one can participate 
in or witness the proceedings without a sense of their solemnity and 
importance. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 05 

The prospective citizens in Chicago are prone to meet together in 
clubs and societies of their own. Hull House and other social settle- 
ments, as well as the splendid establishments for public betterment con- 
ducted by the Park Commissioners and the municipal authorities, en- 
courage these organizations and furnish them with halls and rooms in 
which to hold their meetings. On several occasions the Chairman of this 
committee has been privileged to attend meetings of this kind, and has 
always been impressed with the earnestness of these aliens in the pur- 
suit of knowledge relating to our national ideals. While it is true that 
many of these clubs are socialistic in tone, they are not in any way sub- 
versive of society. I have heard several passionate eulogies of the 
genius of America, uttered in the most battered kind of broken English, 
which I would like our own high-school boys and girls to commit to 
memory. 

In Chicago, as in all other parts of the country, the services for the 
new and prospective citizen performed by the National Americanization 
Committee, of which Mr. Frank Trumbull, of New York, is chairman, 
has been of untold value. Commander Moore and the Chairman of 
your committee are both members of that organization and have at- 
tended and participated in many of its private and public functions. 
Its construction and equipment are most efficient, and those in charge 
are giving to its labors an intelligent, consecrated, and effective zeal 
which acts like a patriotic tonic from sea to sea. We have been glad 
to co-operate with this powerful body and have not thereby lost our 
own individuality. 

Another agency working along somewhat similar lines, and with 
which our committee has been glad to be associated, is the Bureau of 
Naturalization of the United States Department of Labor. The Chair- 
man of this committee has enjoyed a correspondence with the Hon. 
Richard K. Campbell, Commissioner of Naturalization, relative to a 
"Course of Instruction in Citizenship" which his Bureau has completed 
and furnished to superintendents of all the schools in the country which 
desire to co-operate with the Bureau in behalf of the candidate for 
citizenship. It will be recalled that at the meeting of the National 
Executive Committee of our Society, held last November, a resolution 
was adopted urging the Bureau of Naturalization to prepare and issue 
such a manual. The Department of Labor has secured the co-operation 
in spirit of the entire public-school system of the United States in the 
education of the foreigner who becomes a candidate for citizenship. It 
sends monthly to local school authorities names and addresses of all 
aliens who have declared their intention or petitioned for naturalization 
during the preceding month, together with the names of the wives of 
the declarants. At the same time the Bureau sends a personal letter to 
the declarants and their wives. The Bureau welcomes the co-operation 
of societies such as ours in its educational activity. So vast are the 
facilities of this department, and so direct and personal and authorita- 
tive its methods, that we hail with gladness its advent into this field of 
patriotic endeavor. 

The Immigration Committee of the Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States of America prosecutes the good of the immigrant along 
broad and varied avenues. Its program for the present year included : 
(1) Surveys of industrial communities and analyses of plant conditions, 
with recommendations for local work; (2) organization of Americani- 
zation and Immigration Committees in local Chambers of Commerce to 
clear work in local districts and preparation of programs for such com- 
mittees for the Americanization of cities and industries; (3) studies of 
conditions after the war, and of work now being done by industries to 
Americanize their foreign-born workmen ; (4) distribution of civic 
lesson leaflets in pay envelopes and through industries; (5) stimulation 
of interest in housing workmen through local Housing Committees and 



106 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

co-operation with the National Immigrant Housing Competition Com- 
mittee ; (6) study of probable outgoing emigrant traffic and considera- 
tion of measures to safeguard it at the close of the war. 

Recently the General Federation of Women's Clubs has taken up the 
question of the welfare and civic education of immigrant women, work- 
ing hand in hand with the National Americanization Committee and the 
United States Bureau of Naturalization. The Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution have long been engaged in the same commendable 
cause, often in co-operation with the Sons of the American Revolution, 
giving to it the intelligence and persistence which characterize every 
activity of that magnificent organization of patriotic women. 

In conclusion, we would report that we see in these manifold unselfed 
activities in behalf of the new citizen a strong evidence of the renais- 
sance of pure Americanism. In response to the general conviction that 
American patriotism may soon be put to the test, there has been uncov- 
ered a nation-wide loyalty. No one who has followed the progress of 
this awakening can entertain any apprehension as to our spiritual, pre- 
paredness for national defense. Let me close with the words of Presi- 
dent Wilson, uttered within a fortnight : 

"God forbid that the United States should be drawn into war; but if 
she should be, America would shake herself out of a dream and say to 
any one who doubts the spirit of the new world that she still speaks the 
voice of humanity." 

Respectfully submitted, Chancellor L. Jenks, 

Chairman. 

Rev. Dr. Foster: Mr. Chairman, may I speak a few words on that 
report? 

The Chairman : Very glad to have you, sir. 

Rev. Dr. Foster: Compatriots, I want to speak a few words on that 
report, especially the first part of it, that which relates to Seattle, whence 
I hail and where I have lived for many years. I know you will be 
grateful to me for these facts that I will give you just in a few words. 
Under my room in the Y. M. C. A. building, a very large building, 
Dr. Samuel Judd Holmes, Vice-President General of this Society, is 
conducting that class in citizenship. What would you think if I'd tell 
you that as large a number as there is on this side of the aisle assem- 
bled in a room almost as large as this every Wednesday night, and if 
you could go and look in the faces of those men you would make this 
remark involuntarily, "Something must be done to help those men to 
become citizens." Now who is going to do the work? What will be 
the work? How are we going to reach these men? How are we going 
to make American citizens out of these men who cannot speak our lan- 
guage? What would you think of nine languages right before Dr. 
Holmes? And some of them have to have interpreters, and they are so 
hungry for the knowledge of our Constitution they get copies of all of 
our printed matter, for you furnish that free in their own tongue, if 
necessary. Now these men are anxious; what is going to be done? A 
man said to me a little while ago, when I was pressing him to unite 
with our Chapter, of which I am President, "Why don't you come, Mr. 
Fuller, into our Chapter and take hold?" He said, "What good is it?" 
I said, "Why, man alive, what a question. Will you step down into that 



PROCEEDINGS OP NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 07 

room tomorrow night and see what Dr. Holmes is doing? And that is 
only one in the United States. Here is the mill these men have to go 
through in order to become citizens, and it is long and severe and they 
need this information." Who is going to give it to them? I am so 
glad that the Sons of the American Revolution are emphasizing that all 
over the United States, and that men are coming to us by the ship-load. 
The men may come when all is open again. I don't know how many 
millions in the Old World would to God they could come to the Land 
of the Free and the Home of the Brave. What would you think of 
seeing a man who had just landed running a little way from the dock, 
stooping down, taking up a handful of dirt, raising it to his mouth and 
kissing it, saying, in his own language, "Thank God, I am in God's coun- 
try." (Applause.) Compatriots, who is going to do this work? There 
is a good deal of other work we do. I am so glad that our compatriot, 
Dr. Parker, gave us $1,000 this morning. Would to God we had hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars, that we might take hold of this work 
with a vigor never before known! Who will help in it? They call me 
out there "the white-headed kid of the Y. M. C. A." I am a regular 
member of the Y. M. C. A., and although I am more than fourscore 
years old it delights me to mingle with these young men and see their 
work. Now, the Y. M. C. A.'s of the United States are ready to sup- 
plement your work if you will lead. If you go on with this work, they 
will take hold of it. Of course, they are very busy; they have got so 
much on their hands ; but they want you to lead in this and they will 
follow suit. Our Society, 2,600 of the Y. M. C. A. in Seattle, will be 
very glad to supplement all these efforts. In conclusion, you have got 
to either assimilate these men or they will ruin yon. They are here 
with prejudices; they are here with antagonisms; they are here with 
vigor, and somebody must rule those men for righteousness and get 
them into the right way. Who is going to do it? I say all honor to 
you, and I am glad to be a member of a society that will take hold and 
help make those men good citizens of the United States. 

Judge Remington : It seems to me that this is certainly one of the 
most important works that our organization can be engaged in. In 
New York State we have taken no little part in this work, and it is 
something that appeals to these men, and it is a source of great satis- 
faction to be engaged in this work. I am not very familiar with the 
work of the Syracuse Chapter with reference to this, but I know that 
very effective work has been done in Syracuse and along these lines. 
There has also been much work done in Buffalo and Rochester. On 
February 22, a year ago, and on last February 22 we had a service, or 
a meeting, at which all of the aliens who had taken out their final papers 
within a period of sixty days or so were gathered together and they 
received their final certificates of citizenship. On the evening of Feb- 
ruary 22 there was a patriotic service held at our Convention Hall, pre- 
sided over by the Mayor of the city, and distinguished speakers were 
present, and they were presented those certificates, coming up in front 



108 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

to receive them, and it was a great pleasure to see the satisfaction on 
their faces when they received those certificates. They came dressed in 
their best clothes. A large proportion of them were Italians, and the 
whole meeting — the Convention Hall was packed with those interested 
in this service. The Daughters of the American Revolution also have 
taken part in fostering this work, and the idea in our State is to lift 
this form of life, this ceremony, make it more important, and impress 
upon these citizens the value of what they are getting. Now at that 
meeting our most distinguished citizens were present, and there was a 
salute to the flag, and these men lined up in front of the platform, and 
as their names were read they came forward and received their cer- 
tificate of citizenship. As I said, there can be no more important work 
in which we could be engaged than this. In the city of Rochester, with 
a population of 250,000, the figures show that there are 140,000 citizens 
of that city one of whose parents was born in a foreign land, and I may 
say that those people are faithful, law-abiding citizens ; that there would 
not be any sympathy with any other country in case this country were 
drawn into difficulty with any other, which God forbid ; but they would 
all stand shoulder to shoulder for this country and fight for it, although 
their parentage was with a foreign nation ; and so I hope this work will 
go on and this excellent report made by the Chairman will receive con- 
sideration in all the States, as I have no doubt it has done, and I know 
that the work has progressed in other States as well as in New York. 
I may say that in New York County I believe that the county clerk of 
that county has prepared a pamphlet at his own expense, not at the ex- 
pense of the public, but at his own expense, for distribution to the citi- 
zens who are to receive their final papers. A few weeks ago I happened 
to be in the court-house in New York City and engaged in a trial of a 
case, and I noticed a great crowd of men there. They were foreign- 
born citizens. I asked some one what this demonstration wasi about, 
and he said they were citizens receiving their final papers. There were 
four or five hundred gathered around the corridor; there was not room 
in the court-room for them. They were there receiving their papers. 
If the reception of these citizens as citizens could be made more em- 
phatic and more impressive, it seems to me it would be a great thing, as 
it is made more impressive in many localities of the country. These 
men are anxious to become citizens ; they are anxious to take part, and 
they highly prize what is given them, and the more ceremony we throw 
about this, the more dignity attached to it, the better it will be for them. 
(Applause.) 

The Chairman : The Chair might state that in the city of Syracuse 
the Sons of the American Revolution there acted with the Chamber of 
Commerce in having a social survey made of all the alien population. 
An expert was brought there and spent two weeks making this survey. 
As a result, every factory or place where foreigners are employed has 
now several large posters distributed about the building, headed by the 
words, "Learn English; it means a better job; means better pay; it 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 09 

means better things for your family." The result of that has been an 
increased number of those applying for their first papers, and by co- 
operation with the Board of Education the hours of the night schools 
have been extended, and the result has been an enrollment in those 
schools of threefold the number that was enrolled before this survey 
was made. I simply bring this matter to your attention as showing a 
very practical way of increasing the attendance at the night schools 
where these aliens are taught English. We would like to have a word 
from Mr. Henry, who was Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce 
Committee of the city of Detroit, where a similar survey was made on 
a little more exhaustive basis than the one in Syracuse, and the result 
there; I know you would be interested in hearing from Mr. Henry just 
what was accomplished. 

Mr. Burgess : The President of the Connecticut Society has asked me 
to make allusion to the work of the State Society in New Haven. We 
have been working with our new Americans about four months, result- 
ing in a patriotic celebration which was carried on entirely by these men 
working with our committee and which was eminently successful. It 
has brought us into very much closer touch with them and produced a 
great and increasing desire for naturalization. This celebration was 
held on the 27th of April, probably too late to be reported, and filled 
our largest auditorium to overflowing, and was participated in by 
many — as great a number as possible — of our own American people ; 
and it brought us in closer touch with them and brought them in closer 
touch with our ideals, and I shall be glad to turn over one of these 
programs to Chairman Jenks and have him realize that Connecticut is 
making rapid strides. We have had the co-operation of the students of 
Yale University and the Y. M. C. A. has co-operated, and we have the 
entrance to all the large plants and the heads of the different factories 
report to us the most satisfactory progress and the most satisfactory 
results among their employees in this work. We have nine nationalities 
participating in our program and an audience of more than four thou- 
sand, which more than fills Woolsey Hall, and a very gratifying pro- 
gram. 

Colonel Vrooman : I am a Dutchman, and therefore speak bluntly. 
I think this is the most important topic. Mr. President General, you 
struck the keynote of this Congress when you said, referring to aliens, 
"learn English." (Applause.) The Sons of the American Revolution 
want the good people who come to this land to learn English. * * * 
I want to say to my brother here, you have told a lot of truth about 
the Y. M. C. A. I have been a member of the International Committee 
of the Y. M. C. A. for twenty years. I know the work it has done here 
and abroad, and I think we ought to fraternize 1 with that God-given 
institution, so that together we may teach our dear alien brothers to 
become true and tried Americans. Now, I ask your pardon ; I did not 
intend to say five words, but I couldn't help it. I have been through 
one war; I have seen its misery; but I saw, too, that out of that miserv 



IIO SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

came a grander, more glorious country. If we stand together, Ameri- 
cans one and all, and back up our Commander-in-Chief of the Army 
and Navy, no nation on top of God's earth dare do anything except to 
pay obeisance to us. Don't be afraid of war, dear compatriots, against 
any government on earth, so long as we are united. God bless the 
Stars and Stripes. (Applause.) 

Judge Remington : Just one other word. I want to say that through 
the agency of our National Society^ and largely through its interest in 
this matter, at the time when Commander Moore was the chairman of 
this committee, our Society started this work of English, teaching Eng- 
lish to the foreigners in our city. Now our Board of Education em- 
ploys one of its school principals to conduct evening schools for the 
purpose of teaching English to the foreign-born citizens, those who are 
twenty-one and over, and those night schools are attended by several — 
about fifteen hundred to eighteen hundred. They desire to attend those 
schools and they show a very great interest in the work. This Society 
sowed the seed that brought about that work and interested our Board 
of Education to employ this principal and to make appropriations for 
this purpose. 

(There was some discussion as to possible violation of the National 
laws on naturalization in some States.) 

The Chairman : We have before us the report of the committee for 
consideration. If the gentleman will offer his motion after we dispose 
of the report, it will be received. I think the Society is indebted to this 
committee, to the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, for the very exhaustive 
and interesting report they have given us on this subject. If there is 
no objection, the report will be received and placed on file. Is there 
any further discussion? Hearing none, the Chair will direct that the 
report be received and placed on file. 

Mr. Baldwin : In regard to what has been said, I think it will not be 
amiss to state that Oregon in 1914, by popular vote, raised the require- 
ment to vote from six months' residence in the State until they had got 
their second or final papers, five years — six months to five years. 

Mr. Dutton : In behalf of the State of Washington, I wish to say 
the same law is in force ; and while I am on my feet I want to say that 
the State Society is reviving the old-fashioned Fourth of July. On the 
Fourth of July we are inviting these new-made citizens to patriotic 
events, patriotic addresses, where we ask them to take part. We offer 
a prize for the first, second, and third best essays upon Americanism, 
and in conjunction with the Y. M. C. A. we also co-operate, as Doctor 
Foster said, but also with the Council of Social Agency, which repre- 
sents sixty-two social agencies of the city of Seattle. We conduct this 
Fourth of July celebration for the assimilation of our new-made citizens. 

Commander Moore : I would like to offer this resolution : 

Whereas when an alien becomes a citizen of our country his wife 
and minor children, if residing in the United States, become automatic- 
ally citizens ; and 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. Ill 

Whereas the alien in becoming a citizen is obliged to take the oath 
of allegiance, but there is no provision of law obliging his minor chil- 
dren to take such oath upon their arriving at the voting age and desiring 
to cast their first vote ; and 

Whereas we now have a large body of automatic citizens voting each 
year who have not taken the oath of allegiance : Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this the National Congress of the 
Sons of the American Revolution that all citizens should be obliged to 
take the oath of allegiance before casting their first vote. 

The Chairman : The resolution will be referred to the Committee 
on Resolutions. 

[As recorded later in these Proceedings, the resolution was adopted, 
and on June 3 Compatriot Dillingham introduced a bill in Congress as 
follows : 

64th Congress, 1st Session. S. 6288. 
In the Senate of the United States. 

June 3, 1916. — Mr. Dillingham introduced the following bill, which was 
read twice and referred to the Committee on Immigration. 

A BiEE to amend section twenty-one hundred and seventy-two of the 
Revised Statutes of the United States. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That section twenty- 
one hundred and seventy-two of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States of America be amended so as to read as follows : 

"Sec. 2172. The foreign-born children of persons who have been duly 
naturalized under any law of the United States, or who, previous to the 
passing of any law on that subject by the Government of the United 
States, may have become citizens of any one of the States, under the 
laws thereof, being under the age of twenty-one years at the time of 
the naturalization of their parents, shall, in each instance, if dwelling 
in the United States, be considered as citizens thereof if within one 
year after reaching the age of twenty-one years they make oath to sup- 
port the Constitution and laws of the United States before a court hav- 
ing jurisdiction of naturalization in the district in which they reside; 
and the children of persons who now are, or have been, citizens of the 
United < States shall, though born out of the limits and jurisdiction of 
the United States, be considered as citizens thereof; but no person here- 
tofore proscribed by any State or who has been legally convicted of 
having joined the Army of Great Britain during the Revolutionary War 
shall be admitted to become a citizen without the consent of the legis- 
lature of the State in which such person was proscribed."] 

The Chairman : The next committee to report is the Flag Commit- 
tee. In the absence of Chairman Cox, Colonel Lauman will read the 
report. 

REPO'RT OF FLAG COMMITTEE. 

W. V. Cox, Chairman; Col. George V. Lauman, John F. Durston, 
Gen. James R. Lincoln, Gen. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A.; Thomas 
A. Perkins, Claude Hamilton. 

The Flag Committee of the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution begs to report that no law to prevent the desecra- 
tion of the flag of the United States has as yet been enacted by the 



112 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

64th Congress. It has pleasure to report, however, that the Committee 
on the District of Columbia, House of Representatives, has reported 
favorably Mr. Oglesby's bill, H. R. No. 14822, "To prevent and punish 
the desecration, mutilation, or improper use within the District of Co- 
lumbia of the flag of the United States of America." [The bill passed 
the House June 12 and is now before the Senate; see Appendix A.] 

The wave of patriotism now sweeping over the country has stimu- 
lated four additional States to enact protecting flag laws. Last August 
the Legislature of Alabama took favorable action, followed by South 
Carolina in February, Virginia in March, and Mississippi in April. A 
list of the States, Territories, and insular possessions of the United 
States having flag laws is made a part of this report (Appendix B). 

The lack of agreement as to the wording of a National Flag Bill, as 
set forth in the report of the committee last year, continues to handicap 
favorable congressional action. The Portland Congress of this Society 
approved the recommendation that a joint conference of representa- 
tives of the various patriotic societies be held with a view to agreement, 
if possible, on a bill that all organizations could and would support. 

The Washington Congress of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, through the untiring efforts of Mrs. George B. Macfarlane, 
Chairman of its Flag Committee, last year approved such action, but 
no delegates have been appointed by either Society, and there the matter 
rests. Nevertheless the sentiment for a clean flag is growing, as shown 
by business men taking up the question of the proper use of the flag. 
In Washington the Board of Trade has a Special Committee on "Law 
Protecting Nation's Flag" that is quite active. The Retail Merchants' 
Association is also doing effective work. Last month Mr. Ross P. 
Andrews, President of the Association, told the merchants that no ad- 
vertisement of any sort must be allowed to be attached to the flag of 
the United States. The flag, he said, may be freely used for decorative 
purposes so long as the user observes respect for his country's dignity 
as represented by the American flag. 

The merchants in many cities have placed large incandescent flags 
over their stores and mills that their employees and others seeing will 
become familiar with the emblem of the Republic as an incentive to 
patriotism. 

Mr. Francis A. Schneider, of the well-known Ketterlinus Lithographic 
Manufacturing Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., says that it is a great 
pity there is no Federal flag law, so that we would know just what to- 
do. Recently a Philadelphia photographic magazine, one of the best 
and foremost photographic papers in the country, had on its cover a 
beautiful reproduction of an interior scene of Betsy Ross making the 
flag, and through the open window, in the background, was Independ- 
ence Hall. This was sent through the mail without any trouble, but 
was held up at Boston. . . . What is the prospect for a Federal law 
that would be uniform throughout the States? 

A telegram to the New York Times from Boston says : "The July 
number of the Modern Priscilla shows the figure of an aged woman 
industriously sewing an American flag. The Youth's Companion has 
withdrawn its entire issue, for its cover design showed a girl, tin horn 
in one hand, firecrackers in the other, and with two small flags woven 
in her hair. Leslie's Weekly for June 3 featured a large American flag 
with excerpts from the United States note to Germany. 

Under the State law regarding advertising, Police Superintendent 
Crowley contends that the flag is used to attract attention and secure 
sale of the magazines. 

The lack of uniform State flag laws has proven a hardship in some 
cases; but the attention of the thoughtless has been forcibly called to 
the fact that the flag of the United States is not to be treated as an 
attractive piece of bunting. It is somewhat anomalous that the Boston 



PROCEEDINGS 01? NEWARK CONGRESS. I I 3 

post-office should continue to use a mechanical simulation of the United 
States flag to cancel stamps on letters, when these officials are so punc- 
tilious about flag designs on magazines. 

The New York Police Department is to be commended for its recent 
order to the 10,000 men on the force, that they will be required to salute 
the flag when they pass it on any public occasion. 

It should be the duty of officials and custodians of public buildings 
to see that the flag is properly raised and lowered; that the flag is not 
worn out by continuous day and night display. If officials do not show 
respect for their country's flag their constituents should. 

As a rule, flags are properly displayed on all Federal buildings at the 
National Capital. Flags fly at full staff on school buildings from 8.30 
a. m. to 4.30 p. m. on all school days and legal holidays and other days 
made holidays by proclamation of the President. On Memorial Day the 
flag is placed at half staff. 

The suggestion in the report of last year, that the opinion of Justice 
Harlan in the Nebraska Flag case (1907) be read at Flag Day exer- 
cises in the public schools of the United States, has been kindly received 
and has been adopted by several of the schools. Superintendent Thurs- 
ton, of Washington, approves the idea, and thinks it advisable to have 
Justice Harlan's memorable words read at the exercises of the older 
pupils. 

The physical desecrations of the flag this year have not been so 
numerous. Window dressers and platform decorators continue to use 
the flag as improperly as the farmer near Marcellus, New York, who 
uses it to cover his tomato vines on frosty nights, or the person dis- 
covered by Mrs. Isabel Worrell Ball, who used the flag as a shroud 
when he buried his pet dog. 

The United States shield, which is not mentioned specifically in any 
State flag law, has been frequently debased by advertisers, those using 
it claiming that State laws only apply to articles of merchandise or 
receptacles for carrying merchandise and must be in connection with 
something to be sold. 

We commend President Wilson's tribute to the flag: 

"As I look at that flag I seem to see many characters upon it which 
are not visible to the physical eye. There seem to move ghostly visions 
of devoted men who, looking to that flag, thought only of liberty, of the 
rights of mankind, of the mission of America to show the way to the 
world for the realization of those rights. And the grave of every brave 
man in the country would seem to have upon it the colors of the flag, 
if he were a true American — would seem to have on it that stain of red 
which means the true pulse of blood ; that patch of pure white which 
means the peace of the soul. And then there seems to rise over the 
graves of those men and to hallow their memories that blue space of 
the sky in which swim those stars which exemplify for us the glorious 
galaxy of the States of the Union which stand together to vindicate the 
rights of mankind." 

This is the flag Americans want to protect by a national statute. It 
seems anomalous at this time, when men are talking love of country, 
that Congress should hesitate to protect that flag in this country by law, 
on the theory that such a law would be unconstitutional. It is sheer 
nonsense to think that any court would hold that Congress cannot pro- 
tect by national statute the flag which it created and which can only be 
abolished b}^ Congress. 

After years of activity, it is the opinion of your committee that Na- 
tional Flag legislation can only be secured by united, earnest support of 
a single bill. 

In concluding this report, I desire to commend the untiring efforts of 
R. C. Ballard Thruston, Louisville; Maj. Moses Veale, President of the 
Philadelphia Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution ; Dr. Samuel 



114 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Judd Holmes, Seattle ; Henry W. Samson, Washington : Mrs. George B. 
Macfarlane, St. Louis, and E. R. Lewis, Chicago. 

Respectfully submitted, W. V. Cox, 

Chairman. 
Appendix A. 

64th Congress-, 1st Session. H. R. 14822. 

In the Senate of the United States. 

June 20, 1916. — Read twice and referred to the Committee on the 

District of Columbia. 

An Act to prevent and punish the desecration, mutilation, or improper 

use, within the District of Columbia, of the flag of the United 

States of America. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of 'America in Congress assembled, That hereafter any 
person who, within the District of Columbia, in any manner, for ex- 
hibition or display, shall place or cause to be placed any word, figure, 
mark, picture, design, drawing or any advertisement of any nature upon 
any flag, standard, colors or ensign of the' United States of America ; 
or shall expose or cause to be exposed to public view any such flag, 
standard, colors or ensign upon which shall have been printed, painted 
or otherwise placed, or to which shall be attached, appended, affixed or 
annexed any word, figure, mark, picture, design or drawing, or any ad- 
vertisement of any nature ; or who, within the District of Columbia, 
shall manufacture, sell, expose for sale or to public view or give away 
or have in possession for sale or to be given away or for use for any 
purpose, any article or substance being an article of merchandise, or a 
receptacle for merchandise or article or thing for carrying or transport- 
ing merchandise, upon which shall have been printed, painted, attached 
or otherwise placed a representation of any such flag, standard, colors 
or ensign, to advertise, call attention to, decorate, mark or distinguish 
the article or substance on which so placed ; or who, within the District 
of Columbia, shall publicly mutilate, deface, defile or defy, trample upon 
or cast contempt, either by word or act, upon any such flag, standard, 
colors or ensign, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding $100 or by imprisonment for not more 
than thirty days, or both, in the discretion of the court. The words 
"flag, standard, colors, or ensign," as used herein, shall include any flag, 
standard, colors, ensign or any picture or representation of either, or of 
any part or parts of either, made of any substance or represented on 
any substance, of any size evidently purporting to be either of said flag, 
standard, colors or ensign of the United States of America or a picture 
or a representation of either, upon which shall be shown the colors, the 
stars and the stripes, in any number of either thereof, or of any part or 
parts of either, by which the average person seeing the same without 
deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag, colors, standard 
or ensign of the United States of America. 

Passed the House of Representatives June 12, 1916. 

Attest : 

South Trimble, Clerk, 
By D. K. Hempstead, 

Enrolling Clerk. 

Appendix B. 

List of States, Territories, and Insular Possessions of the United States 
Having Laws Protecting the flag of the United States, 1916. 

Alaska, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, 



PROCEEDINGS 01* NEWARK CONGRESS. I 1 5 

Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, New Hampshire, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New 
York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Philippine Islands, 
Porto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Ver- 
mont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming. 

An examination of the laws of the following States, Territories, and 
insular possessions of the United States fails to disclose any legislation 
respecting the desecration of the flag of the United States : Arkansas, 
District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Okla- 
homa, Panama Canal Zone, Tennessee, Texas. 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Committee on the 
Flag. If there are no objections, the report will be received and placed, 
on file. Hearing no objection, the report will take that course. 

Dr. Foster : Mr. Chairman, I want to introduce a resolution that 
may go with the report of the Aliens Committee. (The resolution 
commends the work of the several Y. M. C. A. organizations in the 
instruction of aliens and pledges hearty co-operation with them in this 
work.) 

The Chairman: That will be referred to the Committee on Resolu- 
tions. Next is the report of the Committee on Military and Naval 
Records. 

REPORT ON MILITARY AND NAVAL RECORDS. 

Colonel Kniffin : I did not expect to make this report ; I expected 
the Chairman to make it. We are all interested in recruiting this great 
organization. When we read of the comparatively small numbers that 
are added every year, we feel a little ashamed that so splendid an or- 
ganization as this should grow so slowly. As a means of recruiting, it 
has occurred to quite a number of us that the publication of the names 
of our Revolutionary ancestors would be of great value in this way. 
There are thousands of people who would see that publication and find, 
to their surprise and delight, that one of their ancestors living in a cer- 
tain town enlisted in a certain organization, entitling them to member- 
ship in this organization. Now the years go by and drag slowly by, 
with the hope and expectation in our minds that some day the records 
in the War Department will be printed ; but I think these boys here will 
be as gray headed as I am before it is done. Now the Pension Office 
has a very large number — thousands of names of men who have applied 
for pensions. Of course, that is only a portion of the men who served 
in the Revolutionary War. There were thousands of men who died be- 
fore they were pensioned, before they could apply for a pension — all 
those men who, through battle and disease, had passed away without 
ever having applied for a pension. More than that, from the close of 
the Revolutionary War, in 1787, to 1832 the minute men were not pen- 
sioned, so that all those who passed away could not appear in this ; but 
there are thousands of names that are borne upon the pension record 
that can be printed at a very small expense. For your information, I 
addressed a letter to the Commissioner of Pensions and received the 
following reply : 



Il6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions, 

Washington, April 22, 1916. 
Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, 

Civil War Division, Bureau of Pensions. 
Dear Sir: In response to your request for information relative to 
the present condition of the claims filed on account of service in the 
War of the Revolution, you are advised as follows : 

The papers in the claims have been flat filed by placing same in linen- 
lined envelopes and filing them alphabetically in vertical cap size tiling 
cabinets. These papers are in good condition, considering their age, 
and are being preserved with great care. 

A synopsis showing the name, State, service, and post-office address 
of the pension could be prepared for printing within a reasonable 
period, and the cost of printing same in two volumes could be sold at 
cost to the public and the proceeds turned in to the U. S. Treasury, 
thereby repaying the government for the cost of publication. A bill 
embodying these features has been introduced by Senator Clapp, of 
Minnesota, and is now pending in the Senate. 
Very truly yours, 

G. M. Saetzgaber, 

Commissioner. 

In order to assist in that, I think that action might be taken by this 
Congress urging upon Congress our great desire, the importance of 
this. These books will be sold at a nominal price ; they will cost very 
little; they will be printed at the Public Printing Office, and the cost 
will be very small ; so that the members of this Congress could all get 
copies and distribute them, if we are really in earnest, and I believe 
they will result in recruiting. As a business matter merely, recruiting 
would be of immense value to us, aside from the fact that it is a great 
thing to see the names of our ancestors in those records. It is about 
all the aristocracy we have in America and it is a pretty good thing to 
see in print. 

The bill referred to by the Commissioner is as follows : 

64th Congress, 1st Session. S. 5275. 

In the Senate of the United States. 

March 25, 1916. — Mr. Clapp introduced the following bill, which was 
read twice and referred to the Committee on Printing. 

A Bill making appropriation for publishing the name, service, and 
post-office address of persons who were granted pensions on ac- 
count of service in the Revolutionary War. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That there is hereby 
appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, the sum of $10,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to 
pay for the cost of publishing, arranging alphabetically, the name, serv- 
ice, and post-office address of those persons to whom pensions were 
granted on account of service in the Revolutionary War. Said work 
shall be done under the direction of the Commissioner of Pensions and 
shall be offered for sale to the public at a price sufficient to cover the 
cost of publication; if printed in one volume, at a price not to exceed 
$3.50; if printed in two volumes, at a price not to exceed $2.50. The 
proceeds of such sales to be covered into the Treasury of the United 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. HJ 

States, to be deposited to the credit of miscellaneous receipts on ac- 
count of "Proceeds of sales of government property." 

The Chairman : You have heard the report of the Committee on 
Military and Naval Records. If there is no objection, the report will 
be received and filed. Hearing no objection, the report will be con- 
sidered as received and filed. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON INVESTMENT OF 
PERMANENT FUND. 

The Chairman : The next committee is one on Investment of Per- 
manent Fund, of which the President General is ex officio chairman. 
The Chair would report that the securities belonging to the Permanent 
Fund were examined on Saturday last in the Safe Deposit Compar- 
and found correct, as the report rendered by the Treasurer General 
showed. The next report is that of the Committee on National 
Archives Building, Colonel Bryan. 

REPORT ON NATIONAL ARCHIVES BUILDING 

Colonel Bryan : Mr. President General and Compatriots, the Com- 
mittee on National Archives Building is able to report progress at this 
time and to advise you that the time is ripe for striking some effective 
blows with Congress to secure the speedy accomplishment of what we 
have so long been interested in. 

Washington, D. C, May 10, 1916. 
Mr. Neweix B. Woodworth, 

President General, National Society, S. A. R., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Dear Sir : A special committee on National Archives Building was 
appointed at the Annual Congress, held in Syracuse, N. Y., in May, 1914, 
as an expression of the deep interest felt by our Society in the erection 
of a suitable building at Washington for storing the archives of the 
National Government. The need for such a building is pressing, as 
the archives of the government are now widely scattered and generally 
inaccessible ; their value is priceless, while the danger of loss or dam- 
age by fire, dampness, mold, and other enemies is real and increasing. 

For nearly forty years Congress has been urged to provide such a 
"building. The Senate passed a bill thirty-five years ago authorizing the 
construction of an archives building. By authority of an act of Con- 
gress passed in 1903, an entire block of land in the city of Washington 
was purchased as a site for such a building. That land has since been 
devoted to the building now going up for the use of the Interior De- 
partment. 

The public buildings act, approved March 4, 1913, authorized the con- 
struction of a National Archives Building containing not less than 
3,000,000 cubic feet of space, capable of extension to a capacity of 8,900,- 
000 cubic feet, to cost not more than $1,500,000. The sum of $5,000 
was named for the preparation of plans and estimates, but no appro- 
priation was made. That sum was appropriated in the sundry civil act, 
approved August 1, 1914. 

Paragraph 4 of section 21 of the act approved March 4, 1913, which 
authorized the construction of a National Archives Building, reads as 
follows : 



Il8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

"That before the said designs and estimates are completed inspection 
shall be made under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury of 
the best modern national archives buildings in Europe, and consulta- 
tion shall be had with the best authorities in Europe on the construction 
and arrangement of archives buildings." 

The war in Europe has made it impracticable to inspect archives 
buildings there. Through the efforts of our diplomatic and consular 
representatives abroad, our government has been in possession of the 
original designs and working plans, or of copies thereof, of all the 
principal archives buildings, which has served the purpose of the office 
of the supervising architect fully as well as an inspection in Europe of 
the buildings themselves. As long, however, as that paragraph remains 
on the statute book, it is impossible for the Treasury Department to 
report any designs and estimates of its own for such a building. The 
Department has asked for the repeal of the paragraph above quoted, 
and on Tuesday, May 9, 1916, a bill passed the Senate repealing said 
paragraph, and the bill has gone to the House of Representatives for 
its action. [Adopted by House, and approved by President June 28, 
1916.] 

In the meantime plans and estimates have been prepared in the office 
of the supervising architect of the Treasury Department for a National 
Archives Building. Those who have had an opportunity to see the 
plans are enthusiastic over them. They are now in the hands of the 
Fine Art Commission, who must approve them. That body meets Tues- 
day, May 16, 1916, and a favorable report is forecast. The plans sub- 
mitted show a building containing 3,000,000 cubic feet of space, with an 
extension to 8,900,000 cubic feet, and also showing an intermediate 
capacity which the Department will recommend as absolutely necessary 
for immediate use. Several sites have been considered and estimates 
have been prepared of the cost of each. < A draft of the legislation 
necessary for acquiring a site and proceeding with the construction of 
the building is ready to submit to Congress as soon as the repeal of 
paragraph 4, above cited, becomes a law. 

The above statement of the situation indicates encouraging progress 
since the last meeting of the Society. Our efforts should be directed 
now, first, to securing the passage in the House of S. 5839, to repeal 
paragraph 4 of section 21 of the public buildings act, approved March 4, 
1913 ; second, urging upon Congress early and favorable action on the 
report which will be made by the Treasury Department as soon as that 
bill is passed, asking an appropriation for the construction of a National 
Archives Building in accordance with the plans prepared by the Depart- 
ment and approved by the Fine Arts Commission. 
Very respectfully submitted, 

Frederick C. Bryan, 

Chairman. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the report of the Com- 
mittee on National Archives Building. If there is no objection, it will 
be received and placed on file. Hearing no objection, the report will 
be considered as received and filed. Next is the report of the Com- 
mittee on The Washington Guard, Mr. Merrill. 

A Member: Mr. Merrill requested me, in the event of his absence, to 
ask leave to report later on. 

The Chairman : The committee asks leave to report later on. The 
Chairman assumes there will be no objection to this course. The Chair 
would suggest that any delegates desiring to introduce resolutions do 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 119 

so at this time, so that the Committee on Resolutions may have an op- 
portunity for their consideration. 

Colonel Eujott : I desire to offer a resolution with regard to the 
Valley Forge Memorial, to be submitted to the Committee on Resolu- 
tions. 

(For resolution see committee's report later on.) 

The Chairman: The resolution will be referred in the usual course 
to the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Lum : I desire to offer a resolution at the request of the New 
Jersey delegation. 

( The resolution called for the adoption by the National Society of 
the pledge to the flag used by the New Jersey Society. See opening of 
Congress.) 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the resolution. It will 
be referred to the Committee on Resolutions. (See report of com- 
mittee.) 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
REVOLUTION. 

Mr. Weeks : In 1925 will occur the beginning of the 150th anniver- 
sary of the starting of the Revolution, and in the years that will follow 
there will be observed year by year the 150th anniversary of all the 
various events of importance connected with the Revolution. It has 
seemed to the New Jersey Society, and I speak on their behalf, that 
some steps should be taken now, years in advance, so that preparation 
may be made properly for the observance of all these anniversaries, 
and that a committee should be appointed who shall take this matter up 
deliberately and carefully and plan out a series of commemorations of 
all of these events, doing it systematically and providing for the cele- 
bration on the sites of the various battles of all of the battles of the 
Revolution. We feel that as a patriotic society, pledged as one of our 
objects to perpetuate the memory of these events that are the founda- 
tion of our national existence, we should provide adequately for a proper 
celebration of them all. We do not believe that it should be left to 
localities to handle this matter alone, but that through our National 
organization, perhaps in conjunction with other patriotic societies, if 
you choose, that this matter should be handled on a grand scale. 

The Chairman : The Chair will have to call the gentleman to order, 
as resolutions are not debatable. 

Mr. Weeks : I did not intend to debate, but merely to explain, the 
resolution, which I will now proceed to read : 

Whereas the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Revolution 
will be celebrated in 1925 ; and 

Whereas the Sons of the American Revolution has as one of its 
objects the perpetuation of the history of our struggle for Independ- 
ence: Therefore be it 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution appoint a committee at this 27th Annual Congress to con- 



120 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

sider and report upon the feasibility in 1925 and the years following of 
a proper celebration of all the important events connected with the 
Revolutionary struggle. 

The Chairman : The resolution will be referred to the Committee 
on Resolutions. (See committee's report, page 129.) 

Mr. Arter: Mr. President General, I would like to present a resolu- 
tion adopted by the Western Reserve Society at Cleveland and after- 
ward adopted by the Ohio Society at their convention this year, and it 
will be rewritten for submission to this Congress tomorrow morning. 
It is in regard to placing the American flag in all the United States 
court-rooms and in rooms used by the officers of the United States who 
have to do with the naturalization of aliens. 

The Chairman : The resolution will be received and referred to the 
Committee on Resolutions. (See committee's report.) 

Mr. Edward F. Arthurs : In behalf of Judge Stockbridge, Past 
President General of this Society, who was asked by some of his friends 
to prepare and send here a resolution on the subject of preparedness. 
I present this resolution. 

(The resolution was referred to the Committee on Resolutions.) 

Commander Moore: I beg to offer this resolution, authorizing the 
Committee on National Archives Building to take steps to secure an 
appropriation for that purpose. (See report of Committee on Resolu- 
tions.) 

The Chairman : The resolution will be received and referred to the 
Committee on Resolutions. The reception at Governor Murphy's is at 
4 o'clock, and a motion will now be in order that we take a recess unt.il 
9.30 tomorrow morning. 

The Secretary General : The following telegram has been received : 

Philadelphia, May 15, 19 16. 
A. Howard Clark, 

Robert Treat Hotel, Newark, N. J.: 
Express to the Congress assembled my sincere greetings. 

Herman W. FernbErger. 

Bx-V ice-President General. 

(The Congress then voted to take a recess until the following day at 
-9.30 a. m.) 



Second Day's Session, May 16. 

Secretary General Clark called the Congress to order. The President 
'General entered and took the chair and the colors were received. 

The Chairman : Flag of our great Republic, hallowed by noblest 
deeds and loving sacrifice, guardian of our homes and inspiration of 
•every battle for the right, whose stars and stripes stand for beauty, 
purity, patriotism, and the Union, we salute thee. For thy defense, the 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 2 I 

•protection of onr country, and the conservation of the liberty of the 
American people, we pledge our hearts, our lives, and our sacred honor. 

The invocation will be asked by Dr. Kirbye. 

Rev. Dr. KirbyE: Help us to appreciate the fact, our Father, that our 
life as a people has been made possible through toil and sacrifice, and 
that if we are to pass on anything to the coming generation that will 
be worth while, it will be because we put into the life of our day the 
same spirit and the same toil, the same heroism that our fathers and 
mothers put into the life of their day. Help us, we pray Thee, to be 
■worthy children of worthy sires and grant Thy blessings, our Father, 
upon our country. Grant Thy blessings to be upon the President of the 
United States, upon all men who sit in judicial places. We pray that 
our nation may be one whose God is the Lord. May righteousness 
triumph within all our borders. May the spirit of patriotism increase 
and may we uphold the ideals that have been purchased at such a great 
cost. Amen. 

The Chairman : The color-bearers will stack the colors. The Chair 
invites the Past Presidents General that are present to take seats upon 
the platform. The first business that will be taken up this morning will 
be the presentation of the flags, and I will ask Mr. Dutton, of Wash- 
ington, to come forward, and also Mr. Adams, President of the New 
Jersey Society. The Traveling Banner last year was won by the State 
•of Washington. This year it has been won by the State of New Jersey. 
It will be presented by Mr. Dutton, President of the Washington State 
'Society, to Mr. Adams, President of the New Jersey Society. 

PRESENTATION OF TRAVELING BANNER. 

Mr. Dutton : Mr. President General and President Adams of the 
New Jersey Society, it is with mingled pleasure and regret — regret at 
parting and the pleasure of delivering this flag to you. You have won 
it, and to the victor belongs the spoils. (Applause.) I congratulate you. 

Mr. Adams: Mr. President General and Compatriots, I speak for 
New Jersey when I say that we are, of course, very happy to receive 
back this Traveling Banner. I only wish there were banners enough to 
go round for every State, for in that case each State would have ac- 
quired the largest number of members for our National Society, and 
that would have meant a great increase of strength and influence and 
prestige. New Jersey did not work for itself in this matter; we were 
working for the National Society, and so we feel that the reward which 
has come to us is not a selfish reward, but is a proper and appropriate 
-one under the circumstances. Thank you. (Applause.) 

PRESENTATION OF SYRACUSE BANNER. 

The Chairman : Last year at the Portland Congress another flag was 
•offered for the greatest actual enrolment of new members by any State 
Society, believing that a State Society that had the actual increase 



122 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

should be recognized as well as one having a percentage of increase,. 
The Syracuse Chapter of the Empire State Society donated this flag, 
and on behalf of the Syracuse Chapter and the generous donor of that 
flag I have been requested to present it. This year New Jersey has had 
a dual success, not only the greatest percentage, but the greatest actual 
increase, and it is with great pleasure, Mr. President of the New Jersey 
Society, that, on behalf of the Syracuse Chapter of the Empire State- 
Society, I intrust to your keeping, for the first time, this new flag for 
the actual increase in membership. (Applause.) 

Mr. Adams : Mr. President General, I have requested my good friend' 
and former President of the New Jersey Society and chairman of the 
committee who planned for this Congress, and we hope has planned in- 
a way to please you all. Mr. John Lenord Merrill, to accept this banner 
in behalf of New Jersey. 

Mr. Merrill : Mr. President and Mr. President General, it is indeed 
an honor to accept a banner from our dear good friends of Syracuse. 
The Syracuse Chapter always knows how to do things and to do things- 
rightly. Mr. President General, New Jersey appreciates this gift more 
than I can ever put in words. We are proud to win it. We are over- 
modest, as you may have noticed during our Congress, but I thank: 
you, and I beg you. Air. President General, to carry back to your great 
Chapter the thanks, the heart-felt thanks, of New Jersey, and we will 
be at the next Annual Congress, sir, to take it back to New Jersey 
again. (Laughter and applause.) 

Mr. Jenks : May T at this point introduce a resolution? 

The Chairman : Aery proper, sir. 

THE WASHINGTON GUARD. 

Mr. Jenks : I want to present a resolution expressive of a sentiment 
which, since the events of last evening, has been uppermost in all our 
thoughts : 

Whereas the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution seeks- 
to inspire a more profound reverence for the principles of the govern- 
ment founded by our forefathers, to foster true patriotism, to maintain 
and extend the institutions of American freedom, and to insure for the 
term ''Americanism" the respect of the whole world; and 

W T HEREAS the future of our nation lies in the quality of patriotism 
acquired by those now growing up into manhood ; and 

Whereas the duty and obligation of the members of this Society to 
foster love of country among the young are nowhere more urgent and 
personal than among our own sons ; and 

Whereas this conviction has found effective expression in the crea- 
tion of The Washington Guard; and 

Whereas the splendid public exhibition of its ceremonies and ritual 
presented by the New Jersey Society and its Commandery of The 
Washington Guard has strongly impressed the members of this Con- 
gress with the power of The Washington Guard to awaken love of our 
country and promote good citizenship : Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Sons" of the American Revolution, in Congress 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 23 

assembled, hail The Washington Guard as a most effective and inspir- 
ing agency in the promotion of the cause of pure Americanism ; that 
we extend to the New Jersey Society, and especially to Compatriot 
John Lenord Merrill, profound thanks for the intelligently directed 
"efforts resulting in the establishment of the New Jersey Commandery 
of The Washington Guard and the splendid exhibition of its ritual ; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Congress that each State So- 
ciety should proceed as rapidly as may be to establish within its juris- 
diction a commandery of The Washington Guard, to the end that the 
sons of our members throughout the land may be given the oppor- 
tunity to absorb that quality of patriotism which will exalt pure Amer- 
icanism. 

(Motion seconded.) 

The Chairman : Under the rules this resolution will go to the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions. 

(Jt was moved and carried, by a rising vote, that the rules be sus- 
pended and the resolution was adopted.) 

THE AMERICAN RED CROSS. 
Mr. Marble: I move the adoption of the following resolution: 

Whereas the work being done by the Red Cross on the battlefields 
and in the hospitals of Europe especially commends itself to every 
patriotic citizen; and 

Whereas the membership in the American Red Cross is far less than 
that of any of her sister nations : Therefore 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution urges upon its constituent bodies and their local member- 
ship to enroll as members of the American Red Cross Society, branches 
of which are being now established throughout the entire country, and 
thus aid in placing the American Red Cross on a par with other nations 
in size and efficiency. 

(The resolution offered by Mr. Marble in reference to the Red Cross 
Society was adopted under a suspension of the rules.) 

PLEDGE TO THE FLAG. 

Rev. Mr. Foster: Mr. President General and Compatriots, I want to 
offer the following motto for general use throughout the Society on 
saluting the flag. I have studied mottoes for some time. I have been 
studying the one that has been used today. Now, this is short, right 
to the point, and tells what we mean. It is not new ; there are only 
two words changed. Let me read it slowly : "I pledge allegiance to my 
God, to my home, my flag, and to the Republic for which it stands ; 
one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." I move you, 
sir, that we adopt this motto or pledge. (Applause.) 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, under the rules, that amendment or sub- 
stitute for the resolution already before us, introduced yesterday, will 
go to the Committee on Resolutions for consideration. 



124 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

VICE-PRESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS. 

Mr. Curtis : The Constitution of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion was, in a large way, born in Connecticut, but still it seems to some 
of us in the "Nutmeg State" that it is weak in one respect, and that is 
in regard to our Vice-Presidents General. Now, I have no resolution 
to offer at this time, but I want to serve notice that at the next Con- 
gress I will have an amendment to the Constitution in regard to the 
duties of the Vice-Presidents General. At the present time we elect 
five Vice-Presidents General, all of whom may be elected from the 
same city. Their duties, according to your book, are simply that they 
shall preside in case of the sickness or absence of the President; they 
have no other duties whatsoever. Now, these live Vice-Presidents are 
and are apt to be five of our very best men, and it seems to us as if we 
might make some better use of them than to simply elect them and 
have them disappear in the discard, as they are apt to do now. Con- 
necticut feels, and so do some of the other Societies I have talked to, 
that if we should divide the country into five districts or zones, elect a 
Vice-President General from each one of these zones, and then make 
him the personal representative of the President in that particular zone, 
it would not only enable the Society at a distance to have a representa- 
tive of the President present at any function, but he also would be in 
general charge of the affairs of the Society — of course, subject to the 
control of the President at any time — and would act a general boomer 
for the Society in his particular zone and would be responsible for it. 
It is a system that is carried on by many other large societies, and it 
seems to us as if it would make a powerful influence for good in the 
Society where now we are lacking in that respect. The idea has 
already been passed on by the Connecticut delegates who are here, and 
at our meeting in June we propose to put it before the Connecticut 
Society, and I think it will be approved by them. It will be carefully 
drawn with the assistance of Judge Beardsley, who is the father of the 
present Constitution, and will be presented in due course to the next 
Congress. I wanted to tell you what we had in our minds, so that 
when you receive the announcement of the next convention you will 
know what we hope to do. (Applause.) 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

Mr. Huntting : The Committee on Credentials submits the following- 
list of 210 accredited members of the Congress, including 6 General 
Officers, 7 Past Presidents General, and 197 delegates from 27 State 
Societies : 

National Society Officers. 

President General, Newell B. Woodworth, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Vice- 
President General, Henry F. Punderson, Springfield, Mass.; Vice- 
President General, William K. Boardman, Nashville, Tenn. ; Secretary 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 125 

General and Registrar General, A. Howard Clark, Washington, D. C. ; 
Treasurer General, John H. Burroughs, New York, N. Y. ; Historian 
General, David L. Pierson, East Orange, N. J. 

Past Presidents General: Hon. Morris B. Beardsley, Bridgeport, 
Conn.; Nelson A. McClary, Chicago, 111.; William Allen Marble, New 
York, N. Y. ; Hon. Franklin Murphy, Newark, N. J.; Moses Greeley 
Parker, M. D., Lowell, Mass. ; Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, Peekskill, 
N. Y. ; Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston, Louisville, Ky. 

State Society Delegates. 

Alabama: Maj. William Frye Tebbetts, Trustee. 

California : Hector R. Burroughs, Seabury C. Mastick, B. M. New- 
comb. 

Connecticut: Wilson H. Lee, President; Dr. Geo. C. F. Williams, 
Trustee ; Gen. Edward Elias Bradley, George Franklin Burgess, W. H. 
Burr, Lewis B. Curtis, Frederick A. Doolittle, Gen. George H. Ford, 
George Henry Lee, Seymour C. Loomis, Edward J. Morgan, John M. 
Parker, Jr., Clarence H. Wickham, Col. Tracy Bronson Warren, Capt. 
Arthur E. Woodruff. 

Colorado: Oliver W. Mallaby, Chas. Lincoln Nichols. Lucius Seymour 
Storrs. 

Delaware : Col. George A. Elliott, Trustee. 

District of Columbia : Phillip F. Larner, President ; Colby M. 
Chester (Rear Admiral U. S. Navy), Trustee; George W. Baird (Rear 
Admiral U. S. Navy), John S. Barker, Lieut. Col. F. C. Bryan, Louis D. 
Carman, M. D. ; Ira Warren Dennison, M. D. ; Col. Gilbert C. Kniffin, 
Commander John H. Moore (U. S. Navy), Frederick D. Owen, Albert 
D. Spangler, J. McDonald Stewart. John B. Torbert, Capt. Albert H. 
Van Deusen. 

Empire State Society: Louis Annin Ames, President; Martin S. 
Allen, Robert Marshall Anderson, Joseph M. Bacon, Geo. D. Bangs, 
Jesse H. Clute, Washington Irving Comes, Chas. C. Cook, Hon. Geo. N. 
Crouse, Gen. Chas. Lukens Davis, George H. Denny, Chas. A. Hale, 
N. T. Hawkins, Norman P. Heffley, Walter B. Hopping. Teunis D. 
Huntting, Wm. Shaw Kitchell, Walter C. Morris, Hon. Harvey F. 
Remington, Gen. G. Barrett Rich, James R. Ross, P. Valentine Sher- 
wood, Clifford B. Smith, Albert J. Squier, Frank B. Steele, Samuel L- 
Stewart, Col. John W. Vrooman, George L. Walker, Chas. P. Wortman, 
Chas. H. Wight. 

Illinois: Henry W. Austin, President; C. R. Barney, Louis A. Bow- 
man, R. W. Brown, D. E. Felt, Henry L. Green, Chancellor L. Jenks, 
George V. Lauman. William Reed, Fred A. Smith, David V. Webster, 
Augustus W. Wheeler, George N. Wright. 

Indiana : Hon. Merrill Moores. 

Iowa: Rev. J. Edward Kirbye, D. D., President: E. M. Wentworth, 
Trustee. 

Kentucky : Allen Rogers Carter. Alexander Woodruff Tippett. 
George T. Wood. 



126 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Maine: Roswell F. Doten, Wm. K. Sanderson, Rev. Henry P. Sey- 
mour, Phillip F. Turner, Frederick Sturdivant Vaill. 

Maryland: John Milton Reif snider, President; Edward F. Arthurs, 
Dr. Chas. S. Grindall, Maj. Geo. W. Hyde, Dr. J. D. Iglehart, George 
Peabody Neilson, John H. Orem, Jr. 

Massachusetts: Frank E. Woodward, President and Trustee; 
Joshua Atwood, Luther Atwood, J. Ross Bates, Dr. Waldo E. Board- 
man, Henry A. Booth, Webster Bruce, Chester M. Clark. Martin L. 
Dinsmore, Dr. Robert M. Green, Charles M. Green, M. D.; Clarence E. 
Leonard, Mr. Paul I. Lombard, Fred H. Matthews, Henry Smith Kim- 
ball, Herbert W. Kimball, William S. Lyon, Granville H. Norcross, 
George Hale Nutting, David Pingree, Alfred T. Powers, John G. 
Moseley, Charles F. Read, Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, T. Julien Silsby, 
Richard H. Stacey, Hon. Luke S. Stowe, W r alter K. Watkins, Nathan 
Warren, Charles Edward Wiggin. 

Michigan : Albert M. Henry, Trustee ; Edward W. Bissell, Wm. M. 
Finck. 

Minnesota : Cornelius B. Palmer. 

Missouri : Robt. E. Adreon, President ; Amedee B. Cole, Linn Paine. 

New Hampshire : Frank R. Hill. 

New Jersey: W. I. Lincoln Adams, President; C. Seymour Kiggins, 
Trustee; Aaron Adams, William PI. Bachelor, William J. Conkling, 
Samuel C. Cowart, Herbert R. Crane, Moses M. Crane, S. Carl Downs, 
Hon. J. Franklin Fort, Charles H. K. Halsey, Joseph Holmes, Chester 
N Jones, Frederick B. Love joy, Charles M. Lum, John Lenord Merrill, 
George V. Muchmore, Horace S. Osborne, E. Allen Smith, R. O. von 
Steuben, William H. Sutton, Jr.; Walter B. Timms, John R. Weeks, 
John B. Wight, Thomas W. Williams. 

Ohio: Geo. E. Pomeroy, President; Sherman Arter, Jos. B. Doyle, 
Col. Moulton Houk. 

Oregon : Edward D. Baldwin, Bruce McCamant. 

Pennsylvania : Thomas S. Brown, President ; Col. R. W. Guthrie, 
Trustee; Isaac B. Brown, Rasselas W. Brown, Albert A. Home, Dr. 
Charles W. Karsner, Frank G. Paulson, Joseph C. Slough, Rev. Wil- 
liam A. Stanton, John Cessna Smith, William A. Stritmater. 

Rhode Island: Frederick D. Carr, President; Gen. Charles W. Ab- 
bot, Jr. ; Gen. George Andrews, Orrin L. Bosworth, Christopher 
Rhodes, Arthur P. Sumner, W. Howard Walker. 

Utah : Frederick A. Hale, Col. George H. Penrose, Hon. George Al- 
bert Smith, Prof. Levi Edgar Young. 

Virginia : Arthur B. Clarke, President ; Frederick E. Emerson, Wil- 
liam L. Phillips. 

Washington : Orison J. C. Dutton, President ; Rev. John H. Ed- 
wards, Rev. John O. Foster, D. D. ; Palmer Kennedy. 

Wisconsin: Rev. Frederick S. Penfold, D. D.. President. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 127 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 

The Chairman: I will ask the Committee on Resolutions if it is 
ready to report? Mr. Pngsley, for the Committee on Resolutions, will 
render the report. 

Mr. PuGSLEY: Mr, President General and Compatriots, your Com- 
mittee on Resolutions reports as follows : 

Oath 01' Allegiance. 

The committee recommends and moves the adoption of the following" 
resolution submitted by Commander Moore: 

Whereas when an alien becomes a citizen of our country his wife 
and minor children, if residing in the United States, become automat- 
ically citizens ; and 

Whereas the alien in becoming a citizen is obliged to take the oath 
of allegiance, but there is no provision of law obliging his minor chil- 
dren to take such oath upon their arriving at the voting age and desiring 
to cast their first vote; and 

Whereas we now have a large body of automatic citizens voting each 
year who have not taken the oath of allegiance : Now. therefore, be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this the National Congress of the 
Sons of the American Revolution that all citizens should be obliged to 
take the oath of allegiance before casting their first vote. 

(A motion was made and discussed to eliminate the word "his.'') 

Commander MoorE : I would like to make a few remarks before any 
motion like that is carried [referring to elimination of '"his"], as I was 
the originator of that resolution. This is not any question for the 
States; it is a question of national legislation. (Applause.) What we 
want to get through Congress is a law applying to aliens, their sons, and 
their wives — it will apply to them — and to do that we have got to get a 
bill through Congress amending the Revised Statutes of the United 
States. 

The Chairman : The motion to amend having been withdrawn, the 
vote now comes on the resolution as originally read. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

Memorial to Clara Barton. 

Air. PucslEv: The committee has considered the Barton resolution, 
proposed by President General Woodworth, and moves its adoption, as 
follows : 

Whereas an Association has been formed to erect a National Me- 
morial in the city of Washington to the memory of Miss Clara Barton, 
who was the organizer and active head of the Red Cross Society in this 
country for many years, and whose faithful and unselfish devotion to 
the wounded and sick Union soldiers during the Civil War, as well as 
her devotion to relieving humanity suffering from affliction and disease 
in subsequent years in this country, as well as her work abroad in the 
interest of the Red Cross Society, is a matter of record and forms one 
of the bright pages in the history of the United States : Now it is hereby 



128 SONS OF TH^ AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American? 
Revolution, in Congress assembled, at Newark, N. J., on May 16, hereby 
records its approval and endorsement of the objects of the Clara Barton 
National Memorial Association to perpetuate the memory of Clara 
Barton as an example of a woman faithful to herself, her duty, and in 
service to humanity. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

Local Chapters. 
Mr. PugslEy : The following resolution is also moved for adoption : 

Resolved, That the President General appoint a special committee of 
seven to consider the subject of recommending a uniform system of 
organization of Chapters for all State Societies. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

Valley Forge Memoriae. 

Mr. PugslEy : The Committee on Resolutions moves the adoption of 
the following: 

Whereas the site of the encampment of the Continental Army at 
Valley Forge during the critical winter of 1777-1778 has been taken over 
by the State of Pennsylvania as a State reservation and park, which is 
now being beautified by memorials in honor of the heroes of the Revo- 
lution ; and 

Whereas a chapel, known as "The George Washington Memorial 
Chapel," immediately adjoining the "Cloister of the Colonies" and 1 
"Patriots' Hall," is now being erected, in which chapel every object will 
be a memorial to those who took part in the building up of our nation; 
and 

Whereas many of our State Societies have already taken a deep in- 
terest in these memorials and the plans which provide that there shall 
be placed in the chapel ceiling handsome oak panels, to be known as the 
Roof of the Republic, representing each of the forty-eight States of 
our Union, with the coats of arms and bronze seals of the respective 
States, the names of the States, the names of the donors, and the names 
of those in whose honor the memorials may be given: Therefore be it 

Resolved, That this Congress of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, approving of all efforts to establish memorials to those who took 
part in the great struggle for human liberty and independence, does sug- 
gest to our State Societies the appropriateness of being represented in 
this splendid memorial to General George Washington at Valley Forge.. 

Colonel Elliott : I would not take the time of this splendid Congress 
in saying a word about this resolution, because the resolution speaks for 
itself, were it not for the fact that this is to be left to the State Socie- 
ties. As a member of this committee in charge of the Memorial at. 
Valley Forge, I would like to say that a great many of the State Socie- 
ties have joined in, and I would like to meet with the Presidents of the 
State Societies who may be here and give them full information by 
which they can be shown the tablet, the kind 01 tablet, and the kind of 
shield by which their State can be represented. I do hope, we of Dela- 
ware hope, because we feel that this little spot up among the Pennsyl- 
vania hills is as dear as Faneuil Hall or Independence Hall to all the: 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 20, 

Sons of the American Revolution, that you should have your State rep- 
resented at Valley Forge, and that each State should be represented 
there by having on the shield that is put there the name of the State 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and T am very glad to 
give you any information you may desire. 

(The resolution was then adopted.) 

The Chairman : I would suggest that the State Presidents meet 
immediately after the Board of Trustees convene, at the close of this 
Congress. 

(The resolution introduced by Mr. Weeks (see preceding pages) in 
reference to the 150th anniversary of the American Revolution, and 
providing for the appointment of a committee to consider the celebra- 
tion of all the important events connected therewith, was recommended 
by the Resolutions Committee and adopted.) 

Signers' Memorial Book. 

Mr. PugslEY : The committee moves the adoption of the following- 
resolution, authorizing the Executive Committee to employ a suitable 
person to visit the graves of the Signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence : 

Resolved, That in pursuance of the suggestion made in the report of 
the Memorial Committee, the Executive Committee, in its discretion, be 
authorized to employ a suitable person to visit and inspect the burial 
places of certain Signers of the Declaration of Independence, and that 
said person make a written report in each case, stating the location and 
condition of the cemetery, the material and size of the tombstone, the 
exact wording of any inscription, and obtaining such photographic views 
as may be desirable; also any other information of value that may be 
obtained. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

American Feag in Court-houses. 

Mr. PugslEy : The committee further recommends and moves the 
adoption of the following resolution, presented in behalf of the Ohio 
State Society by Mr. Arter : 

Whereas it has come to the attention of this Society that there is no 
provision in the United States statutes requiring the display of the 
American flag in the respective United States courts, the offices of the 
clerks of said courts, or in the offices of the United States examiners : 
Therefore be it 

Resolved, That the National Congress of the Sons of the American 
Revolution petition the Congress of the United States to the end that 
bills be introduced in both branches of the Congress of the United 
States, which bills shall duly provide for the furnishing of a suitable 
American flag for each of the United States court-rooms, for each of 
the offices of the clerks of said courts, and for each of the offices used 
in proceedings in connection with the naturalization of aliens. 

Mr. Thruston: I think that those flags should be behind the judge's 
seat, as a symbol of the fact that the power of the whole United States 



130 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

is behind the Department of Justice, and I want to strongly favor the 
passage of this resolution. (Applause.) 
(The resolution was adopted.) 

Pledge to the Flag. 

Mr. PugslEy: Mr. President General, it was the consensus of opin- 
ion of your committee that the adoption of a pledge to the flag is a 
very important question, so important that we believe that we should 
have given considerable thought to it, and that it should be referred 
possibly to the Executive Committee or to a special committee appointed 
for this particular resolution. The beauty of the New Jersey pledge 
and its appropriateness, it seems to me, is evident to every compatriot 
who has heard it at this Congress, and I wish that we might adopt just 
such a resolution, possibly, without the changing of a word; but it is so 
important that it was thought wiser to refer it to a committee, as sug- 
gested. I move you, sir, that action along this line be taken upon this 
resolution. 

(Mr. Pugsley's motion was seconded and adopted. See meeting of 
Executive Committee, page 203.) 

Nation a r. Preparedness. 

Mr. Pugsley : Compatriots, I question whether there is any subject 
that has been presented to the Resolutions Committee of greater im- 
portance than that on national preparedness, and your committee, after 
discussing the various resolutions submitted, finally adopted this one 
as the sentiment and thought of the committee, as a substitute for all 
others : 

Resolved, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, in Congress assembled, on May 16, IQ16, in the city of New- 
ark, N. J., believing that national preparedness is of vital importance to 
our Republic, urges upon our National Government, as well as our sev- 
eral State governments, such action as shall give to our nation adequate, 
proper, and effective military and naval preparedness. 

(Mr. Pugsley then moved the adoption of the resolution and the 
motion was seconded.) 

Mr. Marble : I would suggest that the word "industrial" be added to 
the military and naval preparedness. 

A Member : May I make an amendment to that— that copies of these 
resolutions be transmitted to both Houses of Congress as the voice of 
this Society? 

Mr. Pugsley : The committee will accept those amendments. 

Mr. Thruston : In conversation with one of our compatriots night 
before last, he told me that the reason why there was such a small vote 
in Congress in favor of increasing the Army recently was due to a 
propaganda in the congressional districts of many men who strongly 
favor an increase. The threat was made * * * to defeat those 



PROCEEDINGS OP NEWARK CONGRESS. I3I 

men for re-election unless they voted for a smaller army. * * * I 
strongly favor this resolution. It should go also to the governors of 
the States. [After some discussion.] I suggest that we send it to 
every member of Congress and to such others as the Executive Com- 
mittee see proper. 

Mr. Pugseey : The committee accepts those amendments. 

The Chairman : Does that include the President of the United States 
and the members of both Houses of Congress? 

Mr. Pugseey: Yes, sir. 

Mr. ThrusTon : And such others as the Executive Committee think 
proper. 

Mr. MarbeE : It has been suggested to me by a gentleman here that 
the question I made as to industrial preparedness ought to be qualified 
so as not to include government industrial preparedness. If that is of 
any importance, I will offer the suggestion. 

Mr. Smith, of Utah: May we hear the resolution again? 

Mr. Pugseey : "Resolved," etc., "believing that national preparedness 
is of vital importance to our Republic" (the word industrial could 
come in there), "and, further, that it be submitted to members of Con- 
gress, Senators, and the President." 

Mr. Bacon: I do not like to object to anything that my friend from 
New York State, Mr. Marble, suggests. It seems to me that the reso- 
lution as presented by the committee, with the addition of whom it 
shall be sent to, would be a proper resolution ; but I do not believe that 
we should pass anything here as a request to the National Congress 
regarding industrial preparedness. (Applause.) I think we should 
stop with naval and military preparedness and go no further, so I will 
oppose that amendment. 

Mr. McClary : It seems to me that the word industrial, if we had to 
take one of the words alone, would be the most important of all. I 
think the great war has fully demonstrated this fact. I think that to 
leave it out would leave such a resolution inoperative and silly. In- 
dustrial preparedness is now the most important of all, because it takes 
the longest time. It is absolutely necessary to have it in. The sug- 
gestion was made by Mr. Marble that perhaps it ought to be qualified, 
perhaps it ought to be restricted ; but placed as it now stands in the 
amendment, it is general and can be left either way. I am opposed to 
qualifying it; let it stand there in a general way; but by all means let 
it stand. (Applause.) 

Mr. Curtis : Mr. President General, if I may speak a little bit au- 
thoritatively on this subject, I think the word industrial, if it is taken 
to mean what the private manufacturing concerns of this country can 
do for the government in case of trouble, I think it is all right, and I 
think it would be interpreted in that way for the reason that the gov- 
ernment has already made inquiries from my concern and many others, 
undoubtedly, as to just what we can do in case we were called on by 
the government for munitions of various kinds. They have gone to 
the extent of asking us to give lists of the machine tools we had, their 



132 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

sizes, the sizes of lathes, what size shells we could turn out, and they 
have gotten already the data from a very large number of private con- 
cerns, without any attempt to control them, as to what part they can 
take in it if they were called on. I do not think the word industrial 
necessarily means government plants, government armor plants, and 
all that sort of thing; but in the sense of the private concerns being- 
prepared to take their part in this game, if necessary, I think it is very 
important. It has gone so far that it has even been suggested that the 
government give each concern a small amount of work along that line 
to do every year, just so as to get our men instructed and prepared. 
We have been approached to give us a very small amount of a certain 
kind of work to do, not to keep us busy, but so that our men will be 
accustomed to do that particular kind of work in case they should be 
called on for a large amount, and this is very important. Now, just to 
give one point, for example, there is a concern in Waterbury, Conn., 
which started to make fuses for the Spanish War. They did not make 
many, but they did make fuses for shells. Today they are the only 
concern in this country that is making a real success of making fuses, 
simply because they made them back in the Spanish War and have 
been making a few ever since. All the other concerns had to start in 
de novo, and a great many of them have fallen down on the proposi- 
tion. I think it shows what we can do without any government control ; 
but to have the government know where they can place an order for a 
certain amount of goods and get them, I think is most important. 

Mr. Stanton: I wish, Compatriots and Mr. President General, to 
call attention to one thing in this discussion that has been emphasized. 
No one on the floor has any question as to the importance of industrial 
preparedness ; that is not an issue in any legislative hall at the present 
time, either National or State. What we want to do. I think, as a 
body of compatriots, is to line up with what is in issue. I agree with 
the gentleman who was speaking a moment ago back there. I think 
that the strength of this resolution will be in its concreteness, in its 
brevity, and in its concentration. Just as soon as we begin to reach 
out on points of industrialism, on points of morals, on points of this, 
that, or the other — all of which may be important, and undoubtedly are 
important, at least in the minds of the gentlemen here present — we 
weaken ourselves, we dilute our resolutions. If we want this thing to 
go with a bing, we want to hold it right down to these two things that 
are a living issue and make just such a presentation of statements as 
was made by the member from Kentucky a few moments ago. * * * 
I would urge upon this Congress the concentration of this thing into 
just exactly what we really want at this time and about which there is 
a dispute. 

Admiral Chester : I want to say that there is another feature in con- 
nection Avith what the last speaker has said, that the most important 
part of this resolution depends on the national defense. The industrial 
part of it goes in with the military proposition, as every military 
proposition in the world has always been carried out in connection 



I 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 33 

with the industrial proposition. The Constitution of the United States 
distinctly provides that the Congress shall provide for the Army and 
Navy of the United States ; it does not provide for carrying on the 
industrial work of the country. The President of the United States 
lias appealed to the members of the civil profession to support him in 
carrying on the industrial proposition as something that comes to them 
voluntarily, but the Congress of the United States, by the Constitution, 
is only providing for the military and naval propositions of the country, 
and that is what the resolution provides for. If you pass the resolu- 
tion as it originally stood, that means industrial as well as the military 
and naval part of it. The greatest campaign that was ever carried on 
in the world, by Lord Kitchener in Egypt, was carried on by the in- 
dustrial part of the military establishment in building railroads, intro- 
ducing supplies into that country which came in with the military part 
of the proposition. The greatest campaign for the national defense 
is our Panama Canal. It is an industrial proposition and it comes in 
under the national defense, and if you keep this down to the national 
defense — as Hamilton once said, that was the first object of federating 
these United States — I think you will be safe in passing the original 
proposition as it stood. (Applause.) 

Mr. Bacon : I move to strike out the word industrial, which the com- 
mittee had accepted as an amendment to the resolution. 

(This motion was adopted.) 

(There was some further discussion as to whom the resolution should 
be sent.) 

A Member : I move that the resolution be wired today to the Speaker 
of the House of Representatives, to the President of the Senate, and 
to the President of the United States. 

The Chairman : The motion is declared carried. Now the vote is 
on the original resolution as presented by the committee, and providing 
that it be communicated to the President of the United States, to both 
Houses of Congress, and to the Governors of the several States. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

Mr. Pugsley : The Committee on Resolutions moves the adoption of 
the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the National Congress of the Sons of the American 
Revolution hereby commends the splendid work of the several Young 
Men's Christian Associations engaged in instructing aliens to become 
citizens of the United States, and that we hereby assure these organiza- 
tions of our hearty co-operation with them in their noble work. 

(The resolution was adopted.) 

The Chairman: Is there any other new business to come before this 
Congress? We are upon new business. 



134 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Secretary General : I move that, as usual, the reports of the 
State Societies, or abstracts thereof, be published in the Year Book. 
(The motion was seconded and adopted.) 

REPORTS OF STATE SOCIETIES. 

ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 15 

Membership March 31, 1916 15 

ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 53 

Deaths, 4; resigned, 1 ; dropped, 9 14 

Loss 14 

Membership March 31, 1916 39 

At the twentieth annual meeting and dinner of the Arizona Society 
at Phoenix on Washington's Birthday, addresses were made by Com- 
patriot Daniel Minor Lord of the Illinois Society and Andrew Ellicott 
Douglass, Sc. D., Dean of the University of Arizona. The topic of the 
former was "The Mission of the Sons of the American Revolution," 
and of the latter "Some Factors in the Abolishment of War." Follow- 
ing the dinner, at which Compatriot Roy E. Thomas, the retiring Presi- 
dent, was the toastmaster, there was the presentation of prizes and 
medals to the successful contestants in the first annual high school 
oratorical contest held under the auspices of the Society. This contest 
was held at the Phoenix High School, with representatives from four 
high schools of the State participating. These had been selected at 
local contests held in Willcox, Globe, Tempe, and Phoenix. The win- 
ners, who were presented prizes of $20 and $10 respectively in gold and 
appropriately inscribed medals, were Amos Yates of the Phoenix school 
and Everett Edmondson of the Globe school. The presentation address 
was made by Compatriot J. Rockwood Jenkins. 

The subjects of the essays were: 

1. America's opportunity to help or influence the nations of the 
world. 

2. Our nation's relation to the Latin- American republics. 

3. Opportunities for patriotism in times of peace. 

ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 
1 

Membership April 1, 1915 45 

New members 5 

Gain 5 

Membership March 31, 1916 50 

At its annual business meeting and dinner at the Hotel Marion, 
Little Rock, on February 22, the Arkansas Society passed a resolution 
favoring the construction by the United States government of a Bureau 
of Archives at Washington, to consist of a fire-proof building for the 
storage and preservation of archives. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 135 

At the dinner, following the business session,' toasts were responded 
to as follows: "The Shadow of a Flag," by Mr. Frank W. Rawles, 
President of the Society; "The Foresight of Washington," by Com- 
patriot George W. Clark; "The Cavaliers of Virginia in the American 
Revolution," by Gen. John R. Gibbons ; "The Retreat of tta Conti- 
nentals in New England," by Compatriot Sam S. Wassell; "George 
Rogers Clark, the Conqueror of the Northwest Territory," by Com- 
patriot Fay Hempstead, Secretary of the Society. 

CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April i, 1915 4 X 4 

New members, 16 ; transfers, 1 17 

Deaths, 10; demitted, 1; dropped, 7; resigned, 8.. 26 

Loss 9 

Membership March 31, 1915 4°5 

The California Society participated in the Liberty Bell Day Cele- 
bration, on July 17, 191 5, at the Exposition grounds in San Francisco. 
Compatriots T. A. Perkins, W. J. Dutton, F. S. Brittain, R. Cad- 
wallader, and W. P. Humphreys were appointed by the Mayor as mem- 
bers of the Liberty Bell Committee. 

Upon the conclusion of the business session of the Annual Congress 
at Portland adjournment was taken to assemble in San Francisco for 
a banquet and patriotic meeting, accounts of which were given in the 
Official Bulletin and in the National Year Book for 191 5. 

The Society participated in the celebration of "George Washington 
Day" at the San Francisco Exposition on November 15. Col. J. C. 
Currier was chairman of the Executive Committee, of which Mr. 
William H. Crocker, Dr. J. Mora Moss, Mr. W. J. Dutton, and other 
compatriots were members. Secretary Thomas A. Perkins and other 
compatriots served on the Continental Ball Committee. The occasion 
was the anniversary of the signing of the Articles of Confederation by 
the thirteen original States. 

In the afternoon patriotic exercises were held in Festival Hall, when 
Compatriot William H. Crocker, Vice-President of the Exposition, pre- 
sided. A commemoration medal was presented to the Sons of the 
American Revolution. The principal speakers were Prof, E. D. 
Adams, on "Washington and Neutrality," and Gen. Charles A. Wood- 
ruff, U. S. A., on "George Washington and the Flag." 

Upon the invitation of the Arrangements Committee of the Sons of 
the American Revolution and the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, about 2,500 people took part in the Continental Ball, held in the 
California Building from 9 to 12 o'clock in the evening. The celebra- 
tion was one of the largest and best of all the special "days" at the 
Exposition. 

The Society observed "Ladies' Night" on February 22, 1916, at Hale's 
Pompeian Court, San Francisco, with an attendance of 129 members 
and lady guests. The program included an introductory address by 
President Charles H. Blinn ; toast, "George Washington, the Father of 
His Country — a Cursory Analysis and Timely Application of Wash- 
ington's Farewell Address," by Gen. Charles A. Woodruff, U. S. A.; 
"What it Means to be Prepared," by Harris C. Capwell. 

On the evening of April 18, 1916. members of the Society assembled 
at the Telephone Building in San Francisco and extended greetings by 
telephone over the transcontinental lines with Utah Society in meeting 
at Salt Lake City and the Empire State Society in New York City in 
celebration of the anniversary of Paul Revere's ride in 1775. 



I36 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The annual business meeting was held at the Clift House on April iq 
and officers elected for the year. 

COLORADO SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 246 

New members, 27 ; transferred, 2 29 

Deaths, 7; demitted, 1; dropped, 20; resigned, 5... 33 

Loss 4 

Membership March 31, 1916 242 

The Colorado Society continues its activities, through its five local 
Chapters, at Denver, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs, Greeley, and 
Grand Junction. Members of the State Society not affiliated with other 
Chapters are associated with the one at Denver. 

The Board of Managers of the State Society meets at intervals and 
an annual business meeting is held on February 22 for the election of 
officers and other business. 

The Society celebrated Washington's Birthday anniversary with a 
banquet at the Adams Hotel, Denver. The program included : Dipping 
of colors; invocation by Rev. Earnest N. Orr; address by Livingston 
Farrand, M. A., M. D., LL. D., President of the University of Colo- 
rado; toast,"Our Flag," by Col. R. M. Getty, U. S. Infantry; address 
by Compatriot Joseph Farrand Tuttle, Jr. ; toast, "The Mothers of the 
Revolution," by Mrs. Winfield Scott Tarbell, Regent of the D. A. R. ; 
toast, "The Fathers of the Revolution," by Compatriot Edward V. 
Dunklee. 

Brief addresses were made by A. A. Blackmail of Colorado Springs 
Chapter, John T. Jacobs of Greeley Chapter, and T. J. Warren of Fort 
Collins Chapter. 

"The Spirit of '76," an eight-page octavo leaflet, issued at intervals 
by the Society, contains accounts of patriotic work throughout the 
State. The last issue includes a letter to members by the President, 
reviewing the work of the year; the Secretary's letter, and a report on 
the doings of the Denver Chapter by President Enos and Secretary 
Drake. 

CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 L173 

New members, 33 ; transfers, 1 34 

Deaths, 22; resigned, 3; demitted, 1 ; dropped, 124 150 

Loss 116 

Membership March 31, 1916 1.057 

The Connecticut Society numbers 1,037 members, which includes x^ 
new members admitted since April 1, 1915 . 

The graves of many Revolutionary soldiers and sailors have been 
marked with the Society marker during the year. 

The members of the Connecticut Society have contributed $600 for 
the Belgian Relief Fund. 

The annual meeting was held in the Hotel Taft on June 19, 191 5. 
Announcement was made of the winners in the prize essay contest 
among pupils of the high and grammar schools in Connecticut, arranged 
by the Society to stimulate interest in the study of American history. 
Nearly a thousand dollars in prizes and medals were awarded. The 



PROCEEDINGS OE NEWARK CONGRESS. I 37 

first high school prize was awarded to the granddaughter of a German 
immigrant, and the first grammar school prize to a Russian girl, who 
came to this country only five years ago and is now in the eighth 
grade in the school. 

Addresses were delivered by Compatriot William Howard Taft, Dean 
Charles R. Brown of Yale, and President General Thruston. 

Four meetings of the Board of Managers have been held during the 
year, with a good attendance and great interest shown in the proceed- 
ings. 

A committee was appointed to prepare a resolution to be forwarded 
to President Wilson on the preparedness of this nation in case of war. 
The resolution was as follows : 

The spirit and wisdom of the founders of our government, directed 
toward the problems which confronted them at the birth of this nation, 
is particularly desirable in the present world contest. Lives and prop- 
erty have been expended to maintain our national integrity, but who 
can now doubt the propriety of the cost? Even those who formerly 
differed on principle are now among its most ardent champions. 

The recent experience of peaceful peoples has demonstrated that 
kindness and love cannot be relied upon alone to protect them in their 
rights against avarice and crime, but that some strong means are 
required to insure the enjoyments of those rights. We have had the 
priceless blessings of a beneficent government, and in order to safe- 
guard its existence we believe it is necessary that every man of every 
creed and color in our citizenship should be trained to a patriotic under- 
standing that it is his duty to be prepared to offer sacrifices, if neces- 
sary, for a continuation of those blessings. We also believe that the 
welfare of the whole country demands that our Federal authorities and 
representatives make suitable preparations at this time to guard against 
the eils which otherwise are sure to beset it. 

A good citizenship committee was appointed to co-operate with the 
Commissioner of Naturalization of the United States Department of 
Labor to encourage and plan for the education of the foreigners who 
desire to become citizens of the United States. 

On April 27 a big patriotic celebration was held in New Haven at 
A'Voolsey Hall in honor of recently admitted citizens. 

The celebration had as its object the cementing of a stronger friend- 
ship between people of all nationalities and the stimulating of interest 
in citizenship and patriotism. 

The program consisted of songs by the L^nited German Singing 
Societies, composed of 250 voices ; the Roma-Olympia Band, the Swedish 
Singing Society, the Lithuanian Chorus, and the Schiez Society; Scottish 
"bag-pipe selections, composed of Scottish airs ; the Highland fling and 
the sword dance ; piano and violin selections and Irish songs, Polish 
songs, and songs from Holland ; a Greek tableau, with Grecian music 
and dance by girls in costume. At the end the audience and perform- 
ers all joined in signing " America" and the "Star Spangled Banner." 

On Sunday, February 20, the clergymen throughout the country were 
requested to preach patriotic sermons in memory of George Wash- 
ington. 

On Patriots' Day, April 19, the citizens throughout the country were 
requested to show their belief in preparedness by displaying the Amer- 
ican flag. 

The annual banquet was held in Bridgeport on Washington's Birth- 
day, with an attendance of about 200 members from various parts of 
the State. Among the speakers were Francis Harvey Green, of the 
State Normal School, Westchester, Pa., and Mrs. John L. Buel, State 
Regent of the D. A. R. 

Charles G. Stone. 

May 1, 1916. Secretary 



I38 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1. t 9 1 5 51 

New members 3 

Deaths 2 

Gain , 1 

Membership March 31, 1916 52 

The annual meeting and dinner of the Delaware Society was held in 
the headquarters at the Wilmington Club, Wilmington, on Saturday 
evening, April 15, 1916, at which time officers were elected for the year. 

Appropriations were made to the Caesar Rodney Statue to be erected 
shortly in Wilmington, and for the Americanization Night Schools. A 
committee was appointed to arrange for the marking of the graves of 
Revolutionary patriots buried in this State. It is the intention of the 
Society to visit in the early springtime the battlegrounds of Brandy- 
wine and Valley Forge. 

A splendidly arranged dinner was served in the dining rooms of the 
club house, which was followed by a well prepared program, which was 
enjoyed by all the members present. During the evening a large Ameri- 
can flag connected electrically was displayed amid the applause of the 
guests and members. Toasts were proposed to Gen. George Wash- 
ington, Revolutionary patriots, the President of the United States, and 
a silent toast was proposed to the memory of deceased members of the 
Society. 

Excellent addresses were delivered by former State Attorney General 
Robert H. Richards, Dr. Harrison W. Howell, former Mayor of Wil- 
mington and a member of the Governor's staff, and Col. William D. 
Denney, of Dover, Del., each of whom laid great stress on the necessity 
for a state of preparedness for the United States of America to protect 
itself against the invasion of any foe and for the upholding of its honor 
and liberty. 

Harry J. Guthrie, Secretary. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April r, 1915 483 

New members, 35: transferred, 4; reinstated, 2. . . . 41 
Deaths, 12; resignations, it; demitted, 8; dropped, 3 34 



a 



am 7 



Membership March 31. 1916 490 

To the Officers and Delegates of the Twenty-seventh Annual Congress. 

Compatriots : The Secretary of the District of Columbia Society has 
the honor to submit herewith his report on the progress and activities 
of the Society during the past year, together with a few suggestions 
looking to the promotion of the objects of the National Society. 

At the twenty-sixth Annual Congress at Portland, Oregon, this So- 
ciety was represented by Mr. William A. De Caindry, chairman of the 
delegation, and Col. George A. Armes, Lieut. Col. C. E. Dentler, Col. 
James Jackson, Mr. Zebina Moses, and Mr. J. McDonald Stewart. 

The Society was represented on the Board of Trustees of the National 
Society during the year by Rear Admiral Colby M. Chester, U. S. N. 
(retired). 



PROCEEDINGS OF" NEWARK CONGRESS. 139 

The Society year, commencing with November and ending with April, 
includes monthly meetings for the transaction of business and the pres- 
entation of addresses on historical topics. The meetings are held at 
Rauscher's, the place of many social functions of Washington society. 
Good music, both vocal and instrumental, is a feature of the meetings. 
A buffet supper is served at the close of the exercises, affording an 
opportunity for intimate fraternal intercourse. 

During the year seven regular meetings were held and two joint cele- 
brations in co-operation with the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion and the Sons of the Revolution in the District of Columbia, and 
the Society participated in and has been represented at a number of other 
patriotic gatherings. President Chester attended and took a prominent 
part in several celebrations of a patriotic nature. 

The Board of Management held eight meetings for the transaction 
of business. 

The joint public celebration of the Fourth of July, 1915, by the Sons 
of the Revolution in the District of Columbia and this Society was held 
at the base of the Washington Monument in the forenoon of July 5. 
Ambassador Jusserand, of France, occupied a seat on the platform. 
The exercises were distinctively those of an "Americanization Day." 
The joint committee, through the courtesy of the officials of the Immi- 
gration Bureau, Department of Labor, extended special invitations to all 
recently naturalized American citizens resident in the District of Colum- 
bia. In the light of what was transpiring across the sea, the entire 
setting could not fail to impress those present. The program was m 
the nature of a welcome to these new American citizens, tendered by 
the natives, whose immigrant forefathers had established free govern- 
ment on these shores to those who had come later to enjoy its bless- 
ings. The principal speaker was the Hon. Henry B. F. Macfarland, 
one-time Commissioner of the District of Columbia. The decorations 
were elaborate. Forty-eight American flags, representing the family of 
States making up our great country, flew from standards erected in a 
circle around the monument. The music for the occasion was fur- 
nished by the full Marine Band under its leader. Lieut. William H. 
Santelmann. 

At the regular meeting on November 16, iqt.S, an invitation extended 
by the Sons of the Revolution in the District of Columbia to join in 
offering a gold medal to the school child in the District of Columbia 
submitting the best essay on a previously designated topic pertaining 
to the Revolutionary War was accepted and a committee was appointed 
to co-operate with a like committee from the Sons of the Revolution. 

After Commander John H. Moore had made a full report of the 
joint celebration of the Fourth of July, TQ15, at the base of the Wash- 
ington Monument, which assumed the form of Americanization Day, 
the following resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas numerous schools and classes have been formed for the 
purpose of preparing the alien for citizenship: 

Whereas there is no accepted standard of instructions, each school or 
class working independently ; 

Whereas the preparation of the alien for citizenship comes under the 
Bureau of Naturalization of the Department of Labor : Therefore be it 

Resolved. That the Department of Labor be urgently requested to 
prepare, publish, and distribute at as early a date as possible a manual 
on citizenship for the benefit of the would-be citizen. 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to the President of 
the United States, to the Honorable Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and to the Secretary of the Department of Labor. 



140 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. ' 

President Chester offered a resolution pledging the sympathy and 
support of the members of the Distriet of Columbia Society to the 
policy of the government as represented in the statement of the Presi- 
dent of the United States, "We feel justified in preparing ourselves to 
vindicate our rights to independent and unmolested action by making 
the force that is within us ready for assertion." President Chester 
spoke convincingly and at length in support of his resolution and it 
was adopted unanimously. 

This Society desires at this time to pay tribute to the memory of one 
removed from our midst by death shortly after his return from the 
Annual Congress at Portland, Oregon, last summer. Mr. William A. 
De Caindry was one of the most active and zealous members of our 
Society. He took a prominent part in the work of the Society from its 
organization, in 1880, and served it faithfully and well. He was deeply 
interested in all that pertained to the welfare of the Society at large 
and the patriotic work which it is accomplishing. The memorial 
adopted at this meeting was a sincere tribute to the memory of our 
Vice-President and expression of the loss felt by the Society in his 
death. 

At the December meeting Compatriot Charles W. Stew r art, librarian 
of the Navy Department, delivered an illustrated lecture on "The His- 
tory of the Flag." jr 

On December 17 the Society was the guest of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution at Continental Memorial Hall, to witness the 
photoplay "The Battle Cry of Peace." Admiral Chester was one of 
the speakers during the intermission, 

The January meeting has for so many years been devoted to the enter- 
tainment of the ladies that the term "Ladies' Night" is a fitting designa- 
tion for the occasion. On January 19, between 8 and 8:30 o'clock p. m., 
an informal reception was held in one of the parlors adjoining the 
large hall at Rauscher's. The receiving party was composed of Presi- 
dent Chester and Mrs. Chester, several of the past-Presidents of the 
Society and the Hon. Simeon D. Fess and wife. The program of the 
evening was a varied and interesting one. Admiral Chester in his words 
of welcome made an ardent appeal for preparedness. The President 
General of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Mrs. William 
Cumming Story, made a brief but interesting address. Hon. Simeon 
D. Fess, representative in Congress from Ohio, addressed the Society 
on the subject "The Significance of the American Revolution." Invita- 
tions had been sent to the national officers of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, the local officers of the Sons of the Revolution in 
the District of Columbia, and other patriotic organizations in the city, 
and the appreciation of the recipients was shown by a large attendance 
of special guests. 

The "Nominating Meeting" of February 2 was devoted entirely to 
the nomination of officers for the ensuing year and delegates to the 
twenty-seventh Annual Congress. 

In co-operation with the National Society of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and the Sons of the Revolution in the District of 
Columbia, the Society celebrated the 184th anniversary of the birth of 
George Washington by appropriate public exercises at Memorial Con- 
tinental Hall in the forenoon of February 22. The societies conducting 
the celebration were especially honored on the occasion by the presence 
of the President of the United States, members of the Cabinet, the 
French Ambassador and Madame Jusserand, others of the diplomatic 
corps, and many other distinguished guests. Music was rendered by the 
Lmited States Marine Band. A feature of the musical program was 
the rendition for the first time of "America First," a new march dedi- 
cated by its composer, John Philip Sousa, to the three societies under 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 141 

whose auspices the meeting was held. Addresses were delivered by the 
presiding officer, Mr. James Mortimer Montgomery, General President 
of the Sons of the Revolution, Mrs. William Gumming Story, President 
General of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Mr. Hamp- 
son Gary. The principal speaker of the day was the Hon. William C. 
Fitts, of' the Department of Justice. The gold medal offered jointly by 
the Sons of the Revolution in the District of Columbia and the District 
of Columbia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution for the 
best essay on "The Campaign Against Quebec under General Richard 
Montgomery, 1775," was handed to the successful competitor, Miss Ira 
M. Lawrence, of the Eastern High School, by the President of the 
United States. The object of the contest was to engender a more gen- 
eral interest among the youth in the study of history of the American 
Revolution as an inspiration to patriotism. 

The annual business meeting began at noon on February 22. The 
annual reports of the treasurer, registrar, historian, and librarian 
showed the Society to be in a flourishing condition from every point of 
view, and giving encouragement for greater results in the future. Com- 
mander John H. Moore, as chairman of the joint committee having in 
charge the celebration in commemoration of the 184th anniversary of 
the birth of George Washington, made a full report to the Society on 
that successful affair. After luncheon the report of the tellers was 
made, announcing the officers elected for the ensuing year and dele- 
gates elected to the Annual Congress. 

At the March meeting our newly elected President, Philip F. Larner r 
presided and introduced Compatriot Claude N. Bennett, who addressed 
the Society, taking as his theme "Personal Observations on National 
Administrations." 

On the evening of March 18 the members of the Society were the 
guests of the Daughters of the American Revolution at an illustrated 
lecture on the location and preservation of the boundary stones of the 
District of Columbia. 

The officers. Board of Management, and ex-Presidents of the Society 
gave a banquet at the Army and Navy Club Tuesday evening, April 
18, in honor of President General Newell B. Woodworth. It was at 
this family gathering that the project was proposed of having the 
Annual Congress take steps looking to the requirement that the young- 
men of the country, as they come of age, take the oath of allegiance 
to the United States as a prerequisite to their registration as voters. 

The meeting of April 19 being the anniversary of the battle of Lex- 
ington, Col. Frederick C. Bryan was called upon and recited impressively 
Emerson's "Concord Hymn." President General Newell B. Wood- 
worth was the guest of the Society and made the address of the even- 
ing, taking as his theme "Idealism as a Defensive Force." Compatriot 
George H. Moses, of Concord, New Hampshire, former U. S. Minister 
to Greece, made a short but stirring address. 

The following suggestions which I think will tend to the promotion of 
the objects of the National Society are the result of careful considera- 
tion : 

1st. It is suggested that in place of the present method of adding new 
members to our rolls a comprehensive and systematic campaign for 
new members throughout the country be inaugurated by the National 
Society as a means of stimulating patriotism in native Americans, to 
the end that aliens coming to our shores may see our good work and 
appreciate more fully the blessings of liberty regulated by law. An 
enlarged membership would increase the public interest in and give 
greater force to the patriotic work of the Society. 

2d. The stationery of the Society, letter-heads, invitations to join our 
Societv, cards or communications of condolence to the farmlies of de- 



I42 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ceased members, and innumerable other forms should be standardized 
and furnished from one source, thereby saving to the State Societies, 
to a considerable extent, the very large expense incident to present 
methods. 

3d. The official rosette of the Society should be manufactured in 
America instead of in a foreign country, as at present. 

4th. A definite and systematic program of work, not only from year 
to year, but projected into the future, should be mapped out and sub- 
mitted to each State Society for active, vigorous^ and aggressive prose- 
cution to a successful issue. Inspired and stimulated thus by the 
National Society, the results would be certain, great, and far-reaching. 

5th. A vigorous and intelligent campaign of publicity regarding the 
aims, purposes, and objects of the Society could be worked out by the 
National Society and recommended to the State Societies. 

With greeting from the District of Columbia Society to the com- 
patriots assembled at the twenty-seventh Annual Congress of the Sons 
of the American Revolution at Newark, New Jersey, I beg to submit 
the foregoing report and recommendations. 

Respectfully, John B. TorbErt, Secretary. 

FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 33 

New members 11 

Deaths 1 

Gain 10 

Membership March 31, 1916 43 

The Florida Society tendered a dinner to former President General 
Thruston on his visit to Pensacola, where on March 30, 1916, he deliv- 
ered his flag address before the Pensacola High School. 

At the annual meeting, on April 19, officers were elected and plans 
discussed for active work toward the Society's growth and usefulness. 

SOCIETY IN FRANCE. 

The Society in France is not now an active organization as such, 
but its members, as also members of State Societies resident in Paris, 
preserve the memoty of the patriots of the American Revolution. 

On the morning of February 22, 1916, a wreath was placed at the foot 
of Washington's statue, in Place d'lena, by H. Cleveland Coxe, Deputy 
Consul General in Paris, on behalf of the Empire State Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

In the evening upward of 100 Americans dined with a number of 
distinguished Frenchmen and their guests in observance of the day. 
The French government was represented by Baron Denys Cochin, 
member of the Cabinet without portfolio, and who is known as the 
"great citizen of Paris." The Foreign Office was represented by Count 
Peretta de la Rocca, former secretary of the French embassy at Wash- 
ington. Among the others in attendance were Gen. Pierre Cherfils, 
Paul Le Roy-Beaulieu, member of the institute: Joseph Reinach, mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Deputies ; Jean Cruppi, M. Bonet-Maury, and 
M. Henri-Roberts, jurists; Jean Finot, director of La Revue, and 
Frantz Jourdain, the architect. 

Laurence V. Benet, a member of the District of Columbia Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution and president of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in Paris, who presided, referred to the love 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 143 

-and sympathy of the American people for the people of France as not 
a mere hazy "tradition, but as real, ardent, and profound. 

M. Benet proposed the single toast of the evening, which was to the 
memorv of Washington and his companions in arms, to France and 
to America, to the President of the French Republic, and to the Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

Baron Cochin, in responding to the toast, referred to the warm and 
unbroken friendship that has existed between the United States and 
France since the founding of the American Republic. 

William G. Sharp, the American Ambassador, in his address on 
Washington, referred to some phases of the French press. He desired, 
he said, to voice his genuine satisfaction for the spirit of fairness and 
^broad-mindedness that the French press had shown to the government 
of the United States, as well as to its people, at a time when such an 
attitude was to be appreciated." 

Henri Bergson, member of the Academy, in a speech, said he found 
in the personality of Washington the incarnation of the soul of America, 
.as Joan of Arc was the incarnation of the soul of France. 

HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 88 

New members, 7 ; transfer, 1 8 

Deaths, 4; resigned, 2; demitted, 1 ; dropped, 3. . . . 10 

Loss 2 

Membership March 31, 1916 86 

The Hawaiian Society held its annual meeting at the University 
Club, Honolulu, on June 17, 1915, celebrating the twentieth anniversary 
of its organization. 

The exercises following the business meeting included the presenta- 
tion of a 14-foot United States flag to the Federal court, with response 
"by Judge Sanford B. Dole ; addresses by ex-Governor George R. Carter, 
"Twenty Years Ago," and by Judge Sidney M. Ballon on "Armament 
in Relation to War." The flag is intended specially for use during the 
•ceremony of naturalization. It was formally unfurled in the court- 
room on July 3 in the presence of judges, attorneys, and other citizens. 
Addresses were made by Judge Dole, Judge Clemons, and President 
Barnes. 

On August 31 Compatriot George W. Guthrie, U. S. Ambassador to 
Japan, was the guest at a dinner given in his honor by the "Sons" and 
the "Daughters" of the American Revolution and the Pan-Pacific Club. 
President Barnes was toastmaster. Addresses were made by H. Arita, 
Japanese acting consul general ; by Ambassador Guthrie, Horatio T. 
Newell, Dr. E. H. Hanna, and several others. The chief topics of the 
speakers were the relations between Japan and the United States, the 
-progress being made toward the naturalization of Japanese in the 
Hawaiian Islands. 

TheSons of the American Revolution and the Y. M. C. A. are co- 
operating to establish at Honolulu an educational bureau for all for- 
eigners^ seeking citizenship in the United States. A campaign of edu- 
cation is to be instituted soon, employing moving pictures and special 
instructors to carry to all who seek it a better knowledge of American 
ideals, methods, history, and citizenship. 

On November 6 the Society took action toward the promotion of a 
plan to stimulate the study of the rights and duties of citizenship among 
;young folk of high-school age. The Society has decided, with the 



144 sons of the; American revolution. 

Daughters of the American Revolution co-operating, to offer a series, 
of prizes for essays on a subject connected with citizenship. 

This matter of instructing new citizens and citizens of alien descent, 
in the ideals of American citizenship has long been recognized as a 
problem of increasing importance. 

It has weighed heavily on the minds of the Sons and Daughters, and 
all over the country campaigns for the instruction of naturalized citi- 
zens and citizens of alien parentage have been started by these two 
patriotic societies. Last winter we received a letter from President 
General Thruston urging us to embark on this important work. We 
met and decided to take it up. 

The Sons of the American Revolution and the Aloha Chapter of the 
Daughters commemorated the anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrim 
Fathers by holding a Forefathers' Day dinner at the University Club, 
Honolulu, on December 21, 1915. President S. D. Barnes presided as 
toastmaster. Addresses were delivered on "Colonial Wars," by Prof. 
William Alanson Bryan ; "Beginnings of the United States Army," by 
Capt. Paul B. Malone, U. S. A. ; "Applied Patriotism," by James Austin 
Wilder, and "Forefathers in Hawaii, II," by Hon. Sanford B. Dole. 

On February 22 the Society participated in a patriotic mass meeting 
at the Opera House, President Barnes presiding. Announcement was 
made of winners in the prize essay contest, and eight successful contest- 
ants received their trophies and diplomas. The contest was on the gen- 
eral subject "The True American Citizen," and it was an interesting 
detail that only two or three of the winners were white, the others 
being either Hawaiian, Chinese, or Japanese boys and girls. 

IDAHO SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 73 

New members, 4 ; transfer, 1 5 

Membership March 31, 1916 78 

The Idaho Society held its seventh annual meeting and dinner on? 
February 22, 1916, at the Idanha Hotel, Boise, the members of Pioneer 
Chapter, D. A. R., participating in the dinner. Comoatriot Harry 
Keyser was toastmaster. The program included addresses on "Present 
Problems and Revolutionary Ideals," by Mrs. C. W. Pursell ; "Wash- 
ington and Americanization," by Edward L. Wells; "Preparation for 
Peace," by Mrs. Elizabeth Wyman ; "Exploit of Elizabeth Zane," L>y 
Frank G. Ensign ; "The Dual Monarchy," by Dr. A. A. Jessup ; "Di- 
plomacy of the Revolution," by Herbert P. Lee. 

On December 15 the Society announced to the high-school principals 
of Idaho the second annual medal contest for patriotic essays by high- 
school students. As in 1914-1915, three medals were to be awarded— 
gold, silver, and bronze — as first, second, and third prizes respectively 
for the best essay on some patriotic subject by any regularly enrolled. 
high-school student, of either sex, in the State of Idaho for the school- 
year 1915-1916. 

ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 996 

New members, 107; transferred, 4; reinstated, 3 ' 114 
Deaths, 2^\ resignations, 2; demitted, 5; 
dropped, 27 57 

Gain 57 

Membership March 31, 1916 1,053, 



PROCEEDINGS OE NEWARK CONGRESS. J 45 

The year's work of the Illinois Society has been characterized by 
steady activity and a reasonably good growth. One hundred and eleven 
new members were voted in during the year, making the membership 
in good standing April i, 1,053. -All of the usual meetings and cele- 
brations have been held, with a large attendance and addresses of 
historical and patriotic interest. Lexington Day and Yorktown Day 
were observed with banquets, having an attendance of nearly 300 each. 
On Illinois Day, December 3, occurred the annual meeting, while the quar- 
terly meetings in January and March were the most largely attended 
gatherings in the history of the Society. Flag Day was observed by 
attendance at a special patriotic service in Central Church. The Society 
arranged a suitable celebration of Washington's Birthday at the statue 
of the General in Washington Park, Chicago. 

The Society maintains a library and office, open daily throughout the 
year. Two local chapters in the State have held interesting gatherings 
and have co-operated helpfully in the general patriotic activities of their 
communities. 

Thorough preparation has been made for the organization of The 
Washington Guard and the first meeting held. 

The Society has arranged for the National Society pamphlets for the 
benefit of immigrants to be used by the Chicago Board of Education, 
the Young Men's Christian Association, and some of the social settle- 
ments of the city. 

We have no special recommendations to offer for the promotion of 
the objects of the National Society, unless it be to renew recommenda- 
tions previously made, particularly the one referring to the great benefit 
to accrue from the employment of a Field Secretary to devote his entire 
time to traveling throughout the nation organizing and stimulating 
State Societies and forming local Chapters. 

Louis A. Bowman, Secretary. 

INDIANA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 '. 257 

New members, 19 ; transfer, 1 20 

Resignations, 1 ; demitted, 1 2 

Gain 18 

Membership March 31, 1916 275 

IOWA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1,1915 338 

New members, 34 ; transfer, 1 35 

Deaths, 10 ; demitted, 1 11 

Gain 24 

Membership March 31, 1916 362 

The Iowa Society has continued to give particular attention to devel- 
oping the study of history in the high schools and colleges of the State 
through the award of prize medals for the best work done in the 
study of the history of the United States. These medals are donated by 
individual members of the Society. A total distribution of more than 
250 has been awarded since 1908. The Old Continental, published 
quarterly by the Society, records its doings and the pedigrees of new 
members. 



I46 SONS OF TH^ AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

On February 22 there was organized the Powesheik Chapter at Grin- 
nell, with Prof. Frank A. Almy of Grinnell College as President and 
Rev. Dwight P. Breed, D. D., as Secretary. On December 29 a charter 
was issued to The Hamilton Chapter at Sheldon. About sixty Des 
Moines members of the Iowa Society and guests were, on December 9, 
addressed by Judge C. A. Dudley and Mr. E. M. Wentworth. 

At the annual meeting on April 19 an address on "The New Nation- 
alism" was delivered by the new President, Rev. J. Edward Kirbye, 
D. D., and is printed in The Old Continental of April, 1916. 

KANSAS SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 76 

New members, 6 ; reinstated, 2 8 

Deaths, 2 ; dropped, 2 ; demitted, 1 5 

Gain 3 

Membership March 31, 1916 79 

The Kansas Society held its annual meeting at Topeka on January 
15. Quite an increased enthusiasm was manifested by the compatriots 
present and an agreement entered into to make a special drive for 
greater membership. The Secretary reported a small increase in mem- 
bership, with good financial showing. The Society was honored by the 
presence of Mr. Elmer M. Wentworth, of Iowa, a member of the Na- 
tional Executive Committee, and the compatriots greatly appreciated 
his coming. 

KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 178 

New members, 12 ; transfer, 1 13 

Dropped, 2 ; deaths, 2 ; resignation, 2 6 

Gain 7 

Membership March 31, 1916 185 

The Kentucky Society held a Flag Day celebration on June 14, 1915, 
when President General Thruston delivered his address on "The Origin 
and Evolution of the Flag." 

Naturalization Day was observed on Sunday, July 4, at the Girls' 
High School Building, where an audience of about 2,000 assembled and 
listened to several addresses. A large flag was unfurled by President 
General Thruston. Naturalized citizens and their families present num- 
bered about 1,000. The meeting was arranged by a committee ap- 
pointed by the Mayor, in co-operation with the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

The annual business meeting and banquet was held at the Pendennis 
Club, Louisville, on October 20. 

Mr. John Barrett Hundley, the retiring President, reviewed the work 
of the Society during the year and reported on the Annual Congress of 
the National Society at Seattle, Portland, and San Francisco. 

President General Woodworth was the guest of honor at the ban- 
quet. In his address he urged the continued support of the Kentucky 
Society in the movement to secure national legislation for a suitable 
building for preserving records relating to the history of the nation. 
He advocated improvement in the conditions surrounding the natural- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. l£fl 

ization of aliens and spoke in favor of a closer observation of the 
Society's flag laws. Erection of monuments to commemorate Revo- 
lutionary events was a work in which members of the Kentucky Society 
should throw all energy. 

Miss Ethel De Long described the settlement work in the Kentucky 
mountains, and showed that the people of the mountains are descend- 
ants of the men who fought in the Revolution. She vividly pictured 
life in the Kentucky mountains, and told of the work being done by 
the Pine Mountain Settlement schools in educating the youth of Harlan 
County. 

The Liberty Bell was enthusiastically received by the people of Louis- 
ville on November 22, most of the 30,000 school children of the city 
paying patriotic homage to that precious relic. The Kentucky Society 
of Sons of the American Revolution distributed several thousand copies 
of an 8-page leaflet, prepared by Compatriot R. C. Ballard Thruston, 
relating the history of the Bell, particularly in connection with the 
Declaration of Independence. 

At its regular meeting at Louisville, on January 17, 1916, the Society 
adopted the following resolution : 

Whereas the present deplorable condition of the original manuscript 
sources of the nation's history, both as regards their safety and their 
accessibility, demands that these records be better cared for in the 
future, 

Be it resolved by the Kentucky Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, That we urge that the Congress of the United States erect, 
as soon as practicable, a suitable National Archives Building in Wash- 
ington, in which our valuable governmental records may be placed for 
preservation and consultation. 

Be it further resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to each 
Kentucky member of the House of Representatives, as well as to the 
two Senators from Kentucky, and that a copy also be sent to the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

On the evening of February 22, at St. Mark's Church, Louisville, by 
invitation of the Vestry and the Young Men's Club, the Society cele- 
brated Washington's Birthday by special service, conducted by Past 
Chaplains Very Rev. Charles Ewell Craik, D. D., Rev. William Warren 
Landrum, D. D., and Rev. Richard Lightburne McCready, Chaplain 
General of the National Society. An address on "George Rogers 
Clark" was delivered by Rev. Frank Morehead Thomas, D. D., Chap- 
lain of the Society, in which he reviewed the wonderful military 
achievements of George Rogers Clark, "the Hero of the West." An 
abstract of the address was published in the March Official Bulletin. 

LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

Members April 1, 1915 81 

New members 3 

Deaths, 2 ; dropped, 5 ; demitted, 1 8 

Loss 5 

Membership March 31, 1916 j6 

The Louisiana Society during the past year awarded two silver 
medals to pupils in the girls' upper and lower high schools of New 
Orleans. The subject of the essays was "Lafayette in the War of the 
American Revolution." 



I48 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

On November 20 the Society paid homage to the Liberty Bell as it 
passed through New Orleans and was viewed by many thousands of 
citizens and school children. Members of the Sons and Daughters of 
the American Revolution formed part of the guard of honor. During 
the ceremonies the famous painting of the "Spirit of '76" was repre- 
sented by I. J. Fowler, Thomas Dimitry Norvell, and Rene de Touches 
Des Forges. 

Early in April, 1916, former President General Thruston spent some 
time in New Orleans and conferred with officers of the Society about 
its patriotic work. He delivered nis address on "The United States 
Flag" at the Tulane University; also at the State University at Baton 
Rouge and at other places. 

MAINE SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1,1915 397 

New members 14 

Deaths, 5 ; resignations, 3 ; dropped, 8 16 

Loss, including errors in registration 32 

Membership March 31, 1916 365 

The only gathering of the State Society during the year is the annual 
meeting. The twenty- fifth meeting and banquet was held at the Con- 
gress Square Hotel, Portland, on February 22, 1916, attended by about 
100 members. 

It was voted to indorse the movement to have built in Washington 
a place to permanently and safely house the national archives, which 
are at present scattered about in various unsafe and inconvenient 
places. This was left to the Board of Managers to properly prepare 
and forward to the members of Congress. 

The matter of giving some form of practical aid to the Knox 
Memorial at Thomaston was also referred to the Board of Managers. 

The retiring President, Philip F. Turner, presided at the banquet. 
Adj. Gen. George McL. Presson of Farmington took for his topic "Na- 
tional Defense," calling particular attention to the necessity of a trained 
citizenry, not so much to make a war of aggression, but to hold them- 
selves in readiness for any necessary means of defense. Francis L. 
Littlefield described "A Local Incident of Unpreparedness," a story of 
the events leading to the bombardment and burning of the town of 
Falmouth by Mowat, October 19, 1775. Hon. Wainwright Cushing, 
President-elect, of Foxcroft, gave an account of his ancestors, reading a 
number of curious old documents having to do with the family history. 
President Turner read a letter from the present President General, Mr. 
Woodworth. 

MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 308 

New members, 17 ; reinstated, 4 21 

Deaths, 11 ; resigned, 4 ; dropped, 7 22 

Loss 1 

Membership March 31, 1916 307 

The Maryland Society has appointed a committee to secure the 
co-operation of all patriotic societies, fraternal and business organiza- 






PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I49 

tions in the city and State for a more dignified use of our national 
anthem — the Star Spangled Banner. Over fifty organizations sent 
delegates to a meeting held at the Belvedere Hotel on December o. 
At this meeting a copy of a bill to be introduced in the city council 
was read. The action was unanimously endorsed and the committee 
empowered to proceed and to notify the National Society, recommend- 
ing that similar action be taken by other State Societies. 

The Society celebrated Washington's Birthday at the Hotel Belve- 
dere, Baltimore, with an attendance of over 200 members and their 
wives and other guests. President Lawrason Riggs presided, and the 
meeting opened by an invocation by the Chaplain, Rev. Henry Branch. 
Hon. George R. Gaither spoke on "Washington, the Soldier;" the Hon. 
Henry Stockbridge spoke on "Washington, the Statesman," closing his 
remarks with some original verses on peace and preparedness. Osborne 
I. Yellott, Esq., delivered an address on "Washington, the Man." 

The Society honored the memory of Gen. Mordecai Gist, a distin- 
guished Revolutionary hero from Maryland, by the erection of a monu- 
ment over his grave in Charleston, S. C. The monument was unveiled 
on Saturday, November 6, 191 5, in the churchyard adjoining St. 
Michael's P. E. Church. The party from the Maryland Society con- 
sisted of Mr. Alfred D. Bernard, chairman of the committee in charge 
of the erection of the memorial ; Mr. Edward F. Arthurs, Registrar, 
and Mr. John H. Orem, Jr. The unveiling took place at 12 o'clock 
noon and the churchyard was crowded with spectators. The U. S. 
Coast Artillery Band from Fort Moultrie was in attendance playing 
national airs. The Maryland representatives were escorted to the un- 
veiling by the rector, Rev. John Kershaw, D. D., President W. G. Har- 
vey of the South Carolina Sons of the Revolution, and the vestry of the 
church. The exercises opened with an invocation by Dr. Kershaw. 
Mr. Bernard delivered the address presenting the memorial to the 
vestry of the church and the city of Charleston. At the close of iris 
remarks Mr. Orem raised the flag from the memorial to the top of the 
staff planted near the grave and Mr. Arthurs placed on the memorial 
a large bunch of chrysanthemums — a tribute of the Maryland Society — 
and a wreath bearing the words "Lest we forget," from the Mordecai 
Gist Chapter of the D. A. R. in Maryland, was presented by Miss 
Waters from Baltimore, a descendant of General Gist. Mr. Connor, 
on behalf of St. Michael's Church and of the citizens of Charleston, 
accepted the memorial with a few remarks. 

The memorial is the work of the sculptor, Edward Berge of Balti- 
more, and consists of a flat slab of Stony Creek granite, grayish pink 
in color. Upon the top, which is oval, a wreath of oak leaves, as a 
symbol of strength, made of bronze, with the emblem of the Society 
at the ribbon fastening the branches composing the wreath, is securely 
placed, and the name of General Gist is cut into the stone, with the 
following inscription, the letters being faced with gold, lending elegance 
and utility : 

"22nd February, 1742. 2nd August, 1792. 

To the memory of Gen. Mordecai Gist. 

While in command of the First Maryland Battalion he so valiantly 
covered the retreat of the American Forces at the Battle of Long 
Island, August, 1776, that his troops became known as 'The Bayonets 
of the Revolution.' 

A tribute from the Maryland Society, Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. Erected 1915." 

The Society celebrated its 27th birthday and also the anniversary 
of the Battle of Lexington on the evening of April 19, 1916, at the 



150 SONS OE THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Hotel Belvedere, Baltimore. Gen. Lawrason Riggs, President, pre- 
sided. Annual reports were made by the Secretary, Treasurer, Regis- 
trar, and Historian, covering the work of the Society for the year. 
Hon. Albert C. Ritchie, recently elected Attorney General of the State 
of Maryland, delivered an address. 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 1,632 

New members, 155; transfer, 1; reinstated, 11.. 172 
Deaths, 52; resigned, 17; demitted, 1 ; dropped, 34 104 

Gain 68 

Membership March 31, 1916 1,700 

of which ^2 are life members and 3 are "actual sons" of soldiers of 
the Revolutionary War, viz: Elijah J. Faxon, of Salem, aged 84; Rev. 
Elisha Gifford, of New Haven, Conn., aged 83, and Cyrus A. Rockwell, 
of San Francisco, Cal., aged JJ. 

The State Society has held meetings on April 19 ("Patriots' Day"), 
Washington's Birthday, and a field day at Gloucester October 12, 1915. 
The Board of Managers has held its stated meetings, with a good at- 
tendance, each month excepting in July and August. 

Washington's Birthday was observed by a meeting and dinner at 
Hotel Vendome, Boston, followed by an address by Col. Henry L. 
Hawthorne, U. S. Army (retired), on "Modern Armament," illustrated 
by the stereopticon. 

President Frank E. Woodward and Vice-President Charles F. Read 
have given much time and labor to increase the membership of the So- 
ciety. The Board of Managers has attended meetings of Chapters of 
the Massachusetts Society at Springfield, Northampton, Lowell, East 
Walpole, and Maiden. 

The Society contributed $100 towards restoring and preserving the 
historic Governor Shirley mansion on Shirley street, Roxbury; $25 was 
contributed toward purchasing a set of colors for the Massachusetts 
Training School. Dr. Charles M. Green, treasurer of our Society, 
placed a tablet at Leicester to commemorate Washington's journey to 
Cambridge. Twenty "markers" have been contributed for graves of 
Revolutionary soldiers, and flags have been placed on Memorial Day 
in Boston cemeteries through the contributions of the Society and 
Compatriot Edward Webster McGlenen. 

The Washington Guard, located in Lynn, has received encourage- 
ment from the State Society, and. through the earnest efforts of Com- 
patriot Webster Bruce it is bound to be successful. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Herbert W. Kimball, Secretary. 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY. 

Membership April t, 1915 430 

New members, 42 ; reinstated, 3 45 

Deaths, 15; resigned, 7; demitted, 3 25 

Gain 20 

Membership March 31, 1916 450 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 51 

Compatriots: The Secretary of the Michigan Society respectfully 
submits herewith his annual report on the progress of this Society 
during the preceding year. 

The Society was represented at the 26th Annual Congress at Port- 
land, Oregon, in July, 1915, by its President, Albert M. Henry; 
William M. Finck, James H. Hall, and Howard A. Starrett, all of 
Detroit. Our Society has been represented during the year on the 
Board of Trustees of the National Society by our President, Albert M. 
Henry, who was further honored by being reappointed a member of 
the Executive Committee of the National Society for the current year. 

During the year the organization of a local Chapter at Kalamazoo 
was completed and a charter granted. There are also local Chapters 
at Detroit, Ann Arbor, and Mt. Pleasant. Interest throughout the 
State has greatly increased. New members have been admitted from 
Muskegon, Mt. Clemens, and Cheboygan; eighteen new members have 
been added to the Detroit Chapter, eleven to the Grand Rapids 
Chapter, seven to Kalamazoo Chapter, and one to Ann Arbor, and one 
to Mt. Pleasant. 

The membership by Chapters is as follows : 

Detroit Chapter 238 

Kent Chapter, Grand Rapids 5° 

Washtenaw Chapter, Ann Arbor 20 

Kalamazoo Chapter 12 

Mt. Pleasant Chapter n 

Members residing in Detroit who are not affiliated with the local 

Chapter 35 

Members residing in Michigan outside of the jurisdiction of local 

Chapters 58 

Members in other States 26 

making a total membership April 1, 1916, of 450 members. 

During the year the Society has interested itself in formulating a plan 
for illustrated lectures throughout the State promoting Americaniza- 
tion. Prof. Warren W. Florer, President of the Washtenaw Chapter, 
obtained a set of stereopticon slides prepared- by George R. Swain 
illustrating scenes from the American Revolution. These he has ex- 
hibited throughout the State in connection with the lecture on "The 
Formation of the Republic from the Various European Elements." 
These lectures were given in the schools and in foreign settlements, and 
have been received with great interest among those of foreign birth, as 
well as our native sons. This lecture was listed in the University 
Extension Service and was also obtained by private arrangement. 

The field organizer of the Americanization Day Committee was fur- 
nished by the undersigned Secretary with the names of the members of 
this Society in the Michigan cities visited by him, and was introduced 
to the Mayor's office and the newspapers of the city of Detroit. The 
compaign thus begun resulted in a most successful celebration of Amer- 
icanization Day on the Fourth of July in Detroit, Kalamazoo, and else- 
where, under committees among whose members the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution were prominent. President Albert M. Henry being on 
the Detroit committee, and Compatriot Edward C. Parsons being Presi- 
dent of the Kalamazoo committee. 

The education of aliens, so long advocated by this Society, has been 
taken up in earnest by the Board of Commerce and the municipality of 
the City of Detroit, and an appropriation has been made for the com- 
ing year by the Common Council and the Board of Estimates of the 
City of Detroit of the sum of $96,700 for maintenance of night schools 
for the coming year. Compatriots Charles L. Clark and Raymond E. 



152 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION.' 

Van Syckle, members of the Board of Estimates, actively participated 
in the procuring of the allowance of this sum for this purpose. 

A recent addition to the membership of this Society and that of 
the Detroit Chapter is Milton Bentley Purdy, an actual son of the 
Revolutionary soldier Jeremiah Purdy, who enlisted in Newburgh, 
N. Y., in 1777, in Capt. John Shepherd's Company, Col. J. Bald- 
win's Artillery Artificers, and served three years. The soldier was 
born on the 29th day of June, 1761, and died in Hamilton, N. Y., on 
the 16th day of June, 1842. His son Milton B. Purdy was born 
August 28, 1839, the twelfth member of a family of thirteen children. 
The papers in the Pension Office disclosed that the soldier, at the age 
of 71, married a second time, in 1832, Miss Susanna Walworth, who 
was then 18, and that he had thereafter four children — the last being 
born in 1842, when the soldier was 81. 

Two veterans of the Spanish-American war, who saw service on the 
U. S. S. Yosemite, have been admitted to membership and presented 
with Spanish war medals issued by this Society — Hon. Edwin Denby 
and John E. Baker, of Detroit. Another recent addition is Com- 
patriot Clarence F. Conner of Mt. Clemens, corporal with Troop B, 
13th Cavalry, U. S. A., with the expedition into Mexico. 

A public meeting was held on Washington's Birthday, 1916, in the 
auditorium of the Art Museum, Detroit, under the auspices of Com- $ 
patriot Charles Moore, Secretary of the Art Museum, the Secretary 
of this Society and officers of other patriotic societies, at which Claud 
H. Van Tyne, Ph. D., of the University of Michigan, was the speaker. 

The local social events in Detroit are carried on by the Detroit 
Chapter. The annual meeting was held May 14, 1915, at the Detroit 
Athletic Club, President Frederic B. Smith presiding. The reports of 
the Committees on Patriotic Education and on Americanization were 
submitted, and J. H. Dague, Industrial Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., 
spoke on "The Alien Population in Detroit and the Opportunities 
Offered Them in Preparation for Citizenship." A buffet luncheon was 
served. 

Meetings for the winter season 191 5-' 16 have been held by Detroit 
Chapter as follows : 

December 3, 1915. — Hotel Cadillac. An illustrated address was given 
by Prof. Warren W. Florer on "Scenes of the American Revolution," 
snowing his especially prepared stereopticon slides. 

February 8, 1916. — Detroit Athletic Club. Compatriot Arthur J. 
Tuttle, U. S. District Judge, discussed "The Admission of Aliens to 
Citizenship." 

March 17, 1916. — University Club. Capt. Fred M. Alger spoke on 
"Preparedness and National Defense." A general discussion followed, 
participated in by Gen. Charles A. Coolidge, U. S. A.; Gen. Charles 
W. Harrah, M. N. G. ; Lieut. Emory S. West, U. S. A. ; Lieut. William 
V. Rosevear, and Compatriots Burns Henry and Harry Jewett, organ- 
izers of the Business Men's Training Organization of Detroit. 

At Grand Rapids the Kent Chapter has held the following meetings : 

October 12, 191 5. — At the home of Compatriot Charles Carroll Foll- 
mer, 465 Fountain street N. E. Compatriot Mark Norris spoke on the 
topic "Early History." 

November 9, 1915. — At the home of Compatriot William Judson, 225 
Fountain street N. E. Honorable T. J. O'Brien spoke on the topic 
"American Diplomacy." 

December 14, 1915. — Compatriot Claude Hamilton gave a compli- 
mentary dinner at the Pantlind Hotel, the guest and speaker being 
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris. 

January II, T916. — At the home of Compatriot James M. Crosby, 
"Kent Hills." The speaker was Dean Francis White. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 153 

February 8, 1916— At the home of Compatriot Stuart E. Knappen, 
322 Fountain street N. E. Ex-Governor Chase S. Osborn was the 
speaker. 

March 7, 1916.— At the home of Charles H. Leonard, 455 Morris 
avenue S. E. The speaker was Albert M. Henry, President of the 
Michigan Society, Detroit. . 

April 11, 19 16.— At the home of Lucius Boltwood, "Riverside. 
Honorable Huntley Russell was the speaker. 

The Mt. Pleasant Chapter met at the Central Michigan Normal 
College Hall on Friday, January 14. The program included a stereop- 
ticon exhibit of views of the American Revolution, with a lecture by 
Prof. Warren W. Florer, President of the Washtenaw Chapter. An 
audience of 500 attended. After the lecture the local Chapter and the 
invited guests were entertained at the home of A. E. Gorham with a 
banquet. Albert M. Henry, President of the State Society, spoke on 
the "Purposes and Aims of the Sons of the American Revolution." 

The Washtenaw Chapter held a meeting on November 16, 1915, at 
Ann Arbor in Newberry Hall. The topic of discussion was "The 
Original Location of Ann Arbor." On Washington's Birthday, 1916, 
this Chapter held public exercises at the Ann Arbor High School 
Auditorium, at which Albert M. Henry, President of the Michigan 
Society, gave an address on "'Patriotism." Prof. Warren W. Florer 
gave his illustrated talk on the American Revolution, accompanied 
with the Swain stereopticon views. Patriotic songs were rendered. 
The meeting was attended by Company I, Michigan National Guard, 
in uniform, Civil War Veterans, and members of the Woman's Relief 
Corps. The annual meeting and banquet were held at 6 p. m. at the 
Michigan Union Club House. President Albert M. Henry, Gen. Chas. 
A. Coolidge, Dr. J. Remsen Bishop, and Frank D. Taylor, of Detroit, 
were the guests of honor. 

The annual banquet and meeting for the election of officers of the 
Michigan State Society were held at the Detroit Club Wednesday 
evening, May 10. Over too members attended from Detroit and other 
Michigan cities. 

After the business meeting the guests proceeded to the banquet hall, 
which was decorated with national flags and the emblems of the 
Society. Albert M. Henry, retiring President of the State Society, 
presided as toastmaster. Invocation was pronounced by Rev. W. D. 
Maxon. Patriotic airs comprised the selections played by the orches- 
tra, and the members sang "America," "Michigan, My Michigan," and 
"Star Spangled Banner" under the direction of John P. Antisdel. 
Solos were sung by Compatriot John Dickinson, accompanied by Com- 
patriot Henry Riley Fuller. 

An actual son of a Revolutionary soldier, Milton B. Purdy, was 
admitted to membership and presented to those present. His father, 
Jeremiah Purdy, born 1761, died 1842, served three years in the Revo- 
lution, from the State of New York. 

Medals for service in the Spanish-American war were presented to 
Compatriots Edwin Denby and John E. Baker, recently admitted to 
membership. President Clarence M. Burton gave an interesting ad- 
dress, mentioning his recent discovery of the records of the early 
pension agent in Detroit in 1842, containing the names of all Revolu- 
tionary pensioners in Detroit at that time, and also referred to the 
unmarked grave in Dearborn village of a hero 01 the American Revo- 
lution. 

Secretary Van Syckle told of the progress made by the Society and 
of its_ activities in promoting lectures throughout the State in aid of 
Americanization of the various alien elements, its participation in the 
celebrations of Americanization Day, and the aid its members had 



154 SONS OE THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

rendered in assisting in procuring allowances of appropriations for the 
education of aliens. 

Reports and greetings were received from the presidents of local 
Chapters in Michigan, as follows : Kalamazoo Chapter, Edward A. 
Parsons ; Washtenaw Chapter, Prof. Warren W. Florer ; Kent Chap- 
ter, Grand Rapids, Chas. C. Follmer; Detroit Chapter, Harry A. 
Lockwood. 

Compatriot Parsons told of the organization of the Chapter at 
Kalamazoo with a membership of 12. Compatriot Florer told of the 
influence of the meetings at Ann Arbor upon the students, and of the 
intense interest manifested throughout the State in the lecture and 
pictures presented by him in the various Michigan cities under the 
auspices of this Society, promoting the cause of Americanization. 
Compatriots Follmer and Chas. N. Remington, Secretary, gave an 
account of the development of the Chapter at Grand Rapids, now with 
a membership of 53 ; and Compatriot Lockwood, who has been absent 
from Detroit during a tour of South America, spoke on our relations 
with our neighbors there and advised the establishment of a press 
agency to promote mutual knowledge between us. 

Moving pictures were shown illustrating life in the army and navy. 
These were followed by discussions participated in by the invited mili- 
tary and naval men present. The army film was taken by Henry P. 
Joy while with the United States expedition into Mexico, and showed 
the difficulties presented in maintaining communication and transport- 
ing supplies from the border to the forces, and demonstrated the 
efficiency of the modern motor truck. Col. G. R. Cecil, U. S. A., 
described the arid conditions of Mexico and the physical difficulties 
to be encountered by our troops, illustrated by his own experiences in 
command along the border. Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, U. S. A., told of 
the advance made in the last few years in the problems of military 
science and transportation and noted the passing of the army mule. 
Gen. Chas. W. Harrah, U. S. V., demonstrated the necessity of mili- 
tary preparedness for the United States. Col. Walter Barlow, M. N. 
G., described the Michigan National Guard, asserting that it is now 
one of the best organizations in the country. Lieut. Emory S. West, 
U. S. A., in charge of the local recruiting station, advocated as a help 
to preparedness that all Americans seek to unify and Americanize the 
various alien and foreign elements amongst us. 

The second film displayed was "Training for the U. S. Navy.'" 
Lieut. S. Wells Utley, M. N. G., discussed the present efficiency of the 
navy, and deplored the influence of politicians upon the control of 
matters which should be in the hands of experts alone. Comm. J. Far- 
rand Lewis, M. N. G., asked that the employers of men should recog- 
nize the desirability of encouraging their employees to join the local 
military forces. 

Officers and delegates to the National Congress of the Sons of the 
American Revolution to be held at Newark, N. J., May 13 to 17, were 
elected. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Raymond E. Van Syckxi:, 
Secretary Michigan Society, Sons of 

the American Revolution. 

MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 197 

New members 9 

Deaths, 5 ; resigned, 2 7 

Membership March 31, 1916 199 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 155 

The Minnesota Society held its annual business meeting and dinner 
at the Hotel Radisson, Minneapolis, on January 10, 1916, attended by 45 
members. The honor guest of the evening was Compatriot E. M. 
Wentworth, of Iowa, a member of the National Executive Committee 
and of the Organization Committee in the West. In his address Mr. 
Wentworth told of the importance of the patriotic work of the Society 
and of the advantage of a greater membership, in order that its in- 
fluence may be increased. He explained the stand of the National 
Society for an army and navy adequate to throw off any invasion that 
might threaten this nation. He said that reasonable preparedness 
means only insuring our lives, homes, and happiness against selfish 
aggression. He pledged the support of the Society in a move to make 
America secure. 

Rev. S. M. Dick spoke on "International Peace," expressing the 
opinion that the peace of the world could best be promoted by other 
means than increase in armaments. 

Tributes to the memory of members deceased during the year were 
presented by Rev. S. W. Dickinson, Historian of the Society, including 
a sketch of the life of President Winfield Scott Hammond, Governor 
of Minnesota, who died December 30, 1915. 

MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 19.14 34 

Membership March 31, 1915 34 

MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 126 

New members 3 

Deaths, 4 ; demitted, 2 6 

Membership March 31, 1916 £ 123 

The Missouri Society on April 19 held its annual banquet at The 
Buckingham, St. Louis, celebrating the Battles of Lexington and Con- 
cord. President Robert E. Adreon presided. The principal address 
was made by Chancellor L. Jenks, former President of the Illinois 
Society and member of the National Executive Committee, on "Our 
National Organization." 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 29 

New member, 1 ; death, 1. 

Membership March 31, 1916 29 

The Montana Society observed Washington's Birthday, 1916, by hold- 
ing the twenty-second anniversary of the organization of the Society at 
Elks' Hall, Helena. 

At the dinner following the business meeting the retiring President, 
Oliver T. Crane, presided as toastmaster, taking as his theme the 
"Submarine" as invented) by David Bushnell during the Revolutionary 
War. Compatriot W. W. McDowell, Lieutenant Governor of Mon- 
tana, spoke of the importance of adequate national defense and de- 
scribed the present business prosperity in that State. President-elect 
Hedges and Compatriots Harrison, Lyman, Sulgrove, Taylor, and 
Church also made patriotic remarks. 



I56 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 191 5 220 

New members, 25 ; transfer 1 ; reinstated, 1 27 

Deaths, 3 ; dropped, 10 13 

Gain 14 

Membership March 31, 1916 234 

The Nebraska Society met in annual meeting on February 22, 1916, 
when President Herbert M. Bushneli presented his report on the doings 
of the Society during the year and urged still greater future activity. 
He called particular attention to the important work of the Society in 
efforts to secure larger instruction in American history in the public 
schools of the nation. 

NEVADA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1914 19 

Membership March 31, 1915 19 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 236 

New members, 7 ; reinstated, 1 8 

Deaths, 8 ; resignations, 3 ; dropped, 5 16 

Loss 8 

Membership March 31, 1916 228 

The New Hampshire Society held its twenty-sixth annual meeting 
in the Senate Chamber at the State House, Concord, on June 17, 1915. 
President Lamb presided. The report of the Secretary-Treasurer showed 
a membership of 242, expenditures of $202.75, and a cash balance of 
$345-75 i n hand. The oration of the day was by Hon. A. S. Roe, of 
Worcester, Mass., on "John Stark from a Massachusetts Point of 
View." 

NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 914 

New members, 207 ; transfers, 4 211 

Deaths, 14 ; resignations, 8 ; demitted, 1 ; 
dropped, 2 25 

Gain 186 

Membership March 31, 1916 1,100 

The New Jersey Society completed on March 31 another year of 
activity with a membership gain of 207 in new members, or an in- 
crease of 52 greater than our gain in new members last year. 

Our membership roll on March 31, 1915, was 914, and our mem- 
bership roll on March 31, 1916, is 1,100. 

The New Jersey Society has adopted the policy of carrying on its 
activities largely through its Chapters, now eight in number, a new 
Chapter, Passaic Valley Chapter, having been formed during the last 
year. Passaic Valley Chapter started with a charter list of 42 mem- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 57 

bers, to which many new names have since been added. The mem- 
bership of the eight Chapters stood as follows on March 31st: Kliz- 
abethtown, 70; Orange, 175; Montclair, 190; Newark, 90; Monmouth, 
70; Paramus, 45; Morris County, 30; Passaic Valley, 60. 

The question of making the naturalization of new citizens more 
impressive was referred to the several Chapters and has been actively 
taken up by each. At Freehold, Judge Rulif V. Lawrence, after admin- 
istering the oath to new citizens, presented each one with an Amer- 
ican flag. The judges of other courts have agreed to do their utmost 
to meet the suggestions of our Chapters, and we are expecting to 
secure a more impressive ceremony in all of our courts in the near 
future. 

Elizabethtown Chapter participated in a reception to newly natural- 
ized citizens, which was held in connection with the local Fourth of 
July celebration. 

In order to stimulate Chapter activity in increasing membership, our 
State Board offered to that Chapter securing the largest number of 
new members for the State Society who also joined the Chapter a 
gold insignia, the insignia offered being won by Montclair Chapter, 
which made a gain of 21. 

A reception was tendered President General Newell B. Woodworth 
by the State Society on the evening of November 29, at the Down Town 
Club, Newark, N. J. During the evening a number of short addresses 
were made. Mr. Woodworth alluded to his residence in East Orange 
twenty-seven years ago and claimed partial right to the title of Jersey- 
man. One of the menaces of the country today, he said, was racial 
influence upon community life. He declared all else save that having 
the spirit of Americanism should be eradicated, and that foreign cus- 
toms and speech have no place in our national life. Mr. Woodworth 
spoke of the Liberty Bell's travel across New York State from Buffalo 
to Albany, when crowds stood with bared heads and in respectful 
silence as the patriotic monitor of other days arrived at various cities, 
and of the cheers and exuberance of spirit, giving evidence of venera- 
tion for associations of the past. Others who spoke were Hon. Cor- 
nelius A. Pugsley, of Peekskill, N. Y. ; Gen. Edward S. Greeley, of New 
Haven, Conn.; Judge Morris B. Beardsley, of Bridgeport, Conn.; Dr. 
Moses Greeley Parker, of Lowell, Mass., and Hon. Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey, all former Presidents General ; Chancellor L. Jenks, of 
Evanston. 111., President of the Illinois Society; Albert M. Henry, of 
Detroit, President of the Michigan Society, and Elmer M. Wentworth, 
of Des Moines, also members of the National Executive Committee. 
Secretary and Registrar General A. Howard Clark was also one of 
the guests. 

The various Chapters were also requested to hold annually a church 
service in commemoration of some Revolutionary event, and the plan 
has been followed by all with great success. 

All of the Chapters have taken part in the local celebration of Flag 
Day and of the Fourth of July, in several cases taking charge of the 
celebration. 

Our State Society was also represented at the National Conference 
on Immigration and Americanization, held at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The annual meeting of the Society was held 1 in the rooms of the 
New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, on January 8, 1916, and was 
preceded by a luncheon for members and guests and a reception to 
the retiring officers. The reports of the officers and committees showed 
great activity throughout the year and the largest increase in mem- 
bership in the Society's history. The following resolutions were re- 
ported by the Committee on Resolutions — Messrs. John L. Merrill, J. 



158 SONS OL THL AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Lawrence Boggs, and W. I. Lincoln Adams, and were unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas the Constitution of the Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution sets forth that it has been instituted for the purpose, among 
others, to inspire among the members and their descendants the patri- 
otic spirit of their forefathers, and to inculcate in the community in 
general sentiments of nationality and respect for the principles for 
which the patriots of the Revolution contended; and 

Whereas it has become apparent that in this country there has not 
been made that preparation for possible war which George Washington 
urged as the best protection of our peace, and this country is not pre- 
pared either to defend itself against possible aggression or to fulfill the 
duties and responsibilities it. has assumed; and 

Whereas we should be unworthy of our traditions and recreant to 
our own duties as citizens of this Republic should we fail to do our 
share towards safeguarding our heritage : Therefore be it 

Resolved, That the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution in annual meeting assembled unequivocally advocates imme- 
diate steps by legislation and by appropriate executive action to provide 
proper and suitable measures of military preparedness ; and it com- 
mends to each member as a patriotic personal duty that he give his 
individual influence and efforts to further these objects. Be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolution be 
printed in the proceedings of this meeting, to be sent to each member 
of the Society ; and further 

Resolved, That the Board of Managers be requested to take appro- 
priate steps to transmit this resolution to each New Jersey member of 
Congress and the President, leaving it to them to say what is appropriate. 

Whereas the present condition of the original manuscript sources of 
our national history, both in regard to their safety and accessibility, is 
deplorable ; and 

Whereas it is vitally important that these manuscripts should be safe- 
guarded against destruction and should be so arranged that they can 
be accessible and easily examined : Therefore be it 

Resolved, By the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, in annual meeting assembled, that we earnestly petition the 
Congress of the United States to take steps without further delay to 
provide for the erection of a National Archive Building for the housing 
of these invaluable records ; and further 

Resolved, That the Board of Managers be requested to take appro- 
priate steps to transmit this resolution to Congress and to the President. 

Whereas the Sons of the American Revolution is not a secret 

organization ; and 

Whereas there are no mystic signs, grips, nor passwords : Be it 
Resolved, That the members of the New Jersey Society, Sons of the 

American Revolution, shall greet all persons wearing the insignia of 

the Society with a military salute. 

On February to Orange Chapter gave a reception to the local Chap- 
ters of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Daughters 
of the Revolution, which proved to be a most brilliant social event. 
Interesting original papers were read by guests of the evening on 
"Women in the Revolution." 

Our officers have been called upon many tirnes during the year to be 
present at patriotic gatherings of other Societies, as well as at many 
Chapter meetings, all of our Chapters having held frequent meetings 
during the year, proving pleasant social occasions. 

In conclusion we desire to call the attention of the Congress to the 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 59 

fact that in 1925 will occur the 150th anniversary of the beginning of 
the Revolution, and suggest that steps be taken in connection with 
other patriotic Societies to celebrate in that year and the years fol- 
lowing all of the events of importance connected with the struggle for 
independence. We believe that such a celebration, properly conducted, 
would be of immense value and would be thoroughly in sympathy with 
the purposes of our organization. 

Respectfully submitted, Jno. R. Weeks, Secretary. 

NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 71 

New members 3 

Demitted 6 

Loss 3 

Membership March 31, 1916 68 

The New Mexico Society is planning various patriotic activities and 
for the formation of Local Chapters as a means of increasing interest 
in the organization. On September 13 sixteen members of the Society 
met ex-President General Thruston and Secretary General Clark at 
the railroad station at Albuquerque for a brief conference and greetings. 

The Society held its annual meeting on February 22, 1916, at the 
Alvarado Hotel, Albuquerque, immediately following the annual ban- 
quet to members and: their wives. President Charles A. Eller presided. 
Reports of the officers were presented andi ordered filed. 

A resolution was adopted protesting to the New Mexico Board of 
Education against the use in the public schools of a certain "Spanish 
Reader, Book 2," containing an article entitled "A Comparison Between 
Washington and Bolivar," written to the disparagement of George 
Washington. The Board of Education, in accordance with this resolu- 
tion, has since instructed the publishers to omit all portions of the 
Reader obnoxious to the patriotic sense of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

President-elect R. E. Twitchell, on assuming the chair, spoke of the 
activities open to the Sons of the American Revolution in this State, 
and proposed that during the coming year the Society take up the task 
of marking the Santa Fe-Chihuahua trail, following the plan which was 
used in the marking of the old Santa Fe trail. Prior to taking the 
chair, Compatriot Twitchell delivered an address on "Lew Wallace, the 
Man and His Book," the lecture being illustrated by a number of lan- 
tern slides made especially for this address. Former Governor L. 
Bradford Prince was the honor guest of the Society and responded 10 
a toast on patriotism. Compatriot George S. Klock spoke briefly on 
the issue of preparedness. Prof. Roscoe R. Hill, of the University of 
New Mexico, a guest of the Society, responded to the toast "Nation- 
alism and Internationalism." 

(NEW YORK.) 

EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

Membership April r, 1915 1,443 

New members, 106; transfers, 4; reinstated, 7.. 117 
Deaths, 23; resignations, 30; demitted, 5; 
dropped, 44 102 

Gain 1 ; 



Membership March 31, 1916 1,458 



l60 SONS OE THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The annual meeting of the Empire State Society was held at the 
Waldorf-Astoria on the evening of April 20, 1915, at which the officers 
of the Society and delegates to the National Congress were elected. 

The Rev. Thomas Edward Potterton, of Brooklyn, gave an inter- 
esting illustrated lecture on Hawaii, "An Eden of the Pacific." 

During the past year the Society has presented portraits of Wash 
ington to the University of Buffalo, N. Y., the American Legion, and 
to the Chelsea Methodist Episcopal Church, New York City, at which 
the presentation speech was made by Compatriot Gen. George B. Loud. 
The Society also presented a pair of binoculars to one of the prize 
winners of the New York State Nautical School, President Ames mak- 
ing the presentation speech. 

The June meeting was held at Newburgh, N. Y., the officers and 
compatriots of the Society being the guests of the Newburgh Chapter,. 
S. A. R. During the afternoon the visiting compatriots and their 
friends were given an automobile ride to General Knox's headquarters 
in New Windsor, and a banquet at the Palatine Hotel in the evening. 

Our delegation at the National Congress was not as large as we 
would have wished, owing to it being held so far from New York. 

As is our usual custom, the Society had an American flag placed 
on the tomb of Lafayette, in Paris, on the Fourth of July. Com- 
patriot Hanson Cleveland Coxe had charge of the ceremonies. Many 
prominent people were present, both French and American. On the 
22d of February, 1916, Compatriot Coxe placed a wreath on the statue 
of Washington in Paris. The Paris edition of the New York Herald 
of February 23, 1916, had the following : 

"Washington's Birthday was observed by the Sons of the American 
Revolution, Empire State Society, who placed a wreath at the statue of 
Washington. Mr. Hanson Cleveland Coxe, delegate of the Society,, 
made a short address when the wreath was deposited. Mr. Sharpe also 
made a short speech, affirming the love, admiration, and pride which 
every American patriot feels for "The Father of his Country." Among 
those present at the ceremony were : Mr. Alexander Thackara, Amer- 
ican Consul-General; the staff of the American Embassy; M. Dupuy, 
representing the Prime Minister ; M. Delanney, Prefect of the Depart- 
ment of the Seine: M. Laurent, Prefect of Police, and M. du Bellet,. 
formerly American Consul at Rheims." 

Our annual church service was held at The Church of the Divine 
Paternity, New York City, on Sunday, February 20, 1916. The an- 
nual banquet was held at the Waldorf-Astoria on the evening of 
November 20, 1915. At the October meeting of the Society Mr. Henry 
Allan Price gave us a pleasant evening of reading and song. 

The twenty-sixth anniversary of the Society was celebrated by a 
dinner at the Hotel Martinique on February 15, 1916, at which Past 
President Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston gave his interesting lecture, 
"The Origin and Evolution of the American Flag," illustrated by over 
fifty flags. At this meeting the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted: 

Whereas we, the members of the Empire State Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, having already expressed our belief in a 
state of preparedness for the United States of America to protect 
itself against the invasion of any foe, and for the upholding of its honor 
and liberty : 

Resolved, That at this meeting we do reiterate our belief in pre- 
paredness and suggest that the public, through the press, be notified of 
our action, with the request that the citizens of the Empire State be 
asked to show their belief in preparedness by displaying the American 
flag on Patriots' Day, April 19, 1916. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. l6l 

The Society has been asked to send delegations to the church services 
of many kindred societies, to all of which we have had representatives. 

Our President has attended, as a guest, many functions of sister 
Societies, among them the following: The celebration of the 130th 
anniversary of the Battle of White Plains, N. Y., on October 28, 1915; 
the reception to Mrs. William dimming Story, President General of 
the D. A. R., given by the Knickerbocker Chapter, D. A. R. ; the recep- 
tion given to the new voters at the Stadium in New York City : the 
banquet of the Daughters of the American Revolution, at the Hotel 
Astor, November 4, 1915; the banquet of the Society of the Mayflower 
Descendants; the unveiling of a tablet to "Nathan Hale in New York 
City by the Mary Washington Chapter, D. A. R. ; the annual com- 
memoration service of the Veteran Corps of Artillery of the State of 
New York, and Military Society of the War of 1812, at Governors 
Island; the reception of the Society of the Daughters of the Cincinnati; 
the banquet of the Holland Society in New York City; the banquet of 
the Alumni Association of the New York State Nautical School ; the 
banquet of the Ohio Society in New York ; the banquet of the Connecti- 
cut Society, S. A. R. ; the meeting of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution at Newburgh, N. Y. ; spoke at the Washington Headquarters 
Association, November 9, 1915; also at the meeting of the Knicker- 
bocker Chapter, D. A. R., April 15, 1915; represented the Society at 
the religious services of the Daughters of the Revolution, February 
20, 1916; also was on the "City Fourth of July Celebration Committee''; 
a member of the National Defense Committee; and spoke before the 
Society of the Daughters of the British Empire, on March 20, 1916, at 
Yonkers, N. Y. ; he also accompanied the Liberty Bell, as a guest of 
Governor of the State, on its journey from Buffalo to Albany. 

Our President has presented the Society with four handsome silk 
flags, facsimiles of the "Revolutionary Flag of 1777" ; "The Star Span- 
gled Banner" (U. S. Flag of 1812) ; "The Union Flag" (displayed at 
Cambridge. Mass., January 2, 1776) ; and "The Colonel Moultrie Flag" 
(displayed at Fort Sullivan, S. C, June 28, 1776). 

These flags are similar in size and style of trimming and mounting 
as the United States and Sons of the American Revolution flags of 
the Society. 

Respectfully submitted. Jesse H. Clute, Secretary. 

NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 45 

New members, 8 ; reinstated, 5 13 

Deaths, 2 ; dropped, 8 to 

Gain : 3 

Membership March ,^, 1916 48 

The North Carolina Society was represented at the dedication on 
July 3, 1915, of the equestrian statue erected at Guilford Court-House 
in honor of Gen. Nathanael Greene. The banner of the National Soci- 
ety was displayed, in charge of Frederick D. Owen, of the District of 
Columbia Society. President Arthur B. Clarke, of the Virginia Soci- 
ety, delivered an address on "Light Horse Harry" Lee. 

The Society held its annual meeting and banq'uet at Washington on 
February 21, 1915. 

After the business meeting a banquet was served. The hall was 
draped in national flags and decorated in North Carolina pine. Dainty 
little cherry trees were given as souvenirs. 



1 62 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mr. Frank H. Bryan, the newly elected President, acted as toast- 
master. A toast was proposed to Benjamin Franklin and responded to 
by Mr. J. D. Grimes. Miss Lida Tunstall Rodman, North Carolina 
State Regent of the D. A. R., responded to a toast to the Daughters of 
the American Revolution. Judge Stephen C. Bragaw delivered a eulogy 
on George Washington. Mr. H. C. Carter, Jr., delivered a eulogy on 
La Fayette. Mr. E. A. Daniel, Jr., responded to a toast to the Revo- 
lutionary Tea Parties. Mr. Edward L. Stewart delivered a eulogy on 
Alexander Hamilton, and Mr. H. S. Ward responded to a toast to 
Patrick Henry. 

NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 43 

New members 3 

Membership March 31, 1916 46 

OHIO SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 586 

New members, 35 ; transfer, 1 36 

Deaths, 1 1 ; resignations, 3 14 

Gain 22 

Membership March 31, 1916 608 

The Ohio Society as a State organization usually meets only on 
April 19, the local Chapters carrying out patriotic work and holding 
regular meetings throughout the year. The Society is in a flourishing 
condition and doing patriotic educational work along many lines among 
our foreign population by distributing patriotic literature and encourag- 
ing them to stand by our flag in these critical days. 

The annual business meeting for 1916 was held at Cleveland on 
May 6. 

Resolutions were passed in favor of a National Archives Building 
and following out the preparedness resolution adopted at the Portland 
Congress in July last, and instructions were given that copies of these 
resolutions be sent to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and 
to the Ohio Senators and Representatives. 

In the evening the annual banquet was held at the Hollenden Hotel. 
Hon. James H. Hoyt presided as toastmaster. The program included : 
Invocation, by Chaplain E. W. J. Lindesmith, U. S. A., retired ; wel- 
come, by Edward L. Howe, President Western Reserve Society; re- 
sponse, by C. C. Pavey, President Ohio Society; address, by Hon. 
Newell B. Woodworth, President General, and address, "If Wash- 
ington were President," by Dr. William F. Peirce. 

Mr. Woodworth reviewed the work of the National Society and of 
the State Societies in their various patriotic activities. Dr. Peirce 
delivered a carefully prepared address, in which he told of Washing- 
ton's attitude toward the momentous problems of his day, quoting from 
letters and documents of great interest at this time. 

The Western Reserve Society, of Cleveland, held its annual meeting 
on February 22, at the Cleveland Athletic Club. 

A resolution was unanimously adopted approving the efforts of the 
President and Congress "to protect our country from foreign invasion 
and our flag and all it stands for from insult and ignominy." The 
Society also adopted a resolution authorizing several of its members 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 63 

to use their efforts in having Congress pass a law that the government 
supply American flags for Federal court-rooms, offices of Federal clerk 
of court, and Federal naturalization offices. Other patriotic societies 
will be asked to support this movement. 

On January 20 and February 18 the Society held citizenship recep- 
tions for newly naturalized aliens, in co-operation with the Federal 
Court the first time and the Common Pleas Court of the county the 
second time. At the first reception 185 aliens received their citizenship 
papers, at the second over 300. The spirit of the new citizens was 
excellent and the addresses of the speakers impressive. Interest 111 
these receptions is growing and we feel that they are a valuable ad- 
junct in promoting a patriotic spirit in the city. The exercises at these 
receptions included music, addresses by the President of the Society 
and the Presiding Judges, presentation of citizenship certificates, and 
pledge of allegiance, the audience also standing and repeating the pledge 
in unison. 

With a view to increased membership, the Society has issued a blank 
calling for the names, dates of birth, and present addresses of eligible 
brothers, sons, and cousins of present members. 

President General Woodworth visited Cleveland on January 7, when 
he was entertained at luncheon by the officers and managers of the 
Western Reserve Society. The Society has published the anniversary 
sermon on ''The Foundations of Patriotism," delivered by Mattoon 
Monroe Curtis, M. A., Ph. D., at the annual ceremonial of "trooping of 
the colors," held at Trinity Cathedral, commemorating Washington 
crossing the Delaware, December 25, 1776. 

The Benjamin Franklin Chapter joined with the Daughters of the 
American Revolution in celebrating Washington's Birthday at Colum- 
bus. A banquet was held at the Elks' new home, with an attendance 
of about two hundred. There were twelve tables, representing the 
twelve calendar months of the year, decorated to correspond with the 
month represented. Each table was presided over by a hostess member 
of the D. A. R., and seated at the table were members and guests born 
in the month designated, with a speaker at each table. Some of the 
speakers referred to distinguished persons born in the month, or to 
great battles and other historical events occurring in the month. Fre- 
quent references were made to our "national honor and preparedness." 

The Anthony Wayne Chapter held a banquet at the Toledo Club on 
January 6. in honor of President General Newell B. Woodworth. Dr. 
William A. Dickey, President of the Chapter, presided as toastmaster 
and in his introductory speech strongly declared himself for prepared- 
ness and against the "hyphenated" policy. 

Mr. Woodworth also took his stand for preparedness. "If we are to 
acquire peace, it must be known we are prepared for war. Treaties of 
arbitration are only enforceable when backed by power. Otherwise 
they are only scraps of paper," was one of the statements that met with 
hearty approval. 

J. Kent Hamilton, who was the next speaker, declared himself for 
preparedness. 

The meeting adopted a statement, prepared by Gen. J. Kent Hamilton, 
George E. Pomeroy, Dudley Watson Moor, Horace N. Allen, and W. J. 
Allen, a committee appointed for the purpose, pledging the hearty sup- 
port of the Sons of the American Revolution and the people of Toledo 
in the efforts being made by the President and Congress "to place our 
land in a condition of defense commensurate with the vast interests 
that seem endangered." 



164 SONS OF THF AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 40 

New members, 10; transfer, 1; death. 1. 

Membership March 31, 1916 50 

The Oklahoma Society held its annual meeting and luncheon at The 
Savoy, Oklahoma City, on February 22, and adopted the following reso- 
lution : 

Resolved, That this Society heartily indorses the patriotic course 
pursued by the President of the United States in advocating prepared- 
ness in defense of our beloved country, and we pledge him our support 
and sympathy in his important and arduous work. 

A Chapter is being organized at Tulsa. 

OREGON SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 1 79 

New members, 32 ; transfers, 4 36 

Deaths, 3 : dropped, 6 9 

Gain 27 

Membership March 31. 1916 206 

The Oregon Society gave a "smoker" on Thursday, June 17, 191 5, 
in celebration of the 140th Anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill. 
There were eighty or ninety present, and it was one of the largest 
gatherings that the Society has ever held. Compatriot Winthrop 
Hammond, who had made a most careful study of the battle, read a 
paper, illustrated with some maps, showing the geography of the 
vicinity. On a call from the chairman for those descended from 
Bunker Hill veterans to rise, five compatriots stood up. 

In connection with the visit of the Liberty Bell to Portland the fol- 
lowing Guard of Honor was named : Louis G. Clarke, Gen. Thomas M. 
Anderson, Gen. Charles F. Beebe, Col. H. C. Cabell, and Mr. C. H. 
Thompson. The Society circulated a leaflet setting forth a few facts 
with reference to Liberty Bell, while the bell was in Portland, Salem, 
Eugene, and Roseburg 

The entertainment of the National Congress in Portland in July 
was a great event heartily enjoyed by the Oregon Society. A con- 
siderable sum was left over from the fund raised for this purpose 
and a large majority of the contributors consented that it be used in 
patriotic work. The Society decided to present to each court of gen- 
eral jurisdiction throughout the State a handsome silk flag, with the 
request that it be used in naturalization proceedings. It is desired 
that the flag be held by the bailiff in front of the candidate for 
naturalization as he takes his oath of allegiance, and that the court 
then instruct him that his first loyalty in the future is due to this 
flag. Accounts of several of these presentations have been given 
in the Official Bulletin of the National Society. 

On September 8 the Society had a meeting and "smoker" in celebra- 
tion of the 134th Anniversary of the Battle of Eutaw Springs. Com- 
patriot E. D. Baldwin read a paper on "Greene, Morgan, Marion, and 
the Recovery of South Carolina." The gun presented to the Annual 
Congress by Samuel Marion Conway was present at the meeting and 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 165 

was taken away by Compatriot II. B. Augur for exhibition during the 
next few weeks at the Jefferson High School. The aftermath of the 
Congress was discussed at the meeting and much interest was mani- 
fested in the work of Americanizing foreigners. A committee was 
aopointed, consisting of Gen. Chas. F. Beebe and Compatriots R. T. 
Piatt and Joel H. Miner, for the purpose of making plans whereby 
the Society can assist in this work. It is proposed to co-operate with 
the public schools and with other institutions in giving instruction 
which will be useful to aliens and new citizens. The Society has also 
undertaken the intelligent distribution of the pamphlets prepared by 
the National Society for this purpose. 

At the annual meeting at Portland on February 22, officers were re- 
elected for another year. An appropriation of $100 was made for the 
purchase of books bearing on history of the Revolutionary period, for 
circulation under the direction of the State Library. The Board of 
Managers was authorized to offer prizes to school children for essays 
on subjects connected with Revolutionary history. A resolution was 
passed continuing in office for another year the Committee on Amer- 
icanization, consisting of Compatriots Gen. Chas. F. Beebe, Robert 
Treat Piatt, and J. Harold Miner. The scope of this committee's 
work was enlarged to include education along patriotic and his- 
torical lines of children, both of aliens and native-born inhabitants. 

The annual banquet, held at the University Club, was attended by 79 
members and guests. President Wallace McCamant presided as toast- 
master. Addresses were made on "Washington and Present-Day Prob- 
lems," by Mr. Kenneth S. Latourette ; "Some Observations on An- 
cestry," by Mr. Hugh Montgomery, and "Washington — the Man of 
Principle," by Rev. Henry Marcotte, D. D. 

Secretary B. A. Thaxter read the poem on "Rhoda Farrand," pre- 
pared for use at one of the meetings of the New Jersey Society. 
Telegrams of greeting were exchanged with the Washington, Idaho, 
and Utah Societies. 

Patriotic work of the Oregon and other societies has been greatly 
stimulated by the meeting of the Annual Congress on the Pacific coast. 

The Society gave a dinner at the Hotel Marion, Salem, on April 19, in 
celebration of the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Con- 
cord. Compatriot Winthrop Hammond presided. Sixty-seven covers 
were laid. The speakers were Hon. Theodore E. Burton, ex-Senator 
from Ohio ; Gov. James Withycombe, Judge William Galloway, H. O. 
White, Mayor of Salem, and President Wallace McCamant. The 
paper of the evening was read before the dinner by F. S. Gannett, prin- 
cipal of the Junior High School at Salem. The dinner was preliminary 
to the organization of a Chapter at Salem, the second Chapter in the 
State. 

Professor Gannett dealt with the social and economic causes of the 
Revolution and the various acts of shortsightedness of the English 
government which finally brought the American colonies into rebellion, 
although at first they had no thought of separation from the mother 
country. 

On June 5 the Society celebrated the 25th anniversary of its organiza- 
tion with a dinner and reception to Gen. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. 
President McCamant gave a sketch of the life and public service of 
General Anderson and Judge Williams. Greetings were received by 
telegraph from President General Wentworth. 



1 66 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 590 

New members, 39; transfer, 1; reinstated, 1 41 

Deaths, 13 ; resigned, 2 ; dropped, 8 23 

Gain 18 

Membership February 22, 1916 608 

Flag Day, June 14, 19x5, was observed in Pittsburgh by a very 
unusual display of flags throughout the city and numerous demonstra- 
tions of a patriotic character in the schools and parks. On the parade 
ground of the Eighteenth Regiment of the National Guard of Penn- 
sylvania the exercises were under the auspices of the Pennsylvania 
Society Sons of the American Revolution. President Thomas Stephen 
Brown presided, and addresses were made by Gen. Willis J. Hulings, 
Rev. J. M. Robinson, of Ovoca, Ireland; Chancellor S. B. McCormick, 
of the University of Pittsburgh, and J. Boyd Duff, Vice-President of 
the State Society. 

On July 3 there was unveiled at Ligonier a large bronze tablet, 
erected by the Pennsylvania Society near the site of Fort Ligonier. 
There was a large attendance of members of the Society and citizens 
at the dedication exercises, which were presided over by President 
Thomas Stephen Brown. The inscription records that: 

Here General Forbes, with the aid of Colonels George Washington, 
Henry Boquet, and John Armstrong, assembled an army of 7,850 men, 
constructed the Forbes road, marched against Fort Duquesne, and com- 
pelled the evacuation of the fort November 25, 1758, thereby overthrow- 
ing the French and establishing English supremacy in this region. 

Here Henry Boquet reorganized the expedition for the relief of Fort 
Pitt, and while on the road, at a point 27 miles west of this, fought the 
battle of Bushy Run on August 5 and 6, 1763, defeating the Indians 
under Chief Guyasuta in "one of the best-contested actions ever fought 
between white men and Indians." 

Rev. Dr. W. E. Howard, Chaplain of the Society, offered prayer, 
after which President Brown spoke on the aims of the Society. Col. 
Edward E. Robbins, of Greensburg, delivered the oration of the day and 
formally dedicated the memorial. 

Ross W. Griffith, burgess of Ligonier, accepted the tablet in behalf 
of the borough, while C. M. McClune, clerk of Borough Council, ac- 
cepted it in behalf of the school district. 

The Pennsylvania Society held its annual business meeting at the 
Chamber of Commerce, Pittsburgh, on the afternoon of February 22, 
1916. 

At the annual banquet at McCreery's banquet hall, Congressman 
Henry_ W. Temple delivered an address on "Washington and Penn- 
sylvania," relating the experiences of Washington in Pennsylvania, 
starting with his first trip up the Ohio Valley for the Ohio Company, 
until he was elected President of the United States. 

Dr. Snyder spoke on "High Spots in Democracy," which he said 
were universal male suffrage and public schools. 

The New Castle Chapter entertained President General Woodworth 
at its banquet on January 7, which was attended by President Thomas 
Stephen Brown of the State Society and Col. R. W. Guthrie of Pitts- 
burgh. 

The Shenango Chapter. No. 5, at Sharon. Pa., was granted a charter 
on February 10 on petition of ten members resident in Mercer Countv. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 6/ 

The Society commemorated the ride of Paul Revere by holding a 
dinner at the Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, on the evening of April 18. 
There was a large attendance of members with their ladies. President 
Thomas Stephen Brown presided as toastmaster. Dr. Theodore Dilles 
read a paper on "Washington's Trips to Pittsburgh." It is proposed 
to erect an heroic statue of Washington in that city. 

PHILIPPINE SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 18 

New members, 2; dropped I. 

Gain 1 

Membership March 31, 1916 19 

The Philippine Society held its annual banquet and meeting at the 
Army and Navy Club, on the Luneta, Manila, at 8.30 p. m., on Satur- 
day, October 23, 1915. Lieut. Col. Ernest Hinds was the honor guest 
Prof. Austin Craig delivered an address on "The Influence of America 
in the Orient." 

The Society celebrated Washington's Birthday, in company with the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, at Cafiacoa, when about 60 
members and guests enjoyed a dinner, presided over by Mrs. Elser, 
Regent of the Philippine Chapter of the "Daughters," and President 
Frank Lee Strong of the "Sons." 

President Strong acted as master of ceremonies. Miss Mary Helen 
Fee made the introductory address for the Daughters in eulogy of the 
hero of the day. Dr. Louis S. Snow, of the university, spoke of the 
dreams of the early patriots as reaching only to the Mississippi River,, 
and of the great territory of the United States today. Professor 
Craig talked of the tendency to magnify heroes so as to make an at- 
tempt to emulate them almost impossible, and that we should remem- 
ber they were only men, though men of great deeds. Judge Newton 
W. Gilbert made an address on the subject of American patriotism and 
of the duty of all Sons and Daughters to instruct their countrymen as 
to preparedness for war, though that did not necessarily mean war, but 
was essential to national respect as opposed to pusillanimous peace. 
President Strong closed with many references to the influence of women 
in inciting the male population to fight — in fact, they were the real 
cause of most wars — and now he considered it most fitting that the 
women of the country advocate the securing of necessary armament 
and men to fight, if need there be. 

RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 333 

New members, 16; transfer, 1 17 

Deaths, 12; resigned, 1; demitted, 2; dropped, 5.. 20 

Loss 3 

Membership March 31, 1916 330 

The Rhode Island Society held its usual Memorial Day exercises in 
Hopkins Park. _ The annual business meeting was held on February 22 
and in the evening there was a banquet with an attendance of 165 mem- 
bers and guests. Accounts of these events have been given with 
considerable detail in the Official Bulletin. 



1 68 sons of the; American revolution. 



SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 18 

Membership March 31, 1916. 18 

SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 52 

New members 10 

Membership March 31, 1916 62 

TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 70 

New members, 3; dropped. 1. 

Gain 2 



Membership March 31, 1916. 



/- 



The Tennessee Societv held its annual meeting at Nashville on Octo- 
ber 18. 

It was decided to offer two prizes — the first of $10 and the second 
of $5 — for the best papers, to be written by pupils of the different 
educational institutions in the State of Tennessee, on a historical 
subject to be decided upon by the Executive Committee. 

On May 5 the Society presented an American flag (15 by 9 feet) to 
the Hume-Fogg High School at Nashville. As the flag was raised a 
thousand high-school boys and girls joined in singing the ''Star Spangled 
Banner." Hon. John H. De Witt made the presentation address and' 
the flag was accepted by Compatriot Leland Hume in behalf of the 
Board of Education. Mr. Joseph T. Howell traced the history of the 
United States flag, the ideals which it stands for and the principles it 
represents. 

TEXAS SOCIETY. 

Membership April t, 19T5 81 

New members 5 

Membership March 31, 1916 86 

UTAH SOCIETY. 

Membership April r, 1915 T20 

New members, 17 ; reinstated, 1 18 

Resigned, 3 ; demitted, 2 5 

Gain 13 

Membership March 31, 1916 133 

The Utah Society was honored on the occasion of the visit of the 
Liberty Bell Committee by the appointment of former Governor Heber 
M. Wells, President Eddy O. Lee, and former President Hon. C. P. 
Overfield as members of the Official Committee of seven to welcome 
the committee in charge of the Bell on the occasion of their visit to 
Salt Lake City. Over too.ooo people viewed the Bell during its stay of 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. [69 

six hours at Salt Lake, and the military and civic parade had as its 
marshal Compatriot Lieut. Stephen Winchester Wallace, U. S. X. The 
invocation at the banquet to the Philadelphia Official Committee was 
rendered by Compatriot Rt. Rev. Paul Jones, Episcopal Bishop of Utah. 

The Society was honored at the Portland Congress by the election of 
Compatriot Samuel Culver Park, Mayor of Salt Lake City, as one of 
the Vice-Presidents General. 

In proportion to the population of the State, the Utah Society is one 
of the most active societies in the United States. 

The Utah Society has communicated to its Representatives and Sen- 
ators in Congress a request for consideration of the importance of the 
establishment and erection of a National Archives Building, in which 
may be preserved and protected such Revolutionary and other docu- 
ments as may prove to be the wisdom of Congress to have placed in 
such a building. 

The annual banquet was held at the Hotel Utah, Salt Lake City, 
January 26, with an attendance of about 125 members and guests, in- 
cluding lady guests. 

The Society has issued the State Register and Year Book of the 
Society for 1916, containing an account of the work in Utah since 1895, 
with an illustration of the Memorial Tablet to the heroes of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, erected by the Society in the State Capitol; register of 
members and their ancestors and a roll of members deceased. 

The Society commemorated Paul Revere's Ride on the evening of 
April 18 by the singing" of "The Star Spangled Banner" from ocean 
to ocean over the transcontinental telephone line, joining with the 
Empire State Society assembled in banquet at the Waldorf-Astoria in 
New York City and with members of the California Society in San 
Francisco. 

Responding to the greeting of President Ames of the Empire State 
Society, former Mayor Samuel C. Park, Vice-President General of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, told the New Yorkers how Utah 
was planning to observe Patriots' Day by the universal display of the 
American flag. 

Attorney General A. R. Barnes, President of the Utah Society; J. W. 
Bishop, Vice-President; C. P. Overfield, Judge M. L. Ritchie, George 
Jay Gibson, George Albert Smith, Joseph Kimball, Markham Cheever, 
Prof. Levi Edgar Young, and A. B. Cudebec, members of the Society, 
also participated in the occasion. 

VERMONT SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 241 

New members 1 1 

Deaths, 1 t ; resigned, 5 t6 

Loss 5 

Membership March 31. 1916 236 

VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 « 86 

New members, 22 ; reinstated, 4 26 

Deaths 3 

Gain 23 

Membership March 31, 1916 109 



170 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Virginia Society was represented at the dedication of the Gen, 
Nathanael Greene statue at Guilford Court-House, N. C, on July 3, by 
President Arthur B. Clarke, who, at the request of Governor Stuart, 
represented Virginia at the ceremonies and delivered an address on 
"Light Horse Harry" Lee. 

The Society met at the Westmoreland Club, Richmond, on the even- 
ing of February 22 for its annual business meeting and banquet, with 
an attendance of about 40 members. All the officers were re-elected 
for another year. In his annual report President Arthur B. Clarke 
recommended the more thorough teaching of American history in the 
schools, made a strong appeal for "preparedness," and completed his 
report by saying that 25 new members have been enrolled during the 
past year. 

Capt. John A. Coke presented the report of the Board of Visitors to 
Mount Vernon in 1901, and which is a complete history of Mount Ver- 
non. Following was an address by Senator C. O'Conor Goolrick, of 
Fredericksburg, on the work of George Mason and on national pre- 
paredness. Addresses were made by Col. R. McBullington and Dr. 
George Ross. 

Col. Jennings C. Wise spoke on "Preparedness," and resolutions were 
adopted and ordered sent to our Senators and Representatives in Con- 
gress, indorsing the policy of reasonable preparedness. Resolutions 
were also passed calling on the Virginia legislature to provide fire-proof 
repositories for the colonial and other historical records. 

WASHINGTON STATE SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 295 

New members 31 

Deaths, 3 ; demitted, 1 ; resigned, 3 7 

Gain 24 

Membership March 31, 1916 319 

Compatriots : As delegate at large from the Washington State Soci- 
ety, I have the honor to submit the following report : 

We have had a large gain in membership, with twenty-five applica- 
tions pending for a new Chapter at Olympia, the capital of Washington, 
with thirty members. This includes among its honored charter mem- 
bers three judges of the Supreme Court, the Secretary of State, the 
State Librarian, the Superintendent of Public Schools, besides many 
other men of great prominence. 

The Society appropriated $150 toward the expense of marking the 
old Oregon trail, believing that this was a worthy donation toward a 
good cause. 

Gold prizes were given to the winners in the oratorical contests, and 
the most of the subjects of the orations were of the patriotic order 
and of a very high grade. 

When the Liberty Bell came to Seattle the people turned out in 
great numbers and the reception was creditable to the Washingtonians. 
Thousands of people who had never seen the honored relic were won- 
derfully interested. Compatriot Rev. Carter Helm Jones, D. D., made 
the principal address in the City Hall Park to a vast assemblage. 

When a number of your delegates were on their way in 1915 to the 
Congress at Portland, Oregon, they paid our city of Seattle and Chap- 
ter a friendly visit. We were exceedingly glad of their coming. 
They seemed to enjoy the sight of our great mountains covered with 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. IJl 

eternal snow, our splendid deep-water bays, on which they rode with 
comfort, our charming- climate and our evergreen State. 

We had but one note of regret — that they could not have remained 
longer and were far too few in numbers. 

Then we had the privilege at the banquet of nominating the President 
of the coming National Congress at Portland — Newell B. Woodworth — 
and he was duly elected. 

We had our full quota of delegates at the National Congress at 
Portland, and the hospitality of that city and the marked cordiality 
of individual citizens showed their appreciation of the distinguished 
guests from near and far. 

We have the opinion that the scenic auto ride up the Columbia 
River for some miles and then down on the boat will not soon be 
forgotten by those who saw^ some of our Western attractions for the 
first time. The Oregon Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion did nobly in their cordiality and showing the attractions, and we, 
all our Out West compatriots, shouted with one voice, "Come again" ! 

In closing we are glad to remind you that five Chapters are in process 
of organization — Bellingham, Chehalis, Everett, Mount ^ Vernon, and 
Walla Walla. Each of these Chapters will be of great importance to 
our organization. 

It must be remembered that our population is not dense like that of 
the Eastern seaboard, but still is very sparse and scattered over wide 
reaches of territory. We want a million more inhabitants for the 
coming year and as many more each year till our vast territory is 
inhabited. We have the broad acres, the great timber industry, the 
finest and largest supply of fish in the world, vast coal, gold, iron, and 
marble deposits, all in waiting for your coming. 

If you want to enjoy a matchless climate, the beauty of an ever-green 
landscape, the clearest and best water on the globe, a city (Seattle) 
with the lowest death rate known, then come west. 

John Onesimus Foster, 
Delegate at Large and President of Seattle 

Chapter S. A. R., Washington. 

WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 

Membership April I, 1915 193 

New members, 16 ; transfer, 1 17 

Deaths, 7 ; resigned, 3 ; dropped, 39 49 



Loss 



o- 



Membership March 31, 1916 161 

WYOMING SOCIETY. 

Membership April 1, 1915 30 

New members 1 

Membership March 31, 1916 31 

The Wyoming Society celebrated its eighth annual assemblage by 
meeting at the home of one of its members at Cheyenne on the even- 
ing of February 22, 1916. Papers were presented on the Marking of 
the Overland Trail in Wyoming, and Washington at Valley Forge, fol- 
lowed by a round-table talk on Washington. One of the members 
exhibited a pewter dish used by his ancestors at Valley Forge. 



1/2 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The resolutions adopted by the National Society at the Portland 
meeting regarding preparedness and the erection of a National Archives 
Building in Washington were presented, the Society adopting such 
resolutions, sending a copy to each of their representatives in Con- 
gress, as requested by our President General. 

More interest than usual was evident, and indications point to a 
much-needed increase in membership during the ensuing year. 

The Society has co-operated with the State in the work of placing 
permanent markers at historic points and monuments have been erected 
dv private individuals as well. 

The difficulties involved in pushing the work of the Society in a 
State devoid of any city of considerable size cannot be appreciated by 
any one who has not made the attempt. However, we are keeping at 
it. and hope to make our work of some potential value in the State. 

William L. Whipple, Secretary. 



INVITATIONS FOR 1917 CONGRESS. 

The Chairman : An opportunity will now be given to receive invita- 
tions for the next Congress. 

Mr. Boardman (Tennessee) : Mr. President General and Compa- 
triots, in behalf of the Tennessee Society I desire to present to the Na- 
tional Society an invitation to hold the 1917 Congress at Nashville. I 
shall not undertake to tell you of the beauties and attractions of my 
State, because that would be impossible ; but we have a good city ; we 
have a hospitable people, and if our invitation is accepted I assure you 
that we will have a good time. Our invitation is prompted by a rather 
selfish reason, or selfish reasons, rather, because we know that if you 
come to Nashville we will have a great deal of enjoyment from your 
visit ; but beyond that, some of us in the Southern part of the country 
have been working very hard for several years to build up the member- 
ship of our Society and we have had very uphill work. In my opinion, 
the principal reason that we have not gained in membership, as we had 
hoped we would, was due to the fact that our people in the South are 
not familiar with the personnel of our Society and do not understand 
for what it stands. We have skeleton Societies in every State south of 
Tennessee, with the exception of one; but they are skeletons; there is 
no life in them, and we have come to the conclusion that the only way 
that those Societies can be rejuvenated is for the National Congress to 
come to the South, somewhere near the other States, where delegates 
can easily reach the Congress, and we are very sure that if we can get 
them to Nashville and meet you gentlemen, so that they will see the 
personnel of the Society, and learn from the Congress what the Society 
stands for, we will have no trouble in getting all the members that we 
want, because we have the material there. 

Mr. Adams: Mr. President General, speaking for the New Jersey 
delegation, I want to say that we have enjoyed this Congress here in 
Newark so much that we wish you might come here next year and ; 
every year (laughter and applause) ; but we feel that it would be a good 
thing for the Society to change its location each vear, and we think the 



PROCEEDINGS OF" NEWARK CONGRESS. I "3 

reasons which the gentleman has just advanced are very good ones for 
going farther South and farther inland next year, and New Jersey, 
through its State's President, wants to indorse the suggestion which 
has been made by the gentleman from Tennessee and to favor going to 
Nashville for our Congress next year. 

Major Tee-bets (Alabama) : Representing one of the Southern skele- 
ton States and for some years Chairman of the Organization Commit- 
tee, I had the honor of organizing the Alabama Society, and I also did 
considerable work in Georgia, one of the States which is not organized, 
and I will state that if this Convention will choose Nashville I can 
almost guarantee that we will have a Society in Georgia by that time. 
I know something about Georgia, and I want to second the motion of 
the gentleman from Tennessee, that the Congress meet at Nashville in 
1917. 

Colonel Vrooman (New York) : I favor Nashville for this particular 
reason : I had occasion during the past three or four winters to visit 
some of the Southern States. I have met there my Confederate breth- 
ren, and I want to say to you, compatriots, that the Confederates love 
the Stars and Stripes today as much as we do. (Applause.) As one 
who fought for the Stars and Stripes, I want to go down if I live. I 
want the Empire State Society, and I now plead with you, to elect me 
a delegate to go down to Nashville and hobnob with my Confederate 
brethren. (Applause.) 

Mr. Thruston (Kentucky) : Most of you present heard me a couple 
of nights ago deliver my flag address. I have recently been down to 
Florida and Louisiana, and while there I delivered the flag address on 
ten different occasions; I delivered it at Pensacola, Baton Rouge, and 
New Orleans, and one of the places in New Orleans where I delivered 
it was at the Confederate Home. Of course, in that section when I 
showed the Confederate flags, naturally they applauded; they loved 
them; they had fought under them; but when I showed the Federal 
flag the applause was even greater than it was for the Confederate flag, 
and T am certain you will find throughout that whole section loyal, true 
American citizens, and in going to Tennessee I merely want to tell you 
that I am a next-door neighbor to Tennessee. I love them; they are the 
same kind of people as the Kentuckians are; they have got Blue Grass 
land there and mint groweth profusely. (Laughter and applause.) 

Mr. Button (Washington) : Speaking for the entire Pacific coast, I 
wish to indorse Tennessee. We have experienced what it means to 
bring the National Congress to the Pacific coast. You have inspired 
us. The States of Washington, Oregon, and California have grown, 
due to your Congress, your attendance, your presence, and I know, while 
we are not a skeleton State by any means, it has helped us greatly and 
we indorse Tennessee. 

The Secretary General : The Vice-President General from Tennes- 
see has handed me a very cordial letter written by the Governor of the 
State of Tennessee, urging us to come there; also one from the Mayor 



174 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

of the city of Nashville, equally cordial, and one from the President of 
the Commercial Club of Nashville, assuring a pleasant and profitable 
visit. 

Executive Chamber, 
Nashville, Tenn., May 13, 1916. 
To the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
Congress Assembled, Newark, N. J. 
Gentlemen : I have been informed that the Tennessee Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution will invite the National Society to 
hold its 1917 Congress in Nashville. I am very much interested in hav- 
ing this invitation accepted, if it is possible for your organization to 
accept it, as I realize that the coming of so distinguished a body as 
your delegates would be, to Nashville, would be a very great honor to 
our city and to Tennessee. 

I know thatif you do come to Nashville the Tennessee Society will 
entertain you in a fitting manner, and such that will make your trip a 
pleasant one. 

Furthermore, the objects for which your Society stands are very 
worthy ones, and I am sure that if you do come to Nashville your pur- 
poses will be furthered very materially in this section of the country. 
Verv respectfullv, 

Tom C. Rye, 

Governor. 

City of Nashville, 
Mayor's Office, May 13, 1916. 
To the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
Congress Assembled, Newark, N. J.: 
I am informed that Mr. W. K. Boardman, of this city, representing 
the Tennessee Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, will 
invite your body to hold your 1917 Congress in Nashville. As Mayor 
of the city and speaking for its citizens, I hope that you will be able to 
accept the invitation extended to you by the Tennessee Society, as a 
visit to our city by such a distinguished body of men as that which 
makes up your organization cannot help but benefit us, and I am sure 
that such a visit would be a very pleasant one for you. 

We are very much interested in the objects for which your Society 
stands, and I am confident that if your Congress meets in Nashville it 
will result in very materially advancing the interests of your organiza- 
tion. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Robert Ewing, Mayor. 

May 9, 1916. 
To the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
Congress Assembled, Newark, N. J.: 
Mr. W. K. Boardman, of Nashville, and a member of our organiza- 
tion, will, we understand, present to you an invitation to hold your 
1917 Congress at Nashville. 

Speaking for our fifteen hundred members, we hope that you will be 
able to accept Mr. Boardman's invitation, as we deeply appreciate the 
honor that your acceptance will confer upon Nashville. 

We can assure you a most cordial welcome and a pleasant and profit- 
able visit. 

We are familiar with the purpose of your Society, and believe that 
your coming to Nashville will result in a great addition to your strength 
and influence in the Southern States. 

Commercial Club of Nashville, 
R. B. Bran nan, President. 



PROCEEDINGS OE NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 75 

» 

The Chairman : This invitation from the South, so proverbial for 
its hospitality, will be referred to the Board of Trustees, who under 
the Constitution have the power to act on all invitations. Are there 
any other invitations for the 1917 Congress? 

INVITATION TO MASSACHUSETTS IN 1920. 

Mr. Woodward: Last year the State of Massachusetts, at the Oregon 
Congress, invited the National Society to meet in Massachusetts in 
1920, on the three hundredth anniversary of the Landing of the Pil- 
grims. We wish to renew that invitation to this Congress, so that they 
may have in mind that, wherever you may go in the intervening years, 
you must come to Massachusetts in 1920. (Applause.) 

The Chairman : The invitation of Massachusetts will be received and 
placed upon our records. Is there any further new business before 
the Congress? If not, next in order is the election of officers, and 
nomination for officers will be in order. 

NOMINATIONS FOR PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

Mr. Austin (Illinois) : Mr. President General and Compatriots, 
when a man from Chicago is permitted to associate with the polished 
representatives of an older and higher civilization (laughter), there is 
nothing so becoming to that man as humility and quiet. This is a 
proposition in deportment which I think is universally acknowledged 
everywhere east of the Allegheny Mountains. If I appear to disregard 
it today, it is not because I deny it, but simply because of the exigency 
of the occasion. If a poor orator tries to make a speech, he is some- 
times successful if he has a good subject, and if ever a man had a 
good subject for a speech, I have such a subject today. I want to 
present for the office of President General of this association a son of 
Illinois, a native son of Illinois, who is the unanimous choice of the 
Illinois Society. The Illinois delegates at this convention are his faith- 
ful followers. In one way I might be called his particular follower, 
"because I have followed him through the Illinois Society way up to 
the top. Years ago, when he was the Second Vice-President, I was a 
private in the ranks. Wlien he became First Vice-President, I became 
Second Vice-President, and last December, when he laid down the 
Presidential gavel, I got as close as I could to catch the bride's bouquet 
and the Elijah mantle fell on me. (Laughter.) I might say, my 
friends, that I am not ambitious to go higher; this might seem as if I 
was attaching my cart to a star (laughter), but that is not the case. 
(A Member: Why not?) Oh no. it will be honor enough for all the 
members of the Illinois delegation if, when they go back to the Sucker 
State, they can carry with them the President General. My friends, 
what do we need in the office of President General of this Society? I 
think we will acknowledge that two qualifications are necessary. The 
first qualification is that he shall be a man among men. The second 



1/6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

qualification is that he shall have the interests of this Society at heart. 
Take up the hrst. I do not mean by saying that he shall be a man 
among men that, as to character, he shall be a man who, for instance,, 
will not steal sheep, or that, as to his qualifications of social attain- 
ment, he shall be a man who will not swallow his knife at the table or 
tuck his napkin in his collar. I mean more than that. In the first 
place, as regards character, we do not need to discuss that ; no mam 
would come before this body for the office of President General unless 
he were a man of perfect character ; but we want a man who makes- 
friends, who is popular. I happen to live in a neighboring suburb of 
Chicago to the gentleman I am nominating and I know something 
about conditions there. He recently ran for member of the school 
board. There was no opposition. At school elections in Illinois we 
generally cast 25, 50, or 100 votes, but he was so popular that in hi& 
town he got 800 votes — no opposition at all. That speaks for itself. 
Another thing I know about him that he doesn't think I know, for it 
so happens that my stenographer formerly worked in his office, and I 
thus learn that a few years ago he was the chairman of the building 
committee to erect his church, and not only did he give all kinds of 
time to it, but I am confidentially informed that he practically erected 
the church himself. Now, then, it speaks for itself when a man is- 
interested in a subject, and it is a good subject, and his pocket-book is 
free. I know that gentleman ; I have seen him, and I know that he is 
a public-spirited man, open for all good causes. Now, then, he has- 
another qualification — he is a college-educated man. That is the way 
I came to know him. I did not go to the same college, but you know 
there is such a thing as college fraternities, and it so happens that he 
is. at the present time, the National President of the Dartmouth College 
Alumni, in addition to being President of the University Club in his 
town. That is enough on that topic. 

He is a gentleman of leisure and a lover of the fine arts; a fine- 
tenor singer and instrumentalist; and as to singing in the male quar- 
tet — that is incidental — I have heard him sing, too. But T will tell you 
something that is not incidental. In my circle of acquaintance I don't 
know a man who is more thoroughly competent for this particular 
position, and, furthermore, he has got the means and the time and the 
leisure to devote himself exclusively and whole-heartedly as President 
of this organization. Now, I want to call your attention to that word 
leisure. By that I don't mean the kind of leisure that some men have. 
Oh, no; he has been an active business man up to a few years ago, 
when he said he retired. As a matter of fact, we know what it means 
when an active business man retires. He retires from money-making, 
but does something else; he would never be satisfied to do nothing. If 
this gentleman can be given the honor of the Presidency of this asso- 
ciation, I know that he will put his ability into the work of the asso- 
ciation. And lastly, about him T want to say one more thing, and that 
is this: that we know in Chicago from experience that if we want any- 
thing done and give it to him, it is done; he accomplishes the results; 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. J 77 

and, gentlemen, that is more important than anything else I have said — 
when we want a thing well done he 'does it. Now, then, let me say a 
word ahout his interest in this association. I think we will all ac- 
knowledge, we who heard the report yesterday of the various commit- 
tees, 1 think we will all acknowledge that the report of the Committee 
on Americanization and Aliens stood in a class entirely by itself. I 
think that the gentleman who presented that report — I think it is not 
derogatory to any of the other reports when I make that statement — 
T think the gentleman who presented that report showed by the report 
that he had given a careful study to the subject, that he had given 
ability to the subject, and that he could not have gotten up a report like 
that unless he was interested in the subject. Maybe some of you did 
not hear that report. If you did not, I would advise you to read it 
when it comes out in the Year Book. If you read that report, I believe 
you will say that on that particular point he has demonstrated his 
interest in this work. But now what else has he done? He has visited 
various Chapters of the Society from time to time ; he has attended 
the last five Congresses of this Society ; he was a banquet speaker at 
Portland last year, and when the San Francisco authorities gave us an 
S. A. R. Day he was the speaker of the occasion there. But what I 
want to say about him in particular is this : I want to speak of his 
interest in the S. A. R., and vve know him in Chicago by what he has 
done for the Illinois Society. Perhaps you heard in the statistics yes- 
terday that Illinois stood third or fourth in new membership. We do 
not claim that we stood with New Jersey — that's impossible — but we 
have never taken in so many members before as we took in during his 
Presidency and we have never been so prosperous. What he has done 
in Illinois, he can do for this Society on a greater scale. Trust a man 
in small things, and if he does them well he will do greater things well; 
and let me say this one thing in closing — that I candidly believe he will 
reflect as great credit upon the Society as any man you could possibly 
select. I believe it will be as much good for the Society to select him 
as it will be a great honor for him if he receives the Presidency. It is 
my great pleasure, gentlemen, to put in nomination for President Gen- 
eral of this great Society Chancellor L. Jenks, of Illinois. (Applause.) 
Commander Moork : The District of Columbia Society desires the 
great honor of seconding the nomination of Mr. Jenks, of Illinois. 
During the past year I have had the honor to serve under Mr. Jenks 
and I know thoroughly his capacity for work for this Society. I know 
of no work that will compare with the work he has done in the past 
year in the Americanization of the alien. He is thoroughly up in that 
work, so that we can have a continuity of it during the coming year. 
Judging from our reports and from the work done yesterday, it seems 
to me that that is the livest subject for our Society to handle, and I 
think that we will do well to continue with that work, and in doing 
that we want to elect Mr. Jenks. I hope that every one present will 
pass his vote for Mr. Jenks. (Applause.) 



I78 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

A Member : I have known Chancellor Livingston Jenks longer than 
any man in this room. I have known him thirty-seven years, and while 
I would not attempt to add one word to the brilliant nominating speech 
made by the gentleman from the Sucker State, I would say that he left 
out the most important element of character that this man possesses, 
what we need in our Society — he is the craziest enthusiast in the world 
for anything that interests him, and you know and I know that in all 
these little mutual admiration societies enthusiasm is a valuable asset. 

A Member: In behalf of the Missouri Society, it will be a great 
pleasure to indorse the nomination of Chancellor L. Jenks. 

Rev. Dr. Kirbye (Iowa) : Mr. President General and Compatriots, 
for the first time the voice of the Sons of the American Revolution 
west of the Mississippi River is heard in a request for the highest office 
within the gift of our noble Society. 

It is not inappropriate that this voice come from Iowa, one of the 
most prominent Western Commonwealths. We do not, of course, have 
the hallowed ground nor the sacred shrines of the East or South, but 
we do have the spirit of our fathers and mothers enshrined in no less 
than nine district organizations is as many cities and with a membership 
reflecting honor upon our traditions and ideals. 

We do have a Commonwealth that is yet young and in the process 
of making and palpitant with energy and faring forth with high hope 
and swift step. We do have a beautiful land of open and starlit skies, 
of opalescent clouds, of heat and cold, sunshine and rain, which vivifies 
our splendid soil and makes it respond to the wants of man. We do 
have a land of limitless prairies, with rolling hills and fertile valleys, 
with winding and widening streams, with bounteous crops and fruit- 
laden trees, yielding to man their wealth and health. We do have a 
Commonwealth rich in her men and her women of power and might, 
and whose authors, educators, statesmen, and ministers are making an 
intellectual and moral contribution which is a part of the mainstay of 
the Republic — true in the hour of danger and steadfast in the hour of 
triumph. The voice of the Sons of the American Revolution in Iowa 
asks your hearing. 

At the annual meeting of the Society, on the anniversary of the Battle 
of Lexington, the following resolution was enthusiastically and unani- 
mously adopted : "The Iowa Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, in annual meeting assembled, present to the National Con- 
gress of the Sons of the American Revolution the name of Compatriot 
Elmer Marston Wentworth for President General. In doing this we 
recognize the splendid fitness of Compatriot Wentworth for this hon- 
orable position and his many years of devotion to the interests of the 
Society. He has conspicuously served as President of the Iowa Society 
and for many years has been a trustee and member of the Executive 
Committee of the National Society. His patriotism, his earnestness 
and zeal in the things of the Society, and his years of service have- 
been of such a character that we believe they should be recognized by 
his advancement to this high position, and we therefore earnestly re- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I79 

quest other State Societies to unite with us in this eminently worthy 
recognition of Compatriot Wentworth." Five Western States have 
passed similar resolutions, and letters from many others, East and South, 
have assured us that we will bestow honor where honor is due in the 
election of Compatriot Wentworth to the office of President General. 

The Iowa Sons of the American Revolution represent the meeting 
place of the New Englander and the Southerner fused into a noble and 
enduring unity. Some of us as children heard the tales of Kings Moun- 
tain, or Marion's Men, and Yorktown. Others listened to the tales of 
Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill, and are proud that New Eng- 
land had her men and women who were unafraid. I come from the 
former influence. The earliest memories of my life have to do with a 
negro mammy and the stories of my mother of the Battle of Kings 
Mountain. Compatriot Wentworth comes from the State of Maine, 
which, like her New England sisters, has always been one of the rock- 
ribbed bearers of the nation's honor in the hours of peril. Iowa, there- 
fore, is an illustrious example of the true American spirit. In the mak- 
ing of our life there has been fused the spirit of the Huguenot, the 
Scotch Irish, and the Puritan. Our school system, our public squares, 
and our landholding are all modeled after New England. The Con- 
gregational meeting-house has been there from the beginning, and, in 
addition to these, various forms of faith and life characteristic of the 
South are also there. It is a splendid civilization which has been devel- 
oped in the Mississippi Valley. 

Nestled in the security of our achievements, we have not felt the 
stress and strain of other sections, in the national crisis which we are 
facing today. It has been felt in the East, and perhaps justly, that all 
the people of the West have not been as keenly alert in the past months 
to the grave problems which have faced us as a nation. 

Whatever can be said of the pacifist influence in the West, in no sense 
can this be related to Compatriot Wentworth. He was the author of 
the resolutions in behalf of the national defense at the lest meeting of 
the National Congress, in Portland, Oregon. He has consistently cham- 
pioned the spirit of the new nationalism, and the traditions of the 
fathers as to national honor will be safe in his keeping. There is a 
difference in flags in his program of life. He is one of those who dares 
to be counted. 

We believe in international good-will. We have always stood for it, 
and, please God, this nation will remain steadfast in the maintenance of 
the ideal. We pray for the time when the war drums beat no longer 
and the federation of man in the parliament of the world shall become 
a reality. But that dream is useless unless you maintain a loyalty to 
the democratic institutions and ideals which have .been handed down to 
us and which have their symbol in the Stars and Stripes that wave over 
us as a people. 

There is a difference in flags. Our flag is a symbol of the heroisms 
and achievements of the ideals of democracy, and the world can never 



l80 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

be brought together in any other way. War will only cease when the 
righteous aims of democracy are realized. We must stand by our flag. 

"Here is the flag; 
Hail it. 

Who dares to drag 
Or trail it? 
Give it hurrahs — 
Three for the stars, 
Three for the bars. 
Uncover your head to it, 
The soldiers who tread to it. 

"Shout at the sight of it, 
The justice and right of it, 
The unsullied white of it. 
The blue and the red of it, 
And tyranny's dread of it. 
Here comes the flag; 
Cheer it. 

Valley and crag shall hear it, 
Fathers shall bless it, 
Children caress it, 
All shall maintain it; 
No one shall stain it. 

"Cheers for the sailors who fight on the wave for it, 
Cheers for the soldiers who were always brave for it, 
Tears for the men who went down to the grave for it; 
Here is your flag." 

May it always remain for us the emblem of liberty, guaranteeing that 
the rights of humanity shall not perish from the earth. 

And in presenting the name of Compatriot Elmer Marston Went- 
worth, of Iowa, for the office of President General, we bring a man who 
will be true to the traditions of the Republic, which has a right to the 
highest devotion of us all. Our candidate is big in body, brain, and 
heart, and well able to maintain the traditions and add another glorious 
chapter to the history of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
America. Compatriots, I have the honor to represent the Iowa Society 
and to present the name of our former President, Compatriot Elmer 
Marston Wentworth, for President General. 

Mr. Woodward (Massachusetts) : Mr. President General, as the rep- 
resentative of the State of Massachusetts, I am seconding the nomina- 
tion of Mr. Wentworth as a candidate of the office of President Gen- 
eral. I cannot add to what my predecessor has just said, but I wish to 
emphasize in what I have to say only the word "service." Short as are 
the years, they are not short enough to enable us to give the blue sash 
to all the members of this organization who are qualified to fill the 
office ; but of those who are qualified and who can give the time and 
the resources necessary to the proper filling of the office, I think that 
length of service should be the first consideration, and there is no man 
in this organization whose term of service in the training school is 
longer than that of Mr. Wentworth. That is the policy we pursue in 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. l8r 

the State of Massachusetts in the election of our officers, and it has 
worked well, and I am sure that it works well in this greater Society. 
There is, however, a reason personal to myself in which there is a 
bond of sympathy between Mr. Wentworth and me which impels me 
with greater pleasure to second his nomination. I received a letter a 
few weeks ago from a maiden lady in Massachusetts, a descendant of 
the Pilgrims, who lives almost within sight of Plymouth Rock, and, 
looking over the country and seeing the diminishing size of American 
families, I should say the vanishing American families, she wrote to 
me as President of the Massachusetts Society to see if our Society 
could not in some way get some legislation through by which all the 
descendants of the Revolutionary soldiers might be exempt from mili- 
tary duty in order that we might save the remnant of the old Puritan 
stock. (Laughter and applause.) I wrote to her acknowledging her 
letter, and saying that while I appreciated her point of view it was too 
late to attempt any legislation, for the legislators have already gotten 
beyond the control of American citizens of Puritan descent ; but I said 
to her, "Personally I have done my duty in regard to perpetuating the 
American citizens, for I have eight children" (laughter and applause) — 
four boys and four girls. One of my boys is going to Plattsburg this 
summer. Now, Mr. Wentworth has eight children (applause), and I 
say to him, as I stretch my hand across the Mississippi River, that he 
has done his duty in perpetuating the American citizen and maintaining 
the ideas and thoughts that were in the minds of the founders of our 
Republic when they fought for our liberty and independence. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Mr. Turner (Maine) : Mr. President General and Fellow-Compa- 
triots, some years ago a resident of one of the fertile Western States 
made his first visit to a, comparatively speaking, sterile part of the 
farming region of Maine. As he was being shown around that section 
by the lady of the family in which he was a guest, he rather slightingly 
asked her, "What can you raise here?" "We raise men" was the reply 
of the proud and loyal Maine mother. Some few have stayed; many 
more have sought fame and established homes in the Middle and Far 
West. A splendid product of one of those hilly, rocky farms is the gen- 
tleman who has been nominated as your President General from Iowa, 
Compatriot Wentworth, and, speaking logically and with pleasure as a 
representative of the entire Maine delegation, it gives me great pleasure 
to second for them the nomination of Compatriot Wentworth for your 
President General. (Applause.) 

Col. Penrose (Utah) : Mr. President General and Members, as the 
representative of one of the Far Western States, it gives us, the entire 
delegation from the State of Utah, great pleasure to second the nomi- 
nation of Compatriot Wentworth. (Applause.) 

Major Hyde (Maryland) : The Maryland delegation entertains the 
highest regard for the name of Jenks. We have in our city a gentle- 
man of that name, it may be of the same family, who is the Fresident 



1 82 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

of the Maryland League for National Defense, and tomorrow, through 
his superhuman efforts and the efforts of other members of that League, 
we will have on the streets of Baltimore a parade in the interests of 
preparedness. The entire militia of the State will parade, and in addi- 
tion to that two batteries of artillery, recently organized, and one troop 
of cavalry, and while I feel that we would like to honor Mr. Jenks, we 
also feel that our vote, that of Maryland, is due to our faithful com- 
patriot, Mr. Wentworth. I have attended probably twelve of these Na- 
tional conventions, and I have never failed to meet him and never 
failed to see the label on the work that he has undertaken, and it is 
with much pleasure that the Maryland delegation seconds the nomina- 
tion of Mr. Wentworth, with the kindest feelings toward Mr. Jenks. 

Colonel Guthrie : It gives me much pleasure, on behalf of the Penn- 
sylvania delegation, to second the nomination of Mr. Wentworth. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Mr. Wood (Kentucky) : I have served with Mr. Wentworth on the 
Executive Committee of this Society ; I have known him for many 
years, and it gives me great pleasure to second his nomination. 

Mr. Palmer (Minnesota) : It is with great pleasure that I have at- 
tended the Annual Congress of our Society in the State of New Jersey, 
for it was on the soil of New Jersey that my Revolutionary ancestors 
lived and died. I heard County Judge McCutcheon yesterday speak and 
he can hardly rival me in Dutch ancestry, for I will match Tappan and 
Strahlenberg against Herkimer, and I now desire to pay a tribute to 
Gen. William S. Stryker, who was so industrious at Trenton in digging 
out the records, the old records of the Revolutionary War. It was 
Horace Greeley who said, "Go West, young man," and I went. It was 
my privilege to be one of the early organizers of the Minnesota Society. 
The fathers, where are they; and the prophets, do they live forever? 
I can remember those early organizers — old Judge Albert D. Hdgerton, 
Gen. John B. Sanborn, well known to our friend, Mr. A. Howard 
Clark ; Governor Lucius F. Hubbard, Senator Cushman K. Davis — and 
now I regret to learn that Winfield Scott Hammond has followed, [t 
was my privilege to be the State Registrar of the Society, and recognize 
the fact that it is difficult in those Western States to make a record, in 
the thirteen original States it is quite easy, but out there it is more diffi- 
cult, and so I hope that this Congress today will recognize the fact that 
it is quite necessary to have a Western man for the head of the organi- 
zation if you expect effective work in working up the Society numer- 
ically. One day I left Minnesota and went South. I do not like Iowa 
quite as well as I do Jersey. I got stuck in a blizzard for four days in 
a railroad prairie hotel. Still I do not hold any animosity on account 
of my experience on this occasion, and it affords me great pleasure, 
under instructions from my State of Minnesota, to second the nomina- 
tion of Companion Wentworth as President General of this Society. 

Mr. Henry (Michigan) : I desire to second the nomination of Mr. 
Wentworth. I have been on the Executive Committee with Mr. Went- 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 83 

worth for several years and with Mr. Jenks also, and were the other 
man away I should be in favor of Mr. Jenks. But Mr. Wentworth said 
something this morning that really makes me support him. He said 
that we were the two biggest men in the Congress. ( Laughter and ap- 
plause.) After that could I do anything else than second the nomina- 
tion of Mr. Wentworth? (Applause.) But outside of that, during the 
meetings of the Executive Committee, for years I have found him al- 
ways on deck; always for the best interests of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution; sharp and clear and decisive in what he says and what 
he does. For these and for other reasons, I desire to second the nomi- 
nation of Mr. Wentworth. 

Mr. LEE (Connecticut) : Mr. President General and Compatriots, I 
esteem it a great privilege to second the nomination of Mr. Wentworth 
on behalf of the Connecticut delegation. As I have served on the Ex- 
ecutive Committee with Compatriot Wentworth, I recognize his high 
character, his ability, and his interest in this organization. Connecticut 
has two or three men in training for this most honorable office, and we 
came here to this convention with a candidate, and that candidate has 
all of the qualities that have been attributed to our friend from Chicago. 
He is one of the most popular men and one of the most influential in 
the city of Hartford, in the State of Connecticut. He would not like 
to have me mention his name here today, but I am going to ; he sits 
before me — Dr. George C. F. Williams, of Hartford. I do feel, for the 
interests of the Society, that we will withdraw ; we have agreed to with- 
draw Mr. Williams's name in favor of Mr. Wentworth. (Applause.) 

A Member: On behalf of the Oregon Society, I wish to second the 
nomination of Mr. Wentworth. 

(It was moved that the nominations close.) 

Mr. Ames (New York) : Mr. President, I desire to voice the har- 
monious feeling of the Empire State Society, and I know that this 
voice finds echo in the heart of every compatriot from the North and 
the South and the East and the West. This Congress has learned with 
sincere regret that the retiring President General, Newell B. Wood- 
worth, has declined to permit his name to be presented to the Congress 
for re-election. The S. A. R. has been peculiarly fortunate in the 
choice of its presiding officers since its organization. They have been 
men of broad culture, fired with patriotism, alive to the spirit of the 
times, and keen to perpetuate the great work of the founders of our 
organization, and during the past year, at great personal sacrifice, Hon. 
Newell B. Woodworth, of Syracuse, N. Y., has borne the burden of 
his office, rendering distinguished service for the Society and to his 
country and ever indefatigably working to extend its great sphere of 
usefulness. Therefore, as a slight expression of our feelings to our 
distinguished President General and compatriot, 

Be it resolved, That the heart-felt thanks of the Twenty-seventh Con- 
gress of the Sons of the American Revolution be. and they hereby are, 
extended to the Hon. Newell B. Woodworth for the marked abilitv 



184 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

shown by him and the fair and impartial manner in which he has dis- 
charged the duties of his great office, and that we wish him many years 
of health, happiness, and continued zeal for our common cause, so dear 
to his heart; and, in the language of the great Washington, "may his 
future years be as prosperous and happy as his former have been up- 
right and honorable." (Applause.) 

(Past President General Thruston takes the chair.) 

The Chairman : Gentlemen and Compatriots, you have heard the 
motion. As Mr. Woodworth's predecessor and as having been a mem- 
ber of his Executive Committee, I know the work that he has done. 
No one ever did truer or more .loyal work for the Society of the 
S. A. R. than Mr. Woodworth has done. (Applause.) 

(The motion was then adopted by a rising vote.) 

The Chairman : It is unanimous. Mr. Woodworth, you have the 
thanks of the entire S. A. R. and my congratulations for the success 
of your administration. 

(President General Woodworth resumes the chair.) 

The Chairman : Compatriots, your action has stirred my heart from 
the depths. I have endeavored, as I promised when accepting the obli- 
gations of this office in Portland, to give the best that was in me to the 
service which is dear to the hearts of all of us. I have been deeply 
grateful for the opportunity of extending my field of work beyond 
what it had been before, and this tribute which you have paid to me 
this morning will always remain in my mind and in my heart as one of 
the most grateful remembrances that I could ever receive in this life. 
I thank you, gentlemen, thank you doubly, for the honor which you 
have bestowed upon me. (Applause.) 

Mr. Henry: I move you that the resolutions that have just been 
read be engrossed and be presented to the President General. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted, being put by the Secretary 
General.) 

The Chairman : Again, gentlemen, you have placed me in debt to 
you. The Committee on Credentials regret that they are unable to 
furnish a printed list, but that is not due to the fault of the committee, 
but rather to their inability to secure prompt printing; but they desire 
that it should be announced that there are in attendance accredited 
members of this Congress to the number of 209, which makes it one of 
the largest congresses in the history of our Society. (Applause.) 

Mr. PugsIvKy: If there are no further nominations, I move that the 
nominations for President General be now closed. 

Mr. Dutton : In behalf of the Washington State Society, we have 
realized, as has been stated here a number of times, that the most 
important work of the National Society of the S. A. R. has been the 
assimilation of our new-made citizens. Out on the Pacific coast, par- 
ticularly in the Puget Sound country, we are now having an influx of 
foreign immigration from the Oriental side — Japanese, Chinese, and 
particularly Russians — so we have felt out there the influence of a man 
who has devoted his time to this work; therefore, in behalf of the 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. I 85 

Washington State Society, I desire to second the nomination of Chan- 
cellor L. Jenks as President of the National Society. (Applause.) 

Mr. MarbeE: On my own behalf and individually, alone, I wish to 
indorse the nomination of Mr. Wentworth. It was during my adminis- 
tration that he first came into great public notice. I appointed him on 
the Executive Committee and he was an illustration of that quotation, 
"a great Lochinvar has come out from the West ; through all the wide 
waters, his patriotism was the best." 

Mr. Ames : I wish to offer an amendment to the resolution that the 
nominations close. I believe we are a democratic organization, and I 
think that the motion is out of order in a democratic, patriotic organi- 
zation. I offer this amendment, that now that the nominations are 
made, we proceed to ballot. There are States that have placed no one 
in nomination; there may be delegates who desire to vote for some one 
who has not been nominated ; there may be occasion to nominate a 
man later in the convention. Why put the bars up and say that no one 
else can be nominated? Therefore I offer the amendment to the reso- 
lution of our distinguished compatriot, Mr. Pugsley, as a substitute 
amendment, and move that as the nominations have been made, we 
proceed to ballot. 

Mr. PugseEy : I merely moved that resolution in order to facilitate 
the election of President General and will withdraw it. 

The Chairman : Do you now make that motion, Mr. Ames, that we 
now proceed to the election? 

Mr. Ames : I make that motion. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted.) 

The Chairman : As there are two candidates in the field, it will be 
necessary to appoint tellers. Do you desire to appoint the tellers from 
the floor or shall the Chair appoint them? 

(A number of members indicated their desire to have the Chair 
appoint the tellers and this was accordingly done. Colonel Lauman, 
Mr. Lee, Doctor Kirbye, and Judge Remington were so appointed.) 

A Member: I know this is undemocratic, but I want to plead, on 
behalf of New Jersey, that the oratory be cut down hereafter, so that 
we may carry out our program. (Laughter and applause.) 

Mr. Thruston : In order to facilitate matters, I suggest that while 
this ballot is being taken nominations be in order for Vice-Presidents 
General. 

The Chairman: If there is no objection. 

Mr. Thruston : Our Mother of States, Virginia, has for a number 
of years been without a representative on our National organization, 
and I desire to place in nomination for Vice-President General the 
name of Mr. Frederick E. Emerson, of Virginia. 

A Member : I rise for information. A good many of our delegates 
are inquiring whether the delegations from the various States may 
vote as a unit, as some of them have had a caucus and are ready to 
vote their entire delegation. 



l86 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Chairman : The Chair would consider that each individual 
under the procedure would be obliged to cast an individual vote. 
(Applause.) The Chair would announce that only delegates are en- 
titled to vote. There seems to be a misunderstanding that some were 
entitled to vote who were not delegates because they were present in 
the room. Alternates cannot vote unless in the absence of the dele- 
gates for whom they are alternates. 

A Member : I move that we proceed with the nomination and election 
of Vice-Presidents General while we are counting the ballots for 
President. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted.) 

ELECTION OF VICE-PRESIDENTS GENERAL. 

The Chairman : The Chair would suggest, in order not to interfere 
with the program that our hosts have prepared for us, that the nomi- 
nating speeches be limited to not exceeding one minute. (Applause.) 

Mr. Ames : Mr. President and Compatriots, the entire State Society, 
not alone in appreciation of New Jersey's hearty, generous, cordial 
welcome ; not alone for the friendship that exists between the Empire 
State Society and the New Jersey Society, but because New Jersey has 
a favorite son who has been a member of its Society for over twenty 
years, who for eight years has served on the Board of Managers of 
the New Jersey Societ}^, who has been twice a member of the National 
Executive Board, who has been the foremost man in New Jersey for 
twelve years — we wish to place in nomination Mr. Thomas W. Wil- 
liams, of New Jersey, for Vice-President General. (Applause.) 

A Member : I am commissioned by President Adams, of the New 
Jersey Society, to say that New Jersey wants nothing; we are merely 
hosts here; but if the delegates and the Congress should see fit to give 
that honor to Thomas W. Williams, we should be very appreciative. 

Mr. Wood (Kentucky) : I want to place in nomination the name of 
a gentleman who has invited us to be the guests of his Society for next 
year, Mr. William K. Boardman, of Tennessee. (Applause.) 

A Member: I want to add just a word to what has been said regard- 
ing Mr. Williams, of New Jersey, as a representative of the New Jersey 
Society. You have done us people here very great honor ; you have 
covered our 250th anniversary with the glory of your presence and 
your flag and your patriotism, and you are going to go thundering 
through the ages not simply because you are the Sons of the American 
Revolution, but you have taken up New Jersey into your arms and 
covered her with glory on her 250th anniversary; and now we feel that 
we would like you to do one thing more, and that is to put on record 
for all the everlasting ages to come the name of a Jersey man as one 
of the Vice-Presidents of this Society whom you elected at this great 
anniversary and at the greatest meeting you have ever had. 

A Member: On behalf of the State of Connecticut, I wish to second 
the nomination of Mr. Williams, of New Jersey. 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. J 8/ 

A Member: I wish to second the nomination of Mr. Frederick E. 
Emerson, of Norfolk, Va., for Vice-President General for the ensuing 
year. 

A Member: Michigan desires to second the nomination of Mr. Board- 
man for Vice-President General and also of Mr. Williams. 

Maj. Tebbets (Alabama) : On behalf of the South, I second the nomi- 
nation of Mr. Boardman. 

Dr. Foster : Washington State wants to second the nomination of 
Mr. Williams, of New Jersey, for Vice-President General. 

Mr. Thruston : Mr. President General, I think the Pacific coast 
ought to be represented among our Vice-Presidents General and I 
would like to place in nomination Mr. Dutton, of Seattle, one of the 
delegates to this Congress whom you all know. 

Dr. Foster: If you knew that man as well as I know him, you would 
vote for him with both hands. (Laughter.) 

The Chairman : We have four nominations and there are five offices 
to fill. 

A Member: I wish to second the nomination of Mr. Emerson, of 
Virginia. He is the Vice-President and one of the Board of Managers 
of the Virginia Society. 

A Member : I move that the nominations close. 

The Chairman : The gentleman is not in order. There is another 
nominee to be named to fill the list ; only four nominations have been 
made and there are five officers. 

A Member : It is quite fair that New England should be represented 
on the Board of Vice-Presidents General, and I would nominate Mr. 
Turner, of Maine, a compatriot of our friend who Jias been nominated 
as President General. I would nominate for Vice-President General 
Mr. Philip F. Turner, of Maine. 

The Chairman : Those in nomination at the present time are Mr. 
Emerson, of Virginia: Mr. Williams, of New Jersey: Mr. Boardman, 
of Tennessee; Mr. Dutton, of Washington; Mr. Turner, of Maine. 

Judge BeardslEy: May I ask for consent to the suspension of the 
rules and move that the Secretary General deposit one ballot for each 
of the gentlemen who have been nominated for Vice-President General? 

(The motion was seconded and adopted and the ballot cast accord- 
ingly.) 

The Chairman: The Secretary General reports the ballot cast, and 
the Chair declares Mr. Emerson, of Virginia; Mr. Williams, of New 
Jersey; Mr. Boardman, of Tennessee; Mr. Dutton, of Washington, and 
Mr. Turner, of Maine, elected as Vice-Presidents General of this So- 
ciety. I will ask these gentlemen in a moment to come to the platform 
and, under the provisions of our Constitution, to draw lots for the 
order of sequence. 



1 88 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



ELECTION OF PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

The Chairman : I am informed that the tellers are ready to report. 
We will have the announcement of the tellers before we proceed with 
the drawing by the Vice-Presidents General. 

(The tellers reported 205 ballots cast, of which Mr. Wentworth had 
received 157 and Mr. Jenks 48.) 

Mr. Jenks : Mr. President General, before I make the motion which 
I have in mind, I want first to express my appreciation of the sympathy 
which has been expressed for me because of the loss of my stenog- 
rapher. (Applause and laughter.) Though lost to me, she still speak- 
eth. (Laughter.) So universal is the expression of this sympathy 
that it indicates a common grievance. (Laughter and applause.) Mr. 
President General and members of this Congress, I come naturally by 
a great respect for the name of Wentworth. Across the tumultuous 
early history of Chicago there stalks one of the most picturesque fig- 
ures which ever adorned the Middle West. I refer to Long John 
Wentworth (applause), a graduate of my own college, Dartmouth, a 
man fearless in the prosecution of what he considered to be the right. 
When I went to Dartmouth College I came again under the influence 
of the name of Wentworth, because one of the distinguished graduates 
of the college and benefactors of the institution was Governor Went- 
worth, of New Hampshire. I spent two years, and if any of you have 
l)een in Hanover, you will know how to gauge the extent of my rever- 
ence for the name of Wentworth by saying that I dwelt two years in 
that antiquated old ramshackle known as Wentworth Hall. Again, 
upon being placed upon the Executive Committee of this Society, I 
came under the strong influence of the Wentworth type. This Society 
has done well in placing at its head the distinguished compatriot from 
Iowa (applause), and I ask you to indorse, to vote to sustain, the 
motion which I now make. I think that the President General of this 
Society should feel that he is being supported by every individual mem- 
ber of the Society. (Applause.) His duties are not all easy. He re- 
quires the consciousness that he is in truth the representative of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and that in what he endeavors to do 
for the Society he has its unanimous support. I therefore move, Mr. 
President General, that the election of Compatriot Wentworth, of 
Iowa, be made unanimous. (Applause.) 

(Motion seconded.) 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, you have heard the motion. I take it 
you want a rising vote. 

Mr. Jenks : I do. 

The Chairman : All in favor will please rise. I will not put the 
contrary. Mr. Wentworth is declared unanimously elected and the 
Chair will appoint Rev. Dr. Kirbye and Mr. Turner, of Maine, to 
escort the President General-elect to the platform. The Vice-Presi- 
dents General-elect will please come forward and take seats in front. 

(Mr. Wentworth came to the platform and the members all rose.) 



PROCEEDINGS 01" NEWARK CONGRESS. 1 89 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, I present your President General-elect, 
Mr. Elmer Marston Wentworth. (Applause.) 

Mr. Wentworth : Mr. President General and Compatriots, there are 
moments in a man's life, no matter what his ancestry may be, no mat- 
ter what his present position may be, when the heart is too full and 
the brain too weak to give utterance to his thanks, and I thank yon 
each and all and everybody and pledge you the best there is in me to 
keep the traditions of our ancestry good. 

Colonel Lauman : Gentlemen, Compatriots, by permission of the two 
Presidents General of the Society now on the rostrum (Woodworth 
and Wentworth), I want to add one word more. Born in the State of 
Iowa and transplanted to Illinois, there is no hyphen connecting my 
States ; I was thoroughly and heartily in support of our own Illinois 
candidate. This was thoroughly, understood; but since your favor has 
gone to our friend from the old State of Iowa, I wish to say that he 
will have the hearty support of all on our side of the Mississippi. When 
we as a Society have the pleasure of visiting Iowa at some future day 
and look upon the soldiers' monument in front of the State Capitol at 
Des Moines, on one side of it we will see the large bronze bas-relief of 
Colonel Baker leading his regiment at Fort Donelson, where he fell, 
and on the other side we will find the bronze memorial tablet of my own 
honored father, Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jacob F. Lauman, U. S. V., of Iowa, 
leading the victorious troops home and being reviewed by Governor 
Kirkwood, of Iowa, and his cabinet, with the populace in the distance. 
When we go there we will go into the State House, and in their fine 
historical society museum will have the pleasure of viewing the General 
Lauman collection of Civil War relics which I myself have placed in 
the custody of the Iowa Historical Society, so that as you have favored 
Wentworth of Iowa, Jenks and his bunch of Indians from Illinois will 
be with him for the continued prosperity of the Society. 

VOTE OF THANKS TO HOSTS OF CONGRESS. 

Mr. PugslEy : May I ask that the order of business be suspended for 
the introduction of a resolution? 

The Chairman: If there is no objection, the order of business will 
be considered as suspended. 

Mr. PugslEy : I know that I voice the sentiment of every compatriot 
of this great Congress when I rise to express to the New Jersey Society 
the thanks of the compatriots for the gracious hospitality of the State 
of New Jersey, of the several Chapters of this splendid State, to the 
Governor of the State, to the Mayor of the city, to the President of 
the New Jersey Society, to our friend, Mr. Merrill, and to all who have 
done so much to make this great Congress such a splendid one, stand- 
ing out pre-eminently among all the congresses of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. I move you, sir. the adoption of that resolution. 

Mr. Lauman: Three cheers for the Jersey bunch. (Applause.) 

(Three cheers were given.) 



I90 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The Chairman : The Chair considers the resolution already adopted. 

Mr. PugslEy : I wish especially that ex-President General Murphy be 
included in this resolution. (Applause.) 

(The Vice-Presidents then came forward and drew lots.) 

The Chairman : The Chair will announce the order of Vice-Presi- 
dents General to be as follows : Mr. Dutton, Mr. Emerson, Mr. Wil- 
liams, Mr. Turner, Mr. Boardman. Next in order is the nomination of 
Secretary General and Registrar General. 

ELECTION OF SECRETARY GENERAL AND OTHERS. 

Colonel Lauman : I nominate the present Secretary General and Reg- 
istrar General. 

Dr. Foster : I second the nomination. 

Mr. PugslEy: I move that the President General cast the ballot for 
A. Howard Clark for Secretary General and Registrar General. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted and the ballot cast accord- 
ingly and the Chairman announced the result. A speech was called for, 
but Mr. Clark declined.) 

The Chairman : Next is the election of Treasurer General. 

Mr. PugslEy : I move that our Treasurer General, Mr. John H. Bur- 
roughs, be placed in nomination for that office. 

(Motion seconded.) 

(There being no other nominations, it was moved and carried that 
the Secretary General cast the ballot of the Society for Mr. Burroughs, 
and it was cast accordingly.) 

The Chairman : The Secretary General reports the ballot so cast and 
Mr. Burroughs is declared elected Treasurer General. Next come 
nominations for Historian General. 

Colonel Lauman : Mr. President General, Illinois has the honor of 
suggesting, to succeed himself, our worthy Historian General, David L. 
Pierson, of New Jersey. 

A Member : I move that the nominations close, and that the Secretary 
General deposit one ballot for David L. Pierson as Historian General 
of this Society. 

(The motion was seconded and adopted and the ballot cast in accord- 
ance therewith.) 

The Chairman : The Secretary General reports the vote so cast and 
Mr. Pierson is declared elected. Next is nominations for Chaplain 
General. 

Mr. Dutton : I traveled 3,500 miles to place in nomination my vener- 
able friend, Dr. Foster, for Chaplain General ; but, much to my sur- 
prise, you have elected me Vice-President General of the National So- 
ciety. The State of Washington does not want all the offices, but Dr. 
Foster is the choice of the entire coast delegation, and we are going to 
place him in nomination because he deserves it. He is one of the most 
militant Christian patriots and he is 83 years young, and I place in 
nomination Rev. John O. Foster, D. D., of Seattle. 



$r 



PROCEEDINGS OF NEWARK CONGRESS. IQI 

(Nomination seconded by member from Illinois.) 

Mr. Baldwin : Representing- the State of Oregon, I would like to 
have had the privilege of first stretching my hand across the Columbia 
River and seconding the nomination of this grand old man, but Chicago, 
as usual, was a little too fast for us ; but I would like to say that T 
admire Dr. Foster; his fine ardor and splendid sincerity has already 
won all your hearts, and it is an honor to second his nomination. 

Judge Remington : Mr. President General, I desire to second the 
nomination of Dr. Foster — this genial young man from the West ; th's 
young Lochinvar, you might call him, who comes out of the West. 
There is another reason why you should elect him — he was a resident 
for many years of the State of New Jersey. (Laughter.) 

The Chairman: Are there any other nominations? 

(It was moved and carried that the nominations close, and that the 
Secretary General cast the ballot of the Society for Dr. Foster for 
'Chaplain General, and the ballot was cast accordingly. ) 

The Chairman : The Secretary General announces the vote cast, and 
I declare Dr. Foster elected Chaplain General. Next is the election of 
the Board of Trustees. 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEES. 

The Secretary General : The Constitution requires that each State 
shall send to the Secretary General, 30 days before the Congress, a list 
•of nominees for Trustees ; otherwise the President of the State Society 
"becomes a Trustee. The following nominees have been duly filed : Ari- 
zona, Everett E. Ellinwood ; Arkansas, George W. Clark; California, 
Bethuel M. Newcomb; Connecticut, Dr. George C. F. Williams; Dela- 
ware, Col. George A. Elliott ; District of Columbia, Philip F. Larner : 
Empire State, Hon. C. A. Pugsley ; Florida, John Hobart Cross ; Indi- 
ana, Theodore Stein, Jr. ; Iowa, Elmer Marston Wentworth ; Kentucky, 
George T. Wood; Maine, Hon. Wainwright Cushing; Maryland, Hon. 
Henry Stockbridge ; Massachusetts, Moses Greeley Parker, M. D. ; Mis- 
souri. Hon. John L. Ro Bards; New Jersey, Chas. Symmes Kiggins ; 
North Carolina, Henry Clark Bridgers ; Ohio, Col. Moulton Honk: 
Oklahoma, Harlan T. Deupree ; Pennsylvania, Col. R. W. Guthrie : 
Rhode Island, Maj. Henry V. A. Joslin ; South Dakota, F. M. Mills; 
Utah, Albert Raymond Barnes ; Washington, George A. Virtue. 

(It was moved and carried that the nominees named by the several 
States for members of the Board of Trustees be declared elected and 
the Secretary General authorized to cast one ballot for them, and the 
ballot was cast accordingly.) 

The Secretary General : I move that where the States have failed 
to file the names of nominees the Presidents of those State Societies 
shall be the Trustees. 

(This motion was seconded and adopted.) 

(The full list of members of the Board appears on page 4 herein.^ 

(It was moved to adjourn.) 



19-2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(President General Wentworth takes the Chair.) 

The Chairman: Compatriots, a motion has been made to adjourn... 
Is there any further business? The Chair hears none. Are you ready 
for the question. All those in favor of the adjournment of the Twenty- 
seventh Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution will say aye. 
(Vote.) The ayes have it, and the Twenty-seventh Annual Congress- 
of the Sons of the American Revolution stands adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
NOVEMBER 29, 1915. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution, duly called by direction of the 
President General, was held at the University Club, Fifth avenue and 
Fifty- fourth street, New York City, on Monday, November 29, 1915,. 
at 10.30 o'clock a. m. Present : President General Newell B. Wood- 
worth, presiding; Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston, of Kentucky; Mr. Al- 
bert M. Henry, of Michigan ; Mr. Elmer M. Wentworth, of Iowa ; Mr- 
Chancellor L. Jenks, of Illinois, and Mr. John Lenord Merrill, of New 
Jersey, members of the committee; also Vice-President General Henry 
F. Punderson, of Massachusetts ; Treasurer General John H. Burroughs, 
of New York; ex-Presidents General Edwin S. Greeley, of Connecti- 
cut, Morris B. Beardsley, of Connecticut, Moses Greeley Parker, M. D.,. 
of Massachusetts, and Cornelius A. Pugsley, of New York; President 
Louis Annin Ames, of the Empire State Society; Commander John H. 
Moore, U. S. N., vice-chairman of Committee on Americanization and 
Aliens, and Secretary General A. Howard Clark. The courtesy of the 
floor was extended to those present not members of the committee. 

The minutes of the meeting of the committee on July 21, 1915, were- 
read and approved. 

The President General made a statement as to the present condition 
of the Society. 

The Secretary General reported on the work of his office, including 
the completion of the National Year Book for 191 5. An edition of 
1,500 copies of the book was printed; the usual official distribution was 
made of about 650 copies ; about 700 copies were ordered by State 
Societies and Chapters, and the remainder are held for sale at 50 cents 
per copy, as directed by the Executive Committee. 

Mr. Merrill, vice-chairman of the Memorial Committee, reported on 
progress made in preparation of a memorial volume to the Signers of 
the Declaration of Independence, and the Secretary General was re- 
quested to inform the chairman of the committee that it is authorized 
to continue that work under the same joint committee as heretofore. 

Mr. Wentworth, chairman of the Committee on Organization in the 
West, reported on progress made and suggested the importance of 
securing the interest of leading men in the work of the Society. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING. 1 93 

Mr. Henry, chairman of the Committee on Organization in the Middle 
States, presented a report expressing the views of the several members 
of that committee as to the best methods of work, each of them calling 
particular attention to the great advantage of local Chapters. Good 
results have come through co-operation with the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. The attention of the committee was called to 
the plan of operations in Michigan, where several Chapters have been 
organized, the State Society being practically placed on a Chapter basis. 
The fact that 300 members of the State Society resided in Detroit and 
only about 50 in the remaining parts of the State naturally resulted 
in a feeling throughout the State that social activities of the Society 
held at Detroit were primarily of benefit to the Detroit members only, 
and that the "State" Society was in fact, if not in name, but a local 
Detroit affair. To remove this condition, the Detroit Chapter was 
organized, membership in which was optional to State members residing 
in Wayne County. This Chapter levied its own dues of $2 per annum 
and took over the conduct of all social functions in Detroit formerly 
given by the State Society, including monthly meetings during the 
winter season. The State Society continues to hold but the one func- 
tion — the annual meeting and banquet — and it is the intention of the 
State Society to hold this at different cities throughout the State, as 
the Society grows in strength. When it became understood that the 
Detroit members were no longer using the State Society as a local 
Society, the outside members began to evidence a willingness to co- 
operate which had not previously been manifest. Five Chapters have 
been organized : Detroit, 227 members ; Grand Rapids, 38 members ; 
Ann Arbor, 21 members; Mt. Pleasant, 11 members, and Kalamazoo; 
and another Chapter is being formed at Marquette. 

Vice-President General Punderson, chairman of the Committee on 
Organization in New England, reported that he had been in corre- 
spondence with members of that committee, particularly as to what 
efforts are being made to increase membership through the formation 
of local Chapters. In 1913 three Chapters were organized in Maine — 
at Rockland, Lewiston, and Waterville. It has long been the practice, 
in order to arouse local interest, to have a Vice-President for each 
county in that State. New Hampshire has but one Chapter ; Vermont 
none ; Rhode Island, 4, and Connecticut, 7. Massachusetts has 15 
Chapters, two of them recently chartered, and two more will soon be 
formed. That Society has under consideration a plan for the abolition 
of further payment of annual dues after members have paid for some 
definite number of years. The total membership of the Sons of the 
American Revolution in New England on April 1, 1915, was 4,012, 
about 5 per cent being new during the preceding year. In a population 
of 6,525,000 this is about one member to 1,626 men, women, and chil- 
dren. Massachusetts, with half its population of foreign birth or 
parentage, has one member in 2,000, while Connecticut has the remark- 
able record of one member to each 950 of its population. 

In behalf of the Committee on Organization in the South, Mr. 



194 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Thruston reported that a determined effort would be made during the 
present season to arouse greater interest in the Society's work in the 
Southern States. 

Mr. Thruston, chairman of the Committee on Education, outlined a 
plan of operations for promoting patriotic education and read several 
letters from members of the committee suggesting various activities. 
Mr. George A. Brennan, principal of the Van Vlissengen School in 
Chicago, suggests as follows : 

i. We should see that United States history is taught in a more 
attractive manner in the elementary schools, with less attention to de- 
tails of wars and tariffs and more study given to the general growth 
of the nation, the life of the people, stories of great patriots, inventions 
and their usefulness, etc. History must be made alive. 

2. We should make more of patriotic days, such as Lincoln's and 
Washington's Birthdays, Lexington Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, 
Independence Day, Yorktown Day, and Thanksgiving Day. Most of 
these are celebrated by the Chicago school children ; in fact, all but 
Lexington and Yorktown Days, which the Illinois Society celebrates 
officially, and its members take part with other societies in celebrating 
the other patriotic days. 

3. Patriotic songs. * * * The Chicago Board of Education has 
published for general use a book of patriotic songs as sung in the 
Van Vlissengen School. Every school in the country should sing a 
selected number of American patriotic songs instead of the trash that 
some sing. Our committee can help in this line. 

4. Our committee can also help by recommending our members to 
urge more free evening schools for immigrants, not only to teach them 
our language, but also the principles of American citizenship. This is 
being done admirably in Chicago through the use of our Sons of the 
American Revolution leaflets. 

5. Our committee can urge the Society members to do more personal 
work in preaching a business-like patriotism in obeying the laws, in 
selecting good law-makers, in training our people, and preparing our- 
selves to put our country in a state of proper defense. 

Mr. Jenks, chairman, and Commander Moore, vice-chairman, of the 
Committee on Americanization and Aliens, reported on the general suc- 
cess attending the work of that committee, particularly in the prepara- 
tion of aliens for naturalization and in inaugurating impressive cere- 
monies at court when the oath of allegiance is administered to new citi- 
zens. Leaflet No. 2, on Naturalization, and No. 3, the Constitution, are 
in greater demand than ever before for use in night schools. 

The President General called attention to the urgent need of teach- 
ing aliens to speak the English language, that they may more rapidly 
become real Americans, and described special efforts being made at 
Syracuse to that end, the city's alien residents numbering some 8,000 
unnaturalized adult males and some 6,500 non-English-speaking and 
5,200 illiterate persons. 

President General Woodworth co-operated with the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the National Americanization Committee of New York in 
adopting a new method of reaching every non-English-speaking person 
in every section of the city. Forty thousand hand bills were printed in 



I 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING. 1 95 

five languages — English, Polish, Italian, Yiddish, and German — which 
read : 

Make Syracuse an English-speaking City. 

Go To Night School at Once. 

Can you speak well? 

Do you want to be an American citizen? 

Do you want a better job? 

It is hard to get a job in America without English. 

Go to Night School and Learn it. 

Pick out the school nearest you in the list at the bottom of this page 
and go there AT once. 

Commander Moore, of the Committee on a National Archives Build- 
ing, reported on the need of certain legislation in preparation for plans, 
and the President General outlined certain procedure to advance the 
work. 

Mr. Merrill, chairman of the Committee on the Washington Guard, 
reported a form of Constitution, which was adopted, subject to the 
approval of a committee, consisting of the President General, the Sec- 
retary General, Mr. Merrill, and Judge Henry Stockbridge, appointed 
with power to act. [The Constitution as adopted and promulgated in 
Official Bulletin of March, 1916, is given below.] 

Mr. Merrill, chairman of the National Committee on Arrangements 
for the Twenty-seventh Annual Congress, at Newark, N. J., reported 
progress. A proposition to hold the Congress on May 28, 29, and 30 
was considered, but the sentiment of the Executive Committee was 
against it. Approval of arrangements for the Congress was deferred, 
to be determined by the Executive Committee through correspondence. 

Mr. Burroughs presented a letter from the American Relief Clearing- 
house. It was voted that the appeal be commended to the attention of 
individual compatriots, and that the letter be printed in the Official 
Bulletin. Contributions to the cause may be forwarded to Mr. John H. 
Burroughs, Treasurer General, S. A. R., 15 William street, New York 
City. 

Treasurer General Burroughs reported that the balance on hand May 
14, 1915, was $7,969.42; receipts to November 17, $1,703.66; disburse- 
ments, $4,120.58; balance November 17, $5,552.50, including $150.50 cred- 
ited to the Permanent Fund. 

The report was accepted, with thanks of the committee to the Treas- 
urer General for his able services to the National Society. 

Past President General R. C. Ballard Thruston presented to the So- 
ciety, as an addition to the investments in the Permanent Fund, a $1,000 
5 per cent bond. The unanimous thanks of the Executive Committee 
were extended to Mr. Thruston for his generous gift. 

The Permanent Fund now aggregates $8,000 invested in bonds and 
$150.50 cash at interest. 

The President General called attention to the resolutions adooted at 
the Portland Congress with reference to the Commissioner of Educa- 



I96 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

tion, and he was requested to communicate the resolutions, with accom- 
panying exhibits, to the President of the United States for his consid- 
eration and investigation. 

The committee approved the proposed plan of the President General 
to write to each State Society requesting suitable action toward accom- 
plishing the early erection of a National Archives Building in Wash- 
ington City for the preservation of government records now widely 
scattered and in danger of destruction. 

On motion by Mr. Punderson, it was voted that the President Gen- 
eral be requested .to communicate to each State Society a copy of the 
following resolution on "preparedness," adopted at the Portland Con- 
gress on July 20, 1915, as offered by Mr. Nathan Warren, of Massa- 
chusetts, and that each State be recommended to adopt a similar reso- 
lution expressing the sentiment of such community on that important 
question : 

Resolved, That the Sons of the American Revolution, in Congress 
assembled, indorse the sentiment for a system of preparedness on the 
part of the government and the people and the guarantee of peace with 
honor, in accordance with the traditions and policy of our Revolutionary 
ancestry. 

On motion by Mr. Jenks, chairman of the Committee on American- 
ization and Aliens, the following resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas there have been issued from time to time and are in circu- 
lation in different parts of the country manuals or primers on the 
duties of naturalized citizens, such publications seeking to prepare the 
alien for naturalization and to hasten his amalgamation into American 
citizenship ; and 

Whereas, also, such publications lack uniformity of presentation of 
the subjects discussed and the authority of official origin and sanction; 
and 

Whereas, also, the Bureau of Naturalization of the Department of 
Labor has logically and essentially the care of the alien and his induc- 
tion into American citizenship : Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Bureau of Naturalization of the Department of 
Labor be requested to prepare, publish, and issue, as soon as practicable, 
a manual of citizenship for the benefit of aliens who have declared 
their intention to become citizens of this country; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to the President of 
the United States, the Secretary of Labor, and the Speaker of the 
House of Representatives. 

An additional appropriation of $400 was voted for printing and dis- 
tributing the National Year Book. 

The Secretary General was directed to furnish the address by Mr. 
Thruston on the "Origin and Evolution of the United States Flag," 
in pamphlet form, reprinted from the National Year Book, at 15 cents 
per copy, in bulk, to State Societies, and at 25 cents per copy mailed 
to individual members. 

(The committee and other compatriots present at the meeting were 
the guests of the President General at lunch.) 

There being no further business, the meeting then, at 4.45 o'clock, 
adjourned. A Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 



Constttutton 

OF 

THE WASHINGTON GUARD OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF 
THE SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Prepared and Issued under the Authority of a Resolution Adopted by 
the Congress of the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, Held in the City of Portland, Oregon, in 1915, and 
Submitted to and Approved by the Executive Committee of that 
Society. 

Article I — Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The Washington Guard of 
the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," herein- 
after referred to and to be commonly known and designated as The 
Washington Guard. 

Article II — Objects. 

The objects of The Washington Guard shall be to perpetuate the 
memory of the men and women who, by their services or sacrifices 
during the War of the American Revolution, achieved the independence 
of the American people ; to unite and promote fellowship among their 
descendants ; to inspire them and the community at large with a more 
profound reverence for the principles of government founded by our 
forefathers; to celebrate the anniversaries of the prominent events of 
the war ; to foster true patriotism and to maintain and extend the 
institutions of American freedom. 

Article III — Membership. 

Section i. Any male youth shall be eligible to membership in The 
Washington Guard who is under twenty-one years of age and of good 
repute in the community in which he resides, and who at the age of 
twenty-one years would be eligible by right of descent to membership 
in the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Sec. 2. Any member of the Sons of the American Revolution may 
become an honorary member of The Washington Guard upon the pay- 
ment of a fee to be fixed by the Commandery of the State in which he 
may reside. 

Sec. 3. The membership of The Washington Guard shall consist of 
three classes : 

Senior Guardsmen; those between fifteen and twenty-one years of 
age. 

Guardsmen ; those between ten and fifteen years of age. 

Junior Guardsmen; those under ten years of age. 

The right to vote and hold office shall be limited to Senior Guards- 
men and Guardsmen. 

(197) 



I98 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Article IV — State Commanderies and Posts. 

Section i. The National Commandery of The Washington Guard 
shall include all members of whatever class of the State Commanderies 
and Posts. 

Sec. 2. The Governor General of the National Commandery, with the 
approval of the National Council, shall issue all charters for the or- 
ganization of State Commanderies. 

Sec. 3. The Governor for each State to which a charter has been 
issued may, by and with the approval of the State Commandery, grant 
commissions for the organization of Posts within the jurisdiction of 
such State. 

Article V — Officers; National Council. 

Section i. The President General of the Sons of the American 
Revolution shall be ex officio the Honorary Commander-in-Chief of 
The Washington Guard. He shall appoint the first Governor General 
of the National Commandery upon the adoption and promulgation of 
this Constitution by the Executive Committee of the National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, and the said President Gen- 
eral and Governor General, acting jointly, shall appoint the other offi- 
cers of the National Commandery provided for in section 2 of this 
article. All such officers of the National Commandery shall hold office 
until their successors shall have been duly elected by a Congress of the 
National Commandery. 

Sec. 2. The general officers shall be a Governor General, two Lieu- 
tenant Governors General, a Secretary General, a Treasurer General, 
a Registrar General, and a Chaplain General, each of whom shall be a 
member of the Society of the "Sons of the American Revolution. Ex- 
cept as herein provided, all officers shall be elected by ballot by a ma- 
jority vote of the delegates present at the biennial Congress of the 
National Commandery. 

Sec. 3. The officers of each State Commandery shall be a Governor, 
a Lieutenant Governor, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Registrar, and a 
Chaplain, each of whom shall be a member of the Societ}^ of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. Additional officers, if any are needed, 
may be provided for by each State Commandery, to be chosen from 
among the Senior Guardsmen. 

Sec. 4. The officers of a Post shall be a Commandant, who shall be 
a member of the Sons of the American Revolution ; a Captain, a First 
Lieutenant, who shall act as Secretary ; a Second Lieutenant, who shall 
act as Treasurer; an Ensign in charge of the colors, and such other 
officers as the Post may determine. All officers of a Post, with the 
exception of the Commandant, shall be chosen from among the Senior 
Guardsmen or Guardsmen. 

Sec. 5. The general officers of the National Commandery and the 
Governors of State Commanderies shall constitute the National Coun- 
cil, which shall have full authority in the administration of the affairs 
of The Washington Guard. The National Council shall have power to 
adopt and from time to time alter and amend the By-Laws of the 
National Commandery ; to prescribe the duties of the general officers ; 
to provide the seal ; to designate and make regulations for the issue of 
the insignia and the certificate of membership. Meetings of the Na- 
tional Council may be held at the call of the Governor General. At 
such meetings five members shall constitute a quorum. 

Article VI — Dues. 

The National Council shall have power to determine the mode in 
which the expenses of the National Commandery and of each Congress 
shall be provided for and paid. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE WASHINGTON GUARD. I99 

Each State Commandery shall have power to fix and regulate the 
amount of dues to be paid by Posts or members, and such dues shall 
be uniform throughout the State; but this provision shall not be con- 
strued to limit the power of any Post to impose additional dues for 
the use of such Post. 

Article VII — Meetings and Elections. 

The first Congress of The Washington Guard for the transaction of 
business shall be held on the 185th anniversary of the birthday of Wash- 
ington, February 22, 1917, or upon a date to be determined by the Na- 
tional Council and at a place to be designated by said National Council. 

Meetings of the Congress of The Washington Guard shall be held 
biennially at such time and place as may be designated by the preced- 
ing Congress. Special meetings of the Congress may be called by the 
Governor General. 

At all such regular or special meetings the following shall be entitled 
to vote if present in person, but no proxies shall be allowed : 

(1) All general officers and Past Governors General. 

(2) The Governor and Lieutenant Governor of each State Com- 
mandery. 

(3) The Commandant of each Post. 

(4) One delegate for every twenty-five members of a Post, provided 
that each Post shall be entitled to at least two votes. 

Each State Commandery may determine the date for its annual meet- 
ing, and the rules governing the election of officers and delegates and 
the transaction of other business. 

Each Post shall have the power to regulate the meetings of the Post 
and to adopt all necessary regulations for the conduct of such meetings. 

Article VIII — By-Laws. 

Each State Commandery and each Post may adopt all necessary By- 
Laws, provided that the same do not conflict in any way with the pro- 
visions of this Constitution. 

Article IX — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be altered or amnded by a majority vote of 
the members of the National Council present at any meeting called for 
that purpose by the Governor General or the National Council, pro- 
vided that not less than ten days' notice of such proposed amendment 
shall have been given, and which notice shall state the substance of the 
amendment to be submitted. 



200 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
MAY 13, 1916. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, duly called by order of the 
President General, was held at the Robert Treat Hotel, Newark, N. J., 
on the evening of May 13, 1916. Present, President General Wood- 
worth, presiding: Mr. R. C. Ballard Thruston, Mr. Albert M. Henry, 
Mr. Elmer M. Wentworth, Mr. Chancellor L. Jenks, Mr. John Lenord 
Merrill, Secretary General Clark, and Treasurer General Burroughs. 
The minutes of the meeting of November 29, 1915, were approved. 

The President General outlined the contents of his annual report to 
be presented to the Annual Congress. He stated that the resolutions 
adopted at the Portland Congress with reference to the United States 
Commissioner of Education had been communicated to the President 
of the United States. In view of the replies received, the committee 
voted to consider the incident as closed. 

The Treasurer General reviewed the financial condition of the So- 
ciety. He reported cash on hand to the credit of the Permanent Fund 
amounting to $491.66, and it was voted that from the general fund there 
be appropriated such additional sum as may be necessary to purchase a 
$1,000 bond, thereby increasing the Permanent Fund investment to 
$9,000. 

It was voted that an additional appropriation of $146.93 be made for 
the printing and distribution of the Official Bulletin during the past 
year. 

After informally discussing the activities of the Society and the an- 
nual reports of the several National Committees, with recommendations 
therein, the Executive Committee adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MAY 15, 

1916. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees, duly called by direction of the 
President General, was held at the Robert Treat Hotel, Newark, N. J., 
at 9 o'clock Monday morning, May 15, 1916. Present, President Gen- 
eral Woodworth, presiding; Moses Greeley Parker, M. D., of Massa- 
chusetts; Mr. Allen R. Carter, of Kentucky; Mr. Chancellor L. Jenks, 
of Illinois ; Col. George A. Elliott, of Delaware ; Mr. Albert. M. Henry, 
of Michigan; Dr. George C. F. Williams, of Connecticut; Vice-Presi- 
dent General Henry F. Punderson, of Massachusetts; Mr. Elmer M. 
Wentworth, of Iowa; Rear Adm. C. M. Chester, U. S. N., of District 
of Columbia ; Mr. C. Symmes Kiggins, of New Jersey ; Secretary Gen- 
eral A. Howard Clark, and others. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Trustees held at Portland, Ore.. 
July 20, 1915, were approved. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING. 201 

The President General reported briefly on business transacted by the 
Executive Committee during the year, and it was voted that all action 
of the committee be ratified and approved. 

After some informal discussion on the general welfare of the Society, 
there being no further business to come before the Trustees, the meet- 
ing was adjourned at 9.30 o'clock. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MAY 16, 

19T6. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees elected at the Twenty-seventh 
Annual Congress, duly called by the President General, was held in 
the ball-room at the Robert Treat Hotel, Newark, N. J., on the evening 
of May 16, 1916. Present : President General Elmer M. Wentworth, 
presiding; Vice-Presidents General Orison J. C. Dutton, Frederick E. 
Emerson, Philip F. Turner, and William K. Boardman ; Secretary Gen- 
eral A. Howard Clark, Treasurer General John H. Burroughs ; Mr. 
Philip F. Lamer, of District of Columbia ; Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, 
of New York; Col. George A. Elliott, of Delaware, and Mr. George T. 
Wood, of Kentucky, members of the Board of Trustees ; also President 
Louis Annin Ames, of the Empire State Society; Mr. Chancellor L. 
Jenks, of Illinois, and others. 

Vice-President General Boardman presented an invitation from the 
Tennessee Society to hold the Twenty-eighth Annual Congress at Nash- 
ville, Tenn., in May, 19 17. 

The Secretary General announced that since the adjournment of the 
Congress an invitation had been received from the Vermont Society to 
hold the Congress of 1917 at Burlington, Vt. 

On motion, it was voted that the invitation of the Tennessee Society 
be accepted with the thanks of the Board of Trustees, and that the 
Twenty-eighth Congress be held in the city of Nashville on the third 
Monday in May, 1917. 

It was also voted that the thanks of the Board be extended to the 
Vermont Society for its courteous invitation to hold the Congress at 
Burlington. 

It was voted that the usual contribution of $500 be authorized to be 
paid by the Treasurer General toward the expenses of the Nashville 
Congress in 19 17. 

The President General nominated the following members of the 
Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees approved the same 
under the provisions of Article V, section 4, of the Constitution : The 
President General, chairman ; Newell B. Woodworth, of Syracuse, 
N. Y. ; Mr. Albert M. Henry, of Michigan ; Mr. Chancellor L. Jenks, of 
Illinois ; Mr. John Lenord Merrill, of New Jersey ; Mr. Lewis B. Curtis, 
of Connecticut ; Mr. Louis Annin Ames, of New York City. 



202 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

The President General announced that he had under consideration 
the appointment of an Advisory Committee to serve in co-operation 
with the Executive Committee, and his suggestion was favorably in- 
dorsed by the Trustees. 

An appropriation of $2,500, or so much thereof as may be necessary, 
was voted for printing and distributing the Official Bulletin during the 
present Society year. 

An appropriation of $1,600, or so much thereof as may be necessary, 
was voted for the publication of the National Year Book for 1916, 
under the usual editorship of the Secretary General. 

It was voted that the Executive Committee be, and is hereby, em- 
powered to make appropriations for such expenses as may be proper to 
be incurred in furthering the work of the Society. 

It was voted that the Executive Committee be, and is hereby, em- 
powered to act on such matters referred to the Board of Trustees by 
the Congress, or such new business as in the judgment of the President 
General may not require the action of a meeting of the Board. 

There being no further business, the meeting of the Trustees then 
adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
MAY 17, 1916. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee, duly called by direction of 
the President General, was held on May 17, 1916, when the members 
of the Twenty-seventh Congress were the guests of the New Jersey 
Society on a special train visiting Princeton and Trenton. Present : 
President General Elmer M. Wentworth, presiding; Mr. Newell B. 
Woodworth, Mr. Albert M. Henry, Mr. Chancellor L. Jenks, and Mr. 
Louis Annin Ames, of the committee; also Treasurer General Bur- 
roughs, Secretary General Clark, Vice-Presidents General Boardman, 
Dutton, Turner, and others. 

Appropriations for maintenance and for carrying on the patriotic 
work of the Society were voted as follows : 

For the Committee on Americanization and Aliens, $750. 

For miscellaneous expenses of National Committees, $150. 

For continuance of the preparation of a memorial volume on the 
Signers of the Declaration of Independence, as authorized by the Ex- 
ecutive Committee November 20, 1914, $150. 

For salary of Secretary General and Registrar General and necessary 
office expenses, including clerical assistance, as during the last year, 
and for necessary traveling expenses of the Secretary General in at- 
tendance at the Annual Congress and meetings of the Executive Com- 
mittee and Trustees, subject to the approval of the President General. 

The Secretary General was authorized to have printed the usual 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING. 2C>3 

edition of 800 copies of the National Year Book for 1916 for the cus- 
tomary official distribution; also such additional number of copies as 
may be subscribed for by State Societies, Chapters, and individual 
members, at 50 cents per copy in paper covers and 75 cents cloth bound 
(postage or expressage prepaid), provided that orders be placed prior 
to August 1, notice to such effect to be issued by the Secretary General. 

The Secretary General was authorized to insert advertisements in the 
Official Bulletin, if the plan prove feasible and advisable, at such rates 
as he may deem advantageous. 

Vice-President General Boardman, of Tennessee, was authorized to 
carry out a plan for publicity throughout the South without expense 
to the Society. 

Mr. Woodworth and Mr. Jenks were requested to secure information 
with a view to adopting a distinctive standard marker of the Sons of 
the American Revolution for the graves of soldiers and sailors of the 
War of the Revolution, and to report thereon at the next meeting of 
the committee or at the Nashville Congress. 

The committee considered the question of adopting a uniform Pledge 
to the Flag referred by the Congress, and it was voted that the follow- 
ing "Pledge of Allegiance," widely used in the schools of the United 
States and in the Philippines, be recommended for general use by State 
Societies and Chapters : I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the 
Republic for which it stands ; One Nation, indivisible, with Liberty and 
Justice for All. 

It was suggested that the principal moving-picture news services be 
communicated with, to the end that films of special interest to Sons of 
the American Revolution be brought to the attention of State Societies 
and Chapters. 

The Secretary General was authorized to secure a supply of standard 
application blanks for the use of The Washington Guard and to issue 
a circular to State Societies and local Chapters calling attention to the 
Guard; and an appropriation of $100, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary, was voted for these purposes. 

There being no further business, the committee then adjourned. 

A. Howard Clark, 

Secretary General. 



;o4 sons ol the: American revolution. 



BANQUET AT NEWARK IN HONOR OF THE TWENTY- 
SEVENTH ANNUAL CONGRESS. 

Given by the New Jersey Society, at the Robert Treat Hotel, 
Newark, N. J., on the Evening of May 16, 1916. 

The banquet was attended by about 450 members and guests, includ- 
ing ladies. President W. I. Lincoln Adams, of the New Jersey Society, 
presided as toastmaster. 

The Toastmaster : Ladies and Gentlemen, when our genial Master 
of Ceremonies, my personal good friend, and everybody's good friend, 
the founder of The Washington Guard — of course, I refer to John 
Lenord Merrill (applause) — told me very plainly that I was expected 
to make a speech of only two minutes, I told him that I would take 
only half that time. I do not enjoy public speaking, neither do my 
audiences (laughter) ; and my oratory — if it can be called oratory — has 
at least one thing in its favor, and that is its brevity. But, anyway, all 
that I want to say tonight to you is to tell you how happy the Sons of 
the American Revolution in the State of New Jersey are in having you 
with us during this Congress, and especially to have you with us tonight 
to sit down at a common board and break bread with us. (Applause.) 
The business of the Congress is over and all we have to do now is to 
enjoy ourselves. I hope that this dinner will be the means of our 
cementing the acquaintances which we have made during the Congress 
into enduring friendships. I am now going to tell you that our genial 
host of yesterday, the man who has been President General of this 
National Society and Governor of this Commonwealth, the Hon. 
Franklin Murphy (cheers and applause), has just come into the room, 
and I know that you want the privilege of showing him how much you 
appreciated his generous hospitality of yesterday afternoon, and I am 
going to ask Governor Murphy to rise in his place and give us all a 
chance to show how much we did appreciate what he has done, and 
the fact that he has come to us tonight to let us show him how much 
we think of him. (Prolonged cheers and applause.) 

REMARKS BY PAST PRESIDENT GENERAL MURPHY. 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen : I am a little old to be em- 
barrassed at any new experience. If it were not for that, T should be 
embarrassed tonight. If T had a voice such as I used to have when I 
was younger, before my throat failed me. I could perhaps hold you for 
a moment or two ; but T tried to hold an audience in this room last 
Saturday night, but found that one by one they rose at the rear end 
of the room, got up and went away, and it was a good speech, too 
(laughter) ; but I had to cut it short. I did not come up here for this 
at all ; I came up to hear Job Hedges. I think a great deal of Job 
Hedges. We must not bring politics into the Sons of the American 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 205 

Revolution, and I am not going to do it, but I am going to say to yon 
this — that the people in New Jersey who think along those lines that 
Job Hedges thinks along feel that he has been of great service to them, 
and the people in his own State, and the people in the United States. 
I think he may be charged with being a party man, and I was going 
to ask the pardon of the ladies and say he would not be worth a blank 
if he was not; but I will say he would not be worth a sixpence if he 
was not, and if you look at him you will see that he is still young, and 
a great deal may be hoped from him still; and if he will let his friends 
in New Jersey come over to New York and help him for anything in 
the future that his name is associated with, we will buy a 25-cent 
ticket and see what he can do. Now, it only shows when a man gets 
on his feet and starts to say something how easy it is to drift away. 
Let me say in a word that, as a member of the New Jersey Society, as 
a former official in the National Society, and at a time when it was 
easier for me to give the time to your work than of recent years, 1 
was very much interested in the work of this Society, and I am still, 
although I cannot give it the time I once did. But speaking now as a 
member of the New Jersey Society, I reiterate all that the Presi'den: 
of this Society has said. We are glad to see you here ; we hope you 
will come again; and if in a very modest way I have been able to con- 
tribute to your comfort, in however slight a measure, I surely am very 
glad indeed. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

Now, I am sure there is another man whom you wish to show how 
much you think of, and that is the man who has conducted this Con- 
gress so ably and so impartially, who has endeared himself to every 
one here, who will always be remembered by us in New Jersey as the 
President General who had charge of the New Jersey Congress, our 
retiring President General, the Hon. Newell B. Woodworth. (The 
audience rose amid cheers and applause.) 

ADDRESS BY RETIRING PRESIDENT GENERAL WOOD- 
WORTH. 

The Hon. Newell B. Woodworth : Mr. President, Mr. President 
General, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Compatriots : Again you 
place me in debt to you for your graciousness to me in the tribute you 
have given today in the Congress and again this evening. I wish to 
congratulate you, Mr. President of the New Jersey State Society, on 
what I think we can call the most successful Congress that this Society 
has ever held. (Applause.) I know I voice the sentiments of all those 
who have come from other parts of the country that from the moment 
that we have come into your presence here you have given us an hos- 
pitality, free and generous, and made us feel at home. There was no 
attention that you could give us that you have not bestowed, sir, and I 



206 SONS OE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

am sure we will all return home remembering the enjoyment and pleas- 
ure which we have received at the hands of the New Jersey State 
Society. (Applause.) 

Coming to this city at the time when it is celebrating the 250th anni- 
versary of its settlement, naturally our thoughts return to those earlier 
days. Particularly is the founding of Newark interesting in that it was 
the most western settlement of any made by the Puritans in their 
efforts to extend the institutions of their government. The little band 
of pioneers that came here under the leadership of Robert Treat came 
as a church in its entirety — pastor, deacons, records, congregation. 
Here they established their form of government, maintaining that none 
but members of the church should become freemen to participate in 
the town affairs or to hold office, thus exemplifying the union of State 
and Church, "to carry on," as they recorded, "their spiritual concern- 
ments as well as their town and civic affairs according to God and a 
godly government." So tonight we are assembled in what may be called 
one of the very foundations of Puritan theocracy. This little band of 
pioneers was small in number, some thirty-odd families, yet they were 
great in the essential principles of democracy — morality, education, and 
obedience to law. Here, as elsewhere, when Puritanism ceased to be 
a mere religious symbol, it became an intense social force, which was 
to exercise its influence upon the development of this nation and which 
still is exercising its influence in controlling its destiny. The effect of 
Puritanism has not been given its full relative value in our history. 
The English historian, Green, wrote that "the whole history of English 
progress since the Reformation, both on its moral and spiritual side, 
has been the history of Puritanism." These words are equally appli- 
cable to America, for it has been Puritanism that has vitalized our 
national civilization and modeled our national character. (Applause.) 
Beginning with religious intolerance, they so sowed the seeds of liberty 
here that when the time came to assert those rights of mankind by force 
of arms it was their doctrine that made resistance holy. The same 
spirit that led Cromwell and his Roundheads to quote the Scriptures 
as they rushed to battle found its expression here in Puritanism in the 
years preceding the Revolution and during the continuance of that 
struggle, at which time the congregational pulpit of New England — 
and T am pointing to Doctor Kirbye — became virtually recruiting offi- 
cers, because these ministers did not believe that resistance was unholy. 
(Applause.) 

The age of Milton, Bunyan, and Cromwell in England was one of 
intense religious feeling, a reformation of true spiritual freedom; it 
was an easy step then, as vision expanded and tolerance of opinion 
expanded, to extend the thought from the realm of the Church, with 
all this intense furor, to the realm of the State. This was a logical 
development of the doctrine of Christianity that in the eyes of God 
all men are equal. From this same thought also came the logical con- 
clusion that the individual was superior to the State, superseding the 
pagan thought that the State was superior to the individual. Tt was 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 20/ 

the intense devotion of the Puritans to these principles, founded upon 
the Word of God, that has given stability to the American character 
and counteracted the mutability arising from the infusion of so much 
foreign blood. The contributions of the Puritans toward local self- 
government have been great. True, local government was known as a 
political feature before the days of Puritanism, but it remained for 
these people to modify and adopt a plan here adapted to local condi- 
tions. As Judge Cooley writes : "This system is one which almost 
seems a part of the nature of the race to which we belong." Again, 
Puritanism demanded that all individuals should share in the govern- 
ment under penalty for neglect, based upon the sound belief that the 
individual had no right to consider alone his own comfort or interest 
or to trust the protection of this right to others. From this came, as 
a natural sequence, that the man who had the right of suffrage should 
also be able to properly shoulder a musket to defend his right, for who 
are to defend a sovereign people if they defend not themselves? The 
road from Puritanism to the Constitution is as straight as the road 
from Runnymede to Lexington. Puritanism demanded universal mili- 
tary service of all who were to become citizens. (Applause.) It is 
appropriate here, on the very edge of the old Puritan training ground, 
in front of this building, to refer to this, and I am proud to be able to 
state as a citizen of the Empire State of New York that yesterday our 
Governor signed, as I see by the daily papers, several bills affecting 
national preparedness along these lines. One of these bills provides 
for compulsory military training of all boys in the State between the 
ages of 16 and 19 years of age. (Applause.) Another bill provides 
for enrolment of all males between the ages of 18 and 45 years, and 
from this list a draft may be made at any time, in time of peace or in 
time of war, to fill up the quota of any branch of the National Guard 
that requires it. (Applause.) I am proud of being a citizen of a State 
that has acted and not debated. (Applause.) 

It is well that in these troublesome times we, as descendants of those 
who aided in creating this Republic, should meet on a site so intimately 
associated with the principles which have so powerfully influenced the 
development of our government. Recent events have led many to as- 
sert that this influence has either ceased to maintain its former virility 
-or else that it has been so diluted with many foreign bloods, or else 
weakened by the cupidity for wealth, that it is no longer capable of its 
achievements of the past. Personally, I believe none of these conditions 
are correct ; rather, I am of the belief that we and others, as represent- 
ing through ancestry this influence, have become slothful and have 
been living more in the reflected light of the past achievements of our 
ancestors than in the light of our own efforts toward continuing what 
they so actively maintained during their lifetime. If I am correct in 
this assumption, then, indeed, it is time to arouse ourselves from this 
mood of self-complacency and self-satisfaction and take up the task 
"by teaching, by word and example, the qualities which have made this 
nation great in the past. No, I am reluctant to confess that the soul 



208 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

of America has lost its virility or has been submerged by the influx of 
foreign blood ; rather would I believe that the soul of America needs 
but to be called and it will respond with eagerness to again take up 
the work of inculcating the principles of equality, justice, and loyalty. 
Nor do I believe we are placing the dollar above honor, for I would 
not believe the spirit that led our forefathers to do the work which 
they believed God gave them to do has fallen to such a point as to be 
measured by dollars and cents. 

We should teach a love of reverence for the flag ; we should teach 
that there is no room in this nation for the flag of any other nation 
besides that of the United States (cheers and applause) ; no room for 
divided allegiance or dual citizenship. (Applause.) We must teach 
that there is no vote in this country worth having that is not an Amer- 
ican vote cast as representing American principles. (Applause.) The 
public man who stands in awe of the hyphenated vote should study the 
history of this nation, and he will find that his fears, based on that, 
have no foundation. The past history of this nation has been controlled 
by American votes, and T believe that, thank God, it will be controlled 
in the future by American votes. (Applause.) America — free, just,, 
and powerful — has a mission to perform of service to mankind — a mis- 
sion depending not upon a nation filled with discordant voices or con- 
flicting interests, but a nation united and strong and alert and anxious 
to render service to humanity within or without its borders. (Ap- 
plause.) We must teach and lead forward this nation to even greater 
ideals of democracy and aid in extending the principles of democracy 
throughout the world, upon which depend the elements of hope of a 
permanent peace, based upon a federation of world powers. 

"When the war-drums beat no more and the battle flags are furled 
In the parliament of man and the federation of the world." 

A people without a vision perish. America has a vision beneath that 
flag, whose stripes represent the martyrs' blood and the hope of hu- 
manity—the Stars and Stripes. (Applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

The Toastmaster: Before I call upon our newly elected President 
General, I know you would wish to tell the President General of our 
sister society how happy we are that she has been willing to graciously 
honor our company tonight with her presence, and I very much hope 
that Mrs. William Cumming Story, President General of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, will be willing to bring us a greeting from 
our sister society. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY MRS. WILLIAM CUMMING STORY. 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. President General, Distinguished Guests: It 
is a pleasure and privilege to speak for my ninety-two thousand Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution. We love to be indebted to people we 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 209 

care for, and it is a pleasure in your presence to acknowledge our debt 
of inspiration to the Sons of the American Revolution. (Applause.) 
I have a long record of years of appreciation, years in which it has 
been a privilege to know how great the achievements are of this great 
body of American men ; but I think I have never felt so strongly as I 
do now with the vivid recollection of the inspiration of that parade of 
Saturday, as I saw you men walk out there, standing for the things 
that are true and great and brave and normal, standing and showing by 
your presence what you believed in and what we might look to you for 
in the future. A sense of comfort, a sense of security and great inspi- 
ration is ours ; we gained a great deal by your friendship, by the co- 
operation that you have given us, and it is a pleasure to come and tell' 
of our progress, the progress that you have helped along. I know you- 
do delight in the achievements of your sisters ; many of the men arc 
represented through their wives in this great, splendid family of mine,, 
and so I am so glad to come here and to wish for your future a con- 
tinuance of the great success and achievements of the past. This has 
been a notable year, a splendid year for the Sons of the American 
Revolution ; there is in the immediate future, I am sure, a year of 
splendid progress, and still further on in the future more success and 
achievement. Thank you a thousand times for the cordial considera- 
tion that you have given to my family of Daughters and to me. (Three 
cheers were then given to Mrs. Story.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

Compatriots : We have another sister society, perhaps I might call it 
a half-sister, for while some of us believe that it is foolish for the Sons 
to be divided into two organizations, we like to think that it is still 
more foolish for the Daughters to be divided into two organizations ; 
but both of these sister societies have honored us tonight by having 
their President General present, and I have very great pleasure in giv- 
ing you the opportunity to show your appreciation of the fact that we 
have with us the President General of the Daughters of the Revolu- 
tion, Mrs. Raynor, who has also honored us tonight by her presence. 
(Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY MRS. RAYNOR. 

Mr. President, Mr. President General, and Guests : It is a very 
great honor to be able to stand before you this evening and bring to 
you the greetings of the National Society of the Daughters of the 
Revolution. I felt, when sitting at }^our gracious and hospitable table,, 
that Jersey is living up to her own. Washington said that he had called 
on Jersey more than any other State and Jersey had never failed him 
(applause), and the women of Jersey were his stand-bys all through 
that trying time. (Applause.) Madam President General, I feel that 
we are sister societies ; that tonight I am a D. A. R. with the S. A. R.'s,. 
and the middle letter stands for Appreciation. (Applause.) There's 



210 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

just one thought that I would like to express, and that is the wonderful 
time, the wonderful meeting of The Washington Guard held here in 
this room last night. To us memorials and the time for memorials has 
past; we are looking to the future.— The youth of this nation are the 
future ; they are our living memorials ; they are the ones for whom we 
should work. I am proud, and was proud to be able to be here and 
witness those young boys and youths taking the oath of allegiance to 
the flag in the most serious way, being instructed not for the day, not 
for the hour, but for the time to come, perhaps the time of their chil- 
dren and their children's children, that these things may be that we 
have at times let die down ; and so I am glad that I came to Jersey, and 
I thank Jersey for inviting the President General of the Daughters of 
the Revolution. (Three cheers were then given to Mrs. Raynor.) 

(Upon motion of Col. R. W. Guthrie, a rising vote of thanks was 
given to Mrs. Story and Mrs. Raynor.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

Now, my compatriots, I am not going even to introduce the next 
speaker, the man whom you have elected to be your President General, 
the man who is going to be your chief, the man who has already become 
my dear friend, as he has become the friend of you all, the Hon. Elmer 
M. Wentworth, the newly elected President General. (Three cheers 
were given.) 

ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT GENERAL WENTWORTH. 

Mr. President, Madames Presidents General, Ladies, and Com- 
patriots : What words can mere man's brains devise to convey the 
emotions that fill the man's mind and heart after such a tribute as you 
have paid to me and to the office with which you have honored me? 
Frankly, words fail me, and I question if the eloquence of these fair 
ladies (bowing to them), whose presence and greetings have charmed 
ns, could express the appreciation or voice the sentiments which fill the 
heart and which I would I could give to you. It is also a tribute to 
the country west of the Mississippi, from which I come, an appreciation 
of the common ancestry from which we sprung, an earnest of a new 
dawn of a common patriotism from Portland, Maine, to Portland, 
Oregon — English of tongue, American in mind and thought; no hyphen- 
ism (applause); no divisive racial strife; patriots all, Americans all — 
when the voice of the pacifist will not be heard in the land. (Cheers 
and applause.) 

I was greatly impressed by the address of our former President Gen- 
eral. In the pulpit filled by our friend, Doctor Kirbye, as in the pulpit 
referred to, the American flag has a place of honor; the spirit of 
Americanism breathes its inspiration each Sabbath, hallowing every 
thought and utterance. I have a suggestion to add, I think, to that 
influence, because how often have you heard it said the greatest crisis 
in human history confronts and imperils us. For one, I believe it to 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 211 

be true. I cannot conceive there has ever been a time when so much 
was at stake. The great principles of democracy as applied to govern- 
ments of, by, and for the people are on trial, attacked and assaulted by 
the most powerful and determined foe that ever struck at the rights of 
humanity and the privileges of political liberty — rights and privileges 
demanded, won, and defended by our forebears. I would add more, 
sir, to those pulpits. I would place there, if possible to secure it, a flint- 
lock musket, such as carried by our sires in 1776, backed up by the 
most up-to-date modern machine for defense that it is possible to 
obtain (applause) — a plain notice to all that, having won our independ- 
ence with the one, we are ready to maintain it with the other. 

I doubt if I am as enthusiastic over the new law in the Empire State 
as our friend, much as I approve and admire its leadership ; but being 
of the vintage of the 6o's, and physically fit, I would be counted out, 
though I want to do my bit. (Applause.) 

In our forefathers' time inspiration and leadership came from the 
Parish Church. Why not today? From the attendants of the churches 
and the Sunday schools I would add to the different athletic organiza- 
tions, encouraged and supported by them, a battalion, equally fit and 
ready to march as Minute Men did of yore, for the defense of the flag, 
the home, and the church ; for mother, sister, sweetheart, and wife. 
(Cheers and applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

Compatriots and Ladies: I will call your attention to the fact that 
this is a true Jersey banquet. All the food was produced in New Jer- 
sey; the wine is New Jersey wine; even the cigars were made in New 
Jersey, and our principal orator of the evening, although he is now 
from the Empire State, was formerly a Jersey man, of which fact we 
are all very proud, and Job Hedges needs no introduction to a New 
Jersey audience. (Cheers and applause.) 

ADDRESS BY MR. JOB HEDGES. 

Mr. Chairman, Distinguished Guests, and Fellow-diners : I do 
not feel well enough versed in titles to pay individual respects to each 
one of those who have spoken, but I have had enough experience behind 
the guest table to know that it is safer sometimes to indulge in gen- 
eralities. I don't know just what societies are represented here, and I 
care less ; I don't know the reason for each one, and care less ; but the 
general atmosphere appeals to me. (Laughter.) I like the idea of the 
Daughters, although I have not any. I would like to get in closer 
association with the Daughters. (Laughter). Possibly a word in 
reference to pedigree might not be inconsistent. I was born in New 
Jersey and tarried here some six weeks. (Laughter.) My father be- 
ing engaged in the Civil War, the financial resources of the Hedges 
family enabled it to board for six months, and then we visited for 
awhile, there being a larger number whom we could visit in New York 



212 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

and elsewhere than in New Jersey; for the broader feeling of altruism 
the family naturally migrated. I can date, however, from the Declara- 
tion of Independence, incidentally, and a few other things in the Revo- 
lutionary War; I can date from the Civil War and some other things 
that I will not mention in this audience. (Laughter.) It is a rare 
compliment to be invited to address this gathering. From what I have 
heard tonight and what I imagine has gone before, there can hardly be 
any topic that has not been thoroughly exhausted, ornamented, and 
electrified. If, therefore, I am in a way a trailer, it is both from limita- 
tion and a natural modesty; it is inspiration enough to talk about 
daughters and sons of the Revolutionary days. Had our fathers been 
able to vision the present generation, they never could have agreed on 
a constitution. Had it been within the scope of the vision of any of 
the fathers as to what would follow in a half dozen generations, they 
would have stood still in their tasks and their labors would never have 
been completed. Thank God their experience was as limited as it was, 
because we would not be here were it otherwise. There certainly is a 
place in our social life for organizations such as yours, and I belong 
to them all, except the Daughters, because we are going rather rapidly 
these days. Men talk flippantly about the fathers who don't recall their 
names and could have no mental association with them if they did. 
People daily amend the Constitution who have never read it (laughter 
and applause) ; people reorganize this government rhetorically every 
diurnal period of the week without reorganizing themselves at the same 
time. It seems to be heterodox nowadays to be able to date back fur- 
ther than a generation, to know more than any one knew before ; it 
is sort of a threat ; it is a dangerous thing to have a past, politically. 
The present takes care of itself, and with a buoyant sense of hope we 
look toward a future that reflects nothing but imagination. No one 
rises to his feet these days, as a rule, unless he systematizes his remarks 
according to two or three well-known standards, and they always have 
to bring first that well-known speech, uttered invariably at public func- 
tions, where the orator enjoins on behalf of virtue as against vice, no 
one taking the vice end. As if that were not enough, now and then 
some man branches out with the alarming proposition that the laws 
are made for all, and not for one. No one ever had dared claim that 
they were made for one, or ever had thought that they were made for 
one; and then, as if to round up the general situation to an alarming 
enthusiasm, the final proposition is that in this country — this is always 
said — that in this country there shall be no special privilege; and yet I 
never saw a well-ordered American citizen who saw a special privilege 
coming toward him in a direct line who yielded ground by one inch 
(laughter) ; but with the blood of ancestry coursing through his veins 
and his heart palpitating to the tune of the National Anthem, he stood 
his ground until it came within arms' reach, when he folded it to his 
breast, lest it should do harm to some one else. (Laughter and ap- 
plause.) All of which leads me to the conclusion that for the past 
decade or two this country has been rhetorically drunk. When a man 



PROCEEDINGS OP NEWARK CONGRESS. 213 

don't know what to do or how to do it, he makes a speech explaining 
how some one else should do it, and we are substituting hypocrisy for 
larceny, and hypocrisy is the greater crime. When a man is still in 
doubt as to what to do, and sometimes even the topics I have mentioned 
don't seem to be comprehensive enough, then, and only then, his mind 
reverts to those two greatest oratorical topics of support, uplift and 
efficiency, efficiency being the manner in which another man would run 
your business at your expense, if you would let him (laughter and 
applause), an uplift being the character you want some one else to 
assume you have without taking the trouble to investigate whether you 
have it or not. It seems to me, therefore, in a gathering such as this 
we can well devote a few moments to taking stock nationally. I ap- 
preciate what Governor Murphy said. Of course, I can stand anything 
but kindness, and I have had much of everything else. We must revise 
some of our definitions, and one of them is the word politics. Ge- 
nerically, politics is the outward and visible evidence of man's civic 
virtue tested in the term of conduct. Party politics is the phase of 
activity which men indulge in to carry out the principles of political 
belief, and we are coming to a time when it is going to be actually 
respectable for a man to be politically decent. I look forward to the 
time when a man cannot be received into intelligent society who fails 
to understand a political duty and to read it in the light of personal 
conduct. I look at the great war on the other side of the ocean as a 
mirror, providently held up before the American people, so that they 
can look at themselves in the reflected light of the great events over 
there. And it is time for the American people to think; they have 
gone through a sort of a process in the past year. Outside of the great 
patriotic societies there has been a sort of mental inbreeding condition 
which has kept the strain and decreased the size. The time has come 
when we no longer have a right to assume the moral leadership of the 
world without evidencing it in our conduct. It takes about a generation 
to realize how far this country has gone. When Washington was in 
liis second term he said he looked forward with anticipation to the time 
when mail could be carried from Philadelphia to New York in twenty- 
four hours, and he was laughed at by the public print and ridiculed as 
if his mind was affected, and today we do it in ninety minutes. No 
man believed in what Jules Verne wrote, in the fantasies he indulged 
in, but today, if he were alive, he would find that his prophecies had 
come true. Men fly through the air and go under the sea ; they skim 
the surface of the water. Washington indulged in the advice that we 
should have no entangling alliances, and yet when the Atlantic cable 
was laid it brought the shores of this great continent in physical con- 
tact with Europe. A hundred years ago it took four or five months to 
learn the result of an election abroad or of events abroad. Today for 
the smallest unit in our currency a man can read the history of the 
world for the past twenty-four hours. Not an important event takes 
place on the surface of this globe that is not recorded and brought 
within the limit of the humblest citizen. The man who todav earns two 



214 SONS OE THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

dollars a day has a greater variet}' of food upon his table than did the 
first President of the United States in the White House. The humblest 
and poorest citizen at the dispensary can have surgical and medical aid 
for nothing that could not have been secured for any money a quarter 
of a century ago. The mode of thought and the whole process of 
social and civic association has changed as night merges into day. The 
theory of a government is as much different in practice to what it was 
in Washington's time as if it had been phrased in different terms. The 
proposition that all men are equal is sound, but sometimes dangerous, 
and it is talked as glibly as if men understood what it meant. People 
talk about human rights and forget that no man can have a right that 
has not the correlative obligation that goes with it. (Applause.) We 
have swung the proposition of individual liberty until it goes way into 
the air and people find themselves unattached to anything; and yet in a 
way there is another line of thought, another current going on, and 
that is that we attribute to government many of those moral questions 
and obligations which were never intended as a part of government at 
all, as if people were afraid they could not meet their individual moral 
obligations to some one else and shifted to this unseen proposition of 
government as if that were the only way out, concluding that it was all 
right if nobody knew anything about it, and that the question of capital 
and labor ought to be solved by law. Well, it will remain unsolved as 
long as law is the only method sought for a solution. The question of 
civic virtue has passed from a privilege to a right, from a right to an 
obligation, and I want to propound this proposition. You may all have 
thought about it that under our system of government, outside of the 
single question of the worship of the Almighty, there is no one human 
relation unaffected by the casting of a ballot. The church is exempted 
from taxation because it is of moral advantage to the community, of 
such a moral advantage that it exceeds the taxes ; but that had to be 
voted on. Some one, somewhere, had it recorded, and yet men and 
women go about as if they understood the cohesive bond and force 
that makes them a part of this government. As much as I enjoyed the 
invitation to come here and the compliment conveyed, I am quite truth- 
ful in saying that I did not respond to it as a mere compliment; I 
wanted the advantage of being for a few moments in the atmosphere 
of people who were sentimentally exhilarated, whose minds and hearts 
synchronize, who were not everlastingly trying to find out what X 
equaled, who don't try to draw a balance of this great government in 
figures, who don't believe that columns make virtue, who don't believe 
that each computation of so much per capita satisfies the per capita. 
And what difference does it make what each per capita is if you haven't 
it? I don't care how much you have if I have enough. (Laughter.) 
But I am desperately interested in knowing whether, when you got 
yours, you had some method that I overlooked. (Laughter.") I have 
no patience with that degree of patriotic fervor that confines its agita- 
tion to rhetoric. I don't believe in anaemic virtue. I don't believe in 
the man who is afraid to go out nights lest he would be tempted; I 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 21 5 

would like to have him at least have the nerve to take a chance. 
(Laughter.) I believe in the efficacy of prayer, and I would not speak 
flippantly in the presence of the cloth or ladies, but I believe that you 
can stay on your knees so long that you get muscle-bound, and that 
you can't respond to a quick prayer for help and be able to respond to 
a person in suffering than if you were in a less reverend attitude. I 
don't believe in that degree of veracity that is predicated on the fear 
of punishment; neither do I believe that virtue is a state of mind; if 
it were, we would all be comfortable when the light was out. (Laugh- 
ter.) I don't believe in resolutions that are passed after the decease 
of a friend ; I don't believe that is the only thing that can be done ; I 
think it is a good thing to call upon the family of the deceased and see 
what you can do for them. (Applause.) 

The test of virtue is not whether you make the other person happy, 
but how much you inconvenienced yourself when you were doing it. 
The test of generosity is not what you give, but how much you have 
got left, and by a natural process of evolution we are coming to a point 
where the test of citizenship is the measure of sacrifice a man will pay 
for a belief in a principle of conduct (applause), and that's the lesson 
of this generation. I have very pronounced political beliefs. I have 
very pronounced opinions upon some of the questions existing for con- 
troversy between the great parties ; but the real problem in this country 
which an audience such as this can understand is the problem of num- 
bers. How is it possible, with our different civilization, differences in 
race, religion, belief, to have our citizenry draw their conclusions — the 
major and minor premise of admitted facts? On what ground can the 
educated and the uneducated man meet? On what plane can those who 
are advantaged meet with those of less opportunity? What is the final 
argument that can make men do these things that they want other peo- 
ple to do? What is it that makes us, or should make us, test our own 
citizenship before we get nervous about somebody's else? And this 
question of worrying about other people is a matter of mental egotism ; 
it is a sort of human alibi; something you have done that you ought 
not to ; and we are so big now that people get lost in the shuffle. Men 
believe they are unobserved ; men fail to understand that a thing civic- 
ally is right or wrong, whether known or not, and the real test is whether 
you are comfortably minded when you are alone and the light is out. 
There is no trouble about being brave when the band plays ; no trouble 
about being uplifted when the crowd watches ; there is no trouble about 
responding to a paid committee when it says, "We demand that you do 
so and so." Of course, you expect it, and after a few thoughts and 
suggestions that may be you can't give up your time, and then they say, 
"We insist upon it" — you having paid the expenses (laughter) — then 
you give in and become a favored son, the greatest outdoor sport that 
is known to man, a favored son in headlines, and then a man's mind 
begins to break and he passes away and don't know it. (Laughter.) 
And then his family has to hear those well-worn speeches, and the 



-2l6 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

patient wife and the patient daughters applaud when he has finished, 
and he thinks they mean it. No; this self-sacrifice upon the altar of 
duty — I have tried it, at least I tried to try it (laughter) — is a thing that 
bears analysis. Where are we going to meet it? Where is the initia- 
tive in this country for a thought movement? Not in a crowd; don't 
think they follow ; but in an individual mind, where belief means con- 
duct, and where that conduct and that belief gets another mind and 
those minds group and that group becomes a movement. Officialdom in 
this country does not run it; officialdom is the guard that civilized 
people have to keep a lot of people from doing as much harm as they 
would like to. 

There are no affirmative virtues in government. Government fur- 
nishes opportunity for the people to be good if they want to, and re- 
stricts the activities of men who are otherwise inclined; therefore this 
country, as we often say, without quite reasoning why, is a country of 
sentiment. This is not a nation of law and order at all ; it is a nation 
•of precept and example ; a nation that can't be driven, but can be 
•coaxed; a nation that has belief when some one says it should not; a 
nation that moves backward. In thought we are negative today in this 
•country. When we started we were affirmative, and I will give an illus- 
tration. I am not talking politics; I would not talk that under any cir- 
cumstances. (Laughter.) There has just been loaned through New 
York five hundred millions of dollars within the last few weeks to the 
Allies. That is Europe's acknowledgment of our supremacy, our finan- 
cial leadership. That loan could not have been executed if the country 
liad not been on a gold basis. This country would not today have been 
on a gold basis, in my judgment, if Mr. Bryan had not said it should 
not be. (Applause and laughter.) The party to which I belong hadn't 
the nerve to come out openly on this silver proposition ; they merely 
classified it and stowed it away, and it was not until some one came out 
and said that it was impossible, that the American people got up and 
said that the nation should not be on a silver basis. And today those 
who are going to best prepare this nation in the best sense are the 
people who say it shall not be prepared, and I welcome them and I hope 
they will all be given strength ; they believe it and I hope they will con- 
tinue to believe it. But they are going to make it impossible to crystal- 
lize their belief in their own kind of conduct, because it is not human 
nature to invite trouble when we can't either run or fight (applause), 
and nations are not any different than plain, ordinary every-day people. 
They seem bigger because there is more of it, but they are just the 
same; they are not any braver in a crowd than they are when they are 
alone; they are just noisier; they get excited more quickly and then 
they make more trouble, and the greatest reform ever brought about in 
this country is undoing deliberately what we did in a hurry. We never 
reform ab initio; we do something we ought not to do, and then we ex- 
ploit ourselves by undoing it, and that makes patriots ; that makes candi- 
dates; that makes elections, and we are approaching a time now — you 



BANQUET AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 2IJ 

"have been through it several times — when this nation is going to be 
hung over an abyss of despair — up to election time — and then be pulled 
back (laughter) and saved. Nobody has been smart enough to ruin 
this nation. And why? Because there are sentimental people in this 
world. If I had to choose between being loved and respected, I would 
rather be loved, because I can buy respect, and no man gathers friends 
who is not capable of being a friend. Most everybody understands 
everybody else, but they just don't tell them all they know. Nobody 
fools everybody; we just fool ourselves, and we go about our way 
thinking that no one understands our weaknesses ; but they do ; they 
just don't tell us. and men go and come in sort of a sublimated atmos- 
phere, as if there was nothing else there but themselves, and there is 
not up there. 

Now this, in a way, is rambling; but it brings me to the thought I 
want to leave with you. I believe in it as sincerely as I believe in the 
valor of the man whose name I bear, that the foundation, the real foun- 
dation, strength of this government is in just such organizations as 
these represented here tonight. (Applause.) I believe that the affirma- 
tive thought, the only kind that really amounts to anything, comes from 
people who have an emotion before they have an argument, who have a 
sentiment before they talk, who have something inside of them that 
they can't just exactly express, but for which they would die, which 
makes for self-respect, which makes the right to be good and looked 
up to by other people. Now I don't know how to straighten out all 
these things; I think T am the only semi-political speaker who does not. 
No ; I don't know how to regenerate people ; I don't know how to draw 
a law that can make a man reverse himself. I know all about the penal 
•code, and I know that you can prevent a lot of people doing things they 
ought not to do : but you cannot make them do something they ought 
not if they don't want to. How are you going to make people want to 
be decent? I don't know exactly how many people we should have in 
the army, but I know we ought to have an army. (Applause.) I don't 
know where the forts should be, but I know they are going to be. We 
have been paying money and training soldiers and we are afraid to have 
them give us their opinion ; we are afraid to take the expert's advice, 
the advice we have paid for, lest we would have to follow it. We paid 
for it: why have them if we should not be bound by our own logic? 
And pretty soon a lot of these reports that have been put in cubby-holes 
are going to be brought out, perhaps in a few weeks. I know of one 
that was filed a few weeks ago, that said if we go to Mexico in a puni- 
tive way we would have to go back, and if we go in any other way we 
will intervene. That report is coming out in a few days, and there are 
a lot of things we are going to know that we only thought about. 

With regard to this proposition of a hyphenated citizen : If you take 
a man who has served in an army on the other side, put a uniform on 
him for one week and he will forget the other one, and I would rather 
have him wear a uniform than read all the tracts that are distributed 



2l8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

at Ellis Island. And no line of preparation is going to be complete that 
does not make every man before they can secure the right of citizen- 
ship perform this duty really, not fictitiously, so that everybody can see 
him do it. (Applause.) That gets it off his mind. The people that 
are most opposed to preparedness are not ready to be prepared them- 
selves. The price of citizenship is not what it will do for you. Now, 
do you know the remedy for all this? I'm going to tell you; and I 
only know one, and it is a sentimental one. and with this I close. You 
good people are going down to Princeton tomorrow, I believe. I went 
there last fall, on Labor Day, to sort of reorganize myself. I wanted 
to try to get into an atmosphere where everybody was not cross at 
everybody else, and where I could wander around the buildings and 
revive my spirits and sort of reorganize myself mentally and morally. 
And as I stepped off the train I heard the chimes of a near-by church 
playing popular airs, and I wandered through the old buildings, listen- 
ing to those airs, and then I went to the little old cemetery— Princeton's 
Westminster Abbey — and I saw the graves of Wistar, P>urr, McClain, 
Cleveland — the great spirits that have been there — and I saw the stones 
marked with the names of men who had fought the battle of life in 
foreign lands — those who had been in the church and the laity of all 
professions — and as I leaned against the stone in revery I heard the 
chimes change, and from a popular air they merged into "My Country, 
'Tis of Thee," and I was conscious of a tear which coursed down my 
cheek and dropped upon the stone upon which I was leaning, and I saw 
that the headstone was that of a young soldier, and I knew then I did 
not require law ; I knew then what was the remedy — My Country, 'Tis 
of Thee. Emotion, a tear, life, and that's what preparedness means — 
My Country, 'Tis of Thee. (Cheers and prolonged applause.) 

REMARKS BY TOASTMASTER. 

Compatriots, with this magnificent address by our good friend, the 
formal part of our program will be brought to a close ; but it seems to 
me that it would be most appropriate before we leave this room to all 
join in singing the hymn which he has quoted so eloquently, "My Coun- 
try. 'Tis of Thee," and after that I am going to ask our good friend, 
Doctor Kirbye, President of the Iowa Society, to dismiss us with a 
benediction. I want to remind you that we are going to Princeton 
tomorrow and to Trenton and we hope you will all go with us. It is 
going to be a wonderful experience and a great inspiration, and we 
beg of you, as many as possible, to join us tomorrow morning at the 
terminal of the Pennsylvania Railroad, just half a block east of this 
hotel, at nine-forty. 

(The hymn, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," was then sung.) 
Doctor Kirbye then pronounced the benediction, after which the 
Toastmaster announced, at request of the President General, that a 
meeting of the Board of Trustees would be held in that room imme- 
diately after adjournment. 



SOCIAL FUNCTIONS AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 2XO. 



CHURCH SERVICES AND OTHER FUNCTIONS AT 
NEWARK. 

On Saturday evening, May 13, delegates and lady guests arrived at 
the Robert Treat Hotel were informally received by the New Jersey 
Committee. On Sunday afternoon patriotic services were held in 
Trinity Episcopal Church, with a sermon by Bishop Edwin S. Lines, 
Chaplain of the New Jersey Society, reviewing the Colonial history of 
Newark. 

In the evening exercises were held at the Robert Treat Hotel, con- 
ducted by Rev. Dr. Kirbye. Past President General Thruston delivered 
an address on "The Origin and Evolution of the Flag," illustrated by 
about fifty reproductions in silk of flags of different periods. To the 
address as heretofore delivered at the Portland Congress and published 
in the National Year Book for 1915, Mr. Thruston added some facts 
since discovered, and mentioned in particular the following references 
to "Standards and Colors," found by Gen. Philip Reade among the 
Anthony Wayne papers at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia : 

Vol. XXI, Wayne MSS., p. 89: From Pittsburg, 13 Sept., 1792, 
Wayne wrote to H. Knox, Sec'y War, Phil^ : — 

"Standards, Batt n and Camp Colors are much wanted for parade and 
manceuvering." 

P. 112, Vol. XXI., Wayne MSS., 21 Sept., 1792, gives letter from 
Sec'y K. to W., page 4 of which — extract : 

"There were four excellent large standards forwarded the last year 
for the first regt. (Lt. Col. Josiah Harmon), and the second regt. (Maj. 
David Strong) and for the two regts. of (pa.) levies. They are now- 
packed up at Fort Washington (Cincinnati). 

"With some change of colouring as to denote the Sub Legions, they 
would answer perfectly for Sub Legionary standards. They were of 
silk, and were expensive; battalion colours shall be prepared and also 
camp colours. 

"The Legionary Standard, if approved by the President of the United 
States ought to be the representation of a bald Eagle as large as life, 
formed of Silver. If this idea should not be adopted, something of 
the flagg kind will be devised." 

Vol. XXI, p. 118, Hdqr. Pittsburg, 23 Sept., 1792. General Order by 
Wayne : — 

"The Qr. Air. Genl., (James O'Hara), will furnish sixteen Camp 
Colours the same distinguishing colours with those of the four Sub 
Legions ; i. e., four White ; four Red ; four Yellow, and four Green ; 
all to be painted and marked on each side thus ; 1st S. L., U. S. ; 2nd 
S. L., U. S.; 3rd S. L., U. S.; 4th S. L-, U. S. To be each 2 feet 
square, — the poles 8 feet high." 

Vol. XXV, Wayne MSS., P. 123 : Legionville, 30 March, 1793, Wayne 
to Knox, Sec'y War: 

"You promised to order and forward certain Sublegionary distinctive 
decorations, also a Legionary Standard and Sub Legionary and Bat- 
talion Colours; but I have not seen or heard anything further of these 
necessary articles. 



J220 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

"Do forward them : they shall not be lost, and we really want them 
for maneuvering." 

Knox to Wayne, 6 April, 1793 : 

"There are four elegant new silk standards at Fort Washington 
which were provided in the year 1791, and which were never used, and 
which I believe you will consider as answering the purpose of Sub 
Legionary Standards." 

Vol. XXVIII, p. 29: Wayne Manuscript: Hd. Qrs., Hobson's Choice, 
25 July, 1793- 
Parole Cork. Countersign, Cornwallis : 

"The Quartermaster General will immediately cause the words 1st 
Regiment: 2nd Regiment: 1st Levies: 2d Levies on the four Division 
Standards to be obliterated, — and substitute in their place 1st Sub 
Legion : 2d Sub Legion : 3d Sub Legion : 4th Sub Legion. 

''He will also procure the proper decorations and cases for each of 
them, the finest possible." 

Vol. XXVIII, P. 76: Ft. Hamilton, 16 Aug., 1793, Wilkinson to 
Wayne. 

"To Capt. (Howell or Thomas) Lewis (3d Rifle Batt" 3d Sub Le- 
gion) I have committed the Standards of the late 1st and 2d Regiments 
with orders to perish with his whole detachment, or deliver them in 
safety to your Excellency's hands." 

On Monday, at 1 o'clock, the lady guests accompanying the delegates, 
about no in all, were entertained at luncheon at the hotel. Mrs. Wil- 
liam dimming Story, Mrs. Raynor, President Adams, and President 
General Woodworth made brief addresses. 

In the afternoon, from 4 to 6 o'clock, Past President General Franklin 
Murphy gave a reception at his home in honor of the Congress. 

In the evening an elaborate reception was given in honor of the 
National Society officers in the ball-room. The principal feature of 
the occasion was an exhibition of the Ritual of The Washington Guard, 
written and conducted by the Governor General of the Guard, Com- 
patriot John Lenord Merrill. 

Tuesday afternoon, following the adjournment of the Congress, the 
delegates and guests were taken on an automobile trip to Washington's 
Headquarters at Morristown and to Eagle Rock. In the evening an 
elaborate banquet was given by the New Jersey Society, as described 
on a previous page. 



TRIP TO PRINCETON AND TRENTON. 

On Wednesday, May 17, members of the Congress and ladies accom- 
panying them were the guests of the New Jersey Society on a visit to 
Princeton and Trenton. The journey was made by special train, leav- 
ing Newark at 9.45 in the morning and returning there late in the 
afternoon. At Princeton the party was received in Nassau Hall by 
Rev. Sylvester Beach, D. D., and Dean William Francis Magie, of 
Princeton University. The Dean welcomed the Sons of the American 










■ 



V . ,. ... -E^= 






li 



. 



^ 



Y-Y^TT 



TABLET ON GRANITE MONUMENT AT TRENTON BARRACKS. 

Erected under the auspices of the Sons of the American Revolution, 

in National Congress assembled, Trenton, New Jersey, 

May 17, 1916. 



SOCIAL FUNCTIONS AT NEWARK CONGRESS. 221 

Revolution to Princeton and briefly reviewed the history of the uni- 
versity and its part during the Colonial and Revolutionary period. 
Doctor Beach told of the battles of the Revolution at Princeton and in 
vicinity and of some of the important operations of the British and 
American troops in New Jersey. A visit was made to the tomb of 
John Witherspoon and other eminent patriots in the old burying ground. 

Arriving at Trenton about 2 o'clock, the party marched from the 
railroad station to the Revolutionary Barracks, escorted by the Borden- 
town Military Cadets. After a lunch at the Barracks, there was un- 
veiled with appropriate ceremonies a bronze tablet, on a granite monu- 
ment about 10 feet high, presented by Past President General Thruston. 
Below the tablet are the words : "Erected under the auspices of the 
Sons of the American Revolution in National Congress assembled, 
Trenton, New Jersey, May 17, 1916." As the inscription reads, the 
tablet is "erected to commemorate that noble spirit of justice displayed 
by General Washington after his capture of Trenton in December, 1776, 
in returning to both the Whig and Tory alike their personal effects, of 
which they had been ruthlessly plundered by the British and Hessian 
troops after their capture of Fort Washington and during their inva- 
sion of the State of New Jersey. The loot was stored in the churches, 
jail, court-house, and old barracks, which buildings had been used as 
quarters by the foreign troops. This magnanimous act won many to 
the support of the American cause and secured to him the perpetual 
love and admiration of his countrymen." 

Brief remarks were made by President Adams, of the New Jersey 
Society, and Mr. Thruston. The monument was accepted by the Mayor 
of Trenton. President General Wentworth spoke on some of the 
characteristics of Washington and on the work of the Society; and the 
exercises concluded with a dedicatory prayer by Rev. Dr. J. Edward 
Kirbve, President of the Towa Societv. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 

ENROLLED FROM MAY 16, 1915, TO APRIL 30, 1916 

(Continued from 1915 Year Book) 



HOWARD BRIGGS ABBOTT, Dorchester, Mass. (27937). Son of Lewis Smith 
and Harriett J. (Briggs) Abbott; grandson of Elisha Abbott; great-grandson of 
Ebenezer Abbott, private, Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regt. Mass. Volunteer Infan- 
try; grandson of Erastus and Sally (Hunt) Briggs; great-grandson of Richard 
and M. Betsey (Brock) Briggs; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Briggs, private, 
Col. Benjamin Simonds's Mass. Regt. 

FRANK S. ADAMS, Boston, Mass. (4873). Supplementals. Son of William and 
Eliza Mack (Clark) Adams; grandson of Jonathan and Ruth (Hall) Adams; 
great-grandson of Josiah (and Ruth French) Hall, private, Col. Thomas Stick- 
ney's New Hampshire Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Jabez French, Signer of New 
Hampshire Association; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Hall, private, Col. Benja- 
min Bellows's New Hampshire Regt. 

W. I. LINCOLN ADAMS, Montclair, N. J. (6124). Supplementals. Son of 
Washington Irving and Marion Lydia (Briggs) Adams; grandson of George 
and Charlotte (Sweet) Briggs; great-grandson of Edmund D. and Mary 
(Gutihes) Briggs; great-'-grandson of George Briggs, private, Capt. Simeon 
Martin's Company, Colonel Lippitt's Rhode Island Regt., also drummer and 
fifer, Colonel Waterman's Rhode Island Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Richard 
Briggs, private, Colonel Cook's Rhode Island Regt. and Colonel Elliott's Regt. 
Rhode Island Artillery; grandson of Barnabas Seaman and Elizabeth (Carhart) 
Adams; great-grandson of Jessy and Mary (Secor) Adams; great--grandson of 
Jesse Adams, private, Col. James Holmes's Fourth Regt. New York Line. 

•GEORGE ADDLEMAN, Chicago, 111. (27602). Son of Joseph Pyle and Emily W. 
(Jones) Addleman; grandson of William and Abigail (Hall) Jones; great- 
grandson of Percival Hall, Surgeon's Mate, Col. Ebenezer Learned's Mass. 
Regt. 

ARTHUR GARFIELD AKELY, Portland, Me. (26073). Son of Eugene Melvin 
and Abbie (Sufkin) Akely; grandson of George H. and Elmira (Penley) 
Akely; great-grandson of John and Vesta (Abbott) Ackley; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel Ackley. private, Capt. Thomas Jackson's Company, Colonel Crane's 
Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

FRED HASSAN ALDERMAN, Sharon, Pa. (28676). Son of Augustus and Eliza- 
beth (Hassan) Alderman; grandson of Arannah and Eunice Tuttle (Munson) 
Alderman; great-grandson of Jesse and Polly (Hill) Munson; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Munson, private Tenth Regt. Conn.* Militia. 

WILLIAM HENRY ALEXANDER, New York, N. Y. (27640). Son of William 
Pomeroy and Elizabeth F. D. (Stebbins) Alexander; grandson of Henry and 
Amelia (Bowles) Alexander; great-grandson of Henry and Nancy (Bemis'> 
Alexander: great 2 -grandson of Medad and Eunice (Stratton) Alexander; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Alexander, Captain, Col. Israel Chapman's Third Mass. 
Regt., pensioned. 

FREDERIC WINTHROP ALLEN, New York, N. Y. (Mass. 27554). Son of 
Melzar and Martha (Metcalf) Allen; grandson of Lemuel and Adeline (Fisher) 
Allen; great-grandson of Daniel and Patience (Carpenter) Allen; great-grand- 
son of Joshua Allen, private, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt. and other service, 

(223) 



224 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GEORGE HILL ALLEN, Sharon, Pa. (28047). Son of John C. and Mary (Mc 
Cormick) Allen; grandson of Adam Hill and Margaret (Russell) McCormick; 
great-grandson of Alexander and Euphemia (Hill) McCormick; great 2 -grandsom 
of Adam Hill, private Fifth Penna. Regt., Col. Francis Johnston. 

HENRY BUSHNELL ALLEN. Des Moines, Iowa (27655). Son of Joshua Fair- 
hank and Sarah Vienna (Washburne) Allen; grandson of Freeman and Vienna 
(Wright) Washburne; great-grandson of Samuel Wright, private, Col. Joseph: 
Spencer's Conn. Regt. and Fourth Regt. Conn. Line. 

JOHN HERBERT ALLEN, Walpole, Mass. (27555). Son of Samuel and Ellen M. 
(Baker) Allen, Jr.; grandson of Samuel and Martha (Carpenter) Allen; great- 
grandson of Joshua Allen, private, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt. and other 
service. 

MAURICE ALLEN, Toledo, Ohio (27749)- Son of Horace Newton and Frances 
Ann (Messenger) Allen; grandson of Horace and Jane Montgomery (Riley) 
Allen; great-grandson of Heber and Anna Nancy (Hall) Allen; great 2 -grandson 
of Heber Allen, Major Vermont Militia; grandson of Bille Norman. and EHza< 
(Hamer) Messenger; great-grandson of Bille and Martha (Patty Harris) Mes- 
senger; great--grandson of Bille Messenger, Sergeant, Col. Benjamin Simonds's 
Mass. Regt. 

PHILIP R. ALLEN, Walpole, Mass. (27556). Son of Melzar W. and Martha. 
(Metcalf) Allen; grandson of Lemuel and Adeline (Fisher) Allen; great- 
grandson of Daniel and Patience (Carpenter) Allen; great--grandson of Joshua 
Allen, private, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt. and other service. 

WALTER BAKER ALLEN, Walpole, Mass. (27762). Son of Samuel and Ellen 
M. (Baker) Allen, Jr.; grandson of Samuel and Martha (Carpenter) Allen; 
great-grandson of Joshua Allen, private, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt. and' 
other service. 

CHARLES BOOTHE ALLING, Montclair, N. J. (28361). Son of Charles Henry 
and Josephine Slade (Hill) Ailing; grandson of Charles Beebe and Julia Maria 
(Prudden) Ailing; great-grandson of Charles W r yllis and Lucy (Booth) Ailing; 
great 2 -grandson of Walter Booth, Sergeant, Col. Samuel B. Webb's Conn. Regt. 

CLARENCE WILLIS ALLING, Newark, N. J. (28488). Son of Horace and: 
Julia Etta (Ball) Ailing; grandson of David and Eunice (Roberts) Ailing;, 
great-grandson of Isaac Ailing, private, Capt. James Wheeler's Company New 
Jersey Minute Men: great--grandson of John and Martha (Crane) Ailing;. 
great 3 -grandson of Samuel Ailing, private, Capt. James Wheeler's Company 
New Jersey Minute Men. 

GEORGE PETER ALLING, Glen Ridge, N. J. (27690). Son of George Bidwell 
and Kate (Doran) Ailing; grandson of Russell and Jeannette B. (Dorman)' 
Ailing: great-grandson of Ichabod Ailing, private, Capt. Jonas Prentice's Com- 
pany, Col. William Douglas's Fifth Battalion, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

ROBERT JOSEPH ALLYN, Hartford, Conn. (27963). Son of Robert and Jlelle- 
(Main) Allyn; grandson of Timothy Mather and Susan Ann (Pratt) Allyn;: 
great-grandson of Job Allyn, Sergeant Second Conn. Continental Regt., Col. 
Joseph Spencer. 

JOHN NORTON AMES, Oregon, Wis. (27074). Born July 7, 1822. Son of 
David II. and Betsey (Norton) Ames; grandson of Nathaniel Ames, private, 
Colonel Ledyard's Regt. Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOSEPH BUSHNELL AMES, Morristown, N. J. (28162). Son of Elias Hurlbufc 
and Eleanor Gray (Bushnell) Ames; grandson of Frederick W T illiam and Mary 
(Hurlbut) Ames; great-grandson of Charles and Harriet (Ashmun) Ames; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Ashmun, private, Col. John McKinstry's New York: 
Regt., pensioned. 

E. MALCOLM ANDERSON, Chicago. 111. (27601). Son of George W. and Jessie 
Phelps (Randall) Anderson; grandson of Augustus Granville and Mary Shan- 
non (Sanders) Randall; great-grandson of Nathan and Susanna (Creach) Ran- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 225 

dall; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Randall, private, Col. John Jacobs's Mass. Regt., 
pensioned. 

JOHN MALCOLM ANDERSON, Carlinville, 111. (28007). Son of John C. and 
Lucy Williams (Boddie) Anderson; grandson of Willie P. and Martha Rivers 
(McNeill) Boddie; great-grandson of George and Lucy (Williams) Boddie; 
great 2 -grandson of Nathan Boddie, Member North Carolina Provincial Con- 
gress, 1776. 

RANDALL ANDERSON, Chicago, 111. (27400). Son of George W. and Jessie 
Phelps (Randall) Anderson; grandson of Augustus Granville and Mary Shan- 
non (Sanders) Randall; great-grandson of Nathan and Susanna (Creach) Ran- 
dall; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Randall, private, Col. John Jacobs's Mass. Regt., 
pensioned. 

GEORGE LORENZO ANTHONY, Milton, Mass. (27938). Son of William H. 
and Josephine A. (Griffin) Anthony; grandson of George A. and Sarah E- 
(Luther) Griffin; great-grandson of Jannes Luther, private, Col. Archibald 
Crary's Second Rhode Island State Regt. 

WILLIAM ADDISON RICHARDS ANTHONY, Wellesley, Mass. (27553). Son 
of William H. and Josephine A. (Griffin) Anthony; grandson of George A. and 
Sarah E. (Luther) Griffin; great-grandson of James Luther, private, Capt. Wm. 
Lawler's Company, Col. Archibald Crary's Rhode Island Regt. 

RICHARD HERBERT ARMS, Grand Junction, Colo. (26686). Son of Richard 
Catlin and Ellen Maria (Root) Arms; grandson of Christopher Tyler and 
Avice (Stebbins) Arms; great-grandson of Joseph Stebbins, Captain Fifth 
Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GUY NORSE ARMSTRONG, Chicago, 111. (26477). Supplemental. Son of 
Henry Sweppe and Geraldine (Duval) Armstrong; grandson of Theodore and 
Emily Williamson (Rhodes) Duval; great-grandson of Daniel and Catherine 
(Caro) Duval; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Duval {Davol), Captain of Rhode 
Island Flotilla. 

RICARDO FUERTOS ARMSTRONG, New Haven, Conn. (27964). Son of 
Philando and Catherine Boughton (Bradley) Armstrong; grandson of John 
and Mary (Smith) Armstrong; great-grandson of Jeremiah Smith, Corporal, 
Capt. Phineas Bradley's Company Conn. Militia. 

PERRY W. ARNER, Havelock, Nebr. (27312). Son of Elias and Frances Ellen 
(Dull) Arner; grandson of Daniel and Mary (Hoffman) Arner; great-grandson 
of Paul and Elizabeth (Gilmore) Arner; great 2 -grandson of Martin Arner, 
Third Northampton County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

FRANCIS JOHN ARTHUR, Schenectady, N. Y. (27647)- Son of William Alex- 
ander Grant and Eliza (Smith) Arthur; grandson of John and Hannah (Cron- 
ing) Smith, 3rd; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Callender) Smith, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of John (and Sarah Doolittle) Smith, Lieutenant, Col. Artemus 
Ward's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Ephraim Doolittle, Colonel 
Mass. Militia. 

ALBERT HENRY RANDOLPH ATWOOD, Chicago, 111. (27399). Son of Joseph 
S. and Eliza H. (Smith) Atwood; grandson of Joseph and Mary (Smith) 
Atwood; great-grandson of Joseph Atwood, private, Col. Samuel Wyllys's Third 
Regt. Conn. Line. 

EVERETT CICERO BABCOCK, Lincoln, Nebr. (27310). Son of Heman A. and 
Retta O. (Bristol) Babcock; grandson of George C. and Almira Ruth (Brown) 
Babcock; great-grandson of John and Damarius (Crandall) Babcock; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph Babcock, private, Capt. Edward Bliven's Company, Col. 
Joseph Noyes's Regt. Rhode Island Militia. 

HENRY AME BABCOCK, Rushville, 111. (27385). Son of Henry Allen and Birdie 
(Ball) Babcock; grandson of Joseph Taylor and Nancy (Buckley) Ball; great- 
grandson of Elijah and Mary Ann (Duvall) Ball; great 2 -grandson of Jacob 
Duvall, Ensign and Lieutenant Prince George County Maryland Militia 



226 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM H. BACHELER, Summit, N. J. (27509). Son of Henry Martyn and 
Eliza (Dean) Bacheler; grandson of Otis Robinson and Sarah Parker (Merrill) 
Bacheler; great-grandson of Odlin Prescott and Huldah (Searle) Bachelor; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Bachelor (Batchelder), Sergeant New Hampshire 
Militia, Ensign New Hampshire Line; grandson of Benjamin Spinning and 
Phoebe (Badgley) Dean; great-grandson of John Squire and Hannah (Sturges) 
Badgley; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Badgley, private Essex County New 
Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Asa and Esther (Fowler) Merrill; great 2 - 
grandson of Ford and Betsey (Merrill) Merrill; great°-grandson of James 
Merrill, Signer of New Hampshire -Association. 
FRANCIS McNEIL BACON, Jr., New York, N. Y. (27641). Son of Francis 
McNeil and Margaret (Rogers) Bacon; grandson of Dora Baldwin and Sarah 
Ann (Hammond) Bacon; great-grandson of Rufus Bacon, private in Sutton 
Company Mass. Militia. 
JAMES FREDERICK BACON, Short Hills, N. J. (N. Y. 27642). Son of Fran- 
cis McNeil and Margaret (Rogers) Bacon; grandson of Lora Baldwin and 
Sarah Ann (Hammond) Bacon; great-grandson of Ritfus Bacon, private in 
Sutton Company Mass. Militia. 
ERNEST NEWTON BAGG, West Springfield, Mass. (27934). Son of James 
Newton and Mary Sears (Loomis) Bagg; grandson of James and Sibyl Ely 
(Taylor) Bagg; great-grandson of Dan and Sibyl (Ely) Taylor; great-grand- 
son of Joel Ely, private, Col. Ebenezer Wood's Third Regt. Vermont Militia. 
CHARLES ALFRED BAHRENBURG, Newark, N. J. (28702). Son of Henry W. 
and Jessie A. (Gahagan) Bahrenburg; grandson of James Charles and Hannah 
P. (Atcherson) Gahagan; great-grandson of Ephraim and Miriam (Tilton) 
Atcherson; great 2 -grandson of Peter and Miriam (Tompson) Tilton; great 3 - 
grandson of John Tilton, private. Col. George Taylor's New Jersey Regt. 
CHARLES OLIN BAILEY, Jr., Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27286). Son of Charles 
Olin and Mary S. (Merklee) Bailey; grandson of Joseph Mead and Anna 
(Olin) Bailey; great-grandson of Aaron and Maria (Braman) Bailey, Jr.; 
great'-'-grandson of Aaron and Mary (Winchester) Bailey; great 3 -grandson of 
Jonathan Winchester, private, Col. David Gilman's New Hampshire Regt. 
FREDERICK AUGUSTINE BAILEY, Springfield, Mass. (28235). Son of Samuel 
Reed and Lydia Ann (Little) Bailey; grandson of Joshua and Sally (Johnson) 
Little; great-grandson of Abijah and Lydia (Noyes) Little; great 2 -grandson of 
Joshua Little, Lieutenant Second Lincoln County Regt. Mass. Militia. 
GUY WINFRED BAILEY, Essex Junction, Vt. (27485). Son of John Winthrop 
and Laura (Cahill) Bailey; grandson of Abijah and Margaret M. Bailey; 
great-grandson of Philander Bailey; great 2 -grandson of Abijah Bailey, private, 
Capt. Nehemiah Lovewell's Company Vermont Militia. 
DAVID J. BAKER, Lieut. Col., 21st U. S. Infantry, Springfield, 111. (Ore. 28406). 
Son of David J. and Elizabeth S. (White) Baker; grandson of David J. and 
Sarah S. (Fairchild) Baker; great-grandson of Bayze Baker; great 2 -grandson 
of David Baker, First Lieutenant Ninth Mass. Regt. 
JOHN EUGENE BAKER, Detroit, Mich. (28128). Son of Alfred M. and Jose- 
phine P. (Wetherby) Baker; grandson of John and Nancy (Callender) Baker; 
great-grandson of Nathan and Thirza (Wetherby) Callender; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Callender, Sergeant, Col. Stephen Moylan's Fourth Continental 
Dragoons, pensioned. 
WARREN BAKER, Paterson, N. J. (27523). Son of George A. H. and Caroline 
J. (Mills) Baker; grandson of Walter Norman and Caroline J. (Smith) Mills; 
great-grandson of Alpheus and Sophia (Wescott) Smith; great 2 -grandson of 
Reuben and Willoughby (Corliss) Smith; great 3 -grandson of Nathan Smith, 
Second Lieutenant, Capt. Lemuel Stewart's Company Mass. Militia. 
RALPH EMERSON BALCH, Kalamazoo, Mich. (27471 )• Son of Arad Chickenng 
and Elizabeth O. (Emerson) Balch; grandson of Daniel and Hannah (Poole) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 227 

Emerson; great-grandson of Daniel and Esther (Frothingham) Emerson; great-- 
grandson of Daniel Emerson, Captain, Col. Hercules Mooney's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

HOWARD BALDWIN, Summit, N. J. (28360). Son of Frederick Wellington and 
Mary Augusta (Wheeler) Baldwin; grandson of Samuel A. and Eetetia Davis 
(Ward) Baldwin; great-grandson of Abram K. and Abby (Ailing) Ward; 
great 2 -grandson of John Ailing, Lieutenant, Col. Jeduthan Baldwin's Artillery 
Artificer Regt. 

DAVID WASHBURN BALE, East Orange, N. J. (28359)- Son of Jeremiah Price 
and Lydia Maria (Washburn) Ball; grandson of Archibald and Sarah Gibbs 
(Price) Ball; great-grandson of George and Elizabeth (Price) Ball; great 2 - 
grandson of Stephen Ball, Surgeon's Mate First Regt. New Jersey Continental 
Line; grandson of Silas and Lydia (Baldwin) Washburn; great-grandson of 
Joseph Washburn, private, Lieut. Col. James Hamman's New York Regt.; 
great 2 -grandson of Silas Washburn, private, Col. James Hamman's New York 
Regt. 

FRED CLAIR BALL, Lexington, Mass. (27558). Son of Alfred Henry and Caro- 
line (Taylor) Ball; grandson of Stephen Munn and Lucinda (Guile) Ball; 
great-grandson of Marmaduke and Rebecca (Messenger) Ball; g'eat' J -grandson 
of Lcbbeus Ball, Major Fourth Regt. Mass. Continental Line. 

FREDERIC DUNHAM BALL, Clinton, 111. (28280). Son of Fred and Ivanilla 
(Dunham) Ball; grandson of William Williams and Roxanna Carolina (Cush- 
man) Dunham; great-grandson of Jeremiah Perry and Eliza (Cantrell) Dun- 
ham; great 2 -grandson of William Williams and Mary (Greenman) Dunham; 
great 3 -grandson of Jeremiah and Mary (Eddy) Greenman; great'-grandson of 
Jeremiah Greenman, Lieutenant, Adjutant, First Rhode Island Regt., pensioned. 

JOHN GUERIN BALL, South Orange, N. J. (27777). Son of Philander and 
Sarah Ann (Guerin) Ball; grandson of Joseph B. and Eunice (Harrison) Ball; 
great-grandson of Joseph Ball, private, Capt. Samuel Pierson's Company, Van 
Courtlandt's Battalion Essex County New Jersey Militia; grandson of Aram and 
Nancy (Johnson) Guerin; great-grandson of Joshua Guerin, private Morris 
County New Jersey Militia. 

LELAND CHANDLER BALL, Sewickley, Pa. (28044). Son of Richmond Fisk 
and Helen (Gillespie) Ball; grandson of Lemuel Burke and Mary V. (Fisk) 
Ball; great-grandson of L. Chandler and Marcia Ann (Parsons) Ball; great 2 - 
grandson of Lemuel and Lucina (Chandler) Ball; great s -grandson of David 
Ball, private, minute man, Bristol County Mass. Militia. 

ALBERT WORDEN BALLENTINE, Montclair, N. J. (28612). Son of William 
H. and Annie B. (McMurtrie) Ballentine; grandson of William Bradford and 
Angeline (Van Dorn) McMurtrie; great-grandson of Ferdinand and Phebe 
Southard (Woodward) Van Dorn; great 2 -grandson of William Aaron and Elsie 
(Sutton) Van Dorn; great 3 -grandson of Aaron Van Dorn, private, Capt. John 
Sebring's Company, Somerset County New Jersey Militia. 

RALPH STEWARD BARDWELL, Seattle, Wash. (27896). Son of Francis U. 
and Nancy H. (Newhall) Bardwell; grandson of George and Elizabeth (Har- 
rington) Newhall; great-grandson of Timothy and Eunice (Curtine) Newhall; 
great-grandson of Ezra Newhall, private, Col. John Greaton's Mass. Regt., 
died in service. 

ABNER HAROLD BARKER, Medford, Mass. (27772). Son of Noah Wentworth 
and Abigail Ann (Kimball) Barker; grandson of Charles and Saloma (Hasty) 
Kimball; great-grandson of Peter Sanborn and Abigail (Dean) Kimball; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph KJknball, Corporal, Capt. Jesse Page's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

EDGAR RICHARDS BARKER, Providence, R. I. (27182). Son of Stephen Albro 
and Annette (Richards) Barker; grandson of Jesse Fisher and Betsey (Jillson) 
Richards; great-grandson of Jesse Richards, private, Col. Ebenezer Francis's 



228 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mass. Regt. and other service; great 2 -grandson of Edward Richards, Member 
of Committee of Safety, Attleboro, Mass., also private, Colonel Carpenter's 
Mass. Regt. 

MILTON REED BARKER, Chicago, 111. (27386). Son of Isaac and Abigail Tay- 
lor (Nesmith) Barker; grandson of Peter Barker, private, Capt. John Davis's 
Company, Col. James Frye's Mass. Regt. ; grandson of James and Polly 
(Taylor) Nesmith; great-grandson of Jonathan and Eleanor (Dickey) Nesmith; 
great 2 -grandson of James Nesmith, private, Capt. Geo. Reid's Company, Col. 
John Stark's Regt., and Col. David Gilman's Regt. New Hampshire Line. 

TERRY JAMES BARKER, Grand Rapids, Mich. (28133). Son of David Fancher 
and Puella L. (Terry) Barker; grandson of Marcus and Laura (Fancher) 
Barker; great-grandson of David and Polly (Sedgewick) Fancher; great-grand- 
son of Jonathan and Deborah (Sedgewick) Sedgewick; great 3 -grandson of 
Samuel Sedgzvick, private, Capt. John Barnard's Company Conn. Militia. 

FRANK P. BARNARD, Worcester, Mass. (27557). Son of Frederick F. and 
Olive J. (Moffitt) Barnard; grandson of Pliny M. and Adaline D. E. (Hum- 
phrey) Moffitt; great-grandson of Stephen F. and Roxanna (Brown) Humphrey; 
great 3 -grandson of Stephen and Molly (Robbins) Humphrey; great 3 -grandson 
of Ebenezer Humphrey, Captain Thirteenth Company Fifth Worcester County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ELMER CLARK BARNES, Denver, Colo. (26698). Son of Sylvester E. and 
Rosamond (Packard) Barnes, Jr.; grandson of Sylvester and Esther (Treat) 
Barnes; great-grandson of John Treat, private Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HARRY EUGENE BARNES, Denver, Colo. (26699). Son of Sylvester E- and 
Rosamond (Packard) Barnes, Jr.; grandson of Sylvester and Esther (Treat) 
Barnes; great-grandson of John Treat, private Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HOWARD TURNER BARNES, Montreal, Canada (Mass. 27775). Son of William 
Sullivan and Mary Alice (Turner) Barnes; grandson of Charles Augustus and 
Mary A. (Cummings) Turner; great-grandson of Abel and Alice (Rogers) 
Turner; great 2 -grandson of Job Turner, private, Colonel Bailey's Mass. Regt.; 
great 3 -grandson of John Turner, private, Col. William Weston's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

RAYMOND PACKARD BARNES, Denver, Colo. (26700). Son of Sylvester E. 
and Rosamond (Packard) Barnes, Jr.; grandson of Sylvester and Esther 
(Treat) Barnes; great-grandson of John Treat, private Eighteenth Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

WILLIAM GREER BARNES, Cleveland, Ohio (27745). Son of William Thomas 
and Almead (Greer) Barnes; grandson of John and Christiana (Haughey) 
Barnes; great-grandson of Thomas and Jane (McClain) Barnes; great-grand- 
son of John Barnes, Captain Charlotte County New York Militia. 

KARL JACKSON BARR, Paris, 111. (27820). Son of James D. and Harriet Dell 
(Wilson) Barr; grandson of Andrew Jackson and Maria Rebecca (Thomas) 
Barr; great-grandson of Michael and Nancy (Johnson) Barr; great 2 -grandson 
of Hugh Barr, private, Col. James Converse's and Col. Nathan Sparhawk's 
Mass. Regts. 

JOHN ALBERT BARTLETT, Brockton, Mass. (27445)- Son of John and Martha 
E. (McMillen) Bartlett; grandson of George W. and Harriet N. (Foster) 
Bartlett; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Martha (Manley) Bartlett; great 2 - 
grandson of Benjamin Bartlett, Jr., private, Capt. Peter Talbot's Company, 
Col. L. Robinson's Mass. Regt., Lexington Alarm; great 3 -grandson of Benjamin 
Bartlett, Sr., private, Capt. Simeon Leach's Company, Col. Benjamin Gill's 
Mass. Regt. 

JOHN TRACY BARTON, Milton, Ore. (27583). Son of James Henry and Olive 
Jane (Shumway) Barton; grandson of James and Matilda (Mock) Shumway; 
great-grandson of Alvah and Rhoda (Quick) Shumway; great 2 -grandson of 
Reuben Shumway, private, Col. EHsha Porter's Worcester County Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 229 

LAURISTON LEVI BASSETT, Sheldon, Iowa (27657). Son of Larenzo S. and 
Almira J. (Edson) Bassett; grandson of Silas and Pamelia (Bradford) Bassett; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Mary Mahew (Tilton) Bassett; great 2 -grandson 
of John Bassett, private, Capt. Nathan Smith's Company Mass. Militia. 

CLIFTON EATON BATCHELLER, Portland, Me. (28306). Son of Joseph T. 
and Maria Francis (Eaton) Batcheller; grandson of Josiah and Olive Stetson 
(Lyon) Batcheller; great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Trull) Batcheller; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Merrey) Batcheller; great 3 -grandson 
of Benjamin Batchelder, private, Captain Felton's Militia Company and Capt. 
Edward Fettyplace's Company Mass. Coast Guards. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BAUM, Salt Lake City, Utah (28177)- Son of Frank 
and Eliza (McHaffie) Baura; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Sandusky) 
Baum; great-grandson of Charles and Susan (Moier), Baum; great 2 -grandson 
of Charles Baum, private Second Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES MERRITT BEACH, New Milford, Conn. (27334). Son of Merritt 
and Mary Esther (Hollister) Beach; grandson of Preston Sherman and Lois 
(Ford) Hollister; great-grandson of Gideon Hollister, private, Captain Sloper's 
Company, Major Sheldon's Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 

EDWIN ELY BEACH, Summit, N. J. (28703). Son of George Hughes and 
Martha (Christopher) Beach; grandson of Samuel and Alice (Baird) Christo- 
pher; great-grandson of Abraham Dubois and Sarah (Morgan) Baird; great-- 
grandson of John Baird, Captain Second Somerset County Battalion New 
Jersey Militia. 

SYLVESTER WOODBRIDGE BEACH, Princeton, N. J. (27513). Son of Charles 
and Frances Coleman (Woodbridge) Beach; grandson of Sylvester and Eliza- 
beth (Gould) Woodbridge; great-grandson of Sylvester and Mindwell (Lyman) 
Woodbridge; great 2 -grandson of Elias Lyman, Member of Committee of Corre- 
spondence, Inspection, and Safety, Northampton, Mass., 1775, Representative 
in Massachusetts Provincial Congress, May 31 to July 19, 1775. 

BENJAMIN LLOYD BEALL, Salem, Ore. (27600). Son of Alfred Taylor and 
Elizabeth (Mills) Beall; grandson of Benjamin Lloyd and Elizabeth (Taylor) 
Beall; great-grandson of William Dent Beall, Major Second Maryland Regt. 

RICHARD JONES BEALL, Washington, D. C. (27987). Son of Richard Jones 
and Cornelia (Edmonston) Beall; grandson of Nathan and Rebecca (Follin) 
Beall; great-grandson of John Follin, sailor Virginia Navy, prisoner in England. 

FREDERICK STARR BEARDSLEY, Stratford, Conn. (27335)- Son of Frederick 
Josiah and Margaret (Edmond) Beardsley; grandson of David and Rebecca 
(Starr) Beardsley; great-grandson of Curtis Beardsley, Corporal, Capt. Na- 
thaniel Wheeler's Company, Col. Ichabod Lewis's Conn. Regt.; great 2 -grandson 
of Abraham Beardsley, State Inspector of Gunpowder, private in Capt. James 
Booth's "Larm Company" of Connecticut. 

LAKE M. BECHTELL, Prineville, Ore. (26449). Son of Luther M. and Lida A. 
Bechtell; grandson of Martin M. and Elizabeth (Neff) Bechtell; great-grandson 

of and (Webster) Neff; great 2 -grandson of John Batcman Webster, 

Captain Penna. Artillery. 

CLARENCE ABBOTT BECKWITH, Schenectady, N. Y. (27529). Son of Theo- 
dore Ira and Mary A. (Abbott) Beckwith; grandson of Ira and Mary (Ham- 
man) Beckwith; great-grandson of Marvin and Rebecca (Plant) Beckwith; 
great 2 -grandson of Marvin Beckwith, Ensign Fourth Company Fifteenth Regt. 
Conn. State Troops. 

MOODY HAZEN BEDELL, Boston, Mass. (28506). Son of Hazen and Caroline 
(Pierce) Bedel; grandson of Hazen and Ann S. (Lombard) Bedel; great- 
grandson of Moody and Mary (Hunt) Bedel; great 2 -grandson of Timothy 
Bedel, Colonel New Hampshire Militia. 

CHARLES E. BEERY, Canal Winchester, Ohio (27727). Son of Ezra F. and 
Elizabeth (Courtright) Beery, grandson of Jesse Drake and Sarah (Stout) 



23O SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Courtright; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Grubb) Courtright; great 2 - 
grandson of Abram Van Kampen and Effie (Drake) Courtright; great-grand- 
son of John Courtright, Captain-Major Third Battalion Sussex County New 
Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES BELL, Herkimer, N. Y. (27627). Son of Warner and Susan (Brown) 
Bell; grandson of Nicholas and Margaret (Getman) Bell; great-grandson of 
Philip and Dorothy (Hilts) Bell; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Bell, private, Colonel 
Bellinger's New York Regt., also in Mohawk's Rangers, pensioned; great 2 - 
grandson of Nicholas Hilts, private, Colonel Bellinger's Tryon County Regt. 
New York Militia. 

HORACE REID BENEDICT, Roselle, N. J. (28354). Son of James Lawrence 
and Christiana Grant (Purdy) Benedict; gi-andson of Joseph and Betsey 
(Brinckerhoff) Benedict; great-grandson of Timothy and Phoebe (Rockwell) 
Benedict; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Benedict, Captain Fourth Regt. New York 
Continental Line. 

PURDY FAITOUTE BENEDICT, Roselle, N. J. (27797). Son of James Law- 
rence and Lizzie Josephine (Faitoute) Benedict; grandson of James Lawrence 
and Christiana Grant (Purdy) Benedict; great-grandson of Joseph and Betsey 
(Brinckerhoff) Benedict; great 2 -grandson of Timothy and Phoebe (Rockwell") 
Benedict; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Benedict, Captain Fourth Regt. New York 
Continental Line. 

EDWARD J. BENNETT, Indianapolis, Ind. (27712). Son of Henry W. and 
Ariana (Holliday) Bennett; grandson of William Henry and Helen Louise 
(Root) Bennett; great-grandson of Henry and Sarah Anna (Tracy) Bennett; 
great 2 -grandson of Nedabiah W. and Catherine (Combs) Bennett; great-grand- 
son of Robert Bennett, Lieutenant First Company of Militia of Smithfield, 
Rhode Island. 

LEROY WILLIAM BENNETT, Chicago, 111. (Wis. 27059). Son of Charles Eu- 
gene and Hannah M. Kirkwood (Loring) Bennett; grandson of Azariah and 
Margaret Gillespie (McCune) Loring; great-grandson of James and Hannah 
Maria (Kirkwood) McCune; great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Margaret (Gil- 
lespie) Kirkwood; great 3 -grandson of Robert Kirkwood, Captain, Colonel Has- 
lett's Delaware Regt. 

CHARLES CARPENTER BENSON, Milwaukee, Wis. (27067). Son of Robert 
Cootes and Katherine (Gates) Benson; grandson of James Proctor and Cath- 
erine Brooks (Taylor) Gates; great-grandson of John and Susan (Putnam) 
Gates; great 2 -grandson of Amos and Lydia (Hovey) Putnam; great 3 -grandson 
of John Putnam, Captain of Danvers Company Mass. Militia, marched April 
19, 1775- 

CYRUS BENSON, Summit, N. J. (27781). Son of Zeno and Sybyl (Edson) 
Benson; grandson of Ephriam and Mary (Howard) Edson; great-grandson of 
Simeon and Hannah (Bartlett) Howard; great 2 -grandson of Eliakini Hozvard, 
Captain, Col. Edward Mitchell's and other Mass. Regts. 

HUGH BRENT BENTON, New York, N. Y. (27832). Son of William Azro and 
Mittie Elizabeth (Robinson) Benton; grandson of Azro and Eliza Ann (Bur- 
roughs) Benton; great-grandson of Felix Benton, private Berkshire County 
Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

HARRY BENTZ, Montclair, N J. (28369). Son of Peter and Ellen Gilder 
(Griffith) Bentz; grandson of Allen and Mary Ashbury (Stansbury) Griffith; 
great-grandson of William and Ellen Kent (Gilder) Stansbury; great 2 -grandson 
of Reuben Gilder, Surgeon Delaware Regt. 

FRANK LESLIE BERGEN, Burlington, Colo. (111. 27603). Son of Erasmus T. 
and Lou (Yount) Bergen; grandson of George W. and Ann M. C. (Redmon) 
Yount; great-grandson of George Redmon, private and waggoner, Colonel 
Pinckney's South Carolina Regt. and Colonel Richardson's North Carolina 
Regt., pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 231 

LUTHER MELANCHTON BERNHEISEL, Chicago, 111. (27387). Son of Solo- 
mon and Hannah (Dunkleberger) Bernheisel; grandson of John (and Catherine 
Loy) Bernheisel, private Fifth Berks County Regt. Penna. Militia; grandson 
of John and Catherine (Sunday) Dunkleberger; great-grandson of Clemens 
Dunkelberger, private Berks County Penna. Militia; great-grandson of Michael 
Loy, private, Captain Dehuff's Company Lancaster County Penna. Militia and 
Samuel John Atlee's Battalion of Musketry. 

GEORGE ALBERT BERRY, Jr., Chicago, 111. (2801 1). Son of George Albert 
and Gertrude (Pike) Berry; grandson of George and Susan Bartlett (Allen) 
Berry; great-grandson of John and Susan (Bartlett) Allen; great 2 -grandson of 
Joshua and Miriam (Keating) Bartlett; great 3 -grandson of Richard Keating, 
private, Col. Samuel McCobb's Mass. Regt. ; great a -grandson of Samuel Bart- 
lett, Sergeant, Col. Edward Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

SAMUEL WESLEY BERRY, Roxbury. Mass. (27763). Son of Nathaniel Wesley 
and Martha Elizabeth (Saul) Berry; grandson of Nathaniel and Oliva (Cush- 
man) Berry; great-grandson of Azel and I,uranna (Wood) Cushman; great-- 
grandson of Consider Cushman, private, Capt. Moses Harvey's Company, Col- 
onel Woodbridge's Mass. Regt.; grandson of John and Martha (Foye) Saul; 
great-grandson of Joseph Saul, seaman on ship "Salem Packet," commanded 
by Capt. Joseph Cook. 

GEORGE MILLER BETTS, Schenectady, N. Y. (27530). Son of Charles Henry 
and Martha Matilda (Miller) Betts; grandson of Phila and Eleanor (Arnold) 
Betts; great-grandson of Simeon and Margaret (Ward) Arnold; great 2 -grandson 
of John Ward, private First Regt. New York Line and Third Regt. Albany 
County Militia. 

HARRY EMERSON BICKNELL, Northampton, Mass. (20223). Supplemental. 
Son of Luke Emerson and Lucretia T. (Pierce) Bicknell; grandson of Loring 
and Mary Ann (Abbott) Bicknell; great-grandson of Otis and Molly (Stoddard) 
Bicknell; great-grandson of Nathaniel Bicknell, Ensign serving as private in 
Col. Edward Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM SHEPARD BIDDLE, Jr., Portland, Ore. (27954). Son of William 
Shephard and Susan (Ogden) Biddle; grandson of John and Eliza (Bradish) 
Biddle; great-grandson of Charles Biddle, private, Captain Cowperthwaite's 
Company of Quaker Light Infantry in 1776. 

EDWIN TRUMAN BIDWELL, Kinsley, Kans. (26985). Son of George Edwin 
and Martha Amelia (Wadhams) Bidwell; grandson of Edwin and Mary Lewis 
(Tuttle) Wadhams; great-grandson of Abraham Wadhams, private, Col. Andrew 
Ward's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM COE BILL, Hartford, Conn. (27960). Son of Edward W. and Minnie 
Agnes (Coe) Bill; grandson of William Gilmore and Jeannette T. (Lee) Coe; 
great-grandson of Jehial and Amanda Betsey (Case) Coe; great-grandson of 
Jonathan and Charlotte (Spencer) Coe, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Coe, 
Sergeant, Capt. John Hill's Company Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES BIRD, Brig. Gen. U. S. A. (ret.), Wilmington, Del. (26305). Son of 
James Thomas and Elizabeth Kettle (Clark) Bird; grandson of Thomas David 
and May (Thomas) Bird; great-grandson of William Bird, Captain Fourth 
Regt. Continental Light Dragoons, Col. Stephen Moylan. 

GEORGE TAYLOR BISHOP, Macedonia, Ohio (27737). Son of Clark Benjamin 
and Arvilla (Taylor) Bishop; grandson of Orin Azro and Celina (Lillie) 
Bishop; great-grandson of Benjamin and Hannah (Young) Lillie; great-grand- 
son of David Lillie, Ensign Eighth Company Seventh^ Conn. Regt.. 1775. 

CARL ADAMS BLACKINGTON, Waterville, Me. (26071). Son of Oscar E. and 
Julia M. (Withington) Blackington; grandson of Willard and Julia (Thomas) 
Blackington; great-grandson of Benjamin and Lucy (Perry) Thomas; great- 
grandson of John Perry, commander of Mass. privateer "Fly." 



232 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHESTER ARTHUR BLAIR, Shawnee, Okla. (23068). Son of Samuel and Hen- 
rietta (Webb) Blair; grandson of Wiley W. and Elizabeth Polly Webb; great- 
grandson of Benjamin and Jane (Adams) Webb; great--grandson of James 
Webb, private Virginia Infantry. 

HERBERT FRANCIS BLAIR, Schenectady, N. Y. (27634). Son of James G. and 
Mary K. (Scofield) Blair; grandson of Aaron and Mary Ann (Hays) Scofield; 
great-grandson of Silvanus and Martha (Lyons) Scofield; great 2 -grandson of 
Hait Scofield, Third Sergeant General Waterbury's Conn. Regt., pensioned; 
great-grandson of William and Mary (Hays) Hays; great 2 -grandson of James 
Hays, father of Mary, First Lieutenant Second Northumberland County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

HOMER ORRIN BLAIR, Seattle, Wash. (27886). Son of Sherman Leverit and 
Hattie Rhoda (Knapp) Blair; grandson of Orrin and Louisa (Hildbolt) Blair; 
great-grandson of Nathan and Sally (Tyrrell) Blair; great 2 -grandson of Jacob 
Blair, private, Col. David Moseley's Third Hampshire County Mass. Regt. ; 
grandson of Stephen Kelly and Rhoda (Atwood) Knapp; great-grandson of 
William and Rachael (Kelly) Knapp; great 2 -grandson of James Knapp, private, 
Captain Lockwood's Company Conn. Sea Coast Guards. 

LE GRANDE JACKSON BLAIR, Cleveland, Ohio (27728). Son of Ethelbert 
Everest and Olivia (Jackson) Blair; grandson of Hiram Clark and Sarah W. 
(Ward) Blair; great-grandson of Bohan and Julia (Powers) Blair; great 2 - 
grandson of Reuben Blair, private, Capt. John Carpenter's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

FRED F. BLAISDELL, Leominster, Mass. (27927). Son of John N. and Ellen 
A. (Crooker) Blaisdell; grandson of William D. and Eleanor (Robinson) 
Crooker; great-grandson of Jonathan and Hannah (Duncan) Crooker; great- 
grandson of Samuel Duncan, Surgeon, Col. Samuel McCobb's Mass. Regt. 

BENSON BLAKE, Jr., Baltimore, Md. (27860). Son of Benson and Jennie Tay- 
lor (Kyle) Blake; grandson of Joseph and Lucy Christiana (Groverman) Blake; 
great-grandson of Joseph Blake, Ensign Maryland Militia. 

HARVEY H. BLAUVELT, Paramus, N. J. (28079). Son of Jacob H. and Alice 
(Baldwin) Blauvelt; grandson of Garrett B. and Jemima (Ackerman) Blauvelt; 
great-grandson of Henry and Christina (Baldwin) Blauvelt; great 2 -grandson of 
Aaron and Jemima (Banta) Blauvelt; great 3 -grandson of Christian and Cat- 
lyntie (Holdron) Blauvelt; greats-grandson of Arie Blauvelt, Captain Second 
Orange County Regt. New York Militia. 

HARRY DEN BLEYKER, Kalamazoo, Mich. (27470). Son of John and Hannah 
Anna (Balch) den Bleyker; grandson of Nathaniel Aldrich and Sarah Mosher 
(Chapin) Balch; great-grandson of Walter and Hannah (Mosher) Chapin; 
great 2 -grandson of Martin Chapin, Sergeant, Col. John Moseley's Hampshire 
County Mass. Regt. 

WALTER DEN BLEYKER, Kalamazoo, Mich. (27469). Son of John and Hannah 
Anna (Balch) den Bleyker; grandson of Nathaniel Aldrich and Sarah Mosher 
(Chapin) Balch; great-grandson of Walter and Hannah (Mosher) Chapin; 
great 2 -grandson of Martin Chapin, Sergeant, Col. John Moseley's Hampshire 
County Mass. Regt. 

ELMER FRANKLIN BLISS, Schenectady, N. Y. (Mass. 27559). Son of Franklin 
and Lydia Ann (Potter) Bliss; grandson of Otis and Charlotte A. (Dennis) 
Bliss; great-grandson of Asa and Mary (Emerson) Bliss; great 2 -grandson of 
Elisha Bliss, Jr., private, Col. Wm. R. Lee's Mass. Regt. 

WILLARD STALEY BLOOD, Kenmore, N. Y. (27644). Son of Reuben Simon 
and Emily (Hanson) Blood; grandson of Jacob Staley and Harriet (Sheep) 
Blood; great-grandson of William Allen and Elizabeth (McKinney) Blood; 
great 2 -grandson of Robert and Mary (Simonds) Blood; great 3 -grandson of 
Reuben Simonds, private Second Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 233 

WILLIS SHERIDAN BLOOM, Olympia, Wash. (26563,. Son of 

and Harriet (Dunlap) Bloom; grand;-. and Eliza'-,- Dur.- 

lap; gre t-grai - n E John and Martha White; great 2 -grandson of Z 
Col. William Heath's Mass. Regt. 
FRANCIS GOODNOR BOGGS, Hingham, Mass. 282 Son 

Ella J. (Goodnorj Boggs; grandson of Joseph and Lucia M. 

- grandson of Luther and Sarah (Abbott) 
Ephraim Abbott, private, Col. Ezekiel Hows's Regt. Mas = . '■' I 
RUSSELL LOWELL BOIES, Sheldon, Iowa (2767 

and Lillie Ellen (Bidinger] Boies: 2 Sarah 

Chloe Bng Boies; great-grandson of 

. - - IW Ht ' r, Regt. Conn. 

Ctrtinentoi Lin;. 177 
WILLIAM DAYTON BOIES. Sheldon, I 

and Sarah Chloe r Bugbee) Boies; grandson of 

Boies: great-grai . gra 

son of 1 tenant, Paymasl Fifth Regt Conn. Cont 

Line, 1776. 
FREELAND THOMAS BOISE. Salt Lake City, U 28185 Son of Freeland 

rhoi - nd Isabtlie Truman 3:i- ■ . 

great-grandson of Daniel M. and Ruth C. (White) Truman: 
:' Benjamin and Phel trighl 

- mi. Col. John F • - Regt. Mass. Militia. 

THOMAS B. F. BOLAND, Worcester, Mas- 28507 Son 1 ear - 

tzpatrick) Boland: gi - of Bernard r 

gi tt-grai Isoi ■' "■' ' I Elizabeth Carroll 

Francis's Mass Continental Regt a t-g - [rummer 

Mass. Coast Guards. Qua-- iter's Mass. Regt.; 

great 2 -grar d-; n >f It mas Crafts' Mass. Artil- 

lery Regt. 
BEN R. BONES. North Port 2757* 5 ' I mjamin R an: - 

Dooiirtle Cutting Bones; g nd Delia Doolittle 

_ ■ . grand; S Rood) Doolittle, Jr. : great 2 - 

[son of Reuhen and ttle, Sr.; gi 

Ambri I prival ;: Nathaniel Bunnel's Company Firth Lottaiitr 

Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 
JONATHAN BONNEL. Summit. N. J. (27684 . Son of Jonathan Crane and 
Phoebe (Ward; Bonn grandson : E ^r.r.el, Jr.. private, Captain 

Laton's Company. Col Silvanus See'.y's Eastern Battalion Morris County New 
Jersey Militia. 
JONATHAN CRANE BONNEL. Summit. N. J. z-:~z . Son jf Jonathan an i 
Emily Lindsey (Russell) Bonnel; grandson of Jonathan Crane and Phoebe 
(Ward) Bonnel; great grandson of Tr Captain 

- Company, Col Silvanus Seely's Easten Battal ris County New 

rsey Militia. 
CHARLES RUSSELL BOOSTROM, St. Paul. Minn. mm- . Son :f George E. 
and Aurelia (Mattison or Matesen) Boostrom: gra: m and 

c . | . ■■■■ uegaj Mattisoi great-gr; - - g 

-. Co'.. Lewis Dubois's New York I gi 
LOUIS DOUGLAS BOSLEY. Portland. Ore. (27588). Son of Richi 
Jennetl - Bosley; grandson of Daniel and Lucia (Ricl 

great-gran dstn of E:m-:n: and Bos 

Bosley, private Frontier Rangers Northumbei 

CHARLES ROWLAND BOSTWICK, Plainfield, N. J. (Conn _-- 

Frederick and Ida May Boone) Bo-: g - f vi an: 

Elizabeth Jones (Rowland) Bo-- gi t-gi - of Charles and Sarah 



234 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(Trowbridge) Bostwick; great 2 -grandson of Amos Bostwick, Ensign, Capt. 
Chapman's Company Nineteenth Regt. Conn. Continental Infantry, under Col. 
Charles Webb, and other service, pensioned; grandson of Jacob Swisher and 
Mary A. (Cox) Boone; great-grandson of EHsha and Sarah (Swisher) Boone; 
great 2 -grandson of James and Hannah (Barton) Boone; great 3 -grandson of 
Elisha Barton, private, Capt. Patrick Campbell's Company Northampton County 
Penna. Militia. 

FREDERICK BOONE BOSTWICK, New Haven, Conn. (27337). Son of Fred- 
erick and Ida May (Boone) Bostwick; grandson of Frederick Levi and Eliza- 
beth Jones (Rowland) Bostwick; great-grandson of Charles and Sarah (Trow- 
bridge) Bostwick; great 2 -grandson of Amos Bostwick, Ensign, Capt. Chapman's 
Company Nineteenth Regt. Conn. Continental Infantry, under Col. Charles 
Webb, and other service, pensioned; grandson of Jacob Swisher and Mary A. 
(Cox) Boone; great-grandson of EHsha and Sarah (Swisher) Boone; great 2 - 
grandson of James and Hannah (Barton) Boone; great 3 -grandson of Elisha 
Barton, private, Capt. Patrick Campbell's Company Northampton County Penna. 
Militia. 

FRANK SWIFT BOURNS, Seattle, Wash. (27879). Son of Alfred Francis and 
Lucy (Swift) Bourns; grandson of Franklin and Harriet Newell (Purdy) 
Swift; great-grandson of William and Rachel (Barlow) Swift; great--grandson 
of Ward Swift, Captain, Colonel Freeman's Barnstable County Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

NATHANIEL STUART BOWE, Richmond, Va. (28344). Son of Nathaniel 
Woodson and Emma Lewis (Griffin) Bowe; grandson of Hector and Mary 
Ursula (Ellis) Bowe; great-grandson of Woodson and Agnes (Turner) Ellis; 
great 2 -grandson of George and Ursula (Pleasants) Ellis; great"-grandson of 
John Pleasants, Captain Fifth Virginia Regt.; great-grandson of Nathaniel and 
Susannah (Davis) Bowe, Jr. ; great 2 -grandson of John Davis, Sergeant Vir- 
ginia Line: grandson of Edward and Martha Bowe (Cross) Griffin; great- 
grandson of Oliver T. and Polly Venus (Bowe) Cross; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel Cross, Sergeant First Regt. Continental Artillery, Col. Charles Harrison. 

CHARLES WELTER BO WEN, Providence, R. I. (9758). Supplementals. Son 
of Charles Welter and Louisa Sampson (Martin) Bowen; grandson of Isaac 
and Eliza (Bullock) Bowen; great 2 -grandson of Jabez Bullock, Captain, Col. 
Thomas Carpenter's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Richard Cornell and Louisa 
Dana (Sampson) Martin; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Cornell) Mar- 
tin: great 2 -grandson of David Martin, Signer of the "Declaration of the Citi- 
zens of Providence," August 5, 1776; great-grandson of Charles and Ann 
(Bogman Hopkins) Sampson; great 2 -grandson of Alexander Sampson, Signer of 
the "Declaration of the Citizens of Providence," August 5, 1776: great-grand- 
son of Charles Laurens Bogman, Sergeant, Col. Archibald Crary's Rhode Island 
Regt. 

HARRY WALLACE BOWEN, Springfield, Mass. (28521). Son of John Howland 
and Martha (Sly) Bowen; grandson of Arnold and Maria (Howland) Bowen; 
great-grandson of John and Sylinda (Jenks) Howland; great 2 -grandson of 
Abraham Howland, private, Col. Asa Barnes's Mass. Regt. 

HERBERT ASHLEY BOWEN, Lynn, Mass. (27431)- Son of Joseph Herbert and 
Caroline Rea (Brown) Bowen; grandson of Joseph Hooper and Lydia Maria 
(Brown) Bowen; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Abigail (Brown of Salem) 
Brown; great 2 -grandson of Esra Brown, private, Capt. David Perkins's Com- 
pany Mass. Minute Men, April 19, 1775, drummer, Colonel Hutchinson's Mass. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Thomas Martin and Miriam (Russell) Bowen; great 2 - 
grandson of Nathan Bozvcn, Sergeant, Capt. Job Devereux's Company, Col. 
Jacob Gerrish's Regt. Mass. Guards; grandson of William and Hannah (Bur- 
rill) Brown; great-grandson of Micajah and Sally (Curtin) Burrill; great 2 - 
grandson of Micajah (and Mercy Ingalls) Burrill, Jr., private, Capt. Addison 
Richardson's Company Essex County Mass. Militia; great :, -grandson of The- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 235 

ophilus Burrill, private, Capt. William Farrington's Company, April ig, 1775, 
and Col. Jacob Gerrish's Regt. Mass. Guards; great 2 -grandson of John Roads 
and Lois (Hooper) Russell; great-grandson of Marshall and Abigail (Brown) 
Brown, parents of Lydia Maria; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer and Ruth (Boden) 
Brown; great 3 -grandson of John Russell, Member of Committee of Inspection 
at Marblehead, Mass.; great'-grandson of Nathaniel Ingalls, private, Capt. Wil- 
liam Farrington's Company of Lynn, April 19, 1775; great"-grandson of Samuel 
Boden, private, Capt. Nicholas Broughton's Company, Col. John Glover's 
Twenty-first Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Samuel Hooper, Member of Com- 
mittee of Inspection at Marblehead, Mass. 

RICHARD MARTIN BOWEN, Providence, R. I. (9759)- Supplemental. Son 
of Charles Welter and Louisa Sampson (Martin) Bo wen; grandson of Isaac 
and Eliza (Bullock) Bowen; great-grandson of Jabez Bullock, Captain, Col. 
Thomas Carpenter's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Richard Cornell and Louisa 
Dana (Sampson) Martin; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Cornell) Mar- 
tin; great--grandson of David Martin, Signer of the "Declaration of the Citi- 
zens of Providence," August 5, 1776; great-grandson of Charles and Ann 
(Bogman Hopkins) Sampson; great 2 -grandson of Alexander Sampson, Signer 
of the "Declaration of the Citizens of Providence," August 5, 1776; great 2 - 
grandson of Charles Laurens Bogman, Sergeant, Col. Archibald Crary's Rhode 
Island Regt. 

WILLIAM FRANK BOWER, East Orange, N. J. (26871). Son of Samuel L. 
and Caroline (Bocker-Smith) Bower; grandson of Jacob and Louisa (Pffeifer) 
Bocker, Bacher, Jr. ; great-grandson of Jacob Backer, private, Colonel Geiger's 
and Colonel Stroud's Penna. Regts., pensioned. 

JAMES WIRT BOWLES, Richmond, Va. (28340). Son of Thomas Josiah and 
Anna B. (Crump) Bowles; grandson of Drury Wood Knight and Elizabeth 
(Richardson) Bowles; great-grandson of Knight Bowles, private Virginia 
Militia. 

GEORGE LARKIN BOWMAN, Peoria, 111. (28012). Son of Joseph Pierce and 
Helen Maria (Day) Bowman; grandson of Thaddeus and Anna (Hunt) Bow- 
man, 3d; great-grandson of Thaddeus Bowman, Jr., private, Capt. John Par- 
ker's Company at Lexington, April 19, 1775, and other service. 

ROBERT RANKIN BOYCE, East Orange, N. J. (28491). Son of George Adams 
and Catherine (Rankin) Boyce; grandson of Robert Gosman and Laura Maria 
(.Wolcott) Rankin; great-grandson of Frederick and Betsey (Huntington) Wol- 
cott; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Wolcott, Major General Conn. Militia, Signer 
of Declaration of Independence. 

GEORGE ERNEST BOYD, Fredonia, Pa. (27140). Son of George and Martha 
(Elliot) Boyd; grandson of Joseph and Rhoda (Axtell) Boyd; great-grandson 
of Daniel and Euphemia (Lynn) Axtell, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Axtell, 
Sr., private, Capt. John Miller's Company First Washington County Battalion 
Penna. Militia. 

JOHN HARDGROVE BOYD, Portland, Ore. (27576). Son of James Hervey and 
Eliza (Ellis) Boyd; grandson of John Boyd, ranger and scout Virginia Troops; 
grandson of James and Sally (Moorhead) Ellis; great-grandson of Turner 
Morehead, Captain Third Virginia Regt. 

JAMES REASON BOZARTH, Hannibal, Mo. (25293). Son of Abner and Sarah 
(Suddeth) Bozarth; grandson of Reason and Susan (Bowles) Bozarth; great- 
grandson of John and Sarah (Shaw) Bozarth; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan 
Bozarth, private, Col. Aeneas Mackey's Penna. Regt., pensioned. 

WALKER FARRINGTON BRADLEY, Toledo, Ohio (27732). Son of Albert 
Josiah and Clara (Grimes) Bradley; grandson of Eber and Cynthia (Farring- 
ton) Bradley; great-grandson of EH Judson and Sarah (Cooley) Bradley; 
great 2 -grandson of Eber Bradley, fifer, Capt. Thomas Sawyer's and other Ver- 
mont Companies, pensioned. 



236 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



JOHN AKIN BRANCH, Richmond, Va. (28337). Son of John Kerr and Beulah 
(Gould) Branch; grandson of John Patterson and Mary Louise Merritt (Kerr) 
Branch; great-grandson of Thomas and Sarah Pride (Read) Branch; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas Branch, Captain of Chesterfield County Virginia Militia. 

EDWARD ALEXANDER BRAND, Chevy Chase, Md. (D. C. 27995)- Son of 
Alexander J. and Fannie (Stewart) Brand; grandson of James Erskine and 
Fannie Elizabeth (Glenn) Stewart; great-grandson of James Glenn, private 
Virginia Militia. 

EDWARD FORTESQUE BREED, Lynn, Mass. (27926). Son of Henry Wilbur 
and Lillian Gertrude (Martin) Breed; grandson of Edward Fortesque and 
Mary Jane (Hatch) Martin; great-grandson of Anson and Meriel (Litchfield) 
Hatch; great 2 -grandson of Lawrence Litchfield, Lieutenant, Col. Jeremiah Hall's 
Mass. Regt. 

CHAUNCEY MILLAR BRIGGS, Ithaca, N. Y. (28258). Son of Henry EKvin 
and Katharine (Millar) Briggs; grandson of James Wright and Elvira (Hatch) 
Briggs; great-grandson of Amasa and Rhoda (Wright) Briggs; great 2 -grandson 
of Silas Briggs, private, Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Mass. Regt. 

FRANK LEWIS BRIGGS, Indian Orchard, Mass. (27935). Son of Seth Richard- 
son and Martha Kennedy (Shepard) Briggs; grandson of Benjamin Skinner 
and Caroline (Cowen) Briggs; great-grandson of Emerson and Lydia (Rich- 
ardson) Briggs; great 2 -grandson of Jacob (and Esther Skinner) Briggs, Cor- 
poral, Col. John Hathaway's Mass. Regt.: great 3 -grandson of Benjamin Skin- 
ner, private, Col. John Daggett's Mass. Regt. ; great 2 -grandson of Seth (and 
Sarah French) Richardson, Jr., private, Col. John Daggett's Mass. Regt.; 
great 3 -grandson of Seth Richardson, Corporal, Col.' Isaac Dean's Mass. Regt.; 
great 3 -grandson of Thomas French, private, Col. Josiah Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

MARTIN CALKINS BRIGGS, St. Paul, Minn. (Iowa 25231). Supplemental. 
Son of William E- and Elva (Calkins) Briggs; grandson of Moore and Huldah 
(Oviatt) Briggs; great-grandson of Aaron and Electa (Brown) Oviatt; great 2 - 
grandson of Reuben and Huldah (Griswold) Brown; great 3 -grandson of Seth 
Griszvold, private, Captain Pettibone's Company, Col. Thomas Belden's Conn. 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Luman and Rhoda (Norton) Oviatt; great 3 -grandson 
of Benjamin Oviatt, minute man of Goshen, Conn.; great 3 -grandson of Miles 
Norton, Lieutenant Goshen Company Conn. Militia; great 4 -grandson of Eben- 
ezer Norton, Lieutenant Colonel of Goshen, Conn., Regt., Member of Fire- 
arms Committee. 

J. HOWARD BRINKERHOFF, Herkimer, N. Y. (27843). Son of Walter and 
Margaret (McLean) Brinkerhoff, Jr.; grandson of Walter and Eliza Ann 
(Coulter) Brinkerhoff; great-grandson of Isaac and Sophia Roorbach (Quack- 
enboss) Brinkerhoff; great 2 -grandson of Dirck Brinckerhoff, private Second 
Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

JAMES BEARDSLEY BRINSMADE, Derby, Conn. (27965). Son of James Rob- 
ert and Martha (Beardsley) Brinsmade; grandson of Daniel Styles and Cath- 
erine (Mallett) Brinsmade; great-grandson of Abraham and Betsey (Beach) 
Brinsmade; great 2 -grandson of Daniel and Mary (Beebe) Brinsmade; great 3 - 
grandson of Abraham Brinsmade, Member of Committees of Observation and 
Inspection, private Conn. Volunteers at Danbury Raid. 

CARROLL LANGDON BRISTOL, Boston, Mass. (27939)- Son of Frank Louis 
and Annie Cummings (Hill) Bristol; grandson of George Langdon and Anna 
Cummings (Larrabee) Hill; great-grandson of John Langdon and Silence 
Alexander (Gushing) Hill; great 2 -grandson of Christopher and Elanor (Phil- 
brook) Cushing; great'-grandson of Peter Gushing, Captain Second Suffolk 
County Regt. Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Mark Langdon and Mary (Mc- 
Cobb) Hill; great 3 -grandson of James McCobb, Member of Committees of Cor- 
respondence and Safety; great 3 -grandson of Jeremiah and Mrs. Mary Stover 
(Langdon) Hill; great 4 -grandson of John Langdon, Signer of New Hampshire 
Association. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 237 

JAMES EASTON BRODHEAD, Flemington, N. J. (27695). Son of Andrew 
Jackson and Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead; grandson of Garret and Cornelia 
(Dingman) Brodhead; great-grandson of Richard and Hannah (Drake) Brod- 
head; great 2 -grandson of Garrett Brodhead, Ensign Northampton County Penna. 
Militia, private Sussex County New Jersey Troops. 

ARTHUR PERKINS BROWN, Newburyport, Mass. (27446). Son of Moses and 
Josephine E. M. Brown; grandson of Moses and Mary Jane (Perkins) Brown; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Pilsbury) Brown; great 2 -grandson of 
Moses Brown, Commander of privateer ship "General Arnold" and privateer 
brig "Minerva." 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS BROWN, Horsehead, N. Y. (27846). Son of Charles 
Augustus and Sarah E. (Wightman) Brown; grandson of Alanson Mathews 
and Sarah Catherine (McKinney) Wightman; great-grandson of George and 
Hannah (Culver) Wightman; great 2 -grandson of Phineas and Phebe (Breese) 
Culver; great 3 -grandson of John Breese, private Fourth New Jersey Battalion, 
prisoner. 

CHARLES MICHAEL BROWN, Washington, N. C. (24521). Son of Jeremiah 
Michael and Charlotte Caroline Brown; grandson of Jeremiah and Barbary 
(widow Furr) (Smith) Brown; great-grandson of Michael Brown, Justice of 
the Peace in 1776, juror at court held at Salisbury, N. C, March 7, 1777. 

MIEO FREDERIC BROWN, Gloucester, Mass. (27432). Son of William James 
and Sarah Eliza (Murray) Brown; grandson of Milo J. and Ursula Zorada 
(Kingsley) Brown; great-grandson of William and Zorada (Norton) Kingsley; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Norton, Captain Fourteenth Company, Col. John 
Hathaway's Second Bristol County Regt. Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

OLIVER WELLINGTON BROWN, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28027). Son of Thomas 
Stephen and Sydney (Heiskell) Brown; grandson of William and Margaret 
(Orr) Brown; great-grandson of Oliver and Anne (Colwell) Brown; great 2 - 
grandson of Oliver Brown, Captain-Lieutenant of Artillery Mass. Line. 

KENNETH BRUCE, De Funiak Springs, Fla. (20689). Son of Wallace and Annie 
(Becker) Bruce; grandson of Alfred and Mary Ann (McAlpine) Bruce; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Zelpah (Shaw) Bruce; great 2 -grandson of John Bruce, 
Sergeant, Col. James Barrett's Mass. Regt., April 19, 1775. 

ORVILLE SANFORD BRUMBACK, Toledo, Ohio (27750). Son of John Sanford 
and Ellen Perlena (Purmort) Brumback; grandson of Minor and Perlena 
(Nettleton) Purmort; great-grandson of Joshua and Emma (Walworth) Pur- 
mort; great 2 -grandson of Charles Walworth, Signer of New Hampshire Asso- 
ciation Test, 1776. 

OLIVER BRYAN, Atlantic City, N. J. (Conn. 27346). Son of Benjamin Sherman 
and Marie Louise (Hayden) Bryan; grandson of Oliver and Phebe (Gorham) 
Bryan; great-grandson of Oliver Bryan, Sergeant, Colonel Douglass's Conn, 
Regt., pensioned. 

GEORGE ARCHIE BRYANT, Forest Grove, Ore. (27599). Son of Hale Dudley 
and Florence (Brock) Bryant; grandson of C. W. and Mary (Fay) Bryant; 
great-grandson of Dudley and Betsey (Vesper) Bryant; great 2 -grandson of 
David Bryant, private Second Regt. Conn. Line. 

GEORGE GOODALE BRYANT, Racine, Wis. (27070). Son of Hubbard Winslow 
and Lucy (Scammon) Bryant; grandson of William and Hannah (Smith) 
Scammon; great-grandson of Nicholas and Margaret (Coit) Scammon; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Scammon, Second Lieutenant, Col. Lemuel Robinson's 
Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of David and Abby Young (Dyer) Bryant; 
great-grandson of John and Sarah (Whitney) Bryant; great 2 -grandson of Jesse 
Whitney, Second Lieutenant, Col. Benjamin Tupper's Mass. Regt. 

HALE D. BRYANT, Gaston, Ore. (27596). Son of C. W. and Mary E. (Fay) 
Bryant; grandson of Dudley and Betsey (Vesper) Bryant; great-grandson of 
Daniel Bryant, private Second Regt. Conn. Continental Line. 



2 3 8 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



RICHARD GOODALE BRYANT, Racine, Wis. (27062). Son of George G. and 
Effie L. Bryant; grandson of Hubbard W. and Lucy (Scammon) Bryant; great- 
grandson of David and Sarah (Whitney) Bryant; great 2 -grandson of Jesse 
Whitney, Second Lieutenant, Col. Benjamin Tupper's Mass. Regt. ; great- 
grandson of William and Hannah (Smith) Scammon; great 2 -grandson of Nich- 
olas and Margaret (Coit) Scammon; great 3 -grandson of Samuci S common v 
Second Lieutenant, Col. Lemuel Robinson's Mass. Regt. 

CARROLL C. BUCK, Iowa Falls, Iowa (28204). Son of Marcus A. and Lucia M. 
(Wilkins) Buck; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Amesden) Buck; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Lydia (Allen) Buck; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Buck, 
private, Major Danielson's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE MACHAN BUCK, Kalamazoo, Mich. (27457). Son of Minerson and 
Hannah M. (Peirce) Buck; grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Greeley) Peirce; 
great-grandson of Ephraim Peirce, Ensign First Regt. of Foot Cumberland 
County New York Militia and in Col. William Williams's and Colonel Stark's 
Regts., pensioned. 

ELISHA WATERMAN BUCKLIN, East Greenwich, R. I. (27187). Son of David 
Waterman and Nancy J. (Follet) Bucklin; grandson of Elisha Waterman and 
Mary A. (Ballore) Bucklin; great-grandson of David and Dorcas (Waterman) 
Bucklin; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Waterman, Deputy in General Assembly, 
Signer of Rhode Island Declaration of Independence, Captain of Minute Men. 

EMERSON K. BULL, North Bend, Wash. (27876). Son of Joseph W. and Harriet 
B. Bull; grandson of Jacob and Catherine (Balliet) Bull; great-grandson of 
Joseph and Margaretta (Berger) Balliet; great 2 -grandson of Stephen Balliet, 
Colonel Northampton County Penna. Militia. 

JOHN ALBERT BULLARD, Chicago, 111. (27388). Son of John and Adelaide 
Cornelia (Adams) Bullard; grandson of Mark and Abigail (Whitcomb) Bullard; 
great-grandson of Oliver and Abigail (Gay) Bullard: great 2 -grandson of Ben- 
jamin Bullard, private, Capt. Aaron Guild's Company, Col. Josiah Whitney's 
Mass. Regt.; grandson of Luther and Lydia (Read) Adams; great-grandson of 
Samuel Adams, private Fourth Troop, Colonel Sheldon's Conn. Light Dragoons; 
great-grandson of Branch and Elizabeth (Rogers) Whitcomb; great 2 -grandson 
of Lot Whitcomb, private, Capt. Benjamin Wait's Company New York Rangers, 
Major Joab Hoissington; great-grandson of Jonathan Read, private and Cor- 
poral, Capt. James Hill's Company, Colonel Williams's Mass. Regt. 

ROBERT MCCARTHY BULLINGTON, Richmond, Ya. (22997). Son of Robert 
J. and Mary (Blake) Bullington; grandson of Thomas J. and Sarah Price 
(Ammons) Blake; great-grandson of Ballard and Francis (Sharpe) Amnions; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter and Ann (Price) Sharpe; great 3 -grandson of John 
Price, private Virginia Infantry. 

HAROLD EDMUND BULLIS, Syracuse, N. Y. (27828). Son of George E. and 
Ida H. (Wood) Bullis; grandson of Simeon T. and Lasira (Salisbury) Wood; 
great-grandson of Amos E. and Hannah (Dean) Wood; great 2 -grandson of 
Ephraim Wood, private Eleventh Continental Infantry, pensioned. 

DALE BUMSTEAD, Oak Park, 111. (26740). Supplementals. Son of Edwin 
Stimson and Amelia Emeline (Way) Bumstead; grandson of Julius and Harriet 
(Hotchkiss) Way; great-grandson of Benjamin and Hannah (Beecher) Hotch- 
kiss; great 2 -grandson of Abraham Hotchkiss, private, Captain Peck's Company 
Fifth Battalion, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade; grandson of William Jeduthan 
and Lucia (Bolles) Bumstead; great-grandson of Jeduthan and Wealthy 
(Thrall) Bumstead; great 2 -grandson of Oliver and Wealthy (Latimer) Thrall; 
great 3 -grandson of John Thrall, Lieutenant Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES LYNN BUNDY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (28268). Son of Stephen Whipple 
and Leona (Jackson) Bundy; grandson of Charles Henry and Emeline 
(Whipple) Bundy; great-grandson of Stephen and Clarissa (Harrington) 
Whipple; great 2 -grandson of Nathan Whipple, private. Col. Philip Van Cort- 
land's New York Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 239 

GERALD DEFOREST BUNKER, Detroit, Mich. (28127). Son of Charles IT. and 
Helen Augusta (Abbott) Bunker; grandson of Samuel Griffin and Jane (Kier- 
stead) Abbott; great-grandson of Abraham and Rebecca (Benson) Kicrstead; 
great 2 -grandson of Daniel and Rachel (Doremus) Benson; great 3 -grandson of 
Johannas Benson, private, Col. William Malcolmson's New York Regt. 

JOHN HALE HOITT BURBANK, Lynn, Mass. (27764). Son of Gideon W. and 
Eliza Ann (Hoitt) Burbank; grandson of John Hall and Lydia P. (Cook) 
Hoitt; great-grandson of Benjamin and Sarah (Pillsbury) Hoitt; great-grand- 
son of Daniel Hoitt, Ensign, Capt. Enoch Page's Company, Lieut. Col. Joseph 
Senter's New Hampshire Regt. 

EDWIN WELCH BURCH, Rockwell City, Iowa (27670). Son of Rollm and 
Esther C. (Hulbert) Burch; grandson of Oliver Wheeler and Mary Sprague 
(Tower) Burch; great-grandson of John and Lucy (Munson) Tower; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Tower, private, Col. John Greaton's Mass. Regt. 

OLIVER DUDLEY BURDEN, Syracuse, N. Y. (28273). Son of James H. and 
Lucia M. (Groesbeck) Burden; grandson of Peter and Hannah (Van Yalken- 
burgh) Groesbeck; great-grandson of Richard and Christiana (Wessels) Van 
Valkenburgh; great 2 -grandson of Lambert Van Valkenburgh, private First Regt. 
New York Line. 

DAVID BOURDETTE BURGERT, Toledo, Ohio (27726). Son of Adam and 
Elizabeth (Wood) Burgert; grandson of Bourdette and Rhoda (Harrington) 
Wood; great-grandson of Jasper and Elizabeth (Boylston) Wood; great-grand- 
son of Bdzvard Boylston, Captain of Artificers and Engineers, Colonel Flower's 
Regt. of Artillery Artificers. 

CHARLES HAMILTON BURGESS, Baltimore, Md. (27851). Son of Charles R. 
and Mary Ellen (Colladay) Burgess; grandson of William and Elizabeth 
(Ricketts) Burgess; great-grandson of Michael Burgess, Ensign, Member of 
Maryland Council of Safety, 1776. 

EDWIN TEMPLE BURNLEY, Fort Kamehameha, Hawaii (20425). Son of 
Hardin and Blanche (Williams) Burnley; grandson of Edwin and Lucy (Mar- 
shall) Burnley; great-grandson of Harry Burnley; great 2 -grandson of Henry 
Burnley, private, Capt. Harry Terrill's Company Fifth Virginia Regt., Col. 
Josiah Parker; great-grandson of William and Mary (Macon) Marshall; great- 
grandson of Thomas Marshall, Colonel Third Virginia Regt. 

MARTIN B. BURRIS, Middletown, Del. (26307). Son of Nehemiah and Mary 
Jane (Crawford) Burris; grandson of William and Rebecca (Corse) Burns; 
great-grandson of John Corse, First Lieutenant, Colonel Haslet's Delaware 
Regt. and Captain, Col. David Hall's Delaware Regt. 

HENRY. HARDING BURROUGHS, Washington, D. C. (27988). Son of Joseph 
and Georgie (McLean) Burroughs; grandson of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Hard- 
ing) Burroughs; great-grandson of Benjamin and Judith (Lummis) Burroughs, 
2d; great-grandson of Benjamin Burroughs, private, Col. Samuel Dick's Regt. 
New Jersey Militia. 

JOSEPH HALLETT BURROUGHS, Jacksonville, Fla. (20693)- Son of Richard 
Berrien and Ella Jane Burroughs; grandson of Joseph Hallett and Valeria 
Gibbons (Berrien) Burroughs; great-grandson of John MacPherson and Eliza 
(Anciaux) Berrien; great-grandson of John Berrien, Brigade Major North 
Carolina Brigade, on staff of Brevet Major General Lachlan Mcintosh. 

RICHARD BERNARD BURROUGHS, Jacksonville, Fla. (20692). Son of Joseph 
Hallett and Mary Dickerson (Bernard) Burroughs; grandson of Richard Ber- 
rien and Ella Jane Burroughs; great-grandson of Joseph Hallett and Valeria 
Gibbons (Berrien) Burroughs; great-grandson of John MacPherson and Eliza 
(Anciaux) Berrien; great 3 -grandson of John Berrien, Brigade Major North 
Carolina Brigade, on staff of Brevet Major General Lachlan Mcintosh. 

CHARLES WELLINGTON BURT, Brookline, Mass. (27928). Son of Welling- 
ton R. and Armina (Richardson) Burt; grandson of Israel Bush and Amina 



24O SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Philinda (Cook) Richardson; great-grandson of Jason and Mary (Powers) 
Richardson; great-grandson of Israel Richardson, Captain Sixth Hampshire 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILUAM LEE BURT, Elizabeth, N. J. (28359). Son of Lloyd Edward and 
Anna Louisa (Rogers) Burt; grandson of George Washington and Catherine 
(Gifford) Burt; great-grandson of George Burt, private, Col. Thomas Marshall's 
Bristol County Regt. Mass. Infantry. 

ROBERT OLDHAM BURTON, Cleveland, Ohio (27740). Son of Charles T. and 
Minnie (Oldham) Burton; grandson of John and Phebe (Dumm) Oldham; 
great-grandson of Robert and Martha (Morrison) Oldham; great-grandson of 
Isaac Oldham, private, non-commissioned officer, Capt. John Van Meter's Com- 
pany Westmoreland County Penna. Rangers. 

JOHN DONALD BUSHNELL, Lincoln, Nebr. (27309). Son of Herbert M. and 
Elsie N. (Campbell) Bushnell; grandson of Martin and Charlotte P. (Clark) 
Campbell; great-grandson of Stephen and Charlotte (Lovejoy) Clark; great- 
grandson of Paul Clark, Sergeant, Capt. Elijah Lewis's Company, Col. Christo- 
pher Green's Rhode Island Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

CARL ORSON BUTTON, Sheldon, Iowa (27659). Son of Lewis James and Mar- 
garetta (Edwards) Button; grandson of Edwin Daniel and Margaret (Downie) 
Button; great-grandson of Hazzard and Urania (Tuttle) Button; great-grand- 
son of Daniel Button, Jr., private Sixth Conn. Regt., Colonel Parsons. 

LEWIS JAMES BUTTON, Sheldon, Iowa (27660). Son of Edwin Daniel and 
Margaret (Downie) Button; grandson of Hazzard and Urania (Tuttle) Button; 
great-grandson of Daniel Button, Jr., private Sixth Conn. Regt., Colonel Par- 
sons; great-grandson of Jonathan Tuttle, private, Colonel Douglass's Conn. 
Regt. 

CHARLES WINFIELD BUVINGER, East Orange, N. J. (27776). Son of 
Adolphus Gustavus and Ray (Witzman) Buvinger; grandson of William Snyder 

and (Carlisle) Buvinger; great-grandson of Leonard and Mary (Snyder) 

Buvinger; great-grandson of Leonard Boovinger, private, Capt. Alexander 
Peeble's Company Sixth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia, Col. 
James Dunlop. 

JAMES BRANCH CABELL, Dumbarton, Va. (28335). Son of Robert Gamble 
and Anne Harris (Branch) Cabell; grandson of Robert Gamble and Margaret 
Sophia (Caskie) Cabell; great-grandson of William H. and Agnes Sarah Bell 
(Gamble) Cabell; great-grandson of Nicholas Cabell, Colonel of Amherst Vir- 
ginia Volunteers. 

CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN, Fort Collins, Colo. (26681). Son of Wil- 
liam C. and Carrie (Wakefield) Cadman; grandson of John S. and Martha 
(Boyd) Wakefield; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hough) Wake- 
field; great-grandson of Thomas Wakefield, private, Capt. Noah Abraham's 
Company Cumberland County Penna. Militia. 

RAWLINS CADWALLADER, San Francisco, Cal. (10094). Supplementals. Son 
of Sylvanus and Mary Isabella (Paul) Cadwallader; grandson of Joseph and 
Catherine (Cox) Cadwallader; great-grandson of Thomas Cox, Jr., recognized 
patriot of North Carolina, property destroyed by Tories; great-grandson of 
Thomas Cox, Sr., private, Captain Hall's Company, Col. John Patton's North 
Carolina Regt. Was at White Plains. 

CHESTER LE ROY CAIN, Syracuse, N. Y. (27643). Son of Silas B. and Sarah 
A. (Beeman) Cain; grandson of William and Susan (Arnold) Cain; great- 
grandson of Chancey and Charlotte (Huntley) Arnold; great-grandson of 
Thomas and Joanna (Medbury) Arnold; great 3 -grandson of Jabez Arnold, 
private, Col. David Hitchcock's Rhode Island Regt., Ensign Second Rhode 
Island Battalion; great*-grandson of Caleb Arnold, Member of War Committee, 
Deputy Rhode Island Assembly. 



REGISTER OP NEW MEMBERS. 24 1 

JAMES HENRY CALLANAN, Schenectady, N. Y. (27531). Son of Henry Wil- 
liams and Sarai E- (Spaun) Callanan; grandson of James and Mary (Williams) 
Callanan; great-grandson of Thomas Williams, private, Col. Roswell Hopkins's 
Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE ANGUS CAMERON, Maywood, 111. (22234). Supplemental. Son of 
Angus and Susan (Woodruff) Cameron; grandson of Alanson and Eucy 
(Shaw) Woodruff; great-grandson of Blisha Woodruff, Sergeant, Col. Israel 
Chapman's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ARTHUR EGBERT CAMPBELL, Wilkinsburg, Pa. (28041). Son of Eoudon and 
Rebecca (Cooper) Campbell; grandson of James B. Cooper, private Third 
Regt. New Jersey Continental Eine. 

CEARENCE HENRY CAMPBEEE, Lansdowne, Pa. (28029). Son of Eevin Hicks 
and Mary Priscilla (Jones) Campbell; grandson of Samuel and Ann (Shipley) 
Jones; great-grandson of Joshua and Ann (Warfield) Jones; great 2 -grandson of 
Charles Warfield, Member of Committee of Safety and of Observation, Fred- 
erick County, Maryland. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CAMPBEEE, Millburn, N. J. (27525). Son of George 
W. and Eliza Schuyler (Day) Campbell; grandson of Benjamin Eudlow and 
Harriet (Kip) Day; great-grandson of Israel and Elizabeth (Eudlow) Day; 
great 2 -grandson of Cornelius Ludlow, Lieutenant Colonel Morris County New 
Jersey Militia. 

JAMES NOEE HOWARD CAMPBELL, Hartford, Conn. (27338). Son of James 
and Mary Cornelia (Pettibone) Campbell; grandson of James and Esther 
(Griswold) Campbell; great-grandson of Daniel and Esther (Case) Griswold; 
great--grandson of White Griswold, private, Capt. Theophilus Munson's Com- 
pany Eighth Regt. Conn. Line. 

ROBERT FUETON CANINE, Louisville, Ky. (26595). Son of Charles E. and 
Mary E. (Kent) Canine; grandson of James Fulton and Elizabeth (Hutchison) 
Canine; great-grandson of John and Ann (Fulton) Canine; great 2 -grandson of 
Peter Carnine {Canine), Sergeant New Jersey Line, pensioned. 

HENRY FRASER CANNON, Montclair, N. J. (28494)- Son of John Henry and 
Mary Agnes (Bolen) Cannon; grandson of John and Mary Ann (Davol) Can- 
non; great-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Bowen) Davol; great 2 -grandson of 
Pardon Davol, private, Colonel Pope's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRANK LINCOLN CARPENTER, Fall River, Mass. (27948). Son of Joseph 
Wilmarth and Phebe (Kershaw) Carpenter; grandson of Stephen and Mary P. 
Lawton (Douglas) Carpenter; great-grandson of Stephen and Hannah (Wil- 
marth) Carpenter; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Carpenter, Colonel First Bristol 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HARRY C. CARR, Milwaukee, Wis. (27058). Son of Henry More and Sarah T. 
(Burke) Carr; grandson of James Merrill and Mary Parker (Adams) Carr; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Talpey) Adams; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Adams, private, Capt. Abijah Smith's Company, Col. Enoch Hale's 
New Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY GRIFFITH CHAMBERLIN, Chicago, 111. (28281). Son of Brewster 
Hesselridge and Elizabeth Amy (Griffith) Chamberlin; grandson of John Alger 
and Sophia Catherine (Munger) Chamberlain; great-grandson of Gaius and 
Abigail (Button) Munger; great 2 -grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Worth- 
ington) Munger; great 3 -grandson of Elnathan Munger, private, Col. Rufus 
Putnam's Mass. Regt. 

FRITZ ROY CHAMPION, Schenectady, N. Y. (27532). Son of Austin L. and 
Deborah (Van Antwerp) Champion; grandson of John and Nancy (Eaton) 
Van Antwerp; great-grandson of Philip and Deborah (Wemple) Van Antwerp; 
great-grandson of Simon I. (J.) Van Antwerp, private, Col. Abraham Wemple's 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 



242 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES SOMERVILLE CHAPMAN, Ridgewood, N. J. (28156). Son of 
Charles E. and Rosetta A. (Smith) Chapman; grandson of Warren and Sophia 
(Rudyard) Chapman; great-grandson of Timothy and Dolly (Fuller) Chapman; 
great 2 -grandson of Timothy Chapman, Member of East Haddam, Conn., Mili- 
tary Supplies Committee. 

CLARENCE EDWARD CHAPMAN, Oakland, N. J. (2861 1). Son of Charles E- 
and Rosetta A. (Smith) Chapman; grandson of Warren and Sophia (Rudyard) 
Chapman'; great-grandson of Timothy and Dolly (Fuller) Chapman; great 2 - 
grandson of Timothy Chapman, Member of East Haddam, Conn., Military Sup- 
plies Committee. 

BENJAMIN EDWIN CHAPIN, Newark, N. J. (26933). Son of Norman C. and 
Sarah (Blodgett) Chapin; grandson of Sheldon and Altha (Huggins) Chapin; 
great-grandson of Amos Chapin, Corporal, Col. John Ashley's Mass. Regt. 

ASIIER HARRIMAN ST. CLAIR CHASE, Everett, Mass. (27949). Son of 
Asher Moore and Jane M. (Weston) Chase; grandson of Edward B. and Mar- 
garet J. (Harriman) Weston; great-grandson of Samuel Weston (and Abigail 
Bisbee), private, Capt. Elijah Crocker's Company Mass. Militia; great-grand- 
son of Aaron Bisbee, Jr., private, Capt. William .Weston's Company Mass. 
Militia; grandson of Samuel S. and Elizabeth (Curtis) Chase; great-grandson 
of Andrew Chase; great 2 -grandson of Dudley Leavit Chase, Second Lieutenant 
Third New Hampshire Regt. 

FERDINAND WALKER CHASE, Loon Lake, N. Y. (Vt. 27480). Son of William 
and Fanny H. (Randall) Chase; grandson of John and Betsy (Carter) Chase; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Carter, private, Col. John Langdon's Company 
New Hampshire Light Horse. 

FRED WILSON CHASE, Pawnee City, Nebr. (27308). Son of Josiah B. and 
Elsie P. (Warren) Chase; grandson of Moses and Anna (Briggs) Chase; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Fuller) Chase; great 2 -grandson of David 
Prince Chase, Sergeant, Captain Eliot's Company, Col. Jonathan Holmes's 
Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Otis and Huldah (Stone) Briggs; great 2 - 
grandson of Jesse Briggs, private, Col. Gamaliel Bradford's Mass. Regt.; 
grandson of Linus Austin and Sophronia (Parker) Warren; great-grandson of 
Samuel Parker, private, Captain Putnam's Company, Colonel Davis's Mass. 
Regt. 

LEON WILSON CHASE, Lincoln, Nebr. (27322). Son of Fred Wilson and Mary 
Ann (Murdock) Chase; grandson of Josiah B. and Elsie Pauline (Warren) 
Chase: great-grandson of Moses and Anna (Briggs) Chase; great 2 -grandson of 
Isaac and Susanna (Fuller) Chase; great 3 -grandson of David Prince Chase, 
private. Col. Jonathan Holmes's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Otis and 
Huldah (Stone) Briggs; great s -grandson of Jesse Briggs, private, Col. Gamaliel 
Bradford's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Linus Austin and Sophronia (Parker) 
Warren; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Parker, private, Captain Putnam's Com- 
pany Worcester County Mass. Militia. 

LINUS CHASE, Pawnee City, Nebr. (27323). Son of Fred Wilson and Mary 
Anna (Murdock) Chase; grandson of Josiah B. and Elsie P. (Warren) Chase; 
great-grandson of Moses and Anna (Briggs) Chase; great 2 -grandson of Isaac 
and Susanna (Fuller) Chase; great 3 -grandson of David Prince Chase, private, 
Colonel Leonard's Mass. Regt., marched April 19, 1775; great 2 -grandson of 
Otis and Huldah (Stone) Briggs; greats-grandson of Jesse Briggs, private, Col. 
Gamaliel Bradford's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Linus and Sophronia 
(Parker) Warren; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Parker, private, Captain Put- 
nam's Company, Colonel Davis's Mass. Regt. 

GUY IT. CHERRY. Santa Monica, Cal. (Mass. 28242). Son of John Waddell and 
Annie (Holmes) Cherry; grandson of Samuel and Jane (Streeter) Holmes; 
great-grandson of Joshua and Adah (Mason) Streeter; great 2 -grandson of John 
Streeter, Corporal, Col. Ebenezer Learned's Mass. Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 243 

ROY CHILDREY, Richmond, Va. (28329). Son of John Howard and Helen 
(Robertson) Childrey; grandson of John Thomas and Ann (Clarke) Childrey; 
great-grandson of John Salle and Nancy (Frayser) Clarke; great 2 -grandson of 
Jesse Frayser, private Virginia Militia. 

BURNETT M. CHIPERFIELD, Canton, 111. (27389). Son of Thomas and Han- 
nah M. (Reynolds) Chiperfield; grandson of John and Mary (Burnet) Rey- 
nolds; great-grandson of Thomas and Grace (Smith) Burnet; great 2 -grandson 
of Thomas Smith, Lieutenant Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia, 
Lieutenant Colonel Wisner. 

CLAUDE E. CHIPERFIELD, Canton, 111. (27390). Son of Thomas and Hannah 
M. (Reynolds) Chiperfield; grandson of John and Mary (Burnet) Reynolds; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Grace (Smith) Burnet; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Smith, Lieutenant Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia, 
Lieutenant Colonel Wisner. 

GEORGE EMERSON CILLEY, New York, N. Y. (27648). Son of Ceorge Otis 
and Adelaide (Cooper) Cilley; grandson of George and Lydia Darrell (Emer- 
son) Cilley; great-grandson of Eliphalet and Dolly (Shaw) Cilley; great-grand- 
son of Cutting Cilley, Captain New Hampshire Militia. 

CECIL JAMES CLARK, Ravenna, Nebr. (27324). Son of James Addison and 
Mary Anna (Ellis) Clark; grandson of Samuel and Anna (Bryant) Clark, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Dudley and Betsey (Vesper) Bryant; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Bryant, private Second Regt. Conn. Line. 

CHARLES LORIN CLARK, Washington, D. C. (26821). Son of William Lincoln 
and Mary Amelia (Jones) Clark; grandson of Lorin and Sarah Eugenia 
(White) Clark; great-grandson of Stephen and Lydia (Howe) Clark; great 2 - 
grandson of Amos (and Patience Newman) Clark, Sergeant Third Battalion 
Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade; greaf-grandson of Jonathan Newman, private 
Fifth New York and Second Conn. Regts. 

EDWARD JAMES CLARK, Lowell, Mass. (28243). Son of Edward Warren and 
Lily Ann (Huntoon) Clark; grandson of James W. and Rosanah S. Huntoon; 
great-grandson of David and Sally (Kimball) Huntoon; great 2 -grandson of 
Charles Huntoon, private, Col. Benjamin Bellows's New Hampshire Regt. 

HAROLD JOSEPH CLARK, Oklahoma City, Okla. (23074). Son of Richard Nim- 
rod and Anna Grace (Radell) Clark; grandson of Henry C. and Mary Eleanor 
(Travis) Radell; great-grandson of Frederick B. and Gertrude Maria (Schultz) 
Travis; great 2 -grandson of Luke and Helenor (Knickerbocker) Schultz; great 3 - 
grandson of Harmon Jansen Knickerbocker, Lieutenaiit, Colonel Graham's New 
York Regt., 1776. 

HENRY BAYARD CLARK, Elizabeth, N. J. (27790). Son of Thomas March and 
Mary A. B. S. (Brewster) Clark; grandson of Samuel Adams and Sarah 
(Henry) Clark; great-grandson of John Snowden and Elizabeth Ingersoll (Bay- 
ard) Henry; great 2 -grandson of Andrew and Sarah (Pettitt) Bayard; great 5 - 
grandson of Charles Pettit, Assistant Quartermaster General Continental Army, 
by Act of Congress, March 2, 1778. 

IRVING GRINNELL CLARK, Summit, N. J. (28495)- Son of Richard Urann 
and Imigene Rebecca (Caldwell) Clark; grandson of John Pitman and Mary 
Ann (Veltman) Clark; great-grandson of Samuel and Marie Antoinette (Hunt) 
Clark; great 2 -grandson of Abraham Hunt, Captain, Col. Joseph Vose's Mass. 
Regt. 

JOSEPH E. CLARK, Bellevue, Pa. (28040). Son of Joseph and Pauline (Kelly) 
Clark; grandson of James and Sarah (Woodward) Clark; great-grandson of 
James Clark, Captain Armstrong County Penna. Volunteers. 

MYRON HORTON CLARK, Newark, N. J. (28100). Son of Jesse W. and Emma 
(Titchenor) Clark; grandson of Pardee and Polly (Woodword) Clark; great- 
grandson of Daniel Clark, private Fifth Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 



244 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GEORGE STANLEY CLARKE, Richmond, Va. (28328). Son of George Harvey 
and Mary (Pollard) Clarke; grandson of Augustin B. and Emma Ballington 
(Keesie) Clarke; great-grandson of John Salle and Nancy (Frayser) Clarke; 
great 2 -grandson of Jesse Frayser, private Virginia Militia. 

FRANK H. CLEMENT, Rochester, N. Y. (28261). Son of Harris and Clarissa 
Tilden (Paud) Clement; grandson of John, Jr., and Polly (Richardson) 
Clements; great-grandson of John Clements, Sergeant, Colonel Cushing's Mass. 
Regt. 

HENRY CLAY CLEMENT, Jr., Captain U. S. Army, Callands, Va. (N. Y. 27645). 
Son of Henry Clay and Harriet (Morrison) Clement; grandson of George W. 
and Sarah (Turner) Clement; great-grandson of Adam Clement, Captain Bed- 
ford County Virginia Militia. 

ALFRED GORDON CLEVELAND, Olongapo, P. I. (24963). Son of Edward L. 
and Pearl M. Cleveland; grandson of Frederick and Clarisa (Mansfield) Cleve- 
land; great-grandson of William Carrol and Martha Marie (Granger) Mans- 
field; great 2 -grandson of Thimathy Thomas and Phoebe (Adams) Mansfield; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Adams, private, Colonel Hooker's Conn. Regt. 

RICHARD CHESTER CLEVELAND, Worcester, Mass. (28508). Son of Clarence 
Chester and Fluvia Evelina Cleveland; grandson of Chester Bissell and Char- 
lotte Barlow (Weare) Cleveland; great-grandson of Chester Bissell and Kesiah - 1 
(Brown) Cleveland; great 2 -grandson of Hosmer and Fluvia (Bissell) Cleveland; 
great 3 -grandson of Edward Cleveland, private Conn. Regt., killed at Siege of 
Boston, February 15, 1776. 

WILLIAM M. CLEVENGER, Atlantic City, N. J. (26855). Supplemental. Son 
of William and Eleanor Giberson (Wescoat) Clevenger; grandson of Absalom 
S. and Eleanor (Giberson) Wescoat; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Sooy) 
Giberson; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Sooy, Orderly Sergeant Gloucester County 
New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of James Giberson, private Gloucester 
County New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of John Giberson, private Glou- 
cester County New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN WILLIAM CLIFT, Summit, N. J. (27686). Son of John Atkins and Mar- 
garet (Gurnee) Clift; grandson of William A. and Ester (Onderdonck) Gurnee; 
great-grandson of Garret A. and Elizabeth (Gurnee) Onderdonck; great 2 - 
grandson of Abraham Onderdonck, First Lieutenant of Minute Men, Orange 
County New York Minute Men. 

ROY WALTER CLOUD, Redwood City, Cal. (26766). Son of Joseph James and 
Adeline (Wiltsey) Cloud, Jr.; grandson of Joseph James and Phebe (Chamber- 
lain) Cloud; great-grandson of Joseph Cloud, Second Lieutenant Chester 
County Penna. Militia. 

HORACE R. CODDINGTON, Maplewood, N. J. (28497). Son of Theodore 
Thomas and Elvira Ann (Cornell) Coddington; grandson of William Alexander 
and Charity Ann (Colyer) Cornell; great-grandson of Hallett and Elvira 
(Hicks) Cornell; great 2 -grandson of Jeffrey Hicks, Second Lieutenant New 
York Militia. 

LYMAN BADGLEY CODDINGTON, Murray Hill, N. J. (27687). Son of Isaiah 
and Mary Noe (Badgley) Coddington; grandson of Isaiah and Charity (Bird) 
Coddington; great-grandson of Archibald Coddington, private First Somerset 
County Battalion New Jersey Militia. 

RAY FRANK CODDINGTON, Chicago, 111. (27817). Son of William Ellery and 
Dora Linnette (Coffeen) Coddington; grandson of Edwin William and Hannah 
Jane (Spinning) Coffeen; great-grandson of Elias and Phebe (Ball) Spinning; 
great 2 -grandson of Matthias Spinning, private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ALMA COE, Chicago, 111. (28013). Son of Moses and Martha (Boal) Coe; grand- 
son of Daniel and Mary (Gladden) Coe; great-grandson of Moses Coc, Ensign 
Westmoreland County Penna. Rangers. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 245 

PERLEY MASON CODINGTON, Somerville, N. J. (26942). Supplemental. Son 
of Lewis Mundy and Susan Clara (Mason) Codington; grandson of Pethuel 
and Susan Hazeltine (Ramsay) Mason; great-grandson of Jonas and Abiah 
(Bryant) Mason; great 2 -grandson of Bbenezer Mason, private, Capt. Isaac 
Parsons's Company, Colonel Prime's Mass. Regt. ; great-grandson of Matthew 
and Nancy (Hazeltine) Ramsay; great 2 -giandson of Thomas Ramsay, Sergeant 
New Hampshire Troops. 

WALTER ROY COFFMAN, Portland, Ore. (26450). Son of Joseph Y. and Mary 
E. (Cessna) Coffman; grandson of Charles and Sally (House) Cessna; great- 
grandson of Squire James and Elizabeth (Tysenger) Cessna; great 2 -grandson 
of John Cessna, Major of Associators and Militia of Bedford County, Penna. 

WALTER EMERY COFFIN, Des Moines, Iowa (28205). Son of Harrison At- 
wood and Catherine (Stevenson) Coffin; grandson of Nathan Emery and Eunice 
Coffin; great-grandson of Tristram Coffin, private, Major Thomas's Company 
Mass. Artillery. 

JOHN ARCHER COKE, Jr., Richmond, Va. (22998). Son of John Archer and 
Emma (Overby) Coke; grandson of John and EHza (Hankins) Coke; great- 
grandson of Archer and Alice (Browne) Hankins; great 2 -grandson of John 
Browne, Commissary General Virginia Troops. 

JOHN WESLEY COLE, Baltimore, Md. (27855). Son of John Wesley and 
Almira (Purdy) Cole; grandson of Horatio and Margaret Maria (Darby) 
Purdy; great-grandson of John EHas and Ruhamah (Harvey) Darby; great 2 - 
grandson of Ephriam Darby, Quartermaster and Captain New Jersey Militia. 

FRANK H. COLEMAN, Brockton, Mass. (27560). Son of John N. and Harriet 
Ide (French) Coleman; grandson of Ezra and Phoebe (Taylor) French; great- 
grandson of Seba (and Molly Ide) French, Corporal, Captain Bullock's Com- 
pany, Colonel Carpenter's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Elkanah French, 
private, Capt. John Perry's Company Mass. Minute Men, Colonel Carey's 
Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Ide, Sergeant, Capt. N. Carpenter"s 
Company Mass. Militia in Lexington Alarm. 

PAUL ALBRIGHT COLEMAN, Orange, N. J. (28484). Son of William S. S. 
and Lucetta (Meyer) Coleman; grandson of William Nagle and Susan Rebecca 
(Hoke) Coleman; great-grandson of Nicholas and Rebecca (Nagle) Coleman; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter Nagle, Captain Berks County Penna. Militia. 

WILLIAM S. STEWART COLEMAN, East Orange, N. J. (28704). Son of Wil- 
liam Nagle and Susan Rebecca (Hoke) Coleman; grandson of Nicholas and 
Rebecca (Nagle) Coleman; great-grandson of Peter Nagle, Captain Sixth Berks 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

WENTWORTH BRODHEAD COLLINS, Montclair, N. J. (28159). Son of Wil- 
liam Herschel and Stephenia Drew (Wentworth) Collins; grandson of John 
Brodhead and Clara Mathes (Drew) Wentworth; great-grandson of Richard 
and P. (Brodhead) Wentworth; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Wentworth, private, 
Capt. William McDuffie's Company New Hampshire Militia. 

JOHN BUSBY CONAWAY, York, Nebr. (27315). Son of Aaron and Dorcus 
(Busby) Conaway; grandson of Michael C. and Martha (Hoagland) Conaway; 
great-grandson of Michael Conaway, seaman on Maryland ship "Defence," 
George Cook, Commander. 

EDWARD A. CONDIT, Newark, N. J. (28496). Son of Edward and Catherine 
(Sherman) Condit; grandson of Lucius and Sarah (Faitout) Condit; great- 
grandson of David Condit, Lieutenant Colonel Second Essex County Regt. New 
Jersey Militia. 

FREDERICK MILLER CONKLING, Orange, N. J. (26106). Supplemental. Son 
of William Johnson and Mary Irene (Perry) Conkling) ; grandson of Matthias 
Chitterling and Mary (Foster) Perry; great-grandson of Stephen and Susan 
(Maxwell) Foster; great 2 -grandson of John Maxwell, private Essex County 



246 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Foster, Corporal, Col. Philip 
Van Cortlandt's Regt. Essex County New Jersey Militia, also Sergeant, Col. 
Matthias Ogden's First Regt. New Jersey Line. 
JOSHUA RAYMOND CONKUNG, Orange, N. J. (26107). Supplemental. Son 
of William Johnson and Mary Irene (Perry) Conkling; grandson of Matthias 
Chitterling and Mary (Foster) Perry; great-grandson of Stephen and Susan 
(Maxwell) Foster; great 2 -grandson of John Maxwell, private Essex County 
New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Foster, Corporal, Col. Philip 
Van Cortlandt's Regt. Essex County New Jersey Militia, also Sergeant, Col. 
Matthias Ogden's First Regt. New Jersey Line. 
WIEEIAM HOMER CONKUNG, East Orange, N. J. (26852). Supplemental. 
Son of William Johnson and Mary Irene (Perry) Conkling; grandson of 
Matthias Chitterling and Mary (Foster) Perry; great-grandson of Stephen and 
Susan (Maxwell) Foster;, greats-grandson of Samuel Foster, Corporal, Col. 
Philip Van Cortlandt's Regt. Essex County New Jersey Militia, also Sergeant, 
Col. Matthias Ogden's First Regt. New Jersey Continental Line; great-grand- 
son of John Maxwell, private Essex County New Jersey Militia; grandson of 
Joshua and Charlotte A. (Meeks) Conkling; great-grandson of John Johnson 
and Hannah (Tuttle) Conkling; great 2 -grandson of Chat field Tuttle, private, 
Capt. David Bates's Company Eastern Battalion Morris County New Jersey 
Militia, Col. Sylvanus Seeley. 
ALBERT HOLMES CONNER, Sandpoint, Idaho (27009). Son of Homer Erasmus 
and Virginia (Holmes) Conner; grandson of Robert Stevenson and Frances 
Constant (Farnham) Conner; great-grandson of Eli and Amanda (Bryan) 
Farnham; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Bryan, private Third Regt. Conn. Line. 
CLARENCE FISKE CONNER, Detroit, Mich. (27461). Son of Edward H. and 
Jennie (Church) Conner; grandson of Harwell and Mary Ann (Davis) Church; 
great-grandson of Ezra and Lavinda (Mead) Church; great 2 -grandson of Asa 
and Julia (or Juliette) (Humphrey) Church; great 3 -grandson of William 
Humphrey, Captain, Colonel Wingate's New Hampshire Regt. 
DANIEL MARION CONWAY, Portland, Ore. (27584). Son of Joseph and Mary 
L. (Hendricks) Conway; grandson of Samuel Conway, private Virginia Troops. 
CHARLES GOLDSMITH COOK, Detroit, Mich. (27455). Son of Olney Ballou 
and Vashti W. (Goldsmith) Cook; grandson of Fenner and Maranda (Thayer) 
Cook; great-grandson of Thaddeus and Rhoda (Ballou) Cook; great 2 -grandson 
of Levi Ballou, Deputy in Rhode Island General Assembly. 
JAMES CLIFTON COOK, Detroit, Mich. (27456). Son of Olney Ballou and 
Vashti W. (Goldsmith) Cook; grandson of Fenner and Maranda (Thayer) 
Cook; great-grandson of Thaddeus and Rhoda (Ballou) Cook; great 2 -grandson 
of Levi Ballou, Deputy in Rhode Island General Assembly. 
SHERWIN L. COOK, Roxbury, Mass. (27561). Son of John C. and Clara L. 
(Hewes) Cook; grandson of John Milton and Susan Ann (Shedd) Hewes; 
great 2 -grandson of George Robert Twelves Hewes, Member of Boston Tea 
Party, private, Capt. Samuel Cowell's Company, Col. Benj. Hawes's Mass. 
Regt. and other service; great-grandson of Samuel Adams Shedd; great-grand- 
son of Joseph Shed, Jr., Captain, Col. Joseph Gerrish's Mass. Regt. 
HENRY CHURCHILL COOKE, Washington, D. C. (27989). Son of James W. 
and Elizabeth A. (Pickett) Cooke; grandson of Thomas Booth and Jennie 
(Church) Cooke; great-grandson of Mordecai Cooke, Lieutenant, Capt. Jacob 
Walker's Company, Col. Charles Harrison's Virginia Regt. Continental Artillery. 
PHILIP ST. GEORGE COOKE, Richmond, Va. (28334). Son of John R. and 
Anne Gordon (Patton) Cooke; grandson of William Failie and Harriet Shep- 
herd (Buck) Patton; great-grandson of Robert and Anne Gordon (Mercer) 
Patton; great 2 -grandson of Hugh Mercer, Brigadier General Continental Army; 
grandson of Philip St. George and Rachel (Hertzog) Cooke; great-grandson of 
Stephen Cooke, Surgeon, prisoner at Bermuda. 



REGISTER 01- NEW MEMBERS. 247 

GEORGE EDWIN COOLEY, Chicago, 111. (27821). Son of Edwin Homer and 
Mattie G. (Page) Cooley; grandson of Edwin and Caroline Elizabeth (Taylor) 
Cooley; great-grandson of Ariel and Hannah (Bartlett) Taylor; great 2 -grandson 
of Ithamar Taylor, private, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. 

JAMES WALTON COOPER, Walla Walla, Wash. (27878). Son of Daniel Car- 
gill and Louisa J. (Tidball) Cooper; grandson of Ebenezer and Jane (Mc- 
Millan) Cooper; great-grandson of John Cooper, private, Col. Roebuck's South 
Carolina Regt. ; great-grandson of Daniel and Jeanette (Chestnut) McMillan ; 
great 2 -grandson of James Chestnut, private South Carolina Militia; grandson of 
James and Cynthia (Dunlap) Tidball; great-grandson of John and Sarah CMc- 
Goun) Tidball; great 2 -grandson of John McGoun, Brigade Major, Paymaster, 
Lancaster County Penna. Militia. 

CHARLES LOUIS CORBY, Springfield, N. J. (28153). Son of Charles Trumbull 
and Emily Elizabeth (Denman) Corby; grandson of Louis A. and Abigail 
(Briant) Denman; great-grandson of Aaron and Betsey (Sayre) Briant; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Roll) Sayre; great 3 -grandson of Abraham 
and Mary (Brooks) Roll; great 4 -grandson of John Roll, Sergeant Eastern Bat- 
talion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

RICHARD LE ROY CORBY, Springfield, N. J. (28154). Son of Charles Trum- 
bull and Emily Elizabeth (Denman) Corby; grandson of Louis A. and Abigail 
(Briant) Denman; great-grandson of Aaron and Betsey (Sayre) Briant; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Roll) Sayre; great s -grandson of Abraham 
and Mary (Brooks) Roll; great 4 -grandson of John Roll, Sergeant Eastern Bat- 
talion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

GLEN SIBLEY CORKERY, Seattle, Wash. (27887). Son of Thomas J. and 
Flora (Sibley) Corkery; grandson of Warren Dow and Sarah (Clerk) Sibley; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Dow and Lydia (Goodwin) Sibley; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Sibley, private, Col. Thomas Stickney's New Hampshire Regt. 

JOHN CASS CORNELL, Lincoln, Nebr. (27320). Son of Charles Albert and 
Augusta H. (Burrows) Cornell; grandson of John Smith and Maria (Story) 
Burrows; great-grandson of Stephen and Amanda (Leach) Story; great-grand- 
son of Enoch Story, private Mass. Continental Troops, pensioned. 

NELSON JAY COTTINGTON, Chicago, 111. (27604). Son of Joseph and Mary 
Anne (Coburn) Cottington; grandson of Adam and Eliza (Burgess) Cotting- 
ton ; great-grandson of Isaac Burgess, private, Col. John Smock's Monmouth 
County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

EDWIN HILL COURTNEY, Richmond, Va. (28326). Son of Giles C. and Eliza- 
beth Spottswood (Hill) Courtney; grandson of Edwin and Eliza (Minor) Hill; 
great-grandson of Archibald and Ann D. (Rawlins) Minor; great 2 -grandson of 
Vivian Minor, Captain and Quartermaster Third Regt. Nelson's Brigade, widow 
pensioned. 

FREDERICK WINES COWLES, Columbus, Ohio (27741). Son of Frederick 
Lucius and Elizabeth Wines (Botsford) Cowles; grandson of George W. and 
Mary (Arrowhood) Cowles; great-grandson of Harry and Mary (Baldwin) 
Cowles; great 2 -grandson of Zebe Cowles, private Fifteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ANDERSON BOND COX, Portland, Ore. (27598). Son of Lewis and Caroline 
(Bond) Cox; grandson of Nathan Walton and Elizabeth (Trailor) Bond; great- 
grandson of Jesse Walton and Susannah (Crain) Bond; great 2 -grandson of 
John Crain, private, Col. Christy's North Carolina Regt., pensioned. 

EUGENE ANDREWS COX, Lewiston, Idaho (N. C. 24520). Son of Thomas 
Jefferson and Harriet Eliza (Andrews) Cox; grandson of Aldridge and Harriet 
(Roberson) Andrews; great-grandson of Arden and Drupina (Gainer) Andrews; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Gainer, Member of Committee of Safety of Pitt 
County, N. C, 1775; great 2 -grandson of Edmund Andrews, Member of Com- 
mittee of Safety of Pitt County, North Carolina. 



248 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FRANK HIXON COYLE, Minneapolis, Minn. (25309). Son of George Lincoln 
and Clara Lillian (Hixon) Coyle; grandson of Laban and Julia Ann (Fairfield) 
Coyle; great-grandson of William Ethan and Maria (Larrabee) Fairfield; great 2 - 
grandson of Northway and Anne (Miller) Fairfield; great 3 -grandson of Samuel 
Fairfield, Captain Thirteenth Company Second Hampshire County Regt. Mass. 
Militia and other Regts. 

ROBERT CRAIG, New Germantown, N. J. (28087). Son of Robert and Eliza 
(Field) Craig; grandson of Richard and Sarah (Vandervort) Field; great- 
grandson of Hendrick Field, private First Middlesex County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia. 

THOMAS POSEY CRAIG, Boulder, Colo. (28054). Son of James and Maria 
Street (Posey) Craig; grandson of William C. and Ann S. (Gateswood) Posey; 
great-grandson of Thomas Posey, Lieutenant Colonel Seventh Virginia Regt. 

FREDERICK WARREN CRAM, Sheldon, Iowa (27658). Son of Jacob Haskell 
and Sarah Maria (Wing) Cram; grandson of Joseph and Betsey Paine (Has- 
kell) Cram; great-grandson of Tristram Cram, private, Col. Joseph Senter's 
New Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY CLINTON CRAM, Sheldon, Iowa {27672). Son of Henry Jay and 
Annie Adelaide (Clark) Cram; grandson of Jacob Haskell and Sarah Maria 
(Wing) Cram; great-grandson of Joseph and Betsey Paine (Haskell) Cram; 
great 2 -grandson of Tristram Cram, private, Col. Joseph Senter's New Hamp- 
shire Regt. 

HENRY JAY CRAM, Sheldon, Iowa (27671). Son of Jacob Haskell and Sara!) 
Maria (Wing) Cram; grandson of Joseph and Betsey Paine (Haskell) Cram; 
great-grandson of Tristram Cram, privatae, Col. Joseph Senter's New Hamp- 
shire Regt. 

JOHN WESLEY CRAM, Colrain, Mass. (28509). Son of Alfred Jackson and 
Mary Ann (French) Cram; grandson of Moses and Hannah (Philbrick) 
French, Jr.; great-grandson of Moses French, private, Col. Michael Jackson's 
Mass. Regt. 

DAVID BOYD CRANE, Helena, Mont. (18163). Son of Oliver Turnbull and 
Gertrude Newman (Boyd) Crane; grandson of Oliver and Marion Dunn (Turn- 
bull) Crane; great-grandson of Stephen Fordham and Matilda (Smith) Crane; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter Smith, Regimental Quartermaster, First Lieutenant, 
Penna. Line. 

WILLIAM IRA CRANSTON, Providence, R. I. (27 191). Son of William Abel 
and Emma Annette (Mathewson) Cranston; grandson of William Benjamin 
and Laura (French) Cranston; great-grandson of William and Betsey (Mc- 
Millen) Cranston; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Cranston, Quartermaster on 
galley "Spitfire," private Rhode Island Militia, pensioned. 

ARTHUR JAMES CRAWFORD, New Haven, Conn. (27339). Son of Ossian and 
Lavenia (Shepard) Crawford; grandson of Ingoldsby W. and Rhoda (Taft) 
Crawford; great-grandson of Samuel Crazvford, private, Capt. Nehemiah 
Beardsley's Fifth Conn. Regt., Colonel Waterbury. 

FRANKLIN CORTEZ CREGO, Mount Pleasant, Mich. (27453). Son of Richard 
J. and Mary Electa (Reed) Crego; grandson of Joseph Barney and Mary Ann 
(Pickett) Reed; great-grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Read) Reed; great-- 
grandson of Joshua Reed, private, Capt. Daniel Brown's Company, Col. Miles 
Powell's Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRANKLIN W. CRISTMAN, Herkimer, N. Y. (14476). Supplemental. Son of 
James and Catharine (Steele) Cristman; grandson of James and Elizabeth 
(Spohn) Steele; great-grandson of John E. and Elizabeth (Hess) Spohn; great- 
grandson of Nicholas and Catharina (Kilts) Spohn; great 3 -grandson of Peter 
Kilts, parents of Catharina, private, Colonel Klock's Tryon County Regt. New 
York Militia; grandson of Harvey and Nancy (Fulmer) Cristman; great-grand- 
son of George F. and Mary E. (Bell) Cristman; great 2 -grandson of Philip and 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 249 

Dorothea (Hilts) Bell; great 3 -granclson of Nicholas Hilts, private, Colonel 
Bellinger's Tryon County Regt. New York Militia; great a -grandson of Jacob 
Bell, private, Capt. Henry Herder's Company, Bellinger's Tryon County Regt. 
New York Militia and Mohawk Rangers, pensioned; great-grandson of George 
C. and Catherine (Witherstine) Fulmer; great 2 -grandson of John and Margaret 
(Casler) Witherstine; great 3 -grandson of Hendrick Witterstein, private, Captain 
Frank's Company, Colonel Bellinger's New York Regt. ; great'-grandson of 
Melchart Kcssler (Casler), Corporal, Captain Small's Company, Colonel Bel- 
linger's Tryon County Regt. New York Militia; great-grandson of Richard D. 
and Catherine (Bowman) Steele; great 2 -grandson of Frederick Bowman, private, 
Captain Staring's Company, Colonel Bellinger's Tryon County Regt. New York 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of Dietrich Stahl (Steele), First lieutenant, Captain 
Shoemaker's Company, Colonel Herkimer's Tryon County Regt. New York 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of Conrad and Margaret (Frank) Hess; great :! -grandson 
of Augustinus Hess, private, Captain Frank's Company, Colonel Bellinger's 
Tryon County Regt. New York Militia. 

JOHN FRANKUN CRITCHLOW, Salt Lake City, Utah (25992). Son of John 
James and Hattie M. (Ayer) Critchlow; grandson of David and Margaret 
(Coe) Critchlow; great-grandson of William Critchlow, private Westmoreland 
County Penna. Militia, Continental Line. 

WILLIAM McKISSACK CROOK, Beaumont, Texas (251 18). Son of Wiley Jar- 
man and Jennette Thompson (Parham) Crook; grandson of William Pope and 
Lucy Hudson (McKissack) Parham; great-grandson of Thomas Jones and 
Winifred L. (Pope) Parham; great 2 -grandson of William Parham, private Third 
Virginia Continental Regt. 

ARTHUR R. CROOKS, Winthrop, Mass. (27552). Son of Abraham and Ann 
Maria (Guy) Crooks; grandson of Samuel and Emeline (Stearns) Crooks; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Stearns, private, Capt. John Drury's Company, Col. 
Ezra Wood's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE H. CROSBY, Grinnell, Iowa (27668). Son of Samuel Nevers and Mary 
Ann (Halliburton) Crosby; grandson of Ebenezer (and Bathsheba Nevers) 
Crosby, private, Col. Josiah Brewer's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Phineas 
Nevers, Lieutenant Colonel, Col. John Allen's Mass. Regt. 

HOWARD HALL CROSBY, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. (Mass. 
27765). Son of George and Clara Rosette (Hall) Crosby: grandson of George 
and Abigail Harriet (Gleason) Crosby; great-grandson of Michael and Asenath 
(Blanchard) Crosby; great 2 -grandson of Oliver Crosby, Lieutenant Third Bil- 
lerica Company, Colonel Green's Mass. Regt., Lexington Alarm. 

SAMUEL H. CROSBY, Grinnell, Iowa (27669). Son of George H. and Annie 
(Haines) Crosby; grandson of Samuel Nevers and Mary Ann (Halliburton) 
Crosby; great-grandson of Ebenezer (and Bathsheba Nevers) Crosby, private, 
Col. Josiah Brewer's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Phineas Nevers, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel, Col. John Allen's Mass. Regt. 

MORELLE F. CROSS, New Haven, Conn. (19089). Supplemental. Son of Henry 
Tisdale and Julia (Smith) Cross; grandson of Ernestus and Spohia (Otis) 
Cross; great-grandson of Erastus and Catharine (Brace) Cross; great 2 -grandson 
of Abel Brace, Member of Committee of Inspection and Correspondence, Cap- 
tain Eighteenth Regt. Conn. Militia, Col. Seth Smith. 

LEWIS ABBOTT CROSSETT, Boston, Mass. (27950). Son of Robert and Ruth 
Ellen (Lewis) Crossett; grandson of Robert and Mary (Abbott) Crossett; 
great-grandson of Samuel Crossett, private, Col. Samuel Williams's and other 
Mass. Regts. ; great 2 -grandson of Robert Crossett, private, Capt. David Crow- 
den's Company Mass. Militia. 

FRANKLIN MILTON CROSSMAN, : Sayreville, N. J. (28362). Son of Franklin'' 
and Elizabeth (Maney) Crossman; grandson of Alfred B. and Mary (Rush- 
more) Grossman; great-grandson of Gilbert and Betsey (Finch) Crossman; 
great 3 -grartdson of Simeon Crossman, private Third Regt. New York Line, Col. 
James Clinton. 



25O SONS OP THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIS ALFRED GROSSMAN, Worcester, Mass. (2S244). Son of Alfred W- 
and Deborah E. (Buck) Grossman; grandson of Silas and Deborah (Beaman) 
Buck; great-grandson of Gideon White Beaman, private, Capt. Ephraim Hart- 
well's Company Mass. Guards. 

ALFRED PHELPS CRUM. Cleveland, Ohio (28626). Son of X. X. and Marcia: 
(Phelps) Crum; grandson of Alfred and Jennie Marcia (Pomeroy) Phelps, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Alfred and Anna (Tousley) Phelps; great 2 -grandson of Seth 
Phelps, Captain, Col. Charles Webb's Conn. Regt. 

JAMES DOBSON CRUMP, Richmond, Va. (28345). Son of Robert Hill and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Dobson) Crump; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Waddell) 
Dobson; great-grandson of Richard Dobson, private, Colonel Scott's Virginia 
Regt., pensioned. 

ROBERT NEWELL CUNDALL, Buffalo, N. Y. (27845). Son of Charles L. and 
Jessie F. (Randall) Cundall; grandson of Joseph W. and Abigail N. (Fisher) 
Cundall; great-grandson of William and Clara Rebecca (Bennett) Cundall; 
great'-'-grandson of Joseph Bennett, private, Col. Thomas Church's Rhode Island 
Regt., pensioned. 

MILTON LELAND CUSHING, Fitchburg, Mass. (28245). Son of Milton M. and 
Ellen (Leland) Gushing; grandson of Joseph and Elmira (Marble) Gushing; 
great-grandson of Laban and Nancy (Whitney) Cushing; great 2 ~grandson of 
David and Hannah Gushing, Jr.; great'-grandson of David CnsJiing, Colonel 
Second Suffolk County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRED HULTSON CUTLER, Waterloo, Iowa (27652). Son of Henry P. and 
Emily A. (Hultson) Cutler; grandson of Samuel and Cornelia H. (Hubbell) 
Cutler; great-grandson of Robert and Huldah (Bartlett) Cutler; great-grand- 
son of Joseph Cutler, Captain Fourth Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN CHURCHILL DAMON, Salt Lake City, Utah (25997). Son of Edward C. 
and Anne Elizabeth (Hager) Damon; grandson of Calvin C. and Rebecca 
(Poor) Damon; great-grandson of Benjamin Damon, private Mass. Troops, 
pensioned. 

RICHARD OTIS DANFORTH, Dorchester, Mass. (27434). Son of Otis Stanley 
and Minnie J. (Marshall) Danforth; grandson of George Fayette and Martha 
(Reed) Marshall; great-grandson of Abel and Martha (Pierce) Marshall, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of Abel Marshall, private Middlesex County Mass. Militia. 

JOEL SELMAN DANIELS, Manchester, N. H. (25388). Son of Joel and Eliza 
A. (Roach) Daniels; grandson of Nathan and Mehitable (Walker) Daniels; 
great-grandson of Amos and Judith (Bayley) Walker; great 2 -grandson of Asa 
Walker, private, Captain Jones's Company, Col. James Prescott's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

ROBERT JOEL MASON DANLEY, Columbus, Ohio (27096). Son of Joel Mason 
and Martha Jane (Gard) Danley; grandson of John and Sarah Ann (Brown) 
Danley, Jr.; great-grandson of Benjamin Loring and Nellie (Seaman) Brown; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Brown, Captain, Col. Michael Jackson's Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Hiram and Ataline Gage (Dunsmoor) Gard; great-grandson 
of Phineas and Polly (Gage) Dunsmoor; great 2 -grandson of Abner Gage, private 
New Hampshire Minute Men; great 3 -grandson of Daniel Gage, Captain New 
Hampshire Minute Men. 

FRANK E. DARLING, Jr., Milwaukee, Wis. (27063). Son of Frank E. and EHa 
(Crosby) Darling; grandson of Sylvester A. and Sara Jane (Southworth) 
Darling; great-grandson of Russell and Sara (Stafford) Darling; great-grand- 
son of William Stafford, private, Colonel Crary's Rhode Island Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

WILLIAM LAFAYETTE DARLING, St. Paul, Minn. (25312). Son of William 
Edward and Cynthia Marana (Steere) Darling; grandson of Thomas and Syl- 
vania (Sheldon) Darling; great-grandson of Asa Sheldon, private, Colonel 
Hitchcock's and other Conn. Regts., pensioned; grandson of Augustus and 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS. 251 

Cyrena (Salisbury) Steere; great-grandson of Simeon and Mary (Walker) 
Steere; great-grandson of Jonah Steere, Member of Recruiting and Supplies 
Committee, Rhode Island Troops; great-grandson of Duty and Cynthia (Smith) 
Salisbury; great-grandson of Edward Salisbury, minute man and private Rhode 
Island Militia; great 2 -grandson of Martin Smith, Lieutenant of Gloster Light 
Infantry, Rhode Island. 

GEORGE STERLING DATES, Jr., East Orange, N. J. (277S3). Sou of George 
Sterling and Flora I. S. Dates; grandson of Abraham H. and Anna M. Dates; 
great-grandson of Adams and Rebecca (Westervelt) Dates; great-grandson of 
Caspar Westervelt, private, Colonel Graham's Dutchess County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

ARTHUR WERNER DAVIS, Edgartown, Mass. (27433). Son of Ira N, and 
Emma (Werner) Davis; grandson of George II. and Mary (Nickerson) Davis; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Claresse (Hillman) Nickerson; great-grandson 
of Samuel Nickerson, Corporal, Capt. Thomas Nickerson's Company, Major 
Zenas Winslow's Mass. Regt. 

HORACE WEBBER DAVIS, Sharon, Pa. (28046). Son of Phillip Fillmore and 
Mary Churchward (Webber) Davis; grandson of Abraham and Ruth (Mead) 
Davis; great-grandson of Elijah Davis, private First Cumberland County Bat- 
talion New Jersey Militia. 

LESLIE ROWELL DAVIS, Olympia, Wash. (27898). Son of Carroll F. and Ida 
Kate (Rowell) Davis; grandson of Joshua Converse and Mary Fifield (Bill) 
Rowell; great-grandson of Daniel and Mercy (Johnson) Rowell; great-grand- 
son of Enoch Rowell, Sergeant, Colonel Baldwin's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

CHARLES GATES DAWES, Evanston, 111. (27606). Son of Rufus R. and Mary 
Beman (Gates) Dawes; grandson of Henry and Sarah (Cutler) Dawes; great- 
grandson of William Mears and Abby Kendall (Holden) Dawes; great-grand- 
son of William, Dawes, accompanied Paul Revere on his famous ride. 

HAMILTON MILLER DAWES, Montclair, N. J. (28498). Son of Isaac M. and 
Eliza Frances (Young) Dawes; grandson of John and Margaret (Kercheval) 
Young; great-grandson of Benjamin Kercheval, private Eighth Virginia Regt. 

RUFUS CUTLER DAWES, Evanston, 111. (27605). Son of Rufus R. and Mary 
Beman (Gates) Dawes; grandson of Henry and Sarah (Cutler) Dawes; great- 
grandson of William Mears and Abby Kendall (Holden) Dawes; great-grandson 
of William Dawes, accompanied Paul Revere on his famous ride; great-grand- 
son of Jonas Holden, Jr., Corporal Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jonas 
Holden, private, Col. Abijah Pierce's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Ephraim 
and Sally (Parker) Cutler; great-grandson of Manasseh Cutler, Chaplain, Col. 
Ebenezer Francis's Mass. Regt. ; great 2 -grandson of William Parker, Second 
Lieutenant Second Essex County Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Beman and 
Betsey Sybyl (Shipman) Gates; great-grandson of Aaron and Ruth (Beman) 
Gates; great-grandson of Aaron Gates, private, Capt. John Black's Company 
Mass. Minute Men, marched April 20, 1775; great-grandson of Charles and 
Joanna (Bartlett) Shipman; great-grandson of Henry and Betsey (Corey) 
Bartlett; great'-grandson of William Bartlett (and Joanna Herrick), First Lieu- 
tenant brigantine "Hampden," commanded by Capt. John Bartlett, pensioned; 
great 4 -grandson of Henry Herrick, Colonel Eighth Essex County Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

CLARENCE EDWARD DAWSON, Chevy Chase, Md. (D. C. 27996). Son of 
Edward Matthews and Clara (Cox) Dawson; grandson of Edward M. and 
Susan Hambleton (Parrott) Dawson; great-grandson of James and Susanna 
(Hambleton) Parrott; great-grandson of William Hambleton, Captain Thirty- 
eighth Battalion Maryland Militia. 

JOHN AUGUSTUS DAY, Worcester, Mass. (28510). Son of John Eddy and 
Abbie (Fay) Day; grandson of Hamilton Baxter and Hannah (Fairbanks) Fay; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Betsey (Whitney) Fairbanks; great-grandson of 
Amos Fairbanks, Captain, Col. Job Cushing's Mass. Regt. 



2$2 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM MANSFIELD DEACON, Cedar Rapids, Iowa (27651). Son of Charles 
Johnson and Sylvia (Mansfield) Deacon; grandson of Eber Lewis and Lucy A. 
(Warriner) Mansfield; great-grandson of Martin and Margaret (Durham) 
Mansfield; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Mansfield, fifer Third Maryland Conti- 
nentals, Capt. Henry Ridgely, pensioned. 

GERALD JACKSON DEAN, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27629). Son of Archie Leigh and 
Emma L. (Manson) Dean; grandson of Daniel A. and Martha E. (Jackson) 

Dean; great-grandson of and Ann (Torrence) Jackson; great 2 -grandson of 

John Torrence, private Penna. Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM SEARLES DEAN, Summit, N. J. (27508). Son of Benjamin Spinning 
and Phoebe (Badgley) Dean; grandson of John Squire and Hannah (Sturges) 
Badgley; great-grandson of Jonathan Badgley, private Essex County New Jersey 
Militia and other service, pensioned. 

FRED McREYNOLDS DEANE, Grand Rapids, Mich. (28136). Son of Charles 
H. and Maria (McReynolds) Deane; grandson of A. F. and Elizabeth Morgan 
(Brewster) McReynolds; great-grandson of Jonah and Betsey (Belcher) Brews- 
ter; great-grandson of William Belcher, Captain, Col. Samuel Selden's Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

HAROLD FREDERICK De LACOUR, Stratford, Conn. (27340). Son of Joseph 
Walter and Margaret Starr (Beardsley) De Lacour; grandson of Frederick 
Josiah and Margaret (Edmond) Beardsley; great-grandson of David and Re- 
becca (Starr) Beardsley; great 2 -grandson of Curtis Beardsley, Corporal, Capt. 
Nathaniel Wheeler's Company, Col. Ichabod Lewis's Regt. ; great 3 -grandson of 
Abraham Beardsley, State Inspector of gunpowder, private in Capt. James 
Booth's "Larm Company" of Connecticut. 

REGINALD BEARDSLEY De LACOUR, Stratford, Conn. (27341). Son of Joseph 
Walter and Margaret Starr (Beardsley) De Lacour; grandson of Frederick 
Josiah and Margaret (Edmond) Beardsley; great-grandson of David and Re- 
becca (Starr) Beardsley; great 2 -grandson of Curtis Beardsley, Corporal, Capt. 
Nathaniel Wheeler's Company, Col. Ichabod Lewis's Regt.; great 3 -grandson of 
Abraham Beardsley, State Inspector of gunpowder, private in Capt. James 
Booth's "Larm Company" of Connecticut. 

CRAWFORD MORTON DELANO, Lincoln, Nebr. (28378). Son of Will Stevens 
and Ada (Crawford) Delano; grandson of Mortimer and Rosetta Lois (Stevens) 
Delano; great-grandson of Daniel Wheeler and Rebecca (Swift) Delano; great 2 - 
grandson of Roger and Anna (Wheeler) Delano; great'-grandson of Jethro 
Delano, private, Col. Charles Burrell's Conn. Battalion; grandson of Calvin 
and Clarissa (Morris) Crawford; great-grandson of John Barclay and Elizabeth 
(Thompson) Crawford; great 2 -grandson of John Crawford, Lieutenant, Col. 
Jonathan Hasbrouck's New York Regt. and other service. 

WILL STEVENS DELANO, Lincoln, Nebr. (27318). Son of Mortimer and Ro- 
setta Lois (Stevens) Delano; grandson of Daniel Wheeler and Rebecca (Swift) 
Delano; great-grandson of Lot Swift, fifer, Capt. Colby Chamberlain's Com 
pany, Col. Morris Graham's Sixth Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia; 
great-grandson of Roger and Anna (Wheeler) Delano; great 2 -grandson of 
Jethro Delano, private, Capt. David Down's Company, Col. Charles Burrell's 
Conn. Battalion. 

JOHN REMSEN DEMAREST, New Haven, Conn. (27961). Son of Charles 
Dewey and Henrietta Louisa (Bauer) Demarest; grandson of John Taulman 
and Elizabeth (Eckerson-Remsen) Demarest; great-grandson of Aurie and 
Elizabeth (Taulman) Demarest; great 2 -grandson of Johannes and Sarah 
(Sickels) Taulman, or Talma; great 3 -grandson of Harmah Taulman, private 
Second Orange County Regt. New York Militia. 

EDWIN DENBY, Detroit, Mich. (28143). Son of Charles and Martha (Fitch) 
Denby; grandson of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Harvey) Denby; great-grandson 
of Matthew Harvey, private, Capt. Michael Rudolph's Company "Light Horse 
Harry" Lee's Legion of Cavalry; grandson of Graham N. Harriet (Satterlee) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 253 

Fitch; great-grandson of Frederick and Polly (Capen) Fitch; great 2 -grandson 
of Elisha Fitch and great-grandson of Peletiah Fitch, privates, Colonel Web- 
ster's New York Regt. 

HERBERT LOUIS DENNY, Newark. N. J. (19252). Son of George Henry and 
Sarah Jane Denny; grandson of William Henry and Rebecca (Bell) Denny; 
great-grandson of William and Sarah (Bailey) Denny; great-grandson of 
Henry Denny, Sergeant Bergen County New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN WILLIAM DENNY, Newark, N. J. (12704). Supplemental. Son of Wil- 
liam Henry and Rebecca (Bell) Denny; grandson of Samuel and Rebecca 
(Emmes) Bell; great-grandson of Nathaniel Bmmes, private, Major Nathaniel 
Heath's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HARRY LEE DENOON, Richmond, Va. (28338). Son of Daniel and Bettie 
Carver (King) Denoon; grandson of John and Dicey (Quarles) King; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Dicey King (Pemberton) Quarles; great-grandson of 
Thomas Pemberton, Captain First Virginia Regt. Light Dragoons. 

HUGH DENOON, Richmond, Va. (28336). Son of Daniel and Bettie Carver 
(King) Denoon; grandson of John and Dicey (Quarles) King; great-grandson 
of Isaac and Dicey King (Pemberton) Quarles; great 2 -grandson of Thomas 
Pemberton, Captain First Virginia Regt. Light Dragoons. 

WILLIAM M. DERBY, Jr., Chicago, 111. (26194). Supplemental. Son of William 
M. and Frances M. (Wood) Derby; grandson of Jonathan and Sarah Bridge 
(Stiles) Wood; great-grandson of Jonathan and Mary (Praut) Wood; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Wood, Captain Fifth Company Eighth Worcester County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HARRY ALFRED DEVER, Chicago, 111. (27 114). Supplemental. Son of Henry 
Williams and Laura Catharine (Rohrer) Dever; grandson of Henry and Susan 
Ames (Copeland) Dever; great-grandson of Alfred and Polly (Williams) Cope- 
land; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Lucilda (Hodges) Williams; great 8 - 
grandson of Simeon Williams, private, Colonel Pope's Bristol County Mass. 
Regt. 

M. O. DICKERSON, Rutherfordton, N. C. (24516). Son of M. O. and Mary 
(Patten) Dickerson; grandson of Garland and Elizabeth (Reavis) Dickerson; 
great-grandson of NatJianiel Dickerson, private, Captain Wade's Company Ninth 
North Carolina Regt. 

ALFRED BROWN DICKSON, New Haven. Conn. (27347). Son of Charles T. 
and Nettie (Brown) Dickson; grandson of Alfred Nathaniel and Mary (Smith) 
Brown; great-grandson of Daniel and Charlotte (Roe) Brown; great-grandson 
of Daniel Roe, Captain Second New York Regt. from Long Island. 

SHERMAN LANDON DIVINE, Spokane, Wash. (27900). v Son of John A. and 
Nettie E. (Landon) Divine; grandson of John H. and Martha M. (Adams) 
Landon; great-grandson of Luther and Martha (Hulett) Landon; great-grand- 
son of Rtifus Landon, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOHN FRANCIS DOANE, Topeka, Kans. (26989). Son of Abner and Sarah 
(Ward) Doane; grandson of Barnabus and Thankful (Knowles) Doane; great- 
grandson of Herman and Rebecca (Young) Doane; great-grandson of John 
Doane, private, Capt. Isaac Higgin's Company, Major Winslow's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

JOHN GERRY DOBBINS, Montclair, N. J. (27789). Son of John Y. and Imo- 
gene (Diverty) Dobbins; grandson of Jesse and Elizabeth (Garrison) Diverty: 
great-grandson of William and Deborah (Hand) Garrison; great-grandson of 
John Hand, Major Cape May County New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES FRENCH DOBLE, Quincy, Mass. (28246). Son of William Henry 
and Henrietta (French) Doble; grandson of Enoch Hall and Rachel (Timber- 
lake) Doble; great-grandson of James and Rachel (Hewett) Timlierlake; great- 
grandson of James Timberlake, private, Col. Aaron Willard's Regt. Mass. 
Militia; grandson of Charles and Mary Jones (Williams) French; great-grand- 



254 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

son of Pliineas and E valine (Burrill) French; great 2 -grandson of George Lane 
French, private, Col. Solomon Lovel's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of 
Jonathan French, private, Colonel Greaton's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

AMZI DODD, Orlando, Fla. (20696). Son of Stephen Grover and Eliza Sabina 
Dodd; grandson of Joseph Smith and Maria Darby (Grover) Dodd; great- 
grandson of Stephen Grover, private, Capt. Thomas Lawson's Company Conn. 
Militia and other service, pensioned. 

LOUIS F. DODD, Montclair, N. J. (28606). Son of Louis F. and Rachel (Blau- 
velt) Dodd; grandson of Cornelius I. ;and Mary G. (Black) Blauvelt; great- 
grandson of Isaac C. and Rachael (Powles) Blauvelt; great-grandson of John 
M. and Martyntge (Herring) Powles; great 3 -grandson of Abraham A. Herring, 
Captain Bergen County New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN GRISWOLD DOLSON, Orange, N. J. (28373)- Son of John William and 
Mary Alice (Arnold) Dolson; grandson of William Anthony and Lizette Hinds 
(Felton) Arnold; great-grandson of Nathan and Mary (Hinds) Felton;. great 2 - 
grandson of Benjamin Felton, First Lieutenant, x\djutant, Col. Ebenezer 
Learned's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

WILLIAM HENRY DOOLITTLE, Chicago, 111. (Conn. 27342). Son of John 
Henry and Emeline (Hill) Doolittle; grandson of Benjamin and Betsey 
(Moore) Doolittle; great-grandson of Benjamin Doolittle; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Doolittle, private Conn. Militia. 

MUNSON GOLINE DOREMUS, Newark, N. J. (28613). Son of Henry M. and 
Phcebe G. (Baldwin) Doremus; grandson of Peter G. and Susan Doremus; 
great-grandson of Goline and Hester (Mead) Doremus; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Doremus, private New Jersey State Troops. 

JOHN GORDON DORRANCE, Baltimore, Md. (27854). Son of Daniel James 
and Edith Lillian (Turner) Dorrance; grandson of Henry EHis and Amanda 
L. (Hill) Turner; great-grandson of William Walker and Sarah (Townsend) 
Hill; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer and Elizabeth (Hurlburt) Hill; great-grand- 
son of Squier (and Dorothy Walker) Hill, Captain, Colonel McClellan's Conn. 
Regt.; great*-grandson of Ebenezer Walker, private and farrier, Colonel Shel- 
don's Light Dragoons; great-grandson of Robert and Caroline Cheney (Ellis) 
Turner; great 2 -grandson of William Henry and Mercy (Risley) Turner; great*- 
grandson of Reuben Risley, Corporal Sixth Regt. Conn. Militia; great-grand- 
son of Job Risley, Sergeant in Hartford Company Conn. Militia, Lexington 
Alarm, 1775; grandson of John Gordon and Ellen E- (Brown) Dorrance, 1st; 
great-grandson of Daniel Gordon and Ann (Sparrow) Dorrance; great-grand- 
son of John and Mary (Thompson) Dorrance; great 3 -grandson of Alpheus 
Thompson, private, Col. Gideon Burt's and other Mass. Regts. 

JAMES DOTEN, Yarmouth, Me. (26069). Born February 9, 1829. Son of 
Samuel Doten, born at Plymouth, Mass., July 15, 1758, died at North Yar- 
mouth, Me., November 2, 1847, carpenter on Mass. armed brig "Independence," 
captured, prisoner at Halifax, pensioned. 

WILLIAM SHAW DOTY, Pittsburgh, Pa. (2S035). Son of James Cloyd and 
Margaret M. (Shaw) Doty; grandson of Edmund Southard and Catharine 
(Wilson) Doty; great-grandson of Ezra and Rebecca North (Lewis) Doty; 
great 2 -grandson of David Doty, Lieutenant, Adjutant, Wagonmaster General, 
Conn, and New York Troops. 

ARTHUR EDWIN DOWNER, East Orange, N. J. (27520). Son of Benjamin N. 
and Fmily A. (Vessey) Downer; grandson of Edwin and Harriet (Newkirk) 
Downer; great-grandson of Samuel Dozvner, 3d, private, Captain Scudder's 
Company Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia, Col. Philip Van 
Cortlandt. 

ARTHUR BYRAM DRAKE, Cleveland, Ohio (N. J. 26642). Supplementals. Son 
of Nicholas Byram and Mary Noel (Woodward) Drake; grandson of EHas A. 
and Mary Bleecker (Leggett) Woodward; great-grandson of John Haviland and 



REGISTER 01< NEW MEMBERS. 255 

Mary Noel (Bleecker) Leggett; great 2 -grandson of John Haviland and Gertrude 
(Quackenbos) Leggett; great 3 -grandson of John Leggett, Jr., private West- 
chester County New York Militia; great'-grandson of John (and Catherine 
De Witt) Quackenbos, Captain First Regt. New York Line; grcat 4 -grandson of 
John De Witt, Lieutenant, Col. Zephaniah Piatt's Dutchess County Regt. New 
York Militia; great 2 -grandson of Alexander and Francis (Wade) Bleecker; 
great 3 -grandson of William and Anne (Deanc) Wade; grcat*-grandson of Rich- 
ard Deane, Captain Third Regt. New York City Militia. 

~HOMER CLINTON DRAKE, New Castle, Pa. (28031). Son of William Wilson 
and Amanda (McClain) Drake; grandson of Moses and Catherine (Frowaker) 
Drake; great-grandson of Samuel Drake, private Eighth Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JOHN WALTER DRAKE, Detroit, Mich. (27466). Son of Alfred G. and Anna 
M. (Patrick) Drake; grandson of Richard W. and Margaret (Pine) Patrick; 
great-grandson of Joshua and Margaret (Remsen) Pine: great 2 -grandson of 
Luke Remsen, private, Capt. Benjamin Coe's Company, Col. Smith's New York 
State Regt., pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Pine, private New York 
Militia; great 3 -grandson of Joshua Pine, patriot, prisoner. 

ROSCOE DRUMMOND, Seattle, Wash. (27897). Son of Roscoc R. and Anna W. 
(Ladd) Drummond; grandson of Warren and Lucy (Kingman) Ladd; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel and Sarah (Ingersoll) Ladd; great--grandson of Na- 
thaniel Ladd, private Mass. Militia. 

FRANK ADAMS DRURY, Worcester, Mass. (28247). Son of Franklin and Caro- 
line (Bemis) Drury; grandson of Cheney and Martha (Howe) Bemis; great- 
grandson of Joel Howe, private, Colonel Gerrish's Regt. Mass. Guards. 

ARTHUR L. DU BOIS, Ridgewood, N. J. (28078). Son of George M. and 
Lucinda G. (Harvey) Du Bois; grandson of Ruben and Mary Du Bois; great- 
grandson of Coemadt Du Bois; great--grandson of Tobias Du Bois, Quarter- 
master Ulster County New York Light Horse, Second Lieutenant Associated 
Exempts. 

CHARLES ASHMAN DUDLEY, Des Moines, Iowa (27653). Son of Charles and 
Sarah (Leete) Dudley; grandson of Timothy and Anne (Osborne) Dudley; 
great-grandson of John Dudley, private, Col. Benjamin Simonds's Berkshire 
County Regt. Mass. Militia and other service. 

INCREASE MATHER DUNHAM, Omaha, Nebr. (2S380). Son of Thomas Alex- 
ander and Hannah Putnam (Mather) Dunham; grandson of William Williams 
and Emily (Baker) Mather; great-grandson of Eleazer and Fannie (Williams) 
Mather; great--grandson of Eleazer Mather, First Sergeant, Capt. Samuel 
Mather's Company, Colonel Beebe's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM HUSE DUNHAM, Evanston, 111. (27812). Son of George Bates and 
Sarali Jane (Huse) Dunham; grandson of John and Sylvia (Colby) Huse; 
great-grandson of John and Susanna (Webster) Colby; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Colby, private, Col. Nathaniel Wade's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of 
Ebenezer Webster, Captain New Hampshire Militia, 1 777-1 778. 

WILLIAM CONOVER DUNN, Clinton, N. J. (27788). Son of Isaac and Emma 
L. (Conover) Dunn; grandson of Lewis and Clarissa (Hart) Dunn; great- 
grandson of Isaac Dunn, private First Hunterdon County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia and other service. 

EUGENE DU PONT, Greenville, Del. (26306). Son of Eugene and Amelia E- 
Dupont; grandson of Charles I. and Ann (Ridgeley) Dupont; great-grandson 
of Henry Moore and Sara (Bailing) Ridgeley; great 2 -grandson of Charles 
Greenbury Ridgcly, Member of Delaware Constitutional Convention of 1776. 

WILLIAM COATES DURHAM, Terre Haute, Ind. (27707). Son of William and 
Rebecca (Dickson) Durham; grandson of John and Elizabeth Ann (Lambert) 
Dickson; great-grandson of Joseph Dickson, private Eighth Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 



256 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FRANK W. DURKEE, Tufts College, Mass. (27562). Son of Simeon P. and 
Mary E. (Smith) Durkee; grandson of Darius S. and Sally (Whitney) Durkee; 
great-grandson of John Durkee; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Durkee, Second 
Lieutenant, Captain Manning's Company, Colonel Durkee's Conn. Continental 
Regt. and Sheldon's Dragoons, also Captain of Company of Matrosses, pen- 
sioned. 

THEODORE TALBOT DWIGHT, Mt. Pleasant, Utah (28183). Son of William 
Cecil and Laura (Talbot) D wight; grandson of Theodore Foster and Eliza H. 
(Truxton) Talbot; great-grandson of Silas Talbot, Captain Second Rhode Island; 
Regt. Lieutenant Colonel Continental Army, Captain Continental Navy. 

FRANCIS GASSAWAY DYER, Sioux City, Iowa (27656). Son of Charles Cocke 
and Margaret Louise (Mangum) Dyer; grandson of Francis Bickley and Sarah 
Gassaway (White) Dyer; great-grandson of Samuel Dyer, matross, Capt. Na* 
thaniel Burrell's Company First Regt. Virginia Artillery, Col. Charles Harrison. 

HARRY AMENZO DYGERT, Phoenix, N. Y. (27635). Son of John H. and Mary 
A. (Wart) Dygert; grandson of Henry H. and Elizabeth (Staring) Dygert; 
great-grandson of Heinrich Staring, Captain, Col. Peter Bellinger's Tryon 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

HERBERT ROWE EARLE, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. (27458). Son of Charles 
Mason Winslow and Marie Antoinette (Bessac) Earle; grandson of William H. 
and Mary Jane (Whaley) Bessac; great-grandson of Lewis and Mary (Dunham) 
Bessac; great 2 -grandson of Jean Guilliaume Bessac, Commander of French 
vessel under Letter of Marque, taken prisoner and confined on prison ship' 
"Jersey." 

BARCLAY HARLAN EASTMAN, Cleveland, Ohio (111. 27822). Son of Arthur 
William and Gertrude (Harlan) Eastman; grandson of Harry and Calista 
(Butterworth) Eastman; great-grandson of Guy Carlton and Sarah Madison 
(Dyer) Eastman; great 2 -grandson of Edmond and Amarilla (Giles) Dyer;. 
great 3 -grandson of Stephen Dyer, Sergeant, Colonel Crary's Rhode Island Regt. 

JOSEPH SMITH EATON, Taunton, Mass. (2851 1). Son of Daniel Brown and' 
Susan Lee (Smith) Eaton; grandson of Joseph Parsons and Rebecca (Glidden) 
Smith; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Judith (Parsons) Smith; great-grand- 
son of Ebenezer Smith, Lieutenant Colonel New Hampshire Militia. 

LOUIS GILL EATON, Boston, Mass. (27448). Son of Cyrus Perkins and Hen- 
rietta Maria (Vander Woerd) Eaton; grandson of Cyrus Wheeler and Phoebe 
Whitcher (Goodwin) Eaton; great-grandson of Wheeler and Abigail (Perkins) 
Eaton; great 2 -grandson of William Eaton, private, Capt. Samuel Huse's Com- 
pany, Col. Jacob Gerrish's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

HENRY CHENEY EDDY, Montclair, N. J. (28499)- Son of George and Harriet 
L. (Rigden) Eddy; grandson of Ebenezer Cheney and Margaret Ann (Gale) 
Eddy; great-grandson of Ira and Clarissa (Sargent) Gale; great 2 -grandson of 
Jonathan Gale, private, Col. Samuel Williams's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

PALMER DANIEL EDMUNDS, Chicago, 111. (28014). Son of Amos and Mary- 
Ann (Campbell) Edmunds; grandson of Daniel and Eliza Jane (Logan) Ed- 
munds; great-grandson of Obadiah and Lydia (Moore) Edmunds, Jr.; great*- 
grandson of Obadiah Edmunds, private, Col. Ira Allen's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

FRANCIS MARSHALL EDWARDS, Dorchester, Mass. (27773). Son of James 
Miller and Elizabeth Parsons (Moffatt) Edwards; grandson of Ebenezer (and; 
Mary Flint) Edwards, private, Col. Abijah Pierce's Mass. Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Ephraim Flint, private, Col. Eleazar Brooks's Mass. Regt. 

JOHN HARRINGTON EDWARDS, Seattle, Wash. (28557). Son of John and 
Maria A. (Heald) Edwards; grandson of John and Susannah (Harrington) 
Edwards; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Hannah (Prescott) Edwards; great 2 - 
grandson of John Edzvards, private, Col. John Robinson's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

KEITH W. EDWARDS, Fort Sumner, N. Mex. (23922). Son of George B. and) 
Annie A. (Valentine) Edwards; grandson of Henry Mead and Harriet E. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 257 

(Finch) Valentine; great-grandson of Henry Mead and Aletta Johnson (Leake) 
Valentine; great 2 -grandson of Isaac and Anna (Mead) Valentine; great-grand- 
son of Jesse Mead, private, Col. Thaddeus Crane's Regt. Westchester County 
New York Militia. 

CHARLES BYRD ELDER, Chicago, 111. (28015). Son of Robert S. and Harriet 
Newell (Dewey) Elder; grandson of Alanson N. and Nancy (Jones) Dewey; 
great-grandson of Return Ephraim and Nancy (Tuttle) Jones; great 2 -grandson 
of Jasper Jones, private Tenth Company Fifth Conn. Continental Regt., 1775. 

EDWARD OWEN ELDREDGE, Elmira, N. Y. (28271). Son of Edward Heze- 
kiah and Mary Sophia (Ball) Eldredge; grandson of Stephen and Polly 
(Leonard) Ball; great-grandson of Josiah Ball, private, Col. John Brown's 
Mass. Regt. ; great-grandson of Asa Leonard, private Third Battalion Wads- 
worth's Conn. Brigade. 

HAROLD SLAIGHT ELLINGTON, Detroit, Mich. (27464). Son of Ernest El- 
well and Harriett Elizabeth (Bond) Ellington; grandson of John Darwin and 
Elizabeth (Meeker) Bond; great-grandson of EHel and Harriett (Rice) Bond; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonas Rice, Lieutenant, Col. William Williams's Vermont 
Regt. 

ROBERT THOMAS ELLIOTT, Worcester, Mass. (27940). Son of Thomas Os- 
good and Mary (Averill) Elliott; grandson of Ira and Susan (Osgood) Elliott; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Chloe (Bates) Elliott; great 2 -grandson of Joseph 
Elliott, Captain Third Conn. Regt., 1775, Gen. Israel Putnam. 

FRANK DEXTER ELLISON, Belmont, Mass. (28248). Son of Henry Malcom 
and Harriet (Harlow) Ellison; grandson of Tisdale and Mary Jane (Wiley) 
Harlow; great-grandson of Levi and Anna (Damon) Harlow; great 2 -grandson 
of Levi Harlow, private, Colonel Carpenter's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN EARHART ELRICK, Saltsburg, Pa. (28032). Son of George Sutton and 
Sarah (Earhart) Elrick; grandson of Frederick and Margaret (Caton or Katon) 
Elrick; great-grandson of George Elricks or Alricks, private, Baron Von Otten- 
dorff's Corps Penna. Continental Line. 

HERBERT LINCOLN EMERY, Waterville, Me. (26066). Son of Thomas Jeffer- 
son and Julia Maria (Poor) Emery; grandson of Samuel and Deidamia 
(Johnston) Emery; great-grandson of John Johnston, Sergeant of Marines on 
U. S. ship "Warren," commanded by Commodore Saltonstall. 

HERMON P. EMERY, Portland, Ore. (27582). Son of Charles H. and Caroline 
M. Emery; grandson of Charles and Rosemond (Roberts) Emery; great-grand- 
son of Jonathan Roberts, private, Capt. William Butler's Company Second 
Penna. Battalion, Col. Arthur St. Clair. 

MILTON WALWORTH ENSIGN, Lincoln, Neb. (27319). Son of Datus W. and 
Betsey E- (Shirley) Ensign; grandson of Royal and Sally (Rood) Ensign; 
great-grandson of Ezra Rood, private, Colonel Alden's Mass. Regt., widow 
pensioned; grandson of Bradford and Parthena (Stanton) Shirley; great-grand- 
son of Job Shirley, private, Col. John Daggett's and other Mass. Regts., pen- 
sioned; great-grandson of Benjamin Stanton, private, Col. Philip Van Cort- 
landt's and other New York Regts., pensioned. 

JESSE HARPER ERWIN, West Durham, N. C. (24514). Son of Joseph J. and 
Elvira J. (Holt) Erwin; grandson of James and Margaret Locke (Phifer) 
Erwin; great-grandson of Alexander Erwin, recognized patriot, District Au- 
ditor, Clerk of Burke County Court, N. C, and his wife, Sarah Robinson, 
recognized patriot, saving the life of Samuel Alexander, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier; great-grandson of Martin (and Elizabeth Locke) Phifer, Jr., Captain 
Second Light Horse Company of North Carolina, pensioned; grandson of Wil- 
liam Rainey and Mary Gizeal (Allen) Holt; great-grandson of John and Eliza- 
beth (Harper) Allen; great 2 -grandson of Jeduthan Harper, Lieutenant Colonel, 
Col. Ambrose Ramsey's North Carolina Regt., Member of Provincial Congress 
at Halifax, N. C, in 1776; great-grandson of Matthew Locke, Paymaster of 
Troops and Minute Men, District of Salisbury, N. C, 1775, Member of Com- 



258 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

mittee of Observation of Rowan County, Member of Provincial Congress at 
Halifax, N. C, in 1776. 

S[ILAS] KENDRICK ESHLEMAN, Jr., Crafton, Pa. (27131). Supplemental. 
Son of Silas Kendrick and Emma Harriet (Slaymaker or Schleiermacher) 
Eshleman; grandson of John Jacob and Jane Juliette (Witmer) Eshleman; 
great-grandson of David and Jane (Lightner) Witmer; great 2 -grandson of John 
Adam and Leah (Ferree) Lightner; great 3 -grandson of Joel Fcrree, gun- 
maker at Paradise, Pa.; grandson of John Martin and Emma Harriet (Jack) 
Slaymaker; great-grandson of David and Elizabeth Jack; great 2 -grandson of 
Michael Jack, Jr., private Lancaster County Penna. Militia. 

DON WALTER FARRANT, Grand Rapids, Mich. (27473). Son of Walter Scott 
and Delia (McLaughlin) Farrant; grandson of Charles Hendricks and Thom- 
asine (Hocking) McLaughlin; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Copp) 
McLaughlin; great 2 -grandson of John McLaughlin, private Seventh Maryland 
Regt. 

FRANK FOSTER FARWELL, Jr., Dorchester, Mass. (28227). Son of Frank 
Foster and Ella A. (Chase) Farwell; grandson of Lorenzo and Rachel G. 
(Lothrop) Chase; great-grandson of Calvin and Betsey (Clapp) Lothrop; 
great 2 -grandson of John Lothrop, private, Colonel Titcomb's Mass. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

JOHN CHARLES FARWELL, Chicago, 111. (27607). Son of John Howland and 
Jane L. (Eaton) Farwell; grandson of George and Aurilla (Brownell) Far- 
well; great-grandson of Jesse and Abigail (Allen) Farwell; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Allen, private, Col. David Hobart's New Hampshire Regt. 

OLIVER ATKINS FARWELL, Detroit, Mich. (28129). Son of Oliver Atkins 
and Charlotte Louise (Brockway) Farwell; grandson of Oliver and Sarah Burt 
(Atkins) Farwell; great-grandson of Oliver and Abigail (Danforth) Farwell; 
great 2 -grandson of Oliver Farwell, private, Col. David Green's Mass. Regt. 

HARRY D. FAXON, Chicago, 111. (27823). Son of Nathaniel and Josephine 
(Hood) Faxon; grandson of John and Lucy (Hardwick) Faxon; great-grand- 
son of James Faxon, Jr., private, Col. Benjamin Lincoln's Mass. Regt.: great 2 - 
grandson of James Faxon, private, Col. Thomas Cushing's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

FRANK JULIUS FELBEL, New York, N. Y. (27631). Son of Jacob and Adah 
(Benjamin) Felbel; grandson of Julius and Miriam (Cohen) Felbel; great- 
grandson of Jacob I. and Grace (Seixas) Cohen; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin 
Mendez Seixas, Lieutenant New York City Militia. 

WILLARD CARL BARNES FEED, St. Louis, Mo. (9913). Supplemental. Son 
of Joseph and Theodosia (Barnes) Feld; grandson of Amos More and Caro- 
line (Bush) Barnes; great-grandson of Walter and Lydia (Sacket) Bush; 
great 2 -grandson of Adnah Sacket, First Lieutenant, Capt. Daniel Sacket's Com- 
pany, Col. John Moseley's Third Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia; 
great-grandson of Abraham and Ruhamah (Kennedy) Barnes; great 2 -grandson 
of John Barnes, private, Capt. James Horton's and Capt. Daniel Pendleton's 
Company, Col. Jeduthan Baldwin's Regt. of Artificers. 

WILLIS H. FERGUSON, Roswell, New Mex. (111. 27608). Son of James and 
Sarah (Pierson) Ferguson; grandson of Arthur and Phcebe (Cook) Pierson; 
great-grandson of John Pierson, private Essex County New Jersey Militia and 
Continental Line; great-grandson of Stephen (and Sarah McFarland) Cook, 
private, Col. Job Cushing's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Daniel McFarland, 
Colonel Monongahela Rangers, Pa. 

FRANK MYER FERRIN, Newton, Mass. (28512). Son of Francis L- and Mary 
Ann (Burley) Ferrin; grandson of Jonathan and Harriet (Webster) Ferrin; 
great-grandson of Enos and Judith Corliss (Cross) Ferrin; great 2 -grandson of 
Zebulon Ferrin, private, Col. Josiah Starr's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES DOWNING FERRY, Summit, N. J. (28164). Son of George Jackson 
and Elizabeth Johnson (Bradley) Ferry; grandson of Sylvester and Emily 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 259 

(Downing) Ferry; great-grandson of Bliphalet Ferry, private, Col. David 
Waterbury's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

GEORGE JACKSON FERRY, Jr., Montclair, N. J. (28492). Son of George 
Jackson and Virginia (Greene) Ferry; grandson of Sylvester and Emily 
(Downing) Ferry; great-grandson of Bliphalet Ferry, private, Col. David 
bury's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

ERNEST EDWIN FEWKES, Newton Highlands, Mass. (27435). Son of Edwin 
and Julia Ross (Waterhouse) Fewkes; grandson of William and Nancy (Ross) 
Waterhouse; great-grandson of Silas and Nancy (Cook) Waterhouse; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Cook, private, Capt. Amariah Fuller's Company, April 
19. i775» and in Capt. Edward Fuller's First Newton Company, Colonel 
Thatcher's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM PUTNAM FIELD, Havana, Cuba (Cal. 26769). Son of Putnam and 
Kate M. (Burt) Field; grandson of Moses and Rhoda Caroline (Putnam) 
Field, Jr. ; great-grandson of Moses Field, private, Col. David Leonard's Mass. 
Regt., Member of Leverett Committee of Safety. 

FREDERICK SAMUEL FISH, South Bend, Ind. (2771 1). Son of Henry Clay 
and Clarissa (Jones) Fish; grandson of Samuel and Bersheba (Packer) Fish; 
great-grandson of Samuel Fish, private Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia; grandson 
of Gurdon and Delia (Tuttle) Jones; great-grandson of Elijah Tuttle, private 
Sixth Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FREDERICK STUDEBAKER FISH, South Bend, Ind. (27710). Son of Fred- 
erick Samuel and Grace (Studebaker) Fish; grandson of Henry Clay and 
Clarissa (Jones) Fish; great-grandson of Samuel and Bersheba (Packer) Fish; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Fish, private Eighth Regt. Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Gurdon and Delia (Tuttle) Jones; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Tuttle, 
private Sixth Hampshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HARRY KEEN FISHER, Montclair, N. J. (28163). Son of Samuel Ware and 
Lorinda Smith (King) Fisher; grandson of Aaron and Eunice (Joy) Fisher; 
great-grandson of Aaron Fisher, private, Colonel Dickinson's Hampshire County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

MARSHALL ELWOOD FISHER, Providence, R. I. (27184). Son of Elwood 
James and Hattie (Goff) Fisher; grandson of William Marshall and Mary Ann 
Francis (Pain) Fisher; great-grandson of James and Rebecca (Hartshorn) 
Fisher; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Fisher, Captain, Col. Ephraim Wheelock's 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

RUDOLPH HERBERT FISHER, New York, N. Y. {27837). Son of Frederick 
and Annie (Gabriel) Fischer; grandson of Joseph Peter and Martha (Oakley) 
Gabriel; great-grandson of George and Betsey (Seward) Gabriel; great-grand- 
son of Peter Gabriel, private Fifth Regt. Conn. Line. 

DAVID LUTHER FISKE, Grafton, Mass. (28228). Son of Jonathan Stow and 
Georgiana Maria (Keith) Fisk; grandson of David and Sarah (Stow) Fisk; 
great-grandson of William Fisk, Lieutenant Third Worcester County Regt. 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Jonathan Stow, Second Lieutenant Sixth 
Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Royal and Deborah 
(Adams) Keith; great-grandson of Simeon Keith, private, Colonel Learned's 
Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES REYNOLDS FITZGERALD, Salt Lake City, Utah (28176). Son of 
Hart J. and Mary (Reynolds) Fitzgerald; grandson of Jerome B. and Isabel 
(Sweet) Fitzgerald; great-grandson of Kneeland and Julia (Kennedy) Sweet; 
great 2 -grandson of Timothy Siveet, Corporal, Colonel Graham's New York 
State Regt. 

EDWARD A; FITZ HENRY, Olympia, Wash. (28556). Son of Hiram and Eliza- 
beth (Johnson) Fitz Henry; grandson of Edward and Sarah (Brown) Fitz 
Henry; great-grandson of Basil and Nancy (Davis) Brown; great 2 -grandson of 
John Davis, Ensign Bucks County Militia and Third Regt. Penna. I ine. 



26o SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARGES I. FLEMING, Terre Haute, Ind. (27713). Son of Samuel J. and 
Frances (Waggoner) Fleming; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Wright) Flem- 
ing; great-grandson of Jonathan and Hattie (Hutchinson) Wright; great 2 - 
grandson of David Wright, private Third New Jersey Regt., Col. Elias Dayton. 

GEORGE THORNTON FLEMING, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28042). Son of William 
Brandt and Frances Caroline (Smith) Fleming; grandson of George and Nancy 
Ann (Armor) Smith; great-grandson of John and Nancy Ann (Dill) Armor; 
great 2 -grandson of Matthew Dill, Colonel Fifth York County Battalion Penna. 
Militia; great 2 -grandson of Matthew and Ann (Crain) Dill; great 3 -grandson of 
Richard Crain, officer of Penna. Associated Battalions under Col. Frederick 
Watts, prisoner. 

JOHN BURTON FOLEY, Chicago, 111. (28016). Son of John and Sarah (Burns) 
Foley; grandson of David and Catrina (Whittaker) Burns; great-grandson of 
Peter and Catrina (Plough) Whittaker, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Petros Whit- 
taker, private First Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

FREDERICK LEVI FORBES, Seattle, Wash. (27241). Son of Frederick Lotan 
and Harriet (Farnham) Forbes; grandson of Jotham and Nancy (Olmstead) 
Forbes; great-grandson of James Olmstead, Ensign, Sergeant Major Eighth 
Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM OSCAR FORBES, Seattle, Wash. (27242). Son of Frederick Lotan I 
and Hannah (Farnham) Forbes; grandson of Jotham and Nancy (Olmstead) 
Forbes; great-grandson of James Olmstead, Ensign, Sergeant Major Eighth 
Conn. Regt. 

ELMER H. FORNEY, Abilene, Kans. (26988). Son of John K. and Annie S. 
(Hoffman) Forney, grandson of Abraham R. and Anna G. (Keller) Forney; 
great-grandson of Levi and Maria (Rupp) Forney; great 2 -grandson of John 
and Elizabeth (Lehman) Forney; great 3 -grandson of Abraham Forney, private 
Ninth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

DARWIN JOHN FORSAITH, Manchester, N. H. (25392). Son of Samuel Cald- 
well and Clara Johnson (Smith) Forsaith; grandson of Robert and Elizabeth 
(Caldwell) Forsaith; great-grandson of William and Jane (Wilson) Forsaith; 
great 2 -grandson of Matthezu Forsaith, Chairman of Committee of Safety of 
Chester, New Hampshire; grandson of John Cyrus and Clara (Johnson) Smith; 
great-grandson of John Barker and Hannah (Huntoon) Smith; great 2 -grandson 
of John Huntoon, private, Col. Isaac Wyman's Regt. New Hampshire Militia, 
pensioned. 

WILLIAM ANSON FOSKETT, New Haven, Conn. (27955). Son of William 
Alexander and Jane Elizabeth (Hall) Foskett; grandson of Edward O. and 
Clarissa (Bunchane?) Hall; great-grandson of John and Jane (Alexander) 
Hall; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Hall, Jr., Sergeant, Col. Calvin Smith's 
Mass. Regt., widow pensioned. 

HAROLD RICHARD FOSS, Portland, Me. (28304). Son of U. Richard and 
Alice (Pillsbury) Foss; grandson of Thomas C. and Elizabeth Loring (Cobb) 
Foss; great-grandson of Walter and Dorcas (Morrison) Foss; great 2 -grandson 
of Urich and Sally (Goodrich) Foss; great 3 -grandson of Levi Foss, Corporal, 
Col. Edmund Phinney's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Isabella 
Parsons (Millet) Cobb; great 2 -grandson of Zepelon Millet; great 3 -grandson of 
Thomas Millet, private, Col. Enoch Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS FOSTER, Olympia, Wash. (28561). Son of Alonzo A. 
and Helen M. (Sprague) Foster; grandson of Peter T. and Maria Theresa 
(Hussey) Sprague; great-grandson of John Sprague, Surgeon's Mate, Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's Mass. Regt. ; Surgeon armed vessels "Active" and "Thomas," 
prisoner. 

CHARLES EBER FOSTER, Omaha, Nebr. (27314). Son of Ira George and 
Emmogene (Wentworth) Foster; grandson of Nelson and Climena (Bartlett) 
Wentworth; great-grandson of Enos and Sarah (Ferguson) Wentworth; great 2 - 
grandson of Elijah Wentworth, private, Captain Lathrop's Company Conn. 
Line, pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 26l 

FRANK E. FOSTER, Buffalo, N. Y. (27544). Son of Johnson and Louisa (Alger) 
Foster; grandson of Aaron and Elsie (Nichols) Foster; great-grandson of 
Francis Nichols, Lieutenant, Colonel Thompson's Penna. Battery, Major Ninth 
Penna. Regt. 

HERBERT WEST FOSTER, Montclair, N. J. (27505). Supplemental. Son of 
Edward Nelson and Helen (Westgate) Foster; grandson of Alfred and Susan 
(West) Foster; great-grandson of Peleg and Mary (Harris) Foster; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Harris, private, Capt. Ebenezer Humphrey's Company, 
Colonel Davis's Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM F. FOSTER, Salem, Ore. (28403). Son of William Henry and Mary 
(Maher) Foster; grandson of Samuel and Mary Worthington (Walker) Foster; 
great-grandson of Isaac (and Rebecca Hunt) Foster, Jr., private, Capt. Timothy 
Child's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Foster, private, Capt. 
John Wells's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of John Hunt, Sergeant, 
Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. ; great-grandson of Josiah and Rhoda 
(Root) Walker; great 2 -grandson of Josiah (and Jerusha Bardwell) Walker, 
Corporal, Colonel Larned's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan 
Bardivell, Captain, Col. David Brewer's Regt. Mass. Militia: great 2 -grandson 
of Orlando Root, Corporal, Col. Elisha Porter's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM COX FRAME, Schenectady, N. Y. (27646). Son of William H. and 
Elizabeth V. (Moon) Frame; grandson of George W. and Katherine K. (Rosa) 
Moon; great-grandson of James and Deborah (Hall) Rosa; great 2 -grandson of 
Isaac Roosa, Captain Second Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

ROWE FRANCE, Seattle, Wash. (27877). Son of Augustus and Lurena (Rowe) 
France; grandson of Freeman and Eunice (Sanford) France; great-grandson 
of Christopher and Elizabeth (Cole) France; great 2 -grandson of Jacob France, 
private, Col. Philip Schuyler's Regt. New York Militia. 

EDWARD E. FRANCISCO, Great Notch, N. J. (28165). Son of Elsworth E. and 
Florence (Captain) Francisco; grandson of Edward and Mary E. (Houston) 
Francisco; great-grandson of James Carr and Annis (Board) Houston; great 2 - 
grandson of Andrew and Phoebe (Wisner) Houston; great 3 -grandson of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth (Roe) Wisner; great*-grandson of John Wisner, Captain 
Orange County New York Levies and Militia. 

ALONZO CURRIER FRENCH, Burnside, Ky. (N. H. 25390). Son of Moses and 
Elizabeth (Currier) French; grandson of Jonathan French, Corporal, Capt. 
Daniel Place's Company, Col. Joshua Wingate's New Hampshire Regt. and 
other service, pensioned. 

CHARLES MILTON FRENCH, Chicago, 111. (27609). Son of Silas A. and Sarah 
Augusta (Griffin) French; grandson of Nathan and Sally (Wright) Griffin; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Sophia (Foster) Griffin; great 2 -grandson of 
Jacob Foster, Chaplain, Col. James Scammon's (Thirtieth) Mass. Regt. 

DAVID HURLBERT FRENCH, North Yakima, Wash. (27250). Son of Phineas 
Mundy and Sarah Jane (Lees) French; grandson of David and Margaret (Noe) 
French; great-grandson of David French, private Somerset County New Jersey 
Militia. 

GEORGE FOSTER FRENCH, Portland, Me. (6351). Supplemental. Son of 
Nathaniel Waldo and Catherine (Gates) French; grandson of Sargent and Mary 
Boyden (Foster) French; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Martha (Jewell) 
French; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel French, private, Col. Enoch Poor's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

FRANKLIN URIAH FRISBEE, Sheldon, Iowa (27663). Son of Chester and 
Emmeline (Stevens) Frisbee; grandson of Rufus and Polly (Crocker) Frisbee; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Frisbee, private, Col. Henry Van Rensselaer's 
Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

FRED ERNEST FRISBEE, Sheldon, Iowa (27664). Son of Franklin Uriah and 
Eliza Elmira (McLaughlin) Frisbee; grandson of Chester and Emmeline (Ste- 



262 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

vens) Frisbee; great-grandson of Rufus and Polly (Crocker) Frisbee; great- 
grandson of Benjamin Frisbee, private, Col. Henry Van Rensselaer's Albany 
County Regt. New York Militia; grandson of William Wilson and Emmeline 
(Haseltine) McLaughlin; great-grandson of John and Silence (Batcheller) 
Haseltine; great 2 -grandson of Abraham Batcheller, Jr., Lieutenant, Col. Jacob 
Davis's Mass. Regt.; great 8 -grandson of Abraham Batcheller, Captain Fifth 
Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia. 
FREDERICK FRISBEE, Sheldon, Iowa (27665). Son of Chester and Emmeline 
(Stevens) Frisbee; grandson of Rufus and Polly (Crocker) Frisbee; great- 
grandson of Benjamin Frisbee, private, Col. Henry Van Rensselaer's Albany 
County Regt. New York Militia. 
EAURENCE DUANE FRISBEE, Sheldon, Iowa (27666). Son of Frederick and 
Mary Idelle (Haseltine) Frisbee; grandson of Chester and Emmeline (Stevens) 
Frisbee; great-grandson of Rufus and Polly (Crocker) Frisbee; great 2 -grandson 
of Benjamin Frisbee, private, Col. Henry Van Rensselaer's Albany County 
Regt. New York Militia. 
WILLIS HASELTINE FRISBEE, Sheldon, Iowa (27667). Son of Frederick and 
Mary Idelle (Haseltine) Frisbee; grandson of Chester and Emmeline (Stevens) 
Frisbee; great-grandson of Rufus and Polly (Crocker) Frisbee; great 2 -grandson 
of Benjamin Frisbee, private, Col. Henry Van Rensselaer's Albany County 
Regt. New York Militia. 
EDWARD DISBOROUGH FROST, Springfield, N. J. (28358). Son of John 
Schenck and Theodosia Grey (Lowe) Frost; grandson of Richard Isaac and 
Mary Pulhamus (Disborough) Lowe; great-grandson of Daniel H. and Matilda 
(Van Eiew or Lew) Disborough; great 2 -grandson of Frederick Van Lew, pri- 
vate Somerset County New Jersey Militia. 
JOHN CLYDE FRUIT, Evanston, 111. (27824). Son of John Jasper and Marion 
Elizabeth (Hawley) Fruit; grandson of Romeo Hoyt and Ruth (Southworth) 
Hawley; great-grandson of Richard Henry and Armelia (Wilbur) Hawley; 
great 2 -grandson of Elisha Haivley, Quartermaster Cumberland County Minute 
Men, Lieutenant Vermont Rangers. 
FREDERICK WILLIAM FUESSENICH, Torrington, Conn. (27956). Son of 
Frederick F. and Elizabeth (Blake) Fuessenich; grandson of Hervey Vincent 
and Celia (Cleveland) Blake; great-grandson of Allen and Mabel (Beach) 
Blake; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Blake, private, Colonel Canfield's Conn. Regt., 
pensioned. 
WILLIAM EDWARDS FULTON, New Haven, Conn. (7796). Supplemental. 
Son of William Goodrich and Eliza (Edwards) Fulton; grandson of Oliver 
and Laura (Starkweather) Edwards; great-grandson of Robert and Sally 
(Eager) Eager; great 2 -grandson of Nahum Eager, Lieutenant Colonel in Col. 
John Fellows's Regt. Mass. Militia. 
W. JEOFFREY FURLONG, Rochelle, 111. (28282). Son of Will Jay and Lucy 
Ellen (Timberlake) Furlong; grandson of Robert Douglas and J. Ann (Sims) 
Timberlake; great-grandson of Joseph Timberlake, private Virginia Line and 
"Commander-in-Chief's Guard," pensioned. 
BENJAMIN APPLEGATE FURMAN, Newark, N. J. (28083). Son of John Ap- 
plegate and Emma Conover (Ayres) Furman; grandson of Samuel Stout and 
Hanna Amanda (McChesney) Ayres; great-grandson of Robert and Eunice 
(Stout) Ayres; great 2 -grandson of Robert Ayres, private New Jersey Militia 
and Continental Line; grandson of Benjamin Applegate and Sarah Anna (Sill- 
cocks) Furman; great-grandson of Henry and Isabella (Hall) Sillcocks; great 2 - 
grandson of Gabriel Sillcocks, private Second Regt. New Jersey Line, Col. 
Israel Shreve; great 2 -grandson of James and Anna (Emmons) Hall; great-- 
grandson of Isaac Emmons, minute man Middlesex County New Jersey Militia, 
ARTHUR CHESTER FUSSELL, East Orange, N. J. (28618). Son of Richard 
Thomas and Laura Adele (Farrell) Fussell; grandson of Jacob and Anna 
Elizabeth (Taylor) Fussell; great-grandson of Jacob and Clarissa (Whitaker) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 263 

Fussell; great 2 -grandson of Bartholomew and Rebekah (Bond) Fussell; great 3 - 
grandson of William Fussell, private Sixth Artillery of Chester County, Penna. 

PAUL MARTIN GALLAWAY, Tulsa, Okla. (28101). Son of John Bell and Mar- 
garet (Martin) Gallaway; grandson of Thomas Quincy and Sarah (McCluckett) 
Martin; great-grandson of Dabney Amos and Elizabeth (Walker) Martin; 
great 2 -grandson of Thomas Martin, private Second Troop First Regt. Baylor's 
Virginia Light Dragoons. 

AMBROSE JOHN GALLISON, Franklin, Mass. (27563). Son of John Murry and 
Sarah Ann (French) Gallison; grandson of John Smith and Polly (Libby) 
French; great-grandson of Benjamin Libby, private, Col. Joseph Badger's and 
other New Hampshire Regts. ; grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Atwood) Galli- 
son; great-grandson of John Gallison, private, Col. John Glover's Mass. Regt.; 
great-grandson of Solomon Atwood, Third Sergeant, Col. T. Cotton's Mass. 
Regt. 

DAVIS THAYER GALLISON, Franklin, Mass. (27766). Son of Ambrose J. and 
Mary E. (Thayer) Gallison; grandson of John M. and Sarah A. (French) 
Gallison; great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Atwood) Gallison; great 2 - 
grandson of John Gallison, private, Col. John Glover's Essex County Mass. 
Regt. 

EDWARD BOWMAN GALLOWAY, Oklahoma City, Okla. (23073). Son of Har- 
rison Andrew and Katherine Eliza (Reigart) Galloway; grandson of Andrew 
and Mary (Collins) Galloway; great-grandson of James Galloway, private Fourth 
Regt. Continental Light Dragoons, Col. Stephen Moylan. 

WILLIAM FRYE GARCELON, Newton, Mass. (27564). Son of William F. and 
Lucy A. (Tatterson) Garcelon; grandson of Asa and Sophia (Frye) Garcelon; 
great-grandson of Dean and Joanna (March) Frye; great 2 -grandson of Joseph 
and Mary Dean (Robinson) Frye, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Frye, Sr., 
Major General Mass. Militia. 

FREEMAN WORTH GARDNER, Woodridge, N. J. (26948). Supplemental. Son 
of Charles Henry and Mary Gilmore (Farren) Gardner; grandson of Freeman 
Worth and Evaline Brown (Hadden) Gardner; great-grandson of John and 
Rebecca (Brown) Hadden; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Hadden, Jr., private, 
Capt. Asher Fitz-Randolph's Company First Regt. Middlesex County New Jersey 
Militia. 

WILLIAM JAMES GARRABRANT, Verona, N. J. (28609). Son of John H. and 
Julia (Compton) Garrabrant; grandson of James and Susan (Post) Garrabrant; 
great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Terhune) Post; great 2 -grandson of John 
H. Post, Corporal New Jersey Militia. 

MILTON WALLACE GATCH, Baltimore, Md. (27853). Son of Francis McCor- 
mick and Selina (Barber) Gatch; grandson of Emely and Rebecca Paxton 
(Orr) Barber; great-grandson of Robert and Sarah (Paxton) Orr; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Paxton, Lieutenant Colonel Penna. Militia, under Col. 
George Ashman. 

OWEN GATHRIGHT, Louisville, Ky. (26591). Son of Owen and Eliza Ann 
(Austin) Gathright; grandson of James Allen and Elizabeth (Deel) Austin; 
great-grandson of John Austin, private, General Daniel Morgan's Regt. Virginia 
Line, pensioned. 

LACHLAN STEWART GATTER, New York, N. Y. (27632). Son of Robert S. 
and Mary Amelia (Stewart) Gatter; grandson of Lachlan and Julia Ann (Lyon) 
Stewart; great-grandson of Samuel Allen and Permelia Howell (Cramer) Lyon: 
great 2 -grandson of John and Elizabeth Medler (Allen) Lyon; great 3 -grandson 
of Samuel Allen, private, Col. Jeduthan Baldwin's Regt. of Artificers and Col. 
Ellis Cook's Regt. New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

DONALD GAY, Newport News, Va. (Conn. 27957). Son of Erastus and Grace 
Fessenden (Cowles) Gay; grandson of William and Ruth (Holmes) (jay; great- 
grandson of Erastus and Eunice (Treadwell) Gay; great 2 -grandson of Fisher 



264 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Gay, Colonel Second Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade, June 20 to August 
22, 1776. 
JOHN GUY GERWICK, Olympia, Wash. (27884). Son of John Clifford and 
Mary Mayce (Tuttle) Gerwick; grandson of Benjamin and Catharine L. (Trout) 
Tuttle; great-grandson of Solomon Tuttle, private, Capt. Peter Sunderland's 
Company Vermont Militia and other service, prisoner at Montreal, pensioned. 

GEORGE FORT GIBBS, Rosemont, Pa. (D. C. 27894). Son of Benjamin Frank- 
lin and Elizabeth Beatrice (Kellogg) Gibbs; grandson of Benjamin Cooper and 
Sarah Ann (Fort) Gibbs; great-grandson of Andrew and Nancy (Piatt) Fort; 
great 2 -grandson of John Fort, private Burlington County New Jersey Militia. 

CARL ALBIN GIESE, South Orange, N. J. (27693). Son of Carl August and 
Nora Miriam (Jones) Giese; grandson of William A. and Lucy Miriam (An- 
drew) Jones; great-grandson of Alfred and Margaret Emeline (Peck) Jones; 
great 2 -grandson of Ichabod and Rhoda (Munn) Jones; great'-grandson of Joseph 
Jones, Corporal and Sergeant in Captain Ogden's Company First Regt. New 
Jersey Line. 

LEWIS FOSTER GIFFORD, Chicago, 111. (27610). Son of Charles E. and 
Bertha (Lewis) Gifford; grandson of Joseph B. and Mary E. (Foster) Lewis; 
great-grandson of Elijah W. and Mary F. (Biggs) Lewis; great 2 -grandson of 
Elijah and Sarah (Stockbridge) Lewis, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Elijah Lewis, 
Sergeant and Corporal, Capt. Seth Stower's Company, Col. Joseph Whitney's 
Mass. Regt. 

BRADFORD GILL, Chicago, 111. (2761 1). Son of Wilson Lindsley and Florence 
Lydia (Henry) Gill; grandson of John Laureman and Mary Smith (Waters) 
Gill; great-grandson of Asa and Kezia Paddock (Richmond) Waters; great 2 - 
grandson of Asa Waters, private, Col. Josiah Whitney's Mass. Regt.; grandson 
of Edwin and Charlotte Collins (Prince) Henry; great-grandson of William 
Robert and Charlotte Goodwin (Collins) Prince; great 2 -grandson of Charles 
and Lydia (Bradford) Collins; great 3 -grandson of William Bradford, private, 
Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM WASHINGTON GILLULY, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27527). Son of George 
Kenneth and Martha Jane (Washington) Gilluly; grandson of William and 
Barbara (Rist) Washington; great-grandson of John and Mary (Ruffcorn) 
Washington; great 2 -grandson of Simon Ruffcorn, private, Capt. Andrew Long's 
Company Bucks County Penna. Rifle Regt. 

FRANK GAYLORD GILMAN, Newark, N. J. (28600). Son of James Lyman and 
Sarah (Kenyon) Gilman; grandson of William and Marcia (Templer) Gilman; 
great-grandson of Jonathan and Charity (Downs) Gilman; great 2 -grandson of 
Antipas Gilman, Colonel New Hampshire Militia. 

EMERY WINFIELD GIVEN, Newark, N. J. (28604). Son of Ezra R. and 
Naomi J. Given, grandson of Benjamin and Mary (Randall) Given; great- 
grandson of John Given, private Cumberland County (Me.) Mass. Militia. 

CARTER GLASS, Lynchburg, Va. (28346). Son of Robert Henry and Elizabeth 
Augusta (Christian) Glass; grandson of Samuel Patteson and Ann (Patteson) 
Christian; great-grandson of Henry Christian, Captain Virginia Militia. 

HENRY GLEN, Schenectady, N. Y. (27834). Son of Henry Clay and Agnes Clyde 
(Schermerhorn) Glen; grandson of John W. and Ann (Schermerhorn) Scher- 
merhorn; great-grandson of Andries and Agnes (Clyde) Schermerhorn, parents 
of Ann; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Clyde, Colonel Tryon County New York 
Militia. 

HORATIO GATES GLEN, Schenectady, N. Y. (27833)- Son of Henry Clay and 
Agnes Clyde (Schermerhorn) Glen; grandson of John W. and Ann (Scher- 
merhorn) Schermerhorn; great-grandson of Andries and Agnes (Clyde) Scher- 
merhorn, parents of Ann; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Clyde, Colonel Tryon 
County New York Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 265 

JAMES TODMAN GOODWIN, Salt Lake City, Utah (28180). Son of Charles C. 
and Alice B. (Maynard) Goodwin; grandson of Jesse and Dolley (Watkins) 
Goodwin; great-grandson of Jesse Goodwin, Corporal, Col. Roger Enos's Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

MARSHALL HOPKINS GOULD, Boston, Mass. (R. I. 27188). Son of Frederick 
L. and Elizabeth Angell (West) Gould; grandson of George and Sophia Char- 
lotte (Hawes) West; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Hopkins) Hawes; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel and Zeviah Charlotte (Lindsey) Hopkins; great-- 
grandson of Bsek Hopkins, Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Navy, De- 
cember 22, 1775, to January 2, 1778. 

EBEN BAILEY GOWER, Kankakee, 111. (27806). Son of Bailey Ames and Olive 
Cutler (Day) Gower; grandson of John and Dorothy (Weeks) Gower; great- 
grandson of Ebenezer and Roxanna (Brooks) Weeks; great 2 -grandson of Eben- 
ezer Weeks, private, Major Zenas Winslow's Mass. Regt. 

NOAH HAMILTON GRADY, Chattanooga, Tenn. (27902). Son of Josephus and 
Sarelda Jane (Donley) Grady; grandson of Hamilton Campbell and Nancy A. 
(Fudge) Grady; great-grandson of Conrad and Elizabeth (Persinger) Fudge; 
great 2 -grandson of Jacob Persinger, Corporal, Major Nevell's Virginia Regt., 
pensioned. 

ARTHUR E. GRAFTON, Tacoma, Wash. (18618). Son of Lorenzo W. and Ellen 
M. (Landers) Grafton; grandson of Leonard and Almira (Abbott) Landers; 
great-grandson of John and Alice (Walker) Abbott; great 2 -grandson of Timothy 
Walker, private Ninth Regt. Mass. Line. 

JAMES RODNEY GRAGG, Bourneville, Ohio (27742). Son of James C. and 
Margaret (Shoults) Gragg; grandson of Alexander and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Shotts) Shoults; great-grandson of David and Catharine (Long) Shotts; 
great 2 -grandson of Jacob and Sarah (Toops) Shotts; great 3 -grandson of Daniel 
and Mary (Streve) Toops; great 4 -grandson of Paul Streve, private North- 
ampton County Penna. Militia, pensioned. 

DANIEL ROBINSON GRANDY, Burlington, Vt. (27481). Son of Merton Calvin 
and Nellie May (Miller) Grandy; grandson of Lorenzo Calvin and Harriett 
Maria (Griggs) Grandy; great-grandson of Calvin and Thomazin (Johnson) 
Grandy; great 2 -grandson of Robert Grandy, Sergeant, Col. Samuel Ashley's 
New Hampshire Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah Johnson, private First New 
Hampshire Regt.; great-grandson of John Chandler and Lydia (Bixby) Griggs; 
great 2 -grandson of Stephen and Rhoda Bacon (Smith) Griggs; great 3 -grandson 
of Stephen Griggs, Ensign Eleventh Regt. Conn. Militia; great 4 -grandson of 
Solomon Griggs, private, Col. Noadiah Hooker's and other Conn. Regts. ; grand- 
son of Oscar Clarenden and Elma Maria (Brown) Miller; great-grandson of 
Thomas Owen and Ellen (Leland) Brown; great 2 -grandson of James and Mary 
(Owen) Brown; great 3 -grandson of Ezek Brown, Ensign Third Company 
Glocester Rhode Island Militia. 

NORBORNE RUSSEL GRAY, Louisville, Ky. (26593). Son of Norborne Gait 
and Ella (Gray) Gray; grandson of George Edward Hamilton and Lucy Ann 
(Bate) Gray; great-grandson of John Thompson and Mary (Ormsby) Gray; 
great 2 -grandson of George Gray, Captain Third Virginia Regt. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLYN GREEN, Roseville, N. J. (25251). Supplementals. Son 
of Benjamin Franklin and Lydia M. (Pride) Green; grandson of Arnold and 
Allethyna (Roberts) Green; great-grandson of Joel Roberts, private Mass. 
Militia; grandson of Elephas and Ruth (Bow) Pride; great-grandson of Ed- 
ward Bow, Jr., private, Captain Stephens's Company, Colonel Burral's Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

JOSEPH REID GREEN, Lincoln, Nebr. (273 11). Son of Joseph E. and Corrada 
J. (Walrath) Green; grandson of Obediah and Kate (Widrig) Walrath; great- 
grandson of Anthony and Katharine (Davis) Walrath; great 2 -grandson of John 
Adam Walrath, private, Capt. Christian House's Company, Col. Jacob Klock's 
Tryon County Regt. New York Militia. 



266 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

VANDERBILT GREEN, Newark, N. J. (28605). Son of Charles E- and Jane 
(Garrette) Green; grandson of Wait and Florilla (Douglass) Garrett; great- 
grandson of John and Mary (Case) Garrett; great 2 -grandson of John Wait 
Garrett, Major, Col. Zebulon Butler's Conn. Regt., killed at Wyoming, Pa., 
massacre July 3, 1778. 

WILLIAM ELMER GREEN, Summit, N. J. (27524). Son of William Connet and 
Amy (Elmer) Green; grandson of Philemon and Nancy (Potter) Elmer; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Abigail (Bebout) Potter; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Potter, Colonel First Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES FAY GREENE, Milwaukee, Wis. (Vt. 27476). Son of Horace Owen 
and Lucretia (Churchill) Greene; grandson of Heman and Nellie (Billings) 
Greene; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Susan (Alfred) Greene; greats-grand- 
son of Job Greene, private, Capt. Elijah Dewey's Company Vermont Militia. 

ROBERT E. GREENE, Albany, Ore. (28407). Son of William EHphalet and Clara 
Hortson (Lathrop) Greene; grandson of Cuyler and Tryphena (Follett) Greene; 
great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Edmonds) Green; great 2 -grandson of 
Richard Green, private, Col. Jonathan Hasbrouck's New York Regt.; great- 
grandson of EHphalet and Tryphena (Dimick) Follett; great 2 -grandson of Abel 
Dimick, Captain Vermont Militia; grandson of Daniel Avery and Nancy M. 
(Forbes) Lathrop; great-grandson of Jothan and Nancy (Olmstead) Forbes; 
great 2 -grandson of Absalom (and Martha Hall) Forbes, private, Col. Silas 
Wheelock's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of EHphalet Follett, private 
Conn. Militia, killed at Wyoming, Pa., massacre July 3, 1778; great 3 -grandson 
of Willis Hall, Member of Committee of Safety and of Mass. General Court; 
great 2 -grandson of James Olmstead, Captain, Col. John Chandler's Eighth Conn. 
Regt. 

JOHN HAROLD GREENWOOD, Salt Lake City, Utah (25993). Son of Ernest 
Asa and Louise Cecilia (Giesy) Greenwood; grandson of John and Mary Ann 
(Worsley) Greenwood; great-grandson of Asa and Lucy (Mason Evans) Green- 
wood; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Greenzvood, private, minute man, New Hamp- 
shire Militia; great-grandson of George W. and Laura Adeline (Greenwood) 
Worsley; great 2 -grandson of Robert and Rebecca (Crossfield) Worsley; great 3 - 
grandson of Robert Worsley, Jr., private, Capt. Beniamin Mann's Company 
Third New Hampshire Regt., Col. James Reed; great 3 -grandson of William 
Greenwood, private, Col. Enoch Hale's New Hampshire Regt. 

WILLIAM FORMAN GREGG, Cleveland, Ohio (27746). Son of Franklin Car- 
penter and Lydia (Forman) Gregg; grandson of Phineas and Lydia (Carpenter) 
Gregg; great-grandson of William Barney and Sarah B. Carpenter; great 2 - 
grandson of William Carpenter, Sergeant, Colonel Murray's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES GRIFFIN, Lowell, Mass. (28229). Son of Josiah Edwin and Susan 
Maria Griffin; grandson of Josiah and Lydia (Barker) Griffin; great-grandson 
of Jonathan and Persis (Flint) Griffin; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Griffin, Ser- 
geant, Maj. Benjamin Gage's Mass. Regt. 

PAUL WHITMAN GRIFFITHS, Philadelphia, Pa. (28028). Son of Guy M. and 
Alice (Woolworth) Griffiths; grandson of Thomas Moffett and Kathrine J. P. 
(Haslam) Woolworth; great-grandson of Thomas Grandage and Lydia Rape 
(Godfrey) Haslam; great 2 -grandson of James and Louisa (Rape) Godfrey; 
great 3 -grandson of Nicholas and Lydia (Steelman) Rape; great 4 -grandson of 
Christopher Rape, Captain, Col. Richard Somers's Third Gloucester County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Richard Hobson and Ellen (Mof- 
fett) Woolworth; great 2 -grandson of Richard Champion and Abigail (Gilpin) 
Woolworth; great 3 -grandson of Richard and Jemima (Champion) Woolworth; 
grear*-grandson of Reuben Champion, Surgeon Mass. Militia, died in service, 
1777. 

MAURICE GROSHON, Cheyenne, Wyo. (20044). Son of William and Helen 
Fuller (Stubbs) Groshon; grandson of Peter and Polly (Crane) Groshong; 
great-grandson of Aaron Crane, private Third New Jersey Battalion Second 
Regt. New Jersey Continentals. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 267 



ROBERT ECCEES GROVE, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28039). Son of John Williamson 
and Eliza (Eccles) Grove; grandson of Jacob and Martha (Tosh) Grove; great- 
grandson of Francis and Jane (Williamson) Grove; great 2 -grandson of Jacob 
Grove or Graff, private Second York County Battalion Penna. Militia; great 8 - 
grandson of Frantz Graff, private Third York County Battalion Penna. Flying 
Camp. 

HARMON FAUNCE GROVER, Lynn, Mass. (27941 )• Son of James J. and Anne 
Mary (Brown) Grover; grandson of Simon and Mary (Seavey) Brown; great- 
grandson of Simon and Polly (Seavey) Brown; great 2 -grandson of Simon 
Brozvn, Sergeant, Col. Jonathan Moulton's Regt. New Hampshire Militia; 
great-grandson of Amos and Sarah (Drake) Seavey; great 2 -grandson of Wil- 
liam Seavey, Lieutenant, Capt. Joseph Parsons's Company on Great Island, 
November 5, 1775, for defense of Piscataqua Harbor. 

BENJAMIN WRIGHT GUERNSEY, Wellesley, Mass. (27449). Son of George A. 
and Miriam (Wright) Guernsey; grandson of Hiram and Maria (Watrous) 
Guernsey; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Rexford) Guernsey; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Rexford, Lieutenant Seventeenth Albany County Regt. 
New York Militia. 

COURTENAY GUILD, Boston, Mass. (27447). Son of Curtis and Sarah Crocker 
(Cobb) Guild; grandson of David George Washington and Abby (Crocker) 
Cobb; great-grandson of David Cobb, Surgeon, Colonel Marshall's Mass. Regt., 
Lieutenant Colonel Sixteenth Mass. Continental Regt., Aid-de-Camp to General 
Washington, Brevet Brigadier General. 

WILFRED ALBERT GUILD, Cleveland, Ohio (27099). Son of Charles B. and 
Caroline E- (Smith) Guild; grandson of Horace A. and Amanda L. (Chariot) 
Smith; great-grandson of Prescott B. and Mary La Rue (Stillwell) Smith; 
great 2 -grandson of Daniel and Mary (Green) Stillwell; great 3 -grandson of 
Richard Stillwell, Captain First Regt. of Foot Bucks County Penna. Militia, 
Lieut. Col. John Kellar. 

EDGAR GRANVILLE GUNN, Richmond, Va. (22996). Son of James Frederick 
and Eudora (Childrey) Gunn; grandson of Stephen and Sallie (Fletcher) 
Childrey; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth Harris (Frayser) Childrey; 
great 2 -grandson of Jackson Frayser, private Virginia Militia. 

RANDOLPH WELLFORD GUNN, Richmond, Va. (28331). Son of Lewis Luns- 
ford and Marianna (Childrey) Gunn; grandson of John Thomas and Ann 
(Clarke) Childrey; great-grandson of John Salle and Nancy (Frayser) Clarke; 
great 2 -grandson of Jesse Frayser, private Virginia Militia. 

MARK EDWIN GUPTAIL, North Yakima, Wash. (28559). Son of George 
Franklin and Jane Estelle (Longley) Guptail; grandson of John and Phoebe 
{Fuller) Guptail; great-grandson of Benjamin Fuller, private, Col. John Dur- 
kee's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM STANLEY HALL, New York, N. Y. (27842). Son of William Henry 
and Henrietta (Steincolkr) Hall; grandson of William and Mary Eliza (Henry) 
Hall; great-grandson of Morris and Sarah Ann (Nugent) Henry; great-grand- 
son of William Hamilton and Ann Eliza (Neal) Henry; great 3 -grandson of 
Hugh Henry, recognized patriot of Lancaster, Pa. 

WILLIS BLAKE HALL, Portland, Me. (16682). Supplementals. Son of Joseph 
Blake and Lucinda Evans (Todd) Hall; grandson of Winslow and Ruth (How- 
land) Hall; great-grandson of Michael and Abagail (Blake) Howland; great 2 - 
grandson of Hobert (and Ruth Crooker) Howland, Sergeant, Capt. Thomas 
Turner's Company Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of David Crooker, private. 
Col. Theophilus Cotton's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Blake, 
Sergeant, Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD ANSEL HALLIGAN, Montclair, N. J. (28500). Son of James and 
Flora A. (Strong) Halligan; grandson of Ansel W. and Sarah Anne (Bar- 
nard) Strong; great-grandson of Apollas and Sarah (Hardy) Barnard; great 2 - 
grandson of David Barnard, private, Col. EHsha Porter's Regt. Mass. Militia. 



268 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES D. W. HALSEY, Montclair, N. J. (28576). Son of Nicoll and Eleanor 
(Wrenn) Halsey; grandson of William and Eliza (Sosman) Halsey; great- 
grandson of Nicoll and Euphias (McDowell) Halsey; great 2 -grandson of Silas 
Halsey, Jr., private First Regt. of Minute Men Suffolk County New York 
Militia. 

CLINTON GRAY HALSEY, Newark, N. J. (27514). Son of James Oliver and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Van Name) Halsey: grandson of John La Grange and Sarah 
Norris (Oliver) Halsey; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Halsey, Captain First Essex 
County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

STEPHEN FLANAGAN HAMILTON, Washington, D. C. (27990). Son of John 
McLeod and Elizabeth Wilcox (Flanagan) Hamilton; grandson of Stephen 
Flanagan, fifer on boat "Congress," seaman on boat "Chatham" in Penna. 
Navy. 

ERNEST De FOREST HAMMOND, Salt Lake City, Utah (28179). Son of De 
Forrest and Olive (Chadwick) Hammond; grandson of Joshua Weston and 
Nabbie (Keith) Chadwick; great-grandson of Ames and Lucy (Richmond) 
Chadwick; great 2 -grandson of Nathan Chadwick, private Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES SUTHERLAND HAMNER, Elizabeth, N. J. (28577). Son of James 
Garland and Lucy (Brewer) Hamner; grandson of Nicholas and Catherine 
Musser (Medairey) Brewer; great-grandson of Nicholas and Fanny (Davis) 
Brewer; great 2 -grandson of Robert Davis, private Sixth Maryland Regt. 

WALTER EVANS HAMPTON, Montclair, N. J. (27518). Son of John Watts 
and Almira (Whartman) Hampton, Jr.; grandson of John Watts and Tacy 
Stroud (Morgan) Hampton; great-grandson of Benjamin and Tacy (Stroud) 
Morgan; great 2 -grandson of Morgan and Ann (Roberts) Morgan; great-- 
grandson of John Robert, First Lieutenant and Captain Lieutenant in Capt. 
Nathaniel Tom's Company, Col. William Nelson's Continental Regt. of Foot. 

THEODORE C HANCE, Jr., Shelter Island, N. Y. (Mass. 27767). Son of 
Theodore C. and Nancy Hows (Tuthill) Hance; grandson of Daniel Theodore 
and Rosina Dodge (Cartwright) Tuthill; great-grandson of Thomas and Abigail 
(Terry) Tuthill; great 2 -grandson of Daniel (and Ruth Terry) Tuthill, private, 
Capt. Henry Brewster's Company, Col. Frederick Weissenfel's New York 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Terry (father of Abigail), private Suffolk 
County Minute Men and Col. James Clinton's New York Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Thomas Terry (father of Ruth), Colonel Third Suffolk County Regt. 
New York Minute Men; great-grandson of William Robeson and Nancy (Hows) 
Cartwright; great 2 -grandson of Edward Cartwright, private, Capt. Elias Long- 
street's Company First Regt. New Jersey Line. 

WILLIAM PATTEN HANCOCK, Allston, Mass. (27565). Son of William and 
Olive Smith (Patten) Hancock; grandson of William E. P. and Mary Smith 
(Bean) Hancock; great-grandson of William Hancock, private, Capt. Daniel 
Lane's Company, Colonel Brooks's Seventh Mass. Regt. 

JAMES LEO HANLON, Washington, D. C. (26822). Son of James Ardell and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Dawson) Hanlon; grandson of Oliver Winston and Sarah 
Adaline (Long) Dawson; great-grandson of Timothy John and Ruhamah (Rob- 
erts) Dawson; great 2 -grandson of Timothy Dawson, private, Capt. Matthew 
Smith's Company, General Waterbury's Conn. Brigade; great 2 -grandson of 
Oliver (and Anna Bunce) Roberts, private Conn. Militia; great 3 -grandson of 
John Bunce, private, Col. Samuel Canfield's Conn. Regt. 

CHARLES WATTS HANSCOM, Lynn, Mass. (19 161). Supplemental. Son of 
Watts Bowker and Sarah Perkins (Robinson) Hanscom; grandson of Otis 
Pineo and Lydia (Bowker) Hanscom; great-grandson of Levi and Betsey 
(Watts) Bowker; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Watts, Sergeant, Lieut. Joel 
Whitney's detachment Mass. Militia. 

EUGENE X. HARDING, Gaston, Ore. (27597). Son of Sterling F. and Abigail 
(Whitman) Harding; grandson of Jesse and Anna (Game) Harding; great- 
grandson of Thomas Harding, private, Capt. Robert Durkee's Wyoming Valley 
Penna. Independent Company and other service. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 269 

HORACE WHITNEY HARDY, Grand Rapids, Mich. (28132). Son of George 
W. and Harriet B. Hardy; grandson of Amos and Mary (Cummings) Hardy; 
great-grandson of Jesse Hardy, private, Col. John Stark's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

JOHN BRADFORD HARLOW, West Medford, Mass. (27768). Son of James H. 
and Elsie R. (Gee) Harlow; grandson of John and Jane Chandler (Bradford) 
Harlow; great-grandson of Eewis and Hannah (Churchill) Harlow; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Harlow, Corporal, Capt. N. Goodwin's Company, Col. T. 
Cotton's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Alden and Mary (Brown) Gee; great-grand- 
son of Aaron and Mary (Gates) Brown; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Gates, Cap- 
tain, Col. Asa Whitcomb's Mass. Regt. Lexington Alarm; great-grandson of 
Josiah and Mary (Robbins) Bradford; great 2 -grandson of Lemuel Robbins, 
Corporal, Wm. C. Cotton's Company, Col. Josiah Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES HARMAN, Watertown, S. Dak. (27283). Son of John Mathias and 
Ann Rebeca (Link) Harman; grandson of Alexander and Nancy (Dust) Link; 
great-grandson of Adam and Jane (Ogle) Link; great 2 -grandson of Alexander 
Ogle, private Delaware Militia. 

WILLIAM GRAY HARMAN, Grand Junction, Colo. (28051). Son of John Fre- 
linghuysen and Amelia (Gray) Harman; grandson of William and Lavinia 
(Johnson) Gray; great-grandson of William and Mary (Higgins) Gray; great 2 - 
grandson of Blias Gray, minute man, Commissary (Captain) Conn. Militia. 

GASTON SCALES HARRILL, Rutherfordton, N. C. '(24518). Son of John B. 
and Martha Louisa (McFarland) Han-ill; grandson of Amos and Elizabeth 
(Baxter) Harrill; great-grandson of William and Katherine (Lee) Baxter; 
great 2 -grandson of William and Nancy (Bedford) Lee; great 3 -grandson of 
James Lcc, private North Carolina State Militia in 1780. 

ARTHUR CLARK HARRINGTON, North Adams, Mass. (21492). Supplemental. 
Son of James Arthur and Mary Evelyn (Clark) Harrington; grandson of 
Moses Elwell and Mary Willard (Powers) Clark; great-grandson of Nathan 
and Sarah (Thompson) Powers; great 2 -grandson of Isaac and Mehitabel (Chad- 
bourne) Thompson; great 3 -grandson of Eleazer Cha4boume, Member of Com- 
missary Committee. 

WILLIAM SHAW HARRINGTON, Seattle, Wash. (27243). Son of James and 
Charlotte (Walrod) Harrington; grandson of Lot arid Sylvia (Sage) Harring- 
ton; great-grandson of Daniel Sage, private Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

CHARLES TAYLOR HARRIS, Cleveland, Ohio (27734). Son of Charles Taylor 
and Marcella (Clapp) Harris; grandson of David and Julia (Taylor) Harris; 
great-grandson of Asahel Harris, private, Lieut. Lemuel White's Company 
Vermont Militia. 

CHESTER HUTCHISON HARRIS, Cincinnati, Ohio (2773s). Son of Charles 
Taylor and Blanche (Hutchison) Harris, Jr.; grandson of Charles Taylor and 
Marcella (Clapp) Harris; great-grandson of David and Julia (Taylor) Harris: 
great 2 -grandson of Asahel Harris, private Vermont Militia. 

HENRY LINCOLN HARRISON, New Haven, Conn. (27348). Son of Henry 
Augustus and Sarah Rebecca (Robbins) Harrison; grandson of Oliver and Re- 
becca (Woodhouse) Robbins; great-grandson of Robert and Abigail (Hanmer) 
Robbins; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Hanmer, private, Capt. John Hanmer's 
Company Conn. Militia. 

JAMES HARVEY HARRISON, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28026). Son of John and Eliza 
Jane (Sampson) Harrison; grandson of John and Jane (Dampster) Sampson; 
great-grandson of Thomas Sampson, private Third Westmoreland County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

JOHN GOULD HARRISON, East Orange, N. J. (27512). Son of Caleb Gould 
and Charlotte (Washburn) Harrison; grandson of Caleb and Jane (Gould) 
Harrison; great-grandson of Isaac Harrison, private Second Essex County 
Regt. New Jersey Militia and First Battalion Continental Line, pensioned. 



27O SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. , 

LEWIS P. HARRISON, East Orange, N. J. (27510). Son of John G. and Ade- 
laide L. (Knapp) Harrison; grandson of Caleb Gould and Charlotte (Wash- 
burn) Harrison; great-grandson of Caleb and Jane (Gould) Harrison; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Harrison, private Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey 
Militia and First Battalion Continental Line, pensioned. 

WILLIAM GRANGER HASTINGS, Lincoln, Nebr. (27307). Son of Carlisle and 
Hannah (Granger) Hastings; grandson of William and Phcebe (Gardner) 
Granger; great-grandson of Abraham Granger, Jr., private Suffolk Conn. Com- 
pany, Lexington Alarm, Member Conn. State Assembly. 

GEORGE ELIJAH HAWLEY, Detroit, Mich. (27463). Son of Charles P. and 
Harriet (Morhous) Hawley; grandson of George and Harriet (Sinclair) Mor- 
hous; great-grandson of Oliver and Susan Baldwin (Farrand) Morhous; great 2 - 
grandson of Nathan and Ester (Burnet) Farrand; great 3 -grandson of Bethnei 
Farrand, Lieutenant, Colonel Martin's Battalion New Jersey Troops. 

ALLEN HAY, Summit, N. J. (28578). Son of Robert and Julia (Booth) Hay; 
grandson of Ralph W. and Julia Heston (Dailey) Booth; great-grandson of 
Daniel Demmons and Lucy (Sherman) Dailey; great 2 -grandson of Henry Sher- 
man, Ensign of Sherburn's Continental Regt., Lieutenant in Olney's Rhode 
Island Battalion, prisoner. 

BENJAMIN LESTER HAYDON, Schenectady, N. Y. (28251). Son of George 
and Elizabeth (Thurston) Haydon; grandson of John and Polly (Greeley) 
Thurston; great-grandson of John Thurston, private Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

HAROLD MERRILL HAYES, Foxcroft, Me. (28301). Son of Charles W. and 
Lola B. (Whittier) Hayes; grandson of Lendall H. and Mary J. (Howard) 
Whittier; great-grandson of Stillman and Jane (Kincaid) Howard; great 2 - 
grandson of Peres Howard; great 3 -grandson of Jesse Howard, Second Lieu- 
tenant Third Plymouth County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Jonathan 
and Cordelia (Jackson) Whittier; great 2 -grandson of William and Hannah 
(Smith) Jackson; great 3 -grandson of Heman Smith, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph 
Smith's Company Mass. Coast Guards; grandson of William C. and Mary M. 
(Barrows) Hayes; great-grandson of Jabez and Sarah (Davee) Barrows; 
great 2 -grandson of Ephraim Barrows, private, Colonel Cotton's Mass. Regt.; 
great 3 -grandson of Benjamin Barrows, private Plymouth Company Mass. Militia. 

FREDERICK MATSON HAZZARD, Huntington, N. Y. (27844). Son of Charles 
J. and Mary E. (Edwards) Hazzard; grandson of John and Martha (Lewis) 
Hazzard; great-grandson of Joshua and Sophia (Hartt) Hazzard; great-grand- 
son of John Locke and Tryphena (Smith) Hartt; great 3 -grandson of Joshua 
Hartt, clergyman and patriot, prisoner in New York City. 

HENRY OSWALD HEAD, Jr., Union City, Tenn. (Texas 251 17). Son of Henry 
Oswald and Ballu (Wilson) Head; grandson of James Marshall and Bartinia 
(Branham) Head; great-grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Sanford) Head; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Head, Captain, Col. Theodorick Bland's Virginia 
Regt. and Continental Army, prisoner. 

ELROY HEADLEY, East Orange, N. J. (27519). Son of Will C. and Rosetta A. 
Headley; grandson of John Stiles and Sarah Ann (Courter) Headley; great- 
grandson of William Stiles and Hannah (Lockwood) Headley; great 2 -grandson 
of Gary Headley, private Essex County New Jersey Militia and State Troops. 

RAYMOND ROWE HEALEY, New Britain, Conn. (27349). Son of Robert and 
Alice Jane (Bassett) Healey; grandson of Amos and Keziah Huldah (Rowe) 
Bassett; great-grandson of Glover and Elizabeth (Baldwin) Bassett; great- 
grandson of Abraham Bassett, private, Colonel Waterbury's and other Conn. 
Regts., pensioned. 

WILLIAM COLBY HEAP, Chicago, 111. (27816). Son of Arnold and Annie F. 
(Baker) Heap; grandson of Chester and Sarah S. (Loud) Baker; great-grand- 
son of John and Sarah (Hall) Loud; great 2 -grandson of Israel and Sarah 
(Smith) Hall; great 3 -grandson of John Hall, Lieutenant, Capt. Peter Coffin's 
Company New Hampshire Militia, 1775, private, Col. Joseph CUley's Regt., 
1780-1781. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 27 1 

PHILIP TITUvS HEARTT, Montclair, N. J. (27795). Son of Job Pierson and 
Mary A. (Waterman) Heartt; grandson of Philip Titus and Sarah Jerusha 
(Pierson) Heartt; great-grandson of Philip and Deidamia (Gazlay) Heartt; 
great-grandson of Nehemiah and Martha (Titus) Heartt, Jr.; great-grandson 
of Nehemiah. Heartt, private Fourth Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

HENRY PAGE HEIZER, Chicago, 111. (28017). Son of Frederick and Elizabeth 
(Elliott) Heizer; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Ware) Heizer; great-grand- 
son of Frederick (and Elizabeth Detter) Ware, Lieutenant First York County 
Battalion Penna. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Mathias Detter, private York 
County Penna. Militia. 

FRANKLIN WALLACE HELMS, Summit, N. J. (28361). Son of Horace and 
Emma (Scott) Helms; grandson of Mahlon M. and Amanda M. (Wallace) 
Scott; great-grandson of John Dickerson and Rebecca (Cobb) Wallace; great 2 - 
grandson of William Wallace, private Nineteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HAMPTON SANDERS HENDERSON, Grand Junction, Colo. (26693). Son of 
John and Louisa W. (Inzer) Henderson; grandson of John F. and Nancy 
(Mohler) Henderson; great-grandson of Samuel Henderson, private and ma- 
tross, Capt. John Dandridge's Company First Virginia Artillery Regt. 

EARL LESLIE HERMAN, Chicago, 111. (28283). Son of Henry G. and Mary 
Rhoda (Hakes) Herman; grandson of Horatio G. and Lucy Ann (Lynch) 
Hakes; great-grandson of Horatio and Rhoda (Starkweather) Hakes; great 2 - 
grandson of Ephraim Starkweather, private, Capt. Edward Mott's Company 
Conn. Militia. 

RAYMOND E. HERMAN, Chicago, 111. (28284). Son of Henry G. and Mary 
Rhoda (Hakes) Herman; grandson of Horatio G. and Lucy Ann (Lynch) 
Hakes; great-grandson of Horatio and Rhoda (Starkweather) Hakes; great 2 - 
grandson of Ephraim Starkweather, private, Capt. Edward Mott's Company 
Conn. Militia. 

JOHN GOODWIN HERNDON, Jr., Washington, D. C. (28427). Son of John 
Goodwin and Florence Early (Linton) Herndon; grandson of Cotesworth 
Pinckney and Mahala Hall (Turner) Herndon; great-grandson of Robert and 
Sophia Woodcraft (Dale) Turner; great 2 -grandson of Adam Dale, private in 
a boys' company of Maryland Volunteers, 1781; great 3 -grandson of Thomas 
(and Elizabeth Evans) Dale, Captain, Colonel Smallwood's Maryland Regt.; 
great 4 -grandson of John Evans, recognized patriot of Maryland; grandson of 
William Alexander and Indiana (Grimes) Linton; great-grandson of Alexander 
Brown and Jane (Daniel) Linton; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Linton, Quarter- 
master, Gen. Wade Hampton's South Carolina Regt. 

LAUGHLIN R. HETRICK, Asbury Park, N. J. (28477)- Son of J. A. W. and 
Sarah P. (Evans) Hetrick; grandson of Samuel D. and Maria D. (Denison) 
Evans; great-grandson of Henry and Deborah (Pierce) Denison, Jr.; great-- 
grandson of Henry Denison, Second Lieutenant Conn. Militia. 

HARRISON HEWITT, New Haven, Conn. (16204). Supplementals. Son of 
William Henry Harrison and Catharine (Harrison) Hewitt; grandson of John 
Rogers and Eleanor (Bradford) Harrison; great-grandson of James Fitch and 
Mary (Merwin) Bradford; great 2 -grandson of John Bradford, Corporal, Capt. 
David Cady's Company Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Fozvler Merwin, Mem- 
ber of Goshen Military Supplies Committee; great-grandson of Edmund and 
Ruth (Hopkins) Harrison; great 2 -grandson of Noah Harrison, private, Capt. 
Edward Griswold's Company Conn. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Hopkins, 
private Fourteenth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JAMES HOFFMAN HEWSON, Newark, N. J. (28486). Son of Edwin Stewart 
and Mary S. (Hoffman) Hewson; grandson of James and Desire Edwards 
(Crowell) Hewson; great-grandson of James and Martha Hewson; great 2 - 
grandson of John Hewson, Sr., Captain Penna. Militia; great-grandson of 
Caleb and Abigail (Edwards) Crowell; great 2 -grandson of Sylvamis Crowell, 
private Second Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 



2*J2. SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHAUNCEY SANFORD HICKOK, Summit, N. J. (27522). Son of Francis Ste- 
vens and Elizabeth Frances (Pease) Hickok; grandson of Pliny I. and Lucy 
(Stevens) Hickok; great-grandson of Daniel and Lucy (Hoyt) Hickok, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of Daniel Hickok, Captain First Battalion Conn. State Troops, 
under Generals Wooster and Spencer. 

CHAUNCEY SANFORD HICKOK, 2nd, Summit, N. J. (26626). Supplemental. 
Son of Albert Ernest and Sarah Elizabeth (Owen) Hickok; grandson of Fran- 
cis Stevens and Eliza Frances (Pease) Hickok; great-grandson of Pliny I. 
and Lucy (Stevens) Hickok; great 2 -grandson of Daniel and Lucy (Hoyt) 
Hickok, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Nathaniel Hoyt, Jr., Ensign Conn. Militia; 
great 3 -grandson of Daniel and Lucy (Starr) Hickok, Sr. ; great 4 -grandson of 
Thomas Starr, First Lieutenant Second Regt. Conn. Continental Line. 

ARTHUR WILLSON HICKS, Summit, N. J. (27689). Son of John Augustus 
and Caroline Amelia (Willson) Hicks; grandson of John Augustus and Lucy 
(Cleveland) Hicks; great-grandson of George and Catey (Caldwell) Cleveland; 
great 2 -grandson of Aaron Cleveland, Member of Connecticut House of Repre- 
sentatives, 1779. 

S. CHUDLEIGH HICKS, Morristown, N. J. (23354). Supplemental. Son of 
Samuel H. and Elizabeth Ryerson (Holden) Hicks; grandson of Horatio and 
Eliza Ryerson (Halsey) Holden; great-grandson of Henry and Eliza (Plume) 
Holden; great 2 -grandson of Levi and Hannah (Plympton) Holden; great 8 - 
grandson of Thomas Plympton, Member of Mass. Provincial Congress, private, 
Capt. Aaron Haynes's Company Mass. Minute Men; great-grandson of Havilah 
Smith and Elizabeth R. (Miller) Halsey; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Halsey, pri- 
vate Third Battalion New Jersey Line and New Jersey Light Horse. 

EDWARD LEANDER HIGGINS, Portland, Me. (28307). Son of Ambrose H. 
and Elizabeth (Ash) Higgins; grandson of Daniel and Hannah (Higgins) Hig- 
gins; great-grandson of Stephen and Deborah (Wasgatt) Higgins; great-grand- 
son of Israel Higgins, private, Capt. Daniel Sullivan's Company Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES HILL, Montclair, N. J. (28077). Son of Charles and Mary Katherine 
Hill; grandson of Tristram and Katherine Williams (Merrill) Jordan; great- 
grandson of Ichabod and Mary (Coffin) Jordan; great 2 -grandson of Tristram 
Jordan, Colonel Third York County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JONATHAN AVERY HILL, Chicago, 111. (27825). Son of Homer and Elizabeth 
(Kierman) Hill; grandson of Caleb and Annis (Avery) Hill; great-grandson of 
Jonathan Avery, Sergeant Sixth Conn. Regt., Orderly Sergeant Tenth Conti- 
nental Infantry, pensioned. 

OWEN THOMAS HILL, Chicago, 111. (28018). Son of Robert S. and Frances S. 
(Owen) Hill; grandson of Thomas and Mary (Boynton) Hill; great-grandson 
of Ebenezer and Lydia (Harmon) Hill; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Hill, Ensign, 
Col. Joseph Vose's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Mark L. H. and Matilda (Har- 
mon) Owen; great-grandson of Thomas and Hannah (Elwell) Harmon, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of Thomas Harmon, private, Col. Ebenezer Sprout's and other 
Mass. Regts. ; great-grandson of John and Ruth (Hill) Owen; great 2 -grandson 
of John Owen, private, Capt. John Elden's Company Mass. Militia. 

PHILIP TOLL HILL, Schenectady, N. Y. (27549). Son of Erastus Dudley and 
Mary Grace (Toll) Hill; grandson of Philip Ryley and Maria (De Graff) Toll; 
great-grandson of John C. and Nancy (Mynderse) Toll; great 2 -grandson of 
Karl Hansen Toll, Adjutant Fourteenth New York Regt. 

BENJAMIN DE LONG HILTON, Ridgwood, N. J. (28080). Son of Alfred S. 
and Lucinda (De Long) Hilton; grandson of Benjamin and Catherine (White) 
De Long; great-grandson of William and Cloe (Chard) White; great 2 -grandson 
of Barce Chard, Corporal and Sergeant, Col. Marinus Willet's Regt. New York 
State Levies, prisoner, pensioned. 

JOHN MACK HIMES, Grand Rapids, Mich. (28140). Son of Albert and Maria 
Louise (Munger) Himes; grandson of Orin Gridley and Charlotte (Nash) 
Munger; great-grandson of Nathan and Aurelia (Barker) Munger; great 2 - 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 273 

grandson of Nathan and Louisa (Bishop) Munger; great 8 -grandson of Joseph 
Munger, Sergeant, Capt. Anthony Needham's Company Mass. Militia. 

THURSTON RUSSELL HINCKLEY, Paauilo, Hawaii (28528). Son of Charles 
Russell and Marguerite (Thurston) Hinckley; grandson of E. Russell and 
Frances Ellen (Hill) Hinckley; great-grandson of Joseph Briggs and Harriet 
(Hempstead) Hill; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Hempstead, Corporal Third 
Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JAMES HENRY HINSDALE, Meriden, Conn. (27350). Son of James Crane and 
Mari L- (Tuttle) Hinsdale; grandson of Charles James and Catherine Banks 
(Crane) Hinsdale; great-grandson of Epaphras and Elizabeth (Bowen) Hins- 
dale; great 2 -grandson of Bamabus Hinsdale, Ensign Company of Hartford 
Volunteers, Dec. 30, 1776. 

DEXTER HISCOX, Orange, N. J. (N. Y. 27633)- Son of Gardner Dexter and 
Annette (Tremper) Hiscox; grandson of William and Ellen (Snyder) Trem- 
per; great-grandson of William and Anna (Tappen) Tremper; great-grandson 
of Christopher Tappen, First Major, Col. Charles De Witt's New York Minute 
Men, Member of Committee of Safety, Delegate New York Provincial Con- 
gress. 

HIRAM MILTON HITCHCOCK, Chicago, 111. (28008). Son of Lyman and Mary 
(Payne) Hitchcock; grandson of Eleazer and Caroline (Allen) Hitchcock; 
great-grandson of Reuben and Hannah (Smith) Hitchcock; great 2 -grandson of 
John Hitchcock, Lieutenant, Col. Timothy Robinson's detachment Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE TAFT HOBBS, Uxbridge, Mass. (28522). Son of George W. and Chloe 
E. (Taft) Hobbs; grandson of David and Henrietta (Jefferson) Taft; great- 
grandson of David and Lena (Cummings) Taft; great 2 -grandson of Noah Taft, 
Second Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Read's Company Mass. Militia. 

ARCHIBALD JOSEPH HODGES, Chicago, 111. (27613). Son of Charles Gilbert 
and Martha A. (Roberts) Hodges; grandson of George Wheaton and Marana 
M. (Pepoon) Hodges; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah Eunice (Starks) 
Pepoon; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Pepoon, Sergeant. Twelfth Conn. Regt., Col. 
Joseph Hosford. 

JOHN CHAUNCEY HOFFMAN, Brooklyn, N. Y. (28269). Son of Silas Wright 
and Amanda Maria (Thompson) Hoffman; grandson of John Calhoun and 
Mary Ann (Shepherd) Thompson; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary Morris 
(Bristor) Shepherd; great 2 -grandson of George (and Catherine Van Winkle) 
Shepherd, private, Capt. Abraham Speer's Company New Jersey Militia; great-- 
grandson of Jacob Van Winkle, First Lieutenant Bergen County New Jersey 
Militia; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Wheaton) Hoffman; great-grandson 
of Reuben Wheaton, private, Col. Abraham Wemple's New York Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

HORACE HOLDEN, Madison, N. J. (19585). Supplemental. Son of Horace and 
Abby M. (Rankin) Holden; grandson of James Cotton and Sarah Daniels 
(Packard) Holden; great-grandson of Horace and Mary (Cotton) Holden; 
great 2 -grandson of Levi and Hannah (Plympton) Holden; great s -grandson of 
Thomas Plympton, Member of Mass. Provincial Congress, private, Capt. Aaron 
Haynes's Company Mass. Minute Men. 

HORACE HOLMES, Dalton, 111. (27612). Son of William C. and Louisa Holmes; 
grandson of William Sergent and Hannah (Davis) Holmes; great-grandson of 
Joseph and Martha Holmes; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Holmes, private, Col. 
Ebenezer Sprout's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Faunce) 
Davis; great 2 -grandson of Peleg Faunce, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's 
Mass. Regt. 

EUGENE HOLT, Burlington, N. C. (24519). Son of Lawrence Shackleford and 
Margaret Locke (Erwin) Holt; grandson of Joseph J. and Elvira Jane (Holt) 
Erwin; great-grandson of James and Margaret (Phifer) Erwin; great-grand- 
son of Alexander Erzvin, (Colonel) State Auditor, and his wife, Sat ah (Rob- 
inson) Erwin, who saved the life of Samuel Alexander, a Revolutionary sol- 



274 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

dier; great 3 -grandson of Martin (and Elizabeth Locke) Phifer, Jr., Captain 
North Carolina Dragoons, pensioned; great-grandson of Matthew Locke, Dele- 
gate to Halifax, N. C, Congress, Nov., 1776; great-grandson of William Rainey 
and Mary Gizeal (Allen) Holt; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Har- 
per) Allen; great 3 -grandson of Jeduthan Harper, Lieutenant Colonel North 
Carolina Troops, Member of North Carolina Provincial Congress, 1776. 
LAWRENCE SHACKLEFORD HOLT, Jr., Burlington, N. C. (24515). Son of 
Lawrence Shackleford and Margaret Locke (Erwin) Holt; grandson of Joseph 
J. and Elvira Jane (Holt) Erwin; great-grandson of James and Margaret 
(Phifer) Erwin; great-grandson of Martin (and Elizabeth Locke) Phifer, Jr., 
Captain Second Light Horse Company of North Carolina, pensioned; great 8 - 
grandson of Matthew Locke, Paymaster of Troops and Minute Men, District 
of Salisbury, N. C, 1775, Member of Committee of Observation, Rowan 
County, Member of Provincial Congress at Halifax, N. C, in 1776; great- 
grandson of William Rainey and Mary Gizeal (Allen) Holt; great--grandson of 
John and Elizabeth (Harper) Allen; great 3 -grandson of Jeduthan Harper, 
Lieutenant Colonel, Col. Ambrose Ramsey's North Carolina Regt., Member of 
Provincial Congress at Halifax, N. C, in 1776; great 2 -grandson of Alexander 
Brwin, recognized patriot, district auditor, clerk of Burke County Court, N. C, 
and his wife, Sarah {Robinson) Erwin, recognized patriot, saving the life of 
Samuel Alexander, a Revolutionary soldiei". 
JOHN RITCHIE FRASER HOOPER, Richmond, Va. (23000). Son of George 
James and Eliza (Fraser) Hooper; grandson of James Hooper, private, Capt. 
John Hockaday's Company Sixth Virginia Regt. 
LEIGHTON HOPE, Little Rock, Ark. (27156). Son of James Edward and Julia 
Eugenia Grace Witherspoon (Buford) Hope; grandson of Levi and Jane 
Milissa (Harris) Hope; great-grandson of John and Rachel (Gingles) Harris; 
great-grandson of Robert Harris, Jr., private, Capt. Charles Polk's Company 
North Carolina "Light Horse." 
WILLIAM CLARKSON HOPE, Roselle, N. J. (28166). Son of Aaron Dunham 
and Elizabeth Smith (Dunham) Hope; grandson of Nehemiah and Catherine 
(Emery) Dunham; great-grandson of James and Mary Dunham (Carhart) 
Dunham; great 2 -grandson of Nehemiah Dunham, Member of General Assembly 
of New Jersey from Hunterdon County. 
HERBERT MARSHALL HOPKINS, Wakefield, Mass. (27946). Son of Ebenezer 
Sumner and Mary Louisa (Parker) Hopkins; grandson of Joseph Hopkins, 
private Eleventh Mass. Regt. and other service, pensioned; gi-eat-grandson of 
Ebenezer Hopkinson (Hopkins), private, Col. David Green's Mass. Regt., 
marched Alarm April 19, 1775. 
ROBERT HOPKINS, Chicago, 111. (28001). Son of John Cook and Emmer 
Amelia (Young) Hopkins; grandson of Henry Vrooman Berry and Sarah Ann 
(Snook) Young; great-grandson of Richard R. and Eleanor (Prine) Young; 
great 2 -grandson of Richard Young, private Second Tryon County Regt. New 
York Militia. 
EDGAR FORRESTER HORNER, Baltimore, Md- (25573). Son of John A. and 
Catherine E. (Forrester) Horner; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Wilson) 
Horner; great-grandson of David and Mary (Lore) Horner; great 2 -grandson of 
Alexander Lore, Member of Provincial Congress at Charleston, S. C, 1775- 
WILLIAM EDWARD HORTON, Lieut. Col. U. S. Army, New York, N. Y. 
(2012). Supplemental. Son of William E. and Josephine Julia (Clarke) 
Horton; grandson of Otis M. and Caroline Elizabeth (Spicer) Horton; great- 
grandson of William and Sarah (Millard) Horton; great-grandson of William 
Horton, private Third Mass. Regt., Col. Michael Jackson. 
WILLIAM ROWLAND HOTCHKIN, Montclair, N. J. (27676). Son of Gurdon 
Beriah and Sarah Jane (Cochran) Hotchkin; grandson of Beriah Bishop and 
Elizabeth Alice (Fitch) Hotchkin; great-grandson of James Hervey and Re- 
becca (Hall) Hotchkin; great 3 -grandson of Beriah Hotchkin, private, Capt. 
Daniel Hand's Company Conn. Troops for "the New York Expedition." 



J 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. J/5 

NORMAN MILO HOTCHKISS, Summit, N. J. (27515). Son of Edwin Barrett 
and Annie Eliza (Gibbs) Hotchkiss; grandson of Milo and Rhoda (Barrett) 
Hotchkiss; great-grandson of Stephen and Tabitha (Castle) Barrett; great 2 - 
grandson of Phincas Castle, Captain Tenth and Twenty-seventh Regts. Conn. 
Militia. 

MARCUS STEPHEN HOTTENSTEIN, Washington, D. C. (2682.1). Son of 
Charles L. and Amanda H. (Butz) Hottenstein; grandson of Eevi S. and Maria 
(Bowen) Hottenstein; great-grandson of Jacob and Kate (Schwoyer) Hotten- 
stein; great 2 -grandson of David and Elizabeth (Kline) Hottenstein; great-- 
grandson of David Hottenstein, private Berks County Penna. Militia. 

EDWARD SIMON HOUGHTON, Salt Eake City, Utah (25998). Son of George 
Anson and May Abbie (Holmes) Houghton; grandson of Simon Willard and 
Sarah Ann (Mead) Houghton; great-grandson of Timothy and Olive (Moore) 
Houghton; great 2 -grandson of Simon Houghton, private, Col. Job Cushing's 
Mass. Regt. 

ADAMS BAILEY LOTHROP HOWARD, Cleveland, Ohio (27095). Son of Noble 
and Catherine Reed (Eothrop) Howard; grandson of Apollas and Olive (Carey) 
Howard; great-grandson of Caleb and Sylvia (Alger) Howard; great 2 -grandson 
of George Howard, private, Capt. Daniel Eothrop's Company, Col. John Bailey's 
Mass. Regt. 

FREDERICK HAZEN HOWARD, Watertown, Mass. (27436). Son of Frederick 
H. and Sarah E. Howard; grandson of James and Hannah (Farringi.011) How- 
ard; great-grandson of Samuel Howard, private, Capt. Edward Burbank's Com- 
pany, Col. Henry Knox's Regt., pensioned. 

CHARLES HENRY HOWE, New York, N. Y. (27850). Son of Henry J. and 
Emogene (Gaylord) Howe; grandson of Perley and Abigail (Cawles) Howe; 
great-grandson of Joseph Cady and Tabetha (Rhoades) Howe; great 2 -grandson 
of Perley Howe, Captain Second Company Fourth Regt. Conn. Eight Horse. 

JACOB HOWE, Rochester, N. Y. (28256). Son of Jacob and Eucilla (Covert) 
Howe; grandson of Marcellus Peter and Eliza (Fox) Covert; great-grandson 
of Eder Covert, minute man Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ITHAMAR MARTINDAEE HOWELL, Olympia, Wash. (28563). Son of Josephus 
Skudder and Abigail Jane (Noyes) Howell; grandson of William and Abigail 
(Dexter) Noyes; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Reed) Noyes; great-'- 
grandson of Thomas Noyes, private, Thomas Bartlett's Regt. New Hampshire 
Militia. 

ELTON HOYT, II, Cleveland, Ohio (27744). Son of James II. and Jessie 
(Tainter) Hoyt; grandson of James M. and Mary Ella (Beebe) Hoyt; great- 
grandson of David Picket and Mary (Barnum) Hoyt; great 2 -grandson of Noah. 
Hoyt, private, Colonel Bradley's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILBUR W. HUBBARD, Chestertown, Md. (27862). Son of Thomas R. and 
Josephine (Watson) Hubbard; grandson of Lemuel and Mary (Rumbold) Hub- 
bard; great-grandson of Edward Hubbard; great 2 -grandson of Jesse Hubbard, 
seaman Virginia State Navy. 

SAMUEL BROWN HUDDLESTON, Dublin, Ind. (27709). Son of Jesse and 
Editha (Brown) Huddleston; grandson of Jonathan and Phebc (Gardner) 
Huddleston; great-grandson of Seth Huddleston, private Bristol County Mass. 
.Militia. 

EUGENE HUDGINS, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27841). Son of Charles Houlder and 
Margaret (Porter) Hudgins; grandson of Zachariah and Nancy (Nichols) Por- 
ter; great-grandson of Jared and Harley (Higley) Porter; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Porter, Captain Fourth Company Fifteenth Regt. Conn. Militia; great-- 
grandson of Brewster Higley, Sergeant, Capt. Simeon Wright's Company, Col- 
onel Warren's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

RUSSELL WENTWORTH HUDGINS, New York, N. Y. (27637). Son of Charles 
H. and Margaret (Porter) Hudgins; grandson of Zachariah and Nancy (Nich- 



276 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ols) Porter; great-grandson of Jared and Harley (Higley) Porter; greats-grand- 
son of Breivster Higley, 3d, Sergeant, Col. Thomas Lee's Vermont Regt., 
Member of Committee of Safety; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Porter, Captain 
Fourth Company (Train Band), Lieutenant Colonel Meade's Fifteenth Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

FRANK HUGHES, Montclair, N. J. (27698). Son of John and Mary A. (Dawson) 
Hughes; grandson of Robert and Richarda (Hopkins) Dawson; great-grandson 
of Robert and Mary (Sewell) Dawson; great 2 -grandson of Basil Sezvell, Second 
Lieutenant, Capt. George Dawson's Company Thirty-eighth Battalion of Militia 
of Talbot County, Maryland. 

FRANK R. HUGHES, Jr., Montclair, N. J. (27697). Son of Frank and Inez M. 
(Thurston) Hughes; grandson of John and Mary A. (Dawson) Hughes; great- 
grandson of Robert and Richarda (Hopkins) Dawson; great 2 -grandson of Rob- 
ert and Mary (Sewell) Dawson; great 3 -grandson of Basil Sewell, Second Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. George Dawson's Company Thirty-eighth Battalion of Militia of 
Talbot County, Maryland. 

JOHN MACARTHUR HUGHES, Montclair, N. J. (28579). Son of Harry S. and 
Amelia D. (Watt) Hughes; grandson of William and Catherine (McKay) 
Watt; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth D. (Craig) McKay; great 2 - 
grandson of Daniel McKay, Master of sloop "Fanny," prisoner, private First 
Regt. Penna. Line. 

EDGAR ERSKINE HUME, Frankfort, Ky. (24479). Supplemental. Son of Edgar 
Enoch and Mary (South) Hume; grandson of Samuel and Malvey Blackwell 
(Jett) South; great-grandson of Curtis and Nancy (Bryant) Jett; great-grand- 
son of Hiram and Sarah (Evans) Bryant; great 3 -grandson of William (and 
Rachel Wilcoxen) Bryant, Captain North Carolina Militia; great 4 -grandson of 
John Wilcoxen, private North Carolina Continental Line. 

WILLIAM TEMPLETON HUMES, New York, N. Y. (N. J. 2S367). Son of 
Charles and Catherine Agnes (Byrn) Humes; grandson of William and Jerusha 
(Thompson) Humes; great-grandson of Stephen and Sussana (Harris) Thomp- 
son; great 2 -grandson of David Thompson, private Morris County New Jersey 
Militia, Chairman of Committee of Observation at Mendham, N. J. 

JONATHAN HENRY HUNTINGTON, Newark, N. J. (27696). Supplementals. 
Son of Jonathan Henry and Eunice (Ailing) Huntington; grandson of Stephen 
Ball and Jane II. (Weir) Ailing; great-grandson of David and Nancy (Ball) 
Ailing; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Ailing, private New Jersey Minute Men, 1776; 
great 3 -grandson of John Ailing; great 4 -grandson of Samuel Ailing, Jr., private 
New Jersey Minute Men, 1776. 

JONATHAN HENRY HUNTINGTON, Jr., Newark, N. J. (27696). Son of Jon- 
athan Henry and Eunice (Ailing) Huntington; grandson of Stephen Ball and 
Jane H. (Wier) Ailing; great-grandson of David and Nancy (Ball) Ailing; 
great 2 -grandson of Stephen Ball, recognized patriot of New Jersey, losing his 
life at the hands of the enemy; grandson of Jonathan E. and Elizabeth A. 
(Johnson) Huntington; great-grandson of Mahlon and Sarah (Baker) Johnson; 
great 2 -grandson of Jacob Johnson, private, Capt. Jacob Arnold's Troop of New 
Jersey Light Horse. 

CHARLES HENRY HUNTLEY, Schenectady, N. Y. (27548). Son of William W. 
arid Maria A. (Bulkley) Huntley; grandson of Samuel B. and Phoebe (Pulford) 
Bulkley; great-grandson of Samuel and Avis (Maxson) Pulford; great 2 -grandson 
of Joseph Pulford, served in Capt. Elijah Abel's Company, private, Col. Philip 
B. Bradley's and Col. Samuel Whiting's Regts. Conn. Militia. 

HENRY WILLIAM HUSTON, Newton, N. J. (28476). Son of Henry and Laura 
A. (Snyder) Huston; grandson of William and Mary Jane (Kays) Snyder; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Tuttle) Kays; great 2 -grandson of 
John Kays, Lieutenant Second Sussex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

LEE MONTGOMERY HUTCHINS, Grand Rapids, Mich. (27474). Son of John 
Baxter and Charlotte Eliza (Bowles) Hutchins; grandson of John and Mary 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 277 

Allen (Roundy) Hutchins; great-grandson of Uriah Roundy, private, Col. 
Ebenezer Wood's Vermont Regt. 

FLETCHER SPRAGUE HYDE, Maiden, Mass. (28523). Son of Charles Henry 
and Gertrude (Fletcher) Hyde; grandson of Henry Hastings and Susan Fowle 
(Sprague) Hyde; great-grandson of John and Sally (Hill) Sprague; great- 
grandson of John Sprague, Surgeon's Mate, Col. Edmund Phinney's Mass. 
Regt. and surgeon on privateer, prisoner in England. 

JOHN H. HYDE, Washington, D. C. (26824). Son of George and Sarah E. 
(Gillen) Hyde; grandson of Jesse and Harriett (Powel) Hyde; great-grandson 
of Felix Powel, private, Col. Seth Warner's Continental Regt. and other serv- 
ice, pensioned. 

JOHN MERTON HYDE, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27826). Son of Charles and Mary 
Caroline (Gates) Hyde; grandson of Charles and Ann (Seymour) Hyde; great- 
grandson of Chauncey and Alice (Stoughton) Hyde; great 2 -grandson of Caleb 
Hyde, Lieutenant Colonel Third Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOHN EDWARD INGHAM, Topeka, Kans. (26981). Son of Edward and Merinda 
(Potter) Ingham; grandson of Thomas and Merinda (Dodge) Potter; great- 
grandson of Josiah I. Potter, Chaplain, Col. Jonathan Chase's Regt. New 
Hampshire Militia, 1777. 

EDWARD VINCENT IRELAND, New York, N. Y. (Ohio 27743). Son of D. V. 
and Adda (Weagley) Ireland; grandson of Hilary and Eleanora (Whitford) 
Weagley; great-grandson of Cornelius and Mary Brady (Forsythe) Whitford; 
great 2 -grandson of William and Mary (Brady) Forsythe; great 3 -grandson of 
Samuel Brady, Captain Eighth Penna. Regt., Col. Daniel Brodhead. 

GEORGE HENRY JACKSON, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. (27545). Son of George 
Henry and Hannah (Hartlipp) Jackson; grandson of Wilmot and Rose (Mc- 
Bride) Jackson; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Bates) Jackson. Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of James Jackson, Sr., private, Capt. Samuel Dunn's Company, 
Col. Edmund Phinney's Thirty-first Mass^ Regt. 

MERWIN H. JACKSON, Grand Rapids, Wis. (27072). Son of Alonzo and Huldah 
P. (Clark) Jackson; grandson of Reuben and Lucy K. (Dodge) Clark; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel and Philena Clark; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Clark, 
private, Col. Ezra May's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD CLARENDON JAMES, East Orange, N. J. (28081). Son of Riker R. 
and Esther Emily (Moore) James; grandson of Richard M. and Anna Maria 
(Scott) James; great-grandson of David Scott; great 2 -grandson of William 
Scott, Brigade Major New Hampshire Line. 

HEMAN DURYEA JANES, Chicago, 111. (28285). Son of Heman and Mariah M. 
(Rouse) Janes; grandson of James and Lucina (Sage) Janes: great-grandson 
of Heman and Abigail (Burdick) Janes; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Janes, pri- 
vate, Capt. William Francis's Company Mass. Militia. 

CLINTON BROWN JAYNES, Olympia, Wash. (27888). Son of Orestes Frank 
(Janes) and Ella (Brown) Jaynes; grandson of Henry Clinton and Almira L- 
(Jacobs) Jaynes, Janes; great-grandson of Nathan and Celinda (Dexter) Janes; 
great 2 -grandson of Solomon Janes, Sergeant, Col. Timothy Danielson's Mass. 
Regt.; great-grandson of Silas and Lydia (Pike) Jacobs; great 2 -grandson of 
Whitman Jacobs, Jr., private, Col. Nathan Sparhawk's Mass. Regt. 

ROLLAND JENKINS, East Orange, N. J. (25798). Supplemental. Son of Fred- 
erick Nelwin and Jane Field (Vescelius) Jenkins; grandson of Nathan Gurney 
and Sarah Jane (Byram) Jenkins; great-grandson of Manuel Neuman and 
Mary A. (Woodruff) Byram; great 2 -grandson of Seth and Eleanor (Neuman) 
Byram; great 3 -grandson of Japhet Byram, private Morris County New Jersey 
Militia. 

HERBERT CHANCELLOR JENKS, Evanston, 111. (27391 )• Son of Chancellor 
L. and Janet H. (Lyons) Jenks; grandson of Chancellor L. and Pamella M. 
(Hoisington) Jenks; great-grandson of Livingston and Sally (Buffington) Jenks; 



278 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

great 2 -grandson of Caleb and Abigail (Brown) Jenckes; great 3 -grandson of 
Joseph Jenckes, Captain First Smithfield Company Rhode Island Militia; great-- 
grandson of Preserved Buflingtou, private, Col. Christopher Lippitt's and Col. 
Adam Comstock's Rhode Island Regts. ; great-grandson of Jasper A. and 
Pamella (Manning) Hoisington; great 2 -grandson of Ozias and Wealthy (Burtch) 
Hoisington; great 3 -grandson of Joab Hoissington, Major Commandant of Bat- 
talion of New York Rangers; great 3 -grandson of Benjamin and Sally (Strong) 
Burtch; great 4 -grandson of John Strong, Member of Council of Safety for 
Cumberland County and Captain of a Company of Rangers under General 
Schuyler, Vermont. 

ALBERT AUGUSTUS JESSUP, Boise, Idaho (27008). Son of Solon Robinson 
and Sophronia (Coshow) Jessup; grandson of Robert and Julia (Perin) Co- 
show; great-grandson of John and Rachel (Rice) Perin; great 2 -grandson of 
Lemuel Perin, Sergeant, Col. Abiel Mitchel's Mass. Regt. 

ALBERT DEWEY JEWETT, Edgartown, Mass. (27566). Son of Albert G. and 
Vileria A. (Loud) Jewett; grandson of Enoch and Lucy (Dewey) Jewett; 
great-grandson of Timothy Jewett, private, Capt. David Wheeler's Company, 
Col. Benj. Simonds's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Stephen Jetvett, Sergeant, 
Capt. Asa Barns's Company, Col. Benjamin Ruggles Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE DEWEY JEWETT, Northampton, Mass. (28247). Son of Henry and 
Mary (French) Jewett; grandson of Enoch and Lucy (Dewey) Jewett; great- 
grandson of Timothy Jewett, private, Col. Benjamin Simonds's Mass. Regt. ; 
great 2 -grandson of Stephen Jewett, Sergeant, Colonel Woodbridge's Mass. 
Regt.; grandson of Iaby and Lucinda (Wootton) French; great-grandson of 
Asa French, private, Colonel Crane's Artillery Regt. and Col. Joseph Webb's 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES CLIFFORD JOHNSON, Trenton, N. J. (28616). Son of Hermon G. 
and Charlotte L. Johnson; grandson of Hermon G. and Sarah (Beach) Johnson; 
great-grandson of David and Phebe (Tillow) Beach; great 2 -grandson of Elias 
Beach, private New Jersey Militia, prisoner. 

CLARENCE SPAETH JOHNSON, Orange, N. J. (28607). Son of Hermon G. 
and Charlotte L. Johnson; grandson of Hermon G. and Sarah (Beach) John- 
son; great-grandson of David and Phebe (Tillow) Beach; great 2 -grandson of 
Elias Beach, private New Jersey Militia, prisoner. 

EDWARD HURD JOHNSON, North Yakima, Wash. (28558). Son of Thomas S. 
and Ellen (Lowe) Johnson; grandson of John Edward and Mary (Guptail) 
Lowe; great-grandson of John and Phoebe (Fuller) Guptail; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Fuller, private, Col. John Durkee's Conn. Regt. 

HERBERT LINCOLN JOHNSON, Jamaica Plains, Mass. (28513). Son of Charles 
H. and Nellie W. (Gardner) Johnson; grandson of Welcome L. and Rebecca V. 
(Beal) Gardner; great-grandson of Robert and Anna (Humphrey) Beal; great 2 - 
grandson of Jonathan Humphrey, private, Col. Joseph Webb's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

HERMON GRIFFIN JOHNSON, Orange, N. J. (28580). Son of Hermon G. and 
Sarah (Beach) Johnson; grandson of David and Phebe (TilJow) Beach; great- 
grandson of Elias Beach, private New Jersey Militia. 

JOSEPH HARRIS JOHNSON, Providence, R. I. (27193). Son of Joseph Chad- 
well and Martha Bowers (Arnold) Johnson; grandson of Joseph Harris and 
Harriet Adaline (Chadwell) Johnson; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary 
(Chadwell) Johnson; great 2 -grandson of Harris Chadwell, Lieutenant, Col. Isaac 
Smith's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

JOSIAH WILLIAM JOHNSON, Summit, N. J. (28089). Son of Aaron C. and 
Catherine W. (Johnson) Johnson; grandson of Mahlon and Sarah (Baker) 
Johnson, parents of Catherine W. ; great-grandson of Jacob Johnson, trooper, 
Capt. Jacob Arnold's Troop New Jersey Light Horse. 



register of new members. 279 

LESLIE SPENCER JOHNSON, Newark, N. J. (28581). Son of Edward and 
Margaret E. (Van Horn) Johnson; grandson of Hermon Griffen and Sarah 
(Beach) Johnson; great-grandson of David and Phebe (Tillow) Reach; great-- 
grandson of Elias Beach, private New Jersey Militia. 
McMIELAN HOUSTON JOHNSON, Jr., Brazil, Ind. (27705;. Son of McMillan 
Houston and Leila (Wilhite) Johnson; grandson of McMillan and Martha 
(Houston) Johnson; great-grandson of William and Hannah (Harris) Johnson; 
great 2 -grandson of Barnabas C. and Esther (Mueller) Harris; great'-grandson 
of George Harris, Sergeant Second Regt. New Jersey State Troops and Con- 
tinental Army. 
PHILANDER H. JOHNSON, Kearny, N. J. (27691). Son of William Harvey and 
Marietta (Lyon) Johnson; grandson of William Mapes and Rhoda (Ball) John- 
son; great-grandson of Uzal Ball, private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 
SAMUEL PAIGE JOHNSON, Grand Forks, N. Dak. (26556). Son of Samuel 
and Laura S. (Fisher) Johnson; grandson of Orsamus and Ursula W. (Wins- 
low) Fisher; great-grandson of Asa D. and Louisa (Smith) Fisher; great 2 - 
grandson of Caleb and Sarah (Reuback) Smith; great 3 -grandson of Jacob Bor- 
have Reuback (Roback, Rheubeck), Surgeon Vermont Militia. 
ALLEN WHEELOCK JOHNSTON, Niskayuna, N. Y. (27225). Son of George 
Granville and Atlanta Boutelle (Allen) Johnston; grandson of Jacob Allen, 
private, Captain Greenleaf's Company Mass. Continental Troops; great-grand- 
son of Ebenezer Allen, Member of Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775- 
1776. 
CLIFFORD BARTLETT JONES, Spar, Tex. (251 19). Son of Charles Adam and 
Virginia (Bartlett) Jones; grandson of Stephen Wheeler and Katherine (Dick- 
inson) Bartlett; great-grandson of Edward Spear and Sarah (Parsons) Dickin- 
son; great 2 -grandson of Chauncy and Clarissa (Ingalls) Dickinson; great 3 - 
grandson of John C. and Sophia (Fitch) Dickinson; great*-grandson of John 
Dickinson, Lieutenant Second Company, Col. Woodbridge's Mass. Regt. 
GEORGE SALLEY JONES, Jr., Lynn, Mass. (28230). Son of George Salley and 
Roberta (Hardeman) Jones; grandson of George Salley and Martha Ruth 
(Carr) Jones; great-grandson of Donald Bruce and Mary Elvira (Rumph) 
Jones; great--grandson of Jacob Rumph, Captain South Carolina Militia. 
PAUL JONES, Salt Lake City, Utah (25991). Son of Henry Lawrence and Sarah 
Eastman (Coffin) Jones; grandson of Lot and Lucy Ann (Bullard) Jones; 
great-grandson of Artemus and Lucy (White) Bullard; great 2 -grandson of Asa 
Bullard, private, Capt. Staples Chamberlain's Company, Col. Samuel Bullard's 
Regt. Mass. Militia, Lexington Alarm. 
ROBERT JAMES JORDAN, Minneapolis, Minn. (25315). Son of James Francis 
and Mary Skillman (Clayton) Jordan; grandson of Joseph Skillman and Mary 
Disborough (Voorhees) Clayton; great-grandson of Joshua Anderson and Mar- 
garet (Skillman) Clayton; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Ives Clayton, Ensign 
New Jersey Militia. 
GEORGE BOWMAN JOSLYN, Springfield, Mass. (27929). Son of Joseph and 
Orianna P. (Humphrey) Joslyn; grandson of James and Frances (Peirce) 
Joslyn; great-grandson of Sampson and Fanny (Nichols) Peirce; great-grand- 
son of Seth Peirce, Captain Hampshire County Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of David Nichols, private in Holden Company Mass. Militia. 
LEE EVERETT JOSLYN, Detroit, Mich. (28138). Son of Willis Benham and 
Amy R. (Foster) Joslyn; grandson of Jabez Farnham and Polly Ann Joslyn; 
great-grandson of Jabez Joslyn, private, Col. John Brooks's Mass. Regt. 
KARL JUNGBLUTH, Jr., Louisville, Ky. (26596). Son of Karl and Mary Louise 
(Milton) Jungbluth; grandson of Newton E. and Ellen Temple (Clark) Milton; 
great-grandson of William and Frances Ann (Tompkins) Clark; great 2 -grandson 
of Jonathan Clark, Lieutenant Colonel Eighth Virginia Regt., taken prisoner 
at Charleston, May 12, 1780. 



280 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

FRANK WILLIAM KEENE, Lynn, Mass. (28249). Son of Frank and Georgianna 
(Wheeler) Keene; grandson of George Washington and Lucy Turner (Swett) 
Wheeler; great-grandson of Benjamin Hannaford and Mehitable (Varnum) 
Swett; great 2 -grandson of Maj. Daniel and Mehitable (Varnum) Swett; great* - 
grandson of Abraham Swett, Lieutenant, Col. Calvin Smith's Thirteenth Mass. 
Continental Regt. ; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Bradley Varnum, Captain Seventh 
Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Isaiah and Hepzibah 
(Munroe) Wheeler; great 2 -grandson of Timothy and Sally (Newhall) Munroe, 
Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Timothy Munroe, Sergeant, Capt. Nathaniel Bancroft's 
Company Mass. Militia, April 19, 1775, wounded. 

JOHN MILTON KEENLY, Bridgeport, Conn. (27343)- Sou of Burtus Milton 
and Catherine (Williamson) Keeney; grandson of John Milton and Louisa P. 
(Young) Keeney; great-grandson of Giles and Tassie (Chappell) Keeney; 
great 2 -grandson of John Keeney, Jr., Master of Ammunition and Supply Vessel 
of New London, Conn. 

JAMES EDWARD KELLEY, Somerville, Mass. (27930). Son of Benjamin Frank- 
lin and Louisa P. (Adams) Kelley; grandson of Samuel and Sarah (Vickery) 
Kelley; great-grandson of Aaron Kelley, private, Capt. Timothy Langdon's 
Company Mass. Militia. 

ERVIN FAXON KEMP, Chicago, 111. (27614). Son of John and Hattie (Faxon) 
Kemp; grandson of Samuel Ervin and Azubah (Gray) Faxon; great-grandson 
of Samuel and Patty (Spooner) Faxon; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Faxon, 
private, Col. David Wells's Mass. Regt. and other service. 

FREDERICK HAROLD KEMP, Kokomo, Ind. (27714). Son of George R. and 
Flora (Schelling) Kemp; grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Bell) Kemp; great- 
grandson of David and Sarah (Ward) Kemp; great 2 -grandson of John W. 
Kemp, private, Captain Dame's Company Queen Annes County Maryland 
Militia. 

GEORGE RILEY KEMP, Kokomo, Ind. (27715). Son of Daniel and Sarah (Bell) 
Kemp, grandson of David and Sarah (Ward) Kemp; great-grandson of John W . 
Kemp, private, Captain Dame's Company Queen Amies County Maryland 
Militia. 

ARTHUR ROSS KENNEDY, Helix, Ore. (27593). Son of William B. and Allie 
(Klourtz) Kennedy; grandson of Samuel H. and Rebecca Ann (Welbon) Ken- 
nedy; great-grandson of Philip and Margaret Connrod (Nash) Welbon; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas and Hannah Connrod (Brown) Nash; great s -grandson of 
George and Margaret (Connrod) Brown; great*-grandson of Thomas Brown, 
private and Drum Major Virginia Troops. 

HAROLD DORMAN KENNEDY, Cambridge, Mass. (28238). Son of Wesley 
Daniel and Martha Jane (Rice) Kennedy; grandson of Oscar Stewart and 
Martha Jane (Hodgkins) Rice; great-grandson of Stephen L. and Lucinda E- 
(Graves) Hodgkins; great 2 -grandson of John and Catherine (Smith) Graves; 
great'-grandson of Anthony (or Louis) and Evelyn (or Eve Shirts) Smith; 
greats-grandson of Samuel Shirts, private. Col. Peter Gansevoorts New York 
Regt. 

FRANK WORTHY KENT, Montclair, N. J. (28368). Son of Edward and Arte- 
mesia (Streator) Kent; grandson of Zenas and Pamelia (Lewis) Kent, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Zenas Kent, private Fourth Regt. Conn. Line. 

EDWARD GRANT KEPLER, Philadelphia, Pa. (28030). Son of Joseph and 
Jamima (Young) Kepler; grandson of John and Jamima (Keer) Young; great- 
grandson of George and Dorothy (Stone) Young; great 2 -grandson of William 
Stone, private, Capt. Silas Engle's Company Third Regt. Penna. Foot, Col. 
William Wills. 

ALMON NOEL KIDDER, Philadelphia, Pa. (Vt. 27483). Son of Edgar Shawke 
and Martha (Fish) Kidder; grandson of Theron Hubbard and Eliza J. Kidder; 
great-grandson of Gideon and Fanny (Hubbard) Kidder; great 2 -grandson of 
Oliver Kidder, Lieutenant Upper Regt. (Cumberland County) Vermont Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 28l 

•EDGAR SHAWKE KIDDER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Vt. 27482). Son of Theron Hub- 
bard and Eliza J. Kidder; grandson of Gideon and Fanny (Hubbard) Kidder; 
great-grandson of Oliver Kidder, Lieutenant Upper Regt. (Cumberland County) 
Vermont Militia. 

LLOYD RANDOLPH KILLAM, Honolulu, Hawaii (28526). Son of David Thomas 
and Julia Catherine (Magruder) Killam; grandson of Lloyd Belt and Nancy 
(Overall) Magruder; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Belt) Magruder, 2d; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Magruder, Captain Twenty-ninth Battalion Mont- 
gomery County Maryland, Col. John Murdock. 

■GEORGE LANGDON KILMER, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Conn. 27951). Son of Charles 
and Mary Ann (Langdon) Kilmer; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Everts) 
Langdon; great-grandson of Nathaniel Everts, 3d, Captain Fourteenth Regt. 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

EDWARD CHARLES KIMBLE, New York, N. Y (27626). Son of Silas Wesley 
and Emma (Doremus) Kimble; grandson of Benjamin and Helen Miller 
(Beebe) Kimble; great-grandson of John and Hannah (Marinus) Kimble; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin (Kimble) Kimball, Captain and Paymaster, Colonel 
Cilley's First New Hampshire Regt. 

WESLEY EDWARD KING, Salt Lake City, Utah (28178). Son of William Love- 
joy and Harriet (Salada) King; grandson of Thomas Wesley and Harriet E- 
(Forshee) Hoar; great-grandson of William and Harriet (Jenkins) Hoar; 
great 2 -grandson of Davis and Mary (McCalmont) Jenkins; great 3 -grandson of 
David J. Jenkins, Colonel Tenth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

WILLIAM HARRISON KING, Phoenix, Ariz. (2331 1). Supplemental. Son of 
Vincent and Jane Gay (Stevenson) King; grandson of Basil and Sarah (Brook- 
bank) King; great-grandson of Zephaniah King, private, Captain Garkson's 
Company Charles County Maryland Militia. 

ARTHUR MURRAY KINGSBURY, Conde, S. Dak. (27284). Son of Frank Don- 
ald and Clara L. (Freeman) Kingsbury; grandson of Henry W. and Nancy B. 
(Chalfant) Kingsbury; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Adelia (Richardson) 
Kingsbury; great 2 -grandson of Asa Kingsbury, Sergeant Conn. Militia. 

VAN LEER KIRKMAN, U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. (Tenn. 25700). Son of 
Van Leer and Katharine (Thompson) Kirkman; grandson of Hugh and Eleanora 
Chambers (Van Leer) Kirkman; great-grandson of Anthony Wayne and Re- 
becca (Brady) Van Leer; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Van Leer, Captain Fifth 
Chester County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE KITCHELL, Newark, N. J. (28082). Son of Silas and Mary (Garheart) 
Kitchell; grandson of Obadiah and Mary Catherine (Craig) Kitchell; great- 
grandson of Jesse and Mary (Hopping) Kitchell; great 2 -grandson of Obadiah 
Kitchell, Captain First Morris County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

•OBADIAH WILBUR KITCHELL, Pittsburgh, N. Y. (N. J. 28084). Son of 
Obadiah and Mary Catharine (Craig) Kitchell; grandson of Jesse and Mary 
(Hopping) Kitchell; great-grandson of Obadiah Kitchell, Captain Eastern Bat- 
talion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

EDWIN AUGUSTUS KLOCK, Washington, D. C. (28428). Son of Jonathan and 
Sarah Jane (Walters) Klock; grandson of Benjamin and Sallie (Duesler) 
Klock; great-grandson of Jacob I. and Anna (Devendorf) Klock; great-grand- 
son of John J. Klock, Lieutenant Tryon County New York Militia. 

GEORGE OSMON KNAPP, Washington, D. C. (26825). Son of Jacob A. and 
Phebe (Parker) Knapp; grandson of Oliver and Betsy (Sargent) Knapp, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Oliver Knapp, private, Capt. Timothy Parker's Company of 
Minute Men, Col. Warner's Mass. Regt. 

FREDERICK HUGH KNICKERBOCKER, Salt Lake City, Utah (25996). Son 
of Addison Edwards and Agnes (McGwan) Knickerbocker; grandson of Fred- 
erick Henry and Wealthy Ann (Loomis) Knickerbocker; great-grandson of 
Timothy and Wealthy (Hubbard) Loomis; great 3 -grandson of Abijah and Eliza- 



282 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

beth (Gillett) Loomis; greats-grandson of Reuben Loomis, Captain Connecticut 
Line. 

JOHN WATROUS KNIGHT, Evanston, 111. (28002). Son of Erastus G. and 

Anna P. (Watrous) Knight; grandson of John L. and (Isham) Watrous; 

great-grandson of John Richard Watrous, Surgeon Third Conn. Regt, pen- 
sioned. 

COM STOCK KONKLE, Grand Rapids, Mich. (281 31). Son of Franklin and Mary 
Ella (Comstock) Konkle; grandson of Charles C. and Mary M. (Winchester) 
Comstock; great-grandson of Samuel and Chloe E. (Boynton) Winchester; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Winchester, private, Col. John Whitcomb's Mass. 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of David Boynton, private, Col. Thomas Stickney's New 
Hampshire Regt. 

PHILIP SETH KRIEGH, Lawrence, Kans. (26983). Son of Luther Hammer and 
Sarah Rebecca (St. John) Kriegh; grandson of Seth and Agnes (John) St.. 
John; great-grandson of John and Mahetable (Mintum) John; great 2 -grandson 
of John Mintum, private First Battalion New Jersey Continental Line. 

JOHN KUHNS, III, Greensburg, Pa. (28679). Son of Jacob Ulam and Kathryn 
Young (Black) Kuhns; grandson of John and Rachel Ann (Ulam) Kuhns, II; 
great-grandson of John and Susanna (Weltz) Kuhns, I; great 2 -grandson of 
Philip Kuhns, private, Capt. Michael Wolf's Company Bucks County Penna. 
Militia. 

RICHARD PINKNEY LAKE, Memphis, Tenn. (Md. 25574)- Son of William and 
Clementina (Lake) Lake; grandson of Washington and Margaret (Slacom) 
Lake; great-grandson of Job and Susanna (Keene) Slacom, Jr.; great 2 -grandson' 
of Benjamin Keene, Captain Dorchester County Maryland Regt. 

GEORGE HANFORD LALLY, Chicago, 111. (28286). Son of George Abbott and 
Harriet Pynchon (Hanford) Lally; grandson of Richard and Polly (Bontecou) 
Hanford; great-grandson of William Bontecou, private, Captain Mix's Company 
Second Regt. Conn. Militia. 

MERRITT UDELL LAMB, Muskegon, Mich. (28134). Son of Thomas K. and 
Georgia (Remington) Lamb; grandson of George and Statira (Roberts) Rem- 
ington; great-grandson of David and Ester Rutgas (Low) Remington; great-- 
grandson of Shadrack and Experience (Granger) Remington; great 3 -grandson 
of Abner Granger, Captain, Colonel Canfield's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

FRANK E. LANDERS, Webster City, Iowa (28201). Son of John and Mary 
Pamelia (Bidwell) Landers; grandson of John and Charlotte (Patterson) Lan- 
ders; great-grandson of Thomas Landers, private, Col. John Brown's detach- 
ment Berkshire County Mass. Militia. 

OLIN HENRY LANDRETH, Schenectady, N. Y. (27533). Son of James and 
Adelia E. (Comstock) Landreth; grandson of Anson and Rachel (Hitchcock) 
Comstock; great-grandson of John and Hannah (Graves) Comstock; great 3 - 
grandson of Samuel Comstock, Deputy in Connecticut Assembly from New 
Milford, 1777-1778. 

CHESTER H. LANE, Summit, N. J. (28582). Son of Peter and Emma J. (Rine- 
hart) Lane; grandson of Matthew P. and Anna (Hunnell) Lane; great-grandson 
of Peter and Elizabeth (Smock) Lane; great 2 -grandson of John Smock, Colonel 
First Monmouth County Regt. New Jersey State Troops, prisoner. 

FREDERICK LINCOLN LA ROWE, Summit, N. J. (27688). Son of Henry C. 
and Mary E. (Hoagland) La Rowe; grandson of Samuel and Catherine 
(Howell) La Rowe, Jr.; great-grandson of Samuel and Abigail (Ott) La Rowe; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Deborah (Hart) Ott; great 3 -grandson of John 
Hart, Signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

JAMES MALCOLM LA RUE, Summit, N. J. (26947). Supplemental. Son of 
Silas Hoffman and Elizabeth Carver (Ely) La Rue; grandson of William 
Carver and Lydia Dorsett (Hulse) Ely; great-grandson of Thomas and Cath- 
erine (Dorsett) Hulse; great 2 -grandson of James Dorsett, private First Regi- 
ment Monmouth County New Jersey Militia. 



REGISTER 01- NEW MEMBERS. 283 

JONATHAN GUY LATIMER, Chicago, 111. (27615). Son of Joseph F. and 
Joanna (Humiston) Latimer; grandson of Jonathan and Nancy (West) Lati- 
mer; great-grandson of Joseph and Anna (Dobbins) Latimer; great 2 -grandson 
of Jonathan Latimer, Colonel Connecticut Militia. 

ALMET REED LATSON, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. (27838). Son of Almet Reed and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Willits) Latson; grandson of Macajah and Elizabeth (Mathis) 
Willits; great-grandson of John and Hannah (Thompson) Willits; great-grand- 
son of Arthur and Elizabeth (Sooy) Thompson; great 3 -grandson of Nicholas 
Sooy (Soey), minute man Gloucester County New Jersey Militia. 

FRANK B. LAWLER, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (27567). Son of George D. and Mary 
(Richards) Lawler; grandson of William F. and Susan Symonds (Kimball) 
Richards; great-grandson of Dudley and Margaret (Symonds) Kimball; great 2 - 
grandson of Moses Kimball, Corporal, Capt. William Perley's Company of 
Minute Men, Col. James Frye's Mass. Regt. 

DONALD CURTIS LEACH, Portland, Me. (2606S). Son of Convers Edward and 
Gertrude E- (Lang) Leach; grandson of Convers Owen and Harriet E. (Curtis) 
Leach; great-grandson of John and Harriet Porter (Owen) Leach, Jr.; great 2 - 
grandson of John and Hannah Clark (Pridham) Leach; great 3 -grandson of 
Isaac Pridham, private, Col. Long's New Hampshire Regt. ; great-grandson of 
Reuben S. and Elizabeth (Somerby) Curtis; great 2 -grandson of Reuben and 
Abigail (Safford) Curtis; great 3 -grandson of Nathan Safford, private, Capt. 
Zadock Buffington's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Henry and 
Hannah (Goodwin) Somerby; great 3 -grandson of Henry Somerby, Sergeant, 
Capt. Gideon Woodwell's detachment Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Thomas 
Curtis, Jr., private, No. Yarmouth Company Mass. Militia; grandson of Caleb 
N. and Ellen A. (Cummings) Lang; great-grandson of Joseph B. and Betsey 
(Libby) Lang; great 2 -grandson of William and Annie (Norris) Lang; great 3 - 
grandson of Lowell and Susannah (Prescott) Lang; great*-grandson of William 
Prescott, Captain, Col. Jonathan Moulton's New Hampshire Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Nathaniel G. and Dorcas A. (Colley) Cummings; great 2 -grandson of 
Cyrus and Elizabeth (Curtis) Cummings; great 3 -grandson of Nathaniel and 
Mary (Crawford) Cummings; great 4 -grandson of Elisha Cummings, private, 
Capt. James Shepard's Company New Hampshire Militia; great 3 -grandson of 
Abner and Tamsin (Atwood) Curtis, parents of Elizabeth; great*-grandson of 
Eli Curtis, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of 
William and Ruth (Noyes) Colley; great 3 -grandson of Samuel Noyes, Jr., pri- 
vate, Col. Edmund Phinney's Thirty-third Mass. Regt.; great 4 -grandson of 
Samuel Noyes, Captain, Col. Edmund Phinney's Thirty-third Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES EDGAR LEARNED, Jr., St. Paul, Minn. (25313). Son of Charles 
Edgar and Mary Alice (Felter) Learned; grandson of Edgar Augustus and 
Althea Leonora (Holbrook) Learned; great-grandson of Charles and Hannah 
(Uran) Learned; great 2 -grandson of Jonas Learned, Corporal, Lieut, Col. 
William Bond's Mass. Regt. 

BENNETT VAN SYCKEL LEIGH, Clinton, N. J. (28705). Son of John Taylor 

and Fanny (Van Syckel) Leigh; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Taylor) 

Leigh; great-grandson of Samuel Leigh, private, minute man, First Hunterdon 

County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 
BENNET VAN SYCKEL LEIGH, Jr., Clinton, N. J. (28161). Son of B. Van 

Syckel and Elizabeth (Hoffman) Leigh; grandson of John Taylor and Fanny 

(Van Syckel) Leigh; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Taylor) Leigh; 

great 2 -grandson of Samuel Leigh, private First Hunterdon County Regt. New 

Jersey Militia. 
ROBERT EARL LEIGH, New York, N. Y. (N. J. 28623). Son of John Taylor 

and Mary (Van Syckel) Leigh; grandson of Samuel and Mary (Taylor) Leigh; 

great-grandson of Samuel Leigh, private, minute man. First Hunterdon County 

Regt. New Jersey Militia. 



284 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

GLENN RESOR LEMMON, Guthrie Center, Iowa (27050). Son of Albert David 
and Jessie Ella (Resor) Lemmon; grandson of Montgomery Pike and Almira 
Susan (Sisson) Resor; great-grandson of Jesse and Elizabeth H. (Chapline) 
Sisson; great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Nourse) Chapline; great 3 - 
grandson of James Nourse, commissioned to equip volunteer companies from 
Berkely and Frederick counties, Virginia, in 1776, Member Virginia House of 
Delegates, 1778. 

FREDERICK CHARLES LESLIE, Wellesley, Mass. (28226). Son of Irville and 
Maria (Rice) Leslie; grandson of Charles and Maria (Jennings) Rice; great- 
grandson of Ethel and Zerniah (Felch) Jennings; great 2 -grandson of John 
Fetch, private, Col. Samuel Bullard's Mass. Regt. 

BENJAMIN F. LEWIS, Wilmette, 111. (28019). Son of L'Mander and Mary 
(Dodge) Lewis; grandson of Isaac Lewis, private, Colonel Bailey's and other 
Mass. Regts. 

CARLTON C. LEWIS, New Bedford, Mass. (28514). Son of George Fred and 
Ida (Sherman) Lewis; grandson of Fred W. and Almyra B. (Taylor) Sher- 
man; great-grandson of Pliny B. and Katherine (Beale) Sherman; great-- 
grandson of Joshua and Christiana (Simmons) Beale; great 3 -grandson of Allen 
Simmons, private, Col. Solomon Lovel*s Mass. Regt., seaman on brigantine 
"Independence." 

EVERETT WJLKTNSON LEWIS, Hyde Park, Mass. (27568). Son of David W. 
and E. T. (Willett) Lewis; grandson of James and Ruth (Wilkinson) Lewis; 
great-grandson of David Lezvis, private, Capt. John Lincoln's Company, Col. 
Joseph Webb's Mass. Regt. 

FREDERICK HIRAM LEWIS, New York, N. Y. (27526). Son of George W. 
and Helen (Palmer) Lewis; grandson of Amos N. and Mary (Barber) Palmer; 
great-grandson of Weeden and Hannah (Lewis) Barber; great 2 -grandson of 
James and Thankful (Barber) Lewis; great 3 -grandson of Nathan Barber, Cap- 
tain First Kings County Battalion Rhode Island Militia, Deputy from Westerly 
in State Assembly. Commissary of Military Stores. 

F. PERCYVAL LEWIS, Winchester, Mass. (27569). Son of Frederick H. and 
Annie (Soule) Lewis; grandson of Henry and Hannah (Beach) Lewis; great- 
grandson of Warren and Mary E. (Morse) Lewis; great 3 -grandson of Isaac 
Lewis, private, Capt. Nathaniel Heath's Company Mass. Guards and Col. Ben- 
jamin Hawes's Mass. Regt. 

HARRISON RAYMOND LEWIS, Walpole, Mass. (27570). Son of Harrison N. 
and Georgie N. (Ellis) Lewis; grandson of Bradford and Hannah A. (Gay) 
Lewis; great-grandson of Joseph Lewis; great 2 -grandson of John Lewis, private, 
Capt. Seth Bullard's Company, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt.; grandson of 
George and Elizabeth (Mayer) Ellis; great-grandson of Hartford and Mary 
(Estey) Ellis; great 2 -grandson of Oliver and Margaret Ellis; great 3 -grandson 
of Eliphalet Ellis, Lieutenant, Col. John Smith's Mass. Regt. 

ISAAC NEWTON LEWIS, East Walpole, Mass. (27444). Son of William and 
Judith M. (Whittemore) Lewis; grandson of Isaac and Susannah (Ware) 
Lewis; great-grandson of Isaac (and Abigail Bullard) Lezvis, private, Capt. 
Nathaniel Heath's Company Mass. Guards and Col. Benjamin Hawes's Mass. 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Josiah Bullard, private, Capt. Joseph Guild's Company 
Mass. Minute Men and Col. William Heath's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

MARVIN HARRISON LEWIS, Louisville, Ky. (26597)- Son of John W. and 
Lucy (Donaldson) Lewis; grandson of Napoleon B. and Margaret E. Worth- 
ington (Barnett) Lewis; great-grandson of Isaac Newton and Elizabeth Stovell 
(Stemmons) Lewis; great 2 -grandson of Aaron (and Sarah South) Lewis, Col- 
onel of Washington County Virginia Militia; great 3 -grandson of John South, 
private Virginia Militia, Kentucky Division, Capt. John Holder's Company in 
Madison County, Ky., near Boonesborough, June 10, 1779; great-grandson of 
Skuyler and Mary (Durham) Barnett; great 2 -grandson of James P. Barnett, 
private North Carolina Militia, pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 285 

WALTER H. LEWIS, Manchester, N. II. (Mass. 27571). Son of Henry and 
Hannah (Beach) Lewis; grandson of Warren and Mary D. (Morse) Lewis; 
great-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Ware) Lewis; great 2 -grandson of Isaac 
Lewis, private, Capt. Nathaniel Heath's Company, with Guards under Major 
General Gates, also Capt. Oliver Clap's Company, Col. Benjamin Hawes's Mass. 
Regt. 

WILLIAM MATHER LEWIS, Lake Forest, 111. (27392). Son of James and Mary 
Coe (Fajrand) Lewis; grandson of Jacob Shaw and Olive Maria (Coe) Far- 
rand; great-grandson of Bethuel and Marilla (Shaw) Farrand, Jr.; great-grand- 
son of Bethuel Farrand, Lieutenant Morris County New Jersey Militia, widow 
pensioned; great-grandson of Harvey and Deborah (Eddy) Coe; great 2 -grandson 
of Israel Coe, Sergeant, Capt. Benjamin Barnes's Company, Col. David Mosley's 
Mass. Regt. 

LEWIS HENRY LIGHTHIPE, East Orange, N. J. (28478). Son of Lewis Condit 
and Henrietta (Ingraham) Lighthipe; grandson of Charles and Maria Smith 
(Condit) Lighthipe; great-grandson of John Lipehite, private, Colonel Hazen's 
(Second Canadian) Regt. Continental Army; great-grandson of Moses Condit, 
private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ERNEST ALBERT LINK, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27840). Son of John Luther and 
Estelle May (Suader) Link; grandson of Adam and Sarah (Hendricks) Link; 
great-grandson of Alexander and Nancy (Dust) Link; great 2 -grandson of Adam 
and Jane (Ogle) Link; great s -grandson of Alexander Ogle, private New Castle 
County Delaware Militia. 

CHARLES WARREN LIPPITT, Jr., Providence, R. I. (27189). Son of Charles 
Warren and Margaret Barbara (Farnum) Lippitt; grandson of Henry and 
Mary Ann (Balch) Lippitt; great-grandson of Warren and Eliza (Seamans) 
Lippitt; great 2 -grandson of Charles Lippitt, Assistant Commissary of Issues, 
1778, for troops at Warwick, R. I. 

ROBERT BALLANTINE LITTELL, Summit, N. J. (26854). Supplemental. Son 
of William Henry and Julia (Brown) Littell; grandson of William and Me- 
hetabel (Bonnel) Littell; great-grandson of Jonathan Crane and Phebe (Ward) 
Bonnel; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Bonnell, Jr., private Eastern Battalion 
Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

CLARENCE LITTLEFIELD, Woburn, Mass. (28515). Son of Joshua Eaton and 
Czarina (Wood) Littlefield; grandson of Sylvanus and Jerusha (Converse) 
Wood; great-grandson of Silvanns Wood, Lieutenant Twenty-sixth Mass. Regt., 
pensioned. 

VICTOR MURAT LOCKE, Antlers, Okla. (28102). Son of Victor Murat and 
Susan (McKinney) Locke; grandson of Benjamin Franklin and Mary (Sharp) 
Locke; great-grandson of Thomas Locke, private Virginia Militia; great-grand- 
son of Elisha and Eleanor (Huff) Sharp; great 2 -grandson of John Huff, private 
Eighth Virginia Regt., Col. Abraham Bowman. 

MILTON ELWOOD LOGAN, Lincoln, Nebr. (27317). Son of Daniel E. and 
Minnie S. (Boardman) Logan; grandson of Manly B. and Mar}' Treat (Lamb) 
Boardman; great-grandson of John and Clarrissa H. (Stanwood) Lamb; great 2 - 
grandson of Anthony and Mary (Treat) Lamb; great 3 -grandson of John Lamb, 
Colonel Second Continental Artillery. 

FREDERICK ROSCOE LONG, Montclair, N. J. (28583). Son of George Au- 
gustus and Elizabeth Heisley (Weaver) Long; grandson of George and Eliza- 
beth (Heisley) Weaver; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Russell) Heis- 
ley; great 2 -grandson of Michael Heisley, private Second Lancaster County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

PERCIVAL RATHBUN LONG, Cleveland, Ohio (27100). Son of W. E. and 
Allice V. (Rathbun) Long; grandson of Alonzo William and Mary Ann (Miles) 
Rathbun; great-grandson of Pearson and Laura (Steuart) Rathbun. Rathbone; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Rathbone, private Rhode Island Troops, pensioned. 



286 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

SAMUEL JULIAN LORD, Manchester, N. H. (25387). Son of Harrison Dear- 
born and Juliette (True) Lord; grandson of Simeon Smith and Lucy (Sturte- 
vant) True; great-grandson of Hosea Sturtevant, private, Captain Crane's Com- 
pany, Colonel Jacobs's and other Mass. Regts., pensioned. 

VINE DAVID LORD, Cando, N. Dak. (Cal. 26770). Son of Curtis Joseph and 
Jennie (Beele) Lord; grandson of Charles and Julia A. (Buffum) Lord; great- 
grandson of Haskell and Saloma (Wood) Buffum; great 2 -grandson of Jonathan 
and Martha (White) Wood, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Wood, private 
and fifer Worcester County Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM ADGATE LORD, Orange, N. J. (28158). Son of Charles Douglas and 
Lucy Ann (Fay) Lord; grandson of Joel Wood and Lucy (Dutton) Fay; 
great-grandson of Joel and Hannah Rice (Wood) Fay; great 2 -grandson of 
Joseph Wood, private, and great 5 -grandson of Thomas Wood, Sergeant, Col. 
Ebenezer Learned's Mass. Regt. 

FRANK D. LOWE, Albany, N. Y. (28270). Son of Isaac and Zillah (At wood) 
Lowe; grandson of Gideon and Polly (Goudierre) Lowe; great-grandson of 
Peter G. Lowe, private Ulster County New York Militia. 

EDWARD HARRIS LUM, Newark, N. J. (931 1). Supplemental. Son of Harvey 
Mandred and Phebe Jane Smith (Bruen) Lum; grandson of Ashbel and Mary 
(Chandler) Bruen; great-grandson of Jonathan and Mary (Jewell) Chandler; 
great"-grandson of James Chandler, private Essex County New Jersey Militia; 
grandson of Samuel Day and Hamutal (Genung) Lum; great-grandson of David 
and Nancy (Hand) Genung; great 2 -grandson of Silas Hand, private, Capt. 
Thomas Kinney's Light Horse Company of Morris County, N. J., Col. Jacob 
Arnold's Troop. 

GEORGE EDWARD LUM, Chatham, N. J. (27521). Son of Charles and Mary II. 
(Muchmore) Lum; grandson of Samuel Day and Hamutal (Genung) Lum; 
great-grandson of Israel Lum, private New Jersey Troops, under Captains 
Seeley, Bates, and others, pensioned. 

DONALD McBRIDE, Cleveland, Ohio (28628). Son of John Harriss and Eliza- 
beth A. (Wright) McBride; grandson of Samuel II. and Phoebe (Harriss) Mc- 
Bride; great-grandson of Barnabee and Elizabeth (Miller) Harriss; great 2 - 
grandson of George Harriss, private, "Light Horse Harry" Lee's Legion Con- 
tinental Army. 

MALCOLM LEE McBRIDE, Cleveland, Ohio (28627). Son of John Harriss and 
Elizabeth (Wright) McBride; grandson of Samuel H. and Phcebe (Harriss) 
McBride; great-grandson of Barnabee and Esther (Miller) Harriss; great 2 - 
grandson of George Harriss. private, "Light Horse Harry" Lee's Legion Con- 
tinental Army. 

SAMUEL DISBROW McCHESNEY, East Orange, N. T. (27677). Son of Wil- 
liam and Charlotte (Perry) McChesney; grandson of Matthias C. and Mary 
(Foster) Perry; great-grandson of Thomas and Hannah (Chitterling) Perry; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel Perry, private New Jersey Troops, under Captains 
Peck, Williams, and others, pensioned. 

CARL C. McCLELLAND, Detroit, Mich. (27467). Son of William Raymond and 
Gertrude (McNutt) McClelland; grandson of Andrew Jackson and Lydia War- 
ner (Hillman) McNutt; great-grandson of William Edwards and Phcebe (Os- 
born) Hillman; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Osborn, private, Colonel Douglass's 
Conn. Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

WILLIAM WHITE McCOLLUM, Millburn, N. J. (27680). Son of John and 
Harriet (McVickers) McCollum; grandson of Daniel and Mary (Reed) Mc- 
Vickers; great-grandson of David and Susannah (Shumacker) Reed; great 2 - 
grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Arndt) Shumacker; great 3 -grandson of Jacob 
Arndt, Delegate Penna. Provincial Conventions, 1 775-1776, Member Supreme 
Executive Council and Penna. Council of Safety, 1777- 

JOHN ADGER McCRARY, Saltville, Va. (22999). Son of Samuel and Mary 
Montgomery (Reid) McCrary; grandson of Albert and Mary (Harris) Mo- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 28/ 

Crary; great-grandson of John and Mary (Pickens) Harris ; grcat-'-grandson of 
Andrew Pickens, Brigadier General South Carolina State Troops. 

CHARLES WALTER McCULLOUGIT, Chatham, N. J. (28481). Son of William 
Raleigh and Eodema Aurilla (Hine) McCullougli ; grandson of William and 
Lillis (Aldrich) McCullougli; great-grandson of James McCullougli (Mc-Cul- 
lar), private, Col. Timothy Bigelow's Battalion Mass. Foot. 

GEORGE GRANT McCUEEOUGH, Kearney, N. J. (27799). Son of William 
Raleigh and Lodema A. (Hine) McCullougli; grandson of William and Lillis 
(Aldrich) McCullougli; great-grandson of James McCullougli (McCullar), pri- 
vate, Captain Barns's Company, Col. Timothy Bigelow's Battalion Mass. Foot. 

TROVER CLEVELAND McCULLOUGH, Stanley, N. J. (28480;. Son of Charles 
Walter and Sarah Frances (Booth) McCullougli; grandson of William Raleigh 
and Lodema Aurilla (Hine) McCullougli; great-grandson of William and Lillis 
(Aldrich) McCullough; great 2 -grandson of James McCullougli (McCullar) , pri- 
vate, Col. Timothy Bigelow's Battalion Mass. Foot. 

JOHN RALEIGH McCULLOUGH, Kearney, N. J. (27800). Son of William 
Raleigh and Lodema A. (Hine) McCullougli; grandson of William and Lillis 
(Aldrich) McCullough; great-grandson of James McCullough {McCullar), pri- 
vate, Captain Barns's Company, Col. Timothy Bigelow's Battalion Mass. Foot. 

"MALCOLM McDOUGALL, Summit, N. J. (27682). Son of Hugh and Emma 
Theresa (Cowperthwaite) McDougall; grandson of James and Julia (Kitchel) 
McDougall; great-grandson of Joseph and Nancy (Allen) Kitchel; great-grand- 
son of Abraham Kitchel, Member Committee of Safety of Morris County. 
N. J., 1775. 

'WALTER VALEN McDUFFEE, Springfield, Mass. (27931). Son of Samuel and 
Mary (Paterson) McDuffee; grandson of Samuel and Emily (Way) McDuffee; 
great-grandson of John and Martha (Drake) McDuffee: great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel McDuffee, Captain, Col. Stephen Evans's New Hampshire Regt. 

"EDWIN McELVERY, Newark, N. J. (27785). Son of John and Caroline Gedney 
(Rowlee) McElvery; grandson of John Beers and Sarah Ann (Gedney) Row- 
lee; great-grandson of Matthew and Elizabeth (Beers) Rowlee; great--grandson 
of Heman Rowlee, Lieutenant Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia, 
Col. John Hathorn. 

PAUL BAYTON MACFARLAND, Hyattsville, Md. (D. C. 27991). Son of James 
G. and Ellen Frances (Bell) Macfarland; grandson of John and Catherine 
(.Behan) Macfarland; great-grandson of Neil and Nancy (Tuten) Macfarland; 
great 2 -grandson of William Tuten, private Second Maryland Infantry. 

JESSE TENNYSON McGAUGHEY. Helena, Mont. (18162). Son of George 
Fletcher and Sarah Elizabeth (Wolf) McGaughey; grandson of Henry Gross 
and Mary Ann (Henderson) Wolf; great-grandson of Jacob Grove and Lydia 
(Hendershot) Wolff; great 2 -grandson of Peter Wolff, private, Capt. Michael 
Holderbaum's Company Lancaster County Penna. Militia. 

PHILIP BOWDEN McGHIE, Montclair, N. J. (28360). Son of John and Char- 
lotte Bronte (Fisher) McGhie; grandson of Samuel Ware and Sinda Smith 
(King) Fisher; great-grandson of Aaron and Eunice (Toy) Fisher; great 2 - 
grandson of Aaron Fisher, private, Colonel Dickenson's Hampshire County 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FREDERICK 11. MacINTIRE, Philadelphia, Pa. (2714S). Son of Henry Ecford 
and Caroline Maria (Walker) Maclntire; grandson of Alexander and Eliza 
(Coulton) Maclntire; great-grandson of Jesse and Margaret (Pomroy) Mac- 
lntire; great 2 -grandson of Jesse Maclntire, Second Lieutenant Third Hamp- 
shire County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM TILESTON McKECHNIE, Dorchester, Mass. (28238). Son of Ed- 
ward and Susan Elizabeth (Bridgham) McKechnie; grandson of Jonathan and 
Susanna (Blackman) Bridgham; great-grandson of Moses (and Prudence Tiles- 
ton) Blachman, private, Maj. Nathaniel Heath's detachment Mass. Guards; 
great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Tileston, private, Capt. Ebenezer Wellington's 



288 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Company Mass. Militia, mustered April 19, 1775; grandson of Thomas and 
Else (Bohannan) McKechnie; great-grandson of Thomas McKcchnie, private, . 
Maj. William Lithgo's detachment Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of John Mc- 
Kechnie, Physician for Arnold's men at Fort Halifax in 1775. 
EDWARD EODGE McKEE, Jr., Indianapolis, Ind. (27702). Son of Edward L. 
and Emma McKee; grandson of Robert and Aline McKee; great-grandson of 
William Lodge and Mary Grant (La Monte) McKee; great 2 -grandson of James 
and Rebecca Boone (Grant) La Monte; great 3 -grandson of William Grant, pri- 
vate Third North Carolina Regt. 
ALLAN D. McKENZIE, Olympia, Wash. (27880). Son of Peter and Mary 
(Woodruff) McKenzie; grandson of S. Nelson and Samantha (Packwood) 
Woodruff; great-grandson of Jonathan and Leonora (Kendall) Woodruff; 
great 2 -grandson of Gedor Woodruff, private, Colonel Durkee's and other Conn. 
Regts., pensioned. 
C. CLYDE McKENZIE, Olympia, Wash. (27881). Son of Peter and Mary (Wood- 
ruff) McKenzie; grandson of S. Nelson and Samantha (Packwood) Woodruff; 
great-grandson of Jonathan and Lenora (Kendall) Woodruff; great 2 -grandson 
of Gedor Woodruff, private, Colonel Durkee's and other Conn. Regts., pen- 
sioned. 
CHARLES ARTHUR MACKENZIE, Portland, Ore. (26448). Son of W. R. and 
josepha Bowman (Gun) Mackenzie; grandson of James and Josepha (Bow- 
man) Gun; great-grandson of Samuel and Ann (Marr) Bowman; great-grand- 
son of William and Mary (Barber) Marr; great 3 -grandson of Phineas and Ann 
(Kennedy) Barber; great 4 -grandson of James Kennedy, private Penna. Line. 
EDWARD McKERNON, Cambridge, Mass. (27942). Son of Edward J. and Mary 
(Proudfit) McKernon; grandson of John and Susan (Cochran) McKernon; 
great-grandson of John and Ann (Whiteside) Cochran; great 2 -grandson of 
Phineas Whiteside, Member of New York State Assembly, 1779, 1780, 1782. 
WALTER ERNEST McLANE, Fall River, Mass. (27438). Son of James and' 
Mary J. (Hurley) McLane; grandson of Hugh and Lucinda (Knapp) McLane; 
great-grandson of Freeman and Lois (Smith) Knapp; great 2 -grandson of Philip 
Knapp, private, Col. John Hathaway's, Col. Thomas Carpenter's and other 
Mass. Regts., pensioned. 
LEWIS FREEMAN McLAUGHLIN, Geneseo, 111. (17546). Supplementals. Son 
of Joseph Adams and Isadore (Freeman) McLaughlin; grandson of Dwight 
and Sarah Lincoln (Negus) Freeman; great-grandson of Pliny and Delia 
(Marsh) Freeman; great 2 -grandson of Comfort (and Lucy Walker) Freeman, 
Sergeant, Col. Jacob Davis's Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Nathaniel Walker, 
Lieutenant Fifth Worcester County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Elkanah and Lydia (Carlisle) Lincoln; great 2 -grandson of Elkanah Lincoln, 
Sergeant, Col. Isaac Dean's Mass. Regt. 
EDWARD McLELLAN, Newton Centre, Mass. (27450). Son of Edward and 
Rebecca S. (Cleveland) McLellan; grandson of Isaac and Mary (Blake) Mc- 
Lellan; great-grandson of Alexander McLellan, Captain, Col. Jonathan Mitch- 
ell's Mass. Regt. 
EDWARD CARLTON McLELLAN, Allston, Mass. (27551). Son of Edward and 
Josephine M. (Sands) McLellan; grandson of Edward and Rebecca S. (Cleve- 
land) McLellan; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary (Blake) McLellan; great 2 - 
grandson of Alexander McLellan, Captain, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Mass. 
Regt. 
CAMERON MacLEOD, Westwood, Mass. (27774). Son of William A. and Lola 
M. (McConnel) Macleod; grandson of Washington J. and Sarah Ann (Gunn) 
McConnel; great-grandson of Luther and Delia (Dickinson) Gunn; great 2 - 
grandson of Nathaniel (and Hannah Montague) Gunn, First Lieutenant, Capt. 
Moses Harvey's Hampshire County Company Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of 
Richard Montague, Adjutant, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Regt. Mass. Minute 
Men. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 289 

AIvONZO DELUZON McMASTER, Rochester, N. Y. (27449). Son of Alonzo D. 
and Mary (Osborn) McMaster; grandson of William and Eunice (Grover) 
McMaster; great-grandson of John McMaster, private, Capt. Samuel Clarke's 
Company Berkshire County Mass. Militia. 

DANIEL WALTER McMILLAN, Pensacola, Fla. (2069s). Son of Allen Marion 
and Mary (McDavid) McMillan; grandson of Malcolm and Mary (McCaskill) 
McMillan; great-grandson of Allen and Elizabeth McCaskill; great 2 -grandson 
of Fmlay McCaskill, private South Carolina Rangers and Third Continental 
Regt. 

FREDERICK SHEPARD McMURRAY, Hartford, Conn. (N. Y. 27848). Son of 
James M. and Charlotte Lewis (Shepard) McMurray; grandson of Frederick 
and Maria Theresa (Green) Shepard; great-grandson of Timothy and Lucretia 
Hathaway (Knowles) Green; great 2 -grandson of James Green, Captain Second 
Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 

RUSH McNAIR, Kalamazoo, Mich. (28142). Son of Samuel and Ann (Osborn) 
McNair; grandson of Piatt Smith and Mary Ann (Piatt) Osborn; great-grand- 
son of David and Lucretia (Harris) Osborn; great-grandson of Joshua Harris, 
private, Col. Alexander Webster's Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM SMITH McROBERT, Natick, Mass. (28250). Son of Edward True 
and Emma M. (Smith) McRobert; grandson of William Edward and Elizabeth 
(Corbett) McRobert; great-grandson of Edward and Abigail (Thomas) Mc- 
Robert; great 2 -grandson of William and Eunice (Robinson) Thomas; great-- 
grandson of Joshua Robinson, private, Captain Bradish's Company Mass. 
Militia. 

LUCULLUS VIRGIL McWHORTER, North Yakima, Wash. (28553). Son of 
J. M. and Rosetta (Marple) McWhorter; grandson of Walter and Margaret 
(Hurst) McWhorter; great-grandson of Henry McWhorter, private New York, 
New Jersey, and Penna. Troops, pensioned. 

EDWARD LOUIS MACWITHEY, East Orange, N. J. (2751 1). Son of Edward L. 
and Anne B. (Reamer) Macwithey; grandson of Abraham and Anna (Wyckoff) 
Reamer; great-grandson of Nicholas and Helen (Voorhees) Wyckoff; great 2 - 
grandson of Peter Wyckoff, private, Captain Stout's Company, Col. Jacob 
Hyer's Middlesex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

LEWIS SAYRE MACE, San Francisco, Cal. (26767). Son of Benjamin Hale and 
Frances (Laughton) Mace; grandson of Lafayette and Sarah Weston (Flint) 
Mace; great-grandson of Eliphalet Mace, private in Fitchburg Company Mass. 
Militia in Continental service. 

HAROLD GEORGE MACY, Montclair, N. J. (28489). Son of Frank A. and 
Margaret (Ten Eyck) Macy; grandson of Alexander W. and Mary (Jessup) 
Macy; great-grandson of William and Ruth (Halsey) Jessup; great 2 -grandson 
of Stephen Halsey, Surgeon, Col. Samuel Drake's New York Regt. 

CARL C. MAGEE, Tulsa, Okla. (23071). Son of John C. and Jennie C. Magee; 
grandson of David F. and Abigail (Rankin) Magee; great-grandson of John 
and Sarah (Frampton) Magee; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Magee, private 
Fourth Penna. Regt., Col. William Butler. 

JOHN C. MAGEE, Tulsa, Okla. (23070). Son of David F. and Abigail (Rankin) 
Magee; grandson of John and Sarah (Frampton) Magee; great-grandson of 
Daniel Magee, private Fourth Penna. Regt., Col. William Butler. 

PERCIVAL E. MAGEE, Tulsa, Okla. (23072). Son of John C. and Jennie C. 
Magee; grandson of Daniel F. and Abigail (Rankin) Magee; great-grandson of 
Jonn and Sarah (Frampton) Magee; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Magee, private 
Fourth Penna. Regt., Col. William Butler. 

CHAMPION BRAMWELL MANN, Olympia, Wash. (27885). Son of Sylvester 
H. and Ann E- (Whipple) Mann; grandson of Jeremiah R. and Nancy A. 
(Pelton) Whipple; great-grandson of Ezra and Chloe Pelton; great 2 -grandson 
of Ithmar Pelton, Ensign Twenty-third Regt. Conn. Train Bands. 



29O SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CLAUDE BREWER MANN, Winlock, Wash. (28564). Son of Champion Bram- 
well and Evangeline S. Mann; grandson of Sylvester H. and Ann E. (Whip- 
ple) Mann; great-grandson of Jeremiah R. and Nancy A. (Pelton) Whipple; 
great 2 -grandson of Ezra and Chloe Pelton; great 3 -grandson of Ithmar Pelton, 
private Twenty-third Regt. Conn. Train Bands. 

ERNEST ALLEN MANN, Paris, 111. (28009). Son of Enos and Kate (Mann) 
Mann; grandson of Jacob and Abigail (Campbell) Mann; great-grandson of 
Enos Campbell, private, Col. Israel Shreve's New Jersey Regt., pensioned. 

GEORGE MILES MARCH, Fulford, Fla. (20688). Son of William Frank and 
Lena (Miles) March; grandson of George and Helena (Cole) March; great- 
grandson of Henry J. and Tirzah (Robinson) March; great 2 -grandson of Ste- 
phen March; great 3 -grandson of Clement March, Colonel of the Horse Guards 
under Governor Wentworth, and Member of New Hampshire Provincial Con- 
gress, 1776; great-grandson of Samuel Paul and Mary Cole; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Cole, Sergeant, Capt. Samuel Hugg's Western Company of Artillery 
New Jersey State Troops; grandson of John Debra and Lucie (Davis) Miles; 
great-grandson of David and Susanna (Debra) Miles; great--grandson of Daniel 
and Elizabeth (Friend) Debra: great 3 -grandson of Jacob Debra (Jacobus De- 
bora), private and fifer Second Maryland Regt. 

ARTHUR SPENCER MARSELLIS, Montclair, N. J. (28584). Son of Colling- 
wood Nelson and Cornelia Marshall (Piatt) Marsellis; grandson of Rufus D. 
and Francis (Whiton) Piatt; great-grandson of James and Deborah Webb 
(Bassett) Whiton; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Bassett, Jr., Corporal, Colonel 
Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

CLINTON STONER MARSH, Summit, N. J. (27791 )• Son of Rodney and Sarah 
Jane (Eaton) Marsh; grandson of Judah and Betsey (Baker) Marsh; great- 
grandson of Judah Marsh, Corporal, Col. Elisha Porter's Hampshire County 
Mass. Regt. 

CLIFFORD CL ELAND MARSHALL, Sharon, Pa. (28677)- Son of William B. 
and Mary Catherine (Mc Williams) Marshall; grandson of James and Emily 
(Hull) Mc Williams; great-grandson of John and Patience (Elliott) Hull; 
great 2 -grandson of John Elliott, Second Lieutenant Fourth Penna. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

WALTER BEACH MARTIN, Milwaukee, Wis. (27073). Son of Robert Edwin 
and Rena (Beach) Martin; grandson of Robert and Mary (Hunkins) Martin; 
great-grandson of James and Esther (Evans) Hunkins; great 2 -grandson of 
Robert Hastings and Hannah (Emerson) Hunkins; great 3 -grandson of Robert 
Hunkins, Captain Vermont Militia. 

JAMES ALEXANDER MARTINDILL, Chicago, 111. (27819). Son of George A. 
and Lena E. (Roach) Martindill; grandson of James A. and Elizabeth (Cot- 
trell) Martindill; great-grandson of James Martindale, private and Lieutenant 
South Carolina Militia, pensioned. 

GEORGE RITCHIE MARVIN, Brookline, Mass. (27437)- Son of William T. 
Rogers and Mary (Ritchie) Marvin; grandson of Theophilus Rogers and Julia 
Ann Coleman (Coggeshall) Marvin; great-grandson of Elihu Marvin, Lieuten- 
ant and Adjutant, Colonel Durkee's Regt. Conn. Line, Brigade Major, General 
Varnum's Brigade. 

WILBUR F. MARVIN, Grinnell, Iowa (28203). Son of John F. and Amanda B. 
(Castner) Marvin; grandson of Henry S. and Hannah (Park) Marvin; great- 
grandson of Shepherd and Mary (Putnam) Marvin; great 2 -grandson of Daniel 
Putnam, private, Col. Nicholas Dike's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

LOWELL BLAKE MASON, Chicago, 111. (27617). Son of William Earnest and 
Edith Julia (White) Mason; grandson of George and Frances E. (Sprague) 
White; great-grandson of Joseph and Patience Howland (Sampson) White, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Rebecca (Thomas) White; great 3 -grandson of 
Carpus White, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 20,1 

LUCIUS RANDOLPH MASON, Washington, D. C. (27992). Son of William 
Pinckney and Elizabeth (McGill) Mason; grandson of Richard C. and Lucy 
Boiling (Randolph) Mason; great-grandson of Thompson and Sarah M. (Chi- 
chester) Mason; great 2 -grandson of George Mason, Virginia Legislator, Member 
of Committee of Safety, drafted Virginia Bill of Rights, Member of Convention 
of 1776. 

RODERICK WHITE MASON, Chicago, 111. (28003). Son of William Ernest and 
Edith Julia (White) Mason; grandson of George and Frances E. (Sprague) 
White; great-grandson of Joseph and Patience Howland (Sampson) White, Jr.; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Rebecca (Thomas) White; great 3 -grandson of 
Carpus White, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's and other Mass. Regts., died 
in service 1777. 

WILLIAM WALLACE MASON, London, England (Penna. 27141). Son of Wil- 
liam Wallace and Agnes (McClelland) Mason; grandson of John and Eleanor 
(Purviance) McClelland; great-grandson of John and Annalanah (Anderson) 
Purviance; great-grandson of John Purviance, private, Capt. William Findley's 
Company Eighth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ERWIN M. MASSEY, St. Johnsbury Center, Vt. (27479). Son of John Coburn 
and Roselia M. (Bassett) Massey; grandson of John and Sally (Jones) Massey; 
great-grandson of John Massey, private Mass. Continental service. 

GEORGE LA RUE MASTERS, East Orange, N. J. (28366). Son of Ellis Haines 
and Aletha E. (Hagenbuch) Masters; grandson of George M. and Campaspa 
(Melick) Hagenbuch; great-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Willet) Melick; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter Melick, private Penna. Frontier Rangers. 

CALEB McDOWELL MATHEWS* Detroit, Mich. (28137). Son of John Wiley 
and Zeba (Hewitt) Mathews; grandson of Caleb Moffett and Frances (Ed- 
wards) Mathews; great-grandson of Joseph McDowell Mathews; great 2 -grandson 
of John and Sarah (McDowell) Mathews; great 3 -grandson of Joseph McDowell, 
Major North Carolina Militia at Kings Mountain and Cowpens, Member of 
North Carolina "House of Commons." 

HENRY M. MATTHEWS, Chicago, 111. (28020). Son of Isaac Vincent and 
Phoebe Ann (Brooks) Matthews; grandson of Isaac and Anna (Leonard) 
Matthews; great-grandson of Barnabas Matthews, Corporal, Capt. Joshua Gray's 
Company Mass. Coast Guards, seaman, pensioned; grandson of Benedict and 
Maria (McNair) Brooks; great-grandson of David (and Elizabeth Doolittle) 
Brooks, private First Conn. Regt. ; great 2 -grandson of Daniel Doolittle, Ensign 
First Conn. Regt. 

BAYARD WESLEY MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28093). Son of Richard I. and 
Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances (Joslyn) 
Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) Joslyn; 
great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. New York 
Militia. 

CHARLES CLINTON MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28094). Son of Richard I. 
and Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances 
(Joslyn) Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) 
Joslyn; great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. 
New York Militia. 

FRANCIS LEWIS MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28098). Son of Richard I. and 
Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances (Joslyn) 
Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) Joslyn; 
great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. New York 
Militia. 

HOWARD ELMER MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28095). Son of Richard I. and 
Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances (Joslyn) 
Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) Joslyn: 
great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. New York 
Militia. 



292 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

RICHARD I. MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28092). Son of John and Sarah Frances 
(Joslyn) Merrell; grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) 
Joslyn; great-grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. 
New York Militia. 

RICHARD I. MERRELL, Jr., Newark, N. J. (28096). Son of Richard I. and 
Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances (Joslyn) 
Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) Joslyn; 
great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. New York 
Militia. 

WILLIAM LLEWELLYN MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (28097). Son of Richard 
I. and Sarah Rebecca (Lewis) Merrell; grandson of John and Sarah Frances 
(Joslyn) Merrell; great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins ( Stevens) 
Joslyn; great 2 -grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates's Regt. 
New York Militia. 

ALBERT EMERY MERRIAM, Rahway, N. J. (28357). Son of Albert Chester 
and Helen Maria (Silloway) Merriam; grandson of Selden and Amanda (Cook) 
Merriam; great-grandson of Joshua and Sally (Buell) Merriam; great--grand- 
son of Isaac Meriam, private, Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

ERNEST MARTIN MERRILL, Beckley, West Va. (Ohio 27729). Son of Charles 
A. and Mary Martin (Smith) Merrill; grandson of Gilman Chase and Abigail 
(Martin) Smith; great-grandson of Stephen and Dorethy (Rowe) Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaiah Rowe, Sergeant, Capt. Moses Baker's Company New Hamp- 
shire Volunteers. 

WALTER MYRICK MERRILL, Grand Junction, Colo. (26696). Son of Joseph 
and Ellen (Hawes) Merrill; grandson of Josiah Taylor and Temperance Lee 
(Hedge) Hawes; great-grandson of Josiah(?) and Betsy (Taylor) Hawes; great 2 - 
grandson of Ansel Taylor, Sergeant, Col. Freeman's Mass. Regt. 

WILL HERVEY MERRITT, Seattle, Wash. (27245). Son of Julius F. and Mary- 
etta (Moses) Merritt; grandson of Noahdiah and Relief (Parker) Merritt; 
great-grandson of Noah Merritt, private, Capt. Joseph Morse's Company, Col- 
onel Prescott's Mass. Regt. and Fifth Mass. Battalion, Col. Rufus Putnam, 
pensioned. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR MILLARD, Auburndale, Mass. (27572). Son of William A. 
and Angie L. (Lewis) Millard; grandson of William and Judith M. (Whitte- 
more) Lewis; great-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Ware) Lewis; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Lewis, private, Capt. Nathaniel Heath's Company, with 
Guards under Major General Gates, also Capt. Oliver Clap's Company, Col. 
Benjamin Hawes's Mass. Regt. 

ALBERT LATHROP MILLER, Orange, N. J. (27365). Supplemental. Son of 
John Ross and Eliza Acken (Miller) Miller; grandson of Mathias and Elizabeth 
(Acken) Miller, parents of Eliza A.; great-grandson of Joseph Acken, private 
Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ALBERT O. MILLER, Montclair, N. J. (28371). Son of Ozias N. and Hannah 
(Conover) Miller; grandson of Aaron and Franythia Conover; great-grandson 
of David and Esther (Ketcham) Covenhoven; great 2 -grandson of David Coven- 
hoven, private Monmouth County New Jersey Militia. 

CARL DANFORTH MILLER, Chicago, 111. (28021). Son of Charles H. and 
Florence E. (Phelps) Miller; grandson of Horace D. and Lydia S. (Danforth) 
Phelps; great-grandson of Joseph and Lydia (Flint) Danforth; great 2 -grandson 
of Joshua Danforth, Lieutenant, Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

EARLE ANDERSON MILLER, East Orange, N. J. (27366). Supplemental. Son 
of Albert Lathrop and Fannie Moore (Anderson) Miller; grandson of John 
Ross and Eliza Acken (Miller) Miller; great-grandson of Mathias and Eliza- 
beth (Acken) Miller, parents of Eliza A.; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Acken, 
private Essex County New Jersey Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 293 

EDWIN CAREY MILLER, Lincoln, Nebr. (27304). Son of John and Lucetta 
Malvina (Culver) Miller; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Carey) Culver; 
great-grandson of John Carey, Corporal and Sergeant, Capt. Thomas Craig's 
Company, Col. Arthur St. Clair's Penna. Battalion. 

FRANK M. MILLER, Asbury Park, N. J. (28356). Son of Ozias N. and Hannah 
Conover (Conover) Miller; grandson of Aaron and Franythia Conover; great- 
grandson of David and Esther (Ketcham) Couwenhoven; great-grandson of 
David Covenhoven, private Monmouth County New Jersey Militia. 

GROTIS BURDETTE MILLER, Carthage, 111. (28022). Son of William Martin 
and Ellen (Mustain) Miller; grandson of Nathan and Hannah (Wilson) Mus- 
tain; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth Le Grand (Glenn) Mustain; great 2 - 
grandson of Avery Mustain, private, Capt. Jesse Heard's Company, Col. Charles 
Lewis's Virginia Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

HAROLD BAUGHMANN MILLER, Lincoln, Nebr. (27306). Son of John and 
Lucetta Malvina (Culver) Miller; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Carey) 
Culver; great-grandson of John Carey, Corporal and Sergeant, Capt. Thomas 
Craig's Company, Col. Arthur St. Clair's Penna. Battalion. 

JOHN HYER MILLER, Lincoln, Nebr. (27305). Son of Edwin Carey and Kath- 
erine (Hyer) Miller; grandson of John and Lucetta Malvina (Culver) Miller; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Carey) Culver; great--grandson of 
John Carey, Corporal and Sergeant, Capt. Thomas Craig's Company, Col. Arthur 
St. Clair's Penna. Battalion. 

RAY ACKEN MILLER, Orange, N. J. (27367). Supplemental. Son of Albert 
Lathrop and Fannie Moore (Anderson) Miller; grandson of John Ross and 
Eliza Acken (Miller) Miller; great-grandson of Mathias and Elizabeth (Acken) 
Miller, parents of Eliza A.; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Acken, private Essex 
County New Jersey Militia. 

SIDNEY STANHOPE MILLER, Indianapolis, Ind. (27706). Son of Samuel D. 
and Helen Miller; grandson of W. H. H. and Gertrude A. Miller; great-grand- 
son of Curtis and Lucy (Duncan) Miller; great 2 -grandson of Samuel and 
Betsey (Stanhope) Duncan; great 3 -grandson of John Duncan, private, Capt. 
David Burt's Company, Col. Nathaniel Sparhawk's Mass. Regt. 

TAULMAN A. MILLER, Ashbury Park, N. J. (28090). Son of Ozias N. and 
Hannah Conover (Conover) Miller; grandson of Aaron and Franythia Con- 
over; great-grandson of David and Esther (Ketcham) Covenhoven; great 2 - 
grandson of David Covenhoven, private Monmouth County New Jersey Militia. 

CARROLL CRAWFORD MILLS, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27287). Son of Frank 
Moody and Annette (Crawford) Mills; grandson of Dan and Janet (Westfall) 
Mills; great-grandson of Jacob Westfall, Lieutenant, Colonel Crockett's Vir- 
ginia Regt., pensioned. 

DAN ROSS MILLS, Omaha, Nebr. (S. Dak. 27288). Son of Frank Moody and 
Anna (Ross) Mills; grandson of Dan and Janet (Westfall) Mills; great-grand- 
son of Jacob Westfall, Lieutenant Virginia Militia, pensioned. 

VALERIUS ARMITAGE MILROY, Olympia, Wash. (27899). Son of Robert H. 
and Mary Jane (Armitage) Milroy; grandson of Valerius and Mary (Hewitt) 
Armitage; great-grandson of John and Eleanor (Siddon) Armitage; great 2 - 
grandson of Caleb Armitage, Captain Seventh Philadelphia County Battalion 
Penna. Militia. 

WALTER JUDSON MILROY, Olympia, Wash. (27889). Son of Robert H. and 
Mary Jane (Armitage) Milroy; grandson of Valerius and Mary (Hewitt) 
Armitage; great-grandson of John and Eleanor (Siddon) Armitage; great 2 - 
grandson of Caleb Armitage, Captain Third Company Seventh Philadelphia 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

FRANK RAYMOND MITCHELL, Martinsville, Ind. (111. 2780S). Son of Dick 
Draper and Callie (McCracken) Mitchell; grandson of James Vincent and Ada 
May (Draper) Mitchell; great-grandson of James Madison and Mary Ann 



294 SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(Scott) Mitchell; great-grandson of Giles and Mary (Moore) Mitchell; great 3 - 
grandson of William Mitchell, private, Col. Rowland Ward's and other Vir- 
ginia Regts., pensioned. 

OSBORNE MITCHELL, Youngstown, Ohio (Pa. 28043). Son of James Kelly and 
Frances (Osborne) Mitchell; grandson of Zackarias Sprigg and Ann (Baird) 
Mitchell; great-grandson of George and Jane (Wilson) Baird; great 2 -grandson 
of Absalom Baird, Surgeon, Col. Jeduthan Baldwin's Regt. of Artificers. 

De MOTT MODISETTE, Cleveland, Ohio (27736). Son of James Breading and 
Edna Jeffery (Ford) Modisette; grandson of Robert Marye and Mary Meason 
(Austin) Modisette; great-grandson of John Morse and Priscilla (Stephens) 
Austin; great 2 -grandson of EHphalet and Sybel (Dudley) Austin; great-grand- 
son of Aaron Austin, Lieutenant Colonel Twenty-sixth Regt. Conn. Militia, 
1781. 

ROBERT M. MODISETTE, Salem, Ohio (28629). Son of James Breading and 
Edna Jeffery (Ford) Modisette; grandson of Robert Marye and Mary Meason 
(Austin) Modisette; great-grandson of John Morse and Priscilla (Stephens) 
Austin; great-grandson of EHphalet and Sybel (Dudley) Austin; great-grand- 
son of Aaron Austin, Lieutenant Colonel Twenty-sixth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER MONROE, Tacoma, Wash. (27247)- Son of William 
Andrew and Sarah Louise (Hall) Monroe; grandson of Edward and Mary 
Jane (Shannon) Hall; great-grandson of Benjamin and Priscilla (Stuart) Hall; 
great 2 -grandson of Alexander Stuart, Major Virginia Troops in Colonel Mc- 
Dowell's Regt. at battle of Guilford Court House. 

J. JUDSON MONTAGUE, Richmond, Va. (28341). Son of William Valentine 
and Mary Ann (Barrack) Montague; grandson of William and Elizabeth 
(Valentine) Montague; great-grandson of William Montague, private Virginia 
Militia. 

LYMAN EDWARD MONTGOMERY, Schenectady, N. Y. (27534). Son of Adel- 
morn and Ann Elizabeth (Richmond) Montgomery; grandson of Robert and 
Miranda (Woodard) Montgomery; great-grandson of Daniel Woodard, private. 
Col. Miles Powell's Berkshire County Regt. Mass. Militia and Col. John Bailey's 
Second Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE WILLIAM FURNESS MOORE, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27282). Son of 
George D. and Elizabeth (Myers) Moore; grandson of Samuel and Catherine 
(Noel) Myers; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Beamer) Noel; great- 
grandson of John N. Noel, Ensign, Capt. Thomas Ridley's Company Fourth 
Virginia Regt. of Foot. 

HAROLD MOORE, Seattle, Wash. (27882). Son of Harry Denton and Katherin 
(Nies) Moore; grandson of Harry G. and Keturah (Van Hoesen) Moore; 
great-grandson of William McLennan and Anna (Bostwick) Moore; great- 
grandson of Ezekiel (and Mary Barnard) Moore, private, Capt. Daniel Buck- 
nam's Detachment Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Barnard, private, 
Capt. EHas Pratt's Company Mass. Militia; great-grandson of John and Mary 
(Parks) Van Hoesen; great 2 -grandson of John and Desire (Galusha) Parks; 
great 3 -grandson of James Parks, private Conn. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jacob 
Galusha, private, Capt. Jacob Hines's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of Garret and Catherine (Van Buskirk) Van Hoesen; great 3 -grandson of Gar- 
ret G. Van Hoesen, private, Colonel Van Rensselaer's Eighth New York Regt. 
of Foot. 

HARRY DENTON MOORE, Seattle, Wash. (27246). Son of Harry G. and 
Keturah (Van Hoesen) Moore; grandson of William McLennan and Anna 
(Bostwick) Moore; great-grandson of Ezekiel (and Mary Gould Barnard) 
Moore, private, Capt. Daniel Buckman, Jr.'s Detachment Mass. Artillery; great- 
grandson of Jonathan Barnard, private, Capt. EHas Pratt's Company Mass. 
Militia; grandson of John and Mary (Parks) Van Hoesen; great-grandson of 
John and Desire (Galusha) Parks: great-grandson of James Parks, private 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 295 

Militia Company of Groton, Conn. ; great-grandson of Garret and Catherine 
(Van Buskirk) Van Hoesen; great 2 -grandson of Garret G. Van Holsen, private, 
Captain Johnson's Company Fifth New York Regt. of Foot. 

MINOT CANFIELD MORGAN, Summit, N. J. (27779). Son of Minot S. and 
Anna Corilla (Green) Morgan; grandson of George Smith and Sarah (Ken- 
nedy) Green; great-grandson of Caleb Smith and Elizabeth (Van Cleve) Green; 
great 2 -grandson of George Green, Captain First Hunterdon County Regt. New 
Jersey Militia. 

FREDERICK JACOB MORITZ, East Orange, N. J. (27517). Son of Frederick J. 
and Hannah (EHingwood) Moritz; grandson of William and Ann (Dougherty) 
Ellingwood; great-grandson of John Ellingwood, private, Captain Lowe's Com- 
pany Twenty-seventh Mass. Regt. Col. Israel Hutchinson, pensioned. 

HENRY CURTIS MORRIS, Washington, D. C. (27998). Son of John and Anna 
Mary (Curtis) Morris; grandson of Henry D. and Electa (Abell) Curtis; 
great-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Moulton) Abell; great 2 -grandson of 
James Moulton, private, Colonel Scammel's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned. 

WALTER CORNELIUS MORRIS, Yonkers, N. Y. (27836). Son of Walter Cook 
and Adelaide (Stevens) Morris; grandson of Cornelius and Lucrecia (Taylor) 
Stevens; great-grandson of Isaac and Fanny (Cheeseman) Taylor; great-grand- 
son of Isaac Taylor, private, Col. Van Veghten's Albany County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

AMOS ADDISON MORSE, Portland, Ore. (27579). Son of Amos Marsh and 
Louisa (Mulford) Morse; grandson of Amos and Letty (Halsey) Morse; great- 
grandson of Amos Morse, Captain First Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

HARRY LEONARD MORSE, Major, U. S. Army, Watertown Arsenal, Mass. 
(27943). Son of Herbert Leonard and Sarah Adeline (Jones) Morse; grand- 
son of Leonard Townsend and Phebe Adeline (Knapp) Morse; great-grandson 
of Leonard and Clarissa (Battle, later Battelle) Morse; great 2 -grandson of 
Jonathan and Mercy (Day) Battle; great 3 -grandson of Ebenezer Battle, Second 
Major First Suffolk County Regt. Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Ralph Day, 
private, Capt. Ebenezer Battle's Company Mass. Militia, April 19, 1775. 

CLINTON MOTT, Chicago, 111. (27814). Son of Clinton and Annie M. (Marsh) 
Mott; grandson of James Wiley and Joanna (Luckey) Mott; great-grandson 
of John and Elizabeth (Van Bramer) Luckey; great 2 -grandson of Peter Van 
Bramer, private Fourth Dutchess County Regt. New York Militia. 

JOSEPH SIDNEY MOULTON, Stow, Mass. (28231). Son of Stephen Reynolds 
and Sally (Noyes) Moulton; grandson of William Moulton, private, Col. Nathan 
Tyler's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

LESLIE FOWLER MOWRY, Providence, R. I. (27186). Son of Tristam and 
Elizabeth Munroe (Reed) Mowry; grandson of Hugh Maxwell and Sophia 
(Lawrence) Reed; great-grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Munroe) Reed; 
great 2 -grandson of Philemon Munroe, private, Col. Eleazer Brooks's Regt. 
Mass. Guards. 

HERBERT BURNETT MULFORD, Wilmette, 111. (28287). Son of James Alex- 
ander and Sarah Elizabeth (Pruden) Mulford; grandson of Ezra and Phebe S. 
(Kitchell) Pruden; great-grandson of Aaron and Jane (Jacobus) Kitchell; 
great 2 -grandson of Aaron Kitchell, private Morris County New Jersey Militia, 
Member of Committee of Observation. 

HOLBROOK MULFORD, Chicago, 111. (26878). Supplemental. Son of Leonard 
Stratton and Alice (Holbrook) Mulford; grandson of Francis Wayland and 
Barbara Elizabeth (Lansing) Holbrook; great-grandson of Francis Drake and 
Nancy (Hollis) Holbrook; great 2 -grandson of Thomas and Deborah (Clark) 
Holbrook; great 3 -grandson of Tliomas Holbrook, private, Capt. John Vinton's 
Independent Company and Capt. Moses French's Company, Col. Joseph Palmer's 
Mass. Regt. 



296 



SONS OF THE) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



JAMES BERNARD MULLEN, Chicago, 111. (28010). Son of J. Frank and Agnes 
Monica (Sullivan) Mullen; grandson of Edward and Sarah J. (Murphy) 
Mullen; great-grandson of Thomas and Maria Sarah (Warner) Murphy; great 3 - 
grandson of George James and Susan (Nessen) Warner; great 2 -grandson of 
George Warner, private Sixth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

LOUIS C. MULLIKIN, Newark, N. J. (28363). Son of James Rankin and 
Jeanette B. (Campbell) Mullikin; grandson of James Parrott and Catherine 
(Thomas) Mullikin; great-grandson of Edward Parrott and Catherine (P>owdle) 
Thomas; great 2 -grandson of Francis Thomas, Sergeant, Col. Thomas Hartley's 
Penna. Regt., pensioned. 

EDWARD MASON MULLOY, Chicago, 111. (27618). Son of John Rodgers and 
Anna Catherine (Watt) Mulloy; grandson of Thomas and Susannah (Rogers) 
Mulloy; great-grandson of Hugh Mulloy, Lieutenant, Colonel Tupper's Mass. 
Regt., pensioned. 

ALEX PHILIP MURGOTTEN, San Jose, Cal. (26771). Son of Henry C. and 
Susan (Shaffer) Murgotten; grandson of Adam Shaffer; great-grandson of 
George Shaffer, Sergeant Eighth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ARTHUR GEORGE MURLLESS, Chicago, 111. (27807). Son of Frederick T. and 
Mary Ellen (Perrin) Murlless; grandson of John Gladding and Eliza (Child) 
Perrin; great-grandson of John and Betsey (Thayer) Child; great 2 -grandson of 
Elijah Thayer, private, Capt. Gershom Nelson's Company Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT FLORANCE NATHAN, Jr., New York, N. Y. (28266). Son of Robert 
Florance and Fanny (Seligman) Nathan; grandson of Robert Weeks and Annie 
(Florance) Nathan; great-grandson of William and Myrtilla (Seixas) Florance; 
great 2 -grandson of Gershom Seixas, Signer of the Non-importation Agreement. 

ARTHUR WILLIAM NAYLOR, Sr., Pittsburgh, Pa. (27143). Son of Arthur 
Ralph and Elizabeth (Montgomery) Naylor; grandson of Ralph Nailer (Nay~ 
lor), private Seventh Company Second Cumberland County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

LEWIS CASS NEEDHAM, South Wallingford, Vt. (27478). Son of Benjamin 
and Amanda (Page) Needham; grandson of Benjamin and Alice (Trull) Need- 
ham; great-grandson of Benjamin Needham, Sergeant, Capt. Solomon Pollard's 
Company, Col. Samuel Denny's Mass. Regt. 

ELMER HARTSHORN NEFF, Montclair, N. J. (28483). Son of Henry Clinton 
and Emily (Hartshorn) Neff; grandson of Henry and Anna (Scott) Hartshorn; 
great-grandson of Silas and Betsey (Perry) Scott; great 2 -grandson of Seth 
Perry, private, Col. Israel Putnam's Conn. Regt. 

JOHN THORNLEY NEFF, East Orange, N. J. (26418). Supplemental. Son of 
Harmanus and Amanda (Glading) Neff; grandson of Jacob and Adeline (King) 
Neff; great-grandson of Harmanus and Katherine (Batton) Neff; great-grand- 
son of Daniel King, Ammunition Rider New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM WASHINGTON NEIFERT, East Hartford, Conn. (27344). Son of 
William and Lucinda (Lindner) Neifert; grandson of Solomon and Anna 
(Herbster) Lindner; great-grandson of Thomas and Magdalena (Sensenderfer) 
Lindner; great 2 -grandson of Martin Sensenderfer, private, Capt. Fred Beit- 
man's Company Fourth Philadelphia County Battalion Penna. Militia, Col. 
William Dean. 

ROBERT TOOMBS NEILL, El Paso, Tex. (D. C. 27895). Son of Henry Hart 
and Dora M. (Fagan) Neill; grandson of James Henry and Nancy Caroline 
(Cox) Fagan; great-grandson of Robert Lanier and Rebecca Martha (Gibson) 
Fagan; great 2 -grandson of John Fagan, private Eleventh Virginia Regt. of 

F00t; . 

HENRY VAN TYLE NESBIT, Peru, Ind. (25850). Son of Walter H. and Mary 
Florence (Passage) Nesbit; grandson of Henry Van Tyle and Martha (Cooper) 
Passage; great-grandson of John and Marv (R^ed) Passage; great 2 -grandson of 
Henry and Mary (Claus) Passage; great-grandson of George Passage, Lieu- 
tenant Second Albany County Regt. New York Militia and New York Levies. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 297 

WALTER NEWELL, Chicago, 111. (N. J. 6153). Supplemental. Son of John W. 
and Martha Crane (Earl) Newell; grandson of James and Esther Say re (Hunt) 
Earl; grandson of James H. and Eliza D. (Hankinson) Newell; great-grandson 
of James and Sarah (Dunham) Hankinson; great-grandson Azariah and Mary 
(Fford-Stone) Dunham; great-grandson of David Earl, private Essex County- 
New Jersey Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jacob Fjord, Sr., Member of New 
Jersey Assembly, 1775, Member of Committee of Correspondence of Morris 
County. 

CHARLES SUMNER NEWMAN, Rochester, N. Y. (27835). Son of Robert G. 
and Mary (Mears) Newman; grandson of Jonathan and Amanda (Gustin) 
Mears; great-grandson of Walter Gustin, private, Captain Jones's Company 
Conn. Troops at Saratoga, 1777- 

ARTHUR ANNO NICHOLS, Ambler, Pa. (28045). Son of William Elliot and 
Sarah Adeline (Anno) Nichols; grandson of David and Ann Katherine (Nay- 
lor) Nichols; great-grandson of Ralph (Nailer) Naylor, private Cumberland 
County Penna. Militia. 

CARL WHEELER NICHOLS, Grand Junction, Colo. (26690). Son of Charles 
Lincoln and Laura (Stephenson) Nichols; grandson of William and Catherine 
(Lincoln) Nichols; great-grandson of Levi and Christiana (Turner) Nichols; 
great 2 -grandson of William Nichols, private, Capt. Daniel Wilder's Company of 
Minute Men of Leominster, Mass.; great-grandson of Zadock and Eunice 
(Sawyer) Lincoln; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Lincoln, Sergeant, Capt. Thomas 
Hersey's Company, Colonel Lovell's Mass. Regt. ; grandson of John Lincoln 
and Helen I. (Bentley) Stephenson; great-grandson of Cyrus T. and Hannah 
(Smith) Bentley; great 2 -grandson of Caleb Bentley, Captain Sixth Albany 
County Regt. New York Militia; great 3 -grandson of Israel Nichols, Member of 
Mass. General Court. 

CHARLES LINCOLN NICHOLS, Grand Junction, Colo. (26689). Son of Wil- 
liam and Catherine (Lincoln) Nichols; grandson of Levi and Christiana 
(Turner) Nichols; great-grandson of William Nichols, private, Capt. Daniel 
Wilder's Company of Minute Men of Leominster, Mass.; great 2 -grandson of 
Israel Nichols, Member of Mass. General Court; grandson of Zadock and 
Eunice (Sawyer) Lincoln; great-grandson of Joshua Lincoln, Sergeant, Capt. 
Thomas Hersey's Company Lovell's Mass. Regt. 

CHESTER BUTLER NICHOLS, Grand Junction, Colo. (26691). Son of William 
and (second wife) Eva B. (Throop) Nichols; grandson of Levi and Christiana 
(Turner) Nichols; great-grandson of William Nichols, private, Capt. Daniel 
Wilder's Company of Minute Men of Leominster, Mass. ; great 2 -grandson of 
Israel Nichols, Member of Mass. General Court. 

FRED HAMMOND NICHOLS, Lynn, Mass. (27259). Supplemental. Son of 
Parker and Caroline (Smith) Nichols; great-grandson of Augustus Putnam 
and Eliza White (Upton) Smith; great-grandson of Nathaniel Upton, Jr., pri- 
vate, Captain Flint's Company. Col. David Green's Mass. Regt., seaman on 
sloop 'Tyrannicide." 

GEORGE DANE NICHOLS, South Boston, Mass. (28501). Son of George Wat- 
son Burrell and Susan Hooper (Green) Nichols; grandson of Joseph Dane and 
Abigale Ann (Sands) Green; great-grandson of John and Anna (Hanscomb) 
Sands; great 2 -grandson of James Sands, private, Colonel Wigglesworth's Mass. 
Regt. 

THOMAS ATWILL NICHOLS, Lynn, Mass. (27275)- Supplemental. Son of 
Fred Hammond and Annie Louise (Atwill) Nichols; grandson of Thomas 
Parker and Caroline (Smith) Nichols; great-grandson of Augustus Putnam 
and Eliza White (Upton) Smith; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Upton, Jr., pri- 
vate, Captain Flint's Company, Col. David Green's Mass. Regt., seaman on 
sloop "Tyrannicide." 
WILLIAM EMERY NICKERSON, Cambridge, Mass. (27944). Son of Amos and 
Mary Abby (Emery) Nickerson; grandson of William and Lucy (Covel) 



298 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Emery; great-grandson of Solomon Covel, private, Col. Samuel Denny's and 
other Mass. Regts. 

FRANCIS HALSEY NILES, Washington, D. C. (27976). Son of Peter H. and 
Mary Francis (Westcott) Niles; grandson of John and Hester G. (Miller) 
Niles; great-grandson of Peter Niles, Sergeant, Capt. Steven Penniman's and 
other Companies Mass. Militia, pensioned; grandson of Charles and Ursula 
(Jones) Westcott; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary (Chase) Jones; great- 
grandson of Jonathan Chase, Sergeant, Col. Alexander Scammel's New Hamp- 
shire Regt., pensioned. 

STANHOPE WOOD NIXON, Metuchen, N. J. (Md. 25575). Son of Lewis and 
Sally (Wood) Nixon; grandson of Joel Lewis and Mary Jane (Turner) Nixon; 
great-grandson of Joel and Hannah (Milbourne) Nixon; great 2 -grandson of 
John Nixon, private, Capt. Nathan Reid's Company Fourteenth Virginia Regt. 

HENRY HARNDEN NOBLE, Chicago, 111. (28288). Son of James Hervey and 
Mary Ann (Harnden) Noble; grandson of James Dwight and Sarah (Titus) 
Noble; great-grandson of Henry and Susan (Jenkins) Noble; great 2 -grandson 
of James Noble, Jr., private, Col. John Ashley's detachment Mass. Militia and 
other service; great 3 -grandson of James Noble, Captain, Col. James Easton's 
Mass. Regt. 

JAMES BOWEN NOBLE, Chicago, 111. (28289). Son of James Hervey and Cora 
(Youker) Noble; grandson of James Dwight and Sarah (Titus) Noble; great- 
grandson of Henry and Susan (Jenkins) Noble; great £ -grandson of James 
Noble, Jr., private, Col. John Ashley's detachment Mass. Militia and other 
service; great 3 -grandson of James Noble, Captain, Col. James Easton's Mass. 
Regt. 

WALTER MARC NONES, New York, N. Y. (27827). Son of Alexander H. and 
Alice (Levy) Nones; grandson of Joseph B. and Eveline (De Leon) Nones; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Nones, Member of Pulaski Legion and served on 
staff of General Lafayette. 

JOSEPH ARNOLD NORCROSS, New Haven, Conn. (20319). Supplemental. 
Son of Henry Fanning and Susan Brainerd (Arnold) Norcross; grandson of 
Joseph and Mary Louisa (Phelps) Arnold; great-grandson of Jared and Susan 
(Brainerd) Arnold; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Arnold, private Conn. Militia. 

ARTHUR TAPPAN NORTH, Chicago, 111. (27619). Son of Levi and Charlotte 
Corinthia (Strong) North; grandson of Darius and Joanna (Hulbert) North; 
great-grandson of Asa North, private, Captain Shepherd's Company Conn. 
Militia; great-grandson of Joshua Hulbert, privatae, Col. John Ashley's Berk- 
shire County Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Washington and Sallie Charlotte 
(Johnson) Strong; great-grandson of Darius and Lauranas (Ashley) Strong; 
great 2 -grandson of Oliver Strong, fifer Twelfth Regt. Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Nathan Baldwin and Corinthia (Bateman) Johnson; great-grand- 
son of William (and Sarah Baldwin) Johnson, private, Col. David Green's 
Mass. Regt. ; great 8 -grandson of Nathan Baldwin, private, Col. Thomas Car- 
penter's Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM KEIBARD NOTTINGHAM, Washington, D. C (27999). Son of 
Julian Randolph and Ellen Medora (Berkeley) Nottingham; grandson of Wil- 
liam Zadoc and Elizabeth (Smith) Nottingham; great-grandson of William and 
Mary Ann (Keibard) Nottingham; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Keibard, Signer 
of Patriot's Oath, Charles County, Maryland, 1778. 

WILLIAM FLETCHER OATMAN, East Orange, N. J. (28088). Son of Hydro 
P. and Mary Flora (Fletcher) Oatman; grandson of Ira Day and Martha Eliza 
(Smith) Fletcher; great-grandson of Allen and Elmina (Balch) Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of Cyrus and Judith (Stone) Balch; great 3 -grandson of Caleb Balch, 
private Eighth Company, Colonel Reed's Regt. New Hampshire Volunteers. 

CLARENCE R. O'BRION, New Bedford, Mass. (28516). Son of Charles Hunt 
and Carrie Emerson (Rand) O'Brion; grandson of Thomas Wilson and Sarah 
(Hunt) O'Brion; great-grandson of John O'Brion, private Eighth Regt. Mass. 
Continental Infantry, seaman on Mass. sloop "Defence." 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 299 

JEROME O'CONNELL, Morris, 111. (27809). Son of Daniel and Mary (Mc- 
Hugh) O'Connell; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Malloy) O'Connell; great- 
grandson of James and Jane (Given) Malloy; great 2 -grandson of David Given, 
Corporal, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

HENRY A. OLIVER, Fairfield, Iowa (27049). Son of John G. and Winnifred 
(Houghton) Oliver; grandson of David M. and Charlotte Jane (Towne) Oliver; 
great-grandson of Elijah and Elizabeth (Martin) Towne; great 2 -grandson of 
EH and Abigail (Cutting) Towne; great 3 -grandson of Eli Toivne, private, Capt. 
Benjamin Freeman's Company, Col. Jonathan Holman's Mass. Regt. and other 
service. 

GEORGE HENRY OLMSTED, Cleveland, Ohio (27739). Son of Jonathan and 
Harriet Abigail (Sheldon) Olmsted; grandson of Elijah P. and Lydia (Free- 
man) Olmsted; great-grandson of Stephen Olmsted, private Sixth Dutchess 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

HOWARD OLMSTED, Cleveland, Ohio (27738). Son of George Henry and Ella 
Louise (Kelley) Olmsted; grandson of Jonathan and Harriet Abigail (Shel- 
don) Olmsted; great-grandson of Elijah P. and Lydia (Freeman) Olmsted; 
great 2 -grandson of Stephen Olmsted, private Sixth Dutchess County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

EDWIN WINTHRIP OSBORN, St. Paul, Minn. (25316). Son of Samuel H. 
and Cynthia (Nutt) Osborn; grandson of Samuel and Sophia (Harding) Os- 
born; great-grandson of Jabez Osborn, private Fifth Battalion Wadsworth's 
Conn. Brigade, 1776. 

MILTON EPHRAIM OSBORN, Ann Arbor, Mich. (28141). Son of David and 
Eliza Maria (Faxon) Osborn; grandson of Samuel Ervin and Azuba (Gray) 
Faxon; great-grandson of Samuel and Martha (Spooner) Faxon; great-grand- 
son of Thomas Faxon, private, Col. David Wells's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE NEWTON OSBORNE, Jr., U. S. Navy, Bremerton, Wash. (Idaho 
27010). Son of George Newton and Lizzie Mary (Cleeland) Osborne; grand- 
son of Robert John and Caroline Melissa (Newton) Osborne; great-grandson 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Woods) Osborne; great 2 -grandson of James Osborne, 
private, Captain Stephens's Company, Colonel North's Regt. Penna. Conti- 
nental Line. 

FREDERICK WOOSTER OWEN, Morristown, N. J. (28585). Son of William 
Wilson and Adeline (Wooster) Owen; grandson of David and Lettice (Wil- 
son) Owen; great-grandson of William and Mary (Dunning) Owen; great 2 - 
grandson of David Dunning, Member of Committee of Safety, private, Colonel 
Mitchell's Mass. Regt. 

HANS CHRISTIAN OWEN, Baltimore, Md. (27852). Son of George Hodges 
and Louise (Brown) Owen; grandson of William Henry Bradford and Mary 
Elizabeth (Hodges) Owen; great-grandson of George Tisdale and Emily (Bliss) 
Hodges; great 2 -grandson of Luther Bliss, private, Col. Timothy Robinson's 
Mass. Regt. 

WILLIAM McRIGHT OWEN, Oakland, Cal. (26772). Son of William Pitts and 
Martha (Wert) Owen; grandson of Michael and Esther Caroline (Cowan) 
Wert; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Dicson) Cowan; great 2 -grandson 
of Robert Cozuan, private Fourth Regt. Virginia Continental Line. 

LEO EDGAR PACKARD, Denver, Colo. (26697). Son of Charles Moses and 
Allie (Cunningham) Packard; grandson of Job and Hadassah (Austin) Pack- 
ard; great-grandson of Moses and Betsey (Robinson) Packard; great 2 -grandson 
of Job Packard, private, Col. Abiel Mitchell's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

JAMES HARVEY PADDOCK, Springfield, 111. (28290). Son of John Williams 
and Helen (Harvey) Paddock; grandson of James and Ann (McClaughry) 
Paddock; great-grandson of David Paddock, private, Colonel Ludington's New 
York Regt. 

JOHN C. PAGE, Grand Junction, Colo. (26688). Son of Walter Ernest and 
Emma Jerusha (Chatfield) Page; grandson of Ira D. and Lydia Agnes (Pat- 



300 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

terson) Chatfield; great-grandson of Abraham and Jerusha (Cotton) Chatfield; 
great 2 -grandson of Michael Cotton, private, Colonel Sprout's Mass. Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

WALTER CHATFIELD PAGE, Grand Junction, Colo. (26692). Son of Walter 
Ernest and Emma Jerusha (Chatfield) Page; grandson of Ira D. and Lydia 
Agnes (Patterson) Chatfield; great-grandson of Abraham and Jerusha (Cotton) 
Chatfield; great 2 -grandson of Michael Cotton, private, Colonel Sprout's Mass. 
Regt. 

WALTER ERNEST PAGE, Grand Junction, Colo. (26695). Son of William H. 
and Jane Elizabeth (Stevens) Page; grandson of Edward Hall and Clara 
(Coleman) Page; great-grandson of Edward Page, private Mass. Militia. 

WRIGHT BENTON PAGE, Minneapolis, Minn. (25317). Son of Wright B. and 
Ella F. (Snell) Page; grandson of Stephen D. and Mary (Roberts) Snell; 
great-grandson of James and Betsy (Atkinson) Snell; great 2 -grandson of Wil- 
liam and Mary (Blunt) Atkinson; great 3 -grandson of John Blunt, Captain, 
Col. Samuel McCobb's Mass. Regt., prisoner. 

HARRY ALBERT PALMER, Meriden, Conn. (27962). Son of Ralph Averill and 
Sarah Arms (Kinney) Palmer; grandson of Henry and Irene (Averill) Pal- 
mer; great-grandson of Daniel and Abigail (Foote) Averill; great--grandson of 
Daniel Averill, fifer Seventh Regt. Conn. Line, pensioned. 

OLIVER M. PALMER, Montclair, N. J. (28586). Son of Joseph and Emily 
(Godfrey) Palmer; grandson of Benjamin and Harriet (Cooper) Godfrey; 
great-grandson of Knowles Godfrey, private, Col. Nathan Tyler's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

JOHN P. PARK, Beloit, Kans. (26986). Son of Evan and Elizabeth (Barton) 
Park; grandson of Abraham and Martha (Thompson) Park; great-grandson of 
John Park, private Jefferson County Virginia Militia; grandson of Thomas 
and Mary (Burris) Barton; great-grandson of William and Mabel (Terry) 
Barton; great 2 -grandson of William Barton, Colonel Rhode Island Militia. 

EDWARD CLINTON PARKHURST, Providence, R. I. (27192). Son of Daniel 
Sprague and Harriet M. (Wheeler) Parkhurst; grandson of David and Sibyl 
(Sprague) Parkhurst; great-grandson of Jonathan Parkhurst, private, Col. 
Samuel Chapman's Conn. Regt. 

WILLIAM SCOTT PARKS, Washington, D. C. (19353). Supplemental. Son of 
Reuben Sylvester and Emeline Ann (Scott) Parks; grandson of Thomas Grier 
and Matilda Ann (Munson) Scott; great-grandson of Weait and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Davies) Munson; great 2 -grandson of Peter Munson, Drum Major Conn. 
Militia, prisoner, Member of Clothing Committee. 

ALBERT NORTON PARLIN, Danvers, Mass. (27573). Son of Ezra Weld and 
Nancy (Pickering) Parlin; grandson of Ira and Hannah (Houghton) Parlin; 
great-grandson of Simon and Elizabeth (Robinson) Parlin; great 2 -grandson of 
Oliver Parlin, private, Capt. David Wheeler's Company, Colonel Nixon's Mass. 
Regt., also Capt. Simon Hunt's Company, Colonel Brooks's Mass. Regt.; great- 
grandson of James and Hannah (Russell) Houghton; great 2 -grandson of James 
Houghton, private, Capt. D. Robbin's Company, Col. Asa Whitcomb's Mass. 
Regt., also Captain Eager's Company, Colonel Whitney's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE RANDALL PARRISH, Kewanee, 111. (27620). Son of Rufus Parker 
and Frances Adeline (Hollis) Parrish; grandson of Obadiah B. and Nancy 
(Morgan) Parrish; great-grandson of Parker (and Betsey Sanborn) Morgan, 
private, Col. Enoch Poor's New Hampshire Regt, pensioned; great 2 -grandson 
of Richard Sanborn, private, Col. Bedel's New Hampshire Regt.; grandson of 
Daniel and Catherine (Whitemarsh) Hollis; great-grandson of Daniel Hollis, 
Corporal, Capt. John Vinton's (Independent) Company Mass. Militia; great- 
grandson of Ezra Whitmarsh, Jr., Corporal, Col. Solomon Lovell's Mass. Regt. 

NAHUM HENDRY PARSONS, Rockford, 111. (28023). Son of Nahum Fisher 
and Nancy Adaline (Hendry) Parsons; grandson of David Brown and Maria 
Antoinette (Stevens) Hendry; great-grandson of Thomas and Euphremia (Gra- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 301 

ham) Hendry; great 2 -grandson of John Henry {Hendry), Second Lieutenant 
Fifth New York Regt. 

STARR PARSONS, Lynn, Mass. (27439). Son of Ebenezer and Mary Alvina 
(Dodge) Parsons; grandson of Ebenezer and Mary (Hart) Parsons; great- 
grandson of Ebenezer Parsons, private, Capt. Timothy Remick's Company, Col. 
Joseph Vose's Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Ebenezer Hart, Corporal, Capt. 
Joshua Bennett's (Light Infantry) Company, Colonel Putnam's Mass. Regt.; 
great 2 -grandson of John JIart, Jr., private, Capt. Ebenezer Winship's Company, 
Colonel Nixon's Mass. Regt., Sergeant Lynn Militia Company; grandson of 
Nathan Dana and Sarah Parkins (Shepherd) Dodge; great-grandson of John 
and Catherine (Howe) Shepherd; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Shepherd, Sergeant, 
Capt. Simon Marston's Company New Hampshire Militia; great 2 -grandson of 
Mark Howe, Surgeon Third New Hampshire Regt., Colonel Scammell; great- 
grandson of Andrew and Elizabeth (Dane) Dodge; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Dane, private, Capt. Larken Thorndike's Company of Beverly, Mass., Alarm 
of April 19, 1775. 

WILLiAM McDANIEL PARTRIDGE, Montclair, N. J. (28375)- Son of Lewis 
B. and Adele J. Partridge; grandson of Lewis S. and Harriet (Baxter) Part- 
ridge; great-grandson of Abel and Alpha (Lewis) Partridge; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel Partridge, Jr., private Vermont Militia. 

CHARLES HOWARD PATTERSON, New Orleans, La. (26284). Son of Henry 
Augustus and Eleanor Simons (Wright) Patterson; grandson of William and 
Aletta (Crane) Patterson; great-grandson of David Day and Hannah (Cleve- 
land) Crane; great-grandson of Eleazer Crane, private, Captain Samuel J. 
Atlee's Battalion Penna. Musketry. 

CLYDE LLEWELLYN PATTERSON, Eugene, Ore. (27595). Son of Andrew 
Wilson and Amanda Caroline Patterson; grandson of Andrew and Jane (Lind- 
sey) Patterson; great-grandson of John Patterson, Jr., and great 2 -grandson of 
John Patterson, privates, Capt. Nicholas Patterson's Company Bucks County 
Penna. Militia. 

DANIEL THOMAS PATTON, Grand Rapids, Mich. (28126). Son of Rufus 
Deming and Mary Josephine (Cooley) Patton; grandson of Daniel and Lucy 
(Deming) Patton, Jr.; great-grandson of Davis Deming, private, Col. Return 
Jonathan Meig's Conn. Regt., pensioned; great 2 -grandson of John Deming, pri- 
vate, Col. Charles Webb's Conn. Regt. 

EDWARD HOWARD PEASE, Edgartown, Mass. (27574). Son of Louis H. and 
Cynthia B. Pease; grandson of Isaiah D. and Sarah E. Pease, Jr.; great-grand- 
son of Isaiah D. and Polly (Luce) Pease; great 2 -grandson of Noah (and Han- 
nah Dunham) Pease, private, Capt. Benjamin Smith's Company Mass. Troops, 
stationed at Marthas Vineyard; great 3 -grandson of Elijah Dunham, private 
Second Company, Col. Beriah Norton's Dukes County Mass. Regt.; great 2 - 
grandson of Silvanus Luce, private, Capt. Nathan Smith's Company Mass. 
Troops, stationed at Marthas Vineyard. 

HOWARD LOVEJOY PENFIELD, Hannibal, Mo. (25294). Son of Lewis Henry 
and Fanny (Gaylord) Penfield; grandson of Amzi Lewis and Nancy (Henry) 
Penfield; great-grandson of Lewis and Ada (Beardsley) Penfield; great-grand- 
son of Peter Penfield, 2d, Captain Sixteenth Conn. Continental Regt. 

ROBERT FRANKLIN PENNELL, Newark, N. J. (28168). Son of Robert Frank- 
lin and Martha Morgan (Otis) Pennell; grandson of Israel Taintor and Olive 
Morgan (Osgood) Otis; great-grandson of John Thatcher Otis, fifer, Capt. 
Amos Jones's Company, Colonel Latimer's Conn. Regt. 

ADAM FREDERICK PENTZ, Brooklyn, N. Y. (28257). Son of Enoch Carter 
and Ellen (Keefe) Pentz; grandson of Daniel Carter and Elizabeth (Kerbin) 
Pentz; great-grandson of Adam and Annie (Carter) Pentz; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Carter, private First Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

GEORGE GRINDLEY SPENCE PERKINS, Wellesley, Mass. (27575). Son of 
George T. and Annie J. E. (Grindley) Perkins; grandson of Thomas Spence 



302 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

and Betsey Bartlett (Sampson) Perkins; great-grandson of Samuel and Abigail 
(Bartlett) Sampson; great 2 -grandson of John Bartlett, Lieutenant Capt. Z. 
Bartlett's Company First Plymouth County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

WILUAM HENRY PERKINS, Jr., Baltimore, Md. (25572). Son of William 
Henry and Laura Ann (Pochon) Perkins; grandson of John and Harriet 
(Gorsuch) Perkins; great-grandson of Robert and Sarah (Donovan) Gorsuch; 
great 2 -grandson of Richard Donovan, Ensign Sixth Maryland Regt., 1777, 
Regimental Adjutant, 1 777-1 780, Lieutenant, 1778, killed at Camden, S. C, 
Aug. 16, 1780. 

FRANK LUBERT PERRY, Wellesley, Mass. (28517). Son of George and Julia 
A. (Rogers) Perry; grandson of Ezra and Joanna (Parkhurst) Perry; great- 
grandson of Timothy and Sally (Eames) Perry; great 2 -grandson of Nathan 
Perry, private, Col. Samuel Bullard's Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Abner 
Perry, Colonel Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Alexander and Polly (Thayer) 
Parkhurst; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Parkhurst, private Third Worcester 
County Regt. Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE ATWOOD PETTIGREW, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27280). Supplemental. 
Son of Josiah Walker and Susan Ann (Atwood) Pettigrew; grandson of Peter 
Clark and Mary F. (Wilkins) Atwood; great-grandson of Joshua Atwood, Cor- 
poral New Hampshire Rangers, Sergeant, Captain Webster's Company New 
Hampshire Militia and other service, pensioned. 

BERTHOLF MARSH PETTIT, Racine, Wis. (27065). Son of Ossian Marsh and 
Alma (Robinson) Pettit; grandson of Milton Howard and Caroline Diana 
(Marsh) Pettit; great-grandson of George and Jane (Upfold) Pettit; great 2 - 
grandson of John Pettit, Captain Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

FREDERICK ROBINSON PETTIT, Racine, Wis. (27064). Son of Ossian Marsh 
and Alma (Robinson) Pettit; grandson of Milton Howard and Caroline Diana 
(Marsh) Pettit; great-grandson of George and Jane (Upfold) Pettit; great 2 - 
grandson of John Pettit, Captain Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

MILTON HOWARD PETTIT, Racine, Wis. (27066). Son of Ossian Marsh and 
Alma (Robinson) Pettit; grandson of Milton Howard and Caroline Diana 
(Marsh) Pettit; great-grandson of George and Jane (Upfold) Pettit; great 2 - 
grandson of John Pettit, Captain Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

ROBERT CLARK PEYTON, Los Angeles, Cal. (111. 28024). Son of Valentine 
and Emma (Mann) Peyton; grandson of Joseph Morgan and Priscilla (Cass) 
Peyton; great-grandson of Valentine and Mary (Morgan) Peyton; great 2 - 
grandson of Timothy and Sallie (Rector) Peyton; great 3 -grandson of Henry 
Peyton, Captain-Lieutenant, Lee's Battalion of Light Dragoons, killed in serv- 
ice at Charleston, May 12, 1780. 

JAMES CLINTON PHELPS, Springfield, Mass. (26337). Supplemental. Son of 
Clinton and Mary Jane (Rising) Phelps; grandson of Roland and Emeline 
(Rising) Phelps; great-grandson of James Rising, private, Captain Harmon's 
Company Fourth Regt. Conn. Line. 

ALFRED RAYMOND PHILLIPS, Tampa, Fla. (20690). Son of Isham W. and 
Carrie Lee (Trice) Phillips; grandson of Robert Linsay and Modest (Ray- 
mond) Trice; great-grandson of Alfred Hoyt and Louise (Walker) Raymond; 
great 2 -grandson of David and Ann (Scott) Walker; great 3 -grandson of William 
Scott, Lieutenant of a Virginia State Regt., 1776. 

ALONZO LA FAYETTE PHILLIPS, Jr., Richmond, Va. (28343). Son of 
Alonzo L. and Esprella (Blackburn) Phillips; grandson of Fleming and Ro- 
sena (Snead) Phillips; great-grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Gunstead) 
Phillips; great 2 -grandson of Mourning Phillips, private, Capt. James Hawes's 
Company Second Virginia Regt. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 303 

EDWIN WILLIAM STARR PICKETT, Fairfield, Conn. (27966). Son of Edwin 
Darling and Sarah Chickering (Harrington) Pickett; grandson of David H. 
and Olive Graves (Holmes) Harrington; great-grandson of Samuel and Martha 
(Davis) Harrington; great 2 -grandson of Nathan Harrington, First Lieutenant 
First Worcester County Regt., Captain Mass. Guards. 

LEWIS ABIAL PIERCE, Gorham, Me. (26074). Son of Philip Thacher and 
Olive (Bickford) Pierce; grandson of TJhomas and Phebe (Strange) Pierce; 
great-grandson of Richard Pierce, minute man Second Middleborough Company 
Mass. Militia. 

HERBERT ALLEN PIKE, Worcester, Mass. (27751). Son of Nathan Craft and 
Anna (Newell Woodcock) Pike; grandson of Hezekiah and Ann Jeffers (Craft) 
Pike; great-grandson of Zachariah and Hannah (Lovejoy) Pike; great-grand- 
son of Benjamin Pike, private, Capt. Reuben Butterfield's Company, Col. David 
Green's Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Nathan and 
Anna (Hyde) Craft; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Craft, Ensign, Capt. Amariah 
Fuller's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Hezekiah Lovejoy, Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. Josiah Crosby's Company, Col. Moses Nichols's New Hampshire 
Regt., Captain Fifth Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

FRANK RICHARDSON PINGRY, Newark, N. J. (28603). Son of Francis Kip 
and Anna Rebecca (Richardson) Pingry; grandson of Dan and Lucy Cornelia 
(Carpenter) Richardson; great-grandson of Jesse and Harriet (Wait) Carpen- 
ter; great 2 -grandson of Gilbert and Rebecca (Seaver) Wait; great 3 -grandson of 
Benjamin Wait, Major, Col. Samuel Herrick's Regt. Vermont Rangers. 

ARTHUR WELLINGTON PINKHAM, Lynn, Mass. (19167). Supplemental. 
Son of Charles Hacker and Jennie Barker (Jones) Pinkham; grandson of 
John Armstead and Lucy Kimball (Barker) Jones; great-grandson of Asa and 
Lois (Choate) Barker; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer (and Elizabeth Choate) 
Choate, private Mass. Militia, on Penobscot Expedition, 1779; great 3 -grandson 
of Stephen and Elizabeth (Patch) Choate, parents of Elizabeth; great-grand- 
son of Stephen Choate, Member of Committee of Ipswich Inspection and 
Safety, Member of Mass. General Court, and of State Convention at Cam- 
bridge, 1779. 

HARRISON F. PINNELL, Kansas, 111. (27621). Son of William I. S. and Mar- 
tha J. (Poulter) Pinnell; grandson of Abram and Frances (Estes) Pinnell; 
great-grandson of William and Anna (Murphy) Pinnell; great 2 -grandson of 
Thomas Pinnell, private Second Virginia Regt. of Foot. 

FRANK L. PIPER, Fall River, Mass. (27769). Son of William I. and Frances 
(Adams) Piper; grandson of Edwin and Lydia (Bentley) Adams; great-grand- 
son of Willard and Abigail (Marcy) Adams; great 2 -grandson of Paul Adams, 
private, Capt. Daniel Clerk's Company, Col. Jonathan Latimer's Conn. Regt. 

FRED ALLEN PITTENGER, Boise, Idaho (27004). Son of Willis M. and Mar- 
garite (Kern) Pittenger; grandson of Alfred Jackson and Amanda (Oliver) 
Pittenger; great-grandson of Abram and Elner (Ferguson) Pittenger; great 2 - 
grandson of John and Jane (Clingan) Ferguson; great"-grandson of Henry 
Ferguson, private Fourth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE ARTHUR PLIMPTON, Walpole, Mass. (27752). Son of Calvin C. and 
Priscilla G. (Lewis) Plimpton; grandson of Jason and Ruth (Wilkinson) 
Lewis; great-grandson of David Lewis, private, Capt. John Lincoln's Company, 
Col. Joseph Webb's Mass. Regt. 

CARL WILLIAM PLUMB, Grand Junction, Colo. (26694)- Son of Julius C. and 
Clara (Coriell) Plumb; grandson of Julius A. and Mary Ann (Burton) Plumb; 
great-grandson of Theron and Harriett (Merry) Plumb; great 2 -grandson of 
Ebenezer Plumb, private, Colonel Rosseter's detachment Berkshire County 
Mass. Militia. 

HARRY SEARING POND, New Orleans, La. (26282). Son of Byron Milton and 
Helener (Sibley) Pond; grandson of Sylvester and Almira (Wright) Pond; 
great-grandson of Samuel Pond, private, Capt. John Black's Company Mass, 
Minute Men. 



304 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM STAFFORD POST, Summit, N. J. (27780). Son of John Jacob and 
Anne Bucknum (Osborn) Post; grandson of Joshua Ward and Mary (Otis) 
Osborn; great-grandson of David and Phoebe (Ward) Osborn; great 2 -grandson 
of Nehemiah Osborn, private First Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

EDGAR AUSTIN POTTER, Chicago, 111. (27815). Son of William Henry Harri- 
son and Catherine Lois (Peabody) Potter; grandson of Lyman and Nancy 
(Root) Peabody; great-grandson of Aaron and Clarissa (Pomeroy) Root; great 2 - 
grandson of Oliver Root, Major, Col. John Brown's Regt. Mass. Militia and 
other service. 

THOMAS POTTER, East Orange, N. J. (28455). Son of Henry Albert and 
Frances (Green) Potter; grandson of Thomas and Adaline Coleman (Bower) 
Potter; great-grandson of George and Catherine (Cameron) Bower; great 2 - 
grandson of Jacob Bower, Quartermaster, Colonel Thompson's Penna. Rifle 
Battalion, Captain Sixth Regt. Penna. Line. 

WILLIAM PLUMER POTTER, Pittsburgh, Pa. (27149). Son of James Hair and 
Nancy (Naylor) Potter; grandson of Thomas Stewart Naylor; great-grandson 
of Ralph {Nailer) Naylor, private Second Cumberland County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

CLYDE POTTS, Morristown, N. J. (28167). Son of James Franklin and Elizabeth 
Jane (Pancoast) Potts; grandson of Samuel and Jane Patterson (Walker) Pan- 
coast; great-grandson of Joel Walker, private Virginia Militia. 

EDWARD KNOX POWE, West Durham, N. C. (24517). Son of William EHerbe 
and Catherine E- (Tate) Powe; grandson of William Ellerbe and Elizabeth 
Sloan (Torrance) Powe; great-grandson Of Erasmus and Esther (Ellerbe) 
Powe; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Powe, Commissary in Colonel Hicks's North 
Carolina Regt.; grandson of William C. and Laura T. Wilson (Polk) Tate; 
great-grandson of Hugh and Margaret (Erwin) Tate; great 2 -grandson of Alex- 
ander Brwin, recognized patriot, district auditor, clerk of Burke County Court, 
N. C, and his wife, Sarah Robinson Erwin, recognized patriot, saving the life 
of Samuel Alexander, a Revolutionary soldier; great 2 -grandson of William 
Ellerbe, Member of Committee of Observation, Captain Second Company First 
Battalion Thirty-ninth Regt. South Carolina Militia. 

CYRUS E. PRATT, Chicago, 111. (27393)- Son of Cyrus and Elizabeth (Sayre) 
Pratt; grandson of Whittington and Elizabeth (Johnston) Sayre; great-grand- 
son of Nathan Sayre, Second Lieutenant, Capt. John Wisner's Company, Col- 
John Hathorn's New York Regt. 

FRANK McCREARY PRATT, New York, N. Y. (28262). Son of Richard Mentor 
and Emma (McCreary) Pratt; grandson of Prank and Letitia Isabella (Barr) 
McCreary; great-grandson of William Britain and Eliza (Caughey) McCreary; 
great 2 -grandson of Samuel McCreary, private, John Duncan's Company Penna. 
Militia. 

WILLIAM H. PRICE, Detroit, Mich. (28139). Son of William H. and Rebecca 
J. (Cowen) Price; grandson of Orlando H. and Hannah L. (Robinson) Price; 
great-grandson of William H. and Elsie B. (Dow) Price; great 2 -grandson of 
Stephen Price, Sergeant Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

LUCIAN JACOB PRIEST, Charlestown, Mass. (27440). Son of John Porter and 
Sarah C. (Davis) Priest; grandson of Jacob and Eliza Kendall (Porter) Priest, 
Jr.; great-grandson of John and Mary (Kendall) Porter; great 2 -grandson of 
John Porter, Jr., Major, Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Mass. Regt., Inspector, 
Timothy Bigelow's Regt. and other service; great 3 -grandson of John Porter, 
Captain and Adjutant Sixth Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grand- 
son of Jacob Priest, private, Capt. Cyprian Howe's Company Mass. Militia, 
Alarm of April 19, 1775. 

EDGAR LEWIS PRINDLE, Cleveland, Ohio (27730). Son of John Adams and 
Martha Elizabeth (Lewis) Prindle; grandson of Cyrus and Mary (Jenison) 
Prindle; great-grandson of Josiah and Susan (French) Jenison; great 2 -grandson 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 305 

of Nathaniel French, private Mass. Continental Troops; great 2 -grandson of 
Abijah Jenison, private, Col. John Rand's Mass. Regt. 

HOMER EDGAR PRINDLE, Cleveland, Ohio (27747). Son of Cyrus and Mary 
(Jenison) Prindle; grandson of Josiah and Susan (French) Jenison; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel French, private Mass. Continental Troops. 

WILLIAM LEWIS PRINDLE, Cleveland, Ohio (27748). Son of Jno. Adams and 
Martha Elizabeth (Lewis) Prindle; grandson of Cyrus and Mary (Jenison) 
Prindle; great-grandson of Josiah and Susan (French) Jenison; great 2 -grandson 
of Nathaniel French, private Mass. Continental Troops. 

MORTIMER ROBINSON PROCTOR, Proctor, Vt. (27484). Son of Fletcher D. 
and Minnie E- (Robinson) Proctor; grandson of Redfield and Emily J. (Dut- 
ton) Proctor; great-grandson of Jabez and Betsey Proctor; great 2 -grandson of 
Leonard Proctor, Lieutenant Middlesex County Mass. Militia. 

HERBERT T. PROUDFIT, Montclair, N. J. (28370). Son of Daniel L. and 
Frances Marion (Dodge) Proudfit; grandson of David L. and Isabella (Has- 
brouck) Proudfit; great-grandson of Jonathan and Phoebe (Field) Hasbrouck; 
great 2 -grandson of Isaac Hasbrouck; great'-grandson of Jonathan Hasbrouck, 
Colonel Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM WALLACE PUNCHARD, Jr., Newark, N. J. (28076). Son of Wil- 
liam Wallace and Melissa (Campbell) Punchard; grandson of William and 
Charlotte (Myers) Campbell; great-grandson of David and Grace (MacFarland) 
Campbell; great 2 -grandson of David and Elizabeth (Lozier) Campbell; great 3 - 
grandson of David Campbell, private Bergen County New Jersey Militia. 

GEORGE H. QUACKENBOS, West Brighton, N. Y. (27831). Son of George 
Warner and Mary E. (Sim) Quackenbos; grandson of Nicholas J. and Anna 
Georgina (Neville) Quackenbos; great-grandson of John (Johannes) Quack- 
enbos, Captain First Regt. New York Line. 

SAMUEL H. L. QUACKENBUSH, East Orange, N. J. (28602). Son of Edwin 
and Emma (Riedel) Quackenbush; grandson of Gerrit Van Schaick and Hannah 
(Bayeaux) Quackenbush; great-grandson of Sybrant Quackenbush, private 
Col. Yates's New York Regt. 

EDMUND BLANCHARD QUIGGLE, Washington, D. C. (28000). Son of James 
C. and Ella L. (Quiggle) Quiggle; grandson of James W. and Cordelia (Mayer) 
Quiggle, parents of James C. ; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Nicely) 
Quiggle; great 2 -grandson of Nicholas Qnigly, private Sixth York County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

FREDERICK FOSTER QUIMBY, Summit, N. J. (28587). Son of Aaron Almeron 
and Annie (Gee) Quimby; grandson of Aaron and Matilda Fordham (Williams) 
Quimby; great-grandson of Daniel and Martha (Tichenor) Quimby; great 2 - 
grandson of Aaron and Phoebe (Hedden) Quimby; great s -grandson of Josiah 
Quimby, Second Lieutenant Third New Jersey Battalion Continental Troops. 

FRANK ALFRED RANDALL, Chicago, 111. (28004). Son of Samuel Benjamin 
and Anna Louise (Carlson) Randall; grandson of John and Rosalinda (David- 
son) Randall; great-grandson of John Randall, private, Col. Philip Burr Brad- 
ley's Conn. Battalion, Wadsworth's Brigade. 

MILTON PAUL RANDELL, Chicago, 111. (27622). Son of Paul and Phebe Ann 
(Watkins) Randell; grandson of Nathaniel and Martha (Field) Randell; great- 
grandson of John Randell, private, Col. Joseph Cilley's New Hampshire Regt. 

HERMAN PRIMM RANKIN, Lincoln, Nebr. (27316). Son of William L. and 
Susan Jane (Primm) Rankin; grandson of EHsha and Lucinda C. (Glascock) 
Primm; great-grandson of Daniel M. and Mary E. (Lake) Glascock; great- 
grandson of James and Elizabeth (Glascock) Lake; great s -grandson of Thomas 
Glascock, Lieutenant First Georgia Battalion, Maj. John Habersham, and First 
Regt. Continental Light Dragoons, Col. Theodoric Bland, also in Virginia Line. 

JAMES H. RANKIN, Grand Junction, Colo. (26687). Son of Samuel E. and 
Nancy (Crawford) Rankin; grandson of Isaac and Nancy (Frazier) Crawford; 



306 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

great-grandson of James Crawford, private Mass. Militia, marine on frigate 
"Boston" and ship "Scourge," prisoner at Halifax, pensioned. 

RUSSELL BRUCE RANKIN, Newark, N. J. (28588). Son of Edward Stevens 
and Julia S. J. (Russell) Rankin; grandson of William and Ellen Hope (Ste- 
vens) Rankin; great-grandson of Ashbel and Mary (Mead) Stevens; great 2 - 
grandson of Ethan Mead, private, Colonel Drake's Regt. New York Militia. 

ERNEST JUDSON RAYMOND, Salem, Ore. (28402). Son of Thomas Willis and 
Louisa Arabella (Wilkinson) Raymond; grandson of John and Lodema Sophia 
(Hills) Wilkinson; great-grandson of Allen and Fanny Alamena (Yale) Hills; 
great 2 -grandson of Amasa Yale, private, Waterbury's Conn. Brigade; great 3 - 
grandson of Nathaniel Yale, private, Capt. John Hough's Company Fifth Bat- 
talion Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

THOMAS LYNCH RAYMOND, Newark, N. J. (28363). Son of Thomas Lynch 
and Eugenia A. (Launitz) Raymond; grandson of Samuel Graesbeeck and Anna 
Maria (Nicoll) Raymond; great-grandson of Andrew and Ann (Lynch) Ray- 
mond; great L '-grandson of Samnel Raymond, sapper and miner, Capt. James 
Beebe's Company Conn. Militia. 

HENRY ROBINSON REA, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28034). Sou of William and Matilda 
(Robinson) Rea; grandson of John (and Elizabeth Culbertson) Rca, Captain 
Second Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Associators and Militia; great- 
grandson of Samuel Culbertson, Colonel Sixth Cumberland County Battaiion 
Penna. Militia. 

FREDERICK FRENCH READ, Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. (Mass. 27753)- 
Son of William and Catherine (Marshall) Read; grandson of William and 
Sarah A. F. (McLellan) Read; great-grandson of Robert and Rebecca (French) 
Read; great 2 -grandson of William Read, private, Capt. Archelaus Towne's Com- 
pany, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Mass. Regt. 

ALBRO PARKER REED, Swampscott, Mass. (27932). Son of George W. and 
Sarah E. (Nelson) Reed; grandson of James and Rebecca (Major) Reed; great- 
grandson of Stephen H. and Rebecca (Nichols) Reed; great 2 -grandson of David 
and Martha (McMurphey) Reed; great 3 -grandson of Abraham Reid, Lieutenant, 
Col. John Stark's New Hampshire Regt. 

JAMES CHESTER REED, Dorchester, Mass. (27770). Son of Joseph Tibbetts and 
Martha Caroline (Poor) Reed; grandson of Hannibal Dillingham and Martha 
(Tibbetts) Reed; great-grandson of Mark and Ann (Giles) Tibbetts; great 2 - 
grandson of Iclwbod Tibbetts, Sergeant, Capt. Ichabod Pinkham's Company 
Mass. Militia at Boothbay. 

GEORGE F. REEVE, Newark, N. J. (27371). Supplemental. Son of Abner S. 
and Rebecca (Ford) Reeve; grandson of William Washington and Mary 
(Compton) Ford; great-grandson of William Ford, private, Captain Stout's 
Company, Col. Jacob Hyer's Regt. Middlesex County New Jersey Militia. 

CRAWFORD SCOTT REILLEY, Cheboygan, Mich. (28135)- Son of John Scott 
and Cornelia Bissell (Webb) Reilley; grandson of James and Eliza (Lanfear) 
Webb; great-grandson of David and Theodosia (Bissell) Landfear; great-grand- 
son of Osias Bissell, Captain Conn. Militia and Continental Line. 

EDGAR VAN COURT REINHOLD, Yonkers, N. Y. (28252). Son of D. K. and 
Amelia M. (Van Court) Reinhold; grandson of Jesse and Mary (Kurtz) Rein- 
hold; great-grandson of John and Barbara (Brunner) Reinhold; great 2 -grandson 
of Frederick and Elizabeth (Wenger) Reinhold; great 3 -grandson of Christopher 
Reinhold, drummer Second Regt. Penna. Line. 

CHARLES NELSON REMINGTON, Grand Rapids, Mich. (26610). Supplemental. 
Son of Charles N. and Betsey C. (Sherrill) Remington; grandson of John C. 
and Polly (Eaton) Remington; great-grandson of Berry and Lydia (Welch) 
Eaton; great-'-grandson of Ebenezer Eaton, Jr., private, Colonel McClellan's 
Conn. Regt.; great 3 -grandson of Ebenezer Eaton, Corporal, Major Backus's 
Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 2>°7 

DE GRIMM RENFRO, Franklin, Pa. (28678). Son of John Forney and Stella 
(Grimm) Renfro; grandson of Peter Forney and Nannie (Lancaster) Renfro; 
great-grandson of Noah Parker and Nancy (Reinhardt) Renfro; great-grand- 
son of Christian and Mary (Forney) Reinhardt; great 3 -grandsori of Peter 
Forney, Captain North Carolina Dragoons, pensioned. 

GEORGE H. RENTON, Newark, N. J. (28589). Son of James M. and Hannah A. 
(Biddle) Renton; grandson of John and Hannah (Van Dike) Biddle; great- 
grandson of Aaron Biddle, Captain First Salem County Battalion New Jersey 
Militia. 

GEORGE H. RENTON, Jr., Newark, N. J. (28590). Son of George H. and Julia 
A. (Baldwin) Renton; grandson of James M. and Hannah A. (Biddle) Renton; 
great-grandson of John and Hannah (Van Dike) Biddle; great 2 -grandson of 
Aaron Biddle, Captain First Salem County Battalion New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM CROSBY RENWICK, Summit, N. J. (27679). Son of William Rhine- 
lander and Elizabeth Smedes (Crosby) Renwick; grandson of William Bedlow 
and Harriet Ashton (Clarkson) Crosby; great-grandson of William and Cath- 
erine (Floyd) Clarkson; great 2 -grandson of William Floyd, Signer of the Dec- 
laration of Independence, Colonel First Suffolk Regt. New York Militia. 

EDWIN CLAYTON REQUA, Sayville, L. 1., N. Y. (27649). Son of John James 
and Sarah L. (Barnes) Requa; grandson of Edwin D. and Susan (James) 
Requa; great-grandson of Solomon and Catharine (Vredenburgh) Requa; great-- 
grandson of Abraham and Bethia (Hopkins) Requa; great 3 -grandson of Daniel 
Requa, Sergeant New York Militia, prisoner in Sugar House, New York. 

EUGENE CLARENCE RICE, Jr., Washington, D. C. (27977). Son of Eugene 
Clarence and Elizabeth (Hemperly) Rice; grandson of William E. and Lydia 
U. (Coffin) Rice; geat-grandson of Joseph C. and Julia M. (Bronson) Rice; 
great 2 -grandson of David Rice, private Sixteenth Albany County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

HORACE SALEM RICE, East Walpole, Mass. (28518). Son of Willis and Sarah 
G. (Shumway) Rice; grandson of Oris and Pamelia (Atkins) Rice; great-grand- 
son of Jacob Rice, private, Col. Roger Enos's Battalion Conn. Militia; grandson 
of Salem and Lydia (Barrows) Shumway; great-grandson of Amasa Shumway, 
Corporal, Col. EHsha Porter's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES B. RICH, Grand Junction, Colo. (26682). Son of Charles B. and 
Josephine (Crawford) Rich; grandson of George and Elizabeth Weitzel (White) 
Crawford; great-grandson of Robert and Elizabeth (Quigley) Crawford; great-- 
grandsou of James Crawford, Major Twelfth Penna. Regt., Col. William Cook, 
Member from Northumberland County in Constitutional Convention of 1776. 

HENRY ARNOLD RICH, Salt Lake City, Utah (25994)- Son of Fred C. and 
Emma A. Rich; grandson of Charles C. and Sarah D. (Pea) Rich; great-grand- 
son of John and Elizabeth (Knighton) Pea; great 2 -grandson of Thomas 
Knighton, private, Captain Moor's Company, Colonel Knighton's Regt. and 
Colonel Alcock's Virginia Regt., pensioned. 

IRVING LYMAN RICH, Cambridge, Mass. (27754). Son of Irving Bascom and 
Elizabeth (Lyman) Rich; grandson of Gasca and Lorraine (Bascom) Rich; 
great-grandson of Charles Rich; great-grandson of Thomas Rich, Lieutenant, 
Capt. Eldad Wright's Company Mass. Minute Men. Col. Samuel Williams's 
Mass. Regt., and other service; grandson of Horace A. and Mary (Paine) 
Lyman; great-grandson of Jabez and Abigail (Woodbury) Lyman; great 2 - 
grandson of Jabez and Lois (Johnson) Lyman; great"-grandson of Ezekiel Ly- 
man, private, Captain Throop's Company First Conn. Regt. 

HARRY T. B. RICHARDSON, Worcester, Mass. (2S232). Son of Oakley E. D. 
and Lydia Maria (Bailey) Richardson; grandson of Ephraim and Sarah C. 
(Varnura) Richardson; great-grandson of Prescott and Elizabeth (McAllister) 
Varnum; great 2 -grandson of Bbenczer Varmint, Lieutenant, Col. Simeon Spauld- 
ing's Regt. Mass. Militia. 



308 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



JOHN FRANCIS RICHMOND, West Barrington, R. I. (27183). Son of Edward 
Francis and Lucinda (Paine) Richmond; grandson of Ichabod and Roxalana 
(Paine) Richmond; great-grandson of John Rogers Richmond, private, Col. 
Thos. Carpenter's Mass. Regt. 

EUGENE RIDDELL, Sheldon, Iowa (27661). Son of William O. and Caroline 
(Wilcox) Riddell; grandson of William H. and Jeanette (Stetson) Riddell; 
great-grandson of Oliver Stetson, private, artificer, Mass. Troops, pensioned. 

FRANK HERBERT RIDEOUT, Concord Junction, Mass. (28524). Son of Harvey 
J. and Adelaide (Holden) Rideout; grandson of Reuben and Mary (Chute) 
Holden; great-grandson of Sylvanus and Polly (Bathrick) Holden; great-- 
grandson of Philemon Holden, fifer, Col. Jonathan Reed's Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON RIDGE, East Millsboro, R. F. D. 21, Pa. (27150). Son 
of John Hamilton and Margaret S. (Acklin) Ridge; grandson of Thomas Jef- 
ferson and Mary Jane Acklin; great-grandson of George K. and Elizabeth 
Acklin; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Acklin, private Virginia Troops, widow pen- 
sioned by Penna. Assembly. 

RICHARD LESLIE RIKER, East Orange, N. J. (28614). Son of Valentine and 
Fannie Rebecca (Freeman) Riker; grandson of Charles and Ellen V. (Coovert) 
Freeman; great-grandson of Henry and Rebecca (Van Fleet) Coovert; great-- 
grandson of William Van Fleet, private New Jersey Militia. 

OLIVER HENDERSON RITCHIE, Ensign, U. S. N, Washington, D. C. (Utah 
26000). Son of Morris Latimer and Mary Lily (Munsell) Ritchie; grandson 
of Henderson and Mary Louisa (Latimer) Ritchie; great-grandson of Alexander 
and Eunice Jane (Guthrie) Latimer; great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Anna 
(Dobbins) Latimer; great 3 -grandson of Jonathan Latimer, Colonel Third Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN RITER, Jr., Salt Lake City, Utah (25999). Son of 
Benjamin Franklin and Maria Inez (Corlett) Riter; grandson of Levi Evans 
and Rebecca Deborah Riter; great-grandson of Michael and Elizabeth Riter; 
great 2 -grandson of Michael Riter, private, Col. William Evans's Chester County 
Battalion Penna. Militia. 

JOHN DONALD ROBARDS, Kokomo, Ind. (27716). Son of Thomas Davis and 
Mary (Boles) Robards; grandson of Jesse Ro Bards, Sergeant, Colonel Flem- 
ing's and other Virginia Regts., pensioned. 

JOSEPH PLEASANT ROBERTS, Palisade, Colo. (26684). Son of Pleasant Daw- 
son and Lucy Mary (Atkins) Roberts; grandson of Matthews H. and Nancy 
(Dawson) Roberts; great-grandson of John Dawson, Captain Virginia Militia 
of Amherst County. 

REUBEN M. ROBERTS, Cleveland, Ohio (27731). Son of Ernest M. and Anna- 
bel (Emery) Roberts; grandson of Manning and Mary Elvira (Smith) Roberts; 
great-grandson of Reuben and Mary (Smith) Roberts; great 2 -grandson of 
Reuben and Esther (Risley) Roberts; great s -grandson of Joseph Roberts, pri- 
vate, Captain Olcott's Company Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Lyman and 
Electa (Dickinson) Smith; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Dickinson, Jr., private, 
Col. Elisha Porter's Mass. Regt. 

ARCHIBALD THOMAS ROBERTSON, Louisville, Ky. (26590). Son of John 
and Ella (Martin) Robertson; grandson of Joseph and Sally (Hughes) Martin; 
great-grandson of Joseph Martin, Captain Pittsylvania Militia, Major Volunteer 
Battalion Virginia Militia. 

DOANE ROBINSON, Pierre, S. Dak. (27281). Supplemental. Son of George 
McCook and Rhozina (Grow) Robinson; grandson of Jonah and Sarah (Mor- 
rison) Robinson; great-grandson of Jonah (Jonas) Robinson, private, Capt. 
James Roger's Company, Col. Timothy Green's Hanover Rifle Battalion of Lan- 
caster County Penna. Associators. 

GLENN ROBINSON, Rantoul, 111. (28291). Son of Paris and Caroline M. 
(Mandeville) Robinson; grandson of Elijah and Huldah (Denton) Mandeville; 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 309 

great-grandson of Samuel and Lydia (Culver) Mandeville; great 2 -grandson of 
John (and Sarah Drake) Mandeville, Lieutenant Third Westchester County 
Regt. New York Militia; great 3 -grandson of Samuel Drake, Colonel Third 
Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

HARRY PARKER ROBINSON, Grand Rapids, Mich. (27462). Son of Nathan 
Dyer and Elizabeth Leman (Parker) Robinson; grandson of Dyer and Lydia 
(Standish) Robinson; great-grandson of Job and Ruth (Witherill) Standish; 
great 2 -grandson of William Standish, private, Capt. John Turner's Company, 
Col. John Cotton's Mass. Regt.; grandson of Charles and Mary Hildreth (Wal- 
lingford) Parker; great-grandson of Josiah and Olive (Stone) Parker; great 2 - 
grandson of Peter Parker, Member of Committee of Correspondence and Public 
Safety, Framingham, Mass.; great-grandson of Ebenezer Blodgett and Mary 
(Hildreth) Wallingford; great 2 -grandson of David Wallingford, Lieutenant, 
Colonel Hutchinson's Mass. Regt. 

HANFORD ROBISON, Schenectady, N. Y. (26702). Supplemental. Son of Dun- 
can and Abbie Ann (Wilmot) Robison; grandson of Hanford and Sarah (Le 
Roy) Wilmot; great-grandson of James and Priscilla (Lockwood) Wilmot; 
great 2 -grandson of Noah Lockwood, private Conn. Coast Guards, under Capt. 
Henry Waring, Gen. John Mead's Regt., pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Zophar 
Wilmot, private, Capt. Nathaniel Webb's Company Ninth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

JOHN LACEY ROBY, Salt Lake City, Utah (25995). Son of Harry Forest and 
Mary (Clark) Roby; grandson of Benjamin Harlow and Mary (Clark) Roby; 
great-grandson of Enoch and Isabella (Carr) Roby; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
and Mary (Flanders) Roby; great 8 -grandson of Esekiel Flanders, private, Capt. 
Peter Kimball's Company, Col. Thomas Stickney's Regt. New Hampshire 
Militia. 

CHARLES FRANCIS ROCKWELL, Meriden, Conn. (27967). Son of William 
Francis and Sarah Louise (Taylor) Rockwell; grandson of Francis Asbury and 
Mary (Lee) Rockwell; great-grandson of Thomas Hawley and Polly (Smith) 
Rockwell; great 2 -grandson of James Rockwell, Lieutenant Sixteenth Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

HAMILTON RODDIS, Marshfield, Wis. (27061). Son of William Henry and 
Sarah (Denton) Roddis; grandson of Jonas and Frances (Leddel) Denton; 
great-grandson of John Wick and Jemima (Wills) Leddel; great 2 -grandson of 
William Leddel, private Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIS WARREN ROE, Schenectady, N. Y. (27535). Son of Joseph Henry 
Lamb and Julia Chlotida (Rhodes) Roe; grandson of Willis Wilmot and Flora 
(Spencer) Roe; great-grandson of Daniel and Nabby (Tucker) Roe; great 2 - 
grandson of Daniel Roe, Captain of Minute Men and Militia and Fourth Regt. 
New York Line. 

WALTER M. ROGERS, Michigan City, Ind. (111. 27623). Son of Hamilton K. 
and Addie E. (Fales) Rogers; grandson of George W. and Sarah (Allen) 
Rogers; great-grandson of John and Rachel (Gage) Allen; great 2 -grandson of 
John Allen, Captain, Col. John Waldron's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

JAMES SMART ROLLINS, Grinnell, Iowa (28202). Son of Levi and Julia 
(Smart) Rollins; grandson of Mark and Sarah (Roberts) Rollins; great-grand- 
son of Nicholas Rollins, Captain New Hampshire Militia. 

LYMAN ROLLINS, Marblehead, Mass. (28503). Son of Lyman J. T. and Ellen 
Lucy (Carter) Rollins; grandson of William R. and Ellen M. (Glover) Carter; 
great-grandson of William M. Carter; great 2 -grandson of John Carter, private, 
Col. Joseph Carter's New Hampshire Regt. 

ALONZO BAILEY ROOT, Springfield, Mass. (27933). Son of Sumner and So- 
phronia (Pease) Root; grandson of Joseph Root, First Lieutenant, Colonel 
Chapman's Regt. Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Timothy Root, Captain, 
Maj. EHsha Sheldon's Regt. Conn. Light Horse. 

HIRAM EDWIN ROSE, Jr., Chicago, 111. (28025). Son of Hiram Edwin and 
Nellie (Bevier) Rose; grandson of Henry and Honoria (Gavin) Bevier; great- 



3IO SONS 01? THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

grandson of Jacobus and Mary (Yandel) Bevier; great 2 -grandson of Jacob 
Bevier, private Third Ulster County Regt. New York Militia. 

JOHN HOWARD ROSEBAUH, Hartford, Conn. (27952). Son of Carlos Fisher 
and Elizabeth Augusta (Smalley) Rosebaugh; grandson of Imri and Lucy A. 
(McNutt) Smalley, 2d; great-grandson of Horatio N. and Ann Eliza (Hill) 
Smalley; great 2 -grandson of Zerah and Belinda (Allen) Smalley; great-grand- 
son of Imri Smalley, 1st, private, Col. Ebenezer Allen's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

FREDERICK ALBERT ROSS, Portland, Ore. (27589). Son of Samuel Phillips 
and Luthera (Smith) Ross; grandson of Abel and Azuba (Le Barron) Smith; 
great-grandson of Francis Lc Barron, private, Col. Theophilus Cotton's Mass. 
Regt., pensioned. 

OLIVER A. ROSS, Hutchinson, Kans. (26982). Son of Moses Anderson and 
Isabella (Gilmore) Ross; grandson of Robert Ross, Jr., private, Capt. James 
Taylor's Company Fourth Battalion Penna. Line, Col. Anthony Wayne. 

GRANT CHRISTOPHER ROTH, East Orange, N. J. (28622). Son of Henry 
and Sarah Ann (Miller) Roth; grandson of Abraham and Elizabeth (Haus- 
man) Roth; great-grandson of Gottfried Roth, private First Northampton 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

HENRY BENJAMIN ROWE, New Haven, Conn. (27345). Son of John H. and 
Harriet (Bishop) Rowe; grandson of Elijah and Mary (Moulthrop) Rowe; 
great-grandson of Ezra Rowe, private, Capt. Hezekiah Holdridge's Company, 
Col. Samuel Wyllis's Twenty-second Conn. Continental Regt. and other service, 
pensioned. 

FRANK TAYLOR ROWLAND, Greenville, 111. (Pa. 27146). Son of Mahlon 
Dowler and Rhoda Galloway (McFarland) Rowland; grandson of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Murdock) Rowland; great-grandson of William and Mary (Still- 
wagen) Rowland; great 2 -grandson of Henry Rozvland, private Third Lancaster 
County Battalion Penna. Militia, 1779; great-grandson of James and Naomi 
(Mitchell) Murdock; great 2 -grandson of John Mitchell, private, Capt. James 
Wright's Company, Col. John Stevenson's Penna. Regt., 1778; great 2 -grandson 
of Robert Murdock, private, Capt. Jonathan Jones's Company First Penna. 
Battalion, 1776, Col. John Philip De Haas. 

HARRY WILLARD ROWLAND, Cushing, Okla. (Pa. 28681). Son of James 
William and Sarah Parker (McDowell) Rowland; grandson of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Murdock) Rowland; great-grandson of William and Mary (Stillwagen) 
Rowland; great 2 -grandson of Henry Rowland, private Third Lancaster County 
Battalion Penna. Militia; great-grandson of James and Naomi (Mitchell) Mur- 
dock; great 2 -grandson of Robert Murdock, private First Penna. Battalion, Col. 
John Philip De Haas; great-'-grandson of John Mitchell, private, Col. John 
Stevenson's Penna. Regt. 

JAMES WILLIAM ROWLAND, Franklin, Pa. (27144). Son of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Murdock) Rowland; grandson of William and Mary (Stillwagen) Row- 
land; great-grandson of Henry Rowland, private Third Lancaster County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia, 1779; grandson of James and Naomi (Mitchell) Mur- 
dock; great-grandson of John Mitchell, private, Capt. James Wright's Company, 
Col. John Stevenson's Penna. Regt., 1778; great-grandson of Robert Murdock, 
private, Capt. Jonathan Jones's Company First Penna. Battalion, 1776, Col. 
John Philip De Haas. 

WILLARD JACOB ROWLAND, Pittsburgh, Pa. (27145)- Son of Mahlon Dowler 
and Rhoda Galloway (McFarland) Rowland; grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Murdock) Rowland; great-grandson of William and Mary (Stillwagen) Row- 
land; great 2 -grandson of Henry Rowland, private Third Lancaster County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia, 1779; great-grandson of James and Naomi (Mitchell) 
Murdock; great 2 -grandson of John Mitchell, private, Capt. James Wright's 
Company, Col. John Stevenson's Penna. Regt., 1778; great 2 -grandson of Robert 
Murdock, private, Capt. Jonathan Jones's Company First Penna. Battalion, 
1776, Col. John Philip De Haas. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 31 r 

JAMES SAMUEL ROYSE, Terre Haute, Ind. (27701). Son of John and Lavinia 
(Mann) Royse; grandson of Samuel and Martha (Nichol) Royse; great-grand- 
son of Solomon Royse, private and Indian spy, Colonel Barrett's Maryland 
Regt., pensioned. 

SAMUEL DURHAM ROYSE, Terre Haute, Ind. (27708). Son of Samuel and 
Harriet Eliza (Durham) Royse; grandson of Samuel and Martha (Nichol) 
Royse; great-grandson of Solomon Royse, private and Indian spy, Capt. John 
Ilinch's Company, Col. Barret's Maryland Regt.; grandson of William and 
Rebecca (Dickson) Durham; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth Ann (Lam- 
bert) Dickson; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Dickson, private Eighth Cumberland 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ORLA OSCAR RUCKER, Crete, Nebr. (28379). Son of Warren and Amanda 
Jane (Crayton) Rucker; grandson of Lemuel B. and Lucy (Blake) Rucker; 
great-grandson of Lemuel Rucker, private Eighth Virginia Regt., pensioned. 

EDWARD CURTIS RUSSELL, Perry, Iowa (Mass. 27945). Son of George 
Spencer and Mary A. (Neal) Russell; grandson of Spencer and Mary Curtis 
(Barnes) Russell; great-grandson of John Russell, private, Capt. Joshua Wood- 
bridge's Company, Col. Nathan Tyler's Mass. Regt. and other service, pen- 
sioned. 

GEORGE HENRY RUSSELL, Winthrop, Mass. (27755). Son of George Spencer 
and Mary Ann (Neal) Russell; grandson of Spencer and Mary Curtis (Barnes) 
Russell; great-grandson of John Russell, private, Col. Nathan Tyler's Mass. 
Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

SYLVESTER PAUL RUSSELL, New York, N. Y. (Mass. 27756). Son of George 
Spencer and Mary Ann (Neal) Russell; grandson of Spencer and Mary Curtis 
(Barnes) Russell; great-grandson of John Russell, private, Capt. Joshua Wood- 
bridge's Company, Col. Nathan Tyler's Mass. Regt. and other service, pen- 
sioned. 

HARRY SATTERLY SAGE, Grand Junction, Colo. (26685). Son of John W. 
and Sarah A. (Satterly) Sage; grandson of D. B. and Rebecca (Conkling) 
Satterly; great-grandson of Vincent and Sarah (Mathews) Conkling; great 2 - 
grandson of James and Hannah (Hammond) Mathews; great 8 -grandson of 
Lebbius and Lucy (Tubbs) Hammond; great>-grandson of Lebbius Tubbs, 
Lieutenant, Capt. Nicholas Bishop's Company First Regt. Conn. Militia. 

HENRY KNOX SANDER, Seattle, Wash. (27890). Son of Fred Everett and 
Ellen Bryant (Hall) Sander; grandson of Henry Knox and Elizabeth Barnes 
(Bryant) Hall; great-grandson of George and Cynthia (Collier) Hall; great 2 - 
grandson of James Hall, Captain-Lieutenant Third Mass. Regt. of Artillery, 
Regimental Paymaster. 

HARRY B. SALMON, Newark, N. J. (28615). Son of Henry and Sarah Eliza- 
beth Salmon; grandson of Gideon and Jane (Van Fleet) Salmon; great-grand- 
son of Peter and Priscilla (Stephens) Salmon; great 2 -grandson of Peter Sal- 
mon, Captain Western Battalion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

JOSHUA RAYMOND SALMON, Mountain Lakes, N. J. (28620). Son of Joshua 
S. and D. Virginia (Emmons) Salmon; grandson of Gideon and Jane (Van 
Fleet) Salmon; great-grandson of Peter and Priscilla (Stephens) Salmon; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter Salmon, Captain Western Battalion Morris County 
New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM CASKEY SALMON, Boonton, N. J. (28479)- Son of Henry and 
Alma (Bartley) Salmon; grandson of Gideon and Jane (Van Fleet) Salmon; 
great-grandson of Peter and Priscilla (Stephens) Salmon; great 2 -grandson of 
Peter Salmon, Captain Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES P SANDERS, Scotia, N. Y. (27546). Son of Charles P. and Jane L. 
(Ten Broeck) Sanders; grandson of Peter and Maria (Elmendorf) Sanders; 
great-grandson of Peter Edmond and Elizabeth (Van Rensselaer) Elmendorf; 
great 2 -grandson of Philip Van Rensselaer, military storekeeper at Albany, New 
York, rank of Lieutenant Colonel; great 3 -grandson of Killian Van Rennselaer, 
Colonel Fourth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 



312 SONS OF THE: AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

J GLEN SANDERS, Scotia, N. Y. (27547). Son of Charles P and Anna (Lee) 
Sanders; grandson of Charles P. and Jane (Ten Broeck) Sanders; great-grand- 
son of Peter and Maria (Elmendorf) Sanders; great 2 -grandson of Peter Ed- 
mond and Elizabeth (Van Rensselaer) Elmendorf; great 3 -grandson of Philip 
Van Rensselaer, military storekeeper, Albany, New York, rank of Lieutenant 
Colonel; great*-grandson of Killian Van Rensselaer, Colonel Fourth Albany 
County Regt. New York Militia. 

LAWRENCE WITSELL SANDERS, Montclair, N. J. (28617). Son of Joseph 
O'Hear and Mary (Goethe) Sanders; grandson of Joseph Augustus and Laura 
(Witsell) Sanders; great-grandson of John and Eliza (O'Hear) Sanders; great-- 
grandson of John Sanders, Lieutenant, Captain Snipe's Company South Caro- 
lina Militia, prisoner. 

OWSLEY SANDERS, Richmond, Va. (28327). Son of Thomas and Mary Louisa 
(Stuart) Sanders; grandson of Thomas and Jane Irvine (Hardin) Sanders; 
great-grandson of Mark and Mary (Adair) Hardin; great 2 -grandson. of John 
Hardin, Lieutenant Eighth Penna. Regt. 

LAWRENCE WRIGHT SANDERSON, Little Rock, Ark. (27158). Son of Wil- 
liam Lawrence and Izella Maryetta (Wright) Sanderson; grandson of Jesse 
Thomas and Maryetta (Fletcher) Wright; great-grandson of Ezra L. and Bet- 
sey (Manning) Wright; great 2 -grandson of Nathan and Betsey (Lowell) 
Wright; great 3 -grandson of Jacob Wright, private Mass. Continental Line, 
pensioned. 

MARC FLETCHER SANDERSON, Little Rock, Ark. (27157). Son of William 
Lawrence and Izella Maryetta (Wright) Sanderson; grandson of Jesse Thomas 
and Maryetta (Fletcher) Wright; great-grandson of Ezra L- and Betsey (Man- 
ning) Wright; great-grandson of Nathan and Betsey (Lowell) Wright; great 3 - 
grandson of Jacob Wright, private Mass. Continental Line, pensioned. 

COREY WORTLEY SANDFORD, Irvington, N. J. (27778). Son of William 
Morris and Lydia E. (Rockhill) Sandford; grandson of David Chapman and 
Caroline (Baldwin) Sandford; great-grandson of William Sandford, matross 
of Artillery and Sergeant Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

ISRAEL CORNELIUS SANFORD, Portland, Ore. (27586). Son of Thomas J. 
and Sybil A. (Stedman) Sanford; grandson of Elisaph and Rebecca (Wheeler) 
Sanford; great-grandson of Ezekiel Sanford, Corporal, Capt. David Smith's 
Company, Colonel Chandler's Eighth Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

EDWARD EVERETT SAUL, Providence, R. I. (Mass. 26516). Supplemental. 
Son of John F. and Sarah (Dowst) Saul; grandson of Richard and Hannah 
(Somerby) Dowst; great-grandson of Samuel and Abigail (Very) Dowst; great 2 - 
grandson of William Dowst, private, Capt. Benjamin Ward, Jr.'s Company 
Mass. Coast Guards; grandson of John and Martha (Foye) Saul; great-grand- 
son of William Foye, seaman on Mass. ship "Thomas," Capt. Samuel Ingersoll, 
1780. 

WILLIAM HOWERTON SAUNDERS, Omaha, Nebr. (27325). Son of Charles 
and Amanda Saunders; grandson of Caleb and Sarah (Lancaster) Saunders; 
great-grandson of William Lancaster; great 2 -grandson of John Lancaster; 
great 3 -grandson of Ebeneser Lancaster, private New Hampshire Militia. 
: HENRY ALBERT SAWYER, Lynn, Mass. (28654). Son of Charles Nelson and 
Abigail Dorr (Leach) Sawyer; grandson of George and Betsey Parker (Dorr) 
Leach; great-grandson of Henry Dorr, private, Col. Samuel McCobb's Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 

ISAAC HOWE SAWYER, Boxford, Mass. (28240). Son of Thomas and Sophia 
Bridgman (Howe) Sawyer; grandson of George Whitfield and Polly (Killam) 
Sawyer; great-grandson of Thomas Killam, drummer, Col. Samuel Johnson's 
and private, Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Mass. Regts. ; great-grandson of 
Samuel Sawyer, private, Col. Samuel Gerrish's Mass. Regt. 

WALTER VERNON SAYRE, Chatham, N. J. (27692). Son of Frederick and 
Etta E. (Ward) Sayre; grandson of David B. and Mary C. (Spencer) Sayre; 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 313 

great-grandson of Ezekiel and Sarah (Bonnell) Sayre; great 2 -grandson of John 
Sayre, private, Capt. Richard Townley's Company Essex County New Jersey 
Militia. 
WILLIAM SEAMAN SAYRES, Jr., Detroit, Mich. (28130). Son of William 
Seaman and Anna (Stevens) Sayres; grandson of Gilbert and Anna Leah 
(Seaman) Sayres; great-grandson of Gilbert Hunt and Eliza Maria (Brown) 
Sayres; great 2 -grandson of Isaac Sayre, Musician, Col. Matthias Ogden's New 
Jersey Regt., pensioned. 

CHARLES EDWARD SCOTT, Schenectady, N. Y. (27550). Son of David and 
Sarah (Vedder) Scott; grandson of John Scott, Captain First Albany County 
Regt. New York Militia. 

FREDERIC WILLIAM SCOTT, Richmond, Va. (28332). Son of Fred R. and 
Sarah Frances (Branch) Scott; grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Pride) 
Branch; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Patterson) Branch; great 2 - 
grandson of Benjamin Branch, Member of Chesterfield County Committee of 
Public Safety and Captain of Chesterfield Virginia Militia. 

GEORGE COLE SCOTT, Richmond, Va. (28330). Son of Fred. R. and Sarah 
Frances (Branch) Scott; grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Pride) Branch; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Patterson) Branch; great 2 -grandson of 
Benjamin Branch, Member of Chesterfield County Virginia Committee of 
Public Safety and Captain of Chesterfield Militia. 

HENRY JAMES SCOTT, Philadelphia, Pa. (27147). Son of John H. and Harriet 
(Maull) Scott; grandson of William and Sarah (Boyd) Scott; great-grandson 
of George and Sarah (Knott) Boyd; great 2 -grandson of David Knott, Member 
of the Committee of Observation at Shrewsbury, New Jersey. 

RUMSEY WING SCOTT, Montclair, N. J. (28608). Son of Preston Brown and 
Jane EHza (Campbell) Scott; grandson of John Williamson and Jane (Porter) 
Campbell; great-grandson of William and Anne Campbell; great 2 -grandson of 
William Campbell, First Lieutenant First Virginia Regt. 

BENJAMIN NORTON SCUDDER, Jr., Newark, N. J. (27786). Son of Benjamin 
Norton and Belle (Tuttle) Scudder; grandson of Isaac and Martha Elizabeth 
(Hough) Tuttle; great-grandson of William and Rebecca (Jayne) Hough; 
great 2 -grandson of Timothy Jayne, Captain First Northampton County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia. 

EUGENE TUTTLE SCUDDER, Newark, N. J. (27787). Son of Benjamin Norton 
and Belle (Tuttle) Scudder; grandson of Isaac and Martha Elizabeth (Hough) 
Tuttle; great-grandson of William and Rebecca (Jayne) Hough; great 2 -grandson 
of Timothy Jayne, Captain First Northampton County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

ORVILLE ELDRIDGE SCURR, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27285). Son of Thomas 
and Jennie B. (Eldridge) Scurr, Jr.; grandson of Thomas Bailey and Lida 
Wharton (Tiffany) Eldridge; great-grandson of Lyman and Phoebe (Winchell) 
Eldridge; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Winchell, Jr., private Eighteenth Regt. 
Conn. Militia. 

HAL KENDALL SEAL, Salt Lake City, Utah (28184). Son of George Bordman 
and Maria E. (Kendall) Seal; grandson of Henry L. and Penelope (Shield) 
Kendall; great-grandson of Simon B. and Elizabeth (Kent) Kendall; great 2 - 
grandson of Elihu and Elizabeth (Fitch) Kent; great 3 -grandson of Elihu Kent, 
Major First Regt. Conn. Militia. 

CLEMENT WILLIS SEELY, Topeka. Kans. (26984). Son of Henry Tuthill and 
Mary Genieve (Clement) Seely; grandson of Carlos C. and Ellen D. (Moulton) 
Clement; great-grandson of Baruch Chase and Sally (Wood) Clement; great 2 - 
grandson of Benjamin Moody Clement, private, Capt. Nathaniel Head's Com- 
pany, Col. Thomas Stickney's New Hampshire Regt.; great s -grandson of Na- 
thaniel Clement, drummer, Capt. Gordon Hutchins's Company, Colonel Stark's 
New Hampshire Regt.; grandson of Josiah and Harriet (Tuthill) Seely; great- 
grandson of Jesse and Margaret (Heard) Tuthill; great 2 -grandson of Phineas 



314 SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Heard, Cornet, Col. Jesse Woodhull's Light Horse of Orange County, New- 
York. 

FRANK HEPBURN SEELY, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. (28680). Son of Frank H. 
and Mary (Worthington) Seely; grandson of William Hemphill and Phcebe H. 
(Gheen) Worthington; great-grandson of Wilmer and Elizabeth (Hemphill) 
Worthington; great 2 -grandson of William and Anne (McClellan) Hemphill; 
great 3 -grandson of Joseph McClellan, Captain Ninth Penna. Regt., Col. James 
Irvine. 

EDWIN JUDD SEWARD, Worcester, Mass. (28504). Son of Benjamin Franklin 
and Annie (Smith) Seward; grandson of Samuel and Phila (Wales) Seward; 
great-grandson of Samuel Seward, private Sixth Regt. Conn. Tine. 

FRANCIS EMMETT SEYBOLT, Springfield, Mass. (27441). Son of Hulet Clark 
and Emma (Alart) Sejdjolt; grandson of Louis Arnold and Phoebe (Clark) 
Seybolt; great-grandson of John Mikle and Mary (Butters) Seybolt, Jr.; great 2 - 
grandson of John Mikle Seybolt, private Second Ulster County Regt. New York. 
Militia. 

EDWARD WALLACE SHACKFORD, Harrington, Me. (26065). Son of William 
and Mary (Lincoln) Shackford; grandson of John Shackford, private, Captain 
Ward's Company, with Arnold's Quebec Expedition, prisoner at Quebec. 

EDWARD SHATTUCK, Andover, Mass. (28241). Son of Edward and Sarah 
Josephine (Crosby) Shattuck; grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Bailey) Shat- 
tuck; great-grandson of Joseph Shattuck, Sergeant, Capt. Benjamin Farnum's 
Company, Col. Benjamin Tupper's Mass. Regt. 

ELTON ARTHUR SHAW, Schenectady, N. Y. (28263). Son of Rinaldo ana 
Loretta (Gardner) Shaw; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilkey) Shaw; 
great-grandson of Samuel Shaxv, Captain Sixth Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia. 

JAMES PRESTLEV SHAW, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28037). Son of Abijah Conner and' 
Ida (Bryce) Shaw; grandson of William A. and Sarah Terressa (Conner) 
Shaw; great-grandson of William and Margaret (Murdock) Conner; great-- 
grandson of Cornelius and Eliza (Carrol) Conner; greats-grandson of Cor- 
nelius Conner, Sergeant Thirteenth Regt. Virginia Infantry. 

WILLIAM A. SHAW, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28038). Son of John I. and Anna (Mevay) 
Shaw; grandson of William A. and Sarah Terassa (Conner) Shaw; great- 
grandson of William and Margaret (Murdock) Conner; great 2 -grandson of 
Cornelius and Eliza (Carrol) Conner; great 3 -grandson of Cornelius Conner, 
Sergeant Thirteenth Regt. Virginia Infantry. 

HOWARD ALLEN SHEDD, New York, N. Y. (Ohio 27733). Son of Frank J. 
and Anna M. Shedd; grandson of Edmund Earl and Aurelia Edna (Thompson) 
Shedd; great-grandson of Abijah and Sophia (Blood) Shedd; great 2 -grandson 
of Abijah and Joanna (Farley) Shedd; great 3 -grandson of Oliver Shedd, pri- 
vate, Col. Jonathan Reed's Mass. Regt. ; great 3 -grandson of Bbeneser Farley, 
Lieutenant, and great*-grandson of Benjamin Farley, privates, Col. Wm. Pres- 
cott's Mass. Regt. and in New Hampshire Militia. 

MEAD ZACCHEUS SHELDON, Altamont, N. Y. (27636). Son of Zaccheus Mead 
and Helen (Carpenter) Sheldon; grandson of Mead Z. and Martha Chadwick 
(Hoag) Sheldon; great-grandson of James and Anna (Mead) Sheldon; great"- 
grandson of Jonathan Sheldon, seaman, Mass. service, prisoner on prison ship 
at Rhode Island, exchanged 1777. 

JOHN PHILIP SHERIDAN, Summit, N. J. (28355). Son of John B. and Carrie 
Experience (King) Sheridan; grandson of David and Mary (Swain) King; 
great-grandson of Joeb Swain, private Essex County New Jersey Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

ALBERT EVANS SHIELDS, Little Rock, Ark. (27155). Son of David Patrick 
and Isadore Francis (Hine) Shields; grandson of Daniel and Hannah (Brown) 
Hine; great-grandson of Samuel Brown, Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Patch's 
Company Mass. Troops, served on Quebec Expedition, pensioned. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 315 

JAMES ALBERT SHIPLEY, Oak Park, 111. (28276). Son of George Elliott and 
Effie Elizabeth (Selver) Shipley; grandson of Benedict and Abigail (Randolph) 
Shipley; great-grandson of Henry Shipley, private "Maryland Camp Flyers," 
widow pensioned. 

BENJAMIN LEATHERBURY SHORT, Baltimore, Md. (27859). Son of James 
Randolph and Edith May (Leatherbury) Short; grandson of JJenjamin and 
Mary Jones (Crabbe) Short; great-grandson of William M. and Sally Lee 
(Randolph) Crabbe; great 2 -grandson of Robert and Ann (Poythress) Randolph; 
great 3 -grandson of Peter and Elizabeth (Bland) Poythress; great'-grandson of 
Richard Bland, Member of First Continental Congress, Member of Maryland 
Convention of 1775-1776. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM SHORT, Chicago, 111. (27810). Son of Charles Gregory 
and Laura Esther (Kellogg) Short; grandson of Norman and Marinda (Rey- 
nolds) Kellogg; great-grandson of Samuel and Laura (Dauchy) Kellogg; great-- 
grandson of Daniel Kellogg, private, Col. Nehemiah Beardsley's Regt. Conn. 
Militia. 

WALTER HENRY SHURTLEFF, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. (27289). Son of Barzillai 
M. and Ellen M. (Sibley) Shurtleff; grandson of Ira George and Wealthy 
(Chedell) Sibley; great-grandson of Andrew and Polly (Putnam) Sibley; great-- 
grandson of John Sibley, Captain Mass. Militia. 

IRVING THEODORE SICKLEY, Springfield, N. J. (28490). Son of Theodore 
De Witt and Josephine Amanda (Roll) Sickley; grandson of Ziba Hazen and 
Lucy (Comstock) Sickley; great-grandson of Zeno and Amanda (Davis) Corn- 
stock; great 2 -grandson of Caleb (and Lucy Mead) Comstock, private, Col. John 
Mead's Regt. Conn. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Matthezv Mead, Colonel Conn. 
Militia. 

OLIN DE WITT SICKLEY, Springfield, N. J. (28487). Son of Theodore De Witt 
and Josephine Amanda (Roll) Sickley; grandson of Ziba Hazen and Lucy 
(Comstock) Sickley; great-grandson of Zeno and Amanda (Davis) Comstock: 
great 2 -grandson of Caleb (and Lucy Mead) Comstock, private, Col. John Mead's 
Regt. Conn. Militia, pensioned; great s -grandson of Matthezv Mead, Colonel 
Conn. Militia. 

THEODORE DE WITT SICKLEY, Springfield, N. J. (2837-)- Son of Ziba 
Hazen and Lucy (Comstock) Sickley; grandson of Zeno and Amanda (Davis) 
Comstock; great-grandson of Caleb (and Lucy Mead) Comstock. private, Col. 
John Mead's Regt. Conn. Militia, pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Matthew 
Mead, Colonel Conn. Militia. 

ZIBA ELMER SICKLEY, Springfield, N. J. (28591). Son of Ziba Hazen and 
Lucy (Comstock) Sickley; grandson of Zeno and Maranda (Davis) Comstock: 
great-grandson of Caleb (and Lucy Mead) Comstock, private, Col. John Mead's 
Regt. Conn. Militia, pensioned; great 2 -grandson of Matthezv Mead, Colonel 
Conn. Militia. 

DANIEL HOWE SIMMONS, Portland, Ore. (27585). Born at Freeport, Pa., 
March 1, 1829. Son of John Simmons, born in New York City October 24, 
1761, died in Wheeling, W. Va., May 19, 1843, private, Colonel Hay's New 
York Regt. and Captain Bowen's Company, Colonel Weissenfel's Regt., pen- 
sioned. 

ALBERT WRIGHT SIMONDS, Buffalo, N. Y. (27847). Son of Henry and Jean- 
nette (Wright) Simonds; grandson of Marcenus and Adelia (Cannon) Wright: 
great-grandson of Thomas and Naomi (Young) Wright; great 2 -grandson of 
Daniel Wright, Corporal, Colonel Van Alstine's Albany County Regt. New York 
Militia, pensioned. 

ALFRED CARLL SIMONSON, Garden City, N. Y. (27528). Son of Bergen Mott 
and Phebe Elizabeth (Whitson) Simonson; grandson of Isaac and Maria 
(Powell) Whitson; great-grandson of Henry and Phebe (Carll) Whitson; 
great 2 -grandson of Lemuel and Jemima (Baylis) Carll; great 3 -grandson of Tim- 



3 J 6 



SONS OF" THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



othy Carll, Captain First Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia, Col. Wm. 
Floyd. 

WILLIS H. SIMPSON, East Orange, N. J. (27784). Son of Benjamin Franklin 
and Martha A. (Peck) Simpson; grandson of Henry and Unice (Thompson) 
Simpson; great-grandson of Zebadiah Simpson, private, Capt. E. Preble's Com- 
pany, Col. J. Gerrish's Mass. Regt. 

WALTER WILLIAM SKINNER, Chippewa Falls, Wis. (27068). Son of William 
Joslin and Lucy Aurora (Rice) Skinner; grandson of Daniel and Marcia 
(Davidson) Skinner; great-grandson of Eli Skinner, private, Capt. John Wells's 
Company, Colonel Robinson's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

PHILIP KUHNS SLAYMAKER, Lincoln, Nebr. (27321). Son of Robert S. and 
A. E. K. (Bowman) Slaymaker; grandson of Samuel R. and Anna M. (Smith) 
Slaymaker; great-grandson of Samuel and Ann (Cochran) Slaymaker; great 2 - 
grandson of Henry Slaymaker, Delegate from Lancaster County to the Penna. 
Convention of 1776; grandson of Philip K. and Nancy (Robinson) Bowman; 
great-grandson of Adam and Elizabeth (Kuhns) Bowman; great 2 -grandson of 
Bernard Bowman, Northampton County Penna. Ranger; great-grandson of Jon- 
athan and Mary A. (Frazer) Smith; great 2 -grandson of Robert Smith, Delegate 
from Lancaster County to Penna. Convention, 1776, County Lieutenant (rank 
of Colonel) of Chester County, Pa.; great 2 -grandson of Persifer Frazer, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Fifth Penna. Regt. of Foot, Col. Francis Johnston. 

CHARLES WORTHAM SLOAN, Baltimore, Md. (27856). Son of John A. and 
Mary Morton (Wortham) Sloan; grandson of Robert M. and Sarah Jane 
(Paisley) Sloan; great-grandson of William D. and Frances (Mebane) Paisley; 
great 2 -grandson of John Paisley, Lieutenant Colonel First Guilford County 
Battalion North Carolina Militia. 

ABRAM WENT WORTH SMITH, Topeka, Kans. (26987). Son of Ransom and 
Ann (Wentworth) Smith; grandson of John and Betsey (Patterson) Went- 
worth; great-grandson of John Wentworth, private, Colonel Badger's and other 
New Hampshire Regts. 

CHARLES DURYEA SMITH, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. (28267). Son of Charles 
Duryea and Mary Angeline (Sammis) Smith; grandson of EHphalet and Pa- 
tience E- (Duryea) Smith; great-grandson of EHphalet and Phoebe N. (Duryea) 
Smith; great 2 -grandson of Charles Duryea, private First Suffolk County Regt. 
New York Militia. 

DEMPSTER MARTIN SMITH, Washington, D. C. (28430). Son of John Demp- 
ster and Sara E. (Martin) Smith; grandson of Seth and Eliza (Willson) Smith; 
great-grandson of Annie Willson and Betsey (Moore) Willson; great 2 -grandson 
of Goff Moor, private, Col. John Stark's New Hampshire Regt. 

DYER SMITH, Montclair, N. J. (28364). Son of Frank Birge and Grace King 
(Dyer) Smith; grandson of Francis Hickox and Anna (Birge) Smith; great- 
grandson of Samuel Mansfield and Eliza (Wheeler) Smith; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel and Lucy (Hall) Smith; great 3 -grandson of John Smith, Lieutenant 
Second Regt. Conn. Line. 

EDMUND FOSTER SMITH, Chicago, 111. (27394). Son of Charles Thomas and 
Jane Frances (Porter) Smith; grandson of John and Jane Frances (Foster) 
Porter; great-grandson of William (and Mary Hodges) Porter, private, Col. 
Joseph Spencer's Second Conn. Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Seth Hodges, Captain, 
Col. Joseph Marsh's Regt. Vermont Militia. 

EDWARD DAY SMITH, Minneapolis, Minn. (25310). Son of John Day and 
Laura (Bean) Smith; grandson of Edward Gower and Elizabeth Brown (Lord) 
Smith; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Knowlton) Lord; great 2 -grandson 
of James Lord, Capt. Abraham Dodge's Company, Col. Moses Little's Seven- 
teenth Mass. Regt. and Colonel Wade's Regt. Mass. Line. 

ELLIOTT SMITH, New Rochelle, N. Y. (27638). Son of George Moore and 
Anna Maria (Steele) Smith; grandson of Julius Chapman and Hannah (Tit- 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS. $ l 7 

comb) Steele; great-grandson of Ephraim and Hannah (Holland) Titcomb; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph Titcomb, private, Capt. Moses Newell's Company 
Mass. Seacoast Guards. 

FORREST VAN ZANDT SMITH, Haverhill, Mass. (27758). Son of Van Zandt 
E. and Susan Adalaide Smith; grandson of Martin and Salome Smith; great- 
grandson of Josiali Smith, Lieutenant, Colonel Woodbridge's and Colonel Mar- 
shall's Mass. Regts. 

FRED HARLOW SMITH. Springfield, Mass. (27936). Son of Nathaniel and 
Grace Ellen (Harlow) Smith; grandson of Leonard and Deborah Lee (Jack- 
son) Harlow; great-grandson of Levi Harioiv, private, Col. George Williams's 
Mass. Regt. 

GEORGE H. SMITH, Holyoke, Mass. (27771). Son of Oren Barron and Elmina 
A. (James) Smith; grandson of Thomas and Jane (Barron) Smith; great- 
grandson of William Barron, Jr., private, Capt. Peter Page's Company. Colonel 
Walbridge's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned; great 2 -grandson of William 
Barron, St., Captain, Col. Isaac Wyman's New Hampshire Regt. 

HENRY BILLINGS SMITH, South Orange, N. J. (28160). Son of Charles Brad- 
ley and Anna C. (De Camp) Smith; grandson of Anson C. and Mary Ann 
(Pierson) Smith; great-grandson of EHphalet and Jerusha (Dolph) Smith; 
great 2 -grandson of Thomas Smith, private, Capt. Phineas Bradley's Company 
Conn. Artillery Guards. 

LAWRENCE NEWTON SMITH, Rochester, N. Y. (28272). Son of William 
Stuart and Minnie Pomeroy (Sackett) Smith; grandson of Daniel Eaton and 
Mary (Baker) Sackett; great-grandson of Daniel and Abigail (Smith) Sackett; 
great 2 -grandson of Benjamin Sackett, private Fourth Albany County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

LEON OSMER SMITH, Onawa, Iowa (27674). Son of George J. and Ida (Wood) 
Smith; grandson of Murray A. and Louisa B. (Stallsmith) Wood; great-grand- 
son of Solomon and Sarah (Fitch) Wood; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer and 
Polly (Howland) Fitch; great 3 -grandson of Ebenezer- Fitch, private, Capt. 
Obadiah Johnson's Company Third Conn. Regt., under General Putnam, 177 S- 

LEWIS ADDINGTON SMITH, Evanston, 111. (26189). Supplementals. Son of 
Charles Addington and Mary Ann (Lewis) Smith; grandson of Ebenezer and 
Elizabeth (Green) Smith; great-grandson of Benjamin and Elizabeth (McComb) 
Smith; great 2 -grandson of Robert Smith, private Third Cumberland County 
Battalion Penna. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Robert McComb, Lieutenant First 
Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

OSBORN FRANKLIN SMITH, Chicago, 111. (27395). Son of Frank Waldo and 
Dora A. (Hadden) Smith; grandson of Waldo Waite and Elizabeth (Fogg) 
Smith; great-grandson of Henry and Ann Waldo (Waite) Smith; great-grand- 
son of Henry Smith, private Fourth Orange County Regt. New York Militia, 
Col. John Hathorn. 

REUBEN SMITH, Captain Ninth U. S. Infantry, Laredo, Tex. (N. H. 25389). 
Son of John Reuben and Lenora B. (Day) Smith; grandson of John Cyrus 
and Clara (Johnson) Smith; great-grandson of John Baker and Hannah (Hun- 
toon) Smith; great 2 -grandson of John Huntoon, private, Capt. Samuel Wether- 
bee's Company, Col. Isaac Wyman's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned. 

RICHARD HEWLETT SMITH, Richmond, Va. (28342). Son of Samuel I. and 
Margaret (Strother) Smith; grandson of William Porter and Elizabeth K. 
(Hewlett) Strother; great-grandson of John and 1 Catherine Price (Fox) 
Strother; great 2 -grandson of Anthony Strother, Sheriff and Justice King George 
County, Va. 

ROBERT CRAWFORD SMITH, Pittsburgh, Pa. (28050). Son of Robert Sample 
and Anna T. Smith; grandson of Robert J. and Sarah (Crawford) Smith; 
great-grandson of John and Mary (Sample) Crawford; great 2 -giandson of 
James Sample, Captain Third Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 



3l8 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ROBERT EMERY SMITH, Roseburg," Ore. (27577). Son of Emery T. and Anna 
Jane (Demmon) Smith; grandson of Jared S. and Anna Morse (Pineo) Dem- 
mon; great-grandson of John and Sally (Root) Pineo; great 2 -grandson of Dan- 
iel Pineo, private, Capt. Joshua Hazen's Company, Colonel Wood's Regt. Ver- 
mont Militia; great-grandson of Daniel and Lydia R. (Smith) Demmon; great- 
grandson of Abraham and Sally (Crane) Smith; great 3 -grandson of Thaddeus 
Crane, Lieutenant Colonel Fourth Westchester County Regt. New York Militia. 

SAMUEL HUNTER SMITH, Muskogee, Okla. (28104). Son of Daniel and Lucy 
Ann (Pace) Smith; grandson of John and Nancy (Alexander) Pace; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Mollie (Ramsey) Alexander; great-'-grandson of John 
Alexander, Sergeant in "Light Horse Harry" Lee's Legion. 

STEPHEN MOORE SMITH, East Orange, N. J. (28374). Son of William 
Chardavoyne and Mary Eleanor (Moore) Smith; grandson of Havilah Medles 
and Latitia Munson (Washburn) Smith; great-grandson of Walter and Abigail 
(Allen) Smith; great 2 -grandson of Isaac (and Sarah Meeker) Smith, Captain 
Essex County New Jersey Militia; great 3 -grandson of Timothy Meeker, Sergeant 
Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

WALTER CALEF SMITH, Boston, Mass. (26517). Supplemental. Son of Leon- 
ard and Louisa Rebecca (Elliott) Smith; grandson of Samuel and Phebe 
(Noyes) Smith; great-grandson of Josiah Smith, private, Capt. Christopher 
Darrow's and Lieutenant Douglass's Companies, General Parson's Conn. Regt., 
pensioned. 

WALTER C. SMITH, Cambridge, Mass. (26517). Supplemental. Son of Leonard 
and Louisa Rebecca (Elliott) Smith; grandson of Albion Hall and Louisa 
Caroline (Harris) Elliott; great-grandson of Absalom and Rebecca (Tyler) 
Harris; great 2 -grandson of Perley and Abigail (Snow) Harris; great s -grandson 
of Warren Snow, Member of Committee of Inspection and Correspondence of 
Chesterfield, N. H. 

WARD EMERSON SMITH, Paullina, Iowa (27675). Son of George J. and Ida 
(Wood) Smith; grandson of Murray A. and Louisa B. (Stallsmith) Wood; 
great-grandson of Solomon and Sarah (Fitch) Wood; greats-grandson of 
Ebenezer and Polly (Howland) Fitch; great 3 -grandson of Ebcneser Fitch, pri- 
vate, Capt. Obadiah Johnson's Company Third Conn. Regt., under General 
Putnam, 1775. 

ARTHUR ELMORE SMYLIE, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27628). Son of Charles A. and 
Wilhelmina (Wenzel) Smylie; grandson of Edward and Elizabeth (Hardie) 
Smylie; great-grandson of William and Anna Julia (Lightael) Smylie; great 2 - 
grandson of John Smiley, private, Capt. Joseph Parker's Company, Col. Enoch 
Hale's New Hampshire Regt. 

ALLEN SNODDY, Stratford, Okla. (28103). Son of Allen T. and Minnie E. 
Snoddy; grandson of John Barton and Rachel Ellen (Marshall) Snoddy; great- 
grandson of Cary Allen and Harriet (Harlan) Snoddy; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel and Sally (Allen) Snoddy; great 3 -grandson of James and Fanny (Wil- 
kerson) Snoddy; great 4 -grandson of John Snoddy, Captain of Lincoln Virginia 
Militia, under Gen. George Rogers Clark, on Shawnee Expedition. 

STERLING J. SNOW, Salt Lake City, Utah (28182). Son of Willard and Doro 
Crookes (Pratt) Snow; grandson of Erastus and Minerva (White) Snow; 
great-grandson of Levi and Lucina (Streeter) Snow; great 2 -grandson of Zer- 
rubbabel and Mary (Trowbridge) Snow; great 3 -grandson of John Snozv, pri- 
vate, Col. James Reed's New Hampshire Regt. 

GEORGE J. SNYDER, Ames, Iowa (28207). Son of Jeremiah and Abigail (Cot- 
ton) Snyder; grandson of Jacob and Frances (Lehman) Snider; great-grand- 
son of Nicholas and Christiana (Leichenbarger) Snider; great 2 -grandson of 
Peter Snider, Corporal First Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

WINFIELD SCOTT SOLOMON, Jr., Providence, R. I. (27185). Son of Win- 
field Scott and Sarah Ann (Neifert) Solomon; grandson of William and Lu- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 319 

cinda (Lindner) Neifert; great-grandson of Solomon and Anna (Herbster) 
Eindner; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary Magdalena (Sensenderfer) 
Eindner; great 3 -grandson of Martin Sensenderfer, private Fourth Philadelphia 
County Battalion Penna. Militia. 

TIOSEA ANDREW SPAULDING, Delaware, Ohio (27098). Son of Ellis E. and 
Emeline (Schneck) Spaulding; grandson of Ira and Matilda (Ellis) Spaulding; 
great-grandson of Jonas and Susannah (Simonds) Spaulding; great 2 -grandson 
of Andrew Spalding, private in Continental service from Dedham, Mass. 
EVERETT TAYLOR SPINNING, Springfield, N. J. (28592). Son of Dayton 
Martin and Eliza Jane (Douglass) Spinning; grandson of Henry B. and Sarah 
(Comstock) Douglass; great-grandson of Eli Comstock; great-grandson of 
Caleb Comstock, private, Col. John Mead's Regt. Conn. Militia. 

-CHARLES IIARTWEEE SPRAGUE, Benson, Nebr. (28376). Son of Charles D. 
and Emily (Hartwell) Sprague; grandson of Dennis and Olive Ann (Billing- 
ton) Sprague; great-grandson of Isaac and Mercy (Higgins) Sprague; great- 
grandson of William Sprague, private, Col. Samuel Cobb's Mass. Regt. 
RUFUS WIEEIAM SPRAGUE, Jr., Montclair, N. J. (28353). Son of Rufus 
William and Katharine M. Sprague; grandson of Rufus William and Mary 
Sprague; great-grandson of Archibald and Sarah C. Sprague; great-grandson 
of Rufus Sprague, Member of Rhode Island Commissary Committee. 

'CHAREES BATCHEEDER SPRAKER, Rochester, N. Y. (25033). Supplemental. 
Son of David and Josephine A. (Batchelder) Spraker; grandson of David and 
Harriet Francis (Rowan) Spraker; great-grandson of Joseph and Catherine 
(Frazier) Spraker; great-grandson of George Spraker, Sergeant Second Tryon 
County Regt. New York Militia, Colonel Klock. 

sEEEIOT BEEBE SPRING, Olympia, Wash. (27891). Son of Edward Walton and 
Zilpha Isadora (Beebe) Spring; grandson of Eucius E. and Martha C. (Par- 
sons) Spring; great-grandson of Gardiner and Susan (Barney) Spring; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Spring, Chaplain, Col. John Fellows's Mass. Continental 
Regt.; great 2 -grandson of Hanover Barney, private "Governor's Second Com- 
pany of Guards," Conn., 1775; grandson of Ira Eovejoy and Zilphia Isadora 
(Hartt) Beebe; great-grandson of Roderick and Jane Eliza (Eovejoy) Beebe; 
great 2 -grandson of Roderick and Harriet (Son) Beebe; great s -grandson of 
Roderick Beebe, Captain New York Militia, under Gen. Philip Schuyler, widow 
pensioned. 

^GARDINER SPRING, Salisbury, Md. (27858). Son of Lucius E. and Martha C. 
(Parsons) Spring; grandson of Gardiner and Susan (Barney) Spring; great- 
grandson of Samuel Spring, Chaplain Continental Army. 

JAMES NICHOES STANFORD, Olympia, Wash. (28560). Son of Albert Eugene 
and Edith (Nichols) Stanford; grandson of Franklin and Mary (Stone) Stan- 
ford; great-grandson of Jonathan and Eunice (Morton) Stanford; great-grand- 
son of Richard Stanford, private, Col. Samuel Bullard's and other Mass. Regts. 

WEBSTER JONAS STEBBINS, Palisades, Colo. (26683). Son of Jonas B. and 
Maria (Jayne) Stebbins; grandson of Rufus and Clarissa (Blandin) Stebbins; 
great-grandson of Jotham Stebbins, private, Col. David Leonard's and other 
Mass. Regts. 

(EARL NEWELL STEELE, Olympia, Wash. (28552). Son of J. M. and Margaret 
E- (Newell) Steele; grandson of Samuel Fleming and Julia (Fugard) Newell: 
great-grandson of Samuel and Martha (Treadwell) Fugard; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel Fugard, private. Col. Daniel Moore's New Hampshire Regt. 

JOHN D. STEELE, Terre Haute, Ind. (17260). Supplemental. Son of P. C. and 
Eliza F. (Tune) Steele; grandson of William F. and Christina M. (Morton) 
Tune; great-grandson of Jacob and Anne (Fisher) Morton; great-grandson of 
Michael Fisher, private, Capt. Heinrich Nach's Company Berks County Penna. 
Militia; great 3 -grandson of Abraham Fisher, private, Capt. John Jack's Com- 
pany Eighth Cumberland County Battalion Penna. Militia. 



320 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

AUGUSTUS WOLFE STEPHENS, Summit, N. J. (27516). Son of Amzi Chap- 
man and Malinda (Wolfe) Stephens; grandson of Archer and Sally Stephens; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Salmon) Stephens; great 2 -grandson of 
Peter Salmon, Captain Western Battalion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

EWING W. STEPHENS, Lewiston, Idaho (27011). Son of William Ellsworth 
and Minerva (Patterson) Stephens; grandson of William Given and Edith 
Craft (Sharpless) Patterson; great-grandson of James and Mary (Given) Pat- 
terson; great 2 -grandson of William Patterson, private, Capt. James Cowden's 
Company Fourth Lancaster County P>attalion Penna. Militia. 

GEORGE ARTHUR STEPHENS, Moline, 111. (27396). Son of George and Mary 
Ann (Gardner) Stephens; grandson of Ebenezer and Mary Ann (Wilkinson) 
Gardner; great-grandson of Jeptha Wilkinson, private Smithfield and Cumber- 
land Rhode Island Rangers. 

MARSENA PRESTON STEPHENS, Summit, N. J. (27683). Son of Amzi Chap- 
man and Malinda (Wolfe) Stephens; grandson of Archer and Sarah Stephens; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Salmon) Stephens; great 2 -grandson of 
Peter Salmon, Captain Western Battalion Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

PHINEHAS VARNUM STEPHENS, Jacksonville, Fla. (20691). Son of Louis 
Isidore and Hortense (Varnum) Stephens; grandson of Phinehas Fox and 
Elizabeth (Thomas) Varnum; great-grandson of Phinehas and Prudence F. 
Varnum; great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Varnum, Lieutenant, Colonel Bridge's 
Mass. Regt. 

ALBERT LIVINGSTON STEVENS, Schenectady, N. Y. (27543). Son of Cor- 
nelius and Ellen Jane (McLeod) Stevens; grandson of William and Elizabeth 
(Staats) Stevens; great-grandson of William Stevens, Sergeant Sixteenth Al- 
bany County Militia, Col. Van Woert, and Tryon County Levies. 

ELISHA MORSE STEVENS, Lynn, Mass. (27442). Son of Rufus Stowell and 
Sarah King (Morse) Stevens; grandson of Simon Spooner and Nancy (French) 
Stevens; great grandson of Cyprean and Sally (Robinson) Stevens; great 2 - 
grandson of Simon Stevens, Captain, Col. J. Brewer's Regt. Mass. Militia; 
grandson of EHsha and Miranda (King) Morse; great-grandson of George and 
Polly (Hall) King; great 2 -grandson of George King, Sergeant, Capt. Philip 
King's Company, Col. George Williams's Third Bristol County Regt. Mass. 
Militia and other service; great 2 -grandson of Elijah Robinson, private, Capt. 
Jonathan Sibley's Company, Col. Luke Drury's Mass. Regt. 

FREDERIC JOHN STEVENS, Detroit, Mich. (27460). Son of Frederic John 
and Clara Belle (Sackett) Stevens; grandson of John and Mary B. (Covert) 
Stevens; great-grandson of Joseph and Abigail (Knowlton) Stevens; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph Stevens, Corporal, Col. John Thompson's Company Thir- 
teenth Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

HAZARD STEVENS, Olympia, Wash. (27892). Son of Isaac Ingalls and Mar- 
garet Lyman (Hazard) Stevens; grandson of Benjamin and Harriet (Lyman) 
Hazard; great-grandson of Daniel Lyman, Brigade Major Mass. Militia, Aide- 
de-Camp to General Heath. 

CARLETON WHITE STEWARD, Rockport, Me. (28303). Son of Willard Besse 
and Alice (White) Steward; grandson of Hiram S. and Caroline (White) 
Steward; great-grandson of Constantine and Cynthia (Stewart) White; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas and Olive (Moor) Stewart; great 3 -grandson of John 
(and Margaret Goffe) Moor, Major New Hampshire Militia; great*-grandson 
of John Goffe, Military Instructor New Hampshire Troops; great-grandson of 
Josiah and Nancy (Webb) Steward; great 2 grandson of Daniel (and Rachel 
Kemp) Steivard, Jr., and great 3 -grandson of Daniel Stezvard, Sr., privates 
Mass. Militia. 

ARTHUR COLLINS STEWART, Boston, Mass. (28502). Son of James and 
Clara Louise (Collins) Stewart; grandson of James and Sarah Persis (Man- 
son) Stewart; great-grandson of Nicholas and Eunice (Dudley) Manson; 
great 2 -grandson of Ebenezer Dudley, Sergeant, Col. William Prescott's Regt. 
Mass. Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 32 1 

ARTHUR WYMAN STEWART, Augusta, Me. (26067). Son of Elijah W. and 
Sarah F. (Springer) Stewart; grandson of Thomas and Olive (Moor) Stewart; 
great-grandson of John (and Margaret Goffe) Moor, Major on staff of Col. 
John Stark's New Hampshire Regt., 1775; grandson of Gideon and Tiley 
(Ingraham) Springer; great-grandson of Edward Springer, Sergeant, Capt 
Henry Jenne's Company Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of John Goffe, Mem- 
ber of New Hampshire Provincial Assembly; great-grandson of Beriah Ingra- 
ham and great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah Ingraham, privates, Capt. James Endi- 
cott's Company Mass. Militia. 

FRANCIS EDWIN STIVERS, Ansonia, Conn. (27958). Son of John Randall and 
Julia Ellen (Prentice) Stivers; grandson of Jacob and Polly (Bankson) Stivers; 
great-grandson of Daniel Stivers, private New Jersey State Troops. 

ARTHUR LESLIE STOCKBRIDGE, Lewiston, Me. (28308). Son of Napoleon 
B. and Ellen (Donnelley) Stockbridge; grandson of John Calvin and Bernice 
(Austen) Stockbridge; great-grandson of John and Anna (Leavitt) Stock- 
bridge; great 2 -grandson of John Stockbridge, private, Col. Ebenezer Learned's 
Mass. Regt. 

FRED W. STOCKING, Olympia, Wash. (28551). Son of Francis McKee and Ann 
Eliza (James) Stocking; grandson of Francis and Abagail (McKee) Stocking; 
great-grandson of John and Betsey (Edwards) Stocking; great"-grandson of 
Daniel Edwards, private Fifth Conn. Continental Regt. 

FOSTER MARTIN STOCKTON, Denver, Colo. (28055). Son of Alexander 
Campbell and Sophie Gay (Martin) Stockton; grandson of Meredith and Eliza- 
beth Mitchell (Gay) Martin; great-grandson of John H. and Sophie (Mitchell) 
Gay; great 2 -grandson of Edward Mitchell, Corporal, Col, Samuel Meredith's 
Virginia Regt. and other service, pensioned. 

ELLERY WHEELER STONE, Oakland, Cal. (26773). Son of Edgar Parkman 
and Florence Pickering (Weeks) Stone; grandson of Henry and Cornelia 
Adelaide (Daniell) Stone; great-grandson of Josiah and Pamela (Selby) 
Daniell; great"-grand? on of Jeremiah and Eunic (Keith) Dan ell; great 2 - 
grandson of Jeremiah Daniell, Corporal, Col. William Heath's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

FRANCIS FOLLEN STONE, Summit, N. J. (27678). Son of William Cooledge 
and Mary (Houghton) Stone; grandson of Asa and Mary (Cooledge) Stone; 
great-grandson of Samuel Cooledge, private, Capt. Abijah Child's Company, 
Col. John Greaton's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRANCIS WAYLAND STONE, Jr., Washington, D. C. (27980). Son of Francis 
Wayland and Sarah A. (Perry) Stone; grandson of William L. and Harriet 
Douglas (Gillette) Stone; great-grandson of William L. and Susannah P. 
(Wayland) Stone; great 2 -grandson of William Stone, private, Capt. Stephen 
Hall's Company Seventh Regt. Conn. Line, Colonel Swift. 

GEORGE DWIGHT STONE, Cranford, N. J. (27700). Son of Alvah and Arme 
(Grannis) Stone; grandson of Thomas Stone, private, Captain ( ollins's Com- 
pany, Colonel Van Dyke's and Col. Samuel B. Webb's Conn. Regts. 

HARVEY BRINTON STONE, Baltimore, Md. (27857). Son of John Theodore 
and Clara May (Brinton) Stone; grandson of James Harvey and Harriet 
Newell (Fusselbaugh) Stone; great-grandson of Harvey and Jerusha (Wheeler) 
btone; great 2 -grandson of Caleb Wheeler, private, Col. Abijah Pierson's Mass. 
Regt. 

FRANK FILLMORE STOOPS, Chattanooga, Tenn. (27901). Son of Andrew 
Jackson and Nancy Ann (Cox) Stoops; grandson of George McNickle and 
Margaret (Haymaker) Stoops; great-grandson of William and Nancy (Mc- 
Nickle) Stoops; great 2 grandson of James and Jennie (Sherer) Stoops; great 8 - 
grandson of Joseph Sherer, Captain Fourth Lancaster County Battalion Penna. 
Militia. 

EDWIN CYRUS STORY, Springfield, Mass. (28525). Son of Richard H. and 
Matilda N. (Peckham) Story; grandson of Edwin and Martha J. (Pomeroy) 



322 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Story; great-grandson of Henry and Eleanor (Billings) Pomeroy; great 2 - 
grandson of Jesse and Naomah (Dickinson) Pomeroy; great 8 -grandson of 
Simeon Pomeroy, private, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES TILLINGHAST STRAIGHT, Pawtucket, R. I. (18113. Supplemental. 
Son of Albert and Angeline Avery (Tillinghast) Straight; grandson of John 
and Susan Caroline (Avery) Tillinghast; great-grandson of Elisha and Penelope 
(Westcott) Avery; great 2 -grandson of Elisha Avery, private Eighth Conn. 
Regt., Col. Jedediah Huntington. 

FREDERICK ALEXANDER STRATTON, Milwaukee, Wis. (27071). Son of 
Prescott B. and Martha Elizabeth (Lull) Stratton; grandson of Alexander 
Moores and Angeline Maria (Prescott) Stratton; great-grandson of Latham 
and Phcebe (Mead) Stratton; great 2 -grandson of Nathaniel Mead, Lieutenant, 
Colonel Van Ness's Regt. New York Minute Men. 

NORWOOD STRATTON, Chicago, 111. (28005). Son of Lemuel Nathan and 
Maria Louisa (Norwood) Stratton; grandson of Philip and Charity Elizabeth 
(Newton) Norwood; great-grandson of Caleb and Mary (Tuttle) Newton; 
great 2 -grandson of Ezra and Charity (Smith) Tuttle; great 3 -grandson of John 
(and Mary Burrill) Tuttle, private, Col. Rufus Putnam's and other Mass. 
Regts. ; great 4 -grandson of Ebenezer Burrill, Representative Mass. General 
Court. 

WALLACE STREETER, Chicago, 111. (2781 1). Son of William H. and Ruth 
(Cooper) Streeter; grandson of Oliver Cromwell and Catherine (Vandercarr) 
Streeter; great-grandson of Isaac and Hannah (Vanderheyden) Streeter; 
great 2 -grandson of Joel and Molly (Cobb) Streeter; great 8 -grandson of Ebe- 
nezer Streeter, private, Colonel Ashley's Regt. New Hampshire Militia. 

AUGUSTUS JESSUP STRONG, Salem, Ore. (28404). Son of Augustus E. and 
Lillian A. (Carpenter) Strong; grandson of Horace and Sarah A. (Coshow) 
Carpenter; great grandson of Robert and Julia (Perin) Coshow; great-grand- 
son of John and Rachael (Rice) Perin; great 3 -grandson of Lemuel Perrin, 
Sergeant, Col. Abiel Mitchel's Mass. Regt. 

ARTHUR ROLLIN STUBBS, Rockland, Me. (26062). Supplemental. Son of 
Eugene Mears and Leila Emmeline (Perry) Stubbs; grandson of Peter Adams 
and Rachel Robinson (Collins) Stubbs; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Emma 
(Adams) Stubbs; great 2 -grandson of Joel (and Jemima Robbins) Adams, pri- 
vate, Captain Fairbank's Company, Colonel Hawes's Mass. Regt.; great-grand- 
son of Philip Robbins, Lieutenant, Col. John Smith's Regt., Commissary at 
Bagaduce; great-grandson of Aaron and Susannah (Robinson) Collins; great 2 - 
grandson of William Collins, Jr., private, Col. Josiah Bartlett's New Hamp- 
shire Regt.; great 3 -grandson of William Collins, Corporal, Capt. Abraham 
French's Company New Hampshire Militia; great 2 -grandson of Thomas and 
Polite (Collamore) Robinson; great 3 -grandson of Haunce Robinson, Major 
Fourth Lincoln County Regt. Mass. Militia; grandson of Ira and Joanna (Bul- 
lard) Perry; great-grandson of Jotham and Anne (Cutting) Bullard; great 2 - 
grandson of John Cutting, private, Col. James Barrett's Mass. Regt.; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel and Lydia (Partridge) Bullard; great 3 -grandson of Samuel 
Bullard, Colonel Fifth Middlesex County Regt. Mass. Militia; great-grandson 
of Abel and Amita (Morse) Perry; great 2 -grandson of Abel (and Asenath 
Haven) Perry, Jr., Corporal, Col. Abner Perry's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 8 - 
grandson of Abel Perry, Lieutenant, Col. Samuel Bullard's Regt. Mass. Militia; 
great 3 -grandson of David Haven, private Col. Samuel Bullard's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

HARRY WILTON STURGES, Salt Lake City, Utah (28181). Son of Herbert L. 
and Maella (Fogg) Sturgis; grandson of James H. and Hannah I. (Tuttle) 
Fogg; great-grandson of Dudley and Mary (Morell) Fogg; great 2 -grandson of 
Samuel Fogg, private and drummer, Colonel Poor's and other New Hampshire 
Regts., pensioned. 

ERNEST WARREN STURTEVANT, Hartland, Vt. (27487)- Son of Frederick 
Wilson and Mercy Maria (Robbins) Sturtevant; grandson of Joshua and Louisa 



register of new members. 323 

(Monroe) Sturtevant; great-grandson of Joshua and Mary (Monroe) Sturte- 
vant; great 2 -grandson of Henry Monroe, Jr., private, Col. Nathan Sparhawk's 
and other Mass. Regts. 

CARROLL HOPKINS SUDLER, Chicago, 111. (28006). Son of John Wells 
Emory and Martha Virginia (Hopkins) Sudler; grandson of Arthur Emory 
and Mary W. (Jackson) Sudler; great-grandson of Richard and Margaret 
(Emory) Sudler; great 2 -grandson of Arthur Emory, Lieutenant Colonel Twen- 
tieth Battalion Queen Annes County Maryland Militia. 

WILLIAM HENRY SWAIN, Summit, N. J, (28151). Son of William and Briget 
(Duffy) Swain; grandson of Joeb and Experience (Lyon) Swain; great-grand- 
son of Richard Swain, private Essex County New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

SHERBURN L. SWASEY, Concord, N. H. (25391). Son of George and Louisa 
R. (Lang) Swasey; grandson of Moses and Elizabeth (Merrill) Swasey: great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Merrill, First Lieutenant, Capt. Frye Bayley's Company 
New Hampshire Militia; grandson of Sherburn and Mehitable (Ricker) Lang; 
great-grandson of Samuel Lang, private, Capt. Joshua Hayward's Company, 
Col. David Gilman's New Hampshire Regt. 

GEORGE VINCENT SWEM, Avalon, Pa. (28036). Son of Ami and Jennie T. 
(Mortimer) Swein; grandson of Daniel and Frances (Blackburn) Swera; great- 
grandson of Simeon and Esther (Bennett) Blackburn; great 2 -grandson of Ger- 
shom and Fanny (Bishop) Bennett; great 3 -grandson of George Bennett, Cap- 
tain First Regt. Penna. Foot. 

GEORGE WESLEY SWIFT, Elizabeth, N. J. (28086). Son of Reuben Wilbur 
and Mary Esther (Churchill) Swift; grandson of John Emery and Eliza Ann 
(Coburn) Churchill; great-grandson of Francis Churchill, fifer, Capt. Jesse 
Harlow's Company Mass. Coast Guards. 

GEORGE WILKINS SWIFT, Seattle, Wash. (27249). Son of James H. and 
Emily C. (Wilson) Swift; grandson of Samuel and Sally (Blanchard) Wilson; 
great-grandson of Daniel Wilson, private, Colonel Nicholas's New Hampshire 
Regt. 

JAMES MARCUS SWIFT, Fall River, Mass. (27757). Son of Marcus C. B. and 
Mary Duncan (Milne) Swift; grandson of Orson Ross and Mary Elizabeth 
(Barker) Swift; great-grandson of Marcus and Anna (Osband) Swift; great 2 - 
grandson of John Swift, Sergeant, Captain Clark's Company Conn. Artificers, 
private First Regt. Conn. Line; great 2 -grandson of Weaver Osbom (Osband), 
Ensign Second Company Second Battalion Newport (R. I.) County Militia. 

STUART OAKLEY SYMONDS, Portland, Me. (28305). Son of Joseph White 
and Mary Campbell (Stuart) Symonds; grandson of Joseph and Isabella (Jor- 
dan) Symonds; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Martha (Starbird) Symonds; 
great 2 -grandson of Moses Starbird, private, Colonel Wigglesworth's Mass. Regt. 

CHARLES HATFIELD TAFT, Jr., Montclair, N. J. (28701). Son of Charles 
Hatfield and Agnes (Barrie) Taft; grandson of James Horton and Frances 
Adden (Seney) Taft; great-grandson of Robert and Jane Augusta (Ingraham) 
Seney; great 2 -grandson of Joshua and Frances (Nicholson) Seney; great 3 - 
grandson of James Nicholson, Commodore Continental Navy. 

FRANK EDWIN TAFT, Portland, Me. (28302). Son of Edwin Wheaton and 
Sarah Frances (Southwick) Taft; grandson of Ezra Wood and Ludamine 
Draper (Guild) Taft; great-grandson of Frederick Taft, private, Col. Dike's 
Mass. Regt.; great-grandson of Calvin and Ludamine.. (Draper) Guild; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph Guild, Captain, Colonel Greaton's Mass. Regt. 

MINER COLE TAFT, Kalamazoo, Mich. (27468). Son of Howard Bailey and 
Harriet Calista (Cole) Taft; grandson of Amos and Sally (Bailey) Taft; great- 
grandson of Peter and Phebe (Wheaten or Wheaton) Taft; great 2 -grandson of 
Henry Taft, Corporal, Colonel Doolittle's Mass. Regt.; great 3 -grandsor of Peter 
Taft, Sergeant, Capt. Joseph Chapin's Company Mass. Minute Men. 



324 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

DAVID ARTHUR TAGGART, Manchester, N. H. (25393). Son of David Morril 
and Esther (Wilson) Taggart; grandson of Reuben and Esther (Forsaith) 
Wilson; great-grandson of William and Jane (Wilson) Forsaith; great-grand- 
son of Matthew Forsaith, Chairman of Committee of Safety of Chester, New 
Hampshire. 

GEORGE NOYES TALCOTT, Olympia, Wash. (28554). Son of Lucius Lord and 
Harriet (Noyes) Talcott; grandson of George Lord and Sarah (McQuigg) 
Talcott; great-grandson of Elizur Talcott, Colonel Sixth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

GEORGE NOYES TALCOTT, Jr., Olympia, Wash. (28555). Son of George N. 
and Addie Jane (Chambers) Talcott; grandson of Lucius L. and Harriet 
(Noyes) Talcott; great-grandson of George Lord and Sarah (McQuigg) Talcott; 
great 2 -grandson of Elizur Talcott, Colonel Sixth Regt. Conn. Militia. 

BENNET CRAWFORD TALIAFERRO, Washington, D. C. (27981). Son of 
William M. and Sue Henry (Michel) Taliaferro; grandson of Harvey and 
Jane Wood (Johnston) Michel; great-grandson of Peter Johnston, Lieutenant, 
Captain, Lee's Battalion Light Dragoons, attached to Pulaski Legion. 

ARTHUR ORISON TAYLOR, West Somerville, Mass. (28233). Son of Ora J. 
and Abby P. (Taylor) Taylor; grandson of Nathan and Mary (Walton) Taylor, 
parents of Abby; great-grandson of Daniel and Polly (Ross) Walton; great 2 - 
grandson of William Walton, private, Col. David Green's Regt. Mass. Militia, 
marched April 19, 1775. 

FRANK HEM AN TAYLOR, Denver, Colo. (26680). Son of Milton Andrew and 
Ellen Augusta (French) Taylor; grandson of Caleb and Mary (Sanborn) 
French; great-grandson of Caleb and Susanna (Avery) French; great-grand- 
son of Joseph French, private, Capt. Timothy Clement's Company, Col. Pierce 
Long's New Hampshire Regt. 

IRVING KURTZ TAYLOR, Orange, N. J. (28091). Son of William Lamont and 
Martha (Kurtz) Taylor; grandson of John and Sarah (Truman) Kurtz; great- 
grandson of Jacob and Rebecca (Wood) Kurtz; great 2 -grandson of John and 
Martha (Hart) Wood; great 3 -grandson of John Hart, Signer of the Declaration 
of Independence. 

WHITMAN TAYLOR, Wilmette, 111. (28292). Son of David Lee and Ellen West 
(Whitman) Taylor; grandson of Henry Lyman and Ellen (Thompson) Whit- 
man; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Howard) Whitman; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Whitman, Lieutenant, Colonel Webb's Conn. Regt.; great 2 - 
grandson of Stephen Howard, Captain, Solomon Willis's Company Conn. Militia; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Ellsworth) Thompson; great 2 -grandson 
of Daniel and Mary (Abbott) Ellsworth; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Abbott, 
Major Eleventh Regt. Conn. Militia; grandson of Freeman Calvin and Helen 
(Phillips) Taylor; great-grandson of Alfred and Martha (Hammond) Taylor; 
great 2 -grandson of Peter and Charlotte (Holbrook) Hammond; great 3 -grandson 
of Abner Holbrook, private, Col. John Holman's Regt. Mass. Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of Samiuel Hammond, private, Col. Lemuel Robinson's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

BURTON CRAIGHEAD THATCHER, Chicago, 111. (27624). Son of Louis Pat- 
terson and Laura Edna (Childress) Thatcher; grandson of William Craighead 
and Nancy Patterson (Young) Thatcher; great-grandson of Samuel S. and 
Hannah M. (Craighead) Thatcher; great 2 -grandson of William and Jane (Gil- 
lespie) Craighead; great 3 -grandson of Robert Craighead, Captain North Carolina 
Militia. 

FREDERICK CHARLES THAYER, Waterville, Me. (26075). Son of Charles H. 
and Susan E. (Tobey) Thayer; grandson of Stephen and Sophia (Carleton) 
Thayer; great-grandson of Jonathan Carleton, private, Col. Ebenezer Francis's 
Mass. Regt. 

FREDERIC DELAHAYE THIELSEN, Salem, Ore. (28401). Son of Henry B. 
and Jane (Bennett) Thielsen; grandson of William Nathan and Jane Nye 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 325 

(Warner) Bennet; great-grandson of Elnathan and Jerusha (Monroe) Bennet; 
great 2 -grandson of William and Deborah (Pope) Monroe; great' J -grandson of 
Gershom Pope, Captain Conn. Light Horse, under Maj. Ebenezer Backus. 

WILLIAM S. THOMAS, St. Louis, Mo. (25292). Son of John A. and Sophie B. 
Thomas; grandson of Cornelius and Elizabeth (Slaughter) Thomas; great- 
grandson of Charles Thomas, private, Capt. Andrew Hemphill's Company, Col- 
onel Richardson's Regt. Virginia Militia, pensioned. 

ALFRED WRIGHT THOMPSON, Washington, D. C. (27994). Son of Bertis B. 
and Mary (Wright) Thompson; grandson of John O. and Martha (Smith) 
Thompson; great-grandson of Seth and Eliza (Willson) Smith; great 2 -grandson 
of Ammi and Betsey (Moore) Willson; great'-grandson of Goff Moore, private, 
Col. John Stark's New Hampshire Regt, pensioned. 

BERTIS B. THOMPSON, Washington, D. C. (27993). Son of John Q. and Martha 
(Smith) Thompson; grandson of Seth and Eliza (Willson) Smith; great-grand- 
son of Ammi and Betsey (Moore) Willson; great 2 -grandson of Goff Moore, 
private, Col. John Stark's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned. 

GEORGE HALSEY THOMPSON, Brooklyn, N. Y. (N. H. 25376). Supplemental. 
Son of Frank Homer and Caroline Lord (Halsey) Thompson; grandson of 
James Manley and Jame Pearl (Lord) Halsey; great-grandson of Abraham and 
Anne Wright (Gosman) Halsey; great 2 -grandson of Jabez Halsey, private Sec- 
ond Ulster County Regt. New York Militia; great 3 -grandson of Silvanns Hal- 
sey, private First Orange County Regt. New York Militia. 

HAROLD CLARK THOMPSON, Orange, N. J. (28593). Son of Oscar Stanley 
and Jennie (Condit) Thompson; grandson of Daniel Winans and Caroline 
(Clark) Thompson; great-grandson of Daniel Winans and Elizabeth (Brundage) 
Thompson; great 2 -grandson of Moses Thompson, Sergeant, Colonel Baldwin's 
Regt. Continental Artificers. 

RAYMOND WEBB THOMPSON, Baltimore, Md. (27865). Son of Alfred Cook- 
man and Judie Frances (Houck) Thompson; grandson of Jacob W. and Susan- 
nah Francis (Porter) Houck; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth Francis 
(Todd) Porter; great 2 -grandson of Robert Porter, First Lieutenant Third Mary- 
land Regt. 

WALTER LED YARD THOMPSON, Morristown, N. J. (27694). Son of Aaron 
Kitchel and Grace Romaine (Worthington) Thompson; grandson of Martin 
Euclid and Mary (Kitchel) Thompson; great-grandson of Aaron Kitchel, pri- 
vate Morris County New Jersey Militia. 

ARCHIBALD EUGENE THOMSON, Lincoln Ridge, Ky. (26592). Son of George 
and Susan (McPherson) Thomson; grandson of Philip Kesick and Eunice 
(Gaylord) Thomson; great-grandson of John Thomson, private New Jersey 
Militia and Captain of a coasting sloop, pensioned. 

JAMES HARVEY THORNBURG, Detroit, Mich. (27465). Son of James Lewis 
and Virginia Francis (Handley) Thornburg; grandson of Alexander W. and 
Eliza Seabriel (Griffin) Handley; great-grandson of William Zebulon and Vir- 
ginia Francis (Beaumont) Griffin; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Beaumont, Ser- 
geant, Col. Samuel B. Webb's Conn. Regt., pensioned. 

ANTHONY REED THORNTON, Schenectady, N. Y. (27536). Son of Jacob S. 
and Dorcas (Reed) Thornton; grandson of Thomas W. and Sarah (Steers) 
Thornton; great-grandson of William and Eunice (Stevens) Thornton; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas Thornton, Lieutenant, Capt. Thomas Wasson's Company, 
Colonel Wemple's Second Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

JOHN MORGAN TIPTON, Springfield, 111. (27625). Son of Charles Hurst and 
Elizabeth (Morgan) Tipton; grandson of John Patterson and Jane (Moore) 
Tipton; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary Ann (Patterson) Tipton; great-- 
grandson of William Tipton, private, Col. Richard Parker's Virginia Regt., 
pensioned. 



326 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



MARK N. TISDALE, Sutherlin, Ore. (27587). Son of Charles H. and Ellen 
(Vaill) Tisdale; grandson of Henry and Jane (Wilcox) Tisdale; great-grandson 
of Benjamin Tisdale, private, Capt. Isaac Thayer's (Independent) Company 
Mass. Militia. 

JOHN PHIUP TOBERMAN, Norman, Okla. (28105). Son of A. W. and Norah 
E. (Coffey) Toberman; grandson of Philip and Lucy A. (Blackburn) Tober- 
man; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Campbell) Towberman; great-- 
grandson of Henry Towberman, private, Col. Anthony Wayne's and other 
Penna. Regts., pensioned. 

WALTER SIDNEY TOPPING, Summit, N. J. (28601). Son of Charles Edgar 
and Lydia (Culver) Topping; grandson of Sidney Bishop and Temperance Ann 
(Hawkins) Topping; great-grandson of Rensselaer and Charity Topping; great 2 - 
grandson of David Topping, Jr., "Associator from County Hall, Suffolk County, 
N. Y." 

ARTHUR HERMAN TOTMAN, Fairfield, Me. (26072). Son of Ezra and Eliza- 
beth P. (Dunbar) Totman; grandson of Thomas V. and Rhoda Snow (Whit- 
man) Totman; great-grandson of John Totman, Corporal, Col. Aaron Willard's 
Regt. Mass. Militia. 

DONALD A. TRACY, Benson, Nebr. (28377)- Son of Charles A. and Sadie 
Meyer (Bartholf) Tracy; grandson of Timothy Henry and Margeret Jane 
(Davidson) Tracy; great-grandson of Henry and Betsy (Munsell) Tracy; great-- 
grandson of Timothy and Jemima (Simons) Tracy; great 3 -grandson of Perez 1 
Tracy, Corporal Conn. Militia. 

DWIGHT WALLACE TRACY, Hartford, Conn. (27953). Son of David Wallace 
and Sarah Catherine (Burnham) Tracy; grandson of Miles Parker and Clarisa 
M. (Huggins) Tracy; great-grandson of David and Lucy (Cady) Huggins; 
great 2 -grandson of Manassah Cady, private Conn. Troops, Corporal of Marines 
Continental frigate "Trumbull." 

WILLIAM POWERS TRAWIN, Newark, N. J. (28594). Son of James and Har- 
riet Delia (Powers) Trawin; grandson of William and Margaret Price (Wood- 
ruff) Powers; great-grandson of Philip and Fidelia (Clark) Powers; great-- 
grandson of Timothy Powers, private Third Battalion Wadsworth's Conn. 
Brigade. 

LEONARD TREMAN, Rochester, N. Y. (28254), Son of Erastus Rose and Mary 
(Buck) Treman; grandson of Abner Treman, Sergeant Major New York Con- 
tinental Line. 

CHARLES J. TRESSLER, Chicago, 111. (28293). Son of David Loy and Ada 
A. J. (Mclntire) Tressler; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Lov) Tressler: 
great-grandson of Andrew (and Catherine Hamman) Tressler, private Second 
Berks County Battalion Penna. Militia; grandson of Benjamin and Agnes 
(Thomas) Mclntire; great-grandson of John Mclntire, private Fifth Penna. 
Regt. of Foot; great-grandson of George and Margaret (Reed) Loy; great 2 - 
grandson of Michael Reed, private, Col. Arthur St. Clair's Penna. Regt.; 
great 2 -grandson of Michael Loy, private, Captain Dehuff's Company, Colonel 
Atlee's Battalion Penna. Musquetry; great 2 -grartdson of Frederick Hamman, 
private Second Berks County Battalion Penna, Militia. 

CLYDE WALDO TROUPE, Baltimore, Md. (27863). Son of Calvin and Hattie 
(Hull) Troupe; grandson of William Skipwith and Caroline R. (Sauks) Hull; 
great-grandson of Horatio Clement and Caroline Boyd (Somers) Sauks; great-- 
grandson of James and Sarah (Boyd) Somers; great 3 -grandson of Thomas 
Boyd, Lieutenant Fifth Maryland Regt. 

HORACE EUGENE TUNE, Terre Haute, Ind. (17259). Supplemental. Son of 
William T. and Christina M. (Morton) Tune; grandson of Jacob and Anne 
(Fisher) Morton; great-grandson of Michael Fisher; great 2 -grandson of Abrant 
Fisher, private, Capt. John Jacks's Company Eighth Cumberland County Bat- 
talion Penna. Militia, Col. Abram Smith. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 327 

JAMES TURNER, Detroit, Mich. (27454). Son of James M. and Sophie Porter 
(Scott) Turner; grandson of James and Marion (Munroe) Turner; great- 
grandson of Francis Stiles and Deborah (Morton) Turner; great 2 -grandson of 
Jonathan and Bridget (Arthur) Turner; great 3 -grandson of Pain Turner, pri- 
vate Fifth Company Sixth Regt. Conn. Volunteers, 1775; grandson of Ira and 
Esther (Kennedy) Scott; great-grandson of William and Laura (Porter) Scott; 
great 2 -grandson of Elijah and Mary (Lawrence) Porter; great ?, -grandson of 
Moses Porter, Corporal Conn. Militia. 

EUSHA STRANGHAN TURPIN, Richmond, Va. (28339)- Son of E. S. and 
Elizabeth (Keisie) Turpin; grandson of Miles and Fannie (Frayser) Turpin; 
great-grandson of Jackson Frayser, private Virginia Militia. 

FREDERIC PERCIVAL TUTHILL, Brooklyn, N. Y. (27830). Son of James 
Henry and Florence (Mentz) Tuthill; grandson of James Tuthill; great-grand- 
son of David Tuthill; great 2 -grandson of James Tuthill, Jr., private Third 
Suffolk County Regt. New York Militia. 

ARTHUR J. TUTTLE, Detroit, Mich. (27459). Son of Ogden V. and Julia A. 
(McArthur) Tuttle; grandson of John J. and Emma A. (Warren) Tuttle; 
great-grandson of Jabez and Betsy (Ayres) Tuttle; great 2 -grandson of David 
(and Sarah Coe) Tuttle, private Morris County New Jersey Militia; great 8 - 
grandson of Joseph Tuttle, recognized patriot, Justice of the Peace, Colonel of 
Militia at Hanover, N. J.; great 3 -grandson of Benjamin Coe, recognized patriot, 
home plundered by British, furnished substitute in New Jersey Militia. 

HENRY BANCROFT TWOMBLY, Summit, N. J. (28595). Son of Alexander S. 
and Abigail Quincy (Bancroft) Twombly; grandson of Jacob and Martha How- 
land (Gray) Bancroft; great-grandson of Robert Gray, Captain Continental 
Navy. 

BARRETT PRETTYMAN TYLER, Morristown, N. J. (28596). Son of George 
T. and Mary (Fackler) Tyler; grandson of William Findlay and Julia Anna 
(Kemp) Fackler; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary Magdelene (Italy) Kemp; 
great-grandson of Frederick Kemp, Signer of Maryland Association, 1775. 

HERBERT BAILEY VAIL, Belleville, N. J. (28597). Son of Alvah Congdon 
and Gracia Arabella (Himes) Vail; grandson of Jehiel Webb and Eliza (Slo- 
cum) Himes; great-grandson of John and Polly (Parker) Slocum; great 2 - 
grandson of Joshua Slocum, private, Lieut. Col. Samuel Pierce's Regt. Mass. 
Militia. 

THEODORE NEWTON VAIL, New York, N. Y. (28259). Son of Davis and 
Phcebe (Quinby) Vail; grandson of Isaac and Sarah (De Hart) Quinby; great- 
grandson of Josias and Phceba (Harrison) Quimby; great 2 -grandson of Josias 
Quimby, Second Lieutenant Third Battalion New Jersey Continental Line. 

EDWIN ORLANDO VAILE, Oak Park, 111. (27801). Son of Jonathan and Eliza- 
beth (Estabrook) Vaile; grandson of Jonathan and Polly (Rawson) Vaile; 
great-grandson of Edward Vaile, private Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Joshua and Rebecca (Griffith) Rawson; great 2 -grandson of Wilson Rawson, Jr., 
private, Capt. Robert Taft's Company Mass. Militia. 

JOHN WAGNER VAN AUKEN, Schenectady, N. Y. (27537). Son of George W. 
and Pauline (Melber) Van Auken; grandson of John P. S. and Mary E. 
(Wagner) Van Auken; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Ulshaver) 
Van Auken; great 2 -grandson of Jacob and Sally Van Auken; great 8 -grandson 
of Levi Van Auken, Lieutenant Third Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

WOODRUFF MUCHMORE VANCE, North Yakima, Wash. (27895). Son of 
Alanson A. and Caroline Day (Muchmore) Vance; grandson of George and 
Susan (Schooley) Vance; great-grandson of Joseph and Susan (Case) Schooley; 
great 2 -grandson of Joshua Case, private New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN BECKER VANDERZEE, Springfield, Mass. (28234). Son of John G. and 
Elizabeth (Briggs) Vanderzee; grandson of John Becker and Elizabeth (Rowe) 
Vanderzee; great-grandson of Storm and Ann (or Engeltje) (Becker) Van- 
derzee; great 2 -grandson of Comelis Vanderzee, Ensign Fifth Albany County 
Regt. New York Militia. 



328 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



BENJAMIN CORNELIUS VANDEWATER, Cedarhurst, N. Y. (28253). Son of 
Peter C. and Mary E. (Hewlett) Vandewater; grandson of Cornelius and 
Elizabeth (Scull) Vandewater; great-grandson of Richard and Elizabeth (Huch- 
man) Scull; great 2 -grandson of Abel and Alice (Collins) Scull; great 3 -grandson 
of Joseph Scull, private Gloucester County New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES LUTHER VAN DOREN, East Orange, N. J. (27798). Son of Abra- 
ham Halsey and Rachel (Schanck) Van Doren; grandson of Isaac and Abigail 
Foster (Halsey) Van Doren; great-grandson of Abraham Van Doren, private 
Somerset County New Jersey Militia. 

ABRAM GRANT VAN HOUTEN, Newark, N. J. (27793). Son of Abraham and 
Eleanor W. (Benson) Van Houten; grandson of Abraham and Margaret 
(Speer) Van Houten; great-grandson of John and Margaret (Joralemon) 
Speer; great 2 -grandson of John Speer, Lieutenant, Captain Craig's Company 
New Jersey State Troops. 

HERBERT WHITFIELD VAN HOUTEN, Newark, N. J. (27794). Son of Abra- 
ham and Eleanor W. (Benson) Van Houten; grandson of Abraham and Mar- 
garet (Speer) Van Houten; great-grandson of John and Margaret (Joralemon) 
Speer; great 2 -grandson of John Speer, Lieutenant, Captain Craig's Company 
New Jersey State Troops. 

CARL C. VAN NESS, Newark, N. J. (28610). Son of Wallace and Anne E. 
(Waldron) Van Ness; grandson of Nicholas and Catherine Ryerson (Dore- 
mus) Van Ness; great-grandson of Jacob and Martha (Fredericks) Van Ness; 
great 2 -grandson of Simon and Elizabeth (Doremus) Van Ness; great 3 -grandson 
of Thomas Doremus, private, minute man, Essex County New Jersey Militia. 

JOSEPH B. VANNOTE, Pt. Pleasant, N. J. (28482). Son of James M. and 
Rachel (Borden) Vannote; grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Layton) Borden; 
great-grandson of Richard and Catherine (Chamberlain) Borden; great-grand- 
son of John Chamberlain, private Monmouth County New Jersey Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

WILLIAM McCOY VAN PATTEN, Walla Walla, Wash. (27893). Son of John 
Coop and Rachel (McCoy) Van Patten; grandson of Myndert and Hanna 
(Coop) Van Patten; great-grandson of Arent and Helen (Le Grange) Van 
Patten; great 2 -grandson of Nicholas Van Petten, private, Col. Abraham Wem- 
pel's Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

JOHN CHARLES VAN VOAST, Schenectady, N. Y. (27538). Son of Albert and 
Julia (Ramsay) Van Voast; grandson of John G. and Maria (Teller) Van 
Voast; great-grandson of Joachim and Neeltje (Vedder) Van Voast; great 2 - 
grandson of Johanna Van Vorst, private First Regt. New York Line, Col. 
Goose Van Schaick. 

CORNELIUS CLARKSON VERMEULE, East Orange, N. J. (28099). Son of 
Adrian and Maria (Veghte) Vermeule; grandson of Isaac Davis and Mary 
(Field) Vermeule; great-grandson of Cornelius and Elizabeth (Middagh) Ver- 
meule; great 2 -grandson of Cornelius Vermeule, Member of New Jersey Pro- 
vincial Congress and Committee of Correspondence. 

LAWRENCE WARD VIRTUE, Seattle, Wash. (27894). Son of George A. and 
Rhoda Lovisa (Smith) Virtue; grandson of George J. and Jane (Forsyth) 
Virtue; great-grandson of John and Juliet (Ward) Forsyth; great 2 -grandson 
of John Ward, Second Lieutenant Eighth Penna. Regt. 

FRANK DAY VOGT, Morristown, N. J. (28485). Son of Louis A. and Mary E. 
(Day) Vogt; grandson of Francis A. and Hannah D. (Hick) Day; great- 
grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth (Wood) Day; great 2 -grandson of Daniel 
Smith Wood, Captain First Essex County Regt. New Jersey Militia; grandson 
of Louis C. and Elizabeth (Tucker) Vogt; great-grandson of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth (Cutter) Tucker; great 2 -grandson of Ford Cutter, private Middlesex 
County New Jersey Militia. 

GEORGE VAN WICKLE VOORHEES, Somerville, N. J. (27796). Son of Archi- 
bald Craig and Annie Elizabeth (Cole) Voorhees; grandson of John P. and 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 329 

Gitty Jane (Vorhees) Voorhees; great-grandson of Peter L. and Eva (Vorhies) 
Voorhees, parents of Gitty Jane; great 2 -grandson of Lucas Voorhees (father 
of Peter L), private Somerset County New Jersey Militia and minute man; 
great 3 -grandson of Abraham Voorhees, Sergeant Somerset County New Jersey 
Militia. 

LOUIS E- VOSE, East Walpole, Mass. (27759). Son of Charles and Mary Ann 
B. (Hersey) Vose; grandson of Josiah Whiting and Mary Ann (Ellis) Vose; 
great-grandson of Jesse and Matilda (Whiting) Vose; great 2 -grandson of Ben- 
jamin Vose, First Lieutenant, Capt. John Bradley's Company, Col. Lemuel 
Robinson's Mass. Regt. 

HARRY BRIANT VREELAND, Summit, N. J. (27681). Son of Orrin Swift and 
Sarah C. (Hopper) Vreeland; grandson of William and Mary T. (Reynolds) 
Vreeland; great-grandson of Peter Bergen Vreeland, private Bergen County 
New Jersey Militia. 

ARCHIBALD ALEXANDER WALKER, Beaverton, Ore. (27580). Son of Robert 
H. and Rachel F. (Coffey) Walker; grandson of Asbury Madison and Mary 
(Bradford) Coffey; great-grandson of Henry and Rachel (McFarland) Brad- 
ford; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Bennett Bradford, private North Carolina 
Militia. 

SAMUEL HAMILTON WALKER, Washington, D. C. (27982). Son of Jonathan 
Thomas and Jane Amelia (Benson) Walker; grandson of Nathan (and Eliza- 
beth Thomas) Walker, private Maryland Militia; great-grandson of Isaac 
Walker, Lieutenant Prince George's County Battalion Maryland Militia; great- 
grandson of Jonathan Thomas, recognized patriot of Charles County, Md. 

ALEXANDER REMSON WALLING, Newark, N. J. (27792). Son of Jonathan 
Sproul and Mary Catherine (Applegate) Walling; grandson of Samuel and 
Eliza (Hendrickson) Applegate; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Still- 
well) Applegate; great 2 -grandson of John Stilhvell, Quartermaster First Mon- 
mouth County Regt. New Jersey Militia. 

CARL B. WALRATH, Newark, N. J. (28706). Son of James and Nannie 
(Bleecker) Walrath; grandson of William E. and Lucy Ann (Diefendorf) 
Bleecker; great-grandson of Jonas and Anna (Dunckel) Diefendorf; great- 
grandson of John Jacob Diefendorf, Orderly Sergeant New York Militia. 

CHARLES WALSH, Amenia, N. Y. (D. C. 26983). Son of John Johnston and 
Emma (Brett) Walsh; grandson of Henry and Maria (Laurence) Brett; great- 
grandson of Theodorus Brett, Ensign Second Dutchess County Regt. New 
York Militia. 

ROSCOE WALSWORTH, Revere, Mass. (28505). Son of Arthur A. and Anna 
Mercer (Johnson) Walsworth; grandson of Sherlock A. and Cornelia E. 
(Whitney) Walsworth; great-grandson of Avery and Anna (Brown) Wals- 
worth; great 2 -grandson of James Walworth (Walsworth), Lieutenant First 
Cumberland County Regt. New York Militia. 

ALONZO PAIGE WALTON, Schenectady, N. Y. (27650). Son of Richard and 
Rebecca (Mabie) Walton; grandson of John and Prudence (Lawrence) Wal- 
ton; great-grandson of John and Susanna (Mebie) Walton; great 2 -grandson of 
Arent Mebie, private Second Albany County Regt. New York Militia. 

CHARLES THOMAS ATHERTON WARD, Valparaiso, Chile (Mass. 27760). 
Son of Charles Trowbridge and Isabel Juana (Smith) Ward; grandson of 
Charles Trowbridge and Amanda (Atherton) Ward; great-grandson of Artemas 
and Catherine Maria (Dexter) Ward; great 2 -grandson of Artemas Ward, 
General and Commander-in-Chief of Massachusetts Bay Forces, First Major 
General of Continental Army. 

CHARLES A. WARREN, Chicago. Hi. (24131). Supplemental. Son of Calvin A. 
and Harriet (Robbins) Warren; grandson of Benjamin and Esther (Reynolds) 
Warren; great-grandson of Gamaliel and Ruth (Jenks) Warren; great-grand- 
son of James Warren, drummer, Col. Jonathan Brewer's Mass. Regt. 



330 sons of the: American revolution. 

ROLAND JOHN WASGATT, Rockland, Me. (26070). Son of Charles Wesley 
and Margaret Haney (Gray) Wasgatt; grandson of Asa and Sarah (Gott) 
Wasgatt; great-grandson of David Wasgatt, Quartermaster Sergeant, Capt. 
James Harlow's Company, Col. Ezra Wood's Mass. Regt. 

THOMAS LITTLE WASSON, Schenectady, N. Y. (27539). Son of Thomas 
Little and Mary Jane (Wescott) Wasson; grandson of James Thomas and Ann 
(Combs) Wasson; great-grandson of Thomas and Ellen (Bradshaw) Wasson; 
great 2 -grandson of Thomas Wasson, Captain, Col. Abraham Wemple's Albany 
County Regt. New York Militia. : 

ROBERT E. WATSON, Delaware, Ohio (27097)- Son of Elmer and Georgia 
Anna (Allen) Watson; grandson of Horace and Jane M. (Riley) Allen; great- 
grandson of Heber and Anna (Hall) Allen; great 2 -grandson of Heber Allen, 
Major Vermont Volunteers, Assistant Judge of Rutlandshire of Cumberland 
County Court. 

JAMES GEORGE WATTS, Mountain Home, Idaho (27012). Son of Daniel and 
Harriet Patterson (Goodrich) Watts; grandson of James and Deborah A. (Mc- 
Lean) Goodrich; great-grandson of Zebulon Goodrich, private, Col. John 
Brown's Regt. Mass. Militia. 

FRED BAIN WEAVER, Hyde Park, N. Y. (27221). Supplemental. Son of 
Norman and Christina (Avery) Weaver; grandson of Solomon and Sarah 
Caroline (Bain) Avery; great-grandson of Henry and Hannah (Rockefeller) 
Avery; great-grandson of William (and Christina Rockefeller) Rockefeller, 
First Lieutenant, Capt. Diel Rockefeller's Company, Lieut. Col. Henry Liv- 
ingston's Regt. New York Militia; great 8 -grandson of Simeon Rockefeller, pri- 
vate, Capt. Diel Rockefeller's Company, Lieut. Col. Henry Livingston's Regt. 
New York Militia; great 8 -grandson of Diel Rockefeller, Captain, Col. Henry 
Livingston's Regt. New York Militia. 

JAMES BELLAMY WEAVER, Des Moines, Iowa (28206). Son of James Baird 
and Clara (Vinson) Weaver; grandson of Abram and Susan (Imlay) Weaver; 
great-grandson of Henry and Susan Ross (Crane) Weaver; great 2 -grandson of 
William Weaver, private Fifth Regt. New York Line, Col. Louis Dubois, 
prisoner. 

RUFUS MILEY WEAVER, Washington, D. C. (27896). Son of George Jeremiah 
and Lucilla Jane (Wolff) Weaver; grandson of J. George and Eleanor Cath- 
erine (Bittinger) Wolff; great-grandson of Joseph and Lydia (Bair) Bittinger; 
great 2 -grandson of Joseph and Anna Elizabeth (Baugher) Bittinger; great 8 - 
grandson of Nicholas Bicttinger, Captain York County Pennsylvania Militia. 

EDWARD ALLYN WEBB, St. Paul, Minn. (25311). Son of Edward and Nancy 
Allvn (Foote) Webb; grandson of Lucius Chittenden and Rebecca Saltonstall 
(Allyn) Foote; great-grandson of Robert Ally n, Second Lieutenant Fifth Regt. 
Conn. Line and other service. 

WILLIAM WALTER WEBB, Milwaukee, Wis. (27060). Son of William Hewitt 
and Esther Odin (Dorr) Webb; grandson of Benjamin and Esther Kettell 
(Odin) Dorr; great-grandson of Edward Dorr, private, Captain Merritt's Com- 
pany Mass. Militia. 

HENRY WADSWORTH WEBBER, Buhl, Idaho (27005). Son of Nathaniel 
Wilbur and Caroline Gertrude (Brewster) Webber; grandson of Nathaniel and 
Ann Foster (Wadsworth) Webber; great-grandson of Moses and Hannah (Ste- 
vens) Wadsworth; great 2 -grandson of John Wadsworth, private, Col. Lemuel 
Robinson's Mass. Regt.; grandson of William and Maria (Farley) Brewster; 
great-grandson of Jonah and Mehitabel (Brewster) Brewster; great 2 -grandson 
of Jonathan Brewster, father of Jonah, Representative Mass. General Court; 
great 2 -grandson of Simon and Mehitabel (Belcher) Brewster, parents of Me- 
hitabel; great 3 -grandson of William Belcher, Captain Conn. Militia. 

STANLEY ALDEN WEBBER, Buhl, Idaho (27006). Son of Nathaniel Wilbur 
and Caroline Gertrude (Brewster) Webber; grandson of Nathaniel and Ann 
Foster (Wadsworth) Webber; great-grandson of Moses and Hannah (Stevens) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 33 1 

Wadsworth; great 2 -grandson of John Wadsworth, private, Col. Lemuel Robin- 
son's Mass. Regt. ; grandson of William and Maria (Farley) Brewster; great- 
grandson of Jonah and Mehitabel (Brewster) Brewster; great 2 -grandson of 
Jonathan Brewster, father of Jonah, Representative Mass. General Court; 
great 2 -grandson of Simon and Mehitabel (Belcher) Brewster, parents of Me- 
hitabel; great 3 -grandson of William Belcher, Captain Conn. Militia. 

JEROME THOMAS WEBSTER, Chicago, 111. (27802). Son of Thomas Carr and 
Julia Henrietta (Boarman) Webster; grandson of George Cortes and Sybil 
Amelia (Oatman) Webster; great-grandson of Thomas Carr and Julia Ann 
(Stone) Webster; great 2 -grandson o