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I 

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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



/ 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01080 6328 



f¥3 

NATIONAL YEAR BOOK 



THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF THE 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



CONTAINING N.AMES OF TRUSTEES; BIOGRAPHIES OF 
GENERAL OFFICERS; NATIONAL COMMITTEES FOR 1920; 
GENERAL OFFICERS FROM 1889 TO 1920; NATIONAL CHAR- 
TER; CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS; OFFICERS OF STATE 
SOCIETIES AND LOCAL CHAPTERS^ PROCEEDINGS OF 
HARTFORD CONGRESS, MAY 17-18, [920; MEETING OF THE 
TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE; RECORDS OF 
MEMBERS ENROLLED FROM MAY 1, 1919, TO APRIL jo, 1920. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 



http://archive.org/details/nationalyearbook1920sons 



National Year Book 
1920 



Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution 



1893166 




MA/#yL^ 



President General. 



COMPILED IiY 

PHILIP F, LARNER 
Secretary General and Registrar General 



1 }'.*<t> •*/' St'i > 



PRESS OF JUOI) & DETVVEILF.R, INC., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



GENERAL OFFICERS ELECTED AT THE HARTFORD 
CONGRESS, MAY 18, 1920. 

President General: 
James Harry Preston, 820 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Vice-Presidents General: 
George Hale Nutting, 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

New Kngland District: (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massa- 
chusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut). 

Thomas W. Wieeiams, 78 N. Arlington Ave., E. Orange, N. J. 

Middle and Coast District: (New York, New jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, 
.South Carolina, Georgia, Florida). 

Moui/ton Houk, Delaware, Ohio. 

Mississippi Valley, I\ast District: (Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, 
Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Missis- 
sippi). 

Linn Paine, 904 Locust Street, St. Lonis, Mo. 

Mississippi Valley, West District: (Minnesota, Nortli Dakota, South 
Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisi- 
ana, Texas). 

John W. Beee, Jr., P. O. Box 1124, Spokane, Wash. 

Mountain and Pacific District: (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Nevada, 
Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, California, 
Hawaii, Philippines). 

Secretary General and Registrar General: 

Phiwp F. Larner, 918 F Street N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer General: 

John IT. Burroughs, iiji Dean Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Historian General: 

George Carpenter Arnold, Arnold Building, Providence, R. I. 

Chancellor General: 

Harvey F. Remington, Rochester, N. Y. 

Genealogist General: 

Waeter K, Watkins, 9 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 

Chaplain General: 

Rev. LEE S. McColeester, D. D., Tufts College, Mass. 



SONS <>!•' TIM''. A.MKKK'AN K KVOIAJTIO N. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

The General Officers, logether with one member from each State 
Society, constitute the Board of Trustees of the National Society. The 
following' Trustees for the several States were elected at the Hartford 
Congress, May 18, 1920, to serve until their successors are elected at 
the Congress to be held at Buffalo, N. Y., in May, 1921 ; Alabama (va- 
cant) ; Arizona, Clay F. Leonard, Phoenix; Arkansas, George B. Gill, 
Little Rock; California, Frank C. Mortimer, New York City; Colorado, 
Malcolm Lindsay, Denver; Connecticut, Clarence H. Wickham, Hart- 
ford; Delaware, Horace Wilson, Wilmington; District of Columbia, 
Wm. S. Parks, Washington; Far Eastern Society, H. L. Noble, Manila; 

Florida, F. G. Renshaw, Pensacola; Society in France, ; Hawaiian 

Society, Rev. L. L. Loofbourow, Honolulu; Idaho, Col. Marshall \V. 
Wood, Boise; Illinois, Dorr E. Felt, Chicago; Indiana, Charles T. 
Jewett, Terra Haute; Iowa, Hon. Elmer M. Wentworth, State Center; 
Kansas, John M. Meade, Topeka; Kentucky, George T. Wood, Louis- 
ville; Louisiana, C. Robert Churchill, New Orleans; Maine, Oliver B. 
Clason, Gardiner; Maryland, Hon. Henry Stockbridge, Baltimore; 
Massachusetts, Henry F. Punderson, Springfield; Michigan, Albert M. 
Henry, Detroit; Minnesota, Capt. Fred A. Hill, St. Paul; Mississippi, 
Gordon G. Lyell, Jackson; Missouri, George R. Merrill, St. Louis; 
Montana, Leslie B. Sulgrove, Butte; Nebraska, Dr. Ik-nj. F. Bailey, 

Lincoln; Nevada, ; New Hampshire, Hon. Harry T. Lord, 

Manchester; New Jersey, C. Symmes Kiggins, Elizabeth ; New Mexico, 
George S. Klock, Albuquerque ; New York, Hon. C. A. Pugsley, New 
York City; North Dakota, Frank Drew Hall, Fargo; Ohio, Col. Moul- 
toil Monk, Delaware; Oklahoma, VV. A. Jennings, Oklahoma City; 
Oregon, Hon. Wallace McCamant, Portland; Pennsylvania, Col. R. W. 
Guthrie, Pittsburgh; Rhode Island, Robert P. Brown, Providence; 

South Carolina, ; South Dakota, F, M. Mills, Sioux Palls; 

Tennessee, Leland Hume, Nashville; Texas, C. B. Dorchester, Sherman; 
Utah, lion. Daniel S. Spencer, Salt Lake City; Vermont, I Ion. Guy W. 
Bailey, Burlington; Virginia, Arthur B. Clarke, Richmond; Washington, 
Jesse ]\1. I I in, Olympia; Wisconsin, Walter II. Wright, Milwaukee; 
Wyoming, James 15. Guthrie, Cheyenne. 



[tlOCRAlHl IICS OF GIvNIvRAI, OFFICKkS. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF GENERAL OFFICERS. 



JAMES IT. PRESTON, 

PRESIDENT GlvNl^RAI,. 

JAMES II. Pki'.ston was born in Harford County, Maryland, on the 
23d of March, 186O1, Mis father was James Bond Preston, a large 
land-owner of Harford County, Maryland, who was prominent in 
local politics and several times member of the Maryland Legislature. 

James 11. Preston was educated in the public schools of Maryland, 
received his collegiate education at St. Johns College, Annapolis, and 
holds the degree of EL E. from the University of Maryland, and has 
been a practising member of the Baltimore bar since 1881. 

lie has been several times a member of the Maryland Legislature 
and was Speaker of the House of Delegates in the session of 1894, and 
was a colonel on the staff of Governor Brown, of Maryland. Mr. 
Preston, in addition to other political positions, was appointed police 
commissioner for Baltimore city by Governor Edwin Warfield, Past 
President General of the Sons of the American Revolution, and held 
this position for four years, 

In 191 f he was elected Mayor of Baltimore and was re-elected in 
1915 by the largest majority which the city ever gave for this position. 

He has been a member of the Sons of the American Revolution for 
many years, held the position of Vice-President of the Maryland 
Society, and in T919 became the President of the Maryland Society, to 
which position he was re-elected in 1920. One year 1919 was the most 
prosperous year which the Maryland .Society has ever experienced. 

At the annual general meeting of the National Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, held in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1920, Mr. 
Preston was elected President General and immediately entered upon 
the performance of his duties, succeeding President General Chancellor 
L Jenks, of Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Preston married Helen Fiske Jackson in 1894. Mrs. Preston is 
also of Revolutionary ancestry, is a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and the Colonial Dames, and one of the "Lords 
Ladies of the Manor." She was a daughter of Colonel Wilbur Fiske 
Jackson and a niece of Governor E. E. Jackson, of Maryland, and 
Hon. W. F. Jackson, member of Congress from Maryland. Mr. Pres- 
ton has two sons and three daughters — his eldest son, James H. Preston, 
Jr., is a member of the Sons of tin.- American Revolution. 

In politics Mr. Preston is a Democrat, is a member of the Episcopal 
Church, and communicates with the Masonic fraternity. 

His revolutionary ancestor was Jacob Bond, Captain of the nth 



6 SONS OF TUlv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Company, Harford County, Md. Militia, and a member of the First 
Constitutional Convention of Maryland. 

President General Preston's brother, Judge Walter W. Preston, of 
Harford County, Maryland, is also a member of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 



GEORGE HALE NUTTING, 
Vice-President Generai, for New England District. 

George KaXE Nutting, President of the Massachusetts Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, was born at Haverhill, Mass., 
February 27, 1867. He is the oldest son of the late David Hubbard 
Nutting, M. D., and Mary Elizabeth (Nichols) Nutting. 

Fie is descended from John Nutting, of Chelmsford and Groton, 
Mass., one of the original proprietors of the town of Groton, who was 
killed by the Indians in the attack on that frontier town, March 9, 1676, 
at the opening of King Philip's War. 

He is also descended from William Nutting, of Groton, and David 
Hubbard, of Hancock, N. II., Revolutionary soldiers, and from Deacon 
Thomas Barrett, of Concord, Mass., who was a member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence and Safety, and a brother of Col. James 
Barrett. 

Mr. Nutting joined this Society in 1892, and has been a delegate to 
the National Congresses at Chicago, Newark, Detroit, and Hartford, 
and has served successively as Manager, Vice-President, and President 
of the Massachusetts Society, S. A. R. 

He is executor and trustee of the J. Howard Nichols estate, and is a 
member of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, Boston City Club, So- 
ciety of Colonial Wars, Bostonian Society, Prospect Lodge, Mt. Vernon 
Chapter, and Boston Commandery, K. T., and other Masonic bodies, 
and also of the Bunker Hill Monument Association, and a proprietor of 
"The Old North Church" (Christ Church), Boston. 

In 1890 Mr. Nutting married Hannah M. Brown, a descendant of old 
Colonial and Revolutionary stock, by whom he has two children- 
Nathaniel Hubbard Nutting and Dorothy Barrett Nutting. Her death 
occurred in 1907. Tn 1909 he married (second) Gertrude M. Freeman, 
by which union there have been four children — Elizabeth M., Margaret 
P., John Freeman (who died in 1918, aged three years), and James 
Barrett Nutting, who was born in 1919. 

In 1919 Mr. Nutting presented the Washington and Franklin medal, 
for excellence in the study of United States history, to the Massa- 
chusetts Society, in memory of his son, John Freeman Nutting, who was 
enrolled as a member of the Washington Guard at the time of his death. 
This medal was awarded by the Massachusetts Society in 1920 to one 
hundred high schools and academies in the Commonwealth, and is to be 
awarded annually hereafter by the Massachusetts Society. 



BIOGRAPHIES 01' GIvNKKAI. OFFICERS. J 

THOMAS WRIGHT WILLIAMS, 
Vice-President General for Middle and Coast District. 

Thomas Wright Wieeiams, of East Orange, N. J., elected Vice- 
President General at the Newark Congress in 1916, re-elected at 
Rochester in 1918, at Detroit in 1919, and at Hartford in 1920, was born 
at Princeton, N. J., January 31, 1854, a son of George Washington 
and Amy Olden (Wright) Williams. He joined the New Jersey Society 
May 20, 1893, through the services of his great-grandfather, John Van 
Tassel, of Tarrytown, N. Y., a private in Col. James Hammond's Regi- 
ment of New York Militia. 

Thomas Wright Williams received his education in Grammar School 
No. 35, New York City (the famous Thomas Hunter School), and en- 
tered the College of the City of New York in 1870. Pie then engaged 
in commercial business in New York City, and in 1878 assisted in organ- 
izing the Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, of Grand Rapids, Mich., of 
which company he is Vice-President, Eastern and Foreign Manager, 
with offices in New York City. 

Mr. Williams served on the National Executive Committee in 1912 
and 1914. He was Trustee to the National Society from New Jersey in 
I9-I3] Vice-President of the New Jersey Society in 1909, 1910, 19 11, and 
1912, and President of the Orange Chapter in 1903. He served on the 
National Committee of Fifteen on the Celebration of Washington's 
Journey from Philadelphia to Cambridge, 1775. Mr. Williams is a 
member of the Council of the New Jersey Society of the Colonial Wars, 
member of the New Jersey Historical Society, member of the Board 
of Managers of the New England Society of Orange, and of the Board 
of Managers of the Thomas Hunter Association of New York City; 
member of the Hardware Club of New York City and of the Republi- 
can Club of Orange. 

Mr. Williams's son, Thomas Wright Williams, Jr., and his sons-in- 
law, Graham King and Philip Osborne, became members of the Society 
in 1911. 

Mr. Williams enjoys the very unusual distinction of having been 
honored four times with the office of Vice-President General. 

MOULTON HOUK, 

1 

Vice- President General for Mississippi VaeeEy — East District. 

Moui/i'on Hour, of Delaware, Ohio, elected Vice-President General 
at the Detroit Congress, in 19 19, and re-elected at the Hartford Con- 
gress, May 18, 1920, was born on May 16, 1859, at Sandusky, Ohio. 
He is great-great-grandson of Stephen Moulton, who was Lieutenant- 
Colonel in 22d Regiment of Connecticut Militia; was taken prisoner 
September 15, 1776, and exchanged March, 1777. Great-grandson of 
Noah Fuller, who was a private in Captain Washburn's and Captain 



8 



SONS K T 1 1 lv A M !C R I C A N KKVOL, UT I O N 



Drew's Massachusetts companies and in Colonel John Chandler's 
Connecticut Regiment. Great-great-grandson of John Wilson, who was 
a private in the Lexington Alarm; also private in Colonel Seth War- 
ner's Regiment. Great-great-grandson of John Johnson, who was 
Ensign of Lieutenant Thomas Way's Company, which went from Lynn 
for the relief of Boston in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775; served 
nine days; Ensign of Captain Roger Ryley's Company, Colonel Enos' 
Regiment, 1776; Captain in guard service at Lynn. Great-great-great- 
grandson of Josiah Converse, who was a Lieutenant in Captain 
Amos Walbright's Company in the Lexington Alarm, April, 1775, 
ten days; Ensign in Captain Roger Enos' Third Company, Conti- 
nental Regiment, June 26 to December l8, t 775 ; First Lieutenant, Sec- 
ond Company, Captain Parson, Colonel Sage, General Wadsworth's 
Brigade, from June, 1776, to December 26, 1776) served in New York 
City and on Long Island; was in battle of White Plains. Great-great- 
great-grandson of Elias Lee, who served as a Captain, John Watson's, 
Jr., Company (the Ninth) ; discharged in Northern Department, Au- 
gust 23, 1775; in Fourth Regiment, Colonel Hinman's, 1775. Regiment 
reached Ticonderoga in June, 1775, and took part in the operations of 
Northern Department until expiration of term of service, December, 

1775. Re enlisted as a private February 19, 1776, in Captain John 
Stevens's Company (officers from Canaan and Stratford). From muster- 
roll, dated in Camp Mount Independence, Ticonderoga, November 25, 

1776, was in a company in Colonel Burratt's Regiment in 1776. Enlisted 
as Corporal Elias Lee, April 27, 1777, for a term of three years; pro- 
moted to sergeant December 1, 1777; discharged April 27, 1780; was 
in Captain Kimball's Company, Eighth Regiment, Connecticut Line 
Formation, from 1777 to 1 7S r , Colonel John Chandler's Regiment. 

He has been President of Anthony Wayne Chapter, Sons of the 
American Revolution; President of Ohio State Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution, and chairman of the National Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution Press Committee for the years 1900, 1901, 
1902, and 1903, under the administrations of General Breckenridge, 
Mr. Walter Seth Logan, Governor Edwin Warfield, and General 
Greeley, respectively. 

From 1886 to r <j 1 7 was general passenger agent of the Toledo and 
Ohio Central Railway and is now retired. For eleven years was mem- 
ber of Ohio National Guard, retiring therefrom as Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Chief Quartermaster Division. 

In World War assisted in routing and handling troops for the Gov- 
ernment and railways, with headquarters at Toledo, Ohio. 



LTNN T PAINKi 

Vici'-Prksidknt Gi'.nkkm, fok M 1 ssi ssi I'i'i Vaujcy — West District. 

Linn Paini;, of St. Louis, Mo., elected Vice-President General for 
Mississippi Valley, West District, at the Detroit Congress, May 20, 1919, 



BIOGRAPHIES 01" GKN'KRAL Ol'FlCl-KS. i) 

and re-elected at the Hartford Congress, May lS, 1920, was born at 
Linneus, Linn County* Missouri, April 24, 1870, and at the age of 
seven moved to St. Lonis to enter school under the educational advan- 
tages of that city. 

He became a member of the Sons of the American Revolution in 
1901, through the service of his great-grand father, William Payne, 
who was a member of Capt. Mathew Smith's Company of the Con- 
necticut Militia. 

Although actively engaged in the jewelry business and in civil affairs 
at St. Louis, he is interested in many patriotic enterprises in the 
Mississippi Valley and is a member of various societies devoted to 
art, history, and music. 

Mr. Paine is a charter member and vice-president of the Apollo Club 
of St. Louis, an organization of men singers that has for twenty-five 
years maintained a national reputation for its interpretation of patriotic 
songs and American musical compositions. 

In the capacity of State Registrar lie has served the Missouri Society 
for seventeen years. 

Since 19 10 Air. Paine has been chosen as delegate to each Congress 
of the National Society and was elected a member of the Board of 
Trustees at the National Congress, in Louisville, May 2, 191 1. 

JOHN W. BELL, Jr., 

Vick-Prksidknt Gknicraf for Mountain and Pacific District. 

John Wiij.iam. Bk.i.i,, Jr., of Spokane, Wash., was elected Vice-Presi- 
dent General for the Mountain and Pacific District at the Congress held 
in Hartford, Conn., May 18, 1920. He is the son of John William and 
Mary Perkins (Morton) Bell, and was born in St. Paul (Merriam 
Park), Minn., January 30, 189 1. Is great-great-great-grandson of Lieut. 
John Jones, who was a member of General Washington's army. John 
Jones was descended from Governor Eaton, first governor of Connecti- 
cut. On another line he can trace his ancestry back to Joseph Jenckes, 
from whom Past President General Jenks is descended. 

He was admitted to the Washington State Society on January 20, 
10.1.4. In 1917 was appointed Secretary-Treasurer pro ton. of Spokane 
Chapter and the following year was elected to the office. In [919 was 
President of the Chapter and First VicciPresident of the Washington 
Society. Is now Secretary-Treasurer of the Chapter again, having 
been elected in January of this year. 

Lived in St. Paul until 1900, when he moved to Tacoma, Wash., and 
in 1904 to Spokane. Ts a member of the Episcopal Church. Married 
Lillian B. Blakeslee in Spokane, September 2, 1914. Is engaged in the 
coal business, both wholesale and retail, being assistant to the manager 
of the Roslyn Fuel Co.'s Spokane branch. 



10 SONS 01' Tlflv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PHILIP F. LARNER, 
Secretary General and Registrar General. 

Philip F. Larner, elected Secretary General and Registrar General 
at the National Congress held in Detroit, Mich., May 20, 1919, and re- 
elected at the Hartford Congress, May 18, 1920, is a native of the City 
of Washington, D. C, as also were his father and grandfather. His 
great-grandfather, Jacob Gideon, Jr., removed to Washington from 
Philadelphia, Pa., about the time the location of the National Capital 
was established. 

Mr. Larner is a graduate of the original Kmcrson Institute, located 
in Washington for many years and a well-known educational institu- 
tion ; afterward a graduate of the Law College of the Columbian Uni- 
versity (now George Washington University) and a member of the 
bar of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. Later he has 
been actively connected for many years with various business organiza- 
tions in Washington. He is a member of the University Club, as well 
as several civic and religious organizations. 

Mr. Larner became a member of the District of Columbia Society, 
Sons of the American Revolution, in 1891, his ancestor being his 
great-great-grandfather, Jacob Gideon, Sr., who enlisted at Valley 
Forge and served with the Pennsylvania troops iii the battles at Guil- 
ford, Etttaw Springs, Cowpens, and Yorktown. 

Mr. Lamer was for a long term of years Treasurer and afterwards 
President of the District of Columbia Society, and has been a delegate 
from that Society to numerous annual congresses of the National 
Society. His wife, Fannie D. Larner (deceased), was a charter mem- 
ber of the Daughters of the American Revolution, having the national 
number 185 in that organization. His daughter, Mrs. Albert J. Gore, 
is an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and 
the founder and first regent of the Captain Molly Pitcher Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, in the City of Washington. 
His father, Noble D. Larner, at one time President of the District 
of Columbia Society, died in 1903, while holding the office of Vice- 
President General in the National Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

JOHN HARRIS BURROUGHS, 

Treasurer General. 

John Harris Burroughs was born at Trenton, N. J., April 17, 1849, 
son of Charles Burroughs, who served as mayor of Trenton for fifteen 
consecutive years — from 1832 until 1847 — who was also judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for Mercer County, N. J., for sixteen years. 
John Burroughs, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
active in the Revolutionary War from the latter part of 1776 until the 



BIOGRAPHIES 01' ClCNlCRAIy OlM'IClvKS. II 

surrender of Cornwallis, at the battle of Yorktown, in 1781. Mr. Bur- 
roughs is descended from John Burroughs, who settled in Newtown, 
Long Island, in 1653, with other English colonists. In the capacity of 
Treasurer, Vice-President, and President, he has served the Union 
League Club, Brooklyn, N. ¥., in which city he has resided since 1865. 
Pie was President of the Empire State Society in 1910 and 191 1. From 
1874 to 1918 Mr. Burroughs was a dealer in commercial paper and bank 
stocks in New York City. Pie is now manager of the Brooklyn Branch 
of the Corn Exchange Bank of New York. 

He was elected Treasurer General at the Baltimore Congress, in 1909, 
and re-elected at each succeeding Congress. 

LIEUT. GEORGE CARPENTER ARNOLD, 
Historian GenErae. 

George Carpenter Arnoed, of Providence, R. I., First Lieutenant, 
Company C, First Regiment of Infantry, Rhode Island Militia, elected 
Historian General at the Rochester Congress, May 21, 1918, and re- 
elected at Detroit Congress, in 1919, and at Hartford Congress in 1920, 
was born at Providence July 31, 1S68, son of William Rhodes and Sarah 
Hill (Carpenter) Arnold. His ancestry runs without break back to the 
Puritan immigration, William Arnold, the immigrant, being mentioned 
in Lincoln's history of Hingham, Mass. In 1635 William Arnold and 
family left Somersetshire, England, and came to New England. After 
residing a short time at Hingham, he became associated, in 1636, with 
Roger Williams and others in the purchase from the Indian sachems, 
Canonicus and Miantonomoh, of land at Mooshausic, afterward, called 
Providence, and received grants of land from Williams. His initials, 
"W. A.," are second on the famous Indian deed of Roger Williams. 
His real estate was mostly in Providence, Pawtuxct, and Warwick, 
R. I. One hundred and twenty acres of the original grant (including a 
27-acre lake) at Warwick, R. I., are now owned by the subject of this 
sketch, the ancestral home,, built in 1771 (by his great-grandfather, 
George Arnold), being used by him as a summer residence. 

Lieutenant Arnold became a charter member of the Rhode Island 
Society, S. A. R., February t, 1890, his eligibility in the Society being 
derived from the following ancestors: Great 3 -grandson of James Ar- 
nold, of Providence, First Lieutenant, 17^6, Captain-Lieutenant, 1778, 
of Kent County, Rhode Island Militia, member of Council of War, 
signer of the Declaration of Independence of Rhode Island, 1776. 
Great 2 -grandson of Robert Rhodes, of Pawtuxct, R. I., recruiting officer 
for town of Warwick, 1777; in 1778-1779 Captain of Warwick Alarm 
Company, participated in the Lexington fight April 19, 1775, and battle 
of Rhode Island, August 29, 1778. Grcaf-grandson of James Rhodes, 
of Warwick, Deputy in General Assembly, 1760, 1766, 1770, 1773, and 
1777- Great 2 -grandson of Joseph Carpenter, of Uxbridge, Mass., private, 
Lieut. James Chapman's Company of Minute Men (Capt. Jos. Chapin), 



12 



SONS OF T 1 1 J<; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



which marched on the Alarm of April 19, 1775; enlisted again in 
Colonel Wade's regiment, Capt. Edw. Seagraves's Company, June 19, 
1778, Rhode Island Alarm; discharged July 19, 1778. Great 2 -grandson 
of Joseph Wood, of Northbridge, Mass., Captain in Lexington Alarm, 
April 19, 1775; commissioned Captain of the 7th Company, Col. Ezra 
Wood's (Third Worcester County) Regiment of Massachusetts Militia, 
July 9, 1776. Great 3 -grandson of Jeremiah Finney, Bristol, R. t., private, 
Capt. Ezra Ormshee's Company, May 28, 1778; Bristol County Alarm 
Company, October, 1779; Senior Class Company, Bristol County, July 
30, 1780. 

Lieutenant Arnold received his education in the schools of his native 
city and at the Episcopal Military Academy of Cheshire, Conn., class 
of 1887. 

In November. 1887, he joined Company C, First Regiment of Infantry, 
Rhode Islam! Militia; was elected Corporal, 1889; Second Lieutenant, 
1890; First Lieutenant, 1891, 1892, 1893, and 1894. For nearly a quarter 
of a century he was engaged in the worsted yarn business. He is 
President and Treasurer of the Possnegansett Ice Company ; Treasurer 
and Director of the Arnold Real Estate Company; Treasurer of the 
Arnold Numismatic Company; Director of the Central Real Estate 
Company and of the Providence Realty Company; Treasurer of the 
Motor League of Rhode Island; Treasurer of the Society of Descend- 
ants of the Founders of Providence Plantations. Pie is the author of 
several books — one treating on Numismatics (of which he is an au- 
thority) — and publisher of the ''Genealogical Tree of the Arnold Family, 
embracing nearly thirty generations, from 1100 A. D." 

He married Flora Etta Richards December 14, 1892, by whom he has 
three sons: Lincoln Richards Arnold, Brown University, Class of 1916; 
Philip Rhodes Arnold, Amherst College, Class of 1918, and Capt. George 
Carpenter Arnold, Jr., Dartmouth College, Class of [918, now United 
States First Vice Consul at Seville, Spain. 

HARVEY F. REMINGTON, 



C 1 1 ANCKU.OK GKNICKAL. 

Harvey Footk Remington was born in Henrietta, N. Y., June 28, 
1863, son of William T. and Sarah A. (Foote) Remington. Pie married 
Agnes Brodie, daughter of Tho^nas Brodie, May 28, 1889, and they 
have seven children. 

Mr. Remington is practicing law in Rochester, N. Y., and is a director 
in Bastian Bros. Co., James Vick's Sons (seedmen), First National 
Bank of Caledonia, and many other corporations. The firm of Rem- 
ington & Remington, in which his second son, Major Thomas II. 
Remington, is a partner, are attorneys for numerous corporations and 
business interests. Their offices are at 910-914 Wilder Building, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



LHOCKAl'-iiJJ& 01' QIC NKKA I- ofl'U K,KS. 1 3 

Mr. Remington has held the office of supervisor, school commissioner, 
assistant corporation counsel, and judge of the municipal court of 
Rochester, N. Y. He is a member of the -Masonic and other fraternal 
organizations; is an officer in the First Baptist Church of Rochester, 
N. Y., trustee of New York Baptist State Convention; trustee of 
Keuka College; member of the New York State Bar Association, 
Rochester Bar Association, New York State Historical Society, Presi- 
dent of Rochester Historical Society, President of Empire State Society, 
Sons of the American Revolution, and Society of the Colonial Wars, 
and director in the American Flag Association. 

Mr. Remington is descended from William Northrup and other 
ancestors who were active ill the Revolutionary War, and is also 
descended from John Remington, Thomas Gorton, Nathaniel Foote, 
Surgeon John Green, John Male, and other ancestors who served in the 
Colonial Wars. Four of his sons were commissioned officers in the 
Great War. 

Mr. Remington resides at Rochester, N. Y., and his summer home is 
at "Strathmore Lodge," Eagle Bay, Fourth Lake, New York. 

WALTER K. WATKTNS, 

GENEALOGIST GENERAL. 

Walter Kendall Watkins was born in Boston, August 5, 1S55, and 
graduated from the Phillips Grammar and English High Schools. Since 
1880 he has been engaged in historical and genealogical researches in 
tins country and Great Britain. He has published frequently, articles 
in newspapers and magazines and edited the Colonial Wars Magazine 
and publications of the Society of Colonial Wars in the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. A specialty has been his works on the early history 
of Boston and contributions to the Publications of the Bostonian 
Society. 

He has been a charter member and director of Boston Chapter, 
S. A. R.; charter member and historian of Old Suffolk Chapter; char- 
ter member and secretary of Maiden Chapter. He now holds the 
office of Historian of the Massachusetts State Society. He was elected 
Historian General at the National Congresses of 1908 and 1909; a 
charter member of the Massachusetts Society of Colonial Wars; he 
has been Genealogist of the State Society since 1896 and Secretary for 
fifteen yenrs. 

He is a charter member of the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower 
Descendants and Secretary of the Bay State Historical League, com- 
posed of seventy-five historical societies in Massachusetts. A member 
of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society since 1889; he has 
been on its library committee for several years, and is chairman of the 
committee on records. 

lie is also an active and honorary member in several historical 
societies. He is a resident of Maiden, Mass., and Grafton, N. H. 



14 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN KlvVOMJTlON. 



LEE S. McCOLLFSTEP, J). D., 

ClIAn.AlN GlCNIvRAI,. 

h%t S. MeCoLlESTiSRi D. D., elected Chaplain General at the Rochester 
Congress, in 1918, re-elected at the Detroit Congress, in 1919, and at 
the Hartford Congress, in 1920, was born in Westmoreland, N. H., on 
the Connecticut River, in 1859. He is the son of Rev. S. II. McCollester, 
D. D., minister, college president, traveler, and author. His mother 
was Fanny Sophia Knight, of Windham County, Vermont, a descendant 
of a loyal colonial family. Dr. McCollester traces his lineage from 
Capt. Isaac MacAlHster, who was one of the first settlers of Cheshire 
County, N. H., and an officer in the colonial wars. 

Dr. McCollester was educated in the city schools of Nashua, N. H. ; 
Buchtel College, Akron, Ohio, and Tufts College, Massachusetts. He 
graduated from Tufts College in 1881 and from the Theological School 
in 1884. He has traveled extensively and studied abroad and has been 
active in religious and educational affairs. His first pastorate was in 
Clermont, N. H., of three years, where he married Miss Lizzie S. 
Parker, daughter of ex-Congressman Hosea W. Parker. In 1889 he 
took the pastorate of the Church of Our Father, Detroit, Mich., and re- 
mained there twenty-four years, becoming a leader in the religious, 
educational, and civic interests of the city and State. He is a thirty- 
second-degree Mason, a member of Detroit Commandery, No. 1, Knights 
Templar, and for ten years its prelate. He held successively the offices 
of Chaplain, Vice-President, and President of the State Society, S. A. P., 
of Michigan, and was also at the time of his leaving Michigan the 
Chaplain of the Society of Colonial Wars. In 1912 he left Detroit to 
become the Dean of Crane Theological School, Tufts College. He is 
now serving a second term of two years as the President of the Uni- 
versalist General Convention, and for several years has been chairman 
of its Board of Trustees. He is still a member of the Michigan Society, 
S. A. R., and also of the Massachusetts Society, and an honorary mem- 
ber of the Essex Chapter of Lynn. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 15 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES, 1920. 

Executive Com mittee. 

JaMES Harry Preston, President General, Chairman, 820 N. Charles St., Baltimore, 

M.l. 
Chancellor L. Jenks, 30 N. T,a Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Louis Annin Ames, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. Y. 
George F. Fomero^, Toledo; Ohio, 

Arthur P. Sumner> 639 Grosvenor Bldg,, Providence, R. I. 
Rev. Lyman \V. Ali.en, Newark, N. j. 
WILLIAM K. I'.oardman, .Nashville, Tenn. 

A u v i so r v Co mm 1 tte e. 
The Past Presidents-General. 

Committee on Credentials. 

Other members to be named from city, holding 1 0^ 1 Congress. 

Teunis l>. Huntting, Chairman, 220 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
William J. Conkling, Orange, N.J. 
John 1). VandERCOOK, Lombard, 111. 

Committee on Auditing and Finance. 

Georce D. Bangs, Chairman, [Tunyngton, N. Y. 
Norman P. 1 1 kiki.iv, Brooklyn, NY. 
C. Symmes Kiggins, Elizabeth, N.J, 
• . Albert J. Squier, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Mem orial Co m m 1 tt ee. 

I\. C. Ballard TlfRUSTON, Chairman, 1000 ColumlHls Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 

PlULtP F. I.arn'i.r, Secretary General, Secretary of Committee, Washington, D. C. 

Otis G. Hammond, Concord, N. II. 

Charles French Read, Boston, Mass. 

William CllACE G ; REENE, Providence, R. I. 

Dr. George C. F.r Williams, Hartford, Conn. . 

John W. X'uooman, Herkimer, N. Y. 

W. I. Lincoln- Adams, Montclair, N. J. 

Thomas Wynne, Philadelphia, Pa. 

George A. Elliott, Wilmington, Del. 

Arthur I'.. Bibbins, Baltimore, Md. 

William E. Crawford, Richmond, Va. 

Stephen C. Braqaw, Washington, N. C. 

IlARttv T. I. oki,, Manchester, N. II. * 

Committed on Organization (New England District). 

Geo, IIaii; Nutting, Vice-Prcsidem General, Chairman, 53 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Henry Fuller Punoerson, Vice-Chairman, Springfield, Mass. 

Dr. Geo. C F. Wiu.ums, Hartford, Conn, 

Hon. Harry T. Lord, Main luster, X. II. 

Prof. Ashley K. Hardy, Hanover, N. II. 

GEO. F. Burgess, New Haven, Conn. 

Guy W. Bailey, Essex Junction, \'t. 

Frank L. Fish, Vetgennes, \'t. 



iC 



SONS OP THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



Waldo Pettencill, Rurriford Falls, Maine. 
Wm. K. Sanderson, Portland, Maine. 
Fred'k S. Vail, Portland, Maine. 
Walter A, Hall, Swampscott, Mass. 
Herbert M. Clarke, Arctic, R. I. 

Committee on Organization (Middle and Coast District). 

Thomas W. Williams, Vice-President General, Chairman, 70 No. Arlington Ave,, 
East Orange, N. J. 

lion. Harvey F. Remington, Rochester, N.N'. 

Carl M. Vail, New York, x\ r . V. 

Hon. Eb'win C. Bonniweel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Capt. Horace Wilson, Wilmington, Del. 

Hon. James H. P^Eston, Baltimore, Md. 

Hon. David J, Hill, Washington, 1 ). C. 

Arthur B. Clarke, Richmond, Va. 

Frank II. Bryan, Washington, N. C. 

Paul T. IIayne, Greenville, S. C. 

Dr. Frank G. Renshaw, Pehsacoia, Fla. 

Committee on Organization (Mississippi Valley — East District). 

Modlton Houk, Vice-President General, Chairman, Delaware, Ohio. 

Gen. Ciias. A. CoolidgiC, Detroit, Mich. 

Walter II. Wright, ..Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dork A. Felt, Chicago, III. 

Austin II. Brown, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Henry A. Williams, Columbus, Ohio. 

Leland Hume, Nashville, Teun. 

Judge Gordon G. I,yell, Jackson, Miss. 

Marvin II. Lewis, Louisville, Ky. 

Committee on Organization (Mississippi Valley—West District). 

Linn Paine, Vice-President General, Chairman, 904 Locust. Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Capt. l'RED A. Bill, St. Paul, Minn. 

Frank D. IIm.l, Fargo, N, D. 

Dr. J. G. Parsons, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Dr. Benjamin F, Bailey, Lincoln, Nehr. 

Dr. GERSKOM II. Hill, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Arthur H. Bennett, Topeka, Kans. 

George K. Merrill, St. Louis, Mo. 

E; G. Si'ii.i.MAN, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Frank W. Tucker, Little Rock, Ark. 

C. Robert Churchill, New Orleans, La. 

C. P, Dorchester, Sherman, Texas. 



Committee on Organization (Mountain and Pacific District). 

John \V. Bell, Jr., Vice-President General, Chairman, Spokane, Wash. 

I, esi. ie Berry Sulgrove, Butte, Mont. 

I'kank G. Ensign, Boise, Idaho. 

Galen A. I'ox, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Hon. ALBERT D. Aykes, Reno, New 

David Ramsey Gray, Salt l.akc City, Utah. 

EDWARD V. Dunki.EE, Denver, Colo. 

F. W. Perkins, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Thomas F. Keleiii.k, Albuquerque, N.M. 

lion. Wallace McCvmant, Portland, Ore. 



N AT 1 N A L CO MM] fl'IJ K S . 



*7 



Ernest Bektrand HUSSEY, Olympia, Wash 
D0N2EL Stonky, San Francisco, Calif. 
Rev. L,. P. Pooi'boukow, Honolulu, Hawaii 



Committee on Patriotic Education, 

Qeqrce A. Hki.NNAN, Chairman, East, 24 W. 110th PI., Chicago, 111. 

George l'>. Sack, Vice-Chairman, 713 Park Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

Wallace McCamant, V ice-Chairman, West, Portland, Ore. 

R. C. r.Ai.i.Aui) Th.ru STO.V, Louisville, Ky. 

Chancellor P. Jenks, Chicago, 111. 

Matthew Pace Andrews, Baltimore, Md. 

l.iTiiiu Atwooo, I. vim, Mass. 

Amii.u K. II\ki.y, ilam.wi, X .11. 

William K. Wicks] ftjtftfciwe-, N. V. 

1 Pre ideivt) Samuel M d. '< <u m ie k, Pennsylvania. 

Win. i\ vi 1', I'iiko:, Gambici, Ohio. 

N^ke* v . K'otrKv; AlbtfriHerque, X. M. 

CiMKi.K A. Pettjgmew, Sioux Pulls, S. D, 

CLASKSON \. Giver, Denver, Colo. 

Brigadier General Ciiari.4« A. Wooijrufe, Berkeley, Calif. 

Auoison E. Sheldon, Lincoln, Ncbr. 

GcoMR T. Wool,, Louisville, Ky, 

Henry Brown Hawley, Des Moines, Iowa. 



Committee on Naval and Military Records. 

Rear Admiral GEORGE W. Baird (.retired), Chairman, 1505 Rhode Island Ave., 

Washington, 1). C 
Majoi "General Nelson A. Milks, Washington, D. C. 
Waldo Pkttengii.l, Rumford, Maine. 
John M. Parker, Jr., Hartford, Conn. 
Hon, Henry R. Pollard, Richmond, Va. 
Joseph B, Doyle, Steuhenville, Ohio. 
Henry P. PuNi>ERSoNr, Springfield, Mass. 
Prank W. Rywles, Little Rock, Ark. 
James. I » Iglehart, Baltimore, Md, 
Danul Y. Webster, Chicago, ill. 

Kcu Admiral F. F. Fl-ETCHER, U. S. N., Navy Dept., Washington, 1). C. 
C ,1. Jami.s W. Van UlsEN, U. S. A., Washington, 1). C. 
C. A. Klnvon, Washington, 1>. C. 

Committee on Americanization and Aliens, 

lj.MKu M. WENTWORTH, Chairman, State Center, Iowa. 
John II. Moore, Vice-chairman, East, Ther Wyoming, Washington, 1). C 
Samuel Junu Holmes, Vice-Chairman, West, Burke Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
HarIvY T. l.oRU, Manchester, N. II. * 

George II ml Nutting, Boston, Mas,. 
W. Howard Wu.kkk, Providence, R. I. 
Aumn Coir, New London, Conn. 
David P. Pierson, past Grange, N.J. 
Thomas Stephen Brown, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
QSBORNE 1. Yei.loTT, Baltimore, Md. 
Marvin II. Lewis, Louisville, Ky. 
Prank B. Steele, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Fred Alger, Detroit, Mich, 
WALTER II. Wright, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Chancellor p. Jenks, Chicago, 111. 



i8 



SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



1 1 ickhiCrt P. Benton, New Orleans, La. 

Benjamin F. Bailey, Lincoln, Ncbr. 

Wm. PivNN IIumrhreys, San Francisco. Calif. 

Al. W. VVoou, Boise, Idaho. 

Pee Wilson, New Haven, Conn. 

Kmv. M-. Hai.l, JR., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Fred. M. Smith, Wilmette, 111. 

Flag Committee. 

W. V. Cox, Chairman, Washington, D. C 

Dr. Chas. II. Bangs, Swampscott, Mass. 

Col. W. H. Coruusier, New York, N. Y. 

Major G. W. Hyde, Baltimore; Md. 

James T. QuarlES, Missouri. 

Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, Detroit, Mich. 

Brig. Gen. James Rush Lincoln, Ames, Iowa. 

Wardnek Williams, Pueblo, Colo. 

Henry 15. Adsil, San Diego, Calif. 

Col. George Gkeeniiai.gji, Toledo, Ohio. 

Col. George V. Laum an, "Chicago, 111. 



(Additi 



meiuhei 



be 



Publicity Com m ctteE. 

pointed after place of io-m Congress is determined.) 



Frank I,. Stetson, Chairman, Oak Park, 111. 
Frederick 1 K. Fmerson, Norfolk, Ya. 
Park Matiiewson, New York, N. Y. 
Edwin S. Crandon, Boston, Mass. 
Arthur S. Thome-son, New York, N. Y. 
William M. Finck, Detroit, Mich. 
Arthur Henry Bennett, Topeka, Kans. 
John B. TorisErt, Washington, D. C. 



Commit' 



on Local Charters. 



John I.Enori. Merrml, Chairman, East Orange, N.J. 

Fugene C. P.onniwei.l, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Louis A, Bowman, Chicago, 111. 

Ciiari.es N. Remington, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FluRIuce DrEW Hadley, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Edward P. Howe, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Edmund L. Parker, Kokomo, Ind. 

Wm. K. Sanderson, Portland, Me. 

T. Murray M aynadi i;r, Balti-moje, Md. 

AeerEd F. Powers, Worcester, Mass. 

Albert M. Henry, Detroit, Mich. % 

Col. W. L. Curry, Coltimbus, Ohio. 

• Committee on Investment of Permanent Fund. 

The President General. 
The Treasurer General. 
Hon. Cornelius Amokv Pugsi.ev, New York, N. Y. 



Com m 



N. 



Archives Building. 



Major Frederick C. Bryan, Chairman, Colorado Bldg., Washington, D. C. 
Nathan Warren, VValrhanl, Mass. 
Tames P. Goodrich, Winchester, Ind. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 19 

AmEdEE B. Cole, St. Louis, Mo. 

Edward D. Baldwin, The Dalles, Ore. 

Commander J. II. Moore, U. S. N., Washington, D. C. 

Hon. M. L. Ritchie, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Gen. G. Barrett Rich, Buffalo, N. Y. 

William S. Parks, Washington, D. C. 

Committee on Increased Membership. 

Chancellor f,. Jknks, Chairman, 30 N. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Lours Annin Ames, Vice-Chairman, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. V. 

Robert E. Adrian, St. Louis, Mo. 

Arthur II. Bennett, Tojreka, Kans. 

Harry !■'. Brewer, Elizabeth, N.J. 

Kenneth C. Brill, St. Raul, Minn. 

Dr. Benjamin F. Bailey, I, inc. /In, Nebr. 

liMNK II. Bryan, Washington, N. C. 

II. r.i.NNj.n, Tulsa, Okla. 

C.Eokgk l\ Htmw:ss, New Haven, Conn. 

\\m. K. Boaudman, rvashville, Tenh. 

I.i.u is I!. Ccktis, I Si-i. Igepoit, Conn. 
Imh.n II. -mart Cross, Pensacala, l'la. 
W. I.. Cikuv, Columbus, Ohio. 

W. i;. Ciiu-lin, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

II. C. Com:, Paris* France. 

T. W. Dwight, Sioux Falls, S. 1). 

Kmmi-TT A. DONNELLY, .Milwaukee, Wis. 

Col. Geo. A. El 1.10TT, Wilmington, Del. 

Koii'r T. IClliOTT, Worcester, Mass. 

Kkedkrick E. Emerson, Norfolk, \'a. 

1-*kank II. Graham, Albuquerque, ft. M. 

II. W. Grout, Waterloo, Iowa. 

hwicirr 15. HEARD, Phoenix, Ariz. 

ASHLEY K. Hardy, Hanover, N. II. 

I'UANK l>. 1 1 all, Fargo, N. Dak. 

David Arnold Kenning, Greenville, S. C. 

I. Ei. and Hume, Nashville, Term. 

John Charles Harris, Houston, Texas. 

I. M. Howell, Olympia,- Wash. 
I'av llEMi'STEAn, Little Rock, Ark. 

II. Lawrence Noble, Manila, P.I. 

Harry Keyser, Boise, Idaho. 

Hi; MoTT MoiHSETTE, Cleveland, Ohio. 

t.EoRoE II. Neuhali, Providence, R.I. 

Chaincey R. OvERi'n.i.D, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

John M. PARKER, J"., Hartford, Conn. 

Kdmi/nd L. Parker, Kokptwo, Ind. 

Oi.T 1;. I'omeroy, Toledo, Ohio. 

Charles N. REMINGTON, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

George Sadti.er Rohertson, Baltimore, Md. 

Geo. McK. RoiiERTS, Schenectady, N. Y. 

I'). Montgomery Reily, Kansas City, Mo. 
Don/.el Stoney, San Francisco, Calif. 

W.M. H. SEEDS, Denver, Colo. 
Wm. K. Sanderson, Portland, Me. 
Leslie Sulgrove, tlelena, Mont. 
B. K. Sankord, Portland, Ore. 
John B. Tokhert, Washington, D. C. 



20 



SONS OF TUIC AMLRICAN REVOLUTION. 



James T. Taylor, Honolulu. 

Philip S. Tuley, Louisville, Ky. 

George N. Wright, Chicago, 111. 

Binni.E Wilkinson Allen, New Orleans, La. 

A. W. Wai.l, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Committee on Ceremonies and Colors. 

(Additional members to be appointed from city in which the 19.21 Congress is held.) 

Col. George V. I,auman, Chairman, Chicago, [11, 
Fred. D, IIahn, Roselle, N. J. 
J. J. Hess, Rochester, N. Y. 
Drayton IT. ItlTE, Baltimore, Md. 
Capt. Joshua Atwood, Boston, Mass. 

National Committee on Observance of Constitution Day, Sei'Tk.mber 17. 

(Constitution Day inaugurated by the Sons of the American Revolution, 191 7.) 

Executive Committee. 

Louis Annin Ames, Chairman, 99 Fulton St., New York, N. V. 

Philip 1". Earner, Secretary, 918 F St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

David Jayne Hill, Washington, D. C. 

Lhwxs B. Curtis, Bridgeport^ Conn. 

LLMER M. WentworTii, State Center, Iowa. 

Members of Committee. 

Major W. I. Lincoln Adams, U. S. A., New Jersey. 

Hon. George W. Aldridge, New York, N. Y. 

Col. Frederick AT. Alger, U. S. A., Crosse Pointe Village, Mich. 

Rev. Lyman Whitney Allen, Newark, N. J. 

Gen. Francis Henry Ai-i'leton, Massachusetts. 

Hon. Alfred D. Ayers, Nevada. 

Hon. .Simeon L. Baldwin, Connecticut. 

Thomas F. Bayard, Wilmington, Del. 

Judge Morris B. Beakdsley, Connecticut. 

Wm. K. Boakdman, Tennessee. 

Louis A. Bowman, Chicago, 111. 

John G. Bragaw, Jr., North Carolina. 

Brig. -Gen. OLIVER B. Bridgman, New York. 

Austin H. IIiiuwn, Indianapolis, Ind. 

John II. Burroughs,. Treasurer General, New York. 

H. M. Bush nell, Nebraska. 

Hon. William G. Cody, New York. 

Rear-Admfral Coi.uy M. CHESTER, (J. S. N., Washington, D. C. 

Col. C. Rouf.rt Churchill, Louisiana. 

Arthur B. Clark, Richmond, Va. » 

Col. Robert COLGATE, New Jersey. 

Gen. Charles A. Coolidoe, U. S. A., Michigan. 

PRANK Cokiun, Connecticut. 

Kdwin S. Crandon, Boston, Mass. 

lion. W. Murray Crane, former U. S. Senator, Massachusetts. 

John IIohakt CROSS, IVnsacula, l'la. 

Hon. AlherT !'.. Cummins, U. S. Senator, Iowa. 

LEWIS B. Curtis, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Col. William L. Curry, Ohio. 

lion. Paul Dana, New York. 

Lucius P. Deming, New York. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEES. 21 

William C. Dj'cmokEst, New York. 

J Ion. C.hauncey M. Dj;im:w, New York. 

I.oi'is II. Dos Passos, New York. 

Hon. William P. Dillingham, U. S. Senator, Vermont. 

I Ion. Ralph D. Karl, New York, 

John A. KckKkt, New York. 

linn. Walter R. Ri'CK, Senator, New Jersey. 

Col. C.Kokgf. A. Ri.LioTT, \Y il 111 inglon , Del. 

Ykknon Asiilky Field, Massachusetts. 

Rear-Admiral Frank F. FucTCHiiK, V. S. N., Washington, !). C. 

[Ion. J. Franklin Fort, former Governor of New Jersey. 

I I. hi. JoM'.i'H Shkuman Imu-i.ingiiuysEN, [J, S. Senator, New Jersey. 

Judge I'J.hi-.ut II. Gary, Xev. York. 

Judge .1. Howard Oaths, 1'iene, S. Dak. 

i. en. John R. GlBUONS, Ikiuxil. , Ark. 

linn. J vmi:s 1'. Goodrich, Governor of Indiana. 

F.W* >.M. II VC.AMAN II Ml. Nevs Vork. 

Hon. James Dinton Hancock, Pennsylvania. 
I'm i. Amm.i.v K. Harpy, New I lani&plure. 
Ii. IGHT It. lit. M.n, I'li.rnix, An/. 
I Dm. Job Hedges, New Vork. 
Hon. Albert M. IUnky, Michigan* 
D. Davii. Javnk Hill, Washington, I). C. 
Major Walter 1'.. IIopping, IT. S. A;, JNew York. 
Hon. I'oir.Ai!; IIoyt, New York. 
II, ,n. Cii\i'ii;s Ivvans I In; i iKS, New York. 
Gen. Win. is A. (Idlings, Pennsylvania. 
Chancellor I.. Jl.nks, Illinois. 

Ri .-ar- Admiral T. P, JEWELL, R. S. N., Washington, D. C. 
CHESTER JONES, New Jersey, 

I.icUt.-Col, C. T. JEWETT, V. S. A., Indiana. . • 

Rear-Admiral Albert II. Knight, D. S. N., Massachusetts, 

I'll ii. n> !•'. LaRNER, Secretary General, Sons of the American Revolution, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Judge Kimv Qrland Rlk, Dtah. 
M \kvin II. Ri'.wis, Kentucky. 
Hrig.-G«n. James ki'su Lincoln, Iowa. 

Hum Chaklks Warren Rii-imtt, former Governor of Rhode Island. 
Hon. Henry F. RiiM-rn, D. S. Senator from Rhode Island. 
1 1. ,n. Henry Cabot Roixh:, D. S. Senator from Massachusetts. 
Rev. R. R. RooHHiiiKow, Hawaii, 
lion. Frank <>. I.owhen, Governor of Illinois. 
Judge James Gordon Ryi-li, Mississippi. 
Dr. ClIAS. A? McCallum, Minnesota. 
Nelson A. McClaky, Illinois. 

lion. W.M. W. MCDOWELL, Montana. 

Hon. WALLACE McCamant, Oregon. * 

Rev. Wm. GKRRY Mann, Main.'. 

William A. Makiii.i:, New York. 

Dr. Samuel Ik McCormack, Pennsylvania. 

John M. Meade, Kansas. 

Stan wood Menken, New York, 

Gen. Nelson A. Miles, D. S. A., Washington, D. C. 

Frank M. Mills, South Dakota. 

I'.hwin P. M itch Ki.L, New York. 

Hon. Geo. H. Moses, U. S. Senator, New Hampshire. 

Hon. llMiitv S. New, D. S. Senator from Indiana. 
Chas. R. Nichols, Colorado. 



22 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

Geo. Hale Nutting, Massachusetts. 

Hon. Carroll S. Pack, U. S. Senator from Vermont. 

Gen. J. N. Patterson, New Hampshire. 

Hon. Thomas A. Perkins, California. 

David L. PiERSON, New Jersey. 

George E. Pomeroy, Ohio. 

Gen. Horace Porter, New York. 

Col. James II. Preston, former mayor of Baltimore, M<1. 

Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, New York. 

Henry F. Punderson, Massachusetts. 

Charles French Read, Massachusetts. 

Gen. G. Barrett Rich, New York, 

John D. Rockefeller, New York. 

Lieut. -Col. Theodore Roosevelt, New York. 

Hon. Fuhu Boot, New York. 

Col. Henry W. Sackett, New York. 

Wm. K. Sanderson, Maine. 

lion. George 11. Shields, Missouri. 

Hon. Frank Sidway, New York. 

Judge Krnkst C. Simtson, Connecticut. 

Hon. George Albert Smith, Utah. 

Hon. Wm. Allen Smith, former U. S. Senator from Michigan. 

F. G. Si'ilman, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Vernon P. Squires, North Dakota. 

Judge Henry Stockbridge, Maryland. 

Hon. William U. Taet, Connecticut. 

K. C. Ballard Thkuston, Kentucky. 

Col. Ralph Emerson Twitcjiell, New Mexico. 

Carl M. Vail, New Jersey. 

Col. John Vrooman, New York. 

Hon. James W. Wadsworth, U. S. Senator from New York. 

Hon. Francis F. Warren, U. S. Senator from Wyoming. 

Dr. William Seward Webu, Vermont. 

Elmer Marston Wentwokth, Iowa. 

lion. Charles S. Whitman, former Governor of New York. 

Prof. William K. Wickes, New York. 

Dr. Geo. C. F. Williams, Hartford, Conn. 

Hon. ROBERT L. Williams, Governor of Oklahoma. 

Henry A. Williams, Ohio. 

Thomas Wright Williams, New Jersey. 

Col. Elmer E. Wood, U. S. A., Louisiana. 

Lieut. -Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A., Idaho. 

Brig.-Gen. Charles A. Woodruee, LJ. S. A., California. 

Newell B. Woodworth, New York. 

Prof. Levi Fogar Young, Utah. 

Henry A. Williams, Columbus, Ohio. 

Walter H. Wright, Milwaukee, Wis. * 



National Committee on the Observance or Flag Day, June 14TH. 

(Flag Day inaugurated by the Sons of the American Revolution, 1894.) 

Lewis B. Curtis, Chairman, Bridgeport, Conn. 

WALTER Bruce,, Massachusetts. 

Dr. George T. Simcek, Rhode Island. 

Col. William CorbusiEr, New York, N. Y. 

John Brewer Wight, New Jersey. 

Frank H. Bryan, North Carolina. 

Hon. Henry R. Pollard, Virginia. 



NATION Al, COMMITTEES. 23 



Osborne I. Ykllott, Maryland. 
Hon. Eugene 1-onniwkll, Pennsylvania. 
Capt. Horace Wilson, Delaware. 
ASHLEY K. Hardy, New Hampshire. 
Paul T. llAYNE, South Carolina. 



Committed on Pilgrim Tercentenary, 



Charles French Read, Chairman , Boston, Mi 
L>r. GEO, C. P. Williams, Hartford, Conn. 
CwAkLKS E; GROSS, Hartford, Conn. 
Frederick S. \'.mu., Portland, Maine. 
Waldo I'i'.t'jt.nc. ii.i., Rumford Falls, Maine. 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE WASHINGTON GUARD. 

Honorary Commaudei in-Chief, James 11. Preston, President Genefal, Baltimore, Md. 
(i.ivernor General, Joils Lenoki) SIesrill, East Orange, N.J. 

[.tt'Utcnaiil Governors General, Benjamin C. Allen, 1215 E. S-'d St., Chicago, 111.; 
W«nSTKR Hut'ci:, vSo Baker St., Pynn, Mass.; EarlE A. Miller, Past Orange, N.J. 
Secretary General, II. Donald Holmes, Summit, N.J. 
Registrar General, Luther ATWOOD, 8 .Sagamore St., Lynn, Mass. 
Treasurer General, Albert J. Sqi'ikk, Gray Oaks, Vonkers, N. V. 
Chaplain General, Rev. J. Euward KirbyE, D. D., Des Moines, Iowa. 



BANNERS AWARDED FOR INCREASE IN MEMBERSHIP. 

The Traveling Banner. 

The Traveling Banner, presented to the National Society by the Colo- 
rath 1 Society, is awarded each year, by terms of the Rift, to the State 
Society of one hundred or more members which makes the largest per- 
centage of net gain in membership during the year ending' March 31. 

The Syracuse Banner. 

The Syracuse Banner, presented to the National Society by the Syra- 
cuse Chapter, is awarded each year to the State Society making the 
greatest actual enrollment of new members during the year ending 
March 31. 



>4 sons op the; amkkican revolution. 

GENERAL OFFICERS FROM 1889 to 1920. 



General Officers Elected at New York, April 30, 1889. 



President Genera 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gene 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice- President Gener; 
V ice- President Gener 
Vice-President Gene 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice- 1 'resilient Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
\' ice- P resident Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice- President Gener; 
Vice-President Genen 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Vice-President Gener; 
Secretary General. . . . 
Assistant Secretary G 
Assistant Secretary G 
.Assistant Secretary G 
Treasurer General. . . 
Registrar General 
Chaplain General 



Hon. Lucius P. Deming (Conn.) 

al for Alabama Major G. 1». West 

1 for Arkansas Coe. S. W. Wiij.iams 

al for California Cot,. A. S. 1 Iup.barp 

al for Connecticut Mat. J. C. Kinney 

for Delaware A. J. Woodman 

al for Illinois 13 is HOP C. E. Cheney 

al for Indiana Wieuam E. EnGUSH 

al for Kentucky Simon B. Buckner 

al for Maine C. H. Denison 

al for Maryland Rev. John G. Morris, D. D. 

d for Massachusetts Kiavin S. .Barrett 

al for Michigan .Wh.eiam H. BrEarey 

al for . Minnesota John P.. Sancorn 

al for Missouri D. R. Francis 

al for New Hampshire H. K, Seayton 

al for New Jersey ROBERT S. Green 

al for New York Wieeiam H. Arnoux 

al for Ohio Rutherford B. Hayes 

al for Rhode Island E. B. Andrews 

al for South Carolina WADE JIa.mpTon 

al for Tennessee Ok. 1 ). C. Keeey 

al for Vermont W. P. DiEETNGHAM 

al for Virginia Fitzhugh Lee 

al for West Virginia John J. Jacob 

Wisconsin WiEEIAM D. Hoard 

District of Columhia . Admirai, D. D. Pouter 

d for France Edmond de Lafayette 

Lieut. J. C. Cresap, U. S. N. (Md.) 

eneral Ciias. J. KlNG (Cal.) 

eneral WlESON J. Giu, (Ohio) 

eneral WiEEIAM FRANCIS CREGAR (Md.) 

James Otis (N..Y.) 

*. L. L. Tarbeee (Mass.) 

Rev. Ti moth y Dwight ( Conn.) 



.1 for 

1 for 



General Officers Eekc 
President General 



at Louisvji.ee, Ky., Aprie 30, 1800. 
...... Dr. WieEiam Seward WEbii (\ r t.) 



I fonorary Vice-President General. .Adm'i, D. D. Porter, U. S. N. ( D. C.) 
Honorary Vice-President General . . .Gen. Joseph F. Johnston (D. C.) 

Honorary Vice-President General Edwin S. Barrett (Mass.) 

Vice-President General . Lucius P. Deming (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Gov. Simon B. Buckner (Ky.) 



Cl'NKkAl, oH'K'KKS, l8K<; To [9 JO. 25 

Vice-President General William H. Arnoux (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Josiah C. PumpELLY (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Dr. G. Brown Goode (D. C.) 

Secretary General Lieut. James C. Cresap, U. S. N. (Md.) 

Treasurer General James Otis (N. Y.) 

Registrar General ' Luther L,. Tarhell (Mass.) 

1 hMorian General William FRANCIS CrECAR (Md.) 

Surgeon General William Thornton Parker, M. D. (Mass.) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Ciias. l\. CHENEY, D. D. (111.) 

General Oeeicers ! ; .i. r.en'.n at Hartford, Conn., April 30, 1891. 

President General Dr. William Si'.wakd Webb (Vt.) 

Active Vice-President General.. GlvN. HORACE PoR-TER (1). C.) 

\cti\c Vice- President General Jonathan Trumbull (Conn.) 

\etivc Vice'- President General Gen. Bradley T. Johnson (Aid.) 

Wtive \ ice- President General. .',... .Judge Albert Edgertqn (Minn.) 

Active Vice-President General Col. Champion S. Chase (Neb.) 

Honorary Vice-President General.. Rear Adm'l Worden, U.S.N. (D. C.) 

Honorary Vice-President General I y utiier L. Tarheel (Alass.) 

Honorary Vice-President General William Wirt Henry (Va.) 

Secretary General Lieut. James C. Cresap, U. S. N. (Md.) 

Treasurer General James Otis (N. Y.) 

Registrar General Dr. G. Brown Goode (1). C) 

Historian General Henry Hall (N. Y.) 

Surgeon General Dr. Ciias. E. Briggs (Ohio) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev, Ciias. E. Cheney, D. D. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at New York City, April 30, 1892. 

President General Gen. Horace Porter (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Jonathan Trumbull (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. (D. C.) 

Vice-President General Gen. T. S. Peck ( Vt.) 

Vice-President General Paul Revere (N. J.) 

Honorary Vice-President General Chauncey M. Depew (N. Y.) 

Honorary Vice-President General Tnos. F, Bayard (Del.) 

Honorary Vice-President General .... Gen* Bradley T.Johnson (Md.) 

Secretary General A. Howard Clark (1). . C.) 

Treasurer General Charles Waldo Haskhns (N. Y.) 

Registrar General Dr. G. Brown Goopti (D. C.) 

Historian General Henry Hall (N. Y.) 

Surgeon General Dk. Aurelius Bowen- (Neb.) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Ciias. lv Cheney, DA^i. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Chicago, III., June 16, 1893. 

President General Gen. Horace Por ter (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Chauncey M. DepEW (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Henry M. Shepakd (111.) 



26 SONS OF THIv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U.S.A. (D. C.) 

Vice-President General Henry C. Robinson (Conn.) 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy (N. j.) 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. 'Howard Clark (D. C) 

Historian General Henry Hale (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General . Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D.D. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Washington, D. C, April 30, 1894. 

President General Gen. Horace Porter (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. (D.C) 

Vice-President General. .. .Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General Col. William RlDGELY GRIFFITH (Md.) 

Vice-President General Edwin S. Barrett (Mass.) 

Vice-President General John Whitehead (N. J.) 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy (N. j.) 

Treasurer General Chas. W. HASKINS (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Historian General HENRY Hall (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Boston, Mass., May i, 1895. 

President General Gen. Horace Porter (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U.S.A. (D.C.) 

Vice-President General. ... Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U.S.A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General Edwin Shepard Barrett (Mass.) 

Vice-President General John Whitehead (N. J.) 

Vice-President General Cushman K. Davis (Minn.) 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy (N. J.) 

Treasurer General , Chas. W. PIaskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Historian General PIenry Hall (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. (HI.) 

General Officers Elected at Richmond, Va., April 30, 1896. 

President General Gen. Horace Portf.r (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General. .. .Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General Edwin S. Barrett (Mass.) 

Vice-President General John Whitehead (N. J.) 

Vice-President General Col. William Ridgely Griffith (Md.) 

Vice-President General William Wirt PIf.nry ( Va.) 

Secretary General Franklin Murphy (N. J.) 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Plistorian General PIenry Hall (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. D. (111.) 



OICNI-KAI, OI-l'MCKRS, 1 889 TO I92O. 2J 

General Officers Elected at Cleveland, Ohio, April 30, 1897 

President General Edwin Shepard Barrf ( tt (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Col. Thomas M. Andkrson, U. S. A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General John WHITEHEAD (N. J.) 

Vice-President General James M. Richardson (Ohio) 

Vice-President General Capt\ Samuel Eberly Gross (111.) 

Vice-President General Gi'.n. J. C. BRRCKlNKrpcii, U. S. A. (1). G.) 

Secretary General Franklin MurPjHY (N. J.) 

Treasurer General CllAS. W. Haskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. 1 Iowahd Clark (I). C.) 

Historian General Henry Haw, (N. Y.) 

Chaixlain Central Rt. Rev. Chas. E. Cheney, D. 1 ). (111.) 

General Oi-eiceks. Elected at Morkistown, N. J., April 30, 1898. 

President General Edwin Shepard Barrett (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Franklin Murphy (N. J.) 

Vice- President General, .... .Gen. j. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. (J ). C.) 
Vice-President General. . ..Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General James M. Richardson (Ohio) 

Vice-President General John Whitehead (N. J.) 

Secretary General CapT. Samuel EpEREY Gross ( 111.) 

Treasurer General Chas. W. Haskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

1 lisiorian General Enwn. M. GallaUDET, EE. D. ( D. C.) 

Chaplain General Rev. Rueus W. Clark, D. D. (Mich.) 

General Officers Elected at Detroit, Mich., May 2, 1899. 

President General Franklin Murphy (N. J.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. C. Breckinridge, U. S. A. (1). C) 

Vice-President General John Whitehead (N. J.) 

Vice-President General :Tiios. W. Palmer (Mich.) 

Vice-President General Jonathan Trumbull (Conn.) 

Vice-President General James H. Anderson (Ohio) 

Secretary General Capt. Samuel Eberly Gross ( 111.) 

Treasurer General Charles Waldo Haskins (N. Y.) 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (1). C) 

Historian General Enwn. Af. Gai.laudET, EE. D. (1). C) 

Chaplain General Rev. RuFUS W. Clark, D. 1). (Mich.) 

General (Officers Elected at New York City, May i, 1900 

President General Gr.w J. C Breckinridge, U. S. A. (1). C.) 

Vice-President General .... Col. Thomas M. Anderson, U. S. A. (Ore.) 

Vice-President General James H. Gierkrt (Til.) 

Vice-President General Gen. Francis II. AiTLETON (Mass.) 

Vice-President General GEN. Edwin S. Greeley (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Howard De Haven Ross (Del.) 



28 SONS OF TilK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary General CapT. Samuel Eberly Gross (111 

Treasurer General Cornelius Amory Pugsley (N. Y. 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C 

Historian General .Gen. Theodore S. Peck (Vt 

Chaplain General Rev. Etiielbert D. Warfield, D. D. (Pa 

General Officers Elected at Pittsburgh, Pa., May i, 1901. 

President General Walter Setii Logan ( N. Y 

Vice-President General James Denton Hancock (Pa 

Vice-President General Thomas Pitts (Mich 

Vice-President General Horace Davis (Calif 

Vice-President General. John Whitehead (N. J 

Vice-President General George A. Pearre (Md 

Secretary General Cart. Samuel Eberly Gross (111 

Treasurer General Cornelius Amory Pugsley (N. Y 

Registrar General , A. Howard Clark (D. C. 

Historian General George Williams Bates (Mich 

Chaplain General Rev. EtheebErT D. Wakeield, D. D. (Pa 

General Officers Elected at Washington, D, C, May i, 1902. 

President General Edwin WarfiELD (Md, 

Vice-President General Cornelius A. Pugsley (N. Y, 

Vice-President General Cart. Samuel Eberly Gross (111, 

Vice-President General Noble D. Earner (D. C. 

Vice-President General Howard De Haven Ross (Del. 

Vice-President General Col. Albert J. Logan ( Pa, 

Secretary General Charles Waldo Haskins (N. Y, 

Treasurer General Nathan Warren (Mass. 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C. 

Historian General George Williams Bates (Mich, 

Chaplain General Rev. Rueus W. Clark, D. D. (Mich, 

General Officers Elected at New Haven, Conn., May i, 1903. 

President General Gen. Edwin S. Greeley (Conn. 

Vice-President General Major Ira H. Evans (Texas 

Vice-President General Dr. John W. Bayne (D. C, 

Vice-President General Daniel M. Lord (111, 

Vice-President General..* #..J6hn J. Hubbell (N. J. 

Vice-President General Arthur W. Dennis (R. I, 

Secretary General Edward Payson Cone (N. Y, 

Treasurer General Nathan Warren ( Mass. 

Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C. 

Historian General George Williams Bates (Mich. 

Chaplain General Rev. Rueus W. Clark, D. D. (Mich. 

General Officers Ejected at St. Louis, Mo., June 16, 1904. 

President General Hon. James Denton Hancock ( Pa; 

Vice-President General Gen. George Howell Shields (Mo. 



CKNKkAI, OFFICERS, 1889 TO 1920. 29 

Vice-President General John Paul Earnest (D. C. ) 

Vice-President General Col. A. D. Cutler ( Calif.) 

Vice-President General. Edward Payson Conk (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Charles Kingsbury Miller (111.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D.'G.) 

Treasurer General Isaac W. Birdseye (Conn.) 

1 listorian General George Williams Bates (Mich.) 

Chaplain General REV. J. W. Atwood, D. 1). (Ohio) 

General Officers Elected in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, 
May 3, 1905. 

President General Gen. Francis Henry ApplETon (Mass.) 

\ 'ice-President General Hon. Morris B. Beardsi.EY (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Cot,. John C. Lewis (Ky.) 

Vice-President General Prof. Benjamin Blake Minor (Va.) 

\ ice- President General Hon. Henry Stockbridge (Md.) 

Vice-President General Nelson A. McClary (111.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General Isaac W. Birdseye (Conn.) 

Historian General Pkoe. William K. Wickes (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General Rev. J. W. Atwood, D. D. (Ohio) 



General Officers Elected in Faneuil Hall, Boston, May i, 1906. 



President General Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsi.ey (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General MoSES GrEELEY Parker, M. D. (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Hon. Henry Stockbridge (Md.) 

Vice-President General Hon. Edward Anson Butler (Me.) 

Vice-President General Hon. Lunseord L. Lewis (Va.) 

Vice-President General Andrew W. Bray (N. J.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General ... .A. HOWARD Clark (D. C.) 

i Treasurer General Isaac W. Birdseye (Conn.) 
Historian General Prof. William K. Wickes (N. Y.) 

Chaplain General Rev. J. W. Atwood, D. D. (Ohio) 

General Officers* Elected at Denver, Colo., June 4, 190;. 

President General Nelson A. McClary (111.) 

Vice-President General Tr*ueman G. Avery ( N. Y.) 

Vice-President General * William Hamilton Bayly (D. C.) 

Vice-President General Peliiam W. Ames (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Gen. J. W. Whiting (Ala.) 

Vice-President General Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer (Colo.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General. ... A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

1 Treasurer General Wii.lard Secor ( Iowa) 
1 listorian General William Frederick Slocum, LL. 1). (Colo.) 
Chaplain General Rev. J. Herman Randall (Mich.) 



30 sons of Tin-; American revolution. 

General Officers Elected at Buffalo, N. Y., May i, 1908. 

President General '. ." Hon. Henry Stockbridge (Aid.) 

Vice-President General GEORGE W1LLIAM.S BATES (Mich.) 

Vice-President General William Jamks Van Patten (Vt.) 

Vice-President General John R. Webster (Neb.) 

Vice-President General Dr. Clarkson N. Guyer (Colo.) 

Vice-President General George Rowland Howe (N. J.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General ... .A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General WlEEARD SECOR (Iowa) 

Historian General Walter KendalL W ATKINS (Mass.) 

Chaplain General Rkv. Frank Oliver Hall, D. D. (N. Y.) 

General Officers Elected at Baltimore Congress, Session at 
Annapolis, May t, 1009. 

President General Hon. Morris B. BeardslEY (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Dr. Clarkson N. Guvfr (Colo.) 

Vice-President General Col. Peter P. Pkscud (La.) 

Vice-President General WlEEARD SECOR (Iowa) 

Vice-President General George C. Sargent ( Cali f.) 

Vice-President General.. Major MosES VealE (Pa.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General \. Howard Clark (1). C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Historian General WALTER Kendall Watkins (Mass.) 

Chaplain General.., Rev. Frank LIVER Hall, D, D. (N. Y.) 

General Officers Elected at Toledo, Ohio, 1910. 

President General William A. Marrle (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General R. C. Ballard Thrustom ( Ky.) 

Vice-President General William T. Dewey (Vt.) 

Vice-President General. .Com ma ni»f,r John H. Moore, U. S. N. (D. C.) 

Vice-President General Cor.. Samuel K Bliss (111.) 

Vice-President General R. M. Sims (Cal.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General V Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General v Jon n II. BURROUGHS (N. Y.) 

1 listnrian General David L. Pierson (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. John TiMttniY Stone, D. I). (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Louisville, Ky., May 3, 1911. 

President General MoSEsGrEELEY Parker, M. D. (Mass.) 

Vi.ce-Presulent (General Josfru G. Butler, Jr. (Ohio) 

Vice-President General Gen. Irving Hale (Colo.) 

Vice-President General R. C. Ballard Thruston (Ky.^ 

Vice-President General Gkorge O. Dix (Ind.) 

Vice-President General. .Commander John if. Moore, U. S. N. (1). C.) 
Secretary General and Registrar General., . .A* Howard Clark (IX C.) 



CKNKKAI, OKI'K'KKS, 1889 TO HJ20. $1 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Historian General David L. PlgRSON (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. John Timothy Stone, D. D. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Boston, Mass., 1912. 

President General Hon. James M. Richardson (Ohio) 

Vice-President General AmedeE B. Cole (Mo.) 

Vice-President General. . . O. D. Baldwin (Calif.) 

Vice-President General Henry V. A. Josi.in (R. I.) 

Vice-President General Newell B. Woodworth (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Edwin Sanfokd Crandon (Mass.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General V Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

1 listorian General . . .David I y . PiERS.ON (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. John Timothy Stone, D. D. (111.) 

General Officers Elected at Chicago, III., May 20, 1913. 

President General Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston (Ky.) 

1 Vice-President General La Verne Noyes (Til.) 
Vice-President General W11.1.SON WHIPPLE KlRBY (Colo.) 

Vice-President General James Phinney Baxter (Me.) 

Vice-President General. Wallace McCamant (Ore.) 

Vice-President General. .Rear Adm. George W. P.aird, U. S. N. (D. C.) 
Secretary General and Registrar General ... .A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John II. BURROUGHS (N. Y.) 

i listorian General David L. Pierson (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. William Force Whitaker, D. D. (N.J.) 

General Officers Elected at Syracuse, N. Y., May 19, 1914. 

President General ROGERS Clark Ballard Thruston (Ky.) 

Vice-President General. .Com WANDER John H. Moore, U.S.N. (D. C) 

Vice-President General Alvin M. Woolson (Ohio) 

Vice-President General Herman W. Fernderger ( Pa.) 

Vice-President General.... William K. Boardman (Tenn.) 

Vice-President General LlEUT.-CoE. M. W. Wood, U. S. A. (Idaho) 

Secretary General and Registrar General. ... A. Howard Clark (D. C) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

I listorian General. David 1/ Pierson (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Ki-v. William Porce WiiiTAKER, D. D. (N.J.) 

General Officers Elected at Portland, Ore., July 20, 1915. 

President General Ne.U'ELE B. WoodworTH (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Henry F, PundeRSON (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Ijfut.-Col. M. W. Wood, U. S. A. (Idaho) 

Vice-President General Samuel Judd Holmes (Wash.) 

V ice- President General W. K. Boardman (Tenn.) 

Vice-President General Samuel Culver Park (Utah) 



32 SONS 01* TIIK AMKKICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary General and Registrar General ... .A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Historian General .David L. PiERSON (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. R. L. McCready, D. D. (Ky.) 

Gkni-rae Officers Elected at Newark, N. J., May 16, kj l6, and 
Continued in Office until May 21, 1918. 

President General Elmer M. Wentwortii (Iowa) 

Vice-President General. Orison J. C. Dutton (Wash.) 

Vice-President General Frederick E. Emerson (Va.) 

Vice-President General Thomas W. Williams (N. J.) 

Vice-President General .Philip F. Turner (Me.) 

Vice-President General W. K. Boardman (Tenn.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General. ... A. Howard Ceark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Historian General David L. Pierson (N. J.) 

Chaplain General Rev. J. O. Foster (Wash.) 

General Officers Elected at Rochester, N. Y., May 21, 1918. 

President General Eouis Annin Ames (N. Y.) 

Vice-President General Charles French Read (Mass.) 

Vice-President General Thomas W. Williams (N. J.) 

Vice-President General ALBERT M. Henry (Mich.) 

Vice-President General C. ROBERT Churchill (La.) 

Vice-President General .Thomas A. Perkins (Calif.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General. .. .A. Howard Clark (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

I listorian General GeorGF, Carpenter Arnold (R. I.) 

Chaplain General Rev. LEE S. McCoLLESTER, D. D, (Mass.) 

General Officers Elected at Detroit, Mich., May 20, 1910. 

President General CHANCELLOR L. JENICS (111.) 

Vice-President General George P. BURGESS (Conn.) 

Vice-President General Thomas W. Williams (N. J.) 

Vice-President General Moulton I [ouk (Ohio) 

Vice-President General Rinn Paine (Mo.) 

Vice-President General OvERTON G. Ellis (Wash.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General ... .Philip F. Earner (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John H. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Historian General GEORGF Carpenter Arnold ( R. I.) 

Chaplain General Rev. Lee S. McCoi.lestkr, D. I). (Mass,) 

(Note— A Howard Clark, Secretary General and Registrar General 
died December 3T, 1918, and by appointment of the Executive Com 
mittee, the office of Secretary General was filled by William S. Parks, 
of the District of Columbia, and that of Registrar General by Tennis 
D. Hunftino-, of New York, until the Annual Congress at Detroit, 
Mich., May 20, 1019.) 



I .-.•■•■■■. 

national charter. 33 

Generai, Officer? ElEcticij at Hartford, Conn., May 18, 1920. 

President General I Ion. James Marry Preston (Md.) 

Vice-President General George 11ai,e Nuttinc (Muss.) 

Vice-President General Thomas W. Wieuams ( N. J.) 

Vice-President General Moui.Ton Houk (Ohio) 

Vice-President General. Linn Paine (Mo.) 

Vice-President General John W. Bell, Jr. (Wash.) 

Secretary General and Registrar General .... Piiieip F. LARNER (D. C.) 

Treasurer General John 1 1. Burroughs (N. Y.) 

Plistorian General Georce Carpenter Arnold (R. I.) 

Genealogist General Walter K. WaTKINS (Mass.) 

Chancellor General HARVEY P. Reminc.ton ( N. Y.) 

Chaplain General R-KV. Lee S. McCoit.ESTEr, D. D., (Mass.) 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 



[Public — No. 214. ] 



H. R. 15332. 
FIFTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; 

At the First Session, 

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Monday, the fourth day 
of December, one thousand nine hundred and five. 



AN ACT 

To Incorporate the National Society ok the Sons of the American 

Revolution. 



Be it enacted by*lhe Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That Francis Henry 
Appleton, of Massachusetts; Lucius P. Deming, of Connecticut; William 
Seward Webb, of Vermont; Horace Porter, of New York; Joseph C. 
Breckinridge, of Washington, District of Columbia; Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey; Walter S. Logan, of New York; Edwin Warfield, of 
Maryland; Kdwin S. Greeley, of Connecticut; James D. .1 [an cock, of 
Pennsylvania j Morris 15. I5cardslcy, of Connecticut; John C. Lewis, of 
Kentucky; Henry Stock-bridge, of Maryland; Nelson A. McClary, of 



3-| SONS ())• 'ill iC AMlCttlCAN IU$V0J«UTJ0N. 

Illinois; A. Howard Clark, of Washington, District of Columbia; Isaac 
W. Birdseye, of Connecticut; William K. Wickcs, of New York; J. W. 
Atwood, of Ohio; J. W. Whiting, of Alabama; Ricardo E. Miner, of 
Arizona; Joseph M. Hill, of Arkansas; Alexander G. Eells, of Cali- 
fornia; Clarkson N. Guyer, of Colorado; Jonathan Trumbull, of Con- 
necticut; Thomas F, Bayard, of Delaware; William H. Bayly, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia; William S. Keyser, of Florida; Charles 
M, Cooke, of Hawaii; Inman H. Fowler, of Indiana; Eugene Secor, of 
Iowa; John M. Meade, of Kansas; Peter F. Pescud, of Louisiana; 
Waldo Pettengill, of Maine; James D. Iglehart, of Maryland; Moses G. 
Parker, of Massachusetts; Eufus W. Clark, of Michigan; James C. 
Haynes, of Minnesota; Ashley Cabell, of Missouri; Ogden A. South- 
mayd, of Montana; Amos Field, of Nebraska; Daniel C. Roberts, of 
New Hampshire; J. Franklin Fort, of New Jersey; William A. Marble, 
of New York; Isaac F. Mack, of Ohio; Henry H. Edwards, of Okla 
homa; Thomas M. Anderson, of Oregon; William L. Jones, of Penn- 
sylvania; John E. Studley, of Rhode Island; Theodore G. Carter, of 
South Dakota; J. A. Cartwright, of Tennessee; I. M. Standifer, of 
Texas; Fred A. Hale, of Utah; Henry D. Holton, of Vermont; Luns 
ford L. Lewis, of Virginia; Cornelius H. lianford, of Washington: 
J. Franklin Pierce, of Wisconsin; Trueman G. Avery, of New York: 
William W. J. W'arren, of New York; Henry V. A. Joslin, of Rhode 
Island; John Jaul Earnest, of Washington, District of Columbia; A. S. 
Plubbard, of California, and all such other persons as may from time 
to time be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby con- 
stituted a body corporate and politic, in the city of Washington, in the 
District of Columbia, by the name of the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Site. 2. That the purposes and objects of said corporation are de- 
clared to be patriotic, historical, and educational, and shall include those 
intended or designed to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by 
their services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, 
achieved the independence of the American people; to unite and pro 
mote fellowship among their descendants; to inspire them and the com- 
munity at large with a more profound reverence for the principles of 
the government founded by our forefathers; to encourage historical 
researeh in relation to the American Revolution; to acquire and pre- 
serve the records of the individual services of theipatriots of the war, 
as well as documents, relics, and landmarks; to mark the scenes of the 
Revolution by appropriate memorials; to celebrate the anniversaries of 
the. prominent events of the war and of the Revolutionary period; to 
foster true patriotism; to maintain and extend the institutions of 
American freedom, and to carry out the purposes expressed in the pre 
amble to the Constitution of our country and the injunctions of Wash- 
ington in his farewell address to the American people. 

SEC. 3. That said corporation shall have power to receive, purchase, 
hold, sell, and convey real and personal estate, so far only as may be 



NATIONAL CHARTER. 35 

necessary or convenient for its lawful purposes, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding at any one time. in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars' 
to sue and be sued, complain and defend in any court; to adopt a com 
moil seal, and to alter the same at pleasure; to make and adopt a con- 
stitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations for admission, .government, 
suspension, and expulsion of its members, and from time to time tc 
alter and repeal such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations, and 
to adopt others in their places; to provide for the election of its officers 
and to define their duties; to provide for State Societies or Chapters 
with rules for their conduct, and to regulate and provide for the man- 
agement, safe-keeping, and protection of its property and funds; 
Provided always, That such constitution, by-laws, rules, and regula- 
tions be not inconsistent with the laws of the United States or any of 
the States thereof. 

SEC. 4. That the property and affairs of said corporation shall be 
managed by not more than sixty nor less than forty trustees, who shall 
be elected annually at such time as shall be fixed in the by-laws, and at 
least one trustee shall be elected annually from a list of nominees to be 
made by each of the State Societies and submitted to this Society at 
least thirty days before the annual meeting, in accordance with general 
provisions regulating such nominations as may be adopted by this 
Society. 

Sec. 5. That the first meeting of this corporation shall be held on a 
call issued by any fifteen of the above-named corporators by a written 
notice signed by them, stating the time and place of meeting, addressed 
to each of the corporators personally named herein and deposited in 
the post-office at least five days before the day of meeting.. 

Sec. 6. That this charter shall take effect upon its being accepted by a 
majority vote of the corporators named herein who shall be present at 
said meeting, or at any other meeting specially called for that purpose; 
and notice of such acceptance shall be given by said corporation by 
causing a certificate to that effect signed by its President and Secretary 
to be filed in the office of the Secretary of State. 

SEC. 7. That Congress reserves the right to alter, amend, or repeal 
this act. 

J. G. Cannon, 
fipcaktr of the House of Representatives. 
Chas. W. Fairbanks, 
Vice-President of the United States 

mid President of the Senate. 

Approved June 9, 1906. 

Theodore Rooseveet. 



1892166 



CONSTITUTION 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution 

(Adopted at the Denver Congress, June 3, 1907; amended at Toledo 
Congress, May 2, 1910; at Louisville Congress, May 2, 1911 ; 
at Rochester Congress, May 20, 19 rS; at Detroit 
Congress, May /y, 19I9, and at Hart- 
ford Congress, May 17, 1920.) 



Article: I. — Name. 

The name of this organization shall be "The National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution." 

ARTICLE li.— 1 J UKP0SES AND OBJECTS. 

The purposes and objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, 
historical, and educational, and shall include those intended or designed 
to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their services or sacrifices 
daring the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence 
of the American people; to unite and promote fellowship among their 
descendants; to inspire them and the community at large with a more 
profound reverence for the principles of the government founded by 
our forefathers; to encourage historical research in relation to the 
American Revolution, to acquire and preserve the records of the indi- 
vidual services of the patriots of the war, as well as documents, relics, 
and landmarks; to mark the scenes of the Revolution by appropriate 
memorials; to celebrate the anniversaries of the prominent events of 
the war and of the Revolutionary period; to foster true patriotism; to 
maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom,<»and to carry 
out the purposes expressed in the preamble of the Constitution of our 
country and the injunctions of Washington in his farewell address to 
the American people. ♦ 

Articu', III. — Membership. 

Section i. Any man shall be eligible to membership in the Society 
who, being of the age of twenty-one years or over, and a citizen of 
good repute in the community, is the lineal descendant of an ancestor 
who was at all times unfailing in his loyalty to, and rendered active 
service in, the cause of American Independence, either as an officer, 
soldier, seaman, marine, militiaman, or minute man, in the armed forces 
of the Continental Congress, or of any one of the several Colonies or 

(36) 



N A T 1 N A I y CO N ST I T U T JON. 37 

States, or as a signer of the Declaration of Independence; or as a 
member of a Committee of Safety or Correspondence; or as a member 
of any Continental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature; 
or as a recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts 
of resistance to the authority of Great Britain. 

Provided, however, that any male person, above the age of l8 
years and under the age of 21 years, whose qualifications in regard 
to ancestry and personal character are as above prescribed, shall be 
eligible to a qualified membership to be known and designated as 
junior membership, said junior membership to permit to each junior 
member all privileges granted to full membership except those of 
holding office, of voting, of holding any interest in the property or 
funds of the Society or of any Chapter thereof, or of receiving a cer- 
tificate of membership except as hereinafter provided, or of wearing 
any insignia of the Society other than the rosette ; a special certificate 
may be issued to such junior member in such form as may be pre- 
scribed by the Board of Trustees: providing such junior member 
shall not be in arrears for dues, on attaining the age of twenty-one 
years he shall automatically be vested with full membership in the 
Society. 

Suction 2. No one shall be entitled to membership in any State 
Society who has previously been a member of any other State Society 
and dropped for non-payment of dues, until the indebtedness of such 
individual to the first Society shall have been adjusted. 

Section 3. Application for membership shall be made to any State 
Society, in duplicate, upon blank forms prescribed by the Board of 
Trustees, and shall in each case set forth the name, occupation, and 
residence of the applicant, line of descent, and the name, residence, and 
i services of his ancestor or ancestors in the Revolution, from whom he 

derives eligibility. 

The applicant shall make oath that the statements of his application 
are true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

Upon the approval of an application by the State Society to which it 
is made, one copy shall be transmitted to the Registrar General of the 
National Society, who shall examine further the eligibility of the appli- 
cant. Tf satisfied that the member is not eligible, he shall return the 
application for correction. 

Until the State Society shall satisfy the Registrar, General of the 
eligibility of such applicant, his name shall not be placed on the roll 
of membership. 

Section 4. The official designation of the members of The National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be "Compatriots." 

Article IV. — National and State Societies. 

Section i. The National Society shall embrace all the members of the 
State Societies of the Sons of the American Revolution now existing 
or which may hereafter be established under this Constitution. 



38 SONS 01- T111C AMERICAN INVOLUTION. 

SECTION 2. Whenever in any State or Territory in which a State 
Soeiety does not exist, or in which a State Society lias become inactive, 
or failed for two years to pay its annual dues to the National Society, 
fifteen or more persons duly qualified for membership in this Society 
may associate themselves as a State Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, and organize in accordance with this Constitution, they 
may be admitted by the Board of Trustees to the National Society as 

"The Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and shall 

thereafter have exclusive local jurisdiction in the State or Territory or 
in the District in which they are organized, subject to the provisions of 
this Constitution, but this provision shall not be construed so as to 
exclude the admission of candidates residing in other States. 

Section 3. Each State Society shall judge of the qualifications of its 
members and of those proposed for membership, subject to the pro- 
visions of this Constitution, and shall regulate all matters pertaining to 
its own affairs. It shall have authority to establish local Chapters 
within its own jurisdiction, and to endow the Chapters with such power 
as it may deem proper, not inconsistent with the charter of the Na- 
tional Society or with this Constitution. It shall have authority, after 
due notice and impartial trial, to expel any member who, by conduct 
unbecoming a gentleman, shall render himself unworthy to remain a 
member of the Society. 

Section 4. Each State Society shall submit to the Annual Congress 
of the National Society a report, setting forth by name the additions, 
transfers and deaths, and any other changes in the membership, and the 
progress of the State Society during the preceding year, and making 
such suggestions as it shall deem proper for the promotion of the 
objects of the National Society. 

Section 5. Whenever a member in good standing in his Society shall 
change his residence from the jurisdiction of the State Society of which 
he is a member to that of another, he shall be entitled, if he so elects, 
to a certificate of honorable demission from his own State Society, in 
order that he may be transferred to the State Society to whose juris- 
diction he shall have changed his residence: Provided, That his mem- 
bership shall continue in the former until he shall have been elected a 
member of the latter. 

Each State Society shall, however, retain full control of the admis- 
sion of members by transfer. * 

Section 6. Whenever the word "State" occurs in this Constitution, it 
shall be held to include within its meaning the District of Columbia 
and the Territories of the United States. 

Section 7. A Society may be formed in any foreign country by fif- 
teen or more persons who are eligible to membership under this Con- 
stitution, which shall bear the same relation to the national organization 
as the State Society, subject to the provisions of this Constitution. 



NATJONAL CONSTITUTION. 39 

Article V. — Officers and Trustees. 

Section i. The General Officers of the National Society shall be a 
President General, five Vice-Presidents General, a Secretary General, 
Treasurer General, Registrar General, Historian General, Genealogist 
General, Chancellor General, and Chaplain General, who shall be elected 
by ballot by a vote of a majority of the members present and entitled 
to vote at the annual meeting of the Congress of the National Society, 
and shall hold office for one year and until their successors shall be 
elected and qualified. 

In case of the death or disability of any of the above officers, the 
Executive Committee is empowered to elect a successor to fill the un- 
expired term. 

In the election of the five Vice-Presidents General one shall be chosen 
from each of the five districts, as follows: 

(i) New England District: (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut). 

(2) Middle and Coast District: (New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida). 

(3) Mississippi Valley, East District: (Michigan, Wisconsin, Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, 
Mississippi). 

(4) Mississippi Valley. West District: (Minnesota. North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, 
Louisiana, Texas). 

(5) Mountain and Pacific District: (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, 
Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, 
California, Hawaii, Philippines). 

The boundaries of the said districts may be changed by vote of the 
Executive Committee. 

Section 2. The General Officers provided for in section 1, together 
• with one member from each State Society, shall constitute the Board 

of Trustees of the National Society. Such Trustees from each of the 
several State Societies shall be elected annually at the Congress of the 
National Society, upon the nomination, or from a list of nominees, to 
lie made by each of the Stale Societies and submitted to the National 
Society by the filing thereof with the Secretary of the National Society 
at least thirty days before the meeting of the Annual Congress of the 

I National Society. And in the event that any one or more of the State 

Societies shall omit or neglect to make such nominations or submit said 
list of nominees, by the time herein required, then the President of the 
State vSociety so in default shall, virtute officii, he chosen as and become 
the representative of his State Society upon said Board. 

SECTION 3. The Board of Trustees shall have charge of, and be 
charged with the care and custody of, all property belonging to the 
National Society, and to that end shall be vested with the powers con- 
ferred by section 3 of the Act of Incorporation of the National Society: 



40 SONS Ul> Tillt AMERICAN KKVUI.UTION . 

Provided, however, That it shall not have the power to sell, convey, or 
in anywise cucumber any real estate belonging to the Society without 
the assent of three-fourths of the members of said Board. The Board 
of Trustees shall also have authority to adopt and promulgate the 
By-Laws of the National Society, to prescribe the duties of the General 
Officers, to provide the seal, to designate and make regulations for the 
issue of the insignia, and to transact the general business of the Na- 
tional Society during the intervals between the sessions of the Congress. 

Meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held at the call of the 
President General. Meetings shall be called at the request of seven 
members. At such meetings seven shall constitute a quorum. 

Section 4. An executive committee of seven, consisting of the Presi- 
dent General as chairman, and sbv members to be nominated by him and 
approved by the Board of Trustees, shall, in the interim between the 
meetings of the Board, transact such business as may be delegated to- 
it by a Congress of the Society or the Board of Trustees. 

The members of the Executive Committee other than the President 
General, shall be known as Directors General, and by virtue of their 
office shall be members of the National Congress and entitled to vote 
at the annual meeting of the National Congress during their terms of 
office. 

Article VI. — Dues. 

Each State Society shall pay annually to the Treasurer General, to 
defray the expenses of the National Society, fifty cents for each active 
member thereof, unless intermitted by the National Congress. 

All such dues shall be paid on or before the first day of April in each 
year for the ensuing year, in order to secure representation in the 
Congress of the National Society. 

Article VI T. — Meetings and Factions. 

Section i. The Annual Congress of the National Society for the 
election of the General Officers and for the transaction of business shall 
be held on the third Monday of May in each year. The place of such 
meeting shall be designated by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Congress may be called by the 
President General, and shall be called by him when directed so to do by 
the Board of Trustees, or whenever requested in writing so to do by at 
least five State Societies, on giving thirty days' notice, specifying the 
time and place of such meeting and the business to be transacted. . 

Section 3. The following shall be members of all such annual or 
special meetings of the Congress, and shall be entitled to vote therein : 

(1) All the General Officers and the ex-Presidents General of the 
National Society. 

(2) The members of the Board of Trustees and \\\q President or 
Senior Vice-President of each State Society. 

(3) One delegate at large from each State Society. 

(4) One delegate from every fifty members of the Society within a 
State and for a fraction of twenty-five or over. 



NATIONAL CONSTITUTION. 4I 

Suction 4. After the adjournment of the Eighteenth Annual Con- 
gress of this Society, State Societies shall be represented at meetings 
of the National Society only by members of their own State Society, 
either duly elected, or who in the absence of regularly elected delegates, 
may be chosen by the regularly elected attending delegates of such 
State Society from the members of such State Society who ma}' be 
present at any meeting of the National Society. 

Art 1 cue VIII. — Permanent Fund. 

Section i. There shall be created and maintained a Permanent Fund 
of the Society, the income or interest from which shall be covered into 
the general treasury of the Society and available for the general pur- 
poses of the Society, but the principal of which shall be maintained 
intact, and shall only be used or diminished upon the unanimous recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee, approved by the Board of 
Trustees, and ratified by a four-fifths vote of the delegates present at 
the annual or special Congress to which such recommendation of the 
Executive Committee shall be reported. 

Suction 2. The Permanent Fund shall be composed of all legacies or 
donations to the Society, where no other application of the funds is 
designated by the testator or donor, all commissions received from the 
sales of badges, rosettes and ribbons, and such sum or sums as may 
from time to time by the Executive Committee be transferred to such 
fund from the general funds of the Society. 

Suction 3. The permanent fund shall be invested in securities author- 
ized to be held by Savings Banks in Massachusetts, Connecticut, or 
New York, and any premium paid in purchasing such securities shall 
be repaid from the first income received. 

■♦ Article IX. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be altered or amended at any meeting of the 
Congress of the National Society: Provided, That sixty days' notice of 
the proposed alterations or amendments, which shall first have been 
recommended by a State Society, or by a prior Congress, or by the 
Board of Trustees, or by the .Executive Committee of the National 
Society, shall be sent by the Secretary General to the President of each 
State Society. 

A vote of two-thirds of those present shall be necessary to their 
adoption. 

Article X. 

This Constitution shall take effect upon its adoption. 



BY-LAWS 

OF 

The National Society of the Sons of the American 

Revolution 

(Adopted at Denver Congress, June 3, looy ; amended at Boston Con- 
gress, May 20-22, 1912; at Portland Congress, July 20, 
1915; at Rochester Congress, 1918; at Detroit 
Congress, ujio, and at Hartford 
Congress, nj2o.) 



Article I. — Election of Officers, 

All nominations of General Officers shall be made from the floor, and 
the election shall be by ballot. A majority shall elect. The nomina- 
tions may be acted upon directly or may be referred to a committee to 
examine and report. 

Article II. — OfI'ICI^RS. 

The duties of the General Officers shall be such as usually appertain 
to their offices, and they shall have such other duties as are hereinafter 
imposed or shall be delegated to them by an annual Congress or by the 
Board of Trustees. 

They shall report at the annual meeting, and at such other times as 
they may be required to do so by the Board of Trustees. 

Article III.— President General. 

Section 1. The President General, in addition to his general duties, 
shall be ex officio chairman of the Board of Trustees, and of the Execu- 
tive Committee, and a member of every other committee. 

Section 2. He shall appoint the following committees: 

Committee on Auditing and Finance. 
Committee on Credentials. 
Committee on Resolutions. 
Memorial Committee. 
Committee on Organization. 
Committee on Education. 

The duties of the above committees shall be such as usually pertain 
to committees of like character. He may also appoint such other com- 
mittees as in his judgment may be deemed necessary or advisable. 

Article IV. — Vice-Presidents Gi-niCral. 

The Vice-Presidents General shall, in each of their respective dis- 
tricts, seek in every manner to promote the interest and activities of % 

(42) 



NATIONAL BY-LAWS. 43 

the National Society and of the State Societies within their jurisdic- 
tion; encourage the formation of new chapters and the enrollment of 
new members. They shall represent the National Society in the absence 
of the President General on any proper occasion, but acting at all times 
under his direction and control. 

Article V. — Secretary General. 

The Secretary General, in addition to his general duties, shall have 
charge of the seal, and give due notice of all meetings of the National 
Society or Board of Trustees. He shall give due notice to all General 
Officers and State Societies of all votes, orders, and proceedings affect- 
ing or appertaining to their duties. He shall distribute all pamphlets, 
circulars, rosettes, and supplies, as directed by the Board of Trustees. 

Article VI. — Treasurer General. 

Section i. The Treasurer General shall collect and receive the funds 
and securities of the National Society. He shall deposit the same to 
the credit of the "Society of the Sons of the American Revolution," and 
shall draw them thence for the use of the National Society, as directed 
by it or by the Board of Trustees, upon the order of the President 
General, countersigned by the Secretary General. His accounts shall 
be audited by a committee to be appointed at the Annual Meeting. 

SECTION 2. He shall give bond for the safe custody and application of 
the funds, the cost of such bond to be borne by the National Society. 

Article VI T. — Registrar General. 
1 _ 

The Registrar General shall keep a register of the names and dates 

of the election, resignation, or death of all members of the several State 
Societies, and shall have the care and custody of all duplicate appli- 
cations for membership. He shall issue upon the requisition of the 
Secretary or Registrar of the several State Societies certificates of 
membership and insignia to every member entitled thereto, through 
such Secretary or Registrar. 

Article VIII. — Historian General. 

The Historian General shall have the custody of aM the historical 
and biographical collections of which the National Society may become 
possessed and shall catalogue and arrange the same, and shall place 
the same in a fireproof repository for preservation. 

Article TX. — Genealogist General. 

The Genealogist General shall examine and report to the National 
Executive Committee upon all appeals from the decision or want of 
action of the Registrar General, which shall be submitted to him for 
that purpose, within thirty days after submission to him, and shall at 



44 



SONS OK THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



the same time advise the Registrar General of the National Society, 
from whom he received such appeals, of the result of his examination. 

Aimcr.K X. — Chancellor General. 

The Chancellor General shall he a lawyer duly admitted to the bar, 
and it shall he his duty to give legal opinions on matters affecting the 
Society when called upon by the proper officers. 

Article XI. — Chaplain General. 

The Chaplain General shall be a regularly ordained minister, and 
shall open and close all general meetings of the National Society with 
the services usual and proper on such occasions. 



Article XII. — State Societies. 

Each State Society shall— 

(i) Notify the Secretary General of the election and appointment of 
all officers, nominees for Board of Trustees, and delegates. 

(2) Transmit to the Registrar General duplicate applications of all 
accepted members, and promptly notify him of the resignation or death 
of all members thereof, and the names of those dropped from the roll 
for non-payment of dues. 

(3) Transmit to the Registrar General, on April 1 of each year, the 
report required by section _], Article IV, of the Constitution, such re- 
ports to cover the changes in membership occurring between April 1 
of the previous year and March 31 of the current year, and to be made 
on the blank forms furnished for the purpose by the Registrar General. 

(4) Pay -to the Treasurer General, on April 1 of each year, the annual 
dues for such Society, computed at the rate of fifty cents for every 
member carried on the rolls of such Society on that date. 

(5) Cause the Treasurer of such Society, when remitting funds for 
any purpose to the Treasurer General, to use the blank form of letter 
of transmittal prescribed by the Board of Trustees or Executive Com- 
mittee, and furnished by the Treasurer General for the purpose. 

Article XIII. — Board of Trustees. 

Section r. The Board of Trustees shall prepare and carry out plans 
for promoting the objects and growth of the Society; shall generally 
superintend its interests, and shall execute such other duties as shall be 
committed to it at any meeting of the National Society. It shall have 
charge of the printing of the Diploma and the manufacturing of the 
Insignia, and shall determine the price at which the same shall be issued. 

Section 2. It shall have the authority to admit or reorganize as a 
State Society any association of fifteen or more persons duly qualified 
for membership in the Society. 



NATIONAIy [JY-LAWS. 45 

Section 3. It shall have authority to make, alter, and amend the By- 
Laws as hereinafter provided. 

Section 4. The President General may call meetings of the Board of 
Trustees at any time he may deem necessary, and shall call such meet- 
ings upon the written request of any five members thereof, provided 
that of any meeting, other than such as may be called during the session 
or immediately upon the adjournment of an annual or special Congress 
of the National Society, not less than five days' notice of the time and 
place of such meeting shall be given. 

Art 1 cue XTV. — Executive Com m ittee. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee may be called at any time by 
the President General, and such meeting shall he called upon the written 
request of three members thereof. It shall be the duty of the Executive 
Committee to exercise the powers and perform the duties committed to 
it by any annual or special Congress or by the Board of Trustees; to 
control and supervise all arrangements for the holding of the annual or 
any special Congress, and the social and other functions connected 
therewith; it shall, upon the request of the proper committee of the 
National Society or of the Board of Trustees, assist in the organization 
of new State Societies, and increasing the membership of weak State 
Societies, and for these purposes may incur its necessary expenses, 
limited to such amounts as may be in the Treasury unappropriated, and 
not required for the current expenses of the National Society during 
the year. 

Article XV.— Seat,. 

The seal of the Society shall be two and three-eighths of an inch in 
diameter, charged with the figure of a minute man grasping a musket 
in his right hand and surrounded by a constellation of thirteen stars, 
who shall be depicted in the habit of a husbandman of the period of the 
American Revolution, and as in the act of deserting the plough for the 
service of his country; the whole encircled by a band three-eighths of 
an inch wide, within which shall appear the legend, "National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, organized April 30, 1889." 

Article XVI. — Certificates. 

All members of this Society, wherever admitted, shall be entitled to 
a certificate of membership duly attested by the President General, 
Secretary General, and Registrar General, countersigned by the Presi- 
dent, Secretary, and Registrar of the State Society to which such mem- 
ber shall have been admitted. 

Article XVII. — Insignia. 

The insignia of the Society shall comprise (1) a cross surmounted 
by an eagle in gold, (2) a rosette. 



46 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Section i. The cross shall be of silver, with four arms, covered with 
white enamel and eight gold points, same size as a Chevalier's Cross of 
the Legion of Honor of France, with a gold medallion in the center 
bearing on the obverse a bust of Washington in profile, and on the 
reverse the figure of a minute man, surrounded by a ribbon enameled 
blue, with the motto "Libertas et Patria" on the obverse, and the legend 
"Sons of the American Revolution" on the reverse, both in letters of 
gold. The cross shall be surmounted by an eagle in gold and the whole 
decoration suspended from a ring of gold by a ribbon of deep blue, 
with white and buff edges, and may be worn by any member of the 
Society on ceremonial occasions only, and shall be carried on the left 
breast, or at the collar if an active or Past Officer General of the Na- 
tional Society or President, active or past, of a State Society. 

The President General, during his term of office and while acting in 
that capacity on official and ceremonial occasions, shall wear the dis- 
tinctive badge of his office. It may be carried at the left breast or 
suspended from the neck ribbon. In full dress he shall wear a sash 
of the Society colors, three and one-half inches in width, extending 
from the right shoulder to the left hip, with the badge pendant at the 
crossing of the sash over the hip. Past Presidents General and Vice- 
Presidents General in full dress shall wear a sash of the Society colors, 
three and one-half inches wide, extending from the right shoulder to 
the left hip. 

SECTION 2. The rosette shall be seven-sixteenths of an inch in diam- 
eter, of usual pattern, displaying the colors of the Society — blue, white, 
and buff — and may be worn by all members at discretion in the upper 
left-hand buttonhole of the coat. 

SECTION 3. The badge of the Society may be purchased by members 
in accordance with the following agreement, to be signed by the pur- 
chasing member before delivery of same: 

In purchasing the badge of the Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, I hereby agree that it will be worn or used in accordance 
with the regulations of the Society; that I will not pledge, part with, 
or transfer the same except with the written authority of the Society. 
It is further agreed for myself, heirs, executors, administrators, and 
any and all persons asserting any claim through me that upon demand 
of the Society and tender of the purchase price of said badge, or other 
regalia, the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution shall be 
entitled to immediate possession thereof. 

Article XVI IT. — Indebtedness. 

No debts shall be contracted on behalf of the National Society. 
Every obligation for the payment of money, except cheeks drawn 
against deposits, executed in the name or on behalf of the National 
Society shall be null and void. 



NATIONAL J!Y-1 ( A\VS. <\J 

Article XIX. — Orui-m ok Business ov the Annum, Congress. 

i. Calling the Congress to order by the President General. 

2. Opening prayer by the Chaplain General. 

3. Appointment of a Committee on Credentials. 

4. Remarks by the President General on condition and needs of the 
Society. 

5. Report of Committee on Credentials. 

6.' Reading of minutes of the last Congress. 

7. Report of Board of Trustees. 

8. Reports of General Officers. 

9. Reports of standing committees. 

10. Reports of special committees. 

11. Reports of State Societies. 

12. Old and unfinished business. 

13. New business, including election of officers and Trustees. 

14. Adjournment. 

15. Provided, That for a special purpose the Congress may, by a vote 
of two-thirds of those present and voting, suspend the above order of 
business. 

AuTr.ci.lv XX. — Amendments. 

These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a vote of three-fourths 
of the members present at any meeting of the Board of Trustees, notice 
thereof having been given at a previous meeting. 



48 SONS 01? Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

OFFICERS OF STATE SOCIETIES AND CHAPTERS. 



ALABAMA SOCIETY. 

Organized June 27, 1903. Admitted into National Society November 
18, 1903. 

(No report received.) 



ARIZONA SOCIETY. 

40 Mkmbeks. 

Organized June 13, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected ig20. 

President, P. W. Perkins Flagstaff 

Vice-President, If. B. Wilkinson Phoenix 

Secretary, Harold Baxter, 31 1 Fleming Building Phoenix 

Treasurer, Lloyd B. Christy • Phoenix 

Registrar, 1 toward S. Reed Phoenix 

I listorian, Rt. Rev. J. \V. Atvvood Phoenix 

Chaplain, Rev. J. Rockwood Jenkins Phoenix 



ARKANSAS SOCIETY. 

72 Mem bers. 

Organized April 29, 1889. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, Frank W. Tucker Little Rock- 
Vice-President, B. W. Green Little Rock- 
Vice-President, John M. Bracey Little Rock 

Secretary-Registrar, l\iy I iempstead Little Rock- 
Treasurer, Tlios. M. Cory Little Rock 

Chaplain, John Van Lear ♦ Little Rock 

Historian, Jonathan Kellogg (deceased) Little Rock 



CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 

460 M KM NEKS. 

Instituted October 22, J875, as Sons of Revolutionary Sires. Consti- 
tution adopted August 7,. 1876. Name changed to Sons of the American 
Revolution March 22, 1890. Annual meeting April 19. * 



. STATIC SOC1KTIKS. 49 

Officers elected for 1920-21. 

President, Donzel Stoney San Francisco 

Senior Vice-President, Frank S. Brittain San Francisco 

Junior Vice-President, Charles E. Hale San Francisco 

Secretary and Registrar, Thomas A. Perkins, Mills Bldg., San Francisco 

Treasurer, John C. Currier San Francisco 

Historian, E. De Los Magee San Francisco 

Chapter Officers. 

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER. 

President, F. \V. Drummond; First Vice-President, H. B. Adsit; Sec- 
ond Vice-President, W. W. Austin; Secretary, Allen H. Wright, City 
Hall, San Diego; Treasurer, F. P. Reed; Registrar, A. W. Haines; 
Historian, F. W. Baker; Chaplain, Rev. C. E. Spaulding; Marshal, 
R. B. Bryan. 



COLORADO SOCIETY. 

334 Mem hers. 

Organized July 4, 1896. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, Malcolm Lindsey Denver 

First Vice-President, Edward V. 1 hmklee Denver 

Vice-President, Samuel Le Nord Caldwell Colorado Springs 

Vice-President, 1 lenry Tupper Grand Junction 

Vice-President, Charles E. Littell Greeley 

Vice-President, Asa D. Holt Longmont 

Vice-President, Bert Fred Scribner Pueblo 

Vice-President, Thomas J. Warren Fort Collins 

Secretary-Registrar, James Polk Willard, Masonic Temple. ... Denver 

Treasurer, Walter D. Wynkoop .Denver 

Chaplain, Frederick A. I latch Pueblo 

Historian, George W. Hewitt Denver 

Chapter Officers. 

DENVER CHAPTER. * 

President, Lours G. Carpenter; Vice-President, John Chase; Secretary, 
F. M. Stockton; Treasurer, Walter D. Wynkoop; Chaplain, Leander 

C. Hills. 

■ 

COLORADO SPRINGS CHAPTER. 

President, Samuel Le Nord Caldwell ; Secretary, Francis R. Rothrock. 

EONC.MONT CHAPTER, 



President, Asa De Holt; Secretary, Charles W. Boynton; Treasurer, 
Charles P>ohn. 



50 SONS OF TII1C AMERICAN KKVor.UTlON. 

PUEBLO CHAPTER. 

President, Bert Fred Scribner; Vice-Presidents, Ro1)ert C. Tenny, 
Charles Hayden ; Secretary-Registrar, Nerval W. Wall; Treasurer, 
William C. Carrington ; Historian, Herman W. Nash; Chaplain, Fred 
Albert Hatch. 

GREELEY CHAPTER. 

President, Charles E. Littell ; Vice-President, William IF Delbridge; 
Secretary-Registrar, George E. Home ; Chaplain, George 11. Bradfield ; 
Historian, Charles A. White; Orator, Victor K. Keyes. 

GRAND JUNCTION CHAPTER. 

President, Henry Tupper; Vice-President, Carl W. Plumb; Secretary, 
John C. Page; Treasurer, Walter M. Merrill; Historian, James H. 
Rankin; Chaplain, George R ; Warner. 



CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

r,i25 Mkmhkks. 

Organized April 2, l8$Q\ Annual meeting June 14, to commemorate 
the anniversary of Conneeticut's Declaration of Independence. 

Officers elected June 14, 1920. 

President, lion. Morgan G. Uulkcley Hartford 

Vice-President, Hon, Rollin S. Woodruff New Haven 

Vice-President, Hon. H. Wales Lines Meriden 

Vice-President, Orlando 1 1. Brothwefl Bridgeport 

Secretary, Frederick A. poolittle Bridgeport 

Treasurer, Charles 0. Stone .1 lartford 

Registrar, Frederick Bostwick. , New Haven 

Historian, Frank B, Gay Hartford 

Chaplain, Rev. Orville A. Petty New Haven 

Necrologist, Leverett l.elknap Hartford 

Auditor, Frederick W. I hill Bridgeport 

Auditor, Charles K. P. San ford New Haven 

Branch Officers. 

f 

GENERAL DAVID HUMPHREYS BRANCH, NO. I, NEW HAVEN. 

President, Frank A. Corhin ; Vice-President, Clarence Blakeslee ; 
Secretary-Treasurer, George F. Burgess; Historian, Rev. Dryden W. 
Phelps; Chaplain, Rev. Harris K. Starr. 

CAPTAIN JOHN COUCH BRANCH, NO. 2, MKkllH'.N 

President, H. Wales Lines; Vice President, W r alter Hubbard; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, ; Historian, Judge J. P. Piatt; Chaplain, 

Rev. W. S. Perkins. 



STATIC SOCIETIES. 5 l 

Gl'NI'KAI. Sd.IJMAN BRANCH, NO. 3, BRIDGEPORT; 

President, Capt. Reginald H. De Laconr; Vice-President, Albert W. 
Smith; Secretary, Frederick Doolittle; Registrar, Frank E. Blakeman; 
Treasurer, Andrew B, Huntington; Historian, Buckingham Marsh; 
Chaplain, Rev. Benjamin F. Root. 

ISRAEL, PUTNAM BRANCH, NO. 4, NORWICH. 

Secretary, Henry F. Parker. 

NOKWAI.K BRANCH, NO. 5. 

Secretary, Charles A. Ouintard. 

NATHAN UAUv BRANCH, NO. 6, NEW LONDON. 

President, ; Vice-President, Carey Congdon ; Treasurer, 

Frank H. Chappell, Jr.; Historian, J)r. Edward Prentis. 

THE COI.ONET, JEREMIAH W ADS WORTH BRANCH, NO. 7, HARTFORD. 

President, John M. Parker, Jr.; Vice-President, George S. Godard ; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Charles G. Stone; Historian, Frank B. Gay; 
Chaplain, Rev. Arthur Ad;ims, Ph. 1).; Necrologist, Leverett Belknap. 

Till; COl.ONKl, KUSIIA S!Ii:i,l)ON BRANCH, NO. 8, SALISBURY 

President, Donald T. Warner; Vice-President, L.J. Nickcrson; Secre- 
tary, Malcolm 1). Rudd ; Treasurer, William l>. Perry, Jr.; liistorian, 
Donald J. Warner; Chaplain, Walter W. Norton; Necrologist, Richard 
K. Miles; Auditor, William P. Russell. 



DELAWARE SOCIETY. 

42 jYIKMIU'KS. 

Organized January 29, 1889. Annual meeting December 7, to. com- 
memorate the ratification of the Federal Constitution of Delaware. 

Officers elected 1920. * 

President, 1 lorace Wilson , Wilmington 

Vice-President, Robert 1 1. Richards Wilmington 

Vice-President, James H. J [ughes Dover 

Vice-President, Kdwin C. Marshall Lewes 

Secretary, Charles A. Rudolph, 900 Vanhuren St Wilmington 

Treasurer, Charles A. Rudolph, 900 Vanhuren St Wilmington 

Registrar, Charles A. Rudolph, 900 Vanhuren St Wilmington 



52 SONS OK Till; AMKK1CAN REVOLUTION. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOCIETY. 

(Washington, D. C.) 

493 MEMBERS. 

Organized April 19, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, Albert D. Spangler, 72 S Street N. W Washington 

Vice-President, Henry L. Bryan Washington 

Vice-President, Rear- Admiral Frank F. Fletcher Washington 

Vice-President, Lisle S. Lipscomb Washington 

Secretary, William Alexander Miller, 911 Monroe St. N. W., Washington 

Treasurer, Alfred B. Dent Washington 

Registrar, Capt. O. C. Luxford Washington 

Assistant Registrar, Henry P. Holden Washington 

Historian, Selden M. Fly Washington 

Librarian, William L. Hoyden Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. James M. Nourse Westminster, Aid. 



FAR EASTERN SOCIETY. 

19 MEMBERS. 

Charter granted February 17, 1911. Organization perfected at Manila 
October 19, 191 1. 

Officers, 1919. 

President-Secretary, H. Lawrence Noble, P. O. Box 940 Manila 

Vice-President, Edwin Bingham Copeland Manila 

Registrar-Treasurer, Herman Roy Hare Manila 

Honorary President, Judge Charles S. Lobingcr Shanghai, China 



FLORIDA SOCIETY. 

45 Ml'MMKkS. 

Organized March 14, 1896. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate the birthday of Washington. 

Officers elected April 19, 1920. 

President, Dr. F. G. Renshaw Pensacola 

Vice-President, K. M. Cary ' Pensacola 

Vice-President, F. M. Hudson Miami 

Vice-President, Peter O. Knight Tampa 

Vice-President, G. M. West Panama City 

Vice-President, Chas. J. Williams, Jr Jacksonville 

Vice-President, W. S. Branch . .Orlando 



STATIC SOC1KTIKS. 53 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Edw. 0. Weed Jacksonville 

Secretary, John I lobart Cross IVnsacola 

Treasurer-Registrar, K. F. Bingham Pensacola 



SOCIETY IN FRANCE. 

15 Members, 

Organized in Paris, France, September 16, 1897. 
Administered by Empire State Society, 
i 



HAWAIIAN SOCIETY. 

95 Members. 

Organized June 17, 1896. Annual meeting June 17, to commemorate 
the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Officers elected June 17, 1919. 

President, Rev. L. L. Loofbourow Honolulu 

Secretary, James T. Taylor, 51 1 Stangenwald Bldg Honolulu 

Treasurer, John Effinger , Honolulu 

Registrar, Elmer T. Winant Honolulu 



IDAHO SOCIETY. 

138 Members. 

Organized April «S, 1909. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

. President, Frank G, Ensign Boise 

Vice-President, J larry Keyser . Boise 

Vice-President, M, II. Brownell tlailey 

Vice-President, 1 ). \V. Church Poeatello 

Vice-President, Bow en Cur ley hi alio Palls 

Vice-President, Stanly A. Kaston Kellogg 

Vice-President, William I I. Eldridge » . . . .Twin Falls 

Vice-President, Asher V. Getchell Silver City 

Vice-President, VV. 1 1. Ciibson ..Mountain Home 

Vice-President, Rev. VV. S. Hawkes Caldwell 

Vice-President, Miles S. Johnson Lewiston 

Vice-President, Geofge \ T . Osborne Black Lake 

Vice-President, Samuel II. Mays Poise 

Secretary ^Treasurer-Registrar, Allen B. Eaton Boise 

Chaplain, Rev. R. B. WrWht, I). O Boise 

Historian, M. VV. Wo..d. Ft. -Col. U. S. A. (Retired) ..Boise 



54 SONS OF TJIIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

ILLINOIS SOCIETY. 

1,152 Members. 

Organized January 14, 1890. Annual meeting' December 3, to com- 
memorate the admission of Illinois into the Union. 

Officers elected December 3, 1920. 

President, Dorr E. Kelt Chicago 

First Vice-President, Col. James M. Eddy Chicago 

Second Vice-President, Judge Jesse A. Baldwin .Chicago 

Secretary, Louis A. Bowman, 30 North La Salle Street Chicago 

Treasurer, Henry R. Kent, Ft. Dearborn National Bank Chicago 

Registrar, John D. Vandercook Lombard 

Historian, Prof. George A. Rrennan Chicago 

Chaplain, Carl I ). Case, 1 ). D Oak Park 

Sergeant-at-Arms, Arthur R. Camp Chicago 

Chapter Officers. 

PE0KTA CHAPTER. 

President, Philip H. Gregg, Peoria; Vice-President, William S. Miles, 
Peoria; Secretary, II. R. Topping, Peoria; Treasurer, Willard D. Clark, 
Peoria. 

OAK PARK CHAPTER. 

President, J. C. Miller. Oak Park; Vice-President, Geo. R. Heming- 
way, Oak Park; Secretary, Frank L Stetson, Oak Park; Treasurer, 
Louis A. Bowman, Oak Park; Historian, William F. Barton, D. D., 
Oak Park. 

S PR] NGEIEU) CHA PTER. 

President, Dr. H. H. Tuttle, Springfield; Secretary-Treasurer, Isaac 
R. Diller, Springfield. 



INDIANA SOCIETY. 

218 Mem hers. 

Organized January 15, 1890. Annual meeting February 25, to com- 
memorate the capture of Fort Sackville, Vincennes,«Ind., by Gen. George 
Rogers Clark. 

Officers elected February 25, 1920. 

President, Austin II . Brown Indianapolis 

First Vice-President, Cornelius F. Pesson Brazil 

Second Vice-President, II. Bonis Manzy Rushville 

Third Vice-President, Dr. C. I. Fleming; Terre Haute 

Fourth Vice-President, Mason J. Niblack Vincennes 

Secretary, Edmund L. Parker, 512 East Monroe Street Kokomo 



STATE SOCIKTIICS. 55 

Treasurer, Edmund L. Parker, 512 East Monroe Street Kokomo 

Registrar, I lerbert E. Redding Indianapolis 

Chaplain, Rev. Man ford C. Wright Fort Wayne 

Trustee, National Secretary, Chas. T. Jewett Terre Haute 

Chapter Officers. 

JOHN MORTON CHAI'TK.R, TURKIC HAUTE. 

President, Judge James 11. Swan-go J Vice-President, George A. 
Schaal.; Secretary, Chas. T. Jewett; Treasurer, Horace E. Tune. 

GENERAL pleasant a. hackleman chapter, kushvillk. 
President, Dr. Frank G. Hackleman. 



IOWA SOCIETY. 

478 Members. 

Organized September 5, 1893. Annual meeting April 19, except when 
19th is Sunday. 

Officers elected April 20, 1920. 

President, Dr. Ger shorn 1 lydc 1 1 ill Des Moines 

First Vice-President, Thomas G. Gilson Knoxville 

Second Vice-President, Walter K. Coffin Des Moines 

Treasurer, William P,. Barrett Des Moines 

Secretary, Capt. Klbridge I). 1 ladley Des Moines 

Registrar, William G. Ilamlin Des Moines 

Historian, Arthur 11. Davison Des Moines 

Chaplain, Rev. Ambrose E. Wight Spirit Lake 

Chapter Officers. 

HUNKER 1111. L CHAPTER, WATERLOO. 

President, Carleton Sias ; Vice-President, Austin Burt; Secretary, 
Thos. M. Buchanan. 

BEN ERANKLlN CHAPTER, DES MOINES. 

President, Elbriclgc I). Iladley; Vice-President, Dr. Gershom II. Hill; 
Secretary, . 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, SHEED0N. 

President, F. 11. Wilsey; Vice-President, E. B. Myers; Secretary, 
George T. Wellman ; Treasurer, Reed Babcock. 

LEXINGTON CHAPTER, KEOKUK. 

President, Dr. G. Walter Barr ; Vice-President, W. G. Blood; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Frederic C. Smith. 



56 SONS OP T1U\ AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 

POWKSHIKK CHAPTER, GRINNEU,. 

President, — — ; Vice President, A. J. Blakely; Secretary and 

Treasurer, F. P. Marvin. 

UvW WAI,I ( ACI ; , ANDERSON CHARTER, CEUAR RAPIDS. 

President, Dr. II. L. Walker; Vice-President, C. J. Knickerbocker; 
Secretary and Treasurer, William M. Deacon. 

WASHINGTON CHAPTER, AMES. 

President, Tvan 0. llashrouck; Vice-President, Dr. E. W. Stanton; 
Secretary, E. C. Potter; Treasurer, Charles E. Taylor. 

WOODBURY CHAPTER, SIOUX CITY. 

President, Alpheus B. Beall ; Vice-President, Orville B. Tally; Secre- 
tary, Geo. H. Bliven ; Treasurer, E. G. Dilley. 



KANSAS SOCIETY. 

91 Members. 

Organized March 31, 1892. Annual a:eeting the third Wednesday in 
January. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, John M. Meade Topeka 

Vice-President, Henry W. McAfee .• Topeka 

Secretary, Arthur II. Bennett. . . Topeka 

Treasurer, Jonathan D. Norton Topeka 

Historian, Daniel W. Nellis Topeka 



KENTUCKY SOCIETY. 

200 M EM HERS, 

Organized April 8, 1889. Annual meeting October 19, to commemo- 
rate the surrender of Cornwallis. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Marvin 1 1. Lewis « Louisville 

First Vice-President, Credo hitch Harris Glenview 

Second Vice-President, Philip S. Tuley .Louisville 

Third Vice-President, Charles R. Long Louisville 

Fourth Vice-President, S. J. llilhnan Louisville 

Secretary, T. Carter Tiller, 814 Marion E. Taylor Bldg. Louisville 

Treasurer, George Twyman Wood * | ,ouisville 

I listoriau, George 1 )a\ idsou Todd Louisville 

Registrar, Benjamin La Brec 1 Louisville 



STATIC SOCIKT1KS. 57 

Surgeon, Dr. Walker Boerne Gossett Louisville 

Chaplain, Dr. Archibald T. Robertson Louisville 



LOUISIANA SOCIETY. 

213 MEMBERS. 

Organized May 16, 1893. Annual banquet April 13, Jefferson's Birth- 
day. 

Officers elected for 1919-1920. 

President, C. Robert Churchill New Orleans 

First Vice-President, Lynn H. Dinkins New Orleans 

Second Vice-President, J. Wallace Alexander. Alexandria 

Third Vice-President, George G. Weaks Monroe 

Secretary, Herbert P. lien-ton, S l >-\ Prytania Street New Orleans 

Financial Secretary; Robert T. I i u r w c 1 1 ....New Orleans 

Treasurer, Thomas 1 1. Taylor New Orleans 

Registrar, Sol Bloodworth New Orleans 



MAINE SOCIETY. 
311 Members. 

Organized March i_|, f 89 1 . .Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Hon. Oliver B. Clason Gardiner 

Vice-President, I Ion. James O. Bradbury Saco 

Vice-President, Charles L. i lutchinson Portland 

Vice-President, William B. Berry Gardiner 

Secretary, Francis L. Littlelield, 22 "Monument Square Portland 

Treasurer, Enoch 0. Creenleaf Portland 

Registrar, Willis B. Hall. . Portland 

Historian, lion. John 1\ Spraguc .Foxcroft 

I .ibrarian, William T. Cousens. Portland 

Cli plain, Rev. William 0. Maim .....Cumberland Mills 



MARYLAND SOCIETY. 

347 MOIIU'.US 
• >rgani/ed April 20, [8&), Annual meeting April 10. 
Officers elected April 19, 1920. 

President, James Harry Preston Baltimore * 

First Vice-President, ( )sborne I. Yellott Baltimore 



58 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Second Vice-President, Wm. 1 1. I lay ward Baltimore 

Third Vice-President, G. W. S. Musgrave Baltimore 

Trustee, Henry Stockbridge Baltimore 

Secretary, George Sadtler Robertson, 1628 Linden Avenue. ... Baltimore 

Treasurer, A. S. Goldsborough Baltimore 

Registrar, Francis B. Culver Baltimore 

Historian, George \V. Ward Windsor Mills 

Chaplain, Rev. Henry Branch Baltimore 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY. 

1,800 Members. 

Organized April io, 1880. Annual meeting April 19, to commemorate 
battles of Lexington and Concord. 

Officer^ elected April 19, 1920. 

President, George Hale Nutting, 5,? Stale Street Boston 

Vice-President, Charles II. Bangs, M. 1) Swampscott' 

Vice-President, Burton 11. Wiggiu Lowell 

Vice-President, Alfred l r . Powers Worcester 

Secretary, Fletcher S. \\\(\l\ 89 State Street Boston 

Registrar, f lerbert Wood Kimball. . . . : Boston 

Treasurer, Lieut. Col. Charles M. Green Maiden 

Historian, Walter Kendall Watkins Maiden 

Chaplain, Rev. Lewis Wilder 1 licks ?..... Wellesley 

Chapter Officers. 

or,l> SAI.K.M CHAPTER, SAI,I",M. 

President, Isaac II. Sawyer, Topslield ; First Vice-President, Edward 
C. Battis, Salem; Second Vice-President, Willard W. Woodman, Pea- 
body; Secretary, Osborne Leach, Panvers; Treasurer, Samuel I). Lord, 
Peabody ; Registrar, Andrew Nichols, llathorne. 

BOSTON CHAPTER, BOSTON. 

President, Norman Rand Willard, Boston ; Vice-President, Edward 
W. Howe, Roxbury; Secretary, Charles Clement Littlefield; Treasurer, 
W. IT. Stickney, Brookline; Historian, Walter C. Bates, Jamaica Plain. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CHAPTER, SPR1 NC.K Hit, I). 

President, Samuel Fuller Punderson, Springfield; Vice-President, 
Charles Franklin Warner, Springfield; Secretary, Henry Adelbert 
Booth, Springfield; Treasurer, Charles Lewis Baird, Springfield; Regis- 
trar, Allen W. Ilopkins, Springfield ; Historian, Martin Luther Dins- 
more, Springfield ; Chaplain, Rev. Edmund R. Laine, Jr., Springfield; 
Auditor, Walter L. Spaulding, Indian Orchard. V 



- 

STATIC SOU I KT IKS. 59 

CI, I) M 11)1)1. FSFX CHAPTER, I.OWKJ,!,. 

President, George L. Van Deurscn, M. I)., Lowell; Vice-President, 
Howard W. Foster, Lowell ; Secretary, Clarence B. Livington, M. D., 
Lowell; Treasurer, Charles E. Rlaisdell, Lowell; Registrar, Russell M. 
Fox, Lowell; Historian, Frank W. Hall, Lowell; Chaplain, Rev. Wilson 
Waters, Chelmsford; Auditor, Warren W. Fox, Lowell. 

OI.D KSSKX CHAPTER. I.VNN. 

President, Walter Atwood Mall. Swampscott; First Vice-President, 
Henry Rogers Mayo, Lynn ; Second Vice-President, George Everett 
Sprague, Lynn.; Secretary, Luther Atwood, Lynn; Treasurer, William 
G. Keene, Lynn; Historian, Dr. Charles Howard Bangs, Swampscott; 

Chaplain, Rev. Frederic Williams Perkins, 1). D., Lynn. 

■ 

0!,I) COLONY CHAPTER, WHITMAN. 

! 

President, vacant; Vice-President, vacant ;- Secretary, Charles E. 

Lovell, M. D., Whitman; Treasurer, Randall W. Cook, Whitman; His- 
torian, vacant. 

01,1) SUFFOLK CHAPTER;, CHELSEA. 

President, Walter C. Mitchell, Wellesley Hills; Vice-President, Sam- 
uel R. Cutler, Revere; Secretary, Thomas Upham Follansbee, Chelsea; 
Treasurer, Edwin P.. Sibley, Brookline; Historian, Frank E. Parlin, 
Chelsea. 

WORCESTER CHAPTER, WORCFSTFK. 

President, Robert T. Elliott, W r orcester ; Vice-President, Edward F. 
Mann, Worcester ; Vice-President, U. Waldo Cutler, Worcester; Vice- 
President, Walter S. Young, Worcester ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Robert T. Elliott, Worcester; Historian, John K. Warren, M. D., Wor- 
cester. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY CHAPTER, JMTTSFIFJJ). 

President, Arthur J. Witherell, North Adams; Vice-President, Hon. 
E, T. Slocum, Pitts Field ; Vice-President, William C. Stevenson, Pitts- 
field; Secretary, Registrar, and Historian, William' L- Root, Pittsfield ; 
Treasurer, Joseph It. Peirson, Pittsfield. 

■ . 
koi:i-:kt tkicat i'.mnic Chapter, taunton. 

President, Fnos. I ). Williams, Taunton.; Vice-President, Lewis E. 
I litems, Taunton; Secretary, Louis B. Walker, Taunton: Treasurer, 
••vacant; Registrar, vacant; Historian, William M. Emery, Fall River; 
Chaplain, Rev. J. Francis Cooper. Providence, R. 1. 

MAI.DKN CHAPTER, MAI.DF.N. 

President, Horace Chester, Maiden; Vice-President, A. Warren Patch, 
Maiden; Secretary, Walter K. Watkins, Maiden ; Treasurer, Willard 
Welsh, Maiden; Historian, William B. Snow, Maiden. 



6o SONS OF Til !•; AM K K1CA N REVOLUTION 



cami:i<iim;i.; CHAPTER, CAMBRIDGE. 

Prts&lent, Joliii Aiiiee, -Cambridge.; Vice-President, — ; Secre- 
tary, Shepard Llowland, Cambridge; Treasurer, Albert F. Aniee, Cam- 
bridge ; Historian, Edward 13. Hutchinson, Cambridge. 

SETH I'OMIikOY CHAPTER, NORTHAMPTON. 

. President, Henry G. Smith, Northampton; Vice-President, Arthur L. 
Kingsbury, Northampton ; Secretary, Geo. 1 1. Sergeant, Northampton; 
Treasurer, L. L. Campbell, Northampton; Historian, Elmer H. Cope- 
land, M. D., Northampton ; Chaplain, Rev. Thomas A. Emerson, North- 
ampton. 

ROXBURY CHAPTER (ROXBURY DISTRICT), BOSTON. 

President, John S. Richardson, Roxhury; Vice-President, Shefwin L. 
Cook, Roxbury; Secretary, Horace J. Hootin, Roxbury; Treasurer, 
Arthur L. Foster, Roxbnn ; Historian, Charles E. Wiggin, Brookline. 

DL'KKS COUNTY CHAPTER, EDGARTOWN. 

President, Edward H. Pease, Edgartown ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Arthur W. Davis, Edgartown. 

FRANCIS LEWIS CHAPTER, WALPOLE. 

President, Isaac Newton Lewis, East Walpole; Vice-Presidents, Louis 
E. Vose, F. Percyval Lewis, William A. Miliard; Secretary, II. Ray- 
mond Lewis, Walpole; Treasurer, Walter B. Allen; Registrar, John II. 
Allen. 



MICHIGAN SOCIETY. ' 

637 Al I", M IMCKS. 

Organized January 18, 1890. Animal meeting April 15. 
Officers elected April 15, 1920. 

President, Gen. Charles A. Coolidge, U. S. A Detroit 

Vice-President, Charles M. Alden Grand Rapids 

(Vice-President, Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale Ann Arbor 

Secretary, Raymond E. Van Syckle, 1729 LTord Bldg Detroit 

Treasurer, Frank G. Smith Detroit 

Registrar, Franklin S. Dewey ; Detroit 

Historian, William L. Jenks Port Huron 

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D .Detroit 

Chapter Officers. 

DKTROIT CHAPTER. CHARTERED MAY _', I9I.3. 368 MEMBERS. 

President, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D.; Vice-Presidents, William H. 
Hill, George \V. Bates; Secretary, Raymond E. Van Syckle, 1729 Ford 



STAT)', SOCIETIES. 6 1 

Bldg.; Treasurer, Frank W. Smith; Historian, William Stocking; 
Chaplain, Rev. Minot C. Morgan. 

KALAMAZOO CHAPTER. CHARTERED DECEMBER 31, 1 Q t 5 . 8 MEMBERS. 

President, Edward C. Parsons; Secretary, Dr. William A. Stone, 1 102 
West Main Street. 

t 

KENT CHAPTER, GRAND RAPIDS. CHARTERED MARCH 2~ ', 1 Q 1 4. 95 MEMBERS* 

President, Daniel T. Patton ; Vice-President, II. Parker Robinson ; 
Secretary, Horace W. Hardy, 218 Terrace Avenue S. E. ; Treasurer, 
Herbert A. Woodruff; Registrar, Charles N. Remington. 

EENAWEE CHAPTER, ADRIAN. CHARTERED JUEY C), 1020. 1.3 MEMBERS. 

President, Wilbert 11. Barrett, 516 Michigan Avenue, Adrian. 

M'T. PLEASANT CHAPTER. CHARTERED JANUARY 22, 1 9 1 5 . 
Secretary, Sheridan E. Gardiner, Mt. Pleasant. 

ST. GLAIR CHAPTER, PORT HURON. CHARTERED DECEMBER 28, 1917. 
18 MEMBERS. 

President, Burt D. Cady ; Vice-President, Sydney G. McClouth ; Secre- 
tary, William R. Cbadwick; Treasurer, Albert I). Bennett; Historian, 
William L. Jenks ; Chaplain, Alfred L. Chamberlain, 

WASHTENAW CHAPTER, ANN ARBOR. CHARTERED MARCH 27, KJI4. 
24 MEMBERS. « 

President, Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale; Vice-President, Henry W. New- 
kirk; Secretary, Wolcott H. Butler, 806 Arch Street, Ann Arbor; 
Treasurer, Milton K. Osborn; Historian, Harlan H. Johnson; Chaplain, 
Eucius L. Clarke. 

MINNESOTA SOCIETY. 

272 Mem hers. 



Organized December 26, 1889. Annual meeting December 26, to com- 
memorate the anniversary of the Battle of Trenton. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Capt. Fred A. Bill St. Paul 

Vice-President, Charles E. Rittenhoiise Minneapolis 

Vice-President, Kenneth G, Brill St. Paul 

Secretary, Charles II. Bronson, j8 East Fourth Street St. Paul 

Treasurer, Charles W. Eddy St. Paul 

Registrar, Charles Stees St. Paul 

1 listorian, Rev. M. D. Edwards St. Paul 

Chaplain, Rev. S. \V. Dickinson St. Paid 



62 SONS 01* Till?; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY. 
38 Members. 

Organized May 10, 1909. 

Officers, 1918. 

President, Judge Gordon Garland Lyell Jackson 

Vice-President, I Ion. W. I). Anderson Tupelo 

Vice-President, Col. Chalmers M. Williamson Jackson 

Secretary-Registrar, Wm. H. Pullen, Mechanics' Bank Bldg.. .. .Jackson 
Treasurer, Philip Stevens Merrill Jackson 



MISSOURI SOCIETY. 

200 Members. 

Organized April 23, 1889. Annual meeting March 4, to commemorate 
taking effect of the Constitution of the United States. Annual dinner 
April 19, to commemorate battles of Concord and Lexington. 

Officers elected 1920. 

President, \V. D. Vandiver St. Louis 

Vice-President, E. T. Miller St. Louis 

Vice-President, Charles W. Bates St. Louis 

Vice-President, John R. Cooke St. Louis 

Vice-President, John L. Rohards .Hannibal 

Honorary Vice-President, Geo. If. Shields St. Louis 

1 lonorary Vice-President, W. B. 1 lomer St. Louis 

Honorary Vice-President, L. 1). Kingsland St. Louis 

Honorary Vice-President, C. J*. Walbridge St. Louis 

Honorary Vice-President, Harmon J. Bliss St. Louis 

Secretary, W. Scott Hancock, 1703 Boatmen's Bank Bldg St. Louis 

treasurer, 1. Shreve Carter St. Louis 

Registrar, Linn Paine St. Louis 

Historian, W. If. H. Tainter St. Louis 

Chaplain, Rev. Z. B. T. Phillips St. Louis 

Chapter Officers. 

KANSAS CITY CHAPTER. 

President, George P. Gross ; Vice-President, Herbert S. Iladley; Sec- 
ond Vice-President, K. Montgomery Reilly; Secretary, Joseph L. Harri- 
man ; Treasurer, Orran S. Richards; Registrar, George R. Jones; 
Historian, Dr. C. A. Dannaker. 



STATK SOCIKTIICS. 63 

MONTANA SOCIETY. 

36 MEMBERS. 

Organized June 5, 1894. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, Leslie Berry Sulgrove Butte 

Vice-President, Marcus Whritenour Helena 

Secretary-Treasurer, Leslie Sulgrove Helena 

Registrar, John Scott Harrison ..Helena 

Chaplain, Paris Baskett Bartley .Helena 

( 1 istorian, Ranney Yale Lyman • I lelena 

Librarian, William Rush Burroughs Helena 



NEBRASKA SOCIETY. 

243 Members. 

Organized April 26, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to com- 
memorate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, Benjamin P. Bailey Lincoln 

Senior Vice-President, George A. Dana Lincoln 

Junior Vice-President, John M. Banister Omaha 

Secretary-Registrar, Addison E. Sheldon Lincoln 

Treasurer, Charles E. Bardwell Lincoln 

Historian, J. Reid Green Lincoln 

Chapter Officers. 

LINCOLN CHAPTER. 

President, John D. Bushnell ; Senior Vice-President, J. J. Snipes; 
Junior Vice-President, II. P. Rankin; Secretary, Carl Carpender ; Treas- 
urer, A. A. Heflley; Historian, J. Reid Green. 

CRETE CHAPTER. 

President, C. J. Bowlhy; Senior Vice-President, J. N. Bennett; Junior 
Vice-President, lv. 1). Brown; Secretary-Treasurer, J. M. Dunham; 
Historian, W. F. Eyster; Registrar, G. II. Hastings; 

prEEmont chapter. 

President, Burnell Co Is on ; Vice-President, Arthur K. Dame; Secre- 
tary, Frederick C. Laird; Treasurer, Willard H. Fowler. 



6_| ' SONS 01? Till-) AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

NEVADA SOCIETY. 

19 Ml;MHI'KS. 

Organized February 19, ujio. 

( Report not received.) 



NEW HAMPSHIRE SOCIETY. 

213 AflCMl'.KKS. 

Organized April 24, 1889. Annual meeting April 19. 
Officers elected June 22, 1920. 

President, Prof. Ashley K. Hardy Hanover 

First Vice-President, Ira P. Harris Nashua 

Second Vice-President, Waller S. Baker Concord 

Third Vice-President, Sewall W. Abbott. Wolf borough 

Secretary-Treasurer, Will P>. 1 [owe; .Concord 

Registrar, Charles C. Jones Concord 

Historian, Rufus 11. Baker Concord 

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph \V. Presby Grassmere 

Chapter Officers. 

KIC1CNE CHAPTER. « 

President, Fred F. Howe; Vice-President, Leon C. Norwood; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Charles Gale Shcdd. 



NEW JERSEY SOCIETY. 

1,459 Members. 

Organized March 7, 1889. Annual meeting usually January 3 (Battle 
of Princeton ), or at such other time as the Society at any annual meet- 
ing may designate. 

Officers elected April 17, 1920. 

Presidents Rev. Dr. Lyman Whitney Allen Newark 

First Vice-President, Judge Adrian Lyon Perth Amboy 

Second Vice-President, 1 larry F. Brewer Elizabeth 

Secretary, David L. Pierson, 2\ Washington Street Fast Orange 

Treasurer, Riirle A. Miller Orange 

Registrar, William J. Conkling.- Newark 

1 listorian, Rev. M. S. Waters Newark 

Genealogist, Samuel C. Worten past Orange 

Chaplain, Rt. Rev. Wilson R. Steady, I). D Newark 

Chancellor, Raymond T. Parrot Elizabeth * 



STATIC SOCIETIES. * 65 

l-:i.lZAi:i",T[lT()\\' N CI! A 1 TICK, .NO. I. 

President, Frederic I). 1 1 aim, Elizabeth; Vice-President, Chauncey 

R. McPberson, Kli/abeth ; Secretary, Harry C. Whiting, Elizabeth; 
Treasurer, Waller C. Tcuney, Elizabeth; Registrar, William C. .Arm- 
strong, Elizabeth; Historian, Ereaefick B, Bassett, Elizabeth; Chaplain, 
Rev. Charles A. Campbell, D, I)., Elizabeth. 

OKANCIC CllAL'TlCK, NO. 2. 

President, John Thornley Nell, Past Orange; Vice-President, Richard 
P. Riker, Past Orange; Secretary, Arthur C. Kenne'y, East Orange; 
Treasurer, Albert C. Van Nest, past Orange; Historian, Rev. Charles 
B. Ihdlard, Past Orange; Chaplain, Rev. George P. Eastman, Orange. 

MONTCJ,AIK CHAPTER, NO. 3. 

President, Charles Whiting Baker, Montclair; Vice-President, E. G. 

Chamberlain, Montclair; Second Vice-President, Philip Goodell, Mont- 
clair; Secretary, George M. Huttenloch, Montclair; Treasurer, Albert 
W Ballentine, Montclair; Registrar, Arthur H. Churchill, Montclair; 
Historian, Charles M. Dutcher, Montclair; Chaplain, Rev. Puke M. 
Wright, Montclair. 

NEWARK ClJAPTKk, NO. 4. 

President, Herbert R. Crane, Newark; Vice-President, Dr. Emery W. 
Given, Newark; Secretary, George H. Penton, Jr., Newark; Treasurer, 
Benjamin J. Cue, Newark; Historian, Rev. Joseph P. Polsom, Newark; 
Chaplain, Pew Charles P. Reynolds, Newark. 



MONMOUTH CHAPTKR, NO. 5. 



President, William C. Gallagher, Asbufy Park; Vice-President, 
J. Otto Rhome, Asbury Park; Second Vice-President, Charles W. 
Woolley, Asbury .Park; Secretary, William A. Squire, .Asbury Park; 
Treasurer, Robert G. Poole, Behnar; Historian, Samuel C. Co waft, 
Freehold-; Cbaplain, E?ev; Garrett M. Conbver, Asbury Park. 



I'AKA.M US CHAPTER, NO. (). 

President, Frederick X. Board, Ridgewood; Vice-President, VVillett 
Wicks, Pidgvwond ; Secretary, J udsi m B. Salisbury, Ridgewood; Treas- 
urer, Pouis 1 ; . flalsted, Ridgewood; Registrar, Richard T. Wilson, 
Ridgewood; Historian, Everett P. Zabriskie, Pidgewood; Chaplain, Rev. 
John A. Van Neste, Glen Rock. 

MORRIS COUNTY CHAPTER, NO. 7. 

President, Dr. Predcrick W. Owen, Morristown; Vice-President, Ed- 
ward II. Pum, Cbatbam ; Secretary and Treasurer, Judge Joshua R. 
Salmon, Mountain Pakes; Historian, Major S. Cbudleigb Hicks, Mor- 
ristown. 



NEW MEXICO SOCIETY. 
78 Members. 

Organized December 26, 1908. 

Officers elected February 23, 1920. 

President, Thos. F\ Keleher, Jr Albuquerque 

First Vice-President, E. A. Cahoon Roswell 

Second Vice-President, Edmund Ross Albuquerque 

Third Vice-President, Francis C. Wilson Santa Fc 

Fourth Vice-President, Harold 1 [iird Roswell 

Secretary, Frank W. Graham Albuquerque 

Registrar, Frank W. Clancy Albuquerque 

Treasurer, Orville A. Matson Albuquerque 

Historian, II. P. Patton s Clovis 

Chaplain, Rev. W. 1 1. Ziegler .Albuquerque 



(NEW YORK) 
THE EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY. 

1,656 Ml^MIil'RS. 

Organized February 11, 1890. Annual meeting March 17. 
Officers elected April 19, 1920. 

President, Hon. Harvey F. Remington Rochester 

First Vice-President, Maj. Walter B. Hopping New York City 

Second Vice-President, George D. Bangs New York Citu 

Third Vice-President, Col. Henry W. Sackett New York City 



66 SONS OF Till?, AMERICAN KlCVOI/UTION. 

PASSAIC VAIXEY CHAPTER, NO. 8. 

President, John W. Gift, Summit; Vice-President, Bert. E. Under- 
wood, Summit; Secretary, Everett T. Spinning, Short Hills; Treasurer, 
Edwin G. Hotchkiss, Summit; Registrar, H. Donald Holmes, Summit; 
Historian, Schuyler M. Cady, Summit; Chaplain, Rev. John II. Egbert, 
D. D., Chatham. 

WASHINGTON ROCK CHAPTER, NO. Q. 

President, Charles La C. Hoff, Plainfield; Vice-President, Charles R. 
Banks, North Plainfield; Secretary, Harvey R. Linbarger, Plainfield; 
Treasurer, Henry W. Herrman, Plainfield; Historian, John Z. Hatfield, 
Scotch Plains; Chaplain, Rev. Philip B. Strong, Plainfield. 

SI'X'ONI) RIVER CHAPTER, NO. 10. 

President, Dr. Edward O. Cyphers, Belleville; Secretary and Treas- 
urer, Edwin F. Stout, Belleville. 



static sorii'yrir.s. 67 

Secretary, Maj. Charles A. Du Bpb, 220 Broadway New York City 

Treasurer, J as. De La Montanye New York City 

Registrar, Tennis 1). I [unting, 220 Broadway New York City 

Historian, I Ion. James P. I ( aux New York City 

Chaplain, Joseph Port Newton, 1). I) New York City 

Chapter Officers. 

BUl'l'AJ.o CHAPTER, BUFl'AJ.O. 

President, Edward P. Lupfer; Secretary, Frank B. Steele, 

PORT JOHNSTOWN CHAPTER, JOHNSTOWN. 

President, Fayette E. Moyer; Secretary, Rev. W. \V. Ellsworth. 

HUNTINGTON CHAPTER, H UNTINGTON. 

President, Fred'k M. Ilaxzard; Secretary, Everst Samrnis. 

MOHAWK VA1.I,I\Y CHAPTER, HERKIMER. 

President, Col. John \V. Vrooman ; Secretary, Hon. Franklin W. 
Christman. 

NEWBURGH CHAPTER, NEWBURGH. 

President, Rev. J. Lewis llartsock, Ph. 1).: Secretary, Albert K. Lay- 
man. 

N'EWTOWN-BATTI.E CHAPTER, l'.I.M IRA. 

President, Fred aI. [-Towell; vSecretary, George M. Diven. 

NEW VORK CHAPTER, NEW YORK CITY. 

President, Brig.-Gen. Oliver P. Bridgman ; Secretary, Albert J. 
Squire. 

Tilt: PAINTED l'OST CHAPTER, CORNING. 

President, John L. Chatfield, Painted Post; Secretary, Wnt. J. J leer- 
mans, Corning. 

ROC 11 ESTEH CI I A ITER, KOCH I.STKK. 

President;, George P. Sage; vSecretary, Win. P. Boothby. 
SARATOGA CHAPTER, SARATOGA SPRINGS. 

President, Tlipmas P. Knuil; Secretary, Dr. Karl II. King. 

SYRACUSE CHAPTER, SYRACUSE. 

President, Newell P.. Woodworth ; Secretary, Charles C. Cook. 

Cor,. CORNELIUS VAN DYCK CHAPTER, SCHENECTADY. 

President, John L, llall; Secretary, Hanford Robison. 



68 SONS <)!• TI1K AMKkll'A.N REVOLUTION. 

NORTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

6l Mi'M liKkS. 

Organized February 22, 191*1. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers, ig20. 

President, Frank ! I. Bryan Washington 

Vice- P resit lent, Maj. York Coleman RutheriorUton 

Secretary-Registrar, (vacant). 

Treasurer, \V. B. I Larding Washington 

Historian, John G. Bragaw, \v Washington 

Chaplain, Rev. P. B. Rankin Rutherfordton 



NORTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

61 AI I'm ni'.KS. 

Organized February 4, 1911. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Prank I ). Hall Farg< 

Secretary-Registrar, Walter IP Reed \mcni; 

Treasurer, J. W. Wilkersbn UniversiP 

Historian, J. P. Bell Pismarel 



OHIO SOCIETY. 

"2~] MlvMWCKS. 

Organized April 11-22, [889. Annual' meeting April 19, 
Officers elected 1920. 

President, Uenrj A. Williams Columbus 

Vice President, W. S. Sherman Toledo 

Secretary ami Registrar, W. I,. Curry, Box. 6 15, 281J P. I!i oad St., Colnnibu.s 

Treasure!-, S. G. Harvey Toledo 

Historian, Dr. O. W. Aldrich Columbus 

Chaplain, Rev. T. IP Campbell Columbus 

Chapter Officers. 

T.NKII !■] I'll AI-'I'liK, riANCASTUR. 

President, Henry K. Beck; Vice-President, William W. Kemper; 
Secretary and Registrar, CurtPss I.. Berry; Treasurer, Lewis P. Pvman ; 
1 listoriau, Byron P. Cave. 



STA'l'K SotlKTlKS. 6g 

BENJAMIN KKANKIJN CJIAPTKR, 001,1'MHUS. 

President, Marshall A. Smith; Vice-President, John L. Hamilton, Jr.; 
Historian, Ralph Kramer; Registrar, John L,. W. Ilenny; Chaplain, 
Rev. Thomas FI, Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer, Hugh Huntington. 

WESTERN KI\Sl\kVF, SOCIETY, Cl.KVl; f.AND. 

President, Frank C. Oshorn ; Vice-President, Charles T. Pratt; Vice- 
President, Mason P.. McLaughlin ; Vice-President, K. IP Bilker; Vice- 
President, Mo/art Qalhfp, Sandusky; Secretary, R, P. Boggis; Assistant 
Secretary, George E. Rogers; Treasurer, P. S. Wiseman; Registrar, 
Jesse A. h'enner; Historian, George H. Johnson; Chaplain, Rev; Dr. 
1'. B. Avery; Honorary Chaplain, Rev. E. W. J. Lindesniilh. 

ANTHONY WAYNE CHAPTER, TQtEUO. 

President, Silas E. [Turin; First Vice-President, Dudley Watson 
Moor; Second Vice-President, W. 11. Tucker; Secretary, E. 0. Met- 
tler ; Treasurer, S. 0. Harvey; Registrar, Dr. E. 1). Gardner; His- 
torian, Herbert P. Whitney; Chaplain, Rev. Nathan N. Clark. 

e 1 N C ! N N ATI CH APT l\ K , CI N C I N N A T I . 

President, Dr. E. R. Booth; hirst Vice-President, Dr. John Uri 
Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Horace Kdwin Morrill; Secretary-Treas- 
urer-Registrar, Rev. Dr. E. P. Whallon. 

N ATI! A N 1 1 A I ,!■; C 1 1 A i 'TIv K , Y0 1 ' NGST0W N . 

President, Hon. B. F. Wirt.; Vice-President, E. A. Alexander; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, J. J. Brant; Chaplain, Rev. A. L. Frazier. 

JOHN STAkK CHAPTER, MASSIUvON. 
President, Dr. II. C. Kyman ; Secretary, Loren K. Souers, Canton. 

ALEXANDER IIAMII/I'OX CII A ITER, COSHOCTON. 

President, Dr. Wm, P. Reeves- Secretary, [Tarry S. l.\ harger. 

OI.K.NTANGY \.\I,1,EY CHAPTER, DI'I.AWAK!',. 

President, Robert P>. Powers; Secretary, H. A. Spairlding. 

CiENEka.e h:\.\cis mark n chapter, mar.on. 
President, Maj. Samuel N. Titus; Secretary, James A. Knapp. 

RICHARD MONTGOMERY CHAPTER, DAYTON. 

President, Dr. J. F. Wuist ; Vice-President, Henry E. Biggs; Secre- 
tary-, M. S. Kuhns ; Treasurer, M. S. Kuhns; Registrar, Ira Vogt; 
Chaplain, Allen K. Zartman. 



/<) SONS ()!• Til I-) AMKUK'AN RIvVGU JTIO N . 

OKLAHOMA SOCIETY. 
80 Members. 

Organized February 22, 1905. Admitted into the National Society 
May 18, 1905. 

Officers elected 1920. 

President, W. A. Jennings Oklahoma City 

Vice-President, E. F. McKay Bartlesville 

Vice-President, G. E. Beiinett Oklahoma City 

Vice-President, L. A. Morton . . .Oklahoma City 

Secretary-Treasurer, J. I'>. Thoburn Oklahoma City 

Registrar, G. R. Tahor Oklahoma City 

Historian, W. F. Kerr Oklahoma City 

Chaplain, Rev. L. C. Murray Tulsa 



OREGON SOCIETY, 

258 Mkmkkks. 

Organized June 6, 1891. Annual meeting February 22, to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers elected 1920. 

President, Wallace McCamant Portland 

Vice-President, W. P>. Beckman Portland 

Secretary, B. A. Tliaxter, P. (). Box 832 Portland 

Treasurer, A. A. Undsley Portland 

Registrar, Pdvvin Caswell Portland 



PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY. 

680 M KM i;i:ks. 

Organized November 23, 1803. .Animal meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 23, 1920. 

President, James A. Wakefield Pittsburgh 

Vice-President, 11. C. Westervelt Pittsburgh 

Vice- President, Samuel I). 1 ludley Pittsburgh 

Vice-President, Francis Armstrong, Jr Pittsburgh 

Secretary, John S. Pitted, .4th Ave. and Wood St Pittsburgn 

Registrar, Robert K. Grow Pittsburgh 

Treasurer, A. W. Wall Pittsburgh 

Chaplain, Dr. Grafton T, Reynolds Pittsburgh 

1 listorian, Thomas Wynne Philadelphia 

National Trustee, Col, R. W. Guthrie Pittsburgh 



STATIC SOCIKTIKS. J\ 

Chapter Officers. 

WAYNE CHAPTER, ERIE. CHARTERED 1899. 

President, David X. Dennis; Vice-President, John W. Little; Secre- 
tary, George Burton; Treasurer, William Spencer; Registrar, Douglas 
Benson; Historian, Charles S. Clarke. 

NEW CASTLE CUAPTKK. 

President, Thomas 11. llartman; Vice-President, S. H. McGoun ; 
Secretary, W. J. Caldwell; Treasurer, George W. Gagcby ; Registrar, 
J. S. Dn Shane. 

L'H II,AI)K,I, I'll IA CHAPTER. 

President, Clarence P. Wynne; Vice-President, Walter Gabeft; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Fred II. Maclntire; Registrar, Thomas 
Wynne; 1 listorian, James K. Kelms. 

I'ok'f BEDFORD CHAPTER, BEDFORD, 

President, Dr. Americus Enfield; Vice-President, S. Alhert Cessna; 
Vice-President, James C. Russell; Secretary, J. Peed Irvine; Treasurer, 
Wm. F. Beam; Registrar, Abram Weisel; Historian, Howard Cessna. 

SIIKNANC.O CHAPTER, SHARON. 

President, A. C. McLean; Vice-President, G. K. Boyd; Secretary, Guy 
Thome; Treasurer, W. D. McCartney; Registrar, Reroy S. Runser. 



RHODE ISLAND SOCIETY. 

368 Mem hkks. 

• Organized February 1, 1890. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected February 22, 1920. 

President, I lerhert Morton Clarke Arctic 

Vice-President, St. George Reakin Sioussat Providence 

Secretary, Clarence Arthur Cotton, The Providence Chamber 

ot Commerce Providence 

Treasurer, Kdward Bo wen I lamlin Providence 

Registrar, Dr. George Thurston Spicei . . . Providence 

I listorian, I toward Miller Chapin Providence 

Chaplain, Rev. Alfred II. Wheeler Providence 

Poet, George Franklin Weston • Man ton 

Chapter Officers. 

PAWTUCKET CHAPTER. 

President, Henry Clinton Dexter; Vice-President, Dr. Charles Henry 
French; Treasurer, Theodore Everett Dexter. 



J 2 SON'S 01? TIlK, AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PROVIDENCE CI! AFTER. 

President, Rofcert Perkins Brown; Vice-President, Frederick Dick- 
man Carr : Secretary and Treasurer, Arthur Preston Sumner; His- 
torian, Wilfred Harold Munro. 

KENT CHAPTER. 

President, Henry Greene Jackson; Vice-President, Benjamin Frank- 
lin Tefft, Jr., M. I).; Secretary, Klisha W. Rucklin; Treasurer, Frank 
II. Smith, M. I).; Registrar, William Arnold Browning; Historian, 
Albert Rodman Nichols; Chaplain, C. Fremont Roper. 

BRISTOL CHAPTER. 

President, Elczek'iah Church Wardwell; Vice-President, Lewis Brad- 
ford Waldron ; Secretary, Joseph Franklin Far-rally; Treasurer, Wil- 
liam Leonard Manchester; Poet, Orrin Luther Bosworth ; Historian, 
George Ulric .Arnold. 

SOUTH CAROLINA SOCIETY. 

iS \\ EMBERS. 

Organized March 22, 1911. 

( Report not received.) 



SOUTH DAKOTA SOCIETY. 

78 Members. 

Preliminary meeting January 31, ion. Permanently organized March 
27, 1-911. Replaces Society organized in 1899. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, J. G. Parsons Sioux FalL 

Vice-President, Amos Ayres Sioux halls 

1 Fistorian, I )oane Robinson Pierre 

Secretary-Registrar^ 'l\ W. Dwight ' Sioux Falls 

Treasurer, B. II. Requa Sioux halls 

TENNESSEE SOCIETY. 

95 MEMBERS. 

Organized December 2, L889. Animal meeting October 7, to com- 
memorate Battle of Kings Mountain. 

, Officers, 1920. 

President, Lei and I I nine N'ash villi 

Vice-President, James \ T . C. >\ ...... CookeviUe 



STATIC SOU KT IKS. 73 

Vice-President, Win, Lawson Wilhoite Memphis 

Secretary, Wm. K. ISoanlman Nashville 

Treasurer, Carey Folk Nashville 

Registrar, John C. Brown Nashville 

Chaplain, Rev. Jas. T. Vance, I). D Nashville 

Surgeon, Dr. Paul De Witt . Nashville 



TEXAS SOCIETY. 

IO4 M'lvMI'.KKS. 

Organized December 8, ['896. Annual meeting February 22. 
Officers, 1920. 

President, C. B. I )< ucliester Sherman 

First Vice-President, F, F. Downs Temple 

Second Vice-President, Jno. Chas. 1 f arris Houston 

Secretary, Walter S. Mayer Galveston 

Treasurer, P. R. Markham Sherman 

Registrar and Historian, P. P. Rice Galveston 

Chaplain, J. T. Huff master Galveston 



UTAH SOCIETY. 

, 242 MlCM ISI'KS. 

Organized January 29, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers elected 1920. 
i 

I 'resident, David Ramsey Gray Salt Pake City 

Vice-President, I lehcr M. Wells Salt Pake City 

Secretary, Gordon Pines llntchins, Dooly llldg Salt Pake City 

Treasurer, Seth Warne-r Morrison, jr Salt Pake City 

Registrar, Chauncey l\ Ovcrlield .Salt Pake City 

Historian, Preston D. Richards Salt Pake City 

Chaplain. Rex . Fd\\ in Tuttle Pexvis Salt Pake City 



VERMONT SOCIETY. 

2\2 Ml'M liKKS. 

Organized April 2, 1X80, \nnual meeting second Wednesday in 
Xovemher. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Hon. Guy W. Bailey (Uniingttni 

Vice-President, William H. Jeff rex Montpelier 



74 SONS 01? THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary-Historian, Walter H. Crockett Burlington 

Treasurer, Clarence L. Smith Burlington 

Registrar, Dorman B. E. Kent Montpelier 

Chaplain, Rev. I, C. Smart, D. 1) Burlington 



VIRGINIA SOCIETY. 

2ii Members. 

Organized July 7, 1890. Annual meeting February 22, to commemo- 
rate Washington's Birthday. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Arthur B. Clarke Richmond 

hirst Vice-President, lion. Henry R. Pollard Richmond 

Second Vice-President, Frederick F. Emerson Norfolk 

Third Vice-President, Dr. George Ross Richmond 

Secretary-Treasurer- Registrar, William F. Craw ford, 

700 Travelers I'ldg Richmond 

I listorian, James Branch Cabell . Dumbarton 



WASHINGTON STATE SOCIETY. 

265 Members. 

Organized June 17, 1895. Annual meeting February 22. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Ernest Bcrtraud I lussey Seattle 

First Vice-President, William De Forest Totten Seattle 

Second Vice-President, John Chester Ralston Spokane 

Third Vice-President, 1 1 airy Grant Rowland Tacoma 

Secretary-Registrar, G. F. Tilt on, 719 Feary Bldg Seattle 

Treasurer, Percy Bradford Hunting Seattle 

I listorian, ( )\ id Ambrose Myers Seattle 

Chaplain, Rev. John Onesinnis Foster,.,.. Seattle 

Chapter Officers. 

SPOKANE CHAPTER. 

President, William David Vincent; Vice-President, John Chester 
Ralston; Secretary-Treasurer, John William Bell, Jr.; Registrar, John 
W'elbnan Macintosh; Chaplain, Rev. Sherman Land on Divine, D. 1).; 
Senior Trustee, G. 1). Dryer; Junior Trustee, W. F. Metzger. 

SKATTIJ', CHAPTER. 

President, Richard Saxe Jones; Vice-President, Maj. Carl Howell 
Reeves; Secretary, G. P. Tiltoii ; Treasurer. Percy Bradford Hunting; * 



STATE SOCIETIES. 75 

Chaplain, Rev. John Charles Onesimus Foster; Senior Trustee, John 
Charles Gregory; Junior Trustee, Charles Barton Whitney Raymond. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON CHAPTER, TACOMA. 

President, Willard Vaughan Morse; Vice-President, William Petit 
Trowbridge; Secretary, George O. Svvasey; Treasurer, Arthur Edmund 
Grafton; Registrar, Robert Gile Walker; Senior Trustee, Overton Gen- 
try Ellis; Junior Trustee, Walter Marsh Bosworth, 

GOVERNOR ISAAC INGA1J.S STEVENS CHAPTER, OI.YMPIA. 

President, Edward A. Pitzhenry; Vice-President, George Noyes Tat- 
cott, Sr. ; Secretary-Historian, Jesse Martin Hitt; Treasurer, Fred W. 
Stocking; Senior Trustee, John Hiram Chandler ;' Junior Trustee, 
George Henry Tarbell. 



WISCONSIN SOCIETY. 
250 Members. 

Organized February 25, 1890. Annual meeting May 29. 

Officers, 1920. 

President, Walter 11. Wright Milwaukee 

First Vice-President, Walter F. Myers Milwaukee 

Second Vice-President, Marry S. Sloan Milwaukee 

Secretary, Kmmett A. Donnelly, 1030 Wells Rldg Milwaukee 

Treasurer, William Stark Smith Milwaukee 

Registrar, William Ward Wight Milwaukee 

Historian, Fugene M. Perry Milwaukee- 
Chaplain, Rt. Rev. William Walter Webb .Milwaukee 



WYOMING SOCIETY. 
37 Members. 

Organized March 28, 1908. Admitted into the National Society April 
30, kjcxS. Annual meeting Fehruary 22. 

. 
Officers, 1920. 

President, Galen A. Fox Cheyenne 

Vice-President, Warren Richardson Cheyenne 

Secretary, Maurice Groshon Cheyenne 

Treasurer, James B. Guthrie Cheyenne 

Registrar, Arthur H. Doane Cheyenne 

Historian, Ichabod S. Bartlett Cheyenne 



PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL CONGRESS 



OF THE 



NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS Ol 
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Held at Hartford, Connecticut 
May 17 and 18, 1920 



(77) 



SONS OF TII1C AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



LIST OF CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES, ANNUAL CON- 
GRESS, HARTFORD, MAY, 1920. 



Chairman of Committee of Arrangements, 
Dr. GEORGE C. F. Williams. 

Chairman of Reception Committee, 
Clarence Horace Wickham. 

Chairman of Banquet Committee, 
John M.. Parker, Jr. 

Chairman of Committee on Ceremonials and Colors, 
John Spencer Camp. 

Chairman of Committee on Credentials, 
Herbert 1 1. White. 

Chairman of finance Committee, 

Charles P. Cooley. 

Chairman of Committee on Publicity, 
Charles Hopkins Ci.ark. 

Chairman of Committee on Printing, 
F. Clarence Bjssell. 

Chairman of Committee on Historical Sights and Material, 
George S. Godard. 

Chairman of Committee on Automobiles, 
Edward W. Beardsley. 

Chairman of Ladies' Advisory Coinmittee, 
Mrs. Clarence II. Wick 11 am. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL CONGRESS 

OF 

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF 
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

I i£LD AT CENTER CI IURC1 1 I IOUSE, I IARTFORD, CONN. 
MAY 17 AND 18, 1920 



MONDAY MORNING'S SESSION, HELD IN THE CENTER 
CHURCH HOUSE, MAY 17, 1920, AT 10 O'CLOCK. 

Mr. Herbert II. White, of Connecticut, chairman of the local Com- 
mittee on Arrangements: Gentlemen, L have the honor of announcing 
the President General and other National officers, escorted by the Color 
Guard and the Committee on Ceremonies and Color. 

President General JiCNKS (after advancing to the platform) : Will 
you stand while the colors are advanced? 

The delegates arose and the colors were advanced, after which the 
members joined in singing the last stanza of "America." 

President General Jenks assumed the Chair. 

The Chairman: Compatriots, the Thirty-first Congress of the 
National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, is now in session. 
Chaplain General Pec S. McCollester will invoke the divine blessing 
upon this Congress. Will the Compatriots stand? (Members arose,) 

Rev. McCoi,i,i;sti;r : Our Heavenly Father, we thank Thee for the 
beauty of this day; we are responsive to the appeal of nature, the beauty 
and the glory of the sunshine, of the earth and the sea. We are nature 
worshipers. Thou art the God of nature. We thank Thee for the 
souls of men, wherein Thou hast revealed Thyself and all Thy pur- 
poses. We thank Thee that Thou hast given them skill of hand by 
which they have mastered earth and wrought things for comfort and 
for beauty. We thank Thee that Thou hast given them minds whereby 
they penetrate to the highest of the skies and the lowest of the earth, 
the most minute revelations of Thy purpose. We thank Thee most of 
all that Thou hast given them spirits and aspirations penetrating to the 
mysteries of life and immortality, of faith and truth. We thank Thee 
that Thou hast led Thy children through the various changes of this 
earth, peopling it, mastering it and constantly lifting before humanity 
higher and finer ideals. We thank Thee, Father, that as the earth has 
grown populous the; ideals of men have lifted up, and as we come 

(79) 



So 



SONS OL- Till", AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



together this day Ave thank Thee that in the mystery and mastery of 
Thy provinces Thou hast given to men this land and Thou didst people 
it with those who came, not seeking territory, lint a plaee where they 
might be free to worship Thee, and to grow in all things good and true 
and just. We thank Thee for their perseverance and for their spiritual 
and moral and governmental and religious triumphs. Thou wast with 
them; they have been Thy people. We thank Thee for the triumphs of 
their hands and minds, hut most of all for their souls and their endeavor 
to spread those truths of justice, right and equity. For our fathers, as 
we gather here today we, their sons, give humble thanks, and as Thou 
wast to them the guide, he to us the guide. We remember them and 
treasure them and would live out the lives which they made possible to 
us. We belong to this latter (lay, and to all the complexities, to all 
the re-adjustments, to all the changing conditions of this day, give us, 
Cod, that vision to know what is truth and right and justice for this 
the nation which we love best and for this nation in its relation to all 
the nations of the earth. We come here a company of men glad for the 
past but glorying in tile future. Give us wisdom and may this gathering 
work out new ideals for us, and stimulate us to new service for our 
nation and for the world. Here in silence, Our Father, we remember 
those who have given their lives for the service of this nation, those 
who gave it in the olden wars, those who gave it in the recent wars. 
God rest their souls in peace and make us mindful -of their sacrifices, 
and stimulate us will) a new zeal to so labor and so work that wars 
shall lie no more, but peace and righteousness and truth. Bless out- 
organization in all its parts and all its interests. Bless the membership 
that is not gathering with us; awake in all the new sense of service 
and righteousness. Be with our nation in its perplexities; give wisdom 
to those who guide in high or humble places, and help us ever to lift 
higher the ideals which are upon our flag and which are in our hearts, 
of that nation which God has blessed — a nation of the people for Un- 
people and by the people — to serve the world here and to serve the world 
everywhere. Bless all who are here, bless all whom we love, through 
Thy spirit and our obedience to Him, who is the Way, the Truth and 
the Life. Lead us on amidst the mysteries and perplexities of life to 
the triumphs of peace and righteousness, in the name of Christ, Amen. 

The Chairman: Will the Past Presidents General take their seats 
on the platform as their names are called? 

President General Jrnks then called the names of the Past Presidents 
General, and the following responded, going to the platform amid 
applause : 

Hon. Morris B. Beardsley, of the Connecticut Society; Mr. William 
A. Marble, of the Kmpire Slate Society; Hon. Phner M. Went worth, 
of the Iowa Society, anil lion. Louis Annin .Ames, of the Kmpire State 
Society. 

The Chairman: What is the pleasure of the Congress relative to a 
word of greeting to the Past Presidents General who are hot present. 



I'UOCKKDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 8l 

A MEMBER-: Mr; President General, I move that the usual telegram of 
greeting be sent to them. 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

The Chairman : Telegrams will he sent. Before proceeding with the 
regular order of business we will listen to a few words of welcome. 
I have asked to come to the platform Hon. Marcus 11. llolcomb, Gover- 
nor of the State of Connecticut (applause); Hon. Morgan G. Bulkeley, 
ex-mayor of Hartford (applause) 1 ; Dr. George C. L'\ Williams, .Presi- 
dent of the Connecticut Society (applause), and John M. Parker, Jr. 
(applause). 

Compatriot Herbert II. While, chairman of the local Committee on 
Arrangements and Superintendent of the Department of the Glad Hand 
(laughter), will now present the distinguished gentlemen who are to 
deliver to tin- Congress the keys of the Slate, city, Society, and Chapter, 
respect ivcly. 

GREETING I3Y CHAIRMAN HERBERT If. WHITE, Oh THE 
LOCAL COMMITTEE. 

Mr. White: Mr. President General, I am not worthy of this honor, 
for which 1 thank you and the delegates very much. My only right, 
perhaps, to speak to you is that J am a Connecticut man, horn and 
brought up here, and I love Connecticut with my whole heart. Con- 
necticut opens her doors to you this morning in hospitality. We wish 
'you all to have a good time. Some of you know Connecticut well, 
others have occasionally visited it and think', perhaps, you know it, and. 
some others know it only by reputation, but we are so glad to have yon 
here that our Compatriot, the Chief Magistrate of the State, has 
kindly consented to come and give v<m a formal word of welcome in 
the name of the State, lie needs no introduction to us. Our State has 
repeatedly called him to be its Chief Magistrate. Simple, direct, honest, 
fearless, capable, he has conducted the affairs of the State through 
peace and war in such a masterful manner that although the State has 
tried to honor him, he in turn has brought more honor to the State 
than it can ever repay. 

Mr. President General and gentlemen of the Congress, ladies and 
friends, his Kxeellcncy Marcus II. llolcomb, Governor of Connecticut. 

Members arise and applaud. 

WELCOME BY GOVERNOR MARCUS If. HOLCOMB. 

Governor I Ioi.comis: It seems to me that when 1 look over this audi- 
ence it wotdd be more appropriate to say grandfathers than to say sons. 
Put I am very much pleased to look' into the faces of men who have 
arrived at the age of discretion and who ought to be sound, sane, and 
.sensible (laughter). 

Now*, we are very glad to welcome' you to the Slate of Connecticut 
and to the city of Mail ford, one of the three towns on the Con- 



$,2 SONS OF 1*1-113 AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

nectieut River which founded the colony of Connecticut. It isn't a great 
while to look hack to the Revolution. Some of you are almost old 
enough to remctuher some survivor of the Revolution. It is less than 
twice my age to the Revolutionary War, and this Society has for its 
©liject and purpose the veneration of the memory of those red-hlooded 
ancestors of ours who were not too proud to fight (laughter), and I 
hope to God there is no one here that's too proud to hght for the honor 
of the United States and the preservation of the United States. 

We are glad to welcome you to Connecticut hecause it is one of the 
prominent colonics in the establishing of our independence. It was the 
first colony to instruct its delegates in Congress to urge a Declaration 
of Independence and the first colony to adopt the Declaration of 
Independence, the colony which sent the most soldiers to fight in the 
Revolutionary War — 40,000 out of the 200,000 men in the Revo- 
lutionary War were Connecticut men. So we are proud that you should 
conic to Connecticut to hold this Convention, and we want to say to 
yoU that Connecticut stands as true to the ideals for which our fore- 
fathers fought as they did in those days. In all the wars which we 
have had, Connecticut has stood firm and clone its full duty. In this 
last war, if the other States of the Union had furnished the same pro- 
portion of soldiers that Connecticut did we should have had 5,000,000 
men in this army — more than 5,000,000 men. In the contributions which 
were given to support the war the State of Connecticut furnished [49.95 
per cent of what they were asked to furnish, and [ have up in the 
Capitol a llag that was presented to me as the Governor of the State- 
in evidence of what Connecticut did in the contributions to the 
financial assistance of this country, It is a llag that had floated over 
the National Capital al the inauguration of the President; it floated 
over the Capital again when the armistice was declared in November, 
1918, and then it was presented to the State of Connecticut with the 
statement that it was given to us hecause we were the first of all the 
States to contribute to the support of this war 149.95 per cent. 
(Applause.) The next State to us was Michigan, with 135.7 per cent. 
(Applause.) A large part of that was due to such men as ex-Senator 
and ex-Governor Morgan G. Bulkeley (applause), who, whenever 
there was a lag or an apparent lag in subscriptions-, would come for- 
ward and say, "We will subscribe — the /Ktna Life Insurance Company 
and other .associations— $5,000,000 more"— and the city of Hartford 
subscribed to the Liberty Loan $161,000,000 (applause), an amount 
equal to $1,000 for ever)' man, woman, and child in Hartford. (Ap- 
plause.) 

\'o\v, vve have some fads here in Connecticut, You know our fore- 
fathers, our Revolutionary fathers, fouglH US esiahlish this government 
for us, and then they fought after the war was over for several years 
to establish a Constitution, and I want to see that Constitution pre- 
served. I \v;mt In see it lived lip to, and so far as I can do it I am \ 
going to have it lived up to. (Applause.) There seems to be a tend- 



I'KOCKKDINCS OF IIAR'ITOUD CONGRJvSS. 



83 



cncy today to say, "What's a Constitution between friends," and to 
ignore the Constitution, ignore constitutional methods to get at some- 
thing that is desired. Well, I hope they won't do it. 

Now, the chairman spoke ahout giving you the keys to the city, the 
keys to the State. You are welcome to everything there is in the State. 
(Laughter.) i want to give you a little secret — if you really want to 
find the proper key go to Dr. Williams. (Laughter and applause.) 

The Chairman: Governor J lolcomh, such a welcome as yours would 
gratify any group of American citizens, but to Sons of the American 
Revolution— many of us proudly tracing our ancestry bade, to the 
founders of the "Constitutional State," recognizing the ready and 
overwhelming response of your sovereign State to every call upon its 
loyalty — to us this greeting is of particular significance; and on be- 
half of this Congress of the National Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, we accept your welcome from the bottom of our 
hearts. We congratulate you, Governor Holcomb, upon the proud 
honor of being the Chief Executive of the State of Connecticut (ap- 
plause), and we congratulate the State of Connecticut upon its three 
illustrious war Governors. ( Applause.) 

Mr, Wiirn:: Gentlemen, it has been customary for the Mayor of the 
city to extend greetings at the formal occasions that occur here. We 
regret that he will not lie able to be with us today. But we have his 
uncle (laughter) — and his uncle 1 can tell you shines by no reflected 
light, lie himself has been Mayor, Governor, Senator of the United 
States from Connecticut, and for sixty years or so he has been promi- 
nent in all political, social, and financial activities, and is today, al- 
though in the fullness of years, the active head of one of the largest 
and most beneficient institutions in the world — Governor Bulkeley. 

Compatriots arise and applaud. 



WELCOME BY EX-GOVERNOR MORGAN G. BULKELEY. 

Governor IU;i,kku;y : Mr. President General and chairman of the 
committee, it is a great privilege to be recalled from a retirement as 
Mayor of Hartford of thirty or forty years ago to meet with you this 
morning, and to extend for the city, in which I have lived for many, 
many years and where it has been my privilege in a way to serve the 
community, the official greetings of the present Mayor and a welcome 
to this historic city. 

You are meeting today, gentlemen of the Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, upon historic ground, as. perhaps, you all know. 
This has been the home — these grounds and these surroundings — -for 
almost three hundred years of the history of Connecticut. It was the 
pastor of thif church, which was brought from Massachusetts, who 
first proclaimed here in Hartford that wonderful sermon which was the 
foundation of the Connecticut government and of the rights of the 
people to govern themselves-, (Applause.) In the grounds adjoining 



84 ' • SONS Ol- Till') AMERICAN REVOLUTION! 

this building' are the remains of the early settlers of Connecticut and 
of Hartford. 

I bid you this morning a most hearty welcome to our city. I present 
you no keys to the city, for we have no lock upon our door. (Applause.) 
The Iatchstring hangs out, as in olden times, and you have but to pull 
the string and the door responds to your entry. 

We have, perhaps, grown in size since your Society last met iri Con- 
necticut. We have grown in number; we have been brought up in the 
years that have past with the ideas of the founders of Connecticut and 
our religious and our educational institutions, the church and the school- 
house have traveled along side by side for all these three hundred 
years of our existence— nearly three hundred. We have participated 
in all the glories that have reflected so much honor upon our country and 
upon our State. It has been my privilege, in the years somewhat pro- 
longed that have been allotted to me, to witness the patriotic spirit 
of Connecticut's people from the time of its settlement, and I have five 
times during my lifetime witnessed the boys of Connecticut start from 
their homes in the service of their country (applause), and it has been 
my privilege to welcome them back from those conflicts in which they 
were engaged. 

I give you a hearty welcome to Hartford, and I also want to extend 
to you on behalf of a sister Society, the Sons of the Revolution, of 
which I have had the honor for many years to be President, our most 
hearty greetings. (Applause.) I have for many years been an ardent 
advocate of some method by which the two Societies could be joined 
together (applause), and J hope in the course of your deliberations here- 
in Connecticut a treaty of peace may be concocted and perhaps signed, 
which will lead in the future to the joining of these two Societies into 
one, to commemorate the memories of its founders. 1 also bring to you 
as a member of the Connecticut Society of the Cincinnati its most 
hearty greetings. (Applause.) It was, as you know, the foundation at 
the close of the Revolution of the patriotic spirit of the men that had 
won the war, and with these few remarks I present you again not the 
keys but the string that opens the door, not only to our homes but to 
our hearts. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: It takes an ex-mayor to understand how another 
ex-mayor feels. (Laughter.) I haven't even been a mayor, so I am 
going to ask to respond to this word of welcome on behalf of the city 
of Hartford, Honorable James H, Preston, Mayor of the city of Balti- 
more and now President of the Maryland State Society. (Applause.) 

RESPONSE BY -HON. JAMES H. PRESTON, OP BALTIMORE. 

Mayor Pki'.sTon : Mr. President General, it is a very great gratification 
to respond to the welcome of an ex-mayor, [ndeed, I think it must be 
an augury of what may possibly be in store for a less deserving ex- 
mayor to receive today a welcome from Hartford of an ex-mayor who 



PROCIvKDINGS 01'* MAUTl'OK!) CONGRESS. 85 

is also an ex-governor and also an ex-United States v Scnator C applause 
and laughter), without a ray of hope that the same rule which you 
have followed in Connecticut may he followed in Maryland, (Laughter.) 

Tt is a delightful occasion, Mr. Mayor, Governor, Senator, to he in 
your splendid city and State. We, coming up from the Sunny South — 
hut not more sunny than this beautiful May day in Hartford — feel on 
hallowed ground in New England, in Connecticut, in Hartford. The 
memories of our early days — the Pequot War, the great swamp fight, 
Nathan Hale, Roger Sherman — all the resounding names of history, 
come to us as we see your statues, your public buildings, and enjoy the 
flavor of your hospitality. The blood and the instinct and the atmos- 
phere of Judge Tilton of Maryland, of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, 
join with the flavor of Roger Sherman, and all go to show the breadth 
of our Americanism, the development of our nationality, the realization 
of the ideals of our forefathers. It is for the purpose of perpetuating 
those traditions and that history that we, the Sons of the American 
Revolution, are visiting TTartford today. 

We receive, Governor, at your hands, this message of welcome, in tin- 
hope that we may, over the broad land, from the Pacific to the Atlantic, 
from the Canadian border to the Southern gulf, have a concentration 
of American patriotism, of American feeling in this, our special depart- 
ment, that may have its effect on the trying time now existing, so that 
we may lead to a better, a purer, a nobler, a higher Americanism. 
Thank you. (Applause.) 

Mr. Wjutk: Gentlemen, you know now that you are welcome to our 
State, you know now you are welcome to our city. We have got you 
in through two doors now, the next is the Stale Society. The President 
of the State Society is one who has gone in and out among you for 
many years. Some of you know him very well; but we know him here 
and love him, not only for his good fellowship and his courtesy, but for 
his honesty and fairness. He needs no further introduction from me, 
hut I will just present to you Dr. George C. P. Williams, President of 
the State Society. 

Compatriots arise and applaud. 

WELCOME BY UP. GEORGE C. P. WILIJAMS, PRESIDENT 
CONNECTICUT SOCIETY. 

Dr. Wji.uams: Mr. Superintendent of the Glad Hand, President 
General, Governor Bulkeley, delegates to the Thirty-first Annual Con- 
gress of the National Society of the' Sons of the American Revolution, 
ladies — not last, but first — yes, first in war, first in peace, and first in 
the hearts of your countrymen. (Laughter and applause.) We are 
glad to see you here, ladies. We are grateful to you for delivering the 
delegates into our hands in so excellent a state of preservation. 
(Laughter.) What we shall do to them will be limited only by the 
restrictions of the' eighteenth amendment. (Laughter.) 



86 



SONS 01' TIIK AMERICAN UJvVOl„UT ION. 



As I look over this assemblage of delegates I am convinced that 
Hartford has never before entertained a body of men at one time so 
distinguished and so handsome. I wish we could show to you more of 
Hartford than your allotted time will permit. There is much in the 
city to divert the traveler from far countries. You might be interested 
in our varied industrial activities. You will discover on every side 
manifestations of thai ingenuity and enterprise which have made the 
wooden nutmeg and the bass-wood ham household words (laughter), 
the presumptive purchasers of those mythical products residing, of 
course, in other States. Hartford has many natural beauties, animate 
and inanimate, to please the eye and to distract your attention from the 
more serious purposes that brought you here. There are also many 
historical reminiscences, especially mementoes of the .American Revo- 
lution, 

Naturally your attention will be centered here. I'ut if when you arc- 
not engrossed in the excitement of listening to last year's reports or the 
thrill of ballotting for next year's candidates, and you have the time 
and the inclination to visit the State Library, the librarian, Mr. God- 
dard, a member of this Society, can exhibit to you, for instance, the 
old Charter of the Colony negotiated by an adopted Connecticut Yankee 
ai the Court of King Charles the Second. If you should go through 
the Morgan Memorial and the Atheneum, Mr. Cay, another member of 
this Society, can show you in line and letter marks of the many ardu- 
ous footsteps of our forebears which in three hundred years have 
placed our country in its present position of moral and material pre- 
eminence. In the rooms of the Connecticut Historical Society the 
librarian, Mr. Bates, also a member of this Society, can produce from 
his ample stores, rich in the spoil of time, an old dcc(\ to show that 
the rude forefathers were not incapable of stealing justly with a noble 
revenue. You may look upon the neighborhood of the old Dutch Fort 
of Good Hope, which stood on the bank of the Connecticut River when 
that band of adventurers came here from Massachusetts in 1636 with 
Thomas Hooker, their spiritual guide, to enter into real-estate relations 
with the Chief of the Petpiots, called Sassacus. The name was a 
gentle euphemism in. relation to his method's of incitement to strife, 
which at length led to the elimination of his tribe from among the con- 
certed agricultural pursuits in the Connecticut Valley. (Laughter and 
applause.) Near by you may view the site of the Charter Oak, now 
long since departed but still in evidence in numerous objects, useful 
and ornamental, fashioned from wood. Their abundance has been 
adduced as proof that once there was such a tree (laughter), but the 
magnitude of their abundance casts some discredit upon the legend 
that the tree was hollow. (Laughter.) 

You may even walk within the old-time hone- of Joseph Webbs, Esq., 
Where, as Washington says in his Journal on May 22, i/cSr, he fixed, 
with Count de Rochambeau, upon a plan of campaign, which campaign 



PJlOCRrftJlNGS OF HAK'lTokl) CONCUKSS. ^7 

after the final agony at Yorktbwn was to bring to the Colonists who 
had passed through the furnace of the American Revolution, inspired 
by the glorified patriotism of Washington and sustained by his iron 
will, a victory which was destined to influence the history of the 
nations so long as men shall dwell upon the earth. 

There are very many places and records sacred in the association of 
our country's history. There are many things to furnish inspiration 
and to afford amusement. 1 bid you welcome to their enjoyment. I bid 
you welcome to Hartford, with its ancient treasures and its modern 
needs. In the name of I he Connecticut Society, whose members have 
taken a warm intercsl in the assembling of Ibis Congress, I bid you 
welcome to the joys of their Slate, 1o their pride and to their affec- 
tion -I bid you welcome from the hearts of ils members. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: A certain shot was fired, which was heard around 
the world, not very far from here — -at least, not very far as we West- 
erners measure distance. The welcome of the Connecticut Society is 
equally audible, and it seems to the Chair to be fitting that a delegate 
from one of the most distant States should respond to this welcome, 
and let us know that away out there they heard it. I take pleasure in 
presenting IJr. lien iamin , P. Railey, the President of the Nebraska 
Society. (Applause.) 

RESPONSE BY \YR. PENJAM1N P. PAIPKY, PRESIDENT OF 
NIC PR A SKA SOCIETY. 

Mr. BAiivEY : Mr. President General, Mr. Chairman, delegates, mem- 
bers and visitors: It was surely an unexpected honor and privilege 
j when a few moments ago your President General asked me to reply 
to the greeting of the Connecticut Society. The only reason I feel that 
he could have had the courage to ask this of me without preparation 
is because he knew 1 was a Yankee — and Yankees never shirk. Tt is 
always our duty to respond when the call comes, and, born in New 
Hampshire of Connecticut parents, 1 could hardly fail to respond. 

'[ ne cither day, back' in Nebraska, in a street car, a gentleman entered 
who had recently shaved his face. lie had an appearance much 
younger than he. bad presented before, and a gentleman looking at him, 
not recognizing him, then coming to recognize him, called him by name. 
"Why," he said, "you appear younger every day," and the other re- 
plied, "J wish I could return the complim nit." He said, "You could 
if you would lie as easily as I do.", (daughter.) Put, gentlemen, this 
story is not applicable this morning, for the dignified elegance of the 
representatives of Connecticut bespeaks for them, and we all know 
that we could not have had more dignity, more beauty, men whom we 
admire more, to present us the welcome today than have done so. It 
seems to me that we have reached a time when the Sons of the 
American Revolution ought to mean something in this country. It 
seems to me we have reached a time, Mr. President General, when we 



88 



SONS OF TIllC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



arc needed more than we ever were before. We know the principles of 
our fathers — yea, and of our mothers. They fought for liberty of 
thought and liberty of worship, and there has a time come to us now 
when I think it is possible that there is just as much danger from the 
red flag as there was from the red coat in the days of the Revolution. 
During the war that has just passed you and I felt that we were enter- 
ing a new time of altruism and that when the war was over a new 
and wonderful time was to come, and yet we find that, after all, ego- 
tism, the power of might over right, the fight for one's self and for 
one's own luxury, is more dominant than ever, and it needs those who 
by birth are Sons of the American Revolution to carry this through 
until '"the time shall come when our American people will find them- 
selves — and that time surely will come. (Applause.) 

I do not wish to weary you, but I wish to recall the little boy in the 
country school when the committeeman— T think it was up in New 
Hampshire — visited the school, and the school room was decorated, 
and the flag hung on the wall, and the committeeman said, "How many 
of you can tell me what the Hag is for?" And one little boy raised his 
hand and the committeeman said, "What, my son?" And he said, "To 
hide the dirt." (Laughter.) The American flag was born to hide the 
blemishes of the world because it should remove them. It was born to 
teach us that he who serves his fellow man is the strongest and best 
of all, and so, in returning the greeting that was given to us by the 
representative of the Connecticut v Society, it's a pleasure for me to 
speak for a Western State, a Slate in which English and only English 
is spoken in all Ik t schools (applause), a State which sometimes goes 
wrong politically but is absolutely right at heart, a Slate which shares 
with Iowa the lowest percentage of illiteracy in the Union and which 
the Government says is the richest State per capita in the Union: for a 
city which has been called the Boston of the West-— and though Boston 
has ceased to speak English on her streets, we still use the English 
language (applause and laughter) ; for a city which is a great educa- 
tional center, for a people who have come to realize wdiat the Sons of 
the American Revolution mean. We are determined this year to double 
and more than double our membership. We clasp hands with Con- 
necticut and with Connecticut clasp hands with all the other States in 
upholding the principles of our fathers of the Revolution and seeing 
to it that the banner does remove every blemish, that the red flag dis- 
appears, and that our people have liberty and not license. We thank 
you for your welcome. (Applause.) 

Mr. Whitk, : It is said that when the armistice was signed, over in 
Brest, in one of the company regiments of colored soldiers one of the 
privates, as soon as he heard of it, threw down the shovel he was 
working with and said, "I am through." "Why," the corporal said, "no, 
you're not, go right on." He said, "No, I'm through. T enlisted for 
the duration of tin; war, the war am closed and I'm through." Well, 



I'ROCtiJClUNGS oi- n ARTJPOUD CONGUIvSS,. 89 

the corporal hardly knew what to do for a moment, but finally he said, 
"Yes, Sam, you did; you enlisted for the duration of the war. The war 
is over, hut," he said, "the duration am just begun." I tell you, my 
friends, that's so. (Applause and laughter.) Getting from war to ' 
peace is the duration. It's easy enough to get into war, and with the 
spirit that we have it is pretty easy to carry on the war; but to get 
from' war back to peace is really a trying thing. 

One of our members, the President of our local Branch, has been 
doing his part in getting back from war to peace, lie has been at the 
head of the Home Service Section of the Red Cross here, in addition 
to his other arduous duties in assisting our ex-Mayor, ex-Governor, 
ex-Senator, in the management of the /Etna Life Insurance Company, 
and he has been caring for the disabled soldiers and their families and 
their children. Now, it seems to me that today we might call our- 
selves the children of some of the soldiers disabled in the Revolution, 
and as he has cared for the others I think he van speak a few words 
to you — Air. John M. Parker of the Jeremiah Wadsworth Branch, 
Hartford, Connecticut. (Applause.) 

WELCOME BY COMPATRIOT JOHN M. PARKER, OP THE 
JEREMIAH WADSWORTH BRANCH, OF HARTFORD. 

Mr. Parker: Mr. President General, gentlemen of the Congress, 
honored guests and ladies: After the greetings that have been extended 
to you by the distinguished gentlemen who have preceded me, I hope 
that no doubt exists in your minds as to the quality and quantity of 

{your welcome to the State of Connecticut and the city of Hartford. 
I had a very elaborate speech prepared, but since Dr. Williams got 
hold of my notes I shall have to satisfy myself with a few words. We 
arc proud to have you with us, we are glad to have you with us, and 
it has been our pleasure to have planned some things for your enter- 
tainment and comfort and pleasure. We hope that every moment with 
us will be an enjoyable one and that when this too brief sojourn in 
our midst shall be only a memory, it will be a pleasant memory. If in 
our efforts to show you the sincerity and the depth of our welcome to 
Connecticut and to Hartford we have not measured up to our wishes 
in your behalf, it will be through errors of the head and not of the 
heart. Gentlemen, on behalf of the Jeremiah Wadsworth Branch I will 
simply add to the welcome that has been so well expressed by. the 
other -speakers. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: The local Branch of the Connecticut Society is 
one of the banner Chapters of the entire organization. I am deeply 
impressed with the importance of the Chapter system. We have on the 
platform a gentleman from one of the Western States whieh has 
demonstrated the great value of the Chapter system, a Compatriot who 
has worked up the Chapter system in his State. It is fitting that he 



90 SONS Ol' Till-; AMJvKICAN REVOLUTION. 

should respond to this welcome from the President of the local 
Branch. I present Past President General Khner M. Wentworth, of 
Iowa. 

Compatriots arise and applaud. 

RESPONSE BY PAST PRESIDENT GENERAL ELMER M. 

WENTWORTH, OF IOWA. 

Mr, WivN'i'worth : Mr. president General, compatriots and friends. 
If ever a man on God's green earth was justly entitled to say that this 
is an unexpected pleasure, I am that man. 

Now, I did have ambitions. I thought there would be some magnifi- 
cent exemplar of patriotism representing the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution hid us welcome, who would give me an opportunity to 
hunch around the corner and say to the President General, "May I 
respond?" I know that Pugsley, I know that Beardsley, I know that 
Marble, I know all of the ex-Presidents General would welcome that 
opportunity, and why don't we do it anyhow? There they are (direct- 
ing attention to galleries), and we know what is in their mind would 
have been voiced by any spokeswoman who might have been selected 
to present the greeting. What the Governor has said and what the ex- 
Governor and the ex-Senator has said about Connecticut, relating the 
glories of Connecticut statesmen and soldiers and citizenship—their 
deeds were but a primer for the salvos that would express what was 
clone by the wives and the mothers in the days of the American Revolu- 
tion. (Applause.) 

Their Chapter system is the one solution for the big permanent 
growth of our .Society. We who live in the West where our Chapters 
and our members are separated by distances greater than either the 
length or the breadth of your hospitable State, find it hard to keep up 
a local interest, where we have no local Branches or local Chapters. 
We believe. most thoroughly that as they led in the years of the Revo- 
lution, we as Sons of the American Revolution today can find no 
better inspiration in the conduct of our work than the example that 
has been set by the Daughters in their Chapter organizations through- 
out the United States. The work which those ladies have done can in 
a lesser degree be done by us; lesser because man never has the 
enthusiasm, the pep, or the perseverance to carry on which woman 
possesses— but as far as we can we should go, Compatriots, in the 
organization of Chapters. While it's a great thing to he active in your 
various Societies, the work that will make, the Sons of the American 
Revolution the factor that it must be, if we are to proteel the heritage 
and carry out tin- obligations which our ancestry and our ideals, our 
laws and onr Constitution make incumbent upon ns, we must do in an 
individual way in the communities in which we live. I,c1 lis not seek to 



PKOClvKDINCS OF HARTFORD CONGRIvSS. 91 

grasp that which is just over the horizon, but do that which lies at our 
door. 

May I digress a moment, sir, and say to you as a Son of the American 
Revolution that during my term of office as President General J did 
whatever I found it possible to do to bring about a unity of the two 
Societies. There was one thing we asked. We stood shoulder to 
shoulder in defense of American ideals, we were glad to march step 
for step in the promotion of American ideals; we arc proud of the 
name American and we insist before any Steps be taken to bring about 
a union of the two Societies the word American must be in the title 
of the Order. (Applause.) 

The Chairman : I am glad to note the arrival of Past President 
General Pugsley. Will he kindly come to the platform? 

Past President General Pugsley went to the platform amid applause. 

The Chairman: The Chair will ask for the report of the Credentials 
Committee. I feel that the delegates are thoroughly assured that they 
are welcome. 

REPORT OF CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE. 

(The final report of the Credentials Committee as presented by Com- 
patriot T. D. I hunting, of New York, Chairman, includes the names of 
189 officers and delegates as follows:) 

ROLL OP DELEGATES AT Till-. HARTFORD CONGRESS. 

Nationai, Society Oitkt.rs. 

President General, Chicago, 111., Chancellor F. Jenks; Vice-President 
General, New Jersey, Thomas W. Williams; Vice-President General, 
Ohio, Moulton Honk; Vice-President General, Missouri, Finn Paine; 
s Vice-President General, Connecticut, George F. Burgess; Secretary- 
Registrar General, Philip F. Farner; Treasurer General, New York, 
John PI. Burroughs; Historian General, Rhode Island, George C. Ar- 
nold'; Chaplain General, Massachusetts, Rev. Fee S. McCollester, D. D. 

Past Presidents Geneuat,. 

William A. Marble, Louis Annin Ames, Elmer M. Wentworth, lion. 
Morris P.. Feardsley, Cornelius A. Pugsley. 

DjRKCfOKS Gi;ni',rai,. 
Fewis IF Curtis, Hon. James IP Preston, George F. Pomeroy. 

State Society Delegates. 
California: Arthur W. North, II. Robins Burroughs. 
Colorado: Rev. Jesse Penny Martin, I). D. 

CoNNKCTiei'T: 1),-. George C. P. Williams, Alfred Spencer }v John M 
Parker, Jr., Feverctt Belknap, Herbert I I. White, Rev. Drv.b'n W Phelps 
Herbert Randall, Pli C. Pirdsey, II. Wales Fines, Frederick A Doolittle' 
Harry P. Williams, Charles G. Stone, Fdward W. Feardsley T 1) Post' 



92 SONS 01' TJIK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

wick, Geii. George H. Ford, Hon. Rollin S. Woodruff, Arthur K. Woodruff, 
William H. Burr, H. Dayton Humphrey, T. B. Warren, P. 15. Blakcman, 
William S. Wells, George IT. Sage, Seymour C. Loomis, George S. 
Godarcl, Ga.pt Clarence H. Wiekham, Martin Welles. 

Dtstukt of Cor.UMiiiA : John S. Barker, Albert D. Spangler, J. Mc- 
Donald Stewart, Dr. Mark F. Finley, Clarence A. Kenyou, John P>. 
Torbert, Frank 1). Fletcher, William S. Parks, Selden Marvin Ely, Rear 
Admiral G. \V r . Baird, Lieut. Col. Fred Tc C. Bryan, Frederick D. Owen. 

Ir.UNois: William P. Babcock, William P. Reed, David V. Webster, 
Dorr E. Felt, Col. Geo. V. Lauman, Henry L. Green, Louis A. Bowman, 
Michael Huffaker Crassly, Horatio N. Kelsey. 

Iowa: Henry Brown Hawley. 

Louisiana: Maj. Campbell B. Hodges, LI. vS. A. 

Maine.: Philip booster Turner, Waldo Pettengill, Frederick S. Vaill, 
James L. Merrick, William K. vSanderson. 

MASSACiirsK/rrs : George Hale Nutting, Dr. Waldo E. Boardman, 
T. Julien Silsby, Grenvilie H. Norcross, Charles P. Read, William C. 
Briggs, Alfred Foster Powers, h'rank Ernest Woodward, Walter K. 
Watkins, Alvin R. Bailey, Webster Bruce, David Pingree, Edward Jones 
Cox, Joshua Atwood, William S. Lyon, Harry C. Northrop, Charles L. 
Baird, Charles H. Bangs, M. D., Richard PI. Stacy, V S. F. Punderson, 
Eben Putnam. 

Maryland: T. Murray Mayiiadier, Maj. Geo. W. Hyde, Drayton M. 
ITite, Chas. N. Boulden, Dr. James W. Iglchart, John II. Orem, Jr., 
Geo. S. Robertson, Geo. C. Thomas, John M. Lyell, Osborn I. Yallott. 

Michigan-; George PI. harbour, George W. Bates, A. B. Atwater. 

Missouri: James T. Quarles. 

Nebraska: Dr. Benj. F. Bailey, John D. Bushnell. 

Ni;w Hampshire^ Hon. Harry T. Lord, Prof. Ashley K. Hardy. 

Ni-:w Jersey: William Johnson Conkling, Harry F. Brewer, Rev. • 
Lyman Whitney Allen, 1). D., John Lenord Merrill, Frank L. Dyer, 
Joseph Holmes, George V. Muchmore, Washington I. L. Adams, John 
Brewer Wight, William C. Gallagher, A. B. Johnson, Frederick M. 
Haviland, Henry R. Kent, A. R. Elliott, Charles A. Sterling, Augustus 
S. Crane, Richard L. Riker, Chas. V S. Kiggins, Edward Winslow, Cor- 
nelius C. Vermeule, Samuel Copp Wortben, C. R. McPherson, Frederick 
B. Bassett, Bridgewater M. Arnold, Win. Chas. McPherson, Marcy P. 
Stephens, A. H. Loomis, F. B. Lovejoy, Thomas H. Taylor, Edgar A. 
Bates, Dwight P. Cruiksbank, Oscar Stanley Thompson, Sr. 

NEW York: Tennis D. Huntting, Samuel L. Stewart, George McK. 
Roberts, Clarence H. Lobdell, PI on. James B. Laux, George L. Walker, 
Col. Wm, IT. Corbusier, U. S. A., Hon. Harvey F. Remington, Lieut. 
Win. B. Remington, George B. Sage, Norman P. Heflley, A. J. Squier, 
Walter C. Morris, Charles H. Wight, John C. Wight,' George Roycc 
Brown, P. Valentine Sherwood, C. A. Pugsley, Chester 1). Pujjsley, 
John Warner Remington, Frank B. Steele, Robert M. Anderson, J. II. 
Clute. 

Ohio: Joseph B. Doyle, Henry C. Evman, Frank C. Osborn, Warren 
E. Russell. 

Pennsylvania: Omar S. Decker, Isaac B. Brown, Wm A. Stritmater s 
James A. Wakefield, R. W. Guthrie, W. P.. Williams. 



PROCEEDINGS OE IIAkTl'OKl) CONGRESS. 



93 



Rhode Island: Judge Arthur P. Sumner, Dr. Geo. T. Spicer, W. 
Howard Walker, Herbert M, Clarke, Henry Clinton Dexter, Charles 
Samuel Foster. 

TENNESSEE: William K. Boardman. 

V A f kc i x i a : 1\ K. Em'erso'n, Arthur 15. Clarke. 

Wisconsin : Walter II. Wright. 

NUMRER OF DELEGATES i'ko.m F.ACll STATU SOCIETY AT THE Til IKTV- PlRST 

Annual, Congress llr.i.n at Hartford, Conn., May 17-18, 1920. 

General officers Nebraska 2 

Past Presidents General 5 Mew Hampshire 2 

I Jirectors General 3 New Jersey 32 

California 2 New York 2.} 

Qolorado '. 1 Ohio _ I 

Connecticut 26 Pennsylvania 6 

District of Colunibia 12 Rhode Island 6 

1 Ilinois 9 Tennessee 1 

Iowa r Virginia- 2 

Louisiana I Wisconsin I 

Maine 5 

Maryland 10 Total 189 

Massachusetts 21 

Michigan , 3 Ladies 84 

Missouri . . . 1 

Static Societies Not Represented. 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, In- 
diana, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, 
New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South 
Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wyoming. 



The Chairman: Compatriots, several distinguished Sons of the 
American Revolution, whose services to this organization have been 
signal and whom we hold in warm love and respect, have, since the last 
Congress, responded to the call for higher service. It is fitting that we 
pause to pay them a tribute of high esteem. The Chair will call upon 
Director General Lewis B. Curtis to present resolutions commemorative 
of Past President General Edwin S. Greeley. (Applause.) Will the 
Compatriots rise? 

Mr. CURTIS: Pursuant to the appointment of the President General, 
these resolutions were compiled by a committee and are now submitted 
for your approval. They are as follows: 

WiiivKivAs it has pleased God to take from us our Brother Com- 
patriot, General Edwin S. Greeley, who died at his home in New 
Haven, Conn., on January 10, 1020; and 

WHEREAS General Greeley has for nearly thirty years been a member 
of The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
has served the Society by holding many offices, including ih.it of Presi- 
dent General of the National Society, and has been its constant sup- 
porter lip to the time of his death; now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the President General and the Executive Copunittee 
of The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution ex- 



94 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

press their deep sorrow at their bereavement and extend to the family of 
the deceased their sincere sympathy. 

Resolved, That this resolution be recorded in the records of the 
National Society and a copy conveyed to his family and be published in 
the Bulletin. 

Lewis B. Curtis, 

Director General and Chairman, 
Louis Annin Ames, 
Director General and Past President General, 

Elmer Marston Wentworth, 
Director General and Past President General, 
Attest: Committee. 

Lewis B. Curtis, 

Director General and Chairman. 

The Chairman: You have heard the resolutions. What is your 
pleasure ? 

It was moved and seconded that the resolutions he received and 
adopted and the recommendations complied with. Motion carried. 

Dr. Williams: 1 would like to make a motion here with regard to a 
Past President General who has been overlooked for a great many 
years. lie was the firsl President General of the National Society, a 
Connecticut man. He moved away from the State and I suppose that 
is the reason he has been overlooked, but through the notices for this 
Congress he received word that a Congress was to be held, and he has 
written a letter in trembling hand— he is a very old man — and he says 
he has had two attacks of paralysis and he supposes his end is near. 
[ think it would please him very much if we should send greetings 
from this Congress. Therefore, I wish to move that the President 
General be instructed to send the greetings of this Congress to the Hon. 
Lucius P. Deming, first President General of the National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

The motion was duly seconded ami carried. 

'fhe Chairman': 1 value very highly a letter which 1 received from 
Past President General Deming a few days ago, regretting his inability 
to accept the invitation to he here. 

Compatriot Seymour C. Loomis of the Connecticut Society will pre- 
sent further resolutions on behalf of the Connecticut Society relative 
to Past President General Greeley. 

Mr. Loomis: Mr. President General and Compatriots, in behalf of the 
Connecticut Society and of its committee appointed thereto, Governor 
Woodruff, Judge Simpson, and of which committee \ have the honor 
also to he a member, 1 invite your attention while we pay a brief tribute 
of respect to the memory of one whose presence at previous Congresses 
was always appreciated and enjoyed and whose absence tpday we 
deeply feel. 

Air. Loomis then read the resolution, which i- as follows: 

By every standard by which excellence in character is measured, v 
General Edwin Seneca Greeley was the very type and fulfillment of his * 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 95 

time. In the hazard of life he was forced to seek his fortune at the 
age of twelve years and became a machinist's apprentice. From child- 
hood he wrought in iron. He knew no college; his university was 
severe experience and his instructors, when his mind was young, were 
the forge and the anvil. 

God gives to some men a natural culture surpassing that acquired 
from the curriculum of schools, and fashions them out of the stern 
fahric of the age they live in, for His high purposes. 

There is no merit in blue hlood, but there is an aristocracy of clean 
and upright living. 

General Greeley was one of such aristocracy. 

To have descended from a family of titles is no special distinction, 
but to have been the child of generations of men and women who sur- 
mounted obstacles and accomplished tasks and kept the faith, is the 
honorable lineage of the true American. This was the dauntless spirit 
of the Pilgrim pioneer. Tie came from the blood of the builders of a 
race who gave our country the custody of law, the virtue of home, the 
vitality of religion, the democracy of education, and the refuge of the 
human race — self-government, individual initiative, and industrial tran- 
quillity. Their creed in politics is that it is respect for the law and not 
fear of the law that makes civilization. 

To General Greeley duty was the first rerpu'rement for citizenship. 
He had an unselfish devotion to his country and to his home and to his 
fellowmen, even at the cost of personal sacrifice. He volunteered his 
life for his convictions. Such men live for the immortality of the 
period in which they are actors. 

The long experience of this man is not to be detailed here. This 
is not an occasion for a complete biography. The story of General 
Greeley's career might well be a part of the education of every Amer- 
ican fireside. It is briefly this — 

lie was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, May 20, 1832, a son of 
Seneca and Priscilla Field Greeley. His grandfather was Colonel Joseph 
Greeley, a soldier of the American Revolution. The family is of 
Scotch stock and the American ancestor Andrew Grcele (as the name 
was then spelled) came to Salisbury, Mass., prior to 1640. Young 
Greeley was compelled to make his own way in the world at the age 
of twelve years. He became a machinist's assistant and grew with the 
craft and was especially interested in locomotive construction. His 
work took him to various centers of industry. In 1855 he came to 
New Haven, obtained employment with the railroad company and as- 
sisted in the building of the first locomotive constructed there. New 
Haven became his home and Connecticut his State, and he paid a great 
price in service as her citizen. 

In 1856 he was married to Elizabeth A. Corey, of New< Haven. A 
daughter was horn who died in eighteen months. His wife died in 1908. 
He is survived by an adopted daughter, Jennie Elizabeth Greeley. 

On August 2r, 1861, he went to the Civil War as a second lieutenant, 
with the Tenth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, serving throughout the 
long conflict and advancing in rank until, on May 13, 1865, lie was made 
a brigadier-general. His services during the war were continuous, 
perilous, and exacting. He won promotion on his merit as a man and 
Tiis courage as a soldier. Impressed with the meaning of that war and 
inspired by the obligations of those who fought to preserve our Union, 
he became interested in public affairs and continued his interest until 
he died, lie was an active member of those patriotic societies which 
carried on the work of teaching true Americanism and was honored 
bv his companions and elected to the place of President General of 
The National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, at the New 
Haven Congress in io<U- He became a member of the Connecticut 



(jC) SONS 01/ Till; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Society in 1891 and was Vice-President from 1895 to 1902, and has 
been a member of its Board of Managers since 1892. He was a com- 
manding figure in our National Congresses and wielded a vast and 
benign 'influence in the affairs of our order. 

In all Grand Army matters lie was interested — in all works of civic 
evolution and philanthropic co-operation, in all progressive religious 
development, in all enterprises for the cultivation of the spirit of 
practical kindness and relief, in all public activities, and in the industrial 
enlargement and sound investment of public confidence in commerce 
and finance he was prominent. Lie was a man of resource and reliability 
and of an unblemished personal accountability throughout the eighty- 
eighth years of a faithful contribution, modestly and cheerfully rendered, 
to his fellowmen. 

His- character is written in his last will, which reveals in its chari- 
table provisions all the gentleness of his heart and the frank and noble 
justice of his mind. 

His military career is a record in itself so familiar to us all that it 
may be summed up in a single sentence: lie dedicated his life to his 
country and valiantly expressed the genius of his ancestors, comprehend- 
ing that the life of a man is the measure of his usefulness and that 
the motive of that life is the value of his mission. Here on earth we 
estimate a man by the wealth or poverty of his example. His presence 
with us passes with his death, but what he has done becomes a part of 
our age. Tt is the spiritual and real value that lives long after the 
man is gone, for the spirit and reality of a good man remains forever in 
the fabric of the soul of human society. The nation lives by the lives 
of its noble citizens, wdio have given to it more than they have received 
in an unselfish devotion to its welfare, its honor, and its reputation. 

Therefore, be it resolved, That the National Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution, in deep and lasting recognition of the wealth of 
human kindness and of the example of a devout and sterling citizen, 
expresses and registers its gratitude to God for the rich endowment 
He has given us during all the splendid years of a companionship 
with General Edwin Seneca Greeley, wdiosc death on January 10, 1920, 
rounded a long life of dignity and honor and whose character is the 
richest legacy any man can bequeath to our common country. 

The man belongs to history. 

Our purpose is to express the regard of those who knew him with 
the intimacy of love. 

ROU.IN S. WooiiRUi'T. 
Seymour C. Loom is. 
Kakxkst C. Simpson. 

The Chairman: The adoption of the resolution has been moved. 
Ts it seconded? 

The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

The CHAIRMAN: In loving memory of Past President General 
Franklin Murphy, of the N T ew Jersey Society, resolutions have been 
drawn and will be presented by Director General Pouis Annin Ames. 

Mr. AMES: Mr. President General: At noon on February 24, across 
the wires of the nation there flashed the sad intelligence of the death of 
Compatriot Franklin Murphy. Acting upon the request of your worthy 
President General, who conveyed by telegram a message asking that 
Past President General Marble and myself represent him at the 
funeral on February 27, Mr. Marble being out of town 1 journeyed to 



PROCEEDINGS 01- HARTFORD CONGRESS. 97 

Newark officially, carrying with me a personal sorrow for the death of 
a friend whose friendship had begun long before he or I was in the 
Sons of the American Revolution. I walked through the streets of 
Newark, whose tlags were at half mast, to the home of Compatriot 
Murphy, filled with mourning friends. The entire Legislature of New 
Jersey was there, having taken a recess in memory of Franklin 
Murphy. On hehalf of the National Society i present the following 
resolutions, with the motion that they he adopted: 

Our beloved Compatriot, FfcANktiN Murphy, answered the summons 
to the higher life February 24, 1920, and from earth passed a true 
patriot whose love of country was a passion. 

At the age of eighteen Compatriot Murphy responded to President 
Lincoln's call for volunteers, serving for nearly three years with the 
Fighting Thirteenth New Jersey Volunteers. His interest in the wel- 
fare of his city, State, and Nation was deep and unselfish, lie served 
the Commonwealth of New Jersey with honor ami distinction as 
Governor for three years. 

In [891 he became interested in the Sons of the American Revolution, 
serving the National Society for five years as Secretary General, also 
as Vice-President General and as President General. He was ever 
devoted to the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and 
eager to further itsjnfluence. 

With all we regret his too soon departure, thankful, though, that he 
was one with and of us. 

Louts Ann in Ames, 

Past President G curia!. 
Wm, i.iam A. Marble, 

I'usl [^resident General. 
Thomas W. Williams, 

Vice-President General. 

The Chairman: The adoption of this resolution has been moved. 
Is it seconded? 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: One of the most beloved personalities in the entire 
membership of the Sons of the American Revolution was John Milton 
Reifsnider, who died in office as one of your Directors General. I will 
ask Compatriot Ames to read resolutions of respect to John Afilton 
Reifsnider. 

Mr. A.MES: Mr. President General: One by one they go to the glory 
that none may know. I cannot forget the morning of Friday, March rf). 
I was awakened by the beating of the rain upon the window, and as T 
looked out and saw how mother nature was sobbing I knew there was a 
great grief. I came home that afternoon, looked at the western sky, and 
saw a sunset that would do justice to October. At night the stars shone 
with a wintry brightness. T did not know the meaning of that day 
until the morrow. Then at my office there were telegrams from the 
Maryland Society, the Secretary General and the President General 
telling of the death of my friend, your beloved Compatriot, John Milton 



Reifsn 



cler. 



98 SONS OL' TillC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

I was asked by the President General to go to Westminster to attend 
the funeral, and with Vice-President General Williams we journeyed 
from an early hour in the morning and met Past President General 
Wentworth at Philadelphia. At Baltimore we took an auto ride for 
thirty miles across the country into the little sleeping village of West- 
minster and went to the ancestral home built by the father of John 
Milton Reifsnider, and looked upon the face of our departed friend. 
There never was a more quiet village; no one on the streets, every 
shade of every house drawn. We went to the office of John Milton 
Reifsnider and then to the court-house, where his voice had been heard 
hi the cause of humanity. Vice-President General Williams had this 
conversation with the only villager we met upon the street. May I 
recall it? ''You have lost," said Vice-President Williams, ''a dis- 
tinguished citizen." The old man said, ''I knew John Milton Reifsnider's 
father, lie was the banker and kept the store of the town. John 
Milton grew up like other boys; but he was proud, lie became a 
lawyer, and he was hard for justice. lie wanted justice for himself,, 
but John Milton Reifsnider was harder though for justice for others. 
See that court-house ! They elected a Judge this month. I'm a Repub- 
lican. John Milton Reifsnider was a Democrat, but there wouldn't have 
been a Republican in Westminster or Carroll County that wouldn't 
have voted for John Milton Reifsnider." 

The National officers and the State officers of Maryland were the 
honorary pallbearers, and we went to the little stone church back from 
the road in a grove of cedars, straight as the cedars of Lebanon. There 
was not a villager at the church except the immediate family, and the 
church was filled by Compatriots of Maryland and other States. After 
the service of the Episcopal Church, read most expressively by Bishop 
Murphy, we rode by the cemetery where were gathered the entire popu- 
lation of Westminster and most of the people of Carroll County. 

I offer this resolution as the voice of the National Society. 

WiiERivAS, Our National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, 
met with an irreparable loss in the death of our beloved Compatriot, 
John Milton RiUi*snidf,r, who departed this life Friday, March 19, 
1920: 

Resolved, As great as the sorrow that has come into the lives of 
relatives and friends is the loss that has befallen the cause of just 
government and true patriotism in the death of John Milton Rkif- 

SNIDtfR. 

lie was a devoted husband, loving father, noble friend, upright citizen, 
eminent jurist, conscientious and efficient public official, and earnest 
patriot. 

His fine sense of justice made him great in his chosen field of labor. 
His deep love of country and abiding faith in its future endeared him 
to all true lovers of America. His cvery-day acts were the realization 
of the ideals of all tine souls. 

He shall be missed, yet all are thankful that he enriched life in so 
many departments. 



I'KOCICKDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 99 

We pay endearing tribute to the memory of him who lias gone over 
the Unknown Sea to the Unknow Shore. 

(Signed) Louis Annin Ames, 

Past President General National Society, S. A. R. 
(Signed) Elmer M. Wentworth, 

Past President General National Society, S.A.R. 
(Signed) James H. Preston, 

President Maryland Society, S. A. R. 

The Chairman : The adoption of the resolution has been moved 
and seconded. 

A Member: May I suggest that a copy of this resolution be sent to 
the daughter of Mr. Reifsnider. That was not incorporated in the 
resolution. 

The Chairman: All in favor of the adoption of the resolution will 
so signify by saying "dye.*' (Unanimous response.) Contrary by tin- 
same sign. (No response.) The motion prevails. 

Mr. Parks: Gentlemen of the Congress; I move that the following 
be sent to the family of Vice-President General Morton. Vice-Presi- 
dent General Morton was a member of the District of Columbia 
Society, Sons of the American Revolution. He died yesterday at the 
age of 96. The telegram suggested is as follows: 

The National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, in annual 
Congress assembled, extends to the family of our late Compatriot 
Levi Parsons Morton, its sincere sympathy and condolence. 

The passing of ibis distinguished American brings to our minds the 
record of his eminent and patriotic services to his country during a 
long and useful life. 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: Again the summons came. I will call upon Com- 
patriot Branch, of the Maryland Society, to offer resolutions of respect- 
to the memory of Past President General Edwin Warfield. 

Mr. BRANCH: Mr. President General and Compatriots: By the par- 
tiality of our compatriots in Maryland it is my privilege to pay a little 
tribute to my warm personal friend, with whom T was associated most 
of his life, as I present the resolutions of our Society. 

Governor Warfield came from a family known in history as being 
identified with the burning of the Peggy Stewart, an incident of na- 
tional and world-wide interest — significant because it was done in broad 
daylight and done by men without disguise. He was also identified 
with the restoration of the Senate Chamber in Annapolis, where 
General Washington resigned his commission in the army, and Gov- 
ernor Warfield took special pride in that because the chamber had been 
deformed, had been disguised, had been dismembered, but. he restored 
it. You can see it now just as it was at the time General Washington 
resigned his commission and as shown in the pictures which are 
familiar to the world at large. He retired with full honors from that 
position and passed his life finally as President of the Maryland His- 



100 



SONS 01* THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



torical Society, so by family name and tradition and personal virtues 
and character and then President of this National Society, we ask the 
privilege of paying a slight tribute to him to be made a matter of 
record by this Society: 



It is with deepest regret that we announce the death of Honorable 
Edwin Waki'ii:i,i), former President General of the National Society, 
S<»ns of the American Revolution, arid former Governor of Maryland. 

The life of our deceased eompatriot was replete with ihe highest 
patriotic contributions to American patriotism. 

His work as President General of the Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution was distinguished by noble ideals and ill keeping 
with the traditions of the Society and its founders. Be it. therefore 

Resolved, That the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, 
express its sense of loss in the death of the Honorable Edwin War- 
l'ti'.i.n, and that it place on record its appreciation of his life and services 
to his country and his State and to this Society, and that, these resolu- 
tions lie spread upon the minutes of the Society, and a copy forwarded 
to the family of our deceased compatriot. 



I offer this for adoption. 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: I recognize Compatriot Read of Massachusetts. 

Mr. Ri',ai>: Mr. President General and Compatriots: At the Congress 
of the Society held in Detroit last year L had the honor to offer to the 
National Society from the Massachusetts Society an historic gavel made 
of wood from the old Bay State. The gavel has been fashioned. 1 
have it with me, and I am now to present it to the National Society. It 
has been made for us by one of our compatriots in Massachusetts, 
Rnberdel Read, a resident of the historic town of Akton, a man of 
about 8q years of age, who talks Revolution all his waking hours and 
dreams Revolution all his sleeping hours. (Laughter.) The handle, 
which is fashioned in the shape of a Revolutionary cannon, is made of 
wood from the old State House in Boston, of which John Adams said 
in his later years, "Here the child Independence was born." The 
barrel is made of wood from Faneuil liall, in Boston, known through- 
out the land as the "Cradle of Liberty," and the gem of the gavel lies 
in the head of the barrel — not of wood but of stone — Plymouth Rock. 
(Applause.) Inserted in small pieces throughout the gavel are bits of 
historic wood from Massachusetts, and 1 will read briefly, Mr. Presi- 
dent General — it won't take but a moment — where that wood has been 
obtained: Prom Boston, the Old Elm, the Tea Party House, the Old 
South Meeting House, the Paul Revere House, King's Chapel Burying 
Ground, and Christ Church; from Charlestown, Bunker Hill and the 
British frigate Somerset, which lay off of Charlestown during the bat- 
tle in Cambridge; from Cambridge, the Washington Him; from Lexing- 
ton, the John Harrington House, the Captain Isaac Davis I louse, and the 
Rev. Jonas Clarke House; from Concord, the Asa Pollard House, the 



I'KOClCKOINCS 01' HAKTl-'uui) CO'NOKIvSS. 101 



first Church, the North Bridge, and the British Soldiers' graves, and, 
finally, from Pennsylvania^ a piece of wood from Independence Hall, in 
Philadelphia, A detailed typewritten statement will accompany the 
gavel for preservation in the archives of the Society. 

Now, Mr. President General, I present, yon with this gavel, and it 
would he especially gratifying to the Massachusetts Society if yon 
would use it at this Congress as you preside over its deliberation?. 

The Chairman: Compatriot Read, on behalf of the Congress the 
Chair accepts this remarkahle gavel with the serene confidence that it 
has in it the elements out of which I will he able to construct a rudder 
which will steer and stead)' the ship of state during the sessions of this 
Congress. (Laughter and applause.) 

In conformity with the By-Laws the Chair will appoint the following 
Committee on Resolutions: Past Presidents General Beardsley and 
Marble, and Compatriot Osborn, of Ohio. 

The CHAIRMAN: Jt has been customary also to appoint a Committee 
on Official Reports and Recommendations, to which committee such 
reports will he referred. What is the pleasure of the Congress? 

A MKmlucr: 1 move that they be appointed from the Chair. 

The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

The Chairman; I' will appoint Compatriots Wakefield, of Pennsyl- 
vania; Uoardman, of Tennessee, and Sumner, of Rhode Island. 

The Chairman : 1 will present at this point the report of the Presi- 
dent General upon the progress of the Society: 
•I 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT GENERAL. 

The several interests and activities of the Sons of the American 
Revolution will be reviewed by separate reports to he presented today. 
My report will therefore be in the nature of a general survey of the 
organization. To those who have read my message to compatriots in 
the March IJuu.ktin my present remarks will seem like a twice-told 
tale, but repetition is a well established forensic device to secure atten- 
tion and to make an adequate impact upon the sensorium. 

To "see America first," as 1 have seen it during the past year, is a 
privilege which comes to but few, and I assure my compatriots that I 
am deeply grateful that this privilege should have come to me. I have 
visited forty State Societies, passing from one hustling American city 
to another, greeted by groups of earnest American patriots with that, 
splendid hospitality which Sons of the American Revolution always 
extend to their President General. 1 have been intensely gratified to 
note the high place the Society holds everywhere in the esteem of the 
American people. The very sound of the name has a ring which stirs 
the hearts of those whose love of country is a vital force. State 
officials, from the Governor down, mayors of cities, judges, college 
presidents, men of distinction in all walks of life have vied with each 



102 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



other to do honor to our Society. We may well be proud of member- 
ship in this order of the loyal heart. Those who founded it builded 
better than they knew. All honor to those early compatriots of ours 
whose vigorous constructive patriotism found stirring expression in that 
ringing article of the Constitution of the vSociety, which defines its 
purposes and objects. In its inspirational value it is worthy to stand 
beside the Declaration of Independence, the Federal Constitution and 
Washington's farewell address. Everyone of us should read and re- 
read this memorable paragraph. It contains the recipe for true 
Americanism. It gives our vSociety its vitality and its strong appeal. 
Ill it lies the secret of its attractive power over the best men in every 
community. Through it we have achieved a prestige which should 
fill the heart of every loyal compatriot with pride. 

It is to such organizations as ours that the country looks to stay the 
present swelling tide of disloyalty. Education and a wholesome demon- 
stration of governmental power are both needed in this warfare. But 
of these two essential forces, education is paramount. In this field the 
Sons of the American Revolution early took a conspicuous place. The 
nation has recognized and endorsed our educational efforts and looks to 
us to continue them. We cannot do better. We must move on, how- 
ever, to a boarder held, and follow methods more or less standardized. 

But to fulfill our mission most effectively, we must perfect our 
organization. Our weakness lies in the want of cohesion between the 
State Societies. There is not that warm bond uniting the societies 
that should exist between men whose common interest is national 
rather than local. 

Compatriots should therefore accustom themselves to think of the 
nation-wide scope of the organization, which is now promoting the 
cause of patriotism in fifty Societies and one hundred and six Chapters. 
Societies and Chapters should get away from a sense of isolation. In 
the words of the hymn, "We are not divided, all one body we." What 
our order needs is nationalization. 

Societies and Chapters should get into closer touch with the National 
Society. There should be more correspondence between State and 
Chapter officers and National officers. The latter invite the active co- 
operation of the membership everywhere in promoting the best interests 
of the organization as a whole, and of the different groups. 

Frequent reports should be sent to the Secretary General, for pub- 
lication in the Bulletin, of elections and of the activities of the So- 
cieties and Chapters. There is great remissness in this respect. The 
only purpose of the Bulletin is to keep the held advised of the progress 
of the organization. These reports should be as full as possible. 
They are of great value, not only in suggesting to others successful 
methods of expansion, but in arousing a healthful spirit of emulation. 

There should be fostered a warmer fellowship between neighboring 
Societies. Reciprocal courtesies should be extended to officers to at- 



TltOCKKDINCS OV HARTFORD CONGRESS. IO3 

tend and address annual and other meetings. It should be one of our 
traditions that every visitor from another State is a guest of honor. 

Every State Society should send a good representation to our annual 
Congresses. It is a great privilege to attend these convocations of 
patriotic-minded citizens from all sections of the country. Delegates 
bring back to their societies fresh inspiration. Increased activity always 
follows our Congresses in those societies which are represented. 

The button should be worn by compatriots as constantly as possible. 
It is a mark of honor. It identifies the bearer as a 100 per cent 
American. 

The conferring of the S. A. R. service medal has proved to be a most 
popular and attractive feature of our meetings. The ceremony should 
be made as impressive as possible, and the meetings should be widely 
advertised. It has worked well in many cities, to use a public hall or 
church for the occasion and to invite the public to be present. This 
ceremony always gives the Societies the most creditable kind of pub- 
licity. The presence of a National officer, though desirable, is not 
necessary. 

Tn this connection let me suggest that we should use all proper 
means to get the right kind of publicity for the organization. Every 
time the name "Sons of the American Revolution" appears in the news- 
papers, beneficial results follow. Let us not be too modest. We have a 
most important message for the American people. There is no better 
way to deliver that message than through the public press. 

No compatriot should regard himself as a loyal American unless he 
is actively engaged in some form of Americanization work. "Trie 
harvest is plenty, but the laborers are few." Our country's call for this 
service at this crucial time should fall upon our ears with especial 
force. Sons of the American Revolution are recognized as conserva- 
tors of the American ideal. Much is expected of us, and we must see 
to it that this expectation is not disappointed. 

The American's Creed, by William Tyler Page, of the Maryland 
Society, is thoroughly identified in the minds of the public with the 
Sons of the American Revolution. In order to make this impression 
permanent, we must redouble our activity in the distribution of this 
inspired and inspiring document. 

The enthusiasm with which the country received the suggestion of 
the National Society that September 17 be set aside as a day for (lie 
commemoration of the signing of the Federal Constitution was one of 
the most inspiring incidents in the history of our organization. Last 
September over thirteen thousand meetings were held, more than half 
being under the direction of our compatriots. I urge all Societies and 
Chapters to become prominently identified with this important celebra- 
tion, so that it may continue to be known as a Sons of \]\c American 
Revolution affair. The Constitution is a crystallization of American 
ideals and its widespread study is the finest kind of Americanization. 



104 SONS QV Til !•; AMKUICAN REVOLUTION. 

This is the psychological moment to add to our membership. The 
war has caused a nation-wide study of American principles, resulting 
in a better understanding of and a deeper love for the flag. The best- 
men in every community are waiting for the word of invitation. Let 
this be the slogan in membership campaigns, "Membership in the 
Sons of the American Revolution opens up new avenues of service to 
our country." Especial effort should be made to get young men to 
join. There is a dearth of young men in the organization in all parts 
of the country. 

The ranks of the American Legion offer a most attractive field of 
labor for our membership committees. Indeed, there is no greater 
service the .Sons of the American Revolution can perform for America 
than to establish close and cordial relations with the American Legion. 
Every opportunity should be used to cultivate and deserve the con- 
fidence of this magnificent body of eager American youths. 

I have become convinced of the great value of the Chapter system. 
It scatters over a State groups of compatriots who are more effective 
in securing a widely distributed membership than is possible from a 
single point, however central. It brings the Society in closer contact 
with the people through local meetings. It enables all members to 
attend gatherings and to participate in the activities of our organization. 
There is no belter way to build up State Societies than by developing 
the Chapter system. 

The Society of tire Soils of the American Revolution occupies a high 
and unique position in America. Let none of its members forget the 
peculiar obligations which rest upon them of alertness, loyalty and 
initiative. 

Compatriots, do you seek a definite form of Americanization work? 
Build up the Societies and Chapters of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. Perfect this splendid agency for the inculcation of American 
principles. 

Chancellor L. Jenks, 

President General. 

The Chairman: Next in order will be the reading of the minutes 
of the Detroit Congress. What is the pleasure of the Society? 

A MEMBER: As the minutes have already been printed in the Yhak 
Book, T move you, sir, that the reading be dispensed with in the interest 
of saving time. 

The motion was duly seconded. 

The Chairman: And approved as printed? 

A Mem REr : Yes. 

The motion was adopted and the minutes approved. 

The Chairman: lias the Secretary General a report of the Board of 
Trustees and Executive Committee? I will ask for the report of the 
Secretary General. 

The Secretary General (hen read his report, which is as follows: 



PROtfCtiDlNGS 01/ HAKTl''()kl) CONOKI'.SS. 1 05 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL, APRIL r, 1920. 

Compatriots: In accordance with the usual custom, yonr Secretary 
General has the honor to submit his annual report covering a brief 
summary of the affairs of the National Society for the past year. It 
was with considerable embarrassment that 1 entered npon the duties of 
this office and fear that I might not be able to meet fully the require- 
ments of the situation as established by my predecessor, who had for 
so many years directed the activities of the office. I still bear in mind 
a remark made to me a year ago by one of the "elder statesmen" of 
this organization who said that it would take me "a year at least to get 
the hang of the office." While at times during the past year 1 have 
been inclined to doubt the force of this remark', yet after recently com- 
pleting the many necessary formalities required by a meeting of the 
Annual Congress and the great amount of work connected therewith, 
I am prepared to admit that the statement made to me a year ;tgo was 
practically true. 

At the outset of my entrance on the: duties of this office I was con- 
fronted by a demand from the Sniiilisonian Institution at Washington 
(in whose building our property has been located for so many years) 
that we should remove from the space which we there occupied by the 
first da>' of June, this being within about one week after my return 
to Washington. However, through friendly influences, this requirement 
was modified to the extent that permission was given to continue the 
use of the space occupied until such time as a removal of our property 
could be conveniently made. The great demand for office space in 
Washington was an obstacle of much concern in the attempt to secure 
convenient and proper quarters. After a few weeks a room of limited 
capacity was obtained and our property installed therein. It was soon 
found that more space was needed, and an opportunity occurring, a 
larger room was secured and the second move made. The increasing 
requirements for more space to properly and conveniently contain our 
equipment was again evident, and the necessity for a third move became 
pressing. Having, through personal business connections a few months 
ago, become aware of an opportunity to secure accommodations of a 
most desirable and suitable character for our requirements, I laid the 
matter before the Executive Committee and received the necessary 
authority for the lease of the room referred to. The headquarters of 
the National Society are now, I believe, suitably and properly housed 
and with space sufficient to supply means for necessary expansion. We 
have two rooms of large size with splendid light and ventilation and 
in a building of most substantial fire-proof construction in a central 
and convenient location in Washington. It has been necessary to add 
some equipment and a modest amount is still desirable, which can be 
supplied as occasion requires. 1 feel that the National Society head- 
quarters are well established, and the troublesome situation with which 
I was confronted at the commencement of the year and which con- 
tinued for several months has been happily removed. 



io6 



SONS OF T1IK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



The several publications of the Society have been issued as usual. 
The Bulletin in its quarterly circulation is now requiring an edition of 
about- 17,000 copies, and the last (March) issue after mailing to our 
regular list had but a very small number of copies left over. The 
Secretary General has endeavored in the Bulletin to not only present 
the usual brief of the genealogical record of members admitted to the 
Society, but also comment upon the various events in State Society 
activities as well as other matters of interest. Such comments, how- 
ever, are necessarily limited to brief reviews of reports from the State 
Societies, and unless such reports are furnished by State officials the 
Secretary General is compelled to omit reference to all organizations 
failing to keep him informed of events of interest. Such omission fre- 
quently attracts attention and often reports are received too late to 
admit of attention thereafter. 

Conspicuous among the events of great interest to the National 
Society stands the presentation of the World War Medals authorized 
by the National Executive Committee to be delivered to those coming 
within the requirements established by the- committee. Great interest 
has been taken in numerous States in the presentation of these medals, 
and public meetings of various kinds have been held with most inter- 
esting and varied exercises. About 1,300 medals have already been 
distributed. It is estimated that of the entire membership of the 
vSociety about 12 per cent have been actively engaged in the World 
War service, and it is interesting to note that in one organization of 
500 members more than 25 per cent have received the medals. 

Another event of great significance during the past year has been 
the observance of Constitution Day on September 17, 1919, throughout 
our Society, under the guidance of the very efficient committee of one 
hundred Sons of the American Revolution, appointed by the President 
General. That committee, acting in connection with committees ap- 
pointed by other patriotic organizations, performed such effective work 
as resulted in celebrations held in 48 States, with a total of 31,765 
celebrations throughout the United States. 

You arc advised that three proposed amendments to the National 
Constitution have been submitted and are due for action at this Con- 
gress. These amendments have been published heretofore in the 
Bulli',tins of the National Society and have had full publicity among 
the members. 

During the past year we have been compelled to realize that the high 
cost of living has reached us in various ways and none more forcibly 
than in our printing account. The Executive Committee has ordered 
that in the matter of necessary blanks supplied to State Societies these 
should be furnished at actual cost. We have been compelled, much to 
our regret, to increase the cost to $2 of the engraved National Certifi- 
cates furnished to members on application therefor, this amount barely 
covering the actual cost to the National Society at this time. Also on 
account of the .ureal amount of time required in the examination of 



PROCEEDINGS 01- HARTFORD CONGRESS. 



10 7 



supplemental applications it has been found necessary to make a nominal 
fee of $1 for each supplemental filed; this being in accordance also 
with the custom established in other patriotic societies. 

It has been my privilege and certainly a very great pleasure to be 
able during the past year to visit in their several States a considerable 
number of the officials of the various societies, principally in the east- 
ern section of the country and extending from Maine to Maryland. 
During the last winter I made a trip covering several States in the 
South, extending as far as Birmingham, Ala. I had expected to con- 
tinue my trip to New Orleans and visit the Compatriots in that city, 
but a wire received at Augusta, Ga., from the energetic President of 
the Louisiana Society advising me that he would be in Birmingham, I 
had the pleasure of meeting him there. T had hoped to see some evi- 
dence of the existence of active work in our organization south of 
Virginia and north of Louisiana, but have been disappointed. Of the 
energetic work of the Daughters of the American Revolution in that 
section there is an abundance of evidence. In Virginia and Louisiana 
we have two fine State Societies, managed by highly efficient officers 
who are always alert with efforts for the advancement of the interests 
of the organization. But when T consider that within that great section 
between these two States and extending on to Texas, which embraces 
many States having much of historical interest and value, there is no 
activity in this work, 1 must confess that 1 have been amazed, and 
simply express the hope that a way may be found to create interest and 
excite a large degree of enthusiasm. 

The figures relating to the additions and changes in our membership 
will be given in detail in the report of the Treasurer General. 

I have no suggestions to make at this time relative to methods of 
business or other practical matters. None are necessary. The business 
is progressing well; it has evidently greatly increased; a few advan- 
tageous changes have been made in methods; the correspondence has 
grown to very heavy proportions, but has been well handled; a multi- 
tude of inquiries reach me which require much investigation and 
thought, but they always receive courteous attention. I have competent 
assistants, the work is up to date, and the machinery running smoothly. 
What more could be desired? T must express my appreciation of the 
very cordial support in my efforts which I have received from the 
General Officers and members of the National Executive Committee. 

A year ago when T accepted this office I said that whatever I might 
do, although there might be errors, it would be the very best T could 
give you. Aided by my great interest in the Society, I have endeavored 
to fully meet this promise, and the result is before you. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Pinui' F. Larner, 

S cere I tiry General. 



The Chairman 
Official Reports. 



This report will be referred to the Committee on 



io8 



SONS Ol« TlllC AMERICAN REVOLUTION . 



I feel that I would be lacking in common gratitude if I did not take 
this opportunity to express my appreciation of the diligence and patience 
and initiative of Secretary General Larner, He has been an inspiration 
to the National officers throughout the year, and I have had repeated 
occasions to lie grateful to him for his assistance. 

Secretary General Larner then read his report as Registrar General, 
which is as follows : 



REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL FOR YEAR ENDING 
APRIL I, 1920. 

Your Registrar General has the honor to report that since the cessa- 
tion of the World War there has been a marked increase in interest in 
historical and genealogical subjects throughout the country. This is 
partly shown by the increased number of applications to membership 
and by the reawakening of dormant societies. Several new Chapters 
have been formed, thus creating a deeper interest. I am glad to be able 
to report that all the work pertaining to this office is finished to date, 
every application to membership having been fully verified and proven 
and no claims [lending. 

Our files contain the papers of every member of the Society from its 
inception, and, since they are not discarded at time of death or resig- 
nation, number now in the vicinity of 34, 000 original papers and 6,000 
supplementals, containing a rich fund of information in the way of 
historical and genealogical data. Any paper can be easily reached by 
means of the card catalogue system which has been kept up to date, 
both by the applicant's name as well as that of the Revolutionary 
patriot, and now numbers in the vicinity of 42,000 cards. 

We have been able to report in each issue of the quarterly Bulletin 
an increase in membership over the same period last year, although 
last year's figures also showed an increase, which proves that there is 
a steady gain in membership as well as interest in the Society. The 
number of applications for new members examined and approved has 
been l,igg. While we are able to report this increased interest, the 
losses to the Society from death and other causes have been very large. 
A number of the State Societies decided to drop all delinquent members 
from their rolls and begin the Society year with a clean record. This was 
particularly noticeable in Indiana and New Jersey. So while there 
has been a jLjood inerease in the number of new members, it docs not 
appear in the net increase of the National Society. . 

The losses in several of the State Societies are mainly the result of 
conditions (\\\l- to the late war, when many of the members were away, 
either in active service for their country or engaged in other war work. 
All societies were forgotten at that time. 

The additions to the Society showing gain or loss of each State 
Society, together with its total membership, follows and will lie printed 
in the Year Book. 

Ninety-eight former members have been reinstated. The losses by 



PROCEEDINGS Ol' iTAR'ftfORD CONCRIvSS. ICXJ 

death and other causes are 646, leaving- the active membership roll 
16,285. The largest State Society is Massachusetts, with 1,800 mem- 
bers; next "Empire State, 1,656; New Jersey third, 1,459; Illinois, 1,152; 
Connecticut, 1,125. 

The vSyracuse Banner, which is awarded to the State Society show- 
ing- the largest increase in membership, will be retained by New jersey, 
with 189 new members, which Slate received the trophy last year; 42 
of this number were sons of members. The second largest increase 
was in the Empire State Society, having 14 r additions to its member- 
ship; Illinois, 115; Massachusetts, 103; Ohio, 96, and Indiana, 80. 

The Traveling Banner, awarded each year to the State with more 
than [00 members that shows the largest net percentage of increase in 
membership, is won this year by Virginia, which shows an increase of 
20.3 per cent. 

As a result of the clause which was added to the Constitution admit- 
ting applicants under 21 years of age, to be known as "Junior mem- 
bers," about six have applied, three of them having been pending at the 
time of the adoption of the amendment. 

During the past year the National Society has lost by death a large 
number of members, a number of whom have held at various times 
offices of trust among us, and the loss of wdiose influence for the good 
of the association will be felt for many years to come. Among these 
are three who have held the highest office in the Society: Past President 
General Gen. Edwin S. Greeley, of Connecticut; Jinn. Franklin Murphy, 
of New Jersey, who held the offices of Secretary General, Vice-Presi- 
dent General, and President General, and Past President General Hon. 
Edwin Warfield, of Maryland; John Milton Reifsnider, of Maryland, 
a member of the National Executive Committee and "Director General; 
La Verne Noyes, of Illinois, at one time Vice-President General; David 
Wittington, President of the Hawaiian Society; Frederick Tripp Bon- 
ner, Secretary-Registrar of the North Carolina Society; Dr. Charles A. 
Van der Veer, Secretary of the Arizona Society; Col. William B. 
Thompson, Past President of the District of Columbia Society; Jona- 
than Trumbull, Past President .of the Connecticut Society, besides a 
number of members prominent in military and official life. 

The custom of issuing a card notice of election heretofore sent out 
from this office to each new member has, on account of the increased 
cost of printing and material, been stopped and State Secretaries are 
expected to notify their candidates of their acceptance. Dor the same 
reason it was found impossible to publish gratuitously in the Bulletin 
and Year Book the information contained in supplemental papers, which 
were sometimes presented in large numbers. After consideration of the 
subject by the Executive Committee, and, in accordance with the custom 
of kindred societies, it was decided that it would be necessary to re- 
quest a fee of $1.00 to the National Society for each supplemental 
paper, 

About 500 Certificates of Membership have been issued and several 
hundred letters in connection with the work of this office attended to. 



1IO SONS 01- 'PI I IC AMERICAN KKVOI.UTION. 

During the summer the Board of Management of the State of Maine 
Society investigated thoroughly the status of the "Association Test" of 
the State of New Hampshire at the time of the Revolution in regard 
to its standing as a claim to eligibility in our Society. They not only 
secured their own official opinion, but that of an able lawyer, and the 
papers containing their decision were submitted to this office. Upon 
investigation the ages of the men signing this "Test" were found in 
many cases to be within the fighting age — that is, between 20 and 50 
years — and who performed no active service to aid the Colonies, and 
since in some cases the signing must have been forced under penalty of 
punishment, and since the signing of this document could hardly be 
counted as an "overt act" as required by our Constitution, it was 
decided by your Registrar General to support the decision of the Maine 
Society and to accept no further claims based upon the New Hampshire 
Association Test alone. The papers that have been presented from this 
claim throughout the year have been mainly "supplementals" and have 
been returned to the respective State officers with proper explanation. 

It is hoped that each State Society will renew its efforts to increase 
its membership the coming year as well as to retain those within our 
ranks. Our officers should remember that every male relative of a 
member of our sister Society of the D. A. R., now numbering 110,000, 
is eligible to this Society, and a good active committee on increase in 
membership in each locality could secure additional members with very 
little trouble other than the use of the "Daughters" records. 

Respectfully submitted, Piin.ii' F. Larner, 

Registrar General. 

Membership in Each Stale Society, March 31, n;20. 

Arizona 40 Montana 31 

Arkansas 72 Nebraska 243 

California 460 New Hampshire 213 

Colorado 334 New Jersey ; 1,459 

Connecticut . . 1,125 New Mexico 78 

Delaware .42 New York (Empire State) . 1,656 

District of Columbia 493 North Dakota 61 

Far Eastern ....... 20 North Carolina 61 

Florida 45 Ohio 727 

Hawaiian 95 Oklahoma 80 

Idaho 138 Oregon 258 

Illinois 1, 152 Pennsylvania 680 

Indiana 218 Rhode Island 368 

Iowa 478 South Carolina 18 

Kansas 91 South Dakota 78 

Kentucky 200 Tennessee 95 • 

Louisiana 250 Texas 104 

Maine 31 r Utah 242 

Maryland 347 Vermont 212 

Massachusetts i.8oo Virginia 211 

Michigan 637 Washington 1 265 

Minnesota 27 2 Wisconsin 250 

Mississippi 38 Wyoming 37 

Missouri 200 

Total 16,285 



PkOClClvDJNCS 01* HARTFORD CONCRKSS. Ill 

The Chairman : This report will be referred to the Committee on 
Official Reports. 

I notice, with pleasure, the presence of Mrs. A. Howard Clark and 
1 will ask her to take the platform. 

Mrs, Clark went to the platform amid applause. 

The Chairman : It wouldn't be a National Congress of the S. A. R. 
if John Burroughs didn't read the report of the Treasurer General. 
We will listen to that now. (Applause.) 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER GENERAL. 

Treasurer General BURROUGHS : Air. President General and Com- 
patriots of this Congress: Before reading my printed report I want to 
say that three Societies have sent in remittances to pay their annual 
dues, and I want that to go in the official report. Montana has sent in 
its check, Arizona has sent in its check, Washington State sent a part of 
the annual dues, and I wrote them for the rest of the money and they 
have since sent in an additional check, which will also go in the official 
report. 

Through the misdirection of a letter from the Tennessee Society a 
check that should have reached me on the 7th instant was sent to the 
Smithsonian Institution directed to me. That is not my official place 
for receiving checks. It is in the city of Brooklyn, but some one at the 
Smithsonian very kindly sent it to Air. Lanier's brother, and after a 
few days our Secretary General received it and he handed it to me on 
the train on Saturday last. 

Arkansas should have, therefore, been in the printed report, but as 
that report is already typed it is impossible to put it in, but they have 
paid their annual dues. 

There is an impression among some State Societies that if their mem- 
bers pay their State dues they are not required to pay the National 
dues. That is not in accordance with the By-Laws of the National 
Society. If they will read Article 10, Section 4, they will notice that all 
members on the roll, whether they pay their State dues or not, are 
liable for that per capita tax and that you should pay the tax to the 
Treasurer General. I have had occasion every year that I have been 
Treasurer General to correct this wrong impression in the minds of the 
State Treasurers, and I want to repeat it here, because it isn't fair to 
the National Society to retain any amount that is honorably due it, and 
those amounts are really due the National Society. 

Air. President General and Compatriots, I have the honor to submit 
the following report : 

Oi'i'KT, or TkkasukKk Gi;Ni;i<Ar„ 11 11 1)i;an Stkk.kt, 

Brooklyn, N. V., May 12, 1920* 
1 'resident General and Compatriots: * 

The Treasurer General has the honor to submit the following report 
of the receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending May 12, 
1920. 

Respectfully submitted, John II. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 



I 12 SONS Otf TIIIC AMERICAN KlvVOl,UT ION . 

May ]-|, 1919. llalatice on hand $8,781.83 

RECEIPTS. 

Annual Dues : 

1919 $465.50 

1920 7,178.50 

: $7,644.00 

Certificates 892 . 00 

Application and supplemental blanks 228.75 

Interest on balances. . ._ 224.41 

Interest on investment's 529.29 

Interest on Moses Greeley Parker Fund 162.38 

Rebates received credited to Permanent Fund 361.62 

Sale of medals 1,155.00 

Sale of Year Books • 107. 20 

Sale of rosettes and ribbon 9-75 

Sale of Service Bars - 1 .75 

Supplemental s 31 .00 

Postage 1 . 07 

$11,348.22 



$20, [30. 05 
Disbursements 10,801 .30 



Balance on hand May 12, 1919 $9,328.75 

In Corn Exchange. Bank $7,354- 12 

In Broadway Savings Institution ...... 1,054.13 

Checks and cash on hand 920. 50 



$9,328.75 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Salary of Secretary General $875.00 

Salary of Registrar General 600.00 

Printing and mailing Oi'i'iciae Bulletins: 

June, 1919 $6 io. 80 

October, 1919 , 701.83 

December, 1919 743-9- 

March, 1920 ' 1,137. 17 

3,193,72 

Printing and mailing Year Books 1,377.84 

Sundry printing and postage 550.84 

Certificates 485.00 

Engrossing certificates 565.25 

Bulletin envelopes 142.00 

World war medals and badges 853.22 

Expenses, Secretary General attending Detroit Congress 06.91 

Expenses, Treasurer General attending Detroit Congress.... 86.32 

Expenses, Registrar General attending Detroit Congress 87.72 

Expenses. Secretary General attending meeting of Executive 

Committee in New York 33 .89 

Expenses of Chairman of Publicity Com mi lire 21 . 75 

Sundry expense-, of Secretary and Registrar General 999-53 

Kent of office of Secretary General 320. 00 

Moving books and documents from Smithsonian Institution 

to new office, 918 P Street N. W (10.00 

Engrossing memorial of A. Howard Clark 26.75 



PROCKKDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 



H3 



Indemnity bond $25.00 

Rosettes and ribbon 34.64 

Reporting proceedings of Detroit Congress 110.00 

Flowers for funeral of judge Reifsnider 20.00 

Sundry expenses of Treasurer General from May 2, 1910, to 

October 25, 1919 8.21 

Collection of out-of-town checks 4.51 

Clerical work on records 31 .70 

Safe deposit rent 6.00 

Cabinet and racks for Secretary General 63.00 

Book shelves for Secretary General 20.00 

Paper mailing tubes 75.00 

Expenses in connection with Constitution Day work 13-50 

Credential Committee book 12.00 

Adjustment of account, North JDakota Society 2.00 



$10,801.30 



John H. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 



Audited and found correct. 
Norman P. Hi-kkuvY. 
C. Symmlus Kiggins. 

AU'-KRT J. SqUIKR. 



i 14 



SONS OJ? TIIIv AMERICAN UKVOMJTJON. 



Dktaii.s of Ki'.civii'Ts for Fiscai, VivAR Ending May 12, 1920. 



dues. 



Blanks. Certificate 



Total. 



Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Colorado $165.50 

District of Columbia 

Delaware 

Empire State 

Far Eastern 

Florida 

J lawaii jo.50 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 70.00 

Iowa 

Kansas 5--50 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine ..." 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Mew Hampshire 

New jersey 

New Mexico 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 25.00 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 4s. 00 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



30 . 00 



37.00 



$19.50 
230 . 00 

562 . 50 
246.50 

816.50 

22.50 

69 . 00 

576.00 
109.00 
230.00 
47-50 
95 • 00 
125.00 
i55-oo 
173-50 
875 . 00 
316.50 

100.00 

104.50 
106.50 
723.00 



29.50 
312.00 

128.50 

3i7-5o 
184.50 



121.00 
100.00 

105.50 
65.00 
84.50 
18. so 



$4.00 

^24 
14.21 

3-50 



$23.50 



9.88 

7-33 
16.34 
9-77 
5 • 50 
6.87 
8.69 
2.61 
16.00 
3.60 
I.25 

9.40 
3o.75 



28.04 



7-49 



1 3 . 26 
6.87 
5-50 



238.24 

$90 . 00 666 . 7 1 

165.50 

7 . 00 257 . 00 



1 1 . 00 
75.00 



1 2 . 00 
97 . (JO 
20.00 
26.00 
62.00 
14.00 
24 . 00 
3 • 00 



190.00 1,006.50 



22 . 50 

40.50 
80.OO 

666.88 
1 79 . 00 
293 ■ 33 
116.34 
1 16.77 
227.50 
181.87 
208. 19 
939.61 
346.50 
27 . 60 
104.25 



54.00 167.90 

2.00 108.50 

21.00 783.75 



II 


00 


66.15 





00 


314.00 


13 


00 


43.00 
128.50 
401.54 


56 


00 


35 


00 


219.50 

37.00 

3.00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


61.49 
121 00 


3 


00 


1 03. 00 


2 


00 


1 20 . 76 

71.87 

90. (JO 
2 I . 50 






3 


(JO 



$465.50 $7,178.50 $228.75 $892.00 $$,761.7$ 

Interest on balances 224.41 

Interest on investments 520.20 

Interest received on Moses Greeley Parker Fund 162.38 

Rebates received credited to Permanent Fund 361 .62 v 

Sales of medals 1,155.00 ' 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. I I 5 

Sales of rosettes and ribbon $9-75 

Sales of service bars J -75 

Supplemental ' 31 .oo 

Sale of Year Books 107.20 

Postage 1.07 

$11,348.22 

Details of Dishwrskmk.nts of the Treasurer General of The 

National Society, S. A. R., for the Fiscal 

Year Kn'ding May 12, 1020. 

1919. 
May 31. Win. S. Parks, sundry expenses attending National 

Congress at Detroit, as Secretary General $96.91 

" Win. S. Parks, salary as Secretary General, May 1 

to May 20 • 50 . 00 

June 2. T. D. Huntting, expenses attending National Con- 
gress at Detroit 87 ,y> 

" T. D. Huntting, salary as Registrar General for May 50.00 

" John H. Burroughs, expenses attending National 

Congress at Detroit as Treasurer General 86.32 

4. David L. Picrson, expenses as Chairman of Publicity 

Committee, 1918-1019 21.75 

" Annin & Co., rosettes 14.49 

" Annin & Co., ribbon 10.08 

7. R. Weber, engrossing certificates 71*50 

Benedict & Benedict, indemnity bond 25.00 

Wm. S. Parks, sundry expenses as Sec'y General.. M--°- 

" 26. American Bank Note Co., certificates 285. 00 

July i(>. Philip F. Lanier, salary for June, Keg. Gen... 50.00 
" Philip P. Larner, salary for June, Sec. Gen... 75.00 

125.00 

Philip P. Larner, sundry expenses for May and June 94.10 

National Union Ins. Co., rent' National Society office 

for June 20.00 

" 17. R. Weber, engrossing certificates 47-50 

" Elizabeth D. Tabler, clerical work on records....: 31-70 

G. K. Anderson, reporting proceedings of National 

Congress at Detroit : 1 10.00 

' W. S. Parks, sundry expenses ' 9.94 

" 19. Whitehead & Hoag Co., World War medals and 

badges 292.21 

2$. Collection of checks, May and June ' .65 

30. Smith's Transfer & Storage Co., moving documents, 
furniture, etc., of the National Society from Smith- 
sonian Institution to 91S F Street N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 60.00 

Aug. 7. La Pidus Printing Co., letterheads and envelopes for 

Constitution Day 19.50 

" Ecpiitable Safe Deposit Co., rent of safe 6.00 

National Union Ins. Co., rent of Secretary General's 

office for July 20.00 

" Philip F. Larner, salary for July as Sec. Gen.. . 75.00 
" Philip F. Larner, salary for July as Reg. Gen . . 50.00 

1 25 . 00 

Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses as Secretary and 

Registrar General for July 42. oS 



Il6 SONS 01' TIJIv AMERICAN RKVOI.UTlON 



Sep. 5. Judd & Detwcilcr, inc., printing and mailing June 

Ol-FlClAI, 1>U!,I,ICTIN $610.80 

." Judd & Detwcilcr, Inc., sundry printing 261.00 

Oct. 8. National Union Ins. Co., rent fur Secretary General's 

office for August and September 40.00 

" Philip F. learner, salary for August and Sep- 
tember as Secretary General 150.00 

" Philip P. Larner, salary for August and Sep- 
tember as Registrar General 100.00 

250.00 

Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses as Secretary and 

Registrar General for August and September 139.32 

" Annin & Co., sundry expenses in connection with 

"Constitution Day" i.P5o 

" Collection of checks for July, Aug. and Sept .50 

Nov. 8. Philip P. Larner, salary for Oct. as Sec. Gen.. 75.00 
Philip P. Larner, salary for Oct. as Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

125.00 

Philip P. Larner, sundry expenses as Secretary and 

Registrar General for October 5 ( )-47 

Philip F. Larner, expenses attending meeting of Ex- 
ecutive Committee in New York City 33-^9 

National Union Jus. Co., rent of office for Secretary 

General for October 20.00 

" 15. John H. Burroughs, sundry expenses as Treasurer 

General from May 2, 1919, to October 25, 191 9. . . • 8.2r 

Dec. 6. Judd & Detweiler, inc., sundry printing 4.06 

" 26. American Bank Note Co., certificates 200.00 

" " National Union Ins. Co., rent, Secretary General's 

office for November 20.00 

" Philip F. Larner, salary for Nov. as Sec-Gen.. 75.00 
" Philip P. Larner, salary for Nov. as R^g. Gen. . 50.00 

— 125.00 

" Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses for November as 

Secretary and Registrar General 114. 11 

" Judd & Detweiler, inc., sundry printing 17-7$ 

Judd & Detweiler, Inc., sundry printing and BuiXUTiN 

envelopes 142.00 

" Judd & Detweiler, inc., printing and mailing October 

Official Puijjitin •. 701 .83 

31. Collection of checks for Oct., Nov., and Dec 1. 00 

1920. 
Jan. 17. Philip F. Larner, salary for Dec. as Sec. Gen. . 75.00 
" Philip P. Larner, salary for Jan. as Reg. Gen. , 50.00 

125.00 

Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses as Secretary and 

Registrar General 62.05 

National Union Ins. Co., rent, Sec. Gen.'s office ... . 40.00 

Afar. 6. Consolidated Supply Co., paper mailing tubes 75-00 

National Union fns. Co., rent, Secretary General's 

office for January and February 80.00 

Philip F. Larner, salary for Jan. as Sec. Gen. . 75.00 
Philip F. Larner, salary for Jan. as Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

125.00 

Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses 55-09 

" 15. Whitehead & lioag Co., World War medals 415.OO 



I'KOCKKDINCS 01? llARTl-'OKD CONGRESS. I J 7 

Mar. 15. Philip I''. Lamer, salary for Feb. as See. Gen., 75*00 
Philip F. Lamer, salary for Feb. as Reg. Gen.. 50.00 

$125.00 

" Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses 186.84 

" Judd & Detweiler, Inc., sundry printing -3-7^ 

" Judd & Detweiler, Inc., sundry printing 149.08 

' " " Judd & Detweiler, Inc., printing and mailing Decem- 
ber Official Uui.i.ktin 7-43-9- 

" Collection of' out-of-town checks 1 .31 

Apr. [5. Philip F. Earner, salary for Alar, as Sec. Gen. 75.00 
" Philip F. Larner, salary for Mar. as Reg. Gen. 50.00 

1 25 . 00 

Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses 94-03 

" .Philip F. Larner, wreath, funeral of Judge Reifsnider 20.00 

" National Union Ins. Co., rent, Secretary General's 

office for March 40.00 

" Ann in & Co., ribhon 10.07 

" judd & Detweiler, Inc., printing and mailing 1919 

Year Book 1 ^yy . 84 

" 24. Judd & Detweiler, Inc., sundry printing 75.64 

May 8. The O'rvis Co., Credential Committee hook 12.00 

" Whitehead & Moag Co., World War medals 145.92 

National Union Ins. Co., rent, Secretary General's 

office for April 40.00 

" John B. Torbett, engrossing certificates 446.25 

John I>. Torbett, engrossing memorial, A. Howard 

Clark 26.75 

" Philip F. Larner, salary for April as Sec. Gen. 75.00 
Philip F. Larner, salary for April as Reg. Gen. 50.00 

[ 25 . (XJ 

" Philip F. Larner, sundry expenses as Secretary Gen, 127.91 
" Philip F. Larner, cabinet and racks for Secretary 

General's office 63 . 00 

Philip F. Lamer, bookshelves for Secretary General's 

office 2O.00 

I. North Dakota Society. This amount over-credited 

on this date 2.00 

8. Judd & Detweiler, Inc., printing and mailing March 

Official Bulletin 1,137.17 

Apr. 30. Collection of out-of-town checks i .05 

$ro,8oi .30 

The Chairman: This report will he referred to the Committee on 
Reports. 

I want to state to the Compatriots that it is the intention of the 
Chair, with the consent of the Congress, to recommend a recess in 
about 20 minutes. We will gel through with these important reports 
as rapidly as their importance will permit. 

The next report is that from the Committee on Investments. Past 
President General Pugs ley will make the report. 

Secretary General Laknfu: I have the report. 

Secretary General Lamer then read the report, which is as follows: 



I lcS SONS OK TIIIv AMJCKICAN REVOLUTION. 

REPORT QF COMMITTEE ON INVESTMENT OF 
PERMANENT FUNDS. 

Westchester County National Bank, 

Peekskiee, N. Y., May n, 1920. 
Mr, Ph. 1 1, ip F. Larner, 

Secretary General, Washington, D. C. 
My Di$ar SECRETARY GenERAE: I have examined the securities in the 
safe-deposit vault in New York held by the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution and find the amount is as follows: 
$2,500 4% per cent Liberty Bonds. 
1,000 y/ 2 per cent Liberty Bonds. 
.1,000 Keokee Cons. Coke Co. 5 per cent bonds. 
1,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4 per cent. 
2,000 State of New York 4 per cent. 
4,000 4 per cent Bonds City of New York. 
1,000 4r l A per cent City of New York, 
1,000 New York Railway Adjustment 5's. 
I am forwarding you this report upon these securities in order that 
the same may he presented, as required, at the National Congress at 
Hartford. 

Very sincerely yours, 

C. A. Pugsi.KY, 

Of Committee. 

The Chairman: The Treasurer General will make an additional re- 
port on the permanent fund. 

Treasurer General BURROUGHS: It is customary since we have had a 
permanent fund for the Treasurer to make a report. The Treasurer 
General has the honor to submit the following report of the permanent 
fund : 

REPORT ON THE PERMANENT FUND. 

Office of Treasurer Generai,, iiii Dean Street, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., May 12, 1920. 
President General and Compatriots: 

The Treasurer General has the honor to submit the following report 
on the Permanent Fund : 

On May 14, 1919, the National Society held in securities $13,500 at 
par value. There has been no purchase of any kind during the fiscal 
year just closed. However, additions in cash have been made to the 
fund from rebates received from J. E. Caldwell & Co. and from Annin 
& Co., aggregating $361.62; so that at the present time there is a total 
of $971.20 remaining uninvested. 

The Treasurer General suggests that the Committee on Investment 
of Permanent Fund purchase a $1,000 United States Government Bond 
at the present favorable price. 
Respect fully submitted, 

John If. Burroughs, 

Treasurer General. 

The Chairman : This report will take the usual course. v 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 



119 



to my family. Mrs. Williams and I had anticipated a great deal of 
pleasure in giving a reception to the delegates to this Congress, but it 
happens very unfortunately that her mother died suddenly. They were 



Dr. Williams and I had an understanding that when he shook his 
fist at me it meant that he wanted to make an announcement. I have 
seen the brandished hand. (Laughter.) Dr. Williams will come for- 
ward and make his announcement. 

Dr. Wir.UAMS: Mr. President General, that's the first timidity I have 
ever seen on the part of our President General. I ask the privilege 
of making this announcement because it is of a great deal of importance 
to my family. Mrs. Williams and I had anticipated a great deal of 
P* 

PI 
very intimate and she was deeply attached to her mother, and she 
didn't feel that she could even join in the reception. Therefore, I- am 
giving it personally at the Golf Club, as you have learned from the 
cards that you have received when you registered. 

Xow, J want to say in addition to that, that Mrs. Williams will be 
very glad to see you all at our house if you choose to come there from 
the Golf Club. We are about two blocks away. All the ladies and all 
the delegates to the Congress, if you would be good enough to pass that 
word along to any one not here, she will be delighted to see any and 
all of you. The ladies, 1 think, may be interested in the garden, or the 
promise of a garden, and I will try to fix up some sort of a nosegay 
for the men. (Applause and laughter.) 

At the reception Mrs. Wickham has kindly consented to receive. Mrs. 
Wickham is the wife of Harris W. Wickham, former President of the 
State vSociety, and very interesting herself as well as because she is 
the wife of Mr. Wickham. 

When von come out to the Golf Club you will see at tin- left hand 

oad. It doesn't look very promising, but it is well to 

Over at the start. If you take that road it leads 

1. will find my house in front of it as you come Out 

on Prospect Avenue, and you will know it by a flag over the doorway. 
We will both be delighted to see you all. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: I will now ask for the report of the Historian Gen- 
eral, George Carpenter Arnold of Rhode Island. 

Historian General .Arnold read the report, which 



hen you c< 
a rather rugged r 
have the rouglme 
right down and you w 



as follows 



REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN GENERAL. 

Mr. President General and Compatriots of the Thirty-first Annual Con- 
gress of the Soeiely of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
Greeting: 

The course of a historic pilgrimage has brought us into the beautiful 
city of the ''Charter Oak" find Capital of Nutmegdom, the name Hart- 
ford being borrowed from the township of Hertford, on the river Lea 
in Hertfordshire, England. 

For a century or more Hartford has been a great literary center; 
authors, artists, and publishers have ever found it a fruitful field for 
the development of brains and enterprise. 

The famous Hartford wits ami the older portion of the city has its 



120 SUNS 01' TIII.C AMERICAN INVOLUTION. 

precious associations with John Trmnhull, the e])ic of the Revolution; 
Harlow, Dwight, Hopkins, Bnainard, Alsop, Goodrich, Noah Webster, 
as well as with the more recent authors. 

At the corner of Grove and Main streets a business structure dis- 
places the two-storied brick house where John Greenleaf Whittier lived 
when he published his first volume of verse and edited the New England 
Review in a building which then stood a little above the old State 
I louse. 

Mrs. Harriet Ueccher Stowe, most famous of American women and 
author of the most widely-read tale of modern times, passed her de- 
clining years here. 

At the end of Fannington Avenue on a little eminence we find the 
residence of the late Samuel L,. Clemens (Mark Twain), author of 
"Huckleberry Finn," "A Connecticut Yankee," etc. The house is a 
curious hit of architecture and in this retreat among the tree tops much 
of his literary work was done. 

The first townsmen (selectmen) of Hartford of whom there is any 
record were John Talcott, Samuel Wakeman, and William YVadsworth, 
in 1638. Among the first acts of the proprietors was the setting apart 
of a square for the meeting house, the center of the colonial town, the 
present site of City Hall Square, formerly where the Connecticut State- 
House stood. 

Oil the east side stood the little meeting house before which in the 
open air the freedom of the colony adopted the first written constitu- 
tion of 1639. City Hall Square was the rendezvous of the Connecticut 
soldiers for the King Philip War; and it was here (1687) Sir Edmund 
Andros, when as Governor of New England under James II appeared 
and demanded the surrender of the charter of the colony that Governor 
John Winthrop had secured from Charles I I in 1662, an instrument 
based upon the colonial constitution of [639 and of great value to the 
young colony. 

Andros, accompanied by more than 60 regular troops, declared the 
government under the charter dissolved. The colonial governor pro- 
tested against his authority, the conference was prolonged until dark, 
and after some delay the charter was brought in and laid on the table 
where the assemhly was sitting. The lights were instantly extinguished 
and Capt. Joseph Wadsworth, of Hartford, in the most silent and 
secret manner, carried off the charter and secreted it in a hollow tree 
fronting the house of lion. Samuel Wyllys, then one of the magistrates 
of the colony. 

There was no disorder, candles were relighted, hut the charter was 
gone. The large oak tree was destroyed by a furious storm in the fall 
of 1856 and measured 21 feet in circumference. A careful computation 
made by Prof. John Brocklesby, while the tree was prostrate, fixed the 
age at a little less than 1,000 years. From its wood thousands of small 
articles were made, including "nutmegs," and larger productions were 
not uncommon; among the latter may he mentioned the chair of the 
presiding officer of the Connecticut Senate, designed by a son of 
Governor A. 1 1. 1 Lolley. 

A small tablet marks the spot where the old oak stood and the 
colonial charter itself may he seen in the Wadsworth Athenauim, on 
Main Street, which occupies the site of the Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth 
Mansion, where Washington and Rochainheau had their fust conference 
in September, 1780. 

While the colonies were recovering from the effects of previous wars, 
the British Go\ erntuent was preparing the oppressive and annoying 
Stamp Act, and when the news of the repeal of the Stamp Act 'was 
received at Hartford, the general court then in session appointed a day ^ 
of general rejoicing. 



PKOCKKIHNGS 01? [IARTFORD CONGRESS. I -' I 

But England's policy was not changed, and in September, 1774, a con- 
vention was held in Hartford; many strong resolutions were adopted 
in favor of the Non-eonsumption Agreement being entered into by the 
eonsumers of British goods. Connecticut was ready, waiting; and 
when the farmers at Lexington "fired the shot heard around the world" 
Connecticut sprang to arms. Ten companies were immediately put in 
motion for the scene of action, and, like General Putnam, who went 
from the plough to the saddle, gave their best to the patriotic cause. 

Count Rochambeau landed in Newport, Rhode Island, September, 
17N0, and proceeded at once to llartford, where he met General Wash- 
ington and other American officers and where plans were made for 
the surprise of Fort Ticonderoga. The result of the attack is well 
known, but the initiative taken by Connecticut has not always been 
recognized. However, the same spirit animated all (the spirit of 
Washington), the only contest being which colony could render the 
most service for the common cause; and so 137 years ago, on April 30, 
1783, the Treaty of Paris was signed and llartford celebrated with 
great pomp the winning of our national independence. 

Ever since we banished from the free Union of States the English 
pounds, shillings, pence, and farthings, Great Britain has had her 
trials. The destruction of the British fleet on Lake Champlain demon- 
strated thoroughly ami decisively that England could not treat the 
Treaty of Paris (l7&3) as a "scrap of paper" in the extension of her 
empire. 

"Britannia rules the waves" (as sung). 

''When America waives the rule" (as is). 

Paramount no longer as a unit, her faith completely shaken in her 
invincible superiority, well has she sought the League of Nations as a 
haven, to be protected from those no more grasping than herself. 

But there will be no superstate in the Government of the United 
States, and we shall do our duty and protect the sovereignty of our 
country when we eliminate, as we will, Article X and thus protect and 
preserve the great principles for which our ancestors devoted their 



ves. 



Numismatics. 



The first settlers of New England found great difficulty in obtaining 
the means for trade and barter, for, having brought little money to this 
country, their resources soon became exhausted. In their extremity 
they were obliged to adopt the Indian money of the period, wdtich was 
made from various shells and styled sewan, or wampum. 

The general court of Massachusetts, November 15, 1637, ordered that 
wampum should pass for six a penny for any sum under I2<1. Tn 1630, 
owing to the failure of the crops, especially corn (and corn was con- 
sidered as currency), wampum was enhanced in value, and in October, 
i(>!<>. it was ordered in the same general court that while wampum 
shall pass at 4 a penny and blue at _' a penny. 

The first copper coins struck within the borders of Connecticut were 
the fligley or Granby cents and were dated 1737, 1 73K, 1730. They were 
never officially authorized, but John Tliglev, the Coppermine owner and 
native of Granby, was never molested. The Granby mines were never 
profitable, but were worked down to the time of the American Revolu- 
tion, when they were taken over by the general court of Connecticut as 
a colonial jail and public work-house. 

The first regular authorized coinage of Connecticut was granted by 
the assembly at New Haven, October, [785. The act reads as follows: " 

"Resolved by this assembly. That Samuel Bishop. Joseph [lonkins 
Samuel Tfillhouse, and John Goodrich have liberty, and liberty and an- 



122 



SONS Ol' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



thority is hereby granted to then: to establish a mint for coining and 
manufacturing coppers, not to exceed the amount of ten thousand 
pounds of lawful money, in value of the standard of British halfpence, 
and to weigh six pennyweight/' etc. 

Samuel Broome and Jeremiah Piatt secured the contract, and two 
mint houses were built, one situated in what is now known as Morris 
Cove and the other near the mouth of the Westville River, in Westville. 

Abel Buell of New Haven was the principal die-sinker, and prepared 
dies also for Vermont, New York, and some of the New Jersey 
colonials. 




The authorized coinage of Connecticut cents were dated, 1785-1788, 
inclusive. The obverse having a bust, not unlike Washington, with the 
legend "Auctori Connec" (by the authority of Connecticut), and .the 
reversed side "Inde Et Lib" (Independence and Liberty), with the ideal 
head of Liberty and date. 

[ have taken from my collection several varieties of these colonials 
and will be glad to exhibit, after the session, to any of the compatriots 
who would like to see them. 

Respectfully submitted, George Carpenter Arnold, 

Historian General. 

.May 17. 19^0- 

The Chairman: This report will take the usual course. 

With the permission of the Congress we will receive the report of the 
Memorial Committee, of which past President General Thruston is 
President, lie is not present. Will any other 'member of the com- 
mittee present it? 

Dr. Williams: 1 move you that the privilege of the floor be extended 
to Mrs'. Clark to present that report and that she be welcomed with 
great enthusiasm. 

The motion was seconded and adopted. 

Mrs. Clark: Mr. President General, Compatriots, and friends, the 
first sentence of this report was inserted by Mr. Thruston himself. 



REPORT OF 



THE COMMITTEE ON 
SIGNERS." 



MEMORIAL TO THE 



Before leaving this winter for a trip through the Orient your chair- 
man of this committee was fortunate in securing the services of Mrs. 
A. Howard Clark, wife of our late Secretary General, to continue the 
work of this committee — a work in which her husband bad been deeply 
interested and upon whose knowledge of historical subjects the com- 
mittee greatly relied to finish up its work. The Society of "Descendants 



■ f th 



igners, with wlion 



urmg my ler 



f offi 



President 



l'KOCKKUJiNCS OF JJAKTFOKD CONGUKSS. 1 23 

General, our committee had agreed to collaborate, and with whom a 
number of meetings had been held and plans, for each Society's part' 
of the volume mapped out, had stopped all work on the memorial volume 
during the recent war. They have, however, lately renewed their in- 
terest and we learn through the Secretary of the Joint Committee, Air. 
Charles Thornton Adams of New York, that the work on their portion 
of the volume is now progressing finely, The part assigned to our 
committee at one of the joint meetings held in New York in 1916 in- 
cludes the biographies, with photographs, location, and inscriptions of 
the graves and their wills, when possible, of the Signers from New 
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North and South Carolina, and 
Georgia. We have the Signers from Maryland completed and the prin- 
cipal facts for the biographies of the remaining Signers have been 
secured. The desire of the joint committee to publish only that in- 
formation concerning the Signers that has not heretofore been printed 
has necessarily delayed the work and may prove an impossibility. 

While much of the general information concerning the signing as 
well as the life history of the men may have been duplicated by us be- 
fore knowing that the other Society was to continue their portion of 
I he work, it does us no harm to have secured this information, so 
directly in line with the objects of our Society and may be brought out 
by us, if desired, in a less condensed form at some future time. In 
fact, the other committee has suggested, during the past week, the 
idea of publishing a smaller book with a. portion of the information 
already on hand, and which would relate especially to the burial places 
of the Signers. 

In studying the life histories of these men, who took the responsibility 
of severing connections with the mother country, it was interesting to 
note their standing from an educational point of view. Of the fifty-six 
Signers, thirty were college graduates and eight educated by private 
tutors. Seven of these were graduates of Harvard College, four of 
Yah-, three of Princeton, eight of the great universities of Europe, 
and the remainder from universities of Pennsylvania and the William 
and Mary College of Virginia. Three were self-educated. Of the pro- 
fessions, twenty-seven were lawyers, while Josiah Bartlett, Lyman Mall, 
Benjamin Rush, Matthew Thornton, and Oliver Wolcott were graduates 
in medicine; nine were merchants. Franklin was an editor and printer, 
one a clergyman, Charles Carroll a gentleman of leisure, and the re- 
mainder, fourteen, were large agriculturalists. A number of the lawyers 
had reached the highest rank in their professions, being judges, even 
of the supreme court of their States, and several were afterwards 
governors. Thus history shows that the affairs of the colonies at that 
time were in the hands of men of the highest intelligence and standing 
in their respective communities. 

There has been printed in our BULLETIN of June, J915, a brief but 
complete account not only of the proceedings which led to the adoption 
of the Declaration of Independence on July 2, 1776, but a continuous 
sketch of its history which was prepared by the late Secretary General, 
A. Howard Clark. In reading the history of this remarkable document 
yon cannot but feel the anxiety of the members of the committee and 
others in charge that it might not meet with the general approval of 
the Congress. And finally., on July 19, Congress ordered the Decla- 
ration passed on the 4th to be engrossed on parchment and when 
engrossed to be signed by every member of the Congress. This 
was to ensure continued support of all the members and was the out- 
growth i^i the reply of Benjamin Franklin- to Hancock: "Yes, we must, 
indeed, all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang sepa- 
rately." 



J 24 SONS 01' Tlllv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

You were told in the 1915 Buu.ktjn the story of the presentation of 
the Declaration on the 2nd of July, 1776. The original copy, it is be- 
lieved, went from Secretary Thomson on July 4 to the official printer, 
John Dunlap. The next day the Secretary wafcred a copy of the first 
broadside print in a blank space left for it. The copy from which 
the facsimile was made, is in the rough journal in the Manuscript 
Division of the Congressional Library at Washington. 

Copies of the broadside were sent out by order of a resolution of the 
Congress to the ''several assemblies, conventions, or councils of safety 
and to the several commanding officers of the Continental Troops," 
and to be "proclaimed in each of the United States and at the head 
of the army" and sent to several counties (Bucks, Chester, Lancaster, 
Northampton, and Berks) requesting that it be published at the places 
where delegates were to be elected. It is probable that a copy of this 
was received by Washington, as he ordered it on July 9 to be announced 
at the head of the Continental regiments. Copies were also printed in 
Boston and Salem, Mass., and distributed in New England. 

The vote on the "Declaration" of July 2 was not, as you have been 
shown, unanimous. The vote stood at first 9 out of the 13 Colonies 
who voted for it. On the final vote it remained 10 to 3. Cresar Rodney, 
of Delaware, after riding all night, arrived the next day and cast his 
vote in favor, thus putting Delaware on record as favoring it. Three 
members from Pennsylvania then changed, placing that State in favor. 
On July 9 the New York delegates were authorized by their State to 
sign, thus making the vote, by States, unanimous. It was reported to 
Congress on July 15. On July 19 Congress ordered the Declaration, 
which was "passed on the 4th, fairly engrossed on parchment with the 
title and style of "The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United 
States of America." This shows that the word "unanimous" applies 
to the thirteen States and not to individual Signers. On August 2. the 
Declaration of Independence being engrossed and compared, was signed 
by the members present. 

The house in which the Declaration was written stood on the south 
side of Market Street, Philadelphia, probably between Seventh and 
Eighth streets. Tt was the home of a newly married couple — Mr. and 
Mrs. Oratz — and with whom Jefferson was then stopping. 

Had Richard Henry Lee, mover of the original motion respecting the 
independence of the colonies, not been called home on account of the 
illness of his wife, it is probable that he would have been appointed 
to prepare the Declaration. But this document, which has been the 
guide of the colonies not only through the terrible Revolution but 
through many great and serious questions which have threatened our 
country at various times up to the present, could scarcely, in the opinion 
of many -of our best thinkers and writers, have been improved upon, 
either in its sentiment or its phraseology. 

With the exception of Mr. Lynch, who was drowned in his thirtieth 
year, the Signers all lived to a good old age, three being over 90 years, 
ten over 80, eleven over 60. etc. We who are now living in this 
land of the free which they established for us can look back with pride 
upon the memory of those men who placed their signatures to this 
immortal "Declaration," the last; clause of which alone can give us 
some idea of the seriousness of the occasion and the courage required 
for Lhe died: "And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm 
reliance on lhe protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to 
each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor." 
Respectfully submitted, 

R. C. Rau,ar[) Tmkuston, 
Chairman Memorial Committee. 



PKOCKKIMNGS ()!•' IIAK'lTOKl) CuNOKKSS. I 2$ 

The Chairman : This report will take the usual course. 

I want to make some very important announcements, and if they are 
observed it will expedite the business of the Congress. The Trustees 
will meet at the platform at 2 o'clock sharp, and so will the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions and the Committee on Ofticial Reports. The 
Executive Committee will also meet at the same time, 2 o'clock sharp. 
With the permission of the Congress we will now take a recess until 
2:15, and if you will come in promptly we will get through the business 
of the day in time to accept Dr. Williams' invitation for the Golf 
Club. 

Adjourned. 



MONDAY AFTERNOON'S SESSION, HELD IN THE CEN- 
TER CHURCH HOUSE, HARTFORD, CONN., 
MAY 17, 1920, AT 2:15 O'CLOCK. 

President General Jenks in the Chair. 

The Cuaikman : Is Dr. McCollester, Chaplain General, present? 
(Affirmative response.) I )r. McCollester, have you anything to offer 
for the good of the order? 

REPORT OF THE. CHAPLAIN GENERAL. 

Dr. McCoi.i.KSTrvR : Mr. President General and Compatriots: The 
President General asks, lias the Chaplain anything to offer for the 
good of the order? Rather a strange and perplexing question to put 
to a dominie, and yet 1 am reminded that parsons have had important 
places in the history of the American Revolution. They weren't allowed 
to fight in the old days. I often think of Emerson's grandfather who 
preached that sermon the morning before the battle of Concord— the 
Sunday morning before— and how, during the battle, he was, T believe, 
as the story goes, in the upper room of the old manse looking out: of 
the window watching the fight go on, when he wanted to be there. 
Times have changed. 1 think the parson of the present time would 
be allowed to be there, but it was through no lack of interest on the 
part of Emerson that he was not there. It was the custom of the 
times. Then down through all the history of American patriotism the 
minister and the church and the educator have beetl important factors 
leading the ideals of the people, and it seems to me that there never 
was a time when there was more demand for a message from the de- 
partments of education and departments of religion than at the present 
moment. It seems to me that the Sons of the American Revolution 
have never had more responsibilities placed upon them than at this 
present moment. 

We speak' of Koston and patriotism. 1 was interested in the remark 
of Compatriot Bailey from Kansas, who, by the way, comes from a 



126 



SON-S Ol- Till$ AMERICAN INVOLUTION 



home that is just across the street from where my home is in Carmel, 
New Hampshire. Distances bring us close together, hut he said in 
Kansas there are more Americans there, that the English language is 
spoken there — what do you think of Boston? J came back to Boston 
after a long period of absence, and to me it's a line city. Lf you go 
into the subway you will have to look long before you will see a man 
that you can say is of the old generation and of the old stub oi the 
America of long ago. There's where we have got some of our problems. 

When the battles of the Revolution were fought they were fought 
between the English-speaking people on the one side, who wanted to 
establish a government here, and the English-speaking people on the 
other side who belonged over across the sea — they are both brothers 
today. Well, there are in Boston the types of every race under the 
sun, speaking every language that is known everywhere, and the great 
problem before the Sons of the American Revolution is the problem 
of Americanizing, and it [Isn't merely the question of speaking the 
English language, but it is also bringing home to them the English or 
the American ideals, and that's the problem that is before us as Sons of 
the AiTrerican Revolution, and it's a tremendous problem in these 
mixed times. 

A leading educator recently said that the great problem before 
America is the development of leaders. We are developing working- 
men, we are developing along the line of industry, but what we need 
especially are leaders along the line of idealism, and particularly must 
we emphasize that we, sons of the fathers, for there is a special need 
for emphasizing the ideals of Americanism, not simply speaking Eng- 
lish, not simply lighting when we are called forth to war, but standing 
for those principles and those ideals of education and of religion, of 
justice and of equality and of right, and T tell you, compatriots, that 
we are met here not simply that we ma)' elect officers, not simply to 
have these social associations one with the other, which are exceedingly 
delightful, but we are met here to stimulate one another so that when 
we go back to the places where we are working we will go back with 
renewed vigor to help to establish those ideals for which our fathers 
and mothers lived and died. 

May I pause and thank you, compatriots, for the honor which you 
have given me in making me the Chaplain General during the past two 
years. I appreciate the honor. I have tried so far as lay within my 
power to do what I could to carry on the interests of our calling, and 
among the most interesting incidents that have come to me has been that 
of pinning the medals upon the breasts of our sons who have returned. 
1 had a son over the. seas and 1 had a (laughter in a Southern hospital 
during the war time. My interest was with college and with church 
along the educational and the patriotic lines. We did all of us what we 
eoidd, but it seems to me in the pinning of these medals upon the 
breasts of the sons of the compatriots we are looking forward to the 
future, and every medal that is pinned upon them is suggestive that^i 



J'KOCKKIH NGS 01? LIAUTFQKD CONGRESS. 1 -'/ 

they have thereby taken upon themselves the responsibility which you 
and I soon are to lay down — not only to fight when war is declared, but 
to serve when peace comes. Nay, may I say I am not so sure that I 
like the word peace. I rather feel that we should shy the word citizen- 
ship, and citizenship will carry with it the idea of war when Avar is 
necessary. It will carry with it not simply a peace which is simply 
quietude, but it will carry with it a sense of all the responsibilities that 
a young man holds to his community, to his State, to his nation, and to 
the world at large. We must urge upon our sons as we put upon their 
breasts these medals as an expression of our confidence, that the future 
rests with them. 

So that's the word, Air. President, that J have to say today — the word 
of the parson. It is simply this: we are not any of us here as lawyers, 
merchants, physicians, or parsons; we are all American citizens, sons of 
our fathers, devoting ourselves to the ideals for which they lived and 
died and for which we bind ourselves also to live and die. (Applause.) 

The Chairman : The next order of business is the presentation of 
the reports of the several committees on organization. There are five 
of these committees, the chairmen being the respective Vice-Presidents 
General. 1 recognize Colonel 1 Ionic, Vice-President General of Ohio, 
and T will ask him to take the gavel and introduce the reports from the 
Vice-Presidents General. (Applause.) 

Colonel ITotik assumes the Chair. 

The Chairman: Mr. President General and Compatriots: The first 
on the list is that from Compatriot George I\ Burgess, of Connecticut, 
the Vice-President of the New England District. 

Vice-President General BtiRCKss: I purposely made my report brief 
on account of the many tilings being presented to the Congress, .so that 
we should not have anything superfluous. 

The report is as follows: 

REPORT OK VICE-PRESIDENT GENERAL BURGESS. 

New Haven, Conn., May 15, 1920. 
To the Congress: 

Your Vice-President General for the New England district reports 
that the year has been one of distinct progress and realization, stimu- 
lated by the visits of the President General. Each state has enjoyed his 
presence and has been encouraged to carry on the ideals for a better 
national life because he has shown that rare quality of vision which is 
so essential if this nation is to assimilate and make productive the 
resources given it. 

T cannot say that it is altogether due to the work of the patriotic 
societies, but it must be due in a measure to their influence that our 
Chambers of Commerce are now including in their activities a Com- 
mit tee on Americanism. That is certainly most encouraging, as showing 
a quickened sense of responsibility for the future of the republic. 

The distribution of the service medals was a practical recognition 
of the contribution of our membership to the great war and will serve 
as a reminder to many that, as a people, we are thoughtful of the 
splendid devotion they showed to civilization in her hour of need. 



I 28 SONS OL< TIIIv AMERICAN RKVOUUTION. 

( hi page [3 of the March BuiXETiN is a brief record of a dinner 
given by General David Humphreys Branch, No. i, of the Connecticut 
Society, on Lincoln's birthday, in which your Vice-President General 
participated by invitation. The gathering was notable in that it was for 
a group of the most recent newly made citizens and in the heartiness 
of their response which showed their eagerness to become of service 
to their new country. 

There should he noted the observance in New Haven, on the Sunday 
nearest to ''Bunker Mill Day," of decoration of the graves' of 286 
soldiers and patriots of the American Revolution. This custom, of 
many years 1 standing, was particularly interesting last June in the 
presence of representatives of four generations of the descendants of 
Eli Dcnslow, at whose graves the exercises were held. 

[ have noted these occasions in the hope that other branches of the 
Society may find in them an incentive to such activities. 

On two visits of the President General 1 have been prevented, by 
illness or imperative engagements, from being with him, but it has been 
a pleasure to participate several times in my own and nearby States in 
the delightful receptions given him and receive the inspiration of his 
patriotic messages. 

Because he has made so complete a visit and survey in the New 
England Slates it has not seemed necessary for me to try to supplement 
his work, but from all parts of the district I learn of the invaluable 
results of his most complete relation. 

It has been my privilege to speak' a number of times carrying the 
message of our organization, and 1 am confident that my successor will 
find that the spirit of the forefathers is with us in present everyday 
constructive service to the country we love. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Gkorge l\ Bui&'kss, 
/ ' 'ice- P 'resident General. 

The Chairman': 1 know that we have all listened with interest to the 
paper o\' Compatriot Burgess. The territory that he has is due that is 
inspiring, and we can see that the work' has been that to him. I would 
now introduce Compatriot Thomas \V. Williams, of the Middle Slates. 

Vfce-Pfesitlent General Williams then read the report, which is as 
follows: 

REPORT Ob VICE-PRESIDENT 'GENERAL, WIUJAMS. 

Mr. President General tind Compatriots; 

When our esteemed President General assumed the duties of his 
office in May of last year he mapped out very carefully and concisely 
the duties of the offices of his several Vice-Presidents General and 
appointed each one of them as chairman of the Committee on Organi- 
zation for their respective districts. To your humble servant was as- 
signed the district comprising the States of New York, New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, 
North Carolina and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. 

It is needless for me to dilate hen- at Ihis time on the activities of our 
worthy President General during the past year and how comparatively 
easy he has made the work for his Vice-Presidents General, for really 
our President General has done the work and has made possible won- 
derful results in the States above referred to and located in my im- 
mediate district, so that briefly I shall be glad at this time to touch uponv 



L'ROCICKMNCS ol* HARTFORD CONCKKSS. I2ty 

the activities of these States along the line of patrioic work with which 
I have been in more or less contact during the past year. 

It would seem as though, compared with the activities of our Presi- 
dent General, that my own work, J regret to say, owing to chaotic 
business conditions, has been infiuiteshnally small. 

The work of Americanization in the several States above referred to 
has been doubtless the most important activity engaged in during the 
crucial period of reconstruction. The Sons of the American Revolution 
having been pioneers in this held have been constantly enlarging their 
scope during the past year and our Compatriots everywhere have en- 
listed in every effort being made in their communities to educate the 
alien in the fundamentals of Americanism. This held is limitless and 
every individual member of our great Society has found a place in it. 
There is no doubt hut that our increase of membership during the past 
year has been accounted for to a great extent by the work that they 
have prosecuted along the lines of Americanism. The country is at 
the full tide of patriotic interest. In the words of our President 
General, "Americanism is being studied as never before and this studs- 
is creating a nation-wide desire to unite with patriotic societies." 

The Empire State Society during the past year in its various chapters 
has accomplished great results. 1 have kept in as close touch with 
that Society as possible and must congratulate it upon the splendid 
work that it has accomplished during the past year. Time will not per- 
mit me to dilate on (he activities of the Empire State Society whose 
chapters are so constantly kept active. President Remington has re- 
ported their Americani/at ion work to be in fine shape and is constantly 
co-operating with the National Americanization Committee. 

The New Jersey Society, faithful to its traditions, has shown wonder- 
ful results in its various chapters during the past year. The true spirit 
of .Americanism has everywhere prevailed throughout that State 
Society. President Vail of the New jersey State Society, who has just 
retired from that office, has been very active and faithful in the dis- 
charge of his duties during the past year, and our National Bin, i.i',Ti N 
has recorded from time to time during that period (he various activities 
of the New Jersey State Society. The Committee on Americanization 
of the New jersey State Society, Mr. Harry K. Brewer, chairman, has 
been very active during the past year and much good has been ac- 
complished by bis very able committee. The large increase in member- 
ship shown by the New Jersey Society will again entitle her to the 
traveling banner. Several new chapters have been formed and others are 
in course of formation. Rev. Dr. Allen, the newly-elected President, 
has mapped out a great campaign for the coming year. 

The Pennsylvania State Society, through its able President, Hon. 
Eugene C. I'.onniwell, has accomplished great results, and the very able 
pamphlet entitled ".American Citizenship," issued by Compatriot Bonni- 
well, deserves to be preserved in the archives of the National Society. 
Pennsylvania has been very active inched along the line of Americani- 
zation during the past year. 

The Delaware State Society, as a State Society, has done compara- 
tively little during the past year as a Society, but some of the indi- 
vidual members have been co-operating with other organizations in 
.Americanization work, and which has been taken lip in the critv of 
Wilmington by their service citizens and splendid work has been done 
and, as large numbers of their Society members are members of the 
Service Citizens organization there was no seeming need to duplicate' 
the work. 

The District of Columbia Society has been active along the line of 
Americanization, and through their meetings and personal contact 



130 SONS 01- THE AMlvKlCAN RKVOT.UTrON. 

their membership has stood strongly for the diffusion of American 
principles and loyalty to our Constitution, iir which some of their mem- 
bers have taken a special interest. The Society distributed one hundred 
medals in recognition of the service of members and sons of members 
in the late war. 

The Maryland Society, under the very able management of Hon. 
James II. Preston, has had a busy year, and their activities have been 
largely engaged in the propaganda of Americanism, the distribution of 
the America's Creed through patriotic societies in public schools, and 
also in the increase of membership of the Maryland Society, which has 
been quite apparent. The Maryland Society reports Inning bail the 
most flourishing year in its history and is now making plans for a wide- 
spread organization, with the expectation of having a chapter in each 
county of the State. 

The Virginia Society has been exceedingly active during the past 
year and has made great efforts to increase ils membership and with 
very flattering results. They have added forty- four new members to 
their Society charing the past year and many letters of invitation have 
been issued by this State Society for those eligible to become members. 
Their form of invitation should be patterned after by other State 
Societies. Americanism has been the keynote of the endeavors of the 
Virginia Society during the past year. 

The States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 
in my immediate district, have not shown the activities of some of the 
other States, but are still alive and good work can be expected from 
them in the near future. 

T want to take occasion to express at this time my high appreciation 
of the cordial co-operation given me by the officers of the several State 
Societies oyer which T have attempted in a feeble manner to preside 
during the past year, and to express my hope that the splendid work that 
they have all done during this past year may continue during the years 
to come in largely increased membership and in working out the many 
problems that confront this country today. 

T. W. Williams, 
Vice-President General. 

The Chairman: [ take great pleasure now in introducing Vice-Presi- 
dent General Linn Paine, of the Mississippi Valley, West District. 
(Applause.) As distances go, Mr. Paine has great territory, and we all 
know what his interests have been in the last year. 

Mr. Paine then read the report, which is as follows: 

REPORT OF VICE-PRESIDENT GENERAL PAINE. 

In reporting the activities of the Mississippi Valley, West District, I 
beg to acknowledge an indebtedness to the officers of the eleven State 
.Societies that have been assigned to my care. Most cheerfully have 
these compatriots assisted me with information. They have contributed 
valuable suggestions for the upbuilding of our Society in the States 
beyond the Mississippi, 

We who dwell in that land brought into the United States of America 
by the Louisiana Purchase find ourselves at a distance from the graves 
of our Revolutionary ancestors. Unlike our eastern compatriots, we 
have been denied the privilege of reviewing the scenes that remind 
one of the early struggles for American independence. That portion of 
our country acquired by an all-seeing Providence has now become the 
very center of our national progress, It is there that the heart of the- 



J'ROCKKDINGS ()!• HARTFORD CONGRESS. I3I 

American people is beating with devotion to the principles of American 
freedom upheld by our heroic forefathers and cherished by all true 
Americans as our greatest national heritage. 

It has hot been my good fortune to visit each of the State Societies 
during the past year. The remarkable achievement of our President 
General, Chancellor L. jenks, who has visited most of the State 
Societies in person has eclipsed all of the services I have been able to 
render. 

I am truly grateful for his great interest and find that all of his 
efforts are having the desired effect. As the Secretary General's re- 
port will furnish statistics of the State Societies it will not be necessary 
for me to present them here. 

Reluctantly 1 omit mention of many services and courtesies extended 
by officers and compatriots, but I cannot refrain from acknowledging 
the support I have had from — 

President C. Robert Churchill, of the Louisiana Society. 

President Parley Sheldon, of the Iowa Society. 

President Clifford L. Hilton, of the Minnesota Society. 

President Frank D. Hall, of the North Dakota Society. 

President W. L. Baker, of the South Dakota Society. 

President Benjamin F. Bailey, of the Nebraska Society. 

President Joseph B. Thoburn, of the Oklahoma Society. 

President C. P. Dorchester, of the Texas Society. 

President George W. Clark, of the Arkansas Society. 

President John M. Meade, of the Kansas Society, and 

President W. D. Vandiver, of the Missouri Society. 

I am proud to have been associated with such representative patriots 
who, through their State organizations, are upholding the highest stand- 
ard of American citizenship. 

The assembling of district organizations should be continued and 
encouraged. My compatriots in St. Louis hope that its convenient 
location may be considered favorably for such meetings. 

There are thousands of loyal Americans residing beyond the Missis- 
sippi River who arc eligible for membership and would welcome an 
opportunity to join this Society in its great purpose of upholding the 
highest form of American citizenship. Let us enroll them for active 
service, and by unceasing activity assure the world that the people of 
the United States will safeguard now and forever the principles of 
American independence and freedom. 

(The President General resumes the Chair.) 

The Chairman: Before Vice-President Paine leaves the stand I 
desire to transfer to him the gavel, asking him to present one who has 
been of great service to this Society for many years, Vice-President 
General Moulton Honk, of Ohio. 

Mr. Pai.viv: Compatriots: T take pleasure. in presenting to you Vice- 
President General Houk, of the Mississippi Valley, F,ast District; 

Vice-President General Houk read his report, which is as follows: 

RETORT OF VICE-PRESIDENT GENERAL Tfoi-K. 

May 17. 1 020. 

Mr. President Grprrnl nyj f '•-• • f-. 

j ne activities ot tins district are reported in SQ f- ir »<? n Atrial l .,.♦; ,, ■ 
celebrations of historical dates, etc., in the Bi \ivr^ •,, • T' 

here repeated. They all have 'their' v^at^^„^J r n ^ 



[32 SONS ()!• TIIK AMERICAN INVOLUTION. 

Just now the one ever present, all absorbing thought, however, with us 
is the condition confronting us as to a continuance of our heretofore 
form' of constitutional government — one under which in a century and 
a quarter we grew into a powerful, respected, wealthy nation— one with 
a freedom of action, thought, speech, and religion unknown to other 
nations — the American ideal. The activities of our Society the past 
year have been along this line of thought. It has been my privilege to 
have visited the membership, by imitation, in the States of Wisconsin. 
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky during this year and to them I 
am under obligations for many courtesies. Such visits incline to pro- 
voke serious thoughts. One in particular is as to the class of men 
who constitute member-ship. It, in all cases, includes these who "Make 
the wheels go round," and it suggests the wonderful power that Could 
he exercised for good by their combined effort and activity. 

This co-operation and activity in some way seems lacking unless they 
are officered by daring active forces patriotically and unselfishly in- 
spired.. It is, however, noticeable that the membership arc picking live 
men from among them for leaders and it may safely be said that the 
sometimes heretofore officers who accepted their trusts as "Honorary'' 
compliments are giving way to another class who, while not particularly 
better members, are those who will and do see the wast field for the 
Societies' effort and intend such activities shall mark' their individual 
administrations. 

One .State Society this year noticeably has "full house" meetings. 
The Board of Management gather regularly each month. The new 
members are installed with a formal program which includes a pledge 
of allegiance. This is both impressive and inspiring not only to the 
initiate but to the audience also, and is as follows, x\z : 

INSTALLATION OF'NJvW M !•'. \I Hl'.k'S. 

President: "The following gentlemen have been elected members since 
the last installation." (Reads their names.) "They will now come for- 
ward." 

The president will then say : 

"Gentlemen, the interests, objects, and principles of this Society are 
consecrated to our united care. We are pledged to protect the institu- 
tions of our sovereign nation; to guard the Hag; to foster true, [00 per 
cent Americanism; to resist to the utmost of our strength every act or 
sentiment unfriendly to our country. 1 )oes each one of you so pledge 
yourself ?" 

In unison each says: "I do. As my ancestors offered their lives and 
fortunes that this sovereign nation of United States might he born and 
prosper, I, in their names, pledge myself to defend it against enemies; 
to protect its flag from danger and calumny; to stand a.t all times watch- 
ful of its safety; to be quick to attack every sentiment or alien propa- 
ganda that threatens it; to foster love of country and true 100 per cent 
Americanism. 1 serve hut one God, one flag, one country." 

President (to older members) : "Your properly constituted authorities 
have, after due care, recommended and elected these gentlemen; and 
thev are now formally accepted as members of this Society." 

()hk-r members: "Compatriots, we give you hearty welcome." 

(The cusroCij an f n K . colors will then return with the flag. After he 
has done this, the^dcr members will sin- the first verse of "America" 
during which the new> .in^jL.j roinijaUaots will retinm to their seats.) 

Certain Societies are supplving to eighth-grade schools, through co- 
operation will, school hoards, paster leaflets for their readers, which 
leaflets contain upon frontal page the Americans creed, and upon the 



L»R0CICKJ>INGS OF HARTFORD CONGWCSS. 



133 



bade thereof the history of same, and in such manner one Society 
has distributed over 30,000, another is distributing a supply of 20,000, 
and a third field has been so covered. It is a work IO0 per cent 
American. One Society has moved toward obtaining immigration laws 
more in consonance with the necessities of the time. It has invited 
and obtained the co-operation of kindred patriotic societies. Such law 
has in view the placing of burden of proof that he is a desirable 
acquisition upon the immigrant rather than that he is not such upon 
the Government — places his activities here under observation and re- 
port. It does not interfere with present laws affecting the immigrant 
otherwise nor tend to keep out those who can amalgamate with us 
along American lines. 

A chapter once inclined to surrender its charter, instead has now in- 
vited the co-operation of the .American Region and expects to rehabilitate 
the old home in which an American President was born and to dedicate 
such home for patriotic purposes. 

A State Society composed largely of Chapters has taken in hand 
a program fox, 'formal admission of foreign born who .are to be admitted 
here to citizenship. The program is as follows, viz : The class of such 
.aliens are seated in the auditorium of the Federal court room-— the 
Federal judge in his seat — the clerk of court calls the name of one to 
be given his papers. This party (-accompanied by his wife and children 
if any) comes to the front and he is handed his papers by the clerk'. At 
the same time usually a 1). A. K. pins upon the Coat or dress of each 
or all a small American Flag. The class having been individually so 
treated, they all then approach the large American flag and. standing 
before it. salute. They then read the American creed. After being 
again seated, they are addressed "as citizens of the United States" by 
the judge, and as to their duties as such. Usually an address of welcome 
is then made by a Sou of the .American Revolution. Contrasted with 
the old-lime method of simply handing one his papers informally there 
is now left an impression that his newlv-found citizenship involves 
solemn duties upon his part toward his fellows. 

About a year ago Vice-President Henry visited Ohio, then suggesting 
that Regents of Chapters of Daughters of the American Revolution 
be asked to suggest names of men eligible to our .Society. To each 
such the Secretary of the Ohio Society wrote a letter — a two-page 
letter — describing the Society and its aims. The success obtained was 
to make this Ohio's banner year. 

Cash prizes and medals have been awarded for essays on American- 
ization, and war medals have been formally awarded our World War 
heroes, in some cases by the President General and in others Vice- 
President General or the Director General. 

A .State Society has inaugurated a move which should be emulated. 
It is to invite Presidents of the other State .Societies in the district to 
be its guests at its more important meetings. This introduces a 
nationalizing effect, a fraternity of feeling, new ideas. While each and 
every State Society has its own local conditions, all probably differing, 
yet to an interested one such general expressions of thought and 
activities are intensely interesting and inspiring. 

Your reporter had expected to print and circulate such siursrcatfons 
as correspondence brought tending toward effective work, fnit so many 
have been their number the idea was perforce abauT ' |( 'd. One report 
is particularly pleasing and is evidence that publi<; : v v ' s not on.lv possible 
,)nl l )r ^;!Ji;i , !l 1( o. v im'e's' , '"A" : p \'-n "• '" "; ,llct " s in Chicago daily papers 

«!;<•» cv, ry activity of the Society fhonW be Ll , " tZS 
not be known :,s Rcsolntionary Sons of Revoliuionarv sires 



134 SONS Ol' TlllC AMERICAN K!£VOI«U'110N. 

The above listed activities are not singular to this district but are 
here in effect and arc suggested for consideration where not otherwise 
effective 

To the membership I can only add : 

I have enjoyed the inspiration of their gatherings, and to the Presi- 
dent General, that the officers of this district will forever remember 
his genial presence in our every State and the forceful scholarly char- 
acter of his talk's. Himself ever optimistic, he has inspired such thought 
to all, encouraging us to renewed patriotic thought and endeavor. 
Respectfully submitted, 

MoUtTON J loUK, 
Vice-President General. 

(President General Jenks resumed the chair.) 

Nir.' Howard J. Coxt; (Massachusetts) : Mention was made this morn- 
ing of an Indian chieftain in this State named Sassacus. Now, it seems 
to me appropriate to take a moment to nominate myself a "sassy cuss" 
in this gathering; but there were two good points brought out. For 
instance, the Chaplain General spoke of the lack of lighting parsons. 
Now, Peter Joseph Berg, who was pastor of the Episcopal Church 
of Williamsburg, Va., according to the old poem in the school books, 
gathered a company of ioo men from his own parish, marched at the 
head as captain, joined Washington's army, and it is said fired the 
bullet that mortally wounded Colonel Ryall of Trenton; and with re- 
gard to Mr. L'aine and his distance from the Revolutionary grave, 
right in his own burg of St. Louis is buried Mr. Clark of the famous 
Lewis and Clark Expedition, a veteran of the Revolution; and in Iowa 
there are four graves of Revolutionary soldiers, as was brought out in 
an address by a professor of Cornell College to the Boston Blinker 
Hill Monument Association. Now, if I've been too sassy in taking a 
moment of your time you can keep me after school if you wish. 
(Laughter.) 

The Chairman: Is there a report from Vice-President General Over- 
ton Ellis, of Washington, Vice-President of the Mountain and Pacific 
1 )islrict ? ( No response. ) 

Capt. Rev. Ji'.ssi', l\ Martin (Colorado): Mr. President General, I 
belong to that district, but 1 have no authority to speak, but 1 merely 
want to make a report for Colorado. 1 can't speak for California. 
1 understand they have their delegate here, and the California native 
sons are known everywhere, both by their presence and by their speech, 
and 1 am sure lie can speak for himself. \ want to call attention, how- 
ever, to one thing, as there has been so much emphasis laid today 
upon the fact of Americanization. We have a plan out in our State 
of Color aJo, of which the President General and the members of the 
State Society i<>l ( j n ic when I came East T am a parson, too, and 
maybe I can be heard V( .t (laughter) but since wo have taken up the 

matter of Americanization in the State, m u»«ot««u v»y t —.,-,--- 

the leadership of the Hon. Malcom Lind&cy, has been very much Idled 
with the idea that we must do something, not necessarily for the enn- 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 135 

grant as lie comes in, but for the emigrant already in our midst, and 
we have adopted a plan concretely something like this, in the city of 
Denver: We have what we call the Opportunity School. I do not 
know whether it is being tried generally throughout the country, but 
we did a great deal in preparing a number of the emigrants who were 
called under the conscript law for intelligent service in the Arm}- during 
the war. Since they came back a number of these men were turned 
adrift, and not knowing what to do, not having very much preparation 
for any particular line of work, under the leadership of very inspiring 
teachers these people are being trained in various forms of mechanical 
and other honest labor. But the school with it has been to us the 
particularly attractive thing. We have been teaching these people the 
very basic principles or truths of Americanism and of American 
political ideas. So we conceived the idea in the Colorado State Society 
of forming a union with the American Legion, with the public schools, 
and with as many of the preparatory schools as we could reach, ami 
especially with this Opportunity School. Being a member of the 
American Legion, it was my privilege to present the cause to a number 
of the posts, and we secured the unanimous and enthusiastic endorse- 
ment of the whole plan and the appointment of permanent committees 
to collaborate with us. Our plan is, briefly, this: We are blending 
efforts in the Opportunity School to bring the conception of Ameri- 
canization to those people, who are in many instances quite simple- 
minded — they'll grow naturally — but bringing it to them in language 
that they can understand. So a series of -text-books has been devised, 
to be prepared and edited, under the direction of the Colorado Society, 
by different members or friends chosen thereby. We have a text-book 
of six chapters of two pages each.— one on Washington, one on Lincoln, 
and an especially attractive one on American inventions, designed 
especially to appeal to the young mechanic. One on the American Con- 
stitution is being prepared by the Attorney General of our State, who is 
an enthusiastic member, by the way, of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, and a fifth brochure on the American pioneers, intended 
primarily, of course, to cover those who settled this Atlantic seaboard, 
but touching the high lights of the adventurous spirits of the West, 
especially Marcus Whitman and his activities, rind others of like force 
and power in the far West. They arc putting it in the simplest kind 
of language. Each one of these will be prepared and edited, and recast 
where necessary, so that the foreigner will have no difficulty whatever 
in understanding the meaning that it was intended to convey. Now, we 
think we are coming at the matter from a basic point of view. We 
want them to know what we have. We want them to see enough of it 
through thru teaching tharMhey will love it and fall in line with the 
great stream of progress that we have developed in the last century 
and a quarter here in America. 

shmft^finr^ 1, ' f T mny ,)e al,owecl > Mr - President Cener.il, and 1 
■ -^i^t_liiade_ as a report of the Colorado Society. 



i 3 6 



SONS QI? '1' 1 1 i: AMERICAN KKVOl.UTION 



because while we are exceedingly modest in the West we arc rather 
prond of the idea as it has sprung up. Now, the American Legion is 
co-operating with ns entirely in this plan and are willing to support 
it as far as possihle. The public schools are going to co-operate with 
ns, and a little later, as soon as our text-hooks have been edited and 
then printed, they will he taught in the schools and added to the cur- 
riculum, So we are sure, so far as American political history is con- 
cerned, that there will he no adulteration in anything that comes to 
those who take our places. 

Dr. Bangs (Massachusetts) : May I have the privilege of the floor 
for about two minutes to supplement the report of Vice-President 
General Burgess relative to one important work that is being done by 
the Massachusetts Society that was not included. This seems to he a 
meeting for the interchange of suggestions which . may lead to the 
building up of ioo per cent Americanism all over the world. We have 
engaged in the Massachusetts Society in a work which tends in that 
direction, which is worthy of being brought to your attention. The 
Washington and Kranklin medal lias been prepared, and through the 
Massachusetts Society is issued to every high school in the State and 
every private school of secondary grade as a prize for the pupil show- 
ing the greatest efficiency in the study of the United States history. 
That work has been undertaken, and during the course of the year one 
hundred high schools and private high schools have entered into that 
competition, so that at the close of the year we will have one hundred 
medals going out to those of all the nationalities that go to make up our 
cosmopolitan population, not only in that foreign city of Boston, but all 
through the State of Massachusetts, encouraging the study of United 
States history in every school. T think it is only just to say that this 
lias been made possible through the generosity of the present President 
of the Massachusetts State Society, Mr. Nutting, and, therefore, you 
see the application of the influence of the effluence of the affluence in 
Massachusetts. (Applause and laughter.) 

Mr. Ski.dkn M. Ely ( District of Columbia) : Mr. Spangler, the 
President of the District of Columbia Society, in his absence, asked me 
to make notes for him, and I am sure if he were here he would be 
glad to have the record corrected to this effect, and T am epiite sure 
that Mr. Williams, representing the Middle and Coast District, would 
be equally glad to have me state that the District of Columbia Society, 
instead of having presented ioo War Service medals, in accordance 
with the report, either has presented or is to present 136 medals out of 
a membership of 500. 

Mr. A. W. North (California): T do not want to let the various 
remark's that have been made concerning the helpful work" of the 
American Legion pass fvpiri our minds before the same may he put in 
some concrete fashion from this Convention to the next annual con- 
vention of the American Legion. Accordingly as one taking pride in 
membership in both that order and in this, 1 offer thi« K -' f 



I'WCK'KKIHNC.S 01' ITARTl'ORD C( >NCRI\SS. 



•37 



Rcsokwd, That the National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution; in Annual Convention assembled, extends an hearty greeting 
to the American Legion, that splendid new-comer in the ranks of 
patriotic societies, and looks forward to earnest co-operation along 
broad lines of national welfare work'. 

T offer that as a resolution. (Applause.) 

Rev. Martin: As a member of both societies, may I have the honor 
of seconding that motion? 

The Chairman: Under the rule, the resolution will go to a Committee 
on Resolutions and will be brought up at a later point. Will yon 
kindly let ns have the motion for the purpose of the record? Are any 
of the Far Western Slates represented? If not, we will pass to the 
report of the Committee on Patriotic Education. The beloved and 
lamented John Milton Reifsnider was the chairman of this committee. 
The Vice-President is Prof. George A. Br en nan, of Illinois, who has 
prepared the report. In his absence it will be presented by Compatriot 
David Victor Webster, of the Illinois Society. 

Mr. Webster then read the report, which is as follows. 



kKPORT ()K COMMITTER ON PATRIOTIC EDUCATION. 

i Cuicac.o, Ii,i,., May 17, [920. 

Mr. Chancki,i v or R. Jknks, 

President General National Society, Sons 
of the American Revolution, Chicago III. 

DiiAR Sir and Compatriot: Owing to the untimely death of Com- 
patriot Judge John Milton Reifsnider, the Chairman of our National 
Committee on Patriotic Education, the privilege of presenting a report 
of the work and progress of this great committee has been conferred 
upon me. 

By the death of Judge Reifsnider the Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution has lost a distinguished member and leader and 
our country a patriotic citizen and a Christian gentleman. 

I lis work' as chairman of this committee lias been characterized by 
staunch Americanism— Americanism that means more than merely 
learning to read or ^recite certain things about our country and our 
flag. Mis work was based on the ideals of American patriotism; on 
love for our country, shown in thought, word, and deed; not merely 
lip loyalty. lie was very active in promoting the adoption of The 
American's Creed, and accomplished great good in that and similar 
patriotic work. It was a pleasure to work with him in these patriotic 
lines; his aims were so high, his understanding of our American prob- 
lems so thorough, and his courtesy so pleasing. 

The members of our committee realize fully that "Peace hath her 
trials as well as war." Our great World's War has taught us the 
great need <>f not only Americanizing the alien, but also of truly 
Americanizing some Americans. Too many of the foreign peoples have 
lived together in groups, where English was an alien tongue and rarely 
spoken. Whin the shock of war came, many of these' aliens who had 
but recently come to our country and who had but little in common 
with our ideals took up the cause of their native countries — some 
actively, utticrc pnssivetv. 

Tm^Toluttfy^yiaili lllis au ' lul wai ha - accomplished one thing for 
— ^u^JiLile short of a miracle, and thai is the 



'38 



SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



welding together of the many diverse peoples inhabiting our country 
into one great nation, fused by the lire of American patriotism. Men 
who had been totally indifferent to the ideals of American citizenship 
began to take an active interest when their boys enlisted to defend our 
country, and soon that interest became so keen that these aliens became 
proud of their new home and began to talk of "our country, our flag." 
I have seen this personally in many hundred cases and know it was 
the case with many thousands. 

Other aliens, who had come to this country mainly to enjoy the 
blessings of freedom, had embraced the ideals of American government 
and were as keenly anxious to uphold them as native Americans of 
old stock. They rallied to the colors as quickly as any one, and 
thousands of foreign-born Americans have laid down their lives that 
we might live as a free people. Truly, the foreigner who comes here 
with a love of our institutions in his heart and a desire to respect and 
uphold the laws of our country is as good an American citizen as the 
descendant of the Cavalier, the Puritan, or the Knickerbocker. 

The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has 
, been the pioneer in constructive patriotic teaching. For many years it 
has provided patriotic literature in different languages, explaining the 
Constitution of the United States, its liberal system of government, its 
privileges of citizenship, its great possibilities in the line of advance- 
ment, and, above all, the opportunity of having a voice ili building up 
this government of the people; by the people, for the people. 

The present is a trying time. Inspired with the burning desire to 
save our own great country from the unspeakable atrocities and domi- 
nation of the Prussian Huns, the people of the United States met the 
treacherous submarine attacks of the enemy and their determination to 
conquer our country with a courage, devotion, and unity of purpose 
never surpassed in the history of the world. We were not militarists, 
but we realized that if we wished to preserve the liberty laid down by 
our fathers we must fight for it. Those gallant countries, Belgium, 
France, England, Russia, and Italy, had fought bravely and had done 
some marvelous fighting. America sent over her gallant boys, 2,000,000 
of them, with the fiery zeal of Crusaders, to help purge the world of 
Brussianism and its brutality, At Chateau-Thierry, Argon He, and other 
battlefields they changed the French battle cry of "They shall not pass!" 
to a new American slogan, "On to Berlin!" The French, British, Bel- 
gians, and Italians were holding the Germans back on the western 
front when our Yankee boys began to pour into France, helped by the 
British fleet, which aided in transporting them over quickly. 

Our boys showed what patriotic education had done, by fighting with 
such fearlessness and judgment that they broke the German line, to the 
great dismay of the latter. When they found out that 2,000,000 of such 
fighters as these Yankees at Chateau-Thierry, Argonne, and other 
places were actually in France and Belgium and were organized into 
an American army; that 2,000,000 more were waiting to be shipped 
over; that 4,000,000 more were ordered to the colors, to be sent to the 
camps, they lost courage and began to talk peace. The armistice was 
granted, unfortunately, a little too soon. Tt should have been signed 
at Berlin, after the Allies had marched in and taken possession. This 
would have settled the question beyond cavil as to the real defeat of 
the Germans by the troops of the Allies. 

The present, time is one of the most dangerous in the history of the 
country. The change of four million men from a state of war to the 
comparative inaction of peace is a tremendous one in its psvcholo<jic 
and physiologic effects. It is characterized 1\v fchc greatest" kind of 
restlessness and dissatisfaction. This will remain until their «-—'•- ' 



PR0CKK1MNCS 01* HAKYtfORD congkicss. 139 

well as conditions are readjusted. In too many eases the ardent patriot 
who threw himself into the war for his country's sake comes home to 
find some slacker in his place and he is unable to get a position. We 
all know of such cases. They are dangerous — yea, criminal also. 

Another great and increasing source of danger is from these aliens 
who are opposed to our American institutions and are trying to establish 
by force a government based upon the Soviet system of Lenihe and 
Trotsky. Some of these men may be sincere; the vast majority seem 
to be anarchists and lawbreakers. These should be deported as fast as 
possible. There is no room here for such people. Liberty is not license, 
and this country, founded through the toil and blood of our forefathers, 
must not be polluted by the presence of traitors and enemies. 

There remains that great body of aliens who are ignorant of the 
language and ideals of our country, but who have come here to stay 
and expect to become citizens. They are here now, and must be 
seriously' reckoned with. How can we best train them to become worthy 
American citizens? 

Every one realizes that the best way to do this is through the schools. 
Those of us who are in the business of teaching realize our many ad- 
vantage? as well as disadvantages. Here is the point of contact with 
the parents, and here is the place to begin. Many Americans ask, 
"Why do not the children learn as we did years ago?" The answer is 
simple. When we Americans went to school, a generation or more ago, 
everything was conducted for Americans. 

Our ideals and customs were American; our language was English. 
All we needed was instruction in the academic branches of education. 
Today how different, especially in the large cities. Tn many cases 
these poor, underfed school children must be fed, to keep them from 
starving; clothed, to keep them from freezing; housed properly, to keep 
them from illness; must be shown the United States Hag, to know 
their own flag; taught some English, to know the language of their 
country. After nil these things are accomplished, we are ready to go 
on with them from where we commenced a generation ago. 

Much patriotic work' is done in our schools probably more than in 

all other agencies put together, for here is the very foundation work, 
in many cases, of American patriotism ; and the school-teachers, God 
bless them, have done most noble work in inculcating that love of our 
country, our Hag, and our ideals that culminated in that burning fervor 
that gave the spirit of the Crusaders to our American boys in the 
late war. 

This work with the children has been supplemented by school-work 
in the evening schools for adults as well as for young people. Here 
they^are receiving instruction in all kinds of patriotic work and applied 
civics. The work in Chicago, which is especially familiar to me, is but 
a sample of the work done all over the country. The alien is no longer 
an outsider in our body politic; he is a potential American citizen. 
Whether for good or for evil will be largely determined by the manner 
in which he is treated, the cordiality shown him, and the desire on the 
part of real Americans, whether native or foreign born, to acquaint 
him with the real pleasures, privileges., and duties of American citizen- 
ship. 

Our schools are doing great work in these lines. Classes are springing 
up everywhere for giving this instruction to not only the alien, but also 
to 'the native-born. 

Our whole system of American education could be made doubly 
efficient wore it recognized as a government institution, elevated to the 
rank of a real governmental department, called the Department of 
Education, and the Commissioner of Education promoted to bo Secre- 



I4O SONS OK TIIK AMlvKICAN REVOLUTION. 

tary of Education. All matters pertaining to the subject of education, 
in its different phases, could be placed under its jurisdiction without 
assuming any special authority over the State systems of education. 

This would not only simplify educational matters greatly, hut would 
also he a great gain to the government, as it would combine different 
educational plans and departments, making for greater efficiency and 
economy. The Smith-Towner Bill, which calls for a Department of 
Education-, combines these various educational plans in a most efficient 
manner and should he passed by Congress. 

It would help to dignify the position of teacher and aid in providing 
funds so that the teacher will he regarded as one of the bulwarks of 
society and he paid as such. Many thousands of the best teachers are 
leaving the profession to enter the business world, which recognizes the 
ability and character of these teachers .and pays them from two to five 
til-lies their educational salaries to secure their efficient services. Unless 
such recognition he granted, the outlook, with so many untrained 
teachers, is very dark'. 

What is our Society, the Sons of the American Revolution, doing in 
this line of patriotic education? Much. Ours was the first society to 
handle this on a large scale by printing hundreds of thousands of 
pamphlets dealing with American citizenship, the Constitution of the 
United Stales, etc. I have had the pleasure for years of presenting 
these pamphlets by the thousands to the Chicago evening schools, for 
their clashes in citizenship; to the Gary, Indiana. Public Library, and 
other places. 

What is being done by the members of the Committee on Patriotic 
Kdncation? Much. They are all working in various lines of this 
great patriotic work. One great work' that our member's are doing is 
to see that patriotic education is given in the schools; that our historical 
text-hooks are true and patriotic; that teachers, whether of common 
schools, high schools, or colleges and universities, shall he patriotic 
American citizens, teaching a robust, aggressive Americanism. Neither 
Bolshevist nor Bolshevism has any place in our schools. \o position, 
however high, is so sacrosanct that its occupant is above responsibility 
for his utterances. 

Our lamented leader, Judge John Milton Rei fsnidcr, of Baltimore, 
did a great deal of work in directing and aiding in this work of 
patriotic education. Air. Matthew Page Andrews, Chairman of the 
Committee on Publication, states that Judge Rcifsnider was especially 
helpful in placing The .American's Creed in all the public schools of 
Maryland, ami placing a copy of the little hook, "The American's 
Creed and Its Meaning," in the hands of every pupil of the eighth 
grade in the schools of Baltimore. The Maryland Society has done an 
immense anioutfc of work' and accomplished a great deal of good in 
pushing this splendid creed that embrace's the ideals of American 
patriotism and was written by William Tyler Page, a member of the 
Maryland Society. It has been placed in the movies there and is re- 
ceived with great enthusiasm. 

The School Hoard of Baltimore appropriated a sum of money to 
furnish the eighth-grade pupils with "The American's Creed and Its 
Meaning," thus hemg the first city to do this. Chicago has helped 
alfeo in this manner by granting permission to tin- Illinois Society to 
furnish copies of The American's Creed to the seventh and eighth-grade 
pupils of the city schools and distributing them to the said schools. 
The money for this work was appropriated h\ the Illinois Society, and 
Compatriot Ik J. Ashley, by his great patriotism and energy, hasbeen 
the great driving force that has them placed lure. The members of 
our Illinois Society are invited as speakers for the schools on Memorial V 
Day. 



rkOt/l'I'IMNCS 0.1' 1 I A U I It *K[) CONGRESS. 



Ill 



Chicago is also doing great work among the adults through her 
evening schools, teaching English in connection with the work of the 
student and giving elementary work in civics as last as they can grasp 
it. Superintendent Peter Mortenson is bending every effort to Ameri- 
canize the foreign people and train them to become patriotic, self- 
supporting citizens. In this he is backed heartily by the Board of 
Education, which also furnishes teachers in small parks, community 



centers, etc 



iters, etc. 

Assistant Superintendent Morgan C. Llogge has especial charge of 
this Americanization work, and he says it is pathetic and encouraging 
to see the interest and eagerness with which these foreign people 
strive to learn English and become acquainted with the principles of 
true Americanism. During the past winter about 7,000 people were 
thus helped m this patriotic/work in the public schools and about 1,000 
more in the parochial foreign schools, the teachers in the latter being 
also furnished by our city Board of Education. This seems to be a 
\ cry helpful system and will undoubtedly be extended in the future, as 
it is becoming more and more popular with the foreign people. 

I Ion. Francis 0. Blair, State Superintendent of Public Instruction for 
Illinois, writes that be "considers The American's Greed a remarkably 
concise statement of the very essence of Americanization." There is 
no method by which it could be adopted by the Slate of Illinois, but he 
slates that he will publish it in Ins next bulletin, with his endorsement. 
Mr. Blair is doing splendid work in suggesting and directing work in 
patriotic lines. 

Judge Wallace McCamant, the President of the Oregon Society, slates 
that the Oregon Society is active in teaching American patriotism and 
seeing that proper books are used in the schools; that they had one 
history removed from the schools through a campaign of the people; 
that a member of the Oregon Sons of the American Revolution is on 
the Committee on Text-books, and by his help proper books are in use. 
Judge McCamant also says that on September 17 members of the Sons 
of the American Revolution spoke to the Portland Nigh Schools in 
celebration of Constitution Day, and each high school' was presented 
with a framed copy of The American's Creed, which was also, presented 
to every large high school in Oregon. 

The Oregon Society has also purchased and lodged will) the State 
Librarian quite a number of traveling libraries, made up of books that 
are useful in teaching American citizenship. This is a very fine idea 
and should be copied by other Stales. 

Compatriot Prank W. Graham, Secretary of the New Mexico Society, 
is working hard to push the spirit of Americanism throughout the State. 
The Albuquerque Chapter is offering a gold medal to the student al the 
University of Mew Mexico giving the best original oration on 
'Americanism." and also has offered two cash prizes to be awarded to 
the best essays* written by high-school pupils of Xew Mexico. 

Compatriot A. I\. Sheldon, of the Nebraska Society, reports that con- 
structive measures are being taken by their Society toward the teachers 
of patriotism and citizenship among the large foreign population in 
their State. 

lie feels that: the teaching must be left largely to (he schools, both the 
day and the evening schools, and that patriotic citizens will see that 
proper instruction in patriotic education is given wherever needed. 

Splendid work is being done in every State in teaching constructive 
citizenship. In addition to the magnilicent work d«>ne in the public 
schools, much of the same work- is being done in classes that are 
organized in all kinds of industrial and commercial plants, this instruc- 
tion being given in working lime. 



142 SONS OF TIIlv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Many thousands of dollars arc being spent in New York City in 
training the foreign-born to become good American citizens. Schools 
of all kinds are being established to help them in learning English and 
the principles of our government, it is now fully realized that we must 
go to the foreigners and become personally acquainted with them, their 
customs and tniditions, before we can really tench them our American 
ideals. 

Compatriot George Ik Sage, who is President of the Rochester 
Chapter, Empire State Society, writes that New York has been doing 
great things in leaching good citizenship throughout the State. 

At the annual meeting of the Empire State Society the question was 
brought up of uniform naturalization laws. The chairman of our 
National Patriotic Education Committee will say emphatically that no 
man with only his first papers has any right to vote for national officers; 
and no State should have power to allow such a privilege to be used by 
any resident, though it may base the power to grant the privilege of so 
\oting for State officers. 

Where there is a provision in a State constitution allowing the 
declarant to vote, and this is construed to allow the would-be citizen 
to vote for national officers, as well as State officers, it is against public 
policy and should not be allowed. Voting for State officers and -meas- 
ures on first papers is a danger; voting for national officers and meas- 
ures on first papers is a calamity. Neither should be allowed. 

Rochester Chapter presented the City vi Rochester with a six-ton 
boulder with bronze tablet commemorating Constitution Hay, and will 
soon present to the city a tablet marking the spot where Lafayette re- 
ceived the greetings of the soldiers of the Revolution. 

Compatriot Sage says they are doing very effective work by sending 
around to the outdoor meetings in the foreign districts a truck' with 
moving-picture outfit, showing striking scenes of American history, 
flags, songs, etc. With tin's outfit is a small organ, with musicians, etc. 
It certainly makes a hit with the people and enkindles a spirit of pride 
in being an American citizen. 

The speaker would add that, with the co-operation of patriotic friends, 
he has been able to locate two noteworthy historical places near Chicago. 
One is the site of Little Fort (Petite Fort) of the old French and 
Revolutionary times, which was built by the French in the Indiana 
dunes, near Tremont, to control the fur trade of the Calumet region. 
The other is the location of the Revolutionary battle, or skirmish, on 
December 5, 1780, between the American-French forces from Cahokia 
and Peoria, Ilk, and the British-Indians from Fort St. Joseph, Mich., 
whieh had been captured and looted by the Americans. 

This skirmish has often been located at South Chicago, but a very 
painstaking search on tin- part of the speaker found the letter from 
Lieutenant Governor Hamilton, of Mackinaw, and which was later ap- 
proved by Governor Ilaldhnand, of Canada, stating that Mr. Champion, 
the head trader of Fort St. Joseph, had returned from the annual hunt 
with his Indians, pursued the Americans, overtook them at Trail Creek 
(at Michigan City), and defeated them. This settles the location and 
the winner. This location is on the b:a"ijfu| Ooo-aerc duneland farm 
of ex-Mayor Martin T. Krueger, the "Patriotic Mayor of Michigan 
City," who has given 80 acres of this beautiful duneland to Michigan 
City as a memorial park, reserving a pari ojE this beautiful park as a 
burial plot for any soldier, sailor, or marine of Michigan City who 
served in the World War. This running skirmish in 1780 was fought 
in this memorial park, and a monument should be erected here to the 
Revolutionary, World War, and other heroes. 

A testimony of approval bv the National Sons of the American Revo- ^ 
lution of the great patriotism shown by this American patriot, who 



PKOCIvKDINGS Oi' IIAI<TJ ; OKI) CONGRESS. 1 43 

came here from Germany as, a boy in 1863, would doubtless be greatly 
appreciated by Air. Krueger. 

A rather full account of the history of the Chicago Dune Region, 
from the Mound Builders to the present time, including the proposed 
National Dunes Park, is given in the second part of my hook, just com- 
pleted — -"The Wonders of the J)unes." It contains much French and 
Revolutionary history, as well as pioneer trials and triumphs. 

With all these patriotic agencies at work teaching the ideals and 
workings of our Government, the forces for good will be greatly 
strengthened and American patriotism extended and vivified. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Georce A. BrEnnan, 

Chairman. 

The Chairman: This will go to the Committee on Official Reports. 

lias the Commitee on Naval and Military Affairs — George W. 
Stewart, District of Columbia, chairman — any report? (No response.) 

The Flag Committee — W. V. Cox, District of Columbia Society, 
chairman. Is there a report? 

Mr. Wiij.iam S. Parks (District of Columbia) : Mr". President Gen- 
eral, I have the report of Mr. Cox. It was handed to- me in Washington 
two or three days ago. It is not very long, but I am not going to 
wear)' you by reading it. I am simply going to read one or two things 
that I wish every member of this Society would take to himself. 

Mr. Cox, as you know, has been chairman of this committee for a 
good many years, ami every year he has gone to great lengths with the 
purpose of putting over a law in Congress that would protect the flag. 
ft has passed the House in one or two Congresses but didn't pass the 
Senate. Then it passed the Senate in Congress, hut was never brought. 
up in the Mouse; and as this Congress is a political Congress, there is 
little or no hope that the prevention of flag desecration will be brought 
up, at least, before the elections in November next. Mr. Cox's report I 
will not, as I said, read, but 1 will read, if you will permit me, a very 
brief bill that has been introduced into Congress by the Hon. William 
E. Andrews, a Representative from the State of Nebraska, and who, by 
the way, lived in Washington as a Federal official for many years. 
This is particularly the part that we should all endeavor, to use the 
slang phrase, to have put over: 

A Bnj. to Prevent Desecration of the Fi.ac, and Insignia oi< the 
United States and to Provide Punishment Therefor. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatwes of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That whoever shall, 
in any manner for display, place or cause to be placed upon the flag, 
colors, coat of arms, or other insignia of the United States any word, 
picture, or device of trade advertising, or wdio shall sell, have in posses- 
sion, or display, any flag, colors, coat of arms, or insignia of the United 
States so marked or mutilated for advertising or trade purposes, or 
shall, in any manner place on, attach to, or associate with any article 
of commerce any flag, colors, coat of arms, or insignia of the United 
States, or offer for sale or have in possession any such article so 



.144 SONS OI- III I C AMICRICAN REVOLUTION. 

associated, or who shall in any manner mutilate, deface, or by word or 
act publicly exhibit contempt for the flag', colors, coat of arms, or other 
insignia of the United States, or any representation thereof, shall be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction in any Federal 
court shall be subject to a line of not more than $500 or imprisonment 
for not more than six months, or both. 

SivC. 2. That the words "Hag," "colors," "coat of arms," or "insignia" 
used herein include also any picture or representation or simulation 'of 
the same. 

SlCT. 3. That this act shall not apply to the use, wholly disconnected 
from trade advertising, of the flag, colors, coat of arms, or other in- 
signia of the United States on newspapers, book's, certificates, com- 
missions, decorations, banners, pictures, stationery for correspondence, 
or in or on any other article or in any position where its use is purely 
and obviously for ornamental or patriotic purposes; nor shall it apply 
for any other purpose than to prevent the desecration or exhibiting dis- 
respect for the flag, colors, coat of arms, or Other insignia of the United 
States or their employment for advertising or trade purposes. 

Sue. 4. That this act shall go into effect upon its passage and publica- 
tion, except as to goods which shall have been made and marked and in 
stock at that time, and as to such goods it shall be in force six months 
after its passage and publication. 

Now, as you all know, the States have their flag and they have proper 
legislation in most of the States to protect those State flags, but the 
United Stales of America has no law whatever to prevent the desecra- 
tion of the national emblem. 1 bring these things to your attention 
because 1 think every member of this Society should be a missionary to 
put over this protection of the flag of the United States. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Thank you, Mr. Parks. 

REPORT Ob THE FLAG COMMITTEE. 

This flag, which we honor and under which we serve, is the emblem 
of our unity, our power, our thought and purpose as a nation. 

— Woodrow Wilson. 
The President Ceneral: 

The blag Committee, as a preface to its report, begs to recall the fact 
that the creators of the Flag of the United States never contemplated 
that the symbol of the Republic would ever be used for purposes other 
than intended by the Congress, and therefore to protect it by law was 
to them an "unthinkable need." 

The theory of our patriotic forebears having proven fallacious, the 
National Society oj the Sons of the American Revolution appointed a 
Flag Committee to -investigate the question of the flag, and, if found 
necessary, to secure, if possible, a Federal law to protect the flag of the 
United States, "the Emblem of our unity, power, thought and purpose 
as a nation." 

Your committee therefore reports that the flag has been and is still 
abused, misused, and commercially degraded, the only remedy or pre- 
ventive being moral suasion or punishment of the recalcitrant offenders 
by unauthorized persons, without the forms of law. Bills to protect 
the Hag have been introduced and earnestly advocated and base passed 
both House and Senate, but have failed to become law for the reason 
that no flag bill has passed both bodies of the same Congress. 

The 66th Congress of the United States, now in session, has. since 



PROCKKIUNGS Ol' HARTFORD CONGRESS. J 45 

it assembled, been so occupied in discussing the League of Nations, 
economic, peace, and other important measures incident to the World's 
War that Hag- legislation, long and earnestly advocated by the Sons of 
the American Revolution, has once more been relegated to the rear. 

This is a great disappointment to yonr committee, which had reasons 
to hope that the recent years of war and sorrow, that have made 
precious the flag Americans love, would stimulate our lawmakers to vie 
with each other in securing the passage of a bill guarding the unpro- 
tected flag of the United States, the creation of the people's Congress. 

All phages of Hag desecration and remedial legislation have been con- 
sidered by your committee, as shown in the published reports in the 
annual Year Books of the Society. 

The information contained therein and that obtained at the various 
hearings on the flag would be sufficient, it would seem, to make it 
possible for Congress, without further data, to enact a law to protect 
and defend the flag and at the same time punish those guilty of tearing- 
it down or using it in grossly improper ways. The committee believes 
that those who carelessly or thoughtlessly misuse the flag should be 
taught the fundamentals of our government, knowing which and with 
"America first" stamped on their hearts, they will in most cases respect 
and reverence its flag. 

Those who willfully cast reproach on the flag, debauch it, or defiantly 
insult the government for which it stands should be punished in a 
lawful way by honor- and justice-loving courts. 

During these times of great unrest, Congress should enact a law to 
protect the symbols of government, if for no other than a precautionary 
measure. In the absence of law, those who would supplant the Stars 
and Stripes with another flag will become more active in their destruc- 
tive propaganda of dishonoring our flag and the government, as they 
have already done, and the pity of it is that they will likely be immune, 
unless impassioned lovers of our emblem suppress in their own way the 
impious abusers and misusers. 

This has been recently demonstrated in Oklahoma, where two men 
who had cursed our government and flag were dragged from their 
beds by armed and masked men, who lashed them and compelled them 
to kiss the flag, regardless of propriety. The)' then tarred, feathered, 
and drove them from the State. 

The newspapers tell of similar cases where offensive offenders have 
been handled by the frenzied with mob violence of Lynch lay. 

Despite harsh examples and insults, it is the opinion of your com- 
mittee that no legislation will be enacted to protect the flag and punish 
its defilers in a just and a lawful way without the persistent and united 
efforts of the members of the various patriotic societies. 

lion. William K. Andrews, of Nebraska, has introduced a carefully 
prepared bill (H. R, 13707, 66th Congress, second session) that is 
thought will proVe both efficient and workable. It is believed that it 
will also meet technical objections sometimes raised against flag legis- 
lation. Mr. Andrews is an able, forceful, and thoughtful member of 
Congress and is deeply interested in protecting by congressional enact- 
ment the symbols of the Government of the United States. If his efforts 
for a Flag law receive the earnest and united support of patriotic 
Americans,, his bill, already approved by the National Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution; will become a law. 

The time to protect the Klag of I'Veedom from abuse, misuse, and 
Commercial degradation is now here, and the committee appeals to all 
compatriots and those who love the flag to put in practice and make 
possible some of the numberless tributes in prose and poetry spoken 
and fervently sung of our flag. Ry devoting some of their time to this 
patriotic work they will honor their country and themselves and secure 



l.|6. SUNS 01' 'Ill iC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

a law that will protect the Star-Spangled Banner from reproach and 
desecration. 

W. V. Cox, 

Chairman. 

Air. Ricad (of Massachusetts) : In connection with this report, may I 
announce to the Congress, what a good many of us know, the death, 
since the last Congress, of General Philip Read. I mention his name, 
sir, because there was no man more interested in the action to preserve 
the sanctity of the American flag. 

The Chairman: Resolutions of esteem were drawn at the request 
of the Executive Committee and published in the Bui.uc'riN. He was 
one of the most heloved and, I think, one of the most unique characters 
that we have known, and the Congress will miss him. 

Mr. Wen t worth : The notice that Compatriot Read gave in connec- 
tion with this valued work of Compatriot Brigadier Philip Read brings 
to our minds a host of memories. 

The Chairman: Will Past President General Wentworth take the 
platform? 

Mr. Wu NT worth : Tn the absence of Colonel Guthrie, whom T have 
been wailing to see return, I will read a memorial prepared by your 
commit (ee. 1 deeply regret that Colonel Guthrie is not here to read it, 
hut I will do the best 1 can. 

The members arose while Mr. Wentworth read the memorial, which 
is as follows : 

Philip Reade — compatriot, soldier, citizen, true American — to mention 
the name is to reopen the gates of memory, recall acquaintance, revivify 
friendship, restore to our circle one of the most unusual and interesting 
personalities of his time. 

Philip Reade inherited deep love of family, home, and country and 
always exemplified his respect therefor. 

General Reade's record of loyalty and ability as a soldier, covering 
nearly half a century of service, is a matter of history. 1 1 is civic 
activities were ever directed toward a better expression of the duties of 
citizenship, a keener appreciation of American obligations and oppor- 
tunities. 

Mis devotion to his mother was a marvelous blending of filial love 
ami chivalric service; his visits to the last resting places of his ancestors 
partook of the spirit of a pilgrimage. 

Danger never daunted his fearless soul. Death was met with a smile. 

Philip Reade is with those he loved. Mis spirit is with, us today. 

Mr. WtfNTWORTlt : I don't know whether I can tell you how much 
Philip Read meant to us who knew him. f don't know that 1 can com- 
mand myself to tell you the wonderful, beautiful character of that man. 
The most touching scene that T ever participated in was in Philip Read's 
rooms in Wadsworth Hotel in Boston. T was there as his guest at that 
time, and he took me by the arm into his bedroom, where, on the wall, 
by the side of the lied, were seven portraits of his mother. The one in 
the center was the portrait taken when, he went into the Army as a 
young boy. Tie led me tip there, and, as if the mother whom 1 had had >^ 



PROaClvOlNGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 147 

the honor of meeting in years gone by was there present in person, he 
said, "Mother," and introduced me as formally and as tenderly as 
though he had been introducing me to her in her presence. It was in 
Philip Read's case the most marvelous thing in all the acquaintance of 
his friends — that devotion to his mother. lie was wont to make 
pilgrimage after pilgrimage to I he home of his boyhood and to the 
cemetery where his mother was buried, and I am told by residents of 
Lowell, who know of it, that lie would stand with bowed head and tear- 
filled eyes at his mother's grave for an hour at a time. The spirit of 
Philip Read, the life of Philip Read, was the highest exemplification 
of duty and filial love that I have ever known in the fifty-odd years of 
my life. 

The Chairman: The memorial will be entered upon the record. 

Has the Publicity Committee — Compatriot David L. Pearson, of New 
Jersey, chairman — any report? (No response.) 

The Committee on Local Chapters, Past President General Newell 13. 
Woodvvorth, of the Empire State Society, chairman — any report? (No 
response.) 

Has the Committee on Legal and Local Aid — Past President General 
Henry Stockhridge, of Maryland, chairman — any report? (No re- 
sponse.) 

The Committee on National Archives Building — Major Frederick C. 
Bryan, of the District of Columbia Society, chairman? 

Major Bryan: Mr. President General and Compatriots: The Com- 
mittee on National Archives Building has been able to do little more 
than to keep track of the progress of events. It has not been able to 
influence them, but the project has now reached a point where this 
Society and the members of this Society in their individual and collec- 
tive capacity can, I think, accomplish something if they desire to do it 
and will act promptly. It should not need any statement on my part 
or on the part of anybody else to persuade you to take such action. 
The matter of the needs of that building has been discussed before this 
body for a good many years. The condition of the national archives 
in Washington is scandalous, to say the least. That matter has been 
gone into. The needs of that building have been recounted and you 
will all admit that after this great war has ended the need of that build- 
ing will be greater than ever. 

The report <>f the committee, presented by its chairman, is as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTLK ON NATIONAL ARCHIVES 
BUILDING. 

Washington, D. C, May 17, 1920. 
lion. Cll ANCKi.r.ou L. JiCn'KS, 

President General, National Society, Sons of 
the American Revolution, Hartford, Conn. 
Di'AR Sir: The Special Committee of this Congress on a National 
Archives Building was appointed at the Annual Congress held in Syra- 
cuse, New York in 101 |. The need of a suitable building to house the 



UJ.8 SONS 1)1' Til I; AMKKJCAN LUtVUMJTlON. 

invaluable archives of the National Government, now widely scattered 
and in great danger of loss and deterioration, has been dwelt on in 
numerous reports of the committee. The subject-matter is not a new 
one in Congress. For more than forty years that body has been urged 
to provide such a building, and the Senate forty years ago passed a bill 
providing for the construction of a National Archives Building. In 
)( .)°J> by authority of an act of Congress, an entire block of land was 
purchased as the site of such a building. That site is now occupied by 
the Department of the Interior Building* 

Plans for the building have been drawn in the office of the Supervis- 
ing Architect, where they have reposed for many years. Estimates for 
a site and for the building have been submitted to Congress by the 
Secretary of the Treasury regularly for some sessions past, including 
both sessions of the present Congress.. The estimate presented to the 
present session included an item of $1,986,000, of which $4X6,000 was 
for site and $1,500,000 for building and equipment, and was reported by 
the Committee on Appropriations in the Sundry Civil Bill. The item 
was dropped out of the bill in the Committee of the Whole of the 
House and was not restored to the bill by the House itself when it was 
passed, on the 12th day of May this year. 

This body meets at a very opportune time for promoting this much- 
needed legislation — a need vastly increased on account of the World 
War. The bill is now before the Senate, and the Senate is favorably 
disposed to the proposition. The former Secretary of the Treasury, 
who submitted the pending estimate, is now a member of that body. If 
every State and local organization represented in the National Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution and every individual Son 
will at once make an urgent appeal to their and his two United States 
Senators, asking that the item be restored to the Sundry Civil Bill, there 
is every prospect of success in that body, and that the bill as it passes 
the Senate will contain the appropriation for a National Archives 
Building, If this can be accomplished, effort should be directed at once 
to persuade the Mouse conferees and the Mouse itself to accept the 
Senate amendment and keep the item in the bill. I lard work will be 
required to accomplish it, but it is not impossible of accomplishment. 

The site selected is a very desirable one and options have been 
secured. These options expire with the present session of Congress, 
and it is estimated they cannot be renewed except at a figure at least 
20 per cent higher than the figures of the present options. This is a 
further and weighty argument in favor of making immediate and con- 
certed action to secure the enactment of this legislation in the life of 
the present session of Congress. 

Very respectfully submitted, Kkkdkkick C. Bryan 



Cha 



iriiian. 



The CHAIRMAN: This report will be referred to the Committee on 
Official Reports. The Committee on Increased Membership— Director 
General Lewis P.. Curtis, of Connecticut, chairman. 

Director General Curtis: Mr. President General and Compatriots, 
in making this report for the Committee on Increased Membership I 
find myself in a little embarrassing position. The Registrar General, 
having had the first whack at you, has stolen my thunder. Beyond 
that, our Constitution as now amended makes it the duty of the Vice- 
Presidents to increase the membership; so our committee is rather a 
follow-up committee, to keep the Vice-Presidents at their work, and 
they ought to, in turn, have the credit. Now, T don't want to take away 



PROCEEDINGS 01? MAK'ITOKD CONGRESS. 149 

any of their thunder and serve them as the Registrar General lias 
served us, but J will just report ill short form that oar membership 
has increased. We have taken in about 1,200 new members, but there 
has been a great amount of cleaning house among the Societies this 
year, which lias brought our net membership down to some 2.4X, I 
think, but it is a more healthy membership than it was before. There 
I . is no use of keeping dead wood in our rostrum, and now that the 

! house-cleaning has been done, we look for greater results next year. 

Our report last year was published in the Year Book and I hope some 
of you read it, and in that report we said, and 1 want to emphasize 
it again, that this job of increased membership is too big for any 
one busy man. We ought to have a field secretary or somebody who 
could go around and devote his time to it and help the States in their 
work of increasing their membership. T don't know that the time is 
ripe to bring that up, but T throw it out as a thought. 

You already have inosl all the information 1 possibly could give you, 
or will have through the reports of the Vice-Presidents General. 1 
will therefore say that our committee will submit a detailed report, 
which will be published later in the Year Book, with your permission. 
(Applause.) 



REPORT. OK THE COMMITTEE 0\ T INCREASED 
MEMBERSHIP. 

Reference is made to the last report of this committee, published on 
page 131 of the 1919 Year Hook. The work has been vigorously pushed 
by the committee. While the number of new members has been large, 
still the net gain is somewhat smaller than last year, on account of the 
large number of members dropped by the State Societies through death 
or for non-payment of dins. 

While, therefore, we are only able to report a net gain of 242 for 
the year, the quality is improved, owing to the elimination of "dead 
wood." It is certainly not a healthy condition for a society to carry 
many names on the membership roll who do not pay their dues or take 
any interest. This work now having been accomplished, we hope for a 
larger net increase during the coming year. 

The list of membership as of March .31, 1920, having been corrected 
as far as possible, now numbers 16,-443 against a membership of a year 
ago of 16,178. . Full details will appear in the report of the Registrar 
General and will, therefore, not be repeated here. 

Attention is again called to the last paragraph of our last year's report, 
where we advocated the appointment of a field secretary, who could 
devote his entire time to helping the State Societies in their efforts to 
increase their membership. 

Respectfully submitted, Lkwis 15. Curtis, 

V Chairman of the Committee on Increased Membership. 

Tlie Chairman: 1 am requested by \)v. Williams to announce that 
the reception this afternoon will be informal. With his permission we 

will continue this session for half an hour and we will, 1 think, be 
nearly through with our work by thai time. Compatriot White has a 
further statement to make with regard to arrangements. 



J 5o 



SONS OF Til JC AMICIUCAN INVOLUTION. 



Mr. WHITE: 1 want to make a few statements about some of the 
events mentioned on the program. The Daughters of the American 
Revolution have announced that there is ail ■ Kxhibit of Native Arts by 
mir new Americans. They have had this exhibit prepared at the 
Morgan Memorial, and it will be open from (j o'clock to 5 dining the 
sessions of this Congress. 

it is hoped the reception this evening by the Daughters of the American 
Revolution will be recognized by a very large attendance of the dele- 
gates and their ladies. This will surely be a very interesting occasion 
and it will be held at the State Library, 

I want to ask on behalf of the Kanquet Committee for advices from 
any delegate who cannot be present at the banquet tomorrow evening. 
One delegate from New, Hampshire has already been thoughtful enough 
to advise us regarding that. If there is any delegate who will not be 
present tomorrow evening he will please notify the Credentials Com- 
mittee and they will notify the Ikiuquet Committee. 

The Chairman : The report of the Committee on Ceremonies and 
Colors came in with the colors. 

The Committee on Observation of Constitution Day — Past President 
General Ames, chairman. 

Mr. AMI'S: Mr. President General, your Committee on Constitution 
Day submitted a report, October 25, 1919, in detail, and it was published 
in the December Buijlktin, and does not need to be repeated here, but 
referred to your Committee on Official Reports. 

You noticed, however, in the reading of the Treasurer's report that 
there was an expenditure of between $21 and $22. That was the entire 
expense to which this Society was put, although over 31,000 celebrations 
were held and 100,000 columns of newspaper notice obtained, and we 
co-operated with seven other patriotic societies. I do not know that 
any other patriotic society made any financial contribution, but there 
is something that has not been said here before, but I will say it now, 
however. The cost of all these celebrations was $15,000, and your 
Committee of the Sons of the American Revolution and a member of 
the National Security League called upon the Sage Foundation Fund 
and there we obtained that $15,000. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: This report will be referred to the Committee on 
Reports. 

The Washington Guard report is next and it will be read by Gover- 
nor General Lenord Merrill. 

The report is as follows : 



609 Park Avenue, East Orangk, N. J., May 14, T920. 
To the J'rcsident General, National Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, in Congress assembled at 1 /art ford , Conn. 
Mr. PrKsidKnT GENERAL: 1 am again obliged to report little progress 
in the work of thf: National Commandcry of the Washington Guard of 
the Sons of the American Revolution. In my report to the last Con- 
gress J urged that specific instructions should be issued to each State 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS; 15I 

Society to compile a list of the sons of members in the respective States. 
No action, as far as 1 know, was taken, and I very respectfully make 
the request again. With such a list and full data accompanying the 
same, we can proceed to thoroughly organize the Washington Guard. 
Without such data we. can do little or nothing. 

I consider this junior organization to be a valuable asset to our 
Society, and doubly so in these days of unrest. If we can once establish 
the foundation on the firm basis of a proper enrollment, active work 
can be started by the various State commanderies, aided by the National 
Officers. 

Personally, I am deeply interested in the work and the Society may 
count upon my enthusiastic and zealous co-operation. It is a work 

i especially adapted, however, to some of the younger members of our 

Society, and, after data is prepared, the President of each State Society 
should have no difficulty in interesting a number of the younger com- 
patriots in the work. 

Respectfully submitted. John Lhnord MlvRRiij,. 

The Chairman: This report will be referred to the Committee on 
Reports. We will now receive reports of a special committee, the 
War Service Committee — Compatriot Carl V. Vail, Past President of 
the New Jersey Society, chairman. Any report? (No response.) 

The reports of State Societies will go direct to the Secretary General 
and will be printed in the Year Rook. 

Under the head of New Business comes the presentation of the Colo- 
rado Traveling Banner, which has been held during the last year by 
the Louisiana Society, to the Virginia Society, which has achieved the 
largest percentage of net gain, namely 203-10 per cent. I will call upon 
Compatriot Campbell B. Hodges, of the Louisiana Society, to present 
the banner to Compatriot Arthur B. Clark, the President of the Virginia 
Society. 

Major HodG.Es: Mr. President General and Compatriots, I suppose a 
soldier should be ready at all times, no matter what lie may be called 
upon to do. I remember when I first joined my regiment, about eighteen 
years ago, my old Colonel, whenever called upon to make a speech, 
would look very fierce and as soldierly as he could, and say, "Talking 
is not my business," and T feel that way about this occasion. However, 
1 wish to say that although I do not live in Louisiana all the time, 
being in the Regular Army, I have heard by the reports from there 
that Colonel C. Robert Churchill, the President, and all the other mem- 
bers of the Society have been very active, and Louisiana is very proud 
to have possessed this banner for a year. I take great pride in handing 
it, on behalf of the Louisiana Society, to Virginia. (Applause.) 

Mr. Ci.ark : in accepting this flag T am reminded of a friend of mine, 
who whenever in a controversy always replied with an epigram. At 
the (dub one night an Englishman — this was before we got into the 
war — said that if the United States and England got into a fight, how 
quickly England would whip the United States. My friend said, "What, 
;igain?" (Laughter.) Flag, T salute you — what, again? We've had 
it once and 1 thank- you for it again. (Applause.) 



152 SONS OF '11 1 (v AMKlUCAN REVOLUTION. 

The Chairman : The Syracuse Banner for the greatest actual enroll- 
ment during the year was won last year by New Jersey and again this 
year by New Jersey. I will call upon the President of the New Jersey 
State Society, Dr. Lyman Whitney .Mien, to present the banner to 
himself. (Laughter.) 

Dr. AtEEN : Air. President General, 1 can go you one better, than 
that. There is one man in our Society who is much better fitted to 
present this banner than myself. It's the man who was the originator 
of this great movement which has been sweeping for years over New 
Jersey and which has resulted in so much new membership, and I ask, 
therefore, that our beloved and honored Compatriot, who for two years 
was President of the New Jersey Society, Mr. John Let lord Merrill, 
present and receive this banner, lie has had more to do with it than 
anybody else. (Applause.) 

Mr. MerRIEE : Mr. President General, I am reminded of a little Bible 
history. It won't take long to tell it and I'll let you in on it. When 
Noah came out of the ark he thanked his lucky stars that there was no 
congressional committee there to investigate whether lie should receive 
a medal as surviving commander of the fleet. (Laughter and applause.) 
So he pinned the medal on himself. I am not like Noah and have no 
medal to pin on myself. Our State President has been exceedingly 
gracious, and on behalf of the J, 500 or more Jerseyites I accept this 
presentation to ourselves. Mr. President General, it means much; it 
means hard labor; it means a love tor the institution known as the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and for the Americanization it teaches 
throughout our State and our country, and in winning this banner 
again we are proud of the honor of taking it back. I want, Mr. Presi- 
dent General, to speak again in behalf of every member o'f the New 
Jersey Society who has worked zealously and loyally. Our growth has 
been phenomenal. Jersey is proud of her position in this .Society. I 
thank you, Mr. President General. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Has any compatriot anything to offer under the 
head of New Business? 

Mr. Nutting (President of Massachusetts State Society) : We have 
been speaking of the forces of Americanization. One of the greatest 
forces of Americanization this country ever knew, Theodore Roosevelt 
(applause), has passed away, and the Massachusetts Society at a recent 
meeting passed the following resolution: 

Resolution ok tin; Massacii u setts Society, Sons of the American 

Revolution. 

WHEREAS our late Compatriot, Theodore Roosevelt, former President 
of the United States of America, anions the numerous activities of his 
noble and strenuous life, has to his great and lasting renown one (\i.-v<\ 
accomplished which man) men for centuries past had dreamed of, and 
some liad unsuccessfully attempted, namely, the building of the canal 
across the Isthmus of Panama : 

Mow, therefore, the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the Anier- * 



.PKOC&CDINGS OU UAKTi?01<l> CONCRJvSS. 1 53 

ican Revolution, by its Board of Managers, at Boston, Massachusetts, 
does hereby place itself upon record as believing- that a due and fitting 
recognition of this wonderful accomplishment in the construction ot 
this herculean work of engineering, which will help all the world for 
ages to come, should be made by this country, and that no recognition 
of this great service could be more fitting than to name this canal 
"The Roosevelt Canal" , 

Wherefore the Massachusetts Society, Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, hereby petitions the Congress of the United States of America 
to enact, a law whereby the name of the Panama Canal shall be changed 
to and shall forever remain 'The Roosevelt Canal," as a memorial to 
Theodore Roosevelt. 

Copies of this resolution, in triplicate, to be signed by the President, 
Vice-Presidents, Registrar, and Secretary and attested by the seal of 
the Society. 

One copy to be forwarded by the Secretary to each of the presiding 
officers of the Senate and House of Representatives respectively, re- 
questing them to initiate such legislation as may lie necessary or ex- 
pedient to accomplish this purpose, and the third copy to be sent by 
the Secretary to the senior Senator from Massachusetts, asking him to 
aid ami assist this movement in every manner possible. 

llKNKY F. PuNDERSON, 

President. 
George Hai,e Nutting, 

Vice-President. 
T. Juuen Sii.sby, 

Vice-President, 
Charges Howard Bangs, 

Vice-President. 
Herbert W. Kj.mbaij,, 

Registrar, 
Wj 1,1,1 s Norm an Tuu.kk, 

Secretary. 

Mr. Nutting: I move that the National Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, in Congress at Hartford assembled, does hereby 
ratify, endorse, and approve of the action of the Massachusetts Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution in petitioning the Congress 
of the United States that the name of the Panama Canal be changed, as 
a permanent memorial to the late President Theodore Roosevelt, to 
The Roosevelt Canal, and that the Secretary General be directed to 
notify the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives of this action, and to urge the passage of legislation 
to effect this result. 

The Chairman': This will go to the Committee on Resolutions unless 
the Congress desires to take it up now. 

Mr. Yi;rj«oTT (First Vice-President of the Maryland Society): Mr. 
President General and Compatriots, I come today from Maryland with 
a suggestion which we down there have worked over and thought over 
and think contains much which will prove of interest, not only to this 
great Society, but as well to the people throughout the length and 
breadth of this greal land. I think, my friends, I would be safe in 
saying that if some modern Paul Revere would ride into ibis hall now 



154 SONS OF Till-; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

and tell us that some foreign enemy was advancing upon our shores 
that we to a man would get up and under the leadership of our leaders 
here would go out, without thought of home or self, in defense of our 
nation and our ilag. But, my friends and compatriots, not all enemies 
come with a blare of trumpet and of drums and with Hags Hying to the 
breeze. Some come in a much more insidious way, and to us, to a 
people composed as we, the American people, are composed, they are 
infinitely more dangerous than any enemy wdiich might come as 1 
first described; and it seems to me that it behooves this great Society 
of ours to come forward and to meet that insidious enemy with the 
same spirit with which we would meet the other form of enemy. That 
enemy comes under a variety of flags. At the present time the one which 
seems the greatest menace is the one denounced as the Red Flag of 
anarchy, of Bolshevism, of Socialism in its most extreme form; and 
the cry goes up here and there, "Let us destroy it. Let us trample down 
that Ilag." My friends, that Hag as it is, is a hateful sight, a hateful 
thought in the mind and heart of every true American; but if we 
analyze that flag, if we look more closely to it, we will find there em- 
blazoned, not emblazoned, but buried in the warp and woof of that 
ilag for the men of vision to see, for the men to see who can look 
beneath the surface, this one word — "ignorance." My friends, the work 
of the Sons of the American Revolution is to dispel that ignorance, to 
wash it out. To wash out with stripes of white, and snatching a piece 
of the blue sky above, set it in the corner there, and' bring those who 
now would tram-pie on that Ilag under that regenerated Ilag. (Ap- 
plause.) But, compatriots, this resolution which we are about to 
offer now on behalf of the Maryland Society recognizes one more thing, 
one more thought. I'irst we realize that we must meet this enemy as 
Americans should meet all enemies of America. Second, that we should 
dispid that ignorance which is at the basis of all their animosity toward 
the American principles ; and it recognizes further that we must unmask 
that enemy, we must declare that enemy for what it is. Those are the 
three thoughts which are embodied in these resolutions wdiich 1 am 
about to offer on behalf of the Maryland Society. 

WhKREAS we note with dread for the future welfare of our country 
the failure on the part of a large and rapidly growing number of our 
fellow-citizens to appreciate the true significance of those guaranties of 
freedom, equality, justice, and personal liberty which under the Con 
stitution of our land are inalienable rights of every American citizen ; 
and 

WHEREAS we also note with deep regret the failure on the part of so 
many of our citizens to realize that such guaranties of our Constitution 
can only continue to survive so long as the law which created them shall 
ilsel f survive ; and 

YViiKKKAS we fully appreciate the great difficulty of enforcing laws 
against sedition, treason, and other acts and conduct tending to under- 
mine our Government, without at times seeming, in the opinion of the 
unthinking, to violate the fundamental principle of personal liberty, \ 
wdiich is the keystone of a democratic form of government; and 



i'rockkihncs o]' jiAK'rroKi) con&kisss. 155 

WHEREAS we realize that, in view of these facts, the true remedy for 
our present political discontent must lie not so much in the making of laws 
as in arousing in the breasts of the great masses of loyal and patriotic 
American citizens a realization of the blessings of the Government 
under which we live, and a spirit of uncompromising intolerance toward 
those who would persist in their efforts to destroy and overthrow the 
same ; and. 

WHEREAS we deem it peculiarly appropriate that we, the son-^ of 
those patriots who in the American Revolution gave their lives that 
freedom, equality, justice, and personal liberty might live, should to a 
man resist every serious attempt to destroy and overthrow our Govern- 
ment, and that in this hour of danger we should call to the defense of 
our Flag and our Nation, as our fathers did a hundred and forty-five 
years ago, every patriotic and loyal American citizen ; and 

Whereas we have noted that at a recent convention of a political 
organization calling itself the Socialist Party of America, held in the 
metropolis of our Nation, men calling themselves American citizens, 
and presuming upon that freedom of speech which is one of the most 
sacred guaranties of our national Constitution, were permitted by 
those composing snch convention to use, without rebuke, language de- 
signed and intended to disrupt and overthrow our Government, and 
to discredit the principles upon which it was founded and under which 
it has endured for many generations as the home of a free people and a 
haven for the persecuted of other lands; and 

Whereas at said convention the Socialist Party of America had the 
effrontery to insult every patriotic and law-abiding American citizen by 
nominating for the Presidency of the United Slates a man who during 
a long period of years was notorious throughout the land for his 
treasonable utterances and studied efforts to overthrow our Govern- 
ment, who in time of war, when every loyal American had rallied to 
the defense of our country, had been guilt)' of acts of sedition and 
treason for which he was convicted by a jury of his peers, according to 
the law of the land, and who at the time of such nomination was con- 
fined in a Federal penitentiary, under a sentence confirmed by the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, the highest judicial tribunal of our 
Land ; therefore he it 

Resolved by the Maryland Society, Sons of the American Revolution: 

hirst, that this Society unanimously condemns and denounces the 
action of the Socialist Party of America, at its recent convention in 
New York City, in permitting and encouraging efforts on the part of 
memhers of such convention to destroy and overthrow the Government 
of the United States of America, and particularly the action of such 
convention in nominating a convicted felon for the Presidency of the 
{ hiited States : 

Second, that we call upon every patriotic citizen of America to rally 
to the defense of our Nation and its flag, and to rebuke at the polls and 
elsewhere this action of the Socialist Party of America, and as well 
every other similar^ action upon the part of the above or any other 
organization or individual designed to overthrow our Government or 
discredit any of the principles upon which it was founded; and he it 
further 

Resolved, That n copy of these resolutions he presented to the 
Annual Congress of the National Society, Sons of the American Invo- 
lution, to he held at Hartford, Connecticut, May 17 and 18, 1920, and 
that our delegates to such Convention he, and they are hereby, in- 
structed to urge the adoption of these or similar resolutions by the 
National Society and their publication by the press throughout the 
United States. 

This will be referred to the Resolutions Committee. 



I 5O SONS 01? Tlllv AMERICAN MyVQkUTION . 

The Chairman: Compatriots, it is now 4.17. We have yet before us 
three proposed amendments to the Constitution and such new business 
as may be brought before us, the reports of the Committee on Official 
Reports and Recommendations and the report of the Committee on 
Resolutions, the invitations to the next Congress, and the election of 
officers. What is the pleasure of the Congress? 

Mr. Parker: Mr. President General, 1 move that this Congress, out 
of courtesy now to the host and hostess, take a recess until tomorrow 
morning at 9.30. 

Motion, was seconded and carried. 

Adjourned. 



TUESDAY MORNING'S SESSION, HELD IN THE CENTER 
CHURCH HOUSE, MAY 18, 1920, AT 10 O'CLOCK. 

President General Jknks in the chair. 

The Chairman: Compatriots, I will ask Dr. Lyman Whitney Allen, 
President of the New Jersey Society, to invoke the Divine blessing. 

Dr. Au,KN : Our Heavenly Father, we thank Thee that Thou hast 
kept us since last we met. Thou hast brought us together again this 
bright and beautiful morning to serve our country, to serve Thee, to 
be more than ever a blessing to the world. We can do nothing without 
Thee. By Thy Spirit's guidance we can do all tilings; and now we 
ask thai the Spirit of the living God, the God who has presided over 
the councils of this nation, who has guided our fathers and ourselves 
in devious ways, for the glory of righteousness, we pray that God by 
llis Spirit ma)' bless us today and may we have the wisdom that comes 
from above. May everything that is stilish and unholy and not in 
accord with the Divine will be put away. May we think this morning 
and throughout this day not of self, but of others, May we fling oiir 
thoughts and our words and our" emotions into the great trend of Thy 
purpose, so that when this Congress is over we shall all go away feeling 
that we have served God, that we have been honest and faithful in this 
high calling, and wilt Thou bless not only this Congress, but all these 
Societies and these States that are represented in this great organiza- 
tion, meaning more than it has ever meant before and having such 
wonderful opportunities for carrying out the highest ideals of life ami 
history. We humbly ask the forgiveness of all our transgressions, and 
we would honor and glorify Thee, our God, in the name of Jesus Christ, 
the Captain of our Salvation. Amen. 

The Chairman: We will proceed with the business of the Congress 
at the point it was interrupted by the adjournment. 1 will call for Un- 
report of the Committee on Americanization and Aliens by the lion. 
Ilarvey F. Remington, of the Empire Slate Society. (Applause.) 

Judge Ri'MiNCTox : Mr. President General and Compatriots, T must 
apologize for part of this report. 1 had sent it on to Rochester a 



J'KOClvKlMW.S OF JIAKTl'OUl) l/()NCKl\SS. 157 

week or ten days ago for copying, and through Mr. Burleson's neglect 
or the neglect of some one I haven't received it hack and I have had 
to prepare the report largely from memory. 
The report is as follows : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AMERICANIZATION AND 

ALIENS. 

To the Animal Congress of the National Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution: 

Your Committee upon Americanization and Aliens, reporting through 
their chairman, hegs leave to present the following report: 

This committee, as a committee, conducts its work mainly through 
co-operation with other agencies in the various States. In the early 
part of April the chairman sent out to the various members of the com- 
mittee an inquiry as to the specific Americanization work done by or 
activities carried on by similar organizations, with the request as to 
recommendations on activities or work of this character which local 
or Slate organizations should undertake and their opinion as to the 
practicability or desirability of federating the various Americanization 
agencies so as to prevent a duplication of effort. 

Practically all of the members of this committee have been engaged 
during the past year in some form of Americanization work-. The term 
is a broad one, hut, generally speaking, pertains to activities tending to 
the betterment, the uplift, and the helping of the foreign-born to find 
their place in our civic life. 

Mr. \V. Lincoln Adams, of the New Jersey Society, reports that the 
work' carried on in New Jersey, and particularly referring to his own, 
the Alontelair Chapter, consists of having a delegation present at the 
courthouse when aliens are naturalized and impressing upon them the 
privileges and responsibilities of American citizenship. It also includes 
the distribution of patriotic pamphlets on the same subject among the 
foreign-born. Before the war that Chapter conducted a headquarters in 
the Italian section, where instruction was given in patriotic subjects and 
Americanism. This work- was supported by the voluntary contributions 
of that Society. Mr. Adams believes that it is highly desirable to con- 
federate with any Americanization agencies doing similar patriotic 
service-. 

Mr. J. 11. Weston, of Dogtown, Miss., reports that their Society has 
operated in conjunction with the Daughters of the American Revolution 
of New Orleans; that several of their members addressed public meet- 
ings and also spoke in public and other schools composed largely of 
foreign nationalities, lie recommends that State Societies take active 
interest in local and State politics — in local politics to see, as far as they 
can, that none but loyal Americans are elected to public office, and in 
State legislatures to see that laws are passed protecting all .American 
institutions and to counteract all Bolshevistic and 1. W. \Y. agitation. 
lie does not favor federation with other American organizations ex- 
cepting the Daughters of the American Revolution and thinks that the 
Daughters of the American Revolution and Sons of the American 
Revolution are large enough and powerful enough to make their in- 
fluence felt wherever they are united. 

Mr. Frank 15. Hale, of North Dakota Society, reports that on his 
own responsibility he mailed from his office six thousand copies of The 
American's Creed to the public school teachers of the State of North 
Dakota. Mis Society is endeavoring to put large illuminated copies of 
the creed in the courts of the State and on the walls of the school- 



158 



SONS ()!•' Till 1 ) AMKK1CAN l<KV<)I,UTl()N 



houses. Copies of the creed were used in the public schools on what 
is called Children's Home Day, a day set apart in North Dakota by the 
Government and the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the 
offering of the public school children for the work of the North Dakota 
Children's Home Society. Ue states that the Scottish Rite Masons are 
carrying on educational work in the night schools of the cities and towns 
and are co-operating with the Sons of the American Revolution in 
financing the movement for the spread of the creed. Mr. Hale does 
not see how it is practicable to federate the different societies. He 
thinks there are many of the secret societies that would be glad to enter 
into this work on their own responsibility, but would not care to 
federate. 

Mr. Samuel Judd Holmes, of Washington, reports that the work of 
preparing aliens for citizenship is carried on with the co-operation of 
the State government. Many schools teach English, some confining the 
Work to preparing the alien for naturalization. About seventy schools 
throughout the State are doing special work for foreigners. He reports 
that the Y. M. C. A. seems to he most active in this work in Seattle. 
He enclosed several clippings showing that much interest was being 
taken in this subject in Washington'. Mr. Holmes does not see that it 
is practicable to federate these organizations at the present time, lie 
thinks that our State Societies should continue on in the work of 
pressing the teaching of English, and that our form of government 
should he taught to the alien; that talks to these English classes by 
representative nun should be arranged. 

Mr. Prank B. Steele, of the Buffalo Chapter, reports that this organi- 
zation is co-operating with the public schools in Buffalo, and that Buffalo 
has an unusually line system of free night schools, and that the work of 
teaching foreigners to speak, read, and write the English language is 
there carried on in the most, practicable and comprehensive manner. 
The dramatic method is used a great deal and is very successful. He 
reports that the Buffalo Community Chorus, which has held "sings" in 
all parts of the city, has brought many of the Polish, Italian, and other 
nationalities together on a common ground of fellowship, lie states 
that at no time has this work been needed more than now. 

Dr. Samuel D. Barnes, of Bos Angeles, reports that the work in Bos 
Angeles is carried on largely by the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Thomas Stephen Brown, Esq., of Pittsburgh, reports activities carried 
on in co-operation with the Chamber of Commerce and the Board of 
Education. The State Society and local chapter in Philadelphia and 
Pittsburgh were responsible for large meetings in connection with the 
observance of Constitution Day. 

The Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh is very active and ener- 
getic on the subject of Americanization of aliens, and the Sons of the 
American Revolution is closely affiliated with the work of that com- 
mittee. At the suggestion and under the impulse of a committee of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, the Board of Education of that city 
maintains a special course of night classes for the education of for- 
eigners, and a special feature of that course is instruction in the 
essentials and elements of citizenship. The Federal court recognizes 
the work of this committee and these schools ami strongly influences, 
althouglvit cannot be said to absolutely require, persons who are in- 
tending to apply for their second papers of naturalization to attend 
these courses. Every year, on Washington's Birthday, as in Rochester 
and some other cities, graduation exercises are held, in which the aliens 
who are applying for naturalization and have completed the course of 
instruction in these schools are formally graduated and given certifi- 
cates from the public-school authorities. This year there were over 130 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS; 1 59 

graduates receiving certificates. Mr. Brown strongly favors co-ordina- 
tion, if riot federation, of the different agencies working along Ameri- 
canization lines. 

Mr. Alfred Coit, of New London, reports for Connecticut that in his 
opinion federating of Americanization agencies should be done by all 
means, this plan being carried out in New London with happy results. 
They have a paid director, Mr. John C. Ellis, a machinist, a strong 
lahor-union man, and a natural-horn leader, I quote from a recent 
resume by Mr. L C His of his work: 

"The activities of Americanization in this city, have, I think, resulted 
in much good. 1 was appointed director of Americanization ahout 
November 1, 1010, and since then have been actively engaged in the 
work. 

"The program outlined was as follows: Letters were sent to various 
bodies and a central committee appointed. At the first meeting ward 
committees were selected and a Survey made of the city. Shops were 
visited and their co-operation solicited, with the result that the attend- 
ance of the aliens at the public evening schools was largely increased 
and our records show that in six weeks these men were able to speak 
English and understand the rudiments of writing. If any of them 
remained away from school for a week their employer was communi- 
cated with, which resulted in a very regular attendance, which averaged 
65 per cent of enrollment. As to the number that took out their first 
papers, I have no way of ascertaining, because of the fact that the clerk 
of courts resided in Xorwieh and a great many letters to him were 
written by the aliens personally. Of course, the frightful weather of 
I'Ybruary interfered with the attendance, and .later the scarcity of work 
reduced the alien attendance. 

'In the shop visits made by me and talk's to the employees vocational 
education was strongly advocated, which added to the list of night- 
school pupils. The Y. M. C. A. and the State Hoard of Education 
both gave instruction in" this line of education with great success. 

"Illustrated lectures were given by the writer on the formation of 
our country from the colonial settlements to the inauguration of 
Washington to exemplify what true Americanization is. The success 
of these talks c.vcccdi'd my expectations, and I would recommend a like 
Course in any community. 

"I am of the opinion that the activities of the Americanization Com- 
mittee, which was made up of all classes of people, including local 
labor leaders, has resulted in keeping out agitators, for up to the 
present time we have h.id no trouble in our industrial life, with no evi- 
dence of any in sight. I have often stated in my shop talks that 'if we 
do not obey our laws, how can we expect the alien to do it? If we 
have the greatest country on earth and want all aliens to become citizens, 
we must set the example by our own conduct. 

"An international exhibition was given on May 7, 8, and 0, at which 
time all kinds of handicraft work were shown, with an entertainment 
appropriate to the occasion. This brought the different nationalities 
together and will help to allay the feeling which, to some extent, still 
exists between the' people of the contending countries, 

"Americanization is not alone intended for the foreigners, but also 
for ourselves. We must try to break down the wave of personal self- 
ishness "that is sweeping over our country and try to bring back the 
spirit of helpfulness that existed during colonial days. Co-operation 
made the United States what it is, and if it is not again made a vital 
force in this country it will mean disaster to all of us." 

Mr. Coit also writes that during the war a committee of twenty-four 
was formed to prevent profiteering in rents, lie goes on to say: 



i6o 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



"Probably the best tiling about the committee was the fact that only 
two of us were lawyers. This same John C. Ellis was chairman. Hun- 
dreds of landlords and tenants came before us, usually without any at- 
torney, and in half the cases they agreed as to the amount of rent at 
the end of the hearing. 

"Where we decided that less rent should be charged, that was done. 
Really we went back to the time of the patriarchs, when causes were 
decided outside the city gate. Justice was done speedily and freely." 

Seattle, Detroit, Buffalo, Toledo, Syracuse, Rochester, Albany, and scores 
of other communities are keenly alive to the Americanization problem. 
Many of those cities are making large appropriations for the work, 
notably Detroit and Syracuse. A feature of the work has been the 
formation of inter-racial councils, where the different nationalities have 
representation in community committees dealing with problems con- 
cerning the foreign-born. In many cities homeland exhibitions have 
been held. Probably the most notable one was held in Rochester, April 
lO-tQ, 1920, the object being, as announced by a committee of citizens 
oi foreign and native birth co-operating with the Rochester Chamber of 
Commerce and the Regents of the University of the State of New York : 
"First, to open the eyes of our citizens of American birth to the great 
value to us and America of our citizens of foreign birth and descent, by 
giving us an adequate conception of the culture and life of their home- 
lands and the contribution which these people have made to the country 
of their adoption ; second, to make clear to our citizens of foreign birth 
that their contributions and those of their homelands to the prosperity 
and happiness of this country are most highly appreciated by all 
citizens." 

The attendance at the exhibition was estimated at from 10,000 to 
15,000 per night (for ten nights). Entertainment features by eleven 
different racial groups were given — a different program each night. 
About five hundred people, all foreign-born or descended, took part in 
these entertainments. The entertainments consisted of chorus singing, 
instrumental music, tableaux, and dancing. Exhibits were shown from 
seventeen nationalities. During the afternoons programs of folk danc- 
ing and singing were given by the children of the foreign-born from 
all the public and parochial schools. All pupils of the public schools, 
from the fifth grade up, were taken to the exhibition; 41,600 children 
in all attended. The expense of the undertaking, amounting to $15,000, 
was underwritten by industrial and mercantile firms of Rochester. With 
the exception of the large tapestries, all of the exhibits were from 
Rochester. Practically all participants in entertainments were residents 
of Rochester. 

Tt was a great pleasure to mingle with the crowds that thronged this 
exhibition, and the results for good which will flow from this and 
similar efforts cannot be estimated. Rochester, as a result, is to fed- 
erate its Americanization activities and provide a ivni] of about $15,000 
per annum as a start, having a central bureau — a clearing-house for all 
Americanization activities. 

The Department of the Interior has a bureau which is devoted to the 
fostering of Americanization work. It monthly publishes "Americani- 
zation," which can be secured by all agencies interested. 

While in some localities a federation of organizations engaged in 
this^jnost important work may not seem desirable, yet your committee 
respectfully submits that so far as practicable this be done, and that if 
efforts are zealously made by representative local committees appro- 
priations can be secured in many localities from the local administration 
for organizing and advancing the work. Where this is not possible, 
philanthropic citizens and industrial and mercantile firms will freely 
respond to appeals for furthering practicable work. 



PROCEEDINGS 01-" IIARTl'OKD COXCRlvSS. 1 6 1 

You have already heard from reports made to this Congress, of the 
fine work accomplished through the efforts of members of our organi- 
zation in Colorado, Massachusetts, and elsewhere. 

A most important hill affecting Americanization work is now pending 
before Governor Smith, of New York, and likely to receive his ap- 
proval. The legislatures of other States and local boards are keenly 
alive to the importance of this constructive and important work. 

The stranger who is within our gates is entitled to consideration from 
thoughtful and patriotic citizens. No organization should respond more 
quickly than this and kindred patriotic organizations. We must differ- 
entiate between the handful, comparatively speaking, of anarchists and 
Bolshevists and the great army of foreign-born who are intensely 
loyal and quick to condemn any who dishonor our institutions and our 
flag. 

It is probable that no single organization has so many and so large 
a proportion of its members engaged in this wonderful uplifting and 
patriotic work as ours. Let us not be content until just as many of us 
are doing this work as are real patriots. Nothing will more quickly- 
make a patriot than activity in this absorbingly important work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Harvey F. Remington. 

The Chairman: This report will go to the Committee on Reports. 

This, I believe, completes the report of officers and committees. I 
will ask the Secretary General if he has any communications to present 
to the Congress. 

Secretary General LarnER: Telegrams have been received as follows: 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah, May 16, io-'o. 

I l«»n. CH ANCIyU.OR I ,. JivNKS, 

1' resident General, Sous of the // uiericun Revolution, 
Thirty-first Annual Congress, 1 1 art ford , Conn.: 

The Utah Society conveys its hearty greeting to the Congress. We 
stand with you in all our loyalty and energy and will derive fresh in- 
spiration and vigor from your work". Our godspeed to you all. 

R. G. Gray, 

President. 

I). S. Sl'KNCK.K, 

Notional Trustee. 
Syracuse, N. Y., May 17, iojo. 

CtIANCK,1.I,Ok U. Jknks, 

Hartford, Conn.: 

Regret official dulies here prevent my being at the Congress, to which 
I extend my well wishes. 

NKwi'Xi, 15. Woodwoktii. 

Piiii.AnKi.i'iiiA, ITnna., May 17, 1920. 

National Convention, Sons of the American Revolution, Hartford, 
Conn.: 

Congratulations and best wishes from Hoard of Managers, Phila- 
delphia Chapter. 

Fred II. AIacIntiri:. 



I 62 



SONS Ot' Til 1C AMERICAN KlvVObU'l TON 



The Chairman: 1 1 us any one. anything to offer under the head of 
New Business ? 

Mr. Doyus (President of the Ohio State Society): 1 wish to state 
that at a meeting of the Ohio Society last winter a communication 
was received from the Kentucky Society in reference to certain seditions 
propaganda that was industriously -circulated all over the country, and 
the suggestion there was made that the matter be brought before the 
National Congress. As a result, we have prepared this brief resolution, 
which 1 will read, and 1 suppose it will be referred immediately to the 
Committee on Resolutions : 

Believing that the preaching of sedition in its various forms must be 
firmly suppressed if our present constitutional government is to endure; 
and 

Believing further that the primary cause of most of the social unrest 
has been the lack of adequate control of immigration, be it 

Resolved, That the National Society, Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, urge upon its representatives in Congress the necessity of provid- 
ing such additional legislation as will put upon the immigrant the burden 
of proof to show that lie will he a reasonably desirable addition to 
America, and to further provide means by which he may be promptly 
deported should his subsequent conduct indicate that he is undesirable. 

Resolved, further, That the National Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, the Daughters of the American Revolution, Daughters of 
the Confederacy, and the National Federation of Women's Clubs, and 
all other patriotic bodies, through their various State organizations, be 
asked to co-operate in this movement by passing suitable resolutions 
and writing to their representatives in Congress, to the end that sound 
laws ma}' be passed for the control of immigration. 

The Chairman: This will go to the Committee on Resolutions. Any- 
thing further? 

Mr. NNttinc, (President of the Massachusetts Slate Society): As 
you all Know, the great event of next year is to be the commemoration 
of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Lauding of the Pilgrims. 
It offers a great opportunity to this Society to be identified with the 
permanent work that is to go on at Plymouth. The National Govern- 
ment is to expend upwards of $300,000 there and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts is to expend a like sum of $300,000 or more raxing 
buildings, which have grown up around the location of the old Rock- 
like barnacles on the bottom of a ship, and the scenery is to be restored 
there. Houses that have been there for centuries are to be demolished, 
and roads that now run over the graves of the .original settlers of 
Plymouth are to be removed and the graveyards restored. A magnifi- 
cent work is to be done there, a work of permanence and of value, and 
the privilege of this Society of becoming identified in some way and 
placing itself on record as backing up that movement is a real one and 
a valuable one, and accordingly, Mr. President and Compatriots, I 
wish to offer the following motion: 

I move that the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolu v 
tion appoint a committee, to be known as the Pilgrim Tercentenary Com- * 



PJIOCI&gBfNttS <)l : II AUTl-'OKI) (X)N.GKlvSS. 163 

mittee, to investigate into and determine the advisability, as its share 
in the permanent enrichment of Plymouth, Massachusetts, in honor of 
the ,300th anniversary of the Landing of the Pilgrims, of erecting in 
Plymouth either a bronze bas-relief or a bronze tablet of, or in honor 
of, General James Warren, bearing a concise statement of his achieve- 
ments and the words "Erected by the National Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution," the intention being to have the memorial 
which may be decided upon by this committee made and erected under 
the direction of this committee during the year 1920, if possible, or, if 
not then, as early as may be in tqji, in which year the actual celebration 
will take place. The said committee is hereby given full power in the 
matter, including the selection of the design and the location and also 
the making and electing of the proposed memorial to General James 
Warren at Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

The Chairman : This also will go to the Chairman of the Committee 
on Resolutions. 

REPORT OK COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 

Mr. Pkakdsi.iCv (Chairman of the Resolutions Committee): May I 
get rid of these before Mr. Humphrey speaks? Mr. President General, 
we have before us a preamble, with accompanying resolution, which 
emanated from the Maryland Society. We approve of the preamble 
and we recommend the adoption of the accompanying resolution. 

The motion was seconded and adopted. 

We next wish to report that we have from the Massachusetts Society 
a petition which they voted to present to the Congress, with accompany- 
ing resolution. We approve the petition and we recommend the adop- 
tion of the accompanying motion. 

The motion was seconded and adopted. 

We have a resolution, which came to us very late and we hardly had 
time to consider it, relative to the increasing of salaries of teachers of 
the public schools. We approve of it and we ask that the matter be 
referred to the Congress, and that they take action upon it. 

The adoption of the resolution was moved by Mr. Ely, duly seconded 
and carried. 

The resolution, as submitted by Compatriot Walter C. Morris, of the 
Empire State Society, is as follows: 

WhKkKas education is the foundation and salvation of our institu- 
tions ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we, the Sons of the American Revolution, in National 
Congress assembled, give our hearty support and co-operation to the 
teachers of the public schools in their endeavors to obtain sufficient 
compensation to attract the best brains of the country to this noble 
profession, as we realize that the public school system of this country 
has done and is doing more for pure Americanism than any other 
factor. 

Mr. Stkki.k, of the Empire State Society: Along that line— I didn't 
know the gentleman was to present that resolution— but T happen to be 
Secretary of the Committee on the Tercentenary Celebration at Buffalo 



](')4 SONS 01? TIM; AMIvlilA'AN KlCVOMJTK) N . 

and there is a committee in New York now who are carrying out some 
such project as that this year. We have with us today Mr. A. B. 
Humphrey, who is Secretary of that National Committee, and I ask 
the indulgence of the Society for about five minutes, so that he can 
tell what they are doing along that line. 1 ask your indulgence for a 
few minutes to grant Mr. Humphrey the privilege of the floor, and J 
so move. 

Motion (July seconded and carried. 

Mr. Humphrey: Mr. President General and Compatriots, the Mo- 
hammedan turns to Mecca and the Jew to Jerusalem, so those of us 
who come from the old New England stock naturally look to New Eng- 
land. I am back at the home of my ancestors. The first Humphrey 
settled in the Connecticut Valley nearly 300 years ago. Six genera- 
tions are buried within sight of the capital tower. I am here today 
with a double pleasure. It is worth coming 1,000 miles to look into the 
faces of the men who helped to make the Government of the United 
States. I am proud of this occasion, proud of my ancestry, proud of 
my country, and as 1 look into your earnest faces I feel that it is an 
inspiration and a hope, particularly for those of us who live in New 
York and have that great immigration problem before us day by day. 

I represent the great institution which is the successor to the Cele- 
bration Committee organized ten years ago to celebrate 100 years of 
peace between the United States and Great Britain. The war inter- 
fered with that celebration, as you know, and we then incorporated 
the Sulgrave Institution — named Sulgrave because Sulgrave Manor, in 
England, is the old home of Washington, and in the arch or gable of 
the old Sulgrave Manor is the Washington coat of arms, from which 
Betsy Ross got the idea of the Stars and Stripes. The old stone is 
there today, and the women of England during the war raised $60,000 
and bought the old Sulgrove Manor House and presented it to the 
American people as a token of good will. That's something that we all 
appreciate. 

This Sulgrave Institution Committee began a few weeks ago to 
organize for the celebration of the three hundredth anniversary of 
American Institutions, and 1 want to second and commend the motion 
of the gentleman from Massachusetts with reference to the steps taken 
there. 

We have called together about seventy organizations to participate in 
this Three Hundredth Anniversary, including your Order and the 
Daughters of the American Revolution and 68 others. That includes a 
membership of about T5,ooo,(XX). We are beginning on the 2d,. 3d, and 
4th of June in the schools, which are the foundation and bulwalk of 
our institutions, and Commissioner Kiulev, of the State of New York, 
has issued a printed Bulletin for the use of the teachers in rdl the 
schools of the United States. Commissioner Claxtou, at Washington, 
helped to distribute those; so that 697,000 teachers on the 2d, y], and 



PROCEEDINGS ()L> JJAKTl-OKU CONGKKSS. 1 6$ 

4th of June will begin the inslruetion of the history of this celebration, 
beginning- with the children. 

1 heard in Buffalo the other day when I was there of a little Italian, 
a harefooted newsboy, who stopped suddenly on the street when he saw 
a foreigner of a big nation using an old ragged Hag, a United States 
flag, for cleaning the window, lie rushed up to him, grabbed his arm, 
and pulled it down and said, ''You can't do it — my Hag — me no 'low." 
(Applause.) He ran to the nearest corner and took a policeman and 
forced that great big, stalwart fellow to go to court and made him 
salute and apologize for disgracing the American Hag. (Applause.) 
That's the spirit, and you dear fellows who are full of this are every 
one of you ministers of the Gospel along this line. 

Our institution intends not only to have the celebration in Massa- 
chusetts, but we are going down to Norfolk and carry some good old 
Pilgrim doctrines down to Jamestown, and we will bring back some of 
the old Cavalier spirit, and we will all try to be Americans as we were 
in the last war. We are together and we are all fighting the same thing. 

We are invited to send a delegation to England, and we are going to 
be received in England, the Sons of the American Revolution and the 
Daughters, and they are going to escort us over the route the Pilgrims 
took and take us over to Holland. In Holland we will be the guests 
of the Netherlands Government — no matter whether there are ioo or 
200, we are invited to be their guests, and if necessary, and we can't get 
transportation any other way, an official boat of the Holland Govern- 
ment wilj see thai we get bade to New York along the same route that 
the Pilgrims took and be landed in Plymouth Harbor. (Applause.) 
Now, that is the proper spirit that the Sons of the American Revolution 
and the good old American stock have got to get into, not only the 
State game and the New England game and the Southern game and the 
Western game, but the International game. Civilization is now at stake, 
and we of the old stock who have helped to bring the Government into 
existence must see to it, gentlemen, that as long as we live we will do 
our part, and we will leave to the youngsters the same idea that my 
ancestors fired me with, and I am here today out of respect for their 
memory and love and veneration for what they handed down to me 
and mine, and so long as I live T will give what I can to help perpetuate 
it, and 1 know you will do it, every one of you, to a man and a woman. 
T thank you. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Is Compatriot North, of California, here? 

A MUMBER: He has gone home, Mr. President General. 

Mr. BiCARDSU'V (Chairman of the Resolutions Committee) : Mr. Presi- 
dent General, the Committee on Resolutions wishes to submit two ad- 
ditional reports. The first is on the resolution of former President 
Doyle, of the Ohio Society. The Committee on Resolutions highly en- 
dorses it, although it is supplemental to one we recommended before, 
and our regret' is that the Congress hasn't time to hear some of the very 



1 66 sons' of rin-; America^ revolution. 

able men that are with us to express their sentiments upon this reso- 
lution. We move its adoption. 

The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

The Committee on Resolutions wishes to report on the resolution of 
President Nutting, of the Massachusetts Society. They heartily approve 
it and hope that it might result in the committee being able to procure 
for us an adequate participation in the Tercentenary Anniversary, and 
that we may leave the impress of our Society afterward upon it. We 
move its adoption. 

The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

The Chairman': I have just received a communication in the form 
of a resolution, which has been adopted by the California Society. It 
has just' come to the desk' and I would like to refer it to the Resolutions 
Committee. 

INVITATIONS FOR XKXT CONGRESS. 

Mr. Netting: Mr. President, 1 do not know whether I am at the 
correct point in the procedure or not, but 1 wish to take advantage of 
this opportunity to. extend, on behalf of the Massachusetts Society, 
Sons of the American Revolution, again the invitation which I trust 
every one here has already thoroughly understood, that the old lias- 
State Society expects and wishes to have the honor of entertaining the 
National Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution in iq_>i. 1 
would like to say a word or two in regard to the time of holding it. 
Of course, ] understand that the petition of the Arkansas Society in 
regard to changing the date will come before the Congress later on; 
hut, as I understand, the matter is already in shape, so that, as 
was done in Portland, the date can he set at any time that may he 
desired to hold it. We would like to call your attention to the fact 
that the improvements which are to he made, being in the nature of 
permanent improvements, will probably not he in shape satisfactory for 
inspection by the delegates to the Congress before the middle, or per- 
haps a little after the middle, of the summer of iQ2f ; and in extending 
this invitation for the Congress of [921 to he held at Boston, we would 
also like to ask that whatever arrangements may be made it be under- 
stood that the Congress shall be held, perhaps, in the latter part of 
August, or at least as late as it can be held, so that everything may 
be in the best possible condition, and that the delegates may carry 
away an impression of old Plymouth as nearly as possible as it was 
when our ancestors landed there and made the settlement. 1 think 
there is to he, in addition to the permanent improvements, a pageant 
which is going to he taken by the films and will afterwards be exhibited 
rdl over the country. That is something which is going to he an educa- 
tional work of the highest value, and, as 1 understand, will go all over 
the country, and for that reason we are very anxious that the Congress . 
shall not he held until such time as all these arrangements are in per- 



PROCEEDINGS OL< UAkTl'Okl) CONGRESS. 1 67 

feet condition, so that you delegates in going away may carry the best 
and the truest possible impression of the plaee and see everything that 
is to be provided at that time in honor of that celebration. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: 1 would like to invite Vice-President General Thomas 
\V. Williams to the chair to receive the invitations to the next Congress. 

Vice-President General Williams assumed the chair amid applause. 

The Chairman: It is a great honor, Mr. President. 

Mr. STi'Ki.K, of Buffalo: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, in iQOcS the 
Congress met in Buffalo under rather unfavorable circumstances, it 
was then held on the 30th of April, and those gentlemen that were 
there at that time will remember the wonderful snow-storm we greeted 
you with. I think that was really the reason we changed the date until 
the middle of May. And now Buffalo is in its glory, as is Hartford. 
Last year, in Detroit, when no one seemed to care to have the Congress 
for 1920, although it had been intimated that our good friends from 
Boston wanted it at that time, Buffalo stepped into the breach and 
offered to take care of the Congress in 1020. For reasons that seemed 
good to the Executive Committee, we were passed on at that time, and 
Hartford is now giving this delightful entertainment we are having 
at the present time. Buffalo is ready again in 192 1 and wants the 
Congress to come to Buffalo. You that were there in 1908 remember, 
in spite of the snow-storm, that you had rather a warm time in our 
greeting, and there are a few gentlemen today whom 1 meet occasionally 
and hear them say that Buffalo gave one of the most delightful cele- 
brations we ever had. Of course, Buffalo is an attractive city. We 
have there probably, as many of you know, next to the largest Chapter 
in the United States of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and 
Mrs. John Millar Morton told me before I left that the greeting of 
that great Chapter would be for you when you came and their hospi- 
tality would be extended to you. Then we have in Buffalo or near 
Ruffalo — we call it part of Buffalo— the wonderful Niagara Falls. I 
don't doubt at all that there are some gentlemen in this audience 
and possibly some of their families who have never been to Niagara 
Falls, and it would be a great attraction for you to come to Niagara 
Falls, ft might be well to give you a little of our history. We have 
some history out there, although we are the beginning of the Middle 
West. The word Niagara is On-ge-ce-ra, meaning rushing waters — 
and the rushing waters are there. We will see that they are turned 
on properly when you get there, so that you will see them going over 
in all their glory. 

Besides that, T have with me here greetings first from the City of 
Buffalo to the officers and delegates: 

City o-p Buwai,o, Mayor's Opitci?, April 29, 1920. 
To the Officers and Delegates of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
in Session at Hartford. 
C.KNTi.rvMKN ; Because a visit to this city will give you an opportunity 
of learning what we have accomplished, materially and socially, it is a 



[68 SONS OV Til K, AM tfiUCAN INVOLUTION. 

great pleasure to me, as Mayor of the city, to extend to your organiza- 
tion a most cordial invitation to hold your next convention in Buffalo. 

I am confident that you will find our hotel accommodations, trans- 
portation facilities, and the opportunities for entertainment wholly 
satisfactory, and that you will never have any occasion to regret the 
acceptance of this invitation. 

Personally, I will be glad to assist in any way I can to make your 
Buffalo meeting a notable success. 

Very truly yours, GEORGE S. Buck, 

Mayor. 

I also have a very cordial invitation from our Chamber of Com- 
merce : 

BUI-1'AL.O ClIAMlilvR Oi' CoMMl'KCIv, 

Oi'L'icii ol- Tin-; Pkksilh'NT, April jo, 1920. 
To the Officers and Delcyates of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
in Session ut Hartford. 

GentuCmun : Wishing everybody to have a better understanding and 
appreciation of Buffalo, both as a manufacturing and commercial city 
and as a delightful place in which to live, it is a pleasure to me, as 
President of the Chamber of Commerce, to invite your organization to 
come to Buffalo for its next convention. This Chamber of Commerce, 
with nearly 3,500 members, includes in its membership all of the im- 
portant manufacturing, business, and professional interests of the city. 

You will find unexcelled accommodations in our hotels, with splendid 
meals and excellent service. This city is easily and conveniently reached 
from any section of the country and also is accessible in the summer 
time by steamship lines plying the Great Lakes and affording a pleasant 
diversion from railroad travel. Improved highways radiate in all direc- 
tions and with smoothly paved asphalt streets afford splendid facilities 
for auto tourists. 

Niagara Falls, a demonstration of the forces of Nature unsurpassed 
in all the world and marvelous in its scenic beauty, is only a short dis- 
tance from this city and is easily accessible by train, trolley, or auto- 
mobile. No matter what your particular interests may be, you will find 
something here of value to entertain you. 

Assuring you that we will be delighted to have you accept this invi- 
tation and the hospitality of Buffalo, including the free use of any 
accommodations you may require for your meetings, I am 
Very truly yours, 

BuL'i'Ai.o Chamber 01? Commerce. 
Edward S. Koons, President. 

Now, we are here to get that convention next year. We don't ask 
you at all to change the date. We think the weather in Buffalo will be 
all right at that time. We want you to come. We want you there. 
We will open our hearts to you and our homes, and T can say that 1 
have the united support of the Kmpirc State Society back of me in 
asking you to come to Buffalo, and we will do the best we can to give 
you a good time. The waters of the Niagara — On-ge-ee-ra — the spirit 
of the waters, is waiting for you to come there. Come to us and we 
will see that" you have a splendid lime. (Applause.) 

The CHAIRMAN: Mr. Steele, we thank you for this very cordial in- 
vitation. It will take the usual course and be referred to the Board 
of Trustees for action. 



PROCKKhlNGS OF HAKTI'OKI) CON c'.KI- SS. 1 (hj 

Mr. Wicirr (New Jersey) : I have a resolution to offer, Mr. Chairman, 
and if it be the pleasure of the Congress J was going to ask that the 
resolution be acted upon, by the Congress itself at this time, simply 
to expedite the matter, without reference to the Committee on Resolu- 
tions; but I notice that the committee is reporting very promptly, so if 
action can Lie had without delay 1 would not object to its going before 
that committee. In order that there may be the greatest freedom in 
voting, as is the right of every American and in accordance with the 
principles of this Society especially, T offer this resolution, that in voting 
for the officers of the general .Society the voting shall be by individual 
ballot only, and J wish to say that, so far as New Jersey is concerned, 
New Jersey stands heartily and unanimously in favor of always voting 
by the individual ballot when the voting is to be by ballot. Now we 
do not think that this will interfere in any way at all with any State 
Society or organization which may have agreed to vote as a unit, be- 
cause we take it for granted that certainly in most instances, if the 
Societies have agreed to vote by unit, it is because they have all agreed 
on how they will vote; but it may be, and T believe it is, the case, that 
with some of our State Societies there are those who have differences 
of opinion. We believe they should be allowed to express their opinion— 
that is, they should vote as they care to vote, as they feel they ought to 
vote — and therefore New Jersey asks that this resolution be adopted. 

A MEMBER: T second that resolution and ask that it be passed by 
unanimous consent without reference to the committee. The motion 
was unanimously adopted, amid applause. 

The Chairman: Are there any further invitations for the next Con- 
gress? We will be very glad to receive such at this time if there are 
any. (No response.) 

President General Jenks resumed the chair. 

The Chairman: Is there any further report from the Committee on 
Resolutions? 

Mr. Rkakmsi.KV (Chairman of ihe Resolutions Committee) : Mr. Presi- 
dent General, we have before us a resolution which originated with 
the California Society. I wish that the Secretary General might read it. 

Secretary General Lamer then read the resolution, which is as fol- 
lows : 

San Francisco, Caete., May 5, 1920. 

At the meeting of the Board of Managers of the California Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, May 3, 1920, the following 
resolutions were adopted unanimously : 

"Whereas grave clangers appear to threaten the Republic at this time, 
from within our own midst, arising out of the avowed purpose of 
organized Communists, Socialists. F. W. W.'s, Red Radicals, .and others., 
to the number, as we are advised by tin- Department of Justice, of more 
than two millions of persons, to destroy this Government; and 

''WHEREAS these traitorous persons have announced that they intend, 
by continual agitation among .all classes of people, and particularly the 
laboring classes, to foment discontent and unrest and to supplant the 
institutions founded by our forefathers, and nourished by the sacrifices 



170 SONS OF TMM AMERICAN RKVO-I^UTION. 

and the hlood of millions of patriotic Americans, with a Soviet Govern- 
ment modeled after that proclaimed by Nicolai Lenine in Russia; and 

"VViiKkKAS, in addition to the destruction of the Government, they 
propose to supplant the Stars and Stripes with the red flag of revolu- 
tion, rapine, and murder; to destroy the Constitution; to abolish law 
and the law courts; to tear down our churches and to nationalize our 
women ; and 

'AV 11 Km: as the Department of Justice at Washington has appealed to 
all loyal Americans to aid it in its efforts to awaken the Nation to the 
peril that lies today at our door; therefore be it 

"Resolved, That the California Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution pledges itself to aid, by all means in its power, in dissem- 
miuating' among the people of this land a knowledge of the existence of 
this threatened attack upon the institutions and the liberties of our 
country, and to awaken in them a true sense of the necessity of pre- 
paring to combat and crush it to the earth ; and be it further 

"Resolved, That the Secretary of this Society be, and he is hereby, 
instructed to communicate with the National Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution, and the other State Societies and request them to 
take similar action in the premises. Be it further 

"Resolved, That we believe that the present propaganda directed 
against the courts and judiciary of the United States, and having for 
its purpose the changing of the method of selecting judges of the United 
States courts, so that they shall become elective, and hence subject 
to all the evils of a judiciary involved in personal political activities, 
constitutes a menace to our form of government, tending to destroy 
the balance of power established by the Constitution of the United 
States. Be it still further 

"Resolved, That the Secretary of this Society be, and he is hereby, 
instructed to communicate with the National Society and the other 
State Soeicties of the Sons of the American Revolution rind, request 
them to take appropriate action looking Inward the prevention of such 
proposed changes." 

A Mi;m ih;k : 1 move the adoption of that resolution. 

The motion was duly seconded and adopted. 

The CHAIRMAN: Is there any other business under the head of New 
Business? 

Mr. W ATKINS (Massachusetts): ] wish to offer a vote of thanks to 
the Connecticut Society for their hospitality to tin's Congress. T also wish 
to take the opportunity of showing Massachusetts-' appreciation of that 
hospitality by returning to Connecticut this sera]) of paper. A scrap 
of paper doesn't mean much on some occasions, but this does. These 
are two muster rolls of a company of Connecticut militia that have 
been in Massachusetts for 1^0 years. We think they ought to come 
back to Connecticut and we wish the President General to return them 
to the Connecticut Society. (Applause.) My motion is for a vote of 
thanks to the Connecticut Society for their hospitality. 

The motion was duly seconded. 

'flu- CHAIRMAN: Gentlemen, you have heard the motion. All in favor 
of that motion sigmfy by rising. (Unanimous response and Applause.) 
The vote of thanks is unanimously adopted. 

The Chairman: Compatriot Vice-President General Burgess, I will 
ask you to receive the report of the Committee on Official Reports. 



fe 



I»R0ClCKl3ltfGS ol' llAKTfnkl) CONGkKSS. I/I 

Vice-President General Burgess assumed the chair. 

The Chairman: Is the committee ready to report? 

Mr. W AKKKii'Xn : Compatriots, as chairman of the Committee on 
Official Reports, I beg to report that we have gone over the reports of 
the various officials and of the various reports that are made by the 
Secretary General, Treasurer General, etc., and find them in proper 
form, and ask that they lie received and filed. 1 so move. (Applause.) 
.. The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

President General Jenks resumed the chair. 

The Chairman: Is there anything further under the head of New 
Business ? 

Mr. P\rk.f,k: [ won't take much time, gentlemen, hut on behalf of the 
Banquet Committee 1 wish to announce that this banquet starts at 7 p. m., 
and 7 p. m. means 7 p. m. The delegates and ladies are requested to 
be in their places at 7 o'clock sharp. It is not infrequently the case at 
banquets that 7 o'clock means 7.15 or 7*30, but in this case we ask you 
to be in your places at 7 o'clock- sharp and you will aid the Banquet 
Committee very much. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: The Secretary General has a matter to communicate. 

Secretary General LarnKr: Compatriots, there has been some question 
and difficulty in the matter of presenting the War Service Medals. 
There have been a great many instances where individual members of 
Our organization have communicated with the Secretary General and 
requested that medals be sent them, which was impossible, owing to 
the rule adopted by the Kxtcutivc Committee. We have had two re- 
quests for medals to be bestowed here at this session by the President 
General. One comes from the Indiana State Society, which asks that 
a medal be conferred Upon Compatriot Lieutenant Rudolf F. I\. 
Wiedemann, of the Indiana Society. I have sent to Washington for 
some of the medals and we have one for him. 1 also have a request 
that a medal be conferred on Rev. Jesse Penny Martin, who was 
captain and chaplain in the 1571I1 Infantry in iTancc. 

The Chairman: What is the pleasure of the Congress with reference 
to these applications? 

It was moved and seconded that here and now the War Service Medal 
be conferred upon the two Compatriots mentioned. Motion carried. 

The Chairman: 1 will ask the Compatriots to come forward. 

Captain Martin went to the platform amid applause. 

The Chairman : Is Compatriot Wiedemann, of the Indiana Society, 
here? We cannot decorate him in his absence. (No response.) 

Mr. Watkins: Mr. President General, can't the medal be conferred 
this evening, at the banquet? 

The Chairman: The motion is that it be conferred here and now. 

The Chairman at this time bestowed the War Service Medal upon 
Capt. Jesse P. Martin. Members arise and applaud. 

The Chairman: Compatriot Jesse Penny Martin, I like to think of 
the splendid position which the younger sons of the American Pevolu- 



72 



SONS 01- TIM; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



tion who took part in this late war occupy upon the stage of history. 
In a certain high sense they clasp hands with their patriotic forefathers 
in a unity of purpose, of valor, of achievement. Their forefathers 
fought to establish liberty, and they fought an equally winning war 
that that liberty so established might continue, that civilization might 
not recede into barbarism, that chivalry might not disappear from 
among the springs of human action. Nay, Compatriots, more than 
that — they fought, Dr. Martin, that the blessed vision of the Christ 
might not fade from the tired eyes of men. These younger Sons of the 
American Revolution, whom we so proudly call our Compatriots, stand 
shoulder to shoulder with the heroes of the Revolution. They wipe out 
the intervening years and, standing with them, they shed an inex- 
tinguishable luster upon the splendid history of the dominant American 
ideal. (Applause.) 

Dr. Martin: Mr. President General, Compatriots, and Ladies, 1 am 
sure you know 1 am grateful for the courtesy of the morning, and for 
the great honor which was mine in having a part in the little disturbance, 
which grew to be rather a large family affair, on the other side of the 
water; and yet all the time that T was over there, standing as we often 
did under the shadow of the tomb of that great Frenchman who came 
to our aid a number of years ago, when we needed help pretty badly, 
it was a great pleasure, indeed, to feel that the hand that he held out in 
distress and his willingness to help found an answer in the cries and 
the help of the men of America as they, too, could go marching past 
and pay their silent tribute at his tomb and say to him, "We have 
come to discharge our obligation to you and to our beloved France." 

It was a great pleasure, indeed ; but T have also this thought, and it 
ran continuously through my musings on the other side of the water: 
it was this: 'That, after all, the great things for which our forefathers 
gave their lives and pledged their sacred honor and often imperiled 
their personal safety was not in the fact that they were doing these 
things to gather them up and hold them for themselves or to hold them 
for us; for under the leadership of God, may I say, America has a 
peculiarly predestined place for world leadership. 

1 do not know whether it occurs to you, upon first thought or hasty 
thought, that after all America is the product of the finest wheat after 
the winnowings and the fires of persecution in Europe. They came 
over here not simply as an curl in itself, to get away from that kind of 
thing, but as the best seed to be sown for the. finest harvest, which was 
to go out into all parts of the world, so that we, whether it be by 
material bread or by splendid men and measures, should feed the 
teeming millions of the world ; and so it is our privilege, and that was 
our thought. That was the fine, great mission of America, and we 
love to think of her as the knight-errant of the 20th century; and so we 
hope that nothing will be done — it certainly will not be done by this 
glorious Institution, of which we are so proud and to which we give 
ourselves so fully and heartily — to undo what has been done. As she 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 173 

sweeps forward into a cycle of belter years, that hers shall be a record 
as clear as the sun, as fair as the moon, and in her conquests of sin, 
unrighteousness, and lawlessness, as gloriously terrible as an army 
witli banners. Thank you very much. (Applause.) 

Mr. Andrews: Compatriots, some of you will remember me as being 
in Rochester and presenting to you there The American's Creed. That 
American's Creed has gone all over the United States, Alaska, and the 
Panama Canal Zone. It has been spread very largely, as we see in 
the reports, by the work of the Sons of the American Revolution. But 
today I have brought a message from another body of Americans, The 
Constitutional League of America. There have been a number of subtle 
ami insidious attacks upon the Constitution of the United States, in- 
augurated by men of considerable ability, and these attacks have been 
spread abroad in a way that we haven't noticed particularly. Not long 
ago, or back in December, there was a gathering of men, the most 
prominent men of this eountry, and they decided it an important and 
good thing to get out what may be called a People's Edition of the 
Constitution, to be distributed by the millions of copies. A copy in 
every American home is the aim of the organization. I will give you 
some of the names of those who are on the National Committee: 
Franklin K. Lane, Major General Leonard Wood, Theodore Roosevelt, 
Morgan J. O'Brien, James Cardinal Gibbons, Guy Emerson, William 
II. Edwards, Charles E. Hughes, A. Mitchell Palmer, Alfred Smith, 
Herbert C. Pell, Jr., Bishop Charles S. Burch, Jeremiah W. Jenks, 
William B, Marsh, Genera] John J. Pershing, Herbert C. Hoover, 
Franklin 0. Roosevelt, William Phillips, Rev, Joseph Silverman, Joseph 
Hartigan, and Manny Strauss. 

Now, those gentlemen nief together with the idea of getting out a 
popular edition of the Cousiitiition, in which the comments on the 
Constitution would be based on only the most \ital parts that affect the 
life of the every-day citizen, the comments to be used only on the basis 
of the comments and teaching used by practical people in getting a 
message of self-government to tin- enlisted men in the armies and the 
average citizen and workman. 

Now, the purpose of this League, or rather what it is— the Constitu- 
tional League is a voluntary association of citizens who believe in the 
Government of the United States. Its platform: If the people of 
America read and understand the Constitution of the United States, 
there will be no question of any other form of government for America. 
What it proposes to do is to put a copy of the Constitution into every 
one of the 20,000,000 homes in America; explain the Constitution by 
the spoken word in every public forum; translate the Constitution into 
other langu.ages \ explain the Constitution by means of motion-picture 
slides and films in the [6,200 motion-picture houses of America. 

Now, the distribution: The National Committee has funds on hand 
for the distribution of thousands and thousands of these little pamphlets 
or booklets on the Constitution. This book is not for sale anywhere. 



1 74 



SONS 01' TJIIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



The committee is going to make an appeal to chambers of commerce 

and to patriotic organizations everywhere for further distribution in 
the various communities, in the various States and various cities of the 
country. I won't take any more of your time. That is simply the 
message, and 1 have been authorized to bring here to tin's body a 
hundred or more copies of this booklet, which may be obtained by 
members who wish them. I wish T could have been able to bring more, 
but any one who will write to the Constitutional League, at J 22 West 
49th Street, may get a copy of this pamphlet, even if the)- can't gel it 
here. Thank- you. ( 'Applause.) 

The Chairman: We arc very glad to receive the message from Com- 
patriot Andrews. Are there any further resolutions of any kind? 
lias the Compatriot from Indiana, who is to receive the Service Medal, 
returned to the room? (No response.) lie has been constructively 
decorated. ( I .aughter.) 

Under the head of New Business certain amendments to the Con- 
stitution have been proposed. I will hear any resolutions or motions 
under that head. 

Mr. IIakrv R. Wiu.iams (Connecticut): In the Buu.K'ri.N of this 
Association, this Xatioual Society, of March, 1920, our honored Presi- 
dent General, among other things, in a message to this Society and t<> 
the Compatriots, said: "In nearly every part of the country there is 
activity and growth, and an earnest desire to perform efficient patriotic 
service is everywhere evident. I earnestly ask the consideration of all 
Societies and Chapters to the following suggestions." 1 will not read 
them rill, but among other words he said that we are not divided ; we 
are all one body; and what our Order needs is nationalization. He 
said: "This is*what T wish to emphasize. .Societies and Chapters should 
get into closer touch with the National Society. There should be more 
correspondence between the State and Chapter officers and the National 
officers. The latter invite the active co-operation of the membership 
everywhere in promoting the best interests of the organization as a 
whole and of the different groups." 

T stand here as the representative of more than 1,100 members of the 
National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. This Con- 
necticut Chapter which i represent, at a legally called meeting, on 
February 2,1, 1920, unanimously adopted a proposal to amend the 
Constitution of this organization. That amendment, as [ say, was 
passed at a full meeting, and, according to the Constitution of this 
organization, that adoption and proposal was transmitted to the Secre- 
tary General. The Secretary General, according to directions, has 
passed it out to every Society more than 60 days prior to this annual 
Congress. That being so, all of the legal matters have been strictly 
attended to, and, as T say, Connecticut is united in this. What f have 
to say on this amendment will he exceedingly brief. Tt does not take 
from the President of this organization one single prerogative. It does 
not encroach upon his rights in any way. The article proposed to he ' 



PROCKKDINGS C)1' A IlAU'lTORD CONGRESS. i 75 

amended is Section IV of Article V of the Constitution of this organi- 
zation. Section IV, Article V, is that "an Executive Committee of 
seven, consisting of the President General as Chairman and six mem- 
bers, to be nominated by him and approved by the Board of Trustees, 
shall in the interim between the meetings of the Board transact such 
business as may be delegated to it by a Congress of the Society or the 
Board of Trustees. The members of the Executive Committee other 
than the President General shall be known as Directors General, and 
by virtue of their office shall be members of the National Congress and 
entitled to vote at the annual meeting of the National Congress during 
their terms of office." 

The Connecticut Society proposes as an amendment to that the fol- 
lowing: At the end of Section IV, Article V, add:- "Each State or 
District Society shall file with the. Secretary General, on or before the 
Opening of the National Congress each year, the names of two of its 
members who reside within the State or district of such Society, and 
the President General shall select his nominees to the Executive Com- 
mittee, known as Directors General, from the names so filed, and not 
more than one member from a Society shall be nominated for such 
office by the President General." 

This, as I said, does not encroach in any way upon the prerogative 
of the President. Il is simply in the nature of a recommendation. It 
doesn't even asl< the I 'resident to appoint, but it does say to the Presi- 
dent General, "If you are going to appoint a man from our Society, ap- 
point a man that is recommended by the Society." Now, gentlemen, 
there is only one thing, as far as I can understand, whereby any one 
should be tempted to oppose that motion. Any opposition to that 
motion, it seems to me, must come froni somebody who is afraid they 
can'! be endorsed by (heir own State Society, and we don't wan! in the 
Directors General anybody who is not endorsed by their own Society. 
(Applause.) I move the passage of this amendment to the Constitu- 
tion. 

The Chairman: It has been moved that the proposed amendment 
to the Constitution be adopted. What is the further pleasure of this 
meeting? 

The motion was duly seconded. 

The Chairman: The motion has been seconded and is before the 
house for discussion. 

Mr. PowKr.T, (Massachusetts) : While it may be that some of the State 
Societies have differences that make it necessary to put some restriction 
upon those nominated for Directors General, it would seem to me that 
the success of the National Society in the past has been so great and 
the working has been so even that it would be rather foolish at this 
time to make any change in the Constitution. I therefore move, Mr. 
President, that ihe motion be laid on the table. 

Mr. TI. P. Wiij.iams (Connecticut) : I rise to a point, of order. The 
gentlemen is out of order. Thai is our constitutional right. If we 



1/6 SONS Of? Tlllv AMKK1CAN K !• VOJ.UT ION . 

even put it on the table, that can be raised again before the session is 
over. Let ns have a vote on it. The Constitution says we have done 
what we wanted to, what we were required to do, and therefore we 
can have a vote on it today. 

Mr. WivNTWoKTii : 1 would like to ask the gentleman from Massa- 
chusetts to withdraw the motion to lay the motion on the table. 1 
think', sir, that it is a very good idea to talk this over. 

Mr. PowEkt : Mr. President, 1 desire to withdraw my motion, if 
agreeable to everybody. 

The Chairman : Does the seconder of the motion consent to its 
withdrawal 

The seconder consents. 

The Chairman: The motion is withdrawn and the question before 
the house is the adoption of the resolution. (Cries of, "Question.") 
Is there any speaking to the adoption of the proposed amendment? 

Mr. WENTWOKTH : Mr. President General, L would like to ask the 
gentleman who proposed this constitutional amendment if it was 
primarily conceived and is intended as a reflection upon our sitting 
President General, upon Past President General Ames, upon every 
President General of the National .Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution who have had the unquestioned right, and exercised it, to 
select their cabinet? (Applause;) 

Mr.' H, R. \Vu.i,iAMS (Connecticut): Absolutely no. It is not a re- 
flection on any President General of this Society. Every Past President 
General of this Society had a right to do as they have done. Jt is no 
reflection of any kind or an}' nature, and I ask if there is to be any 
discussion that personalities be left out of it. We will get to the merits 
of it. Is there anything objectionable in having the State Society 
nominate or suggest to the President who would be appreciable? 

(Cries of, "Question.") 

The CHAIRMAN: The question is called for. Does any one desire 
further to discuss this motion? 

Mr. WiCNTWORTH : The thought occurs to my mind, Mr. President 
General, that there is a question of doubt in the minds of some of the 
Compatriots present in this Congress that at some far-distant date, T 
know not when, there may be men gathered in a National Congress of 
the Sons of the American Revolution who may select as its official 
head a man in whom they have little confidence. 1 don't speak from 
any personal feeling in this matter. T have run my race. 1 did as every 
other President General of the National Society has done in the years 
1 have been a Trustee and the years I have been on the Executive 
Committee. I did what every other President General, so far as T know, 
has done — 1 selected my Executive Committee with a careful considera- 
tion, based upon the personal knowledge which I possessed of the mem- 
bers who were interested in the work of the National Society, the men 
best fitted, in my judgment, to carry on the great work of the Society 
and representative of its broad activities. It has been the policy of V 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. }JJ 

Presidents General to reappoint men who have been particularly valu- 
able, with constant infusion of new blood. 

1 believe that the continuity of the work of this Society requires not 
only that, but that the hands of the President General be left free in 
all appointments. 1 have not been approached by any man. I never 
was approached. There never was a question, so far as any conference 
or any meeting of any portion of this Society or the whole Society, 
but "What is for the best interest of the National Society ?" H the 
Executive Committee could consist of one member from each State, it 
might be a grand thing to have it so; but you would have such an 
unwieldy body, separated so widely, that you could not bring them 
together. 

You all know how impossible it is to bring together a full meeting of 
the Hoard of Trustees of the National Society. This means the same 
number of men. It doesn't change the numerical representation. It 
simply, it seems to me, carries a reflection upon the character or the 
capacity and handicaps the liberty and the freedom of action of any man 
whom you select for President General. (Applause.) And I will say to 
you, sir, not knowing who will be President General next year, or the 
year after, or any of the succeeding years, that I do not believe that there 
will ever be a man selected by the National Congress of the Sons of the 
American Revolution as its President General that you cannot trust 
implicitly. ( Applause.) 

The Chairman: 1 am going to ask your indulgence to suspend this 
matter for a moment. The Secretary General has called my attention 
to the fact that the final report of the Credentials Committee has not 
yet been presented. It will be presented now with your permission, 

The report is printed earlier in these proceedings. 

The Chairman: If there is no objection, the report will be received 
and filed. Is there any further discussion on -the motion before the 
house? All in favor of the adoption of the proposed amendment will 
signify by saying ''Aye." (Responses.) Contrary by saying "No." 
(Majority response.) The "Noes" seem to have it. Its adoption re- 
quires a two-thirds vote. In the absence of any question, the Chair 
declares that the motion to adopt the proposed amendment to the 
Constitution is lost. Are there any further amendments to be pre- 
sented? 

Secretary General LARNlyR: The amendments to Section I, Article V, 
of the Constitution, proposed by the P.mpire State Society, are as fol- 
lows : 

The following amendment to Section i, Article 5, of the Constitution 
has been proposed by the Kmpirc State Society, the same having been 
offered by Past President General Louis Annin Ames, at a meeting of 
that Society held at the City Hall. New York City, on Flag Day. June 
14, tojo, the offer being seconded by Past President General Marble, 
and carried unanimously by the Society, as follows: 

To insert, following the words "Historian General," the words 
"Genealogist General, Chancellor General," and in the National By- 



i 7 8 



SONS 01- TJIIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Laws change the number of Article r; to Article II, and to insert after 
Article 8, Article 0, "Genealogist General," and that reads: 

"The Genealogist General shall examine and report to the National 
Executive Committee upon all appeals from the decision or want 'of 
action of the Registrar General, which shall be submitted to him for 
that purpose, within thirty days after submission to him, and shall at 
the same time advise the Registrar General of the National' Society, 
from whom he received such appeals, of the result of his examination." 

Akticuv X — Clninccllur General. 

The Chancellor General shall be a lawyer duly admitted to the bar, 
and it shall be his duty to give legal opinions on matters affecting the 
Society when called upon by the proper officers. 

The Chairman: These provide for two new officers — a Chancellor 
General and a Genealogist General. 

It was moved and seconded that the proposed amendments to the 
Constitution be adopted. 

The Chairman; Is there any speaking to the motion? (Cries of, 
"Question.") The question is called for. All in favor of the adoption 
of the proposed amendments to the Constitution will signify it by say- 
ing '''Aye'." ("'Responses.) Opposed, by saying "No." (Responses.) 
Unless a division is requested, the Chair will declare that the proposed 
amendments have received the necessary two-thirds vote. 

Both amendments have been adopted. 

Secretary General Lakni'.k: There is another proposed amendment 
that is not actually offered in the shape of an amendment, but it comes 
from the State of Arkansas. It is put in this shape: 

Amendment to Section r, Article VII, 01? the Constitution oe the 
National Society of the Sons oe the American Revolution. 

Whereas Section r, Article VII, of the Constitution of the National 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution provides for the hold- 
ing of its annual meeting and Congress on the third Monday of May 
of each year ; and 

WHEREAS it is believed that a later date would be preferable, so 
that one might combine the summer vacation with the annual meeting, 
and thus secure a larger attendance for the same; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the Arkansas Society of the Sons of the American 
.Revolution respectfully suggests to the National Society the propriety 
of making a change to a later date of the time of meeting of the 
National Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution, and that 
we request that the Secretary General shall send to the President 
of each Stale Society a sixty days' notice of such proposed alteration, 
prior to the meeting of the next Congress, made at the suggestion of the 
Arkansas Society. 

Adopted at the annual meeting of the Arkansas Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, February 2r, 10,-0 

Thai was considered as a proposed amendment, and 1 sent out the 
60-day notices as required by our Constitution. 

The Chairman: Although somewhat informal, the Chair rules that 
the proposed amendment to the Constitution is properly before this * 
Congress for consideration, [s there any motion? 



PROOCKDINCS 01- HARTFORD CONGRESS. 1 79 

Mr. H. R. Williams (Connecticut) : Mr. Chairman, is that an amend- 
ment to the Constitution? An amendment to a Constitution or a paper 
of any kind must he definite. 

The Chairman: Not necessarily. Under the notice, this Congress 
may make such change in the date. of the congresses as seems expedient. 

Mr. Williams: That is more of a by-law than a constitutional amend- 
ment. 

The Chairman: Well, if it is a by-law it is proper for us to consider 
it. However, the date of our Congress is provided for in our Con- 
stitution. 

Mr. Williams: If it is a hy-lavv it cannot properly he considered as 
an amendment. 

The Chairman: I apprehend that we do not desire to be particularly 
technical about this. It seems to me the matter has heen presented in 
such a way that it may he considered, and if not it is for the Congress to 
determine. 

Mr. Nutting (Massachusetts) : Mr. President General, I would like 
to say that it seems to me that there is some misapprehension in regard 
to the existing condition about this matter. The fact is that at Detroit 
and at one or two other Congresses action was taken to change the date 
to a more suitable or acceptable period. This can be done at any time. 
Personally, it seems to me that to fix another date, instead of the date 
in May, which is now fixed, would he a mistake, as there would he no 
gain, no improvement over the present situation. Therefore it is much 
better to allow it to stand as it is. 

The Chairman : I desire to call the attention of the Compatriot to 
the fact that there is no motion before the house. 

It was moved and seconded that tiie proposed amendment to the Con- 
stitution be laid upon the table. 

Motion carried. 

The Chairman: The invitations for the next Congress, which arc- 
very gratefully received and which have heen very graciously made, go 
to the Board of Trustees for acceptance. If there is no further business 
to he transacted under the head of New Business, we will proceed to 
the election of officers. 

Mr. Randall (Connecticut) : This may have no hearing, this will be 
a matter that is found out later, but Compatriot Nutting suggested that 
the next meeting of the Congress he in Boston, especially on account of 
the meeting and celebration by the Mayflower Soeiety. The waters of 
Niagara will be flowing just the same the year after, at the next meet- 
ing, and as a representative, self-appointed just for a minute, T want 
to say that the Mayflower Society will have their important week 
September Tst, the week of September ist, in Plymouth. That will offer 
the delegates and memhers of this Society many advantages that no 
other year or no other season will do again, if they are interested in 
that. in a eo-operative way, to see the spectacle. I am only suggesting 
it as a memher of the Society. 



i8o 



SONS OF TJlli AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



The Chairman: I call the attention of the Compatriots to the fact 
that the astute lawyers of the Sons of the American Resolution in the 
case of the Portland Congress devised a scheme by which it is possible 
to hold the Congress at any time in the year that is acceptable. The 
precise date of the Congress is subject to be changed at a pro- forma 
meeting on the date fixed in the Constitution, by an adjournment to 
such time as is desired. 

Is there anything further under the head of New Business? (No. 
response.) 

The Chair will receive nominations for the office of President General. 
(No response.) If there are no nominations for the office of President 
General, we will pass to the election of the Vice-Presidents General. 
( Laughter and applause.) 

The Chair recogni/.es Dr. Allen, President of the New Jersey Society. 

Dr. Ai.i.i'N : Mr. President General and Members of the Congress, yon 
have all heard that I represent the State of New Jersey—a little State, 
we know, in size; but what it lack's in size and quantity it makes up in 
quality] as you well know. It was George Elliot who said very beauti- 
fully, "The soul of Greece conquers the bulk of person." Tin; soul 
comes here today, and New Jersey represents soul. Of course, we pass 
by the consideration that New Jersey sent a man to the White I louse. 
( Laughter.) We are on a different errand here today; we want to send 
a man to this platform. 

Now, we who live in Jersey are very proud of our little State. Mr. 
President General, your Sons of the American Revolution were born 
in Jersey. We represent the mother State of patriotism. We do not 
forget Jersey's history — the battle-ground of the American Revolution. 
It was across the State of New Jersey that George Washington made 
that great retreat, with tears in his eyes, his heart breaking with sorrow. 
But God had not forgotten his own, and ere long that same man crossed 
the Delaware on that great Christmas night, under the inspiration of 
(rod and amid the cohorts of heaven, fought the battle of Trenton, 
fought the battle of Princeton, fought the battle of Monmouth, and 
went on to victory. 

I have a sort of a feeling, 'Mr. President General, if I know any- 
thing about wireless telegraphy — but I don't — that somehow or other 
George Washington and those 20,000 men who trailed across the State 
of New Jersey with their sacrifice and their blood are sending down 
messages to yon to send a Jerscyman to this platform. (Applause.) 
The sons of those sires are a good deal like their fathers. They sit 
before you, some of them. There are men from Princeton here, there 
are men from Trenton here, and there are men from Monmouth here, 
and men from the battle-fields of Jersey, and men that have emerged 
out of its great history with the same spirit which won the American 
Revolution and this great war through which we have'jnst passed. 

Now, we have had in the history of New Jersey, connected with the* 
Sons of the American Revolution, one National President, and that was 



I'KOCKKJHNGS OL- HAKTl-'OKl) CONGRESS. l8l 

our beloved friend, Governor Murphy, about whom I\lr. Ames spoke 
so beautifully and so tenderly yesterday. It has been 21 years since 
New Jersey lias had a National President, Mr. President General, in 
those 21 years New Jersey has never asked for a President General. 
She has stood by quietly, and gently, and politely, and seen the proces- 
sion pass — New York with her six Presidents, Connecticut with her 
three Presidents, Massachusetts with her three Presidents, and Alary- 
land with her two Presidents. She comes here today — you will excuse 
me; it is no conceit at all; it has just been read in you hearing' — with 
the largest delegation present in this Congress — 32 delegates. This is 
no stuffed affair; this is no caucus. These men are from Jersey, with 
the spirit of the American Revolution in their hearts, and they have 
come here, politely, patriotically, and with a spirit and love for their 
country, to aslc you gentleman to give New Jersey a President again. 
We have 1,500 members, the third largest membership in the United 
States. We have enrolled in our membership tin's last year nearly 200, 
and it looks to us as if we were entitled to this position if we have got 
a man that we can present. 

Governor Murphy was a large man. Mr. President and Compatriots, 
we have got a large man here today. (Applause.) We are presenting 
no pigmy ; we have brought no man from obscurify or from some little 
village from the far end of the little State of New Jersey, but we have 
brought a man here; we have borne him on our shield, we have carried 
him on our hearts. No man is belter known or better loved in the 
State of New Jersey than John I.enord Merrill. (.Applause.) 

Now, what about Mr. Merrill!-' 1 have known him intimately for a 
good many years. It has been one of the delightful things of my life, 
and the same thing can be said and has just been said by these my 
fellow-Compatriots. A man physically — well, Mr. Wentworth is a little 
bit bigger — but he is strong enough to visit 40 Societies, as you have 
done (turning to the President General), You have had a noble record. 
Mr. Merrill can visit 40 Societies; he's got the physique, lie never 
gets tired; he doesn't need to sleep; he can walk, he can run, he can fly. 
(Laughter.) In the second place, he has a brain. You don't want a 
man that hasn't a brain and a mind. He's a man who thinks and he's 
a man who solves problems. Wasn't he three years — I think' three 
years — on your Executive Council? You don't have men on your 
Executive Council who haven't brains, do you? He was three years on 
the Executive Council; therefore he has brains. (Applause and laugh- 
ter.) We have seen his brains oozing out there in Jersey a good many 
years. lie's been one of the directors, and we couldn't have had this 
banner that he received so beautifully if it hadn't been for the brains 
and patriotism of John Lenord Merrill. (Applause.) 

Mr. President General, there's another thing. You don't want a man 
at the head of this great Society that isn't a Christian man, a man of 
God. (Applause.) John I,cnord Merrill kneels at the feet of Jesus 
Christ. Every Sabbath, I absolutely know, for his pastor is an intimate 



182 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



friend of mine, he is in the house of God worshiping with God's people, 
and as I have known him and others have known him through these 
years, he is a man who lias created a spiritual influence that is felt 
everywhere in the Stale of New Jersey. 

Now, in addition to that, Mr. Merrill has a marvelous equipment. 
He's the organizer and founder of the Washington Guards, and [ will 
just say here publicly, as the President of that State Society, you are- 
going to hear from the Washington Guards. You are going to hear 
from Mr. Merrill's children as a power throughout this country. 

Mr. Merrill is equipped by a very large business acquaintance, lie 
has gradually ascended the stairway of business power and influence 
until now he is at the head of that great institution which we know as 
the American Cables, and it is his hand that reaches out from the 
United States and touches every route of territory and every influence 
of life in that great world of Latin-America. 

And now, Mr. President, Mr. Merrill has the time, and I don't want 
to give away anything, but he's got the money. You cannot be a Presi- 
dent General without time and money. I don't know whether he's a 
multimillionaire, but he's got money enough to visit every State in the 
United States, and he will use it for the Hag. You see how he stood 
and handled the Hag yesterday. 

Then, in conclusion, Mr. President, if Mr. Murphy had a thousand 
bodies you would bear him crying out — and I am going to do it for 
him — "if T had a thousand lives I'd give them all to my- country"; 
and that's Mr. Merrill. He's a bundle of patriotism. We love him, we 
honor him, and we come here and ask you gentlemen to appreciate what 
Jersey has been as your mother, and the fact that she has not had this 
office for so many years, to present to this Congress, and through this 
Congress to the great American nation, a great, good, and noble 
patriot — John I.enord Merrill. (Continued applause.) 

The Chairman: Does this nomination receive a second? 

Or. Williams: Mr. President General and Delegates to the National 
Congress, having obtained the platform in this surreptitious manner, L 
wish to take advantage of your good nature to extend to you an invita- 
tion which was given me last night to pass on to you from the President 
of the Connecticut Society of the Colonial Dames to visit the old Webb 
House, which they have purchased and which they maintain in Wethers- 
field, and where there will be an exposition today and the remainder of 
this week; and making that announcement suggests to me another thing, 
which is out of order, but if the President General will indulge me T 
would like to make a motion. We are very much overwhelmed with 
the kindness that the Daughters of the American Revolution have ex- 
tended to this Congress, and it has been' so spontaneous. I think it 
would be very agreeable to them if this Congress should pass a vote 
requesting the Seerctary General to send a note to the Ruth Wyllis 
Chapter of Hartford, who gave that reception last night at the State 
Library, and also lo send a note to the President of the Colonial Dames 



PROCEEDINGS OJ/ JIARTPokd CONGRESS. 183 

of Connecticut for extending the invitation to visit the Webb House. 
Now, if it is agreeable to you and the President General will indulge 
me, I would like to make that motion. 

The motion was duly seconded and unanimously carried. 

Dr. YVn.UAMS: Mr. ['resident General and Delegates, my chief reason 
in coming to the platform was another one. I wish to second a nomina- 
tion. You all look favorable and friendly, but I suppose there are 
different views here or you wouldn't be descendants of patriots of the 
American Revolution (laughter) ; but they were fair-minded people, 
and I suppose you all have open minds and any speaker here is sure of 
a sympathetic reception, as sympathetic and perhaps even more sympa- 
thetic than the girl up in Maine received who was out sleigh-riding one 
night. Everything was very quiet and serene, but a little dull, and by 
and by she broke the stillness of the winter air by saying, ''I feel so 
sad tonight." Well, then, of course, it was up to him. (Laughter.) 
He said, "Why do you say that?" "Why," she said, "1 feel that nobody 
loves me, and my hands are so cold." "Well," he said, "you shouldn't 
say that, because God loves you, and your mother loves you, and you 
can sit on your hands." (Applause and laughter.) Now, gentlemen, I 
come here not in my individual capacity, but for the State of Con- 
necticut, to second the nomination for the high office of President 
General of this Society — a position of great opportunity for human 
service, a position which needs large men, such as has been described; 
a position, I think, which needs a man who has had experience in the 
work of the National Society and experience in the work of the State 
Society, one who has that work near his heart, who has shown that 
he has it near his heart by his devotion to the work'. 

Yesterday a man was at my house whom 1 met coming from the well 
(laughter) wiping the dew of morning from his lips, lie had evidently 
kissed the Blarney Stone. He said to me, "I would like to vote for you 
for President General." (Applause.) I didn't expect that; that was a 
false move. (Laughter.) I just wanted to say that that one man in 
this body who would like to vote for me .for President General couldn't 
do me a greater favor or a greater kindness than to vote for the man 
who has just been nominated. Much has been said about how Con- 
necticut feels. Connecticut feels very deeply, Connecticut feels very 
sincerely, on this subject, very warmly. I will say, furthermore, that 
any one in this assemblage who would like to vote for Connecticut, 
who would like to do a favor to the Connecticut Society, cannot do a 
greater favor than to vote in this Congress for John Lenord Merrill 
as President General. (Continued applause.) 

Mr. Bryan (Washington, D. C.) : On behalf of a very considerable 
majority of the District of Columbia Society, I rise to second the 
nomination of Mr. Merrill. (Applause.) Whoever you elect today you 
will make no mistake. You have two strong men to select from and 
either one will reflect honor and credit upon this Society, (Applause.) 
Whoever is elected will, 1 predict, have the hearty, loyal, and faithful 



j 84 



SONS OK TNI': AMKKK'AN UK VOLUTION 



support of every organization and every member of this Society. But 
because of the magnificent record of the New Jersey Society, because of 
his long, faithful, and efficient service, 1 second the nomination of John 
Lenord Merrill. (Applause.) 

The Oiajkman: Are there any further seconds or nominations ? 

Mr. Yi'Xi.oTT : Mr. President General and Compatriots, as 1 have been 
sitting here in these surroundings and attending this Congress of this 
great Society, the thought has come to me more than once of the great 
work of service to humanity which this organization is doing and has 
been doing for so many years, and is fitting itself today to do in a 
larger measure than ever before. And that thought expressed itself to 
me in words which no doubt have been uttered from this platform be- 
fore many times — "It is more blessed to give than to receive." 

Having been honored by the Maryland delegation with the task of 
coming here and putting in nomination the favorite son of our State, it 
seemed to me that I would come here and recount to yon the deeds 
of our Maryland ancestors in Revolutionary times. There is a long 
list of them, Compatriots: There is a long list of the men and there 
is a longer list of the great deeds they did for us and our posterity. 
But that is not my thought. We ask absolutely nothing from the Sons 
of the American Revolution. We believe that it is infinitely more 
blessed to give than to receive (applause) ; and, Compatriots, another 
thought came into my mind, expressed also in words from the Holy 
Scriptures, when I wanted to speak of the man whom we are offering 
to the Sons of the American Revolution, and through them to the 
cause of humanity, and when 1 wondered what I should say, whether 
1 should go back and follow the example that has been set and trace 
him from his earliest history and his various works that he has been 
engaged in, this other thought came to me, "By their fruits ye shall 
know them"; and by his fruits I want you, fellow-members of this 
organization, to know the man that Maryland brings here and offers 
to your service. T have known this man many, many years. T. can't 
say that he and 1 were boys together, although when 1 first knew him 
we were both almost boys in our Slate Legislature, some 26 years ago, 
where 1 was a member and he was speaker; and he made a splendid 
Speaker of the I louse, and he made a record of which any man could 
be proud. As a lawyer he made a record of which his family and the 
bar of our State all have reason to be proud. But it is not by those 
fruits that T want you to know him. 

W r e realize, we must realize, Compatriots, that the time has come 
when the Sons of the American Revolution must go forward and do 
greater and larger things, in a greater and larger measure, than ever 
before 1 . We need a man at the head of this Organization who is ac- 
big things, a man who has within him. in the highest 
ability, a man who will take ns, the members of this 
1 mold us into a great, living, moving organization, 
and on, and on, and carry forward the principles of 



customed to do 
sense, executive 
organization, ai 
that will « r o on. 



PROCEEDINGS Oi' ll Aim- OKI) CONGRESS. 1 85 

our organization and the principles of our Republic into the uttermost 
quarters — yea, I was going to say of the United Stales, but of the whole 
world. Now who is this man? What lias he done? 

Many, many of you have known Baltimore. Many of you have been 
in Baltimore in past years. I. went out yesterday on the street-car and 
1 sat next to a gentleman from up in this country who had been clown 
to Baltimore some years ago, and he said that there were some things 
he didn't like about Baltimore. He said the streets were so rough, and 
I inquired a little more, and he talked about cobblestones, etc. Why, 
that was Baltimore, that was Baltimore. Baltimore was the home, 1 
believe, of all the cobblestones on earth. The streets were simply full 
of them; and that was the Baltimore that this man took hold of when 
he was elected Mayor of Baltimore City, some ten years ago— a great 
big, awkward, gawky, country village, that had cobblestones with grass 
growing up between them. There were no sewers, no lights, except 
these old gas lights, which would k<> out if a hard gust of wind came 
along. That was the kind of town that man found. And what did he- 
do? He came out and he struck the first pick in the ground to cover 
old Jones Palls, that ran from the northwest section of our city down 
to the basin, at the southern end of it, and an open sewer that was 
paved over is now a wide viaduct, over a hundred feet wide, a magnifi- 
cent structure. And then the Key Highway opening up our port. Then 
the cobblestones in the streets were taken up, and practically every 
street in our whole city is now smooth. Great electric "White Ways" 
were built through the heart of our city in all directions, and Balti- 
more— the little, awkward, gawky town that it was — is now a city of 
which any man might be proud. (Applause.) 

Now, my friends, 1 have lived there during these years and had 
numerous occasions to have my little controversies with the gentleman 
who did this work. There was no particular reason why [ should give 
him more credit than was his due; lint in the midst of one of the hottest 
controversies that I had with him, when 1 got on my feet I said: "f care 
not about the merits of this controversy, but if you ask me who is the 
man who made Baltimore, T will say it was James Harry Preston." 
(Applause.) We all knew that he was the man. By their fruits ye 
shall know them. Do we want that kind of a man? Are you willing, 
when Maryland brings him to you and offers him to you, are you willing 
to accept that freewill offering that we give? Do you want a man at 
the head of this organization who can and does build up, wlio under- 
stands just what is required in handling large affairs, large principles, 
large masses of men? Do you want to do a favor to Maryland? Do 
you want to do a favor to Connecticut? Do you want to do a favor 
to New Jersey? Do you want to do a favor to my friend, Dr. Wil- 
liams — and I was the man who wanted to elect him yesterday. I would 
elect him; certainly 1 would. Who wouldn't? (Applause and laugh 
ter.) Why, gentlemen, T never warmed up to any man in the whole 
course of my life in a few minutes as I warmed up to Dr. Williams. 



i8G SONS 01' TJIlv AMl'ULCAN REVOLUTION. 

(Laughter.) I knew that his picture would be embedded for years in 
my heart, but 1 had my little camera and I wanted to make sure of it, 
and J. tried to take his picture, so that 1 would have it when 1 went 
home. 1 never knew a more genial, a more generous host than Dr. 
Williams (applause) ; but my friends, Compatriots, are we here to do 
favors to Connecticut, to Dr. Williams, to New Jersey, or to any other 
nominee? Js that the object of this great organization, to do favors to 
them? No. We are here to do the greatest favor within our power to 
the great American people, to those of today, to those of generations 
as yet unborn. Let us not be turned aside, Compatriots, from the plain 
path of duty, from doing the thing that our minds tell us is right, by 
any feeling that we would like to do a favor to men here, there, or 
elsewhere. 

Now, our nominee's work has not been confined alone to building up 
Baltimore City, lie has done a great piece of work through and by the 
aid of this organization. It was some three and one-half years ago 
when he, as Mayor of Baltimore City, heard or read in the papers about 
this move to have an American's Creed, something which would express 
in a relatively few words the fundamental principles of our creed, 
something which could be learned by the most ignorant coming to out" 
shores, something which could be learned by the little children in our 
schools. You all know that American's Creed, of course, and it was 
he who, acting for and on behalf of the City of Baltimore, offered a 
prize of $1,000 to the man who. should prepare the most acceptable and 
satisfactory creed, and it was through our nominee, James Harry 
Preston, that the literary world woke up and became interested in this 
great document, which to my mind stands second only to the Declara- 
tion of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. (Ap- 
plause.) But was he satisfied by merely offering this prize? No. He 
took the most intense interest in it, and after that creed was written 
and the prize awarded to a Maryland man, then he became interested, 
as head of Baltimore City, in having that creed taught in the public 
schools of our city; and just a few days ago 1 attended a patriotic 
celebration where there were a hundred little tots, school children, who 
got up and every one of them were able to repeat that American's Creed 
as they might the Lord's Prayer in Sunday School, and throughout our 
entire Baltimore City there is not a single child who does not know by 
heart that American's Creed. And, not satisfied with that, our nominee 
went forward — and all this work was not done spasmodically, but it 
was done with system and precision — went forward and is now having 
it taught in every public school in the entire Stale of Maryland. That's 
the kind of man that we bring here to serve this organization, and, as 1 
say, through this organization the American people. 

Compatriots, 1 could recount many more things which that man has 
done, but 1 say to you when we offer you a man who has done as much 
as lie has along work of this order, in spreading throughout this land 
that great document, the American's Creed, when we offer you a man 



I'kOCKKJMNGS OI' JIAUTFOKI) CONGRESS." J 8/ 



who lias done what he has done in building up a great city like Balti- 
• more, like ho has built it up, then I say we of Maryland, realizing that 
it is more blessed to give than to receive, have offered you a man 
who is without question, in point of achievement, the greatest man that 
Maryland has known for fifty years and the greatest man in Maryland 
today. (Applause.) 

Judge Remington,, of the Empire State Society: Mr. President 
General and Compatriots, whatever the result of our choice may be 
today, it can be said that that choice will have had the sanction of I loly 
Writ, judging from the remarks that have already been made. (Laugh- 
ter.) We are met at this hour upon the most important work of this 
Congress, the selection of a President General who will carry out the 
traditions of the. past This is a very important time in the history of 
our organization, and it behooves us to select a man who will make the 
most of the opportunities that are before us. We have learned of the 
achievements of the gentlemen whose names have been prsentcd to this 
Congress. T came here with an open mind. I had not decided for 
whom T would cast my vote. I have talked with various delegates. I 
have heard discussions from time to time, and I have come to the con- 
clusion that the one who will best scree the interests of our organization 
is the gentleman whose nomination I wish to second. lie has had 
wide experience as a lawyer, as a legislator, as an executive of the 
great city of Baltimore, and it seems to me that for these reasons we 
ought to make him our choice today. 

There is another very important reason to me. Our .Society has made 
great growth in the North in the past few years. In former years we 
were represented from the Southern States — notably from Kentucky, 
from Tennessee, and some of the other States — by large delegations. 
The Society seems to have reached a rather stagnant state in the 
South, and it seems to me that the time is ripe for recruiting our mem- 
bership in the Southern States, and it seems to me that no man is better 
fitted or more qualified to extend the influence of the organization in 
the South than former Mayor James Ik Preston, of Baltimore. (-Ap- 
plause.) 

I would take nothing from what has been said with reference to 
Mr. Merrill. He is my personal friend and T would be pleased to vote 
for him for President General; but it seems to me that the exigencies 
of this situation demand that we choose Mr. Preston for this position. 
It is therefore, on behalf of the united delegation for the Empire State, 
that I second the nomination of James H. Preston. (Applause.) 

Mr. Nuttinc. : On behalf of the delegation from the Old Bay State, 
T have great pleasure in also seconding the nomination of Mr. Preston, 
of Baltimore. (Applause.) 

Mr. Putnam (Massachusetts) : Mr. President General, T wish to 
second the nomination of Mr. Merrill, of New Jersey. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Having nominated two 'biblical characters, do you 
desire to bring before the Congress any other kind? (Laughter.) 



l'ROCKKDINGS OF JIAUTJ'OKI) CONGKKSS. 1 8/ 



who has done what lie has done in building up a great city like Balti- 
■ more, like he has built it up, then I say we of Maryland, realizing that 
it is more blessed to give than to receive, have offered you a man 
who is without question, in point of achievement, the greatest man that 
Maryland has known for fifty years and the greatest man in Maryland 
today. (.Applause.) 

Judge Remington, of the Empire State Society: Mr. President 
General and Compatriots, whatever the result of our choice may be 
today, it can be said that that choice will have had the sanction of lloly 
Writ, judging from the remarks that have already been made. (Laugh- 
ter.) We are met at this hour upon the most important work of this 
Congress, the selection of a President General who will carry out the 
traditions of the. past. This is a very important time in the history of 
our organization, and it behooves us to select a man who will make the 
most of the opportunities that are before us. We have learned of the 
achievements of the gentlemen whose names have been prsented to this 
Congress. T came here with an open mind, I had not decided for 
whom T would cast my vote. [ have talked with various delegates. I 
have heart] discussions from time to time, and I have come to the con- 
clusion that the one who wall best servo the interests of our organization 
is the gentleman wdiose nomination 1 wish to second, lie has had 
wide experience as a lawyer, as a legislator, as an executive of the 
great city of Baltimore, and it seems to me that for these reasons we 
ought to make him our choice today. 

There is another very important reason to me. Our Society has made 
great growth in the North in the past few years. ]\) former years we 
were represented from the Southern States — notably from Kentucky, 
from Tennessee, and some of the other Stales — by large delegations. 
The Society seems to have reached a rather stagnant state in the 
South, arid it seems to me that the time is ripe for recruiting our mem- 
bership in the Southern States, and it seems to me that no man is better 
fitted or more qualified to extend the influence of the organization in 
the South than former Mayor James IF. Preston, of Baltimore. (.Ap- 
plause. - ) 

T would take nothing from what has been said with reference to 
Mr. Merrill, He is my persona! friend and T would be pleased to vote 
for him for President General; but it seems to me that the exigencies 
of this situation demand that we choose Mr. Preston for this position. 
Tt is therefore, on behalf of the united delegation for the Empire State, 
that T second the nomination of James Pf. Preston. (Applause.) 

Mr. Nuttjnc : On behalf of the delegation from the Old Bay State, 
T have great pleasure in also seconding the nomination of Mr. Preston, 
of Baltimore. (Applause.") 

Mr. Putnam (Massachusetts) : Mr. President General, T wish to 
second the nomination of Mr. Merrill, of New Jersey. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Having nominated two 'biblical characters, do you 
desire to bring before the Congress any other kind? (Laughter.) 



I 88 SONS OK Til I; AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Mr. IIawi.Ky (Iowa) : I represent a large delegation from Iowa. As 
you will notice on your list, we left off the large number Mr. Went- 
worth ; with him we have a large delegation from Iowa. I wish to 
second the nomination of Mr. Preston. (Applause.) 

Mr. WRIGHT; On behalf of the large delegation from Wisconsin, ] 
wish to second the nomination of Mr. Preston. 

Mr. Barbour: Mr. Chairman, I believe this body is to be congratu- 
lated on having two such splendid men offered for their President 
General. As far as I learn, both of them are very desirable, but Michi- 
gan has concluded to cast her vote for James H, Preston, of Maryland. 

The Chairman: Jf there are no further nominations -- 

A'MkmjjKR: I move that the nominations be closed. 
The motion was duly seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: I will appoint the following Compatriots as tellers: 
Frank B. Steele, of the Empire vState Society; C. R. McPherson, of 
New Jersey; Major J lodges, of Louisiana; Mr, Robertson, of Mary- 
land, and Compatriot Qnarles of Missouri. The ballots are on the 
desk, if the tellers will please distribute them. 

The ballots at this time were distributed by the tellers. 

Mr. WENTWORTi-i : ] move you, sir, that in casting the ballots for the 
election of President General the States be called, and that the delegates 
from those States pass in front of the tellers and deposit their ballot. 
(Applause.) Then, in checking the voters, that the names printed of 
the complete roster of the delegates be used. If there is any man here 
whose name has not been listed on this roster, it can be determined by 
the Credentials Committee whether he has the right to vote. 

Captain Martin : I second the motion. 

The motion was carried. 

The Chairman: The Secretary Genera] will call the names of the 
States. The voting will be as follows: General officers, Past Presidents 
General, Directors General, and Delegates. 

The ballots were east at this time. 

The Chairman : Nave you all voted? If so, I declare the polls closed. 

Compatriots, I want to make an announcement. Please notice that 
the United .States ['lag mentioned in the Governor's address of welcome 
will fly from the State Capitol this afternoon. This flag flew over the 
Capitol at Washington at the second inauguration of President Wilson ; 
also at the time war was declared; also at the signing of the armistice, 
and was presented to the State of Connecticut for its record in the 
Liberty Poan campaign, November IT, 1919. (Applause.) 

A short recess was taken at this time. 

The CHAIRMAN: The Congress will be in order and listen to the re- 
port of the tellers. 

Mr. STivEr.K: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Convention, the 
tellers beg to report as follows: The number id votes east were I/O; 
necessary for a choice, 91; of which Dr. George F; Williams received 1, 



l'kOCI'KlHNGS ()1< JIAK'll'OUU CONGRESS. 1 89 

Mr. John Leaord Merrill received 85, and Mr.* James II. Preston, 93. 
(Applause.) 

The Chairman: The Chair recognizes Mr. Merrill. 

Mr. MivKKii.i. : Mr. President Central, I am allowed by my delegation 
to speak for them now and for New Jersey. New Jersey is a good 
winner, but she's a good loser, too. Mr. President General, 1 have the 
honor, on behalf of the New Jersey delegation, of moving you, sir, that 
this election be made unanimous, (Applause and cheers.) 

The motion was seconded and carried unanimously. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares James 11. Preston to be the 
unanimous choice of this Congress. I will appoint Past Presidents 
General Pcardsley, Pugsley, Marble, and Wentworth to escort the 
President; General elect to the platform. 

The President General elect was escorted to the platform by the Past 
Presidents General mentioned, members applauding. 

The Chairman : Compatriot Preston, you have received many honors 
in the past, but none greater than this election, for this is the expression 
of approVal of your life and principles by a body of your fellow- 
citizens who believe in American ideals and whose love of country is 
the common bond which unites them. 1 congratulate you and the 
National Society of the Sons of the .American Revolution. Compatriots, 
your President General. (Applause.) 

President General PeESTON : Past President General elect (laughter), 
Compatriots, it is a very agreeable occasion for me — a little close, but 
healthy. (Laughter.) It is a good thing to light things out in the 
open. 1 hope I'll be a good winner. I know 1 would have been a good 
loser. 1 was waiting across the street to come over and make the 
nomination of Mr. Merrill unanimous, if that had been the fortune of 
war. 

We are a great organization, one running from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific and from Canada to the Gulf, and must necessarily, therefore, 
have a wide and different point of view. We have our ideas, our am- 
bitions, but they all will melt, I believe, into the common good of the 
Society, and that should be the keynote now and of the future. 

We have enjoyed the splendid hospitality of Connecticut and of 
Hartford. We have enjoyed the splendid hospitality of Dr. Williams, 
the President of the Connecticut Society. (Applause.) We have been 
received in the warmest way by your people, your government, your 
public authorities, and by the Connecticut Chapter; so that, personally 
and on behalf of the Society, permit me .again to renew and extend my 
thanks and our thanks. We are deeply appreciative of the splendid 
position of New Jersey in this organization. (Applause.) We are 
deeply appreciative of your splendid President, the good that he does 
the Society and American aims, and we will, I hope-, attempt in every 
way to unify, to develop, to march forward with a united front in the 
ranks of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

There is one section of our country which needs careful attention. 



I(jO SONS OF Till': AMERICAN RfgVOI*UTION. 

The South has been very poor for two generations — rich in tradition, 
rich in accomplishment, but without the very material means which 
have existed in the North and in the East. Books are published in the 
North and in the East, patriotic societies are widely and largely en- 
couraged in the North and the Hast ; but we in the South, up to a 
short time ago, have been busily engaged in living. I believe, however, 
that the field is now ripe for a wide, enthusiastic development of this 
patriotic order and a furthering and widening of the field of the Sons 
of the American Revolution in the South. As far as may be, I shall 
devote my efforts to that end. 

T cannot hope, Compatriots, to rival the activities of the splendid 
Presidents General who preceded me. 1 can only hope to be as useful 
to the Order as the)' have been. 1 ,et us, therefore, march forward 
with a united front against the common enemy— and we have a common 
enemy, just as our ancestors had 140 years ago. We have an enemy to 
repel which aims at American institutions, and American liberties, and 
American freedom, the liberty of the individual and the liberty of prop- 
erty, just as our fathers had r^o years ago. Let us be as true to our 
ideals. Let us be as true to our traditions. Let us advance the banner 
of our splendid Society in the interest of a splendid Americanism. 
(Applause.) 

The Chairman: Compatriots, the clock and certain other indications 
tell us that the time for lunch has arrived. On the floor below there- 
is a hearty repast awaiting us, and. with the permission of the Congress 
we will take a recess until 2 o'clock sharp, and upon the stroke of 2 the 
meeting will again be called to order. 

Adjourned. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON'S SESSION, HELD AT THE CEN- 
TER CHURCH HOUSE, MAY 18, 1920, AT 2 O'CLOCK. 

Ex-President General Jknks in the chair. 

The Chairman: The Congress will be in order. The Chair will re- 
ceive nominations for the office of Vice-President General of the New 
England District. 

Mr. Read (Massachusetts).: Mr. President General and Compatriots, 
T prepared notes on a long and elaborate speech in which T was to 
present a candidate for the office of Vice-President General of the New 
Kngland District, but time hastened and T believe we have yet a good 
deal to do; so I will simply say that T nominate for the office of Vice- 
President General for the New England District the President of the 
Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, Mr. 
George Dale Nulling. 

Mr. 'IVrnkr (Maine) : Maine cordially seconds the nomination of the 
candidate of the mother State, Massachusetts, Compatriot Nutting, as 
a candidate or as Vice-President General of the Society. ' 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONGRESS. 191 

The Chairman: Are there any further nominations? 

Captain Martin riioved that the nominations lie closed. 

It was then moved and seconded that the Secretary General be in- 
structed to cast the ballot of the Congress for President Nutting, of 
the Massachusetts Society, for the office of Vice-President General of 
the New England District. Motion carried. 

Secretary General EarnKk: Mr. President General, 1 take great pleas- 
ure in casting the unanimous ballot of the Society for Mr. George Hale 
Nutting. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares Mr. George Male Nutting unani- 
mously elected Vice-President of the New England District, and I will 
ask' him to come to the platform. 

The Chair will receive nominations for the office of Vice-President 
General of the Middle and Coast District. 

Mr. GeorGK Pomkrov (Ohio): From the great State of Ohio, repre- 
senting this Society as its delegate, I take great pleasure in placing in 
nomination 'J nomas W. Williams, of New Jersey. 

Mr. P.ARi-.oi'k : Mr. President General, having great admiration for 
my friend, Mr. Pomeroy, I take great pleasure in seconding the nomina- 
tion. 

Mr. Pucsi.Kv : It gives me very great pleasure, in behalf of the 
Empire State Society, to second the nomination of Mr. Thomas W. 
Williams, of New Jersey. New Jersey lias shown a magnificent spirit 
in this Convention today, and we are all proud of New Jersey. (Ap- 
plause,) It seems eminently fitting that a member of that splendid 
.Society should be a Vice-President General. 

Mr. WIGHT; As a member of the New Jersey delegation and repre- 
senting the New Jersey delegates, we are particularly pleased that Mr. 
Williams's name has been placed in line for this position. We are 
proud of the record he has made. It is an unusual record, I believe, 
and we heartily second his renomination. 

Mr. WiCNTWOR'rii : T move you, sir, there being no further nomina- 
tions, that the rules be suspended, and the Congress by a rising vote 
express their endorsement of the nomination of Thomas W. Williams 
for Vice-President General. 

The motion was seconded and unanimously carried. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares the election of Thomas W. 
Williams unanimous and asks him to come to the platform. 

Mr. Wn.UAMs: Mr. President General and Compatriots, I feel highly 
honored by the office to which you have elected me, j think, the third 
time. It is more than 1 deserve, and 1 can only say I will endeavor to 
do my duty to the fullest extent. I thank you. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: We will now pass 10 (he nomination of the Vice- 
President General for the Mississippi Valley, West District. 

Mr. SfKEUc: Past year, by some remarkable inspiration, sitting next 
to a young man who has been devoted to this organization by constant 
attendance and work - in the organization, I suddenly rose and nominated 



192 SONS OF THE AM KKICAN 1<I> VOLUTION. 

Linn ]'ainc. lie has more than made good, and I again nominate Linn 
Paine Vice-President for the Mississippi Valley, West District. 

The Chairman : Mr. Linn Paine has been nominated for the Missis- 
sippi Valley, West District. Are there any further nominations. 

The nomination was seconded by Mr. Wentworth. 

It was moved by Captain Martin and duly seconded that the nomina- 
tions be closed, and that the Secretary General cast the ballot of the 
Congress for Compatriot Linn Paine for Vice-President of the Missis- 
sippi Valley, West District. 

Secretary Genera! Larner: Mr. President General, I take great pleas- 
ure in casting the unanimous ballot of the Society for Mr. L.inn Paine 
as Vice-President General of the Mississippi Valley, West District. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares Mr. Linn Paine elected and asks 
him to come forward. 

Next in order will be nominations for Vice-President General for 
the Mississippi Valley, East District. 

Mr. OsbornC (Ohio) : It is an old saying that one good turn deserves 
another. We have a Vice-President in that district who, if anybody 
deserves recognition, certainly does, for the efficient work he has dune 
during his term, and I hereby nominate Col. Moulton Honk, of Dela- 
ware, Ohio, for that position. 

Mr. WRIGHT (President of Wisconsin Society): On behalf of the 
Wisconsin Society, I wish to testify to the interest and to the industry 
shown by the present incumbent of the office of Vice-President of that 
district. 1 do not know how many Societies the gentleman has visited, 
but 1 do know that he favored the Wisconsin Society last September, 
in company with the President General, where he met many of our 
members. I can also testify to the gentleman being somewhat of a 
correspondent, for he has kept me busy answering letters in the interest 
of our beloved Order; and on behalf of the Wisconsin delegation 1 
most heartily second his renomination for the office that he has so' 
ably filled. 

The Chairman! Are there any other nominations? If not, the Chair 
declares the nominations closed. 

It was moved, seconded, and carried, that the Secretary General cast 
the ballot of the Congress for Vice-President General Houk. 

Secretary General Larnkr: Mr. President General, I lake great 
pleasure in casting the unanimous ballot of the Society for Col. Moul- 
ton Houk as Vice-President General of the Mississippi Valley, Last 
District. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares Col. Moulton Houk duly elected 
and asks him to come to the platform. 

The Chair will receive nominations for Vice-President General of 
Ihe Mountain and Pacific District. 

Captain Maktin: It gives me a great deal of pleasure to present the 
name of John K. Hell, Jr., of the Washington State Society. May T 
have the pleasure of adding this remark, that I personally do not know * 



PROCEEDINGS OF HARTFORD CONORlJSS. 1 93 

Mr. BeJL; but often one finds that the sweetest smell comes from the 
rose-bush that you can't see, ami he not only smells good, but he looks 
good. (Laughter.) 

The Chairman: Are there any other nominations? If there are no 
other nominations, the Chair declares the nominations closed. What 
is the pleasure of the Congress? 

It was moved and seconded that the Secretary General cast the ballot 
of the Congress for Mr. John K. Bell, of the Washington Society, for 
Vice-President General of the Mountain and Pacific District. Motion 
carried. 

Captain Martin: Just for information, Mr. President General. Mr. 
Hell is from Spokane, is he not? 

The Chairman: Yes. lie is Vice-President of the Washington State 
Society and has been President of the Spokane Chapter, lie is a young 
man of great push and initiative. 

Secretary General LarnEr: ! take very great pleasure in casting this 
ballot for Mr. John W. Pell, Jr., of Spokane. 

The Chairman: I will state that when the President General visited 
the State of Washington and made the tour of the live Chapters of 
that State, Mr. Bell accompanied me throughout the State. I take pleas- 
ure in declaring Mr. Bell duly elected Vice-President General of the 
Mountain and Pacific District. 

The Chair will receive nominations for the office of Secretary Gen- 
eral. 

Mr. Pry (Washington, I). C.) : As a delegate from the District of 
Columbia Society and long-time friend of the present incumbent, as 
well as of bis father, Noble D. Lamer, it gives be unusual pleasure to 
place in nomination for the office of Secretary General Mr. Philip F. 
Lamer, of the District of Columbia. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: Are there any other nominations? I haven't had the 
pleasure of knowing the father of the Secretary General, but 1 have 
become very well acquainted with him, and he has been of the greatest 
service to the Society during a period when it was difficult to perform 
the arduous duties of Secretary General. 

Captain Martin: Mr. President, 1 move you, sir, that the President 
General be authorized to cast a ballot for the Secretary General elect. 

Seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: It has been moved and seconded that the President 
General, the Secretary General being a modest man. have the privilege 
of casting the ballot of the Congress for Secretary General Larner. I 
hereby cast the ballot and declare the new Secretary General to be the 
old Secretary General. 

Secretary General Larnkk: Compatriots, T have been working under 
such hard pressure that I haven't had a chance to prepare a speech, but 
T certainly appreciate your good wishes and the action that you have 
taken. If T have worked bard the past year, T hope I can do some more 
another year. I will surely make the effort. (Applause.) 



194 



SONS 01" THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



The Chairman: I will ask the Secretary General to read this tele- 
gram that has just been handed me. 

Secretary General Lamer then read the following telegram : 

Spokane, Wash., May 18, 1920. 
Hon. Chanci:i.i,or 1 ( . JENKS, 

President General^ Sons of the American Resolution, Hartford, 

Conn.: 

Greetings and best wishes for success of Thirty-first Annual Congress, 

pledging support of Spokane Chapter in all things for the good of the 

Nation and the Society, particularly Americanization and Big Brother 

movements. 

W. D. VlNCUNT, 

President. 
J. W. Bicu., Jr., 

Secretary. 

'Idie Chairman': Nominations are in order for the office of Registrar 
General. 

Mr. TomKuoy: 1 take great pleasure in placing in nomination the 
present incumhent, Philip h\ Lamer, of the District of Columbia, for 
the office of Registrar General. 

The nomination was seconded by Captain Martin. 

The Chairman: Are there any other nominations? 

Captain Martin.: 1 move that the nominations be closed, and that the 
President General cast the ballot of the Congress for Philip I\ Lanier 
as Registrar General. 

Seconded and carried. 

The Chairman: I do so. lie has been unanimously elected. Do you 
desire to make another address, Mr. Larner? (Laughter.) 

Nominations will he received lor the office of Treasurer General. 

Mr. Marble: Twelve years ago, when the finances of our organization 
were somewhat badly mixed, I had the great pleasure of nominating the 
Treasurer on that occasion. lie has served the organization eleven 
years, and it gives me great pleasure to nominate for re-election my 
friend, John 11. Burroughs, the financial man from New York. (Ap- 
plause.) 

The Chairman: Are there any other nominations? 

It was moved, seconded, and carried that the Secretary General cast 
the ballot of die Congress for Mr. John II. Burroughs for the office 
of Treasurer General. 

Secretary General Larni'.r: I take the greatest kind of pleasure in 
casting this ballot for Mr. John II. Burroughs for the office of Treas- 
urer General. 1 know he is the right man for the place. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares him duly elected and asks him 
to stop to the platform, 

Mr. Bi'RRoucns : Just a word, Compatriots, I consider it a greal 
honor to be renominated. This is the twelfth time you have so honored 
me, and it has been my purpose, as a Labor of love, to work for the ^ 
National Society as its Treasurer General. I was saving to one of my 



PROCEEDINGS 01" HARTFORD CONGRESS. IQ5 

Compatriots today that they haven't increased my bond yet, but if the 
money keeps coming in greater amounts, I presume that it would be a 
wise thing for the Treasurer General to have his bond increased. The 
Society is growing gradually better off financially, also numerically, 
and it gives me a special pleasure each April and May and March to 
receive larger amounts from the various State Societies, which shows a 
healthy growth in many of them, and I want once more to thank the 
different Treasurers of the State Societies who have been so loyal 
during my last year's administration. 

The Chairman: Nominations for the office of Chaplain General are 
in order. 

Mr. BakBOUr: T move you, sir, that the Rev. L,ee S. McCollcster be 
renominated. 

Mr. RiiAD: As a member of the Massachusetts Society, I second that 
nomination with pleasure. 

The Chairman: Rev. Lee S. McCollester, of Tufts College, Massa- 
chusetts, has been nominated. 

It was moved and seconded that the unanimous vote of the Congress 
be cast by the Secretary General for Rev. Lee S. McCollester as Chap- 
lain General. Motion carried. 

Secretary General T,akni<:r: Again I have great pleasure in casting the 
unanimous ballot of the Society for Rev. Rcc S. McCollester as Chap- 
lain General. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares him duly elected. (Applause.) 

Next is the Historian General. 

Mr. l)\'i'i:s: Raving been Historian General for several years, 1 know 
something about the requirements of the position and it is quite desir- 
able thai the man who occupies il one term or two terms should be 
continued, and there is no one who has filled the position with more 
honor to himself and credit to the Society than the present incumbent. 
T therefore nominate Air. George C. Arnold, of the Rhode Island 
Society. 

Mr. Torhkrt : Coming from the South, the Mason and Dixon line, it 
gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of a man from way 
down East. Ours has been an acquaintance that has grown with the 
years at these annual congresses. ] take great pleasure in seconding 
the nomination of Mr. Arnold for the position of Historian General. 

It was moved and seconded that the Secretary cast the ballot of the 
Congress for Mr. George C. Arnold for the office of Historian General. 

The Chairman: Are there any further nominations? If not, 1 declare 
the nominations closed. The motion is that the Secretary General cast 
the ballot of the Congress for the present incumbent of the office of 
Historian General, Compatriot Arnold. He should be a Historian 
General, as f understand he owns and lives upon a tract of land which 
has belonged to the Arnold family for three or four hundred years. 

The motion was carried. 



196 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

Secretary General Larnkr: ] take great pleasure in easting the ballot 
of the Society for Mr. George C. Arnold as Historian General. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares him duly elected. 

The next is the office of Chancellor General. 

Mr. Stkki.K : Mr. Chairman, as a delegate from the State of New 
York, I desire to place in nomination the name of our dearly beloved 
President of the New York State Society, Harvey \V. Remington. 
Harvey Remington is a lawyer. He has been admitted to the bar long 
enough to know something about the legal end of this business. I 
therefore place in nomination for that office Harvey VV. Remington. 

The Chairman: Are there any further nominations? 

It was moved and seconded that the nominations be closed, and that 
the Secretary General cast the ballot of the Society for Judge Reming- 
ton fur the office of Chancellor General. Motion carried. 

Secretary General RarnKr: I have pleasure in casting the ballot of the 
Society for Judge Harvey W. Remington as Chancellor General. 

The Chairman: The Chair declares Judge Harvey W. Remington 
duly elected Chancellor General. 

Nominations are in order for the office of Genealogist General. This 
is for a man with a spade. Do any of you know of a good digger? 
(Laughter.) 

Mr. RivAu: Mr. President General, T nominate for the office of 
Genealogist General Mr. Walter K. Watkins, of Massachusetts, than 
whom no one is better fitted to fill that office. 

The Chairman: Any further nominations? 

It was moved and seconded that the nominations be closed, and that 
the Secretary General cast the unanimous vote of the Society for Mr. 
Watkins for the office, of Genealogist General. Motion carried. 

Secretary General Laknkr: T cast the unanimous vote of the Society 
for Mr. Walter K. Watkins for the office of Genealogist General. 

The Chairman : The Chair declares Compatriot Watkins duly elected 
Genealogist General. 

The next order of business is the election of Trustetes. 

Secretary General Rarnkr: T will state, Mr. President General, that 
I have a list of the Trustees as far as presented. I won't stop to read 
them over to you, but there are 20-odd names there, and under the 
Constitution T am authorized to select the President of each State to fill 
Vacancies. T move the election of the list as prepared. 

It was moved and seconded that the list of Trustees as prepared be 
duly elected. 

Mr. Barbour: Read the list. 

Secretary General Larnkr : The list is not complete. 

The Chairman: The Chair understands that the Trustees to be now 
elected are such as have been nominated by the several Societies, and in 
such States as no nominations have been made, the President of such 
State Society. 

Secretary General T,akni',r: It lias been impossible to 'get all of the V 



PROCKKDINGS OF JIAk'tTOKD CONGRlCSS, 197 

States to name Trustees. I have the list, so far as it could be com- 
pleted, and under the Constitution the Secretary General is authorized 
to name the last-named President to take the place of any vacancy. 

The list, as far as completed, was read by the Secretary General. 

(The complete list of Trustees will be found printed in the fore part 
of this book.) 

Captain Martin: Mr. President General, I should like to ask that the 
name of Hon. Malcolm Lindsey be substituted for Edward V. Dunkee. 
lion. Malcolm Lindsey is the new President, and I know that it is the 
intention that he should be the Trustee. 

Mr. Barbour: Among the list presented by the Secretary is the name 
of A. N. Henry. I want to assure you, gentlemen, that there is nobody 
more disappointed than Mr. Henry at not being able to be here. Some 
three weeks ago he was taken with a very severe case of pneumonia. 
] fe is convalescing at the present time, and as he has in the past gen- 
erally attended your meetings, I took the liberty last evening of sending 
a telegram to him, which I hope will be endorsed by tliis organization, 
because I felt that it would cheer him up and carry him along ami 
restore him to perfect health. Two weeks ago last Sunday it was 
questionable whether he would survive or not, but he is convalescing, 
as T said, and is improving, and this is the telegram I sent him last 
night: 

"The officers and your many friends, members of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, join with me in extending their sympathy, and 
wish you a most speedy recovery." 

Secretary General Lakni;r: J will state that I had a letter from Mr. 
Henry's son a few days ago, telling nie of his father's illness and re- 
gretting that lie could not be present at the meeting of the Executive 
Committee held last week, and at tin- request of the Executive Com- 
mittee 1 sent him a very sympathetic and cordial telegram last Saturday 
night. 

The Chairman: With the consent of the Congress, the record will 
show the telegram sent by the vote of the Congress. 

Mr. Cox-fi: In the little hamlet of Chicago, on the shores of Lake 
Michigan, some years ago it is said that a German name was presented 
as the candidate for alderman. The people didn't know who he was, 
and when they asked about him it was explained that "he hasn't come 
over yet .already." (Laughter.) We can accept this list as it is and 
trust the people who haven't sent in the names to send in the names of 
those who "haven't come over yet already." (Laughter.) 

The Chairman: What is the pleasure of the Congress? 

It was moved and seconded that the Trustees who have been named 
and the Presidents,, in cases where they have not been named, be elected 
as Trustees. Motion carried. 

The Chairman: T am asked by the President General to announce 
a meeting of the Trustees immediately at the close of this Congress, to 



J98 SONS 01' TIIK AMMIUCAN REVOLUTION. 

meet here at the platform. Is there any further business to come 
hefore the Congress? 

Mr. Frank C. OssornB (Ohio) : Mr. President General, 1 have a 
short resolution to offer, and move its adoption by this Congress: 

WhjSrUAS Cn ANC.Ki.UJR L. Jf.nks has served our Society as President 
General with a fidelity unexceled, has given all his time and attention 
to its welfare, has visited forty States in its behalf, lias unceasingly 
worked for its furtherance in the cause of patriotism and Americanism ; 
now he it 

Resolved, That the National Society, Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, in annual Congress assembled, hereby extends to him its apprecia- 
tion of his services, so faithfully performed. 

In deference to the modesty of our President General, I would sug- 
gest that one of the Vice-Presidents General submit the resolution. 

Vice-President General Wiu.iams: This resolution comes from a 
member of the Ohio Society and 1 put it before you. lias it been 
seconded? 

It was duly seconded. 

Mr. P.aiU'.y: Pardon me if I speak a little bit for the West to this 
resolution. 1 fear for the last few years, in the activity of the present, 
we have been rather forgetful of the past. We seem to have been 
napping before the war and to have slumbered during the war. There 
came into our midst, along in the winter, a quiet, genial gentleman, a 
man who spoke before our Commercial Club and before the Sons of the 
American Revolution. He impressed us as a man who had not attained 
to an ambition, but who had accepted a sacred trust, lie aroused in us 
the old New England spirit He pointed us the way and he gave to us 
a. new life, which 1 trust will be as useful to you and to our people 
throughout the country as the West continues to develop; and so, mem- 
bers of the Congress, it is my pleasure for Nebraska, and 1 am sure I 
may say for the great West, to second the adoption of this resolution. 
(Applause.) 

Vice-President General Wiumams: Are there any other remark's upon 
the resolution? If not, we will put it to a vote. 

The motion was unanimously carried. 

The Chairman: Compatriots, T assure you that I am deeply touched 
by this expression of esteem. T want to assure you that whatever 1 
have done for the Society has been a labor of love. The office which \ 
have occupied is one of great honor. 1 esteem it as such and I thank 
you for your expressions of approval. And now, at the close of this 
Congress, 1 resign my responsibilities to my successor, who has been 
so signally honored* I wish him God-speed in his important work. 
( Applause.) 

At this time President General Preston resumed the chair. 

The Chairman : It only remains for us at this closing hour to have 
(he benediction pronounced over us and to adjourn, and I request tin- 



ruocKicuiNcs of iiAK'ri-oKD con'gukss. 199 

Rev. William I.', Pierce, President of Kcnyon College, to deliver the 
benediction. 

A MKmhkr : I would like to move that the thanks of this Congress 
he extended to the press of Hartford for the eourtesics extended in 
report-nig the meetings of the Congress. 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

Rev. W11.UAM F. Pierce: Let us pray. Almighty God, for the bless- 
ings that Thou hast vouchsafed to our forefathers, we give Thee most 
humble and hearty thanks. Upon us, their descendants, assembled in 
this National Congress, we implore Thy divine favor. May we reconse- 
crate ourselves to the maintenance of those great principles which 
they established. May the peace of Cod, which passeth all understand- 
ing, keep our hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of God and 
of His Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 

Whereupon, on motion, the Congress was duly adjourned. 



SOCIAL FUNCTIONS INCIDENT TO THE NATIONAL 
CONGRESS. 

Social functions in connection with the Congress included a recep- 
tion to the delegates and officers of the Congress and their ladies by 
Dr. George C. P. Williams, President of the Connecticut State Society, 
at the Hartford Golf Club, on Monday afternoon, May \j. After a 
most enjoyable and cordial reception by the Compatriots and ladies of 
the State, the visitors on their return called at the residence of Dr. 
Williams, where they were most graciously received by the Doctor and 
Mrs. Williams. In the evening a general reception was extended by 
the Ruth Wyllys Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, of 
Hartford — Miss Florence S. Marcy Crofut, Regent — at the State 
Library. 

On Tuesday, at noon, the officers and delegates of the Congress were 
entertained at luncheon by the Connecticut State Society, while the 
ladies who were guests in attendance at the Congress were entertained 
at luncheon by Mrs. Clarence II. Wickham. In the afternoon the 
officers and delegates and their ladies were given an auto trip to places 
of interest in and about Hartford, in the evening, at the Hartford 
Club, the officers, delegates, and ladies were entertained at a banquet 
presided over by President Williams, of the Connecticut State Society, 
the Governor of the State also being present. 

Addresses were made by retiring President General Jenks, and other 
guests, including Mrs. George Maynard Minor, President Genera], 
Daughters of the American Revolution; Mrs. John Laidlow Puel, State 
Regent, Connecticut .Society, Daughters of the American Revolution; 
Miss Florence S. Marcy Crofut, Regent of Ruth Wyllys Chapter, Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution, and General V. S. MacAlexander. 



200 SO N.S O V T I i K, A iM I'. K I CA N K l\ VU U U TIO N . 

Religious and patriotic services were held in the Scttit h Congrega- 
tional Church, attended by the delegates and ladies, on Sunday evening, 
May 16, the sermon being delivered by the Rev. Warren Seymour 
Archibald, pastor of the church. This church was organized in 1670 
and the present edifice dedicated in 1827. 



MEETINGS OF TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF EXECUTIVE. COMMITTEE, 
HELD MAY 15, 1920, AT BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Society, Sons 
of the American Revolution, was held, on call hy the President General, 
on Saturday, May 15, TQ-O, at the residence of Mr. Lewis B. Curtis, a 
member of the committee, at Bridgeport, Conn. The committee con- 
vened at 2.30 (/clock ]). m. 

Those present were President General Jetties; Mr. Louis Annin Ames, 
of New York; Mr. Elmer M. Wentworth, of Iowa; Mr. George E. 
Pomeroy, of Ohio; Mr. Lewis 1!. Curtis, of Connecticut, and Mr. James 
II. Preston, of Maryland, all member's of the committee. 

Mr. Albert M. Henry, of Michigan, was detained at home hy illness. 

Also present: Vice-Presidents General George F. Burgess, of Con- 
necticut, and Thomas \V. Williams, of New Jersey; also Treasurer 
General John H. Burroughs, of New York. 

Also Past President General Wm. A. Marble, of New York, and 
Morris II Beardsley, of Connecticut. 

On motion, all present not members of the committee were invited' to 
attend the meeting. 

The minutes of the last meeting of the Executive Committee, held 
October 25, ion), at New York City, were approved as printed. 

Remark's were made by President General Jenks on the general state 
of the Society, and especial reference was made to the death of John 
Milton Reifsnider, former Director General. 

The Secretary General reported on the condition of the business of 
his office and the establishment and furnishing of the Society Head- 
quarters in Washington; also, that as a measure of precaution a policy 
of lire insurance for $2,500 had been placed upon the property in the 
rooms. The report and action with reference to fire insurance were 
approved by the committee, with the suggestion that the insurance be 
increased to $5,000. 

The Secretary General was requested to send a telegram to Mr. 
Albert M. Henry (who was absent from the meeting), expressing 
sympathy of the committee for his illness and a hope for speedy re- 
covery.. 

Various statistics connected with the report of the Registrar General, 



M KlvTING OF JvXlvCU'll VI-; COM M I'lTM. 201 

to be presented to the National Congress convening in Hartford on 
May if, were presented and considered by the committee. 

Attention was called by the Registrar General to the occasional re- 
ceipt of applications for membership in which two or more lines of 
eligibility were entered upon the original blank, causing much con- 
fusion and making it quite difficult to record accurately. 

The fact that all records are carefully kept and are of increasing 
value for historical and genealogical reference makes it important that 
each line of applicant's descent should he kept separately, except in 
such instances in which the applicant traced his descent through father 
and son. 

The Registrar General was directed to call the attention of State 
Registrars to the absolute necessity of using supplemental blanks in all 
cases where applicant traces to two or more Revolutionary patriots, 
except as above stated, and urge them to make each paper as com- 
plete as possible, for its historical value in the future. 

Communications having been received from Compatriots in various 
parts of the country who were entitled to and could not obtain the 
World War medals through the State Societies in which they held 
membership, the Executive Committee, on motion, decided that where 
a State Society neglects without due cause to provide the desired 
medals the National Society may present the medal, application there- 
for being made through and certified by the State Society or the Secre- 
tary General, no charge to be made therefor, the applicant being known 
as a member. 

Treasurer General Burroughs made a statement to the committee 
covering the expenses ami general finances of the National Society, 
and suggesting that, in view of the increased cost of various features 
of the work, it would be advisable soon to consider an increased income 
for the Society. The committee recommended that the incoming \\y ■ 
ecutive Committee take steps to increase the income of the National 
Society and present an amendment to the Constitution providing there- 
for. 

A communication was submitted from the Board of Managers of the 
Washington State Society respecting a petition filed by Spokane Chap- 
ter of the State Society for a charter of a new and separate State 
Society for eastern Washington. Upon consideration of the matter by 
the Executive Committee, the Secretary General was instructed to 
notify the Spokane Chapter that to organize, an additional chapter as 
desired would necessitate an amendment to the Constitution of the 
National Society, which must be presented in the manner required. 

A unanimous vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 15. 
Curtis for their hospitality in the entertainment of the members of the 
Executive Committee and accompanying guests. 

The committee thereafter adjourned. 

Pjiiup 1\ Larnisr, 

Secretary General. 



202 SONS 01- TIUC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

SOCIAL FUNCTIONS INCIDENT TO THE MEETING OF THE 
EXECUTIVE COiMM 1TTEE. 

The members of the Exeeutive Committee and officials attending the 
meeting in Bridgeport were accompanied by severaj ladies, including 
Mrs. C. L. Jenks, of Chicago, 111.; Mrs. George E. Pbrheroy, of Toledo, 
Ohio; Mrs. M. B. Beardsley, of Bridgeport, Conn., and Mrs. A. J. Gore, 
of Washington, D. C. Prior to the meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee the guests were entertained at luncheon by Mr. and Mrs. Curtis, 
at their home, and in the evening a dinner was given at the Bridgeport 
Country Club; where a very pleasant evening was enjoyed. On the fol- 
lowing' morning (Sunday), under the escort of Mr. Curtis, the guests 
were conveyed in automobiles to the city of Hartford. 

MINUTES OK Till' MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

MAY 17, 1920. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees was held at the Center Church 
House, Hartford, Conn., on call by the President General, on May 
17, 1920. 

Present: President General Jenks; Mr. G. C. Arnold, Historian 
General; Mr. Kiggins, of New Jersey; Mr. Wright, of Wisconsin; Mr. 
Parks, of District of Columbia; Mr. Read, of Massachusetts; Mr. 
Bailey, of Nebraska; Mr. Honk, of Ohio, and Mr. Lord, of New Hamp- 
shire. 

On motion, the Board voted to approve and ratify the various acts 
of the Executive Committee and National Officers as performed during 
the interim since the last meeting of the National Congress. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

Pi! ii/ii' P. Eaknkr, 

Secretary General. 

MINUTES OE THE MEETING OK THE BOARD OE TRUSTEES, 

MAY 18, 1920. 

A meeting of the Board of Trustees was held at the Center Church 
House, Hartford, Conn., on call of the President General, immediately 
after the adjournment of the Congress, May 1-8, 1020. 

Present : President General Preston ; former President General Jenks ; 
Mr. Pugsley, of New York; Mr. Honk, of Ohio; Mr. Wickham, of 
Connecticut; Mr. Parks, of the District of Columbia; Mr. Wentworth, 
of Iowa; Mr. Kjtggins, of New Jersey; Mr. Bailey, o.f Nebraska ; Mr. 
Wright, of Wisconsin; Mr. Felt, of Illinois, and Mr. Lord, of New 
I lampshirc. 

Mr. Jenks, as retiring President General, transferred the insignia of 
the office 1o the newly elected President General, Mr. Preston. 

( )ii motion, the usual appropriation of $500 was made toward the ex- 
penses of the next Congress. 



KKI'OKTS 01" STATIC SOCI I'.T I RS. 203 

Also voted the usual appropriations and authority for work and 
material of all necessary character for the proper transaction of the 
business of the Society in accordance with previous customs. 

The matter of designating the place and time for holding the next 
Congress of the National Society was considered, and on motion was 
referred to the Executive Committee with power to act. 

iOn motion, the Executive Committee was authorized to transact all 
necessary business matters of the National Society in the interim be- 
tween this date and the next meeting of the National Congress. 

President General Preston announced the following as appointed 
members of the Executive Committee: 

President General James Harry Preston, chairman; Mr. Chancellor 
L. Jeuks, of Illinois; Mr. Louis Anniu Ames, of New York; Mr. 
George E. Pomeroy, of Ohio; Mr. Arthur Preston Sumner, of Rhode 
Island; Rev. Lyman Whitney Allen, of New Jersey, and Mr. VV. K. 
Poardman, of Tennessee. 

(Note.— Cot. K. M. Alger, of Michigan, was appointed a member of 
the committee but was unable to accept.) 

The appointments were adopted by the Board, and meeting of the 
Trustees then adjourned. 

Vi 1 11. !i> F. Larnkk, 

Secretary General. 



REPORTS OF STATE SOCIETIES SUBMITTED AT 
NATIONAL CONGRESS. 




204 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

t- 
Revolution occasion. Past President Chester N. Jones was master of 
ceremonies. 

President Vail and a large delegation of New Jersey Society visited 
the Empire State Society on Flag Day, June 14, and participated in its 
exercises of awarding war service medals to those of that organization 
who had served in the Federal Army or Navy during the World War. 
The event proved the existence of the strong bond of fellowship be- 
tween the two societies. 

It was announced at the beginning of the summer vacation that Capt. 
Joseph O. Sanders had been placed on the roster as the 2,000th member. 

On Saturday, September 13, a memorial to Abraham Clark, a New 
Jersey Signer of the Declaration of Independence, was dedicated at 
Roselle, N". J., on trie site of the home of the patriot thus remembered. 
The boulder was contributed by the Compatriots living in Roselle, and 
the tablet, with suitable inscription, was the gift of the Society. Presi- 
dent Carl M. Vail presided, and addresses were given by several dis- 
tinguished citizens, including the Governor, William M. Runyon. A 
feature of the ceremony which attracted considerable attention was 
the placing of floral tributes by young women, representing the 
original thirteen States. These tributes were placed at the base of the 
boulder while "Jersey Land" was played by the brass band. 

Constitution Day, September T7, was remembered in many of the 
schools of New Jersey, and in the evening a large delegation of our 
Society attended exercises in the old First Church, Newark. At noon 
President Vail, accompanied by a number of the officers and members 
of the Board of Managers, attended exercises at the Subtreasury Build- 
ing, New York, under the auspices of the Empire State Society. 

Our reception to Compatriot Chancellor L. Jenks, President General, 
on October 25, was really the opening of the social season of the 
Oranges. The distinguished guest, accompanied by Mrs. Jenks, was 
escorted from New York to Fast Orange, where they were entertained 
at dinner by Vice-President General Thomas W. Williams at his home. 
Later in the evening members of the Stale Society, with their ladies, 
met at the Woman's Club, in the same city, and there tendered a recep- 
tion to the guests of the evening. A number of the national officers 
were present and the entire affair was voted one of the most successful 
affairs held under the auspices of the New Jersey Society. 

An automobile pilgrimage, under the direction of Paramus Chapter, 
to various points of historical interest in Bergen County will always 
be a delightful event associated with September 30, iqiq. The day 
was ideal from the weather viewpoint', and the Hoard of Managers, 
which was the guest of the Chapter, enjoyed fully the program so 
painstakingly arranged by the committee of arrangements. The trip 
concluded at the home of Frederick Z. Board, Ridgewood, an old-time 
colonial house, only a few of which type are still standing in New 
Jersey. The social hour proved a very happy affair, Mr. and Mrs. 
Board acting as host and hostess. An opportunity was given each 



KKI'OKTS Ol' STATIC SOO I'.Tl l',S. 205 

guest to inspect the rooms and the Quaint furniture with which the 
house is furnished. 

A new chapter, known as Second River, No. io, was organized on 
December I. Dr, Edward O. Cyphers, who was instrumental in securing 
fourteen new members during the year, will be known as the founder. 
The headquarters are at Belleville. 

New Jersey Day, December 18, was observed by the Society, when it 
gave a free stereopticon lecture on "The blag of Our Great Republic." 
The lecturer was Compatriot John Willis Weeks. Addresses were also 
given by President Vail and Historian Pierson. 

On Washington's Birthday the clergy of the State quite generally, by 
request of our Committee on Americanization, of which Compatriot 
Harry I'\ Brewer is chairman, preached sermons on the life of the First 
Citizen of our Country. 

The Board of Managers held eleven meetings during the year, which 
in some respects was the most notable in our history. There was a 
much more earnest activity directed toward the securing of new mem- 
bers than in other years. This applied more especially during the last 
quarter, when no members were added to the roll. 

Chapters have for the most part been very active during the year. 
Ail have had ceremonies of varying form for the presentation of the 
War Service medals to the Compatriots entitled to receive them. 

John Lawrence Boggs is now the first Compatriot on the State and 
National roster, being No. 4. Peter B. Fairchikl, No. 15, of Orange, is 
second, and Compatriot Frederick Frelinghuysen, of Newark, is third, 
being No. 26. 

Sylvester If. M. A gens, who was elected to membership in 1919. 
secured the gold insignia for having secured the largest number of new 
members, his record for the fiscal year being twenty. 

The Society 'has suffered the loss of two Compatriots, who in their 
day were among the leaders of our Society. Compatriot Franklin 
Murphy died at Palm Beach, Florida, February 24. He had been Gover- 
nor of New Jersey, President General of the National Society, and had 
occupied other offices of honor and trust. 

Compatriot George Herbert Richards, M. D., who had served the 
Society faithfully for a number of years as its Registrar, died at his 
home, in Orange, September 9 last. He was a regular attendant as a 
delegate of the New Jersey Society at the annual Congresses for many 
years, lie was also a member of the committee which had charge of 
the pilgrimage in June and July, IQ14, from Philadelphia to Boston. 

As the year 1919-1920 ends, there is a very uncertain future for the 
Society. The headquarters, at 756 Broad Street, Newark, which has 
been occupied for the seven years, must be vacated. For thirty-one 
years the Society has been located in the center of a busy manufacturing 
city, with all its noise and hurry. Shall this be exchanged for more 
quid location, free from distracting incidents? 

And so the old year comes to an end for the New Jersey Society. 



2()6 



SONS OF Till', AMKKK'AN DEVOLUTION. 



Its work lias been accomplished as well as the tools at hand would per- 
mit. There is much to be done. The old order is changing in New 
Jersey and everywhere else. But we must not forget that there is a 
Flag and there is a Constitution which will continue in the need of our 
affection, our strength, and our courage. 
Respectfully submitted, 

David L. PiUrson, 

Secretary. 

EXTRACTS FROM REPORT OF THE OHIO SOCIETY FOR 
THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 19, 1920. 



The number of members added to the roll during, the year is 96. 
Members who have died, K). 

A chapter was organized at Marion, Ohio, January 20, 1920, named 
General Francis Marion Chapter. 

Some of the chapters have been quite active during the past year in 
patriotic work', and especially in assisting foreign-born citizens in pre- 
paring their applications for naturalization and arranging with the 
Federal courts for graduating classes. One class of thirty-five was 
graduated before the court recently, in which the members of Benjamin 
Franklin Chapter took' a prominent part. 

Constitution Day, September 17, was celebrated by several of the 
chapters. All chapters report great interest nt their meetings during 
the fall and winter months. 

At a meeting of the State officers and Board of Managers, called by 
President Doyle, held in Columbus, the Secretary was instructed to 
continue correspondence with men who were eligible to membership as 
reported by the Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 
Upward of three hundred letters have been written along this line dur- 
ing the past year, giving full information as to our objects and em- 
phasizing the influence of the Society in an\ community organized to 
honor the ancestors of Ihe members who offered their lives for liberty 
in 1776. Many replies have been received, and, as evidenced by the 
large increase in membership, this appeal to persons wdio are eligible to 
join our Society has brought a good response. Ninety-six members 
have been recruited, the largest number for one year in the history of 
the Society. 

As reported by chapter officers, 122 members of the State Society 
served in the World War, a number of whom were commissioned 
officers, and all members of the Society are justly proud of their dis- 
tinguished services, as they have proved true to the heritage handed 
down to them by their ancestors of the Revolution. 

Tn educational and Americanization work, all chapters have responded 
to the call to duty by distributing several thousand of our booklets. 
"Information for Immigrants," and a large number of copies of the 
United States Constitution. These documents . were distributed to * 



KKroKTs <)!• static SO( UCTJlvS. 207 

schools, mining districts, and Americanization organizations, a large 
number being printed in foreign languages. Never in the history of the 
Society has there been so much interest taken by persons who are not 
members, nor so many requests for military records of the service of 
ancestors who fought in the Revolution. In summing up results, it has 
been a very satisfactory year, and with the large number of young 
active members, all "100 per cent Americans," who served in the 
World War, we should move forward all along the lines with renewed 
inspiration in our patriotic services. 



g 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS 

ENROLLED FROM MAY 1, 1919, TO APRIL 30, 1920 

(Continued from 1919 Year Book.) 



FRANK A03BQTT, Washington, 1). C. (33-'55). Son of Frank and Catherine 
Ann (Cuyler) Abbott; grandson of David Henry and Helen (Settle) Cuyler; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (Rust) Cuyler; great 2 -grandson of Ama- 
ziah and Catherine (Quaekenbush) Rust; great 3 -grandson of Amasidh Rust 
(Russ) ; Ensign, Eleventh Company, Fifth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

JOHN MlIyTON ACKiJvY, Cleveland, Ohio (32843). Son of John Anson and 
Miriam (Emerson) Ackley; grandson of Asa and Sally (Small) l^merson; 
great-grandson of Asa Briterson, private, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

LOUIS GAYRORD ACTON, Portland, Oregon (33^7). Son of J. TI. and 
Julia (Clark) Acton; grandson of Levi and Mary (Elmore) Clark; great- 
grandson of Noah Clark, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia. 

BERTRAM SAC.F, ADAMS, Hibbing, Minn. (33506). Son of II. K. and Frances 
Abby (Sage) Adams; grandson of Sidney and Susan (Whitney) Sage; great- 
grandson of Joel and Rethiah (Hurlhut) Sage; great 2 -grandson of Samuel 
Hiirlbut, Corporal, Wadsworth's Battalion, Conn. Militia. 

BURTON ATJ3EN ADAMS, Springfield, Mass. (33932). Son of Philip T. and 
Emma (Wright) Adam-; grandson of Ezra and Sally Ann (Holmes) Wright; 
jreat-grandso'n of Barzilai and Ruth (Cushman) Holmes; great 2 -grandson of 
Ebeneser Cushman, private, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN DAWSON ADAMS, Boise, Idaho (31811). Sun of Thomas Edward and 
Mary F,llen (Massie) Adams; grandson of Joseph and Margaret Elizabeth 
Corded (Funk) Massie; great-grandson of Nimrod and Evy (Eeib) Funk; 
gi-eat--grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Corded) Funk"; great s -grandson of 
John Funk, private, Tenth Regt., Cont'l I,ine. 

VVTT,I,AR.D CRANE ADDY, Minneapolis, Minn. (318.17). Son of James Emmelt 
and Mary (Rolstoil) Atldy; grandson of Samuel and Sarah Amanda (Clover) 
koision; great-grandson of Benjamin and Mary (Toggart) Clover; great 2 - 
grandson of Nathan and Dcsiah (Craiy) Cdover; greaC-grandsnn of Benjamin 
Crary, Hieutenant in Capt. F^K-ne/cr Holbrook's Company, Col. John Ely's 

Fourth Battalion, Conn. Troops. 
FREDERICK GIRARD A0ENS, Sk., Newark, N. J. (32910). Son of Thomas 
and Eliza Crane (Osborn) Agens; grandson of James Agens, private, New- 
Jersey Troops, pensioned, 

SYUVESTEN 1IAI,SF,Y MOORE AGENS, N r . J. (32374), Supplemental-. Son 
of Frederick Girard and Emma l.ouise (Moore) Agens; grandson of Sylvester 
llalsey and Hetty Malonia (Peshine) Moore; gi eat -gi andsou of Joshua and 
I'amella (llalsey) Moore; great-grandson of Amtis llalsey, private, Capt. 
Isaac llalsey's Company, Moiris County, New Jersey Militia; grandson of 
Thomas and Ivli/a Crane (Osborn) Agens; great-grandson of James Agens, 
private, New Jersey Troops, pensioned; great -grandson of David S. and 
Hannah (Eagles) Osborn; greaP'-grandson of Alexander and Esther (Crane) 
Eagles; greaC-grand.son of Israel Crane, New Jeisey Justice of the Feace, 1777. 

UI.\kl,KS TIII'ODOKh; AKIN, Terre Haul.-, Ind. U^7<)). Son of Charles 
Theodore and Mary S. Akin; grandson of Ransom W. and Sarah Kawlings 

(200) ,7<L. 



210 SONS OF TIIF, AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

(Sedwick) Akin; great-grandson of Josiah and Rebecca (Stewart) Akin; great 2 - 
grandson of James Steicart, Jr., private, Westmoreland County, Virginia 
Militia. 
K£RR FREEMAN APBERTSON, Baltimore, Md. (33106). Son of Coversen 
Henry and Clarissa (White) Alhertson; grandson of Samson and Abbie S- 
(Coversen) Albertsbn; great-grandson of Nicholas ami Jane (Howell) Albert- 
son; great--grandson of Garret Alberts<>n, Second Major, Second Regt., 
Hunterdon County, New Jersey Militia. 

MIPTON HOAGPAND APBERTSON, Nutley, N. 1. (33747). Son of Coursen 
II. and Clarissa (White) Alhertson; grandson of Samson and Abbie S. 
(Coudscn.) Alhertson; great-grandson of Nicholas and Jane (Howell) Albert- 
son; great--grandsou of Garret Alhertson, Second Major, Hunterdon County, 
New Jersey Militia. 

LEON PRATT ALFORD, Monlclair, N. J. (33745)- Son of Emerson and Sarah 

Mcrriam (Pratt) Alford; grandson of Daniel M. and Eniira (Amis) Alford; 

great-grandson of Samuel Alford; great--grandson of Pelatuih Alford, private, 
Eighteenth and Fifth Regts., Conn. Militia. 

CARLISLE VISSCHER AlJ,AN, Lieutenant 0. S. Army, Nebraska (3^065). 
Son of Donald Buddington and Carolynn Anne (Visscher) Allan; grandson 
of William Charles and Katharine (Booth) Visscher; great-grandson of Wil- 
liam Broner and Ann (Faston) Visscher; great--grandson of Frederick 
Visscher, Colonel, New York Militia. 

AFFRpD PIERCE APPEN, Norwich, Conn. (32860), Sou of William IP and 
Abby D. (Johnson) Alien; grandson of Alfred W. and Sarah A. Simpson 
Allen; great-grandson of E. E. and Emmeline (Williams) Simpson; great-- 
grandson of John and Pucinda (Fairchild) Williams; great a -grandson . of 
Clement Fairchild, private, Fourth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

JOHN IIERRON APPEN, Sharpsville, Pa. (33681). Son of John C. and Mary 
(McCormick) Allen; grandson of Adam Hill and Margaret (Russell) Mc- 
Cormick; great-grandson of Alexander and hyphemia (Hill) McCormick; 
great-grandson of Ada»\ Ihll, private, First Kcgt., Pine, wounded. 

JUPIAN SARGEANT API. FN, Hartford, Conn. (3*867), Son of Samuel Howe 
ami Julia Anne (l'ierson) Allen; grandson of William Seward and Nancy 
(Sargeant) l'ierson; great-grandson of Abraham l'ierson, Clerk and Sergeant, 
Conn. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Dodo l'ierson, private, Conn. Cont'l Troops; 
grandson of Chester Allen; great-grandson of P.dmcmd Allen, private, Mass. 

Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

<>RA A. APPEN, J. ife.sonville, Ohio. (Pa. 33679). Sou of Samuel and Zella 

(Williams) Allen; grandson of John A. ami F.leanor (Young) Williams; 
great-grandson of John T. and Euphania (Jarvis) Young; great--grandson of 
Jacob and Penelope (Watt) Young, Jr.; great--grandson of Jacob Yoiing, 
Pioneer, Sixth Regt., Continental Pine. 

SAMUEP ERNEST ANDPRSON, Pocatello, Idaho (31818). Son of Samuel 
Agnew and Sarah Ellen (Shively) Ander.son; grandson of Robert S. and 
Dorcas Ann Sims (Hopkins) Anderson; great-grandson of Robert and 
Elizabeth (Agnew) Anderson; great--grandson of Robert Anderson, private, 
Pancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

WARREN BARRET APPEN, Berkeley, Cal. (3-730). Son of Woodson and 
Frances (Orr) Allen; giandson of Alexander and Mary Elizabeth (Barrett) 
Allen; great-grandson of James Joseph and Ann (Barrett) Allen; great-- 
grandson of David Allen. Captain, Independent Company, Virginia Militia. 

WALTER SCOTT AMOS, Kingwood, W. Va. (Pa. 3J978). Sou of Francis 
Marion and Eunice Ann (Cisne) (Cessna) Amos; grandson of Emanuel and 
Sarah (C.iard) Cisne (Cessna); great-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Rose) ' 



UKGISTI-K 01? NEW MEMBERS. 211 

Cisne (Cessna); great--grandson of Jonathan and Rebecca (VVorley) Cessna); 
great 3 -grandson of John Cessna, Major, Volunteers. 

THOMAS EDWIN ANDERSON, Denver, Colo. (31445)". Son of Edwin Clark 
and Eydia Eouise (Shtllfz) Anderson; grandson of Perry and Eydia 
(Gladfelty) ghultz; great-grandson of Adam and Nancy (Shockey) Shultz; 
greal 2 -grandson of Christian Shockey, Corporal, Line, pensioned. 

ALFRED BURRITT ANDREWS, Chicago, 111. (33095)- Son of Edwin Norton 
and Mary E- (Berry) Andrews; grandson of Alfred and Mary Lee (Shipman) 
Andrews; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary. (Polly) (Lee) Shipman; great 2 - 
grandson of Isaac Lee, Colonel, Sixth Regt N Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES MORRISON ANDREWS, Richmond, Va. (32946). Son of Lewis 

Ilolcombe and Ann Winston (Butler) Andrews; grandson of William Fleming 
and Virginia Judith (Winston) Butler; great-grandson of Ruben and Elizabeth 
(Rutfin) Butler; greaF'-grandson of Francis Ruflin, Member Mecklenburg 
County, Virginia, Committee of Safety. 

EDGAR DUDLEY ANDREWS, Boston, Mass. (332S2). Son of George L. and 
Sarah E. (Paten) Andrews; grandson of George A. and Susan (Higgins) 
Andrews; great-grandson of Lyman and Susan (Webster) Andrews; great 2 - 
grandson of Asa Andrews; greaF-grandson of Jonathan Andrews, private, 
Mass, Militia; great-'-grandson of Israel Webster; grcaF-grandson of Jolm 
Webster, Colonel, New Hampshire Militia. 

WILLIAM CURTIS ANGELL, Providence, R. I. (32487). Son of Abncr 
Harris and Adeline (Aylsworth) Angell; grandson of Stephen and Mary 
(Harris) Angell; great-grandson of John Angell, Lieutenant-Colonel, Second 
Regt., Rhode Island Militia. 

HARRY BELL ANNIN, So. Orange, N. J. (32678). Son of Edwin Lewis and 
.Anna (Strothcr) Annin; grandson of John and Mary (Mulford) Annin; 
great-grandson of Alexander and Margaret (Miller') Annin; greaF-grandson 
of ll'illiain Annin, Member of Committee of Correspondence, Somerset 
County, New Jersey, 1776. 

HAROLD ANTHONY APPLEGET, Woodward, ()k!a. (Neb. 32955). Son of 
Anthony M. and Clara "May (Greene) Appleget; grandson of John Abel and 
Mary A. (Brundage) Greene; great-grandson of Lynn McNulty and Nancy 
Owens (Abel) Greene; great-grandson of William Gribbs and Elizabeth 
(Graham) Greene; grea^-grandson of Javis Greene, private, Capt. Robert Por- 
ter's Company, Tryon County, North Carolina Militia, killed in battle of Blue 
Licks; giands., n of Thomas and Helen A. (Yoorhees) Appleget; great- 
grandson (if Anthony and Helena (Riggs) Appleget; great-grandson of 
Tin. mas and Sarah (Baird) Appleget; great ;, -grandson of David Baird, Captain, 
Cot. Asher 'Holmes' First Regt., Monmouth Countv, New Jersey State 
Troops. 

JOHN ALAN APPELGET, Moorelarid, Okla, (Neb. 3-'957). Son of Anthony M. 
and Clara May (Greene) Appelget; grandson of John Abel and Alary A. 
(Brundage) Greene; great-grandson, of Lynn AlcNulty and Nancy Owens 
(Abel) Greene; great-grandson of William Griggs and Elizabeth (Graham) 
Greene; great :, -grandson of J arris Greene, private, Capt. Robert Porter's 
Company, Tryon County, North Carolina Militia; grandson of Thomas and 
Helen A. (Vooihees) Appelget; gnat grandson of Anthony and Helena (Riggs) 
Appelget; great-grandson of Thmuas and Sarah (Haird) Appelget; great 3 - 
grandson of Bavid Baird, Captain, Col. Asher Holmes' First Regt., Mon- 
mouth County, New Jersey State Troops. 

ALFRED DASH IF I J, ARNOLD, New York City (N. J. 33332). Son of Wil- 
liam C. and Katharine De Forest (Dashiell) Arnold; grandson of John Ford 
and Rebecca (Campbell) Arnold; great-grandson of Lewis Arnold, private, 



SONS Ml- Til !•; AM KKICAN REVOLUTION. 



Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of John Arnold, 
private, First Regt., .Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia. 

AMBROSE SPENCER ARNOLD, New York City, N. V. (33350. Son of 
Mathias Bovee and Jessie (Gibson) Arnold; grandson of Benedict and Polly 
(Mary) (Bovee) Arnold; great-grandson of Elisha .In,, ,1,1, Sergeant, Four- 
teenth Regt., Albany County, New York Militia. 

MATHIAS ItoVlvlv ARNOLD, Houston, Tex. (N. V. 33367V. Sun of Mathias 
Rovcc and Jessie (Gibson) Arnold; grandson of l'.cnediet and Polly or Mary 
(Bovee) Arnold; great-grandson of Ulisha Arnold, Sergeant, Fourteenth Regt., 
Albany County, New York Militia. 

LESTER P. ASKUE, Cleveland, Ohio (33169). Son of Arthur P. and Addie 
(Pettis) Adore; grandson of R. W. and Emeline (Latimer) Pettis; great- 
grandson of Hiram and Uuldah (dolman) Patimer; great-grandson of 

Thomas Uohmni, private, Conn, and Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

FRANK FREEMAN ATKINSON, Sacramento, Cal. I Mass. 32925)- Son of Frank 
Kugene and Mary Nancy (Freeman) Atkinson; grandson of Benjamin B. and 
Mary IT. (Clement) Atkinson; great-grandson of Nathaniel Atkinson, Corporal, 
New Hampshire Troops, pensioned. 

EDWARD SANFORD ATWATER, Jr., Elizabeth, N. J. (32682). Son of 
Edward Sanfunl and Gertrude (Vanderpoefj Atwater; grandson of Pyman 
llotchkiss and Susan (Sanford) Atwater; great-grandson of Lyman and 
Clarissa ( I rotchkiss) Atwaier; great-'-grandsoti of Mcdad and Rhoda (Dicker- 
man) Atwaier; great f! --gf'amlson of David Atwater, I ,iet*tenaut, Lieut-Col. 
Thomas Seymour's Gonte Light Horse; great-grandson Mi-dad Atwiiter, 
private Seventeenth New Haven Company, Conn. Militia. 

BENJAMIN WELLS ATWOOD, Second Lieutenant, U. S. Rf. C, Brighton, 
Mass. (32591). Son of Joshua and Carolyn (Pewere) Atwood; grandson of 
Joshua and Hannah Josephine (Morgan) Atwood; great-grandson of Joshua 
and Jane (Lewis) Atwood; greats-grandson of David Atwood, private, Capt. 
Winslow Lewis' Company, Barnstable County, Mass. Militia. 

JASON RUGG AUSTIN, Emporia, Kans. (.51043). Son of Henry Minot and 
Minerva (Smith) Auston; grandson of Daniel Hudson and Loisa (Rugg) 
Austin; great-grandson of Linus and Mary (Polly) (Hudson) Austin; great- 
grandson of Daniel Austin, private, Conn. Troops and Fifth Regt., Conn. 
Light Horse Dragoons'; gramPon of Mason D. and Minerva (Messenger) 
Smith; great-grandson of Ira and Lucy (Russell) Smith; great-grandson of 
David Russell, Sergeant, Capt. Benjamin Harney's Company, Colonel Dick- 
iuson's Regt., Mass. Militia; great-grandson ,,f Itille and Martha (Harris) 
Messenger; great-grandson of Uillc Messenger, Sergeant, Capt. Peter Porter's 
Company, Col. J (dm Patterson's Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned; great- 
grandson of James Harris, Sergeant, Capt. Joshua Habcoek's Company, Col. 
John Topham's Rhode [stand Troops, pensioned. 

PAUL WEBER AUSTIN, Toledo, Ohio (33159) Son of James and Minnie 
(Weber) Austin, Jr.; grandson of James and Tammie Jane (Whiting) 
Austin, Sr.; great-grandson of John and Phebe (Lathe) Whiting; great- 
grandson of Blkanah Whiting, Sergeant, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

EDWARD CHAPMAN AXTELL, Newark, N. J. (3334-'). Son of William D. 
and Laura G. (Rodine) Axlell; grandson of Cornelius W. and Miriam Chap- 
man (Romine) Podine; great-grandson of James Willard and Sarah (Chap- 
man) Rominc; great-grandson of Furman and Ann (Ilolcombe) Romine; 
great-grandson of Richard Hol.combe, private and Minute Man, Hunterdon 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

TRESTON REED AVARS, Major, U. S. A., St. Louis, Mo. (3.-563). So,, of Rohi- 
son and Annie Seavey (Palmer) .Avars; grandson of and ['ranees Abigail 



UHGISTICK OK NEW MEMBERS. ~ ] 3 

(Whidden) Palmer; great-grandson of Joseph \V. and Abigail (Weaver) 
Whidden, Jr.; great-grandson of Joseph W. Whidden, private, C'apt . John 
Frown's Company, Col. David Oilman's Regt., New Hampshire Militia; 
great^grandsoti of William and Annie (Trefetbern) Seavey; great--grandson 

of Amos and Mary (Langdnn) Seavey; great 'grandson of John Langdon, 
Captain, New Hampshire Militia; Member and Speaker, New Hampshire 
House of .Representatives, 1776 to '82; great' J -grandson of JVilliam Seavey, 
Lieutenant in Col. Joshua Wingate's First New Hampshire Regt. of Militia. 

HARRY BENNETT AVER, Piddeford, Me. (32441). Son of James Curtis and 
Mary Armine (Bennett) Ayer; grandson of John Perkins and Arniine 
Whitten) Bennett; great-grandson of Simon Jordan and Mary 1'.. (Pike) 
Whitten; great 2 -grandsori of Riehaid Whitten, private, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN MATHIAS AYRES, While Sulphur Springs, \Y. Va. (Va. 3~'9^9). Son of 
William Daniel and Margaret Jane (McMillion) Ayres; grandson of Olive 
Salle and Catharine (Seay) Ayres; great-grandson of John Ayres, private in 
Col. John Iloleombe's Virginia Line of Light Infantry. 

JOHN PEED BABCOCK; Sheldon, Iowa (32782). Son of Charles A. and 
Agnes R. (Garfield) Babcocke; grandson of E. and Hannah Sampson (Cope- 
land) Garfield; great-grandson of Jonathan ami llanna (Reed) CopeUmd; 
great-grandson of John Reed, Mass. Chaplin, Ship "Warren." 

ERNEST BACON, Poplar Bluff, Mo. (.^--57 4). Son of Daniel and Rydia Ann 
(Griffin) Paeon; grandson of Cyrus and Melinda (Curnsey) Bacon; great- 
grandson of Daniel and Hannah (Tarbox) Paeon; gi eat--grandson of Solomon 
Tarbox, 'Lieutenant, Third Regt., Conn. Line. 

ERNEST AMOS BAILEY, Lake Benton, Minn. (31845). Son of Orange James 
and Louisa P. Robbins (Porter) Railey; grandson of Amos and Alary (Abbot) 
Bailey; great-grandson of A'ta Bailey, private in Capt. Samuel Young's Com- 
pany, Colonel Bedell's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

PRANK JOLL PAILEY, Buffalo, N. Y. (3-713). Son of Joel Green and 
Isabella (N.) Bailey; grandson of William Wallace and Betsey (Butman) 
Bailey; great-grandson of Jacob and Ruth (Ladd) Railey; greaL'-grandson of 
Jaeob Bailey; Prigadier-General, \ r ermont Troops, and Commissary General, 
Northern Department; great-grandson of Jaeob Bailey, Captain, Vermont 
Troops. 

FREDERIC STARR PAILEY (Junior Member), Worcester, Mass. (32590). 
Son of Frederic William and Olive (Marble) Railey; grandson of William 
Egbert and Jane (Sharps.) Pailey; great-grandson of Noah Starr and Angeline 
(Holley) Pailey; great'-'-grandson of Eheucv.cr and Ann (.Starr) Bailey; great 3 - 
grandson of Samuel Bailey, Lieutenant, Ninth Company, .Sixteenth Regt., 
Conn. Militia; great--grandson of Bbene.cer Bailey, private, Second Regt., 
Conn. "Light Horse"; grandson of Jerome and Susan 1C (Planehard) Marble; 
great-grandson of J (dm and Ruth Ann (Ryder) Marble; great-grandson of 
Thaddcvs Marble, private, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN .MASON PAILHAC1IL, San Francisco, Cal. (3-7J8). Son of William 
Henry and Adeline (Rraymanj Railhaehe; grandson of John and Elizabeth 
1 1 ai wood (Heath) Railhaehe; great-grandson of William and Sally Pell 
(Watson) Heath; great"-grandson of William Heath {lleth), Colonel, Third 
Virginia Cont'l Regt., prisoner. 

WILLIAM 11LNRY PAII.HACnL, San Francisco, Cal. (32729). Son of Wil- 
liam Henry and Adeline (Bray man) Pailhaehe; grandson of John and 
Elizabeth Harwood (Heath) Railhaehe; great-grandson of William and Sally 
Bell (Watson) Heath; great 2 -grandson of William Heath (Ileth), Colonel, 
Third Regt., Virginia Cont'l Troops, 

GEORGE SUMNER RAKER, Detroit, Mich. (33755). Son of J. Murray and 
i:i1.i A. (Bigelow) Ral<er; grandson of Lambert and Emily (Dickinson) 



214 SONS 01' Tlilv AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

- 
Bigelow; great-grandson of Herman and Ethelinda (— ) Dickinson; great-- 
grandson of Beiwui Dickinson, private, Col. David Well's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

JOSEPH KITTRIDGE BAKER, Lieutenant, U. S. A., Douglas, Ariz., (La. 32547). 
Son of Robert Lee and Mary Louise (Whittington) linker; grandson of Joseph 
and Mollie (Kittredge) Whittington; great-grandson of Ebenezer Eaton and 
Elizabeth (Kelly) Kittredge.; great s -grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth (Eaton) 
Kittredge; great 3 -grandson of Francis Kittredge, Surgeon, Colonel Frye's 
Mass. Troops. 

MATTHIAS WISEN BAKER, Jr., Providence, R. I. (32479). Son of Matthias 
Wisen and Fanny May (Edgcombe) Baker; grandson of Matthias Wisen and 
Marynette Turner (Rogers) Baker; great-grandson of Henry Clark and Maria 
Fowler (Palmer) Rogers; great--grandson of Denison and Anna (Pendleton) 
Rogers; great 3 -grandson of Joshua Pendleton, Captain, First Company, 
Westerley, Rhode Island Militia. 

RALPH DOUGLAS BAKER (Junior Member), Napoleonville, La. (32757). 
Son of Robert Lee and Mary Louise (Whittington) Baker; grandson of 
Joseph and Mollie (Kettredge) Whittington; great-grandson of Ebenezer 
Eaton and Elizabeth (Kelly) Kettredge; great-grandson of Stephen and 
Elizabeth (Eaton) Kettredge; great 3 -grandson of Francis Kettredge, Snrge-on, 
Colonel Frye's Mass. Troops. 

RICHARD EUGENE BAI/IMAN, Lieutenant, U. S. A., Omaha, Neb. (32951;. 
Son of Robert Rudolph and Eldora Isabella (Smith) Baliman; grandson of 
Richard Byron and Margaret (Chapman) Smith; great-grandson of Benjamin 
and Lydia (Gardiner) Smith; great-grandson of Diodati and Rachael (Alls- 
worth) Smith] great ;, -grandson of Thomas Smith, Jr., Corporal in Capt. William 
Van Duersen's Company, Conn. Militia; great--grandson of Richard and ■ — 
Gardiner; great s -grandson of John Gardiner, killed in Wyoming, Pa., 
Massacre, 

CLARENCE BALL, Captain, U. S. M. C, Rochester, N. Y. (3.2709). Son of 
Henry E. ami Rose (Curtis) Ball; grandson of Andrew and Amy (Pollock) 
Curtiss; great-grandson of Abijah N. and Naomi (Smith) Curtiss; great-- 
grandson of Atidretv Citriiss; Minute Man, Dutchess County, New York 
Militia, pensioned. 

ELMER DARWIN BALL, Ames, Iowa (32799)- Son of Leroy Augustus and 

Mary Adell (Mansfield) Ball; grandson of Abraham Edward and Elvira 
Holdcn Ball; great-grandson of Abraham and Hannah (Edwards) Hall; great-- 
grandson of Abraham and Delivercnce (Perham) Ball; great 8 -grandson of 
Fbeneccr Ball, private,. Colonel I'rescott's Kegt., Mass. Militia, at> Lexington. 

FREDERICK HOOKER BALL, Williamsburg, Va. (32042). Son of John 
Augustus and Amelia Brewster (Hooker) - Ball ; grandson of Derrick Swart 
and Fannie (Dewey) Ball; great-grandson of Joint Ball, Lieutenant, Third 

, Regt., New York-Conn. Troops. 

WALDO MARSHALL BALL, Grand Rapids, Mich. (33633). Son of Frank 
Webster and Josephine' G. (Fungrm) Ball; grandson of John and Mary T. 
(Webster) Ball; great-grandson of Nathaniel Ball, private, New Hampshire 
Militia; great-grandson of Fbcuczcr Ball, private, and Minute Man, New 
Hampshire Militia. 

ALEXANDER HEGLKR BALLARD, Dayton, Ohio (3371 O. Son of Charles F. 

and N.tla 1',. (Ilegler) Ballard; grandson of Allen and Maria Louisa (Ellis) 

llegh-r; great-grandson of Henry and Charity (Harper) Jvllis; great-grandson 

of Abraham F.llis, private, Virginia Militia, pensioned), 
CASWELL ADEN MALLARD, Moorhead, Minn. (31840). Son of Joshua and 

Nancy (Earnest Ballard; grandson of Nathan and Mary (Abbott) Fames; v 

great-grandson of Ebe.ncscr Fames, private, Mass. Militia. 



REGISTER .OF NEW MEMBERS. 215 

HERBERT STANTON BALLIET, New York, N. Y. (32722). Son of Paul and 
Alary Ellen (NelT) B.dlict; grandson of Paul and Salome (Moyer) Balliet; 
great-grandson of Stephen and Susan (Thrie) Balliet; great 2 -grandson of 
Stephen Baltiet, Colonel, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of Stephen and Mag- 
dnlcna (P.urkhalter) Balliet; great 3 -grandson of Peter Burkhalter, Lieutenant- 
Colonel, Sixth Battalion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia, Member Con- 
stitutional Convention. 

DAVID CORNELIUS PANGS, Oak Park, 111. (33077)- Son of James Cannon 
and Mary (Gormley) Jiangs; grandson of David Barnwell and Margaret M. 
(Cannon) Bangs; great-grandson of Eliakim and !,ois (Barnwell) Bangs; 
great 2 -grandson of Lemuel Bungs, Lieutenant, Ninth Company, Fourth Regt., 
Conn. Militia. 

ROSCOF, CONKLING BANGS, Sioux Palls, S. D. (30057). Son of David C. 

and Clara (Pake) Bangs; grandson of Charles II. and Elizabeth F. (Betzel) 

Lake; great-grandson of pli and Mary (Ifaight) Pake; great-'-gi andson of 

Wells and Ruth (Iline) Lake; great a -grandson of Lewis Iline, private, Conn. 

Militia; great'-grandson of Natlicui Iline, Captain, Thirteenth Regt., Conn. 

Militia. 
JAMES HOBART HANKS, Spokane, Wash. (33464). Son of John and Prances 

P. (Somers) Banks; grandson of William and Sarah M. (Mead) Banks; 

great-grandson of Samuel Banks, Ensign, Second Regt., Westchester County, 

New York Militia. 

WILLIAM BOYS BANKS, Spokane, Wash. (32463). Son of James Ilohart 
and Helen L. (Boys) Banks; grandson of John and Frances F. (Somers) 
Banks; great-grandson of William and Sarah M. (Mead) Banks; grc?at 2 - 
grandson of Suinucl Banks, Pnsign, Second Regt., Westchester County, New 
York Militia. 

ARTHUR WPFLPSFPY WACAR BARBER, ' Lakewood, Ohio (32841). Son of 
Arthur Wellesley and Harriet May (Wagar) Barber; grandson of Francis 
Harvey and Serena (Tucker) Wagar; great-grandson of John and Polly 
(Mary) (Ward) Tucker; great 2 -grandson of Jesse and Susan (Booth) Ward; 
great 8 -gra.ndson of Josiah Ward, Captain, New Hampshire Militia; great 2 ? 
grandson of . John and Elizabeth (Lucas) Tucker; great 8 -grandson of Ezra 
Tucker, Second Lieutenant, Colonel Baldwin's Regt., New Hampshire Militia, 
pensioned. 

GEORGE IIARTFR BARBER, Cleveland, Ohio (33704). Son of George and 
Gertrude (Oakley) Barber; grandson of Thomas Harty and Abigail Oakley; 
great-grandson of John Oukley, Ensign, First Regt., Phillipsburg County,. 
New York Militia;' great-grandson of Isaac Oakley, Second Lieutenant, 
Westchester County, New York Militia. 

RARKPPY PATTISON BAREFOOT, Toledo, Ohio (33719). Son of William 
and Jennie (Barkley) Barefoot, Jr.; grandson of William and Diann (Heck) 
Barefoot; great-grandson of James and Alary (Slide) Barefoot; great-- 
, grandson of William Sink, Sergeant, Maryland Flying Camp, private, Mary- 
land Con't'l Line, pensioned. 

EDWIN STRONG BARGER, Toledo, Ohio (33150). Son of John W. and Hattie 
May (Drummond) Barger; grandson of Logan and Amanda (Campbell) 
Barger; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Steel) Campbell; great 8 - 
grandson of Thomas Sleel, private, Captain Marsh's Company, Colonel 
Moor's Regt., Chester County, Pa. Militia, pensioned, 

HAROLD DRUMMOND BARGER, Columbus, Ohio (33t(><>). Son 0* John W. 

and Hattie May (Drummond,) Barger, grandson of Logan and Amanda (Camp- 
bell) Barger; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Steel) Campbell; 
gl eat-' grandson of Tlunmn Sleel, private, Chester Comity, Pa. Militia. 



210 SONS OV TlllC AMI'RK'AN U KVOI ,UTK)N . 

JAMES CREIGKTON BARKER, New Milford, Conn. (32268); Son of James 
C. and Adelaide (DeWitt) Darker; grandson of James and Mary Eliza 
(Pendleton) Marker; great-grandson of Job Slant, ,11 and Lucy Ann ( Slant, in) 
Pendleton; great-grandson of Oliver and Hannah (.Dewey) Stanton; great-- 
grandson of Augustus Stantinr, Captain of Rhode Island Cont'l Artillery. 

ARTHUR ICLMENDOR'F BARLOW, Newark, N. J. (334.96). Son of John 
Howard and Mary Matilda ( Llmcndorf) Harlow ; grandson of James and 
Deborah (Spetman) Barlow; great-grandson of Edmund Barlow, Lieutenant, 
Hampshire County, Mass. Militia, prisoner. 

ARTHUR WILLIAM HARLOW, Newark, N. J. (33729). Son of Arthur K. and 
Lillie (Dixon) Barlow; grandson of John Howard and Mary Matilda 
(Khnimdorf) Harlow; great-grandson of James and Deborah (Spelman) Bar- 
low; greai--giandson of EdmuiicI Barlow, Lieutenant, Hampshire County, 
Mass. Militia, prisoner. 

HARRY IRA BARNES, Orange, Conn. (33465). Sou of Silas R. and Emma 
(Snyder) Barnes; grandson of Nathan and Lucy Ann (Diefendorf) Snyder; 
great-grandson of W'arnei and Christine (Wohlgemuth) Diefendorf; great- 
grandson of John Diefendorf, private, Tryon County, New York Militia, 
pensioned. 

HENRY LEWIS HARNETT, Lakeyille, Conn. (33466). Son of George and 
Catherine Emeline (Gardner) Harnett; grandson of John and Amelia 
(Knap])) Harnett; great-grandson of John Bamclt, Chaplain, Dutchess 
County, New York .Militia, and Second Brigade, .Mass. Line, pensioned. 

DAVID WILLIAM BARR, New York, N. Y. (32099). Son of William II. I). 
and Ella F. (Smith) Barr; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Patterson) 
Smith, Jr.; great-grandson of Nicholas and Jane (Greer) Patterson; great- 
grandson of Andrew and Mary (Farr) Patterson; great-grandson of Nicholas 
Patterson, Captain, Buck's County, Pa. Militia. 

JAMES A. BARTON, Providence, R. I. (34050J. Son of William and Imogene 
(Potter) Barton; grandson of Robert H. ami Julia Anne (— ) Barton; great- 
grandson John B. and Hannah (West) Barton; great--gt andsoti uf William 
Barton, Colonel, Rhode Island Militia and Cont'l Line, pensioned. 

MARK HANI LI, BATCHELDER, Peoria, III. (33099). Son of James Henry 
and PIuIh: Hannah (Gove) Batchelder; grandson of Mark and Mary (Martin) 
Hatehelder; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Martha (Duncklee) Batchelder; 
gie:it--grandson of Josvph Batclict'dcr, private, 'Peter Clark's Company, New 
Hampshire Militia; greaf-'-grandson of Nathaniel Batchelder, Member Lunde 
borough, New Hampshire, Special Committees, and Selectman; great-grandson 
of James ami Ruth (Dodge) Martin; great L '-grandson of Jesse Martin, 
private, Colonel Prcscott's Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned; great'-'-graudson of 
Jesse and Naomi (Hopkins) Martin; great :! -gramlson of James Hopkins, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, David Oilman's Regt., New Hampshire Militia; great--grandson 
of Simeon Dodge, private, Mass. Militia to reinforce Cont'l Army. 

JAMES MONROE LINCOLN BATES, Gardiner, Me. (32443). Son of James 
Nichols and Caroline Cornelia ( P risbie) Bates; grandson of Nathaniel 
Nichols and Susan (Lincoln) Hates; great-grandson of Newcomh and Lydia 
(Nichols) Hates; great-grandson of Samuel Bates, private, Col. Solornoi? 
Lovell's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

FREDERIC ATTWOOD BATTELLE, Detroit, Mich. (323X1). Son of Hrinmer 
and Jennie (Attwood) BattcHc; grandson of Andrew Hrinmer and Mary 
Lli/abeih (T*arfccr) Hattellc; great-grandson of I'l.ene/er and Mary (Greene) 
Bundle; great'-' e.iandson of Ebenezer Hallelle, Major, hjghlli Suffolk County, 
Mass. Troops; gi eaf-'-gi audson of John and Maiy (Greene) C.recne; great-' 1 - 
grandson of Philip Greene (father of Mary), Patriot, and Judge of Common 
Pleas Court; great-grandson of Joseph and Melissa (Stone) Barker; great'-'- 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS, 2\y 

grandson of Jonathan Stone, Paymaster and Captain, Mass. Troops; great-- 
grandson of pbenezcr and Anna (Durant) Battelle, Jr.; gi caC-grandson of 
Bbeiieffer Battelle, Sr., Major in Colonel Mcintosh's First Snll'olk County, 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Joseph and plizabeth (Dana) Parker; great-- 
grandson of WilUam Puna, Captain 1 .ieutenant in Col. Henry Knox's Regt., 
Mass. Militia. 

ROLLIN MORGAN BATTE-M, J-Mrst lieutenant, M. C. (A. E. F.), Caldwell, 
N. J. (337-to). Son of George and Carrie llaskill (Morgan) Batten; grand- 
son of Thomas Gaskill and Emeline (Zane) Patten ; great-grandson of Joseph 
Cooper and Sarah (Perkins) Zane; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary 
( Marple) Zane; greaP-grandson of WilUam Zane, Member Gloucester Comity, 
New Jersey, Committee of Observation. 

HENRY -WILSON BATTLE, Charlottesville, \'a. (3~'947). Son of Cullen A. 
and George F. (Williams) Pattle; grandson of Cullen and Jane (Pamon) 
Battle; grcat-grandsort of Dempsey and Jane (Andrews) Pattle; great-- 
grandson of Ulisha Battle, Member North Carolina Provisional Congress at 
Halifax and llilksboro; Member North Carolina State Convention 1o consider 
Federal Constitution, Slate Senator ijCj-'%7. 

DARWIN BLAKE BATTLKS, Cleveland, Ohio (33705). Son of Durell and Flora 
!•;. (Johnson) Battles; grandson of George and Arvilla (Dyer) Battles; great- 
grandson of Ithiel and Sarah (Smith) Battles, Jr.; great-grandson of Jesse 
Smith, Jr., private, Fifth Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM W'PIPICJI I'.AU.M, Warren, Ohio (3343 t>- Son of William Z. and 
Emma Klizabeth (Weirich) Baura.; grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Zach- 
arias) Baum; great-grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Van Reed) Baum; 
greats-grandson of Jonas and Elizabeth Zacharias (Feger) Baum; great-- 
grandson of Joint Baum, Court Martial Man, Captain Detrich's Company, 
Reading, Pa. Militia. 

ROPP1S EARL BAUMAN, Marion, Ohio (3-'«49)- Son of Amos Pauman and 
Rebecca (Clippinger) Pauman; grandson of Emanuel ami Alivia (Fording) 
Clippinger; great-grandson of Anthony Clippinger, Sergeant, Eighth Com- 
pany, Third' Battalion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 

CLAIRE UPPP BAYMILLER, Peoria, III. (jm*o). Son of Michael and Martha 
(Carroll) Baymilhr; grandson of John and Mary (Smith) Paymiller; great- 
grandson of Michael Bay miller, private, York County, Pa, Militia. 

FREDERICK JAMES BEAR, Detroit, Mich. (33634). Son of Charles V. and 
Mabel Herkimer (Hull) Hear; grandson of Joshua Reynolds and Mary 
(Lidell) Hull; great-grandson of Jonas Alva and Delia (Herkimer) Pidell; 
great--grandson of Ilenry and Catherine (Timmerman) Herkimer; great-'- 
grandson of Hendrick Herchmier {Herkimer), Captain, New York Militia; 
great-grandson of Justus and Cynthia (Reynolds) Hull; great-'-grandsou of 
Hezekiah Hull, Lieutenant, Sixth Regt., Albany County, New York Militia; 
great-grandson of David Hull, I, ieutenant, Sixth Regt., Albany County, New 
York Militia. 

DANIEL BREED BEARD, Boston, Mass. (33031 ). Son of Isham Rrowder and 
Cordelia Mary Elizabeth (New hall) Peard; grandson of Rufus and Pelsey 
Bean (Dolloff) Newhall; great-grandson of Abner and Irene (Smith) Dolloff; 
great-grandson of h'obert Smith, Adjutant, CM. Moses NLchol's Regt., Lieu- 
lenanl, Stark's Brigade, New Hampshire Troops. 

MARSHALL ARTHUR BEARD, Urbana, 111. (333<Jo). Son of Irvin Kurd and 
Elbe (Pewis) Peard; grandson of Augustus P. and Nyrha (Ilurd) Beard; 
great-grandson of Andrew and Rachel (Marshall) Beard; greal--grands,, n of 
William Beard, Ensign, Colonel Stickney's Regt., New Hampshire Militia; 
great-grandson of Hiram and Esther (Patten) Ilurd; great--grandsnn of 
Jonathan I'utteu, private, New Hampshire Troops. 



2l8 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

LUCIEN LAMBERT BEAVERS, St. Louis, Mo. (32565). Son of Milus M. 
and Etta J. (Ay res) Beavers; grandson of Lambert Pernel and Frances Ann 
(Johnson) Ayres; great-grandson of John James and Mary (ITill) Ayres; 
great 2 -grandson of James Ayres, Sergeant, Fifth Regt., Worcester County, 
Maryland Troops, 

JAMES HENRY RICAZLEY, Richmond, Va. (33-554). Son of William Franklin 
and Emma Jane (Alsop) Beazley; grandson of Henry and Jane (Garnett) . 
Alsop; great-grandson of William Alsop, private, Caroline County, Virginia 
Militia. 

HOWARD CLINTON RECK, Jr., Baltimore, Md. (33854}, Son of Howard 
Clinton and Flora (Mch'.li oy) Beck; grandson of Charles Augustus and Sarah 
Amanda (Cossart) Beck; great-grandson of William and Harriet (Hyde) 
Heck; grcat 2 -grandson of Jacob Beck, Sergeant, Captain Massey's Artillery 
Company, Philadelphia Militia. 

AARON BECKER, Schenectady, N. Y. (32890). Son of William Templar and 
Almira Louisa (Ryncx) Becker; grandson of Telfair Clinton and Elizabeth 
lane (Templar) Rynex; great-grandson of James and Margaret (Magee) 
Templar; great-grandson of William McGee, private, Albany County, New 
York Militia. 

ARTHUR BRISTOW BECKER, Chicago, 111. (33391). Son of Edward P. and 

Addie C (Biistow) Becker; grandson of Henry Gahhert and Sarah B.ad- 
shavv (Cherry) Bristow; great-grandson of Elijah and Susannah (Gahhert) 
Bristow; greats-grandson of James Bristow (Bristoe), private, Captain 
Mitchell's Company, Winchester, Virginia Militia. 

HENRY KENYON BECKW1TU, Rochester, N. Y. (32877). Son of Ansel E. 
and Olive Crawford (Mooreluad) Beckwith; grandson of Ansel A. and 
Celeste Lydia (Kenyon) Beckwith; great-grandson of Stuckley Westcott and 
Lydia (Hawkins) Kenyon; great--grandson of Nathan and Mary (Young) 
Hawkins; ' great a -grandson of Zebidce Yoxing, private, Col. John Tapham's 
Rhode Island Troops. 

GERALD 1'HWIN BEEBE, Portland, Ore. (33129). Son of Charles Francis and 
Emma (Bowne) B'eebe; grandson of Charles Edwin and Jane Blakeney 
Wade; great-grandson of Silas ami Anna (Breed) Beehe; great"-grandson of 
Josef h Breed, private, Poor's Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned; great 3 rgrandson 
of Nathan Breed, Corporal, Capt. Ely Avery's Company, Colonel Parson's 
Regt., Conn. Militia. 

JOHN EDHOWKS BEEBEj Chicago* HI. (.32232). Son of Thomas Hempstead 
and Catherine (Eddowes) Beehe; grandson <jf Elijah and Sarah (Hemp- 
stead) Bee; great-grandson of Stephen Hempstead, Sergeant, Capt. Nathan 
Hale's Company, Conn. Cont'l Troops. 

KENNETH BEEBE, Portland, Ore. (33130). Son of Charles Francis and 
Emma (Bowne) Beebe; grandson of Charles Edwin and Jane Blakeney 
(Wade) Beebe; great-grandson of Silas and Anna (Breed) Beehe; great 2 - 
grandson of Joseph Breed, private, Poor's Reg*., Mass. Militia, pensioned; 
grcat 3 -grandson of Nathan Breed, Corporal, Colonel Parson's Regt., Conn. 
Militia. 

FRANK. HULL IHvE.LS, Norfolk, Neb. (32972). Son of William Gould and 
Sarah Frances (Hull) Peels; grandson of Aimer S. and Jane (Shepherd) 
Peels; great-grandson of John Shepherd, private, Col. John Moore's Regt., 
Philadelphia County, Pa. Militia. 

GEORGE NELSON BKELS, Norfolk, Neb. (32970. Son of Abner S. and 
Martha M. (Burton) Beds; grandson of Aimer S. and Jane (Shepherd) Beds; 
great-grandson of John Shepherd, private, Col. John Moore's Regt., Phila- 
delphia Counts, Pa. Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS* 2I(j 

EEVI It, BEERUOWER, Elizabeth, N. J. (32637). Son of Reuben and Alary 

S. (Hartman) Beerbower; grandson of Benjamin and Mary (Henner) llart- 

inan; great-grandson of Peter Hartman; Major, First, Second and Fourth 
Battalions, New Jersey Militia. 

CIU'STER SARGENT BELL, Chicago, 111. (33392). Son of Charles Washing- 
ton and Inez Lydia (Paige) Bell; grandson of Sargent A. and Euella E- 
(Ilixson) Paige; great-grandson of Avery and . Caroline (Allen) Ilixson; 
great 3 -grandson of Jcdediah and Celia (Cushing) Allen; greats-grandson of 
Joshua dishing; greaf*-grandson of Solomon Cushing, Fifer, Col. Solomon 
hovel's Regt., Mass. Militia; great :f -grandson of Nathan and Esther (Paine) 
Allen; great-grandson of Thomas Paine (Payne), private, Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES EMMETT BELCHER, Columbus, Ohio (33161). Son of John W. 
and Mary A. ( — ) Belcher; grandson of William and Eliza (Powell) Belcher; 
great-grandson of George Belcher, private, Capt, James Foster's Company, 
Fifteenth Regt., Virginia Troops; great-grandson of Cader Powell, Ensign, 
South Carolina Militia. 

BURRITT ELLIS BENSON, Sheldon, Iowa (31970). Son of Caleb Ellis and 
Alice Anzanette (Hatch) Benson; grandson of Andress and Polly Amanda 
(Welton) Hatch; great-grandson of lib en ll'elton, private, Captain Ransom's 
Company, New Haven Count)', Conn. Militia, pensioned, 

GEORGE PAYNP, BENT, Chicago, 111. (32821). Son of George and Mary 
I'riscilla (Payne) I'.ent ; grandson of Samuel Browning and Catherine 
(Avery) l'.eut; great-grandson of David Bent, Captain, Mass. Militia. 

WIEIJAM CHAMBERLAYNE BENTLEY, Richmond, Va. (33557). Son of 
Efford Boiling and Lucy Williamson (Chamberlayne) Bentley; grandson of 
Efford Bentley, Sergeant, Virginia Militia. 

WILLIAM HARRIS BENTLEY, Newark, N. J. (33400). Son of William 
Harris and Charlotte Anstis (Bingham) Bentley; grandson of George and 
Mary Ann (Bliven) Bingham; great-grandson of Thomas and Charlotte 
(Flint) Bingham; great s -gfandson of Ebenescr Bingham, Ensign, Fourth 
Battalion, Conn. Militia. 

JOSEPH PAYNE BERRY., Tioja, Pa. (N. Y. 3324s). Son of James Thomas 
and Eva Gertrude (Payne) Berry; grandson of Joseph Ballon and Susan 
(Taylor; Payne; great-grandson of Phillip and Sally (Ryon) Taylor; great- 
grandson of John and Susannah (Tubbs) Ryan, Jr.; great a -graudson of 
Samuel and Sarah Susannah (Dorrance) Tubbs; great'-grandson of George 
Dorrame, Lieutenant-Colonel, Conn, Militia, killed at Wyoming; great' 
grandson of l.ehbens Tubbs, Lieutenant, Col. Zebulon Butler's Regt., Conn. 
Militia; great-grandson of Phillip and Sally (Ryon) Taylor; great'-grandson 
of Ebenezer and Polly (Cook) Taylor; great :, -grandson of Reuben Cook, 
private, Pa. Militia, pensioned; great 3 -gran<lson of Samuel Tubbs, Fifer- 
Musician, Colonel Durkee's Regt., Conn. Militia; grandson of Thomas J. and 
Francis Annis (Mersereau) Berry; great-grandson of James Guion and Emily 
Annis (Butts) Mersereau; greal--grandson of Joshua Mersereau, Jr., Quarter- 
master, guide and spy, prisoner on prison ship Scorpion, wounded; great-- 
grandson of Joshua Mersereau, Member New York Provincial Assembly, 
Deputy Commissary General of Prisoners, and Major, New York Militia; 
great 3 grandson of John Ryon, Sr., Sergeant, Fifth Company, Second Regt., 
Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

PHILANDER HAMMER BETTS, A. E. P., Montelair, N. J. (334m). Son of 
Philander and Nannie Bell (Hammer) Belts, 3rd; grandson of Philander and 
Sarah Taulman (Demarest) Betts, Jr.; great-grandson of Philander and 
Jane Elizabeth (Wilcox) Betts; great 2 -grandson of James and Esther 
(Benedict) Betts; gr.eat a -grandson of Elijah Belts, private, Major Starr's 
Conn. Light tlorsc and Fifth Regt., Conn. Line. 



220 



SONS OF THE AMKRICAN REVOLUTION 



JAMES B. BINGHAM, Chicago, 111. (32811). Son of Edmund James and 
Elizabeth (Baldwin) Bingham; grandson of Miles Covell and Mary Ann 
(Smith) Baldwin; great-grandson of Vine Ilathorn and Sally (Burt) Baldwin; 
great-grandson of Thomas Baldwin, Sergeant, Col. John Durkee's 24th Conn. 



great--}. 
Regt 



JOHN IT. BIRCH, Yellow Springs, Ohio (331 71). Son of John Milligan and 
pmma (Little) Birch; grandson of Erastus Mitchell and Sarah (Milligan) 
Birch; great-grandson of George Ilaviland and Phebe Fairlie (Mitchell) 
Birch; great-grandson of John and Patty (Ralph) Birch; greats-grandson 
John Birch., private, . Dutchess County, New York Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of Uriah Mitcln-U, Quartermaster, McDoUgall's Brigade, Dutchess County, 
New York Militia; greaMg.randson of Robert Millikcn, private, Fifth Rcgt., 
New York Militia. 

CHARLES SPENCER BISSELL, Suffield, Conn. (32868). Son of Charles 
Chauncey and Clara Julia (Spencer.) Bissell; grandson of I. Luther and Julia 
(Pease) Spencer; great-grandson of [Iezekiah and Cecelia Spencer; great 2 - 
grandson of lle/ekiah and Jerusha (Nelson) Sjiencer; great : '-grandson of 
Hesckiah Spencer, private, Mass. Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

GEORGE PERKINS BISSELL, Central City, Neb. (3-960). Son of Josiah 

VVolcott and Julia Wolcott (Hooker) Bissell ; grandson of Josiah and Henrietta 
(Perkins) Bissell; great-grandson of Josiah and Mary (Mather) Bissell; 
great--grandson of Josiah IJissell, Member Conn. Committee of Inspection; 
grandson of Horace and Helen (Wolcott) Hooker; great-grandson of James 
Hooker, Corporal, Conn. Cont'l Troops, pensioned, Member Windsor Conn. 
Committee of Inspection; great-grandson of Erastus Wolcott, Jr. Captain, 
First and Second Regts., Conn. Troops, prisoner; great--grandson of Erastus 
Wolcott, Brigadier-General, Conn. Mditia, Representative to Congress arid 
General Assembly. 

THEODORE PERRY BLACK, Montclair, X. J. (3.3795). Son of William 
Alexander and Alice (Simpson) Black; grandson of Alexander and Anne 
(Pitted) Black; great-grandson of James and Anne (Calhoun) Pittcll; great 2 - 
grandson of William tittell, private, Eighth Kegt., Pa. Pine, prisoner. 

ABRAHAM VICKROY BLACKBURN, Toledo, ()hi«, (328.27). Son of George 
and Laura (Vickroy) Blackhurii; grandson of George and Julia (McDonald) 
Vickroy; great-grandson of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Atlee) Vickroy; great 2 - 
grandson of William A, Atlee, Deputy Commissary General, Judge of Pa. 
Supreme Court r77.8-'83; great-grandson of Thomas Vickroy, private, and 
Pa. Deputy Commissary of Issues. 

JAMES LEMUEL BLAKENEY, Chaplain U. S. Army, Little Rock, Ark. 
(31765). Son of James B. and Dora (P.) Blakeney ; grandson of James 
Madison and Martha (Evans) Blakeney; great-grandson of Benjamin and 
pli/a (Ferguson) Blakeney; great-grandson of James and Susannah (Hale) 
Blakeney; great 3 -grandson of J, >Un Blakeney, Captain, Benton's Regr., South 
Carolina Militia. 

POUIS PRANK BLAUVETT, Mouclair, N. J. (33480). Son of William P. 
and Lorentha (Storms) Blauvett; grandson of John William and .Maria 
(Demaray) Blauvett; great-grandson of John Gerrit and EHzaheth (— ) 
Blauvett; great-grandson of .Gcrrit and Marite (Sickles) Blauvett; great- 
grandson of Johannes Isaac Blauvett, Lieutenant, Orange Counts', New York 
Militia, Member Committee of Correspondence; gi eal<-grandson of Isaac 
Blanvett, private, Colonel May's Kegt., New York Mditia. 

H. BOYBEN BPOOD, Keokuk, Iowa (32790). Son of Henry Boyden and 
Annie (Grafton) Blood; grandson of John and Pavina (Stone) Blood; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Blood, private, Mass. Militia, and Minute Man at 
Lexington Alarm, 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS* 221 

SOI, BLOODWORTH, Ju. (Junior Member), New Orleans, La. (32758). Son 
of Sol and Ellen (Norlleet) Blood worth ; grandson of Jasper Greer and Mary 
Pressia (Barrett) Bloodworth; great-grandson of Solomon Washington and 
Lucy (Thornton) Blood worth ; grcat :! -grandson of Thomas Bloodworth, Major, 
New Haven Company, North Carolina Cont'l Troops. 

"NICHOLAS BUNN UODDIE, Nashville, N. C. (3150-O. Son of Bennett and 
Anna Crudup (l'.oddie); grandson of Nieholas Williams and Iyouisiana 
(Crudup) l'.oddie; great-grandson of George and Lucy (Williams) l'.oddie; 
great--grandson of Nathan Buddie, Representative to Provisional Congress 
of North Carolina, 1776. * Formerly Nieholas l'.oddie Bunn. 

HERBERT BARBER BOIES, Waterloo, Iowa (3107-'). Son of Horace and 
Versalia (Barber) Boies; grandson of Hber and Esther (Heiishaw) Boies; 
great-grandson of William and Jerusha (Brace) llenshaw; greaU-grandson 
of William Henshd'zv, Sr., Lieutenant and Paymaster, Fifth New York Regt; 
great-grandson of Joel Boies, private, Captain Ferguson's Company, Colonel 
Danielson's Regt., Mass. Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

AUGUSTUS KEEPER BOOM, Adams, Mass., (3-'5«o). Son of W. James and 
Lucy (Selby) Boom; grandson of John and Mary (Patterson) 'Boom; great- 
grandson of Nieholas Boom, private, Capt. Nieholas Van Rensselaer's Com- 
pany, Col. Van Sehaick's Regt., New York Cont'l Line. 

FREDERICK STARR BOOTAY, Belleville, N. J. (33331). Son of Edgar Starr 
and Caroline Marie (Haas) Bootay; grandson of Edward and Jennette (Foote) 
Bootay; great-grandson of John Burgoyne and Sally (Norton) Foote; great'-'- 
grandson of George Norton, private, Captain Hoswiek's Company, Col. Charles 
Webb's Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOHN BORDMAN, Manila, P. I. (Mass. 3J5X8). Son of John and Lois Estella 
(Lawry) Bordinan; grandson of Charles and Harriet Susan (Spalding) 
Rordman; great-grandson of Solomon and Sally (Peterson) Spalding; great 2 - 
grandson of Solomon Spalding, Sergeant, Mass. Militia and "Carpenter's 
Regt.", Cont'l Army. 

HARRY AI'.RAM BORST, Bayonne, N. J. (326.24),.' Son of Abner Harmon 
and Sarah (Verity) Borst; grandson of Abram and Betsy Simmons Borst; 
great-grandson of Petri- and Klnora (Ferguson) Borst; great 2 -grandson of 
Joseph J. Borst, private, Fourth Company, Fifteenth Regt., New York 
Militia. 

JOHN BEVERLEY BOSTWICK, Amsterdam, N. Y. (s.^^j). Son of John 
Newman and Ada La Due (Beverley) Bostwick; grandson of Stephenson 
Thome and Martha E. (Newman) Bostwick; great-grandson of John and 
Prudence (Thorne) Bostwick; great-grandson of Robert Bostwick, Sergeant, 
Captain Chapman's Company, Colonel Thomas' Regt., Westchester County, 
New York Militia; grandson of John and Margaret (Smith) Beverley; 
great-grandson of David and Phebe (Mills) Beverley; great 2 -grandson of 
David Beverley, Captain, Ueut.-Col. John Newkirk's Regt., Montgomery 
County, New York Militia. 

WALLACE ROBERT BOSTWICK, Upper Montolair, N. J. (33781). Son of 
George Wallace and Amelia May (Titus) Bostwick; grandson of Robert and 
Eliza J. (Peltce) Bostwick; great-grandson of Rufus Hubbell Smith and 
Elizabeth ( I'.irch) Bostwick; great-grandson of Levi Bostwick-, private, Colonel 
Watcrbury's Fifth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

GEORGE FREDERICK BOSWORTII, Buffalo, N. V. (33601). Son of Harlan 

Page and Mary lirunt (Turner) I'.osworlh); grandson of Frederick and 
Malinda (Rice) Bosworth; grcat-grand.son of Frederick BostVOrth, private, 
Mass. Militia. 

HARLAN PACE BOSWORTH, 3rd, Buffalo, N. V. (3360.0. Son of Harlan 

Page and Louise (Hurt) Bosworth, 2nd; grandson of Harlan Page and Mary 



222 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION", 

Brunt (Turner) Bosworth; gnat-grandson of Frederick and Malinda (Rice) 
Bosworth; great a -grandson of Frederick Bosivo.rth, private, .Mass. Militia. 

HENRY BURT BOSWARTH, Buffalo, N. V. (33604). Son of Harlan Page 
and Louise (JBurt) Boswortk; grandson of Harlan Page and Mary Brunt 
(Turner) Bosworth; great-grandson of Frederick and Malinda (Riee) Bos- 
worth; great--grandson of Frederick Bosworth, private, Mass. Militia. 

FLOYD BISHOP BOTI1WLLL, Salt Lake City, Utah (32632). Son of Glenn 
R. and Jessie L. Bothwell; grandson of Alexander and Charlotte (Bishop) 
Bothwell; great-grandson of Levi and Sally (Minor) Bishop; great--grandson 
of John and Mary (Kilborne) Bishop; great-grandson of Nicholas Bishop, 
Captain, Conn. Militia. 

DONALD FLAGG BOVVFN, Providence, R. I. (32490) ■ Son of Henry and 
Clarabelle (Flagg) Bowen; grandson of William II. and Kdnah I'.. (Goodhue) 
Bowen; great-grandson of Henry and Amanda (Monroe) Bowen; great 2 - 
grandson of Ja'bez Bowen, Colonel, First Regt., Rhode Island Militia, Deputy 
Governor of Rhode Island, Member Council of War and other committees. 

EDWARD' F. BOWEN, Idaho (21356). Supplemental. Son of Caleb Tillinghast 
and Lydia Waterman (Knight) Bowen; grandson of Joseph and Abigail 
Tillinghast (Bates) Bowen; great-grandson of Ichabod and Mary (Bucklin) 
Bowen; great 2 -grandson of Joseph Bucklin, private, Mass. Militia, Rhode 
Island Service. 

JOSEPH BOWEN, Providence, R. I. (32491). Son of Henry and Clarabelle 
(Flagg) Bowen; /grandson of William 11. and Fdnah B. (Goodhue) Bowen; 
great-grandson of Henry and Amanda (Monroe) Bowen; great-'-grandson of 
Jabez Boicen, Colonel, First Regt., Rhode Island Militia, Deputy-Governor of 
Rhode Island, Member Council of War and other committees. 

AUBREY .RUSSELL BOWLES, Jr., Lieutenant, A. E. P., Richmond, Va. (32946). 
Son of Aubrey Russell ami Ida Gertrude (Hoekaday) Bowles; grandson of 
Drury Wood and -Regina (Elmore) Bowles; great-grandson of Drury Wood 
Knight and Elizabeth (Richardson) Bowles; great-'-grandson of Knight 
Bowles, private, Virginia Militia. 

HARRY EUDWIG WEBER BOWLES, Second Lieutenant, A. E. P., Detroit, 
Mich. (3.3635), Son of Frank Irving and Madge B. (Weber) Bowles; grand- 
son of Ludwig and Jerucia (Martin) Weber; great-grandson of John and 
Mary (Smith) Martin; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Martin, private, Fourth 
Battalion, Pa. Troops, Captain, Virginia Militia; great-grandson of Thomas 
and Jerucia Jane (Post) 'Smith; great a -grandson of Joseph Post, private, 
Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 

HURLBUT CHAPMAN BOWMAN, Chicago, 111. (33393). Son of James Mont- 
gomery and Eleanor Graff (Cockey) Bowman; grandson of John Hanson 
Thomas and Elizabeth Ann (Ilurlbut) Cockey; great-grandson of John and 
Elizabeth (Zantzinger) Cockey; great-grandson of John Cockey, Captain, 
Col. Edward Cockcy's Battalion, Baltimore County, Maryland Militia; great- 
grandson of Lemuel and Ann E. (Phelps) Ilurlbut; great-grandson of 
Jeremiah Wilcox Phelps, private, Conn. Militia. 

JOHN MONTGOMERY BOWMAN, Chicago, 111. (33380). Son of James Mont- 
gomery and Eleanor Graff (Cockey) Bowman; grandson of John Hanson 
Thomas and Elizabeth Ann (Ilurlbut) Cockey; great-grandson of John and 
Elizabeth (Zantzinger) Cockey; grcaF'-giandson of John Cockey, Captain, 
Baltimore County, .Maryland Militia, Member Maryland Council of Safety; 
great-grandson of Lemuel and Ann H. (Phelps) Ilurlbut; great-grandson 
of Jeremiah Wilcox Phelps, private, Conn. Militia. 

BERTRAM) FRANCIS BOWSER, New York, N. Y. <33~A3). Sou of Lewis 
and Elizabeth (Noel) Bowser; grandson of Edward and Emily (Dumas)' 



KKCJSTKR OF NEW MEMBERS. 



^3 



Noel; great-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Paulin) Dumas; great-grandson 
of Antoine Paulin (Paulint), Captain, Independent Company, Col. M'osea 
Llazen's Regt., Cont'l Troops. 

STANLEY IIlvSTON BOYD, Canton, Ohio, (33439>. Son of Charles Thomas 
and Nellie (Ilesfcesn) Boyd; grandson of Thomas Warner and Margaretta M. 
(Bowiuau) lleston; great-grandson of Isaac and Mary Ann (Jones) I lesion; 
great-grandson of Edward IWnner liesion, Captain and Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Philadelphia Militia. 

WILLIAM AUSTIN BRADFORD, Chicago, 111. .33004). Son of William 
Talbott and Grizella Ann (Parkinson) Bradford; grandson of James M. and 
Arsenelh (Talbott) Bradford; great-grandson of Austin and Elizabeth (Herd) 
Bradford; groat-grandson of Alexander Bradford, Lieutenant, Fauquier 
Count)', Virginia Militia; great-grandson of David and Harriet (Harding) 
Talbott; great-grandson of Edward and Elizabeth (Standiford) Talbott; 



gnaC-grandson of -Edward Talbott] Justice of the Peace, Baltimore County, 
Maryland, Member .Maryland Convention of '76; great ' grandson of John 
Talbott, private, Baltimore County, Maryland Militia. 

DONALD DUNBAR BRADISH, New York, N, Y. (32096). Son of Walter F. 
and Frances (Suctt) Bradford; grandson of Martin Bradish and Louisa Ann 
(Gilson) Bradish; great-grandson of David and Amelia Maria (Colville) 
Bradisli; great a -grands6n of David Bradish, Major, Col. Timothy Bigelow's 

Thirteenth Mass. Regt., Cont'l Army. 

CHARLES ALBERT BRADY, Rochester, N. Y. (32616). Son of Charles A. 
ami Adelia Sila (Aldridge) Brady; grandson of Albert and Sarah Ann 
(Day) Aldridge; great-grandson of Martin and Mary (Conkey) Aldridge; 
great-grandson of Jonas Conkey, Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

WILSON FISK BRAINARD, Glen Rid K c, N. J. (337-f). Son of Fi.sk and 
Cynthia E. ('fownc) Brainard; grandson of John and Eliza (Day) Brainard; 
great-grandson of Frederic and Anna Brainard; great-grandson of Ezra and 
Jerusha (Smith) Brainard ; great-grandson of Jnsiah Brainard, Ensign, 
Fourth Battalion, Conn. Militia, taken prisoner at Norwalk. 

HENRY ALLEN I!KA [NERD, Neb. (p$9#6). Supplemental. Son of Henry 
Hall and Maria L Stetson Biainerd; grandson of Tinner ami Thankful 
(Lombard) Stetson; great-grandson of Bachelor Stetson, Matrons and bom- 
bardier, Mass. Militia, wounded at Bennington. 

UNDEN WENTZEIy BRIDCLMAN, Maplewood, N. J. (33001). Son of Wenizel 
A. and Florence Linden (.Green) Bridgeman; grandson of John Linden and 
Josephine (Russell) Green; great-grandson of Isaac Fairbanks and Catherine 
(Van Steenburgh) Russell; great-grandson of Isaac Russell, Lieutenant ami 
Captain, Thirteenth Regt., Mass. Cont'l Infantry, widow pensioned. 

ALBERT HENRY BRIGGS, Elma, N. Y. (32717); Son of Joseph Benson and 
Altha (Wilbor) Briggs; grandson of Joseph Benson and Hoper (Benson) 
Brigs; great-grandson of Jose I'll Brif^s, private, Captain Nyer's Company, 
Colonel Sprout's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

JOHN ADDISON BRIGGS, Chicago, III. (33394). Son of Joseph and Mary 
Ellen (Swett) Briggs; grandson of John and Renumber (Ferry) Ssvett; 
great-grandson of John and Betsy (Warren I Swett; great-grandson of Stephen 
Swell, Surgeon, Mass. Militia. 

NELSON M. BRINK ERH OFF, Philadelphia, Fa. (32175). Son of J. Frank and 

Anna Laura (Miltcn) Rrinkcr hol'f ; grandson of Isaac F. and Margaret R. 
(Mont/) I'.iinkcrholf; ei eat -gi andson of James and Susan (Range) Brinker- 
holf; great-grandson of John Bnnkerho0, private, York County, Pa. Militia. 



24 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUT ION 

AYI^ORD LINCOLN BRISTOL, Toledo, Ohio (Conn. 3JS61). Son of George 
W. anil Susie 1\ (Kinny) Bristol; garndson of George G. and I,uey Jane 
(CaMelon) Bristol; great-grandson of George Gideon and Polly (Gaylord) 
Bristol; great 2 -grandson of Gideon Bristol, Corporal, Conn. Cont'l Tropps, 



pensioned, 
YON EDISON BRISTOW, Gloucester Point, Va. (335^3). Son of Lewis 
Shuck and Nellie Blanche (Games) Bristow; grandson of L'arkin S. and 
Catharine (Seward) Bristow; great-grandson of Benjamin and Anne 
(Saunders) Bristow, Jr.; great a -grandson of Benjamin Bri&tozv, private, Sixth 
Regt., Virginia Cont'l Troops. 



Kegt., Virginia Lont 1 I roops. 
ILLIS S. BRITTON, Veterans' Home, Wis. (32659). Son of Hiram Z. and 
Harriett Britton; grandson of Samuel Britton, Sergeant, New Hampshire 
•.Militia, pensioned; great-grandson of Ebcneser Britton, Member New Hamp- 
shire Committee of Safety, Delegate to Provisional Congress. 
KNRY HARRINGTON BROADFOOT, Rrverpoint, R. I. (32482). Son of 
James Templeton and Lillian May (Harrington) Broadfoot; grandson of 
Alden and Sarah Angelina (Mason) Harrington; great-grandson of Jesse 
and Mary (Leavitt) Mason; great"-grandson of Nathaniel and Sally (Stone) 
Mason; great :i -grandson of Joseph and Anne (Prentiss) Mason; greaC- 
grandson of Benjamin Mason, Chairman, Committee of Inspection, Dublin, 
New Hampshire, Signer of Declaration of Rights, Etc. 

WALTER DUDLEY BROCKFTT, New* Haven, Conn. (33454). Son of William 
E. and , Grace C. (Clark) Brockett; grandson of William A. and Louise 
(Eaton) Brocktet; great-grandson of Fli and Lucy (Atwater) Brockett; 
great--grandson of Isaiah Brockett, Corporal, Conn. Militia. 

WILLIAM E. BROCKFTT, New Haven, Conn. (33455). Son of William A. 
and Louise (Eaton) Brockett; grandson of Eli and Lucy (Atwater) Brockett; 
great-grandson of Isaiah Brockett, Corporal, Conn. Militia. 

JOHN WINFIELD BRODFRICK, Hillside Township, N. J. (33730). Son of 
John and Electa M. Broderick; grandson of John and Faster B. (Winfield) 
Broderick; great-grandson of William Winfield, private, Fourth Regt., Orange 
County, New York Militia, widow pensioned. 

WILLIS BRODIIEAD, Captain, U. S. M. Corps, A. E. P., Detroit, Mich. 
(33643). Son of John T. and Jessie (Willis) Brodhead; grandson of 
Nathaniel and Hannah (Parker) Willis, Jr.; great-grandson of Nathaniel 
Willis, Bombardier, Colonel Craft's First Regt., Mass. Artillery, Editor 
Independent Chronicle; great-'-grandson of Charles Willis, Corporal, Mass. 
Trooi 



FIX 



I roops. 

JAR FUGFNF BROOKS, N. J. (16605). Supplemental. Son of Samuel 
and Anna (Matthews) Brooks; grandson of Samuel and Dorothy (Leonard) 
Brooks; great-grandson of Samuel and Eunice (Dean) Brooks; great" 
grandson of B.benezer Brooks, private; Conn. Militia and Fourth Regt., Cont'l 
1 ,ine. 
RSON BROOKS, Montclair, N. J. (33498). Son of Horace and Mary O. 
Emerson) Brooks; grandson of Andrew Leonard and Mary J. G. (Clapp) 
Cme'rson; great-grandson of Asa Clapp, private, Mass. Militia for Rhode 



EM El 
( 

r<; 

Island Sei 



I M.I III 1 vTH. i \ 11. c. 

ERIC GREGG BROTHERTJN, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32993), Son of John and 
Martha Gregg (Kinne) Bmtherlin; grandson of Henry Hale and Sarah 
(Gregg) Kinne; grealgi. imbon of Andrew and Martha (Potter) Gregg; 
great-grandson of James Bolter, Major-General, Pa. Militia. 

MITCHELL BRONK, Stoncham, Mass. (.5.5051). Son of Abram and Cynthia 
(Brewster) Bronk; grandson of Stephen and Anna (Pierce) Brewster; great 
grandson of Joseph Brewster, private, Captain Mott's Company, Sixth Regt., > 
Conn. Militia; grral-gnindson of Nail.au iind M.n> (McClongh) Pie.ee; 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 225 

grcat--gi-andson of Nathan Fierce, Captain, Col. Scth Warner's Regt., Berk- 
shire County, Mass. Militia, died in service; great-grandson of Joseph and 
Sarah (Ceer) Brewster; greats-grandson of Isaac Gccr, Captain, Conn. "Con- 
ditional" Militia. 

CKCII, PRESTON BROWN, South Portland, Maine (32439). Son of Alonzo 

and Addie (Shillings) Brown; grandson of Leonard and Susan (— ) Shilling-,; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Sally ( — ) Shillings; great-grandson of Simeon 
Shillings, private, Col. Jonathan Mitchell's Regt, Mass. Militia. 

CTJNTON CHARIvK'S BROWN, Boston, Mass. (3^59-'). Son of Charles 
Warren and Myrtella (Champion) Brown; grandson of Edmund D. and 
Abigail Bracket (Androus) Brown; great-grandson of Reubin and Roxanna 
(Sherwood) Brown; great 2 -grandson of Joel Brown, private, Thirteenth and 
Second Regis., New York Militia. 

I-UJOTT BASSET'f BROWN, Springfield, Mass. (3.5055)- Son of Plumb and 
Rebecca (Bassett) Brown; grandson of Plumb and Olive E. (Crissey) 
Brown; great-grandson of Benjamin and Eunice (Burr) Crifsey; great 3 - 
grandson of Daniel and Betty (Brown) Burr; great 3 -grandson of Titus 
Brozvn, private, Ninth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

GEORGE EARL BROWN, Greeley, Colo. (3144-1). Son of George Washington 
and Mary Janett (Walkins) Brown; grandson of William and Sophrouia 
(.Sehofield) W'atkins; great-grandson of Oliver W'atkins, private, Berkshire 
County, Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

GEORGE OLIVER BROWN, St. Paul, Minn. (31840). Son of Abraham Oliver 
and Mary Caroline (Bates) Brown; grandson of Seneca and Sally (Goold) 
Brown; great-grandson of Phineas and Betsy (Smith) Goold ; great--grandsou 
of James Goold, Lieutenant, Colonel Cilley's Regt., New Hampshire Troops, 
wounded at Bemis Heights, pensioned. 

liAROED EAWTOX BROWN, Kdgcuood, R. T. (32498). Son of Arnold C. 
and Gretchen M. (Eeonhardt) llrOwn; grandson 01" Henry II. ami Mary 
S. (Wilbur) llrown; great-grandson of William R. and Almira C. G. 
(Cleveland) Wilbur; grea* 2 -grandspn of Albro and Sarah (Angell) Cleve- 
land; greai--g.and.son of Israel Angell, Colonel, Second Battalion, Rhode 
Island Conn Infantry. 

HENRY SEABURY BROWN, Providence, K. I. (32476). Son of Arnold 
Cleveland and Gretchen Margaret (Uonhardt) llrown; grandson of Henry 
Harris and Mary Susan (Wilbur) Brown; great-grandson of William 
Ramsdell and Almira Charlotte Gardner (Cleveland) Wilbur; great 3 -grandson 
of Albro and Saiah (Angell) Cleveland; great B -grandson of Israel Angell, 
Colonel, Second Rhode Island Regt., ContM Army. 

IIORACK RUSSEW. BROWN, Major, A. C, II. S. A., Utile Rock, Ark. (3170,). 
Son (if George Russell and Mary E. (Brown) .Brown; grandson of Eeverett 
Russell and Catherine Ann (Ostrander) Brown; great-grandson of Joseph 
Patterson Brown, Jr.; great-grandson of Joseph Patterson Brown; great 3 - 
grandson of Abraham Brow'n, private, Mass. Militia. 

1/EWJS DOUGT,AS I'.ROWN, Houston, Texas (l,a. 3*548). Sou of James 
Hunter and ["Catherine (Kingsbury) Brown; grandson of Andrew J. and 
..Elizabeth (Lewis) (Minor) llmwn; great-grandson of Samuel Overton and 
Kydia E. (Eewis) Minor; great-grandson of Thomas Walker and Elizahcth 
(Meriwether) Lewis; great 3 -grandson of Nicholas tewxs, Colonel, Albemarle 
County, Virginia Militia, .against Cherokee Indians in '76. 

MARSHALL EUDINGTON BROWN, Richmond, Ya. (320.5,). Son of Robert 
Imdiugtun and Margaret Neeson (Woods) Brown; grandson of John J. and 
Lmma l ( ou ( I ,udine,l,,n ) Brown; e,realgrandson of Robert and Ann 
(Hawthorn) Brown; gi < al --grandson of John Hawthorn, private, Col. Thomas 
Proctor's Ba. Artillery ; 'great-grandson of Zalmon and T.oviln (Ilagans) laid- 



226 



SONS OK Tlllv AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



ington; great'-grandsofl of Zalinon and Phoebe (Simkins) LutKng.ton; great 8 - 

grandson of Comfort tu'dvigton, Captain, Second Regt., Dutchess County, 
New York .Minute Men. 

PAUL W'lNTIIROP BROWN, Si. Lotus, .Mo. (32557). Son of Henry Lewis 
and Mary Osborne ( I lallant iue ) Brown; grandson of Rbenczer and E. A. 
(Watkiiis) I'.allantine; great-grandson of Hbene'scr ttallantine, Surgeon's 
Male in Col. Thomas Dixon's Sixth -Mass. CoiVt'l Troops: grandson of 
l,cwis and Mary Elinor (kuowllon) Brown; gn a! grandson of Robert 
Knowlton; great~grandsoti of Hphraim KnotvUoiv, private; Essex County, 
Mass. Militia. 

PHILIP FRANCIS BROWN, Richmond, \'a. (33564). Son of Edward 1. and 
Martha Susan (Ruckcr) Brown; grandson of Isaac and Mary (Christian) 
■ Rucker; great-gi-andsoii of Ambrose Rucker, Captain, Amherst County, Vir- 
ginia Militia. 

KOYAI, HUNTER IIKOWX, Newark, N. j . (.j-";-'.?). Son of Willard W. and 
Kavourctta (Clark) 13 town; grandson of James \V. and Evelina I >. ( Brincker- 
lioff) Clark; great-grandson of Garrett Blauvelt and Mrs. Elizabeth (Dayton) 
Mullen Brinckerhoff ; great"-grandson of Henry and Frances Brinckci hofT ; 
great-grandson of John G. BriHrkcrtioff, Captain, Second Regt., Dutchess 
County, New York Militia. 

WILLIAM CLAYTON BROWN, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. (32891). Son of William 
K. and Eliza J. (Ilotehkiss) Brown; grandson of William A. and Cornelia 
(Ives) Brown; great-grandson of William and Naomi (Hull) Brown; great- 
grandson of Robert Brown, Captain, Third Company, Fifth Battalion, Conn. 
Militia. 

WILLIAM MORTIMER BROWN, Rochester, N. V. (313(>H). Son of Thomas 
Anthony and Lmily (Ayer) Brown; grandson of Thomas Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Pain) Broun; great-grandson of William Brown, private, Second Regt., 
Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia, died from imprisonment on "Jersey" 
prison ship. 

GEORGE HENRY BROWN, New Haven, Conn. (32269). Son of Moody M. 
and Ellen (June) Brown; grandson of Reuben and Kesiah (Bassctt) 
Tucker; great-grandson of Samuel and Abigail Mary (McNeil) Bassctt; 
greaP'-grandson of Abruni B'assett, Captain, Conn. Militia. 

CHARtES LRDMAN BRUNER, Omaha, Neb. (31024). Son of John Gangewere 
and Judith (Kidman) Brumier; grandson of Andrew Britncr, private, Second 
Battalion Associators, Northampton County, l'a. Troops. 

JAMES BENJAMIN BRUNER, Omaha, Neb. (31023). Son of John Gangewere 
and Judith (Lrdmau) B rimer j grandson of Andrew Bruncr, private, Second 
Battalion Associators, Northampton County, l'a. Troops. 

THOMAS COOPER BRUNER, Omaha, Neb. (.jio-<r>). 'Sou of John C.angewcrr 
and Judith (Kidman) Bruncr; grandson of Andrew Bniner, private, Second 
Battalion Associators, Northampton , County, l'a. Troops. 

HENRY RAKKR BRYANT, Spiingf.eld, Mass. (33062). Son of Andrew Symmes 
and Sarah (Birnie) Bryant; grandson of William and Emily (Bliss) Bryant; 
great-grandson of John Bryant, Captain- Lieutenant, Colonel Mason's Mass. 
Artillery Artificers'; Cont'l Army, and Commissary of Issues. 

OIIARLKS WARREN BLIHKR, Providence, R. 1. (32489). Sou of Samuel \l. 
ami Mary W. (Todd) Rubier; grandson of Samuel C. and Lydia (Could) 
Todd; great-grandson of John and Ruth (Perkins) Gould, Jr.; great- grands, m 
of John Could, Member Mass. Provisional Congress, 1778. " 

C1IARLKS KRANCIS BUCKLKY, Sergeant, U. S. A., New York, N. Y. (32711). 
Son of Prank James and Ella (Rosenbury) Buckley; grandson of Jol 



Malvina Elizabeth (Staring) Buckley; great-grandson of Matli 



Ad 



"> 



REGISTER OF NEW MF.MRFKS. 227 

laide (Lincoln) faring; greatr-grandson of Adam and Mary Margaret 
(Misfers) Staring; great 3 -grandsan of Niclwlgs Staring, Second Lieutenant, 
Fourth Regt., Tryon County, New York Militia, 

HARRY MASTERS BUCKLIN, Jersey City, N. J. (N. V. 3-Sq 0- Son of 
Clark Abbey and Julia Frances (Masters) Bucklin; grandson of Gouverneur 
Morris and Arabella (Abbey) Rucklin; great-grandson of Denephus and 
Catharine (Clark) Abbey; great-grandson of Peter and Hannah (Allien) 
Abbey; great 8 -grandson of Thomas Abbey, Captain, Third Regt., Conn. Une; 
grandson of David Jenkins and Ann Eliza (Owen) Masters; great-grandson 
of Silas and Sarah (Jenkins) Masters; grc-at--grandsoii of Joel Jenkins, 
Lieutenant, Tenth and Third Regis., Mass. Militia. 

JOSEPH SUMNER RUClvNAM, Eastport, Maine (32446). Son of Sumner 
and Adelaide (Rice) Rucknam; grandson of William and Sarah Ann 
(White) Rice; great-grandson of Thomas and — (Warwick) White; great- 
grandson' of Jot ham White, Ensign, and Quartermaster, New Hampshire 
Militia. 

HARRY A. BUFFUM, Rockland, Maine (3.2435). Son of David Hanson and 
Charlotte F.lizabeth (Stickney) I'.ulTum; grandson of Alexander Hamilton 
and I'.etsy 11am (Chesley) Stickney; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Charlotte 
(Odlin) Stickney; great--grandson of Thomas Stiehncy, Colonel in General 
Stark's Regt., New Hampshire Militia, and Member Committee of Safety and 
Constitutional Convention. 

|'!;RI,I;V RUl'US BUGBEE, Hanover, N. II. (3<J534). Son of Justin and 
Abbie McMillan (Dana) Bugbee; grandson of Nathan R. and Lorenza 
(Woodward) Dana; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Dean) Dana, 
great--grandson of John Winchester ami Hannah Pope (Putnam) Dana; 
greaC-grandson of Israel I'ntnam, Major-General, Cont'l Army. 

DANA RIPLEY BULLEN, Schenectady, N. Y. (Ma-s. 33293)- Sou of George 
and Maria Jane (Ripley) P.ullen; grandson of Joseph .and Frances Green 
(Boardman) Bullen; great-grandson of Sylvanus and Phehe (Dana) Board- 
man; grcaf 3j grandson of George Dana, Sergeant, Mass. Minute Men, at 
Lexington Alarm. 

CHARLES CLIFFORD BUNTON, Pittsburgh, Pa. (3J164). Son of issac N. 
ami Jennie ( 1 lemlrickson ) I'.unton; grandson of Devid Lawrence and Mar- 
garetta Hays (Park) I lemlrickson ; great-grandson of Samuel and Lucy 
(Imlay) Hendricksou ; great 2 -grandson of David Hetldrkltson, Colonel, New 
Jersey Militia; grandson of James and Elizabeth (Speer) Bunton; great- 
grandson of Alexander and Mary (Rower) Speer; great"-grandson of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (North) Power; greaC-grandsnn of George \ r orth, Lieutenant) 
Fifth Pa. Regt., Brigade Quartermaster, Second Pa. Brigade. 

WILLIAM KENNEDY BUNTON, Wilkinsburg, Pa. (3117O. Son of Isaac N. 
and Jennie (H endrickson) Ronton; grandson of James and Elizabeth (Speer) 
Bunton; great-grandson of Alexander and Mary (Power) Speer; greal-- 
grandson of Thomas and I\lizabeth (North) Power; great 3 -grandson of George 
North, Lieutenant, Pa. Cont'l Troops. 1 

EDWARD MANNING BURACKER, Baltimore, Md. (331 12). Son of Edward 
Michael and Cornelia (Manning) Ruracker; grandson of Nathaniel and Mary 
Araminta (Chase) Manning; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Mary (Bnggs) 
Manning; great--grandson of Nathaniel Manning, private, Colonel Latimer's 
and Colonel Chapman's Regts., Conn. Militia. 

ELMER VALENTINE RURDETT, Clinton, Mass. (33930). Son of George W. 
and Elizabeth J. (Valentine) Rurdett; grandson of Nathan ami Margaret 
(Darling) Rurdett; great-grandson of John and Abigail (Sargent) Rurdett; 
great-grandson of John Burdeit Uhinlit), private, Col. Job Cushing's Regt., 
Mass. Militia. 



228 SONS 01' Till' AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

JAMES CROWE BURDETT, Burdctt, La. (:t2 77 n). Son of Giles Gibbons and 
Lconea Allen (Crowe) Burdfctt; grandson of Joel Allen and Elizabeth 
(Gibbons) Burdett; great-grandson of Jesse and Mildred (Crane) liurdett; 
great-grandson of William Burdett (Bur Jet), private, Captain Pillow's Com- 
pany, Mounted South Carolina Troops. 

WILLIAM JAMKS BURGE, Ldgewood, R. I. (32494); Son of Lemuel and 
Elizabeth Frances (Shaw) Burge; grandson of James Bir-ge (Burge), private, 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

ANDREW HOLMES BURGESS, Cicero, 111, (32233). Sou of Henry T. and 
Lluiira F. (Norn's) Burgess; grandson of Thomas and Levania (Smith) 
Burgess; great-grandson of Benjamin Burgess, private, Mass. Militia. 

DON CILLHAM BURNSIDK, Detroit, Mich. (3364.x). Son of Edwin A. and 
Minnie Belle (Morris) Burnskle; grandson of Robert Fulton and Elizabeth 
A. (Humphrey) Morris; great-grandson of David and Frances (Millard) 
Morris, Jr.; great-grandson of David Morris; great s -grandson of Jonathan 
Morris, private, Sixth Battalion, Chester County, Pa. Militia. 

MORRIS LYON BURR, VVestport, Conn, (jj.-';.sL Son of William Uanford and 
ICliza M. (Huntington) Burr; grandson of William lianford and Mary A. 
(Jennings) Jim r ; great-grandson of Abraham Gould and Anna (Burr) Jen- 
nings; great-grandson of Isaac and Abigail (Gould) Jennings; great-- 
grandson of Abraham Gould, Colonel, Fairfield, Conn. Militia, killed in battle 
at Ridgcfield; great-grandson of Isaac Jennings, Lieutenant, Conn. Militia; 
great-grandson of Zahnon and Mary (lianford) Burr; great-grandson of 
Daniel Burr, private, Fifth Regt., Conn. Troops. 

SAMUEL MILLER BUSHNELL, Atlanta, Ga. (Mich. 3375<>)- Son of John 
Michelberger and Anna (Terrill) Bushnell; grandson of John W. and Mar- 
gretta (Michelberger) Bushnell; great-grandson of Benjamin and Maria 
(Baker) Bushnell; great-grandson of John BusJmell, private, Major Skinner's 
Regt., Conn. Light Horse. 

ARTHUR ST. CLAIR RUTLFR, Poplar Grove, \'a. (32984). Son of William 
Fleming and Virginia Judith (Winston) Butler; grandson of Ruben and 
Elizabeth (Ruiiin) Butler; great-grandson of Brands Ratlin, Member Mecklen- 
burg, Virginia, Committee of Safety. 

CECIL LOOM IS BURTON, Bismarck, N. D. (26572}. Son of Clark Ashton 
and Mary F. (Loomis) Burton; grandson of .Sherman ami Fidelia (Strong) 
Loomis; great-grandson of Reuben and Lydia (Spencer) Loomis; great 2 - 
grandson of. Israel Loomis, Jr., private, Conn. Line. 

GEORGE WILLIAM BURTON, Feoria, III. (3.5070). Son of Robert Alson and 
Fannie S. (Way) Burton; grandson of George B. and Jane (MeCord) Way; 
great-grandson of Andrew and Mary M. (Brevitt) Way; great-grandson of 
John Brevitt, Lieutenant, Fourth Battalion, Maryland Cont'l Troops, 

ROBERT PICKETT BURWELL; Tobaceoville, Va. (31 671). Son of Blair and 
Virginia (Pickett) Burwell; grandson of Blair and Delia (Harris) Bnrwell; 
great-grandson of Lewis and Anne (Spottswood) Burwell; great-grandson of 
Armstead and Christian (Blair) Burwell; great :l -gi andson of Lcivis Burwell. 
Colonel, Mecklenburg County, Virginia Militia. 

PIERCE BUTLER, New Orleans, La. (33224). Son of James Pierce and Mary 
Louisa (Harrison) Butler; grandson of Pierce and Louisa (Sterling) Butler; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Nancy (Ellis) Butler; great-grandson of 
Thomas Butler, Captain, Third Regt., Pa. Troops, wounded. 

DUANE OWEN RUTTERFIKLD, Detroit, Mich. (3303*). Son of Wells Duane 
and Helen (Ilossie) Buttei field ; grandson of James Duane and Emily Ward 
(Owen) Butterfiehl; great-grandson of Loderick and Ann (Carpenter) Butter- 
field; great-grandson of Jonathan Butterfiehl, Jr., Corporal, Vermont Militia. 



UKCISTKK OF NEW MEMBKUS. 220. 

JAMBS DUREI<lv i'.UT'Ji;i<I<*IJ;i.I>, Jr., Highland Park, Mich. (.33(>37C Son 
of James Duell and Sarali Jessie (Smith) Butterfield; grandson of Jaraes 
Duane and Emily Ward (Owen) Butterfield; great-grandson of Loderick and 
Ann (Carpenter) Butterfield, ; great?-grandson of Jonathan Butterfield, Jr., 
Corporal, Vermont Militia. 

ALPHEUS EDWARD BYERtV, Des Moines, Iowa (32784). Son of John 
Edward and Clara Bell Howie Byerly; grandson of Andrew Jackson and 
Mary Elizabeth (Hash) Byerly; great-grandson of Michael and Mary (!,nkc- 
hangh) Byerly; gnat- grandson of Francis Byerly, private, Ca'pt. Moses 
Carson's Company, Westmoreland Connly, Pa. Militia. 

VERNON E. CADY, Everett, Wash. (32470). Son of Walter E. and May 
Muslin) Cady; grandson of Elias 15. and Juliet (Arrowsmithj Cady; great- 
grandson of Seth B. and Sally (Jdslin) Cady; great-grandson of Ellas Cady, 
private, Col. Elisha Mory's Regt., Rhode Island Militia. 

ORA BUTLER CAIIOON, Chicago, 111. (32234). Son of Levi and Willie Ann 
(Wells) Cahoon; grandson of 'Wilber and Tirza (Moor) Cahoon; great- 
grandson of Joseph Moor, private, Third Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

JUNIUS CAIJDWElX Brunswick, Ca. (Ky. 33031). Son of James Guthrie and 
Nannie (Standiford) Caldwell; grandson of William Beverly am) Ann 
Augusta (Guthrie) Caldwell; great-grandson <,f William and Ann (Traluic) 
Caldwell; great s -grandson of John Caldwell, private, Virginia Line, Cont'l 
Establishment; great 3 -grondson of David Caldwell, private, Third, Fifth and 
Seventh Virginia Regis., Cont'l Line; great-grandson of James and Eliza 
(Prather) Guthrie; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Churchill) Rrather; 
great ;, -grandson of Armistead Churchill, Colonel, Second Battalion, Fauquier 
County, Virginia Militia; great-grandson of William Trabue, Sergeant, Vir- 
ginia Militia; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Haskins) Trabue; 
great 3 -grandson of Hubert Haskins, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chesterfield County, 
Virginia Militia. 

JOSEPH STARKE CALFEE, St. Louis, Mo. (32559). Sou of John A and 
Julia A. (Davidson) Calfee; grandson of William and Elvira (Howard) 
Calfee; great-grandson of li.zehiel Howard, private in Capt. Silas Howell's 
Company, Colonel Ogden's First Regt., New Jersey Cont'l Line. 

HIRAM CALKINS, Ridgewood, N. J. (33746). Son of Hiram ami Mary Jane 
(Ranch) Calkins; grandson of Elisha Deming and Abigail (Lockwood) 
Calkins; great-grandson of Job and Sarah (Uickok) Lockwood; great 2 - 
grandson of James Lockwood, Sergeant, Conn. Militia, pensioned, four years' 
si rv ice. 

RALPH JULIAN CANINE; Lieutenant, U. S. Army, Iml. (32045). Son of 

Edwin N. and Nannie C. (Lucas) Canine, grandson of William Ralph and 
Margaret Ann (McCord) Canine; great-grandson of Refer and" Hester Ann 
(Clark; Canine; great-grandson of Ralph and Margaret (Warmen) Canine; 
great :: -grandsnn of I'eter Canine (Camine), Orderly Sergeant and Quarter- 
master, Somerset County, New Jersey Militia. 

JASON BARNES CANFIELD, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32163). Son of Aleck Caskey 
ami Laura Edna (Barnes) Canlield; gi, unison of Elmore Alfonso ami Abby 
Luella (Fisher) Raines; great-grandson of William and Rhebe (Bonton) 
Haines; great-grandson of Robert and Agnes (Graham) Barnes; greaf' 1 - 
grandson of I'eter Barnes, private, Captain Morton's Company, Col. lames 
Holmes' Fourth New York Regt. 

MAIILON HUMPHREY CARADINE, Munroe, Wis. (32658). Son of Hector 
X. ]'.. and Sophy (Humphrey) Garadine; grandson of Mahlon M. and 
Lucinda (Davis) Humphrey; great-grandson of George and Polly (Galtry) 

Humphrey; grcat-gi andson of Cornelius and Sarah (Woolsey) Humphrey; 
gr<at ;, -graudson of Cornelius Ilumfdirey. Colonel, New York Militia, Member 
New York Second Provisional Congress and Committee of Safety. 



2 3 



SONS OF TI1IC AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



WILLIAM BENJAMIN CARDOZA, New York City, N. Y. (33615). Son of 

Abraham Hart and Sarah (Peixotto) Cardozo; grandson of Daniel E. M. 

and Rachel Mendez (Scixas) Peixotto; great-grandson of Benjamin Mendez 
Scixds, Officer, New York Militia. 

GEORGE HAVENS CAREY, New York, N. Y. (33359-)- Hon of George Ring- 
liam and Ann Amelia (Havens) Carey; grandson of Ralpli and Emily (Smith,) 
Carey; great-grandson of plcazer and Mehitable (Robinson) Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of Abner Robinson, Captain, Col. Samuel McPellan's Regt., Conn. 
Militia and Provisional Regt. 

PERT EOUIS CARMAN, Lancaster, Ohio (33444). Son of Howard and 
Minerva (Bixler) Carman; grandson of Adam and Mary (Moore) Pixier; 
great-grandson of John and Mary (Picking) Moore; great--grandson of 
Jacob and Mary (Jacobs) Moore; great 3 -grandson of Peter Mohr (Moore), 
private, Seventh Battalion, New York Count}' Militia. 

CHAUPCS -PPOOM PIKED CARMAN, Metuchen, N. J. (3.2608). Son of Theo- 
dore Prclinghuy-cn and S. lionise (Osborp) Caiman; grandson of Melanchton 
freeman and .Ann Maria (Ayersj Carman; great-grandson of Phiucas Carman, 
private, Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia. 

HOWARD THOMAS CARMAN, Lancaster, Ohio (33442). Son of Pert Eouis 
and Nellie J. (K.) Carman; grandson of Howard and Minerva (Pixier) 
Carman; great-grandson of Adam and Mary (Moore) Pixlei great-grandson 
oi John and Mary (Picking) Moore; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary 
(Jacobs) Moore; great'-grandson of Voter Mohr (Moore), private, Seventh 
Battalion, New York County, Pa. Militia. 

CHARLES HAM PIN CARPENTER, Bristol, N. IP (30537). Son of Eugene 
P. and Gertrude Rebecca Fletcher (Hamlin) Carpenter; grandson of Elijah 

and pmily (Penno) Carpenter; great-grandson of Prccman and Hannah 
(Norcross) Penno; great-grandson of • ami Ruth (Fletcher) Norcross; 
Krcat :i -grandsoii of Joe! Fletcher, Captain, Colonel Poolittle's Mass. Regt. 
at Pexington Alarm. 

WIPC1AM PEPAND CARPENTER, Detroit, Mich. (32386.).' Son of Charles 
K. and Jenuelte (Coryell) Carpenter; grandson of George and Eliza (Sher- 
wood) Coriell; great-grandson of Ahrani and Anna (Covert) Coriell; great-- 
grandson of Luke Coverl, Minute Man, Essex County, New Jersey Militia; 
great-grandson of John ami Jennette (Henderson) Sherwood', great--grandsoii 
of Bdiotird Henderson, Ueuteiianl in Capt, Shadrach Phelp's Company, Ver- 
mont Militia: ,great--grnndsou of Abraham Coriell, Minute Man, Middlesex 
1 otinty, New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM HARRISON CARRCTH KRS, Detroit, Midi. (Conn. 33467). Son 
of William and Nancy Quincy (Snyder) Carruthers; grandson of Daniel 
Oil and .Mary Ann (Croney) Snyder; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary 
(Ott) Snyder; great-grandson of John Snyder, Corporal, Maryland Flying 
Camp, wounded, pensioned. 

PERCY JOHN CARTWRIGHT, Whitney, NO). (3_>o 7 3). Son of Pewis N. and 
Cora (Cripps) Cartwright ; grandson of Abel and Adeline (Hillyard) Cart- 
wright; great-grandson of Anson and Amity (Smith) Hillyard; great '- 
grandson of Joshua Hillyard, private, Conn. Militia, and Marine on Conn. 
Brigade "Defense;" great-grandson of Silas and Sally (Heath) Cartwright; 
great-grandson of Chnslo/'lier Carttvright, private, Col. Seth Warner's Cont'l 
Troops, pensioned. 

ALBERT NEVIN CARSON, New Castle, Pa> (32174). Son of Eeander and 

Sarah (White) Carson; grandson of John ami Mary (McMillan) Carson; 
great-grandson of William Carson, private, Cap!. Casper Weitzel's Company, 

Col. Samuel Miles' p a . Rifle Regt., pensioned. 



RFGtSTKR ()l ' NJvW MEMBERS, 



231 



WILLIAM FRANCIS CARTER, St. Louis, Mo. C3\3«'86). Son uf William and 
Maria (Mcllvain) Carter; gftuulsotf of Ziinri A. and Clementina (Chilton) 
Carter; great-grandson of Bekjamih Carter, private, Virginia Militia. 

J'dAVIN \VII,S<>N CASWELL, Portland, Ore. (33125). Son of iCclwin and 
Mary Alice (Wilson) Caswell; grandson of Edwin and Maria ( [Eaton ) Cas- 
well; great-grandson of Warren and Rosamond ( — ) Caswell; great-grandson 
of David Caswell, private, Albany County, New York Militia, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Parley and Rhila (Barnes) Eaton"; great-grandson of 
Wyman and Mercy (Knights) Eaton; greaC-grandson of John Baton, private, 
Captain Lawrence's Company, Colonel Poor's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

GRANDER LUCAS CASEY, Greenwood, Miss. (I, a. 3-753).. Son of Eeaiider 

Lawrence and Elizabeth (Camp) Caseyj grandson of Jacob Ducket and 
Sarah Frances (Lucas) Casey; great-grandson of Levi Casey, Captain, South 
Carolina Militia. 
ROBERT ACLL CI1ADW1CK, Jr., Milwaukee, Wis. (3^655). Son of Robert 
Anil and M y 1 tie A 111.-11 icla (Hreedeu) Cbadwick; grandson of Henry T. and 
Fanny (Berry) lireeden; great -grandson of Uriah an, I Amanda jane (Rich- 
mond) Kerry; great-grandson of James Berry, I'nsign, .'5th Cont'l Infantry. 

I •; I'. I •; X WliriWKV CHAFFEE. Ameiiia, N. D. (33000). Son df Herbert Fuller 
and Carolyn (Toogood) ChalTee; grandson of l\ben Whitney and Amanda 
(Fuller) Chaffee; great-grandson of Joshua Uignall and Hannah (Rirdscy) 
ChalTee; greal-'-g. andsou of Joshua Chaffee, Minute Man, Capt. Lliphalet 
Holmes' Conn. Mililia; great-grandson of Cyrus Sacked and Harriett (Skill; 
Fuller; great 2 -grandson of Nathan and Abagail (Fuller) Skiff, Jr.; great 8 - 
grandson of Nathan Skiff, private in Cajit. Abraham Fuller's Company, Conn. 
Militia; great-grandson of John Fuller, Sergeant, Coin. Militia, pensioned: 

HERBERT LACRANCK CHAFFEE, Ameuia, N. I). v3300i). Sou of Herbert 
Puller and Carolyn (Toogood) Chaffee; grandson of Lben Whitney and 
Amanda (Fuller) Chaffee; great-grandson of Joshua Uignall and Hannah 
(Kirdscy) Chaffee; grcal--gra.ulso.i of Joshua Chaffee, Minute Man, Capt. 
I'diphalet Holmes' Conn. Mililia; great-grandson of Cyrus Sackett and Harriet 
(Skiff) Fuller; great-grandson of John Culler, Sergeant, Conn. Militia, 
pensioned; great--grandson of Nathiin and Abagail (Fuller) Skiff, Jr.; great-- 
grandson of Nathan Skill, private in Capt. Abraham Fuller's Company, Conn. 
Militia. 

OTWAY HEBRON CI I ALKLLY, Richmond, Va. (31673): Son of Ernest 

Howell and Sarah llaskins (Winn) Chal.klcy ; grandson of George and Sarah 
Cornelia (Breeden) Winn; great grandson of William and Sarah (llaskins) 
Breeden; great s -grandson of Aaron and Ann (Brackett) llaskins; great-- 
grandson of Edward llaskins, Member Cumberland County, Virginia, Com- 
mittee of Safety. 

CHARLES LEWIS CHAMBERS, Terre Haute, Ind. (33576). Son of Charles 
Lewis and Anne Elizabeth (Hudson) Chambers; grandson of Mustor and 

Mary (Lewis) Chambers; great-grandson of Charles and —- (Yancey) Lewis; 
great-grandson of Thomas Lewis, Member Virginia House of Burgesses ami 
Convention which ratified Stale Constitution, 
JOHN C. CHAMBERS, Option, J'a. (32170); Son of John A. and Ellen A. 
Chambers; grandson of William and Lydia Chambers; great-grandson of 
John Chambers, private, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

CALBRAITM PERRY CIIAMI'LIN, Buffalo, N. Y. (33370). Son of Oliver 

Hazard I'erry and Ch 1 isl im- M argaret (Lawson) Champlin ..n,!; gramlson of 
Oliver Hazard Perry and Amelia (Tilh-y) Champlm; great-grandson of 
Stephen ami Minerva 1, ( l'ome,„y )' Champlin; great* grandson of Stephen 
Champlin; Sergeant, Rhode Island Troops, and Conn. Cont'J Line, pensioned; 
great 8 grandson of Freeman I'eny, Chief Justice of Rhode Island Court of 



■^ 



SONS OP THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



Common Pleas, President South Kingston, Rhode Island, Town Council, and 
Secretary Rhode Island General Assembly, 1781; great-grandson of John 
Taborer and Amelia (Tew) Tilley; great'-'-grandson of William Tew, Captain, 
Eleventh and Second Regis., Rhode Island Cont'l Infantry 
OLIVER HAZARD PERRY CHAMPLIN, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. (33370. Son of 
Oliver Hazard Perry and Christine .Margaret (Lawson) Champlin 2nd; 
grandson of Oliver Hazard Perry and Amelia (Tilley) Champlin; great- 
grandson of Stepheii and Minerva L. (Pomeroy) Champlin; great 8 -grandson 
of Stephen Champlin, Sergeant, Rhode Island Troops and Conn. Cont'l Line, 
pensioned; great a -grandson of Freeman Perry, Chief Justice Rhode Island 
Court of Common Pleas, President South Kingston, Rhode Island, Town 
Council, and Secretary Rhode Kland General Assembly, 1781; great-grandson, 
of John Taborer and Amelia (Tew) Tilley; greats-grandson of William 
fezv, Captain, Eleventh and Second Regis., Rhode Island Cont'l Infantry. 

GEORGE BRINTON CHANDLER, Rocky Hill, Conn. (32856). Son of James 
Everett and Henrietta X. (Sanborn) Chandler; grandson of Samuel Langdon 
and .Mary S. (Kilgore) Chandler; great-grandson of Moses Chandler, private 
in Captain Frye's Company, Colonel Cilley's New Hampshire Regt., pensioned; 
great--grandson of John Chamiler, Member Committee of Safety. 

HENRY STERLING CIIAPIN, Brooklyn, N. Y. (.Md. 33102). Son of plisha 
Sterling and Laura Catherine (Shaw; Chapin; grandson of John Miss and 
Laura Maynard (Harris) Shaw; great-grandson of Joseph and Lucretia 
(Lord) Harris; great-grandson of Israel Harris, Captain, Berkshire County, 
Mass. .Militia. 

HOWARD MILLAR CIIAPIN, Providence, R. I. (324S5). Son of Charles 
Value and Anna Augusta (Raich) Chapin;. grandson of Joshua IhckneH and 
Jane Catherine Louise (Value) Chapin; great-grandson of Seth and Mary 
(Bicknell) Chapin; gn-at-'-grandson of Sctli Chapin, Lieutenant and Pay- 
master, Thud Regt., Worcester County, .Mass. Militia. 

VYARREN STORRS CIIAPIN, Springfield, Mass. (33063). Son of Gilbert W. 
and Delia P. (Campbell) Chapin; grandson of Joel and Amelia (Parsons) 
Chapin; great grandson of Timothy and Susanna (Terry) Chapin; great 2 - 
grandson of lihenczcr Chapin, Sergeant, Captain Amidou's Company, Col. 
Nathan Taylor's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

FREDERICK DARE CHAPMAN, New York, N. V. (sjUjj). Son of William 
Lincoln and Laura Alice (Dare) Chapman; grandson of William Edgar and 
Ducinda P. (Rudd) Chapman; great-grandson of Isaac and Hannah A. 
( Howell) ' Chapman ; great-- grandson of Thomas Chapman, private, Dutchess 
County, New York Militia. 

ISAAC EDWARD CHAPMAN, Brooklyn, N. Y. (32006). Sou of William 
Edgar and Luanda 1'. (Budd) Edgar; grandson of Isaac and Hannah A. 
(Howell) Chapman; great-grandson of Thomas Chapman, private, Dutchess 
County, New York Militia. 

RALPH EDGAK CHAPMAN, Brooklyn, N. Y. (32608). Son of Isaac Kdwanl 

and William.lta (Mason) Chapman; grandson of William Edgar and l,uemda 

K. (Rudd) Chapman: great-grandtfon of Isaac and Hannah A. (Howell) 

Chapman; great- gi audsnu of Thomas Chapman, private, Dutchess County, New 
York Militia. 

RICHARD BAYLY CHAPMAN", Baltimore, Md. (33850). Son of William |ohn 

and Sallie (Bayly) Chapman; grandson of John Waller and Martha (Weedon) 
Chapman; great-grandson of John Gatesby ami [Elizabeth (Trone) Weedon; 
great-'-grandson of Augustine Weedon, Jr., Sergeant, Colonel Brent's Regt., 
Virginia Troops, pensioned", 
WILLIAM DARE CHAPMAN, New York, N. V. (3262!). Son of William 

Lincoln and I .aura Alice (Dare) Chapman; grandson of William Edgar and > 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 233 

Lueinda F. (Budd) Chapman; great-grandson of Isaac and Hannah A. 

(Howell) Chapman; great 2 -grandson of Thomas Chapvnan, private, Dutchess 

County, New York Militia. 
WII,UAM LINCOLN CHAPMAN, New York, N. Y. (32620). Son of William 

Edgar and Lucinda F. (Budd) Chapman; grandson of Isaac and Hannah A. 

(Howell) Chapman; great-grandson of Thomas Chapman, private, Dutchess 

County, New York Militia. 
IIOI5ART CHATFTELD CHATFIELD, Taylor, 111. (.1239). Supplemental. Son 

of Henry Hohart and Adelaide (Chatfuld) Taylor; grandson of Horace and 

Catherine (Rogue) Chat field; great-grandson of F'ubliirs Virgilius Vogue, 

private, Conn. Militia, pensioned. 
WILLIAM TATOM CIIKNEY, Terre Haute, Ind. (33578). Son of Milton and 

Martha (Coffee) Cheney; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Kirkly) Cheney; 

great-grandson of Thomas Cheney, private, Col. Israel Putnam's Third Conn. 

Regt. ; great--grandson of Wftliam Cheney, private, Colonel Putnam's Third 

Conn. Regt., killed at Bunker Hill. 
HERBERT CIIESEBRO, Sheboygan, Wis. (3-65-1)- Son of Paul and Jane E- 

(Denison) Chescbro; grandson of Benjamin Pendleton and Lydia (Gree.n- 

nian) Chesel.ro; great-grandson of William and Lydia (Pendleton) Chesebro; 

great 2 grandson of Benjamin Pendleton, Lieutenant, Rhode Island Militia. 
JOHN STANLEY CniPDREV, Forest Hill, Va. (3-OJ6). Son of John Howard 

and Helen (Robinson) Children-; grandson of John Thomas and Julia Ann 

Clarke) Childrey; great-grandson of John S. and Nancy (Frayser) Clarke; 

great'-'-grandsun of Jesse Frayser, private, Virginia Militia. 

Wild, 1AM VARRAGUT CIIIPMAN, . San Francisco, Cal. (3273s). Son of 
William Worthmgton ami Caroline Elizabeth McLean (Dwindle) Chipman; 
grandson of Ansel and Elizabeth (Cole) Chipman; great grandson of Matthew 
ami Emma Amy (Ely) Cole (Cowles); greats-grandson of John lily, Colonel 
and Physician, Conn. Militia, prisoner. 

GEORGE BERKELEY CllRtSTIAN, Richmond, Va. (32031). Son of Wdliam 
Pryor and Maria Heath (Berkeley) Christian; grandson of Jam s Doswell 
and Llhu (Pryor) Christian; great-grandson of Tinner Christian, Srond 
Lieutenant, Virginia Troops, ami Assistant Commissary General. 

HORACE r'.ERKELEY CHRISTIAN,, Kiehmoiid, \'a. (31675). Sou of William 
Pryor ami Maria Heath (Berkcdey) Christian; grand- on of James Doswill 
and I'.llen ( Pryor) Christian; great-grandson of Turner Christian, Second 
Lieutenant, Virginia Troops, and Assistant Commissary General. 

DANIEL WHIPPLE CHURCH, Jr., Boise, Idaho (31814). Son of Daniel 
Whipple and Chloe L. (Ramsey) Church; grandson of Joseph Addison and 
Minerva J. (Johnson) Church; great-grandson of Agijah Wheeler and Clara 
Almira (RoweJ Church; great-grandson of Daniel Whipple and Dorothy 
(Wheehr) Church; great-grandson of Jonathan Clnireh, private, New York 
Levies and Albany County, New York Militia. 

IVRUCE BYRNE CLARK, Peoria, 111. (3J075). Son of Willard D. and Susan 
E. (Byrne) Clark; grandson of Joel Warner and Sarah Storrs (Waters) 
Clark; great-grandson of Samuel and Susannah (Gray) (dark, Jr.; great- 
grandson of Samuel Clark, Sergeant, Col. John Ashley's Regt., Mass. Militia; 
great"-grandson of /illiott Cray, private, Mass. Militia, pensioned; great- 
granclsoii of Luther and Sallie (Storrs) Waters; great-grandson of A'athauiel 
Storrs, New Hampshire Minute Man; great-grandson of Hesekiah ll'aters, 
private, Col. Jonathan Chase's Regt., New Hampshire Militia; great-grandson 
of Nathaniel and Ruth (Hall) Storrs; greaC-gt andson of Xalhaniel Hall, 
Lieutenant, Tenth Conn. Infantry; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Mary 
(BUSS) Waters; great--grandson of Asariah Bliss, Member llauover, New 
1 lampshire. Committee of Safetv. 



234 SONS 01- Till-! AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

DAVID l).\.\llil, CLARK, Uorseheads, N. Y. (33613). Son of Harrison and 
Sarah Anna (Warner) Clark; grandson of David C and Sarah iCmily 
( Mersereau) Warner; great-grandson of Peter and Sarah (Layton) Mersereau; 
Starrs, New Hampshire Minute -Man; great-'-grandson of llezekiah Waters, 
great-grandson of John Mersereau, New Jersey Spy and Guide for Washing- 
tun, and Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners. 

HOWARD J. CLARK, Des Moines, Lowa (31966). Son of Riley P. and Juliet 
C. (Davis) Clark; gran.lson of William and Jereusha (Porter) Davis; great- 
grandson of William and Drusella (Olney) Davis; great 2 -grandson of Daniel 
Davis, Caiitain, Mass. Militia, Member local committees. 

IRA ROSS CLARK, Major, A. \\. 1\, M. C, St. Louis, Mo. (33952). Son of 
Japtha and l'anny La Dorcia (.McClatlin) Clark; grandson of William and 
Elizabeth (Uila) Clark; great-grandson of William Clark, private, Hampshire 
County, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN ASA CLARK, Pueblo, Colo. '(-'9513). Supplemental. Son of Joseph Dent 
and Cora (Rose) Clark; grandson of John Burroughs and Mary Elizabeth 
(Clark) Rose; great-grandson of Abraham and Sarah (Garrison) Rose; great- 
grandson of William and Hannah (Burroughs) Rose; great :l -grandson of 
Benjamin Burroughs, private, Salem County, New Jersey Militia. 

JOHN SHELDON CLARK, Freeport, 111. (32.235). Son of John Sheldon and 
Mary Catherine (Kbcrman) Clark; grandson of Lorenzo Dow and Elizabeth 
(Sterrett) Kherinan; great-grandson of William and Mary (Moore) Sterrett; 
great--grandson of John and Elizabeth (Whi(eside) .Moore; gieaD-grandson 
of James Moore, Captain, Virginia Militia. 

NOAH SMITH CLARK, Beatrice, Neb, (.,..950). Sou of Joseph and Rhoda 
Huntington (Swan) Clark; grandson of Joseph Clark, private in Colonel 
Larson's and Colonel .Swift's Regis., Conn. Line, pensioned. 

WILLIS KLLI.OCC, CLARK, Newberg, Ore. (33126). Son of Frederick Paterson 
and Jessie M. (Hill) Clark; grandson of K/ekicl and Harriet (Stanley) 
Clark; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary (i'aterson) Stanley; great-'-grandson 
of Josiah Lee and Clarissa (Hyde) Paterson; great 3 -grandson of John 
I'aterson, Brevet M ajor-Geiieral, Conl'l Army. 

ARTHUR BELL CLARKK, Richmond, \'a. (17.52). Supplemental. Son of 
Augustus liurfoot and Lmma Lullington (Kccsee) Clarke; grandson of Jesse 
Frayser and Cynthia (Lullington) Keesee; great-grandson of Josiah and 
Maria (Hobson) Rullinetoii; great-grandson of Matthew Hobson, private, 
Virginia Troops; great-grandson of William Hobson, private, Henrico County, 
Virginia Line; grandson of John Salle and .Nancy Frayser (Frayser) Clarke; 
great-grandson of Charles Clarke, .//., Lieutenant, Cumberland County, Vir- 
ginia Militia; great-grandson of Charles and Nancy (Martin, Marian) Clark, 
Jr.; great-grandson of II ilham ( C nilleaiime) Marlain, private, Colonel Lib- 
son's Rcgt., Virginia Militia. 

W'ARRLN 1IINLS CLARKK, Baltimore, Md. (D. C. 33-'6s). Son of Warren 
Hines and Jladdie (Stephenson) Clarke; grandson of Lloyd Bead and 
Katharine Bentley (Gray) Stephenson ; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth 
C. (Bead) Stephenson; great-grandson of Lloyd Beall, Lieutenant and 
Captain, Maryland Conl'l Troops, prisoner at Gennantown, seven years' 
service. 

OLIVl'.R BARRETT CLASON', Gordaaier, Maine Cj-M-tS). Son of l'ell and 
Sarah (Temple) Clason; grandson of Llijah and Annie (Whitcomb) Temple; 
great-grandson of Isaac ami Elizabeth (Cheney) Tempjej great-grandson of 
Lphraini ami Mary (I'airar) Temple; greap'-gi andson of Isaac Temple. 
private, MttSSi Militia, Member town committees. 

RALI'H FRANCIS CI.ARY, Omaha, Neb. (3^959). Son of William Carroll 
and Aii):eluie Geneva (Hayes) Clark; grandson of fuhn and Uhoda (Arm- 



kl'XlSTKK 01' NKW MEMBERS. -35 

strong) Clary; great-grandson of Robert Armstrong, private, Colonel I, yule's 
Regt., North Carolina Militia, pensioned; grcat-'-grandson of James Ann- 
strong, private, North Carolina Militia. 

BRUCE CRRVRRANI), Rieutcnant, U. S. A., Kensington, Md. (I>. C. 32144). 
Son of Unman Moody ami Rmma (Ornisby) Cleveland; grandson of Erin 
and Laura (Marsh) Cleveland; great-grandson of Frederick ami Cynthia 
(Mash) Cleveland; great--grandson of Frederick Cleveland, private, Conn. 
Militia ; great-grandson of Amos and Abigail (Olin) Marsh; great-grandson 
of .-linos Marsh, private, Conn. Militia and Cont'l I,ine. 

WARREN JOHN CEOUGH, Chicago, 111. (32825); Son of John Everett and 
Harriet (.Sunderland) dough; grandson of Cyrus and Mariah (Sturgeon) 
Clongh; great grandson of Daniel dough, private, I'irs! Regt., New Hampshire 
Militia, pensioned; gicalgramhon of William and Jane (McElUen) Slurgeoii; 
great-grandson of Samuel Sturgeon, private, Capt. James Murray's Com- 
pany, Fourth Battalion, Lancaster County, l'a. Associators. 

GEORGE AUGUSTUS CLOUSTON, Roxbury, Mass. (3-*593). Son of Robert 
Hunt and Marietta II. (Pierce) Clouston; grandson of Robert Hunt and 
Anna R. (I'.arry) Clouston; great -gi andson of Robert and lather (Hunt) 
Clouston; great-grandson of Thomas Clouston, Captain, Mass. Iliigantine 
"Antilnpe," prisoner; great 2 -graudson of Nathaniel Hunt, private, Mass. 

Ml RON O. CRURls Cambridge, Mass. (33052). Son of Daniel B. and Rncy A. 
(Webster) Cluff; grandson of John and Hannah (Cummings) Webster; 
great-grandson of libenezer Webster, private, Capt. Asa Richardson's Com- 
pany, New Hampshire Cont'l Troops. 

AMOS IIUBRRRR COBB, 3rd, Brighton, N. Y. (33248). Son of Amos Hubbeli 
ami Mary (Carpenter) Cobb, Jr.; grandson of Amos Hubbeli and Angelena 
(Hodgeman) Cobb, Sr. ; great grandson of Tyler Retry and Catharine 
(llui.hell) Cohb; great-grandson of Amos Hubbeli; great 3 -grand.soil of 
Shailrarh Hubbeli, Rieutenant, Conn. State Troops and Volunteers. 

ROBERT CARRYRR COCHRANE, Boston, Mass. (33276). Son of John Mc- 
Gregor and Rillian Maria (Waterman) Cochrane; grandson of John Allen 
and Isabelle Josephine (Jost) Waterman; great-grandson of Zenas and 
Experience (Rreeman) Waterman; great-grandson of Zenis Waterman , Rifer 
and Corporal, Captain Washburn's Company, Colonel Cotton's Regt., Mass. 
Militia. 

JAMES LEE COCHRRRN, Columbus, Ohio (33437). Sou of Jasper R. aid 
' Catherine (Carmean) Cochruu; grandson of Simon and Rucinda (Miller) 
Cochrun; great-grandson of Wesley and Elizabeth Cochrun; great-grandson 
of Simon Cochrun, Sergeant, Virginia Rine, Cont'l Establishment. 

JOSEPH DEEPER CODINGTON, Omaha, Neb. (31021). Son of William 
Alexander and Elizabeth (Watkins) Codington; grandson of William and 
Sarah (Armstrong) Watkins; great-grandson of Hugh and Frances Graham 
(Greene) Armstrong; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Graham) 
Greene; gtc at :i -grand>-ou of .larrit deene, private, Tryon County, North 
Carolina Militia, killed in hatlle of Blue Ricks; great- grandson of Robert 
and Nancy (Green) Armstrong; greats-grandson of .Limes .Armstrong, private, 
in Colonel Ryltle's Regt., North Carolina Militia; gi cat-grandson of Joseph 
and Nancy (Greene) Watkins; great-grandson of Ge&rge Greene, private, 
Capt Robert Porter's Company, Tryim County, North Carolina Militia. 

CAKRORR DANA COl-'K I lft f T>, Cleveland, ohm (.t.n.sX). Sou of George W. 
and Mary (flaftletl) Coi'lield; grandson of William I), and Raura (Clark) 
liartlett; great grandson of Ohediah and Sarah (Ruing) Clark; great'-' grandson 
of George &Vfing, Ensign, Third Regt., New Jersey Cont'l Troops, Rieulenant, 
New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 



236 



SONS OF THE AMERICxVN REVOLUTION, 



JEFFERSON FRANKLIN COLBERT, Minden, La. ( 3 -V 5 S ) • Son of John A. 
and Sarah );. (Taylor) Colbert; grandson of James White and Elizabeth R. 
(Turner) Taylor; great-grandson of Kinehen and Elizabeth (Wasden) Taylor; 
great-grandson of ll'illiam Taylor, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel iLillington's 
North Carolina Regt., Member of Congress from Dublin County, North 
Carolina, '76. 

HARRY EASTMAN COLBY, Waterloo, Iowa (3>97<). Son of Abraham and 
Julia (Yroom) Colby; grandson of .Ilendrick Drumort-1 and Maria (Beckman) 
Vroom; great-grandson of Garret and Margar-et (Quick) Beckman; greai'-- 
grandson of Jacobus Quick, Captain, Second Battalion, Somerset County, 
New Jersey Troops; great-grandson of II end rick D. I'room, private, New 
Jersey Militia. 

GEORGE W. COLE, Peoria, Til. (32824). Sou of James and Eliza Jane (Tibbies) 
Cole; grandson of William and Martha (Cooley) Tibbies; great grandson of 
Jabe and Lucy ( -) Cooley; great-grandson of Jabea Cqoley, private, Mass. 
Militia. 

ROBERT ALFRED COLL, Waterloo, Iowa (31904). Sou of William Robert 
and Mary Elizabeth (Fisher) Cole; grandson of Charles Ellis and Mary C. 1.. 
(Alfred) Fisher; great-grandson of Nathan and Elizabeth Clapp (Boyden) 
Fisher; great-grandson of Charles and Ruby (Wilson) great-'-grandson of 
Samuel Fisher, Captain, Col. Ebenezer Howe's Regt., Mass. Troops. 

HOUGHTON WINSOR COLLART, Lakewood, Ohio (13707)- Son of Martin 
C. and Stella Mary (Jacobus) Collar!; grandson of 'Elijah 1!. and Mary 
Diana (Stow) Jacobus; great-grandson of Winsor and Mary (Houghton) 
Stow; great-grandson of Quartus Stow, Corporal,' Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE HENRY COLLLTT, Edgewood, R. I. (32477). Sun of Daniel T. 
and Adele J. (Bryan) Collett; grandson of Henry and Celestia T. (Smith)' 
Bryan; great-grandson of Jehial and Sarah (Merwin) Bryan, 3rd; great- 
grandson of Jehial and Mary (Treat) Bryan, 2nd; great-grandson of Jeliial ■ 
Bryan, Captain, Fifth Battalion, Colonel Douglas' Regt., Conn. Troops. 

CHARLES CD'MMINC.S COLLINS, St. Louis, Mo. (33189). Son of Charles 
StauHisli and Catherine (Couifort) Collins; Jamison of Charles and Harriet 
N. (Hart) Collins; great-grandson of Joseph Warren and Hannah (Slimli- 
vant) Collins; great K -g.randso.n of Cyreneite Collins, private, Conn, and Mass. 
Militia. 

FRED LLSTON COLLINS, Brookline, Mass, (N. Y. 33227).. Son of Charles 
Melville and Belinda (Allen) Collins; grandson of William Bissell and Anna 
(Lgau) Allen; great grandson of Paul V. and Belinda (Bissell) Allen; great- 
grandson of Barnabas and Faith (Parrish) Allen, Jr.; great 3 -grandson of 
Barnabas Allen, private, Berkshire County, Mass. Militia. 

HOMER MLLVILLK COLLINS, New York, N. Y. (32886). Son of Charles 
Melville and Belinda (Allen) Collins; grandson of William Bissell and Anna 
(Egan) Allen; great-grandson of Raul V. and Belinda (I'dssell) Allen; great- 
grandson of Barnabas Allen, private, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN STANLEY COLLINS, Richmond, Va. <.i!.s.v>>. Son of D. I!, and Anne 
Elizabeth (Frayser) Collins; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth Frances 
(Weymouth) Frayser; great-grandson of Jesse I'rayser, private, Virginia 
Militia. 

WILl'OKD E. COfd, INS, Last Cleveland, Ohio (337<-l). Son of William l'enn 
and Harriet Louise (Snyder) Collins; grandson of Peter and Henrietta 
(Wagner) Snyder; great-grandson of John and Anna Barbara (Desldei) 
Wagner; gi cat'-'- grand son of David Deshler, Member Pa. Committee of 
Observation, Del. 'gale to -Philadelphia Provisional Congress of Committees, V 
Assistant Forage Master and Assistant Commissaiy of Purchase's. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



'■37 



\V1I,I,I.\.\I BROWN Col, SON, Glen Ridge, N. J. (32694). Son of Andrew 
ICIlicotl and Ann ICIiza (l.cavitt) Colson; grandson of Augustus an.tl Sarah 
Ann (Kennedy) Colsou; gfeat'graiulson of Thomas Kushlon and jane Judith 
(Kllicott) Kennedy; great a -grandson of Andrew Ellicott, Captain and .Major, 
Elk Ridge Battalion, Maryland Militia, 

FREDERICK GRANVILLE GO WINS, Fast Greenwich, R. I. (34054). Son 
of Charles Wesson and Harriet Louise (Hill) Comins; grandson of Erastus 
Mansfield and .Mary (Taylor) Comins; great-grandson of Cbolidge and Mar- 
garet (' Mansfield) Comins; great 2 -grandson of William Comins, Lieutenant, 
Fifth Regt., Worcester County, Mass. Militia. 

KLWIN WHITE CONDIT, Lorahie, Wyo. (30011). Sou of Ezekial Carmichael 
and Mary A. (White) Condit; grandson of Jabez and Ruth (Scott) Condi) ; 
great-grandson of Ezeldel and Ruth (Carmichael) Condit; great"-grandson of 
Jabez and Phoebe (Smith) Condit; grea^-grandson of Philip Condit, ptivale, 
Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 

LFSTER PAVTD CONDIT, Washington, 1). C. (33256). Son of Francis M. 
and Leah Catherine (Mayer) Condit; grandson of William David and Martha 
(Charles) Condit; great- grandson of Isaac and Jam- (Doblins) Condit; great- 
grandson of Isaac Condit, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of Jonathan Condit, Captain, Second Rem., F,sscx County, New 
Jersey Militia. 

ALBERT F. CONEY, P tiger, ' Ne-b. (32969). Son of Charles Stephen and 
Caroline (Alfrey) Coney; giandson of Albert G. and Emily Ruth (De l.ano) 
Coney; great-grandson of Stephen Briggs and Lydia (Smith) De l.ano; great-- 
grandson of Jonathan He l.ano, private and Corporal, Mass. Cont'l Line. 

HERBERT LEE CONNFLLYj Cleveland, Ohio (32844). Son of Joseph Willis 
and Kmmn Alice (Sample) Connelly; grandson of Jeremiah Mosher and 
Sarah llinklc (l.ind) Sample; gi eal-gl nmltfOll of Nathaniel and l-aliclla 
(Mosher) Sample; great-grandson of -Jeremiah Mosher, Jr., Sergeant, Mass. 
Militia and Cont'l Troops, six years' service. 

RAY CONNOR, Detroit, Mich. (33649). Son of l.eartus and Anna A. (Dame) 
Connor; grandson of llc/ekiah and Caroline (Corwm) Connor; great-grandson 
of William and Sarah (Roe) Connor; great-grandson of John Connor, private, 
New York Militia and Cont'l Dine; great-'-grandson of Benjamin Roc. private, 
Dutchess County, New York Mditia; great 2 grandson of Pheiiis Corwin, 
private, Orange County, New York Militia. 

GARRETT KDDIOTT CONOVER, Aisbury Dark, N. J. 13379-'). Son of Garrett 
Milton and Josie (Van Arsdale) Conover; grandson of Theodore Young and 
Sarah A. (Sharp) Conover; great-grandson of Garrett and Mary (StD.er) 
Conover; great-grandson of William Covcn'navcn , Captain, Hunterdon County, 
New Jersey Militia. 

MELVILLE SHERMAN CONYUSK. Springfield, Mass. (33291). Son of Sher- 
man and Parnelia Sheldon (Wa lb ridge) Convuse; grandson of William and 
Caroline (Could) Walhridge; great-grandson of Porter and Miriam (McClure) 
Walhridge; great-grandson of Amos Walhridge, Captain and Major, Seventh 
and Second Regis., Conn. Cont'l Dine, six years' service. 

MORTON WARE COOK, Iowa (31400). Supplemental. Son of Oscar and 
Alcesta Sevia (Williams) Cook; grandson of Nathan and Olivia Ann (Ware) 
Williams; great-grandson of l\lijah and Mrs. Sevia (Btistin) Tenny-Ware; 
great- -grandson of John .Ditslin, private, Mass. Troops, pt-nsioned; great 2 - 
grandson of Jfvhll and Sarah (Webster) Duslinj great 3 -gi ands'on of Jonathan 
Webster, private, New Hampshire Slate 'J'roo|»s. 

GEORGE GERMAIN COOKE, Detroit, Mich. (3-'39-A. Sou of George Germain 
and Sarah (Patterson) Cooke; grandson of James Henry and Mary Elizabeth 
(Germain) Cooke; great grandson of Henry and Kama (Dowd) Cooke; gnat*- 



238 



SONS OK Tilft AM KlOCAN UK V()l,irr ION 



grandson of Charles and Sylvia ( Ykltf ) Cooke; grett*-grantfcon of lilihn Yale, 
Sergeant, Conn. Militia; grcat 8 -grandson of Ambrose Cook, private, Capt. 
Isaac Cook's Company, Conn. Minute Men; great'-grandsen of Isaac Cook, 
Captain, Wallingford, Com. Minute Men, at Lexington. 
ALGERNON BOOTH CORIHN, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Conn. 3*070). Son of Algernon 
[Sooth and Emily (Ahiuru) Corbin; grandson of James Booth and Mary 
Mitchell (Smith) Corbin; great-grandson of Thaddeus and Candance (Dutton) 
Smith; great 2 -gran«lson of Theophilns Smith, Captain, Conn. Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

EMORY CURTISS CORBIN, New Britain, Conn. (33456), Life Member. Son 
of Albert K. and A. May (Parker) Corbin; grandson of Waldo and Emily 
M. (Curtiss) Corbin; great-grandson of Philip and Lois (Chaffee) Corbin; 
great--grandson of Philip and Rhoda (IJealy) Corbin; greats-grandson of 
Leihiiel Corbin, Captain, Col. Jacob Davis' Regt., Mass. Militia.' 

T.omS COURTNEY CORPUS, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32982). Son of John and Elsie 
(Winans) Corbus; grandson of Samuel and Eliza (Reeves) Corbus; great- 
grandson of Daniel and Margaret (Steen) Reeves; grcat--grandson of Matthew 
Steen, private, Capt. James Scott's Company, Third Battalion, Washington ■ 
County, Pa. Militia. 

CLAUDE' EpMEYN CORBUSIER, San Francisco, Cal. (32734). Son of William 
Henry and Fanny (Dunbar) Corbusier; grandson of William Morrison and 
Mahala (Myers) Coiirasier; great-grandson of James Henry and Eleanor 
Catherine ( Sloat ) Corbusicn; great-grandson of Alexander and Sarah 
(Layton) Sloat; greaC-grandson of Cornelius Sloat, Orderly Sergeant, Second 
Ulster County, New York Regt., prisoner. 

GEORGE DUNN CORNISH, Summif, N. j. '(3.39*5). Son of Ah.nzo G. ami 
Frances (Dunn) Cornish; grandson of Robert S. and Rachel (Gillette) 
Cornish; great-grandson of Aaron and Rhoda (Brown) Cornish; great 1 '- 
grandson of Joseph Cornisli, private, Capt. Martin Kirtland's Company, 
Conn. Line. 

ROBERT BATES CORNISH, Sterling, N. J, (.53779). Son of Alonzo G. ami 
Frances (Dunn) Cornish; grandson of Robert 1!. and Rachelle (Gillette) 
Cornish; great-grandson of Aaron and Rhoda (Brown) Cornisli; great-- 
grandson of Joseph Cornisli, private, New London County, Conn. Line. 

JOSEPH MLRR1TT COUSE, Asbury Park, N. J. (.53903). Son of William J. 
and Elizabeth (Winsor) Couse; grandson of Peter and Emily Couse; great- 
grandson of William and Elizabeth (Negus) Couse; great-grandson of John 
Couse, private, Noiihampton County, Pa. Militia. 

WILLIAM J. COUSE, Asbury Park, N. J. (.3.i>34). Son of Peter and Emily 
Couse; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Negus) Couse; great-grandson 
of John Couse, private, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 

EDWIN STEPHEN COWLES, Jr., Hartford, Conn. (33457). Son of Edwin 
Stephen and Ella C, (Harrington) Cowles; grandson of Frank and Emeline 
N. (Stebbinsj Cowles; great-grandson of Stephen and Thankful (Hatheway) 
Cowles; greaD-gramlson of Elijah and Thankful (King) Hatheway; great-- 
grandson of Daniel King, Sergeant, Captain ('.ranger's Company, Major Ship- 
man's Battalion, Conn. Troops. 

FRANKDIN PAGE CRAGIN, Buffalo, N. V. <3-'7-'D. Son of Irving Franklin 
and Helen M. (Cragin) Cragin; grandson of Renjamin Franklin and Harriet 
Louisa (Coggeshall) Cragin; great-grandson of Aaron and Sarah (Wilkin.-,) 
Cragin; great'-' grandson of Benjamin Cragin, lieutenant, New rl.nmpshir: 
Militia, under Gen. John Stark. 

JESSE YINCKNT CRAIG, Lincoln, Neb. (3-'950). Son of William and Martha 
1C (Cish) CraigJ grandson of Thomas and Catherine (Hagenhuch) Craig; v 
great-grandson of Thomas Craig, Colonel. Poor's Brigade, Pa. Troops. 



REGISTER OF NEW M KM BI-RS. 2^) 

J()ll\' KNSTKR CRAIG, Kebfcuk, l.»wa (33803). Son of A. K. and Sarah 
(Mcl.aiu) Craig; grandson of William and Margaret (MeCl. Hand ) McKain; 
gri-at-gfand%on of Thumas McClelland, private, Vork County, l'a. Militia, and 
Rowan County, North Carolina Militia, pensioned. 

ARWYN HOC1L CRANK, Marion, Ohio (337--). Son of Alwyn M. and Mary 
(llocli) Crane; grandson of Knock and Mary Catharine (Garvin) I loch; 
great-grandson of Henry and Catharine (Omwalce) Garvin, Jr.; great 2 -grandson 
of Henry Garvin, private, Pa. Militia. 

ARTHUR BROOM KR CRANK, P.elleville, N. J. (3334.0. Son of Harry Raknho 
and Kathie M. .(Pollock) Crane; grandson of William Bloomer and Kueia 
Maria (Cram) Pollock-; great-grandson of Harry Kmnens and Alary Frances 
(Reed) Cram; great'-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Grant) Reed; great-- 
grandson 'of Batholomeu Real, private, Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD DICKINSON CRANE, Ridgewood, N. J. (12683). Son of Charles 
G. and Marie K. (Dickinson) Crane, grandson of William IT. and Mary Jane 
(Gillen) Crane; great-grandson of Josiah and Keziah Saxton (Sunges) 
Crane; great 2 -grandson of Benjamin and Phebe Allien Crane; great 8 -grandson 
of Josiah Crane, Captain, Eastern Battalion, Morris County, New Jersey 
Militia. 

WlKl.lAM WIN-NIC CRANK, Elizabeth, N, J. (32918). Son of Moses Miller 
and Nellie Kilian (Kiwis) Crane; grandson of John William and Anna 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Crane; great-grandson of Moses Miller and Phebe Stiles 
(Williams) Crane; grcat--grandson of Nathaniel Crane, private, Essex County, 
New Jersey Militia; grandson of David Kyon and Rachel Caroline (Winne) 
Kcwis; great-grandson of Alvah and Margaret (Rickey) Kewis; great-- 
grandson of Thomas and Susan (McCoy) Kewis; great 11 grandson of Gavin 
McCoy, Captain, First Battalion, Somerset County, New Jersey Militia; great-- 
grandson of John and Anna (Spinning) Williams; great 3 -grandson of 
Samuel Williams, private, Second Regt., Essex County, New Jersey Militia. 

C1IARKKS AKh'Rlvl) CRAWFORD, Richmond, Va. (33551). Son of Jacob 
Valentine and Koilisa A. (Johnson) Crawford; grandson of William and 
Anne (Turnbull) Cravvford; great-grandson of Charles Turnbull; Brevet- 
Major, Contl Tic, ,,p,, prisoner at Round Brook. 

CHARI.KS III'.N'RV CRESSMAN, Philadelphia, Ra. (3.3986). Son of L'hilip 
and Barbara Ann il'iciis) Cressman; grandson of l'hilip and Catharine 
(Kuick) Cressman; grcat-grandsgn of Georg* Cressman, private, Capl. John 

Cope's Company, Gerina.ntown, Pa. Militia. 

"RRXRORD CREWE, New York City, N. Y. (33-'-)9)- Son of II. Hamlin and 
Anne- (Crewe) Kirchgraber ; grandson of Kambert Jefferson and Frances 
Margaret (Schumpert) Crewe; great-grandson of Peter M. and Mary Knieline 
(Sheppard) Schumpert; great-'-grandson of Honorius and Phebe (Denis) 
Sheppard; great B -grandsOn of William Sheppard, Captain, North Carolina 
Kight Horse, Cherokee Campaign, and Representative to State Senate, 'jj-'Sj. 
"Name legally changed from Kirchgraber to Crewe. 

RICHARD I'D WAR!) CROASDA IKK, Canton, Ohio (33-l3«). Son of Richard 
and Emma (Hurt) Croasdaile; grandson of Edward Franklin and Mamie 
(Garden) Hurt; great-grandson of Samuel Jones and Sarah (Penticost) 
Hurt; great--grandsou of John Hurt, Brigade Chaplain, Virginia Cont'l Kine. 

SAMUKK MANhKRWIKKK CROFT, Washington, I ). C. (3325V). Son .of Clayton 
frying and Mary M. (Seining) Croft; grandson of James I?. and Rachel 

(Re(pia) Seining; 1; real grandson of James an. I Mary (Ruton) Requa; great- 
grandson of James and Mary Kli/abeth (llelekei) Requa; gi eat :, -grandson 
of Clode (Claude) Requa, Captain, New York Militia, prisoner, Member 
Committee of Rubin- Safety. 



24O SONS C)i- 'I'll J", AMERICAN lilCVOMJTION, 

SIDNEY W.. CROFUT, Hartford, Conn. (3-857). Son of George W. and Susan 
(Fisher) Croful; grandson of Jesse and Elizabeth (Bailey) Crofut; great- 
grandson of Setk Crofut, Sergeant, Conn. Militia, pensioned, 

SAMUEL J. CRUMP.INE, Topeka, Kans. (3*049). Sou of Samuel J. and Sarah 
(Mull) Kru.nhine; grandson of Jacob and Edith (Distler) Krumbein; great- 
grandson of John and Sophia (Qhmwake) Krumbein; great" grandson of 
Leonard Krumbein, private in Capt. David Kjfaust's Seeond Battalion, Lan- 
caster County, Pa. Militia. 

FRANK CRUTCH FIELD, Richmond, Ya. (33562). Son of George K. and Vir- 
ginia Alice (Denson) Crutchfield ; grandson of Samuel 1). and Elizabeth 
(Quarles) Denson; great-grandson of Isaac and Daisy King ( Pemberton) 
Quarks; greaU-grandson of Thomas Pentberion, Captain, First Regt., King 
William County, Virginia Ugh\ Dragoons. 

ROY I.ORUAINl'; CU.MMINOS, Watertown, Mas,. (33532). Son of Leonard 
N. and Ella F. (Cole) Cummiugs; gramPon of Albion P, and Julia 1'. 
(Perry) Cole; great-grandson of Jonathan and Abigail Packard (Whitman) 
Cole; great--grandson of Jacob Whitman, private, Col. Edward Mitchell's 
Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

FRANCTS MARION CURLEE, St. Louis, Mo. (32575), Son of William Peyton 
and Mary (Boone) Curlce; grandson- of Francis Marion and Ursula (Patton) 
Boone; great-grandson of William Hamilton and Jane (Tsom) Ration; great 2 - 
grandsou of John and Elizabeth (Cooper) Patton; great :! -grandson of Robert 
Cooper, Captain, Colonel Lacey's Regt., South Carolina Militia. 

CIIARLFS WALDO CURRIER* Maplcwood, N. J. (329.C3). Son of Charles p. 
and Lavina 1'. (Winter) Currier; grandson of Edward E. and Betsy (Pond) 
Currier; great-grandson of Eilwdrd Currier, private, New Hampshire Militia, 
pensioned. 

GEORGE BARTLFTT CURTIS, Youkers, N. Y. (Conn. 32869). Sou of Charles 
Newman and Lillian (BaiMlett) Curtis; grandson of George Gary and Ruby 
Ann (Coffin) P.arilell; great-grandson of Oliver Cromwell and Fanny (Fam- 
son) Bartlett; greats-grandson of John Barlett, Surgeon-General, Northern 
Depaitmenl, Cont'l Army. 

CONDIT WALKER CUTLER, New York, N. Y. (33228). Son of Augustus 
William and Julia Rebecca (Walker) Cutler; grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth 
1*. (Cook) Cuthr; great-grandson of James ami Elizabeth P. (Conduit) Cook; 
great-grandson of SUas. Canduit, Member New Jersey Committee of Safety 
and Cont'l Congress; grandson of Widard and Maria (Hastings) Walker; 
great-grandson of Silas Walker, Ca]itain, fifth Mass. Cont'l Infantry. 

ELTIIU II. CUTLER, Springfield, Mass.* (33297)'. Son of Henry and Harriet 
(Dennis) Cutler; grandson of Simeon N. and Mary (I'ifts) Cutler; great- 
grandson of Elihu and Lavina (Newton) Cutler; grcat~-grandson of Simeon 
Ciitlef; Lieutenant, Mass. Militia, great a -grandson of Timothy Rockzvood, 
Sergeant, Mass. Militia, 

FRANKLTN EARL CUTLER, Cleveland, Ohio (33716). Son of Henry Sidney 
and Emma De Etta (Spencer) Culler; grandson of Nathan and Sally Ann 
(Price) Spencer; great-grandson of Isaac and Nancv (Peabody) Spencer; 

great--giandsou of .linos Spencer, private, Ninth Regt., Albany Count)' and 
Dutchess County, New York .Militia. 
EDWARD RUSSIA. L CUTTER, R. S., U. S. N.. Arlington, Mass. (32509). 
Son of Edward Hall and Susan A. Cummiugs Cutter; grandson of Joseph 
and Susan T. (1 lowland) Cunuuings; great-grandson of Leonard and Hannah 
(Cheney.) Cummiugs; great- gramFon of Jo-thtim Cummiugs, Second Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. Janus Osgood's Company, New Hampshire Rangers; great- 
grandson of Jedediah and Susan 'I'. (Crapo) Uowlaud; great 2 -grandson of 
libene-er Holland, private, Capt. I bury Pierce's Company, Colonel Colton's 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS. 



2 4 1 



Regt., Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Peter Crapa, private. Col. Edward 
Pope's Regt., Mass, Militia; great-grandson of Nathaniel Cheney, private, 
Mass. Coiit'l Troops; grandson, of Cyrus Hall and Maria Louisa (Russell) 
Cutter; great-grandson of Cyrus and Hannah (Hall) Cutler; great-grandson 
of Janus and Anna Harrington (Russell) Cutter; great-grandson of Ainmi 
Cutter, Mass. Minute Man; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Esther (Hall) 
Russell; great-grandson of Edward and Lydia (Adams) Russell; great-- 
grandson of Scth Russell, taken prisoner at Lexington; greats-grandson of 
William Adams, Captain, Col. Tliateher's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WEBBER CUT'TER, Arlington, Mass. (33064). Son of Amos and 
Catherine Maria (Harrington) Cutter; grandson of Moses and Hannah S- 
(WYhhei-) Cutter; great grandson of Christopher Webber, Colonel, New 
J (ampshirc Militia. 

CLARENCE FRANKLIN CUTTING, Concord, Vt. (Mass. 32600). Son of Oliver 
Ballou and T.ois (Robinson) Cutting; grandson of Franklin and Prudence 
(Isham) Cutting; great-grandson of Oliver .and Pho-'be (Church) Cutting; 
great-grandson of George Cutting, Sergeant, Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., 
Worcester County, Mass. Militia. 

CEARENCE EUGENE CIPHERS, Valentine, Neb. (X. J. 33327). Son of 
George Wesley and Catherine Lucy (\\ r all) Cyphers; grandson of William 1,. 
ami Harriet M. (LeFoy) Cyphers; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth 
(Lawrence) LeFoy; great-grandson of Aberham Le Foy, private, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Fell's Battalion, New Jersey State Troops. 

MARK D.E WITT CYPHERS, Valentine, Neb. (N. J. 333.26). Son of Mark 
and Elizabeth (Keifer) Cyphers; grandson of William L. and Harriet M. 
(Le Foy) Cyphers; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Lawrence) LeFoy; 
great-grandson of Aberham LeFoy, private, Lieutenant-Colonel Fell's Bat- 
talion, New Jersey State Troops. 

SAMUEL WESLEY CYPHERS, Valentine, Neb. (N. J. 3332S). Son of Mark 
am! Elizabeth (Keifer) Cyphers; grandson of William I,, and Harriet M. 
(LeFoy) Cyphers; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Lawrence) LeFoy; 
great-grandson of Aberham LeFoy, private, Lieutenant-Colonel Fell's Bat- 
talion, New Jersey State Troops. 

IIAROIyD ALDEN DAEZELL, Chicago, 111. (32823). Son of diaries A. and 
Anna (French) Pal/ell; grandson of Horace and Mary Alma (Alden) 
French; great-grandson of Pliney and Ann (Upson) Alden; great-grandson 
of Ashbel and Mary (Munson) Upson; great-grandson of Levi Munson, 
Second Lieutenant, Sixth Regt., Conn. Cont'l Troops, prisoner. 

EARLE BALCOM DANE, Providence, R. I. (34051 ). Son of Frank and Annie 
(Balcom) Dane; grandson of William Shepherd and Ann Moore (Smith) 
Balcom; great-grandson of Gardner and Lucinda (Ball) Smith; great- 
grandson of Elijah Ball, Lieutenant, Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt., Mass. 
Militia. 

[CRNEST IJAILEY DANIELS. Drdhani, Mass! (33533>, Son of Arthur Thomas 
Cunningham and Elk-ii Caroline (Bailey) Daniels; grandson of Joshua Sim- 
inons and Elizabeth (Richards) Bailey; great-grandson of Luther and Polly 
(Battle) Richards; great-grandson of Ubeneser Battle, Captain and Second 
Major, Pirst Regt., Suffolk County, Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE BROWN DANIELS, Grand Rapids, Mich. (32391)! Son of Ansori J. 
and Eliza J. (Brown) Daniels; grandson of James and Laura (Bailey) 
Daniels; great-grandson of LUwch Bailey (Jiayley), Bombardier, Captain 
Swan's Company, Colonel Croft's Artillery Regt., Mass 'IToops. 

WILLARD CLARK DARBY, Pueblo, Colo. (31444). Sou of Daniel' Harvey and 
Harriet L. (Clark) Dai by; grandson of John Elias and Rahama (Harvey) 
Darby; great-grandson of J : ,l>hraiin Darby, Captain, New Jersey Militia, 
Quartermaster and l'.r.-svi Captain, New Jersey Cont'l I, inc. 



242 SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CARLOS PARSONS DARfrlWG, N. Y. (29791), Bupplemenital. Son of Lewis 
and Julia f,av:lla (Day) Darling; grandson of Carlos Curtis and l.avilla 
(Woodruff) Day; greht-gi'andson of Krastus and Amelia (Doty) Day; great 8 - 
grandson of Thomas Stanley an.l Ruth (Newell) Day; grcaP'-grandson of 
Aaron Day, Member Mass. Committee for collecting supplies for Boston. 

GEORGE HENRY DAVIS, New Orleans, l,a. (33207), Sou of Samuel Abijah 
an.l Esther Theresa (Parks) Davis; grandson of Hiram Metcalf and Mary 
Adelaide: (\\ r ilson) Davis; great-grandson of Abijah and Mary Ann (Newell) 
Davis; great-grandson of Amos Davis, private, Colonel Ashley's Regt., New 
Hampshire Militia, Member New Hampshire Committee of Safety. 

HENRY RICK DAVIS, Everett, Mass. (33063). Sou of Henry Cassett and 
Ellen Waite (Deeriilg) Davis; grandson of Nathaniel F. and Ann (Waite) 
■ Dcering; great -g i aixlsoii of Oeorge and Klcam.ra ( W'ihlrage ) Waite; great- 
grandson of John Waite, Colonel, First Cumberland County, Mass. Militia, 
Member Provincial Congress. 

RAYMOND FOSTER DAVIS, Bloomfield, N. J. (i3733)- Son of Frederic M. 
and Augusta (Stalker) Davis; grandson of Charles M. and Maria (Foster) 
Davis; great-grandson of Caleb and Hannah Smith (Dodd) Davis; great- 
grandson of Joseph and Anna (Crane) Davis; grcaC-grandson of Caleb Ditvis, 
private, "Spencer's Regiment," New Jersey Cont'l Troops, severely wounded 
at C.ermantown. 

APHKRT WESLEY DAVISON, Ashton, Iowa (33800). Son of Albert Duvern 
and Jennie U,indsey) Davison; grandson of Wesley and- Cyntltia Amelia 
(Thompson) DavCon; great-grandson of William Corden ami Jane' Ann 
Mariah (Rca:i\) Davison; great-gi andson of John Davison, private, Conn, 
ami Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

ARTHUR HENRY DAVISON, Des Moines, fowa (327.91). Son of Wesley and 
Cynthia Amelia (Thompson) Davison; grandson of William Gordon am! Jane 
Anne Maria (Reed) Davison; great-grandson of John (and Hvdia Wood) 
Davison, private, Mass. and Conn. Militia, pensioned; great'-'-grandson of 
Nathaniel Wood, Captain Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Kliphalct and 
Anne (Saekett) Reed; great-grandson of David Reed, private, Berkshire 
County, Mass. Militia; great--grand,son of Bzekiel Saekett, private, Sixth 
Regt., Dutchess County, New York Militia. 

BURNHAM FRANK DAY, Minneapolis, Minn. (31836). Son of Henry Harrison 
and Nellie (llurnham) Day; grandson of George Brown and Samantha 
(Snodgrass) Rumham; great-grandson of Robert and Eleanor (Robinson) 
Snodgrass; great-grandson of James and ).\\\e (Morrison) Robinson, Jr.; 
greaC-grandson of James Robinson, .ST., private, Colonel Ross' Sixth Battalion, 
York County, Pa. Militia. 

PAUL DEBEVOISE, Elizabeth, N. J. (33415)- Son of George W. and Katherine 
Price (McFlrath) Debevoise; grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth (Price) 
McFlrath; great-grandson of Thompson and Elizabeth (James) Price; great- 
grandson of Kphriam and Cloe (Thompson) Price; greats-grandson of 
Nathaniel Price, private and Matross, New Jersey Cont'l Dim- and Army, : 
seven years' service. 

HENRY BAZlNG DrGRAY, VVyckoff, N. J. (32914). Son of Harry and K.tiza- 

helh (M.) DeGray; grandson of William Miles and Mary ' E. (Deimuest) 

De Cray; great-grandson of David W. and Maria (Van Horn) Demaicst; 

, great'-'-grandson of William Dcmaresl, private, Bergen * County, New Jersey 

Militia. 

STERLING PARKER Dfi EANO, New Rochelle; N. Y. (33607). Son of Henry 

(day Webster and May Ellen (Dwyer) De I. auo; grandson of llihbard and 
Samantha (Parker) l)cl,ano, Jr.; great-grandson of llihbard and Anna 
(Wright) hel,ano; great-grandson of Benjamin Wright, Jr., private, Col.f 
Inhn Wood's R-gt., Vermont Militia. 



KI-GISTICR OI' Nl'VV MJ5MB.ICKS. 243 

DOUGLAS I). Die LONG, lirooksvillc, Ohio (32320). Son pf James F. and Sue 
(15.) be Long,; grandson of John R, and Sarah (Taylor) Dc Long; great- 
grandson of Thomas and Mary (Owens) Taylor; gi -cat-grandson of Tfwmas 
Taylor, non-Commissioned Qfftpcr, Virginia Line. 

ROBKRT ORlN DOMING, Oswego, Kans. (33300). Son of Aaron Nathan and 
Julia Ann (Noble) Dewing; grandson uf Orin Stoddard and Ruth (Khlridge) 
Dcming; great-grandson of Aar&fl Denting, private, Capt. Samuel Clark's 
Company, Col. Benjamin Simond's Regt., Mass. Militia; grandson of Robert 
and Sarah (Phelps) Noble; great-grandson of Eli Noble, private, Berkshire 
County, Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES LYMAN D10N1SON, Belleville, N. J. (33339). Son of Henry Syl- 
vester and Kaehel (Brown) Denison; grandson of Sylvester Rercival' and 
Ann Maria (Kidney) Denison; gnat-grandson of Richard and Mary Kidney; 
great"-grandson of John Kidney, Captain, .Second Regt., Kssex County, New 

Jersey Militia. 

T1KNRY LYMAN DKN1SON, Belleville, N. J. (33337)- Son of Charles Lyman 
and Maud (Underbill) Denison; grandson of Henry Sylvester and Rachel 
(Brown) Denison; great-grandson of Sylvester Pereival and Ann Maria 
(Kidney) Denison; great^graridsGB of Richard an<l Mary Kidney; great* 
grandson of John Kidney, Captain, Second Rrgi., Kssex County, New Jersey 
Militia. 

[livRBERT ]*,KM ICK Dh'.WISnN, BrooMine, Mass. (33298). Son of Otis and 
Mary V 1 anccs (Slocomb) Dennison; . grandson of Kmmons and Sarah 
(Blanchard) Sloeomb; great-grandson of Kmmons and Elizabeth (Hyde) 
Slocomb; great-'-grandson of Samuel Sloeomb, private, Suffolk County, Mass. 
Militia for Cont'l service ;' grandson of James and Mary (Wheeler) Dennison; 
great-grandson pf Isaac Dennison, private and Sergeant, Gloucester, Mass. 
Cont'l Troops; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Rowe) Dennison; great-- 
grandson of John Rowe, Major, Sixth Regt,, Essex County, Mass. Militia. 

JAMTiS PKRONNRAU Di; SAUSSURK, Washington, 1). C. (33251)'. Son of 
Janus i'eronrieau and Annie Isabella (1, aureus) DeSaussurc; grandson of 
Richard Corbett and f.ucy (Harleston) Laurens; great-grandson of Frederick 
and Margaret (Corbett) Laurens; great-grandson of Henry and Kliza 
(Rutledge) 1, aureus; great 3 -grandson of Henry Laurens, President of Con- 
tinental Congress, Ambassador to Holland, prisoner; grandson of Henry VV. 
and Mary Collin (lYronneau) DeSaussurc; great-grandson of Henry Alex- 
ander and Susan (Boone) DeSaussurc; great-grandson of Chancellor Henry 
Alexander and Susan (J'ooue) DeSaussurc; great ;, -grandson of Daniel D c 
Saussure, Captain, Charleston, South Carolina Volunteer Corps. 

TKNNKY COOK DkSODKAR, Hancock, Mich. (32388). Son of Henry Cook 
and Nellie Jane De Sollar; grandson of James W. and Maria L. (Tenncy) 
Waggoner; great grambon of Daniel and Sylvia (Kent) Tcnney ; great 2 - 
grandson of Benjamin Teuucy, private, New Hampshire Militia. 

JOHN C. DICKKKSON, I'.ii -niiiigliam, Mich. (33751). Son of Clarence W. and 

iCva (Cm ings) Dickerson; grandson of Orion Cobb and Anne (Rent on) 

Dickerson; great-grandson of Aaron and Elizabeth (Wadsworth) Dickerson; 
great-'-grandson of Joseph Lindsley Dickerson, Major, Morris County, New 
Jersey Militia; grcaC-gramlson of John and ('.race (Rindsley) Dickerson; 
great-grandson of Peter Dickerson, Captain, Third Battalion, New Jersey 
Troops; .Member New Jersey Provincial Congress and Commissioner of 
Correspondence. 

ORKIN J. DlCKIvV, Belfast, Maine (32440). Son of Adelhcrt <>. and Georgia 
iClla (bane) Dickey; grandson of John Davi.bou and KDa (Nun) Dickey; 
great-grandson of James Dickey, b.nsign, Capt. Reuben Dow's Company, New 
Hampshire Militia. 



244 



SO NS ( ) F T 1 1 K A M F. K I CA N R.£VOLUT ION 



GEORGE FA'FDKTII DICKS, New Orleans, Da. (33~'i.D- Son of Charles B. 
and Margaret Douglass (Fleming) Dick; grandson of George Jefferson and 
Annie l\!i/ahcth (Bass) Dicks; great-grandson of Daniel and Martha (West- 
brooke,) Bass; great 2 ^grandson of Samuel Bass, private, Mass. Militia, prisoner 
on "jersey" prison ship, 

FRANK ALLEN DIDATOSH, Cincinnati, Ohio (33441). Son of Walter Scott 
and Annie (Hone) Dilatush; grandson of Henry and Eliza (Hunt) Dilatush; 
great-grandson of Nicholas Van Vickie and Catalina (Yard) Dilatush; great- 
grandson of Henry Dilatush {Dilatush), lieutenant, First Regt,, New Jersey 
Militia; great-'-grandson of George Yard, private, New Jersey Artillery. 

SANI'OKD D. DIMMICK, Newark, N. J. (33493). Son of Milton and Annie 
Durand (Cowles) Dimmick; grandson of Silas Henry and Henrietta (Kitchell) 
Cowles; great-grandson of Mathias and Caroline (Beach) Kitchell; great 2 - 
grandson of Janus Kit Audi, private, Morris County, New Jersey Militia and 
Cont'l Line, pensioned. 

HAMILTON CHARLES DTNK1NS, Philipp, MDs. (La. 33200). Son of Alex- 
ander H. and Cynthia (Springs) Dinkins; grandson of William and Margaret 
(Polk) Springs; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Alexander) Springs; 
grcat--grandson of Adam Alexander, Colonel, North Carolina Militia, signer 
of Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. 

JOHN HAMILTON DINKINS, Dos Angeles, Cal. (Da. 32766). Son of Hamilton 
Charles and Willie (Tuustall) Dinkins; grandson of Alexander Hamilton and 
Cynthia (Springs) Dinkins; great-grandson of William Polk and Margaret 
(.Alexander) Springs; great-'-grandson of Adam Alexander, Colonel, Mecklen- 
burg County, North Carolina Troops, signer of Mecklenburg Declaration of 
Independence. 

WIDDIAM TUNSTADl, DINKINS, Omaha, Nch. (Da. 3-'/CO. Son of Hamilton 
Charles and Willie (Tuustall) Dinkins; grandson of Alexander Hamilton and 
Cynthia (Springs) Dinkins; great-grandson of William Polk and Margaret 
(Alexander) Springs; great--grandson of Adam Alexander, Colonel, Mecklen- 
burg County, North Carolina Troops, signer of Mecklenburg Declaration of 
Independence. 

KIJSHA PAUL DISMUKES, Columbus, Ga. (32936). Son of I'lisha Paul and 
Annie Elizabeth (Forman) Dismukes; grandson of John Thompson and Ann 
l.ogan (Munroe) Dismukes; great-grandson of Paul Dismukes, private, Vir- 
ginia Troops, pensioned. 

THOMAS ACNDR DOBYNS, Captain, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. (33-'5«). 
Son of Thomas Abncr ami Maria (Berry) Dobyns; grandson of George 
Washington and Mary Holiday (Dorsett) Berry; great-grandson of Zachaiiah 
and Priscilla (Cant) Berry; great 2 -grandson of Zachariah Berry, Sergeant* 
Maryland l,inc; great-'-grandson of Zachariah and Mary (Williams) Berry; 
greaD-grandson of Otlio ll'ilhams, Brigadier-Generalj Maryland Cont'l Troops, 
seven-and-a-half years' service. 

FREDERIC DANCDON DODD, Montclair, N. J. (337S0). Son of Louis I 7 . 
and Florence H. (de Bary) Dodd; grandson of Louis F. and Rachael 
(Blauvelt) Dodd; great-grandson of Cornelius I. and Mary G. (Black) 
Blauvelt; gieat-graildson of Isaac C. and Rachael (Powers) Blauvelt; great 8 - 
grandson of John M. and Martyntge (Herring) Powles; great'-grandson of 
Abraham A. Herring, Captain, Bergen County, New Jersey Militia. 

WALTER DONALD DODD, St. Douis, Mo. (3-\S7i)." Son of Ira Freeman and 
Charlotte (Williams) Dodd; grandson of Aaron George and Mary A. 
(Bigelow) Dodd; great-grandson of Samuel and Jemima (Dodd) Dodd; great-'- 
grandson of linos Dodd, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia; great-- 
grandson of '1 nomas Dodd, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia. 

HARRY HAUDAN DOGGl-TT, Chicago, 111. (3^820). Son of Samuel Jaekso^ 
and Mary Kli/abelh (Harlan) Doggett; grandson of William Francis and 



REGISTER 01? NEW MEMBERS, -45 

Elizabeth (Rorlander) Doggett] great-grandson of John and Sophie (Miller) 
Doggett; great a -grahdsoh of Samuel Doggett, Lieutenant, Second Company, 
First Norfolk County, Mass. Militia.. 

TRUBEE JOSEPH DOOLITTLE. Wpodmont, Conn. (32271). Son of Joseph 
I. and Lucy 1!. (Hill) Doolittle; grandson of Junius Fayette and Elizabeth 
Augusta (Porter) Hill; great-grandson of Samuel and Polly Brocfcett (Hill) 
Mansfield; greats-grandson of fared Hill, Ensign in Capt. Benjamin Trum- 
bull's Company, Conn. Militia. 

CHARLES SAMUEL DORRANCE, Baltimore, Md. (32425). Son of Joseph 
Dorrance and Eliza Ann (Tinkham) Dorranee; grandson of George and 
Ann Qlney (Warner) Dorrance; great-grandson of Samuel Dorrance, Clerk, 
Capt. John Edward's Company, Rhode Island "Alarm." 

STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS, Mt. Vernon, Ohio (32826). Son of Silas M. and 
May (Weagley) Douglas; grandson of Hilary II. and Eleanor (Whitford) 
Weagley; great-grandson of Cornelius and Mary Brady (Forsythe) Whitford; 
great--granclson of Tfenry and Mary (Brady) Forsythe; great 8 -grandson of 
Samuel Brady, Captain, Coh.nel Brodhead's Regt., Pa. Troops. 

WILLIAM VARDAMAN DOUGLASS, Spokane, Wash. (,i-'i55). Sou of Robert 
Steven and Rosariah (Keeble) Douglass; grandson of James Harvey and 
Elizabeth Dorothy (Wash) Douglass; great-grandson of William Wash, 
Sergeant in Col. Thomas Posey's Sixth Virginia Regt. 

EVERETT ELTON DOW, Hartford, Conn. (32862). Son of Rion D. and 
Sarah A. (Grant) Dow; grandson of Joseph Newton and Sally' (Trapp) 
Dow; great-grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Richardson) Dow; great-- 
grandson of llezekiah and Olive (Thompson) Richardson; great 8 -g.randson 
of Amos Richardson, private, Second Regt., Conn. Line; grandson of Nelson 
and Sarah M. (Freeman) Grant; great-grandson of Hamilton Grant, Drummer, 
Fourth Company, Sixth Battalion, Wadsworth's Brigade, Conn. Troops. 

ALLEN BEEBE DRAPER, Amherst, Mass. (N. Y. 33240). Son of Herbert 
Stone and Gertrude (Beebe) Draper; grandson of Henry Stone and Eineline 
Aurelia (Barnes) Draper; great-grandson of Henry and Harriet (Stone) 
Diaper; great 2 -grandson of Simeon Diaper, private, Worcester County, Mass. 
Militia. 

JOHN RUSSELL DRAPER, Chicago, 111. (3309.0. Son of Eliuorc Delano and 
Ella L. (Sargeant) Draper; grandson of Silas G. and Lydia E. (Dewey) 
Sargeant; great-grandson of James and Olive (Gardner) Sargeant; great 2 - 
grandson of William Sargeant, private, Worcester County, Mass. Militia; 
grcaC-grandson of Jonathan Sargeant, private, Leicester County, Mass. Militia. 

JESSE ALBERT DREW, Portland, Maine (3-M30). Son of Morrill Newman 
and Sarah l.ouise (Davis) Drew; grandson of Jesse and Mary Ann (Wood- 
bury) Davis; great-grandson of Jonathan and Rebecca (Larrahee) Devi.-,; 
great-graiidson of Jesse Davis, private, Mass. Militia; grandson of Jesse 
and Clarissa (Wellington) Drew; great-grandson of Stephen and Anna 
(Bisbce) Drew; great-grandson of Hlisha Bisbce, private in Capt, Amos 
Turner's Company, Mass. Militia; great ;i -grandson of Charles Bisbce, private, 
Mass. Militia. 

JOHN ALMUS DREW, Major, Medical Corps, U. S. Army, Fort Ethan Allen, 
Vt. (33829), Son of Charles Wesley and Hannah (Truman) Drew; grandson 
of John Veatou and- Almira (Atwater) Drew; great-grandson of Lemuel 
and Polly (Warren) Drew; great-grandson of William Cotton Warren, 
Corpora!, Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD DREYFOUS, New York, N. Y. (3271S). Son of Albert Gomez and 
Maud Elizabeth (Heckman) Dreyfous; grandson of Emanuel and Lucille 
(Gomez) Dreyfous; great-grandson of Simon and Esther (Andrews) Drey- 
fous; great-grandson of Joseph and Sally (Salomon) Andrews; gnat 3 - 



246 SONS Ol' 'I'll K AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

grandson of Iluyin Salomon, negotiator of war subsidies of France and 
Holland. 

ALF&ED ERNEST DRISCOLL, Grand Rapids, Mich. (32387). Son of John 
W. and Carmelia (Parke) Driscoll; grandson of John and Elizabeth (Griswold) 
Park; great-grandson of Josiah Griswold, private, Albany County, New York 
Militia. 

DEAN DRISCOLL, Boise, Idaho (31813). Son of John and Hannah M. (Hill) 
Driscoll; grandson of James and Sarah (Cummings) Hill; great-grandson of 
William arid Jane (Lowiy) Hill; great s -grandson of Adam Hill, private, First 
l'a. Regt., Cont'l Line, wounded at Brandywine, six years' serviee. 

JOHN lA'NN DRISCOLL, Poise, Idaho (31817). Son of John and Hannah M. 
1 Hill) Driscoll; grandson of James and Sarah (Cumuiings) Hill; great- 
grandson of William and Jane (Lowry) Hill; great-grandson of Adam Hill, 
private, h'irst Regt., Pa. Cont'l Pine, six years' service. 

FRANK EDGAR DRULLARD, Buffalo, N. Y. (336x4), Son of Francis O. and 
Susan Augusta (Racy) Drullard; grandson of Solomon and Eunice (Ingalls) 
Drullard; great-grandsora of Francois ami Margaret ( Fairchild) Drullard; 
great-grandson of Nathaniel If air child, Sergeant, Col. Jacobus Swartwout's 
Company, New York Troops, pensioned; gnat- grandson of Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth (Munsen) Fairchild; great 3 -grandson of John Miinson, Lieutenant- 
Colonel, Maltiu's Battalion, A! orris County, New Jersey Troops. 

DANA - WARREN DRURY, Major, U. S. A., Roxbury, Mass. (3259s). Son of 
Lewis Dana and lsadore (York) Drury; grandson of Joseph W, and Mary 
Aim Baboon (.Osgood) York; great-grandson of John and Dorcas (Griffin) 
Osgood; great--grandson of John Osgood, priyate, Capt. Jonathan Pool's Com- 
pany, .Mass. Militia; grands, -n of Eric ami Judith (Real) Drury; great- 
grandson of David ami ],ois (Young) Drury; great--grandson of Samuel 
Young, Sergeant, Captain Wilder'* Company, Colonel Sparhawk's Regt., Mass. 
Mililia. 

TASCAR POPK Du POSE, South Taeoma, Wash. (32462). Son of Julius Jesse 
and Alary .(Polk) Du Pose; grandson of George \Yashinglon and Sally Leah 
(Hilliard) Polk; great-grandson of William Polk, Alajor, Ninth North Carolina 
Cont'l Battalion; great-grandson of Thomas Polk, Colonel, Second Battalion, 
North Carolina Minute Men, signer Mecklenburg Declaration of independence. 

RALPH WILLIAM DUDLEY, Alaltapan, Mass. (33334). Son of Daniel 1,. and 
Jennie p. (Smyth) Dudley; grandson of William J. and Josephine (De Silva) 
Dudley; great-grandson of Ira and Sarah J. (Thomas) De Silva; . great- 
grandson of Ahner and Mary (Tnhbs) De Silva; gieat :! -grand-ou of Joseph 
Dr Silva, private, New Jeisey Militia, prisoner, gave information to Ceueral 
Messci concerning British intent ions, pensibtied. 

HARRY < . 1 r , I . J •: S I ' t I •; DUin-, New Castle, l'a. (33x65). Sm. of Alexander and 
Alkey Smitli (Eulkirison) Dull; grandson of Richard and Delilah (l.o-pcr) 
I'ulkinson; great-grandson of John Pvlkinson, private, New Jersey Militia, 
pensioned. 

ROWLAND WARREN DUNHAM, Columbus, Ohio (33710). Sou of Edward 
I'ayson ami ('.race Maria (Coudy) Dunham; grandson of Daniel Marrow 
and Myra Ahagail (Coiianl) Dunham; great grandson of Joseph and Petsy 
(Drury) Conant; greal-grand-on of Jij\hraim Coiiant, private, Col'. James 

L'rescpU's Regt., Mass. Militia. 
lOUC.IvNIv IIF,NKY DUPF,F„ Chicago, 111. (33057)- Son of Charles Analdo and 
Jane (Wells) Dupce, g.amLon of Henry Conld and Harriet Julia (Dorsey) 
V\ r el)s; great-grandson of Nathan ami Mary Ruggles (UlTord) Wells; great*- 
gi andson of Isaac Wells, Corporal, Capt. Nichols' Company, Conn. Light 
Dragoons, at New Haven Alarm; gi cat-grandson of Samilcl Uffotd (Uffoot), 
Captain, Lieutenant-Colonel Dimon's Conn. Regt. at Tryon's invasion. 



REGISTER 01- NEW MEMBERS. 247 

NEESON RAYMOND DURANT, New Haven, Conn. (32866). Son of William 
Albert and Sarah Alice ( Boone) Durant; grandson of Jacob Swisher and 
Alary Ann (Cox) Boone; great-grandson of Elisha and Sarah (Swisher) 
Boone; greal-'-grandsou of James and Hannah (Barton) Boone; great 3 -grandson 
of Hlisha Barton, private, Sixth Company, Sixth Battalion, Northampton 
County, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of William and Mary (Battin) Cox; 
great 2 -grandson of Thomas ami Ann (Schooley) Cox; greal"-grandson of 
Nicholas Cox, Chaplain, first Battalion, Second Establishment, New Jersey 
Troops. 

HENRY SMITH 1)UKKI':K, Springfield, Mass. (33066). Son of Simeon 1'. and 
Mary E, (Smith) Durkee; grandson of Darius S. and Sally (Whitney) 
Durkee; great-grandson of John Durkee; greats-grandson of Benjamin Durkee, 
Captain, Matross Company, Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

FRED WHEEI/ER DUSENBERRY, Chatham, N. J. (337-7)- Son of Augustus 
and Mary Elizabeth (Smith) Dusenberry; grandson of Peter and Mary 
(Wheeler) Dusenberry; great-grandson of Joseph Lyon and Phoebe (Jones) 
Wheeler; great--grandsoii of James Wheeler, Captain, Maj. Joseph Morris' 
Battalion, Essex Count}', New Jersey State Troops.. 

FREDERICK HA RUTS DUTCHER, Ensign, N. R., Newark, N. J. (33175). 
Son of Charles Mason and Helen To.rcy (Harris) Dutcher; grandson of 
Charles Henry and Amanda (Story) Dutcher; great-grandson of Henry and 
Jane (Mason) Dutcher; great-grandson of Darius and Sarah (Boot) Mason; 
great?-grand'son of Aaron Hoot, Colonel, Berkshire County, Mass. Militia, 
Member Suffield, Mass. Committee on Resolutions. 

JOHN PAHMER DYER, New York City, N. Y. (332:26), Son of Volney 
Nicholas and Harriet Eliza (Hamilton) Dyer; grandson of Rufus Frederick ' 
■ahA Martha (Macfie) Hamilton; great-grandson of Rufus and Eliza (Oapp) 
Hamilton, Jr.; great 2 -grandson of Rufus Hamilton, Sr., private, Capt. Asa 
Danforih's Company, Mass. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Nathan Hamilton, 
Captain, Fourth Regt., Worcester County, Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of 
Joshua Clapp, Eieutenant, Ninth Regt., Mass. Militia. 

FRED WlkkTAM EARIIART, Paducah, Ky. (33026). Sun of Charles and 
Inez I,. (Holly) Earhart; grandson of Fred Henry and Stella Evelyn 
(Cotirtright) Holly; great-grandson of Alanson Barker and Harriet (Stowell) 
Holly; great-grandson of Samuel and Anna (Coif) Stowell; great 8 -grandson 
of Asa Stowell, private, Mass. Militia; great*-grandson of Hesehiah Stowell, 
Captain, Mass. and Vermont Militia. 

SAMUEE STOCKWEIX KARI/Y, North Easton, Mass. (Tnd. 33580). Sou of 
Samuel Stockwell and A. l.ouisa (Andrews) Early; grandson of Timothy 1". 
and Emily Roscville (Snowden) Andrews; great-grandson of Richard and 
Elizabeth (Warfield) Snowden; great-grandson of Charles Alexander War field, 
Major, Eik Ridge, Maryland Battalion, Member Anne Arundel County 
Association Com nut tee. 

ROBERT HENRY EASEEY, Springfield, 111. (33395). Son of James B. and 
Margaret (l)odds) Easley; grandson of Joseph and Matlie (Drennan) Dodds; 
great-grandson of William and Mary (Thomas) Drennan; great-'-grandson 
of U'illiani Drennan, private, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia. 

HAROHD MUkKEY EASEEY, Detroit, Mich. (33756). Son of Charles C. and 
Daisy (Mulkey) Easley ; grandson of William Fletcher and Minerva A. 
Mulkey; great-grandson of John Milton and Matilda Mulkey; great--grands ( ,n 
of Philip Malhey, private and Chaplain, North Carolina Militia. 

LEVI PRANK EATON, Detroit, Mich. (32398). Son of lle/ekiah Cooley and 
Elizabeth Susan (Damon) Eaton; grandson of Aaron and Eavina Thomas 
• (Cushmari) Ramon; great-grandson of Robert Cushman, lieutenant, Captain 
Crane's Mass. Company of Cuank, widow pensioned. 



248 SONS OF Til K AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILFnRI) MAM, EATON, Uridgcport, III. (32250). Son of James and 
Cynthia F„ (Lewis) Eaton; grandson of Caiua M and l.uoy (Paine.) Eaton; 
great-grandson of James and Mary (Brockelbank) Eaton; grcatSgraudson of 

David Lialon, private, New Hampshire Militia. 

WILLIAM B. EDGAR, Chicago, 111. (3~'8o_>). Son of George M. and Alary C. 
(Rrindle) Edgar; grandson of William and Elizabeth (Hudnell.) Edgar; 
great-grandson of John Hudnell, private, Colonel M erri weather's Regt., Vir- 
ginia Militia, pensioned. 

McDONALD 1,()\V EDING33R, Appenang, K. 1. (32499). Son of Urban Gutter- 
man ami Alice (Low) Edinger; grandson of James Edward and Elizabeth 
Tremper ( Van Gi asbeck) Low; great-grandson of Andrew and Elizabeth 
( Klmeiidoi-f) Low; great-grandson of Abram 1. and Anna E. (Low) Low; 
great 8 -grandsOn of Jacobus Loiv, private, Ulster County, New York Militia. 

WILLIAM LAC3Y EDMUNDSON, Denver, Colo. (.31969). Son of William 
and Cora (Wood) Kdmundson; grandson of William and Priscilla (Depew) 
Edmundson; great-grandson of William Edmundson, private, Virginia Troops. 

FREDERICK BUCKELEY EDWARDS, Hartiordj Conn. (32870). Son of 
Frederick Buckley and Agnes (M.) Edwards; grandson of Walter and Jane 
(Buckeley) Edwards; great-grandson of Frederick and Nancy (Riley) Bucke- 

ley; great-grandson of James and Esther (Goodrich) Riley; great'-grandson 
of Jolin Riley., Captain, Conn. Militia, prisoner. 

BENJAMIN ARTHUR 1CGJC, Minneapolis, Minn. (31841). Son of James Henry 
and Margaret Catherine (Quick) Ege; grandson of Joseph Arthur and Jane 
Klmira (Woodburn) Ege; great-grandson of Peter and Jane (Arthur) Ege; 
great-grandson of Michael P.ge, Jr., Lieutenant-Colonel, Fifth Battalion, York 
County, Pa. Militia; grcatr-grandson of Michael and Ann Dorothea (Wolff) 
Ege; grcaC-grandson of Peter Wolff, private, York County, Pa. Militia. 

JOSEPH DUPUY EC-GLESTON, 2nd, Blacksburg, \'a. (31672). Son of Joseph 
Dupuy and Anne Carrington (Booker) Fggl< ston ; grandson of Richard 
Beverly and Elvira (Dupuy) Eggleston; great grandson of James Dupuy, 
Captain, Virginia Militia. 

LOUIS PETER I'd, KINS, Concord, N. II. (3053J). Son of William Connor 
and Poiia (I'.artlelt) i^llcins; grandson of Peter and Harriet (Hall) Elkins; 
great-grandson of Obadiah and Betsy (Connor) Elkins; great-grandson of 
Peter Elkins, Corporal in Colonel Drake's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

HENRY WATKINS ELLERSON, Richmond, \'a. (33559). Son of John Hauckel 
and Ida (Watkins) Ellerson; grandson of Henry Clay and Malvina Haskins 
(Day) Watkins; great-grandson of Claiborne and Ellen (Harris) Watkins; 
greai--grandson of James Harris, Captain and Lieutenant-Colonel, Virginia 
Militia. 

BYARD HAMPTON ELLINGTON, Richmond, Va. (33565). Son of Joseph C. 
and Elizabeth (Tomlinson) Ellington; grandson of John F. and Christiana 
(Avery) Islington; great-grandson of Thomas Avery., private, Johnston County, 
North Carolina Militia. 

THOMAS ELMER ELLIS, Indiana, Pa. (33676). Son of Griffith and Mary 
Lloyd (St. Clair) Ellis; grandson of Thomas and Charlotte D. (Patton) St. 
Clair; great-grandson of John and Charlotte Clark (Dennison) Patton; great'- 
grandson of John and Mary (Campbell) Dennison; greaF'-grandson of Charles 
Campbell, Second Lieutenant, Westmoreland County, l'a. Militia. 

WADE HAMPTON FPUS, Washington, D. C. (33-"5'»). Son of Alexander 
Campbell and Kate (Blackburn) Ellis; grandson of Christopher and Jennette 
(Smith) Blackburn; great-grandson of Jonathan and Elizabeth (McPike) 
Smith; great-grandson of James McPike, Sergeant, Lancaster County, l'a 
Cont'l Troops. 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBERS. 



249 



RAYMOND LUTHER ELLISON, New Orleans, La. (33J-*0>. Son of Tedford 
Blakeley and Virginia (Carraras) J.Cllisoti ; grandson of Aimer and Adeline 
(Blakeley) Ellison; great-grandson of John and Hanna (Freeman) Ellison; 
great— grandson of John and Anna (Sheppard) Ellison; great :! -grandson of 
Joseph Ellison, private, First New Hampshire Regt., Cont'l Troo|>s and 
Militia. 

WILLIAM JUDSON ELMENDQRE, Seattle, Wash. (32460). Son of William 
Sinclair and Martha (Rider) Elmendorf ; grandson of Levi and Selitjc 
(Du.Puys) Elmendorf; great-grandson of Martin and Rachel (Roosa) 
Elmendorf; great-grandson of John {Jan) Elmendorf, Captain, Col. Johannes 
Snyder's First Regt., New Vork Militia. 

WILLIAM BRAXTON ELWANG, Richmond, \ r a. (J3555). Son of Arthur J. 
and Susan Blanks (Davis) Klwang; grandson of Vincent and Annie (Blanks) 
Davis; great-grandson of James E. W. and Sarah Early (Carter) Blanks ; 
great-grandson of David and Margaret (Braxton) Blanks; great :, -grandsun 
of (.'drier Braxton, Virginia signer of Declaration of Independence. 

WILLIAM CARYD ELY, N. Y. (10538). Supplemental. Son of William 
Horace and Ellen (Caryl) ICly ; grandson of Leonard and Mary (Crippen) 
Caryl; great-grandson of Isaac and Susanna (Sneel) Caryl; great-grandson 
-if Jonathan Caryl, Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Sibley's Company at Lexington 
Alarm;' great-grandson of Silas Cripp&tl, private, Colonel Elmore's Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Sumner and Hannah Knapp (Gilbert) Ely; great-grandson 
of Benjamin Gilbert, Lieutenant, Third Regt., Mass. Cont'l Troops; great- 
grandson of Daniel Gilbert, Captain, Mass. Militia. 

HAROLD IIUNTKR EMMONS, Detroit, Mich. (33640). Son of Marcus A. 
and Margaret Alma (Shaven) Emmons; grandson of George and Sally Nancy 
(Miller) Slaven; great-grandson of Abraham and Nancy Agnes (Blackburn) 
Miller; great-grandson of John Blackburn, Lieutenant, Pa. Militia. 

WALTER T1IIRLM0RE EMMONS, Detroit, Mich. (33639). Son of Marcus A. 
and Margaret Alma (Slaven) Emmons; grandson of George and Sally Nancy 
(Miller) Slaven; great-grandson of Abraham and Nancy Agnes (Blackburn); 
great—grandson of John Blackburn, Lieutenant, Pa. Militia. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS KRY'JNG, West Hartford, Conn. (32863). Son of 
Daniel Dodge and Cynthia Ann Chapjn • (Woodward) Living; grandson of 
John and Lydia Carlisle (Fuller) Erving; great-grandson of John Brving, 
private, Col. Matthew Thornton's Sixth Regt., New Hampshire Militia; 
grandson of Levi ami Cynthia (Wood) Woodward; great-grandson of Joseph 
Wooihoard, private, Conn. Cont'l Troops; great-grandson of Joseph fuller, 
private, Mass. Cont'l Troops., pensioned; great-grandson of Pester Wood, 
Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

DAVID EVANS, Chicago, ill. (3.1087)- Sou of Chesley Da. del and Sarah Jane 

(llaselden) Lvans; grandson of Thomas and Jane Beverly (Daniel) Kvans; 

great-grandson of George and Martha ( — ) Daniel; great-grandson of Chesley 

Daniel, signer of North Carolina Oath of Allegiance. 
ERNEST ARTHUR LVANS, Newark, N. J. (33778). Son of Edward Oscar hd 

Carrie Evelyn (Bradley) Evans; grandson of Edward and Harriett (Wilcox) 

Bradley; great-grandson of Enoch nw\ Mepzibah Wilcox; great— grandson of 

Elijah IVilcox, Jr., private, Conn. .Militia. 
GEORGE BRAYTON EVANS, Duluth, Minn. (31839). Son of John Sessions 

and Philinda Saliina (Brown) Evans; grandson of Parley and Submit 

(Harwell) Evans; great-grandson of libenezcr Brown, private, Fifth and 
20th RegtS., Conn. Line. 

LAY HAMPTON LVLRHART I). C. C32140). Supplemental. Son of Georgs 

Marlow and Cornelia Adelaide (Banner) Lverhart; grands. 111 of Constantino 
Ladd and Mary (Bowman) Ra.mer; great-grandson of Charles and Rebecca 
Apjones (Evans) Banner; (freat B -grandson of Joseph Banner, private, North 



25© 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



DON BUSH FY EVEKEY, Guyahoga Fulls, Ohio (3370t). Son of Ora W. and 
Eovie. K. (Bushey) Evi-rly; grandson of Thomas and Martha R. (Painter) 
Everly; great- grandson of Adam and Naomi (McConkey) Everly; great 2 - 
grandson of Peter and Pei nulla (Sniilh) Everly; great 3 -gran4son of Leonard 
Hverly, private, Colonel EJausegger's Maryland German Regt., and Wash- 
ington Count}-, Pa. Militia and Cotit'l Line; grandson of James C. and 
Katherine R. 'While) Bushey; great-grandson of Peter Nicholas and Isabelle 
j. (Taylor) Bushey; grcat--grandson of Nicholas and Hester (Mickley) 
Bushey; greaC-grandsou of Peter and Dorothy (Biery) Mickley; greal 4 - 
grandstin of John Martin Mickley, private, Second Battalion, Northampton 
County, Pa. Militia". 

CUV PAINTER EYLKLY, St. Joseph, Mo. (Ohio 3,3702). Son of Ora \V. and 
I.ovie R. (Bushey) Kverley; grandson of 'I nomas and Martha R. (Painter) 
Evcrley; great-grandson of Adam and Naomi (McConkey) loverly; great 2 - 
grandson of Peter and Permilla (Smith) loverly; great 8 -grandson of Leonard 
Hverly, private, Colonel Uauseggcr's Maryland German Regt., and Wash- 
ington County, Pa. Militia and Cont'l Line; grandson of James C. and 
Katherine R. (White) Bushey; great-grandson of Peter Nicholas and Isabelle 
J. (Taylor) Bushey; great 2 -grartdson of Nicholas and Hester (Mickley) 
Bushey; great-grandson of Peter and Dorothy (Biery) Mickley; great'- 

grandson of John Martin Mickley, private, Sec 1 Battalion, Northampton 

County, Pa. Militia. 

ORA \YALKFR EVEREY, Columbus, Ohio (33162). Son of Thomas and 
Martha R. (Painter) Everly; grandson of Adam and Naomi (McConkey) 
Everly; great-grandson of Peter and Permilla (Smith) Everly; greaP'-grandson 
of Loiiard Hverly, private, Maryland Troops and Washington County, Pa. 
Militia and Cont'l Pine. 

PETER POWERS EVERTS, Eakeville, Conn. (33468). Son of Charles Lewis 
and Mary Catherine (Oibhs) Everts; grandson of Peter Powers and Trypheila 
(Harnett) Everts; great-grandson of Silas and Betsey (Warner (Underwood) 

F verts; great--grandson of Nathaniel Everts, Jr., Ensign and Captain, Four- 
teenth Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

PAYETTE CEAY EWI'NG; Alexandria, Pa. (33211). Son of Payette Clay and 
Eliza Josephine (KHtrcdge) Ewing; grandson of Ephratili McEcan and Jane 
Pope (Mclnlyie) Ewing; great-grandson of Robert Hieing, private, Virginia 
Militia. 

HOMER EDMUND PYMAN, Lancaster, Ohio. (33446). Son of Henry Bryan 
and Mary Ann (Baker) Kyman; grandson of Henry and Mary (Bryan) 
Eyman; great-grandson of Henry Lyman, private, First Battalion, Lancaster 
County, Pa. Militia. 

HUBERT BAKER EYMAN, Lancaster, Ohio (33443). Son of Eouis Erwiu and 
Lizzie Ann (Long) Lyman; grandson of Henry Bryan and Mary Ann (Baker) 
Eyman,; great-grandson of llenry and Mary (Bryan) Eyman ; gi eat--grandson 
of llenry Eyman, private, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

BLOOMFILLD MILLS FAIRBANKS, Washington, D. C. (33260). Son of 
John Henry and Jane (Mills) Fairbanks; grandson of Nathaniel Doan and 
Julia (Cray) Pail banks; great-grandson of Moses and Lucy ; Doan (Doolittle) 
Fairbanks; great-grandson of Oliver Fairbanks, Corporal, Mass. Cont'l Troops, 
pensioned; great --grandson of Oliver and Elizabeth Norcross (Clark) Fair- 
hanks; greapgiamPon of John (J,nl:, Memher Mass. Firsl Provincial Con- 
gress. 

LAMBERT FAIRC1IIED, .Minneapolis, Minn. (33505). Son of llenry Shields 
and Elizabeth Matilda (Clayland) Fairchild; grandson of Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Day) Fairchild; great-grandson of John and Mary King (Avers) Day; great- 
grandson of Silas Pay, private, Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 



R ]• G I ST P R P H F, W M R Ml'. I'. RS. -251 

JOHN WHEELER FAIRFAX, Jr., New Orleans, U. (32549). Son of John 
Wheeler and Mary Virginia (Washington) Fairfax; grandson of John Stith 
and Mary Anastesia (Kaynal) Washington; great-grandson of Warner and 
Ariana (.Stith) Washington; grcat 2 -grandson of John Stith, Captain, First Com- 
pany, Virginia Cont'l Line. 

CHARL-ES ARTHUR FAIRWEATJIER, Chicago, 111. (358*5). Son of William 
and Rachel V. (Manning) Fairweather; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Hale) Manning; great-grandson of Thomas Hale, private, South Carolina 
Cont'l Cine, pensioned. 

EDWARD ROE FAITONTl-:, Newark, N. J. (32366). Son of Edward Cheevcr 
and Almira (Tyler) Faitonle; grandson of Edward Could and Harriet 
(Cheever) Faitonte; great-grandson of Moses and Phoebe (Could) Faitonte; 
great--grandson of William Gould, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia. 

T.kROV FAITONTE, Newark, N. J. (3^67)- Son of Frederick B. and Abbie 
(Raylis) Faitonte; grandson of Joseph Slanshury and Hannah (Noe) Bay lis; 
great-grandson of Matthias and Martha (Howell.) Noe; great-grandson of 
Calvin and Mary (Sayre) Howell; great--grandson of Uphraim Sayre, Mass. 
Minute Man. 

FRANK CHARLES F Al .KENSTEIN, Bottineau, N. D. (33004). Son of Edmund 
and Julia (MosSer) Falkenstein ; grandson of Jacob and Jane (Forman) 
Falkenstein; grcat-g. andson of l.udwig and Margaret (Smith) Falkenstein, 
3rd; great-grandson of l/ttdwig I'alUcnstcin, 2nd, signer of Pa. Oath of 
Allegiance. 

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS FARLEY, Jr., Melburn, N. J. (33423). Son of 
Frederick Coolidge and Julia (ITobhs) Farley; grandson of Frederick Augustus 
and Jane Caster (Sigourney) Farley; great-grandson of Eben and Lydia 
(Dawes) Coolidge; great--grandson of John. Coolidge, Second Lieutenant, 
Boston, 'Mass. Militia and Artillery. 

JAMES ALEXANDER FARRAND, GHggsville, 111. (32237). Son of l-lbridge 
Gerry and Elizabeth (McWilliams) Farrand; grandson of Samuel and Mary 
(Kitchell) Farrand; great-grandson of Bethriel farrand, Lieutenant, Morris 
County, New Jersey Militia, pensioned; great-grandson of Phiveas Kitchell, 
Minnie Man, Capt. Isaac Kitchell's Company, Morris County, New Jersey 
Militia; great-.graiulson of Phineas and Esther (Mulford) Kitchell; great*- 
grandson of (ieofgu Kitchell, Minnie Man, Capt. Isaac Kileludl's Company,. 
Morris County, New jersey. 

CHARLES JENNINGSS FARRAU, Crafton, Pa. U-070). Sou of Samuel 

Clarke and Marietta (Cooke) Farrar; grandson of David and Agnes Hoggs 
(Ritchie) Cooke; great-grandson of James Cooke, Captain, Fourth Battalion, 
Lancaster County, Pa. Militia; grandson of John and Phoebe (White) Farrar; 
great-grandson of John and Mary (May) While; great-grandson of John 
and Phoebe (Ross) May; great--grandson of Alexander May, private, Sixth 
Battalion, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of Samuel and Jane 
(Simanton) Farrar; great-grandson of Peter Simanton, private in Capt. John 
Van Etten's Company, Northampton County,. Pa, Militia; great 2 -grandson of 
Andrew and Margaret (Moore) Farrar; greaC-grandson of James h'anar, 
army blacksmith at Hunterdon County, New Jersey; great-grandson of 
Peter and Margaret (McFarren) Simanton or Symington; great 3 -grandson 
of William McFarren, private in Capt. John Nelson's Company, Sixth Bat- 
talion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia; grcat--grandson of John and Ann 
(Bouar) White; grcaC-grandson of John White, Major, Third Battalion, 
Washington County, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of John White, Jr., Lieu- 
tenant, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of James and Martha (MeComb) Cooke; 
great-grandson of David McComb, Ensign in Capt. Robert Campbell's Com- 
pany, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of Charles and Jane 
(McWilliams) Ritchie; great s -grandson of Andrew Ritchie, private in Col. 



SONS OF T1IK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



Thomas Porter's Regt., Lancaster County, Pa. Militia; greats-grandson of 
William McWilliams, Lieutenant^ Washington County, Pa. Militia. 

CHESTER HAROLD FARTHING, Lieutenant, U. S. R., St. Louis, Mo. (32566). 
Son of William Dudley and Sarah Boyd (Phillips) Farthing; grandson of 
Thomas and Eliza Chadwell (Johnson) Phillips; great-grandson of Joseph 
Harris and Harriet Adaline (Chadwell) Johns. ,11; grcat--grandson of Joseph 
and Mary (Chadwell) Johnson; great-grandson of Harris Chadwell, Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. Samuel King's Company, Lynn, Mass. Militia. 

ISAAC WOODRUFF FAULKS, East Orange, N. J. (33484). Son of Stephen 
Hunting and Anna (Cleveland) Paulks; grandson of Ezra and Priscilla 
Warner (Bkickwell) Cleveland; great-grandson of Benjamin Norton and 
Elizabeth (Gibbs) Cleveland; grcat--grandson of Joseph Cibbs, private, Essex 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

RICHARD CLEVELAND FAULKS, Kast Orange, N. J. (52760). Son of Isaac 
Woodruff and Ella (Fort) Faulks; grandson of Jacob Piatt and Margaret 
Force.) Fort; great grandson of Andrew ami Nancy (Piatt) Fort; great- 
grandson of John h'orl, private and Minute Man, New Jersey Militia. 

TIIFonOKF DUFPORD FAHLKS. Newark, N. J. ("33776). Son of Stephen 
[Tiinting and Anna (Cleveland') Faulfces; grandson of H/ra and Priscilla 



Warner (Blackwell) Ch 
F.li/aheth (Gibbs) Clevch 
County, New Jersey MBit 



ds. 



X. 



gieat-giandson of Joseph Cibbs, private, Essex 



IiERTRAND FAY, Captain, U. S. Army, flighwood Park, N. J. (32602). Son 

of William Gaston and Emilia Courtenay (Fcniier) Fay; grandson of Samuel 
Howard and Susan Montforf (Shellman) Fay; great-grandson of Samuel 
Prescott Phillips and Harriet (Howard) Fay; great--grandson of Jonathan and 
Lucy (Prescott) Fay; great 3 -grandson of Abel Prescott, private, Captain 
Jewett's Company, Col. Samuel Bollard's Peg!., Ma^s. Militia. 

CLARENCE PARWFLL FAY, Roselte, N. J. ^29-08). Son of Adoniram J. and 

Allemirah (Smith) Fay; grandson of l.ynds and Fanny (Morton) Smith; 
great-grandson of Luther and Abigail (— ) Smith; great 2 -grandson of Asa 
Smith, Corporal, in Captain Dexter's Company, Colonel Doolittle's Regt., Mass. 
Militia. 

JOHN CARSON PEBIGER, JR., New Orleans, La. C3-'75^). Son of John C. 
and Anna Catharine (Ryan) Febiger; grandson of Christian Carson and 
Hannah (Lea) Febiger; great-grandson of Christian Febiger, Brevet Brigadier- 
General, Cont'l Army. 

CHARLES 1IFNPY FENSTERMACHER, Tulsa, Olda. (316.20). Son of "Nathan 
Wesley and Bertha (Loneta) Fenstermacher; grandson of Daniel F. and 
Mary (liogart) Fenstermacher; great-grandson of Abraham and Christina 
(Weiss) Fenstermacher; great-grandson of Michael Fenstermacher, Ensign, 
First Battalion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 

EDGAR HANLON FERGUSON, Richmond, Va. (33561). Son of John Wesley 
and Evalina (Godwin) Ferguson; grandson of George and Ann Ursula Fer- 
guson; great-gran dson of Robert and Elizabeth Ferguson; great-grandson ■ of 
h'obort Ferguson, private, First Regt., Virginia Lighl Dragoons and Partisan 
Legion, wounded, pensioned. 

i;i)\\..\KD EUGENE FF,RKF,l'., Buffalo, N. Y. (33602). Son of Joshua p. and 
F,li/:i (Ihingan) Fence; grandson of l.evi and Margaret (Cameron) Dungan, 
Jr., great-grandson of Levi P'uiigan, private, Washington County, Pa. Militia. 

LE0NIDAS COLUMRUS FERREUU New Orleans, I. a. (33219). Son of Cole- 
man l'». and Missouri (Wilkerson) I'errell; grandson of Micklehe.ry and 
Nancy (Coleman) Fen ell; great-grandson of Urnjamin Coleman, Captain, 

Fifth and S^ond Regts., North Carolina Troops. 



REGISTER OF Nl'AV M I'.M BF,KS. 2$$ 

DAVID UNCOEN FERRIS, Rochester, N. V. (33365). Son of Janus Augustus 
and Catherine Sophia (Clark) Ferris; grandson of William Beldcn and Mary 
(Forgee) Ferris.; great-grandson of Joseph and Fydia (Seymour) Ferris; 
great 2 -grandson of Jonathan Ferris, Sergeant, Third Regt., Westchester 

County, New York Militia. 
JOHN FftRRIS, Newark, N. J. (32603). Son of James Booth and Emilinc R. 
(Jones) Ferris; grandson of John and Katharine A. (Booth) Ferris;- great- 
grandson of Jesse and Eliza Jane (Covel) Ferris? great-grandson of EHzaheth 
(Ash) and Dr. - - Covel; greaF-grandson of Samuel Ash, private, Col John 
Mead's Regt., Conn. Militia. 
HAROLD WOODMAN FH.FS, Rutherford, N. J. (N. Y. 33358). Son of 
Charles Granville "and Emma Fouisa (Woodman) Files; grandson of Edward 
and Jane (Boyrtton Files; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Sarah (.Stuart) 
Files; great-grandson of Hbenezer Files, private, Col. Edmund Phinney's 
Regt.., Mass. Militia; great :; -grandson of Witttam Files, private, Col. Jonathan 
Mitchell's Regt., Mass. Militia, Penobscot Expedition; great-grandson of 
Edward ] '. and Apphia ( Philbrick) Boynton; great-grandson of Samuel 
Boyntun, seaman and private, New Hampshire Troops, prisoner, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Wentworth and Hannah (Shaw) Stuart; greaF-grandson 
of Wentworth Stuart, Captain, Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. Militia, 
died in service. 
JAMES CRAMPTON FINN, Detroit, Mich. (33645). Son of Albert Henry and 
Katharine (ScotO Finn; grandson of Silas and Cynthia (Eaton) Finn; great- 
grandson of James and Folly (Wells) Finn, Jr.; great-grandson of James 
Finn, private, Eighth Regt., Pa. Cont'l Fine; grandson of James D. and 
Prudence C. (Crampton) Scott; great-grandson of William Chauncy and 
Katherine Dfuillard (Kadette) Crampton; great'-'-graudson of Darius and 
Prudence (Munger) Crampton; great :1 -grandson of James M unger, Captain, 
Seventh Regt., Conn. Militia. 
SILAS MUNGER FINN, Detroit, Mich. C33G44). Son of Albert Henry and 
Katherine (Scott) Finn; grandson of Silas and Cynthia (Eaton) Finn; great- 
grandson of James and Polly (Wells) Finn; great°-grandson of James Finn, 
private, Eighth Regt.., Pa. Cont'l Fine; grandson of James D. and Prudence 
C. (Crampton) Scott; great-grandson of William Chauncy and Katherine 
Druillard (Kadette) Crampton; great-grandson of Darius and Prudence 
(Munger) Crampton; great 1 grandson of James Munger, Captain, Seventh 
Regt,, Conn. Militia. 
ORANGE SCOTT HUM IN, Washington, I). C. (11430). Son of Francis Bugbee 
and Mary (Chapin) Firmin; grandson of Curtis Simeon and Mary (Burseil) 
Chapiu; great-grandson of Ithamar Chap'm, private, Captain Reuben's Com- 
pany, Col. Nicholas Dike's Regt!, Mass, Militia. 
Cr,YDE MDFIIAFFON FISH, Pkasaiitville, N. J. (32689). Son of Hiram B. 
and Mary R. (Mulhallon) Fish; grandson of J. Clyde and Elizabeth M. 
(Kern) Mulhallon.; great grandson of Jacob and Mary (Palmer) Kern; great- 
grandson of N'ieholas Kem, Lieutenant, Fourth Company, Third .Battalion, 
Northampton County, Pa. Militia; greaF-grandson of Nicholas Kern, Sr., 
Colonel, Third Battalion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 
AMOS HOWARD FISKE, i'lamingham, Mass. (33067). Son of John Wesley 
ami Adelaide (Holbrook) l'iske; grandson of Moses and Abbie (Bryant) 
Fiske; great-grandson of Moses Fish, Corporal, Captain Brewer's Com- 
pany, Col. Abmr Perry's Regt., Mass. Militia. 
FERDINAND r.KAFNS, FOCKE, Baltimore, Md. (33110). Son of Rdward 
Fewis and l£Iizal*etll l.uce (Smullj 1'oeke; grandson of David Burke and 
Rliza (Edes) Sniull; great gi auds.ni of William and Margaret Panmll 
(Small.) F.des; great-grand-.. >n of Benjamin tides, I ,ieutenant, Mass. Artillery, 
Member Boston "Tea Party," iCdjlor Boston Gazette ami County lournal. 



254 SONS OF THK AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

PRANK PRENTISS FORBES, Springficldi Mass. (33056). Son of William A. 
and Eliza P. (Prentiss) Forbes; grandson of William and Eunice (Sherman) 
Forbes; great-grandson of Edward Forbes, private, -Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WELLS FORBES, Holyoke, Mass. (33535). Son of Caleb E. and 
Roxy (B'atchelder) Forbes; grandson of William and Eunice (Sherman) 
Forbes; great-grandson of Edward Forbes, private, Mass. Militia. 

MALCOLM FjORBES, Springfield, Mass. {33-^77). Son of Frank P. and Kate 
llayden (Talbot) Forbes; grandson of William A. and Eliza F. (Prentiss) 
Forbes; great-grandson of William ami p'mma (Sherman) Forbes; great 1 ' - 
grandson of Edward Forbes, private, Col. Benjamin Tupper's Tenth Regt., 
Mass. Troops. 

TALBOT FORBES, Springfield, .Mass. (33057). Son of Prank P. and Kate 
llayden (Talbot) Forbes; grandson of William A. and Eliza F. (Prentiss) 
Forbes; great-grandson of William and Eunice (Sherman) Forbes; great 2 - 
grandson of Udzvard Forbes, private, Mass. Militia. 

WALTER BHRTON FORI), Ann Arbor, Mich. (32385). Son of Sylvester and 
[magene (Burton) I'ord; Kian.l-.on of Eliakiin R. and Harriet (Emmons.) 
Pord; great-grandson .of Sylvester and Lydia (Reed) Ford; great 2 -grandson 
of Jacob Ford, Lieutenant-Colonel, Pourth Company, Ninth Regt., .Albany 
Count)', New York Militia. 

GEORGE HARRISON FOSS, Qujncy, Mass. (32200). Son of George W. W. 
and Riania (Rutterfield) Foss; grandson of William Pitt and Sarah O. 
Putnam Luscoihb (Boyden) Butterfield; great-grandson of Pitts and I.ucy 
(Damon) Butterfield; greal--grandson of Jonathan Damon, Mass. Minute 
Man, Capl. Aaron Fuller's Company at Lexington Alarm. 

WESLEY BLAKE FOSS, Springfield, Mass. (33929). Son of lloraee Ervin 
ami Eninia (Blake) Foss; grandson of Francis Warren and Mary (Judkins) 
Blake; great-grandson of Enoch and Lydia (Smith) Blake; great a -grandspn 
of Enoch Blake, private, Col. Abraham Drake's New Hampshire Militia to 
reinforce Northern Cont'l Army. 

CLYDE D WIGHT FOSTER, Evanston, 111. (33092). Son Of Albert and Mary 
Elizabeth (Spensler) Foster; grandson of George Lyman ami Lucy Jane 
(Heathaway) Poster; great-grandson of Elijah Dwight and Martha G. 
(Lavalley) Foster; great--grandson of Theophilns Foster, private, Ma-s. 
Militia at Lexington Alarm; greaP'-grandson of Jedediah Foster, private, 
Capt. Selah Hearst's Company, Col. Krastns Woolcot's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

SAMUEL COLEMAN POSTER, Medical Corps, A. E. P., Cumberland, \ a. 
(31674). Smi uf Peter lb and Rosa V. ( Build) Foster, grandson of Henry 
Hoagland and Virginia II. (Watson) Budd; great-grandson of Allen and 
Saral (Allen) Watson; great-grandson of James Allen, private, Cob William 
Russet's Tenth Virginia Regt., Cont'l Troops. 

THOMAS MYRON POSTER, New Orleans, La. (33218). Son of Elmer J. and 
Mary II. C. (Dean) Foster; grandson of Thomas W. and Rachel (Ham) 
Foster; great-grandson of Ira and Martha (Welling) Foster; great a -grandson 
of John Foster, private, Conn. Militia, pensioned; great a *grandson of Abraham 
Foster, East Windsor, Conn. Patriot. 

ARTHUR WARD POX, Hartford, Conn. (32855). Sou of Simeon Joseph ami 
Margaret (Parnliam) Pox'; grandson of Levi G. and Elizabeth II. (Bodfish) 
Pox; great-grandson of Joseph Kneeland and Sally (Cray) Fox; great- 
grandson of Abraham Fox, private. Col. Obadiah Johnson's Regt., Conn. 
Militia. 

KENNETH CORDON FREELAND, Phomix, Ariz. (--3319). Son of Henry 
Rankin ami Caroline Steel (Walker) Prcehuid, grandson of William and 
Caroline (Steel) Walker; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Eaton), 
Walker; great-grandson of Abel Walker, private, Mass. Militia for Rhode 
Island service. 



kkgistlk m' new ai i:m ui'.ks. 255 

CHARLES EDWIN lMii;i;SlC, Detroit, Mich. (32400). Sun of Charles Edwin 
ami Mary (Hobart) Freest; grandson of Martin and Clarissa Cornelia 
(Parshail) Hobart; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) l'arshall; 
gfeat 2 -grandson of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshail; grcat 3 -grandso.n of 
Jonathan Parshail, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia. 

GEORGE CALEB FRENCH,, Milwaukee, Wis. (32653). Son of George Henry 
and .Mary Catherine (Collier; French; grandson of Caleb and Mary (Polly) 
Sanborn) French; great-grandson of Caleb and Susanna (Avery) French; 
great a -grandson of Joseph French, private, Capt. Timothy Clement's Company, 
Col. Pierce Long's New Hampshire Regt., Cont'l service. 

WALTER R. FRENCH, Waterloo, Iowa (31965). Son of Wallace R. and 
Katherine W. (Vogt) French; grandson of Joseph and Roxanna (Joslyn) 
French; great-grandson of Jedidiah and Phebe (Wales) French; great 2 - 
grandson of Joshua French, private, Ma^s. Militia. 

WILLIAM CLEGG FRfiRE, New Orleans, l,a. (3J7'.')). Sou of Alexander G. 
and Lula (Clegg) Frere; grandson of Raster and Temperance (Collins) 
Clegg; great-grandson of Thomas and Bridget (Polk) Ck-gg; great--grandson 
of IVilliani Polk, Captain, AcComac County, Virginia Militia. 

NORMAN KF.LLER FRICK, Syracuse, N. Y. (32610). Son of William Keller 
and Louise (Klump) Flick; grandson of Lewis and Mary (Schmidt) Klump; 
great-grandson of Ludwig and (Sara) Salome (Biery) Schmidt; great-- 
grandson of David and Susanna (Mickley) Biery; great :, -grandson of John 
Martin Mickley, private, Lieut. -Col. Stephen Ralliet's Regt., Second Battalion, 
Pa. Troops. 

ANDREW GAIENNIE FRIEDRICHS, New Orleans, I,a. (32756). Son of 
George 1. and Louise Natalie (Gaiennie) Friedrichs; grandson of Louis Rene 
and Natalie (LaFouta) Gaiennie; great-grandson of Edward and Susan 
(Iiepp) LaFonta; great--grandson of John Hepp, Bombardier, Captain Court- 
ney's Company, Pa. Artillery. 

CARL CONVERSE FRIEDRICHS, New Orleans, La. (32546), Son of George 
J. and Louise Natalie (Gaiennie) Friedrichs; grandson of Louis Rem; and 
Natalie (Lafonta) Gaiennie; great-grandson of Edward and Susan (Hepp) 
Lafonta; great'-'-gramlson of John Hepp, Bombardier in Captain Courtney's 
Company, Pa. Artillery. 

WILLIS D. RRIKSTLDT, Chicago, 111. (333*7). Son of Luther Peter and 
Dora M. (Mcner) Fricstedt; grandson of Peter and Mary Leslie (Danford) 
Friestedt; great-grandson of Elbridge Gerry and Mary (Dufur) Danford; 
great-grandson of Rbenc/cr and llep/ibeth (Dufur) Danfotd; great--grandson 
of Jonathan Danford (Daitforth), private, New Hampshire Militia to join 
Northern Army. 

IRA CHESTER FROST, Toledo, Ohio (33151). Son of Albinus Finney and 
Emma Jane (Richardson) Frost; grandson of Augustus Chester and Jessie 
(Hurd) Frost; great-grandson of Chester and Llisa (Cole) Frost; great-- 
grandson of Amasa Frost, private, Capt. Ebenezcr Strong's Company, Colonel 
Sears' Regt., Hampshire County, Mass. Troops. 

WILLIAM WALLACK FRY, Jr., Mexico, Mo. (32561). Son of William Wallace 
and Nellie (Bourn) Fry; grandson id Jacob Young and Elizabeth Carson 
(Jordan) Fry; great grandson of Robert Carson and Josephine (Allison) 
Jordan; great--grandson of Alexander Allison; grcat :i -grandson of Robert 
AUison, Captain, .South Carolina Militia. 

JAMES MeMILLAN FRYE, Concord, N. II. (Me. 3-'-l3«). Son of Charles 
Jefferson ami Harriet Whipple (Cook) Frye; grandson of George Henry ami 
Selina At wood (Aiken) Cook; great -gi au.Lon of Charles and Lli/.abeth (Bur- 
beck) Cook; great-grandson of Edward and Jane (Milk) limbeck; gres " 
grandson of William Unrhcck, Lieutenant, Colonel Gridley's Regt., Ma 
Artillery and Knox's Cont'l Artillery. 



leaf 



■56 



SONS 01'" T11.1C AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



CHARLES II ICK IJJCK'I' FULLFR, Wyoming, N. J. (33411). Son of William J. 
and Sarah M. (Carr) (Peterson) Puller; grandson of William F. and Sarah 
E. (Holmes) Carr; great-grandson of Joseph and Abigail (Austin) Holmes; 
great-grandson of Barnabas Holmes, private, Colonel Dike's Regt:; Mass. 
-Militia. 

FRANK WASHBURN FULLFR, Rockland, Main.- (32437). Son of William 
Oliver and Bethiah Charlotte (Snow) Fuller; grandson of Peter- and Phoebe 
(Dunbar) Fuller; great-grandson of Andrew Vulh-r, Sergeant in Capt. Zebulon 
King's Company, Col. John Brooks' Seventh Mass. Regt. 

HEBER J. FULLFR, Chicago, 111. (33654)- Son of Eugene P. and Alary 
(Gueriri) Fuller; grandson of Jerome and Lucy (Pratt) Fuller; great-grandson 
of Alphius and Amy (Turrill) Fuller; great-grandson of Isaac Fuller, 
Lieutenant, Colonel Sargent's Regt., Mass. 'Militia. 

CHARLES FRANKLIN FULMER, Philadelphia, Pa. (3368-'). Son of Charles 
and Annie Virginia (Wyatt) Fuluver; grandson of Michael and Sarah (Ped rick) 
Fuimer; great-grandson of John 1' aimer, dispatch carrier; great-grandson of 
John and Mary (Krauskop) I'nliner; great-grandson of George Krauskop, 
private, Philadelphia Militia. 

ALBERT NELSON GAMBELE, Portland, Ore. (31098). Son of Willard and 
Susan Gambell; grandson of John Gumboil, private in Captain Means' Com- 
pany, Colonel Sprout's Regt;, Ma-ss. Militia, pensioned. 

CtARK McKTNLFV GARBER, Columbus, Ohio (33165). Son of Jacob Silas 
and Maria (Swank) Carber; grandson of Daniel and Matilda (Oldfield) 
Garber; great-grandson of Richard and F.limina (Phelps) Oldfield; great- 
grandson of William Oldfield, private, Dutchess and Orange Counties, New 
York Militia, pensioned, 

PAUL OIJH-IELD CARBER, Columbus, Ohio (32S34). Son of Jacob Silas and 
Maria (Swank) Garber; grandson of Daniel and Matilda (Oldfield) Garber; 
gnat-grandson of Richard and I'.lmina (Phelps) Oldfield; great-grandson of 
William Oldfield, private in Col. George Clinton's Regt., Dutchess County, 
New York Militia. 

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER GARDNER, Kirksville, Mo. riowa 32789). Son of 
Christopher C. and Susan (HarUett) Gardner; grandson of Kzrkiel (lilt- 
and Nancy (Fifield) Barllett; great-grandson of Daniel and Ruth . (Gilc) 
P.artletl; grcaF'-gra udson of Ksck'icl die. Captain, New Hampshire Militia, 
Member New Hampshire legislature of '70; grandson of Samuel W. and 
Sophia (Greeley) Gardner; great-grandson of Joseph and [Dorothy (Sargent) 
Greeley, jr.; great-grandson of Joseph Greeley, private, New Hampshire 
Militia; great-grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Walker) Gardner; great- 
grandson of Samuel Gardner, Sergeant, Mass. Militia; greal-giandsoi'i of 
Christopher Sargent, Mass. private at Lexington Alarm ami a town officer; 
gi eaF-grandsoii of Robert Sargent, Mass. private at Lexington Alarm. 

PAUF NFAVTON GARRIGUS, New York City, N. Y. (33608). Son of Curtis 
Newton and Margaret Elizabeth (KePeau) Garrigus; grandson of Horace 
and Maria Ann (Daily) Garrigus; great-grandson of Isaac and Sara (Shcpardj 
Garrigus; great z -grandson of John Garrigus^ private, Morris County, New 
Jersey Militia and Cont'l I/me. 

MAKKV IIWII'IMX GARVER, Chicago, 111. (333«6). Son of Ivlias Stombau 
aild Mary I 1' rakes) Carver; grandson of Henry and Mary Anna (Xcrbe) 
Carver; gn-al -Riaudson of Philip and Hannah (Sunday) Zerbe; great 8 - 
grandson of Adam Sunday (Sondav), private, Colonel Craig's Regt., Berk's 
County, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 

Mil, TON WALLACE CATCH, Md. (37853). Supplemental. Son of Francis 
McCormick and Salcna (Barber) Catch ; grandson of Thomas and f.ucimla 
(MeCormiek) Catch; great -grandson of Francis McCormick, private, Frederick 
County, Virginia Militia, pensioned. 



RECISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



^1 



LINCOLN FURLOW GAUI/f, Tacjoma, Wash. (34026). Son of Joseph and 
Caroline Amanda (Zinn) C.ault; grandson of John and Elizabeth (France) 
Caulr (Cant); great-grandson of Matthew Gaitlt (Gait!), private, Westmore- 
land County, Pa. Militia. 

JAMES STORY GAY, Jr., Portland, Ore. (331.33). Son of James Story and 
Ella May (Briggs) Cay; grandson of Joseph and Eunice (Story) Gay; great- 
grandson of Bradford and Sarah (Copp) Story; great-grandson of Asa 
Story, Lieutenant, Conn. Troops. 

EDWARD CHARLES GEEHR. Wenonah, N. J. (333.44). Son of Charles L. and 
Alameda (Robertson) Geehr; grandson of Charles Herman and Martha 
(Thompson) C.eehr; g real-grandson of Benjamin and Catharine (Small) 
Geehr; grcat 2 -grandson of Pliilip Geehr, Caurtmartial Man, Fourth Com|iany, 
Second Battalion, Berk's County, 1'a. Militia, 

1AMKS JOSEPH GERBER, Elisabeth, N. J. (33333). Son of lames J. and Alice 
A. (Buzby) C.trher; grandson of Joseph E. and Anna (Dusenherry) Ru/.by; 
great-grandson of Peter and Mary (Wheeler) Dusenherry; gi eat'-'-grandson 
of Joseph Lyon and Phoebe (Jones) Wheeler; great 8 -grandson of James Wheeler, 
Captain, Maj. Joseph Morris' l'.attalion, Essex County, New Jersey Militia. 

LEWIS' HAMILTON GIRBES, Schenectady, N. Y. (32898). Son of Robert 
Hamilton and Emma (Van Vrauken) Gibbes; grandson of Stephen Gates 
and Emma C. (Dow) Van Vrauken; great-grandson of Jacob E. and Evelina 
E. (Gates) Van Vrauken; great-grandson of Stephen and Johannah (— ) 
Gates, Jr.; grcat 3 -grandson of Stephen Gales, private and scout, Albany 
County, New York Militia. 

GEORGE UUSHNELL GILBERT, Minneapolis, Minn. (31837). Sou of Isaac 
Newton and Mary (llusson) Gilbert; grandson of Truman and Anna (Smith) 
Gilbert; great-grandson of Thomas Gilbert, Corporal, Colonel liurrall's Rcgt., 
Conn. Troops, pensioned. 

GEORGE T. GILBERT, Oklahoma City, Okla. (31622). Son of James S. and 
Harriet (Eaton) Gilbert; grandson of Ebenezer and Sally Chadwick (SpofTord) 
fvaton; great-grandson of Ebencscr Eaton, private, Captain Upton's Company, 
Mass. Militia at Hunker Hill. 

ALBERT BURNS GILLAM, Jr., New York, N. Y. (3287S). Son of Albert 
Rums and Mae (Fowler) Gillam ; grandson of John and Lucy Augusta 
(Childs) Fowler; great grandson of William 11. and Laura (Amsden) Childs; 
great--grandson of Simeon and Abigail (Whitney) Amsden; great 8 -grandson 
of Jonathan Whitney, Captain, Seventh Company, Fifth Mass. Regt. 

MAURICE BUSHNEI/t GILLESPIE, Columbus, Ohio (33709). Son of John 
W. and Caroline (St. John) Gillespie; grandson of Morris L. and Sarah 
(Gatwood) St. John; great-grandson of Russell and Isabelle (Chamberlain) 
St. John; great a -graud.,nn of Uriah and Sarah (Church) St. John; great 3 - 
grandson of Daniel St. John, pm,,.,., Conn. Militia, Member Committee of 
Inspection. 

ROBERT AMBROSE GLENN, Si. Louis, Mo. (Kans, 33303). Son of Williu.« 

C r ami Nell jllafVey) Chun; gi amb-on of Archibald Alexander ami 

Lfwinia (Cooper) Clum; gi cat- grandson of Henry and Ruth (Rhodes) Glenn; 
great-grandson of Archibald Glenn., private, Uedford County, Pa. Militia, 

pensioned. 

WILLIAM COOPER GLENN, Webb City, Mo. (Kans. ;s.u<>M. Son of Archibald 
Alexander and Lavina (Cooper) Glenn; grandson of Henry and Ruth 
(Rhodes) Glenn; great-grandson of Archibald Glenn, private, Bedford County, 
Pa. Mililia; great-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Furlovv) Rhodes; great*- 
grandson of Robert Viirlow, private, Washington County, Pa. Militia; great- 
grandson of Archibald and Sarah (Ferguson) Glenn; great--grandson of 
Moses Fereuson, Cumberland County. Pa. Militia; great-grambon of J,n ol, 



258 SONS 01' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

■ Rhoadc's, ranger on Pa. frontier; grandson of William Covington and Mary 
CMize) Cooper; great-grandson of Leighton Cooper, private, Virginia Militia, 
pensioned; great-grandson of Leighton and Grizzel (Covington) Cooper; 
great-grandson of IVilliani Covington, private, Virginia Militia. 
HARVEY BINGHAM GLIDDEN, Claremont, N. II. (30535). Son of Gardner 
I*, and Mary M. (liingham); grandson of Harvey and Polly (Cram) Bingham; 
great-grandson of l\zra and Ditty (Ualch) Grain; great-grandson of Robert 
Batch, private, .Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES CARROLL GLOVER, Jr., Washington, O. C. (33261), Son of 

Charles Carroll and Annie Cunningham (Poor) Glover; grandson of Charles 
Henry and Mattie Lindsay (Stark) Poor; great-grandson of Robert Dolling 
and Mattie (Lindsay) Stark; great-grandson of William Lindsay, Captain, 
Lee's Battalion, Virginia Light Dragoons; great-grandson of Eliphalel Poor, 
private, New Hampshire Militia to join Cont'l Troops; great' 1 grandson of 
William Dangerjh'M, Colonel, Seventh Regt., Virginia Troops. 

CHARLES LAWRENCE GLOVER, Washington, I). C. (33253). Son of George 
N. and Frances C. (Gould) Glover; grandson of William G. and Isabella 
(Eckels) Glover; great-grandson of Francis and Isabella (Clendcnnin) Eckels; 
great-grandson of Nathaniel and Isabella (Huston) Eckels; great—grandson 
of Samuel Husston, Second Lieutenant, Third Battalion, Cumberland County, 
Pa. Militia. 

JOHN CALVIN GODDARD, Salisbury, Conn. (334.69). Son of Tames Edward 
and Catherine Fredcricka (Jennings) Goddard; grandson of llezekiah and 
Eunice (Rathbojie) Goddard; great-grandson of Daniel Goddard, Lieutenant, 
Sixth Regt., Worcester County, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN NELSON GOLTRA, Chicago, 111. (32236). Son of Nelson and Elizabeth 
Julia (Allison) Gultra; grandson of Oliver and Ann Maria (Harris) Goltra, 
Jr.; great-grandson of John and Mary (Scbring) Harris; git-aP'-grandson of 
William Harris, private, New Jersey State and Cont'l Troops. 

LIVINGSTON TAYLOR GOODMAN, Montclair, N. J. (33478). Son of Frederic 
Simeon and Mary Jeanette (Anderson) Goodman; grandson of Noah W. ami 
Mary (Bristol) Goodman; great-grandson of Simeon and Martha (Wright) 
Goodman; great-grandson of Noah Goodman, Major, Mass. Militia to re- 
inforce Cont'l Army. 

CHARLES ENSIGN GOODRICH, San Erancisco, Cal. (32744). Son of Lucien 

Goodwin and Martha Abigail (Ensign) Goodrich; grandson of Martha and 
Sevilla (Bristol) Goodrich; great -grandson of Stephen Goodrich, private, 
Colonel Wokotl's Regt,, Conn. Militia. 

EDMOND TUTTLK GOODRICH, Detroit, Mich. (33C29). S<>n of Jrrsoph 
T, 1, shall and Viclla (Tutlle) Goodrich; grandson of Nelson Lyman and 
Clarissa Cornelia (Parshall) Goodrich; gi cat gi an<U..n ot Joseph and Clarissa 
(Moon) Parshall; great--grandson of Jo*imm »«d Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; 
great-grandson of Jonatfiun Marshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, 
NTcW York Militia, 

GEORGE NELSON GOODRICH, Detroit, Mich. (33628). Son of Joseph Par- 
shall ami Viclla (Tutlle) Goodrich; grandson of Nelson Lyman and Clarissa 
Cornelia (Pa. shall) Goodrich; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) 
Parshall; gi cat ; '-gi andson of Janus and F.Hzabi \ h (Todd) Parshall; great- 
grandson of Jonathan Parshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New 
York Militia. 

HENRY FRENCl.I GOODWIN, Chicago, III. (33085). Son of Henry Martyn 
and Martha S. (French) Goodwin; grandson of John and Mary (Gale) 
French; grwil grandson of Amm Gate, selectman, Kingsion, N< w Hampshire, 
and j.u, . l,,,s- , of Army supplies; great-grandson of Amos and Hannah > 
(Oilman) C;nY; great-grandson of Daniel Gihnan, private, New Hampshire 

Coast Defense. 



REGISTER <>F NEW M1',MI5F,RS. 2^() 

GEORGE MARTIN GORDON, I). 1)., East Orange-, N. J. (337^7). Son of 
Alexander Jacob and Alice Gertrude (Jelliffe) Gordon; grandson of Hczekiah 
Wesley and v Sarah Martha (Kelly) Jelliffe; great-grandson of Hczekiah and 
Nancy (Bennett) Jelliffe; great-grandson of William and Iluldah (Sturges) 
Jelliffe; g;eat 3 -grandson of Hczekiah S.t urges, private, Conn. Militia, pensioned; 
great 4 -grandsou of Solomon StMtges, killed by British and burning of Fairfield, 
Conn. 

HENRY JEROME GORIN, Seattle, Wash. (32471!). Son of Marcellus Gladden 
and Joanna (Knott) Gorin; grandson of Hartley William and Mary (Johnson) 
Gorin'; great-grandson of John 1). and Martha (Thomas) Gorin; great- 
grandson of Henry and Sarah (Pell) Gorin; great :! -grandson of John Gorin 
(Gorcn), private, Virginia Militia. 

WARREN EKE GOSS* Rutherford, N. J. (33418). Son of William Whittemore 
and Hannah (Foster) Goss; grandson of Daniel and Sally (Tuck) Goss; 
great-grandson of Peter Goss (Goose), Corporal, New Hampshire Militia, 
private, Conl'l Army. 

SAMUEL BOONE GOUCFTRR, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32981). Son of Charles W. 
and Mary (Sinister) Goucher; grandson of Samuel and Martha (Boone) 
Gaucher; great-grandson of Thomas Gaucher, private, Capt. Adam Foulk's 
Company, Second Class, Fifth Battalion, Philadelphia Militia. 

ARTHUR lloWI.AND GRAIN', New York, N. Y. (32708). Son of Frederick 
and Eydia Frances (Good-peed) ("rain; grandson of Arthur and Kydia Baxter 
(Kothrop) Coodspecd; e i r;i I -grandson of Charles and Deidamia ( I lowland) 
Goodspeed; great-grandson of Lemuel Howla-nd, private, Colonel Freman's 
Regt., Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD WY1J,YS TAYLOR GRAY, Montclair, N. J. (33476). Son of Edwin 
Fairfax and Rosalie Woodburn (Taylor) Gray; grandson of Edward Wyllys 
and Caroline Retsy (Porter) Taylor; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth' 
(Terry) Taylor; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Terry) Taylor; 
great-grandson of Nathaniel Terry, Colonel, Nineteenth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

GEORGE HENRY GRAY, Eynu, Mass. (33536). Sou of Otis Mowc and 
Diantha Victoria (Chamberlin) Gray; grandson of Deacon Henry and Dorothy 
(Otis) Gray; great-grandson of Elijah Otis, private, Captain Titcomb's Com- 
pany, Colonel Poor's Regt., New Hampshire Militia, pensioned. 

HKX'RY EVANS GRAY. Captain, A. J",. F., Montclair, N. J. (33486). Son of 
Edward VV. T. and Zillah Augusta (Keel Gray; grandson of Edwin Fairfax 
ami Rosalie Woodburn (Taylor) Gray; great-grandson of Edward Wyllys and 
Caroline Retsy (Porter) Taylor; great-grandson ol" James and Elizabeth 
(Terry) Taylor; great 3 -grandson of John and Elizabeth (Terry) Taylor; 
great 4 -grahdson of Nathaniel Terry, Colonel, Nineteenth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

ROGER DIMMICK GRAY, South Orange, N. J. (33485,). Son of Austin and 
Alice (Dimmick) Gray; grandson of John Carr and Charlotte (Roberts) 
Diminick; great-grandson of Samuel and Kydia (Vail) Roberts; great 2 -grandson 
of Alsop and Frances (Scybolt) Vail; great 3 -grandson of Benjamin I'ail, 
Captain, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia, pensioned. 

WII.KIAM AYRES GRAN', Jr., Elizabeth, X. J. (33407). Son of William Ayres 
and Margaret I'.yers (Morrison) Gray; grandson of Philander Raymond and 
Josephine Cecelia (McDowell) Gray; great-grandson of Alanson and Jane 
R. (Tarvin) Cray; great s -grandson of EHsha and Martha (Burrclt) Gray; 
greats-grandson of Nathaniel Gray, Ensign, Conn. Militia; great 8 -grandson of 
Blackleach Barrett, Conn, clergyman, 14 months prisoner in Sugar House 
Prison; gi:eat*-gramtson of I'dig Hurrett, Jr., Pa. Minute Man at defense of 
Forty Fort; great--gi amlson of Alexander McDotuell, private, Second Battalion, 
Cumberland County, Pa. Militia; great 3 -g.randson of William McDowell, Jr., 
private, Sixth Rattalion, Lancaster County, . Pa, Militia; great '-grandson ol 
William McDowell, S>.. Recruiting Officer and Ensign, Pa. Militia; great 4 - 



2()() SONS 01' 'I'll \\ AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

grandson of Melqtiah Laljirop, Member Columbia County. Mass. Committee 
of Safety; great s -grahdsoH of Rlackleach and .Martha (Welles) Rurrett; great*- 
grandson of Gideon Welles, private, Conn. Militia; great*-grandson of Richard 
and Sarali (Armstrong) Tarvin; gfeat s -grandson of John Armstrong, Second 
lieutenant, Third Reg*., l'a. Fine; great-gi andson of Thomas Shelly and 
Emily Ncvii (Ayrcs) McDowell; grea1 2 -gramlson of Alexander an<l Sarah 
(1'arker) McDowell; groaf'-granclsoii of Jacob I'arkar, Corporal, Pa. Artillery. 

G. EDWIN GREEN, DeW'itl, Nch. (31022). Son of Joseph R. and Cowada J. 
(Walfath) Green; grandson of Obediah and Kate (Widr-ig) VValrAth; great- 
grandson of Anthony and Katharine (Davis) Walrath; great-'-grandson of 
John Adam Walrath, Col, Jacob Klock's Regt., Tryon County, New York 
Militia. 

TIlvNDKRSON MONTGOMERY GREEN, Montdair, N. J. (326X5). Son of 
Richard Montgomery and Thesllena (Ward) Green; grandson of Thomas 
Henderson and Mary Scott (Oulick) Green; great-grandson of Richard Mont- 
gomery and Mary (Henderson) Green; great 2 -grandsbn of Thomas Henderson, 
Lieutenant, Colonel Forman's New Jersey Battalion, Heard's Brigade, and 
Member Provincial Congress, 1777. 

JAMES WOODALL GREENE, Baltimore, Md. (33853). Son of Thomas Reed 
and Anna Deborah (Smith) Greene; grandson of James Nathaniel and Annie 
(Woodall) Smith; great-grandson (T f Esekial and Deborah (Mifflin) Wbodall; 
great-grandson id Joshua ITowell and Mary (Skidmore) Mifflin; great'- 
grandson of Daniel and Deborah (Howell) Mniilin; great 4 -grandson of Samuel 
Howell, private, Ruck's County, l'a. Militia, Master of ship "Trooper," Member 
Committee of Safety. 

LEE EUGENIC GREENE, U. S. A., Chicago, 111. (32807). Son of John Edward 
and Mary Alice (Kimber) Greene; grandson of George Allen and Avis Fales 
(Sanford) Greene; great-grandson of Samuel I. and Sarah Eli/aluth (Jenkins) 
Greene; great-grandson of John Greene, private, Colonel Topham's Regt., 
Rhode Island .Militia; great ;, -grandson of Samuel Greene, private. Colonel 
Topham's Regt., Rhode Island Militia. 

RICHARDSON LESTER GREENE, St. Albans, Vt. (33825). Son of Frank 
Lester and Jennie Emma (Richardson) Greene; grandson of I, ester Bruce 
and .Mary Elizabeth (Uoadley) Greene; great-grandson of Henry Collamer 
and Hannah (F,arrahee) Greene; greaF'-grandson of Nathan and Susan 
(Alford) Greene; greats-grandson of Job Greene, private, Captain Dewey's 
Company, Vermont Militia, organized for Battle of Bennington. 

ARCHIBALD D. GREER* East Orange, N. J. (33409). Son of Matthew and 
Caroline (Stickle) Greer; grandson of David and Charlotte (Hill) Stickle; 
great-grandson of David J fill, private, Morris County, 'New Jersey Militia. 

RICHARD SEATON GREGG, Peoria, 111. (32*38). Son of James Rams and 
Kmma Theresa (Render) Gregg; grandson of Aaron Phoebe (Barns) Gregg; 
great-grandson of Aaron and Maria (Seaton) Gregg; great-'-grandson of 
Richard Gregg, private, Captain Crawford's Company, Washington County, 
l'a. Militia; greaF-grandson of William and Sarah (Myers) Seaton; great-- 
grandson of James Seaton, clerk, Captain Crawford's Company, l'a. Militia; 
great-grandson of Samuel Gregg, private, Virginia Militia; great grandson of 
James ami Rhoda Ann (Davidson) Barns; greats-grandson of Thomas Barns, 
Sergeant, Capt. Aimer Crump's Company, First Virginia Regt. 

WILLIAM BENJAMIN GREGORY, New Orleans, La. (33ZO4). Son of ICzra 
Fugene and Mary Elizabeth (Rush) Gregory; grandson of Lewis and Martha 
(Gage) Gregory; great-grandson of Ezra and Martha (Hoyt) Gregory; great-- 
grandson of Daniel Gregory, private, Conn. Militia, pensioned; great-'-grandson 
uf lilnathan Gregory, patriot and preacher. 

HENRY nOLBROOK GRIMES, Peoria, III. (33385). Son of James M. and v 
Annie E- (Rhodes) Grimes; grandson of Stephen Holbrook and Elizabeth 



REGISTER OL' NEW MEMBERS. 



>6j 



M. (Godfrey) Rhodes; great-grandson of Charles and Hannah (Shaw) (Dean) 
Godfrey; great s -grandson of John Godfrey, Minute Man at Lexington Alarm; 
great*-grandso'n of George Godfrey, Brigadier General, Mass. Militia. 
CRAWFORD GRISWOLD, Medical Corps, U. S. Army, Hartford, Conn. (33458). 
Son of Robert Sherman and Bessie {Aldington (Crawford) Griswold; grandson 
&i [losmer and F,inily A. (Blank) Griswold; great-grandsoji of Daniel and 
Ann (Runcfc) Griswold; great s -grawdson of Daniel While and Esther (Case) 
Griswold; great 3 -grandson of White Griswold, private, Eighth- Regt., Conn. 
Militia. 

HAMILTON CO IT GRISWOLD, Rochester, N. V. (32892). Son of Samuel B. 

and Susan (hay) Griswold; grandson of Albeit C. and Caroline f ,. (Goodrich) 
Griswold; great-grandson of William and Sally (Whitmore) Goodrich; great*- 
grandson of Hesckiah Whitmore, private, Gen. Erastus \\ r o!cott's Brigade, 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

Jl'ldUS ALFRED GROW, Detroit, .Mich. (33625). Son of Julius Austin and 
Mary (Jlobart) Grow; grandson of Merlin and Clarissa Cornelia (Parshall) 
Ilohart; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) Parshall; great 2 - 
grandson of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; great 3 -grahdson of Jonathan 
Parshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia; grandson 
of Phillip Waterman and Elizabeth (Hacked) Crow; great-grandson of Elisha 
and I.ois (Palmer) Grow; great-grandson of Abel Palmer, private, Col. 
Samuel Parson's Regt., Conn. Militia. 

RUSSELL" WATERMAN GROW, Detroit, Mich. (33627). Sou of Julius Austin 
and Mary (Hobart) Grow; grandson of Merlin and Clarissa Cornelia 
(Parshall) llobart; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) Parshall; 
great 2 -graridson of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; great :1 -grandson of 
Jonathan Parshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia; 
grandson of Phillip Waterman and Elizabeth (Hackett) Grow; great-grandson 
of Klisha ami Lois (Palmer) Grow; grcal'-'-grandson of /Ibel Palmer, private, 
Col. Samuel Parson's Regt., Conn. Militia. 

DEWEY DAVID GUILFOIL, Brownlee, Neb. (32970). Son of Francis Esmay 
and Ma l.eila (Dughman) Guilfoil; grandson of David McL and Mary Ann 
(IlogUe) Dughman; great-grandson of John and Mary Ann (Finney) llogue; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Margaret (Wood) Dogate (Hogge) ; great 3 - 
grandson of James Hogge, private, Puck's County, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 

JAMES HOWARD GUILFOIL, Brownlee, Neb. (32968). Son of Frances Esmey 
and Ida Leila (Dughman) Guilfoil; grandson of David McL. and Mary Ann 
(llogue) Dughman; great-grandson of John and Mai}- Ann (Finney) Hogue; 
great-'-grandson of Samuel and Margaret (Wood) llogue; greats-grandson of 
James Hogge {llogue), private, Buck's Count)-, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 

COLLIS BELL GUSHEE, New York, N. Y. (32713). Son of Ralph Adrian and 
Louise Ardelle (Perkins) Gushee; grandson of Stephen Jones and Alvina 
Adelaide (Frohock) Gushee; great grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth Stone 
(Ifurdj Frohock; great"-grandson of Thomas and Mary Rea (Ray) Frohock, 
Jr.; great 8 -grandson of Thomas Frohock, private, .Stark's Regt., New Hampshire 
Troops; gieat-grandson of Jonathan Shaw and Cynthia A. (Jones) Gushee; 
great-'-grandson of Almond and Nancy (Robbins) Gushee; great 3 -grandson of 
David RobbhlS, private, Mass. Coast Defense; great grandson of Philip 
Robbins, Dienteiiant, C.pt. Jeremiah Smith's Company, Col. John Smith's 
Regt., Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth Stone (llurd) 
I'rol.oek; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (Rea, Ray) iM-ohock; great"- 
grandson of Benjamin h\a (luiy), private, Mass. Militia; great' gi andson of 
Benjamin and Eydia ( I'ulnain) Rea; gi cat'-grandsoii of O'i.er Putnam, 
Ensign, Mass. Militia. 

HARRY THOMAS GUSH I'd':, New York City, N. Y. (33369). Son of Thomas 
Edward and Jessie Josephine (Thomas) Gushee; grandson of Stephen Jones 



262 



SONS 01? T1IU AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



ami Alrina Adelaide (Frohock) Gushee; great-grandson of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Stone (llnrd) Frohock, 3rd; great 2 -grandsen of Thomas and .Mary (Rea 
or Kay) Frohock, -Mid; great 3 -grandson of Thomas Frohock, private, New 
Hampshire Militia, pensioned; greats-grandson of Benjamin Rea, Sergeant, 
Mass. Militia, pensioned; gfeal'-grandson of Benjamin and Lydia (Putnam) 
Rea; great'-gfandson of Oliver l J utnam, private, Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson 
of Almund and Nancy (Robbins) Gushee; greats-grandson of David Robbins 
(Robins), private, Col. .lames Car-gill's Regt,, Mass. Coast Defense; greaf- 
grandson of I'ltilip Robbins (Robins), Lieutenant, Walpole, Mass. Militia. 

RALPH ADRIAN GUSHEE, N. V. (31192). Supplemental. Son of Stephen 
J.mes and Alvina Adelaide (Frohock) Gushee; grandson of Jonathan Shaw 
and Cynthia A. (Jones) Gushee; great-grandson of Almond and Nancy 
(Robbins) Cnshee; great--grandsou of David Robbins, private, Cant. Samuel 
'Gregg's Company, Col. James Cargill's Regt., Mass. Coast Defense; great 8 - 
grandson of Philip Robbins, i ,ieutenant, Qapt. Jeremiah Smith's Company, 
Col. John Smiths Regt., Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT GEORGE GUTIIRli;, Oil City, J'a. (329S9). Son of Joshua Vande- 
water ami Sarah (Tinsk-y) Guthrie; grandson of William Woodward and 
Mana (Vandewater) Gulhrie; great-grandson of James Verner and Martha 
(Brindon) Guthrie; greal 2 -.grahdson of John Guthrie, Second Lieutenant, 
Eighth Regt., 1'a.Cont'l Troops. 

B0VI1 I!. IIADl><)\, Columbus, Ohio ($3167). Son of Louis Cass and Caroline 
(Ireland) Haddox; grandson of Alexander and Mary (Maxwell) Inland; 
great-grandson of Thomas ami Kathcrtne (J, outlier) Ireland; great-'-grandson 
of Robert and Catherine (Cain) I,owther; great-grandson of William Lowtlier, 
Captain, Virginia Militia. 

ELLIOTT KIDDER HALE, Lisbon Kails, Maine (Mass. 33926)'. Son of Richard 
Augustus and Arabella Johnson (I'lnmer) Hale; grandson of Bernice Sargent 
and Sophia Kendrick (Kkkler) Hale; great -grandson of Moses and Rachel 
Shepard (Kendrick) Kidder; grcaf-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Stickney) 
Kidder; great-grandson of 4 bra ham Stickney, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia, 
Rhode Island service. 

[■'RANK BERNlCE HALE, Washington, D. C. (Mass. 33927). Son of Richard 
Augustus and Arabella Johnson (Plumer) Hale; grandson of Bernice Sargent 
and Sophia Kendrick (Kidder) Hale; great-grandson of Mom-, and Rachel 
Shepard (Kendrick) Kidder; great 2 -grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Stickney) 
Kidder; great a -grandson of Abraham Stickncy, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia, 
Rhode Island service. 

RICHARD AUGUSTUS HALE, Lawrence, Mass. (3*596). Sen of Hemic 
Sargent and Sophia Kendrick (Kidder) Hale; grandson of Moses and Rachel 
Shepard (Kendrick) Kidder; great-grandson off Isaac and Sarah (Stickney) 
Kidder; greai"--grahdson of Abraham Stickney, Lieutenant, Captain Baldwin's 
Company, Col. Simeon Spaulding's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

RICHARD AUGUSTUS HALE, J*-, Lawrence, Mass. (33928). Son of Richard 
Augustus and Arabella Johnson (Plumer) Hale; grandson of Uernice Sargent 
and Sophia Kendrick (Kidder) Hale; great-grandson of Moses and Rachel 
Shepard (Kendrick) Kidder; great-grandson of Isaac and Sarah (Stickney) 
Kidder; great 3 -gra«dson of Abraham Stickney, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia, 
Rhode Island service. 

HOMEK HALL, St. Loins, Mo. (3J199). Son of George and Rachell Abbott 
(Smith) Hall; grandson of William and Kr/a Ann (Stevens) Smith; great- 
grandson of David ;nd Eleanor (Bentley) Stevens; great-grandson of Henry 
Bent ley, private, Third Regt., Pa. Troops, six years' and to months' service, 

wounded. 

LAWKF.NCF, L'ERCIVAL HALL, Montclair, X. J. (33742). Son of Samuel > 
Stickney and I'Jeauor Sexton (Borst) Hall; grandson of Asaph and Cloc 



REGISTER DE NEW MEMBERS. ~(\] 

Angeline (Stickney) Hall; great-grandson of Asaph and Hannah C. (Palmer) 
Hall; great 3 -grandS0:n of Asaph Hall, Captain, Second Battalion, Conn. Troops, 
and Colonel Sheldon's Regt., New Haven Alarm- 

0RP11 M. HALL, Terre Haute, Ind. (.13577). Sun of Walter Lawwill and Viola 
(Paddock) Hall; grandson of John Newton and Emmet (Chambers) Paddock; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Rebecca (Thomas) Chambers; great 2 -grandson 
of William Thomas, private, Virginia Cont'l Troops, pensioned. 

SAMUEL STICKNEY HALL, Jr., Montclair, N. J. (33798). Son of Samuel 
Stickney and Eleanor Sexton (Borst) Hall; grandson of Asaph and Angeliue 
(Stickney) Hall; great-grandson of Asaph and Hannah (Palmer) Hall; great- 
grandson of Asaph Hall, Lieutenant, fourth Regt., Conn. Militia, Member 
Constitutional Convention. 

EDMUND RYOND HALSEY, Maplewood, N. J. (33499'. Sun of Edmund R. 
and Harriet J. (Whitney) Halsey; grandson of Isaac and Harriet (Ryan) 
Halsey; great-grandson of Isaac llalsey, wagon boy and private, New Jersey 
Militia and Light Horse. 

JOHN WHITTEMORE HALSEY, Newark, N. J. (32684). Son of Augustus 
Ogden and Maria Lucas (Whittemore) Halsey; grandson of John Taylor and 
Margaret (Oakley) Halsey; great-grandson of Luther Halsey, Brevet Captain, 
Second liattalion, Second Establishment, New Jersey Cont'l TrOops. 

SAMUEL ARMSTRONG HAI.SRY, Newark, N. J. (326.95). Son of William 
Armstrong and Mary Edwards (Miller) Halsey; grandson of George (Arm- 
strong) and Abby Caroline (Connet) Halsey; great-grandson of Samuel, and 
Mary ( 1 1 u tellings) Halsey; great-grandson of Isaac llalscy, private, New 
Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

HERMAN GONZALES HALSTEAD, Orange, N. J. (32691). Son of Knos and 
Anna (Con/ales) Halsted; grandson of Matthias Ogden and Cornelia Dayton 
(Wade) Halsted; great-grandson of Robert Halsted, surgeon, New Jersey 
Militia, prisoner. 

RODMAN THOMAS 1 1 AM RI.R'RON, Grand Meadow, Minn. (N. V. 3J015). Suij 
of S. R. and Lidie (Stout) Itambleton; grandson of Samuel Rodman and Jane 
M. (llibbs) Stout; great r grandson of Jaeob and Sarah Ann (Worstall) Hibbs; 
great-grandson of Joseph ami Jane (Heston) Worstall; great 8 -graudson of 
Edward Warner Heston, Lieutenant-Colonel, Ra. Tioops, prisoner. 

DONALD SHELDON HAMMER, Ames, Iowa (32797). Son of Edward Wist 
and Harriett Elvira (Sheldon) Hammer; grandson ,.f Parley and Prances A. 
(Judd) Sheldon; great-grandson of Parley and Elvira (I. itch) Sheldon; 
great--grandsun of Amasa and Jane (Ellis) Sheldon; great s -grandson of 
Caleb Ellis, private, New Hampshire Militia. 

RICHARD BERNICE HAMMER, Ames, Iowa (32798). "Son of Edward West 
and Harriett Elvira (Sheldon) Hammer; grandson of Parley and Frances A. 
(Judd) Sheldon; great-grandson of Parley and Elvira (Litch) Sheldon; great 8 - 
gramrsun of Ainhsa and Jane (ElMs) Sheldon; great 3 -gr-andson of Caleb Ellis, 
pDvate, New Hampshire Militia. 

WILLIAM JDDSON IIAMR'tOX, Jr., Roil Richmond, N. V. (32897). Son of 
William Judson ami Amelia (Roycej Hampton; grandson of John Albert and 
Julia (Webb) Boyce; great-grandson of Col. Samuel ami Abigail (Conklin) 
Webb; great-grandson of Charles Webb, private, Orange County, New York 
Militia. 

RASCo EDWARD HANKS, Keokuk, Iowa (32788); Son of George Wesley 
and Sarah Aim (Parish) Hants; grandson of Raseo ami IVmirli, I ,»i in 
(Cady) .Danes, Jr.; gi eat -gi andson of Wesley and Alcy Hazard (Brown) 
Cady; great a -grands*>n of David and Nancy (Waterman) Cady; great"- 
grandson of Jonathan 1 a,C:, Captain, Eleventh Regt., Conn. Militia. 



264 SONS OK Till'! AMERICAN DEVOLUTION. 

BEN A. HAPGOOD, Springfield, Mass. (330GS). Son of Thomas K. and U. 
Sophia (Brigham) Hapgoocf; grandson of Thomas and Mary (Witt) KapgOod; 
great-grandson of Thomas Hapgood, private, Capt. William Morse's Company, 
Col. Jonathan Read's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD HARRRCR, Nutley, N. J. (32716). Son of John 11. and Josephine 
1,. (Simmons) Elarbeck; grandson of Henry S. and Maria (Metzlen) Ilarbeck; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Anna (Henson) (Tarbeck; great 2 -grandson of 
John Harbcck, Second Lieutenant, first Albany County Regt., New York 
Militia. 

DUNCAN l\, HARDING, pomfret, Conn. (32871). Son of Edward Learned 
and Lucy Booker (Ramsey) Harding; grandson of Seth and Mary (Learned) 
I larding; great-grandson of Abraham Harding, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia. 

JOSEPH MONROIC DARKER, Peoria, 111. (3307*). Son of Jeremiah W. and 
Nancy Ann (Kinder) Darker; grandson of James and l'uella Oligley 
Partridge) Marker; great-grandson of Joseph Ilarker, Lieutenant, Fourth 
Battalion, New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES STANARD HARRRY, Little Rock, Ark. (31766). Son of Slanard 
Clay and Hatlie Jacintha Marks (Cheatham) llarley; grandson of William 
and Louisa (Thompson) llarley; great-grandson of William and Louviney 
(Bo-wen) Thompson; great 2 -grandson of Recce Bowcn, Lieutenant, Virginia 
Troops, killed at Rattle of Ring's Mountain. 

ALEXANDER MASON HARRIS, Richmond, Va. (33566). Son of Alexander 
Mason and Sallie Lee (Hundley) Harris; grandson of George A. and Maria 
Frances (Keesce) Hundley; great grandson of Jesse Frayser and Cynthia 
(Bullihgton.) Keesee; great-grandson of Josiah and Maria (Hobson) Bulling- 
ton; great :, -gr.-mdson of Matthew Hobson, private, Virginia Gont'l Line; 
greaf-grandson of Willi, mi Hobson, private, Virginia Coht'l Troops. 

GAVIN HAMILTON HARRIS. Bucyrus, Ohio (33-44°). Son of Stephen R. 
and Mary (Monnett) Harris grandson of Stephen and Sybil (Clarke) Harris; 
great-grandson of John Harris, private, New Jersey Militia and Cont'j Line. 

HAROLD COBB [[ARRIS, N. A.. U. S. Navy, Dcdham, Mass. (;\-^7)- Son 
of Sanvuel Tihhelts and Carrie Shumway (Cobb) Harris; grandson of Samuel 
Doggetl and Mary Thwing (Shumway) Cobb; great-grandson of Jonathan 
Holmes and Sophia (Doggetl) Cbbb; great-grandson of John and Sophia 
(Miller) Doggett; great s -gramlson of Samuel Doggett (Daggett), Second Lieu- 
tenant, Rnox's Ree,t., Mass. Cont'l Artillery; great--grandson of Jonathan and 
Sibbel (Holmes) Cobb'; great 3 -grandson of William Holmes, private, Captain 
Pa-pson's Company, Col. Joseph Read's Mass. Regt., at siege of Boston. 

BISHOP SEARS HARRORD, New York City, N. V. (33366). Son of Clam W. 
and Clarissa Sears (RisR-y) [Iarrold; grandson of J. Henry and Mary 
Elizabeth (Bishop) Risley; great-grandson of Ephraim Br'own and Clarissa 
(Sears) Bishop; great-grandson of John and Anne (Hawkins) Bishop; great-- 
grandson of Benjamin Bishop, private, New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

CHARLES FREEMONT HARROUN, Berkey, Ohio (33152). Son of Levi and 
Amanda (Wolfinger) Harroun; grandson (jf John Ilarroan, private, Hamp- 
shire County, Mass. Militia. 

KRNRST GEORGE HART, Columbus, Ohio (328,18). Son of George 1*. and 
Deborah (Willcox) Hart; grandson of Benjamin [<\ and Sabra Jane (Spears) 
Willcox; great grandson of William ami Love (Watkins) Spears; great- 
grandson of Nathan Watkins, Captain, Berkshire County, Mass. Militia. 

HENRY MKLVIN HART, Spokane, Wash. (32.157). Son of William C. and 
l-ilizaln-th MouhR(Moirison) Hart; grandson of Hamilton and Maiia (Mould) 
Morrison; great-grandson of Hamilton Morrison, Sergeant, Second Regt., 
Ulster County, New York Militia; great--graudson of John Morrison, private 
in Colonel McClaughry's Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia; \ 

great-grandson of Joint Morrison, Sr., signer of "Pledge of Association." 



R KC, I STICK OP NlvW MEMBERS. 



SILSBY POTTER HART, Rochester, .\ T . V. (33-^31). Son of Howard M. and 
I'.hannr (Silsby) Hart; grandson of Horace and Mary K. Trawick) Silsby; 
great-grandson of Horace Cady and Phccbe (Kurt) Silsby; great 2 -grandson of 
Seth and Elizabeth (Cady) Silsby; greafgrandson of Julius Silsby, Corporal, 
Capt. Abel Walker's Company, Colonel Bellou's Regt., New Hampshire Troops, 

JOSEPH HARRIS HARVEY, St. Louis, Mo. (33950). Son of William and 
Alary (Anthony) Harvey; grandson of Frank William and Sarah Jane 
(Harris) Anthony; great-grandson of James and Sarah Porter (Williams) 
Anthony; gr.cat--grantb>6n of Nehemiah and Persis (Keyes) Williams; great'- 
grandson of Stephen Keyes, private, Hampshire County, Mass. Militia. 

RICHARD HENRY liARWOOD, Richmond, Va. (3355-). Son of William 
l'ranklin and Virginia ( Stubbkfiek] ) ; grandson ..I" John and Polly Lvppes 
(Harwood) Stublcfteld; great-grandson of Edward Norwood, Lieutenant, 
Virginia Militia. 

LEONARD CLARK HASKELL, Bloomfield, N. J. (33904). Son of Benjamin 
and Harricl Ells (Steele) Haskell; grandson of Perez Simmons and Polly 
(Ells) Steele; g real -g ra n< Is, m of John and Roily (Harper) EHs; great 2 - 
Kiands.m of Nat liuniel tills {.Hells), 3rd, Minute Man ami private, Second 
I'hmonth County, Kegl., Mass. Militia; great a -graiubon of Nathaniel Hells, 
Jr., Chaplain, Kighth Regt., Conn. Militia. 

ROBERT RICHARDSON HASTINGS, Crete, Neb. (32963). Son of George 
Henry and Helen May (Richardson) Hastings; grandson of Carlisle and 
Hannah (Granger) Hasting; great-grandson of William and Phccbe (Gardner) 
Granger; great--grandson of Abraham Granger, private, Conn. Militia, at 
Lexington Alarm. 

RODNEY 1'JSK SAGE HATCH, Rochester, N. Y. (32601). Son of George 
Edward and Anna Pancost (Sage) Hatch; grandson of Edwin Oren and 
Mary Jane (Hotchkiss) Sage; great-grandson of Oren ami Marilda Plumb 
(Allcott) Sage; great 2 -grandson of Asa Allcott, artificer, Col. Joduthan Bald- 
win's Regt., Conn. Line, pensioned. 

JOHN SHEPPARD HAW, Richmond, Va. C32927). Son of Richardson Wallace 
and Ruth Deare (Sheppard) Haw; grandson of John Mickelbur rough and 
Catherine Smith (Shore) Sheppard; great-grandson of Henry Smith and 
Catherine Robinson (Winston) Shore; , gre.at 2 -grandsou of IVilliatii Overtoil 
Winston, Captain, Virginia Minute Men. 

MARVIN TINSLEY HAW, St. Louis, Mo. (33178). Son of Joseph Lindsay 
and Mollie (Vernon) Haw; grandson of Eleanor and Thomas (Vernon) 
Swank; great-grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth (Van Meter) Swank; great- 
grandson of Abraham and Kebecca ( — ) Van Meter; greal :i -grandson of 
Jacob Van ketet, Member Augusta County, Virginia, Committee of Observa- 
tion. 

HARRY BARTON HAWKS, Major, A. K. P., St. Louis, Mo. (33194). Sou of 
Smith Nicholas and Susan E. (SiniralH Hawes; grandson of Richard and 
Hettie Morrison (Nicholas) Hawes, Jr.; great-grandson of Richard and Clara 
(Walker) Hawes; greats-grandson of Samuel Hawes, clerk, Caroline Comity, 

Virginia Committee of Safety. 

RICHARD SIMRALL HAWES, St. Louis, Mo. (33193). Son of Smith Nicholas 
and Susan K. (Simiall) Hawes; grandson of Richard and Hettie Morrison 
(Nicholas) Hawes, Jr.; great-grandsqn of Richard and Clara (Walker) 
Hawes; great-grandson of SaiHjiel HaiV-es, clerk, Caroline County, Virginia, 
Committee of Safety. 

CHARLES MARTIN It AY, St. Louis, Mo. '(33'77>. Son of William H. and 
Lucy (Pease) Hay; grandson of Gabriel and Elizabeth (Nifong) Hay; great- 
grandson of George and Elizabeth (Clodfelter) Nifong; great-grandson of 
George Clodfelter, private, North Carolina Troops, pensioned. 



266 



SONS OF TIIK AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



MELVILLE WINSLOW HAYNES, Denial Surgeon, II. S. A. R., Dorchester, Mass. 
(32578), Son of John Melville and Helen Stoddard (Hunt) Haynes; grandson 
of John and Sylvia Jane (Nye) Hay lies; great-grandson of Thomas and 
Sylvira (Mayo) Nye; greatr-grandson of Timothy and Sally (Cobb) Nye; 
great 3 grandson of Timothy Nye (Ney), Second Lieutenant, Capt. Joseph 
Smith's Company, Mas-. Coast Defense. 

THOMAS EDWARD HAY WARD, Si. bonis, Mo. (33190). Son of Thomas 
Edward and Virginia (Shultz) Hay ward; grandson of Perry and Lydia 
(Gladfelty) Shultz; great-grandson of Adam and Nancy (Shockey) Shultz; 
great-grandson of Christian Shockey, Corporal, Pa. Line, pensioned. 

JOHN EESL/IE IIAZLETT, JR., Indiana, Pa. (32995). Son of John Leslie and 
Charlotte D. (St. Clair) Hazlett; grandson of Thomas and Charlotte D. 
(Patton) St. Clair; great-grandson of John and Charlotte Clark (Dennison) 
Patton; great-grandson of John and Mary (Campbell) Dennison; great 8 - 
grandson of Charles Campbell .Major, Westmoreland County, Pa. Militia. 

JACK WHITEHEAD HEARD, Colonel, U. S. A., Payne Field, Miss. (Hawaii 
28534). Sou of John W. and Mildred Jewell (Townsend) Heard; grandson 
of William Smith and Sarah Elizabeth (Whitehead) Heard; great-grandson 
of Jesse balkuei- and Caroline (Wilkinson) Heard; great-grandson of Jesse 
Ileal,!, Captain, Virginia Troop.-. 

WILSON HATPIN II ELLER, Salem, Mo. (N. Y. 32884).- Son of William S. 
and Ulanche CBentoh) Heller; grandson of Henry and Flora (De Haven) 
Benton, Jr.; great-grandson of Henry and Sarah (Heacock) Benton; great 2 - 
grandson of David Benton, Jr., private, Col. John Brown's Regt., Berkshire 

County, Conn. Militia. 

STANWOOD LEE 1 1 EN l» ERS< >N, New York, N. Y. (33233). Son of William 
T. and billw Josephine (Swan) Henderson; grand, on of John and Sarah 
Jane ( FisJo) Swan; greal-grandson of Francis and Sarah (Liverinore) Fi.sk; 
great- grands. .11 ol Samuel I'isk, Sergeant, Capt. Jonathan Fish's Company, 
Colonel Brook's Regt., Mass. Militia, 

CHARLES OREN HENDRICK, Easi Orange, N. J. (33464). Son of Oren 

Alonzo and Rosy Catherine (Baldwin) Hendrick; grandson of Abijah and 
Eunecia (Taylor) Hendrick; great-grandson of Abijah Hendrick, private, 
Mass. State Troops, guarded public stores at Springfield, Mass., pensioned. 

WILLTAM HENDRIE, Major. A. E, P., Crosse Pointe Farms, Mich. (33642). 
Son of George and Sarah Sibley ( Trowbridge') Hendrie; gran. Nun of Charles 
C. and Catharine Whipple (Sibley) Trowbridge; great-grandson of Luther 
Trowbridge, Major, Mass. Troops at Lexington and Bunker Hill; great- 
grandson of Luther and Elizabeth (Tillman) Trowbridge; great 2 -grartdson of 
John Tillman, Major. Second Regt., New York Line; great-grandson of 
Solomon and Sarah Whipple (Sproat) Sibley; great-grandson • of Hbeneser 
Sprout, Colonel, Mass. Troops, Brigade Inspector on Baron Steuben's staff; 
great-grandson of Abraham Whipple, Commodore, U. S. Navy. 

WILLIAM t.ETTIEN HKNMAN, IMainfield, N. J. (3-;6qo). Sou of Henry 
White and Kaihaiinr (C.eltier) llenman; grandson of William Tdl and 
Josephine (White) llmiman; great-grandson of John ami Elizabeth (Mc- 

Coughey) llenman; greaf-'-gi a ndson of William McCotighey, private, Captain 

Choreics Company, Fourth Pa. Battalion. 
CHARLES CUY HF,QUEMBOURG, lieutenant, Engineers, V. S. A., Boston, 
Mass., and Dunkirk, N. Y. (32583). Son of Charles Ezra and Harriet E. 
(Thnrbei) He.pi, i,)h,,i.rg; grandson of Edward and Emma (Ilequembourg) 
Tlnirb, r; great-grandson of Aimer and Betsy (Haskins) Thurber: great 8 - 
grandson of T.nmh Uaskiiut, Jr., private, Mass. Cont'l Troops; great 8 -grandson 
of I'.iuuh tlaskin, Sr., private, Maj. Caleb Hyde's Regt., Mass. Militia. ^ 



REGISTER OF M'W MEMBERS. 267 

AIvONZQ DIVERS HERRICK, Hackettstown, N. J. (33330). Son of Seth 

Watson ami Sussanah (Divers) llerrick; grandson of William Alexis and 
Agnes (Watson) Ik-nick; great-grandson of Seth and Ruth (Sprague) 
Derrick; grcat--grandson of Joseph and Mary (Preston) Derrick; great 8 - 
grandson of Israel llerrick, Minute Man, Captain Ames' Company, Col. James 
I? rye's Mass. Regt. 

HERBERT ALONZO HERRICK, Louisville, Ky, (N. J. 32924). Son of William 
Alonzo and Elizabeth (Skeltbn) llerrick; grandson of William A. and Agnes 
(Watson) Derrick; great-grandson of Seth and Ruth (Sprague) llerrick; 
great--grandson of Joseph and Mary (Preston) Derrick; great'-grandson of 
Israel llerrick, .Minute Man in Capt. Benjamin Ames' Company, Mass. 
Militia; great'-grandson of Joseph llerrick, private, Mass. Militia. 

JAMES E. IIEKSIIEY, Pittsburgh, l'a. (3297s). Son of Christopher C. and 
Jane (Reno) Dersluy; grandson of William and La villa (Crimes) Reno; 
great-grandson of William and — (Patterson) Reno; greaC-grandson of Benjamin 
Reno, private, Washington County, L'a. Militia; grandson of Jacob and 
Catherine (Wollet) Uershcy; great-grandson of Christian llershey, private, 
Third Battalion, Lancaster County, l'a. Militia. 

CHESTER ELKHART [ITCKMAN, Chicago, 111. (3.5091). Son of Henry and 
Mary (Sliuman) Hickman; grandson of Cornelius and Catherine (Sherer) 
Hickman; great-grandson of Daniel and Catherine (Yazel) Sherer; great- 
grandson of Jacob Sherer, private, North Carolina Militia. 

HENRY SAMUKL IIICBY, New Haven, Conn. (jjS 7 j). Son of Samuel and 

'/ Harriet (Thomas) Higby; grandson of Samuel C.alpin and Lucy Ann 
(Marlett) Higby; great-grandson of Samuel Higby, private, Third Company, 
Colonel Wolcott's Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOSEPH MICHAEL IIHVEMAN, Waterloo, Iowa. (31968). Son of Michael and 
Annan (da Backus) llile.nan; grandson of Michael and. Mary (Milligan) 
Hilcman; great-grandson of Edward Milligan, private, Capt. Henry Black's 
Company, l'a. Troops, pensioned. 

GEORGE EVERETT HILL, )u., West Orange-, X. J. (33479). Son of George 
Ev.tre.tt and Martha (Lewis) Hill; grandson of Horace and Mary Scott 
(Wiggins) Hill; great-grandson of William Ashby and Elizabeth Lynsen 
(Smith) Wiggins; grcat--grandson of Samuel ami .Mary Scott (McKnight) 
Smith; greater grands on of Charles McKnight, Jr., Surgeon-General, l'a. Middle 
Department, chief hospital physician; great'-grandson of Charles McKnight, 
patriot-clergyman, died in prison. 

ROSCOE R. HILL, (\lbuquerque, N, Mex. (30087). Son of Philip and Leona 
(E.) H'll; grandson of William and Matilda (Leonard) Lindscy; great- 
grandson of James Alfred and Jean (Scott) Lindscy; grcat-'-graiidson of 
James Lnulsey, Sergeant, First Regt.', Virginia Line; great--grandson of 
William Scott, private, Third Regt., South Carolina Militia. 

JAMES ELBERT HILLIS, Kokomo, Ind. (32046). Son of Francis Marion and 
Nancy Elizabeth (Clark) Hillis; grandson of John and Jane Shores (Farrow) 
1 1 ill is ; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Shores) Farrow; great 2 - 
grandson of Thomas Shores, Jr., rifleman, Col. Daniel Morgan's Regt., Vir- 
ginia Cont'l Troops. 

EDWIN WARREN DINK, Orange, X. J. (33405). Son of David and Harriet 
Amelia (Bridges-) Hirie; grandson of David and Achrah (Sackett) Dine; 
great-grandson of Benjamin Sackett, Corporal, Colonel Cantield's Regt., Conn. 
Cont'l Troops, pensioned. 

WALTER ROBBINS DINK, Short Dills, N. J. (33408)! Son of Edwin Warren 
and Nellie ( Sturtevant ) Dine; grandson of David and Harriet Amelia 
( Bridges) Iline; great-grandson of David and Achrah (Sackett) Dine; great'- 
grandson of Benjamin Sackett, private and Corporal, Conn. Cont'l Troops, 
ornsioncd. 



268 SO N S 1' T J I F, A M Kl<] CA X R eVO I , U T 1 ( ) X . 

PETER ARRELL BROWNE HOBLITZELL, Baltimore, Md. (33119). Son of 

William W. and Julia -Louise (Browne) Hoblitzell; grandson of Peter Arrcll 
and .Mary Helen (Scott) Browne; great-grandson of Horace Gustavus and 
Louisa M. (Boycr) Browne; great-grandson of Peter Arrell and Harriel 
(Harper) Browne; grcat 3 :grahdson of John Bro'wne, Lieutenant, Capt. Jehu 
Eyre's Com], any, Philadelphia Militia. 

FREDERICK il'pCTI, Marion, Ohio (33157). Son of Enoch and Mar) Katharine 
(Garvin) lloeh; grandson of Henry and Katharine (Ornwake) Garvin, Jr., 
great-grandson of Henry Garvin, Corporal, Pa. Militia. ' 

HARRY LEON HODGES, Indianapolis, Ind. (32047). Son of Everett Macey 
and Jennie Willie (Gillett) Hodges; grandson iif Jonathan and Rhoda Ann 
(Ford) Hodges; great-grandson of Macey and Melinda (Collins) Hodges; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Hodges, private, .Mass. Militia. 

HOWARD WILKINSON 1IODCKINS, Captain, U. S. A., Washington, 1). C. 
(33250). Son of Howard Lincoln and Marie (Wilkinson) Hodgkins; grandson 
of Aliah George and Lucinda Buniam (Wilson) Wilkinson; great-grandson 
of Nathaniel Warhehl and Mary Ann (dim nam) Wilson; great-grandson of 
Augustus Nathaniel Coburn and Caroline Randolph (Woodson) Wilson; 
greats-grandson of Nathaniel Wilson, Captain, Maryland Troops. 

WILLARD HOFF, Arlington, X. J. (N. V. 32888). Sou of Stephen and Katrina 
(Van Duzer) Hod; grandson of William A. and Louisa (Garland) Van Duzer; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Ursula (Russell) Van Duzer; great-grandson 
of Stephen Russell, private, Wadsworth's Brigade, Conn. Troops. 

HARRY DRAPER HOFFMAN, Washington, 1). C. (33-(>*)- Son of Leonard 
George and Helen (Draper) . Hoffman; grandson of Lemuel Janus and Mary 
Lduionia (Balmain) Draper; great-grandson of Andrew and Amy Ellen 
(Deoham) Balmain; gibat-grandson of Andrew and Nancy Constant (Wash- 
ington) T.almain; great s -grandson of John Washington, Captain, Fourth Regt., 
Virginia Troops. 

GICURGE EDWARD HOGABOOM, Major, U. S. A., Basic City, Miss. (N. Y. 
32720). Son of George C. and Mary A. (Crawford) Hogahoom; grandson 
of William and Julia A. (Rice) Uogaboom ; great-grandson of Rohert and 
Rehecca (Wemple) HogabOom; great-grandson of Peter Hogahoom, private, 
Eighth Regt., Albany County, New York Militia. 

MARCUS EI. HOLCOMB, Southington, Conn. (32858). Son of Carlos and 
Adah L. (Bushnell) Holcomb; grandson of Harvey and Catherine (Case) 
Holcomb; great-grandson of Joshua and Sarah (Smith) Holcomb; great- 
grandson of Joshua Holcomb, private, Captain Bates' Company, Colonel Phelps' 

1 3th Conn. Regt. 

CALVIN [RJRROWES HOLCOMBE, Corning, Ohio (337'-'). Son of Burrowcs 
and Sarah (Ogg) Holcombe; grandson of John and Rachel (Burrowes) llol- 
combe; great-grandson of Elijah Holcombe, private, Pa. and New York 
Mditia, pensioned. 

GEORGE JEAN 1 1 < > 1 . 1 ) 1 •; N , Colour!, U. S. Army, Burlington, Yt. (33827). Son 
of George Henry and Uhoda Bell (Hopkins) Holden; grandson of Jonas Reed 
and Mary Ann (Burgess) Holden; great-grandson of Luther and Ratty 
(11. .ward) Holden; great-grandson of Jonas Holden, Corporal, Mass. Militia. 

RICHARD DEMING HOLLINGTON, Providence, R. I. (3-l"5-). Son of Am- 
brose and Sephronia Elizabeth (Deming) Hollington; grandson of William 
Mather and Amelia (ljyadley) Deming; great-grandson of Andrew and Eliza- 
beth (Mather) D.niin-; great-grandson of Solomon Deming, Lieutenant, 
First Berkshire Regt.', "Mass. Militia. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN IIORMAX, Portland, Ore. i.^uS). Son of Charles 
and Mary U ( I I nntingl on ) llolm.m; grandson of Benjamin and Jcrusha 
(Stone) Huntington; great-grandson of Jacob and Martha (l.indly) Hunting 



REGISTER OE NEW MEMBERS. 269 

ton; great 2 -grandsou of James Huntington, Sergeant, F Company, Eighth 
Regt., Conn. Troops. 

CEBERT CARUSEE IIOPMKS, Oakland, Cal. (32743)-. Son of Joseph Carlisle 
and Airs. Carrie (Capvvell) Holmes; grandson of William R. and Esther R. 
Capwell; great-grandson of John and Mary (Vincent) Capwell; great 2 -grandson 
of William Capweilj private, Rhode Island Militia, pensioned. 

HOWARD ACKERMAN HOLMES* Beltevffie, N. J. (33348). Son of Edmund 
Kiting and Martha Elizabeth (Aekerman) Holmes; grandson of David P. 
and Catherine Elizabeth (Moore) Aekerman; great-grandson of Peter D. and 
Martha (Smith) Aekerman; .meat-grandson of Garret Smith, private, Dutchess 
County, New York and New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

KU'AZKR BARTLETT HOMER, Providence, R. 1. (32495). Sun of Orlando 
Mead and Mary Frances (Wellington) Homer; grandson of EleaZer ami 
Louisa Agnes (Wellington) [Tomer; great-grandson of JeJnthan Wellington, 
Third Sergeant, Mass. Militia.. 

RALPH WINSLOW HOOKER, Springfield, Mass. (33299). Son of Charles P. 
and Nellie N. (Augur) Honker; grandson of John and Mary A. (I'olley) 
Hooker; great-grandson of Calvin and Chloe (Wood) Policy; great-grandson 
of John Policy, Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

NORMAN REEVE HOOSE, Cleveland, Ohio (33168). Son of Peon Reckwith and 
Eillian (Reeve) IToos'e; grandson of Wai m n I ,. and - Sarah Ann (Hanson) 
lloose; great-grandson of Cornelius and Jane (Usher) (loose; greats-grandson 
of Jacob and Sa.brina (Burliite) I loose; great"-grandson of -- and Olive 
(Messenger) Purhite; greaf-grandson of Isaac Messenger, private, Conn. State 
Troops. 

CEARKSON CAMPBELL HOPE, Detroit, Mich. (N. J. 33416). Son of William 
Clarkson ami Sarah Campbell (Berdan) Hope; grandson of Aaron and 
Elizabeth Smith (Dunham) Mope; great-grandson of Nehemiah and Catherine 
(Emery) Dunham; great-grandson of James and Mary Dunham (Carhart) 
Dunham; greats-grandson of Nehemiah Dunham, Member New Jersey General 
Assembly. 

BENJAMIN CLARENCE HOPEWELL, Lincoln, Neb. (32964). Son of Melville 
Reeves and Harriet l',Da (Nelson) Hopewell; grandson of Benjamin C. and 
Sarah (Reeves) Hopewell; great-grandson ol' Henry and Rachacl (Edmundson) 
Hopewell; greats-grandson of John Hopewell, private, Captain Porterfield's 
Company, Colonel. Morgan's Virginia Riflemen. 

ARTHUR THOMAS HOPKINS, New Haven, Conn. (32851). Son of Samuel 
Hamblen and Melissa Ann (Rich) Hopkins; grandson of Thomas and Hope 
(Hambley) Hopkins; great-grandson of Thomas and Susan (Raker) Hopkins; 
greal-'-grandsou of Caleb Hopkins, Sergeant, Mass. Sea-coast Defense, pen- 
sioned. 

ERNEST MARTIN HOPKINS, Hanover, N. II. (30536). Son of Adoniram 
Judson and Mary (Martin) Hopkins; grandson of Horace and Porinda (Wood- 
ward) Martin; great-grandson of Kpbraim Story and Susanna (Roynton) 
Man in; great-grandson of Hphraim Mat tin, private and Corporal, Mass. 
Militia for Coni'l service; great --grandson of Jonathan Boynton, private, Mass. 
Militia to reinforce Coni'l Army; grandson of Samuel C. and Philena S. 
(Ford) Hopkins; great-grandson of Robert and Priscilla (Chapman) Hopkins; 
greaf-'-grandson of Da; id Hopkins, private, Mass. Coast Defense, assisted in 
capture of ship •'Cruel." 

CHARLES BERNARD HOPPER, Chicago, III. (3365.0. Son of George Henry 

and Selina Araminta (Eynde) Hopper; grandson of Sylvester Bcniaid and 
Frances (Phillips) Lynde; great-grandson of Jabez and Clarissa (Woodruff) 
Pynde; great-grandson of John LynJc, Ensign, Col. John Fellon's Regt., 
Mass. Militia. 



2^0 SONS 01- THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

LAURENCE S. 1KMTKK, Detroit, Mich. (33754)/ Son of Henry S. ami Evelyn 

II. (Hall; Hopper; gnamfeon of William ami Frances (Vernor) Hall; great- 
grandson of John and Poly (Smitli) Vernor; gi cat-'-grandson of John anil 
I'rudy (Hitchcock-) Vernor; great 3 -granclson of John I'emor, Quartermaster, 
Thirteenth Albany County Regf., New York Militia. 
FRANK COLEMAN HORTON, Baltimore,. Md. (33109). Son of Franklin S. 
and Amanda (Coleman) Florton; grandson of Gustavtis and Eliza (Sargent) 
Morton; great-grandson of Jotham and Robcy (Warren) Horton; great 8 - 
grandson of William Warren, lieutenant, Col. John Nixon's Regt., Mass. 
Militia. 

ELMORE DELOS HOTCHKISS, Richmond, \'a. (3-93-0- Son of Nelson Hill 
and Harriett (Russell) Ilotchkiss; grandson of Stiles and Rydia (Beecher) 
Ilotchkiss; great-grandson of Amraphel and Appaulina (Ilotchkiss) Ilotchkiss; 
great 2 -grandson of David and Abigail (Douglass) Ilotchkiss; grcaC-grandson 
of Gideon Hotchkiss, Member Waterbury, Conn., Committee of Public Safety. 

RIKUT. DONARD HOUGH, White Bear Rake, Minn. (31844). Son of Sher- 
wood and EJdith Evelyn (Moses) Hough; grandson of Sherwood and Frances 
J.orinda (Morrow) Hough; great-grandson of Thomas Jefferson and Mahala 
(Strong) Hough; greats-grandson of Josiah Strong, private, Conn. Militia, 
pensioned. 

IRA RUT1IRR HOUGHTON, Baltimore; Md. (32423). Son of Ira Holden and 
Louise Ruther (Ringwalt) Houghton; grandson of Charles E. and Caroline 
Sellman (McMurray) Houghton; great-grandson of Stedman and Ann (Cragin) 
Houghton; great'-'-grandson of Silas and Ann (Prichard) Cragin; great-- 
grandson of Ftancjs CragVd, Sergeant, New Hampshire Militia. 

JOHN MOULTON HOUR, Delaware, Ohio (33720). Son of Moulton and Lillian 
Malic 1 llouk; grandson of Harrison Willard ami Catherine (Kent) llouk; 
great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Moulton) llouk; great- grandson of 
Joseph and Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) Moulton; great a grandson of Stephen 
Moulton, Lieutenant-Colonel, 22nd Regt., Conn. Militia, prisoner. 

WILLIAM II. IT; HOWR, Cambridge, Mass. (33537). Son of Solomon A. and 
Ruth (Raines) Howe; grandson of Josiah D. and Arathusa (Reed) Howe; 
great-grandson of Silas and Eleanor (Hunter) Reed; great-grandson of 
Benjamin Reed, private, Colonel Doolittle's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

WIRRIAM CORKY HOWELL, Keokuk, Iowa (3-^79-0. Sou of Harrison Scott 
and Ann Elizabeth (Redman) Howell; grandson of Daniel Gideon and lean 
Elizabeth (Ryall) Howell; great-grandson of Daniel and Eunice (Keen) 
Howell; great--grandsou of James Keen, Captain, Morris County, New Jersey 
Militia. 

LEWIS AIA'AH HOWRS, Peoria, 111. (33090). Son of A'.vah Remuel and Irene 
(Fichelberger) Howes; grandson of Remuel and Mary PhilHpps (Forbes) 
Howes; great-grandson of Daniel and Mary ( Philipps) Forbes ( Forbush) ; 
great'-'-gramlson of Ebeneser Forbush, private, Capt. Thomas Baker's Company, 
Col. Nathan Tyler's Regt., Mass. Militia; grandson of Martin and Isabella 
(Johnson) F'ichelberger ; great-grandson of George and Elizabeth (Schriemr) 
Eichelberger; grcat-'-grantlson of Martin and Mary (Welsh) E'chelbergerj 
great 3 -grandson of George Eichelberger, Pa. Deputy Quartermaster. 

BURT PRINDLE IIOYI-R, Buffalo, N. V. (32719). Son of George A. ami 
Dortha (Prindle) Hoyer; grandson of Frederick and Eva (Kaynor) Hover; 
great-grandson of Piter and Eva (Petrie) Hover; great"-grandson of George 
Frederick Hoyer, private, Col. Philip Schuyler's Reft., Albany County, New 
York Militia; great :t -gramlson of Peter 1 1 oyer, private, Col, Peter Bellinger's 
Fourth Regt., Tryon County. New York Militia. 

JAMES CALF, IIUPHRPR, New Orleans, La. (3-77- >• Son of Wakeman and 

Margaret (Keith) llulibell; giamlsoii of Hir.mi and Mary (Oilman) ' Hubbell ; *J> 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



-7' 



great-grandson of Abijah Hubhell, Corporal, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of 
Gersham Hubbeti,. Captain, Conn. Militia. 

MAIUOX OLIVER HUCK, Jacksonville, Fla. (La. 33214). Son of II. J. and 
Margaret Douglas (lb-own) I luck; grandson of Andrew J. and Elizabeth 
Lewis (Minor) Riowu; great-grandson of Samuel Overton and Lydia I, auric 
(!,ewis) Minor; great-grandson of Thomas Walker and Elizabeth (Meri- 
wether) Lewis; great-grandson of Nicholas lewis, Colonel, Virginia Militia 

CHARLES T.EANDER 1 1 U M M EL, ivokomo, lud. (.53575). Son of Constantino 
I,, and Augusta BeJIsi'na (Heel.) Hummel; grandson of William and Nancy 
Cook (Wagoner) Heel.; great grandson of John and Catherine (Zinn) 
Wagoner; great-grandson of George William Wagoner, Lieutenant, Third 
Battalion, Berk's County, Pa. Militia; great 3 -grandson of Jacob Zinn, fifer, 
Col. Peter Grubb's Battalion, Lancaster County, Pa, Associators. 

CALVIN GALl'SHA HUNTINGTON, Rochester, X. V. (32885). Son of George 
and Abigail (Gallisha) [InntiiTgton ; grandson of Amos and I'armlia (Hard) 
Huntington; great -grandson of Amos Huntington, Captain, Col. Moses Robin 
son's Kegt., Virginia Militia, prisoner of war; grandson of Jonas Galusha, 
Captain, Vt. Militia, Coiit'l service. 

CHARLES BRUSH HUNTINGTON, Omaha, Neb. (.32953). Son of Samuel 
Slicrwood ami Elizabeth (Kalher) Huntington; grandson of Simeon Fitch and 
Antoinette Mary (Brush) Huntington; great-grandson of Simon and Sarah 

(Fitch) Huntington; givat'-'-grandson of Andrew Huntington, Lieutenant, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hosford's Kegt., Conn. Troops. 

JONATHAN HENRY HUNTINGTON, 3rd, Newark, N. J. (33735). Son of 
Jonathan Henry and Elizabeth (Contrell) Huntington, 2nd; grandson of 
Jonathan Henry and Eunice (Ailing) Huntington; great-grandson of Stephen 
Ball and Jane H. (Wier) Ailing; great 2 -grandson of David and Nancy (Ball) 
.Ailing; great ;! -grandson of Stephen Boll, New Jersey patriot, hung as spy by 
British. 

ROBERT GRAHAM HUNTINGTON, Newark, N. J. (3J7J<>). Son of Jonathan 
Henry and Elizabeth (Contrell) Huntington, 2nd; grandson of Jonathan 
Henry ami Eunice (Ailing )' 1 1 untington ; great-grandson of Stephen Ball and 
Jan.: II. (Wier) Ailing; great--gra«dson of David and Nancy (Hall) Ailing; 
greaF'-grandson of Stephen Hull, New Jersey patriot, hung as spy by British. 

EDWARD FRANKLIN HURLBUT, Meeker, Okla. (31621). Son of Charles 
Martin and Sarah Rebecca (Peacock) Hurlbut; grandson of Hermon and 
Chloe (Martin) Hurlbut; great-grandson of John Hurlbut, private, Colonel 
Lippctfs Regt., Rhode Island Troops, pensioned. 

JOHN FLETCHER HURST, Barcelona, Spain (I). C. 33254). Son of Carlton 
Bailey and Harriette Hamline (Strobridge) Hurst; grandson of John Fletcher 
and Catherine (Lament) Hurst; great-grandson of Elijah and Ann Catherine 
(Colston) Hurst; great-grandson of Samuel Hurst, private, Maryland Line, 
pensioned. 

HENRY HUTCHINSON, Winth.rop, Mass. (33295). Son of Charles C. and 
Isadora Bradley (Bliss) Hutchinson; grandson of E)i C, and Adaline (\'ea/io 
liliv S ; great-grandson of ICJi and Mary (Campbell) Yea/ie; great-grandson of 
Elijah Veazie (Vcsey), private, Mass. Militia. 

CORNEUUS MARION LIUTTON, Jk„ Mindere, La. (33-'o«). Son of Cornelius 
Marion ami Elizabeth Jane (Cordon) Huttou; grandson of William Josephus 
and Ann (Callaway) Ilutlon; great-grandson of Joseph and Nancy (Calhoun) 
Huttou; great-'-grandson of William Huttou, Captain, Gen. Andrew Pickins' 
Regt., South Carolina Troops. 

FREDERICK TANGUARY HYDE, Captain, U. S. Army, fort Angeles, Wash 

(Mas-. 33058). Son of John I'oisal and Mary Elizabeth (Tanguary) Hyde; 
grandson of Frederick and Jane Bruce (I'helps) Hyde; great-grandson of 



2/2 



SONS OF THIS AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



John and Sarah Jane (Wells) Hyde; great-grandson of William Hyde, Colonel, 
Second Battalion, Maryland Cont'l Troops. 

WILLIAM HYDE, BaysJdc, Long Island, N. V. (33360). Son of Charles Edward 
and Georgiana (Miller) Hyde; grandson' of Edward Clarendon and Rebecca 
(Tibbits) Hyde; great-grandson of Jonathan and Deborah (Thomas) Hyde; 
great-grandson of James Thomas, surgeon, Twelfth Regt., Conn, Militia. 

WILLIAM VINTON HYDE, Boston, Mass. (32060). Son of John Poisal and 
Mary Elizabeth (Tanguary) Hyde; grandson of Frederick and Jane Bruce 
(Phelps) Hyde; great-grandson of John and Sarah Jane (Wells) Hyde; 
great-grandson of William Hyde, Colonel, Second Battalion, Maryland Flying 
Camp. 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Chicago, HI. (330&). Son of Jesse B. W. and Martha 
Ann (McCune) Ickes; grandson of John Loy and Mary Jane (Stroder) Ickes; 
great-grandson of Nicholas Ickes, private, Capt. Abraham Turrey's Company, 
York County, Pa, Militia. 

WALDO SEBASTIAN ICKES, Captain, U. S. Army, Nutley, N. J. (32690), Son 
of William Irvine and Margaret Jane ' (Sebastian) lekes; grandson of Samuel 
M. and Elizabeth J. — Ickes; great-grandson of Jonas and Mary (Duncan) 
Ickes; great-grandson of Nicholas Ickes, private, Capt. Abraham Turrey's 
Company, York County, Pa. Militia. 

FRED ABBOTT IRISH, l ? argo, N. D. (26575). Son of John Small and Emma 
(Abbott) Irish; grandson of Dean Snow and Mahetable (Small) Dish; great- 
grandson of Obadiah and Mary (Dean) Irish; great-grandson of James Irish, 
Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

IIADDON IVINS, Hoboken, X. J. (32680). Son of K. Barclay and Cecelia 
Jane (lladdon) Ivans; grandson of William and Elizabeth D'uryea (Ivaten) 
Haddon; great-grandson of Jacob and Catherine (Paine) Karen; great- 
grandson of Joseph and Altye (Martling) Paine; great-grandson of Abraham 
Martling, Jr., Captain, New York State Cont'l Troops. 

ARTHUR COPELAND JACKSON, Houston, Tex. (I). C. 33262). Son of Arthur 
(-. and Donnie May (Copeland) Jackson; grandson of Samuel and Margaret 
(Beal) Copeland; great-grandson of Joshua and Elizabeth (Axley) Copeland; 
great-grandson of John and Sarah (Short) Copeland; great-grandson of 
William Copeland, Corporal, Seventh Kegt., Virginia Troops. 

MYRON PRINDLE JACKSON, St. Louis, Mo. (33182). Son of Ezra Peter 
and Mary Ann (Gudtner) Jackson; grandson of John and Christine (Hine) 
Jackson; great-grandson of William Jackson, private, Third Regt., Mil. Troops; 
grandson of John Harmon and Elizabeth (Cozier) Guitner; great-grandson 
of John Gudtner, private, First Battalion, Cumberland County, Pa. Troops. 

JOHN IIOYT JAMESON, Toledo. Ohio lj,||.|fii. Son of Albert Lloyd and 
Frances (H.oyt) Jameson; grandson of Bevnn Bierson and Sarah Ann (Blair) 



ral grandsoi 
Ruben lUat 



Koh 



d B; 



(And. uson) I'd. 



g' 



Corporal, Mass. Militia. 

J. MILO JEFFREY, Bloomfield, \'l. (33H2X). Son of William II. and Nellie 
Amelia (Jenkins) Jeffrey; grandson of Milo and Ellen A. (Etteridge) Jenkins; 
Ki-i-.-it grandson of Lewis and Polley ( I '.riswablj Jenkins; grcal'-'-grandsou ol 
l.cmacl Jenkins, lifer, Mass. Militia; grandson of Klea/.ei and l.ydia Jane 
(Clough') Jeffrey; great-grandson of Ivory and Pha-be Jane (McKenney) 
Clough; great- grandson of Shadrach and Lydia f Abbott) Clough; great-- 
grandson Of Silas Abbott, private and Corporal, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN PARIS JELKE, JR., Chicago, III. (.(.(070). Son of John Paris and Lou 
anna (I'ra/.ier) Jelke; grandson of James William and Mary Florence (O'Hair) 
1'ia/iei; great grandson of Thomas and Anna (Stark) ]Ta/icr; great-grandson 
of John h'ruzivr, Sergeant, Virginia Infantry; great-grandson of John and 
Elizabeth (Hard wick) O'Hair; gi eat- gi and son of Michael Oharra (0' II air), 
private, General i.m en's Uegl., \ irgmisi 'I loops. 



K liO I STI<; K ( ) V N K W M K M 1 1 K R S . 



^73 



DJLTTHER HOWARD JENKINS, Richmond, Va. (32937). Sun of Luther If. 

and Rosa (King) Jenkins; grandson of John J. and Susan (Todd) King; 
great-grandson of Royal and Elizabeth Todd; great-grandson of James and 
Susanna (Iyoving) Todd; great-grandson of Richard Losing, private, Virginia 
State Troops and Cont'l Dine, pensioned. 

HARRISON DABIyING JENKS, Detroit, Mich. (32395). Sou of Henry Hush 
nell and Mary 1$. (Darling) Jenks; grandson of Nathan and Jane Bushnell 
Jenks; great-grandson of Barnett and Electa (Kellogg) Bushnell; great 8 - 
grandson of Jusiah B ushndl, private, Berkshire County, Mass. Militia. 

CLARENCE STEPHEN JENNINGS, Brooklyn, N. V. (32604). Son of Stephen 
McCrea and Mary Jane (Wicks) Jennings; grandson of Herman and Anne 
(Dawrence) Jennings; great-grandson of Israel and Sally (I [owes) Jennings; 
great— grandson of ZachariaJi Jennings, Jr., private, Captain Bennett's Com- 
pany, General Waterbury's Conn. Brigade. 

K<>SS UOYNE JENSEN, Lieutenant, U. S. Army, .Minneapolis, Minn. (31848). 
S.m of 1'eter Syren and Carrie (Turner) Jensen; grandson of Don Carlos 
and Kunice (Mills.) Turner; great-grandson of John and Mary (Ellis) Turner; 
great-grandson of John and .Mary (Wright) Turner; greaC-grandson of 
Bbeneser. Wright, Sergeant, Second Company, Colonel Hinmau's Fourth Regt., 
Conn. Militia. 

ll^NRY HERBERT JESSUP, Greenwich, Conn. (N. V. 33364). Son of Henry 
Wynans and Mary Hay (StatesburyJ Jessnp; grandson of Henry Harris ami 
Caroline (Bush) jessup; great-grandson of William an. I Amanda (Harris) 
Jessnp; great-grandson of /.coition Jessup, private, New York Minute .Men 
and Third Regt., Cont'l Dine; greaD-g'and.son of Simeon (Simon) TcrBoSih 
(Jinsh), private, New York Militia and Cont'l Line. 

HENRY WINANS JESSUP, New York, N. Y. (33*35). Son of Henry Harris 
ami Caroline (Rush) Jessnp; grandson of William and Amanda (Harris) 
Jessnp; great-grandson of Zebitlon Jessnp, private, Third Regt., New York 
Cont'l Dine; grandson of Wynans and Julia Ann (Dooinis) Bush; great- 
grandson of William T. ami Ksthcr (Bull) Bush.; great-grandson of Simeon 
Ter Bosch (nnsh), private, Colonel Holmes' Fourth Regt,, Ncu York Cont'l 
Dine. 

FREDERICK WIRDIAM JKAVKTT, New York City, N. Y. (3J~ J 47). Son of 
Clarence Frederick and Margaret Anne (Robinson) Jcwelt; grandson of 
Frederick and Josephine (Forehand) Jewett; great-grandson of Christopher 
and Betsy (Walker) Forehand; great-grandson of Gideon Walker, private, 
Colonel Dolman's Regt., Mass. Militia; great a -grandson of Asa Walker, 
private, Mass. Militia. 

AMASA PARKER JOHNSON, Jk., San Diego, Cal. (32.742). Son of Amasa 
Parker and Elizabeth (Janke) Johnson; grandson of Elias and Phoebe 
(Finney) Johnson; great-grandson of Jonathan Finney, ' private, Mass. Militia'. 

MEN WAYLAND JOHNSON, Toledo, Ohio (33154). Son of Norman C. and 
Sarah (Tillotson) Johnson; grandson of Corliss and Sophrania (Curtiss) 
Tillotson; great-grandson of David. and Uaeliel (Cowan) Curtiss; great-'-grandson 
of Peter Kurr Curtiss (Curtis), private, Capt. F,benezef Wells' Company, 
Colonel Symomi's Regt., Mass. Militia, Member Committee of Safely. 

ClIARDKS FOSTER JOHNSON, Columbus, Ohio (33172). Son of William 11. 
and Mary R. (Humphrey) Johnson; grandson of Thomas Dawson and Eliza- 
beth (Ferguson) Johnson; great-grandson ot Reason and Klizabeth (Wetzel) 
Ferguson; great-grandson of John Ferguson, Associator, Frederick County, 
Maryland; great-grandson of Robert Johnson, private, Second Regt., Mary- 
land Militia. 

CURTIS TIDIfOTSON JOHNSON, Toledo, Ohio (33160). Son of Norman D 
and Sarah (Tillotson) Johnson; grandson of Curtis and Sophronia (Curtiss) 



274 SONS 01- Tin; AMERICAN REVOLUTION'. 

Tillotson; great-graridson of Benjamin Tilldtson, private, Berkshire County, 

Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Joshua Tillotson, private, Col. "Benjamin 
Simond's Regt., Berkshire County, Mass. Militia. 

IRA JOILYSON, South Norfolk, Va. (Md. 32424). Son () f Greenleaf and Jessie 
(Crbcker) Johnson; grandson of Lmmanucl and Harriet (Griffith) Crocker; 
great-grandson .if Thomas Hockley and Elizabeth (Johnson) Griffith; great 2 - 
grandson of Samuel Griffith, private, Buck's County, Pa. Militia. 

MORRIS LINCOLN JOHNSON, Atlantic City, N. J. (33900). Sun of John W. 
and Sarah (Adams) Johnson; grandson of James and Hannah (Bell) Johnson; 
great-grandson of James Hell, private, Eleventh Licgt., Cont'l Line. 

WILLIAM HENRY JOHNSON, St. Paul, Minn. (33501). Son of James Orin 
and Kvaline (Gardineer) Johnson; grandson of Orin and Sarah (Lobclell) 
Johnson; great-grandson of Obijah and Mary (Little) Lobdell ; great--grandson 
of John Little, Captain, Tyron County, New York Militia, wounded at Johns- 
town. 

MOLLIS JOHNSTON, Callipolis, Ohio (33173). Son of James and Augusta 
(Bradbury) Johnston; grandson of Asa and Electa (I fording) Bradbury; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth (Stevens) Bradbury; great 2 -grandson 
of Jacob Brailbiiry-, Captain, Sixth Company, Third Regt., Mass. Militia. 

BRECKtNRJDGE JONES, St. Louis, Mo. (33188). Son of Daniel W. and 
Rebecca (Dunlap) Jones; grandson of George and Mary (Downton) Dunlap; 
great-grandson of William Dunlap, private, Captain Fry's Company, Virginia 
Line. 

BREWSTER HAWKINS, JONES, Belleville, N. J. (3.3.341). Son of Charles G. 
and Maude (Ainsworth) Jones; grandson of Spencer Seth and Mary A. 
(Hawkins) Ainsworth; great-grandson of Ahial and Artemesia (Stowell) 
Ainsworth; great'-'-grandson of Xathan Ainsivorth, private, Eleventh Regt., 
Conn. Militia, died in British prison. 

CARROLL riAMJVIET JONES, Columbia, S. C. (Va. 33568). Son of James \V. 
and Nannie May (Clarke) Jones; grandson of Charles ETariimett and Cas- 
sandria (Childrey) Clarke; great-grandson of John Salle and Nancy (Frayser) 
Clarke; great--grnndson of Charles Clarke, Jr., Lieutenant, Cumberland County, 
Virginia Militia. 

CHESTER NEVILLE JONES, N. J. (26125). Supplemental. Son of Edward 

Conkling and Harriet Meeker (Badglcy) Jones; grandson of Dayton and 
Sarah (Lyon) Badglcy; great-grandson of John and Tabitha (Moore) Lyon; 
great 8 -grandson of Isaac Moore, private, Somerset Count)', New Jersey Militia. 

LOUIS EDWIN JONES, Providence, R. I. (32483). Son of Edwin Eugene 
and Carrie (Weil) Jones; grandson of Peter S. ami Mary Adele (Kyle) Jones; 
great-grandson of John and Polly (On) Kyle; great 2 -gfand9©ri of Robert Kyle, 
private in Capt. William Huston's Company,' Fourth Battalion, Cumberland 
County, Pa. Militia. 

NOBLE WILEY JONES, Portland, Ore. (33.140). Son of Philo Everett and 
Mary Eveline (Noble) Jones; grandson of Joel Orville and Mary (Wheeler) 
Noble; great-grandson of Gustavus Adolphus and Mary (Freeman) Noble; 
great--grandson of Nathan S'ohle, Lieutenant, Conn, Militia. 

RICH API) SANK JONES, Seattle, Wash. (3-2465). Son of Richard A. and 
Sarah Jane (McClelland) Jones; grandson of Robert and Sarah Jane (Irwin) 
McClelland; great-grandson of John and Sarah McClay (Harris) Irwin; great- 
grandson of John and Jean (Harris) Harris; great 3 -grandson of John Harris, 
Captain, Twelfth Pa. Cont'l Troops, Delegate to Provincial Congress, and 
Member of Assembly. 

JOHN STUART JORDAN, Terre Haute, Ind. (32039). Son of John Stuart 

and Amanda (Hollinger) Jordan; grandson of John Smart and Jane (Alex- ^ 
audcr) Jordan'; great-granilsori of John Stuart .md Mary fllanna) Jordan; 



REGISTER <>!•• NEW M KM HERS. 



275 



great--gramlson of John (Stuart) Jordan, Captain, Eighth Company, Second 
Battalion, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia. 

WILLIAM BEAUMONT JORDAN, Chicago, 111. (33097). Son of Scott and 
Clifford Moody (Hall) Jordan; grandson of Collins Hansberger and Mary 
Louise (Scott) Jordan; great-grandson of David Jefferson and Julia Ann 
(Cady) Jordan; great--grandson of Joseph Cleveland and Mrs. Mary (Wilkin- 
son) Rosencrantz Cady; great 3 -grandson of David Cady, Captain, Conn. Militia 
at Lexington Alarm. 

JOHN KENDALL JOS', Springfield, Mass. (33538). Son of Austin Calvin 
and Margaret May (Livingston) Joy; grandson of John Kendall and Mary 
Jane (Shertlieff) Joy; great-grandson of Nathaniel Joy, private, Mass. Militia 
and independent companies, pensioned. 

rilll/) PEERS LAX'!';, Springfield, 111. LuLvD. Son of Charles Philo and 
Flora (I'.rittin) Kane; grandson of Andrew Jackson ami Caroline Maria 
(Beers) Kane; great-grandson of Philo and Martha (Stillman) Leers; great- 
grandson of Zacharia Hers, private. Conn. Militia, Orderly Sergeant, Fair- 
field Guards, pensioned. 

GEORGE S. KALSI.Lk, New Orleans, La. (33223). Son of George S. and 
Harriet II. (Snyder) Kausler; grandson of Jacob and Catherine (Shall) 
Kausler: great-grandson of George Shail, Lieutenant, First Battalion, Berk's 
County, Pa. Militia. 

AKRTSICN PARRY KK.ASBRY, Mountain Lakes, X. J. (33340). Son of Robert 
Aeitsen and Susan' 1$. (Monday) Keashey ; grandson of Edward rind Mary 
Ann (Griffith) Keashey ; great-grandson of Edward ( ). and Mary Parry 
(Aertson) Keashey; great-grandson of Anthony and Hannah (Brick) Keashey; 
greaCgrandson of lidward Keasbey, deputy to Provincial Congress, and 
Member of Committee of Safety, Salem County, New Jersey. 

JAMES SOTHLKOX KLKCH, Racine, Wis. (Md. 33857). Son of William 
Sotheron and Olivia T. (Wiley) Keech; grandson of James and Clarissa 
<Sui heron) Keech ; great-grandson of James Keech., private, Charles County, 
Maryland Militia. 

LULL POPE KEENEY, Elizabeth, X. J. (32679). Son of George Alonzo and 
Esther (Pope) Keeney; grandson of John Alonzo and Lois (Whitmarsh) 
Keeney; great-grandson of John and Ann (C.ouuabell) Keniiey; great"- 
grandson of John and Sarah (Dewey) Counahell; great :, -gran.L(m of Samuel 
Cotuiabcll, private in Capt. Agrippa WML' Company, Colonel Williams' M.iss. 
Militia. 

lil'.X MILAM KLLXO.N, Frankfort, Ky. (33032). Son of Uherte and Annie 
(Milam) Keenon; grandson of Benjamin Cave and Martha (ShockLy) Milam; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Ann (Stephens) Shockley; great--grandson of 
John Stephens-, private, Orange County, Virginia Militia, pensioned; also 
private, Col. George Rogers Clark's Expedition. 

DONALD WICKIIAM KLLLoCO. Toledo, Ohio (33427). Son of Edgar Romeyn 
and Mar> (Wickham)) Kellogg; grandson of Moses Curtis and Elizabeth 
(Swartwout) Kellogg; great-grandson of Robert and Sarah (Richards) Swart- 
wont; ki 'at- grandson of liantardus Swarlwoitt, Jr.. Second Lieutenant, 
Fourth Dutchess County Regt., New York Militia; grcal 8 -grandson of 
luirnardus Sli'tfrUi'Viii, Capt;iin, Fourth Dutchess County Regt., New York 
Militia. 

ROY ISURDETTE KELLOGG, Palo Alio, CaL (32738). Son of John Evans 
and Frances Ladore (Hickcox) Kellogg; grandson of Frederick ami Sally 

S. (Kvarts) Kellogg; greaf-grands d Frederick an. I Mary (Polly) (Phelps) 

Kellogg; B reat--grandson of Ash Kelhss, Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

CARLlvTON LFLSLY, Hartford, Conn. (-33.470). Son of William Andrews and 
Kate Louise (Patehen) Kelsey; inandson of Ephraini A. and Catharine 



276 



SONS OK TllK AMERICAN R KV()I,l JTloN . 



(Andrews) Kclsey; great-grandson of Benajab and Elizabeth (Hall) Andrews; 
grcat--grandson of Aaron Hall, private, Seventh Regt., Conn. Line, pensioned. 

CART. HENRY COOPER KELSEV MATTISON, Montclair, Nf. J. (32902). Son 
of William Resell McK. and Fannie L. (Smith) Mattison; grandson of John 
Beskerer and Mary (llardi.sty Mattison; great-grandson of William and 
Elizabeth (Robins) Mattison; great-grandson of J. nines and [Catherine (Egbert) 
Mattison; great— grandson of Aaron Mattison, private, New Jersey Militia and 
Cont'l Troops. 

JOSEPH MASTl'N KENDALL, San Diego, Ca'l. (3-745). Son of Frank Irving 
and Margaret Louise (Maslen) Kendall; grandson of Joseph R, ami Sarah 
A. (Cutler) Kendall; great-grandson of Leonard and Maria II. (Cutler) 
Cutler; great— grandson of Thomas Cutler, private, Mass. Militia, and Minute 
Man at Lexington Alarm. 

JOHN BURTON KENNARD, St. Louis, Mo. (33175). Sou of Samuel M. and 
Annie (Maude) Kennard; grandson of John and Rebecca (). (Mummey) Ken- 
nard; great-grandson of John and Mary (Spencer) Kennard; great— grandson 
of Perry Spencer, Member "Independent Company," Talbot County, Maryland 
Militia. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR KENNEDY, Auburndale, Mass. (33290). Son of William 
Taylor and Charlotte Bray (Fowle) Kennedy; grandson of John and Sarah 
Ann Winslow (Taylor) Kennedy; grandson of John and Olivia (Gardner) 
Kennedy; great-grandson of John Kennedy, .Mass. constable, '/O-'N.J, Member 
Committee of Inspection and other committees; great— grandson of Samuel 
Gardner, private, Mass. Militia and detachment guards; great-grandson of 
Joseph Card ncr, Mass. Justice of Peace, Judge of Court of Common Pleas, 
and Member Court of Inquiry; grandson of Henry and Mary Elizabeth 
(F.des) Fowle; great-grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Bentley) Fowle; 
great-grandson of Henry Fowle, Member Medford, Mass., Committee of 
Prosecution, and loaned money lo 0. S. Government. 

FRANK DICKINSON KENT, Montclair, N. J. (3341-0. Son of Henry R. and 
Maud (Dickinson) Kent; grandson of Edward and Artimesia (Streator) 
Kent; great-grandson of Zenas and Panulia (Lewis) Kent; great— grandson 
of Zenas Kant, private, • Fourth Regt., Conn. Line, Cont'l Army. 

IMCIIAkl) LEWIS CAMPBELL* KKYSKK, Pensacola, Fla. (29914). Son of 
William Swift and Mary (Campbell) Keyser; grandson of William Judah 
Harriet (Swift) Keyset; great-grandson of Zephaniah and Nelly (Everett) 
Swift; great—grandson of Josiah and Nelly (Pease) Everett; great—grandson 
.if Samuel 1'ease, private, Conn. Militia and Cont'l Line. 

BURWELE NEWTON KILBOURN, Murray, Utah (32628)'. Son of Jonathan 
Burwell and Mary A. (Douglas) Kilbourn; grandson of William and Catherine 
(Riley) Douglas; grent-grandson of William and Sarah (Kinland) pouglas; 
greai-grandson of William Douglas, Colonel, Fifth Battalion", Wadsworth 
Brigade, Conn. Militia. 

FRANCIS JOSEPH KILL1EN, I.owell, Wash. (32472). Son of William A. and 
Georgia (Pease) Killien; grandson of George W. and Sarah E. (Morrill) 
Pease; great-grands., n of Ruruham and Hannah (French) Morrill; great- 
grandson of Ruben ami Sarah (Carr) Mori ill; great :, -grandson of Abraham 
Merrill, Sergeant, Col. Caleb Cushing's Mass. Regt., at Lexington Alarm. 

CHARLES HENRY KIMBALL, Chicago, 111. (3^239). Son of William C. and 
Katherine (Kit/.) Kimball; grandson of Charles Dean and Caroline (Howes) 
Kimball; great-grandson of Nemehiah Dean ami Mary (Moore) Kimball; great- 
grandson of Peter Sanborn an<l Abigail (Dean) Kimball; great-grandson of 
Joseph Kimball, Corporal, Cot Jacob Cabs - New Hampshire Volunteers. 

ERASTUS STEVENS KIMBALL, New Haven, Conn. CM459). Son of Alfred 
A. and Hannah (Slevens) Kimball; grandson of |ohn and Lucinda (Fowler) 



[{JCQISTKK OF NEW M KM I'.I'.US. 



-77 



Kimball; great-grandson of John and Susan (Eastman) Kimball; great 8 - 
gramlson of Abraham Kimball, private, Col. Thomas Strckney's Regt., New 
I lanipsliiri- Militia, wounded at Bennington, pensioned. 

ALEXANDER MANN KING, Detroit, Mich, (32394). Sun of Prank William and 
Clorinda (Mann) King; grandson of James William ami Hannah Spit 1 
(Kusd King; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Brook) Ruse; great- 
grandson of Peleg Hose, private, Captain Spicer's Company, Colonel Parson's 
Sixth Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

CHARLES DALY KING, East Orange, N. J. (N. V. 33234). Son of Robert 

Courtney and Ella (Daly) King; grandson of Silas Ilolbrook and Frances 
Anna (Dcming) King; great-grandson of Frederick Granger and Anne 
(Batsford) Deming; great 2 -grandson of Andrew Dealing, Matross, Capt. Henry 
Burbeck's Company, Col. John Crane's Regt., Mass. Cont'l Troops; great"- 
grandson of John Deming. private, Capt. Moses Soules' Company, Mass. 
Militia; grandson of Charles and Charity (Dealing) Daly; great-grandson of 
James and Emily (Bloomer) Daly; greap'-grandson of Thomas ^i\d Maria 
(Goffett) Bloomer; greaF'-grandson of William Bloomer, private, New York 
Militia and Cont'l Dine; great-grandson of William and Mary ( BOU rdette) 
Dealing; gr'eat 2 -grandson of Benjamin and Rachel (Bourdette) Bou rdette; 
greaD-grandson of Peter Bourdette, donated land fur Port Dee and a bouse 
for headquarters for Commander-in-chief; great-grandson of Karl Storrs and 
Adeline (Ilolbrook) King; great-grandson of Silas and Betsy (Bridges) 
Ilolbrook; great-grandson of Hulkdiah Bridges, Jr., Corporal, Mass. Dight 
Infantry; great-'-grandson of Thomas and Sarah (I, ay) Batsford; great 8 - 
grandson oiReubcn Lux, private, Seventh Regt., Albany County, New York 
Militia. 

HAROLD WIDDTAM KIND., St. Louis, Mo. (Pa. 33217). Son of David William 
and Jesse Woodward (Raker) King; grandson of James Stuart and Margaret 
Coolidge (Branson) King; great-grandson of David and Sarah Ames (Dennis- 
ton) King; great 2 -grandsbn of Samuel ami Rebecca (Campbell) Denniston; 
great a -grandson of Charles Campbell, County lieutenant, Westmoreland County, 
Pa. Militia. 

JAI'.h'.Z WOOD KIND, Toledo, Ohio (33448). Son of John and Mary (Peveicaux) 
King; grandson of Samuel and Hannah (Wight) King; great-grandson of John 
Wight, 3'''/, Sergeant-Major, Mass. Militia. 

WARREN CLOUDMAN KING, Portland, Maine (32433). Son of Marquis Payette 
and Prances Olivia ( I'laisted) King; grandson of Samuel Hall and Eliza 
(Shaw) King; great grandson of Gilbert and Silence (Cole) Shaw; great- 
grandson of Elcascr Cole, Sergeant, Mass. Militia, pensioned; grandson of 
Samuel Pomeroy and Sabrina (Perkins) I'laisted; great-grandson of Benjamin 
Garland and Prances (Gushing) Perkins; great- grandson of Ezekiel Gushing--, 
private, Mass. Militia; greaD-grandson of Loring Cashing, private, Mass. 
Militia, died in service; great-grandson of Samuel and Susan (flight) I'laisted; 
great 2 -grandson of .Ionics High!, private, Captain Salter's Company, New 
Hampshire Artillery; great 2 -grahd.son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Dart) I'laisted; 
great' 1 grands. mi of Samuel Hart, private, New Hampshire Artillery; grandson 
of Samuel Poincroy and Sabrina (Perkins) I'laisted; great-grandson of 
Benjamin Garland and Frances (dishing) Perkins; great-grandson of Richard 
Perkins, private, Mass. Militia, pensioned; greaF'-grandson of Gilbert Perkins, 
private, Captain Brewster's Company, Colonel Dong's Cont'l P.attalion; great 8 - 
grandson of Kzekiel and Frances (McCobb) dishing; givaC-grandson of James 
McCobb, ehauman Mass. Commit lee of Safety and ( \m respoixlence ; great- 
grandson of Abncr Shaw, Corporal, Mass. Militia, [*ri <i 0.1 ship "Jeniey." 

CLARENCE JOSEPH KJNNE, luiii.ilo, N. Y. (33011' Sou of Cyrus I and 

Fanny (Williams) Kinne; grandson -if Horace auA Amanda (llayward) 
Williams; K ,,. it grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Cram ) Williams. Jr.; great 8 - 



2 7 8 



SONS OK THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



grandson of Joseph Williams, Sergeant, Mass. Militia, Lieutenant, Mass. Cont'l 
Troops. 

CHARLES HENRY KINNEY, Waterbury, Conn. (32852). Son of Charles 
Dwight and Manila Jane (Wilder) Kinney; grandson of Isaac and Anna 
(Church) Keeiiey; great-grandson of William ami Melatiah (Steele) Keeney ; 
great-grandson of Bradford Steele, Captain, Conn. Minute Men. 

ROY IIOIJ, IS KI.W'KY, Lorain, Ohio (32325). Son of Leslie Joseph and Viola 
(Hale) Kinney; grandson of Sylvester and l,onisa (Morse) Hale; great- 
grandson of Amos and Anna (Fisher) Morse (Moss); great-grandson of 
Jonathan Muss, private, Captain Williams' Company, Colonel Johnson's Regt., 
Conn. Troops. 

WIIJJAM BURNET KINNEY, Red Bank, X. J. (3291-9). Son of Thomas 

Talmadge and Kslelie (Condit) Kinney; grandson of William Burnet and 
Mary (Chandler) Kinney; great-grandson of Abraham Kinney, Lieutenant, 
Second Regt., New Jersey Cont'l Dragoons; great--grandson of Thomas Kinney, 
Ensign, Third Regt., New Jersey Cont'l Troops. 

EDMUND K1RRY-SMIT11, Jr., Mexico City (111. 32805). Son of Edmund and 
Carrie (Selden) Kirhy-Smith ; grandson of Joseph Lee and Frances (Kirby) 
Smith; great-grandson of Elnathan Smith, Conn. Commissary; great-grandson 
of Ephrttim Kirby, Ensign, Olney's Rhode Island Battalion. 

KPIIRAIM KlRI'.Y-SMlTIf, Sewanee, Ten-n. (111. 33081). Son of Edmund Kirby 
and Cassie (Selden) Smith; grandson of Joseph l,ee and Francis (Kirby) 
Smith; great-grandson of lilnalhar, Smith, Commissary, Conn. Cont'l Troops; 
great-grands,,,, of Ephraim Kirby, Ensign, Olney's Rhode Island Battalion; 
grandson of Samuel Mai shall and Caroline (Hare) Selden; great-grandson of 
John Wallace and Anne (Hooker) Selden; gicat--gra nihon of Samuel Booker. 
Brevet Major, Virginia Troops, prisoner; great-grandson of Elnathan and 
Chloe (Lee) Smith; great-grandson of Isaac Lee, Colonel, Sixth Regt., Conn. 
Militia. Representative to General Assembly. 

JOSEPH LEE KIKI1Y-SM1TII, Jacksonville, l'la. (III. 33080). Son of Edmund 
Kirby and Cassie (Selden) Smith; grandson of Joseph I,ce and Francis 
(Kirby) Smith; great-grandson of Elnathan Smith, Commissary, Conn. Cont'l 
Troops; great grandson of Ephraim Kirby, Ensign, Olney's Rhode I -.land 
Battalion; grandson of Samuel Marshall and Caroline (Hare) Selden; great- 
grandson of John Wallace and Anne (Hooker) Selden; great-grandson of 
Samuel Booker, Brevet Major. Virginia Troops, prisoner; great-grandson of 
Elnathan and Chloe il.ee) Smith; great-grandson of Isaac Lee, Colonel, Sixth 
Regt., Conn. Militia. . 

RAY WH.1JAM KISSANE, Roanoke, Va. (Ohio 32828). Son of Richard I*. and 
Meta (Remy) Kissane; grandson of Persifer T. and Agnes ((*..) Kissane; 
great-grandson of Richard b'ish and Nancy (Shipley) Kissane; great--grandson 
of Adam Shirley, private, Maryland Militia, Captain Maryland Company of 
Horse, pensioned. 

GEORGE KINZER KLINE, Johnstown, Pa. (33686). Son of Wellington 1!. and 
Anna Margareta (Custer) Kline; grandson of Aaron and Elizabeth E. (Kinzer) 
Custer; groat-grandson of George and Anna M. (Ellmaker) Kinzer; greal- 
grandson uf Nathaniel Ellmaker, private. Tenth Battalion, Lancaster County, 
Pa. Militia; gr.eat--grandson of Michael Kinzer, private, Tenth Battalion. 
Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

JAMES MORLEY KLINE, Johnstown, Pa. (33687). Son of George Kinzer and 

Sarah (Morley) Kline; grandson of Wellington Ik and Anna Maigareta 
(Custer) Kline; great -grand- of Aaron and I'.li/ahclh E. (Km/er) Custer; 

great-grandson of George ami Anna M. (Ellmaker) Kinzer; K ieat 3 -graiuUon 
ol Nathaniel Ellmaker, private, Tenth Battalion, Lancaster County. Pa. Militia; v 



d Michael Kinzer, private, lentil Battalion, Lancaster County 



I'm. M: 



JJGISVKK OF NIyW M KM I! I', US. 



JIAK()I,I) BI^ANCHARD KI.INO, San Francisco, Cal. (32727). Son of William 
A. and Cora (Blanchard) Kline; grandson of Abijah Barnard and Julia Ann 
(Sweet) Blanchard; great-grandson of Sylvester and Mary (Heath) Sweet; 
great—grandson of Aaron Heath, private-, Mass. and Conn. Troops, prisoner. 

GEORGE BRUNTON KNAI'I', .Major, A. it I'., Marion, Ohio (33430). Son of 
James Andrew and Rusetla (Tavriiurr) Knapp; grandson of John R. and l.ydia 
(Eybarger) Knapp; great-grandson of William Knapp, Minute Man and private, 
Albany County, New York Mditia. 

JAMES ANDREW KNAI'I', Marion, Ohio (32835). Son of John R. and Lydia 
(Eybarger) Knapp; grandson of William Knapp, private and Minute Man, 
New Yoik Mditia. - 

LEWIS WAI,i.,AClv KNOWIJCS, New York, N. Y. (35889), Junior Member. 
Son of Horace Greeley and iCdith I'.lla (Wallace) Knowlcs; grandson of Lewis 
and Georgianna (Wells) Wallace; great-grandson of David and Elizabeth 
prances (Getty) Wallace; great-grandson of Samuel Wallace, private, Mass. 
Mditia, pensioned; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Burlingame) . Wallace; 
great-grandson of Nathan Ihtrtuigamc, private, Rhode Island Militia, pensioned. 

SAMUEL, MARVIN K0OKO0EY, Westticld, X. J. (333.59). Son <>f William 
PrescoU and Elizabeth (Marvin) Kookugey; grandson of Samuel and Susan 
(MeCraw) Kookugey; great-grandson of Andrew ami Elizabeth (Walton) 
Kookogey; fcurat-grandsnii of Samuel Koukogey (Kokogai), musician, Col. 
Tliomas Proctor's Fourth Artillery, Coiil'l Troops, pensioned. 

FRANK VVAETER KREPS, East Orange, N. J. (33450). Son of Prank A. M. 
and Sarah T. (Weaver) Kreps; grandson of Jacob Fordney and Eliza (Turney) 
Kreps; great-grandson of Jacob and Catherine (Hetterick) Kreps; great- 
grandson of Michael Kreps (Krebs), private and Corporal, Lancaster County, 
Pa. Militia; grandson of Adam and Ann (Nancy) (Tomer) Weaver; great- 
grandson of Ailam Weaver, private, Eighth Pa. Regt., Cont'l Kine. 

CEAUDE WASHINGTON KRESS, New York City, N. Y. (33611). Son of John 
franklin and Margaret Dodson (Conner) Kress; grandson of Henry and 
(Kressier) Kress; great-grandson of'Carl and Elizabeth Kress; great-grandson 
of Charles (Carl)' Kress, private, Third liatlalion, Lehigh Township, J'a. 
Militia. 

PAEMHR JOHN KRESS, Allentown, Pa. (N. Y. 33609). Son of John Franklin 
and Margaret Dodson (.Conner) Kress; grandson of Henry and — (Kressier) 
Kress; great-grandson of Carl and Elizabeth Kress; great-grandson of Charles 
(Carl) Kress (Grass)) private, Third Battalion, Pa. Militia. 

RUSH HARRISON KRESS, New York City, N. Y. (33615). Son of John 
franklin and Margaret Dodson (Conner) Kress; grandson of Henry and — 
(Kressier) Kress; great-grandson of Carl and Elizabeth Kress; great-grandson 
of Charles (Carl) Kress, private, Third Battalion, Lehigh Township, Pa. 
Militia. 

SAMUEL HENRY KRESS, New York City, N. Y. (33600). Son of John 
Franklin and Margaret Dodson (Conner) Kress; grandson of Henry and -- 
(Kressier) Kress; great grandson of Carl and Elizabeth Kress; gn at-gl andsoit 
Of Charles (Carl) Kress, private, Pa, Militia. 

C. FREMONT KCY KENDALL, Jr., Jersey City, N. J. (N. Y. 33235). Sou of 
Charles Fremont, and Carrie Almeda (Weiter) Kuykendall; grandson of Josiab 
and Sarah Adeline (Van Duzer) Kuykciidall; great-grandson of Jacob and 
Mary (Tcrwilliger ) Kuykendall ; great-grandson ' of Wilhclmus Kuykendall. 
private, Capt. Abraham West fall's Company, Colonel Paulding's Regt., New 
York Militia, pensioned. 

EDWIN KRAUSE, Springfield, Mass. (35586), Son of A A. I), and Anna 
Maria ( Knglish ) Kiause; grandson of Frederick and Harriet llogenblick; 
great-grandson of Joseph ami Magadelena Ma.ia (Miekl.y) llogcnhuck; great?- 
grandson of Henry Uogenbuck, Captain, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 



>8o 



SONS ()]' 'rill", AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



RICHMOND TERRJLL LACY, 3rd, Richmond, Va. (33558). Son of Richmond 
Terrill and Elizabeth P. T. Lacy, jnd; grandson of Richmond Tcrril) and Ellen 
Green (Lane) Lacy; great-grandson of William and Lucy (Terrill) Lacy; 

great-grandson of Richmond and Ann (Holt) Terrill; grcat :i -grandson of 
Thomas Holt, Captain, Col. Daniel Morgan's Regt., Virginia Cont'l Troops, 
seven years' service, 

PAUL ALAIN LOUIS LAFORGUE, Lieutenant, U S. Army, Paris, France 
(N. V. 3J7 u). Son of Charles Louis and Elsie Taggart (Billingsley) La- 
forgue; grandson of Allen Fisher ami Rebecca Alice (Taggart) Billingsley; 
great-grandson of James Clark and Alice (Brown) Taggart; great'-'-grandson 
of George and Alice (Hardesty) Brown; great-grandson of Will, am Brawn, 
Lieutenant, Capt. Andrew Robb's Company, Westmoreland County, Pa. 
Rangers. 

CONSTANT LAKE, Newark, N. J. (33347). Son of William Garfield and 
Martha Mary (Collins) Lake; grandson of Benjamin Benton and Lucy Lcora 
(Blackley) Lake; great-grand.M.u of Constant and Eleanor (Jones) Rake; 
greaf'-gramlson of Benjamin and Hannah (Vanemmon) Jones; greaF'-grandson 
of Samuel Jones, Captain, Virginia Cont'l Troops. 

RICHARD BOWLES I. A M B E RT, LoWell, .Mass. (3^597): Junior Member. Son 
of Wallace Corliss and Martha (Bowles) Lambert; grandson of Henry A. 
and Sarah Grace (Corliss) Lambert; great-grandson of John Had. I and Lydi.i 
Lawrence (Woodbury) Corliss; great-grandson of John and Sarah (Ford) 
Corliss greaC-grandsoii of John Ford, Captain, Mass. Militia; grandson of 
Lyman L. and Julia (Lclaml) Bowles; great-grandson of Otis and Nancy 
(Spalding) Lelandj great-grandson of Jesse and Winifred (Swift) Spalding; 
great 3 -grandson of Benjamin Spalding, Lieutenant, Captain Wood's Company, 
Col. James Converse's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

FORRES B. LAMP MAN, U. S. Army, Columbus, Ohio (12323). Son of I.uellen 
I), and Alice May (Welch) Lampmau; grandson of Nathaniel B. and Mary E. 
(Reed) l.ampman; great-grandson of Al.rohineaml Mary (Lincoln) Lampmau; 
great--grandson of Eber and Belief (Joslin) Lincoln; greal :, -grandson of James 
Juslin, Captain, Second Regt., Leominster County, Mass. Militia. 

[-'RANK LATHROP LANDERS, fovva (32777)- Supplemental. Son of Frank- 
Edward and Mary Olive (Barrows) Landers; grandson of Lathrop II. S. and 
Emily Sarah (Parker) Barrows; great-grandson of Shepard and Olive (Storrs) 
Barrows; great-grandson of Thomas Barrows, Corporal, Conn. Militia, pen- 
sioned; great— grandson of Bex. jam in Storrs, private, Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Alvin Hyde and Mary (llosford) Barker; great-gi andson of 
Joseph llosford, private in Col. Philip Van Cortland's Regt., New York Line. 

JOHN CLKMRNT LANDERS, Iowa (32776). Supplemental. Son of Frank 
Edward and Mary Olive (Barrows) Landers; grandson of Lalhrop II. S. and 
Emily Sarah (Parker) Barrows; great-grandson of Shepard and Olive (Storrs) 
Barrows; great-' grandson of Thomas Barrows, Corporal, Conn. Militia, pen- 
sioned'; great-grandson of Benjamin Storrs, private, Conn. Militia; great- 
■ grandson of Alvin Hyde and Mary (llosford) Parker; great-grandson of 
Joseph HosforJ, private in Col. Philip Van Cortland's Regt., New Vork Line. 

FREDERICK M. LASH, Stevenson, Wash. (32473)- Son of William S. and 
Katheryne D. (Farr) Lash; grandson of Milton P. and Julia F. (Thompson) 
Lash; great-grandson of William M. and Magdalene (Broadhead) Thompson; 
great-grandson of David and Pheebe (.Shaw) Broadhead; grcaF-graudson of 
Charles IF. Broadhead, private, Orange and Ulster Counties, New York Militia. 

JAMES DUDLEY LATHAM, Mouroeville, Ohio (3284.-). Son of Thomas W. 
and Mary Elizabeth (Davis) . Latham ; grandson ot Iliram and Maiy Vnn 
(Evans) Latham; gi cat-grandson of Alexander Wolcott and Anna (Wood) 
Latham; greai" grandson of Lhcne/er and Elizabeth (Smith) Latham; great*- 
grandson of Joseph Latham, private, Captain Moll's New London County, 
Conn., Militia. 



REGISTER Ob NEW MEMBERS. 



28l 



JOHN ADAM I.AUTZ, Buffalo, N. Y. (33350). Son of Carl A. ami Charlotte 
(Cobb) Lautz; grandson of Oscar and Charlotte Callender (Wilcox) Cobb; 
great-grandson of John and Sarah (Kol)bins) Cobb; great 8 -grandsori of John 
Cobb, Corporal, Second Regt., Conn. Cont'l Troops. 

OSCAR Colli! L.U'TV, Buffalo, N. Y. (33353). Son of Carl A. and Charlotte 
(Cobb) Uutz; grandson of Oscar and Charlotte Callender (Wilcox) Cobb; 
great-grandson of John ami Sarah (Bobbins) Cobb; great-grandson of John 
Cobb, Corporal, Second Regt., Conn. Cont'l Troops. 

STANTON TOWNLLY LAURENCE, Rutherford, N. J. <.)37-'o). Son of David 
William and .Mary Delila (Fake) Laurence; grandson of Henry Lansing and 
Margaret (Elwood) Fake; great-grandson of Jacob and - (Baum) bake; 
great-grandson of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Frei&tj bake; grcat a -gra.ndson of 
George Fake, private, Fourteenth Regt., Albany County, New York Militia. 

FIvNN ALYORD LLAMINO, Mansfield, La. (32761). Son of Rush C.reen and 
Martha (Rogers) beaming; grands. hi tif Daniel Mcintosh and Mary (Tucker) 
Learning; great-grandson of Jutlah Learning (Learning), private in Major 
Welch's Company, Colonel Woostcr's Conn. Regt. 

PIERRE NAPOLEON LkI'.RUN, lb S. Navy, Montclair, X. J. (32922), Son 
of Michel Moracin and Maria Olivia (Steele) Le limn; grandson of Oliver 
Richards and Elizabeth (Selden) Steele; great-grandson of Joseph and Mary 
Ann (Kinland) SOden; great-grandson of Samuel Selden, Jr., Lieutenant, 
Conn. Militia; greaCg. andson of Samuel Selden, Colonel, Fourth Battalion, 
Wadsworth Brigade, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Ebenezer Hart and 
Marilla (Richards) Steele; great-grandson of Allyn and Mrs. Lucy (Jerome) 
Hart Steele; great ;i -grandson of Josiah Steele, private, Capt. William Judd's 
Comp.iny, Colonel Wylly's Regt., Third Regt., Conn. Line, pensioned; great 4 - 
grandson of Ebenezer Steele, privale, Capt. Abraham Sedgwick's Company, 
Conn. Militia. 

HOWARD lb LEE, Crosse Point, Mich. (33630). Son of James Louis and Mary 
(Lawson) Lee; grandson of James Barker and Samantha Bassett (Chad wick) 
Lee; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Smith) Lee; great-grandson of 
Thomas Lee, Captain, Col. Lewis Du Bois' Regt., New York Militia. 

THOMAS BAILEY LEE, Hurley, Idaho (31810). Sorr of William Drayton and 
Sarah (Bailey) Lee; grandson of Braxton Bryan and Jane McEwen (John- 
stone)' llailey; great-grandson of Lemuel Dickey ami Anne (Hal!) Johnstone; 
great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Dickey) Johnstone; great n -grandson 
of John Dickey, Captain, North Carolina Militia. 

CLAUD FREDERICK LESTER, Wash. (28935). Supplemental. Son of bred 
Volney and Eva M. (Conklin) Lester; grandson of Jonathan Delavan ami 
Nancy (Harris) Conklin; great-grandson of Howard and Melimla (liur.lbut) 
Harris; great-grandson of Viiw and Sally (Stan) llnrlbuf greal 3 -grandson 
of Rufns and Hannah (Lester) Ilurlbut; great 4 -grandson of Peter Lester, Sr., 
Minute Man, Conn. Militia; great- grandson of Joseph and Polly Harris; 
greats-grandson of Nathan II trris, private, Colonel Douglass' 21st Regt., Conn. 
Militia; grandson of Volney and Mary (Smith) Lester; great-grandson of 
Daniel and Mary (Mead) Lester, Jr.; gfeal-grandson of Daniel and Sarah 
Allyn) Lester; great' 1 grandson of John Allyn, private, General Spencer's 
brigade, Conn. Troops. 

SIDNEY b". LEWIS, New Orleans, l,a. (33215). Son of John Hampden and 
Anna Lodoiska (Von Ettendahl) r,cwis; grandson of Joshua and America 
t Lawson) Lewis; great -grandson of Robert Lawson,. Brigadier-General, Vir- 
ginia Militia. 

STANLEY HUNTLEY LEWIS, Indianapolis, [ml. (32037). Son of Stillman E. 
and Julia (Huntley) Lewis; grandson of Caleb and Joanna (Wade) Lewis; 
great-grandson of Jacob and Sarah (Jones) Wade-; great-grandson of Daniel 
Wade, private, I'/scx County, New Jersey Militia. 



282 



SONS Ol' Till', AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



DONALD CURTIS LEACH, Portland, Maine (32432). Supplemental. Son of 
Convers I\. and Gertrude E. (Lang) Leach; grandson of Caleb X. and Ellen 
A. Cumm.in.gs) Lang; great-grandson of Nathaniel G, and Dorcas A. (Colley) 
Cummings; great— grandson of William Colley, private, Mass. Line, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Joseph B. and Betsey (Libbey) Hang; great—grandson of 
William and Annie (Xorris) l.ang; great u -grandsc>n of Lowell Lang, frfer, 
Captain Rowe's Company, New Hampshire Troops. 

HERBERT I,. LEE, Captain, U. S. Army, X. Y. (332^-6). Son of James Wil- 
liams and Jvmma Herbert (Kronan) Lee; grandson of Henry and Mary 
(M-oran) Kronan; great-grandson of James Hawkins and Sophia (Herbert) 
Moran; great-grandson of James and Mary (—) Moran; grcaH-grandson of 
Gabriel Moran, private, Twelfth Battalion, Charles dainty, Maryland Militia. 

LYNDEN HENRY LESCII, Chicago, 111. (.32812), Son of Henry and Mary 
Isabel!,' (Xiles) Lesch ; grandson of William Austin and Ann (Doner) Niles; 
great-grandson of Henry and Susan (Austin) Xiles; great-grandson .if Elisha 
Miles, private and lifer, Mass. Militia, six years' service, 

CLAUD FREDERICK LUSTER, Wash. (28935). Supplemental. Son of Fred 

Yolney and Eva M. (Conklin) I. ester; grandson of Jonathan DelevSh and 
Nancy (Harris) Conklin; great-grandson of Howard and Mclinda (Ilurl'liut) 
Harris; great-grandson of Amos and Sally (Starr) llurlhnt; great a -grandson 
of Tfromas Stair, private, Capt, Joseph Gallup's Company, Lieut-Col. Oliver 
Smith's Rcgt., Conn. Militia; grandson of Yolney and Mary (Smith) Lester; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Mary (Mead) Hester, Jr.; great-grandson of 
Israel Mead, private, Conn. Militia, pensioned; great 3 -grandson of Stephen 
Mcaci, private, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Israel and Mary Hern's 
Mead; greaf'-grandson of James Ferris, Sergeant, Conn. Militia. 

ARTHUR LEONARD LEWIS, Buffalo, N. V. (32625). Son of Jacob K. and 
Mary (Winnie) Lewis; grandson of William C. and Patience (Smith) Winnie; 
great-grandson of Arthur and Helen (Simpson) Smith; great-grandson of 
William Smith, private, Ulster County, New York Militia; pensioned. 

FREDERICK BOKEE Hh'AVlS, New Rochelle, N. V. (32896). Son of James 
Sides and Elizabeth Dwight (Bill) Lewis; grandson of llarace and Abnira 
(Clark) Lewis; great-grandson of Horatio Hates and Betsey (Bailey) Lewis; 
great-grandson of Nathaniel Lewis, Ensign, Conn. Militia; grandson of Elijah 
Abel and Angelina Margaret (Hazard) Rill; great-grandson of Philip and 
Hannah (Abel) Hill; gi eat- grandson of Benjamin Bill, Jr.. private, Conn. 
Militia, pensioned. 

ROBERT PARKER LEWIS, New York, X. Y. (32895). Son of lames S'iles 
and Elizabeth Dwight (Bill) Lewis.; grandson of Horace- and Abnira (Clark) 
Lewis; great-grandson of Horatio Hates and Betsey (Bailey). Lewis; great- 
grandson of Nathaniel Lewis. Ensign, Conn. Militia; grandson of Elijah Abel 
and Angelina Margaret (Hazard) Bill; great-grandson of Philip and Hannah 
(Abel) Bill; great-grandson of Benjamin Bill, Jr., private, Windham County, 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

WALTER STANFORD LEWIS, New Orleans, Ha. (33201)-. Son of Ernest S. 
and Susan Daggett Phelps (McCoy) Lewis; grandson of Algernon Sidney 
ami Annette (Tronchct) Lewis; great-grandson of Joshua and America (Law- 
son) Lewis-; gi eat'-'-gramHon of Robert Lawson, l'.rigadier General, Virginia 
Militia: grandson of Amos I), and Susan (Daggett) McCoy; great-grandson 
of Jcthro ami Hannah (Cottle) Daggett; great-grandson of Brother ton Daggett, 
Major, Col. Bcriah Norton's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

EVERETT ELLSWORTH LIBBEY, Lynn, Mass. (.US-'.sH Son of Jeremiah 
Heavitt and Elizabeth ( llepstcnslall ) Libbey; grandson of Joshua and Sarah 
(Gratit) Libbey; great-grandson of Charles Libbey, Sergeant, Mass. Militia; 
great-grandson of Charles and Sarah (Pray) Libbey; great-grandson of John 
Fray, Captain, Twelfth and First Regts., Mass. Cont-'l Troops. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



*i 



FRANCIS HENRY LIEBEN, Seattle, Wash. (32467). Sou of Coma. I Cornelius 
and Sarah Margate! (De Huff) Ziehen.; grandson of Abraham and Maria 
Reeves (Lynch) Do Mull; great-grandson of Abraham and Elizabeth (Sitler) 
Dellutf; great-grandson of Abraham Dc Huff, Captain, Musketry Battalion, 
Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

LEWIS HENRY LlGHTllIPE, X. J. ( -). Supplemental. Son of Lewis Condit 

and Henrietta (Ingraham) I ,ight hipe ; grandson of Charles and Maria Smith 
(Condit) Lighthipe; great-grandson of Moses and Hannah (Smith) Condit; 
great 2 -grandson of James and Eleanor. (Harrison) Smith; great 3 -grandson of 
.■Imos Harrison, Minnie Man, Essex County, New Jersey, 

DREW UNAKI), Washington, D. C. (33150). Son of Andrew J. and Sarah 
Anderson ( kuckman) Linard; grandson of John and .Mary (Anderson) lluck- 
man; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Thomas; Anderson; greal'-'-grandson 
of Isaac Anderson, Lieutenant, Sixth Company, Kifth Battalion, Chester 
County, Pa, Militia; Member Chester County Committee of Safety; great 3 - 
grandson of Patrick Anderson, Senior Captain, Col. Samuel Atlee's Battalion 
of Musketry. 

ALFRED REYNOLDS LINCOLN, Springfield, Mass. (33925). Son of Charles 
A. and Martha J. (Avery) l.ineoln; grandson of Charles A. and Llvina 
(Reynolds) Lincoln; great-grandson of George and Louisa (Lord) Lincoln; 
great-'-gi-andson of Francis and Charlotte Lincoln; grcat 3 -grandson of Job 
Lincoln , private, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN SCHUYLER LLXKX, East Orange, X. J. (.53401). Son of William C. 
and Hortense (Schuyler) Linen; grandson of John Gridley and Hannah M. 
(Smith) Schuyler; great -grandson of John and Clara (Gridley) Schuyler; 
great-grandson of Johii Van Gelder and Mary (Pinckney) Gridley; great 3 - 
grandson of Judah Gridley, private, Conn. Militia and Light Dragoons. 

CHARLES ALFRED LJNDSLEY, Orange, N. J. (3.5726). Son of George and 

Henrietta Matilda (Mtinn) Lindsley; grandson of John Mori is and Charlotte 
(Taylor) Lindsley; great-grandson of Daniel Taylor, private, I'.ssex County, 
Xew Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

HENRY L. LITCIIFOkD, Richmond, Va. (31670).. Sou of James John and 
Auncellus Bogus (Westrey) LHchford; grandson of James and Mary Archer 
(Cill) LHchford; great-grandson of Arthur Litchford, private, Virginia Cout'l 
Army, pensioned. 

ROBERT CALHOON L1TTELL, ken Avon, Pa. (32162). Son of John Smith 
and Mary Calhoon Ljttell; grandson of William and Cynthia (Smith) Lutell; 
great-grandson of William Littcil, private, Colonel Proctor and Colonel Stro- 
buck's Pa. Troops, prisoner, pensioned. 

ROBERT PARKER LITTLE, Columbus, Ohio (33430. Son of William Parker 
and Jenny Piatt (Hales) Little; grandson of Robert Parker ami Cynthia Dow 
(Scarritt) Little; great-grandson of P. W. ami Mary (Parker) Little; great- 
grandson of Robert Parker, Captain-Lieutenant, Fourth kegt., Pa. Artillery. 

IVORY L1TTLEFJELD, Providence, R. I. (3-19-'). Son of C.eorge Aimer ami 
Lmnia Warren (Bancroft) Litllefield ; grandson of Janus Warren and Martha 
Ann (Milliken) Bancroft; great-grandson of Warren and Hannah Saunders 
(KelleyJ Bancroft; great-grandson of Thomas and Lydia Nichols (Brown) 
Bancroft; great 3 -grandson of Joseph Bancroft, Lieutenant, Middlesex County, 
Mass. Militia. 

JAMES BANCROFT LITTLEFIELD, Providence, R. L (3-'493)- Son of George 
Aimer and Emma Warren (Bancroft) Littktield; grandson of James Warren 
and Martha Ann (Milliken) Bancroft; great-grandson of Warren and Harriet 
Saunders (Kelley) Bancroft; great-grandson of Thomas ant! Lydia Nichols 
(Brown) Bancroft; great-grandson of Joseph Bancroft, Lieutenant, Middlesex 
County, Mass. Militia. 



284 



SONS OF TliK AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



JOHN IIOYT LOCKWOOD, Springfield, Mass. (33070). Son of Charles Nichols 
and Mary Elizabeth (Fry) Lockwood; grandson of Harford Nichols and 
Rachel (Wildeman) Lockwood; great-grandson of Isaac Lockwood, J>., 
private, Captain Lockwood's Company, Conn. Sea-coast Guards. 

OLIVER EMBY LOGAN, Sheldon, Iowa (3-7$<>). Son of Scott and Bexilah 
(13mhy) Logan; grandson of Thomas S. and Mary (Fort) Logan; great- 
grandson of Anthony and Ann (Shinn) Logan; grea't 2 -grandson of James 
Logan, private, Col. Elias Dayton's Third Regt., First Establishment, New- 
Jersey Cont'l Line, pensioned. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM LONG, Keokuk, Iowa (32796). Son of Henry W. and 
Mary L. (Briggs) Long; grandson of Adam and Abigail (Betts) Long; great- 
grandson of John and Tryphena (Remsdell) Betts; great a -grandson of Richard 
Beits, private, First Regt., Suffolk County, New York, Minnie Men. 

GJSORGJC VAN NF,SS LOTHRGP, Jr., Detroit, Mich. (3375.'). Son of Charles 

I!. and Isabella G. Ik (Stewart) Lothrop; grandson of Morse and Isabella 
Graham (Duffield) Stewart; great-grandson of George and Isabella Graham 
(Beth une) Duffield; great-grandson of George and Rebecea (Slaymaker) 
Duffield; great 3 -grandson of George Ditflield, chaplain, Pa. Troops and First 
Cork'] Congress. 

HERBERT MATTOON LOURIE, Springfield, 111. (,1.5375). Son of Alexander 
and Mary Sophia (Bigelow) Lourie; grandson of George and Mary Whiteside 
(Irvine) Lourie; great-grandson of James Irvine, private, Sixteenth Regt , 
Albany County, New York Militia. 

ANDREW ALLXAXDLR LOVE;, Jr.., Fargo, X. D. (-'0573). Son of Andrew 
Alexander and Nellie (Campbell) Love; grandson of Thomas Jefferson and 
Ellen Frances (Leighton) Campbell; great-grandson of lames Archil, aid and 
Thir/.a (Fickett) Campbell; great-grandson of James and SusannaT) (Coffin) 
Campbell; great- -gi and-on of Alexander Campbell, Lieutenant-Colonel, Sixth 
Rl-gt., Lincoln County, Mass. Militia; grrat-grandson of Henry Dyer and 
Isovice (W'ass) Leighton; great-grandson of Jonathan and Annah (Dyer) 
Leighton; great-grandson of Henry Dyer, Captain, Alass. Company of Ranger-,, 
S a-eoast Defense. 

FREDERICK L10RR LOVEJOY, Captain, A. E. p., Muntclair, N. J. (.1.5117). 
Son of Frederick Hates and Katharine (Ilorr) Lovejoy; grandson of William 
Hates and Margaret Scott (Weston) Lovejoy; great-grandson of William 
Russell and Mary Ann (Perkins) Lovejoy; great-grandson of Ebenezer ami 
Phoebe (Russell) Lovejoy; great :, -grandsan of Jeremiah Lovejoy, private, Capt. 
Joshua Holt's Regt., Mass. Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

EDMUND KLINE LOW'ER, Spokane, Wash. (32466). Son of George W. and 
Elizabeth Ann (Barnes) Lower; grandson of William ami Mary (Bergey) 
Barnes; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Oberholtzer) Rergey; great- 
grandson of Christian Bogey, private, Third and Fifth Battalions, Philadelphia 
County, Pa. Militia. 

CLAUDE PERCY LUCKETT; St. Louis, Mo. (3256.'). Son of Robert Francis 
and Louisiana (McElhiney) Luckett; grandson of Henry Fenton and Maria 
(Peyton) Luckett; great-grandson of William and Nancy (Combs) Luckett; 
great--grandson of Thomas Hitsscy Luckett, Lieutenant, Stephenson's Mary- 
land Rifle Regt., prisoner: 

JULIAN BELL LUCKETT, St. Louis, Mo. (32560). Son of Robert Francis 
and Louisiana (McElhiney) Luckett; grandson of Henry Fenton ami Maria 
(Peyton) Luckett; great-grandson of William and Nancy (Combs) Luckett; 
great-'-grandson of Thomas HtiSSCy Luckett, Lieutenant, Stephenson's Mary- 
land Rifle Regt., prisoner. 

ARTHUR KIMBALL H'LTKL, Salem, Ore. (3313.O. Son of Richard A. ami 
Martha Jane (Kimball) Ltietke; grandson of Curtis Donald and Mary Eliza 



REGISTER OF .\K\V MEMBERS. 



285 



(Harris) Kimball; great-grandson of Square and Patty (Goodcll) Harris; 
greats-grandson of Asa and Patty (Eiscomb) Goodell; great 3 -grandson of 
Alexander and Polly (liakcr) Uscombj great 'grandson of Enoch linker, 
.Minute Man and private, Mass. Militia. 
FREDERICK HARVEY LUM, Jr., Chatham, N. J. (32687). Son of Frederick 
II. and Alice (Harris) r,uni; grandson of Harvey M. and Phccbe Jane Smith 
(Bruen) Eum; great-grandson of Samuel D. and llamutel (Gening) Uinr; 
great-grandson of Israel hum,, private, New Jersey Cont'l Troops; great- 
grandson ,,f Ashbel and Mary (Chandler) l'.rnen; great-grandson of Jonathan 
Chandler, private, New Jersey Cont'l Troops, prisoner. 

JAMES ARTHUR EUPFER, Buffalo, N. Y. (32618). Son of Arthur 11. and 
Lillian A. (UttleJ Lupfer; grandson of Israel and Mary Jane (Fleming) 
Hinder; great-grandson of Jacob and Eleanor (Marshall) Lupfer; great- 
grandson of Casper Lupfer, private, Fifth Battalion, Cumberland County, 
Pa. Militia. 

CHAREES EDWARD LUSCOMB, Hartford, Conn. (33471). Son of Henry 
Herbert and Georgia (Murch) Euscomb; grandson of Charles P. and Mary 
A. (Perkins) Euscomb; great-grandson of Henry and Sarah A. (Eastman) 
Luscomb; great-grandson of Abie! and Sally (Thompson) Eastman; greaC- 
grandson of Moses Eastman', Sergeant and Second Lieutenant, New Hampshire 
Militia, signer of the Association Test. 

G. FRANK HYDSTON, Chicago, 111. (33383). Son of George Nelson and Lucy 
A. (McCounj Eydstoh; grandson f Robie and Marjorie (Allen) Eydston; 
great-grandson of William Lydston, Corporal, York County, Mass. .Militia. 

WIEEIAM CEARK EYMAN, Batavia, N. Y. (1). C. 32149). Son of Verner C. 

and Lilian J. (Stevens) Lyman; grandson of William II. and Maria J. (Van 
Kleeck) Lyman; great-grandson of Henry James and Maria (Uphani) Hyinan; 
great-grandson of Henry and Lucy (Field) I.yman; greaf' 1 - grandson of James 
Lyman, Lieutenant, Hampshire County, Mass. Militia. 

KIM) ICUGENE LYON, Portland, Ore, (.51100). Son of Judah and Launnda 
(Ketehum.) Eyon; grandson of Xehemiah May and Sally (Durrell) .Eyon; 
great-grandson of Nehemiah and Elizabeth (Bugbee) Lyon; great'-'-grandson 
of Benjamin Lyon, Captain, Seventeenth Company, Eleventh RegL, Conn. 
Militia. 

HOWARD SXYDAM LYON, Berth Amboy, N. J. (33424). Son of Adrian and 
Cornelia (Post) Lyon; grandson of William and Ursula (Seining) Lyon; 
great-grandson of Stephen and Nancy (Hill) Lyon; great-grandson of Thomas 
11,11, Captain, Sussex County, New Jersey Mdilia, widow pensioned. 

EDWIN HOWARD MeCALEB, Jr., New Orleans, La. (327O4). Son of Edwin 
Howard and i'Jodie Louise (Barriere) McCaleb; grandson of Kdwin Howard 
and Marie I. (Collens) McCaleb; gi .at grandson of Edwin Howard and 
Frances Lueilia (Pulliamj MeCaieh;. great--gntndson of David and Matilda 
d'ariar) McCaleb; great 1 ' grandson of William M.Caleb, CaplaiUi Soutli 
Carolina Militia, and Member Constitutional Convention; greaP-grandson of 
Thomas J'anar, Lieutenant -Colonel, South Carolina Troops. 

HARVEY MacCAULKY, Bloomfieid; N. J. (3_'69_>). Son of Hugh Bournonville 
and Sarah f.avinia (Harvey) MacCauley; grandson of Francis Raker and 
Rachel (Baker) Harvey; great-grandson of Levi an. I Ann (McNeil) Baker; 
greal--grandson of William Me. Veil, private, Chester County, Pa. .Militia. 

GEORGE PATTERSON McCENEY, Laurel, Md. (33107). Son of Edgar Pat- 
terson and Eliza Coombs (Bowie) McCency; grandson of Charles and Sarah 
Maria (Sutcr.) Bowie; great-grandson of William and Ursula (Burgess) Howie; 

greal--grandson of William Howie, Lieutenant, Middle Battalion, Prince George 
County, Maryland Militia. 



CLAYTON ASA McCLEARY, Columbus, Ohio f.t.o-'s). 
an.ler and Henrietta (Holmes) MeCl.-ary; gran.lsoi 



if Clay 



Ale 



of \ 



d \l. 



•86 



SONS <)!' Till? AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



(McC.y) [lolhics; great-grandson of Joseph and Sarah (McNabb) Holmes; 
great-grandson of Obadiali ami Mary (Chinn) Holmes; great R grandson of 
Joseph Holmes, Member Provincial Congress and Committee of Safety; grand- 
son of Ephraim an. I Mary Ai/uhali (Gillespie) McCleary; great- grandson of 
Menses and Chloe (Phelps) Gillespie; great-grandson of Edzvard Phelps, 
private, Eighth Company, First Regt., Conn. Militia. 

FRANK McCLINTOCK, Grand Junction, Colo. (31443). Son of William and 
Athaliah May (Lacy) McClintock; grandson of Jasper and Athalia' May 
(Henry) Lacy; great-grandson of Simon and Rho'da (Parsons) itenry; great 2 - 
grandson of John Parsons, Jr., Sergeant, Captain Mezekiah Parson's Com- 
pany, Colonel Stager's Regt., Conn. Militia. 

HAROLD MeCOI,LUM LAKE, Newark, N. J. (33346). Son of William Garfield 
and Martha Mary (Collins) Lake; grandson of Benjamin Kenton and Lucy 
Leora (Blacklcy) Lake; great-grandson of Constant and Eleanor (Jones) Lake; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Hannah (Vanemmon) Jones; great s -grandson 
of Samuel Jones. Captain, Virginia Cont'l Troops. 

WILLIAM MYERS McCONAHAY, Salt Lake City, Utah (32634). Son of A. P. 
and Laura A. (Myers) McConahay; grandson of John Adam and Isabel 
(Rogers) Myers; great-grandson of Edward and Margaret (White) Rogers; 
great-grandson of Thomas Rogers, private, Col. Samuel Miles' Pa. Rifle Regt., 
prisoner. 

HARRY JACKSON McCORMICK, Webster Groves, Mo. (33^7)- Sun of Samuel 
Thomas and Angie (Jones) McCormick; grandson of James Glenn and 
Nancy (Sappingto'n) McCormick; great-grandson of John Sappington, private, 
Thirteenth Regt., Virginia Militia. 

WALTER DLVLR1; McCORMICK, Sharon, Pa. (3->Oo6). Son of Oscar 1). and 
Marietta (Thompson) McCormick; grandson of Adam Hill and Margaret 
(Russell) McCormick; great-grandson of Alexander and" Kuphemia (Hill) 
McCormick; great-grandson of Adam Hill, private, First - Regt.', Pa. Line, 
wounded. 

CHARLES W. McCRKARY, Columbus, Ohio (33435). Son of Davis M. and 
Sarah J. (Saunders) MeCreary; grandson of George and Elizabeth (George) 
McCreary; great grandson of Benjamin and Deborah (Mathews) MeCreary; 
greats-grandson of Geofge MeCreary-, Sergeant, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 

PHILIP SIDNEY McDOUOALL, Buffalo, N, Y. (3-619). Son of Sidney and 
Anna C. (Morris) McDougall; grandson of Abram and Rebecca M. (Vedder) 
Morris; great-grandson of Isaac and Jane (Vrooman) Morris; great 2 -grandson 
of A'bram Vrooman, private, Col. Abraham Wemple's Company, New York 
State Troops. 

EDGAR HUMPHREY McPARLAND, Chicago. 111. (3^03). Sou of James 
Campbell and Rebecca Margaret (Logan) Mcbarland; grandson of Joseph and 
Nancy Clark (Humphrey) Mcl'ailand; great-grandson of James McFarland, 
private, Sixth. Pa. Regt., Cont'l Army; great-grandson of David Humphrey, 
private, Eighth Battalion, Fourth Regt., Pa. Cont'l Troops. 

CHARLES GREEN Mcl'ARLANp, Elizabeth, N. J. (334*2). Son of George 
Elliott and Katharine Nelson (Green) McKarlnne; grandson of Thomas 
Henderson" and Mary Scott (Gulick) Green; great-grandson of Richard Mont 
gomery and Mary (Henderson) Green; great- grandson of Thomas Henderson, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Forman's New Jersey Additional Cont'l Regt., Member 
New Jersey Committee of Observation and Inspection and Provincial. Congress 
«T '7 7. 

1IUC.II CLLMLNT McGINITlE, Uccla, S. I>. (30656). Son of Clyde and Etley 

(Anderson) McC.imtie; grandson of Hugh i.owrie and Theresa (Moore) 
McC.initic; great-grandson of John and Lavina (lledrick) Mo,. re; great- 
grandson of Nicholas and Catherine (Orr) lledrick; great 8 -grandson of Jacob > 

lledriek, private, Pa. Second Battalion, Cont'l Line. 



REGISTER OF \1{\V MEMBERS. 



287 



KENNETH McKRNZIE, San Diego, Cai. (32729). Son of Isaac Richard and 
Virginia (Piatt) McKenzie; grandson of Abram Sedam and Mary Pope 
(.McCoy) Piatt; great-grandson of Jacob Piatt, Captain, First New Jersey 
Infantry. 

SIDNEY SIMS McKINNlCY, Cadiz, Ky. (33030). Son of Henry IJowdetl and 
Bertie (Sims) McKinnes; grandson of Fenton and Sidney (Redd) Sims; 
great-grandson of Thomas Bird and Martha Jane (Prjewitt) Redd; great- 
grandson pf \'anl Allen and Sidney Lee (Fqx) (third wife) Prewitt; great 3 -, 
grandson of Robert Prczvilt (Prewelt), private, Fifth Virginia Battalion, Cont'l 
Troops; also private, Col. George Rogers Clark's Kentucky County Expedition. 

WILFRED CRITTENDEN M \cL.WCI 1 1,1 X, Detroit, Mich. (32383), Son of 
John Thompson and Mary Gillispie (Crittenden) MacLaughliuj grandson of 
John and lleloy Goodrich (I'lummcr) Crittenden; great-grandson of Levi 
Crittenden, drummer in Col. David Rossiter's Mass. Regt., pensioned. 

JONX CROCKKR McI.EA.N, I'. S. Army, Maroa, 111. (32804). Son of William 
Thomas and Margaret I'hilhrook (Crocker) McLean; grandson of John llol- 
In-ook and Louise Vibla (Philhrook) Crocker; great-grandson of John and 
Mary Xeal (I'dshury) Crocker ; . great-grandson of Moses Cross and Lois 
(Cleveland) Pilsbury; great a -grandson of Lliflialet Pilshnry, Corporal, Capt.. 
Ezra hunt's Com]. any, Col. Moses Little's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

OWEN CALIAYKLIv McLFAN, Sharon, Pa. (32099). Son of Andrew Curtin 
and Lyda (— ) McLean; grandson of James Ross and Elizabeth (Keck) 
McLean; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Ross) McLean; great- 
grandson of Andrew Mel.ean, private, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia. 

HENRY E. MCMILLAN, St. Paul, Minn. (31846). Son of John Stovve and 
Lucretia (Thorp) McMillan; grandson of Charles and Merriam (Brown) 
McMillan; great-grandson of David and Hannah (Stowe) McMillan; great-- 
grandson of John McMillan, private, Washington County, New York Militia. 

RALPH TATUM McMILLIN, San Fraticisco, Cai. (32732). Son of William L- 
and Sibyl (Tlohhs) Mc.Millin; grandson of Barnabas Coffin and Rebecca 
(Tatum) Hohhs; great-grandson of William and Priscilla (Coffin) Mobbs; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Macy) Coffin; grcaC-graudson of William 
Collin, North Carolina patriot. 

IHXLLY ALEXANDER McXCTT, Terrc Haute, Ind. (33582). Son of Cyrus F. 
and Elizabeth S. (Fihleyj McXntt; grandson of John and Catherine (McNutl) 
Finley; great-grandson of John Lvans and Elizabeth (RustOiO Linley; great- 
grandson of James Puiley, private, Cdonel Bull's and Colonel Stewart's Regis., 
l'a. State Troops, special agent for l'a. western counties and frontiers. 

JOHN GILBERT McNCTT, Indianapolis, Ind. (33583). Son of John Gilbert 
and Mary Brook (Korhly) McXutt; grandson of Cyrus F. and Elizabeth S. 
(Finley) McXutt; great-grandson of John and Catherine (McNutt) Pinky.; 
great-grandson of Evans and Elizahclh (Ruston) Finley; greaC-grandson of 
J allies I'inley, private, Colonel Bull's and Colonel Stewart's Kcgts., l'a, State 
Troops, special agent for l'a. western counties and frontiers. 

EUGENE FAIRFIELD McPIKE, Chicago, 111. (32809). Son of Henry Guesf 
and Nannie Louise (Lyon) Mcl'ike; grandson of John Mountain and Lydia 
Jane (C.uesi) Mcl'ike; great-grandson of James Mcl'ike, Sergeant, Pa. Cont'l 
Troops; great-grandson of Moses and Lydia (Dumonl) Guest; great-grands, .11 
of Peter Dumont, Captain, Second Battalion, New Jersey Troops; great- 
grandson of Moses Guest, Captain, Firs* Regt., Monmouth County, Xew Jersey 
Troops; grandson of Luther Wells and Martha W. ( I'airlield ) Lyon; great- 
grandson of Luther Wells and Nancy (Well*) Lyon; great-grandson of Isaiah 
Lyon, private, Conn. Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

JOI1X CUTLER McVEAU, Seottsville, X. Y. (33244). Son of John C. and 
Sarah (Cutler) McWau; grandson of Abram and Catherine (Young) Culler; 



IM 



great-grand; 

York Levies 



SONS (>F THIS AMERICAN RKVoLUTION . 
m of Xatliani.'l Curler, Corporal, Colonel Du Bois' Regt., New 



E. Da LOS MAGEE, San Francisco, Cal. (3-737). Son of Thomas L. and Sarah 
ICHzabetll (Sanford) Magee; grandson of John ami Maria Rachel Magee; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Charity (Mathews) Magee; great 2 -grandson of 
Charles- Magee, private, • Capt. James Ross' Company, First Pa. Regt., Cont'l 
Troops. 

EDWARD CURTISS MALLORY, Wilford, Conn. (32864). Son of Edward 
Benajah and Esther (Porter) Mallory; grandson of Harvey and Polly (Hin- 
man) Mallory; great-grandson of Benajah ami Hannah (Welch) Maliory; 
great-grandson of Moses Mallory, private, Col. William Douglas' Regt., Conn. 
Militia; great-grandson of Benajah Mallory, private, Capt. John Yates' Com- 
pany, Conn. Sea-coast Defense. 

CHARLES JAMES MANN, Sheldon, Iowa (32787). Son of James and Isabella 

(Safeley) Mann; grandson of J, ,1m ami Betsey (Davis) Sal'eley; great-grandson 
of Zimri and Laura (Whitcley) Davis; great-grandson of John Whiteley, 
private, Vermont Troops, pensioned. 

CHARLES COWAN MANNING, Gallup, New M-ex. (30086). Son of Charles 

James and Mary Kli/abeih (Cowan)' Manning; grandson of Thomas Jefferson 
and Frances (Jack) Manning; great-grandson of Phincas Manning, private, 
Middlesex Comity, New Jersey Militia; great 2 -grandson of Jeremiah Manning, 
Captain, Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia, Member Committee of Ob- 
scvation, Justice of Peace, and I '.arrack master. 

CILVREES JAMESON MAPEL, El Paso, Texas (29496). Son of John Jameson 
and Mary Lois (Dexter) Mapel; grandson of Jacob Grove ami Ann (Patrick* 
Mapel; great-grandson of John and Mary Ann ((.rove) Mapel; gnat-grandson 
of William Mafel, private ami wagoner, New Jersey Militia, pensioned; 
grandson of John Lufkin and Sarah Jam- (Smith) Dexter; great-grandson of 
Addison and Nancy Fitzgerald (Hicks) Smith; great-grandson of Benjamin 
Smith, private, Colonel f>urkee\s Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JAMES MARKOE, St. Paul, Minn. (31842). Son of James C. and Mary Amelia 



(Prince) Markoe; grandson of William and M; 



(Cox) Mi 



great-grandson of John and Ditty (Cox) Markoe; great-gramb 
Markoe, First Captain, Philadelphia Militia. 



>f Abram 



WTI/IJAM AUGUSTUS MARSH, Miami, Ida. (N. Y. 32611). Son of Benjamin 
franklin and Mary Cordelia (Gregory) Marsh; grandson of William Augustus 
and Mary Ann (Ketcham) Gregory; great-grandson of Miles and Annis 
(Bronson) C.regory; great-grandson of Ezra ami Anna (Knapp) Bronson; 
great a -grands'on of Thaddens Bronson, private, Captain Benedict's Company, 
Colonel Bradley's Battalion, Wadsworth's Conn. Brigade. 

J. MAURICE MARTIN, Bismarck, N. D. (j(-57D. Son of Joseph Penrose and 
Harriet Michel (Sager) Martin; grandson of James and Edith (Penrose) 
Martin; great-grandson of Jonathan and Keziall (Irwin) Martin; great 8 - 
graudson of Samirel Martin, private, Col. James Hind's Fourth Battalion, 
Lancaster County, Pa, Troops. 

DWIOIIT EDWARD MARVIN, Summit, N. J. (.u.u.O. Son of Uriah ami 
Margaret Jane (Stevens) Marvin; grandson of Uriah and Olive (Ingraham) 
Marvin; great-grandson of Benjamin ami Plul.e (Rowland) Marvin; great- 
grandson of Uriah RoivlunJ, Quartermaster Sergeant, Colonel Lamb's Regt., 
Conn, Artillery, seven years' service. 

JUDSON MARVIN, Emporia, Kans. (31044). Son of William and Sarah (Stmhlc) 
Marvin; grandson of Cornelius and Eliza (Worden) Marvin; great-grandson 
of Archibald and Amy (Young) Worden; greaf 3 -grandson of Jacob Young, 
private, Captain Johnson's Company, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Militia. 



KI'GISTKK ()!•" NJ$W MlvMBlCRS. 



iSi) 



i 



GEORGE SCLIOONMAKpR MASK, New York, N. Y. (32714). Son of John 
Franklin and -Mary (Robinson) Mast*; grandson of Peter piston and Adelaide 
(Merwin) Mase; great-grandson of Samuel Mase, private, Capt. John llollins- 
head's Company, Gloucester County, New Jersey Militia. 

WIPIJAM LOWS MASON, St. Louis, Mo. (33951). Son of Benjamin F. and 
Alameda Frances (Walker) Mason; grandson of William Powe and Tamor 
(Paggct) Mason; great-grandson of Turner and Mary (t-owe) Mason; great- 
grandson of William Loive, drummer and lifer, Col". Thomas Clark's Regt., 
North Carolina I'.altalion, Cont'l Troops. 

HOWARD MKPYIPPK, ,\I.\X\VI ; ,I<I„ Richmond, Maine (32434). Son of John 
Franklin and Maria f.outse (Hatch) Maxwell; grandson of 1'lijah Crooker 
and Flixa Sophia (Tallman) Hatch; great-grandson of Jonathan Soule and 
Zerniah (Oliver) Tallman; grcat-grandsgn of Alexander Oliver, Sergeant and 
Ensign, Fifth Mass. Cont'l Troops; great-grandson of John and Rachael 
(Thompson) Wilson; great-grandson of Samuel ThompsoHj Brigadier General, 
Cumberland County, Mass. Militia, and Member Mass. Provincial Congress. 

PARKER WRIGHT MI'ADI-;, Sergeant, U. S. N. R., A. P. J'., Cleveland, Ohio 
(33706). Son of George Pouis and Emma Somers (Isxard) .Meade; grandson 
of William Howard and Harriet Somers (Irelan) Is/ard; great-grandson of 
Thomas and Sarah Ann (Scull) Irelan; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary 
(Williams) Irelan; great :i -grandson of James Manlove and Charlotte (W'estcott) 
Williams; great'-grandson of Richard Westcott, First Major, Third Battalion, 
Gloucester County, New Jersey Militia. 

PKWIS HAMILTON MpADpR, Providence, P. P (32484). Son of Granville 
Carleton and Elizabeth A. (Colb'urn) Meader; grandson of Ellis and l.ucy 
(Wethefbee) Colburn; great-grandson of Hesekiah Wethcrbee, private, New 
Hampshire Militia. 

A PAN HAY MEANS, Chicago, PI. (3.U**). Son of Archibald and Janie (Schley) 
Means; grandson of Newton and Margaret (Hay) Schley; great-grandson of 
Peter and Christine (Platter) Hay; great'-grandson of Peter /'/<//.', -r, private, 
Washington County, Pa, Militia and Frontier Ranger. 

NIv.VP FRANCIS MEARS, Chicago, 111. (.■-■Xjji. Son of John Marion and Adelia 
Roe (Pool) Mears; grandson of Pucias and Harriet (McPane; Mears; 
great-grandson of Isaac and Polly (Pongon) Mears; great-grandson of 
Thomas Mears, Mass. Minute Man at Lexington Alarm; grandson of Isaac 
and Poretla Woolsey ('Ketcham) Pool; great-grandson of Kpenelus and Mary 
Ann (Sattcrly) Ketcham; great-grandson of Zuphar Ketcham, private,- First 
Regt., Orange County, New York Mdilia; great-grandson of Samuel and 
Sarah (Seely) Satterly; great-grandson of Bezaleel Sgely, Quartermaster, 
Third Regt., Orange County, New York Militia, Member New York State 
Assembly; great—grandson of Samuel Lortggon, Minute Man at Lexington 
Alarm; great-grandson of Samuel Satterly, private, Westchester County, New 
York Militia; great-grandson of Zophar and Asenath (Buckbee) Ketcham; 
grcaP-grandson of Russell Buekhee, private, Fourth Kcgt., Westchester County, 
New York Militia, prisoner; great 8 -grandsoti of Nathaniel Satterly, Quarter- 
master, First Kegt., Orange County, New York Militia, Member of various 
committees; great-grandson of Thomas and Pydia (Carleton) Mears; great-- 
grandson of John Carleton, Minute Man at Pexitfgton .Alarm. 

JAMKS PERRY MEEK, Peoria, 111. (32810). Son of Louis F. and Ellen (Perry) 
Meek; grandson of Bazel Du Vaille and rCHzabetll (Ward) Meek; great- 
grandson of Henry Maze! and Partheuia (Perry) Meek; great-grandson of 
Bassel Meeks, private, Winchester County, Virginia Militia. 

ALBERT AUSTIN .MEEKS, Meriden, Conn. (33472). Son of Harold Albert 
and Sarah Florence (Austin) Meeks; grandson of Albeit Victor and Sarah 
Anna (Diehl) Meeks; grCat-graiidsbil of Joseph and Sophia (Yidah Meeks; 
great-grandson of Jusepli and Sarah Clarke (VanDyk) Meeks; great'-grandson 



290 



SONS 01? Till', AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



of John Van Dyk, Captain, New York Artillery; grandson of Abner Ellsworth 
and Ruth (Coc) Austin; great-grandson of Ebenezer Jackson and Phebe 

(i$rdsey) Coc; great --grand. son of Eli as and Hannah (Tryon) Coc; great 8 - 
grandson of Scth ami Mary (Miller) Coe; grcat*-grandson of David Coe, 
patriot in raising troops, food and clothing for the Army; greaf'-grandson of 
John Mee&s, private, Morris County, New Jersey Militia; grandson of Abner 
Ellsworth and Ruth (Coe) Austin; great-grandson of Ebenezer Jackson and 
Pfiebe (I'.irdscy) Coe; great-grandson of Llias and Hannah (Tryon) Coe; 
griat !, -graudson of David and Deborali (I'.rainard) Tryon; greaf'-grandson of 
David Tryon, Conn. Member of committee on clothing for soldiers; greaf'- 
grandson of Jahe.: B.rainard, private, Conn. Militia. 
PAUL OWEN MEREDITH, Lieutenant, U. S. A., Franklin, Ind. (32044). Son 



ield 



and Rose (Tilson) Meredith; grandson of I ,ca 



Catherine (Shafer) Meredith; great-grandson of William and Susan Meredith; 

great-grandson of Samuel Meredith, private, Cant. Ceorge 1 Tandy's Company, 

Col. Henry Lee's Regt., Virginia .Militia, pensioned. 
WILLIAM 130LING MEREDITH, Kittanning, Pa. (3-997). Son of Jonathan 

E. and Caroline (McKee) Meredith; grandson of Owen and Ann (McFaddcti) 

Meredith; great-grandson of Thomas Meredith, private, Col. Arthur St. Clair's 

Regt., Ra. Troops. 
KDW'IN T. MERRICK, Ju., Legonier, La. (,j.j-;o.i). Son of David Thomas and 

Tallulah (Dowdell) Merrick; grandson of Edwin T. and Caroline Elizabeth 

(Thomas) Merrick; great-grandson of Thomas and Anna (Brewer) Merrick; 

greal--grandson of Jonathan Merrick, private, Capt. James Shaw's Company, 

Mass. MilUla. 

HUBERT SPENCER MERRELL, jk., St. Louis, Mo. (33198), Sou of Uuberl 
Spencer and C.eorgia (Crenshaw) Mcrrell; grandson of Jacob Spencer and 
Catherine Gciiette (Kellogg) Mcrrell; great-grandson oi Jacob Man ley and 
Silvia (Spencer) Mcrrell; great-grandson of John Spencer, private, Conn. 
Militia; greaf'-grandson of Thomas Spencer, private, Conn. Militia; great- 
grandson of Warren and Rhoda (Case) Kellogg; great-grandson of Abraham 
and Sarah (Seymour) Kellogg; greaf'-grandson of Abraham and Sarah (Sey- 
mour) Kellogg; greats-grandson of Isaac Kellogg, Representative to Conn. 
General Assembly of 1776; great-grandson of Caleb Case, private and Minute 
Man, Conn. Militia. 

SPENCER ATKINS MERRELL, St. Louis, Mo. (33197). Son of George Robert 
and Alice (Atkins) Mcrrell; grandson of Jacob Spencer and Catherine Genetic 



(Kellogg) Mi 



it-gramh 



.f Jacob Manley and Silvia (Spencer) 



Mcrrell; great-grandson of John Spencer, private, Conn. Militia; great-- 
grandson of Thomas Spencer, private, Conn. Militia; grcai-grandsou of Warren 
and Rhoda (Case) Kellogg; great-grandson of Abraham ami Sarah (Seymour) 
Kellogg; great-grandson id Isaac Kellogg, Representative to Conn. General 
Assembly of 1776; great-grandson of Caleb Case, private and Minute Man, 
. Conn. Militia. 

WALTER LESLIE MERRELL, Newark, N. J. (3349-O. Son of Francis Lewis 
and Carrie (Sloan) Mcrrell; grandson of Richard Isaac and Sarah Rebecca 
(Lewis) Mcrrell; great-grandson of John and Sarah Frances (Joslyn) Mcrrell ; 
great-grandson of Henry W. and Amelia Tompkins (Stevens) Joslyn; greaf'- 
grandson of James Stevens, Sergeant, Col. Peter Yates' Regt., New York 
Militia. 

CURTIS WHITNEY MERRILL, Elizabeth, N. J. (33349). Son of Frank W. and 

Harriet E. (Whitney) Merrill; grandson of Daniel ('.. and Lb/a 1. (Knight) 
Whitney; great-grandson of Solomon and Polly (Pratt) Knight; great-grandson 
of l.ulhcr Pratt, private, Col. Thopilus Cotton's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT LOCKE MERRILL, Detroit, Mich. (33636). Son of Lucius Howe and 
Cora Louise (Locke) Men ill; grandson of Ceorge Washington and Lizzie M. 



RRGISTKH ()!• NEW M KM HERS. 



2f)l 



(Sanborn) Locke; grcat-gr;iiulson of .Micajah ami Klmira (RusseD Locke; 
great 3 -grandson of aminos and I'.ettsey Hall Cray (Pierce') Russcl; great"- 
grandson of Solomon Pierce, lieutenant, Mass. Militia, wounded at Lexington ; 
grandson of \'an and Lima C. (Howe) Merrill; great-grandson of Kucins M. 
and Lmra L. (Cutler) llouc; great -'-grandson of Abner HoiVe, Captain, Lfottrtli 
Regt., Worcester Connly, Mass. Mililia; great 8 -grandson of John and Betsey 
(Crosby; Culler; great a -grandson of Alphens and Elizabeth (Cilmore) Crosby; 
great'-grandson of Josidh Crosby, Captain, Colonel Reed's Regt., New Hamp- 
shire Militia at Hunker Hill, Representative to New Hampshire General Court, 
<77*-'79- 

ARTrilJR CLIFFORD MKRRITT, Springfield, Mass. (33294). Son of Isaac 
Parti. .w and Mary Kinily (Cage) Men ill; grandson of Samuel and Sally 
(Partlow) M'erritt; great-grandson of Henry Merritt (Afaryott), private, Rhode 
Island Militia. 

JOHN CALVIN METCALF, University, Ya. (3'2943). Son of John Calvin and 
Victoria (Willis) Metcall"; grandson of Joseph and Susan Olive (Fairbanks) 
Metcalf; great-grandson of Abijah Fairbanks, private, Mass. Militia. 

RICHARD METCALF, Wi'nthrop, Mass. (33288). Son of Joseph Mason and 
Cora May Cornell (Abbott) Metcalf; grandson of Alexander and Agues Isabel 
(Ximnis) Abbot; great-grandson of John and Mary Jane (St.. It) Nimms; 
great-grandson of — and I'h.ebe (Knight) Stott; great" gi andson of Josi-ah 
Knight, private, Conn, Line, pensioned. 

HENRY ARTHUR MIDDLETON; Toledo, Ohio (32837). Son of Arthur N. 
and Allie L. (Taylor) Middleton; grandson of John and Mary (MacCumber) 
Mi.ldleton; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (West) Middleton; great- 
grandson of John West, private, Virginia Troops. 

ROWLAND MILKS, Northport, Long Island, N. Y. (33238). Son of Benjamin 
l'\ and Mary M. (Duguid) Miles; grandson of Reuben and Sarah (llallock) 
Miles; great-grandson of Jesse and Olive (Adams) Miles; great--grandson of 
Thomas Miles, private, Second Company, Twenty-first Regt., Conn. Minute 
Men. 

ALBERT HOWENSTINF MILLER, Toledo, Ohio (32850). Son of Alex W. 
and Martha Ella (Howenstine) Miller; grandson of Jacob and Martha (Stough) 
llowenstine; great-grandson of Samuel and Susan ( Kinsely) Stough; great 2 - 
grandson of John and Elizabeth (llogmire) Stough; great 3 -grandson of 
Conrad Hogmire, Captain, Maryland Minute Men, Member Frederick County, 
Maryland, committees. 

CHARLES HENRY MILLER, Jk„ Philadelphia, Pa. (.i-'oX;). Son of Charles 
IK-nry and Ellen (Campbell) Miller; grandson of Jacob E. and Eliza A. 
(Nunberg) Miller; great grands, ,11 of Jacob Miller, private, Chester County, 
Militia; great grandson ..("Jacob and Elizabeth (Kneer) Miller; great-grandson 
of Henry (Heinriclc) Miller, private, Second Battalion. Chester County, Pa. 
Militia. 

FRANCIS A. MILLER, N T eb. (31011)'. Supplemental. Son of Horace and Olive 
(base (Fuller) Miller); grandson of Abijah Thurston and Betsey (Lcrmond) 
Milbr; gieat grandsun of Jesse and Kevina (Thurston) Mill.r; great 9 -g rand son 
of Abijah Thurston, private, Mass. Militia; grcat--grandsnn of Joseph Millard, 
private, Mass. Militia; gieaC-grandsou of Daniel Thurston, private, Mass. 
Militia. 

LESLIE WALKER MILLAR, Detroit, Mich. (32389). Son of William Kilham 
and EBa Thayer (Walker) Millar; grandson of Samuel Ayer and Mary Cecilia 
Thompson (Thayer) Walker; great-grandson of Samuel Walker, private, Mass. 
Militia; great"- grand SOU of Nathaniel Walker, Member Mass. Committees. 

MAHLON DICKINSON MILLER, Chicago. 111. (33396). Son oi Mahlon Dick- 
inson and Kli/abclh Barbara (Blair) Miller; grandson of Linus High and 



202 



SONS OF Till.; AMF.KIOAN REVOLUTION. 



Abigail Pierscin (Price) Miller; great-grandson of Flihu and Abigail (Pierson) 
Price; great 8 -grandsqn of William Pierson, private, Essex County, .\cw 
Jersey .Militia; great-brands,, n of Ezra and Mary (High) Miller; great 2 - 
grandson of Moses Miller, private, Kssex County, New Jersey Militia; great-- 
grandson of Ralph Price, private, New Jersey Militia. 

PHILIP SCHUYLER MILLER* M.lrose, N. V. (32707). Son of William Snyder 
and I' ranees Seliuyler (E<My) Miller; grandson of Samuel Cleason and 
Frances Catherine (Seliuyler) Kddy ; great-grandson of Peter and Rditjl Ruston 

(MeCrea) Seliuyler; great-grandson of Philip P. Schuyler, Cloned, Third 
Regt., Albany County, New York Militia. 

TURNER AS11RY MILLER, Jr., Richmond, Va. (35:935). Son of Turner Ashby 
and Iola (Sorcy) Miller; grandson of John Green and Anne Catharine (—-) 
Miller; great-grandson of Henry and Elizabeth (Criglor) Miller; great 2 - 
grandson of John and Nancy (llitt) Miller; great*-grandson of Peter and 
Hannah ( — ) Hill; great '-grandson of Peter llitt. private, Virginia Cont'l 
Hiue. 

/ICTO-R JOSEPH MILLER, Lieutenant, F. A, St. Louis, Mo. <j.'5(>y). Son 
of Julius C. and Ida Jane (Miller) Miller; grandson of Matthew and Rebecca 
(Kelley) Miller (father of Julius); great-grandson of John and Nancy (Musick) 
Miller; great--grandson of Pleasant M. and Mary Louisa (111. unit) Miller; 
great : '-grandson of William HI, mat, Member Cont'l Congress from North 
Carolina; greaC-grandson of William and Mary (Grainger) BJount; great '- 
grandson of Caleb Grainger, Captain and Major, First Regt., North Carolina 
Troops. 

SAMUEL ALGER MILLIKEN, First Lieutenant, U S. M. C, Norfolk, Va. 
(Mass. 33539). Son of William Hardy ' and May (Nickerson) Milliken; 
grandson' of Franklin R. and Sarah C. (Hangs) Milliken; great-grandson of. 
Sylvanus and Hannah (Bean) Bangs; great--grandsnn of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Cobb) Bangs; great :, -grandson of Barnabas Bangs, private and clerk, Mass. 
Militia, an.l Matross, Capt. Aimer Lowell's Company, Mass. Artillery. 

WILLIAM HARDY MILLIKEN, Boston, Mass. (33-289). Sou of Franklin R. 
and Sarah C. (Bangs) Milliken; grandson of Sylvanus and Hannah I'!. (Bean) 
Bangs; great-grandson of F,hcnczer and Folly (Mary) (Cobb) Bangs; great-- 
grandson of Barnabas Bangs, private, Mass. Militia, and Matross, Aimer 
Howell's Company, Mass. Artillery. 

COT,. THOMAS Hi; WITT MILLING, U. S. Army, Washington, I >. C. (La. 
3-> 55 o). Son of Robert E. and Ida (Roberts) Milling; grandson of Thomas 
David and Mary A. (Teddlie) Milling; great-grandson of David T. and Maria 
(Latham) Milling; great-grandson of Hugh Milling, Captain, Sixth South 
Carolina Cont'l Regt., prisoner. 

CHARLES SMITH MIFFS, D. D., Montclair, N. J. (33777). Son of Charles 
Lewis and Rebecca Bartlett (Smith) Mills; grandson of Jabez and Hannah 
(Cue) Mills; great-grandson of Edward Mills, Sergeant, "Eastern Battalion," 
Morris County, New Jersey State Troops. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR MIFFS, Pittsburgh, Fa. (32983). Son of Charles Dcnnisoii 
ami Alicia Mane.va (KcFey) Mills; grandson of John He-mis and Agnes 
Nancy (Rafferty) Mills; great-grandson of Jacob and Prudence (Hopkins) 
Mills; great-grandson of Caleb Hopkins, Lieutenant, Capt. James Round's 
Company, Maj. Samuel Hayes' Regt., Sussex County, New York State Troops, 

ARTHUR RODNEY MII,NF,S, Waterloo, [owa (327:93).. Son of Charles IF and 
Mertic A. (Sprague) Milnes; grandson of Rodney and Georgiana (Nichols) 
Sprague; great -grandson of Flisha and Amanda M. (Tuttle) Sprague; great- 
grandson of Morris and Diedema v Sprague; great :i -grandson of Jonathan 
Sprague, Lieutenant, Col. Ira Allen's Regt., Ycimont Militia. 



RpClSTRR Ol'' NEW MEMBERS. 



M 



ALFRED Y. MITCHELL, JUngham Center, .Mass. (33386). Son of J. Alfred 

and K. Josephine (Sprague) Mitchell; grandson of George and S. Agnes 
Sprague; great-grandson of William P. and RHza (Harding) Poring; great 6 - 
grandson of Matthew LorLng, drummer and Bombardier, Mass. Mdiiia. 

KpNNpTH M1PPS MITCHELL, liaise, Idaho (31816). Son of William M. and 
l.eura P. (Mills) Mitchell; grandson of Andrew J. and Sarah P. (VVhJtcmure) 
Mills; great-grandson of William and Pura A. (Fisk) Mills; great 2 -gramhon 
of Kber and .Martha ( Pigelow ) Fisk; great :, -g. andson of Joel and Abigail 
(Call) T.igelow; great 1 -grandson of James Call, private, Major Ilqrsinglon's 
Vermont Rangers and New Flampsliirc Troops. 

JAM PS COLLINS MOCK, Toledo, Ohio (.07-1). Son of Solomon and Charlotte 
(Barefoot) Mock; grandson of James and Sarah (Mickey) Barefoot, Jr.; 
great-grandson of James and Mary (Slick) Uarefoot; great"-grandson of 
William Slick, Sergeant, Maryland "Flying Cam])," private, Maryland Coht'l 
Line, pensioned. 

ALLEN FORD MOPISPTTP, Salem, Ohio (33433).. Son of J. P. and pdr.a 
(Ford) iModisette; grandson of Robert Marye and Mary Meason (Austin) 
Modiselte; great-grandson of John More and I'riseilla (Stephens) Austin; 
great-grandson of EHph'alcl and Syhel (Dudley) Austin; gi eat :i gi andson of 
Anion Austin, Pnuienant Colonel, Twenty-sixth Regl., Conn. Militia. 

APPpRT WPPPOUN MOISP, St. I.onis, Mo. (j-.'.soy ). Son of Albert and 
pli/abelh (l.anieil Moise; grandson of Robert Fletcher and F,li/abeP\ Mar\ 
Ann (Clark) l.anier; great-grandson of Rohert Panier; great-grandson of 
Robert Lanier, delegate to North Carolina Provincial Congress, Commissary. 

ARCHIBALD MONTKITII, Albany, Ore. (33136). Son of Thomas and Christine 
M. (Dunbar) Monteith; grandson of Butler and Sarah Ann (lleaton) Dunbar; 
great-grandson of Miles Dttitpar, Fife Major, Eighth R.gt., Conn. Militia. 

GKORG1S 1 1 fCRDl-'.R'r MOORK, St. Uo*iis, Mo. (33181). Sou of William Pike 
and Catherine Unu (Threlkeld) Moor.-; grandson of William Butler and 
pliza Hughes (Clover) Moore; great-grandson of John and Fanny (Taylor) 
('.lover; great-grandson of ll'illiani Clover, private, Virginia Troops. 

GEORGE P. MOUpY, South Bend, Ind. (j-'o-p). Son of Handy Joiner and 
Sarah Ann Eliza (Hall) Morey; grandson of Isaac ami Joanna (— ) Hall; 
great-grandson of AbA Hall, Captain, Colonel July's Regt., Conn. Militia; 
great-grandson of Isaac Hall, Captain, Colonel Gardner's Regt., Mass. Troops. 

CLARENCE PpRRANI) MORGAN, Boise, Idaho (31815). Son of J. M. and 
Caroline Allen (Parrand) Morgan; grandson of Rethuel and Mary Nixon 
< Harris) Farrand; great-grandson of Samuel and Mary (Kitchell) Parrand; 
great--grandson of Phineas Kitchel, private, Morris County, New Jersey Militia; 
great ;, -graudson of John Kitchel, private, Morris County, New Jersey Militia; 
Kieat'-'-grandson of Bethncl Farrand, Lieutenant, New Jersey Troops. 

CLINTON CKRARD MORGAN, Annapolis, M,|. (33131). Son ' of De Wit! 
Clinton and Sarah Perry (Hurst) Morgan; grandson of Gerard and Rosaunah 
(Prowu) Morgan; great-grandson of John Brown, Captain, Virginia Militia, 



CUNTON CKRARD MORGAN, Jk., Annapolis, Md. (33122). Son of Clinton 
Gerard and Emma p. Morgan; grandson of De Witt Clinton and Sarah Perry 
. (Hurst) Morgan; grandson of Gerard ami Rosaunah (Brown) Morgan; great- 
grandson of John Brown, Captain, Virginia Militia, prisoner. 

ALBERT rjNCOLN MORSE. Poise, Idaho (31812). Son of Henry Albert and 
Jane Mariah (Carpenter) Morse; grandson of Jason and Mercy (Meriitt) 
Carpenter; great-grandson of I'.lihn Carpenter, Corporal and Sergeant, Mass. 
Militia, Rhode Island serviee. 

GARDNER WARREN MORSE, New Haven, Conn. (33460). Son of plliolt How 
and Grace Adele (Bowns) Morse; grandson of Gardner and Mary P. 



m 



SONS ()]' THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



(Brigham) Morse; great-grandson of Stephen Morse, private, Colonel Sprout's 
Regt., Mass. I, inc. 

LOUIS AI,I,IA' MORTON, Duncan, Ukla. (31615). Son of Reuben Oliver and 
Madrid (I«ove) Morton; grandson of Thomas II. and Martha \Y. (Cole) 
Morton; great-grandson of Oliver Morion, sailor on Cant. Simeon Samson's 
brigantine "Independence;" great-grandson of Silas Morton, Lieutenant, Second 
Mass, Regt., Cont'l Troops. 

REUBEN OLIVER MORTON, Duncan, Okla. (31616). Son of Thomas II. and 
Martha \V. (Cole) Morton; grandson of Oliver Morton, sailor Oil Capt. 
Simeon Samson's brigantine "Independence;' great-grandson of Silas Morton, 
Lieutenant, Second Mass. Regt., Cont'l Troops. 

THOMAS TALFOUKI) MOS&Y, Jr., New York City, X. Y. (Md. 33123). Son of 
Thomas Talfourd and Lottie Alleiue (Prilchard) Mo.shy; grandson of Irvin 
Stewart and Charlotte Elizabeth Julie (Donley) J'ritchard; great-grandson of 
Nicholas B. and Elizabeth Ann (Stewart) Prilchard; great--gran<Lon of John 
and Mary Elisabeth (Fra/ier) Stewart; great 3 -gi andson of Levin Frasier, 
private, Midshipman, and Lieutenant, Maryland Line, 1776-17X3, pensioned. 

FREDERICK IRVING MOSHER, Haltimore, Md. (.33117). Son of John Powers 
and Mary M. (Wilkinson) Mosher; grandson of Oriel and Arvilla (Powers; 
Moshcr; great-grandson of John and Laurana (Cady) Lowers; great 2 -grandson 
of John Cady, private, Second Regt., New York Line; great-grandson of 
James /Vavr.v, private, Colonel Whitcomb's Regt., .Mass. Line, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Abil and Mehitahle (Smith) Mosher; great-grandson of 
Joscl'h Moslirr, private, Albany County, New York Militia. 

WORKALL FREDERICK MOUNTAIN, East Orange, N. J. (33905). Son of 
Frederick and D.ne Adclia Tallmaii; grandson ol William M. an. I Mary A. 
M. (Spader) . Tallmati; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth Bnyce 
(Hardenbrook) Talluian; gr*:aiH,g rami son of William Tallmaii, private, Mon- 
mouth County, New Jersey Milrtia. 

WILLIAM YALLNTINL MULFORD, Newark, N. J. (32920). Son of Jacob 
Davis and Sarah R. (Valentine) Mulford; grandson of William and Mrs. 
Retsey (Davis) Ludlow Mulford; great-grandson of John Mulford, private, 
Lssex County, New Jersey Militia. 

CARLL SEYMOUR MUNDY, Toledo, Ohio (32833). Son of William Nelson 
and Maggie (J.) Mundy; grandson of William Nelson and Margaret Jane 
(Harris) Mundy; great-grandson of Edward Nelson and Margaret Fran 
(Sisco) Mundy; great--grandson of Jot ol> (I- ran) Sisco, private., Morris County, 
New Jersey Militia. 

GILES JUSTIN MUNDY, Forest, Ohio (33>f>4). Son of William Nelson and 
Maggie (J.) Mundy; grandson of William Nelson and Margaret Jane (Harris) 
Mundy; great-grandson of Edward Nelson and Margaret (I'rlui). (Sisco) 
Mundy; grcat~grandson of Jacob (Frau) Sisco, private, Morris County, New 
Jersey Militia. 

MARRY MUNROI". MURDOUC.II, Dorchester, Mass. (33526), Son of James M. 
and Frances A. (Flanders) Mtvrdough; grandson of Henry Traine and Lois 
(Peters) Mtvrdough; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth Murdough; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Murdough, private, New Hampshire .Militia to reinforce 
Cont'l Army; great 8 ->grandson of Thomas Murdough, private, Ilillsboro, New 
Hampshire, Military Company; great-grandson of Jacob ami Sarah W. (Eager) 
Peters; great 3 -grandson of William and Sarah (Jewell) Peters; greats-grandson 
of James Peters, private, llenniker, New Hampshire "Trainband;" great- 
grandson of Samuel and Mary (Jones) Murdough; great" grands, .11 of William 
Jones, private, Ilillsboro, New I I am,, shire, "Trainband;" grandson of Ansel 
Lothrop and Adeline (Pierce) Flanders; great-grandson of Josiah and Susan 
(llatstat) Pierce, Jr.; greaU-grandson of Josiah Pierce, private, Mass. Cont'l 
Troops. 



REGISTER Ol' NEW M KM HERS. 



L>5 



HENRY DAVIS XAVDCR MURPHY, Jersey City, N. .1. (N. Y. 328*7). Son 
of David and Uinta (Hall) Murphy; grandson of Rubcrt S. and Louise 

(Stewart) Hall; great-grandson of Elijah and Mary Elizabeth (Shaw) Hall; 
great-grandson of David and Lucy (Hams) Hall; great a -grandson of Elijah 
and Sally (Bogue.) Barns (Barnes); great 4 -grandson of Benjamin Bums 
(Barnes), Captain, Colon. -1 Mbseley's Hampshire County, Mass, Militia. 

CHARLES SKINNER MYERS, Portland, Ore. (33135). Son of Henry Harr and- 
Mary Amelia Jane (Skinner) Myers grandson of Andrew and Mary (C.rubb) 
Skinner; great-grandson of Enoch and Elizabeth (Wilson) Skinner; great 2 - 
grandson of Andrew Wilson, Second Lieutenant, Cumberland County, Pa. 
Militia; great-grandson of John Skin net , private, Middlesex County, New 
Jersey Militia; grandson of Hiram and Jane Ann (Dean) Myers; great- 
grandson of John and Mary (Shields) Myers (Moyers); great 2 -grandsori of 
Godfrey Myers (Moyers), Second Lieutenant, Flying Battalion, Pa. Troops; 
great-grandson of Patrick Shields, private, Eighth Battalion, Chester County, 
Pa. Militia. 

CLARENCE HORACE RICKARD MYERS, Elagerstown, Md. (33105). Son of 
Jacob Harry and Emily Matilda (Crow) Myers; grandson of James \V. and 
Maria (Crow) Myers; great-grandson of George and Mrs. Elizabeth Ellen 
(Gray) Simmons Myers; great— grandson of George Myers, private, German 
l'.attalion, Baltimore County, Maryland Militia. 

EDMUND TROWBRIDGE DANA MYERS, Major, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army, 
Montreal, Canada ( \'a.. 32944), Son of Edmund Trowbridge Dana and 
Frances Colnuhoun (Trigg) Myers; grandson of Lilburn Henderson and 
Barbara (Colquhoun) Trigg; great-grandson of William and Rachael (Findlay) 
Trigg; great— grandson of Dani.l Trigg, Lieutenant, First Regt., Virginia 
Troops. 

ELLERSLIE B! MYERS, Sheldon, Iowa (32778). Son of W. H. and Anna 
Elizabeth (Richard) Myers; grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Kunsman) 
Myers; great-grandson of Isaac and Ilanna (Christine) Richard; great- 
grandson of — and — (Old) Christine; great :, -grandson of John Old, Corporal, 
Fifth Class, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 

HUGH A. MYERS, Omaha, \eb. (32961). Son of Peter and Lucinda (Guist) 
Myers; grandson of Peter and Mary G. (Grove) Myers; great-grandson of 
Peter (Jroff (Ciore), Lieutenant, Cumberland and Northumberland Counties, 
Pa. Rangers. 

JOHN MORRIS MYERS, Ridgewood, N. J. (3-915).' Son of John Norris and 
Laura Virginia (Starr) Myers; grandson of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Norris) 
Myers; great-grandson of John and Charlotte (Miller) Myers; great-grandson 
of John de Mire (Myers), private, Eleventh Regt., Albany County, New York 
Militia. 

JUDSON WILLIAM MYERS, Sheldon, Iowa (32780). Son of W. II. and Anna 
Elisabeth (Richard) Myers; grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth ( Kunsman 1 
Richard (Richart); gnat-grandson of Isaac and Ilanna (Christine) Richard; 
great-grandson of - and -, (Old) Christine; great-grandson of John Old, 

Corporal, Fifth Class, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 
LOYAL RICHARD MYERS, Sheldon, Iowa (.{--779). Son of W. II. and Anna 

Elizabeth (Richard) Myers; grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Kunsman) 

Richard (Richart); great-grandson of Isaac and Ilanna (Christine) Richard; 

great--grandson of — and (Old) Christine; greaf'-graudson of John Old, 

Corporal, Fifth Class, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 
LYNN LEWIS MYERS, Sheldon, Iowa (32781). Son of W. H. and Anna 

Elizabeth (Richard) Myers; grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (KunsmanJ 

Richard (Richart); great-grandson id Isaac and Ilanna (Christine) Richard; 

great-grandson of - and (Old) Christine; greal 3 -grandson of John Old, 

Corporal, Fifth Class, Pa. Militia, pensioned. 



2()6 



SONS Ol'* Til 1C AMKRICAN REVOLUTION 



ROBERT EVKRSIIED MYERS, Rochester, N. Y. (.33*41). Son of Robert 
Ma, lis,, n tint] Mary < Evershed ) Myers; grandson of Robert and llairaali 
(Dusted) Myers; great-grandson of Michael Frederick and' Margarel (German) 
Myers; grcat-'-grandson of Frederick Myers, private, First and Third Regis., 
New York Militia. 

ROBERT NORFLEET \.\SH, St. Louis, Mo. (33180). Son of [Ienrj K. and 
Caroline (Norfleetj Nash; grandson of Harry K. and Mary (Simpson) .Nrh; 
great-grandson of Frederick Xash; great-grandson of Abner Nash, Member 
First Provincial Council, and Governor of North Carolina. 

RAY Cl'kSoNS NEAL, liuffalo, N. Y. (3335"). Son of Edgar C. and Belle 
C. iSmiili) Neat; grandson of Thomas C. and Maria I,. (Irish) Smith; great- 
grandson of ira E. and Gerald* I., (Raker) rrish; great L '-grandson of Reuben 
and Lois (Comfort) Baker; great : »-grandson of Reuben linker, private, Berk- 
shire Comity, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN THORNLEY NEFF, Jr., East Orange, N. J. (32901). Son of John 
Thornley and Marion (Gray) Neff; grandson of Rollin Bifney and Lydia 
Diitcher (Whitney) Gray; great-grandson of Ezra Slack and Lydia (Diitcher) 
Whitney; great--grandson of Salen and l,ydia (Denny) Diitcher; great-- 
grandson of William Diitcher, Captain, Col. Joseph Drake's Company, New 
York Regt. 

l.dRIXt; GALE NESMITH, San Diego, Cal. (3-741). Son of Thomas and 
.Maria Antoinette (Gale) Nesmith; grandson of Anthony Rutgers and Maria 
Dobbs (llelme) Gale; great-grandson of Henry Arnold and Cornelia (Rutgers) 
Gale.; grcat 2 -grahdson of Anthony Rutgers, Captain, New York Artillery, 
Member New York Provincial Congresses, 1775-1776, Member New York 
Constitutional Convention; great-grandson of Obadiah and Ann llelme; (.-real - 
grandson of Phineas and Mary (Wisner) flelme; great 3 -grandson of Henry 
Wisrier, Member First and Second Continental Congresses, New York Senate 
and Provincial Congress, 

I.ORIN IVES NEVLING, St. Louts, Mo. (33191). Son of Clyde and Clara 
Mabel (Sizer) Nevling'; grandson of Abraham and Catherine (Matthew*) 
Nevling; great-grandson of John Adam and Edith (Vaughn) Nevling; grea'A- 
gramlson of Jacob Nevling, private, Lancaster County, I'a. Militia, killed at 
Brandywine; grandson of Daniel Augustus and Carrie Elvira (Riggs) * Sizer; 
great-grandson of Albert Dann and Elizabeth (Taylor) Sizer; grcat--grandson 
of Daniel and Sarah (Johnson) Sizer; grcaC-grandson of Da Hit'/ Sizer, 
Sergeant, Third Regt., Conn. Line; great-grandson of Gideon Morehouse 
and I'h, ebe ( Wallbridge ) Taylor; great-grandson of Thomas and Mary (More 
house) Taylor; great-grandson of Gamaliel Taylor, Lieutenant, Ninth Reg-., 
Conn. Militia; greaf'-grandsou of Oliver and Elizabeth (Smith) Walbridge; 
great '-grandson of Henry IValbridge, Sergeant, Mass. Militia; great a -grandson 
of Thomas Taylor, private, Conn. Cont'l Line. 

l'l,VDK A. NEWTON, Chicago, III. (Neb. 3-'o6 7 ). Son of Horace E. and Mtla 
(l'eeples) Newton; grandson ,,f Oliver Reed and Ahbie (I'ettee) Newton; 
great-grandson of Dana and Martha (Reed) Newton; great-'-grandson of Luther 
Newton, private, Herkshjrc County, Mass. Militia; great 8 -grandson of Selh 
Newton, Captain, Mass. Militia, Member Mass. Constitutional Convention; 
great-grandson of Luther and Miriam (Newton) Newton; grcaC-grandson of 
lisra Newton, Corporal, Mass. Militia. 

HORACE EDWIN NEWTON, Aurora, Neb. (33071). Son of Oliver Reed and 

Abide II. (IVtlce) Newton; grandson Of Dana and Martha (Reed) Newton; 
great grarfdsou of I, other and Miriam (Newton) Ncwlon; great-grandson 
of Beth tfewloil, Captain, Sixth Regt., Worcester County, Mass. Militia, 
Member Mass. Constitutional Convention; great-'-grandson of Ezra Newton, 
Corporal, Elijah Ihlh.w's Regt., Mass. Militia. 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 2[ff 

J < > S I •; 1 * I L FORT NKW'I'OX, New York City, X. Y. (33354). Son of Use and 
Susan Green (Battle.) Newton; grandson of R. J. and Susan Green (Fort) 
Battle; great-grandson of josiaft and Diana Coleman (I.,igon) Fort; great 2 - 
grandson of William and Elizabeth (llilliard) Fort; greaC-grandsnn of lUias 
I'ort, Corporal, Col. Thomas Clark's First Battalion, North Carolina Troops. 

W1LLTAM C. NEWTON, Piovincetown, Mass. (33071). Son of William M. and 
Mary E. (Nickcrson) Newton; grandson of Adis Hubbard and Susanna A. 
(Hatch) Newton; great grandson of Israel and Mary (Cerould) [latch, Jr.; 
great" grandson of Israel Hatch, private, Capt. Alexander Foster's Company, 
Col. Thomas Carpenter's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES WILLIAM NICHOLS, C.raud Junction, Colo. (31439). Son of Chester 
Butler and Lizzie 1. (Glass) Nichols; grandson of William and Eva I!. 
(Throof) Nichols; great-grandson of l,cvi and Christina (Turner) Nichols; 
great-grandson of William and R. (Carter) Nichols; great 11 -grandson of 'Israel 
Nichols, Deputy to Mass. General Court, 1774-'*"; signer of Articles of 
Association. 

I'TWARI) NlCIK)l,S, Newark, N. .1 . (33731). Son of Edward Livingston and 
Sarah Wilkins (Wesleutt) Nichols; grandson of Charles Lewis and Jennet 
(Burroughs) Nichols; great-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Jennings) Bur- 
roughs, 3rd; great"-grandson of Stephen Burroughs, Jr., Captain, Conn. Militia, 
Member Conn. General Assembly. 

HERBERT NOBLE, Fasthampton, Mass. (Conn, 3_'«sa). Son of George Belden 
and Caroline Louisa (Mine) Noble; grandson of George Henry and Henrietta 
(Burnt!) Noble; great-grandson of Ezra and Amelia (Hickok) Noble; great-'- 
grandson of Ezra Dibble and Eunice (Bostwick) Noble; great 3 -grandson of 
Zadock Noble, Member New Bedford, Conn., Committee of Inspection and 
Correspondence. 

EDWARD BARBOUR OWEN NORVELL, Asheville, N. C. (Va. 33567). Son 
of Charles and Fannie (Field) Norvell; grandson of Richard Henry and 
1'lnlippa (Barhour) Field; great-grandson of Daniel and Judith (Young) Field; 
great 2 -grandson of Henry Field, Jr., Lieutenant, Eighth Regt., Virginia Troops, 
Member House of Burgesses and Committee of Safety. 

NATHAN! LI, HUBBARD NUTTING, Boston, Mass. (33275), Son of George 
Ash and Hannah M . (Brown) Nutting; grandson of David Hubbard ami 
Mary Elizabeth (Nichols) Nutting; great-grandson of William and Mary 
Barrett (Hubbard) Nutting; great--grandson of William Nutting, private, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Mass. Militia; great-grandson of David Hubbard, Corporal, 
Colonel Reed's Regt., Mass. Militia; great-'-grandson of Has id and Mary 
(Barrett.) Hubbard; great :, -grandsqn of Thomas Barrett, Member Committee 

of Safety ami Correspondence, Concord, Mass. 

NLAL HOWARD NAT;, Bender, Neb. (33X7G). Son of Orville K. and Florida 
(Bacon) Nye; grandson of William and Sally (Kellogg) Nye; great-grandson 
of William Nye, private, Worcester County, Mass. Militia; great-'-grandson 
of Jonathan Nye, private, Col. Job Cushlng's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

SYLYANUS BARLOW NYE, Buffalo, N. Y. (32623). Son of Sylvauus fl. ami 
Esther (Fisher) Nye; grandson of Sylvanus and Lucy (Hubbard) Nye; great- 
grandson of Syivanns Nye, private, Capt. William Henry's Company, Colonel 
Whitney's Regt., Mass. Troops. 

HARRISON DUDLEY OAKLS, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy, Winth.op, Mass. (33296). 
Son of George H. and Mary A. (Jordan) Oakes; grandson of Joseph W. 
and Cordelia (Wiley) Jordan; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Mary (Bailey) 
Jordan; great-grandson of Israel and Susanna Jordan; great :1 -grandson of 
Nathaniel Jo,, Inn, Lieu una nl Colonel, Bristol and Cumberland Counties, Mass. 
Militia. 



2(j8 



SONS 01? THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



LYMAN HENRY OAKLEY, Gillmore, Cal. (32740). Son of Edward and 
Lizzie M. (.Mo(t) Oakley; grandson of Joseph and Emily Elizabeth (Ilyser) 
Oakley; great-grandson of Peter J. and Ella (Fritz) Ilyser; great-grandson 
of John and Margaret (Rockefeller) Ilyser; great 8 -grandson of Simon Rocke- 
feller, private, Tenth Rcgt., Alhany County, New Vork Militia. ' 

JOSEPH CRAWFORD OGDEN, Elizabeth, N. J. (33477). Son of Frank C. and 
Mary Ellen (Ruzby) ( >gden ; grandson of James Crawford and Lyrlia (Drake) 
Ogden; great-grandson of John and Joanna II. (Ross) Ogden; great--grandson 
of Muses and Rhoda (JTalsey) Ogden; greaf-grandson of John llalsey, private, 
Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 

[CIIAI'.OD ALLEN OLMSTEAD, Elmira, N. V. (32098). Son of Harry C. and 
Lydia P>. (MeConnell) Olmstead; grandson of Eleazer and Clarissa (Rolf) 
Olmstead; great-grandson of Eliphelet and Molly (Chapman) Olmstead; great-- 
grandson of Elijah Olmstead, cavalryman, Capt. Joel Loomis' Conn. Light 
Horse. 

FERDINAND SUCCESS OPPENHEIM, New York, N. Y. (33229). Son of 
Ralph I'., and Nettie (Schulhofer) Oppenheim; grandson of Julius Hertz 
and Sarah Ann (Goldsmith) Oppenheim; great-grandson of Moses and Eleanor 
Alexander Goldsmith; great--grandson of Abraham and Hannah (Aarons) 
Alexander, J r. ; >grcat :1 -grandson of Abraham Alexander, Sr., Lieutenant, South 
Carolina Militia. 

JOHN McFARLAND ORMOND, Toledo, Ohio (32836). Son of Benjamin Kelso 
and Mary (McFarland) Ormond; grandson of Alexander Poe and Jean Kelso 
Ormond; great-grandson of John Kelso, Orderly Sergeant, First Pa. Regt., 
Conl'l Pine, seven-and-a-hal i" years' service; great L '-grandson of Robert Rider, 
Colonel, Pa. Militia, i77/-'8i. 

FREDERICK WALTER ORR, Newcastle, Pa. (32990). Son of John E. and 
Louise C. (Waller) Orr; grandson of J, ,1m \Y. and Ellen Malilta ( F ulkerson) 
Walter; great-grandson of Richard and Delilah (Peeper) Pulkinson; great- 
grandson of John Fiilkinson, private, New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

ISAAC HENRY ORR, St. Louis, Mo. (32564). Son of William Campbell and 
Eliza (Jordan) Orr; grandson of Robert and Isiphene (Allison) Jordan; great- 
grandson of Alexander Allison; great-grandson of Robert Allison, Captain, 
South Carolina State Militia. 

WILLIAM CAMPRKPL ORR, St. Louis, Mo. (32564P Son of William Campbell 
and Eliza (Jordan) Orr; grandson of Robert and Isiphene (Allison) Jordan; 
great-grandson of Alexander Allison; great 2 -grandson of Robert Allison, 
Captain, South Carolina Stale Troops; great-grandson of James Orr, private, 
North Carolina State Troops. 

RAYMOND WINTER ORTON, Newark, N. J. (33345). Son of James Douglas 
and Lizzie Katheriue (Roylan) Orton; grandson of James Douglas and Hetty 
Maria (Douglas) Orton; great-grandson of Marcus Brutus and Nancy C. 
(Could) Douglas; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Sarah (Rates) Douglas; 
grcaC-grandson of David Hales, Captain, Norris County, New Jersey Militia. 

I'.DRK KENNETH OSBORN, Detroit, Mich. (32384). Son of Milton Lphraim 
and Eva 1,. (West) Osborn; grandson of David and Eliza M. (Faxon) Osborn; 
great-grandson of Samuel Ervin and Azubah (Cray) Faxon; great 2 -grandson 
of Samuel and Patty (Spooner) Faxon; great :l -grandson of Thomas Faxon, 
private, Mass. Militia. 

lollN F. OSBORN, Kansas City. Fans. (33305). Son of Eugene P. and Ida 
M. (Zachan) Osborn; grandson of Samuel 11. a.,, I Cynthia (Nuttj Osborn; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Sophia (Harding! Oslw.rn; great-grandson of 
Jabez Osborn. private, Fifth Battalion, C,,nn Militia and State Guard. 

HAROLD ALEXANDER OSGOOD, St. Louis, Mo. (32568). Son of Charles 
N. and Margaret. (Alexander) Osgood; grandson of Moses F. and Sarah 



REGISTER 01' NEW M EMBERS. 



-99 



(Gle{iso.n) Osgood; great-grandson of George ami Nancy ( Kndicott ) Osgood; 
gSreat 2 -grandso.Q of .Moses Endicott; great 3 -graudson of John Bndicott, Ueu- 
tenant, Capt. Asa Prince's Company, Col. Timothy Pickering's Regt., Mass. 

Ti oops. 
STEPHEN D.WMI) PADDOCK, Providence, R. I. (32486). Son of Miner 

Hamlin and Susan (Plumb) Paddock; grandson of Stephen Raton and Caroline 
J. (Miner) Paddock; great-grandson of Nathan and Mehitable (Eaton) 
Paddock; great-grandson of Stephen Baton, private, Col. Samuel Wylly's Thud 
Regt., Conn, l.ine, pensioned. 

AI,<).\/(> WINSLGW PAIGE, -md, Schenectady, N. V. (32723). Son of John 
Keyes and Janet M.CIOlan ( Kranchol) Paige; grandson of John Keyes and 
Anna Maria (Blopugood) Paige; great-grandson of W'inslow and Clarissa 
(Keyes) Paige; great 2 -grandson of John Keyes, Captain, Twentieth Conn. 
Cont'l Regt., and Adjutant-General, Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

JOI1.N KEYES PAIGE, N. V. (31637). Supplemental. Son of John Keyes and 
Janet McClellan (Kranchot) Paige; grandson of John Keyes and Anna Maria 
(Uloodgood) Paige; great-grandson of W'inslow and Clarissa (Keyes) Paige; 
great-'-grandson of John and Mary (Wales) Keyes great-grandson of Jilisha 
Wales, Representative to Conn. General Assembly, 1776. 

JOHN MKKRIU, PAICK, Oregon City, Ore. (33139), Sou of Zeiio T. and 
Levina Harding (Steams) Paige; grandson of Joseph Merrill and Phila 
(Smith) Stearns; great-grandson of Nathaniel VV. and I,evina Harding 
(Strauss) Stearns; e.reat-grandson of Peter Strains, Lieutenant, New Hamp- 
shire Militia for Cont'l service. 

RICHARD FRANC110T I'AIGE, Schenectady, N. V. (32-879). Son of John 
Keyes and Janet McClellan ( Kranchot ) I'aige; grandson of John Keyes and 
Anna Maria (Blopdgood) Paige; great-grandson of W'inslow and Clarissa 
(Keyes) Paige; great-grandson of John Keyes, Adjutant-General, Conn. 
Militia; greaC-grandson of John and Mary (Wales) Keyes; greaC-grandson 
of Elisha Wales, Representative, Conn. General Assembly. 

THOMAS KING PAICK, White Plains, N. Y. (32893). Son of Charles Cutler 
and Jeannette Titus (Vail) Paige; grandson of David Raymond and Ellen 
Lewis (King) Paige; great-grandson of David Leicester and Bettie Wash- 
ington (Steele) King; great-grandson of Robert and Ellen Jael (Lewi.O 
Steele; great-grandson of Howell and Ellen Haekley (Pollard) Lewis; great-- 
grandson of Fielding Lewis, Brigadier General, Virginia Militia, Member 
Virginia Committee of Safety. 

IIKNRV WOOD PALKN, New York, N. V. (3^665). Son of Frank Archibald 
and Florence 1, (Humphrey) Palen; grandson of Frank and Anna tM.) 
Palen; great-grandson of Archibald and Elizabeth (Wood) Palen; great 2 - 
grandson of Paulus and Rachel (Shorter) Palen; great 3 -grandson of Petrus 
(Peter) Palen, private, Second Regt., Dutchess County, New York Militia. 

HENRY WILLIAM PA [/PRE Y, Alexandria, La. (33206). Son of Henry William 
and Francis Peyton (Finney) Palfrey; grandson of Henry William and Mary 
Lloomueld (Inslip) Palfrey; great-grandson of John and Mary (.Gorham) Pal- 
frey; great--grandson of William Palfrey, paymaster, Gen'l Continental forces, 
aide-de-camp to General Washington, Consul General to France. 

SOLON PALMER, New York, N. Y. (32617), Son of Eddy and Emma Louise 
(Davis) Palmer; grandson of Solon and Mary A. (Beckett) Palmer; great- 
grandson of James C. and Elizabeth (Burns) iSeckctt; grea*«-grandson of Jehu 
Beckett, private, Capt. Thomas Paxton's Co., I'.edford Knum>. l»a. Rangers, pen 
sioned. 
DJCANE WORKMAN PAKKER, Toledo, Ohio (3->839). Son of William Seely and 
• Clara Crane (Vance) Parker; grandson of Miles Wilson and Eliza (Brown) 
Vance; great-grandson of Wilson and Sarah (Wilson) Vance; great-grandson 



300 



SO N S O J? T HI- A M ERIC A N K K VO LV T I ( ) N . 



of Joseph Colvillc Vance, trooper, Capt. Saul Vail's Co., Col. Morgan's Rifle 
Regt., Virginia ContT Troops. 

RETNOIJ) MARVIN PARKER, I'. S. X. R., Hartford, Conn. (12*73). Son of 
John Marvin and Xulette Kenyon (Gilbert) Parker; grandson. of John Marvin 
and Kllcn M. (fT'otcbkiss-) Parieer; great-grandson of Marslvfrcld Sterling and 
AzubflJi Harvey (.Marvin) Parker; great 2 -grandson of Johh Parker, private, 
Conn. Militia. 

PERCY ni'J.M.W PARKS, New Orleans, Pa. (33975), Son of Henry Dolman 
and Mary jane (Cox) 1'arks; grandson of James Cary and Eliza Ann (liab- 
eoclO Parks; great-grandson of James and Catharine 1). (How) Babeock; great 8 - 
grandson of Isaac How, private, Colonel Ward's Rcgt., Mass. "Militia. 

FRED ORSON PARRISH, Waterloo, Iowa (32800). Son of Cuss Alvin and 
Florence May (Uvermore) Parrish; grandson of Park and Mary Ann (Correll) 
lavermore; great-grandson of Andrew Park and Betsy (Fuller) Uvermore; 
great-grandson of Jonas and Mary Park (Kelsey) l.ivermoie; greaL 8 -grandson 
of John Kcl.wy, Sergeant, Mass. Militia. 

HOMKK II. PARSHAFF, Detroit, Mich. (.52300). Son of Homer F.ll worth and 
Caroline Pauline (iCitel) Parshall; grands.;.) of James and Caroline (Kinney) 
Parshall; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) Parshall; great-'-grand- 
son of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; greaC-grandson of Jonathan 
Parshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia. 

JAMES K. PARSHAFF, Detroit, Mich. (336^6). Son of Homer Ellsworth and 
Caroline Pauline (Eitel) Par, hall; grandson of James and Caroline (Kinney) 
Parshall; great-grandson of Joseph and Clarissa (Moon) Parshall; great-grand- 
son of James and Elizabeth (Todd) Parshall; grcat s -grandson of Jonathan 
Parshall, private, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York Militia. 

JOHN EMORY PARSONS, Toledo, Ohio (33426). Son of John K. and Genrgi- 
anna (Parke) Parsons; grandson of Renjamin and Elizabeth (Leebrich) Parke; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Eunice (Champlin) Parke; great-grandson of 
Benjamin I'ark, Captain, Rhode Island Militia, mortally wounded at Bunker 
Hill. 

MAIIPOX WILDER PARSONS, Newark, N. J. (33793). Son of George Walter 
and Semanlha (Terry) Parsons; grandson of Hosiner and Mahalah (Tirller) 
Parsons; great-grandson of Paul Parsons, private, Middlesex County, Conn. 
Troops. 

KREPERICK RECK PATTERSON, Dayton, Ohio (3.2830). Son of John Henry 
and Katharine (Peck) Patterson; grandson of,- Jefferson and Juliana (JoliUFton) 
Patterson; greal-grands,,n of Robert ami Elizabeth (Lindsay) Patterson; 
great"-grandson of Krancis and lane < — ) Patterson; great-grandson of John 

and Mary ( ) Patterson; great'-grandson of Robert Patterson, Captain, 

Virginia Volunteers. 

JOHN HENRY PATTERSON, Dayton, Ohio (.328.51). Son of Jefferson and 
Juliana (Johnston) Patterson; grandson of Robert and Elizabeth (Findsay) 
Patterson; great-grandson of Francis and Jan« (— -) Patterson; great-grand- 
son of John and Mary ( ) Patterson; great n -grandson of Robert Patterson, 

Captain, .Virginia Volunteers. 

LAWRENCE PATTOX, ['. S. N., Chicago, III. ( .52X1.0. Sou of John and Frances 
Stevens (Foster) Palton; grandson of John and Catharine M. (Ennis) Pattoti; 
great-grandson of John and Susan (Antes) Patton ; great-grandson of John 
Paiton. Colonel. Peima. Additional Cont'l Regt.; great a -grand.son of Philip and 
Susanna (Williams) Antes; s-rcat :, -grandson of Henry Antes, l.ieutenant- 
Colonel, Third Battalion, Pa. Troops; great-grandson oi l'lnl,/< Anlt't, private, 
Xoithumhcrland County, Pa. Militia. 

JAMES PFTTpORpW PW'F, D. S. V, Salt Pake City, Utah (5121;). Sort of 
J. II. ami Annie (Peltegrew) Paul; grandson of David and Car. dine (Cope) 



REGISTER OR NEW MEMBERS. 



301 



Pettegrew; gi*eg.t-grandson of ■William Pettegrew, private, Col. Joseph Cilley's 
Regt,, New Hampshire Militia. 

LESLIE JOSHUA PAUL, l'ii'st Lieutenant (A. E. I\), Salt Lake City, Utah 
.(.h-mo). Sun of .!. II. ami Annie (Pettegrew) Raul; grandson of David, and 
Caroline ( Cope) Pettegrew; great-grandson of William Pettegrew, private, Col. 
Joseph Cilley's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

THEODORE DORR PAUL, Gloucester, Mass. (330^0). Son of Edwin Ruthven 
and Esther Goldthwaite (Don) Paul; grandson of Theodore Haskell and 
Nancy Caroline (Richards) Dorr; great-grandson of John and Esther (Cold- 
tluvaile) Dorr; great-grandson of Hbenecer Dorr, Jr., memher of lloston, Mass., 
Committee of Corresponde'tice", Inspection and Safety. 

CHARLES HENRY PAULSON, Pittsburgh, Pa. (30684). Supplemental. Son of 
Prank G. and Kale Conway (Macon) Paulson; grandson of Ruben Conway and 
Emma C. (Reily) Macon; great-grandson of James Madison and Lucetla (New- 
man) Macon; grem--grandson of Thomas and Lucy (Barbour) Macon; great 3 - 
grandson of Thomas Barbour, Lieutenant-Colonel, Virginia Militia. 

DANIEL McKEE PAULSON, Pennsylvania (30685). Supplemental. Son of 
Prank G. and Kate Conway (Maron) Paulson; grandson of Reuben Conwaj 
and Emma C. (Reily) Macon; great-grandson of James Madison and Lucelta 
(Newman) Macon; great-grandson of Thomas and l.ncy (Barbour) Newman; 
great :i -gran(Don of Thomas Barbour, Lieutenant-Colonel, Virginia' Militia. 

FRANCIS DAVIS PEALE, Utica, N. V. < N r . J. 33799)- Son of Algernon Thiers 
and Martha Givens (Davis) Peale; grandson of August in R. rind Virginia Peale; 
great-grandson of Charles Linneans and Christiana (Ruuyon) Peale; great'-'- 
grandson of Charles Wilson Peale, Captain, Fourth Battalion, Philadelphia In- 
fantry. 

HARRY DODDS PEASE, Dayton, Ohio (33174). Son of Oliver and Isabel 
(Dodds) Pease; grandson of James and Mary (Yeazell) Dodds; great-grandson 
of William Dodds, Captain, York County, Pa. Militia. 

CHARLES JIM, IDS PECK, Detroit, Mich. (32380). Son of Julius and Grace 
(Ashford) Reck; grandson of Chaunccy and Abl.y (Lewis.) Peek; great-grandson 
of EHsha and Milisceot (Ryington) Peck; great-grandson of Ariel Peck, private, 
Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

HOWARD PECK, Maplewood, N. J. (3_><>->i). Son of William and Ella Parsil 
Peck; grandson of lames and Harriet Marvin (Uedden) Reck; great-grandson 
of William and Fanny (Canftekl) Reck; great 2 -graudson of James and Hannah 
(Cantleld) Peck; great-grandson of David and Mary (Williams) Peck; ur-at'- 
grandson of Joseph Park, private, Second Regt., Essex County, N. J., Militia; 
grandson of William H. and Joan (Burnet) Parsil; great-grandson of Samuel 
and Betsey (Ball) Burnet; great 2 -grandson of Aimer and Rachel (Robertson) 
Rail; great-grandson of Thomas Ball, Quartermaster and Orderly Sergeant, 
Capt. Isaac Gillam's Co., New Jersey, Militia, pensioned. 

PRANK CHAPMAN PELLETT, Atantic, Iowa (33801). Sou of Ambrose ami 
Ellen (Chapman) Pellelt; grandson of Jnsou and Pha-be Delia (Rogers) Pellett; 
Kreat-graudson of Daniel and Urenin Tajnson (Dayton) Rogers; great -'-gram! son 
of S'jwuu'l Rogers, private, Col. Roger Enos' Uattalion, Conn. State Troops. 

LEWIS DOR'MAN PERKINS, Park Ridge, III. (3339?)> Son of Benjamin Ring 
and Mary (Rees) Perkins; grandson of Dorman and Nancy (Ring) Perkins; 
great-grandson of Hlisha Perkins, private, Mass! Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

PRANK IVEUSON RRRRY, Woiidbridge, N. L ' .1 I I— ' »• Son ,,f St. ph. n B. 
and Charlotte Amelia ( \lmy) I'en s ; grandson u( \ndre« and Mary (Tcnnant) 
Almy; ureal Kiandso,, „f Juntas Tennant, Sergeant, Uliodu Island Militia, en- 
listed on Privateei "General Milllin," taken prisoner; private, Maryland Militia, 



302 SONS OF Till- AM I- l< I CAN REVOLUTION. 

FREDERICK LORD PERRY, New Haven, Conn. (3.2874). Son of Edwin Niies 
and Fedora Elizabeth ( 1.<..«1 ) Perry; grandson ..l" Noble Everett, and Betsey 
Pools (Hockley? fcarel; great-grandson of George and Abigail (Everett) Lord; 
great-grarfclybn of tfoMc EiWett, Chaplain, Conn. Troops. 

SIDNEY MARCKI.I.US I'l I KI.A N, Jr., Three Rivers*, Mich. (Mo., 33195). Son 
Of Sidney Marcellus and ftnina (Harrison) Phelan; grandson of Joseph II. 

and Lama (Powell) Phelan; great-grandson of John and Mrs. Priscilla (). 
(Ford) Morris; great-grandson of John I'm J, Captain, Maryland Militia; 
great-grandson of John and Millicent (llyland) Ford; great-grandson of 
Stephen iiyUuui, Colonel, Independent Maryland Militia. 

W I 1 ,1.1AM IJALFOUR PHELAN, St. Louis, Mo. (33196), Son of Sidney Mar- 
eelhts and Emma (Harrison) Phelan; grandson of Joseph II. and Lama 
(Powell) Phelan; great-grandson of John and Mrs. Priscilla <>. (Ford) Morris; 
. grcat--grandson of John If or J, Captain, Maryland Militia; great-grandson of 
John and Miliicenl (llyland-) Ford; greaf'-grandson of Stephen Hyland, Colonel, 
Independent Maryland Militia. 

DRYDICN WILLIAM PHELPS, New Haven, Conn. (592). Supplemental. Son 
of Sylvanus Dryden and Sophia Emilia (Linsley) Phelps; grandson of James 
Harvey and Sophia Krainerd (Lyon) Linsley; great-grandson of James and 
Sarah (Maltl.y) Linsley; great-grandson of Benjamin Mallhy. Captain, "trained 
land," Conn. Militia. 

ALBERT I'll KX IS, Catonsville, Md. (33124). Son of Isaac R. and Emily 
(Gardner) Phenis; grandson of Solomon and Elizabeth (Hammond) Phenis; 
great-grandson of Isaac Hammond, private, Capt. George Houston's Co., 
Colonel Morgan's Regt., Virginia Troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM itLTTJCLL PHILBROOK, Charlestown, Mass. Iuojj). Son o* Wil- 
liam S. and Malo (Retted) Philhrook; grandson of Charles E. and 1'. Augusta 
I!. (Stiekley) Rettell; great-grandson of George Parker and Lorinda (Branch) 
Rett- 11; great-grandson of James Ketiell, Adjutant, Second Regt., Essex 
County, Mass. Militia. 

JAMES EATON PHILLIPS, Marion, Ohio (3340o). Son of Samuel and Mary 
Ann (Ellis) Phillips; grandson of Richard and Mary P. (Selover) Ellis; great- 
grandson of John and Ahilena (Phillips) l-'JIis, Jr.; greaf-'-grandson of John 
Ellis, Second Lieutenant, Fifth Regt., Hampshire County, Mass. Militia. 

WALTER BELLEVILLE PHILLIPS, Captain, U, S. A., N. V. (3,i^v>). Son of 

Horace ami Anna Elizabeth (Pease) Phillips; grandson of Jonathan Dickinson 
and Luciana Ziegler (Greene) Phillips; great-grandson of Horatio Gates and 
Eliza Smith (Houston) Phillips; great-grandson of Jonathan Phillips., Captain, 
Second Regt., New Jersey Cpnt'l Troops. 

HAROLD JESSE PIERCE, Lieutenant, Medical Corps, Terre Haute, Ind (32050). 
Son of Harry Maldon and Mint (Kennedy) Pierce; grandson of Chester and 
Harriet (Lily) Pierce; great-grandson of Shepard and Sarah (Coolbaugh) 
Pierce; great-grandson of Moses Coolbaugh, Lieutenant, Fifth Battalion, North 
Hampton County, Pa, Associators and Militia; great-grandson of William 
Coolbaugh, private, North Hampton County, Pa. State Troops. 

ALBERT WARING PIERSON, Niagara Falls, N. Y. (33606). Son of George W. 
and Juliet Eliza (Avery) Pierson; grandson of Ellsworth and Laura (Pierson) 
Avery; great-grandson of Aaron and Anna (Kinne) Avery; great-grandson of 
Amos A'vcry, Minute .Man, Conn. Militia at Lexington Alarm and attack on 
New London. 

GEORGE F. PINKERTON, Brighton, Mass. (335-7). Son of George F. and Mary 
C. (Myers) Pinkerton; grandson of Thomas II. and Mary A. (Trull) Pinker- 
ton; great-grandson of John and Sarah (More) Trnll; great-grandson of 
Samuel Trail, private. Mass. Militia; great 8 -grandson of John Trull, private, 
Mass. Militia, at Siege of Boston. 



REGISTER Ob" NEW MUMHI'kS. 303 

JORR ALFRED PIPER, Lincoln, Nebr. (3 1019). Sun of Joseph Benson and 
Rucinda (Ford) Piper; grandson of Joel and ITuklah (Burdick) Piper; great- 
grandson of Caleb Piper, private, Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Janus and 
Phoebe (Smith) Biir'click; great-'-grancjson of Robert Bur dick, private, Berkshire 
Comity, Mass. Militia. 

HENRY PIRTRE, Captain, UP. S. A., Cleveland, Ohio (Ky. 33025). Son of Henry 
and Ivy (Walking 1'irtle; grandson of John R. and F.lmira (Sehurig) Pirtle; 
great-grandson of Henry and Jane Anne (Rogers) Pirtle; great--grandsou of 
Colnian and Jane (Farrar) Rogers; great-grandson of Joseph Rogers, private, 
Virginia Militia and member Committee of Safety. 

RRANKRIN CARPRNTRR PRATT, Waterloo, Iowa (31967). Son of John Daly 
and Julia Elizabeth (Carpenter) Piatt; grandson of Joseph and Hannah (Olm- 
stead) Carpenter; great-grandson of Nathaniel Carpenter, private, Captain 
Draper's Company, Colonel Gardner's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

S. JOHNSON PO.lv, Baltimore, Md. (33118). Son of John Prentiss and Anna 
Johnson (Hough) Poe; grandson of Neilson and Josephine Emily (Clcmm) 
L'oe ; great-grandson of Jacob and Bridget Amelia Fitzgerald (Kennedy) Poe; 
Rreat--grandson of George Roe, Captain, Thirty-fourth Battalion, Frederick 
County, Maryland Militia. 

HARRY LINCOLN POLLOCK, Belleville, N. J. (32916). Son of William 
Bloomer and Rucia Maria (Cram) Pollock; grandson of Henry Lourens and 
Mary Frances (Reed) Cram; great-grandson of Stephen and Mary (Grant) 
Read; great-grandson of Bartholomew Read, private, Mass. Militia. 

HENRY WARNER POND, Evanston, 111. (33098). Son of Warner J. and Anna 
(Eager) Pond; grandson of John II. and Mary (Wetliercll) Eager; great-grand- 
son of Paul and Elizabeth (Partridge) Eager; grcat"-grandson of Amos Part- 
ridge, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia. 

WALTER ELMER POND, Chicago, 111. (33089). Son of Walter Merrilt and 
Sarah Ann (Webb) Pond; grandson of Merritt and Ariadne (Soper) Pond; 
great-grandson of Bartholomew Poiul, Lieutenant, Conn. Militia; great-grandson 
of Bartholomew and Elizabeth (Dunbar) Pond; great 2 -grandsbn of Joel Dunbar, 
drummer ami private, Firs* Regt., Conn. Militia; great 3 -gran.dson of John Dun- 
bar, private, Fifth Regl.', Coon. I, in.-; great-grandson of Amos 1 ). and Raster 
(Cuoke) Soper; great-'-grai'idson of Oliver Cook, private, Conn. Cont'I Troops, 
pensioned. 

EDWIN RRIG11T POUCH, San Antonio, Texas (15673). Supplemental. Son of 
Rate 11 Bennett and Hester (Edwards) Porch; grandson of Thomas ami Mary 
(Dudley) Edwards; gnat grandson of William and Cynthia (Barnes) Dudley; 
great'-'-grandson of William Dudley, private, Virginia Militia. 

RA FA.YETTE lit VAN PORTER, South Bend, Iud. (HI. 33398). Sou of Wil- 
liam Franklin and Abigail Gore (Re Van) Porter; grandson of John W. and 
Catherine (Weiss) f,e Van; great-grandson of I'cter and Abigail (Gore) Re 
Van; gr-eat 2 -grandson of Jacob Le I 'an, Lieutenant, Fourth Co., Berk's County, 
Pa. Militia; great :! -graiuRon of Sebastian Le Van* Colonel, .Seventh Battalion, 
Berk's County, Pa. Militia, Member Committee of Observation. 

ALFRED HENRY POST, New York City, N. Y. (33355). Son of Rlisha and 
Carrie (Cornell) Post; grandson of Jehial and Elizabeth Post; great-grandson 
of David Post, private, New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

HERBERT KARL POST, Steilacoom, Wash. (j->47-0- Son of Herbert C. and 
Adaline (Harney) Post; grandson of l,a Payette and Huldah R. (Root) Post; 
great-grandson of Truman and Elizabeth (Atwater) Pom ; great--grandson of 
Roswell Post, Jr., Sergeant, Conn. Militia; greaR-gramRoii of Rosivell Post, 
Sergeant and Clerk, Conn. Militia. 

SAMUEL POWRR, Newport, R. I. (32480). Son of Samuel and Hope h-cs 
d'.inney) Puwci; grandson of William and Charlotte Hope (Ooddnrd) Uiniiey; 



304 SONS (.)!• TIM'; AMERICAN REVOEUT l() N . 

great-grandson of Horace and Elizabeth (Cox) Binney; great-'-grandson of John 
Co.v, Member Pa. Provincial Convention and Council of Safety, Pieutenant- 
Colonel, Second Battalion Pa. .Militia and Assistant Quartermaster General; great-'- 
grandson, of Bamnbas Binney, Hospital Surgeon, Cont'l Army; great-grandson 
of William Giles and Charlotte Rhoda (Ives) C.oddard ; great-grandson of 
Thomas Poynlon and Hope (Brown) Ives; great ;1 -grandson of Nicholas Broivn, 
Member of Rliode Island Special War Committees; grea't-gran'dson of William 
and Abigail (Angell) Coddard; great'-grandson of James Aitgell, Colonel, Provi- 
dence County, R, P, Militia and Member Special War Committees. 

MAX P. POWPPP, .Burlington, N't. (J38_>6) ( . Sou of Henry suit] Ellen Grace 
(/Powell) Powell; grandson of Herman and Julia S. (White) Powell; great- 
grandson of Bradford and Clara (Gaff) Powell; great 2 -grandson of Hesckiah 
Cuff, private, Conn. Militia, and privateersnian on ship "Oliver Cromwell," 

CHARLES HENRY POWERS, Boston, Mass. (.53540). Son of William II. and 
Susan Eliza (Perkins) Powers; grandson of Charles and Susan (Lufkin) Per- 
kins; great-grandson of Samuel and Judith (Saunders) Pufkin; great-'-grandson 
of Moses Litfkin, Drum Major, pssex County, Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM POCKWOOi) POWERS, Hempstead, N. V. (N. J., 33788). Son of 
Henry I), and Henrietta Elizabeth (Dodd) Powers; grandson ui William 
Pigeluw and Phebe ( Pockwood) Taylor; great-grandson of Abiather and Mary 
(Bigelow) Dodd; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Dodd, Pienteuant, Essex County, 
New Jersey Militia. 

DONAI.D RICHARDSON PRATT, Second Lieutenant (C. A. R. C), Montclair, 
N. J. (33794). Son of Charles Richardson and Mary Byron (Ladd) Piatt; 
grandson of John C. and Mary Ann (Richardson) Pratt; great-grandson of 
Alfred and Rebecca Richardson; great-grandson of pzekiel and Sally (Rice) 
Richardson; great 3 -grandson of John Richardson, private, Col. job Cushing's 
Pegt., Worcester County, Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD HOUGHTON PRENTISS, -Vancouver, Wash. (Ore 33134). Son of 
Samuel I'Mward ami Jennie Weeks (Campbell) Prentiss; grandson of Charles 
William and Caroline (Kellog) Prentiss; great-grandson of Samuel and Pucretia 
(Houghton) Prentiss; grcat-'-grandson of Samuel and Pucretia (Holmes; 
Prentiss; grcat :l -grandson of Samuel Prentiss (Prentice), Pieutenant-Colonel, 
Conn. Cont'l Troops. 

HpNRY MOEEPER PRENTISS, Rutherford; N. J. (33790). Son of Roberi 
Swayne and Ella (Eorfey) Prentiss; grandson of Sylvanus Beckwitli and Mary 
(Godfrey) Prentiss; great-grandson of Stephan and Marie Elizabeth (Beckwith) 
Prentiss; great a -grandson of Nathan Becktvith, private. 

RAYMOND BLAKE PRESCOTT, Detroit, Mich. (33031). Son of Frederick A. 
and Fannie (Barnes) Preseott; grandson of James Tilton and Lucy (Barnes) 
Prescott; great-grandson of Abraham Perkins and Nancy (Martin) Prescott; 
great-grandson of Jesse and Abigail (Towle) Prescott; grcat/'-grandson of 
James Prescott, private, Colonel Drake's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

ALEXANDER PRESTON, Baltimore, Md. (jjj itO- Son of J. Alexander and 
Aehsah Ridgely (Carroll) Preston; grandson of j. Alexander and Caroline 
(Perryman) Preston; great-grandson of Per.nard and Sarah Pell (Bond) Pres- 
ton; great'-'-grandson of JueuU Bond, Captain, Harford County, Maryland 
Militia, Member Provincial Assembly and fust Maryland Constitutional Con- 
vention. 

WARPER W. PRESTON* [$d Air, Md. (33120). Son of James Bond am! Mary 
A. (Wilks) Preston, Jr.; grandson of James Rood and Eliza A. Preston; great 
grandson of Bernard and Sarah (Rood) Preston; great-grandson of Jaeob 
Bond, Captain, Harford County, Maryland Militia; Member first Maryland 
Constitutional Convention and Provincial Assembly. 

GEORGE GUY PRINCE, Buffalo, N. Y. (3.-8X1). Sou of Alpheus and Angelina 
P. (Mead) Prince; grandson of David and Aha (Poiueroy) Prince; great- 



REGISTER 01? NKW MEMBERS. 



3<>5 



grandson of Samuel Porter Prince, private, Capt. Win. Clark's Co., Col. Benja- 
min Symond's Regt., Mass. Militia; great 2 -grandsbn of David Prince, private, 
Colonel Barnes' and Colonel Murry's Regts., Hampshire County, Mass. Militia. 

EDWARD GRAVES PRINGL& Summit, N. J. (33406). Son of Edward M. and 
Annie Graves (Webb) Pringle; grandson of James Thaddeus and Sarah Ann 
(Ferney) Webb: great-grandson of Milton and Martha (Kdwards) Perney; 
great--grandson of Ambrose Edwards, Virginia soldier under I^afayette. 

WIUJAM KENT .PUDNEY, Captain Medical Corps (A. E. FA, Montclair, X. J. 
(33790. Son of John C. and Janet (Kent) Pudney; grandson of John-]!. 
and Kli/.abeih (Adriance) Pudney; great-grandson of Charles Piatt and Sarah 
(Camp) Adriance; greaP'-graiulson of Aaron and Rebecca (Brucn) Camp; 
grcat :, -grandson of Hathanial Camp, Captain of Artillery, Second Regt., Essex 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

['RANK KDWARDS I'D X! H'.RSON, Springfield, Mass. (33548). Son of James 
II. and Clara Mary (Kdwards) Punderson; gramlson of James Mellen and 
Mary Leeds (Mellin) Punderson; great-grandson of Kovett Russell and 
l.ucrctia (Taylor) Mellen; great'-'-grandson of William II. and Lucretia 
(Marsh) Mellen; grcaD-grandson of James Mellen. I .ieutenaut-Colonel, Mass. 
Cont'l Troops. 

ROBERT MOSBY PULLIAM, Richmond, \a. (3-9.ll). Son of Robert Mosby and 
Kmma Louise ((-old) Pulliani; grandson of Samuel Thompson, and Clara 
Waller (Godfrey) Pulliam; great-grandson of Mosby Pulliani, private, Virginia' 
Militia. 

KKWIS A1SRAM PULLING, W. La. Fayette, Ind. (32048). Son of William M. 
and Julia (llascall) Pulling; grandson of Chauncey S. and Kmma Pamelia 
(Brown) llascall; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Hannah (Shay) Brown; 
great'-'-grandson of Martin and Sarah (Hammond) l!rown; greal ;1 -grandson of 
William Hammond, private, Conn. Militia. 

BURTON KKK PURVINES, Phccnix, Ariz. (23317). Son of Green Lee and 
Louisa (Potter) Purvines; grandson of Alexander C. and Margaret (Wedding- 
ton) Purviues; great-grandson of John Purvines, private, South Carolina Militia, 
5 years' service. 

SAMl'KK RUSH ODICKKY, Peoria, 111. (3281.1), Son of Samuel and Rebecca 
(Huston) Onigk-y; grandson of Samuel ami Rebecca (McMa'slers) Quigley; 
great-grandson of John Qmgl&y, private, First Battalion, Cumberland Comity, 
Pa. Militia. 

CK1KTOX CLARK QUIMBV, Maiden, Mass. (32576). Son of Herman Haines ami 
Amy Marelta (Clark) (Juimby; grandson of John Monlton and Sarah Sturtevaut 
(Haines) (Juimby; great-grand son of John Smith and Nancy (Marston) 
Quimby; great-grandson of Enoch Qnimby; great 3 -grandson of Aaron Qitimby, 
Captain, Col. Moses Kelly's Regt., New Hampshire Troops; grcat--graudson of 
John Marston, private, New Hampshire Troops; grcaD-grandson of Jonathan 
Moulton. Colonel, New Hampshire Militia, representative from town of 
Moultonborough, N. 11.; great-grandson of Josiah and Sally (Sturtevaut) 
Haines; great--grandson of Ilosea Sturtevaut ; private, Col. Jacobs' Mass. Regt., 
prisoner on ship "Jersey/' pensioned ; grandson of Langdon Doddard and Ann 
Maria (P.eedei Clark; great-grandson of Elijah and Ann (Felch) Rccdc; great- 
grandson of Nathan and Dorothy (Scrilmcr) Beede; great 8 -grandson of Daniel 
Beetle, Delegate to h'ifih Provincial Congress at Exeter. N. II. 

JAMES JOHNSON OUINN, Houston, Texas (29486). Son of James Whitsell 
and Susan Frances (Johnson) Oninn; grandson of Janus and Sallie (Bruce) 
Johnson; great-grandson of ll'illiam Bruce, private, Culpeper County, Virginia 
M ilitia. 

JAMES REED OUINN, •Beaumont, Texas (29495). Son of James Johnson and 
Mattie ICditll (Peed) Qtiinii; grand-,,, n of George Walker ami Minerva Nar- 
cissus <KMes) Reed; Ri-eat-Rrandson of [llincoc Wadswurth am! Margery Ann 



306 sons oi- Tine American revolution. 

(Ellis) Reccl; grest 2 -grandson of William Need, private, Col. Thomas Clark's 

Regt., North Carolina Troops. 

OKAN LEE RABER, Cambridge, Mass, (33528). Son of Levi 1,. and Eliza 
(Cowley) Raber; grandson of William and Sarah (Olin) Cowley; great-grand- 
son of Samuel and Betsy (Green) Olin; great 2 -grandson of Ezra and Ruth 
(Green) Olin; great 3 -grandson of John Olin, private, Vermont Militia. 

WILLIAM WHEAT RAGSDALE, Rutherford, N. J. (33328). Son of John Wes- 
ley and. Aphelia (Wheat) Ragsdale; grandson of Anderson M. and Jane C. 
(Carson) Ragsdale;. great-grandson of William and Marguerite (Hunter) 
Ragsdale; great s -grandspn of Godfrey Ragsdale, Lieutenant and Quartermaster, 
Col. Theodoric Bland's Regt., Virginia Militia, Midshipman, Sloop of War 
"Liberty," pensioned. 

JAMES MINOR RAINS, Lebanon, Ky. (33033)- Son of William and Rehecca 
Ann (Minor) Rains; grandson of Jeremiah and Frances .Moss (Guthrie) Rains; 
great-grandson of James Rains, private, Col. William Grayson's Regt.j Virginia 
Troops, pensioned. 

HARRY WELLS RANSDELL, Washington, I). C. (33263)- Son of Edward S. 
and Frances E. (Leonard) Ransdell; grandson of John II. and Mary ly (Grubb) 
Ransdell; great-grandson oi Thomas Ransdell, Captain, Third Regt,, Virginia 
Troops. 

HARMON CAMP RAY, Youngslown, Ohio (32319). Sou of Henry Wilfred and 
Oametle (Camp) Ray; grandson of William and Maryettc (Austin) Ray; great- 
grandson of Harmon Williams and Charlotte (Bishop) Austin; «reaf-'-gran«Kon 

( ,f Kli and Berlina (Austin) Shepard; greaFVgi andson of L'lias and Rebecca 

(Williams) Shepard; great '-grandson of Thomas Shepard, Rieulenanl in Colonel 
Wadsworth's Conn. State Regt., and Captain, Conn. Militia. 

JACK SOULARD RAYMOND, Chicago, 111. (32806). Son of Harry Sherwood 
and Caroline (McCloskey) Raymond; grandson of George N. and l'luebe K. 
(Yarwood) Raymond; great-grandson of George R. and Catherine R. (Sher- 
wood) Raymond; great'--grand.son of Neivcomb Raymond, private. Second Regt., 
Conn. Hine, pensioned; grandson of Henry F. and Theresa (Soulard) Mc- 
Closkey; great-grandson of James Gustav and Eliza Mitchell (Hunt) Soulard; 
great-grandson of Thomas Hunt, Captain, C<;nu. and Mass. Cont'l Troops. 

WILLIAM THOMAS RAYNKR, Springfield, Mas-,. (33278). Smi of Wdliam 
Henry ami Jeanie (Rainier) Rayner; grandson of Thomas Lilc and Eunice 
(Learned) Rayner; great-grandson of Henry and I'hebe (Lealherbee) Learned; 
great"-gi andson of Jedediah Learned, private, Mass. Militia. 

DAVID MERRILL REED, Chicago, ill. (33660). Sou of Frank Merrill nm] 

Mollie (Clark) \<evd; grandson of David Merrill and Dolly A. (Welch) Reed; 
great-grandson of Neherhiah and Dolly (Rage) Welch; great-grandson of 
lidmund Welch, private, York County, Mass. Militia. 

ROBERT RIRDSl'.YK, \i\\\\\\ Amt-uia, No. Dak. (33003). Son of John Horace 
and Florence Adde (Chaffee) \We>\; grandson of Newton and Ann (Van 
Dyek) Reed; great-grandson of Ezra an. I Esther (Edgerton) Reed; great s -grand- 
son of liliakim Reed, private, Dutchess County, New York Militia; great- 
grandson of Simeon Bdgvrhon, Captain, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of Demy 
L. and Catherine (Van Alen) Van Dyek; greats-grandson of I. omens Van Dyek, 
private, Seventeenth Regt., Albany County, .New York Militia; grandson of 
Eben Whitney and Amanda (Fuller) Chaffee; great-grandson of Joshua Big- 
nall and Hannah (R.irdseye) Chaffee; greal-'-grandson of Joshua Chaffee, private, 
Sharon, Conn., Householders; greal-'-graudson of John Fuller, Sergeant, CajA. 
Bcnj. Conklin's Company, Colonel Arnold's Regt., Conn. Militia, pensioned; 
great-grandson of Cyrus Sacked and Harriet (Skiff) Fuller; great-grandson of 
Nathan and Abigail Fuller ShilT, Jr.; greaC-gramlson of Nathan Sniff, private, 
Capt. Abraham Fuller's Company, Conn. Militia. 

WARREN BETTISON REED, Morgan City, La. (32754). Son of Lyman Cole- 
man and Kale (Bcttison) Reed; grandson of Warren Atlierton and Louisa 



REGISTER OF NEW M l\M Itl'RS. 307 

(Lyman) Reed; great-grandson of Warren and Mary (Atherton) Reed; great 2 - 
grandsori of Benjamin Need, Corporal, Mass. Militia. 
MRRR1TT 1$. REEVE, East Orange, N. J. (.33402). Son of George W. and 
Laura (Brokaw) Reeve; grandson of Abner D. and Sarah Caroline (Baldwin) 
Reeve; great-grandson of Daniel and Catherine (Meeker) Baldwin; great- 
grandson of Michael Meeker, private, New Jersey Milil'ia, State Troops and 
Conl'l Army. 

ELTINGE FERREE RK1FSNI DJCR, Westminster, Md. (33104). Son of John 
Lawrence and Lethe (I /isle) Reifsnider, Jr.; grandson of John Lawrence and 
Mary Anna (Shriver) Reifsnider; great-grandson of Augustus and Maria Louise 
(Keener) Shriver; great—grandson of Jacob and Anna Eva (llupert) Shriver; 
great a -grandson of David Shriver, Lieutenant-Colonel, Maryland Militia, Mem- 
ber Maryland Constitutional Convention, Committee of Observation, and Fred- 
erick County Court of '•/?. 

ROE REISINGER, Franklin, Pa. (32169). Son of Charles and Providence (Rob- 
erts) Reisinger; grandson of Peter and Catherine (Heckert) Reisinger; great- 
grandson of Peter Reisinger, private, Capt. Alexander Liggit's Company, Third 
Battalion, York County, Pa. Militia. 

ANDREW JACKSON RKMINC.TON, Vancouver, Wash. (Oregon 31094). Son of 
Benjamin F. and Lydia (Rice) Remihgton; grandson of Benjamin Remington, 
private) Mass. Cont'l Troops. 

WILLIAM CLIFFORD RENTON, Newark, N. J. (3373y). Son of William J. 
and Caroline (Magcr) Ronton; grandson of James M. and Hannah A. (.Riddle) 
Ronton; great-grandson of John and Hannah (.Van Dike) Biddle; great—grand- 
son of Aaron Biddle, Jr., Captain, Col. Samuel Dick's Battalion, Salem County, 
New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM J. RENTON, Newark, N. J. (3373*)- Sou of James M. and Hannah 
A. (Riddle) Ronton; grandson of John and Hannah (Van Dike) Biddle; great- 
grandson of Aaron Biddle, Jr., Captain, Col. Samuel Dick's Battalion, Salem 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

ALBERT DUFF REYNOLDS, Braddock, Pa. (32980). Son of Malhew Robert 
and Martha J. (McClelland) Reynolds; grandson of William and Fliza Ann 
(McCune) McClelland; great-grandson of William and Mary (Craig) McClelland; 
grea("-gr;mdsoii of William and Esther (Craig) McClelland; greats-grandson of 
Samuel Craig, Lieutenant, Col. John Proctor's Battalion, Westmoreland County, 
Pa. Militia. 

BRONTE A. REYNOLDS, D.C. (25,708). Supplemental. Son of Elmer Robert 
and Susan Doriuda (Althonse) Reynolds; grandson of Conrad and Miranda 
(Slick) (Selich) Altliouse; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Yickroy) 
Slick (Selich); great-grandson of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Atlee) Yickroy; 
great :, -grandson of William Augustus Alice, Chairman, Committee of Safety, 
and Commissary, Superintendent of Arsenal, Lancaster, l'a. 

IRA PHETTYFLACE EVANS REYNOLDS, Portland, Oregon (33138). Son of 
Fred A. and Lucy A. (Evans,) Reynolds; grandson of John D. and Mary J. 
(llannum) Reynolds; great-grandson of Stiles and Lydia (Miller) lfannum; 
great-grandson of Moses Hannum, private, Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

JOHN DICKINSON RHOADES, Toledo, Ohio (33703). Sou of Edward Henry 
and Hannah Sophia ( Khoades) Rhoades; grandson of Lewis limit and Rachel 
Parsons (Williams) Khoades; great-grandson of Samuel Rhoades {Rhodes), 
private, Mass. Cont'l Troops, 

HERMAN SWEETSER KIRJ, Marian, Ohio (j3-t-'8)- Son of Auguste and Helen 
Sweetser (Swcney) Rhu; grandson of Robert Lcepc'r and Elizabeth (Concklin) 
Sweeney; great-grandson of W. W. and Sophia (Sweetser) Concklin; great- 
grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Williams) Concklin, _>d ; great-grandson of 
Isaac Ccmcklin, Captain, Fourth Regt., Dutchess County, New York- Militia. 



308 SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

CHARLES HENRY RICK, Buffalo, N. V. (32609), Sun of Will. am and Emma A. 
(Buck) Rice; grandson of William Dana and Sarah K. (Bennett) Ruck; great- 
grandson of Frederick and Jane (Killam) Bennett; great 2 -grandson of Stephen 
and Mary (Gates) Bennett; great 3 -grandson of Nathaniel Gates, private, Colonel 
Holmes' Fourth Regt., New York Line. 

GEORGE TROWBRIDGE RICE, New Haven, Conn. (32272). Son of George an. I 
Emilia Elizabeth (Flower) Rice; grandson of Reuben and Klinor Paris (Root) 
Rice; great-grandson of Joel and Elinor (Strong) Root; great-'-graiidson of 
John Strong, Captain, Torringford, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of lilisha 
Root, Lieutenant, First Company, Colonel Walcplt's Regt., Conn; Cont'l Troop-,. 

LLOYD IIOFF RICE, Hutchinson, Kans. (33304). Son of Gustavus Adolphus 

and Sallie Ann ( ) Rice; grandson of Moses Hill and Susan (Jones) Riee; 

great-grandson of George Rice; great--grandson of George Rice, private, Bucks 
County, Pa. Militia. 

ARTHUR SYLVESTER RICHARDSON, Massachusetts (31745). Supplemental. 
Son of George Henry and Emogene (Gale) Richardson; grandson of Solomon 
and Mary Isabel (Stratton) Richardson; great-grandson of Solomon and 
Cynthia (Rice) Richardson; great-grandson of Jesse Rice, private, Col. Dan- 
forth Key's Regt., Mass. Militia; great ;i -grandson of Oliver Rice, private, 
Brookfield, Mass. Militia. 

CORNELIUS THOMAS RICHARDSON, Forest Grove, Ore. (31097). Son of 
George K. and Eva (Homer) Richardson; grandson of Orin and Elizabeth 
(Kent) Richardson; great-grandson of Joseph and Jane (Rideout) Richardson; 
great--grandson of Benjamin Allen Richardson, private, Colonel Lewis' Regt., 
Mass. Troops. 

WARREN RICHARDSON, Cheyenne, Wyo. (30010). Son of Warren and Mary 
( Kabis) Richardson; grandson of Warren and Clarissa (Dix) Richardson; great- 
grandson of Thomas and I'hilenda (Wright) Richardson; great-grandson of 
Abijah Richardson, private, "Carpenter's Regt.," Mass. Militia for Cont'l 
service. 

CHARLES SWIFT RICHF, Colonel, U. S. Army, Mo. (33184). Son of George 
Inman and Elizabeth Ramsay (WetherilD Riche; grandson of William and 
Isabella (Macomb) Wetherill; great-grandson of Samuel and Rachel (Price) 
Wether-ill; great 2 -grandson of John and Rebecca (Morgan) Price; great-grand- 
son of Jacob Morgan, Colonel, lurks County, Pa. Militia, Member Supreme 
Executive Council, Delegate to Constitutional Convention of '76. 

LEWIS DANIEL RIGHTS, Roseile, N. J. (32686). Son of Theodore M. and 
Hannah Weaver (Riegel) Rights; grandson of Christian L. and Elizabeth Bal- 
four (Hughes) Rights; great-grandson of Johna Rights; great-'-grandson of 
John and Mary M. Kicks (Luckin) Rights; great-grandson of Matheto Rights, 
Rhode Island Minute Man. 

HARRY ALBERT RILEY, Spalding, Neb. (32952). Son of John James and 
Catharine Kidman (Brunei - ) Riley; grandson id J. din Gauge-ware and Judith 
(Krdman) Primer; great-grandson of Andrew Bmner, private, Second Battalion, 
Northampton County, Pa. Associators. 

HARVEY MOREHOUSE ROBERTS, Millbum, N. J. (337*5). Son of George \V. 
and Louisa Baldwin (Morehouse) Roberts; grandson of Harvey Williams and 
Juliet Woods (Baldwin) Morehouse; great-grandson of Jacob and l.ydia (Bald- 
win) Morehouse; grcat 2 -grandson of David and Elizabeth (Reeve) Baldwin) I 
great ; '-graudson of linos Baldwin, Minute Man, Middlesex County, New Jersey 
Militia. 

HENRY HASKINS ROBERTS, Buffalo, N. Y. (33357). Son of Abner S. and 

Mary Finette (Haskins) Roberts; grandson of Enoch and Mary (Wadsworth) 
llaskins, 3d; great grandson of Enoch ami Kydia (Ackley) Haskins, 2d; great- 
grandson of Enoch Haskins, transportation service and private, Mass. Cont'l 
Troops, pensioned. 



REGISTER Ol«- NEW MEMIM-US. 309 

JOHN CALVIN ROBERTS, St. Louts, M.i. (33176). Son of James Madison and 
Louisa (Conley) Roberts; grandson of James M. and — — (Rose); great- 
grandson of Philip Rose, Ensign, Virginia Troops, pensioned. 

JOSEPH BECKHAM ROBERTS, Mast Orange, N. J. (33403). Son of Joseph 
Beckham and Katherine Jane (Bruen) Roberts; grandson of Theodore W. and 
Caroline (Miller) Bruen; great-grandson of Smith Maxwell and Catherine 
(Coddington) Miller; great-grandson of Smith and Rachel Miller; great-grand- 
son of John Miller, Sergeant, Third Regt., New Jersey Cont'l Troops, Yolnn- 
teer in capture of British ship "Klne Mountain Valley." 

RALPH SMITH ROBERTS, New Orleans, La. (32760).. Son of Aaron Wilkins 
and Caroline Haven (Smith) Roberts; grandson of Joseph Freeman and 
Prances Amelia (Mills) Smith; great-grandson of Hiram and Hepsibah 
(Haven) Mills; great-grandson of Nathaniel and Mary (Codlidge) Haven; 
great-grandson of David Haven, private, Mass. Militia. 

1HTI.TNG PARKER ROBERTSON, Jr., U. S. N. R. P., Temple, Texas (29494). 
Son of Hiding P, and Mary Catlin (Cooke) Robertson; grandson of Charles 
and Susan Catlin (Reavis) Cooke; great-grandson of Turner and Sarah Cath- 
erine (Catlin) Reavis; great—grandson of John and Susan (Caswell) Catlin; 
great— grandson of Richard Caswell, Major-General, North Carolina Militia, 
President Provincial Congress, First North Carolina Governor. 

CHARLES fo\RNED ROBINSON, New York, N. V. (33605). Son of Edward 

Hay ward and Alice \\. (Smith) Robinson; grands.ni of James Jackson and 
Hannah Maria (Lamed) Robinson; great-grandson of Morris and Elizabeth 
(Eaton) Lamed; great— grandson of Thomas and Hannah (Morris) Larned; 
great— grandson of William Larned, Major, Fifth Regt., Worcester County, 
Mass. Militia. 

FRANK CRAWFORD ROBINSON, Wash. (29569)- Supplemental. Son of 
Campbell and Elizabeth (llnngate) Robinson; grandson of Adonejah and Eliza- 
beth (Ward) Hnngate; great-grandson of Nathan and Lucy (Fowler) Ward; 
great— grandson of William Fowler, private, Second Regt., Maryland Cont'l 
Troops. 

J()ll\ r ROBINSON, Salem, Mass. (33^7)- Son of John and Elizabeth Rollins 
(Kemhlr) Robinson; grandson of John and Lucy Pickering (Stene) Robinson; 
great-grandson of Aaron and Sarah (Poor) Robinson; great-grandson of John 
Robinson, Captain, Mass. Militia. 

JOHN MERCHANT ROBINSON, Hammond, La. (33202). Son of ITenr> Welch 
and Henrietta (Schneider) Robinson; grandson .of William and Ellen (Welch) 
Robinson; great-grandson of Andrew and Priscilla (Locke) Robinson; great- 
grandson of Joseph Robinson, Lieutenant, New Hampshire Troops: great- 
grandson of Joint T.ocke t .private, Captain Blodgett's Company, Col. Enoch 
Poor's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

JOSEPH WILLIAM ROBINSON, Hammond, La. (3277lh Son of Henry Welch 
and Henrietta (Schneider) Robinson; grandson of William and Ellen (Welch) 
Robinson; great-grandson of Andrew and Priscilla (Locke) Robinson; great- 
gr and son of Joseph Robinson, Sergeant, New Hampshire Militia for Cont'l 
service; great— grandson of John Locke, Sergeant, New Hampshire Militia. 

LEWIS CASS ROBINSON, Chicago, 111. (33088). Son of Lewis Cass and Mand 
(Burton) Robinson; grandson of Edward Leslie and Mary Jane (Crocker) 
Burton; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Hooper) Burton; great— grandson 
of Pont ins and Lydia (Clark) Hooper; great-grandson of Samuel Clark, 
Major, New York Troops. 

ROBERT McTVIERE ROBINSON, Louisville, Ky. (33029). Son of James Boy- 
kin and Laura (Nnnnally) Robinson; grandson of James If. and Martha Ann 
Elizabeth (Webb) Robinson; great-grandson of John and Ann (Thomason) 
Webb; great-grandson of Francis Webb, Midshipman, Virginia Navy. 



310 



SONS 01- TJll£ AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 






LOWELL ALLEN ROBLEE, Terre Haute, Ind. (32040). Son of Henry Scott 
and Alma Louisa (Partridge) Roblee; grandson of Frederick Horn and Mary 
E. (Root) Partridge; great-grandson of Stephen E. and Hannah (Moxley) 
Root; great L> -grandson of John Root, private, Conn. Militia, 

GEORGE ROGERS, Omaha, Neb. (33875). Son of George and Lcafie (Culbertson) 
Rogers; grandson of Samuel and EHza Jane (Brazeltort) Culbertson; great- 
grandson of Charles McClay and Maria (Logan) Culbertson.; great 2 -gr'andson 
of Samuel Culbertson, Colonel, Sixth Battalion, Cumberland County, Pa. As- 
sociators and Militia; great 2 -grandsQn of Samuel and Elizabeth (McClay) 
Culbertson; great 3 -gra.ndsoii of John McClay, Member First L'hiladelphia As- 
sembly. 

KERMIT ROOSEVELT, Oyster Bay, N. V. (32883). Sou of Theodore and Edith 
Kermit (Carew) Roosevelt; grandson of Theodore and Martha (Bullock) Roose- 
velt; great-grandson of Cornelius V. S. and Margaret (Barnhili) Roosevelt; 
great 2 -grandson of Jacobus (James) Roosevelt, Commissary, New York State 
Troops. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Lieutenant-Colonel, H. S. A., Oyster. Bay, N. V. 
(32876), Son of Theodore and Edith Kermil (Carew) Roosevelt; grandson 
,>f Theodore and Martha (Bullock) Roosevelt; great-grandson of Cornelius 
V. S. and Margaret (Barnhili) Roosevelt; great-grandson of Jacobus (James) 
Roosevelt, Commissary, New York State Troops. 

CLARKE WATKINS ROPER, Richmond, Va. (32928). Son of George Kemper 
and Kate Cowles (Childrey) Roper; grandson of John Thomas and Julia Ann 
(Clarke) Childrey; great-grandson of John Salle and Nancy (Frayser) Clarke; 
great'-'-grandsou of Jesse Frayser, private, Virginia Troops. 

ALBERT LEONARD ROWELL, Boston, Mass. (3354"). Son of Hiram L. and 
Clara Frances (BatcheldeO Rowell; grandson of Nathaniel and Abby A. 
(Marsh) Batchelder; great-grandson of Amos' Moody and Sally (Stocker) 
Batchelder; great L '-grandsou of Nathaniel Batchcllcr, Adjutant, Colonel Abra- 
ham Drake's Regt., New Hampshire Militia, 

CHARLES ROY NEWTON, N. 1. (33780). Son of William and Anna M. (Shot- 
well) Roy; grandson of Charles and Elizabeth M. (Hankinson) Roy; great- 
grandson of William and Anna (Hankinson) Roy; great 2 grandson of lusley 
Roy, Teamster and Wagon-master in carting forage and provisions for Cont'l 
Army, also carrying British sick prisoners. 

MARVIN PIERCE RUCKER, Richmond, Va. (j35'6o). Son of Edwin T. and 
Anne (Pendleton) Rueker; grandson of Benjamin J. and Eliza (Sandridge) 
Rucker; great-grandson. of Isaac and Mary (Christian) Rueker; great 2 -grandson 
of Ambrose Rueker, Captain, Amherst County, Virginia Militia, member Com-. 
mittee of v Safety. 

SKYLES EDWIN RUNSER, Sharpsville, Pa. G3368O). Sou of Leroy Sebastian 
and Alma (Twitmyer) Kunser; grandson of Sebastian and Adejine (Dunham) 
liunser; gi eat-gi andson of Robert and Anna (Titus) Dunham; great s -grandson 
of Azariah and Margaret (Clark) Dunham; great a -grandson of Jonathan and 
Sarah (Lennox) Dunham; greats-grandson of David Dunham, Captain, First 
Regt., Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia. 

ALFRED EDWIN RYAN, Washington, D. C. (33266). Son of Edwin J. and 
Jennie M. (Fetters) Ryan; grandson of Joseph and Margaret (Broden) Felters; 
great-grandson of Charles and Hannah (Markword) Broden; great-grandson 
of Mordecai Markword, Associator, Fourth Battalion, Chester County, Pa. 
Militia. 

*WILLIAM CHESTER UAWLEY SACK, U. S. A., New York, N. Y. (32097). 
Son of John Church and Marie Rogers Hawley; grandson of Herbert Stanley 
and Carolyn (Coodale) Rogers; great-grandson of Charles Chester and Eliza- 

' Adopted son of George B. Sage. 



KKC.ISTKK 0:1' NEW M KM ltl\US. ^1 1 

beth Jane (Davis) C.oodale; great-grandson of Chester and Sophie (Busnnell) 

C.oodale; great 3 -gramlson of Chester Coodale, private) Colonel Well's Regt., 
Conn. Troopsi pensioned. 

FRED LINCOLN SALMON, Newark, N. J. (33775)- Son of Robert 1). and 
Phoebe A. (Cutler) Salmon; grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Landon) Salmon; 
great-grandson of Peter Salmon, Captain, "Western Battalion," Morris County, 
New Jersey Stale Troops, 7 years' serviced 

IRA PETER SALMON, Last Orange, N. J. (33786). Son of Aaron Howell and 
Almira Jane Salmon; grandson of Peter and Elizabeth (Larison) Salmon; great- 
grandson of Aaron and Mercy (.Stephen) Salmon; great 2 -grandson of Peter 
Salmon, Captain, "Western Battalion," Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 

JESSE RYERSON SALMON, Trenton, N. J. (33785). Son of Robert Durland 
and Phoebe Ann (Cutler) Salmon; grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Landon) 
Salmon; great-grandson of Peter Salmon, Captain, "Western Battalion," Morris 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

ROGER ELLIOTT SALMON, Newark, N. J. (337-19)- Son of Jesse R. and Daisy 
Irene (Tichenor) Salmon; grandson of Robert Durland and Phoebe A. (Cutler) 
Salmon; great-grandson of Stephen and Sarah (Landon) Salmon; great-- 
grandson of Peter Salmon, Captain, "Western Battalion," Morris County, New 
Jersey State Troops, 7 years' service. 

FRED ROY SANBORN, Chicago, 111. (33.082). Son of Harvey Eugene and Caroline 
Amelia (Beardcn) Sanborn; grandson of Leonard Harvey and Lucy D. (Mc- 
Intyre) Sanborn; great-grandson of William D. and Mary (Carpenter) Mc- 
Intyre; great 3 -grandson of Willard and Polly (Bacon) Carpenter; great 3 - 
grandson of Bphraim Carpenter, Captain, Col. John Ely's Regt., Fourth Bat- 
talion, Conn. Troops. 

BENJAMIN BLETHER SANDERSON, Portland, Me. (32431). Son of William 
Kennedy and Ella Louise (Blether) Sanderson; grandson of Benjamin and 
Mary Elizabeth (Little) Sanderson; grcat'-'-grandson of Joshua and Sally (John- 
son) Little; great--grandson of Abijah and Lydia (Noyes) Little; great-grand- 
son of Joshua Little, Lieutenant, Mass. Militia; great--grandson of Samuel 
little, Mass. Member Provincial Congress. 

HAROLD EDMUND SANFORD, Portland, Ore. (31099). Son of Israel Cor- 
nelius and Emily (Edmunds) Sanford; grandson of Thomas J. and Sybil A. 
(Stedman) Sanford; great-grandson of Elisaph and Rebecca (Wheeler) San- 
ford; great-grandson of Ezekwl Sanford, private, Colonel Chandler's Eighth 
Regt., Conn. Militia, 

LOTUS MILTON SANDERS, East Orange, N. J. (.i348-A. Sim of Janus Ransom 
and Sarah Louise (Dey) Saunders; grandson of Garrett (Girard) and Eleanor 
(Dey) Dey-J great-grandson of David Dey, private, Bergen County, New Jersey 
Militia; great-grandson of John Dey, private, Bergen County, New Jersey 
Militia; great-'-grandson of Thennis Dey, Colonel, Bergen County, New Jersey 
Militia, .Member New Jersey State Assembly. 

FRANK LORING SAWYER, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (33541). Son of Josiah E. and 
Eunice S. (Bahcock) Sawyer; grandson of Ira and Abigail (Hastings) Sawyer; 
great-grandson' of J usiah Sawyer, private, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

WESLEY STEVENS SAWYER, Boston, Mass. (33547)- Son of Frank L. and 
Helen M. (Stevens) Sawyer; grandson of Josiah E. and Eunice S. (Babcock) 
Sawyer; great-grandson of Ira and Abigail (Hastings) Sawyer; great--grandson 
of JosiaJi Sawyer, private, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

OSBORN MATHER SAXTON, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Mass. 33292). Son of Robert 
M. and Harriet Josephine (Barker) Saxtou; grandson of John and Eliza (Cray) 
Barker; great grandson of John and Hannah (Smith) Barker; great--grandson 
of Barnabas Barker, private* Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN SCA UBOROUOI I, Oshawa, Out. (Va. 3-941). Son of 
William S. and Bertha M. (Emerson) Scarborough; grandson of James W. and 



312 SONS OF THE AMI-RICAN REVOLUTION. 

Elisabeth M. Emerson; great-grandson of Calvin and Freelove (Beach) Emer- 
son; great--grandsoii of Gcrskom Beach, Major, Vermont Militia. 

LLOYD DIEHL SCIIAEEEER, Westminster, Aid. (33108). Son of Milton and 
Mary (Zacliarias) Schaeffer; grandson of Jacob and Sarah Ann (Orndorff) 
Schaeffer; great-grandson of George and Susannah (Sherman) Zacliarias; great"- 
grandson of Conrad Sherman, Captain, Soxth Battalion, Berks County, Pa. 
Militia! 

WILLIAM ANTHONY SCHK.NCK, Meriden, Conn. (33463). Son of Martin B. 
and Margaret \Y. (Anthony) Schcnck; grandson of John and Hannah (Perkins) 
Schcnck; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary (Lott) Schcnck; great 2 -grandson 
of John Schcnck, Captain, Second Regt., Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia. 

LEWIS HYDE SCIINABEL, (wand Forks, Xo. Dak. (26574). Son of George Ellis 
and Mary Eunice (Stcdman) Schnabel; grandson of Thomas l,athrop and 
Alary Parthenia Janes (Hyde) Stedman; great-grandson of Lewis and Mary 
(Backus) Hyde; great-grandson of Asa and Parthenia (Janes) Backus, jr.; 
great s -gra»daon of Asa Backus, Corporal, Twentieth Regt., Conn. Militia; great 2 - 
grandson of Andrew Hyde, Sergeant, Conn. Cont'l Line, pensioned. 

EARL VICTOR SCQTFORD, Cleveland, Ohio (33715). Son of Henry Clinton 
and Olive Isabella (Pomcroy) Scotfurd; grandson pf Joseph Smith and Manila 
Le Baron (Gilbert) Pomcroy; great-grandson of John Spencer and Elizabeth 

(Smith) Pomcroy; great--gi andson of John Pomcroy, Sergeant, Capt. Oliver 
Hanchetfs Company, Conn. Militia. 

ALBERT HENRY SCOTT, Moomington, 111. (33399). Son of John Curtis and 
Mary Eliza (Munis) Scott; grandson of John Wilson and l,uenda (Blair) 
Scott; .great-grandson of James K. and Elizabeth Scott; great- grandson ,,f 
John II'. Sculi, private, Washington County, Virginia Cont'l I, it*/, pensioned. 

GEORGE ADDISON SCOTT, Terre Elaute, Ind. (32035). Son of John T. and 
Rebecca K. (Jones) Scott; grandson of Samuel and Sarah Wood (Duncan) 
Scott; great-grandson of Samuel Scott, Minute Man in Captain Campbell's 
Company, at Battle of King's Mountain. 

JOHN G. SCOTT, Elk City, Okla. (31618). Son of Lafayette T. and Marion 1,. 
(Purdie) Scott; grandson of Elhanan and Eliza (Fuller) Scott; great-grandson 
of Abram and Elizabeth (Yates) Fuller; great 2 -grandson of Brasilia Yates, 
private, Vermont Militia, pensioned. 

JOHN THERON SCOTT, Terre Haute, Ind. (32038). Son of George Addison and 
Jennie E. (Pell) Scott; grandson of John T. and Rebecca E. (Jones) .Scott; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Sarah Wood (Duncan) Scott; great--grandson of 
Samuel Scott, Minute Man in Captain Campbell's Company, at Battle of King's 
Mountain. 

RICHARD WALTER SCOTT, Terre Haute, Ind. (3-036). Son of George Addi- 
son and Jennie E. (Bell) Scott; grandson of John T. and Rebecca E. (Jones; 
Scott;- great-grandson of Samuel and Sara Wood (Duncan) Scott; great-- 
grandson of Samuel Scott, Minute Man in Capt. Campbell's Company, at 
Battle of King's Mountain. 

SAMUEL WALTER SCOTT, San Antonio, Texas (-'9493). Son of Samuel Asbury 
and Mary ( Rosey) Scott, grandson of James C. and Khoda (Evans) Kosey; 
great-grandson of John and Mary (J'arham) Evans, Jr.; great-grandson of 
John Uvaus, Sr., private, Charles Pinckney's First Rcgt., South Carolina 
Troops, twice wounded. 

JAMES BUCHANAN SEARCY, Springfield, 111. (33050). Son of Benjamin Perry 
and Nannie Elizabeth (Ridgway) Searcy; grandson of Lemuel Bartlett and 
Millie A. (Connelly) Searcy; great-grandson of John Connelly, private, Mary- 
laud Militia, pensioned. 

A.LBERT WII.SON SKNTKR, llubbell, Mich. (3-'3«^). Son of John and Lizzie 
Tisdale (Porter) Senter; grandson of George Washington and Mary (Steel) y j 



RKC.ISTKK 01' NI\W MI'M UK US. 3 I 3 

Sentcr; gteat-gramlson of Asa Senter i 'Captain, First New Hampshire Regt., 
pensioned. 

FRED ANSLEY SERVICE, Sharon, Pa. {32998). Son of John and Ella (Wil- 
liams; Service; grandson of Riley and Rachel (Porter) Williams; great-grand- 
son of [lector and Polly (Mcrvin) Williams; great 8 -gra»dson of Daniel and 
Hannah (Mnnson) Williams; great-grandson of Samuel Munson, private, 

Tilllll Iv'icrt (\111n Milili-l 



Tenth Regt., Conn. Mil 
THOMAS C.RK.KNHOW \VII,[,IA.\ 



S SETTLE), Lieutenant, U. S. N., D. C. 

of 



.j.u.-VD vjj\i^JU,i , siiu\^ \\ 1 1 Y i <i.\ .\i >~5 di, 1 l iyi',, 1 jieuienani, u, o. i\., jj. w.. 
(32145). Son of Joseph Andrew and .May C. (Williams) Settle; grandson of 
Thomas Greenhow and Mary Christiana (Curtis) Williams; great-grandson of 
Henry and Christiana (Tyler) Curtis; great 2 -grandson of John Tyler, Captain, 
Virginia Militia, Judge of Admiralty Court and Speaker, Virginia House of 
Delegates. 

\LBERT W. SEXTON, East Hampton, Conn. (33473). Son of Leverett S. and 
Matilda A. (Clark) Sexton; grandson of Amos and Hctsy Mary (Smith) 
Clark, Jr.; great-grandson of .hnos Clark, Corporal and Sergeant, Mass. Militia, 
nensioned. 

, Kan. (31047). Son of Joshua an 



pensione 
OSCAR BARTON SKVSTKK, Leavenworl 



.AK J5.\K1U.N &!*, X Z> I ftlt; i,eaven worm, i\an. (3-1-047 ). S>on 01 Josiiua ami 
Ella Celesta (Waite) Seyster; grandson of Clark G. and Charlotte (Warren) 
Waite; great-grandson of Clark G. and Abigail (Phillips) Waite; greats-grand- 
son of Peieg Waite, private and Minute Man, New York Militia. 

I-I.OYT ROBERTS S1IEIIAN, Buffalo, N. Y. (3335-). Son of Michael and Evelyn 

(Roberts) Shehan; grandson of Ahner S. and Mary kinetic (Haskins) Roberts; 
great-grandson of Enoch and Mary (Wadsworth) llaskin, 3d; great-grandson 
of Enoch and l.yclia (Ackley) llaskin, 2d; great ;! -grandson of Enoch llaskin, 
private, .Mass. Militia to reinforce Cont'l Army, pensioned. 

ALGER SHELDON, Ensign, U. S. N. R. E., Detroit, Mich. (33648). Son of 
Henry lb and Caroline (Alger) Sheldeii; grandson of Russell Alexander and 
Annette (Henry) Alger; great-grandson of Russell and Caroline (Moulton) 
Alger; great-grandson of Daniel and Marcia (Miles) Moulton; great-grandson 
of Phinias and Theoda (Blodgett.) Moulton; great'-grandson of Freeborn 
Moulton, Captain, Mass. Militia, at Lexington Alarm; great-grandson of 
William and Anna (Brownson)' Henry; great-grandson of Eli Brownson, 
Lieutenant, Vermont Troops, Member VVindsor Convention of June 4, '77. 

ALLAN SHELDEN, Grosse Pointe Shores, Mich. (33646). Son of Henry D. and 



UvAIN hlUU,lM' y .\, t.rosse l'ointc bliorcs, Alien. (33O40;. £>on ot Henry 1>. and 
Caroline (Alger) Shelden ; grandson of Russell Alexander and Annette (Henry) 
Alger; great-grandson of Russell and Caroline (Moulton) Alger; great- grand- 
son of Daniel and Marcia (Miles) Moulton; great— grandson of l'liineas and 
Theoda (Blodgett) Moulton; gre.it '-grandson of 1'reeborn Moulton, Captain, 
Mass. .Militia, at Lexington Alarm; great-grandson of William and Anna 
(Brownson) Henry; great-grandson of Eli Brownson, Lieutenant, Vermont 

Trnnnt: Mcinlwr vVinn-Crtf CniivciilKtn of Tiinp a r - -"7 




Troops, Member Windsor Convention of June 4, 17 

ROY STUART SHEPARD, Boston, Mass. (33073*. S 

Julia Norton (McKissiek) Shepard; grandson of Slum ami I'.Ii/a ( Mclntire) 
McKissick; great-grandson of Jesse ami Margarel (Pomeroy) Mclnlire; great 2 - 
grandson of Lemuel and I.ouise (Pynchon) Pomeroy; great— grandson of Seth 
Pomeroy, Major-General, Mass. Militia. 



.f Charles Warner and 
dson of Si 11:11 1 and Eliza (Mclntire) 



314 SONS OF 'I'JIlC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

EUGENE PROCTOR SHERMAN, Annapolis, Md. (Idaho 31808). Son of Eugene 
Bufeft and Julia 'Maude (Shaw) Sherman; grandson of Eugene Leland and 
Harriet Alice (Shelter) Sherman; great-grandson of Phineas I,, and Eveline 
(Robinson) Sherman; great--grandson of Cyrus and Nancy (Dinsmore) Robin- 
son; great :) -grandson of John Robinson, Sergeant Major, Capt. David Cook's 
Company, Col. John Crane's Regt., .Mass. Could Troops, 

ROBERT MAURICE SHERRARD, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32166). Son of John Hind- 
man and Kezia N. (Fulton) Sherrard; grandson of Robert Andrew and Jane 
(llindman) Sherrard; great-grandson of Mm Sherrard, private, Pa. Flying 
Camp. 

BENJAMIN (VEST SHERWOOD, Rverett, Wash. (32469). Son of Charles 
Daniel and Charlotte Plirebe Sherwood; grandson of Daniel and Fanny (Shovel 
Sherwood; great-grandson of Daniel Shenvopd, Corporal, Conn. Militia, pen- 
sioned. 

CLIVE NFWCOMF; SHERWOOD, Chicago, 111. (3.3655)- Son of Marcel Wesley 
and Dorcas Fjneline (Chamberlin) Sherwood; grandson of Isaac and _ Lucy 
(Card) Sherwood; great-grandson of James S. and Hannah (Giles) Card; 
great 2 -grandsnu of Jonathan Giles, private, Berkshire County, Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM GLKNN SHIELDS, Chicago, 111. (Kans. 31050). Son of William 
Prentiss and Ella (Glenn) Shields; grandson of Archibald Alexander and 
Favinia (Cooper) Glenn; great-grandson of Henry and Ruth (Rhodes) Glenn; 
great--grandson of Archibald Glenn, private, Bedford County, Pa. Troops, 
pensioned; great-grandson of William Covington and Mary (Mize) Cooper; 
great-grandson of Leighton and Grizzel (Covington) Cooper; great 3 -grandson of 
William, Covington, private, Virginia Troops; great"-grandson of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Fuilow) Rhodes; great 3 -grandson of Robert Furlo'w, private, Second 
Battalion, Washington County, Fa. Militia; great 2 -grandson of Jacob Rhodes, 
Ranger, Fa. frontier; great- grandson of Archibald and Sara (Ferguson) Glenn; 
great-grandson of Moses Ferguson, private, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia; 
greaF'-grandsou of Leighton Cooper, private, Capt. John Robert's Company, 
Col. Travis' Regt., Virginia Troops, pensioned, 

CASSIUS CLAY SHIRLEY, Rokomo, lud. (32049). Son of D. 1. and Waitsel 
(Seward) Shirley.; grandson of Kbinezar and Flinor (Baker) Seward; great 
grandson of William Baker, private, Second Keel., Duchess County, New York 
State Troops. 

VINTON HUBBARD SHOLL, San Antonio, Texas (111. 33096). Son of David 
Vinton and Florence (Hubbard) Sholl; grandson of Emery Orin and Julia 
(Hardy) Hubbard; great-grandson of Warren and Folly (Goodenough) Hub- 
bard; great-grandson of Theodore and Dorothy (Wilson) Hubbard; great 8 - 
gruulson of I'eier 1 1 nbbanl , J r . , Ensign, New Hampshire Troops ; gre.at 3 -grandson 
of Jeremiah ll'illson, private, Mass. Militia and New Hampshire Troops, pen- 
sioned. 
EDWIN WHITTLESEY SHORE, Boston, Mass. (3.-598). Son of Alfred and 
Mary Daniels (Whittlesey) Shore; grandson of Henry P. and Mary A. 
(Daniels) Whittlesey; great-grandson of John and Sallie (Whittlesey) Whit- 
tlesey; great-grandson of Joint Whittlesey, private, Capt. Shapley's Conn. 
Artillery, killed at Fort Griswold. 
LIEUT. EDWARD DERR SHRINER, JR., Frederick, Md. (3*422). Son of 
Edward Derr and Nannie (Getzeridanner) Shriner; grandson of Edward Au- 
gustus and Margaret Ann (Dorr) Shriner; great-grandson . of John Derr and 
Elizabeth (Lugenbeel) Derr, Jr.; great-grandson of John and Catharine 
Margaret (Stoner or Stiener) Derr; great n -giandson of John Stoner or Sticner, 
Captain, First Battalion, Frederick County, Maryland Militia, and Member 
of . Committee of Observation. 
EDWIN LONGSTREET SHUKY, Dayton, Ohio (33708). Son of William John 
and Sarah ( Merger) Slmey; grandson of Adam and Hannah (Aley) Slmey; 



U ICO I S'I'J'.K OF NEW MKMIM'.kS. $1 



great-grandson of John Martin Shwey, private, Third Company, Second Bat- 
talion, [.ancasfccr Cuiinty, Pa. Militia. 

WIUdAM AITI.FCATK SI1UICY, Dayton, Ohio ( j j 7 i S ) . Sou of William /61m 
and Sarah (Berger) Shuey; grandson of Adam and llannali (Aleyi Shuey, 
great-grandson of John Martin Shuey, private, Second Battalion, Lancaster 
County, Pa. Militia. 

EDWARD DAVID SHURTLEFF, Illinois (23649). Supplemental. Son of Alfred 
James and Mary Fairchild (ll'igby) Shurtleff; grandson of David and Ruth 
(Knapp) Shurtleff; great-grandson of Eleazer Knapp, private, Colonel Swift's 
Regt., Conn. Line, pensioned; grandson of Elihu and Phoebe Hannah (King) 
Higby; great-grandson of Levi and Chloe (Cobb) Jligby; greap'-gi'andson of 
Itlihu Higby, private, Conn. Cont'l Tr.jops, died in service. 

FRANCIS GREER SIMONTON, Jvlinl.urg, I'a. (.33075)- Son of Willis and 
Venice (Anderson) Simonton; grandson of James and Meliuda (Koser) Simon- 
ton; great-grandson of William and Katherine (Carlon) Simonton; great-- 
grandson of Robert and Margaret (Richards) Simonton; greal'-grandson of- 
William Richards, private, First L'a. Regl., Cont'l Line, pensioned. 

HARRY VI'KN'OX SIMS, New Orleans, La. (33321). Son of Robert NicftoHs and 
Juanita (Dalferes) Sims; grandson of Robert Nicholls and Emma (Kittredge) 
Sims; great-grandson of P,bcne/.er Eaton and Elizabeth (Kelly) Kittredge; 
great-grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth (Eaton) Kittredge; great 8 -grandson 
of Francis Kittredge, 2d, Surgeon, Mass. Troops, 

PARDEE NORTON SINGLETON, Amcnia, N. Dak. (Wash. 34025). Son of 
William W. and Jesse Pardee (llorton) Singleton; grandson of Gilbert and 
Elizabeth Pardee (Perkins) Jlorlon; great-grandson of .Silas and Salley (Jones) 
Perkins; great--grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth Webb (Pardee) Jones; great-- 
grandson of John Jones, Lieutenant-Colonel, Philip Bradley's Conn. Battalion, 
W a d s \v rtli's Brigade. 

ROBERT PEET SKINNER, London, Eng. (Ohio 32838). Son of Augustus 
Thomas and Cecilia (Van Rensselaer) Skinner; grandson of Sanders and 
Abigail (McCarthy) Van Rensselaer; great-grandson of Philip Van Rensselaer, 
Commissary of Military Stores, Northern Department; great 2 -grandson of 
Killian Van Rensselaer. Colonel, Fourth Regt., Albany, New York Troops. 

BENJAMIN P. SLOAT, Ridgewobd, N. J. (33744). Son of Benjamin F. and 
Mary S. (Gyimcj Sloat; grandson of Henry C. and Laura (i'armalee) Sloat; 
great-grandson of Johannes C. ami Martha Coronet (Corkey) Slott ; great-- 
grandson of Cornelius Slot!, Orderly Sergeant, Second Regt., Ulster Count)', 
New York Militia. 

PHILIP G. SLOAT, Ridgewood, N. J. (337-13)- Sou of Benjamin F. and Mary 
p. (Gynne) Sloat; grandson of Henry C. and Laura (I'armalee) Sloat, great- 
grandson of Johannes C. and Martha Corquet (Corkey) Slott; great-'-grandson 
of Cornelius Slott, Orderly Sergeant, Second Regt., Ulster County, New York 
Militia. 

EDWIN PERLEY SMART, Livermore Palls, Me. (32427). Son of C. P. and 
Lydia (MacFarland) Smart; grandson of F.Hjah and Betsy (Dearborn) Mac- 
Farland; great-grandson of Josiah Marshall and, Rebecca (Springer) MacFarlin; 
great-grandson of Elijah MacFarlin, private, Captain Newconib's Company, 
Col. Theophilus Cotton's Regt., Mass. Militia; great'-grandson of Elijah Mac- 
Farlin, $r. t private, Colojiel Bradford's Mass. Troops; great 3 -grandson of 
Josiah Marshall, private-, Mass. Militia. 

ALFRED FRANKLIN SMITH, St. Louis, Mo. (3.1179). Sou of James Washing- 
ton and Martha A. ( Kurdish) Smith; grandson of James and Elizabeth (Swank) 
Smith; great-grandson of Washington and Hannah (McWilliams) Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of James and Sallie (Gentry) Smith; greats-grandson of John Smith, 
Captain, Albemarle County, Virginia Militia; great-grandson of Jacob anil 
Elizabeth (Van Meter, Swank; great-grandson of Abraham and Rebecca 



3 1 6 



SO N S 01' 'J" 1 1 K, A M !■; K I C A N R E VO I , U TI O N 



( ) Van Meter; great 3 -grandson of Jacob I'an Meter, Member Augusta 

County, Virginia Committee of Observation. 

PKRTON I,A SAU,E SMITH, Fargo, N. Dale. (33002). Sou of Sylvester T,. 

and Mary Rebecca (Clark) Smith; grandson of William L. and (Dustin) 

Smith; great-grandson of Greenup and Sarah (Johnson) Smith; grea* 2 -grandson 
of Rueben and Martha (Hall) Johnson; greai 8 -grandson of John Hall, Orderly 
Sergeant, Third and Fourth RegtS., North Carolina Troops. 

CPYDD PEON SMITH, Carbondalc, III. (.i--oig). Son of George VV. and Nellie 
(Adams) Smith; graififdson of Stephen and Sallie M. (Pace) Smith; great- 
grandson of John and Nancy (Alexander) Pace; great-grandson of Thomas 
and Mollie (Kamcv) Alexander; great s -gr4hdson of John Alexander, Sergeant, 
Dee's Regt., Virginia Cont'l Troops. 

EDGAR OU1NCY SMITH, Honolulu, Hawaii (28535). Son of Edgar C. and 
Sarah Ktfzabeth (Rutfan) Smith; grandson of Harrison and Caroline Matilda 
(Kennedy) Smith; great-grandson of John I „ and llanna (Roberts) Canerdy 
(Kennedy); gieat £ -grandson of David Kennedy, private, Vermont Militia; grand- 
son of Jacob and "Margaret (Clapp) Rnitan; great-grandson of John and Sarah 
(Smith) Clapp; great-grandson of 1:1ms Clapp, private, Dutchess County, .New 
York Militia. 

PDW'ARD SMITH, l.akcwood, Ohio (3371?). S< f Joseph ami Helen (Estes) 

Smith; grandson of Joshna and Saba (Drew) Smith; great-grandson of Joseph 
Smith. Second Officer, privateer "Republic." 

FRANK GARDNER SMITH, New York City, N. Y. (33301). Son of Puihcr 
Ifabey and Annie Mitchell (Gardner) Smith; grandson of Joseph and Mary 
Holmes (Cas-alt) Gardner; great-grandson of Francis and Mary (Ham) 
Gardner; great--grandson of Joseph Gardner, Captain, Chester County, Pa. , 
Militia, Member Pa. Assemtfly; grandson of Charles Gardner and Martha 
(McDonald) Smith; great-grandson of Aaron and Ann (Gardner) Smith; great- 
grandson of George Gardner, private and Sergeant, New York Militia and 
Cont'l Dine. 

FREDERICK McCAUEEY SMITH, Reading, Pa. CD. C. 33148), Son of Albert 
M. and Mary K. (Hinimelreich) Smith; grandson of Francis and Elizabeth 
(Moore) Smith; great-grandson of John and Rebecca (Hoyer) Smith; great 2 - 
grandson of Baltaza and Catharine (Held) Smith; great 8 -grandson of Philip 
Smith, private, Capt. George Rcehm's Company, First Regt., Berks County, 
Pa. Militia. 

HANFORD OTIS SMITH, Lexington, Neb. (31620). Son of Altnon and Jane 
Andrews (Downs) Smith; grandson of Josiah and Petsy (Holbrook) Smith; 
great-grandson of Daniel and Anna (Hitchcock) Holbrook; great-'-grandson of 
. Jonniluin Hitchcock, Member Derby, Conn. Committee to Classify for Cont'l 
Army; great-grandson of Daniel Holbrook, Captain, Second Regt., Conn. 
Militia. 

IIAROT/D VVAELACE SMITH, New York, N. Y. (32725). Son of Samuel and 
Ella (Boynton) Smith; grandson of ' Carmen and Ruthetta (Smith) Smith; 
great-grandson of Joseph Smith, Captain, Queens County, New York Militia, 
pensioned; great'--grandson of Joseph Smith, .ST., private* Captain Hewlett's 
Company, Queen's County, New York Militia. 

HENRY PUTIIKR SMITH, Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N.\ M. C, Harris!. urg, 
Pa. (33078). Son of Frederick Charles and Mary Ellen (Blett) Smith; grand- 
son of Daniel and Catherine (Rcigcl) llhtt; great-grandson of John and 
Catherine (P.ingeman) Reigel; gi eat- grandson of Frederick Bingaman, Second 
Class of Captain Davis' Company, Fourth l'.att.ili..n. Philadelphia Couitfy, I'a. 
Militia. 

IRA STUART SMITH, Newark, N. J. (32681), Son of Benjamin Hansel .and 

Dydia E. tl.imlsley) Smith; gran. Don of William Allen and Phoebe (Hand) w 
Smith; great-grandson of Benjamin VV. ami Sarah (Allen) Smith; great 8 - 



REGISTER OI- NEW M 'KM BKRS. 



3^ 



grandson of Samuel Afoeu, Ensign, Captain Beach's Company, Eastern Battalion, 
New Jersey Troops great-grandson of Ira and Rhoda (Crowell) Hand; great- 
grandson of Sylraniis Crowell, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia and 
State Troops; great—grandson of William Smith, private, Captain Squire's 
Company, Second Regt., Kssex County, New Jersey Militia. 

ISRAEL ALEXANDER SMITH, Independence, Mo. (33377). Son of Joseph 
and Bertha (Madison) Smith,; grandson of Joseph and Emma (Hale) Smith; 
great-grandson of Joseph and I,ucy (Mack) Smith; great-grandson of Asahel 
and Mary (Duly) Smith; greaP-grandson of Samuel Smith, Chairman, Tops- 
field, Mass. Committee of Safety, Member Third Provincial Congress, Repre- 
sentative to General Court, Captain, Mass. Militia. 

JAMES SCHWARTZ SMITH, Salt Lake City, Utah (52631). Son of Joseph V. 
and Mary Taylor (Schwartz) Smith; grandson of llyrum and Mary (Fielding) 
Smith; great-grandson of Joseph and Pucy (Mack) Smith; great-grandson of 
Asael and Mary (Duty) Smith; great-grandson of Samuel Smith, Captain, 
Mass. Militia, Member Committee of Safety, Delegate to Mass. Provincial Con- 
gress and Representative to Ccneral Court. 

JOSEPH WASHINGTON SMITH, St. Louis, Mo. (33145). Son of Joseph D. 
and Elizabeth (McKenna) Smith; grandson of Ruben B. and Povey (Baxter) 
Smith; great-grandson of Reuben Smith, private-, Rhode Island Militia, and 
Seaman on frigate "Deane"; great-grandson of Reuben and Mary (Williams) 
Smith; great-grandson of /.elndee Williams, Corporal, Rhode Island Militia. 

RAN' ARCHIBALD SMITH, Garwood, N. J. (32905). Son of Benjamin Hansel 
and Rydia p. ( [,iud-ley ) Smith; grandson of William Allen and Phoebe (Hand) 
Smith; great-grandson of lieujamin W. ami Sarah (Allen) Smith; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Allen, Ensign in Captain Beach's Company, Eastern Battalion, 
New Jersey Mililia; great-grandson of William Smith, private, Second Regt., 
Essex County, New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Ira ami Rhoda (Crowell) 
Hand; great-grandson " f Sylvaiuu Crowell, private, Second Regt., Essex 
County, New Jersey Militia and State Troops. 

TRACY SCOYIPP SMITH, Detroit, Mich. (32397)- Son of Edward Chester and 
Ada (Pegged) Smith; grandson of Edward Chester and Julia Plnenix (Talbot) 
Smith; great-grandson of Theodore Foster and widow Elizabeth . (Truxtun) 
(Cox) Talbot; great- gi andson of Silas Talbot, Pieutenant-Colonel, Rhode Island 
Crint'l Troops, Captain, [J. S. Navy; great-grandson of Thomas Truxtun, Cap- 
tain, U. S. Navy; great-grandson of Joseph and Sophia ( ) Smith; great- 
grandson of Caleb Smith, private, Hampshire County, Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM P. SMITH, Newark, N. J. (334M). Sou of Elijah P. and Mary M. 
(Ash) Smith.; grandson id William Allen and Phoebe (Hand) Smith; great- 
grandson of Benjamin W. and Sarah (Allen) Smith; great-grandson of Samuel 
Allen, Ensign, Eastern Battalion, New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Ira and 
Rhoda (Crowell) Hand; great-grandson of Sylraniis Crowell, private, Second 
Regt., New Jersey Troops; great-grandson of William Smith, private, Second 
Regt., pssex County, New Jersey Militia. 

JAMES WILLIAM SMlTIIpR, New Orleans, Pa. (32775). Son of Charles 0. 
and Georgia (Tate) Smithei ; grandson of Thomas Simpson and Frances Kath- 
erine (Ford) Tate; great-grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth (Robertson) Tate; 
great-grandson of Poorge and Susannah (Nelson) Robertson; greap-grandson 
of Charles Robertson, Major, Col. John Sevier's South Carolina Troops. 

EIERBERT TURNER SNYDER, Ilasbruuck Heights, N. J. (Md. j-.'4-m). Son of 

John William and Annie (Turner) Snyder; grandson of Daniel Ott and Mary 
Ann (Croney) Snyder; great-grandson of John Snyder, Corporal, Maryland 
"Plying Camp." 
WILLIAM LEROY SNYDER, Baltimore, Md. (32419). Sou of John William and 
Annie (Turner) Snyder; grandson of Daniel On and Mary Ann (Croney) 
Snyder; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary (Ott) Snvdei; greal-graildsoil of 
John Snyder. Corporal, Maryland "Flying Camp." 



3l8 SONS 01' Tilt, AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

WILLIAM TRAMWELL SNYDER, Baltimore, Md, (32420). Son of John Wil- 
liam and Annie (Turner) Snyder; grandson of Daniel Ott and Mary Ami 
(Crottey) Snyder; great-grandson of Jacob and Mary (Ott) Snyder; great 2 - 
grandson of John Snyder, Corporal, Maryland "Flying Camp." 

HUBERT SOMERS, N. J. (32511). Supplementals. Son. of Samuel and Rachel 
L. (Oithens) Somers; grandson of Constant and Sarah (Edwards) Somers; 
great-grandson of Samuel and Roxanna (Scull) Somers; great-grandson of 
John Scull, Captain, Third Battalion, Gloucester County, New Jersey Militia; 
great-grandson' of Daniel and Mary (Frambes) I'M wards; great 2 -grandson of 
Nicholas Frambes, private, Gloucester County, New Jersey Militia; great-grand- 
son of Nicholas and Sarah (Rape) Frambes; great-grandson of Christopher 
Rape, Captain, Col. Richard Somers' Regt., New Jersey Militia; grandson of 
John If. and Rebecca (Furguson) Githens; great-grandson of John and Rebecca 
(Jones) Furguson; great--grandson of David Jones, private, Captain Simpson's 
Company Philadelphia City Guards. 

WARREN SOMERS, Atlantic City, N. J. (3333-4). Son of Samuel and Rachel L. 
(Githenis) Somers; grandson of Constant and Sarah (Edwards) Somers; great- 
grandson of Samuel and Roxanna (Scull,) Somers; grcat-'-grandson of James 
Somers, Captain, Third Battalion, Gloucester County, New jersey Cont'l Troops., 

ATWELL SOMERVILLE, Culpeper, Va. (32945). Sou of Robert B. and Laura 
A. (Cray) Somervillc; grandson of James and Harriet A. (Wherry) Gray; 
great-grandson of Jesse and Anna Howard (Chaplin) Wherry; great 2 -grandson 
of Benjamin Chaplin, Surgeon, Virginia State Line Navy, died on furlough; 
grandson of James and Mary (At well) Somervillc; great-grandson of Francis 
AtWeU, Captain, Fauquier County, Virginia Militia. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON SOUTHARD, Richmond, Me, (.i-'.t.i*). Son of Charles 
Henry T. J. and Olive Steward (Foster) Southard; grandson of Charles Benja- 
min ami Dorcas Furbusli (Sp.mldine,) Foster; great-grandson of Benjamin and 
Ravinia (Millman) Foster; great-grandson of Samuel Foster, Corporal, Capt. 
David Dexter's Company, Col. Israel Angell's Rhode Island Battalion. 

CHARLES EDWARD SPALDING, Coronado, Calif. (31550). Son of Henry 
Whitehoiise and Henrietta (Fitzhugh) Spalding; grandson of Frastus and 
Laura Maria (Wooster) Spalding; great-grandson of Reuben and Hannah 
Peahody) Spalding; great-grandson of Josiah Spalding, Lieutenant, Conn. 
Militia, pensioned. 

JOHN F. SPARKS, Summitville, Ind. (32042). Son of John W. and Sarah (A.) 
Sparks; grandson of Solomon and Rachel Sparks; great-grandson. - of George 
Sparks, private, Pa. Line, prisoner. 

ARTHUR WILSON SPENCER, Passaic, N. J. (33796). Son of Bird Wilson and 
Florence (Conover) Spencer; grandson of Jesse Ames and Sara Jane Elizabeth 
Spencer; great-grandson of Reuben and Mary (Ames) Spencer; great s -grandso« 
of Jesse .lines (F.mes), Captain, Fifth Regt., Middlesex County, Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES LUTHER SPENCER, Suflield, Conn. (32865). Son of Israel Luther 
and Julia (Pease) Spencer; grandson of Hezekiah and Cecelia (Spencer) 
Spencer; great-grandson of Hezekiah and Jerusha (Nelson) Spencer; great-- 
grandsoii of Hezekiah Spencer, private, Conn. Militia, at Lexington Alarm. 

HARRY ARKXANDKR SPFNCKR, Cleveland, Ohio (33170). Son of George 
Warren and Rula (Thompson) Spencer; grandson of Henry Allison and Rsthei 
Ann (Stanley) Thompson; great-grandson of Daniel Southerland and Hannah 
(Crammer) Stanley; g'rcat*-gi andson of John and Mary (Southerland) Stanley; 
great 8 -grandson of Joint Southerland, Lieutenant, Vermont Militia, Member 
Vermont Council of Safety. 

HERBERT SPENCER, Hartford, Conn. (33463). Son of Alfred and Ella S. 
(Nichols) Spencer, Jr.; grandson of Alfred and Caroline Frances (Reid) 
Spencer; great grandson of Alfred and Harriet (Ring) Spencer; great s -graiidson\J 
of l!e::el.iali Spciuer, private, Conn. Militia, at r.exiiiRlun Alum. 



register 01- new members. 310 

THOMAS EDWIN SPENCER, St. Louis, Mo. (3-'573>- Sou ..f Kerry Hill ami 
Caroline M. Clark (Austin) Spencer; grandson of Richard Darrett and Sarah 
Ware (Mansfield) Austin; great-grandson of Robert Mansfield, private, Col. 
Richard Linsey's Regt., General kawson's Brigade, Virginia Troops. 

WIT/EIAM ARNOT/D SPICER, Providence, R 1. (32496). Son of William Arnold 
and Anna Eliza (Carpenter) Spieer; grandson of Joseph and Ann Eliza (Chirk); 
great-grandson of Daniel and Eunice (Wood) Carpenter; great-grandson of 
Joseph Carpenter, Rhode Island Minute Man. 

CM ARI.ES HENRY SPRAGUE, Swaiupscolt, Mass. (335J9). Son of Henry Hired 
and I, aura Poring (Brown) Sprague; grandson of l$enja*nin and Susan E. 
(Ireson) Sprague; great-grandson of J, ,1m and Eliza (Bulfinch) Ireson; great- 
grandson of John Ircson, Sergeant, Essex County, Mass. Militia; great 2 -grand- 
son of John fhilfiucli, Jr., private, Colonel Freeman's Regt., M;iss. Militia. 

HOWARD IHJRNHAM SPRAGUE. ■ Swampscott, Mass. (3.(530). Son of Henry 
Hrecd and Haura goring ( Brown ) Sprague; grandson of llenjamin and Susan 
E. (Ireson) Sprague; great-grandson of John an. I Eli/a (Bulfinch) Ireson; 
great 2 -grandson of John Ireson, private, lvssex County, Mass. Militia; great-- 
grandson of John Bulfinch, Jr., private, Colonel Freeman's Regt,, Mass. Militia. 

FRED POMEROY STACY, Springfield, Mass. (33531). Son of frank Edwin and 
Mai. el (Whitcomh.) Stacy; grandson of Edwin Slebhins and Martha (Pomeroy) 
Stacy; giVat-grandson of Richard and Armedia (Frost) Stacy; greats-grandson 
of Moses and Sally (Frost) Stacy; greal 3 -grandson of William Simon Stacy. 
private, Mass. Militia. 

PHILIP P. STACY, A. !•;. !•., N. J. (32688). Sou of Richard and Matilda N. 
(Peckham) Stacy; grandson of Edwin S. and Martha J. (Pomeroy) Stacy; 
great-grandson of Henry and Eleanor (Billings) Pomeroy; great"-grandson vi 
Jesse and Naamah (Dickinson) Pomeroy; great a -grandson of Simeon Pomeroy, 
private, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

WAI/rrCR AMES STANDISII, East Orange, N. J. ( j .? 7 '^ 7 > • Son of Walter Fitch 
and Sarah Wheeler (Bingham) Standish; grandson of Thomas Pitch and Ruth. 
Ann (lloldcn) Standish; great-grandson of Walter and Nancy I'.enjamin t I'.ush- 
nelli Holden; great-'-gi rmd.son of Samuel lloldcn, Captain, Colonel Thayer's 
Regt., Suffolk County, Mass. Militia to reinforce Cont'l Army. 

CIIARU'.S WIIJ,ARD STANTON, Llemidji, Minn. (33501). Son of Harrison Mi 
and Alida (Parker) Stanton; grandson of Amos C. and A/uha (Duncan) 
Stanton; great-grandson of Amos and Sahra (Palmer) Stanton; great-grandson 
of Nehemiah Palmer, private, Eighth Com), any, Second Regt., Conn. Militia. 

EDWARD BURNHAM STKARNS, Montclair, N. J. (32909). Son of Charles 
Augustus and Mary E. (Kuruham) Stearns; grandson of Edward Ray ami Eliza 
Tyler (Barker) Stearns; great-grandson of Elijah ami Polly (Rawlins) Stearns; 
grcat-'-grandsoii of John Stearns, private, Major Nnrris' Third Regt., New 
1 lampshire Troops. 

SARGENT SOLOMON STEARNS, Cambridge, Mass. (33542). Son of Jusiah 
Herald and Sarah (Russell) Stearns; grandson of Solomon and Sally (lleald) 
Stearns; great-grandson of Benjamin Steams, Corporal, Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WOOD STEM, New Orleans, I,a. (3276J). Son of Ceorge Wood and 
Irene (Irwin) Stem; grandson of Jesse R. and Margaret (Miller) Trwin; great- 
grandson of William and Lydia (Rirdsong) Jrvin; great--grandson of Robert 
Ir-cin, Colonel, North Carolina Militia and Signer Mecklenburg Declaration of 
Independence, Member Provincial Congress. 

JESSE KPWDWORTH STEPHENS, Shreveport, l.a. (32765). Son of 1. II. and 

Sarah Jane ( ) Stephens; grandson of W. D. and Mary (befalls) Stephens; 

great-grandson of John Stephens, lieutenant, Col. Daniel Morgan's Virginia 
Riflemen. 

PRESTON TAPLEY STE PI I ENS( >N, Lynn, Mass. (33545). Sou of Charles 

Henry and Adeline I'li/dxth (Tapley) Stephenson; grandson of llt-hry fuller 



3 2 ° 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



.ui.l Ida Jane (Saundcrson) Tapb y ; great-grandson of Amos Preston am] 
Adeline Elizabeth (Fuller) Tapley; great- grandson of Amos and Elizabeth (Lye) 
Tapley; great a -gra*ndsbn of ./m,>.v Tapley, Sergeant and Lieutenant, Mass. 
Militia; great"- grandson of Gilbert Tapley, Lieutenant, Capt. John Putnam's 
Company, at Lexington Alarm. 

FRANK GREGORY STEWART, I). C. (30035). Supplemental.. Son of Albert and 
Anna Relle (Gregory) Stewart; gran. Ken ,,1 Andrew and Elizabeth (ShriverJ 
Stewart; great-grandson of Abraham and Mary (Oliphant) Stewart; great- 
grandson of Andrew Oliphant, private, Chester County, Pa. Awsoc.iiftors and 

Militia. 

SAMUEL ARTHUR STEWART, In. liana (19418). Supplemental. Son of Samuel 
P. and Deborah Jane (Dickson) Stewart; grandson of Thomas an. I Esther 
(Porter) Stewart; great-grandson of Charles Stewart, private, Cumberland and 
Westmoreland Counties, Pa. Militia; great-grandson of J '0/111' Stewart , private, 
First Paltalion, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia; great--gran.lson of Robert 
Stockton, private, Pa. Militia. 

Wild J AM HENRY STILES, Commander, U. S. Navy, New York City. N. Y. 
(33610). Sou of William Henry and Elizabeth (Chadwick) Stiles; grandson of 
William I lent y ami Eliza Clifford (Cor. Ion) SfcUes; great-grandson of William 
Washington and Sarah An. lei son (Stiles) Cordon; great-'-grandson of Ambrose 
Cordon, Paymaster, Virginia Cont'l Dragoons. 

UOWFJLL MORTIMER STILLMAN, Caldwell, N. J. (32912)- Son of William 
Howard and Elizabeth P>. (Dingwell) Stillman; grandson of Lewis Mortimer 
and Sarah C. (Moore's) Stillman; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Rhoda 
(Francis) Stillman; great s -grandson of Joseph Stillman., Conn. Minute Man, at 
Lexington Alarm, pensioned; great-grandson of John Fraucis, Captain, Conn. 
Provisional Rogt. 

GLENN KING STIMSON, Lansing, Mich. (3^393). Son of Henry I. and Eliza 
(King) Stimsou, Jr.; grandson of Henry Increase and Mary (AlkhhT) Stimsou; 
great-grandson of John and Sally (Claflin) Stimsoit; great-grandson of In- 
crease and Sarah (Stimson) Claflin; greaf'-grandsor. of George Stimsou (father 
of Sarah), private, Mass. Militia; great 2 - grandson of Samuel Stimsou (father 
of John), Mass. Minute Man. 

HENRY INCREASE STIMSON, Grand Raj. ids, Mich. (32390). Son of Thomas 
Jefferson and Emma (Churchill) Stimsou; grandson of Henry Increase and 
Mary (AHebin) Stimsou; great-grandson of John and Sally (Claflin) Stimson; 
great-grandson of Samuel Stimsou, Mass. Minute Man, at Lexington; great"- 
grandson of Increase Claflin, private, Mass. Militia; great-grandson of George 
Stimsou, private, Mass. Militia, at Lexington; grcaC-grandson of Cornelius 
Claflin, Lieutenant, Col, Thomas Poor's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

RAYMOND LINCOLN STol'T, Rejlville, N. J. (33481). Son of Edwin Franklin 

and Rose (IVllingcr) Stout; grandson of John U. and Sophia Milton (Hughes) 
Stout; great grandson of Jaeoh and Margaret (McKlroy) Stout, great-grand- 
son of inilmiu Melilroy, Sergeant, .New Jersey Line, pensioned. 

EDWIN CCRTIS STRONG, Philadelphia, Pa. (3^988). Son of Afcheppus Parish 
and Lillian Louise (Connsueau) Strong; grandson of John Curtis and Jiilianna 
(Chillis) Strong; great -g 1 andsoil of ArcheppUS Parish and Margaret (Son) 
Child; great-'-grandson of Timothy Child, private, Conn. Militia, widow pen- 
sioned. 

ARTHUR JAMES STR1 "N I LPS, Clifio. id.de, Mass. (.r.sop. Son of William 
Conrad and Eliza (Fufbush) Claflin; grandson of Luthei and Mary (Forbuslrt 
Claflin; great grandson of Ama/iah and Edc (Walking) Clalliu; gieat'-graiulstm 
of John Claflin, private, Capt. John Homer's t\mipany. Col. Samuel Kid-lard's 
Mass. Regt!', at Lexington Alarm. 

SAMUEL DAVIS STRYKER, Oradell, N. J. (33483). Son of Samtu-1 Davis and » 

Eunice Virginia (Lritton) Stryker; grand f Samuel Davis and Lli/.i (('an) 



REGISTER OF NEW MEMBERS. 



321 



Stryker; great-grandson of Peter Stryker, Fifer, First Battalion, Somerset 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

CHARLES. ALGERNON SUNDERUN, Boise, Idaho (31800). Son of Arthur \'. 
and E. Jennie (Collin) Sundcrlin; grandson of J. D. Collin; great-grandson of 
Nathan Emery Collin; great-grandson of Tristain Coffin, private, Major Thomas' 
Company, Conn. Artillery. 

FREDERICK MAYHEW SUTTER, Detroit, Mich. (33^3^- Son of Frederick C. 
and Emily (Mayhew) Sutter; grandson of David Porter and Florenne (ITrindei) 
Mayhew; great-grandson of Melchiah and Sallie (Ward) Drindel; great-grand- 
son of Ebu and Sallie (Potter) Ward; great :i -grandson of David Ward, private, 
New York and Vermont Militia and State '1'roops; great-grandson of Asahel 
Ward; private, Vermont Militia, died in service. 

SUMNER HEARSE SWAIN, Upper Montclair, N. J. (3.2907). Son of Henry 
Sumner and Eugenia Dunbar (Hearse) Swain; grandson of James M. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Sumner) Swain; great-grandson of Harrison Grey and Mary 
Elizabeth (Thomas) Sumner; great-grandson of Ebenezer and Pamelia (Thorpe) 
Sumner; great :! -grandson of Bbcnezer Sumner, Sergeant, Captain Guild's Com- 
pany, Colonel Whitney's Regt,, Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON SWENEY, Marion, Ohio (33433). Son of Robert 
l.cper and Elizabeth (Concklin) Sweney; grandson of W. VV. and Sophia 
(Sueeiserj Concklin; great-grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Williams) Couck- 
lii.i; great-grandson of Isaac Concklin, Captain, Fourth and Sixth Regt.s., 
Dutchess County. New York Militia. 

WILLIAM STREET SWIFT, First Lieutenant, A. K. F., Watertown, Mass. 
(33S43L Sun of John Huston and Caroline l.ucretia ( Locke) Swift; grandson 
of George Augustus and Lucretia (Benson) Locke; great-grandson of Otis 
and Kezia (Harrington) Locke; great— grandson of Thomas Locke, Sergeant 
and Lieutenant, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

JOHN SWIMBORNE, St. Paul, Minn. (31843). Son of James and Cordelia 
(Cooper) Swimhome; grandson of Charles and Cordelia Cooper (Booth) 
Crosby; great-grandson of Ahija and Caty (Catherine) (Olds) Crosby; great- 
grandson of John Crosby, private, Col. Thomas Marshall's and Col. Dike's 
Mass. Rcgts. 

FRANK FOLSOM SYMONDS, Chicago, 111. (3J808), Son of Charles Page and 
Millie (Folsom) Symonds; grandson of Lyman J. and Ellen (Martin) Folsom; 
great-grandson of Augustus Taylor and Jauette (Moon) Martin; great-grand- 
son of Peter and lane (Taylor) Martin; great 8 -grandson of Peter Martin, 
Lieutenant, Col. Peter Yates' Regt., Albany County, New York Militia; grand- 
son of Joseph and Louisa (Page) Symonds; great-grandson of Elias C. a;.d 
Dolly (Shaw) Page; great-grandson of Joseph and Susanna (Mason) Shaw; 
greaH-grandson of Oliver Mason, private, Col. Gideon Pun's Regt., Mass. 
Militia; greal ;i -grandson of Oliver and Lucy (Johnson) Mason; grcat'-grandson 
of James Johnson , private, Colonel Learned 's Company, Mass. Militia; great- 
grandson of Joseph Shaw, private, Captain Clark's Company, Colonel Hobnail's 
Regt., Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

ROY MAXWELL TALBOT, Peking, China (111. 32817). Son of George Isaac 
and Lucy Emma (Maxwell) Talbot; grandson of Alfred and Cecelia (Hunt) 
Talbot; great-grandson of Isaac and Martha (Ludington) Hunt; great-grand- 
sou of Isaac and Polly (Kinney) llunl; greaf-grandsoii of Timothy Hunt, 
private, Captain Yeoman's Company, Col. Frederick Fisher's Third Regt., New 
York Militia. 

SAMUEL WALKER TALIAFERRO, Peoria, 111. (3381H). Son of David Moore 
:nu\ Sarah Jane (Kelley) Taliafcnu; grandson of Samuel Walker and Sallie 
McClung (Moore) Taliaferro; great-grandson of I'rands Taliaferro, Captain 
Second Regt., Virginia Troops. 

WILLIAM JAMES TAPPAN, Newark, N. J. (.)_•<. 0. | ). Sou Of Henry Agripp.i and 
Anna (MacKride) Tappen ; grands. f Henry liegeman ami Caroline (/Wing) 



32: 



SONS OF Till? AMERICAN EVOLUTION-, 



Tappen; great-grandson of John mid Jane Ann (liegeman) Tappen; great- 
grandson of Matthew Tappen, Sergeant, Captain Dodge's Company, Captain 
Wetatcnfcl's Regt., New York levies and Dutchess County Militia. 

EDMUND HAYNKS TAYLOR, Frankfort, Ivy. (28822). Son of John Ivastin and 
Rebecca (Kdrington) Taylor; grandson of Richard and Mary (Taylor) Taylor, 
Jr.; great-grandson of Richard Taylor, Captain, Virginia State Navy, pen- 
sioned; grcat-'-grandsoii of George Taylor, Colonel, Orange County, Virginia 
Miluia, Member Committee -of Safety and Virginia House of Burgesses; great- 
grandson of Edmund Taylor (father of Mary Taylor), Captain, Virginia 
Troops. 

EDMUND IIAYN'KS TAYLOR, Jfi., U. S. A.,. Frankfort, Ky. (--8824). Son of 
Jacob Swigert and Sadie Bacon (Crittenden) Taylor; grandson of Edmund 
llavnes and Frances M. (Johnson) Taylor; great-grandson of John Rastin and 
Rebecca (Edrington) Taylor; grcat 2 -grandson of Richard and Mary (Taylor) 
Taylor, Jr.: great s -grands.on of Richard Taylor, Captain, Virginia State Navy, 
pensioned; great ' grandson of George Taylor. Colonel, OniUge County', Virginia 
Militia; Member Committee of Safety and Virginia Mouse of [largesses; great-- 
grandson of Edmund Taylor (lather of Mary Taylor), Captain, Virginia Troops. 

LDMDXD WATSON TAYLOR, Frankfort, Ky. (33027). Sou of Fdmund Maynes 
and Frances (Miller) Johnson; grandson of John Lastin and Rebecca 
(Kdrington) Taylor; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Taylor) Taylor; 
great-grandson of Richard Taylor, Captain, Virginia Navy, pensioned; great"- 
grandson of George Taylor, Member Orange County, Virginia Committee of 
Safety and Virginia Convention of 1775; great--grandson of lldmund Taylor 
(father of Mary Taylor), Captain, Virginia State Line. 

JACOB SWIGLRT TAYLOR, Frankfort, Ky. (28823). Sou of 1'Mnmnd llavnes 
and Frances Miller (Johnson) Taylor; grandson of John Rastin and Rebecca 
(Kdrington) Taylor; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Taylor) Taylor, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Richard Taylor, Captain, Virginia State NTavy, pensioned; 
greaC-giandson of George Taylor, Colonel, Orange County, Virginia Militia, 
Member Committee of Safety and Virginia Mouse of Burgesses; great 2 -grandson 
of Edmund Taylor (father of Mary Tailor), Captain, Virginia Troops. 

JAMES TAYLOR, East Orange, N. J. (334'3)- Son of George M. and Belle 
Stockton (Lewis) Taylor; grandson of William C.arthwaite and Rydia J. (Lytic) 
Lewis; great-grandson of William M. and Kliza Ward (Garthwaite) Lewis; 
greats-grandson of William and Ahba (Ward) Garthwaite; great 3 -grandson of' 
Jeremiah Crane Garlhivuite, Drummer. Spencer's New Jersey Kegt., Cont'l 
Army. 

KLNNF.K TAYLOR, Frankfort, Ky. (2K825). Son of Kdinund Maynes and Frances 
Miller (Johnson) Taylor, Jr.; grandson of John IJnsiin and Rebecca (Kdring- 
ton) Taylor; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Taylor) Taylor, Jr.; great 1 - 
grandson of Richard Taylor. Captain, Virginia State Navy, pensioned; great- 
grandson of George Taylor, Colonel, Orange County, Virginia Militia, Member 
Committee of Safety .and Virginia House of Burgesses; great-grandson of 
Edmund Taylor (father of Mary Taylor), Captain, Virginia Troop*. 

FRANKLIN DLWEY TEACIIONT, Adrian, Mich. (.53757)- Son of Alonzo and 
Anna (Dewey) Teachont; grandson of Edmund Bernenl and Sarah (Cooper) 
Dewey; great-grandson of Jcdcdiah, and Anna (Bemertt.) Dewey; great-grand- 
son of John Dczoey, private, Conn. Militia. 

GRAHAM FfCLLOWKS THOMPSON, New Haven. Conn. (32875). Son of Henry 
Grant and Henrietta (Fellows) Thompson; grandson of Henry Graham and 
Louisa II. (Barnard) Thompson; great-grandst.n ol Orrin and Love (Lusk) 
Thompson; great-grandson of Matthew Thompson, private, Third Regt., Conn. 
Rine, widow pensioned. 

JOHN' L. THOMPSON, New Orleans, La. (33205). Son of George C. and Annie' 
(Bosw 10 Thompson; grandson of William and Zclpha (Clarke) Thompson; 



KF.ClSTl-K 1)1'' NIvW M I'.AI lil'KS. 323 

great-grandson of George C. Thompson; great-grandson of George Thompson, 
Major, Virginia Troops, Atde-de-Canip to General I, a Fayette, pensioned. 

JOSEPH THOMPSON, Atlantic City, N. J. (.U077). Son of William W. and 
[Tester (Pennington) Thompson; grandson of Joseph and Eliza (Scott) Thnmp- 
son; great-grandson of F.lias an. I Rachel (Wills) Thompson; gren^-grandson 
of Joseph Thompson, private, Captain Waddell's Company, first Regt., Mom 
mmttii County, New Jersey Militia; grandson of John and ICHzabeth (Taylor) 
Pennington; great'grandsoh of Nathan and Margaret (VVetscott) Pennington; 
great-grandson of Kit hard Wc&cott, Major, Third Battalion, Gloucester County, 
New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Nathan Pennington, private, First Bat- 
talion, Second Establishment, New Jersey Cont'l I,ine, prisoner. 

RONAIJD LT^OYD THOMPSON, Bloomiield, N. J. (33487). Son of Stephen and 
Sarah Ann (Cratsley) Thompson; grandson of Frederick and Mary Jane 
(Stout) Cratsley; great-grandson of William and Sarah Ann (Johnson) Ming 
Stout; great-grandson of Samuel Stout, privat.', [lunlerden County, New Jersey 
Militia, prisoner. 

WI1.FIA.M 'COOPER THOMPSON, Millington, X. J. (33338). Son of Joseph 
Worral and Margaret (MclvOwen) Cooper; grandson of William and 
Martha Mclvowen (Brown) Cooper; great-grandson of fclias and Joanna (Mc- 
F.owen) Brown; great- -grandson of William ami Martha (Mehelm) McJ'own; 
great 3 -grandson of John Mehelm, Colonel and Quartermaster General, New 
Jersey Mditia. 

WlUdAM PIIIUJPS THOMPSON', Atlantic City, N. J. (3.2696). Sun of Joseph 
and Isabella I,. (Philli])s) Thompson; grandson of William W. and Hester 
(Pennington) Thompson; great-grandson of John ami Elizabeth (Taylor) Pen- 
nington; great-grandson of Nathan and Margaret (WestCOtt) Pennington; great-- 
grandson of Richard Westi-oit, Major. Third Battalion, Gloucester County, New 
Jersey Militia; grandson of William Wilson I.atta and Margaret Sarah (Mc- 
Kelway) Phillips; great-grandson of George W. and Abigail (Ketcham) Phillips; 
great-grandson of L,evi and Hannah (Fisher) Ketcham; great 3 -grands6n of 
John Kctchfim, private, First and Third Regis., New Jersey State Troop.-, and 
Cont'l Army; great-grandson of Joseph and F.liza (Scott) Thompson; great- 
grandson of Klias and Rachel (Wills) Thompson; gi caf'-gi andson of Joseph 
Thompson, private, Captain Waddell's Company. First Rcjjt., Monmouth County, 
New Jersey Militia; great-grandson of Nathan Pennington, private, Neu Jersey 
Cont'l Fine, prisoner; great-- grandson of Levi Ketcham, private, New Jersey- 
Slate Troops, 7 years' service. 

BURTON FFF TIIORPK, Mo. (32012). Supplemental. Son of Charles G. and 
iCmma Ames (Sands) Thorpe; grandson of J. I"). and Fmily (Ames) Sand- 
great-grandson of Uri and Mehitable 'Mix) Ames; great--grandson of Timothy' 
Mix, Lieutenant, Second Keg*., Conn. Cont'l Artillery, pensioned. 

ALFRED BUCKNER. THRUSTON, Grand Junction, Col,.. (31437). Son of 
Alfred Buclcner and Mary Fucy (Washington) Thru-ton; grandson of Allied 
Buckner and Catherine Frances Magill (Gordon) Thruston; great-grandson of 
Buckner and Jeonnette (Jonuary) Thruston; great-grandson of Charles Myun 
Thruston,' Colonel, Virginia Cont'l Troops. 

MASON OSGOOD T1I,]>KN, Chicago, III (33651). Son of IS. Frank and l.nc.ctia 
Jane (Greaveraet) Tilden ; grandson of Mason Blackman and Cordelia (Allen) 
Tilden; great-grandson of John Mareellus an. I Polls (7'annel) Tilden; great*- 
grandson of Mason and Sally (Flack. nan) Tilden; great-grandson of Daniel 
Tilden, Captain, Conn. Twentieth Cont'l Infantry. 

WIFUAM RICHMOND T I Id , I NCI I AST, Providence, R. I. (34053). Son of 
Janus and Sarah B] (Anthony) Tillmghast; grandson of Charles Foster and 
Fu/auna ( R iclumm.l ) Tillinghast ; great-grandson of Stephen Hopkins and 
Thcodosia (Foster) Tillinghast; great-grandson of Daniel Tillinghast, Colonel, 
Rhode Island Train of Artillery, Memher Rhode Island Committee of Safety, 
General Asseml.lv. ami other committees 



3^4 



SONS OF TII1$ AMERICAN INVOLUTION. 



JOSEPH BENJAMIN TttXOU, Jersey City. N. J. (N. V. 33246). Son of Thomas 
T. and Small Elizabeth (Benjamin) Tillou; grandson of Joseph Seymour and 
Emily Ann (AVoolsey) Tillon; great-grandson of Orange and Clarissa (Thorp) 
Benjamin; great"-grandson of Judah Benjamin, private, Conn. Militia and 
Dragoons, pensioned. 

FRANK OYSTER TINTITOFF, Peoria, Til. (32801). Son of Sylvester Matthew 
and .Mary Ann (Oyster) TintlmlT; grandson of Daniel and Sarah (Kneisel) 
Oyster; great-grandson of Stephen and Elizabeth (Snyder) Kneisel; great 2 -. 
grands., n of Stephen Kneisel, private. Bucks County, Pa. Militia. 

SAMI'Kl, NEY TITUS, Marion, Ohio (33163). Son of Stephen and Margaretta 
I,. (Nye) Titus; grandson of Mel/ar and Phebc (Spragne) Xye; great-grand- 
son of James and Mary (Spooner) Sprague; grcat--gi andson of Joshua Spfague, t 
private, Mass. Militia, Major in Col. Joab Stafford's Independent Company,' 
Mass. Volunteers; great-grandson of F,bencccr Spooner, Mass. privateer service, 
prisoner-; great-grandson of Ebcnezer .Vv<\ private, Third Regt., Conn. Militia; 
great-grandson of James Spragne, private, Captain Leavenworth's Company, 
Colonel M.-ik's Regt., Conn. Cont'l T ;, pensioned. 

CHARLES TOMS TODD, Dunella, N. J. <.{.(pr/>. So,, of Augustus 1". and Adeila 
(Cameron) Todd; grandson • of Augustus and Meribah (Toms) Todd; great- 
grandson of Charles and Mercy (Runyon) Toms; great' J -grandson of Michael 
Toms, Corporal, Middlesex County, New Jersey Militia and Stale Troops. 

HUBERT ft. TODD, New Orleans, f,a. (33216). Son of James Alfred and Marien 
(Smith) Todd; grandson of Alfred and Mary Ann (TTovey) Todd; great- 
grandson of Oliver and Esther (Saylcs) Ifovcy; great 2 -grandson of Thomas 
and Prudence (Brown) Saylcs; great-grandson of John Saylcs, Colonel, Rhode 
Island Militia, Member Committee of Safely and Council of War. 

Iire.ll OSCAR TOMPKINS, Ocean Grove, N. J. (33784). Son of George L D. 
and I'.leau or RHzalwth lAsay) Tompkins; grandson of Oscar Hamlet and 
Elizabeth (Neal) Tompkins; great-grandson of John ami Maria (Van Vleet) 
Neal; great-grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Salter) Neal; great a -gra"ndson of 
John Neal, private, Maryland Cont'l Troops, pensioned. 

NEAL ASAY TOMPKINS, Ocean Grove, N. J. (33783). Son of George L. I), 
and Eleanor Elizabeth (Asay) Tompkins; grandson of Oscar Mantlet and 
Elizabeth (Neal) Tompkins; great-grandson of John and Maria (Van Vleet) 
Neal; great-grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth (Salter) Neal; great-grandson of 
Jolm Neal, private, Alary laud Cont'l Troops, pensioned. 

ALBERT DUttLEY TOPPING, Cedar Point, Kan. (31046), Sou of George and 
Louise Elvira (Grinned) Topping; grandson of II, ram and Amanda Elvira (Mont- 
gomery) Grinned; great-grandson of Johnson and Klvira (Dudley) Montgomery; 
great- grandson of Peter and Lucy (Barnard) Dudley; great--grandson of 
Benjamin Barnard, private, Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

CHARLES TALI. MAN TOPPING, Brooklyn, X. Y. (Kan. 31048). Son of George 
and Louise Elvira (Grinncll) Topping; grandson of flcnry and Mary Rine 
(Tallman) Topping.; great-grandson of John Calhoun and Ellen (Rine) Tall- 
yman; great-grandson of Peter Tallman; great 3 -grandson of J.aincs Tallman, 
private, Seventh Company, Eleventh Regt., Virginia Cont'l Line. 

HUDSON ROBERT TOPPING, Peoria, 111. (33086). Son of Hudson Boyd and 
Margaret (Atkinson) Topping; grandson of Sanford and Maryclta (Boyd) 
Topping; great-grandson of John Hudson and Amanda (Kind, all) Topping; 
great'-'-grandson of Jared Toppin; great 8 -grandson of Josiah Toppin, private, 
Morris County, New Jersey Militia. 

HAROLD TAYLOR TORRANCE, Wilkinsburg, Pa. (32172). Son of Jeremiah 

UcvC] and Mary A. (McBeth) Torrance; grandson of Joseph and Sarah 
(Peebles) Torrance; great-grandson of Hugh Torrance, Adjutant, First Bat- 
talion, Cumberland County, Pa. Militia. v 
MILES LLK AND TOWER, Morton, Wash. (3J45H). So,, ,,f No, I I), and Alice 
(Miles) Tower; grandson of John ( >. and Louisa fTafl) Miles; great-grandson 



KP,C,ISTF,R Ol- NICW M I'.M HICKS. 



325 



of Jessie and Betsy (Prcscott) MiUs; great"-graudson of Jeremiah Vrcscotl, 
Captain, Col. Thomas Stickncy's Regt., New Hampshire Militia. 

EDMUND FRANCIS TRABUE, Louisville, Ky. (33035). Son of Stephen Fit/- 
Jfamea ami Alice' Elizabeth (Berry) Trabue; grandson of Chaslain I- (asking and 
Ivlizabetk (Trahnt) Trabue! great-grandson of James Trabue, Uculenaiil with 
Col. George Rogers Cl.uk, prisoner at Montreal; grandson of Ldmuud Taylor 
and Sarah Francis (Taylor) licuy; great-grandson of Washington and Mice 
(Taylor j limy; great-grandson of Jasues Taylor, Colonel, Virginia Militia, 
Member Virginia Constitutional Convention; great-grandson of Stephen and 
Jane (llaskins) Trabue; great-grandson of Robert Haskins, County Lieutenant, 
Chester/kid County, Virginia Militia; great-grandson of William Berry and 
Susanna Harrison Grayson (Gibson) Taylor; great 2 -grandsor) of Jonathan 
Taylor, Lieutenant, Botetourt County, Virginia Convention Guards. 

ROBERT COLEMAN TRACY, Washington, I) .C. (3.2147). Son of Alyan Taleott 
and F.llen Louise (Townsend) Tracy; grandson of Andrew Williams and 
Kmeline (Taleott) Tracy; great-grandson of Alvan and Philemela (Root) 
Taleott; great 2 -grandson of Samuel Root, private, Conn. Militia and State 
Troops. 

CHARMER BOORMAN TRAVER, Milwaukee, Wis. (32660). Son of Frank 
Albert and Jennie (Poorman) Traver; grandson of John R. and Lovillo 
Minerva (Barto) Traver; great-grandson of Lewis and l£unice (Hyde) liarto; 
great--grandson of Oliver Cromwell Hyde, private, Colonel Putnam's Regt., 

Conn. Troops. 

WILLIAM OREN TRENOR,' Roanoke, Va. (32949). Son of Charles Paris and 
Martha Anne (Atkins) jIYcnor; grandson of Gafwood Goggill and Jane (Webb) 
Trenor; great-grandson of George II. and Sarah Trenor; greats-grandson of 

James Trenor, Sergeant and Adjutant, Virginia Militia. 

CHARLES MACIJLING TRIMBLE, Lancaster, Ohio (33445)- Son of George 
W. and Mary Elizabeth (Geiser) Trimble; grandson of James and Ami Eliza- 
beth (Crane) Trimble; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (MeComick) 
Trimble; great 2 -gfandson of William Trimble, private, First Battalion, Cumber- 
land C.ninty, Pa, Militia. 

FRANK KING TRUBY, PaineSvillc, Ohio (32840). Son of William and Margaret 
l'hi|ips (.McMillan) Truhy; grandson of William and Susan (Murphy) Truby; 
great-grandson of Samuel Mur/'hy, private, Virginia Cont'l Troops, 5 years' 
service; great-grandson of John and Mary (Reamer) Truby; great-'-grandso'n of 
Christopher Truby, Captain, Westmoreland County, l'a. Militia, and Justiceof 
the Peace. 

HENRY EMILE TRUHEAU, New Orleans, La. ($2768). Son of Louis Fmile 
and Francoise Eulalie ( Fourcade) Trudeau; grandson of Don Zen on Trudeau-, 

Captaifl, Louisiana Infantry under C.alvez. 

GRATZ ASHLEY TRUE, New Orleans, La. (33209). Sou of James I!, and Sarah 
(Crump) True; grandson of Robert Henry and Sarah (Dorsey) Crump; great- 
grandson of Charles Griffith ami Catherine (Welsh) Dorsey; great-grandson 
of Nicholas Dorsey, First Lieutenant, Fourth Regt., Maryland Cont'l Troops. 

CIIAPLIF LEWIS TRUESDELL, Milwaukee, Wis. (32657). Sou of William 
I'mii and Prtsy Kli/aheth (Stevens; Trucsdelj ; grandson of Jonathan G. and 

Ph.ehe (Moggland) Truesdell; great-grandson of Jabish (Jelnsh) Truesdell, 
private, Capt. Jesse Truesdcll's Company, Colonel Crane's Regt., New York 
Stale Troops. 
EDWIN CARROLL TUBUS, Chicago, 111. (32816). Son of C. A. an. I Olive M . 
(tingles) Tubbs; grandson of James and Mary Ann (Pa. ton) Tubbs; great- 
grandson of Lemuel and Lydia (Millions) Tubbs; great" ei .mdsou of Israel 
and Betsy (Lewis) Tubbs; great 3 -grandson of Lemuel Tubbs, Second Lieuten- 
ant, Seventeenth Regt., New York Stale Troops. 



326 



SONS OK Till', AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



THEODORE BRUSH TUCKER, Jr., Toledo, Ohio (33447). Sen of Theodore 
Brush and Adclia (Reynolds) Tucker; grandson of John Alexander and Eliza- 
beth (Brush) Tucker; great-grandson of Jacob and Clue (Ferguson) Tucker, 3d; 
great 2 -grandson of Jacob Tucker, Jr., private, New Hampshire Militia; great- 
grandson of Benjamin Brush, private, Colonel Van Veghten's Regt., New York 
Stale Troops; great-grandson of and Sarah (Miller) Brush; great-grand- 
son of William Miller, private and Coporal, Westchester County, New York 
Militia. 

IUvVKRUvY RANDOLPH TUCKER, Richmosd, Va. (3.3939). Son of John 
Randolph and Fannie Booth (Crump) 'Pucker; grandson of Nathaniel Beverley 
and Jane (Ellis') Tucker; great-grandson of Henry St. George and Ann Evelina 
(Hunter) Tucker; great 2 -grandson of St. George Tucker, Secretary and Aide- 
de-Camp to General Nelson, Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, Virginia Militia. 

HENRY ST. GEORGE TUCKER, Lexington, Va. (32938X. Sun of John Randolph 
and Laura (Powell) Tucker; grandson of Henry St. George and Evelina (Hunter) 
Tucker; great-grandson of St, George Tucker, Secretary and Aide-de-Camp to 
General Nelson, Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, Virginia Militia. 

BOAVEN TUFTS, Winchester, Mass. (.us-l-D- Son of Albert Nelson an<l Mars 
(Locke) Tufts; grandson of Jonathan Erost and Mary Moore (Adams) Locke; 
great-grandson of Joseph .l.iaius. private, Col. Jacob Oerrish's Regt., Mass. 
Militia. 

FUOUA TURNER, St. Louis, Mo. (339S3>. Son of Benjamin and Susan Amanda 
(Fuqita) Turner; grandson of Richard Booker and Deborah Booh < Sisk > 
Fuqua; great-grandson of Joseph Fit-qua, Jr., Captain, Charlotte County, Vir- 
ginia Militia; great-grandson of Joseph Fit-quo, private, Fourth and Fifth 
Regts., Virginia Militia, 

OSCAR CREDEI.LE TURNER, Chicago, 111. (Fa. 32767). Son of. John 1). and 
Cynthia (Hendry) Turner; grandson of Thomas and Fouivny iCredrlle) 
Turner, J r. ; great-grandson of Thomas and Catherine (Records) Turner; 
gfeai-gr^ndspii of Zadoc Turner, private. Second Regt., Maryland Troops. 

HENRY MESSENGER TURNEY; Lansing, Mich. (Ohio 32832). Sou of Adam 

Weber and Catherine (William..) Turney; grandson of Joseph and Margaret 
(Weber) Turney; great-grandson of John Turney, private, dipt. George 
Knopinherger's Company, Second Battalion, Northampton County, I'a. Militia. 

MERRILL ADAMS TURNEY, Marion, Ohio (3232.1). Sou of Adam Weber and 
Catherine (Williams) Turney; grandson of Joseph and Margaret (Weber) 
Turney; great-grandson of John Turney. private. Second Company, Second 
Battalion, Northampton County, Pa. Militia. 

WILLIAM LEWIS TUTTLE, Ness Haven, Conn. (32273). Son of Horace Whit- 
ney and Emma Maria (Nan Valkenberg) Tuttle; grandson of Horace and 
Sarah (Cook) Tuttle; great-grandson of Billions and' Sarah (Munson) Cook; 
great --grandson of Samuel and Mais (Finland) Cook; gfeat a -grandson of 
Thachicits Cook, Major of Ward's Regt., Conn. Stan- Troops, and Colonel, 
Conn. Militia. 

WIT,FRED CHARLES TW1SS, Salt Fake City, Utah (32629). Son of Charles 
Wesley and Kate (B.) Tss'iss; grandson of Caleb Page and Charity (White) 
Twiss; great-grandson of James and Polly (Stewart) White; great-grandson 
of William Steivart, Lieutenant, Conn. Militia, prisoner at Port Washington, 
pensioned. 

GEORGE SAMUEL TYLER, St. Louis, Mo. (33183). Son of Jared Whiting and 
Grace Louise ( Whitney » Tyler; grandson of Samuel and Tahiti. a (Whiting) 
Tyler, Jr.; great-grandson of Samuel Tyler, private, Mass. Militia. 

FRANCIS GUILD UNDERWOOD, Milwaukee, Wis. (j*«$6). Son of. Albert 
Oallatin and Sarah Smith (Wight) Underwood; grandson of Itarvilnml and 
Sophia (Smith) Wight; great-grandson of Paletiali and Prwicnce. (Austin) 
Wight; grraF-giamFou of Simeon Wight, Surgeon, Mass. Militia, died in 
service. 



UEGISTlyK ()!• NEW M-KM HERS. 



327 



CHARM'S JAMES UPHAM, Dorchester, Mass. (33059 X. Son of Charles Amos 
and Eliza Ann (Kelton) Upham; grandson of Amos ami Abigail 1 1 1 umphreys) 
Upham; great-grandson of Pliincas Upham, private, Mass. Militia. 

CHARLES KELTON Ul'IIA.M, Junior Member, Dorchester, Mass. (33053). Son 
of Charles James am! Emma Eugenia (Sclloii) Upham; grandson of Cliar'fcs 
Amos and iCIi/n Ann (kelton) Upham; great-grandson of Amos ami Abigail 
(Humphreys) Upham; grcal--grandson of Phineas Upham, private, Mass. Mililia; 
great--grandsun of j dines Humphreys, Sergeant, Mass, Militia, 

JOSEPH ALVIN VAN BERG1I, Cambridge, Mass. (N. V. 33330)! Son of Morris 
!•;. and Bertha (Sneilenbergh) Van Uergh; grandson of Joseph and Clara A. 
(Moore) Sneilenbergh; great-grandson of William and Elizabeth (Lightfoot) 
Moore; great 2 -grandson of James Moore, Lieutenant, Capt. James Barnes' 
Company, Colonel Battle's Regt., New York Troops, pensioned. 

HOWELL VAN IICAUCA.M. Pittsburgh, I'a. (3^004). Son of William Dixon 
and [tannic Emily (Cortant) Van Rlarcom; grandson of All, an Jasper and Sarah 
Mahala (Howes) Conan! ; great-grandson of Caleb and Sally (names') Conant; 
great-grandson of John Harms, private, Mass. Militia, enlisted for .5 years; 
gfeat»-grandson of Daniel Barnes, Captain, Mass. Militia; great-grandson of 
Jonathan Conant, private, Colonel Cilley's Regt., New Flampshire Militia; 
great-grandson oi John Barnes, private, Middlesex County, Mass. Militia. 

rRANK ORRIN VANCE, Meriden, Conn. (33464). Son of Lewellyn Robert and 
Harriet Colliding (Hall) Vance; grandson of Qrrin and Julia Ann (Conkling) 
Hall; great-grandson of Sylvester and Elizabeth ( I'.rainard) Hall; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Hall, Captain, Conn. Light Horse, 1770. 

EUGENE SALTER VAN COURT, Oakland, Calif. (32733). Son of John W. 
and Elizabeth A. (Lines) Van Court; grandson of William S. and Fanny 
(Wade) Van Court; great-grandson of Abner and Mary (Clark) Wade; great- 
grandson of .linos \Wnlc, private, Essex County, New Jersey Militia; great 3 - 
grandson of Daniel Wade, private, Essex County, New Jersey Mililia. 

IIAUHERT liAlLEY VAN NESS, Detroit, Mich. (111. .(.U>.s<0. Son of Kratik 
Colgate and Mable (Clark) Van Ness; grandson of William Henry and 
Lucinda (Harhert) Clark; great-grandson of Solomon and Amadine A. (Wat- 
son) Harhert; greatr-grandson of Hezekiah and Rachel (Sblsbee) Harhert; 
great :, -gran<lson of Daniel Solsbee, private, Washington County, Pa. Cont'l 
Troops, pensioned. 

WILLIAM VAN WYCK, New York City, N. Y. (33363). Son of Augustus and 
l.elia Cordon < WilkinO Van Wyck; grandson of William and Lydia Ann 
(Maverick) Van Wyek; great-grandson of Abraham and Zuruah Van Wyck; 
great-grandson of .Ihraham I'an Wye/:. Lieutenant, Second Regt., Dutchess 
County, New York Militia. 

EDGAR CALVIN VARNEY, St. Paul, .Minn. (31838). Son of Calvin and Eliza 
(Nowell) Varney; grandson of Mark Noivell, sailor and private; Mass. Coasl 
Defense, pensioned, 

CAPT. HARRY VAUGHAN, Morxistown, N. J. (32904). Son of Harry and 
Helena Elizabeth (Robinson) Vaughan; grandson of Thomas T. and Zibiah 
Smallwood (Hodgson) Vaughan; great-grandson of Thomas and Margaret (Van 
Hook) Vaughan; great-grandson of Thomas Vaughan, private, Capt. John 
Unison's Company, Col. licnjamin T. Eyre's Regt., I'a.. Militia. 

WILLIAM ELLEGOOD VAUGIIAN, Washington, D. C. Lu-'s-M. Son of William 

EJlegOOd and Mary Idalene (JohnsonJ Vaughan; grandson of William EHegood 
and Claudia (Morris) Vaughan; great-grandson of Thomas and Claudia (Eli©- 

good) Vaughan; great-grandson of William and Sarah C. (Matthews) Ellegood; 
great ;, -grandson of Thomas Matthews, Lieutenant ColoneJ, Virginia Militia. 
CILIHCRT GUY VIA, Newport News, Va. (33556). Son of George Elphus and 
Emma (Johnson) Via; grandson of Matthew Turner and Mary (Runkle) Via; 
great-grandson of K.cubin ami Lorinia (Garrison) Via; great"-'- grandson of 
William Via, private, Albemarle County, Virginia Mililia, pensioned. 



3->8 



SONS OF THE 'AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



ROBERT FRANCIS VINCENT, Ashtabula, Ohio (N. .!. 33495). Son of George 

I'.liplilci and Julia Ann (Rowe) Vincent; grandson of Peter Sayre and Eliza 
(Lyon) Vincent; great-grandson of Amos anil Sarah (Mason) Vincent; great- 
grandson of Peter and Sarah (Quinby) Vincent; great 3 -grandson of John 
Vincent, private, Second Regt., Essex County, New Jersey Militia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM OSCAR VINCENT, Newark, N. J. (32917). Son of George K. and 
Julia A. (Rowe) Vincent; grandson of Peter S. and Eliza (Lyon) Vincent; 
great-grandson of Amos and Sarah (Mason) Vincent; great-grandson of Peter 
and Sarah (Quinby) Vincent; great 3 -grandson of John Vincent, private, New 
Jersey Militia and Co.nt'l Troops. 

GILRERT DOIGN VON PlIUL, New Orleans, La. (33210). Son of Henry and 
Mary (Doign) Von Plml; grandson of Henry and Rosalie (Sangrain) Von 
rind; great-grandson of William Von Phnl, private, Lancaster County, Pa. 
Militia. 

NOl.AN STEWART VOX PHUL, New Orleans, La. (M77^\). Son of William 
and Mary McD. (Williams) Von Plml.; grandson of Henry, and Rosalie (San- 
grain) Von Plml; great-grandson of William I'un Plml, private, Col. Mathias 
Slough's Battalion, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

WILLIAM VON PITUL, Jr., Lieutenant, r. S A., San Francisco, Calif. (La. 

3-J759). Son of William and Marie Ali/ire (Cade) Von l'hnl; grandson of 
William and Mary McD. (Williams) Von [Mud; great-grandson of Henry and 
Rosalie (Sangrain) Von l'hnl; grcat-g' andson of William Von Phut, private, 
Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

RICHARD SPARKS WAINWRICIIT, Tacoma, Wash. (324.6O. Sou of Lisle and 
Martha Lyre (Tripler) Wainwright; grandson of Henry l.entz and Susan 
(Lyre) Wainwrighl; great-gi andson of Jonathan and Susan (Eyre) Wain- 
Wright; great-grandson of George and Martha (Hollingshead) Lyre; great 3 - 
grandson of Jehu Byre, Colonel. First Company, Philadelphia Artillery. 

\^\i\ ARNOLD WAI.DKN, New Haven. Conn. 1 3,3450). Son -of William [Jvirtcui 
and Sarah Louise (Orr) Walden ; grandson of John Henry and Jane Jan-t 
(Fisher) Orr; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Lydia (Green) l'isher ; great- 
grandson of Henry Green, private, Captain Clifton's Company, Third Regt., 
Conn. Line. 

LDWIN FRANCIS WALKER. Evanston, 111. (336*2)-. Son of Francis llorton 

and Marilla Antoinette (Metcalf) Walker; grandson of Mason Jerome and 
Hannah Elizabeth (Welch) Metcalf; great-grandson of Solomon and Hannah 
(Donnell) Metcalf; great-grandson of Simeon Metcalf, Corporal, Worcester 
County, Mass. Militia. 

GILBERT STODDARD WALKER, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32979). Son of George 
Stoddard and Ann Catharine (MeKain) Walker; grandson of James and 
Adaline Cecil (Kerwin) MeKain or McCain; great-grandson of William and 
Catharine (Huff) MeKain or McCain; great-grandson of Jacob Huff, private, 
Thirteenth Pa. Regt., Gout'l Line. 

ROY OLLIN WALKER, Chicago, 111. (33083). Son of Sylvester Rounds and 
Anna Elsie (Pratt) Walker; grandson of David Rounds and Sylvia K. 
(Hough) Walker; great grandson of Joseph and Emergency (Rounds) Walker; 
great-grandson of Jonathan Walker, Corporal. Col. John llathaway's Regt., 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Jonathan Walker, private, Colonel Rope's 
Regt., Mass. Militia. 

WILLIAM HOWARD WALKER, Jr., Providence, R. I. (30400). Son of Wil- 
liam II (.ward and llattie Boone (Newell) Walker; grandson of William Russell 
and Eliza BiHings (Hall) Walker; great-grandson of Alfred and Iluldah 
Kardccn (Perry) Walker; great-grandson of George White-field and MehitahL 
(Rucklin) Walker; great ;i -grandson of John Walker, Sergeant, at Lexington 
Alarm. 



REGISTER 01' NEW MEMBKRS. 



A- ( ) 



WILLIAM RUSSELL WALKER, Providence, R. I. (30399). Son of William 

Howard ami Jlattic Boone (Newell) Walker; grandson of William Russell 
and Eliza Billings (Hall) Walker; great-grandson of Alfred .and [Iuldah 
liardeen (Perry) Walker; great--grandson of George Wliitefield ami Mchitable 
(Bucklin) Walker; great 3 -grandson of John Walker, Sergeant, ai Lexington 

Alarm. 

LOGAN DOUGLAS WALLACE, Chicago, 111. (J.}.)*.))- Son of Logan David and 
Bessie Griffin (Harris) Wallace; grandson of IScnjamin ami Susan (Terrell) 
Harris; great-grandson of Sampson and Susan (Willis) Harris; greaf--gramlson 
of Walton J lams, private, Georgia Militia, Member House of Assembly; 
great-grandson of Nathan and Elizabeth Starnes Harris; great--grandsnn of 
Nathan Harris, private, Virginia Militia. 

HORACE LvLURIDGE WALLIS, Waltham, Mass. (33074). Son of Horace and 
Eunice Perry (Puller) Wallis, Jr.; grandson of Horace and CaLsta (Wood) 
Wallis; great-grandson of David Wallis, private, Captain May's Company, Col. 
David Leonard's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

CRL0C, F. POOL WALTON (adopted son of lsaiali W. Walton), Fremont, Ohio 
(32324). Son of Sherman Ira and Minnie Lois (Walton) Pool; grandson of 
Ira and Lucy Kggleskm Dill; great-grandson of Liluih Egglest'on, Drummer, 
New York Militia; great-grandson of Eliab and Lucy (Ingraham) Eggleston; 
greal--grandson ,,f Daniel Ingraham, private, Capt. Andrew Waterman's Com- 
pany, Lieutenant-Colonel llosford's Regt., Conn. Militia. 

LEWIS DONALD WAN/PR, Sergeant-Major, I'. S. A., Portland, Ore. (31096). 
Son of Charles Whiting and Grace Gibson (Lewis) Wanzer; grandson of 
Curtis ('.rant and Loretta (Gibson) Lewis; great-grandson of Reuben [Hitter- 
field and Margaret (.McAllister) Gibson; great"-grandson of Janus and Dorcas 
(Sherburn) Gibson ; great-grandson of William and Sarah ( liutterhcld ) Sher- 
burn; great'-grandson of Reuben Butfer field, Captain, Eighth Company, Col. 
Samuel Thatcher's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN WARD, Buffalo, N. Y. (32880). Son. of Hamilton and 
Mary Adelia (Chamberlain) Ward; grandson of Peter Hamilton and Eliza 
(Cleveland) Ward; great-grandson of Peter am! Maria (Colfax) Ward; great'"- 
grandson of I'cter Word, Captain, Bergen County, New Jersey Militia. 

WILLIAM RANKIN WARD, Newark, N. J. (,33494). Son of William R. and 
Mary Robinson (Meeker) Ward; grandson of Isaac Morean and Mary Ogden 
(Rankin) Ward; great-grandson of ' Joseph Smith and Lucy (Dodd) Ward; 
great--grandson of Bet Intel Word, private, Second Regt., Essex County, New 
Jersey Militia. 

ELLIS FULTON WARNER, Bellevue, Ohio (32847). Son of George and Mary 
(Seblers) Warner; grandson of George and Rebecca (Hovenslein) Werner; 
great-grandson of Gddrge liovenstein, Corporal, Third Battalion, Lancaster 
County, Pa. Militia. 

GEORGE OTIS WARRLN, Pekin, III. (J337K). Son of K/.ra C. and Ellen 
(Sylvester) Warren; grandson of Ezra and Eleanor (Greaves) Warren; great- 
grandson of. Isaac ami Lncmda (Broekway) Warren; g.reat--grandson of 
Cornelius Warren, private, Col. James Reed's Regt., New Hampshire Milijia; 
grcat ;; -giaudson of liphraim Broekway.; private, Colonel Nichol's Regt., General 
Staik's Brigade, New Hampshire Militia. 

ROBERT EDWIN WARRLN, Delaware, Ohio (32829). Son of Benjamin Frank- 
lin and Elizabeth (Welch) • Warren; grandson of Robert William and Nancy 
(Richey) Warren; great-grandson of James and Sarah (Newhouse) Richey; 
great--grandson of Anthony and Nancy (Coons) Newhouse; great"-grand-on of 
.lnlhonv Newhouse, Sr., Seaman on brig "Northampton," Virginia State Navy. 

TRACY RRONSoN WARREN, Bridgeport, Conn. (77.70?, Supplemental. Son 
of David Hard and Louisa (llrOnson) Warren; gramls,,,, of William and Al.iiira 
(Tyler) Rronson; great-grandson of RoswaJl and Susan (Kaslon) Tyler; great"- 



330 



SONS OF TIL)'! AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 



grandson of James and Anne (Mungerford) Tyler; great 3 -grandson- -of Daniel 
Tyler, Captain, Conn. Company of Matross; grandson of Alanson and Sarah 
M. (Hickox) Warren; great-grandson of Caleb and Ruth (Seoville) Ilickox; 

great-grandson of Daniel Hickox, Captain, Ninth Company, Sixteenth Regt., 
Conn. Militia, pensioned; great-grandson of Edward and Alary (Steele) Warren; 
great-'-graudson of James Warren, private, Conn. Militia; great-grandson of 
Edward and .Mary (Steele) Warren; great-grandson of Bradford Steele, Mem- 
ber Committee of Inspection, Major, Quartermaster Department for raising 
recruits; great-grandson of Asahcl Ihonson, private, Conn. Militia, pensioned. 

STANLEY RUSSELL WATERMAN, Meriden, Conn. 133174). Son of Frank 
Callalier and Alary Hicks (Russell) Waterman; grandson of Moses Philpot and 
Maria Winslow (I,unt) Waterman; great-grandson of John and Lydia Hamil- 
ton) Waterman; great-grandson of Malac'hai Waterman, private, Mass. Militia. 

ALLAN WATERS, Mi. Vernon, 111. (N, Y. 328H3). Son of Otis Marion and 
l.'.crinthia (Pace) Waters; grandson of Edward C. and Mary A. (Woodin) 
Pace; great-grandson of Joel and Parmcla (Daniel) Pace, Jr.; great-grandson 
of Joel I'aee, Sr.. private, Colonel Neath's and Colonel Davis' Regts., Henry 
County, Virginia Militia. 

EDWARD THOMAS WEAKLEY, Dayton, Ohio (33700). Son of George Willis 
and Viola (Maguire) Weakley; grandson of Edward Thomas and Catherine 
(Gunckel) Weakley; great-grands, ,11 of Thomas ami Anne (Alexander) Weak- 
ley; great-grandson of Edward Weakley, private, Second Battalion, Cumberland 
County, Pa. Militia. 

GEORGE WILLIS WEAKLEY, Dayton, Ohio (33449). Son of Edward Thomas 
and Catherine (Cunckel) Weakley; grandson of Thomas and Anne (Alexander) 
Weakley; great-grandson of Edtvard Weakley, private, Second Pattaliou, Cum- 
berland County, Pa. Militia. 

SAMUEL GRIGSHY WPP.i:, Minden, La. (3.2751).. Son of Junius Young and 
Ann fC. M. (Grigshy) Webb; grandson of Samuel Mays and Sarah R. C. 

(Green 1 Gr'rgshy; grenl-grandson of Uhyd md Sarah (Manning) Grigshy; 

great'-' grandson of Hiwch Crxgsby, l.ifulenant, South Carolina Militia, 

WALLACE EDGA1? WElHiER, Lewislon, Me. (3^444). Sou of Arista ami L.uella 
(Wcdgewoofl) Webber; grandson of George and Rebecca (Mcrriman) Webber; 
great-grandson of George Weber, Sergeant, Mass. Militia, pensioned. 

HAROLD KINGSLEY WEIDENFIELD, San Francisco, Calif. (32726). Son of 
Edward A. and Helen Thomson (Whittemore) Weidenfield; grandson of George 
W. ami Lucia K. (Thomson) Whittemore; great-grandson of Philip and Sarah 
(Cutler) Whittemore; great"-gi andson of Philip Carteret ami Lydia (Phelps) 
Whittemore; grcat ; '-grandson ; of William and Abigail (Carteret) Whittemore; 
great'-giandson of Samuel Whittemore. Minute Man, Mass. Militia, wounded 
at Lexington. 

FREDERICK LEWIS WKIS, Providence, R. F. (32488). Son of John Peter Carl 
and Georgma (Lewis) Weis; grandson of Charles Frederick and Mary (Clap) 
Weis; great-grandson of Richard and Mary (Make) Clap; great-grandson ,,1 
Lemuel Clap, Captain, Dorchester, Mass. Militia; great-grandson of Jonathan 
Blake, \» ivate and Sergeant, Dorchester, Mass. Militia; grandson of Ahiel Smith 
ami Harriet Phipps (Richardson) Lewis; great-grandson of George and Harriet 
(Phipps) Richardson; great-grandson of William and Prudence (Burpee) 
Richardson; greaC-gramlsou of Benjamin Richardson, Captain, Worcester 
County, Mass. Militia; gi eat-'-graudsoii of Sylvanus and Anna (Winch) Phipps; 
gieaC-grandsou of John / J /n'/'/>.v, Sergeant, Mass. Cont'l Troops; gi eat '-grandson 
of Jcdediah l'hin<s, private, Mass. Militia and Cont'l Troops. 

EDWARD WINSI.oW WELLINGTON, Ellsworth, Kan. (33301). Son of Am- 
brose ami I.uey Jane (Kent) Wellington; grandson of Benjamin Oliver and 
Patty (Hastings) Wellington; great grandson of Benjamin Wellington Sergeant, 
Mass. Militia. 



U EG I ST E R O F N K W M K M IS I' - , H S . 



33' 



WARNER WELLINGTON WELSH, Baltimore, lid. (33100), Son of Winner O. 

and Alary Clare (Knox) Welsh; grandson of Luther Brooke and Juliette (Mux- 
ley) Welsh; great-grandson of Warner and Marah (Scott) Welsh; great-- 

I grandson of Samuel ami Rachel (Griffith) : Welsh; great :! -grandson of Hairy 
Griffith, Member Maryland Committee of Observation, Assembly, and Convcn- 
• lion. 

JAMES BRUCE WF.XTLLY, Poise, Idaho (Pa. 32985). Son of John and Sarah 
A. (Peterson) Wentley; grandson of Charles I!. and Elizabeth (Bayington) 
Peterson; great-grandson of Gabriel Peterson, fyieutenant, Eighth and Second 
Regis., Pa. Cont'l TrOOpSj 7 ycais' service. 

DAVID MOORE WESSON; Alonlclair, X. J. (33,902). Son of David and Mary 
Matilda (Moore) Wesson; grandson of Elijah Burbank and Elizabeth Coil 
(Goodwin) Wesson; great-gran. Ron of David and Anna (Purbank) Wesson; 
great-grandson of Joel and Thankful (Newton) Wesson, Jr.; great :l -gramRon of 
Joel and Hannah (Rigclow) Wesson; great '-grandson of Join, Wesson, private, 
Col. Samuel Bullard's Regt., Mass. Militia. 

GEORGE PARSONS WEST, Second Lieutenant, A. K. P., Montclair, X. J. 
(3373-)- Son of Charles Converse and Mary (Parsons) West; grandson of 
William Cordon and Alary (Cook) West; great-grandson of Royal and Rox- 
ianna (Hamlin) West; great L '-grandson of William Hamlin, private, Fifth and 
Second RegtS., Conn. Rine, pensioned. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON WESTCOTT, Sumner, Iowa (32783). Son of James 
Afonroe and Druzilla (Roberts) Westcott; grandson of George W. and Alary Jane 
(Carroll) Weslcolt; great-grandson of George W. and Olive (Waterman) 
Westcott; great-grandson of George WcslCOtt, private, Col. Jeremiah Olney's 
Rhode Island Cont'l Troops, pensioned. 

JOHN ELLIS WESTLAKE, Minneapolis, Minn, (31850). Son of Ellis John ami 
Grace K. (Thomas) Westlake; grandson of Charles Dean and Harriet Elizabeth 
(AIcNist) Westlake; great-grandson of George and Julia (Pinch) AIcX T ist; 
great--grandson of James and Sarah Finch; greats-grandson of James Finch, 
private, Fourth Regt., Orange County, X T e\v York Militia. 

HOWARD NELSON WESTON, Skowhegan, Ale. (32442). Son of Nelson Wheeler 

ami Martha. Emily (Palmer) Weston; grandson of John and Susan (Mel. aire) 

Weston; great : grandsan of Alvm and Abigail (Harding) Weston; great--grand- 

son of John and Azubah (Piper) Weston; great :! -grandson of Joseph Westpn, 

. Guide to Benedict .Arnold, died from service. 

JOHN ROLAND WESTON, Logtown, Miss. (La, 33222)-. Son of John Henry 
and Amelia (Paxlcr) Weston; grandson of Henry and Lois (Alead) Weston; 
great-grandson of John W. and Sarah Parker (Walker) Weston; great-'-grandson 
of Samuel and Mary (White) Weston; greaC-grandson of Joseph Weston, 
Pilot to Benedict Arnold, died from service. 
LIC ROY LILSPY WESTON, Seattle, Wash. (32475). Son of Royal Seymour 
and Dora .May (Silsby) Weston ; grandson of John Alonzo and Josephine 
Elvira (Miinson) Silsby; great-grandson of Jeremiah and Alary (Hill) Mnnson; 
great-'-grandson of Joint Munson, private, Lincoln County, Alass. Militia; 
grcat :i -grandson of Joseph Mnnson, private, Lincoln County, Alass. Militia. 
LDW'ARD MANSFIELD WHARFF, Rock Island, 111. (33379). Son of Isaac- 
Harrison Whittier and Annie Planchard (Chambers) Wharff; grandson of 
Le Roy ami Mary Llizabcth (Tibbett) Chambers; great-grandson of Nathaniel 
and Mary L. ( Shed. I ) Tibbett; grcat--grandson of Daniel Shcdd, .Mass, .seaman 
on frigate "Hague;" grandson of Joseph and Sophia Alible (Norton) Wharff; 
great-grandson of Isaac Penned and Sally (Penny) WharfT; great-'-g 1 amlson of 
Thomas Penny, private, First Company, .Mass. Seacoasi Defense. 

CHARLES HALL WHEELER, Minneapolis, Minn. 13350.). Son of Warren and 
Catherine Hall (liruwup) Wheeler; grandson of Warren and Ellis (Harmon) 
Wheeler; great-grandson of /.enas Wlieeler, private, Berkshire County, Mass. 
Milil.a. 



33^ 



SONS OP TIIIC AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



EDWARD JOSEPH WHITE, St. Louis, Mo. (.32570). Son of Edward C. and 

Euphenia Louise (Moffatt) White; grandson of Levi and Antoinette (Ch'auvin) 

Moffatt; great-grandson of Join' Moffatt, Jr., private, Captain Dix's Company, 
c. ..,.,.,. i, ii:,.: .:..., \i„.,, 'p,...^..... ....... *" .,.1.,., .f /../,.. 11. .(»,»< ....;...... 



Seventh Division, Mass. Troops; great"-g _ 
Colonel William's Regt., Mass. Militia. 
HARRY ALFRED WHITE, Lynn, Mass, (33283}. 
Carrie Etta (Tarbox) White; g 



of John Moffatt, priva 



.. jf William Ellsworth and 
andsoil of Simeon and Lois Prat! (Rlanchard) 
White; great-grandson of Reuben and Sophia (Loud) I'danehard; great s -granson 
of William and Hannah (Porter) Loud, Jr.; great-grandson of William Loud, 
private, Mass. Militia, prisoner. 
LUKE MATTHEWS WHITE, Montclair, X. 1. (.i.Mii). Son of David Irvine 
and Lucy (Matthews) White; grandson of Luke and Lucy Ann (Spottswood) 
Matthews; great-grandson of Elliott and Sally Dandridge (Littlepage) Spotts- 



I; great*-grandso 



,..,. • u , John and Sally (Rousie) Spottswood; g 
of Alexander Spottswood, Colonel, Virginia Cont'l Trooi 

. .\M. (33.103): Son of I 
Cat! 

it-grandson of John and Catherine (Hay) Rarnitz; gre 

.. 
Lieutenant Col 



.It 



(Ban 

grand 



) w 



John 



JOSEPH LEE WICKES, lis 

(Welsh) Wickes; grandson of Henry and Cathcri 
great-grandson of John and Catherine (May) Rarnitz; gre; 
Hay, Lieutenant, I'a. Militia, t 

I, and Mnnher I'a. Assembly. 
CLYDE PRANKLPN WIDAMAN, Aurora, Neb. (32966). Sun of Daniel VV. and 
Martha Clare (Kirkpatriqk) W, daman; grandson of Ad 
(Askren) Kirkpatrick; gi 



i.f Thin 



C. au<\ Doi-c. 
KKii) i\ 1 1 Kpaw RK ; gi eai -gi aiuison 111 1 nomas and Mary McCulIotigh Kill 
Patrick; great-'-grandson of Thomas McCullough, private, Ninth Battalion, l.ai 
caster County, Pa. Militia. 
EDWIN Ely! WILCOX, Salt Lake City, Utah (32633). Son of Walter E. an 
Maria Wealthy (Richards) Wilcox; grandson of Phineas and Wea 
Richards; great-grandson of Joseph Richards, private, Mass. Milu 
JOHN ASHER WILCOX, Rloomfiekl, Conn. (32274). Son of John a 
(Wright) Wilcox; grandson of Eli and Lois (Eno) Wileox; grea 
Daniel Wilcox, private, Captain Zacheus C.iUet's Company, Con: 
Lexington .Alarm. 

(33451). Son of Carlos .\ 
Mary ( Ried) Wileox; gr 
great-grandson of Elijah Wil 



. and 
(Dewey) 
ensioned. 
Susan M. 
indson of 
lilitia, at 



WILBUR ENOCH WILCOX, Meriden, C 

dson of Linus and .Miner R.ieon (Clark) Wilcox; 
, Jr., private, Conn. Militia, at Lexington 
Alarm; great'-'-gramlson of Elijah Wilcox, Sergeant, Eighteenth Regt., Conn. 
Militia; great grandson of Elijah and Lois (Warner) Wileox; great-grandson 
of John Warner, Lieutenant, Second Regt., Conn. Militia. 
ROBERT PARMALEE WILDER, Montclair, X. J. (33336). Son of Royal Could 
and Eliza Jane (Smith) Wilder; grandson of Abel and Hannah (Paine) 
Wilder.; great-grandson of Thomas Paine, Member Mass. Committee of Cor- 
respondence, Justice of the Peace, and Representative, 
JOHN RAYMOND WILDMAN, Upper Montclair, K. .1. 0.17.i7>. Sou of pliakim 
Edwards and Harriet Anna (Raymond) Wildman; grandson of William Henry 
and Hannah Green (Pcrrigo) Raymond; great-grandson of John and Annie 
rrigo; gre at--grandson of Dorastus Green, private, Thud 
pensioned. 

,a. (33212). Son of Henry and 
■11 of Clement It. and Ann (Will 



1) P 



Ames (G 
Regt.. Co 

JESSE PENROSE WILKINSON, New Orle 
Anna Howard (Penrose) Wilk 

son) Penrose; gi eat grandson of Joseph Rid. lie and Catherine (Andrews) 
Wilkinson; greaL'-graiidsou of James Wilkinson, Rrevet II rigadiei ( '.eneral and 

Clothier-General, Cont'l Army, Secretary to Board of War and Urigadier-Gen- 
eral, I'a. Militia. 
ALVIN MARCOS WILLIAMS, West Orange. N. J. (32903). Son of Charles I'. 
and Julia Ida (Condit) Williams; g.andson of Daniel I'. and Harriet (Card 
net) Williams; ,;, eat g 1 amis,, n of Zenas and Naomi (Williams) Williams; 
great-grandson ol l-lra::or Williams, private, Essex County. New Jersey Militia. 



REGISTER, 01* NlvW MEM I'.Kus. $3$ 

CHARM'S PACK, WILLIAMS, Denver, Colo. (.514.?"). Son of Charles Andrew 
and Ann. Catherine (Page) Williams; grandson of Henry ami Jane I!. (Dcanc) 
Page.; great-grandson of Carter Page, Captain, Third Regt., Virginia UgJu 
Dragoons, Aide-dc-Camp to General Lafayette; great-grandson of Carter and 
.Mary (Gary) Page; great 2 sgpan4sQii id' Archibald Cary, Colonel, Virginia 
Militia, and Delegate to Cont'l Congress. 

GEORGE HAWKINS WILLIAMS, New York, N. V. (32854). Son of David and 
Emma G. (Hawkins) Williams; grandson of Jesse and Amanda (Wells) Wil- 
liams; great-grandson of David Williams, privatecrsman and private, Conn. 
Troops, pensioned. 

HENRY CLINTON WILLIAMS, Last Orange, N. J.. (33489). Son of William 
and Louisa (Peck) Williams; grandson of William and Pliehe (Harrison) 
Williams; great-grandson of Thomas Williams, Captain, Second Regt., Essex 
County, New Jersey Militia. 

OLIVER WOK'l IlINCToN WILLIAMS, New York City, N. V. (Pa. 33677)- Sou 
of John A. and Eleanor (Young) Williams; grandson of John T. and 
Euphania (Jarvis') Young; great-grandson of Jacob and Penelope (Watt) 
Young, Jr.; great-grandson of Jacob Young, Pioneer, Captain Moser's Com- 
pany, Sixth Regt., Pa. Cont'l Pine. 

SCHUYLER" WIPP1AMS. Plainville, Conn. (34000). Son of Douglas and 
Sophioma (lloleondu) Williams; grandson of Phincas Holcombe, private, Conn. 
Militia, pensioned. 

STAUNTON WILLIAMS, Aviation Corps, U. S. N., Hartford, Conn. (3JS59). 
Son of George C. P. and Jes.se Scott (Dike) Williams; grandson of William 
Cook and F.ucinda (Fairchild) Williams; great-grandson of William Chauucey 
and Julia White (Cook) Williams; great 2 -grandson of William and Lydia 
(Loomis) Williams; great 3 -gra~ndson of Veach (I'ctch) Williams, Captain, Conn. 
Mditia, pensioned. 

WILLIAM IJRONSON WIPPIAMS, New York City, \. Y. (Pa. 3J17.D. Son of 
John A. and Eleanor (Young) Williams; grandson of John T. and Euphania 
(Javers) Young; great-grandson of Jacob and Penelope (Watt) Young, Jr.; 
great-grandson of Jacob Voting; Sr., private. Capt. David Moser's Company, 
Sixth. Regt., Pa. Cont'l Pine. 

WILLIAM C. WIPPIAMS, Bellevue, Ohio (32322). Son of Adam and Catherine 

(llennig) Williams; grandson of Adam and Catherine (Rickel) Hennig; great- 
grandson of A.lam Hennig, Drummer in Captain Mover's Company, Sixth 
Battalion, Pain-aster County, Pa. Associators. 

ROBERT JOSIAH WI LLING1 1 AM, Jr., Richmond, Va. (3J930). Son of Robert 
Jo'siah and Sarah Cornei'lle (Bacon) Willingham; grandson of Robert J. and 
Mary Isabella .(Walton) Paeon; great-grandson of Thomas and Sarah (Hol- 
combe) Paeon; great--granilson > of Hairy Holcoriibe, Captain, Virginia Dragoons. 

GEORGE STOCKTON WILLS, Fallston, Md. (32426). Son of Richard Henry 

and Ann Louisa (N.ooman) Wills; grandson of William Henry and Anna 
Maria Maker (Whilaker) Wills; great-grandson of Cary and Martha Susan 
(I taker) Whilaker; grca,t B -grandson of John Wlnlakcr, Colonel, Halifax County, 
North Carolina Right Horse, Member North Carolina General Assembly. 

AUGUSTUS C.MS LAND WILMORL, Winchester, Ind. (32026). Son of Levi 
and Nancy ( Golden ) A\ ilmore ; grandson of William and Susanna (Greshani) 
Wilmore; great-grandson of John W Urn ore, private. Captain Van Swearjugeh's 
Company, Col. Daniel Morgan's k.gt., Virginia Cont'l Rifle Troops; great- 
grandson of William Jours, private, Colonel Williams' Regt., Maryland Troops. 

FRANK HIRAM VVTLSEY, Sheldon, Iowa (,{107;D- Son of Hiram ami Ann 
( 1:0yd) Wilscy; grandson of Peter and Magdelina (IV Voe) Royd; great- 
grandson of David and P,ve (Was.mr) De Voe; great-grandson of John /v 
Voe, Lieutenant, Albany Countv, New York Militia. 



334 



SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



III RAM FRANCES WILSEY, Slid. Ion, [owa (32785). Son of Louis Napoleon 
arid Alary (Mullin) Wilsey; grandson <■!" llirain and Anna (Boyd) Wilsey.; 
great-grandson of Peter and Magdclcua (De Voe) Roy.l; great 2 -grandson of 
David and Eve (Wasmer) De Voe; greats-grandson of John De \'oc, J>\. 
Lieutenant, Albany County, New York Militia. . 

JAMES HO YD WILSEY, Sheldon, fowa (31973). Son of Hiram and Ann (Boyd) 
Wilscy. grandson of Peter and Magdelina (De Voe) Boyd; great-grandson o" 
David and Eve (Wasmer) De Voe; great 8 -grandson of Jolm De Voe, Lieutenant, 
Albany County, New York Militia. 

LOUIS NEPOLIAN WILSEY, Sheldon, Iowa (31074L Son of Hiram and Ann 
(Boyd) Wilscy; grandson of Peter and Magdelina (De Voe) Hoyd; great-grand- 
son of David and Eve (Wasmer) De Voe; great-grandson of John De Voe, 
Lieutenant, Albany County, New York- Militia, 

ROBERT AGUSTUS WILSON, Baltimore, Md. (33115). Son of William George 
ami Letitia l'uinell (Johnson) Wilson; grandson of Robert and Julia Mary 
( Stevens) Johnson; great-grandson of Samuel Richard and Eliza Morrison 
(l'uinell) Stevens; gteat"-grandson of Jesse and Julianna (Morrison) l'uinell; 
great 3 -grandson of John Morrison, Sergeant-Major, Sixth and Seventh Regts., 
Pa. Cont'l Line. 

THOMAS D. WILSON, Wampum. I'a. (32901). ' Son of James and Margaret 
(Morton) Wilson; grandson of William and Hannah (Slemmons) Morton; 
great grandson of Robert Slemmons, private, Col. Walter Stewart's Regt., Pa. 



EDWARD CLARK WI NANS', Chicago, 111. (3338:2). Sou of Richard and Sarah 
(Atkinson) Winans; grandson of John and Lucinda (Rla) (Whitney) Atkin- 
son; great-grandson of Jacob and Lucinda (Hough) Rla; great-grandson of 
Jacob Bin (Caley), Minute Man, at Lexington Alarm. 

EDWARD HOWELL WINDLE, Washington,, 1). C. (33267), S >f Charles 

Thomas and Luna (Bailey.) Wiudle; grandson of David C. and Anna (Thomas) 
W illdle; great-grandson of David ami Mary (Morgan) Wiudle; great-grand- 
son of William Windle, private, Eighth Battalion, Chester County, Pa. As- 
sociate^ and Militia. 

HUNTER ALEXANDER WINSETTE, Muskogee, Okla. (31617,). Son of James 
and Anna (Smith) Winsette; grandson of Samuel Hunter and Lucy (Waller) 
Smith; great-grandson of Daniel and Lucy (Pace.) Smith; great-grandson of 
John and Nancy "(Alexander) Pace; great'-gratldson of Thomas and Mollie 
(Ramsey) Alexander; great-grandson of John Alexander, Sergeant, "Light 
Horse" Harry Lee's Virginia Legion. 

EDWIN MARTIN WIN-SLOW; Lynn, Mass. (.3.^84). Son of Louis Martin and 
Lucy Porter (Hovey) Winslow.; grandson of John Martin and Martha Deni- 
son (Hartshorn) Winslow; great-grandson of Richard Denison and Martha H. 
(Rhoades) Hartshorn; great-grandson of Richard and Nancy (Paine) Harts- 
horn, Jr.; grcnC-grandson of Richard Hartshorn . Sergeant, Fourth Suffolk 
County Regt., Mass. Militia; great-grandson of George and Olive C. (Smith) 
Winslow; great-grandson of Nathan and Mary (Nye) Winslow, Jr.; great 3 - 
grandson of Nathan Winslow, private, Mass. Militia. 

HERBERT WINSLOW, SomerviHe, Mass. (3328s). Son of George Herbert and 

Mary Wright (Stoddard) Winslow; grandson of Roland and Anna Payson 
(Hall) Winslow; great-grandson of Abraham and Rhoda (Clark) Winslow; 
great-grandson of Roland and Rhoda (Pangs) Clark; greal'-grands.m of 
lilkanah Bangs, privateersman, died on British prison ship; great-grandson of 
Kcneiin IVinslow. private, Mass. Militia. 
HERBERT HOLLAND WINSLOW, Swampscott, Mass. (33279), Son of Louis 

Martin and Lucy (Hovey) Winslow; grandson of J. ,1m Martin and Martha 
Denison (Hartshorn) Winslow; great-grandson of Richard Denison and y-nth.-i 
H. (Rhoades) Hartshorn; great-grandson of Richard and Nancy (Paine) 



register of new m km rf.rs. 335 

I tartshorn, Jr.; great a -grandsori of Richard Hartshorn, Sergeant, Suffolk County, 
Mass. Militia; great-grandson, of George and Olive C. (Smith) Winslow; great-- 
grandson of Nathan and Mary (Nye) Winslow, Jr.; great a -grandson of Natlutn 
Winslow, private, Mass. Militia. 

ROLLTN ROBBINS WINSLOW, St. Joseph, Mich. (32396). Son of Charles 

Bertram! and Cynthia Kelley (Rohhins) Winslow; grandson of Nathaniel and 
Hannah ]). (Nickerson) Rohhins; great-grandson of F.lkanah and Hannah 
(Doan*) Nickerson; great--grandson of Flkanah and Elizabeth (Voting) Nickcr- 
son; great-grandson of Phmcas Nickerson, Corporal, Capt. Small's Company, 
Col. Zeuas Winslow's R.gl., Mass. Militia. 

[5RAYTON WfTTTERELL, Ensign, U. S. N. R., Brooklyn, N. V. (Mass. 33280). 
Son of Arthur James and Anna (Richmond) Witlicrell; grandson of Edward 
James and Ph.ehe (Woodward) Withered; great-grandson of Orrin and Celia 
(Potter) Withered; great'-'-grandson or fames Poltcr, Captain, Rhode Island 
Minute Men. 

\\ II J JAM RICHMOND WI.TI 1 ERELL, Captain, U. S. Infantry, New York City 

(Mass. 33281). Sort of Artlmr James and Anna (Richmond) Withered; grand- 
son of Edward James and Ph.ehe (Woodward) Wit'herell; great-grandson of 

Orrin and Celia ( Roller) Withered; great-grandson of James Putter, Captain. 
Rhode Island Minute Men. 

CHARLES ALBERT WO] II. FORD, St. Paul, Minn. (33503). Son of Thomas J. 
and Emma (Burnham) WoliTfqrd; grandson of Jacob and Mary S. (Kraemer) 
Wohlford; great-grandson of Michael and Susan (Shiely) Kraemer; great'- 
grandson of Andrew {Andreas) Kraemer (Kremmer, also, Kremer), private, 

Second Battalion, Lancaster County, Pa. Militia. 

CHRISTOPHER PARSONS WOLCOTT, Pittsburgh, Pa. (32992). Sou of Dar- 
win Stanton and Evelyn Brent (Riley) Wolcott; grandson of Christopher Par- 
sons and Pamphila (Stanton) Wolcott; great-grandson of Christopher Colum- 
bus and Susan (Blinn) Wolcott; great-grandson of Christopher Wolcott, 
Surg, oil's Mate, Erastus Wolcott's Conn. Regt. 

( IIARLKS EDWIN WOLVERTON, Portland, Ore. (31095). Son of John and 
Mary Jane (Ne'aly) Wolverton; grandson of John and Mary (Hoogland) 
illogeland) Wolverton; great -grandson of Am