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NATURAL GAS 



AND 



GASOLINE 



J O L R N A I 



\»>l i: J A N I A R V I Q I M Hi'>v^'>^^'"'* ^*^ ' 

'oTc:i::3oc^5lo! f^ ioi ^5|oir^5o^5r (~^ — ll tao i >i: o|c=ioi 



u 



I I 

 ^ 



i 



The C. & G. Cooper Co. 

MT. VKRNON. OHIO 

Specialists In 

GAS ENGINE MANUFACTURE 
COMPRESSOR STATION DESIGN 






x Generations of right business conduct are '^ 



\ 

\ 

\ 

ill 



the basis of our success 



" FCHVnKI> , 

1 833 



 I 




.^oTcjbcr^Tc — zziz o rl 7. :;:= i aW t^=lg> .^^Tq] 



PiBUSiiHU BY THi: Pl.RioniCA: s pi h: l^M:^<; oimi-av^ 



Disposal of 
Condensation— 
The Gas Man's 
Greatest Problem 
Solved 



»i i W - a PaiiK b fas 



An Automatic Overflow 



In 



Westinghouse 

Improved p^'p!^'!*.'!!! Gas Meters 

Drains Off All Condensation 



Another distinctive feature of Westinghouse Improved Gas 
Meters is their all-metal construction. They have no leather dia- 
phragms to stretch and break when used under high pressure or, 
when used under vacuum or normal pressure, to become worth- 
less after a few days' subjection to condensate, making the 
registration inaccurate or stopping meter altogether. 

Westinghouse Improved Gas Meters are particularly ad- 
apted for measuring casing-head gas or any gas impreg- 
nated with gasohne, or other condensate. They are 
equally accurate at both minimum and maximum 
capacities. Self lubricating bearings, eliminat- 
ing undue wear, guarantee the longest 
life and low maintenance cost. 



Pittsburgh Meter Company 



General Office and Works : 



EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Alto manufaeturen of "Ironclad" Drp Gaa Mettr; Meter Prooerw,— and "Kmpttone" and "Eurmka" Water Meten. 



Natural 




an 

JOURNAL 



dG 



asolme 



SUBSCRIPnON- 
$2.00 IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR JANUARY, 1918 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

86ii605 

ASTO« 

TILDEN 



WD 
DATlO^!IB 



1919 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advertising Copy should be in by the 15th of 
month previous to issue. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindred industries. 

Buffalo Long Distance (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca 329S-W. 



Cable Address: — "Publight, Buffalo. 



»t 



Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central Office. 

PUBLISHED BY 

PERIODICALS PUBUSHING CO.. 
68 West Huron Street, 

BUFFALO, X. T. 

Lucius S. Bigblow, President and Editor, 
Hassis S. Bigblow, Secretary, 

Entered as second class matter December i, 
19 ID, at the Post Office at Buffalo, New York, 
under the act of March 3, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE 



FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG: 

Annual Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Sons... 15 

Another Substitute for Gasoline 6 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E, 
Gilbert 31 

Riillctin on Cost Accounting 6 



Bureau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Gush- 
ing Field 5 

Calendar of Youngstown Sheet and Tube 
Company 16 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Converting Linotype Metal Melting Furnace 
From Coal to Gas 32 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers 32 

Drilling Results 23 

Efficient Goggles 22 

Financial Report for 19 17 41 

Gas Difficulties Disclosed , 13 

Gas for Drying Food 17 

Heat Insurance 21 

Long, Elias H., Deceased 20 

Natural Gas Business Thirty-four Years. In 6 
No Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Bedford 33 

Otoe-Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr 15 

Picturing One's Face in Advertising 12 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Recovery of Gasoline from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son 7 

Reynolds, M. G., Passes Away 20 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor 20 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 1917 41 

Vast Acreage Deal 5 

Western Associations Merge 5 

Year 1918 4 

AROUND THE BELT. 

Financial 35 

Franchises 36 

General 37 

Incorporated 36 

Personals 35 

Rates 36 



VOLUME 12 
THIS NUMBER 1 



MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 
GAS SUPPLY MEN 



I ABWOI'I At>AH«. tail****! iK* »»■ 









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THE YEAR 1918. 




IIILIC the necessities of the war have immensely curtailed sup- 
plies of raw materials, have interfered with deliveries of raw 
materials and the shipping of finished products, and while some 
of our j^as companies have through one cause and another, shut 
down to quite an extent on their activities, yet we believe that the 
ciunmercial life of this great nation and of the industry of which this 
magazine is a part, will so adjust themselves to conditions, as to lessen 
in U)i8 some of the stress in the closing months of 1917 and opening of 
u>i8. and this, notwithstanding the fact that we shall in 1918. unless 
the unforeseen ikxhus, be more deeply in war matters with our own men, 
than in the prece<Iing year. 

We shall very likely during 1918 be discharging at the enemy from 
iUir ordnance and our smaller arms, vast tonnage of explosives and pro- 
jectiles in addition to what we shall be called upon to supply to our allies, 
yet those at the hetm have in mind the need for keeping up our com- 
mercial life and industries, that commercially our country shall not be 
crippled, and in order to prc^vide funds whereby artisans and others who 
have boxight Liberty Bonds on the installment plan, will be enabled to 
meet their obligations, and that the country itself may in turn meet 
its obligatioUvS. This being the case, ever)- effort will be undertaken 
tv> keep the wheels of trade well in motion, even in face of industrial 
shwt-downs» this is the ^ase. 

Our manufacturers should maintain their activities, they should 
jvatronize those dependent upon them, as they will expect patronage 
from thoiie up*.>n whom they depend for their business life. We must 
keep the ball rolling. We must remember that to shu* off our activ- 
ities and our patronage, would bring about curtailments and disaster 
in ma!iy branches of business, most of which can be avoided if sane 
methods are pursued and patronage is continued. 

It is surprising to note how well, commercially, the country has 
st^xKl up under the tremendous strain that came to it. all of a sudden, 
when tinally war was declared by the United States, and during the 
»>eri^Hl of things finding their level, and of the commercial machinery of 
the cv>untry righting itself. 

This is the time when every enterprise must stand by its neighbor-, 
euter prises and with such a condition in vogue, every industnb- may 
anticipate the return to it. of the equivalent of the funds it has expended. 
Such conditions result in a cycle of activity. He who spends, receives 
again. 

Keep >our patronage active in 1918. 






FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG 



. . - ^. .4 



WESTKKN ASSOCIATIONS MKKGK 



VAST ACKI.A(«I. IiKAl 




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NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



J 



million cubi'. feet open fiov. in j^s welU. will j:ive an 
additional supply of ai'out ten million feet a day as 
boon ai> eonneclion^ with our pres»ent propertie*^ can 
U: made." — Doheriv Newjr. 



TO PREVENT GAS STEALING. 



EOK the guidance of those who are interested in 
right and justice it i^ important that action 
uken in the State of Texaf shouJc be widel> 
published. A law against stealing gas in 
Texas was formulated with the hope that ga^ pilfer- 
ing might be. not curtailed, but absolutely cut off. 
The law went into efiect January ist. and brings to 
the fore the following features which include a ban 
upon the stealing of water or electric current, as well 
a^ upon the stealing of gas. The first section sets 
forth that. "W hoever. intentionalh. bv anv means or 

• • * 

device, prevent^ elect ri'. current, water or gas from 
passing through any meter or meters belonging to a 
person, corporation, or company, engaged in the manu- 
facture- o" svale of eieciricit> . water or gas. for lighting, 
power or other ]Jurpo^e^. furnished ^uch person tc» 
registe*" the current o: electricity, water or gas. pass- 
ing through meters, or intentionally prevent^ a meter 
from duly registering the ()uantity of electricity, water 
or gas supplied, or in any way. interferes with its 
pro]-»er action or just regulation, or without the con- 
sent of such corporation or company, intentionally 
diverts any electric current from any wire, or water 
or gas from any pip<' or pipes of hucl- person, corpora- 
tion or company, or otherwise intentionally uses, or 
♦:auses to be used, without the consent of such person, 
corporation or company an\ elecficity or gas manu- 
factured, or water produced or distributed, by such 
person, corporation or company, or any jierson. cor- 
poration or company whc* retains possession of, or 
refuses to deliver. an\ meter or meters, lamp or lamps, 
or other appliances which ma} i*e. or may have been, 
loaned ^heIn by any j>erson. corporation or company 
for the purpose of furnishing electricity, water or gas. 
through the same, with the intent to defraud such 
person. corpc»ration or comjiany. c»r. if any person, cor- 
poration or company engaged in the manufacture or 
other purposes, shall knowingly misread any meter or 
overcharge any customer for 5>uch light, water or gas 
furnished, shall, for every such offense, be punished 
bv a fine of not les^ than twentv-five dollars and no' 
more than one hundred dollars Fvery |>erson. firm <»r 
corporation engaged in th*- busin ss reie*-'-ed tc» in this 
act shall keep displaced at all .iirt*-s in a consjMcuous 
place in their office, a printed c »py o^ this law " 

'J"h<- second section ]ir'.'\ id' s as folI'jxNs **'J'h<' 
presence at any time, on or about >u't: meter or 
meters, wire or wires, pip^ or lij^es. of any de\ ice or 
pi]/es or wires resulting in th • di^ ersir»n "*" ^-le-'tri' 
<:urrent. water or gas. as abo^ e defined or r*-sultin^' in 
the ]^re\eiition of the proper ac*ic»n or just rej^istration 
of th<- meter c»r meters, as abov*- Net forth, shall con- 
stitute' priii>a ia<'ie evidence ' f knovvl«-rl;c:e on the pan 
'/ \hi' p*-rhon hav in^' custody and coTftro! ^^' thf- roorr 



or place where such device rrr pipe or wires of the 
existence thereo:' and the effect thereof and shall fur- 
ther constitute prima facie evidence of intention on 
the part of such ]>erson to defraud and shall bring 
such person jjrima facie within the scope, meaning and 
penalties of this act ** 



IN NATURAL GAS BUSINESS THIRTY-FOI7B 




.AM \\ . SXVL>EK. for many years foreman for 
the Inited Natural Gas Cu. at Sharon, Pa., 
retired from active service on Ilecember 31 si, 
IQ17 

Mr. Snyder was connected with the pas interest for 
34 years, and made a name for himself as the origi- 
naior of the Snyder movement, which was placed in 
the old Metric meters. 

A dinner was given tt» Mr. Snyder by his associates 
at Sharon on New Year's eve. twenty-six employes 
being at the aftafr. this being the entire fm-ce except one 
man, who had to remain on the job on account of low 
l>ressure. 

John P. Curry, agent, was toast-master, and in a 
friv word- told of Mr. Snyder's connection with the 
business, and on behalf of the employes presented Mr. 
Snyder with a Royal easy chair. 

While taken by <uqrrise. Mr. Snyder found words to 
thank the danor^ His remarks were followed by a 
«hort talk b\ Mr. Peter C. .Cutry and other members oi 
the T>artv 



BULLETIN ON COST ACCOUNTING. 



mHE liureau of Mines. I>ei)artment of the In- 
terior, has recently issued Bulletin No. 15B 
on **C i>Pt Accounting for C»il Producers." by 
Clarence G. Smith. This is the first treatise 
of its kind and is a simpl'^ explanation of the methods 
that mav be emj)k»yed in cost accounting for oil 
producers, who. on ac:ount of the peculiar and 
unusual conditions afTecting oil production, require a 
much diflterent system of cost accounting than any 
other class of business men. 

This puV»li cation may be obtained free of charge by 
application to the Director, Bureau of Mines, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



ANOTHER SUBSTITUTE FOR GASOLINE. 



S^'.C'KDIXG 10 the Scientific Amcricam. a new- 
substitute fr>r gasoline is being tried out in 
^.ierman>. ''^ne part benzc»l and two jjarts 
ai' ^»hol are used, it is said, with good results, 
.An nr-'-.r.Lry carburetor may be used, and in a test a car 
rar. j, ^^> mile- nn ftr\t ;>int oi the mixture. A speed of 
4' Titiie;- an hour can be attained, it is said, on this fuel. 
"^'.Tice 'r.'Jt'r- alcf.'hol and benzol are ear^ily obtsunable in 
<".iern-!any. :he discovery f»f thi? new fuel would naturally 
be ' f tht create-' imT»ortance to the Germans. 



it 18 by presence of mind in untried emergencies that the native metal of a n>an is tested. — Lowell 



mm 



Allied Industries 

/?«OMfy of GoBolitm from Nmrntol Cm m on Indmtrp Albod io fVodh^tioii 

otm Kofmo^ of iwifomomm 



mll^ manuUiliirr oi i;4««»linr t>\ rrt u%rr% or 
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it« |a«t «lrvrliipffTirnt arnl itttiirr r\trfi%iofi« 
offrf a •u^)^t t Mhith i« ««» lirnail that t«i hantllr it in 
tt% rfttirrt> ««iiil«l rr«jiiirr a \i»I«mmitti% y^\^f I ^«' 
«ritrf milt thrrrf<ifr attrinpt t«« « uri* rntratr thr 
r**cnttal mattrr «>f tlir %iiK)r« t l«»f a ^jrnrral |»rr%cnta 
tti>fi. ifi^ini; tiinir nf thr nin^t tritrrr«tini; lirtailt o< 
thr la«ti»f* that arr imtwiftant ti* thr in<lii«tr% 

I>ii% in<!u«tr\ ha% i!ra««n it*'rfa!l% (tii thr pnni ip!r« 
*'* ;>h««N* an«l ihrmi«tr%. and tn a lar^'r r\trnt ha« 
Kjir! |i» a4af*t Atith niftirnutii»ii a* t« mi»*t it*rltil ri«it 

<r..fTi fiata rr*«»ri1ri! v^tth trirrru^r t'» j»ctf»»'rti?tv hut 
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S\UH\1 C.VS \S1I 1.\^11IIM. 



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lO 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



its percentage, freezes at the . reduced temperature 
maintained and makes trouble. Where naphtha is 
being continually used for blending with the raw out- 
put in compression operation, the application of the 
end absorber is exceedingly simple and involves prac- 
tically no attention other than continuous pumping of 
a supply of naphtha against the prevailing gas 
pressure. 

A quite recent refrigerating scheme applies am- 
monia to the cooling of brine and then brings the 
brine in contact with the residual gas. In California 
some three years ago, the application of ammonia 
refrigeration was successfully made and one or more 
plants of considerable size are now operating in that 
field along those lines. It is not possible for a com- 
pression operation to separate completely the heavy 
hydrocarbon vapors from the gas in which they are 
carried, and the increase in gasoline yield effected by 
intense refrigeration may amount to lo per cent, or 
better of the gross gasoline yield of the gas. The con- 
densation of the vapors is less complete when the gas 
being worked is diluted by any material percentage of 
air. It is almost impossible to eliminate air entirely 
from the gas being withdrawn from wells under 
vacuum. Therefore, from the viewpoint of increased 
efficiency, the application of intensive refrigeration, 
or of absorption, for recovery of tail-gas saturation is 
justifiable in every compressor operation of any con- 
siderable magnitude. 

Absorption will be described rather with relation to 
the gas that does not issue from an oil well. We will 
not consider vacuum as a function of the absorption 
operation. 

It is a well known law of physics, readily demon- 
strated in practice, that the eflfectiveness of absorption 
of gas or vapor by a liquid with which it is present 
is proportional to the pressure exerted on the gas. It 
has been found in practice that most effective results 
can be had in absorption operation under the applica- 
tion of three or more atmospheres of pressure. At 
pressures considerably lower than three atmospheres, 
it has been found that the efficiency of absorption 
operation reduces to an extent involving the calling 
for excessive absorption equipment by reason of the 
longer time required. Under this method, where suffi- 
cient pressure is not available from the well (rock 
pressure), artificial means are employed. 

Absorber chambers are used through which the gas 
is passed under pressure. The common practice is to 
inject the absorbent oil through atomizer spray noz- 
zles. The character of the oil usually employed is as 
follows : a kerosene distillate ; color not material ; 
Baume gravity, 36°-42° (corresponding sp. gr. 0.8448 
to 0.8156) ; initial boiling point, 415° F. (213^ C). The 
oil, for best results, should have end point of final 
distillation not above 700° F. (360° C), and should 
have a low viscosity factor. 

The gas and oil move in counter-currents. The oil 
is drawn off continuously and passes through a re- 
covery still where the light absorbed condensate is 
separated by distillation and re-condensation as gaso- 
line. One and the same stock of absorbent oil is used 



continuously and requires very little replenishing, ir 
some cases none. It will be seen, therefore, that the 
absorption method involves the use of a steam plant; 
as the distillation recovery is conducted with a steam 
still, and various circulating pumps are required. Tc 
date, the apparatus and equipment in use for absorp- 
tion has not been generally standardized and is in the 
state of energetic evolution. 

A comparison of the relative merits and details o\ 
the two systems of operation will be of interest. A 
clean-cut and exact comparison cannot be made of all 
the features to be considered, since, as stated, the 
absorption system is considerably behind the com- 
pression system in its present stage of developmeni 
as against its anticipated possibilities. Enough car 
be seen, however, to indicate that the two systems 
operating in competition will be fairly evenly balanced 
with reference to operating cost, and when all refine- 
ments are applied in either case, it is the writer's 
judgment that the compression system will be found 
preferable. 



Compression System 

(a) System is now well stand- 
ardized. Gas-engine 
power equipment and 
compressors designed 
especially for the work 
are available. The range 
of operating pressure is 
also standardized and 
plans for development 
definite estimates and 
are a simple matter. 

(b) Condensing equipment, 
such as oil separators, 
condenser coils, accumu- 
lators and various details 
are well standardized. 



Absorption System 

(a) System not so well stand 
ardized. In fact, is it 
process of developmen 
and evolution to working 
standards. 



(c) Operation requires skilled 
attendants familiar with 
the handling of gas com- 
pressors operating to 250- 
gage pressure. 



(d) Skilled and experienced 
attendants are required 
to handle a very volatile 
product. Treatment 
known as "weathering" 
involved. Use of steam 
required during cold 
weather. Storage of un- 
weathered manufactured 
product requires espe- 
cially constructed tank- 
age. 



(b) In absorption systems cor- 
responding details are 
not yet developed to ap- 
proach acceptable stand- 
ards. Absorbers of about 
three distinctive typei 
are exploited. Some de 
tails of refinement are tc 
be worked out with ref 
erence to absorbent cir 
culation that offer nc 
apparent difficulty o 
solution. 

(c) Practically the same limit 
obtain in absorption a; 
in compression with ex 
ception that it appear: 
likely that standards o 
operating pressure wil 
be very materially low 
ered by comparison. 

(d) Steam boilers and still; 
required to be maintainec 
in continuous operation 
Product as afforded b) 
methods developed tc 
present date less volatile 
than in compression sys- 
tem. Storage tankage oi 
a cheaper class is being 
used. It is most likely 
however, that improve 
ments or further refine- 
ments in absorption 
system will bring about 
condition parallel tc 



The red-tape worm devours about haM the time of every organization. — Herbert Kaufman 



.lamury 



NATURAL CAS AND GASOUNE 



It 



I xWfVti*? <% St •tltf 






*n«| MI««tuMf u*#4 for 



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of pOUlM^ MKftAMT. b? 

• •<K 4t«tW>|Mn€iit. of 
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1 4r * <•*% tn^ii Hr Iffrtflnl itfi«l«ff 
natnfal «vll ptfntt 

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miAril |K«| »«<itiim *p 
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4 i*«t« «>f ofirfatMin in^«»l%ini; «.AUrir« of AttrfWUnt* 
luttfuAnt* i»A«lr Aru$ pUnt tui^itlic* Mill he abcHlt 
r«|ttJil 

In the cA*c «»f iHr timftlr iNittrf^ of At»««>ff>fMMi 
r*|Ui|*tnrnt with a rrct*%rf% •till intrf|a»«ctl in * |>fe« 
•urr i;»« main, the ftkill rr«|nife4 c>n the |KArt c»f the 
l»Uint «»f*cfAti%c« ma> he lr«« than in the (A%e €>f a rfMn- 
l»re««M*n filAnt in%«>l%inK alt it* hramhe* and deUitU 
vkhen flr%el«>pef| to the full extent It it ftlM> hkeli 
that a iffrater dci^ree (»f tkill on the |iAft i>f attend 
antt wilt he re«|ttirrd for ahaiif|if»»il opemlMHl in «hKh 
^allium an«l «iim|«re««Min are alto uted. |c>f the rea«>fi 
that the drtaiU «»f o|jeratM»n are Mimewhat more em 
ten«!r«| l|i»«»e^er. thit ditTrence will tiot he matefial 

It villi l>e under*t4«>d in thi* connection that the 
ah««ir|»ti«in t^ttem i« t>etn|[ evploited in cotn|»efttton 
mifh the « c»m|*re%«i«>n •^•trm for the viorktnc ol fKh 
catmi: head c»r 4mI well tsim^€%, and tahen ao apfdied 
pravtually all cW the refnementa and raifitAcationa of 
the c«*fnpre«tian t)Mem are in%ol%ed af%d the onh 
maleftal ad%antai:e to Ite i^ained la the (nvaaihility of 
«»|ierattni: «»n ii:a«e« with a wide >ariance of aatttration 
with t>ne anil the aame a^Mem with4>ut rraulta detrt 
mental to the \ leld (ri»m the rn h i:a%e« h% pretence of 
the Iran i:a«e« in f»re|M>fideranfe 

Man% iaM-« ante. |iArtuulart% in the drilling of new 
oil |trot>ertir«. where o^e* of mean low aaturmlKM 
\altte •at from ^^ tt» i<| i,'al |ier i.ono cu ft - 
mu«t ^*r left out of the <*t«rritini: •%ttem hecatftte of 
the frdti*rH |artiat j»fr»»ttfr u*t«.f and the cofiae 
«jiirnt I.i^rfinj; .i^ \ir>i! f fh. en- \ •• thr o%er all plant 
• .«t;'tit 

\S 4«tr% A*r %\i%fxinr*\ n •>: » ma% th^x % an otherwite 
f>4> ji\«*i«lr«l I ht« •'haft«' «'* <!;»« ti«*i««n apftliea to the 
(|r ^ r!**{iviirfit of nr^ t»*' he <!* r^t^tr' than tit old de 
\rl«»|ic«! arra% \ proliirm \rt\ iltfh^ ult «»f tcdiHiofi 
1% «i?frrr<! in tht« |*arlt< u'a^ t-K^%r ••( *»t\ «*|«eratii>n The 
ij^rrat 4 u>htn^ immA ma% ^x ^ itrd a« a malertal illna- 
trati-'fi « »il ifcr!l» ifi i^fcA! nu^*»cr « a^r »n th»i fteld 
delitrnri^ at thr «afT-r timr hun^^frtS* *»f th*iu«andt 
and r\ru m\Vtt*,t\% of • u*'*> trrt *>f ^-a% tif U»m ^AU^ltnr 
•atufAtuffi *iailt \h'\ • ut; ut ••$ ^a* «»f ii»ur%e wa* 
of fthtrft (iurat»«*n a* ihr f^fiMlu^inn: xrrg i^at drtllrd 
in liAAiH'fit •uffit trnt!% ,\-*%r t<fi^*c*^-rf t^ c«Kau%t the 
•arttl* »fi thr ^ftm% ^'»* «!r|«.»it «i * 'A'ld rate In a 
prfi«-*l ..f <rirm thfcr t" %t\ ft' -fit^ii fKc wr!!t •etfted 
ff|«'mn tfj . At^n,j hrad j;*« • 'n-^'r t  ^-^ r*M^w% •< fnwm 
I - ••' t; ** *•» t'i*'tt- > 'J *t <la<'^ T Kr '-nS wa% 
t«i -i^'f^'ti t^-r «it1 t« t*i ftfl"« thr g^at t<i r«« at*^ with 
fhr 4..* f-^ .,.• X>, •.•..*/rnt 'r< w^i»**tfc-n «»f the ifa* 



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12 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



admit a concentration of the heavy gasoline vapors 
and their separation from the total gas output of the 
well with rejection and delivery of the lighter gases 
to any desired channel. If successful application can 
be made, it will be comparable to the concentration of 
metallic ores, which has, in many cases, so success- 
fully solved low-grade ore problems. 

A few essentials of the technique of gasoline plant 
operation are well worth noting. The effect of the 
presence of lean gas in a compression operation and 
its reduction of the plant yield from rich gases, or 
gases of high saturation, has been mentioned. This 
is due to the fa^rt established in practice that an oper- 
ating pressure of 250 lb. per square inch is not suffi- 
cient for adequate removal of gasoline hydrocarbons, 
but in many cases will allow as much as y^ gal. of 
product to escape in the residue or tail gas. It is not, 
therefore, an approved commercial practice to mix 
gases of saturation below about i gal. per 1,000 cu. ft. 
with gases of high saturation, around 3 or 4 gal. per 
1,000 cu. ft., except in such proportions that the higher 
saturated gas is in excess. 

The dilution of gas with air is equally detrimental ; 
it is a difficult and tedious matter requiring constant 
attention, where heavy vacuum is applied to the wells, 
to prevent undesirable amounts of air from being 
drawn in through leakage. A simple apparatus of 
the Orsat type is used and the amount of oxygen 
present in the gas is frequently checked under efficient 
management. 

Very recently automatic oxygen recorders have been 
worked out and are being applied. Occasionally con- 
ditions may be met in which the gas being used is 
contaminated to a greater or less extent with carbonic 
acid. Phosphorus cannot be successfully used as an 
absorbent reagent for oxygen in a gaseous mixture 
containing a hydrocarbon of the petroleum series. 
Gas analysis is also used to locate the source of the 
air leakage. The necessity for taking samples of gas 
from the pipe lines under a sustained vacuum as high 
as 27 in. of mercury involves difficulties which can be 
appreciated only by one who has attempted to secure 
concordant results under such conditions. Very 
largely, the work has to be done by men who have not 
had laboratory experience and who have been hur- 
riedly instructed in the manipulation of the apparatus. 
Unusual courage and determination to overcome the 
vexatious little obstacles of the industry are seen on 
every hand among the oil operators and investors who 
have entered this field of the industry. 

The paramount feature of commercial interest to- 
ward which the casing-head gasoline industry has 
undoubtedly contributed in a large way is the favor- 
able acceptance by the consumers of motor fuel having 
an unprecedentedly high distillation end point; in 
other words, carrying a heavy percentage of a product 
which in reality approaches the character of kerosene. 
In the very beginning of the casing-head gas industry 
it was found practical to use, by mixing or blending 
with the casing-head product, a large percentage of 
what was known as painter's naphtha. This product 



alone could not be successfully used in a motor be- 
cause of the difficulty in getting the motor started, 
but, long before the day of starting our motors from 
the seat by electric storage batteries, casing-head gaso- 
line had made their starting by hand possible by 
giving to the heavy product a light, readily vapor- 
izable fraction. 

This starting difficulty was the only obstacle to be 
overcome in the use of the naphtha as a satisfactory 
motor fuel. Elaboration and extension of this appli- 
cation resulted largely, no doubt, in encouraging, first, 
the destructive distillation of petroleum or its residues, 
and, more recently, a concentrated effort to treat the 
kerosene distillate crude fraction in the same manner. 

Efforts are being concentrated by every progressive 
refiner on the problem of destructive redistillation of 
kerosene distillates, which amount to a large fraction 
of the crude. Sufficient success and encouragement 
has been reached in this direction to insure that within 
the near future all excess kerosene distillates will be 
treated in this fashion. It is now evident that from 
25 to 50 per cent, of such distillates can be economi- 
cally converted for use as motor fuel or can be used 
by blending with casing-head gasoline. This will add 
to the total gasoline supply an amount equivalent to 
an increase of 10 per cent, in our total crude-oil 
production. 



PICTURING ONE'S FACE IN ADVERTISING. 



WE have seen on bill-boards, pictures of a face from 
the mouth of which protrudes a cigar. That 
 cigar may be perhaps the best cigar ever made, 
but from the standpoint of some men, it would 
never be purchased, because of the character of the face 
on the bill-board. 

Before one uses a face or a portrait in advertising, he 
should be sure that the features and characteristics of 
the face would lend to, rather than detract from the 
strength of the advertisement. We have in mind one 
advertisement that we have seen in various magazines 
that in every case to our notion has proven good. The 
portrait is that of the manufacturers' face, one that would 
at once give the prospective purchaser confidence in the 
product. 

Secondly, the reading matter in these advertisements 
to which we refer is clever, and thirdly, a good slogan 
has been adopted. It is direct and to the point, and 
should attract the attention of fitters and those at the 
head of fitters' shops. The slogan reads, "Say Nye 
Dies." — Make your advertising feature advertising. And 
make every feature featured, tell to the good. Trade 
names are good as are slogans that may be tied to the 
article, or that may tie the article to the maker, in the 
minds of possible buyers. 



We join ourselves to no party that does not carry the flag and keep step to the muric oi the union. — Choate 



Gas Difficulties Disclosed 



M nlfW9 dOOW 



Nmmpap9f T0II C o n m$ n m n of Digiemhim in Mmmmhmig 



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ml liA* l«*tiK' Itrrti %aiil that \«|\rrti%in^ |tj 
NlAniifat turrr * haxr 4i!^rrti%r«l miiIi uirfi«!rr 
ful rrfr« t Mrr«hjint« \\A\r A*\\rfXi%ri\ 4n«! 
Iiuill l*ii«trir%«r« ( hiirilir« 4<l\rf1i«r an*! (ill 

DC * rf l^cliifr It % an 4^t nf trllin^* •»t!»rf% thai >ftJ::»h 

\r«rr ham ilirrr t-n ri in X\\r tirM tti fialnrat <*r arfih 

• tal t** a nitifr 4 ti.r fljIrfj.fMr ff'^n X\\r rn*.rt\*ti*r 
^^ann^ tlir fiam* ».« Ilififv I I^nhrft*. »«f I^^ihrft* 
!ti1rfr»l« un<]rr whatr^rt ti»!r \\\* \ fna^ as>|*rar 

Mmf% I iK.Jirfl* M 4M 4'!'.r«!i%«' Mr !r!!* •»!V.rr« 
tVftt «hi«li \\\ry •ht<i:!<t ktii»v* Mr 1* a ^•^•lir.rf m 
••i'^twif*. an'! %rf*iM a tr** \i-4f* %in\r Mhm Urnr* 

I fj^'hrrll Wiifkc! i?l i\\r ,4* V ■•»*'• J-r »» ^■'!4^ 4? 

1* r hr^flS Iff \4«t itMff'*** HI X) t f-f ** .? •.4!tl»i! i .4 • 
A*t*4k(t4l gj« r!r tf :• 't • 4n<l \\ iN r •>i4rf 

\\r afr fw.f rtj' ., .'-ri,- \1 • !'.**••- I I-.4! t« r.'»t 

• •**. r tK«««r in tJ.r J .4 * •I'l »•»*'.. •t?-.w »f'. 4t '.4*' 
•^-.Tni^;* Mf I *•«!»€?!% :fit*'»-?- *»4'. '. • • *?»•! »%f-. %• rt'af 

t^ r *• he hat ai l'.^*' ^ «■•! I V? * .•• •  * :.•• •: !r ! • . •*  ^ 

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w i^'ht !«• rtlui jv t* ' ; ■** ' *' ' • i. * I •***S ; "* ' :• • 

Man« |ftitih« uttiitir* 4« .\r]\ 4« rfi4n«.iT4 *tir:?i^' 
rfstrt|»fi%c«. arc r.rr tr«kM|^- ;■!*.!■: if. Mi'Ti'i^ ^.ii fi^- 

artittrm an«1 n»<fiir* »r»4f'lMi^' Tlitn, 1 »,t '.rir %s,»% ^".* 

• f^-thrf that lhr\ . I4!!'i Jkfr iXrU'% •»! ifttrfr*? i** • 
?^#t<*<^»fr «lMtiiIf) a;|Mr4? mi ?* r rri.'-v^- ;•;•?».* . * 
^-uMk Atli»f1« whrn t\\r\ kri«v% 4* wr'.* 4« •* r J*:*':»*rf 

!Kat thr •»nU rra»«»n !?.• » afr ^-.jntt-n^; tJ-.i* r*i4!«rf • . 
tKr f»tlMi«hrr l* that thr\ n-a^ %r- *i»r Irrr ; t;* ,i •» 
!• ttitultl ^»c r4fl'.rf iiitrfr *?••., • I ft'.rrt A ;-*'ft*ir. ^' , 

.•'jl'l hH#nr%l!\ *4* !>;at lJi»«*r *.4f»'!i»i,; - -it •■* )\ •: *••»• 
at »r ha^r iSc*4riW«S h4il fl«>tir %•» if *:4i! %«>*r, M ! * 

^* %a* it9f Xhr fiUt'Ilt i;«-*«1 *•«• *'.J'«' ?^ *• " a"*-* '- a » 
^!-i4< «t»<>fflftl anti M<»ti!il \*€ hrljj-i! • »itrf:»i*.!* •i-.****^* 
• hr*t\ <*ut <«»f that fravi'n Ku! !ratik;« !* r > .I'l'rr . jt 
Ni^^t hif irrc puMittt^ 

IHr llrnr% I I»«»Krft* mtrfn!* ...rr •* #• •?•> ..' 

llLaSI«At Vatural '.a* • ..ri^jfi^ •■■• n ! li-r* ! . «,••' 
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14 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



advertising, and adding that the public is appreciating 
the attempt to describe the difficulties and hard labor 
necessary to furnish a supply of natural gas to a city. 

"One of the novelties of the advertising is the 
printing of a daily weather report immediately under 
the headline of the advertisement, thus adding to the 
drawing-power of the ad. 

"There is only one way to get an adequate idea of 
the original advertising campaign, and that is by read- 
ing the advertisements themselves. Each contains 
some matter which will undoubtedly be of interest, not 
only from the advertising point of view, but also from 
the natural gas and oil standpoint. Lots of things 
mentioned in the copy are news to many, and it is 
unfortunate that all the ads run thus far cannot be 



THROUGH SNOW AND MUD TO LAY PIPE. 

WEATHER REPORT. 

Kansas City and vicinity (radius 20 miles) — • 
Generally fair and somewhat warmer Monday; 
unsettled Tuesday. 

Continued zero weather, interrupted by short periods 
of sunshine and moderation, has had a marked influ- 
ence on the resumption of the new pipeline to the 
.Blackwell, Okla., gas field, completion of which was in 
sight when the storm came. 

In addition to clearing roads for stretches of several 
miles, the snow had to be shoveled from the completed 
ditch, which was found drifted level full, before pipe 
laying could proceed. When the weather moderated 
for a few hours and the crust of ice yielded, the men 
worked in cold slime, or winter mud, about which we 
hear so much from the trenches in France. 

Figures can express little of the hardships that are 
being endured in the great effort of the men to finish 
their work. However, the last report from the field 
showed the ditching machine had traveled one-third 
mile since the storm. Teams had been able to haul 
1% miles of pipe to the scene of the work, and pipe 
layers had proceeded but one-fourth mile. That prog- 
ress was snail-like in comparison to what was done 
before the storm, but the men were working harder, 
if that were possible, than when the weather was with 

KANSAS NATURAL GAS CO. 



A SAMPLE NATURAL GAS ADVERTISEMENT. 

reproduced. The next best thing is to reprint some 
of the advertisements, and from them one can gain a 
good idea of the quality of the matter run and the 
novelty of presentation. Following is one of the 
advertisements, called 'Guardians of Gas Service 



f ->» 



Just as railroads employ trackwalkers to make pains- 
taking inspections of their right-of-way, so the pipe- 
line company that supplies your gas has linewalkers for 
every mile of its lines. It is a lonesome job, but one 
highly specialized and essential to giving you good 
service. 

The linewalkers search for leaks. Leaks cannot be 
avoided. They are inevitable. 

The question naturally arises, "How does the line- 
walker locate a leak in a pipeline buried several feet 



under ground?" Perhaps most leaks are found through 
the smell of the escaping gas. Others make a sound 
— half whistle and half hi9S. Experienced linewalkers 
often find leaks through the peculiar appearance of the 
vegetation nearby, and sometimes a swarm of big 
green flies tells them where gas is escaping. That 
type of fly has a peculiar affinity for natural gas. 

The leak located, the linewalker digs down to the 
line with the digging tools he carries. If the leak is 
small he often mends it himself. If it is too large for 
him to handle — but space compels that you be told that 
tomorrow. 

''Dynamite Rips Way for Pipeline" is the name of 
the following advertisement, which appeared in the 
sixty newspapers on November 2 : 

By the time the new pipelines now being laid arc 
completed, twenty-iive tons of dynamite and 140,00c 
percussion caps will have been used in the effort to get 
more gas to you. You now have a better idea of the 
obstacle presented by the rocky hills through which 
the lines pass, and through which a trench for the pipe 
must be blasted. 

For the 43-mile line to the. Blackwell field — half of 
which is in hilly country — a ditch 26 inches wide and 
44 inches deep is required for the 16-inch pipe. 

It is not necessary to blast twice in most places in 
order to reach the required depth. The electric drills 
work some distance ahead of the blasting gang, pre- 
paring holes for the dynamite. Twenty "shots" are 
fired at one time. 

The following advertisement shows how the char- 
acter of the ads was varied. This interesting story 
emphasizes more than a long list of statistics the hard 
work necessary to push through the big job. This 
one is headed *'Two Hundred Miles in the Night to 
Speed Gas": 

The difficulties of constructing 90 miles of gas pipe- 
line in four months will be appreciated better if one of 
many incidents that arise is cited. 

At 4 o'clock one day last week the supply of per- 
cussion caps used in blasting was exhausted, and an 
expected shipment had not arrived. The lack of caps 
threatened to halt the work of ditching. Ross M. 
Stuntz, who is in charge of the work, received long 
distance telephone notice of the shortage in Bartles- 
ville at 6 o'clock that night. Much telephoning 
developed that the nearest supply of caps was in Pitts- 
burgh, Kans. He caught his assistant by telephone at 
Chanute, dispatched him to Pittsburgh, 70 miles away, 
in a motor car. Five thousand caps were loaded in this 
car and taken that night 200 miles to Burden, Kans., 
arriving there in time for the men to go to work at 8 
o'clock the following morning. 

That is only one of many things that characterizes 
the high efficiency of the organization that is doing 
everything that it can to deliver more gas to its patrons 
for this winter's use. 

Throughout the series there is more or less atten- 
tion paid to the ever-popular topic of conversation — 
the war. An example of that kind of ad is the follow- 
ing called ''Ditching Machine a 'Tank' of Peace": 

The big ditching machine that began on October 
27 to open a way for the gas pipeline extension to 
Blackwell, Okla., field, is a "tank" of peace. It strongly 
reminds one of the big "tanks" that have wrought such 
havoc on the battlefields of Europe, but its mission in 
the world is a far different one. 



The truth is always the strongest argument. — Sophocies 



It It t»rop«Ur<S by |h« Mim« kin4 ol wHcvU— iIm 
*<*if«l»ilUf type. *ii4 It io€« *h«*ttt iti m*»tk *• 
tt»etHcMlH*lly ftMl f Aci««tl|f *• 4o€t It* MiilitAry <o«i«ia 
IfiM »«t« it I* cvttmt • tteiKli j6 io€li«t «i4t *ii4 44 
ift<b€« 4«^p. tt«t th€ •!!<»« «U nn tH# h%g rvtttfttf 4e«Kt 
«t« *4|ii»t«blt ftiid It It c*^bW c»f mAkiim • dtitk j 
l«vt vmW *«4 A ft«t d««p 

Not lung will It rcoMnn a "Uok** ol ^*<t. Ii>r utbtr 
■h4<litii«* uf tt» tfpt. nude bv tbe mom iiuii«f«<f«fYr 

• •11 tK»rtl« ttAft difftfifig trefKbtf for tb« Mlitt on 
I at c>p*4ii b*ttltlt«ldt 

^ Hmt «>I thr fnc»M rUlMiratr af|\rrtt»cmrfiU run in 
•he MTficft ulketl <i( llcnr^ 1. I>f>hrrt> Mtul hu i»c»rk tn 
the ^M% btt«tnr»« Thr ad^eriiftcmrnt. Iuni;rr tlun thr 
atu^! (Uth co|>>. C(in«t«trtl chirfl) of c<»mmcnt hy thr 
n%M%'»t ol 'lufiekA. (tan*. «ho i*«lirtl Mr iKihcrty 
l>»e f.at Mo»r« " 

)•> 1^ liunAY. !4*tur ui T«>peka. K*ii» . ar4 tpectAl 

• ffiivf c*fi the ttAll ol the Tupek* t^Atl> I 4|^it«l. Ka« 
iK« l»lkf«intf t«» ft*) ol the cat titoAtioa in hit <<»l«mA. 

I »• V€<»ii4 Ihiitttht" 

<«Atfm to and Ifoin upturn the ttreet cart #i»4 UrMig 
l'>fth. #t «e 4«» oovi «n4 Ancjfli. iiit«> the btity ourtt 
«'l t<M*l <t*mmrf(e mt hrtr miMh t*lk Almot the g#t 
trtsAtKtfi Mott ol thf lAlk It t»t»e4 either iit»>*a mtt 
r«1«j#«Mttiiufi or tgfitirtncc (*i conditftnt ^c^tt «i| it it 
t« rritMitm either **i the gt» ««iin^fi9 «»r o( UkaI 



*\%e ^«*lft«bty knuw *t iniMh «b«>«t the c«t tit«a 
tK^ at ftAytMMly la Topeka In the latt year ur t«<> 
•e h«*e taken tome |»etnt to tcjuatnt oartell «ith it 
V^e ha«e attended hall a d«»rrn <«>nleren<e« «t »>ii«H 
an Uht di«erfrnt intrfr«i» in the gtt titttatt n •ef« 
» f aetn w ted and ne are Itmilttr mtth •!! (nf the ctaimt 
•M rwater claiint 

Mrte then it «»ur <i(Mfii<in iff tS« g%% t-iuttt >n briefly 
e*p#ette4 Y<Hi n\M% l*ke M or !c*%r it I he Me«ff« 
tkohetff t*«»inp»«n% •• t|»eni|ing • •mewbere *»et«eeft 
*••< aad three fntllion d 'Hart m an ell >rt t:> etiend 
f^ M*tAt of the Ktn»at \tftjr«l trit> pfw«fu( mg terr* 
t'»ef Mr r>ohert% it -if^r of the Wall ^tttwi *H%*»pt 
and a thrt«4 buttrrtt ff\an If Ke di«1 n«'l believe he 
' «14 Htcreate the •u|»pl> f>t (at Kr «<*ytdn't be tpend 
r*-^ all that iiw»neT IWiHerty it the 'Motet' of the 
t«ff«atiMi 

'If anv4Br»dt cart fet triorr gat I^*Kerfy i an II 
{k^Wrty cAa't get it the pa it up and fo« snaht at 
vet! Mfap yo«r a*t ranee 

*\%e hate an idea the gat titifcat»i»n it g'^^ng t»» iit» 
^«t«e There »ill t>e more aat thit •mtet tban there 
«at Utt Hvt there «'*n t f< enough tktt ywMt to •up 
p*f the 49fnMn4 for it l*rot»aM« there never »Ut Ve 
eekn«gk fltit fX^hertv it m the butmrtt t « tell gat 
%n4 an? time he tt able to l-Kate a p»r«*fffirtinc t«»«rce 
'f tv^l^U he'll tswend t^e ne'ettafv ( 'in t' ;»jt^ lS« 
«^.t# r*f hit fnatnt to it 

'Meanwhile the tupt»S 'if gat tan n *f ^»e itt/reated 
% f 'fdinante fMtific*n mi cntititm W r fftf f^af at 
« ti#<Ht »«ncemertf \ftd at «e Ka«r Kif^eri'» fR*<ftvate4 
t .« ifiay lake it or lea»e tt " 



THE OTOBMORRISON FIELD 



E' ^T »brti tbr .'i! jm ! |fjii itr!N *>{ •'•<■ ^^*jf*»'m"h 



in t«iuthmtiern Ntildr i-'^mtilT. < Hitahr«iia. aUmtt thr tamr 
iltatanre fr<<n >ttlhaalrf. |N«Ka. I'rtf^ and l*a«fic« 
Koor fma tarllt hate hmi cianfilrtrtl m thia hrlil ytehltng 
l49/xaM»>oAac Itti uf gaa tlaily Ki%e atMttitinal wcDa 
are drilltnf The toirtrtalul cuRi|ilrt»«iei ««f thetr atlcb 
tmnal tarila tn the iHcje-Murriaim firM m\\ {irutulr tailli- 
nent gfta die mMny cttiea. t«vi»nt and %illafet in the 
atale It tt to thr credit of thiMe in chaffr of the «levrlii|^ 
mrnt «tirk tn the i ^tirtr- M or rtaon field that frrai tare t* 
re|M»rleti tn clnUirif. and tu* fmt it aJkmol to l«^ «a«teet 

< feolcifttla. tietr«4ofitta and faac4iifiatt find an intefral* 
inf ftekl ff>r tttid> in the great defmaitt <if ml and faa 
in the Arkantat Ki%er ami i'tmarrun Ki%er %allr?t a»il 
hilU. and riHimiabout the trihotartra of thcMe ttreama 

Ccrtitiderahle of the < Hoe M<icriaiici held it in the I Hue 
ln«lun Ketrr^atkrti Thr Black Hear i trek runt throofh 
tKn C^rat fat hrld Thr t«mrce of Mi|i|»ltr of the < MiU- 
huma Natural <»aa i'«im|iant «at ae%erel^ taaed chtrYng 
the rcvrut c«4d iaa%e. and the a%aitalaltt3r of fat fmm 
the ( ntnr Mornaon field t»re%entrd arrioua tiKonvemence 
im the {art of the ci«iifan%'t omtomert 

Kinf lUii/ard an<i ja«.k Fr^'tt titll rrreiire a warwi 
rece|4iiin on thnr neat %uit in ( ^lahi«fia Ktren tho#- 
tantlt of farnwrt i«i the tttitallett ant! nalleaa |yrminr« 
of Wrtlrfti I »kUKi«iia arr talkifif of ha^tiif fat piped 
to thrtr Ujntrt It it a fri4ofpial |ir\ulurit% that to 
fnuih fat an«! <4l thotild lie f««und ad)a4ent to the I iliU* 
h«inu Ki%rr m < iklaKi<rva. and ru4 miKh up and dawn 
that It ream 

The \fkantA» •taftt :r. * . l.-fa*/^- a?.! etit|4iet iflto the 
MMtJ**!;*^-; «brfr it >%  a'!r.l Kr-! K-^rr tiut mhe t het 
Xhjr*r A't ^r.\ '••* a'*! |fj* r; . • •» * .' x' tKr Nrkantat m 

K^nta* x"A \?^A?:*-»» '\r\r\^^<\^ \ •• fk uj» t*> the pret- 
erit bit llt!rj !i. ;if»\e 



ANNUAL REVIEW 



p I 



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mm »raf i'>t7 b^» trrti tftr hsf * rtt ; f^rt rtef 5%a»d 
l-.f i fvi'Jr !ft iKr mt^%lw^^\ ^n^, **^th«i extern hrkft. 
aii'l the hifhr^! |ri*r in thr ea»?efn fic!i!» »jfKe 
t^ir 'rviuttfi nat "I ^u% tiie It Ka% Weti the 
larfrtt . tin turf*. ;'<>«*ti e%ef «.tfic«Mr*S jm *Kr b tS' *> cil tHr 
otl tn<!uti«« afi'! rv4«{tht!aff^!trif tSc b*fti {letif^ ftie 
<ru*l«' ?^^ *, ^ •Hjkt»'ei Kjt r» .< it^feat*'! vofftdtf^rrtlf |i> 
^Att^i \\y • ** *\it •^. lurti'f} e: at tn *eaft 2*ail I hit 
tn i{/i*r ..| t^^ fjk. 1 iKat the laffrtt rsumttfr "f «et!t etee 
i-ttft^ifhrtr-! • a trf.f^c ^t^j mrfr . 4rnptrt#«I n l«#:* <wt 
eftt^ * *'C^' a*ea «>f ti^infr^ In fa&t the tuitt^it mdl 
rt*4 M e?ir •iff-.fi /t aai.tt* l*a**r!% ..€ ••i».^r -.f t^;^*tinf 
the .Jrriiar: ! Iii*t tt nwM- t* a? tb# I ?• tr*! s«4«<rt Hat 
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•ffa'rt •>•* •• If f ati t^Slfik^.a* r-ur* *«r» f mf'% eia- ♦i 
tear t*' «T**<;it .«e «««#*«# tKe natue a' ih*-*^-4afv tVeie 
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i6 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



grade paraffine base oil, high in gasoline content. Wyom- 
ing increased its potential production from 20,000 bbls. 
to an estimate of 50,000 barrels daily, but owing to its 
geographical position it cannot be utilized to its fullest 
extent, and while its most exuberant friends talk 100,000 
barrels daily, the state will need pipe line connections 
with the east to be fully utilized. There are a number 
of producing sands and the territory is most promising 
for increasing production in the United States today, but 
with the present price of material the pipe lines will be 
delayed. On the other hand the daily production of 
40,000 barrels would swamp the present railroad facili- 
ties in the Mid-Continent field. Kansas could increase 
its present production but owing to the inadequate pipe 
line facilities, and scarcity of material its production will 
not come so fast that it will not be absorbed. Oklahoma 
production as the trend goes west and southwest has 
become so deep and expensive that it will not be drilled 
quickly and the shallower pools do not have staying 
qualities. The Osage Nation probably offers the most 
attractive place for the wildcatter of moderate capital 
and is controlled by the government. The state will 
furnish many new pools and some new sands, but with 
the chances agaist finding another Glenn or Gushing pool. 

Texas, outside of the Gulf Coastal fields is proving 
attractive. The wildcat element and several spots promise 
to develop into limited pools of light oil in west central 
Texas. 

California has to a large extent lost the wildcatter and 
promoter, who have moved eastward to countries that 
are cheaper to test, and have not been exploited to as 
great extent, and this will mitigate against California 
increasing its present production to a great extent. 

The Illinois, Ohio and the eastern fields developed 
nothing during 191 7 that promises much production. 
Western Indiana and eastern Illinois developed several 
small, but paying pools that did not overcome the de- 
cline. 

In West Virginia the Cabin Creek field was the largest 
discovery, promising about 5,000 barrels while in Pennsyl- 
vania a pool in Green County of rather spotty nature is 
still under development. 

Kentucky has been the favorite eastern state on account 
of its shallow sand and low cost. The Irvine pool in 
Estell County and its extensions in Powell and Lee 
Counties have been the cause of new work starting in 
both the eastern and western parts of the state, and at 
several points there have been reported favorable show- 
ings which have not as yet stood the test of the gauge. 
Mexico during the year completed a number of large 
wells which in a few cases added new producing 
possibilities. However, it has been shown that the Mexi- 
can producing formations are very irregular and light 
wells can be found within one or two locations of 
gushers and where transportation is available. Our im- 
ports of 1917 with the limited number of tankers avail- 
able will be 8,000,000 to 10,000,000 barrels more than 
1916, and the largest interest in the oil industry in this 
country have increased their inv^tment in Mexico 
during the year. 

The refining capacity of the country has increased 
more rapidly than any previous year. There has been 



an improvement in gasoline by means of different 
processes and by blending, and it has been noticeable 
that the gravity is still getting on lower plane, but so fai 
there has been little or no complaint by users. The 
coming year will doubtless see a largely increased con- 
sumption and a still lower grade, with the further develop- 
ment and use of the kerosene carburetor as a motive 
power on the heavy and slow-moving machines. The 
refining capacity now largely exceeds the production and 
the last half of the year has not been as profitable tc 
refiners as the first half, owing to the advance in crude 
prices and in many cases the additional premiums range 
from 10 cents to 20 cents in the east and from 10 cents 
to as high as 50 cents per barrel in the west, added to the 
failure of advance prices of other manufactured prod- 
ucts until late in the year. Those refiners owning suffi- 
cient cars to care for their business were able to make 
good profits on the same owing to their scarcity.^ 

The year closed with oil securities at their lowest 
point, although many of the seasoned companies have 
paid the largest dividends in years. 

NATURAL GAS SECURITIES. 

The year has seen several consolidations, increased 
domestic consumption with increased prices, increased 
earnings from gasoline recovered by the absorptior 
process. In some cases this additional earning was suffi- 
cient to pay the dividends on the stock and is becoming 
an important item with all large natural gas companies. 
Generally speaking, there has been no field developed 
during the past year that promises large future supplies. 
Some extensions to the old fields have been added in 
Ohio and several new pools have been opened in Okla- 
homa, but owing to the continual adding of new con- 
sumers by most all the companies, a shortage was notice- 
able both east and west during the first cold snap of the 
winter. Increased cost which can partially be met b> 
increased prices with a declining supply may be expected. 
In the east none of the very deep wells drilled in several 
sections of the country have shown any deeper of new 
formations that give promise of future supply. Natural 
gas is a luxury, it should be conserved entirely for do- 
mestic supply, and not furnished to carbon black manu- 
facturing plants or allowed to be exhausted in the air 
as it has been in the past. 

In comparison with other securities the prices of nat- 
ural gas stocks and bonds show a smaller per cent of 
shrinkage than any other class of securities. 



CALENDAR OF YOUNGSTOWN SHEET AND 

TUBE COMPANY. 



The Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company has 
presented its friends this year, as it has in the past^ 
with a very handsome calendar of generous dimen- 
sions, making it a valuable addition to any office e<quip- 
ment. Each of the large leaves of the calendar shows 
in halftone reproduction views of the company's 
foundry in actual operation. 



Things don't turn up until somebody turns them up. — James A. Garfield 



i8 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



we keep such organisms away, the foodstuffs will keep 
pure and sweet, but as the air, our hands or in fact any 
outside agency, are contaminated with bacteria of mahy 
kinds, so it is essential to the preservation of foods that 
such organisms be excluded. 

The preservation of a number of products is effected 
by heat alone. Few adult bacteria can live beyond 165 
deg. fahr. in the presence of water, although dry heat 
alone only kills with certainty at about 285 deg. fahr. De- 
struction of such life takes place more rapidly in solu- 
tions showing an acid reaction. It is for this reason that 
acid fruit is more easily preserved than milk (because 
fresh milk is alkaline). Hence, we can sterilize food- 
stuffs by cooking them and they will remain sterile unless 
another crop of bacteria comes into contact with them. 
The methods of canning of such products are familiar 
to everyone and in such ways are the products main- 
tained in a sterilized condition. 

In preserving foodstuffs by chemical, sugar, salt, etc., 
are used. Other agencies were employed for a time, 
such as salicylic and benzoic acids, but their use is now 
almost universally prohibited, owing to their deleterious 
and injurious properties and their bad effect on the 
human digestive system. 

The preservation of food by refrigeration is outside 
the scope of this paper. There are so many works of 
reference on the subject that it would be superfluous to 
treat of it at this time, except to state that at about 32 
deg. fahr., fungoid organisms can neither grow nor mul- 
tiply. Refrigeration, therefore, affords a means of keep- 
ing raw food in a preserved condition for a reasonable 
length of time. 

Among the general forms of food preservation above 
referred to, however, that of drying is at present of the 
greatest importance. Foremost among the drying opera- 
tions is that of the preservation of certain meat products 
such as hams, bacon, sausage, etc., by drying and smok- 
ing. These are usually treated in smoke houses which 
may be of either the stationary or portable type. Port- 
able smoke houses are generally employed where small 
quantities of meats are to be smoked at a time and are 
usually constructed of sheet steel, whereas those of the 
stationary type are usually built of Ijrick or concrete and 

are of many styles and types. 

« 

One type of gas-heated portable smoke house is 
shown in Fig. i and the details as to sizes, etc., in 
which they are made is given in Table i. This smoke 
house is so designed that the smoke may be sent 
through the meats, or deflected into the flue at will. 
Sausages and meats may, therefore, be left hanging in 
the house without getting more smoke than necessary. 

No smoke escapes into the room when the door is 
opened; there are smoke shutters over the sawdust pan 
operated by a bracket near the lower latch of the door, 
so that, when the door is closed, the operation of pulling 
down the handle to close the latch forces this bracket 
down and opens the shutters, permitting the smoke to 
pass into the snjoking chamber. When the handle of the 
door is partly raised the bracket rises with it, closing the 
smoke shutters, and, at the same time, leaving the door 
fastened, and the flue damper opens as the shutters 



TABLE 1. DETAILS OF USUAL SIZES OF PORTABLE SMO 







HOUSES. 
















Maximum 












Gas Con- 












sumption 


:ight 


Width Depth 


(cu. ft.) 


Weight, lb. 


per hr.) 




Dimensions in ft. 




Capacity 


Shipping 


(cu. ft. 


8 


3 3 




49% 


480 


100 


8 


4 3 




66 


560 


125 


7 


3 2 




27 


312 


60 


8 


3 2 




33 


390 


80 



The height from the bottom of the smoke house to the grate is 30 in. 
in each case. The capacities shown above do not include the space below 
the grate. 

close, thus sending all smoke from the generator directly 
into the chimney. The small draft door is then opened 
which admits air into the smoking compartment to blow 
out the smoke. One minute after this has been done the 
main smoke house door may be opened. 

The generator compartment contains the sawdust pan 
and gas burners. The latter are so designed as to give 
no smoke with a high heat, a heavy smoke with a low 
heat, or any stage between these two extremes. This is 
accomplished by having four burners — two under the 
pan, and two at the sides. The pan slides on runners 
so that it may be conveniently removed to dump the 
ashes. Angle iron flanges along the sides of the smoke 
house supply supports for bars on which to hang the 
meat. A strong wire screen is placed over the shutters. 
This prevents meats from dropping upon the shutters 
or into the sawdust pan. A thermometer is an import- 
ant adjunct to any smoke house where it is desired to 
do the best work, and where it is important to turn out 
uniform goods. : ^ 

Cured meats, after being soaked to repiove surplus 
salt, should hang several hours until they stop dripping. 



fXBLE 2. SMOKING AND 



COOKING SCHEDULE 
SAUSAGE. 



I Smoking 

Name of Sausage m Hr. Temp. F. 

Long Bologna ..'^ 3 MS-^SO 

Large Bologna . .'^. 3 145-150 

Round Bologna ;. 2 135-140 

Bag Bologna i 140-145 

Bologna in weasands.. 4 185 

Knoblauch i-i % 130 

Leona Bologna, long. . 3 145 

Leona Bologna, large. 3 145 

Frankfurts 2%-3 130-135 

Vienna Frankfurts ... 3 140-145 

High grade Frankfurts y^y^ 150-160 

Tongue 12 65- 70 

Liver 1-1% 110-120 

Polish yi^ 150-160 

Minced Ham y:sy2 135 

Berlin Ham 5 130-140 

Cooked pressed Ham.. 5 130-140 

Cottage Ham z^ 120 

Boneless Ham 48 120 



h 



\^ 



FOR DOMESTIC 

Cooking 
Hr. Temp. F. 

160 



2 

% 
2 

% 

% 

% 
2 
l/lO 
l/lO 

i/io 

2 

t 

4 
2 

2% 

t 

t 



160 

155 
160 

155 
160 

155 
160 

160 

160 

160 

200 

160 

• • • 

150 
170 
180 



The smoke house should then be warmed to about 115 
deg. fahr. so as to dry the surface of the meats until 
they have a glazed appearance; this will require several 



To do two things at once is to do neither. — Syrus 



Vanturv 



CAS AND GASOUNK 



I'* 



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however, involve a particular design for almost every 
installation and a description of each would clearly be 
^ outside the scope of the present paper. It is hoped, how- 
ever, that this short discussion will be of assistance to 
those who are planning work of this nature in these 
present times of stress. 

Presented before Semi-Anntial Meetitif of The Americati Society of 

Heating and Ventilating Engineers, Chicago, in. Cats by Coortesy 
Of tfte Society. 



EUAS H. LONG, DECEASED. 



SHABBY OVERCOATS AS BADGES OF HONOR. 




ECENTLY a statement was made by Frank A. 
Vanderlip, so the daily papers reported, that 
pleasures should be forgotten during the war, 
to a large extent, and the money be invested 
in war saving stamps, or other government securities. 

We disagree with Mr. Vanderlip in his statement 
that "pleasures should be forgotten during the wnr to 
a large extent." Instead, let us say that unwise and 
uncurbed pleasures should be eliminated, but that 
pleasures and pleasures in the broad sense of the word 
should be encouraged. They are a relief from the 
pressure that comes with the leaving of home by o :r 
young men, and the contemplating of the risks that we 
know they are taking, etc., etc. 

Mr. Vanderlip advises that we should not buy a 
theatre ticket or a movie ticket. How unwise in our 
opinion would this be if followed literally, while in- 
stead, the somewhat more moderate buying of amuse- 
ment tickets versus indiscriminate buying, is the way 
this thing should be put to the public. 

We should rt^t desijc^ our show-houses to go out of 
business, and our actors who have purchased Liberty 
Bonds on the installment plan, to have their income 
cut off. We must not go "hammer-and-tongs" at mat- 
ters, we must use thoughtful care in making our sug- 
gestions as well as our expenditures. 

Then again, Mr. Vanderlip says, that the shabby 
overcoat is a badge of honor. We differ with Mr. Van- 
derlip. In other words, we do not believe that "shabby'* 
anything, was ever a creditable badge of anything. As 
a rule, that which is shabby is the result of lack of 
thrift, and how unreasonable it would be for us to go 
to extremes, and as the slang has it, put our clothing 
establishments "on the blink," the millions of employes 
back of which are Liberty Bond subscribers on the in- 
stallment plan, loyal folk, government and home sup- 
porters. 

Garments should, in war times as in peace, fill the 
function of neatness as well as utility. Foppishness 
should be frowned upon, but the substantial garment 
is the means and the evidence of money-circulation. 

Avoid excesses, both in what we say and what we do, 
yet extremes upon the other side are undesirable, so 
let's be sane and sensible. What we need is poise. 
"Don't rock the boat."— The Editor. 



EOR many years Mr. Elias A. Long conducted and 
edited the Acetylene Journal of Chicago, pub- 
lished not only in the interests of acetylene, but 
as well in the interests of the International 
Acetylene Association, directly representing the Associa- 
tion in print, yet at the same time conducted with that 
freedom of speedi and justice to all, that was universally 
found a fundamental principle in Mr. Long's work. 

For quite a period Mr. Long had been incapacitated 
for business, through a lingering illness, and as a conse- 
quence, for a long period has been missed by a large circle 
of acetylene friends that formerly gathered about the man 
whose self was lost sight of in his love for, and untiring 
zeal in bdhalf of, the acetylene industry collectively, and 
the manufacturers of apparatus and the manufacturers 
of carbide, individually. These the makers and builders 
of that industry, though, as it might be said, the work 
of the Acetylene Journal was the cement that helped to 
bind these integral parts into one solid structure. 

Mr. Long died on Christmas evening at Sioux City, 
la., at the home of his daughter, though the interment 
was at Buffalo, N. Y., where Mr. Long in his earlier life, 
always a lover of flowers and the beautiful, conducted 
that which was then Buffalo's leading floral store. 

The Journal, after Mr. Long relinquished his connec- 
tion continued along the lines formerly laid, until at a 
more recent date, die oxweld-acetylene industry kaving 
developed to large proportions, the Journal added a de- 
partment especially devoted to that arm of the industry. 
The Acetylene Journal has always bom the stamp of 
"right," an imprint of Mr. Long's own personality. The 
Journal for some time past, in fact since Mr. Long's ill- 
ness overtook him, has been under the management of 
"Mr. R. W. Hume. 



M. G. REYNOLDS PASSES AWAY. 



mT is with deep regret and sincere feelings of sad- 
ness that we recount the death of Mr. M. G. 
Reynolds, President and General Manager of the 
Reynolds Gas Regulator Company of Anderson, 
Ind. Mr. Reynolds founded this business years 
since, and under his guidance, and by reason of honest 
methods and honest product, developed it into an 
affair of large proportions. Mr. Reynolds was an able 
man in his profession; he made manv friends in the 
field. 

Some time ago Mr. Reynolds associated with him 
Mr. J. C. Groble as Vice-President and Assistant Man- 
ager, a man of wide experience and a fund of valuable 
knowledge as applied to gas conditions and appliances. 
Mr. Groble's experience has assisted and will continue 
to be of valuable assistance in the business that Mr. 
Reynolds' experience, tact and ability has built into a 
lasting concern. 

Many personal friends will sadly regret to learn that 
Mr. Reynolds passed away on the afternoon of 
December 12th. The passing away was quite sudden. 



The world is a wheel, and it will come round right. — Disraeli 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



January 



Openings are provided in fire door for the insertion 
in the fire pot of a coil for heating water, for bath and 
other domestic purposes. 

THE GAS FURNACE. 

The gas furnace is entirely separate from the coal fur- 
nace and, when installed, it surrounds the coal furnace 
as indicated in illustration following: 

QAS AND COAL FURNACES WITHOUT CASING. 

The gas furnace has a corrugated cast iron burner pot, 
to assure durability, the burner pot surrounding two 
powerful cast iron drilled burners. 



From the burners, the products of combustion pass 
through the burner pot and into the three radiators above 
it. encircling each radiator on their way to the vent flue. 

In this manner the long fire travel which is so neces- 
sary to secure "high efficiency" in the use of gas is 
secured. 



vestigating this new furnace for much added consump- 
tion could be obtained on off peak loads, Spring and Fall, 
through such an installation, coal could and probably 
would be employed for fuel during mid-winter months. 

Gas companies selling manufactured gas at forty cents 
or less for heating could, if desired, doubtless obtain all 
winter consumption with present high coal prices. 

During normal coal and coke prices and demand, those 
artificial gas companies seeking a market for both gas 
and coke could, through this dual fuel furnace, by naming 
and advertising it as a gas-coke furnace, assist sales of 
both coke and gas and price of gas could be locally made 
to invite off peak load for gas, — peak for coke. 

In many cities provided with natural gas, supply was 
low and service interrupted last winter, chiefly because 
of unusual demand. 

Patrons using burners in coal furnaces and those using 
independent gas furnaces suffered temporarily during 
days of severe cold through inadequate supply. 

With the Dual Fuel Furnace installed and a small 
supply of coal on hand, no discomfort would have been 
had, for coal could have been used during temporary gas 
shortage and homes kept comfortable. 

The opportunity is present for those companies not 
previously exploiting gas for central unit heating, coal 
prices high, deliveries poor, to investigate this new fur- 
nace further and engage in some trial installation durii^ 
coming fall and winter and no good argument can Ixe 
advanced by prospective user for with it householder can 
use gas or coal or both together as he pleases. 



EFFICIENT CjOGGLES. 



I a I FEW years since, the offering of "goggles" for 
I A I sale in the field of gas-mains, and need for 
1^ *| them in the running of pipe-lines through 
country districts, was not known, nor were 
"goggles" called for, but today, in view of the fact that 
the type of light produced by oxy-acetylene welding is 
injurious to the naked eye of the welder, excellent 
"goggles" are made indispensable, and just the right 
kind are important. 

It depends upon whether the "goggles ' are niade 
right, and whether the color of the "goggles" is right 
where one desires eye-saving, eye-rest, good-work, 
and lasting stability. 

Don't let your operatives do welding without proper 
■■goggles." You owe it to them, to your work and to 
yourselves, that the right kind shall be provided. In- 
vestigate, it's a good rule. 



ni'AL FUEL FURN.\CE WITHOUT C.\S1N"G. 

The radiators are made of heavy rust resisting iron, 
each joint and seam tightly made to prevent any pos- 
sibility of the escape of burned gases into the warm air 
chamber. 

Companies selling manufactured gas at a price not 
exceeding sixty cents per thousand would profit by in- 

Make it thy buaioew to know tliyaelf, vMch is the most difficuh lesson in the world. — Cervantes 



n 


Get down to brass tacks with yourself! 


Sooner or later the problem of advertising, 




once a slim shadow will become a grim sub- 




stance. "Putting it off" cuts no knots but. 




only draws them tighter. 



RESULTS OF DRILUNG-LATEST REPORTS 



KNNtVLVANIA riBLD 



ALLBOAMf riILP 

t-W* U<k««a Ntlartl <M« 



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WErr VIKOINIA 



TV^* Rail Rr--* i 
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l»>4« tlfr<(.n '• A •■ 
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• wKvn It w MkdowblMll) kMIn to imm* Um lka« la — k» flMK — PUm«» 



24 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



Jairaaiy 



Wirt County — 

Nutter- Wilson, Campbell Oil 2 Dry 

Rathbone Tract, Robert Bros. 109 Dry 

Gilmer County — 

Woods, Hope Gas i Gas 

Pishcr heirs, Hope Gas i Gas 

Cox, Carnegie Gas i Dry 

Broadwater, Philadelphia Co. i Gas 

Wilson, Philadelphia Co. i Gas 

Maxwell heirs, Philadelphia Co. 3 Dry 

Cottrill, Philadelphia Co. i Gas 

Campbell, Carter Oil 5 Gas 

Freeman, Eastern Petroleum 5 Gas 

Trainor heirs, Trainor Bros. 3 Dry 

Pleasants County — 

McKnight, Logan Oil 4 ^'•y 

Powell, Octo Oil 14 ^^ 

Carson, B. H. Gorrell & Co. i Dry 

. Roane County — 

Dalrymple, Latta O. & G. i Dry 

Shreengost, S. P. Oil i Dry 

Kanawha County — 

Sunday Creek Coal, U. F. G. 19 Dry 

Sunday Creek Coal, U. F. G. 20 Gas 

Sunday Creek Coal, U. F. G. 21 Gas 

Ward heirs. Cabin Creek Gas 17 Dry 

Ward heirs, Cabin Creek Gas 18 Gas 

Goshorn, O'Connell & Co. 56 Gas 

Dry 21 

Gas 36 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 

Woodsfield— 
Ktafy, Banner Oil i 

Perry County — 

Keyvham, Keller, Marshall & Co. 8 

Jones Bros., Jones Bros. 5 

N. F. P. Co., Haydenville Oil 20 

Muskingum — 

Tweed, D. D. Flanigan & Co. i 

Notestein, Clay O. & G. 19 

Cannon, Chicago Oil 3 

Estadt, J. O. McKee & Co. i 

SchaflFer, J. W. KeiflFer 3 

Macksburg — 

Miller-Blake, Macatee & Co. i 

Williams, Monroe-Noble Oil 9 

Athens County — 
Grovenor, G. W. Ashburn 4 

Morgran County — 

Van Fossen, Penn O. & G. 46 

Dougherty, W. B. Dougherty 16 

Bowman, Kamerer & Co. 10 

Marietta — 

Stephens, Fort Harmcr Oil 54 

Keiffer, Carter Oil 2 

Nicholson, Cambria Oil 4 

Keiffer, Carter Oil i 

Smith, Phelix Oil i 

Hutcheson heirs, Wickersham & Co. 4 

Schoen, Burkhart & Co. i 

Harris, Bailey Oil i 

Wickens, J. T. Dillon & Co. 24 

Decker, J. B. Bradcn Oil 6 

Decker, W. A. Decker & Co. 8 

Carroll County — 

Hoynacki, Scott O. & G. 3 

Harrison County — 
Kinzey, Home Co. i 

Jefferson County — 

Burris, Lewis & Co. i 

Linton, Thompson & Co. i 

Columbiana County — 
Smith, Geo. Vickcrs 5 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



Belmont County — 

Gibson, O. F. S. i Dry 

Caldwell, N. G. Co. of W. Va. i Dry 

Dry 30 

Gas 3 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS 



SUMMAST OP OPBRATIONS. 

Comp. Prod. 

Allegany 18 45 

Bradford 42 139 

Middle Field 46 52 

Venango-Clarion 64 81 

Butler-Armstrong 23 50 

Southwest Penna 62 191 

West Virginia 132 1.365 

Southeast Ohio 113 1,045 

ToUl 500 2,968 



Dry 


Gas 


I 


1 








5 


3 


6 


2 


4 


2 


17 


17 


21 


35 


30 


3 



84 63 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



LICKING COUNTY. 

Granville — Jones, Columbus Nat. Gas i 

Washington — E. M. Wartham, Utica Gas, Oil & 

Mining Co. 3 

Liberty — W. W. Green, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

McKean — I. Jones. Columbus Nat. Gas r 



Dry 
Gas 



PAIRPIBLD COUNTY. 

Berne — J. Mossburger, City Nat. G. i 

KNOX COUNTY. 
JeflFerson — A. S. Vance. Ohio Fuel Sup. i 



ASHLAND COUNTY. 

Green — Frank Kilvar. Logan G. & F. i . . . 
Hanover — Chas. Sacklc. Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Mohican — A. Huston, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . . 
Miflin— M. B. Landis, Ohio Fuel S. i 



Dry 
Gas 



MEDINA COUNTY. 
York — H. VV*. & E. Bowman, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . 

J. Gager, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Harrisvillc — A. Daguc. Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

Joel Holmes, Logan Gas & Fuel r 

Litchfield — Holmes. Jos. H. Artman i 

Westfield— N. E. & B. Cole, Medina Gas & Fuel i 

J. W. Troutman, Medina Gas & F. i 

Brunswick — Fordham, Medina G. & F. 2 

Lafayette — Infirmary, Logan G. & F. i 

Mary House, Medina Gas & Fuel r 

Medina — Schaber, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

Liverpool — John Hansel. Ohio Fuel Sup. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Congress — Rockenfcldcr, Logan G. & F. i 
Chester — Morrow. Logan Gas & Fuel i . . 

C. E. Martin. Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Cannan — J. Gcarhart, Ohio Fuel Sup. 6... 

W. F. Funk, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

C. H. Ault, Medina Gas & Fuel 2 



Gas 



Gas 

Gas 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

2 
2 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dr>' 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

3 
Q 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable. — ^Web»ter 



w— K«i)*f. ithm l-orl Sap) 



•ICMIAKD COOirTV 
Mmm»-U * ) StM-«f*>. l-r^m* I*, ft 1^' J 

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V ■«(•>■ 

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Dry 



COVAMOOA ceuVTT 

v«,t>*f.iiw ) r iiMiMtd*. F Ohio t; I 

!>■'.» U I' Wol(«. I^caa Cai ft Karl i 
It f ft f Kn>«i«I t »«•■> <; ft K • 
r<tu«h Pr«*infi Oil I 
• V«* llMta r'atl oht.. !;•* t 
Al«i« M MwM r>r*tna Oil i 



UMA riBLD 

AOOLAtIt eOOKTT 
S«UiM \ } (^••hait S«t«niHI I 
UB«l»atloA-» knlil«« t V HfraMi ( 



VIHTOH COOMTT 
■mUm4-T W U(<"<An <ih«. t S 
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r.a. 



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INDIANA PIBLO 



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TmBWJ COUHTT 

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riKI COWM1* 



MOCKIMO COVWtT 
iKali < ft«b-Wm l»4al !••«•» f". A I 
M H %%■«■■•* Ohtn ImI Sat>P>< • 
Mai IUr4Ht o|iw> I^btI Smpp><  



INDIANA FIELD 



CMHOCTOa COUMTT 

H.'! • tMb-l H Si*f«n. M«4>M '.At 



CSNTKAt OHIO FIELDS 



5«*ui( m«k»« a • 



t And al>;« ii> <lo ikiAc* - - \l««h tIaMM 




KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



WAYNB COUNTY. 
Cooper — Sam Shearer, M. Jones & Co. i 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Ulysses — Austin, White Bros. & HuflF i . . 

Mattie Cause, White Bros. & Huff i. 



Gas 



ESTILL COUNTY. 

Irvine — Thos. Powell, Empire Oil & Cas 4 
Luther Young, Empire Oil & Gas 5.... 

Cvrus White, Empire Oil & Gas i 

Billy Cox, Crown Oil 4 

A. J. Rawlins, Crown Oil 23 

Simp Horn, Security Prod. & Refg. 2 

Wade Parks, CTark & Co. 2 

Geo. M. Reed, Sr., Ohio Oil 5 

Matt Lowry, Stanton Oil 4 

Bratlin, White, Newton & Moore 13 



Dry 



POWELL COUNTY. 

Pilot— W. M. Adams, Federal Oil 12.... 
Howard Phillips, Bundy & Hare r.... 
J. Townsend, Huff, Wirebaugh & Co. i 
J. Townsend, D. N. Baker & Co. i . . . . 
John Kinzer, Cumberland Pet. 2 



Dry 



LEE COUNTY. 



Beattyville — R. Kincaid, Kenova Oil i 

Wiler, Rex Oil & Gas I 

Arch Snowden, Snowden Oil i 

Poplar Thickett, Hopewell Oil i 

Johnson, Southwestern Oil i . . .* 



Dry 
Gas 



BATH COUNTY. 
Licking Union — Alley, Kentucky Prod, i 

ALLEN COUNTY. 

Scottsville — C. Stovall. Southern Oil 5 . . . 
W. H. Spann, E. T. Adams & Co, i . . . 

R. A. Read, Hogue & Boggs t 

Vivian Brown, Eastern Oil i 

W. P. Dalton, Anderson & Dulin 2 

Gregory, Kentucky-Indiana Oil 2 

W. J. Brown. Yoke Oil 2 

R. A. Read, Yoke Oil 2 

Dobbs, Anderson T. Herd r 

Spurlock, Apex Oil 2 



Dry 



KNOX COUNTY. 
Barboursville — Brown, White & Co. i 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Buffalo— Xorth Oil i 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 
Paintsville— Connolly, Bed Rock Oil i . . 

WARREN COUNTY. 
Enos Harris, H. W. Johnatzen Oil i 

PULASKI COUNTY. 

Somerset — Isaac, Curtis & McGavern 2.. 
Coyler, Senate Oil r 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Drip Rock — Tom Rose, Hillis Bros. i... 



Dry 

Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

10 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

4 
I 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

10 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

• 

Dry 



BREATHITT COUNTY. 

Cope Branch — Buck Crawford, Atlantic Prod. & 
Rcfg. I 

MADISON COUNTY. 
Waco—C. L. Searcy, W. K. White & Co. i 



TAYLOR COUNTY. . 

Campbellsville — Morrison Develop. 5, 6.. 
Buchannan, Morrison Development i . . 
Penick, Morrison Development i 



Gas 



MONROE COUNTY. 
Emberton — Unknown i 



ADAIR COUNTY. 

Columbia — Dunbar, Sunrise Oil i 



Dry 

Dry 

Ga8 
Gas 
Gas 

3 
Dry 

Dry 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 

Wayne 4 

Wolfe 3 

Lawrence 5 

Estill 34 

Powell 49 

Lee 18 

Bath I 

Allen 16 

Whitley o 

Lincoln o 

Metcalf I 

Knox 3 

Perry i 

Johnson i 

Warren 5 

Barren o 

Pulaski 2 

Jackson 4 

Boyle 

LaRue * o 

Breathitt i 

Madison i 

Taylor 4 

Simpson o 

Hopkins o 

Monroe i 

Adair 2 

Tennessee o 



Nov. '17 



Oct '17 



Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. 



Total 156 



29 

55 

19 

195 

1.330 

155 
o 

70 
o 
o 
o 

15 

o 
o 

50 

o 
o 

40 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

3 
o 

1,961 



I 
o 

2 

10 

5 
5 
I 

10 
o 
p 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
o 

2 
I 

o 
o 

I 
I 

4 
o 
o 
I 
I 
o 



7 
6 

5 

69 

43 

4 

o 

14 

2 

3 
o 

4 
o 
o 
o 

2 
I 

2 
I 

4 
o 


4 
I 

I 



o 

I 



50 174 



20 

14 

15 

683 

1,372 

235 
o 

255 

5 
30 
o 
22 
o 
o 
o 

10 
10 

20 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

ID 

o 
o 
o 
o 

2,702 



Dry 
2 

4 
I 
8 

4 
I 
o 

3 

I 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 
o 
I 
I 

4 
o 
o 

4 
o 
I 
o 
o 
I 

37 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



CLARK COUNTY. 

Parker — Mrs. A. R. Hays, Kewanee O. & G. 11 
Casey — King est., Geo. H. Stahr & Co. 11 ..... . 

Chas. Bair, Ohio Oil 8 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Oblong— W. D. Walker, Mahutska Oil 14 

Prairie — M. Barlow, Fisher 'Oil 8 

G. W. Cox, Central Refining i 

Honey Creek — J. P. Wagner No. 2, Ohio Oil 2 

G. W. Goff, Ohio Oil 16 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



By the work one knows the workman. — De La Fontaine 



WA»IN COUNTY 

•«i I- < 't«*4.»t *ii(.l( Ami 



J *: I. Wr.«*i !•«•(., ft al A 
lu^A »*lll>a« la|Mt« trf. A Iwrl J 






ILLINOIS PIBLD 



lUMHAtT or COHri.CTI» WOkl 



MIDCOKTINKNT 

XANIAS 

VOMTCOaiVV (OUMTT 



IT. 1%* t,.„ •.f.h.n: 

'4 W — . >■ I I- ..-. * I 



CHAUTAVQVA (OVHT* 



 ■Am rSABIlIM DOVOLM COVMTItl 

» (- J/ 1 lahf lUfb. >i ai  

fv Ilk «4 U. < .ll..««l> I a.flW •! •■ A 

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oiA A Kit* )*4 t aM**!! J 

< tj ti <.•*«• I \ \I.IWi I 

> >• )t <•»•• r \ yiiWf 1 



i.< 



Ma'* •> ' 



I A •••■ t 



.'..A 



MtMd* • ••( A !'••■ I 



^/l il..l.>>.>( I4*t4 A Hattt«rtt  

hti. R-' I'ri"- •>,( A '■■• > 

•*ti U.i.k«ll t>«tK, A T.n4al* I 

Sil %%..4.>m ^•••..(| It*. I 

: w vt..«.t.:, \I.' •tUBgl, A Tra... 

T ti W.U.am. Ha<if •••) I 

• it. WilWirt II.. .M O.I ; 

• iJ U.ll.>in. Baof* '-•) I 



U<< atb*< I -"I 



-.1 A  






IHt 
Ilr* 

n** 
i>f* 

l»rT 



MtO«HO COVNTT 



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i\ 


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.Sahm p*opW AN M load •! iH'hiih ikM ik#v rw* h*ll-«ttf u < 



Butler County — 
23-37-6, Schwartz, Iroquois Oil !■.. 

Dry 

Gas 

Production 



OKLAHOMA. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

9-26-13, Whiteturkey. National O. & D. 2. 

33-29-14, Fee. E. V. Crowell i 

11-27-13. Clay, National Oil & Dev, 26 

10-26-13, Harkins. Portrell et al i 

iQ- 28-14. Parks, Montgomery Oil 7 

9-28-lS, Miller, Ed Karns 4 

49-26-13, Hilderbrand, Keystone Oil I 

16-28-13, HoRshooter, Kawfield Oil i 

7-27-17, Wilson, Midland Oil 7 



Dry . 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

5-21-1 1, Osage Nat Gas 1 

S-22-I2, Lot 82, Charles Owens 1 

■33-33-11. Finance Oil i? 

S-21-10, Carter Oil 5 

14-21-10, Osage & Okla Gas 1 

33-21-12. Carter Oil i 

3,1-21-12, Monitor O. & G 

3S-22-IO, Tidal Oil 1 

4-22-1 1, Kansas Nat. Gas 3 

4-22-1 r, Kansas Nat. Gas 4 

Q-22-11, Kansas Nat. Gas 3 

,33-21-12, & Carter 17 

3i-2.';-io, Oil 187 

24-29-10, tewart 5 

1-22- 8, Harris O. St G. 1 

1-22- 8. Kiskadden Oil i 

33-21-12. Monitor O. 81 G. I 

19-27-11, Ind, Ter. III. Oil 259 

75-26-1 T, Lahoma O. Sc G. 1 

31-25-11, Lot 181, Ind. Ted, 111. Oil 93 

9-22-1 1, Lot 316, Charles Owens 51 

5-2t-io. Carter Oil 5 

15-29-10. Ind. Ter, 111. Oil 193 

33-21-12, Monitor Oil t 

1-22- a. Block Oil 8 

33-23-11, Finance Oil 2 

22-27-10, Echo Oil 3 

0-23- 8. Sinclair Gulf & Osage Hominy 811. 

15-29-10, Ind. Ter, 111. Oil 197 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



Production 60.OOO.OOO 

CHEROKEE SHALLOW SANDS. 

22-24-17, Jenkins, Milo Oil 1 Dry 

14-24-17, Bird, White Point Oil Dry 

' 14-26-15, H. Janzen. Hale & Purdy 2 Dry 

' 8-25-16, McConnie, Big Four O, & G, 1 Dry 

4-26-16, Smith, Carter Oil I Dry 

26-24-16, Lovell, Milo Oil 8 Dry 

16-28-18, Green, Painter & Sloger 1 Dry 

4r25-i7, Clark, Arapahoe Pet. i Dry 

iS-24-17- Palmour, Amalgamated Pet, 6 Dry 



TITLSA, BIXBY, GLENN POOL. WICEY, KELLYVILLE AND 
BRISTOW. 

33-2T-i_>. Lot 104, Monitor O. & G. i Gas 

.14-rS-r T. Specogee. Dardanelle Oil 1 Dry 



33-18-12, Tucker, Okla. State Oil i.. 

4-17-12, Laurel Oil & Gas 6 

, Childers, Aiken Oil 1 

, Moore, Edgar Oil 4 

. Keno Oil 4 

1 Anderson, Atlantic Pet. 3.. 
. Anderson, Atlantic Pet, S-- 
, Bartlett & Buell 10 



5-19-1 .. 
36-18-14, ] 
24-18-14, 
36-16-14, 1 
36-16-14. , 
30-15- 

7-19-11. 

7-17-12, 
10-18-13, 
35-17-11, 



Pittman, Producers Oil 22.... 

Fee, Minshall O, & G. I 

d persons 5.. 



, Bell 



*1?lg. 2.. 



12-17-12, 
22-18-12, 

32-i8^t2, 
34-18-12, 
30-17-11. 
3i-'7-i4. 
32-18-13. 
26-18-14. 
13-18-11, 
6- 8-12, 
32-17-12. 
13-19-13, 
21-17-13. 
21-17-14. 
10-16-13, 
21-16-13, 



aPlit Refg.a 

Brown, Manaford O. & G. 8.. 
Churchill, C. G. Tibbens 6... 

Martin. Producers Oil 22 

Northland Oil 1 

De Prieste, P, O. G. i 

Hickory, Misener et al 6 

Lee, Lee Oil 17 

Bigpond, March Oil IQ 

Stewart, S r4 

Arcutt, !^ 9 

Murray, al 4 

Steel, Atlantic Pet. I 

Ferryman, Wilcox Oil 4 

Bigpond. Atlantic Pet. i 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Production -  .25.000,0c 

Dry '' 



23-18-16. 
28-14-15. 
15-13-15. 

6-17-15, 
10-15-15. 
26-15-15, 
30-15-16. 
12- 14- 1 4, 
16-14-16, 
15-13-15. 
33- 14- 16. 

7-14-1S. 
14-14-15. 
2 1 -2,5-16. 
21-16-is, 
34-15-15. 
17-15-16, 
28-28-15. 



8-15-15. 

6-15-1,5. 

8-15-15. 
31-15-rs. 
36-15-15. 

2-14-1,5. 
26-18-16. 
Z6-18-16. 
23-18- r6, 
19.19-15, 
29-20-15, 
26-15-15. 
35-15-15. 



MUSKOGEE AND WAGONER. 

Childers, Frank Wright 7 

Carter Cooper 



Ike Sin 



al I 



i Belle 1 



Simmons. Gladvs 

Franklin, Brown et al 1 

Howard, SS & G. 2. 

Franklin, 

Manuel. A. D. Morton et al 3 

Sandy. Simons et al 1 

^! Oil2 

Rentie, Levine et al 1 

Shooham, Central Oil 1 

Mcintosh. Billingslea et al 1 

»« = Oil3 

Franklin, 2 

Harrison, Caney River Gas 1 

II al8..: 

3^ al 7 

t al 1 . . . . 
Fulotka. F. V. Wright 1 . , . . 
Buffington. Pitlman et al 1.. . 
Ware. W. Gas 2. . . . 

Manue, Carter Oil 3 

Barnett. Caney River Gas 2.. 
Mayson. Okla. Oil Wells 4.. 

Peters. W. B, Pine 2 

Manuel Kiskadden & Oiler 2 
Fulotka. Pennypacker et al. . 
Fulotka, Pennypacker et al, . 
Childers. Frank Wright 8, . , . 

Bellsted. Savoy Oil i 

Cuddles, R. Pettitl ] 

Franklin Brown el al, 1 

Canada, Cosden O. & G. 1 . . . 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Drv 

Dry 



Dry 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



Do not turn back v^en you are just at the goal. — Syrua 



*tt I I art., I. it \ I. lb.. I 

: *i « Ha.r.i>ai..o Nut'- < ■••*  . s -. . 





•ALO NILL AMD MOCN MBM 


■1 •! 


Ik.,. If • 1 lit, .11.1 .1 1 


>»-l4. 


Uilnt.oh Vf^Mtf Oil 1 


• t '* 


ll.liilo.li U I'hitlipt 1. J 




\Vr.<ht V.n H...l*n ft M<«.tl A 


t« I4 


t4.>n. 1 W M.-..» 4 


•« 1* 


■.laiM.n V|Wft> «l ft (. \ 



• Hipiwll ft Vtoul A 



HtALOtOM DltTMCt 

J*' J 1 W**fh«im«t I (Sana <>tl v 

jn. J J \4«Mi* *i •) > 

r- «' t. V\tilhf<«Mi \\al'h..>i> *t »1 1 

1 4 i \\.inib(f ri..4w.tr. ■••I « 

^ I I < iar.u 1 >,! * 

I) 4 t tl>itkl* Hovtnania ■••I 1 

^^ »■ %. l.hBH.it Mntlair ft \itfal 



• -•! 






OKMULOtC HOMIt 



1-^ iW M.tf 



I mUt V\ I '••-1 ' 



TAtI QUAT **b PATMK COVMTIIk 



M I* •! M • 



 t*<a*Bti MBWIIMK 1 



T* (••dwrl |r««l mativta *a«l ••vat to tw Ml • immk » kW** tka l«K* al kwMMft ■■In** — f^wi«)> 



30 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



Pontotoc County — 
I- 4- 6, Oliver, Benedum & Trees i Dry 

Dry 25 

Gas 3 

Production 30,000,000 

ARKANSAS. 

Jefferson County — 

13- 6- 8, Jefferson Oil i Dry 

Montgomery County — 

9- 7-24, Harold, Arkoma O. & G. i Dry 

Howard County — 

36- 9-27, Perpetual Oil & Gas i Dry 

Benton County — 

5-19-31. Summers, Centerton Oil i Dry 

Sebastian County — 

18- 7-32, Universal Oil & Gas i Dry 

II- 4-32, R. T. Lane et al. i Dry 

Dry 6 



KANSAS. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLFTED. 

Comp. Prod. 

Montgomery 43 275 

Chautauqua 48 626 

Butler 128 25,567 

Allen 27 187 

Miami-Franklin-Douglas 85 847 

Wilson 16 60 

Neosho 28 444 

Wildcats 22 342 

Total 397 28.348 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. 

Cherokee d. s 68 1,336 

Cherokee s. s 96 810 

Osage 86 7J75 

Creek Nation 3i9 10,103 

Kay County I5 2,660 

Garfield-Noble I5 i.9io 

Cushing-Shamrock 17 810 

Cleveland 25 1,193 

Healdton 62 3,583 

Wildcats 41 640 

Total 744 30.220 



MID-CONTINENT. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. 

Oklahoma 744 30,095 

Kansas 397 28,348 

Arkansas 6 o 



Total M47 58,443 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



WICHITA AND WILBARGER COUNTIES. 

Electra— 

Kemple, Stough et al. i 

Smith, Federal Oil 3 



Dry 


Gas 


4 


4 


14 


8 


9 


I 








21 


7 


4 


I 


I 


2 


8 


2 



61 



156 



223 



25 



Dry 


Gas 


7 


I 


9 





II 


18 


85 


24 


2 


I 


3 


1 


I 


I 


I 





10 


1 


27 





50 



Dry 


Gas 


156 


50 


61 


25 


6 






75 



Dry 
Dry 



Marsh, Texas-Colorado Oil i 

N. Ziset, Theobald Oil i 

White, Magnolia Petroleum i 
Ancell, Peoples Oil i 



Dry 



CULBERSTON DISTRICT. 

Burnett, Mutual Oil i 

Burnett, Thos. Gresham et al. i 

Hurdleson-Burnett, Gulf Production 2 

Waggoner Bros., Producers Oil 2 

Forbes-Burnett, Gulf Production 3 

Waggoner Bros., Chapman & McFarlin 2 

Burnett (Section 5), Langford, Staley & Chenault i. 
Burnett, Magnolia Petroleum 2 



Dry 



BURKBURNETT. 

Ruyle, Ruyle Farm Oil 15 

Dodson, L. R. Crowell 3 

Danels, F. H. Hunter i 

G. C. Woods, Magnolia Petroleum 3 

Clark, Texahoma Oil & Gas 3 

Powell, Texahoma Oil & Gas 19 

Daniels, Hall & Fares i 

Horton, Lattimer et al. i 

Beach. Knight & Smith 15 

Rexford, Gt. Northern Refining 5 • • 



Drv Holes 



PETROLIA. 



Byers, Producers Oil 36 



WILDCATS. 

Archer County — 

Grant, Barton Valley Oil i 

Wilson, 66 Oil 2 

Munger, Clover Leaf Oil i 

Xutt, Lee Farm Oil t 

Overby, Lee Farm Oil i 

Reunion, Reunion Oil i 

Orton, Coline Oil i 

Parrish, St. Clair Oil i 

Skiles, Midway Oil i 

Stephens County — 
Hughes, Texas & Pacific Coal i . . . . 

Eastland County — 
Walker, Texas & Pacific Coal i . . 

Wichita County — 
Sunday, Sunday Oil 1 

Brown County — 
Low, Hillman et al. i 



Dry holes 
Gas 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 

Caddo — 
16-21-15, School Tee, Producers Oil r... 

De Soto— 
25-13-12, Grand Bayou Pl'ting, Prod. O. 17 

Miscellaneous — 

2-11-16, Bland, Producers Oil i 

8-10-14, Sailings. Atlas Oil i 

22-19- 4. McLain, Southern Carbon i 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dr> 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

10 



Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Dry 

12 
I 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas^ 

4 
I 



Honegt labour bears a lovely face. — Dekker 



'T 



NATURAL CAS AND CASOUNE 



3« 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 







iUMIIAVf 


Of ormiuTiOMi 










1 


ufflp 


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IH, 


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o 


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t 


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O 


J 


1 




ft 


41 


4« 


ll 




1 1 


Jt»t\ 


4 


1 




(4 


III 


Ifil 



OULT COAST 

OOOtB C»«tK 
HitCKLtAHIOUi 



OULr COAST 



»u 



= 4  



tl 



1 • 



K'/. 



ua« 



«•«• 





iUMMA^Y 


or ortVATioHi 








tf«t 


< •>ntp 


rff.*<i 


hri 


M 


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!•«< 


T 1 


ft 


i» 


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f. 


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t 


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1 


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Jt^i 



•/rl 



rrOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL 



m II y I. II ftiBT 

1 1 HIS the n'rfi»or> of the %otini:r«t i*** mm 

in thr t«iuritr% ihrrr h*» >»crn rn4'i>m|4%%#«l 

the rnlifr ilr\ r|.»|»mrnl of tmt> %rr* in;{«ift4nt 

U<ttir« in thr hrat trrjitini; f»( mrtalt At hi^h 

rraturrt 

EffI 

oo^S \uti>niAti( trm)»rrAttirr « iiffitfol inr u«# in 
r«f»<»n viith t;A« tiffr.l hifc^h trfnticrAtufr \\%tfkx<r% 

ft«c ^Amttiar Mith rtthrr «tth)rtt mill m<»«t hcAfttN 
rM tKr «tAtrnirftt t«i thr rffnt that thr fkr«l fAC" 
Hl'.!r takin^' x I-*fi»: «tr|* in thr «|tfr«tKifi \A nKh%\ 
cJK.trn. \ IT'. !^r ilr>rti*t<mrfit «if hrat tfeAlnicol 
rts*« At hii'h !rtii}^rjiturr« i« iffi«tini|*Irtp «ttbt»ttl 
tcuod lAit*«r Afu! thAt mhrrr thr t«kii i^r cuffi 



htnrfl thcfr arr AltAiff»r«l rnultt thjt •ith cfthrr iiftr 
AltMie arr ifn|H»««ililc 

Ry mrthcMlt and ilr%HC« f1r%rl«>|«c«l aik! |<crlr<fr«! 
vkithifi the Ia«I it'Wk )rAr«. it \% f>ti« |H»%AiliIr t*> 4«^«im 
|»li«h AutomAtK-trmftcfAturr cuntrul at Afi% mAttmuni 
trmtirratttrc thAl it i« |H*%«il»le to rrat h » ith (At Itirl 
And Alill A%uid An% form f»l dnrrtiHAltifffi ol thr 4 0f«lr«>l 
t)»trm. «»f it* fartt. acwI mith«»ut an^ lurm <»f mamtr 
riAfKr •till inturr inntiiiurd aA<1 %Ati«lA« t«ir% i>|<rA 
tiun of thr dr\K'r duriiii; An% number ol irar* 

It It bkrmitr |a»««il4r. h\ %tfn{»lr and c««i%mirnt mrAn*. 
til acrrvtifilidi the drtmitr vcltinf o( trTn|vrAttifp» 
within the rAni:r til thr turiUK^r An<l to Aricim|iluh 
AUtomatuAtU \ti\ dr«irr<l fUmr iiitwlitMin or ttAtr of 
hrAt comprr««ion within thr furnAf r. thrrrh^ AwHiimi: 
in mAn% in^tAnir* thr nr«r««itt of a mufflr thAt hrrr 
tofcirr hA% l»rrn thr r«»rntiAl in niAn% |inMr««e« 

Tlie Aliu%c %tAtrmrnt* Are |H>«ftiMr uf coo%in4inie 
pruuf. in niAn% pUnt% thruuichout thr country In 
th«»«r CA«r« whrrr drtinitr tr«t« hA%r l^rrn iundu4tr«l. 
At in thr pUnt of the ^ Mi« FIr%At4>r ( <» At llArriMin. 
\ J . an<i in thr plant* of ! II MAthrw* A ( «» Ami 
l*itttl»ttri:h Strrl StAmp i «i At Pttt*l*uri:h thr fothm 
tnu rt%rnttAl fatt* hA\r !*rrn dr\rl.»jtr»j . thr* Arr 
prr^entril a« (on%inrin^ prtmf 

Fir%t. tliAt It i« |H»««it>Ir tt% mrAnt of thi« mrthiMl. 
to AUtomAtHAlU control thr trm{i<fAturr **\ a furiiAcr 
«lurtni; AH) ii»ntitttirtS {•crtoi). h«iM r%rr loni;. vtithin 
thrrr «|UArtrr« *%{ s*\\r ;icf rfit w \r\\^\t*\ h\ ttAtr 
mrnt «»i * 'ti* I Ir^it r »  t ..r'-n^' thr •uli|r«t. 
Mhrrrin \\ r\ %r\ '..rth \\\\\ f jfc- t a% rr*«i'tin,; ffotn thr 
tr%t thr\ Yx't . wn-Ju* tri! 

^» tin^J thi? t^r i^;a M> ••! a iuruA^r an !< >rr% 

!Ar|^i% ifn fCAW'* A« J^-f f^vr %tA!rfTirf?t -f !*i*t»ht|ffh 

^trr! NtAmp t •» lhr\ <i»n«!u«trd a tr%t !••? thr pur 
|n»*r tif r«tA^'!i«hiri^ «hAt i»A« ii»n*ii!rrr'! a fact. 
namrU thAt thr% xtit A^!r t«( ohtAin A^^iut «lfiul»)r thr 
prodtKtHrn frtifi*. x turrv^- r th^t !hr% •**>tAinr*! ^icfufr 
thr% inttAKr*! thi* r^iuis-mmt 

Ihird. that rr«ultt xtf um^'f^t-!^ \'4r^\t x in x\\ |»Art* 
of thr hrAtm^' « hafii.Trt arvf th^t \\.\% i« r<]UAlN trur 
with thr d4ja*r %*\*xi «*r t|ir*r(l I hit ApficArt in vtAtr 
mrnt* madr t»% thr l*itt*'iuf^'h "^\rt\ ^\xn\\ • *» »Ko 
in tr«t ron'Iu^ tr«! UtsxtuK tht* tu *•< xn ji*'*«r!utr fa» t 
ami ftna!l> tK^t Aftrr two ^r^r* *<• M'rii. r «itHiitit 
ma I nt rna n« r of rrpJA* rtf rnt <>f ;AArtt thr (fr^i.r mxW 
fviii a* li^^ifr rr^'ittrr itt 'ifii^TfiA! « aIi^ f Attttn Ih:* 
«p|irar* m vtatrmrntt ••* . .n^rfnt th^t ha^r KaJ thr 
r.juipmrnt init4!!r»! ♦Ju'ifii.* \\\\% Icn^'lh .#f tirrr 

Ihr •iihjC' \ \% ••' rt\ tfr %\vxn {«ft9*in^' jfitrfrtt •■< 
€ xM^€ «*i It* rrlAt>-«n t > t^r t\t 9%%^^* h>h •**rvfla?'i9 
nnw rvtahlithrif ^n f^-r Kr»f tfrAt«*-rn! >•* mrt^!* at^ 
thr fact that tk ;!'*•♦! la^«if it ***t-*tiinj* mi«»#r Afwl Mbiirr 
difftttilt to *r« uf r tir trtain 

It mi»ta!«! •ttV. aati'T'-AU* • .n?f"' %€r^T: |*>>*«r* !r 
(i^trd €in thr fr*u!t« *i ' 'im;<Ci*hr*! t'« r!:mtPk4tr • r« « 
Uri^rK thr ti^r^ ulatKin p*rt#nf m t^r hr*t ••rAt«wwt 
4i4 mrtal* •! hi^-h trnij*f«tufr \ \i n» >♦ ' -ntrU* t 
unffra*«»fta^!r tn •U4'i;r*t ?Ktt K»niS - .«•*•*>•• ^ ^t *.?#•«! 
hi|fh trf? jicf Atufr fuffna«r* m%\\ •* *u;^!»f.?r»! •% !»■• 
nil r-* aototTiHitn aHv ii^n^f' 'Ir«S *« a n.ftt»j*** . .^a** 
,-.;rf.<r 'A thr ?<t!r* *r«!j't« that f«ifW»« 






32 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Jmmry 



CONVERTING LINOTYPE METAL MELTING 
FURNACE PROM COAL TO GAS. 



SVERY useful suggestion as to means whereby 
a linotype metal melting furnace may be con- 
verted from coal to gas, has recently devel- 
oped at Colorado Springs. 

Good practical industrial work is being done along 
gas-lines in the city of Colorado Springs, by the Colo- 
rado Springs Light, Heat & Power Company at the 
hands of George H. Sullivan, Industrial Salesman, 
who supplies the following information, and a most 
excellent illustration of the method employed, through 
the "U. G. & E. Bulletin." Mr. Sullivan says: 

**The line-drawing shows the furnace as converted 
to gas, and particular attention is called to Spout (E) 
which adds greatly to the convenience of operation of 
the furnace and makes it possible to draw off the metal 
with the least possible waste. 

"In applying Spout (E) the vertical line on which 
it was desired to have the spout project from the 
jacket was first located on the outside, then the metal 
pot was tilted up on that side and held up by pieces 
of board between the rim and jacket. The point for 
inserting the close nipple (A) in the pot was located 
in line with the vertical line on the jacket and the pot 
drilled and tapped for i-inch iron pipe and a close 
nipple (A) and 45 degrees elbow (B) screwed in. 
(All the pipe and fittings used should be ordinary 
extra heavy i-inch iron pipe, no brass fittings.) The 
pot was lowered and a hole considerably larger than 
the pipe was cut in the jacket (T) where the pipe 
nipple (C) would pass through. Then a pipe nipple 
(C) was screwed into the elbow (B), the nipple being 
long enough to extend about two inches outside of 
the jacket. An iron plate (G) ^4 >nch thick, with a 
hole in the center just large enough for the pipe nip- 
ple to pass through, was bolted to the outside of the 
jacket to cover the opening and support the pipe nip- 
ple and prevent strain on the close nipple screwed 
into the pot. A flat-head iron service cock (D) was 
screwed into the nipple and a piece of iron pipe bent 
to form the spout (E), which was screwed into the 
service cock (D). A handle (F) for the service cock 
about 15 inches long was made from i^ x % inch 
soft iron bent and slotted to fit over the head of the 
service cock and pinned in place. 

"A y^ inch gas line was run under the service cock 
and a small bunsen burner (I) placed under the serv- 
ice cock to heat it and make it easy to turn. The 
bunsen burner has a separate valve (b) underneath, 
and it is only necessary to light the burner a few min- 
utes before starting to run metal. 

In describing the conversion of this furnace Mr. 
Sullivan says, '*I found this furnace back of the print- 
ing shop in a shed, as they could not have the smoke 
and dirt in the shop. On days when it was needed 
one of the employes had to be out there all day, his 
time costing $4 per day. He also had to carry the 
metal out to the shed and carry it back to the shop 



which was about 200 feet. After four months of talk- 
ing I finally converted the furnace and moved it into 
the shop. We tapped the bottom of the kettle (as 
described previously) so the metal could be run into 
moulds instead of pouring it by a ladle, which is very 
dangerous and wasteful. The same work is accom- 
plished in an hour and a half which formerly took a 
whole day. 




A — Close nipper. 

B— 45» elbow. 

C — Iron pipe nipple. 

n — Flat Head all iron service 
cock. 

E — Spout made from bent pipe. 

F — Soft iron handle on valre. 

G — Iron plate bolted to pot 
jacket, hole in center for pipe. 

H — Bolts for iron plate. 

I — Bunsen burner to heat service 
cock so it will turn freely. 

J— Valve for bunsen burner. 



K — J Ring homer plaeed 

pot in coal fire bmc to beat 
metal. 

L — Supports placed under burner 
to raise up to within j" of 
pot 

M— VentiUting hood. 

X — Sliding door in hood. 

O — Grates under fire box. 

P — Fire box doors. 

Q — Ash box . doors. 

R — Burner mixer. 

5? — Fire brick. 

T— MeUl pot jacket. 



DEANE AUTOMATIC PUMPS AND RECEIVERS. 



The Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation has 
issued Bulletin D-1301 illustrating and describing Deane 
Automatic Pumps and Receivers. These are built for 
steam and electricity and may be had in single, duplex 
and triplex models. 

This apparatus comprises a receiver or tank into whid 
is drained the discharge from piping or machinery, a 
pump (steam or electric) which draws the water from 
the receiver and pumps it back into the boiler under 
pressure, the necessary automatic devices for regulating 
these operations and the necessary water and steam or 
electric connections. 

of life's greatest blessings. — Syrus 



AVMj' \ 



NATURAL CAS AND UAMJLINI 



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NO GASOLINK SHOKTAGK 



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34 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



CARBON INDUSTRY OPPOSED. 



State Senator of Louisiana, Leon R. Smith, Champions the 

Cause of Special Conservation. 



mX Louisiana the manufacture of carbon black 
has grown into an industry of developing 
magnitude, and Senator Smith of Louisiana, 
like the street crossing traffic officer, holds 
up the hand to check that which he looks upon as 
foreshadowing the exhausting of Louisiana's supply 
of natural gas through the manufacture of carbon 
black. In making a recent statement, the Senator said : 

'*I intend to make a study of the other States that 
have dealt with this vital topic, and I will father any 
legislation that will protect the life of our natural gas 
supply." 

The Senator claims that those who are of the carbon 
industry are unknown to him, and his offering a warn- 
ing, and his services to accomplish conservation of 
gas are based wholly on his desire to serve his people. 
The Senator goes into the matter at some length, the 
following being a statement of his own words, touch- 
ing upon this matter of importance to his constituents : 

In Xew York City we read that in all apartment 
houses the furnaces are shut down between the hours 
of ID a. m. and 3 p. m. each day, to the great discom- 
fort of the millions of people who have to shiver 
through these hours. 

This condition obtains throughout the land. Here 
close at home we read in public prints that Mayor 
Behrman had to make a hurried trip to Washington to 
plead for coal enough to take care of the essential 
needs of the city of New Orleans. Mayor Behrman 
succeeded in his mission, and the service he rendered 
New Orleans was considered great indeed. 

The Texas & Pacific Railway Co. only recently 
obtained permission from the Louisiana passenger 
trains to save coal so that war material moving over 
the rails of that company would not have to be 
retarded. 

The President, acting under the war powers granted 
him, has placed all the railroads of the United States 
under a director general and has named as that official 
one of the biggest men the Wilson administration has 
produced, viz., W. G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treas- 
ury. The fuel situation was a large factor in bringing 
about this decision. 

Now, with all of these facts being brought home to 
us, we have been profoundly grateful for our supply 
of natural gas. Notwithstanding the world shortage 
of fuel, this section of the State has felt snug in the 
fact that we had what we all have thought was an 
inexhaustible supply of natural gas. 

Naturally, it would be presumed that the people of 
Louisiana were doing all in their power to safeguard 
this God-given natural resource, but such is not the 
fact. 

An industry has recently sprung up in Louisiana 
that threatens the life or longevity of our natural gas 
supply — in fact, it is my opinion that if the people are 
not aroused, in four or five years natural gas will be 
a thing of the past in this State. 

In other words, we are permitting a great natural 
resource to be frittered away, and we are not only 



permitting a , c^ime. against ourselves, but we are de- 
liberately permitting posterity to be robbed of what is 
rightfully its due. 

I use emphatic language, for I think the situation 
warrants vigorous treatment. The abuse I refer to is 
the use that is being made of natural gas to manufac- 
ture carbon. Carbon is a by-product of natural gas. 

I should not have dignified the making of carbon 
as a manufacturing enterprise. As I understand the 
process, natural gas is allowed to flow practically un- 
restrained after being ignited, and only a corrugated 
iron shed is placed over the burning gas. A roof of 
carbon deposit is the result of this wasteful procedure. 

The landowner gets a paltry return for the sale of 
the great natural resource that he consents to being 
frittered away. A landowner gave me the following 
figures of how insignificant was the return, or royalty, 
to the landowner of the natural gas he sold to the 
carbon maker. 

One well for a stated period of less than 30 days 
produced 24,349,500 feet of gas, for which the land- 
owner received as royalty 2 cents per 1,000, or $47.70- 
Another well yielded 7,312,800 feet, for which he re- 
ceived a royalty check of $14.62. A third well pro- 
duced 14,903,800 feet and a remittance of $29.80 was 
the landowner's royalty. 

I am reliably informed that the consumption of 
Shreveport averages 7,000,000 feet of gas a day, so it 
appears that this city could have been supplied for 
three and one-half days with the natural gas from 
which the above landowner received the magnificent 
sum of $48.70. 

« 

Monroe has only recently enjoyed the blessings of 
natural gas, and the use of natural gas for carbon m 
that section is a thriving industry, thereby threatening 
seriously the supply of that city. 

The Terrebonne Parish gas field promises New Or- 
leans the boon of natural gas at some future date. In 
fact, the United States Government has canvassed the 
situation with a view of aiding the early ^ntry of nat- 
ural gas into the city of New Orleans. The carbon 
industry is looking with longing eyes to the use of 
this supply of gas, if the piping of the same to ' Jew 
Orleans meets with difficulties that apparently cannot 
be readily overcome. 

The entire State is vitally interested in the conser- 
vation of natural gas, as it is one of the great resources 

of the State. 

The Conservation Commission of Louisiana is awake 
to the threatened danger, but the power of thlt body 
under the present law to take action is doubtful. 

The State Council of Defense might take the matter 
up with the Federal Government and prompt relief 
might be had. I intend to make a study of the laws 
of the other States that have dealt with this ?ital 
topic, and I will father any legislation that will protect 
the life of our natural gas supply. 

The original suit that was filed against the owners 
of the wild well that was permitted to flow for over 
four years in the Caddo field I prepared and procured 
the Attorney General's consent at that time to file. 
The cause of action was upheld after a legal battle, 
and before a trial was had on the merits the well was 
closed. 

Later, in an address before the Ad Club of this city. 
I called attention to the criminal waste of gas from 
another gas well that was permitted to run wild, and 
with the aggressive campaign undertaken by the Ad 
Club the community was aroused, the State Consen*a- 
tion Committee went actively to work, and with the 
splendid co-operation of the large oil companies, this 
menace was removed. 



Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm. — Emerson 



^ 



TRADE PERSONALS 






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>•;• . f !hr lhi;Mt|fht Kt>4ar% i Jul* 



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ITEMS OF FINAN 



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36 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



January 



are dated December i, 191 7, and are due December i, 
1919. Interest is payable semi-annually on June i and 
December i. 

OHIO-<:ieveland 

The East Ohio Gas Company is redeeming at 105 and 
interest the issue of $15,906,000 5 per cent bonds due 
July I, 1939. The bonds were oflfered at 98 and interest 
in 1910. The total issue was in the amount of $18,- 
906,000, of which $3,000,000 have previously been re- 
tired by the sinking fund. 




SOUTH DAKOTA— Hot Springs 

The Alum Creek Petroleum Company is seeking a 
natural gas franchise in this city. 

WYOMING— Cowley 

The Cowley Gas Company has been granted a fran- 
chise here, and is already piping the city. 




INDIANA — Indianapolis 

A new concern formed in this city is the James O. 
Hamilton Oil & Gas Company, capital $50,000. James 
O. Hamilton and associates are the incorporators. 

KANSAS— Gamett 

The Garnett Light & Fuel Company has been taken 
over by new interests, and a reorganization has been 
effected. The new officers are: A. L. Derby, Inde- 
pendence, Kan., president ; C. M. Weekly, Wichita, vice- 
president; C. W. Tyndale, treasurer, and Gail Carey, of 
Garnett, secretary. 

O KL AH O MA— Okmulgee 

The Peoples Electric & Gas Company has been incor- 
porated with a capital stock of $75,000. Those named 
as incorporators are: A. B. DeFreeze, G. F Ortman 
and Earlan Reed, all of Okmulgee. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Bradford 

The Lewis Run Gasoline Company has been incor- 
porated here with a capital stock of $400,000. The 
incorporators are: A. R. Johnson, H. D. Yates and A.J. 
Wise, all of Bradford. 

TEX AS— H ouston 

The United Oil & Fuel Company was recently formed 
here with a capital stock of $100,000. Those who are 
named as connected with the n^w project are Walter 
T. Crawford and E. D. Lee, both of Houston; Sam 
George of Sour Lake, and H. G. Curran, of New York. 
Producing properties in the Jennings, Sour Lake, and 
Humble pools have been taken over by the new company. 



UTAH— Corinne 

The Corinne Oil & Gas Company has been formed 
here with a capital of $200,000. W. F. House of 
Corinne is President, and Charles F. Lloyd, Jackson, 
Mont., Secretary. 



PER CUBIC FOOT-RATES 



ARKANSAS— Fort Smith 

An advance of 10 cents per thousand in its rates is 
announced by the Fort Smith Light & Traction Com- 
pany. 

INDIANA— Anderson 

The Central Indiana Gas Company is supplying arti- 
ficial gas in this city, Muncie, and Marion during the 
severe weather, to supplement its natural gas resources. 
For the manufactured gas the company is charging 90 
cents per thousand for the first thousand cubic feet. A 
lower rate is provided for greater quantities. 

KENTUCKY— LouisvUlc 

The franchise of the Louisville Gas & Electric Com- 
pany provides that a pressure of not less than three 
ounces to the inch of natural gas be maintained. When 
the pressure falls below this figure the company has 
bound itself to make good the deficiency to its customers. 

NEW YORK— AddUon 

The Addison Gas Company has filed a petition asking 
for permission to increase its rate from 40 to 50 cents 
per thousand. 
Bolivar 

The Empire ( ias & Fuel Company has announced that 
beginning with February ist its rate will be advanced 
to 40 cents per thousand. The present rate is 38 cents 
per thousand for domestic purposes. 

Coming 

The Crystal City Gas Company, which supplies local 
consumers with natural gas, announces an increase from 
40 cents a thousand feet to 50 cents. 

OHIO— Bowling Green 

The Northwestern Ohio Natural Gas Company has 
adopted a ready-to-serve charge of 35 cents. 

Toledo 

The Northwestern Ohio Natural Gas Company has 
increased its rate from 35 cents net to 42 cents net per 
thousand. Permission to boost the rate was given the 
gas company by the State Utilities Commission. In 
addition to the 42-cent rate, the new schedule calls for 
a 30-cent rate on low pressure line between Perrysburg 
and Bowling Green. This rate formerly was 25 cents 
for 1,000 feet. 

OKLAHOMA— Oklahoma City 

The Consumers' Gas Company is asking for permis- 
sion to increase its gas rates. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Jefferson County 

The Revere Natural Gas Company has increased its 
rate from 27 cents to 32 cents per thousand. 



It is a wise man who so guards his affairs that he leaves little to chance. — James Bryce 



WKtT VIROINIA-^lurtMlM 
t< ft%rra*c it% fair* 



GENERAL 



A» KANSAS LmW Koclt 

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38 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



January 



Louisville 

The Charles C. Stoll Oil Co. has purchased a lease 
on 50 acres of producing land from the Furnace Oil 
Co. in the Irvine (Ky.) field, for $220,000. 

The franchise assessment of the Louisville Gas & 
Electric Company has been increased from $6,000,000 
to $13,000,000. The company's greatly increased busi- 
ness is responsible for this increase. 

Three employes of the Louisville Gas & Electric 
Company have received commissions as a result of 
their training at the Second Officers' Reserve Camp 
— Robert Montgomery and Fulton Mandeville, First 
Lieutenants, and Walter L. Dawkins, Second Lieu- 
tenant. 

LOUISIANA— New Orleans 

The supply of gas from the Terrebonne district, it 
is said, is sufficient to take care of the needs of New 
Orleans. The Fuel Administration is advocating the 
speedy piping of the city, and the laying of a pipe line 
from the gas field to bring the gas into the city as a 
measure of coal conservation. Development work in 
this territory is receiving every encouragement. 

NEW YORK— Batavia 

It is reported that manufacturers of Batavia have 
expressed themselves in favor of abandoning the use 
of natural gas next winter in order that householders 
may have it all. 

The Alden-Batavia Natural Gas Company is paying 
taxes on special franchise valuation of $240,700. 

Dunkirk 

The South Shore Natural Gas Company suflfered 
severe loss recently through a fire in its meter plant. 

Elmira 

The Elmira Water, Light & Railway Company has 
contracted with the Potter Gas Corporation for a 
supply of 1,500,000 cubic feet of natural gas daily 
during the winter. 

Madison County 

W. E. Lewis of Utica is drilling on a farm three 
miles east of Cazenovia. Gas was found at a depth 
of 1,650 feet, but drilling is being continued to a lower 
level. 

Pavilion 

The Pavilion Natural Gas Company recently com- 
pleted a good gasser on the farm of Patrick Quinlan 
one mile south of Pavilion. The Company is now 
drilling on the Patrick Doran farm, two miles west of 
here. 
OHIO— Belmont County 

In Meade district, E. J. Gallagher & Co.'s test on the 
T. J. McKelvey farm is a gasser in the Berea grit. 

Bowling Green 

A third gas well has been completed on the Normal 
college farm at a depth of 1,150 feet. 

Cincinnati 

The Union Gas & Electric Company has completed 
its artificial gas plant which is to be commissioned in 
periods of natural gas shortage. The plant will have 
a capacity of 15,000,000 cubic feet per day. 



Lancaster 

The Logan Natural Gas Company of Columbus has 
succeeded in increasing its supply of gas so that all 
consumers are taken care of, domestic as well as 
industrial. 

Lima 

It is reported that in the recent past the Medina Gas 
Company has drilled in six natural gas wells. 

Mount Vernon 

A court decision handed down in the local common 
pleas court would indicate that the use of pumps or 
compressors to increase the flow of naturial gas in pipe 
lines is permissible. 

Muskingum County 

One mile west of Production rn Cass Township 
George Guthrie & Co. have completed a test on the 
Thomas Little farm. It is a fair gasser. 

Pleasants County 

In Lafayette district, West Virginia, the Monon- 
gahela Oil Company has drilled a test on the Thornton 
Wagner farm through the Maxon sand. It is a gasser 
in that formation. 

OKLAHOMA^Ada 

The American Oil & Refining Company has com- 
pleted a large gasser on the Bauhaus farm in section 
17-4-6. The gas was uncovered at a depth of 1,300 
feet. The capacity of the well is estimated at 28,600,- 
000 cubic feet. 

BartlesviUe 

It is reported that the Tahlequah Gas Company is 
riow supplying gas in this city. 

BartlesviUe 

With the completion of the new eight-story Masonic 
Temple now under construction in this city, the Qua- 
paw Gas Company will establish itself in very hand- 
some quarters, comprising six floors of the new 
building. 

Cushing 

Natural gas is now being distributed Here by the 
Yale Natural Gas Company. 

Enid 

The Southwestern Refining Company at Enid, 
Okla., is rapidly completing its plant and will start 
operations 'February i. The Oil State Refining Com- 
pany has begun construction of its new plant and 
expects to start operations April i. Both of these 
refineries use natural gas fuel under contract from the 
Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company, Enid division. 
The first named refinery has a capacity of 1,500 bar- 
rels and the latter 2,500 barrels daily. 

Haskell District 

In the Haskell district, the Caney River Gas Co. 
completed a 3,500,000-foot gas well in No. 2 on the 
Harrison farm, in the northwest of the southeast quar- 
ter of Section 1 7-1 5-16. The well was drilled to 1,207 
feet. 

Healdton Field 

An eight-unit casinghead gasoline plant is being, 
built by the Superior Petroleum & Gasoline Company 



Chiefly the mould of a man*8 fortune is in his own hands. — Bacon 



laiiiury 



NATURAL CAS AND CASOUNE 



J9 



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40 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Jsinuary 



Parkersburg 

The Hope Natural Gas Company is looking first 
after the needs of its domestic consumers, cutting off 
industrial users during periods of shortage. 

Ritchie County 

On Beesons Run, Clay district, the Carnegie Nat- 
ural Gas Company's test on the Mary J. Sims farm 
is a light gasser in the Big Injun sand. 

Roane County 

On Cotton Tree Run, Walton district, the United 
Fuel Gas Company has a Big Injun sand gasser at its 
test on the W. D. C. Steele farm. 

On Rock Creek, Walton district, the Carter Oil 
Company drilled its No. 4 on the C. E. Marks farm 
from the salt sand to the Big Injun formation. This 
well was formerly a gasser in the salt sand and is now 
showing for a light pumper in the lower sand. 

Tyler County 

In McElry district, the Pittsburgh & West V'irginia 
Gas Company's test on the Jacob McCullough farm is 
a gasser in the Big Injun sand. 

In the Centerville district, the Manufacturers' Light 
and Heat Company's test on the S. J. Straight farm is 
a light gasser in the Gordon sand. 

Weston 

Drilling of gas wells was stopped by many large 
development companies in Lewis County gas fields, 

in order to conserve the gas used under boilers for 
use in dwellings and factories. 

"The Keener Natural Gas Company recently took 
over the natural gas franchise of the Weston Gas Com- 
pany as well as that company's distributing system. 
The wells owned by the Weston Company were not 
included in the deal. 

Wetzel County 

The Carnegie Natural Gas Company has completed 
No. 2 on the Patrick Noon farm, located on Long 
Drain Run, Church district. It is a gasser in the 
Gordon sand. 

On Fish Creek, in Grant district, the Hope Natural 
Gas Company drilled a test on the A. J. Wichterman 
farm into the Gordon sand ap-d developed a fair gas 
pressure. 

On the north fork of Hughes River, Clay district, 
the Philadelphia Company's test on the B. H. Hick- 
man farm is a gasser in the Maxon sand. 

On Fish Creek, Church district, the Manufacturers' 
Light and Heat Company has a Gordon sand gasser 
at its test on the S. E. Stewart farm. One mile east 
of Pine Grove, Grant district, the Hope Natural Gas 
Company has completed in the Gordon sand its secoild 
test on the A. J. Wichterman. It is a fair gasser. In 
the same district the same company has drilled a test 
on the C. L. Newman farm through the Gordon and 
developed a light gas pressure. 



In Grant district, the Philadelphia Company has 
drilled a test on the T. M. Haskins farm through the 
Fourth sand. It is a gasser in that formation. In the 
same locality the Manufacturers' Light and Heat Com- 
pany's second test on the William Thomas farm is a 
gasser in the same formation. 

Wirt County 

On West Fork River, Coal district, the Clarksburg 
Light and Heat Company has a gasser in the 50-foot 
sand on the S. D. Gore Farm. The Reserve Gas Com- 
pany's test on the Edwin Curry farm is a gasser in 
the Fifth sand. 

WYOMING-Casper 

According to report, the New York Oil Company 
and the Curtis Petroleum Company^ drilling in com- 
bination at Iron Creek in the Wyoming territory have 
a gas well down 750 feet, four feet into the oil sand 
that will go over three million feet of gas a day. The 
drill is going down still further. The gas is wet and 
carries a heavy percentage of gasoline. It is intended 
to drill the well to 1,600 feet. 

Cowley 

A plant comprising sixty buildings has been com- 
pleted by the Midland Carbon Company to house its 
carbon black manufacturing equipment. The plant 
has now reached two-thirds of its proposed size. 
When the entire plant has been completed and is in 
commission it will require a supply of 25,000,000 cubic 
feet of gas. The gas is piped from the Byron fields. 
A gasoline plant is being built by the Occidental Oil 
& Gas Company who will recover gasoline from the 
gas before it reaches the plant of the Midland Com- 
pany, where the dry gas will be used for the making 
of carbon black. 

ALBERTA— Calgary 

The Calgary Petroleum Products Co. has made an 
offer to the city of Calgary to pipe gas from its wells 
at Okotoks to the city limits at a price of 12% cents 
per 1,000 cubic feet, guaranteeing at least 1,000,000 
cubic feet a day. The company controls two wells in 
the Calgary field, with an estimated production of 
4,000,000 cubic feet per day of wet gas. A plant is 
now being constructed for the extraction of the gaso- 
line, and the proposal is for the sale of the gas residue 
to the city. The Canadian Western Natural Gas, 
Light, Heat & Power Co. holds a franchise for Cal- 
gary, supplying gas from the Bow Island field ; but a 
recent decision of the appellate division of the Su- 
preme Court holds that the city has the right to dis- 
tribute gas in districts annexed to Calgary since this 
company was granted its franchise. Under the pro- 
posal of the Calgary Petroleum Products Co. the gas 
from the Dingman wells would be piped to Calgary 
by the company and distributed by the city in the 
annexed areas. 



Gaun not hase gains; base gains are the ssune as losses. — ^Hesiod 



Unttar^ 



MANLTACTURFJiy SFXTTION 



IQlH 



tTANDARO OIL SUMIDIARIftt 



INDRPENDKirr OIL COMPANIKt 



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I9i8 



MANUFACTURERS* SECTION 



January 



NEW INGERSOLL-RAND BULLETINS. 



The IngersoU-Rand Company has recently issued the 
following Bulletins descriptive of their Pumps and Drills : 

Form 859 — Four-page leaflet on I-R Pocket Oil 
Flask. 

Form 858 — Steam Condensing Plant leaflet. 

Form 3118 — Thirty-two-page catalog on Compres- 
sors and Vacuum Pumps for e-traction of gasoline from 
natural gas. 

Form 4302 — Twenty-page catalog on Sergeant Rock 
Drills. 

Copies may be had upon making request of tlic Com- 
pany's nearest branch office. 



POSITION WANTED 

Repairer and prover, married, sober 
young man, twelve years experience 
with all makes of meters. Employed at 
present. References if required. 
Address, Meters 2209, Natural Gas and 
Gasoline Journal. 



George A. gurrell 

CONSULTING CHEMICAL ENGINEER 



n 



Careful tests of natural gas to 
determine gasoline content. Gas- 
oline plants operated at highest 
efficiency. Compression and ab- 
sorption process. Natural gas, 
gasoline, petroleum. 



Benedum-Trecs BUg., 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



JOHNSON & HUNTLEY 

OEOLOGI8T8. APPRAISERS 

OIL AND GAS 

HOSWELL H. JOHNSON L. 6. HUNTLBV 

306 STATE HALL PITTSBURGH, 

. UNIVERSITY OF ^Tji 

PITTSBURGH PA. 



"Can I Make Gasoline 
From My Natural Cat ? " 

H. A. FISHER CO. 

HATORAL-GAS GASQUNE EHOHEERS 

can tell you ' definitely. — Their new lyitein 
of testing the gai at the wells is the best pUn jet de- 
vised. It is absolutely dependable. It eliminatet the 
"guess work" from the gasoline business. 



PitUburgh, 



Pennsylvaiua 



FOR SALE 

350 feet new plain standard wei^t i 
inch wrought iron pipe to be used wi 
Dresser Couplings. 

Immediate shipment can be made. 



Paris gas ft Electric Co. 



THe 5R6AK6RS 

on the Ocean Front 

Atlantic City's Newest Fire-proof Hotel 

offers unusual attractions during all 
seasons of the year. Luxurious lobbies, 
spacious verandas, restful sun parlors 
and superb music. A palatial residence 
for those seeking rest and recreation. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLANS 

Illustrated literature and terms mailed. 

Garage wilh accommodations for chauffeuis. 



I9i8 MANUFACTURERS' SECTION January 



Natural 




as an 

JOURNAL 



dG 



asoline 



$Zm IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR FEBRUARY, I9I8 



VOLUME 12 
THIS NUMBER 2 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advertising Copy shonld be in by the 15th of 
roontli preriottf to isMic 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindred industries. 

Buffalo Long DisUnce (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca 3a95*W. 

Cable Address:— "Publight. Buffalo." 

Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central Office. 

rUBLISHID BT 

PERIODICALS PUBUSHING CO.. 
68 West Huron Street, 

BUfFALO, V. T. 

Lucius S. BiOBLOW, Prttident mnd Editor, 
Habbis S. Bioblow, Secreiary. 

Entered as second class matter December i, 
1910, at the Post Oiice at Bugala, Hew York, 
under the act of March j, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE 



PROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG: 

Auto Delivery Cars 80 

Heautiful Tribute to Traveling Man. 

By C. I. Hendrickson 62 

Bulletin on Oil Accounting 50 

Completing of Great Project. By R. C. 

Morrison S3 

iVoperation Urged to Raise. Oil Embargo 50 

Development Work in Terrebonne Parish 50 

Drilling Reports 73 

Financial Report 80 

(iovernmcnt Experiment Station at Bar- 

tlesville 5J 

Marking Time 7a 

Moving in Cycles 72 

Natural lias Service. By L. W. Lansley 55 

Oxv.Vcetylcne Welding. By Lucius S. 

Rigelow 61 

Proceedings Received .'. . . 51 

Producing Gasoline 6j 

Sense and Cents 54 

Spirit of Safety 62 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 80 



Stop Buying — 1 hen What ? 59 

Unique Method of Starting Gas Engines 51 

Valuable Publication in Oil and Gas Field 51 

Winner of Prizes in Contest Held at Buf- 
falo 51 

Work of Petroleum Committee 59 

Your Mistakes 60 

AROUND THE BELT: 

Deceased 81 

Franchises 8a 

General 8a 

Personals 81 

Rates 81 



INDEI OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



Annual Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Soos. ..is 

Another Substitute for Gasoline 6 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E. 
Gilbert 31 

Bulletin on Cost Accounting 6 

Bureau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Gush- 
ing Fidd 5 

Calendar of Youngstown Sheet and Tube 
Company 16 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Converting Linotype Metal Mehing Furnace 
From Coal to Gas 32 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers 3.2 

Drilling Results 23 

Efficient Goggles 22 

Financial Report for 1917 4* 

Gas Difficulties Disclosed 13 

Gas for Drying Food 17 

Heat Insurance ai 

Long, Elias H., Deceased ao 

Natural Gas Business Thirty-four Years. In 6 
Xo Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Bedford 33 

Dtoe- Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr 15 

Picturing One*s Face in Advertising la 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Recovery of GasoUne from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son ^ 7 

Reynolds, M. G., Passes Away 20 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor ao 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 1917 41 

Vast Acreage Deal 5 

Western Associations Merge 5 

Y«ir 1918 4 



MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 
GAS SUPPLY MEN 









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OVER HERE ! 




|AY you red-blooded fellow Over Here, take down the receiver and 
listen to a line of talk that ought to get under the hide and into 
the heart of men of your brand. 

You are a skilled man. You have been fighting life's game in 
a country where every man has an even chance to make the most of him- 
self. You are an American, and all that you are, and all that you hope to 
be. reflects to the credit of a democracy. 

That democracy is being assailed by the most damnable foe that ever 
fired a cannon, that ever drove home a bayonet, that ever ravaged a neutral 
state, that ever sunk a hospital ship, that ever shelled women and children 
in lifeboats, that ever crucified and castrated captured enemy soldiers, that 
ever cut the right hands off boy children in captured territory, that ever 
raped women by the thousand, that ever lived to fasten its demon clutches 
on the throat of civilization. 

Almighty God will not permit the unleashed hellishness of Kaiserism 
to engulf the world. No sane thinking man can conceive of an all wise 
and loving supreme Deity permitting our section of the world to become 
under German leadership — the stench of the universe, but now, not tomor- 
row — right now — Almighty God needs the help of trained men. 

It has been said repeatedly by men who ought to know what they are 
talking about, that this war will be won in the air. Uncle Sam is building 
an air fleet that will astound the fighting world. Factories from Maine 
to California are working day and night on aeroplane parts. Guns and oil 
and gasoline and cameras and other material parts of these war machines 
are coming along as fast as skilled organized American factories can bring 
them out. Already they are being assembled, and that acme of the Ameri- 
can get-together spirit. The Liberty motor, is being installed. 

Ever since this great war started the Government has been establishing 
aviation schools to perfect the bird men who will be the eyes of the national 
army. These schools have already turned out a mighty healthy number of 
those fearless chaps who can climb to dizzy heights, loop the loop, spiral 
with the engine cut off, repair a jammed machine gun, and get it into 
action before they reach the ground, and there are thousands more well 
on the road to their commissions, and they are getting into the seats of the 
new machines almost before the paint is dry on the initials U. S. A. 

The machines and many of the fliers are taken care of, but there is a 
crying need of trained men to care for these machines, and those men will 
be forthcoming when the need is known. 

But let's get down to cases. Do you drive an automobile? Thank 
God, if you do and enlist. 



m 



I>o >ott kfiuiiif anxihtfiK ahout a i^atolinc enictnc* llwink ImmI. tl >itu 
ck> atiii mlitt 

Art yt»u « machiniftt or a machtni«t'« hrl|»cr ^ I hank ««<m1 tluit %«•«)# 
liinr tn thr Unci t»( Oic frrr lu« l«rm iiirnt learning a tt«rlul tra«lr. anil rtiltti 

iVi vua knam %ktllc«l inrti. an*! ha%r \<iu ami tnrtucftar viith ihnn * 1( 
%ou ha%r. fiitt that influrntr tu ¥h«»rk. |iut %uur •h«»ul<lrr to thr vihrrl. rrfiiin«l 
\€iur%ct( that Mkjkf \% nt»«i thr l>ti%inr%% ol Amrrua. an<f that wr arc threat 
rnrd with all th«»%r thint:« <«rrfnan% ha« taut^ht thr morhl t<» r\|»r^t (rum 
hrr S|Mit >oiir «kiltr«l mrn. an<l \\ X\\r\ :itr n«»t lAorkini; on %%ar r«»rntiaU 
%htM»t %<>ntr of >oitr hrand of Xmrruani^ni into thrtn 

Mrn c>( draft ai;r. if thr%r rrmarkt rra«h %ou. rrat h for )our hat ami 
•tart far thr nrarr«t rrc ruitini; station and rnlt«t in thr a>iatM»n ftrttion of 
thr Sifiuil i\n\*% 

If yiu arr tH. i«/ ff ji> srAt^ i»ld, rfilt*( 4titl VwriM* a nian 

If ^i»u air l«-lmrrn .U a»d 40 \tAt\ of afr in«l <{tialthrt| rti!i*t an«! \yr\%mvt 
<ifir of tKt>«r «ihi» ktx'w flit <»Mi(ali4fti ^rr^trr t^an th«tr \**\r i»f totintr^ 

Ihrfr ha% fir\rf hern a i^tratrr a|>|*cat ti» ^killril mrn Ihrrr j.ri.*.^^'^ 
Will iir%rr t»r a z^^^^^^ nrrd of «killri| mrn callrd uf«>n to |«cr«orm a dut% 
•tf r«»rntial 

In ^HNjik ti.»riir Mill %»t!!r«| ttirn fr ..^'v.t 0?% rmrr^rn* * Krv-** a 
nrrd »lirn ^oti %rr onr l>i%4rrit li^twrrn •frfmaii n.^ifr nr»% a»..J \tvcft 
« A%\ fuaifr to w % tin* t* n«> «i% it:i»n!h* »% j* If ?* 4 V^K! *>< tf%rrn : • f.. 1; 'r 
and dr«fw»ti%rn an<l it i« a hni«h h|?hf 



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FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG 



CO-OPERATION URGED TO RAISE OIL 

EMBARGO. 



I 



mH E following statement has been issued by the 
Petroleum War Service Committee: 
The public must expect a radical curtail- 
ment of public utilities, munition factories 
and all industrial activities dependent upon oil ship- 
ments, unless immediate relief can be had from the 
embargoes the railroads have placed against the move- 
ment of tank cars, both loaded and empty. 

The petroleum industry has, accordingly, made an 
urgent appeal to the Director General of Railways, at 
the very earliest possible moment to order the rail- 
roads to give the same preferred movement to tank 
cars that is being given to coal cars. 

So much attention has been focused on the shortage 
of coal that the public and the railroad authorities 
may have lost si^^ht of the fact that fuel oil, gasoline 
and lubricating oils, are just as essential to the indus- 
trial and domestic life of the country as coal. In 
fact, industrial plants with a full coal supply cannot 
run without oil. 

Unless some radical steps are taken to speed up the 
movement of tank cars for petroleum products, the 
railroads themselves w^ill run short of lubricating oil. 
Alreadv the failure of the railroads to haul tank cars 
has forced a number of plants to shut down for lack 
of petroleum products. The Pennsylvania Railroad, 
for instance, early in January, notified shippers that 
it would not accept for shipment tank cars loaded with 
fuel oil and other petroleum products. 

While deliveries by tank cars under normal rail- 
road conditions is 18.000,000 barrels a month, in De- 
cember, due to the failure of the roads to haul loaded 
tank cars, or to return empty cars to loading points, 
the deliveries amounted to only 12,400,000 barrels, a 
deficit of 5,600,000 barrels, or 31 per cent. In January, 
according to the performance of the roads for the first 
15 days, deliveries will show a decrease of 45 per 
cent as compared to the normal amount. The short- 
age in deliveries in December was greater than the 
entire production of gasoline and naphtha products in 
the United States during the same period. 

Due to the shortage of coal many plants are depend- 
ing entirely upon fuel oil to operate their plants. 
Oil used to manufacture gas is an absolute essential 
at this time, when the demands for gas for domestic 
purposes — heating, lighting and cooking — are greater 
than ever before. A supply can be furnished to gas 
companies only by tank cars. 

If the farmer, public utilities, shipyards and muni- 
tion manufacturers are to secure adequate supplies 
to maintain their operations as at present, it is of 
the utmost importance that all of the present tank 
car equipment be utilized to its maximum carrying 



capacity. The Petroleum Committee feels that th 
should be brought most forcibly to the attention 
the governmental authorities, and representations 
this eflFcet have been made to the Director General 
Railways and to the Oil Administrator of the Fu 
Administration. 



BULLETIN ON OIL ACCOUNTING 




HE lUireau of Mines, Department of the I 
terior. has recently issued Bulletin No. i 
on '*Cost Accounting for Oil Producers," 1 
Clarence G. Smith. 

In the Bulletin are set forth various methods whi< 
may be employed in oil accounting. The explanation 
and descriptions are couched in terms easily undc 
stood. 

We quote the following statement by the auth 
of the paper: 

'Trior to the actual development of an oil pro 
erty, it is difficult to determine the quantity of ( 
under the property and the rate at which this oil a 
be brought to the surface — factors that determine tl 
ultimate value of the property. Consequently, the 
has been much confusion in devising accounting sy 
tems that, during the entire life of a property, w 
show costs and profits from which the producer c« 
determine whether his property is being worked 
a profit or otherwise. The Bureau of Mines pu 
lishes this report in recognition of a distinct need f 
a simple treatise on accounting methods adapted 
the peculiarities of the petroleum industry." 



DEVELOPMENT WORK IN TERREBONNE 

PARISH. 



mllE recent bringing in of the third large gj 
well by the McCormick interests in Terr 
bonne Parish, La., one half mile west of the 
other two wells, has the tendency to increa 
faith in this territorv, and should their fourth w< 
which is now drilling four miles north of the prese 
wells come in with equal volume, New Orleans w 
be assured of an abundant supply of natural gas. 

No effort is being made at present to finance tl 
building of a pipe line to New Orleans, as the secu 
ing of sufficient material and labor at this time 
practically out of the question, but with the furth 
development of the field, there is no reason why Ne 
Orleans should not be numbered among the natui 
gas cities in the near future 



If the end be well, all is well. BomanoroixL 



l-rbmarv 



NATURAL CAS AND CASOUNC 



SI 



%i 



UNIQUE METHOD OP STARTING GAS 

BNGINBS 



Bf 1 I II %l «.II1 



I hr \«i)iitnr «Mntain« •fini|*lr|r rr|»fittt« *»t tUr 
t«A|irr« |*fr«cf«tri! jt ihr «ttn«rntMtn ^tu\ trrtkAiim 
(|i%« u««N»f«« a« well A« rr|»>rt« ol aII » •mmitlrr* i>t tKr 
«4ri«*ti« «r\tHtn« that fn^kr ii«» thr I'^-anif atinn* 



SFFW %rAr« ai;ti whilr thr writrr wa« in «'luiri;r 
cil A |iUnt rfin«i«tini: **^ ^ik'^t hi|*h «tai;r an<f 
•t% !«»« •tairr 1:3^* ••ifn|»rr««4ir« ra« h fitrrrt 
r e mn rct rj to a i.^«i4 inch t«»in ^mclr artinc 
»»• rnt^inr thr fotlnviini* mrthiMl «a« ai|<>|>tr<l int 
«tarttnc the low ttairr unit* 

\ Sfanch linr (rum thr f!i%4 hari'r linr ti> thr hi|C^ 

*?afr fOfnprr«M>r« «ia« Ird armiml tt» thr l<>«k •tAk:r 

'•fnf»fr««nf« ainl «ia« hranch tunnc^ tr<l tn thr tntakr 

• •»r i»f rarh fiump f»rt»rrn thr fnimfi An<l jjatr \Al\r 
•n tiKtmn linr 

*»\ hrn vtartini; <*tir nl thr l^w «tak*r itnit« t«^huh 

•!i«r til thr ailflrfl fru tioii anil inrrtia **i thr lafi'rr 

;ia't« mrtr rathrr •Imft alxiiit ^tarttnt; with thr |*4« 

A(vt aif mitturr a« thr othrim «rrr ^tartnl • it wa« 

nS nr«r«»ar% t«» aflmit thr hi/h )irr««tirr t*» thr 

-fafcr tn thr ptimfi an^l thr unit i%«»nM ttnmrcliatrU 

t*aft off with a ^*«i"4! rjttr nf «{>rr«f a* ««Min a« thr 

, -.-trtt wrrr worlunc thr ^a!^r m %taftinfcr linr «ta« 

-•r*f anrf thr Hi^rhafi-r iiT»cnr«l t«» thr mtrfvnr^liatr 

• •r»»fifr anil alft#i tn fir!*f *»f *»!• titin |trr*«nfr 

* ** rntSftr thi* nirlh«»*1 i«ni!«! !»•#! I^r rf«;i!.»\rf! i»n 
*n;'rr«%or« ha^m;* t*»vt'<'t ttr .!•{•. tnutf. %af^r% 'mt 

f^rfr ti no rra«««n tliai if t* f».if 4!»i''ti %^t]r ti» <!iffrfrMt 

f«*ir« nf mrrhani(aM\ (••■'jtrt! \4t\r* 

^^^ onr fMfa«t«in wVrti rlur ti. *-i'?^r -a't t»ii»t'»V 

•**r rntirr plant •hut •l.iv^n tmr ^j.rMrtfN an»! thr 

^••t attrfn|it tf» *tjirt 'r^M^rff m 'Mm/ thr %mT'' '^ 

• ' •nimtnfr without mjl'M.- 4n% Vrii!i»a> at •taftmu 

•^r hfph tttaCT^ pflfTiJ»« wrfr *!4f^rif ill thr %amr man 
-MTT hv rfnptvint* that part •»( thr «fi%*haf.'r Itnr 
•^fnr^liate to thr r iiftiT'fr**-if * an^l a*!'^»ttffu' thr 

• 'air frvifri thr firlt! • t^T . ••»•• fr-*t-** X* mhiO 
&• a itntt %iat ttartrff thr intaWr Ma« «hiit off an«1 
•^■r pnnip allow r«! t«« run i*ith«iiit '<ia«! until rra«l^ 

• ^•a4 all Of •rxr'al '•( thrrt* **hrn thr fatr in 
— •♦n 4i*rhari*r linr i»a« •.t^rnrtl »m.! tl*r '.ia«! thrn 
ft:r«fic«l HI thr u«tia1 mannrr 

'M ro«r^# thti wa« a httir r^faa-ant a« thr /a* 
•r-;«?ffr<1 to ttart ra«'h fnimfi wa« >.'••*•' t^ thr a'* 
•? 't wa« an rmrfjjrni \ m t»h* h tt ,, ^^ < .n«)f!rrrc| 

• *•# to urt thint*« i*oin • m thr «h«.»«r«t {»»%tihtr 

• ^ftr r»rn at a •arnfiir of r<on«im\ 

Whm #%r of *i% unit* mrfr «fartr<| ••ir* wrfr 
.a.4r«f an4 thr Kalamr %tartri! tn *hr ti%ua! mannrr 

• 'h the miiturr itndrr |irr««urr whtrh mrth^wl t« 
'• * or %hooM hr r>hw*1rtr 



mOCEBDINGS IIBCEIVBD 

'^r |«ffintnl pr^ rrflin^'v ••! thr thirtrrnth annua* 
»'rrtti>»n of thr ^*tithMr«trrn I- In trtt al an«l ( ^a* 
* fti • latwHi hrlfl at l^alla« 'Vr% \|>ril ii^t^ arr t*rin/ 
nt In aM«bcf% 



WINNERS OF PRIZES IN CONTEST HELD 
AT BUPPALO CONVENTION 



Sr thr 1 ii«urftti«*«i ot thr Natural <»a« \ii««ta 
ii.iti or \rTwrHa f»rM m ItuHak. \ N \ta» 
i«*ir »r%rn |irifr« mrfr liffrrr*! !-.• fhr }w%i 
|%ft|vr* «ul«iuttr>! !u«l a* fhn ttuir « ai foirtf 
!•» pfr*% a 1i«f •«! fhr »!Tirwfi « a -^ »rvriir.' fr.«ii the 
• rftur «if thr Vr«fr1ari ..f iltr \*««« latiiKi T hr\ a-r 
a« fiin<i«k« 



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••r»'ft <■• •T\a"l|frft .f '^r «T*i'-#* » ••> •»••, ^ •>•< 

. *i?r*?a^f» Ifr it*i*WT»r«* 



VALUABLE PUBLICATION IN OIL AND 

CAS PIELI) 

^' ' 1 Mij^ '*^trf- • •"*•••• I 1- .?'j»«' a' 
 u"**f €•••'*-■• prf ifcT-.a. . • '  »• • 

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•*ir ^* r -f far ''te 1 ■/« .''##^1 f^« ; '» « tt f^iti 



52 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



GOVERNMENT EXPERIMENT STATION AT 

BARTLESVILLE. 




ECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR LANE has 
designated Bartlesville, Okla., as the location 
of the new experimental station of the Bureau 
of Mines for the investigation of problems re- 
lating to the petroleum and natural gas industries. The 
station is one of three new experimental stations for 
the establishment of which the sum of $75,000 was ap- 
propriated by the last Congress. The two other sta- 
tions have been located at Minneapolis, Minn.» for the 
study of iron and manganese problems and at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, for research connected with the ceramic and 
clay-working industries. 

The selection of Bartlesville was due to its location 
in the heart of the great Mid-Continent oil and gas 
field. The selection was influenced also by the offer of 
a free site and by the raising of $50,000 by the citizens 
of the town. This sum of money will be applied to the 
building of offices and laboratories and the purchase of 
engineering and chemical equipment. 

The technical staff of the new experimental station 
will study various problems having practical commer- 
cial application to the petroleum and natural gas in- 
dustries, including questions of production, transporta- 
tion, storage and refining of petroleum, and various 
problems connected with the technology of natural 
gas. 

It has been the policy to establish experimental sta- 
tions in different parts of the United States where vari- 
ous phases of the mining industries could be studied at 
first hand, such stations likewise serving as centers for 
keeping in close touch with the practical needs of the 
industries throughout the country. Several experi- 
mental stations have been established in the past for 
studying problems of mining, metallurgy and of other 
branches of the mineral industries. These have given 
excellent results and there have been increasing de- 
mands for the establishment of new stations to repre- 
sent other districts and other phases of the mineral 
industries. 

Bartlesville was selected by Secretary Lane be- 
cause of its obvious advantage as an oil center and be- 
cause of the financial aid proffered as well as the possi- 
bilities for State and local co-operation. 

The purpose of this experimental station, is to aid in 
increasing the efficiency of the petroleum industry, and 
investigations are not to be limited to any one field nor 
to any one branch, but will cover problems of produc- 
tion, transportation, storage and refining and problems 
connected with natural gas. For the most part, the 
problems taken up will be directly applicable to com- 
mercial development, and where it is found necessary 
to start a field in theoretical research, such investiga- 
tions will eventually lead into some practical applica- 
tion to the industry. 

Though emphasis is to be laid on the practical side 
of the industry, some misconception may exist in the 



minds of many about what is 6i practical importance. 
In many phases of the industry, basic elementary facts 
necessary for the development of new processes or the 
increasing of efficiency in established processes are 
lacking, and in such cases it may be desirable to carry 
out investigations that are not in themselves directly 
practical though they will provide the knowledge upon 
which commercial results of tremendous value may be 
founded. Such investigations have provided the 
foundations for advancement made in engineering and 
in many industries and without them the wonderful 
strides made in our present civilization would have 

been impossible. 

One of the greatest needs of the i>etroleum industry 
has been the co-ordination of scientific research with 
the practical side of the industry, for compared with 
other mineral industries, it has been singularly back- 
ward in this respect. Seldom does the practical man in 
the oil business realize how much of his every day 
work, his tools and equipment are derived directly or 
indirectlv from the most scientific and abstruse tech- 
nical and engineering investigations. 

The station is aimed to act as an intermediary be- 
tween the facts evolved by scientific mvestigations and 
the needs of the oil industries. That is, men will be 
employed who will be able to gather scientific data and 
find out how they may be applied to the practical needs 
of the industrv. 

The problems that may be attacked in such a station 
are endless. When one begins a close study of the in- 
dustry, new problems and new means for increasing 
efficiency continually disclose themselves. In consid- 
ering the problems presented, the difficulty will not be 
in finding problems, but in determining which prob- 
lems should best be attacked first. Methods for ex- 
tracting more oil from the oil sands, for determining 
the best spacing of wells, for estimating the future pro- 
duction of wells, for solving water problems, for re- 
ducing the evaporation losses in the field, in storage 
and in the refineries, dehydration of oils, cracking 
methods, reduction of fuel consumption and heat losses 
in refineries, and the recovery of gasoline from natural 
gas are but a few of the endless problems about which 
inquiries are made of the bureau every day by men in 
commercial life. 

In order to make the work of this station most use- 
ful, continual co-operation will be needed from the in- 
dustry. This means encouragement and recognition 
of the work going on, aiding the men with advice and 
information, suggesting problems, and at times co-op- 
erating in practical tests on the properties or in the 
plants of operating companies. The amount of benefit 
that the industry as a whole and each individual will 
derive, will depend largely on the encouragement and 
assistance rendered the station. It is, therefore, largely 
dependent on the industry itself how successful this 
experimental station will be and how much the mem- 
bers of the industry will individually and collectively 
be benefited. 



Tmtli ia as impo88il)le to be soiled by any outwaid touch as the sunbeam. Milton. 



x 



54 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



pipe, cleaning ditch and even at pipe laying. The 
-esult was that many became ill from exposure. 

More than half of the 43-mile Blackwell line was 
»aid in hills and upland prairies of Southern Kansas, 
where it was necessary to use dynamite to open a 
ditch for the line. Several of the hills were of sheer 
limestone, rising perpendicularly to a height of forty 
or fifty feet. Others were less steep. Rut in all of 
the hill country there was rock and it required ten 
tons of dynamite to blast out the ditch for that section 
of the improvements alone. 

The bluff at Silver Creek crossing, three miles 
southwest of Burden, Kansas, was perhaps the most 
difficult of the ascents. A blasting gang worked there 
a month, in solid limestone, opening a way for the 
line. When the work was finished two tons of dyna- 
mite had been used and the ditch had been shot 
away to a depth of thirty feet. 

The Arkansas River, which the line crosses near 
Arkansas City, Kan., constituted more than a geo- 
graphical division of the work. The hilly country was 
north of that stream ; south of it the right of way led 
through comparatively smooth, loamy farm land. The 
latter condition gave the opportunity for the use of a 
19-ton ditching machine which plowed a ditch forty- 
four by twenty-six inches at a speed of a mile in each 
twenty-four hours. With the machine, eight men did 
the work of 175, and did it better than it could have 
been accomplished by hand. It was the most exten- 
sive use ever made of ditching machinery in the 
Mid-Continent. 

The Arkansas River crossing itself offered a unique 
problem. At the point of crossing the river bed is 
1,300 feet wide, is sandy and treacherous in the spring 
of the year when the stream nearly always runs 
**bank full." The 16-inch line was divided into lo-inch 
lines for the crossing, each bowed against the current 
to provide greater resistive strength. The smaller 
lines were laid with screw joints, covered by rubber 
pack joints, in turn protected by one-half ton river 
clamps. 

The Osa^e-Hominv line, a 12-inch, was laid under 
natural difficulties as great as those figuring in the 
Blackwell line construction, with the exception that it 
was completed in November, before the weather 
turned against the pipeliners. It is in the heart of 
the rugged Osage Nation, a section of Northern Okla- 
homa widelv known for its wild and all but im- 
passable hills. The Hominy line joins the system at 
the Empire compressor station at Righeart. Okla. 

Men for the big undertaking were recruited in 
Chicago, San Francisco, Cincinnati, Galveston and 
other cities nearer the scene of the work by Emi^ire 
•employment agents. That was the only means of 
combatting the scarcity of labor that prevailed in the 
late summer. 

The improvements proceeded under the immediate 
direction of Frank P. Fisher, assistant general man- 
ager of the Empire in charge of the gas division. In 
active change of the work for Mr. Fisher was Ross M. 
Stuntz, superintendent of gas pipelines. 



SENSE AND CENTS. 



What One-third Cent's Worth of Gas Will Do— Rate 
Thirty Cents per 1,000 Cubic Feet. 

1. Will cook the cereal, boil the coflFee and boil 
eggs for the breakfast of a family of eight. 

2. Will toast fifty slices of bread. 

3. Will bake enough biscuits for the breakfast of 
a family of eight. 

4. Will heat an ordinary bedroom for one hour. 

5. Will heat enough water for shaving for the 
average man for three weeks. 

6. Will heat the baby's bottle for ten feedings. 

7. Will heat milady's curling iron every day for a 
month. 

9. Will furnish twelve gallons of hot water. 

10. Will furnish three hours' continuous ironing. 

1 1. Will cook enough soup for a family of eight. 

12. Will fry chops for two meals for a family of 
eight. 

13. Will heat and operate a large domestic oven 
for half an hour. 

14. After being heated, it will operate the oven for 
three-cjuarters of an hour. 

I S- Will sinsre twentv chickens. 

16. Will fry four chickens. 

17. Will fry enough waffles for eight people. 

18. Will boil enough potatoes for a family of eight. 

19. Will sterilize fourteen gallons of water for 
drinkinq: purposes. 

20. Will operate a Rutz lighter for three days — 
lighting the top burners as many times as would be nec- 
essary where a gas stove is used for preparing all the 
food of a familv. 

21. Will operate three large upright mantle lamps 
for one hour. 

22. Will make six pounds of ice. 

23. Will operate a one-horse-power gas engine for 
forty minutes. 

-'>4. Will operate a one-horse-power gas-fired steam 
boiler for thirteen and a half minutes. 

What Three and One-third Cents' Worth of Gas WUl 
Do — Rate Thirty Cents per 1,000 Cubic Feet. 

1. Cook a ^\^ course dinner for six persons, as 
follows: (a) Cream of asparagus soup, toasted bread 
sticks ; (b) creamed fish, mashed potatoes, sandwiches; 
(c) prime roast of beef (^\^ pounds), lima beans, scal- 
loped tomatoes, cauliflower with white sauce, baked 
yams, corn muffins ; (d) grape fruit salad French dress- 
ing, crackers; fe) fancy charlotte. 

2. Rake thirty biscuits and broil a three-pound 
steak for i cent or ^\^ times that quantity for five 
cents. 

3. Rake one four-layer cake with chocolate filling 
for I cent or five four-layer cakes for five cents. 

4. Bake ^\^ large angel cakes at five different 
times. 

5. Frv one hundred waffles. 

6. Heat water for eight hot baths in summer, five 
in winter. 

7. Cook three meals for six persons. 

8. Run a gas iron twenty hours. 



Pespatch is the soul of 'business. Chesterfield. 



Natural Gas Service 

A S€r90B of S#urra/ Arttcl09 O^anng Uftnn thm Suhfrri Iftdteaied Wmrm Hnrfrn 

for Ctsaiomera of th^ Central Indiana (»a% Cnntftony. 



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S6 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



establishing beyond question the productiveness of the 
field and the capacity of the transportation and distribu- 
tion systems to deliver the gas to the consumers. 

During the entire period, covering three winter sea- 
sons, and extending into the fourth one, the peak-load of 
the coldest day was carried easily and there was more 
than enough gas for everyone. Careful estimates sup- 
port the statement that during the past three years this 
company has by substituting natural for artificial gas in 
the towns and cities served, saved its customers in fuel 
bills the sum of one million dollars, an average of about 
one thousand dollars per day. This large saving >yas 
eflFected in the actual difference in price between the nat- 
ural gas and the fuel it displaced. It does not take into 
account the indirect economies brought about by the 
cleaner, more convenient and more efficient product, nor 
the substantial competitive advantage it has undeniably 
given to the manufacturers of this section. 

Three years of uninterrupted perfect service is some- 
thing to point to in any line of industrial effort, especially 
in a business subject to the great peak-load demand of 
house-heating in cold weather, and when it can be shown 
that the patrons of the company have been saved a thou- 
sand dollars a day in fuel cost while it was going on. 
This is a large item to be applied on the credit side of 
the natural gas service account when considering the tem- 
porary interruptions that are always possible and some- 
times occur, no matter how strenuous the effort to pre- 
vent them. 

HOUSE HEATING CAUSES TROUBLE. 

One of the characteristics of natural gas service is that 
wherever it has been introduced as fuel, the price has been 
low enough to permit its use for heating houses in winter. 
Herein is one of its most distinctive features and the one, 
in fact, which causes the greater part of the trouble, when 
trouble occurs, for all concerned. Notwithstanding its 
far greater heating power per cubic foot, ranging from 
150 per cent, to almost double the heating value of arti- 
ficial gas, natural gas always has been sold at a much 
lower price than artificial gas, and even in normal times 
of fuel demand and supply is a competitor of coal and 
other solid fuels for house-heating business. 

Under ordinary circumstances, this load grows steadily 
larger and larger each year, as the people become more 
fully acquainted with the superiority and economy of the 
service. Long experience in the house-heating business 
has been a costly teacher to natural gas companies, and 
they know there is no exemption from the possibility of 
interrupted service due to the enormous demand for gas 
for heating houses in severely cold weather. They are 
familiar with the discomfort and suffering that may re- 
sult from a so-called "shortage" and they take every 
opportunity to warn their customers to provide them- 
solves with auxiliary heating appliances and be prepared. 
Too often their advice, even their pleading, in this matter, 
goes unheeded, and when the fatal day comes a large part 
of the population is caught with no preparation whatever. 

The gas company never sleeps on this proposition. It 
does everything known to the business to minimize the 
hazard of the house-heating demand. Field operations, 



transporting lines, compressing stations, distributing mains 
— every part of the system is planned on a scale many 
times larger than normal weather would require, in order 
that there may be plenty of gas for house-heating on the 
one or very few coldest days of the year, when the de- 
mand may be five times, ten times or even fifteen times 
as great as in the summer months. 

There is a reasonable limit, of course, to expenditures 
for this purpose, and if it were to be extended, the cost 
of delivering gas throughout the year would be greater 
than the public should pay. With ordinary fuel condi- 
tions prevailng, the modern natural gas company is able 
to take care of the tremendous household load on the 
coldest days in winter, as three years of uninterrupted 
and unimpaired service in central Indiana show. 

It is evident that only extraordinary conditions should 
cause a break-down in natural gas service in the cities 
supplied from the West Virginia fields. It is also evident 
that when the abnormal demand caused by extraordinary 
fuel conditions is piled on top of the maximum normal 
demand of the coldest days in winter, the natural gas sys- 
tem is going to be overloaded. This hazard will exist as 
long^ as abnormal conditions continue and severely cold 
weather is possible. 

"SHORTAGE" OFTEN DUE TO "OVERLOAD." 

When the demand for natural gas exceeds the supply, 
the machine, though working perfectly, is overloaded — it 
slows down or stops until such time as the demand falls 
again within its capacity. Thus, the so-called "gas short- 
age" which has occurred and which will, no doubt, occur 
again in every city supplied with natural gas, is not truly 
a shortage of supply at all, but an overload caused by 
excessive demand. 

When the demand for coal or other solid fuels exceeds 
the supply, the price goes up, the demand is curtailed by 
stricter economy and by turning to other fuels, the supply 
is stimulated, and eventually the balance is restored by 
these various adjustments. A situation of this kind in 
the supply and price of solid fuel now exists and is exert- 
ing direct influence on the natural gas business. 

Everyone is familiar with the extraordinary fuel 
conditions that have prevailed for months, especially 
in the manufacturing centers of the East and Middle 
West. How the great industrial activity of the Nation 
increased the demand for fuel of every kind, more par- 
ticularly coal and oil ; how the railroads, congested by 
swollen traffic in food stuffs and the increased output 
of the very factories clamoring for fuel, have been un- 
able to carry the overload, how the prices of coal and 
oil have gone up and up until they have become almost 
prohibitive where these fuels can be obtained at all — 
these things are matters of common knowledge. 

Under such extraordinary conditions, it is not 
strange that the natural gas companies, still supplying 
their superior fuel at the same old price, should 
promptly be given their share, perhaps more than their 
share, of the overload. That they have been and are 
still able to pull this abnormal load with only the 
possible brief interruption due to a few days of ex- 
tremely cold weather, is a significant testimonial to 



The opinion of the strongest is always the best De La Fontaine. 



58 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Febraary 



organizations and while this cheap and valuable ser- 
vice is subject only to the occasional temporary inter- 
ruptions that come from a combination of extremely 
cold weather and abnormal fuel conditions, such a 
radical move as a return to artificial gas service should 
be considered with extraordinary care. In many cities 
where natural gas has been substituted for the manu- 
factured product, artificial gas plants are kept in ope- 
rating condition as reserve. A return to the artificial 
service would not be difficult or a particularly serious 
matter for the companies, further than causing the 
surrender of a great volume of business. It is the 
public that would be most concerned in such a change 
and any modern progressive gas company would strive 
to meet the public desire whenever it is given expres- 
sion. 

CAPITAL INVESTMENT MUST BE WITHIN 

REASON. 

The element of transportation is of over-shadowing 
importance in the production and delivery of natural 
gas. Most of the gas fields in various sections of the 
countrv are at considerable distance from the centers 
of population and industry to be supplied. Before the 
gas can be marketed, great lines of large pipe must be 
laid, often in mountainous country, under rivers, over 
hills and valleys. To accelerate the flow of gas and to 
build up "pressure" or "storage" that will meet the 
varying demand from hour to hour, powerful compres- 
sors must be installed along these lines and kept con- 
stantly at work. 

In planning a transportation system for natural gas, 
the best engineering skill is utilized, combined with 
the experience of men who have spent many years in 
the business. It is necessary to give the lines the 
greatest possible capacity, with reasonable regard to 
the amount of capital investment that can be pro- 
cured and supported by the income from sales of gas. 

To obtain this income and make use of the product 
of the gas fields over wide areas, it is necessary to lay 
these pipe lines to points many miles from the wells. 
The towns and cities of Central Indiana, for instance, 
receive their gas from wells 300 miles distant in West 
V^irginia. It is also necessary, from the standpoint of 
the investor and the public, that these lines and com- 
pressor stations be sufficient to meet the largest de- 
mand of all classes of consumers under normal or 
expected conditions. 

It is possible to overload a gas transportation sys- 
tem, just as it is possible to overload a railroad, tele- 
graph or tele])hone system. To build so extensively 
as to make an overload impossible at any time under 
any conditions, would be to tax the service, and, there- 
fore, the public, w'ith an investment burden that would 
in great measure destroy the usefulness and economy 
of the enterprise. 

When there is an occasional "shortage" of gas dur- 
ing the very few coldest days of winter, it is quite 
natural for the consumer to ask why the company does 
not lay another pipe line. As a matter of fact, addi- 
tional pipe lines are generally constructed at once 
when any inadequacy or lack of balance becomes 



apparent at any particular point in the system. But 
for a gas transportation company to greatly enlarge 
or perhaps double its capacity to meet an abnormal 
demand on one or a half dozen days in a year or sev- 
eral vears, would be as unreasonable as for a railroad 
company to lay an extra line of main track to be used 
only for the same brief period. The public would 
have to bear the unjustified expense in the end, and 
the service would be unreasonably expensive all the 
year around. In a sense, the law of supply and 
demand would be violated by over-building and true 
economy would not be possible to such an under- 
taking. 

LARGE SALES OF NATURAL GAS NECESSARY TO 

LIFE OF BUSINESS. 

The animating idea behind every natural gas under- 
taking is, of course, to make money — to convey this 
splendid product from the fields to market and dispose 
of it under conditions that will give a fair return on 
the capital invested and a reasonable compensation 
for the skill, experience and risk involved. Unless 
these conditions prevail the service cannot be and re- 
main satisfactory. 

The vast sums of capital required can be procured 
only when it appears that the enterprise can be con- 
ducted at a profit. Interest charges, taxes, operating 
expense and depreciation of plant begin at the begin- 
ning and never cease. Risk of accident and shortage 
are always present. 

Under these circumstances, natural, gas companies 
find it necessary to make every effort to develop their 
business as rapidly as possible and to take on con- 
sumers as they come. Furthermore, the public utility 
business carries a moral obligation to serve all alike. 
To refuse or neglect to serve any particular class of 
customers desiring fuel would be violating the prin- 
ciples of public utility duty and restricting the growth 
of the business to a point that would make it unpro- 
fitable and eventually impossible. 

If there were no industrial or house-heating con- 
sumption to contribute to the earnings of the com- 
pany, the natural gas business would degenerate at 
once to an artificial gas basis. The price would have 
to be increased to a figure much higher per cubic foot 
than the usual price of artificial gas because of the 
higher heating value of the natural product and the 
smaller volume required to do the work. The lower 
cost of producing natural gas would be overbalanced 
by the great cost of transportation from the fields to 
the user. It would still be subject to possible inter- 
ruption. It would not be as satisfactory to the pubHc 
as first-class artificial gas service. 

The idea has been advanced by students of public 
utility service that the final solution of the gas ques- 
tion will be found in artificial service for the cooking, 
water-heating, lighting and minor domestic fuel re- 
(luirements of the home and the use of natural gas in 
the industries. This idea is based on the theory, no 
doubt, that the manufactured gas is equally satisfac- 
tory for domestic use, but that it cannot do the work 
required in factories, where natural gas produces 



Knowledge Is more than equivalent to force. Jolmson. 






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6o 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



Mr. Requa stated that it was his desire that the 
Petroleum War Service Committee should for the 
present continue its activities without change, to the 
end that there should not be any interruption in the 
continuous flow of petroleum products to the Allies or 
for our domestic uses. 

In accordance with the above request that the 
Petroleum War Service Committee should continue to 
represent the industry and perform the functions pre- 
viously committed to it, Mr. Bedford stated that the 
committee had agreed to continue to act and render 
every service possible. 

The Petroleum War Service Committee has, to its 
regret, been advised of the resignation of Mr. Joseph 
F. GufTey, as the Petroleum Administrator for the 
War Industries Board. Mr. Guffey is President of 
the Natural Gas Association of America and is at the 
head of one of the vast gas producing companies 
having its headquarters in Pittsburgh. 

Mr. GufTey had been handling all questions in con- 
nection writh the purchase of Petroleum products for 
shipment to the Allied Governments. 

The Petroleum Committee wishes to record in this 
formal manner its appreciation of the fact that it at all 
times found Mr. Guffey most painstaking in the dis- 
charge of his public duties. By reason of his intimate 
knowledge of the oil business and his broad-spirited 
disposition to engage the support of everybody con- 
cerned, it has been possible for the Petroleum Com- 
mittee to co-operate harmoniously and effectively with 
the War Industries Board, with the result that during 
the past nine months, all of the requirements of the 
Allied Governments for petroleum products have been 
taken care of by the Petroleum Committee without 
any delay whatsoever. 



TRUCKS AND TRAILERS. 




AULING, delivering and emergency-service are 
three great factors in the producing of profit 
or loss results in gas company service. 

When it comes to light deliveries, the small 
trailer can be used successfully, to haul auxiliary loads 
behind light delivery cars, thus in many cases doubling 
the capacity of the automobile at only a nominal addi- 
tional cost for trailer and power and maintenance. 

Even though one buys the highest priced motor- 
equipment, there must necessarily be charges made 
against "power-plant" maintenance and repairs, for 
each motor car is a power plant within itself, and in 
many cases these charges mount into a considerable 
sum during the year. 

There are engine repairs on the motor car, not only, 
but there is large tire maintenance, the cost of this lat- 
ter is accentuated by virtue of the heavy load of the 
automobile itself, the weight of motor, etc. These, in 
addition to the carriage-load, the tires must carry. 

The area in the body of the auto for the carrying of 
deliveries, is limited ; Perhaps not over 50% of the 
length over all of the car, being available. 

On the face of it one can see that to haul a trailer be- 
hind a light delivery car, means but one set of motor- 
maintenance-charges, it does not add tire expense more 



than as a nominal item, for the trailers are light, no ''trcu:- 
tion" is required of the tires, yet the capacity of the trailer 
is, ''over all/' 100^ of the vehicle area, with but a short 
pole coupling it to the automobile. 

Note, therefore, that the capacity of a light delivery 
car, for carrying deliveries, may be doubled by using a 
trailer, at but a slight additional cost for maintenance, 
and with but a slight additional charge for fuel, and 
without adding to wages account for driver or for deliv- 
ery assistant. 

The pull is nominal, therefore the additional traction 
on the part of the delivery car is but a small item. In 
other words, trailers will, even when loaded, pull along 
on level road with one or two fingers of the hand acting 
as the pulling-coupling. A trailer is simply a roller, it 
rolls along with but a bit of power expended. 

The gas field has found the automobile indispensable, 
and there remain for automobile manufacturers quantities 
of orders in the field, as quantities more of vehicles of 
this nature will be needed, than have yet been pur- 
chased. Then the trailer manufacturer is now simply 
coming into his own. He has both capacity and economy 
in his favor, as an auxiliary to the motor. 

In this matter of motor cars and trailers reference 
should not be limited to simply light delivery cars and 
light trailers, for heavy cars plus heavy trailers are in 
just as economical and successful use, while the tractor 
or truck is performing other service, instead of holding 
the "power-plant" and expensive equipment of the truck, 
while the trailer is being loaded and the load discharged. 

Motor-truck-manufacturers and trailer-builders are 
provided with endless data that may be made of value to 
those having supplies and equipment to haul. The gas 
interests are only now awaking to the exceeding advan- 
tage to be found in tiie trailer, though they are already 
showing appreciation of the value of motor vehicles in 
their business, by becoming liberal buyers of that type of 
equipment. 



YOUR MISTAKES. 



SAN you make something good come out of your 
mistakes? 
Will you ? 

These questions assume that you make mis- 
takes sometimes. It is,, possibly, a compliment, for it is 
said "A wise man makes mistakes, a fool never." 

Can you label that mistake so clearly in your mind that 
you will never forget it? Will you try to do so?^ If 
you will, you'll be making something good come out of 
your errors. 

When you are convinced that you have made a mis- 
take, own it, frankly and fairly. Your very frankness 
will dispel half the displeasure of your employer, or your 
customer — whichever the mistake affected. 

A fair employer or a fair customer will condone one 
careless error where they would not be justified in over- 
looking many such. 

Make your mistakes, taken to heart, count for some- 
thing. 

Our greatest danger lies in the neglect of duty, not in 
its performance. 



Wise men say nothing in daagerons times. Seldon. 



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v; '••'"TZf: 'sZ 'r.*: fvr: rrat -xhcnzs a.*; ■•:£ r:c arrincal 5*- 

r-.r ptc^. rnurh '-.f that T'^^v := ondcr hi^ pr^^nr^. 
'*r:nir*fi for :ar>txr*3an ^-prvicr. and rn rnc r^ocim^ ".f 
•<;•*!« "oif^thfrr '.n * main !:nc '^r ^n !artfral? thar ar» alT 

'^'itfi >:nif-di«5tancc Htr.-:c* :n 'he arrincai ris ::e:L 
•ii|px-fjr*?.*ixr'? -^rrrc^ increase* :n ictand, 'hns nicr»af- 
•.nif •he opTKifiinitv rfi^r.' -or -jxv-acetvtec ■w-'flone an*: 
-orrinif anrf rhc -r.anufacmr'? if T*=. V'-. rrc^res. -ftc . x-T 
^*f -irhich perraiHr in "iiar nci«l *s :t ic*^ :n ±c itfaer 

T: =r«n5 rrj tic •ncr*f'-,r*. -hat *ach ".f :hi:-< rrefe 
'*f 9ir. \rr^v&ft 'hey ar* -'j ennr^iy iiffer^Bt. ne fr:iT: 
•hr ither. -arfi nc^ds ±c i:r?ct md -.inr g n itri rTg i i:eit: r;n 
-.f "he ir_r^--di^ nfiusTrr 

•'■jmi^ r^rv r.mnanics hav*; icrc -r.;-=irnarT -vrk :r: 
•r:e r* ifi't. anri "his A-^rk ":a5 ''r'.nght aix:ur i know*- 

^%nsrr-xr*:r,n. -iUt :t Ut '.ne --£ rhe -hing? ±ar ^cuM b« 



BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE TO TRAVELLING MAN. 



T  



?:^>a: x>- * 




▼■ T 



:. * n«?ar: :.s ripir. ne ■^«ar* 1 ttti.c. ne :i 5:30 :: 
Hte vrti. r:e :'-.iCs .lis neii -3^ .iien. ne :i 
'fr'^-^i r. "iie latent fafhion. He :« dean w.thin 
iH'i *r-h^.ti:. He :• jccd r.arjre*! He := ^niarT. 
::> ?ia.-: --"^iin^e r:e :? v: ,ct:n::rt. Zeneath ihc 'T^etie - 
hr^rr/ .h*::!. zAifA i-A-riv -,i:t 'f sight. *.:e- 1 --air :f th:r 
T.frrr.hrarx::- - irrrcc-T^rt ^-nzT. C^a-Te^ by rre war-r 
^fiijrh'A'e':*' v.n/i. :t \zr^.irjL •hem '-ut -r. i -tinrrrer even- 
r.^ ^rui y.ar- ^ vv. in the :r.y-rter->Ur ii-tar.ce. A.-rii the 
^aie^.man. f^r-tr^-r:. -veir/. -err.cre'! by ar* hour "^f i--I:- 
•ixrie. rcrz/f'. '.:-. ^o^y:-: ar.*: hi* r.r.i. -/.uifies :ur :f the 
iniiorr: vo: r^ve ^eame': v. krj.v ini z:ve< h:rr:ie-f u:: 









niv 1/^. 'I'^'.^r* r.:rr. .v^ifrr: '.te •:.*:'*r.t-:': .^rttTr Z'.rr. rjirr.e 
'i/'.^- •^of ^if.r.'-^ir The ^.rji:Tr,:rf. 'hr -mar* rr.;in. the mar: 

T!i8T cliBt fowmm the auist 



ini: .er= .il-. :mi^»r r-Tr ^le jcs* ir 
'.^hen tsner*. ir» tsil inri •▼hd tiie 



TtC 



5 wool ti 
c&e lasd 



r^ the Tifihinn- :f his -siTmg n 
5^*ce; "it "ffi ?' j^rr "nar iiinc? 
"he ^cniie «nc baritiiiarfe :f "iic 
-:e=-= and ■•rianl-ry i:.- p*;" 

azicc genes :f 



rot -f -rh iH tfsr. ^ i ir'iin er he is -tnlv 



03 S 

at 

fcnoW: 

T in bosni 
and 



xtiiftn 7-12 irmcT ^-?f 
ic^'^ti, i'tn r z-zr^ "hs 
r.e. f — m IT- 3ct ins 



irrt 
:e .5 



a «alea 
and tiat voa are n 



THE SPOUT OF SAFETT. 




Let U 




HAT 15 :r, rns Spirit rf SatietT? We bave he; 

ami resii rrn^nierabic about the Spirit 

Safety bur :r :s probable that all have i 

ra!i;^hr .r^ rral Jteamng and significance. 

ve realize that. «rce the birtn of indnatries. there 1 

r.rt been anv Tiiaie i :ndustrial activitr which I 



acc'implishe: Tier- :n al! the years of its opera t 
than ha5 the Safety m»:' emenc hx its few short ye 

:f eiT:n 

'Ally :5 this a4:t:%-:ty TTaimg for itsdf a place wh 
ranks aH rthers' It is becmse it is a * miwif  basis 
thought and purpose. It is :nspirtn|r men to do things 
their feHcw nzen and f':r ±e!r famxIicsL to lencier an 1 
selnsh service and ti.^ reccgnize man-vafaK in its i 



of Saf< 
It brii 
strflces at 



"Help ±e Jther Fellow/' That's the S 
and in the ertd that is what soei 
:ut the be>-t there is :n ivery nian and it 
verj.- i^rursre :f pcv«rr.- and misery, of 
^ocn:. Itj the >tMr:t that draws aQ men 
r:niir:cn bend. It is a ^cint of aco 
±e mc^: sincere thought of the best 
best ±ought and ^jnsiderarion of I 
attained bv a t:n:te«i ourrosenil eifort of 
It :s reflecte'i ::: the iaiiy vvoric and the 
man A-ho is endeavoring to be guided by 
Safer.- : :n more efhcient work and 
tion-r: in happier faces and more chcerfnl 
:n brighter homes and in more c 
mothers, because of the assurance of 
an*: icc^: :n better fe^i. better dad and 

Heed. then, tiie Spirit of Safety. Be cantioos a 
careful of vourseif: thoughtful and considerate of vc 
fei!o".v-::!er! ; kind a::^: prj'vident in your home and 
gcoii t:::r:gs t ? a!! men. In these things Be the great 
achievements :f r:ght furt>ose and true 

thel 



r b; 
worthy 
and of 
and 
m 
Efe of ev4 
dds Spirit 
coa 
dinj 
wives 2 
of hnsbai 
edncai 



I 

. I 
I 

ft 



H 






I 



^! 



II III 



72 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



MOVING IN CYCLES. 




E all realize in a general way that large sums of 
money being expended in the world today for 
army equipment, munitions of war, etc., are not 
getting away from the United States, yet few 
seem to realize fully the fact that in a very vast way this 
money is remaining in the United States, even though 
loaned through the United States government, by the 
peoples of this country. 

We do not mention the foregoing in order to pat our- 
selves on the back as exceedingly clever people, bui 
simply to indicate what is true, namely, that our country 
is fuU of money, and while living is high, wages are also 
high, and therefore to a large extent matters in general 
balance themselves. 

Concerns that cannot advance their prices for one or 
another reason, and yet that must pay high prices for 
their raw materials, are among the unfortunate ones, 
bearing a burden that we all hope will be of more or less 
short duration. 

In view of the fact that concerns in many instances 
have assumed the responsibility of having advanced their 
salary rates, and in view of the vast increase in price 
of raw materials, etc., there is one thing we must do — 
namely, be progressive, keep money moving and keep 
business going. 

We must be judicious "spenders," and continue the 
judicious buying of products, thus to keep money in 
circulation, thus to keep everybody employed, and to 
insure incomes for all. 

Even in these times the most desirable business is not 
long going to hunt the non-progressive business house, 
any more than in times of peace. The manufacturer 
must hunt his business, if he would have the type of 
patrons that he most desires. 

No doubt an institution under present conditions may 
for a time without aggressive work find plenty to do, but 
what the wise manufacturer is after now is to build up 
a line of patrons that he considers "choice," and the only 
way to gain such, is to keep constantly before them 
("out of sight, out of mind") and to actively go after 
their business. This is a time when manufacturers may 
be choosers, yet to be a chooser, one must make publicity 
and activity his motto. 

The present sounds the call, "build for the future." 
There is plenty of money at hand with which to pay for 
progressive work, and the institution that uses a good 
reasonable portion of this "easy money" to make itself 
widely known, and to install itself securely with the best 
buyers in its particular line, is a mighty wise concern. 

A concern that says, "Because we have plenty of 
business now," or "because we have more business now 
than we can cope with in view of shortage of raw 
materials, or because of difficulty in receiving and making 
shipments we will quietly settle down and keep still" 
is adopting the most approved ditch-digging method with 



which to excavate a commercial grave, in which to pla 
the self-satisfied, money-hedging-institution. 

There never was a time better than the present 
which to make one's concern best known in its particul 
line of industry, since some will be "slackers" in tl 
direction even though they have plenty of money, a 
thus leave the field at the disposal of the active ones. 



MARKING TIME. 




LL those who have had actual military experien< 
and as well those who have stood by ai 
watched troops that ceased to move, yet co 
tinued stepping, will know exactly what is mea 
by the expression, "marking time." 

When troops are "marking time," they are making 
progress; they are wearing out sole leather, they are usi 
up energ}', they are inviting fatigue. Just so in busim 
when enterprises mark time though they are not at ; 
actual standstill, they are not making progress, they a 
expending energy, without gaining ground, they a 
largely wasting the productiveness of their emplo> 
forces. 

Commercial concerns cannot "mark time" witho 
losing ground, even though during the process of "mar 
ing time" the "overhead" is being taken care of in t 
income from that which is produced during that peri( 
of semi-activity. Others, as a result, are overtakii 
and some passing, and there lies a fatal result. • 

Recently the manager of a concern in conversati< 
regarding business, said, "We are marking time." I 
felt that the times required that his concern should < 
so, but when the matter was carefully discussed, he car 
to see that to "mark time" meant to actually lose groui 
in commercial lines, since various of the other commerc: 
interests in his field had not ceased to march on, ai 
would thus leave him behind. 

When left behind, it does not mean simply a liti 
more pressure, in order to catch up. It means excessi 
high tension, excessive wear and tear, excessive co 
way beyond simply reasonable normal activity that go 
with continued progressive advance. Where you ^ 
these forced conditions in order to catch up, such 
abnormal physical and mental fatigue, cost of abnonr 
aggressiveness, etc., it means excessive wear and tear 1 
an institution and its peopli . 

The right way is not to "mark time." The right w; 
is to keep on the move. We would offer the woi 
"Progress," rather than "mark time" as the slogan 
every concern in the United States during these w 
times, thus not allowing one's competitors to walk aw 
with the business in sight whether little or much, I 
cause they are progressing while others are "marki: 
time." 



The secret of success is constancy to pozpose. DisraelL 



? 



FBNNiYLVANIA riELD 



ALLaOAHV niLO 

l^ li . ft lr«»A**i«« S <• 

BBAOWOmO PIILD 

-•^•■v j/ii I nilrd \«f !•«• ^j«t 

.*« •Vllt 

HIODLI riILD 

^r^ * 1 f ff«tn|»h < »il .*.- 
. t  - I'fft^prf rl a! !*• 

VIMAHOOCLAfttOH 
'v'« ^ r M<« almoffit I *t«fr « 
I •'•ikA KrII* IWI*> «f •! I 

. •• • 



• VTLIB AfeillT»OllO 
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viti uti •i«h r«h A v\ \« •• • 
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l»f 

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lit 

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74 



V 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Febmarj 



Mil 



i! 



II 



II 



ia 



V 



I 



Athens Co. — 
Grovner, Geo. W. Ashburn & Co. 5. 

Morgan Co. — 
Penrose, Mosier & Co. i 

Marietta — 

Burton, Bush & Co. i 

Adkins, Alvin Adkins 7 

Grimes, W. A. Decker i , 

Beaver, Austin Oil i 

Edwards, Charles Hanlon & Co. i 

Riggs, J. H. Kiggins & Co. 12 

Beech hrs., W. R. Metcalf & Co. 2 

Rousch, Patterson Bros. 4 

Cugle, S. J. Bogard & Co. i 

Herron, Taylor & Dye i 

Harrison Co. — 

Heavlin, Westgate & Black i 

Marinacci, Hugus & Sutton i 

Jefferson Co. — 
Burriss, Lewis & Co. i 

Belmont Co. — 
McKelvey, H. J. Gallager & Co. i . 



Dry 
Gas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 

Allegany 7 

Middle Field 19 

Venango-Clarion 34 

Butler-Armstrong 15 

Southwest Penna 36 

West Virginia 124 

Southeast Ohio 76 



o 
I 
I 

3 
3 

7 

19 
18 



Total 341 



2.699 52 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



LICKING COUNTY. 
Licking — J. L. Diltz, Columbus Nat. G. i 

KNOX COUNTY. 

Pike — Earl Loney, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

Morris — Anna J. Love, Upham Gas i . . . . 



Dry 
Gas 



ASHLAND COUNTY. 
Hanover — Geo. Wolfe, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . 
Mohican — Winbigler, Logan Gas & Fuel i 
Montgomery — Wile, Ohio F'uel Sup. i . . . . 



Gas 



MEDINA COUNTY. 

Litchfield — Scovillc, Joe H. Artman 2.... 
Brunswick — Ferriman, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Lafayette — Tuttler, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . . . 

C. D. Whitman, Medina Gas & Fuel i . , 
Medina — F. E. Horton, Medina G. & F. i 

J. & K. Mate, Medina Gas & Fuel i . . . 

John Walker, Medina Gas & Fuel 2... 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

18 
3 



Prod. Dry Gas 

13 
80 

49 

41 

15 

750 

1,162 

589 



I 
2 
2 
2 
2 

9 
29 

3 
50 



Gas 

Dry 
Gas 

I 
I 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

2 

5 



WAYNE COUNTY. 
Congress — Miller-Spring, Logan G. & F. 4. 
Cannan — Badger, Logan Gas & Fuel i — 

H. Bowman, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

Geo. Irvine, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

W. Davidson, Medina Gas & Fuel i 

Wayne — McDonald, Hartman & Co. i 

Clinton — Aylesworth, East Ohio Gas i . . . 



Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 
Worthington — Forbes, Logan Gas & F. i 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover — W. H. Lawrence, Logan G. & F. 2 
C. W. Winslow, Melrose Oil & Gas i . . . 

F. Cipra, Melrose Oil & Gas i 

J. &. H. Borth, East Ohio Gas 2 

Geo. Elliott, East Ohio Gas i 



Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland — Atwood, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 
Luther H. Stone, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . . . 



Gas 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — W. A. Boring, Ohio Fuel Sup. 4 

Wm. Culp, Heisey Gas 2 

School lot, Heisy Gas i 



Gas 



HOCKING COUNTY. 
Salt Creek— Tisdall, Logan Gas & Fuel 4 
D. Karschner, Ohio Fuel Supply i 



Gas 



HOLMES COUNTY. 
Ripley— T. & L Hague. Medina G. & F. 2, 
Washington — Sprang, Logan G. & F. i.. 



Gas 



COSHOCTON COUNTY. 
Mill Creek — Shoemaker, Medina G. & F. i 
Guy Crawford, Medina G. & F. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELDS, 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Proc*. 

Licking I 

Fairfield o 

Knox 2 

Ashland 3 

Medina 7 

Lorain o 

Wayne 7 

Richland I 

Cuyahoga 5 

Vinton 2 

Jackson 

Perry 3 

Hocking 2 

Holmes 2 

Coshocton 2 

Marion o 

Total 37 



Dry 



o o 

o o 

o I 

o o 

o 2 

o o 

o o 

o I 

o o 

o o 

o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

O I 

o o 



All tliat is human mnst retrograde if it do not advance. Gibbon. 



WOOD COUITTT 
f- .am y I llnafhi. iKrnRan • III Ji 
 ■«•<• I U>( alkMuh. Sim r.,1 ■< 



INDIANA PtBLD 



Wm < U« < ft 



TT 



PIUtWAK COVMTV 
-•1. t(..«v 1h..n... tl • .>...f.-n I 
■AMDOLPH (OUI 

»iKi covmv 

.<  n )..t>n N *•«■('■« • (hi.! < Ml h 
Ik. ! '•••..Ih U ll.i(|>t» '•••" < 
I ■.■.<!..». k>. U Mui[.l.. f tai* 
• .*» I»..,l<f S.tf A U:iri..„t , 



• ULLIVAM (OUKTV 



rOWItL COVNtT 

IM..) t M \,hW, I- I Wh.it 4: 
H I lUh*f I'.i.'i k*..!. •>.: I) 

^ M*>*M. |l.k*tl Imhum • >.l A •••• I 
s lUlt < ■>!•.> ValUi '••! I 
^ Hall < Ih*. \ all*! till t 

tia co«»tv 

llar(-ti..ll<' \ \ V'-'l'" Kr' • A " ■-'• 
I |i k.n....t in.H , ' 



INDIANA riKl-I) 



Attaii COUNTY 



**v or lomtt KTtr< wobi 



WMITLBT COVMTT 



m,. I-...I !►. 



 ■CBIAVT COL-«TT 



LIttCOIN (OUM' 



rOMMftOM lOvmiW 



KBHTUCKV TKNNKUBK 



rvtAtat iov«T< 



WAVMI COUKTT 
' VMM Wh». I*n <■ Srrl.  .■ 



WOLM COUMTT 
. w«. • ..I 1-h.l \\,l>n t 
■^ H .>^„ Hk>ir tit... A Mufl .- 



too*« lovari 



4««« I Mr— FrMh Had*. 



l«(«»oa (ovaiT 



76 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



BOYLE COUNTY. 

Junction City— Sutherland. Hcrwald et al. i Dry 

OWSLEY COUNTY. 
Hoonvillc — Turkey Foot Lumber. Henry Oil i Dry 

GRAYSON COUNTY. 
Lcitchtield — Majors. Carl Dresser i Dry 

MADISON COUNTY. 
Red House— Cobb. Parks & Bunch i Dry 

LA RUE COUNTY. 
Silvia — Crabtree, W. Tempelman et al. i Dry 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 
Willoughby— Mt. Willoughby, Leod et al. i Dry 

GREENUP COUNTY. 
Seaton. Unknown parties i Dry 

MARION COUNTY. 
Bradfordsville — Jones P'ork, Unknown i Dry 

TAYLOR COUNTY. 
Campbellsville — Davis J. W. Cashdollar i Dry 

GREENE COUNTY. 

Whitewood — White, Morrison Develop, i Gas 

R. A. White, Morrison Development 2 Gas 

C. Buchanan, Morrison Development i Gas 

Joe Vance, Morrison Development i Gas 

Versailles — Field, J. H. Kearney & Son 1 Gas 

Gas 5 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



Drv 
Drv 
Dr^ 
Dry 
Dr> 



CLARK COUNTY. 

Casey— W. Dehl. Hudson Oil iz Dry 

Koughest. Geo. H. Siahr et al. 4 Dry 

Dry :r 

CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Oblong— W. D. Walker, iiahusta Oil 15 

W. D. Walker. Mahusia Oil 16 

Prairie — S. S. Green, Watson et al. 2 

C. W. Daron, McXally et al. i 

A- L. Maxwell. Sheets et al. 4 

Dry 5 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Dennison — J. J. Buchannan, Fisher Oil i Dry 

Petty — Piper. Snowdon Bros, et al. 31 Dry 

Dry 2 

CLINTON COUNTY. 
Carrigan — W. S. Gerrish, F. J. Casey i Dry 

WABASH COUNTY. 
Friendship — Price.Midland Oil & Gas 1 Dr>- 



KANSAS. 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 

W^ayne 2 

W^olfe 5 

Lawrence 3 

Morgan 2 

Estill 28 

Powell 35 

Lee 14 

Bath 3 

.Allen 12 

Floyd I 

Metcalf I 

Whitley i 

McCreary i 

Lincoln 4 

Knox 4 

Johnson i 

Warren i 

Pulaski 3 

Logan 3 

Jackson 2 

Boyle - I 

Owsley I 

Grayson i 

Madison i 

LaRue • • i 

Simpson i 

Montgomery i 

Greenup i 

Marion r 

Taylor i 

Monroe i 

Greene - 4 

Woodford I 



Prod. 


Dry 





2 


40 


2 


18 








I 


219 


9 


569 


^ 

3 


22i) 


3 


15 





365 


3 


I 





5 














I 


10 


2 


3.S 








I 





I 





2 





3 


25 


I 





I 





I 





I 





I 





I 


5 








I 





I 





r 





I 










I 









33-34-15. 

28-34-15. 

16-33-15. 

19-34-17. 

29-34-17. 

II-24-I5. 

10-33-14. 

17-27-14. 
17-24-14. 

4-33-15. 
19-33-14. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Grother, Mahutska & Samuel 3 

Grother, Mahutska & Samuel 4 

McGuston. A. S. Riley 2 

Berkhart, Ed. Karns 2 

Day, Jesse Graham 2 

Gordon. National Ref. i 

Fee, Frankston Oil 2 

Wilson. Tidal Oil 10 

Wilson. Tidal Oil r i 

Robinson. Northland Oil 3 

Sullivan. Rothrock, Dickens & Jones i 



Gas production 

Dry 

Gas 



16-25-5, 

8-27-4. 

9-27-5. 
14-27-5. 
18-28-4, 
22-28-4, 
29-28-4. 

1-27-4. 

34-24-5. 
14-28-4. 

34-24-5, 
22-28-4. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

Robinson, Theta Oil i 

Kollenberg, Peoples Oil & Gas i 
Marshall. Gold Dollar Oil 1 . . . . 

Morgan. Morgan Oil i 

Freed. Freed Oil & Gas 4 

Varner, Empire Gas & Fuel 7.. 
Chance. Empire Gas & Fuel 2. . . 

Churchill, Cosden & Co. i 

Hill, Bradford et al i ......... . 

Shreve, Mid-Kansas Oil 16 

Hill, R. H. Hazlett i 

Brown, Monitor Oil 5 



Dry 

Gas 

Gas production 



Total 142 



1. 541 



45 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY, 

1 1-34-1 1, Tout, Tulsa parties 3 

Near Peru, W. F. Lemmon i 

13-33-12, Aiken, Link Oil 2 

34-32-13, Gilbert. Sachem Oil i 

23-32-12, Holladay, Mary Holladay i....,, 

8-35-12, Mayfield, Osage-Cherokee Oil 2.. 

5-35-12, Paulus, E. A. Durham 14 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

500.000 
8 
3 

Dry 
Dry 
Drv 

• 

Ory 
Dr> 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dr>' 
Dry 
Gas 

II 

I 

1,000.000 

Dry 
Gas 
Dr>' 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Drv 



The greatest of faults, I shonld say, la to be Odnscioiu of none. Carlyle. 



<; IL..4 k<*«nr. • -.1 
in lloill. llgifi Mil ( 
ri \i««l>« VVklUf \> 



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OKLAHOMA 



IH. 



0«*OB [OVVTT 



iliti H -f-.-t }.■ 



WAkHINUtUM louatt 



22-16-13, Bear, R. Mook et al I 

11-16-14, Ward, Sherman 8c Craig i 

19-18-13, Clifford, Moss & Bailey i 

19-18-13, Pittman, Moss Sl Bailey I 

28-19-12, Yargee, Pennok Oil 3 

20-19-12, Colbert, Kilmer et al 8 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas production 28,0( 

HUSKOGEB, WAGONER AND ROGBRS COUNTISS. 

10-21-14, Young, et al 2 

28-14-16, Brown, Lochiel Oil & Gas 2 

22-13-16, Thompson, Pelican Oil & Gas 2 

22-18-15, Apuelka, Fox et al 3 

25-17-14, Riverbed, Davis & Younger 5 

25-18-14, et al 12 

25-16-14, Peterson et al i 

11-13-1S, 2 

34-15-16, \'1» Oil & Gas I 

25-16-14. 

31-15-15, Mayson, Okla. Oil Wells 3 

36-15-16, Durant, Okla. P. 81 R. I 

3-14-15, Capps, Rose et al t 

II-13-IS, Baxter & Winemiller i 

30-15-16, Howard, Boynton Oil 81 Gas 5 

23-15-15, Friday, French et al 2 

17-15-16, Fields, Melba Oil 3 

28-18-15. Hall el al 2 

18-14-17, Okla. Prod 1 

34-15-15. «a1 2 

20-15-16, et al I 

13-13-1S, ^ 

11-13-15, Navajo Oil 2 

20-15-16, Taylor, Kistler et al 

34-16-15, Richards, Minnetonka Oil i 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas production i5.ot 

OKHULGBB-HORRI8. 

29-12-12, Randall, Mitchell Oil 16 

1-14-13, Brandiger, S. Drew 9 

31-14-13, Haynes, al. I 

4-14-14, Hudson, Okla Prod. Sl Refg. 4 

10-14-14, Stevens, Magnolia Petroleum 17 

16-15-14, Nelson, Selby O. & G. 9 

30-15-14, Starr, Magnolia Petroleum 15 

, 34-13-14. Fat, J. Ribold et al 

11-16-12, Brown, Bailey 1 

27-16-13, Moore, A, Braden 1 

6-16-13, Murray, Hubbard et al 

29-12-12, Randall, Mitchell et al. 16 

34-14-14, Fat, Mountain Rock Oil 3 

25-15-13. River Gas i 

24-13-10, Wolverine Oil 

32-13-14, J. Ribold 3 

10-16-11, Petroleum 1 

11-16-12, et al I 

13-16-12, et al I 

ia-i4-i2, Douglas, Swindler et al i 

22-14-12, Colbert, Fields et al i 

30-14-12, Ulrich, Alexander et al t 

7-13-14. Milan, Okla. State Oil 5 

34-13-14, Fat, J. Rebold et al 4 

3-16-12, Whetstone, Stale Petroleum 5 

15-14-12, Huckaby, Kimbley et al i 

36-14-12, el al 1 

33-IS-13. Oil 3 

17-13-14. T'^ , State Oil 5 

24-iS-ii, Cobb, Topaz Oil 2 



Dry 33-14-11, Thompson, Savoy Oil i Dry 

Gas 13-16-11, Postoak, J. O. Mitchell i Gu 

Dry 

Dry Dry 25 

Dry Gas production .30,000,000 

38 BALD HILL AMD BOOCH SANDS. 

8 3r-i4-'3. Hays, Kansas Drg. i Dry 

>,ooo 5-14-14, Rentie, Marion Oil 5..-- Gas 

29-14-14, Ashley, Sperry Oil & Gas 6 Gas 

30-14-14, Thomas, W. B, Pine 2 Gas 

Dry IO-14-14, Stevens, Magnolia Petroleum 17 Dry 

Dry 10-14-14, Dill, Magnolia Petroleum 17 Dry 

Dry 7-14-15. Rentie, Levine et al i Dry 

Dry S-14-14, Rentie, Marion Oil & Gas 2 Gai 

Dry 33-15-13. Smith, Tidal Oil 2 Dry 

Dry 1-15-14. Mcintosh, Texas Oil 4 Dry 

Dry 21-15-14, Osborne, Mass-Okla Oil 3 Dry 

Gas 32-14-14. Ashley, Hanson O. & G. 2 Gas 

Gas ^ - 

Dry Dry 7 

Dry Gas 5 

Dry Gas production 18,000,000 

J. ^ CLSVBLAHD, PAWNBB. HANHPORD AMD JBNHIHQS. 

Gas '1-20- 8, Mayfield, Jennings Bros. 5 Dry 

Tj 22-20- 8, Buel, Concord Oil 1 Dry 

^y 14-20- 8, EngJish-Okia. Oil i Dry 

Dry _, 

Dry D'y 3 

jj'^ CU8HIHQ AHD 8RA11R0CK. 

rjrv 10-18-7, Nettie, Texas Oil 4 Dry 

Gas «6-i7-7. West, P. O. & G. 21 Gas 

Dry 30-17-7, Benson, Gushing Development I Dry 

Gas _, 

Dry 2 

^ Ga , 

. Gas Production 3,500,000 

^'"^ GARFIBLD AND NOBLB C0UNTIB8. 

24-23-2, Deal, Hansen el al i Dry 

l^ry NBWKIRR AND PONCA CITT. 

Dry 5.28.1, nch Oil 1,2 Dry 

Dry 31-29-1. 8iBuel3 Gas 

Dry 30-29-1, lion Oil I Gas 

Dry 31-29-1, Smith, Bermont Oil 4 Gas 

Dry 

Dry Dry i 

Gas G»s 3 

Dfy Gas production 69,000,000 

_" HBALDTON. 

jj 16-1-2, Murphy et al i Dry 

q/ >7-2-3. Nunnelly, Summit Oil 1 Dry 

29-2.3, Daugherty, Phillips Petroleum 4 Gas 

""■y 29-2-3, Pruitt, Gypsy Oil 1 Gas 

G" II- 4- 3, Skidmore Lone Jack Oil I Dry 

Gas 30-3-3. Homer, Czarina Oil 3 Dry 

Dry 16-4-3, Carter, Sinclair Gulf 3 Dry 

Dry 29-2-3, Pruitt, Gypsy Oil 1 Gas 

Gas 

Dry Dry 5 

Dry Gas 3 

j3^ Gas production 80,000,000 

^''' WILDCATS. 

D'"'' Pontotoc County— 

^'y 20-4-8, Waiters, Cornish et al 1 Dry 

}^'y 1 1-3-S, Kreiger, Barnsdall Oil i Dry 

Dry 1-4-6, Benedum & Trees i I>ry 

Dry 21-5-8, Gilmore, Plains Oil & Gas i Dry 

Dry Okmulgee County- 
Dry 24-13-17, Evans, Bassett et al 1 Dry 

va to •mrthltig. Bnike. 



MID-COmilEirT. 



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8o 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



GUUF COAST. 



DAMON MOUND. 
Masterson, Texas Exploration 3 



Gas 



GULF COAST. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Dist. Comp. Prod. Dry 

Anse LaButte o o o 

Batson o o o 

Damon Mound 4 350 2 

Edgerly 4 1.700 o 

Goose Creek 17 14.200 5 

Humble 27 447 11 

Jennings 2 240 o 

Markham o o 

Spindletop 4 375 i 

Saratoga o o 

Sour Lake 2 o 2 

Vinton 3 4,075 ^ 

New Iberia i o i 

Piedras Pintas o o 

Miscellaneous 21 75 17 

Total 85 21,462 40 



STANDARD OIL SUBSIDIARIES. 



January ist to January 20th, inclusive. 



RY JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS. 



£1 

$100 

100 

50 
TOO 
100 
100 

50 
100 
100 

100 

100 
100 

50 
121/2 

100 
100 

25 

100 

100 
100 
lOO 

100 

100 
100 

100 

100 
100 
100 

100 
100 

100 
100 

100 

100 

10 

25 

5 



Anglo-American 

Atlantic Ref 

Borne-Scrymser 

Buckeye Pipe 

Cheesebrough 

Colonial 

Continental 

Crescent 

Cumberland 

Eureka 

Galena, Com 

Galena, Pref 

Illinois Pipe 

Indiana Pipe 

National Transit 

New York Transit .... 

Northern Pipe 

Ohio Oil 

Prairie Oil 

Prairie Pipe Line 

Solar Refining 

Southern Pipe 

South Penn. Oil 

South West Penn. Pipe 

S. O. of California.... 

S. O. of Indiana. ..... 

S. O. of Kansas 

S. O. of Kentucky 

S. O. of Nebraska 

S. O. of New Jersey. . . 

S. O. of New York. . . . 

S. O. of Ohio 

Swan & Finch 

Union Tank 

Vacuum Oil 

Washington Oil ...... 

Penn-Mex 

International Pet 



Open 

17 
925 
450 

96 
300 

10 
450 

30 
125 
190 
140 
128 
190 

95 
12I/2 
190 

95 
305 

425 

257 
300 

175 
290 

100 

22s 

210 

450 
310 
480 

525 

255 
420 

95 
86 

350 

25 
40 

13/2 



High 

17^ 
950 
450 

98 
300 

10 
480 

32 
125 
200 
140 

105 
100 

12'A 
190 

98 

345 
460 

260 

300 

■175 

293 
100 

235 
650 

470 
310 
500 

547 
270 
480 

95 

86 

360 

25 
42 

13/2 



Low 

13 
875 
430 

93 
300 

10 
430 

30 
120 

185 
130 

120 

185 

93 
12 

180 

93 
300 

415 
240 

280 

r6o 

270 

95 
218 

590 
430 
300 

475 
520 

247 

410 

90 

83 
330 

25 
35 

12M 



Last 

13 
920 

430 

95 
300 

10 

480 

32 

125 
200 
130 
120 

185 
98 

i2y2 
180 

98 
332 
450 
250 
290 
170 

2()0 

95 

233 
630 
460 
300 
480 

545 
279 
410 

95 

83 

350 

25 
42 

12.VJ 



25 
50 
25 

5 
5 

5 

10 
I 



Independent Oil Companies: 

Open 

Pierce Oil 11 

Midwest Refining no 

Tropical Oil 5 

Cosden Refining 7% 

Sapulpa Refining 8^ 

Cosden Oil & Gas. Pfd. 3^ 
Okla. Producing & Ref. 7% 
Atlantic Petroleum . . . 3^^ 

Merritt Oil 21 

Midwest Oil 97 



High 


Low 


Last 


11^ 


954 


9K2 


no 


103 


104 


5/2 


SVa 


SYz 


7H 


^Va 


7 


9Va 


854 


8^ 


3^ 


3'/^ 


3% 


JVa 


6>i 


6H 


3Va 


3'A 


3'A 


23y2 


20H 


21 K> 


"5 


95 


"5 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



January ist to January aoth, indiuive. 



BY JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS. 



Sales 

Columbia G. & E... 820 

Fayette Gas 

Mfg. L. & H 3.007 

Ohio Fuel Supply. . 12,935 

Ohio Fuel Oil 530 

Oklahoma Gas 770 

Pgh. Oil & Gas 300 

Pure Oil Com 

Cent. Kentucky Gas 

Lone Star Gas 165 

Union Gas 



Open 


High 


Low 


Last 


32 


34'A 


3054 


32 


•  


m • 


• • 


129 


52^ 


53 


5iJ< 


si'A 


41^ 


45 


4154 


44 


15^ 


isH 


iSVi 


isH 


25 


25 


25 


2S 


5/. 


SVa 


s'A 


5« 


•  


• • 


m m 


245'> 


• • 


• • 


• • 


22 


95 


96 


95 


96 


• • 


• • 


• • 


153/i 



AUTO DELIVERY CARS. 



SOMETIMES a manufacturer having taken the 
initiative along certain specific lines, has the 
^^^ lead even beyond the period when others are 
enabled to manufacture and meet the wants of 
a trade possibly even better than the one who became 
first established. This applies in the automobilc-delivery- 
car-field, where a certain car that has been exceedingly 
popular as a low-priced car, is today being widely pur- 
chased, in many instances on the basis of its having been 
early made popular through much advertising and its 
exceedingly moderate price, though today not by many 
considered the best at the price. 

It is not our wont to specifically name an article that 
may be purchased in competition with any similar article. 
We leave such statements as a rule to be made bv the 
manufacturer who offers the article, but we are wonder- 
ing at the present moment how many of the managers 
of gas companies have considered that inexpensive, clever 
production, the "Vim'* car, a well built, well pro- 
portioned delivery car, made by a concern that does not 
build pleasure cars, but has given its entire attention to 
the commercial car proposition, thus specializing in a 
way to provide the best type of appliance for its specific 
purpose. This delivery car is not a converted pleasure 
car. 

What we have said regarding the *Vim" is said for 
the benefit of the gas appliance manufacturers of the 
United States and our subscribers, who are the gas com- 
panies of the country, both requiring light commercial 
cars, easy on tires and long on gasoline mileage. 



Ther9 Is notblng so powerful as truth, — and often nothing so strange. V^ebster. 



AROUND THE BELT 



I 






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TRADE PERSONALS 



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82 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



February 



tribution and sale to the Hornell Gas Light Company 
and the Canisteo Gas Light Company. In all but four 
places the company's customers are paying 40 cents a 
thousand with the three cents discount. 

Coming 

The Crystal City Gas Company recently raised its 
rate schedule. 



PENNSYLVANIA— Butler 

The T. W. Phillips Gas & Oil Company has in- 
creased its rates from 2y cents per thousand 
per thousand. 



•any 

to 30 cents 



Warren 

Warren has withdrawn its suit against the Pennsyl- 
vania Gas Company in the matter of objecting against 
the raise in gas rates At a meeting of the borough 
council it was decided not to take further action in the 
suit brought by the cities of Warren, Erie and Corry 
against the gas company. 

The decision was reached after data were secured 
showing that the gas company spent more than $500,- 
000 last year in search of gas and intends to drill 50 
more wells this year. 



NEW FRANCHISES 



ALABAMA — Birmingham 

The Dixie Gas Company has applied to the local 
municipal authorities for a natural gas franchise. W. 
F. Aldrich is President, and Edward R. Lovewell is 
Secretary of the company. 

ARKANSAS^Little Rock 

The city has granted a natural gas franchise to the 
Arkansas-Louisiana Gas & Development Company of 
Monroe, La. The company has agreed to have its sys- 
tem completed within twelve months or forfeit $20,000. 

OHIO— Urbana 

The franchise of the Ohio Fuel & Supply Company in 
this city expires in March. A new franchise is being 
considered. 

TEXAS— DaUas 

The Dallas Gas Company has been granted a new 
service-at-cost franchise. The maximum price of gas 
to the consumer is fixed at 50 cents a thousand, this be- 
ing the rate now in effect. 




ALABAMA — Birmingham 

It is reported that the leases of the Dixie Gas Com- 
pany on the Aldrich Dome, near this city, will be 
actively developed during the coming spring. The 



program as laid out includes the laying of pipe lines 
and marketing of gas. 

ARKANSAS— Arkansas City 

The Arkansas Valley Railway Light & Power Com- 
pany has employed several girls in the capacity of 
meter readers. If the innovation is a success the force 
will be enlarged. 

CALIFORNIA— McKittrick 

It is reported that the Pacific Light & Fuel Company 
is laying a gas line from the Belridge field to McKit- 
trick in order to increase the supply. The company 
supplies gas for domestic and industrial needs of the 
city and vicinity, having formerly secured their gas 
from the Associated wells about McKittrick. The new 
line, which is nearing completion, will draw from the 
Belridge Oil Company's wells. The minimum price 
received for gas is $1.50 per 1,000 cubic feet. 

Stockton 

Natural gas is being used to operate a motor car 
owned by Pengilly & Clark, a local business house. The 
gas in contained in a rubber bag fastened on top of the 
cover of the car. The tube of the gas bag is attached 
to the carburetor by means of a check valve. One part 
gas and nine parts air is the mixture used. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Washington 

A club-house has been fitted up at No. 1329 K Street, 
this city, for the convenience of men connected with the 
Doherty organization who come to Washington on 
business. The officers of the club are: J. C. Mc- 
Dowell, in general charge of Doherty natural gas 
and oil operations, president; H. D. Williams, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., counsel for the Dominion Gas Company, 
Ltd., etc., vice-president; George Williams, manager 
of the new business department, chairman of the house 
committee, and Carl H. Henrichson, formerly of the 
Toledo new business department, secretary. The lat- 
ter resides at the club and is responsible for its main- 
tenance. 

ILLINOIS— Chicago 

The Federal Oil Company, owned exclusively by 
women, recently held its annual meeting. The former 
officers were re-elected as follows: President, Mrs. H. 
H. Honore; Vice-President, Mrs. Elizabeth Doyle; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Elmer Burgess. 

INHSTaNA— Pike County 

A . B. Bement is reported to have drilled in a 1,000.- 
ooo-foot well in his test on the Jane Fettinger farm, 
Section 19, at a depth of 936 to 950 feet. 

KANSAS— Chautauqua County 

The Prairie Oil Company owns 61 producing oil 
wells in this county, as well as one large gasser. 

Paola 

Oklahoma interests have drilled in a well on the Lis- 
ter farm, 13 miles northwest of here, which at a depth 
of 710 feet has a good showing of gas. 

A large gasser is reported by the Missouri Oil & Gas 
Company on the Hogan farm. Section 9-17-23, at a 
depth of only 370 feet. 



They never fail ^xrlio die In a great cause. Byron. 






NATLRAL CAS AND (.A.SOI.INH 



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84 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Febniai 



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Doylestown 

The East Ohio Gas Company has a very good well 
on the F. \V. Galehouse farm, two miles south of this 
city The gas was found in the Trenton rock. 

Hocking County 

In the Brinkhaven development in Tiverton- Town- 
ship, the Logan Natural Gas Company drilled a second 
test on the Lewis Reece farm through the Clinton 
sand. This location is 800 feet east of the first tpst on 
this farm. Nc)thing was found in the second test but 
a gas pressure, with an estimated capacity of 500,000 
cubic feet a dav. 

Holmes County 

In Washington To\>nship the Logan Gas & Fuel 
Comjjany drilled in a large gasser in a test on the E. 
J. Lozier farm, Section 3. 

Lima 

In the local Common Pleas court it was ruled that 
the Lima Natural (ias C()m])any is not responsible 
for accidents that might grow out of low gas pressure. 

Medina County 

In Homer Township the .( )hio Fuel Supply Com- 
pany drilled a very light gas well in a test on the Ella 
A. Fike farm. Section 35, and a fair gas well on the 
Fred Hardinger farm, in Medina Township. 

In Lafayette Township, the Ohio Fuel Supply Com- 
pany drilled a good gas well in a test on the Levi Lance 
farm. Section 32, and a light gas well in No. 2 on the 
Howard Huff farm. Section 23. 

Mentor 

The Lake Shore Chemical Company, owners of the 
Mentor Knitting Mills property, struck two gas wells 
at Mentor, the production of which is said to be su cient 
to furnish 2,500,000 feet of gas to Painesville a day. The 
Chemical Coinj;)any is said to be consulting with the 
Painesville (]as Company with a view to furnishing gas 
for this city. 

Wayne County 

In Franklin Township, the Ohio Oil Company 
drilled a light gas well in No. 9 on the \V. P. Snyder 
farm, Section 23. 

OKLAHOMA— Bald Hill 

West of Bald i I ill on the S. Colbert farm, in the east 
half of the northeast quarter of Section 9-14-13, French 
and others on the S. Colbert farm have a well giving 
2,500,000 feet of gas and spraying oil in considerable 
quantity. 

Bixby 

The Magnolia Petroleum Company has a 5,500,000- 
foot gasser in its No. 4 on the Moore farm, in the 
southeast of the northwest quarter of Section 34-16-13. 

Bojmton 

In the Boynton pool, Probst & Morrison have a 6.- 
ooo,ooo-foot gasser in their No. 2 on the Gracie Beams 
farm, Section 19-14-16, at a de])th of 1,670 feet. The 
Minnekota Oil Company, in Section 34-16-15, has a 
gas.ser which is being converted into an oil well. 



Butler County 

The Lucky Eight Oil & Gas Company reports a gt 
gasser in its No. 2 on the Piper farm, Section 13-21 

Gas has been struck by H. J. Parker and others 
their No. 2 on the W. E. Brown farm. Section 22-2I 

Garfield County 

In the Garber district, the Oil State Petroleum Cc 
pany struck a gas sand in its No. i on the Barnes fa 
in the northwest quarter of Section 15-22-3. This v 
is on the Reiger anticline and is a mile and a half noi 
west of the 4,000-foot dry hole drilled by Glenn 
l»raden. The flow of gas found at 1,340 feet registe 
10,000,000 cubic feet daily. It has been mudded in ; 
the well will be drilled deeper, the oil sand being 
pected at 1,500 feet or less. 

The Ben PVanks Oil & Gas Company, at a deptl 
1,340 feet in its No. i on the Allen farm, had 1,000, 
feet of gas. This well is in the southwest quartei 
Section 16-22-3 west. The well will be drilled deeper 
is producing gas at 1,220 feet. 

Gas was struck by the Kanotex Oil Company 
sand at 1,185 ^^^* '" '*s test on the Haynes farm, in 
northwest corner of Section 9-21-3 west. The wel 
being cleaned out and will be drilled deeper. Jus 
short distance awav from the Kanotex well is the 1 
of the Amber Oil Company on the Cain farm, wli 
got a flow of gas at 1,220 feet. 

Kay County 

The Cherokee Oil & Gas Company has a 5,ooo,c 
foot gas well in its test on the Smythman farm, in 
west half of the southwest quarter of Section 15-2 
west. The sand was found at 800 feet. 

Lawton 

A natural gas plant and distributing system are 
ing installed by the Lawton Gas & Electric Comp; 
in this citv. 

Muskogee 

The Prairie Oil & Gas Company is drilling on 
John Tiger farm. Section 1 5-14-7. The well will 
drilled to the Tucker sand, and has so far cost its o^ 
ers $100,000. 

Muskogee County 

Cosden & Company completed a 1,000,000-foot g 
ser in its No. 3 on the Reynolds farm, in Section 5- 
15, Haskell district. Peterson and others drilled a 
000,000-foot gasser on the Asbury farm, in Sect 
20-16-15. 

Oklahoma City 

Consumers have been objecting to the plan of 
Oklahoma Natural Gas Company to recover gaso! 
from the gas before it is distributed on the ground t 
the quality of the gas is impaired by the process, 
company, to meet this situation, offered to send 
gas in its original state for four days, to be followed 
four days during which the gas delivered would 
without gasoline content, the gas having pas 
through the gasoline recovery apparatus. The city 
ficials, however, held to their point of asking for I 
oratory tests. 



Pliilosophy is nothing 1)Ut discretion. Selden. 



 



i r\>t\tir\ 



NATURAL CAS AND CiASOUNF. 



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I9I8 



MANUFACTURERS' SECTION 



February 



The Hope Natural Gas Company is drillinfj^ a deep 
test on the M. A. Goff farm, located on Owens Run, 
near Bridgeport, Simpson district. This well has now 
reached a total depth of J.^C^^ feet, the deepest of any 
in the world. An 8-inch hole was carried down to a 
depth of 7.260 feet and then a liner was placed and the 
hole reduced in size from 8 to 6-inch. It is thought 
there will be no trouble in reachinp^ a depth of 8,000 
feet. 

The well next in depth of which there is any record 
is located in Silesia-Austria. The drilling was financed 
by the xAustrian Government and the well is said to 
have reached a depth of 7,349 feet. The method of 
drilling diflPered from that of the Hope Gas Company. 
The Hope Company uses a steel cable and the Aus- 
trians used the coring and rotary method, taking out 
the core in sections. 

Kanawha County 

On Kellv's Creek, Cabin Creek district, Frank 
Smith's second test on the Melly 1>. Thompkins farm, 
is a gasser in the IJerea grit. In the same locality, the 
Montgomery Oil & Gas Company got a gasser at No. 
7 on the Sarah B. Watson farm. The Columbia Car- 
bon Company completed its well on the Spruce lot. 
S^etting a gasser with a capacity of 3,500,000 cubic feet 
a day. 

Lewis County 

On Wolf Fen Run. Freeman's Creek district, the Re- 
serve Gas Company has completed a test on the Calvin 
Flesher farm. It is a fair gasser in the Big Injun 
sand. 

Marion County 

In Mannington district, the Hope Natural (ias Com- 
pany has drilled on the J. L. Hamilton farm and it is 
a fair gasser. The Carnegie Natural Gas Company has 
drilled its test on the Mary A. Shaw farm and is a light 
gasser. The Wildwood Oil Company drilled its test 
on the N. H. and M. Debolt farm and developed a light 
gas pressure. 

In Mannington district, the Carter Oil Company 
made the location for a test on the George Robbins 
farm, and F. W. Bartlett is rigging up another test on 
the John Huey heirs farm. 
Marshall County 

On Big Run, Liberty district, the Manufacturers' 
Light & Heat Company has now drilled its test on the 
J. M. Rhine farm through the Big Injun sand. A fair 
gas pressure was developed in that formation. 

On Bens Run. Liberty district, the Manufacturers' 
Light & Heat Company is due in the Gordon on the 
Samuel Ernest farm. 

On Grave Creek. Cameron district, the same com- 
pany's test on the J. I. Dorsey farm is a light gasser in 
the Gordon sand. 

On Fishing Creek, Liberty district, the Carnegie 
Natural Gas Company has drilled No. 3 on the H. G. 
Fair farm into the Maxon sand, developing a very good 
gasser. The capacity of the well is estimated at 15,- 
000,000 cubic feet a day. 



Monongalia County 

On Thomas Run, Clay district, the Manufacturers' 
Light & Heat Company drilled its first test on the A. 
Varner farm, a gasser in the top of the Big Injun sand, 
15 feet deeper into that formation and it is showing 
for a five-barrel pumper. 

Preston County 

In Kingwood district, the Southern West Virginia 
Gas Companv has started to drill a test on the Dr. 
Graham farm'. 

Roane County 

In Walton district, the Lotty Oil & Gas Company 
has the rig completed for a test on the Robert N. 
Greene farm. 

Wetzel County 

The Philadelphia Company's No. 4 on the VV. E. 
Iligginbotham farm has been drilled through the 
Fourth Sand. It is a gasser in that formation. 

WYOMING— Hidden Dome 

According to geologists, prospects for oil and gas in 
this section are excellent. 

Salt Creek 

The casinghead gasoline plant of the Midwest Refin- 
ing Company has been tested out and found satisfac- 
tory. The plant and 56-mile pipe line to Casper repre- 
sents an investment of $400,000. 

ALBERTA Calgary 

The Calgary Petroleum Products Company, to- 
gether with California capitalists is building a casing- 
head gasoline plant where the Petroleum Company's 
product from its No. 2 gasser will be utilized in the 
making of gasoline. The company's No i well in Sec- 
tion 6-20-2 is producing both oil and gas. The total 
production of gas frcm the two weels is estimated at 
about 5,000,000 cubic feet. 

Edmonton 

The Northern Natural Gas & Development Com- 
pany has a 5.000,000-cubic foot gasser in its No. 7 well 
in the Viking field. 



''Can I Make Gasoline 
From My Natural Gas ? 



»f 



H. A. FISHER CO. 

NATURAL. GAS GASOLINE 



r I I n K r n ..n 



can tell you definitely. —Their new system 
of testing the gas at the wells is the best plan yet de- 
vised. It is absolutely dependable. It eliminates the 
guess work'' from the gasoline business. 



It 



Pittsburgh, (542 wiiifi«M At«.) Pemuylvmnia 



Dill 



Natural Gas and Gasoline 



JOURNAL 



SUBSOUPTION- 
$2.00 IN THE U S. 



CONTENTS FOR MARCH. 1918 



VOLUME 
THIS NUMBER 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 
Advrrtiiinc CopT ihould be in b> Ihc isth ol 
nontb prcvlou* to idac. 

ADVERTISING RATES on rcqueil. 



BuHalo Long 
Seneca 3a9S-W 

Cable Addrei 



lance (Daj) Bell Telephone, 

-"Publighi, Buffalo." 

ice. Editorial 
i1 Office. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE 


An-iv^is of G««, by Prnf. W. ». F.ll«. 

J. W. nam, and E. G. R. .^rdagh 

Aisocialion ol Na.ural O* Supply Men.. 
Combatling Doubllul Oil Stock Pro- 


96 
90 


l>fnv« i!sr, Kak<^ Oil Slock Sale. 

Doherty Syndicali Operate* FroM Ga« 


.. 








in 


r V c n r  


, 


Gasoline from Natural Gas. by H. A. 


^ 






f 








Measureratnl of Gas by OHficf Mct«-.-. 


'" 


N O 1 d N t 1 


, 


 




Uueslions and Answers— I'Hic Paper 


93 
















11 










AROUND THE BELT— 
reraonati. Rates, Financial, FiBncbises, 
Incoioorated. General 





INDEX OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



By C. I. Hendrickion 

Bulletin on Coil Accounting... 

Bulletin on Oil Accounting 

1 luue* Bnllctin 



Calendar of You 

Company .... 
Carbon Induatry 



1 Cuih. 

S 

d Tube 



1 Project. By R. C. 



Converting Linotype Metal Meltioa Furnace 

From Coal to <Ut jj 

Co-operation Urged to Raise Oil Embar^ jo 



nent Wprk in Terrel 



Keai Insurance 

Long, Eliai H., Deceaaed 



■ing in Cycl. 
ural Gas Bu'sn 
urat Gat Ser<i 



I Tbirty.toar."V«»r». Ir> 6 

By L. W. LJBsley sj 

snoriage, A. C. Be^fori^.r u 

m Field. By Malt t>ubr "ij  

le WeWing. By Luciua S. 



rediiTgs Received 



an Industry Allied to Product ic 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank 

:eynoIds, M. G., Passes Away . 



Sense and Cents 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges 
Siiiril of Safety 



MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 

GAS SUPPLY MEN 



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I Ajl||Ol*|l AllAM 




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THE ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL GAS SUPPLY MEN 



PITTSBURGH. PA.. 

Feb. 18, 1918. 



mn 



Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal* 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Gentlemen! - 



As you are no doubt avare*- the Dlreoters of the 
Natural Oas Assoolatlon have decided to change the 
place of meeting of their AsBoclation to Pittsbarght Fa.y 
and also have requested that ve eliminate the exhibit 
feature this yearf due to the abnormal conditions which 
we are undergoing at the present time. 

Tour directors were more than glad to concede 
to this requestf and so this year we will all meet in 
Pittsburgh wiihout the exhibit feature. The convention 
will last only two days 9 and our Association will prob- 
ably give a luncheont or something of the sort to the 



visiting delegates. 



Tours very truly t 
(Signed) ^aztnouz £L&afno 



Secretary • . 



SUMMER AND WINTER CAS 



ol t— iiir Q«Mimy SoM» 
0*»llMi't L«titr 



Pitcwiaid m 



• - • 



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92 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



Those who are selected will be taken upon the basis 
of their qualifications, and will be assigned in accord- 
ance therewith. 

The government requires the ships to get supplies to 
our men and our allies on the other side of the Atlan- 
tic. This is a needed service and every man who en- 
ters it will be recognized as doing *'his part," equally 
with the men who are on the other side waiting to be 
served by the ships that these men will provide. 



GAS, VERSUS CAR-DELIVERIES. 



What Would Have Happened This Winter Had There Been 
No Gas, in View of the Car Shortage. 




NE of the daily newspapers of Columbus, Ohio, 
published an interesting statement, and it wa^ 
surely a clever piece of business to thus put the 
matter before the gas consumers of that Ohio 
city. The article read as follows: 

"On one day this month more than 3,000 tons of coal 
substitute was delivered to the homes of Columbus, with- 
out fuss or confusion. This substitute coal did not in- 
terfere with the shipment of war necessities by tying up 
even one railroad car or one delivery wagon. It was de- 
livered right into the homes of Columbus, without effort 
on the part of the people receiving it. Of course it has 
taken an investment of millions of dollars in compress- 
ing stations, pipe lines and other equipment, to make this 
possible, but then that is another story. 

"I wonder if the people of Columbus fully appreciate 
the value of the remarkably low-priced fuel which has 
for years been ready for their use by simply turning a 
valve? I refer to natural gas. It is hard to grasp what 
gas has meant to the city of Columbus and the whole 
State of Ohio. We hear so much about the great efforts 
to bring forward the coal supply that we may lose track 
of the fact that the gas companies have been delivering 
millions of cubic feet more gas this winter than ever be- 
fore, to fill the need where the coal supply has been in- 
sufficient. 

"In conversation with a number of gas men today I 
find that on that one Saturday, when the blizzard was 
with us, and the thermometer hitting 12 below, the local 
gas companies delivered about 65,000,000 cubic feet of 
gas to the homes of Columbus. These men figured out 
the fact that this amount of fuel represented, in heat 
value, more than 187 carloads of coal, which would re- 
quire four trains of 46 cars of 35,000 pounds capacity. 

*' These same men state that an average of almost 50,- 
000,000 cubic feet of gas a day was served to the people 
of Columbus, all during this cold spell. Taking the 
proven B. T. U. values of run of mine coal and natural 
gas as a comparison, it is no exaggeration to say that the 
gas served to the homes of Columbus was equal to one 
ton and a half of coal delivered each month to everv 

m 

house and place of business in the city. Think of the 
tie-up in railroad and delivery service there might have 



been if we had not had the gas service which the gas 
companies have given us ! 

"Columbus has many things to boast about, and when 
it comes to getting folks to locate in Ohio, we should 
not forget to tell about natural gas service." 



DOHERTY SYNDICATE OPERATES FROST 

GAS COMPANY. 



mHE Henry L. Doherty interests, located in Buf- 
falo, N. v., are seeking a transfer of the fran- 
chises, as well as the properties, known as the 
South Shore Natural Gas & Fuel Co., the Silver 
Creek Gas & Improvement Co., Fredonia Natural Gas 
Co., the Attica Natural Gas Co., the Ontario Gas Co., 
North Buffalo Natural Gas Fuel Co. and the Niagara 
Light, Heat & Power Co. 

In January 191 7 the stock of the South Shore Natural 
Gas & Fuel Company, the Silver Creek Gas & Improve- 
ment Company, and the Fredonia Natural Gas Light 
Company, was acquired by the Frost Gas Company. 

These companies supply 11,317 consumers with a pipe 
line and distribution system of approximately 438 miles 
in length. They supply with natural gas for fuel, light- 
ing and power Dunkirk, Fredonia, Westfield, Silver 
Creek and Mayville. The gas is obtained as far east 
as approximately twenty miles west of Buffalo and in 
the vicinity of Farnham. The North Buffalo Natural 
Gas Fuel Co. supplies natural gas for domestic con- 
sumption in the northerly part of Buffalo and the Niag- 
ara Light, Heat & Power Co. supplies manufactured gas 
in Tonawanda. The Niagara company is about to supply 
by-product gas in Tonawanda and North Tonawanda 
and will be required to make a large investment in pipe 
lines, apparatus and holders. It also supplies gas to 
Kenmore, ten m.iles east of which is the westerly end of 
the Alden-Ratavia Natural Gas Co.'s pipe line and dis- 
tribution system. The Alden-Batavia Natural Gas Co. 
and the Akron Natural Gas Co. are operated as one 
system, supplying 7,423 customers in Erie, Genesee, Wy- 
oming, Monroe, Livingston and Ontario counties. The 
natural gas is obtained locally. 

The following corporations are of New York state 
and all of them are operated from the Doherty offices 
in Buffalo. 

In New York state the following companies are op- 
erated from the office in Buffalo : Alden-Batavia Natural 
Gas Co. Ltd., Akron Natural Gas Co. Ltd., Attica Nat- 
ural Gas Co. Ltd., Ontario Gas Company, Ltd., North 
Buffalo Natural Gas Fuel Co., South Shore Natural Gas 
& Fuel Co., Silver Creek Gas & Improvement Co., Frost 
Gas Co. and Brocton Gas & Fuel Co. 

The officers are as follows: F. M. I^wry, general man- 
ager ; H. R. Davis, general superintendent ; J. A. Richie, 
secretary-treasurer, while the Niagara Light & Power 
Co. is operated from Tonawanda with C. W. Wallace, 
general manager ; H. W. Beckett, secretary-treasurer ; E. 
H. Beam, new business manager. 



Remember this, — ^that very little is needed to make a happy life. — . 



4- 



Questions and Answers 

PnM0 Winning t^pmr m CommM O/fwrwd hp .VoCuro/ 
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NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 




March 



carried to the bottom of the well by means of a pipe in- 
side the tubing. The steam will completely dissolve the 

salt. 

Question: How would you start packer in gas well 
where rubber is vulcanized to rock? 

Answer: A practical way to start a packer vulcan- 
ized to the rock is to jar it loose by working the tubing 
up and down, which will eventually loosen it. This 
working up and down wears away the rubber so that the 
packer will pass the "ring bone*' which is a slight shoulder 
or close place in the wall. The "ring bone/' or the close 
place, in the way is the cause of the packer sticking. 

Question: What is the largest size tap which it is 
practical to make in 2-in., 4-in., 6-in. and 8-in. line pipe? 

Answer: The largest size tap it is practical to make 
in a 2-in., 4-in., 6-in. and 8-in. pipe without flattening the 
pipe so as to form a shoulder or corking after screwing 
in the connecting pipe, is as follows : 

( )ne-half inch tap in tw^o-inch pipe. 

One and a quarter inch tap in four-inch pipe. 

Two inch tap in six-inch pipe. 

Two and a half inch tap in eight-inch pipe. 

Question: What are the chief constituents of nat- 
ural gas and approximately what percentage of each? 

Answer: Natural ^as usually composed of the fol- 
lowing gases : 

C.H^ (Marsh Gas), about 92 per cent. 

CoHo (Ethane), about 3 per cent. 

H (Hydrogen), about 2 per cent. 

N (Nitrogen), about 3 per cent. 

The constituents of natural gas vary greatly — accord- 
ing to the locality — and the above composition is only 
approximate for most natural gases. 

Question: In your opinion, which is the proper 
place to tap a line for the service — on the side, top or 
bottom ? 

Answer: The top is the best place to tap a main 
for a service on account of the following reasons: 

1. To aid in keeping dirt out of the service, as dirt 
lias a tendency to move to the low places. 

2. By means of two ells the service can be swung 
from the main at any angle. 

3. The danger of the service being broken off is 
lessened. 

4. The tendency of having a strain put on the con- 
nection is lessened. 

Question: Which has the most heat units per cubic 
foot, natural or artificial gas? 

Answer: Natural gas has approximately twice the 
number of heat units per cubic foot that artificial gas 
has. 

Question: What is the approximate value of the 
natural gas sold in the United States? 

Answer: The amount of natural gas utilized in the 
United States during the year of 1916 amounted to ap- 
proximately 700,000,000 cubic feet with a value of $5,- 
560,000,000. 

The appearance of things to the mind ii 



Question: What methods should be adopted for de- 
termining the efficiency of the line walkers ? 

Answer: The question of determining the efficiency 
of line walker depends on whether the line walker is 
covering field or trunk lines. 

In fields where more than one line walker is employed, 
a simple way is to assign a different man to certain lines 
each time, so that no line walker knows what his work 
will be the next day. 

On trunk or main lines, a good check on the efficiency 
of a line walker is by means of a portable clock, which 
the line walker carries. This clock is sealed and con- 
tains a weekly or monthly chart, giving date and time. 
The charts are changed and the clocks sealed at the main 
office, or by the man having charge of line walkers. Any 
number of distinct and different keys, no two alike, for 
punching the chart in the clock on the hour, quarter or 
half hour as desired, may be made. The keys are fixed 
in position so that line walker cannot fool with them or 
carrv them around. The kevs are to be located in such 
positions so that it would also be a necessity for the line 
walker to cover his beat in order to punch the chart, 
which gives a record of the date and time he was at the 
place. The chart will tell if the line walker has covered 
his beat — but will not tell if he is reporting all n>atters 
that he should. However, if he does not report all mat- 
ters that fault will soon come to light. 

Question: How can gas wells not in service be best 
prevented from drowning out? 

Answer: Gas wells not in service can best be pre- 
vented from drowning out by means of a pumping out- 
fit, or a syphon pipe, and then giving the well proper 
attention. 

Question: How much more capacity has a twelve- 
inch line than a four-inch line twenty miles in length, 
both with two hundred pounds initial and forty pounds 
discharge pressure? 

Answer: The carrying capacity of 4-inch line, 20 
miles in length, with initial pressure of 200 lbs. and a 
discharge pressure is 



0=42 a. ^ 



p 2 p 



=42x34.10 / 2i4-7'-54-72' 

\ 20 

0=66483 cu. ft. per hour. 

The carrying capacity of lines for same conditions 
vary as the 2.542 power of their diameter. 
Therefore. 4-:-'^- : 12 : 12'-^'^- :: 66483 : X 

X=discharge of 12"^ 1,085.297 cu. ft. per hour. 

By use of above formula, the discharge of the 12" line 
is 1.084.096 cu. ft. per hour. 

Therefore, the 12" line has a capacity of (1,084,096) 



(66483) 
1630 per cent, more than the capacity of the 4-inch line. 



Question: How much more capacity has an eight- 
inch line twenty miles in length with discharge pressure 
of forty pounds when initial pressure is raised from one 
hundred pounds to three hundred? 

Answer: When size of pipe is 8-inch, length 20 
miles, initial pressure 100 lbs. and discharge pressure 
40 lbs. 



The discharge==Q=42 a. /f_i 



2 p 2 

^ 2 



20 



0=42x198 ,/ ^ ^5^-55^ 

\ 20 



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13225—3025 



20 



10200 



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20 

==8316x22.5 
=187154 cu. ft. per hr. 

When initial pressure is raised to 300 lbs. and the dis- 
charge remains 40 lbs. with other conditions the same, 
the formula substitution becomes 



0=42x198/ 3152—552 
\ 20 



20 

=8316x69.3 

=576,698 cubic feet per hour. 

Thus percentage increase in the capacity of the line 
by increasing the initial pressure from 100 lbs. to 30C 

(576698) 

lbs. is or 308.0 per cent. 

. (187154) 

Question: Assuming that a line has a certair 
amount of leakage, quantity unknown, and the pressure 
of this line was reduced one-half, would the leakage be 
reduced one-half — or would the leakage be reduced more 
or less than one-half? 

Answer: Because the pressure on the leaky line ifi 
reduced one-half, the leakage would not be reduced one- 
half, nor would it be reduced less than half. The reason 
for that being that discharge varies directly as the square 
root of the drop in pressure. 

Question: Assuming a line one mile long, with 
initial pressure of 100 pounds and terminal pressure of 
95 pounds. If the pressure at both points is reduced one- 
half, would the carrying capacity be reduced one-half? 

Answer: Assuming a line a mile long, with initial 
pressure of 100 pounds and a terminal pressure of 95 
pounds, the reducing of the pressure one-half at each 
end, would not reduce the carrying capacity exactly one 
half, but would reduce the carrying capacity about 48 
per cent. 

Question: What size meter is desirable in an or- 
dinary eight-room house where gas is to be used for 
heating, lighting, cooking and other domestic purposes? 
Give reasons why, showing how the maximum consump- 



tion would compare vyith the maximum capacity of the 
meter. 

Answer: A meter with capacity of 300 cubic feet 
per hour is usually used in the ordinary eight-room house. 

Ordinarily in an eight-room house there would be ap- 
proximately : 

Seven heating stoves, with maximum consumption of 
150 cu. ft. per hour" 

One cooking stove, with maximum consumption of. 20 
cu. ft. per hour. 

Thirty Welsbach mantle lights, with maximum con- 
sumption of 90 cu. ft. per hour. 

One hot water heater, with maximum consumption of 
10 cu. ft. per hour. 

Total maximum consumption, 270 cu. ft. per hour. 

The maximum consumption would rarely exceed 70 
per cent, of a 300 cubic feet per hour meter, and the most 
of the time it rarely exceeds forty per cent, of the capac- 
ity of meter. Such variation in the loads of domestic 
meters are allowable, as a small positive meter will meas- 
ure all volumes of gas within its capacity correctly. 



DENVER BARS FAKE OIL STOCK SALES. 



City Council Passes Ordinance Providing Fine and Jail 
Sentence for Promoters or Advertisers Making 

False Statements. 




IGILANCE Committees and Better Business 
Bureaus will be interested in legislation enacted 
in Denver to check the wave of fraudulent stock 
promotion schemes, chiefly oil, which are prev- 
alent there. 

Briefly, the Denver Ordinance forbids the sale of any 
* 'Fictitious, fraudulent, fake or spurious stocks" or to 
make misleading statements concerning the character, 
title or value of the property of any corporation or asso- 
ciation when selling or offering for sale stock of such 
corporation or association.'' 

It provides for the issuance of license fees of $300 for 
all stock exchanges and $10 for all stock brokers, the 
licenses to be issued by the Manager of Safety and Excise 
when satisfactory statements are made as to the character 
of the persons comprising the exchanges or brokerage 
firms. The Manager of Safety and Excise has the 
power to revoke licenses, and it is required that the city, 
in addition to stopping the sale or fake securities must 
advertise the facts in such cases. If a newspaper or 
other advertising medium accepts advertisements of 
fraudulent securities after such a condemnation the ad- 
vertising medium will be guilty under the law. 

The penalties provided are a fine of from $10 to $300 
to which may be added from 5 to 90 days imprisonment. 

This is believed to be the most drastic and sweeping 
law adopted by any Amferican city to rid itself of the 
pest of fake stock peddlers.. Vigilance Committees anl 
Better Business Bureaus in other parts of the country 
which are interested should write the Denver cicy clerk 
for copies of the Ordinance. 



Work for safety means safety in work. The Commonwealther. 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



GASOLINF FROM NATURAL GAS. 



SCIENTIFIC RECOVERY METHODS EMPLOYED. 



mHERE is no part of the oil and gas business tha. 
requires more and receives less scientific treat- 
ment than the manufacture of gasoline from 
Natural Gas. The refining of oil from crude to 
vasaline, paraffine. etc., is comparatively simple, easily 
understood and it.s problems have been worked out until 
there is loo'/f efficiency in every part of the work. 

The manufacture of gasohnc from natural gas is a 
new business, llecause a quantity of gasoline could be 
produced with the crudest of apparatus the conclusion 
was "jumped at," that any old machinery or any kind 
of appliances were "good enough" for a gasoline plant. 
Assuming this the man who had a quantity of gas 
"guessed" it would make gasoline and put in a plant. If it 
failed he took the oil man's remedy of "cussing it out" 
and let it go at ihat. If he succeeded in getting some 
gasoline he was satisfied and never knew whether he was 
getting the amount he should or not. 

That the average efficiency was far too low is shown 
by actual te.sts made by the writer of many plants in 
operation. 

A small gasoline plant was making an average of f)0 
gallons per day. A test of the gas showed that he should 
get more. A change was made at the expense of not over 
$15.00 and the average production was no gallons per 
day. 

.-Knothcr gasoline plant was using 180.000 feet of gas 
and getting 75 gallon per day. It was 2\i. gallon gas 
and his production should have been 350 gallons. 

A gasoline plant was using 500.000 feet of gas per 
day and getting 500 gallons of gasoline. An ine.vpensive 
phangc in the appliances would have given a normal 
production which would have been 1250 gallons per day. 

These are not unusual instances; they are typical cases 
and can be dnplicateil in scores of plants, in the Penn- 
svlvanian and West \'irginian fields. It undoubtedly is 
a fact that no owner of a gasoline plant can l>e sure that 
he is getting the results he should unless he has bad his 
gas tested and his plant examined and tested scientifically 
through a term of nuinths. 

In explanation of the difficulties confronting the 
gasoline engineers allow me to cite a few instances that 
aciuallv occurred in different plants. 

The temperature of the gas as it was leaving the 
cooling coils was 60°. it was reduced to 58'— 56°— 54°. 
each change resuhing in reduced production and it was 
neces.sarv to come back to 58° at the best. 

A plant using cooling water with a temperature of 
54 changed the cooling system and increased the produc- 
tion 25'! . 

A release valve in a di.^^charge gasoline line was 
moved from one end to the other of the line (over 100 
feet), no other change was made but there was an in- 
crease in the production of 50 gallons per day. 



In another plant the temperature of the cooling 
coils was reduced from 50' to zo° with zo'^i increase in 
the production. 

Instances like these could be given almost without 
limit, tut these will emphasize our claim that there is 
no part of the oil and gas business as intricate or re- 
quiring more scientific knowledge as the manufacture of 
gasoline from natural gas. 



WATER REGULATOR. 



< lur illustration shows a water regulator for controll- 
ing water level in boilers. It serves as a safety device 
for kee])ing the pro|)er amount of water in boilers, thus 
];revcnting accidents and .saving costs for repairs. It also 
saves fuel, as the water is admitted in the same propor- 
tion that it is used, with a slight variation. This regula- 
tor has been tried out for two years, feeding two boilers 



NEW W.VTKK RK(;UI,.\TOR FOR <;AS AXI> OIL FIELD WORK. 

and sometimes three, and is said to have given entire 
satisfaction. There has been no cost for repairs. The 
only parts needing replacements would be valve seals, 
which would be a slight co-^t. Can be made for high or 
low pressure work, and is a great thing for use in gas and 
cil field work. It is j>atented bv William H. Minekime. 
Water \allev. N. Y. 



1' 



ABSORBING SUBSIDIARIES- 

■|()RD has come to us that the Ohio Cities Gas 
Company is making material changes in con- 
nection with its subsidiaries, the plan being to 
take them over in fee. The subsidiaries re- 
ferred to are. it is said, ccmtrolled by ownership of 
slock. The statement reads: — 

"With the completion of plans now well advanced the 
Ohio Cities Gas Co. will hold in fee. and not througb 
stock ownership, all of its ramified properties with the 
exception of those distributing natural gas. Although 
the name does not indicate it the Ohio Cities Gas Co. 
is a large <)il producer. It has 2.700 welh in operation 
and produces 12.000 barrels a day. It is m the oil 
fields that it i-i making such big strides as an ^dependetit. 
That is why the stock of the Ohio Cities Gas Co. moves 
with other oil stocks." 



Slight not what's near though aimmg: at what's far.— Euripides. 




BY PROFESSORS W. H. ELLIS, J. W. BAIN AND E. G. R. ARDAGH. 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 



Bureau of Mines, Ontario, Canada. 



mHE results of investigation have shown that the 
ordinary methods must be modified when ap- 
plied to the examination of natural gas, and 
these conclusions have formed the 1 asi.-: of the 
present study. 

Carbon dioxide w2ls determined in the usual manner by 
absorption in potassium hydroxide solution. 

Oxygen. Burrell and Seibert^ have shown that alkaline 
pyrogallate* is unsuitable for this determination and 
that phosphorus is also unreliable in the presence of 
large amounts of ethane and its higher homologues. 
In all the samples examined the ethane is compara- 
tively low, and the higher members are present only 
in very small amounts so that no objection to the use 
of phosphorus could be raised on this ground. The 
usual form of phosphorus pipette was accordingly 
used, and nothing abnormal was observed during the 
investigation. 

Carbon monoxide and olcfinc hydrocarbons: These 
have not been detected in the numerous samples an- 
alyzed by Burrell and Seibert-, and accordingly our 
gases were first examined qualitatively with the aid of 
a dilute solution of palladium chloride^ About lOO 
c.c. of the gas was transferred to a glass holder and 
shaken with 5 c.c. of palladium chloride solution (0.5 
g. PdCi^ pe rioo c.c.) ; after standing for at least one 
hour, a sooty scum could be observed if these gases 
were present. To test the delicacy of this reaction. 
0.3 c.c. ethylene was introduced into the gas holder 
whh the palladium chloride solution, the color of the 
latter changed immediately and in 5 minutes a sooty 
scum appeared. With o.i c.c. of ethylene the action 
took place more slowly; 0.5 c.c. of illuminating gas 
gave a reaction practically immediately. 

Hydrogen: Palladium black^ heated to ioo°C. was 
employed for the detection of this constituent, and its 
presence could not be determined with certainty in any 
of the samples. 

Paraffin hydrocarbons : These were determined by the 
slow combustion method in a sample from which the 
carbon dioxide and oxygen had been removed and in 
which the absence of carbon monoxide, the olefine 
hydrocarbons and hydrogen had been proved by the 



methods just described. One hundred c.c. of oxygen 
were first passed into the pipette and about 25 c.c. o^^ 
the sample was slowly admitted while the spiral of 
platinum wire was maintained at bright red heat. In 
order to assure the completeness of the combustion, . 
the mixture was passed into and out of the pipette 
twenty-five times, and the total contraction was then 
noted. The carbon dioxide was absorbed as usual and 
the results were calculated on the assumption that 
methane and ethane only were present 

Hydrogen sulphide was determined by Tutwiler's 
method.* Harding and Johnson® show that this method 
invariably yields much too high results with coal gas, 
due no doubt to the presence of substances other than 
hydrogen sulphide which are acted upon by free 
iodine. In the c^se of natural gases, however, consist- 
ing practically entirely of paraffin hydrocarbons, such 
errors would not be encountered. 

The burettes and pipettes were of the Hempel form. 
The burettes were of 100 c.c. capacity divided to 1/5 
c.c. and water jacketed. For the determination of car- 
bon dioxide and oxygen, water was used as the con- 
fining liquid, while mercury served for the combus- 
tions. The analvses were carried out in a room where 
the temperature was kept as close as possible to 20°C. 

Apparatus Employed. 

Several forms of the slow combustion pipette were 
tried which did not differ materially from the form 
recommended by Dennis.^ It was found distinctly ad- 
vantageous to introduce the two leads in the manner 
shown in the sketch. When the two leads were intro- 
duced separately through a double bored rubber stop- 
per, it was difficult to make a gas-tight joint, and the 
effort to force the stopper home tightly resulted fre- 
quently in an objectionable distortion of the spiral. 
The latter was made of No. 32 platinum wire with 
about ro turns of about i mm. diameter. 

Detailed Method of Analysis. 

The constituents for which tests were made And 
which were determined when present in the samples 
of natural gas examined are (i) Hydrogen sulphide, 
(2) Unsaturated hydrocarbons, (3) Carbon monoxide. 



^ Loc. Cit., 87. 

* Loc. cit., 76. 

' Loc. cit., 80; Phillips, F. C, Amcr. Chcm. Journ., Vol. XMI, 1894, 
p. 267. 

* Dennis, "Gas Analysis," Macmillan, 1913, p. 188. 

* Jour. Amer. Chcm. Soc, Vol. XXIII (1901), pp. 173-7. 

* Harding and Johnson, 8th Intcrnat. Cong. App. Chem., 1912, V^ol. 
XXV, p. 673. 

* Dennis, loc. cit., p. 148. 



Let us consider the reason of the case. For nothing is law that is not reason. PowelL. 



98 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



(4) Hydrogen, (5) Carbon dioxide, (6) Oxygen, (7) 
Methane, (8) Ethane, (9) Propane. 

For hydrogen sulphide a qualitative test was made 
with lead acetate paper at each gas well. When lead- 
pap^T was not blackened at the well, the quantitative 
estimation with iodine was, of course, omitted. 

The following description sets forth in detail the 
procedure for gases on which all determinations were 
carried out : 

Hydrogen sulphide was the first constituent deter- 
mined; the sample collected in the glass holder being 
employed for this purpose. One hundred cubic centi- 
metres of gas were drawn into Tutwiler's apparatus*, 
mercury being used as confinmg liquid, about 5 c.c. of 
freshly-prepared starch solution were then sucktd m. 
and standard iodine solution^ (One litre contamed 
1. 134 grams iodine, i c.c. =0.1 c.c. of hydrogen sul- 
phide at 0° C. and 760 mm.) added a little at a time, 
shaking vigorously between each addition, until a 
standard blue color resulted Some time before the 




Copper ^ G/ass 

/ \ /C 



i 



3= 



fiubb^r stopper 




APP.XRATUS FOR GAS ANALYSIS. 

end-point was reached, a purplish-pink color devel- 
oped, reminding one strongly of the titration of hydro- 
gen sulphide obtained from pig iron by the evolution 
method. It is a rather interesting fact that after all 
the hydrogen sulphide had been oxydized by the 
iodine, some of these gases still possessed a sickening 
stench far more disagreeable than hydrogen sulphide 
and not at all like it. This odor may possibly be due 
to traces of mercaptans. 

The gas-sample in which the hydrogen sulphide had 
been estimated, was then examined qualitatively for 
unsaturated hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide by 
shaking it with palladious chloride (PdCi.,) solution. 
The test was made by sucking about 5 c.c. of 0.5^? 
palladious chloride solution into a small glass sampling 
tube of about 150 c.c. capacity, evacuating the same by 
means of a water pump, introducing the sample of gas 
to be tested, shaking vigorously for perhaps a minute 
and allowing to stand for some time. In not a single 
instance did any reducing action on the palladious 
chloride take place, even in cases where the gas 
samples were left for a whole day in contact with the 
reagent. 

To determine the hydrogen, a sample of the gas, 
freed from hydrogen sulphide and saturated with 
water vapor, was m'''^ed with oxygen and passed 
through a tube containing palladium-black heated in 
a boiling water-bath^ In every case the result was 
negative, or so nearly so as to be within the limits of 
error for the method. 

To determine the carbon dioxide, 100 c.c. of the gas 
from which the hydrogen sulphide had been removed 



by shaking with a solution of lead acetate in distilled 
water slightly acid with acetic acid, were taken in a 
water-jacketed Hempel gas burette, water being used 
as confining li(|uid, and the carbon dioxide absorbed 
by potassium hydroxide (one of potassium hydroxide 
to two of water) in a Hempel gas pipette containing 
several rolls of iron wire gauze. The gas was passed 
back and forth into the pipette ten times to make per- 
fectly certain of complete absorption ; only, however, 
when the caustic potash was nearly exhausted did any 
further contraction take place after the gas had been 
passed twice into the pipette. The temperature of the 
water in the jacket wa«^ kept within 0.5"^ of 20°C. Be> 
fore taking the reading, the burette was allowed to 
drain for two and one-half minutes. 

After measuring the contraction due to absorption 
of the carbon dioxide, the gas was passed into the 
phosphorus pipette to remoxe oxygen. The use of 
phosphorus gave a very valuable qualitative (as well 
as quantitative) test for oxygen, since less than o.i 
c.c. of oxygen in 100 c.c. of gas will give a noticeable 
white fume. The pipette was filled completely with 
slender sticks of phosphorus. The few instances in 
which oxygen was found in small amounts probably 
indicate slight contamination of the samples with air. 

After the removal of oxygen, the gas was passed 
into a water pipette from which samples could be con- 
venientlv taken for the estimation of the saturated 
hydrocarbons. The latter were determined bv the 
method of slow combustion described by Dennis^. The 
confining liquid used both in the combustion pipette 
and in the gas-burette employed in connection there- 
with was mercury, water having too great a solvent 
action on carbon dioxide. The burette was water 
jacketed, and the temperature of the water was kept 
within at least half a degree of 20°C. 

About 100 c.c. of oxygen were carefully measured 
and passed into the combustion pipette, then about 
25 c.c. of residual gas were taken from the storage 
pipette, and its volume accurately read. The capillary 
connecting the burette and pipette was next cautiously 
freed from mercury and water, if any, the no volt cur- 
rent switched on. and the platinum spiral in the pipette 
brought to bright redness by cautiously manipulating: 
a simple "nichrome" rheostat placed in series with a 
lamp resistance. The gas was now allowed to flow into 
the combustion pipette at the rate of about 10 c.c. per 
minute, the flow being controlled by a screw pinch- 
cock. The rate of flow permissible depends, however, 
very Jargely upon the form, size, position and tempera- 
ture of the spiral, and possibly upon the shape of the 
pipette, also. Combustion took place perfectly quietly. 
Great care must be taken to avoid shooting a single 
particle of mercury into the combustion pipette, since 
a drop striking the white hot wire will cut it like a 
knife. When all the sample had been run in, the gas 
was run backwards and forwards between the com- 
bustion pipette and the burette about fifteen times, not 



- Jour. Amcr. Clicm. Soc., Vol. XXIII (1901), pp. 173-7. 
^ Hempel, "Cas Analysis," 1902 edition, pp. 237, 303. 

^ Dennis, loc. cit., i). 196. 

- Dennis, loc. cit., pp. 147-154. 



To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to kno wledge. Disraeli. 



NAIIKM. CAS AM) i..\>()IIM. 






. .* « 



• 



• • 



 • 



A crrAlUv rcunutc) ;• the fuel u! 5.^c.!Uc:.cc Ca«rtcft 



-5<x^ 



lOO 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



to gasify and was then measured. The non-condens- 
able portion was again liquefied, and a second small 
condensate was thus obtained. 

The entire fraction condensed was then analyzed 
by the slow combustion method, and in some instances 
the non-condensable portion also. 

Circumstances would not permit the application of 
this method to all the samples taken, so that those 
which were high in ethane, as determined by a com- 
bustion on the whole sample, were selected. It is 
obvious that the presence of propane or butane or 
both in any gas, would lead, in the ordinary combus- 
tion method, to the conclusion that the amount of 
ethane present was higher than the real value, and 
hence those samples which were highest in ethane 
were examined first. 

Ethane by combustion Ethane, propane, etc., 
on whole sample. by liquefaction. 

Kent No. 2 10.8% 10.6% 

Lambton No. r 17.6% 11.6% 

Lambton No. 2 i8.47r Qi^^v 

Brant No. i 9.5% /•S'/c 

Brant No. 2 ig.o^r 147^^' 

Haldimand Xo. 2 1 1.4% 10.8% 

Haldimand No. 7 i6.37r Jo.S7r 

Welland No. i 17-3'/'^ ^S-(^'/c 

Haldimand Xo. i 2i.3yr I7.69r 

It is unnecessary to give the details of the analysi.s 
of each of these condensates, but it will suffice to (juote 
one for illustration. 

In the case of Brant No. 2 the condensate yieldcJ the 
following results : 

Sample Xo. i. Sample Xo. 2. 

Volume of gas taken 14.4 150 

Volume of oxygen added 98.8 999 

Total volume 113.-2 ii4-9 

Contraction 7S.7 78.3 

Volume after potassium hydroxide 

absorption 5i-7 SO.i 

Volume of carbon dioxide 27.0 28.2 

Ethane 1 2.60 1 2.75 

Methane o.c>8 1 .80 

In all the condensates analyzed only methane and 
ethane could be found, with the exception of Brant 
No. I, Lambton Tand 2, and Haldimand i. Butane 
appears to be entirely absent in these gases. 

Reverting to Brant No. 2, the above data furnish 
two concordant values, 12.60 and 12.75 P^^ cent, of 
ethane in the gas, but these figures are much lower 
than 19.0, the percentage determined by combustion 
on the entire sample without liquefaction. A compari- 
son of the values set down in the table shows that this 
is also the case in Lambton Xo. i and Haldimand Xo. 
7, and we have endeavored to find some reason for 
these discrepancies. The condensations were usually 
carried out in duplicate and when some experience had 
been obtained, the volumes of condensate from two 
samples of the same gas did not vary by more than i 
c.c. on a 100 c.c. portion. A series of determinations 
were carried out on Welland No. i which was one of 
the first gases examined by this method, with the ob- 
ject of studying this difficulty ; but no higher value iOr 

Dost thou love life? Then do not squander time, 



the condensate than that which is given above could 
be obtained. 

The only explanation which we can offer to account 
for these variations is the well known fact that the 
vapor pressure of a li(|uid is altered by the addition of 
a second liquid ; we have as yet no reliable method of 
calculating the amount of the change. The magnitude 
may be guessed from an observation that at — 78 'C 
the vapor pressure of li(iuid isobutane is raised from 
12.7 mm. to 19.9 mm. by the presence of 0.9^^ of pro- 
pane^ While, therefore, pure ethane may at the tem- 
perature of liquid air have a vapor pressure of prac- 
tically zero, the presence of a large quantity of liquid 
methane which is slowly being removed at each stroke 
of the pump, will almost certainly result in the evapor- 
ation of some of the liquid ethane also. It may at 
once be said that this error in parallel experiments 
might be expected to show a uniformity, and we have 
tried with the greatest care to realize this prediction 
but without success. 

In several cases the non-condensable gases were also 
analyzed and proved to be mixtures of much methane 
and some nitrogen with small amounts of ethane. The 
quantity of the latter when added to that obtained 
from the condensate was still too low as compared 
with the value for ethane obtained by direct combus- 
tion. 

Lack of time has prevented us from making a more 
thorough study of this problem. 

The reason for the variations referred to above still 
remains undiscovered and the results actually obtained 
are given as a basis for the conclusions which have 
been drawn. 

The data obtained by the liquefaction method, show- 
ing the absence of butane and higher homologues and 
the presence of propane in very small amount in only 
four samples, are taken by us to indicate the substan- 
tial accuracy of the combustion analyses. Any error 
which might be due to the presence of the higher 
paraffins may be regarded as entirely eliminated. 

Note : It was the intention to carrv out helium de- 
terminations on the most likely gases, i. e., the high 
nitrogen ones. It w-ill be observed there were very 
few of these. Of two selected as promising one gave 
no helium and the other a distinguishable quantity. 



* r.tl>caii and Damicns, loc. cit. 



MAKING TIGHT JOINTS. 



The 1>. V. (Goodrich Rubber Company is making a 
si)ecial drive in telling layers of pipe how they can 
make their joints gas-tight by using their coupling- 
rubbers which are known as "Grade 19.*' 

The difficulties met with on account of disintegra- 
tion caused by natural gas and gasoline are, it is 
claimed, dissipated through the use of the specially 
prepared rubbers manufactured by the company. A 
clever statement is made, namel\% *Tt's a Coupling 
King with the camouflage left out." 

for that is the stuff life is made of. FrankUn. 



JVater In Wells 

Communication bg A. E. Bogdt of the Ohio Fuel Supply Company 

of Ashlandf Ohio 



Editor Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal. 
Dear Sir: 

On July 22nd, 1916, I issued a circular letter to all 
well men working in my district. I thought then to 
publish the letter, but thinking some skeptics might not 
altogether agree with me, I concluded to wait and see 
if there would be any benefits derived from the letter. 
After watching the results closely for more than a year, 
and knowing that we have derived much benefitj I 
thought to ask you to publish the letter that other gas 
men might profit thereby. The letter to well blowers 
was as follows: 

TO ALL WELL BLOWERS :— 

We have been having considerable trouble this summer 
with some of our well men letting water accumulate in 
their wells. This makes it necessary to move a large 
baiHng machine in, which is very expensive to the com- 
pany, and is also very hard on the wells, for quite often 
after a well has had several hundred feet of water on the 
sand it takes several days to get it back to its natural 
production. Now this is not what the company is pay- 
ing the well men for. They have had a certain number 
of wells consigned to their care and are supposed to keep 
the wells in good condition, unless something unusual 
happens, which is liable to happen to any well. What 
I mean by this is, a packer may blow out, or a string of 
tubing may drop once in a while, but these things 
usually happen to comparatively new wells. As I said 
before, the well men are supposed to keep their wells in 
good condition. If the wells make water they are sup- 
posed to keep it blowed out as long as the well has 
gas enough to blow the water out readily, but just as 
soon as the pressure gets so low it does not lift the 
water then it is time to begin to swab the well and not 
wait until it fills up several hundred feet with water and 
then **holler'' for a bailing machine. 

Under ordinary circumstances a well should never be 
allowed to fill up more than a few feet in the tubing 
with water. If it does it cannot make its natural pro- 
duction, and the well will deteriorate m^re rapidly. I 
think some of the men take it for granted certain wells 
are dry and it is not necesssary to swab them as long 
as they make a pound on the gauge. This is a wrong 
idea. They take it for granted the well is O. K. until 
it is dead, then they try to swab and there is not enough 
gas to swab with, then they report something wrong with 



the well. We go in with the large bailing machine and 
maybe find several hundred feet of water in the tubing. 
This should not be. I would advise, on a light well, 
that you run a swab once in a while and find out for 
sure if there is any water in it. 

I believe some of you are doing this. If you are, 
this does not apply to you. Some of you would have 
done so but you never thought it necessary. We have 
some old experienced well men, then we have some who 
have not had much experience. The object of this letter 
is to help you to learn and to help you to try to save 
the company's property and thus gain the end for which 
the company has you employed, that is, to keep their wells 
in good condition. Some of you will say, '*0, that letter 
dont apply to me, it is for the other fellow," but I think 
every one of you can get a little good from it. A part 
of it will apply to any of you. I know I receive a great 
many circular letters from the company and there is 
always part of them that applies to me in some way or 
other. 

I will admit some of our well men arc causing us very 
little trouble and are keeping their wells in good shape, 
while there are others who are causing us a great deal 
of trouble. I will be frank with you and say I think the 
man who causes the least trouble is the man who watches 
his well closely and keeps it clean, both from water and 
salt, and never lets it get the start of him even if he 
has to put in a long day now and then and occasionally 
has to work on a Sunday. That man has the easiest job 
in the end, anyway. The other fellow lets a well get 
the best of him. He works "like thunder" on it a day or 
two, has to give it up and report the well as being dead, 
and while he has been monkeying with that one, another 
well is getting the best of him. "Nip them in the bud," 
that is what you have to do and that is what constitutes 
a good well man. That kind of a well man seldom, if 
ever, has to call for help. He is ..doing what the com- 
pany pays him to do, that is, to keep a certain number 
of wells free from water, salt, etc., as well as saving all 
the gas for the company he possibly can by keeping all 
leaks tight, etc. 

The same instructions regarding water can be applied 
to salt. You cannot always tell if a well is salty by the 
gauge. Open your well occasionally and familiarize 
yourself with the flow. You can often tell that way 
if a well is off because of water or salt either one. If 
a well shows indications of salt put fresh water in it 
often. Don't wait until the well is salted up. 



«•> 



The measure of a man's life is the well spending of it, and not the length. Plutarch. 



I02 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



LATEST INSTRUCTIONS. 



mHE following instructions have been issued to 
gas and oil pipe line companies, and to gas 
and oil pipe line workers, by the Federal Oil 
Inspection Board for California. Findings 
arrived at in the matter of hours for labor and other 
matters pertaining to the California field are given. 
The report is signed by the following Federal Oil In- 
spection Board members : L. P. St. Clair, \V. F. Byrne. 
G. M. Swindell. The rules are as follows : 

First: That the eight-hour day shall be put into 
effect as of Jan. i, 1918, and shall apply to all w^ork 
connected with the transportation of oil or gas by 
pipe lines in all parts of the State of California. 

It is the intent and purpose of this ruling that eight 
hours shall constitute a day's work and longer hours 
of labor will not be permitted, save in cases of emer- 
gency when the protection of life and property requires 
working longer hours, which extra time shall be com- 
pensated for by an allowance of an equivalent amount 
of time during some subsequent day. 

In the event that, because of an inadequate supply 
of labor, lack of sufficient quarters or for other good 
and sufficient reasons the eight-hour day has not been 
put into effect, on the day specified, the workers will 
work, and they are hereby requested by this Board to 
work, until further notified, such additional hours as 
may be necessary and they shall be paid for such ex- 
tra work on a pro rata hourly basis of the day's wage. 

All pipe-line workers are expected to work a full 
eight hours per day ; time for beginning and ending 
work as well as length of time allowed for lunch to be 
fixed by each company, but in all instances to be 
reasonable. Where work is located at a considerable 
distance from boarding house or other central station, 
men will go to their work on company time and re- 
turn on their own time, with the proviso that loss of 
time to workers shall not exceed 20 minutes per day. 

Second: The minimum wage for pipe-line workers 
shall be $4 per day, which wage shall apply as of Dec. 
1st, 1917. 

The term *'pipe-line worker'' as used above is meant 
to apply to all workers who are continuously em- 
ployed, directly or indirectly, in the transportation of 
oil or gas, including telegraph operators, linemen and 
linewalkers. It is not intended to include commissary 
or office help, other than telegraphers, or the casual 
worker who is a mere incident to the business and not 
continuously employed therein. 

This ruling, so far as gas lines are concerned, is to 
apply to natural gas lines originating within the 
boundaries of any oil field, and only affects those 
workers who are employed in the production of gas 
within the oil fields or engaged in work along the pipe- 
line systems, but does not apply to workers employed 
within the limits of municipalities. 

All pipe-line workers, in any class except those ex- 
empted, who left the service on or after Dec. i, 1917, 
will be entitled, upon demand, to an adjustment be- 



tween the wage paid at the time of settlement and the 
wage fixed in the ruling mentioned above. 

Third : Xo employe shall be discriminated against 
by reason of his membership in any labor organization 
affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, nor 
shall any employe not a member of any labor organi- 
zation be intimidated by members of such organiza- 
tions. 

Any infraction of this rule should be reported to this 
Board for adjustment and settlement, and offending 
parties will be dealt with as conditions justify. 

Fourth : All disputes or disagreements between em- 
ployers and employes, on any matters connected with 
the carrying out of the findings or their interpretation 
by this Board, irtust be submitted in writing to this 
Board for adjudication. 

Any employe who leaves his work, or any employer 
who discharges an employe without good or sufficient 
reasons therefor, or any employer or employe who un- 
dertakes to act arbitrarily in the premises, prior to sub- 
mission of and determination by the Board of any mat- 
ter of dispute or disagreement and the final rulifig of 
the Secretarv of Labor thereon, will be viewed as an 
insurgent unworthy of the good influences of the 
Board or the protection of the Federal Government. 

In this connection it mav be well to remind all con- 
cerned that to this l>oard and only to this Board, has 
been delegated the authority of interpreting the Santa 
r>arbara findings and of deciding all questions pertain- 
ing to their application and the method of putting 
them into effect. 



MEASUREMENT OF GAS BY ORIFICE METER 



The title of this notice is the title of a recently pub- 
lished hand-book of which we have previously spoken, 
but regarding which we would desire to again make 
mention. The book is by Henry P. Westcott, member 
of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and 
author of "Hand Book of Natural Gas," Hand Book of 
Casingliead Gas," and Measurement of Gases Where 
Density Changes." The work has 400 pages, containing 
30 sets of Tables. A full description with plainly writ- 
ten instructions for measuring gas by Orifice Meter. 

Complete set of Pressure Extension Tables from 29 
inches mercury vacuum to 500 pounds pressure. 

Complete tables of Coefficients for 4, 6, 8 and 10 inch 
Pipe Lines. 

Tables for percentages fast or slow when error is 
found in differential pen arm or in specific gravity used. 

Various tables and data necessary to the Orifice Meter 
owner. 

Pocket size (4% 7Vj), clearly printed from new 
type on specially made paper. 

The price in Cloth binding is $3.50, Leather bound it 
is $4.00. 

The book is published by Metric Metal Works, of 
Erie, Pa. 



No one knows what he can do till he tries. Sjrrus. 



I04 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons of the 
paraffine series, also usually containing very small 
portions of nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water vapors. 
A sample of "wet" gas recently analyzed showed the 
following composition : 

Methane 37-4% 

Ethane • .. 32.0% 

Propane 20.1% 

Butanes, Petanes, Hexanes, etc 10.5% 



Total I nc. 1.03 Nitrogen 100.0% 

The "dry" gases are usually very high in methane, 
sometimes as much as 95 per cent. Methane cannot 
be liquefied by ordinary commercial methods, conse- 
quently the gasoline content of natural gas is recov- 
ered from the lower hydrocarbons, ethane, propane, 
butane^ etc. 

There are two general methods of recovering con- 
densates from natural gas. Briefly, they may be 
described as follows: 

(a) Compressing the gas by means of an air com- 
pressor adapted to the purpose. Cooling the com- 
pressed gas by means of condensing coils, by use of 
water, air or artificial refrigeration. 

(b) The Absorption Method — Passing the gas 
through towers, or receptacle in contact with heavy 
oils, (used as a menstrum). Then heating the oil 
in ordinary stills to a point where the light vapors 
absorbed by the menstrum pass off as vapors, which 
vapors are reduced to condensates by the usual 
methods of condensation. 

The first method used only with "wet" gas has 
many variations, embodying the ideas of many inven- 
tive men. Although patents are extant claiming to 
cover the basic principle, no attempt has been made 
to enforce them. There are, however, many patents 
on special devices of more or less merit. 

COMPRESSION PLANTS. 

A plant for recovering gasoline from casing head 
gas was erected in the vicinity of Titusville, Pa., near 
the Drake well in 1904. The equipment was crude. 
The gas, compressed by gas pumps, was condensed 
by means of a pipe coil in a water tank, the condensate 
dripping into a wooden barrel. The product, when 
first obtained, had a gravity of 80 to 90 degrees Baume 
scale, and the loss from evaporation was large. Other 
plants were installed in that locality. soon thereafter. 
These ventures proving a commercial success, plants 
of better design and equipment were installed in other 
oil regions. 

At first ordinary gas pumps at pressures of 50 
pounds were used; at present compressors — usually 
two stage — of modern design are installed and the 
gas is compressed to from 100 to 250 pounds per 
square inch, depending upon the quality of the gas 
and the resultant gravity of the condensate. 

Speaking generally, the higher the gas is com- 
pressed, the higher the resultant condensate. At 
above 80 degrees Baume the evaporation of the 
product at atmosphere is very rapid. The quantity 



of gas consumed or utilized in the recovery of the 
gasoline is but a small percentage of the total volume 
compressed. The waste gas, or gas from which the 
gasoline has been recovered, can be used for fuel and 
internal combustion engines. The recovery of gaso- 
line from casing head gas is from two to eight gallons 
per thousand cubic feet of gas. depending upon the 
quality of the gas. 

The absorption process is of more recent adoption 
than the compression process, and installed, usually, 
to recover condensates from **dry" gas transported 
through pipe lines to more or less distant markets. 
The operation of the plant is essentially this : 

The plant is erected close to the pipeline, preferably 
at a gas pipeline compressor station. By suitable 
connections the gas is diverted through the absorbers 
— the flow of gas through the pipelines is undisturbed 
— the gas passes into the bottom of the absorbers, 
up through the oil and out at the top, and thence 
on the market. In passing through the absorber, the 
gas mingles with the oil coming into the absorber 
from the top, broken and spread by baflfles and other 
devices. The oil descending absorbs gasoline from 
the gas, and is pumped from the bottom into a still 
where the gasoline is distilled out of the oil by live 
steam. The oil, stripped of the gasoline, is then 
pumped into the absorber to absorb more gasoline, 
the operation being a continuous circuit of the heavy 
oil. A weathering tank is in the circuit to get rid 
of some of the lighter condensates before the oil 
enters the still. There is also a heat exchanger for 
cooling the oil before it returns to the absorber. Re- 
cently, some absorption plants are also equipped with 
a compressor plant, which takes the light g^ses from 
the weathering tank, and the tail pipe of the con- 
densers reduced them to liquid and mingles them with 
the gasoline recovered through the absorber. 

The heating value of the gas after passing through 
the absorber is not appreciably lowered, and the dele- 
terious effect of gasoline on the rubber in coupling 
on the gas pipeline is eliminated. 

The absorption process is patented by at least two 
inventors^ and several operators have installed plants 
and are using the process in defiance of the patentee. 

The recovery of gasoline from **dry" gas by the 
absorption method is comparatively small and depends 
somewhat on the quality of the gas, but is usually 
y about one pint for each one thousand cubic feet. 

Absorption plants are usually installed where large 
volumes of gas can be treated — in some cases from 
forty to fifty million cubic feet for each twenty-four 
hours. 

The term '^condensate" is a more suitable name for 
the liquid obtained from natural gas by either process, 
for some of the liquid obtained is so volatile that it 
does not come within the meaning of the trade name 
gasoline. 

At present practically all natural gas condensate 
is mixed with low grade naphtha — a refinery product 



Fair words never hurt the tongne. Ohapman. 



M«Kh 



NATURAL CAS AND CASOUNE 



»«»J 



In the rarU cUv« ui thr iii4tti«tr% Hratli* imi^" t«»r 

r . Af«iratii»n of thr tii;ht \4|Nir« nt ilir mnilf fi«.kt« Ma« 

'^■Ar%mmry for M(n% in •hi|ifMn|« ami ii«r I li« prtNr*^ 

vmlhcriiiK" (rr«|urntl\ caii^rfl a !•>«« ni irnni ;•• 

* - r^ V^ ^^M tty "lilrndini;" 4 tir«Mlti«t i« hIiT^mh .! 
t^.At Ka« a morh •lowrr ratr of r\4|i«ir4liiiii ihan l!ir 
A4?ufAl §;«• riinflrn«alr. anil « 411 tn- «hi|i|*ri| aiwl ti«ril 
• -ih •Alrl% Sr%rral nirth«M|« «if f^lrfiilifi^- arr m 
m%r rhr our in mo»t fa^nr now m tl-.r \fic| 1 i«riiiiiriit 
^rM It thai c»( •|ira«in^' ihr Iu4v\ tuplillia iiiIm thr 
K .* •«acnprr%«r«l Cji«r« a« ttir\ Ira^r ilir « tifiipfr**!!? 
Ui<h thr naphtha intriNltunl tni.«t!\ ^a«ifirt| 1.% hr^t 

' thr ci»m|iffr»ttrt1 |i*a« aiifi lltr 1 iitn|irr««r<! ^-4^ 4rr 
^^r«i |ia»*r«l mill thr nitnli ti^ r « .mil Mh n *ii!t.irii 
ffa^itv rrducnl tn a iMm)»ar4tt\r1\ »t.iMc- {ir'tlutt 

Ihi« mrthfid ArrftM Iirii4i|i\ •>i\fml !•% thr I .hit 

Ur \nh«r patmt. and itt um* rr«ul!« m a rrtovcry 
.« jt tf* yi per «'rnl ninrr mrri 1i4iit4f*!r t'riMlii«t ihafi 

• ^«krlr«ftatr and Iciw i;rai|r rrrinrr\ ii4f*hth4 

>f !• c1|»t«tfti4r% to 1r*t ffit . .1* {■'•»;- 'Til to l>r ii^t •) 

* Srtrfminr it* ;;4»<t1iiir •>.*)*• tit« fifi.ir* m^tal'-n 

A ; '*fit and a clc**c drtrr iiiin4fi<ifi ^^i (!ic •nn n «;i!t 
A* *^ arffi«rfi at !•% %\uh tr»t> 

-•««•>, r • a |»lan! haiid'iti 
•■^ns* Kiiur« !• |priilit4^'« 
'-^•"•f Irrt !• («*nftii!< ri <! .« ' .* 

' » plant in«fl»|ir« . .ti«>i 

• h*<h l^a* i* ti» lir IMril * « • ; ( "r 

?**r • a «inc hrad k'^* t'«'J.i .••;f^•^ 
ft« AAiitaY'Ir tanka^'r iti'l >.  v 

* ;i?^frd •■•! wrlU 4rr •  • •  



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ihr |ffCi«|ttt tiiin «•! K*--«' ■»• '■ • -• ' 

#  .'■■» |fal)«in« in i*^ i| !•• '•; • • • t > , .1 ! .n « 'n i<,i ; 
T*^^ ittrrra*r Unf |i«m "^rr i'#i-' .* *• ; •= •<• # •«• 
r >' 4 rtnc i«#tj(. f»$J^^."•; ^'411 .11 • .*r»f f »••»•• ! * . «■? 
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;' ^vn. thr %alor iiHIir \f 4r «..•.:!;••.:• *.« ■,•*;:; «».■» 
r* '• r«tifnatr«i that lHrii»\ '.im' * ?! ••• 

*A"7ra! k'** na« utili/nl m t^« im^mi' i * 
A > tf^ac* rrcmrrj «»i j s^ ij4l!..f»* .•? ^-i- 
•^««^ «nlMr frrt 

I? r« r^limalrd that thr |>r -l':  -ii ' •« i« 



' M 



riTt Bi iir nil :n 

A h«W r^rry c^* Mrll m a )--fiti« >  • -*!i r- 
^AtaJsttr. ihrrr arr man^ rr4^«>fi* i«f % t^i < •« - ' n .• 
•' attltfrd for thr manutfat ittir ••! ^•i^<.'Mtr \<r>. r.^ 



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nftri 


fni ficlil t*l tf«t 


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rn 


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N rt !^.rrr urr ii in. iiti!ii>*ri« nt trrt **\ . 4«iii^ hra«l 
h.4« rkiw ajKinij til f»4«tr that «ill ^ir tiiiltfrtf I hr timr 
i« iir4r mhrn a i;a««iliiir plant will (•< 4* ifu«h a |<iart iit 

4 Mr'! r>it|i|i|irt| ••?! :r4«r 4* thr tm-mf |'*An1 li.r pump 
illi^' thr Mci!* i»i<M It ihr liu«iffic«ft :» ;-r .f*ti jli'r undrff 
pr«i|M-r < tiiulititirM 4114! t iin«rf % al>«*ffi i* alwav* |m«|»u 
lar mhrii it i« |iri*hl4h!r 



MONTHLY STANDARD OIL RKVIEW 




t \ »■• r iKiri*- » N* 



I Kl N* • ihr ; .i«l t^rrr «rvL«. !'ic I m 4! « .A« «tiB k% 

• •n ■t|;'<t :rji! ii|« h4%r *h'>«ri htllr > h4?.|C'' *" thr 
^ii;«;''\ h4i '**rM »* ' \r l»iih i»n th* ra4! Uuf*l 

all^! ••: \» * ^ ffk .;^'>ri| »• H* _ »*-V:'i|f !» ^f 4! 4.1* • 

aritl t*.« a! 4.*'« Ihr 1 •«ii|ari% « :i! ha^r '.}\r lirvt 

>(4trTi.t r-.' II'. t! * •:«? if \ •^••t«iv|^ ^ tijr%a!»« •ti« :ii« rra«r 
>!>' r ( fi \ L •!!« «rar ' •■)... i '.i' .  ':i « j ^ ilul! veiling 
■M r 1 ; ^ • • I'. !r^ l.Mjj *:' •  'ii j.*». -jia Natural i »a« 
*«>k'! tirii fi4ll|(r.* 4f t^r «! CI *- t| -. ;'ri>r t «■ ; nn «l<1 kiC« 
*':VtVti'|-I. • p'" 4f 1 ».,^ • ,1 i- i5^ aivil |pXj hlfh 






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m Aftiurt ! St^iKaf 

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fc*' • ' Taw :M ra?n 

• ' : ' •* A* 4 '•• * %alur 

t • t'* irjr r«,tta! i>< 

• * ' kr 4 ;4irihatr 

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a • •• , • *• = ' • ■• A"*-- »'-*'r A r  .*!•»'! 



fllinois Pipe Line, l^elieving that both have more future. 
The dividend's declared yo far this year show no change ; 
with the advancing prices of crude oil, the outlook for 
the producing company are extremely flattering. 

Standard ^>tl Company of Xew York through purchase 
of the minority interest in Magnolia Petroleum with 
which they did a great deal of business, gives it an 
additional earning pr^wer. The buying of this stock for 
the past six months, looks like accunuilation and the 
surplus should amount to the capital stock. Looks like 
a purchase if you are willing to hold it. The increase 
of the capita] stock of the Magnolia Petroleum from 
$30,000,000 to $60,000,000 is one of the indications of 
the rapid expansion of the business, and the necessity 
of amply capital to carry on the business on a large 
scale. 

Midwest Refining sold low at 106. and up at 1 1 1. The 
Imperial Oil Company of Canada have denied that they 
own the control of the same. The f>assing of the leasing 
bill before the house should benefit both Midwest Refin- 
ing and Midwest ^)il, as it will provide a way of settling 
law suits without further litigation. 

Xorthwest Oil moved up from 58 to 68. Have well 
down 2400 feet which is an oflFsct to a well several months 
old doing 500 barrels. This stoc!: offers a good looking 
speculation, as with other wells drilling they should soon 
have a nice prr>duction. 

Cosden & Company moved from 7 to 8^4- Come 
selling of the dividend stock noticeazle, but it being well 
absorl>ed. With all depreciation and taxes deducted, 
earnings are expected to show a big return on the 
common. Ixjoks like a purchase and should sell higher. 

Oklahoma Producing & Refining statement was rather 
a disap[>ointment. although it does not show the exact 
conditions of the comj)any which are much better than 
the figures would indicate. Strxrk has been quoted 
around 7 to 7Vm. 

Sinclair Oil & Refining Company have completed their 
pipe line to Flast Chicago. This will have a capacit)' 
of 20.000 barrels a day. [)art of which will go to Kansas 
City Plant and the balance to the new plant at East 
Chicago. Report for nine months after deducting fixed 
charges, income, and excess profit taxes and depreciation, 
show at the rate of $5.12^/^ for the year. The last 
quarter is expected to be somewhat Ixrtter than the third 
quarter, and earnings shrmld show present dividends 
more than earned. 

Sapulpa Refining sold low at 8 and high at 8%. The 
Company are in excellent financial shape and fully 
earned their dividend and a nice surplus. 



VICTORY PLANT IN SERVICE. 



fl 



The next thing to genius is the ability to 
appreciate genius, but greater than either is 
the ability to utilize genius, whether your 
own or another's. — Ginger 




X the City of Buffalo, N. Y., for the building of 
turbine engines, a great plant, representing 
$3,000,000 investment, has been set in opera- 
tion. The first cuts made on two Bullard 
vertical turret lathes on wheel forgings, were after 
2*45 o'clocok on February 22nd, immediately follow- 
ing the starting of the great plant, sent to Secretary 
of the Xavy Daniels at Washington, a telegram being 
despatched by Mr. E. B. Germain, General Manager 
of the Black Rock works of the Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Company, announcing that the manufacture of 
turbine engines for torpedo boat destroyers had been 
begun at the great plant in Buffalo, which plant is 
owned by the United States government, but is being 
operated by the company mentioned. 

Buffalo again shows itself possessed of vast facil- 
ities added to its alreadv almost numberless manu- 
facturing institutions. 

The manufacturing enterprises in the "Queen City 
of the Lakes" are so diversified as to represent an ex- 
ceedingly broad line of opportunity to serve the peo- 
ples of the United States while ensuring the City of 
Buffalo against ill effects from any mishap occurring 
to. or strikes occtrrring in any one particular line of 
industry. Buffalo is a great city with great indus- 
tries, and a great future. 



NEW ORLEANS AND NATURAL. 




F things keep on. New Orleans will have natural 
gas. There certainly is good prospect of such 
a result being attained. The following star 
has arisen on the horizon. It is Mr. T. H. 
Lackland. Manager of the Big Ben Oil Company, with 
offices at Peoria, III. Mr. Lackland's company, owns 
leases on approximately 10,000 acres in gas-producing 
section, all of which is within piping distance of New 
Orleans, so he states, and he says that he would be glad 
to negotiate for a franchise to serve the city of New 
Orleans. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



BY JO. P. CWPPEAU SONS. 

Open High 

Columbia G. & E 35 35 

Favette Gas 

Mfg. L. & H S2 53Mi 

Ohio Fuel Supply 43^2 43% 

Ohio Fuel Oil . . .' 16 16 

r)klahonia Gas 25 25 

Pgh. Oil & Gas 5% 6% 

Pure Oil Com 24V2 24M8 

Cent. Kentucky Gas 

Lone Star Gas 96 100 

Union Gas 



Low 

35 

• • 

51% 
42^ 
15 V2 

25 

5 Mi 
24^.4 

• • 

96 



Last 

35 
110 

51^ 
42 'S 

16 

25 

22 
100 

153^ 



Talk of nothing but business, and despatch that business quickly. 



RESULTS OF DRILUNG-LATEST REPORTS 



FSNNtYLVANlA riBLD 

ALLKOAHV flRLD 

\ f *r« \ «. \latllAn4 

IIIODL8 riRLO 

v%- 'ft ( «icitiiir«tAl < *il «' 
l«^r».>^ !r lumps Hill < »il ^1 
' -»ri - Ifftnmph Hill ( >il J4 
lM^''«^i«tt Vtop€r A ( •* I 

<.»• \\r!1t 

VRHAHOOCLAfelOH 

* r+ a f •! Vffi altni^nt r«t«fr i 

••*'.♦• *'!• ftt t iiitr*! \«f <«j» I 
r* • W> 1 Auc^'tn rmtf t Njf <••• I 
I !• "^^-.ARYf «i I' lf(« almont rtiatr j 
fr*«« { tttKcf llulUr lUltt ri •! i 
A r- ' 1lr«4 KratW« krr-l A < >• I 

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CKMTIIAI. OHIO 



'•  " 



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io8 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 
Walnut — Kenney, Logan Gas & Fuel 4 . 

KNOX COUNTY. 

Brown — ^J. Hendricks. Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Jas. Temple, Upham Gas i 



Gas 



ASHLAND COUNTY. 

Green — Lathrow, Ohio Fuel Supply i ... 

M. Tungend, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

W. Paulin, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

Hanover — Brubaker, Logan Gas & F. 2 . . 
Mohican — J. M. Gill, Logan Gas & Fuel r 

Lake — A. Long, Ohio F^uel Supply i 

Montgomery — S. Rice, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . 
Jackson — R. Welch, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . 



Dry 
Gas 



MEDINA COUNTY. 

Westfield — Steele. Ohio Fuel Supply i . . 
Homer — E. A. Fike. Ohio Fuel Supply i 
Medina — Hardinger, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

L. S. Ball, Medina Gas & Fuel i 

Lafayette — Champan, Logan Gas & F. i 

Levi Lance, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

H. Huff, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 



Gas 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Congress — Grundelsperger, Logan Gas & Fuel i 
J. & M. Packard, Logan Gas & Fuel 2 

Franklin — W. P. Snyder, Ohio Oil 9 

Cannan — F. Eby, Medina Gas & Fuel r 

Wayne — Specht, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

M. Seib, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Plain — R. Homey, East Ohio Gas i- 

W. D. Alleman, Medina Gas & Fuel i 

Clinton — M. Richey, Medina G. & F. i 



Dry 
Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Monroe — Yarnell, Ohio Fuel Supply 1 . 
C. E. Shearer, Logan Gas & Fuel 1 . . 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover — F. Cipra, Kundtz & Hulse 2 . . . . 
E. Tuttle. East Ohio Gas i 

B. M. Schuster, East Ohio Gas i 

J. D. Wagner, East Ohio Gas i 

C. Wilbert, East Ohio Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland— Cath. R. Poling, Ohio F. S. 3 
Abram Cassill, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . . 
T. J. Thatcher, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . 

L. H. Tripp, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Chas. Sowers, Ohio Fuel Supply 3 . . 



Elk— Mary E. Winters. Ohio F. & S. i 

Dry 

Gas 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

Washington — L. Poland. Ohio V. S. 2 . 
Superior Dev.. Ohio Fuel Sup. i.... 



Gas 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — E. M. Swick, Ohio Fuel Sup. 2 
Chas. Boring, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . . 



Gas 

Gas 
Gas 



Chittenden lot, Heisey Gas 1 



Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

2 

6 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

2 

7 

Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

I 
4 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Dry 
I 

5 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 



Gas 



HOCKING COUNTY. 

Salt Creek — Wm. Hamman, Ohio F. S. i 

HOLMES COUNTY. 

Washington — Lozier, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

Lenninger, Logan Gas & Fuel i 



Gas 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Tiverton- 



COSHOCTON COUNTY. 
■Koch, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . 
MARION COUNTY. 



Clarion — Foos. Persoll & Stewart 2 



Gas 



Drv 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. 

Licking 4 

Fairfield * 1 

Knox 2 

Ashland 8 

Medina 7 

Lorain o 

VV'ayne 10 

Richland 2 

Cuyahoga 5 

Vinton 6 

Jackson 2 

Perry 3 

Hocking i 

Holmes 2 

Coshocton I 

Marion i 



Prod. Dry. Gas 





I 3 





I 





2 





2 6 





7 








25 


2 7 





I I 





I 4 





I .=; 





2 





3 





I 





2 





I 





I 



Total 55 



25 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



WOLPE COUNTY. 

Campton — 1. Ff. Brewer, Calwell & Fike 2, 
Stillwell— D. Rose. McMann Oil & Gas i 
Sam Whisman, Ky. Pet. Producing 2... 



Drv 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Russcvville — Jas. Short. Ohio Fuel Oil 2, 
Wilbur— O'Rryan, Mullin & White i ... 



Drv 



MORGAN COUNTY. 

Cannel City— Oldfield, Mullin & Mullin 3 

Murphy, Yancy Hudson & Co. i 

White Oak— W. H. Vance. Atlantic Oil & Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



ESTILL COUNTY. 

Irvine — J. Wallace. West Penn i 

Chas. Rice. T. H. Yates 8 



Dry 



POWELL COUNTY. 

Pilot— J. M. Ashley, Pat J. White 48 • 

r. T. Rogers, Ohio Oil 5 

Fruitt — Miller, Pet. Exploration 13 . 
Cain Rogers. Rarnett Oil & Gas i.. 



45 



Dry 
Diy 
Dry 



Dry 
Drv 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

I 
2 

Drv 
Drv 



Dry 



Dry 
Drv 
Dry 
Dry 

4 



Be wise to-day ; it is madness to defer. Young. 



ALLEN COUNTY. 

Scottsville — Roark, McClanahan & Nicoll i 

Benedict, McQanahan & Nicoll i 

F. M. Mitchell, Clark & Co. i 

Smith, Unknown i 



Gas 

Dry 

MAGOFFIN COUNTY. 
Salyersville — Sport Fork, Rice Oil i 

JOHNSON COUNTY. 
Paintsville — Paint Lick Dome, Federal Oil 2 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Bowling Green — E. Harris, Johntzen Co. 2.. . 
Luther Jackson, Chenault Oil & Gas i 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

I 
3 

Gas 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



ELLIOTT COUNTY. 

Isonville — ^J. Dials, Rice Oil i 



Gas 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. Dry. Gas. 

Wayne 2 

Wolfe 7 

Lawrence 5 

Morgan 3 

Estill 13 

Powell 21 

Lee 5 

Allen 9 

Knox 2 

Magoffin , 2 

Johnson 3 

Warren 2 

Barren 2 

Elliott I 



10 








115 


3 





II 


2 








I 


2 


120 


2 





217 


4 





105 








:5 


3 


I 


10 








10 





I 


20 





I 





2 





25 














I 



Total yy 



718 



17 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 
Montgomery — W. H. Conrad, J. J. Cauley & Co. 3 

CLINTON COUNTY. 
Irishtown — J. E. Rogers. Spurgeon, Davis & Co. i 

WABASH COUNTY. 
Friendsville-T-Toney, Midland Oil & Gas 2 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 



KANSAS. 



10-25- 5, 

33-25- 5. 
11-26- 4, 

1-26- 5, 

9-26- 5, 
26-26- 5, 
18-28- 4, 

7-26- 3, 
30-24- 4, 
16-25- 5, 

6-26- 5, 
26-26- 5, 
31-26- 5, 
14-28- 4, 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

Johnson, Hazlett et al i 

Stokes, Empire G. & F. 59 

Orban, Carter Oil 21 

Sharp, Eldorado Harper Emporia O. & G. i 

White, Wood & Mclntyre i 

Sluss, A. L. Derby et al. 2 

Freed, Magnolia Petr. 3 

Hennenkamp Uncle Sam Oil i 

Adams, J. B. Adams i 

Robinson, Standard Oil of Ind. 2 

Porter, Carter Oil 13 

Sluss, Whitewater Oil & Gas 2 

Clough, Wrightsman et al. i 

Bottom. Mid Kansas Oil i 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Gas 2 

Dry 12 

Gas 2,000,000 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

12-32-13, Wudick, Cuttes & Connor i 

7-34-14, Blake, J. G. Smith et al. i 

30-34-15, Wheeler, Commonw. O. & G. 4.. 
30-34-15. Wheeler, Commonw. O. & G. 5.. 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



ALLEN COUNTY. 
34-26-16, Bigelow,- Columbine Oil & Gas 3 



MIAMI.PRANKLIN-DOUGLAS COUNTIES. 

16-17-22, William. Racine Oil 4 

6-16-10, Overstreet, Lucky Four i 

5-17-22, Singert, Bartlett et al. i 

20-17-21, Furnace, Pacific Oil i 

36-16-21, Downs, Hirsh i 

26-16-21, Perry, Wood i 



Dry 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 4 

Gas , 2 

Gas 800,000 



CHAUTAUQUA AND ELK COUNTIES. 

Elk City— 

34-32-13, Gilbert, Sachem Oil i 

33-32-13, Roebuck, Rickard et al. i 

29-31-13, Dexter, Bliss & Co. 2 

29-31-13, Hogan, Bliss & Co. 2 

Sedan — 

32-33-1 1> Kirchner, Scott Co. Oil 2 

32-33-11, Kirchner, Scott Co. Oil 3 

Elgin — 
34-34-10, Hewitt, Elgin Oil 5 



Dry 

Gas 

Gas 



NEOSHO COUNTY. 
14-27-19, Whitworth, Globe Crude i .. 
22- 8-ig, Johnson, Riverside Oil 7 .... 

2-28-18, Nixon, Parkins & Co. i 

14-27-19, Whitworth, Globe Crude 2 . 
36-27-18, Bangard, Republic O. & G. i 
25-27-21, Melick, Haggam & Davis i . . 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

6 

I 

1,000,000 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 4 

Gas 2 

Gas 2,200,000 



WILSON COUNTY. 

32-30-16, Cramer, P. O. G. 6 

34-29-16, Scott, Eureka Gasoline i .... 

6-29-15. Burnshill, Lucky John Oil i . 

32-29-16, Shannon, Geo. Shannon i .... 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

3 
I 



WILDCATS. 

Crowley County — 

Q-25- 7, Le Master, Standish Oil 2 

13-25- 7, Bronson, Standish Oil i 

Greenwood County — 

23-24-12, Johnson, Foster Oil 4 

22-25-12, Loveland, Sinclair Oil & Gas i . . 

Chase County — 
72-30- 9, Hughes, Hatfield Oil i 

McPherson County — 
9-17- 4W., Sangren, Lindsberg O. & G. i 

Pawnee County — 
29- 3-12, Miller, J. F. Hurst et al. i 

Shawnee County — 
26-11-13, Pitts, Renker et al. i 



Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Drv 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Drv 



Men are so apt to believe what they least understand. Montaigne. 



Elk County — 

8-3r-io, Johns. Elec. O, & G. ; 



OKLAHOMA. 

WASHINGTON COUNTV. 

Whilelurkey. F, Haskell, agt, i->. 

Martin. Denver Oil i 

Forman, H, S. Roll I 

Whiteturkey, Coombs et al. 8.... 

Everett. F. W. C Boleche i 

Ketchuin, P. O. & G. i 

Shepard, Boschee et al. I 

Chestnut, Shufflin et al. 6 

Cokar. Kunny et al. 6 , . 

Merrell. Campbell et al. i .... 

P. O. & G. 6 

Filzsu'^mons. E. V. Crowell 2 ..- 

Step. Kaiir.ld Oil T 

Dick. Voun.'-->n Oil [ 

Merrill. W. K Tampbell et al. i.. 

Coker. E. S ki^iiny et a!, 6 

Shepard. Boschee ;l al [ . , . . ... 



27-2 



17-28-14, 
16-28-13. 
16-28-13. 

4-28-15. 
-IS. 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

25-22-10. Tidal Oil I 

4-22-1 [. Kansas Natural Gas 5 .... 

35-24, 8, Carter Oil 2 

9-25- 0. Drejcel Oil 2 

4-22- 9, H. V, Foster 1 

15-26-11. Workman Oil 4 

4-22- 1 1. Osage, Tidal Oil 5 

33-2i-'2. Texas Co. 6 

16-26-12, Lahoma Oil & Gas 43 

19.21-12, Tidal Oil i .. 

8-20-12. Tidal Oil 

20-21-12, Tidal Oil i 

18-22- 9. Kiskadden et al. i 



Dry 



NOWATA AND ROGERS COUN' 
15-24-17. Palmour. .Amalsanialed Pet, <> 

2.24-16, Ketchum. Ellis Oil 2 

1-24-16. House, G. French & HoRue 12 .. 
15-24-16. Adams, D. F, Roberts 2 



Dry 



TULSA COUNTY. 



Bird Creek— 
,16-22-1,1. Tulsa Fuel . 



-13. Alhin 



Oil . 



28-20-14, Thompson. Henry O. & G. 2 

,15.22-13. Sequick. Tulsa Fuel 1 

28-20-14. Henry Oil [ 

Red Fork— 

20-19-11, Hardridge. E. B. Howard 1 

8-19-II. Sunday Island, Nelson O. & G. 1. 

Broken Arrow and Jenks— 

24-19-13. PerrymaiT, Burton et al, 1 

14-18-14. Atkins. Ellis Oil 2 

32-18-14. Burgess. CunninKham & Graham ' 

Bixby- 

'9-17-13. Manuel, N'ew York Oil 1 

i;..;.],. Crosby, Sparks Oil 8 

27-16-13. Roberts. Praden et al. I 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Drv 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



6-16-14. Craig & Sherman i 

11-16-14. Craig & Sherman I .... 
25-16-14. Nevins, Carter Oil 2 ... 
I7-f7-l3. Crosby, Lnited Prod. 1 
19-17-13. Austin, Billingslea et al. 
20-I7-I3. Berryhill. Gladstone Oil 
21-17-13, Tiger. J. II. Fisher. 4 .. 

1-16-13. Murray, Hubbard & Co. 

8-16-13. Cowles. Winemiller e( a 
19-16-13, Gorndorfer. Wilcox et : 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dr> 
Dry 
Dry 



OKUULGES COUNTY. 

Mounds — 

33-16-11, Simmons, Texas Co. i 

29-14-14, .Ashley. Sperry Oil & Gas 6 

.13-15-13. Roberts. Tidal Oil 3 

22-15-14. Seiver, Paw Paw Oil 4 

T-14-13. Robertson. Bryan et al. i 

20-14-14. Jefferson. N. V. & Henry Oil 6 .. 
20-14-14, Sadler. N. Y. & Henry Oil 11 ... 

3i-i5-'3. Pigeon. 1 

21-14-14, Grayson, Sperry Oil & Gas 13... 

1-15-14. Mcintosh, Texas Co. 5 

Okmulgee Morris — 

30-i3-'3. Harjo. Barbara Oil 2 

34.13-14, Fat. Mt. Fork Oil 3 

.M-13-14. Fat. Texas Co. i 

34-13-14. Fat, Rebold et al. 1 

8-13-14. ^awf Oil 50 

Hamilton Switch— 
3^-14-11. I'nallotted. Okmulgee P. & R. J.2 
1-13-11, Newman. Kimbley & Cook I .... 



Dry 
Dry 

Dr>- 
Dry 



Dry 1 

Gas 

Gas 7S,ooo.o( 



MUSKOCBB, WAGONER AND 

Catoosa — 
10-20-14, Harris, Tulsa Fuel 1 

-I^, Vannov. Lane Oil & Kefin 
-18-16, Williams, F. V. Wright 1 
-16. Childers. F. V, Wright 9 

l.ofFland et al. 2 . . 
Stone Bluff and Haskell— 

i-ie. Banks. Da-vis ei al. :; 

S-15, Drew. Melha Oil 5 

--16-16, Richards, Carter Oil 1 ... 

? -S-l''. H^irr'o-i. C "<v Ri 'er C. 
6-15. Vann, Black Hawk Pet. 1 
6-ii, Asburv, Melba Oil & Gas 

6-15, Porter, Anco Oil 1 

6-15, Ballard, Ross el al. 4 

5-16. Smith. Summers et al. 1 .. 
5-16, Howiird, Boynton Oil & G 
5-16, Smith. Patterson. Seullv el 
4-15, Manuel. Oiler et al. 1 .... 
4-1=1- Smith, llasura et al, 1 . . 
Smith, Winemiller et al. 1 



COUNTIES. 



-17. T.e 

-16. Gravson 

-!■;. Menders 

-16. Banks, 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



al. 4 
. Colbert. Laurel Oil & Gas 
-i^, Bruner. Lambert et al, I 
-16, Grayson, Jolly et al. 1 .. 
18-14-15. Rentie. Kiel et al. 5 



Dry 



Fortnne turns a cold shoulder to hotheads. Herbert Kaufman. 



CREEK COUNTY. 

Gushing Pool — 

32-18- 8, Raabe, Magnolia Petroleum i 

16-17- 7» West, P. O. & G. 22 

6^18- 8, Eastman, Waddell & Co. i 

1-19- 8, Anbury, Samona Oil i 

21-18- 7, Wacoche, P. O. & G. 6 

34-17- 7, Renfrow, Cosden Oil & Gas 3 . . . . 

3-18- 7, Wilson, Commercial Petroleum i . . 
Mannford and Olive — 

3-19- 9, Thomas, Markham & Schoenfeldt i 

3-19- 9, Coonrod, E. N. Gillespie i 

16-18-11, Mcintosh, Livingston Oil 6 

16-18-11, Mcintosh, N. Y.-Okla. Oil 6 

27-18-11, Bruner, Mrs. Northrup 4 

34-18-11, Sapulpa, Sapulpa Fuel 2 

5-17-12, Bosen, Okla. State Oil 22 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 



Dry II 

Gas 3 

Gas 9,000,000 

PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Maramec — 

1 1-20- 5, Quinan, Devonian Oil 2 Dry 

25-21- 8, Thomas, Markham et al 2 Dry 



Dry 



PAYNE COUNTY. 

Yale— 
7*19- 6, Jones, Magnolia Petroleum 3 
2-18- 5, Laughlin, C. B. Shaffer 2 . . . . 



Gas 
Gas 



Gas 2 

Gas 15,000,000 

GARFIELD AND NOBLE COUNTIES. 

Garber District — 

30-22- 3, Windier, Sinclair O. & G Gas 

iS-22- 3, Ba'rnes, Oil State Pet. i Gas 

Billings — 
2-23- 2, Armstrong, Paragon Oil i Dry 



Dry 2 

Gas I 

Gas I T,ooo,ooo 

KAY COUNTY. 

Ponca City — 

9-26- 3, Ruby, Okla-Kansas Oil i Dry 

Blackwell — 

29-28- I, Perry, National Union i Gas 

6-28- I, Harvell, Blackwell O. & G Gas 

6-28- I, Smith, Kay & Kiowa 3 Dry 

29-27- I, Presbury, Empire G. & F Gas 

Newkirk — 

17-28- 3, Russell, Marland et al. i Gas 



Dry 2 

Gas 5 

Gas 41.000.000 

CARTER COUNTY. 

Healdton District — 

33- 2- 3, Hickman, Hickman O. & G. i Dry 

31- 3- 3, Westheimer & Daube 9 Dry 

30- 3- 3. Daney, J. L. Hamon 10 Dry 

17- 2- 3. Hernstadt) Summit Oil i Dry 



Dry 



WILDCATS. 

Pontotoc County — 
17- 4- 6, Urban, Skelly & Sankcy 2 
S2' 5- 7, Benedum & Trees r 

Pawnee County — 
26-22- 6, Arnold, Cosden O. & G. t 

Croek — 
21-17- 5, Gyp!«y Oil I 



Gas 
Gas 

Dry 

Dry 



Okfuskee County — 
10-12- 6, Jenkins, Gypsy Oil i 

Ellis County — 
16-25-25 W., La Verne O. & G. i 

Washita County — 
18-11-19W., Wilcox, Elk O. & G. I 

Kiowa County — 

10- 7-ioW., Rednour et al. i 

22- 7-16W., Huber, J. L. Nation i 

27- 7-16W., Rbsser-Weiss i 

8- 7-15W., M. C. Ent et al. I 

Caddo County — 

28- S-iiW., Polk-Clark Oil i 

Tillman County — 

12-1N-16W., Frensley, Guiding Star Oil i 

Cotton County — 
23-iS-ioW., Tilly, John Keys et al. i ... 
^ i-io. Gross, Keys et al. i 

Garfield County — 
9-2T- 3, Bowers, Kantexo Oil i 

Okfuskee County — 
28-13-10, Knight, Carter Oil i 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas 
Gas 

Gas 

Dry 



Dry II 

Gas .• 6 

Gas 68,000,000 



ARKANSAS. 

Crawford County — 
28- 9-30, Embry, Wildcat Oil i 

Hot Springs County — 
19- 4-16, Henson, Taylor Henson i . . 

Ashley County — 
20-16- 5, Louisiana, Ark. Land Co... 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 



KANSAS. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. Dry. Gas. 

Butler : . . 64 14,765 14 2 

Chautauqua 21 315 6 I 

Montgomery 32 269 4 o 

Wilson 22 91 3 I 

Neosho 34 300 4 2 

Allen 8 50 i o 

Miami-Franklin-Douglas 40 389 4 3 

Wildcats II 700 8 i 



Total 232 16,879 



44 



10 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. Dry. Gas. 

Osage 53 2,072 II 2 

Washington 47 610 15 2 

Nowta-Rogers 49 407 4 o 

Tulsa S7 390 17 8 

Creek 43 2,135 11 4 

Okmulgee 75 2,327 11 6 

Muskogee-Wagoner-Rogers 42 875 22 5 

Payne 14 2,818 "» 2 

Pawnee 9 340 2 o 

Garfield-Noble 9 5,075 ? 2 

Kay 14 2,250 4 4 

Carter IQ 720 5 o 

Wildcats 21 10 14 4 



Total 442 20,020 118 



39 



Second thoughts, they say, are best. Dryden. 



112 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



March 



MID-CONTINENT. 



SUMMARY OP WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. Dry. Gas. 

Kansas 232 i6379 44 10 

Oklahoma 442 20,029 1 18 39 

Arkansas 2 o i i 

Total 676 36,908 163 50 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



WICHITA AND WILBARGER COUNTIES. 

Electra — 

Smith, Pyle et al. i 

Granger, Duncan-Electra Oil i 

Tate, Federal Oil 15 



Dry 

CULBERTSON DISTRICT. 

Waggoner Bros., Lazy Nine Oil r 

Jennings, Tarver Oil i 



Dry 



BURKBURNETT. 

Schnarre, Magnolia Petroleum 10 . . . . 

Harden, Mann et al. 27 

Fowler, C. B. Hammond 4 

Harris, Smith & Myers i 

Birk, Parker-Ezell Co. 5 

Roller, Kell et al. i 



Dry 



WILDCATS. 



Stephens County — 
Lauderdale, Texas & Pacific Coal i . . 
Maxwell, Texas & Pacific Coal i . . . 

Young County — 
Lisle, Empire Gas & Fuel i 

Parker County — 
Mortens, Parker County Oil & Gas 4 

Palo Pinto County — 

Stewart, Texas & Pacific Coal 3 

Terry, Empire Gas & Fuel i 

Grayson County — 
Xear Tom Bean, Fortuna Oil i 

Coleman County — 
Babbington Mutual Petroleum i 

Eastland County — 
Carruth, Desdemona Oil i 



Dry 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 

Caddo — 

16-21-15, School Fee, The Texas Co. i 

3-20-15, Subdivision, Louisiana Pet. i 

De Soto— 
25-13-12, Grand Bayou Planting, The Texas Co. 18. 
Bossier — 

2-16-12, Gayle, Arkansas Natural Gas 64 

Miscellaneous — 

2^- 9-14, Hatcher, Federal Petroleum i 

22-22-\z, Bridger, La. Oil Ref. Corp. i 

21-22-13, Dudney, Dallas Oil i 

22-22-13. Gleason, Petroleum Co., Inc. i 

29-1 1- 6, Giddens, Ark. Nat. Gas 58 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



GULF COAST. 

SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Dist. Comp. 

.\nse La Bute o 

Batson 2 

Damon Mound 4 

Edgerly 5 

Goose Creek 15 

Humble 35 

Jennings 4 

Markham o 

Spindletop 8 

Saratoga i 

Sour Lake 6 

Vinton 3 

New Iberia i 

Piedras Pintas I 

Miscellaneous 13 

Total 98 



Prod. 


Dry. 








55 





1.500 


3 


265 


3 


2,900 


6 


1.355 


17 


90 


2 








575 


I 


20 





1.805 


2 


260 


I 





I 





I 


210 


10 



9.035 



47 



3 




Dry 
Dry 


£1 


2 


$100 




100 


Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 


50 

100 
100 

roo 

50 

roo 

roo 


6 


100 
roo 




100 


Dry 
Dry 


50 

roo 
roo 


Dry 


25 
roo 


Dry 


roo 
roo 


Dry 
Dry 


roo 
roo 
roo 


Dry 


roo 

ICO 


Dry 


100 
100 


Dry 


roo 
roo 


9 


roo 
roo 




too 




roo 




100 


Dry 
Dry 


ro 

25 

5 


Dry 




Gas 


25 
50 


Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 


25 

5 

r 

^ 
5 



STANDARD OIL SUBSIDIARIES. 



8 



ro 
r 



BY JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS 

Open 

Anglo-American 11% 

Atlantic Ref 930 

Borne-Scrymscr 430 

Buckeye Pipe 95 

Chescbrough 320 

Colonial 10 

Continental 470 

Crescent 32 

Cumberland 125 

Eureka 200 

Galena Com 137 

Galena Pref 125 

Illinois Pipe 190 

Indiana Pipe 93 

National Transit 12% 

New York Transit r8o 

Northern Pipe 98 

Ohio Oil 332 

Prairie Oil 495 

Prairie Pipe Line 255 

Solar Refining 290 

Southern Pipe r88 

South Penn. Oil 285 

South West Penn. Pipe.. 95 

S. O. of California 232 

S. O. of Indiana 640 

S. O. of Kansas 470 

S. O. of Kentucky 320 

S. O. of Nebraska 480 

S. O. of New Jersey ....567 

S. O. of New York 283 

S. O. of Ohio 410 

Swan & Finch 95 

L^nion Tank 86 

Vacuum Oil 355 

Washington Oil 25 

Penn-Mex 45 

International Petroleum . 12% 

Independent Oil Companies. 

Elk Basin 6% 

Pierce Oil 9% 

Midwest Refining rro 

Tropical Oil 5% 

Cosden Refining 7 

Sapulpa Refining 8% 

Northwest Oil 62 

Northwest Oil Pfd 3% 

Okla. Producing & Refg. 7 

.Atlantic Petroleum 3% 

Merritt Oil 20% 

Midwest Oil r r2 



High 


Low 


Last. 


11% 


iiV^ 


rr% 


930 


900 


910 


430 


430 


430 


97 


95 


97 


320 


320 


320 


10 


10 


10 


470 


460 


460 


32 


32 


32 


135 


125 


135 


200 


190 


195 


140 


135 


137 


125 


120 


120 


190 


j85 


190 


93 


93 


93 


12% 


12% 


12% 


185 


180 


185 


100 


98 


TOO 


335 


328 


335 


495 


465 


472 


270 


250 


270 


290 


290 


290 


190 


180 


180 


290 


280 


285 


95 


90 


90 


232 


225 


228 


640 


630 


630 


470 


460 


460 


320 


310 


310 


480 


480 


480 


573 


550 


555 


283 


273 


278 


410 


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WEST VIRGINIA— Clarksburg 

A certificate of incorporation has been granted the 
C. J. Sams Drilling Company, $10,000 capital stock ; 
to drill for oil and gas in Clark and Cass Districts, 
Harrison County, and elsewhere in West Virginia. 
The incorporators are C. J. Sams and Emma Sands 
of Amandville, W. A. Gaylord, W. T. Wallis of Clarks- 
burg, and G. L. Pettrey of Wilsonburg. 



NEW FRANCHISES 



NEW YORK— Chautauqua 

Application for permission to construct a gas plant 
in Mayville, and in the town of Chautauqua, has been 
filed with the Second District Public Service Commis- 
sion by the South Shore Natural Gas Company, whose 
capital stock is owned by the Frost Gas Company of 
Buflfalo. 

TEXAS— DaUas 

The Dallas Gas Company has accepted the fran- 
chise conditions offered by the city. The service-at- 
cost plan will be followed, and the company will be 
under the supervision of the Public Utilities Commission. 
The rate provided in the agreement is 50 cents per 
thousand gross: This the price under which the company 
has been operating. 

WASHINGTON— Yakima 

The Spokane-BentonCounty Gas Company has 
filed application for a gas franchise in this city. The 
gas fields from which the city would be supplied are 
located in Benton Countv, 40 miles east of this city. 



PER CUBIC FOOT-RATES 



ARKANSAS— Fort Smith 

Gas rates have been increased 
Wild Cat Oil & Gas Company. 



in this city by the 



MISSOURI— Carl Junction 

Gas rates for domestic and industrial purposes have 
been advanved to 50 cents per thousand by the Carl 
Junction Gas Company and the Oronogo Gas Com- 
pany. 

NEW YORK— Albany 

The Public Service Commission, Second District, 
has decided that the maximum price charged by the 
Addison Gas & Powder Company for natural gas to its 
consumers in the village of Addison shall be 48 cents 
per thousand feet, with the privilege, however, to fix 
a gross rate at not to exceed 53 cents, with five cents 
discount for payment on or before the i8th of the 
month following rendition of service. This rate is to 
continue for three years from March i, 1918, unless 
the Commission shall fix a diflferent rate. 



Coming 

The local natural gas company has increased i 
gas rates. 



ts 



Lancaster 

The Iroquois Natural Gas Company has served no- 
tice on the village board that April ist the rate on gas 
will be increased to 35 cents a thousand to consumers 
here. The rate now is 32^^ cents a thousand with a 
discount of 2V0 cents if bills are paid by the 15th of 
the month. 

WEST VIRGINIA— Charleston 

The United Fuel Gas Company has obtained per- 
mission from the Public Service Commission to put 
in force in this city and Barboursville, the following 
rates: Domestic service — Eighteen cents per thou- 
sand cubic feet, subject to a discount of one cent per 
thousand if paid on o rbefore the tenth day of the fol- 
lowing month. 

Manufacturing or industrial service: First 150,000 
cubic feet, 18 cents per thousand; next 150,000 cubic 
feet, 17 cents per thousand, all subject to a discount 
of one cent per thousand if paid on or before the 30th 
of the following month. 

The present industrial rate for gas in excess of 300,- 
000 feet is II cents. No increase was sought in this 
rate. 

Coalburgh 

The Public Service Commission has authorized tli^ 
United Fuel Gas Company to increase its rates 33%% 
in this city, as well as in Huntington. 

Elkins 

The local gas rate for domestic consumers has been 
advanced from 25 to 30 cents. 

Wheeling 

Permission is being sought by the City & Suburban 
Gas Company to increase its rates for domestic gas 
from 25 to 31 cents, and its rates for industrial gas 
from 20 to 28 cents. 



ITEMS OF FINANCE 



KENTUCKY— Louisville 

The Louisville Gas & Electric Company of Louis- 
ville, Ky., a subsidiary of the Standard Gas & Electric 
Company, under the management of H. M. Byllesby 
& Company, has sold a new issue of $1,600,000 7 per 
cent two and one-half year secured notes. The proceeds 
will be used chiefly for retiring notes which mature 
April »st, next. The new notes which mature Septem- 
ber I, 1920, will be offered publicly tomorrow by H. 
M. Byllesby & Company, Bonbright & Company and 
Wakefield tS: Company, of Louisville, at 97% to yield 
8 per cent. The notrs arc secured by def>osit of the 
company's mortgage ])onds, pledged with the trustees 



Where law ends, tjrranny begins. Pitt. 



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ii6 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



laws to the Legislature under which j^as companies 
may mix artificial with natural gas. 

Collins Center 

A good gas well has been drilled in on the Bates 
brothers' farm, about two miles south of the village. 

New York City 

The following appointments are announced by the 
VVorthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, 115 
Broadway, New York City : James E. Sague, Vice- 
President, in charge of Engineering and Manufactur- 
ing ; Leon P. Feustman, Vice-President, in charge of 
General Commercial Affairs, including contracts, 
prices, purchases, traffic, etc.; Frank H. Jones, Vice- 
President, in charge of sales; William Goodman, as- 
sist ant to \'ice-President ; William Schwahausser, 
Chief Engineer; Edward T. Fishwick, General Sales 
Manager; Charles E. Wilson, Assistant General Sales 
Manager; Neil C. Lamont, Works Manager, Laidlaw 
Works, with office at the works, Elmwood Place, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

NORTH DAKOTA— Grand Forks . 

Drilling for water supply in this section recently re- 
sulted in the bringing in of a fairly good gas well. 

OHIO— Hocking County 

In the Brinkhaven development in Tiverton Town- 
ship, the Logan Natural Gas Company drilled a sec- 
ond test on the Lewis Reece farm through the Clinton 
sand. Nothing was found but a gas pressure, with an 
estimated capacity of 500,000 cubic feet a day. 

OKLAHOMA— Creek-Tulsa Counties 

The No. 5 Northrup well is reported to be making 
5,000,000 cubic feet of gas. This well is located on 
the Bruner farm, in Section 27-18-11, and was drilled 
to a depth of 1,660 feet. 

H. U. Bartlett's No. i on the Spocogee farm, in the 
northwest of the southeast quarter of Section 34-1 8-1 1. 
is producing 4,000,000 feet of gas from sand at 1,600 
feet. The Mount Vernon Oil Company drilled a dry 
hole to 1,605 ^c^t J" Jts No. 9 in the southwest corner 
of the northwest of the southwest quarter of Section 
9-18-12. The Oklahoma State Oil Company has a 5,- 
ooo,C)00-foot gasser in No. 33, in the southwest of the 
northeast quarter of Section 18-17-12. 

Enid 

Consumers are asking that the Oklahoma Natural 
Gas Company shall install booster stations on its pipe 
lines to eliminate the inconvenience of gas shortage 
which has been experienced during the past winter. 

Hamilton Switch 

Kimbley & Cook's No. i Henry, in the northeast 
of the southeast quarter of Section 36-14-11, is a 
7,000,000- foot gas well from sand at 2,052 feet. 

Muskogee 

An 8,000,000-foot well in Section 29-16-15, took fire 
recently, which it took considerable ingenuity to ex- 
tinguish. The well was down 1,465 feet when it was 
accidentally ignited. The rig and casing will be replaced 
and the well drilled deeper. 



Oklahoma City 

The name of the Southwestern Association of Pe- 
troleum Geologists has been changed to The American 
Association of Petroleum Geologists. A convention 
of the Association was held in this city recently, and 
at this meeting it was decided that the scope of the 
organization should be extended to cover the entire 
country instead of only the southwestern section. The 
new officers elected are : President, Alexander Deus- 
sen. Houston, Texas ; V^ice-President, Dr. I. C. White, 
Morgantown, \V. Va., State Geologist of the same 
State; Secretary and Treasurer. W. E. Wrather, 
Wichita Falls, Texas. 

Okmulgee County 

In Mounds District. Foster & Davis have a 4.500,- 
ooo-foot gasser on the Glass farm in the southwest of 
the southeast quarter of Section 27,16-11. 

The Cosden Oil & Gas Company completed a 2,- 
500,000-foot gasser in No. i Bird, in Section 35-13-12. 

Osage 

The Standish Oil Company has a good gasser in 
Section 17-35-7. 

The Indian Territory Illuminating Oil Company's 
No. 1 in Section 14-24-9 came in an 8,000,000- foot 
well. 

The Osage Hominy Oil Company's No. 43 in Sec- 
tion 9-28-8, is a gas well with an output of about 2.- 
000,000 feet. 

In the Osage District, the Henry Oil Company's 
No. I in the northeast of the northwest quarter of Sec- 
tion 10-23-8, showed 4,000,000 feet of gas at 2,390 feet 
and a showing of oil at 2,418 feet. 

Payne County 

In Ripley District, Section 27-19-4, the Fortuna Oil 
Company's No. 1 on the Miller farm, in the center of 
the south line of the west half of the southwest quar- 
ter of Section 27-19-4, struck a gas flow in sand, the 
top of which was at 3,445 feet. The well was doing 
27,000,000 feet of gas at last report and had been 
drilled to 3,467 feet. 

Payne County 

In the Yale District, the Roma Oil Company drilled 
in a 10.500,000-foot well at 2,824 feet in its No. 2 in 
the southeast quarter of Section 3S-I9-5- 

Red Fork 

Nelson and others have a large gasser in their No 
I in the southeast of the northwest of Section 9-18-11, 
at a depth of 1,630 feet. 

The Paxton Oil & Gas Company have completed a 
gasser in their No. 2 on the Harding farm in the 
southeast corner of Section 19-19-11. 

Billingslea and others have completed a good gasser 
in No. I on the Cato farm, in the southwest of the 
northwest quarter of Section 29-19-11. 



Patience is a necessary ingredient of genius. Disraeli 



»r .^ 



NATURAL CAS AND GASOUNF. 



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ii8 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



March 



Knox County 

In the Brinkhaven District, the Forbing Drilling 
Company has the rig completed for a second test on 
the Robert Crider farm and the Logan Natural Gas 
Company has rigs completed for two tests on the 
Lewis Reese farm. 

Lewis County 

On Wolf Run, Freeman's Creek. Freeman's Creek 
District, the Reserve Gas Company has completed a 
test on the Calvin Flesher farm. It is a fair gasser in 
the Big Injun sand. 

On Freeman's Creek, Freeman's Creek District, the 
Reserve Gas Company completed a Gordon sand gas- 
ser at its test on the W. T. Garten farm. 

Lincoln County 

On Straight Fork, Duval District, the South Penn 
Oil Company has completed No. 8 on the M. A. 
Bays farm. 

Marion County 

On Quaker Fork, Mannington District, the Car- 
negie Natural Gas Company's test on the Mary A. 
Shaw farm has been completed through the Gordon, 
developing a light gas pressure. 

Marshall County 

On Ben's Run, Liberty District, the Manufacturers 
Light & Heat Company's test on the Samuel Ernest 
farm is a light gasser in the Big Injun Sand. 

On Fishing Creek, Liberty District, the Carnegie 
Natural Gas Company has drilled No. 3 on the H. G. 
Fair farm into the Maxon sand, developing a gasser 
with a capacity of 15,000,000 cubic feet a day. 

On the same stream and in the same district, the 
Manufacturers Light & Heat Company has a good 
gasser in the Big Injun sand at a test on the John M. 
Rhine farm. 

On Grave Creek, Cameron District, the same com- 
pany's test on the J. I. Dorsey farm is a light gasser 
in the Gordon sand. 

In Liberty District, the Manufacturers Light & 
Heat Company has drilled its test on the A. J. Mc- 
Glumphy farm through the Gordon sand. It is a gas- 
ser in that formation. 

Ritchie County 

In Clay District, the Philadelphia ' Company has 
completed No. 6 on the E. R. Taylor heirs' farm. It 
is showing for a light gasser in the Big Injun sand. 
On the same stream and in the same district, the 
Hope Natural Gas Company has a fair gasser at its 
test on the J. M. Wilson farm, and in Center District, 
Gilmer County, the same company has a gasser in the 
Big Lime and Squaw sand at its test on the M. E. 
Boggs farm. 

Roane County 

On Rock Creek, Walton District, the Jarvis Oil 
Company has drilled its No. 4 on the Nancy C. Lovve 
farm, a gasser in the salt sand, to the Big Injun for- 
mation and it is showing for a lo-barrel pumper. 



Tyler County 

In Central District, the Manufacturers Light & 
Heat Company has drilled its test on the A. Fuche 
farm, and has a gasser. In the same district the Hope 
Natural Gas Company drilled its second test on the 
Robert heirs' farm, and it is dry in that formation and 
drilling deeper. 

Wetzel County 

On Little Creek, Center District, the Hope Natural 
Gas Company's test on the James T. Brookover farm 
is showing for a light gasser in the Gordon sand. 

In Greene District, the Manufacturers Light & 
Heat Company's test on the Sarah Ashcroft farm is 
a gasser in the Big Injun sand. In the same district, 
the Philadelphia Company's test on the E. A. Glover 
farm is dry in all sands. 

WYOMING^Caaper 

According to a bill which is expected to pass Con- 
gress soon, one man may take up 2,560 acres in this 
State with one-eighth royalty, and is constrained to 
complete a well to 2,000 feet in two years under pen- 
alty of forfeiture unless oil or gas is found in payinjj 
quantities at a lesser depth. 

The lease is to be in force for a term of 20 years 
with a renewal clause in case the oil or gas is still be- 
ing produced. One man or firm must not hold more 
than the allotted acreage in any one field and relief 
is to be given to those who have drilled wells on with- 
drawn lands by allowing them to continue the de- 
velopment of the properties which have been lying 
idle for some time pending a decision by Congress on 
this point. 

Salt Creek 

T|;ie Midwest Refining Company has placed in op- 
eration its casinghead gasoline plant in this field. The 
plant is equipped to handle 4,000,000 cubic feet of gas 
l)er (lay, and cost in the neighborhood of $400,000 to 
construct. 

ALBERTA— Edmonton 

In the Viking field, east of Edmonton, the Alberta 
Volcanic Oil Company has finished No. i. This was 
drilled for oil, but developed a good gasser. 

ONTARIO— Elgin County 

The Dominion Natural Gas Company has completed 
a large gasser near Port Talbot. The initial flow is 
estimated between 5,000,000 and 7,000,000 cubic feet, 
with 500 pounds rock pressure. The well is strictly 
a wildcat proposition being located a short distance 
up the creek from Port Talbot, and a considerable dis- 
tance from any other producing well. The location 
is about 10 miles from Port Stanley, and is in territory 
where the Dominion Natural Gas 'Company has been 
drilling for some time. 



We cannot succeed at anything if we are uncertain. Millard Fillmore. 



Process of Reducing Crude Petroleum, Chauncey For- 
ward, Urbana, Ohio. 1,202,82^^. 

Screw Point for Well Tubings, John Wallace, Houston, 
Tex. 1,202,928. 

Pump, Elmer A. Watts, Springfield, Ohio. 1,202,932. 

Process and Device for Separation of Oils, Sidney 
Cornell, Pawling, N. Y. 1,202,969. 

Drill, Robert U. Harris, Whittier, and George Molidor, 
Fellows, Cal., assignors to Rotary Disc Bit Comj)any, 
Fellows, Cal. 1,203,112. 



Sand Pump for Wells, Leroy L. Richard, Coalinga, 
Cal. 1,203,784. 

Rotary Boring Drill, Howard R. Hughes, Houston, 
Tex., assignor to Hughes Tool Company, Houston, Tex, 
1,204,022. 

Oil Well \^alve, Robert H. Thorne, Williamsport, Pa. 
1,204,087. 

Well Drilling Device, George R. Watson, Waterloo, 
Iowa. 1 ,204,099. 

Sand Trap for Oil Wells, Clarence A. Wiley, Tulsa, 
Okla. 1,204,105. 



Federal Engineering 
Company 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Consultiiig and Contracting 
Engineers 

for the 

Plrododion, Transportation and 
Distribution of Natural Gas 



PATETSTTS 



GREEN & McCALLISTER 

OLIVER BUILDING 
PITTSBURGH 

ATTORNEY S 



Specialty : Cases Relating to Oil 
and Gas. 



Standard Ofl Sobsidiaries 
Natural Gas !!^ 03 Secorities 



JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS 

225 Fourth Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

415 Central Bank Building 
Tulsa, Okla. 



MEEK OVEN MANUFACTURING CO., Newburyport, Mass 



A Statement 

MEEK PRODUCTS are only built in one quality - the best. 
Gas Companies selling this well known and extensive line of 
gas appliances find that their consumers are more than well pleased 
with them. In efficiency and sturdy construction there is all that 
could be desired. From the burners to the final appearance every 
item of every Meek Appliance was given the most careful thought 
before the ideas were incorporated in the product. 

Every bakery, hotel, restaurant, meat-market, candy-store and 
foundry core-oyen department, many munition factories, etc., etc., are 
possible Meek-Product users. 

Sell Meek Appliances, they will please consumers, and help ma- 
terially in conserving the coal supply, a matter of vital importance today. 



MEEK OVEN MANUFACl URING CO., Newburyport, Mass 



Natural 




as an 

JOURNAL 



dG 



asoline 



SUBSCRIPTION- 
$2.00 IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR APRIL, 1918 



VOLUME 12 
THIS NUMBER 4 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



INDEX OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advertifling Copy should be in by the 15th of 
month previous to issue. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindred industries. 

Buffalo Long DisUnce (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca jags-W. 

Cable Address :~"Publiffht, Buffalo." 

Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central Office. 

rUSLISHIO BY 

PERIODICALS PUBLISHING CO., 

68 West Huron Street, 

•urrALO, V. T. 

Lucius S. Bigblow, President and BdUor, 
Hasiis S. Bioblow, Secretary, 

Entered as second class matter December i, 
19 ID, at the Past Office at Buffalo t New York, 
under the act of March 3, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE 



Answering an Inquiry 141 

Drilling Reports 143 

Give the Geologist His Dues 126 

Government Takes Over Oil Production. 132 

New Heating System ij5 

Office Economics 128 

Oil Production 133 

Opportunity To (jct Lal>or 134 

Pastor Sees Labor in Control After War 134 

Peak Load Service 132 

Ready-to-Scrve Charge 142 

Secure Gas Line 127 

Shipments to Oil and Natural Gas Com- 
panies 1 26 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 148 

Third Liberty Loan and V^ictory 126 

Truck Operators' Conference '25 

Welcome Letter 134 

Winning the War 128 

Wrinkles, Prices for 129 

AROUND THE BELT— 

I ieceased 1 49 

Financial 1 49 

General 151 

1 ncorporati'd 150 

Personals 1 49 

Kates 1 50 



Absorbing Subsidiaries 96 

Analv^is of Gases, by Prof. W. H. Ellis, 

J. W. Bain, and E. G. R. Ardagb 97 

Anntial Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Sons... 15 

Another Substitute for Gasoline 6 

Association of Natural Gas Supply Men.. 90 

Auto Delivery Cars 80 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E. 

Gilbert 31 

Beautiful Tribute to Trareling Man. 

By C. I. Hendrickson 6s 

Bulletin on Cost Accounting 6 

Bulletin on Oil Accounting 50 

Bureau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Cash* 
ing Field 5 

Calendar of Yotmgstown Sheet and Tube 
Company x6 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Combatting Doubtful Oil Stock Pro- 
motion 104 

Completing of Great Project. By R. C. 
Morrison 53 

Converting Linotype Metal Melting Furnace 
From Coal to Gas 32 

Co-operation Urged to Raise Oil Embargo 50 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers.. ..3a 

Denver Bars Fake Oil Stock Sales 95 

Development Work in Terrebonne Parish 50 
Doherty Syndicate Operates Frost Gas 

Company 92 

Drilling Results 23 

Drilling Reports 73 

Drilling Reports 107 

Efficient Goggles a J 

Financial Report for 1917 4< 

Financial Report 80 

Financial Report 106 

Gas Difficulties Disclosed 13 

Gas for Drying Food 17 

Gasoline from Natural Gas, by H. A. 

Fisher 9^ 

Gasoline from Natural Gas 103 

Gas Versus Car-Deliveries 92 

Government Experiment Station at Bar- 

tlesville 52 

Heat Insurance 21 

Latest Instruction 102 

Long, Elias H., Deceased 20 

Making Tight Joints 100 

Marking Time 73 

Measurement of Gas by Orifice Meter. . . . 102 
Monthly Standard Oil Review, by Jo. P. 

Cappeau Sons 105 

Moving in Cycles 72 

Natural Gas Business Thirty-four Years. In 6 
Natural Gas Service. By L. W. Lansley 55 

New Orleans and Natural 10 

No Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Bedford zi 

Oil Production 103 

Otoe- Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr 15 

Oxy-Acetylenc Welding. By Lucius S. 
Bigelow 61 

Picturing One's Face in Advertising 12 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Proceedings Received 51 

Producing Gasoline 63 

Questions and Answers — Prize Paper.... 93 

Rcady-to-Servc Charge 104 



Recovery of Gasoline from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son 7 

Reynolds, M. G., Passes Away 20 

Sense and Cents 54 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor 20 

Shipyard Volunteers 91 

Spirit of Safety 62 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 1917 41 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 80 

Summer and Winter Gas 91 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 1 14 

Stop Buying— Then What? 59 

Unique Method of Starting Gas Engines 51 

Valuable Publication in Oil and Gas Field 51 

Vast Acreage Deal 5 

Victory Plant in Service 106 

Water in Wefls loi 

Water Regulator 96 

Western Associations Merge 5 

Winner of Prizes in Contest Hekl at Buf- 
falo s X 

Work of Petroleum Committee 59 

Year 1918 4 

Your Mistakes 60 






MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 
CAS SUPPLY MEN 



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TRUCK OPERATORS' CONFERENCE 



BN Operator of motor trucks recently said to the editor of The Natural 
Gas and Gasoline Journal, "We are getting down to dots in this 
matter of operating motor trucks in many of the other fields, and your 
gas-men should see to it that they grasp the opportunity available, where- 
by to put the operating of trucks in the gas business upon the right basis." 

At the Hotel Astor on March 8th and 9th the assembling truck operators 
Some time since scheduled a conference such as has also been held in Detroit, 
the purpose being helpfulness to one another through the discussing of 
topics on truck operation and maintenance with the purpose of eliciting 
practical discussion that the experiences, methods, and means employed by 
one should be made known to the other. 

These subjects, while often illustrated with examples taken from the 
speakers' own individual experience, primarily cover principles of operation 
and maintenance as easily applicable to one business as another. Were 
detailed plans discussed, the average user attending might say: *'That may 
be all right for the speaker, but my business is different." 

When the principles of quicker loading through planning the work 
ahead, better mechanical facilities, bonus plans to the loading gang and 
careful dispatching were clearly explained by such men as Irving A. Berndt, 
of Ryerson, Chicago, and J. A. Hanley of Hudson. Detroit, their hearers 
get mental pictures of what they might themselves do to quicken shipments 
and reduce costs. 

Handling drivers to secure greater results with less controversy is one 
of the main points discussed. At Detroit most emphasis was laid upon 
gaining the drivers' good will by allowing them to share in the profits re- 
sulting from their handling more tonnage at a lower cost. 

One who was present at the Detroit conference between truck operators, 
stated to us that some six different plans of "bonuses to truck drivers" were 
discussed, as were plans for dividing between the company and the men the 
saving in cost under a certain sum per ton-mile. In some cases, the results 
have been those of large bonuses to men as well as material saving to the 
employer. 

It is almost unbelievable that in the case of one truck, this bonus plan 
caused an increase of 99.9 per cent in ton-miles hauled, with a reduction in 
cost of 64.7 per cent. Efficiency thus attained reduces the actual hauimg 
cost to about one-third of what it had been under normal conditions. 



1 he maintrnanrr of tmckt uid trmk ^erx% either in ca%r« where one or 
twro trtH-k« are em|ilo>r«l. «>r othrr «a*e« %%hrrr mj|fi% truck* are tt^ed. i« (nen 
attentioti at these conierenceti 

Ad^aminf co«tt of Ut»ur and malrrtaU. an<l a need U»f the u^e ol tncs 
l»ertenced drtvera. make* it alltmpi>rtant that c»perator« of trtKl^« alioiitd 
l>e on the alert to tmfirove their maintenance mefhudt 

RrdiKinc tire coatt. method* of aiiuratr aci oiuitiQ|;» form* of intpee 
tt<*n. %ctrctini; drtvert and trainint; mm. ctifitni* viith problemt, the outcome 
€^f the war, the relieving of freight Cimt;r«ti<in h\ rafnd trucking method*, all 
ha\e their fiart at theae tcinfrrrnce* v^huh are fmrely educattonal in char 
a<*ter N*o admitmion i* charK<^!. and each enecutne or tranaportation man* 
aicrr wh<i attend*, find* htm*elf in an atm<»%phere free from aalea talk, aa 
mithtnt: of the kind i* allow e<i h^ manufacturer* or aale* ref»reikentati%e* of 
comrrn* tiunufacturini; trurk*. tire*, or arre**-»ne* 

'the*r conference* are held f«>r the f»ur|iii»%e <»l rncourai;ini:. inttructini:, 
and aidini; the men wh<» are meeting: truck prohlem* t\tf\ da> The three 
*r«*i«>n* of the Nei* York conference March Kth and Qfh «ere announced 

• jtiitr in af|v4nir. a« f*ri«l4\ mofnini* and aftrfn««»n. and ^atur^la^ m<ifntn|f 

\* thr u%e of trutk* arvl trailers in ihr ^ja* hrl.l i% |^r«>i«in^* a« an a{>s«rr 
« latn! «}tiantitv a %a*t niimt»rr «if trti-k* ^n*\ !r!t\rf* • ar  ^•^•in^* atrrady 
in «»prf4tn»n in thr j;a« firld, thr*r intrfr%»* %*• •:*.! »%*!.*•. ,\..%r'\ •.^.r rr%it't« 
of !hr»r tf ti« k ofxrafof*' ionfrrrmr* an«l *h.'.*r«! ^hrfrset •'« ;«*rtuntl% i*rr 
%rfi!« •rntf f r[»f e%rntatn r% to thr ii>n(rrrn. * 4% a tlo!!af» an*! .rnt* vavtni; 
an«l a *rf\irr (!r\rlofMn|* feattirr 

Idwaffl F I-aShuni of thr \ntrf 1. a?i I %;»fr»% ( orrpan^ Nrw Nock 
i •!%. ha* explained at thr»r ci*nfrfrn«r» !:•.*% ** «arrtii! in«|<r%ti*'n an>| the 

* maintain a* the% -uo** |m>1u\. hi* fi»nijan% ha» frdu* rtl it% !a% tj;» timr ti> 
tH e!\ r <ia* • r\rr\ li*«» \rar*. %%hilr n»4nv .M.r»n% frj»r*rntr«| 4'|mtttr«l ft*** 
timr* that la% up a* their a^rrac^ 

\t the Nri* York *onfrfrn<r ihr *u^ r •% rrrntt.inc*! miW rr. ri%r attrn 
tM>n. a* Willi tho%r «>f rr«liit in^* tirr io%t» »• xit^^.r a.*<>unttn^' mrth«Mft m 
•|»ettM»n. *elf»tin4' and training dnvrr* MrriM?^' thr pro*.!r«fTt *'f .ti^ht ■•n 
\t\ the war and the |*aft tr w* W .J►cfa^••* A*r •Akm^- m trltr* n, trfttttnal 
freii;ht ionge*ti<»n in « •? ratrr \ri* > . rV ^ .' *^ mtrfrttm,;! » ^f-m^^-ht out 
h% hwal apeakert 

Memt>er* of the llii;hM4\« ]t^r\%\m,f* i ••ft-ittrr mrtr AM'-.ng th-#*# 
pre*ent and Ka%e an in«i|.'ht mt » thr U!*-*? \r r!..^.»* rr-tt m m\\Mt th# •^'••rfn 
ment e%|iect* of tru« k o|»erat«»r« 



THE THIRD LIBERTY LOAN AND VICTORY. 



GIVE THE GEOLOGIST HIS DUES. 



mHE people of the United States will soon be 
called upon to subscribe to the Third Liberty 
Loan which, like its two predecessors, will 
be for the purpose of financing the war against 
Germany and Austria-Hungary. The amount of 
money which the third bond issue will represent is 
not yet of general public knowledge, — perhaps the 
authorities at Washington have not decided that ques- 
tion. But there is no doubt that it will amount to 
several billions of dollars. 

That the third loan will be oversubscribed as were 
the first and second bond issues is the fervent hope 
of every patriotic American. The nation is at war 
and war calls for the expenditure of huge sums of 
money. But every dollar subscribed helps by so much 
to shorten the conflict, thereby bringing peace with 
victory nearer and in its train a return to normal 
prosperity. Americans should never los« sight of the 
fact that when subscribing to these Liberty Loans 
they are doing not only their duty to the L'nited 
States, but they are placing their funds in the safe 
keeping of the Government, — investing their money 
in the securities of the wealthiest nation on earth at 
terms of interest bearing returns that nets a hand- 
some profit on the investment. 

Readers of the Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal 

m 

will require no special urging to induce them to make 
investments in this unexcelled profit-bringing and 
patriotic Third Liberty Loan bond issue. 



SHIPMENTS TO OIL AND NATURAL GAS 

COMPANIES. 




NDER date of March 25th there was issued from 
the office of the L'n'ted States Railroad Admin- 
istration circular Xo. C. S. i-A. under which, in 
Class "(V' an exemption from the railroad em- 
bargo is made for supplies for oil and natural gas wells. 
Under this exemption the railroads are supposed to re- 
ceive all supplies for natural gas companies. This circular 
is signed by \\*. C. Kendall Manager of the Car Service 
Section. 

All freight addressed to oil and natural gas com- 
panies should be marked "OIL AND GAS WKLL 
SUPPLIES." This should also appear on the bill of 
lading. 



GASOLINE EXPORTS. 



Kxports of gasoline for the 12 months ended De- 
cember, 1917, were 224,811.186 gallons, with a value of 
$49,049,580. an increase of approximately 30 per cent 
over preceding year, when 167,928,262 gallons, worth 
^^3*^^^4-957^ were exported. 




>» 



HE following plea for the geologist of which 
W. S. Sterrct is the author, recently appeared 
in the Doherty News, published for Doherty 
interests. 



A geologist man, on a hot summer's day 

Was pecking at rocks just for the pay, 

A farmer drove by and he said, "Look out ! 

There's a crazy man here just tearing about.' 

But the geologist cuss kept at his work 

And not for a week did he ever once shirk. 

He looked at the ground and then at the sky — 

He wrinkled his brow, which was half a foot high; 

He walked up a hill and then down again. 

He kept doing this while 'twas hotter than sin. 

The farmer came back with some of his crowd — 

He talked and talked till his language grew loud: 

"Git out o* this place as fast as you can." 

He yelled at the working geologist man. 

"Mebbe so, ve can't do me any bad harm 

But I want no nuts on this here farm. 

H he be a feller what's huntin' bugs 

Go back tew town where they keep jugs : 

We're doin' some better'n we did down Texas, 

'Cause we're makin' a livin' an' payin' our taxes ; 

So g^t right off an don't make no trouble 

Or we'll bust yo' outfit jest like a bubble." 

The geologist man was deaf as a mummy 

But he gave the gink a coin to be chummy. 

He continued his magic with such perfect skill 

That the mystified rube went home with a chill. 

He juggled his aneroid and little hand level. 

In a fashion that looked like the work of the devil — 

He found with clinometer dope of the dips 

But no word came ever from his closed lips. 

II is eye was glued to his new alidade. 

While the farmer's crew stood bv in the shade. 

It took many days 'til the highbrow was pleased — 

Then he flew to his den like a man who was greased. 

For a day and a night he worked like a fool 

While the rest of the world was enjoying the cool. 

He mapped out the logic of domes and things — 

Tested the waters of brooks and springs ; 

He counted the freckles on lots of rocks 

And took from nature the key to her locks. 

He made his report to the man with the "tin" 

And fell into bed feeling just about **in." 

The man with the **tin" rushed out a drill 

.\nd commenced to punch on the crest of a hill. 

In a few months' time the gusher got busy 

And gushed so hard it made the world dizzy. 

The higher up got a million for "his" 

.\nd the farmer went north for his "rheumatiz." 

The geological man got his name in the paper — 

But his portion of swag resembled a wafer. 



Carry On ! Buy More Liberty Bonds 1 



128 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



The Fuel Supply Company has a policy of keeping its 
entire equipment in ''fighting'* condition, regardless of 
the great expense, and the construction branch of the 
Engineering Department set to work to eliminate this 
weak place. Oscar Krebs figured out a plan and he was 
in charge of the work. 

It was decided to drop the line from a position of some 
three feet above the water line to a safe position three or 
four feet under the bed of the river, making a drop in the 
line of more than ten feet, because the water at this place, 
even in normal times, is from- four to five feet deep. But 
the big difficulty was to do this work without shutting 
oflF the flow of gas to the towns supplied. Here was 
some problem. 

The work was completed in November of last year 
after five weeks of steady, hard work, and ** without drop- 
ping a stitch," as the ladies now say. The photographs 
published show in part how the work was done. 

In picture No. i, we see the big line as it was just 
when the men started to work. They are getting ready 
to drag away one of the heavy stumps that had been 
lodged against the side of the pipe. 

In photograph No. 2 is shown a section of the coffer 
dam and in the foreground two sections of the suction 
pipe used to pump the water out of the coffer dam. The 
work was done by making two coflfer dams, first on one 
side of the river and next on the other, letting the river 
run around the end of the dam. It took 4,000 bags of 
s^nd to build up the dam and an engine kept busily pump- 
ing out the water. In order to get the level for the pipe 
at the river bottom, it was necessary to lower about t.ooo 
feet of the line. 

In snapshot No. 3 is shown the gang of men as they 
slowly lowered the pipe into the ditch below the river 
bed. This was the most difficult feat of all, because the 
least jar or wrong move might have broken the line, and 
had a flood come along, it is hard to say what might have 
happened. 

After the line was laid and just before the water was 
allowed to flow along in its old course, photograph No. 4 
was taken. This shows the big stones that were placed 
above the line. Two hundred wagon loads of these heavy 
rocks were hauled and dumped and placed above the 
line. The line was also anchored with twenty heavy 
river hooks and it is believed that this line w'ill stay put. 

It was a big job, and a very necessary one. It was the 
only thing to do to bring these gas lines up to the high 
standard necessarv for Ohio Fuel service. It was done. 



WINNING THE WAR. 



DON*T get downhearted if the news about the 
war happens to be a little unfortunate now 
^ and then. 

He is a poor patriot who wails and weeps 
when things g?) wrong on the Italian front or on the 
western front. 

You don't hear the boys at the training canton- 
ments worrying about the war news. 
All they want is the order to go across. 
They are awaiting it with anxiety. 



They don't pay much attention to the front page 
headlines in the newspapers. 

They are not standing around on the corner wag- 
ging their heads and saying it looks bad every time 
the stock market goes down a point or two. 

They are not bemoaning the facts that are brought 
out in the investigation at Washington. 

They are working like blazes every day to become 
better soldiers, to make up for the deficiency of the 
people themselves — for in the last analysis the people 
of this nation are to blame because our boys didn't 
have the preliminary training that might have enabled 
us to put a couple of millions of men into the field 
within a few months after war was declared. 

So one of the ways to help do your share if you are 
not at the front, or getting ready to go to the front is 
to be an optomist about it. 

We are going to win this war. 

Perhaps the Teutons are making their last effort 
on the western front. 

They are not going to win. 

They may make some headway. 

But they are going to be held just the same. 

And even if we do have some set-backs, in the end 
we are going to win. 

And when peace does come it is going to be the 
kind of peace that will stand up under pressure. 

It will be a satisfactory peace for the world at large. 

Don't get cold feet about the war. 



OFFICE ECONOMIES. 




O you use a pencil sharpener in your office, the 
kind that in two or three seconds puts a perfect 
point on the pencil, and saves 500% of the time 
consumed in sharpening a pencil the old-fash- 
ioned way? 

There is an expression "The good old times," but when 
we consider what the waste was in those days, versus the 
sf>eed and convenience of the methods of now, we are 
astonished to find how we disregarded the value of time 
in those days. Time although paid for at a much lesser 
rate per hour, per day, or per year, was waste neverthe- 
less, in proportion with what was paid in dollars and 
cents, and, so far as time itself is concerned, was pre- 
cisely as wasteful as in these present days. 

Where an office is spread over quite an area, the ia— 
vestment in duplicating speed appliances, like for in- 
stance, the pencil sharpener, is putting money where th.^ 
saving is magnified by hundreds and hundreds of pe*^ 
cent, in a year's time. 

Our text, '*The Pencil Sharpener," may seem, on tha * 
face of it, a bit of a thing about which to write so mucb'^ 
It is not, however. It, i nproportion, has as much td d- " 
with winning or lo.sing in the outcome of a business, £^ 
that which would, on the face of it, seem the most in- ' 
portant thing to be considered in business managemei 

We are not advertising pencil sharpeners, we are a* 
vocating looking after the small leaks in business conduc 



Oermany is Listening— Make your Money Talk — Buy a Liberty Bond. 



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Prizes for Wrinkles 



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134 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



yore: 'Civus Romanus sum'/* (I am a Roman citizen.) 
• This war will be won not alone by the victories of 
our soldiers and our sailors but to a very marked degree 
by the spirit of the soul of the people at home. 

I appeal, therefore, to the oil industry to stand as a 
unit in taking its part in this great conflict. It has no 
inconspicuous or unimportant part to play. It must fur- 
nish products vitally necessary for the triumph of our 
armies, and it can do this only through the most efficient 
co-operation and united action. 

I pledge the Oil Division to meet with the industry in 
a spirit of justice and fairness; asking and expecting 
complete confidence and united support, to the end that 
when the time shall have come and our returning soldiers 
and sailors march proudly past in final review we may 
be able to look them squarely in the eye and say **We, too, 
have done our part." 



A WELCOME LETTER. 



UNION FRANgAISE DES ACfiTYLfiNISTES. 

Paris, France, January lo, 1918. 

M. Cressy Morrison, 
42nd Street Building, New York, U. S. A., 
Secretary International Acetylene Assn. 

Dear Sir: — 

With our best wishes for 1918, we beg to inform you 
that we intend offering our services to all our dear 
members of International Acetylene Association 
whose parents and friends are required to serve in 
France in the Allied Armies. 

Far from their families, we think they will be happy 
to know that they will find at the **Office Central de 
L'Acetylene," 104 Boulevard de Clichy, help and as- 
sistance for all they may desire. 

We shall not only be happy to welcome them when 
they are staying or passing in Paris, but we shall be 
proud to help them, in the correspondence for parcels 
they may have difficulties to get. 

We propose, through your intercession, to be their 
friends and devoted correspondents here, and to 
smooth, by all means, the rigor of their present exile. 
They can, therefore, apply to us in all circumstances. 
We shall put ourselves entirely at their disposition. 

In begging you, please, to inform of our intentions 
the members of your Association. 

We remain, dear sir. 

Yours very truly, 
PIERRE ROSENBERG. 



OPPORTUNITY TO GET LABOR. 



In these days when labor is as scarce as "hen's teeth,'* 
as the expression goes, it should be acceptable news that 
one can get gangs of men of 50 or 150 in number by 
ai;i)lying for them. An advertisement appears in this 
number, of a contractor who has the men and will con- 
tract to dig ditches for pipe-lines, supplying the neces- 
sary men. His service should be a boon to companies 
having work in prospect. 



MACHINE TRADE THIRD LOAN. 



EFT all of our readers take notice that there is 
in connection with the Third Liberty Loan, 
a special Liberty Loan Committee for the 
Machinery and Machine Tool Trades. In the 
personnel of this Committee are several with whom our 
gas trade come in touch. The representation from the 
Machine Trade is extensive and representative. Those 
our field knows best are C. Philip Coleman, President 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation; Aug- 
ustus Davis, President Davis-Bournonville Company; 
George Doubleday, President Ingersoll-Rand Com- 
pany. The Trades should co-operate. 



PASTOR SEES LABOR IN CONTROL AFTER 

WAR. 



twTr E note in one of the New York papers, an item 
I n reading as follows : 

I ' ^ I "The Rev. Dr. John Haynes Holmes, of the 

Church of the Messiah, Thirty-fourth Street 
and Park Avenue, told his congregation yesterday 
that labor will control things after the war." 

We hope the Pastor in speaking to his people made a 
very strong point of who the working people are. With- 
out such statement accompanying the assertion on the 
part of the Pastor, an utterance of that nature is danger- 
ous, since many are sufficiently narrow to interpret this 
to cover only certain toilers. In reality in this country, 
there are exceedingly few who are not toilers, and it is 
always unfortunate to class executive people, outside of 
the pale of "working people." Such are "workers" just 
as important as those who work with their hands, as are 
those who are hand-workers important to the executive, 
and financial interests. 

It would be better to say, after the war, the world when 
it has settled down to its bearings, is going to be wholly, 
or in a very large measure, conducted by the people and 
for the people. 

It is unwise to intimate or draw dividing lines. In- 
stead thereof, let us try now in advance of the closing of 
the closing of the war, and after the war has ceased, to 
unify our nation and our peoples by that wonderfully 
magnetic and powerful unifier, namely, the words "for 
the people, and by the people/' Let us eliminate in even' 
way possible the term and the thought that surrounds the 
term, namely, the ''working classes/' and in place thereof 
let us refer to ourselves and the others of our communi- 
ties as ''the people/' those who through unity of purpose, 
and a unified desire for the best good for the greatest 
number, stand for a Utopia through the unifying of in- 
terests, the true essence of socialism, devoid, however, of 
those things that make the rampant socialist a distasteful, 
a disturbing and in many instances a dangerous member 
of a community. 



Time Fights for Qermany— Buy Bonds Now. 



 ^ 



New Heating System 

Anawrrtng fu^l A'r#«/« With a .Vnr Hetrtmg .Sp«irm. 



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NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



April 



Fvcti wherf s^s-rates are most favorable, the fuel 
cos: t> n-T3alJy higher than coal, th::ref:re a tro:" 
or itsif- e-vpen^ive educational campaign is needed to 
inriure f-eople to see the benefils in a more expensive 
lue! Thfn. too. the gas-appliances, in a large meas- 
ure, mailable, have not been entirely satisfactory for 
pencral u?*- 

Thes* reasons are sufficient largely to explain the 
tardv acceptance of gas for general heating of build- 
mgf. yet in spite of them, due much to the energy 



saw that the heat of the products of combustion in 
the exhaust pipe might be utilized in a radiator for 
room, or space-heating. Tests soon showed him that 
with properly designated radiation, the system would 
show an efficiency unknown till then and that beyond 
this gain, some most desirable features of ventilation, 
valve operation and temperature control would be 
possible. 

For several years Mr. Rector struggled with those 
obstacles usually met with by the inventor of moderate 



of a few manufacturers of heaters, this practice has 
extended at a gradually increasing rate, till now it is 
not uncommon in certain localities, or in those build- 
ings for which the appliances now on the market are 
suitable, to see gas-heating systems in operation. 

About 1909, .Mcorn Rector, while experimentin;; with 
incandescent mantle gas lamps, particularly with the 
view of increasing the quantity or intensity of the 
light as well as the efficiency of the lamp, adopted 
the exhaust instead of the pressure method for aug- 
menting the proportion of primary air in his atmos- 
pheric burners. Keen and observant, he immediately 



means, constantly improving his system by the slow 
and unsatisfactory means of fault elimination in com- 
mercial installations, until about two years ago he 
formed a connection with a well known company 
with manufacturing and commercial facilities to prop- 
erly build, sell and install the system. 

The faults of the heating-units and their parts have 
been overcome and improvements made in them, units 
of several sizes have been designed, and specifications 
drawn up for the installation of the radiation, piping, 
exhaust-fan, etc.. for a system of heating primarily 
adapted for the heatinj? of a building or one large sec- 



A Gktod Kettun on your Money. A Quick Return for onr Hen, Buy Liberty Bonds. 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



tion of a building, although it is perfectly practical to 
install a single radiator. 

The Rector system'is a distinct departure from any 
previous plan of heating. Its basic principle is the 
generation of heat at the exact point where heat is 
needed, and at the exact time when heat is wanted, 
with the added feature of positive ventilation. The 
ventilation, though positive, is not, however, to be 



is a primary requisite and any apparatus which does 
not achieve these results will not be largely successful 
in broadening the use of gas as a heating agent. 
Further than this, any such apparatus should provide 
so easy a fuel-supply-control that the fuel may be 
shut off and its expense eliminated at the instant that 
a room or group of rooms becomes properly heated, 
or their occupancy has ceased. 



considered as sufficient in quantity to meet the require- 
ments of the usual building laws for auditoriums. It 
is sufficient, however, to make the atmosphere of the 
ordinary living room noticeably more satisfactory. 



Elementally, the G. F. E. Rector system is a hot 
air system, heat being obtained by passing the hot 
products of combustion from the gas burner through 
the various sections of a metal radiator. The design 
of the burner box and the radiation are such that 



It is obvious that the cost of artificial gas demands 
that any apparatus devised to utilize it as a fuel, 
should positively provide for: (r) perfect combustion, 
(2) complete utilization of its heat, and (3) proper 
ventilation. The accomplishment of these three ends 



practically all of the heat from the products of com- 
bustion is radiated into the room before the products 
are exhausted from the radiator. Where thermostatic 
control is provided, the fuel supply is operated, not 
by chance, but by the temperature of the room itself. 



Your Money or tiieir Lives. Save Both — Bi^ Libn^ Bondi. 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



In most pas. radiators, the products of combustion 
leave the radiator at a very high temparature and, 
when a fliic is provided, pass through it to the outside 
air still containing a great deal of heat which should 
hi- f;i\cn up in the ri«>ni if fuel waste is to be elim- 
inated. 

\\'hen the appliance is not provided with a flue, all 
of the heat from the gas is, of course, available for 
heating the nx>n). but as this heat is largely heat of 
convection in the prodiicts of combustion its actual 
effect on the comfort of the occupants of the room is 
not as satisfactory as might be supposed. 

Rroadly. the Rector system as it is installed, is 
similar in arrangement to the two-pipe steam heating 
system, each room being equipped with the number of 
radiators necessary to suitably heat it. Each radiator 
has its own individual valve so that it is a complete 
heating unit, .\ll of the radiators, however, are con- 
nected into one vacuum system and the products of 
combustion, after their heat has been radiated into 



being made to each radiator at V in the automatic 
radiator valve. Fig 7. A shut-off is installed in each 
radiator connection so that the entire radiator may be 
removed from the system n-ithout affecting the bal- 
ance of the heating plant. The gas pressnre regulator 
shown ma}-, where necessary, be installed in the gas 
pipe near the meter and it maintains a constant gas 
pressure at all times regardless of the pressure Bactu- 
ations in the city gas main. 



the room, are drawn through this vacuum piping and 
expelled out-of-doors by the agency of a small motor- 
driven suction fan. 

For the details of the G. F. E. Rector system, 
reference may be had to Fig. i. which illustrates it 
diagrammatically. Sub-division I shows the details 
of the basement arrangement from which it will be 
readily seen that none of the apparatus takes up any 
large amount of space, thus leaving the cellar entirely 
free for other uses. The most important part of the 
basement equipment is the fan, which is interposed at 
any convenient point in the vacuum line of pipe and 
unless other power is available this fan is driven by a 
small direct-connected electric motor. When the fan 
is running air is drawn through all radiators as each 
radiator is connected to the vacuum system by the tee 
between the bottom sections. It is through this 
system of vacuum pipe that all products of combus- 
tion are removed from the radiators and expelled out 
of doors through the flue as shown. 

Several drip legs are necessary because one of the 
products of gas combustion is water and other sedi- 
ment from the vacuum piping, so that they will not 
accumulate and break the vacuum. 

The gas piping which supplies the radiator starts 
from the house side of the gas meter, connections 



Sub-division II shows an end view of a radiator 
illustrating how the automatic gas valve is connected 
to the burner box of the radiator. Here will be 
noticed the thermostat wiring between the thermostat 
on the wall and the automatic gas valve of the radi- 
ator. This thermostat automatically controls the 
room temperature by means of a solenoid attached 
to the automatic radiator valve, the gas being turned 
On when the room temperature is lower than the tem- 
perature indicated on the thermostat dial and off 



OF THE GAS CONTROL UECRANlSlf. 

when the room temperature is higher than the tem- 
perature indicated. The thermostat circuits are op- 
erated at a low voltage (10 to 14 volts). 

Sub-division III shows a part section through the 
individual radiator. When the gas cock is opened, a 
very small part of the gas admitted feeds directly 
into the little pilot in the burner box. The pilot is 
lighted by opening the burner box door and inserting 
a match just as any ordinary gas burner would be 



We'n in It-^et'i Win It. Buy Uber^ Bonds. 



April 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



139 



lighted. The pilot light gives off a very small amount 
of heat and consumes a nominal amount of gas. Once 
it is lighted, it is usually left burning throughout the 
entire heating season. Its sole purpose is to ignite 
the gas in the main burner when it is admitted by the 
operation of the automatic gas valve. 

In Sub-division V a cross section of the radiator is 
diagrammatically shown illustrating the violet flame 
in the burner. The little arrows show how the prod- 
ucts of combustion and all the heated gases are circu- 
lated through the radiator until practically all of their 
heat has been delivered into the room. After the 
gases have been cooled practically to room tempera- 
ture, they are drawn into the exhaust as shown by the 
arrows, taken through the vacuum system and ex- 
pelled out of doors through the flue. 

Fig. 2 shows the G. F. E. Rector radiator which is 
similar to the common direct hot water or steam 
type radiator with the central sections removed and 
the gas combustion chamber A inserted in the place. 
This combustion chamber is connected to the top of 
the radiator sections only. The tee B of the same 
width as the combustion chamber is inserted in the 
bottom sections to couple them together and provide 
a connection to the vacuum system. Heat is gen- 
erated by burning gas in the combustion chamber of 
the radiator and by means of the suction fan, the hot 
products of combustion are drawn throughout all 
sections of the radiator which is so proportioned that 
by the time they reach the exhaust pipe they have 
given up practically all of their heat. 

Further details of the combustion chamber are 
shown in Fig. 3 which is a sectional view of the lower 
part of the burner box A in the front of which is the 
door C for access to the burners, etc. This door is 
provided with a mica window D so that the flame 
may be observed without opening the door. 

In the back of the box is an air inlet E provided 
with a flap. This flap is so constructed that it hangs 
open except when the fan is runnnig and through it 
air is supplied to the pilot flame. When the fan is in 
operation the suction pulls the flap to its seat, thus 
preventing any admission of air except through the 
burners. A similar flap is placed at the top of the 
burner box to permit the escape of the products of 
combustion from the small pilot burner when the fan 
is not in operation. 

Fig. 3 also shows the position of the main and pilot 
burners in the burner box or combustion chamber. 
Through an opening in the bottom of the burner box 
the mixing tube C" projects and is fastened in place 
by the valve flange nut D". The lower end of the 
mixing tube is attached to the automatic valve body 
at K Fig. 4) by stud bolts. The main burner E" 
fits loosely on the upper end of the mixing tube and 
consists of a body of cast brass with alternate strips 
of plain and corrugated brass held in the body by brass 
end clamps. The burner orifices are formed by the 
spaces between the plain and corrugated strips which 
are so designed that they effectually prevent "flashing 
back" and at the same time readily permit cleaning, 
if necessary. 



The pilot burner is the result of long and careful 
experiment under all conditions and consists of several 
parts so designed as to be simple and rugged. A 
nipple or tube of iron pipe G" screws into the bottom 
of the burner box. On top of this tube is the pilot 
body H'' which serves, as. a shield for the pilot flame 
which burns from the end of the pilot tube J". In 
the lower end of the nipple is a plug K" with two 
holes which serve as gas and air passages. The pilot 
tube enters the top of the gas passage and the pilot 
connecting tube (shown at L", Fig. 2) enters the 
bottom. The upper end of the air passage is open and 
the lower end receives the air connecting tube (M", 
Fig. 2). In this passage is an air regulating screw 
N''. These connecting tubes are attached to the gas 
control body U' and the interior of the automatic 
valve body ,F (Fig. 7) by slip joints at their lower 
ends. The gas for the pilot is regulated by the pilot 
screw Z' (Fig. 7) and the air needed by the pilot for 
perfect combustion is regulated by the screw N". 

The present automatic gas valve of the G. F. E. 
Rector system is so radically different from any other 
valve previously used for this purpose that a some- 
what detailed description of it is warranted. The 
functions of this valve have already been indicated 
and Figs. 4, 5, 6, and 7 show in section its operating 
mechanism. 

The valve consists of the body F, Fig. 4, made from 
a special mixture of cast iron, which contains the gas 
inlet G, the air inlet H, and the gas and air mixing 
chamber J. The mixing chamber J is connected to 
the gas burner by means of stud bolts at the ground 
surface K. Axially supported in the body is the valve 
tube L. The valve proper consists of the bronze ball 
M, with its stem N, and weight O. The ball valve 
M seats on the upper end of the tube L and normally 
is kept closed by the weight of M, N and O. 

Also axially supported from the body is the cor- 
rugated bronze diaphragm P to which is soldered the 
diaphragm spud Q. On the lower part of the dia- 
phragm is soldered the boss R, which is threaded to 
receive the diaphragm spindle S. This spindle also 
carries the diaphragm weight T. The diaphragm is 
enclosed in the diaphragm case U, which is made in 
two parts. The position of the diaphragm case in 
relation to the body is maintained by means of the 
diaphragm spud nut V. 

The quantity of air admitted through the air inlet 
H is controlled by means of the brass air regulator W, 
which is held in place by means of a screw, threaded 
into a bridge of "^he valve body. The air strainer X 
is a finely perforated brass screen, which is attached 
to the valve body by screws and which may be re- 
moved for cleaning or for inspection of the valve. 
On top of the valve body is the cast iron valve cap 
Y which makes a gas tight chamber around the ball 
valve. 

In Fig. 4, the parts are shown in the normal posi- 
tion, the gas valve being closed and the ball resting 
on its seat. As soon as the exhaust fan starts there is 
a vacuum or negative pressure created throughout 
the exhaust piping, the radiators and down through 



Invest in Victoiy — ^Bny Liberty Bonds. 



the burner into the mixing chamber J. This negative 
pressure extends down through the diaphragm spud 
nut Q and inside of the diaphragm P. As the outside 
of the diaphragm is subject to atmospheric pressure 
which enters through the hole Z, in the bottom of the 
diaphragm case U, the lower f)art of the diaphragm 
moves upwards raising the diaphragm spindle S so 
that it comes in contact with the valve weight O, 
lifting the ball valve M from its seat and allowing gas 
to pass from the gas inlet G down through the interior 
of the valve tube L and out through the holes A into 
the mixing chamber J. Simultaneously air is drawn 
in through the air inlet H and the interior of the valve 
body to the mixing chamber J. Here it mixes with 
the gas which has already entered and the mixture 
passes to the burner. 

If the exhaust ceases there is nothing to hold the 
lower part of the diaphragm in its raised position and 
the counteracting weight T causes the diaphragm to 
move back to its normal position, permitting the 
weight O to pull the diaphragm valve M securely 
against its seat thus putting off the gas. 

Fig. 5 illustrates the control of several radiators on 
the same line when it is desirable to close one of them 
while the exhaust is still operating. In the valve 
body F there is a passage B' from which lead two 
other passages, the first C giving direct connection 
with the atmosphere at a point just above the dia- 
phragm case U but inside of the screen X. 

The second passage D' gives communication from 
the passage B' to the opening E' in the diaphragm 
spud Q. A plug valve F' is provided in the passage 
B' which normallv closes communication between the 
passages C and D'. When one radiator is not to be 
operated the plug valve is turned so that there will 
be communication through the passages C and D' and 
the opening E' through the spud Q to the interior of 
the diaphragm P. Consequently atmospheric pressure 
is exerted both on the inside and the outside of the 
diaphragm. Therefore there will be no tendency for 
the low^er part of the diaphragm to rise and the gas 
valve will remain closed. This plug valve may be 
controlled either bv hand or bv a thermostat, as later 
described. 

The constant inflow of air through the valve when 
the blower is in operation might cause dust to collect 
in the valve passages and the purpose of the screen X 
(Fig. 4) is \ri nrevent this, all of the air entering any 
part of the apparatus being drawn through this screen, 
which is easily cleaned without removal, although easy 
removal is provided for. 

While a simple plug valve may be used at F', Fig. 
5, experience has shown the desirability of a control 
which is more universal in character. This is illus- 
trated in Fig. 6. The valve body G' has a base for 
holding a solenoid at the back and threaded in front 
for the cap nut H'. In the valve body are two annular 
channels Y and K', communicating respectively with 
the passages C' and D', and the axial passage into 
which fits the sleeve L' a thin cylinder open at the 
back and carrying at the front the handle M' fastened 
to the sleeve bv means of a screw. Communication 



between the channels ]' and K' is obtained by the 
holes N', O' and P' — when the sleeve L' is turned 
to certain positions. R' is a cylindrical plunger actu- 
ated bv the armature of the solenoid. A dial or indi- 
cator plate S' shows the various operating positions 
of the parts. 

When magnet control is to be employed the handle 
M' is turned to the position shown bringing the hole 
N' so that there is. at all times, communication be- 
tween the atmosphere through the passage C and the 
interior of the sleeve. With the plunger R' in the 
position shown the passage P' is closed so that the 
diaphra.L'm is only subject to the pressure caused by 
the fan. If the armature of the solenoid to the left 
(in the illustration) it will pull the plunger to the 
left uncovering the hole P' permitting atmospheric 
pressure to pass from the interior of the screen X 
through C, N', P' and D' to the interior of the dia- 
phragm so that the latter is not affected by the 
suction of the fan. The magnet, therefore, does not 
directly operate the valve, but simply controls the air 
passages, breaking the vacuum, thus allowing the 
valve to close. 

When hand control is desired the solenoid is dis- 
pensed with, the hole in the back of the body being 
plugged. Control of the vacuum is then obtained bv 
revolving the sleeve \J by means of the handle M' 
to a position as indicated on the dial plate. By this 
means communication between the holes N' and O' 
is opened or closed and the diaphragm is affected as 
in the case of magnet control. 

If simultaneous magnetic and hand control is de- 
sired the parts are left as shown in Fig. 6 when 
either the ])lun'jer R' is moved bv the solenoid or the 
sleeve 1/ is turned by hand, but in this case the 
handle M' must be put in the position MAG when 
the magnet is to operate. Current to the solenoid 
may be controlled bv means of a switch or thermostat. 

Fig. 7 shows the details of the gas control. On the 
valve body F is a boss T' into which is screwed the 
brass gas and pilot body U', which is tapped for the 
gas connection at V. In the front of the body U' 
are two passages W' and X', W' for the gas to the 
main burner, the quantity of gas being controlled by 
means of the screw Y', which is made gas tight by 
means of the stuffing nut A" and a gasket. The pilot 
screw Z' for regulating the gas to the pilot burner 
is placed in the passage X', and held in adjustment 
by means of a spring. 

Ready accessibility to all parts is obtained bv re- 
moving the air screen X, the valve body cap Y and 
the valve nut B", Fig. 4. When these are removed 
all of the w^orking parts of the valve, with the dia- 
phragm, may be removed as a unit. The diaphragm 
may be examined or adjusted by opening the dia- 
phragm case by removing the screws which hold the 
* two parts together. 

As the temperature of the burner box is somewhat 
higher than in the common steam or hot water radi- 
ator it is at times desirable to provide a guard to 
prevent contact with the hot parts of the radiator. 
There are many satisfactory kinds of such guards but 



Liberty Bond[8 Save lives — ^the Lives of our Sons. 



April 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



141 



one has been adopted as a standard with which all ing appliances of the single unit type, but the system 

radiators are equipped, unless some other is specified. just described is certainly unique in that it is a type 

This guard is of heavy sheet steel perforated in a of ^a> heatin^j^ appliance on the locally controlled 

diamond pattern and consists of two parts : the guard, series principle, consistently and scientifically devel- 

or top, curved to conform to the top of the radiator oped, not as a heating unit, but as has been said, a 

and the apron which depends from the guard and complete heating system embodying as well, localized- 

protects, not only the burner box but the valve and units advantages, 

other working parts. 

The guard is rigidly attached to the radiator by ANSWERING AN INQUIRY, 
brackets which screw into the tapped holes in the tops 
of the sections and the apron is so attached to the 

guard that it may be easily swung aside to give access Editor Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal, 

to the burner box or valve. The guard also carries a Buffalo, N. Y. 

protecting shield above and behind the radiator, the Dear Sir: — 

shield being designed to increase materially the circu- Can you inform us regarding the natural gas pro- 

lation of air over the hottest part of the radiator. duced and distributed during the year past in West 

From this description it will be evident that there Virginia, and can you give us what shrinkage there 

are several distinct and desirable heating conveniences was in the manufacture of carbon? 

with the G. F. E. Rector gas heating system : Yours very truly, 

1. It gives exactly the amount of heat just when and A SUBSCRIBER, 
where wanted ; Our reply was to the effect that the subscriber might 

2. It g'nes nearly 100 per cent heating value from expect an answer to his query in the March issue of 
the fuel used" Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal. 

As a reply to the request, we publish the comparative 

3. When equipped with thermostatic control it gives statement made for the period covered by the years end- 
an even, non-fluctuating temperature, no matter jng respectivelv September 30th, 1916, June 30th, 1917. 
how sharp and sudden the outside temperature All amounts are in cubic feet. 

^ ' Utilities produced 226,618,602,000 

4. It requires the minimum of attention and. aside Estimated for missing reports 2,730,393.000 

from minor adjustments in its mechanism, can be t ♦^i ^ a u *-i*- o I 

•' 1 otal gas produced by utilities 229,348,995,00c 

run as readily bv a woman as bv a man ;  ^ , , , .,. . 

Others produced — not utilities 39,618,510,000 

5. It is absolutely odorless, absolutely dustless and Estimated for missing reports 477,340,000 

absolutely healthful ; ^ 1 ^ ^^ , ,. • 7. 

•^ lotal produced by others — not utilities 40,095,850,000 

6. It leaves the cellar just as clean as the other Total produced— reported 266,237,112,000 

rooms of a building, because it does away with Estimated for missing reports 3,207,733,000 

coal, ashes and all the dirt and dust incident to 

the operation of the usual coal-fired furnace or J°^^^ produced .. 269,444,845,000 

. ,, Less amount reported used for carbon black... 9,627,826,000 

boiler ; 

Total Produced for Domestic and Industrial 

7. It serves also as a partial ventilating system in Distribution 259,817,019,000 

that it constantlv renews the fresh air through- ^^^ o^„o, ^a r» «.♦• j t ^ * • 1 - ^ 

- . . . '^ uas consumed, Domestic and Industrial 53,970,674,000 

out a buildmg because it expels the vitiated air. Estimated for missing reports 2,406,653,000 

It can well be seen that this system is very elastic ^^^^^ consumed-Domestic and Industrial 

and the desirability of such heating elasticity is oh- (Carbon black not included) 56,377,327,000 

vious as applied to dwellings where certain rooms are ^as consumed-Domestic and Industrial (Car- 
used infrequently but where heat must be quickly bon black not included) 56,377.327,000 

obtainable when needed. The advantage of such Gas consumed-Field and Main Lines 17,964,726,000 

elasticity in heating as applied to business buildings Estimated for missing reports 801,080,000 

is not so readily evident, but in such cases the janitor 

or engineer is enabled to give an adjustment of differ- "^^^^J consumed— Field and Main Lines (Car- 

. . _ . • . .. r -lu u -u- bon black not included) 18,765,806,000 

ent temperatures in various sections of the building. »/ o» » 

T-J-.  XT . T^ j.\. c • J -J.' -J. Gas consumed — reported 7 1, 93 5, 400.000 

Editors l\ote: — From the foregoing description it Fc*,v»,ofo^ f^- ^;eo;«^ ^«,>^^f. \\iiZ^J^r. 

. . ,. ^ ..rr r , i, r Estimated for missing rcports 3,207,733,000 

is clear that this system ditters fundamentally from . 

practically all other gas-heating appliances. It is pre- Total gas consumed (Carbon black not in- 

eminently a gas heating system, embodying local gas- eluded) 75»M3.i33,ooo 

heat-producing units, while generally other gas ap- Gas exported out of State 188,169,235,000 

pliances are heating units, not in series or otherwise Gas imported into State 2,810,684,000 

a part of a system ; except, of course, where gas is Gas reported used for Carbon black (a) 9,627,826,000 

used for fuel in a central heating plant. There is a (3) i^ is estimated that about 19,000,000.000 was used for 

great field, and will always be a great field, for heat- this purpose. 

Save More Lives — ^Buy More Bonds. 



142 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



Natural Gas Production and Distribution in West Virginia 
for the Year Ending June 30, 191 7. 

All amounts are in cubic feet. 

Utilities produced 252,749,340,000 

Others produced v . . 38,75 1,444,000 



Total production 291,501 .784,000 

Less amounts reported used for Carbon black. . 10,919,084,000 

Total production for Domestic and Industrial 

Distribution ,1 280,582,700,000 

Gas consumed — Domestic and Industrial 50,729,000,000 

Gas consumed — Field and Main Lines 23,449,943,000 



Total gas consumed (Carbon black not in- 
cluded) " 74,178,943,000 

Gas exported out of State 210,321,226,000 

Gas imported into State 3,278,087,000 

Gas reported used for Carbon black (b) 10,919,084,000 

(b) It is estimated that about 20,000,000,000 was used for 
this purpose. 



Utilities produced 1916. . .229,348,995,000 

Utilities produced 1917- • 252,749,340,000 10.2 % increase 1917 



23.400,345,000 

Others produced 19 16 40,095,850,000 

Others produced 1917 38,751,444,000 3.35% decrease 1917 



1,344,406,000 

Total produced 1916 269,444,845,000 

(carbon black reported 

included) 
Total produced 1917 291,501,784,000 8.19% increase 1917 



22,056,939,000 

Total produced 1916 259,817,019,000 

(carbon black reported 

not included) 
Total produced 1917 280.582,700,000 11.84% increase 1917 

30,765,681.000 

Gas consumed— domestic 

and industrial 1916.. 56,377,327,000 
Gas consumed — domestic 

and industrial 1917.. 50,727,000,000 10.02% decrease 1917 



5,650,327,000 

Gas consumed Field and 

Main Lines 1916 18,765,806,000 

Gas consumed Field and 

Main Lines 1917.... 23.449,943,00024.96% increase 1917 



4,684.137,000 

Total consumed 1916.... 75,143,133,000 
(carbon black not re- 
ported included) 

Total consumed 1917.... 74,178,943,000 1.28% decrease 191 7 



964,190,000 

Total consumed 1916.... 84,770,959,000 

(carbon black reported 

included) 
Total consumed 1917.... 85,098,027,000 38% increase 1917 



327,068,000 

Gas exported out of State 

1916 188,169,235,000 

Gas exported out of State 

1917 210,321,226,000 1 1.77% increase 1917 

22,151,991,000 



Gas imported into State 

1916 2,810,684,000 

Gas imported into State 

1917 3,278,087,000 16.63% increase 1917 



467,403,000 



Amount reported used for 

carbon black (c) 1916 9,627,826,000 
Amount reported used for 

carbon black (c) 191 7 10,919,084,000 



1,291,258,000 

(c) It is to be noted that reports" for all the gas used for 
this purpose are not available. 



READY-TO-SERVE CHARGE. 



mHE city of Toledo has done the square thing; by 
the Northwestern Ohio Natural Gas Com- 
pany of that city, in allowing a ready-to-serve 
charge of 35 cents per month per consumer. 
This granting of the privilege has resulted in other 
cities or communities doing likewise. For instance, 
North Baltimore, Bowling Green, Maumee. and Per- 
rysburg have fallen in line, the Public Service Com- 
mission promptly approving the act. 

The following are stated as the reasons for this 
move: 

'*The overhead cost per meter for labor, repairs, 
bookkeeping, collecting, taxes, compressing and de- 
livering gas is 65 cents per month, which is exclusive 
of the cost of gas. 

*'It was found on investigating the matter that 3,900 
families used an average of 1,900 feet of gas per month 
and paid 35 cents per month for twelve months in the 
year. Therefore the company was furnishing them 
with 1,000 feet of gas per month free, and giving them 
30 cents per month for the privilege of having them as 
consumers. 

**About 6,300 families paid 70 cents per month for 
each month in the year, and they received 2,000 feet 
of gas per month for this, and they were therefore get- 
ting their gas for 2V2 cents per thousand; 6,100 fami- 
lies paid Si. 05 each month, for which they received 
3,000 feet of gas, which netted the company a trifle over 
13 cents per thousand feet. 

"About 5.000 families paid $1.40 per month, for 
which they received 4.000 feet of gas, and which netted 
the company about 19 cents per thousand. 

''Inasmuch as the gas costs the company in the field, 
hundreds of miles from Toledo, more per thousand 
than these consumers pay for it, it can very readily be 
seen that they are really a detriment to the company. 

Raising the price of gas would not remedy this 
condition, as the discrimination would still exist — 
hence the ready-to-serve charge, which it is hoped will 
produce sufficient revenue to meet the increased ex- 
penses, and help to make a fair return upon the valua- 
tion of the property devoted to the transportation and 
distribution of natural gas." 



While your Money Fights the Kaiser, Blake it Work at Home for You— Buy Liberty Bonds. 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELD. 



ALLEGANY FIELD. 
Jordan, E. J. Wilson. • • 

VENANGO-CLARION. 

J. S. Stover, S. P. McCalmont et al 3.. . . 
Winkleman, S. P. O. M. D. 2 

Clarion County — 
Buzza, J. N. Buzza et al 4 

Forest County — 
Coleman Fraer, Jefferson O. & G. 4.... 



Dry 
Gas 



BUTLER-ARMSTRONG. 

Abrams, Abrams i 

Mangel, N. Mangel 2'. 



Dry 

SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA. 

Washington — 

Ritchie, Peoples Gas i 

Y. & O. Coal, Y. & O. Coal i 

Aiken-Leech, So. P. O. M. D. i 

Day, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Craft hrs., W. Va. N. G. 2 

Dorseyville — 

Miller, Amer. N. G. i . . • • 

Ingomar — M. M. Walley, M. M. Walley & Co. 3 

Mt. Morris — 

Kigler, Philadelphia Co. i ^ 

Mackey, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Greggs, Mfrs. L. & H. 2 

Clutter, N. G. Co. of W. Va. I 

Lawrence Co. — 
Hefnee, Campbell & Jackson 2 



Dry 
Gas 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



Mannington — 

Strum, So. P. O. i 

Satterfield, Blackshere O. & G. 3 

Hibbs, Mfrs. L. & H. 3 

Maxwell, Philadelphia Co. 3. 1. . 

Cox, Hope Gas 2 , 

Keck, Pgh. & W. Va. Gas r 

Neptune, Pgh. & W. Va. Gas i 

Moore, Carnegie Gas 2 

Hamilton, Hope Gas 6 

Ashcraft, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Glover, Philadelphia Co. i 

Thomas, Hope Gas 5 

Wetzel and Tyler — 

Pendergast, Carnegie Gas 2 

Fuchs, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Brookover, Hope Gas 3 

Shrader, Max Fudner & Co., i , 

Marshall Co. — 

Dorsey, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Rhine, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

McGlumphry, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Fair, Carnegie Gas 3 

Sisterville — Williamson, Adams Oil 4 

Ritchie Co. — 
Kelly hrs., Hope Gas i 

Gilmer Co. — 
Wilson, Hope Gas 4 



Gas 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

2 
2 



Dry 
Dry 



Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Gas 



4 
8 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 

Gas 



Freeman, Eastern Pet. 6 

Calhoun Co. — 
Bell, Hope Gas i — 

Roane Co. — 
Taylor, O. F. S. 7- 

Kanawha Co. — 

Bowers, K. V. Prods 8 

Marmott Coal. Libby-Owens Glass 4 

Moore, G. L. Cabot i 

Clay Co. — Baxter hrs., U. F. G. i . . . . 



Dry 
Gas 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 

Woodsfield — 

Ellis, Ellis & Cunningham i 

Block, J. M. Lofland & Co. 2 

Hocking Co. — 

Reinscheld, Carter Oil i 

Door Run Coal, Cochran, Funk & Co. i . . . . 

Licking Co. — 

Humphrey, Planet Oil i 

Fossett, Geo. Guthrie & Co. 2 

McLaughlin, McLaughlin Bros. 4 

Wickham, Whitehill & Co. 2 

Holmes Co. — 
Reece, Logan Nat. Gas 2 

Athens Co. — 
Reuter, Meyers O. & G. 7. 8, 9 

Morgan Co. — 

Penrose, Mosier & Co. 2 

Smith, Henne Oil 39 

Marietta — 

Dennis, Carner & Edwards i 

Farnsworth, J. H. Jiggins & Co. 3 

Reuenhausen, Reuenhausen & Co. 2 

Reynolds, Jeanette Oil i 

Carroll Co. — 
O. & U. Coal Co., Scott O. & G. 3 



Dry 
Gas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK 

Comp. 

Allegany 4 

Bradford Field 9 

Middle Field 13 

Venango-Clarion 22 

Butler-Armstrong 7 

S. W. Pennsylvania 24 

West Virginia 67 

S. E. Ohio 53 



Total IQ9 



1.956 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



ASHLAND COUNTY. 
Mohican — W. F. Haire, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

MEDINA COUNTY. 

Brunswick — Bental, Medina G. & F. i . . . 
J. H. Fordham, Medina G. & F. 3 



Gas 

Gas 

Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

9 
21 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

18 
I 



^rod. 


Dry 


Gas 


5 





I 


28 








22 








87 


2 


2 


10 


2 





112 


5 


8 


987 


9 


18 


755 


18 


I 



36 30 



Dry 

Gas 
Gas 



You don't need a Bank Account to Buy Liberty Bonds. 



»44 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



Wm. M. Strong, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . 
Medina — J no. Kennedy, Medina G. & F. 3 
Lafayette — Carrigan, Medina G. & F. 2., 

Jno. O. Lance, Medina G. & F. i 



Gas 



LORAIN COUNTY. 

Grafton — R. L. Sears, Ohio Fuel Supply i 
Columbia — Fannie Posts, East Ohio Gas i 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Wooster — Walter Smith, Ohio Oil i 

Cannan — Heim-Irwin, Logan G. & F. 1.. 

C. Talley, Ohio Fuel Supply r 

G. A. Smith, Ohio Fuel Supply 1 

Wayne — McDaniel, Logan G. & F. i 

Clinton — Williamson, East Ohio Gas i . . . . 

J. & B. Lake, East Ohio Gas 2 

Chippewa — Galehouse, East Ohio Gas i . . . 
East Union — Craven, Chas. Curry & Co. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Monroe — Wigton, Richland Land Dev. 2.. 
Worthington — Mowery, Logan Gas & F. i 



Gas 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover — F. Malke, Logan Gas & Fuel 1 . . 
M. E. W^olfe, Logan Gas & Fuel 2.... 

B. L. Hart, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

J. D. Kurdtz, Preston Oil i 

Reed, Melrose Oil & Gas 1 

B. L. Smith, East Ohio Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland — Thatcher, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

C. E. Wyatt. Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Eugene Stock. Ohio Fuel Supply r . . . . 



Gas 



PERRY COUNTY. 
Thorn — E. Fink, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . . . 

HOCKING COUNTY. 
Benton — Thompson, Ohio Fuel Supply i . 

HOLMES COUNTY. 

Ripley — S. E. Fverhart. Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Ida Rose. Medina G. & F. i 

Gas 



COSHOCTON COUNTY. 
Tiverton — W. L. Reese, Logan G. & F. 2. 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. 

Licking o 

Fairfield o 

Knox o 

Ashland i 

Medina 7 

Lorain 2 

W^ayne 9 

Richland 2 

Cuyahoga 6 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

2 

7 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

I 

5 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 

Gas 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 



od. 


Dry 


Gas 





9 




























1 





35 





6 





I 


I 





2 


7 








2 





I 


5 



Vinton 3 

Perry i 

Hocking i 

Holmes 3 

Coshocton I 

Jackson o 

Total 36 









3 








1 





I 


I 


40 





2 








I 












75 



INDIANA FIELD. 



JAY COUNTY. 

Penn — J. M. Gardner, J. F. Gardner 2 

PIKE COUNTY. 
Patoka — Jane Fettinger, A. B. Bement i . . . 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Turman — W. C. Riggs, Scott & W^elman 1 
J. S. Bottsoff, Wm. C. Kennedy Co. i.... 
J. Freeman, Gambill & Bement i 



Dry 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Denney — Steele hrs., Beaver Oil 5 

L. Corder, Crown Oil & Gas 2 



Dry 



WOLFE COUNTY. 

Campton — Jeff Wells. Mason & Dixon i . . . . 

Whiteman — Volley Profit, Sun Co. i 

Torrent — Spencer hrs., P. J. White & Co. 3 



Dry 



MORGAN COUNTY. 

Cannel City — Geo. Elliott, Lenox Oil & Gas i 

ESTILL COUNTY. 

Irvine — Dave Patrick, Kentucky Pet. 10 

Chas. Cox. Crown Oil i 

Laban Parks, F. H. Yates 4 



Dry 



POWELL COUNTY. 
Pilot— J. M. Ashley, Pat. I White 48. 

J. T. Rogers. Ohio Oil 5 

Meadow hrs., Henry Clay Oil i 



Dry 



LEE COUNTY. 
Beattyville — J. C. Rrandeberry, Atlantic Prod. & R. i 

BATH COUNTY. 

Olympia — Richardson, Yates & Co. i 

FLOYD COUNTY. 

Beaver Creek — S. Gray. Eastern Gulf Oil i 

WHITLEY COUNTY. 
Williamsburg — Kentucky River, Kentucky Mountain 

Oil I 

• LAUREL COUNTY. 

London — Jackson hrs.. Atlantic P. & R. i 

Tuel. Jackson & Co. i 

D. Brose, Laurel Oil & Gas i 



Dry 



CLAY COUNTY. 

Manchester — Babtist Land. Farmer & Kennedy i 
Oneida, Cherry & Co. i 



29 



Dry 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

3 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

.3 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

3 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 



Money means Munitions — Buy Liberty Bonds. 



April 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



145 



WARREN COUNTY. 

Bowling Green — F. Gerard, Fynn & Co. i 
W. Garrison, National Oil i 



Dry 



BREATHITT COUNTY. 

Copes Branch — Breck Crawford, Atlantic Prod. & 
Refg. I ^ 

MADISON COUNTY. 

Red House — McKinney, Parks 81 Bunch i 

LARUE COUNTY. 

Upton — Jno. Burke, Dundee Pet. i 

LEWIS COUNTY. 

Petersville — Tri-State Drilling 1 



TENNESSEE. 



MACON COUNTY. 
Salt Lick— D. B. White, N. Haskell i. 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED 

Comp. 

Wayne 3 

Wolfe 8 

Morgan 4 

Estill 13 

Powell 23 

Lee 

Bath 

Allen 

Floyd .... 
Whitley .. 
Rockcastle 
Knox .... 
Laurel . . . 
Clay 



20 
I 

9 
I 

I 

I 

I 

3 
2 



Magoffin 2 

Warren 

Barren 

Breathitt 

Madison 

LaRue 

Lewis 

Tennessee 



3 
2 

2 

I 

I 

I 

2 



WORK. 

Prod. 
10 

55 

45 

no 

750 

645 
o 

250 

o 

o 

10 

5 
o 

o 

5 
10 

30 

5 
o 

o 

o 

o 



Total 104 



1,930 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 
Honey Creek — Bert Wesley, Phipps & Co. 5 

WABASH COUNTY. 
Friendsville — Couch, Sparks & Co. i 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



Dry 
2 

3 
I 

3 

3 
I 

I 

o 

o 

I 

o 

I 

3 
o 

o 

2 
O 
O 
I 
I 
I 
2 

26 



Dry 
Dry 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



Gas 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 
o 

o 
o 
2 
o 
o 
o 
I 
o 
o 
o 
o 



Gas 



Dry 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. . 

February, 1918. January, 1918. 

Conip. Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. Dry 



Clark o 

Crawford 3 

Lawrence o 

Clinton o 

Wabash i 

Edgar i 

McDonough o 

Total 5 









3 


95 





6 


I 


4 


18 


2 








2 


80 











r 





I 





I 


2 


50 


I 


5 




















I 


5 






KANSAS. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

26-26-5, Sluss, Patton & Huston i 

29-28-4, Love, Empire Gas & Fuel 19 

7-29-4, Holcomb, Hoyt et al i 

28-26-5, Hegberg, Empire Gas & Fuel 58. 
31-25-5, Robinson, Sinclair Oil & Gas 69.. 

9-26-4, Town lot, Wichita Crude Oil i . . . 

4-29-4, Minor, Mid-Kansas Oil & Gas 13 
13-27-6, Stebbins, Mollhyde Oil i 

7-29-4. Holcomb, Hoyt et al 2 

29-28-4. Love, Empire Gas & Fuel 19 

13-29-3. Piper, Lucky Eight Oil & Gas 2. 

16-27.4, Scully, P. O. & G. 18 

12-28-3, Joseph, Seven Fields Oil i 

21-27-4, Lines, Big Seven Oil 2 

15-27-4, Loomis, Carter Oil 9 

8-27-4, Jones, Monarch Oil i...-. 

33-25-5. Stokes, Empire Gas & Fuel 59... 
36-25-4, Houston, Empire Gas & Fuel 27.. 
17-25-5. Robinson, Southwestern Pet. i.... 

2-28-4, Martin, Empire Gas & Fuel 8.... 
23-26-4, Boucher, Dynamo Petroleum i . . . 



Gas 

Dry 

Gas production 



WILSON COUNTY. 

^30i5» Hill, Fredonia Gas i 

28-27-16, Colaw, Anthony Syndicate 

8-29-16, Watson, Merchants Oil &.Gas i 
33-28-18, Albert, Moore Bros. & Troy 5., 



Gas 

Dry 

Gas production 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

5 

17 

6,000,000 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

3 
I 

8,000,000 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 
32-34-14, Wylie, Heaton Oil &Retining 2., 



3-34-15. Pugh, C. E. Roth 2 



Gas 
Gas 



Gas 

Gas production 



1,000,000 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Sedan — 

11-34-11, Trout. Crook et al 3 

1-32-12, French, Guy Berry 6 

9-32-13, Thorp, Bernadine Oil i 

Elk— 

21-31-12, Hogan, Bliss & Co. 3 

24-30-12, Clark, Sachem Oil i 



Gas 

Dry 

Gas production 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

2 

3 
2,000,000 



II 



13 



248 



MIAMI-PRANKLIN-DOUGLAS. 

Wellsville— 

36-16-21, Downs, Hirsh i 

27-17-21, Gaylor, Ray Oil 2. 

15-17-21, Freeman, Kan. Duluth O. & G. 5 

13-16-20, Lister. Wellington Wellsville O. & G. 4 

13-14-21, Rodewald, Kansas Natl. Gas 2 

13-16-20, Lister, Wellington-Wellsville 4 

10-16-20, Kyle, Mc Wells Co. 3 

10-16-20, Kyle, McWells Co. 2 

20-16-21, Axline, Unnamed parties i 

24-16-21, Love, Unnamed parties i 

13-16-21, Shields, Gossett et al i 

14-12-21, Cone, Home Oil & Gas 2 

Rantoul — 

31-17-22, Cress, L X. Miller 3 

1 1-17-22, Murry, L. & S. Oil i 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 



He also Fights who Helps a Fighter Fight. 



J 46 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 




16-17-22, Wilkins, Amalgamated Oil i 

Northwest of Paola, Lister, Okla. parties i 

9-17-23. Hogan. Missouri Oil & Gas i.... 

Near Block, Peckham. Phillips i 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 8 

Dry 10 

Gas production 3,000,000 



ALLEN COUNTY. 
30-26-18, Squire, Penn Oil 5 

NEOSHO COUNTY. 

33-28-18, Abbott, Moore Bros, et al 2 

WILDCATS. 

Greenwood County — 
22-25-12, Loveland, Sinclair O. & G. i 

Chase County — 
22-22-9, Hughes, Matfield Oil i 

McPherson County — 
9-17-4W., Sangren, Lindsborg Oil & Gas i 

Pawnee County — 
29-3-12, Miller, J. F. Hurst et al i 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



OKLAHOMA. 



OSAGE COUNTY. 

20-27- 9, American Pipe Line i 

14-21-10, Osage & Okla. 233 

36-26-10, Barnsdall Oil r 

25-25-10, Barnsdall Oil 10 

10-23- 8, Henry Oil 

25-23- 8, Graham & Bird 6 

22-27-10, Echo Oil 4 

32-23-11, Osage, Tidal Oil 7 

22-24-10, Mass.-Okla. Oil 13 

32-23-11, Tidal Oil 7 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Gas 4 

Dry ....* 6 

Gas production 17,000,000 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

6-26-13, Tehee, Phillips Petroleum 4 Dry 

r9-28-i3, Huston. Seamans Oil i Dry 

6-26-13, Tehee, Phillips Petroleum 6 Dry 

17-26-14, Climax Oil & Gas 3 Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



3 
I 



NOWATA AND NORTHERN ROGERS COUNTIES. 

Cherokee Shallow Sand — 
20-26-16. Kulchinski, Commercial National Bank of 

Nowata 6 

2-26-16, Rogers, Painter et al i 

22-26-15. Prohoda, Aetna Oil 6 

2-26-16, Couch, F. C. Henderson i 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 



Gas I 

Dry ' 3 

Gas production 250,000 



TULSA COUNTY. 

Bird Creek and Flat Rock — 

29-20-14, PVakes, Finton Oil & Gas 

10-20-14, Young, Okla. City Oil & Gas 3 

29-20-14, Thompson. Ardizzone & Ossenbeck 3 

20-20-14, Rodman, Ike Simons et al 5..; 

10-20-14, Young. VV. C. Brissey et al 3 

36-22-13, Kee, Tulsa Fuel 2 

Red Fork— 
9-18-12, Fulton, Mt. Vernon Oil 8 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 



Bixby— 
34-16-13, Moore, Magnolia Petroleum 4. 

22-16-13, Bear, H. F. Wilcox 4 , 

22-17-13, Vox, Bissett et al 2 

29-17-13, Berryhill, Mid West Royalty 8, 
34-16-13, Townsend, Cosden Oil & Gas i 
Jenks and Broken Arrow — 

2-19-14, Bruner, Seifrid & Co. i 

6-19-14, Woods, Thompson et al i 

35-18-14. Miller, Edgar Oil 6 

20-18-13, Phipps, Dundee Petroleum 12.. 
19-18-14, Cooper, Parkdale Oil & Gas i. 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Gas 4 

Dry 13 

Gas produition 16,500,000 



CREEK COUNTY. 

Gushing — 
11-18-7, Smith, Iron Mountain Oil 3.. 

36-18-7, Jones, Carter Oil i 

34-18-7, Hukey, P. O. & G. 3 

7-17-8, Samuel, Lancaster & Kerr i.. 

20-r8-7, Wacoche, P. O. & G. 6 

Mannford, etc. — 
1-19- 8, Anderson, Roxana Pet 

Glenn Pool — 
22-17-11, Cloud, King Carlyle Oil 9... 

33-17-11. Hill, W. M. Graham i 

12-18-12, Bunger. Hamilton et al i.... 

33-^7-^^ f George, Cinco Oil 16 

34-18-11. Spocogee, H. U. Bartlett i.. 

Kelleyville — 
io-r6-io. Pepper, Okla. Natural Gas 3. 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 
Dr>' 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Drv 



Gas 4 

Dry 8 

Gas production 16,000,000 



OKMULGEE COUNTY. 

Mounds — 

5-16-13, Tiger, Atlantic Petroleum i 

31-15-13. Pigeon, Standard Royalties i 

9-r6-ii, Fee, W. Graham 6 

9-16-11, Fee, W. Graham 5 

10-15-12, Robbins, C. B. Shaffer i 

Hamilton Switch — 

25-14-1 1, Teal, Texas Co. i , 

20-15-11, Drew, Morgan et al 10 

30-15-12, Robins, C. B. Shaffer i 

Tiger Flats — 
13-13-12, Grayson, Okmulgee P. & R. 6 

8-13-12. Leffard, Iowa Oil 1 

Bald Hill— 

35-16-14, Anderson, Baker Oil i , 

18-14-13, Reynolds Drilling 

33-i5-i3» Roberts, Tidal Oil 2 

19-14-15. Rentie, A. C. Saint et al i 

2-14-13, Leader, Ohio Cities Gas 2 , 

6-14-15, Pattinger, Price et al 5 

7-14-15, Rentie. Mary Rentie Oil 5 

20-14-14. Hagerson, Henry, X. Y. O. et al 10 
20-14-14. Sadler, Henry. N. Y. Oil et al 10.. 

1- 1 5-14, Charles. Caney River O. & G. i..., 

^8-15-13, Brown, W. T. Rapp 1 

26-14-13, Phillips, Neely et al 2 

Okmulgee-Morris — 

1-13-^3. Alexander, Nile Oil 6 , 

9- 1 4- 1 3. Colbert, French & Luttes 1 

13-13-12. Grayson. Okmulgee P. & R. 6.... 
18-14-13, Tiger, Deitrich et al 4 

1-13-13, Moore, Nile Oil i , 

26-14-13, Phillips, J. W. Neely 2 

1-13-13. Alexander, Okla. State Oil 6 

13-13-12, Grayson, Okmulgee P. & R. 6 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Gas 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry- 
Dry 
Gas. 
Dr)^ 
Dry^ 
Drr' 
Drr- 
Dr)- 
Ga^ 

Dr>^ 
Ga-== 
Dn-H 
Ga-^ 

Dr— 
Ga 

Dr - 
Dr - 



Doing Without is as Vital as Doing. Save and buy Liberty Bonds. 



April 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



147 



Henryctta — 

9-1 2-14, Sampson, W. C. Newman 2 Gas 

Gas S 

Dry 23 

Gas production 63,000,000 

MUSKOGEE, WAGONER, ROGERS COUNTIES. 
Inola — 

30-19-15, Sunday, Laurel Oil & Gas i Gas 

Haskell— 

5-16-15, Reynolds, Cosden Oil & Gas 3 Gas 

20-16-15, Asbury, Peterson et al 3 Gas 

17-15-16, Banks, Peterson et al 3.... Dry 

17-IS-16, Banks, Peterson, et al 4 Dry 

17-15-16, Harrison, Caney River Gas i Gas 

19-15-16, Howard, Caney River Gas 5 Dry 

20-15-16, Woodall, Pacific Petroleum 2. . . . ! Dry 

35-15-15. Canada, Brown et al 5 Dry 

17-15-16, Banks, Brady et al i Dry 

20-16-15, Asbury, Melba Oil i Dry 

" Boynton — 

2-14-15, Harrison, Okla. Iowa Oil 2 Dry 

1 1-13-15, Seivers, Navajo Petroleum 2 Dry 

3-14-15, Smith, Cappes & Rose i Dry 

6-14-15, Conners, Hazlett & Price 6 Gas 

8-13-15, Rich, Penn-Wyoming Oil i Dry 

19-14-16, Beams, Probst & Morrison 2 Gas 

35-15-15. Canada, Brown et al 5 Dry 

5-14-16, Rentie, C. E. Harris i Dry 

19-14-15, Rentie, A. C. Saint et al i Dry 

10-14-16, Beams, Probst & Morrison 2 Gas 

Deer, W. C. Newman i Dry'Si-t^i-ee 

Gas 7 

Dry 15 

Gas production 17,000,000 

PAYNE COUNTY, 

Outside Yale District — 

26-1&-5, Parker, Fortuna Oil 2 Dry 

PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Cleveland — 

32-21-8. Howe, State Lands Petroleum i Dry 

32-21-8, Phillips, State Lands Pet. 3 Gas 

5-21-8, Mullendore, Mullendore & Thompson 4.... Dry 

Maramec — 

12-21-6, Danley, Ohio Cities Gas i Dry 

Gas r 

Dry 3 

Gas production 5,000,000 

KAY COUNTY. 

Blackwell — 

15-27-1W., Smythman, Cherokee O. & G. i Gas 

26-28- I, Whiteside, Duluth & Okla. i Dry 

26-28-17, Whiteside, Duluth & Okla. i Dry 

31-29-1E., Sloan, Bermont Oil i Dry 

31-29-1, Hoover, Bermont Oil 2 Dry 

29-28-1, Warren, Carter Oil 8 Gas 

Gas 2 

Dry 4 

Gas production 8,000,000 

CARTER COUNTY. 

Healdton and Fox — 

33-3-3. Sarasota, Strawn Oil 2 Dry 

14-4-3, Simpson, Gates Oil i Dry 

22-4-3, Watson, Texas Co. 22 Dry 

9-3-3, Bush, Osaple Oil 2 Dry 

6-3-2, Kirk & Patsy Oil i Gas 

6-3-2, Bogie, Marcum et al i Gas 

A Bond in the Hand is 



6-3-2, Bogie, Marcum et al 2 Gas 

23-4-3, Rose, Magnolia Petroleum 25 Dry 

Gas 3 

Dry 5 

Gas production 5,500,000 

WILDCATS. 

Pontotoc County — 

22-5-8, Jackson, Stabb & McCann Gas 

28-5-8, Chicago Oil Co Gas 

Love County — 
13-7-3. Pierce Oil Corp. i Dry 

Coal County — 
'25-3N-9E., Lucillene Oil i Dry 

Carter County — 
6-5S-rE., CoflFey, Spectator Oil i Dry 

Stephens County — 
30-2S-8W., Hart, W. J. Mack i Dry 

Kay County — 
26-28- 1 E.. Whiteside, Duluth-Okla. Oil i Dry 

Marshall County — 
25-5S-5E., Arbuckle, Schumacher et al i Dry 

LeFlore County — 
26-7N-26E., Durant, American Indian Oil i Gas 

Kay County — 
25-28N-1 W., Tyler, Kay & Kiowa Oil i Dry 

Cotton County — 

23-rS-ioW., Anderson, Keyes et al i Gas 

27-1-10, Boetsche, Keyes et al i Gas 

20-1 N-io, Korthouse, J. P. Evans et al i Gas 

Gas 6 

Dry 7 

Gas production 64,000,000 



ARKANSAS. 



WICHITA AND WILBARGER COUNTIES. 

Sevier County — 
2-9-31, Powell, Clear Creek O. & G. -i 



Gas 



Gas production ,^ 7,000,000 



KANSAS. 

SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK 

Comp. 

Butler 95 

Chautauqua and Elk 13 

Montgomery 11 

Wilson 22 

Neosho 9 

Allen 10 

Miami-Pranklin-Douglas 40 

Wildcats 12 

Total 212 21,911 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 


22,475 


20 


5 


55 


3 


2 


61 





2 


153 


I 


3 


55 


I 





93 


I 





440 


10 


6 


605 


5 






41 



18 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. 

Osage 49 3,025 

Washington 25 217 

Nowata-North Rogers Zl 535 

Tulsa 41 814 

Creek ,•. . . 43 1,850 

Okmulgee 94 5»i20 

Muskogee- Wagoner-Rogers 48 2,363 

Payne " 2,320 

Pawnee I5 795 

Worth Two in the Booth. 



Dry 


Gas 


7 


2 


2 


I 


3 


I 


13 


4 


9 


3 


23 


8 


16 


7 


9 





6 


I 



148 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



Gartield-Noble 4 

Kay 24 

Carter 34 

Wildcats 20 

Total 445 



1. 165 


I 





7,630 


4 


I 


I.6I3 


^ 

D 


2 


145 


10 


6 



27,692 



100 



MID-CONTINENT. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. 

Kansas 212 

Oklahoma 445 

Arkansas '. i 

Total 658 53.629 



141 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



Caddo — 
32-13-1 1, J. M. Xabors. The Texas 6 

Bossier — 
24-16-12, Caplis, The Texas 3 

M iscellaneous — 
40-20- 4, Trezevant, Ouachita Xat. Gas & Oil 2 

21-22-13, McClanahan, Palmetto Pet. i 

4-17-14, Cross Lake. J. G. Gambert et al 3.. 

31-20- 9, Hardin, J. Y. Steele i 

29-20-14, Douglass. Red River Valley O. i 

27-21-14, Dixon, Richardson Oil i 

Dry 

Gas wells • . . 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. 

Caddo 24 1,420 

De Soto 2 75 

Red River o o 

Bossier 2 10 

Miscellan's 7 ^5 

Total 35 1.520 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



36 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 


23M7 


41 


18 


27,692 


100 


36 








1 



55 



Dry 

Gas 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry- 
Dry 
Dry 

3 



Dry 


Gas 








I 














1 


4 


2 



WICHITA AND WILBARGER COUNTIES. 

Electra — 

Tate, Trammel et al 2 Dry 

Davis. Pittsburg-Texas Oil i Dry 

Dry 2 

CULBERTSON DISTRICT. 

Jennings, Colorado-Texas Dev. i Dry 

Burnett (sec. 5), Xo. 3, Gulf Production Dry 

Burnett (sec. 7), Xo. 4, Gulf Production Dry 

Dry 3 

BURKBURNETT. 

Knauth, Staley et al 2 Dry 

Birk. Reynols Oil 11 Dry 

Harden. Mann et al 26 Dry 

Bentley. Burk Drilling Co. i Dry 

Knauth, Snyder-Burkburnett Oil i Dry 

L. F. Ramming, Panhandle Refming 10 Dry 

Meyers, Mann et al i Dry 

Waite, Shackelford 1 Dry 

Thom, Gulf Production 8 Dry 

Dry 9 

Lend Him a Hand- 



WILDCATS. 

Coleman County — 
Wells, F. \V. Turner et al 1 

Stephens County — 
Binney, Texas & Pacific Coal 6.... 



Gas 
Gas 



TEXAS-LOUISIANA. 



SUMMARY OP OPERATIONS. 

Comp. Prod. 

Xorth Texas 71 1.666 

Xorth Louisiana 35 1,520 

Gulf Coast 97 20.130 

Total 203 21,316 



Dry Gas 

IS 2 

5 3 

39 2 



59 



7 



STANDARD OIL SUBSIDIARIES. 



BY JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS. 



Par Open 

£1 Anglo-American nj/^ 

$100 Atlantic Ref 900 

100 Borne-Scfymser 430 

50 Buckeye Pipe 98 

100 Chesebrough 320 

100 Colonial 10 

100 Continental 450 

50 Crescent 30 

100 Cumberland 135 

TOO Eureka 195 

100 Galena, Com 137 

TOO Galena, Pref 120 

100 Illinois Pipe 190 

50 Indiana Pipe 93 

12J.2 National Transit 12;^ 

100 New York Transit . . . 190 

100 Northern Pipe 100 

25 Ohio Oil 340 

100 Prairie Oil 480 

100 Prairie Pipe Line .... 277 

100 Solar Refining 290 

100 Southern Pipe 180 

ICO South Penn. Oil 285 

roo South West Penn. Pipe 90 

100 S. O. of California 228 

100 S. O. of Indiana 645 

100 5. O. of Kansas 450 

ICO S. O. of Kentucky 310 

100 S. O. of Nebraska 470 

100 S. O. of New Jersey... 548 

100 S. O. of New York.... 275 

roo S. O. of Ohio 410 

100 Swan & Finch 95 

100 Union Tank 87 

100 Vacuum Oil • 350 

10 Washington Oil 25 

2^ Penn-Mex 44 

5 International Petroleum 133^ 
Independent Oil Companies: 

5 Elk Basin 6ys 

2t Pierce Oil 10 

50 Midwest Refining 1 10V2 

25 Tropical Oil S'A 

5 Cosden Refining 8 

5 Sapulpa Refining 8^ 

I Northwest Oil 65 

5 Cosden Oil & Has, Pfd. ^H 

5 Okla. Prod. & Refining 7H 

5 Atlantic Petroleum .... 3 

10 Merritt C)il 21^^ 

I Midwest Oil in 

-Buy Liberty Bonds. 



High 


Low 


Last 


123^ 


ii« 


ii^i 


900 


875 


900 


430 


430 


430 


98 


90 


90 


3-20 


310 


310 


10 


10 


10 


450 


430 


430 


30 


30 


30 


140 


130 


130 


195 


185 


185 


137 


128 


130 


120 


115 


115 


190 


185 


185 


94 


93 


93 


12J4 


121/2 


12J/2 


205 


190 


200 


105 


100 


1 04 


340 


327 


327 


480 


465 


475 


277 


263 


275 


290 


290 


290 


183 


180 


r8o 


285 


275 


275 


95 


90 


93 


230 


210 


213 


650 


625 


630 


450 


425 


425 


310 


310 


310 


470 


460 


460 


548 


525 


525 


275 


255 


260 


410 


390 


390 


95 


90 


90 


90 


83 


90 


350 


335 


345 


25 


25 


2S 


44 


38 


40 


13K2 


12^ 


I3!2 


67A 


6/2 


6J. 


10 


9% 


0^4 


110V2 


102 


103 


^ 

n 


4 


4 


8 


7% 


7H 


sy2 


8 


8 


82 


64 


64 


3H 


3/2 


m 


7H 


(>% 


6i4 


3V4 


2/2 


2V1 


2\Va 


17^ 


f/^i 


114 


102 


lOi 



AROUND THE BELT 

A fmtd «4 V 




TRADE PERSONALS 



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ITEMS OF FINANCE 



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1918, due September ist, 1920. The proceeds from 
this new issue took care of the $i.5oo,ocx) 6 per cent 
which became due April ist, 1918. 

LOUISIANA— Shreveport. 

The capital stock of the Louisiana Gas Company 
has been increased from $400,000 to $1,000,000. 

OHIO— Shelby. 

The Shelby Oil & Gas Company has increased its 
capital stock from $8,000 to $64,000. Extensive de- 
velopment work in nearby fields is planned by the 
company. F. Marion Snyder is General Manager of 
the company. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Pittsburgh. 

According to a recent statement of the Pittsburgh 
Oil & Gas Company which covers a period of nine 
months ending December 31st, 191 7, the company nad 
a surplus of $208,527 available for dividends, of which 
$100,000 went to stockholders. Gross income for the 
five months was $606,629 and net earnings were $339,680. 
Surplus for the period was $108,527. 

Pittsburgh. 

The Philadelphia Comjiany has declared the regular 
semi-annual dividend of $1.50 on the 6 per cent cumu- 
lative preferred stock, payable May i to stock of record 
April I. 




INCORPORATED 



DELAWARE— Dover. 

The Tuxbury Oil & Gas Corporation has been incor- 
porated under the laws of this state with a capital 
stock of $3,000,000. The Company will develop oil 
and gas leases in the state of Tennessee. 

Dover. 

A $2,000,000 corporation under the name of the Bell 
Oil & Gas Company has been formed here by Charles 
Douglis, Bernard Douglis, Samuel L. Lufbell, and 
Samuel C. Bamport. all of New York. 

ILLINOIS-~Chicago. 

The Republic Oil & Gas Company has been or- 
ganized by a group of Chicago capitalists with a capi- 
tal of $5,000,000. 

OKLAHOMA— Enid. 

The Scouts Oil & Gas Company has been formed 
here with a capital stock of $250,000. The operations 
of the company will extend to Texas, Kansas, and Ok- 
lahoma. The officers are : President, Bert L. Miller. 
Enid, Olka. ; vice, president, Joseph L. Cromwell, Mus- 
kogee, Okla. ; second vice president, R. E. Young, 
Coffey ville, Kan.; secretary-treasurer, Frank H. Let- 
son, Enid, Okla. ; assistant secretary-treasurer, R. W. 
Ketelsen, Enid, Okla. 



NEW YORK— Coming. 

The Crystal City Gas Company is asking permission 
to increase its rate from 45 to 58 cents per thousand. 

Elmira. 

The Potter Gas Company, distributing natural gas 
in the Counties of McKean, Potter and Tioga, Penn- 
sylvania, and Steuben and Chemung in New York, in- 
cluding the natural gas sold in Corning, filed with the 
Pennsylvania public service commission a new tariff, 
effective March 25, which makes changes in the appli- 
cation of the discount for prompt payment. Due to a 
restricted supply of gas, the company has discontinued 
its manufacturing rate and has divided its consumers 
into three classes. 

Class A — Domestic consumers, to receive preference 
over all other consumers in case of a shortage. 

Class B — Engines, greenhouses and small manufac- 
turers using less than 500,000 cubic feet per month, to 
pay the same rate as class A, and have preference over 
class C in case of shortage of supply. 

Class C — Glass manufacturers, wood alcohol plants 
and all other consumers using in excess of 500,000 
cubic feet per month. Gas sold to consumers in this 
class is considered surplus gas and is sold subject to 
discontinuance whenever the supply is not adequate 
to meet the demands of the other classes. The rate 
for the service is the same as for the other classes. 

O H I O— Cincinnati. 

The Union Gas & Electric Company have in hand 
the framing of a petition asking permission to increase 
its rates. 

Cleveland. 

The East Ohio Gas Company in investigating the 
local situation with a view to providing for the de- 
mands of next winter, cites as one cause for the tre- 
mendous consumption of gas during the cold months 
the poor construction of houses, which are largely 
built for speculation. The Company holds that con- 
servation of the gas supply could be brought about by 
increasing the rates to such an extent that other fuels 
would have to be resorted to for house heating. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Pittsburgh. 

Among the companies who on April ist adopted 
higher gas rates are the Equitable Gas Company, the 
Alleghany Heating Company, and the Monongahela 
Natural Gas Company. 

O NT A RI O— Leamington. 

The Beaver Oil & Gas Company which supplies 
Leamington from the Tilbury gas field, has requested 
an increase of 5 cents per i.ooo cubic feet, the present 
price to Leamington consumers being 30 cents per 
1,000. 



Back those Bayonets with Bonds. 




GENERAL 



ALABAMA — Birmingham. 

The Dixie Gas Company, which has a franchise un- 
der which it will distribute natural gas in this city, 
has wells just outside the city which are producing 
5,000,000 cubic feet of gas per day. 

CALIFORNIA— San Francisco. 

At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the 
Standard Oil Co. of California, the following were 
elected directors and officers: W. S. Rheem, presi- 
dent; K. R. Kingsbury, vice president; W. S. Miller, 
vice president; F. H. Hillman, vice president and di- 
rector of producing ; R. J. Hanna, treasurer and secre- 
tary and director of pipe lines ; L. P. Smith, director. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Washington. 

Under a bill introduced in the House of Represen- 
tatives by Representative Norton of North Dakota, 
President Wilson is authorized and directed to fix 
prices on gasoline and fuel oil. According to the bill, 
hoarding of oil, which, at present is tending to disor- 
ganize supply systems of the army and navy, would be 
preveted by price fixing. 

KANSAS— Augusta. 

The Mid-Kansas Oil & Gas Company has a fair gasser 
in its No. 6 on the Ruthford property at a depth of 
1780 feet. The well will be drilled deeper far oil. 

Parsons. 

The local gas company has notified its consumers 
that it will not be able to furnish enough gas next 
winter to satisfy all demands, and advises early stock- 
ing of other fuels. 

KENTUCKY— Grayson County. 

In the Leitchfield pool, the Kentucky Oil & Refining 
Company's second well on the Henton farm is esti- 
mated good for about 750,000 cubic feet of gas. 

Louisville. 

Donald McDonald, general manager of the Louis- 
ville Gas & Electric Company, Louisville, Ky., has 
offered two of the Company's vacant plots of ground 
to citizens for war gardens. 

The Commercial Department of the Louisville Gas 
& Electric Company reported a gain of 93 customers 
in the gas department for the week ended March 31st. 

Powell County. 

The Petroleum Producing Company's No. i Isaac 
Sparks farm, is reported showing for better than a 
1,000,000 cubic foot gas well. 

Wolfe County. 

The Green River Oil Company got a small showing 
of oil, and 500,000 cubic feet of gas, in No. i, E. B. Tyra. 

LOUISIANA— Lincoln Parish. 

Two wells are being drilled by the Oklahoma-Wy- 
oming Oil & Refining Company for Louis Lock, one 
in this Parish, and one in Bienville Parish. 



Monroe. 

The Southern Carbon Company is establishing a 
casing-head gasoline plant in this field. 

The Southern Carbon Company encountered a 
streak of bad luck when a blaze destroyed the derrick 
at their No. 3 well on the Spryker land. Gas had been 
struck at a depth of 2200 feet, and in some way took 
fire. The crew was successful in putting out the 
blaze, but not until after the derrick was a total loss. 

Monroe. 

A second gas main, duplicating the first one laid, is 
being constructed by the Ouachita Natural Gas & Oil 
Company connecting the city with the gas field, thus 
to insure a satisfactory supply of gas for its customers 
at all times. 

New Orieans. 

A well which was drilled to a depth of 1300 feet by 
the Young Men's Gymnastic Club to secure a supply 
of water, is yielding gas, the supply being great 
enough to be a source of profit. 

New Orieans. 

Two applications for franchises are before the com- 
missoners, one of them being filed by the McCor- 
mick interests of Shreveport, La., and the other by 
local people. It is proposed to pipe the gas from the 
Terrebonne field, near Houma, Terrebonne Parish, 45 
miles southwest of New Orleans. 

E. W. Shaw, of the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, has made a report to the mayor to the effect that 
there is sufficient gas in the Terrebnoe field to sup- 
ply the city. Mayor Behrman favors a municipally- 
owned distributing plant and that the gas should be 
brought to the river for seven cents a thousand cubic 
feet, the city retailing it for 25 cents and 30 cents a 
thousand feet. The franchise apj)lications name a 
price of 50 cents a thousand to domestic consumeru «fi(I 
offer to furnish free gas to the city. 

Pine Island. 

A 40,ooo,C)00-foot gasser has been drilled in in sec- 
tion 25-21-15, by the Farmers Oil Company. Muck 
leasing is recorded, and it is expected that this terri- 
tory will be fully developed. 

Shreveport 

In the Pine Island District the Texas Co.'s No. 3 
Heilperin, Section 28-21-15, is blowing 3,000,000 feet 
of dry gas at 2,200 feet and will be drilled deeper. 

OHIO— Ashtabula County. 

In the extreme northeastern corner of Ohio, in Say- 
brook Township, the Commercial Oil & Gas Company 
has completed a test on the Bebout farm, showing a 
capacity of 6,000,000 cubic feet a day. 

Cincinnati 

The local gas company recently suffered a loss, of 
property amounting to $25,000 caused by the blowing 
up of a 24-inch gas main. 

Findlay. 

The city is drilling several wells near the water 
works station, the gas to be used as fuel in order to 
conserve coal. One well previously drilled is main- 
taining very good production. 



Buy Liberty BoncLsk-Buy— Buy— BUY— till it hurts! 



152 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



April 



Mifflin County. 

The Lo^an County Natural Gas Company has taken 
fourteen leases on farms in this county. Extensive 
development work is planned for the near future. 

Washington County. 

One mile west of production, in Grandview Town- 
ship, the Hill Top Oil Co. has drilled a second test on 
the Witten Hanlon farm, into the Keener sand. The 
well shows a gas pressure of 150,000 cubic feet a day, 
and is spraying oil at the rate of 5 bbls. a day. 

NEW YORK— BuflFalo. 

The Forest Gas Company of Buffalo, has been 
authorized by the up-state public service commission 
to acquire the outstanding issues of stock of the Alden- 
Batavia Natural Gas Company, the Akron Natural Gas 
Company, the Attica Natural Gas Company, the On- 
tario Gas Company, and the North Buffalo Gas Fuel 
Company, together with 4,342 shares of the capital 
stock of the Niagara' Light. Heat & Power Co. The 
companies are all located in the vicinity of Buffalo. 

Dunkirk. 

The South Shore Natural Gas Company has moved 
into its new quarters at 433 Central Avenue. The 
offices are attractively fitted up, and modern and con- 
venient in every respect. 

Smith MiUs. 

The South Shore Gas Company is drilling a well on 
the Franklin farm near Smith Mills, the drill being 
down 1,400 feet. It will be drilled to a depth of 2,400 
feet. 

ONTARIO— Toronto. 

Representations are being made to the Ontario gov- 
ernment by many interests, asking amendments to the 
Natural Gas Act, passed at the present session of the 
legislature and by which complete control of the nat- 
ural gas industry in Ontario was given to the Ontario 
Municipal and Railway board. The tile makers in Til- 
bury East, whose plants operate with natural gas and 
supply 50 per cent, of the tile manufactured in On- 
tario, claim that they are entitled to preferential treat- 
ment in view of the importance of tile drainage to food 
producion. Farmers' organizations are strongly sup- 
porting these representations ; and are also objecting 
to clauses in the act empowering the railway board to 
fix the price of natural gas regardless of existing fran- 
chise agreements, and to order the shutting down of 
producing wells where deemed necessary. It is claim- 
ed that the latter clause particularly will tend to dis- 
courage drilling, particularly on the part of Amer- 
icans. 

OKLAHOMA— BartlesvUle. 

The country club just outside of this city of whose 
350 members 250 are connected with Empire Gas and 
Oil Companies, is a monument to the Doherty Organ- 
ization. The club grounds cover 80 acres of Osage 
Indian land. Provisions have been made for golfing, 
bathing, tennis, roque, and trapshooting. The club 
house is of generous proportions and furnished with 
every comfort. 



The club's affairs are now in the hands of the follow- 
ing executive committee : Alfred J. Diescher, W. \. 
Williams. II. R. Straight and R. C. Russum, Empire 
officials; H. V. Foster, Frank Phillips and W. H. Mer- 
ritt. J. P. Chalmers, assistant secretary of the Empire 
and secretarv of the Oak Hill executive committee, is 
one of the chief guiding spirits. W. F. Broadnax, 
superintendent of Empire buildings, manages the club 
for the committee. 

The Empire Gas & Fuel Company has cerried on a 
vigorous campaign in the interests of the War Sav- 
ings and Thrift Stamps, having sold them to the ex- 
tent of $2,598 up to March 15. 

Bixby. 

The Prairie Oil & Gas Company has a 3,000,000-foot 
gasser in its No. i on the Crosby property in the 
southeast corner of section 8-17-13. 

Cotton County. 

Keyes and others No. i test on the J. Q. Grass land 
in section 26-is-iow is shut down at 2000 feet, and is 
making 10,000,000 cubic feet. 

Creek County. 

In the Gushing field, the Monitor Oil & Gas Com- 
pany's No. 3 on the Fixico farm, in the northeast of 
the northeast quarter of section 1-17-7, is doing 6,- 
000,000 feet of gas from sand at 2,894-2,944 feet. 

The Prairie Oil & Gas Company completed a 6.- 
ooo,ooo-!oot gas well in No. ^7 on the Watson farm, 
in the northeast of the noreast of the northwest quarter 
in section 21-17-7. ^^ ^'^^ drilled to 2,243 feet. 

Drumright. 

The White & Black Oil Company of this city has 
sold the output of its big gasser in section 1-17-7 to 
the Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. A six-inch line 
is being constructed to connect the well with the Okla- 
homa Company's distributing system. 

Fox Field. 

The Gypsey Oil Company has a 20,000,000-foot gass- 
er in its No. 2 on the Moncrief land in section 32-2S-3W, 
at a depth of 2316 feet. 

The Lindersmith No. 2 test in section 33-2S-3W is 
reported good for 10,000,000-cubic feet at a depth of 
2157 feet. 

The Carter Oil Company, in the west half of the 
northeast quarter of Section 29-2S-3W, has 30,000,000 
feet of gas at 2,2 5 feet, with rock pressure of 600 
pounds. 

Haskell. 

In this field the Melba Oil Company saved 500,000 
feet of gas in its test on the Asbury farm in section 
21-16-15. 

The Presto Oil & Gas Company's No. 2 on the Kelly 
farm in section 29-16-15 is reported as making 4,000,000 
cubic feet. 



OvenubBcribe the Third Liberty Loan. Over the Top to the Third Line Trenches I 



April 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



153 



Kay County. 

In the Blackwell district, the Empire Gas & Fuel 
Company completed two big gassers. No. 2 on the 
Presbury farm, in the center of the southwest of the 
southwest quarter of Section 29-29-1 east, is good for 
20,000,000 feet at 2,607 ^^^^ ^i^d No. 4 on the Pratt 
farm, in the southeast of the southwest quarter of sec- 
tion 31-29-1 east, is a 10,000,000-foot gasser at 2,215 
feet. 

Nowata. 

The T. B. Gasoline Company, it is reported, is in- 
stalling a plant for the making of lampblack. 

Oklahoma City. 

The School Land Commission has decided to adver- 
tise for leasing oil and gas lands belonging to the State 
of Oklahoma in Cotton and Stephens Counties. 

Okmulgee County. 

In the Youngstown Pool, Hamilton Switch district, 
the Okmulgee Producing & Refining Company has 
completed a i2,oc)0,ooo-foot gasser. 

The Company also got 5, 000,000- foot of gas in its 
No. 2 Phillips & French, on the Foster farm, section 
36. The well was drilled 14 feet into the sand found 
at 2130 feet, but showed no oil. 

A 7,000,000-foot gasser has been completed by A. L. 
Morgan in his No. i test on the Bruner land, in the 
southwest of the southeast quarter of section 9-16-12. 

The Ohio Cities Gas Company completed a 4,000,- 
ooo-foot gas well at 2,031 feet in its No. 2 on the Berry- 
hill farm, in the northeast of the southeast quarter of 
section 17-14-13. 

Tulsa County. 

The Albino Oil Company has a i , 000,000-foot gasser 
at a depth of 1336 feet in its Xo. i on the Heindelman 
land. 

A pumping station will be installed on the Copan 
lease of the Grafeman Oil (Jv: Gas Company. Permis- 
sion to make this installation was granted by the Su- 
perior Court. 

Wagoner County. 

In Coweta District, the Gladys Bell Oil Company's 
No. 2 on the Monroe farm, in the southwest quarter 
of section 29-17-15, is making 500 bbls. of oil with 
about 5,000,000 feet of gas. It is 29 feet in the sand. 

A 3,000,000-foot gasser is reported by F. D. Misener 
in his No. 4 on the McHenry property in the northeast 
of the northwest quarter of section 29-18-15. 

Washington County. 

The Keystone Oil Company has a i ,000,000- foot 
gasser in its No. i on the Frank Wilson farm in sec- 
tion 17-26-13. 

Yale. 

C. B. Shaffer's No. 2 on the McCorkell farm, in the 
northwest of the southeast quarter of section 26-18-5, 
is a 2,000,000-foot gas well at 2,947 leet. 



Yukon. 

The city authorities are undertaking to test the sur- 
rounding territory of this city for oil and gas. In one 
test well on the Steele farm, gas was found at a depth 
of 2,000 feet. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Allegheny County. 

In the old Cookson field, near the Allegheny-Beaver 
County line, Harbison & Company have drilled a test 
on the Ihman heirs* farm through the Boulder. It is 
a fair gasser in that formation. 

Greene County. 

On Hoge Run, Cedar Township, the Phiadelphia 
Company has completed a second test on the William 
Hoge farm. It is a gasser in the Gordon sand. 

Pittsburgh. 

The annual report of the Union Natural Gas Com- 
pany for 1917 shows earnings of 33 per cent after de- 
duction of war income and excess profit taxes. 

TEXAS^Brownwood. 

2,000,000 cubic feet of gas was developed in the Ma- 
gee well located fifteen miles southwest of this city. 
The gas sand was found at a depth of about 456 feet. 
At a depth of 1200 feet the well has a capacity of 8,- 
000,000 cubic feet, and a rock pressure of 500 lbs. 

Petrolia. 

This field leads in the production of gas in northern 
Texas, the output being 197,000,000 cubic feet per day. 
The total production of this part of the state is estimated 
at 235,000,000 cubic feet per day. 

Red River. 

The Texola Oil Company completed a well in No. i 
La-Delta Pecan Company, section 27-13-11, making 
2,500,000 feet at 840 feet. 

The Gulf Refining Company is drilling at 2,450 feet 
in Xo. 10 Christopher, section 16-13-10. 

Stephens County. 

The Prairie Oil & Gas Company's Rayney No. i, 
near the village of Lacasa, about 13 miles north of 
Ranger, is making about 25,000,000 feet of gas from a 
sand at 1,985 to 1,995 ^^^t. 

UTAH— Boxelder County. 

The Corinne Oil & Gas Company has brought in a 
good gasser at Corinne Station, located six miles west 
of Brigham City. W. F. House, Corinne, is President 
of the company. 

WEST VIRGINIA— Barbour County. 

On Isaacs Fork of Elk Creek, Elk district, the Hope 
Natural Gas Company's test on the M. D. Riley farm 
is a gasser good for 500,000 cubic feet a day. 

Cabin Creek. 

The Ohio Cities Gas Company is erecting a gasoline 
plant in this field which occupies an area of about 
eight square miles. The plant will be equipped for 



I9I8 



MANUFACTURERS* SECTION 



April 



both the compression method and the absorption 
method of jjasoline recovery. 

Lewis County. 

In Court House District, the Reserve Gas Company 
has completed a Fifth sand fjasser on the T. H. Cum- 
minys farm. 

On .Mum Run, the Hope Natural Gas Company's 
test on the Owen Quinn farm in a gasser in the fifth 
sand. 

In Freeman's Creek district, the Reserve Gas Com- 
pany drilled a test on the .\. P. White farm developing 
a fair gas pressure, and the Hope \atural Gas Com- 
pany's test on the Owen Quinn farm is a gasser. 

Manhall County. 

In Liberty district, the Carnegie Natural Gas Com- 
pany has completed a fair gasser at a second test on 
the Jacob Miller farm. 

In Liberty district, the Manufacturers' Light and 
Heat Company has been completing some fair gas 
wells. In tests on the M. Rhine and Robert Buzzard 
farms are also fair gassers. The same company is due 
at a test on the G. M. Miller farm. The Carnegie Nat- 
ural Gas Company has a gasser on the H. G, Fair farm, 
and James Wilson & Company, are due at a test oh the 
\V. S. Phillips farm. 

Spencer District. 

A well of large producing capacity has been com- 
pleted in this district by the United l-\iel Gas Com- 
pany, a concern uwnecl jointly by the Columbia Gas 
& Klectric Company and the ( )hio Fuel Supply Company. 

WYOMING— Big Muddy. 

The Kinney & Ohio Oil Company has completed its 
cashinghcad gasoline plant, and is recovering about 
1500 gallons of gasoline per day. 

Byron. 

Larrabee lirothers are installing a gasoline absorp- 
tion plant in this field, -and in connection with it a 
plant for the making of lampblack. The jilant is being 
equipped by the Hoih- Kngineering S: Snpi)ly (.oni- 
])anv of Mount N'ernon. ( )hio. 



ALBERTA— Edmonton. 

In the \'iking field east of Edmonton, the Alberta 
\'olcanic Oil Company has finished \o. i well. This 
was drilled for oil. but developed a good gasser. 



ONTARI C— Chatham. 

In Hover township, the L'nioi 
liany is drilling its No. 7 and No. 



Natural Gas Coni- 
S wells. 



Haldimand County. 

The Oiener Gas S; Manufacturing Company, Ltd., 
is drilling on its leaseholds in Canboro Township. One 
well has been completed, and is showing a fair pro- 
duction. No. 2 well is under way. The company will 
sell its product to the Provincial (ias & F'uei Conipanv. 
Ltd. 

The City Gas Company, of London, Ontario, which 
distributes artificial gas in that city, has applied to the 
city authorities for permission to distribute natural 
gas mixed with the artificial product. The company 
state.-; that thh stei> is necessitated by the high prices 
of coal and fuel oil. and the difficulty of securing the 
latter, owing to demands for naval and munition pur- 
I)oses. The use of natural gas would enable the com- 
pany to do without fuel oil and to dispose of its coke 
product to good advantage. As an alternative, jwr- 
mission is asked to increase the present rate for arti- 
ficila gas which is 90 cents per 1,000. 

Port Talbot. 

A well has been completed here which is estimated 
to be ])roducing between 6,000.000 and 7.000.000 cubic 
feet per day. The Southern Ontario Gas Company 
owns this well, and will pipe the gas to London. Ont. 

Sherbrookc Township 

Two wells with a cajiacity of about 1.000.000 cubit 
feet each, were brought in recently by the Sterling Gas 
Company, Ltd. 

Shetland 

The Shetlanil Gas Company has completed the 
mains which will sup])ly the city with gas froni tlif 
Smith well which is located at Smith's Falls, two mile.; 
east of Shetland. 



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MX VERNON. O. 
XULSA, OKLA. 
PITTSBURGH. PA. 



Natural 




as an 

JOURNAL 



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SUBSCRIPTION- 
$2.00 IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR MAY, 1918 



VOLUME i: 
THIS NUMBER i 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



INDEX OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advrrtiting Copy should be in by the 15th of 
month previous to issue. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindred industries. 

Buffalo Long Distance (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca j^ps-W. 

Cable Address :~"Publight. Buiralo." 

Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central Office. 

rUBLISHID BT 

PERIODICALS PUBLISHING CO., 

68 West Huron Street, 

BUPPALO, M. Y. 

Lucius S. BiGKLOW, President and Editor, 
Habris S. Bicklow, Secretary. 

Entered a* second close matter December i, 
1910, at the Post Office at Buffalo, New York, 
under the act of March 3, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE 



PROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG: 

Canada's Taxation 190 

('asingtiead — The Name 160 

Curve Charts 1 74 

Drilling Operations 175 

Dunnville. Ont 171 

Efficiency on Reduced Pressure 163 

Employment Managers 171 

Flow, of fJas in Pipes 165 

Ciooil Installation of Prrssure (iaiiKcs. . 174 

Hire Vourself 171 

Men for Kxport Trade 1 59 

Nation I'pon a Firm Foun<lation 16K 

Xatural (!as Association 159 

Natural Cias Wrinkles 160 

Oil .Storage Tanks and Reservoirs 170 

Output of Refmeries 160 

Preach C)ptimi8m and Win the War.... 164 

President of Vast Corporation 169 

Production and Transportation of Gas... 162 

Reeser, Harry C 161 

.Sailing Lake Krie 162 

West Virginia Convention 159 

AROUND THE BELT: 191 and following 
I>age8. 



Absorbing Subsidiaries 96 

Analysis of Gases, by Prof. W. H. Ellis, 

J. W. Bain, and £. G. R. Ardagh 97 

Annual Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Sons. ..15 

Another Substitute for Gasoline 6 

Answering an Inquiry 141 

Association of Natural Gas Supply Men . . 90 

Auto Delivery Cars 80 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E. 

Gilbert 31 

Beautiful Tribute to Traveling Man. 

By C. I. ' Hendrickson 62 

Bulletin on Cost Accounting 6 

Bulletin on Oil Accounting 50 

Bureau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Gush- 
ing Field 5 

Calendar of Youngstown Sheet and Tube 
Company 16 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Combatting Doubtful Oil Stock Pro- 
motion 104 

Completing of Great Project. By R. C. 
Morrison S3 

Converting Linotype Metal Melting Furnace 
' From Coal to Gas 32 

Co-operation Urged to Raise Oil Embargo 50 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers 32 

Denver Bars Fake Oil Stock Sales 95 

Development Work in Terrebonne Parish 50 
Doherty Syndicate Operates Frost Gas 
Company 92 

Drilling Resulu 23 

Drilling Reports 73 

Drillinsr Reports 107 

Drilling Reports I43 

Efficient Goggles 22 

Financial Report for 1917 41 

Financial Report 80 

Financial Report 106 

Gas Difficulties Disclosed 13 

<^as for Drying Food 17 

Gasoline from Natural Gas, by H. A. 

Fisher 96 

Gasoline from Natural Gas 103 

Gas Versus Car-Deliveries 92 

Give the Geologist His Dues 126 

Government Experiment Station at Bar- 

tlesville 52 

Government Takes Over Oil Production. 132 

Heat Insurance 21 

Latest Instruction loa 

Long, Elias H., Deceased 20 

Making Tight Joints 100 

Marking Time 72 

Measurement of Gas by Orifice Meter.... 102 
Monthly Standard Oil Review, by Jo. P. 

Cappeau Sons 105 

Moving in Cycles 72 

Natural Gas Business Thirty-four Years. In 6 
Natural Gas Service. By L. W. Lansley 55 

New Heating System 135 

New Orleans and Natural 10 

No Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Hedford ij^ 

Office Economics 128 

Oil Production 103 

Oil Production 133 

Opportunity To Get Labor 134 

Otoe-Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr 15 

Oxy -.Acetylene Welding. By Lucius S. 
Rigclow 61 



Pastor Sees Labor in Control .After War 134 

Peak Load Service 132 

Picturing One's Face in Advertising 12 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Proceedings Received 51 

^•roducing Gasoline 63 

Questions and Answers — Prize Paper 93 

Ready-to- Serve Charge 104 

Rcady-to-Scrve Charge 142 

Recovery of Gasoline from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son 7 

Reynolds, M. G., Passes Away 20 

Secure Gas Line 1 27 

Sense and Cents $4 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor 20 

Shipments to Oil and Natural Gas Com- 
panies 126 

Shipyard Voltmteers 91 

Spirit of Safety 62 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 19 17 41 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 80 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 148 

Summer and Winter Gas 91 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 1 14 

Stop Buying—! hen What? 59 

Third Liberty Loan and Victory 126 

Truck Operators* Conference 25 

Unique Method of Starting Gas Engines 51 

Valuable Publication in Oil and Gas Field 51 

Vast Acreage Deal 5 

Victory Plant in Service 106 

Water in Wells 101 

Water Regulator 96 

Welcome Letter 134 

Western Associations Merge 5 

Winner of Prizes in Contest Held at Buf- 
falo 51 

Winning the War 128 

Work of Petroleum Committee 59 

Wrinkles, Prices for ia9 

Year 1918 4 

Your Mistakes 60 






MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 
GAS SUPPLY MEN 



LASUOUR ADAMS, S«reUr>, 1J04 Firit 
NBtional Bank Building, Piitaburgb. 

Ai«i Iron Work*, Corn-. F». 
AllCBblnT Steel Co., Piltiburgh. 
Ancboc Packins Co., Piltibur(b. 
BeHemtr Gal EoEine Co., Grove City. 
Blodgetl Co., Inc., The G. S. Burlington. Vl. 
Borden Company, Wartin, Ohio. 
Boraird & S»IanK itlg. Co., Bradford, Fa. 
Briilol Co., The, VaterburT, Conn. 
Broderick & Baicom Rope Co., St I.ouil. 
Bryant Healer & Mfe, Co., Cleveland. 
Buffalo Co-operitive ^tove Co.. Buffalo. 
Buildrri Iron Fdy„ Fiovidence. 
Byeri, A. M. Co., Pitlabnrgh. 



Crandalt-Fetlee Co., New York City, 
Culler Kaminer Mfg. Co., The Milwiu 
Davi*. Bourn on villc Co., Jersey City. 
Daylon Pipe Coupling. Co.. Dayton. 
Davilon, N, C. Ga. Burner & Weld'g 

Piltiburgh. 
Domeitic Engineering Co., Dayton, O. 
Draeger Oxygen Apparatui Co., Pillibu 
Drexer. S. R., Mfg. Co., Bradford. P». 
Equitable Meter Co., Piltiburgh. 
Eilate Stove Co.. HamiUon, O. 
Filkr, Edwin H. Co, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fo-boro Co. The, Foiboro. Mali. 
Franklin Co. The, Canton, b. 
Frick & Lindigy Co., Pitliburgh. 
Fuel Oil Journal, Houiton. Texaa. 
Garlock Packing Co., Palmyra, N, Y. 
G>» Age, The, Sew York City. 
Gai Appliance Co.. Cleveland. 
Ca> Record, Chicago. 
General Fire ExI'g'r Co., Providence. 
General Gas Light Co., Kalamaioo, 
Germer Stove Co.. Erie. 
Gilhllan Machine Works, Ebenezer, N. Y 
Goodrich. B. F. Co., Akron. O. 
Grave* Supply Co., Cincinnati. 
Guardian Gai Appliance Co.. The, CI 



Mfg. Co.. Erie, 
art Mlg. Co., Cleveland, 
Biard Mfg. Co.. Chicago. 

, C. M, Sona & Co., Inc.. Butler. Pa. 
Rubber Co.. Piltiburgh. 

I, Oweni, RentKhlet Co. HamiUon O. 

Sngineering & Supply Co, PitHburgh. 

{eating Co., The. Columbui. 

il Bellmg Co., Chicago, 111. 

ill-Raod Co., Piltiburgh. 



larecki Mf<. Co., Erie. 
Jifly Water Heater Co., St. Loui*. 
Jones at Laughlin Sieel Co., Pitiiburg. 
La Belle Iran Works. Sleubenville, O. 
L»t timer-Stevens Co., Columbui. Ohio. 



Ludlow Va 


ve Mfg. Co,. Pittsburgh, 




Ma 




& Whyle Rope Co Chica 










s; 


.S„"ft 


.8-i,S'S"fc°.., „...,.. I 








Mfg, Co., Newburyport. 


















































-;,,"* 


„S°.:c".r6.a.,.,i,. 














































ural Gi 


& Gasoline Journal. Bufl 






w Bedfo 
















, A. T. 


i Son Co., Marietta. 0. 






























upply Co, Piiisburgh, 





e Co,, Chicl 
Parketsburg Mach. Co,. Parkeributg, W.Va. 
Parkersburg Rig & Ret\ Co,, Parkeraburg, 
W V. 

r Co., PilUburgh,_ 



lin.ylva 



e A Stove Co., Wsn 
r Co., East. 



. .--..„ jriei Brazing i Mach. Co.. 

Pittsburgh, 
Pittihurg Valve » Fillings Co., Pitliburgb 
Pilisburg Valve, F'd'y & Conit. Co., Pills 

Pillslu'rgh Water Htr. Co., Piltiburgh, 
Plymoutli Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, Mail. 
Pratt & Cady Co., Inc.. New York City. 
Prichard Supply Co.. Maoninglon, W. Va. 
Ralhbunjonel Eng. Co., Toledo. 
Reid. Jos. Gas Engine Co., Oil Cily, Pa. 
Reliable Stove Co., Cleveland. 
Republic Iron & Steel Co.. YoungslQwn. O. 
Revere Rubber Co., Chelsea, Mais. 
Reinor Mfg. Co,. Ltd,. Mercer, Pa. 
Rieienman M(g, Co^ Ltd.. Franklin. Pa, 
Robinion. J. E. & Cfo,, Oil Cily, Pa. 
Robinson Packer & Mach. Co,. Coffeyville, 



■■, h*"iA^- ^'"" ^''■- ''"'" 



 N- J, 



& Hole Co., 
d Mfg'. Co..' Piltiburgh. 
o( A 

• ten __ _.... 

r Co., The, Cleveland. Ohio. 
.-eias 1.0, Lanion, O. 
Polar Light Co^. New York Cily. 
South rfieiter tube. Chester, Pi. 
Spang, Challanl 4 Co,, Piltiburgh, 
Sprague Meter Co,, ntid^eporl Conn. 



le-Jo 



idaepon C 

Phifadelph... 

Gag Engine Co,. Springfielt 
■1 & Co., Inc. PiUsburoh. 



Tavlor. . _. __. 

Toledo Pipe Thr'd'g Mach. Co.. Toledo. O. 

Troop Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 

United Seal Co., Columbui. 

Ulica Valve & Fixture Co., Utica. N. Y. 

Wclibach Co, Glouceslir City, N. J. 

Weslinghoule Mach. Co., Pitlsbutgii. 

Wcstingbouie Electric & Mfg. Co.. Pilti- 

Wheefing Sieel & Iron Co., Wheeling. 
WoUe,^ Linden W.. Oil Cily, Pa. 



Annual Convention Na- 



.(KAL Gas As.s(.ri.\TioN of America — May 22-2-^. at William Penn Hotel, 
riltsbiirgh, Pa. 



READ THIS 



You're a regular, red-blooded, true-blooded American. You love 
your country. You love that flapping, snapping old flag. 
Your heart thumps hard when the troops tramp by. You're 
loyal, you're 100%. 

You want to help win the war in a hurry. 

"A sacrifice?" Sure, you've been thinking. "Just you wait 
until they really need it." And you have honestly tHbught 
you meant that too. But - look yourself in the eye now and 

search up and down inside of your heart Did you mean it ? 

Did you really mean "sacrifice?" 

Listen: You feel poor. The Third Liberty Loan, the high prices, 
the income tax, you've done your bit. You feel that you 
have given all you can spare. 

Well, then, what did you mean? What's that you said about 
loving your country? What do you think the word "sacrifice" 
means ? 

Surely, you did not mean, did you, to give only what you can 
spare ? 

What about our boys who are giving their lives in the trenches ? 
Are they giving only what they can "spare?" 

How about those mothers and little "kiddies" in the shell- 
wrecked towns of that shell-swept hell: hungry, ragged, 
sobbing alone? Giving up their homes, their husbands, their 
fathers . 

While we over here with our fun and our comforts, we hold up 

our heads and feel patriotic because we have given what ? 

Some loose bills off the top of our roll. "We've given all 
we can spare" ! Come, come ! Let's quit fooling ourselves. 
Let us learn what "sacrifice" means. Let us give more than 
we can spare -- let us "give until the heart says stop. " 

-Contributed. 



NATUKAL GAS ASSOCIATION 



l.AMOK SAVIMi MACIfINi:.S AS Oil. 
KIKl.I) KIXTl'KKS 




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i6o 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



NATURAL GAS WRINKLES. 



BEWARE! BEWARE! 



mT is with sincere gratification that we acknowl- 
edji^e a letter received from the editor of the 
"Wrinkle Department'' of the Natural Gas 
Association, Mr. \V. Re. Brown, of which 
Department of the Natural Gas Association's work, 
Mr. A. J. Diescher is Assistant Editor. 

The followMn^ letter refers especially to the double 
pages in colors, published in the month of April in 
THE NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE JOURN- 
AL, ^'boosting" for the Wrinkles Committee, while At 
the same time lending thereby a good and substan- 
tial hand to the Natural Gas Association through as- 
sisting to make the coming convention at Pittsburgh, 
May 22nd and 23rd a big and howling success. Mr. 
Brown's letter reads as follows : 

NATURAL GAS ASSOCL-\TION 
OF AMERICA 

Columbus. Ohio, April 29, 1918. 
Mr. L. S. Bigelow, 

Natural Gas and Gosoline Tournal, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Dear Mr. Bigelow: 

You have surely "gone over the top" in an endeav- 
or to make The Natural Gas and ( jasoline JorRXAL a 
real boost organ for the Natural Gas Association's 
activities. 

Your "spread eagle" boost for the Wrinkle Depart- 
ment was surely appreciated by Mr. A. J. Diescher 
and myself, and I am equally sure that the officers 
and members of the Association, will be pleased to 
see how you are backing up their efforts to make the 
war-time convention a success. 

Yours verv trulv. 

W.'R. BROWN. 



mllERE are various "high-flyer" and question- 
able propositions going the rounds, and we 
advise thinking people to consider twice be- 
fore deciding to invest. 

Sometimes a good proposition is widely promoted 
and those make monev who become interested in it, 
but more often losses would be heard of if shame did 
not prevent. 

The word ''Sensational,'' when used in connection 
with the sale of oil stocks, should be a warning sign 
in many instances, and when the w'ord is coupled up 
wnth the words **vast opportunity," then look out. 
These words appeared recently in connection with 
others in a sensational head-line advertising certain 
oil stocks that when sold promise to make the buyers 
rich beyond measure. 

When the words "Gigantic Fortune" are used, again 
we say. consider well, then when it is stated that "Un- 
limited are the possibilities," it is well to be sure that 
these possibilities are not those of losing all that one 
invests, rather than as the promoters would wish to 
indicate, that there is untold wealth to be realized. 

Sometimes the printer is at fault in making up copy 
for promoters, but the earmarks of unreliability are 
attached to a sheet that makes promises in glaring 
head-lines to the possible investor, and uses strong 
adjectives in telling of the w-onderful things that await 
him if he wall but buy the stock. 

The words w^e have printed in this notice are fa- 
miliar words in the work of a promoter. We do not 
point to them as applying in this instance to any one 
particular enterprise, but feel it our duty in view of 
recent advertisements that have appeared, to advise 
very careful consideration before one invests. 



THE NAME CASINGHEAD. 

OUTPUT OF REFINERIES. 

B LETTER from A. H. Eishcr, Pittsburgh, 

states that Mr. Fisher is advocating rele- The Department of the Interior sends us the fol- 

gating to the background the name "Casing- lowing information, which will be of interest to thos« 

head" as ai)plied to a particular kind of gas. vvho seek to keep track of refineries output. 
He states that the term "Casinghcad" is a perfectly 

proper term in its proper place, but its application to 1917 Nine Months October Novemi^^'*' 

the ijasoline field is, as he calls it. a misnomer. }'">''*' ^"" ^V''\ u :x'u<\ "•♦^^"s.qiq 26.971.980 ^s.sjj^^^ 

^ ^ ^ " Oils purchased ami Rerun (bbl.) 7,445,101 2,863,^18 2,519./*^ 

Mr. Fisher's feelin"- in this matter is similar to what (Usoiine (Rai) 1,962,^05,420 265.634.890 258,696,5 Jf 

, I .1 . ^1 1 .. ^ Kerosene (gal.) 1,2.26,118,966 i3S.77S.oa5 »i».i33> •^X 

was our own, when we urged that the word extrac- Cas & Fuel (gai.) 4,548,676,207 608,327.006 580,140,2^59 

%y 1 ^1 J *. ^ ^- " • ^1 £! 1J f - l.ubricatiiiK (pal) 5.U.7oo.i^8 66,289,783 642,631,2-^^ 

tion, and the word extractmg, in the held of re- wax (pound) 316,796.738 46.623.624 39.50^,1^^ 

covering gasoline, should be entirely done away with. Asphail^Tumr'::::;:::::;:.:.:; \\\aA efis^ 58!^^*^ 

and in place thereof, the words "recovery'' and "re- i'^'os^"bbu"^ /.^^^^^ '*°8;6t!;o4o ^°:i99.4?7 ^m!;;!^^ 

covering'' shcnild be used. Daii>' 

Our argument in urging this last suggestion, is that di- December Toui 1917 Aver»^^ 

the non "gas-educated" public might easily misun- \;^' ^^U ^.:r\^ ' [x^S ''^^1,% 'VS^if^ %o;l|^ 

derstand the term "extracted" to mean taking from l^t.^;^!;;;; \?aV\ ::::::::: ::;::::: M^i^^rMol \IV^I\\M\ ';t;%^i 

the ^as that which would be of decided value, if it r.as and Fud (Rai.) 551.287,109 6,288,430,581 i7.ai8.s^^ 

. . > ^s , .1 . u n Lubricating fj?al.^ 59.023.661 721,644.821 »'977.**^^ 

remamed m the gas; whereas, the term recovery, wax (pound) 38,185,497 441,107,964 i.aos.s'^ 

, , , ,, . ,, ,. 1 • 1' '^1 Coke (ton) 4'»30' 484,180 i,^ , 

and the word recovering, are directelv m line with \spiiait (ton) 47.376 690,279 ''^% 

the trend of the times, namely, getting the most out of ,^^;:r'( bM.7". )^^. . .' ! .' : : ' ^""^Z^ir ''\'ia?i':i^^ ''^1i%' 

everything and letting nothing go to waste. -Xo account of this item for first six months. 

Money means mercy for the wounded. Give freely. 



l62 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



was also one of the first operators to take messages 
from the wire by ear, discarding the old method of 
using a strip of tape. In 1887 he became connected 
with the Oil City Fuel Supply Company in the capac- 
ity of accountant. 

*'It was while in the employ of this company he 
gained his knowledge of natural gas, and in later 
years became one of the most prominent men in the 
industry and a recognized authority in that branch of 
the industry. It was while connected with this com- 
pany that he, in company with the late F. H. Oliphant, 
visited Alaska, where they engaged in extensive re- 
search work. Upon his return from this trip he be- 
came identified with the Triple State Gas Company 
and remained with it for two years and then accepted 
a position with the Citizens Traction Company of Oil 
City and was active in extending the lines to Franklin. 

"In December, 1901, Mr. Reeser came to Pittsburgh 
at the solicitation of Messrs, Trett & Crawford and 
took charge of their growing gas interests. Later, 
under his direction, these interests were merged into 
The Ohio Fuel Supply Company, which lias been con- 
stantly expanding until at the present time it has be- 
come one of the largest in the United States. At the 
time of his death he also held the position of secre- 
tary of the Tropical Oil Company, .\ssistant to 
President and secretary of The Ohio Fuel Supply 
Company ; secretary, Ohio Fuel Oil Company : secre- 
tary and treasurer. Northwestern Ohio Natural Gas 
Company ; secretary and treasurer, Pennsylvania Fuel 
Supply Company; secretary of the ( )h'() Fuel Oil Com- 
pany, and vice president and general manager of the 
Fayette County Gas Company, and a director in the 
Ohio Fuel Supply Company. He was a member of 
the Herron Hill Gun Club, Pittsburgh Athletic Asso- 
ciation, the Union Club Connellsville Game Preserve, 
and Clear Creek Hunting and Fishing Club. 

"One of those who has long been associated with 
Mr. Reeser says: *One outstanding factor in his suc- 
cess was his UTUiring effort in studyirgj the ur deriv- 
ing principles of all problems with which he came in 
contact. He studied the works of nature and the 
woods and all like associations were to him a source 
of never-ending ])leasure. To those under him as bus- 
iness associates he was a true and loyal friend ; to 
those for whom he labored. Mr. Treat and Mr. Craw- 
ford, he was all devotion to their interests and the 
memory of Harry Reeser will be a lasting inspiration 
to all who knew him.' 

**Mr. Reeser leaves his wife, and two sons. Frank 
B. Reeser, of Piqua, (^hio. and Norman, at home ; 
also his mother and one sister residing at Pottstown, 
Pa., and three brothers, Fdward Reeser of Pittsburgh, 
Warren Reeser of Huntington W. Va., and John 
Reeser of Harrisburg, Pa. The family home is at Col- 
lege and Home streets. Mr. Reeser was 34 vears 
old." 

The funeral service and interment took place in Oil 
City. 



PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORTATION 

OF GAS. 




HF following report was prepared by George 
F. Taylor, Assistant Engineer of the Public 
I Service Commission of West Virginia, and 
placed before the commission under recent 
date. 

The compilation is for the year ending December 
1st, 1917, and is accomplished from the reports sent 
in each month by different utilities as required in the 
Commission's rule No. 21. 

Pro<lucc<! I>y gas utilities 251,935,^29,000 cu. ft. 

Pro<lucfd liy producers 38,746.414000 " 

Pro<luci'd by carbon black companies not included 
above (estimated) 14,583,283,000 ** 

TOT.VL PROnUCEJ) (a) 305.264,926,000 " 

Consumed domestic and industrial 52,258,468,000 ** 

Consumed field and main lines 22,924,291,000 

Consumed for carbon black (estimated) 26,062,706,000 

TOTAL CONSUMED 101,245,465,000 " 

Transported out of State 208,280.274.000 " 

Transported into State 4,024,818,000 

NET TR.\NSP()RTEI) OIT OF ST.\TE 204,255.456,000 " 

(a) It is estimated that .16,062,706.000 cu. ft. was use-d for the manu 
facture of carbon black. 

Commenting on the above figures, it is to be noted 
that the volume of natural gas produced commercial- 
ly in West Virginia in 1917 established a new record 
of gas production, a gain of 2% over the output for 
the year 1916, as shown by the records of the United 
States Geological Survey. 

There is a discrepancy of 235.995,000 cu. ft. between 
the amount shown as exported out of the State and 
the difference between production and consumption 
within the State. The amount reported as purchased 
by utilities from other utilities differs from the amount 
reported as sold bv utilities to other utilities by this 
same figure, which re])resents only about H of one 
percent of the amount shown as exported and about 
1^0 of one percent of the amount shown as produced. 
This discrepancy should most likely be deducted from 
the amount shown as consumed in field and main 
lines. 



SAILING LAKE ERIE 



The opening tri]) of the magnificent steamers plying 
Lake Erie between Buffalo and Cleveland tool^ 
place on May ist, and from that date on through tb*-* 
season the steamers will leave Buffalo at 8:co P. Nl- 
each evening, standard central time, arriving in Cleve- 
land 7:00 .\. M. The reverse trip Cleveland to Buffalo 
is made each day. boat leaving Cleveland at 8:00 ^^ 
M., standard central time, arriving in Buffalo at 6:3^ 
.\. M. Fare one way VS3.32, round trip S6.02. -^ 
special automobile rate f(^r tourists is made as \cA' 
lows: $7.50 round trip for automobile not exceeding 
127 inches wheel base. Return limit two days. 



Boost for Red Cross War Fund Week May 20-27th. 



Efficiency on Reduced Pressure 

Statement of Claims on Method of Operating on Reduced Pressure 
Together with Copg of Register of Assignments Laid 
Before the Field bg W. O. Felt, M. E. 



mHE following communication was recently re- 
ceived at the editorial office of The Natural 
Gas and Gasoline Journal. The letter and 
specifications that follow will be read with 
much interest. 

The whole is printed as presented to us by Mr. W. 
O. Felt, of New York City, we claiming no knowledge 
of the facts of the case other than as offered by Mr. 
Felt in his communication which is published as from 
a subscriber. —Editor's Note. 

April 27, 1918. 

Editor, Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal, 

Buffalo. N. Y. 
Dear Sir: 

I noticed in "Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal" of 
September, 1917, an article on ''Efficiency on Reduced 
Pressure," page 244, marked patent pending. 

The process and apparatus set forth in the article 
appears to me to be included with the process and ap- 
paratus disclosed in my Canadian patent No. 126,144, 
dated June 7th, 1910, of which I enclose copy of speci- 
fication, in part, with claims in connection therewith, 
for your careful consideration. 

After I had filed application in Canada I learned 
that the process had been previously disclosed in a 
book published in 1906 entitled "Compend of Mechan- 
ical Refrigeration and Engineering" by J. E. Siebel, 
see page 479 of the book, where there are several ex- 
amples on Natural Gas expanding adiabatically for 
the purpose of refrigeration and ice-making. On ac- 
count of this I did not file application in the United 
States and other foreign countries. 

I also enclose Canada abstract from Register of 
Assignments referring to Patent No. 126.144. ^"^l ^'^^1" 
attention to the fact that the abstract shows that as 
early as 1910 A. J. Paris. Jr., appears as one of the 
assignees of record of the Canadian patent above men- 
tioned. 

In 1908 Paris and myself incorporated the Petro- 
leum Products Co. for the purpose of exploiting and 
developing my processes for extracting Gasoline from 
Natural Gas, and for compressing, purifying, drying 
and cooling air and gases respectively. 

In 1909 I installed an expansion engine at the plant 
of the Petroleum Products Co., at Bingham, Pa., to be 
operated by the compressed natural gas, so as to util- 
ize the exhaust therefrom to effect the desired refrig- 
eration; thereby condensing the gasoline from the 
natural gas instead of using water for that purpose. 



In view of the above facts you will see that Paris's 
claim as the alleged original inventor are not borne 
out by the facts. 

In view of the publicity accorded to the article in 
question I deem it no more than right, in the public 
interest, to request you to lay the above facts before 
your readers. 

Yours very truly, 

W. O. FELT. 

CANADIAN PATENT SPECIFICATION 
NO. 126,144, DATED JUNE 7, 1910. 

Specification. 

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY fcoNCERN: 

BE IT KNOWN THAJ I, WILLARD OLIVER 
FELT, of 274 West 140th Street, in the City of New 
York, in the State of New York, having invented cer- 
tain new and useful improvements in Methods of 
Treating Aeriform Fluids upon Compression, do here- 
by declare that the following is a full, clear and exact 
description of the same. 

The compression of Aeriform fluid, is attended with 
heat and to take this up, it has been found necessary 
to cool the compression cylinder. 

I cool the aeriform fluid directly by presenting to 
it, while under compression, a substance which will, 
of itself, absorb and abstract the heat, — in effect pre- 
vent heating — and also purify it and absorb any mois- 
ture in it contained. 

To this end, I have employed glycerine ; but I now 
find that I may employ Turkey-red oil, and this with 
certain advantages. In addition, I have discovered 
that, in the employment of any liquid substance, 
which, directly presented to the fluid under compres- 
sion, will abstract its heat, I can entirely separate any 
vapor therefrom by refrigeration; and, finally, that I 
can employ the compressed fluid used expansively to 
effect the desired refrigeration. 

To carry my invention into effect, I compress any 
desirable aeriform fluid in a suitable compressor and, 
simultaneously present to it, as by injection, and thus 
in a finely divided condition, Turkey-red oil, and the 
effect of this is, that the oil, coming into intimate con- 
tact with the aeriform fluid, at once abstracts its heat, 
absorbs any aqueous vapor in it contained, and puri- 
fies it. 

Instead of artificially compressing the aeriform 
fluid, I mav take the same, as natural gas, direct from 
the earth at rock pressure. 



If you can 't go ' * over there, ' * send your money * ' over the top ' * for you. 



i64 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



From the compressor, I discharge the gas into a 
pressure-and-separating-tank, where the Turkey-red 
oil subsides, carrying with it any aqueous vapor and 
impurities, and the gas is led off to a storage-tank or 
receiver. 

From the receiver, the aeriform fluid takes two di- 
rections and performs, and is subjected to, two differ- 
ent functions: A minor quantity of this fluid passes 
to the expansion-cylinder of the compressing-engine, 
aiding the steam or other power, and, thence escaping, 
passes, by a suitable conduit, to a condensing-tank, 
which is, preferably, of a kind arranged with a number 
of vertical tubes opening at their ends into chambers 
at its top and bottom, the expanded aeriform fluid 
passing around the outside of the tubes. The major 
portion of the fluid passes into the upper chamber of 
the condensing-tank, thence, through the tubes, to the 
lower chamber, and, thence, to any desired place of 
use; the effect of the expanded aeriform fluid passing 
around the tubes being to lower the temperature so 
greatly, in fact, carrying it below zero Fahrenheit, 
that any liquefiable substance, such as gasoline, con- 



2. The method of preventing the usual heating of 
an aeriform fluid while undergoing compression and. 
at the same time, purifying it, which consists in in- 
jecting into it Turkey-red oil, substantially as set 
forth. 

3. The method of preventing the usual heating of 
an aeriform fluid while undergoing compression and, 
at the same time, purifying it and freeing it from any 
aqueous vapor present, which consists in injecting in- 
to it Turkey-red oil, substantially as specified. 

4. The method of condensing and separating hydro- 
carbon, or other vapor, such as gasoline- vapor, and so 
forth, from a gaseous fluid which consists in refriger- 
ating the fluid to a temperature below zero, substan- 
tially as and for the purpose described. 

5. The method of condensing and separating hydro- 
carbon, or other vapor, such as gasoline-vapor, and so 
forth, from a gaseous fluid, by refrigeration, whiclv 
consists in permitting compressed, cool aeiform flui 
to expand, as in supplying power for an engine, and 
on exhaust therefrom employing it, then, to abstrac 
heat from the gaseous fluid. 



ABSTRACT PROM REGISTER OP ASSIGNMENTS. 



No. or 

Assignment. Assiffnor 

59930 W. O. Fellt 

6141 1 W. O. Fellt 

6^604 Stone Gundy & Brackin, Plaintiffs 

63604 Vi J. R. (Icmmill, Sheriff 

63977 C. L. Bisnett, Plaintiff 

64008 A. Park 

64683 R. L. Brackin 

64684 C. L. Bisnett 



Assignee. 
A. J. Paris. Jr. 

R. S. Walker, Trustee 
R. S Walker, Trustee Defendant 
A. Park 

^. ^'ark. Defendant 
R. L. Brackin 
C. L. Bisnett 
J.. B. Detwiler 



Date of 

Assignment. 

Sept. 18, 1908 




Date of 

Record 

May 30, 1910 



So. of 
Patent 
1 26 1 44 



Nov. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

July 

July 

Oct. 

Oct. 



Title 
Methods of treating aeriform 
fluids upon compression 



5. 

27. 
31. 
10, 
10, 



1910 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
191 1 




























i« 
«« 
«« 
«« 
«« 



tained in the fluid passing through the tubes, is con- 
densed and flows out from- the lower chamber to a suit- 
able vessel. 

It will be understood, that the expansion-cylinder 
and condensing-tank and all other parts, where desir- 
able, will be heat-insulated. 

The Turkey-red oil may be used over and over 
again, until desirable to free it from impurities, and 
each time, may be cooled before injecting into the 
compression-cylinder. 

In treatment of the Turkey-red oil to free it from 
other matter, many valuable by-products will be re- 
covered. 

What I claim and desire to secure bv Letter-Patent, 
is: 

I. The method of preventing the usual heating of 
an aeriform, or gaseous, fluid, while undergoing com- 
pression, which consists, in subjecting the same to the 
action of Turkev-red oil, substantiall-v as described. 



(f 
l« 

n 

M 

n 



Territory Assigned. 
.Vgreement. 

All interest. 

Writ. 

All Interest. 

Copy of writ. 

All interest. 

License County of Brant. 

All his interest. 



Department of .\griculture. Patent Office, 

Ottawa, C^anada. 
ABSTR.VCT from Register of Assignments 
referring to Patent No. 126 144. 

GEO. F. O'lIALLORAV. 
Deputy Commissioner of Patents. 

Nov. ^oth, 1 012. 

WILLARD OLIVER FELT 

New ^'ork, N. Y., January 29th, 1910. 

SIGNED IN PRESENCE OF: 

RICHARD LILTON EDWARDS. 
CHARLES QUACKERBUSH FREEMAN. 



PREACH OPTIMISM AND WIN THE WAR 



Henry L. Doherty said, "I know of no other way i^ 
which to thoroughly discourage the war work in th^ 
United States as by giving currency to assertions tb^^ 
the Government is not getting along in its prepare* 
tions. and that profiteering is rampant," said Henry I^* 
Doherty on April 17, in an address before members ^* 
the New York organization at the Reform Club, th^ 
occasion being the last monthly dinner until autum^* 
"We must dwell on the actual truth of the situatio-*^' 
and that means preaching optimism and the result v*^*** 
be a united countrv." 



Fiffht if you can— if you can't flght, give all you can. 



Flow of Gas in Pipes 

Dependable Data on Piping for Low and 

High Pressure. 



^ 



As a matter of convenience to our gas-men, we are herewith printing 
data that is absolutely dependable, such having been gathered by careful 
research and appearing collectively in the Handbook of the National Tube 
Company. It is reprinted by permission. — The Editor. 



LENGTH OP PIPB = xoo YARDS. 




HE following formulae are intended for low-press- 
ure distribution of gas, with comparatively small 
differences between the initial and final 
pressures. 



Pole's Formula, 



Q = 1350 



Molesworth's Formula, Q = 1000 



•Gill's Formula, 



= 1291 



nT 


si 


4- 


d'h 
si 


1 . d^h 



'{l-\-d) 



Where Q=quantity of gas discharged in cubic feet per hour. 
(/=inside diameter of pipe in inches. 
/i=pressure in inches of water. 
j=s=specific gravity of gas, air being i. 
/=length of main in yards. 

The formula of Gill is said to be based on experimental data, 
and to make allowance for obstructions by tar, water, and 
other bodies tending to check the flow of gas through the 
pipe. 

An experiment made by Mr. Clegg, in London, with a 4-inch 
pipe, 6 miles long, pressure 3 inches of water, specific gravity 
of gas 0.398, gave a discharge into the atmosphere of 852 
cubic feet per hour, after a correction of 33 cubic feet was 
made for leakage. Substituting this value for Q in the formula 



o-cM 



* we find the coefficient C to be 997, which corre- 



sponds very closely with the formula given by Molesworth. 

MAXIMUM SUPPLY OP GAS THROUGH PIPES IN CUBIC FEET 

PER HOUR, SPECIFIC GRAVITY BEING TAKEN AT 

0.45. CALCULATED FROM THE FORMULA 

LENGTH OF PIPE = xo YARDS. 

Inside 
diameter 
of pipe in Pressure by the water gage in inches 

inches o.i 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 i.o 

% 13 18 22 26 29 31 34 36 38 41 

y2 26 37 46 53 59 64 70 74 79 83 

H 73 103 126 145 162 187 192 205 218 230 

1 149 211 258 298 333 365 394 422 447 47i 

VA 260 368 451 521 582 638 689 737 781 823 
154 411 581 711 821 918 1006 1082 1 162 1232 1299 

2 843 1 192 1460 1686 1886 2066 2231 2385 2530 2667 



Inside 










diameter 










of pipe in 


Pressure by the water 


gauge in inches 




inches 










0.1 


0.2 0.3 


0.4 0.5 0.75 


1.0 1.25 1.5 2.0 


2.5 


^ 8 


12 14 


17 19 23 


26 29 32 36 


42 


Va 23 


32 42 


46 51 63 


73 81 89 103 


115 


I 47 


67 82 


94 105 129 


149 167 183 211 


236 


iVa 82 


116 143 


165 184 225 


260 291 319 368 


412 



iVi 130 184 225 260 290 356 411 459 503 581 649 

2 267 377 462 533 596 730 843 943 1033 1 193 ^ZZZ 

2y2 466 659 807 932 1042 1276 1473 1647 1804 2083 2329 

3 735 1039 1270 1470 1643 2012 2323 2598 2846 3286 3674 

3J^ 1080 1528 1871 2161 2416 2958 3416 3820 4184 4831 5402 

4 1508 2133 2613 3017 3373 4131 4770 5333 5842 6746 7542 

LENGTH OF PIPE = xooo YARDS. 



Inside 














diameter of 


Pressure 


; by the 


water-j 


gauge 


in inches 


pipe in inches 














0.5 0.75 


1.0 


1.5 


2.0 


2.5 


3.0 


I 


33 41 


47 


58 


67 


75 


82 


1K2 


92 113 


130 


159 


184 


20s 


226 


2 


189 231 


267 


327 


in 


422 


462 


2V2 


329 403 


466 


571 


659 


7Z1 


807 


3 


520 636 


735 


900 


1039 


1162 


1273 


4 


1067 1306 


1508 


1847 


2133 


2385 


2613 


5 


1863 2282 


2635 


3227 


3727 


4167 


4564 


6 


2939 3600 


4157 


5091 


5879 


6573 


7200 




LENGTH < 


OF PIPE 


= 5000 YARDS 


• 




Inside 














diameter of 


Pressure 


; by the 


water-] 


gauge 


in inches 


pipe in inches i.o 


1.5 


2.0 




2.5 


3.0 


2 


119 


146 


169 




189 


207 


3 


329 


402 


465 




520 


569 


4 


675 


826 


955 


I 


067 


1168 


5 


I 179 I 


443 


I 667 


I 


863 


2041 


6 


1859 2 


277 


2629 


2 


939 


3220 


7 


2 733 3 347 


3865 


4321 


4 734 


8 


3816 4 


674 


5 397 


6 


034 


6 610 


9 


5123 6 


274 


7245 


8 


100 


8873 


10 


6667 8 


165 


9428 


10 


541 


II 547 


12 


10516 12 


880 


14872 


16628 


18 215 



Dr. A. C. Humphreys says his experience goes to show 
that these tables give too small- a flow, but it is difficult 
to accurately check the tables, on account of the extra 
friction introduced by rough pipes, bends, etc. For bends, 
one rule is to allow 1/42 of an inch pressure for each 
right-angle bend. 

Where there is apt to be trouble from frost it is well to 
use no service of less diameter than % inch, no matter 
how short it may be. In extremely cold climates this is 
now often increased to i inch, even for a single lamp. The 
best practice in the United States now condemns any ser- 
vice less than %-inch. 



Tou can help to save lives by contributing to the Bed Gross. 



:66 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



TABLE SHOWING THE CORRECT SIZES OF HOUSE PIPES FOR 
DIFFERENT LENGTHS OF PIPES AND NUMBER 

OF OUTLETS. 

(Denver Gas and Electric Company.) 
Length of pipe in feet 



Number 
of out- 
lets 




.9* 


u 

c 


.9* 
'5. 


%-inch 
pipe 


1-inch 
pipe 


c 
1 


CO 

a -7 0. 
0. N^ a 


2-inch 

• 


(J 

a .t= a 
a ^'S. 


3-inch 
pipe 


I 


20 


30 


50 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


2 


• • 


27 


50 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


3 






12 


50 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


4 






• • 


SO 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


5 










33 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


6 










24 


70 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


8 










13 


50 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


10 












35 


100 150 


200 300 


400 


13 












21 


60 150 


200 300 


400 


15 












16 


45 120 


200 300 


400 


20 














27 65 


200 300 


400 


25 














1 


7 42 


175 300 


400 


30 














12 30 


120 300 


400 


35 
















22 


90 270 


400 


40 
















17 


70 210 


400 


45 
















13 


55 165 


400 


50 
65, 


















45 135 
27 80 


330 
200 


75 


















20 60 


150 


lOO 




















33 


80 


125 




















22 


50 


150 
175 




















15 

• • • 


35 
28 


2C0 




















1  • • 


21 


225 




















 •  • 


17 


250 




















 • • • 


14 



In this table the quantity of gas the piping may be called 
on to convey is stated in terms of %-inch outlets on the 
assumption that each outlet requires a supply of 10 cubic 
feet per hour. The aim of the table is to have the loss in 
pressure not exceed i/io inch water pressure in 30 feet. 

In using the table the following rules should be ob- 
served : 

In figuring out the size of pipe, always start at the ex- 
tremities of the system and work toward the meter. 

Gas should not be supplied from a smaller to a larger 
size pipe. 

If the exact number of outlets given cannot be found in 
the table, take the next larger number. For example, if 
17 outlets are required, work with the next larger number 
in the table, which is 20. Or, if, for the number of outlets 
given, the exact length which feeds these outlets cannot 
be found in the table, the next larger length correspond- 
ing to the outlets given must be taken to determine the 
size of pipe required. Thus if there are 8 outlets to be fed 
through 55 feet of pipe, the next larger than 55 in the 8 
outlet line in the table, which is 100, should be used. As 
this is in the iVi-inch column, that size pipe would be re- 
quired. 

For any given number of outlets, a smaller size should 
not be used than the smallest size that contains a figure in 
the table for that number of outlets. Thus, to feed 15 
outlets, no smaller size pipe than i inch may be used, no 
matter how short the section of pipe may be. 

In any continuous run from an extremity to the meter, 
there may not be used a longer length of any size pipe 
than found in the table for that size, as 50 feet of %-inch, 
70 feet of I -inch, etc. If any one section would exceed 
the limit length, it must be made of larger pipe. 



1% 


1% 


2 


2% 


3 


II 


16 


28 


44 


64 



If any outlet is larger than %-inch it must be counted 
as more than one, in accordance with the following table : 

Size of outlet (inches) % % i 
Value in table 247 

High Pressure. 

The formulae given do not take account of the varying 
density and volume of the gas when subjected to differ- 
ent pressures ; they are applicable, therefore, only to low- 
pressure distribution where the difference in pressure is 
measured in inches of water head. Under the vastly dif- 
ferent conditions connected with high pressure distribu- 
tion, where the differences between initial and final 
pressures are so great as to cause a material alteration in 
the volume of the gas, the error involved in their use is 
great. 

Mariotte's law states that the volume of a gas varies 
inversely with the pressure to which it is subjected. If 
the pressure be doubled the gas will be compressed to half 
its former volume. When we consider the high pressure 
at which gas is now being distributed in many places, we 
ma/ appreciate the disturbances which this degree of com- 
pression introduces into a formula designed for use under 
far different conditions. 

Then there is also the process of expansion continually 
going on, the volume increasing as the gas travels farther 
away from the point at which the initial pressure is ap- 
plied. Suppose a quantity of gas is passed through a pipe^ 
at an initial pressure of 20 pounds per square inch anA 
discharged at i pound per square inch, the consequential 
expansion represents a certain amount of work, and thi;^ 
factor must, in all cases, be taken into account, to what — 
ever degree it has been operating. 

The common form of the formula for flow of gas i 
long pipes under high pressure is 



Q 



^\ Is 



where Q = discharge in cubic feet per hour at atmospheric 

pressure. 
s = specific gravity of gas, air being i. 
c = coefficient, which is variously given in different 
formulae. 
Pi = absolute initial pressure in pounds per square incli- 
Pa = absolute final pressure in pounds per square inch. 
d = inside diameter of pipe in inches. 
/ = length of pipe line in feet. 
The expression (Pi* — Pa*) may be replaced by (Pi+f a) 

(Pi -P.). 
William Cox (Am. Mach., Mar. 20, 1902) gives the formula 

in the form 



Q 



= 3000^/^ when s = 0.05 



E. A. Rix, in a paper on the ''Compression and Tran- - 
mission of Illuminating Gas," r^ad before the Pacilic 
Coast Gas Association, 1905, gives for the discharge per 
minute : 



44.66 



)6_ Up ,* - Pa') 

s \J I 



V 

from which the discharge per hour would be 



2680 
V7 



0=:7T 



V 



(P 1* - P,*) d* 



They axe fighting for YOU. Do your duty by them here. 



MEMBERS OF ASSOCIATION OF NATURAL 

GAS SUPPLY MEN 



DAVID O. HOLBROOK, President, Oliver 
Building, Pittsburgh. 

L ARMOUR ADAMS. SecreUry. 1304 First 
National Bank Building, Pittsburgh. 



Aiax Iron Works, Corrv, Pa. 
Allegheny Steel Co., Pittsburgh. 
Anchor Packing Co., Pittsburgh. 

Bessemer Gas Engine Co., Grove City. 
Blodgett Co., Inc., The G. S. Burlington. Vt. 
Borden Company, Warren, Ohio. 
BoYaird & Serfang Mfg. Co., Bradford. Pa. 
Bristol Co.. The. Waterbury, Conn. 
Broderick & Bascom Rope Co.. St. Louis. 
Bryant Heater & Mfg. Co., Cleveland. 
Buffalo Co-operative Stove Co., Buffalo. 
Builders Iron Fdy., Providence. 
Byers, A. M. Co., Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Steel Co., Pittsburgh. 
Chaplm- Fulton Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 
Cincinnati Rubber Mfg. Co., Cincinnati. 
Clark & Norton Mfg. Co., Wellsville. N. Y. 
Cleveland Gas Meter Co., Cleveland. 
Colona Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 
Columbia uas Stove Co., Huntington, W.Va. 
Columbian Rope Co., Auburn, N. Y. 
Columbus H't'g & VcntV Co.. Columbus. 
Continental Sunply Co., St. Louis. 
Cooper. C. & G Co., Mt. Vernon, O. 
Crandall-Pettec Co., New York City. 
Cutler Hammer Mfg. Co., The Milwaukee. 

Davis-Bournonville Co., Jersey City. 
Dayton Pipe Couoling Co., Dayton. 
Davison. N. C. Gas Burner & Weld'g Co., 



Domestic Engineering Co., Dayton^ O. 
Dracger Oxygen Apparatus Co.. Pittsburgh. 
Dresser, S. R., Mfg. Co., Bradford. Pa. 

Equitable Meter Co. Pittsburgh. 
Estate Stove Co., Hamilton, O, 

Filler, Edwin H. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Foxboro Co. The, Foxboro. Mass. 
Franklin Co. The, Canton, O. 
Frick & Lindsay Co.. Pittsburgh. 
Fuel Oil Journal, Houston. Texas. 

Garlock Packing Co., Palmyra, N. Y. 
Gas Age, The, New York City. 
Gas Appliance Co.. Cleveland. 
Gas Record, Chicago. 
General Fire Ext'g r Co., Providence. 
General Gas Light Co.. Kalamazoo. 
Gcrmer Stove Co., prie. 
Gilfillan Machine Works. Ebenezer, N. Y. 
Goodrich. B. F. Co., Akron, O. 
Graves Supply Co., Cincinnati. 
Guardian Gas Appliance Co., The, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 
Gwynn Gas Burner & Eng. Co., Pittsburgh. 

Hammon Coupler Co., Pittsburgh. 

Haymond Co., Muncie, Ind. 

Hays Mfg, Co., Erie. 

Hart Mfff. Co.. Cleveland. 

Hazard Mfg. Co., Chicago. 

Hecter. C. M. Sons & Co.. Inc., Butler, Pa. 

Hewitt Rubber Co., Pittsburgh. 

Hooven, Owens, Rentschler Co. Hamilton O. 

Hope Engineering & Supply Co. Pittsburgh. 

Ideal Heating Co^ The, Columbus. 
Imperial Beltmg Co., Chicago, 111. 
Ingersoll-Rand Co.. Pittsburgh. 
International Hale Gas Mixer Company, 

Providence. 
Iroquois Natural Gas Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

arecki Mfg. Co., Erie. 

iffy Water Heater Co. St. Louis. 

ones & Laughlin Steel Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

LaBelle Iron Works, Steubenville, O. 
Lattimer-Stevens Co., Columbus, Ohio. 
Leschen, A. & Sons Rope Co., St. Louis. 
Lezius Automatic Draft Reg. Co., Cleveland. 
Lucey Mfg. Corp., Pittsburgh. 



} 



Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 

M acorn ber & Whyte Rope Co^ ChicaRO. 

Manhattan Rubber Mfg. Co., Passaic, .\. J. 

Mark Mfg. Co., Chicago. 

Maxon Premix Burner Co., Muncie, Ind. 

Meek Oven Mfg. Co., Ncwburyport, Mass. 

Metric Metal Works, Erie. 

Minneapolis Heat Reg. Co.. Minneapolis. 

Modern Iron Wks., Quincy, 111. 

Modern Safety Iron Co., Philadelphia. 

Moon Mfg. Co., The, Chicago. 

Moore, Lee C. & Co., Inc., Pittsburgh. 

Moser Mfg. Co., Kane, Pa. 

Mueller H. Mfg. Co.. Decatur, 111. 

Nathan Mfg. Co., New York City. 

National Supply Co., Pittsburgh. 

National Transit Pump & Mach. Co., Oil 

City, Pa. 
National Tube Co., Pittsburgh. 
Natural Gas & Gasoline Journal, Buffalo. 
New Bedford Cordage Co., New York City. 
New York Belt'g & Pack'g Co.. New York. 
Nye, A. T. & Son Co., Marietta, O, 

Oil & Gas Journal, Tulsa, Okla. 
Oil City Boiler Wks., Oil City, Pa. 
Oil Trade Journal, New York. 
Oil Well Supply Co., Pittsburgh. 
Oxweld Acetylene Co., Chicago. 

Parkersburg Mach. Co.. Parkcrsburg, W.Va. 
Parkersburg Rig & Reel Co., Parkersburg. 

W. Va. 
Peerless Heater Co., Pittsburgh. 
Pennsylvania Furnace & Stove Co., Warren, 

Pa. 
Pittsburg Meter Co.. East Pittsburg. 
Pittsburg Reinforcea Brazing & Mach. Co., 

Pittsburgh. 
Pittsburg Valve & Fittings Co., Pittsburgh. 
Pittsburg Valve, F'd'y & Const. Co., Pitts 
burgh. 

Pittsburgh Water Htr. Co., Pittsburgh. 
Plymouth Cordage Co.. N. Plymouth, Mass. 
Pratt & Cady Co., Inc.. New York City. 
Prichard Supply Co., Mannington, W. Va. 

Rathbun-Jones Eng. Co., Toledo. 
Reid, Jos. Gas Engme Co., Oil City, Pa. 
Reliable Stove Co., Cleveland. 
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngstown. O. 
Revere Rubber Co., Chelsea, Mass. 
Reznor Mfg. Co., Ltd., Mercer, Pa, 
Riesenman Mfg. Co., Ltd.. Franklin. Pa. 
Robinson, J. E. & Co., Oil City, Pa. 
Robinson Packer & Mach. Co.. Coffeyville, 

Kansas. 
Rocbling, John A. Sons Co., Trenton, N. J. 
Rossendale-Reddaway Belt'g & Hose Co., 

Newark, N. J. 
Ruud Mfg. Co.. Pittsburgh. 

Sanitary Co. of America, Linfield, Pa. 
Schaeffer & Budenberg Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 
Scientific Heater Co., The, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Selas Co., Canton, O. 
Solar Light Co^ New York City. 
South Chester Tube, Chester, Pa. 
Spang, Chalfant & Co., Pittsburgh. 
Sprague Meter Co.. Bridgeport. Conn. 
Strause Gas Iron Co., Philadelphia. 
Superior Gas Engine Co., Springfield, O. 

Tate-Jones & Co., Inc., Pittsburgh. 
Taylor, W. P. Co.. Buffalo. 
Toledo Pipe Thr'd'g Mach. Co.. Toledo, O. 
Troop Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh. 

United Seal Co., Columbus. 

Utica Valve & Fixture Co., Utica. N. Y. 

Welsbach Co., Gloucester City, N. J. 
VVestinghouse Mach. Co., Pittsburgh. 
Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.. Pitts 

burgh. 
Wheeling Steel & Iron Co., Wheeling. 
Wolfe, Linden W.. Oil City, Pa. 
Worthington Pump & Mach. Corp., Buffalo. 
Wright Wire Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co,, Youngs- 
town, O. 



Annual Convention Natural Gas As.sociation of America— May 22-2^, at William Penn Hotel, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Mdy 



found thai these disturbing influences vary to a great ex- 
tent with the character of the bend. The resistance of- 
fered is least when the radius of the bend is equal to five 
times the radius of the pipe. The most convenient way of 
stating the resistance offered by bends is in terms of 
equivalent length of straight pipe which offers the same 
resistance to flow as the extra resistance due to the bend. 
A formula given for this equivalent length is 



L = 12.( 



(ir 



= equivalent length in feet. 
= radius of pipe. 

- radius of curve. 

- length of curve in f 






 of a bend ' 



Rise in 


P. 


Rise In 


P, 


Rise in 


temperature 


— 


temperature 


— 


temperature 


*F. 


P, 


°F. 


P. 


•F. 


0* 


6. 


238- 


14. 


386- 


47 


6.S 


251 


1 6. 


412 


83 


7. 


263 


1 8. 


435 



578 
609 



A NATION UPON A FIRM FOUNDATION 



radius of the pipe, that is — — .2, is equal to 
3.38 /. 

The reduction of pressure produced by elbows, tees and 
globe valves is also taken account of by the addition of an 
equivalent length to the length of straight pipe. The fol- 
lowing table shows the additional length required to equal 
the friction due to globe valves. For elbows and tees take 
3^ of the value given in the table. 



Diameter of 
pipe in inches 



Additional 
length in feet 



ADIABATIC COMPRESSION OF NATURAL GAS. 

The following table and the curve give the rise in tempera- 
ture due to the adiabatic compression of natural gas. 
Pi is the absolute initial and Pi the absolute linat pressure, 



— being therefore the 

P, 

perature of the gas is ; 



tio of compression. The initial t 
iumed to he 60° F. 



i" 



;. Harold G. Moulton at Union League Club. 

Tacoma, recently said : 
"The government is urging us to save as 

never before; and to save with a view to the 
elimination of nonessential industries. The Liberty 
Loan Committee states: 

Luxuries and extravagance must go completely out 
of fashion — should, in fact, be considered little short 

of treachery There is not enough capital, labor. 

transportation, or raw material to go around, if those 
industries which are not essential to the conduct of 
war are continued at their normal productiveness. 
Every unessential industry which continues in opera- 
tion must be considered as bidding against the nation 

for its life's blood Every unessential industry 

which burns coal deprives the essential industries by 
just so much of the supply available for their pur- 
poses. Every man who buys a new overcoat is bid- 
ding against Uncle Sam, who is buying overcoats for 
soldiers. And every dollar spent on a luxury is help- 
ing to support an unessential industry in the com- 
petitive consumption of essentials." 

— Economic World. 

The results of all this will be far-reaching. We 
shall find ourselves a nation built upon a rock, that 
rock being economy, thrift, saving, etc. Such con- 
ditions, with our banking system of today what it 
is. should establish us as a nation which no storms 
of business disaster, that in former years at times 
threatened destruction could more than Jar, much less 
seriously affect. 

We had become an extravagant nation. The world 
was extravagant, and was becoming more so. witt> 
the possibility of a tremendous crash at some future 
time. That crash has been averted, and our children- 
and our children's children will see prosperity, and a 
form of life worth living, far above and beyond tlic 
fictitious pleasures such as in the recent past we ha%'*^ 
inclined to believe were real pleasures based upo^ 
eyhorbitant, foolish expenditures, the striving afte^ 
popularity through vast wastefulness, etc. Great and 
satisfactory will be the future. 



Give liberally to tbe Red Cross. 



170 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



5. The Power & Mining Machinery Works at Cud- 
ahy, Wis., which, as its name indicates, gets out a com- 
plete line of crushing, concentrating and mining equip- 
ment. 

6. The Laidlaw Works at Cincinnati, Ohio, given over 
to air compressing machinery only. 

7. The Jeansville Works at Hazleton, Pa., working 
at present on special product. 

8. The International Gas Engine Works at Cudahy, 
Wis., making a full Hne of gas and oil engines and ac- 
cessories. 

The high reputation of the Worthington product, tak- 
en in connection with its widespread scope in manufac- 
turing and sales and with additional lines being added, 
places it in the forefront as 6ne of the most important 
industrials of the day. 



OIL STORAGE TANKS AND RESERVOIRS. 



mllE Bureau of Mines, Department of the Inter- 
ior, has in FUiUetin No. 155 set forth various 
important features in connection with oil 
storage tanks and reservoirs, with a brief dis- 
cussion of losses of oil in storage and methods of 
prevention. The report is by C. P. Bowie, Petroleum 
Engineer of the Bureau. 

The facts brought to the fore, will be found of ex- 
ceeding interest, and what has been said upon these 
matters of especial value. The matters are timely, in 
view of the attempts that are being made to avoid all 
waste, and to get the most out of everything. 

The conclusions are briefly summarized as follows: 

The best all-round container in use at the present 
time for storing oil is the all-steel tank of gas-tight 
construction. 

Tanks that are used for the accumulation of fresh 
oils from the well should invariably be of this con- 
struction, and as a rule it will probably pay to equip 
them with water-seal tops, if not also with some form 
of tile encasing or lagging. 

Other devices for lessening the temperature of the 
oil in the tanks that can be cheaply applied and econ- 
omically maintained, such as sprinkling with water 
in hot w^eather and painting the tanks white, are 
worth while. 

To store gasoline or light distillate in tanks that 
have not tight tops is the height of folly, and it is 
poor judgment not to use some type of cooling device. 

Large concrete-lined reservoirs, as at present con- 
structed, should not be used for the storage of fresh 
oils or of light oils. 

It will pay to line a reservoir with concrete even 
though heavy oil only is to be stored. 

In most cases it would probably pay to put a con- 
crete roof on the reservoir and cover it with earth — 
at least such a type of structure is worthy of consider- 



ation, regardless of the gravity of the oils to be 
handled. 

Concrete, if properly proportioned, mixed, poured, 
tamped, and floated can be made impervious to heavy 
oils without the addition of so-called "oil-proofing" 
compounds. 

Contrary to popular engineering opinion, expansion 
joints are not necessary in properly constructed con- 
crete linings for oil reservoirs in temperate climates, 
and no injury will result to the linings from their 
omission if the reservoirs be kept reasonably full of 
oil, or if, when the tanks are not in use, they are kept 
partly filled with water. 

If crude can be refined at any profit, it should be 
put through the refinery as soon as possible after it 
is taken from the wells. If refining will not pay, the 
period of storage should be as short as possible be- 
cause, so far as the oil is concerned, each day of stor- 
age will entail a loss. 

The writer further states that particular care should 
be used in making tank grades, as a tank built partly 
on filled ground and partly on excavated ground is 
liable to be disrupted at the point where the founda- 
tion goes from cut to fill. It is the best policy to fill 
the entire area to approximately the same depth so 
as to insure uniform settling. The **gas-tight" steel 
tank is admittedly the largest practicable type now in 
use in the diflPerent fields and specifications for such a 
tank of 55,000 barrel capacity of steel construction 
throughout are given in the bulletin. These specifica- 
tions are very valuable in determining the proper con- 
struction for such a tank. 

The writer points out that although the modern 
steel tanks in use today are capable of withstanding 
the pressure from within, proper attention is not paid 
to the wind stresses. It is very essential that, even 
though very .few steel roofs have collapsed durin<T a 
wind storm, precaution should be taken for overcom- 
ing wind stresses. The so-called "sand-line construc- 
tion" is the most efficient for this purpose as the cost 
is reasonable and the method effective and easily ap- 
plicable. Tank roofs, size of plates, swing pipes, 
swivel joints for swing pipes, explosion doors, and 
vacuum relief valves, are described in considerable 
detail. 

Owing to the uncertainty of the market price of 
manufactured products, the future cost of tanks is 
difficult to ascertain. At the time of the outbreak of 
the war in August, 1914, a steel tank wath steel root 
could have been built for a cost of from 30 to 32 cents 
a barrel, but today such a tank would cost from 4^ 
to 45 cents a barrel. Wooden roof tanks three years 
ago cost from 25 to 2"] cents a barrel, but the same 
tanks are now worth 37 to 40 cents a barrel. 

Concrete lined reservoirs are given considerable at- 
tention. The particular container described has an 
extreme outside diameter of 488 feet, a total depth of 
about 25 feet, and a slope on the sides of r to i. ^^ 
selecting the site for such a reservoir it is essential 
that the soil should be of homogeneous mixture, p^"^' 
ferably a sandy clay, in which clay predominates. The 



Tour money will save their lives. Oive to the Red Gross. 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



in 



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rt"? iti itir iliirati •<! Mtiir*. \\ a«hini;ti>n. 



CURVE CHARTS 



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EMPLOYMENT MANAGERS 



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NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



GOOD INSTALLATION OF PRESSURE 
GAUGES. 

mHE illustration that appears in connection with 
this article, displays the layout of a recording 
and signaling system, which is the outcome of 
experience and study on the part of Manager 
Woodward, of Santa Anna, Texas. Mr. Woodward 
states : 

"When we were installing our system, and were ready 
for the pressure gauges, we wrote the manufacturers for 
gauges 'with electrical connections.' The gauges arrived 
with but one wired connection to ring one bell, 

"It was necessary to have a signal for high pressure, 
and another signal for low pressure, and at first it seemed 
necessary to wire the equipment for two bells, but as a re- 
sult of careful study of the situation, it was decided to 
ground one wire and thus make one bell ring for both 
high and low pressure. 

"At the wells, steam regulators are used to reduce the 
rock pressure to desired given pressure, regardless of the 
variation of gas consumption. 



EFFICIENT GAUGE SYSTEM. 

"The gas is brought into the town at 140 pounds. The 
high pressure line enters the intermediate regulating sta- 
tion where the pressure is reduced to thirty pounds. 

"In this intermediate regulating station is installed a 
pressure gauge like the large gauges shown in the illus- 
tration. Two wires are carried from this gauge into the 
office through a half-inch pipe. This wire installation 
was planned as a safety precaution, rather than to carrj' 
the high pressure into the office. 

One of the two wires mentioned is connected with the 
top bell on the signal board, which rings if the pressure 
starts to crawl above a given pressure that has been de- 
termined upon. The other wire runs to the buzzer below 
the upper bell, which sounds in case the pr''.ssure drops 
below a determined pressure. 

The gauge on the left connects with the intermediate 
regulating station and carries a pressure of thirty pounds. 
It is from this line that we supply all "industrials." The 
bell on the left rings if the pressure rises, or falls below 
the determined standard. 

The round gauge in the center is simply a check on the 
intermediate gauge. The figures and hand on this gauge 
can be seen from any point in the office. 

The gauge on the right is connected with the low press- 
ure regulating station, where the pressure is reduced from 
thirty pounds (on the intermediate line) to four ounces. 
It is under this pressure that we deliver gas to our domes- 
tic consumers. 



The recording and signaling system installation that is 
so neatly arranged upon a varnished board is installed 
in the company's office. Therefore, should anything go 
wrong with the city mains, or the low pressure station, 
announcement would be made in the office by the bell on 
the right, which is set to ring on three and six ounces. 
{This, of course, could be changed to any desired 
pressures). 

The three push-button switches are ordinary electric 
circuit switches. The right switch button on the left 
switch is pushed to stop the ringing of the high pressure 
bell after it has signaled, and continues as a bell-cut-out 
until the line has been repaired. 

To stop the ringing of the intermediate bell after alarm 
has been given, the left button on the left switch is 
pushed, while when the low pressure bell has signaled, the 
right button on the right switch is pushed to stop the 
ringing, which leaves the left button on the right switch, 
which ceases the ringing of the bell that indicates low 
pressure on the low pressure line. 

As an auxiliary to this signal system, the board is con- 
nected with the telephone line whereby on Sundays and 
holidays, or at night, or during other periods when there 
is no one at the office, the buttons on the lower switch 
are pushed, this forms a connection with the telephone 
station, thereby if anything goes wrong with any por- 
tion of the system the central telephone station is auto- 
matically rung up, and the telephone operator having been 
informed where to find those of the office, by telephone, 
is enabled to at once communicate, whereupon a repre- 
sentative goes to the office, touches the proper buttons 
and promptly takes care of the condition in hand. 

This equipment was installed about two years ago, and 
ample time has been thus given for the testing of the en- 
tire system, and in that period in no respect has the sys- 
tem failed to work to perfection. 

Indeed, Mr. Woodward and his associates have reason 
to be proud of the system, which is of their own devis- 
ing, and has performed its work in so excellent a manner. 



HIRE YOURSELF 



SS May 7th saw a notable mass meeting in Ne^iV 
York City to commemorate the loss of the 
Lusitania, on which sank Mr. and Mrs. Elbert 
Hubbard, it would not be inappropriate in 
our commercial life to quote one of Mr. Hubbard"> 
excellent sayings, entitled, "Hire yourself." It reads as 
follows : 

HIRE YOURSELFI 

The Law of Wages is as sure and exaci in its 
working as the law of the Standard of Life. You 
can go to the very top. And going down the 
scale, you can find men who will not work of 
themselves and no one can make them work, and 
so their lives are worth nothing, and they are a tax 
and a burden on the community. Do your work 
<-o well that it will require no supervision, and bj- 
doing your own thinking you will save the expense 
of hiring someone to think tor you. 

—Elbert Hubbard. 



Oive to the Red Cross till selfislmess says stop — then keep right on giving. 



RESULTS OF DRILLING-LATEST REPORTS 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELD. 



BRADFORD FIELD. 

Slingerland, Mcintosh Oil 

Bing. 580, A. P. Co. 217 



MIDDLE FIELD. 

Vail. Hopewell Oil & Gas 4 

Vail, Nat. Oil 2 

Schreiber, Cont. Oil 3 

Wallace, Ginger Oil 4 

Isenbaum, Proper & Co. 2 

Lot 104, Perry Oil i 



Dry 
Gas 



VENANGO-CLARION. 

C. & G., Crawford & Gregory 321 

Clarion County — 

Booth, Henry Booth 3 

Alleman, United Natural Gas 5 

Jefferson County — 
Rogers, South Penn Oil M. D. 4 



Dry 
Gas 



BUTLER-ARMSTRONG. 

Levier, Stover & Co 

Smith, Johnson & Stanford 

Moser, Phillips Gas i 

Cypher, American Natural Gas i 

Eichert, J. Eichert & Co. 3 



Dry 
Gas 



SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA. 

Washington — 

Dunn hrs., Baker & MacBridc 4 

A Vxpnder, Canonsburg S. & I. i 

Tngomar — 

^Voher lot. Glenn & Co. i 

Huff County — 

Ihman, Harbison & Co. i 

Mt. Morris — 

Minor. Peoples Gas i 

Blair, Peoples Gas i 

Cole, Peoples Gas i 

Wendt. Carnesrie Ga*? i 

Dve. South Penn Oil 4 

Whipkey, Peoples Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

Mannington — 

Trash, Hope Gas i 

Smith. Carnegie Gas 2 

Kincaid, Blackshere Oil & Gas i 

Mason, Imperial Oil & Gas P. 2 

Keyser, Pgh. & W. Va. G. i 

Riggs, Eastern Petroleum 8 

Shuman. Hope Gas 5 

Wetzel and Tyler — 
Teagarden, Manufacturers L. & H. i . . . . 
Snodgrass, Blackshere Oil & Gas i . . . . 

Roberts hrs., Hope Gas 2 

Co. Poor Farm, Middlebourne O. & G. 7 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 



3 
3 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 

Drv 



3 
I 



Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



3 



Gas 
Gas 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
'^as 
Dry 
Drv 



3 



Gts 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Marshall County — 

Sorsey, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

Rhine, Manufacturers L. & H.. i 

McGlumphey, Manufacturers L. & H. i . . 

Buzzard, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

Fair, Carnegie Gas 3 

Brooke County — 
Ravora, Ravora & Co. i 

Ritchie County — 

Lambert, South Penn Oil i 

Keith, I. O. & G. P. 4 

Smith, .Carnegie Gas 2 

Hoguc, Carnegie Gas i 

Taylor. Carnegie Gas 21 

Minnear, Philadelphia Co. i 

Wilson, Philadelphia Co. 21 

Collins, Philadelphia Co. 2 

Elder, I. O. & G. P. i 

Patton-Wilson, Ahrens & O'Dell 5 

Wirt Countv — 
Johnson hrs., T. A. & E. P. Mellon 2... 

Barnes, Stayer Oil & Gas 6 

Xutter-Wilson, Campbell Oil 3 

Pleasants County — 

Ripgs Bros., L. C. White & Co. i 

Ankrom. E. T. Edminds & Co. i , 

Ferguson, Hope Gas 5 

Calhoun County — 
Riddle, Hope Gas i 

Roane Countv — 
Queen. United Fuel Gas 2 

Kanawha County — 
Sunday Creek Coal. United Fuel Gas 6 

Bowers. K. V. P. 10 

Tbompkins. West Virt^inia Prod, i 

Knight. Eastern Carbon i 



Dry 
Gas 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 

Woodsfield — 

FJlis. Ellis -^' Cunningham i 

Thomas. J. L. Kaklan & Co. i 

Perry County — 
Rogers Bros.. Ruth & Strong 15 

Athens County — 

Grovner. George Washburn 6 

Cunningham hrs., Wilmington O. & G. 10. 

Morgan County — 
Penrose, Mosicr & Co. 3 

Noble County — 

McAtee. S. W. King & Co. 9 

Blake. A. L. Patton & Co. 2 

Huffman. M. E. Roby & Co. i 

Miller. C. E. Hammonds & Co. 4 

Marietta — 

Eddy, J. E Johnson & Co. 5 

Becker. Patterson & Pevey i . . 

Farnsworth hrs T. H. Kij?gins & Co. 4... 

Wickens. J. T. Dillon & Co. 25 

Decker, J. B. Bradcn O. & G. 9 

Plumlev hrs., Cambrina Oil 3 

Carroll Countv — 

Madison. W. H. McClellan & Co. 3 

Gordon, Scott Oil & Gas i 

Harrison County — 
Murer, J. B. Riffle & Co. i 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Uas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

18 
21 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Drv 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
D-v 
Drv 
Dry 
Dry 

Drv 
Gas 

Dry 



Make the Red Cross a tower of strength back of our men. 



178 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



Jefferson County — 
Mills, Ed. Housen i 

Dry 

Gas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. 

Allegany 9 4 

Bradford 30 97 

Middle Field 26 47 

Venango-Clarion 33 41 

Butler-Armstrong 13 14 

S. W. Pennsylvania 23 113 

West Virginia 100 783 

S. E. Ohio 64 276 

Total 298 1.385 



Dry. 
o 
2 

3 
3 
3 
^ 
16 
20 

50 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



LICKING COUNTY. 
Licking — A. A. Haines, Werhle Stowe 2 

KNOX COUNTY. 
Pike — A. J. Lorer, Upham Gas 2 



MEDINA COUNTY. 

Harrisville — A. & S. Repp, Logan Gas & F'uel i . . 

E. M. Frary. Logan Gas & Fuel i 

York — J. H. & H. Holcomb. Logan Gas & Fuel i. 

H. Essig, Ohio Prod. & Refg. 2 

Lafayette — Rose Vlk, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

D. H. Weible, Medina G. & F. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Chester — J. P. Seaman. Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . 
Cannan — Fike-West. Ohio Fuel Supply i . . . . 
Wayne — ^Jos. Winkler. Ohio Fuel Sup i . . 
Clinton — Elmira I. Craig, East Ohio Gas 2 

A. E. Aylesworth. Medina G. & F. 2... 

Mira A. Eddy, Medina Gas & Fuel i . . . . 

H. B. Williams, East Ohio Gas i 

Green — V. C. Roycr, Logan G. & F. 1 



Dry 
Gas 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover — .Allen Seager. Preston Oil i 

H. Bailev Preston Oil i 

C. Durrow. East Ohio Gas i 

R. Durrow, East Ohio Gas i 

Schendel. East Ohio Gas i 

Fzra Tuttle. East Ohio Gas i 

C. Wilson. East Ohio Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 



5 



Richland — C. R. Poling, Ohio Fuel S. 

H W Whitecrpft Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

Reb. Blackstone, Ohio Fuel Sup. 2 

W. A. Sowers. Ohio Fuel Supply i 

H. H. Cozad Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Harrison — J. E. Bechtel, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 
Jackson — H. J. Westcott. Ohio Fuel Supply i. . 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 



20 
] 



Gas. 
o 
o 

3 
I 
2 

7 

21 

I 

35 



Gas 

Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



4 

2 



Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



3 

5 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



3 

5 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 



2 

5 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — M. Shancr, Heisey Gas i 

M. Shaner, Heisey Gas 2 

J. Burkett, Heisey Gas i 

Dry 

Gas 

HOCKING COUNTY. 
Salt Creek — N. Karshner, Logan G. & F. 7 
W. H. McDowell, Ohio Fuel Supply i . 

Dry 

Gas 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 



Licking . , 
Fairfield . 
Knox . . . 
Ashland 
Medina 
Lorain . . 
Wayne . . . 
Richland 
Cuyahoga 
Vinton . . . 
Perry . . . . 
Hocking . 
Holmes .. 
Coshocton 
Jackson . . 



Total 40 



130 



16 



LIMA FIELD. 



VAN WERT COUNTY. 
Harrison — E. J. Springer, .\rnold & Co. i 



LIMA FIELD. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 

Wood 

Hancock 2 

Allen .^ 

Auglaize 3 

Sandusky 3 

Mercer 3 

Van Wert 3 

Seneca 2 

Ottawa 2 



Total 30 



317 



INDIANA FIELD 



BLACKFORD COUNTY. 
Harrison — T. C. Neal, National Steel Castin 5 

JAY COUNTY. 
Penn — D. J. Edmonson. Prairie Oil 5 

RANDOLPH COUNTY. 
Monroe— R. F. Hill, W. H. Mitchell 2 

GIBSON COUNTY. 
Patoka — C. T. Emerson, Farmers Oil 40 

PIKE COUNTY. 
Madison — E. P. Barker, A. R. Bement 4 



Drv 

Dry 

Gas 



Gas 

Drv 



I 



Comp. 


Prod. 


Dry. 


Gas. 


I 








I 














I 








I 














7 


5 


4 


2 














9 


125 


3 


5 














8 





3 


5 


7 





2 


5 


3 





2 


I 


2 





I 


I 


I 








I 














I 





I 






■>■> 



Drv 



Prod. 


Dry. 


Comp. 


Prod. 


Dry 


135 





I 


5 





15 














54 














21 














15 





1 


15 





30 














12 


I 











10 


I 


I 





I 


25 





2 


42 






Dr- 
D'v 
Dr) 
Dry 
Dry 



If you can't go **over there" send your money **over the top" for you. 



Mi% 



NATURAL CAS AND GASOUNE 



ir"^ 



• 4 



•ULtlVAH COHIITY 

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WOtrC COUNTY 
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1 82 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



Lawrence 4 

Marion i 

Wabash 3 

Jasper i 

Edgar i 

McDonough ... i 

Total 2-] 



170 


I 














I 














3 


I 





I 


2 














I 





I 


•• 

3 





10 















308 



<> 



1 1 



KANSAS. 



2-28-4. 

34--25-5. 
23-26-4, 

27-28-4, 
9-27-5 » 
4-27-5. 

27-24-5. 

3-25-5. 
15-26-4. 

33-25-4. 

31-25-5, 

25-25-4. 

1-25-5. 
8-29-4. 

25-26-5, 

Dry 
Gas 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

Brant, Empire G. & F. 6 

Hayman, Seven Fields Oil i 

Buscher. Dynamo Oil i 

Martin, Gordon Heights Oil i.... 

Marshall, Gold Dollar Oil i 

Xuttle, Atlas Pet. i 

Calvin, Norvall et al i 

Robinson, Theta Oil 8 

Parker, Atlantic Petroleum 6 

Grey, Towanda Oil & Gas i 

Adams. Sinclair Oil & Gas 6(>.... 

Allen, Fraizier et al 7 

Claasem. McMan Oil i 

Rutherford, Mid Kansas O. & G. 6. 
Sluss, Northeast Oil i 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 



WILSON COUNTY. 
28- --16. Colaw, .Anthony Gas 2 

5-28-16. Long. Sherman & Buck i 

8-2Q-16, Watson, Farmers & Mechanics O. 2 
25-28-15, Farwell. Marion Oil & Gas 



12 
3 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry I 

Gas 3 

Gas 1 .oco coo 

ALLEN COUNTY. 

14-26-18. Schuman. K. M. & S. Oil i Dry 

16-26-18. Squires. T. M. Galey 2 Dry 

18-25-17. Stocklebrand. Eakin & Lamberton 3 Dry 



Dry 

20-31-13. 
r6-i3-ii. 

20-31-12, 

2-31-12. 
8-35-12, 
i-.^3-i2, 
2-35-10, 
24-32-12. 

.'I-31-13. 
26-33- ". 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



CHAUTAUQUA AND ELK COUNTIES. 

Woodworth, Iowa Oil 

Dixon. Bliss & Co. 3 

Gardner, Link Oil 19 

Dexter. Bliss & Co. 4 

McGuire. Duffield & Blair 5 

Fee, W. F. Lemon 3 

French, Geo. Perry 7 

Moore. Roth & Fainrot 3 

Morey. A. M. Clark i 

Oliver. Appleton C. O. & G. 4 

Wodsworth, Iowa Oil i 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



8 

3 
4.500,000 



NEOSHO COUNTY. 

T2-28-18 Rettig, Frank Devore et al i. 
19-27-18, Hammond. K. M. & S. Oil i.. 

24-27-19. Johnson, Globe Oil 2 

14-28-20. Poor farm. Crown Oil 4 

10-28-18, City of Chanute i 

27-27-16. O. Claw. .Anthony Gas Snyd. 
20-28-18. Converse. Moore & Loy i.... 
-:o-28-i8, Brinkman, J. W. Leonard .. 



Drv 
Dry 

Dry 
Prv 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



se 



6 

1 

500,000 



MIAMI. FRANKLIN. DOUGLAS COUNTIES. 

10-16-21, Whitcley, Flo Jean Oil 2 

18-14-22, Findley, Reid. Scarritt et al i 

19-16-2, Wolf, Unnamed parties 6 

13-16-21, Lister, Wellington-Wellsville 4 

24-16-21, Pflug, Ruff, Vampell et al 2 

10-16-21, Whiteley, Flo Jean Oil i 

S. of Rantoul, Lane. Unnamed owners i 

6-17-22. Williams, Armourdalc Oil & Gas 2 

21-17-22, Crees. I. N. Miller 3 

14-16-21, Cone, Wilson & McCullough 2 

20-16-21, Moherman, Sentinel O. & G. 3 

ig-i')-2i, Fee. F. K. VVolte i 

14-16-21. Wincgard, Russell. Jtrand et al i 

24-16-21, Pflug, Ainsworth et al 2 

.<7-i6-20, Easdale, Walnut Creek O. & G. i 

-a-16-21, Moherman, Otto Shazt O. & G. 2 

,^-14-21. Rodewald, Kansas Natl. Gas 3 

j2-i6-2r, Tulloss, Benton Oil & Gas 3 

-3-16-21. Booze. George Staves 2 

12-16-20, Mallory, Mallory et al 2 

16-16-21, Cone, Xeiswener & Brcndell i 

35-16-21. Long. Unnamed persons 1 

32-16-21. Tullos, Benton Oil & Gas 4 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Di» 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 
Dry 
(jas 
(ras 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 



Dry 20 

Gas 3 

Gas 1 ,000,000 



10.33-14. 
^3-34- r 5, 
14-35-14. 
31-34-15. 
35-35-^5. 
10-35-15. 
33-35-15, 
30-34-16, 

3-33-15. 
28-32-16, 

18-33-15. 
35--29-15. 

,3-33-14. 

6-35-15. 

2-33-14. 

6-35-15. 
18-33-15. 
13-32-14. 

4-32-16, 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Tucker, Franklin Oil 1 

Ellison, National Refg. 1,2 

Louthan, McXabb & Barrington i... 
Dabney, Wyoming Blackford O. 1 . . 

Torpedo, Coon et al 3 

Barnes. Graham, Knight et al i 

Scovell, Mahutska & Samuel 1 

Day, Jesse Graham 22 

Edman, C. E. Roth 3 

Lange, Stoop et al 2 

Erhardt, J. F. Overfield 8 

Montgomery, Sticelber & Banowitz 1 

Jones. Tulsa parties i 

Sonora Petroleum 2 

M. Fee. Minnesota Oil i 

I^ual, Mont. Co. State Bank 4 

Bolt, Stoll et al i 

Inscho. Home Producers 2 

Turner, Independence O. & G. i.... 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Drv 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

Drv 

Drv 

Dry 

Gas 

Drv 

Drv 

Dry 

Dry 

Ga^ 

Drv 




WILDCATS. 

Sowley County — 

6-31-4. Clark. Little Pirate Oil 3 

Ellsworth County — 
1-16-10, W.. Dunravc. Carter Oil 1.... 
Woodson County — 
35-26-13. Ireland, Gaston & Daniels i.. 
22-25-15, Harder, Orona Oil & Gaas 3. 

Elk County — 
12-30-12, Lewis, Peerless Oil i 

Marion County — 
31-21-4, Townsend. Crawford et al i.... 

Greenwood County — 
2-26-10, .Armstrong, Parker et al i.... 

Webaunsee County — 
12-10-10, Miller. Crawford & Jennings i 

Greenwood County — 
11-24-11. Piet, Henekemper et al I 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 



Dry 



Help to conserve our manpower by gupporting the Red Cross. 



OKLAHOMA. 

 0«*r* AMD MOVTNH^M MMKH COUHTtl 

*. I'>..«* M..h»U •' A 1. • 

' U.-w—^. >•! ViialhiarMttn Oil 4 
 '^^.•11 « «hiB \allri Uminx i<t 
- M»lia lulm»«l IVl i 

fill. iMHUl Oil I 



VI. lU- I itl 



OKHVtOBI (OUM.V 



'■• ^;:';; ■"';•,'}•. ■; 



0*A0> (OUNTT 



><a* A okU > 

' -iai<4..ti • '.1 I 



 i T«' III 0,1 






II l« Wt'.tf t< l'*(tr> 



vLiA t ci n:< 



Stuul buk of lb* KmI CnM 



i86 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



29-18-15, McHenry, F. D. Misener 4 

r4-f8-i6. Cunningham, Gladys Belle Oil i... 
Catoosa — 

10-20-14, Slater, Tulsa Fuel 

Muskogee — 

36-15-18, McKellapp, F. E. Coss i 

Haskell and Stone Bluff — 
16-15-16, Mcintosh. Mid-Continent Dev. 3... 

16-15-16, Mcintosh, Peterson et al 3 

17-15-16, Banks. Davis et al 5 

1-16-15, Rothammer. Cosden Oil & Gas i.. 

30-16-15, Lowery, Kistler et al 

28-15-16, Harrison, Cunningham & Beam i 

29-16-15, Kilby, Presto Oil & Gas 2 

20-15-16. Woodall, Curd & White 2 

17-15-16, Banks, Peterson et al 5 

16-15-16, Mcintosh, Mid-Co. Dev. 4 

21-16-15, Asbury, Melba Oil 1 

28-i6-'i5, Roe, Anco Oil 

35-5-I5, Manuel. Brown et al 4 

Boynton and Cole Pool — 

8-14-16, Brown, New York Oil 5 

18-14-15, Patterson. Patterson O. & G. 5.. 

35-i5-i5» Manuel, Cosden & Acme Oil 3 

I5"U-I5. McGilbra, Terriokla Oil i 

22-13-15. Grayson, Tri-State Oil i 

8-14-16, Brown, Henry Oil 5 

^5-^-15. Sandy, Fifty-Five Oil 2 

I5-I3'J5. McGilbra, Owensby et al i 

3-14-15, McGilbra, Minnetoka Oil 4 

6-14-15, Rentie, Cosden Oil & Gas i 

Muskogee — 

18-14-18, Hayes, Pittman et al 3 

10-14-18, Barnett, Bradstreet et al i 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

28 

6 

35.000,000 



Kellyville— 
j2-f6-io, Miller, Atlantic Pet. 



Dry 



CREEK COUNTY. 

Gushing District — 

4-18-8, Monday, Cushing Development i . . 

14-18-7, Corbray, P. O. & G. 3 

20-18-7, Wacoche, Sinclair Oil & Gas 6.... 

9-18-7, F*reeman, Producers Oil & Gas 14 
10-18-7, Nettie, Texas Co. 5 

3-r6-7, Hemmitt, P. O. & G. 5 

1-17-7, Fixico, Monitor Oil & Gas 3 

30-17-7, Benson, Cushing Development 2. 

11-18-7, Smith, Iron Mountain Oil 5 

14-18-7, Selvina, Magnolia Petroleum 6 

21-17-7, Watson, P. O. & G. 2>7 

Mannford — 

15-18-10. Stanley, Marshall et al 2 

22-18-10, Biggy. Sapulpa Refg. 2 

35-18-ro. Jackson, Kelley et al 6 

Tuskegee — 

15-15-10, Clinton, Hawthorne Oil 8 

-23-15-10, Barnett, Sperry Oil & Gas i 

3-15- 9. Simmons, Iron Mountain Oil i.... 
Glenn Pool — 

27-18-11, Bruner, Mrs. Northrup 5 

34-18-11, Spocogee, H. U. Bartlett 1 

0-18-12. Fulton, Mt. Vernon Oil 9 

18-17-12, Bosen. Okla State Oil 33 

33-18-12. Brown, P. O. & G. 7 

6-17-12. Childers. P. O. & G. ri 

7-17-12. Pittman, Texas Co. 1 

6-17-12, Gypsy Oil 

3-18-1 1, Tahledge , Laurel Oil & Gas 2... 
27-18-11, Bruner, Ingalls et al 5 

6-18-12, James. Graves et al 9 

25-17-11. Green, Federated Oil & Gas 1... 

^i-^7-^^' H. George. Cinco Oil 17 

27-18-11, Ingalls. Mathews ct al 2 

35-18-12, Watson, rihcs Oil 1 

33-17-11, Robinson. Graham et al 2 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Drv 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



10 
43,000.000 

14 



PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Cleveland District — 

2-21-9, Charles Page i 

8-20-8, Liscomb, Selby Oil & Gas 4. . . 
1-20-7, Mullendore, Selby Oil & Gas 2 



Dry 
Dry 
Drv 



Dry 



PAYNE COUNTY. 
Yale Pool— 

35-19-5. Lee. Roma Oil 2 

25-19-5, Lee, Roma Oil 1 

5-18-5, Taylor. Okla. Xat. Gas i 

26-18-5, McCorkell, C. B. Shaffer 2... 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



I 

2O.O2O,CC0 



GARFIELD AND NOBLE COUNTIES. 

Garber — 
15-22-4, Searcy, Algiers Oil i 



Drv 



KAY COUNTY. 

Blackwell District — 

4-28-1, Booten, Carter Oil i 

29-29-1, Presbury, Empire G. & F. 2... 
31-29-1, Pratt, Empire G. & F. 4 

6-28-1, Wolfe, Blackwell O. & G. 10... 

1-28-1W, Hampton, Mid-Co. Pet. i 

1 3-26-2 W, Wainscoat. Kay & Kiowa 1 . . 

31-29-1, Shurtz, Empire G. & F. i 

35-28-1 W, Mclntyre, Xorthcliffe Devel. 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Drv 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



CARTER COUNTY. 

Healdton District — 

6-3-2, Kirk & Patsy Oil 2 

26-5-2, Sullivan, Burford et al 1 

33*3-3. Sarasota, Harris & Strawn 15.. 
31-2-2, Bennett, Kvan Bates 2 



4 

4 

4o.OCO.000 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



WILDCATS. 

Pontotoc County — 
34-15-7, G. Fagan. Oil State Pet. 1 

Mcintosh County — 
1-10X-16E, Carr, R. H. Searcy i 

Garfield County — 
20-24X-7VV, Hartman, McCready and others i 

Woods County — 
2-28N-17W, Adamson. Northwestern Oil i... 

Garfield County — 
31-24X-3W, Botts, Enid Co-op. Oil 1 

.\lfalfa C'ounty — 
31-24N-3W, George, Mendes et al 1 

Roger Mills County — 
17-27N-21W, Bu. Co. Oil 1 

Payne County — 
27-19-4, Miller, P'ortuna Oil 1 

Kay County — 
11-27-iVV, Bucholtz. Duluth-Okla Oil 2 

Le Flore County — 

23-7X-26E, Durant. American Indian Oil 1 

27-7N-26E. Hill. American Indian Oil 1 

Garvin County — 
10-4N-3K. Strickland, Barnsdall Oil i 



2,000.000 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas- 

Drr 

Ga^ 
Ga=5 

Dr:^* 



You are fighting the enemy if you are giving to the Red Cross. 



May 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



187 



Atoka County — 
26-1 N-14E, Miller, Bison Oil i Dry 

Pushmataha County — 
81S-14E, Crawford, Indiana-Okla Oil 2 Dry 

Stephens County — 
11-2N-SW, Smith et al i Gas 

Wagoner County — 

3 1 -12-16, Scott, Barbara Oil i Dry 

17-17-17, Joe Childers, Rainey et al i Dry 

Muskogee County — 
30-14-19, Morris, Bud Ledbetter et al i Dry 

Jefferson County — 
3-7S-6W, Trout. I. & N. I Dry 

Carter County — 
26-5-2, Burford & Brim O. & G. i Dry 

Dry 16 

Gas 4 

Gas 77,000,000 

ARKANSAS. 

Drew County — 
13-13-5. Jamison, Sulphur Rock Dev. i Dry 



KANSAS. 

SUMMARY OP WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. Prod. 



Butler 107 

Chautauqua-Elk 53 

Montgomery 40 

Wilson 17 

Neosho ^7 

Allen 21 

Miami-Franklin-Douglas ... 60 

Wildcats 16 



59.110 

1.235 

334 
167 

562 

326 

534 
480 



Total 352 62,748 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS 

Comp, 

Osage 115 

Washington 57 

Nowata-Rogers 77 

Tulsa 65 

Creek 57 

Okmulgee 143 

Muskogee-Wagoner-Rogers 74 

Payne 13 

Kay 26 

Garfield-Noble 12 

Carter 21 

Wildcats 32 



COMPLETED. 

Prod. 
4.868 

668 

807 

1.707 
1.512 

12,836 
4.795 

Q50 
3.905 

3,560 

605 

450 



Total 709 37,168 



MID-CONTINENT. 

SUMMARY OP WELLS COMPLETED 

Comp. Prod. 

Kansas 352 62,748 

.Oklahoma 709 37,168 

Arkansas 4 o 



Total 1,065 99.916 



WYOMING. 



18-48-90, Tensleep, Ohio Oil i 

6-33-79, Placer claim. General Pet. 

19-40-79. Placer claim 

61-40-79, Placer claim, i and 2 

24-40-80. Placer claim 

25-40-80, Placer claim 



Dry. 
12 

9 

14 
I 

8 

3 

19 

9 

75 



Dry. 

10 

6 

8 

21 

19 

28 
I 

4 
I 

3 

16 

153 



-^33 



Gas 
3 
3 

5 

3 
I 

o 

3 
o 

18 



Gas 

7 
3 
o 
6 

M 
8 

6 

3 
4 
o 
2 

4 

57 



Dry. 


Gas 


75 


18 


153 


57 


4 






75 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



25-40-80, Placer claim, Bessemer Oil i Dry 

23-33-76, State land, William Cheley i Dry 

16-41-81, Western Expl. Co. Shiloh Oil i Dry 

Dry 9 

Gas I 

Gas production 10,000,000 

COLORADO. 

Akron, Akron Oil Dry 

Aurora. Mid- West Colorado Dry 

Padroni, Sterling Oil Dry 

Dry ae 3 



WYOMING-COLORADO. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

Comp. Prod. 

Wyoming 17 1,100 

Colorado , 3 o 

Total 20 1,100 



Dry. 
9 
3 

12 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



ELECTRA. 



Ziest, D. A. Smith et al i 
McAllister et al 1 



Dry 

SUNSHINE HILL. 

McClure, Brewer et al 3 

McClure, Briner et al 3 



Dry 



BURK BURNETT. 
Buerbaum, Magnolia Petroleum 2.... 
Morris, Johnson et al i 



Dry 



BURKBURNETT. 

Hardin. Mann et al 34 , 

Rexford, Bishop et al i , 

Williard, Williard Oil i 



Dry 



CULBERTSON. 

Burnett, Gulf Production 6 

Wilson, Gulf Production i 

Wilson, Gulf Protection 3 

Jennings, Gulf Production i 



Dry 



BROWNWOOD. 



K-O-Tex Oil i 
K^-O-Tex Oil 2 



Dry 



WILDCATS. 



Wichita County — 
Near Burkburnett. Atkins Oil 2, 

Shakleford County — 
Snyder, Empire Gas & Fuel i . 

Palo Pinto County — 
Stuart, exas & Pacific Coal 4.. 

Foard County — 
Havlatty. Texas Co. i 

Brown County — 
Waller, Magee et al i 

Stephens County — 
Ragney. Texas & Pacific Coal 



Gas • 
I 
o 



I 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



Put another weapon in his hand by subscribing to the Red Cro8&« 



igo 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



May 



Sudderath, Texas & Pacific Coal i 

Raney, Texas & Pacific Coal r 

. inney, Texas & Pacific Coal 6 

I inney, Texas & Pacific Coal 7 ;.. 

Dry 

Gas 

NORTH LOUISIANA. 

Caddo — 

28-21-15. Heilperin, The Texas Co. 2 

27-21-15. Solly, Rowe Oil 2 

25-21-15. Noel, Old Farmers Oil i 

Red River — 
27-13-11. La-Delta Pecan Texola Oil i 

Miscellaneous — 

..-17-23. Williams. Ark. Natural Gas 63 

25-17-14. Cronk & Herbert, Atlas Oil i 

2-1 r-i6, Bland, The Texas Co. i 

18-15-12. Huron Land. The Texas Co. 2 

3-21- I, Pearson, Lock & Brown i 

22-12- 8, Wren, Vogeler Oil 2 

1 2- ro- 6. West, Ahrens et al i 

30- 6-12, Long Leaf Lumber Co., Pomeroy & Ham- 
ilton I 

Bowie County. Texas — 
Morse, Sulphur River Oil i 

Dry 

Gas wells 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



SUMMARY OP MARCH OPERATIONS. 



Comp. 

Caddo 24 

De Soto 4 

Red River 3 

Bossier o 

Miscellaneous 

Total 40 



T4.8r5 



TO 



GULF COAST. 



GOOSE CREEK. 

Rosenthal. Gulf Production 2 

Schilling, Simme-Sinclair 20 

Gas 

Dry 

JENNINGS. 

Chicago-Jennings. Gulf Refg. 5 (old). 

MARKHAM. 

Myers, Clem Oil 13 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Harris County — 
Seahrook. Taylor Oil & Gas 2 

SOUTH LOUISIANA. 

Calcasieu Parish — 
Fee. Standard Sulphur Co. i 

.\llen Parish — 
Lyles, Barnes Creek Oil 5 

Dry 



GULF COAST. 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



5 



''-as 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 

Gas 
Dry 
Dr.- 
Pry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Pry 



9 

4 



Prod. 


Dry. 


Gas 


4.500 


I 


2 


250 








6^ 





I 

















I 



Dry 
Gas 



1 
I 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 





SUMMARY OP OPERATIONS. 








Comp 


Prod 


Prv. 


'\nse T a Bute 











Batsoii 


4 


^3? 






Damon Mound 13 

Edgerly i 

Goose Creek ^2 

Humble 29 

Jennings 2 

Markham 3 

Spindletop 8 

Saratoga 4 

Sour Lake 13 

Vinton 6 

New Iberia i 

Piedras Pintas 3 

Miscellaneous 15 

Total 1 34 



435 


8 


1-25 





35.215 


7 


5.990 


9 


150 


I 





3 


5^0 


I 


3,035 


I 


615 


» 

5 


2,100 


I 


75 





10 


I 





»5 


48.445 


5-' 



TEXAS-LOUISIANA. 



SUMMARY OP OPERATIONS. 

Comp. Prod. 

North Texas 148 8.775 

North Louisiana 40 14,815 

Gulf Coast 134 48,445 

Total 322 72,02s 



Drv. 


Ga.s 


18 


3 


50 


4 


52 


J 



120 



10 



CANADA'S TAXATION 



E ROB ABLY all of our readers, or most of them, 
have seen the announcement in the daily 
press, that Canada is to pay bigger taxes 
to pay war expense. Let us hope that vol- 
untary giving of money to the government of the 
L'nited States may prevent intensive taxation over- 
here. 

When taxes are assessed and collected, there is of 
course no rate of interest payable to compensate the 
one taxed. Nor is there any guarantee of a repay- 
ment of these funds, whereas with the Liberty 
Loans, like the three that have thus far been har- 
vested, the ''tax" idea is eliminated, the government 
promising to refund in full, all moneys advanced by 
its peoples with interest. 

When the next Liberty Loan comes along, individuals 
(the masses) should remember that a tremendous pro- 
portion of the regular and even special taxes levied 
every year by the government fall upon big manufact- 
urinp- corporations and men of vast incomes and 
wealth ; therefore, the repaying of Liberty Loans by the 
government will not fall as a heavy burden upon the 
individual smaller bond holder. He will be repaid by 
the government out of funds acquired by the govern- 
ment throui^h taxes on incomes, returns from exports 
and through many channels. The repayment to him 
with interest, as we have said, will not be accomplished 
by heavy taxes levied upon him personally. 

How much better to loan our money to the govern- 
ment at interest, than to have the experience of tre- 
mendously heavy taxes, non-repayable by the govern- 
ment and non-interest bearing. 

Watch out for the next Libertv Loan, when it i> 
asked, and take advanta^re of I'ncle Sam's liberal 
policy of borrowing returnable money at good interest 
to the loaner. 



Make sure that our wounded are cared for by giving to the Red Cross. 



AROUND THE BELT 



N«w Welk New Pipe Linet. New Cootreclt. Addidoiu and Exteottoiu. A Fund of ValoaUe News GedMrad 

for the JounuJ Tkrough Many Sowon. 



TRADE PERSONALS 



It will be noted that the names appearing under the personal headings 
are exclusively those of men interested in the development of the natural 
gas field. Those wishing to learn of matters pertaining to men interested 
in the field of artificial gas should refer to THE GAS INDUSTRY maga- 
zine, published at 60 Pearl Street, Buffalo, N. Y., which devotes its col- 
umns entirely to artificial gas matters. That magazine is published by 
the publishers of THE NATURAL GAS JOURNAL, each magazine being 
specificially issued for its respective field. In this way each magazine 
renders 100% efficiency in the industry it covers. — Publisher's Note. 

Bonner, James A., hvis retired after serving thirty 
years as Superintendent of drilling operations for the 
the Phillips Gas & Oil Company, Butler, Pa. 

Morrison, R. E., representing the Empire Gas & 
Fuel Company at Kansas City, Mo., has been elected 
Chairman of the Information Committee of the Inter- 
national Convention of Rotary Clubs which will take 
place in that city next month. 

OwE'^s. J. E., Vice-President and General Manager 
of the Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company. Oklahoma 
City, Okla., was chosen President of the Oklahoma 
Gas, Electric & Street Railway Association at its an- 
nual meeting recently held. 

Sullivan. L. A., Superintendent of the Muskogee 
Gas & Electric Company, Muskogee, Okla., presented 
an excellent paper on "Gas Fired Boilers" before the 
convention of the Oklahoma Gas, Electric & Street 
Railway Association. 

Williams, George, has been elected Director of the 
Cities Service Company. Mr. Williams succeeds Mr. 
John C. Mitchell of Denver, who recently resigned on 
account of pressure of other matters. 



ELECTED 



OHIO— Cincinnati 

At the annual meeting of the Union Gas & Electric 
Company, the following directors were re-elected : 
Chas. Boldt, W. Y. Cartwright, George W. Crawford, 
W. W. Freeman, P. G. Gossler, Lewis J. Hauck, 
August Herrmann, J. M. Hutton, A. B. Leach. Law- 
rence Maxwell, Polk Laffoon. T. F. Wickham. and 
Chas. P. Taft, Robert A. Taft and Samuel Assur re- 
tired from the board and R. C. Altizer of Charlestown, 
W. Va., was elected to fill one of the vacancies. 

TEXAS— Fort Worth 

At the recent annual meeting of the Lone Star Gas 
Company, the following officers were elected : Presi- 
dent, L. B. Denning, 8 East Long St., Columbus. O. : 
First Vice-President, and General Manager, F. ^L 



Lege, Jr., Fort Worth, Texas; Second Vice-President, 
M. W. Bahan, Fort Worth, Texas; Secretary and 
Treasurer, D. L. Cobb, Fort Worth, Texas; Assistant 
Secretary and Treasurer, H. A. Jackson, Fort Worth, 
Texas ; Assistant Secretary and Treasurer, R. W. Ster- 
ritt. Fort Worth, Texas ; Manager Natural Gas De- 
partment. F. L. Chase, Fort Worth, Texas; Manager 
Oil Department, W. P. Gage, Fort Worth, Texas. 



PER CUBIC FOOT-RATES 



C ALIFO RNI A— Glendale. 

The Southern California Gas Company in offering 
to establish natural gas service in this city, has pre- 
pared the following tentative rate schedule : First 
5,000 cu. ft., per 1,000, 80 cents; next 5,000, 75 cents; 
next 15,000, 65 cents ; next 25,000, 55 cents ; next 50,000 
45 cents; all over 100,000 cu. ft. a month, per 1,000 cu. 
ft., .40 cents. 

OHIO— Delphos 

The Delphos Gas Company has adopted a readiness- 
to-serve charge of 50 cents per month which will re- 
main in force until eighteen months after the tennina- 
tion of the war. 

PENNSYIVANIA— Beaver Falls 

The Manufacturers Light & Heat Company has 
filed a new schedule of rates with the Public Service 
Commission at Harrisburg, in which it is asking for an 
increase of rates amounting to 5 cents per 1,000 cubic 
feet. The present rate is 32 cents per thousand. 

Harrisburg 

The American Natural Gas Company and the Gilpin 
Natural Gas Company, operating in Allegheny, Arm- 
strong, Butler, Indiana and Westmoreland Counties, 
have filed notice of increase of rates, effective May 19, 
with the Public Service Commission. 

The new tariff provides for an advance from 25 to 
28 cents a thousand cubic feet for all gas used in ex- 
cess of 500,000 feet a month by manufacturers and 
other large users. 

Kane 

The Kane Gas Light & Heating Company, operating 
in the Borough of Kane, has filed with the Public Ser- 
vice Commission a new tariff of rates for the sale of 
natural gas, effective May 31, 1918, increasing the rate 
for gas to manufacturers and to public service corpor- 
ations, from 22 cents per thousand cubic feet, less 2 
cents per thousand cubic feet for prompt payment, to 
2y cents per thousand cubic feet. 

The new tariff further provides that the company 
reserves the right to curtail or temporarily discontinue 
the supply of gas to manufacturing establishments. 



Your sons and brothers are soldiers. Help the Red Cross to help them. Subscribe. 



194 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



May 



when necessary to provide sufficient gas for domestic 
consumption or for public utilities. 

New Castle 

An application for an increase in rates for gas sup- 
plied in this city, has been filed with the Public Ser- 
vice Commission at Harrisburg, by the Manufacturers' 
Light & Heat Company. The increase asked is 5 cents 
per thousand cubic feet. The rate now prevailing is 32 
cents, the new rate asked is 37 cents. The rate will be- 
come effective on June i, according to the petition of 
the company. 



ITEMS OF FINANCE 



KANSAS— Topeka 

A recent report of the Prairie Oil & Gas Company 
and the Prairie Pipe Line Company shows resources 
of over $152,000,000. The Prairie Pipe Line Company 
shows assets exceeding $50,000,000, and the Prairie 
Oil & Gas Company $102,000,000. 

KENTUCKY— LouisviUe 

The Louisville Gas & Electric Company reports for 
March gross earnings of $269,287, an increase over 
March, 1917, of $27,095; net earnings $140,952, an in- 
crease of $10,033. For the twelve months ended on 
March 31st. gross earnings were $2,915,135, an increase 
over the preceding twelve months *of $351,324; net 
earnings $1,566,642, an increase of $149,871. Electric 
energy output for the week ended on April 13th was 
29.5 per cent, greater than for the corresponding 
week of 1917. 

NEW YORK— New York City 

The Wayland Oil & Gas Company declared the reg- 
ular semi-annual dividend of 3 per cent, on preferred 
stock, payable May 11 to stockholders of record May 
I. A dividend of 2 per cent, was also declared on the 
common, payable June 11 to stockholders of record 
June I. 

A recent report of the National Fuel Gas Company 
shows that in 191 7 the company had gross earnings 
of $8,604,622, compared with $7,278,690 in 1916. Net 
earnings were $4,446,494, against $7,928,240 the pre- 
ceding year. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Pittsburgrh 

The Pittsburgh Oil & Gas Company has declared 
the regular quarterly dividend of 2 per cent, payable 
May 15 to stock of record April 30. 



INCORPORATED 



DELAWARE— Dover 

The following companies were recently chartered 
under the laws of this State : Fentress Oil & Gas Com- 
pany, to drill and operate oil and gas wells, capital 



$200,000. Incorporators : A. A. Alles, A. M. Harrison. 
Q. L. Clovis, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A. L. McCrea Oil & Gas Company, to own and op- 
erate oil and gas wells, capital $250,000. Incorporators: 
A. L. McCrea, Edwin C. Maloney, John J. Boyer. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

OHIO^Mingo Jiinctioii 

Andrew S. Barnes, George W. Meager, Walter Ong. 
Casper Dallas and John J. Azallion are the incorpora- 
tors of the Piney Fork Consolidated Oil & Gas Com- 
pany. 

OKLAHOMA— Enid 

A new concern in this city is the Anlo Oil & Gas 
Company. The company was formed with a capital 
of $100,000. The incorporators are Charles N. Har- 
mon, C. C. Fritz and Ruby Craig. 

The Sharpless Oil & Gas Company has been incor- 
porated with a capital stock of $30,000 by R. J. Qark. 
F. C. Clark, and E. J. Masemore, all of Enid. 

TuIm 

The Red Man Oil & Gas Company has been formed 
here with a capital stock of $250,000. The incorpora- 
tors are F. R. McCarthy. C. E. McCarthy and J. T. 
Nixon of Tulsa. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Warren 

The Will Creek Oil & Gas Company has been in- 
corporated under the State laws of West Virginia. 
Capital $30,000. Incorporators: S. E. Pryor, W. J. 
Eagan, A. Krupp, George A. Krupp, George B. Bren- 
nison of Warren and C. L. Conn of Meadville, Pa. 



GENERAL 



ALABAMA— HuntovUle 

T. W. Pratt, E. C. Dillon, and Lawrence Cooper re- 
cently took over the properties of the Huntsville Con- 
solidated Gas & Oil Company. It is reported that the 
new owners will shortly begin operating the company. 

Glendale 

This city is considering taking over the Southern 
California Gas Company's local plant and operating it 
on municipal account. 

Taft 

Properties in Section 32-12-23 controlled by the Gov- 
ernment are to be made to yield further revenue 
through the establishment of a gasoline recovery plant 
on the Spreckles property. The Richfield Oil Com' 
pany will furnish the gas. 

With the installation of this compressor plant on 
Section 32, the production of the Richfield Company 
will be nearly doubled. 

All receipts from the Richfield company by Receiver 
Payne are to go into escrow, along with the millions 
now at hand, received from oil sales, this income to be 
distributed to the various companies when the long 
drawn out suits with the Government are decided. 



Protect them by giving to the Bed Cross. 



tKDUNA*WiiKh««itff 

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* « la* * I'fliji iti\ .»* thi» I It % 

KAMftAf-KtfiMtCity 

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I9I8 



MAhRiFACrURERS" SECTION 



May 



Lancaster 

In Berne Township, Fairfield Township, the City 
Natural Gas Company drilled a fair ^a,s well in a test 
on the Michael Killhari^er farm. 

It is reported that the Ohio Fuel Supply Company, 
the Logman Natural Gas Company and the Hope Nat- 
ural Gas Company, all of whom operate bi^ plants in 
the Sugar Grove field, were all over one hundred per 
cent, firms in the recent war chest drive. Everv man 
employed by these companies subscribed to the fund. 

Licking County 

The Heisey Gas Company has a light gas well in 
No. 2 on the John Gourley farm. The Wehrle Stove 
Company has 500,000-cubic feet of gas in its No. 2 on 
the A. A. Haines farm. 

Perry County 

In Thorn Township, the Columbus Natural Gas 
Company drilled a dry hole in No. 2 on the M. Shaner 
farm, Section 3, making the second dry hole for this 
farm. 

The Heisey Gas Company completed an exceptional 
gas well on the J. Burkett farm, of 75 acres. Section 8. 

The Ohio Fuel Supply Company drilled a fair gas 
well on the Charles Boring farm. Section 3, and a light 
gas well in a test on the Anna Rarick farm, Section 6. 

Vinton County 

In Richland Township, the Ohio Fuel Supply Com- 
pany drilled a fair gas well in a test on the H. M. 
Whitecraft farm. Section 33, and a good gasser on the 
John Cassill farm. Section 25. 

OKLAHOMA— Bixby 

Davis, Younger and others' No. 2 on the Beggs farm, 
in the northeast of the southwest quarter of Section 
14-17-13. is a io,ooo.ooo-foot gas well with a 500-pound 
rock pressure. The gas comes from sand at 1.5 18 feet. 
The Humble Oil Company's No. 4 Mingo, in the south- 
west of the northeast quarter of Section 27-17-13. is 
good for 3,000.000 feet of gas from sand at T.485 feet. 

Bristow 

The natural gas pipe line now operated by the Bris- 
tow Gas Company is to be replaced with pipes of a 
larger size. 



Dnimright 

1 he Drumright division of the Oklahoma Gas & 
Electric Company has sent three more employes into 
Government ser\*ice. They are I. J. Lyons, Private. 
363d Infantry : Hal W'hittenburg. Camp Funston. Kan- 
sas: and S. H. Kurrv. L'. S. Navv. 

Martin Sands, general bookkeeper of the El Reno 
division of the Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company, 
has entered the Navv. 

Grove 

On the Witty farm a 3. 000.000- foot gasser has been 
completed at a depth of 22J feet. 

The Le Flore County Ga> & Electric Company has a 
3,000.000-foot gasser on the Closter farm, near Poteau. 

Le Flore County 

The American Indian Oil & Gas Company is re- 
ported to have completed a 25.000,000 cubic foot gasser 
in Section 2S-J-26 in the Poteau field. 

Okmulgee County 

The Okmulgee Producing & Refining Company has 
a 35.000,000 gasser in Section 8-13-12 on the Harjo 
farm, at a depth of 2.105 feet. \V. B. Pine is associated 
with the Okmulgee Company in this project. 

\\'. B. Alexander completed a 15.000.000-foot gasser 
on the Wigton farm at a depth of 2,154 feet. 



George A. ^ui*!*^!! 

CONSULTING CHEMICAL ENGINEER 



f 



Careful tests of natural gas to 
determine gasoline content Gas- 
oline plants operated at highest 
efficiency. Compression and ab- 
sorption process. Natural gas, 
gasoline, petroleum. 



Bencdum-Trees BIdg., 



Piusburgh, Pa. 



PATENTS 



GREEN & McCALLISTER 

OLIVER BUILDING 
PFTTSBURGH 

ATTORNEYS 



Specialty : Cases Relating to Oil 
and Gas. 



JOHNSON & HUNTLEY 

GEOLOGISTS, APPRAISERS 
OIL AND GAS 



ROSffELLH.JOH»OI L.G.HUITLET 



386 STATE UU 

UllfERSITT OF 

PITTSIUII6I 



PinSBURGH 
PA. 



Standard 03 Sobsidiaries 

BMsk SaH ad QMid 

Natnral Gas!!^ (M Secnrides 



JO. P. GAPPEAU SONS 

225 Fourth Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

415 Central Bank Building 
Tulsa, Okla. 



FROM THE PEN OF THE EDITOR 



STIMULATING PRODUCTION 




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NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



June 



tions, and it is anticipated that the pleasures of this WELDING TORCHES. 

meetin},' will be enjoyed by an attendance fully as 

large as has been had at the conventions of Charleston ^^^ 

and Parkersburg. l^w^IHE welding torch seems a very simple affair, and 

Huntington. W. Va.. where this year's convention III yet men and concerns have put almost an infin- 
is to be held, enjoys the record of being one of the LiJ '*^ amount of time, thought, and labor upon the 
best convention towns in the state, it having ample developing of a torch that will be in every re- 
facilities, spect exactly right. 

Secretary Robinson was in attendance at the con- There are cutting torches especially designed for that 

vention of the Natural Gas Association of .'\merica, particular work. Then there are combination cutting 

recently held in Pittsburgh. Me took occasion at that and welding torches, and there are torches designed only 

time to focus upon certain things that may be looked as welding torches. 

forward to as matters of interest in connection with It is exceedingly well to have the proposed line of 

the convention at Huntington. work known to the torch manufacturer so that he may 

The thing to do is to come out in full force July 24th assist in suggesting what particular torch is best adapted 

and 25th. and make the 1918 patriotic convention some- lo the proposed work. 

thing long to be remembered as attractive, interesting, and Torch manufacturers, if they are turning out the right 

thoroughly worth while. sort of product, well undersUnd the needs of wdders in 

various specific lines of trade. Therefore, it would be 

 well in every instance for the prospective buyer of a 

torch, or of torches, to see to it that he becomes thor- 

FUEL ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCEMENT. oughly well advised on the capacity, minute details, and 

quality of torches offered, bef 

There are torches and tore! 

 •njl ETWEF.N May 20th and July 19th the prices instead, consider well before 

I 111 ^^^ petroleum products to purchasing upon which form of torch, w 

I J^l agencies of allied governments with the au- and welding, or torch with ot 

thority of the W.ar Industries Board have for the work in hand. 

been arranged by the nil divisoin of the United States Every torch manufacturei 

Fuel .Administration as follows: business, and the advice of su 

F. O. B. Gulf Ports. ^'^^ '" °^^" *^** ^^^ P''°^P 

Per Gallon equipped with information be 

FUEL OIL Brilish .\dmirally purchase. 

Sp"''!!f t'^"*- '50 There are several concerns 

.■\be t ash s.soc 0E754 bs. , . ^ , 

'' ''^ are supplying oxy-acetylenc 

FUEL OIL U- S. Navy Specifi- prospective buyer should g 

. »v,.,,r,r.,.„,,^- """"' 5.25cof?mbs. ggurces, and then arrive at a 

STANDARD WHITE u , w. 

REFINED KEROSENE r35 Fire Test. Min- **"'*^" ^^ ™y- 

imutn gravity 44 Some combination cutting 

S""'"^ 7-^oc of f>'/t lbs. excellently be used on various 

G-^SOLINE V. S. Navy Spccili- a torch that is made exclusi' 

•^^■^ons 2[.oocof6 lbs. lively for welding should pre 

AVIATION NAPHTHA Hrilish .Specifics- tain Other conditions exist. / 

lions, xoyv. final - ^ 5tick, and a well-inform. 

.boiling point io.coc of S»ic lbs. * - l. 

gas-tight mam. 

F. O. B. Norfolk, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. 

FUEL OIL U. .S. Navy Speeifi- 

lions 7.50c of 7i<i lbs. 

STANDARDWHITF A UNIQUE SALES LETTER. 

REFINED KEROSENE 135 Fire Test. Min- 

imum gravity 44 

B^utif 8.25c of 6!4'lba. The American Meter Company, of New York, Mr. 

GASOLINE V. S. Navy Speeifi- \V. K. Harrington. Manager, recently sent out a verj 

'■'tions 23.50cof6 lbs effective letter to the gas fraternity. The letter as 

AVIATION NAPHTHA British Specifica- framed was an announcement ot the fact that they are 

lions, 302' F. final manufacturers of Gas .Apparatus, Calorimetrv and 

boiling point 3^.ooeof5«lbs. Photometry Equipment. Meter Provers. The" letter 

MEXICAN REDUCED was not an appeal; it took the form of a notification 

■^^^ bu'l'ker puTpl^ses '!" 6.00c of 7% lbs. "^'"^ ^ stTong suggestive element in view between the 

.Approved. M. L. REQUA. lines. Such notifications to the trade are far more 

Director, effective than communications of the ordinary type. 

Have you ENUSTBD in the Army of Saven? Buy War Savings Stamps. 



NATURAL CAS AND CA.SOUNE 



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2CX) 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Jane 



Frank L. Chase Manager Gas Dcpt., I^ne Star Gas 
Company, Fort Worth, Texas. 

H. V. Couch, Purchasing Agent, United Natural Gas 
Company. Oil City, Pa. 

Wm. G. Cummings, Proprietor, Wm. G. Cummings, Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. 

Charles DeW'eese, Asst. Supt. Gas Distribution & Const., 
I-ouisville Gas & Electric Company, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 

W. T. Doebele, Agent, Ohio Fuel Supply Co., Miamisburg, 
Ohio. 

D. M. Donehue. Producer, Titusville, Pa. 

George M. Evans, Contractor, P. N. G. & Phila. Co., 
New Kensington, Pa. 

Todd Evans. Treasurer and Manager, Barnsdall Printing 
Co.. Bradford, Pa. 

H. A. Fisher, Proprietor, H. A. Fisher Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

James P. Fisher, Chief Technologist, Wichita Natural 
Gas Company, Bartlesville, Okla. 

A. J. Fitzgibbon, Salesman, A. M. Byers Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

F. D. Freeland Well Ganger, Peoplles Natural Gas Com- 
pany, Brave, Greene County. Pa. 

S. M. Gill. Assistant Credit Clerk, The East Ohio Gas 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

R. L. Heaton. Asst. Chief Geologist, Medina Gas & Fuel 
Company, Wooster. Ohio. 

James Henderson. District Foreman, Peoples Natural 
Gas Company. Imperial. Pa. 

Jesse Whalen Hines. Chief Dispatcher (Gas), Empire 
Gas & Pipe Line Company, Bartlesville. Okla. 

William Home. General Manager & Treasurer, Pure Oil 
& Gas Company, Marietta, Ohio. 

H. R. Hyatt. Chief Engineer, Logan Natural Gas & 
Fuel Company, Pavonia, Ohio. 

William T. Kent, Director, Tiona Gasoline Company, 
Brave, Pa. 

Clark Knox, Salesman, Estate Stove Company. Crafton, 

Pa. 

F. D. Krum, Agent, Pennsylvania Gas Company, Erie, 

Pa. 

W. H. Lane. Civil Engineer. Logan Natural Gas & Fuel 
Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

Harry M. Leathers, Gas Meter Engineer, Cutler-Hammer 
Manufacturing Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Fred M. Lege, Jr., ist Vice President & General Man- 
ager, Lone Star Gas Company, Fort W'orth, Texas. 

G. W. McCullough. Land Agent, Mfg. Light & Heat 
Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Donald W. Mackie, Manager, Bradford Supply Company. 

West Warren, Pa. 

W. K. Mason, Division Superintendent, Carnegie Gas 
Company. Moundsville, W. Va. 

R. A. Mckinney. General Agent. The Manhattan Manu- 
facturing Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John A. Miller, Chief Engineer, The Preston Oil Com- 
pany, Pavonia, Ohio. 

P. J. Morrissey, General Manager, Johnstown Fuel Sup- 
ply Company, Johnstown. Pa. 

S. E. Murphy. Mgr., Empire Gasoline Co., Bartlesville, 
Okla. 

A War Saver is a Life Saver. 



Franklin C. Murray, Representative. The B. F. Goodrich 
Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

C. O. Nordensen, Mgr., Huessener Engineering Com- 
pany, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

J. F. Owens, General Manager, Muskogee Gas & Electric 

Company, Muskc^ee, Okla. 
W. A. Pannabecker, Supt., Preston Oil Co., Lancaster, 

Ohio. 
J. E. Parsons, General Auditor, The Ohio Fuel Supply 

Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

D. V. Peden, Secretary to the President, The East Ohio 
Gas Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Jesse Rearidc, Chief Engineer, Logan Natural Gas & Fuel 

Company, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
James D. Robertson. Representative. Pittsburgh Valve, 

Foundry & Construction Company, Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Fred B. Seem, Supt. Tel. & Tel. Empire Gas & Pipe Line 

Company, Bartlesville, Okal. 
Charles Seibert, Agent, Ohio Fuel Supply Company, New 

Lexington, Ohio. 

G. E. Shoup, Purchasing Agent. Medina G. &. F. Co., 
Wooster, Ohio. 

W. H. Snyder. Oil & Gas Producer, W. H. Snyder, 
Beaver, Pa. 

Charles M. Staigers, Lease Agent, L. G. Neely, Win- 
chester. Ky. 

Robert J. Wallacy.'^Upt. Contracts. Empire Companies, 

Bartlesville, Okla. 
Olandus West, Pres. \'esper O. & G. Co., Qarksburg. 

W. Va. 
Wm. H. Whiteley, with Wm. G. Cummings, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-TREASURER 

To the Natural Gas Association of America, 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present the Annual Report of tbe 
Secretary-Treasurer, for the year ending May i. 1918. 

MEMBERSHIP REPORT. 

Honorary Members 
As per Membership Rolls, May 15, 191 7 8 

Active Members 

As per Membership Rolls. May i, 1917 1.168 

Elected May 15, 191 7 262 

1.430 
Released from Membership May 15, 1917... 142 
Died during the year 9 

151 

Total i,27Q 

Total Membership this date 1.287 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand. May i, 191 7 $ 5,084.08 

Dues 4,480.00 

Initiation Fees 1,310.00 

Books of Proceedings, Sold 30.00 

Refund of Whitehead & Hoage Co 30.18 

Total $10,034.26 

Buy War Savings Stamps. 



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NATURAL CAS AND GASOUNE 



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... .'.icii, 1 take great 
... 1..S.I president, Mr, 

■1^ ilu- lUities as Presi- 

i ..iiiiliers uf the Natural 

... I \vi>ulii be ungrateful 

. \v\-^v ;uul to appreciate the 

. ■; hAW cunfcrrt-d upon me. 

. . .iii'lau- that splendid ^^alaxy of 

II nil imiustrv who have gone 

' , .> ilu' lirilliant administration of 

. .1 mtfii'stcd in this Association, 

n*.: I have always felt that an 

. ■. n-prcscntative of a great industry 

. -, vitort. 1 have taken great pleasure 

,,»ih ;Mid its progress. I realize that 

.1 iMU'. with conditions in their present 

.1, ,iiid with such great tasks before us to 

,,.i i\i' pruliably will have problems before 

i-.|iiirc the be.st thought and the best effort 

.1.1 III .ill of Us in their final solution. 

. ii.il (\;iiit to keep vou but for a moment. I 

. '. v\.iiit 1(1 pledge you my best endeavors insofar 

' iHi .ililc to exert them in bringing success to our 

!i. viiiii-iits and to assure you that I will work 

n lul- that enil earnestly, enthusiastically and to the 

.1 1.1 my ability. But success in the final analy.sis 

|u-nils always npon your assistance, your advice. 

.11' liclp. and' 1 crave tlial much both for myself and 

\ li'llinv-ntificers. I thank you. rVpitlause.) 



THE RETIRING SECRETARY. 

.MR. I.. S. Bir,KI.()\V: Mr. President, before pro- 
ceeding with the regular program. I want to say a 
word about what has been done for this Association 
fi>r years ]iast by one of its retiring officers. 

This Association, of which I have been a member 
since its swaddling clothes days, has gone on year 
after year without interruption so far as a part of the 
executive work is concerned. 1 am referring now to 
the type of executive work which i^ consecutive in 
nianv as.sociations as it is in this Association. Presi- 



liiv -ind presidents go. and time and again we 

lie -viini is dead! Long live the Kins'", but 

■.n ; cmies to the work of the Secretary, it is a typf 

vurk that goes steadily on fnmi year to year, and 

.^ 'lec'-'me so accustomed to receiving the services oi 
■in: man occupying that position and saying that he is 

I iood fellow and all that sort of thing, that we f'irf;ct 
very frequently what that man recceives from the Asso- 
ciation does not compen.sate him for the ami'unt of 
time and attention that he gives to his office and his 
duties. I say duties, because when he has assumed 
that office, he has assumed all the duties that go with 
it. and which he must perform whether or not he feels 
he is fully compcn.sated in cash. 

Now. in connection with this .Sssociati'm. having 
been a member for years, I want t'l say to ^f^. Jones 
and of Mr. jonos a word or two. I want to say that 
Mr. Jones has done splendid work for this .Association. 
It has been productive work. The .\ssociation ba 
grown during the period of Mr. Jones' tenure of 
office, and f want to say the following, if I may be 
privileged, from the .\ssociation to Mr. Jnncs — ( I have 
not been asked to do this, but I want to do it volun- 
tarily, because I know it is deserved^ I want to say 
to Mr. Jones on behalf of the entire membership oi 
this .■\ssociation that we are exceedingly grateful t> 
him for all the good work he has done. It has be« 
manifold and it has been exacting and in many in- 
stances it has been difficult work tn be performed. 

That Mr. Jones has done the work well, goes with- 
out the saying, and ! ask the President for permission 
to offer a resolution, that a vote of thanks be extended 
to Mr. Jones, now as he is retiring from office in this 
.\ssociation, for the excellent work that he has done 
for so many years as our efficient secretary and treas- 
urer. 

MR. JOSKPII I-. (il'Fl-KV: I take pleasnre in 
seconding the motion. 

PRESini'.NT KRICK: l.enllcmen. you have 
heard the motion. .\re there any remarks? Mr. Hii;e- 
low moves that a hearty vote of thanks beextended to 
our retiring Secretary and Treasurer. Mr. T, C. Jone*. 
for the efficient services reiuiered by him to the .As.so- 
ciation. 

The atmve motion having been duly seconded was 
then unanimously adopted amid applause. 

MR. T. C JONI-'S : I certainly appreciate the kind- 
ly feeling extended by Mr. f'.igelow and also tlianfc 
you for the resolution just passed. 



Spend, but spend Wige^. Save, and save earnestly. Buy War Savin^^ Stamps. 



Oil and Gas Joint Meeting 

Joint Meeting of the Oil Producers of the Appalachian Field 
and the Natural Gas Aaaociation of America. 



mHE Joint Meeting of the Oil Producers of the Ap- 
palachian Field and The Natural Gas Associa- 
tion of America was held at the Chamber of 
Commerce, Pittsburgh, Pa., on the afternoon of 
Wednesday, May 22, 1918. 

Hon. Joseph F. Guffey, President of The Natural Gas 
Association of America, in calling the meeting to order, 
said : 

At this joint meeting of the Oil Producers of the 
Appalachian Field and The Natural Gas Association of 
America, I am going to take the liberty, as well as the 
pleasure, of asking one of the best known men in the oil 
and gas business to take charge of the proceedings for 
the balance of the afternoon session. He is a gentleman 
who needs no introduction to you. He has done much 
during the past year to serve his country with credit and 
distinction, as well as the industry with which he is 
affiliated. I take pleasure in introducing to you Mr. A. 
C. Bedford (Applause). 

A. C. Bedford, Chairman of the Petroleum War Ser- 
vice Committee, then said : 

When President Guffey asked me to take charge here 
today, I am sure it will occur to all of you that he made 
a mistake. The man who should have taken charge of 
this part of our program is that very highly thought of 
gentleman, and also exceedinly modest man, who was 
appointed Chairman of the Production Committee of 
this District, but who should have been in the Chair 
today. I refer to Mr. George W. Crawford (applause). 

I want to say some things, with reference to that part 
of our discussion today which we now turn to, namely 
the oil question. 

In considering the oil question we have got to put 
aside all thoughts of peace and turn our minds to war. 
We have got to forget conditions as they have existed 
in the past and turn our thoughts and our attention, 
and our energies to the emergency of the present. You 
gentlemen know, as well as I know, that the require- 
ments for oil are such as to tax the facilities of our pro- 
duction to the utmost. It is therefore imperative that 
oil production should be encouraged and developed to the 
highest extent possible. To that patriotic end every oil 
producer should give his utmost endeavor and in doing 
that, he must give consideration to it. as must also the 
refiner, and the distributor, and the carrier, whether it 
be by pipe line or by ship, and he must consider the con- 
ditions of the times and not carry on his business as un- 



der normal conditions. That means that we have got to 
have, throughout the whole industry, the most efficient 
co-ordination that it is possible for us to have. That 
means that we have got to do our business, perhaps, in 
a different way from that in which we did it before. 
It is impossible for us to go on, — in this business at 
least, — as in ordinary times. It is not a time when 
the conditions of the law of supply and demand shall 
govern, or the law of competition shall govern. It is 
a time, as I said a moment ago, for absolute co-operation, 
and that means not only the co-operation of the individ- 
ual with the individual in the business, but it means 
co-operation of the individual with the government, and 
the co-operation of the Government with the individual. 
We have got to forget many things. We have got to 
forget that we are in business solely and mainly as before, 
and as it has been up to the present itme, — for profit 
and for profit alone. Profit has got to be a secondary 
consideration. We have got to forget that we are in 
business to build our business up to the greatest extent 
possible. It is all right, and perfectly proper in or- 
dinary times, but. these are not the times for one man 
to climb up or to extend his business at the expense of 
another. We have got to forget the old animosities and 
prejudices. In fact, we have got to weld ourselves to- 
gether as a whole, if we are to retain our business as 
individuals. 

Now, you know, probably all of you, so that it is 
not necessary for me to repeat it here, how the in* 
dustry has tried to meet these conditions of which I 
have briefly spoken. 

The organization which the petroleum industry had 
built up had its first inception, as you will recall, at the 
instance of the Council of National Defense, a semi- 
Governmental body, and then the organization was 
formed which was called the Petroleum Committee, or 
the Committee on Oils of the Advisory Council of the 
Council of the National Defense which became a trade 
committee, representative of the trade. At the sugges- 
tion of the War Industries Board, the Council of Na- 
tional Defense, and the Shipping Board, it was arranged 
that on their written request they should continue their 
work. Shortly after this, Mr Requa was appointed as 
Administrator of the Oil Division of the Fuel Admin- 
istration. The Committee got in touch with Mr. Requa, 
and I am delighted to say, in his presence, found in him 
a man of breadth of view, as well as strength of purpose, 
and with the broadest ideas as regards the duties of the 
industry and the duty of the Government, and with a 



Deeds, not words, will win the war. Buy War Stamps. 



cordial reception of the idea of complete co-operation 
between the Government and the industry. At his sug- 
gestion the Committee was enlarged, as you know, and 
now numbers some thirty-four men, representative of 
the branches of the industry. Under its direction num- 
erous committees have been formed throughout the coun- 
try, also representative of the different branches of the 
industry. There have been formed two committees in 
this district, one on production, the chairman of which 
is Mr. Messner. 

These two committees, co-operating with the parent 
committee, are intended to be at the suggestion of Mr. 
Requa, the point of contact between the industry and 
the Government, and we ask all you gentlemen today, 
for these committees and for the National Committee, 
on the part of every oil man, and also on the part of 
every gas man, — for the gas men are also interested in 
this, for there is a natural gas committee, of which your 
President, Mr. Guffey, is the Chairman, also affiliated 
with the National Petroleum War Service Committee, — 
we ask for each of these committees, and for the Na- 
tional Committee the individual and active support of 
these industries. With your support, with your help, 
lined up behind their committees, there is nothing that 
the industry cannot do that is humanly possible, to meet 
the war conditions, and to provide^ as has been done up 
to the present time, at least every gallon of oil that is 
necessary to fully supply our own Navy, our own Army, 
and the navies and armies of our Allies (Applause). 

Now, the situation which, of course, comes home to 
every man is more or less personal. We wonder, under 
present conditions, where we are being led to, and what 
the end will be. It is very simple to my mind, if the 
industry conducts itself as it should. 

The broad principle which Mr. Requa has laid down 
is fundamentally correct, and one that the industry, as 
a whole, can be thankful for. Mr. Requa has said that 
he expects the industry to govern itself, and he construes 
that his duties are to help and assist the industry in those 
matters, where the industry cannot itself perform what 
is to be accomplished, without such assistance. Take 
for example, the question of the delivery of goods with 
a shortage, such as existed during the winter, in fuel oil, 
and as in all probability will exist again during the 
coming winter, the question of priority naturally comes 
up. A company with numerous contracts on its hands, 
could not determine for itself the priority of delivery, 
when it could not fill, through its supply, all the contracts 
which where upon its books. It could not discriminate 
among those with whom it had contracted relations with- 
out incurring the penalties or without incurring lawsuits 
for damages. Consequently the Government had to 
come in and say, "Such and such is the order of priority, 
and you must deliver the oil you have available in such 
and such order." 

Mr. Requa came to the rescue of the industry at this 
critical time with the estimate of these priority orders. 
Now, of course, while in general that is the proposition, 
yet at the same time, we recognize the fact that the Gov- 
ernment — and when I say the Government, I refer to Mr. 



Requa, for he is the man with whom you will have to 
deal as personifying the Government, — the Government 
must have the final say in all of these matters, and while 
it is not desired to exercise a drastic control. — and with 
proper care of the industry, drastic control will not be 
necessary, — yet the industry must be conducted more or 
less under the direction of the Fuel Administration. 

That brings us to consider the question which h 
paramount in many minds at present. The price ques- 
tion has agitated the industry considerably, especially that 
part of the industry concerning the new production of 
oil. I think there has been some psychology applied 
with reference to the subject, as it has been working 
itself out in the minds of the producer. At times, how- 
ever, there have been some uncertain features with 
reference to the industry which has caused much hes- 
itancy, but I believe that these uncertain features have 
more or less been cleared away. The atmosphere is 
clearer today than it was before. The principle has 
been announced that the small man must live, and must 
be allowed to live, and that fair profits would be per- 
mitted has been clearly established, and that because 
of the necessities of the case we must encourage espec- 
ially production. But that does not mean for a moment 
anything more than fair return, and fair prices, and 
not run away prices, and any one who takes advantage 
of the situation to exact undue and unlimited profits 
as occasions may offer, will certainly find that the stern 
hand of the Government will be found restraining him 
without mercy. As to the merits of such a principle, 
in these times, I think we all agree, for we are proud 
to feel that the industry, at least up to the present 
time, and with very few exceptional instances, has not 
been on what might be called a profiteering basis, but 
an earnest endeavor has been made to conduct the busi- 
ness conservatively, wisely, and with due consideration 
to the public, and it has only sought to charge fair and 
reasonable prices, and such advances as have been made 
have been due to the fact that the producers had to be 
stimulated, and in order to get the necessary crude oil. 
higher prices had to be paid on account of many con- 
ditions with which you are all familiar, and that I do 
not need to go into. 

Now. we welcome any investigation of the industry 
that shall demonstrate the fact whether we are profiteer- 
ing or whether we are not. 

Speaking for the Petroleum Committee, I want to 
say that they wish to feel, and they wish Mr. Requa to 
feel, that the industry, as a whole, is absolutely sincere 
when it stands up and says to the public that it is going 
to carry on this industry with a pure spirit of patriotism 
and love of country (great applause). 

Now how can we get at it? The way has been de- 
vised. It is generally or tacitly understood, I think, 
with the Fuel Administration that prices throughout 
the country shall remain as they are. If, for any reason 
the industry, or any part of it, feels that prices should 
be advanced, it is expected and hoped that they will 
take it up through the proper Committee, who will 
study the question. If it is a local question, it will be 



Buy War Stamps for yourself, your family, your friends. 



— ; n 

NATURAL CAS AND CASOUNE - M| 



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Wtf BAViAtfB lUBpt ftTt worth fcU lAcnAc* 



206 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



will offset that with another bid, and you will find your- 
selves in the situation of pyramiding your prices. Then, 
where are you going to stop? There would be nothing 
left to be done but for the Government to step in and 
say. "Enough ; this has got to stop." 

Now, Gentlerhen, we have been warned in .this matter. 
We know the conditions. I am sure we will all be 
patriotic enough to comply with these reasonable re- 
quirements. We will show no selfish interest in our 
earnest endeavor to do our bit. We will all see the 
absolute, prime necessity for it, and as I said before, 
we will govern ourselves accordingly, in a pure spirit 
of patriotism, and do that which is necessary, and I am 
sure you are with me in assuring Mr. Requa that that 
is our intention as an industry, (more applause). 

Gentlemen, I now take great pleasure in introducing 
to you Mr. Requa (long continued applause). 

Hon. Mark L. Requa. Director of the Oil Division of 
the United States, Fuel Administration, then said: 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Bedford, and Gentlemen: It is 
very difficult for the layman, who does not come in 
intimate and close contact with affairs in Washington 
to fully realize, not only the magnitude but the diversity 
of the problem that confronts the Government in its 
dealings with the Petroleum Industry, to say nothing 
of its dealings with the entire industries of the United 
States. I approach this particular problem somewhat 
disillusionized because of an apprenticeship served 
under Mr. Hoover, in the Food Administration. There 
was a time when I was quite confident that there were 
a great many non-essential industries in the United 
States, but now I am vainly looking for one industry 
of which it could be said, "it is a non-essential.'* 

In the distribution of oil under the priority classifica- 
tion I found most unexpected obstacles in the way. 

A man in New England was manufacturing chain, 
and he was in priority class 12. Manufacturers of 
tractors for farmers were in class 9, and the man who 
was making the tractors came to me and said, "Unless 
we can buy some chain, we cannot run the tractors, and 
if we don't run the tractors, the farmer cannot plow, 
and if the farmer does not plow, there will not be any 
wheat," and it became obvious that there must some 
way be discovered of supplying the man who makes 
chains with fuel oil. 

A man in Florida was manufacturing Fuller's earth 
and we found it was necessary for the oil refiners to 
have Fuller's earth if they were to make proper lubri- 
cants, and so it goes on almost without end, that one 
part is dependent upon some other part; that the var- 
ious departments of the oil industry must supply their 
production efficiently and satisfactorily, or some other 
part of the Government program will fail, because a 
man somewhere here in the vicinity of Pittsburgh, who 
is manufacturing rivets, ran out of fuel oil. 

I was advised by an investigator from the Shipping 
Board that the ship building program of the United 
States was in danger unless the man who is canning 
vegetables, and other canned products, could be sup- 



plied with tin cans for there must be an adequate 
supply of canned products for export, and yet at the 
same* time there is an insistent demand for tin cans in 
which to put the products of petroleum. So that if 
we are adequately to appreciate the existing conditions, 
it can only be by means of a consolidated picture that 
will show in general outline the requirements of all the 
branches of the Government, and to meet that very 
situation there has been organized in Washington what 
is known as the Priorities Committee of the Council 
of National Defense. 

That committee grants priorities. Then there is the 
Requirements Committee that meets every morning and 
receives requests from the various departments for their 
requirements. 

The Government in its program alone, — to say noth- 
ing of the industrial life of the nation, can today con- 
sume practically the entire iron and steel output of 
this nation. It is obvious, therefore, that there must 
be some distribution of those supplies. Everybody may 
not receive all that they require, but everybody will 
receive something. 

The oil problem to a very large extent is primarily a 
problem of transportaition. Because of the require- 
ment for ships to carry the oil to Europe, a great many 
tankers upon the Atlantic Seaboard have been diverted 
to Trans-Atlantic service. It is needed, to adequately 
meet that situation, practically the consolidation of the 
oil industry of the nation. 

The sales managers of all the large selling organiza- 
tions are meeting regularly in New ork. The cards 
are all on the table, face up. There are no secrets. 
Every man knows the ability of everybody else to de- 
liver, and where there is a shortage, some one steps in 
and helps the deficiency. There is no other possible 
conduct that would adequately meet the situation, and 
there is absolutely no excuse for the failure to carry 
out a program of that character. 

Such action among the oil companies themselves is 
obviously impossible without the assistance and protec- 
tion of the Government of the United States. It in- 
volves the complete temporary abrogation of the Sher- 
man law. 

The oil industry today is acting as a unit under the 
direction of the Government, not only upon the At- 
lantic Seaboard, but upon the Pacific Coast as well. 
Upon the Pacific, pipe lines have been unified. One 
pipe line has been closed down. Oil produced in the 
San Joaquin valley has been exchanged for other oil 
that has been produced in Southern California, to the 
very great benefit of the public at large, and these 
actions have made possible serving the communities 
upon the Pacific Coast in a way that they could not 
possibly otherwise have been served. I do not think 
that many of us realize that the oil industry of the 
world today, so far as the Allied nations are concerned, 
centers in the United States. By a very great majority, 
the oil that is supplied to England, to France, and to 
Italy, comes from America. The export of oil has 
grown by leaps and bounds, and I presume will continue 
to grow during the present year equally as rapidly as 



Prea4di patriotism and thrift— practice it youndf. Boy War Savings Stamps. 



NATURAL CAS AND CA90UNE 



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208 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



the Fuel Administration that the oil jobbing industry of 
the United States be placed under license." That was an 
experience of profound gratification to me. I felt that 
a ver>- great majority of the jobbers of oil did not need 
any regulation, but in all lines there is always a minor- 
ity, that no matter what the occasion will take ad- 
vantage of it. to the detriment of their more conscien- 
tious associates, and I could see no way to control tha< 
element save by licensing, and I said to the jobbers that 
that element would be controlled. 

UnJer the licensing provision, rules and regulations 
may be promulgated of the most drastic character. The 
provisions are identical with those being utilized by 
the food administration in the licensing program, and 
you may have noticed from time to time that licenses 
have been revoked and men have been prohibited from 
doing business, and I want to say, with all the emphasis 
that I can say it, that in the oil industry, if there be 
men of that character in it, who are willing to take 
advantage of the times, whose consciences are so de- 
graded that they propose to fatten upon the blood and 
the bone of the American people, so far as I am con- 
cerned, the first mistake — the first misstep will be the 
last, and for the period of this war they can rusticate 
somewhere else. T'^ey cannot do business in competi- 
tion with honest minded American citizens, who rec- 
ognize that their first duty is to their country, and their 
second duty to themselves (long continued applause). 

I have considered it a great privilege to come among 
you gentlemen here today, and to tell you some of the 
problems we have to deal with in Washington, how we 
are confronted with an acute shortage of oil in Cali- 
fornia; how we find it practically an impossibility to 
convert the oil burning industries of the Pacific north- 
west to coal. Materials for that conversion are lack- 
ing. They cannot at this time lay up the ships to make 
the conversion from oil to coal burners. They dare 
not lay up the locomotives to convert them to coal 
burners. The Pacific Northwest, under existing con- 
ditions, cannot produce sufficient coal to supplant the 
quantity of oil now being consumed We have nitrate 
fields in Chile to supply with oil. The Canal at Pan- 
ama must be kept supplied. The domestic industries of 
the United States must be cared for, so that the neces- 
sary supplies may be manufactured for export over- 
seas, and the needs of our Allies must be paramount 
importance to us in our calculation. The demands of 
our own force in Europe are constantly increasing, and 
1 believe that they will increase for a considerable 
period of time to come. 

My own impression is that this war will be won in 
the air with gasoline supplied by the oil men of the 
United States, and I can conceive no prouder distinc- 
tion than to be entrusted with the responsibility, as you 
men are, of supplying that product. 

The men who produce the natural gas of the United 
States have quite as great a responsibility resting upon 
them. There is gasoline made from that product that 
can be utilized to great advantage. Natural gas can 
be supplied in places where it will release either coal 
or petroleum, and to those of you who are engaged in 



the natural gas industry, I can but say that it is your 
duty, so far as you can, to keep your production at the 
maximum. The conditions that will confront us next 
winter will in all probability be as acute as those that 
confronted us last winter. 

There is a congested area in the eastern portion of 
the United States, east of Pittsburgh, in which it seeins 
almost impossible to meet adequately the demand that 
will be made for fuel. 

Efforts are being made to convert coal burning plants 
to fuel oil. We are asked to supply the fuel oil and to 
give transportation facilities. I know that that oil can 
be supplied, but it does not seem humanly possible that 
the transportation facilities will be adequate to meet 
all the demands that may be made upon it during the 
coming winter. 

This is a time. Gentlemen, when individualism must 
be submerged. The effort of the individual must be 
consolidated into the effort of the Government during 
this period of War. The greatness and the glory of 
this nation has been founded upon individual effort, but 
the test of democracy — the greatest test, I believe that 
democracy can undergo, is to gladly and voluntarily 
surrender that right of initiative effort in time of a 
crisis, and act as a unit under Governmental control, 
for the best interests of the nation as a whole. 

Mr. Berfford has read to you a letter that I wrot? 
him a few days ago. on the subject of the price of oil. 
I may say to you that the question of price is under- 
going a most careful scrutiny. We have received at 
various times, figures of the Federal Trade Commission, 
indicating costs of performing various operations. 
Those figures we are assuming as a basis. We are 
reviewing them, and examining them with the object 
of determining what are right and reasonable and just 
prices at which various commodities will be sold, and 
in that examination the oil industry, through the Pe- 
troleum War Service Committee is co-operating most 
heartily, most willingly, most gladly, in an endeavor 
to assist us in determining the facts, and w^hen we have 
determined those facts we w^ill know the answer. We 
will know it in a way that it cannot be repudiated, and 
whatever that answer may be, it will rest with the oil 
industry to apply it. 

Industry of any character is entitled to and must re- 
ceive just compensation for its eflfort. and that coin- 
pensation should be based upon the character of the 
industry, upon the hazard and upon the vicissitudes con- 
nected with it. I do not want you to think that there 
is any effort upon the part of the Government to inter- 
fere with the normal channels of business more than i> 
absolutelv necessary, under the conditions that exist at 
the present time. Action of an unwise character i? 
far worse than no action, but we are concerned with 
conditions today that are entirely new and strange. The 
normal atmosphere of business operations is giving 
away to the abnormal atmosphere of War, and we must 
govern ourselves so as to make most efficient the petro- 
leum industry for the winning of the war, and I am 
proud to say that it is my profound belief that when 



Don't wait. Do it now. Buy War Savings Stamps. 



NATURAL GAS AND GA50UNF. 



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2IO 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



June 



put it into the hands of a lot of accountants, whom I 
am apprehensive about also (more applause and laugh- 
ter) I doubted the necesisty. 

When Mr. Requa asked me to come and assist him, 
and take charge of the oil production of the country. 
I felt that my health would not permit me to undertake 
the effort, and then I thought of my relationship to him, 
and the real knowledge that I have of producing con- 
ditions in this country, and Mexico, and because of his 
confidence in me, I felt that probably I could be of 
assistance to him in a advisory capacity. 

This war demands of us, — you and I, — no considera- 
tion save national welfare, whether the thing involved 
is our fortune or our lives, and no man has a right, as 
a good citizen, at this time, with conscious thought 
of his Government, to shirk any dlity that is put up to 
him, that he. with a clear conscience concludes he can 
perform and perform well (more applause). 

I want to say to the producers here today — I am not 
as sure about the gas fellows, for I don't know them as 
well, but I know I can talk to the producers, and my 
conclusions about gas men are thet they are not any 
different, for they are the drillers of wells, and the 
same problems confront them that confront the oil 
producers, and I want to say that in so far as my work 
is concerned. I have a full appreciation of the difficul- 
ties of an oil operator. I have been very active, as 
those who know me from California will tell you, in 
that state, and in Mexico, and I have met all the prob- 
lems that we have to meet through rather a long life 
of activity. If my judgment prevails, — and I believe 
it will as long as Mr. Requa holds his present position, 
because he thinks along the same lines, — the oil in- 
dustry of the United States, in so far as the abstract 
problem of producing oil is concerned, is in no danger 
in our hands (long continued applause). We know 
your problems. We know that from ninety to ninety- 
five per cent of all wild cat wells drilled in the United 
States, were failures, and from five to ten per cent 
have been a success, and that this has been the founda- 
tion upon which the oil producer has built the great oil 
industry in this country. We know the spirit that is 
necessary to prompt individuals to go out and explore. 
We know the constant necessities of the business, and 
the margins that are required for the successful con- 
duct of the business, in order to meet the constant 
vicissitudes which are encountered. We also know, 
Gentlemen, enough about it to know when your industry 
is in a healthy condition. If we had any other object 
in our official capacity than the national welfare, and 
if we deal with prices with any other object than to 
produce for this country and our Allies, the necessary 
petroleums, then we ought to be shot. We are accept- 
ing the responsibility of looking after the petroleum 
supply of this country, in so far as any Government 
interference is necessary, and in doing that we are 
going to do the right thing by you, because it is neces- 
sary to do the right thing by you for the National wel- 
fare. The machine for producing oil has got to be in 
a healthy condition. 



I am not an expert in examining balance sheets, or 
auditors' reports. I defy any set of auditors in the 
United Staes to produce the figures which will show 
what a barrel of petroleum costs in the aggregate in this 
country (long continued applause). It is an abstract 
problem. It takes an optomist to pursue the game 
(more applause and laughter), but we have got to be 
supplied with the wherewith. 

On the other hand I take my hat off to no man in 
the United States when is comes to analyzing whether 
or not the industry in a particular part of the countn 
is in a healthy condition, or not, and whether it needs 
extra stimulation. 

Now, you are going to perform in this country one 
of the great needs in this terrible struggle we are in. 
and you are going to do it voluntarily, and you are 
going to do it with contentment and assurance, and you 
are going to believe it when we say to you now. after 
a complete survey of the entire American continent, in 
your oil producing area, that we believe that the oil 
producing part of the nation is in a healthy condition, 
under present prices, and it should and will get the 
necessary quantity of oil where and when it is needed. 

We believe, in connection with our work at W^ashing- 
ton, — indeed we are convinced, that the time is here 
when it is absolutely necessary for the petroleum in- 
dustry, as well as many other industries in this countr>', 
to be in a stabilized condition. 

We believe in that wonderful steel industry that is 
so important to us in this great struggle, that they have 
reached a stabilizing period, plenty of margin, it is 
true, to leave the industry in a healthy shape, but we 
believe it is stabilized, and we believe the oil producers 
of this country can and will produce the oil necessan- 
for the National need on the present basis of cost, and 
I wish to assure you that we are giving that careful con- 
sideration, and we wish at all times to be informed 
properly and accurately of any change of condition. I 
personally believe we have reached the apex of increase 
of price of the things you use, and knowing what it 
costs to produce oil, we believe that you can, under 
present conditions, produce that oil and leave your- 
selves in a healthy condition. Therefore until we know 
of some other things having a bearing upon your in- 
dustry in such a way that it is going to produce an effect 
on the industry itself, indicating that it will not furnish 
the petroleum required, then we are going to ask you 
to let us help you stabilize the product where it should 
be stabilized in order to produce the necessary quantity 
and quality, and we want to assure you, or do at least 
after a complete survey, of the United States, that it 
is our earnest desire to assist you in every way we can to 
meet the demands that will be made upon the industrv 
in order to assure the successful prosecution of the 
war. 

I have probably met more producers of oil in the last 
few months than any one man met before, and I have not 
failed, in any instance, to get the heartiest support for 
the sentiments I have just expressed (loud applause). 

I come from a state, Gentlemen, where I have spent 
my life, and where the price of crude oil is the lowest 



Tou are summoned to sign the W. S. S. pledge on or bef(»« June 28th. 




that it is anywhere in the United States, and where it 
costs the most to drill a" well. I was amused at a state- 
ment Dr. White made to you in referring to a well that 
he spoke about in thie course of his paper, in which he 
said that that well might have cost $50,000. Our aver- 
age cost in California at the present time is about that 
figure. We frequently get $100,000 into a well, but of 
course, they are good wells, and they last a long time 
(more applause and laughter). 

MR. BEDFORD: Some of them are dry holes. 

MR. O'DONNELL: Yes, some of them prove to be 
dry holes. The California producer might say to us, 
and has said to us : "Why is it that the oil down on the 
Gulf Coast that is used for the same purpose that the 
other fellow's oil is used for, and is of the same char- 
acter, sells for $1.80, and we only get $1.23 per barrel 
for it? In fairness to us, having the same kind of a 
product, we sihould get better prices." 

Gentlemen, if you will sit down with your conscience, 
your God and your country, you will know that is not 
the right basis of argument, in this world crisis. Because 
you happen to be in that part of the country where God 
Almighty was more liberal in the distribution of his 
wealth, is no reason why in this particular time of the 
Nation's want, you should seek to enrich yourselves be- 
cause some other fellow gets a better price in some other 
part of the country. I have had it put up to me in my 
travels throughout the country about the four dollar oil 
in Pennsylvania, and I have said to some of these fellows, 
"You don't know what you are talking about. $4.00 is 
necessary in Pennsylvania, for they have to gather it with 
a tin can (more laughter and continued applause), and 
the operators in California and Oklahoma, and some of 
the other wild parts of the west, lose more money rolling 
in the grass than would absorb the profits of some of the 
little farms in the East (more laughter and appulause). 

But you are, nevertherless in a healthy condition. I 
am here to tell you that, and you are here to acknowledge 
it with me, and then you are here to say that we all are 
going to do the right thing at this time. 

Now, I want to tell you something about the problems 
we have got. We have got to furnish the oil to fill the 
gap in the struggle in Europe, during the next year or 
two. We are drawing on our stocks all over the country 
heavily. We drew twenty million barrels last year, and 
some estimate furnished by Mr. Bedford and others of 
the War Service Boards of this country, lead us to be- 
lieve that we might, as a maximum requirement, have 
to draw eighty million barrels more from our stock in 
this country. 

I believe the gas producers are going to have the nec- 
essary pep to do their part. 

In the 'Western country, where we produce in large 
quantities, it may not reach those figures. It will reach 
them if we do not have the right kind of spirit among 
the oil producers, and all of us seek to do our part. 

We have a safety valve in Mexico, that is going to 
take care of us in time, but in the meantime we have 
got to furnish every barrel of oil where it is, and when 



and how it may be required, and we must furnish it at 
the time that it is needed. The time it is needed is 
now, while we are building ships to take care of our- 
selves in the future, and anybody in the oil industry in 
this country that is withholding their oil from the market, 
with the hope of a future price, that will justify them 
from a business standpoint in holding that oil, if he will 
sit down with a clear conscience and think it over, he 
will know that by so doing he is lowering his standard 
of citizenship (applause). 

Gentlemen, that is something I want you to think about. 
We need it now. We need the oil that you gentlemen are 
producing here in the mid continent field, to fill the gap — 
for what? To drive from the earth the damnable Ger- 
mans (more applause). 

You know, Gentlemen, some of us are nearing the latter 
part of the trail of life, but we always cling to it to the 
last moment as a precious thing, but I want to stand here 
and tell you today, with all the force that is in me, that 
there are two conditions under which I do not care to 
live from now on, afid one is that this country might be 
dominated by the German spirit, and the other is by the 
Bolsheviki (long continued applause). 

That does not only apply to myself. I have got a 
couple of daughters in their young womanhood, that I 
think more of than I do of all the money that any of 
you men have piled up, and I would not trade them for 
all of your money, too. I say to you here and now that 
I want them to die with me if Germany is going to rule 
the world (more applause). 

I take this matter seriously. I think it is very serious. 
I went to Washington believing, as I did, that we were 
not badly needed, but soon learning that it was an ab- 
solute necessity for the petroleum industry of this country 
to be co-related to the other departments of the Govern- 
ment in this great struggle. The first two months of 
my work in Washington were the most depressing period 
of my whole life. I didn't care for the business feature, 
or anything else. I was apprehensive of where we were 
going to. The endless confusion was amazing to a fellow 
like me, that had been having a little circle of vision, and 
not realizing the small margin of a great industrial nation, 
and finding in Washington the unsettled condition, or lack 
of centralized authority and responsibility that existed 
there, I was filled with apprehension. Men of talent 
were called from all parts of the nation, and had vol- 
unteered their service and had rushed to Washington 
into confusion and lack of authority and centralized re- 
sponsibility. 

I am glad to say I feel better about it now. I feel we 
are getting our feet on the ground, and we are going to 
face the enemy in the right spirit with the right men at 
the head of our industrial needs (continued applause). 

I am not going to criticise. Far be it from me to 
criticise any part of our administration, and above all, 
our wonderful President. I am going to say to you, 
though, that I believe we have wasted a year in order to 
bring home to the American people the fact we were at 
ing up, for the last twenty years, our industrial machin- 
ery that was necessary to win. We were a peaceful. 



Every family is a fighting family when each member buys War Stamps regularly. 



212 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



reckless people. We were tearing apart instead of build- 
ing up, for the last twentyyears, our industrial machin- 
ery in the country, which might have been a good thing 
then. I am not here to contradict it in times of peace, 
but it was certainly not the thing to do as we were ap- 
proaching war. We have to put those machines together 
in the way that the biggest and strongest men in this 
country have wanted to put them together in times of 
peace. We have to put them together as a War neces- 
sity. I do not believe the American people were ready 
for it when we first attacked this job. I do not believe 
that the American people would have felt the relief they 
did when that appointment was made (more applause). 
They would have criticised. 

John D. Ryan taking charge of our aviation program 
is almost unheard of, if you will think of the atttacks 
of the newspapers of the country upon that man in the 
past, yet the people accepted the appointment with assur- 
ance and good will. 

The corporations of America are putting their talented 
men into our War Department. I think it is coming at 
the right time. I doubt whether the President, or any- 
body else, could have hurried it along. The American 
people are willing to accept it, and I thank God for it 
(more applause). Now, we have got our feet on the 
ground. W^e are going to start now, and we are going 
to start to fight, and when we get to fighting, believe me, 
we are going to go some (long continued applause and 
laughter). 

This is an industrial war. The industrial capacity of 
this nation is going to be measured by its weakest link, 
and there is no link in that chain of industries that is of 
any greater importance than that link which you gentle- 
men have got to weld and to watch. You know we are 
going to fight; we are gomg to fight everything in sight 
(more applause), and that means you. It means you 
(more applause). 

There is a feeling among many people that Uncle Sam 
is at Washington. He is not there. He is a good deal 
like the God that many of us worship, or think about, 
at least. He is invisible. He is everywhere. He is 
right here today. He is here in this city. He is right 
among you now, and to serve Uncle Sam is just as much 
your duty as it is mine. 

Notwithstanding I have accepted an ofiicial job that 
does not put any greater responsibility upon me than it 
does upon you, you must attack everything within your 
sight that needs attacking. That is the right spirit of 
Americanism, and above all. you must attack that damn- 
able thing that is going throughout this Nation, the Ger- 
man propaganda (long continued applause), but in at- 
tacking that, spread a propaganda of your own, an Amer- 
ican propaganda (more applause), and that brings home 
to me something I am rather embarrassed in saying in 
front of Mr. Bedford and Mr. Teagle here, today, but I 
want to say to you producers, so that you can stamp the 
poisonous snake that is issuing poisonous rumors to the 
country whenever it comes within your vision. 

You know — whether justified or not, is not the point 
at this time. — that the whole people of this Nation will 
not get a square deal from public opinion without great 



effort on their part. It is a popular thing to attack. It 
is a thing for politicians to roll around their tongue. It 
is poisonous, no matter if issued by politicians, or 
hawked about the streets, or in our town halls, as if it 
was paid for by the Geramns. 

I want you with me here today, to forget yesterday 
for today and tomorrow, and act accordingly, and in that 
connection, you are going to meet with rumors in con- 
nection with Mr. Requa and myself. I have been for 
twenty-eight years an active developer and producer, a 
field man in California, a place where twenty-five per 
cent of all the petroleum produced in the world was pro- 
duced for a number of years. In my entire career I 
have never played in the front yard or the back yard, 
directly or indirectly, with the Standard Oil Company. 
I joined all the independent wild schemes that were ever 
promoted on the Pacific Coast (more laughter and ap- 
plause). I was for ten years on the Executive Board of 
the Independent Oil Producers of California, one of the 
most active competitors of the Standard Oil Company 
that ever existed in the United States as an organization 
of that kind. I am telling you this Gentlemen so you 
can defend Mr. Requa and myself when somebody says 
that "I have seen Tom OT)onnell going up the stairs at 
26 Broadway and something is wrong (prolonged laugh- 
ter and applause)." 

I am going up the stairs at 26 Broadway. In fact I 
will tell you — there is no secret, — I have been there al- 
ready (more laughter and applause), and I am going up 
those stairs as many times and as frequently as my duty 
calls me there. 

I am going to go anywhere in the United States where 
I think there is a hidden German, and drag him out, if 
I can (long continued applause and laughter). 

Don't take me too literally, Gentlemen, for I can say. 
from personal knowledge, that there are no hidden Ger- 
mans to be found at 26 Broadway, and I am going to 
wind up the subject of the Standard Oil Company for 
no reason but a wholesome one, by saying to all of you, 
that every person that 1 have met and been with, and 
worked with, which has included nearlv all of the Stand- 
ard Oil boys within the last four months, has shown that 
degree of patriotism and sacrifice that would lead me to 
say that the (lermans better go back to Berlin quick if all 
of the American people attack this problem with the same 
spirit that every single one of these men are attacking 
it (more applause). I never saw a more complete spirit 
of sacrifice than I have met in that office. I at no time 
ever heard anything that led me to believe that any but 
the utmost loyal American spirit prevailed and above all 
they are American through and through, and whatever 
they have is on the table for Uncle Sam to take if he 
needs it. 

Their lives are in this work just as wholly, and com- 
pletely as any man's in this room, and that is the thin^ 
that I want you gentlemen to help spread. But when- 
ever you see that poisonous stuff cropping out, stamp on 
it like vou would throttle the man who talks in favor of 
the Kaiser, because he is talking in favor of the Kaiser 
when he wants to bring up old prejudices at a time like 
this. 



Thrive by Thrift. Buy War Savings Stamps. 



June 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



213 



We had a recent experience down in Washington 
where a very important committtee was listening to our 
land troubles in the West, the most important thing we 
have in connection with our petroleum industry in the 
west, where thoughtlessly or with malicious purpose — I 
do not know which — but I think thoughtlessly into that 
investigation were injected the words ^'Standard Oil." It 
was suggested that the Standard Oil might be interested 
in those lands, and they immediately forgot what they 
were there about, and spent weeks trying to find out if 
the Standard Oil Company owned any of it. and if they 
did, that was enough. It was wrong. That is the pop- 
ular thing politically to say and do. Now, we want to 
stop all kinds of wrong propaganda. That is going to 
be stopped, not by me talking about it here, or at a few 
town halls throughout the country, but by you gentle- 
men, — by every one of you, and I think every one of 
you that has got the thought in his mind to express that 
kind of a sentiment at this time, and to keep alive the 
old prejudices until the war is over is not in favor of 
this family of ours, but he is doing his country a great 
injury and his family a greater injury. 

A good many years ago, when I was a boy and first 
went West, I washed dishes in a restaurant. It was a 
rough community, a rough people, and a cheap restau- 
rant. (Laughter and applause.) In those cheap restau- 
rants they have rather heavy side dishes. There were 
two cooks, a man and his wife, and some dispute oc- 
curred between the man and the wife, and he hit her 
with a frying pan. I had this dish in my hand and I 
made a good sliot at his head, and it was eflfective. But 
when I got out of that kitchen. I was a fit subject for the 
hospital, and the woman did the most of the damage. 
(Long continued laughter and great applause.) I tell 
you, Gentlemen, that same family spirit is something 
we are going to show here in this war. ( More applause.) 
You are going to do it. You arc going to helj) every- 
where. And I want you to go home — you producers 
w^ho believe in me and believe in our work, I want you 
to go home and everyone of you work to win the war. 
Tha^s the business of the hour. Don't knock at home. 
Don't knock on the street. If you have to knock, come 
down to Washington and knock yourselves hard as you 
want to at our doors, and we will listen to you. (More 
applause.) We want your help. We have got to have 
it. We are not "super" men. There are none of them 
except in Germany. We are going to fail, unless we 
get the united support of the oil industry of this country. 
We need your talent ; we want you to point out to us 
when we are going along a path that some of you may 
feel to be wrong — point it out to us, why you think we 
are wrong. Come there as often as you want. Come 
freely. We are not thin-skinned. We don't want to 
run for office after this is all over either. (More laugh- 
ter and applause.) We will stand by any criticism that 
is given in the right spirit. When you see us going 
wrong, say so. 

I want to say just a word — Mr. Bedford, I don't know 
how long I have been talking, but too long I know, but 
I want to say just a word in conclusion on the labor 
question. You know that is a problem in which we are 



all interested very much. I simply want to say this, get 
out and talk to your men. Encourage them. Pay them 
what they are entitled to. But don't allow the wrong 
kind of a fellow to talk to them. There has been in this 
country too much rattle brained loose talk to the labor 
element of the country. Some of our labor union lead- 
ers are able, conscientious and loyal citizens of this 
country. Others are not. You must go among your 
men and instill into them yourselves the spirit that this 
is the time to do. It is no time to get shorter hours and 
do less work. Stir up a loyal patriotic spirit among the 
men engaged in your industry. You fellows have got to 
do it yourselves. You have to talk the fellow down that 
is talking to them about German propaganda. 

I want to close by saying that I consider this war a 
serious matter. I consider your part in it a serious 
matter, and I do not want you, any of you, today to 
think of joining or consenting to a **sauer-kraut" peace. 
(Great laughter and prolonged applause.) The German 
will have in his left hand the pen with which to sign it; 
with his right hand behind his back full of cheese, and 
he will ram it in your nose, and say, *'You have got to 
like the odor." (Long continued applause and great 
laughter.) 

CHAIRMAN BEDFORD: I am sure we all appreci- 
ate the talk of Mr. 0*Donnell. He talks a language we 
can all understand. We know when he talks that a man is 
talking to us. (Applause.) Time is going along. I 
should like very much if one or possibly more of the 
members of the advisory committees on production who 
may happen to be here would say a word. I will ask 
Mr. Phillips, Vice-chairman Advisory Committee Appal- 
achian Production, Eastern Division, to say a word. 

MR. PHILLH^S: Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen 
Representing the Oil and Gas Industry: We meet here 
first as patriotic citizens ; second, as business men ; and 
third, as producers of oil and natural gas. ' 

As patriotic American citizens everything that we have 
that is worth having; everything that the generations 
that are following us might have that is worth having, 
is involved in this war. As business men, we are reason- 
able men. Were that not the case, we would long since 
have been eliminated from the business. As producers 
of oil and natural gas, we realize that we, are engaged 
in an industry that is absolutely vital, absolutely essential 
to the Government. 

Now, the Government has appointed advisory com- 
mittees in various sections of the country. I take it 
that these committees are for the purpose of eliminating, 
as far as possible, a great deal of suggestion and com- 
ment and criticism which would prove of no particular 
benefit in this crisis, and to make an accurate presenta- 
tion of the petroleum and natural gas situation in these 
various districts so as to assist the Government in every 
way we can to help win the war. 

We have a committee. Appalachian production, with 
its headquarters in this city, and that committee, regard- 
less of how busy the men are who are connected with 
it, are always glad to take up any suggestions, and to 
answer any questions that may be propounded. In fact 



Smother the Kaiser with War Savings Stamps. 



214 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



it acts as a clearing house, so to speak, in the way of 
gathering facts and data and information needed at 
headquarters, and then forwards what they think of 
value on to Washington. 

The oil industry for years and years has been running 
with as little friction and as smoothly as possible, and 
it is our duty during the balance of the war to see that 
the oil and gas men run their own business without any 
internal friction in their business at all. 

As far as the advisory committee is concerned. I know 
I speak for them, and I believe I voice the sentiment of 
all the people connected with the industry when I assure 
the people at Washington — Mr. Requa and his co-work- 
ers — that we will do everything within reason — more — 
we will do everything within reach in order to help 
carry out the suggestions that they may have to make. 
(Applause.) 

CHAIRMAN BEDFORD: I would like to have a 
word from Mr. J. C. Darnell, chairman of the Advisory 
Committee, Appalachian Production, Western Division. 

J. C. DARNELL: I do not propose to make a speech 
or go into any details. 

I am chair;nan of the Western Division of Appalachian 
Production, consisting of the western part of Ohio, 
Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. They are old fields. 
Ohio is very old. And there is no chance to drill any 
big wells. We do drill some wells, and, of course, by so 
doing, we keep up the production fairly well. But we 
are producing from wells that are averaging less than 
a half barrel per day. 

I have heard a good deal said about fixing the price 
to suit the well that produces a half or a quarter of a 
barrel of oil per day. That is impossible. You cannot 
fix a price for oil that will make it profitable to produce 
oil from that kind of wells. But we are keeping alive 
everything that we possibly can. Very many of the wells 
in our country are being run at a loss. That is to say 
where there might be a good many wells connected 
together, two or three of the wells might be doing 
practically all of the work, and the others, of course, 
doing scarcely anything. It brings down the average. 
But we arc doing the best we can, and we will continue 
to do all we can to keep the production up and to in- 
crease it if possible. 

We had a meeting of our committee in Toledo on the 
13th of this month, and w-e took a solemn vow there 
(and the gentlemen were all enthusiastic) and said that 
we would do all that we possibly could to uphold the 
administration and Mr. Requa and Mr. Bedford, and I 
think that that is about all I could say in reference to the 
matter. Our hearts are in the work, and we wil' do 
everything we possibly can to assist in getting the oil 
which is now needed for the Government in this great 
work of winning the war. (Applause). 



CONSERVATION OF GAS 



Report of a Committee Appointed by the Natural Gas 

Association of America 



BY A. J. DIESC HER. CHAIRMAN 




Our men in the trenches and in the submarine 
chasers are doing their part. Are you doing your 
part? Buy War Savings Stamps to your utmost 
capacity. 



URING the past year, there has been a general im- 
provement in gas conservation matters. Op- 
erators for oil and gas have taken a greater 
interest in preventing waste and sealing-off the 
gas sands through which they drill. 

Several flagrant wastages of gas occurred during the 
year, principally in Northern Texas and in the Elm Grove 
field of Louisiana. In the former case the wastage was 
voluntary while in the latter it was accidental and ever)' 
effort was made to close in the well which had broken 
loose. 

In Northern Texas, wells of five to ten million feet 
open flow of gas are allowed to blow to carry the oil to 
the surface, although the gas sand is several hundred feet 
above the oil sand. There are no laws in Texas prohibit- 
ing waste and for the present it is strictly a matter of the 
operator's conscience whether he will protect the gas or 
not. 

The use of casing-head gas for gasoline manufacture 
has tended greatly toward a better attitude generally, re- 
specting conservation. The amount of casing head gas 
wasting, while greatly reduced over past years, is still a 
very great item. It is estimated in West Virginia there 
are over one hundred million cubic feet blowing to the air 
daily. There is no doubt as much gas going to waste 
from this source in Oklahoma and other States. While it 
is not gas which would be available for entering a gas 
trunk line without compression it has its bearing upon 
general natural gas conservation. 

In Osage County, Oklahoma, there has been a waste 
of about two billion feet of gas during the past yeaiJroni 
one lease which was of high rock pressure, four himdred 
pounds, during a controversy whether it w-as or was not 
casing-head gas. Other than this, Oklahoma is practi- 
cally free from high pressure gas blowing to the air. The 
Oklahoma authorities have greatly extended and im- 
proved their regulation of conservation and have won 
the good will and regard of oil and gas operators. Their 
work stands out as an example of what can be done 
through governmental conservation, and is a good guide 
for other States to follow. 

Perhaps the best example of gas and oil conservation 
in the United States today is on the property of the 
Standard Oil Company of California at Fullerton, Gal., 
where they are producing large volumes of oil and gas in 
the same sand, separating the gas and oil at the surface, 
absorbing the gasoline from the oil. and recovering all 
of the oil, gas, and gasoline from their property without 
waste. The oil and gasoline are run into the oil line^ 
to the refineries and the gas is sold to the pipe lines sup- 
plying the Southern California markets. These wells pro- 
duce up to several thousand barrels of oil daily and ten to 



June 28th^-National War Savings Day. 



June 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



215 



twenty million feet of gas. Their installation plant 
stands out as an example of what can be done to eliminate 
waste on an operating property. 

In general, a considerable advance is being made toward 
effective natural gas conservation over the land, both 
through regulation and through the sentiment of the op- 
erators. 



CONSERVATION URGED 



Dr, I. C. White, State Geologist of IV. Virginia, said, 
following the reading of the Conservation report : 

mN view of the enormous potential value locked up 
in natural gas, which none of us have ever suf- 
ficiently realized, the increasing importance of 
conservation of this natural product becomes 
more and more imperative. 

I, like one flying in the wilderness down in West Vir- 
ginia, have been puting forth my feeble efforts, and rais- 
ing my feeble voice against this enormous waste of one 
of our most valuable natural products for over twenty 
years. It has never met with legislative approval. Not 
a single line has been written into the Statutes of West 
V^irginia like there has been in Oklahoma where Mr. 
Diescher, connected with one of the great oil and gas 
companies, says that their Governmental regulations are 
working splendidly and that the natural gas and .oil com- 
panies are satisfied with it. 

Why can not we have the same Governmeiital regula- 
tions in Pennsylvania and West Virginia? The vast 
amount of gas left in these old wells is much more valu- 
able now than it ever was before, and the wonderful by- 
products of which Dr. Garner of Mellen Institute of 
Pittsburgh has told us (See Dr. Garner's address in sub- 
sequent issue of Natural Ga.s and Gasoline 
Journal) in such a way that even the layman can realize 
their importance, makes it all the more imperative that 
we should see to it that the waste in natural gas be stop- 
ped and stopped quickly. The enormous waste that has 
been permitted in the three States of Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia and Ohio must astound the ordinary gas and 
oil producer when brought face to face with the com- 
mercial value of the product thus wasted. 

Why cannot the larger operating companies, like the 
South Penn Oil Company, The Manufacturers Company, 
The Philadelphia Company and the other larger operat- 
ing companies, — why can they not inaugurate a plan like 
the Standard Oil Company of California has done in that 
field? They can afford to pay the independent operator 
who does not have enough gas to warrant installation, — 
they can afford to pay him a reasonable price for this 
gas that would otherwise be wasted. 

The independent operators would be glad to sell it to 
them. Let these larger companies establish plants to 
take care of this waste and to utilize it. 

Dr. Garner has shown us that natural gas can still be 
utilized with b. t. u. of over 800 to the cubic foot. It is 
a much better gas than can be manufactured from coal. 



Dr. Garner has demonstrated also the value of the by- 
products to be obtained from this gas, so that even the 
remnants may be utilized advantageously in a commercial 
way. 

The citizens of these States would be glad to have that 
kind of gas for fuel which would aid materially in sup- 
plying the demand of natural gas for domestic purposes. 
These larger companies can well afford to put in these 
installations and work out these problems that Dr. Garner 
has been so successfully attacking. 

I hope to see these great companies which are doing 
so much in a patriotic way, take up this question of 
waste in a serious manner and in a serious way and with 
the funds that they have at their disposal they will not 
only reap large returns for themselves but save and con- 
serve one of the best natural products in the world, full 
of these potential possibilities and save it for themselves 
and for the country." 



UNIFORM ACCOUNTING 



BY C. S. MITCHELL, CHAIRMAN 



.'/ committee appointed on Uniform Accounting, by the 
Natural Gas Association of America, reported in May as 
follozvs : 

[tit E have arranged with the Public Service Commis- 
1 11 sions of Pennsylvania, West V^irginia, Ohio and 
{J^^ New York that this classification will be sub- 
mitted to them fpr their consideration, and have 
every reason to believe that within a comparatively short 
time we will be called into consultation with the represen- 
tatives of the different commissions. 

Your Committee was represented at a meeting with the 
Public Service Commission of Pennsylvania on the sub- 
ject of uniform deposits, but as yet no rule has been 
issued by the Commission on this subject. 



Remember! the men in our Army and Navy do not 
expect luxuries. Should we at home expect them? 
Buy necessities and War Savings Stamps. 



TRAILER AUXILIARY 



ERACTICING economies, yet adding to facilities 
and convenience at one and the same time, 
would seem to be in a sense not practical, 
and yet such is not the case in many in- 
stances. An instance of this nature has come to our 
attention this morning. 

We are strong believers in the use of automobiles 
by gas companies, and have for a long period advo- 
cated this type of power and transportation facilities, 
versus the expensive and slow method of horse-drawn 
vehicles, expensive from various standpoints, and 
growing more expensive as wages advance, since 
hours required on the part of drivers and helpers do 
not diminish where the horse is employed. 



To keep the barbarians out of America, buy W. S. S. 



Constitution and By-Laws 

Report of the Committee on Revision Presented at Annual Convention of the 

Natural Gas Association of America. 



As the chairman for the committee made the following 
statement, and the association as a whole voted that this 
should be printed for the benefit of all members, we are 
publishing the matter in full in THE NATURAL GAS 
AND GASOLINE JOURNAL, that it may be spread 
broadcast among the members of the association, and 
those who should become members. — The Editor. 



BY H. J. HOOVER, CHAIRMAN 



mHE Committee appointed last year to revise the 
Constitution and By-Laws of The Natural Gas 
Association of America begs leave to submit a 
number of changes in the present Constitution 
and also in the By-Laws. 

According to the Constitution the Constitution cannot 
be changed until the subsequent meeting of 1919. 

Article 8, Sec. i, reads: 

"Any proposition to amend this Constitution shall 
be submitted at a regular meeting, and secondly by a 
majority of all the members present ; the proposition shall 
not be acted upon until the next regular meeting, when 
if approved by two-thirds of all the members who may 
be present at said meeting, it shall become a part of the 
Constitution." 

The recommendation of the Committee is that the 
Constitution as proposed to be revised and amended, be 
printed some time after this meeting, submitted to all 
the members of the Association, to be acted upon at the 
next Annual Meeting. 

The Chairman said: — **I think it would be much the 
best plan to have this report submitted to each member 
in printed form, so that the proposed changes may be 
noted, and the matter can then come up at the next 
meeting, at which time each member will have before 
him the Constitution as it is now and the amendments 
and revisions as proposed by the Committee. 



Those portions of the Constitution as at present in 
effect and the same portions of the Constitution as 
proposed to be revised and amended as per the recom- 
mendation of the Committee are as follows: 

Sec. I of Article 3 of the Constitution as in effect at 
this time: 

"The membership of the Association shall consist of 
Honorary, Active and Junior Members, and the Junior 
Members shall not be entitled to vote nor hold office, 
but shall be entitled to all other privileges of member- 
ship." 

Sec. I of Article 3 as amended, per recommendation 
of the Committee : 

"Sec. I. The membership of the Association shall 
consist of Honorary, Associnte and Active members, and 
the Honorary and Associate members shall not be en- 
titl«d to vote nor hold office, but shall be entitled to all 
other privileges of membership." 



Sec. 4 of Article 3 of the Constitution as in effect at 
this time: 

"Sec. 4. To be eligible to Junior Membership, a 
person must be directly or indirectly connected with the 
gas industry, or may be skilled therein. Junior members 
shall have all the privileges and courtesies of the Associa- 
tion, except the right to vote or hold office. Junior 
members may be transferred to Active Membership by 
a vote of the Association upon recommendation of the 
Board of Directors." 

Sec. 4 of Article 3 as amended per recommendation of 
Committee : 

"Sec. 4. Any corporation, firm or partnership engaged 
in the production, transportation or distribution of nat- 
ural gas may become an associate member without voting 
power, upon payment of such dues as may be prescribed 
by the Board of Directors of the Association." 

Sec. I and Sec. 2 of Article 4 of the Constitution as in 
effect at this time : 

"Sec. I. The officers of the Association shall consist 
of a President, Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer, 
who shall be elected for one year. 

Sec. 2. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
President, the Vice-Preident, the Secretary-Treasurer and 
twelve active members of the Association, six of whom 
shall be elected at each annual meeting, and whose term 
of office shall be two years. Five members of the Board 
of Directors shall constitute a quorum for the transaction 
of business. 

At the annual meeting in 1913, there shall be elected 
six Directors, who will serve two years, and four Direct- 
ors who shall serve one year." 

Sec. I and Sec. 2 of Article 4 as amended per recom- 
mendation of Committee : 

"Sec. I. The officers of the Association shall consist 
of a President, three Vice-Presidents and Secretary and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected for one year. 

Sec. 2. The Board of Directors shall consist of the 
President, \'ice-President and twelve active members of 
the Association, six of whom shall be elected at each 
annual meeting ,and whose terms of office shall be two 
years. Seven members of the Board of Directors shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business." 

Article 5. Sec. i. Sec. 2 and Sec. 3 of the Constitution 
as in effect at this time : 

"Sec. I. The management of the affairs of the Asso- 
ciation shall be intrusted to the officers and the Board of 
Directors, under the general direction of the members in 
convention. 

Sec. 2. A majority of the Board shall constitute a 
quorum, and the Board shall have the power to fill any 
vacancies that may exist therein. 

Sec. 3. That the Past Presidents of the Association 
be constituted an Advisory Committee, which, from time 
to time, shall give to the Association wise counsel and 
sound advice on matters of importance. Three members 
of this Committee shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. 



2l8 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



The Chairman of this Committee shall be each out- 
going president.'* 

Sec. I and Sec. 2 of Article 5 as amended per recom- 
mendation of Committee : 

''Sec. I. The management of the affairs of the Asso- 
ciation shall be intrusted to the officers and the Board 
of Directors, under the general direction of the members 
in convention. The Board shall have the power to fill 
any vacancies that may exist therein. 

Sec. 2. That the Past Presidents of the Association 

» 

be constituted an Advisory Committee which from time 
to time, shall give to the Association wise counsel and 
sound advice on matters of importance. Three members 
of this Committee shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. 

The Chairman of this Committee shall be each out- 
going president." 

MR. HOOVER (continuing) : The provision of the 
By-Laws with reference to revision or amendment now 
in effect being Sec. i and Sec. 2 of Article 13 is as fol- 
lows: 

"These by-laws may be altered or amended only in 
the following manner : 

Sec. I. Any proposition to alter or repeal an existing 
By-Law. shall be presented in writing during any meet- 
ing of the Association, at any time before its adjourn- 
ment, seconded by not less than three members, shall be 
read twice, and if approved by two-thirds of all the 
members present, shall become a part of these By-Laws; 
but no such alteration or amendment shall affect any 
question pending at the time of its adoption. 

Sec. 2. Any additional section of these By-Laws, 
not in conflict with existing By-Laws, may be adopted at 
any meeting of the Association, upon being presented 
in writing, duly seconded, read twice, and approved by 
at least two-thirds of all the members present.*' 

There are three changes recommended in the By-Laws 
which the Committee submits to be acted upon at this 
meeting : 

The first is in Art. 4, Sec. 2, with reference to the 
duties of the Secretary-Treasurer. 

The second is in Article 6, Sec. 4, with reference to 
the duties of the Board of Directors in regard to the 
selection of a Finance Committee of three. 

The third is in Article 6, Sec. 6, with reference to the 
Appointement of a Nominating Committee. 

I will read those portions of the lU-Laws as in effect 
at the present time and in conjunction therewith I will 
read the recommendations of the Committee as to the 
amendment and revision of those particular sections. 

Sec. 2 of Article 4 of the By-I^ws as in effect at this 
nme i^ads as follows-. 

"Sec. 2. The Secretary-Treasurer shall attend all 
meetings of the Association and of tb**. Board of Direct- 
ors; ihall have charge of the books, papers and other 
property of the Association and perform such other 
duties as may properly belong to his office." 

Sec. 2 and Sec. 3 of Article 4 as amended per recom- 
mendation of the Committee reads as follows: 

"Sec. 2. The Secretary shall attend all meetings of the 
Association and of the Board of Directors; shall have 
charge of the books, papers and other property of the 
Association and perform such other duties as may prop- 



erly belong to his office and be prescribed by the Board 
of Directors. 

**Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall attend tu the collection 
of dues from all members, shall have tht custody of the 
funds of the Association, and shall keep the financial 
books of the Association and disburse said funds in the 
manner prescribed by the Board of Directors." 

Sec. 4 of Article 6 of the By-Laws as in effect at this 
time reads as follows : 

**Sec. 4. Said Board shall annually, immediately after 
its own organization, elect a finance cominittee of three, 
from its own number who shall have power to examine 
at any time, the books and accounts of the Secretary- 
Treasurer; said committee shall also on the morning of 
the first day of the annual meeting, examine the report 
of the Secretary-Trea.curer. audit his accounts, and report 
thereon to the Association, provided, that no officer whose 
accounts may be subject to examination shall under any 
circumstances, be a member of such examining com- 
mittee. The Board of Directors, at the same meeting, 
shall also appoint a committee of three from its own 
number, whose duty it shall be to exaine and report on 
applications for membership." 

Sec. 4 of Article 6 as amended per recommendation 
of the Committee reads as follows : 

"Sec. 4. Said Board shall annually, immediately after 
its own organization, elect a finance committee of three, 
from its own number who shall examine the books and 
accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer, the report of 
the Secretary and Treasurer, audit the accounts, and 
report thereon to the Association, provided, that no 
officer whose accounts may be subject to examination 
shall under any circumstances, be a member of such 
examining committee. The Board of Directors, at the 
same meeting, shall also appoint a committee of three 
from its own number, whose duty it shall be to examine 
and report on application for member.^hip. 

After Sec. 5 of Article 6 your Committee recommends 
the adoption of an additional section, numbered Section 
6, which reads as follows : 

"Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall at the lasv 
meeting previous to the annual convention, appoint a 
nominating committee of three members of the associa- 
tion." 

In the By-Laws as in effect at this time there is no 
provision for appointing a Nominating Committee ex- 
cept by the President and it was deemed advisable to 
have that Committee appointed by the Board of Direct- 
ors. 

{Those three amendments to the By-Lazvs were then 
adopted at the current meeting. — The Editor.) 

PRESIDENT GUFFEY: T will now entertain a 
motion that the Constitution as recommended to be re- 
vised and amended and the By-I^ws as amended, be 
printed and a copy mailed to every member of the Asso- 
ciation so that we can get the matter intelligently before 
you at our next Annual Meeting. Do I hear such a 
motion ? 

MR. DONALD McDONALD: I will make such 
a motion Mr. President. 

DR. I. C. WHITE : I second the motion. 

The above motion having been duly seconded was then 
unanimously adopted. 



PmtAAi the fntnre of your child— buy W. S. 8. 



220 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



us to be as exceedingly liberal in our donations. Less, 
however, than otherwise need be said in this direction, 
for the reason that great has been the liberality of our 
people. Notwithstanding this, it is not out of place to say 
that the coming Red Cross drive should have a response 
more wonderful than anything that has gone before. 

It should go almost without saying, that the response 
to the approaching bond issue should be almost limitless, 
and there's a reason. Every bond purchased is an invest- 
ment at excellent interest, a type of *'giving" that we 
should not pat ourselves on the back for. On the con- 
trary, we should be inspired by that same element that 
is exhilarating in the life of the financier. In other words, 
we, the common people, have now actually become the 
fiftancal center, the loaners of vast sums to our govern- 
ment. We have become loaners, rather than borrowers. 

It is interesting to note what has been accomplished in 
the settling of labor troubles. The following is an offi- 
cial statement: 

"Since we entered the war. Department of Labor has 
dealt with 807 labor troubles involving 1,200,000 workers 
and has adjusted 539 of these difficulties without inter- 
rupting work." 

It is impossible to operate vast plants, and execute 
enormous government orders without the use of em- 
ployes, and although the young men of our country have 
by millions been called into war service, the families of 
the United States and of these young men, strange to say, 
to a very large extent, are not suffering, and will not 
suffer financially on account of this condition, since the 
young women of the United States are becoming the 
earners, holding the positions that were formerly occu- 
pied by their brothers, their husbands, or their sweet- 
hearts. 

As a rsult of the foregoing, the distribution of the vast 
wealth that is pouring into the treasury of the United 
States from the people, is being through these new chan- 
nels distributed to the families of the nation, including 
the families of those who have sent their young men into 
service. 

It would certainly appear that this is a nation not only 
ruled, but co-operatively financed, '*of the people, for the 
people, and by the people." 

We have gathered the following data through the 
courtesy of one of our very large financial institutions, 
and oflFer it as evidence of how we, **the people," are 
financing our ouni country, so that it may buy of us, and 
at a profit to us, those things that are needed by it and 
for its forces. 

When one stops to think of it, the conditions are in- 
deed most wonderful. Note the following facts that tell 
of our growth and of our prosperity as a people: 

Chandler Motor Car Company of Cleveland has een awarded 
contract for tractors by the Government amounting to 
$10,000,000. 

Ford tractor plant near Detroit has output of 70 tractors per 
day. Fifty-seven cars containing seven tractors each for 
export left plant recently for seaboard. 



Regal Motor Car Company, Detroit, has Government contract 
for 300,000 three-inch shells and will erect new building 
at Jamestown, N. Y. 

Willys-Overland Company has another Government contract 
for shells amounting to $10,000,000. making $50,000,000 in 
Government orders now on its books. 

Contract has been let by the Government for a shell-loading 
plant near Elmwood, N. J., to cost $11,000,000, which will 
employ 3,000 men and women. Construction has begun. 

War Department will build ordnance base in France to cost 
$25,000,000 and include 20 store-houses, 12 large shops and 
100 small shops. The work is in progress. 

Government explosives plant near Nashville, Tenn., will cost 
$100,000,000 instead of $60,000,000 as previously planned. 

Keystone furnace of Reading Iron Company resumed after 
shut-down since September with output of 2,100 tons 
pig iron per week. 

Trumbull Steel Company, Warren, Ohio, placed part of its 
open-hearth plant in operation early this month. Plant 
consists of seven lOO-ton furnaces, blooming mill, sheet- 
bar and billet mill. 

J. C. Cromwell Steel Company announces doubling capacity 
of its steel plant during summer months. 

New tin-plate plant of Liberty Steel Company at Warren, 
Ohio, will start April ist with eight mills having annual 
capacity of 600,000 base boxes tin-plate. 

Steel Corporation is constructing gun forging plant at Gary 
to cost $9,000,000. 

New addition to Gary coke ovens comprising 160 new ovens 
and costing $4,000,000 will be completed within a month, 
making 720 ovens for the Steel Corporation at the Gary 
plant. 

New England Westinghouse Company has additional order 
for Browning machine guns exceeding $12,000,000, making 
total Browning guns under Government order from them 
totaling $130,000,000. 

The $20,000,000 addition to Gary plant of Illinois Steel Com- 
pany is completed and this is now the largest steel unit 
in the world. 

Anaconda Company will construct ferro-manganese plant at 
Great Falls, Mont. 

Monsanto Chemical Works of St. Louis purchased plant of 
Commercial Acid Company of East St. Louis for considera- 
tion exceeding $2,000,000. 

Frick interests will spend $9,000 developing 30,000 acres coal 
lands, building modern town, employing 1,000 persons and 
having capacity over 10,000 tons of coal per day. 

New Sinclair refinery at East Chicago has received first oil 
through 800-mile pipe line just completed. Refinery has 
capacity 10,000 barrels per day. 

Reported Galena Signal Oil Company has bought A. S. Cul- 
linan holdings and refinery interests for $10,000,000. 

Reported Government will take over Dow Chemical Com- 
pany's plants at Midland and Mt. Pleasant and use $2,000,- 
000 for improvements to supply chemicals for munitions 
making. 



LAUGH. 

WHY live with the shades eternally pulled down? Why 
not open the windows of your soul, and see something worth 
living for — worth laughing at? Remember, the pendulum 
of life swings from tears to smiles; and when a fellow lives 
like a daily funeral, it's time to take a laugh-powder. — "The 
Silent Partner." 



No amount is too small to lend to your country. Buy War Savings Stamps. 



222 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



nouncements accredited to individuals, merchants, and 
manufacturers. 

We have absolute faith in the patriotism and loyalty 
to the cause existing among the publications in the gas 
field of the United States, and while we are speaking 
well of the work done by the dailies, weeklies, semi- 
monthlies, or monthlies in other fields in the United 
States, we desire to emphatically speak in high terms of 
the purposes back of all patriotic work entered into, or 
conducted by the several publications in the gas fields 
of this country. 

The following letter has been received from the 
American Red Cross National Headquarters at Wash- 
ington. Its contents are, of course, gratifying, to our- 
selves as publishers, but the expressions contained in the 
letter we wish to convey to those who contributed the 
pages, for the gratitude of the Red Cross most properly 
should be extended to them : 



THE AMERICAN RED CROSS 

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

June 3, 1918. 
Mr. L. S. Bigelow, 
President Editor, 
Periodicals Publishing Company, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Dear Sir: 

Mr. Davison, chairman of the War 
Council of the American Red Cross, has 
asked me to acknowledge for him, copies 
of the Gas Industry Magazine and the 
Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal con- 
taining the Red Cross advertisements, 
and to express at the sameltime our warm 
appreciation of your splendid attitude 
of helpfulness to the Red Cross. 

The campaign just concluded has been 
a notable one, and not the least in the 
wonderful way in which the publishers 
and advertisers of the country have 
made it possible to get before the pub- 
lic the appeal of the Red Cross. 

Yours very truly. 



S. ^]IJZ. SzeeZy 



Director Department of Development. 



In no wise depreciating the services of other organi- 
zations in this time of need, yet we would say of the 
Red Cross, that its service rendered to the well soldier, 
to the sick soldier, to the injured soldier, to all soldiers 
in need, and as well to stricken humanity throughout the 
war zone, and to humanity wherever reached by extreme 
calamity, is without exception possibly the greatest work 
of a humanitarian nature extant in the world today. 
Furthermore, in this time of war the accounts of the 
Red Cross are audited by the United States Government, 
a means of preventing profiteering on the part of indi- 
viduals or concerns who might seek this evil form of 



personal gain, even though the society be pure as the 
white of its flag, in its purposes as a society. 

Every dollar, and every minute of time given to Red 
Cross service is a dollar and a minute invested, from 
which is assured vast dividends to humanity. 



EXERCISING AN HOUR A DAY. 



EOR the conservation of its employees' health, 
the newest preparedness plan was recently 
inaugurated in the plant of the White Com- 
pany, one of Cleveland's largest indus- 
trial plants. This to build up the physical endurance 
of the men to a point where each man may assume 
added responsibility, if necessary. 

The plan applies to the executive officers, superin- 
tendents, managers, heads of departments and others 
on whom rests responsibilty of solving important 
manufacturing and selling problems. 

The new plan has been in effect since November 
and the men holding responsible positions it is in- 
tended shall take vigorous physical exercise daily, un- ; 
der the direction of a trained instructor, spending air I 
hour each afternoon in the spacious new gymnasium. ^ 

Many large manufacturing concerns have in times 
past erected pretentious gymnasiums for the optional 
use of their employes outside of regular business hours. , 
but this is the first movement of this nature whereby to 
enforce improved health conditions among employes, 
thus to make them more efficient in the present crisis. 

Those male employes who are enrolled in the dif- 
ferent classes, are paid by the company for the time 
they spend in the **gym/' these men being compelled 
under penalty of a fine to report at the gymnasium at 
a specified time and are not permitted to leave until 
the class is dismissed. 

For some time various of President Wilson's Cab- 
inet have been taking regular exercise daily under the 
personal direction of Walter Camp and their program 
is along the same lines as that in effect at the big 
White plant. 

The Government realizes the great benefit to be 
derived from regular exercise and is recommending 
that all manufacturing and industrial plants set aside 
fifteen minutes a day to be devoted to breathing exer- 
cises and light calisthenics. 

The American soldiers abroad spend several hours 
a day in athletic games and troops landing in France 
are immediately marched to an athletic field, where 
they participate in inter-regimental games. This ex* 
ercise limbers up their muscles after the long joumcf 
on the transports. 

The results of the training, so for, have been grati- 
fying to both the company and the men. The plaO 
may, later, be extended to include all of the five thott- 
sand or more bookkeepers, clerks, accountants, sales- 
men, stenographers, skilled and unskilled workmen it 
the plant. 



Paste the Kaiser in the eye with War Savings Stamps. 



I 



RESULTS OF DRILLING-LATEST REPORTS 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



Mt. Morris — 
Tennant, Peoples Gas i 



BRADFORD FIELD. 
J. T. Jones, W. P. Burton i 



MIDDLE FIELD. 



Lot 3190, Dr. Kitchen i 

Lot 373, Pennsylvania Oil 597 
Schriner, Continental Oil 4 . . 
Jackson, Carnahan & Co. i . . 
Shanley, Natural Gasoline 21 . , 
McKean, Haskell & Co. 18 . 
Isenbrown, Proper & Co. 3... 

Siggins, J. B. Siggins ri 

Wallace, Dinger Oil 5 

Wallace, dinger Oil 6 

Joclyn, Proper et al. 15 



Dry 
Gas 



VENANGO-CLARION. 



Evans, Davis, Glenn et al. 2 

Moore, Krug & Co. i 

Foster, A. T. Foster 28 

Stein, S. P. McCalmont est. 5 

Henry, United Natural Gas 2 

Clarion County — 
Stumpner, Stumpner, Shorts, Kapp 15 

Buzza, J. N. Buzza et al. 5 

Shipps, Shorts et al. 2 

Reed, Keatley, Reed & Co. i 

Furnace Co., Furnace Co. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



BUTLER-ARMSTRONG. 

Young, W. G. Daughtery i 

Barkley, Humphrey & Lockwood i .... 

Kneise hrs., Henry & Co. i 

Campbell, Heist et al. i 



Dry 



Washington — 
Kerr hrs.. Manufacturers L. & H. i. 

Imperial — 
Deemer, Manufacturers L. & H. i . 
Briceland hrs., Watson & Co. 2 

Dorseyville — 
Johnston, Schlagel & Freid 2 ... 
Peel, Peel & Co. i 

Duff City— 
Ncely, Neely Bros. & Harbison i . 
Thman, Harbison & Co. i 

Bellevue — 

Millford, Steir & Co. 2 

Swan hrs., Nock & Co. 2 

Beaver County — 
Connell, S. S. Ferguson & Co. 3 . . , 
Buchannan, Tope, Coulter & Co. 6, 

Milltown — 
Barnett, Peoples Gas i 



Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



8 
3 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 



S 
5 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA. 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

Mannington — 

Gump, South Penn Oil 3 

Barnett, Hope Gas i 

Starcher, South Penn Oil 3 

Smith, Carnegie Gas 2 

Maxwell, Philadelphia Co. 4 

Kincaid, Blackshere Oil & Gas i 

Brannon, Carnegie Gas i 

Kendall, Hope Gas i 

Furbee, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

McCullough, Carnegie Gas 2 

Rutter, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

Haught, Hope Gas 5 

Lemley, Hope Gas 2 

Wetzel and Tyler — 

Sole, Carnegie Gas 2 

Horher, Carnegie Gas i 

Brast, Hope Gas 2 

Wayne, Hope Gas i 

Carlin, South Penn Oil 5 

Marshall County — 

Miller, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

Buzzard, Manufacturers L. & H. i 

Miller, J. C. Nevlin & Co. i 

Brooke County — 

Mozingo, Horse Shoe Oil & Gas i 

Revora, Revora & Co. i 

Ritchie County — 

Nlewbrough, Carter Oil 2 

Hardman, Hope Gas i 

Wilson, Hope Gas i 

Hurst, Hope Gas i 

Taylor, Philadelphia Co. 4 

Freeman hrs., Carter Oil i 

Brannon, South Penn Oil i 

Spurgeon, Philadelphia Co. i 

Lemon, O. V. O. & G. i 

Wirt County — 

Rathbone tract, Roberts Bros. 110 

Swisher, Roberts Oil 14 

Pleasants County — 

Tate, Tate Farm Oil 3 

Ward, Ward Oil i 

Morgan, Smith & McCullough i 

Ditson, Walnut Run Oil i 

Kanawha County — 
Williams Coal, Ohio Cities Gas 100 . . . 
Williams Coal, Ohio Cities Gas 148 . . . . 
Spruce, G. L. Cabot i 

Cabell County — 
I^ilgore, Harsbarger Oil & Gas 5 



Gas 

8 

5 



Dry 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Ga& 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 

19 
23 



To bear is to conquer our fate. — CampbelL 



226 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



Woodsiield — 

McBroom, Cooper & Young i 

Ulrich, Vandergrift & Co., i 

Thomas, J. L. Kakland & Co. i 

Perry County — 

Newman, Ohio Cities Gas i 

Denman & Son, Kellar, Marshall & Co. 3 

Rodgers Bros., Ruth & Strong 15 

Weaver, Thos. O'Connor & Co. 26 

Meenen, Clark Oil & Gas 2 

Studer, Cherokee Oil 2 

Hocking County — 

Hammond, Preston Oil i 

Loomis, United Fuel Prod, i 

Bratt, Preston Oil 3 

Mowery, McConnell Oil 3 

Cable, Preston Oil i 

Athens County — 
Reuter, Meyer Oil & Gas 10 

Morgan County — 
P. H. Building Co., Sunday Creek Coal 4. 
E: R. Dale, H. E. Smith 231 

Noble County — 

Hill, J. T. Watson & Co. 2 

Shafer, H. H. Mosley & Co. 6 

Nau, Brady Dixon & Co. i 

Marietta — 

Hays, Tait Bros. & Co. 5 

Hall, L. J. Tomer & Co. 27 

Plumley, Cambrina Oil & Gas 4 

Breckenridge, J. C. Dinsmoor 17 

Schulteise, Lauck & Co. i 

Templeton, J. H. Kiggins & Co. i 

Brown, James Imel 4 

Deucher-Bliss, W. Tornily & Co. 12 

Montgomery, Bell Oil & Gas i 

Phillips, Central National Bank i 

Felter, G. L. Watson & Co., 3 

Decker. J. B. Braden Oil 4 

Hadley, E. A. Ryan 4 

Felter, Watson & Co. 2 

Harrison County — 

Henderson, Surprise Oil 2 

Kerby, Thomas Moon i 

Smith, Petroleum Oil & Gas 2 

Columbiana County — 

Stanley, J. C. Nevin & Co. i 

Fryfogle. N. G. Co. of VV. Va. i 

Belmont County — 

Ramsey. N. G. Co. of VV. Va. i 

Perkins, Minnie M. Borchcrs 9 



Dry 
(jas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. 

Allegany 15 

Bradford 38 

Middle Field 26 

Venango-Clarion 47 

Butler-Armstrong 14 

S. W. Penna 27 

West Virginia 107 

S. E. Ohio 108 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 



39 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 


49 








125 


I 





25 


8 


2 


64 


5 


5 


19 


4 





208 


8 


5 


691 


17 


22 


1,002 


39 


2 



Licking- 
Liberty- 

Dry 
Gas 



LICKING COUNTY. 

■Gourley, Heisey Gas 2 

D. C. Brooks, Heisey Gas i 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 

Berne — M. Killbarger, City Nat. Gas i . 

KNOX COUNTY. 
Pike — A. J. Pealer, Upham Gas 

ASHLAND COUNTY. 
Sullivan — J. Spencer, Ohio Fuel S. i 



MEDINA COUNTY. 
Brunswick — Carpenter, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Medina — Nichols, Medina Gas & Fuel i 
Lafayette — Schock, Ohio Fuel Sup. i . . . 

J. A. Clark. Ohio Fuel Supply 2 .... 

Infirmary, Logan Gas & Fuel 2 



Dry 

Gas 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Cannan — F. S. & N. Gast, Logan G. & F. i 
G. E. Haley, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Wayne — Johnson, Ohio Fuel Supply i ... 

Clinton — D. O. Welty, East Ohio Gas 2.. . 

E. Aylesworth, East Ohio Gas i 

A. E. Vrooman, East Ohio Gas 4 



Dry 
Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Monroe — Irvine, Logan Gas & Fuel t . . 
Sam Andrews, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 . 



Gas 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover— A. & M. Wolfe, Logan G. & F. i 

Alice C. Beam, Preston Oil i 

E. S. Lewis, Melrose Oil & Gas i 

C. Mallie, East Ohio Gas i 

R. Meyer, East Ohio Gas i 

Ezra Tuttle, East Ohio Gas 2 

E. Champ, East Ohio Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland — Cassill, Ohio Fuel Supply i.... 
Jackson — Sadie Hays, Ohio Fuel Supply i 



Gas 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — Chas. Boring, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 
Anna Rarick, Ohio Fuel Supply i ... 
Nancy J. Lynn, Logan Gas & Fuel 2 , . 



Gas 



HOCKING COUNTY. 

Salt Creek — Eli Stevens, Logan G. & F. i 
Dan Karshner, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 . . . 



Dry 
Gas 

I 
I 

Gas 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

I 
4 

Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

2 
4 



Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
, Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

2 

5 

Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



Total 382 2,183 82 36 



Dry 
Gas 



I 
I 



The world is a comedy to those that think^ a tragedy to those who feel. — Walpole. 



HOLMES COUNTY. 
Washington — S. Fulmer, Logan G. & F. i 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 



2 

I 
I 
I 

5 
o 



Licking 

Fairfield 

Knox 

Ashland 

Medina 

Lorain 

Wayne 6 

2 

7 

2 

3 

2 

2 

I 

O 



Richland 

Cuvahoga 

Vinton 

Perry .... 
Hocking . 
Holmes 
Coshocton 
Jackson 



Total 35 



Prod. 

< o 
o 

o 

o 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



o 

20 

70 
o 

00 



LIMA FIELD. 



WOOD COUNTY. 

Li'berty — Jno. Johnson, Ohio Oil 32 

DEFIANCE COUNTY. 
Lirvan — H. Newcomer. Whitcsides & Co. i 



INDIANA FIELD. 



WELLS COUNTY. 
Nottingham — J. O'Dell. McCrary Bros. j. 

JAY COUNTY. 
Penn — S. E. Davis, Jones & Lyons 8 

GIBSON COUNTY. 

W^ashington — Zimmerman. Indian Rcfg. i 
Thos. Duncan, Ohio Oil i 



Gas 



PIKE COUNTY. 

Madison — G. M. Reed. M. Murphy est. 3 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Gill— W. F. Bates, E. R. Riggs 8 

W. H. Hoseman, E. R. Riggs 3 



Dry 



INDIANA FIELD. 



I 
o 
I 
I 
I 
o 
2 
o 

o 



I 
o 
o 
o 



Gas 



Dry Gas 



I 
I 
o 
o 

4 
o 

2 

5 
2 

3 
I 

I 

o 



24 



Drv 



Dry 



Dry 

Dry 

Gas 
Gas 



Dr 



v 



Dry 
Drv 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

April. '18 March. '18 

Comp. Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. Dry 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Cooper — H. C. Coffey, O. ^L Carter 10... 
Steubenville — Jno. Burnett, Wood Oil 16 

Dry 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 
Busseyville — H. Carter. Ohio Fuel Oil 2. 

ESTILL COUNTY. 

Irvine— W. M. Truitt. Ohio Oil 3 

J. L. Ross, Empire Oil & Gas 10 

Banks Tipton, F. H. Yates i 

L. Young, Empire Oil & Gas 7 



Dry 



POWELL COUNTY. 

Pilot— T. T. Rogers, Ohio Oil 6 

J. Bishop. Ajax Oil r 

P. Y. Drake, Unknown i 

W. Townsend, Cumberland Pet. 5 . . 

John McCoy. Wood Oil 3 

Elijah Baker, Cherokee Oil 17 

Wince Friend, New York-Trvine Oil i 



Dry 



LEE COUNTY. 

P)cattyville — Jno. Kincaid, Stanton Oil 3 

ICurcka. Southwest Oil 3 

Eureka. Southwest Oil 4 

Thos. Hurkhart. Carter Oil 1 



Dry 



ALLEN COUNTY. 

Scottsville — Lester Charton. Walmer Oil i 
May me Johnson, State Line O. & G. 2. , . 

Dott Oliver, Snowden Bros. 2 

B. \. Downing, Phinney & Co. 2 

Slate, Phinney & Co. i 

J. Wainscott, J. L. McMahon & Co. i . . . 
Geo. Tucker, J. W. CashdoHar i 



Dry 
Gas 



W^ells I 

Blackford o 

Jay 3 

Delaware 

Randolph o 

Gibson 3 

Pike 7 

Sullivan 4 

. Total 18 



ROCKCASTLE COUNTY. 
Broadhead — Owens-Norton. .Atlantic Oil & Prod. i. 

KNOX COUNTY. 
Barbourville — Morris. New York Dev. i 

PULASKI COUNTY. 
Somerset— White Oak. P. J. White i 

BREATHITT COUNTY. 
Copes Branch — Buck Crawford, Atlantic O. & P. 2.. 

LOGAN COUNTY. 
Russellville — Edward, Big Dome Oil i 

SUMNER COUNTY. 
Gallatine — Widow Carter, Judge Kies i 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
iDry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



6 
I 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 






I 


I 


2 

I 
2 

7 




I 

3 

4 

3 
2 

6 

8 

27 






20 

145 

60 

*« .» 
/o 

135 

34 

469 




I 
I 


I 
I 
I 

5 
10 


Wavne . . . . 




E. 

Prod. 

45 
96 

14 
10 


Dry 
2 



I 







85 


KENTUCKY-TENNESSE 







20 

20 1; 


COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. 
c 


Gas 



6 


Woife 

Lawrence .. 
Morgan . . . 


• «J 

8 

4 






406 


...................... m^ 

I 






He that wrestles with us strenj^thens. our nerves and sharpens our skUl. Our antagonist is our helper. — B.\&x^^, 



228 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



June 



Estill 36 

Powell 41 

Lee 34 

Allen 21 

Barren S 

Floyd .-. ^ 

Lincoln 10 

Rockcastle i 

Knox I 

Pulaski I 

Owsley I 

Breathitt S 

Logan I 

Tennessee 4 

Total 180 



427 

445 

755 
240 

25 
5 

50 
o 
o 


5 

15 

o 

90 
2,222 



4 

7 

4 
6 




I 
I 
o 
o 
I 
I 
o 

28 







I 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

I 



o 



I 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



CLARK COUNTY. 

Parker— Otis Elliott, J. L Campbell & Co. 7 

CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Oblong — Job Randolph, H. C. Ferriman & Co. 3 

Licking— Carolina Wilkin, W. C. Kennedy Co. i 

Montgomery — Lake Dances, Kentucky Petroleum 2 

Honey Creek — Jones, Craig & Lowrie 7 

W. A. F. H. Hope, Lease Oil 8 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 
Dennison— Thos. Perkins, Smith & Leighty i 
W. Dennison, Central Refg. 2 



4 
I 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



CLINTON COUNTY. 
Irishtown— Geo. Kandis, Ewing & Spurgeon i 

WABASH COUNTY. 

Wabash— Jac. Smith, Sian Oil & Gas 13 

Friendsville— Toney, Midland O. & G. 3 

O. Matheney, Central Refg. 2 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

April, *i8 March, '18 

Comp. Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. Dry 



Cbrk 7 

Crawford 18 

Lawrence 7 

Clinton 2 

Marion o 

Wabash 3 

Jasper o 

Edgar 

McDonough i 



72 

84 
216 

3 
o 

o 

o 

o 

3 



Total 38 378 



I 

5 

2 

I 
o 

3 
o 
o 
o 

12 



4 
12 

4 
o 

I 

3 
I 

I 
I 

27 



17 
108 

170 



o 

o 

2 

I 

10 

308 



o 

4 
I 



I 

3 
o 





KANSAS. 



BUTLER COUNTY. 

26-26-4, Buscher, Grifman Oil i Dry 

7-29-4, Ruthford, Mid-Kansas O. & G. 3 I^«*y 

8-29-4, Ruthford. Mid-Kansas O. & G. 6 Gas 

9-29-4, Harter, Mid-Kansas O. & G. 3 ^y 

Q-29-4, Harter, Mid-Kansas O. & G. S '^^V 

9-29-4. Harter, Mid-Kansas O. & G. 6 Dry 



14-29-3, Hoyt, Lucky Eight Oil 2 

26-26-4, Buffman, Manley & Griffith i .. 

1-28-5, Tague, Central O. & G. 2 

25-26-5, SIuss, Big Chief Oil i 

27-24-5, Colvin, Phillips ct a1. i 

8-25-4, Munson, P. O. & G. i 

36-25-4, Houston, Empire G. & F. 25 

27-27-5, Wilson, Carter Oil 18 

»6-26-4, Bralcy, Texokla Oil i 

18-26-4, Mosier, P. O. & G. i 

26-26-5, Sluss, Skelly et al. 2 

9-26-4, Zink, Peters O. & G. i 

1-27-5, Smock, Carter Oil i 

9-23-3, Regier, Big Mogul Oil i 

15-25-4, Bradford, Wyoming-Montana i. 
18-23-4, Loydig, Dedrick et al. i 

1-26-4, Ralston, Empire G. •& F. i 

25-25-4, Houston, Empire G. & F. 38 

29-25-5, Stapleton, Empire G. & F. 22 . . . 
26-25-4, Harden, Empire G. & F. i 

3-25-5, Robinson, Theta Oil 15 

29-26-5, Kinney, Leonard Oil 2 

1 1 -27-5, Marshall, Haverhill Petroleum 3 



Gas 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Gas 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 



Gas 4 

Dry 25 

Gas 7fOC»,ooo 



1 2- 1 6-21 

12-16-21 

23-16-21 

12-17-22 

21-17-22 

20-17-23 

17-17-23 

35-17-22 

I 3- 16-21 

16-21-21 

32-16-21 

1 3- 16-21 

28-17-22 

28-17-22 

20-16-21 

IO-16-21 

13-16-20 

19-17-23 

21 -T 7-22 
2Q-16-2I 
IO-16-2I 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



26-31-12, 
20-13-12, 
34-31-12, 
22-33- ro, 
26-32-14, 

31-32-13, 
24-31-12, 
24-32-12, 
North of 
16-31-12, 

31-32-13. 
24-31 12, 

36-33*12, 

27-33- TO, 



MIAMI-PRANKLIN AND DOUGLAS COUNTIES. 

Mallory, J. E. Mallory i Dry 

Tullos, Benton O. & G. 4 Dry 

Boozem, unknown owner 2 Dry 

Hogan, Harley et al. i Dry 

Crees, Dr. L N. Miller 5 Dry 

Kelly, unknown parties i Dry 

Wilgers, unknown parties i Dn' 

Stockwell, Greystone O. & G. i Dr>' 

Mallory, Jackson O. & G. 3 Gas 

Chitton, Victor O. & G. i Dry 

Tullos, Benton O. & G. 5 Dry 

Weingart, Russell Strand et al. 2 Dry 

Roberts, Grand Central Oil i Dry 

Roberts, Grand Central Oil 2 Dry 

Thompson, Sentinel O. & G. 4 Dry 

Bradford Flo Jean Oil 5 Gas 

Mallory, Mallory i Gas 

Hogan, Root Pennman Co. 20 Dr}- 

Crees. Dr, L N. Miller 6 Dry 

Gingrich, Alflomo Oil i Dry 

Bauman, Choctaw & Chickasha 5 Dry 



CHAUTAUQUA AND ELK COUNTIES. 

Jones, Railroaders Oil i 

Dexter, Bliss & Co. 5 

Guthrie, West & Hazlett 3 

Hopkins. C. E. Roth et al. 2 

Hendricks, Dover Oil 2 

Seybold. Sachem Oil i 

Deeskill, Conley & Bowson i 

Fee, Mary Holliday 

Longton, Brooker Bros, i . . . , 

Freeman, Statti et al. i 

Seybold, Sachem Oil 4 

Nelson, Ashley et al. 2 

McAfee, Denver parties i 

Moffit, C. E. Roth 4 



3 
iS 

f,750.«» 




Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



^ I 



,4.000, 



It is not enough to do good; one must do it the right way.— Morley. 



atOIMO COUHTT 

IK.-rfii.>n lull* >i«nrr* i 
. t..h^n I M I iifi* rl *T I 
' < ■n<t>>>r*l McTin-t i xl i 
. Ii*«*tl I s t ini'^tn 
. HafBhifli \I.H.Tr ilr..t A I'... j 

, l»-iln» 1'nbnoan i>«nrr i 

Van t an n«t>*n< I W M.> -rr rt a1 J 
> H»*rtiVFri llrll rl ■! j 
I .l.liii...n .1 .1 K>.r'«.tr •! A <. t« 



ALLSH COUWTV 

■I tyt«a •) 



iR U-tlrr U'ltalf 






1* It It ■.:. ■, ^'.t rM A I,,,»., , 

M tl •> Uf..U„ U I kasM. •• A ., 

»»M' -J. t lit, ini-> IVanaat tt A l*. i 
 ' .'i II. Ila:l suii4>ilt •>.!  

i*ift t i.t'.f, <^.,. i.,t t 



:4 ■» • I •■ . iHl ( 
■"I  I ••rnrral rrlfntriiai | 
U >• .- t-mp.'* l,a, A K»*l I 
'I <.*' 1 llMhar4wiii ft al I 
Wrfhrfk.ii favHl,. . 
I t'f. lU rtak. It!,ii ... (.,; , 



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OKLAHOMA 

oa*(.K (ovkTV 



Ik, 



MOMTbOHrrV < 






> * I H<l IVf'-. A M»<* 
i» I .!t ; \ M,.i;»w. 

ttt V •.... lar..'-.   



» : *■ -Imar. I- 
"« ''«'h (Iff. 
I- -).:*• ii> : 



I hlu frukMM Di«Mh 



33-»>-'4- Lacey, E. V. Crowell i 

32-28-13, Sheets. J. C. Sheets 

36-29-13, Gordon. Caney Gas 

17-26-13. Wilson. Mid-Co. Gasoline Co. 2. 
i6-26-i2. Lot 38, Interstate Oil & Gas 27  

9-26-12, Lot 35. Kinsley Oil & Gas 52 . . . 

0-28-13, Hanks. Queen Oil & Refju. 3  

18-28-14. Davis, Copan Oil 1 

36-28-14, Fee, Tidal Oil 34 



Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Gas 500.000 



) NORTHBRN ROGERS COUNTIES. 



Cherokee Shallow— 

11.24.17. Palmour. Rex Oil 2 

26-24-16. DouRlas. Gibraltar Oil 2 

15-24.16. Rowsey. Gt. Soiilhweslcrn Oil 5 . 

35-25-16. Greer. Riij soo Oil i 

io-25-'6, Brtimmon. Spring Oil 12 

29-27-16. Wills, Strike Oil Syndicate 1 .... 

11-24-T7, Chelsea Oil 3 

18-24-17. McAUester's 7 

8.24-17. Optimo Oil & Gas 5 

8-24.17. -Optimo Oil & Gas 6 

4-25.17. Midland Oil & DrillinK 7 

6-26-16. Ballard. Nicklc & Cook 1 



Dry 



TULSA COUNTY. 
Bird Creek ;ind Skiatook — 

-13. Hitchie. BerRcn Oil & Gas ... 

■13. Donahoe. Lewis et al. 2 

-13, Kinneson. Texas Co. r 

-13. Justice. Tulsa Fuel 1 

21-20-13, Johnson. Liberty Oil 12 

19-20-13. Lloyd. Texas Co. 1 

36-23-13. Foreman. Tulsa Fuel 1 

Red Fork— 

9-19-11, Barnett, Charles Page 2 

29-19-11. Leader. Irelan & Smith 1... 

29-19-12, Wright Producing Co 

20-19-11. Postoak. I', S, Oil 14 

8-19-11. Island. C. Page 1 

21-19-12. Ferryman. I", S. Oil 3 

34-19-12. Templin. Gladys Belle Oil 1 .. 

29-19-11. Flat. BillinRlea et al. i 

Broken Arrow^ 
11-19-13. Morgan. H. F. Wilcox et al. .. 

23-19-13. Fields. Gallagher ct al. 1 

13-18.14, Rarnctt. Bearman et al. 2 

25-18-14. Scott. Bearman et al. 7 

33-18-14, Colbert, Brown & McFunn 1 

34-18-14. Ferryman, F-dgar Oil i 

35-18-14. Childers. T-ampton * 



>kla. Queen Oil l 
impson et al. . . . 
Brady el al. q... 



33-18-14. Smith. 
29-18.1;. McHeni 
29-10-14, Tucker. 
30-18-13. Perrym: 

17-18-15. Kernee. ! tiompson et ai. 1 

24-18-14. Beaver. Varner et al. [ 

S-18-13. Fields, Tucker et al. 2 

Bixby— 

21-16-13, Rig Pond Tidal Oil 2 

27-17-13. Mings. Humble Oil 4 

28.[6-i3. Puryear, Ardi^^onc & Bradcn i 

iQ-18-13, Kirnie, Cosden & Roger's i 

14-17-13. Beggs. Davis Sr Younger 2 

29-16-13 Big Pond, W. M. Cole et al. 1.. 
25-16-14, Grayson. Carter Oil 1 

6-16-13. Murray. Eastern Oil 2 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



23-17.14, Wilcox. H. H. McFann 2 . 
i8-i;-i3, Berryhill, Gladys Oil 5... 



Gas SO,«».«» 



OKMULGEE COUNTY. 



Mounds- 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



, Stearns. Sperry Oil & Gas 1 

, Barnett, American Petroleum i ... 

. Sterans, H. H. McFann et al. 1 

. Adams, J. O. Mitchell 

, Lewis. Carter Oil I 

, Lewis. Minshell et at. I 

, Bruner, Kawfictd Oil & Gas I 

M6-II. Hadley, Carter Oil I 

. Hill. Gypsy Oil 3 

-16-1 1, Anthis, Paraffine Oil 2 

-16-11, Lannen, Paraffine Oil 1 

It, Lewis, Carter Oil 1 

[1, Looma, F. Barnes I 

II, Lewis, Territorial Oil 1 

T8-16-12. Thornton O. & G. 4.. 

11-16-12, Sharp. Kawfield Oil 1 Dfj 

26-16-13. Dunlap et al.. Solo Oil 7 "^ 

Hamilton Switch, Voungstown— 

36-14-11. Gill. Okmulgee P. & R. 2 

25-14-1 1. Fee. Texas Co. r 

1') 14-13, Montgomery, Peerless O. & G. 1.... 

17-14-13, Berryhill. Ohio Cities Gas 2 

36-14-1 1, Foster. W. Phillips et al, 2 

34-15-11, Isparhecher, Wilcox et al. i 

30-14-12. Huckaby, Barbara Oil I 

Bald Hill and Booch Sand— 

4-15-14. Bruner. Tidal Oil I 

20-15-14. Lewis. et al. 7 

31-14-13- Ben. ^2 

13- 14-' 4. & Smith 11 

21-14-14. Colbert. Sperry Oil & Gas 12 

36-14-14. Rentie. E. R. Black ct al. 2 

13-14-14. Sutler, Chestnut & Stnilh 15 

5-14-14. Deland. P. O. & G. 3 

23.14-13. Lovett, Reno Oil r 

22-14-14. Colbert. Okmulgee P. & R 

29-14-14. Ashley, Truman Oil 5 

14-15-14. Scoil. Musgrove Oil 15 

32-14-14, Renlie. Brady's Bend Oil 3 

Tiger Flats— 

2-13-11, Larney, Carter Oil 1 

3'>-r2-ii. Rentie. Foley el al. i 

19-12-12, Graves, Luck Tiger Oil 5 

31-12-12. Rentie. M. Clark 1 

35-I3-I'*, Tiger. Cosden Oil & Gas 2 

•5-t3-i2, Bank. Cosden Oil & Gas 4 

6-1 1-12. Holmes, Humble Oil 4 

Okmulgee. Morris — 

16-13-14. Morton. Oklahoma Oil 1 

34-13-14, Brown. J. H. Rebold et al. i 

16-13-1.1. Grace. Okmulgee P. & R. 2 

2-rvil. Highlower. Nile Oil & Gas i 

16-13-14. Morton, Oklamo Oil S 

14-13-14, Clarney, Rebold et at. i 

IQ-13-14, Willie. W. B. Pine et al. 2 

TM-i.";- Town. Lambert el al, 3 

2i-[3-M- Scott. Long et al. 4 

8-13-14. Landry, D. F, Parker 1 

10-13-14. Mcintosh. Keeton & Reynolds I..., 

Henrietta — 
16-1 r-1 J, Stand. Okmulgee P. & R. 1 



Dry 
Ga* 
Gu 
Dry 
Dry 
Gu 
Dry 
Gu 
Drr 



Dry 
I>rT 



Drr 
Drjr 

Dry 
Dry 
D17 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 

Dry 
Dr» 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



Pei^le will not look forwcrd to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.— Bmke. 



-vv* 



NATURAL GAS AfD 



June 






I . ......■■ 

ARKANSAS. 

'ixia rvtiolcuin I 

.. l4.ii^»M, «.\-ntral Coal O- & G. r 
. I. \U I Hiin. liarper ct al. i 

W i^ vMmplctvv.1 



NSBRASKA. 



I I III! I \. 1 ^ ^IlllltV 

i '. \V. Mvniiv;Kr. The Bowsers i 



KANSAS. 

SUMMARY OF WEIXS C01fFX.KrKD. 

Comp. Pn>l 

Im.iU. r^ 3^2-00.! 

» li.tuiau«|u.i ^.Ik -- 37 5^2 

^1 i.m .-iitiici s 30 337 

Nli.im; I'laukliii iVujilas 7^ ^3 

\Vil...u 27 r^W 

\lliu 22 r6»> 

\v«»iK'»  • -- ^' 'j^i 

WiUll.lln -i^ 34.1 

I oi.tl -t7x 34.0»i^ 



TOO 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMABT OF WELLS COMFLBTED. 



iKasc 

Washington 

Nowata- Roger? ... 

IVUa 

Creek 

Okmuleee 

Pawnee 

Pavne 

Kay 



Gart:c!d-N' 
Carter . 
Wildcats 

T--.:a: 



MIIXONTINENT. 



Kant a4 . 

r' • « • 

.\r<can§a* 






SUMMAFT OF WELLS COMFLETED. 

^74 S*/>^ 

7*4 .y^-'79 

3 o 



153 
3 



3 
9 



>7 



I>rr 



Drj 


Ga.* 


2^ 


4 




J 


ro 


" 


rJ» 


2 


^ 


2 


iV 
^ 


r 


ro 




22 


2 



i6 



OOTItp. 


Pro'l. 


Drv 


Gx* 


:o^ 


7!-2>» 


r^/ 


:2 


f< 


'y:^ 

# 


8 


2 


• ' f 


',-', 


12 





>-* 


*./ -3 


30 





^.r 


2 ::x 


2? 





.=^ 


^6ji» 


29% 


6 


:^/. 


5-K5t2 


4^ 


r^ 


:x 


4:9 


I 





^ 


7r>5 


I 





31 


4.5-» 


6 


2 


:6 


5-t|0 


3 





27 


y>o 


6 


4 


. :6 


zSo 


10 


2 



7^ .1*^.179 I^ 53 



r>ry Ga§ 



' 2r»r 7^'^ '.? 2^5 



o 

73 






-Tl 



n'aniT 



»■ 



Wa4^PMX«r 



er ^■»:a.i _.:. jr. 



I*->£.*c^ pTre Oil 2 

'ziiZ^ n^jod LxBck CHI : 
Marai, My^-f ct al : 



. '^ 



?.-»ach. 5a€^o^? et al 5.* . . 

Da&fels. Ktxeha et *L 7 

Roller. Varrr et al 27 

•Cnarr.*. S^jl^r-Bsrfc^crrTett 



^•V' 



Dtt 



Browrr CoantT — 3r- T- ' *«: >c<i- 
rf . 3pfa?ee et al. r 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



SUMMAKT OF COMFLETED WO 

Coin?. 

Electra 21 

Soafhrre H:I! 28 

Barkbarcett , . j6 

M:*ceIIancou5 11 



Total rog 



4.072 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



Caddo — 
23-21-16, Brooks Fee. The Texas Co. 14... 

J6-21-15. Dickson. Jim Clark Oil i 

ro-20-15. Glassell. Mo.-La, Oil 4 

De Soto — 
2J-13-12. Christine. The Texas Co. 27 

Bossier — 
27-16-11. Fletcher & Ale.xander. Atlas Co. i, 

29-16-12. Weaver, .\tlas Oil i 

7-16-11. Giddens. The Texas Co. i 

Miscellaneous — Caddo— 
17-13. Walpoole. Southwestern G. & E. 166. 
17-13. Slatter>-. The Texas Co. C-i 

Morehouse — 
J.V2I- 5, Spyker. Southern Carbon 2 

Ouachita — 
T2-19- 4. Kerr. Central Co.. Inc. i 



Drv 
Dry 
Gas 
Dn- 
Gas 



Dry 
Drv 



Drv 
Dtt 
Drr 
Dry 
Dr^- 
Dri- 
Dti 
Dtt 
Dr^ 
Drr 
lb 
Drr 



12 



Dry 



Prod. 


Dry 


'".a^ 


717 

360 

2-iir 

5&4 



12 • 

I 


n 







14 



Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Drr 

Gai 
Ga? 
Ga« 

Gas 
Gas 

Gas 
Gas 



Fortmia hdpt the brave.— Terrence. 



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EVERY MAN A K>ND~HOLX»UI 



* v. 



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AROUND THE BELT 

New WelU, New Pipe Lines, New Contracts, Additions and Extensions. A Fund o( Valuable News Gatbcrad 

for the Journal Through Many Sources. 



TRADE PERSONALS 



It will be noted that the names appearing under the personal headings 
are exclusively those of men interested in the development of the natural 
gas field. Those wishing to learn of matters pertaining to men interested 
in the field of artificial gas should refer to THE GAS INDUSTRY maga- 
zine, published at 60 Pearl Street, Buffalo, N. Y., which devotes its col- 
umns entirely to artificial gas matters. That magazine is published by 
the publishers of THE NATURAL GAS JOURNAL, each magazine being 
specificially issued for its respective field. In this way each magazine 
renders 100% efficiency in the industry it covers. — Publisher's Note. 

Beerowek, Lincolx, manager of the Enid division 
of the Oklahoma (]as & Electric Company, has been 
elected director of the Enid Rotary Club. 

CoRTELVou. George B., President of the ConsoHdated 
Gas Company, New York City, has been elected Presi- 
dent of the American Gas Association, the national or- 
ganization which has grown out of the amalgamation of 
the American Gas Institute and the National Commercial 
Gas Association. 

Cox, Frank, of Charleston, West Virginia, was 
elected Vice-President of the Merritt Oil & Gas Com- 
pany, Tulsa, Okla., at the recent annual meeting of that 
corporation. 

Denning, L. B., of Columbus, Ohio, President of the 
Lone Star Gas Company, Fort Worth. Tex., is now also 
assistant to the President and Secretary of the Ohio 
Fuel Supply Company, \'ice-President and General Man- 
ager of the Fayette County Gas Company, Secretary of 
the Ohio Fuel Company, and Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Tropical Oil Company, filling the vacancies caused 
by the death of Harry C. Reeser. 

Dohertv. Henry L., at the commencement of Lin- 
coln Memorial University, Cumberland Gap, Tenn.. was 
awarded the degree of LL.D. 

Earnest, Rictiard H., has been elected Vice-President 
and General Manager of the Manhattan Oil Company, 
Tulsa, Okla. 

GiLLOCLV, J. J., formerly with the Iroquois Natural 
Gas Company of Buffalo, N. Y., is now with the Ameri- 
can expeditionary force in France. 

Hall, W. E., has been elected President of the re- 
cently formed W. E. Hall Oil & Gas Company, Shreve- 
port. La. 

Heath, Cv, is President of the Pet Oil Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind., the object of which is the selling of 
mixed artificial and natural gas in Indiana. 

HoLnR(X)K, David O., of Pittsburg, Pa., is the new 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Natural Gas Association of 
America. 

Keck, William M.. has recently been appointed Con- 
sulting Engineer to the Oil & Gas Department of the 
State of California. 



Lege, F. M., Jr., who has been manager of the Dallas 
Light & Power Company, Dallas, Texas, is now \'ice- 
President and General Manager of the Lone Star & 
Gas Company, Fort Worth, Texas. 

LvNOT, Dr. W. D., formerly safety and welfare expert 
for the principal companies in the Joplin, Mo., zinc min- 
ing district, has been secured by the Empire Gas & Fuel 
Company. He will remove to Bartlesville, where he will 
be in exclusive charge of similar operations. 

Maguire, a. G., of the Bartles-Maguire Oil Company 
of Milwaukee, Wis., has been appointed assistant to M. 
L. Requa. Oil Director of the Fuel Administration. Mr. 
Maguire will be connected with the purchasing end of 
the work. 

McCuNE, Charles A., has resigned his position as 
Chief Engineer of the Commercial Acetylene Company, 
and is now Sales Manager for the Page Steel & Wire 
Company, 30 Church Street, New York. His activities 
will be devoted to the selling and service of Armco Weld- 
ing Rods. 

Merritt, Thomas A., of Duluth, Minn., at the annual 
meeting of the Merritt Oil & Gas Company, Tulsa, Okla., 
was elected President of the company. 

Oliphant, B. C. of the Iroquois Natural Gas Com- 
pany, Buffalo, N. Y., was elected Vice-President of the 
Natural Gas Association of America, at the recent an- 
nual meeting of that organization. 

Richardson, G. H., formerly auditor of the Oklahoma 
Gas & Electric Company, Drumright division, is now in 
the Auditing Department at Oklahoma City. R. D. 
Beard, formerly of Fort Smith, will succeed Mr. Rich- 
ardson as auditor at Drumright. 

Walton. J. D., recently became Assistant Superin- 
tendent of the Iroquois Gas Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 



INCORPORATED 



DELAWARE— Dover 

The \^olcanic Oil & Gas Company of Kentucky has 
been chartered under the laws of this state by E. M. Has- 
lem, Ferris Giles, and O. M. Ryan, of Wilmington, Del. 
The company has a capital of $250,000. 

INDIANA — Indianapolis 

The Pet Oil Company was recently incorporated in 
this city with a capital stock of $100,000, for the purpose 
of supplying local consumers with mixed natural and ar- 
tigcial gas. The President of the company is Cy Heath. 

Tcrrc Haute 

The Henry Oil & Gas Company has been formed here 
wMth a capital stock of $150,000. George F. Kean is 
among those interested. 



The march of the human mind is slow. — Burke. 



NATl RAl. CAS AM) l.AM)l INF. 



m . « 



». ASSAS i. ar !r-: L -i 



.\ 



 • 



< K J •- 4 I 'T 



« • 



*. I&IANA &hrv«r|«.iit 



  



V\ SS.s^ I '- \SI A 



•l! AMOMA T 



u •« 



• • 



 * 



i %7 VIHUINIA )«.. 



•  . • 



• • 



PER CL'HIC lOOl- KAILS 



«».>;aha Mur . » 



• t 



A -x 



• 



• • • • 



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Thar* u nu ilrt»t «tll: to ::iiuh prrj ;.l.^«> y^\ •^. %a \>.x\ A ..«'•..« fl-^tAfch 



236 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



GENERAL 



CALIFORNIA— Glendale 

The Southern California Gas Company, it is reported, 
will extend its service to this city. 

Ventura 

It is reported that a plant will be built here by the 
State Consolfdated Oil Company for the manufacture of 
gasoline. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Washington 

The British thermal unit in measuring gas is to be 
made the standardized unit by government authority in 
the United States, as a conservation proposition. 

ILLINOIS— Chicago 

Eight of the staff of H. M. Byllesby & Company are 
reported as having arrived "over there." They are : Gen- 
eral George H. Harries, A. W. Carstens, E. K. MacDon- 
ald, R. T. Purchas, T. E. Sanford, A. H. Say re, A. H. 
Kuhn, and J. J. Nolan. 

KANSAS— Finney County 

Territory in this county which has been favorably re- 
ported upon by geologists is shortly to be tested by the 
Garden City Oil & Gas Company. The company was re- 
cently formed for this purpose. 

LaCygne 

A 2,000,000- foot gasser has been completed in the 
fields near this place. 

Miami 

The Mutual Oil & Gas Company, recently organized, 
has leased a tract of land in this county, and will begin 
to drill test wells shortly. 

Sedan 

The Puritan Oil & Fuel Company recently drilled a 
well on the Ackerman farm to a depth of 2,000 feet 
without finding a trace of oil or gas. The water, how- 
ever, which is present in great volume, is impregnated 
with mineral substances, which may make it valuable for 
medicinal purposes. 

Boggier Parish 

In the Elm Grove district, Bossier Parish, at 875 feet, 
and the Federal Petroleum Company completed a 15,000,- 
000-foot well on the Union Sawmill Company lease, in 
section 13-20-3. 

Monroe District 

The Peerless Carbon Black Company, in its No. i on 
the Moore property in section 35-20-4, completed a 12,- 
000,000- foot gas well. The well was drilled to a depth 
of 2,150 feet. » 

New Orleang 

The difficulty in obtaining steel pipe is deferring the 
bringing of natural gas to the city from the Terrebonne 
district. In this connection, the feasibility of using con- 
crete pipe is being investigated. Experiments are being 
conducted by Howard Eggleston, Industrial Engineer of 
the New Orleans Association of Commerce. 



Pine Igland Diatrict 

The Standard Oil Company has a showing of oil and 
gas in a test on the Dixon lease in section 15-21 -14, in 
the shallow sand at 950 feet. 

Kinnebrew & RatcliflF completed a 15, 000,000- foot well 
in No. I Youree, section 12-21 -15, at 2,300 feet. The 
Richardson Oil Company's No. 2 Christian, section 27- 
21-15, made a 10,000,000 foot well at 2,250 feet. The 
Texas Company has a 20,000,000- foot gasser in No. i 
Kelly, setion 8-16-11. 

Shreveport 

After many unsuccessful attempts to control a wild 
gas well in the Elm Grove district, 14 miles north of 
Shreveport, owned by White Brothers and known as 
Ward Well No. 2. which became uncontrollable last No- 
vember, a committee composed of J. W. Smith, superin- 
tendent of minerals, as chairman, and several officials 
of local gas companies, recently appointed by Commis- 
sioner of Conservation M. L. Alexander, agreed that the 
only way to control the situation would be to kill Ward 
Well No. I, which is owned by the Atlas Company. This 
was done and since then indications that the activity in 
the wild well is decreasing, according to statements of 
the committee. 

NEW YORK— Jameatown 

The Pine Ridge Oil & Gas Company struck a good 
flow of gas on the Stowe farm, on the outskirts of the 
city. The gas was found at a depth of 750 feet. It is 
the plan to send the drill deeper to test the territory for 
oil. 

Richburg 

The Oil & Gas Company has let a contract to drill 
three wells on a lease in this place. 

OHIO— Columbug 

This city has been chosen as the place for the 1919 
convention of the Natural Gas Association of America, 
which recently held its annual convention in Pittsburgh. 

Coghocton County 

In the northwest quarter of section 14, Pike township, 
the Plymouth Oil & Gas Company's test on the Stanley 
Sharpless farm is producing 500,000 cubic feet of gas 
with a light showing of oil. 

Findlay 

According to report, the Logan Natural Gas Company 
is facing the possible necessity of having to close down 
operations in this city on account of shortage of gas 
supply. 

OKLAHOMA— Carter County 

The structure as outlined by geologists, running from 
the Wheeler field in Carter County, through the Graham 
and Fox countries and extending up into northern 
Stephens County, is being proven productive of oil and 
gas. 

Covington 

The natural gas line from the gas fields north of the 
city is completed, and the city distributing system is rap- 
idly nearing completion. 



Self -trust is the first secret of success. — ^EmersoiL 



Creek County 

The Magnolia Petroleum Company has drilled iii its 
test on the Jones farrii in section 36-18-7.' It is making 
5,000,000 feet of gas in the Bartlesville sand at a depth 
of 2,928 feet. ' 

The Magnolia Company also has a gasser in section 
34-17-7 on the Boome property, which is said to be good 
for 23,000,000 cubic feet. The gas is from the Bartles- 
ville sand at 2,732 feet. 

On the Agent farm, in section 24-17-12 Swoveland and 
others have a 100,000-foot gasser in their No. i at a 
depth of 1,725 feet. 

HaskeU 

In the Haskell district, in Wagoner and Muskogee 
counties, Cosden and others completed No. 5, in section 
26-16-15, in sand at 1,352-64 feet, and have a well doing 
6,000,000 feet of gas and 5 barrels of oil. 

On the Lewis farm in section 1-7-18 the Pittsburg Oil 
& Gas Company has a gasser which is said to have a 
capacity of 30,000,000 cubic feet. The gas is in sand 
from 1,547 to 1,643 fc^t- 

Healdton Field 

The Kirk gas well, in section 31-2S-IW, on the Bennett 
farm, has been shut in as a gasser. 

The Sparks Oil & Development Company is building 
a California rig on the Sparks farm in section 30-2S-2W, 
about 300 feet northeast of the Kirk gasser in section 31. 

The Phillips Petroleum Company's Tucker No. i, in 
section 29-2S-3W, is making about 40,000,000 cubic feet 
of gas from sand found at 1,860 feet. The company's 
No. 4 Tucker is on top of a gas sand at 1,942 feet, and 
is waiting for cement to set before drilling in. 

Kay County 

The Empire Gas & Fuel Company has an 8,000,000- 
foot gasser in its No. 4 on the Shurtz farm in section 
31-27-1. 

The Southwestern Oil has a 15,000,000- foot gasser at 
1,360-80 feet in No. 7 on the Welch farm, in section 20- 
28-1 east. 

Glaman Oil Company completed a loo-barrel well in 
sand at 1,648-53 feet, on the Perry farm, in the north- 
east corner of the southwest of the northwest quarter of 
section 29-28-1. 

Kay County 

The Empire Gas & Fuel Company has a 13,000,000- 
foot gas well in No. 2, on the Pratt farm, in section 31- 
29-1 east, from sand at 2,588 to 2,602 feet. 

Anderson & Johnson have a small gas well on the 
Sango farm in section 21- 13- 15. The gas was found at a 
depth of 1,960 feet. 

Chestnut & Smith, in their No. 3 on the Rentie land 
in section 19-14-15, have a well making 3,000,000 cubic 
feet. 

Muskogee County 

The Oklahoma-Iowa Oil Company brought in a well 
on the Taylor land in section 21-15- 16 which produced 
a 20,000,000-foot gasser in the beginning, then a large 
quantity of water, and finally ceased producing both the 
gas and the water. 



Oklahoma City 

Of the staff of the Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company, 
twenty-seven are now in government service. 

Okmulgee 

The Okmulgee Producing & Refining Company, on the 
Sone farm in the Morris district,, section 9-13-12, reports 
a 3,000,000- foot gasser, which is also producing 25 bar- 
rels of oil. 

Osage 

In section 32-22-10 E. N. Gillespie has completed a 
20,000,000- foot gasser. 

The Clover Oil Company's No. 2, on lot 202, in section 
36-27-11, is making 2,000,000 cubic feet of gas at a depth 
of 1,785 feet. 

The Osage Oil & Refining Company has a 4,000,000- 
foot gas well at 1,075 ^^^t in its No. i, in section 18- 
24-12. 

The Magnolia Petroleum Company, in its No. 12 on 
lot 90, in section 27-22-12, has a well producin^^ 1,000,000 
cubic feet. 

Pawnee County 

The Magnolia Petroleum Company has a 5,000,000- 
foot gasser in its test on the Jones farm, in section 36- 
18-7. It is in the Bartlesville sand at 2,928 to 3,001 
feet. The same company's No. 2 Boone, in section 34- 
^7-7 7 is good for 23,000,000 feet of gas from the Bartles- 
ville sand at 2,732-2,802 feet. 

Payne County 

The Creek County Gas Company has a large gasser on 
the J. W. Fried farm in section 25-18-56, at a depth of 
2,978 feet. 

Rogers County 

In the Collinsville district, two gas wells were opened 
up by the Henry Oil Company, one on the McLemore 
farm, in the southeast of the northeast quarter of section 
23-23-14, good for a little less than a million feet, from 
sand at 1,212 to 1,221 feet, and the other on the Edwards 
farm, in the southwest of the southeast quarter of section 
26-23-14, with a capacity of 3,000,000 feet from sand 
at 1,135-50 feet. 

Stephens County 

The Guiding Star Oil Company has a 5,000,000- foot 
gas well in No. 4, on the James farm, in section i2-in-6w. 

Tulsa County 

The Paxton Oil Company has completed a good gasser 
in its No. 2 well in the Rogers property in section 20- 
19-11. 

At the annual meeting of the Merritt Oil & Gas Com- 
panq, the following officers and directors were elected 
for the ensuing year: Officers, Thomas A. Merritt, Presi- 
dent; Frank Cox, Vice-President; N. J. Gubser, Secre- 
tary; and S. W. Eckman, of Denver, Treasurer; direc- 
tors, A. E. Humphreys, Denver, Colo. ; John B. Means,, 
Tulsa, Okla. ; Thomas A. Merritt, Duluth, Minn. ; N. J. 
Gubser, Tulsa, Okla.; Frank Cox, Charleston, W. Va. 



Labour to keep alive in your brea«t that little q>ark of celestial fire, — coiuMrienjce.---Waahiiigt(Wi^ 



238 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



June 



Tulsa County 

The Texas Company has a 3,cxx),ooo-foot well in its 
No. I on the McPherson property in section 6-23-13. 
The gas was found in sand at 1,635-1,700 feet. 

Washington County 

In the Bartlesville district, the Kawfield Oil Com- 
pany's No. 12, on the Step land in section 16-28-13, is 
estimated at i ,000,000 cubic feet. 

Yale 

The Roma Oil Company's No. i on the Cole farm, 
in the center of the north line of the northeast quarter 
of section 11-18-6, drilled into a gas sand at 2,904-37 
feet and has a well with a capacity of 15,000,000 feet 
backed by a rock pressure of 1,060 pounds. 

Youngstown 

L. S. Skelton, in his test on the Narcome farm, in 
section 35-14-12, is a 6,000,000- foot gasser at 1,950-54 
feet. 

The Texas Company, in its No. 9 fee, section 25-14-11, 
developed a 9,000,000 cubic foot well, which has also an 
oil production of 10 barrels. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Allegheny County 

In the Unity district, Plum township, the People's Nat- 
ural Gas Company has completed a test on the William 
Batett farm, and it is a gasser. 

In the Brush Creek John Williams' No. 2, on the Mil- 
ton Irwin farm, is a gasser in the fourth sand. 

In the Imperial district, Jones & Company have a light 
Gordon sand gasser on the John Steinmetz farm. In 
(he Duff City field Harbison & Company's test on the 
J. Purvador farm is a duster. In the Crafton district, 
Yolton & Company got a light gasser at a second test 
on the Beals farm. 

Clarksville 

It is reported that the United Natural Gas Company 
will extend its service to this place. 

Crawford County 

In Rockdale township, gas has been struck in a test 
well drilled on the Beedy farm. 

Emporium 

The service of the St. Marys Gas Company of .St. 
Marys, Pa., in this city, is to be extended. 

Greene County 

On Coon Run, Springhill township, the Carnegie Nat- 
ural Gas Company has drilled No. 3 on the S. B. Keffer 
farm through all sands at a depth of 3,209 feet. Light 
gas pressure developed in the fourth sand. 

In Jackson township, the Philadelphia Company's test 
on the Jesse Thomas farm is a gasser in the Gordon sand. 

On Coon Run, Springhill township, the Manufacturers 
Light & Heat Company is through all sands at a second 
test on the Robert Cooper farm. It is a small gasser in 
the Big Injun sand. It was drilled to a depth of 3,339 
feet. 

Harrisborg 

The Manufacturers Light & Heat Company, supplying 
gas in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, is asking 
permission to advance its rate to domestic consumers to 
32 cents per thousand in a new petition recently filed. 



Sheffield 

The Eagle Rock Oil Company has acquired the entire 
holdings, franchise, pipe lines, gasoline plants, etc., of the 
Citizens Gas Company of Sheffield, Pa., which company 
has been supplying domestic consumers in Sheffield for 
many years. 

Washington County 

In the Washington district the Manufacturers Light 
and Heat Company's tests on the J. B. Greenlee and 
Swart farms are both gassers. In the same district the 
People's Natural Gas Company's test on the J. C. Bane 
farm is also a gasser. 

Waynesburg 

A well has been completed in the nearby fields which 
is reported to be making 2,000,000 cubic feet. 

TEXAS— Forth Worth 

Profits in the sum of $772,630 for the fiscal year just 
closed are reported by the Lone Star Gas Company, as 
compared with $517,720 for the preceding twelve-month 
period. 

Ranger 

On the Stewart farm, the Texas & Pacific Coal Com- 
pany have shut their well in for a gasser on top of the 
lime at 3,205 feet where a fishing job has been in prog- 
ress for some time, and another test will be started for 
oil. The well is making approximately 4,000,000 cubic 
feet of gas. The No. i Rust, of the same company, in 
the west edge of Ranger, is showing some oil and gas 
on top of the lime at 3,250 feet. 

A shallow sand gas volume was uncovered at 2,150 
feet in a test on the Brewer farm of the Texas & Pacific 
Coal Company, four miles south of town, and near the 
Merriman school house. The volume is estimated at 
3,000,000 cubic feet. 

Valeni 

One mile west of Valers, Woods & Wooley are re- 
ported to have a 1,000,000 cubic foot gas showing at 1,190 
feet on the Overhall tract. 

WEST VIRGINIA— Braxton County. 

On Steer Creek, Birch district, the Philadelphia Com- 
pany's test on the G. B. Howell farm is a gasser in the 
Big Injun sand. 

In Birch district, the Philadelphia Company's test on 
the H. M. Bourne farm is a gasser in the Big Injun 
sand. 

Calhoun County 

On Three Mile Creek, Sheridan district, the same 
company's second test on the W. R. Bush farm, is a 
gasser in the salt sand. 

Doddridge County 

On Buckeye Fork, Greenbrier district, the Hope Nat- 
ural Gas Company has a Gordon-sand gasser at its test 
on the A. B. Freeman farm. 

In Greenbrier district, the Eastern Petroleum Gomp^my 
has a fair gasser at a test on the John A. Davis farm. 



Example is the school of mankmd, and they will learn at no other. — ^Bnrke. 



June 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



239 



Gilmer County 

On Tanners Creek, Dekalb district, the Hope Natural 
Gas Company's test on the America Boylen farm is a 
gasser in the Big Injun sand. On Laurel^ Run in the 
same district, the Continental Oil & Gas Company's test 
on the W. B. Howell farm is a gasser in the Big Injun 
sand. 

Hancock County 

In Grant district, located one mile east of the Brenne- 
man field, Mahan & Company have completed a wildcat 
on the W. C. Mahan farm. It is a gasser in the Berea 
grit. 

Harrison County 

On Cole Davisson Run, Simpson district, the Clarks- 
burg Light & Heat Company's test on the W. G. Kesfer 
farm is a gasser in the Big Injun and fifth sands. 

In Sardis district, the Hope Natural Gas Company has 
drilled on the W. L. Dawson farm and it is a fair gasser. 
In the same district the South Penn Oil Company has 
the rig completed for one on the Wetzel heirs' farm. 

In Grant district the Philadelphia Company has drilled 
on the Porter Maxwell farm, developing a light gasser. 
The Hope Natural Gas Company is drilling a second 
test on the A. W. Smith farm. 

On Painter fork, Eagle district, the Hope Natural Gas 
Company's test on the M. K. Copenhaver farm is a gasser 
in the Gordon sand. 

Kanawha County 

On Kelly's Creek Godfrey L. Cabot has a million-foot 
gasser at his test on the M. F. Spruce farm. Godfrey L. 
Cabot & Thomas have drilled a test on the George E. 
Tbcmps farm through the Weir sand and found it barren. 
It is being drilled to the Rerea grit. 

Lawrence County 

Extensive oil and gas operations by the Manufac- 
turers' Light & Heat Company are indicated by 41 oil 
and gas leases recently recorded. The leases are taken 
on farms in Shenango and North l>eaver Townships, 
29 in the former and 12 in the latter. 

Lewis County 

In Freeman's Creek District, the South Penn Oil 
Company drilled its test on the John C. Starcher farm 
through the Gordon and fifth sands. It is dry in lx)th 
formations but a fair gasser in the Gantz sand. 

The Hope Natural Gas Company has a gasser at its 
second test on the John Taylor farm. 

On Smoke Creek Run, Freeman's Creek district, the 
same company completed a Gordon-sand gasser on the 
J. J. Taylor farm. 

Lincoln County 

On Furnett Run, Laurelhill district, the Columbia Gas 
& Electric Company has a gasser in the Big Injun sand 
at a test on the J. B. Cummings farm. 

Marion County 

On Ministers Run, Paw Paw district, the Owen Bot- 
tling Works Company has a light gasser in the fifth sand 
on the J. L. Michaels farm. 



On Bartholomew Run, Mannington district, the Hope 
Natural Gas Company has completed a test on the E. H. 
Hudson farm. It is a gasser. 

In Mannington district the South Penn Oil Company 
has a Big Injun sand gasser at No. 4 on the Gump farm. 

Monongalia County 

On Miracle Run, Battelle district, the West Virginia 
Traction Company has a fourth-sand gasser at its test 
on the Shriver heirs' farm. 

On Scott's Run, Battelle district, the Hope Natural 
Gas Company has completed a test on the Elum Park 
farm. It is a light gasser in the Bayard sand. This 
well was drilled to a total depth of 3,365 feet. 

On Miracle Run, in the same district, the South Penn 
Oil Company drilled a second test on the S. T. Fordyce 
farm, through the same formation, securing a good gasser 
at a depth of 3,444 feet. 

On Dunkard Creek, Battelle district, the Philadelphia 
Company's test on the Lemley-Tennant farm is a gasser 
in the fourth sand. A light show of oil was developed 
in the same formation. 

In the deep sand territory in Battelle District, lo- 
cated on Miracle Run, the Hope Natural Gas Com- 
pany's test on the Isaac Lemley farm is showing for 
a light gasser in the Bayard sand. 

On Day's Run, Clay District, the Hope Natural Gas 
Company has drilled No. 5 on the David Haught farm 
from the Gordon to the Bayard sand at a depth of 
3,440 feet. It is a fair gasser in the lower formation. 

On Jakes Run, Clay District, the Eddy Oil Com- 
pany's test on the W. H. Eddy farm is a gasser in the 
Big Injun sand. 

Pleasants County 

On McKim Creek, McKim District, the Walnut Run 
Oil Company's test on the W. O. Dotson farm is a 
light gasser in the Keener sand. 

On Sheat's Run, Union District, Smith, Eddy & Co.. 
have drilled a test on the S. D. Martin farm through 
the Cow Run sand and it is showing very light. 

Ritchie County 

On the north fork of Hughes River, Clay District, 
the Philadelphia Company's second test on the Ed- 
mond Taylor farm is a gasser in the Squaw sand. 

'On McKim Creek, the Walnut Run Oil Company's 
test on the W. C. Dotson farm is a gasser in the 
Keener sand. 

On Burton Run, Clay District, the Philadelphia 
Company got a gasser in the Big Injun sand at its 
test on the A. A. Lantz farm. 

On the south fork of the Hughes River, Murphy 
District, Ira Haught has completed a test on his own 
farm. It is a salt sand gasser with a capacity of 
6,000,000 cubic feet a day. 

Tyler County 

On Sancho Creek, Centerville District, the Wiser 
Oil Company's test on the E. C. Pierpont farm is a 
gasser in the Big Injun sand. 



Be ruled by time, the wisest counsellor of all. — ^PlutarclL 



On Big Run, Centerville District, the Carnegie Nat- 
ural Gas Company has drilled a second test on the 
Minnie McCullough farm through the Big Injun sand, 
developing a fair gas pressure in that formation. 

The Mid-Continent Gasoline Company has a light 
gasser in its No. 2 test on the F. Wilson land. 

Volcano 

The Hope Natural Gas Company has encountered dif- 
ficulties in its deep test on a lease in the old White Oak 
field, near here. The well caved in at a depth of 4,535 
feet, at which depth a heavy flow of gas was found. 

Wetzel County 

On Little Creek, Greene district, the Larimer Oil Com- 
pany's second test on the Lindsey Burley farm developed 
a light show of oil and a small gas pressure. 

On Long Drain Run, Church district, the Manufac- 
turers Light & Heat Company's No. 4, on the M. A. Tea- 
garden farm, is a gasser in the Big Injun sand. 

On Fish Creek, Church district, the Blackshere Oil 
& Gas Company has started to drill on the A. K. Whist- 
ler farm. 

On Fish Creek, Church district, the Carnegie Gas 
Company has a Big Injun sand gasser at a test on the 
J. A. Lemley farm. 

WYOMING— Casper 

The Curtis Petroleum Company has a gasser estimated 
at 20,000,000 cubic feet in its No. 2 on the Iron Creek 
dome, about twenty miles southwest of Casper. 

Iron Creek 

The New York Oil Company and the Curtis Petroleum 
Company have let contracts for the drilling of three wells 
in this field. 

ONTARIO— Chatham 

In Dover Township the Union Gas Company recently 
drilled in an oil well which is producing between 400 and 
500 barrels a day. The well has a heavy gas pressure. 

Elgin County 

The gasser drilled early in March by the Dominion 
Natural Gas Company near Port Talbot, and which 
started off with an estimated capacity of 5,000,000 to 



7,000.000 cubic feet per day, is now reported to be 
producing only 600,000 cubic feet, but looks like a 
steady producer on this basis. 

Guelph 

It is reported that both the Trenton Oil & Gas Com- 
pany and the Rockwood Oil & Gas Company have 
encountered shallow oil indications on the Rockwood 
anticline, in Wellington and Halton Counties, near 
Guelph. 

Kent County 

It is reported that the No. i well of the Union Natural 
Gas Company, in Dover Township, which was drilled in 
six months ago, is still producing 60 barrels of oil per 
day, as well as several million cubic feet of gas. 

The Union Natural Gas Company's No. 7 well, on the 
Meyers farm, found good production of gas at a depth 
of 2,931 feet, at 2,953 feet, and again at 2,984 feet. The 
drill is now down 3,100 feet. 

The H. D.» Symmes well on the St. Luke's Club 
property, Dover Township, was shot a second time, 
but developed only about 50,000 feet of gas. A third 
shot will be attempted. 

Norfolk County 

The Dominion Natural Gas Company has located 
a test on the John Martin property at Port Dover, 



George h. gurrell 

CONSULTING CHEMICAL ENGINEER 



§ 



Careful tests of natural gas to 
determine gasoline content. Gas- 
oline plants operated at highest 
efficiency. Compression and ab- 
sorption process. Natural gas, 
gasoline, petroleum. 



Bcnedum-Trees Bldg., 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



J 



PATENTS 



GREEN & McCALUSTER 

OLIVER BU1U)ING 
PITTSBURGH 

ATTORNEYS 



Specialty : Cases Relating to Oil 
and Gas. 



JOHNSON & HUNTLEY 



GEOLOGISTS, APPRAISERS 
OIL AND GAS 



R08WELL H. J0NI80I L. 6. HUITLEY 



306 STATE HALL 

UIIVERSITT OF 

PITTSBURON 



PinSBURBH 
PA. 



Standard 03 Sabsidiaries 

Boofk^ScId aidQHiBd 

Natural Gas >!^ (Kl Secnities 



JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS 

225 Fourth Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

415 Central Bank Building 
Tulsa, Okla. 



MASLKACTURERS- »XTH)N 



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SPEOAL EOmON OF BUllETM 19. 
PART IL 

The Oklahoma Geological Sanrey, 

Norman. Okla , |>ul>l»hr() m l*H 7 
Hullrlm r>. I'dtt II. I'rltotrum ami 
Natural (tas in Olttahnnui. ulmli (li«- 
cuurs iKr rntiir Slair \>\ (nunlir^ fom 
an oil ami |{as »taml|H>int in a 1mh>Ii <>f 550 
|>at{r». SiKly-lwo ^rojo^'u ami «liui tuial 
map! of spmal arrai arc iniliKlril 

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lllll * Irw (I I'trt • I a •\n\»\ • 'J I > n ■»•! al V 

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naiTH-d «l>i»r 



I9I8 



MANUFACTURERS* SECTION 



June 



iMIilllllll^^ 



National 

War Savings Day 

June 28 



That's the day we sign up. 

That's the day we tell Uncle Sam just how hard we want to win thb 
war. That's the day our government has officially set for us to purchase 
War Savings Stamps. 

On June 28th every man, woman and child in the United States will be called 
upon to pledge his or her full quota of War Savings Stamp purchases for 1918. 

You will be expected to pledge the full amount that you can afford — no 
more — but by the same token, no less. 



In every stale, coiinly, city, town and villa<(e 
me War Savinj^s Coniniiltees are preparing for 
this big patriolic rally of June 28th. Unless 
you have already bought War Savings Stamps 
to the $1,000 limit, get' busy with paper and 
pencil and figure out the utmost you can do. 

Remember this. You take no chances when 
you go the limit on War Savings Stamps. They 
are the best and safest investment in the world, 
lliey pay you 4% interest compounded quar- 



terly. They can't go below par. You can get 
back every dollar you put into War Savings 
Stamps any time you need it. You can turn 
them in at the Post Oflice any time for their full 
value plus interest. 

Uncle Sam.is asking hundreds of thousands 
of men to give their lives to their country. He 
is asking you only to lend your money. 

What are you lending? 



National War Savings Committee, Washington* 



® 



WS.S. 



utvow 
UNITID tTATEt 
COVIBMMENT 



CvnirittMted tkr»mgh Dtmtfon 9f A&uertttitig 




United ^tatet Co'/t, Comm. on PwhKe tmfo*»ttff<*» 



This spacf contributed for the li^inmiti' ^f ''»» ^y^r by 

THE NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE JOURNAL, Buffalo, N. Y, 



'ViniiiiiiMiiiii^^ 



J"ly MANUFACTURERS' SECTION 1918 

EVERYTHING FOR OIL AND GAS WELLS 

BRANCH STORES IN ALL OIL FIELDS 

HIGH PRESSURE POWER PUMPS 



For lonj distance pumping, hl^h vertical lifts* and all severe 
conditions where the suction lift Is not (freater than 23 feet. 

Made entirely of iron and steel. Simple, compact, rigid and cannot get out of alignment. 
Can be driven by either gas, gasoline, kerosene or oil engines : or by electric motor. Every pump 
thoroughly tested at its guaranteed working pressure. 



Send for Bulletin No. 22 which describes these pumps 
io detail* or Inquire at any of our 75 Branch Stores. 



Oil Well Supply Co. 

PITTSBURGH 

NBW YORK SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELBS TAMPICO LONDON 



Natural 





as an 

JOURNAL 




asolme 



SUBSCRIPTION- 
$2.00 IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR JULY. 1918 



VOLUME 12 
THIS NUMBER 7 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advertising Copy should be in by the 15th of 
month previous to issue. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindre<l industries. 

HuflTalo Long Distance (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca 3295-W. 

Cable Address:— "Publight. Buffalo." 

Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central Office. 

PUBLISMEO BY 

PERIODICALS PUBLISHING CO.. 
68 West Huron Street, 

BUPPALO, N. Y. 

Lucius S. Bigklow. President and EdUor. 
Harbis S. BiCELOW, Secretary. 

Entered as second class matter December \, 
1910, at the Post Office at Bufaio, New York, 
under the act of March 3, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSDE 



FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG: 

Automatic Regulation 250 

Becomes Purchasing Agent 262 

Byllesby, H. M., Now Lieut. -Colonel. .. . 263 

Commercial Conditions 246 

Conserving Gas 248 

Denning, I.cs'ie B.. Assistant to President 249 

Dinner to John G. Pt w 247 

Drilling Operations 26 4 

Elimination of Discrimination in Natural 
Gas Rates by "ReadinesstoScrve" 
Charges, by Samuel S. Wyer ( Discus- 
sion page 256) 251 

Here's An Opportunity 247 

Interior Lakes Travel 248 

New Gas and Oil Association 262 

Piqua, Ohio, Celebrates 248 

Power by Gas 263 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 272 

Visiting Oil Producers 249 

AROUND THE BELT : 

Fincncial 273 

General 275 

Incorporated 274 

Personals 273 

Rates 274 



INDEX OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



Absorbing Subsidiaries 96 

Analysis of Gases, by Prof. W. 11. Ellis, 

J. W. Bain, and E. G. R. Ardagh 97 

Annual Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Sons... 15 

Another Substitute for Gasohne 6 

Answering an Inquiry 141 

Association of Natural Gas Supply Men.. 90 

Auto Delivery Cars 80 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E. 

Gilbert 31 

Beautiful Tribute to Traveling Man. 

By C. I. Hendrickson 6a 

Bulletin on Cost Accounting 6 

Bull.tin on Oil Accounting 50 

Bureau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Gush- 
ing Field 5 

Calendar of Youngstown Sheet and Tube 

Canada's Taxation 190 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Casinghead — The Name 160 

Combatting Doubtful Oil Stock Pro- 
motion 104 

Completing of Great Project. By R. C. 

Morrison 53 

Converting Linotype Metal Melting Furnace 

^ From Coal to Gas 32 

Conservation of Gas, by A. J. Diescher.. 214 
Conservation Urged, By Dr. I. C. White 215 

Constitution ana By-Laws 217 

Co-operation Urged to Raise Oil Embargo 50 
Curve Charts 1 74 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers 32 

Denver Bars Fake Oil Stock Sales 95 

Development Work in Terrebonne Parish 50 
Doherty Syndicate Operates Frost Gas 

Company 92 

Drilling Results 23 

Drilling Reports ^.. 73 

Drilling Reports ; . m-* 

Drilling Reports 143 

Dri'ling ( )perations 175 

Drir.in^f Results 225 

Dunnville, Ont 171 

Efficient Goggles 22 

Efficency on Reduced Pressure 163 

Employment Managp's 171 

Every Man a Bond-Holder 233 

Exercising an Hour a Day 222 

Financial Report for 1917 41 

Financial Report 80 

Financial Report 106 

Financial Report 233 

Flow of Gas in Pipes 16"; 

Fuel Administration Announcement 196 

Gas Difficulties Disclosed 13 

Gas for Drying Food 17 

Gasoline from Natural Gas, by H. A. 

Fisher 96 

Gasoline from Natural Gas 103 

Gas Versus Car- Deliveries 92 

Give the Geologist His Dues 126 

Glaring Abuse of Advertising by Oil 

Stock Promoters 194 

Good Installation of Pr'fsuT Gaup**^.. 171 
Government Experiment Station at Bar- 

tlesville 52 

Government Takes Over Oil Production. 132 

Heat Insurance 21 

Hire Yourself 171 

Joint Meeting Oil Producers and Natural 
Gas Association 203 

Latest Instruction 102 

Long, Elias H., Deceased 20 

Making Ti^ht Joints 100 

Marking Time 72 

Measurement of Gas by Orifice Meter 102 

Men for Export Trade 1 59 

Monthly Standard Oil Review, by Jo. P. 

Cappeau Sons 105 

Moving in Cycles 72 



Nation's Pulse 219 

Nation Upon a Firm Foundation itis 

Natural Gas Association 159 

Natural Gas Association, Annual Meeting 197 
.Natural (jas Business Thirty-fotir Yemrs. In 6 
Natural Gas Service. By L. W. Lansley 55 

Natural Gas Wrinkles 160 

New Heating System 135 

New Orleans and Natural 10 

No Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Bedford 33 

Office Economics ia8 

Oil Production 103 

Oil Production 133 

Oil Storage Tanks and Reservoirs 170 

Opportunity To Get Labor 134 

Otoe-Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr 15 

Output of Refineries i6o 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding. By Lucius S. 
Bigelow 61 

Pastor Sees Labor in Control After War 134 

Peak Load Service 132 

Picturing One's Face in Advertising 12 

Preach Optimism and Win the War 164 

President of Vast Corporaton 169 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Proceedings Receiv^i 51 

Producing Gasoline 63 

Production and Transportation of Gas... 162 

Questions and Answers — Prize Paper 93 

Ready-to-Servc Charge 104 

Ready-to-Serve Charge 142 

Recovery of Gasoline from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
fining of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son 7 

Red Cross Drive 221 

Reeser, Harry C 161 

Reynolds, M. G.. Passes Away 20 

Sailing Lake Erie 162 

Secure Gas Line 1 27 

.Sense and Cents 54 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor 20 

Shipments to Oil and Natural Gas Com- 
panies 126 

Ship;^ard Volunteers 91 

.Spint of Safety 62 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 1917 .11 

•Standard Oil Subsidiaries 80 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 148 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 114 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 23s 

Stmulatin^ Production 195 

Stop Buying — 1 hen What ? jq 

Summer and Winter Gas 91 

Third Libertv Loan and Victory 126 

Trailer Auxiliary '. J15 

Truck Operators* Conference -25 

I'niform Accounting. By C. S. Mitchell.. 215 
Unique Method of Starting Gas Engines si 
Unique Sales Letter 196 

Valuable Publication in Oil and Gas Field 51 

Vast Acreage Deal 5 

V'ictory Plant in Service 106 

Water in Wells loi 

Water Regulator 96 

Welcome Letter 134 

Welding Torches 196 

Western Associations Merge 5 

West Virginia Convention no 

West Virginia Gas Association 195 

Winner of Prizes in Contest Held at Buf- 
falo J I 

Winning the War lag 

Work of Petroleum Committee 59 

Wrinkles, Prices for 1^9 

Year 1918 j 

Your Mistakes 60 





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COMMERCIAL CONDITIONS.' 



mNDUSTRIES in the United States are increasing in number, the 
new and large corporations formed during April had authorized 
capital of 256 million dollars compared with 197 million dollars 
a month ago and 439 million dollars for such incorporations in 
April a year ago. 

New munitions companies had capital of 5.100 thousand dollars 
compared with nothing a month ago and 100 thousand dollars a year ago. 

New airplane companies had capital of 250 thousand dollars com- 
pared with 6.250 thousand dollars a month ago and 3,198 thousand dol- 
lars a year ago. 

On the whole, present business conditions compare very favorably 
with a year ago. 

New oil concerns had capital of 61,729 thousand dollars compared 
with 41.400 thousand dollars a month ago and 23.285 thousand dollars 
a year ago. 

The total authorized capital of new shipbuilding, munitions, air- 
plane, chemical and oil firms organized since August. 1914. is S2.620,- 
000,000. 

New oil production for April amounted to 125 thousand barrels com- 
pared with 177 thousand barrels in March and 92 thousand barrels in 
April of last year. Crude petroleum stocks held by the various pipe line 
companies on the ist of April totaled 90.091 thousand barrels compared 
with 90,375 thousand barrels a month ago and 93.686 thousand barrels 
a year ago. 

The last Federal report on crops indicates a winter wheat produc- 
tion of 573 million bushels, a gain of 13 pillion bushels over the condi- 
tion a month ago and an indicated increase of 155 million bushels over 
last year's crop. The rye crop is now estimated at 83 million bushels 
compared with 60 million bushels last year. The production of hay is 
estimated at 108 million tons compared with 95 million tons a year ago. 
Spring wheat planting is nearly finished in the far north and winter 
wheat harvest has already begun in the far suuth. Never since crop 
conditions have been generally reported has the outlook for the average 
of all crops been better than it is at this time. This |)rospective big grain 
crop coupled with more economical use of grains in this country would 
mean much to the people of Western Europe. 

E^ank clearings at the principal cities during .\pril amounted to over 
26 billion dollars compared with 25 billion dollars a year ago, the increase 
being 6%. E.xdusive of New York City, clearings were more than 12 
billion dollars compared with more than 10 billion dollars a year ago. 
the increase being 20^^. Total clearings for April set a new high record 
for the month and more than one hundred of the principal cities set a 
new high mark for April. 

Business failures during April numbered S(iq compared with 990 a 
month ago and 1,088 a year ago, the number of failed concerns making 
the smallest April record in eleven years. Liabilities of the failed con- 
cerns were 13 million dollars compared with 15 million dollars a month 
ago and 12 million dollars for concerns failing in .'\pril, 1917. 



FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG 



HBRrS AN OPPORTUNITY 



A Tm M ImfUt^ %m 



0«r Cmmmny, to Ow 

^ til* U i. P«tl A<ilmitr> 



Mm. and to Ovr 



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248 



NATURAL GAS AND CkASOLINE 



July 



Corrin ; Chief Engineer, H. C. Cooper; Treasurer, R. D. 
Beardslee; General Superintendent, J. J. F.vans. 

Of the Peoples Natural (las Company John B. Tobin 
becomes General Manager and Vice-President ; H. C. 
Cooper, becomes Chief Engineer. 

Of the Reserve Gas Copany, John B. Corrin accepts 
the office of General Manager and Vice-President. R. D. 
Beardslee, becomes Treasurer, as he is also treasurer of 
the Hope Company. Likewise, H. C. Cooper, Qiief En- 
gineer of the Hope Company is Chief Engineer of the 
Peoples Company. 

T. O. Sullivan, the new General Manager and Vice- 
President of the Hope Company has been for a matter of 
ten years connected with the Manufacturers' Light & 
Heat Company. He was General Manager, while the 
new General Manager of the Peoples Gas Company, John 
B. Tobin, was formerly the Treasurer of that same com- 
pany. 

The dinner at Pittsburgh was a notable one. 



PIQUA, OHIO, CELEBRATES. 



mHE recent natural gas celebration in Piqua, Ohio, 
was one of the most enthusiastic public demon- 
strations which has ever taken place in that city. 
Early in the afternoon the business houses and 
many private residences were appropriately decorated and 
the gas arches completed. 

Long before dusk crow-ds of people from neij:(hbor- 
ing towns and the country 'round began to flock into 
the city. There have been but few events in Piqua 
which have aroused more interest among the populace 
as comparatively everybody left their homes and 
thronged the streets to witness the demonstration. 

The whole scene was one of great beauty and long 
to be remembered by all who witnessed it. Altogether 
the celebration was a proper demonstration in honor 
of that great progressive factor, natural gas. 

The foregoing is a clipping from the Piqua, Ohio. 
Daily Call, of June 19, 1888. "That great progressive 
factor, natural gas." is now being served to the people 
of Piqua by The Ohio Fuel Supply Company. It is 
interesting to note that Piqua has enjoyed thirty 
years of natural gas service. 



CONSERVING OF GAS. 



mN reply to a letter to Mr. Boyd E. Horner, of 
Clarksburg, West Va.. on the subject of 
conservation of gas, Mr. Horner writes that 
which is certainly encouraging. His letter is 
as follows: 

Clarksburg, W. Va., June 3, 1918. 

Natural Gas and Gasoline Journal, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gentlemen : — 

Replying to your letter. 

All operators are working to conserve gas, in 
every way, no leaks in lines or around connections 
are permitted ; old wells, in which the production 
has decreased materially and a number of which 



have apparently been exhausted, are being re- 
paired by the use of bailing machines, with which 
light drilling can also be done, such as drilling out 
cavings or in tubing of different size, and this ma- 
chine is also verv valuable in wells that have be- 
come salted, of which there are quite a few in this 
section, when salted these machines can readily 
drill up the salt. 

The different gas associations and organiza- 
tions meet frequently and always have for dis- 
cussion the conservation of gas. 

All operations in the field, for which gas is used, 
such as drilling boilers, etc., are required to use low- 
pressure burners and pay for the gas by the thou- 
sand instead of flat rate, which teaches economv for 
they are always watching the meter. 

There is a tendency to get away from Industrial 
consumption by increasing the industrial rate ma- 
terially. The larger companies are endeavoring to 
establish a preferred rate which will be equivalent 
to a domestic rate, and are also securing from the 
Public Service Commission an increase in all rates 
for domestic use and otherwise. 

I, personally, think selling all gas by meter and at 
a pretty good price will do more than any other one 
thing to conserve the gas. 

Very truly. Boyd E. Horner. 



INTERIOR LAKES TRAVEL. 



EAKE ERIE is one of America's most beautiful 
sheets of water, and one sailing from Buffalo 
to Cleveland, or over the reverse route, enjoys 
for a part of the time the shore line, while at 
other times nothing but the blue of the lakes and the sky 
is to be seen, save here and there a sailing vessel, a pas- 
senger steamer, or a great freighter. 

Summer travel by train is dusty and hot. yet of 
course there are links in travel that must be by rail. 
Where, however, there is a water-link, such as the run 
between Buffalo and Cleveland, it is a great relief and 
exceeding pleasure to change from rail to steamer. 

The largest and most magnificent side-wheel 
steamer plying on fresh water in the United States, is 
the steamship "Seeandbee.*' The sister ship is the City 
of Buffalo. These are large and commodious steamers 
plying alternately every night between these, the two 
great cities of Lake Erie. The sailings from Buffalo 
are at 8:00 P. M., arriving at Cleveland at 7:30 A. M., 
leaving Cleveland at 8 P. M., arriving at Buffalo early 
the following morning. 

The staterooms may be .had complete, or single 
berths, in two-berth staterooms may be secured. It 
is w^ell to comunicate in advance, however, with the 
Cleveland or Buffalo office of the Cleveland & Buffalo 
Transit Company, of which Mr. H. R. Rogers, a most 
affable officer, is traffic manager. 

We offer the suggestion presuming that many of those 
who read our magazines may possibly have little ac- 
quaintance with the facts that we are tendering them. 



Prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them. — Syros. 



NATURAL GAS ANO CiA-SOUSK 



ASSISTANT TO PRESIUKNT 



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NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



AUTOMATIC REGULATION. 



An Auto mat U 



SyHtem for the Regulating of Oil Supply in 
Absorber Tanks. 



mHE maintaining of a ronstant oil level in both 
the ahsorbinfT tank and the still, during the pro- 
cess of the nianufactnrc of gasoline by absorb- 
ing the gasoline in oil. and subsequently separat- 
ing the gasoline from the oil by distillation, makes neces- 
sary a regulator which will accommodate itself to any 
type of absorber or steam still, one that will maintain 
with certainly a constant oil level nnder all condili-ms 
of temperature and pressure. 

Twenty-live years ago a feed -water-regulator was de- 
vised by the Chaplin-Fulton lirm of Pittsburgh. Little 



To describe the inside of the chamber of the regula- 
tor — there is suspended a displacement body or weight. 
This is hung from the end of a level, the fulcrum of 
which is a shaft. One end of this shaft extends through 
a flushing box, while the other rests on a step inside. 

Our illustration of the "Vigilant" attached to the out- 
side of a tank, indicates the exterior, while our line- 
sketch with weight affixed on arm or "level." disclose;. th« 
method of operation. 

ll will l>e seen that when the oil level rises above the 
desired point, the displacement body and level will ri^e, 
pressing the actuating valve against its top scat causing 
the exhaitst valve to open to the air. The result will be. 
no pressure on the diaphragm of the controlling valve, il 
being wide open, allowing the oil to feed out of the tank 

The outward feeding nf the oil rnnlinues. until the oil- 
level falls, when the displacement body and the "level," 
following the oil, will open the gas-connection, shnlling 
the exhaust. 

The operation we have described, it will be seen, ad- 
mits gas-pressure to the diaphragm of the controlling- 
valve, forcing the valve to its seat, and shutting off (he 
feed. 



; LUAl^RAM OF  



ANT" REGI'LATOR. 



was imagincil then what possibilities lay in that regula- 
tor far beyond its service as a "feed -water" affair. 

After the devising and introducing of this device, years 
ago, by those who have now passed away, but who are 
succeeded by others of another generation, who continue 
in the same line of manufactures, the "Vigilant" still 
continues to perform its original function, that of feeding 
water to boilers. 

It was years after the "Vigilant" made itself known, 
that the recovery of gasoline by absorption process be- 
came an art. and still later, when this recovery developed 
'nto a vast industry. 

It was found that the "Viligant" mounted on the side 
of a tank used in this process of gasoline recovery, with 
the center of the chamber directly opposite the oil-level 
desired, would bring the exact result desired. 



KXTERIOR VTF.W OF RKr.l'LATOR. 

Naturally, as one will sec, no more oil will flow out of 
the tank until the "level" again commences to rise when 
all of the operations are reversed and the conlrolling 
valve again opens. 

The operations continue automatically, and accurately, 
therefore the device is a valuable adjunct at absorption 
recovery plants. 

A feature of the equipment is that one regulator "ill 
control the oil in any number of ab.sorbers in an evapor- 
ator. 

A stem extends from the valve to a chamber located 
above the cast iron loop, and is connected to the dia- 
phragm moving in this chamber. Under the diaphragm 
or piston is a spring which assists to open the valve nl'en 
there is no pressure on the diaphragm. 

When so desired, a controlling valve with a by-pas^ "f 
continuous feed valve will be furnished. This valve is 
adjusted by means of a hand wheel, so that oil may flo" 
out of the tank almost as rapidly as it enters. 

We are indebted to the Chaplin- Fulton Manufactur- 
ing Company for our illustrations. 



Apologies only account for that which they do not alter. — Disraeli. 



The Matter of Rates 

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252 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



the fact that natural gas is an exhaustible resource that 
is becoming scarcer every year, and it is the only public 
utility service that does not, and in fact cannot create the 
basic feature of the service that it renders to the public. 
There is no regeneration in the present fields, that are 
now being depleted ; when the gas is once used it is gone 
forever. Every time a natural gas company sells i,ooo 
cubic feet of gas it is selling a non-replaceable part of its 
property. That is, the natural gas company is alone in 
depending entirely on the caprice of nature for first the 
finding and secondly the continuity of the supply of its 
primary source of public utility service. This ought to 
make it self-evident that more latitude must be allowed 
in natural gas plant standards of service than are ncecs- 
sary in other public utilities. 

Sec. 7 — Relation of Fixed Charges and Load Factor to 
ReadinesS'to-Serve. 

"If the total annual expenses of a utility are taken at 
ICO per cent, then the fixed charges are that part of the 
total ICG per cent of annual expenses that must be met 
in order to maintain the integrity of the property value, 
regardless of the quantity of service rendered. That is, 
these fixed charges accrue regardless of the volume of the 
utility's business and range from 49 per cent to 73 per 
cent, depending on the typ>e of the utility. 

If the total continuous full load of the serving capacity 
of the plant is taken at 100 per cent, then the load factor 
is that part of the total 100 per cent of service capacity 
that is actually sold. Seasonal and hourly load variations 
— with marked peaks — are conspicuous features of public 
utility plants. These result in low load factors and many 
potential service facilities cannot be utilized although the 
inevitable^ fixed charges are constantly accruing. Most 
utility plants must be so operated as to have not more 
than 30 per. cent load factor, with, of course, a large 
range of individual variations or individual plants."* 
That is, the utility must be in constant readiness-to-serve, 
on account of the facts just mentioned, and only a rela- 
tively small part of its total serving possibilities can be 
actually utilized. 

Sec. 8 — Peak Loads Increase Cost of Service, 

"An increase of volume of business can decrease the 
cost of production only when the increment of increase 
is distributed so as to make possible the more efficient use 
of existing equipment. When the increment of increase 
is concentrated so as to require more equipment, as is the 
case in all peak loads, the cost of production per unit of 
service is increased. Therefore, the cost of peak load 
natural gas service is greater than the cost of normal ser- 
vice. A rate schedule, to be equitable to all consumers 
of natural gas, must make the consumers who need 
and create the peak load service, pay a price that will 
be commensurate with the extra cost of the service 
they are receiving. 

'* House heating furnace services not only produce 
marked peaks each day, but the consumption is limited to 
relatively a short period out of each year. For this 



reason house heating furnace service costs more than 
ordinary gas service:"! 

Sec. 9 — Distinction Betiveen Luxury and Necessity im 
Natural Gas Service, 

"To the average family for cooking, hot water boiler 
heating, lighting and incidental house heating service, 
natural gas is a necessity, but when used in larger quan- 
tities, or for house heating furnace work, it becomes a 
luxury. Furthermore, the peak load characteristics of 
house heating furnace service makes this service cost 
more to the natural g^s company. An equitable sched- 
ule of rates ought, therefore, to provide for a fixed net 
price per thousand cubic feet for a. large enough monthly 
consumption to permit of the cooking, hot water boiler 
heating, lighting and incidental house heating service 
necessary in the average family. If this fixed consump- 
tion is exceeded, then the price per thousand cubic feet 
for such excess consumption ought to be increased so as 
to make the consumer pay for the higher priced service 
he is receiving."^ 

It is a trite observation thai the luxuries of one day 
tend to become the necessities of the next. Most com- 
plaints for inadequate service, during the few peak load 
hours — usually less than i per cent, of the total 8,760 
hours in the year J — are based on the fallacy that a ser- 
vice which is purely a privlege has become a prerc^tive. 
That is, natural gas consumers, as compared with other 
fuel users who have to use solid fuel or manufactured 
gas, are a privileged class enjoying a luxury that^is sel- 
dom appreciated until it becomes difficult to obtain, and 
on account of the limitations fixed by nature they do not 
possess and cannot ask any inalienable rights of service, 
under conditions that are physically impossible to meet. 

Sec. 10 — Methods of Selling Utility Service. 

Public utility services are sold by the following three 
methods : 

A. Flat Rate — This eliminates the measuring devices, 
but is inequitable, places a premium on waste and 
is desirable from most viewpoints. 

B. Meter Rate — Here the charge is based on a cer- 
tain price per unit of service. This would appar- 
ently be just, but it ignores the "readiness-to- 
serve" and "value-of-service" features, both of 
which must be considered in the application of an 
equitable rate schedule. This divides itself into 
the following: 

a. Straight Meter Rate — That is, uniform price 
per unit of service to all consumers for certain 
classes of service. This makes the cost exceed 
the value of the service in some instances, 
and the consumer will not use the service. This 
makes necessary the following sliding scale ad- 
justment : 

b. Meter Rate with Quantity Discount — That is. 
the price will be decreased as the consumption 



•"Valuc-of-Service" as a Factor in Public Utility Rates With Special 
Reference to Natural Gas Rates, p. 14. By Samuel S. Wyer. 



f Engineering Report on Wh'^lesale Cost and Worth of Natural Gas 
Service at the Gates of the Various Towns, and Valuation of all the prop- 
erty of the Kansas Natural Gas Company, December 27, 191a. By 
Samuel S. Wyer. 

JFew people appreciate that even it the service averages below normal 
5 hours per day for 17 days, that the total period of normal service is still 
more than 99 per cent. 



Powerful, indeed, is the empire of habit. Syrus. 



NATURAL CAS AND CASOLINK 



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nected load data for water or gas consumers are 
much more difficult to obtain than for electricity. 
It is in recognition of this engineering fact that 
most readiness-to-serve charges for water or gas 
are proportioned to the size of the meter used for 
measuring the service, rather than for any con- 
nected load that may be put on beyond the meter. 

Sec. 14 — Why There Are Relatively Few Adjudicated 
Readiness-to-Seri'e Cluirges. 

The adjudicated minimum charge monetary allowances, 
now in force in a large number of public utility rate 
schedules, have thoroughly established the minimum 
charge doctrine as a fixed'part of American public utility 
jurisprudence.* If, therefore, little question is made 
of the minimum charge, less question should be raised re- 
garding the more equitable and more just readiness-to- 
serve charge. As so well stated by the Louisiana Su- 
preme Court: 

'*It may be well to mention that the principle of 
making this distinct and separate charge for service is 
the same precisely which underlies the making of a 
minimum charge by gas, electricity and water com- 
panies, for gas, electricity, or water not used, and that 
the making of a minimum charge may be said to be uni- 
versally approved." P. U. R. 1916-E, p. 1017, State 
vs. Sloan, June 30, 1916 (139 La., — , 72 So. 428). 

The large number of readiness-to-serve schedules now 
in effect — the majority of these in states having public 
utility commission jurisdiction — show the widespread use 
of this equitable method of charging. It is for this reason 
that it is now little questioned and therefore seldom liti- 
gated. 

Sec. 15 — Judicial Recognition of Rcadiness-to-Senr 
Doctrine. 

"The question is whether the said 25-cent charge, thus 
made *for service,' was made 'for electricity.' Of course, 
the customer pays the bill in order to have the electricity, 
and in that sense the charge is made for electricity. But 
in another sense, it is not made for electricity, but 'for 
service' ; and the bill on its face shows it. 

"The reason why this separate charge is made is this. 
Electricity cannot be economically stored, and yet the sup- 
ply must be in constant and immediate readiness on the 
touch of a button or the turn of a switch. This necessi- 
tates the installation and keeping up of a plant and equip- 
ment adequate to produce the quantity needed at such 
times as the demands are heaviest, and not only the 
quantity which at such times is actually demanded, but 
also the quantity which might be demanded, and neces- 
sarily all that part of this preparation which, at those 
times when the demands are light, is not called into 
requisition and especially that part which might, at any 
moment, be, but never in fact is called into requisition, is 
idle and profitless. The expense of the preparation thus 
not utilized together with that of making connections 
with the premises of customers and the furnishing of 



'Tabulation of adjudicated and nonadjudicated minimum charge data 
in 82-page report made to Hon. Thomas J. Flannelly, District Court of 
Montgomery County, Independence, Kansas, on "Reasonableness ind 
Legal Right of the Minimum Charge in Public Utility Services." Re- 
printed by American Gas Institute, 29 West 39th Street, New York City. 



meters, being more or less fixed, is sought to be provided 
for by this fixed 25 cents charge, denominated 'for ser- 
vice,' while the current actually produced and consumed 
is charged for according to meter reading, at a rate which 
has been arrived at after taking into consideration this 
service charge. In other words, this service charge does 
not represent a bonus to the company, but has been de- 
vised as a means of more equitably apportioning among 
the customers of the company the expenses incident to 
the installation and operation of the plant." 

Louisiana Supreme Court, State vs. Sloan, P. U. 
R. 1916-E, pp. 1015-6, June 30, 1916. 

"We are of opinion that it is more just and equitable 
to make what is known as a 'readiness to serve' charge 
in the place of a so-called * minimum' charge. The ready- 
to-serve charge is justified on the ground that the utilit>', 
after its plant is once constructed and ready for service, 
may ask each patron to pay a reasonable amount based 
upon the size of its service pipe, in order to reimburse 
the utility for the cost of so much of its plant as is re- 
quired to enable it to at all times stand ready to serve its 
patrons. 

"We have set forth in the schedule which we have pre- 
pared, the amount of ready-to-serve charges to be paid 
by its patrons classified on the basis of the size of the 
service pipe. These charges, we think, will protect the 
company in its service, and at the same time will not im- 
pose any unnecessary burden upon its patrons." 

Pcfifisylvania Public Service Commission, Ben 
Avon Borough vs. Ohio Valley Water Co., 
P. U. R. 191 7-C, p. 421, Fd)ruary 12, 1917. 

'The costs for domestic, industrial, and public con- 
sumers should be met by ( i ) a fixed service charge, pay- 
able whether water is taken or not, and (2) a charge 
covering proportional or variable costs apportioned on 
the basis of the quantity of water consumed." 

New Jersey Board of Public Utility Commis- 
sioners, Re Hackensack Water Co., Rates, 
P. U. R. 1917-E, p. 179, April 28, 1917. 

'*In substituting a consumer charge for a minimum 
charge, the New York Commission, First District, recog- 
nized the constant consumer cost which should be borne 
equitably by all consumers." 

New York Public Sennce Commission, First 
District, Re Nciv York & Q. E. L. & P. Co., 
P. U. R. 1917-D, p. 773, April II, 1917. 

'There is much to be said in favor of a minimum or 
readiness-to-serve charge, and it has been recognized by 
the commissions and courts of several states, and experi- 
ence has shown that it is not the poorer cl^ss who usually 
demand the connection and then fail to use the service, 
but the well-to-do, who have other means of supply and 
desire the connection only that they may be prepared for 
emergencies. 

'There is a certain amount which the public must pay 
to enable the utility to operate. If a portion .of it is paid 
in a readiness-to-serve charge, that much less is necessary 
to be produced from the sale of gas. The readiness-to- 



That which comes after ever conforms to that which has gone before. — ^Aurelius. 



July 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



255 



serve charge does not yield the company any greater sum, 
nor cost the consumer any more money. It results only 
in a different distribution of the burden." 

Ohio Public Utilities Commission, Re Ashtabula 
Gas Co., P. U. R. 1917-D., 801, April 24, 1917. 

"In most cases the producers of electric lighting also 
endeavor to so fix their rates as to take account of these 
differences in the cost as between the short and long hour 
consumers. In some cases this is done under the so- 
called 'readiness-to-serve' system of fixing rates. Under 
this system the consumer is charged a certain sum per 
month on his installation in addition to a specific rate 
per unit of current used. The monthly sum charged for 
the installation is probably intended to cover all or a part 
of the fixed charges, and appears to vary with the num- 
ber of lamps installed. The rate per k. w. hr. for the 
current used is probably designed to meet the variable 
expenses. Under this system the consumer really pays 
the company for holding itself in readiness to serve, and 
it is on the whole an attempt to charge each consumer on 
the basis of the actual cost of serving him." 

Wisconsin Railroad Commission, in re Appl. La. 
Crosse Gas & E. Co., 2 W. R. C, p. 24 Sep- 
tember 19, 1907. 

"These rates, which the applicant desires to put into 
effect for power purposes, are made up of a fixed charge 
based on the load connected and a variable charge based 
on the quantity of current consumed. In this respect the 
proposed rates resemble those which apparently meet con- 
ditions in Rice Lake. They differ in having a lower 
fixed charge and a somewhat higher meter charge than 
the theoretical rate. This may not be an altogether un- 
desirable feature, as the proposed fixed cliarge is not 
so high but that installations may be encouraged thereby, 
and, at the same time, the meter rate is sufficiently low 
to invite long daily use of current. The proposed power 
rate also recognizes the existence of a difference in the 
ratio of active to connected load, as between small and 
large installations. This difference is allowed for by a 
difference in the ixed rate per connected h. p. instead of 
by a uniform fixed rate based on different percentages 
of the connected load." 

Wisconsin Railroad Commission, In re A pp. 
Red Cedar Valley El. Co., 6 W. R. C. p. 762, 
June 14, 191 1. 

"There still appears to be much misunckrstanding 
among consumers regarding the service charge which is 
incorporated in the rate schedule. To make clear just 
what connection this charge has with the costs of service, 
a short explanation of the analysis made of the expenses 
of a utility in working out equitable rates, it is believed, 
will not be amiss. 

"Examining the expense items incurred by a water 
utility in conducting its business, it is at once apparent 
that they differ very much in character. Steam genera- 
tion expenses differ very much from interest on the in- 
vestment, '5tc. Careful scrutiny will reveal that there are 
certain expenses which are fixed and which do not change 
to an)' extent with increase or decrease in the amount of 



water pumped, but are influenced by the capacity of the 
plant or the demands upon it. Further, it logically fol- 
lows that there are other expenses which are directly de- 
pendent upon the output of the plant, varying directly 
with the output. These classes of expenses have 
been variously designated, but the Commission has fre- 
quently used the terms 'capacity' and 'output* to distin- 
guish them. Output expenses, or direct expenses, both 
material and labor, are those that enter into the product 
itself (water in this case) and can be charged accurately 
to a particular article or to a particular operation. Capac- 
ity, or indirect expenses, are those that cannot be so 
charged, but must be distributed over that part of the 
production indirectly aflfected by such expenses. 

'*It must be clear that there are expenses which are oc- 
casioned by every consumer ; capacity or demand charges 
on the property used and the cost of running, whether 
for pumping, distribution, management, etc. In other 
words, as every consumer is responsible for a certain de- 
mand upon the plant it cannot be denied thai the capacity 
or indirect expenses should be charged to ^he consumer 
upon the basis of his demand. The consumer exercises 
complete control of the service. Even if for considerable 
periods his demand is nothing, if he is still connected to 
the mains of the company, the fact that the latter must 
be ready at all times to supply the service to the consumer 
up to his maximum capacity, would necessarily imply, it 
seems, that of the capacity expenses he should be assessed 
an amount in proportion to his maximum demand upon 
the plant. It is clear that service must be rendered simul- 
taneously with the demand for that service. 

"Every consumer in addition to the fact that he is sub- 
ject to demand service in varying quantities up to his 
maximum demand, should pay for every cubic foot of 
water he consumes in addition to the demand or con- 
sumer charge. In other words, those expenses, which, 
as stated, are the cost of running or the constant opera- 
tion of the plant, whether for pumping, selling, manage- 
ment, etc., must be considered separately from the de- 
mand of capacity expenses. 

''While there may not be the variation in the demand 
on a water works that is found in the case of gas or elec- 
tric plants, there are nevertheless seasonal variations in 
water pumped. In order to meet the annual peak, it is 
necessary to provide equipment, hence it is evident that 
the demand is not negligible in any case. Moreover, the 
fact that a reservoir or stand pipe is immediately re- 
quired necessitates the assignment or investment and ex- 
penses of such units to demand. The demand i s a large 
factor when we come to consider the distribution system, 
the size of the mains being determined by the peak de- 
mand. 

"When it comes to determining the form of rate sched- 
ule the question arises, shall the capacity costs and output 
costs be combined, or shall each be kept separate and dis- 
tinct? The consumer must pay the capacity cost in either 
case, hence in most water rate schedules the capacity 
costs are distributed in the form of a service charge." 

Wisconsin Railroad Commission, City of Beloit 
vs. Beloit W. G. & E. Co., vf W. R. C. pp. 195, 
196, 197. 



Notliiiig can come out of nothing, any more than a thing can go bade to nothing, 



2s6 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



Sfx. 1 6 — Conclusions. 

1. The primary function of the readiness-to-scrve 
charge is to eliminate discrimination by making all con- 
sumers pay for service rendered separate and distinct 
from gas delivered. 

2. The readiness-to-serve charge is more equitable 
than the minimum charge. 

3. There has been a marked lack of appreciation of 
the distinction between readiness-to-serve charges and 
minimum charges, and judicial bodies have frequently 
erroneously used the two terms interchangeably. 

4. It is important to bear in mind that regardless of 
the name applied, the readiness-to-serve charge never 
includes any quantity of gas. 

5. The determination of the proper amount of a readi- 
ness-to-serve charge is more a matter of judgment than 
a following of rigid rules or mathematical calculations. 
For a given total income, whatever is derived in the ag- 
gregate from the readiness-to-serve charge makes the 
rate per "M" cubic feet of gas actually used that much 
less. 

6. Up to date (April 9, 19 18), there has been but one 
Supreme Court decision (namely Louisiana), sustaining 
the readiness-to-serve charge principle. 

7. The reason why there has been so little litigation 
is that the readiness-to-serve charge has had such a 
widespread use that it is now little questioned, and, there- 
fore, seldom litigated. 

8. Readiness-to-serve charges have been judicially al- 
lowed in 75 cases before the State Public Utilities Com- 
missions of Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Indi- 
ana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, First District, 
New York, Second District, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania. 
Washington and Wisconsin. 

9. Readiness-to-serve charges are in use in over 250 
towns in the United States for electric, gas and water 
service. 



DISCUSSION. 

F. W. STONI^: The "Readiness to Serve Charge'* is 
distinctly a legal and an eingeering proposition. It seems 
to me that to a certain extent at least it is a local propo- 
sition, particularly with reference to the amount of the 
charge. The amount to be charged is something that 
must be determined locally. We must also take into 
consideration the fact that in making the charge we do 
not always fix what we want to make but merely what 
we can get and make the best bargain we can. 

I think this paper might well have been discussed in 
connection with the paper that was presented by Mr. 
P^mmerling particularly that portion relating to the sup- 
plying of gas for heating purposes in the winter time. 

It seems to me if a readiness to serve charge is made, 
it would eliminate to a certain extent the objections raised 
in Mr. Emmerling's j)aper. If we eliminate the peak 



load consumption for house heating, we will not be able 
to do a profitable business. If we can use a readiness to 
serve charge we could eliminate the peak load consump- 
tion and still do a profitable business. It seems to me 
that would be one of the ways out of the difficulty which 
confronts us in this matter. 

Also if this scheme advocated by Mr. Wyer of estab- 
lishing a readiness to serve charge and then an increasing 
price in proportion to the amount of gas used that would 
automatically shut off the heating business when it be- 
come a peak load business. Whenever the business got 
to the point where the bills at the end of the month were 
very much higher the price of the pas would become so 
expensive that it would automatically reduce the con- 
sumption and that would be another way out of our 
difficulty and would help us out at least partially in the 
way of a solution of the peak load consumption. 

We have a readiness to serve charge of 20 cents per 
month at Ashtabula established by the Public Utilities 
Commission of Ohio. I will say to you frankly that it 
is not enough but we got that much and probably we 
ought to be thankful for that, since it is a start in the 
right direction. An analysis of our accounts shows that 
it materially helps in equalizing the burden. That is, it 
materially helps in making the small consumer. — the very 
small consumer bear his portion of the burden. I refer 
to the fellow who uses onlv two or three thousand feet 
of gas per month. It makes him a profitable consumer 
or at least it makes him pay his proportion of the operat- 
ing expenses where otherwise he would not pay his proper 
proportion. 

In conclusion I may say that I am heartily in sympathy 
with the proposition as suggested by Mr. Wyer but I 
think the details would have to be worked out in every 
locality and in each particular case as the particular 
case might be affected by the local situation. 

(lEORGE S. (lOFF: I am the General Manager of 
the Crystal City Gas Company, Corning, New York. 
We are before the Public Service Commission now with 
this same question. I do not know about the 20 cents 
suggested by Mr. Stone of Ashtabula. That is pretty 
light. W^e get 50 cents for our gas. We charge for 2.000 
feet. From the figures we get by way of comparison we 
find that the 2,000 feet of gas as a minimum charge or 
a service charge seems to be all right. The Commission 
has absolute control over us and while we are asking 
for a little higher rate we not only can sell all the gas 
we have at 50 cents to domestic consumers but we can 
sell it for certain industrial purposes. That 20 cent 
charge made by the Company represented by Mr. Stone 
I think is too small. We get a dollar. 

F. W. STONE: I think Mr. Goff must have mis- 
understood me. We have a 34 cent rate net and a io 
cent charge against every consumer in addition to that. 
No matter whether he uses any gas or not he pays 20 
cents per month. I will say frankly that this 20 cents is 
not enough. We ought to have more but at the same 
time that was the charge that the Public Utililties Com- 
mission of Ohio allowed us whether we delivered any 
gas or not and of course inasmuch as that is al\ they 



Most of us don't get on because we fly off at telling crises. — Herbert Kaufman. 



NATURAL GAS AND i;A>Ol.lNr 



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258 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



July 



by the meter which is a much lower rate than gas could 
be purchased for in that district under any other cir- 
cumstances. We are convinced that the application of 
this rate in our district will result: First, in a vast im- 
provement in the just and fair distribution of the cost of 
gas service between various classes of cpnsumers; Sec- 
ond, that it will lighten the most burdensome feature of 
paying for natural gas, i. e., the extreme high winter 
bills; Third, it will produce a more satisfactory revenue 
to the gas company ; Fourth, it will make absolutely defin- 
ite the amount of maximum winter demand which the 
company should be prepared to meet. 

I quote from the printed report of the committee of 
the Chamber of Commerce, the summary giving the 
problems which the committee found and the conditions 
to be met. followed by the details of the plan proposed to 
meet these conditions as follows : 

(Page numbers refer to pages in report which give the 
detail of the finding or recommendation). 

1. Without radical measures, no relief in the gas situ- 
ation can be looked for next winter. (Pages 14-15-16- 
17-18). 

2. The Kansas City Gas Company cannot supply ar- 
tificial gas in time to be of assistance next winter (Page 

21). 

3. The natural gas fields are giving out, and the time 
is coming — it may be three years or it may be twenty — 
when there will be no available natural gas for Kansas 
City (Pages 15-17-18). 

4. The gas problem is now involved in legal techni- 
calities which can be eliminated if all parties interested 
will co-operate. (Page 15). 

5. The Kansas City Gas Company is a distributing 
company only, and is obligated to supply only such gas 
as is delivered to it by the producing companies. (Page 
16). 

6. There are f\\'t leading natural gas companies con- 
nected with the system which supplies Kansas City. They 
are all controlled, however, by the Cities Service Com- 
pany, a holding company, of which Henry L. Doherty & 
Company are the principal owners. (Page 16). 

7. Kansas City's present normal consumption of 
natural gas varies from fifteen million to twenty-five mil- 
lion cubic feet per day. The average daily delivery of 
gas in December, 191 7, was 7,331,000 cubic feet, and in 
January, 19 18. 6,045,000. (Page 17). 

8. The normal consumption of artificial gas in other 
cities would indicate that Kansas City's consumption for 
cooking and lighting purposes only on artificial gas basis 
would be not to exceed an average of seven million cubic 
feet per day. This would provide a liberal allowance for 
Kansas City's previous experience with large users of 
gas and lower rates. There is sufficient natural gas at 
present to supply the next winter's demands if the use 
in Kansas City is somewhat restricted (Pages 19-20-21). 

9. The only workable way of restricting the use is to 
increase the price (Pages 19-22). 

10. By the winter of 1919-1920, a supplementary ar- 
tificial supply can be made available (Pages 22-23-27). 



11. To increase the supply of natural gas, the Do- 
herty interests made improvements costing approxi- 
mately two and one-half million dollars during the win- 
ter of 1917-1918. Since February loth, when these were 
complete, the supply in Kansas City has increased from 
three to four times what it was during December and 
January (Pages 17-18-19-21). 

12. Conditions of labor, supplies and money are such 
now that the natural gas companies are unable to make 
further expenditures by securing additional capital. 
Therefore, when improvements now under way are com- 
pleted, work will be stopped unless earnings are suffic- 
ient to make further betterments (Pages 14-22). 

13. The problem of supplying gas is one which must 
be looked at in the light of a permanent future supply. 
This means that we must plan on both natural and arti- 
ficial gas (Pages 15-18-22-23-24). 

14. The following plan has been worked out as one 
which will give a permanent solution of the gas question : 
(Pages 22-23-24-25) : 

(a) Depend on natural gas ^pply for the coming win- 
ter with a temporary rate which will restrict the use so as 
to make the supply adequate. Such rate should be a 
$6.00 per annum customer's charge, plus 80 cents per 
1,000 cubic feet for the natural gas consumed. 

(b) To increase the supply of natural gas, the natural 
gas company to use a portion of its earnings toward nev? 
extensions. 

(c) The Doherty interests to commence at once, on 
the reaching of an agreement, to install at various points 
along the pipe lines and near coal fields, various chemical 
plants, of which artificial gas will be a by-product. 

(d) The Doherty interests also to secure the establish- 
ment of a coke oven plant in or near Kansas City, with a 
capacity of ten million cubic feet of gas per day as a by- 
product. This is a contingent on the ability to secure the 
location of such a plant here. 

(e) All earnings to be applied to improving the gas 
supply, both natural and artificial. The increased revenue 
due to increased charges is to be applied only to taking 
care of increased costs due to the war. None of these 
costs to be considered as capital expenditures on which 
earnings will be expected. This means that instead of 
building at present high prices and making consumers 
pay for these high prices for years to come, they will be 
taken care 'of immediately out of the increased charge 
and the plants built and capitalized on the normal cost 
basis. 

(f) Prices shall be fixed for permanent artificial and 
natural gas which will be determined in a scientific way 
and which shall be very low (For details, see pages 
25-26). 

(g) All cities on the pipe lines are to be included in 
the plan (Page 28). 

15. The city of Kansas City has no power at present 
to purchase or build a gas plant, because of lack of abil* 
ity to get money. This also puts the city in a weak pos* 
tion in its dealings with the companies (Page 30). 



Difficulties are things that show what men are. — ^Epictetns. 



NATl RAL GAS AND (.ASOl.INK 



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26o 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



consumer carries. Therefore, the **readiness to serve" 
charge is proven to be a fair method of distributing the 
load. The amount of gas dehvered is adjusted by the 
meters so that the exact amount contracted for is the 
maximum which can flow through the meter in any 
given period. 

Table 111, herewith, shows the cost of gas under the 
6o-cent rate, under the proposed temporary rate, under 
the proposed permanent natural gas rate, and the pro- 
posed permanent artificial gas rate, together with a per- 
centage table, setting out clearly, costs in various quanti- 
ties of consumption. 

Artificial gas on the .same basis as natural gas requires 
about forty per cent, more volume to aftain the same 
number of heat units, as the manufactured standard is 
572 B. T. r.s per cubic foot and natural gas has 1,000 
B.T.U.s per cubic foot. 

Under the plan [)roposed in this report the rate of 40 
cents for artificial gas contemplates furnishing manu- 



the proposed permanent rate for artificial gas there is an 
increase on all amounts below 5,cxx) cubic feet as given 
in the table, and a decrease on amounts of 100,000 and 
above. 

These various rates as given show that on the perman- 
ent gas rates which are to be established as soon as pos- 
sible, if gas is purchased in quantities sufficiently large 
to provide for heating, i\ will be ptirchaseable at a lower 
cost than at present. For the very smallest consumer, 
w^hose present bill is not now more than 60 cents, there 
will be a large increase in the price. For the consumer 
who is consuming about 3,000 cubic feet or whose pres- 
ent bill is now^ $1.80, there will be a decrease on a per- 
manent natural gas rate, and a slight increase on the per- 
manent artificial gas rate." 

DONALD McDonald : The principle of the readi- 
ness to serve charge is undoubtedly an absolutely fair 
one but the plan of installing a check on the meter 



TABLE III. 
PRESENT AND PROPOSED RATES FOR GAS IN KANSAS CITY. 







Proposed Tempo 


rary 


Proposed Permanent 






Proposed Permanent 






Present Rate Nat 


ural Gas Rate* 


Natural (^ 


as 


Rate-* 






Artificial Gas Rate 


• •• 




n 


V 




3 

rr 
•<* 

W 


 


^ 


5^ 








TS 


■j: 


C 


►t 


M4 


onsumptio 
Feet per 


[onthly B 
per 1,000 
Feet) . . 


as Cost 
Cubic Fe 


er Cent. I 
or Deere 
Present . 




3 
.-»■ 




as. Cost p< 
Cubic Fe 


or Decrea 
Present ( 


n 

n 

3 



3 

rr 

e 


c 


ir Cent. I 
or Decrea 
Present ( 


ourly Demand in 
Lubic Feet on 
which these prices 


3 


• n- 


— 




• w 3 

• w ft 


= 




S^ 


E* 


3 
n 


•^^ 


a-^ 


a*2 3 


Cubic 
fonth . 


(60c 
ubic 


• 
• 
• 


1 

*•* 
. ^ 

• 

• 


rease 
e from 






»>4 
• 

• 

• 

• 


• • •  
UIOJI 


•1 
n 

M 

ft 


• 
• 

• 
• 


»4 
• ^ 

• 

• C 

• 

• 


rease 
from 


• 


. 


• 


• 








• 




• 


• 






1,000 


$0.60 


$1.30 


$'.30 


$1.1; 


$1.07 


$1 


.06 2-i 


78 




$«.3^' 


$«-3» 2-3 


120 


10 


1,500 


.90 


1.70 


I. 13 1-3 


.88 


1. 21 




.81 


35 




».52 


1. 01 


68 


10 


2,000 


1.20 


2. ro 


105 


.75 


1.37 




.68 


14 




1.72 


.86 


43 


ID 


3,000 


1.80 


2.90 


.96 23 


.62 


1.67 




.56 


7 




2.12 


.71 


18 


10 


4,000 


2.40 


3.70 


.92 % 


.54 


1.97 




.49 


18 




2.52 


.63 


5 


10 


S.ooo 


J. 00 


4.50 


.90 


.50 


2.40 




.48 


20 




313 


.62 


3 


15 


10. (.00 


6.00 


8.50 


.85 


.42 


4.03 




.40 


33 




533 


.53 


la 


20 


20,000 


12.00 


16.50 


.82 V6 


.38 


7.57 




.38 


37 




10.17 


•5« 


15 


40 


25.000 


15.00 


20.50 


.82 


.37 


9-33 




.Z7 


3« 




12-55 


.50 


17 


50 



• $6.ou per year customer charge; 8oc per i.ooo cubic feet of gas. 
•• $6.00 per year customer charge; 32c per year per foot per hour maximum demand charge; 30c 
per thousand cubic feet of gas. 

**' $6.00 per year customer charge: 50c per year per foot per hour maximum demand charge; 40c per 
thousand cubic feet of gas. 

(a) These apply to the permanent rates only. 

(b) Black face type indicates decrease. 



factured gas of 1,000 B.T.U.s per cubic foot or in other 
words, on the same basis as natural gas. 

This is believed to be the lowest net rate for artificial 
gas offered in any city in the United States. 
- Under the plan illustrated all consumers would be on a 
par in carrying a share of the overhead burden in pro- 
portion to their individual requirements for service, and 
would pay for gas consumed at a minimum rale, because 
they would not be carrying a part of the burden of the 
customer who was not paying his just share of the over- 
head and carrying charges. 

It will be seen from this table that on the proposed 
temporary rate the largest percentage of increase is on 
the smallest consumption, and that the increase grows 
smaller as the amount purchased grows larger. 

For the proposed permanent rate for natural gas, there 
is an increase only up to 2,000 cubic feet. On amounts 
above this the charge is a decrease below the present 
rate of 60 cents until on an amount of 25,000 cubic feet 
there is a decrease of 38 per cent, in the total rate. In 



which will only allow a certain consumption per hour 
will not accomplish all that ought to be accompHshed. 
If a man can burn ten feet or we will say thirty feet an 
hour and keeps that consumption up for twenty-four 
hours a day for the period of a year, when you have 
not enough gas for everybody he does just as much 
harm to the Company and puts just a great a burden on 
it as if he burned three times as much for one-third of 
the time. A readiness to serve charge on electrical ap- 
paratus is a matter of seconds. A readiness to serve 
charge in a gas company plant is a matter of hours and 
more Hkely of days. In adjusting a readiness to serve 
charge it ought to be calculated so as not to put on the 
poor man and on the small consumer any greater burden 
than is actually occasioned to the company by standing 
ready to meet that man's wants. His consumption is 
fairly uniform. He does not put any much greater 
burden on the Company's service in the winter time 
than he does in the summer. But when you come to 
the heating of houses and especially the heating of large 



Men at some times are masters of their fates. — Shakespeare. 



>! 



NATLRAl. (.AS AM) l.A><)l.lNK 



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262 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



Jul) 



than at any other time has to pay a premium for the 
extra expense to which he puts you in the form of a 
demand charge and he will find ways to limit himself in 
the consumption of gas and in the demand for service 
at the time which hits your supply the hardest, namely, 
your peak hours of nine o'clock in the morning and five 
thirty in the afternoon. 

F. W. STONE: In connection with what has been 
said by some of the speakers, we would judge from the 
record as given, that the rich man was the fellow who 
uses the gas and that he was the big consumer and the 
poor man uses a very small amount of gas. In other 
words the amount of gas a man uses to a certain extent 
is proportionate to his income. While we generally 
have that impression the facts do not bear out a state- 
of the accounts of two Gas Companies, one in a manu- 
ment of that kind. I had occasion to make an analysis 
facturing town of about eight or nine thousand people 
where they had 2,600 accounts on their books, — a western 
Pennsylvania town doing the ordinary business that a 
western Pennsylvania town does, and another town of 
25,000 people where they had 6,000 accounts on their 
books. We had occasion to go back over the ledgers 
and find out the income of one out of every five cus- 
tomers just taking the ledger as the names of the cus- 
tomers appeared upon it so that we would get an average 
of about the financial situation of the customers as they 
appeared upon the ledger. The facts of the case are as 
disclosed by that analysis that the rich man was not the 
man who used the most gas. The fact of the matter 
is that the very poor man and the very rich man use 
about the same amount of gas. We figured it out this 
w^ay. That the very rich man had plenty of help in 
his house and he thought if it did not cost him any 
more to have his furnace fired and it was not any burden 
on him but that the man who did the chores around the 
house or a maid or whoever did the rough work about 
the house they could shovel in the coal and carry out 
the ashes and it did not entail any extra work to him 
and the consequence was that he burned the coal for 
heating his mansion and he used electric light for light- 
ing it and he used gas for just whatever cooking was 
necessary and that was about the limit of his consump- 
tion on the average. The very poor man used gas for 
cooking and used coal for heating because he felt that 
the coal would be cheaper and he could get along that 
way. We found an analysis of these accounts that the 
best customer of the (las Company and the man who 
used the most gas was the thrifty and well to do me- 
chanic. The fellow who was making good wages and 
had a very good income but whose wife did her own 
work and in order to make it easy for the wife to do the 
work he would use gas for cooking and lighting and 
heating and for everything around the house where it 
was possible to use gas and that he was the fellow who 
was really the big consumer of gas. So that all of this 
talk has been indulged in here this morning about the 
man heating his mansion being the big consumer of gas 
is not borne out by the facts at least so far as our ex- 
perience goes. 

H. C. MORRIS: An analysis of the gas sales in a 
town of 135,000 indicated that 70 per cent of the cus- 



tomers only used 30 per cent of the gas and that the 
remaining 30 per cent of the customers used 70 per 
cent of the gas. That is domestic consumption only. 



NEW GAS AND OIL ASSOCIATIONS. 




N Wednesday, July loth, at a meeting held at 
the Chittenden Plotel in Columbus, the pre- 
liminary steps were taken towards the forma- 
tion of The Ohio Gas & Oil Men's Associa- 
tion, intended ultimately to embrace in its membership 
every man directly or indirectly engaged in the gas or 
oil industry in Ohio. 

The Secretary — Mr. William H. Thompson, for 
many years associated with the Ohio Fuel Supply 
Company as attorney, and who is thoroughly experi- 
enced in every branch of the industry, will devote his 
entire time to the work of the Association, and within 
the next two or three weeks will open Association of- 
fices in Columbus and establish permanent headquar- 
ters here. 

Officers and Directors Elected. 

President — Hon. L. G. Neely St. Marys, Ohio 

V^ice-President — H. J. Hoover Cincinnati, Ohio 

Vice-President — F. O. Levering Mt. Vernon. Ohio 

Secretary-Treasurer — Wm. H. Thompson 

Box 1 192, Columbus. Ohio 

DIRECTORS. 
Three Years. 

J. M. Garard Columbus, Ohio 

James McMahon Toledo, Ohio 

A. F. Holliday Newark, Ohio 

Geo. W. Trimble Lancaster. Ohio 

Two Years. 

Kay C. Krick Columbus, Ohio 

C. W. Sears Wooster. Ohio 

Geo.H. Mauntler Woodville, Ohio 

J. J. Crawford Toronto, Ohio 

One Year. 

M. B. Dalv Cleveland, Ohio 

Hon. James R. Campbell Columbus, (ihlo 

W. E. Svkes Marietta, Ohii 

\\. H. Lear Woodsfield, Ohio 



BECOMES PURCHASING AGENT. 




N July 1st, Mr. James McK. Reiley who was at 
one time connected with The Gas Industry 
magazine and The Natural Gas Journal, suc- 
ceeded Mr. B. (i. (irammel as Purchasing Agent 
of the Iroquois Natural (ias Company of Buffalo. 

Mr. Reiley some while since took charge of the appli- 
ance exhibition room of the Iroquois Company, since 
which time this exhibit has been continuou.sly maintained 
as a *iive exhibit.*' It has proved a marked success. 

The conduct of the appliance exhibit section continues 
under Mr. Reiley 's supervision as formerly, thus he will 
now perform a dual service on the staff of the Iroquois 
Company. 

Mr. Reiley 's youngest son has sailed for France as 
Captain of a machine gun company. 



One foolish act may undo a man, and a timely one make his fortune. — Ohesterfield. 



RESULTS OF DRILLING-LATEST REPORTS 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELD. 



ALLEGANY FIELD. 

Carpenter & Co., Potter Gas 

Wheeler heirs, \. L. Shaner 

Ballard. F. G. & F 



Gas Wells 

MIDDLE FIELD. 
Lot 3i()0. Dr. Kitchen 2 



McKean, Haskell & Co. 18. 
McKean, Haskell & Co. 19 . 
Schreiber, Continental Oil 5 
Isenbrown, Proper & Co. 3 
Sigj^ins. G. R. Siggins r-' . . 

Wilson. Clinger Oil 6 

Johnson, Triumph Oil jj . . 
Wallace. Clinger Oil 7 .... 
Carson. R. O. Carson m .. 



Dry 

Gas Wells 



BRADFORD FIELD. 

Kinney, Rerwald & Lester i 

A. Batton, S. Newell 



Dry 

VENANOO-CLARION. 

Pithole Oil. Tague & Troutinan 2 

Pithole Oil. Tagiic & Troutman 3 ...... 

P. G. .'\lbaiigh, S. P. NfcCalmont est. 14 
.\. F. Korb, Kapp, Korb & Beary 14 .. 
Strong & Brown, Chambers Oil 45 .... 

Joe Kaverline. Kaverline i 

Shoch, Grieff & Smith 2 

John Lijshen. Ballen Dally et al. 7 

Clarion — 
Paul Black. F*. G. Yonkers 6 



Dry 



BUTLER-ARMSTRONG 
Wm. Foringer, Knight. Moody et al. 2.. 



Dry 



Co. I 



SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA 

Washington — 

Greenlee. M frs. L. & H . i 

Swart, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Bane, Peoples Gas i 

Bell. F'eoples Gas 7 . 
Custer, Lew .Mills & 

Imperial — 

Meanor, Gladys Oil 2 

Steinetz, Jones & Co. i 

Dorseyville — 

Kretzer, Wildwood Oil i 

Crystal, Burke & Co. i 

Hartz heirs. .American X. G. i.... 
Pcghor heirs. National O. & G. 1 

Ingomar — 
Irwin. I T. Williams 2 

Duff City— 
Xeeley heirs. Nceley Bros. & Co. 
Purvador, Harbison & Co. i .... 

Crafton — 
Beales, Yolton & Co. 2 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

4 
6 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



Drv 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Drv 
Gas 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 

Gas 
Dry 

Gas 



Bcllevuc — 
Wilson, Philadelphia Gas 2 

Beaver County — 
Breadin heirs. Crown Petroleum 3 
Davidson, L. R. Davidson 14 

Mt. Morris — 

Keener. J. L. Garard 8 

Thomas jot, J. L. Garard 3 

Garrison, Peoples Gas 4 

White, Peoples Gas i 

Carpenter, Peoples Gas i 

Jones, Peoples Gas i 

Keffer. Carnegie Gas 3 

Garrison, Peoples Gas 4 

King, Mfrs. L. & H. i 



Dry 
Gas 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



Mannington — 

Neeley, Reserve Gas i 

Taylor. Hope Gas 2 

Davis, Reserve Gas i 

Hawkins. South Penn Oil 3 

Springer, Carnegie Gas 2 

Stewart, South Penn Oil 2 

Kinsey, Hope Gas 4 

Cole, Carnegie Gas i 

Dawson. Hope Gas 3 

Maxwell. Philadelphia Co. 4 . . . . 

Smith, Hope Gas 2 

Clark hrs., Philadelphia Co. i .. 

Cordray, South Penn Oil i 

W>lls, Carnegie Gas 2 

Spencer, A. O. D. 3 

Keyser, Hope Gas 2 

Moore, Hope Gas 3 

Wilson, Hope Gas 3 

Park, Hope Gas i 

Fordyce, South Penn Oil 2 

Wilson, Philadelphia Co. i 

Wetzel and Tyler — 

Hart. Carnegie Gas i 

Roberts hrs., Hope Gas 3 

Postalwaite, Hope Gas i 

Davis, Eastern I^etroleum i 

Cook. Benedum-Trees Oil i .... 

Hancock County — 
Heilman, Heilman & Co. i 

Wood County — 
Bell, B. B. Bell i 

Ritchie County — 
W. Va. tract. Burke Bros. 19 . . . 

Push. Hope Gas i 

Keith, R. E. L. Frymier i 

Hays, Hope Gas i 

Brannon, South Penn Oil 5 .... 

Mason, Carnegie Gas i 

Dotson, Philadelphia Co. i .... 
Haught. Ira Haught i 

Wirt County — 
Adams, Krepps & Co. i 

Pleasants Countv — 

Tait, Tait Farm Oil 4 

Smith. F". M. Gardner & Co. i .. 
Barron lot, Wright & Co. i ... 
Gilmore, Xewilmington O. & G. i 
Hammett, Hope Gas 7 



I Drv 

Dr 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

la 

I- 



Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 

Drv 

Dry 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 

Gas 

Ga. 

Drv 

Dry 

Gas 

Ga5 

Gas 

Gas 

Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Ga> 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

Pry 

Dr. 
Drv 
Drv 
Drv 
I Drv 



Ingenuity is genius in trifles. — Johnson. 



July 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



26s 



Calhoun County — 

Haverty, Martin Crawley i 

Devore, Federal Oil 5 

Kanawha County — 
Sunday Creek Coal, U. F. G. 9 
Sunday Creek Coal, U. F. G. 10 , 
Thomas, Cabot & Thomas i . . . 

Dry 

Gas 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 



Woodsfield — 

Smith, Big Ben Oil i 

Draper, Sylvan Oil i 

Hamilton heirs, O. F. S. i 

Braysville — 
Kinsey, Gatton & Dye 4 

Perry County — 

Green, Sturm & Co. i 

Buckley, Drumbottom Oil i 

Schmeltzer, Carter Oil i 

Hocking County — 

Trobridge, Preston Oil i 

Longstreth, Preston Oil 12 

McClain, Lupher Producing 2 . . . , 

Coshocton County — 
Hamilton Rico Oil i 

Athens County — 

Rice, L. Stephens i 

Totman, Citizens National Bank 2 

Morgan County — 
Van Fossen, Pittsburgh Oil i . . . 

Best, Henne Oil 11 

Crew, Davis & Turney 6 

Dale, A. G. Smith 234 

Noble County — 
Archer, M. B. Archer & Co. i . . . 
Archer, M. B. Archer & Co. 2 . . . 
Hohman, Felix Gerst & Co. i . . . . 

Terles, Velda Oil 3 

Blake, J. W. McKee i 

Banker, A. L. Patton & Co. i . . . . 

Marietta — 

Reader, William Reader 24 

Allen, Carter Oil i 

Knowlton, J. C. Grant & Co. i . . . 

Harris, Earl Stephens i 

Soles, Beaver Valley Dev. i ... 

Carroll County — 
Long, Holmes & Co. i 

Harrison County — 
McCauley, W. C. Kennedy Co. 1 
Armstrong, Liberty O. & G. i . . 
Crawford, Archer Dev. Co. 3 . . . . 

Jefferson County — 
Mills, F. Housen 2 

Columbiana County — 
Christie, Renner-Deibel O. & G. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

20 

^7 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK 

Comp. Prod 

Allegany 20 

Bradford 49 

Middle Field 28 

Venango-Clarion 49 

Butler-Armstrong 11 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

30 
4 



rod. 


Dry 


Gas 


ZZ 





3 


131 


2 





30 


4 


6 


63 


9 





21 


I 






S. W. Penn'a 45 

West Virginia 109 

S. E. Ohio 109 

Total 420 



72 


10 





670 


20 


27 


1,165 


30 


4 



2,185 76 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



LICKING COUNTY. 

Granville — J. Jones, Heisey Gas i 

Licking — A. A. Haines, Wehrle Stove 3.. 

Liberty — S. C. Montgomery, Ohio F. S. i 

A. Horn, Ohio Fuel Supply i 



Dry 
Gas 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 
Walnut — J. H. Grubb, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

KNOX COUNAY. 
Jefferson — A. J. Workman, Ohio F. S. i . 

ASHLAND COUNTY. 
Hanover — Atkinson, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

MEDINA COUNTY. 

Leitchfield — Heiserman, Hartman & Co. i 
.'\. J. Holmes, Jas. Hartman & Co. 3... 
Westrteld — A. Mong, Ohio Fuel Supply i 
Brunswick — Carpenter, Ohio Fuel Sup. 2 . 
Liverpool — P. Emet, Ohio Fuel Supply i 
Medina — L. A. Miner, Ohio Fuel Supply i 



• • • • 



Dry 
Gas 



WAYNE COUNTY. 
Cannan — V. & C. Bowman, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

C. C. Pinkley, Logan Gas & Fuel 1 

J. & K. Sell. Logan Gas & F'uel i 

r. S. Oiler. Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Wm. Weidrick. Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

T. Armstrong. Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Plain — Silas F'icks. East Ohio Gas t 

Chippewa — F. W. Galehouse, East O. G. 2 



Dry 
Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 

Monroe — J. A. Irvine, Logan Gas & F. i 

C. E. Shearer, Logan Gas & Fuel 2 

Worthington — Sniith-Creedy, Logan G. & Fuel i 



Gas 



CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 
Dover — A. V. Coone, Logan Gas & F. i . 

H. Myers, Logan Gas & Fuel 2 

Mary E. Wulf, Logan Gas & Fuel 3.., 

C. R. La Salle. Breston Oil i 

Bailey-Lewis, Melrose Oil & Gas 2... 

J. Kirk, Melrose Oil & Gas 2 

C. L. Mogawar, East Ohio Gas r...., 

C. M. Lippert, East Ohio Gas i 

J. W. Clemens, East Ohio Gas i . . . . 
Victor Tuttle, East Ohio Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland — Cath. R. Poling, Ohio F. S. 9.. 

Jas. Stone, Ohio Fuel Supply 3 

Chas. Nickles, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . . . 
W. R. Ratcliff, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . . . 



40 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

2 
2 

Dry 

Gas 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

3 
3 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

2 
6 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

3 
7 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Speech is the gift of all, but thought of few. — Oato. 



266 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



S. M. Waltz, ( )hio Fuel Supply 2 Gas 

Harrison — Thatcher, Ohio Fuel Supply 3 Gas 

Elk — I. M. Lautz, Ohio Fuel Sup. 2 Gas 

J no. Clark, Ohio Fuel Supply i Gas 

Eagle — S. Hysel, Ohio Fuel Supply i Dry 

m 

Dry I 

Gas 8 

PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — J. & E. Bope, Logan G. & F. 4 Gas 

H. Crossmark, Heisey Gas i Dry 

n. Foster, Heisey Gas i Gas 

Dry I 

Gas  2 

HOCKING COUNTY. 

Salt Creek — U. & A. Shappell, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . Dry 

J. J. Brown, Ohio Fuel Supply i Dry 

Benton — Huffman, Ohio Fuel Supply 1 Dry 

Dry 3 

HOLMES COUNTY. 

Ripley — V. V, Denny, Ohio F'uel Supply i Dry 

Jas. Dye, East Ohio Gas i Gas 

Washington — P. Sprang, Logan G. & F. i Gas 

Houdenschild, Logan Gas & Fuel i Dry 

J. H. Doty, Ohio Fuel Supply r jas 

Amanda Graven, Ohio Fuel Supply i Gas 

Dry 2 

Gas 4 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Coal — S. Bingham, Ohio Fuel Supply i Gas 



CENTRAL OHIO FIELD. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLEIED WORK. 

Comp. Prod. 

Licking 4 o 

Fairheid i o 

Knox 1 o 

Ashland i o 

Medina 7 5 

Lorain o o 

Wayne 10 18 

Richland 3 o 

Cuyahoga 10 o 

Vinton 9 o 

Perry 3 o 

Hocking 3 o 

Holmes 7 50 

Loshocton i 50 

Jackson i o 

Total 61 123 



Dry 

2 


Oa. 

2 


I 








1 





1 


3 

2 


3 







3 

I 


3 

7 

8 


I 


2 


3 

2 






4 






1 



18 38 



LIMA FIELD. 



N^OOD COUNTY. 

Bloom— N. W. Gas 17. Ohio Oil 46 . . . 
Troy — Englehart, J. E. Englehart i . 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 



I 
I 



AUGLAIZE COUNTY. 

St. Marys — C. J. Hacseker, Ohio Oil 8 Dry 

Gust Evons, W. V. Young i Dry 



Dry 



VAN WERT COUNTY. 
Willshire — Z. Bowen, E. J. Wheeler i, 2. 



SENECA COUNTY. 
Clinton— N. J. Nelkirk, Barhoff & Co. i 
Wm. Einsel, the Sun Co. 17 

Dry 

LUCAS COUNTY. 

Waterville— R. G. Stitt, R. G. Stitt 7 ... 

WYANDOT COUNTY. 

Salem — Enders, M. H. Hauser & Co. 2.. 



Drv 
Drv 



Drv 



Drv 



LIMA FIELD. 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED WORK. 

May. '18. April/18 

Comp. Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. Dry 

Wood 10 87 2 9 60 1 

Hancock 4 48 o 5 30 

Allen 5 fto o 2 20 

Auglaize 8 32 2 3 6 

Sandusky 8 38 o 3 30 

Mercer 3 28 o 3 36 

Van Wert 8 45 2 i 10 

Seneca 4 115 2 2 165 

Lucas J I I o o 

Ottawa 6 76 o 4 30 

Wyandot i o i o o .^ 

Williams o o o 1 o 1 

Defiance o o o i 2 

Total 59 530 10 34 389 2 



INDIANA FIELD. 



JAY COUNTY. 
Penn — Jas. Sutton, Jones & Lyons 6 

DELAWARE COUNTY. 

Liberty — J. Hitchcoqk, Oklahoma-Southern Oil 3 
Delaware — M. M. Friddle, Roberts & Co. 3 

Dry 

PIKE COUNTY. 

Madison — W. J. Rapp. Ohio Oil i 

Eli Rumble hrs., M. Murphy estate i 

Eliza D. Tame. M. Murphy estate 5 

Geo. W. Willis, A. B. Bement i 

Dry 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Turman — W. C. Riggs, Scott & Co. 2 

Gill — M. Berry, Indiana-Illinois Oil i 

Curry — F. Dix, W. C. Kennedy Co. 6 

Dry 



Dry 

Dry 
Drv 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 



Dry 
Drv 
Drv 



INDIANA FIELD. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

May, '18. April, 'iS 

Comp. Prod. Dry Comp. Prod. Dr; 



Dry 



Wells o 

Jay I 

Huntington 3 

Delaware 2 

Randolph 1 

Gibson o 

Pike 8 

Sullivan 3 

Allen I 

Total IQ 









I 





1 





1 


3 


85 


1 


9 

















2 











•25 




















3 


20 


2 


266 


4 


7 


295 


I 





3 


4 


6 


T 


4 











(' 



304 



10 



18 406 



It takes a long time to bring ezc^ence to matmity. Synu. 



July 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



267 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

Lee Baker, Jas. Walker & Co. i 



WOLFE COUNTY. 

Torrent — Davis, Meadow Creek O. & G. i 

ESTILL COUNTY. 

Irvine — Cox hrs., A. M. Pague & Co. 2... 

E. Stacy, New York-Ky. Oil 4 

Williams, Erode, Reis & Holden i 

Callon Cox, Harris & Co. i 

Chas. Cox hrs., A. M. Pague & Co. 3.. 



Dry 



POWELL COUNTY. 

Pilot— J. D. Huff, Ohio Oil i 

Geo. Woodward, O. K. Oil 2 

Elias Bishop, Federal Oil 15 

W. R. Sparks, Ohio Oil 4 

Widow Amburgy, J. D. Drake 2 



Dry 



LEE COUNTY. 

Beattyville — Kincaid hrs.. Combination Oil i 

A. H. Warner, California Pet. i 

A. H. Warner, California Pet. 2 

A. H. Warner, California Pet. 3 



Dry 
,Gas 



ALLEN COUNTY. 

Scottsville — Riley Hunt, Smith & Morrison i 
C. J. Harmon, C. A. Rose i 



Dry 
Gas 



BATH COUNTY. 
Licking Union — Crosswait, Kentucky Crude Oil i . 

LINCOLN COUNTY. 

Waynesburg — Dunningan, Florence Oil 1 

Turpman, Owen & Neal 1 



Dry 
Gas 



KNOX COUNTY. 

Barbourville — S. H. Jones, Ohio Oil i 
S. B. Dishman, Empire O. & G. i . . 
Pursiiield, Empire O. & G. 1 



Dry 



JOHNSON COUNTY. 
Paintsville — Paint Lick Dome, Paint Lick Dev. i . . . . 

ROWAN COUNTY. 

Long Tunnel — Clearfield Lumber, Kentucky Crude 
Oil I 

GRAYSON COUNTY. 

Leitchfield — ^John Dunn, C. H. Dooley i 

TAYLOR COUNTY. 

Campbellsville — Grayson County O. & G. 7 

ELLIOTT COUNTY. 

Isonville — Fulton, Ohio Cities Gas i 

Burkes — Gillam, Badger Oil i 



Dry 



EDMONSON COUNTY. 

Asphalt — Asphalt Tract, Southwestern Dev. i 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

3 
I 



Gas 
Dry 

^ -    

I 

I 

Dry 

Gas 
Dry 

» - ^ 

I 
I 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



SUMMARY OP COMPLETED 

Comp 

Wayne 4 

Wolfe 5 

Lawrence 1 

Morgan i 

Estill 44 

Powell 39 

Lee 42 

Allen II 

Bath I 

Warren i 

Metcalf I 

Lincoln 7 

Knox 4 

Johnson 

Rowan 

Owsley 

Grayson 

Taylor 

Elliott 3 

Edmonson i 

Union i 

Total 171 



WORK. 

. Prod. 

10 

50 

4 

5 

325 

306 

1,090 

176 

o 

5 

5 

25 

5 
o 
o 
10 
o 
o 

5 



10 



2,031 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



CLARK COUNTY. 
Parker— N. P. Doughtree, Ohio Oil z-j . . 
Westheld— M. L. Briscoe, Briscoe Oil 8 

Dry 



CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

Oblong— G. W. Davis. Ohio Oil 

Prairie — M. Newlin, Watson & Co. i 

O. Newlin, Pease Oil i ' 

Montgomery — Parker, S. Y. Ramage 10 . . 
Honey Creek — Maxwell, John McNally 13 
J. F. Rich, Pease Oil i 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
I 
I 
o 
o 

D 

5 

3 

I 

I 

o 
o 
I 

3 
r 

I 

o 

I 

o 

2 

/ 

o 

27 



JASPER COUNTY. 
Grandville — C. Shook, Central Refining 3 

COLES COUNTY. 

East Oakland — Sam Doughtree, Woman's Federal 
Oil 1 



ILLINOIS FIELD. 



SUMMARY 



OF COMPLETED 

May, '18. 
Comp. Prod. 
6 19 



Gas 

o 
o 

o 
o 
I 
I 

o 
o 
o 
I 

3 
o 
o 

4 

o 
1 
o 
o 

u 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
'Gas 
Dry 
Dr3 
Dry 
Gas 

4 
2 



Dry 



Gas 



WORK. 

April. '18 
Dry Comp. Prod. »^ry 



Clark 

Crawford 18 195 

Lawrence 3 235 

Clinton o o 

Wabash 1 5 

Jasper i o 

Coles I o 

McDonough o o 

Total 30 454 



t 
o 
o 

I 
I 
o 

10 



/ 

13 

/ 
2 

3 
o 

o 

I 

38 



12 

84 

216 

3 
o 

o 

o 

3 



I 

5 

2 
I 

3 
o 

o 


12 



KANSAS. 



12-26- 4, Enyart, Paragon Oil 15 

35-25- 4, Adsit, Empire G. & F. 10 . . . 
36-25- 4, Houston, Empire G. & F. 25 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



'Tis a wise saying. Drive on your own track. — Plutarch* 



268 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



20-26- 

31-26- 
28-26- 
28-26- 

34--?5- 

3--J5- 
2-25- 

26-^5- 
3-4-^5- 

27-26- 
26-27- 

0-29- 
25-26- 

27-26- 
30-24- 
25-26- 



5, Kinney, Leonard Oil 2 

5, Risagno, Mid-Kansas Oil i 

6, Unger. Big Four Oil i 

5, Lane. Crown Rock Oil i 

5. Lane, Gore et al. i 

4, Dillenbeck, Southwestern Pet. r 

5, Robinson, Theta Oil 15 

5, Guinn, Gypsy Oil 2 

4. Harden, Empire G. & F. i 

4, Dillenbeck Tuloma O. & G. et al. 

4, Marsh, Magnolia Petroleum i .... 

5, Fullenweiter, Towa State Oil i . . . 
4. Palmer, Magnolia Petroleum . 
4, Harter, Mid-Kansas Oil 6 

4. Simpkins, Forest Oil 3 

5, Fullenweider, Iowa State Oil i . . 

4, Bremer, Security O. & G. i 

4, Simpkins, Wichita-Augusta Oil 3 



Dry 

6-35- 15. 

33-34-15. 

7-35-15. 
31-29-16, 

-27-33-14. 

ro-33-14. 
2-23-14, 

I -33- 1 5. 
28-32-16. 

31-29-16, 
3-35-14. 
3-35-14, 

33-34-15. 

7-35-15. 

7-33-15. 
28-32-16. 

28-31-14. 
3-33-16. 

3-33-16. 

6-35-15. 

31-32-15. 

31-32-15. 
31-22-15. 

31-32-15. 
36-33-14. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Tummocliflf. Drohe et al. i 

Scovel. Mahutska Oil 2 

Fields. J. Sahfzern et al. i 

Scott. J. P. Kelly i 

Sullivan, K. C. Syndicate 1 

Gopher, Rothrock et al. 6 

Fee, Minn Oil 2 

Broolby, R. V. Hill i 

Hendrich, Findburg & Stoll 1 ... 

Scott, J. P. Riley i 

Fecht. C. M. Hamilton 5 

Pollet, C. M. Hamilton 2 

Scovel, Manhattan Oil et al. 2... 

Fields. Shertzer et al. 1 

Cheesman, Bankers Oil 3 

Hendrick, A. B. Harm i 

Cole, A. A. Small i 

Blaker, W. W. Blaker 4 

Blaker. W. W. Blaker 5 

TummeclifFe. J. VV. Dyche ct al. 
Durett, Compton & Galbreath 3 . 

Witten, J. F. Overtield 8 

DeMott, Compton & Galbreath 3 

Willie. J. F. Overfield 8 

Mason. Three Sands Oil 3 



Drv 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

21 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 



Dry 20 

Gas 3,000,000 

Gas 5 



ALLEN COUNTY. 

21-25-18, Sims, F. M. Wilbur 1 

10-26-18, Miller, Midvale Oil & Gas 2 

10-26-18. Osborne, L. K. Spielman 4 

33-26-18. McGovern. Combination O. & G. 2 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 2 

Gas 300.000 

Gas 2 

NEOSHO COUNTY. 

4-27-18, Allen. Bates et al. 2 Dry 

27-27- 18, Woosley, Fairfield Oil & Gas 3 Gas 

4-27-18, Butler, Liquid Wealth O. & G. 7 Gas 

28-28-20, Haynes, Moore et al. 1 Dry 

21-28-18. Barnes. Moore & Loy 1 Dry 

26-28-18, McCloud. Chenago Oil 1 Dry 

26-28-19, Wagner, Moore et al. 1 Dry 



Dry 5 

Gas 250,000 

Gas 2 



CHAUTAUQUA AND ELK COUNTIES. 

31-32-13, Ferguson, Sachem Oil 1 

1 1-32-12, Doty, Conley & Bowser i 



25-31-12, 
31 32-12. 
31-32-12. 
28-31-14. 
27-34-10, 
27-34-10. 
27-34-10. 
2-32- 9. 

2^-33-11. 
30-33-12. 
24-32-12, 
27-29-11, 

20-31-13. 
31-32-13, 
^'0-31-13. 

29-32-14. 
24-32-12, 

20-31-13. 



Jones, R. C. Ingram et al. i . . . . 

Seybold, Sachem Oil 5 

Furgeson. Sachem Oil 2 

Cole, Small & Carter Oil 1 . . 

Hewitt, F^^lgin Oil 9 

Hewitt, Flgin Oil 10 

Rathburn, Denman Bros, i . . . . 

Hylton. Beal & Co. 1 

Woodworth. Iowa Oil 1 

Stephens. Arnold Oil 2 

Holliday Development 8 ... 

Illuminating O. & G. 1 

Gardner. Foster & Dexter 3.. 

Wright, Sachem Oil i 

F. Gardner. Foster & Dexter 

Lahn, Chastain Bros. 4 

Holliday, Mary Holliday 2 ... 
Gardner, Cook No. 3 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dr>' 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

8-17-22. 

6-17-22, 
32-16-21, 
15-T7-22, 
1016-21, 
11-T6-21. 
22-20-20, 
22-20-20. 
22-20-20. 
36-16-22, 

8-17-22. 
21-17-22. 
35-16-21, 

1-17-21. 
26-16-21. 

Dry 

Gas 

WILDCATS AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

Woodson County — 
33-26-16. McGovern. Combination O. & G. 2... 
33-26-16, McCloud, Young Bros, i 

Greenwood County — 

35-25- 8, Ladd, Derby & Marshall 1 

33-24- 9. .Anderson. B. & H. Oil 1 



MIAMI. FRANKLIN, DOUGLAS COUNTIES. 

Cappell, McCain et al. i 

Freeman. Kansas-Duluth Oil i 

Tullos. Benton O. & G. 6 

Kite. Unknown i 

Bauman. Choctaw & Chickasha O. & G. 6.. 

Watkins. Hawk O. & G. 1 

Patton. Sperm Oil 3 

Pinney. Progressive Oil i 

Pinney. Progressive Oil 2 

Van Dresser, Smith et al. 1 _. . 

Kepple, Unnamed Owner 1 

Day, Dadidor et al. i 

Anthony, Harvey & Allison 3 

Neel. Hurley et al. 1 

Wilson. Hvde & Harrison i 



10 
16,000,000 

10 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dr>' 
Drv 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 
Dry 
Dr}' 
Dry 

13 
I 



Gas 
Dry 

Dry 



Dry 3 

Gas 100,000 

Gas I 



OKLAHOMA. 



Bartles 

7-28-13, 

9-28-13, 

17-26-13, 

30-29-14. 
7-28-15. 

7-28-15. 
30-21^-15, 

18-28-13, 

9-28-13, 

14-24-12, 

35-28-13, 
35-28-13. 

Dry 



WASHINGTON COUNTY, 
ville. Etc. — 

Condra & Paine, Creta Oil 7 . . . . 

Morris. Highland Oil 1 

Byron, Three Link Oil 25 

Davis, H. B. Campbell et al. i... 

Smith. Jones. Lamb et al. i 

Smith, Jones, Lamb et al. 2.... 

Davis, H. B., Campbell et al. 1.. 

Walls, Seamans Oil 3 

Banks, Queen Oil & Refg. 3 

Symonds, Louvain Oil 3 

Johnson, U. S. Oil 2 

Johnson, H. V. Foster 7 



OSAGE COUNTY. 



Gas 
Dry 



20-27-11, Carter Oil 1 
20-27-11, Carter Oil 3 
19-27-11. Carter Oil 1 



Dry 

On- 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dn- 

Drr 

Drv 

Dry 

Drv 

Dr) 

Pr> 

]2 

Drv 

Dr> 
Gas 



Knowledge is the only fountain both of the love and the principles of human liberty. — ^Webster. 



4-21-10 

35-24- 8 
10-28-ic 
3S-24- 8 

27-29- ic 

9-26-ii 

8-22-12 



8-26.1 

18-J4-I. 



, Prairie Oil & Gas .. 

, Bergen Oil 7 

, Barnsdali Oil 27 .... 
t Osage Oil 2 



OKMULGEE COUNTY. 



, Oil 



IS 



I Petroleum 15 . 
1 Oil 2 



Osage 



Oil 207 . 

Oil & Markham . 

Natural Gas 3.. . . 

Mass,-Okla. Oil 5 

Graham & Bird 2 

Indian Territory III. Oil z 
Osage Oil & Refining i .. 
Magnolia Petroleum 12 . 



Dry 

Gas \\v^y^y^\v^]\v^[[v^y^['.'.'^'^'. 

NOWATA-ROGERS COUNTIES. 

Cherokee Shallow Sands — 
23-24-16, Fee, Cabin Valley Mining 13 

2-24-16. Scott. Arrow Head el al. 8 

7-25-17, Roberts et al,. Tulsa Oil t 

15-24-17. Palmour. Oklamade Oil & Gas 18-, 

5-26-17. Brannon, H. C. Campbell 2 

^7-27-15, Stunkard, Cherewata Oil i 

i8-26-r5, Barsby, Phillips Petroleum 2 

26-24-16. Fee. Wiser Oil 3 

26-26-15. Rogers. .\. C. Bailey t ,. 



TULSA COUNTY. 
Bird Creek, F.tc— 
13-21-13. Abholt, A. D. Woodv el al. 3.. 

36.20-12, Collins, Busha & Co 

4-21-13. Adair. Dollilis et al. 1 

S-ZI-13. Hitchie, Berger O. & G 

35-2i-i'l. Keys.Mallory & Curtis 3 ... 
Red Fork and Sand SprinRs- 



8-ig-i 
8-19-it, 

29-19-11. 



ti et al. 



. Billin 



ai. 3 - 



t al. 



Childers. Jaeksc 
20-19-11. Rogers, Howard & Duffield 2 

29-19-11. Payne. Texas Co. 1 

20.19-11, Martin. Jackson & Wise t ... 

29-19-12. Payne. Texas Co. 1 

27-19-12, Clinton. Texas Co. r 

27-19-12. Clinton. Volfier el al. u 

20-19-H, Rogers, Paxton Oil 2 

Broken Arrow— 
10-18-IS. Webster & Olson 4 

4-19-14. Mills. Dean et al. 2 

1-18-13, Sango, L. L. Colburn 3 

,ji-i8-T4. Halkey, Reynolds et al. 2.... 

23-19.13, Eubank, Miles el al. 4........ 

34-18-14. Childers, Webster el al. 3,,.. 

13-18-14. Barnett, Bearman et al. 6 

ig-18-14. Tiger. Webster e( al. 4 

Bixby— 
33-16-13. Good. Cosden O. & G. i . , , 
25-16-14. Gravson, Peterson et al. 2.... 
14-17-13. Allen, Davis & Younger 2 ... 
35-16-13, Atkins. Tammany Oil 4 

6-17-13. Daylon. French et al. 3 

16-17-13. Wildcat. Wieth & Weldy 3 .. 
25-17-14, Riverbed, Wagoner et al. i.... 
15.16-13. Tiger. Gladys Oil 7 

5-16-13. Rowland. ). H. Markham. Jr. 
29-17-13. Berryhill, Marshall & Simmoni 

Dry 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 

Drv 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



. Grayson, Tex. Co, t 

'. Steele, Texas Co. 4 

. Harris, Cunningham el a 

, Melzgar O. & G. 1 

■, Wigton, Alexander et al. 

■, Burns et al. r 

. Harjo. W. B. Pine et al. 1 
;. Stewart, Barbara Oil 1 .. 
fr, Sequoyah Oil 



, Kai 



rd. Devi 



al. 



, Atkins. Gumbo Oil 3 . 

!. J. R. Burns 1 

, Fink, Dickerson et al. 2 

■-. Atkins, C. R. Shaffer 2 

, Scott. Wilcox et al, I 

. Fee. Texas Co. ; 

. Gill, Okmulgee P. & R, i ... 

\ Kanard, Alexander et al. i . . . . 

IS  

I. McGilbra. H. C. Baker el al, 4 

;. Johnson. Okmulgee P. & R. 

. Fat.. Mountain Fork Oil 5 .. 

I, Pine 2 

I.SH Oil4 

, Gray, Iowa Oil i 

;, Washington. Unity Oil 2.., 

i. Sone, Okmulgee P. & R. i 

I, Schock. United Producers 4 . 
I. Peterson. Okla. Pcnn. Oil 4.. 
. Leader, Ohio Cities Gas 3 ... 
I. Thompson. Uyons et al. 1... 
;, Malone. First Choice Oil 2... 
. Bruner. Turnbuckle Oil 2 ... 



et al. ; 



. Huling e 



al. 4.. 



,. Jackson. .Aggas et al. t. . 

. Griffith. McMahon <-t al, 

. Renlie. Wilson & Clark 1 

: Renlie. Brink Oil 2 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



OKMULG2E. ROGERS AND WAGONER COUNTIES. 



-15. N'oble, Papoose Oil I .. . 

-15. Reed, North American Oil 

-i.q. Riverbed. Wagoner et al. 

-IS. .Simmons, Livingston Oil i 

-15. Noble. Papoose Oil 1 



i-i=.. Drew, Edgar Oil 2 

(■I.:;, Tiger. Oliver et al. t 

'-1^. Rogers. H. W. Talbot 3 

-■'-■' -iH  -'..ff- 

i-iv Roe, Robinson et al, t 

i-T3, Gray,son. Carter Oil 6 , , . ... 
,-15. Henderson. Caney River Gas 2 
;-i6. Ferryman. Jas. Whitesides i , 
;-i6. Franklin, Caney River Gas i.. 
;■!:;, Corhral. Producers & Refiners 
:t:. Corhrav. Producers & Refiners 
;-t6. McDaniel, Muskahoma Oil 2.. 

;-!<;. Corbrav, Egolf et al. i 

i-i6, Harris. McMahon et al. 2.... 
i-i6. Taylor. Rradstreet et al. 1... 
;-i6, Taylor. Hazletl & Brown i ,. 

;-i6. Herrod. Gillespie 1 

;-r6. McDaniels. Peterson <-t al. 7.. 
;-i6, Richards. Minnekola Oil 3 ... 
ivnton and Cole Pool— 
l-r,. Steadham. W. B. Pine 3 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Drv 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 

Dry 
Drv 



Best men are moulded out of faults. — Shakespeare. 



270 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



1-13-15. Freeman. Lambert et al. 3 . . 

14-13-15, Dan, Penn Wyoming Oil 7 .. 

2-14-15, Smith. Capps & Rose 2 

1-14-15, Manuel, Gulick et al. i 

7-13-15, Freeman, W. B. Pine 2 

I5'i3-i5. McGilbra, McLaughlin et al. i 

4-13-15, Taylor, Credo Oil 2 

2-14-15, Davis, Cosden Oil & Gas .... 

28-14-15, Cooper, N. Carter 1 

Muskogee and Miscellaneous — 

10-15-18, Durant, White River O. & G. i 

34-18-16. Barnett, Grai}d River Pet. i. 

25-13-16, Francis, Navy Oil & Gas 2 . . . . 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 29 

Gas 60,000.000 

Gas 7 



CREEK COUNTY. 

Glenn Pool^ 

22-17-11. Jack, Old Dominion Oil 6 

27-18-11, Bruner. Ingalls et al. 2 

24-18-11, Berryhill, H. J. Herbert i 

13-18-IT, Lee, Lee Oil 19 

32-18-12, Parks, Spring Oil 11 

18-17-12. Quinn, Seth Ely 2 

31-18-12, Trelan, Vogler & Reynolds 1 .. 

3-18-12. Adams, Gilger et al. i 

34-17-12, Agent, P. & R. 2 

33-18-12, Parks, Spring Oil 12 

Gushing and Olive — 

23-18- 7, Riley, P. O. & G. i 

12-17- 7. Jacobs, J. W. Van Horn et al. i 

3-16- 7, Williams, Magnolia Pet. 15 

3-16- 7. Williams, Magnolia Pet. 16 .... 

1-17- 7, Stevens, Lancaster & Kerr 1 ... 

1-17- 7, Fixico, Monitor Oil & Gas 3.... 

7-17- 8, Doke Oil i 

34-17- 7. Mitchell, Iron Mountain Oil 21 
35-18- 7. Jones, Magnolia Pet. 1 

7-17- 8, Samuel. Atlantic Petroleum i . 

Q-18- 7, Scott, P. O. & G. I 

12-17- 7» Jacobs, Van Horn Oil i 

36-18- 7, Jones, Carter Oil i 

Tuskogee — 

2-15- 9, Hamilton, Joe Abraham 2 

Mannford — 
34-18- 9, Brown. Wolverine Oil 2 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 

Gas 

Dry 



Dry 15 

Gas 37,000,000 

Gas 10 



PAWNEE COUNTY. 

Cleveland — 
26-20- 7, Anderson. Compound O. & G. i . 
26-27- 7, Anderson, Compound O. & G. 2 

19-21- 8, Skinner, Skinner Oil 2 

25-20- 8, Head, Southv^'estern O. F. i . . . . 

18-20- 7, Boten, Carter Oil i 

26-20- 7, Richards, Markham & Grieves i 
32-21- 8, Sew^ell, State Lands Pet. 2 



Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 



Dry 5 

Gas 1 ,000,000 

Gas 2 



PAYNE COUNTY. 

Yale, Etc. — 

I -18- 5, Ellis, Okla. Nat. Gas i 

25-18- 5, Fruend, Rowland et al. i.... 
3-19- 6, Scofe, Suppes et al. i 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 



Dry I 

Gas 22,000,000 

Gas 2 



GARFIELD AND NOBLE COUNTIES. 

Billings District — 
14-23- 2, Neil, Ohio Cities Gas i 

Garber District — 
33-22- 4, Hinc, Tuloma Oil 1 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



KAY COUNTY. 
Blackwell, Ncwkirk.and Ponca City — 

11-27- 3E, Shuping, Ivanhoe Oil 8 

23-28- iW, Woods. National Union Oil i 
15-27- iW, Smithman, Cherokee Oil 2 . . . 
30-29- lE, Hobaugh, Empire G. & F. 2.. 

30-28- lE, Kuhne, Minnehoma Oil 2 

32-27- iW, Elledge, Independent Refg. i 
10-27- lE, Humphrey, Glenrose Oil 1 ... 
16-27- 5E, Riggs, South Carolina Oil i .. 

10-27- I, Clifft, Independent Oil i 

31-29- I, Pratt, Empire Gas & Fuel 2 

15-27- I, Johnson, Lucky Leaf Oil i 

15-27- I, Otstot, Cherokee Oil & Gas 2.. 
6-28- I, Harvel, Duluth-Okla. Oil 4 .... 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 



Dry 7 

Gas 45,000,000 

Gas 6 



CARTER COUNTY. 

Healdton and Fox — 
24- 4- 3, Rhodes, Carter Oil 3 

5- 4- 3, Mullin, Sinclair Gulf Oil 23 

20- 3- 4, Mullen, Gypsy Oil & Johnson i 

I- 3- I, Ervin, Stephens Oil & Gas i .. 

31- 2- 2, Bennett, Kirk Oil i 

27- 3- 2, Caldwell. American Ind. Oil 4 

5- 4- 3, Mullin, Sinclair Gulf Oil 22 .. . 
29- 2- 3, Tucker. Phillips Pet. i 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 5 

Gas 50,000,000 

Gas 3 

WILDCATS. 

Woodard County — 
3-21N-21W, Baker, Home Producers i Dry 

Muskogee County — 
6-13-18, Dean. Barbara Oil i Dry 

Pawnee County — 
29-22N-3E. Jackson, Watchorn et al. i Dr> 

Pontotoc County — 

2y 5- 8. Quails, K. C. Oil 2 Dry 

28- 5- 8, Gilmore, Lyndale Oil 4 Dry 

34- 5- 8, Crabtrce. Homa Okla. Oil 2 Gas 

Cotton County — 
14-1S-10W, To-Ge-Nipper, Douglas & Skelton i.... Gas 

26-iS-ioW, Grave, Keys et al. i Gas 

Stephens County — 
22-1S-5W, Sanner. Velma Oil i Dry 

Kay County — 
1527- I. Johnson, Lucky Leaf Oil i Gas 

Pittsburgh County — 
1-7N-18E, Lewis, Pittsburgh Oil & Gas 2 Gas 

Garfield County — 
13-20N-4W, Logan Oil i Dry 

Kay County — 
10-27- I. Humphrey, Glenrose Oil i Gas 

Kiowa County — 
10-2N-20W. St. Louis-Okla. Oil i Dry 

Ellis County — 
13-21 N-26W, Boyd, Sterling Oil i Dry 

Dry 

Gas 60,000,000 

Gas 6 



NEBRASKA. 

32-19-55, Kelly, P. O. & G. i 



Dn- 



Be checked for silence, but never taxed for speech.— Shakespeare. 



J 



July 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



KANSAS. 



SUMMARY OP WELLS 



COMPLETED. 
Comp. Prod. 



Butler 152 

Chautauqua-Elk 54 

Montgomery 78 

Miami-Fr'k'n-Douglas 60 

Wilson 18 

Allen 39 

Neosho 64 

Wildcats 28 



32,372 
417 
427 
426 

348 

305 
696 

732 



Dry 

30 

8 

20 

16 

o 

2 

3 



Total 502 35,723 84 



OKLAHOMA. 



SUMMARY OF WELLS COMPLETED. 

Comp. 

Osage 116 

Washington 48 

Nowata-Rogers 77 

Tulsa 100 

Okmulgee 155 

Creek 80 

Muskogee- Wagoner-Rogers 85 

Payne 18 

Pawnee 13 

Garfield- Noble 19 

Kay 27 

Carter 33 

Wildcats 18 



Total 789 



KANSAS-OKLAHOMA-ARKANSAS. 



Comp. Prod. 

Kansas 502 35723 

Oklahoma 789 47.975 

Arkansas 6 o 



WYOMING. 



11-32-82. 

i6-43-94» 
22'33'76, 

33-46-98, 

5-58-99, 
22-49-89, 

16-57-97, 

4-56-97, 
2-42-94, 

28-40-79, 
30-40-79, 
20-40-79, 



Iron Dome, New York Oil 3 

Warm Springs, Williams & McGrath 

State Land, Ohio Oil i 

Findlay, Ohio Oil 2 

Placer Claim, Old Colony Oil i . . . . 

Government Land, Shiloh Oil i 

Government Land, Elk Basin Oil i . 

Howell, Wyo. Dixie Oil r 

Patented Land, Markham et al. i . . . , 
Government Land, Jupiter Oil i . . . . 
Government Land, Bessemer Oil i . . 
Marshall, Cactus Petroleum i 



Gas 

o 

10 

5 
I 

o 

2 
2 
I 

21 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 


4,209 


10 


•9 


477 


12 





1,800 


9 





3,395 


24 


II 


10,369 


32 


10 


2.740 


15 


9 


8,532 


27 


7 


1.758 


I 


3 


160 


6 





9.040 


I 





2.970 


9 


6 


2,440 


7 


3 


85 


9 


6 


47,975 


162 


64 



Dry 


Gas 


84 


21 


162 


64 


6 






Total 1,297 82,998 252 85 



Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 10 

Gas 2 

Gas production 22.000,000 



WYOMING. 



May 
April 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

Comp. 

21 

12 



Difiference 9 



Prod. 

2,175 

795 

1,380 



Dry 
10 

3 



Gas 
2 
2 



TEXAS PANHANDLE. 



WICHITA AND WILBARGER COUNTIES. 

Electra — 

Herron, Texas Co. 4 

Honaker, Magnolia Pet. i 

Fisher, Smith-Hewitt i 

Zeiset, Colorado-Texas Oil i 

Honaker, Sunset Oil i 

Fisher, Hub Oil & Gas i 

Hall, Juel Oil i 

Chenworth, Chenworth Oil i 

Wagner. Godley et al. i 

Humphries, Hall et al. i 

Hall. Good Luck Oil i 



Dry 



SUNSHINE HILL. 

Zeiset, Zincher et al. i 

Ward & Todd, Southwestern Pet. i . . . 

Humphries, Hall et al. i 

Jennings, Hull et al. i 



Dry ' 

BURKBURNETT AND VICINITY. 

Hardin, Mann et al. 37 

Markowitz, Hemco Oil i 

Warren, Cozy Oil 6 

Warren, Allies Oil 2 

Warren, Allies Oil 3 

R. V\^ Ramming, Staley et al. 2 

Bailey, Liberty Oil i 

Roller, Claud Oil i 

Willis, Turner et al. 4 

Ramming, W. G. Skelly 8 

Beach, Birkdell Oil 9 

Beach, Birkdell Oil 10 

Beach, National Oil & Gas 19 

Beach. National Oil & Gas 20 

Dodson, Pure Oil 4 

Fowler^ Texhoma Oil 5 

Fowler, Texhoma Oil 6 

Warren, Allies Oil 3 

Clara, Adams Oil i 



Dry r 

CLAY COUNTY. 

Root, Harvey et al. 1 

HoUoway. Lone Star Gas i 



271 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Drv 



II 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



19 

Dry 
Gas 



Dry I 

Gas I 

Gas volume 5,000,000 



EASTLAND COUNTY. 
Pratt, Champion, Cunningham et al. i . . 



Dry 



BROWN COUNTY. 

Near Brownwood — 

Page, Miller et al. i 

Munn, Callopy et al. i 

Windham, Darby et al. i 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



WILDCATS. 

Palo Pinto County — 

McDonald, Texas Co. i 

Oakes, Owen & Wilson i 

Parker County — 

Acme, Plains Oil & Gas i 

Merten, Parker County Oil & Gas i 

Dry 



Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 



The food of hope is mediated action. — ^Bulwer. 



272 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



NORTH TEXAS-PANHANDLE. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Electra 21 675 

Sunshine Hill 30 280 

Burkburnett 58 1 ,';22 

Clay County 2 o 

Eastland County 4 535 

Stephens County 2 175 

Brown County 2^2. 410 

Miscellaneous 6 10 

Total 155 3,807 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



Caddo — 
33-21-15, Louisiana Gas, Richardson Oil 2 

10-20-15, Glassell, Mo-La Oil 4 

10-19-15, Caddo Levee Board, Layne i ... 

Bossier — 
10-16-11, Mercer. The Texas Co. 1 

Miscellaneous — 

12-19- 4. Kerr, Central Co. Inc. r 

35-20- 4, Moore, Peerless Carbon Black i 

-17-13, Mandina, Gulf Refg. i 

25-17-14, Fee, Ark. Natural Gas 67 

32-20-11, Heilperin, Standard Oil i 

30-11- 9, Carnes, Lake End Oil & Gas 2. 

Texas-Marion County — 
Singleton, C. A. Crowl et al. i 



Dry .... 
Gas wells 



NORTH LOUISIANA. 



SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS. 

Comp. Prod. 

Caddo 31 -25-055 

De Soto 2 505 

Red River o 

Bossier 2 75 

Miscellaneous 8 105 



Total • 43 25,740 



GULF COAST. 



BATSON. 



Milhome, The Sun Co. 62 



GOOSE CREEK. 

Stateland-Producers, Gulf Prod. 9 . . . 
Adoue, Green et al. i 



Gas 



GULF COAST. 



II 





4 





19 





I 


I 


I 











3 





4 






43 



Dry 

3 

o 

'o 

t 

3 



SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS. 

Dist. Comp. 

Anse LaBute o 

Batson 8 

Damon Mound 3 

Edgerly 7 

Goose Creek 29 

Humble 46 

Jennings o 

Markham 2 

Spindletop 18 

Saratoga 13 

Sour Lake 19 

Vinton 9 



Prod. 

o 

60 

500 

740 
22,165 

800 
o 
o 

1,240 

2.525 

.S75 
3.920 



Dry 

Dry 

.Dry 

Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

7 
4 



Ga.s 
o 
o 

o 
4 



Gas 

Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
o 
2 
I 


4 

13 


2 

4 
6 

5 
4 



New Iberia 2 

Piedras Pintas 4 

Miscellaneous 28 

Totals 188 



o 

35 

75 



32.635 



I 
26 

70 



TEXAS-LOUISIANA. 



Comp. Prod. 

North Texas 155 3,807 

North Lou siana 43 25.740 

Gulf Coast 188 Z^<!^ZS 

Total 386 63.182 



Dry 


Gas 


43 


I 


/ 


4 


70 


4 



129 



STANDARD OIL SUBSIDIARIES. 



BY JO. P. CAPPEAU SONS. 



£1 

$100 

100 

50 
100 
ICO 

100 

50 
100 

100 

100 
100 
100 

50 

12% 
100 

100 

^5 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

10 

25 
5 



From May aoth to June aoth. 

Open High 

Anglo-American 11% 

Atlantic Ref 915 

Borne-Scrymser 425 

Buckeye Pie 94 

Chesebrough 315 

Colonial 10 

Continental 425 

Crescent 35 

Cumberland 150 

Eureka 205 

Galena Com 134 

Galena Pref 123 

Illinois Pipe 183 

Indiana Pipe 95 

National Transit 13 

New York Transit 210 

Northern Pipe no 

Ohio Oil 345 

Prairie Oil 490 

Prairie Pipe Line 275 

Solar Refining 310 

Southern Pipe 188 

South Penn. Oil 280 

South West Penn. Pipe.. 92 

S. C). of California 215 

S. O. of Indiana 640 

S. O. of Kansas 445 

S. O. of Kentucky 330 

S. O. of Nebraska 465 

S. O. of New Jersey ...550 
S. O. of New York ....270 

S. O. of Ohio 395 

Swan & Finch 93 

Union Tank 100 

Vacuum Oil 355 

Washington Oil 25 

Penn-Mex 35 

International Petroleum . 13% 



11% 

925 
450 

95 

315 
10 

440 

38 

155 
205 

134 
124 

185 

97 

13^/^ 
210 
112 

345 

515 

^75 
310 

188 

280 

04 
217 
630 

450 
330 
465 
550 
278 
400 

93 

TOI 

355 
21 
35 
13H 



Independent Oil Companies. 

5 Elk Basin 6% 6% 

20 Pierce Oil 10 14% 

50 Midwest Refining 114 1x5 

25 Tropical Oil \\% 11% 

5 Cosden Refining 6% 7% 

5 Sapulpa Refining 8% 9% 

I Northwest Oil 63 63 

5 Cosden & Co 3% 3% 

5 Okla. Producing & Ref... 7% 7% 

5 Atlantic Petroleum 2% 2% 

10 Merritt Oil 22% 28% 

I Midwest Oil 100 116 



Low 

II 
900 

425 

90 
300 

10 
420 

30 
130 
200 

125 
120 
162 

93 
12 

200 

100 

320 

485 
258 

295 
180 

270 

90 

208 

615 
440 
320 
460 
528 
265 
390 
88 

95 
335 
25 
29 
12% 



5% 
9% 
104 

IT 

6% 

8% 

59 

3% 
6% 

19% 
100 



Last 
11^ 

905 

440 

300 
10 

+25 

38 

140 

200 

125 
120 
162 

04 

12H 
205 
103 
320 

262 
29; 
180 

265 

go 
210 

615 

450 
320 
450 

52i? 
270 

390 

90 

96 

27 
29 

\2\ 



14^ 
in 
11 •* 
6% 

9^ 
62 

3^ 



7^ 



n5 



To a man full of questions give no answer at all. — Plato. 



AROUND THE BELT 

New Wells. New Pipe Lmes, New G>ntrM:ts, AddkioDs and ExtensioDs. A Fund of Valuable Newt Gatkerad 

for the Journal Througk Many Sources. 



TRADE PERSONALS 



Armstrong, George W., has resigned from the office 
of President of the Fort Worth Gas Company, Fort 
Worth, Tex. 

Bahan, W. H., of Fort Worth, Texas, recently was 
elected President of the Fort Worth Gas Company. 

Bedford, A. C, of the Standard Oil Company is now 
President of the Peoples Natural Gas Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., succeeding John G. Pew. 

Boyce, Richard, of Zanesville, Ohio, has been elected 
President of the Otsego Gas Oil Company, Otsego, Ohio. 

BuNER, C. W., of Otsego, Ohio, has been elected Vice- 
President of the Otsego Gas Oil Company. 

Gage, Paul, who was formerly Vice-President of the 
Lone Star Gas Company, Fort Worth, Texas, is now in 
charge of oil developments in the North Texas field for 
the company, 

Harrington, Hugh, Safety Inspector of the Empire 
Gas & Fuel Company, Bartlesville, Okla., has left his 
post in order to join the army. 

Hem MICK, O. L., who severed his connection with the 
Empire Gas & Electric Company, Bartlesville, Ohio, to 
.join the army, is reported as having arrived in France. 

Hurst, Edwin, formerly Superintendent of the 
Wichita Pipeline Company, Neodesha, Kan., is now with 
the Quapaw Gas Company, Joplin, Mo., in a similar ca- 
pacity. 

McDonald, Donald Vice-President and General Man- 
ager of the Louisville Gas & Electric Company, Louis- 
ville, Ky., addressed a mass meeting of manufacturers 
connection with the movement to secure war contracts 
for the city. 

Montgomery, First Lt. Rodert, who was Alanager 
of the Commercial Department of the Louisville ( ias cK: 
Electric Company before joining the colors, is now sta- 
tioned at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Myers, Watler S., Commercial luigineer for the 
Louisville Gas & Electric Company, has been selected by 
the Louisville War Industries Committee to go to Wash- 
ington to secure war contracts for local manufacturing 
concerns. 

Niedermeyer, a., for many years connected with the 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, most re- 
cently as Works Manager of the Snow-Holly Works of 
that corporation at Buffalo, N. Y., resigned recently to 
devote his entire time to enterprises of his own. 

Pew, John G., has resigned as President of the 
Peoples Natural Gas Company, as Vice-President and 
Manager of the Hope Natural Gas Company, as Man- 
ager of the River & Reserve Gas Company, the Connect- 



ing Gas Company, and the Marion Oil Company. Mr. 
Pew is now President and General Manager of the Sun. 
Shipbuilding Co. 

Plagg, Wilbur, who was formerly on the staff of the 
New Business Department of the Arkansas V^alley Gas 
Company, Arkansas City, Kan., is now in training at 
Camp Funston. 

Raucii. Georce, formerly of the Joplin G^s Companv. 
Joplin, Mo., is now Manager of the company at Orrville, 
Ohio. 

Richardson, G. H., who was auditor of the Okla- 
homa Gas & Electric Company's Division at Drumright, 
Okla., recently became Auditor for the company at its 
Oklahoma City office. 

Shannon, O. K., recently became Vice-President of 
the Fort Worth Gas Company, Fort Worth, Texas. 

Taylor, Fenton J., who has been local Manager for 
the Pavilion Natural Gas Company, for Leicester and 
Mt. Morris, N. V., during the several years that these 
places have been connected up with the Pavilion wells, 
has been appointed local Manager for practically all of 
the places served with gas by the Pavilion Company. His 
headquarters will be at Le Roy. 

Tschachtle, Victor R., who for some time has been 
Purchasing Agent for the Empire Gas & Fuel Company, 
with headquarters at Augusta, Kan., is now in army ser- 
vice as interpreter of French. 

Walton, J. D., has been appointed Assistant Superin- 
dent of the Iroquois Natural Gas Company, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Willard, Jess, champion heavyweight pugilist, has 
begun to realize his ambition to become an oil man, hav- 
ing invested with the Occident ( )il & Refining Company 
at Wichita, Kan. 

( )'Xe.\l. Lawrence, a memi)er of the force of the 
Louisville Gas Company, Louisville, Ky., for over thirty 
years, died recently at his home in that city. 




NEW YORK— Buffalo 

The Iroquois Natural Gas Company of Buffalo, N. Y., 
filed with the Public Service Commission, Second Dis- 
trict, a petition asking authority to issue $169,403.78 of 
stock to reimburse its treasury for expenditures made 
from capital stock from July i, 1914. The company's 
petition soys the amount was expended for construction, 
completion, extension and improvement of its service. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Pittsburgh 

The financial report of the Philadelphia Company for 
the fiscal year ending March 31, 1918, showed for the 
natural gas department a gross revenue of $15,506,298, 
and for the oil department $794,283. 



There is no difficulty to him who wills.— Koesuth. 




ARKANSAS-Little Rock 

The following local capitalists form the board of di- 
rectors of a company organized to undertake develop- 
ment work in the Ranger field in North Central Texas. 
J. W. Trieschman, President; W. E. Biggs, Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. W. Beale, Secretary; C. N. Faubel, Treasurer; 

C. Floyd Huff, Sam Costen, A. B. Fairfield, C. L. Moore, 
Jr.. and John P. Streepey. 

DELAWARE— Dover 

The National Commercial Oil & Gas Company has 
been incorporated under the laws of this State with a 
capital of $1,000,000, by A. W. Posey, H. Bonsall, and 
G. H. Haydene, all of Wilmington. 

Dover 

The Twin City Oil & Gas Company was incorporated 
here with a capital of $500,000. Those named as in- 
corporators are F. R. Hansell, J. Verbon Pimm and S. C. 
Seymour, all of Philadelphia. 

OHIO— Canton 

The Security Oil & Gas Company has been incorpor- 
ated at Columbus with a capital of $50,000. Those named 
as incorporators are: C. Edward Haley and Robert S. 
Magee, of Canton. 

Uhrichsville 

The Rice Oil & Gas Company has been incorporated 
here with a capital stock of $50,000. The incorporators 
are: C. W. Rice, J. L. Rice, H. F. Rice, B. W. Peck, H. 
P. Copeland. 

WEST VIRGINIA— Huntington 

A new concern in the field of development is the Pro- 
duction Development Company which was organized here 
to operate in the Harrison County fields. The new con- 
cern has a capital of $100,000. The incorporators are: 
O. C. HuflFman, 1. F. \'ase, A. J. Crowell. E. J. Hofmeier, 
and K. L. Berglass. 

Lowther 

The Lowther Oil & Gas Company has been organized 
to operate in Kentucky and other fields, with a capital 
stock of $50,000. The incorporators are : C. F. Lowther, 

D. V. Lowther, C. N. Davis, S. S. Melvin and M. M. 
Lowther. 




ARKANSAS-Little Rock 

The Little Rock Gas & Fuel Company has increased 
its rates as follows : For the first 50,000 cubic feet, 45 
cents per 1,000 cubic feet ; for the next 50,000 cubic feet, 
35 cents ; for the next 50,000 cubic feet, 30 cents ; for the 
next 50,000 cubic feet, 25 cents; for all over 200,000 
cubic feet, 20 cents. The old rates were: For the first 
10,000 cubic feet, 40 cents per 1,000 cubic feet; for the 



second 10,000 cubic feet, 35 cents; for 130,000 cubic feet, 
30 cents per i ,000 cubic feet ; for 200,000 or more cubic 
feet, 20 cents per 1,000 cubic feet. 

Pine Blu£F 

The Arkansas Natural Gas Company has increased its 
rates 5 cents per thousand to small consumers, and 15 
cents to large users. 

INDIANA— Muncie 

The Central Indiana Gas Company has been granted 
authority to increase its rates to large consumers from 
M^ ^^ 35 ^'cnts per thou.^and for gas u cd over 5.003000 
cubic feet. This change applies to consumers in this city, 
Marion, Anderson, Elwood. Hartford City, Fairmount, 
Alexandria. Riverside City and Normal City. 
Rushville 

The Peoples Natural Gas Company is making request 
for permission to increase its rates from 30 cents per 
thousand to $1.00 per thousand for the first 1,000 cubic 
feet, and 50 cents per thousand for all over 1,000. 

KANSAS— Kansas City 

According to report, a rate of $1.00 a thousand cubic 
feet for gas will be charged by the distributing com- 
panies of Kansas City, and St. Joseph, Mo., Kansas City, 
Kas., and a number of smaller Kansas towns. The pres- 
ent rate is 60 cents. 

LOUISIANA— Little Rock 

In the franchise recently granted to Louis Lock of 
Monroe, La., to bring gas to Little Rock the rates are 
fixed as follows: For 1,000.000 feet, 15c per 1,000 cubic 
feet; for 500,000 cubic feet, 20 cents; for 100,000 and 
less than 500,000 feet, 25 cents ; domestic consumers, 35 
cents per i.ooo cubic feet. 

Shreveport 

The Southwestern Gas & Electric Company has raised 
its rate to small consumers from 22Y2 cents to 2J cents 
net per thousand. The rate for large users has been ad- 
vanced from y.7 cents to 10 cents per thousand. 
NEW YORK— Buffalo 

Under court ruling the increased rates filed by the Iro- 
quois Natural Gas Company have become eflfective. 
Coming 

The Crystal City Gas Company has been permitted 
by the Public Service Commission to increase rates for 
natural gas from 45 to 58 cents per thousand cubic feet 
and ih^ niininiuni charge per month from 45 cents 10 
$1.10. 

Dunkirk 

The South Shore Natural Gas Company has filed a 
petition with the Public Service Commission to increase 
its rates to factories to 27 cents per 1,000 feet, which is 
the same rate charged for domestic purposes. The prompt 
payment discount of ten cents per thousand to factories 
using a million cubic feet or over is also reduced to three 
I en'!- per thousand cubic feet. 

The South Shore Natural Gas & Fuel Company has 
served notice on its large consumers that effective July 
25, an increase in gas rates to the maximum amount al- 
lowable under the franchise will be made. This will be , 
a raise from twenty to twenty-seven cents per thousand 
feet. 



Talent is that which is in a man's pov;er; genius is that in v. hose power a man is. LowelL 






July 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



275 



Medina 

The Medina Gas & Fuel Company has increased its 
rates from 28 cents to 38 cents per thousand, less a dis- 
count of 3 cents. This advance applies also to the vil- 
lages of Seville, Creston, Leroy and Lodi, all served by 
the Medina company. 

Olean 

The Producers Gas Company has filed a petition with 
the Public Service Commission asking permission to in- 
crease its rate from 39 cents to 42 cents per thousand in 
Olean, Olean Town and the village of Portville. 

Pulaski 

The Pulaski Gas & Oil Company has increased its rate 
for less than 40,000 cubic feet from 55V2 cents to 
62^1; cents per thousand. 

OHIO— Cincinnati 

Judge Hollister of the United States District Court at 
Cincinnati, has granted to the Union Gas & Electric 
Company a temporary injunction restraining the city of 
Cincinnati from putting into effect the 30-cent gas rate 
ordinance passed by the City Council August 20, 1917. 

OKLAHOMA^Oklahoma City 

The Oklahoma Natural Gas Company has been au- 
thorized by the State Corporation Commission of Okla- 
homa to charge a mi limum rate of 20 cents per thous^n \ 
cubic feet for natural gas furnished by it in the State, 
subject to. 10 per cent, discount. Four Ryllesby proper- 
ties are benefited : Enid, El Reno, Muskogee and Okla- 
hoa City divisions of the Oklahoma Gas & Electric 
Company. 

PENNSYLVANIA— Glcnshaw 

The Glenshaw Natural Gas Company has increased its 
rate from 30 cents net to 35 cents net |)er thousand cubic 
feet. A minimum charge of 70 cents net per month has 
been established. The company supplies the northern 
portion of Allegheny County. 



GENERAL 



ARKANSAS— Little Rock 

Application for a natural gas franchise in this city has 
been filed by Louis Lock of Monroe. It is claimed that 
the gas supply controlled by Mr. Lock is taken from 
twenly-eght wells in the fields near Monroe, La. 

ALABAMA— Gadsden 

The Gadsden Oil & Gas Company has been formed 
in this city for the purpose of undertaking development 
work in Owl's Valley. 

CALIFORNIA— McKittrick 

The pipe line of the Pacific Light & Fuel Company is 
being extended to this city. 

Wcrland 

It is reported that a gasoline absorption plant will be 
constructed in the Hidden Dome field, located near this 
city. Tlie plant will be built by the Petroleum Gas Prod- 
ucts Company, and will cost in the neighborhood of 
$500,000. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Washington 

Government control for distribution of steel will not 
be permitted to retard the production of petroleum and 
oil gas which are considered essential to the war, accord- 
ing to an announcement made by the oil division of the 
Fuel Administration. The Government will assist drill- 
ing contractors and producers in securing drilling ma- 
terials. 

INDIANA— Richmond 

The Richmond Light, Heat & Power Company, it is 
reported, will be unable to secure natural gas from the 
West Virginia fields after Novembet ist, the supply be- 
ing insufficient. 

KANSAS— Arkansas City 

The Empire Gasoline Company has completed its sixth 
gasoline absorption plant. It is located one mile north 
of this city. The new plant handles 50^000,000 cubic 
feet of gas daily. 

Chanute 

A new town border meter and regulating station has 
been established by the Wichita Pipeline Company on the 
grounds of the Chanute Smelting, Company. 

£1 Dorado 

The Empire Gas & Fuel Company recently completed 
two good gas wells in the El Dorado field. 

KENTUCKY— Glasgow 

A large gasser has been completed by the Hoflfman Oil 
Company on the Sam Francis farm, near this city. 

Modoc 

The Modoc Natural Gas & Oil Company reports suc- 
cessful drilling operations in nearby fields. The officers 
of the company are: S. C. Mendenhall, of Winchester, 
President; John W. W'riglu. of Mijdoc. X'ice-President, 
and A. A. Conorroe, of Modc^c, Secretary-Treasurer. 

LOUISIANA— Jefferson County 

The Marion Oil & Gas Company lias a large gasser in 
new territory near Red River. The gas was found at a 
dei)th of 1.535 feet. 

Monroe 

One hundred and forty thousand dollars has been set 
aside by the Ouachita Natural (jas Company to take 
care of improvements. 
1' 00 rehouse Parish 

The Mountain and Gulf Oil Company completed a 15,- 
oo().(KX>fo()t gas well in No. 1 Spyker, Section 39-20-5, 
at 3,700 feet. 

New Orleans 

According to report, the McCormick interests claim 
to be able to pipe natural gas to the city by December of 
this year. It is said that pipe is available sufficient to 
connect the city with the wells at Houma. The city is 
debating whether it will undertake to construct the pipe 
line on its own account, or include the constructing of 
the line in the agreement with the McCormick interests. 

The Orleans Oil & Gas Corporation, capitalized at 
$500,000, has drilled in a small well forty-five miles from 
the city in the Terrebonne Parish. The officers of the 
new concern are: F. H. Wickett, of Chicago, Presi- 
dent; Governor, T- N. Gillett, of California; S. |. Aikens, 



The man of thought strikes deepest and strikes safest. — Savage. 



276 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



July 



of Denver. Co.: Senator Key Pittman, of Nevada, and 
\V. E. Lawrence, of New Orleans, directors. 

Ouachita Parish 

In Ouachita Parish the Central Company, Inc., com- 
pleted a 1 5.000.000- foot gas well at 2,150 feet in No. 2 
on the Cole property, Section 31-20-4. and Nelson, Inc.. 
completed a 3.500.000- foot well in No. i Smith land. 
Section 33-19-4. 

OHIO— Ashland County 

In Hanover Township, the Ohio Fuel Supply Coni- 
pany drilled a fair gas well in a test on the J. P. Moerz 
farm. Section 25. and one a little larger in a second test 
on the A. and T. Strickler farm, Section 18. 

Columbus 

The Ohio Fuel Supply Company, it is reported, will 
build a five-story fireproof building on the northwest 
corner of Elm and Front streets. The building will be 
of reinforced concrete construction with an exterior of 
brick and tile. 

Coshocton County 

In the deep sand territory in Southeastern Ohio, lo- 
cated near Rrinkhaven. New Castle Township, the Logan 
Natural Gas & Supply Company has drilled a test on the 
Charles Fry farm through the Clinton sand. It is a 
gasser with a light showing of oil. 

Elyria 

The Citizens Gas & Electric Company has notified 
its consumers that during the coming winter, no family 
may consume over 35,000 cubic feet of gas per month. 
Factories and other consumers, not domestic, will be cut 
off before the above order will become operative. 

Findlay 

Several very good wells have recently been drilled in 
by the city in the local field. 

Medina County 

In Lafayette Towniship, the Ohio Fuel Supply Com- 
pany drilled a large gas well in No. 2 on the Paul J. War- 
ner farm, Section it, and a light gas well in a test on 
thejohn Mong farm. Section 24. 

Kundtz & Hulse drilled in a fair gas well in a test on 
the Mary J. Young farm, Section ;^'^. 

In Medina Township the Ohio Fuel Supply Company 
drilled a fair gas test on the J. A. Witzel farm, in Lot 
68. In Westfield Township, the same company made 
a location for a test on the Morris Mead iio-acre farm, 
Section 18. 

Miami 

The Ohio Fuel Supply Company has acquired by pur- 
chase the properties of the Miami Valley Gas & Fuel 
Company. The sale i)rice was $312.5(30. 

Newport 

Leases having been secured by the Louisville Oil & 
nevelopment Company on 35,000 acres of land in Pulaski 
and McCreary counties. 

Otsego 

The ( )tsego ( ias Oil Comjjany has elected officers and 
directors as follows at the annual meeting: Richard 
Royce. of Zanesville. President : C. W. Buker. Otsego. 
Vice-President; C. R. Bradford, New Concord. Treas- 



urer, and John Ridgeway, Otsego, Secretary. The di- 
rectors are A. H. Lane of Otsego; George A. McLaugh- 
lin, of Marietta, and J. G. Shirer, of Newark. 

Springfield 

The Springfield (ias Company is completing plans for 
the construction of a regulator house in Snyder Park 
near the Main Street entrance. It is planned to have a 
man at hand constantly to watch the regulator and take 
proper action when the supply is insuflficient. 

OKLAHOMA— BartlesviUe 

Women with training in geology are being sought by 
the sub-surface 1 rrncli of the Department of Geology 
in this city, to fill valiancies caused by the drafting and 
enlistment of men. The employment of women for this 
work in the I'jnpire ( ias & Fuel Companies was begun in 
January when Florence Travis of Chicago and Dorothy 
Aylesbury of St. Louis became office geologists in the 
sub-surface branch. 

The Empire Gas & Fuel Company of the Doherty or- 
ganization has established a school where the boys and 
girls in the messenger service, and others, may become 
competent short-hand writers and typists, thus fitting 
themselves for advancement in the compan)r*s service. 

Carter County 

Development work in an undeveloj^d section of the 
county has proved very profitable, a well said to have a 
production of 20.000,000 cubic feet pe day having been 
drilled in recently. 

Cleveland 

This city is inviting natural gas interests to bid on sup- 
plying the municipality with gas. 

Cotton County 

In Section 22- is-iow, Keys and others in No. i on the 
Smith farm, in the southwest comer of the southeast 
quarter have a 40,000.000-foot gas well from sand at 
2,217 to 2,222 feet. 

Enid 

The Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company, Enid Di- 
vision, has closed contracts with the Oil State Refining 
Company covering its requirements of natural gas. Ap- 
proximately 300,000 cubic feet per day will be used. 
Thirty new residences are being erected in Enid, all of 
which will be serv^ed by the Oklahoma Gas & Electric 
Company without the necessity of extensions of electric 
lines or gas mains. 

Haskell District 

• 

The ( )klahoma Natural (^las Company, Peterson & 
Carlin's Xo. 9. on the J. Harrison farm, in Section 17-15- 
16. is good for 8.000,000 feet of gas, which will be used 
for the lease. It comes from sand at 1,285-95 feet. The 
C aney River Gas Company got a 2,cxx>,ocx>-foot gas wdl 
at 1,284-95 feet in No. 2, on the J. Mcintosh farm, in the 
center of the north line of the southeast of the southeast 
quarter of Section 20-15-16. 

The Five Hundred Oil & Gas Company's No. i on the 
Alice Woodal farm, in the northeast corner of the south- 
east of the northwest quarter of Section 20-15-16, is esti- 
mated by its owners to be good for io.ocx>,ooo feet of 
gas daily. The gas comes from sand at 1,243-55 f^et 



Error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left to combat it. Jefferson. 



Natural 




an 

JOURNAL 



dG 



asolme 



s 



SUBSCRIPTION- 
$2.00 IN THE U. S. 



CONTENTS FOR AUGUST, 1918 



VCXJJME 12 
THIS NUMBER 8 



PUBUSHER'S NOTICE 



INDEX OF PAST 1918 ISSUES 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY. 

Advertising Copy thoald b« in by the tstb of 
month prerious to il 



ADVERTISING RATES on request. 

CORRESPONDENCE IS SOLICITED 
from all those interested in Natural Gas and 
kindre<l industries. 

Buffalo Long Distance (Day) Bell Telephone, 
Seneca 3S95-W. 

Cable Address:— "Publight. Buffalo.** 

Address General Correspondence, Editorial 
and Advertising Matter to Central OflSce. 

PVSLISHI* BY 

PERIODICALS PUBUSHING CO., 
68 West Huron Street, 

BUFFALO, ■. T. 

Lucius S. Bigzlow, President and Ediiar. 
Habbis S. B16BX.0W, Secretary. 

Entered as second class tnatter December 1, 
1910, at the Post Ofice ai Bnfalo, Mew York, 
under the act of March 3, 1889. 



CONTENTS OF THIS ISSDE 



FROM THE EDITORIAL MAIL BAG 



Administrative Order No. 34... 



Doufile Burner 
DrillitiK Reports 



Facts About Natural (las Industry in 
West \'irgiiiia. I?y Edwin Rofinson. 

Honor Roil in Nc>a Form 

How Advert'sii'.K: Saves Vou Money 



Make \ our Fetter* Say "WeMl Win" 
McCoriiiick InterLSt* I >eveIojii!i;j. . 
More L'liiform Delivcrv 



< 'ur SuKg<-'stion 

I'etr oImiiii. A«*|'l'alt and Natural (Jjn 

Pr- ventinn (las Fire-* Near Oil and (ias 
riants 

I*r!ce oi IVtrnicurii. I'y M. [.. Rcijua . . . 



25 
-'0 5 

2q» 



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JOO 

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^^4 



Radroa'U M«)re I'JeadIv Tlian Kaiser'- 
Mullets ; 



I'rxas <Ias \ssociation ("oiivintion 
Vhv »Iermati\ That Is To He.... 



Willie •>{ < ias Delivered at \'.iryinjjf Pre**- 
sui«s. I>y Charif* \'. (."ritchHcl«I ( His- 
cussion pajie J'JJ > 

W est \ irRinia Meeting 



-•^4 

.•84 

-'07 

281 



AROUND THE BELT: 

I*ers«>na"H. Incor]M»rations Rates Fran- 
iliises c M-neral jo8 and folIowinR 



Absorbing Subsidiaries 96 

Analysts of Gases, by Prof. \V. H, Ellis, 

J. W. Bain, and E. G. R. Ardagh 97 

Annual Review, by Jo. P. Cappeau Sons... 15 

Another Substitute for Gasoline 6 

Answering an Inquiry 141 

Association of Natural Gas Supply Men.. 90 

Auto Delivery Cars 80 

.>utomatic Rejrulation 250 

Automatic Temperature Control, by H. E. 

Gilbert 31 

Beautiful Tribute to Traveling Man. 

By C. I. Hendrickson 62 

Becomes Purchasing Agent 262 

Bulletin on Cost Accounting 6 

Bulletin on Oil Accounting 50 

Btireau of Mines Issues Bulletin on Gush- 
ing Field .^ 5 

Byllesby, H. M., Now Lieut.- Colonel. .. . 263 

Canada's Taxation 190 

Carbon Industry Opposed 34 

Casinghead — The Name 160 

Combatting Doubtful Oil Stock Pro- 
motion^ ^ 104 

Commercial Conditions 246 

Completing of Great Project. By R. C. 

Morrison 53 

Ccmverting Linotype Metal Melting Furnace 

From Coal to Gas • . v. - 3^ 

Conservation of Gas, by" A. J. Diescher.. 214 
Conservation Urged, By Dr. I. C. White 2x5 

Conserving Gas . i 248 

Constitution and. By-Laws 217 

Co-operation L^rgcd to Raise Oil Embargo 50 
Curve Charts 174 

Deane Automatic Pumps and Receivers 32 

Denning. Leslie B., Assistant to President 249 

Denver Bars Fake Oil Stock Sales 95 

Development Work in Terrebonne Parish 50 

Dinner to John G. Pew 247 

Doherty Syndicate Operates Frost Gas 

Company 92 

Drilling Results 23 

Drilling Reports 73 

Drilling; Reports 107 

Drilling Reports 143 

Drilling Operations 17s 

Drilling Results 225 

Drilling Operations 26 1 

Dunnville, Ont 171 

Efficient Goggles 2 j 

Efficiency on Reduced Pressure r6.^ 

Elimination of Discrimination in Natural 
Gas Rates by "Readincss-to- Serve" 
Charges, by Samuel S. Wyer f Discus- 
sion page 256) 251 

Employment Managers i - 1 

Exercising an Hour a Day 222 

Financial Report 233 

Flow of Gas in Pipes 10^ 

Fuel Administration Announcement 196 

Gas EHfficuIties EHscIosed 13 

Gas for Drying Food 17 

Gasoline from Natural Gas, by H. A. 

Fisher 96 

Gasoline from Natural Gas 103 

Gas Versus Car-Deliveries 92 

Give the Geologist His Dues 126 

Glaring Abuse of .Advertising by Oil 

Stock Promoters 194 

Good Installation of Pr* ^sure I'laujjos. . i~ ^ 
Government Experiment Station at Bar- 

tlesville 52 

Government Takes Over Oil Production. 132 

Heat Insurance 21 

Here's \n (Opportunity 247 

Hire Yourself 171 

Interior Lakes Travel 248 

Joint Meeting Oil Producers and Natural 
Gas Association 203 

Latest Instruction loa 

Long, Elias H., Deceased 20 



Making Tight Joints 100 

Marking 1 ime 72 

Measurement of Gas by Orifice Meter...'.* 102 

-Men for Export Trade 150 

Monthly Sundard Oil Review, by Jo. P. 

Cappeau Sons iqc 

Movmg in Cycles 7a 

Nation's Pulse ai^ 

Nation Upon a Firm Foundation .*..* 168 

Natural Gas Association 159 

Natural Gas Association, Annual Meeting 107 
Natural Gas Business Thirty-foor Yean. In 6 
Natural Gas Service. By L. W. Lansley 55 

Natural Gas Wrinkles ,60 

New Gas and Oil Association a62 

New Heating System itc 

New Orleans and Natural 10 

No Gasoline Shortage, A. C. Bedford 33 

Office Economics 128 

Ofl Froducti<»i .'.*.* to. 

Oil Production J33 

Oil Storage Tanks and Reservoirs*.*.'.*.'.*. 170 

Opportunity To Get Labor 134 

Otoe- Morrison Field. By Matt Duhr i< 

Output of Refineries 160 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding. By Lucius S. 
Bigelow ^, 

Pastor Sees Labor in Control After War 134 

Peak Load Service 132 

Picturing One's Face in Advertising .* . . 12 

Piqua, Ohio, Celebrates 348 

Power by Gas 263 

Preach Optimism and Win the War...! 164 

President of Vast Corporation 160 

Prevent Gas Stealing 6 

Proceedings Received ki 

Producing Gasoline 63 

P.-oducHon and Transportation of Gas.'.! 162 

Questions and Answers — Prize Paper 93 

Ready-to-Serve Charge 104 

Ready-to-Serve Charge 142 

Recovery of Gasoline from Natural Gas as 
an Industry Allied to Production and Re- 
finmg of Petroleum. By Frank B. Peter- 
son y 

Red Cross Drive !!.*.*.'.*.*.*.* '221 

Reeser. Harry C * t6 1 

Reynolds, M. G.. Passes Away 20 

Sailing Lake Erie ,5^ 

Secure Gas Line .*...' 127 

Sense and Cents ".'..'. •* - 

Shabby Overcoats as Badges of Honor.*.*.*. .20 
Shipments to Oil and Natural Gas Com- 
panies ,^ 

Shipyard Volunteers 91 

Spirit of Safety g^ 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries for 1917....*.*.* 41 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries..; 114 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries 2xx 

Standard Oil Subsidiaries .'..'. ,72 

St mutating Production tqc 

Stop Buymg— Then What? .'/. ej 

Summer and Winter Gas 91 

Third Liberty Loan and Victory 126 

Trailer Auxiliary ,,5 

Truck Operators' Conference !.*.*.' -25 

Uniform Accounting By C. S. Mitchell.. 215 
Unique Method of SUrting Gaa Engines «i 
Unifjue Sales Letter ,96 

Valuable Publication in Oil and Gas Field «i 

Vast Acreage Deal ^, 

V'ictory Plant in Service " 'io6 

Visiting Oil Proihicers !.!!! 240 

Water in Wells ,01 

Water Regulator ^ 

Welcome Letter , j^ 

Welding Torches .'. . . 196 

Western Associations Merge ..**.* 5 

West Virginia Convention ! ! "1 59 

West Virginia Gas Association iqc 

Winner of Prizes in Contest Held at Buf- 
falo , , 

N\mning the War ,^g 

Work of Petroleum Committee 1 ! I *. * so 

Wrinkles, Prices for ,^ 

Year 1918 . 

Your Mistakes A 



WHAT WOULD YOU THINK OF A MANUFACTURER 



— who wrote to you with a stub pencil — "We 
are saving much money because we do not use 
typewriters and telephones ?" You might well 
wonder whether his merchandise was as much 
out of date as his business methods. 

You know that modern time and labor sav- 
ing appliances are hot added expenses, but that 
they have superseded slower and more costly 
processes. 

The concern that uses your business paper 
to tell you its business story. is simply making 
it easier for you to buy intelligently with the 
least waste of time on your part and theirs. 



For the right kind of advertising shortens 
the distance between human minds just as cer- 
tainly as the railroad has shortened the dis- 
tance between places. It is still possible to 
walk from New York to Chicago, and it is 
still possible for a business to get along with- 
out advertising, BUT — 

— don't forget that the seller who does not 
advertise, is not only paying for the results 
that such advertising would get him, but he is 
also paying more than necessary. 

Progressive advertisers are progressive mer- 
chandisers and it pays to do business with 
them. 



OUR SUGGESTION. 

In these days of high railroad fares, high cost of living at hotels, and other abnormal costs at- 
tendant upon traveling to sell goods, we urge the plan adopted by certain well organized concerns, viz: 
advertise to a larger extent than heretofore, allowing the advertisement to plow and harrow the soil, 
and sow the seed, using the traveling representatives of a concern to go personally into the field to 
harvest the crop and to close such direct prospects as may have been focused through attractive ad- 
vertisments bringing inquiries. { 

Don't let-up on seeking orders by personal solicitation, but ease-up by doing more advertising^ 
while experienced men are unavailable for traveling positions, and while the expense of traveling is 
so great. / 

Let advertising play the part of introducer o f your appliances, and be for you a follow-up sys- 
tem to keep your appliances constantly before possible buyers of whom you know, and before possi- 
ble buyers who will see your advertisements, yet of whom you, as yet, know not. 



i^SlU^ /^/^^^^^^>^ 



FROM THE PEN OF THE EDITOR 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 34. 



The Following Order Appears as Recorded at a Regular 

Session of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, 

Held at Columbus, Ohio, on the aist 

Day of May, 1918. 



mHE Public Utilities Commission, having under 
consideration the probable inability of nat- 
ural gas companies to furnish an adequate 
supply to all their consumers during the com- 
ing winter, and the necessity of formulating more 
definite rules for the guidance of such public utility 
companies in disconnecting industrial and other con- 
sumers from the service, when necessary, during an 
emergency, to conserve the supply for domestic con-^ 
sumers, and the order in which disconnection should 
be made, as well as the order in which the service 
should be restored when the emergency is passed, 
hereby adopts the following rules and regulations, to 
wit.: 

1. That for the purpose of disconnecting or curtail- 
ing service to consumers during an emergency, all con- 
sumers of natural gas are divided into two general 
classes namely: Domestic Consumers and Industrial 
Consumers. 

2. That domestic consumers, for such purposes, in- 
clude the users of natural gas for heating, lighting and 
cooking in private homes, boarding houses, and apart- 
ment houses, and users of natural gas for lighting and 
cooking only, in hotels, restaurants, bakeries, eating 
places, club houses, hospitals, and other charitable in- 
stitutions. 

3. That all other consumers shall be designated as 
"Industrial Consumers"; but for the purposes of dis- 
connection or curtailment during an emergency, the 
following subdivisions of industrial consumers may be 
made, in cases where there is more than a sufficient 
supply of gas for domestic consumers as herein speci- 
fied, but not a sufficient supply for all industrial con- 
sumers : 

A. Users who are not included in the domestic 
consumers class, as herein specified, but who are 
engaged in preparing or preserving foodstuffs, or 
food producing plants, for such purposes only. 

B. Industries directly engaged in manufactur- 
ing or producing war materials, for such purposes 
only ; and users of gas in gas engines. 

C. All other industrial consumers. 

When there is not sufficient gas for all industrial 
consumers, as herein defined, the surplus shall be fur- 
nished to industrials in the order above named. 

4. This classification is subject to the following ex- 
ception: Where natural gas is being used in limited 



quantities for scientific, experimental, or mechanical 
purposes, and where other means of producing light 
and heat for such purposes cannot be reasonably sub- 
stituted, an amount essential to such use, but not to 
exceed five thousand (5,000) cubic feet per month to 
each consumer so engaged may be used for such pur- 
poses only, and as if they were included in the class of 
domestic consumers herein specified. 

5. If, after disconnecting all industrial consumers, 
there is not a sufficient supply of gas for the domestic 
consumers, then all boilers and furnaces not provided 
with gas fixtures and appliances primarily designed for 
burning natural gas as a fuel shall be disconnected; 
and if it becomes necessary to further restrict the use 
of gas to meet the emergency, domestic consumers 
may be limited to the use of thirty-five thousand 
(35,000) cubic feet per month, in one building, or for 
one family. 

6. A copy of these regulations shall be furnished 
by each natural gas company to its consumers not 
later than June 15, 1918. 

7. Consumers who do not promptly disconnect or 
curtail, in accordance with these rules and regulations, 
when notified by the utility that it is necessary so to 
do, shall, upon discovery, be wholly disconnected from 
the service until the emergency is passed. 



SALES MANAGER OF ALIEN PROPERTY. 



MR. JOSEPH F. GUFFEY, late president of the 
Natural Gas Association of America and until 
' recently on the petroleum committee of the 
Council of National Defense, was lately ap- 
pointed Sales Manager of the Federal Selling Corpora- 
tion, to have charge of the actual disposition of the 
German owned corporations disposed of in this coun- 
try. 

Mr. GufTey will supervise all of the details, and his 
office will be in New York City, though his residence 
is in Pittsburg. He is working in co-operation with 
an advisory committee and a Washington committee 
in all things connected with any sale and in all mat- 
ters that may arise before any property is actually 
turned over to the purchaser. 

The advisory committee named by Mr. A. Mitchell 
Rlinn follows : Chairman, Otto T. Bannard of the Nev 
York Trust Company ; former Justice George L. In- 
graham of the appellate division of the New York 
Supreme Court; Cleveland H. Dodge, New York 
banker and philanthropist; Benjamin H. Griswold. Jr^ 
!)anker of Baltimore, and Ralph Stone of the Detroit 
Trust Company. 



He that has patience may compass anything. — ^Rabelais. 



I 



West Virginia Meeting 



Tim Wmm Vifghm NmmnJ Cm AmoeiaiHm Hokk 

Mmiit^ m Hmmif^otu J^» 24-25 



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282 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



August 



\ 



FACTS ABOUT THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY 

IN WEST VIRGINIA. 



BY EDWIN ROBINSON. 



mHE producer, transporter and distributor of nat- 
ural gas have been given public attention and 
criticism as to the manner in which their busi- 
ness is conducted from the incipiency of the 
natural gas industry. 

In the early stages of the business little or no atten- 
tion was paid to the leakage, defective pipe line laying 
or bad plumbing in the consumer's residence. 

Gas in those days was plentiful and the markets 
scarce. As everybody was after oil, gas was considered 
of little value and a great amount of it was allowed to 
go to waste. 

Along about 1902 the possibilities of West Virginia's 
natural gas resources became evident to some of the 
larger producers, leasing of territory began in earnest, 
leases were drawn more carefully, the drilling of wells 
was begun, locations were made miles apart for the 
purpose of testing the scope of the gas belt. 

When gas was found in large quantities in scattered 
districts, it was then that the industry was put upon a 
business basis. Careful records of everything done, 
every formation and strata through which the drill 
went was noted. 

Conservation, which heretofore was unknown, was 
being practiced in a primary way by some of the 
larger companies. It was not long after this that the 
gas companies began in earnest to see that gas once 
in the line should go to the consumer. 

Leaks were stopped, line walkers were started in all 
directions to note any leaks, the condition of the lines 
or the probable chances of a slip or land slide. And this 
is in practice today. 

Now, efficieiicy experts, geologists, engineers and 
chemists and overy known device and invention for the 
betterment of the service have been adopted. 

Some gas companies that formerly used gas for 
driving the gas compressors have installed boilers, 
opened coal mines that more gas could be delivered to 
its customers. 

The amount of gas used under boilers for drilling 
wells was one hundred and ten thousand cubic feet 
every twenty-four hours, now thirty-five thousand 
cubic feet is used. 

Everything is being done to conserve gas by the pro- 
ducer. The State has passed laws and the Public Ser- 
vice Commission rules to regulate the gas company in 
the conduct of its business. Reports of its business, in 
many of the most minute details are made, pressures 
in cities are reported, in fact everything about its busi- 
ness is known to the Administration at Charleston. 

There is no objection to this — all the gas people ask 
is fair treatment and to be treated like other people and 
corporations. I will say that our relations with the 
Public Service Commission and the Administration 
and its departments have been most cordial and fair. 



Conservation by the consumer has not yet begun. 
He has not made any appreciable effort to improve th^ 
use of gas in his home, for I believe that ninety per 
cent, of the appliances used in the homes in West Vir- 
ginia where natural gas is used as a fuel are the same 
that were originally installed twenty to twenty-five 
years ago. 

There has been no attempt on the part of the con- 
sumer to insist upon modern appliances properly in- 
stalled that will save gas and reduce the gas bill. 

A great many companies have men whose only duties 
are to see that their customers bum gas in the proper 
manner and not waste it. If this method was adopted 
by all of the distributing companies and the consumers 
would not object to installing modern devices and ap- 
pliances the amount of gas saved would take care of 
considerable of the shortage that occurs during the ex- 
treme cold weather. 

There'is another class of consumers where conserva- 
tion of gas is unknown. I am speaking of the free con- 
sumers. We can cite an instance in West Virginia 
where a free consumer used one billion cubic feet of gas 
in one month in his residence. This should be sufficient 
gas for one hundred consumers for the same period. 

A great deal of this waste comes from the training 
and conditions incident to the early use of gas. From 
the beginning of the business until within a very short 
time ago natural gas had but little commercial value 
except as a bait for locating industries by offering free 
gas for a term of years or at a rate so exceedingly low 
to amount to almost the same thing. 

In West Virginia the earlier investors in the natural 
gas business followed in the footsteps of the North- 
western Ohio producers by making it incident to the 
real estate business. 

Along about that time the Ohio and Indiana gas 
fields were exhausted and a number of industries that 
were seeking locations where gas was plentiful and 
cheap, turned their eyes to West Virginia. 

The manufacturer from Ohio, Indiana and Pennsvl- 
vania looking for cheap gas had never been trained to 
conserve in any way or to use any modern methods or 
appliances. The price of gas was so low that no at- 
tention was paid to the amount consumed. The gas 
men encouraged this for the bills were larger. 

Today to a certain extent this is true for the reason 
that the majority of the industrial consumers have no 
idea as to the value of the commodity nor realize the 
importance of conservation. 

The low price of natural gas has had more to do with 
the waste and careless use of it than anything else. 

Whenever the price of gas reaches the point of its 
value as a commodity both the industrial and domestic 
consumers will use every known device and appliance 
for getting every possible heat unit out of it. 

The exceedingly low price for gas offered by pro- 
ducers. Boards of Trade or Real Estate men attracted 
to the towns one class of manufacturers, with few ex- 
ceptions, namely those engaged in the manufacture of 
glass. Then came the carbon black maker, who fol* 



He who bridlei the fiiry of the billows, kiu>WB 1^ a stop to all the secret plans of the wicked.— Badne. 






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284 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



August 



being in the rural districts where advantages were 
crude, schools poorly conducted and situated great dis- 
tances apart. 

It was necessary for the oil and gas companies to se- 
cure men capable and reliable (and it takes capable and 
reliable men to conduct either of these industries) to 
have improvement made in the country schools or these 
men would not move their families where their chil- 
dren did not have the advantages of an education. 

The natural gas industry has brought to West Vir- 
ginia millions of dollars in its development. 

The amount expended annually by the natural gas 
industry for rentals and royalties is in excess of five 
million dollars in sums ranging from five dollars to 
five hundred dollars annually. 

This money is distributed to land owners in the 
thirty-two oil and gas producing counties of the State. 
The annual expenditure for operating, rig building, 
teaming, drilling, labor, pipe, casing, fittings, supplies, 
maintenance, etc., is many times more than paid out 
for rentals and royalties. 

Fifteen years ago there were liens or mortgages on 
fifty per cent, of the farms in the oil and gas distncts, 
today there are not two per cent. 

There is one county in the State in which five-sixths 
of all the taxes are paid by the oil and gas industry. 

Another interesting thing about this industry ninety- 
five per cent, of its employees are native West Virgin- 
ians. 

The natural gas utilities have an assessed valuation 
for taxation of more than one hundred million dollars, 
as assessed by the Board of Public Works, and pay 
taxes on this amount. 

The entire oil and gas business of the State pay not 
less than one-eighth of the entire taxes of the State. 

The increase in land values, the improved schools 
producing counties of the State can be attributable to 
producing counties of the State can be attributable in 
a very large extent to the oil and gas industry. 



CONVENTION OF TEXAS GAS ASSOCIATION. 



mHE third annual meeting of the Texas Gas As- 
sociation will be held at Fort Worth, Texas, 
September loth and nth. The headquarters 
will be the Westbrook Hotel. 
The program of papers is as follows: 
"Public Utility Conditions in the Southwest,'' M. T. 
Walker, Manager, Beaumont Gas Light Lompany. 

"Gas Heating," A. L. Knies, Manager Austin Gas 
Light Company. 

"Oven Temperature Regulation." by C. K. Enos, 
National Stove Company, Lorain, Ohio. 

"Natural Gas Gasoline," E. J. Raisch, T. P. Coal 
Company, Thurber, Texas. 

"The Factors Limiting the Production of Toluol," 
P. E. Nicholls, Superintendent, Galveston Gas Com- 
pany. 

Write Mr. O. K. Shannon of the Fort Worth Gas 
Company in connection with reservations. 



PETROLEUM, ASPHALT AND NATURAL GAS. 



mHE Kansas City Testing Laboratory is conducted 
with a view to arriving at conclusions only 
through thorough tests, not at haphazard. Care- 
ful analyses are required covering whatever the 
research may be, whether in chemistry or other scientific 
fields, or along mechanical lines. 

An exceedingly comprehensive work has been pub- 
lished by the Laboratories, known as "Bulletin 14." The 
same is copyrighted by Mr. Roy Cross of the Laborator- 
ies. 

The table of contents of the work occupies six pages, 
and is excellently compiled. There is an index which 
enters thoroughly into the details of the work, and fills 
fifteen pages. Each subject in the index is subdivided, 
in some cases as many as twelve to fifteen sub-divisions 
appearing. Thus it enters into details in a way to add 
greatly to the work as a practical and ready-reference 
book. 

There are eighteen pages of blank space, each page 
headed with the word "Notes." These pages are for 
memorandum purposes and will be found very conven- 
ient for those who would wish to make memorandum 
in permanent form. There are many pages in tJibiUar 
form covering an infinite variety of data required by 
those handling subjects pertaining to petroleum, a"phalt 
and natural gas. This work will be found of great value 
to every practical man or field operator. 



Mccormick interests developing. 



r7|R. W. B. McCORMTCK (Terrebone Gas Com- 
[▼l I pany, Houma, La.), has the assistance and co- 
1 A| operation of W. IL Sedberry, formerly Man- 
ager-Secretary-Treasurer of the Marshall Gas 
Company of Marshall, Tex. Mr. Sedberry recently re- 
signed from the Marshall Company, leaves very pleas- 
ant friendships there to take up active work in Mr. 
McCormick's interests which he has been in direct 
touch with for quite a long period. 

This is not a "try-out" with Mr. Sedberry or Mr. 
McCormick. It is simply a consummation of former 
touch in these business matters. We congratulate 
both Mr. McCormick and Mr. Sedberry. 



RAILROADS MORE DEADLY THAN KAISER'S 

BULLETS. 



American railroads are far more deadly than Ger- 
man bullets. A comparison of the casualties in the 
American expeditionary forces with an interstate com- 
merce commission accident report covering the first 
quarter of 1917, shows that, as against 476 American 
soldiers killed in action to date, 1,152 passengers lost 
their lives in railroad accidents in the first three 
months of last year. Deaths in the expenditionary 
forces from all causes total 2,260. The railroads list 
of deaths in train accidents in the three months' per- 
iod totals 3,365 persons, including passengers and em- 
ployes. 



A wronff-doer is often a man that has left soauMdng undone, not always he that hae done gomeBifag. — ^AnreHu 



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CVS MFN N UKlNkli.N 






INITAI.LATION KOM HURNING NATUKAI. GAft 

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GAS MENS WWNKLES 



N. G. A. of A. 



(ound to increase the efficiency. It also shows the 
"grate" of sheet iron covered with fire-clay to keep oul 
excess air. There are holes in the iron for the i'4" 
mixing chambers to pass up through. 

The arrows in the drawing show the path of the 
burnt gases — always in direct contact with the water 
surfaces. Therein lies the reason for the high efficiency 
of this setting. 

If the boiler is running under capacity, it is possible 
to shut off one. two or three of the tour sets of burn- 
ers. The writer usualy shuts the rear sets off first, on 
account of the longer travel of the hot gases from the 
front burners. 



HEATER FOR TOWN BORDER METERS. 

Dciigntd br S. B. Crook 1. A»t. Cat Pipe Line Dcpl., Wichiu Naiuti] 
Gil Company. Binlesvltlr. OfcU. 



WHAT THEY MUST DO SHOULD GAS FLOW STOP. 

II. H. Hill, The Ohio Fuel Suppi) Company, Calumbu*, O. 

In our smaller towns, where we would not be justi- 
fied in employing a man for that town only, we pay a 
small amount to someone, generally the village black- 
smith, or store keeper for changing the chart once a 
week on our regulator. 

In order to impress on them what to do in an 
emergency, the following notice printed on io"xi4" 
cardboard and framed has been hung in all regulator 
houses. 

IF. FOR ANY REASON THE SUPPLY OF GAS 

SHOULD STOP 

1st — Shut the gate ahead of low pressure regulator. 

2nd — Notify EVERY consumer to turn off all stop 




HEATER FOB TOWN BORDER METERS. 



A simple, but absolutely safe heater capable of close 
regulation : 

In building this particular heater the 6^^" junk cas- 
ing running from the furnace to the roof was first put 
in place. The concrete was poured around it for the 
furnace pit. The meter house had a dirt floor and the 
heater pipe was left uncovered along the horizontal 
run. This trench can be covered, if desired, with a 
grating. 

The regulator in the fuel line holds a constant 
pressure at the throttle valve which prevents variation 
in heat due to pressure changes at the meter. The 
iron door being locked down prevents tampering with 
burner. 

In later installations the furnace will be built on the 
ground instead of in a pit as in this case, this will per- 
mit of the heater pipe being installed level and above 
the floor of the meter house. 



cocks at lights and iires. and in case a consumer is 
not at home, shut off gas at curb or meter. 

3rd — ^When pressure again is sufficient in main lint 
open gate slowly and allow gas to go into town lines. 

Be SURE everything is safe. 

THE OHIO FUEL SUPPLY CO. 



FOR STARTING A TAP IN DIRECTION DBSIKEU 



I Natnnl Gas ComiiaBT, 



Aikadelphia, 



Attach a saddle of the right size firmly to the pi»" 
where it is desired to make the tap. Screw the t^ 
into the saddle, which acts as a guide for the tap. 

Using the saddle as outlined above overcomes a3 
difficulty of starting the tap true. 



lOuBtom is almost a second nature. — Plntarch. 



CAS MKNS WRlSKll.s 



CATK IKAl. FOK SMAU. GATKS 



Al WAY<t I'M Voll.' HI.AIt 



rO I.IVI: AI>I>ITI<(PiAI .ItflSt.IH To WM |i 



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TO TkANftFKK l.» A<tK Itnl I1IN1.S Tn MAI- 



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usmess 




boratory 



United States Methods for Systematizing Departments and Accomplishing 
Efficiencg Results by Herbert D. Brown^ Chief U. S. 

Bureau of Efficiency. 



mHE work of the United States Bureau of Effic- 
iency resembles in part the work of efficiency 
men in the commercial field and in part presents 
aspects peculiar to itself. 

Its particular task is to introduce modern and efficient 
methods into various branches of the Government ser- 
vice. It has to make the usual study of difficulties and 
reach solutions along unusual lines. This is what all 
efficiency workers find themselves called upon to do. 

But in the second place, this bureau has found it neces- 
sary to work out a peculiar procedure of its own in or- 
der to overcome the inertia that prevails in most gov- 
ernment departments. It not only is required to submit 
plans for cutting away the barbed wire entanglements, 
but it often finds it necessary actually to blast away the 
obstacles by its own eflforts. 

To illustrate the first point the Bureau of Efficiency 
was called upon to devise a method of recording requisi- 
tions for a large number of different kinds of supplies. 
To meet this problem it introduced the use of a 17- 
bank duplex adding machine with an 18-inch carriage. 

In another division it was asked to find a method of 
registering the issue of documents in numeric sequence 
and at the same time of registering payment in an irregu- 
lar audit. In the course of the solution of this problem 
it was found necessary to distinguish the entries of pay- 
ments in the current month from the entries of payments 
in preceding months. The plan hit upon was the use of 
an ink which would write one color (red) when finished, 
and turn another color (black) after three or four weeks. 

In another office the bureau installed addressing ma- 
chines with special devices that the manufacturers re- 
quired about four months to perfect. Again, members 
of the staflF worked out a plan to send an important series 
of documents to one office for recording and cost check- 
ing instead of through several offices, at a great saving 
of time and clerk hire. 

The foregoing examples will be recognized as typical 
of the usual tasks efficiency engineers are called upon 
to perform — introducing labor-saving devices, chopping 
away antiquated methods, and routing work. Such 
schemes, together with new accounting systems, form the 
bulk of the work of the Bureau of Efficiencv. 

Now comes the part of the procedure peculiar to our 
field of operation. The introduction of efficiency methods 
into government offices is almost always difficult. In the 
commercial field efficiency engineers are usually invited 
into a plant or factory and are given the benefit of en- 
thusiastic co-operation. 



In the government service, officials are for the most 
part content with present practices; they are not eager 
to experiment with new methods. 

It is hard, indeed often impossible, to get a change 
adopted on a mere report, no matter how beneficial the 
suggested changes might appear. To overcome this pas- 
sive and sometimes active resistance, the Bureau of 
Efficiency has created a special procedure. It undertakes 
to dredge a channel through government lassitude. 

After a plan which this Bureau considers adequate has 
been mapped out, the Bureau turns itself into a business 
laboratory for developing and testing the plan. It en- 
deavors to reconstruct completely the offices studied, even 
with its field branches. 

If, for instance, it be dealing with a department that 
handles considerable money, it creates the whole routine 
of that department's financial transactions. It carries 
those transactions through with dummy checks, adding 
machines, ledgers, bookkeeping machines, and so on, re- 
producing the actual routine as closely as possible. 

It continues this test until it is convinced that the new 
procedure will work smoothly and will secure the effic- 
iency for which it is designed. At this point the officials 
of the office being studied are consulted and told of the 
proposed changes. Very often they say these plans 
sound all right, but they will not work. We are able to 
reply, "Come over to our Bureau and see them work. We 
have them in actual operation." The officers are invited 
to supply difficulties in the material and the procedure 
is gone over again and again until every contingency has 
been met. 

After this office trial, the second step in our procedure 
is taken — installation. The Bureau of Efficiency sends 
a part of its staflf into the office it seeks to help, equipped 
with its tested plans. It supercedes for the time being 
the regular employees. It takes over the actual business 
of the office. It makes an eflFective demonstration of its 
plans. It supplies concrete proof that the plans will 
work. It leaves the recalcitrants high and dry. 

Into one large government office the Bureau of Effic- 
iency sent a force of thirty skilled adding machine op- 
erators, bookkeepers, accountants, and sorters who took 
over all the work and ran the office for several weeks. 
They continued at the task until all the details of the 
new method had been reduced to perfect running order. 

Always the chief emphasis is placed, first on long, se- 
vere, and painstaking experiment in our office, and sec- 
ond, on a thorough-going installation of the tested sys- 
tem under actual conditions of operation. 



Oowardfl do not count in battle ; they are there, but not in it. — Euripidee. 



1 



Results of Interesting Experiments 

Sh Forth in a P^fmr by ChaHn V. Cntch/Md. EmUimL ''Ttm V ohm of Com 

Dotivorod oi Vmoin^ ProomtroB'\ Folkumd ho 1^ 



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Asrvliai 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



irnoT to secure a steady flow of gas, the calorimeter', 
proper, a set of scales, two copper water pails, and a 
number of short lengths of rubber' tubing. Named in 
the order of the gas travel comes first the governor, 
which is in construction a miniature prover, auto- 
matic in action, with the bell weighted to give the 
desired pressure and having its inlet connected by a 
small rubber tubing to the gas supply and its outlet 
similarly connected to the small meter. This type of 
meter differs essentially from the ordinary meter in 
that a drum, made up of several compartments, re- 
volving partially submerged in water, takes the duty 
performed by leather diaphragms in the commercial 
meter. The outlet of the meter is connected by flex- 
ible tubing to the gas burner located at the bottom 
and within the calorimeter. The calorimeter proper 
is a hollow cylinder so constructed that, water may 
readily flow around a central passage through which 
the heat from the burner passes. .A thin wall separ- 
ates the water from the warm air within and, conse- 
quently, rapidly absorbs whatever heat is trans- 
mitted to the air by the gas burner. The temperature 
of the cold water entering the calorimeter is indicated 
by one thermometer and, as it passes out. by a sec- 
ond, indicating the temperature to which the gas 
flame has raised it during its travel through the calor- 
imeter. As the water leaves it is caught in one of the 
copper pails and accurately weighed. Usually the 
amount of water used in each test is whatever will 
flow through the calorimeter while the burner is con- 
suming i/io foot of gas. Ten turns, or tests, are made 
to give an average of i cubic foot. 

Three factors enter into the test, viz., a cubic foot of 
gas measured by the meter, the weight of the water, 
and the difference in temperatures of the water as it 
enters and leaves the calorimeter. The product of 
these three, with some slight modifications, determ- 
ines the amount of heat contained in a cubic foot of 
the gas burned, so by the use of this instrument the 
comparative heating values of various natural and 
artificial gaSes for domestic and industrial purposes 
can be very accurately ascertained. 

REGULATORS 

A gas regulator is a device both to reduce and main- 
tain a regular gas pressure. A familiar form operates 
upon the same principle, to use an illustration familiar 
to all, of the lever and the fulcrum. If a bar of steel 
is laid across a small solid substance, which we will 
call the fulcrum, in such a way that the fulcrum di- 
vides the length of the bar unequally, we know that a 
small downward pressure on the long end of the bar 
will exert a very considerable upward pressure on the 
small end of the bar. In a gas regulator the low 
pressure gas, after it has passed through the regula- 
tor, exerts a back pressure on a large movable surface 
called a diaphragm, sufficient to equal the force of 
high pressure gas on a much smaller surface, called a 
valve. The object in using regulators is the necessity 
to reduce the pressure of gas as it issues from wells or 
long pipe lines to an extent that will permit the use 
of gas with safety in appliances in the homes. 



DOMESTIC METER 

The ordinary gas meter is a <Jcvice for measuring 
and registering gas passing from Jhe ^s main into 
the consumer's premises. Whilemen and women are 
familiar with the outside appearam^e of the ordinary 
domestic meter with its tin or iron case and registering 
dials, few have any conception of its interior me- 
chanism and a brief description may be of interest to 
the reader. 

I will describe the older and more familiar make 
known as the case diaphragm type. Within the tin 
body or case are two compartments, a large lower and 
an upper and smaller compartment. The lower con- 
tains two leather diaphragms, the upper the valves, 
gears, and the "clock" or registering device. Enfh 
meter has two outside openings, otherwise it is gM 
tight. One of these openings admits ras from die 
street main into the meter, the o 
outlet through which gas passes i 
the house lines. The principle o 
operates is somewhat similar to 
miliar device, viz., the blacksmith 
blacksmith opens the bellows air 
he closes this huge leather bag, 
forced out into the forge. So in tl 
leather diaphragms take the placi 
bellows which alternately fill with 
and. in turn, close, forcing the gas oi 
pipes. The blacksmith's arm is the 
bellows at the forge, the pressure of 
operating the diaphragms. Certain 
lached to these leather diaphragms ] 
the upper compartment and connec 
registering mechanism. As there j 
the flow of gas through the meter is 
of them fills, the other discharges an 
of expanding and contracting, the hi 
propelled so that each time one ol 
bellows em))ties its content of gas, th 
a small degree. 

These leather diaphragms must he 
and no more, otherwise they will 
hand too far or not far enough, con 
is used in making (hese dia])hragms. In fact, the ac- 
curacy of the meter depends almost wholly on the siw 
and pliability of ihcse leather bags. 

Since the creation of the Ohio Utilities Commission, 
six years ago. it has been a part of my duties to inspect 
and test many domestic meters and, taking into considera- 
tion the conditions under which meters operate, as they 
are exposed to the action of the gas within and heat, coM 
and moisture without, I can safely say the gas meter if 
the most reliable measuring apparatus made. 

I have, in as simple language as possible, described the 
Meter Prover, Calorimeter, Regulator and Domestic 
Meter, all four of which were used in some simple ex- 
periments to determine to what extent pressure influence 
the value of natural gas to domestic consumers. 

The natural phenomena of contraction and expansion 
of gas works a blessing on the one hand and a menace 



It is good to live and learn. Oervaiit«i, 



290 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



August 



TIME PASSING ONE CUBIC FOOT NATURAL GAS THROUGH VARIOUS SIZE 

ORIFICES AT VARYING PRESSURES. 






No. 


60 


58 


56 


52 


48 


46 


44 


42 


40 


38 


34 


30 


Diam. 


.040 


.042 


.0465 


.0635 


.076 


.081 


.086 


.0935 


.098 


.1015 


.III 


.1285 


Time 


ni s 


m s 


m s 


m s 


ni 5 


m s 


m s 


m s 


m s 


m s 


m s 


m s 


£ V2 


2^1 


21 30 


2}^ 30 


13 20 


9 40 


825 


8 05 


5 30 


5 10 


5 05 


4 40 


4 00 


S ' 


21 55 


19 40 


15 50 


8 15 


7 20 


4 55 


4 45 


3 50 


3 40 


3 35 


3 25 


2 45 


3 2 


14 40 


13 45 


II 20 


5 50 


4 15 


3 40 


3 30 


2 30 


2 25 


2 20 


2 05 


I 45 


° 4 


10 50 


10 00 


8 45 


3 55 


3 05 


2 45 


2 35 


I 50 


I 45 


I 40 


I 35 


I 05 


6 


8 50 


8 05 


6 05 


3 25 


2 30 


2 05 


2 00 


I 35 


I 30 


I 25 


I 20 


55 



Room and Gas 60 degrees. 

Meter — Harris Bros., Philadelphia. 

Appliance— Hot-plate No. 32. Sawed burner. Estate Stove Co., Hamilton, Ohio. 













TEST NO. I. 














Weight 


Burner 


Gas 


Water Rise 


Cubic Feet 






Orif. 


cr 


Water Distance Pressure From To 


Net 


Gas 


Time 




No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


IV^" 


I OZ. 


6odeg. 212 deg. 


152 deg. 


2.0t25 


20' 39"' 


381 


No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


I^^" 


2 0Z. 


55 deg. 212 deg. 


157 deg. 


2.17 


14' 52" 


303 


No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


I^" 


3 OZ. 


56 deg. 212 deg. 


156 deg. 


2.18 


12' 19" 


251 


No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


I%" 


40Z. 


56 deg. 212 deg. 
TEST NO. 2. 


156 deg. 


2.30 


II' 18" 


243 






Weight 


Burner 


Gas 


Water Rise 




Cubic Feet 




Orifice 


Water Distance 


Pressure From To 


Net Time 


Gas 




No. 


52 


6Jbs. 


1%" 


1 OZ. 


60 deg. 212 deg. 


152 deg. 


2.20 


22' 20" 


448 


No. 


52 


6fbs. 


1%" 


2 0Z. 


58 deg. 212 deg. 


154 deg. 


2.2n 


16' 39" 


364 


No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


1%" 


30Z. 


56 deg. 212 deg. 


154 deg. 


2.47s 


13' 47" 


315 


No. 


52 


6 lbs. 


I%" 


40Z. 


54 deg. 212 deg. 


158 deg. 


2.48 


II' 46" 


277 



— Narural Gas Association Convention 



DISCUSSION 

J. F. MASON : I would like to ask Mr. Critchfield 
this question. What in your judgment is the proper 
normal pressure for a distributing system? 

MR. CRITCHFIELD : That is a very difficult matter 
to say, as it depends largely on your local distributing 
system. 

In a general way I would say that rather than carry 
pressures of six or eight ounces during seventy-five per 
cent of the time and be obliged to drop to one, two or 
three ounces during the remainder of the time, it would 
be very much better to lower pressures to a point within 
your ability to maintain without fluctuation. 

While it is probably not germane to a discussion of this 
paper, I would like to add a statement or two relative to 
the natural gas situation in Ohio. Very recently I said to 
the members of our State Commission that the burden 
of furnishing an adequate supply of gas had shifted 
very largely from the gas utilities to their consumers; 
that gas production had apparently reached a maximum 
and the problem now confronting the producer is to 
maintain the output while the consumer was morally 
bound by economical appliances and equitable distribu- 
tion to keep within the available supply. Unless we have 
an open winter, there will be a repetition of the exper- 
iences of last. There are but two chief forms of fuel 
— i. e. : coal and natural gas. The Federal Government 



will have full control of the distribution of coal and our 
Commission of gas. Every consumer in our state must 
have either gas or coal, and to my notion gas should 
always be used in preference to coal, since the latter can 
be stored and the former cannot, consequently it becomes 
the plain duty of every gas company to sell its maximum 
output every day in the month and every hour in the 
day and no regulatory body should issue orders so in- 
flexible as to leave an undistributed surplus in the pos- 
session of any gas company where it could be substituted 
tor coal. 

MR. J. F. MASON: Assuming that the distributing 
plant is in normal condition and assuming that the neces- 
sities of the case required a lowering of the pressure in 
your judgment and from your research work, to what 
pressure would you recommend working down to? 

MR. CRITCHFIELD: By the introduction of the 
proper kind of appliances, properly adjusted, I see no 
reason why natural gas cannot be distributed as low as 
two ounces. 



might 



W. Y. CARTWRIGHT: Mr. Critchfield vou 
refer to your experience at my house last winter. 

MR. CRITCHFIELD : Mr. Cartwright has asked me 
to tell you about what happened at his house. That re- 
minds me of an incident. Mr. Cartwright has in his 
home a very efficient heating apparatus. I am not ad- 
vertising any particular kind of heating apparatus but 



The food of hope is mediated action. — ^Bulwer. 



August 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOUNE 



291 



I believe this was made in the City of Cleveland. I 
know that during the intensely cold weather that pre- 
vailed in the country last winter I was in Cincinnati and 
examined the apparatus in Mr. Cartwright's house which 
was working so efficiently that I found that Mr. Cart- 
wright was able to keep his house warm on one half 
inch of gas. 

I think in the distribution of gas some poor results 
have been brought about through the practice usually 
followed when a Gas Company goes into a town and 
begins to pipe it and to lay services, it naturally will lay 
a big service into the big house and a little service into 
the little house and when you get down to low pressure 
the fellow in the big house is getting the gas and the 
fellow in the little house is not getting it. He is being 
stinted in his supply. Although it is running contrary to 
usual practice yet I believe that if you increase the size 
of the service — I won't say anything about decreasing the 
size of the service to the big house but if you increase 
the size of the service to the small house you are going 
to get away from a great deal of your low pressure 
troubles and under those conditions I cannot under- 
stand why there will be any difficulty brought about by 
lowering pressures down to two ounces. 

HENRY C. MORRIS: I would like to ask Mr. 
Critchfield if in his judgment it is not going to be nec- 
essary for the gas range manufacturers to readjust their 
ranges because at the present time the distance between 
the top of the gas burner and the top of the grid is ap- 
proximately two inches. With a four ounce pressure 
you can use the gas with comparative efficiency in a range 
constructed in that way but with a two ounce pressure 
I think it is going to be necessary to bring the cooking 
surface of the range closer to the burner and with gas 
ranges constructed as they are at the present time that 
cannot be done. 

CHARLES V. CRITCHFIELD: Oh, that is not a 
debatable question at all. The manufacturer of natural 
gas appliances must arrange to build and construct his 
appliances so as to meet this difficulty since the cooking 
surface must be brought closer to the flame. I used to 
burn artificial gas. In fact I used to manufacture arti- 
♦^cial gas and later on began the use of natural gas. M\ 
nife always said to me she thought she could get quicker 
results on the old artificial range than she could get on 
ihe new natural gas range and this has been brought 
iiome to me for a good many years. The fact i*^ that 
the burner in the natural gas range has been tcj far 
away from the top surface of the range. It mignt do 
in years gone by when we had all kinds of natural gas 
supply but when we are getting down to the point where 
we are conserving the gas and using a lower pressure 
it is of course necessary that the appliance manufacturer 
should adjust himself to these changed conditions in the 
construction of his natural gas appliances. 

J. C. McDowell : From a practical point of view 
I think this paper of Mr. Critchfield's is one of the most 
valuable we have ever had presented to our Association 
for the reiason that there is a very general impression 

Toa won't find anything by losing your ten 



among the consumers of gas that they are not getting 
half of the heat units out of the gas or half out of the 
gas when they receive it at a lower pressure that they 
do at a higher pressure. This impression is so strongly, 
imbedded in the public mind and it is so important that 
the true situation be brought to their attention that I do 
not think a gas company could do a wiser thing than to 
have this paper printed in the form in which it is now 
prepared for this convention and distributed among their 
consumers. It would do a world of good. 

Information is what the p>eople want. They have been 
misinformed by demagogues because of, their own nat- 
urally antagonistic feeling towards the gas meter and 
towards the gas man and they feel that they are- being 
cheated in this way by the Gas Company. In fact many 
Cities have raised this question and some Public Utilities 
Commissions have also labored under a similar misap- 
prehension ; one I know of particularly, attempted to 
enforce a higher pressure on the ground that there is not 
enough heat in the low pressure gas. So for that reason 
I am very much pleased to hear this paper and to have it 
presented to the members of this Association at this 
time. 

Just one further suggestion on the matter of pressure. 
I will only take a moment. I know of two large instal- 
lations which were installed and designed to distribute 
gas at a two ounce pressure and they gave a very fair 
service at that pressure. So that it is a question of 
design of your plant which is the practical point that 
must be given due consideration. 

L. B. DENNING: In line with Mr. Critchfield's 
statement that he thought that an artificial gas installa- 
tion would give better results I may state that some ex- 
periments have recently been conducted — a series of them 
in fact, by the Ohio State University seeking to obtain 
comparative results by the use of an artificial gas stovi 
taken out of stock and the ordinary natural gas range 
and hot plate. The experiments show that much better 
results were obtained from the use of the artificial gas 
stove than by either the natural gas range or the hot 
plate. I am informed that it is perfectly fair to conclude 
from the results of those experiments that anything 
above two ounces pressure in the use of natural gas is 
a waste both to the consumer and to the Company. 

Before this discussion is ended I would like Mr. Wyet 
to give the results of those experiments for the benefit 
of the members of the Association. 

SAMUEL S. WYER: Some time ago in order to 
answer the question as to what is usable natural gas 
pressure, arrangements were made with the Department 
of Home Economics at the Ohio State University, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, to run a series of tests making determi- 
nation as to exactly what the gas consumed would be 
and what the time element would be and what the 
general eflficiency of the apparatus would be in cooking 
potatoes by ordinary pan frying and boiling; in cooking 
meat by ordinary pan frying and pan broiling and in 
baking bread. 

The first thing that was done was to follow the general 
viewj)oint that usable conditions were more important 



292 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



August 



than were efficiency. Therefore, a series of tests were 
conducted with the idea of translating — if we may use 
the expression — all of the engineering features into do- 
• mestic science or home economics, in cooking opera- 
tions. These tests have been completed. They have 
been published by the Ohio State University as a Uni- 
versity Bulletin. Additional copies of that Bulletin can 
be obtained directly from the Department of Home 
Economics of the University. 

The Bulletin is twenty-seven pages long and gives all 
the details of the tests which were carried on in demon- 
strating cooking operations from two-tenths of one ounce 
up to fivc ounce pressure using a standard natural gas 
range, a standard manufactured gas range and a stan<lard 
hot plate with no change whatever in adjustment. 

In addition to giving the data pertaining to the test 
there is a general discussion of the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying the whole natural gas pressure situa- 
tion. In order that you may get a summary of the tests 
I will read the conclusion. 

'*i. — Satisfactory cooking operations in frying pota- 
toes, boiling potatoes, frying beefsteak, and pan broiling 
beefsteak can be carried on with .2 oz. natural gas 
pressure. 

'*2. — The changes in vessel position necessary to per- 
mit satisfactory operation at pressures as low as .2 oz. 
are easy to make and require no special changes in exist- 
ing stoves. 

3. — Bread can be satisfactorily baked with .5 oz. nat- 
ural gas pressure. 

4. — Natural gas stoves are not properly constructed to 
use natural gas efficiently at high pressures, nor satis- 
factorily at low pressures. 

5. — At high pressures natural gas stoves are inefficient 
and therefore wasteful in their use of gas. 

6. — The burners on natural gas stoves arc too low. 

7. — The holes in the spuds of natural gas stoves are too 
small. 

8. — I-ong flames for cooking operations are wasteful. 

9. — The maximum results are obtained with many 
short flames rather than a few long flames. 

10. — A strong draft of air may deflect the flame awa>' 
from cooking vessel so as to seriously interfere with and 
in many cases stop cooking. 

1 1 . — Where two flames strike each other, due to the 
fact that openings are too close in burner, poor combus- 
tion will result. This will produce a luminous flame 
which will in turn result in a smoking burner. Neither 
air nor gas adjustment can overcome this. 

12. — Drilled burners are better than slotted burners, 
because there is less likelihood of two adjacent flames 
striking against each other, therefore producing imperfect 
combustion conditions. 

13. — Natural gas cook stoves should not be furnished 
with solid stove tops since this suggests the carrying on 
of cooking operations on top of the stove, rather than 
with the vessel in the proper position. 



14. — At low pressures no perceptible change can k 
made in the combustion by adjusting the air shutter. 
The best conditions obtained were with the shutter wide 
open. 

15. — Too much heat is used in most cooking opera- 
tions, correct application is more important than mere 
intensity. 

16. — The natural gas pressures carried in most natural 
gas distributing plants are too high for efficient opera- 
tion. 

17. — Meter registration is approximately correct re- 
gardless as to variation in pressure. That is, meters do 
not run faster when the pressure is low. 

18.- -Lowering the temperature of natural gas increases 
its heating value per cubic foot. Natural gas has a 
temperature about 25 degrees lower in the coldest month 
in winter than in the hottest month in summer, and the 
heating value per cubic foot due to change in temperature 
is therefore about 5 per cent higher in the coldest month 
in winter than in the warmest month in summer. 

19. — The maximum possible variation of heating 
value due to variation in gage pressure would make the 
heating value during the low pressure periods in winter 
less than 3 per cent lower than during the high pressure 
period in summer. 

20. — Since the heating value increase due to low tem- 
perature of gas in winter more than offsets the possible 
decrease in heating value due to low pressure, the practi- 
cal effect of the two is that the heating value per cubic 
foot of natural gas as served in the winter under low 
pressures and low temperature is higher than that sened 
in the summer under higher pressures and higher tem- 
perature. 

21. — Variation in barometer from day to day may 
make more of a change in the heating value of gas than 
any possible variation in gage pressure. 

22. — Better and more efficient service could be rend- 
ered if natural gas pressures were generally lowered to 
probably 2 oz. rather than increased to 4 oz. or above. 

2^. — The lowering of natural gas distributing pressures 
to approximately 2 oz. would produce more efficient and 
satisfactory operating conditions for the consumer, would 
greatly curtail the leakage on the consumer's premises, 
which is paid for by the consumer, and would also sub- 
stantially lower the leakage in the gas ccnnpany's distrib- 
uting plant." 

DONALD McDonald : I differ fundamentally 
with the conclusions arrived at by Mr. Critchfield as to 
any benefit being derived by lowering our pressure. The 
largest part of our investment is in our distributing 
mains. If you divide the distributing pressure by fonr 
you cut down the quantity of gas, so that makes you cany 
about one-half. If you adjust your appliances to one 
inch and you only get a half inch then there is going to 
be dissatisfaction. 

If everybody in your City is adjusted down to oncinck 
and all of them together take more gas than you can 



ThinjTs true and evident must of necessity be recognized by those who would contradict them. — ^Bpicitte 



NATURAL CAS AND GASOLINE 



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294 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



August 



only about 13 per cent with 4 ounce pressure and I 
imagine from 13 to 18 per cent would represent fairly 
well the average efficiency obtained under these condi- 
tions, whereas it is shown by Mr. Wyer's test and Mr. 
Critchfield*s tests and tests of my own, that efficiency of 
37 to 45 per cent is very easily obtained, practically and 
in every day service. That means that we have practi- 
cally one-third of the gas consumption or from 13 to 39 
per cent for the same service. So that you would need 
less gas through your distributing system and even as- 
suming that an increase of consumers creates a greater 
demand for your gas changes such as Mr. Cartwright has 
outlined could very readily be made to the distributing 
system or possibly changes in the low pressure regulator 
systems and increasing the number of them. I think that 
could be worked out very satisfactorily and without very 
great expense. 

J. H. MAXON: There are two points in this dis- 
cussion that I think ought to be fully emphasized; one 
raised t)y Mr. McDonald, that it is obvious that we can- 
not reduce the delivering capacity of our low pressure 
systems and maintain the delivery of the quantity of gas 
that is needed. No company practically can stand the 
additional investment to attempt any such experiments. 

The other point is that it may be entirely practical to 
standardize the pressure on the customer's premises, 
which probably is desirable, so that regard-less of the 
pressure on the distributing mains there may be a con- 
tinuous certain pressure on the piping of the particular 
building. That has been followed successfully in many 
instances. In some instances by appliance manufactur- 
ers installing on the equipment a regulator that was ad- 
justed so that the boilers — I refer to heating boilers, — 
worked always on a low pressure. That has furnished 
very satisfactory results as to efficiency. 

It is practical to install a sensitive regulator on the 
service of customers an<i by the particular sized piping 
in the building utilize gas more advantageously at lower 
pressures than it is now utilized. The customer, how- 
ever, should be the one who bears the burden of the in- 
vestment in the regulator, the enlarged pipe and the nec- 
essary appliances to get the full advantage out of the gas 
rather than the Gas Company. 

JOHN A. MILLER : I think Mr. Cartwright and Mr. 
McDonald are both right. They appeared to differ with 
each other but I think they really agree on the main 
point. The main issue in this whole controversy I think 
can be settled by having uniform pressure whether it be 
one ounce, two ounces or one-half inch water, having uni- 
form pressure at each house throughout the twenty-four 
hours and then have your appliance adjusted to that pres- 
sure. I think that will solve the difficulty. If the main 
system is not in such condition that the pressure can be 
maintained then you should install a regulator. I have 
always contended that natural gas ranges are very inef- 
ficient from the appliance standpoint and they certainly 
should be changed as rapidly as possible in order to make 
them efficient. 

In regard to the question of pressure it does not matter 
what your pressure in different parts of the town is, so 



long as it is maintained at the same point throughout 
the twenty-four hours in the various districts of the 
town. I think that would settle the whole controversy. 

MR. CRITCHFIELD: Just as a matter of informa 
tion on the question of introducing individual regulators, 
we have in Ohio a Gas Company that is unique. It is 
an artificial gas company distributing gas under high 
pressure. As I recall it there are about ten towns fur- 
nished by this company three of which are county seats 
They distribute artificial gas through their small mains, 
— 2 and 3 inch mains under a pressure of 8 to 10 pounds 
and every single consumer is served through an individ- 
ual regulator. This company has been in operation some 
three or four years and the distribution of their product 
has been entirely successful. 

J. C. McDowell : I suppose there are 60,000 in- 
dividual regulators in this City. 

DONALD McDonald : I don't want to be a brak« 
on the wheels of progress but I am also dead set against 
house regulators and I will tell you why. First of all, 
we don't need them. In the second place the consumers 
pipes are generally speaking not large enough to dis- 
tribute through his own house at a low pressure. The 
place to regulate gas is at the key of the appliance in 
which you are burning it. Any burner will do propor- 
tionately better under one inch pressure. The stove in 
any city will work better under one inch pressure than 
under higher pressure up to that appliance. If the con- 
sumer gets better results at one inch pressure than he 
does at four inch — as most of them would why can't he 
turn that little cock just a little bit and put the flame 
down to where he wants it? As a matter of fact that 
is what he does. We get no complaints from too much 
pressure. If we turn the pressure down in our mains 
and the consumers open their stop cocks wide then if the 
pressure goes up in the main, the blaze would whistle 
and there would be complaints all over town. But what 
actually happens is that each consumer turns down his 
heating stove and his furnace to that point that satisfies 
his individual needs and to have automatic appliances on 
his house will furnish uniform pressure in the cellar and 
probably give a fairly good result at the cooking stove 
but would give no gas at all in the third story, will not 
satisfy the needs of the individual consumer. It im- 
poses a large investment on our consumer, and I will tell 
you another thing ; all of these automatic regulators are 
equipped with rubber diaphrams and in time they will get 
stiff and lose their elasticity and ultimately break and in 
due course of time you will get the complaint that som^ 
body's house is about to be blown up. 

As I said before I don't want to stand in the way of 
progress but it seems to me that if you want your cus- 
tomers to use your gas at low pressure then let the in- 
dividual customer regulate it himself at the key of the 
appliance in which he is burning it. 

L. B. DENNING: I am afraid that Mr. McDonald 
has not been up against the point which he suggests. 1 
have. I want to say if the obligation is fastened on the 
Gas Company to furnish adequate pressure at the con- 
sumer's burner it is going to bankrupt every Gas Corn- 



It ig not permitted to the most equitable of men to be a judge in his own cause. — ^PiMoaL 



»•:"•« 



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296 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



August 



A MORE UNIFORM DELIVERY. 

I HEX one's eye follows the line described on this 
diagram loaned by the Ohio I'uel Supply 
Company o( Columbus, it is not surprising 
that at times the natural-gas-man might be 
accused of having an attack of old-time ague, on ac- 
count of his "shaking in his boots." 

The curve indicates the amount of gas sold by the 
Ohio Fuel Supply Company during various months 
of the year. On the line between December and Jan- 
uary appears the peak or maximum load. 



It certainly is not fair to ask the gas company to go 
to enormous expense, in order to take care of those 
comparatively few people who use no more than a 
mere trifle of the company's product during the year 
until the severe cold is upon them, uwrf then make rei/uish 
lion for lart/e i-olutne. 

Kvery gas company should do all it can to supply 
communities, and we believe the great .majority of 
companies make a strong effort in that direction. How- 
I'icr. no company has accomplished the impossible, 
nor can companies do so, nor can they afford to invest 
large sums in means f(ir su])])lying excessi7r demand for 
but an exceedingly brief period with sueli im-esttnenl In 



At such "peak" times, the public claims "gas short- 
age," while the gas-man describes the condition as 
"delivery then of more gas than at any other time in the 
year." 

It is being urged that gas companies should find 
means whereby to make the delivery more uniform 
throughout the year. We believe utilities commissions 
and executive bodies are gradually coming to the point 
of agreeing that snch would not only be fair to the 
company, but would render best service to the public. 



remain idle the baianee of Ihe year. 

UtUess the public is willing to do its part by paying 
per thousand cubic feet Ihrougbout the year in order thai 
the gas company may have in hand funds with which 
to prepare itself to meet the jiuhlic's unusual peak load 
demands, we do not see how such can be met. 

W'c insure ourselves and our property by paying a 
premium. Our property docs not burn; we ate not 
injured through accident: we do not have an automo- 
bile collision, and therefore the premiums we pay per 



So mncli is a man worth as h« esteems himself. — ^Babelais. 



NAIIKAI. GAS AND l.A>Ol INK 



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Thtrr arr iorur ilrfn'.i ;• .fr •.f.  i : ir'. M %r. * i t.if'.o Mar.lA.e?« 



RESULTS OF DRILLING-LATEST REPORTS 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELD. 



ALLEGANY FIELD. 

Wheeler hrs., A. L. Shaner & Co 

Fee, A. P. McDivett 



MIDDLE FIELD. 

Mickelson, Burton & Co. i 

Grandin, Sand Hill Oil 6 

Johnson, Triumph Oil 23 

McKean, Haskell & Co. 19 

McKean, Haskell & Co. 20 

Deible Oil, Gaston & Lander 114 

Siggins, G. B. Siggins 13 

Siggins, G. B. Siggins 14 

Natural Gasoline, Shanley 21 

Lot 373, Penna. Oil 671 



Dry 

Gas Wells 



BRADFORD FIELD. 

Q. Irons est., Stoner & Gaffney 12 . . . 



VENANGO-CLARION. 

Culp, United Natural Gas 2 

Lusher, Bullard, Dalley et al. 8 

Sullinger, Grieff & Smith 5 

Clarion County — 

Hanby, Shorts & Master 2 

Weaver, G. A. Weaver 3 

Yonkers, J. Black 

Brisben Bros., W. F. Smitz i 

Furnace, Furuace Co. 3 

Forest County — 
Coleman tract, Jefferson Co. Gas 



Dry 

Gas Wells 



BUTLER-ARMSTRONG. 

S. Glenn, McCandless & Co. 5 

Douthett heirs, Wall, Hall et al. 2 

J. S. Campbell. W. B. Rath 3 

Adam Lang, Lang & Co. i 

Mrs. P. Hockenberry, T. S. Armstrong 2. 
Steeb, Youngbloot & Goettman i 



Dry 
Gas 



SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA. 

Washington — 

Buckingham, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Henry, Geary Oil I 

Imperial — 
Briceland hrs., Watson & Co. 3 

Dorseyville — 

Trautman, Mer. N. G. i 

Braun, Mer. N. G. i 

Nuttall hrs., Alex Walley i 

Ingomar — 
Rhine-Timmons, Walker & Co. i 

Duff City— 
Kirk-Christy, E. A. Bream 1 1 

Bellevue — 
Gibson hrs., M. M. Walley & Co. 3 

Beaver County — 
Brown & Co., Lynn & Co. i 

Milltown — 

McMath hrs.. Peoples Gas i 

Morrison. National Oil & Gas i 

McMath, Clark & Vincent i 



Gas 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



I 
9 

Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

Gas 



5 
4 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 



5 
I 



Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Dry 



Mt. Morris — 

Keener, J. L., Garard 9 

Thomas lot, J. L. Garard & Co. 4. 

Stewart hrs.. Peoples Gas i 

Calvert, Peoples Gas i 

Thomas, Philadelphia Co. i 

Graham, Natural Gas of W. Va. 3 

Wendt, Carnegie Gas 2 

Cooper, Mfrs. L. & H. 2 

Flaherty, Peoples Gas 1 

Estell, Philadelphia Co. i 



Dry 
Gas 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

Mannington — 

Neeley, Reserve Gas i 

Gump, South Penn Oil 4 

Copenhaver, Carnegie Gas i 

Baker, Blackshere Oil & Gas 2 

Straight, Blackshere O. & G. 4 

Tennant, Philadelphia Co. i 

Price, Hope Gas i 

Durkin, Hope Gas i 

Coffman, Hope Gas i 

Fox, Carnegie Gas i 

Musgrave, Hope Gas i 

Beaty, Southern Oil 3 

McReynolds, Phila. Co. 2 

Lemley, Carnegie Gas i 

Hixenbaugh, Cochran & Funk 8 

Rice, Mfrs. L. & H. 2 

Nichols, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Tuttle, Hope Gas i 

Lemasters, M. V. T. 3 

Wetzel and Tyler — 

Welling, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Marshall County Bk., Mfrs. L. & H. 6... 

Eastman, Hope Gas i 

Cook, Benedum-Trees Oil i 

Myers, Domain Oil 3 

Marshall County — 

Charnock, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Blake, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Earnest, Mfrs. L. & H. i 

Hancock County — 

Bucher hrs.. Resolute Oil 9 

Mahan, Mahan Oil i 

Wood County — 
Cover, Carter Oil 2 

Ritchie County — 

Haught, South Penn Oil 25 

Trainer, R. G. Gillespie 2 

Ellison, Hope Gas i 

Jones, Hope Gas i 

Elliott, Carnegie Gas i 

Smith, Eastern Petroleum i 

Wirt County — 
Adams, Kreps & Co. i , 

Pleasants County — 

Nesuseschwander, Coal River Oil 7 

Pethtel, S. Y. Ramage 46 

Calhoun County — 

Bell, G. L. Cabot i 

Williams, G. L. Cabot i 

Roane County — 

McCloy, United Fuel Gas i , 

Whited, Fisher Oil 2 , 

Hart, G. L. Cabot i 



Truth haB never been, never can be, contained in any one creed or syBteoL— Ward. 



Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 

13 
10 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Drv 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

Df)' 

Dry 
Dry 

Gas 
Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Gas 




August 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



399 



Kanawha County — 

Ward tract, Cabin Creek Gas 19 

Thompson, Eastern Carbon 6 

Wherley, Montgomery Oil & Gas i 
R. C. C, Ohio Cities Gas i 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



Dry 
Gas 



SOUTHEASTERN OHIO. 



Woodsfield— 
Boltz, Hardy & Co. 2 

Perry County — 

Schmeltzer, Carter Oil i 

Elder, Stewart & Co. i 

Licking County — 
Loughman, Ohio Cities Gas i 

Fairfield County — 
Stoner, Rise, Rush & Co. i 

Muskingum County — 

Deitrick, Southern Oil i 

Nice, Citizens N. Bank 4 

Brison, Wilmington-Athens Oil 12 

Morgan County — 
Augustein, Frank Panhans i 

Noble County — 

Saling, C. E. Hammons & Co. 24 

Hanna hrs., Kerr Bros. & Co. 5 

Marietta — 

Taylor, Percy Davis 3 

McWherley, Sutton Bros, i 

Beardmore, Penna. & Ky. Oil 2 

Brown Bros., Immel & Co. 4 

Soles, Beaver Falls Dev. i 

Edwards, S. E. Edwards & Co. i 

Lowry, Earl Stephens i 

Francisco, Fleming & Hicker 2 

Rardin, Kamerer & Co. 6 

Hall hrs.. Exchange National Bank 31 
Westbrook, G. L. Watson & Co. 2 

Carroll County — 
McClave, Natural Gas of W. Va. i . . . 

Harrison County — 

Lattimer, W. C. Kennedy i 

Cippakizer, W. C. Kennedy i 

Borland, H. B. Cameron & Co. i 

Rife, Hodges & Co. 3 

Jefferson County — 
Scott, Steuben Oil & Gas 4 

Belmont County — 
Stoneking, Natural Gas of W. Va. i . 
Crozier hrs.. Natural Gas of W. Va. i . 



Dry 
Gas 



PENNSYLVANIA FIELDS. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WELT S 

Comp. 

Allegany 14 

Bradford 52 

Middle Field 29 

Venango*Qarion 56 

Butler-Armstrong 14 

So. W. Pa. ,. so 

West Virginia 117 

S. E. Ohio 119 



Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 



16 
32 



Gas 

Gas 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Dry 
Dry 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Dry 

Gas 

Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 

Dry 

Gas 
Gas 



23 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 


20 


I 


I 


104 


I 





29 
66 


I 
5 


9 
4 


25 


5 


I 


173 

8S4 
802 


13 
16 

23 


10 
32 

7 



Total 451 2,103 65 64 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 

Berne — Wm. Curile, City Nat. Gas i 



KNOX COUNTY. 

Pike — J. H. Metzger, Upham Gas i 

Brown — ^J. J. Neyhart, East Ohio Gas i 



ASHLAND COUNTY. 

Lake — M. M. Byers, Logan G. & Fuel i . . 
Perry — ^Alex. Griffith, Logan G. & F. i . . . 
Hanover — ^J. M. Hay, Logan Gas & Fuel i 

Moerz, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

A. & J. Strickler, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 . . 



Dry 
Gas 



MEDINA COUNTY. 

Westfield — Clyde Steele, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 

J. W. Strock, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Medina — ^J. Kennedy, Medina Gas & F. i . . 

J. A. Witzel, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

L H. Kennedy, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . . 
Lafayette — J. Mong, Ohio Fuel Supply i . 

M. F. Dague, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

P. J. Warner, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

M. J. Young, Kundtz & Hulse i 

I. J. Snyder, Medina Gas & Fuel 2 



Dry 
Gas 



LORAIN COUNTY. 
Grafton — iM. H. Wilkins, Ohio F. Supply i 

WAYNE COUNTY. 
Cannan — J. & E. Fetzer, Logan G. & F. i 

C. & K. Stebbins, Logan Gas & Fuel i . . 

T. Brinkerhoff, Brinkerhoff & Co. 2 

Maggie McElroy, Ohio Fuel Supply i ... 
T. A. Armstrong, Preston Oil i 

Wayne — D. Mowery, Ohio Fuel Supply i . 

D. W. Mowery, Ohio Fuel Supply i .... 
Jos. W. McDonald, Vanover & Co. i 

Milton — L. & C. Steiner, East Ohio Gas i . 

Clinton — F. L. Denney, East Ohio Gas i . . 

Geo. Iceman, East Ohio Gas i 

E. 1. Craig, East Ohio Gas 3 

G. F. Aylesworth, East Ohio Gas 2 

H. B. Brown, Medina Gas & Fuel i 

Plain — G. Z. Cochel, Ohio Fuel Supply i . . 



Dry 
Gas 



RICHLAND COUNTY. 
Monroe — W. & M. Wigton, Logan G. & F. i 

CUYAHOGA COUNTY. 

Dover — A. A. Ellenwood, Preston Oil i . . . . 

Chas. Bailey, Preston Oil i 

J. May, J. May i 

B. L. Smith, East Ohio Gas i 

J. £. Elsholtz, East Ohio Gas i 

W. Juergmier, East Ohio Gas i 

A. S. Cooley, East Ohio Gas r 



Dry 
Gas 



VINTON COUNTY. 

Richland — C. R. Poling, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

C. R. Poling, Ohio Fuel Supply 6 

C. R. Poling, Ohio Fuel Supply 8, 9 

John Scott, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

Wm. Petty, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Lewis Kruger, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 



Dry 



Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 

3 
2 



Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 

2 
8 



Dry 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 

8 

7 

Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Dry 

3 
4 

Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Tba diffloalfy in life is the dholoe.~lE6ore. 



300 



NATURAL GAS AND GASOLINE 



August 



J. A. Barney, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

Eagle — Lydia Shoemaker, Ohio F'uel S. i 



Dry 
Gas 



PERRY COUNTY. 

Thorn — J. W. Conn, Ohio Fuel Supply i 

C. A. Hettrick, Ohio Fuel Supply i .. 
B. Alspaugh. Logan Gas & Fuel 2 . . . 

D. Boring, Columbus Natural Gas i . . 

J. Yost, Columbus Natural Gas i 

I. A. Trovinger, Heisey Gas i 

E. M. Yost, Heisey Gas i 



Dry 
Gas 



HOCKING COUNTY. 
Salt Creek — D. Schwalbaugh. Logan Gas & Fuel 2 

W. A. Williamson, Ohio Fuel Supply 2 

Benton — S. C. Harsh, Ohio Fuel Supply i 



Gas 



HOLMES COUNTY. 

Ripley — C. A. Craig, Medina G. & F. i... 
Washington — P. Sprang, Logan G. & F. 2 



Dry 



Franklin- 



JACKSON COUNTY. 
-W. C. Mercer, Ohio Fuel Sup. i 



CENTRAL OHIO. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 

Comp. 

Fairfield i 

Knox 2 

Ashland 5 

Medina 10 

Lorain i 

Wayne 18 

Richland i 

Cuyahoga 7 

Vinton 10 

Perry 7 

Hocking 3 

Holmes 2 

Coshocton o 

Jackson i 



Total 68 



202 



LIMA FIELD. 



WOOD COUNTY. 
Bloom — P. Ziegler, Geo. Lefler i 

HANCOCK COUNTY. 
Marion — Town lot, City of Findlay 2 

SENECA COUNTY. 

Clinton— A. G. Stoltz. A. G. Stoltz & Co. i 

OTTAWA COUNTY. 
Allen — A. H. Sandrock, John Weber i.... 



INDIANA FIELD. 



JAY COUNTY. 

Penn — S. E. Davis, Jones & Lyons 9 . . . 
P. J. Kirkman. Chandler & Cooper i 



25 



Gas 
Dry 



2 

7 

Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 
Gas 



I 
6 



Gas 
Gas 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 



Dry 



Prod. 


Dry 


Gas 








I 





I 


I 





3 


2 





2 


8 





T 





200 


8 


7 





I 








3 


4 


2 


2 


7 





I 


6 








3 





2 

















I 






39 



Gas 
Gas 
Dry 
Gas 



Dry 
Dry 



GRANT COUNTY. 

Van Burcn — B. Studebaker, Producers Refiners of 
Indiana i 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Salamonie — R. Rausch, March Pet. Oil i 

DELAWARE COUNTY. 
Liberty — S. R. Strong, Powers, Nat. Oil 2 

RANDOLPH COUNTY. 

Monroe — Martha Adams, Black Diamond Oil 4 

GIBSON COUNTY. 

Washington — Roberts, Indian Refg. i 

W. S. Hegeman, Indian Refg. i 



Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dry 

Dn 
Drv 



Dry 



PIKE COUNTY. 

Madison — S. A. D. Barker, A. B. Bement 3 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Turman — A. T. Osborne. A. T. Osborne 6 
Gill— W. E. Maple, Wilson & Co. i 

J. J. Bragdon, Indiana-Illinois Oil 7 

T. Durham, Indiana-Illinois Oil i 

Luke Squires. Lumbarr O. & G. i 



Dry 

Dry 
Gas 
Drv 
Drv 
Drv 



Dry 
Gas 



4 
I 



INDIANA FIELD. 



SUMMARY OF COMPLETED WORK. 



Comp. 

Jay 2 

Grant i 

Huntington 2 

Delaware 4 

Randolph 8 

Gibson 7 

Pike 7 

Sullivan 5 

Allen o 

Total 36 



ne, '18. 




M 


av, '