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Full text of "New encyclopedia of Texas, volume 2"

HOUSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



R0101151011 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/newencyclopediao02davi 



HOUSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 








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Compiled Ar\d Edited b\) 

ELLIS A. DAVIS - EDWIN H.GR0BE 

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TEXAS DEVELOP/AE/HT BUREAU 

DALLAS. TEXAS 



HOUSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




S. MANLEY, although but recently come 
to Orange, where he occupies a position of 
industrial leadership, for many years has 
been identified with timber preservation 
enterprises, and few men are better informed as 
to creosoting methods, and to the value of this 
treatment in timber conservation. Mr. Manley is 
president of the Texas Creosoting Company, one 
of the more recently organized industrial enter- 
prises of Orange, established in the fall of 1923. 
The plant of the Texas Creosoting Company is one 
of the ' largest creosoting plants in Texas. This 
large industrial unit is located on a twenty-three 
acre tract on the ship channel, and has sixteen hun- 
dred feet of water frontage, facilitating transporta- 
tion and eliminating unnecessary delays in the traf- 
fic department. Some idea of the size of the plant 
may be gained when it is stated that one cylinder 
used in its construction required five flat cars to 
carry, and a freight bill of some thirty-five hundred 
dollars to transport it to Orange. Its length made 
it possible for sixty men, hands clasped together at 
arms length, to stand upon it. The Texas Creosot- 
ing Company creosotes telegraph and telephone 
poles, bridge timber, and piling, and all classes of 
wood where this treatment for preservation is de- 
sired. The plant has a capacity of four million feet, 
board measure, per month, and turns out creosoted 
timber both for domestic and export trade, supplying 
a large percentage of this class of timber in use 
in this section. The company has a force of one 
hundred and fifty employees. Officers are: R. S. 
Manley, president; W. H. Stark, vice president, and 
D. E. Roach, secretary, treasurer and purchasing 
agent. 

R. S. Manley was born at Junction City, Kansas, 
the twenty-seventh of September, 1878, the son of 
C. H. and Marion I. (Jones) Manley. C. H. Manley, 
retired, is a pioneer banker of Junction City, Kan- 
sas. Mr. Manley was educated in the public schools 
of his native city, and after finishing there was 
appointed to the Naval Academy, at Annapolis, 
graduating in 1901, and receiving his ensign's com- 
mission in 1903. While at Annapolis he took an 
active part in athletics and played halfback on the 
navy football team. He served until 1906 as an 
officer on ships on the North and South Atlantic 
Ocean, resigning in that year to accept a position 
as manager of the Gulfport Creosoting Company, 
at Gulfport, Mississippi. He remained with the 
Gulfport Company until 1911, resigning to become 
president and manager of the Creosoted Wood Block 
Paving Company, which he headed until 1915. At 
that time the company was reorganized and the 
name was changed to the Creosoted Material Com- 
pany, Mr. Manley remaining as president and man- 
ager of the new company, until August, 1923, when 
he resigned to come to Orange to take charge of 
the organization of the Texas Creosoting Company. 
He built the plant at Orange and has since been 
active in building up one of the leading enterprises 
here. 

Mr. Manley was married at Pensacola, Florida, 
the tenth of November, 1906, to Miss Celestine A. 
Brent, a native of Pennsylvania. They have five 
children, Rufus S., F. S. Brent, Charles Conrad, 
James Grant and Donald Manley. Mr. Manley is a 
member of the Army and Navy Club of Washington, 
D. C, the Rotary and Country Clubs at Orange. As 
one of the leading creosoting experts in the country 




he has attained a national prominence in this field, 
and is one of the representatives of this industry, 
qualified to discuss the industry and its future with 
authority. Since coming to Orange, a city Mr. Man- 
ley feels offers unusual opportunities along indus- 
trial lines, he has taken an active interest in civic 
work, and has contributed, both through the build- 
ing of one of the most important enterprises here, 
and in a general way, through his sponsoring of 
development measures, to the expansion of Orange 
as an industrial center. 

OHN W. HART, whose activities through- 
out an active and busy life have identified 
him with Orange, has been associated with 
enterprises of important bearing on the 
prosperity of the city, and for around a decade has 
been connected with the auto supply business, a 
field wherein he has established the reputation of 
a merchant of experience and success. Mr. Hart is 
the proprietor of the Hart Auto Supply Company, 
a business he established in April, 1913, and which 
has since done a large and rapidly increasing busi- 
ness in wholesale and retail auto supplies. Mr. 
Hart carries a complete line of supplies and acces- 
sories, including tires, parts, bearings and auto 
equipment of all kinds, and has the largest stock 
of this kind in the city. The Hart Auto Supply 
Company is well located on Front Street, and has 
a force of three employees. Mr. Hart has organ- 
ized his business along progressive lines, keeping 
in close touch with developments in his field, and 
makes a point of offering his patrons the best of 
the many new accessories and equipment on the 
market. 

John W. Hart is a native of Orange, having been 
born in this city the third of July, 1883. His father, 
John T. Hart, came to Orange from his native state 
of Alabama, in 1876, and was a prominent attorney 
here until his death. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Miss Addie Goodman, was also a native of 
Alabama, and continues to make her home in Orange. 
John W. Hart received his early education in the 
public schools of Orange, later attending Texas A. 
and M. College, where he specialized in mechanical 
engineering. Later he entered the University of 
Virginia, in the law department, taking the LL.B. 
degree from that institution. After a short time 
spent in legal practice in Virginia he was recalled 
to Orange on account of his father's health, return- 
ing here and taking charge of the Hart interests in 
1908. He began growing rice on a large scale, and 
was also head of the Orange County Irrigation 
Company for around eight years, furnishing water 
to the rice farmers until 1913, when he quit rice 
farming, and converted the large rice farm he owned 
into a ranch, which he still operates. In 1913 he 
also entered the auto supply business in which he 
now engages. 

Mr. Hart was married at Orange the nineteenth 
of July, 1915, to Miss Eula Orthmeyer, a native of 
New Orleans, and the daughter of H. J. Orthmeyer, 
a prominent funeral director of Orange, where he 
has resided for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Hart 
reside on Green Avenue, and have one child, John 
T. Hart, named for his grandfather. Mr. Hart 
belongs to the Rotary Club, the Elks Club, and is 
an Odd Fellow. He is active in all civic work, 
and one of the best known and liked citizens of 
Orange. 



1033 



MEN OF TEXAS 




career 



B. DOTY. Ambition and determination, 
coupled with strict attention to business, 
and devotion to duty are the characteristics 
which have marked the successful business 
of P. B. Doty, president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Beaumont, Texas, whose connection 
with the banking business dates back to 1896 when 
he began as a messenger boy of the First National 
Bank of Burlingame, Kansas. He came to Beau- 
mont in 1902, at the beginning of the oil boom here, 
and his life since that time has been interwoven with 
the history of this city in its growth from a village 
to the busy, thriving city that it is today. While 
Mr. Doty has had much to do in the past history of 
Beaumont, he will continue to be a factor in its fu- 
ture. The First National Bank of Beaumont, of 
which Mr. Doty became president in 1919, was or- 
ganized in 1889 as the First National Bank, and 
is the oldest institution of its kind in this city. Col. 
W. S. Davidson was president from the time of its 
organization up to 1917, and he was followed by 
John C. Ward as president, who was the chief ex- 
ecutive from 1917 to 1919. As an evidence of the 
growth of this bank, the deposits at the beginning 
amounted to $100,000.00 and at the close of busi- 
ness April 6, 1925, the deposits amounted to $6,600,- 
182.84, and is today one of the largest and strong- 
est banks in Texas. The capital stock of the First 
National Bank of Beaumont is $400,000.00 and sur- 
plus and undivided profits amount to over $400,000. 
This institution is authorized by the Federal Re- 
serve Board, Washington, D. C, to act as trustee 
under wills, mortgages, agreements and reorgani- 
zations, and in other fiduciary capacities. In addi- 
tion to his interest in the First National Bank, Mr. 
Doty is identified with many of the city's financial 
and business concerns, a large number of which he 
helped to organize. He is president of the Wall 
Street Property Company, which has vast holdings 
in city real estate, and is vice president of the Jef- 
ferson Securities Company. He is also treasurer 
and director of the Beaumont Hotel Operating Com- 
pany. Mr. Doty for several years has been pres- 
ident of the Beaumont Y. M. C. A. and takes a keen 
interest in the workings of this organization. Dur- 
ing the World War, he was a member of the execu- 
tive committee and chairman of the Three Minute 
Men. He was active in all the Liberty Loan com- 
mittees, and in Red Cross and Salvation Army work, 
and it is known that no man in Jefferson County 
worked harder for his country during the period 
of the World War, and in getting the country back 
to normalcy following it than did P. B. Doty. His 
entire business life has been devoted to the bank- 
ing business in its various branches, and after serv- 
ing two years, at the same time attending school, 
at Burlingame, Kansas, in 1898 he went with the 
Colorado Springs Exchange National Bank. The 
change took place through the fact that the pres- 
ident of the first bank in which he had been em- 
ployed went with the Colorado Springs institution 
and Mr. Doty went with him. He remained with this 
bank until 1902 and during this period he had been 
promoted from stenographer to paying teller. In 
1902, he came to this city and for about seven months 
was associated with the Gulf National Bank, after 
its organization, beginning as collection clerk, and 
filled every office in the bank in succession up to 
president, to which office he was promoted in 1913. 



When Colonel Davidson retired from the banking 
business in 1919, the Gulf National Bank and the 
First National Bank consolidated, and there was 
a condition extraordinary in banking annals and 
history here in that for about six months prior to 
this consolidation, and for about six months follow- 
ing, there was not a government official here to 
examine these banks. 

Mr. Doty was born at Burlingame, Kansas, on 
April 9th, 1877. His father, G. W. Doty (deceased 
since 1915), was a native of New York state and 
a pioneer of Kansas, where he practiced law all 
his life and was one of the most prominent law- 
yers of his time. He took an active interest in 
politics and served for several terms in the Kan- 
sas Legislature, and also served with distinction 
as probate and civil judge. He was a veteran of 
the Civil War, and served throughout the conflict. 
His mother was Miss Ella Beverly, a native of Mich- 
igan, where she was a member of a prominent fam- 
ily. She came to Kansas at an early age, and her 
father built and lived for many years in a log house 
in Kansas, which he built in the pioneer days of 
that state, and lived to be one hundred and five 
years old. His education was obtained in the pub- 
lic and high schools of Burlingame, Kansas. 

Mr. Doty was married at Colorado Springs on 
July 20th, 1900, to Miss Charlotte Griffith, a native 
of Topeka, Kansas, and a daughter of William H. 
Griffith, a well known contractor of Topeka. Mr. 
Doty is a member of the A. F. and A. M. in the 
Scottish Rite bodies and is a K. C. C. H. of this lodge 
and is active in putting on the 28th degree. He is 
assistant Rabban of El Mina Shrine of Galveston, 
is the imperial representative of the Shrine and 
is president of the Texas Shrine Council and is also 
a Knight Templar, and is prominent in the Masonic 
Circles throughout the country. Mr. Doty is past 
director of the Beaumont Chamber of Commerce, 
and is a member of the Beaumont Club, the Rotary 
Club, of which he is past president, the Beaumont 
Rotary Club, of which he is past president also, 
and is a past director of the Neches Club. He is 
actively identified with all the civic organizations of 
Beaumont, and is an ardent worker for the advance- 
ment of his city, and gives liberally of his time 
and means to further any project having as its ob- 
ject the improvement of Beaumont. His watchword 
is "The future of Beaumont never looked brighter 
than this very day." Mr. Doty has a personality 
that is strong and benevolent, exerting for more 
than two decades an influence for good throughout 
a wide range of the city's activities. He is a leader 
in the profession of banking and a steadfast ex- 
ponent of its highest standards. 

ILLIAM CARROLL KEITH, identified with 
the lumber industry at Beaumont since his 
entrance into the business world, has been 
instrumental in building up one of the lar- 
gest lumber enterprises in this district, and has 
also taken an interest in public affairs. Mr. Keith 
is president and manager of the Keith Lumber Com- 
pany, a business established at Beaumont in 1901 
by Mr. Keith's father, John Frank Keith, who was 
president of the corporation until his death in 1921, 
when his son, W. C. Keith, the subject of this sketch, 
succeeded him. At the time of its organization, the 
business was primarily for the manufacture of lum- 
ber and the business was one of the leading lumber 




1034 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



manufacturing enterprises of this section. But with 
passing years the policy was more and mere toward 
converting the business to a wholesale organiza- 
tion and divert it from the manufacturing busi- 
ness. This change has now been effected and the 
entire business handled by the Keith Lumber Com- 
pany is of a wholesale nature, in car load lots only. 
The trade territory is extensive, extending through- 
out the United States, and in addition including a 
large export business to Mexico and Porto Rico and 
other countries. The Keith Lumber Company han- 
dles yellow pine, hardwoods of all kinds, railroad 
timbers, and also does a big business in oil derrick 
patterns. The company owns in fee forty thousand 
acres of timber lands. The officers are William Car- 
roll Keith, president and manager; B. R. Norvell 
vice president, and T. H. Hunter, Jr., secretary,' 
treasurer and sales manager. A branch office is 
located in Fort Worth. Mr. Keith is also presi- 
dent of the Keith Land and Investment Company, 
holders of city industrial property and farm lands' 
and is a director of the American National Bank. 
Mr. Keith was born at Beaumont, the twenty- 
eighth of May, 1886, the son of John Frank Keith, 
who was born in 1857 and in the lumber business 
at Beaumont throughout his business career, organ- 
izing the Keith Lumber Company, of which he was 
president at the time of his death, in 1921, and Alice 
Carroll Keith, daughter of Frank Carroll, who be- 
fore his death was president of the Beaumont Lum- 
ber Company. Mr. Keith spent his boyhood in Beau- 
mont, attending the public schools, and after his 
graduation from high school went to a preparatory 
school at Asheville, North Carolina, and later to 
Eastman Business School, at Poughkeepsie, New 
York, where he graduated in 1907. He returned to 
Beaumont, going with the Keith Lumber Company 
and at his own request beginning at the bottom of 
the business. He gave close attention to the details 
01 the lumber business, and had soon mastered its 
intricacies. The years that followed he worked in 
the various departments and in every capacity in 
the lumber camps and saw mills, acquiring at first 
hand the details of their operation, and on up to 
the general offices. At the time of his father's 
death he became president and general manager, a 
position which he is well equipped to hold, and 
wherein he demonstrates executive ability and a 
thorough understanding of every detail of the oper- 
ation of this great industry. At the beginning of 
the United States participation in the World War, 
Mr. Keith enlisted in the services of his country in 
April, 1917, and spent three months at the Officers 
iraming Camp at Leon Springs. He was commis- 
sioned first lieutenant, and sent to Camp Travis, 
with the 343rd Machine Gun Batallion, 90th Division 
and was instructor there for over a year, being dis- 
charged in August, 1918. 

TVT- Mr ' T , : ? eith Was married at Beaumont, in 1907, to 
Miss Blanche Doucette, daughter of A. L. Doucette 
one of the finest timber estimators in South Texas' 
and who worked for all the major companies and 
was considered an authority, and Louise Harding 
Doucette. Mr. and Mrs. Keith have one child, Wil- 
liam Carroll Keith, Jr., born the seventh of Novem- 
ber, 1909, and now at preparatory school, prepar- 
ing for Princeton University. Mr. and Mrs. Keith 
live at 41 Seventh Street, and are popular members 
oi their representative social set. Mr. Keith is a 



member of the Beaumont Country Club, the Beau- 
mont Club, the Neches Club, the Port Arthur Tar- 
pon Club, and fraternally is an Elk and a Mason, 
York and Scottish Rites, and a member of El Mina 
Temple Shrine at Galveston. 

EDWARD H. GREEN, JR., of Beaumont, Tex- 
as, has spent his entire life in the various 




branches of the lumber industry in Louisi- 
ana and Texas. He has handled and worked 
in every department of the saw mill business and has 
made a close study of the selling and manufacturing 
end of this industry. As secretary-treasurer and 
manager of the Miller-Vidor Lumber Company of 
this city, he has been a factor in building up and 
making a success of this company. The Miller-Vidor 
Lumber Company mill was established here in 1905, 
but prior to 1910 was known as the Beaumont Saw 
Mill Company. This lumber company, located at 
the end of Madison Avenue, sells both wholesale 
and retail, and makes and mills all kinds of rough 
and dressed yellow pine lumber. The plant at Beau- 
mont, which is located on the ship channel, covers an 
area of twenty-five acres, and has a daily capacity 
of sixty thousand feet of lumber. The company owns 
thirty-eight thousand acres of timber land of pine 
and hardwood. About two hundred and ten men are 
employed by this lumber company, in the woods 
and at the mill. Mr. Green came to this city in 
1905 and in addition to his interests with the Miller- 
Vidor Lumber Company, he is a part owner and 
manager of the Green, Moore and Company at 
Starks, Louisiana, which owns a large saw mill and 
thousands of acres of contract timber, and between 
thirty-five and forty thousand acres of standing hard- 
wood and pine. The mill at Starks has a capacity 
of thirty thousand feet of lumber daily and employs 
about one hundred and ten men. This is a highly 
successful lumber concern. Mr. Green started his 
career in the lumber business at the saw mills of 
Lake Charles, Louisiana and remained there for a 
period of sixteen years, before coming to this city. 
The other officers of the Miller-Vidor Lumber Com- 
pany of Beaumont are K. Moore and B. D. Moore 
of Galveston, president and vice president. 

Mr. Green was born at Hopkinsville, Kentucky on 
February 22nd, 1874. His father, E. H. Green came 
to Texas in the late sixties, and for many years was 
engaged in mercantile and lumber business. He 
died at the age of seventy-nine. His mother, Sarah 
E. Green resides in Lake Charles. His early educa- 
tion was obtained in the schools of Louisiana, after 
which he attended Southwestern University at 
Georgetown, Texas, during 1889 and 1890. 

Mr. Green was married at Lake Charles, Louisi- 
ana, in 1903, to Miss Elizabeth E. Green, a daugh- 
ter of M. Green, deceased, well known in Burlington, 
Iowa, having been in the train service of C. B. & Q. 
Ry. Co. for forty years. They have three children, 
Kathryn, Edward H. Green, 3rd., and John M. Mr. 
and Mrs. Green resides at 485 Frederick Street. Mr. 
Green is a member of the Beaumont Country Club, 
and is a director of the Beaumont Club. He is also 
a member of the Rotary Club and of the Hoo Hoo 
Club of which he is a life member of No. 9393. Mr. 
Green has always been active in the business, so- 
cial and general community life of Beaumont, and 
gives liberally of his time and means to all pro- 
jects tending to the welfare and advancement of 
this city. 



1037 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ILLIAM M. CARROLL, the record of whose 
life forms an essential part of the history 
of Beaumont and Jefferson County, has 
throughout a busy career been prominently 
identified with commercial and industrial enterprises 
of wide scope and important bearing on community 
prosperity, and has taken an active part in the devel- 
opment of the resources of this section of the state. 
Mr. Carroll is that sturdy type of citizen, qualified 
by nature to take a position of leadership and as- 
sume responsibilities, who gives his best to his home 
community, and without whom progress would be 
impossible. Although Beaumont has claimed him 
as a citizen, his influence has been felt through- 
out Southeast Texas, and he has taken a vital and 
important part in the agricultural, industrial and 
commercial development of this section. Allied with 
large rice, irrigation and milling interests, his influ- 
ence in this line has resulted in increased produc- 
tion, and in the placing of this crop among the im- 
portant coastal agricultural products. One of the 
largest owners and breeders of thoroughbred Big 
Bone Brahma cattle, his part in the development 
of this breed would be hard to estimate. He is pres- 
ident and general manager of the Neches Canal 
Company, president and general manager of the 
Atlantic Rice Mills Company, receiver for the San 
Jacinto Rice Company, a director of the American 
National Bank of Beaumont, and is interested finan- 
cially in other enterprises in this section. While Mr. 
Carroll is a rice grower, his chief interest in the 
rice industry is furnishing water to the growers of 
this grain. The Neches Canal Company, one of 
the largest irrigation companies in this section, can 
supply water to from thirty-five to forty thousand 
acres of land. Mr. Carroll is the only exclusive 
breeder of Brahma cattle in Texas, and for more 
than a decade has given this breed his exclusive 
attention. He owns three of the finest Brahma 
bulls in the country, and nine cows and several calves 
of pure bred stock. His entire herd includes around 
seven hundred head, and is one of the most impor- 
tant Brahma herds in this section. 

William M. Carroll was born in Louisiana, the 
third of July, 1867. His father, the late Frank L. 
Carroll, was one of the pioneer lumber men in the 
southeast part of Texas, and was one of the most 
prominent men and business leaders in this section. 
At the time of his death, in 1906, he was president 
of the Nona Mills Company, and owned many im- 
portant interests in this section. His mother, prior 
to her marriage, was Miss Sarah Long. Mr. Carroll 
attended the public schools of Beaumont as a boy, 
and was at Baylor University, at Waco, from 1882, 
until 1885. He then went in the lumber business 
with his father, and was in various branches of the 
manufacturing lumber business until 1901, when he 
sold his lumber interests to the Kirby Lumber Com- 
pany. From that time until 1903 he engaged in the 
oil business in a small way, and in 1903 turned his 
attention to rice farming, beginning in a big way, 
and constantly expanding and developing his in- 
terests until he is one of the leading rice irrigators 
in the state. From time to time, Mr. Carroll has 
added other interests to the list of enterprises in 
which he is interested, and is one of the most ac- 
tive business men in this part of the state. 

Mr. Carroll was married at Waco, to Miss Vannie 
Carter, who is his second wife. He and Mrs. Car- 




roll have one of the fine homes of Beaumont, at 
2120 Calder Avenue, and are prominent and pop- 
ular socially. Mr. Carroll has one daughter, Mrs. 
Clytie Allen, by his first marriage. He is a mem- 
ber of the Beaumont Country Club, the Beaumont 
Club, and fraternally is an Elk and a Woodman of 
the World. He has contributed generously to every 
movement for the advancement of Beaumont, taking 
an active part in all development work for more 
than a quarter of a century. He has also been ac- 
tive in public life serving as county commissioner 
from 1914 until 1916, and as county judge from 1916 
until 1920. Whether as public official, private citi- 
zen or business leader, Mr. Carroll has given his 
best to his community, and is one of the most high- 
ly esteemed and honored builders of Beaumont. 

W. PIPKIN, for more than a half a century 
has been a dominating figure in the history 
of Beaumont, and during these years there 
„_-__. have been few enterprises of importance 
to the prosperity of the community in which he has 
not been interested, and few civic movements which 
he has not actively supported. Although he has 
for the past decade practically retired from the 
active management of his many interests, he_ is 
frequently consulted when matters of unusual im- 
portance arise, and he still retains the keen interest 
in commercial and civic activities that has signifi- 
cantly marked his career. Among the enterprises 
in which he is still interested are the Paraffine 
Oil Company, of which he is vice president, and the 
American National Bank, the Neches Canal Com- 
pany, and the Norvell-Wilder Hardware Company, 
in all of which he is director. He also holds stock 
in a number of other concerns, and owns much 
valuable city and country property. 

Mr. Pipkin was born in Orange County, the twen- 
ty-fourth of August, 1858, the son of John F. Pip- 
kin, pioneer lumberman and saw mill operator of 
Beaumont, and county judge here for a decade, and 
Amelia Rabb Pipkin. He attended the public 
schools near his home for a time, and as a boy 
went to work in the shingle mills, later going with 
the Long and Company Shingle Mills, after which 
he went in the lumber mills in Montgomery County. 
This was followed by two years on a farm, and two 
years teaching school, after which he went with 
the Nona Mills Company, remaining with that con- 
cern six years. He then spent three years with 
the Beaumont Lumber Company. From 1893 until 
1906 he was tax assessor at Beaumont, and during 
that time bought up cattle and lands in this section. 
Mr. Pipkin is interested and owns some cattle and 
pasture land, and was one of the biggest cattlemen 
in this part of the country. In 1903 he, with others, 
went into the oil business and he was president 
and general manager of the Paraffine Oil Company 
from 1904 until 1912. This was one of the very 
successful oil companies established during the days 
of the first oil boom in the coastal region, and 
brought in the first well at Batson. The company 
has been active in the coastal fields since its organ- 
ization, engaging in production, and has been a 
factor in the development of this section. Mr. Pip- 
kin has retired from active business, and for the 
past decade or more has spent his time in looking 
after his many interests in and around Beaumont. 

Mr. Pipkin was married at Beaumont, to Miss 
Mary P. Barrow. Mr. Pipkin has two children — 



1038 




7f >7Z 




aJiAfr^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Jean and John F. The family reside at 476 Fred- 
ericks Street, and attend the Methodist Church. 
Mr. Pipkin is a member of the Beaumont Country 
Club. It would be hard to estimate the part he 
has taken in the development of Beaumont, since 
the days when he first began his business career 
here, so many and varied have been his activities, 
yet it is doubtful if there are many citizens of this 
community who have done more for the development 
and upbuilding of Beaumont than has he. He has 
been active in every public spirited movement, and 
has contributed freely to every civic cause and wel- 
fare drive of the past half a century, and the record 
of his life is a bright page in the history of his 
city. 

ALTER L. PONDROM, whose name for 
around a quarter of a century has been 
of significance in banking circles at Beau- 
mont, is a conservative banker, whose sound 
experience and banking policy has played a large 
part in shaping financial affairs in this city. Mr. 
Pondrom is active vice president of the City Na- 
tional Bank, of Beaumont, a financial institution 
that is the result of the re-organization of the Guar- 
anty Bank and Trust Company, of Beaumont, which 
was effected in May, 1922, at which time the name 
was changed to the City National Bank, and the 
bank nationalized and new officers elected. The 
City National Bank occupies its own banking home, 
a fine building in the center of the business district, 
and well appointed throughout. It is capitalized at 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, with de- 
posits of more than two and three quarter million 
dollars, and since the reorganization has met with 
rapid growth, and has the confidence of the com- 
munity. The officers are I. J. Bordages, president; 
W. L. Pondrom, active vice president; J. T. Shelby, 
vice president, and G. H. Petkovsek, cashier. 

Walter L. Pondrom was born at Florissant, Mis- 
souri, the fourth of September, 1877, the son of 
Dr. John B. Pondrom, a surgeon of Jefferson City, 
Missouri, and Mary E. Pondrom. Mr. Pondrom 
received his education in the public schools of St. 
Louis, graduating from the high school there, and 
spent some time in the grocery business after leav- 
ing school. In 1893 he came to Texas, going to 
Dallas, where he was with the American National 
Bank until 1895. Later from 1895 to 1897 he was 
with his brother, John B. Pondrom, handling the 
finances and books of his cotton business. He came 
to Beaumont in 1900, with the Beaumont National 
Bank, as bookkeeper, leaving there in 1902 to go 
with the First National Bank. With this excep- 
tion he was with the First National Bank until 
April, 1922, when he resigned to accept his present 
position with the City National Bank. At the time 
of his resignation he was vice president of the First 
National Bank. Mr. Pondrom is a veteran of the 
Spanish-American War, serving during that conflict 
with the infantry, Fourth Missouri Volunteers, on 
occupation duty in Cuba, and being discharged 
in 1898. 

Mr. Pondrom was married at Beaumont, 1912, 
to Miss Christine Poole, daughter of Judge William 
J. Poole, a well known judiciary and attorney from 
Hempstead, and Mrs. Josephine Poole. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pondrom live at 895 North Street, and have 
four children— Elizabeth, W. L. Junior, Ruth, and 




Sybil. Mr. Pondrom is a member of the Beaumont 
Club, and the Beaumont Country Club, and fra- 
ternally is a B. P. O. E. While Mr. Pondrom de- 
votes most of his time to his business, and to the 
direction of the affairs of the financial institution 
with which he is connected, he takes a deep interest 
in civic welfare, and is vitally interested in com- 
munity progress. 

ILLIAM F. KEITH, who for many years has 
been one of the leading druggists of Beau- 
mont, has been held in high esteem for his 
work in this connection, and for his inter- 
est in the civic and business life of the city. Mr. 
Keith is the owner of the Keith Drug Company, one 
of the finest drug stores in the city, located at the 
corner of Liberty and Pearl Streets. Mr. Keith es- 
tablished this business in 1907, the present store 
being the outgrowth of the old Dunlap Drug Com- 
pany, which Mr. Keith bought out and re-organized 
in that year. The business has since been developed 
along progressive lines, and the new building occu- 
pied by the store in 1922, is one of the finest drug 
store buildings in the city. In equipping the build- 
ing, Mr. Keith gave careful attention to every de- 
tail, the tile floor, marble fountain and fine fixtures 
combining to make an interior of the most attractive" 
kind. The store arrangement is exceptionally good, 
and while a small store in dimension, has been 
planned so that every foot of space is utilized to 
advantage, and is complete in every detail. Mr. 
Keith has been accorded a substantial patronage by 
a better class of people, and is doing a flourishing 
business. He has a force of ten employees, includ- 
ing one of the best prescription men in the city. 
Mr. Keith was born at Houston, the sixteenth of 
April, 1875. His father, John Wilbur Keith, pioneer 
lumberman of South Texas, and one of the most 
prominent lumbermen in the state, has been asso- 
ciated with the development of this resource for 
many decades, and is in business with Messrs. 
Fletcher, Long and Carroll, all leaders in the lum- 
ber business in this section. His mother was before 
her marriage Miss Hasseltine V. Long. Mr. Keith 
was educated in the public schools of Beaumont and 
New Orleans, and after leaving school spent a num- 
ber of years in the lumber business, later going into 
the mercantile business, and still later, in 1907, in 
the drug business. Mr. Keith has also been inter- 
ested in rice culture, and from 1910 until 1920 oper- 
ated one of the large rice farms in this section, 
and has also been a factor in the cattle business and 
particularly interested in the development of the 
Brahman strain. 

Mr. Keith was married at Beaumont, in 1899, to 
Miss Seawillow Caswell, daughter of C. C. Caswell, 
a prominent lumberman of Beaumont. Mr. and Mrs. 
Keith have a fine home at 2008 McFaddin Avenue, 
and have two children, Marjorie, a graduate of Na- 
tional Park Seminary, and Caswell, of the Univer- 
sity of Texas. Mr. Keith belongs to the Rotary 
Club, the Neches Club, the Beaumont Club, and the 
Beaumont Country Club. Fraternally he is a Ma- 
son, York and Scottish Rites, and a member of El 
Mina Temple Shrine. He has been on the school 
board for around a decade, and is active in every 
form of civic endeavor, and as one of the veteran 
drug men of the city has taken part in the advance- 
ment of this business. 



1041 



MEN OF TEXAS 




F. YOUNT has for a quarter of a century 
been closely identified with the history of 
Beaumont and oil production in the Gulf 
Coast district, and is held in high esteem by 
the citizens of this progressive city for the part he 
has taken in the development of the resources of 
this section. Mr. Yount is president and general 
manager of the Yount-Lee Oil Company, one of the 
major companies operating in the coastal fields, and 
which he organized and has since directed. This 
company is active in drilling in the Gulf Coast fields, 
with a recent tendency to move rigs into the proven 
pools of Louisiana, and has settled production run- 
ning around two thousand barrels daily, with fifteen 
producing wells at Sour Lake and also production at 
Hull and other scattered points. Mr. Yount has 
been for many years a close student of conditions 
prevailing in the petroleum fields of the coastal ter- 
ritory, and is familiar with formations here and an 
authority on oil and drilling in the various pools. 
He has his office in the San Jacinto Building, direct- 
ing all activities from his headquarters here. The 
Yount-Lee Oil Company, of which he is the largest 
stockholder, and president and manager, has for 
its other officers T. F. Rothwell, vice president, and 
J. H. Phelan, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Yount was born at Monticello, Arkansas, the 
thirty-first day of January, 1880, the son of J. N. 
Yount, who came to that state from his native state 
of North Carolina, and was a farmer and land own- 
er there, and Mrs. Hattie Yount. Mr. Yount was 
educated in the schools of his native state as a boy 
developing a marked aptitude for machinery, study- 
ing and learning mechanical engineering through 
reading and actual experience. He came to Texas 
in 1898 and began drilling water wells, and after 
several years thus engaged turned his attention to 
drilling for oil. He began in the oil business in 1904, 
and since that time has held every position in the 
oil fields, from the bottom up, and knows the oil 
business from every angle. During the first years 
of his interest in this industry, he engaged in drill- 
ing for himself, as his capital permitted, and mak- 
ing allowance for the usual drilling hazards, has 
been very successful. He is one of those men who 
forming judgment of a field, through careful study 
and examination into reports and other available 
data, retain faith in that judgment and experi- 
ment with the oil possibilities and work actively for 
its development. His drilling operations have always 
been watched with interest, for when he begins a 
well there is every indication that it will prove up, 
and he has to his credit an unusual number of defin- 
ite successes as an operator and producer. In ad- 
dition to his interests in the petroleum industry, Mr, 
Yount has also taken an active part in general 
business affairs, and is vice president of the Phelan- 
Joseph Grocery Company and a director of the First 
National Bank. 

Mr. Yount was married at Beaumont, in 1915, to 
Miss Pansy Merritt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hose 
Merritt, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Yount have one child, Mildred, born in 1920. Their 
home, at 1376 Calder Street, is one of the finest in 
Beaumont. The interior woodwork, of carefully 
selected oak and walnut, hand carved and finished 
to bring out the natural beauty of the wood, and 
the hand decorated walls form a background for the 
beautiful furnishings that is delightful. Mr. Yount 




is a member of the Elks, Beaumont Country and 
Beaumont Clubs, the American Petroleum Institute 
and the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association. 
Mr. Yount has many friends in the oil industry, 
operators in the coastal fields who know and value 
him as one of the most experienced men in the in- 
dustry. His part in the development of the coastal 
fields has been no small one, and to him is accorded 
much credit for his many activities incident to the 
opening up of new fields throughout the coastal dis- 
trict. He has the true spirit of the pioneer, the cour- 
age to go in as a part of the vanguard, that has 
resulted in untold wealth in this section, and has 
made it one of the most important petroleum centers 
of the state. 

HOMER CHAMBERS, veteran oil operator, 
and for the past three decades one of the 
progressive citizens of Beaumont, has for 
some twenty years devoted his entire time 
to drilling and production activities, and is well 
known to the oil fraternity of the Lone Star State 
for the part he has taken in the development of the 
petroleum industry in the Gulf Coast district. Mr. 
Chambers is president of the Minor Oil Company, 
secretary and treasurer of the Gilbert Company, and 
is also a director in the First National Bank of 
Beaumont. These enterprises, in which he is finan- 
cially interested, are all closed corporations, owned 
by a few men, and have been real money makers, 
paying many times the capital stock in dividends, 
and own valuable production in the coastal fields. 
Mr. Chambers has his offices in the Gilbert Build- 
ing, at Beaumont, directing from this point his oper- 
ations in the various fields in which he is inter- 
ested, and in addition to the properties in which 
he is interested through companies in which he holds 
stock, has individual holdings in the fields of the 
coastal region. 

Mr. Chambers was born at Luling, Texas, the thir- 
tieth of July, 1878, the son of C. R. Chambers, of 
Beaumont, and in the retail department of the E. L. 
Wilson Hardware Company, and Florence (Huff) 
Chambers. Mr. Chambers spent his boyhood at Lul- 
ing, attending the public schools there, and later 
taking a commercial course in preparation for his 
business career. He went on the road for the E. L. 
Wilson Hardware Company, representing that well 
known firm to the trade for around four years. In 
1901 he went to Spindle Top, when that field first 
came in, and started in the manufacture and build- 
ing of oil tanks, continuing in that line for two years. 
He then went to Sour Lake, where he drilled for the 
Gilbert Company, the well, their first in that field, 
proving a gusher, and one of the largest evei 
brought in in the Sour Lake field. Mr. Chambers' 
activities in the coastal field represent the pioneer- 
ing of a man who had the nerve and vision to back 
his judgment, and he has been largely instrumental 
in developing the rich oil fields in the coastal dis- 
trict. Since entering the industry, he has done every- 
thing to be done in the oil fields, from the bottom 
up, and is familiar with every phase of oil field 
work. In the many years of his actual operations, 
he has met with the usual reverses that go hand in 
hand with the oil business, but on the whole his 
successes have more than balanced these, and his 
operations are watched with interest by the fra- 
ternity. 

Mr. Chambers was married in Beaumont, in 1900, 



1042 




Ing.by E C.U/dhams <£ Brc NY 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



to Miss Edith Fuller, the daughter of Dr. C. T. 
Fuller, whose death occurred in Beaumont around 
three decades ago, and Mrs. Mary L. Fuller. Dr. 
Fuller was one of the well known physicians of his 
day, and prominent in all civic activities. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chambers have an attractive home at 2240 
Calder Avenue, and take an active part in the so- 
cial life of the city. They are the parents of two 
children, Ruth, a graduate of Randolph Macon Col- 
lege, and who did post graduate work at the Univer- 
sity of Texas, and Florence, attending the Beaumont 
High School. The family attend the First Methodist 
Church, which they liberally support. Mr. Chambers 
is a member of the Beaumont Country Club, the 
Beaumont Club, the Neches Club, and fraternally is 
an Elk. He is a veteran of the Spanish American 
War, serving in that conflict with the Third Texas 
Infantry, as non-commissioned officer. Mr. Cham- 
bers has many friends among the oil men operating 
in the South Texas fields, and is regarded by them 
as one of the most expert operators in this district. 
He has kept in close touch with developments in 
various parts of the state, and few men are better 
informed as to development work and the outlook 
generally, than he. Identified with an industry that 
is second to but one industry, cotton, in the Lone 
Star State, he is one of the prominent men in that 
industry, and has done much for the material ad- 
vancement and general prosperity of his com- 
munity. 

H. REESE has for the past decade been 
prominently identified with the lumber bus- 
iness at Beaumont, and is firmly established 
as a business man who makes his influence 
felt in every walk of life. Mr. Reese is president 
of the Home Lumber Company, one of the leading 
lumber companies of Beaumont, established in 1917, 
and incorporated for one hundred thousand dollars. 
The Home Lumber Company handles a wholesale 
and retail lumber business, carrying a complete 
line of building materials. They also build and 
finance the building of homes and residences, and 
have handled much construction of this class in 
Beaumont. The yard is located at the corner of 
Bowie and Holmes Streets, with J. H. Reese as 
president, Jake Westbrook, vice president; M. R. 
Reese, vice president; W. O. McKinnon, secretary, 
and John Reese, treasurer. Mr. J. H. Reese is 
also president of the Nederland Lumber Company, 
which he established in 1923, with a new plant, and 
a completely stocked yard, dealing in building ma- 
terial of all kinds, and is vice president of the Beau- 
mont Sash and Door Company. 

Mr. Reese was born at Belton, Texas, the second 
of March, 1878. His father, J. H. Reese, an old 
settler, and for many years a merchant of Belton, 
died in 1917, and his mother, Mrs. Bettie Reese, in 
1920. Mr. Reese was educated in the public schools 
of Belton, and after finishing school engaged in the 
mercantile business for two years, and in the bank- 
ing business for three years prior to going in the 
lumber business. He came to Beaumont in 1914, 
and has been active in the lumber business since 
that time. Mr. Reese has had much experience 
in the timber business in various parts of the pine 
belt country, and knows the lumber business from 
every angle, from the timber to the finished 
product. 

Mr. Reese was married at Fort Worth, the twenty- 





ninth of December, 1903, to Miss Elma Connell, 
daughter of G. H. Connell, well known banker of 
that city. They have five children — Connell, Eliz- 
abeth, Jep, Marion and Lena-Ruth Reese, and live 
at 1810 Calder Avenue. The family attend the 
Baptist Church. Mr. Reese is a member of the 
Beaumont Country Club, the Beaumont Club, the 
Kiwanis Club, and is a Hoo-Hoo, a fraternal organ- 
ization to which only lumbermen are eligible. He 
is also a director of the City National Bank. Mr. 
Reese owns much city property at Beaumont, and 
takes an active interest in the development of this 
city, being in every way a sterling resident. 

OHN C. WARD, JR., president and general 
manager of the Texas Ice Company, with 
general offices at Franklin and Neches 
Streets, is a successful Beaumont business 
man who has grown up in the city and with the ex- 
ception of the years spent at college has lived here 
his entire life. Under his direction, the business of 
the Texas Ice Company has grown and prospered and 
in both wholesale and retail divisions it is one of the 
largest ice distributors in this section of the state. 

The Texas Ice Company was organized some years 
ago and in 1919 was incorporated with a capitaliza- 
tion of sixty thousand dollars. The capital stock 
has been increased to $165,000.00 It owns and oper- 
ates two large plants for the manufacture of ice, the 
first located at Franklin and Neches Street, where 
the general offices of the company are maintained, 
and the smaller plant at Magnolia Avenue and Har- 
rison Street. The plant at Franklin and Neches 
Streets has a daily capacity of seventy tons of ice. 
The other plant is equipped to produce forty tons 
daily. A large fleet of delivery wagons and trucks 
supplies ice to every portion of the business and 
residence district, including outlying additions. 
Every phase of the company's dealings with the pub- 
lic is characterized by courtesy and fair dealing. 

Mr. Ward is a native of Beaumont and was born 
on January 27th, 1882. He is a son of John C. and 
Pickie (Kyle) Ward and received his education 
in the public and high schools of Beaumont and at 
Georgetown University, where he completed a four 
year course. He also attended a business college at 
Waco. 

After leaving school he returned to Beaumont and 
was connected with the Beaumont Ice, Light and 
Refrigerating Company for three years. After that 
he was with the J. S. and W. M. Rice Lumber Com- 
pany for four years. He was then made secretary 
of the Beaumont Ice Company and continued in this 
capacity for five years. The company disposed of 
its business in 1917 to the Crystal Ice Company and 
shortly after that Mr. Ward organized the Texas 
Ice Company. From a small beginning, he has de- 
veloped the business until his company has come to 
be recognized as one of the leading manufacturing 
concerns in Southeast Texas. 

In 1914 Mr. Ward was married in Beaumont to 
Miss Margaret Doucette, daughter of P. A. and Eliza 
(Jordan) Doucette. They reside at 693 Irma Ave- 
nue. Mrs. Ward's father was engaged in the re- 
tail lumber business. 

Mr. Ward is a member of the Beaumont Club, the 
Beaumont Country Club, Neches and Rotary Clubs. 
He is interested and active in the development of 
Beaumont and is one of the city's most consistent 
boosters. 



1045 



MEN OF TEXAS 




COOKE WILSON, veteran oil man of Beau- 
mont, and a business man of many and 
varied interests, has for upwards of two 
decades made this city his headquarters, 
taking a constructive interest in commercial devel- 
opment and directing his operations in the coastal 
fields from this point. Mr. Wilson is president of 
the Wilson Broach Company, president of the Tyrrell 
Hardware Company, vice president of the Texas 
division of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Company, 
and president of the Tyrrell- Wilson Investment Com- 
pany. All these organizations are sound and capably 
directed enterprises, and Mr. Wilson takes an active 
part in their management. In addition to the above, 
Mr. Wilson is a director of the Houston branch of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. As a business man 
and executive he is versatile, conservative, and shows 
a discrimination that is the ripened result of his 
years of business experience. His name on the board 
of directors, or as an officer of an organization, is 
sufficient to stamp it as successful and to rank it 
among the sound institutions of the city. Among 
the independent oil operators of this section, Mr. 
Wilson is considered one of the most careful and 
conservative, and he has large oil holdings in the 
fields of the coastal district, as well as in Oklahoma 
and Louisiana. He has done much to develop the 
oil resources near Beaumont, and since coming to 
this city in 1901 has been successful in getting real 
production. The first well he drilled was a gusher, 
and this has been followed by other successes. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Meridian, Mississippi, the 
twenty-third of February, 1879, the son of Hugh 
W. Wilson, a contractor and builder of that city, and 
Joella Shearer Wilson. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Meridian, graduating from the high 
school, after which he began his business career. He 
first entered the banking business at Meridian, and 
was with the Meridian National Bank there for seven 
years, during which time he became familiar with 
the soundest financial principles, and acquired a 
knowledge of business operation that has been a fac- 
tor in his subsequent success. In 1902 Mr. Wilson 
came to Beaumont, and was at that time financially 
interested in the Mississippi-Texas Oil Company, of 
which he was general manager. Shortly after his 
arrival at Beaumont he became interested in devel- 
opment work at Spindle Top. He drilled the twenty- 
seventh well in this field, which proved to be a 
gusher, and since that time he has continued to en- 
gage in actual development work, with success. 
From time to time Mr. Wilson has bought oil hold- 
ings, and property at Beaumont, and is financially 
interested in many important business enterprises 
in this city. During the Spanish-American War he 
was in military service, volunteering, and serving in 
the Infantry as a non-commissioned officer. With 
this exception he has been active in the business 
world since leaving school. 

Mr. Wilson was married in 1908, at Gainesville, 
Texas, to Miss Mary Eandolph, daughter of Thomas 
W. Randolph, whose death occurred in 1886, and who 
prior to that time had been one of the leading mer- 
chants of Sherman, and a landowner of that section. 
Mr. Randolph was one of the early settlers of Texas, 
and one of the prominent men of his day. Mrs. Wil- 
son's mother, prior to her marriage Miss Bettie 
Thompson, died in 1923. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson live 
in Beaumont, at 2295 Calder Avenue, and have four 




children, Waldo, Mary Randolph, Fay Randolph, and 
J. Cooke, Jr. They attend the Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Wilson is a Mason, York Rite, and a member 
of El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. He is also 
an Elk, and a member of the Rotary Club, the Beau- 
mont Club, the Neches Club, and the Beaumont 
Country Club. Despite the exacting demands of his 
many business interests, Mr. Wilson has always 
found time to work for the development and ad- 
vancement of Beaumont, and is one of the most pub- 
lic spirited citizens of this city. His business pros- 
perity has been reflected in the prosperity of Beau- 
mont, and much that has been done in a business 
way has been of material advantage to the city. 

V. SMELKER for more than a quarter of 
a century has been a factor in the commer- 
cial world at Beaumont, and is widely 

,„ , known as an insurance and real estate man 

who, through his progressive activities in this field, 
has contributed to the development of his commun- 
ity. Mr. Smelker is a member of the firm of T. V. 
Smelker and Company, one of the oldest real estate 
and insurance firms in Beaumont. The business was 
established in 1895, Mr. Smelker coming into the 
firm five years later, since which time he has been 
active in the management of the business, building 
up a large clientele. A general insurance business 
is handled, the company representing some of the 
large and well known insurance companies of the 
country, and writing a large volume of insurance of 
all classes, including life, annually. The firm of 
T. V. Smelker and Company also handled some of 
the most important real estate transactions in this 
city, and act as general real estate brokers, selling 
both city and country property. Officers are main- 
tained in the Gilbert Building, and other members 
of the firm are C. M. Smelker and K. C. Withers. 
An efficient corps of salesmen are also with the 
company. 

T. V. Smelker was born at Altoona, Pennsylvania, 
the fourteenth of March, 1872, the son of Charles B. 
and Mrs. Charles B. Smelker. At the age of five 
years he was brought to Texas by his parents and 
spent his youth in this state and in Kansas, attend- 
ing the schools of these states. After leaving school 
he was variously employed for some years, later 
becoming a telegraph operator, and still later going 
in the printing business in North Texas, spending 
five years in that business. He then came to Hous- 
ton, where he was cashier for the Houston Street 
Railway for a time, after which he came to Beau- 
mont, in 1898. He was in a local railroad office 
until 1899, when he became a member of the firm 
of T. V. Smelker and Company, with which he is 
now associated. 

Mr. Smelker was married at Beaumont, in 1903, 
to Miss Grace Young, a native of Pennsylvania, and 
they have since made this city their home. They 
have three children, Charles, Thomas and Herbert. 
Mr. Smelker is a member of the Rotary Club, the 
Neches Club, the Beaumont Club and the Beaumont 
Country Club. He is a Mason, York Rite, and a 
member of El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. He 
has taken a deep interest in civic affairs for many 
years and served as alderman for a period of six 
years, around a decade ago. He has done much 
for the advancement of this city, and has many 
friends here, who hold him in high esteem for his 
business and civic activities. 



1046 








Z^yZ>GA<^e ^i^(J 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




RESTON P. BUTLER for a number of years 
past has been a factor in commercial circles 
at Beaumont, and as one of the leading 
representatives of the import and export 
trade, has done his part toward making this city one 
of the leading inland ports of the country. Mr. Butler 
is secretary and treasurer of the Beaumont Export 
and Import Company, a large exporting and im- 
porting company established in 1919 and the lar- 
gest business of its kind in Texas, and one of the lar- 
gest in the United States. The company exports and 
imports commodities of all kinds, and in addition to 
the office at Beaumont, in the Perlstein Building, 
has offices in Tampico, Mexico, Torreon, Saltillo, 
and Mexico City, Mexico, Monterey, Mexico, and 
Vera Cruz, Mexico. The capital stock of the Beau- 
mont Export and Import Company is three hundred 
thousand dollars, fully paid in, and the officers are 
all men of sound integrity in the business world and 
are William Saenger, president; H. A. Perlstein, 
first vice president; Arthur Dooley, second vice 
president, and Preston P. Butler, the subject of this 
sketch, secretary and treasurer. Since the estab- 
lishment of the company, a large business has been 
built along progressive lines, and the firm acts as 
representative for many of the leading manufac- 
turing companies of the United States, building up 
new markets for their products, particularly in 
Mexico, and also promoting a larger importation 
of Mexican products into this country. Chief among 
the exports are tanks, pipe, oil well supplies, trac- 
tors, trucks, construction supplies and machinery 
of various kinds. Mr. Butler, as an executive, has 
taken an active part in the development of this 
trade, and his progressive business policy is re- 
flected in the happy trade relations he has estab- 
lished with Mexican markets. 

Preston P. Butler was born at Tyler, in Smith 
County, Texas, on the eighteenth of August, 1891. 
His father, William 0. Butler, a very prominent 
man of that section, is a farmer and planter in 
Smith County, and also owns much land in that 
part of the state. His mother's maiden name was 
Miss Mattie Gray. Mr. Butler was educated in the 
Tyler public schools, graduating from the high school 
there, after which he entered upon his business 
career. He spent a decade with the Lutcher and 
Moore Lumber Company at Orange, and while with 
this company, one of the largest lumber corpora- 
tions in the South, made rapid advancement in the 
business world. He began with the company at a 
small salary, in one of the lumber camps, and with 
a view to advancing in this industry, applied him- 
self to learning the rudiments of the lumber busi- 
ness, particularly with reference to logging and 
transportation. During the years that followed, he 
worked in every department, advancing steadily and 
acquiring a very thorough and accurate knowledge 
of the lumber business from a manufacturing stand- 
point. The last four years he was with the Lutcher 
and Moore^ Lumber Company he held the position 
of purchasing agent, a position requiring an exact 
knowledge of the entire field of lumber manufac- 
turing and presenting peculiar problems. When 
he tendered his resignation to come with the Beau- 
mont Export and Import Company as an executive, 
he was made a very flattering offer to become gen- 
eral manager of the logging and transportation de- 
partment, and it was with great reluctance that 




the company accepted his resignation. 

Mr. Butler was married at Orange, in 1913, to Miss 
Nea Portwood, daughter of the late J. N. Portwood, 
formerly a druggist of that city. Mr. and Mrs. But- 
ler reside at 985 Fifth Street in Beaumont, and 
are members of the Methodist Church. Mr. But- 
ler is a member of the Rotary Club, of which he is 
one of the directors; of the Round Table Club, of 
which he is past president, and of the Beaumont 
Country Club, the Beaumont Club, of which he is a 
director, and the Neches Club, of which he is a direc- 
tor. He is also a director of the South Texas State 
Fair. Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow and a Mason, 
York and Scottish Rites. His position in the export- 
ing world, one of special distinction for a man of his 
years, is significant of what the future offers him in 
that field. 

EE J. BLACK, for upwards of three decades 
has been a prime factor in the industrial 
development of Beaumont, and has one of 
the finest and most completely equipped 
foundries in this part of the state. Mr. Black is 
president and manager of the Beaumont Iron Works 
Company, which he organized in 1910. This large 
industrial concern occupies a site covering two city 
blocks, well located in the industrial section, and 
whereon are located six large buildings, of reinforced 
concrete construction, and representing a total of 
three quarters of a million investment. The com- 
pany makes oil well equipment, rotary drilling ma- 
chinery, refinery and pipe line equipment and sup- 
plies, and also handles special jobbing work, carry- 
ing an extra large stock. The foundry makes iron, 
steel and brass, and is the largest in Texas. The 
officers of the Beaumont Iron Works are, Lee J. 
Black, the subject of this sketch, president; J. E. 
Swindler, of Tulsa, Oklahoma, vice president, and 
Charles B. Sheeks, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Black was born at Jefferson, Texas, the 
twenty-fourth of June, 1870, the son of Oliver H. 
Black, a mechanic, and construction engineer, and 
Mary Hunt Black. He was educated at Austin 
College, Sherman, later going to Tennessee School 
of Technology, where he took up special work. He 
then began his business career with the construc- 
tion engineer of the Texas and Pacific Railroad, 
spending several years in the engineering depart- 
ment of that and other railroads. For twelve years 
he was superintendent for H. Hanson, Construction 
Company, railroad, bridge and dock builders. In 
September, 1902, he came to Beaumont, as superin- 
tendent of the Higgins Oil and Fuel Company, 
remaining with that company until the first of Jan^ 
uary, 1911, when he resigned to devote his entire 
time to the iron works which he had organized. 

Mr. Black was married at Beaumont, in January, 
1901, to Miss Maude Bevil, daughter of John R. 
Bevil, lumberman, cattle raiser and land owner, who 
now resides at Kountze, and Martha Hart Bevil. 
Mr. and Mrs. Black live at 2315 Park Avenue. He 
is a member of the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, the Beaumont Club, the Rotary Club, 
and fraternally is a Mason, York and Scottish Rites, 
and a member of El Mina Temple Shrine at Gal- 
veston. Mr. Black, building his business along con- 
structive progressive policies, has been very suc- 
cessful in the industrial world, and is known 
throughout the Lone Star State for his activities 
in this field. 



1049 



MEN OF TEXAS 




B. FLYNN has spent his entire business 
career in the oil business, entering this line 
soon after leaving high school. For more 
than two decades he has been located at 
Beaumont, coming here in 1902, soon after the 
bringing in of the famous discovery well at Spindle- 
top, which was the beginning of the oil industry in 
Texas. 

Mr. Flynn is president and general manager of 
the McNamara Oil Company, that has production in 
Sour Lake and Hull. The McNamara Oil Company 
was organized in 1914, Mr. Flynn having an in- 
terest in the company at that time, but it was not 
until four or five years ago that he took an active 
part in its management. The company has its 
general offices at 1108 San Jacinto Building, Beau- 
mont. J. D. Proctor is secretary and treasurer. 

For many years Mr. Flynn served as vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the Paraffine Oil Com- 
pany. Following its organization this company 
drilled the discovery well at Batson, opening up a 
new and prolific field. It has been engaged in drill- 
ing and producing oil in the coastal fields since its 
organization. The company has always been a closed 
corporation and has never disposed of any of its 
shares of stock to the public. 

In 1907 the interests owning the Paraffine Oil 
Company organized the Reliance Oil Company and 
it has been operated under the same management as 
the Paraffine. The same people owned and operated 
the DeSoto Gasoline Company and the McNamara 
Oil Company. For fifteen years, and until 1924 each 
of these concerns was under the direct management 
of Mr. Flynn, who is one of the best known and 
most widely experienced oil men in the State. In 
1924 he took over the McNamara Oil Company and 
is operating independently in Oklahoma, Louisiana, 
North Texas and Gulf Coast. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Flynn was born in 
Duke Center on March 21, 1881, a son of J. W. 
Flynn, one of the pioneer oil operators of that State, 
who died in 1911. His mother was Miss Ellen (Lol- 
ler) Flynn. His father was actively engaged in 
drilling and producing in Pennsylvania for many 
years. 

After attending the public and high schools at 
Bradford, Mr. Flynn followed in his father's foot- 
steps, and worked in the oil fields of Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia and Indiana before coming to Beau- 
mont in 1902. From his work in the field he ob- 
tained a practical knowledge of the oil business that 
has been invaluable to him. He is one of the few 
men to engage in the oil business in Texas in the 
early days of the industry, who has remained con- 
tinuously until this time. He has been closely asso- 
ciated with some of the biggest men in the oil in- 
dustry in the Southwest and has contributed no 
small part in the development of the vast oil re- 
sources of this State. 

In 1907 Mr. Flynn was married at Beaumont to 
Miss Florence Maher, daughter of J. W. Maher, an 
old time operator from Pennsylvania. They have one 
son, W. B., Jr., and reside at 2108 Harrison Avenue. 

Mr. Flynn takes an active interest in civic and 
social affairs and is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Beaumont Country, 
City and Neches clubs. A man of pleasing person- 
ality and keen business judgment, he is one of the 
most popular oil men of the State as well as one 




of the most widely known. Among his former as- 
sociates were the men who organized and developed 
the Humble Oil and Refining Company, the person- 
nel of this concern in the early days being made up 
largely of men formerly connected with the Paraf- 
fine Oil Company and the Reliance Oil Company 
and properties formerly owned by them forming 
the nucleus of the company which since has become 
one of the largest in the country. 

WALKER SAYLE, one of the three prison 
commissioners in charge of penal institu- 
tions in Texas, has made his headquarters 
at Huntsville since receiving his appoint- 
ment to this office the fifteenth of September, 1921. 
Mr. Sayle, associated with the other two commis- 
sioners, has under their administration and super- 
vision the penitentiary at Huntsville and the various 
farms comprising the prison system of the state, 
and the four thousand prisoners in these various 
institutions. Some four hundred prisoners are kept 
in the penitentiary at Huntsville, the others being 
at the various farms. The Texas prison system 
owns about eighty thousand acres of lands at various 
points in the state, some of the finest crops in 
Texas being raised on these farms, 46,000 acres in 
cultivation. A total of three hundred and fifty 
guards are employed by the system, and these are 
also under the supervision of Mr. Sayle, and the 
two commissioners serving with him. Mr. Sayle 
has been especially interested in improving prison 
conditions, and has done much work in this line. 
The penitentiary at Huntsville is clean, taking care 
of all prisoners in an adequate manner. A chapel 
with a seating capacity of five hundred, and a library 
with some five thousand volumes is at the peni- 
tentiary, and under Mr. Sayle's direction various 
other facilities have been added. 

H. Walker Sayle was born in Yalobusha County, 
Mississippi, the eighteenth of May, 1877, the son 
of G. A. and Kate Walker Sayle, the former of Mis- 
sissippi, the latter of Alabama. The family moved 
to Texas when H. Walker Sayle was a child of one 
year of age, and the father engaged in farming 
and cattle raising in Stephens County until his death. 
Mrs. Sayle is also deceased. H. Walker Sayle 
attended the schools of Stephens County and as a 
young man went to the Panhandle, where he spent 
some three years on the P. B. and W. H. Fugua 
ranch. He then operated the Lee Bivins ranch in 
the Panhandle for three years, after which he re- 
turned to Stephens County. In 1912 he was elected 
sheriff of Stephens County, serving until 1916; 
also dealing in real estate in Breckenridge some two 
years, then as the county became famous as an oil 
field, Mr. Sayle became the first mayor, serving 
in this capacity until he was appointed prison com- 
missioner the fifteenth of September, 1921, removing 
from Breckenridge to Huntsville at that time. 

Mr. Sayle was married in Stephens County, the 
seventh of May, 1895, to Miss Lillian Liles, daughter 
of L. D. Liles, a prominent cattleman of Stephens 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Sayle make their home in 
the state home across from the penitentiary at 
Huntsville, and have one child, Miss Kate Sayle. 
Mr. Sayle's work in behalf of the betterment of 
prison conditions has attracted the attention of those 
interested in prison reform and has brought him 
favorable comment. 



1050 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




H. BORCHERS has for many years past 
been associated with the technical manage- 
ment of the telephone and telegraph system 
belonging to The Texas Company, making 
his headquarters at Houston, and is one of the best 
known utility executives in Texas. Mr. Borchers 
is superintendent of the telephone and telegraph 
system of the Texas Pipe Line Company, which is 
one of the largest departments of the Texas organ- 
ization, and owns a net work of lines, all over Texas 
and in Oklahoma, Louisiana and Arkansas. There 
are more than a hundred employees in this branch 
of the Texas Pipe Line Company, and affording as 
it does instant communication with all points, at 
all times, the department is very important. Mr. 
Borchers is a telephone man with a sound technical 
knowledge, and with experience of three decades 
spent in this line. Under his direction the system 
has been strengthened, and all lines are efficiently 
kept up, and the entire department handled in a 
most capable manner. He began with The Texas 
Company in the Sour Lake field, in 1903, as a line- 
man, and was later made foreman over the tele- 
phone and telegraph installation system. In 1917 
he was made superintendent of the telephone and 
telegraph system of the Texas Pipe Line Company, 
and established headquarters in Houston, where he 
has since resided, directing the management of the 
hundreds of miles of lines from this city. Mr. Bor- 
chers has working under him a large force, all of 
whom are competent men, and trained in their 
especial work. He directs all installations, mainte- 
nance and operation of the lines. 

Mr. Borchers was born at Nebraska City, Ne- 
braska, the twenty-fourth of May, 1872. His father, 
Edward Borchers, a native of Germany, came to 
the United States at the age of eighteen, going to 
Illinois. During the Civil War he joined the Federal 
Army, and was in a Missouri division throughout 
the war. At the close of that conflict he went to 
Nebraska and was a farmer near Nebraska City 
for many years. After his retirement he moved 
to Nebraska City, where his death occurred, at the 
ripe old age of eighty-seven years, the twenty-sixth 
of October, 1923. Mr. Borchers' mother was before 
her marriage Miss Fredericke Fredericks. Her death 
occurred in 1874. As a boy Mr. Borchers attended 
the country schools of Nebraska, remaining on the 
farm with his father until he was eighteen years of 
age. At that time he went with a water well drill- 
ing manufacturing plant, the first builders of rotary 
tools to drill wells. His position was showing the 
purchasers how to put up and operate these tools, 
and brought him in touch with many of the early 
oil operators. In 1892, after many years with the 
rotary tool company, Mr. Borchers came to Gal- 
veston, Texas, and was a marine engineer in that 
city for one year. In 1893 he went with the South- 
western Bell Telephone Company, as lineman-helper, 
and later as lineman, and while in that position 
helped put up many of the first telephone lines in 
this section. He remained with the Southwestern 
Bell Telephone Company until 1903, when he went 
with The Texas Company, as lineman, and has since 
remained with that company, working throughout 
the different departments of the telephone and tel- 
egraph system. 

Mr. Borchers was married at Houston, the second 
of June, 1900, to Miss Mabel A. Hill, a native of 




Nebraska, who came to Houston with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Hill, as a child. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Hill now make their home with Mrs. Borchers, 
at 903 Merrill Avenue. Mr. Borchers is a member of 
the Houston Lodge, I. O. O. F. He is known to 
telephone and telegraph men throughout the Lone 
Star State as one of the most efficient and highly 
trained men in this field, and is familiar with the 
entire field of telephone management and operation. 
Mr. Borchers is justly proud of the well functioning 
telephone and telegraph system of The Texas Com- 
pany, a system which owes much of its success to 
his careful management. He is interested in Hous- 
ton, both from a civic and commercial standpoint, 
and has many friends in this city who have watched 
his progress with interest. 

ALTER L. SLOAN, Chief Oil Dispatcher of 
the Gulf Companies, is well known all over 
the oil country and has the reputation of 
handling more oil than any other man in his 
line of business. Mr. Sloan became associated with 
the Gulf Company in September, 1903, at Sour Lake 
and came to Houston in 1916, when the Gulf Com- 
panies moved their headquarters to this city. He 
came to Houston in 1903 with the Postal Telegraph 
Company, and was later transferred to Beaumont, 
Texas, and soon after going to Beaumont, came 
with the Gulf Company and has remained with this 
company since that time. He went to Sour Lake 
soon after entering the employ of the Gulf Com- 
pany and then to Batson, and was the second tele- 
graph operator this company employed. In 1907 he 
was made Chief Oil Dispatcher, which position he 
has since held. Practically all storage tanks and 
pipe lines have been built since he has been with 
the company and he knows the history of it all. 

Mr. Sloan was born at McLeansboro, Illinois, on 
February 21, 1879. His father, C. O. Sloan, was for 
many years a locomotive engineer, but is now with 
the Gulf Company. His mother was Miss Sarah 
Buck, a member of a well known Illinois family. 
His education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of McLeansboro, Illinois. Soon after leaving 
school, Mr. Sloan began his business career as a 
telegi-aph operator with the Illinois Central Rail- 
road in Kentucky and Illinois and later was telegraph 
operator for the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. 
He then went with the Western Union and Postal 
Telegraph Companies, where he continued until he 
came with the Gulf Companies in 1903. 

Mr. Sloan was married in Beaumont, Texas, in 
1905 to Miss Jodie M. Gibson, a native of Living- 
ston, Texas, and a member of a pioneer family of 
that portion of the State. Mr. and Mrs. Sloan re- 
side at 612 Hathaway Avenue. Mr. Sloan is a mem- 
ber of the Houston Chamber of Commerce, the B. 
P. O. E., and the Smithers Lake Hunting Club. He 
has one hobby, "Bird Dogs," and has several cham- 
pion English Setters, and some of the best dogs to 
be found anywhere, and spends his leisure time in 
hunting and fishing in the Texas Coast country. Mr. 
Sloan is regarded as one of the best posted men in 
the employ of the Gulf Companies in regard to the 
fields, and locations of the company's tanks, and 
pipe lines. He directs the movements of all oil 
into storage tanks from the fields to the Gulf Com- 
pany's various refineries, and this requires a com- 
plete knowledge of all the tanks and pipe lines of 
the company. 



1053 



MEN OF TEXAS 




^D STEDMAN, one of a group of business 
men who have taken a prominent part in 
the development of Beaumont, is the lead- 
ing representative of the wholesale fruit 
and vegetable business in this city, and his name is 
well known throughout Southeast Texas and western 
Louisiana. Mr. Stedman is president of the Sted- 
man Fruit Company, an enterprise representing an 
investment of more than a quarter of a million dol- 
lars, and equipped with modern cold storage machin- 
ery, and handle efficiently the wholesale fruit and 
vegetable business of Southeastern Texas and South- 
western Louisiana. This modern plant, one of the 
largest in the country, is located at Bowie and Park 
Streets, and is complete in every detail. Rooms 
maintaining a temperature of forty degrees above 
zero are used to house fruits and vegetables de- 
manding a low temperature, two motors forcing the 
freezing compounds through the six miles of pip- 
ing included in the cold storage plant. All vegetables 
are handled in the most efficient manner, those 
needing washing going direct to the washing rooms, 
where they are cleaned and sent to the department 
where they are to be stored. Much of the second 
floor is used for the storage of grocery specialties, 
crates and other things necessary to the operation 
of the firm. Six chutes operate to the lower floor, 
and a P. B. X. board, with twenty-two telephones, 
insure constant communication from the ex- 
ecutive offices to any part of the plant. Al- 
though the company handles a wide range of fruits 
and vegetables, they handle large quantities of ban- 
anas and they have facilities for storing twenty-two 
hundred bunches of this tropical fruit. The method 
of handling is very efficient, the bunches being pro- 
pelled to and from the cold storage rooms by an 
overhead system which permits the weighing and 
tagging of the fruit. Until 1918 the Stedman Fruit 
Company was owned by Mr. Stedman and his broth- 
er, Jerry Stedman, but in that year the company was 
incorporated, with a stock of $236,000.00, with Ed 
Stedman as president, and Jerry Stedman, secretary 
and treasurer, and H. P. Wolfe, vice president and 
sales manager. The trade territory reaches as far 
as Fisher, Louisiana, on the Kansas City Southern; 
Dayton, Texas, on the west, Lake Charles, Louis- 
iana, on the east, and includes the principal cities 
of Southeast Texas. 

Mr. Stedman was born at Kosse, Texas, the son of 
E. D. Stedman, for many years engaged in the 
wholesale fruit and vegetable business, and Maude 
Stedman. As a boy he attended the schools of Hous- 
ton, and at the age of fourteen began to help his 
father in his fruit business. His father gave him 
the ambition to establish a large fruit and vegetable 
business, and although his death occurred almost two 
decades ago, he witnessed the coming true of part of 
this ambition. After several years in the plant, Mr. 
Stedman began on the road, at that time the young- 
est travelling salesman in the state, and was very 
successful in that field. He then went with the 
firm of T. H. Thompson, at Houston, and later came 
to Beaumont where he went with the T. S. Reed Gro- 
cery Company, aiding in the opening of this business 
and its management. Later he left that firm and 
went with the new firm of Heisig and Norvell. Then 
with his brother, J. C. Stedman, he established a 
fruit business, in a small way, in a small building 
near the Southern Pacific right-of-way. Within a 



short time, the company grew to such proportions 
that larger quarters were necessary, and the busi- 
ness was moved to the Langham Building, where 
headquarters were maintained until 1923, when the 
new plant, on Bowie and Park Streets, was 
occupied. 

Mr. Stedman was married at Austin, in 1898, to 
Miss Lotta S. Finley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. 
W. Finley. Mr. Finley is comptroller of the state of 
Texas, and one of the prominent men of Austin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stedman live at Fifth and North 
Streets, where they have a very attractive home, 
and have one child, Ed Stedman, Jr., who, since his 
graduation from the University of Texas, has been 
with the firm, in charge of the candy and cracker 
department of the business. Mr. Stedman is vice 
president of the American National Bank, past pres- 
ident of the South Texas State Fair, past president 
of the Rotary Club, and is a member of the Beau- 
mont Club, Neches Club, the Beaumont Country 
Club, and the Port Arthur Tarpon Club. He, with 
his family, attends the Methodist Church, in which 
he has been a steward for many years. Fraternally 
he is an Elk and a U. C. T. The Stedman plant 
represents an achievement in the industrial world, 
and is one of the most interesting, as well as im- 
portant businesses at Beaumont. Mr. Stedman has, 
throughout his residence here, been the splendid type 
of citizen who takes an interest in the development 
and advancement of his city, as well as his own pri- 
vate interests, and few men have done more than he 
to insure the prosperity of Beaumont. 

UBERT B. OXFORD, who has in the two 

decades of his residence at Beaumont been 
identified with commercial enterprises of 
wide scope, has for many years been one 
of a group of lumbermen who have taken a leading 
part in the development of this industry here, and 
has also been particularly active in civic work, en- 
joying the highest esteem of his fellow citizens. Mr. 
Oxford is vice president of the Gulf Manufacturing 
and Lumber Company, Incorporated, and as an 
executive has made a record for capable and effi- 
cient management that has placed this company 
among the leading lumber manufacturing companies 
in this section. The Gulf Manufacturing and Lum- 
ber Company was established in 1916, by a group of 
lumbermen of many years experience, and has since 
handled a large volume of wholesale and retail busi- 
ness. The company manufactures all kinds of mill 
work, operating a large plant, comprising three 
acres on the Santa Fe Railroad, and equipped with 
large modern buildings, and the finest and most 
modern type of machinery. The work done in this 
mill is largely detail mill work, for which expert 
workmen are employed, and only the highest grade 
of work turned out. No cheap or inferior work is 
handled, and every piece of mill work that leaves the 
plant must conform to the high standards that 
have been set and must pass a rigid inspection. The 
plant, located at the corner of North and Gulf 
Streets, is the largest of its kind at Beaumont, and 
furnishes employment to a force of forty operatives 
The Gulf Manufacturing and Lumber Company has 
done work for the San Jacinto Life Building, doing 
all the mill work on that building, and the Hotel 
Beaumont, and has also furnished the mill work for 
many of the finest homes in the city. In Houston 




1054 




-/ 



V/%/ <??C£3U u-^ 






p3E^$D ST • of bush 

ominent part in 
■..-lopment of Beaumont, is the lead- 
rtiolesale fruit 
is city, and his name is 
Southeast Texas and western 
n is president of the S1 
my. an enterprise represenl 
tore than a quarter o 

modern cold storage ] 
tly tfo 
!S£ if Southeastern r J and 

Louisian is modern 

the country, is located 

com . letail 

• 

man ding 

freezing com p' - 

ing in< 

are i 

. 

J 

I 

P. B. X. boi 
constant commu 
i ' any 

ompany I 
s, they hani s 

! 

S bunches of this 

very ef ■• , 

■ ■ ■ 

. 

in wny wai 

, . . -. ■ • . 

! 

or y reaches a 

Southen 

i 

■' ipa 

f i 

on of 



t time, the com] ' 'portions 



qui be] 

. red ' ■ 

■ 






the busi- 
, where 

), when the 
, was 



fruit a 
Iman. A ■ 

I 

is fruit bi 

death oc 

I 
■ >n the 

man in the stab 

r 
111 

. ■ I \ I 

■ 

fir ■ ■ .. 

her, J. C. Stedman, h< 
in a small way, in a small 
il tern I icifi -ight-of-way ma 



plant, 
pied. 

r, Stedman ra 8. to 

Lotta S. Finlej - R- 

ley. Mr. Fin!.- bate of 

md one of bhe pronrin istin. 

td Mrs. Stedm 'rth 

ets, where they have a home, 

and have one child, Ed Sted] his 

duation from the University of Texas, has been 
with the firm, in charge of the candy and cracker 
ent of the business. Mr. Stedman is vice 
.American National Bank, past pres- 
Fair, past president 
if the Beau- 
Jountry 
Club. He, with 
hich 
. : lally 
plant 
•u-ld, 
.im- 
portant businesses at Be. has, 
lughout his residence here • type 

i • velopment 

bis city, as vi ' iwn pri- 

ini >«e more than he 

aumont. 

OXFORD, who has in the two 

his residence at Beaumont been 

: enterprises of 

; any years been one 

of a umbermei have taken a leading 

here, and 
o been particularly rk, en- 

he highest esteem of] citizens. Mr. 

is vice president ■ anufacturing 

I Lumber Compa I, and as an 

r- has made ^ble and effi- 

anagemeot ed this company 

among t le leadi iufacturing companies 

mfacturing and Lum- 
ber Coi Wished in 1916, by a group of 

experience, and has since 
handled a la rge of wholesale and retail busi- 

ness. r i '■ ' mufactures all kinds of mill 

work, o arge plant, c< ing three 

Railroad, am pped with 

, mo , and most 

type of machinery. done in this 

ely detail mill which expert 

ri are employed, and on! f tl grade 

work is 

■ ; every piece es the 

conform ; 'ds that 

.on. The 

North and Gulf 

is the h Beaumont, and 

. e . . oJ forty operatives 

Mi . ber Company has 

into Life Building, doing 

and the Hotel 

dished the mill work for 

many of the in the city. In Houston 



1054 





^w^^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



they have done various jobs, among which are the 
Montrose Apartment Building and the Heights Li- 
brary Building. The officers of the Gulf Manufac- 
turing and Lumber Company, Inc., are, W. Clapp, 
president; Hubert B. Oxford, the subject of this 
sketch, vice president, and John Birdwell, secretary 
and treasurer. 

Mr. Oxford is a native of the Lone Star State 
and was born at Sherman, the third of November, 
1882. His father, William E. Oxford, for many 
years a resident of Sherman, was engaged in the 
mercantile business there, and has taken a promi- 
nent part in politics and in civic activities for many 
years. His mother, before her marriage was Miss 
Ada Burton. Mr. Oxford attended the public schools 
of Sherman, and after graduating from the high 
school there went with E. G. Dunn Company, re- 
maining with that concern for two years, at which 
time he went with the Wells Fargo Express Com- 
pany, and for the ensuing three years was with that 
company. He left that company to go with the 
Southern Pacific Lines and three years later turned 
his attention to the lumber business going with the 
Sabine Tram Company, and after three years with 
that company, was with the Gulf Lumber Company 
in Louisiana. Three years later he went with the 
Turnbow Lumber Company and was for five years 
with that organization, resigning to come with the 
Gulf Manufacturing and Lumber Company, acquir- 
ing a third interest in the company, in 1917. The 
Gulf Building and Loan Company with $30,000.00 
capital stock was organized by Mr. Oxford and his 
associates in the Gulf Manufacturing and Lumber 
Company and builds and finances residences. He 
served as city councilman, taking an active part in 
the administration of the municipal affairs of Beau- 
mont, and advocating all progressive civic move- 
ments. Mr. Oxford served five years as captain 
in the State Militia. 

Mr. Oxford was married at Beaumont, in 1909, 
to Miss Sadie Holmes, daughter of John Holmes and 
Sibal (Van Wormer) Holmes. They have one child, 
Hubert B., Jr. The Oxford home, four miles from 
Beaumont, on the Houston-Beaumont Highway, is 
one of the finest country homes in this part of the 
state, and the large grounds are beautifully im- 
proved and cared for, making the place unusually 
attractive. The family attend the First Methodist 
Church. Mr. Oxford is a director of the South Tex- 
as State Fair Association, vice president of the 
Texas Lumberman's Association and is a member of 
the Beaumont Country Club, the Beaumont Club, 
the Neches Club, the Port Arthur Tarpon Club, and 
the Rotary Club of which he is a charter member and 
of which he was the first secretary. He has many 
friends at Beaumont who have watched his progress 
in the business world with interest, and regard him 
as one of the coming men in the lumber business. 

EO L. RYDER has been prominently iden- 
tified with merchandising activities at 
Beaumont for upwards of a decade, and his 
name carries a prestige in the business 
world that is a distinct asset to the community with 
which it is associated. Mr. Ryder is secretary, 
treasurer and manager of the Ryder Furniture and 
Carpet Company of Beaumont, one of the largest 
wholesale and retail furniture houses in the south- 
eastern part of the state, and a creditable addition 




to the business world here. The retail store is well 
located in the heart of the business district, occupy- 
ing an attractive and modern building of ample pro- 
portions. The stock is unusually complete, giving 
the purchaser a wide range of price and styles. While 
Mr. Ryder has given special attention to his choice 
of finer furniture and has a stock that enables the 
residents of this section to furnish the finest homes 
completely, he has not neglected the lower priced 
furniture for the modest home, and has an excellent 
line of well constructed furniture at a nominal price. 
Every article in the Ryder establishment has been 
selected with a view to giving the customer a ster- 
ling value, and the patrons of the store shop with 
the assurance that their selections represent the 
utmost in quality and value. In addition to the re- 
tail house, a well located, three story warehouse is 
used for surplus stock, thus eliminating long delays 
in replacing stock in the retail store. A total of 
more than fifty thousand feet of storage space in 
the warehouse, with the large retail house, makes 
the business one of the larger commercial concerns 
of Beaumont, representing an investment of more 
than a half a million dollars. The company fur- 
nishes employment to a force of about fifty people. 
W. F. Ryder is president of the company. 

Mr. Ryder was born at Cedar Vale, Kansas, the 
third of December, 1885. His father, William Fran- 
cis Ryder, prominent lumberman, for years with the 
Long-Bell Lumber Company and who has amassed 
a fortune in the business, is known throughout the 
Lone Star State for the part he has taken in the 
development of the lumber interests of this section. 
His mother, before her marriage was Miss Anna E. 
Mohler. Mr. Ryder received his early education in 
the public schools of Kansas, later entering the Uni- 
versity of Louisiana, where he studied for two years, 
after which he took a commercial course in a busi- 
ness college at Kansas City, Missouri, fitting him- 
self for his business career. He followed his father 
in the lumber business, going wtih the Long-Bell 
organization, and for the ensuing thirteen years he 
was in the logging and lumber camps of that com- 
pany. He then went with the Finkbine Lumber 
Company, at D'Lo, Mississippi, and spent two years 
building roads for them. He came to Beaumont in 
1918, and started a mill for the manufacture of 
hard wood and pine lumber, later disposing of this 
interest in 1922, at which time he began his active 
connection with the Ryder Furniture and Carpet 
Company. 

Mr. Ryder was married at Oyan, Arkansas, in 
1907, to Miss Mattie H. Stuart, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. M. Stuart, of that state. Mr. Stuart is 
a farmer and landowner, and is well known in 
Arkansas for his agricultural activities. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ryder have one son, William Ford Ryder, and 
make their home at 2294 Broadway. Mr. Ryder is 
a member of the Beaumont, Neches and Lions Clubs 
and is an Elk and a Hoo-Hoo. He has taken an 
active part in the civic advancement of Beaumont, 
particularly from a commercial standpoint, and has 
done much to insure the prosperity of the city. As 
a business man he has advocated all progressive and 
forward looking steps, and is one of the leaders 
among the younger business men. Mr. Ryder con- 
tributes generously to every charitable and welfare 
organization, and few men have done more than he 
for the general welfare and prosperity of the city. 



1057 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ALBOT FREDERICK ROTHWELL, vice 
president and superintendent of production 
of the Yount-Lee Oil Company of Beau- 
mont, has been associated with the pe- 
troleum industry of Texas for over sixteen years 
and his continued successes in the field manage- 
ment of his company has caused his name to be 
brought to the forefront of the oil fraternity. The 
Yount-Lee Oil Company is probably the leading 1 
independent oil company of Texas, and attention 
has been especially brought to it since its discovery 
of deep oil in Spindle Top in January, 1926, twenty- 
five years after the bringing in of the Lucas gusher 
and the discovery of Spindle Top. The first well 
completed in Spindle Top by the Yount-Lee Oil Com- 
pany in October, 1925, was not a producer, but gave 
encouraging indications. The second well, completed 
in January, 1926, came in with about fifteen hundred 
barrels per day. From then on the company has 
carried on an intensive drilling campaign. The 
third well at Spindle Top came in with about six 
thousand barrels, the fourth with about three thou- 
sand barrels, the fifth, completed on May 11th, 1926, 
brought about fifty-five hundred barrels, and the 
sixth, completed May 16th, 1926, came in with about 
six thousand barrels. The Yount-Lee Oil Company 
does not confine its operations to Spindle Top, but 
has been successful in other fields, such as Sour 
Lake, Hull and Hackberry, Louisiana. Mr. Roth- 
well became associated with the Yount and Roth- 
well partnership, which is the predecessor to the 
Yount-Lee Oil Company in the latter part of 1914, 
at which time he purchased the Pivoto interests of 
the Yount-Pivoto Oil Company. A year or two 
later the interests of the Yount-Rothwell partner- 
ship had developed to such an extent that it was 
thought advisable to incorporate, using the name 
of Yount-Rothwell, which had already become highly 
and favorably known; but it developed that under 
the laws of Texas, a partnership may not legally 
incorporate, under the same name, without much 
delay and extended legal requirements. In order 
to avoid this long delay and legal requirements, 
the name "Lee" was substituted for that of "Roth- 
well" in charter application, and the firm was con- 
tinued under the corporate name of Yount-Lee Oil 
Company. From the beginning the rise of the com- 
pany to major importance has been rapid and un- 
usual. In the oil fraternity the credit for this suc- 
cess is given to Mr. M. F. Yount, president, and 
T. F. Rothwell, vice president. These men are to- 
day considered two of the outstanding practical oil 
men of the industry. The company employs from 
fifty to one hundred people, own complete drilling 
equipment, and under Mr. Rothwell's supervision 
does its drilling. 

T. F. Rothwell was born in West Virginia Feb- 
ruary 7th, 1887, son of T. J. and Mary Jane (Cross) 
Rothwell, both natives of West Virginia. T. J. Roth- 
well is now engaged in the oil business in West Vir- 
ginia, but for many years was a farmer in that 
State. Mr. Rothwell secured his early schooling 
in his native State, and at the age of sixteen went 
into the oil fields here, and later in Ohio, where 
he learned the rudiments of the profession. In due 
course of time he became a production man and 
learned cable tool drilling while employed by various 
oil companies and contractors. In 1910 he came to 
Saratoga, Texas, where he was employed in the 




production department of the Sun Company, being 
promoted to the position of field manager. He re- 
signed this position to make his present association. 
Mr. Rothwell gives Mr. T. P. Lee a goodly measure 
of credit for his subsequent success, for it was Mr. 
Lee who not only suggested the change, but made 
it possible for him to make it. Mr. Rothwell is a 
director of the following: Citizens National Bank, 
Lake Tool Company and the Rex Supply Company, 
all of Sour Lake. 

On August 13th, 1913, Mr. Rothwell was united 
in marriage in West Virginia to Miss Mabel Martha 
Lee, the daughter of T. P. and Elizabeth (Mann) 
Lee. T. P. Lee is the vice president and general 
manager of the American Republics Corporation and 
one of the outstanding men of the petroleum indus- 
try of the United States. To Mr. and Mrs. Rothwell 
were born three children — Mary Elizabeth, Virginia 
May and Essie Lee (deceased). The family attend 
the Methodist Church. Mr. Rothwell, like all good 
citizens, is interested in civic matters, but the nature 
of his work at this time is very exacting and he 
cannot give his personal attention to these good 
causes, although he otherwise contributes generously 
to them. He is primarily a family man and his 
spare moments are spent at home with his wife 
and children. 

L. SAVOY, although one of the younger 
member of the business fraternity of Beau- 
mont, Texas, has had a wide experience 
in the men's furnishings and clothing busi- 
ness, to which he has devoted his entire business 
life. Mr. Savoy is vice president of the Kyle-Savoy 
Company, Inc., which is strictly a man's store and 
carries a full and complete line of very high class 
men's furnishings and clothing. The Kyle-Savoy 
Company, Inc. is the leading store of its kind in 
Beaumont, carrying in stock Society Brand of 
clothes, Manhattan shirts, and all other merchandise 
carried is of the best grades and carry the foremost 
trade marks of the entire country. This store is 
attractive both without and within, and the splen- 
did fixtures and lighting facilities form a setting 
that is at once pleasing to purchasers. Other officers 
of the Kyle-Savoy Company, Inc., which is located at 
590 Pearl Street, are W. W. Kyle, Jr., president, 
and B. E. Kyle, secretary and treasurer. As a very 
young man, Mr. Savoy started his career in the 
clothing business at Houston, Texas, with the Ed 
Kiam clothing firm, which has since closed out this 
business, and he later became associated with the 
Mistrot and Munn Store of Houston, and remained 
with this firm until he came to Beaumont in 1914, 
where he was associated with various establishments 
in this city until the present firm was organized in 
1922, and has had a wonderful growth since that 
time. Mr. Savoy believes in keeping all departments 
up to the standard, and in carrying nothing but the 
best merchandise, and makes promptness and effi- 
ciency the watchword of his establishment. 

Mr. Savoy was born at Lake Charles, Louisiana, 
on November 17th, 1892. His parents, also natives 
of Louisiana, were members of prominent families of 
that state. His education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of Houston, Texas, which he left at an 
early age in order to enter the business world. 

Mr. Savoy is popular in both the business and 
social circles of Beaumont and is a member of the 
B. P. O. E. and the Neches Club, in both of which 



1058 



. 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




he takes an active interest. He is a firm believer 
in knowing thoroughly whatever business in which 
a man intends to engage, and a young man should 
at all times be willing to start at the bottom in any 
line, in order to learn the business and be able to 
merit promotions, which are sure to come to the man 
who pays strict attention to the affairs of the busi- 
ness of his employer. Mr. Savoy is regarded as one 
of the leaders among the younger generation of 
business men in Southeast Texas and has a sure 
claim to a brilliant future. He is optimistic as to 
the future of Beaumont and Southeast Texas, and be- 
lieves that this portion of the state is in better con- 
dition financially than ever before in its history. 

WESTBROOK of Sour Lake, Texas, is well 
known to the oil fraternity of Texas where 
he has been engaged in the various branches 
of this industry since 1902. Mr. Westbrook 
is superintendent of drilling and production of The 
Texas Company at Sour Lake, and is also in charge 
of all drilling and production of this company at 
Liberty, Saratoga and Batson. He has been located 
here for two years, and The Texas Company is the 
largest producing company in this field, and has 
the largest acreage, with valuable leases and com- 
plete and modern equipment. This company has 
eight hundred acres in the Sour Lake field, with 
one hundred and seventeen producing wells, with 
a daily production of around 1750 barrels. The 
Texas Company was one of the first to see the 
necessity of building houses for their employees 
here, and they now have more than thirty houses, 
all of which are comfortable, for their employees. 
_ About sixty people are employed by The Texas 
Company here. Mr. Westbrook is regarded as one 
of the successful oil well drillers in Texas, and his 
services are always in demand by the large oil com- 
panies in this line of work. He has during his 
career been associated with many of the State's 
biggest oil men, who are now rich, and many of 
them have left the oil business. Before he entered 
the oil business, Mr. Westbrook was for several 
years engaged in various lines of endeavor in South 
Texas. His first oil experience was at Spindle Top 
in 1902, where he remained for more than two years, 
after which he went to Humble, Texas, and became 
associated with Walter Fondren and was for a period 
of four years engaged in the various branches of 
the industry with Mr. Fondren. He then went with 
The Texas Company, and for seven years was asso- 
ciated with this company in the various fields of 
South Texas, after which he went with the Fondren 
Drilling Company, and for one year worked for 
this company in the field at Humble, Texas. He 
then came to Sour Lake and drilled two of the big- 
gest wells ever brought in in this field. These 
wells were located on the lease of the Humble Oil 
and Refining Company, and each made about twelve 
thousand barrels of oil, when first brought in. Mr. 
Westbrook engaged in drilling and contracting for 
himself, and also took contracts for pulling casing, 
and continued in this line of work for several years. 
In 1917 the company organized a school and Mr. 
Westbrook had charge of this school, and trained 
men in drilling and associated work, and has been 
with this company since that time as superintendent 
in the drilling and production departments. 




Mr. Westbrook was married at Humble, Texas, 
to Miss Ida Hankammer, a native Texan, and a 
member of a pioneer family of the Lone Star State. 
They have one child— Georgie. Mr. and Mrs. West- 
brook reside on the lease of The Texas Company 
at Sour Lake. Mr. Westbrook is a member of the 
I. 0. O. F. and takes an active interest in this 
organization. Mr. Westbrook is popular in the oil 
circles of South Texas and is regarded as one of 
the reliable and valuable men connected with The 
Texas Company. He gives his presonal attention 
to all the details of the business, and has built up 
a reputation as a successful driller, and it is said 
of him in oil circles that he has never lost a well, 
where care and experience counted in the bringing 
in the production. 

H. McDANIEL, throughout his business 
career, has been one of the vital factors 
of the construction business at Beaumont, 
and has contributed materially to the ad- 
vancement and development of this city. Mr. Mc- 
Daniel is secretary and general manager of the 
firm of McDaniel and Hartford, one of the leading 
construction firms here, and one that has taken 
a prominent part in construction work since its 
organization. The firm has given special attention 
to the larger contracts, and concentrate their at- 
tention largely on work in Beaumont and Port Ar- 
thur, although they have handled construction 
throughout Southeast Texas and Western Louisiana. 
They give particular attention to schools, churches, 
and office buildings, and fine residences, but in 
the main they make no effort toward specialization, 
handling a general contracting business. His office 
is in the Kyle Building, and officers of McDaniel 
& Hartford, other than Mr. McDaniel, as secretary 
and general manager, are Howard McDaniel, vice 
president, and E. E. Hartford, president, both of 
Port Arthur. 

C. H. McDaniel was born at Trenton, Missouri, 
the twentieth of March, 1891, son of Warren Mc- 
Daniel and Emma McDaniel. The elder Mr. Mc- 
Daniel is well known throughout Southeast Texas 
for his activities in the construction, lumber and 
oil business. He was also an oil operator in Spin- 
dle Top, but has now retired and makes his home 
in California. C. H. McDaniel attended the public 
schools of Port Arthur, where he graduated from 
the high school, after which he entered Ohio State 
University, where he graduated in 1912 with the 
degrees M. E. and E. E. He then returned to Texas 
and Beaumont, and was for two years with the 
Bell Telephone Company, as manager of the traffic 
department. He then went with his father and 
brother in the contracting business, the firm at that 
time being known as the McDaniel Construction 
Company. A little later his father retired, selling 
his interest to E. E. Hartford, and the firm has 
since continued, and was incorporated in 1920. 

Mr. McDaniel was married at Beaumont, in 1916, 
to Miss Emily Suggs. They have four children — 
Vernice, Chester, Charles, and Dorothea. The fam- 
ily reside at 2195 Avenue A, and attend the Bap- 
tist Church. Mr. McDaniel belongs to the Kiwanis 
Club, and the Knights of Pythias. As a building 
contractor he has taken an influential part in the 
affairs of Beaumont, and has done much, both in 
a business and private way, for its development. 



1061 



MEN OF TEXAS 




JHARLES PAGGI, although a resident of 
Beaumont but a few years, is well known 
as an independent oil operator in the coast- 
al fields, whose years of experience enables 
him to speak with authority on matters affecting the 
petroleum industry here. Mr. Paggi came to Beau- 
mont in 1921, and has taken his place among the 
progressive business men of the city, maintaining 
his office in the San Jacinto Building, and is a 
most valuable addition to the oil fraternity. He di- 
rects extensive operations in the coastal fields, in 
which he is interested, and his expert knowledge of 
oil properties and production has been a factor in 
his success. In his prospecting and development 
work he uses gasoline drilling equipment and has al- 
ready drilled over twelve wells in this way. Mr. 
Paggi began in the oil business in 1907, with his 
brother, Edward Paggi, organizing the Paggi 
Brothers Oil Company, which they operated for 
some years, with Charles Paggi in charge of the 
field and operating end of the business, and Edward 
Paggi handling the office and business end. Since 
Edward Paggi's death he has had complete charge 
of this business, directing both office and field work. 
In 1910 Mr. Paggi organized the Tarver Oil Com- 
pany, which is now the Tholl Oil Company, and also 
has full charge of the management of this company. 
The company has good production, and owns its own 
equipment, including drilling rigs, and under Mr. 
Paggi's direction has engaged in active operation in 
the various fields, bringing in a number of promis- 
ing wells. Mr. Paggi is the class of independent 
operator who has made a success of buying acreage 
in or near the proven fields, and holding this pro- 
perty to await developments. He finds this a partic- 
ularly profitable business, and in 1917 sold to the 
Gulf Company The Tarver Oil Company holdings at 
Sour Lake, for a million and a half dollars. This was 
one of Paggi Brothers' first wild cat operations. 
This method of operation is only possible for those 
operators, men of expert hnowledge and sound judg- 
ment, in whom the big companies have confidence, 
and of this class Mr. Paggi is a conspicuous exam- 
ple. In addition to his oil interests Mr. Paggi is al- 
so financially interested in business enterprises in 
Houston and Beaumont, and owns city property, 
farming lands, and cattle. Be is interested in the 
Conant Auto Company of Houston, the Lake Arthur 
Dredging Company, Charles Paggi and Company, 
Burgess and Whisenant Undertaking Company of 
Houston, the Oleander Oil Company, oil jobbers, 
Galveston, and is a director in the Texas National 
Bank. 

Mr. Paggi was born at Austin, Texas, the 
thirtieth of December, 1883, the son of M. Paggi, a 
manufacturer of carriages and wagons at Austin, 
and Eugenie Paggie. Mr. Paggi was educated in the 
Austin schools, after which he learned the plumb- 
ing business, engaging in that work for two years. 
He then became interested in oil field work, and the 
opportunities it offered the young man who was 
ambitious and willing to work, and he began work 
in the coastal fields, the first four years, until 1903 
working for others, and learning at first hand every 
detail of the work in the field. In 1903 he went to 
Sour Lake, at first alone, and in 1907 joining his 
brother, Edward Paggi, with whom he was asso- 
ciated until the latter's death. During the years that 




se 



he has been in the oil business Mr. Paggi has at 
various times worked in every department of oil 
field work, and has operated in the Gulf Coast fields 
exclusively. 

Mr. Paggi was married in 1910, at Kountze, 
Texas, to Miss Gladys Fontaine, daughter of Dr. 
W. D. Fontaine, a practicing physician of Hardin 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Paggi have made Beaumont 
their home for some years, and have an attractive 
residence, at 2400 Broadway. They have two chil- 
dren, William Mechel and Charles Edward. They 
attend the Presbyterian Church, to which denomi- 
nation they contribute liberally, and take an ac- 
tive part in the various social activities. Mr. Paggi 
is a member of the Beaumont Country Club, the 
Neches Club, and is a Mason, York Rite, and is a 
charter member of Arabia Temple Shrine at Hous- 
ton. Mr. Paggi, although primarily interested in 
petroleum activities, is also active in various busi- 
ness lines, and a business man of sound and prac- 
tical judgment. He is a thoroughly public minded 
citizen, interested in civic welfare and development, 
and takes an active part in all progressive civic 
movements. 

AUL W. GASOW, one of the younger 
business men of Beaumont, has taken a 
constructive interest in the commercial de- 
_^ ,_ „ velopment of this city since coming here 
„_veral years ago, and is well known as one of the 
leading representatives of the automobile business. 
Mr. Gasow is president and general manager of 
the Gasow-Howard Motor Company, Incorporated, 
which he established at Beaumont the first of Au- 
gust, 1921. This is the authorized Ford, Fordson 
and Lincoln dealership in Beaumont, and since the 
organization of the business Mr. Gasgow has sold 
a record number of Fords, Lincolns, and Fordsons 
to his many friends and fellow citizens. The plant 
is one of the best organized and most modern auto- 
mobile establishments in the city, and has complete 
sales, parts and service departments, each with a 
corps of experts in charge. The entire force of 
employees totals more than thirty. The plant is 
located at 802-812 Calder Avenue, where is a modern, 
semi-fireproof building, one hundred by one hun- 
dred and forty feet, which was completed for the 
company in the fall of 1922. An addition of sixty 
by one hundred and sixty feet, steel and brick, was 
built August, 1925. This building, designed espe- 
cially for the Gasow-Howard Company, is consid- 
ered one of the finest automobile buildings in Beau- 
mont, and combines a number of unusual features. 
The officers of the Gasow-Howard Motor Company 
are, Paul W. Gasow, president and manager; George 
F. Howard, president of the San Jacinto Trust 
Company of Houston, vice president; C. A. Caskey, 
treasurer, and W. A. Manning, secretary. 

Mr. Gasow was born at Detroit, Michigan, the 
thirtieth of March, 1893, the son of the late William 
Gasow. He spent his early years in Michigan, at- 
tending the public schools there, and after finishing 
high school began his business career in the Mich- 
igan Savings Bank at Detroit, remaining there from 
September, 1912, until April, 1913. He then went 
with the Ford Motor Company, spending two years 
in the office at Detroit, after which he became trav- 
eling auditor for the company, traveling all over 
the country to the different Ford branches. He 
resigned this position in 1921, coming to Beaumont 



1062 



III I i I IS 






cuGuC\-A 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




the twenty-sixth of July of that year, and organ- 
izing the present business the first of August. 

Mr. Gasow is a member of the Beaumont Coun- 
try Club, and is active in all civic work. He is 
known to the automobile trade as one of the leading 
Ford men of the country, and has attained a high 
standing in this field. 

ILLIAM A. KIRKPATRICK, for upwards 
of two decades has been a leader in musical 
activities at Beaumont, and as a teacher, 
pianist, and organist has contributed mate- 
rially to the artistic advancement of this city. Prof. 
Kirkpatrick is a musician of distinctive and inter- 
pretive talent whose performance invariably wins 
the admiration of his hearers, and he displays an en- 
thusiasm in his chosen domain of art that influences 
his every activity. One of the leading teachers of 
Beaumont, his classes, limited to forty talented pu- 
pils, are inspired by him to seek the highest mu- 
sical skill and scholarship, and his talents as a 
teacher are no less distinctive than his talents as per- 
former. Professor Kirkpatrick is especially active 
in all musical advancement and has brought to Beau- 
mont many of the great artists and the finest mu- 
sical talent of the country. He also promotes mu- 
sical events of local interests and organized the 
Beaumont Musical Society in 1905, and was also a 
director of the Galveston Quartette Society for sev- 
eral years. He conducts many recitals and displays 
great generosity by contributing to musical pro- 
grams on many occasions. 

Professor Kirkpatrick was born at Troy, New 
York, the twenty-ninth of January, 1866, the son of 
William Alexander Kirkpatrick, a noted artist, and 
Nellie Van Rensler Kirkpatrick, a singer of unusual 
distinction. Professor Kirkpatrick attended the pub- 
lic schools of Boston, and for eight years studied 
at the Choir School of the Church of the Advent. 
He then spent two years at the New England Con- 
servatory fo Music, graduating in voice, piano and 
organ. The following five years were spent at Troy, 
New York, where he taught music and was choir 
master and organist. He then went to St. Louis, 
where for one year he was in charge of the Trin- 
ity Church choir and was organist. This was fol- 
lowed by two years at Memphis, Tennessee, as direc- 
tor for the first choral society in that city, and as 
organist and choir master at Grace Church and 
other churches. He then went to Anniston, Ala- 
bama, as organist and choir master, and later spent 
a year at Opelika, Alabama, in a like capacity, mak- 
ing an exceptional choir leader and organist. Fol- 
lowing this he went to Birmingham, as organist and 
choir master at St. Mary's on the Highlands, and 
as leader of various musical clubs, still later going 
to Montgomery, where he was in charge of four of 
the leading choirs, remaining there for seven years, 
until 1899, during which time he organized many 
clubs and was a leader in all musical activities. The 
five following years were spent at Washington, 
D. C, as choir director and organist at Trinity 
Church, Ascension Church and St. John's Church, 
Georgetown, and also as instructor at Ralston In- 
stitute. Immediately following, in 1904, Professor 
Kirkpatrick came to Beaumont, and has since made 
this city his home, and has been organist and choir 
master for the past twenty years for Saint Mark's 
Church. 




Professor Kirkpatrick was married at Beaumont, 
to Miss Mary Bertha Woodward, a very gifted and 
talented artist. Mrs. Kirkpatrick has charge of 
the choir of the Christian Church and is interested 
in all musical events. She was formerly of Wash- 
ington, D. C. Professor and Mrs. Kirkpatrick have 
a very attractive home at 1700 Avenue E, where 
Professor Kirkpatrick has his handsomely appointed 
studio, and meets his classes. They have one child, 
Willie Francis. The family are members of the 
Episcopal Church. As an artist, Professor Kirkpat- 
rick has received the best professional advantages, 
and is highly accomplished and cultured, splendidly 
equipped to meet any demands on his talents. He 
gives his enthusiasm to musical activities and Beau- 
mont is indeed fortunate that there is in the city so 
thorough a teacher, and so talented an artist as he. 
For two decades he has been in the lead in musical 
advancement, creating a demand for the highest 
type of musical entertainment and securing artists 
and entertainments that have made Beaumont a mu- 
sical center of first rank in this section. 

10BERT CORLEY, for a quarter of a cen- 
tury one of the sterling citizens of Beau- 
mont, has been a vital force for progress 
in this community, and is highly esteemed 
by all who know him. Mr. Corley is sole owner of 
the real estate and insurance firm of Robert Cor- 
ley and Company, a firm that has proven itself fore- 
most in civic advancement, and that has a strong, 
permanent business, built on years of honest deal- 
ings. Mr. Corley sells city and country property, 
and all kinds of insurance and surety bonds of all 
kinds. Mr. Corley has shown his faith in the growth 
of Beaumont by making real estate investments from 
time to time, and holds much city property here. 
He is familiar with property values, and is able to 
forecast the direction with future growth will take. 

Mr. Corley was born at Terrell, Texas, the twenty- 
first of February, 1878. His father, J. H. Corley, 
whose death occurred in 1913, was a pioneer banker, 
entering the banking business in 1875, and con- 
tinuing therein until his death. His mother, before 
her marriage was Miss Martha Kuykendall. Mr. 
Corley was educated in the public schools of Ter- 
rell, and after graduating from the high school there 
took special business courses, equipping himself for 
his business career. Mr. Corley spent one year in 
Houston, where he engaged in the cotton business, 
and came to Beaumont in 1899. Mr. Corley is a 
director in the First National Bank. 

Mr. Corley is a member of the Rotary Club, the 
Beaumont Country Club, the Beaumont Club, the 
Neches Club, and is a Scottish Rite Mason, a Knight 
Templar and a member of El Mina Temple Shrine 
at Galveston. Mr. Corley is a past president of 
the Beaumont Real Estate Board, and is one of those 
sterling realtors whose business, founded on in- 
tegrity and square dealing, is more than a mere es- 
tablishment for the sale of property, but is an insti- 
tution of which the community is proud, and which 
is a factor for civic progress. Mr. Corley is one 
of the best liked men in his community, with those 
qualities of Christian citizenship which make for 
friendships. He has been identified with all pro- 
gressive movements for a quarter of a century, and 
few men have done more for the advancement of 
Beaumont than he. 



1065 



MEN OF TEXAS 




DWARD PAGGI. Few men were more 
prominently associated with the develop- 
ment of the petroleum resources of South- 
east Texas, particularly in that district 
near Beaumont, of which city he was a resident, 
than Edward Paggi, who was one of the pioneer 
operators in the coastal field, and active in its 
development for about two decades. Mr. Paggi was 
typical of the oil man with vision, and with the 
courage to back his judgment, and his development 
activities were highly successful not only bringing 
him a fortune, but adding materially to the petro- 
leum wealth of the State. Mr. Paggi also took an 
interest in civic activities, co-operating with the 
various organizations in the plans for the social and 
commercial development of Beaumont. While he 
was an oil operator primarily, yet he was interested 
in various other business enterprises. 

Edward Paggi was born at Austin, Texas, the 
twelfth of October, 1876, the son of Mechel Paggi, 
pioneer of Texas and prominent in affairs for many 
years. He attended the schools of Austin, receiv- 
ing his education in that city, and as a young man 
began to build boats, which he operated on the 
Colorado River at Austin. This venture proving 
successful, Mr. Paggi next went to Mexico, where he 
began building boats on a larger scale, and for a 
number of years was a ship builder and contractor, 
and became well known in ship building circles. 
After several years in Mexico he returned to Texas, 
coming to Beaumont at the beginning of the oil 
boom. He worked in the oil fields up until 1907, but 
in that year began in the oil business for himself, 
organizing the Cole Oil Company. He operated this 
company for a time, later selling it and organizing 
the Paggi Brothers Oil Company, of which he was 
president and manager until his death. Associated 
with him was his brother, Charles Paggi, promi- 
nently known in petroleum circles. This was one 
of the really successful independent oil companies, 
and Mr. Paggi made a fortune from the develop- 
ment of its interests. He was also one of the or- 
ganizers of the Tarver Oil Company, of which he 
was the head until his death, and which was also 
successful. Mr. Paggi bought a great deal of valua- 
ble real estate in Beaumont, and was one of the 
large property owners of this city. In matters per- 
taining to the oil development of this district, Mr. 
Paggi was regarded as one of the best informed 
men in the State, and his opinion carried weight with 
the members of the oil fraternity. 

Edward Paggi was married at Lampasas, Texas, 
the thirtieth of December, 1903, to Miss Bertha D. 
Spreen, a native of Brenham, Texas. Mrs. Paggi 
is the daughter of Henry Spreen, a native of Ger- 
many, who came to the United States as a young 
man, locating in Washington County, Texas, and 
later going to Lampasas, which was his home for 
many years. He now resides at Austin. Her mother 
was Miss Louise Freitag, prior to her marriage to 
Mr. Spreen, she also being a native of Germany, 
coming to Texas as a young lady. Mr. and Mrs. 
Paggi were the parents of two children: Louise, a 
graduate of Loretta Heights Academy of Denver, 
Colorado, and Ruth, a student in the Beaumont 
schools. Mrs. Paggi is a woman of accomplished 
intelligence, and during her husband's lifetime was 
his constant inspiration and a charming wife and 
mother. She is a good business woman and has 




learned much about the oil industry. At this time 
she is president of the Paggi Brothers Oil Company 
and vice president of the Tholl Oil Company. The 
family has continued to reside in the beautiful 
Paggi home at 230 Seventh Street. 

Mr. Paggi was prominent in Masonic circles, a 
member of the Saratoga Blue Lodge, Knight Temp- 
lar and a member of El Mina Temple Shrine at 
Galveston, and also of the Eastern Star. He took 
a deep interest in all civic work, contributing to 
welfare work with a fine generosity that was en- 
tirely without ostentation, and was ever ready to 
lend a helping hand to those less fortunate than 
himself. His death, which occurred in Beaumont 
on the thirtieth of January, 1921, was a deep loss 
to his city, and was the cause of a sincere regret 
on the part of his many friends, both at Beaumont 
and in other parts of the State. 

OUIS J. BARNES, for two decades a resi- 
dent of Houston, Texas, was one of the 
pioneers in the field of railroad building 
of the Lone Star State, having started in 
this work in 1871, when Texas was a vast empire of 
prairies over which myriads of cattle and wild game 
roamed unmolested. Mr. Barnes was for about fifty 
years active in the various branches of railroad con- 
struction — his entire business career being spent 
in this field of activity, which he started as a very 
young man. His first work was on the construc- 
tion of the Texas and Pacific Railroad between Long- 
view and Dallas, where he was the superintendent 
in charge of laying and building the road bed and 
work for the various Texas railroads, in the con- 
struction end, besides furnishing the materials for 
same. During the greater part of his activities Mr. 
Barnes made Longview, Texas, his home and for a 
period of eight years served Gregg County as its 
tax assessor, carrying on his railroad work at the 
same time. 

Mr. Barnes was born in Mississippi on December 
bridges. Later he went with the International and 
Great Northern Railroad, doing this same class of 
work. Later still, he formed a partnership with the 
late George W. Burkett, one of the best known men 
of the railroad fraternity of Texas, this firm en- 
gaged in the sale of material for railroads and 
bridges, which they obtained from the vast forests 
of East Texas. This firm also did a great deal of 
12th, 1851. His father, Bryant Barnes, was a 
native of Georgia and a member of a well known 
family of that State. His mother, Mrs. (Harris) 
Barnes, was a member of a prominent Mississippi 
family. His education was obtained in the schools of 
Texas, which he left at an early age in order to en- 
ter the construction business, choosing the railroad 
branch of this industry, in which he was a signal 
success throughout his life. 

Mr. Barnes was married at Longview, Texas, on 
October 4th, 1874, to Miss Mary Brown, a native of 
Longview, Texas, and a daughter of Horatio Brown, 
who was a member of a well known family of 
Alabama. Her mother, Mrs. Annie (Turner) Brown, 
was a member of a leading Georgia family. Mrs. 
Barnes, during her married life, was more than an 
ordinary helpmeet, for she was able to handle 
various business and farming undertakings during 
the absence of her husband. Today she resides at 
204 Lenox Avenue and is interested in church work, 
teaching a Sunday School class of the Baptist 



1066 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Church, near her home. Four children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Barnes, two boys and one girl, now 
deceased, but all of whom lived to reach manhood 
and womanhood and the only surviving child is John 
L. Barnes of Houston, Texas, who is prominently 
identified with the commercial life of this city. 
Horatio died at the age of thirty-two, Maude, who 
married R. A. McLain, died at the age of twenty- 
eight, leaving two children, and Oliver P. died at 
the age of thirty-five. The grandchildren are: 
Mary Bess McLain Prall of Fort Worth, Maude Mc- 
Lain of Longview, and John L. Barnes, Jr. The 
great-grandchild is Robert Dana Prall. Mr. Barnes 
was a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Left- 
Handed Fishing Club of Houston, and various other 
organizations of this city and of the State. He 
was a member of the Baptist Church, this being the 
religion of his forbears. Mr. Barnes died in Hous- 
ton, Texas, January 12th, 1919. Besides being a 
pioneer in the railroad building of Texas, he assisted 
greatly in the upbuilding of many of Texas' towns 
and communities. Many of the younger generation 
cf Texas' construction men received their training 
under the able guidance of this splendid man, who 
was indeed a gentleman of the old school. He was 
one of nature's noblemen, who loved the trees and 
flowers of Texas as much as if they were children of 
the human parents. During his residence in Hous- 
ton he made a host of friends and his place in the 
city and community will be a difficult one to fill. 

AM WESTON FOSTER, for more than two 
decades has been actively identified with 
the printing business at Beaumont, and has 
established a printery that has contributed 
materially to the standing of Beaumont as a com- 
mercial center. Mr. Foster is the owner of Foster' 
Print Shop, and a business which he established in 
1913, and which has since enjoyed a large and profit- 
able business. He specializes in commercial print- 
ing, and gives careful attention to the printing needs 
of the business man, offering him a service in this 
field that has no equal in the city. His' shop, at 
249 Bowie Street, is housed in a modern building 
and the plant is equipped throughout with the finest 
and most modern equipment, with every facility for 
turning out high class work. Mr. Foster maintains 
a force of around ten trained helpers, and personally 
supervises all work done in his shop. 

Sam Weston Foster was born at Richmond, Texas, 
the ninth of January, 1871, the son of Guilford 
Foster, who was also born at Richmond, and Sallie 
Jones Foster, daughter of Randall Jones. Both his 
paternal grandfather, Randolph Foster, and his ma- 
ternal grandfather, Randall Jones, were members 
of Stephen F. Austin's colony which settled at Fort 
Bend, now known as Richmond, in 1823. Mr. Foster 
spent his boyhood at Richmond, attending school 
there. His first business experience was in the 
printing business, in 1882, at Houston, where he 
remained until 1897, when he went to Mexico, spend- 
ing two years in that country. This was followed 
by two years at Galveston, after which he came to 
Beaumont, in 1902, where he has since made his 
home. Shortly after coming here he went with the 
Beaumont Journal and was with that paper for 
six years, later spending two years with the Amer- 
ican Printing Company, after which he established 
his present business. 

Mr. Foster was married at Houston, in 1895, to 




Miss Vibella McGary, daughter of Daniel McGary, 
noted publisher and newspaper man, who was fea- 
tured in the cartoons and stories of Alex Sweet, 
famous newspaper character and publisher of the 
Houston Age. Mr. and Mrs. Foster reside in Beau- 
mont, at 1169 Broadway Avenue, and have one child, 
Sam Weston Foster, Jr. The family attends the 
First Methodist Church, where Mr. Foster is a very 
prominent church worker, and where he has been 
one of the most regular attendants at Sunday school, 
missing but three times in forty years. Mr. Foster 
belongs to the Kiwanis Club, the Lions Club, and 
fraternally is a Woodman of the World. He finds 
recreation in hunting and fishing, and is interested 
in all civic and development activities. 

ILL F. GRAHAM, well known merchant and 
business man, has been a resident of Beau- 
mont for about fourteen years, having come 
here in August, 1912, following the com- 
pletion of his education. Mr. Graham is one of the 
best known business men of the city and numbers 
his friends and acquaintance among people in every 
walk of life. 

Mr. Graham is secretary-treasurer and general 
manager of the White House Dry Goods Company, 
founded in 1904 by his father, Chas. F. Graham, who 
is president of the company. Chas. F. Graham, Jr., 
is vice president and each of the three is active in 
the management of the business, 

The White House store is the leading dry goods 
emporium of the city, carrying a stock of high class, 
dependable and thoroughly up to date merchandise 
that would do credit to a city much larger than Beau- 
mont. The stock carried includes clothing for both 
men and women, dry goods, dresses, millinery, no- 
tions and practically everything f .und in the modern 
department store. The store occupies thirty thou- 
sand square feet of floor space and employs one 
hundred people in its various departments. 

Will F. Graham was born at Hillsboro, Texas, on 
March 3, 1888. He is a son of Chas. Fletcher and 
Etta Graham and spent his boyhood in Hillsboro 
where his father was engaged in business for many 
years before removing to Beaumont. The younger 
Graham attended the public schools and the high 
school at Hillsboro and then entered Baylor Uni- 
versity at Waco, later attending Vanderbilt. After 
completing his studies at Vanderbilt he came to 
Beaumont where his father had established the 
Store and entered actively upon the management of 
the business. 

Mr. Graham was married at Hillsboro in June, 
1913, to Miss Nautie Bird Kirksey, daughter of 
James S. Kirksey, well known hotel man. Mr. and 
Mrs. Graham have one son, Chas. Fletcher, nine 
years of age. 

Besides his business Mr. Graham takes an active 
interest in civic affairs and has been identified with 
numerous movements in Beaumont of a public char- 
acter. He is a Mason and a member of the Beau- 
mont Country Club, the Beaumont Club and Neches 
Club. He is affiliated with the Presbyterian church 
and is a director of the American National Bank. 

Friends of Mr. Graham regard him as one of the 
most active of the younger business men of Beau- 
mont. The White House Dry Goods Company under 
his management has achieved a splendid success and 
is experiencing a gratifying increase in business 
year by year. 



1069 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ERBERT J. HALLIDAY has for upwards of 
two decades taken an active part in the 
commercial and industrial development of 
Beaumont, where he is interested in enter- 
prises of wide scope, and has been for the past sev- 
eral years a factor in the lumber business in this 
section. The Turnbow Lumber Company, of which 
Mr. Halliday is president, is one of the largest lum- 
ber companies in the city, and under the capable 
management of D. M. Caffall, has expanded rapidly. 
The business was organized in 1907, and until 1919 
operated by the original management. In this latter 
year the present officers took over the business, 
re-organizing along modern and progressive lines. 
The yards and offices are located on a three acre 
tract, with railroad frontage, at the corner of Park 
and Austin Streets. Adequate buildings, of modern 
construction, are used for storing the large stock of 
lumber, and a modern office building insures per- 
fect working conditions in the office. An excep- 
tionally complete line of lumber and building mate- 
rials is carried, and in addition to the large retail 
business in this commodity, the company has been 
active in financing building. The officers are Her- 
bert J. Halliday, president; H. H. Howell, vice pres- 
ident; and D. M. Caffall, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Halliday was born at Dundee, New York, the 
ninth of January, 1880, the son of C. H. Halliday, a 
farmer and land owner of that state. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools at Wellsville and Andover, 
New York, graduating from high school. He then 
began working in the oil fields of New York and 
Pennsylvania, where he spent three years, after 
which, in 1902, he came to Beaumont, and began 
operating in the oil fields at Spindletop, and where 
he has since been active. Mr. Halliday is a prac- 
tical oil operator, familiar with every phase of oil 
development, and through experience knows how 
everything in the fields should be done. In 1907 he 
organized the Stella Oil Company, with D. M. Caf- 
fall, and one other partner. Two years later Mr. 
Halliday, with Mr. Caffall, bought the interests of 
the other owner, and have since operated the com- 
pany, which has been active in drilling and produc- 
tion. They also own the Halliday and Caffall Oil 
Company, organized in 1917, and a factor in drill- 
ing and production activities until its consolidaton 
with the Stella Oil Company. 

Mr. Halliday was married at Beaumont, in 1905, to 
Miss Anna Bonham, daughter of M. Bonham, a cot- 
ton man at Corsicana. Mr. and Mrs. Halliday have 
three children, Herbert B., Elizabeth and David, and 
make their home at 1696 Victoria. Mr. Halliday 
is a member of the Beaumont Club, Masonic Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, Oddfellows and Hoo-Hoos. Few 
men have done more in a material way, for the de- 
velopment of Beaumont, than has Mr. Halliday. The 
many enterprises in which he has been interested 
have been of vital importance to commercial devel- 
opment, and he has taken pride in the accomplish- 
ments of his city. 

N. DOUGLAS a few years ago became 
identified with the oil city of Daisetta, and 
since that time has been one of the most 
i=J enterprising men in the oil industry here, 
holding a responsible position with a large com- 
pany, and attaining the reputation of a produc- 
tion expert. Mr. Douglas is production superin- 




tendent for the Houston Production Company, and 
has been in charge of the work here since September, 
1922. He is now in charge of all production, 
averaging at the present time around a thousand 
barrels, and is managing the affairs of the com- 
pany in a capable and efficient manner. 

Mr. Douglas had his first oil experience at Goose 
Creek, where he began with the Humble Company 
in December, 1916, and until April of the next year 
was roughnecking and working in various other 
capacities for that company. In April, 1917, he 
went to Sour Lake, with the Lake Graham Oil 
Company, remaining with them until August, after 
which he went to Humble with the Texas Company, 
remaining there until November, 1917. He returned 
to Sour Lake around the first of the year, later en- 
listing in the navy, and after receiving his discharge 
returning to the fields in Sour Lake, August, 1919, 
when he went to Spindle Top, pushing tools, and 
was there until March, 1920, when he went to 
West Columbia as timekeeper for the Texas Com- 
pany. He came to Hull in 1920, with the Gulf 
Company, remaining with them for one year, after 
which he went with the Houston Production Com- 
pany, as timekeeper, and was sent by them to 
Daisetta in 1922 as production superintendent. In 
January, 1925, Mr. Douglas went in the retail 
grocery business at Daisetta, and is now engaged 
in this line. 

Mr. Douglas was born at Colmesneil, Texas, the 
twenty-ninth of October, 1897, son of Irwin B. 
Douglas, a druggist, and Nannie Fowler Douglas. 
He moved to Sour Lake as a boy and attended the 
public schools there. After leaving high school 
he began work in the oil fields, and worked there 
until enlisting in the navy in 1918. He was dis- 
charged in July, 1919, as second class machinist, and 
returned to the oil fields, where he has since been. 

Mr. Douglas was married at Beaumont, Texas, the 
eleventh of November, 1920, to Miss Lillian Bryant, 
whose parents came from Massachusetts. Mr. and 
Mrs. Douglas make their home at Daisetta, and have 
one child, Melva Jack. They attend the Methodist 
Church. Mr. Douglas is a Mason, Blue Lodge 
Chapter at Dayton. He is a young man who has 
made rapid progress in oil field work, and his as- 
sociates foresee a real future for him in production 
activities. 

H. SEXTON has recently become identified 
with the oil city of Hull, and since coming 
here has been one of the most enterprising 
and enthusiastic men in the industry, and 
has taken an active part in development work. Mr. 
Sexton is the representative of the Houston Oil 
Company, at Hull. Mr. Sexton has been with the 
Houston Oil Company since May, 1922, at which 
time he was stationed at Mexia, where he had 
charge of running the oil away for the company, 
and experimented with wells. From Mexia he went 
to Curry, as general utility man. In November, 
1922, he went to Live Oak County, where he also 
acted as general utility man. Prior to going with 
the Houston Oil Company Mr. Sexton spent a year 
and a half roughnecking at Hull for the Republic 
Company. 

L. H. Sexton was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 
the twenty-second of November, 1890, son of S. B. 
Sexton, of the B. B. Sexton Stove Manufacturing 
Company, of Baltimore, a business established in 




1070 




rf//7iaXC^£y 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



1839. Mr. Sexton attended the public schools of 
Baltimore until he entered St. John's School, at 
Annapolis. Later he attended Tome School at Port 
Deport, and the University of Virginia, where he 
was in the engineering school. After leaving the 
university in 1910 Mr. Sexton was with the Kline 
Motor Corporation for a time, and later in the 
banking business at Baltimore for three years, after 
which he was associated with Mackubin Goodrich 
and Company. He enlisted in the Aviation Section 
of the Signal Corps, the thirteenth of December, 
1917, and was sent to Princeton U. S. School of 
Aeronautics, where he was commissioned second 
lieutenant, and sent with the Motor Transport Corps 
to Camp Meigs, Washington, handling heavy trucks. 
Later he was at Camp Meade, in the heavy Motor 
Transport Division, and was discharged from there 
in April, 1919. 

Mr. Sexton was married at York, Pennsylvania, 
in December, 1910, to Miss Bessie Ragsdale, daugh- 
ter of a prominent New York and Baltimore family. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sexton have two children, Jean and 
Mary, and make their home in Houston, at 3505 
Graustark Avenue. Mr. Sexton is a member of the 
Sigma Pi Epsilon fraternity at the University of 
Virginia, and belongs to the Baltimore Yacht Club 
and the Baltimore Athletic Club. He formerly own- 
ed the yacht "Cheneden", winning a number of 
trophies on the Atlantic in the years from 1908 
until 1917. 

HOMPSON MELTON THAMES, president 
and manager of the Neches Creamery Com- 
pany, 1494 Park Street, has been a resident 
of Texas for more than twenty years and 
since 1918 has been actively identified with the com- 
mercial interests of Beaumont, coming to this city 
from Port Arthur. 

The Neches Creamery Company was organized 
by Mr. Thames in 1918 and succeeded to the business 
of the former Beaumont Dairy Products Company, 
the Neches Company buying the plant and business 
of the Dairy Products Company. The company 
manufactures ice cream and butter, which it sells 
over a wide territory. Most of the milk, cream and 
other dairy products are sold in Beaumont. The 
plant and equipment is thoroughly modern through- 
out and the superior quality of its products is known 
throughout a large trade territory. The company 
has ten employees. James S. Kennedy is secretary- 
treasurer of the company and has been actively 
associated with Mr. Thames for several years. 

Mr. Thames is a native of Alabama and was born 
at Clayborn on April 2, 1872, a son of John and Ame- 
lia Thames. His father was a well known farmer 
and land owner and Mr. Thames received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native state. For sev- 
eral years he was engaged in various lines of work, 
including the manufacture of lumber, the operation 
of a grist mill, cotton gin, etc. He also followed the 
contracting business for a number of years. Com- 
ing to Texas in 1902, he operated as a contractor and 
builder until 1912, when he engaged in the creamery 
business. 

Mr. Thames organized the Thames Ice Cream 
Company at Port Arthur in 1913 and operated this 
business successfully until 1916 when he organized 
the Milk Products Company at Port Arthur, contin- 
uing this business until his removal to Beaumont in 





1918. The business of the Neches Creamery Com- 
pany under the management of Mr. Thames has ex- 
panded until it is the largest concern of its kind in 
this section of the state. No small portion of its suc- 
cess is attributed to the close, personal attention 
given the business by Mr. Thames, who personally 
supervises the making of all its products. 

In 1897 Mr. Thames was married in Alabama to 
Miss Amelia Slater, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. N. 
Slater. They have nine children, Norvell Leigh, 
Dollie, Antonette, Sarah, Marschael, Joe, Amy Lee, 
James P. and Mollie. The family home is at 1418 
North Street. 

Mr. Thames has always taken an active interest 
in civic affairs and is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias and the Beaumont Rotary Club. He is a 
communicant of the Baptist Church. He is a strong 
booster for Beaumont and ever ready to aid in any 
movement for the city's development. 

ALTER C. A. BENEKE, one of the progres- 
sive business men at Orange who has taken 
an active part in the commercial develop- 
_._^ ment of the city, has been a factor in the 
business world here for a number of years, and is 
well known in Southeast Texas. Shortly after his 
arrival in Orange in 1919 he engaged in the filling 
station business which he conducted along with his 
other interests until going with the Orange Car 
and Steel Company, with whom he is now associated. 
Walter C. A. Beneke was born in Oshkosh, Wis- 
consin, the fifteenth of June, 1881, the son of Wil- 
liam Beneke, a native of Germany, who came to the 
United States with his brother as a boy, and who en- 
gaged in the mercantile business for many years, 
and Elizabeth (Schneider) Beneke. The family 
moved to Fort Worth in 1893, where both parents' 
death occurred, and Mr. Beneke received his educa- 
tion in the schools of that city. As a young man he 
went to Hot Springs, Arkansas, where he was with 
the Great Northern Hotel for two years, and in 
1904 came to the Sour Lake oil field, later going to 
Batson, and still later to Saratoga, where he was 
with the A. T. & S. F. Oil Company, as field super- 
intendent, for a time. He later went to Wheelan, 
Oklahoma, where he located the Healdon field, and 
after a year there returned to Texas, going to Hous- 
ton where he was chemical inspector for a group of 
railroads for a period of three years. He then went to 
Mexico, spending three years in the Tampico oil 
fields, after which he again returned to Texas, this 
time coming to Orange, where after six months with 
the chemical department of the Seaboard Oil and 
Refining Company, and a year and a half as pur- 
chasing agent for a Dry Dock and Ship Building 
Company he entered business for himself. 

Mr. Beneke was married twice, the first time to 
Mrs. Ada Taylor Gary, a member of the Tyre Tay- 
lor family, one of the pioneer families of Wharton, 
County, Texas, this marriage occurring at Hot 
Springs. He was married the second time at 
Orange, in 1921, to Mrs. Nellie Simmons Phillips, a 
native of Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Beneke have 
one child, Walter, Jr., and reside at Orange. Mr. 
Beneke is a member of the Elks Club, the Country 
Club, the Rotary Club, the Orange Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Young Men's Business League, and 
takes a deep interest in all civic activities, giving 
his active support to all development measures. 



1073 



MEN OF TEXAS 




1HOMAS HENRY LANGHAM. The name of 
Thomas Henry Lang-ham, distinguished 
pioneer of Jefferson County, and one of 
those early residents of Beaumont to whom 
this city owes much of its present development, will 
ever be prominently associated with the history of 
this city and accorded the high honor that is justly 
due one who took so active and unselfish a part 
in the life of his day. Mr. Langham, for years a 
factor in public life, was that type of public of- 
ficial who finds in his office opportunity to serve 
his community, and uses his influence to advance his 
city, rather than to serve his own private ambitions. 
In few counties has an official held an elective of- 
fice for so many consecutive years, and while this 
was in part a tribute to the high esteem in which 
he was held, it was also a tribute to the untiring 
devotion he gave to the duties his office involved, 
and the loyal interest he took in his city and its 
welfare. 

Thomas Henry Langham, a native of Texas, was 
born the third of August, 1845, in Jefferson County, 
where his father, James Biddle Langham, settled in 
the early forties, coming from his native State of 
Tennessee. He lived here, engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, until his death. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Miss Sarah Jane Nettles, was a native of 
Louisiana. Growing up under pioneer conditions 
Thomas Henry Langham had few educational oppor- 
tunities, and although he attended school at Cold 
Springs for several terms his education was largely 
by self help. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in 
the Confederate Army, serving throughout the war, 
and at its close returning to Jefferson County, 
where he began farming some four miles from 
Beaumont. 

After a number of years thus engaged Mr. Lang- 
ham came to Beaumont, in 1875, having been elected 
Sheriff and Tax Collector of Jefferson County, be- 
ginning a public career that was marked by many 
distinctions. He held the combined offices for twen- 
ty-six years, at which time the two offices were sep- 
arated. He then became a candidate for tax collector, 
being elected by a large majority, and was re- 
elected each succeeding term until his resignation. 
Later, at the urging of his many friends, he became 
a candidate for mayor, being elected to this office, 
which he held for four years, during which time 
he was active in securing many civic advantages 
for Beaumont. At the expiration of four years he 
resigned to look after his extensive private in- 
terests, which included much property acquired from 
his real estate dealings. Mr. Langham, although, 
a candidate for office on many occasions was never 
defeated, and there have been few men in public 
life so generally esteemed and admired. In the 
"Story of Beaumont" there was a statement that 
Mr. Langham had been defeated for mayor at one 
time, but this was a mistake, because he was never 
defeated for office. 

Thomas Henry Langham was married at the old 
French home, on Voth Road, the twenty-ninth of 
December, 1869, to Miss Mary Elizabeth French, who 
was born in that home, the daughter of David R. 
French, who came with his father to Jefferson 
County as a boy of twelve years, settling on that 
place, where he lived until his death, at the age of 
ninety-five years. Her mother was Miss Amelia 
Guidry, a native of Louisiana. Mr. and Mrs. Lang- 



ham had an ideal married life, he finding in his 
home, his wife and children an interest which left no 
room for clubs and lodges. Mrs. Langham, a woman 
of many accomplishments, and a talent for home 
making, was his constant companion and inspira- 
tion throughout the many years of their married life. 
They had three children: Lula, wife of Guy W. 
Junker of Beaumont, and who has one child, Lyle, 
who is married to John Spencer, and also has one 
child, Junker Spencer; Henry C. Langham, who is 
married to Hancel Finley, and has two sons, T. 
Henry, who is married to Arline Stewart and has 
one child, Hancel, and R. W. Langham; and Sadie, 
wife of W. F. Treadaway and who has two sons: 
W. F., Jr., and Tom Langham Treadaway. 

Mr. Langham's death, which occurred at Beaumont 
the ninteenth of April, 1919, was a deep loss to 
Beaumont, and it will be long before his place will 
be filled. He had friends by the hundreds, men and 
women who appreciated his fine qualities, and who 
knew him for a real man, honest and upright in 
all his dealings. Even criminals, while fearing him, 
yet admired him for his square dealing at all times. 
His name was synonymous with a high integrity, and 
on many occasions he was sought to act as receiver 
for some bankrupt concern because of his high stand- 
ing as a business man of sound and constructive 
ideals. During the almost half a century of his 
life in Beaumont he stood for the highest type of 
civic development and betterment, using his in- 
fluence at all times to secure for his city the ad- 
vancement that he so firmly believed in, and there 
are today many memorials to him in this city that 
will stand as long as Beaumont shall stand, and 
recall his memory to the citizens as one of the real 
builders of his city. 

OHN WILKINS HUTCHISON, attorney at 
law, Houston, Texas, began the practice of 
his profession here in April, 1916, and in 
a very short time had established an en- 
viable reputation in his chosen branch of legal 
jurisprudence. Prior to taking up the study of law, 
Mr. Hutchison had for almost fifteen years been 
active in the business and railroad world. He started 
his career in the railroad service in a minor position 
when eighteen years of age, continuing in this field 
of activity until 1907, during which time he had 
occupied many positions of trust and as an offical 
of one of the largest railroads of the Lone Star 
State. He later engaged in the real estate business 
in the State of Pennsylvania, and still later returned 
to this State and was associated with some of the 
largest interests of North Texas. 

A native Texan, Mr. Hutchison was born at Bryan 
on April 6th, 1870. His father, Abraham Young 
Hutchison (now deceased), was a native of Spring- 
field, Tennessee, and throughout his life was en- 
gaged in the mercantile business and was known 
as one of the most progressive merchants of his 
native State and of Texas. His mother, Mrs. Mary 
K. (Wilkins) Hutchison, was a native of Brenham, 
Texas, where she was a member of one of Texas' 
most prominent families. Mrs. Hutchison is well 
and favorably known as a composer of sacred music. 
Mr. Hutchison's education was obtained in the 
public and high schools of Brenham, Texas, after 
which he became a student of Baylor University, 
where he pursued a commercial course, but did 




1074 





>J2-^*S^-^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



not graduate from this institution. In 1888, 
Mr. Hutchison entered the employ of the 
Houston and Texas Central and the Texas and 
Pacific Railroad at Sherman, Texas, as assistant 
ticket agent. In 1895 he was made city passen- 
ger and ticket agent at Sherman of the Cotton 
Belt Railroad, where later he became joint 
passenger agent of the Cotton Belt and the Santa 
Fe railroads. He continued in this position until 
1902, when he removed to San Antonio and accepted 
the position of passenger agent of the San Antonio 
and Aransas Pass Railroad, and was made travel- 
ing passenger agent of this line of road in 1905. 
He continued in this capacity until 1907, when he 
removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania, in order to en- 
gage in the real estate business there. He was suc- 
cessful in this field of activity, and during 1908, he 
became associated with the Henry L. Doherty in- 
terests at Altoona, Pennsylvania, but remained with 
this organization but a few months when he returned 
to Texas in order to accept a position with the Hob- 
son Electric Company at Dallas, Texas. He remained 
with this company until 1910, when he went with the 
Western Electric Company at Dallas, and remained 
with this company until 1912, when ill health forced 
him to sever his connection with this organization. 
Mr. Hutchison had had throughout his life, a desire 
to become a lawyer, and after the failure of his 
health, he began the study of law, continuing to read 
under some of the State's leading attorneys for a 
period of four years. He passed the bar examination 
of the Court of First Civil Appeals of Galveston, 
Texas, in April, 1916. He then established his home 
and office in Houston and began the practice of law 
alone, continuing in this profession until the be- 
ginning of the World War, when he entered the 
service of the United States War Department. He 
was particularly fitted for a position of a military 
nature on account of the training which he had at 
various times received. Prior to the beginning of the 
war he was captain and personnel adjutant, 8th 
Infantry of the National Guard of Texas. During 
the war, he was assigned to Selective Service Law 
Department, adjutant general's office, stationed in 
the war department at Austin, Texas. Mr. Hutchi- 
son had direct and complete charge of draft induc- 
tions and allocation of all calls from the provost 
marshal general's office to the two hundred and 
eighty-two draft boards in the State of Texas. This 
position was a very responsible one in that he was 
responsible for all reports and records pertaining to 
the draft induction. He originated and designed 
many of the report forms used by the war depart- 
ment for the draft. During his period of service, 
Mr. Hutchison was promoted to the rank of major. 
He was discharged in June, 1919, and on January 
5th, 1924, he was appointed by the president of the 
United States as major adjutant general and rated 
as a specialist, thereby establishing a record in 
military circles that is equal in honor to any ever 
bestowed on a man without being a graduate of 
some of the leading military institutions of the 
country. Mr. Hutchison was a member of the A. F. 
and A. M. with membership in Temple Lodge No. 4, 
of Houston, where he belonged to Ruthven Com- 
mandery No. 2, and was a Knight Templar of Texas 
Consistory No. 1. He also was a member of the 
Scottish Rite body of this order at Galveston, and 
was a Shriner of Arabia Temple of Houston, being a 




life member of this organization. He was a member 
of the Elks Lodge of Houston No. 151, the Woodmen 
of the World and many other of the fraternal, social 
and business organizations of Houston and other 
portions of Texas. He was a consistent member of 
the Baptist Church, this being the religion of his 
forbears, and to which he clung with the religious 
tenacity of those members of his family, who were 
the pioneers in the religious life of Texas. Mr. 
Hutchison died in Houston, Texas, on October 22, 
1924, among his many friends and business associ- 
ates, who knew him as a man of sterling qualities, 
loved by those who knew him, intuitively esteemed 
by all who had the honor of his acquaintance. A 
gentle, kindly character that appealed to all. A 
worthy and honored citizen, who was ever ready to 
contribute his material aid and time toward the up- 
building of his city and state. Mr. Hutchison was en- 
dowed with vigorous intellectual powers, lofty ideals 
of commercial and civic virtue, a personality ener- 
getic, gracious and commanding in its high sense of 
honor and probity. His attributes of character had 
endeared him to a wide host of friends and made his 
name illustrious in the life of a great community. 

AURENCE CARR, member of the firm of 
Dunn and Carr, stock and bond brokers, 
604 Union National Bank Building, Hous- 
ton, Texas, has since this firm was organ- 
ized in 1919 devoted his time exclusively to the sale 
of stocks, bonds and all other securities, and has a 
large and growing business. Mr. Carr, prior to the 
organizing of his firm, had a wide experience in the 
stock and bond business with Neuhaus and Com- 
pany of Houston. He opened an office for this firm 
in Dallas in 1912 and was manager of this business 
until 1914, when he returned to Houston. Associated 
with Mr. Carr as a partner is Mr. Dewitt Dunn. 

A native Texan, Mr. Carr was born in Houston 
January 7th, 1887. His father, J. O. Carr (deceased 
since 1921), was born at Charleston, West Virginia, 
and came to Houston in 1870, and was associated 
with the Houston and Texas Central Railroad prac- 
tically all his life, and was paymaster of this rail- 
road when he retired from active business pursuits 
in 1910. When twelve years of age, Mr. Carr started 
his business career in the office of the General 
Freight Agent of the Houston and Texas Central 
Railroad where he remained for a number of years. 
His next line of employment was with James Bute 
and Company of Houston, after which he entered the 
oil business at Beaumont. After a few years, he 
returned to Houston and entered the business office 
of the Houston Post where he remained for two 
years, and then went with the Kirby Lumber Com- 
pany. He traveled for the Big Tree Lumber Com- 
pany from 1907 to 1917, after which he became as- 
sociated with the Neuhaus Company. 

Mr. Carr was married at Dallas, February 14th, 
1914, to Miss Kathleen Moroney, a member of a well 
known North Texas family and a daughter of W. 
J. Moroney, a prominent lawyer of Dallas. They 
have five children: Laurence Carr, Jr., Mary Kath- 
leen, Dabney, Charlotte and John O. Carr. Mr. and 
Mrs. Carr reside at 3419 Audubon Place. Mr. Carr 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus, Houston 
Club, Houston Country Club, River Oaks Country 
Club, Chamber of Commerce, the Houston Cotton 
Exchange, and the Catholic Church. 



1077 



MEN OF TEXAS 




EORGE O'BRIEN MILLARD. Beaumont 
has claimed among its citizens many promi- 
nent and public spirited men, men who 
through their unselfish interest in the wel- 
fare of the city have furthered civic and commercial 
advancement, and of these men none have stood 
higher in public esteem, or have taken a more promi- 
nent part in affairs, and particularly in the advance- 
ment of the public school system of Beaumont, than 
has George O'Brien Millard, one of the most hon- 
ored pioneers of this city. Although Mr. Millard 
occupied a high place in the business world, and 
was one of those constructive business men who in- 
fluence commercial progress, it was not for his busi- 
ness activities that he was most distinguished, but 
for the years which he unselfishly devoted to the 
development of the Beaumont public schools. To 
him is" given credit, and without reserve, for the 
splendid public school system this city can claim 
today, and it was these schools, rather than the 
business he had built up, which were his special 
pride. 

George O'Brien Millard was born on the twenty- 
second of February, 1847, son of Sidney H. Millard, 
one of the real pioneers of Beaumont, who came 
here in the thirties, and was one of the four men to 
lay out the city. Sidney H. Millard was the first 
county judge of Jefferson County, living near where 
the present standpipe now stands, and it was here 
that he reared his son, George O'Brien Millard. 
The latter attended the schools in Bastrop, but was 
largely self educated, and at an early age entered 
the army, at the beginning of the Civil War, fight- 
ing on the side of the Confederacy throughout the 
conflict. After the close of the war he was a 
guard at the Huntsville Penitentiary for a short 
time, after which he returned to Beaumont, in 1875, 
and was a clerk in the John C. Craig mercantile 
store for four years. He then managed the store 
for Olive and Sternenberg for a while, later going 
with the Texas Tram and Lumber Company in 
which he was active for years. He operated the ice 
plant for a year, later going in business for him- 
self in the late eighties, engaging in the hardware 
business for a time. During these years he had ac- 
cumulated property that was fast increasing in 
value, and around 1900 he sold his business interests 
and spent his remaining years looking after his 
property interests and in his public school work. 

Mr. Millard was married at Beaumont, the twenty- 
second of March, 1877, to Miss Amma Reeves, a 
native of Mississippi, and the daughter of John C. 
Reeves, a North Carolinian, who went to Mississippi 
as a young man and lived there until his death. 
Mrs. Millard's mother, who before her marriage 
was Miss Barbaria Shankle, a native of Tennessee, 
came to Texas after her husband's death, coming 
to Beaumont in 1872, and made this city her home 
until her death. Mr. and Mrs. Millard had an ideal 
home life, and were the parents of three children, 
Paul Millard of Beaumont, and who married Miss 
Margaret Allison, a native of Louisiana, and who is 
a well known insurance man and also manages the 
Millard estate; Minnie, wife of O. E. Moore of In- 
dependence, Missouri, and who has two children, 
Leslie Millard and Theoric Edwin, and Leslie Reeves 
Millard, who was killed by bandits while in Mexico 
for an oil company. Mrs. Millard was the constant 
companion of her husband, taking a deep interest 




and pardonable pride in his work for the public 
schools. Since Mr. Millard's death she has con- 
tinued to reside in Beaumont, living at 393 Austin 
Avenue, the family home for many years. 

Mr. Millard's death occurred at Beaumont, the 
twenty-sixth of January, 1909. By a strange fate 
it was while carrying out some work for the pub- 
lic schools that he received the injury, to his thumb, 
which resulted in his death. For years an alderman 
and a member of the school board, Mr. Millard was 
constantly alert for the means to advance the 
schools. He had guarded the standards of the pub- 
lic schools with a zealousness that was remarkable 
and commanding of esteem. Mr. Millard was a 
steward of the First Methodist Church, and past 
commander of the Albert Sidney Johnston Camp of 
Confederate Veterans. His death was a deep loss 
not only to the public schools but to the city, and 
his memory will live in the hearts of the peo- 
ple as long as the city stands as an unselfish, 
patriotic, truly Christian citizen, who spent his life 
for the advancement of his city. 

H. POWER, president of Murphy & Bolanz 
Company, Incoporated, and the Power In- 
vestment Company of Dallas, came to the 
city with the Murphy & Bolanz Company 
in 1897. Mr. Power has devoted his entire business 
career to real estate achievement, investments and 
loans and as president of the above named concerns 
has gained wide recognition in these fields. Murphy 
& Bolanz Company was organized in 1874 and has 
the distinction of being the oldest real estate firm 
in the state. The company handles general real 
estate, fire insurance, loans and rental leases and 
has been the determining factor in a number of the 
large real estate deals of this city for the past 
decade, among which are the Union Terminal, Butler 
Brothers and the Adolphus Hotel sites. The com- 
pany also publishes Murphy & Bolanz's official Map 
of Dallas, which is considered the most accurate map 
of the city. The Home Lease Department is unique 
in that it sends out to all subscribers a weekly digest 
of the real estate conditions of Dallas. This com- 
pany has laid out and supervised the sale of twenty- 
seven Dallas additions, 4,200 lots. The present home 
of the company was purchased by Mr. Power for the 
company early in 1920 and is located at Commerce 
and Field streets. There are twenty-three employed 
in the organization which does over $1,000,000 in 
business per year. The company has over three 
thousand clients in and out of Dallas and have on 
their books for clients $4,500 on Dallas real estate 
confined mostly to residential loans. It has always 
been Mr. Power's hobby to assist people in building 
and owning their own homes. 

The Power Investment Company was organized 
in 1910 by Mr. Power with a capital of $5,000, which 
was increased to $100,000 in 1915 and gradually has 
been increased until now it has a paid capital of 
$500,000. This company is represented exclusively 
by the Murphy & Bolanz Company. The business of 
this concern is to develop residential districts and 
to build houses and dispose of same to people of 
moderate means. In 1919 it built one hundred and 
twenty-five houses and in 1920 about one hundred. 
During the past five years has erected over five 
hundred. 



1078 



^ 







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, '■".,}:,.?■'. J 




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/uo. &@ Tu^u-c^Jl 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




UDGE BENNETT BRADLEY JOHNSON, 

county judge of Jefferson County, is one of 
the best known men in Beaumont, having 
been a resident of this city and actively 
identified with its various affairs for seventeen 
years. Judge Johnson has occupied his present po- 
sition since January 1, 1922 and has made an en- 
viable reputation in his skilful handling of the coun- 
ty's affairs. Efficiency and economy have charac- 
terized his administration of the office of county 
judge and he has been accorded the whole hearted 
support of the business interests of Beaumont and 
of Jefferson County generally. 

As the presiding officer of the Commissioner's 
Court, Judge Johnson exercises general supervision 
over the road and drainage construction and main- 
tenance and other public activities of the county. 
The issuance of bonds for public improvements also 
come under the direction of his court and in most 
cases the expenditure of the bond money is under 
the direct supervision of the county judge and com- 
missioners of the county. 

In legal matters the only cases tried before Judge 
Johnson are lunacy charges and the litigation in 
connection with probate matters. 

A native of Texas, Judge Johnson was born at 
Port Bolivar, Galveston County, on July 29, 1869, 
a son of Andrew J. and Camilla (Shaw) Johnson. 
His father was a pioneer citizen of Galveston Coun- 
ty, coming there in 1867, and was well known there 
as a farmer, stockman and sheep and cattle raiser. 
In his youth, Judge Johnson attended the public and 
high schools in Galveston and later was associated 
with his father in farming and cattle raising and in 
the operation of a cotton gin. 

When twenty-two years of age he became con- 
nected with the United States government engineer- 
ing department and for nine years was employed in 
the work of building the fortifications and jetties at 
Galveston harbor. During the last four years of his 
work he was superintendent of construction. When 
he left Galveston in 1903, the employes of the gov- 
ernment in the jetty work presented him with a 
beautiful gold watch. After this he engaged in the 
mercantile business at Port Bolivar for seven years 
before removing to Beaumont in 1908. He still is 
interested in the lands in Galveston County that 
were a part of his father's estate. 

Judge Johnson came to Beaumont as a building 
contractor, but after a few years joined the police 
department as a patrolman. He served four years 
as assistant chief and two years as chief of police, 
being connected with the Beaumont police depart- 
ment altogether for a period of twelve years. He 
left the department as chief to become county judge 
of Jefferson County. 

In 1891 Judge Johnson was married at Galveston 
to Miss Delia May Simpton, daughter of George 
Simpton, well known cattle man of Galveston Coun- 
ty. Judge and Mrs. Johnson have two daughters; 
Mrs. Leona Brown and Mrs. Helen Romeo. His 
grandchildren are Marguerite Brown and O. B., Aud- 
drey, Elsie and Josephine Romeo. B. B. Brown, the 
husband of the younger daughter, is a conductor 
on the T. & N. O. Railroad and Robert Romeo, the 
husband of the elder daughter, is district manager 
of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, lo- 
cated at Morgan City, Louisiana. 

Judge Johnson is a man of fine personality and is 




a keen analyst of human nature. Both his public 
and private life have been as an open book to his 
constituents and he has won and retained the con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellow men. 

Manifesting at all times a keen and lively inter- 
est in civic affairs, Judge Johnson is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias, the Lions Club and Beau- 
mont Chamber of Commerce. His church affiliation 
is First Methodist. 

AM Z. POWELL, pioneer lumberman and 
business man, has been a resident of Beau- 
mont for more than two decades, having 
come here in 1901 when the city attained 
worldwide fame by reason of the opening of the 
famous Spindle Top gusher oil field. Mr. Powell 
did not engage in the oil business, however, and 
has never done so, but has devoted almost his entire 
business career to the lumbering industry. In this 
he is admittedly a leader and the mill owned by 
his company is the largest in Beaumont. 

Mr. Powell is identified with the Neches Lumber 
and Building Company, which has its offices and 
plant at 1500-1600 Pine Street. J. R. Callaghan is 
president of the company and Mr. Powell is vice 
president and general manager. 

The company was organized in 1907 and is capi- 
talized at $75,000.00. It does a general lumber 
business, including wholesale and retail, and manu- 
factures most of the lumber which it handles. Be- 
sides the large lumber mill located on the ship 
channel the Neches Lumber and Building Company 
has a large cypress shingle mill which has a capacity 
of over thirty-five thousand shingles daily. The 
lumber mill has a capacity of fifty thousand board 
feet daily. About thirty per cent of the lumber 
handled is cypress and the remainder is made up 
of pine and gum. A total of 125 men are employed 
in the various departments. 

One department of the company's business is 
devoted to the financing of homes and splendid 
service is rendered clients of the company in this 
department. 

Mr. Powell is a native of Missouri and was born 
at Kansas City on July 22, 1873. He is a son of 
A. J. and Phoebe (Johnson) Powell, and received 
his preliminary education at Independence, Mo., 
where for many years his father was engaged in 
the lumber business. He attended Woodland Col- 
lege at Independence and upon coming to Texas 
in 1901 he located at Beaumont and established a 
hard-wood saw mill a few miles north of the city. 
He operated this mill for about three years and 
then built his present mill, which he has operated 
since that time. 

In 1907 Mr. Powell was married at Beaumont to 
Miss Carrie Hobner, a native of Baltimore, Mary- 
land. Their home is at 1737 Orange Street. 

Devoting practically his whole life to the lumber 
business, Mr. Powell is an expert in this line. He 
knows thoroughly every detail of the manufacture 
and sale of lumber from the stump to the finished 
and delivered product. He has a splendid person- 
ality and is one of the best known lumbermen in 
Southwest Texas. 

Mr. Powell has always taken an active interest in 
civic affairs and served the city as alderman for 
two years. He is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and the Beaumont Club. 



1081 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ALTER J. CRAWFORD. The career of Wal- 
ter J. Crawford, for more than a quarter 
of a century a leader in the political and 
civic life at Beaumont, and one of the most 
distinguished attorneys of the Lone Star State, is 
an essential part of the history of this city, and 
forms one of the interesting chapters in the story 
of the upbuilding of this city. Always in the lead 
in every forward movement, his individual influence 
served to accomplish a great many things for his 
city. A man of outstanding personality, and en- 
dowed with the highest mental qualities, he had 
that extraordinary courage that enabled him to 
face the gravest responsibilities, and to impress 
his life indelibly on his community. 

Mr. Crawford was born at Mount Vernon, Frank- 
lin County, Texas, the twenty-fifth day of Febru- 
ary, 1873. His father, J. S. Crawford, a pioneer 
school teacher of this state, built up a large school 
at Campbell, Hunt County. He later moved with 
his family to Austin. Mr. Crawford's mother, be- 
fore her marriage Miss Lou Eddins, was the sis- 
ter of Judge Walter Eddins, a distinguished lawyer. 
He finished his high school work at Austin and 
entered the University of Texas, where he finished 
the law course in two years, graduating in 1897. 
Later, in 1904, the B. A. degree was conferred 
upon him. 

Mr. Crawford came to Beaumont just after leav- 
ing the university, in 1898 and became associated 
with Judge W. H. Ford, forming the firm of Ford 
and Crawford, which continued until the former's 
death, in 1901. Mr. Crawford then became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Smith, Crawford and Sonfield, 
which, when Mr. Sonfield left the firm in 1915, be- 
came Smith and Crawford, an association contin- 
uing until Mr. Crawford's death. Mr. Crawford was 
especially prominent in corporation law, his master- 
ly handling of corporation problems resulting in 
his being retained by many important firms as 
counsel. He was also interested in many enter- 
prises of financial and commercial importance, and 
was a director of the First National Bank, the Or- 
ange Petroleum Company, vice president and direc- 
tor of the Gulf Export and Transportation Com- 
pany, the Beaumont Hotel Company and the Inter- 
national Lumber and Export Company. He was 
chairman of the Chamber of Commerce Committee 
that made possible, through the sale of the stock, 
the Beaumont Hotel, and was foremost in many ac- 
tivities of like character, and during the World War 
served as chairman of the legal advisory committee. 

Mr. Crawford was married at Dallas, in 1901, to 
Miss Cora Shults, daughter of Martin Shults, a 
pioneer lumber man of Texas, and who shipped the 
first load of lumber over the Houston and Texas 
Central Railroad, and Alexine Smith Shults. Mr. 
Shults was a close personal friend of General Sam 
Houston, and one of the prominent men of his day. 
Mrs. Crawford, in addition to being the constant 
companion and inspiration of her husband, has been 
an ideal homemaker and mother to the two children 
born to them. These children are Alexine and W. J. 
Jr. The family home is at 1494 Broadway. 

Texas Law Review of October, 1924, said, "Judge 
Crawford held the distinction of being one of most 
eloquent members of the Texas bar. His fame in 
this respect was not confined in the courts of the 
country for his voice was frequently raised in com- 



manding eloquence in behalf of some worthy move- 
ments, his country and for democracy. 

Although eminently fitted for any office within 
the gift of the people of the state of Texas, Judge 
Crawford was never a candidate, but was frequently 
in the midst of the fight in behalf of a friend. 
For two terms he held the party office of chairman of 
the Democratic Executive Committee of Jefferson 
County and was frequently a delegate to state and 
district conventions. From 1906 to 1908 he was a 
member of the State Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Mi-. Crawford was a steward in the First Meth- 
odist Church, of which the family were members. 
He was a Knight Templar, a Shriner and an Elk, 
and a member of the Woodmen of the World. He 
was formerly president of the Texas Alumni Asso- 
ciation, former president of the Neches Club, for- 
mer exalted ruler of the Elks, a member of the 
state normal board of regents, a charter member of 
the Chamber of Commerce, which he served for years 
as director, and a member of the Kappa Alpha 
fraternity. He was active in Masonic work and lec- 
turer in the twenty-eighth degree. He was formerly 
president of the Rotary Club and served on the board 
of directors of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. He was manager of the campaign of W. P. 
Hobby at the time of his election as governor, and 
was prominent in all political events of the day. His 
death, which occurred at Beaumont the nineteenth of 
February, 1924, was a deep loss to the city of Beau- 
mont, and marked the passing of one of the most 
prominent and constructive citizens of this com- 
munity. 

EM PUTMAN OGDEN— The name of Lem 
Putman Ogden has many memorials at 
Beaumont, his native city, wherein he spent 
many years of his life, and while prospering 
as the city prospered unselfishly found in his in- 
creasing fortune an opportunity to aid in those civ- 
ic movements which are important to the progress 
of a city, and to take a constructive interest in the 
development of Beaumont along commercial lines. 
Mr. Ogden was interested in enterprises of wide 
scope, and as a large property owner was instru- 
mental in putting several new additions on the mar- 
ket, and due to his interest in this field was able 
to secure many advantages, particularly along the 
lines of public improvements, for Beaumont. 

Lem Putman Ogden was born at Beaumont, Texas, 
on the banks of the Neches River, in 1845. His 
father, Frederick Ogden, came here in 1841 and was 
a lawyer and physician of the early days, being ac- 
tive in these professions until his death. His mother 
was prior to her marriage, Miss Mary Wilcox. Lem 
Putman Ogden attended the schools of Beaumont 
until after his parents' death, when he was taken 
back to Kentucky by relatives, finishing school in 
that state, and later joining the army there. He 
fought in most of the important battles of the Civil 
War, receiving a wound in the pit of the stomach 
that eventually caused his death. At the close of the 
war he returned to Texas, primarily to look up his 
brother, Edward, who had remained in this state. 
He found him in Calhoun County, driving an ox 
team from Calhoun County to Houston, hauling 
freight. Together they came to Beaumont to look 
up and claim property owned here by their father, 




1082 




/Ozz^z^fr QraMjfr^oLT 




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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



located it and recovered a part of it. They began 
manufacturing hand made shingles, which they took 
to Galveston by schooner, where they were sold. 
Later Lem Putman Ogden, with his brother, Edward, 
engaged in the mercantile business, establishing one 
of the large general mercantile stores of Beaumont, 
which was later sold. Edward Ogden then became 
Sheriff of Jefferson County, an office he held for 
sixteen years, during which time his brother, Lem 
Putman acted as his chief deputy, who also served 
as county clerk. The latter also began in the real 
estate business about that time, buying up land in 
and near Beaumont. He built the first brick build- 
ing to be erected here, this building now being 
known as the Ogden Hotel. Mr. Ogden owned the 
entire block on which the hotel is located, and also 
another block on Main Street, as well as the land 
from which the Odgen Addition was developed. He 
was one of the organizers of the First National 
Bank of Beaumont, and for many years owned the 
Dunlap Drug Store. In addition to these proper- 
ties Mr. Ogden also owned other scattered interests, 
among them the block whereon is located the Ogden 
School, a tract which Mrs. Ogden gave to the city. 

Mr. Ogden was married at Beaumont, the nine- 
teenth of January, 1870, to Miss Cynthealia McClure, 
a native of Mississippi, and the daughter of Andrew 
McClure, who came to Texas shortly after the Civil 
War, and Jane Lacy McClure, whose death oc- 
curred when Mrs. Ogden was an infant. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ogden were ideal companions throughout their 
married life, and were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, three of whom survive, Mittie, wife of George 
P. Sweatt of Beaumont, and who has one child, 
Miss Ed Ogden Sweatt, named for her uncle, Edward 
Ogden; Katie May, wife of Dr. C. A. Cobb, one of the 
prominent surgeons of Beaumont, and Kittie Mc- 
Clure, wife of Autry Greer of Beaumont, and who 
has two children, Cytheal Ogden and Betty Allen 
Greer. 

Mr. Ogden died at Beaumont the ninteenth of 
June, 1903, and with his going the city lost one of 
its finest citizens, and a man who had been most 
active in every progressive line of civic endeavor. 

The true type of city builder, Mr. Ogden had while 
promoting his own interests, developed them along 
lines consistent with the advancement of Beaumont. 
Mr. Ogden was a Blue Lodge Mason, taking a deep 
interest in this order, and had many friends at 
Beaumont who found him a friend, a sterling 
citizen, and a man whose death left vacant a place 
in the life of the community. 

ICT1RLO GEORGE GREEVES. The name of 
Orlo George Greeves figures prominently 
in business and civic activities at Beaumont, 
... ,.^_ during a period covering more than a dec- 
ade, when he was a factor not only in industrial 
circles, as head of a large oil well supply house, but 
also in civic affairs, giving a large part of his time 
to constructive work in this field. During those 
years Mr. Greeves demonstrated a business ability 
which made him a leader among the business men 
of the city and resulted in the building of an enter- 
prise of vital importance to the prosperity of Beau- 
mont. He was also keenly awake to his duties as 
a citizen and took a deep interest in all activities 
which had to do with the progress of the city. 

Orlo George Greeves was a native Texan, born 
in Orange the twenty-eighth of August, 1886. His 




father, Orlo Bruce Greeves, a Canadian by birth, 
came to Texas locating first at Orange, where he 
spent a number of years, and later removing to 
Beaumont in the late nineties, his death occurring 
there. The subject of this sketch attended the pub- 
lic schools of Beaumont and later went with his 
father in the iron foundry business, receiving his 
early business training under him. After a number 
of years with his father, during which time he 
became thoroughly familiar with every phase of the 
foundry business, he made the decision to enter 
business for himself, establishing, in 1910, the 
Neches Supply and Equipment Company, of which 
he was president and manager until his death. Mr. 
Greeves watched this business grow and develop 
under his constructive and progressive methods, un- 
til it became one of the largest oil well and oil re- 
finery supply houses in South Texas. 

This business, managed today by his widow, is 
a monument to the vision of its founder, and the 
concrete evidence of his executive ability. The com- 
pany today handles mostly refining equipment, iron 
castings, steel rails, steel of all kinds, fire brick air 
tools, etc., and salesmen cover the Gulf Coast and 
Mexico. Offices are located in the Kyle Theatre 
Building, Beaumont. 

Mr. Greeves was married at Beaumont the eighth 
of September, 1908, to Miss Zilpah Bushea, a native 
of Waco. Mrs. Greeves was the constant companion 
of her husband during his lifetime, taking a deep 
interest in his career. Since his death she has taken 
over the management of the Neches Supply and 
Equipment Company, continuing it along the same 
progressive lines mapped out by her husband, and 
has developed into one of the leading business 
women of Beaumont. She has an executive ability 
unusual in a woman, and directs her affairs along 
efficient lines favorable to expansion and develop- 
ment. Mrs. Greeves erected the Orlo Terrace, one 
of the exclusive apartment houses in Beaumont, lo- 
cated at 2209 Calder Avenue. This beautiful struc- 
ture occupies two and a half lots and his eight apart- 
ments, each of six rooms and beautifully finished 
with many unusual features. This achievement 
further marks Mrs. Greeves as a woman of business 
talents, and is a contribution to the city. 

Mr. Greeves' death occurred the nineteenth of De- 
cember, 1920, as the result of an accidental gun 
shot wound received while hunting in company with 
a life long friend. He was a member of the Country 
Club, the Beaumont Club, the Neches Club, the 
Round Table Club of which he was a past president, 
the Rotary Club, the Chamber of Commerce and 
of other civic organizations. He served as a di- 
rector of the Texas National Bank. As a sportsman 
he was well known in Texas and for two years he 
was president of the Beaumont Baseball Associa- 
tion. His death, coming at the zenith of a career 
of real achievement, was untimely and a distinct 
loss not only to the business world at Beaumont, 
but to the State in general, and to his many friends 
in all parts of the State who knew and admired him 
for his many outstanding qualities. A man of 
highest integrity and sterling qualities of citizen- 
ship he was able to influence to a marked degree the 
trend of progress in Beaumont and the name of Orlo 
George Greeves will ever be associated with the 
progress of this city during those years when his 
interests were interwoven with those of the city. 



1085 



MEN OF TEXAS 




UDGE EDMOND A. McDOWELL, whose 
name is honored at Beaumont as a lawyer 
and jurist who for more than two decades 
has occupied a high place in the confidence 
of the people, was at various times called upon to 
fill positions of public trust wherein he has demon- 
strated an official and judicial ability and a devotion 
to the best interests of the community which won the 
highest approval. Judge McDowell served as judge 
of the Sixtieth District Court, to which position 
he was appointed in June, 1915, by Governor Fer- 
guson, which office he held until his death, April 
14, 1924. After his appointment he was elected by the 
people twice to this judgeship. He had under his jur- 
isdiction both civil and criminal cases in Jefferson 
County, and the wisdom of his decisions and the 
capable manner in which he dispatched the duties 
of his judicial office met with the approval of both 
bench and bar. Judge McDowell took an active in- 
terest in politics and was one of the leading political 
factors in this county. Just prior to his appoint- 
ment to the judgeship he served as a member of the 
legislature in 1914 and 1915, and during that time 
influenced much of the important legislation. 

Judge McDowell was born in Amite County, 
Mississippi, the eighteenth of December, 1857, the 
son of Thomas H. McDowell, also a native of that 
county, and a farmer and land owner there until his 
death in 1898, and Lethea (Lea) McDowell. He 
spent his boyhood in his native county, attending 
the schools there, and later entered Mississippi Col- 
lege at Clinton, Mississippi, where he graduated in 
1877 with the B. L. degree. He then entered the 
University of Virginia, in the law department, and 
after finishing there came to Liberty, Mississippi, 
where he began his practice, and where he spent 
two years. He then came to Texas, going to Gates- 
ville in 1883, and practicing law there until 1898, at 
which time he spent two years at his old home in 
Mississippi, closing his father's estate. On his re- 
turn to Texas he went back to Gatesville and after 
two years there came to Beaumont, in August, 1902. 
During his residence in Gatesville, he served as dis- 
trict attorney, and as a trustee and and director of 
the Gatesville Reformatory, a position to which he 
was appointed by Governor Sul Ross. He became 
assistant county attorney of Jefferson County in 
1903, serving until 1904, after which he entered 
general practice, in which he engaged until his elec- 
tion to the legislature in 1914. 

Judge McDowell was married in Mississippi in 
1880, to Miss Minnie Davis McDowell, whose death 
occurred in 1898. He was later married the sec- 
ond time, in Mississippi, to Mrs. Laura Banks Fer- 
guson in 1899. Mrs. McDowell resides in Beaumont, 
where her son, Dr. Edward C. Ferguson, is num- 
bered among the leading medical men. Judge Mc- 
Dowell was an Odd Fellow. There were few civic 
events of importance in which Judge McDowell did 
not take an interest during his residence in Texas, 
and he was one of the most honored men of Beau- 
mont, and as a lawyer and judge attained a distinc- 
tion of which his many friends and family are justly 
proud. 

LFRED T. WEBSTER, for thirty-six years 

a citizen of Galveston was a well known 

business man and lover of the fine arts. At 

the time of his death, May 16th, 1924, he 

had retired from active participation in business af- 




fairs. Mr. Webster started his active business career 
with the Central and South American Telegraph 
Company in Panama in 1882, and remained there 
several years. During this period he made fre- 
quent trips to the South American countries in con- 
nection with his work. He came to Galveston in 
1888 with the All American Cables, Inc., as oper- 
ator. He worked for a number of years under Mr. 
R. L. McCann, whom he succeeded as general man- 
ager in 1909. Later he was appointed traffic con- 
troller of the company, having jurisdiction over the 
entire system from Galveston to Panama. Mr. Web- 
ster was compelled to retire from active duty in 1921 
due to failing health, and after a lapse of eight 
months decided to retire permanently on a pension. 
Mr. Webster was much thought of by the officials 
of his company and was considered as one of their 
ablest executives. The Galveston offices were recog- 
nized as being among the most important operated 
by this company. 

Mr. Webster was born in London, England, Aug- 
ust 29th, 1864, but was brought up in Edinburgh, 
Scotland, where he also received his education, Edin- 
burgh being one of the world's famous seats of 
learning. His father, Oswald Webster, was a pioneer 
in the British postal service, and was for many years 
telegrapher to the late Queen Victoria at Balmoral 
Castle, Scotland. Mr. Webster's mother was a mem- 
ber of a famous Scotch family of historical note, 
being a sister of John Kinross, composer of much 
of Scotia's stirring music. It was probably from 
this branch of the family that he inherited his love 
for the finer things of life, being himself an artist 
of some ability, though he only painted pictures to 
satisfy his desire for expression rather than as a 
commercial venture. 

He was united in marriage at Galveston, Texas, to 
Miss Jeanne Keenan, a native of Galveston. Her 
father, Michael J. Keenan, was born in Enniskillin, 
Ireland, and came to the United States in 1844 when 
six months old, settling in New Orleans, Louisiana. 
His cousin was Nancy Armstrong, famous in the his- 
tory of Ireland, and who lived until she was one 
hundred and twenty years old. From New Orleans 
he came to Galveston in 1864, going with the Galves- 
ton City Railroad. He built the Market Street Line 
when only nineteen years old. He retired one year 
ago, having been general superintendent for this 
company for twenty-four years. In addition to his 
work in Galveston he has built railroads in various 
parts of the country, principally California. Her 
mother was Fannie Ward Sadler, a native of New 
Orleans and a member of a well known Louisiana 
family. She died over three years ago. There was 
one child born of the union, a boy, Alfred Reginald. 

Mr. Webster was very much interested in the de- 
velopment of the Art League in Galveston, and was 
responsible for bringing to Galveston exhibits from 
the largest museums and art galleries in the country. 
He was a member of the New York Water Color 
Club. His own work as an artist was recognized 
and ranked as being in the professional class. For 
many years he was chief of the Clan McAlpine, a 
local Scottish society. He was an unassuming gen- 
tleman of splendid character and his life was an in- 
spiration to those with whom he came in contact, and 
as one of his intimate friends said, "No more fitting 
eulogy could be made of him than to say he was a 
good man, a good husband and a good father. 



1086 




dT.a. >z^W^£/. 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




P. WALLACE, one of the most prominent 
lumbermen of Southeast Texas, and one 
of the most constructive business men of 
Grayburg, has for around two decades been 
identified with commercial and civic activities in- 
cident to the development of this town. Mr. Wallace 
is treasurer and general manager of the Thompson 
and Ford Lumber Company, one of the larger lum- 
ber companies of the Lone Star State, and one hold- 
ing extensive timber interests near Grayburg. These 
interests include around one hundred thousand acres 
of cutover timber land, with an additional twenty- 
five thousand acres of timber to be cut, and a com- 
pletely equipped mill, located at Grayburg. The 
company has their own dry kiln, planing mill, and 
other equipment, with a capacity of one hundred and 
twenty-five thousand feet of lumber daily, which is 
shipped from Grayburg in wholesale lots. A force 
of around four hundred operatives are employed, 
who make their home at Grayburg. This town was 
established by the Thompson and Ford Lumber Com- 
pany in 1907, as a lumber camp, and was incor- 
porated one year later. Since that time it has de- 
veloped along progressive lines until it is a village 
of some three hundred residences, owned by the 
lumber company, and has its own stores, postoffice, 
mayor and other officials. The officers of the 
Thompson and Ford Lumber Company are: J. W. 
Reynolds of Houston, president; N. P. Sanderson of 
Texarkana, vice president, and W. P. Wallace, the 
subject of this sketch, treasurer and general man- 
ager. Mr. Wallace is one of the most experienced 
lumbermen of the State, thoroughly familiar with 
all phases of the industry, and has been in charge 
of the Thompson and Ford Company for many years, 
directing all operations, and developing the company 
to its present state of expansion. Mr. Wallace is 
also vice president of the William Graydon Hard- 
wood Company of Grayburg; president of the Wal- 
lace Brothers Lumber Company of Kyle, and a di- 
rector of the Doucette Lumber Company, at Hull. 
Mr. Wallace was born at Schulenburg, Texas, the 
seventh of March, 1875. His father, H. C. Wallace, 
one of the pioneer lumbermen of the Lone Star 
State, was a factor in the lumber business at Kyle, 
Texas, for forty years, and took a prominent part 
in the development of that town. His mother was 
Mrs. Julia L. Wallace. Mr. Wallace attended the 
schools near his home, later entering Southwestern 
University, at Georgetown, where he finished his 
education. Returning to Kyle he was in the lumber 
business with his father for five years, after which 
he went to Trinity County, where he engaged in the 
saw mill business for eight years. He then went 
with the Thompson-Tucker Lumber Company, which 
later became the Thompson-Ford Company, and has 
since been associated with the development of this 
company. 

Mr. Wallace was married at Fort Worth, Texas, to 
Miss Mary Randal. They have four children — 
Thomas, William, Martha and Mary — and reside at 
Grayburg. The family attend the Methodist Church, 
Mr. Wallace being a steward in the church. He is 
a Mason, Scottish Rite, and a member of El Mina 
Temple Shrine at Galveston. Mr. Wallace has been 
especially interested in educational matters for 
many years, and as president of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Sour Lake schools has done much to 
improve the school system. He is also deeply in- 




terested in civic affairs, and has done much to pro- 
mote the development of Grayburg, and to make 
it a desirable residence city. Few lumbermen of 
the State are better equipped than he to hold a re- 
sponsible position in the lumber business, and as a 
lumberman he is held in highest esteem by his as- 
sociates. 

R. NORVELL, president of the American 
National Bank of Beaumont, has been a 
resident of Beaumont for about forty-five 
years, and has taken an active part in the 
growth and development of this leading city of 
Southeast Texas. The American National Bank is 
one of the strongest banks of Texas, and its officers 
and directors are made up of a group of leading 
citizens of Beaumont and South Texas. The bank 
has a capital and surplus of six hundred thousand 
dollars, with deposits of about five million dollars. 
It was organized in June 1901, and re-organized 
in 1902. Mr. J. P. Withers was one of the organ- 
izers, and the first president of the bank. In 1902, 
Mr. Norvell became president, and has occupied this 
position creditably since that time. 

B. R. Norvell was born in Burtville, Newton Coun- 
ty, November 24th, 1865, the son of William, and 
Leonora Jane (Swearinger) Norvell. William Nor- 
vell lived for many years in Jasper County where he 
was a pioneer, and for many years he was in the 
mercantile business in Burtville, Texas. The boy- 
hood of Mr. Norvell was spent in work on a farm. 
In 1881 he came to Beaumont, and up until 1902 was 
engaged in the lumber business. He worked his way 
up in this field of endeavor, and has done practically 
all of the work required in the saw mill business 
except as sawyer and logger. For many years he 
was vice president and treasurer of the Keith Lum- 
ber Company, one of the leading concerns of Texas. 
It will be remembered that the Keith Lumber Com- 
pany sold its mills and timber to the Voth Lumber 
Company. It is, however, still engaged in the 
wholesale lumber business. For many years Mr. 
Norvell was also a director in the Industrial Lumber 
Company, but has not been active since engaging 
in banking. 

On April 26th, 1895, Mr. Norvell was married in 
Staunton, Virginia, to Miss Aurelia P. McCue, a na- 
tive of Virginia and a member of an old colonial 
Virginia family. Mr. and Mrs. Norvell have one 
daughter, now Mrs. Latta. Mr. Norvell is a mem- 
ber of the Beaumont, and Beaumont Country Clubs, 
Elks Lodge, and is a Knight Templar and Shriner of 
El Mina Temple. He has not confined his interests 
alone to banking, but has done much for his com- 
munity in the way of helping enterprises that built 
the city. He is a director of the Beaumont Hotel 
Company, which he aided materially in financial 
matters. He is a director and treasurer, and chair- 
man of the finance committee of the San Jacinto 
Life Insurance Company, assisting in financing the 
San Jacinto Life Insurance Building. He is a di- 
rector and one of the organizers of the Kirbyville 
State Bank, and a director of the Gulf Coast Lines. 
B. R. Norvell has come to be considered the dean of 
bankers in his section of the state, and is highly 
regarded and beloved by his associates and those 
with whom he has had dealings. His name will be 
recorded in the history of the city as one who has 
devoted a life time to its progress and growth. 



1089 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN C. WARD, pioneer of Beaumont and 
one of the most honored builders of this 
city, was actively associated with the life 
and progress of this Southeast Texas 
metropolis for more than half a century. His life 
was dedicated to usefulness and service, and few 
Texans have been held in higher esteem than John 
C. Ward. During his business life he was associated 
with practically every activity whose purpose was 
for the good of the city, and the development of the 
natural resources of this section, and few men have 
done more for the advancement of Beaumont 
than he. 

A native of the Lone Star State, Mr. Ward was 
born in Titus County the twenty-sixth of December, 
1851, son of Andrew Jackson and Nancy (Kelly) 
Ward. His father, a native of Arkansas who later 
came to Titus County, removed to Beaumont in 
1859, and was one of the pioneer lumbermen of this 
part of the State. His death occurred in 1867. His 
mother was also a native of Arkansas. Mr. Ward re- 
ceived his early education in the schools of Beau- 
mont, and after finishing his education entered the 
lumber business with J. G. and George W. Smyth 
at Smyth's Bluff. He was associated with them for 
four years, then going with the Beaumont Lumber 
Company, which also owned the Nona Mills Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Ward was vice president and 
manager for a decade. In 1893 Mr. Ward became 
president of the Beaumont Ice, Light and Refriger- 
ating Company, taking active charge of the organ- 
ization. He was president until 1903, when he re- 
signed, and removed to Waco to educate his chil- 
dren. He was in Waco until 1909, when he returned 
to Beaumont and was again made president of the 
Beaumont Ice, Light and Refrigerating Company. 
He was also active in the lumber business with J. 
S. and W. M. Rice at Ward, Louisiana, until 1913, 
when he became president of the First National 
Bank, holding this office until 1920, when he re- 
signed. In 1901 Mr. Ward organized the Keith- 
Ward Oil Company, of which he was vice president, 
and which was one of the first companies to operate 
in Spindle Top, drilling one of the first wells there, 
which proved to be a gusher. The company operated 
in the coastal fields until 1908, and was engaged in 
much development here, and was successful. 

Mr. Ward was married at Beaumont, in 1877, to 
Miss Pickie Kyle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Kyle. Mrs. Ward's death occurred in 1884. On De- 
cember 15, 1885, he was married for the second 
time, to Miss Belle Carroll, daughter of J. A. Carroll, 
a lumber man of Beaumont, and Martha (Long) 
Carroll. Mr. Ward had a family of eleven chil- 
dren: Wesley Kyle, John C, Jr.; J. S. and J. D. 
deceased, by the first marriage; H. L., Carroll, 
King, Mena, Seawillow, Alma and Emma Ward, by 
the second marriage. The Ward home at 1685 Park 
Street, is one of the finest in the city and has al- 
ways been the seat of a gracious hospitality. Mr. 
Ward was a Master Mason for almost half a cen- 
tury, having been made a Master Mason in 1875, 
and was one of the most honored members of this 
order. He was a member of both York and Scottish 
Rites, and of El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. 
He was a member of the Beaumont Club, and also 
of the Port Arthur Tarpon Club. He was a lover 
of out-door sports and many happy hours were spent 
by him at Port Arthur, one of the best known tar- 




pon fishing resorts on the coast. 

With the passing of John C. Ward on October 20, 
1924, Beaumont and the State of Texas, lost one 
of the most valued and public spirited citizens. Dur- 
ing the half century of his active association with 
the business world of Beaumont, there was associ- 
ated with his name an integrity and business honor 
that was a factor in the success of his many enter- 
prises. His business policies were at all times con- 
servative, and his investments all of a sound and 
substantial character. A man of distinguished ap- 
pearance who had lived his life for the good of 
others, he was known and loved throughout the en- 
tire community, and his death was the cause of much 
deep and sincere sorrow wherever he was known. 

APTAIN BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STER- 
LING. The founder of the Sterling family 
!| in Texas was Captain Benjamin Franklin 
Sterling, who for seventy years was num- 
bered among the hardy pioneers who blazed the 
way for the present generation. His children and 
grandchildren have taken a conspicuous part in the 
growth and development of the various communities 
in which they reside. The Sterling family is an 
unusual one, all members of which are not only 
successful in their various fields of activity, but 
are numbered among the finest type of the citizen- 
ship of Texas. 

Captain Sterling was born in Mississippi in 1831, 
and as a boy came to Texas in the late forties, 
locating at Liberty. He engaged in manufacturing 
and building here before the Civil War. When the 
war came he organized the first company that left 
Liberty County for the front. He was commissioned 
as first lieutenant in the company of which his 
wife's uncle, King Bryan, was captain. He did 
not go with this company, however, but soon or- 
ganized another company, which as captain he took 
to war and served in Waul's Texas Legion. He 
was an intimate friend of General Sam Houston and, 
like him, was against secession, but fought for the 
South when the war came. After the war he lo- 
cated in Chambers County and where he soon be- 
came one of the leading men of this section of the 
State. He was active in the social and political 
matters of the day and engaged in farming, mer- 
chandising and shipping. 

Captain Sterling was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Jane Bryan, a native of Texas and a 
member of one of the prominent Texas families. 
The Bryans were of Scotch-Irish descent, and their 
American ancestors were among the early settlers 
of Virginia. A member of this family, Luke Bryan, 
served with distinction in the battle of San Jacinto. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sterling were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Ross S., Frank P., Mrs. Annie L. 
Barrow, Miss Florence M., O. Bryan, James B., Al- 
bert A., John L., Mrs. Cora A. (Mrs. B. F.) Barrow, 
Mrs. George Koehler and Benjamin G. (deceased). 

Captain Benjamin Franklin Sterling passed away 
in 1917 and Mrs. Sterling in 1888. The name of 
Captain Sterling and family is indelibly written 
on the pages of Texas history, and members of the 
family are destined to play important parts through- 
out the generations. No finer tribute could be paid 
to the memory of Mr. and Mrs. Sterling than to say 
that they reared a family of children whom they 
inspired with Christian ideals, and who have emu- 
lated their parents in clean living, integrity and 
good citizenship. 



1090 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




RANK H. CARPENTER, for upwards of two 
decades one of the leading citizens at Sour 
Lake, and head of one of the largest finan- 
cial institutions of the city, is well known in 
the banking world in Texas. Mr. Carpenter is the 
president of the Sour Lake State Bank, one of the 
oldest banking institutions in the city, and the larg- 
est in point of customers. The Sour Lake State 
Bank was organized in 1909, it being the outgrowth 
of a private banking firm established a number of 
years earlier by Mr. Carpenter and R. S. Sterling, 
and reorganized in that year, under a state charter. 
The Sour Lake State Bank, a conservatively and 
capably directed institution, has at all times en- 
joyed the highest confidence of the business men 
of the city, and numbers among its depositors some 
of the leading individuals and firms here, including 
many of the oil companies located at Sour Lake. 
A modern banking home, owned by the bank, and 
located on one of the leading corners in the busi- 
ness section, and equipped with the finest fixtures, 
gives the bank a building in keeping with the pres- 
tige of the institution, and is a creditable addi- 
tion to the business center. The Sour Lake State 
Bank is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, 
the surplus and undivided profits running above 
that figure, and has total assets of around four hun- 
dred thousand dollars. The officers are: Frank H. 
Carpenter, president; Tom F. Cruse, vice president; 
M. E. Pivoto, vice president; W. Z. Trotti, cashier, 
and Mrs. Lena Trotti, assistant cashier, with Harold 
D. Carpenter, Frank H. Carpenter, W. Z. Trotti, 
T. F. Cruse and M. E. Pivoto as directors. 

Frank H. Carpenter was born at Shannon, Illinois, 
in November, 1870, the son of John M. Carpenter, a 
farmer and merchant of Western Iowa, to which 
State he removed in the early seventies. He was 
educated in the public schools of Iowa, and came 
to Texas in 1895, going first to Nome, at the time 
the new railroad was being built to that place. 
After five years in the mercantile business there 
he went to Victoria, and later Port Lavaca, where 
he spent two years, after which he came to Sour 
Lake, which has since been his home. During his 
residence here he has acquired land which has proved 
to be valuable oil land, and he has taken an active 
part in the development of this resource. At the 
beginning of the development of the oil industry 
here Mr. Carpenter had a large number of teams 
and handled teaming contracts, and operated a trans- 
fer and bus line for Savage Brothers, who brought 
in the first big well here. After two years he went 
to Humble, remaining there for one year, after 
which he returned to Sour Lake, which has since 
been his home. Later Mr. Carpenter bought out 
the ice plant, operating this for a time, and also 
bought out a grain business. He now owns many 
thousands of acres of rice and oil lands, and also 
has timber interests in this section. 

Mr. Carpenter was married in South Dakota, in 
1894, to Miss Alma M. Gross, daughter of E. F. 
Gross, hardware and implement man of that Stata, 
and also a member of the State legislature. Mr. 
and Mrs. Carpenter have a family of five children, 
Harold D., Mrs. Margaret Doucette, Mildred, Agnes 
and Frank H., Jr., all of whom are college grad- 
uates. Mr. Carpenter is an Elk and an Odd Fellow. 
He has been associated with the development of 
Sour Lake from the days when this city was known 




as a health resort, until the present time, when it 
is the center of a great oil district, and has taken 
an active part in furthering this development. 

ILLIAM S. HIGGS of Bryan, Texas, has had 
a wide and varied business career, withal 
a very successful one. A native of Bryan, 
he has since a very young man been a 
factor in the business, political and educational life 
of this city. In 1918, he entered the banking busi- 
ness here, and is the active vice president of the 
First State Bank and Trust Company of this city. 
This bank was organized in 1909 and its charter 
obtained on October 1st of that year, and showed 
in its report at the close of business on December 
31st, 1923, the following financial condition: Capital 
stock being $100,000.00; surplus fund, $50,000.00; 
undivided profits, $35,000.00, and deposits of 
$1,237,133.99. He has always been a leader in all 
matters pertaining to the progress and advance- 
ment of Bryan and Brazos County. In addition to 
his banking interests, Mr. Higgs is one of the or- 
ganizers of the Bryan Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, one of the most successful building and loan 
companies in Texas and operates on less cost than 
any organization of its kind in Texas. Mr. Higgs 
started his business career in this city, with his 
father who was engaged in the general merchandise 
business, and remained in this line of activity until 
1910, when he was elected to the office of county 
clerk of Brazos County. He held this office until 
1916, when he again engaged in business, this time 
choosing the dry goods line. He continued in the dry 
goods business until 1918, when he came with the 
First State Bank and Trust Company and has done 
much toward making this institution one of the best 
in this portion of the country. 

Mr. Higgs was born on April 3rd, 1882. His father, 
Thomas W. Higgs (deceased since 1905), was one of 
the pioneers of this county, having located here in 
1835, where he was throughout his life engaged in 
the mercantile business, farming and cattle rais- 
ing. He was one of the best known and most highly 
esteemed citizens of this part of the Lone Star State. 
His mother was Miss Esther Mawhinney. His early 
education was obtained in the public schools of 
Bryan, after which he attended Allen Academy of 
this city and later became a student of Hill's 
Business College of Waco. Mr. Higgs has at all 
times taken a keen interest in the educational af- 
fairs of this city, and for a period of twelve years 
was a member of the Bryan school board. He also 
served as chairman of the democratic executive com- 
mittee, for several years. 

Mr. Higgs was married at Bryan in 1903, to Miss 
Belle Wren, a native of Grimes County, Texas, 
where she was a member of a weil known family. 
They have three children: Katherine, Ida Belle and 
Margaret. Mr. Higgs is a member of the A. F. and 
A. M. and has membership in the York Rite body of 
this order. He is also a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Bryan Country Club, the Fin-Feather 
Club of this city, the Bryan Chamber of Commerce 
and is a director of the Bryan Building and Loan As- 
sociation. Mr. Higgs is active in all matters having 
to do with the civic improvement, progress and 
advancement of Bryan, where he is regarded as one 
of this city's most public-spirited citizens and lead- 
ing business men. 



1093 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARLES E. WALDEN, whose business ac- 
tivities for around three decades have been 
an essential part of the life and progress 
of Beaumont, has contributed materially to 
the advancement of this city and the development of 
the lumber and other resources of the southwestern 
part of the state. Mr. Walden is vice president of 
the George W. Smyth Lumber Company, one of the 
largest retail lumber companies in Beaumont. The 
company is well located, the plant covering light 
acres and carrying a complete line of building mate- 
rials. While the business is primarily retail, borne 
wholesale business is also handled, and the company 
is one of the vital businesses of the city. The of- 
ficers are J. B. Smyth, of San Antonio, president; 
Charles E. Walden, vice president; R. F. Cheesman, 
secretary; Frank Alvey, treasurer, and Guy W. 
Cheesman, general manager. The Sabine Tram Com- 
pany is also an organization with which Mr. Walden 
has been associated for many years, since 1897, and 
has been an official of since 1900. He is now vice 
president of the company, and takes an active part 
in its management. Mr. Walden is vice president 
and chairman of the board of directors of the Texas 
National Bank of Beaumont, a director in the Beau- 
mont Iron Works, and secretary of the Uvalde Rock 
Asphalt Company, of which he was one of the organ- 
izers. Like many Beaumont business men, Mr. Wal- 
den played a part in the development of the Spindle 
Top oil fields. He was interested in the Yellow Pine 
Oil Company that brought in the third or fourth 
well, which was a gusher, the first well to use a six 
inch casing. The company owned a one acre lease 
and later sold one-sixteenth parts of the acre. 

Mr. Walden was born at Doylesville, Madison 
County, Kentucky, on the first day of June, 1865, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Walden, who moved 
with their family to Clark County, Kentucky, just 
out of Winchester, in 1873. Mr. Walden was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native state, and 
finished the course at Allenville Academy, a school 
corresponding to high school, in 1877. He took the 
teachers examinations, receiving a first class cer- 
tificate, and taught school until he had acquired 
funds to complete his business education, when he 
went to Cleveland, Ohio, and entered Spencer, Fel- 
ton and Loomis Business College, finishing there 
just prior to his twenty-first birthday. He then 
accepted a position with Johnson's Business College, 
in St. Louis, Missouri, as instructor, but remained 
there only a short time, for he was anxious to em- 
bark in business for himself. He came to Texas 
in the spring of 1889, and with his older brother 
opened a business college in Austin, continuing there 
until the year 1894, when he came to Beaumont, 
going with the Sabine Tram Company, and later, 
when the George W. Smyth Lumber Company was 
organized, going with that company. 

Mr. Walden was married the twenty-sixth of De- 
cember, 1895, to Miss Sallie Smyth, daughter of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. George W. Smyth, of Beaumont. 
Mr. Smyth was organizer of the Sabine Tram Com- 
pany and of the George W. Smyth Lumber Company, 
and one of the pioneer lumbermen of Southeast 
Texas who have been active in developing this sec- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Walden have one child, Charles 
Smyth Walden, born the fifteenth of June, 1905. 
They reared Glenn H. Alvey, a nephew, who is like 
a son to them. Mr. Alvey graduated with honors 



from the University of California in 1919. He resides 
in San Antonio, where he is well known among the 
younger business men. They reside at 526 Elizabeth 
Street. Mr. Walden is past president of the Beau- 
mont Country Club, past president of the Rotary 
Club and belongs to the Beaumont Club, the Neches 
Club, the Ghrotto, and several other social organ- 
izations of Beaumont. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist Church, the Woodmen of the World, and several 
other organizations of that character. Mr. Walden 
is one of the best known Masons of the Lone Star 
State and a close personal friend of Sam P. Coch- 
ran. His father, a Master Mason, and Master of his 
Lodge used to ride some fifteen miles on horse- 
back to attend meetings, and it was his devotion that 
first instilled in the son the desire to become a 
Mason. He was initiated as an apprentice Mason, 
December the sixteenth, 1890, passing the degree of 
Fellowcraft on January the twenty-fourth of 1891, 
and in March raised to Master Mason. In 1892 he 
served as Deacon of Hill City Lodge No. 456, at 
Austin, where he had become affiliated and was ac- 
tive in the work there until 1893. Later he became a 
Royal Arch Mason, Lone Star Chapter, Knight of 
the Red Cross, Colorado Commandery, and Knight 
Templar. He joined Ben Hur Temple of the Mys- 
tic Shrine at Austin. Later he became affiliated with 
Beaumont Lodge No. 286, in February, 1901, and 
also with Beaumont Chapter No. 198, in 1903. He 
served as Master of the Beaumont Lodge in 1905, 
and as High Priest of the Beaumont Chapter for one 
year, and as Thrice Illustrious Master of the Beau- 
mont Council, No. 126, for one year. In 1903 he 
assisted in the organization of the Beaumont Com- 
mandery, and was its first Eminent Commander, 
serving from 1903 until 1905. In 1910 he was made 
a thirty-third degree Mason, having held member- 
ship in the Galveston Scottish Rite bodies for many 
years and in 1911, he served as Potentate cf El Mina 
Temple Shrine of Galveston. He was active in 
Masonic work until 1913, when his health failed, but 
has since found it impossible to enter actively into 
the work, although his interest remains the same. 
In civic work, as in Masonic work, Mr. Walden has 
always been active, and has done much for the de- 
velopment of Beaumont. In the first days of his 
residence here he was particularly active in his work 
on behalf of the young municipality, and is one of 
the real builders of the Beaumont of the present 
day. 

UY WALDEN CHEESMAN, one of the pro- 
gressive young business men of Beaumont, 
for several years has been active in the lum- 
fSJ ber trade of the city and is general man- 
ager of the George W. Smyth Lumber Company, 
one of the largest retail lumber concerns here. While 
the company handles a retail business primarily, 
some wholesale business is also done. It has a large 
stock of all kinds of building material and in addi- 
tion to supplying material for the home, are also 
financing the building of houses at Beaumont, and 
through advertising campaigns and other mediums 
have done much to foster home building and own- 
ing in this city. Mr. Cheesman came with the com- 
pany in May, 1919, and became general manager in 
January, 1921. Under his direction, the company 
has rapidly increased the volume of business done 
annually. The large yards, at the corner of Frank- 
lin and Neches Streets, are carefully planned, all 




1094 




4^pW3u^ 



/ ' 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



buildings being of the modern type. The officers 
of the company are J. B. Smyth, of San Antonio, 
president; C. E. Walden, vice president; R. F. Chees- 
man, secretary, and Frank Alvey, treasurer. 

Guy Walden Cheesman was born at Beaumont, the 
fourteenth of Septembr, 1895, the son of Richard 
Frederick Cheesman, for many years a resident of 
this city, and secretary of the George W. Smyth 
Lumber Company, and Emma Regina (Smyth) 
Cheesman. He began his education in the public 
schools of his native city, continuing here until his 
graduation from high school. He then entered the 
law department of the University of Virginia, where 
he studied three years. Shortly after the entrance 
of the United States in the World War, Mr. Chees- 
man enlisted in military service and was assigned 
to the 133rd Field Artillery, 36th Division. He was 
sent to Camp Mabry and after training there for 
two months, was sent overseas. He spent nine 
months in France, after which he was returned to 
America and discharged the second of April, 1919. 

Mr. Cheesman was married at Beaumont, the 
twenty-first of October, 1919, to Miss lone McGill, 
daughter of J. T. McGill, lumberman, and Catherine 
McGill. Mr. and Mrs. Cheesman have one child, 
Guy Walden Cheesman, Jr., and reside at 2431 Lib- 
erty Street. He is a member of the Alpha Chi Rho 
college fraternity and of the Beaumont and Rotary 
Clubs. Mr. Cheesman is interested in civic work and 
has done much for the development of Beaumont, es- 
pecially along the lines of encouraging building ac- 
tivity. 

E. HAMMONS, for about fifteen years has 
been identified with the commercial devel- 
opment of Beaumont, and is one of the lead- 
ing wholesale lumber dealers of this sec- 
tion, featuring a product that has a wide demand. 
Mr. Hammons is president of the P. E. Hammons 
Company, Incorporated, a wholesale lumber cor- 
poration, handling round piling for ship docks, rail- 
road and industrial construction. It is the only firm 
in the city handling this class of lumber, and have 
one of the largest businesses in the state in this line. 
The company was established in 1913, and since that 
time has done an increasingly large volume of busi- 
ness, each year showing a gratifying increase. The 
Hammons Company sells this product throughout 
the United States and Mexico, and also has a large 
amount of export trade. The business is manufac- 
turing and wholesale, selling in car lots only. The 
offices of the P. E. Hammons Company, Inc. are in 
the Perlstein Building, and the officers are Mr. Ham- 
mons, president; T. E. McNamara, vice president 
and manager; H. L. Bonner, secretary and treasurer. 
Mr. Hammons also has other business interests, both 
in Beaumont and in other cities and is vice pres- 
ident of the Southern Land and Lumber Company, 
president of the De Quincy Wholesale Grocery and 
Grain Company of De Quincy, Louisiana; president 
of the National Department Store at De Quincy, 
Louisiana, and vice president of C. E. Reed and 
Company. 

Mr. Hammons was born at Antoine, Arkansas, the 
fourth of October, 1885, the son of W. P. Hammons, 
for many years in the mercantile business in Arkan- 
sas, and Sarah Hammons. Mr. Hammons attended 
the schools of Arkansas, and was a student at the 
Baptist College at Fordyce, in that state. After 
leaving school he entered the lumber business, form- 





ing the firm of Hammons and Cash, and a little later 
bought out Mr. Cash, operating the business in 
Louisiana for around six years. He came to Beau- 
mont in 1911, entering the lumber business in this 
city, and has since handled the round piling for which 
he has an international reputation. Mr. Hammons 
owns thousands of acres of timber land in Louis- 
iana and Southeast Texas, and is known to lumber- 
men throughout the country for his activities in this 
field. 

Mr. Hammons was married at De Quincy, Louis- 
iana, to Miss Clara Gill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. M. Gill. Mr. Gill, an old settler of De Quincy, has 
been in the mercantile business there for many 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Hammons have two children, 
Bruce and P. E., Junior, and live at 1923 Broadway 
Street. Mr. Hammons is a member of the Beau- 
mont Club, the Beaumont Country Club and the 
Beaumont Business Men's Club, and fraternally is 
a Mason. Mr. Hammons has done much to develop 
the lumber resources of Southeast Texas, and is well 
known for his many activities in the field of lumber 
conservation. He takes a deep pride in the civic 
advancement of Beaumont, and during the years of 
his residence here has contributed liberally, both 
of his time and means, for the welfare and devel- 
opment of this city. 

ALLACE E. SPROUSE for around a dec- 
ade has been a factor in the commercial 
life at Beaumont, and as one of the leading 
lumber brokers in this city has been instru- 
mental in building up the lumber exporting bus- 
iness here. Mr. Sprouse is a member of the firm 
of the Kaulbach-Sprouse Lumber Company, one of 
the principal lumber exporting companies of Beau- 
mont, and organized in January, 1923. The firm 
maintains offices in the Gilbert Building, and en- 
gaged in a lumber brokerage business, handling yel- 
low pine, hardwood and shingles in car load lots 
only. They also handle a large volume of busi- 
ness in ties, piling and railroad timbers, selling 
largely for export. Mr. Sprouse is associated with 
Andrew J. Kaulbach. 

Mr. Sprouse was born in Denton County, Texas, 
the twenty-fourth of May, 1889, the son of John A. 
C. Sprouse, well known ranchman of that locality, 
and Mrs. Mary (Holmes) Sprouse. He spent his 
boyhood in Denton County, attending the public 
schools there, and after leaving high school spent 
one year at Wall College, at Honey Grove, Texas. 
He began his lumber experience with a retail lum- 
ber yard at Denton, later going in the saw mills at 
Grayburg and Oakhurst, where he acquired an expert 
knowledge of the manufacturing end of the business. 
He then went to Waco, where he spent one year 
with the W. R. Pickering Lumber Company, after 
which he went to Houston and was with the Picker- 
ing Lumber Company there for around four years. 
He then came to Beaumont, in 1915, and was with 
the Gulf Export and Transportation Company, as 
secretary and treasurer, from 1915 until 1922. At 
that time he became general manager of the South- 
ern Land and Lumber Company, a position he held 
for one year, resigning to form his present company. 
Mr. Sprouse was married at Houston, in 1912, to 
Miss Irma M. Morse, daughter of George T. Morse, 
oil man of Houston. They reside at Beaumont, at 
2195 Long Avenue, and have two children, W. E., Jr. 
and John Holmes. 



1097 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARLES W. McFARLANE for upwards of 
four decades has been one of the vital forces 
of the progress of Orange, and is well 
known throughout Southeast Texas for his 
numerous financial and business activities relative 
to the prosperity of this section, and for his promi- 
nence in Masonic circles. Mr. McFarlane is the pro- 
prietor of the Orange Iron Works, one of the most 
important industrial enterprises of Orange, and 
which he has owned since 1896. The business, how- 
ever, was established in 1881 by Greeves and Mc- 
Phee, for whom he worked from that time until he 
took over the plant. The years since that time 
have been marked by progress, the business being 
developed constructively, and filling a definite need 
created by the extensive oil operations in this sec- 
tion for a high class foundry. The plant in its pres- 
ent state of expansion covers an entire block, the 
foundry being completely equipped for all classes 
of work. Special attention is given to machine 
work, the repair of heavy machinery, marine work, 
boiler work, oil field machinery and the manufac- 
turing of various parts. A force of twenty-four 
skilled operatives is employed in the plant and all 
work turned out is of the highest standard. Mr. 
McFarlane is assisted in the management of the 
Orange Iron Works by his son, Charles T. Mc- 
Farlane, who is plant superintendent. 

Mr. McFarlane is also chairman of the board of 
directors of the Guaranty Bond Bank and Trust 
Company, of which he was one of the organizers. 
The Guaranty Bond Bank and Trust Company is a 
soundly directed financial institution, contributing a 
constructive banking service, compatible with com- 
mercial development, to Orange and the surround- 
ing territory, and has made a splendid record of 
growth since its organization. 

Charles W. McFarlane was born in New Bruns- 
wick, Canada, the twenty-seventh of February, 1860, 
the son of George McFarlane, a native of Canada, 
where he resided until his death, and Minnie (Na- 
son) McFarlane, also deceased. Mr. McFarlane was 
educated in the schools of Canada, and at the age 
of seventeen years began work in the timber mills 
of that country. Several years later he determined 
to come to Texas, coming by way of Boston, Buf- 
falo, St. Louis, and Houston, stopping at all these 
places for a short time, and arriving at Orange in 
December, 1880. Here he began work in the D. R. 
Wingate Lumber Company, remaining with that mill 
for one year, after which time he engaged in saw 
mill work for himself, operating several partner- 
ship businesses. In 1896 he established the Orange 
Iron Works, as previously mentioned, and has since 
been the directing head of this business, as well as 
becoming interested in various other activities. 

Mr. McFarlane was married the 20th of April, 
1886, to Miss Jennie Otis, daughter of E. D. (Carrie) 
Otis, a native of Illinois. Mrs. McFarlane was 
reared in Mississippi, later coming to Orange, where 
her marriage to Mr. McFarlane occurred. A family 
of nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McFar- 
lane; the surviving of these are: C. T., Addie Cooke, 
Annie Murray Smith, Mona, W. S., and F. L. Mc- 
Farlane. Mrs. McFarlane's death occurred at her 
home in Orange on the eighteenth of January, 1906. 
Mr. McFarlane was married the second time to Miss 
Rosa McDonald, a native of Texas, and to this 
union have been born five children, Misses Blanche, 




Fannie Rose, Zelma, Helen and George E. McFar- 
lane. The family reside at 710 Front Street, which 
has been their home for many years. Mr. McFar- 
lane is a member of the Rotary Club, and has been 
active in all civic work for many years, contribut- 
ing generously to all organized civic and charitable 
movements. He is one of the most prominent Ma- 
sons of the country, and one of the foremost Ma- 
sonic workers of Texas. He has taken all degrees, 
to the highest honor this order can bestow, and 
was made a thirty-third degree Mason at Dallas in 
1913. Twice each year he goes to Galveston, where 
he is active in the degree work of the Texas Con- 
sistory, No. 1. Mr. McFarlane has been a member 
of the Madison Blue Lodge of Orange since its 
organization in 1898, and has been a member of 
El Mina Temple Shrine of Galveston for many 
years. 

ORACE H. WATSON, for many years a 
factor in the life at Orange, in addition 
to serving as postmaster and taking an 
active part in the mercantile business, has 
been for many years a prominent figure in politics, 
and is one of the best known Republicans in the 
Lone Star State. Mr. Watson was appointed post- 
master of Orange the twenty-second of February, 
1922, receiving his appointment from the late Presi- 
dent Harding. The Orange postoffice under his 
term of office has been brought to a high state of 
efficiency, employing nineteen clerks, and has han- 
dled a very large volume of business, reflective of 
the prosperity of Orange, and indicating the rapid 
growth of this city. Mr. Watson is also a member 
of the firm of the McKay and Watson Paint Store, 
having been part owner of this business since 
1918. The store sells retail trade exclusively, deal- 
ing in paint, wall paper, glass and like products, and 
does the largest business in this field at Orange. 

Horace H. Watson was born at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, the seventh of March, 1873. His father, Jos. 
Watson, a native of Pennsylvania, came to Texas 
in 1875 and was an educator in Austin County until 
his retirement several years ago. He now makes 
his home at Corpus Christi. His mother, also of 
Corpus Christi, was prior to her marriage Miss Ad- 
die Hensel, and a native of Pennsylvania. Horace 
H. Watson was educated in the schools of Austin 
County. He came to Orange shortly before the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American War, enlisting in 
the Second U. S. Volunteers, and seeing service in 
Cuba. After being discharged he went to William- 
son County, remaining there a short time, and then 
returned to Orange, going in the liquor business in 
which he engaged until 1918, when he entered the 
paint business. 

Mr. Watson was married at Beaumont, the twen- 
ty-ninth of December, 1907, to Mrs. Lennie Sheehan 
Streevy, a native of the Lone Star State. Mr. and 
Mrs. Watson reside at 1006 Main Street and have 
three children, Harry H. Watson, Alma Watson and 
Eloise Watson. Mr. Watson is a member of the 
Moose, the T. P. A., and the Elks Club, and belongs 
to the Rotary Club, the Spanish-American War 
Veterans, and the National Association of Postmas- 
ters. He has been chairman of the Republican 
Party of Texas from 1919, until assuming the office 
of postmaster, and has been prominent in political 
activities for many years. He is also interested in 
all civic work. 



1098 




^D. ty.eMt*; {fauArU* 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




ilHARLES F. LAW has for around a decade 
been associated with building activities at 
Beaumont, and is well known in construc- 
tion circles for the many important con- 
tracts he has handled, and his part in the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of the community. Mr. Law 
came to this city in 1915, and has since engaged 
as a building contractor, operating under his own 
name, and with his offices at 1245 Avenue E. While 
he handles a general contracting business, his atten- 
tion for the most part is given to big work, and 
he has supervised the construction of many of the 
finer buildings in this city. He gives special atten- 
tion to residence work of the better class, schools, 
churches, court houses, office buildings, industrial 
plants, and like structures, and has attained an 
enviable reputation for this class of construction. 
While a large part of his work has been in and 
around Beaumont, Mr. Law does not confine his 
activities to work in this city, and has handled many 
important contracts in surrounding towns, and in 
Louisiana. Mr. Law has his own equipment, and is 
prepared to handle the largest contracts efficiently 
and without loss of time. 

Mr. Law was born at Indianola, Iowa, the twenty- 
second of October, 1875, son of William F. Law, a 
contractor and builder, and Flora Martin Law. As 
a boy he attended the public schools near his home, 
graduating from the high schools at St. Charles, 
Iowa, after which he entered Simpson College, at 
Indianola, Iowa, where he spent one year. He then 
went to work in the planing mill at Des Moines, 
where he spent two and a half years, after which 
he started a factory of his own, doing fine cabinet 
and mill work for the ensuing four years. In 1906 
he moved to Lake Charles, Louisiana, where he en- 
gaged in the contracting and building business until 
1915, when he came to Beaumont, establishing the 
firm of McBride and Law, General Contractors. In 
1917 he opened a large shipyard, at Beaumont, build- 
ing ships for the government, and the first contract 
let in Texas was handled by him. He completed 
and launched the first ship built in Texas, and oper- 
ated the shipyard until the summer of 1919, when 
the yard was closed, and the partnership between 
himself and Mr. McBride dissolved. Since that time 
he has been in business alone. 

Mr. Law was married at Des Moines, Iowa, in 
1900, to Miss Gertrude M. Hastie, daughter of Alex- 
ander Hastie, at one time a coal operator in that 
state, and later in the abstract business, and Mrs. 
Mary Hastie. Mr. and Mrs. Law live at 1245 Ave- 
nue E, and have three children — John Wilton, Wil- 
liam Wallace, and Grace. Mr. Law is a Mason, 
York and Scottish Rites, and a member of El Mina 
Temple Shrine at Galveston. His work in construc- 
tion circles has won him more than local recognition, 
and Mr. Law is known throughout South Texas for 
his work in this line. 

T. HARRIS, one of the leading ice manu- 
facturers of Texas, has taken an active part 
in the development of this industry. Mr. 
Harris operates the Independent Ice and 
Refrigerating Company of Abilene, Texas. Prior 
to coming to Abilene he was for about ten years an 
outstanding figure in his line of business in Beau- 
mont and was president of the Crystal Ice Company 
and was interested in other ice manufacturing plants 





in South Texas. 

Mr. Harris was born at Decatur, Illinois, the eigh- 
teenth of January, 1887, son of T. H. Harris, a land- 
owner, farmer and builder of that State. He was 
educated in the schools of Illinois and Kansas, and 
then went in the ice business in Illinois, later 
moving to Kansas, where after four years he went 
to Louisiana, and was engaged in rice farming for 
six years. The following year he operated a 
garage at Lake Charles, Louisiana, later going with 
the Union Sulphur Company, as foreman of bat- 
teries. He then went with the Crystal Ice Company 
at Jennings, Louisiana, in 1914, as chief engineer, 
and has been in the ice business ever since, coming 
to Beaumont as president and general manager of 
the Crystal Ice Company. He served in this capacity 
until moving to Abilene. 

Mr. Harris was married at Lake Charles, Louis- 
iana, in 1910, to Miss Grace Drost, daughter of John 
Drost, a retired business man of that city. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris have three children: Leo, Willis and 
Gene. They attend the Baptist Church and take 
an active part in church work. Mr. Harris is a 
Mason, York Rite, a Knight Templar and a mem- 
ber of El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. 

HERSCHEL WHITING, for more than 
three decades one of the substantial resi- 
dents of Beaumont, has contributed an es- 

sential service to community advancement 

through his large plumbing contracting business. 
Mr. Whiting operates his business under his own 
name, maintaining his office, show room and ware- 
house at 740 Liberty Street, and engaging in a gen- 
eral plumbing contracting business. He employs a 
force of competent workmen, supervising all con- 
struction, and has established a reputation for cor- 
rect work that has resulted in a large volume of 
business. Mr. Whiting has made the plumbing in- 
stallations in hundreds of Beaumont homes. He es- 
tablished his business in 1908, since which time he 
has advanced steadily, and has one of the prosper- 
ous plumbing businesses of the city. 

Mr. Whiting was born in Michigan, the fourth of 
December, 1865, the son of William Henry Whiting, 
a blacksmith of that state. As a boy he attended the 
public schools of his native state, and engaged in 
business there until 1891, when he came to Texas and 
Beaumont. Prior to coming to this city, Mr. Whit- 
ing had had several years experience in railroad 
work, and continued in this line after coming to 
Beaumont, working for the Southern Pacific and 
later for the Santa Fe Railroad. He left this work 
in 1908 to go in the plumbing business, in which he 
has since engaged. 

Mr. Whiting was married at Beaumont, in 1893, 
to Miss Margaret Butcher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Butcher, natives of Michigan, who resided 
in Beaumont for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Whit- 
ing have one child, Mrs. Jessie Kerr, and make 
their home in Beaumont. Mr. Whiting is an Odd- 
fellow and a Mason, and belongs to the Chamber 
of Commerce. He has served for several years as 
president of the Master Plumbers Association, and 
is active in the work of that body, taking a deep in- 
terest in the advancement of the craft along modern 
lines. Mr. Whiting has from time to time invested 
in Beaumont property, and is greatly _ interested 
in the growth and development of this city. 



1101 



MEN OF TEXAS 




flILLIAM McKISSACK CROOK, lawyer of 
Beaumont, began the practice of his profes- 
sion in this city January 1st, 1899, and has 
continued to follow his vocation to the pres- 
ent time. Mr. Crook is senior member of the law firm 
time is given to the requirements of corporate in- 
terests, including locally the W. C. Tyrrell Trust, the 
Jefferson County Investment & Building Associa- 
tion, the Uvalde Rock Asphalt Company, Beaumont 
Iron Works Company, Phoenix Furniture Company, 
Unity Oil Company, Sanacosa Oil Company, Beau- 
mont Box Manufacturing Company, Goodell Piano 
Company, Anahuac Canal Company, Tyrrell Hard- 
ware Company, etc. 

Mr. Crook was the first Texas commissioner to 
be appointed on uniform State laws, being associated 
with Hiram Glass of Texarkana, and H. M. Gar- 
wood of Houston; in 1914 he was made vice presi- 
dent of this body; he served as vice president of the 
Commercial Law League of America, is a director of 
the Texas State Bar Association, a member of the 
General Council of the American Bar Association, 
a director and vice president of the Texas Law Re- 
view. With H. M. Garwood, he was elected to life 
membership in the American Law Institute, in the 
organization of which he was invited by Elihu Root, 
its first president, to participate. He was selected 
by Dr. William Draper Lewis, director of the Law 
Institute, as one of his advisors in the Restatement of 
the Common Law of Business Association. In local 
civic matters, he was first chairman of the Library 
Commission of the City of Beaumont. He is a direc- 
tor of the Tyrrell-Combest Realty Company, the 
Jefferson County Investment & Building Associa- 
tion, the Pierce Goodell Piano Company, the Beau- 
mont Hotel Operating Company, and was one of the 
organizers of the Texas National Bank. 

Mr. Crook was born in Maury County, Tennessee, 
the twenty-fourth of December, 1874, the son of W. 
J. Crook, a farmer and confederate captain, and 
Jennie (Parham) Crook. After attending the pub- 
lic schools near his home, he finished his prepara- 
tory work at Spring Hill Academy at Spring Hill, 
Tennessee, later attending Vanderbilt and George 
Washington universities, taking his LL. B. degree in 
the latter in 1877. He taught school in Texas under 
a permanent teacher's certificate. He engaged in 
practice in Trinity County, Texas, for one year, 
coming from there to Beaumont in 1899. 

Mr. Crook was born in Maury County, Tennessee, 
1897, to Miss Jennie M. Helsel, daughter of S. R. 
Helsel, a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Crook reside at 
395 Seventh Street. They have three children: 
Theo Helsel Crook, with bachelors and masters de- 
grees from University of California, is a geologist 
in Venezuela, South America, with the Standard Oil 
Company of California, Philip G. Crook, proprietor 
of the Beaumont Landscape Company, and William 
McKissack Crook, Jr., a student in Beaumont High 
School. The family are members of the Methodist 
Church, of which Mr. Crook is trustee and Steward. 
Mr. Crook is a member of the Beaumont Club, the 
Texas State and American Bar associations, is a 
Mason, York and Scottish Rites, and a member of 
El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. 




OHN W. LOCKHART, attorney at law and 
senior member of the well known law firm 
of Lockhart Hughes, Lockhart and Rayzor 
of Galveston, Texas, has during his prac- 
tice of more than eight years before the Texas bar 
established a place of marked distinction in the legal 
profession. This firm was established on July 1st, 
1923, and specializes in admiralty law, practices 
in all the courts and are representatives of Under- 
writers in Admiralty law cases, and Mr. Lockhart 
referees in bankruptcy. This firm does a large busi- 
ness, and number among their clients many of the 
shipping interests of the Island City. Their offices 
are located at 718 American National Insurance 
Company Building. Mr. Lockhart was admitted to 
the bar in 1917 and immediately joined his father in 
Galveston in the practice of law under the firm name 
of Lockhart and Lockhart. This firm continued 
until the death of his father in 1923, when he form- 
ed the present firm. The firm opened offices at 
517 Cotton Exchange Building, Houston, in January, 
1925. 

A native of Galveston, Texas, Mr. Lockhart was 
born on August 2nd, 1892. His father, Judge W. B. 
Lockhart (deceased since June 17th, 1923), was 
born at Chapel Hill, Texas, and was one of the 
most able of Texas' lawyers. He practiced his 
profession for a period of thirty-seven years and 
was a recognized authority on admiralty law, and 
practiced in all the Southern ports. Judge Lockhart 
was active in the Masonic circles of Texas. He 
joined Harmony Lodge of this order of Galveston 
when a young man and served his turn in all elec- 
tive offices, except that of secretary. He was a 
member of the Royal Arch Chapter and Commandery 
in Galveston, and served as eminent commander of 
the commandery. He received his Scottish Rite de- 
grees in Galveston, fourth to thirty-second inclusive, 
and was elected thirty-third, honorary, by the Su- 
preme Council in Washington in October, 1909, and 
crowned in 1910. He was for many years and up 
to the time of his death one of the three trustees 
of the Scottish Rite Reserve Fund. He had for a 
long time served as class director during each suc- 
cessive reunion, and was past wise master of L. M. 
Oppenheimer Chapter No. 2, Knights Rose Croix. 
Judge Lockhart filled a unique place in the life of 
this community. He was a big man, in all that word 
implies, and was a true son of the Old South. Mr. 
Lockhart's mother, Mrs. Esther (Gresham) Lock- 
hart, is a daughter of the late Colonel Walter Gres- 
ham of Galveston, and a member of one of Texas' 
pioneer families, who have done much in the de- 
velopment of the Lone Star State. His early edu- 
cation was obtained in the public and high schools 
of Galveston, after which he attended for one year 
a preparatory school at Austin. He then became 
a student of the law department of the University 
of Virginia, and left that institution at the begin- 
ning of the World War. He returned to Galveston 
and was admitted to the bar here and has continued 
his practice here since that time. Mr. Lockhart is 
the fourth generation of the Lockhart family in 
Texas. His great-grandfather, Dr. John W. Lock- 
hart, came to Texas from Alabama on business, and 
liked the Lone Star State so well that he returned to 
Alabama and resigned his seat in the legislature 
of that State and returned to Texas and located on 
a plantation near the town of Old Washington. 



1102 




tf 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



Many years later he sold this plantation and pur- 
chased another at Chapel Hill, Washington County, 
which is still the property of the Lockhart family. 
Dr. Lockhart was at the Battle of Galveston, the 
family having removed to Texas about 1838, during 
the time the State was a Republic. The Lockhart 
family have aided greatly in the development of the 
Lone Star State along many lines, and much of their 
work will always remain a monument to the enter- 
prise of the family. Mr. Lockhart has in his col- 
lection many relics of the early days of Texas; 
among this collection is a cane which was presented 
to his great-grandfather by General Sam Houston, 
and this cane was made from a hickory stick given 
to General Houston by General Andrew Jackson. 
This cane is now preserved in the Rosenberg Library 
of Galveston, but always remains the property of 
John W. Lockhart. 

Mr. Lockhart was married at Navasota, Texas, 
on November 18th, 1922, to Miss Frances Harris, a 
native Texan and a daughter of Dr. E. A. Harris, 
well known physician of Central Texas. They have 
two children, Frances and Josephine. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lockhart reside at 1502 Avenue H, which is the 
house in which Mr. Lockhart was born. Mr. Lock- 
hart is a member of Harmony Blue Lodge of the 
Masonic fraternity of Galveston and is a member 
of both the York and- Scottish Rite bodies, is a 
K. C. C. H., and a member of El Mina Temple Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Galveston Chamber of 
Commerce, Galveston Country Club and the Artillery 
Club. He is interested in civic affairs and in the 
general upbuilding of his native city. In the last 
few years he has built some thirty rent houses here 
and has other interests in city and farm property. 

Mr. Lockhart is devoting his efforts to the prac- 
tice of maritime law, and is interested in the growth 
and development of Galveston as a shipping center. 

AVID ANDREW SIMMONS, a member of 
the law firm of Campbell, Myer and Sim- 
^| mons, although one of the younger at- 
torneys of Houston, has made a creditable 
record as a trial lawyer. The firm was formed the 
first of January, 1924, and is composed of Judge 
Ben Campbell, Sterling Myer and David Andrew 
Simmons, all of whom are lawyers of experience and 
success. The resulting firm makes one of the 
strongest legal associations in Houston, and Camp- 
bell, Myer and Simmons have annexed an enviable 
list of clients. They handle a general civil and 
criminal practice, Mr. Simmons giving his time 
chiefly to trial work, for which he is especially well 
adapted. Offices are maintained in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

David Andrew Simmons was born at Galveston, 
Texas, the thirty-first day of May, 1897, the son of 

D. E. Simmons, and Virginia (Finlay) Simmons. D. 

E. Simmons, a native of Iowa, came to Texas as a 
baby, and was until his death, which occurred in 
1924, one of the most prominent attorneys of 
Texas. Mrs. Simmons has made her home in Hous- 
ton since her husband's death. David Andrew Sim- 
mons attended the public schools of Austin and 
Houston, later entering the University of Texas, 
where the LL. B. degree was conferred on him in 
1920. He was admitted to the bar in 1919 and be- 
gan his law practice as a member of the firm of 
Simmons, Jackson and Peddy. A year and a half 





later Mr. Simmons was appointed assistant United 



States district attorney at Houston, coming here to 
take this office, which he held until the first of 
July, 1922, when he resigned to go to Kansas City 
on special work. After eight months there he re- 
turned to Houston, practicing alone until the forma- 
tion of his present firm. 

Mr. Simmons was married at Fort Worth, Texas, 
the seventh of September, 1921, to Miss Elizabeth 
Daggett, a native of Fort Worth, and a daughter 
of E. M. Daggett, one of the best known cattle men 
of Texas. Mr. Simmons is a member of the Harris 
County Bar Association, the Texas Bar Association, 
and the American Bar Association. 

J. HARRIS, for upwards of a quarter of a 
est esteem of the bench and bar of Texas, 
century a lawyer who has enjoyed the high 
has for many years engaged in practice at 
Houston, where his special qualifications as coun- 
sel and trial lawyer have won the admiration and 
respect of his associates. Mr. Harris is senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Harris and Painter, one of the 
leading law firms of Houston, and one which has 
had a remarkable growth since its organization in 
1923. J. H. Painter, also well known as a lawyer of 
high standing in his profession, is associated with 
Mr. Harris. The firm of Harris and Painter handle 
a very large practice, taking both civil and criminal 
cases, and have their offices on the fourth floor 
of the Scanlan Building. 

T. J. Harris was born in Alabama, the twenty- 
second of July, 1870, the son of the late R. J. Har- 
ris, a native of Georgia, and for many years a 
resident of Alabama, and Fannie Crabb Harris, 
whose death occurred during her son's infancy. As 
a boy, Mr. Harris attended the public schools of 
Palestine, Texas, and after leaving school entered 
the law office of Judge S. A. McMeans, and later 
Governor Tom Campbell and Judge W. H. Gill, re- 
ceiving his legal training under these eminent jur- 
ists. Mr. Harris was admitted to the bar in 1896, 
beginning his practice with Judge McMeans and 
Governor Campbell, and was later associated with 
Judge Gill. In 1898 he was made city attorney of 
Palestine, holding that office until 1900, when he was 
elected county attorney of Anderson County, 
and four years later was elected district at- 
torney, holding that office for four years. 
At the expiration of that time, Mr. Harris 
came to Houston, in 1910 forming an association 
with J. W. Woods, as Woods and Harris. Still 
later he was associated with George S. King, and 
in 1914 was appointed assistant district attorney, 
in charge of the Criminal District Court, holding 
that office four years. After a short period of prac- 
tice alone, Mr. Harris became associated with E. A. 
Berry, forming the law firm of Berry and Harris, 
which later, on the entrance of Weaver Moore in the 
firm, became Berry, Harris and Moore. This firm 
was dissolved in 1923. 

Mr. Harris was married at Palestine, Texas, to 
Miss Nellie Hester, a native of Palestine. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris reside at 211 Hawthorne Avenue, and 
have two children, Nellie, a student at Rice Institute, 
and Jack. Mr. Harris is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, is a Dokey and a member of the Bar 
Association of Houston. He has for many years 
been one of the leading trial lawyers at Houston, and 
is generally regarded as one of the most eminent 
attorneys here. 



1105 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARVEY W. GILBERT, one of the business 
leaders of Beaumont, has through his con- 
structive business policies been instrumental 

in securing for this city many permanent 

improvements and industrial enterprises, and to his 
energy and ability this city owes much expansion. 
He has spent a decade of his time, and large sums 
of his own money to advance Beaumont, and to aid 
in its development, and it was primarily due to his 
influence that the Atlantic Refining Company, one 
of the major refining companies of the city, the 
Pure Oil Company, the K. C. S. Industrial Belt 
Terminal Railroad, and other concerns have located 
here. Mr. Gilbert is also financially interested in 
many enterprises here, and is one of the large prop- 
erty owners of the city. Harvey W. Gilbert and 
Company own a large part of the nine thousand two 
hundred acres on the ship channel between Beau- 
mont and Port Arthur, and has taken an active part 
in developing that district. Mr. Gilbert is president 
of the High Island Company, Incorporated, one of 
the larger oil companies, vice president of the Gil- 
bert Cattle and Pasture Company, manager of the 
lands of the Nona Mills Company, and a member 
of the Water Ways Committee, the Industrial Com- 
mittee, and the First Commission of Pilots. Re- 
cently Mr. Gilbert organized the Gilbert Home Com- 
pany, of which he is president. This company owns 
a patent on aluminum sheets that are made in units 
for residence construction cheaply. These units are 
manufactured in the east and "shipped by water 
and will be handled by the various lumber and 
building material companies. Because of the high 
cost of lumber this new system of house construction 
will undoubtedly become very popular with the 
small home builders. He has his offices in the 
Gilbert Building. Mr. Gilbert is also a data expert, 
compiling data and preparing articles for publica- 
tion. 

Mr. Gilbert was born at Beaumont, the eighteenth 
of February, 1884, the son of John N. and Annie 
Wilbarger Gilbert. Mr. John N. Gilbert for many 
years was one of the most prominent men of this 
city, owner of large land, timber and oil interests, 
and active in all development work. A pioneer lum- 
berman, he organized in 1877 the Nona Mills Com- 
pany of Texas and Louisiana, one of the large lum- 
ber companies of this section, and was the owner 
of more than one hundred and twentv-five thousand 
acres of cut-over timber lands. He was also pres- 
ident of the Gilbert Company. In 1880 Mr. Gilbert, 
in association with Congressman S. B. Cooper W a' 
Fletcher, and William Wiess, and with the assistance 
o* others, took the first step toward the development 
of the ship channel, and it has been largely due to 
their efforts that this advantage of prime import- 
ance to the development of Beaumont has ma- 
terialized. John N. Gilbert died June 5, 1924. Mrs 
Gilbert, before her marriage was Miss Annie Wil- 
barger, also comes of a family that has for years 
been active m public development, the County of 
Wilbarger having been named for her grandfather. 
Harvey W. Gilbert received his elementary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Beaumont, and after 
graduating from the high school here entered 
preparatory school at Ashville, North Carolina, 
after which he finished at the University of Vir- 
ginia. He then returned to his home and went with 
his father in the lumber business, in which he has 




engaged for a decade and a half. About ten years 
ago Mr. Gilbert became interested in the ship chan- 
nel and its possibilities for development, and since 
that time has been active in this field of endeavor. 
He has devoted his time and money to the advance- 
ment of this important waterway, which has become 
the greatest oil refining center in the world. In 
addition to this a good part of the lumber from 
this section, as well as the sulphur production use 
the waterway, and it has made possible a period 
of prosperity that has made Beaumont one of the 
most important cities in the state. 

Mr. Gilbert was married at Houston, in 1914, to 
Miss Hortense Gibbons. They have since made their 
home at Beaumont, occupying a fine home at Calder 
and Seventh Avenues, and have two children— John 
N. Gilbert, II, and Eleanor Hortense. The family 
attends the First Church of Christ, Scientist, and 
are active supporters of this denomination. Mr. 
Gilbert is a member of the Beaumont Country Club 
the Beaumont Club, the Neches Club, and is a Mason! 
York and Scottish Rites, and a member of El Mina 
Temple Shrine of Galveston. He combines excep- 
tional executive ability, with constructive financial 
talents, and his work for the development of the 
ship channel is not only one of the most important 
achievements in Beaumont in recent years, but is 
a monument to the foresight of Mr. Gilbert. 

OHN DOLLINGER, JR., for around two dec- 
ades has been a factor in the manufactur- 
ing world at Beaumont, and has built up a 
plant that ranks among the largest in this 
section Mr. Dollinger is president and manager of 
the John Dollinger, Jr., Incorporated, Company, a 
manufacturing concern established in a small way 
in 1906, and since that time a constantly growing 
business The Dollinger Company manufactures steel 
tanks of all kinds, smoke stacks and a general line 
of flat steel work, and is one of the largest manu- 
facturers of this line of steel products in this sec- 
tion. The plant was removed in 1923 to the new 
location on the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe Rail- 
roads, where they occupy an industrial site of eleven 
and a half acres, and have a modern, and com- 
pletely equipped shop. The main building is sev- 
enty-five by three hundred feet, and several smaller 
buildmgs complete the plant. A force of from forty 
to fifty operatives are employed, and the business 
is one of the leading industrial concerns here From 
a small beginning, the John D. Dollinger, Jr plant 
has grown to be one of the finest in the country 
engaged in flat steel and steel tank and smoke 
stack manufacture, and the new plant is the largest 
in this section. The officers are John Dollinger Jr 
president and manager; Ambrose Rouse, secretary 
and treasurer; and Andrew Rouse, vice president and 
superintendent. 

John Dollinger, Jr., was born at New Orleans 
Louisiana, the twenty-first of September, 1871, the 
son of John Dollinger, a merchant of that city, and 
Margaret Dollinger. He attended the public schools 
of New Orleans, and first engaged in business in 
that city, in the metal business. Later he went to 
Donaldsville, Louisiana, where he was in business 
for himself for four years, later spending four 
years at Placquemine, Louisiana, after which he 
moved to Beaumont, establishing his present 
business. 



Mr. Dollinger was married at Placquemine, Louis- 



1106 




tWw^A^ 






NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




iana, in 1904, to Miss Cora Rouse, daughter of 
Charles Eouse, an old resident of that place and a 
grocery merchant, and Nancy Rouse. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dollinger have six children, Charles, Meyerer, Paul- 
ine, John, Cora Lee and Francis, and make their 
home at 1120 Avenue D. Mr. Dollinger is a mem- 
ber of the Rotary Club and is a Mason, York and 
Scottish Rites, and a member of El Mina Temple. 

USTEN F. JAKOWICZ came to Port Ar- 
thur, Texas, in 1917 in order to take over 
the management of the Consumer's Ice and 
Coal Company, which is located at 945 
Houston Avenue. In 1921 Mr. Jakowicz purchased 
the plant and has been the owner and manager of 
same since that time. This plant was built in 1915, 
and has a capacity of thirty tons of ice daily, and 
sells to both the wholesale and retail trade. Since 
Mr. Jakowicz has had the management of this plant, 
he has built up a wonderful business, not only in the 
wholesale and retail sales of ice, but in coal and 
building materials, consisting of brick, cement, lime, 
roofing, etc. He has made the Consumer's Ice and 
Coal Company one of the leading plants of its kind 
in this portion of the state, and plans to increase 
the capacity of the plant at an early date. Mr. 
Jakowicz has had an experience as an engineer and 
ice manufacturer that has taken him to practically 
all portions of the United States, and he has gained 
a practical experience that few men are fortunate 
enough to obtain. He came to the United States 
at the early age of sixteen years and began his 
business career immediately, and for a period of 
twelve years was employed as an engineer at New- 
ark, New Jersey. With this experience as a founda- 
tion, he has followed engineering and kindred lines 
up to the present time, and a good portion of his 
life has been spent in the ice and brewing lines 
of this business. He was for many years trouble 
man for plants of this kind, and this line of work 
carried him to all parts of the United States. He 
was regarded as an expert and his services in this 
field of activity were constantly in demand. He 
came to Beaumont, Texas, in 1919 on a mission of 
straightening out the ice plant at that place, and 
it was his intention to only remain a few days, 
but he liked the Lone Star State better than any 
place he had visited, and he concluded to make this 
his future home, and has never left the environs 
of Texas. He was associated with the Consumers 
Ice and Coal Company at Beaumont in 1909, and 
later was made manager of this plant, and still 
later was made general manager of Beaumont and 
Port Arthur plants, and in 1917 came here as man- 
ager and in 1921 bought out the plant, which he 
has since conducted successfully. 

Mr. Jakowicz was born in Poland on January 
7th, 1873. His parents, natives of Poland also, never 
came to America. Mr. Jakowicz was married in 
Chicago in 1906 to Miss Hedwig Janis, a native of 
Poland, but who had spent nearly all her life in 
America. They have two children: Eugene and 
Frances. Mr. and Mrs. Jakowicz reside at 3456 
Sixth Street. Mr. Jakowicz is a member of the 
Knights of Columbus and has attained to the fourth 
degree in this order. Mr. Jakowicz is a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce and the Young Men's 
Business League. He is loud in his praise of Port 
Arthur, and believes that this city will become the 
leading shipping point of the Southwest. 




C. LOVE is well known in Texas and Louis- 
iana as an engineer, where he has been in 
charge of some of the most important work 
in this line which has been carried out in this 
portion of the country. Mr. Love came to Beaumont, 
Texas, four years ago to make this city his perma- 
nent home, but had resided here for some time 
before, and had left this city on account of his work 
calling him to other parts of the state. Mr. Love 
is county highway engineer of Jefferson County, 
with headquarters at the court house in Beaumont. 
More than $2,700,000.00 worth of new roads and 
highways have been completed under his direction. 
Mr. Love has charge of all highway construction 
in this county and is recognized as one of the most 
competent engineers in the state. His office here 
is located at the county court house. In addition 
to his work as an engineer, Mr. Love is regarded as 
one of the most capable instructors in engineering 
of Texas and many of the younger engineers of 
this and other states have received their knowledge 
under the able tutelage of Mr. Love. He has had 
a wide and varied experience in engineering and 
kindred lines, which he began as an instructor in 
drawing at the A. and M. College, covering the full 
subject, for a period of four years. He then entered 
railroad service, in the construction and maintenance 
departments and was located in South Central Texas 
and Louisiana, where he remained for four years — 
1903-1907, during which time he was associated 
with the Southern Pacific lines and the Santa Fe 
Railroad. He then came to Beaumont as general 
superintendent of the Beaumont Irrigating Com- 
pany, and was in charge of the work of this com- 
pany for four and one-half years, after which he 
engaged in private work for one year. He then 
returned to the A. and M. College, on the request 
of the board of that institution, and for seven years 
was professor of engineering at that Texas College. 
He then became division engineer for the state 
highway department and remained in this position 
for a period of two years, when he returned to 
Beaumont in order to accept his present place as 
county highway engineer. 

A native Texan, Mr. Love was born at Calvert, 
on April 1st, 1876. His father, B. F. Love, was one 
of the pioneers in surveying and engineering in 
Central Texas. His mother was Miss Amelia M. 
Weir, a member of a well known Texas family. 
His early education was obtained in the public 
schools of Calvert, Texas, after which he entered 
the A. and M. College and remained a student of 
this institution for three years, and then attended 
Cornell University, pursuing the courses which would 
fit him for his life work. 

Mr. Love was married at Houston in 1899 to Miss 
Laurel Sronce, a daughter of E. C. Sronce, for many 
years engaged in the furniture business at Colum- 
bus, Texas, and well known in the business circles 
of South Texas. They have two children— Jeane, 
twenty-two years of age, and Alan, aged fourteen 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Love reside at 1455 North 
Street. Mr. Love is a member of the York Rite 
body of the Masonic Fraternity, the B. P. O. E., 
the Rotary Club and the American Society of Civil 
Engineers. He is popular in the business and social 
circles of Beaumont and in all portions of the state, 
where he is regarded as a man at the top of his 
profession, and his services along engineering and 
educational lines are in constant demand. 



1109 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARRS McLEAN, who for about two decades 
has been associated with the development 
of the coastal oil fields as an independent 
operator, has made his headquarters at 
Beaumont, and is widely known to the oil fraternity 
of this section. Mr. McLean operates under his 
own name, maintaining offices in the Gilbert Build- 
ing, and has limited his operations to the coastal 
fields. He has production from royalties in most 
of the fields of the coastal region, and is one of the 
largest royalty owners in South Texas. Mr. Mc- 
Lean has been unusually successful in buying un- 
developed leases, securing the capital to develop 
them, and retaining a part of the royalty, a form 
of operation that has proven profitable. Two of his 
most notable successes was in the development of 
the deep sand fields at Spindle Top and High Island. 
In both of these fields he secured large lease acreage 
on which he promoted the successful development, 
retaining a substantial over-riding royalty on his 
leases. 

Mr. McLean's operations have not been confined to 
royalties, as his activities are also directed to the 
producing end of the oil business. He has interest 
in substantial production in a number of the coastal 
fields of Texas and Louisiana, with well equipped 
lease and drilling machinery. While he has asso- 
ciates in some properties, for the most part his 
operations are in an individual capacity. 

Mr. McLean was born at Sherman, Texas, the 
twentieth of June, 1883. His father, Judge E. C. 
McLean, is one of the prominent attorneys of Sher- 
man. His mother, prior to her marriage, was Miss 
Rena Wilson Marrs, a member of a well known 
family of Kentucky. 

Mr. McLean received his early instructions in 
the public schools of Sherman, later attending Aus- 
tin College, in that city for three years, after 
which he went to Austin and attended the University 
of Texas for three years, receiving the LL. B. de- 
gree from that institution in 1904. He was a "T" 
man in football team, and a member of Sigma Nu 
fraternity. He came to Beaumont in 1908, and be- 
gan in the oil business as an independent operator, 
and has so continued to the present time. 

Mr. McLean was married at Beaumont, in 1917, to 
Miss Verna Hooks, daughter of J. L. Hooks, land 
owner and cattle man of this section. Mr. and Mrs. 
McLean have one child, Ruth, and reside at 1262 
Calder Avenue. Mr. McLean is a member of the 
Beaumont Country Club, the Neches Club, and is 
an Elk. A business man whose sound and versatile 
knowledge of the petroleum industry has been a fac- 
tor in his success. Mr. McLean has won the re- 
spect and confidence of the business world at Beau- 
mont, ana! has taken an active part in the develop- 
ment of this city. 

E. PIVOTO, one of the most careful and 
conservative operators in the Sour Lake 
field, has in the two decades of his activity 
in the petroleum industry concentrated his 
attention on development in this locality, and has 
established the reputation of an independent opera- 
tor thoroughly familiar with this field and its possi- 
bilities. Mr. Pivoto, who operates independently, 
has two fine tracts in the Sour Lake field, one of ten 
acres owned in fee, and one of eight acres in lease. 
He has around a score of producing wells, with close 
to a hundred barrels daily production, and his lease 




is one of the best in the field. He has one of the 
finest power plants in the Sour Lake field, and 
has all modern equipment for operating his lease. 
Mr. Pivoto is also vice-president and a director of 
the Hull State Bank at Hull, Texas, and vice presi- 
dent and director of the Sour Lake State Bank, 
at Sour Lake, Texas, and as a banker is thoroughly 
familiar with the soundest financial policies, tak- 
ing an active interest in the management of the two 
banking institutions with which he is connected. 

Mr. Pivoto was born at Nome, Texas, seven miles 
from Sour Lake, in May, 1875, the son of J. M. 
Pivoto, a farmer and stockman of this community. 
He attended the public schools at Nome, later engag- 
ing in farming until 1903, when he began his oil 
field experience. He started at the bottom, work- 
ing for others, and while learning the business 
saved his money with the view of operating inde- 
pendently. In 1911 he began for himself, drilling 
his own wells, and operating his lease in the Sour 
Lake field, and has made a big success here. 

Mr. Pivoto was married at Nome, Texas, in 1900, 
to Miss Ella D. Peterson, the daughter of G. J. 
Peterson, a farmer in Jefferson County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pivoto reside at Sour Lake, and are active 
in the social life here. Mr. Pivoto is an Elk. He 
has for many years been deeply interested in the 
civic development of Sour Lake, and has held public 
offices, at various times, serving as justice of the 
peace and as county commissioner. 

Note: Mr. Pivoto has, since this sketch was 
written, moved his family to Beaumont, Texas, resi- 
dence, 1620 Victoria Street. 

UNCAN M. HALL, for around a decade one 
of the progressive business men of Beau- 
mont, has been a factor in the development 

of this city as a shipping center, and is 

one ofthe best informed shipping and transportation 
men in this locality. Mr. Hall is the owner of the 
Hall Shipping Company, one of the leading and 
oldest shipping companies at Beaumont, and one 
which has built up a large and prosperous business. 
The Hall Shipping Company acts as steamship 
agents and freight forwarders, representing nine of 
the leading steamship lines. The leading merchan- 
dise shipped is lumber, rice, and oil well supplies, 
and a large proportion of the business handled is 
to coastwise ports and to Mexico and South America. 
The office in Beaumont is in the San Jacinto Build- 
ing, and an office is also maintained in Port Arthur. 

Mr. Hall was born at Rockwall, Texas, the third 
of February, 1889, the son of A. R. Hall, who is 
with the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad at 
Rockwall. He was educated in the public schools, 
attending the schools of Fort Worth, where he 
graduated from high school. He then went with 
a railroad company in Fort Worth, in the trans- 
portation department, remaining there until 1916, 
when he came to Beaumont, as general agent for 
the Gulf Coast Lines, a position he held for two 
years. He then became traffic manager of the 
Gulf Export and Transportation Company, remain- 
ing with that organization for three and a half 
years, and resigning to establish the shipping com- 
pany he has since headed. 

Mr. Hall was married at Fort Worth, in 1911, to 
Miss Eva Susan Sharp. They reside in Beaumont, 
at 2598 South Street, and have two children, Duncan 
M. Hall, Jr., and Helen Elizabeth Hall. Mr. Hall 




1110 




Th^y^n^ 



SL&sV*^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




is a member of the Rotary Club, and is a Mason, 
Scottish Rite, and a member of El Mina Temple 
Shrine at Galveston. He keeps in close touch with 
shipping and transportation activities, and is an 
expert in this line. Mr. Hall is also deeply inter- 
ested in civic affairs, particularly those which have 
to do with the advancement of Beaumont as an 
inland port. 

C. GRIFFING, whose name is of special 
significance in the horticultural world, has 
for a number of years past been associated 
with the nursery business at Beaumont, 
and has established here one of the largest nurser- 
ies in the entire Southwest. Mr. Griffing is the 
owner of the Griffing Nurseries, an organization 
that saw its beginning in a small nursery estab- 
lished in Florida nearly four decades ago by D. C. 
Griffing, and later managed by his five sons, of 
whom the subject of this sketch is one. The com- 
pany at Beaumont was established nearly two de- 
cades ago, as a partnership between John W. Gates 
and the Griffing Brothers, and capitalized at that 
time for five hundred thousand dollars. After Mr. 
Gates' death the partnership was dissolved, and W. 
C. Griffing became the sole owner of the business. 
The tract formerly owned at Port Arthur, consisting 
of three hundred and sixty-five acres, has been made 
into one of the most modern sub-divisions in the 
South, and is known as Griffing Residential Park. 
The land holdings of the company include two hun- 
dred and twenty-four acres at Rosedale, Texas, and 
one hundred and twenty-six acres near Kountze, 
with fifteen houses on the Rosedale property and 
six buildings on the Kountze property. Also around 
twenty thousand feet under glass at Griffing Resi- 
dential Park, that is used for florist business. 

Today the Griffing Nurseries ship to practically 
every state in the union, and as far off as Lima, 
Peru, filling each season around four thousand or- 
ders, with approximately two million trees and 
plants used in supplying the demands of their trade. 
The general organization consists of Mr. Griffing 
as general supervisor, with the offices of secretary, 
auditor, landscape architect and nursery manager 
filled at each separate tract. The entire force em- 
ployed in the Griffing Nurseries is around two hun- 
dred. In planning the Griffing Nurseries first con- 
sideration was given to securing a perfect system 
of irrigation and drainage, and the plant was built 
at Rosedale around these two important points. The 
plant, in its entirety, is one of the best planned, 
most efficiently operated, in the South, and is a 
concrete example of the executive ability of Mr. 
Griffing. 

Since Mr. Griffing took complete charge of the 
business, a period of expansion has marked the en- 
tire business, and the territory served has been 
materially extended. Landscape men from Oklahoma, 
Arkansas, Texas and Louisiana are coming to the 
nursery in ever increasing numbers to select their 
material in car load lots. The mail service carries 
the nurseries to many thousands of smaller pur- 
chasers, and the attractive catalogue of the com- 
pany is distributed to around two hundred thousand 
people, while thousands of other pieces of small 
mail go out carrying the Griffing message. In 
addition to this an ever increasing volume of land- 
scape work is being done by the Griffing Landscape 
Department, in Beaumont, Part Arthur, Orange, and 
nearby cities, as well as in cities of Louisiana. 



Among the attractive grounds planned and executed 
by this department are V. Wiess Park, Pecos Boule- 
vard, the Beaumont High School, and the homes 
of John N. Gilbert, W. M. Crook, Ed. Linn, E. Con- 
way Broun, J. E. LeBlanc, B. R. Norvell, W. R. 
Priddie, William Saenger, W. C. Keith, M. F. Yount 
and others in Beaumont; the Port Arthur Hospital, 
business college, library and many other finer homes 
of Port Arthur, and many public buildings, apart- 
ments and residences in other cities in this section. 

Mr. Griffing has spent many years in developing 
the Satsuma orange, the early market orange of the 
coast states, and an ideal eating orange. The trees 
supplied by the Griffing Nurseries begin bearing 
th second year after planting, and are a hardy, per- 
fect example of this fruit, free from disease, and 
supplying orange growers of this section with a 
tree that they can grow without risk. Mr. Griffing 
also specializes in figs, roses, palms and general 
landscape material, and has one of the finest stocks 
in the entire Southwest. The Griffing system of 
B. and B. shipping is successful and popular. This 
means baling and burlapping. By this method (B. 
and B.) the plants are carefully dug with a gen- 
erous amount of the soil about their roots, and then 
tightly sewed up in burlap, and so are ready for ship- 
ment. Some of the especially successful products 
of the nursery are the Moserianum or Goldflower, 
Lauretinus, the Privet group, the beautiful broad 
leaf evergreen, Red or Griffing's Crimson Crepe 
Myrtle. Everblooming Roses, tens of thousands of 
which have been grown here and in which field the 
nursery is supreme. Griffings' Hardy Palms, Ari- 
zona Ash, Papershell Pecans, Commercial Figs, Mul- 
berries and Improved Bud Selected Satsuma Or- 
anges. 

Mr. Griffing was born at Norwich, New York, 
the ninth of May, 1873, the son of D. C. Griffing, 
who established the Griffing Nursery in Florida 
around four decades ago. As a boy Mr. Griffing 
spent much time in the nursery, and after finishing 
his education he took up horticulture as his life's 
vocation. He came to Texas in 1906, to establish 
the Griffing Nurseries in this state, and has been at 
Beaumont for the latter years of his residence in 
Texas. 

Mr. Griffing was married in New York in 1902, 
to Miss Nellie R. Bacon, daughter of I. G. Bacon, a 
farmer and land owner of that state. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griffing have one child, Ralph C. Griffing, and re- 
side in Beaumont. Mr. Griffing with his family 
attend the First Baptist Church. He is a member of 
the Rotary Club of Beaumont, and the Business 
Men's Club, and fraternally is a Knight of Pythias, 
an Odd Fellow, and an Elk. He is past president of 
the Texas Horticultural Society, and of the South- 
western Nurseryman's Association. He is also a 
member of American Nurseryman's Association, the 
Texas Florists Society and the Southern Nursery 
men's Association. Mr. Griffing is a director of the 
Tyrell-Combest Realty Company, to whom he re- 
cently sold 16,000 fig trees. Mr. Griffing has been 
especially interested in the development and beauti- 
fication of Beaumont, and has done much to advance 
this city and make it a perfect residence city. His 
nurseries and his position as a nurseryman, is point- 
ed to with justifiable pride by Beaumont, and 
this city is indeed fortunate in having this large en- 
terprise, and a man of Mr. Griffings calibre located 
here. 



1113 



MEN OF TEXAS 




LIVER J. TODD, one of the foremost law- 
yers of Beaumont, began the practice of his 
profession in this city in 1901, steadily ad- 
vancing to a position among the leading 
lawyers of the state. Mr. Todd's practice is of a 
general nature, and carries him into all the courts, 
where his connection with many important and hard 
fought cases has made him a prominent figure. Mr. 
Todd has a large and modern suite of offices with 
a complete library in the San Jacinto Building. He 
has a force of assistants and his firm is one of the 
leaders in the city. Mr. Todd gives special atten- 
tion to corporation practice and is a director in and 
attorney for the San Jacinto Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and vice president and director in the Security 
State Bank and Trust Company. He also represents 
many of the leading industrial concerns and larger 
corporations in this part of the state, and is re- 
garded as an authority on corporation litigation. 

Mr. Todd was born at Charleston, Illinois, the 
twenty-seventh of September, 1877, the son of David 
P. Todd, a native of Ohio, and a farmer and land 
owner, and Virginia C. Todd, a native of Virginia. 
As a boy Mr. Todd attended the public schools in 
Coles County, Illinois, and later of Valparaiso, In- 
diana, after which he entered the University of Mich- 
igan, completing the law course in three years, and 
graduating in 1901 with the L. L. B. degree. He then 
came to Beaumont, where he began his practice and 
has so continued to the present time. He has always 
taken a keen interest in education and for over two 
years has served as a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation. In 1924 he was elected president of this 
board. He has also become interested in agricul- 
ture and owns a 5,000 acre rice farm, twenty-five 
miles from the city. 

Mr. Todd was married in Illinois, in 1906, to Miss 
Carrie Mason, daughter of K. Mason, a farmer of 
that state, and Mary Mason. Mr. and Mrs. Todd 
have three children, John D., a student of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, Oliver J. Jr., and James W. 
Charles M., another child, died in May, 1924. They 
live at 2325 Broadway. Mr. Todd is a member of 
the American and State Bar Association, the Beau- 
mont Club, the Beaumont Country Club, and is a 
Mason, York and Scottish Eites, and a member of 
El Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. He repre- 
sents the highest type of Christian citizenship, and 
has taken a deep interest in the accomplishments 
of his city. His masterly handling of corporation 
problems, and his legal ability has won for him the 
respect of the bench and bar of this state, and his 
merited success is in just proportion to his qualities 
as a citizen and professional man. Notwithstanding 
his exacting professional and business duties, Mr. 
Todd has taken an active interest in all constructive 
public affairs, and is especially concerned with the 
upbuilding and development of the city. 

RINCE A. DOWLEN, attorney at law, Beau- 
mont, Texas, has for more than a quarter 
of a century practiced before the Texas 
bar, and is one of the most successful law- 
yers of this portion of the state. He began the 
practice of his profession in this city in 1897 and 
while he is engaged in a general practice of law, 
he specializes in land title work and is regarded as 
an authority on this branch of law. Judge Dowlen 
has been the recipient of many positions of honor 




and trust at the hands of his fellow man, and for 
two years was justice of the peace here, from 1897 
to 1899. He was elected to the office of alderman 
of the city of Beaumont, in 1906, and served with 
distinction in this office three consecutive terms. 
He has always taken a keen interest in educational 
matters and is a champion of education along all 
lines. He was a member of the Beaumont school 
board for about sixteen years and exerted an influ- 
ence for good and usefulness as a member of that 
body. He is active in political matters of his city 
county and state, and has held the office of sec- 
retary of the County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee since 1920, and for more than four years 
has held the place of chairman of the City Demo- 
cratic Committee. Judge Dowlen was admitted to 
the bar in 1892, and immediately began the prac< 
tice of his profession in Randle County, Texas, where 
he remained until 1894, when he came to Beaumont 
to accept the position of superintendent of the pub- 
lic schools of this city. He remained as superin- 
tendent of the Beaumont public schools until 1897, 
when he resigned in order to again take up the prac- 
tice of law, and has remained here since that time 
in the practice of law. After leaving school, Mr. 
Dowlen began his career in the business world as a 
school teacher, and taught for several years. His 
first experience in educational work was in Cheath- 
am County, Tennesseee, and later he taught in Da- 
vidson and Robertson Counties of that state, after 
which he removed to Texas and located at Farmers- 
ville where he was one of the organizers of the 
Farmersville Academy and was an instructor of 
mathematics in this institution until 1889. He then 
went to Canyon City, Texas, where he was principal 
of the school at that place, and during the entire 
period in which he was engaged in teaching, Mr. 
Dowlen studied law and continued his study of law 
until he was admitted to the bar. 

Judge P. A. Dowlen was born near Pleasant View, 
Cheatham County, Tennessee, on January 8th, 1859. 
His father, Harris Dowlen, a native of Robertson 
County, Tennessee, was a well known farmer and 
planter of his native state. His mother was Miss 
Ann Mathis, a member of a prominent family of 
Davidson County, Tennessee. His early education 
was obtained in the county schools of Tennessee, 
after which he became a student of the Peab'ody 
Normal at Nashville, and graduated from that insti- 
tution with the degree of L. I. 

Judge Dowlen was married on December 25th, 
1889, to Miss Lulu Martin, a daughter of Captain 
T. B. Martin of Fairforest, South Carolina. They 
have two children, Prince Orrin Dowlen of Houston, 
Texas, in the land department of the Roxana Petro- 
leum Corporation, and Tom Harris Dowlen of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, who is manager of City Service 
Refining Company. Judge Dowlen is a member of 
the Masonic Lodge No. 286 of Beaumont; is a mem- 
ber of the Beaumont Commandery No. 38, and is also 
a member of El Mina Temple Shrine of Galveston, 
and is a Past Master, Past High Priest and is a 
Past Commander, and shows his activity in Masonic 
circles here and throughout the state, where he is 
well known and popular. He is an elder in the Pres- 
byterian Church of Beaumont, and is a leader in all 
civic movements for the progress and advancement 
of the city, where he is highly esteemed by the en- 
tire citizenship. 



1114 




&0Oc>-t>u ^4^^-z ^f 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




AYNE L. LAY, for many years a factor in 
the drug business at Beaumont, has recently 
established one of the finest drug stores 
in the city, and is highly esteemed for his 
connection with the business life of his community. 
Mr. Lay is president and manager of the Corner 
Drug Company, one of the large down town drug 
stores, and located at the corner of Crockett and 
Pearl Streets, which property has been used for a 
drug location for the last thirty-five years. The 
Corner Drug Company, an organization representing 
an investment of around forty thousand dollars, was 
established in May, 1922. At that time the building 
they occupy was entirely remodeled, and all fixtures 
are new, and the best that can be had. The store, 
under the new management, is one of the finest 
in the city, and carries one of the most complete 
stocks. A force of seventeen employees is main- 
tained, and each department has been carefully plan- 
ned, to give a maximum of service. In addition to 
Mr. Lay, as president, J. F. Goodhue is vice president 
of the company. The corner occupied by the Corner 
Drug Store is that on which the Dunlap Drug Com- 
pany was located many years ago, and later the 
Keith Drug Company, and is one of the best drug 
locations in the city. 

Mr. Lay was born in Mason County, Texas, the 
eleventh of March, 1887, the son of J. W. Lay, a 
farmer and land owner of that section, and Mrs. 
Addie Lay. He was educated in the public schools 
of Yoakum and Beaumont, and after finishing school 
began in the drug business. Mr. Lay spent five 
years with Grimes and Hurst, later going with the 
P. 0. Drug Store, for one year, after which he went 
with the Keith Drug Company, remaining with them 
for twelve years, and leaving that firm to establish 
his present business. He is one of the best known 
registered pharmacists in the city, and is regarded 
as unusually competent in all branches of this pro- 
fession. 

Mr. Lay was married at Beaumont, in 1914, to 
Miss Julia Brown, daughter of a Beaumont family. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lay reside at 1445 Avenue G, and have 
three children— Daniel, Albert and Mary Adalene. 
Mr. Lay belongs to the Rotary Club, and is a leader 
among the younger business men. 

W. SANDERS, who has for the past sev- 
eral years been a factor in the development 
of the oil fields of Texas, has had a wide 
experience in oil field work, especially in 
the construction of pipe lines. Mr. Sanders is con- 
nected with the Humble Pipe Line Company at San 
Angelo, Texas, going there from the Humble Pipe 
Line Station at Hull, where he was responsible for 
the forty-nine miles of pipe line from Hull to Bay- 
town. 

Mr. Sanders was born at Corsicana, Texas, the 
ninth of June, 1886, son of R. I. Sanders, a cattle- 
man of that section. He was educated in the public 
schools, and after leaving school began in the oil 
business, in the pipe line department. His first 
experience was at Sour Lake, Texas, where he be- 
gan in 1904 for the Texas Pipe Line Company. He 
remained with the Texas Company for about three 
years, after which he went with the Gulf Pipe Line 
Company, remaining with them until 1913, and han- 
dling pipe line construction for them in the fields 
of Texas and Louisiana. He was stationed in Louis- 
iana from 1913 until 1915, for the Caddo Oil and 





Refinery Company. In 1918 Mr. Sanders went with 
the Humble Pipe Line Company, and began work 
on the pipe line from Webster to Columbia, which 
he completed in 1918. He also built the lines from 
Webster to Hearne, from Hull to Webster, and two 
lines from Webster to Texas City, and one from 
Groesbeck to Webster, all of this construction being 
for the Humble Company. He went to Hull in 
January, 1923, to take charge of the pipe lines of 
the Humble Pipe Line Company in that district, 
remaining there until going to San Angelo. 

Mr. Sanders was married at Paris, Texas, the 
twenty-ninth of July, 1915, to Miss Nannie Everidge, 
daughter of Benjamin A. Everidge, a native of 
Kentucky, who came to Texas a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago. Mr. and Mrs. Sanders have one child, 
Roy W. Sanders, Jr. Mr. Sanders is one of the 
most capable pipe line men in the coastal field, his 
knowledge of pipe line construction being the re- 
sult of years of experience combined with a study 
of this department of oil field operation. 

OHN E. HATCHER, since the attention of 
operators in the coastal field has been di- 
rected toward Hull, has been closely asso- 
ciated with the advancement and develop- 
ment of this field. Mr. Hatcher is field superin- 
tendent for the Yount-Lee Company and has been 
in charge of the work at Daisetta since February, 
1922. He has a force of around fifty-five men 
working under him here, and has a number of pro- 
ducing wells, giving production of around fifty-five 
hundred barrels. Mr. Hatcher directs all drilling 
and production activities, and looks after the leases 
of the Yount-Lee Company here. 

Mr. Hatcher gained his first oil experience at 
Spindle Top, and in 1914 with the Lake Oil Com- 
pany at Sour Lake running a rig. In 1919 he went 
to High Island, wildcatting for the Sun Company, 
and after a short time there went to Wichita Falls, 
with the Sibbly Drilling Company. In October, 1920, 
he returned to the coastal fields, later going to 
Duncan, Oklahoma, where he made a good well. 
He went from there to Mexia, remaining at that 
place until February, 1921, with the Sibbly Drilling 
Company. After that he came to Hull with the 
Yount-Lee Company, and drilled in that field for 
them until February, 1922, and was in charge of the 
drilling there until taking charge of all field work 
for the Yount-Lee Company. 

Mr. Hatcher was born at Refugio, Texas, the 
fifteenth of October, 1892, son of William Hatcher, 
a farmer, who later went to Beaumont to engage 
in oil field work. His mother, before her marriage, 
was Miss Sallie McFarrin. Mr. Hatcher attended 
the public schools of Beaumont, and after leaving 
school began oil field work. 

Mr. Hatcher was married at Sour Lake, Texas, 
the sixteenth of October, 1915, to Miss Louise Tid- 
well, of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Hatcher now 
make their home at Hull, and have one child, 
Johnie Maye. They attend the Methodist Church. 
Fraternally Mr. Hatcher is an Odd Fellow and Knight 
Temular; Shriner, Arabia Temple, Houston. Since 
entering the oil fields with intention of making 
this work his career, Mr. Hatcher has made rapid 
progress. His success is largely due to his indus- 
try, his close study of conditions, his ability to 
handle men, and his capability to adapt himself to 
conditions and handle any situation that may arise. 



1117 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OSEPH E. GRAMMIER, during the decade 
cf his residence in Port Arthur, has been 
a mortician, and has built, through an 
earnest desire to give the city a real serv- 
ice, one of the finest and most modern undertak- 
ing establishments in the state. Mr. Grammier 
operates the business under his own name, and oc- 
cupies a large and perfectly appointed funeral home 
at the corner of Waco and Fifth Streets. Here a 
modern, two-story brick structure houses the of- 
fices, funeral parlors, embalming room, and display 
rooms, while in the rear and with easy access to 
the street, is the modern garage where the hearses, 
cars, and ambulances are kept. A force of four 
employees assist Mr. Grammier with the fine service 
that he has set for his establishment since the 
organization of the business in 1916. In those days 
Mr. Grammier occupied a small office at 525 Fifth 
Street, with a pair of horses and a humble ambu- 
lance as his equipment. But those horses, and the 
man behind the small organization responded nobly, 
and although the equipment was not of the best, 
there was a spirit of service that made up for 
this lack, and the business grew. Soon an auto- 
mobile ambulance replaced the horses, then an- 
other, and another, until now Mr. Grammier has a 
fleet of four ambulances, and two large hearses, 
ready at all hours of the day or night to answer the 
call. The two last ambulances added to this fleet 
are deserving a few descriptive words. Fully 
equipped with lung motors, first aid kits, and beds 
that know no jar, they are the last word in am- 
bulance construction, and are the result of many 
years of study on the part of their builders. These 
ambulances have meant much to Port Arthur, and 
few cities of its size can boast the perfect am- 
bulance service that Mr. Grammier has made pos- 
sible for this city. 

Mr. Grammier was born at Hampshire, Texas, the 
fifth of May, 1895. His father, the late L. Gram- 
mier, a native of Jefferson County, and one of the 
early pioneers of the state, was a planter and cat- 
tleman throughout his life. His mother, before her 
marriage, Miss Clara Broussard, is a member of 
one of Jefferson County's most prominent pioneer 
families, and now makes her home at Beaumont. 
Mr. Grammier spent much of his boyhood in Beau- 
mont, attending the public schools there. After 
finishing his education he entered his cousin's under- 
taking establishment, in the fall of 1911, and 
learned the business under him. In 1915, he took 
his state board examination and was licensed as 
an undertaker and embalmer. At this time he was 
only twenty years old, and the youngest man to be 
licensed up to that time. He came to Port Arthur 
immediately following, and established his business 
in a small way, but, as was inevitable, the business 
grew, and is now not only the finest undertaking 
establishment in Port Arthur, but one of the finest 
in the state. In 1918 Mr. Grammier enlisted in 
military service, with the 303rd Cavalry, Fifty-third 
Field Division, at Leon Springs, and was later sent 
to San Antonio. He was discharged in January, 
1919, and returned to Port Arthur and resumed 
the management of his business. Mr. Grammier is 
also a director of the Homestead Building and Loan 
Association. 

Mr. Grammier was married the seventeenth of 
September, 1917, at Port Arthur, to Miss Blanche 




Mooman, the first child to be born in Port Arthur, 
and the daughter of L. Mooman, a pioneer of Jef- 
ferson County, and one of the first residents of 
Port Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. Grammier have an 
apartment over the undertaking establishment, at 
Waco and Fifth Streets. Mr. Grammier is affiliated 
with nearly all the fraternal orders of Port Arthur, 
such as the Elks, Knights of Pythias, Red Men, and 
others. He is a Mason, Port Arthur Lodge, thirty- 
second degree, Scottish Rite, and a member of El 
Mina Temple Shrine at Galveston. He belongs to the 
Country Club, the Chamber of Commerce, the Re- 
tail Merchants Association, the Rotary Club, the 
Texas Funeral Directors Association, the National 
Funeral Directors Association and the Sanitarian 
Club of America. Mr. Grammier is interested in 
all civic work, and development work, and is one of 
the boosters of Port Arthur as "the fastest growing 
city in Texas." 

AMES L. DUNN, for the past several years 
a factor in financial circles at Port Arthur, 
is an expert on loans and credits. Mr. 
Dunn is secretary and manager of the Se- 
curity Loan and Investment Company, Inc., a financ- 
ing company operated under the supervision of the 
banking department of Texas, and which was estab- 
lished in 1921 and incorporated in 1922 as the Port 
Arthur Finance Company, the name being changed 
in 1924 to the Security Loan and Investment Com- 
pany, Inc. They loan money on real estate and 
buy paper of all classes, particularly automobile 
paper and trade acceptances, but the main feature 
of their work consists in making industrial loans. 
The company has offices in the Deutser Building, 
and the officers are Dr. Frank D. Mabry, president; 
H. C. Crawford, vice president; Dr. B. H. Vaughan, 
treasurer; J. L. Dunn, secretary, with P. T. Williams, 
Fred Rodriguez and C. C. Harrell as additional di- 
rectors. Mr. Dunn, as one of the organizers of the 
company, performed a valuable service to his com- 
munity in offering a home company to handle local 
paper, obviating the necessity of having this paper 
sent to out-of-town financing companies. Local 
business men have been quick to avail themselves of 
the facility of this company, and the business han- 
dled has been very gratifying. But the feature of 
their work which means the most to Port Arthur 
is the granting of "personal character loans" mod- 
eled after the well known "Morris Plan." 

Mr. Dunn was born in Hopkins County, Texas, 
the eighteenth of July, 1892, son of J. M. Dunn, and 
Lucy (Ballinger) Dunn, a native of Kentucky, now 
deceased. The elder Mr. Dunn came to Texas in 
1875, and was one of the leading educators of this 
state until his retirement several years ago. As 
a boy, James L. Dunn attended the public schools 
of Sulphur Springs, Texas, later entering the Uni- 
versity of Texas. He left the university to enter 
the First Officers Training Camp at i^eon Springs, 
where he was commissioned second lieutenant, and 
sent to Camp Travis, and later to Camp Jackson, 
and still later to Camp Sheridan, at Montgomery, 
Alabama. He was discharged the eleventh of De- 
cember, 1918, as captain of field artillery. He came 
to Port Arthur in 1919 and was for a year and a 
half agent for the Texas Company, and was then 
with Sidney C. Collins, steamship agent, for a 
time, resigning to go with the present company. 
Mr. Dunn, as has been stated, is secretary of the 



1118 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Security Loan and Investment Company, president 
of the Butler Motor Exchange, and he is also sec- 
retary of the Mabry-Griffing Trust Company, and 
is interested in the Griffing Residential Park De- 
velopment Company. 

Mr. Dunn was married at San Antonio, Texas, the 
twenty-second of July, 1917, to Miss Flora Reese, a 
native of Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn reside in the 
Griffing Residential Park, and have one son, J. L., 
Jr. Mr. Dunn is commander of the Port Arthur 
American Legion Post, is a director of the Young 
Men's Business League, president of the University 
Club, and a member and past president of the 
Lions Club. He is a member of the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon and Phi Alpha, college fraternities. Al- 
though a resident of Port Arthur but a few years, 
Mr. Dunn has taken his place among the civic lead- 
ers, and is one of the most popular and progressive 
young business men of the city. 

ALEXANDER BUNGE, throughout his 
residence at Port Arthur identified with 
civic and business enterprises of impor- 
tance, has been a factor in the development 
of the city of Port Arthur, and is the directing head 
of the dominating real estate institution of the city. 
Mr. Bunge is manager of the Holland-Texas Hypo- 
theek Bank, successors to the Port Arthur Town- 
site Company, and an organization that has assisted 
in the building of more than two thousand homes 
in Port Arthur, at a total cost in excess of three 
million dollars. This development work started 
with the tiny village on the Sabine Lake, before the 
incorporation of Port Arthur, and has continued 
throughout the years, covering the entire city. While 
in a brief article it would be impossible to give 
the history of the Holland-Texas Hypotheek Bank, 
and its many operations incident to the development 
of Port Arthur, a brief resume of these operations 
will serve to indicate the importance of this institu- 
tion, from a civic and commercial standpoint. Organ- 
ized in 1895, as the Port Arthur Townsite Company, 
with men like Arthur E. Stilwell, E. L. Martin, C. A. 
Braley and J. McD. Trimble as its first trustees, 
this company has followed a policy that has fostered 
and built the city along modern lines. The exten- 
sive program of street construction, park improve- 
ment, drains and sidewalk building that was inaugu- 
rated at that time has been followed to the present 
date, and to this company Port Arthur owes the 
park along the lake shore, extending from Houston 
Avenue, to Vandervoort Boulevard, and other parks 
and public grounds in various parts of the city. Of 
these public grounds a large portion are now occu- 
pied by such institutions as the Mary Gates Hospital, 
the Port Arthur high school, Dellora R. Gates Me- 
morial Library, Port Arthur College and other 
schools and public buildings. Throughout its history 
the Holland-Texas Hypotheek Bank has been gen- 
erous in the donations made to civic activities, and 
has contributed thousands of dollars to securing 
public improvements. From the time of its organi- 
zation, one-fifth of the net proceeds of sales has 
been set aside to carry forward improvement work. 
In 1905 the organization recognized the demand for 
homes in Port Arthur, and broadened their program, 
which had at first included only the sale of unim- 
proved property, to include loans for the erection 
of homes, and this policy of promoting home build- 
ing has resulted in more than two thousand con- 




tented home owners for the city. E. J. Everwyn 
Lange, of Amsterdam, Holland, is now president of 
the Holland-Texas Hypotheek Bank; E. A. Bunge 
of Port Arthur is manager, and Miss Claire Easley 
is assistant manager. Offices are maintained in the 
Plaza Hotel Building. 

Mr. Bunge was born in Amsterdam, Holland, and 
came to Port Arthur in 1918. On the retirement of 
Jan Van Tyen, in 1920, he assumed the management 
of this important real estate institution, continuing 
to direct the affairs of this organization along the 
constructive policies adopted in the early days. 

Mr. Bunge was married to Miss Elsa Meulman, a 
native of Holland. They reside at 2948 Sixth Street, 
and have two children, Adrienne, and Sonja. Mr. 
Bunge is a member of the Rotary Club. 

RANK E. STONEBURNER has for around 
a decade and a half been active in business 
circles at Port Arthur, and during this time 
has been a factor in the field of electrical 
merchandising and contracting. Mr. Stoneburner 
is a member of the firm of The Electric Supply 
Company of which his father, John F. Stoneburner, 
is the other member. The firm handles a general 
electrical contracting business, and has a complete 
stock of electrical supplies, including radio equip- 
ment. They carry the most complete equipment of 
any electrical house in Port Arthur, and are dis- 
tributors in this locality for all nationally advertised 
goods. The retail business is one of the largest 
electrical merchandising businesses in the city, and in 
addition to this the contracting department handles 
many of the most important electric wiring con- 
tracts here, and is equipped to do any class of 
electrical installation. The Electric Supply Com- 
pany is well located in the business district, and 
occupies a modern building, forty by one hundred 
and thirty-six feet, at 637 Procter Street. A force 
of eight employees are maintained, all trained elec- 
tricians, and competent to handle any kind of elec- 
tric wiring. 

Frank E. Stoneburner was born at Crooksville, 
Ohio, the twenty-second of December, 1891. His 
father, John F. Stoneburner, a native of that state, 
came to Orange, Texas, in 1903, and was manager 
of Orange County Irrigation Company for five 
years. He then came to Port Arthur and operated 
the Port Arthur Planing Mill for a period of five 
years, after which, with his son, he established The 
Electirc Supply Company. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Jennie Brown, was also a native of Ohio, 
her death occurring at Port Arthur in 1921. As a 
boy Mr. Stoneburner attended the public schools of 
Ohio, and later of Orange, after which he took a 
commercial course at Port Arthur College. He then 
went with his father in the planing mill business, 
and later with his father established The Electric 
Supply Company, which he now operates. 

Mr. Stoneburner was married at Port Arthur, the 
thirty-first of March, 1913, to Miss Emma Elder, a 
native of Louisiana, who was reared in Texas. They 
have since made this city their home, and now re- 
side at 2341 Fourth Street. Mr. Stoneburner is a 
Knight of Pythias, a member of the D. 0. K. K., the 
Elks Club, the Lions Club, and other civic organiza- 
tions. He has taken an active part in all develop- 
ment work at Port Arthur, both along commercial 
and civic lines, and is one of the best liked young 
business men of this city. 



1121 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN MATTHEW CONLEY, an honored res- 
ident of Beaumont for two decades, and one 
of the ablest attorneys in this section of 
the state, has earned noteworthy prom- 
inence as a lawyer, and has at various times held 
positions of public trust, demonstrating his official 
ability. His devotion to the best interests of the 
community has won him the highest esteem of his 
fellow citizens. Judge Conley served as district 
judge of the Sixtieth District Court from 1911 until 
1915, in which year he became chief justice of the 
Ninth Court ctf Civil Appeals, at Beaumont, holding 
this office from June, 1915, until January, 1917. 
Since that time he has been engaged in the civil 
practice of law and has been identified with im- 
portant litigation. Judge Conley is a member of 
the firm of Conley and Renfro, with offices in the 
Perlstein Building. He has a large clientele, being 
retained by some of the large corporations of the 
city, as well as by many individuals. His law li- 
brary is complete, placing at his disposal every 
legal advantage. His careful attention to the in- 
terests of his clients has brought him success and 
he is numbered among the leaders of the Jeffer- 
son County Bar. Judge Conley is a director in the 
City National Bank, for which he is also attorney, 
and is one of the trustees and attorney for the 
East Beaumont Townsite Company. He also has 
oil interests and other properties in this section. 
Judge Conley was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, the 
twenty-second of February, 1874, son of William 
and Annie E. Conley, the father for many years 
being a railroad man of that city. Judge Conley 
attended the public schools of Chillicothe, and after 
graduating from the schools there, entered the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, where he graduated in 1898, 
from the law department with the B. L. degree. 
Since he was fifteen years of age, Judge Conley has 
supported himself and he worked his way through 
college. As a boy he became a telegraph operator 
and worked for the B. & 0. R. R. as operator, train 
dispatcher, and was employed in the superintendent's 
office and completed his railroad career in the legal 
department. He began his practice in his native 
state, coming to Texas and Beaumont in 1902, and 
since that time has been one of the best known 
attorneys and judges here. From 1904 to 1906 he 
served as assistant city attorney, and for years as 
vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. He is 
taking an active part in building up the Southeast 
Texas State Fair and was its second president. Dur- 
ing the World War, Judge Conley took a prominent 
part in war work, serving as chief of the Civilian 
Secret Service of this district, comprising six comi- 
ties, and also as chairman of the County Council of 
Defense, and served as a Four-Minute Man. He was 
one of the organizers and a member of the execu- 
tive committee of the Red Cross and chairman of 
the home service section thereof. 

Judge Conley was married at Kingston, Ohio, in 
1902, to Miss Essie Lee May, daughter of Charles 
W. May, now living in Houston County, where he 
is a well known farmer and land owner. Judge 
and Mrs. Conley live at 2272 Grand Avenue, and 
have one child, Jayne, who was born in 1920. Judge 
Conley is a member of the Beaumont Club and the 
Beaumont Country Club, American State and County 
Bar Associations, and fraternally is an Elk. Whether 
as a private citizen, as an attorney, or as a mem- 




ber of the judiciary, Judge Conley has been unswerv- 
ingly on the side of justice and the highest and best 
development of his community, and has done much 
to further these causes. 

B. SAWYER, for two decades one of the 
progressive business men of Beaumont, has 
been a factor in the drug business here 
during this time, and has done much to raise 
the standards of drug store operation in this city. 
Mr. Sawyer is president of the Jefferson Drug Com- 
pany, the only wholesale drug house in the city and 
one handling a large volume of business annually. 
The Jefferson Drug Company was established in 
1919, with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, 
which has been increased from time to time until it 
is now capitalized for one hundred and fifty thou- 
sand dollars. Since its establishment, the business 
has developed consistently, along progressive lines, 
and has paid a big dividend annually. The company 
owns its own business home, a modern two story 
brick structure, at 381 College Street, fronting sixty 
feet on that street and running back one hundred 
and eighty feet. They cover a trade territory that 
includes the states of Texas and Louisiana, and the 
volume of annual trade reaches a large figure. The 
officers of the Jefferson Drug Company are O. B. 
Sawyer, the subject of this sketch, president; D. C. 
Proctor, secretary, treasurer and manager, and M. R. 
Kleas, vice president. 

Mr. Sawyer was born in Alabama, the twenty- 
eighth of March, 1877, the son of the late Dr. J. B. 
Sawyer, a practicing physician of Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, and Eudora Stubbs Sawyer. Mr. Sawyer was 
educated in the public schools of Memphis, attending 
the high school there, and rounding out his educa- 
tion with special courses. Mr. Sawyer came to Texas 
in 1893, going to Hillsboro, where he was in a retail 
drug store for two years, after which he went to 
Galveston, where he was in the drug business for 
four and a half years. He then came to Beaumont, 
and was with W. B. Dunlap for a year and a half, 
and for another year and a half with the Caswell- 
Preston Drug Company. In 1905 he started in busi- 
ness for himself, at that time having a partner, 
whom he later bought out. At that time he opened 
the Post Office Drug Store, still owning a large 
part of the stock of this company. Later he bought 
the Orleans Drug Store, and is now a stockholder 
in this business. Still later he started the Citizens 
Drug Store No. 1, later opening the Citizens Drug 
Store No. 2, and in both of which he is a stockholder. 
He is interested in the Hardin Drug Company, In- 
corporated, at Silsbee, Texas, owning the building 
occupied. 

Mr. Sawyer was married at Beaumont, in 1908, 
to Miss Ethel Little. They live at 875 Fifth Ave- 
nue, and attend the Methodist Church. Mr. Sawyer 
is a member of the Beaumont Country Club, and is 
a Mason, York Rite, and a member of El Mina Tem- 
ple Shrine at Galveston. Mr. Sawyer's achievement 
in the business world has been entirely through his 
own efforts, and his intimate knowledge of the drug 
business, as well as his ability as an executive, has 
resulted in a wholesale drug business which is an im- 
portant factor in the commercial life of the com- 
munity. Mr. Sawyer has also been identified with 
many business and civic affairs, and has done much 
for his community along the lines of civic advance- 
ment and beautification. 



1122 





&6m, 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 





|NTON JACOBS, Volkart Brothers, Inc., 
agency of Volkart Brothers, Inc., 26 Bea- 
ver Street, New York City. President and 
general manager, Max Greeven. Vice pres- 
ident and secretary, Leon B. Herault. Houston 
manager, Anton Jacobs. Office, 1509 Cotton Ex- 
change Building. Telephone, Preston 3189. 

S. ALLEN is one of the live, progressive 
young insurance men of Houston and is 
associated with R. M. Anderson in the 
Anderson-Allen agency with offices at 317 
Carter Building. Anderson and Allen are general 
agents for the Lincoln National Life Insurance Com- 
pany and have a large section of South Texas as 
their territory. Local agents are stationed at prac- 
tically all important points in their territory and 
the agency has been producing a steadily increas- 
ing volume of business since its organization in 
May, 1922. The Lincoln National is one of the 
strongest old line companies operating in Texas and 
writes an attractive line of standard life contracts. 
Business produced by the Anderson-Allen Agency 
by the middle of the summer of 1923 indicated 
they would write during the year a considerable 
increase of business over the previous year. 

Mr. Allen procured his first experience in life 
insurance work as an agent for the Southland Life 
Insurance Company of Dallas. He was with the 
Southland for only a few months when he accepted 
the general agency for the Lincoln National Life 
at Jacksonville, Texas. His territory there em- 
braced four counties surrounding Jacksonville and 
the agency was conducted with splendid success 
from September, 1921, until May, 1922, when Mr. 
Allen concluded to join forces with Mr. Anderson 
in the agency at Houston. 

A native of Texas, Mr. Allen was born at Rusk 
in Cherokee County on September 4, 1891. He is 
a son of W. R. and Leota (Summers) Allen and 
received his education in the public schools and 
high school at Jacksonville and in a commercial 
college at Tyler. His father was a well known 
business man at Jacksonville and for ten years or 
more prior to his death in July, 1923, was the 
resident agent there for the Texas Company. He 
originally came to Texas from Georgia, some fifty 
years ago. 

After leaving the business college, Mr. Allen's 
first work was as secretary to the superintendent 
of the Texas and New Orleans Railway Company. 
He remained in this position for about a year and 
a half, when he resigned to become stenographer 
in the general offices of the Texas Company. He 
remained with this company for several years and 
was filling the position of general cashier when he 
resigned. In 1919 Mr. Allen was elected secretary 
of the Young Men's Business League of Houston 
and had a splendid record of accomplishments to 
his credit when he resigned eighteen months later 
to enter the insurance field. 

Mr. Allen was married in Jacksonville on August 
6, 1913, to Miss Clyde Williams, daughter of J. D. 
Williams, prominent business man and dry goods 
merchant at Jacksonville for the past forty years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen are the parents of two children, 
R. S., Jr., and Mary Jean. 

Mr. Allen has always maintained an active inter- 
est in civic affairs and is a member of the Houston 




Salesmanship Club and a director of the Young 
Men's Division of the Houston Chamber of Com- 
merce. He also is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

OHN F. LEWIS has during his eight years 
spent in the oil business established an en- 
viable reputation as a producer of flowing 
wells, having brought in fifteen producers 
without drilling a dry hole, and has also proven a 
success as an executive. Mr. Lewis came to Hous- 
ton in 1919 from Fort Worth and is President of the 
Producers Crude Oil Company, with office located at 
405 Goggan Building. The Producers Crude Oil 
Company was organized in 1922 with a capital of 
$1,000,000.00, fully paid, and operate in the Mid- 
Continent oil and gas fields and are operating in 
Arkansas and expect to begin active development 
work in Texas. Other officers of this company are 
Frank Lewis, Secretary and Treasurer; this young 
oil official graduated from Harvard University in 
June, 1923. J. H. Smith of Fort Worth is Vice- 
President of the Producers Crude Oil Company. Mr. 
Lewis was Vice-President and Field Superintendent 
of the Old Dominion Oil Company, whose predeces- 
sors were the General Petroleum Company, from 
1919 to 1922. 

A native Texan, Mr. Lewis was born in Erath 
County, November 13, 1876. His father, F. M. Lewis, 
a native of Alabama, came to Texas in 1854 and for 
many years was engaged in farming in Erath Coun- 
ty. His mother was Miss Minerva Gilbreath, a 
native of Tennessee, and came to Texas in 1853. His 
education was obtained in the country schools of 
Erath County. After leaving school in 1896, he 
started his business career as a clerk in a store at 
Dublin, Texas, and later became a traveling sales- 
man in Texas, Louisiana and West Mississippi, and 
continued in this line from 1903 to 1905. He then 
became Manager of the Strawn Merchandise Com- 
pany at Strawn, Texas, where he remained for one 
year, and then went to Mexia with the Nussbaum 
store, where he remained until 1910, as Manager of 
this dry goods store. In 1910 he entered the dry 
goods business for himself at Dublin, Texas, and in 
1912 his store was burned and he engaged in the 
real estate business there, and continued in this line 
of endeavor until 1917 when he entered the oil busi- 
ness. Mr. Lewis drilled a number of wells in Ste- 
phens and Wichita Counties, and it was while drill- 
ing here that he drilled the fifteen consecutive pro- 
ducing wells, and this occurred while he was an offi- 
cial with the General Production Company and the 
Old Dominion Oil Company. In addition to his oil 
interests, Mr. Lewis owns farm lands in West Texas 
and has other real estate interests in the State, and 
is a Director in the Quartet Music Company of Fort 
Worth. 

Mr. Lewis was married in Dublin, Texas, on De- 
cember 26, 1897, to Miss Irene Smith, a native of 
Tennessee and a member of a prominent family of 
that State. They have three children, Frank, Imo- 
gene and Billie. Mr. Lewis is a member of the A. F. 
and A. M. He is one of the most careful and con- 
servative men engaged in the oil business and has 
built up a strong company. He has had several 
years experience in the field and today spends the 
greater part of his time there, and is a student of 
the oil business, and is popular in the oil circles of 
Texas. 



1125 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARRY A. BURR, for many years a resident 
of Orange, where he has been identified 
with the technical management of public 
utilities throughout much of his business 
career, has used his influence to further the de- 
velopment of Orange along progressive lines. Mr. 
Burr is secretary and general manager of the Gulf 
States utilities under the executive management of 
Stone and Webster, Inc., whose predecessor, the 
Orange Ice, Light and Water Company, was estab- 
lished in 1896, and has since supplied Orange with 
these important utilities. At all times the com- 
pany has kept pace with the development of the 
city, extending their service as the growth of 
Orange demanded, and has been an important fac- 
tor in this growth. Mr. Burr has directed much of 
this development, and is keenly awake to the part 
public utilities take in civic advancement. The ice 
plant has at present a capacity for eighty tons of 
ice daily, employing in this department five men, 
and manufacturing ice for wholesale distribution 
only. The light department, a modernly equipped 
plant, has a daily capacity of nine thousand kilo- 
watts, furnishing light and power throughout 
Orange County, including the oil fields near here, 
and also extending service to a number of Louisiana 
towns and oil fields. This department employs 
seventy-five people. The water department, a plant 
with a capacity of two million gallons of water per 
day, the supply coming from pure artesian wells 
sunk to a depth of seven hundred and fifty feet, has 
some fifteen miles of water mains, supplying this 
important utility to the entire city, and has a force 
of five employees. The officers of the old Orange 
Ice, Light and Water Company were: W. H. Stark, 
president; H. J. L. Stark, vice president and treas- 
urer, and Harry A. Burr, secretary and general 
manager. The plant office is located at 406 Front 
Street, where modern electric appliances are dis- 
played and handled. 

Harry A. Burr was born in Floyd County, Iowa, 
the fourteenth of July, 1880. His father, O. Burr, a 
native of Ohio, after a number of years in Iowa 
removed to Jennings, Louisiana, and later, in 1889, 
came to Orange. His mother, whose maiden name 
was Miss Helen Walker, was a native of New York 
State. Harry A. Burr was educated in the public 
schools of Orange, later taking a commercial course 
at the Massie Business College, at Birmingham, 
Alabama, after which he began his practical busi- 
ness career. He had formerly, as a school boy, 
worked for the Orange Ice, Water and Light Com- 
pany during vacations and after one year with the 
Leader Printing Company came back to the plant. 
During the years that followed he worked in prac- 
tically all the departments, obtaining a first-hand 
knowledge of the technicalities of public utilities, 
and in 1914 was made general manager of the plant, 
four years later, in 1918, becoming secretary of 
the company. 

Mr. Burr was married at Orange, in March, 1907, 
to Miss Bessie Parish, a native of Orange, and the 
daughter of James Parish of this city. Mr. and 
Mrs. Burr live at 406 Third Street. He is a Mason, 
Orange Blue Lodge, a Knight of Pythias, a Macabee, 
an Elk, and a Woodman of the World. He is also 
a member of the Rotary Club, and the Country 
Club, and has for many years taken a deep interest 
in the advancement of Orange, particularly in the 
development of the up-to-date public utilities. 





FRANK BROWN, president and general 
manager of the Sabine Supply Company, a 
wholesale hardware and supply company, 
doing a large business in Southeast Texas 
and Southwest Louisiana. This business has been 
built up from a small concern to its present position 
among the hardware jobbers of Texas, mainly 
through the efforts of Mr. Brown, who has been 
connected with this company as its manager since 
1906. Officers of the company are: B. F. Brown, 
president and general manager; W. H. Stark, vice 
president; H. J. L. Stark, treasurer, and D. A. Pru- 
ter, secretary. The foregoing officers, with Mr. F. 
H. Farrell, make up the board of directors. 

B. F. Brown was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, De- 
cember 18th, 1875, his wife, formerly Miss Julia 
Andrews Robertson of Austin, Texas, and his three 
children, Julia, age thirteen, Eleanor, age eight 
years, and Frances, age four years, comprise his fam- 
ily. Mr. Brown is a member of St. Paul's Epis- 
copal Church, a director in the Orange National 
Bank and is chairman of the Orange Wharf and 
Dock Commission, operating wharves and terminals 
at Orange. 

AMES N. PARKER has been actively identi- 
fied with business affairs at Orange since 
coming here several years ago, and as a 
banker has taken an influential part in the 
commercial and civic development of this city. He 
came to Orange in 1919 to organize the Guaranty 
Bank and Trust Company, which he served until 
recently as vice president and directing head. Since 
leaving the bank Mr. Parker has devoted his atten- 
tion to looking after his personal business interests. 
James N. Parker was born at Arizona, Louisiana, 
the nineteenth of March, 1880. His father, James 
A. Parker, a native of Arkansas, during his early 
life a lawyer of Arkansas, and a former general 
attorney of that state, removed to Louisiana in the 
'70s, and later became a Methodist minister. James 
N. Parker was educated in the schools of Louisiana, 
graduating from the high school at Lake Charles, 
after which he entered Vanderbilt University, tak- 
ing the B.S. degree in 1898. He began his banking 
career at New Orleans, in 1909, as clerk in a bank 
there, later going to Rayville, Louisiana, where he 
was in the Rayville State Bank for three years, 
leaving as cashier. After several years with the 
Louisiana State Banking Department he became 
president of the Bank of Delhi, of Delhi, Louisiana, 
and later went with the Frost-Johnson Lumber 
Company, at Mansfield, Louisiana, as superinten- 
dent and later as manager. After nine years with 
the company he came to Orange. 

Mr. Parker was married at Monroe, Louisiana, 
the twenty-second of November, 1906, to Miss Jessie 
Mason, the daughter of John T. Mason, a prominent 
business man of Louisiana. Mr. and Mrs. Parker 
reside at 611 Tenth Street, in Orange, and have two 
children, Jessie Nash, and Eliza Belle. Mr. Parker 
is a Mason, Blue Lodge Chapter, Mansfield, Lou- 
isiana, Royal Arch and Knight Templar, at Beau- 
mont, and a member of El Mina Temple Shrine at 
Galveston. He belongs to the Country Club, the 
Orange Gun Club and the Port Arthur Tarpon Club, 
and is well known as an outdoor sportsman. Mr. 
Parker is also interested in civic work and supports 
liberally those movements which have for their 
purpose the advancement of Orange. 



1126 



I 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




H. McNEILL, during the decade and more 
of his residence at Nederland, has attained 
a commendable reputation in the commun- 
ity for his activity in mercantile circles, 
and has taken a deep interest in civic affairs. Mr. 
McNeill is a member of the firm of McNeill & 
Company, one of the leading general mercantile 
stores in this locality, which he established in the 
fall of 1911, shortly after his arrival in this com- 
munity. The McNeill store has met with a pro- 
gressive growth since its establishment, meeting 
the community need for a mercantile store of re- 
liability and sound values, and at present has one 
of the largest stocks in the city, and employs a 
sales force of four people. The store is well lo- 
cated in the down-town business center, occupying 
a modern store building, and has a complete stock 
of dry goods, general merchandise and groceries. 
Mr. McNeill has partially relinquished the active 
management of the store in recent years, and the 
management of the business has been largely in 
the hands of his sons, J. H. McNeill, Jr., and J. 
Paul McNeill, and James B. Cook, who is a partner 
in the business. 

J. H. McNeill was born in North Carolina the 
twentieth of August, 1862, the son of the late Alex 
McNeill, a native of that state and a prominent 
farmer. Mr. McNeill was educated in the country 
schools of his native state and in 1887 began in 
the mercantile business at Godwin, North Carolina, 
later removing to Brown Summit, also in that state, 
where he was in the mercantile business for many 
years prior to coming to Nederland in 1911 to en- 
gage in business. Mr. McNeill still owns three large 
farms in his native state and raises tobacco and 
grain. 

Mr. MeNeill was married in North Carolina in 
1890, to Miss Minnie Walker, a native of that 
State. They have three children living: W. T. Mc- 
Neill, a prominent young attorney of Beaumont; 
J. H. McNeill, Jr., and Paul McNeill, both in the 
store here as partners, and have two children de- 
ceased. In 1916 Mr. McNeill built one of the finest 
homes in Nederland, and the family have since 
resided there. Mr. McNeill has been a factor in the 
commercial development of Nederland, his pro- 
gressive merchandising methods greatly affecting 
the prosperity of the city, and has also been active 
in all civic work. 

ILLIAM MEEKER, one of the real builders 
of Port Neches, and one of a group of 
business leaders who have been active in 
every forward movement, as one of the 
largest property owners here has been able to in- 
fluence the trend of advancement to a large ex- 
tent and has taken a constructive interest in all 
development work. Mr. Meeker came to Port Neches 
in 1916 and engaged in the furniture business here 
until his retirement in 1919, building up one of the 
largest furniture businesses here, and taking an 
active part in the commercial life of the city. Since 
1917 he has built four modern business buildings 
of brick and concrete construction, and all of which 
are creditable additions to the business center. He 
has also built a modern moving picture building, 
with seating capacity for five hundred people, and 
equipped to give the highest type of shows, and 
provide the residents of Port Neches with a first 





class amusement house. In addition to these prop- 
erties Mr. Meeker owns a number of rent houses 
and other valuable real estate. Since his retire- 
ment he has spent his time in looking after these 
interests, and in furthering the development of 
Port Neches. 

Mr. Meeker was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the 
fifteenth of May, 1860, the son of Sam Meeker, a 
native of Tenneessee, who went to St. Louis as a 
young man, and Mrs. Meeker, nee Hood, a native 
of St. Louis. He was educated in the public schools 
of Missouri, and as a young man went with the 
United States government, doing special work until 
coming to Texas in 1912. He located first at 
Brownsville, remaining there for one year, after 
which he went to Beeville where he engaged in 
business until coming to Port Neches, in 1916, since 
which time his career has been sketched. 

Mr. Meeker was married at St. Louis, in 1910, to 
Miss Stella Gardner, a native of Illinois. They have 
made their home in Port Neches since Mr. Meeker's 
business interests have been centralized in this city, 
and are active in all public advancement movements. 
Although Mr. Meeker was formerly active in club 
and fraternal work, he has resigned from all these 
organizations, and devotes his entire time to his 
business interests, and to the development of his 
city. 

LONZO CHARLES LOUIS WEITZEL, who 

has recently entered the business world at 
Beaumont, is one of the most progressive 
druggists of this city, and is a factor in 
the life here. Mr. Weitzel is secretary, treasurer 
and manager of the Palace Drug Store, one of the 
old established drug stores of Beaumont, which was 
bought out in 1922 by Mr. Weitzel and O. B. Saw- 
yer, and has continued to operate under the old 
name. The Palace Drug Store has a fine location 
at 600 Pearl Street, in the business district, and has 
a very large trade. Under the management of Mr. 
Weitzel the business has been materially expanded 
and built up and the success of the reorganized es- 
tablishment is a creditable reflection on his busi- 
ness ability. Every department is complete and es- 
pecial attention has been given to prescription work 
and the development of a large fountain trade. In 
addition to Mr. Weitzel as secretary and treasurer 
of the Palace Drug Store, O. B. Sawyer is president. 
Mr. Weitzel was born in Goliad County, Texas, 
the thirteenth of January, 1897. His father, Fred 
Weitzel Jr., is a farmer, stock raiser and land ownei 
of that county. Mr. Weitzel attended the public 
schools of Goliad County, and after leaving high 
school went in the drug business, at El Campo, 
Texas, where he spent five years. He then came to 
Beaumont, going with the Post Office Drug Store 
for a short time, and leaving there to buy an in- 
terest in the Palace Drug Store, which he has since 
managed. During the World War, Mr. Weitzel 
served with the Medical Corps, 35th Infantry, Nine- 
teenth Division, at Camp Travis, enlisting in Sep- 
tember, 1917, and being discharged in June, 1918. 

Mr. Weitzel was married at El Campo, in June, 
1922, to Miss Olivia Otell, daughter of Fred Otell, a 
farmer and landowner of that section. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weitzel reside in Beaumont at 1493 Park Street. 
Mr. Weitzel is a Mason, and since coming to Beau- 
mont has taken an active interest in the commercial 
development of this city. 



1129 



MEN OF TEXAS 




AMES HENRY RACHFORD came to Beau- 
mont in 1883 and during his long residence 
here has been active in the development 
of this city along all lines and many of 
city's most substantial improvements were 
started by this progressive citizen. He started to 
practice law in 1887 and during this same year 
engaged in the land business, and was the first 
to enter the real estate business in this part of 
Texas. He selected Beaumont as the town of prom- 
ise, and among the many additions to this city which 
he and his associates platted and sold were the 
Herring Addition, the O'Brien Addition, the B. D. 
Crary Addition, the Langham Addition, the N. 
Blanchette Addition, the V. Blanchette Addition, the 
first section of the Van Wormer Addition and the 
Neches River Park Addition. They platted and sold 
out completely the Oaks Subdivision of Port Neches, 
and are selling the industrial and waterfront addi- 
tions of the Rachford and Dearing Subdivision of 
this city; this being the only additions to Port Neches 
with a river frontage and many other advantages. 
Mr. Rachford is the owner of the Coast Land Town- 
site Company, which is selling the additions to Port 
Neches, and is a firm believer in the future of 
this portion of Texas. The Coast Land and Town- 
site Company also are the owners of the Finlay 
Townsite in Hudspeth County. Having devoted many 
years of his life to the various branches of the real 
estate business, and the fact that he has resided 
here continuously for more than forty years, during 
which time he has made a close study of conditions 
and land values, makes him an authority on these 
matters and he is recognized as such. In 1888 Mr. 
Rachford organized the Rachford Abstract Company 
of Beaumont, of which he is the sole owner, and 
this company is the oldest abstract company in this 
section of the state. He is one of the pioneers 
in the rice growing industry of Texas and was 
largely instrumental in getting the people interested 
in rice growing in this section. In 1890 he sold much 
land to people from other states in order to get 
them to come here and assist in the development 
of this territory. Mr. Rachford is president of the 
Silsbee Oil and Development Company, which was 
organized in 1921, and are operating in Hardin 
County. He also has large and valuable land hold- 
ings, which he owns in fee, and in time expects to 
develop a real oil field. He has, drilled many wells 
and located valuable holdings, but is holding devel- 
opment on account of titles. He is the owner of 
the Rachford Building at Port Neches, Texas. Mr. 
Rachford has the oldest real estate office in Beau- 
mont or in this part of the state. He served as 
county judge part of an unexpired term in 1896, 
and served as county surveyor of Jefferson County 
for a period of twelve years. Mr. Rachford started 
the interest in building sidewalks in Beaumont and 
has ever been active along this line, and now this 
city can boast of as many miles of sidewalks as 
any city of similar size in the country. He was 
for many years a member of the school board and 
has always taken an active part in the educational 
matters of the city and community. Mr. Rachford 
was one of the organizers of the first Chamber 
of Commerce of Beaumont and was the first sec- 
retary of this organization. Among his many 
achievements for the good of this portion of the 
country was in 1894, when the people of this portion 
of the state were struggling to get the national 



government to appropriate money to dredge Sabine 
Pass, and at this time a great portion of this con- 
gressional district looked on deep water aspirations 
for this section as a joke, and in order to overcome 
this, Mr. Rachford, with a few associates, called 
the first and only Deep Water Convention, and car- 
ried a solid twelve-coach trainload of East Texas 
people to Sabine Pass to see the waterway. After 
that they all became boosters and appropriations 
were forthcoming. In 1900 Mr. Rachford, with a 
few friends and associates, worked up the Rice 
Carnival, which was a success and the forerunner 
of the fairs for this portion of Texas. For many 
years he was connected with river excursions, carry- 
ing thousands of passengers every season, and is 
still engaged in putting this territory on the map 
as a shipping point. Mr. Rachford's office in Beau- 
mont is located at 948 Pearl Street. He came to 
Texas in 1883 and settled in Dallas, but in Novem- 
ber of the same year, he removed to Beaumont, and 
for the first few years practiced law here, which 
was practically confined to land practice, 

Mr. Rachford was born in Monroe County, Ken- 
tucky, on September 8th, 1866. His father, Robert 
E. Rachford, also a native of Kentucky, was en- 
gaged in the lumber business and farming at Beau- 
mont and Port Neches. His mother was Miss Angie 
E. Dearing, a member of a prominent family of 
Kentucky. His early education was obtained in the 
public and high schools of Glasgow, Kentucky, after 
which he attended the Glasgow Normal College and 
graduated from this institution in the class of 1883 
with the B. S. and A. M. degrees, after which he 
immediately started his business career. 

Mr. Rachford was married in Beaumont, Texas, 
in 1889 to Miss Annie C. Baughn, a daughter of 
W. P. Baughn, an extensive cotton and sugar planter 
of Brazoria County. They have two sons — Henry 
H. Rachford, who is the personal representative of 
the Gulf Oil Company at El Dorado, Arkansas, and 
Leslie V. Rachford, with the Texas Title Guaranty 
Company, San Antonio. The Rachford home is 
located at 2335 Park Street. Mr. Rachford has 
always been active in the business, social and gen- 
eral community life of Beaumont and gives liber- 
ally of his time and means to all projects tending 
to the welfare and advancement of this city. It 
can be truthfully said that there is probably no 
man in Beaumont today who has for more than 
four decades been so closely identified with the 
social, civic and commercial life of Beaumont, ex- 
erting an influence for good throughout a wide 
range of the city's activities, and a recognized 
leader along all lines as James Henry Rachford. 

HARLES F. GRAHAM, although but recent- 
ly come to Beaumont where he is known as 
one of the most progressive merchants of 
the city, has for more than four decades 
been associated with merchandising activities of 
wide scope, and is one of the best known pioneer 
merchants of the Lone Star State. Mr. Graham is 
president of the White House Dry Goods Company 
of Beaumont, the largest and most modern depart- 
ment store in the city, and one handling a large 
volume of business annually. The White House Dry 
Goods Company was established in this city a 
number of years ago, being opened and managed by 
William F. Graham, son of the subject of this 
sketch, with Mr. Graham as president. Since com- 




1130 




UaaJ^^^tn^, 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



ing to Beaumont to make his home in 1921, Mr. 
Graham has been partly retired from active business, 
and while he directs in part the management of the 
store here, he has continued to leave its management 
largely to his son, who is vice president and general 
manager of the business. 

Charles F. Graham was born at Carrollton, Mis- 
souri, the seventh of November, 1862. His father, 
W. H. Graham, a native of Kentucky, removed to 
Missouri while he was a young man and after a 
number of years in that state came to Denton Coun- 
ty, Texas, in 1871, where he was a farmer for a 
number of years. Later he removed to Dallas, Tex- 
as, remaining there until his retirement some few 
years prior to his death, which occurred at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-seven years. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Miss Jane Minnis, was a 
native of Missouri, her death occurring in Dallas, at 
the age of eighty-seven, the same age at which her 
husband passed away. Mr. Graham attended the 
public schools of Missouri, and at the age of eighteen 
years began in the mercantile business, gaining his 
first business experience at Lewisville, Texas, with 
the A. E. Graham Chain of stores in North Texas, he 
being a partner in the business. He later went to 
Ladonia, where he spent two years, and in the fall 
of 1890 went to Denton, and still later to Hillsboro 
where he opened a store, the Graham Company De- 
partment Store, of which he was president and 
general manager until 1921, when he sold out the 
business and came to Beaumont. Mr. Graham has 
also been interested in mercantile establishments at 
various Texas cities, and is one of the best known 
merchants in the state. 

Mr. Graham was married at Lewisville, Texas, 
the twenty-fifth of May, 1887, to Miss M. Ettie Fox, 
the daughter of John M. Fox, a pioneer of Collin 
County, and later a resident of McKinney where he 
was prominent in business and civic activities for 
many years. Mr. and Mrs. Graham have three 
children, William F., associated with his father in 
business, as vice president and general manager of 
the White House Dry Goods Company of Beaumont; 
Charles F., Jr., also associated with his father in 
business, and Etta Jess, wife of C. A. Graham, who 
is also a member of the firm. Few merchants in 
the Lone Star State have had so wide and varied 
experience in the merchantile business, and Mr. 
Graham brings to Beaumont an outlook and breadth 
of vision that is exerting a wide felt influence on 
the business life of the city. 

ONROE W. CARROLL, whose name has 
been constructively associated with the de- 
velopment of the petroleum resources of 
the coastal fields for around a quarter of a 
century, has been for four decades and more one 
of the outstanding citizens of Beaumont, and has 
taken an active part in the industrial and commer- 
cial development of this city. Mr. Carroll's partici- 
pation in the oil industry has been primarily as an 
independent operator, buying undeveloped proper- 
ties, which he has developed principally with his 
own capital, later selling to the larger companies 
after the property has been proven. He has dis- 
played an unusual ability in this field, and has de- 
veloped some of the most important tracts in the 
oil fields along the coast. One of his most recent 
projects is the development of a few thousand acre 
holding in Gonzales County, where operations are 




going forward at a gratifying rate. A second con- 
tribution to the oil industry, and one of no less im- 
portance than his development activities, has been 
the many new drilling and fishing tools of his in- 
vention which Mr. Carroll has placed on the mar- 
ket. Many of these tools have been in constant 
use since their introduction and have proven espe- 
cially adaptable to conditions of the coastal fields. 
Two in particular, the Carroll mud pump, a device 
that will fit in any water or mud pump, and a deep 
well pump for pumping oil, are important advances 
in oil well machinery, and deserving of special 
mention. These devices are being manufactured 
commercially and are supplied to operators through 
the oil well supply companies. 

Mr. Carroll was born at Natchitoches Parish, Louis- 
iana, the eighth of January, 1860, the son of Fran- 
cis L. Carroll, a lumberman and land owner of that 
state who moved to Texas in 1873 and is one of 
the pioneer lumbermen of the Lone Star State, and 
Sarah Long Carroll. He began his education in 
the public schools of Beaumont, and after leaving 
high school and later Baylor University and Texas 
A. and M. College, after which he went to Salem, 
Virginia, where he attended Roanoke College, and 
further equipped himself for the business world 
through a commercial course at Eastman Business 
College at Poughkeepsie, New York, graduating at 
the age of twenty-one. He had his first business ex- 
perience at Nona, Texas, a town some twenty miles 
from Beaumont, and which he named. He served 
four years as postmaster, also financing all early 
development operations at Nona, and was one of the 
incorporators of the Nona Mills Company, in which 
he was active from 1882 until 1885. In 1885 he re- 
turned to Louisiana, establishing a saw mill at Pro- 
vencal, which he operated until 1894. In that year 
he went to Dallas, making that city his headquar- 
ters, and continuing the operation of the mill until 
1898, when he came to Beaumont, at which time he 
disposed of his lumber interests. In 1901, Mr. Car- 
roll turned his attention to the oil business, drilling 
a gusher in the Spindle Top, which produced three 
hundred thousand barrels of oil in three months. 
He owned several tracts of land in Spindle Top, drill- 
ing his own property here and also handling drill- 
ing contracts. In 1902 he, with S. W. Pipkin, went 
to West Columbia and bought property which was 
held until 1920, when it was leased to the Humble 
Company and has proven one of their most valuable 
holdings. In 1903, Mr. Carroll went to High Island, 
buying and developing property there, and is at the 
present time engaged in active development work 
there. From 1906 until 1911 he operated a large 
machine shop and foundry business. He has from 
time to time been active in the various fields along 
the coast, and few oil men are better or more fa- 
vorably known than he. 

Mr. Carroll was married at Mount Lebanon, in 
June, 1887, to Miss Lula Prothro, daughter of W. B. 
Prothro, a planter, landowner and cotton mill man 
of that place. They make their home at Beaumont, 
residing at 1726 Park Street, and have four chil- 
dren, M. W., Jr., Mrs. Pearl Miller, Harry P., as- 
sistant manager of the Beaumont Gas Company, and 
Mrs. Thelma Hamm. Mr. Carroll has throughout 
his residence at Beaumont taken a definite inter- 
est in the advancement of this city and has con- 
tributed to all development work for many years. 



1133 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARLES HENRY MOORE— In the history 
of the lumber industry of Texas, the name 
of Charles Henry Moore occupies a promi- 
nent and important place as a man who pio- 
neered and blazed the way for those who are today 
leaders in this great industry. When he entered 
this field of activity, methods were crude, and with 
a progressive spirit he adopted modern ways of man- 
ufacturing and marketing the products of the forest. 
In 1870, when he entered this business in Texas, the 
virgin pine forests of Texas and Louisiana were 
so extensive that there appeared to be enough lum- 
ber in them to furnish the entire world throughout 
the ages to come. He witnessed a complete revo- 
lution in which the business was handled from the 
cutting of the timber by a few people in a small mill 
and hauling was done by ox teams. He saw the im- 
mense tramways built to the forests and the iron 
horse of commerce in the form of railroads enter 
the vast saw mill districts and carry the finished 
products to every portion of the globe. Mr. Moore 
was always one of the most progressive and public- 
spirited citizens of the Island City, and after his 
retirement from business he served in an official 
capacity with some of the largest and most im- 
portant institutions of the city until his death on 
February 3, 1926. He served as president of the 
Edgewood Land and Logging Company, Miller- 
Vidor Lumber Company, vice president of the Lock- 
Moore Company, Texas Bank and Trust Company, 
Texas and Gulf Steam Ship Company, American In- 
demnity Company, and was a director in the First 
National Bank of Galveston and the Doe Estates 
Company of San Francisco. 

Mr. Moore began very young as a school teacher 
in his native State, and in 1862 he went to California 
and became associated with his uncle in the sash, 
door and blind business, where he learned every 
branch of this industry, and remained in this line of 
endeavor in California until he came to Galveston 
in 1867 and engaged in this line of business for him- 
self. He later engaged in the lumber business, both 
manufacturing and retail, and under the name of 
C. H. Moore and Company, established the first 
factory for making interior woodwork that was es- 
tablished in this portion of the State. In 1876 he 
engaged in the general lumber business with W. F. 
Stewart and Company, and continued in this branch 
until 1880, when he sold his interests with this firm 
and joined A. J. Perkins of Lake Charles, Louisiana, 
and continued with this firm as a member until the 
death of Mr. Perkins in 1893. The firm then became 
known as Moore and Goodman, and is now conducted 
by Mr. Moore's two sons and Mr. H. B. Goodman un- 
der this name, and is one of the largest companies 
of its kind in the city. 

Mr. Moore was born at Freeport, Cumberland 
County, Maine, on August 10th, 1842. His father, 
Ira Moore, was a pioneer school teacher in the State 
of Maine, and was also engaged in farming. His 
mother was Miss Martha Doe, a member of a well 
known Maine family. His education was obtained 
in his native State, in York County, where through 
close application he finished school at a very early 
age, and engaged for a short time in teaching. 

Mr. Moore was married in California in 1871 to 
Miss Ida Kilburn, a daughter of Wells Kilburn of 
Napa, California, who was well known in the busi- 
ness circles of the Golden State. They had two 




children, Kilburn and Bartlett D. Moore. Mr. Moore 
was a member of the Hoo-Hoos and B. P. O. E., 
and always took an active interest in the affairs, 
both civic and political, of Galveston, and served 
for one term as alderman. Mr. Moore never failed 
to take a keen interest in everything pertaining to 
modern life, and believed that all the changes which 
have taken place in the business and social world 
were for the betterment of this generation and those 
to come. Out of the spirit of the pioneers of yes- 
terday, men of loyal devotion, energy and progres- 
siveness, has emerged the Lone Star State of today 
with its immense activities. To these builders of 
yesterday, who laid foundations, is due much of the 
success of the present and future eras. In the list 
of pioneers in the lumber industry of the State, no 
name stands out with greater prominence and noae 
is more worthy of honorable mention, not simply 
as one of the makers of the greatest industry this 
State has ever known, but as a leading spirit of 
the Southwest than is the name of Charles Henry 
Moore. 

UDGE DANIEL P. WHEAT came to Beau- 
mont, Texas, in 1882 and three years later 
was admitted to the bar, and prior to his 
election to the bench he practiced his pro- 
fession before the courts of South Texas for sev- 
eral years. During his period of law practice, Judge 
Wheat was identified with many of the most impor- 
tant cases which came before the courts of this por- 
tion of the state. Judge Wheat was popular and 
was the recipient of many positions of honor and 
trust at the hands of his fellow man. In 1887, he 
was appointed county attorney of Jefferson County 
and served with distinction in this office for eight 
years. In 1899, he was elected to the office of 
mayor of Beaumont, and his administration was one 
of great accomplishment, and his services to the 
city have become a part of the history of the city, 
and his name will be perpetually associated with 
the beneficial achievements of his administration. 
While serving as mayor, he created the first paid 
fire department in this city, paved the first street 
ever paved in Beaumont built the first sewer line 
here and also created the first free mail delivery in 
the city, and re-named and numbered the streets of 
Beaumont. After serving his city for four years as 
mayor, he was appointed to the office of county 
judge of Jefferson County, and served his county 
in this capacity for a period of five years, follow- 
ing which he was judge of the Corporation Court 
here for about six years, and won the admiration of 
the entire citizenship for his just decisions. Later, 
the County Court at Law was created and in 1915 
he was made judge of this court, and throughout his 
long service on the bench the dignity of the court 
was at all times upheld. Judge Wheat rendered the 
citizenship of Beaumont and Jefferson County great 
service, both in public and private capacities. In the 
capacity of an attorney, he wrote the first charter 
the city of Beaumont had, and as a private citizen 
he was one of the leaders in this portion of the coun- 
try, always ready and willing to aid his fellow man, 
his city, state and country in every manner possible. 
In the building of both the foundation and the super- 
structure of Beaumont, he worked zealously and ef- 
ficiently, and demonstrated his faith in the future 
of this city by both words and deeds. 

Judge Wheat was born at New Orleans, Louisiana. 



1134 





C//>^^^_ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



on April 13th, 1865. His father, Captain J. J. Wheat, 
was a well known and highly esteemed citizen of 
Louisiana. His education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of Texas, but the liberal education which 
he obtained in later years was largely through self 
help. The opportunities for securing an education 
were limited, and he devoted himself diligently to 
home study, and his splendid knowledge of law and 
its fundamentals was secured through his own ef- 
forts in home study. Judge Wheat, at all times, had 
the deepest interest in the man who aspired to better 
his condition, and was ever ready and willing to 
render helpful service to his fellow man. 

Judge Wheat was married at Beaumont on June 
25th, 1889, to Miss Lettie E. Thompson, a daughter 
of Col. W. L. Thompson, well known in the legal 
circles of Texas and Louisiana, having been a mem- 
ber of the Texas Legislature, and serving for sev- 
eral years as a member of the Louisiana Senate. He 
was also deputy collector of customs under Pres- 
ident Cleveland. Of this union six children were 
born, John J. Wheat, Mrs. Nenie A. Trotter, Mrs. 
Lettie Mae Cade, Lee B. Wheat, Daniel P. Wheat, 
Jr., and Virginia E. Wheat. In fraternal organiza- 
tions, Judge Wheat was a member of the A. F. and 
A. M., the I. O. O. F., Woodmen of the World, An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, B. P. 0. E. and 
the Eagles, and he took an active interest in all or- 
ganizations for the progress and advancement of 
his city. Judge Wheat died at his home in Beau- 
mont on the 27th of February, 1924, and at the time 
of his death was the oldest judge in Jefferson Coun- 
ty in point of service. He was honored and loved 
by all with whom he came in contact, and he left 
as a heritage those things which he had done, which 
will be cherished always as living memories of the 
man who had been closely identified with the social, 
civic and commercial life of Beaumont for more than 
four decades, and exerted an influence for good 
throughout a wide range of the city's activities. 
Judge Wheat was endowed with vigorous intellec- 
tual powers, lofty ideals of commercial, political and 
civic virtue, a personality energetic, strong, mag- 
netic, gracious and commanding in its high sense of 
honor and probity. During the long period of his 
life spent in Beaumont, he occupied a place of lead- 
ership in all the circles of the city on which, indel- 
ibly, he has impressed the seal of his usefulness, 
and in his passing, the profession to which he be- 
longed lost one of its ablest figures, and the city of 
Beaumont a staunch, wise, resolute and constructive 
citizen. 

ICHARD ANGELO GIRAUD, whose name 
for many years was one of special signifi- 
cance in the financial world at Houston, had 
a genius for handling financial affairs and 
was one of the men carrying heavy burdens of re- 
sponsibility in his time. Mr. Giraud was a banker of 
unusual success and experience, and contributed con- 
structive banking service to his city that was largely 
instrumental in furthering civic development. Be- 
ginning at the very bottom, by close application he 
rose to a position where his name carried a pres- 
tige that was an asset to the institution with which 
it was connected, and his death, while he was yet in 
his prime, cut short a career that promised to carry 
him to the very pinnacle of success. Mr. Giraud had 
intellectual talents of high order, the natural ability 




and perseverance to attain great heights, and his 
financial achievement was but a tribute to his ear- 
nest application of these endowments. 

Mr. Giraud was born at New Orleans, Louisiana, 
the second day of October, 1850. His father, Theo- 
dore Giraud, was born in the United States, but edu- 
cated in the home of his ancestors, in Paris, France. 
He came to Texas before the Civil War, later going 
to Mexico for the Mexican Government, and his 
death occurred very suddenly in that country. His 
mother, before her marriage, Catherine Thorne, was 
born in Sterling Castle, Scotland, where her father, 
an English officer, was stationed. Later the family 
came to the United States, during her girlhood, and 
she was reared in Alabama, later coming to Galves- 
ton, where she met and married Theodore Giraud. 
After her husband's death in Mexico she moved to 
Houston with her two sons, during the Civil War. 

Richard Angelo Giraud was educated in Houston, 
attending school until he was fourteen years of age, 
when he went to work for J. R. Morris Hardware 
Store. After a short time with that store, Mr. W. J. 
Hutchins, head of the City Bank of Houston, and 
who had known him for a long time, saw in the boy 
a remarkable promise and took him in charge, with 
a view of making a real banker of him. He started 
from the very bottom in the City Bank, working 
himself up to the position of Assistant Cashier dur- 
ing his quarter of a century with that institution. 
When that bank failed and the Commercial National 
Bank took it over Mr. Giraud was made Cashier, a 
position he held until his death in 1896. 

Richard Angelo Giraud was married at Lynchburg, 
Virginia, the tenth of November, 1874, to Miss Annie 
Ott, a native of that State and daughter of William 
H. Ott, who was also born in Virginia, and was a 
planter there all his life, and Frances Connell Ott, 
a native of England who came to the United States 
with her parents as a small girl. Mrs. Giraud is a 
woman of charming personality and culture, bril- 
liantly endowed to be the wife of a man of distinc- 
tion such as was Mr. Giraud. Their home at Hous- 
ton was the seat of a flowing hospitality that en- 
deared them to the friends that they made by the 
hundreds, and this home life was made further de- 
lightful by the seven children of Mr. and Mrs. Gi- 
raud. These children are, the late James Arthur 
Giraud, whose death occurred the fifteenth of Feb- 
ruary, 1923, and who was a prominent insurance 
man of Houston, and who was married to Miss Mil- 
dred Durst; Richard Theodore Giraud, who is mar- 
ried to Miss Louise Brown, and who has two chil- 
dren, and is owner of the Giraud Insurance Agency; 
Frances, wife of Theodore Heyck, Manager of the 
Houston Cotton Oil Mill and the Consumers Cotton 
Oil Mill, and who has four children; Edith, wife of 
George S. Westerfield, a mechanical engineer and 
manufacturers agent at Houston, and who has four 
children; Charles William Giraud, whose death oc- 
curred th fifth of October, 1918, and whose widow 
was formerly Miss Mary Kittrell, whom he left with 
two children; Stuart A. Giraud, of the Humble Oil 
and Refining Company, who married Miss Earle 
Anderson, and Miss Stella Giraud, who is at home. 

Mr. Giraud died at his home in Houston the nine- 
teenth of October, 1896, at the age of forty-six years. 
His life, spent in earnest endeavor, was marked by a 
generosity that endeared him to all who knew him, 
and the record of that life is a bright page in the 
history of his city. 



1137 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN GOGGAN — Few names figure more 
prominently in the annals of Galveston's 
history, few men were more vitally con- 
cerned with civic growth, or were more gen- 
erally admired than John Goggan, business man, 
city builder, philanthropist and for two score years 
one of the honored residents of Galveston. Mr. Gog- 
gan was a man of vision, dreaming big dreams of 
the Galveston of today, but unlike most dreamers 
he was likewise a man of practical attainments and 
had the ability to make his dreams of civic great- 
ness come true, at least in large measure. At the 
time of his arrival in Galveston in 1867 the city was 
emerging from the port of early Texas history into 
the thriving city that is one of the leading ports 
in the world of commerce, and men capable of bear- 
ing responsibility, of planning and directing big 
things, were in demand as never before. Mr. Gog- 
gan, with his characteristic energy, entered into 
this development work, giving his time, his strength 
and his means to the material development of Gal- 
veston, and in the doing impressed himself on his 
world as one of the remarkable personalities of his 
time. 

John Goggan was born in Tipperary, Ireland, on 
the twentieth day of October, 1846, son of Thomas 
Goggan and Bridget Goggan. He spent his early 
years in his native country, but his dreams were 
of America, and he came here as a young man, 
seeking a career that would give him opportunity 
for self-expression as well as the acquirement of 
wealth. In 1866 his brother, Thomas Goggan, had 
come to Galveston and established the pioneer music 
house of Thomas Goggan and Brother, and the fol- 
lowing year, in 1867, John Goggan followed him 
here. This business, established in a small way, 
and one of the first establishments dealing in musi- 
cal instruments to be established in Texas, grew 
under the guiding hand of John Goggan, and today 
the firm of Thomas Goggan & Bro. is known 
throughout Texas, and for that matter to the musi- 
cal trade of the country. The house became one of 
the largest musical establishments in Texas, with 
branches in various cities, and was more than a 
mere merchandising establishment, it was a Texas 
institution, and counted its patrons friends rather 
than customers. 

John Goggan was married twice, after the death 
of his first wife, Sophie Marke Goggan, at Galves- 
ton, marrying Miss Aileen Patterson at Galveston 
in 1884. He had three children — Daisy, who later 
married Dougal McAlpin, and is now deceased, and 
Mary, now Mrs. Thomas Griffith Johnson of At- 
lanta, Georgia, daughters of his first wife, and 
Eveline Catherine, who married George Noble Cop- 
ley on the twenty-first of April, 1909, his daughter 
by his second wife. Mr. Goggan was a devout mem- 
ber of the Catholic Church, and was throughout his 
residence at Galveston a communicant of St. Mary's 
Cathedral, and later at Sacred Heart Church, at the 
corner of Fourteenth and Broadway. 

John Goggan was a leader in every movement 
for the betterment of Galveston, and his high ideals 
were felt in much of the development of his time. 
After the storm of 1900 he was in charge of all 
work in the east end of Galveston, working under 
the emergency government, and taking an active 
part in alleviating the suffering and distress fol- 
lowing the disaster. He was benevolent in a fine 




and unostentatious way, many of his contributions 
to charity being made anonymously, and the unfor- 
tunate of Galveston found in him a real friend, 
ever ready to lend a helping hand when by so doing 
he could aid someone less fortunate than himself. 
Mr. Goggan was an ardent fisherman, and a mem- 
ber of the Fish Feeders' Club, an organization com- 
posed of a number of prominent Galveston men who 
spent Saturday afternoons engaged in their favorite 
sport. He also belonged to the Aziola Club, the Ar- 
tillery Club, the Garten Verein, the Old Harmony 
Club, the Galveston Yacht Club, the Galveston Golf 
Club, and was a patron and supporter of many or- 
ganizations for musical and artistic advancement. 
He belonged to Camp Hughes, and met his death 
through drowning while on a fishing trip with the 
members of this camp on the fifth of September, 
1908. A man of broad sympathies, with a wholesome 
philosophy of life, he counted his friends by the 
hundreds, and his death was deeply felt throughout 
the city, and the memory of his busy and well-spent 
life is an inspiration to others to follow in his whole- 
some example. 

RTHUR EDWARD ANDERSON was 

throughout his life prominently identified 
with the business, financial and social life 
of Galveston, Texas, where he was per- 
haps best known in the cotton and shipping cir- 
cles, being a leading factor of these two fields of 
activity. He was brought to the Island City by 
his parents in 1892, was reared and educated here 
where his business successes were also achieved. 
As a very young man, Mr. Anderson joined the well 
known firm of Sgitcovich and Company, becoming 
secretary soon after joining this organization, and 
later because of his splendid work was made sec- 
retary-treasurer of this company, which is the larg- 
est shipping company of the Lone Star State. He 
was always a student, taking at various times 
courses in his line of activity, that he might better 
fit himself to serve his company and render more 
efficient service to it. Mr. Anderson has an innate 
artistic talent and in his early youth showed great 
promise as an artist and only economic conditions 
prevented him from following his natural bent in the 
world of art. His work had received special men- 
tion among artists of the country, who held out the 
greatest encouragement to young Anderson and his 
family. 

A native Texan, Mr. Anderson was born at Pales- 
tine on November 17th, 1888. His father, August 
Edward Anderson, a native of Sweden, came to the 
United States as a young man, where he became a 
leader in the business world. His mother was a na- 
tive of Houston and is now residing in New Or- 
leans, Louisiana. His education was obtained in 
the public schools and convent at Galveston, which 
he left when a mere boy in order to enter the busi- 
ness world and where he met with success. 

Mr. Anderson started his business career in Gal- 
veston with the Galveston, Harrisburg and Houston 
Railroad in the cotton department, and while asso- 
ciated with this line of railway, he received many 
merited promotions. Outside interests saw the 
ability of young Anderson and he was invited to 
join the staff of the E. C. Worrall Company, cotton 
brokers of Galveston. He remained with this com- 
pany for several years and when they removed to 
England he became associated with the firm of 



1138 




JOHN GOGGAN 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



Sproule and Buckman, remaining with this organ- 
ization until 1913. His accurate and efficient busi- 
ness methods together with his strict attention to 
the details of his business attracted the attention 
of the late M. Sgitcovich, and when his firm retired 
from active business pursuits, Mr. Anderson was 
offered a position with the Sgitcovich Company, who 
for some time had wanted him with their organiza- 
tion. He accepted and became one of the most 
honored and trusted men of this large shipping 
company. 

Mr. Anderson was married at Galveston, Texas, 
in August, 1908, to Miss Betty Parr, a native of 
Fantanette, Indiana. Her father, Joseph Parr, and 
mother, Margaret Jane (Gregory) Parr, both natives 
of England, came to the United States in 1887, set- 
tling in Indiana. In 1901 they removed to Texas and 
established their home near Galveston, where they 
remained for a period of five years, then removed 
to Colorado Springs, Colorado, where they still 
make their home. Two children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Anderson: Betty Jane and Helen Irene. 
The Anderson home is located at 3402 R%. Mr. An- 
derson was prominent in the Masonic circles of 
Galveston and of Texas, his membership in this 
order being with Tucker Lodge where he also was 
a Shriner of El Mina Temple of Galveston. He 
held membership in the B. P. 0. E., and other social 
organizations where he was very popular. In the 
business and civic organizations of the Island City 
Mr. Anderson took a leading part, at all times will- 
ing and desirous of giving his material aid to all 
projects for the improvement and betterment of 
the Island City. His church affiliation was with 
the Episcopal Church, this being the religion of his 
forebears for many generations. 

Mr. Anderson was killed in an automobile acci- 
dent in 1924. At the time of his death he was 
acting president of the Sgitcovich Company, while 
Mr. T. R. Hancock, the president of the company, 
was absent in Washington, D. C, on important busi- 
ness of the company. Mr. Anderson was indeed a 
young man of the very highest type, was very pop- 
ular with his business associates and all others who 
were fortunate in having him as an acquaintance. 
His future in the business world was the brightest of 
any man of the Island City, being absolutely as- 
sured, through his great knowledge of his business 
and of his knowledge of men in general, and his 
capacity for making friends and of holding them. 

ERMANN CARL LANGE— Among those 
pioneers of Galveston, who in the early 
days of the history of the city laid the 
solid foundation of commercial and civic 
progress, upon which the prosperity of today rests, 
stands the name of Hermann Carl Lange, for half 
a century associated with the business world here, 
and a man whose activity in all civic affairs entitles 
him to a place among the builders of Galveston. 
Mr. Lange came to Galveston as a young man, bring- 
ing with him the enthusiasm of youth and, filled 
with an unconquerable ambition to forge ahead, he 
soon took his place among the more prominent men 
of earlier days. Actuated by a realization that in- 
dustry was the price of success, Mr. Lang threw 
himself wholeheartedly into his work and the man- 
agement of the business he had founded, with the 
result that he built up one of the largest wholesale 




grocery houses of his time, and yet, in spite of heavy 
business demands, he found time to take an inter- 
est in the development of Galveston, and whenever 
opportunity arose he was one of the first to give 
his support to those civic measures which determine 
the future growth of a city. Mr. Lange was that 
type of business man whose integrity, whose sound 
and practical ideas and whose constructive vision 
are best appreciated in a crisis, and in times when 
cool heads and men capable of bearing heavy re- 
sponsibilities were in demand, he never faltered', 
giving his best to his city, and working indefatig- 
ably for the common good. 

Hermann Carl Lange was born in Germany, the 
seventeenth of July, 1846, of German parentage, and 
was brought to the United States as an infant, in 
1847. His family settled at Houston, where he re- 
ceived his schooling, and where he remained until 
the late sixties, when he came to Galveston. Here 
he entered the wholesale grocery business, begin- 
ning in a local house, and as he learned the business 
he found advancement rapid. Some years later he 
started in the wholesale grocery business for him- 
self, and later became associated with the firm of 
Foche, Wilkens and Lange, a firm which was there- 
after not only a factor in the wholesale grocery 
business, but engaged in the cotton business, and 
dealt largely in that product. Mr. Lange was the 
head of the grocery department of this firm and 
active in its management from its organization 
until his death in 1912, and it was largely due to his 
constructive policies and his foresight that this firm 
became one of the largest in Galveston, and con- 
tributed to the general prosperity of the city. 

Mr. Lange was married in Galveston in 1877, to 
Miss Augusta Gruendler, daughter of C. Gruendler 
of Germany, who came to America in 1867, his death 
occurring the following year. Mrs. Lange took a 
deep interest in her husband's business, and gave 
encouragement and inspiration to him throughout 
their married life. Mr. and Mrs. Lange were the 
parents of ten children — Alvin T. Lange, Carl W. 
Lange, Hermann R. Lange, William G. Lange, Oscar 
G. Lange, Olga, Mrs. R. B. Wilkins; Adele, Mrs. 
A. Q. Peterson; Helene, Mrs. F. A. Redmond; Anna, 
Mrs. J. S. Stafford, and Miss Erna Lange The 
family have resided since 1885 in the Lange home 
at 1102 Avenue G. Alvin T. Lange succeeded to 
his father's interest in the business, which is now 
conducted under the name of Wilkins & Lange. 

Mr. Lange was a prominent Mason, taking an ac- 
tive interest in Masonic affairs, and was a member 
of the Aziola Club, the Germania Club, the Garten 
Verein, and other organizations. He belonged to the 
South Texas Wholesale Grocers' Association, of 
which organization he was a past president. Mr. 
Lange was a member of the Lutheran Church, in 
which faith he was reared. Mr. Lange was a mem- 
ber of the first city commission of Galveston, ap- 
pointed by the governor, and was re-elected each 
succeeding term, serving until his death. He was a 
prime factor in the rebuilding of Galveston after 
the great storm of 1900. From 1900 until his death 
he was president of the City (Water) Works Com- 
pany, and had charge of the plant after the city 
took it over. Mr. Lange's death, which occurred in 
Galveston in 1912, on the twentieth of April, was 
deeply felt throughout the city, and was a loss, not 
only to commercial and civic interests, but to his 
hundreds of friends. 



1141 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARLES THEODORE SUDERMAN. For 

more than four decades the business, ship- 
ping and marine circles of Galveston had as 
one of its most enterprising members 
Charles Theodore Suderman. Mr. Suderman was the 
senior member of the firm of Suderman and Young, 
harbor and coastwise tug boat operators, one of the 
largest and oldest institutions of its kind in the 
city. Mr. Suderman started in stevedoring for him- 
self in 1896, meeting with splendid success and add- 
ing other branches of the business, and joining 
forces with Mr. John Young, well known in the 
business and financial circles of the city. 

Mr. Suderman was born in Sweden on October 
13th, 1859. His father, N. P. Suderman, spent his 
entire life on the sea, and Mr. Suderman inherited 
this love for the sea from his father, and after at- 
tending school in his native country, he shipped on 
an American ship to America in 1877, and within 
a year he was made an officer. Before locating at 
Galveston, he was on the high seas for many years, 
and has been in every port in the world. When Mr. 
Suderman first came to Galveston, he entered the 
employ of Charles Clark and Company, large ship 
owners and well known throughout the country in 
this profession. He had always been active in the 
business, civic and political life of this city, and 
served on the city commission for two vears, from 
1918 to 1920. 

Mr. Suderman was married at Galveston in 1891, 
to Miss Katie Dolson, a daughter of Benjamin Dol- 
son, well known business man of this city, where for 
many years he was engaged in the stevedoring 
business. Mr. and Mrs. Suderman had four chil- 
dren: Charles W., Adolph Daniels, Collis P. and El- 
Mar. Mr. Suderman was a member of both York 
and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic order, and 
was a Shriner of El Mina Temple of Galveston. He 
also held membership in the Aziola Club and the 
Galveston Country Club. 

Mr. Suderman's death occurred in his native 
country, August 30th, 1925, while he was on a visit 
to his birthplace. In the passing of Mr. Suderman 
Galveston lost one of its most valued business men, 
and beloved citizens. A host of warm friends, and 
all those with whom he was associated knew him to 
be a loyal friend and devoted husband and father. 

ESSE E. LONGE— In recounting the history 
of the commercial development of Beau- 
mont, the name of Jesse E. Longe, one of 
the foremost residents of this city for many 
years, stands out as the type of business man who 
used his influence in commercial circles to secure 
advantages for his city, and whose business activ- 
ities were conducive to civic prosperity. Mr. Longe 
was the type of merchant to whom progress is inev- 
itable, and, although beginning in a small way, he 
built up in a brief period of time one of the largest 
coffee importing houses in the city, bringing to 
Beaumont a business in this line that added mater- 
ially to the wealth of the city. Yet he was not 
interested in this business alone, but found time 
to take a part in all civic work, and contributed 
generously to various welfare movements. 

Jesse E. Longe was born at Humboldt, Kansas, 
the twenty-seventh of November, 1871, son of Wil- 
liam H. Longe, a native Ohioan, who spent a number 
of years in Kansas, removing to Florida in the 
early eighties, and later going to California, where 




his death occurred, and Libby Swartz Longe, also 
deceased. Mr. Longe was reared in Daytonia, Flor- 
ida, attending the schools there, and as a young 
man beginning his business career in that city as 
a clerk in a grocery store. Later he took charge 
of the store as manager, operating it very success- 
fully for a number of years, after which he removed 
to Colorado. He did not like that state, however, 
and shortly afterwards came to Texas, locating at 
Beaumont, where he started the Longe Coffee Store 
on a very small scale. This business developed rap- 
idly, constantly expanding to meet growing trade 
demands, until today it is one of the largest coffee 
retail houses in Texas, and a monument to the vision 
and business ability of its founder. Mr. Longe 
imported and roasted coffee, giving careful atten- 
tion to securing the best coffee available, and giv- 
ing to his patrons a product that was in part 
responsible for the growth of the business. As a 
business man there was ever associated with his 
name an integrity that was one of his greatest 
assets, and his business relations with his fellows 
were of the highest order. 

Mr. Longe was married in Daytonia, Florida, the 
twentieth of October, 1892, to Miss Bessie Austin, 
his childhood sweetheart and schoolmate. Mrs. Longe 
was a native of Rock Island, Illinois, and the daugh- 
ter of Richard Austin, who came to Florida when 
she was a child, and whose death occurred a few 
years later. Mrs. Longe was reared and educated 
by her mother, Deborah Ballough Austin, who is 
also deceased. She and Mr. Longe had an ideal 
married life, and their home was noted for its fine 
hospitality and atmosphere. Mrs. Longe is a woman 
of high accomplishments, and throughout her mar- 
ried life was the constant inspiration and companion 
of her husband. One child, W. Harry Longe, was 
born to this union. He is a graduate of the Beau- 
mont schools and of the New York University, where 
he specialized in advertising. Leaving college he 
enlisted in the United States Army, and served dur- 
ing the World War, with the coast artillery, at Gal- 
veston and other points. After his discharge he 
returned to Beaumont, taking over the management 
of the business established by his father, and has 
since continued the operation of the business along 
highly successful lines. 

Jesse E. Longe died at Beaumont the twenty- 
second of April, 1921, cutting short a career which 
had been marked with many distinctions. He was 
a lifelong member of the Methodist Church, and 
had been chairman of the Board of Stewards for 
many years, taking a prominent part in all church 
work. He was also a member of the Beaumont 
Country and Rotary Clubs and was a director of 
the Y. M. C. A. Mr. Longe was greatly interested 
in civic work, especially in those movements which 
had for their purpose the welfare of the community 
and he gave freely both of his time and means for 
the betterment of the condition of those less fortu- 
nate than himself. Among his business associates 
he was known for his progressive ideals and a high 
business standard that was reflected in his own 
business and made it an organization of which Beau- 
mont was justly proud. He had many friends, men, 
women and children, from every walk in life, and 
was held in highest esteem by all who knew him, 
and his memory will long be honored by all who 
were associated with him, and who felt the influence 
of his character. 



1142 




CHARLES T. SUDERMAN 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




JUDGE FREDERICK JOSEPH DUFF, whose 
merited success as a member of the bar at 
Beaumont is in proportion to his qualities as 
lawyer and citizen, has in the two decades 
and more of his practice in this city attained a posi- 
tion of leadership in his profession. Judge Duff is 
a member of the firm of F. J. and C. T. Duff. The 
firm is one of primary importance at Beaumont, both 
in point of prestige and practice, and has established 
one of the largest practices in the city, with an im- 
posing list of clients. Special attention is given to 
corporation work, and Mr. Duff's masterly handling 
of corporation matters has won for him the admira- 
tion and respect of bench and bar. He also has a 
large admiralty practice and has attained a high 
reputation for his work in this field. The firm repre- 
sents the Southern Pacific Railroad and the Gulf, 
Colorado and Santa Fe Railroad as division attor- 
neys, and acts as attorney for the Western Union 
Telegraph Company, the American Railway Express 
Company and the Gulf Refining Company. They are 
also employed as counsel for many of the other large 
concerns of Beaumont, and represent these corpora- 
tions efficiently. Offices are located in the San Ja- 
cinto Life Insurance Building. C. T. Duff, one of 
the brilliant young attorneys of the city, is follow- 
ing in the footsteps of his father, and promises to 
attain distinction in his vocation. 

Judge Duff was born in Brazoria County, the sixth 
of August, 1859, the son of George W. Duff, pioneer 
attorney of that county, and Martha (Culpepper) 
Duff. After finishing his school work, in the schools 
of Brazoria County, he went to Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and entered Baltimore City College. After 
leaving college, he returned to Texas, where he was 
engaged in steamboating some three years, reading 
law and making preparation for his legal career 
during that time. He was admitted to the bar in 
1883, going to the State Legislature in the same 
year, at that time the youngest man to go to this 
body. He made an excellent record at Austin, im- 
pressing his influence on much of the important 
legislation of the day and looking after the interests 
of his constituents in a capable and commendatory 
manner. Returning to Brazoria County, he resumed 
his private practice, and was elected county judge 
of Brazoria County, and while in that office demon- 
strated his judicial ability and his devotion to the 
best interests of the people. He came to Beaumont 
in January, 1901, after almost two decades of suc- 
cessful practice, and established his practice in this 
city, steadily advancing in his profession, and ful- 
filling the earlier predictions as to his future. As a 
railroad builder, Judge Duff has contributed much 
to the development of Texas. He took an important 
part in the building of the road from Beaumont to 
Summerville and Beaumont to Longview and the 
road from Houston to Beaumont, now a part of the 
Gulf Coast Lines. 

Mr. Duff was married in Brazoria County, in 1885, 
to Miss Clinton Terry, daughter of Mr. Clint Terry, 
pioneer attorney, of Brazoria County, who was killed 
at the battle of Shiloh, in the first year of the Civil 
War. Judge and Mrs. Duff have one child, Clinton 
Terry Duff, who is associated with his father. The 
family reside at 2280 Calder Sfreet. Judge Duff is 
a member of the Beaumont Country Club, of which 
he is one of the organizers, is a life member of 
Hoo-Hoos, and is a Mason, York Rite, Knight Temp- 




lar and an Elk. In legal ability, poise and char- 
acter, he has no superior among the attorneys of 
this state and represents the highest type of Chris- 
tian citizenship. 

OHN D. McLELLAND is well known in the 
business circles of Houston, where for 
more than twenty years he has been as- 
sociated with the local Western Union Tele- 
graph office. Mr. McLelland is City Superintend- 
ent of the Western Union Telegraph Company; this 
being the highest position of the company in Hous- 
ton, where two hundred and fifty people are em- 
ployed. Mr. McLelland came to Texas and to Hous- 
ton m 1901 as night chief operator of the Postal 
Telegraph Company, and received one promotion 
after another until he had reached the highest 
position in Houston within the gift of this company, 
that of manager. In 1914 he went with the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, and has been with them 
since that time. This Company maintains con- 
veniently located offices at 915 Franklin Avenue. 

Mr. McLelland was born in Georgia in 1869. His 
father, J. D. McLelland, was a native of Scotland 
and came to the United States when thirty years' 
of age and settled in Georgia. His mother was Miss 
Luvicy Moody, a member of a well-known Georgia 
family. His early education was obtained in the 
public schools of Georgia, and later he was a stu- 
dent at the Southern Normal School and Business 
College at Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

While attending College, Mr. McLelland studied 
Telegraphy, and formed quite a liking for this 
work, and, after leaving College, he began his busi- 
ness career as a railroad telegrapher at Hazelhurst, 
Georgia. He continued in railroad work at various 
points in Georgia until 1896, when he entered the 
employ of the Western Union Telegraph Company 
He then went with the Postal Telegraph Company 
at Augusta, Georgia, as operator and later became 
wire and traffic chief. He continued in this posi- 
tion until 1901, when he came to Houston as night 
chief operator for the Postal Telegraph Company 
He remained in this position for one year, when 
he was made chief operator, and in 1914 was made 
\nanager of the Houston office. He held this posi- 
tion until 1920, when he was made City superin- 
tendent of the Western Union Telegraph Company. 
Mr. McLelland was married in Georgia on De- 
cember 24, 1891, to Miss Lona M. Ramsey, a daugh- 
ter of Col. and Mrs. W. H. Ramsey, of Valdosta, 
Georgia. They have one daughter, Thelma, now the 
wife of J. P. Lalor, of Houston, who have three chil- 
dren— J. P. Lalor, Jr., Catherine and John McLel- 
land Lalor. Mr. McLelland has received practically 
all the honors that may be conferred by the A. F. 
and A. M. He is a 33rd Degree Mason, is Past Mas- 
ter of Holland Lodge No. 1, of Houston, is Past 
Master of San Jacinto Lodge of Perfection, of Hous- 
ton, is Past Wise Master of the Rose Croix, a Knight 
Templar and member of the Royal Order of Scot- 
land. Mr. McLelland was coronated a 33rd Degree 
Mason at the House of the Temple at Washington, 
D. C, October 24th, 1918. Mr. McLelland has al- 
ways been active in the business, social and general 
community life of Houston, is an active member of 
the Rotary Club, and gives liberally of his time 
to all projects tending to the welfare and advance- 
ment of this city. 



1145 



MEN OF TEXAS 




STJLINTON WEST NUGENT, noted Galveston 
attorney, came to this city in 1918, adding 
an element of strength and purpose of fine 
J capacity and of judicial ability to the up- 
building of the legal forces of Galveston. Judge 
Nugent possessed a wide experience gained as coun- 
ty attorney, county judge, State senator and many 
other places of importance in his city and State, and 
he once took his rightful place among the men whose 
activities were advancing the city's importance. 
Before coming to Galveston Judge Nugent was a 
citizen and lawyer of Houston for about two years, 
where he was regarded as one of the leading law- 
yers of that city. He was admitted to the bar on 
December 13th, 1886, at Montgomery, Texas, but 
instead of beginning the practice of his profession 
at that time, he taught school for several years. He 
was superintendent of the schools of Conroe, Texas, 
during 1888 and 1889, and during 1889 and 1890 he 
headed the schools of Legget, Polk County, Texas, 
and during his association with these schools, and 
throughout his life there was reflected the progres- 
sive spirit of Judge Nugent, who at all times had 
the welfare of the public schools at heart. After 
severing his connection with the public school work, 
he entered the lumber business, and for a period of 
six years was manager of the Freeman Lumber 
Company. In July, 1897, Judge Nugent established 
his office at Conroe, Texas, and began the practice 
of law, and continued the practice of his profession 
there until March 16th, 1916. During this period 
he served as county attorney for one year and as 
county judge for four years, retiring from the bench 
in 1902 in order to give his time and attention to 
the practice of law. In 1916 he removed to Houston, 
Texas, where he engaged in law practice, which he 
continued in that city until removing to Galveston 
in 1918, when he came to the Island City as head 
of the legal department of the American National 
Insurance Company, and also attorney for the Amer- 
ican Bank and Trust Company and the City Na- 
tional Bank. He later became attorney for the 
receiver of the Gulf Fisheries Company, general at- 
torney for the Galveston News, attorney for W. L. 
Moody Cotton Company, W. L. Moody and Company 
(private bankers of Galveston) and director and 
general counsel for the Security National Fire In- 
surance Company of Galveston, in all of which he 
was active at the time of his death. In addition to 
being one of the leading lawyers of South Texas, 
Judge Nugent was one of the leaders in the politics 
of the Lone Star State, and always took a keen in- 
terest in the politics of his city, state and nation. 
In 1908 he was a delegate to the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention at Denver and was the Texas 
member of the rules committee, and with Senator 
Grady of New York, wrote the rules and orders of 
business of that convention. In November, 1912, 
Judge Nugent was elected State senator and served 
as a member of this body for four years, and during 
this period he fathered many measures for the good 
of the Texas populace, and his activity while a mem- 
ber of the Texas senate is an important page in 
Texas history. Among the many offices of honor 
and trust which Mr. Nugent has been the recipient, 
and in which he served with dignity, was in 1915, 
when he was elected president pro tern of the reg- 
ular session of the thirty-fourth senate, when a 
vacancy in the lieutenant governor's office occurred, 



and he filled this place with honor and distinction to 
himself and his State until the inauguration of Gov- 
ernor W. P. Hobby. Judge Nugent was one of the 
largest land owners in Texas, besides owing many 
thousands of acres of land in Sonora, Mexico. 

A native Texan, Mr. Nugent was born on a farm 
near Montgomery on September 19th, 1865. His 
father, Judge J. L. Nugent, born July 20th, 1827, 
was one of the brilliant lawyers of his time. The 
oldest brother of Judge J. L. Nugent, at the age 
of fifteen years, fought with General Sam Houston 
at the Battle of San Jacinto, where he was a mem- 
ber of Lamar's and Sidney Sherman's Cavalry. 
The great-grandfather of C. W. Nugent, Colonel 
John Nugent, came to Texas from Mississippi in 
1818, but later returned to his native State, and 
came again to the Lone Star State with Moses Aus- 
tin, when this distinguished man of early Texas his- 
tory was on his way to San Antonio to confer with 
Baron de Bastrop for the first contract of Settle- 
ment. He returned again to Mississippi, and again 
came back to Texas with Hayden Edwards and set- 
tled west of the Angelina Biver, in the eastern por- 
tion of what is now Houston County, where the old 
town of Augusta was built. Judge J. L. Nugent was 
the first man elected to the office of county judge 
of Hardin County in 1860, and held this office until 
1863, when he resigned in order to enter the Civil 
War. He entered the Confederate army as a pri- 
vate and was at the Battle of Mansfield, command- 
ing the Nugent White Horse Battery, and was com- 
missioned a lieutenant on the field of battle for 
bravery, and served throughout the remainder of the 
Civil War under General Dick Taylor. His mother 
was a grandniece of General Zachary Taylor, one of 
the bravest commanders of the Mexican War of 1847. 
No name, perhaps, in the annals of Texas history 
figures more prominently than that of Nugent, 
and continues down the line of statesmen, lawyers 
and men of prominence in all lines. 

Judge Nugent was married to Miss Nettie S. Car- 
son in 1889, a native of Montgomery, Texas. They 
had five children — C. W., Jr., of Worcester, Mass.; 
Olive, now wife of Dr. Jack Bevil of Hull, Texas; 
Eunice, wife of R. H. Winfre of Galveston; Ruth, 
wife of J. L. Paul of Galveston, and J. W. Nugent 
of Galveston. The family residence is at 1804 Ave- 
nue H, and is one of the most palatial in the Island 
City. Judge Nugent was a member of the A. F. 
and A. M. with membership in Harmony Lodge No. 
6, and the Chapter of this order at Conroe, Texas. 
He was a Knight Templar of the Commandery at 
Huntsville, Texas, and a member of Arabia Temple 
Shrine of Houston, and was always prominently 
identified with the Masonic order. He was a mem- 
ber and past president of the Lions Club. Judge 
Nugent was a staunch and consistent member of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church, and served as a 
member of the Board of Stewards and Finance Com- 
mittee. He was a teacher of the largest Bible Class 
of any of the churches of the city, and took an ac- 
tive part in all church work. 

With the death of Judge Nugent on December 
19th, 1925, Texas suffered the loss of one of its most 
beloved citizens and attorneys. Known over the 
entire State, he was respected and loved wherever 
he was known, and his place will remain long un- 
filled. 



1146 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




R. FRANK HUBERT NEUHAUS— For 

Many years Dr. Frank Hubert Neuhaus, 
§| whose success and prestige in the medical 
profession was in proportion to his years 
of practice, was looked upon as one of the leaders 
in the local fraternity. Dr. Neuhaus came to Hous- 
ton after a very successful practice in other cities 
of the state, and soon made himself one of the 
substantial citizens of his community. He took a 
deep interest in all civic affairs, particularly those 
that had to do with the betterment of the com- 
munity, questions of public health especially appeal- 
ing to him. He also gave much time to the raising 
of medical standards, and was in every way worthy 
the obligations and honors of his profession. 

Dr. Frank Hubert Neuhaus was born in Germany, 
the twenty-second of April, 1869. His father was a 
government forrester in that country. As a boy, 
Dr. Neuhaus attended the schools of his native 
country, and lived there until he was sixteen years 
of age. He then came to the United States, joining 
his uncle in East Texas, where a number of the 
family already lived and were prominent in various 
affairs. After a short time in East Texas, Dr. Neu- 
haus went to New York City, entering Bellevue 
Medical College, where he took his medical degree. 
He then further fortified himself with post graduate 
work in New York City and in Europe, taking in all, 
five different post graduate courses. Returning to 
the United States and Texas, he began his practice in 
Hackberry, remaining there a short time. He then 
went to Schulenberg, Texas, and practiced there for 
a time prior to coming to Houston in 1903. The first 
years Dr. Neuhaus practiced in Houston he did a gen- 
eral practice, later limiting his work to Internal Med- 
icine and Diagnosis, in which he was exceptionally 
successful. Dr. Neuhaus always practiced alone, but 
just prior to his death, when a number of prominent 
physicians were considering the formation of a clinic 
for the group practice of medicine and surgery Dr. 
Neuhaus planned going with them, but his death 
occurred before the organization was completed. 

Dr. Neuhaus was married to Miss Adele Boettcher, 
a native of Weimar, and a member of one of the 
most prominent families of Texas. In her family 
there were twelve children, all of whom with one 
exception, are residents of the Lone Star State. The 
mother and father are deceased. Mrs. Neuhaus is a 
sister of F. A. Boettcher, a member of the firm Desel- 
Boettcher Company, and one of the leading business 
men of Houston and Texas. Dr. and Mrs. Neuhaus 
had an ideal married life. Mrs. Neuhaus had the 
qualities of sympathy and understanding so neces- 
sary in a physician's wife, and she took a deep in- 
terest in his career. They had three children, 
Madeline, wife of Francis M. Semans of Houston, 
and who has one child, Franna M.; Marguerite, wife 
of Leonard F. Hilty of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and 
who has two children, Leonard F. Junior, and Annis 
Kay, and Vernon Frank Neuhaus, an oil operator of 
Dallas. 

Dr. Neuhaus' death occurred at his home in Hous- 
ton, the first of May, 1919. His death was a deep 
loss to the medical profession, in which he had for 
so many years held a position of leadership. Dr. 
Neuhaus was a man of many distinctions, in his 
profession, and took an active part in all medical 
affairs, being especially interested in any movement 
for the advancement of the profession and the estab- 




lishment of a real medical center at Houston. He 
was a member of the Harris County Medical Society, 
the Texas Medical Association, the American Medical 
Association and a fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. Dr. Neuhaus was also a member of the 
Sons of Hermann, taking a deep interest in the 
activities of that order. His many benevolences, all 
entirely without ostentation, made him beloved by 
the less fortunate of Houston. He was a generous 
contributor to various funds, from time to time, and 
any movement touching on the future of the city had 
his interest. He had hundreds of friends, both in 
Houston and in other parts of the state, men, women 
and children from every walk in life, who at his 
death mourned the loss of a true and sincere friend. 

R. CARL WHITE FULBRIGHT has been 
prominently identified with medical activi- 
^| ties at Port Arthur for the past several 
years and his name carries a prestige in 
the medical world that is a distinct advantage to the 
community with which it is associated. Dr. Ful- 
bright is a physician whose talent and training has 
resulted in a large and lucrative practice, and while 
he has no specialty in his profession he has been 
exceptionally successful. He practices general 
medicine, with all that term implies, and has com- 
plete library and laboratory facilities. Dr. Fulbright 
has his office in the Terminal Realty Building. 

Dr. Fulbright was born at Minden, Louisiana, the 
third of October, 1895. His father, D. R. Fulbright, 
a native of Paris, Texas, has been a resident of 
Louisiana for many years, and was formerly in the 
saw mill and lumber business, but now operates a 
grocery store. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Miss Lena Ann Almand, is a native of Louisiana, 
and a member of a well known family of that state. 
Dr. Fulbright attended the public schools of Yellow 
Pine, Louisiana, as a boy, later entering Louisiana 
Polytechnic College at Ruston, Louisiana, where he 
took a course in mechanical engineering, which he 
dropped to take up the study of medicine and for 
that purpose entered the Baylor University at 
Waco, where he studied preparatory to entering 
Baylor Medical College at Dallas, where he received 
his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1920. He then 
spent one year at Baylor Hospital, at the end of 
which time he went with the Detroit Receiving 
Hospital and the City Hospital at Detroit, Michigan, 
spending one year here preparatory to taking up 
active practice. He then came to Port Arthur, 
where his father, D. R. Fulbright, was visiting, and 
after studying the situation decided this city of- 
fered an exceptional professional opportunity, and 
remained here. He was connected with the Texas 
Company for one year as surgeon and has since then 
engaged in the general practice of medicine and 
surgery since coming to this city. 

Dr. Fulbright is a member of the Civitan Club of 
Port Arthur and the Jefferson County Medical So- 
ciety, and takes a deep interest in all that concerns 
the welfare and advancement of Port Arthur. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, Trinity Valley Lodge 
No. 1048, A. F. and A. M., Dallas, Texas. Dr. Ful- 
bright has the altruistic attitude of his profession, 
regarding his duty to humanity, and to work in the 
field of preventive medicine and the advancement 
of public health standards, and is known and valued 
as an enthusiastic and progressive representative 
of the medical profession at Port Arthur. 



1149 



MEN OF TEXAS 




IHARLES WILLIAM GILL. In recounting the 
history of Galveston, the name of Charles 
William Gill figures prominently as that of 
a citizen who through an unselfish interest 
in the growth of the city, was instrumental in secur- 
ing many advantages, both commercial and civic. 
Mr. Gill was for around four decades identified with 
commercial affairs at Galveston, and holding busi- 
ness interests of wide and varied scope, much that 
he did in a business way had a direct bearing on the 
prosperity of the city. He was familiar with and 
had a working knowledge of a number of different 
industries, and was a stockholder in many of those 
enterprises which make up industrial Galveston. 
Mr. Gill was also a factor in the real estate and in- 
vestment business, and with his knowledge of busi- 
ness generally, and his familiarity with land and 
land values in this section, as well as an unusual 
ability to foresee the trend of development, he was 
able to make investments which were profitable to 
himself, and also suggest like investments for his 
clients. A business man of vision, as is indicated 
by his career, Mr. Gill was withal a man of practical 
attainments, with a sound and well defined business 
policy, and there was ever attached to his name an 
integrity which made a statement from him as to 
land values, future values, or on business problems 
generally, of special value. His partnership of Gill 
and League built what is known as the Gill Building 
at the corner of Twenty-first and Market. 

Charles William Gill was born at Wheeling, West 
Virginia, the twenty-sixth of January, 1858, the son 
of John Wallace Gill, of English ancestry, and a na- 
tive of Virginia, who died in 1872, and Rhoda A. 
Smith Gill, who died in 1908. The elder Mr. Gill 
established the Crescent Iron Works at Wheeling, 
West Virginia, the largest industry of its kind in 
the country at that time. Later he moved to Ohio, 
where he engaged in the silk manufacturing busi- 
ness, and was the first to make a United States 
flag from silk. Charles William Gill obtained his 
early education in the public schools, and after 
graduating from the high school, at Springfield, Illi- 
nois, entered Northwestern University, where he 
spent two years. He first engaged in business at 
Springfield, Illinois, where he was in the drug busi- 
ness for eight years. He came to Galveston in 
1882, not, however, remaining here permanently un- 
til 1886. He entered the real estate business here 
at that time, and was also in the investment busi- 
ness for a like time, handling his own property here, 
and investing in many of the important enterprise? 
at Galveston. 

Mr. Gill was twice married, his first wife having 
been Miss Esther Wells League, of Galveston, whom 
he married in 1881, and whose death occurred in 
1907. He was married for the second time to Miss 
Tommie V. Hodges at Galveston, the thirty-first of 
December, 1908. Mrs. Gill, a native of Gonzales 
County, Texas, is the daughter of Thomas W. Hodges, 
a prominent business man of Belmont, Texas. The 
latter is a native of Fayette County, Texas, and his 
father was also a native Texan. Mrs. Gill was an 
ideal wife and mother, making a home known in Gal- 
veston for its charm and hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gill had one child, Charles William Gill, Jr., born 
the thirteenth of December, 1910, and Mrs. Gill has 
also been a real mother to the five children of Mr. 




Gill by his first marriage. These children are John 
W., David M., Mary D., Esther R. and Anna C. Gill. 
The family attend the Trinity Protestant Episcopal 
Church, in which faith Mr. Gill was reared and of 
which he was a vestryman, and reside at 1818 
Avenue J. 

Mr. Gill was one of the best known Masons in 
Texas, and was active in all Masonic work. He was 
honorary inspector general of the Supreme Council, 
past commander in chief of Texas Consistory, No. 1, 
sublime prince of the Royal Secret, past master of 
Pike Tucker Council, No. 1, Knights of Kadosh, 
and was identified with San Felipe Lodge of Per- 
fection No. 1 and L. M. Oppenheimer Rose Croix 
Chapter 2, in all of which bodies -he was a life 
member. He was a York Rite Mason, Tucker 
Lodge No. 297, Free and Accepted Masons, San 
Felipe de Austin, Chapter 1, Knights Templar, 
of which he was past eminent commander, and 
was instrumental in organizing El Mina Temple 
Shrine. He was made a thirty-third degree Mason 
in 1903. Mr. Gill died at his home in Galveston the 
thirty-first of January, 1924. His name has many 
memorials at Galveston, and the memory of his life 
an inspiration to others to emulate his example. 

RAVIS LOGAN SMITH, whose life for more 
than half a century has been associated 
with the destinies of West Columbia and 
Brazoria County, is one of those real pio- 
neers who, while growing up with the community 
and prospering as it has prospered, has taken an im- 
portant part in developing and cultivating the lands 
of the county, has done his share of public duties, 
and has, since 1872, been the leading merchant of 
this section. In that year, one year after coming 
to Columbia, then known as Bell's Landing, Mr. 
Smith opened, on the banks of the Brazos River, a 
general mercantile business, which has been con- 
tinuously in operation for half a century. This 
store, now in West Columbia, is unusually complete, 
and in addition to the general merchandise business 
Mr. Smith is a cotton buyer and a man of general 
business affairs, taking an interest in most of the 
activities that have been of importance to the de- 
velopment of this section. 

Shortly after his arrival in Brazoria County in 
1871 Mr. Smith began to buy lands, which he stock- 
ed with herds of cattle, and in the seventies and 
eighties he drove many herds to the markets at 
Kansas City, and also drove some to California. 
His land holdings now run to more than ten thou- 
sand acres, including tracts of timber, grazing and 
farming land, and he has several thousand head of 
cattle. Mr. Smith also began his activities as a 
cotton buyer in the early days, and has since con- 
tinued to be one of the largest cotton buyers of 
his community. Before the coming of the railroad 
he owned and operated four or five boats on the 
river and hauled produce, cotton and cattle to Gal- 
veston, bringing back merchandise. Mr. Smith has 
also found time to serve his community in a public 
office and was county commissioner for a number 
of years. He also acted as postmaster at one time 
and has at all times taken an active interest in 
every progressive and forward movement. 

Travis Logan Smith was born in Mathews County, 
Virginia, the thirtieth of November, 1852, son of 
Thomas and Nancy Smith, the father a farmer and 
land owner of that county. Mr. Smith spent his 



1150 







Veil 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




boyhood on the farm there, attending the rural 
school, and assisting his father in cultivating the 
farm. In 1871 he came to Texas, locating in Bra- 
zoria County, and since that time has been a factor 
in various activities as previously sketched. 

Mr. Smith was married at Columbia, Texas, in 
1873, to Miss Nellie Masterson, daughter of Thomas 
G. Masterson, a lawyer of the early days, and Chris- 
tiana Masterson. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have reared 
a large family of nine children — Mrs. Christie 
Crews, T. L. Smith, Jr., T. M. Smith, Miss Ethel 
Smith, Mrs. Gladys Parker, William Smith, Ran- 
dolph Smith, Mrs. Roene Womack, and Miss Jenette 
Smith. The family has continuously made Columbia 
their home, and are known throughout this section 
as one of the sterling pioneer families of Brazoria 
County. Mr. Smith is a business man of conserva- 
tive policies, with a sound knowledge of business 
operation and management. He has been an inde- 
fatigable worker, personally taking charge of his 
many activities and investments, and few men have 
accomplished more than he. While he gives liberal- 
ly where he deems the cause worthy, in this, as in 
his business affairs, he is conservative, and indis- 
criminate benevolences do not appeal to him. In 
summing up his life it may well be said that he 
has accounted well for himself, and that Brazoria 
can boast of no more sterling citizen. 

ILLIAM LEE PENNY for a period of more 
than ten years was actively identified with 
the public interests of Texas, and since 
1917 was numbered among the enterprising 
citizens of Houston. Mr. Penny was active vice 
president and general manager of the Kenyon 
Dredging Company, which operated on big dredging 
contracts in Houston and South Texas. One of the 
large operations was on the dredging of Brays 
Bayou, a very large and difficult job, requiring em- 
ployment of a considerable number of men and a 
large amount of expensive machinery. This work 
came under the personal management of Mr. Penny 
and at the finish of the job received the highest 
compliments from the County Commissioners, who 
passed on the character of the work. 

William Lee Penny was born at Mobile, Alabama, 
October 6, 1886. His parents were Sam and Sophia 
Ludlow Penny, both natives of Alabama. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of Mobile 
and University of Alabama. While at the univer- 
sity he was a prominent athlete and engaged in all 
of the major sports. He played center on the basket 
ball team and became widely known throughout the 
South for his ability as an athlete. After leaving 
college he played center on the Y. M. C. A. basket 
ball team at Mobile. This team attained more than 
a local reputation. 

One of Mr. Penny's first business associations was 
with the Bailey-Reeder Contracting Company, noted 
road contractors. He came to Texas in 1914 in the 
interest of this company and had charge of a great 
deal of construction work. He went to Dallas in 
1917 and built the disposal plant and after finishing 
this job, he came to Houston to accept a position 
with the Kenyon Dredging Company. 

Mr. Penny was married December 1, 1915, at Bay 
City, Texas, to Miss Mollie Belle Matthews, daugh- 
ter of Jesse and Sallie Lawson Matthews. Her par- 
ents were both natives of Texas. Mr. and Mrs. 
Penny were the parents of two children — William 




Matthews and Sallie Belle Penny. Mr. Penny was 
a member of the Building Exchange and the Trinity 
Episcopal Church. The premature death of Mr. 
Penny, December 18, 1925, still in the prime of life, 
was due to enlargement of the heart which resulted 
from his vigorous training while a member of the 
basket ball teams in his younger days. His death 
was a distinct loss to the building activities of Hous- 
ton, in which he had a noteworthy part. 

OHN E. WEINER has for a number of 
years been a factor in the development of 
Houston, and has been identified with en- 
terprises of wide scope and important bear- 
ing on the prosperity of the city. Mr. Weiner is 
the Trustee for the Bell Estate, and has taken an 
active part in developing the Second Ward, where 
the holdings of this estate are located. Mr. Weiner 
looks after all property, real estate and investments 
for this estate, and builds and sells many houses. 
As a builder he personally attends to all the details 
of construction, supervising his own building crews, 
and has since becoming the trustee for the estate, 
in 1920, been instrumental in placing in homes in 
the Second Ward, near the car barns, many families. 
These homes are sold on time payments and Mr. 
Weiner has created a desire for home ownership in 
the car barn district that will be of lasting benefit 
to the city. The estate also has a great deal of 
rental property in this district, and Mr. Weiner has 
charge of this, collecting the rents, looking after 
the upkeep, and other matters incidental to rental 
properties. With the exception of one block of 
business property in Galveston, the entire Bell es- 
tate holdings are in the Second Ward, at Houston. 

Mr. Weiner is the nephew of Mrs. Josie E. Bell, 
who with her husband came to Houston, from Gal- 
veston, in 1885. Mr. Bell's death occurred in 1895, 
and his widow died at Houston in 1917. Mr. Weiner 
was reared by his aunt from boyhood, and was 
trained to take charge of the building end of the 
estate, and in 1920 took over the entire manage- 
ment. He has proven very efficient, materially in- 
creasing the value of the property by his manage- 
ment, as well as correcting an involved condition 
left by his predecessor. 

John E. Weiner was born in New York, the thirty- 
first of January, 1889, son of Charles W. Weiner, 
who was a resident of that State until his death, 
and Mary Weiner, who also spent her entire life in 
New York. Mr. Weiner came to Houston as a boy 
of twelve, continuing his education, begun in private 
schools, in this city. He was a student at various 
times at St. John's College, at Montreal, Canada, 
St. Vitus College, at Kankakee, Illinois, St. Thomas 
College and Houston Academy. 

Mr. Weiner was married at Houston, the twelfth 
of November, 1912, to Miss Mary Hogan, a native of 
Kentucky, and whose parents died in that State dur- 
ing her infancy. She was reared by her aunt and 
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. 0. J. Depp, of Dallas. Mr. and 
Mrs. Weiner make their home at 820 Branard 
Avenue, and have two children, Lumajoe and Jose- 
phine. Mr. Weiner takes a real interest in the de- 
velopment of his city, especially the Second Ward, 
and sees a future of growth and progress for this 
city. Mr. Weiner is known as a business man of 
ability, interested in his work, and thoroughly un- 
derstanding it, and his contributions to civic im- 
provement are well recognized. 



1153 



MEN OF TEXAS 




EE GRANDISON WILEY— The name of Lee 
Grandison Wiley, one of the younger busi- 
ness men of Galveston to achieve signal 
success, stands today in the business world 
here as that of a progressive, worthwhile and thor- 
oughly public-spirited man, and withal a man who in 
his contact with the business world brought a whole- 
some philosophy of life that inspired confidence and 
encouraged others to emulate his high example of 
Christian citizenship. Mr. Wiley exerted an in- 
fluence that builds character and creates happiness, 
and this influence reached not only those with whom 
he came in contact, but indirectly affected many 
others. He was one of those men who lend his 
strength to material development, and while his in- 
terest was largely in the shipping business, he was 
also vitally concerned with the welfare of his fel- 
lowmen and was generous in his contributions to 
benevolent and philanthropic work. One of his 
chief interests in the commercial world was the 
development of Galveston into a coffee center, and 
he accomplished much toward this end, and whether 
as business man, citizen, or civic worker, his work 
left its imprint in his city. 

Lee Grandison Wiley was born at Huntsville, Tex- 
as, the twelfth of September, 1885, the son of John 
Keenan Wiley and Fannie O. (Joseph) Wiley. The 
family removed to Galveston during his early boy- 
hood and he obtained his education in the public 
schools here, graduating from high school. He first 
went in the office of a large cotton company, where 
his energy and enthusiasm soon won him the reputa- 
tion of being a man with a definite future in the 
field of commerce. After several years during 
which time he was identified with general business 
activities, Mr. Wiley entered the freight forward- 
ing business for himself, later going with the Gal- 
veston Cotton Concentration Company, in which he 
was financially interested, and of which he was 
manager at the time of his death. His work with 
this company, and his work for the development 
of Galveston as a coffee center, gave indication of 
an unusually brilliant future. 

Mr. Wiley was married at Galveston, the tenth 
of February, 1910, to Miss Marguerite Mitchell, a 
native of Galveston, and the daughter of Thomas 
R. and Henrietta (Cain) Mitchell, Mr. Mitchell, a 
long time resident of Galveston, was with the Gal- 
veston Wharf Company for many years. Mrs. Wiley 
is a women of many accomplishments, and is one 
of the most talented singers of Galveston, possess- 
ing a voice of unusual richness. As a young lady, 
and as a young matron she has been a leader in so- 
cial circles, and in the cultural life at Galveston. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wiley had two children: Florence, and 
Lee W. Wiley, who reside with their mother at 1811 
Thirty-second Street. 

Lee Grandison Wiley died in Galveston the nine- 
teenth of June, 1923, after an illness of six months, 
during which time he had shown a patience in suf- 
fering and weakness which gave strong testimony to 
his Christian faith and fortitude. It is not often that 
one finds a life of such short duration so thor- 
oughly worthwhile, and in his passing, Galveston 
suffered a severe loss. While Mr. Wiley was a leader 
in commercial circles, it was as a Christian gentle- 
man that his influence was greatest. He was a mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian Church for eleven 
years and for a good part of that time served on 




the diaconate, where his work as secretary to the 
board was both conscientious' and efficient. Mr. 
Wiley was a Mason, a member of the Scottish Rite 
bodies and El Mina Temple Shrine. He was laid 
to rest in the cemetery at Huntsville, and on the 
following Sunday memorial services were held at 
Galveston, in the First Presbyterian Church. 

RANK ALBERT PETERS. In recording 
the advancement of the prosperous South 
Texas oil center of Humble the name of 
F. A. Peters occupies a place of prominence 
and honor as a man who was ever ready and willing 
to offer his best for the good of his city. Mr. 
Peters probably did more to bring modern con- 
veniences to Humble than any other man. In 1906 
he established the Humble Light and Power Com- 
pany, which now furnishes light to more than three 
hundred homes and business houses. In 1912 he 
added the ice plant, and in 1923 the bottling depart- 
ment was built and put into active operation, but 
which was later discontinued. Since the death of 
Mr. Peters his son, with his associates, have greatly 
improved and increased the capacity of the plant. 
To these industries Mr. Peters devoted the principal 
part of his time, although he was also interested 
in farming and owned a splendid farm near Hum- 
ble, where each year he demonstrated that more 
money could be earned on each acre than is pro- 
duced in other parts of the state. This he did by 
intensive farming and the use of modern farm 
methods. As an evidence of his success along this 
line, in 1923 he netted $535.00 on one acre of cab- 
bage, and other farm products in proportion. 

Mr. Peters was born at Abilene, Kansas, on May 
7th, 1874. His father, F. F. Peters, a native of 
Pennsylvania, but later of Kansas, was well known 
in the business circles of these states. His educa- 
tion was obtained in the public schools of his native 
state. For fifteen years he was a resident of Hous- 
ton, where for a number of years he was city in- 
spector of the Light and Power Company, and from 
1897 to 1906 he was electric inspector for the city 
of Houston, at which time he removed to Humble 
and took up the work in which he was active at the 
time of his death. 

Mr. Peters was twice married. His first marriage 
was to Miss Mamie Davis (deceased). Of this union 
four children were born, three surviving, as follows: 
Mrs. Ruth Hebert of Palestine, Texas; J. R., treas- 
urer and general manager of the Humble Power and 
Ice Company, and Mrs. Nellie Kilpatrick of Mon- 
roe, Louisiana. Mr. Peters was married the second 
time at Conroe, Texas, to Miss Blanche Boyett, a 
native of Bryan, Texas. For many years Mr. Peters 
was a leader in all civic movements at Humble, 
giving of his time and means to all projects having 
to do with the progress and advancement of his 
town and county. He was president of the Humble 
Chamber of Commerce, director of the Retail Mer- 
chants Association, president of the Pure Bred Live 
Stock Association, and a member of the Refrigerat- 
ing Engineers Association and the Southern Auto- 
mobile Association. 

Upon the death of Mr. Peters on November 16th, 
1924, Humble and adjacent territory lost one of its 
most highly esteemed citizens, and a leader in all 
civic, commercial and social movements. It is given 
to few communities to possess a man of such high 
ideals and his loss was felt by the entire citizenship. 



1154 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




JOHAN RASMUSSEN, veteran automobile 
man of Texas, and for three decades iden- 
tified with the business life at Galveston, 
has exerted a favorable influence over the 
automobile business here and has been a factor in 
the development of one of the largest Ford agencies 
in Texas. Mr. Rasmussen is part owner of the firm 
of John Christensen and Company, which company 
has the local agency for Fords, Lincolns and Ford- 
sons, and also has a large and well established 
bicycle and sporting goods business. This firm 
dates back to 1897 when it was established by John 
C. Christensen and Mr. Rasmussen, in a very small 
way as a bicycle repair shop. The business gradu- 
ally expanded, and in 1904, the company took the 
Oldsmobile agency, establishing the first automobile 
agency in Galveston. A year later they became 
Ford dealers for Galveston and Brazoria counties, 
and several years later took the agency for the 
Marmon car here, later taking over the Mitchell, and 
still later the Cadillac, Buick, and several others. 
Since 1912 the company has handled Fords exclu- 
sively, with the exception of the Lincoln car since 
the Ford company has taken over that plant, and the 
Fordson tractor. The company has been especially 
successful in placing the Fordson on farms in this 
territory, and in addition to handling the Fordson, 
they have stocked a good line of plows and tools 
made especially for this sturdy tractor. John 
Christensen and Company occupy a modern build- 
ing, designed especially for them, at 601 to 611 
Twenty-third Street, and also have a large ware- 
house in addition to the sales rooms and service and 
parts department housed there. The property 
owned by the company represents an investment of 
three hundred thousand dollars, and a force of thirty 
employees is maintained. 

A. Johan Rasmussen was born at Horsens, Den- 
mark, the fourth of November, 1870, of Danish 
parents, and spent his youth there, obtaining his 
education in the schools of Denmark, where he 
studied both English and German. He came to the 
United States in 1890, landing in New York City, 
where he remained three years, coming to Galves- 
ton in February, 1893, to get away from the extreme 
winters of the North. While here he saw that in 
this new country a big future awaited the young 
man with the industry and ambition to work, and 
decided to remain here. He went to work at com- 
mon labor, in the meanwhile saving every possible 
penny so that when the opportunity came he could 
start in business for himself. In 1897, he, with John 
C. Christensen, started the bicycle shop which 
formed the nucleus of the present business, and he 
has been active in this business since that time. 

Mr. Rasmussen was married at Galveston, the 
twenty-second of December, 1900, to Miss Minnie 
Olander, a native of Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Ras- 
mussen reside at 2024 M 1/2 Street, and have six 
children: Dorothy, a graduate of Southern Metho- 
dist University at Dallas; Walter, a cadet at West 
Texas Military Academy; Helen, John Henry, Harry 
and Katherine. Mr. Rasmussen is a member of the 
Galveston Chamber of Commerce and fraternally is 
a Mason, Scottish Rite, and a member of El Mina 
Temple Shrine at Galveston. Mr. Rasmussen is 
secretary of the Crystal Palace, and is a stockholder 
in various industries at Galveston, taking an active 




part in the business world, and much that he has 
done in a business way has had a vital influence 
over the prosperity of Galveston. Mr. Rasmussen, 
like his partner, Mr. Christensen, is a fine example 
of the self-made man, and is in every way a public- 
spirited, worth-while citizen of Galveston, and is 
known to his associates as a man of highest integ- 
rity and sound executive ability, ready at all times 
to contribute to any cause that has for its purpose 
the welfare of Galveston or its advancement as a 
business center. 

D WOODWARD of Galveston became asso- 
ciated with the firm of Gordon, Sewall and 
Company, wholesale grocers of Houston, in 
1918, beginning at the bottom with that 
firm, and in 1922 was made manager of the branch 
house of this firm in this city. Prior to the estab- 
lishment of the branch house here under the man- 
agement of Mr. Woodward, Gordon Sewall and Com- 
pany had a small house operating here as the Gal- 
veston Mercantile Company, but in 1922 decided to 
establish the branch house here under the firm name, 
and Mr. Woodward opened same, which is located 
at 102 Twenty-fourth Street. The trade territory 
of Gordon, Sewall and Company extends for twenty- 
five miles in a circle on the mainland, the city of 
Galveston, and a growing export business to Mexico 
and the West Indies. In addition to the wholesale 
groceries handled by this firm, which includes the 
famous Rice Hotel brands, they handle ship chand- 
lers supplies and are sole agents for Patterson and 
Sargeant Marine Paints. Sixteen experienced peo- 
ple, which includes salesmen, are employed by this 
firm at Galveston, and their annual business aver- 
ages $800,000.00. The officers of the Gordon Sewall 
Company are Cleveland Sewall, president; W. D. 
Cooper, secretary and treasurer, and Campbell 
Sewall, vice president and general manager. 

A native Texan, Mr. Woodward was born at Hous- 
ton on November 19th, 1892. His father, W. H. 
Woodward, came to Houston as a young man and 
was engaged in the railroad business practically all 
his life. His education was obtained in the public 
schools of Houston. After leaving school, Mr. Wood- 
ward engaged in the railroad business, and was for 
a period of eleven years in this line of endeavor, and 
had been promoted to the position of chief clerk 
in the International and Great Northern Railroad, 
when he became acquainted with the firm of Gor- 
don, Sewall and Company and left the railroad in 
order to enter the employ of this company. 

Mr. Woodward was married at Houston on August 
15th, 1915, to Miss Idell Alice Henderson, a native 
of Galveston and a member of a well known family, 
who later removed to Houston, and she was reared 
in the latter city. They have one child, Leah Mary. 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodward reside at the Broadmoor 
Apartments. Mr. Woodward is a member of the 
A. F. and A. M., with membership in Gray Lodge No. 
329 of Houston, and has attained to the 14th degree 
in the Scottish Rite body of this order, having taken 
these degrees in Houston. He is also a member 
of the Galveston Chamber of Commerce, the Amer- 
ican Wholesale Grocers Association and the Young 
Men's Progressive League and the Optimist Club. 
Mr. Woodward is regarded as one of the most pro- 
gressive men among the younger bsuiness men of 
Galveston, and is popular in the business and social 
circles of this city. 



1157 



MEN OF TEXAS 




TEPHEN FRANCIS SGITCOVICH. Gal- 
veston has been the home of many public- 
spirited men, men who have given gener- 
ously of their time and means that this 
city might grow and prosper, and of these few have 
done more than Stephen Francis Sgitcovich, whose 
name for many years was significantly associated 
with every forward and progressive movement. Dur- 
ing a busy lifetime Mr. Sgitcovich impressed him- 
self upon the life at Galveston as one of those re- 
markable personalities, combining breadth of vision, 
and qualities of leadership, with a practical business 
sense that enabled him to accomplish much, both in 
a commercial and a civic way. Mr. Sgitcovich was a 
veteran steamship man, a keen student of economic 
and trade conditions throughout the world, and had 
a special fund of information and constructive ideas 
on maritime affairs. He used this knowledge to 
advantage in building up a steamship agency and 
shipping business known all over the world, and was 
a factor in the development of Galveston into a city 
of maritime importance. Mr. Sgitcovich early recog- 
nized that the need for a national policy encouraging 
the development of American shipping, and urged 
the business men of Galveston to take recognition 
of this vital fact. In this connection he gave close 
study to the problems foreign trade presented, 
problems to a large degree of distance and ocean 
transportation, and through the establishment of 
his well organized and conducted shipping business, 
was able to a large extent to help in the solution of 
these problems. 

Stephen Francis Sgitcovich was born at Galves- 
ton, Texas, the fourteenth of January, 1879, the 
son of Michael Sgitcovich, a native of Austria, who 
came to Galveston as a young man and lived here 
until his death. As a boy "Steve" Sgitcovich, as 
he was known to his many friends at Galveston, at- 
tended the public schools here, later entering St. 
Mary's College at Galveston, where he completed 
his studies. He then went in the office of the Daniel 
Ripley Steamship Company, and in the twelve years 
he spent there became familiar with the require- 
ments of shipping and through application and a 
capacity to study and learn above the average, made 
rapid advancement in the shipping business. In 
1907, leaving the Daniel Ripley Steamship Company, 
Mr. Sgitcovich established the firm of S. Sgitcovich 
& Company, steamship agents and brokers, of which 
he was directing head until his death, and which 
under his management became known all over the 
world, and was a factor of prime importance in the 
development of Galveston as a shipping center. The 
firm was one of the largest shippers of the Gulf 
Coast and Galveston. 

Mr. Sgitcovich was married at Galveston on the 
second of November, 1902, to Miss Winifred Teller, 
a native of Iowa, and the daughter of H. R. Teller of 
Canada, and a contractor in Iowa for many years, 
and Catherine (Delaney) Teller. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sgitcovich had two children: Stephen F., a grad- 
uate of the Galveston schools and Culver Military 
School, and Lucile, a graduate at St. Mary's Col- 
lege at Dallas, and Finch, finishing school in 
New York. Since Mr. Sgitcovich's death, his widow 
has remarried, and is now Mrs. Thomas R. Han- 
cock. Mr. Hancock is president of S. Sgitcovich & 
Company, and has been for many years with the 
firm and Mrs. Hancock is vice president of the 




company. The family reside at 2809 Broadway. 

Stephen Francis Sgitcovich died at Galveston in 
March, 1920. A man of sterling qualities, as a 
citizen and as a business man, he had for many years 
given a constructive interest to the development 
of Galveston, and his name is held in high esteem 
as that of one of the real builders of this city. 

AMES PERRIE ALVEY. For more than 
four decades the name of James Perrie 
Alvey was of special significance in finan- 
cial circles at Galveston, and he was 
throughout this period one of the men of this sec- 
tion bearing heavy burdens of responsibility, and his 
name carried a prominence in the banking world 
that was an asset to the city with which it was con- 
nected. Aside from his activities in the banking field 
Mr. Alvey was one of the most public spirited cit- 
izens of Galveston, taking an active part in civic af- 
fairs, and supporting all movements directed toward 
the future growth of Galveston. Mr. Alvey was a 
keen student of economic conditions throughout the 
world, and had a special fund of information and 
constructive ideas on finance, knowledge he used to 
advantage in building up one of the strongest bank- 
ing houses at Galveston. His life was one of intense 
activity, and he impressed himself on the city 
of Galveston as one of the most remarkable bankers 
this city has produced, exerting an influence over the 
trend of commercial growth and civic prosperity. 

James Perrie Alvey was born in Maryland, in 1841, 
and after completing his work in the schools near his 
home he entered the Catholic College at Georgetown, 
where he finished. Mr. Alvey made his entrance 
into the business world in the drug business, he, 
with Dr. T. C. Thompson, established a large whole- 
sale drug house at Galveston, shortly after his ar- 
rival in the early seventies. After the big fire of 
1876, when this interest was destroyed, Mr. Alvey 
went to New Orleans and established a wholesale 
drug business which he operated some six or seven 
years. In 1883 he returned to Galveston, entering 
the field of banking, and was active in this and 
other businesses until his death. Mr. Alvey was for 
many years president of the South Texas State 
Bank, and was also connected with a trust company. 
He was a stockholder in various business enterprises, 
and was one of the largest property owners of Gal- 
veston, during the course of his busy career ac- 
cumulating much money and property. While pri- 
marily a business man, Mr. Alvey was at all times 
active in civic work, and supported generously all 
civic movements of his day, giving both of his 
wealth and his time that Galveston might grow 
and develop along progressive and modern lines. 

Mr. Alvey was married at Galveston, in 1885, to 
Miss Jennie McCullough, the daughter of the Rev. 
John McCullough, a pioneer Presbyterian minister 
who came to Galveston in the early days and or- 
ganized the first Presbyterian church to be located 
here. He also organized the first Presbyterian 
church to be established at San Antonio, and was 
active in religious work throughout the State until 
his death, which occurred in 1871. Mrs. Alvey's 
mother, prior to her marriage to Rev. McCullough, 
was Miss Margaret Riddell. Mrs. Alvey was an 
ideal wife and mother, and created a home life which 
was delightful, and she has also been closely iden- 
tified with the cultural life of Galveston, and is a 
woman combining the social graces with those of 



1158 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




the home maker. Mr. and Mrs. Alvey had an at- 
tractive home at 1228 Avenue I, where Mrs. Alvey 
continues to reside and were the parents of four 
children: Richard, J. P., Jr., and John Carroll Alvey, 
and a daughter, Mrs. Jenny Wilson. 

Mr. Alvey was vice president of the Galveston 
Wharf Company, and was treasurer of the Rosen- 
berg Library, and was for many years active in 
public school work, taking a deep interest in educa- 
tional advancement. His death, which occurred the 
twenty-first of December, 1916, resulted in a deep 
loss, not only to the banking and business world, 
but to the city at large and his hundreds of friends 
in Galveston and throughout the State. 

ENRY C. MOORE was for nearly a score 
of years prominently associated with the 
oil development of South Texas and the 
Gulf Coast oil fields. He was one of the 
most widely known oil men in South Texas and 
engaged in all of the departments of the oil industry. 
He was popular in the oil fraternity and had a wide 
circle of friends throughout the South Texass fields. 
Mr. Moore first began his career in the oil indus- 
try with the Texas Company at Sour Lake, in the 
production department. He worked up to the posi- 
tion as head driller and remained with the Texas 
Company for eight years. He then withdrew from 
the Texas Company and organized the Lake Oil 
Company of which he became vice president and 
field manager, remaining with this company for 
two years. He also established the Sour Lake Ma- 
chine and Supply Company which dealt in oil ma- 
chinery which, besides the main office at Sour Lake, 
have branches at Liberty and Rockdale. In 1916 
Mr. Moore sold out his interest in the Lake Oil 
Company and moved to Houston and bought the 
controlling interest in the Southern Petroleum Com- 
pany. He continued with this company for five 
years, during which time he was active in the de- 
velopment of South Texas fields. In 1921 he sold 
out his interest in the Southern Petroleum Company 
and the following year organized the Moore Motor 
Company, which business he conducted for over a 
year. In 1923, due to ill health, Mr. Moore sold 
out his interest in the Moore Motor Company and 
retired from active business but still retained an 
interest in the Sour Lake Machine and Supply 
Company. 

Mr. Moore was a native of Louisiana; born in 
Vermillion parish, September 6, 1876. His parents 
were James R. and Harriet Ashworth Moore. His 
father and mother were both native Texans. After 
receiving a common school education Mr. Moore 
began his business career working on dredge boats 
in Louisiana, continuing this occupation until he 
came to Texas and engaged in the oil business. 

Mr. Moore was first married at Beaumont, Feb- 
ruary 27th, 1905, to Miss Fannie Mae Mooney of 
Sour Lake. From this union there are three chil- 
dren: Charles C, Marguerite and Jennie Mae. Mr. 
Moore was again married on September 6th, 1917, 
at Temple, Texas, to Miss Mayme Morgan, daughter 
of Henry and Tempa Eaton Morgan. Mrs. Moore 
was a native of Texas, where her mother was also 
born, while her father was a native of Georgia. 

Mr. Moore took a very active interest in the 
civic and social life of Texas. He held a life mera- 




a prominent Odd Fellow. He was thoroughly fa- 
miliar with all of the different departments of the 
oil industry, in which he had spent a greater part of 
his business life and was an extremely popular man 
in the oil fraternity. 

He was a self-made man, who had by constancy 
of purpose and strict devotion to his business, at- 
tained his success through tireless industry. His 
death on December 25, 1925, was a distinct loss 
to the oil fraternity of Texas. 

ULIUS GROSSMANN. For more than 
twenty years Julius Grossmann was known 
in Humble and Harris County as a leader 
in commercial circles, and a man whom all 
loved and honored. As the owner of "The Store 
Ahead" he set the standard for the entire commu- 
nity, and the store, a complete department store, 
carrying a full line of dry goods, notions, shoes for 
men and women and ready-to-wear for men and 
women, would have been a credit to a town many 
times the size of Humble. Mr. Grossmann's busi- 
ness career was wide and varied. As a boy he 
started his business experience with the William 
Foley Dry Goods Store of Houston, at the end of 
six months he became associated with the Thomas 
R. Franklin Department Store, where he remained 
for nine years. He then became connected with 
J. T. Mason, remaining with this firm for a period 
of eight years. He spent seven years in the employ 
of Tilbrook and Clay Department Store, after which 
he went with Brown Brothers Company for two 
years. For three years he traveled East Texas 
as traveling salesman for a shoe house. He went 
to Sour Lake during the boom days and became 
associated with an oil company which was operating 
there. He was associated with the Producers Com- 
pany at Humble as timekeeper at the time he 
engaged in his venture as owner of "The Store 
Ahead." 

A native Texan, Mr. Grossmann was born at 
Houston on January 12th, 1865, at 2013 Commerce 
Street. The old house in which Mr. Grossmann 
was born still stands, and in those days this was 
regarded as the finest residence district of Hous- 
ton. His father, August Grossmann, came to the 
United States from Europe in 1852 and for a few 
years remained in the East, when he came to Hous- 
ton, and was one of the best known painting and 
decorating contractors of his time. He remained 
in Houston until his death in 1885. Mr. Grossmann's 
mother, Mrs. Charlotte (Vollers) Grossmann, was a 
native of Germany and came to the United States 
and to Galveston in 1855. His education was ob- 
tained in private institutions of Houston, Texas. 

Mr. Grossmann was married at Houston, Texas, 
on January 23rd, 1895, to Miss Margaret Van Ben- 
thuysen, a native of Houston, and a member of a 
pioneer family of this city. Her father, G. E. 
Van Benthuysen, was born in Albany, N. Y., and 
came to Galveston about 1848 and in 1869 to Hous- 
ton, where he resided until his death. Mrs. Gross- 
mann still conducts the store which she helped build 
up from the very beginning. Mr. Grossmann was 
a member of the Woodmen of the World, in which 
organization he was active. He was buried in the 
Forest Hill Cemetery, Houston. Upon the passing 
of Mr. Grossmann on December 7th, 1924, Humble 
suffered the loss of one of its best loved and hon- 
ored citizens, and one of its most progressive and 



bership in the Elks Lodge at Beaumont and was public spirited merchants. 



1161 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARRY TAYLOR KENDALL has spent all 
of his business life in the lumber industry, 
knows lumber as few men know it, and is 
one of the leading executives among lumber 
men of this generation. Mr. Kendall is general 
sales agent and a member of the board of directors 
of the Kirby Lumber Company, one of the leading 
lumber companies of the world. He came to Hous- 
ton in 1909 with the W. R. Pickering Lumber Com- 
pany of Kansas City as sales agent, and continued in 
this position until 1911, when he became associated 
with the Kirby Lumber Company as assistant sales 
agent, being promoted to general sales agent in 
1913. He has charge of the sales of this company, 
both foreign and domestic, and fifty people are em- 
ployed in his department. Branch sales offices are 
maintained at the following points: New York, Chi- 
cago, Cleveland, St. Louis, Kansas City, Oklahoma 
City, Dallas, New Orleans, Fort Worth, San Antonio, 
Havana, Cuba, with sales representatives in various 
other cities. The Kirby Lumber Company manufac- 
tures 300,000,000 feet of yellow pine lumber and 
Southern hardwoods annually, and it is Mr. Ken- 
dall's job to market this product; this in a measure 
indicates the magnitude of his duties. 

Harry Taylor Kendall was born in Clay Center, 
Kansas, May 26th, 1882. His father, David A. Ken- 
dall, is a native of Wisconsin and was engaged in 
the saw mill business. His mother was Miss Eliza 
M. Taylor, and is also a native of Wisconsin. The 
family moved to Lansing, Iowa, and in 1890 to La 
Crosse, Wisconsin, where the subject of this sketch 
lived until 1900. His education was obtained in the 
public and high schools of La Crosse and Kansas 
City, graduating from the latter in 1902. During the 
year of his graduation, he entered the lumber busi- 
ness in St. Louis with the Banner Lumber Com- 
pany and remained with this company until 1907. 
From 1907 to 1911 he was employed by the W. R. 
Pickering Lumber Company, first as salesman on 
the road, and then in 1909 as sales agent for Texas, 
with headquarters in Houston. Since coming to 
Houston, Mr. Kendall has been closely identified 
with the commercial and civic interests of the city. 
He is president of the Globe Box Company, manu- 
facturers of boxes of all kinds with plant located in 
Houston, and is interested in various other com- 
mercial enterprises. 

Mr. Kendall was married in Temple, November 
30th, 1910, to Miss Helen Lucille Pendleton (de- 
ceased), a native of Temple and a daughter of Hon. 
George C. Pendleton, former Lieutenant Governor 
of Texas, and prominent in legal circles throughout 
the State. They had four children, Harry T. Ken- 
dall, Jr., George P., Robert A. and Susanne E. (de- 
ceased). The great sorrow of his life came to Mr. 
Kendall on September 3rd, 1924, when Mrs. Ken- 
dall and his little daughter Susanne were killed 
in an automobile accident. 

In fraternal organizations Mr. Kendall is a mem- 
ber of the A. F. & A. M. and of the Scottish Rite 
bodies of that order to the eighteenth degree, and 
is a charter member of Temple Blue Lodge. He also 
holds membership in the Houston Club, the Houston 
Country Club, of which he is now serving a second 
term as president; Lumbermen's Club, River Oaks 
Country Club, Lumbermen's Club of New Orleans, 
Rotary Club, the Texas Retail Lumber Dealers Asso- 




ciation, of which he is a director, and the Methodist 
Church. In April, 1925, he was honored by an 
appointment by the Department of Commerce to its 
advisory committee to assist the lumber section of 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce in 
working out expert problems. Mr. Kendall is con- 
sidered one of the outstanding lumber men in Hous- 
ton, and is one of the most popular men in the city. 
He is active in civic affairs, and is loved and es- 
teemed by all with whom he comes in contact, 
whether it be in a social or business way. He is a 
friend to everybody he meets, and is called "Harry" 
by all his friends and associates. His contempo- 
raries say of him: "Wherever lumber is sold in the 
world, Harry Kendall is known." He has great 
faith in his adopted city, and believes the time is 
close at hand when it will become the leading city 
of the Southwest, and never loses an opportunity to 
speak a good word for the South Texas metropolis 
and Texas in general. 

Note: Since the foregoing was written Mr. Ken- 
dall accepted the position of general sales agent of 
the Central Coal and Coke Company of Kansas City, 
where he removed February 1st, 1926. 

OHN W. GRAHAM, for a quarter of a cen- 
tury identified with various phases of hat 
merchandising, has for the past thirteen 
years been associated with wholesale mer- 
cantile activities at Houston. Mr. Graham came to 
this city in 1910, and shortly after his arrival estab- 
lished the Graham Hat Company, Incorporated, of 
which he has since been president and general man- 
ager. He has under his direction the distribution 
of Stetson hats, Sure-Fit caps and Tufnut gloves in 
Texas, representing this well known line since the 
establishment of his business. Mr. Graham handles 
wholesale trade exclusively, and has five salesmen 
on the road, covering this state and Louisiana. The 
Graham Hat Company, Incorporated, is located at 
601 Franklin Avenue, where a modern building, af- 
fording sixteen thousand feet of floor space, is 
occupied. Fourteen employees are employed here, 
in addition to the salesmen on the road. The Gra- 
ham Hat Company is well and favorably known to 
hatters throughout the state, and does a large an- 
nual volume of business. Mr. Graham, as pre- 
viously stated, is president and general manager of 
the company, and C. H. Pilney is vice president and 
secretary. 

Mr. Graham was born at Nashville, Tennessee, in 
1883, son of John W. Graham, a native of Maryland, 
who spent many years in Tennessee. His mother 
before her marriage Miss Margarette Pitts, is also 
from Tennessee. Mr. Graham was educated in the 
public schools of his native city, graduating from 
the Nashville high school and later attending South- 
west Presbyterian College at Nashville. After fin- 
ishing school, he went to St. Louis, Missouri, and 
began with the Boogher-Force and Goodbar Hat 
company, as stock boy, in 1898, working his way up 
to buyer and stock manager. He left this firm in 
1910 and came to Houston, establishing the present 
business. 

Mr. Graham was married in Illinois, in July, 1908, 
to Miss Noma Hollowell, a native of that state. 
They make their home in Houston, at 703 Dallas 
Avenue. Mr. Graham is a member of the Rotary 
Club and the Houston Credit Men's Association. 



1162 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




|LFRED C. TIEMANN, pioneer produce man 
of Houston, has engaged in this business 
here for the past twelve years. Mr. Tie- 
mann is the owner of the A. C. Tiemann 
poultry business at 805 Commerce Street, retailing 
live poultry and eggs, and also has a branch of his 
business at No. 22 and 25 in the City Market, known 
as the Peerless Market, where he retails dressed 
poultry and eggs. In addition to his extensive retail 
business, Mr. Tiemann makes a specialty of selling 
to hotels, cafes and dining cars, and has built up 
a large and profitable business in this field. One 
of the factors entering into the success of Mr. 
Tiemann's business has been the maintaining of high 
standards and all produce offered for sale, either 
in the Commerce Street shop, or in the City Mar- 
ket, must conform to this standard. 

Alfred C. Tiemann was born in Fayette County, 
Texas, the third of June, 1883, son of F. A. Tie- 
mann and Mary (Ahlrich) Tiemann, both of whom 
are natives of Germany. Mr. Tiemann, Sr., is a 
cigar manufacturer. Alfred C. Tiemann, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was educated in the Texas public 
schools and began in the produce business as a 
young man. He has been a resident of Houston 
since 1904, and during his earlier years in this city 
was in the employ of W. F. Puis, later establishing 
his own business. 

Mr. Tiemann was married at Houston the 
twelfth of July, 1919, to Miss Edith Cern. They 
reside at 1409 Eagle Street, and have one child, 
Wilma Janice Tiemann. Mr. Tiemann belongs to the 
Presbyterian Church. 

JLBERT WARE has for a number of years 
been a factor in industrial activities at 
Houston, and for almost a decade has been 
associated with the electro plating business 
in this city. Mr. Ware is Manager and 55 per cent 
owner of the Ware Electro Plating Company, estab- 
lished in 1916, and one of the best equipped electro 
plating plants in the Southwest. The plant is lo- 
cated at 1812 Congress Avenue, where a modern 
building, with every provision for the efficient 
handling of a large volume of work, is occupied. All 
equipment used is modern and the best obtainable 
and installed with the view of making the work 
turned out by this plant superior in every respect. 
The Ware Electro Plating Company refinishes and 
plates all classes and kinds of metal and metal 
products, handling a large volume of business for 
automobile firms, jewelry houses, and other firms. 
They also refinish and plate surgical instruments and 
have a large amount of this business. A force of 
six operatives, all carefully trained and competent, 
are employed. Mr. Ware's associate in this busi- 
ness is Mr. J. Earl Whitehead. Mr. Ware also owns 
a one-third interest in the Houston Japanning Com- 
pany, and an electro plating plant in Beaumont. 

Elbert Ware was born in Gonzales County, Texas, 
the ninth of October, 1890. His father, J. E. Ware, 
a native of Georgia, and for a number of years a 
resident of Texas, now makes his home in Okla- 
homa. His mother, whose maiden name was Miss 
Venie Hunt, died when the subject of this sketch 
was an infant, and at the age of four years he was 
placed in the Buckner's Orphan Home. Here he re- 
ceived an excellent education and at the age of 
seventeen left there to take a position with the 
Southwestern Telephone Company. He later went 





with the Western Electric Company, during this 
period coming to Houston for a short time at various 
times, then returning to the Western Electric Com- 
pany. These visits impressed him with the possi- 
bilities Houston offered for a modern electro-plating 
plant and he came to this city to make his per- 
manent residence. After a short time with the Hous- 
ton Car Wheel Company, he bought in 1916 the elec- 
tro-plating plant which he now operates. Later he 
was joined in this business by his life-long friend, 
J. Earl Whitehead, his present partner, and the 
business has since been operated as a partnership. 
Mr. Ware makes his home at 1717 Tuam Avenue 
and is a Blue Lodge Mason, Holland No. 1, and 
also Washington Chapter No. 2. He has won the 
highest esteem of his associates in the business 
world and is considered one of the most experienced 
electro-plating men in the city. 

EARL WHITEHEAD, since coming to 
Houston several years ago, has built up a 
successful industrial enterprise, and has 
become established as one of the leading 
representatives of the Electro Plating business in 
the city. Until the latter part of 1923 Mr. White- 
head was Manager and half owner of the Houston 
Japanning Company, a partnership business owned 
by himself and Elbert Ware. Since disposing of his 
interest in this company he is devoting all of his 
time to the Ware Electro Plating Company, in 
which he is a partner. The plant is located in a 
modern well equipped building at 1812 Congress 
Avenue, where only first class work is done. Pat- 
rons include automobile firms, jewelry houses, medi- 
cal men and others. Six competent operatives are 
employed here to aid in taking care of growing 
business. 

Mr. Whitehead was born at Oakwood, Texas, the 
sixteenth of September, 1885, son of Louis White- 
head, whose death occurred in 1889. After his fath- 
er's death, Mr. Whitehead was sent to Buckner's 
Orphan Home, near Dallas, where he remained 
until he was seventeen. His education in this splen- 
did institution was of the highest grade and equip- 
ped him to hold a good position in the business 
world. At the age of seventeen he went to Waco 
to work for Tom Padgitt. Later he returned to 
Dallas and spent fifteen years with the Southwest- 
ern Telephone Company, and the Western Electric 
Company there, working in the electrical and repair 
departments, and gaining a wide knowledge of elec- 
trical equipment. During the World War he worked 
with the Houston Car Wheel Company, later return- 
ing to Dallas, with the Western Electric Company, 
where he remained until October, 1920. He then 
came to Houston to join his lifelong friend, Elbert 
Ware, in the electro plating business, in which he 
now owns a 45 per cent interest. In June, 1923, he 
bought out the Houston Japanning Company, sell- 
ing a one-half interest in same to his friend, Elbert 
Ware, but later he sold his interest in this concern 
and now may be found giving service to his cus- 
tomers at the Ware Electro Plating Plant. 

Mr. Whitehead was married at Alvin, Texas, to 
Mrs. Ruby Gaffney Taylor, a native of Texas, and 
who had one child, Harold, by a former marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead make their home at 2304 
Lee Street. Mr. Whitehead is a Mason, Blue Lodge, 
Gray No. 329, and has many friends in the business 
world at Houston, who regard him as one of the 
most capable business men here. 



1165 



MEN OF TEXAS 




EORGE R. CHRISTIE is one of Houston's 
leading business men and his interests here 
comprise three separate and distinct com- 
panies of which he is one of the chief execu- 
tives. Mr. Christie is general manager of the Lum- 
berman's Reciprocal Association, which writes 
workmen's compensation insurance for the lum- 
ber and woodworking industry; he is attorney-in- 
fact for the Oilmen's Reciprocal Association, which 
writes workmen's compensation and public liability 
insurance for the oil industry. These two organi- 
zations operate a reciprocal plan and return to policy 
holders dividends or profits resulting from their 
operations, and these organizations have enjoyed an 
exceptional experience since they were organized 
and are considered the leaders of this particular 
field. Mr. Christie is also attorney-in-fact for the 
American Lumber Underwriters writing fire in- 
surance, principally for saw mills, but includes lum- 
ber yards and other woodworking plants. These or- 
ganizations have branch offices in various states ex- 
tending from those of the South to California, with 
offices located at San Francisco and Los Angeles, 
Calif.; Richmond, Va.; Memphis, Tenn.; Alexandria, 
La., and Fort Worth and Wichita Falls, in Texas, and 
at present these organizations are covering pay rolls 
amounting to $85,000,000.00 annually. The advisory 
committees of these organizations are made up of 
representative men in the respective lines, and are 
considered the strongest of their kind in the United 
States. 

A native Texan, Mr. Christie was born at Galves- 
ton. His father, George A. Christie, (deceased since 
1903) was also a native of the Lone Star State and 
for many years was a well known contractor of 
tie was a native of Scotland and many years of his 
the Island City. The father of Mr. George A. Chris- 
life was spent in the British Government Service, and 
came to America and to Galveston in 1858. His 
mother was Miss Dora Hoxie, a native of Houston, 
Texas, where she belonged to a pioneer family. His 
education was obtained in public and private schools 
of Galveston. After leaving school, Mr. Christie 
entered the cotton business and later was with the 
North German Lloyd Steamship Company, and re- 
mained with this company until 1902, when he came 
to Houston and became associated with the Kirby 
Lumber Company and for sixteen years was general 
auditor, secretary and treasurer of this large and 
well known lumber company. On December 1st, 
1917, Mr. Christie organized his present business- 
concerns and his success along the lines he is pur- 
suing has been remarkable. Mr. Christie's offices 
for his different interests are located on the fourth 
floor of the Great Southern Life Building. 

Mr. Christie was married in Galveston to Miss 
Mary E. Walker, a daughter of John B. Walker, one 
of the leading merchants of the Island City. They 
have one daughter, Nezzell, now the wife of Robert 
R. Dennis, one of the leaders among the younger 
business men of Houston, where he is engaged in 
the insurance business. Mr. and Mrs. Christie re- 
side at 2816 Milam Street. Mr. Christie is a mem- 
ber of the A. F. and A. M. and has attained to the 
32nd degree in the Scottish Rite body of this order 
and is a Shriner of Arabia Temple. He is also a 
member of the Houston Club, the Houston Country 
Club, River Oaks Country Club, Beaumont Country 
Club, Lumbermen's Club and the Rotary Club. Since 




coming to Houston more than a decade ago, Mr. 
Christie has become associated with many of the 
city's financial and industrial institutions and is a 
director of the Union National Bank. He is regarded 
as one of the most progressive men in Houston and 
in Texas, ever ready to assist his city and state in 
any way possible. Mr. Christie has done much for 
the furtherance of education in Texas and gives 
liberally of his time and means to any matter hav- 
ing to do with the education of the youth of the 
Lone Star State, where he is known as one of the 
most progressive and public spirited citizens. 

LI MARKS, well known in the banking and 
business circles of the state, became asso- 
ciated with the Gulf State Bank as active 
vice president and director at the time of 
the reorganization of this institution, on March 1st, 
1921. The Gulf State Bank is a guaranty fund bank 
with a capital stock of §100,000.00, with undivided 
profits of §9,062.29 and deposits amounting to 
§728,181.07. Other officers of the Gulf State Bank 
are D. S. Cage, president; W. H. Irvin, M. Schwarz 
and J. R. Kubena, vice presidents, and F. E. Hood, 
cashier. The directors are composed of the officers 
named and several of the representative business 
men of Houston and South Texas. The Gulf State 
Bank is located at 817 Main Street and invite ac- 
counts of individuals, firms and corporations on a 
basis of mutual co-operation and observance of the 
proper banking principles. 

A native Texan, Mr. Marks was born at Hillsboro, 
October 15th, 1891. His father, Sam Marks, now 
a resident of Waco, Texas, was for many years a 
leading merchant of Central Texas, but is now re- 
tired from active business pursuits. His mother 
was Miss Fannie Greenstone, a native of Waco, 
where she belonged to a well known pioneer fam- 
ily. His education was obtained in the public and 
high schools of Waco, Texas. 

Soon after leaving school, and when a very young 
man, Mr. Marks began his business career with the 
Exchange National Bank of Waco, where he re- 
mained as a clerk for six years. He then went with 
the State of Texas as a state bank examiner and 
occupied this important position for a period of five 
years, and in 1919 came to Houston and became as- 
sociated with the People's State Bank as cashier, 
where he remained until 1920, when he entered the 
bond business for himself, and remained in this line 
of endeavor until the reorganization of the Gulf 
State Bank, when he became active vice president 
and director of this institution. In addition to his 
banking interests, Mr. Marks has other large and 
varied interests in Houston, among which is the 
Gibraltar Savings and Building Association, with an 
authorized capital of $5,000,000.00, of which he is 
vice president. This association deals in and en- 
courages savings accounts, installment certificates 
and prepaid certificates. 

Mr. Marks was married at Waco, Texas, on Octo- 
ber 23rd, 1912, to Miss Sadie Friedlander, a native 
of Waco and a member of a pioneer family of Cen- 
tral Texas. They have two children, Adolph and 
Maynard. Mr. and Mrs. Marks reside at 1320 West 
Alabama Avenue. Mr. Marks is a member of the 
Houston Club, and all the city's civic associations, 
in which he takes an active interest. Mr. Marks 
has shown his faith in the future of Houston by the 



1166 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




many investments he has made here, and believes 
that this city will soon lead the entire Southwest in 
commercial, financial and educational lines. 

AMES R. CHEEK, president and treasurer 
of the Magnolia Park Land Company, has 
been actively identified with Houston real 
estate since coming to this city in 1909, in 
which year the Magnolia Park Land Company was 
organized. One thousand acres of land on the east 
end of the city was developed by this company into 
what is now Magnolia Park. The city of Magnolia 
Park is a separately incorporated city with a popu- 
lation of over twelve thousand, and located on Har- 
risburg Boulevard, running from the Belt and Ter- 
minal to Brays Bayou bridge on the east. The Mag- 
nolia Land Company has been very active in pro- 
moting new additions in different parts of the city. 
Some of the more important ones are, Engle Addi- 
tion, School Addition, Central Park Annex and Daly 
Place, all residential additions. Manchester Addition 
was also promoted by this company. This addition, 
adjoining Houston, consists of industrial sites, being 
located on the ship channel. The Houston Mill and 
Elevator Company, Texas Portland Cement Com- 
pany, Magnolia Petroleum Company, Deepwater Re- 
fineries and Texas Chemical Company are some of 
the industries located here. The company handles 
only their own property. J. R. Cheek is interested 
in various other enterprises and is president of the 
Manchester Corporation and president of the Citi- 
zens Loan and Land Company. He is a member of 
the Elks and W. O. W. Lodges, the Turnverein, 
Houston and Houston Country Clubs. 

Mr. Cheek was born in White County, Tennessee, 
April 7th, 1869, son of Elijah and Sarah (Moss) 
Cheek. He attended school but thirteen months. At 
the age of twelve he began work at one dollar and 
twenty-five cents per week in a newspaper office 
and learned the printers trade. He came to Texas 
in 1880 and located in Denison and was employed 
in a newspaper office there until 1883, with excep- 
tion of six months spent in school in Fort Scott, Kan- 
sas. He paid his way in school by working in the 
Wilder House Hotel. In 1883 he came to Galveston 
and worked first for Shaw and Blaylock and then 
the Evening Print. The name was changed to the 
Record and then the Tribune in 1894. For one year 
he was in the butter, eggs and cheese business. In 
1895 he entered the real estate business, remaining 
in this line until the storm in 1900. From then up 
to the time of organizing his present company he 
was in the oil business, operating in various coastal 
fields. 

Mr. Cheek was married April 22nd, 1891 in Gal- 
veston to Miss Sallie Lee. Two sons were born to 
this union, James Lee, with his father in business, 
and Richard Edwards, with the E. N. Mills real es- 
tate office. Mr. Cheek is a man of vision and fore- 
sight, a man who was able to look over an area of 
undeveloped woodland, low and marshy, and visu- 
alize a city of beautiful homes and thriving business 
establishments, and along with this gift of vision 
he had the business knowledge to carry out the prac- 
tical side and make it a reality. He saw the great 
possibilities of deep water and the turning basin, 
and to Mr. Cheek is due no small part in the develop- 
ment of the ship channel. He is a man of pleasing 
personality, makes and keeps friends and is num- 
bered among the leading citizens of Houston. 




KE L. FREED has for more than a quarter 
of a century been a merchandise broker of 
Houston and during that period has built up 
a business which amounts to more than a 
million dollars a year. Mr. Freed started this busi- 
ness in a small way in 1896 representing a neckwear 
manufacturer. His business has grown steadily 
until now he represents several of the largest manu- 
facturers of men's furnishings in the United States. 
He has six men on the road covering Texas, Louis- 
iana, Mississippi and part of Alabama. Among the 
firms represented by Mr. Freed are: H. C. Cohns and 
Company, Rochester, New York, manufacturers of 
the Superba Cravats; Rauh and Mack Shirt Com- 
pany of Cincinnati, makes of popular priced shirts. 
Notaseme Hosiery Company of Philadelphia, Crawn 
Suspender and Belt Company of New York, Regatta 
Manufacturing Company of Baltimore, manufactur- 
ers of summer underwear; Hall, Wolffe and Park, 
Inc., manufacturers of linen and cotton handker- 
chiefs; Superior Knitwear Corporation of Philadel- 
phia, makers of knitted neckwear; Tuxedo Shirt 
Company, manufacturers of silk shirts exclusively; 
Steiner and Son, New York, manufacturing Univer- 
sal Sleeping garments. 

Mr. Freed has splendidly equipped offices and 
sample rooms occupying a floor space of 27x85 feet 
over the Peoples' State Bank at 908 1-2 Congress 
Avenue. The elegant and ornate fixtures of artistic 
design in Mr. Freed's offices and sample rooms were 
all manufactured in Houston. 

A native Texan, Mr. Freed was born at Hemp- 
stead, April 20th, 1877. His father Abe Freed died 
when Mr. Freed was a small boy. His mother was 
Miss Theresa Kaiser, a native of Vicksburg, Missis- 
sippi, but came to Texas fifty-five years ago and 
now, at the age of seventy-three years is residing 
in Houston. Mr. Freed's education was obtained in 
the public schools of Hempstead, Texas. 

Mr. Freed came to Houston when fifteen years of 
age and went to work as a clerk for a local whole- 
sale dry goods firm. After remaining in the employ 
of this firm for two years he resigned and started 
his present business, going on the road as a sales- 
man when nineteen years old. From time to time 
he added to his line until now he has the finest 
lines of any merchandise broker in the Southwest. 
Mr. Freed is interested in many of the commercial 
and industrial institutions of Houston and is a di- 
rector of the Marine Bank and Trust Co. Mr. Freed 
has been twice married: his first marriage was in 
Houston in 1898 to Miss Louise Lipper (deceased 
since 1907) a member of the prominent Houston 
family. One son was born of this union, Abbye L. 
Freed, who is associated with his father in business. 
His second marriage was to Miss Sybil Dellheim, a 
member of a well known family of Birmingham, 
Alabama. They have two children, Jean and Louis. 
Mr. Freed is a member of the A. F. and A. M. with 
membership in Holland Lodge No. 1 of Houston. He 
is a 32nd degree member of the Scottish Rite body of 
this organization and a Shriner of Arabia Temple. 
He holds a life membership in both Holland Lodge 
and Arabia Temple. Mr. Freed has always been ac- 
tive in the business, social and general community 
life of Houston and gives liberally of his time and 
means to all projects tending to the welfare and 
advancement of this city, where he is regarded as 
one of the most progressive and public spirited 



citizens. 



1169 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RED J. HEYNE, native Houstonian, began 
his career in the banking business when 
fourteen years of age as a runner and 
collector for the T. W. House Bank, and 
has served in every branch of the banking business 
since that time, and is now one of the leading execu- 
tives of one of the strongest financial institutions 
of Houston. Mr. Heyne is active vice president of 
the Bankers Mortgage Company, and has always 
been active in the financial and industrial life of 
Houston, where he has devoted his entire life to 
the banking business. His advice is frequently 
sought in matters of financial purport, as he is 
regarded as an authority by his friends and business 
associates. 

Mr. Heyne was born in Houston December 31st, 
1878. His father, Charles G. Heyne, a native of 
Germany, came to the United States at the age 
of nineteen years, and first located in New York, 
but later came to New Orleans, where he enlisted 
in the Confederate Army and served throughout 
the Civil War in the Q. M. C, under General Gibson, 
who was also one of his close personal friends. 
On May 9th, 1865, Mr. Charles G. Heyne received a 
letter from General Gibson in which he praised him 
highly as a soldier and a real man of highest 
standard of manhood, and this letter is now in 
the possession of Mr. Fred J. Heyne, which natur- 
ally, he prizes very highly, and is numbered among 
his most valuable possessions. Mr. Charles G. Heyne 
died at the age of seventy-six years. His mother, 
prior to her marriage was Miss Frances Burkhart, 
a native of Harris County, and is residing in Hous- 
ton. After the close of the Civil War the senior 
Mr. Heyne came to Houston, where he met and 
married Miss Burkhart and he continued to make 
Houston his home until his death. Mr. Heyne at- 
tended the Houston public schools and also studied 
at night after beginning work at the age of four- 
teen, for the T. W. House Bank, and the liberal 
education which he received was largely through 
self help. Mr. Heyne remained with that institu- 
tion until it failed, and he then remained for a 
short time with the receiver. He then went with 
the National City Bank as cashier, and later liqui- 
dated that bank and was one of the organizers of 
the Texas Trust Company in 1909 and went with 
this company as secretary and treasurer. The 
Bankers Trust Company and the Texas Trust Com- 
pany was consolidated in 1911 and the business 
continued as the Bankers Trust Company. Mr. 
Heyne remained as secretary and treasurer of the 
new named institution until 1917, when he was made 
vice president. The name of this bank was changed 
in 1920 to the Bankers Mortgage Company, and he 
was again made active vice president and has been 
active in its affairs to date. The Bankers Mortgage 
Company is one of the largest mortgage companies 
in Texas. It has a capital and surplus of $2,600,000. 
Mr. Heyne is largely interested in many of the city's 
financial and industrial projects and is a director 
in the following: Jesse H. Jones and Company, 
National Bank of Commerce, The Houston Hotel 
Association, and is vice president and director of 
the Jones Lumber Company. 

Mr. Heyne was married in Houston in 1900 to 
Miss Hallie Brookshire (deceased) and he has one 
son of this union, Charles, who is now engaged in 
business in Houston. Charles Heyne has had un- 




usual educational advantages. His early education 
was obtained in the public schools of Houston, after 
which he attended the Allen Academy at Bryan, 
Texas. He then became a student of the South- 
western University at Georgetown, graduating in 
1922 with A. B. degree. He won honors, and was 
a football star on the team of that college, in 1922. 
Mr. Fred J. Heyne was married the second time in 
Houston in 1906 to Miss Mayne E. Green, a native 
Texan and a daughter of Rev. A. L. Green (deceased 
for many years), a well known Methodist minister 
of Texas. They have one son, Frederick J. Heyne, 
Jr., nine years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Heyne reside 
at 220 Westmoreland Boulevard. Mr. Heyne is a 
member of the Houston Club, and of the First Meth- 
odist Church, which he has served for over twenty 
years as a steward. He is regarded as one of the 
leaders in Houston in all moves for the progress and 
advancement of the city of his nativity, which he 
believes will soon become the leading city of the 
Southwest. 

ENTON W. COOLEY, president of the 
Marine Bank and Trust Company, has been 
actively identified with the banking in- 
terest of Houston for a score of years. He 
is one of the principal organizers of the Marine 
Bank and Trust Company which opened for business 
February 24th, 1925, in which institution he became 
president upon its organization. This bank which 
is one of the latest of Houston's financial institu- 
tions organized with a capital stock of three hundred 
thousand dollars, a surplus of seventy-five thousand 
fully paid in. Other officers of the bank are T. P. 
Priddie, Jr., vice president and cashier; Ike L. Freed, 
vice president; H. H. Gieseke, vice president; Stuart 
A Giraud, vice president, and a corps of minor of- 
ficers and directors consisting of many of the most 
substantial and progressive business men of Hous- 
ton. 

Before organizing the Marine Bank and Trust 
Company, Mr. Cooley was for over twenty years 
with the Union National Bank and was vice presi- 
dent for several years prior to severing his con- 
nections with that bank to accept the presidency of 
the Marine Bank. 

Denton W. Cooley was born at Ashland, Nebraska, 
the fifteenth of March, 1885, son of D. D. Cooley, 
former banker of that city, later insurance man of 
Houston, and Helen G. (Winfield) Cooley, who is 
a native of Maryland. His parents moved to Hous- 
ton when Denton W. was but seven years of age, 
consequently receiving his education in the public 
schools of this city. When sixteen years of age, 
Mr. Cooley began his banking career as a messenger 
boy for the old South Texas National Bank, now 
known as the South Texas Commercial Bank. Four 
years later he became connected with the Union 
National Bank with whom, as stated above, he re- 
mained for a score of years, having worked up 
through all the departments to the position of vice 
president. 

Aside from his banking interests, Mr. Cooley 
is identified with other Houston business enter- 
prises. He is a director of the Houston Lighting and 
Power Company, treasurer of the Houston Fair and 
Exposition. During 1921 and 1922, Mr. Cooley was 
vice president of the Texas Division of the American 
Bankers Association. He is treasurer of the Sam 
Houston Memorial Association and of the Harris 



1170 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




County Humane Society and is a trustee of the 
benefit funds of the Houston Fire Department and 
the Houston Police Department. 

Mr. Cooley was married to Miss Val Lock, daugh- 
ter of W. H. Lock, a pioneer resident of Houston. 
Mr. Cooley is a member of the Houston Club, Hous- 
ton Country Club, Lumbermen's Club, B. P. O. Elks, 
the Episcopal Church and has always taken an ac- 
tive interest in civic, social and political affairs of 
Houston. 

M. DUNCAN has in nineteen years of 
achievement in the business world of Hous- 
ton developed a coffee importing and 
roasting business of volume, and is recog- 
nized as one of the leaders in his line. The Duncan 
Coffee Company, Inc., of which he is president 
and general manager, was organized in 1918. This 
business, the practical result of Mr. Duncan's 
ambition to put on the market a perfectly blended, 
perfectly roasted and perfectly packed coffee, 
has met with success. The product, Duncan's 
Admiration Coffee, being now known throughout 
the South and demanded by lovers of good coffee. 
The plant, located at the corner of Carr and Conti 
Streets, is in keeping with the volume of the busi- 
ness and requires twenty thousand feet of floor 
space and employs forty-six experienced people with 
fourteen men on the road. The plant is located on 
the main line of the International and Great North- 
ern Railway, using two hundred and fifty feet of 
switch trackage. The eight years since the estab- 
lishment of the business has seen a remarkable de- 
velopment, the daily output now running over fif- 
teen thousand pounds, roasted and packed. The 
corporation is composed of Mr. Duncan as presi- 
dent, C. W. Duncan, vice president, and L. J. Bland, 
secretary. 

Mr. Duncan came to Houston as a young man, 
the tenth of August, 1907, and shortly after his ar- 
rival in the city went to work for the Cheek-Neal 
Coffee Company. It was his ambition to learn the 
business and he went to work in overalls as a 
laborer, learning the business from the very bot- 
tom. His progress was rapid, and his promotions 
well earned and well deserved a decade later find- 
ing him with this same firm as general superin- 
tendent of the plant. But the idea of operating his 
own plant appealed to Mr. Duncan far more than 
managing the plant of another, and in 1918 he re- 
signed his position to establish his own business, the 
Duncan Coffee Company, Inc. 

Mr. Duncan was born in the State of Kentucky, 
near the Southern border, the fifth of November, 
1888, son of J. G. Duncan, a native of the Blue Grass 
State, and true to the blue grass traditions, a raiser 
of fine horses. Mr. Duncan was educated in his 
native State, attending the public schools, the Ken- 
tucky State College and the Bowling Green Business 
University. After finishing his education he came to 
Texas to begin his business career. 

Mr. Duncan was married at Houston, the fifth 
of June, 1912, to Miss Linnie Dunn, daughter of Tom 
Dunn, a pioneer resident of Houston. Mr. and and 
Mrs. Duncan have one of the attractive homes of 
the city, at 2220 Brazos Street, and have four 
children: Katherine, Amelia and Harriet, and a son, 
Mills. Mr. Duncan is a member of Holland Masonic 
Lodge No. 1, Houston Country Club, Houston Club, 
and Houston Launch Club. 




A.RD TIMLIN, although a comparatively 
recent addition to the business circles of 
Houston, Texas, has entered actively into 
the spirit of the South Texas Metropolis 
and has made his influence felt in the commercial 
and financial life of this city. Mr. Timlin is the 
president of the Equitable Land & Trust Company, 
which is a general real estate and trust company, 
specializing in property along and contiguous to the 
ship channel and other industrial locations. This 
company has purchased much valuable and desirable 
property along the ship channel and adjacent to 
other industrial locations in Houston, among which 
are Sinco Place and Lindale. This acreage property 
is situated in the heart of industrial areas. The 
Equitable Land & Trust Company was organized 
here on May 1st, 1926, by the two chief executives 
of this organization, the subject of this sketch and 
Mr. David Kennedy, who is the vice president and 
well known in the business and financial circles 
of South Texas. The company is introducing to 
the public many new methods in real estate devel- 
opment. Their offices are located at 505 Public 
National Bank Building. 

A native of Missouri, Mr. Timlin was born in St. 
Louis on May 27th, 1894. His father, D. J. Timlin 
(deceased) was in his day prominently identified 
with various activities in different parts of the 
country, was very successful and amassed a fortune 
in his business ventures. D. J. Timlin had many 
claims to distinction, having during his time in- 
vented steam heat and was the first man to light 
trains with gas. He also put the filtering system 
in the Mississippi River, also designed and built 
the Chester, Illinois, State Prison, which was the 
finest penitentiary in the world at that time. His 
mother, Mrs. Mattie (Hoshall) Timlin, was a mem- 
ber of a prominent Mississippi family. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the public schools of Dublin, 
Texas, which he left when sixteen years of age 
and started his career in the business world as a 
court reporter, continuing in this field of activity 
until he was twenty-six years of age. At that time 
he engaged in the real estate business. During his 
career as a court reporter, Mr. Timlin did reporting 
in all courts, ranging from police court to the high- 
est courts in various parts of the country, and his 
experience in this work would fill a large volume 
and has been of untold value to him. 

Mr. Timlin was married at Dublin, Texas, on 
September 4th, 1916, to Miss Octa Lee Stephen, 
a native Texan and a daughter of J. V. Stephen, 
also a native of the Lone Star State, where througn- 
out his life he was active in the business and social 
life. Her mother, Mrs. Maud (Johnson) Stephen, 
was a member of a well known family of Oklahoma. 
They have three children — David Joe, Mary Lee and 
Edward Earl. Mr. and Mrs. Timlin reside at 938 
Pecore Avenue. Mr. Timlin is a member of the 
A. F. and A. M., and other fraternal, commercial, 
civic and social organizations here, in all of which 
he takes an active interest. His church affiliation 
is with the Baptist denomination. Since locating 
in Houston Mr. Timlin has made a host of friends 
who recognize in him a leader of his generation 
and one of the most progressive business men of 
this city, and his friends are expecting much of 
this ambitious citizen of Houston and the company 
which he heads. 



1173 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARTER STEWART, Vice-President and 
Cashier of the Public National Bank, and 
one of the most active and enterprising 
young bankers of South Texas, has devoted 
his entire business life to the Banking business, 
where he is known throughout the State as an execu- 
tive and organizer. The Public National Bank has 
a Capital Stock of |300,000.00, and their statement 
made at the close of business on June 30th, 1925, 
shows that they have a surplus fund of $30,000, un- 
divided profits of $10,010.82 and deposits amounting 
to $2,305,473.12. Other officers of the Public Na- 
tional Bank are J. Lewis Thompson, President; J. 
H. Tallichet, and J. W. Carter, Vice Presidents. The 
directors of this bank, which is located at 402 Main 
Street, are among the financiers and representative 
business men of Houston. 

Mr. Stewart is also identified with other com- 
mercial enterprises and is President of the Public 
Warehouse and Forwarding Company, and Vice- 
President of the Public Securities Company, the lat- 
ter company handling all trust matters of the Pub- 
lic National Bank. 

A native Texan, Mr. Stewart was born in Hill 
County, January 9th, 1892. His father, J. D. 
Stewart, came to Texas from Mississippi, of which 
State he was a native, fifty-seven year ago, and is 
now retired from active business pursuits and is re- 
siding in Beaumont. His mother was Miss Stella 
Guice, a member of a well-known family of Misis- 
sippi. His education was obtained in the public 
schools of Hillsboro, Texas. When quite a young 
man, Mr. Stewart's parents removed to Houston, and 
he entered the employ of the South Texas Commer- 
cial Bank as a clerk. Later, he became bookkeeper 
with this bank and remained with this institution 
for a period of six years, when he went to New 
Orleans as branch manager of the Commercial Ger- 
mania Bank and Trust Company, where he remained 
for three years. He then returned to Houston, and 
went with the Lumberman's National Bank, where 
for two years he held the position of Teller, after 
which he became National Bank Examiner for the 
11th Federal Reserve District, serving for two years. 
He then came to Houston as Assistant Cashier of 
the Houston National Exchange Bank, where, he re- 
mained for two years. Mr. Stewart then went to 
Coleman, Texas, where he reorganized the First 
National Bank, and remained there for one year, 
during which time he put this Bank in good condi- 
tion, and then again returned to Houston, and was 
made Vice-President and Cashier of the Public Na- 
tional Bank in August, 1922. 

Mr. Stewart was married at Beaumont, Texas, in 
May 9th, 1915, to Miss Emlyion Odell, a daughter of 
G. B. Odell, well-known in the business circles of 
East Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart reside at the 
Rice Hotel. Mr. Stewart is a member of the A. F. 
and A. M., with membership in Gray Lodge No. 329 
of Houston, where he is also a member of the Chap- 
ter. Mr. Stewart is also a member of the Houston, 
Houston Country, River Oaks, Lumbermans and the 
Glenbrook Country Club. Mr. Stewart has great 
faith in the future of Houston. Being the logical 
distributing point for the great South and Central 
Texas territory, he believes that it will ultimately 
become the largest commercial and industrial city 
of the Southwest. The continued development of 
the matchless resources of the State will, Mr. Stew- 




art believes, bring greater development to his city, 
and he takes pleasure in contemplating the future 
greatness of the South Texas Metropolis. 

W. KEELAND, of Houston, Texas, has for 
many years been identified with the finan- 
cial activities of the Lone Star State, and 
is active vice president and general manager 
of the Guaranty Trust Company of this city. This 
financial institution, which was organized and char- 
ter obtained in January, 1924, has a capital stock 
of $100,000.00 and surplus of $10,000.00 This com- 
pany is privileged to transact a general trust com- 
pany and banking business. The officers of the com- 
pany, in addition to Mr. Keeland, are: J. A. Elkins, 
president; E. P. Greenwood, vice president; Wharton 
Weems, vice president, and B. W. Ward, secretary 
and treasurer. The board of directors consists of 
the following leading business and professional men 
of South Texas: Mr. J. A. Elkins, Mr. William A. 
Vinson, Mr. Wharton Weems, Mr. C. M. Hightower, 
Mr. L. S. Adams, Mr. E. P. Greenwood, Mr. H. G. 
Cern, Mr. H. H. Thomson, Mr. B. W. Ward and Mr. 
J. W. Keeland. Few men of Texas are in touch 
with more of the current trend of finance or have 
banking interests more widely distributed, than has 
Mr. Keeland. While he has centered many of his 
activities in Houston and South Texas, his interests 
reach other sections of the state. In addition to his 
banking connections in this city, he is president of 
the New Waverly State Bank at New Waverly, 
director in the Huntsville State Bank, at Huntsville, 
Texas; director in the Guaranty State Bank, at 
Willis, Texas; director in the Pasadena State Bank, 
at Pasadena, Texas; president of the New Waverly 
Drug Company, at New Waverly, Texas; president 
of the Herrin Hardware Company of Crockett, 
Texas; director in the Traylor Brothers Mercantile 
Company, at New Waverly, and is identified with 
many other interests. 

A native Texan, Mr. Keeland was born at Hunts- 
ville, Walker County, on February 12th, 1883. His 
father, J. W. Keeland, has for many years been a 
resident of East Texas, where he is a large farmer, 
planter and land owner. His education was ob- 
tained in the schools of Huntsville, Texas. Mr. Kee- 
land began his career at a very early age in the mer- 
cantile business at Huntsville, where he learned this 
business and later established himself in this line of 
endeavor at New Waverly and Grapeland, and built 
up a large business. During this period, he started 
in the banking business also, and has become one of 
the leading bankers and financiers of South Texas. 
Mr. Keeland was married at New Waverly, Texas, 
in June, 1911, to Miss Lenna Traylor, a native of 
New Waverly, Texas, and a daughter of J. R. Tray- 
lor (deceased) who was one of the pioneer business 
men of Walker County. Mrs. Keeland is also a sis- 
ter of the Traylor Brothers, who are numbered 
among the leading business men and progressive citi- 
zens of their community. They have one son, Luther 
Keeland. Mr. and Mrs. Keeland own their own home 
in Alden Place. Mr. Keeland never loses an oppor- 
tunity to speak a good word for Houston, which he 
believes by reason of the deep water and railroad 
facilities is destined to become the greatest commer- 
cial and industrial center of the Southwest. The 
steady development of the last few years he expects 
to continue indefinitely. 



1174 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




HOMAS P. WIER for almost a quarter of 
a century has been one of a group of lum- 
bermen whose interest lies not alone in the 
lumber business, but in the development of 
this industry along progressive lines to the highest 
possible plane of achievement. Mr. Wier is asso- 
ciated with his brother, R. W. Wier, in the opera- 
tion of the R. W. Wier Lumber Company, the whole- 
sale branch of the business and the Wier Long Leaf 
Lumber Company, the corporation manufacturing 
the lumber for the selling branch. Of both these 
companies Mr. Wier is secretary and treasurer, di- 
recting his executive ability toward efficient opera- 
tion, and giving careful thought to the welfare of 
the many employes. These two companies represent 
a capitalization well over a million dollars, and have 
extensive timber holdings in Sabine, Newton and 
Jasper Counties, Texas. 

Thomas P. Wier was born the eleventh of Novem- 
ber, 1882, in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana, son of 
Thomas Dabney Wier, who located there shortly 
after the Civil War, and Margaret Campbell Wier, 
both of whom are of Scottish ancestry. Mr. Wier 
was educated in the public schools of Louisiana, and 
after finishing his education began his career as a 
lumberman, as purchasing agent for the Kirby Lum- 
ber Company, later with the formation of the Wier 
Companies, associating with his brother, R. W. Weir 
and helping in the organization. 

Mr. Wier was married at Houston, the twenty- 
ninth of June, 1918, to Miss Elinor Jones, daughter 
of Ira P. Jones, well known Houston lawyer. Mr. 
and Mrs. 'Wier are active in social and civic activi- 
ties. They have two children, T. P. Junior, and 
Mary Margaret. Mr. Wier is president of the Ki- 
wanis Club, a member of the Lumberman's Club, 
Houston Club, Houston Country Club and the River 
Oaks Country Club. Fraternally he is an Elk and 
a Mason, thirty-second degree Scottish Rite and 
member of Arabia Temple Shrine. Mr. Wier takes 
an active interest in the advancement of the lum- 
ber industry, and his thoughts for the welfare of 
the employees of the Wier interests combine the 
most modern and approved ideas. He takes an active 
part in all public affairs, giving his time freely for 
the promotion of civic development. 

OHN F. STAUB, A. I. A., with office in the 

Second National Bank Building, has won 

a reputation as an architect of original 

and logical arrangement, ordered with the 

fundamental principles of permanancy. 

Mr. Staub is the architect of the River Oaks 
Country Club House, and the associate architect of 
some of the finest homes in Houston. Among these 
are the residences of K. E. Womack, Esq.; W. S. 
Farish, Esq.; H. V. Neuhaus, Esq.; and D. D. Peden, 
Esq. These homes are among the finest in the 
South. 

In 1921 Mr. Staub came to Houston as the asso- 
ciate architect of H. T. Lindeberg of New York 
City. Although retaining this association, the great- 
er portion of his time is now occupied by an inde- 
pendent practice. 

Mr. Staub was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, in 
1892. Upon the completion of the four year 
Academic course at the University of Tennessee, he 
entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 





at Boston, remaining for two years and recovering 
the degree of B. S. in architecture. He was awarded 
a scholarship and returned for a year of post-grad- 
uate study, receiving the degree of Master of Science 
in Architecture. 

After leaving college, he became associated with 
H. T. Lindeberg in New York City, and has been 
with him since that time except for the period spent 
in the Navy. Mr. Staub served in the Navy Flying 
Corps from July, 1917, until January, 1919, and was 
awarded the "Navy Cross" for distinguished service. 

Mr. Staub was married in 1920 to Miss Madeleine 
Delabarre of Conway, Massachusetts. They have a 
son, John Delabarre, and a daughter, Nancy Dela- 
barre. 

He is a member of the Houston Country Club and 
the River Oaks Country Club. His college fraternity 
is "Sigma Alpha Epsilon." 

Mr. Staub is most enthusiastic regarding Hous- 
ton's development, both commercial and artistic. 

ACK C. DIONNE, for more than a decade 
a prime factor in Houston publishing cir- 
cles, has done much effective work for the 
development of the lumber industry as ed- 
itor and publisher of one of the leading trade papers 
devoted to that activity, "The Gulf Coast Lumber- 
man." Mr. Dionne is president of the Gulf Coast 
Lumberman, publishing it since the first issue in 
1913. This periodical is issued twice a month, on 
the first and fifteenth, from a modernly equipped 
press and is one of the finest papers dedicated to 
the lumber industry. The circulation each issue is 
five thousand copies, the distribution being largely 
in the Middle West and Southwest. As editor of 
this magazine Mr. Dionne has done some splendid 
work toward moulding sentiment favorable to the 
best interests of the lumber industry, backing every 
progressive movement and encouraging progress. 
Mr. Dionne also owns and publishes the California 
Lumber Merchant, one of the best of the lumber 
trade journals on the Pacific Coast, this also being 
a semi-monthly issued on the first and fifteenth of 
each month at Los Angeles, California. 

Mr. Dionne was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
the thirtieth of November, 1881, son of F. E. Dionne, 
now of Houston, who has been a lumberman all his 
life and is widely known in lumber circles. Mr. 
Dionne was educated in the public schools of his na- 
tive state, and after leaving school began work in 
the lumber camps of Wisconsin. Later he was a 
newspaper reporter in Wisconsin and Michigan, then 
a lumber reporter a nd contributor to the various 
lumber journals. After this came a period when 
he edited the Southern Industrial and Lumber Re- 
view of Houston, his first editorial experience, fol- 
lowed by the publication of his own paper, which he 
also edits. 

Mr. Dionne was married at Orange, Texas, in 1907 
to Miss Maude Renfro, daughter of a native of the 
Lone Star State and a resident of Orange. They 
have three children, Dorothy, Katherine and Betty 
Ann. The family live at 119 West Alabama Ave- 
nue. Mr. Dionne is a member of the Hoo-Hoo's, a 
fraternal organization of lumbermen, the Houston 
Country Club, the Houston Club and is secretary of 
the Lumbermen's Association of Texas and a mem- 
ber of various civic organizations. 



1177 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ILL F. MILLER since coming to Houston, 
January 1, 1920, has become well known in 
banking and business circles of South Tex- 
as. Mr. Miller is active president of the 
Bankers Mortgage Company. Since 1908 he has 
given his time and talents to the banking profes- 
sion, and by attention to his duties has risen to an 
enviable position for a man of his years. The 
Bankers Mortgage Company has a capital stock of 
$2,000,000.00 and a surplus fund of $600,000.00. Oth- 
er officers of the Bankers Mortgage Company are: 
Jesse H. Jones, president and chairman of the 
board; N. E. Meador, J. M. Rockwall and F. J. 
Heyne, vice presidents and W. W. Moore, secretary 
and treasurer. The directors of the Bankers Mort- 
gage Company are the representative business men 
of Houston. 

A native Texan, Mr. Miller was born in Colorado 
County, Texas, July 13th, 1884. His father, F. G. 
Miller, was also a native of Colorado County, where 
he lived all his life and was engaged in farming 
and stock raising. He died at the age of fifty-nine 
years. Mr. F. G. Miller's father, Fritz Miller, came 
to Texas as a young man, from Germany. His 
mother was prior to her marriage, Miss Helen Bar- 
tels, a native of Germany, and is now residing at 
Columbus, Texas. His education was obtained in 
the country schools of Colorado County, where his 
opportunities for securing an education were lim- 
ited. Later, he attended a business college at 
Tyler, but after six months there, was called home 
in order to assist his father, and the liberal educa- 
tion which he obtained in later years, was entirely 
through self help. Mr. Miller started his business 
career in 1908, with the First State Bank of Weimar, 
Colorado County, Texas, as a bookkeeper and work- 
ed in all the departments of this bank, and laid the 
foundation for his future success in the financial 
world. At the time Mr. Miller entered the Weimar 
Bank, Mr. Ross S. Sterling was president. In 1911, 
Mr. Miller was made cashier of the First State Bank 
of Weimar and in 1914 was elected president to 
succeed Mr. Sterling, and remained as the execu- 
tive head of this institution until he came to Hous- 
ton in 1920 to accept his present position. In addi- 
tion to his interests in the Bankers Mortgage Com- 
pany, Mr. Miller holds directorates in the National 
Bank of Commerce, Houston, the First State Bank 
of Weimar, Texas, and the First State Bank of 
Columbus, Texas, and is president of the State 
Guaranty Bank of Goose Creek, president of the 
Guaranty State Bank of Ganado. 

Mr. Miller resides at the Rice Hotel in Houston, 
and is a member of the Houston Club. Since com- 
ing to Houston he has been a constant worker for 
the advancement of his city. 

R. H. F. ESTILL, president of Sam Houston 
State Teachers' College, at Huntsville, 
Texas, is known and valued as one of the 
leading representatives of the pedagogic 
profession in Texas. Dr. Estill has been president 
of this college since 1908 and has built up the college 
under conditions and demands of modern educational 
policy and has done much to increase the standing 
of the institution as an educational center. Dr. 
Estill is a man of high intellectual attainments, and 
as an executive has shown a splendid discrimination, 
his educational ideals being the ripened result of a 




long period of years spent in educational work. He 
makes each student a special problem, and is the 
true friend of every student on the campus. Sam 
Houston State Teachers' College, located at Hunts- 
ville, was established for the definite purpose of 
preparing competent teachers for the public schools 
of the state, the legislative act creating the college 
being signed by Governor O. M. Roberts in 1879, 
in April, the school opening the following October. 
Since that time the institution has stood for three 
essentials in the teachers' preparation: a high grade 
of scholarship, the study of education as a science, 
and practice in teaching under expert supervision. 
The college offers four years of standard college 
work, emphasizing those special subjects which will 
best prepare the student for the pedagogic pro- 
fession. In addition, for the benefit of those teach- 
ers and other students with limited educational 
preparation, who plan to teach in rural schools, one 
year of sub-college work is offered. 

The plant of the Sam Houston Teachers' College 
includes the Main Building, the Industrial Arts 
Building, the Library Building, the Stephen F. Aus- 
tin Building, also known as the Social Center Build- 
ing; the Women's Gymnasium, the Men's Gym- 
nasium, the Science and Administration Building, 
and the Training School Building, and in addition 
to this the president's residence, the greenhouse, 
cafeteria, model dairy barn, central heating plant, 
amphitheatre and a well equipped college farm with 
various farm buildings. Every provision is made 
for the students' comfort, as well as their scholastic 
advancement and athletics are encouraged. High 
moral standards prevail and the students are at 
all times under the benign influence of the faculty, 
men and women of high religious and moral char- 
acter. The faculty and corps of instructors include 
some fifty-seven men and women, selected with dis- 
crimination, and a high standard of scholarship 
is maintained in each department. 

Dr. H. F. Estill was born at Lexington, Virginia, 
the twelfth of August, 1861, son of Charles P. Estill 
and Katherine (Fishburne) Estill, both natives of 
Virginia, and both deceased. Charles P. Estill, a 
captain on General Hood's staff, during the Civil 
War, was an educator in Virginia. Later, in 1871, 
he came to Texas and was superintendent of public 
schools at Brenham, Texas, for a time. Later he 
became a professor at Texas A. and M. College, 
then known as Sam Houston Normal, remaining 
there until his death. Dr. H. F. Estill attended the 
public schools of Mexia and Brenham during his 
early years, later entering Austin College, at Sher- 
man, Texas, still later entering Sam Houston State 
Normal College, where he was a classmate of Mrs. 
Percy V. Pennybacker and Dean T. M. Taylor. In 
1885 he became a member of the faculty and in 
1908 was made president of Sam Houston State 
Normal College, and has since held this office. 

Dr. Estill was married at Marshall, Texas, the 
third of August, 1892, to Miss Loulie Sexton, a 
native of Texas, and the daughter of Frank B. Sex- 
ton, a member of the Confederate Congress and one 
of the South's most prominent statesmen. Dr. and 
Mrs. Estill have five children — Frank Sexton, A. B., 
B. B. A., University of Texas, and now a resident 
of Beaumont; Katherine, now Mrs. A. K. Asbury, 
A. B., Columbia University and University of Texas, 
and now residing at Beaumont; Miss Mary Estill, 



1178 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




a graduate of Sam Houston State Normal College, 
and A. B. of Columbia University, now a teacher 
at Marshall, Texas; Harry Estill, a graduate of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and now liv- 
ing at Dallas, Texas, and Miss Ruth Estill, A. B., 
Columbia University, and now teaching in the high 
school at Marshall, Texas. Dr. and Mrs. Estill make 
their home at the president's residence on the cam- 
pus, at Sam Houston State Teachers' College. Dr. 
Estill is a Mason, Blue Lodge at Huntsville, Knight 
Templar, and a member of Arabia Temple Shrine 
at Houston. He is listed in Who's Who in America, 
and is recognized as one of the foremost educators 
in the country. 

ILLIAM WILLARD MOORE, well known in 
the banking, railroad and business circles 
of the State, was for several years secre- 
tary of the Bankers Trust Company, and 
when this company was reorganized and the name 
changed to the Bankers Mortgage Company in 1920, 
he was again made secretary, with the office of 
treasurer added. The Bankers Mortgage Company 
has a capital stock of $2,000,000.00, surplus fund 
of $600,000.00, and undivided profits of $205,172.90. 
Other officers of the Bankers Mortgage Company 
are: Jesse H. Jones, president and chairman of 
board; N. E. Meador, J. M. Rockwell, Will F. Miller 
and F. J. Heyne, vice presidents. The offices of the 
Bankers Mortgage Company are located on the 
second floor of the Bankers Mortgage Building, 
Houston, Texas. 

A native Texan, Mr. Moore was born in Jackson 
County, January 22nd, 1885. His father, William 
M. Moore, was brought to Texas from Murray 
County, Tennessee, by his parents, who first settled 
in Cherokee County, and later removed to Jackson 
County, where he grew to manhood, and for many 
years was engaged in farming, but for the past 
twenty-four years has been county and district clerk, 
and is still a county officer. His mother was Miss 
Triphine Elizabeth Laughter, a native Texan and 
a member of a pioneer family of the Lone Star State 
(now deceased). His education was obtained in the 
public schools of Jackson County and later attended 
a business college. When quite a young man Mr. 
Moore came to Houston and entered the office of 
Lewis and Austin, attorneys, as a stenographer, 
where he remained a short while, when he became 
associated with the Houston Belt and Terminal 
Railroad. He remained with this railroad for a 
period of two years, when he went with the Saint 
Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railroad and was 
stationed at Kingsville, Texas, and later went into 
the Republic of Mexico, where he remained from 
1909 to 1914, with the Tehuantepec National Rail- 
way Company. In 1914 Mr. Moore returned to 
Houston and became associated with the Texas 
Company, but remained with this company but 
three months, when he went with the Bankers Trust 
Company, and remained with this company until the 
reorganization. Mr. Moore is interested in many 
of Houston's large enterprises, and in addition to 
his banking interests is an executive in the fol- 
lowing: secretary -treasurer and general manager 
Jones Company; secretary of Jesse H. Jones & Com- 
pany; secretary-treasurer and director of the Hous- 
ton Terminal Land Company, and various other of 
the city's financial and industrial concerns. 




Mr. Moore was married at Laredo, Texas, in 1912, 
to Miss Mabel Cecilia Smith, a native of New York 
State. They have three children: Jewel Elizabeth, 
Dorothy Regina and William Willard Moore, Jr. 
Mr. Moore has a host of friends, both in the social 
and business circles of the city, who regard him as 
one of the city's most enterprising citizens. 

J. CASPERSEN left a profitable profes- 
sional business, for which he was educated, 
and in which he was highly proficient, in 
order to become assistant general manager 
of the Crystal Ice and Fuel Company, Houston, 
where he has been successful in augmenting the bus- 
iness of this company. The Crystal Ice and Fuel 
Company, Inc., located at the McKee Street Bridge, 
was started thirty-three years ago, and all stock 
is owned by the family, who also own and operate 
the Texas Ice and Fuel Company, Houston, a plant 
with a capacity of sixty-five tons per day. The 
Crystal Ice and Fuel Company, Inc., has a daily 
capacity of one hundred tons, and sells to both the 
wholesale and retail trade, most of which is in the 
city. This plant manufactures ice only, is operated 
with crude oil fuel, and uses only the absorption 
system and all their ice is made with distilled water. 
The Crystal Ice and Fuel Company, Inc., operate 
three large trucks, and seven horse-drawn wagons, 
and employs thirty people in their plant. Other of- 
ficers of the Crystal Ice and Fuel Company are: 
C. A. Zilker, president; A. J. Zilker, vice president, 
and N. L. Caspersen, secretary and treasurer. 

A native Texan, Mr. Caspersen was born in Hous- 
ton in 1891. His father, N. L. Caspersen, has been 
engaged in the ice business in Houston for the past 
thirty-three years and is well known in the busi- 
ness circles of the city. His mother was Miss Annie 
Zilker, native of Indiana. Mr. Caspersen's prelimi- 
nary education was obtained in the public and high 
schools and private schools of Houston, after which 
he attended the Texas Dental College for three 
years. He then went to Harvard University for 
one year, graduating from that institution in 1913 
with the degree of D. D. S. In the same year of 
his graduation Mr. Caspersen began the practice of 
dentistry, which he continued until he enlisted in 
the World War in September, 1917. He was sent 
to Camp Travis, San Antonio, as a first lieutenant, 
and was later transferred to Camp Greenleaf, Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee, where he remained until he was 
discharged in December, 1918. On his return to 
Houston, he became associated with the Crystal Ice 
and Fuel Company, Inc., as assistant manager. Mr. 
Caspersen is also treasurer of the Texas Ice and 
Fuel Company. 

Mr. Caspersen was married in 1920 to Miss Clara 
Carter, a daughter of C. L. Carter, a well known 
attorney of Houston, and a member of the law firm 
of Baker, Botts, Parker & Garwood. Mr. and Mrs. 
Caspersen reside at 902 Hadley Avenue. In frater- 
nal and social organizations Mr. Caspersen holds 
membership in the B. P. O. E., the Houston Club, 
and the Lumberman's Club. Dr. Caspersen has 
made a name among business associates for his 
straightforward business methods and keenness of 
judgment, and with character, perseverance and 
foresight the dominant factors in his daily life, 
the future is bright for this young man, who is 
still in the morning of life. 



1181 



MEN OF TEXAS 




CLIFTON WILSON, whose home and busi- 
ness are located at Houston, has in the last 
five years directed his energies toward the 
organization and operation of a printing 
and stationery business that ranks well toward the 
top of the list of such industries in this city. The 
Wilson Stationery and Printing Company, Incorpo- 
rated, was established and incorporated in 1918, the 
outgrowth of a business started in 1917, and then 
known as Cummings and Sons. The business con- 
tinued under this name until 1920, at which time Mr. 
Wilson effected a change in name. Mr. Wilson has 
been President and General Manager of the Wilson 
Stationery and Printing Company since acquiring 
the business in 1918, and under his capable direction 
the plant has done a constantly increasing business. 
The plant occupies a modern building, at 508-10 Fan- 
nin Street, using all three floors, and having fifteen 
thousand feet of floor space. They handle a gen- 
eral stationery and printing business. Mr. Wilson 
has sixty employees in the plant, with five city sales- 
men, and one man on the road, covering South Texas. 
A. A. Tomlinson is Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Corporation. 

Mr. Wilson was born at Houston the thirteenth 
of July, 1891, son of T. W. Wilson, and Leila Blake 
Wilson, both of whom are also natives of Houston. 
The Blake and Wilson families came to Houston in 
the early days, and are numbered among the oldest in 
this city. The elder Mr. Wilson is Vice-President of 
the Wilson Supply Company of Houston, a firm 
handling extensive oil supply business. E. Clifton 
Wilson was educated in the public schools of Hous- 
ton, and after finishing his education entered upon 
his active business career with the Kirby Lumber 
Company, being but sixteen when he took the posi- 
tion with this firm. After four years, during which 
he made rapid progress, he took a position with the 
Thompson-Tucker Lumber Company, remaining here 
two years. He then went with the W. H. Coyle and 
Company, Printers, as Secretary and Treasurer, 
holding this position for the ensuing five years, and 
resigning it to buy the present business. Mr. Wil- 
son is also a Director of the Wilson Supply Com- 
pany and the Houston Stamp and Stencil Company. 

Mr. Wilson was married at Houston the ninth of 
September, 1915, to Miss Miriam Moore, a native of 
Mississippi, and reared at Palestine, Texas. They 
make their home at 901 West Alabama Avenue, and 
have one child, Edward Clifton, Junior. Mr. Wilson 
is a Blue Lodge Mason, Gray Lodge No. 329, Thirty- 
Second Degree Scottish Rite, and a member of 
Arabia Temple Shrine, the Glenbrook and River 
Oaks Country Clubs. 

[JOSEPH S. SMITH has, for the past twenty 
years, been associated with the Aetna Life 
and Affiliated Companies. He is district 
manager for the Aetna Life Insurance 
Company, of Hartford, Conn., for the Southeastern 
district of Texas, with offices at 301-2 Gulf Build- 
ing, Houston, Texas. Mr. Smith first entered the 
insurance profession in Tucson, Arizona, having 
made his home in Arizona for many years. Having 
been born and raised in Texas he was glad to have 
the opportunity of returning to Texas in 1907 as 
assistant manager of the South Texas District for 
the Aetna, holding that position until 1921, when 
he was promoted to manager, with headquarters 
in Houston. Before coming to Houston, Mr. Smith 




was located in Victoria, Texas, and lived there for 
several years, during which time he took active 
part in the welfare of that City. While residing 
in Victoria, he organized the Rotary Club at Vic- 
toria, and also the Rotary Clubs at Cuero and Bee- 
ville. He was an active member and officer of 
the Chamber of Commerce, and was one of the 
promoters of the Victoria County Fair. During 
the World's War Mr. Smith was associated with the 
Red Cross as vice-president, and also chairman of 
the finance committee, and member of the Exemp- 
tion Board of Victoria County. Mr. Smith was born 
in Austin, Texas, January 6th, 1879. His father, 
James Baird Smith, native of Scotland (deceased 
since 1905) was a well-known contractor and build- 
er of the Capital City. His mother was born in 
London, England. Mr. Smith's parents came direct 
to Texas, and located in Austin, in 1868. The old 
family home, being built from the stone of the old 
Capitol building, is at present being occupied by 
Mr. Smith's mothers and sisters. 

Mr. Smith's education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of Austin. He began his business ca- 
reer at the age of fifteen years, and traveled 
through different parts of Mexico, United States 
and Canada, before he attained his majority. His 
business career started in the brokerage and stock 
business. After the death of his brother in Arizona 
Mr. Smith entered the Insurance profession, and 
has made a very careful study of this business for 
many years, and, since opening the offices of the 
Aetna Life in Houston, has enjoyed a very lucra- 
tive business. His territory consists of thirty coun- 
ties, and he has at present fifteen men connected 
with the general agency. 

Mr. Smith was married at Victoria, Texas, Janu- 
ary 15th, 1913, to Miss Venie Jones (formerly of 
Houston, Texas) a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Jones. Mr. Jones being for many years divi- 
sion superintendent of the Victoria Division of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. The Smith home at 2602 
Whitney Street, is very happy with three children, 
Joseph, Jr., Margaret Elizabeth and Mary Kings- 
well. Mr. Smith is a member of the A. F. & A. 
M., with membership in Victoria Lodge No. 320, 
also Chapter and Commandery at Victoria, and 
Arabia Temple, Houston. He is a member of the 
Houston Chamber of Commerce, City and County 
Club, Houston Club, and declares that Houston, 
Texas, will be the first city in the Southwest to have 
a million population. 

AMES E. DALEY, general manager of the 
Bender Hotel, Houston, is one of the most 
successful hotel men in Texas, where he is 
widely known and popular with the travel- 
ing public. Mr. Daley is also president of the Ben- 
der Hotel Operating Company, which owns the Ben- 
der Hotel. This hostelry, located at Walker Ave- 
nue and Main Street, is among the finest hotels 
in Houston. The building, a ten-story, modern, fire- 
proof structure, was completed in 1910 and leased 
by the Bender Hotel Operating Company in 1915. 
The Bender Hotel has three hundred outside rooms, 
all comfortably and elegantly furnished. In the 
manner of ministering to the needs of the inner man, 
the Bender Hotel is most luxuriously equipped with 
dining room with a seating capacity of three hun- 
dred people, and large grill and lunch room. The 




1182 





txls(cA 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



attractive, well-ventilated ball room has a capacity 
of accommodating three hundred and fifty people. 
The Bender Hotel building is one hundred and twen- 
ty-five feet by one hundred and twenty-five feet, 
and employs one hundred and seventy-five people. 
The Bender is not regarded as an expensive hotel, 
as comfortable rooms may be had from $1.50 and 
upward. The Bender Hotel Operating Company are 
interested in the Cotton Hotel of Houston, a hotel 
of one hundred and seventy-five rooms, and the 
Crosby House of Beaumont, an attractive hotel with 
one hundred and eighty-five rooms. Other officers 
of the Bender Hotel Operating Company are E. H. 
Coombs, vice president, and L. A. Grevemberg, sec- 
retary and treasurer. 

Mr. Daley was born in Missouri in 1870 and his 
early education was obtained in that State. 

Mr. Daley began hotel work when seventeen years 
of age, and since that time has worked in practically 
every capacity from bell boy to manager. He came 
to Texas in 1897 and went with the old Hot Wells 
Hotel at San Antonio, where he remained for a few 
years and then came to Houston with the old Rice 
Hotel. He was first steward and buyer for the Rice 
and later assistant manager. He remained with 
the Rice Hotel until the building was razed in order 
to build the new Rice. Mr. Daley was with the Cot- 
ton Hotel of Houston from 1912 to 1915, at the time 
he leased the Bender Hotel; however, retaining his 
interest in the Cotton. Mr. Daley was married in 
San Antonio in 1909 to Miss Lillian Sanderson, a na- 
tive Texan and a member of a well known Marshall 
family. They have four children — Harry, Marcus, 
James E. Jr. and Hugh. Mr. Daley and his family 
reside at the Bender Hotel. He is a member of the 
Houston Country Club, Kiwanis Club and the Texas 
Hotel Association, in which organization he is a 
director. Mr. Daley is interested in all agencies 
working for the greater development and civic im- 
provement of Houston and gives liberally of his time 
and assistance to help his city in every way. 

LOYD IKARD, although a comparatively re- 
cent addition to the banking fraternity of 
Houston, is well known in financial circles 
of the State, having prior to coming to 
Houston been connected with several of the State's 
leading institutions. Mr. Ikard is one of the organ- 
izers and Vice-President and Cashier of the Federal 
Trust Company. The company has offices in the 
Sam Houston Hotel building and has a capital and 
surplus of $250,000.00. Although opened for busi- 
ness in May, 1925, it has deposits, including trust 
funds, of nearly $500,000.00. The officers, other than 
Mr. Ikard, are Chester A. Bryan, President, and Mur- 
ray B. Jones, Vice-President. The Directors are made 
up of a group of leading men of this section of the 
State. 

A native Texan, Mr. Ikard was born in Henrietta 
in 1886. His father, M. Ikard, came to Texas with 
his parents when four years of age, and was raised 
in this State, where he was well known as one of 
Texas' leading cattle men. Mr. Ikard and his broth- 
ers have the distinction of having introduced Here- 
ford cattle into Texas. His mother was, prior to her 
marriage, Miss Nellie Wait, a native of Alabama. 
His parents now reside at Ardmore, Oklahoma. Mr. 
Ikard's education was obtained in the public and 
high schools of Ardmore, Indian Territory (now the 
State of Oklahoma), where he graduated from high 





school in 1904. After finishing high school, Mr. 
Ikard attended the Hargrove College at Ardmore. 

Mr. Ikard began his business career in the banking 
business at Ardmore, Oklahoma, when eighteen 
years of age, where he was employed by the Ard- 
more Loan and Trust Company. From 1905 to 1918 
he was with the Fort Worth and Dallas Commer- 
cial Banks. In 1918 Mr. Ikard went with the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank at Dallas as Assistant Manager 
of the War Loan Department, and was later made 
Assistant Cashier of this bank, and in January, 1921, 
was transferred to the branch of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank at Houston, as Cashier, and becoming 
Manager in August, 1921. In May, 1923, he was 
appointed manager of the Federal Intermediate 
Credit Bank of Houston, which he served until tak- 
ing his present position. 

Mr. Ikard was married at Fort Worth in 1912 to 
Miss Beulah A. High, a native of the Lone Star 
State, and a daughter of J. S. High (deceased), a 
well known, pioneer citizen of Texas. Mr. Ikard is a 
32nd Degree Mason and a member of the Dallas 
Consistory No. 2, and a Shriner of Hella Temple, 
Dallas. In social organizations he holds membership 
in the Houston Club and the Kiwanis Club. Mr. Ikard 
is thoroughly trained in his profession, and has al- 
ready become a leader among the younger bankers 
of this district. 

|OURT NORTON, for more than a decade 
a factor in the tailoring industry at Hous- 
ton, has during this time established a 

. -. . , commendable reputation as a merchant 

tailor, building up a business of recognized distinc- 
tion. The Barringer-Norton Company, Incorporated, 
was established by Mr. Norton in 1909 and incor- 
porated in 1912. The firm operates an exclusive 
men's tailoring shop, their work representing the 
highest achievement of the tailors' art. They occupy 
two handsomely appointed floors at 410 Main Street, 
each floor thirty by one hundred feet, and have 
thirty trained and experienced men in the shop. 
The Barringer-Norton Company caters to the high- 
est class of trade, their clientele being drawn from 
among the best of Houston's citizenry. All the 
work on garments tailored by this firm is done in 
their own shop, and in charge of workmen expert 
in their own line. Mr. Norton is president of the 
Barringer-Norton Company, Incorporated, and is 
also treasurer and manager. Bragg Callaway is vice 
president and Bruce Patterson, secretary. 

Mr. Norton was born at Calvert, Texas, the eigh- 
teenth of August, 1885, son of C. M. Norton, a 
native of Tennessee, who came to Texas in the early 
seventies, and Ada Court Norton, a native of Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Norton was educated in the public 
schools of his native city and gained his first ex- 
perience in the merchant tailoring business there. 
He was for a number of years on the road, for 
a well known Chicago firm, covering Texas, Okla- 
homa and Indian Territory. In 1909 he came to 
Houston, establishing his present business. 

Mr. Norton was married at Houston, in 1910, 
to Miss Mabel Emery. They have two children, 
Natalie and Court, Jr. The family make their 
home at 1320 Missouri Avenue. Mr. Norton is a 
member of the Houston Club, the Lumberman's 
Club, the Houston Country Club, the Rotary Club, 
and the B. P. O. E. He is also a Mason, a member 
of Holland Lodge No. 1, Galveston Consistory No. 1, 
and Arabia Temple Shrine. 



1185 



MEN OF TEXAS 




AYMOND C. STONE, one of the younger 
business men of Houston and Galveston, 
has been a factor for a number of years in 
the shipping world, and is recognized as an 
authority on shipping problems. Mr. Stone is Presi- 
dent of the Stone Forwarding Company, one of the 
leading shipping companies of the Texas ports, 
acting as ocean freight brokers and specializing in 
handling all details for exporters and importers. 
This company was organized by Mr. Stone the first 
of September, 1919, since which time it has met 
with a phenomenal growth. The principal business 
of the Stone Forwarding Company is in handling 
grain and cotton shipments, acting as shipping 
agents for various grain and cotton exporting firms 
as well as for firms handling other commodities, 
and making shipments to various European ports. 
They secure ocean freight for cotton shippers to 
complete a cargo to any desired destination, and 
also keep behind shipments from origination to des- 
tination. One of their greatest services to ship- 
pers is in the time saved, resulting in a consequent 
reduction of interest, this saving running from two 
to ten days on shipments. The Stone Forwarding 
Company also acts as grain shippers' agents, and 
carry records of individual stocks carried in ele- 
vators by shippers. When a steamer calls at the 
Ports of Houston and Galveston they are enabled 
to promptly supervise the loading of various grades 
of grain in storage, thus avoiding delays. The 
company has its own men at the docks and railroad 
yards, employing a force of around eighteen men, 
another factor in facilitating shipments without de- 
lay. Offices of the firm are maintained in Gal- 
veston, Dallas and Houston. 

Raymond C. Stone is a native of Chicago, where 
he was born the twenty-fourth of February, 1891. 
After completing his elementary and high school 
education, Mr. Stone spent one year in the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma, after which he entered upon 
his practical business career. He has engaged in 
the ocean freight brokerage business throughout his 
career, and was with the J. H. W. Steel Company 
for ten years, during that time having charge of 
many different offices for that company, and learn- 
ing the business from the ground up. Mr. Stone 
first came to Galveston for that company, and 
was later sent to San Francisco, where he was in 
charge of the office of the J. H. W. Steel Com- 
pany at that point when called to service by the 
war department early in the World War. Mr. Stone 
served as captain in Army Transport service from 
the twenty-second of October, 1917, until the 
eleventh of December, 1918, and was general super- 
intendent of Army Transport service, in charge of 
all water transportation for the expeditionary 
forces to and from England, Ireland, Scotland and 
Wales. He was cited by General John J. Pershing 
for exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous serv- 
ice at London, England, and commended by General 
W. W. Attebury. After returning to the United 
States from England at the close of the war, Mr. 
Stone spent a short time as manager of the J. H. 
W. Steel Company at New York, after which he 
came to Galveston to establish his present busi- 
ness, and on November 1st, 1925, he opened his pres- 
ent offices in Houston. 

Mr. Stone was married in Mineral Wells, Texas, 
the twenty-third of December, 1914, to Miss Lila 




O'Neal, a member of a Texas family. He is a mem- 
ber of Tucker Lodge No. 297, A. F. and A. M., and 
a past director of the Rotary Club of Galveston, 
the Galveston Country Club, the Aziola Club, a 
member of the Artillery Club of Galveston, and the 
Houston Club, and Traffic Club of Houston. At the 
time of his removal to Houston he was President 
of the Galveston Chamber of Commerce, and of the 
Ocean Freight Brokers' Association of Galveston. 
He is one of the organizers of the National Fire 
Insurance Company of Galveston. 

L. MILLER, who has recently established 
his home and business headquarters at 
Houston, is a factor in manufacturing activ- 

ities. Mr. Miller is Manufacturing Manager 

of the Houston factory branch of the National Bis- 
cuit Company, established in this city in 1900. At 
that time a small building was occupied, but rapid 
growth soon necessitated a larger factory and in 
1910 the business was moved into the new five-story 
factory, built by the company, and covering a half 
block at Chenevert and Magnolia Streets. Mr. Mil- 
ler took charge of the factory in 1921, and since 
that time the business has made rapid progress, now 
employing almost three hundred operatives in the 
manufacturing departments. The National Biscuit 
Company is one of the largest manufacturers of 
crackers, cakes, wafers and package goods of this 
class in the State, putting on the market a line of 
goods that has won national recognition. 

Mr. Miller has been identified with this company 
since leaving school, first at Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, as a clerk. It was not long, however, before 
the company sent him to various branches, and for 
two months he was at Macon, Georgia, then at Rome, 
Georgia, for a year, followed by a year at Meridian, 
Mississippi, and a year at Atlanta. He was then 
sent to the general office in New York City, remain- 
ing there three months, after which he was made 
traveling auditor, with headquarters at Albany, N. 
Y. In 1919 he was sent to Houston as Office Mana- 
ger and in September, 1921, was made Manufactur- 
ing Manager, the position he now holds. 

Mr. Miller was born in South Carolina, the fifth 
of November, 1893, son of L. T. Miller, a native of 
that State, and now living at Hartsville, South Caro- 
lina, and Susie Wilson Miller, also a South Caro- 
linan. He was educated in the public schools of his 
native State, going with the National Biscuit Com- 
pany after finishing his education. 

Mr. Miller was married at Rome, Georgia, the 
twenty-first of March, 1914, to Miss Gladys Camp, 
a native of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Miller make 
their home in Houston, at 1620 Hawthorne Street, 
and have one son, H. L. Miller, Junior. 

ERBERT S. L'HOMMEDIEU, who has 
recently come to Houston, is well known in 
shipping circles as one of the expert traffic 
men of the state, and has attained an envi- 
able position in his chosen field. Mr. L'Hommedieu 
is manager of the traffic department of Collin and 
Conover, freight forwarders, with offices in the Cot- 
ton Exchange Building. The firm handles a gen- 
eral steamship freight forwarding business, and 
acts as forwarding agent for many large companies. 
Mr. L'Hommedieu was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
the nineteenth of March, 1880. His father, Louis 
L'Hommedieu, was a railroad man his entire life, 




1186 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



and the L'Hommedieu family, from the first days 
of the railroad, have been railroad men, and have 
been represented in all branches of the railroad 
business, from the president's office to the more 
humble capacities. Mr. L'Hommedieu was educated 
in the public schools of Cincinnati, and after finish- 
ing there entered Gambrel College, where he attend- 
ed some years. Just before the close of the Spanish- 
American War he joined the army, spending two 
years with the forces at Cuba and other places. 
After leaving the army he went to New York City 
and went into the stock and bond house of Henry L. 
Dartz, remaining there a short time, when he went 
with the New York Central Railroad, with which he 
was identified for four years. He then came to 
Beaumont with the Southern Pacific Railroad, in the 
transportation department, and after ten years in 
that office was employed by the Beaumont Cham- 
ber of Commerce, in the transportation department. 
Four years later he moved to Orange, and was with 
the Chamber of Commerce there for four years, 
until 1918, when he engaged in the forwarding 
business for himself, organizing the Texas Shipping 
and Forwarding Company, in 1921, which he served 
as president until coming to Houston, in January, 
1925. 

Mr. L'Hommedieu was married at Houston, the 
seventh of September, 1910, to Miss Zoe Ganchan, a 
native of Texas. They reside in Houston, at 4444 
Travis Street, and have one child, Constance. Mr. 
L'Hommedieu is a member of the Rotary, Beaumont 
and Neches Clubs, at Beaumont. Since coming to 
Houston he has taken an active interest in the work 
being done by the various civic organizations, and 
occupies a place of leadership among the younger 
business men of Houston. 

HARLES EIKEL, President of the Southern 
Stevedoring and Contracting Company of 
Houston, came to this city several years 
ago to enter this business, and is well 
known in shipping circles as one of the most ver- 
satile men in this field. The Southern Stevedoring 
and Contracting Company was established in 1922, 
by Mr. Eikel, since which time he has been active in 
its management, building up the business along 
progressive lines and through giving super service 
to his many patrons in Houston and Galveston. Mr. 
Eikel's company loads and unloads ships by con- 
tract, employing a large crew of efficient work- 
men, and all special equipment to facilitate this 
work. He has contracts with Wilkens and Biehl, 
steamship agents, The Texas Transport and Termi- 
nal Company and others, handling over fifty per 
«ent of the tonnage in the Houston Harbor. Offices 
are maintained in the Cotton Exchange Building. 
0. R. Seagraves is secretary and treasurer of the 
company, and like Mr. Eikel, has had a wide ex- 
perience in the stevedoring and contracting business. 
Charles Eikel was born at New Braunfels, Texas, 
on the twelfth day of January, 1880, son of Albert 
Eikel and Augusta (Faust) Eikel, both native Tex- 
ans, and well known residents of New Braunfels. 
Mr. Eikel obtained his education in the schools of 
Texas and after leaving school was with the South- 
ern Pacific Steamship Company for many years in 
Mexico and Galveston. He came to Houston in 
1922, and has since been president of the Southern 
Stevedoring and Contracting Company. 





Mr. Eikel was married at Laredo, Texas, the 
seventh of June, 1905, to Miss Marie Drake, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Drake. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eikel reside at 3919 Mount Vernon Avenue, and 
have one child, Mary Augusta. Mr. Eikel is a mem- 
ber of the Houston Club, the River Oaks Country 
Club, the Houston Chamber of Commerce, the Hous- 
ton Cotton Exchange, the Episcopal Church and is 
a Scottish Rite Mason. 

MARKLEY CROSSWELL has for a decade 
been manager of the Houston Business of 
Alex Sprunt & Son, Inc., Cotton Dealers, 
and during this period he has played an 
important part in bringing his firm to a position 
of prominence in the cotton industry of the South- 
west. Mr. Crosswell is also President of the Ship 
Channel Compress Company, Inc., the cotton firm 
of Alex Sprunt and Son, Inc., with headquarters at 
Wilmington, North Carolina, are large exporters of 
cotton and do a large domestic business. They ship- 
ped from Houston in 1923 more than 150,000 bales 
of cotton to England, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, 
Belgium and to Scandinavian countries. Alex Sprunt 
and Son, Inc., own the Ship Channel Compress Com- 
pany, Inc., which has a storage capacity of 75,000 
bales, and have two high density Webb presses with 
800 feet of wharfage, they are able to load cotton 
direct to steamers. There are approximately 250 
people under the supervision of the Houston branch 
and their business has increased steadily since the 
opening of their office in this city. 

Mr. Crosswell was born in Greenville, South Caro- 
lina, June 1, 1886, but went with his parents to 
North Carolina when three years of age. His father, 
W. J. Crosswell, was for a period covering forty- 
four years superintendent of the Atlantic Division 
of the Southern Express Company, with headquar- 
ters at Wilmington. His education was obtained in 
the public and high schools of Wilmington, North 
Carolina, and later he attended Davidson College. 
He began his business career in the banking busi- 
ness, but remained in this line of endeavor for only 
one year, when he entered the employ of Alex Sprunt 
and Son, Inc. He later went to Germany for one 
year, and from there came to Houston August, 1911, 
as Assistant Manager of Alex Sprunt and Son, Inc., 
and in 1913 was made Manager of the Houston of- 
fice, where he has since remained. 

Mr. Crosswell was married at Temple, Texas, 
April 23, 1913, to Miss Anna Downs, a daughter of 
F. F. Downs, President of the First National Bank 
of Temple, Texas, and member of an old and promi- 
nent Texas family. They have four children, all of 
whom were born in Texas, Sarah Anne, H. M., Jr., 
Fla Downs and James Earle. Mr. and Mrs. Cross- 
well reside at 3910 Yoakum Boulevard. In fraternal 
and social organizations Mr. Crosswell is a member 
of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the University Club, 
Houston Country Club and the Houston Club. Mr. 
Crosswell is a staunch and consistent member of the 
First Presbyterian Church, and has been a Deacon 
since 1921. He has since coming to Houston been 
active in the Houston Cotton Exchange, of which 
organization he is President. He is also prominently 
associated with all civic clubs of the city, and gives 
his time and means to all projects having as their 
object the improvement and advancement of Hous- 
ton. 



1189 



MEN OF TEXAS 




SI) AVID RICE, senior member of the firm 
of Rice and Reynaud, cotton weigh- 
ers, is a native Houstonian, where he 
has been engaged in the cotton weighing 
business for more than forty years. The duty of 
a public cotton weigher, who are all appointed by 
the Governor of the State, is to get as near a cor- 
rect and fair weight as possible, and he acts as a 
balancing medium between the buyer and seller of 
cotton. Cotton weights are subject to great varia- 
tion on account of the qualities of cotton for ab- 
sorbing moisture when exposed, and the amount of 
as a public weigher in 1882, and, after a time left 
this business, but for only a short while, when he 
returned and has since been continuously engaged 
exposure it has had in the weather. Mr. Rice began 
in this line of endeavor. He is a member of a pio- 
neer family, and one of the city's most enterprising 
and progressive citizens. The office of Rice and 
Reynaud is located at 412 Cotton Exchange Build- 
ing. 

Mr. Rice was born January 18th, 1863. His father, 
F. A. Rice (decased since 1901) was one of the early 
settlers of Texas, coming to this State from Spring- 
field, Massachusetts, in 1850. He was a pioneer 
merchant and planter of the Brazos River Valley. 
Later, he was, for many years, treasurer of the 
Houston and Texas Central Railroad, and, still later, 
was engaged in the banking business in Houston, 
and was one of the original Trustees of the Rice In- 
stitute. His mother was Miss Charlotte M. Bald- 
win, a daughter of Horace Baldwin, who was Mayor 
of Houston during the days of the Republic, and 
was a brother-in-law of A. C. Allen, one of the 
founders of Houston. Her paternal ancestors were 
the founders of Baldwinsville, New York. Mr. Rice's 
family is of old Revolutionary stock, sprung from 
the sturdy Scotch-Irish and English pioneers of Co- 
lonial days in America. Mr. Rice's brothers, H. B., 
J. S., B. B. and W. M., are prominent business men 
of Houston. His education was obtained in the 
private schools of Houston. Mr. Rice owns interests 
in various financial and business institutions of 
Houston, but his personal interest has always been 
in the cotton weighing business. He is one of the 
organizers of the Southern Drug Company, is now 
a director in this company, and 1 is interested in the 
insurance business through his son, Brown Rice, of 
the firm of Rice and Belk Insurance Company. 

Mr. Rice was married in Houston to Miss Mattie 
L. Botts, a member of a pioneer Houston family, 
and a daughter of Col. W. B. Botts (deceased) who 
was a member of the well-known law firm of Baker, 
Botts, Parker and Garwood. They have seven chil- 
dren — five boys and two girls. Brown B. Rice, of 
the firm of Rice and Belk Insurance Company, is 
a son, and Mrs. W. S. Farish is a daughter. Mr. 
Rice has seen Houston grow from a village of 1500 
population to the busy, thriving city of today, and 
expects to see Houston become the greatest city in 
the South. Mr. Rice, although more than sixty 
years of age, is hale and hearty, which he attrib- 
utes to having lived an out-door life, and is much 
interested in the success achieved by his sons and 
daughters, who are among the leaders in the so- 
cial and business life of the younger generation of 
Houston. In the midst of his private work, Mr. Rice 
finds opportunity to give his time and assistance 
to many improvements of a public nature. 




S. JARETT, whose home and business 
headquarters are at Houston, is a factor 
in the commercial life and is well known 
as a wholesale merchant. The Pincus- 
Jarett Dry Goods Company, Incorporated, of which 
Mr. Jarett is vice president, treasurer and manager, 
was established in 1907. At that time the business 
was located in a small building on Congress Avenue 
and began operations in a small way. The business 
met with a rapid success, trade conditions demand- 
ing expansion, and in 1910, three years after its 
organization, the Pincus-Jarett Dry Goods Company 
moved to their present location, a fine four-story 
building, fifty by one hundred feet, located at 213 
Milam Street. The Pincus-Jarett Company does 
a wholesale business exclusively, selling dry goods 
and notions, and keeps seven men on the road. 
They carry the well known lines of goods and oper- 
ate the business on the most progressive lines, 
building and developing trade through their repu- 
tation for reliability and square dealing with their 
customers. The Pincus-Jarett Dry Goods Company 
has a force of from thirty-five to forty employees 
in the store at Houston. The officers of the com- 
pany are: Louis Jarett, of New York City, presi- 
dent; R. S. Jarett, the subject of this sketch, vice 
president, treasurer, and M. D. Cohn, secretary. 

Mr. Jarett was born in New York City, in 1886, 
and began his business career as a boy in that city. 
In 1902 he came to Houston and when his uncle, 
Louis Jarett, organized the Pincus-Jarett Dry Goods 
Company, in 1907, he came with the firm, and has 
since been with the buisness. 

OHN W. DEHNERT, manager of the Hous- 
ton office and associate of the firm of C. 
D. Hill & Company, one of the leading firms 
of architects in Texas, is firmly established 
at Houston as an architect of wide experience and 
success in his profession. Mr. Dehnert came to 
Houston in 1921 and has since made his influence 
felt in the work done by this firm here. The C. D. 
Hill Company are general architects and architec- 
tural engineers, handling work all over the state, 
with around two million dollars worth of construc- 
tion under way at Houston, and plans being drawn 
for much additional work. They have their of- 
fices in the Kress Building and maintain a force of 
assistant architects and draftsmen. The firm is 
building the First Baptist Church, an edifice which, 
when completed, will represent a million dollar in- 
vestment. The C. D. Hill Company maintain offices 
in Dallas and handle much work in that section, de- 
signing and superintending the construction of many 
large buildings there. The officers of the Company 
are C. D. Hill, D. F. Coburn, H. D. Smith and J. W. 
Dehnert. 

Mr. Dehnert was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 
1890, son of Frederick William and Emelie (Bursie) 
Dehnert, the father a well known merchant and 
baker there. Mr. Dehnert was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of St. Louis and after graduating from 
high school entered Washington University at St. 
Louis, for the four year course in architecture, grad- 
uating in 1913 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. He immediately began architectural work 
in St. Louis, confining in that city until 1917, when 
he entered the army, enlisting in August. He was 
sent to the officers training camp at Fort Sheri- 
dan, Illinois, where he spent three months, then 




1190 





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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




going overseas, spending three months at the French 
Artillery School at Saumur, France, after which he 
was assigned to the 121st Field Artillery of the Thir- 
ty-second Division, and was on the front in active 
service until November 11th, 1918. He was then 
with the Army of Occupation in Germany until 
March, 1919, after which he attended the School of 
Architecture, near Paris, France, for three months, 
returning to St. Louis in July of 1919. After a 
month at home he came to Dallas, remaining there 
two years with C. D. Hill & Company before com- 
ing to Houston. 

Mr. Dehnert was married at Uniontown, Alabama, 
in 1922 to Miss Mattilee Underwood, daughter of a 
landowner and planter of that state. 

Mr. Dehnert is a member of the Houston En- 
gineers Club and the Texas Chapter of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects. He is a Theta-Xi and 
fraternally is a Scottish Rite Mason and member of 
Arabia Temple Shrine. 

LIVER BRYAN STERLING, for twenty 
years one of the most influential citizens 
of Dayton, where his constructive interest 
in the development of the town resulted in 
an era of building and progress on a scale large 
enough to rank him as one of the builders of the 
Dayton of today, has recently come to Houston to 
reside. In April, 1925, he established the Sterbaco 
Battery Electrical Service at 1719 Main Street, and 
is sole owner of the new business. The concern 
carries a complete line of U. S. L. Automobile bat- 
teries and radio batteries, as well as electrical equip- 
ment, oil, gas, Ajax tires and tire accessories, and 
in fact, a general line of automobile accessories of 
all kinds. The plant is housed in an especially 
constructed building for this kind of enterprise, and 
is modern in every detail. Courteous and efficient 
service is the watchword, and competent employees 
are on hand to take care of practically every auto- 
mobile need of the public. 

Mr. Sterling went to Dayton, Texas, in 1904, go- 
ing there from Galveston, and at that time began 
the construction of residences and business property, 
continued during the many years he spent in the 
city, until he had accumulated rental property here 
to the extent of over. one hundred thousand dollars. 
He is also the owner of the Dayton Theater, a mod- 
ern show house, with a seating capacity of six hun- 
dred people, and is one of the Directors of the Day- 
ton Mercantile Company, of which his brother, J. 
B. Sterling, is President and Manager. Mr. Sterling 
was also for many years one of the leading rice 
growers of this section, annually planting a large 
acreage to this crop, and also building canals to 
irrigate the rice lands of this section. He was one 
of the builders of the Moores-Bluff Canal, one of 
the largest irrigation projects here, and was other- 
wise active in the rice industry. Mr. Sterling as- 
sisted in every way in the development of Dayton, 
encouraging the establishment of enterprises of im- 
portance, and is regarded, and justly, as the real 
builder of this city. 

Oliver Bryan Sterling was born in Liberty County, 
Texas, the thirteenth of August, 1866, one of the 
twelve children of Captain Benjamin Franklin Ster- 
ling and Mary Jane Bryan Sterling. Captain Ster- 
ling was born in Mississippi, in 1831, coming to 
Texas, where he located in Liberty County, as a 
young man. At the outbreak of the Civil War he 



recruited a company in Liberty County, the first to 
be organized here, and of which Captain King Bry- 
an, an uncle of his wife's, was Captain. Captain 
Sterling did not go with this company, remaining 
to recruit a second company, of which he was Cap- 
tain, and which served in Walls, Texas. At the close 
of the war Captain Sterling left Liberty County, 
coming to Chambers County, where he became one 
of the leaders of that section. He was an intimate 
friend of Sam Houston and other men of his day who 
have played an important part in Texas history. 
Captain Sterling remained in Chambers County 
until several years prior to his death, removing to 
Houston, where his death occurred in 1917. Mrs. 
Sterling, a native of Texas, and a member of one 
of the most prominent families of the State, was of 
Scotch-Irish descent, her American ancestors being 
among the early settlers of Virginia. A member of 
the family, Luke Bryan, served with distinction in 
the Battle of San Jacinto. The twelve children of 
Captain and Mrs. Sterling include Oliver Bryan, the 
subject of this sketch; R. S., Ex-Chairman of the 
Board of Directors of the Humble Oil Company, and 
interested in many other important activities; F. P., 
Vice-President of the Humble Oil and Refining Com- 
pany; A. A., President of the American Building 
and Loan Association; J. B., President of the Dayton 
Mercantile Company; Miss Florence, Ex-Secretary of 
the Humble Oil and Refining Company, and one of 
the most prominent women of Texas; J. L., promi- 
nent business man of Galveston; Mrs. Cora Barrow, 
Mrs. S. E. Barrow and Mrs. G. L. H. Koehler. The 
deceased children are: B. G. and S. H. Sterling. 

Oliver Bryan Sterling was educated in the country 
schools of Chambers County, working on his father's 
farm between the short school terms of that day. 
He remained on the farm until he attained his ma- 
jority, a little later taking up carpenter work, rice 
irrigation work, and engineering work, during these 
years handling all classes of work in these fields, and 
for a time taking charge of a canal as engineer and 
superintendent. In 1900 he went to Galveston, 
where he engaged in the contracting business, re- 
maining there for four years prior to going to 
Dayton, where he began a career of building, which 
resulted in the development of a town which will 
live throughout the years to come. 

Mr. Sterling was married at Dayton, Texas, the 
twenty-fourth of January, 1912, to Miss Lula Crites, 
a native of Huntington, Indiana, and the daughter of 
Jesse F. Crites, also of that State. Mrs. Sterling 
was educated for the teaching profession and taught 
school in Michigan and Indiana. She is a cultured 
lady, possessing a keen business judgment, and has 
materially aided her husband in his career. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sterling have five children, Gwendolyn, Oliver 
Bryan, Jr., Lee F., Mary Lu and Elizabeth Ross Ster- 
ling. Mr. Sterling, with his family, reside at 107 
Hathaway since coming to Houston to make his home 
and is a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of 
Dayton. Essentially a business and family man, he 
has found in his business and in his family life his 
two chief interests, and social life, as typified by 
lodges and clubs, has made little appeal to him. In 
the coming of O. B. Sterling and family to Houston 
to live the city profits by this addition to its citizen- 
ship and whatever Mr. Sterling undertakes in a busi- 
ness way will reflect credit to himself because his 
career has been founded upon fair and honest deal- 
ings. 



1193 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN M. BOYLE, veteran laundry owner of 
Houston, has been for two decades one of 
the vital forces for progress in this in- 
dustry, devoting his energies not alone to 
the development of his business, but to the raising 
of laundry operation standards. Mr. Boyle came to 
Houston in 1889 and after a business experience 
of ten years, founded the Eureka Laundry and Dry 
Cleaning Works, in 1902, and has since operated this 
business. Mr. Boyle began in a small way at 911 
Capitol Avenue, the first year employing ten oper- 
atives. But his methods of operation, his desire to 
give to the Houston housewives an efficient, high 
grade service, accomplished much and the business 
prospered from the start. In 1919 it had grown to 
such proportions that the Eureka Laundry and Dry 
Cleaning Works was incorporated and today finds 
this enterprise one of the biggest and finest com- 
mercial laundries in the Southwest. Located at 610 
Travis Street, the Eureka Laundry and Dry Clean- 
ing Works, with Mr. Boyle as its president and man- 
ager, occupies one of the most modernly equipped 
plants in the Lone Star State, with thirty-five thou- 
sand square feet of floor space and employing one 
hundred and fifty-six operatives. Mr. Boyle has 
at all times, since the first day of operation, kept 
apace with modern and progressive methods of oper- 
ation, installing new equipment when he saw where 
he could raise his standards by so doing, introducing 
new methods in the wash room when he saw a 
chance to improve over the old methods and give a 
better class of work. He has been a leader in every 
movement for the improvement of the laundry indus- 
try. His plant stands a monument to John M. 
Boyle, known throughout the laundry industry as 
one of the most progressive men in the industry 
today. Mr. Boyle does all classes of laundry and dry 
cleaning and makes a specialty of service. Twenty 
delivery trucks are operated to further facilitate 
efficient operation and every effort made to give 
Houston a laundry service second to none. Mr. 
Boyle, as previously mentioned, is president and 
general manager of the Eureka Laundry and Dry 
Cleaning Works, Inc., J. G. Palrrier, vice president 
and C. A. Palmer, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Boyle was born at Caddo Parish, Louisiana, in 
1872, son of J. M. Boyle, a native of Ireland who 
came to Louisiana as a young man. Mr. Boyle 
was educated in the Caddo parish schools, and in 
1892 came to Houston. Until 1896 he was with an 
ice company here, in that year beginning his laun- 
dry experience in one of the Houston laundries. Six 
years later he launched his own business, which he 
has since operated. 

Mr. Boyle was married at Houston, in 1903, to 
Miss Rosa Iselt, a native of Waller County, Texas. 
They have one child, Virginia Rose. Mr. and Mrs. 
Boyle make their home at 1012 Rosedale Street. Mr. 
Boyle is a popular member of most of the social and 
civic organizations at Houston, a Mason, member of 
Gray Lodge, 32nd Degree, Scottish Rite, and a mem- 
ber of Arabia Temple Shrine. He is active in the 
work of the Texas Laundryowners Association, 
where he is affectionately hailed as "Red Boyle" and 
of which he is the popular president. He is also 
identified with the Laundryowners National Asso- 
ciation and takes an active interest in the work, 
along progressive lines, that this association plans 
and carries out. 




ALTER H. MYERS is well-known in the 
business circles of Houston, where, before 
entering the real estate and investment 
business, he was for eleven years engaged 
in the drug business. Mr. Myers is president of 
the Ship Channel Development Company, which was 
incorporated in 1919, and deals principally in resi- 
dential property, and some business sites in Har- 
risburg, Pasadena and Gloverdale, with sub-divisions 
in Harrisburg and along the Ship Channel. This 
Development Company also finances and builds for 
clients; they also have a sub-division at Bellaire. 
The office of the Ship Channel Development Com- 
pany is located at 503-7 West Building. 

Mr. Myers was born in West Virginia, January 
23rd, 1884. His father, W. H. Myers, was a ma- 
chinist in West Virginia. His education was ob- 
tained in the West Virginia public schools, after 
which he attended the University of West Virginia, 
and graduated from this Institution in 1906 with the 
degree of M. D., but never practiced his profession. 
Mr. Myers worked his way through school as a 
druggist, and when he had graduated, found him- 
self the owner of a drug store, but badly in debt, 
but by close application to his business he soon had 
this debt paid, and since that time has been en- 
gaged in the drug business in West Virginia, Cali- 
fornia, Arizona and Texas, totalling twenty years 
spent in this line of endeavor. He sold his Houston 
interests in which he had been engaged since 1912, 
in January, 1923. Since coming to Houston, Mr. 
Myers has been closely connected with the com- 
mercial interests of the city, and is a director in 
the Harrisburg Drug Company and in the Thomas 
Land Corporation. He is vice president of the 
American State Bank at Harrisburg, and is one 
of the organizers of this institution, and is connect- 
ed with various other interests in the city and in 
Harrisburg. 

Mr. Myers has been twice married. His first mar- 
riage was solemnized in West Virginia, and his 
wife died a few years later in Texas, where he had 
removed for the benefit of his health. His second 
marriage was in Harrisburg, Texas, March 31st, 
1918, to Miss Ruby Brown, a daughter of G. T. 
Brown, whose family were among the original set- 
tlers of Cedar Bayou, and the Brown family origi- 
nally owned part of the land that comprises the 
famous Goose Creek oil fields. Two children were 
born to Mr. Myers and his first wife — Virginia and 
Woodford Myers. The Myers residence is located 
in Harrisburg. Mr. Myers is an M. D., also a mem- 
ber of the State Druggists Association and the 
Registered Druggists of Texas. Mr. Myers 
is also a member of the A. F. and A. M., 
with membership in Union Lodge No. 4, of Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia; this Lodge has the name 
of George Washington on its charter. He is a 
member of the Chapter and Consistory at that place, 
a 32nd Degree Scottish Rite at Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, and a member of the Arabia Temple Shrine, 
of Houston. Mr. Myers has always considered that 
it was purely an accident that he became a citi- 
zen of Texas and Houston, but is convinced that 
accidents are not always disagreeable. He had 
started to South America, and missed his boat at 
Galveston, and during the wait of sixty days for 
another boat, he had made frequent trips to Hous- 
ton, and when the next boat came, he had decided 
to remain in the Metropolis of the Lone Star State. 



1194 





£^>^^C- 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




| RANK LOUIS HOLTON, young business 
man, came to Houston on September 14, 
1922, and has been identified since that time 
with the branch store of Victory Wilson, 
Inc., in the capacity of local manager. The Houston 
store is located at 419 V 2 Main Street over the J. J. 
Sweeney Jewelry Store and occupies a floor space of 
fifty-two by seventy-five feet. Seven people are 
employed in the local store, which handles a line of 
high grade clothing for men and young men, spe- 
cializing in suits and overcoats. James K. Wilson 
of Dallas is President of the Company. 

The Victory Wilson Stores were organized at Dal- 
las some years ago on a policy of occupying second 
floor, low-rent quarters and passing the saving in 
overhead expense on to its customers in the form of 
reduced prices for high grade merchandise. The 
first Dallas store was a success from the start and 
now the company has a chain of stores located in 
most of the principal cities of Texas, all of them 
having upstairs locations and featuring the com- 
pany's slogan of "a short flight to economy." The 
men employed in the Houston store are all expert 
clothing people and the volume of business has shown 
a steady and consistent increase under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Holton. 

A native of Mississippi, Mr. Holton was born at 
Meridian on August 11, 1890, a son of Frank P. 
and Lucile Clara (Morrison) Holton. In 1894 the 
family removed to Cleburne, Texas, and remained 
there until 1919, when they removed to Dallas. 

Mr. Holton was educated in the public schools at 
Cleburne and graduated at the Cleburne High School, 
later attending Metropolitan Business College at 
Dallas for nine months. After completing his high 
school course, he joined the navy in 1907 and after 
a training period on the West Coast made a trip 
around the world, visiting practically every country 
on the face of the globe during his four years cruise. 
He received his discharge on his twenty-first birth- 
day in 1911 and returned to Cleburne, remaining 
there four months and then going to Dallas, where 
he entered a business college. After that he pur- 
chased a tailor shop in the old Metropolitan Hotel 
at Dallas, operating it for a year and then went with 
the Robertson, Nash and Robert Clothing Company. 
Seven months later he decided to take a trip over 
the United States and upon returning to Dallas in 
1914, went with Sears, Roebuck and Company^ in 
their sales department, remaining with this firm 
until 1917, when he resigned as Assistant Manager 
of the Sales Department to again enlist in the United 
States Navy, at the time of the entrance of the 
United States into the World War, although he was 
placed in the deferred classification, Mr. Holton 
felt it was his duty to offer his services to the 
navy, in which field he was experienced. So he re- 
entered the navy in July, 1917, and was sent to the 
East Coast as a yeomen and assigned to duty on a 
transport, making four trips across the Atlantic. He 
was then transferred to Newport, Viriginia, as per- 
sonnel officer in charge of 1,200 men until March 
10, 1919, when he was transferred to New Orleans 
and discharged. 

Returning to Dallas he again entered the employ 
of Sears, Roebuck and Company for a short time 
and then with A. Harris and Company, and later 
for two years with the Trivers Clothing Company. 
In September, 1921, he went with Victory Wilson as 




Clothing Salesman and in August, 1922, was trans- 
ferred to Houston to superintend the remodeling of 
their local store and upon its completion was placed 
in charge of this branch. 

Mr. Holton was married at Dallas on January 12, 
1913, to Miss Bertha Louise Nehermeyer, a daugh- 
ter of John Nehermeyer, prominent resident of Dal- 
las for many years. 

Mr. Holton is a Thirty-Second degree Mason, a 
member of the Scottish Rite bodies, Hella Temple 
Shrine, Chapter, Council and Blue Lodge of Dallas. 
He is a member of the Salesmanship Club and the 
Chamber of Commerce of Houston and takes an ac- 
tive interest in the civic affairs of the city. 

A. PALMER, one of the progressive young 
business men of Houston, has for a number 
of years taken an active part in the com- 

mercial laundry industry in this city. Mr. 

Palmer is secretary, treasurer and assistant man- 
ager of the Eureka Laundry and Dye Works, one 
of the largest, as well as one of the oldest, laun- 
dries in the city. The Eureka Laundry occupies a 
large, modern, well lighted plant at 610 Travis 
Street, where they have installed all the most mod- 
ern and efficient equipment and handle their work 
under the most approved conditions. They give es- 
pecial attention to the welfare of the operatives, all 
of whom work under ideal conditions, and conse- 
quently are enabled to do much better work. The 
Eureka Laundry Company was established many 
years ago by J. M. Boyle, veteran laundry owner of 
the Lone Star State, and has since been operated 
by him. Mr. Boyle is president and manager of the 
company, G. J. Palmer, father of C. A. Palmer, is 
vice president and C. A. Palmer, secretary and 
treasurer. 

After finishing his education, in 1915, Mr. Palmer 
was a cotton checker for one season, then went with 
the Houston Electric Company, working in all de- 
partments, in the shops, as street car motorman and 
on up, with the intention of making this his career. 
But after a year and a half he went with the Hous- 
ton Post, in the advertising department, and was 
there until the beginning of the recent war. After 
trying to enlist in every branch of the service, he 
was finally accepted for duty in the Infantry, doing 
recruiting, and was in Houston until 1918 when he 
was discharged. He then went with the Eureka 
Laundry and Dye Works, in February, 1919 and m 
the following April bought an interest in the busi- 
ness and was made secretary and treasurer. 

Mr Palmer was born at Houston, the nineteenth 
of October, 1895, son of G. J. Palmer, pioneer news- 
paper man of this city, who came to Houston as a 
young man, from Illinois. He is vice president of 
the Houston Post and special commissioner of the 
Texas Newspaper Publishers Association, vice pres- 
ident of the Eureka Laundry and has other large in- 
terests in Houston. His mother, prior to her mar- 
riage, was Miss Katherine Ray. Mr. Palmer was 
educated in the public schools of Houston, and 
later Sewanee Military Academy, and one year at 
the University of the South at summer term, alter 
which he entered upon his business career. 

Mr Palmer was married at Houston, the seventh 
of July, 1917, to Miss Louise Hamilton, daughter of 
George H. Hamilton, a prominent business man of 
this city. They have one son, Charles A., Junior. 



1197 



MEN OF TEXAS 




JAMES W. TRIMBLE is well known to the 
business fraternity of Houston, where twen- 
ty-two years ago he organized the Ineeda 
Laundry and Cleaning Company, Inc., and 
has been President of this company since that time. 
The plant of this company, located at Rusk and 
Smith Avenue, was established and incorporated in 
1903 and is one of the largest laundries and cleaning 
establishments in South Texas. The Ineeda Laun- 
dry and Cleaning Company, Inc., has a fine, fire- 
proof, two-story building, which was erected in 1912, 
and is equipped with all modern machinery, and is 
thoroughly sanitary in every respect. The laundry 
and cleaning plant have thirty trucks in their de- 
livery department, and at present this department 
is taxed to capacity. The Ineeda Laundry and 
Cleaning Company, Inc., take great pride in the 
work done at their plant, and every detail is looked 
after by competent help. Over two hundred people 
are employed at the plant, which has thirty thousand 
square feet of floor space. Other officers of the 
company are A. J. Fittger, Vice-President and Man- 
ager, and B. G. Sydnor, Secretary and Treasurer, 
which position he has held since 1907. Mr. Fittger 
has been Vice-President and Manager since 1917. 

Mr. Trimble was born in Winchester, Tennessee 
May 26, 1869. His father, Aaron Trimble, was a na- 
tive of Tennessee, but the latter part of his life was 
spent in Missouri, where he died. Mr. Trimble's 
education was obtained in the public schools of Ten- 
nessee. His opportunities for securing an education 
were limited, and the liberal education which he ob- 
tained in later years has been through self help. 

When Mr. Trimble first came to Houston it was 
for the purpose of securing work, and he was em- 
ployed by a laundry on a salary. He saved his 
money and learned the laundry business at the same 
time, and soon was able to engage in the laundry 
business, in a small way, for himself. His establish- 
ment has grown, under able management, until it 
is now among the largest plants of its kind in the 
State. Mr. Trimble has one daughter, Wendla now 
the wife of W. H. Black. His home is at La Porte, 
on the bay. Mr. Trimble is a member of the Elks' 
the Houston Club, the Houston Turnverein, Holland 
Lodge No. 1, A. F. and A. M., and of the York and 
Scottish Rite bodies of that order, and is a Shriner 
of Arabia Temple. 

Having risen from the ranks, Mr. Trimble has 
the deepest interest in the man who aspires to bet- 
ter his condition, and is at all times ready and 
willing to render helpful service to his fellowman. 
He is an advocate of efficiency, promptness and 
punctuality, and these characteristics coupled with 
great industry accounts for the success achieved by 
this good man. 

EE ROGERSON, plumbing and heating con- 
tractor, has during the vast growth of 
Houston been a factor in supplying an 
enormous demand for plumbing and heat- 
ing material, which has been required in the build- 
ings of this city. Mr. Rogerson is sole owner of 
the plumbing and heating business bearing his name, 
located at 908 Truxillo Avenue, which represents 
and investment of more than $35,000.00. Among 
the buildings in which Mr. Rogerson installed the 
plumbing and heating work are the Great Southern 
Life Building, the Masonic Temple, Standard San- 
itary Building, many of the largest apartment 




houses, the homes of John T. Crotty and W. W. 
Moore, two of the finest residences in the city, and 
hundreds of other homes and buildings. Mr. Roger- 
son has for more than a decade had his home and 
business together, in the finest residence section 
of the city. He employs eighteen people and has 
a large business. 

Mr. Rogerson was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylva- 
nia, in 1884. His father, John Lee Rogerson, was 
a well known building contractor of Pittsburg. His 
mother was Miss Louise Ulrich, a native of Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Rogerson's early education was ob- 
tained in the public schools of Pittsburgh. Later, 
he was a student for three years at the Carnegie 
Technical School, and received a diploma from this 
institution in Sanitary Engineering. Mr. Rogerson 
has the distinction of being one of three students 
in a class numbering forty-eight, who passed the 
required examination. After leaving college, Mr. 
Rogerson was for a period of six years superin- 
tendent of the George H. Soffel Company, Plumb- 
ing Contractors of Pittsburgh. The George H. Sof- 
fel Company, at the time that Mr. Rogerson was 
superintendent of their establishment, was the sec- 
ond largest company of its kind in the United States. 
He resigned his position with this firm and came 
to Texas and to Houston in 1912 and engaged in 
his present business. 

Mr. Rogerson was married in Houston in 1915 to 
Miss Gussie Frederick, a daughter of Herman Fred- 
erick, well known building contractor of Houston. 
In fraternal and social organizations Mr. Rogerson 
is a member of the York Rite body of the A. F. 
and A. M., and a Shriner of Arabia Temple, and 
a member of the Houston Launch Club. Mr. Roger- 
son expects Houston to continue to advance to the 
first city in the Southwest, and is looking forward 
to an era of great business prosperity in all lines. 

A. GRIESENBECK, for more than two de- 
cades associated with the business life at 
Houston, is one of the most progressive in- 
surance men in the city, and represents 
some of the oldest and strongest insurance com- 
panies operating in this country. Mr. Griesenbeck is 
senior member of the firm of B. A. Griesenbeck and 
Company, and has been in the insurance business in 
Houston since 1905. The present firm was orga- 
nized in 1920, and acts as the local agency for the 
New York Underwriters, the Massachusetts Fire 
and Marine, the Milwaukee Mechanics, the Travel- 
lers, and also writes life insurance in the South- 
western Life Insurance Company. Mr. Giesenbeck 
is known in insurance circles as a real producer and 
has written a record amount of business. Mr. Gries- 
enbeck is associated with R. E. Fones, who has had 
fourteen years experience in the insurance field. The 
firm has offices in the Bankers Mortgage Building. 
Mr. Griesenbeck was born at Bastrop, Texas, the 
nineteenth of September, 1885. His father, R. J. 
Griesenbeck, a native of the Lone Star State, was 
in the wholesale grocery and insurance business at 
Bastrop, and was District Clerk for the past two 
decades. He has recently retired from business life, 
but still makes his home in Bastrop. His mother, 
also a native Texan, was before her marriage Miss 
Mollie Orts. Mr. Griesenbeck attended the schools 
of Bastrop, and after finishing his education was 
a stenographer for one year. He then entered the 
insurance business, with Cravens and Cage, and has 




1198 



\i:w}wmm 




^JoJ^t^U- 






NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




since continued in this line. He was formerly Spe- 
cial Agent and Adjuster out of Houston for the 
Queen Insurance Company, handling the territory 
in South Texas for about six years. In 1921 he or- 
ganized his present company, with which he has 
since been actively associated. 

Mr. Griesenbeck was married in Brenham, in 1907, 
to Miss Alma Miller, of that city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griesenbeck now make their home in Houston at 10 
Latham Street. They attend the Methodist Church. 
Mr. Griesenbeck takes a deep interest in civic ac- 
tivities at Houston, and is active in all lines of 
public development. He has a constructive view- 
point, and a keen insight into economic questions, 
and brings to the insurance business an attitude 
that makes for a progressive, well organized busi- 
ness, that is a distinct asset to the commercial life 
of the city. 

ARRY S. CRAWFORD when becoming Pres- 
ident and General Manager of the Texas 
Advertising Company brought to this com- 
pany the knowledge that had been devel- 
oped through thirty years of experience and which 
has had an important part in the success of this 
company. The Texas Advertising Company located 
at Main Boulevard and Wentworth Avenue, are the 
builders of the finest and most artistic signs in the 
entire South, and are known as outdoor advertisers. 
They are builders of the beautiful de luxe bulletins 
that are seen on the Houston avenues and highways 
and are real works of art. Their beautiful new 
studio, 65x125 feet, in size, is truly a house of glass 
built for their artists in making theatre curtains and 
art signs. The Texas Advertising Company employ 
fifteen skilled artists in their work and have 
branches at Galveston, Beaumont, and Port Arthur, 
Texas, and build signs for firms in all portions of 
Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Other 
officers of the Texas Advertising Company are P. L. 
Michael, Vice-President, H. C. Hurd, Secretary, and 
W. A. McKenna, Art Director and Treasurer. Mr. 
McKenna is one of the leading artists of this country 
in this line. All of his business life has been spent 
in this field. For years he was identified with lead- 
ing advertising and lithographing firms in New York 
City. He came to Houston in 1919, joining the 
Texas Advertising Company's personnel at this time. 
No little credit is due him for the success of his com- 
pany. He makes the art signs in miniature so that 
the advertiser can visualize the value of the finished 
work. 

Mr. Crawford was born at Lexington, Kentucky, in 
1877. His father, J. S. Crawford, died when he was a 
small boy. Mr. Crawford's education was obtained 
in the public schools of Kentucky and Ohio, but 
much of his real learning has been attained through 
self help. 

Mr. Crawford, when a mere youth, formed a liking 
for the sign business and when sixteen years of age, 
began his business career in a sign shop in Chicago, 
where he remained for two years, 1893 and 1894. He 
then went to New York City and was employed in a 
sign shop there for one year, after which he went to 
Boston, engaged in the sign business and remained 
there five years. He went on the road for a large 
sign and advertising company of the East and trav- 
eled in practically every state in the Union. Texas 
was in his itinerary and when he reached Houston he 
considered this a fertile field for this business and 




in May, 1915, organized and incorporated the present 
company in a small way, and it has grown by leaps 
and bounds since its organization. Mr. Crawford is 
a director in the Houston Poster Advertising Com- 
pany and is interested in various industries in Hous- 
ton. Mr. Crawford is a member of the A. F. and 
A. M., with membership in Chicago, and is a mem- 
ber of the Scottish Rite body of this order to the 
32nd degree and is a Shriner of the Chicago Medina 
Temple. Mr. Crawford is optimistic as to the future 
of Houston, which he believes will soon take her 
place as the leading city of the Southwest. 

P. KALB, for upwards of three decades as- 
sociated with the prosperity and advance- 
ment of Houston, has been actively identi- 
fied with enterprises of wide scope, taking 
a leading part in shaping commercial affairs. Mr. 
Kalb is now retired, and is not actively represented 
in any of the companies he formerly directed, but 
still retains many important investments in oil 
properties, both developed and undeveloped, and has 
numerous real estate holdings, handling many deals 
along this line. He is also a director of the Houston 
National Bank, one of the strongest financial institu- 
tions in the city. Mr. Kalb was for many years 
financially interested in and managed a department 
of the Houston Ice and Brewing Association as well 
as serving as chairman of the board. He has done 
much for Houston in the way of civic development 
and has always been one of the first to come for- 
ward and invest in any new enterprise locating 
here. 

Mr. Kalb came to Houston in 1892, as superin- 
tendent of the Houston Ice and Brewing Company, 
remaining active in this organization for eighteen 
years, retiring in 1912. His entire career has been 
marked by a staunchness of character and an in- 
tegrity that has come to be associated with his name 
and has been in a large measure a factor in all his 
success as a business man. 

Mr. Kalb is a native of Germany, in which coun- 
try he was born in 1865, son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
P. Kalb. He was educated in the schools of his na- 
tive country and came to America in 1882. For one 
year he was with the Pabst Brewing Company in 
Milwaukee, then going to La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
where for two years he was in this industry. He then 
attended the Brewers Academy, in New York City, 
for one season, coming to San Antonio as plant 
superintendent, and remaining there for three and a 
half years before moving to Houston. 

Mr. Kalb was married at Houston, in 1893, to Miss 
Josephine Hauser, daughter of Christian Hauser, an 
old settler of San Antonio, and a Civil War veteran. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kalb have three children, Ervin F. 
Kalb, Elva M. Kalb and Bernard J. Kalb. They have 
one of the fine homes of the city, at 1415 Rosalie 
Avenue. Mr. Kalb is a member of the Turnverein 
Club, an organization that dates back to 1854, and 
in which he has been an officer since 1893 and at this 
time is president. Ervin F. Kalb, the eldest son, 
enlisted in the World War in 1917, serving overseas 
as lieutenant in the Trench Mortar Division, for 
six months, his entire service being fifteen months. 
He is now in the cotton business in New Orleans. 
Miss Elva M. Kalb is a talented singer and popular 
in musical and social circles in South Texas. Ber- 
nard J. Kalb graduated from high school in 1925, 
and will enter college. 



1201 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ARD G. ELLIOTT, since coming to Hous- 
ton in 1917, has represented a number of 
the leading railway supply manufacturers 
of the country in this section. Mr. Elliott 
is President of the G. F. Cotter Supply Company, 
which was organized in 1913, and which specializes 
in the selling of railway and industrial materials 
and supplies. The company is exclusive Southwest- 
ern representative of the American Steel Foundries, 
the Duff Manufacturing Company, the Elliot Frog 
and Switch Works, Ramapo-Ajax Corporation, the 
Henry Giessel Company, The Heywood-Wakefield 
Company, Manning, Maxwell and Moore, Inc., The 
Nathan Manufacturing Company, the Perolin Com- 
pany of America, the Pollak Steel Company, The 
Premier Staybolt Company, the Railroad Supply 
Company, the Rome Iron Mills, Inc., the Simplified 
Steam Chest Company, the Standard Railway Equip- 
ment Company and the Union Metal Products Com- 
pany. 

The Houston office of the G. F. Cotter Supply 
Company is in the Union National Bank Building. 
Simon M. Dolan is Vice-President. 

Card G. Elliott was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
the third of September, 1877, and was educated in 
the schools of Ohio and Kansas. At the age of 
fifteen he entered the railroad business, continuing 
therein for twenty-three years, during which he was 
connected with the operating and executive depart- 
ments of various railroads of the West and South- 
west. His last railroad service was in the capacity 
of Assistant to Chief Operating Officer, Missouri 
Kansas and Texas Lines, which position he resigned 
in 1917 to accept his present position as President 
of the G. F. Cotter Supply Company. 

Mr. Elliott was married in 1906 to Miss Mary 
Olive Malone. They reside in Houston, at 912 Col- 
quitt Avenue, and have two children, Mary Alice 
and Card G. Elliott, Jr. Mr. Elliott is a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, the Houston Country Club, 
the Houston Club, the Lumberman's Club, the Ki- 
wanis Club, the Traffic Club, the Salesmanship Club 
and is a Mason, Blue Lodge, Dallas, Thirty-Second 
degree, Scottish Rite, and belongs to Arabia Temple 
Shrine at Houston. 

ALE C. ROGERS, for the past five years 
a factor in the development of the adver- 
tising business at Houston, has during that 
time been variously identified with phases 
of this important commercial activity, and for the 
past two years of the time has been operating one 
of the biggest advertising agencies here. The 
Rogers-Gano Advertising Agency, Incorporated, of 
which Mr. Rogers is president and general mana- 
ger, was established in December, 1920, by Mr. 
Rogers and R. C. Gano, vice president and in charge 
of the Chicago office, in association with Mr. C. S. 
Johnson, secretary and treasurer. They give their 
attention to all phases of newspaper and magazine 
advertising and direct mail advertising, representing 
newspapers and publishing companies from all over 
the United States. The Rogers-Gano Advertising 
Agency has handled many important contracts, and 
gives careful attention to the business of the large 
industrial advertisers. This company has estab- 
lished a reputation for turning out copy and hand- 
ling contracts that get results. The Rogers-Gano 
Company maintains their office in the Humble 
Building, and have five trained men in the office, 




working under the direction of Mr. Rogers. 

Dale C. Rogers was born in the Ozark Mountains 
of Arkansas, near Springfield, the fifteenth of Octo- 
ber, 1894, son of C. M. Rogers, a native of Arkansas, 
now living in Houston, and Mary Lee Rogers, also a 
native of that state. Mr. Rogers attended the public 
schools of Springfield, Missouri, and later Drury 
College. He then went to the University of Mis- 
souri, specializing in journalism and advertising. 
From this institution Mr. Rogers began on the 
Springfield Republic, one of the leading newspapers 
of that city, as advertising man. After a year he 
came to Houston, and was with the Houston Chron- 
icle for a short time in the advertising department. 
He then went with the Hughes Tool Company, as 
advertising manager, and then to Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, where he had charge of the advertising of 
the United Iron Works. After a short time he 
returned to Houston, with the Reed-Roller Bit Com- 
pany, as advertising director and sales manager. 
He resigned this position in 1920 to establish his 
own agency. 

Mr. Rogers was married, first at Springfield, 
Missouri, in 1916, to Miss Lucile Lovan, now de- 
ceased, and by whom he had two children, Dale R. 
Junior, and Babiee. He was married for the second 
time the twentieth of April, 1920, to Miss Jennie 
V. Lovan, sister of his first wife. They have one 
child, Gine. The family make their home at 1601 
Minnesota Street. Mr. Rogers is past president 
of the Houston Advertising Club, a member of the 
Salesmanship Club and the University Club, and 
president of the 10th District Associated Advertis- 
ing Club of the World. 

^TlHARLES R. WESTMORELAND of Houston, 
^i is well known in the insurance circles of 
this city and of South Texas, where for 
the past twelve years he has devoted his 
entire attention to this business in Houston, and 
prior to entering this line of endeavor here he was 
for two years engaged in the insurance business at 
Eagle Lake. Mr. Westmoreland is the owner of the 
insurance business conducted under the name of 
W. H. Kirkland and Company, with office located 
at First National Bank Building, and is among the 
largest concerns of its kind in Houston. This busi- 
ness was organized in 1903 and Mr. Westmoreland 
purchased the interests of the several partners, and 
has since conducted the business alone. W. H. Kirk- 
land and Company are General Agents of the Ocean 
Accident and Guaranty Corporation and is local 
agent for the Hartford, Commercial Union, Conti- 
nental, The Alliance of Philadelphia, and Aetna 
Underwriters. Fifteen people are employed in the 
Houston office and about twenty local agents for 
the Ocean Accident and Guaranty Company are lo- 
cated in the adjacent counties. This company also 
handles a large volume of cotton insurance, which 
alone makes a very large and important business. 

A native Texan, Mr. Westmoreland was born at 
Tyler June 30, 1889. His father, W. Y. Westmore- 
land, also a native of the Lone Star State, was for 
many years engaged in the general merchandising 
business at Eagle Lake, and was well known in the 
business and financial circles of South Texas. His 
mother was Miss Beulah Newsome, a member of a 
pioneer Texas family. His education was obtained 
in the public schools of Eagle Lake, Texas, after 
which he attended the Texas A. and M. College, and 




1202 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




entered the insurance business soon after leaving 
school. 

Mr. Westmoreland was married at Eagle Lake, 
Texas, in 1912, to Miss Cleo Baughman. They have 
one son, Charles R. Westmoreland, Jr. Mr. and 
Mrs. Westmoreland reside at 419 Colquitt Avenue. 
Mr. Westmoreland is a member of the A. F. and 
A. M. and has attained to the 32nd degree in the 
Scottish Rite body of this order, and is a member 
of Arabia Temple Shrine of Houston. He is also 
a member of the River Oaks Country Club. His 
church affiliation is with the Methodist faith and 
he is an active member of the Men's Bible Class of 
that church. Mr. Westmoreland is interested in all 
matters having to do with the civic improvement, 
progress and advancement of Houston. 

^DWIN DALE SHEPHERD, General Agent 
for the Union Central Life Insurance Com- 
pany, came to Houston in 1904 and estab- 
lished his present business in May of that 
year, and since that time has devoted his attentions 
exclusively to the life insurance business. As an 
evidence of his success and the growth of Mr. Shep- 
herd's business, his increase in business is now 
upward of $2,500,000.00 each year. Mr. Shepherd 
opened this agency himself and has built it up to its 
present large proportions from a very small begin- 
ning. The business from the Houston office of the 
Union Central Life Insurance extends to forty coun- 
ties about Houston, and Mr. Shepherd covers this 
territory with a staff of thirty trained men. He 
has District Agents in various counties and sends 
Special Agents out of the Houston office when oc- 
casion demands, and has upward of $15,000,000.00 
insurance in force in the Houston district. He em- 
ploys, besides the clerical force and different agents, 
a secretary, cashier and assistant cashier at the 
Houston office and has several part-time men in the 
country districts to look after the vast amount of 
business. Mr. Shepherd maintains well appointed 
offices at 701 State National Bank Building, Hous- 
ton. 

Mr. Shepherd was born at Hamilton, Illinois, July 
25, 1876. His father, William Harrison Shepherd, 
was for many years engaged in farming in Illinois. 
His mother was Miss Ruth Bassett, a native of In- 
dianapolis, and a member of a well known family 
of that city. His early education was obtained in 
the public and high schools of Illinois, after which 
he attended a business college for a period of one 
year. After leaving college Mr. Shepherd began 
his business career in the grocery business and re- 
mained in this line of endeavor for a short time and 
then entered the insurance field. His first work 
in insurance was as Field Agent for the Prudential 
for a period of eleven months, which time was spent 
in Keokuk, Iowa. He remained with the Prudential 
and was advanced to many positions of importance 
with this company, and for the last six years spent 
with this company he was Assistant Superintendent 
in Iowa. In March, 1923, Mr. Shepherd had passed 
the quarter of a century mark in the insurance busi- 
ness, and is one of the outstanding men in this line 
in Texas. 

Mr. Shepherd was married at Keoduk, Iowa, De- 
cember 24, 1901, to Miss Mamie Nagel, a native of 
Cincinnati, and a daughter of Frank Nagel, well 
known foundry manufacturer, but now deceased. 
They have four children, Edwin Dale Shepherd, Jr., 




Mary Alice, Alvin Russell and Henry Harrison. Mr. 
Shepherd is a member of the Rotary Club, the Glen- 
brook Country Club, and the Houston Chamber of 
Commerce. He is a consistent member of the Chris- 
tion Church. Mr. Shepherd is enthusiastic as to the 
future of Houston and believes that this city is des- 
tined to soon become the greatest city in the South. 

JLFRED J. SHUDDE, of Houston, Texas, has 
devoted his entire life to the hat business, 
and has by close application mastered every 
detail of the business up to the executive 
end of it. Mr. Shudde, with his three brothers, B. 
W., J. A. and H. G. Shudde, own and operate 
Shudde's Southern Hat Company, exclusive dealers 
in hats and are the largest retail hatters in Texas. 
This business was established by the Shudde Broth- 
ers, in a small way in 1907 at 808 Preston Avenue, 
and at that time were retail hat dealers and clean- 
ers. The Shudde's Southern Hat Company have a 
factory in this city, where they manufacture fine 
felt and Panama hats. They also do a large business 
in remodeling hats, and only the most skilled men 
are employed in this work. This is the largest 
plant of its kind in the State, and is operated in con- 
nection with their two retail stores. Thirty-five 
people are employed at this factory. They have 
two stores, one of which is located at Travis and 
Preston Streets, where six people are employed and 
where a large stock is carried at all times. In 1924, 
their magnificent store located at 616 Main Street 
was opened, and is one of the show places of Hous- 
ton, with more than two hundred dozen hats on dis- 
play. Their splendid fixtures were manufactured in 
Houston, and are a great advantage in the display 
of the merchandise of this store, together with all 
modern lighting equipment. Five people are em- 
ployed at the magnificent Main Street store of the 
Shudde's Southern Hat Company, which is an inno- 
vation in the hat business of Houston, and is due 
to the enterprise of the Shudde Brothers, who are 
all active in the business. 

A native Texan, Mr. Shudde was born in Fayette 
County, on August 14, 1888. His father, H. T. 
Shudde, is now retired from active business pur- 
suits, and is living quietly in his home in this city. 
His education was obtained in the schools of Fay- 
ette County, and later entered the Houston public 
schools, and began as a boy in the hat business with 
his brothers. 

Mr. Shudde was married at Houston on January 
19, 1918, to Miss Lillie Kluever, a native Texan, and 
a member of a pioneer family of the Southern por- 
tion of the State. They have one son, Weldon Glenn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shudde reside at 4422 Woodside 
Avenue. Mr. Shudde is a member of the A. F. and 
A. M. with membership in Temple Blue Lodge of 
Houston, and is a member of many of the civic or- 
ganizations of the city in which he takes an active 
interest. Mr. Shudde is an enthusiastic booster for 
Houston and never loses an opportunity to speak a 
good word for his city, which he believes will soon be- 
come the metropolis of the Southwest. The Shudde 
establishment is an example of what can be accom- 
plished through specializing in one line of business, 
coupled with modern ideas and thrift. Mr. Shudde 
is regarded as one of the most enterprising business 
men of this city, and is always working for the 
progress and advancement of his institution and of 
Houston. 



1205 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARLES S. DROUET has for almost fif- 
teen years been associated with the Marine 
^| industry of Houston and in the meteoric 
growth of this business, occasioned by the 
vast increase in water shipping, he has been a fac- 
tor in supplying boats and towing which has been 
required in his line. Mr. Drouet is President of the 
D. W. Ryan Tow Boat Company, Inc., with office 
located in the Larendon Building, and has spent all 
of his life in the Marine business. This company 
was founded by Dan W. Ryan, who died in 1922, 
and is engaged in a general ocean and harbor towing 
and sand and shell business. They are well equip- 
ped for the handling of this business, owning six 
boats — Orion, Neches, Helen Henderson, Dan Ryan, 
Edmond Browne and the Ellis. They also have two 
large oil barges, one dredge boat and six shell and 
sand barges, and employ about fifty men. The 
Board of Directors of the D. W. Ryan Tow Boat 
Company, Inc., are Chas. S. Drouet, Edward Minor, 
Claude Minor, Elbert Roberts and M. L. Trost. 

A native Texan, Mr. Drouet was born in Galves- 
ton August 18, 1870. His father, Capt. Sebastian 
Drouet, was a veteran of the seas, his parents 
having brought him to Galveston at the age of two 
years, and spent his life on the high seas. He was 
a pilot on the Confederate Gun Boat, "Bayou City," 
during the Civil War at the age of twenty-two years, 
and was a Galveston bar pilot during the last thirty 
years of his life. Mr. Drouet's education was ob- 
tained in the public and high schools of Galveston. 
After finishing school Mr. Drouet began his busi- 
ness career in steamship building and repairing as 
a mechanical engineer for large steamship compa- 
nies, and later was engaged in this business for 
himself at Galveston. In 1909 he came to Houston 
as manager of the Buffalo Bayou Company, which 
was later purchaser by Dan W. Ryan of Port Arthur, 
Texas, and he remained as manager of the com- 
pany under the new ownership. After Mr. Ryan's 
death in 1922, Mr. Drouet had the Port Arthur firm 
moved to Houston in August, 1922, and consolidated 
the two firms. 

Mr. Drouet was married at Galveston in 1900 to 
Miss Mary W. Steinhoff, a native of Galveston, and 
a daughter of Captain Charles Steinhoff, who was 
for many years a prominent contractor and builder 
of the upper Bay country. Mr. and Mrs. Drouet re- 
side at 4630 Walker Avenue. Mr. Drouet was State 
Pilot Commissioner for five years prior to the city 
of Houston taking over this department. Mr. Drouet 
is optimistic as to the future of Houston and be- 
lieves since the deep water has become a reality, 
that nothing can prevent this city from becoming 
the leading city and port of the Southwest. 

I H. PHELPS, owner of the Houston Planing 
j Mill at 3519 McKinney Avenue, has been 
a resident of Houston for thirty-six years 
and is regarded as one of the most skilled 
and best posted men in woodwork of all kinds, in 
the city. Mr. Phelps started the Houston Planing 
Mill on a small scale in 1898, and he now has a plant 
one hundred feet by ninety feet in size, equipped 
with everything to be found in a modern planing 
mill. Mr. Phelps does a general milling business, 
sash and door manufacturing and cabinet work. He 
also does a large business for the various lumber 
yards of Houston on special orders and general mill- 
ing work. 




A native Texan, Mr. Phelps was born at La Grange 
in 1872. His father, E. C. Phelps (deceased), a na- 
tive of Virginia, came to Texas soon after the close 
of the Civil War and spent the remainder of his 
life in the Lone Star State. His mother (now de- 
ceased) was Miss Fannie Louise Blanton, a member 
of a well known Virginia family. His education was 
obtained in the public and high schools of La Grange, 
Texas, and Mr. Phelps left his native town at the 
age of sixteen years and learned the trade of a 
carpenter by working as an apprentice in various 
parts of Texas, Louisiana and other states, and 
came to Houston and was employed by the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company for a period of ten 
years in their Houston shops. At the ends of that 
period, Mr. Phelps suffered a serious accident and 
was unable to pursue his vocation for a period of 
one and one-half years, when he opened the Hous- 
ton Planing Mill and has been active in this work 
since that time and has met with great success in 
this business. 

Mr. Phelps was married in Houston in 1910 to Miss 
Lola Hardesty, a native Texan and a daugther of 
R. T. Hardesty, a pioneer in the lumber business of 
the state. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps reside at 1402 Ver- 
mont Street. Mr. Phelps has always been active in 
the business and general community life of Houston 
and gives liberally of his time and means to all 
projects tending to the welfare and advancement of 
this city. During his thirty-six years of residence 
in Houston, Mr. Phelps has noted many changes, and 
he believes that the future of this city is one of un- 
limited possibilities for continued growth and ad- 
vancement, and with thirty feet of water in the chan- 
nel, the bonds for which have been issued, will give 
to Houston a great harbor, and it will become the 
leading city of the Southwest. 

AMES B. EARTHMAN has for almost two 
decades been allied with the funeral direct- 
ing and embalming profession at Houston. 

He is the owner of the Earthman-McCarty 

Company, Funeral Directors and Embalmers, a firm 
which was established in 1907 as a partnership, by 
Mr. Earthman and J. L. McCarty. After the death 
of Mr. McCarty, which occurred in 1921, Mr. Earth- 
man has operated the business alone. The establish- 
ment is located at 1011 Milam Street, where they 
have their chapel, show rooms, and other of the 
usual departments incident to this profession. The 
Earthman-McCarty Company has two motor ambu- 
lances, motor hearse and other equipment, offering 
quiet, careful and courteous service to their patrons. 
They have four assistants, also well trained in the 
work. 

Mr. Earthman was born at Winchester, Fayette 
County, Texas, the eighteenth of August, 1866, son 
of I. Y. Earthman, a native of Missouri, who came 
to Fayette County in 1836, and was a farmer there 
and in Williamson County all his life, and Sarah 
Mitchell Earthman, a native of the Lone Star State. 
Mr. Earthman attended the public schools of Fay- 
ette County and at the age of eighteen left home 
and went on a ranch in Jones County, and later on 
a ranch in Haskell County. He then returned to 
Williamson County and went in the transfer and 
storage business, then in the undertaking business 
at Taylor, Texas, where he spent fifteen years. He 
came to Houston in 1905 and went with the Stowers 
Furniture Company for two years, after which he, 




1206 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




with Mr. McCarty, established his present business. 

Mr. Earthman was married at Taylor, Texas, the 
twenty-third of November, 1892, to Miss May Mc- 
Cool, a native of Kentucky, who was reared at Tay- 
lor, where he mother, Mrs. Ella McCool, was en- 
gaged in business. Mr. and Mrs. Earthman have four 
children, a daughter, Sister M. Perpetua, a Catholic 
Sister, now at Beaumont, Texas, a daughter, Jamie, 
at home, a daughter, Addie, at Rice Institute, and a 
son, J. B., Junior, also a student at Rice Institute. 
The family live at 1011 Milam Street, and attend the 
Catholic Church. Mr. Earthman is a Knight of Co- 
lumbus. 

NTHONY ARMBRUSTER, pioneer resident 
of Houston, and veteran laundry owner of 
this city, has for upwards of two score 
years been associated with the prosperity of 
his community, and has spent three decades active- 
ly engaged in the laundry industry. Mr. Armbruster 
is the proprietor of the American Laundry, which 
he established in 1894, in a small way, growing with 
the city and prospering as it prospered, until the 
American Laundry is now one of the largest here. 
Mr. Armbruster has a modern plant at 1302 and 
1304 Washington Avenue, with sixty by one hundred 
and eighty feet of floor space. His plant is equipped 
with modern power machinery and special equipment 
for handling various services offered his patronage. 
He operates a complete laundry service, giving the 
housewife a wide range of choice and also has a 
complete dry cleaning and dyeing department. In 
this department, as in the laundry proper, all equip- 
ment is of the best and most approved type and 
assures the customer the best work possible. Mr. 
Armbruster employs around seventy-five operatives, 
who work under the best conditions and in whom he 
takes an active interest. Twelve cars are used to 
expedite delivery service. Mr. Armbruster has no 
partnership affiliations, operating the business as 
sole proprietor. 

Mr. Armbruster was born at Lynchburg, Texas, in 
November, 1874, son of A. and Marietta Lemuel 
Armbruster. His father died when he was a small 
boy and he came to Houston, living with an aunt, 
Mrs. Grenough, and attending the Houston public 
schools. As a boy he sold papers on the streets of 
Houston and later became a messenger boy for the 
Western Union Telegraph Company. Still later he 
worked in various dry goods establishments and in 
laundries, oil mills and other industries. He started 
in business for himself in 1893 in a very small way, 
but after a short period of operation went broke, 
going to work in a laundry until he had saved up 
enough money to make a second start, and again 
opened his business in a small way. For many years 
the laundry was known as Armbruster's Laundry, 
but later, when Mr. Armbruster took over the old 
American Laundry, combining the two plants, he 
changed the name to the American Laundry. 

Mr. Armbruster was married in Houston the sev- 
enteenth of September, 1892, to Miss Florence Cagle, 
a native of Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Armbruster 
have a family of nine children, Clifton E., with his 
father in the laundry business, as assistant plant 
manager; Chester L.; Gladys, wife of Frank Mc- 
Loughlin; Florence, wife of C. M. Mather; Ivy; Mil- 
dred, Vernon, Howard and Robert. They make their 
home at 320 Sidney Street, while Mr. Armbruster 
resides at 1511 Leeland Avenue. 




OBERT J. PETER, of LaGrange, Texas, 
wholesale dealer in turkeys, chickens and 
eggs, has done much in developing and en- 
couraging the poultry industry in Texas. 
Mr. Peter for a time maintained headquarters in 
Houston, but for the past several years has conducted 
his business from LaGrange, shipping in carload 
lots. His branch houses in Texas are located at 
the following points: Cameron, Giddings, New Ulm, 
and Rockdale, besides many men who buy on com- 
mission for him at other points in the state. Twen- 
ty-seven people are on their regular pay rolls and 
fifteen on a commission basis, and during the tur- 
key shipping season of November and December, 
they work more than two hundred women pickers. 
Mr. Peter originated the famous "Peter Rabbit 
Egg" and only eggs of the first quality go into this 
established and popular brand. 

A native Texan, Mr. Peter was born at Winches- 
ter, August 23rd, 1888. His father, J. A. Peter, 
came to the United States and to Texas in the early 
days with a colony of forty-two Germans from the 
land of their nativity and settled at Serbin, where 
for many years he was engaged in the ginning 
business, and was known for many miles around 
as the leading ginner of that section. His mother 
was Miss Theresa Killiam. His education was ob- 
tained in the public and high schools of Winchester. 
Mr. Peter began in a small way in the poultry 
business at Winchester, Texas, after which he was 
able to branch out through the advantage of hav- 
ing capital with which to do so. In September, 1916, 
he began his business at LaGrange, and in 1917 
established the branch house at Giddings, later at 
Cameron and the other branch houses were estab- 
lished in 1922. Mr. Peter was worried about mar- 
keting his first order of 400 cases of eggs, and now 
he sells in many instances, ten carloads at an order. 
Mr. Peter was married at Winchester, Texas, on 
September 1st, 1920, to Miss Posey Elizabeth Gates, 
a daughter of Charles S. Gates, a well known Fay- 
ette County druggist, and member of a pioneer 
Texas family. They have two children, Robert J. 
Peter, Jr., and Rosemary. Mr. Peter is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, the Texas and Na- 
tional Poultry and Egg Association, and the Luther- 
an Church. Mr. Peter is enthusiastic as to the fu- 
ture of Texas as a poultry state, and while much 
poultry is produced here now, he believes that within 
a period of ten years that Texas will supply seventy- 
five per cent of the entire turkey crop. He con- 
siders the climate in Texas to be especially adapted 
to poultry raising, but that the farmers will have 
to become educated to it, in order to know the many 
great advantages offered here. In Fayette County 
the bankers there report to Mr. Peter that poultry 
and eggs brought in more money annually than the 
cotton crop and that this condition had prevailed in 
that vicinity for several years. In Brazos County, 
at Bryan, the citizens are trying for one million 
hens in its territory, and are building big incubators 
and expect to have only Leghorn variety of eggs 
to hatch out in the incubators, thereby making this 
point one of the largest Leghorn chicken districts 
in the entire country. Mr. Peter has stirred up a 
great deal of interest among the farmers as to 
poultry raising and at all times stresses the fact 
that he is an advocate of raising for market and 
selling only fowls of a good quality. 



1209 



MEN OF TEXAS 




AYMOND PEARSON, one of Houston's 
native sons, and for many years connected 
with the automobile industry in the city, and 
well known in the trade, has made a credit- 
able record along all lines and is firmly established 
as a citizen whose influence is felt in every walk of 
life. Mr. Pearson is the owner and manager of the 
Raymond Pearson Dealership for Ford, Fordson and 
Lincoln Automobiles, and has been instrumental in 
selling a record number of these popular cars and 
tractors. Mr. Pearson established the agency the 
nineteenth of October, 1916, in a small way, occupy- 
ing small space and with nine employees. Under 
his management the business has grown by leaps 
and bounds and is now one of the largest automobile 
companies in the city. Mr. Pearson has a modern 
fireproof building, completed in March, 1917, and 
comprising three floors with a total of twenty-seven 
thousand square feet of floor space and employing 
more than fifty salesmen and operatives. He has 
built up a live wire sales organization and each year 
sees a real increase over the preceding year. The 
first floor of the building, on Main Street, at the 
viaduct, is devoted to the offices, show rooms and 
service departments. On the second floor a com- 
pletely equipped repair department renders a service 
of exceptional quality to the Ford, Fordson and Lin- 
coln owners of this section. The basement is used 
as an assembly department and is completely equip- 
ped and in charge of expert operatives. 

Raymond Pearson was born at Houston the fif- 
teenth of March, 1891. His father, J. A. Pearson, 
formerly of Tennessee, came here in 1875 and was 
for many years a farmer and cattleman with exten- 
sive interests near Houston. He removed to Hous- 
ton m 1900 and has since retired from active life. 
His mother, before her marriage, Miss Addie Dolen^ 
of Missouri, has made her home in Houston for 
many years. Mr. Pearson was educated in the pub- 
lis schools of his native city and after leaving school 
went with the Southwestern Paper Company re- 
maining with that firm for one year. He then began 
in the Union National Bank, in 1908, leaving that 
institution in 1916 as auditor. In 1916 he established 
his present business and has since taken a leading 
part m the development of the automobile business. 
Mr. Pearson was married in Houston the tenth of 
September, 1913, to Miss Mattie M. Hendrie, a native 
of this city and daughter of Robert M. Hendrie, of 
Scotland, and a resident of Houston for the past 
three decades. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson have three 
children, Raymond, Junior, Robertson and Rose 
Mary. They have an attractive home at 1507 West 
Alabama Avenue. Mr. Pearson is a member of 
various civic and social clubs, such as the Houston 
Club, the Houston Country Club, the Polo Club, the 
Kotary Club, the Lumberman's Clubs, the Elks Club 
and the Salesmanship Club, of which he is Past 
President. He is also Chairman of the Alexander 
Hamilton Institute Study Group, a member of the 
Advisory Committee on Educational work of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, and Director of 
the Chamber of Commerce. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, Gray Blue Lodge No. 329, Thirty-Second 
degree Scottish Rite, is a Knight Templar and a 
member of Arabia Temple Shrine. Mr Pearson 
as a business man is efficient and a constructive 
thinker, a master executive, and although a young 

me a n'and S af a faTr a s! Ure ^^ "* **** t0 ha " dle 




L. WALKER has for more than three de- 
cades been identified with commercial and 
industrial activities at Houston, and for the 
past several years has been a factor in the 
automotive industry as distributor for several well 
known makes of automobile parts. Mr. T. L. Walk- 
er established this business in 1916 and since that 
time he had charge of the distribution of Timkens, 
Hyatt and New Departure Bearings, and D. and B. 
Timing Gears. These lines represent the standard 
in bearings and timing gears, and since undertaking 
their distribution Mr. Walker has built up a large 
and profitable business in this territory. He carries 
a full line of stock, and his store, at 1517 Main 
Street, is well located for this business. Mr. Walker 
makes a point of real service, and has under him two 
trained men who make Walker Bearing Service syn- 
onomous with superior service. Prior to establishing 
this business he was engaged in other branches of 
the automobile business for a time and thoroughly 
understands the demands of the trade. His business 
is both wholesale and retail, and is entirely under his 
personal supervision. 

T. L. Walker is a native of the Lone Star State, 
and was born at Lufkin, Texas, the fifth of June, 
1878. His father, R. P. Walker, has been for many 
years a resident of Lufkin, and still makes his home 
in that city. His mother, whose death occurred 
when the subject of this sketch was a small child, 
was before her marriage Miss Hattie Roberts. Mr. 
Walker received his education in the public schools 
of his native city and after leaving school was for 
a number of years in a grocery store there. He 
later went with the railroads, in the car and air de- 
partment, and was a foreman of these departments 
for five years, and for ten years locomotive engi- 
neer, with the Southern Pacific Railroad, with his 
headquarters at Houston. He then went with J. M. 
West, remaining with him for a year and a half, 
after which he established an automobile repair 
business, which he operated until 1916, at which 
time his present business was organized and he 
took charge of the distribution of Timken, Hyatt 
and New Departure Bearings and D. and B. Timing 
Gears. 

Mr. Walker was married at Houston, in 1900, to 
Miss Essie Langston, a native of the Lone Star 
State. Mr. and Mrs. Walker make their home at 
1203 Rosedale Avenue, and have one child, a daugh- 
ter, Frances Sue. Mr. Walker is a Blue Lodge 
Mason, Thirty-Second degree, Scottish Rite, Knight 
Templar, and a member of Arabia Temple Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
a member of Division 139, Locomotive Engineers, 
and a consistent member of the Baptist Church.' 
He has hosts of friends in Houston who appreciate 
his sterling qualities, and regard him as a valued 
addition to the business world here. 

D. JOHNSON, manager of the Western 
Auto Supply Company branch at Houston, 
came here early in 1924 to establish this 
__ — business and take over its management, and 
has made a splendid record in the automotive mer- 
chandising field. The Western Auto Supply Com- 
pany, one of the largest businesses of its kind in the 
country, has its headquarters at Kansas City, where 
the president, Don A. Davis, a native Texan, resides. 
Four branches are maintained in Texas, one at Dal- 
las, one at Fort Worth, one at San Antonio, and the 




1210 




/°^Y. 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



one at Houston. The Houston branch was estab- 
lished on the third of March, 1924, with six em- 
ployees. Under Mr. Johnson's management the 
growth of this branch has been very rapid, the busi- 
ness increasing to such an extent that after a year 
of operation the employment force had mounted 
to more than thirty. In addition to the large local 
trade the branch does an extensive mail order busi- 
ness, featuring twenty-four hour service, and serv- 
ing a trade territory that covers South and South- 
east Texas and Southern Louisiana. 

R. D. Johnson was born in Travis County, Texas, 
the twenty-fourth of December, 1897, son of S. T. 
Johnson, and Mrs. Bettie (Jones) Johnson, natives 
of Tennessee, who now reside in Dallas. Mr. John- 
son was educated in the schools of Texas and served 
in the United States Army three years during the 
World War, and prior to his enlistment had been 
engaged in government work at San Antonio for sev- 
eral years. After leaving the service Mr. Johnson 
went with the Western Auto Supply Company at 
Dallas, beginning at the bottom, and working his 
way to a responsible position with the Dallas branch 
in a short time. When the Houston branch was 
opened his record of service resulted in his appoint- 
ment to the managership of the new branch, and he 
has since held this position. 

Mr. Johnson was married at San Antonio on the 
ninth of March, 1923, to Miss Rosalie Rader, daugh- 
ter of J. L. Rader and Mrs. Rosalie (Hall) Rader. 
Mr. Rader, a native of Missouri, has lived in Texas 
for many years, making his home in San Antonio. 
Mrs. Rader is a native Texan. Mr. and Mrs. John- 
son reside at 950 Redan Street. Mr. Johnson is a 
Mason, Dallas Lodge, No. 760, and belongs to the 
Houston Chamber of Commerce and the Methodist 
Church. 

AT L. DAVIS, although a young man, has 
had a wide, varied and successful business 
career and since establishing the Davis Mo- 
tor Company, in Houston, of which he is the 
sole owner, he has been unusually successful in this 
business also. Mr. Davis is dealer for the Ford, Ford- 
son and Lincoln cars and has one of the finest 
plants in Houston, with a floor space of 10,000 
square feet and employs forty people. He began 
business in Houston in August, 1921, at 905 San Ja- 
cinto Street, with twelve employees and remained 
there until his fine building was finished. This 
splendid building, located at 1500 Congress Avenue 
at La Branch Street, was completed in April, 1922, 
and was constructed by Mr. Davis for this business, 
and besides being a splendid and ornate building is 
absolutely fireproof. The Davis Motor Company 
have in this magnificent building their attractive 
show rooms, offices, parts department and their 
shops, where they have experienced a wonderful 
growth in their business and are among the leading 
Ford dealers in this portion of Texas, where Mr. 
Davis has a host of friends. Since the business was 
first started the volume done each year has increased 
five hundred per cent. It has been necessary to take 
care of the expansion by putting up an additional 
plant on property located immediately across the 
street from the original building. 

A native Texan, Mr. Davis was born at Maysfield, 
Milam County, in 1888. His father, L. P. Davis (de- 
ceased since 1911) was also a native of the Lone Star 




State, where he was a prominent Methodist minister 
known in all portions of the state, where he had 
preached in the churches of this denomination and 
was loved by all who knew him. His mother (now 
deceased) was Miss Fannie Patton, a member of a 
pioneer Texas family. Mr. Davis attended public 
schools in practically every portion of the state, 
where his father was pastor, and later was a stu- 
dent at the Southwestern University of Georgetown 
and left this institution in 1904 in order to join the 
army of the United States. He was consigned to 
Company K, 26th Infantry and was first stationed 
at Brownsville, Texas, and later went to Manila. Mr. 
Davis received his discharge from the United States 
army March 5th, 1907, and re-enlisted on the same 
day and served until June, 1909, when he was again 
discharged. He then entered th adjutant general's 
department as civil clerk and later entered the Man- 
ila police department and still later became con- 
nected with the internal revenue department and 
continued in this service until April 8th, 1911, when 
he left the Island on account of his father's death 
and returned to Texas and has since that time re- 
mained in the States. His first work here was at 
Alvin, Texas where he was connected with the ice 
plant, but remained in this business only a short 
time, when he went with the Citizens State Bank 
of Alvin and remained with this institution from 
September, 1911, to August, 1915, when he went to 
Galveston and was in charge of the May shipments 
to Europe and continued in this work until May, 
1916. He then went with the Dow Motor Company 
of Houston where he remained from August to De- 
cember, 1916, when he organized the Texas Motor 
Company, Inc., Ford dealers with agencies at Col- 
umbus, Schulenburg and La Grange, Texas. He re- 
mained as the executive head of this firm until Aug- 
ust, 1917, when he sold out and organized the La 
Grange Motor Company, Inc. and on August 25th of 
the same year, Mr. Davis dissolved the corporation 
and in August, 1919, took over the ownership of the 
business and continued the business as manager and 
owner until July 1st, 1921, when he sold out and 
came to Houston as Ford dealer here and where he 
has met with unusual success and his business is 
still growing. 

Mr. Davis was married at Alvin, Texas, June 21st, 
1914 to Miss Myrtle King, a native of Alvin and a 
daughter of R. H. King, who has been a resident of 
Alvin for more than thirty years and is well known 
in the business circles of South Texas. They have 
two children, Elizabeth and Pat L. Davis, Jr. Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis reside at 408 Avondale Street, in 
the beautiful Montrose Addition. Mr. Davis is a 
member of the A. F. & A. M., with membership in 
Fayette Lodge No. 34 and has attained to the 32nd 
degree in the Scottish Rite body of this order, is a 
member of Galveston Consistory No. 1 and is a 
Shriner of Arabia Temple, Houston. He is also a 
member of the Kiwanis Club, Civitan Club and the 
Motor League. Mr. Davis is a member of the faculty 
of the Houston School of Technology, teaching ad- 
vanced sales practice. He is an ardent amateur ath- 
lete, having a special liking for boxing and wrest- 
ling. Mr. Davis has great faith in the future of 
Houston and has shown this faith in his several in- 
vestments here and expects Houston to soon take 
her place as the leading city of the entire Southwest 



1213 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN MILBY, who is well known in Harris- 
burg for his numerous business affairs rela- 
tive to the prosperity of his city, has been 
for many years one of the vital forces for 
progress in his community and enjoys the esteem 
of his fellow citizens. Whether as cattleman, bank- 
er, merchant, or individual citizen it is doubtful if 
any individual name has a larger command of re- 
spect and admiration than has his. Mr. Milby has 
recently organized the Milby Motor Company, at 
Harrisburg, a firm which is selling a record number 
of cars in that territory. Mr. Milby has for twelve 
years been a factor in the cattle raising industry in 
that section, in association with Walter Williams. 
He runs about three thousand head of cattle, of the 
Brahma strain, marketing his calves, which due to 
present market conditions, will bring as much as 
two cows. Mr. Milby has recently given much at- 
tention to diseases of cattle, especially a new di- 
sease that has made its appearance, attacking prin- 
cipally cattle of Brahma blood. No one seems to 
know just what causes it, or how to combat it, but 
there has been a theory advanced that it is due to 
dipping. Mr. Milby's observations are based on his 
own experience, and he is working in co-operation 
from veterinaries from all over the country in order 
to find the cause and eradicate the disease. 

Mr. Milby was born at Harrisburg, the twenty- 
ninth of September, 1880, son of C. H. Milby, who 
was born in Lavaca County, and Maggie Todd Milby. 
Mrs. Milby's father, J. G. Todd, was a seafaring 
man, and during the war with Mexico served in the 
Texas Navy, as an officer. His navy sword, which 
has been preserved, is one of the most cherished 
possessions of his family. Mr. Milby's grandfather, 
William Milby, came to Texas from his native State 
of Maryland, before the Civil War, locating in La- 
vaca County, where he engaged in merchandising. 

Mr. Milby was educated in the public schools of 
Harrisburg, later attending San Marcos Academy 
and Texas A. and M. College. After finishing his 
education he returned to his home and for twenty- 
five years engaged in banking, with the Planters 
and Mechanics Bank, now the Union National Bank. 
He then turned his attention to cattle raising, and 
for twelve years has been active in this industry. 
The first of January, 1923, he entered the automo- 
bile business, as local dealer for the Star and Du- 
rant lines, and has taken an active part in intro- 
ducing this mar in his community. 

Mr. Milby was married at Harrisburg, in 1909, 
to Miss Orlean Allen, daughter of C. D. Allen, and 
grand-daughter of S. W. Allen. Mr. and Mrs. Milby 
make their home in Harrisburg, taking an active 
part in the various social and civic events of their 
community. They are the parents of two children, 
Abbie Louise Milby and Charles Dow Milby. Mr. 
Milby is a Mason, Blue Lodge, Gray, Chapter and 
Commandery at Houston, Eighteenth Degree, at 
Houston, Thirty-Second Degree at Galveston, and a 
member of Arabia Temple Shrine, at Houston. 

Mr. Milby has been an integral part of the life at 
Harrisburg for many years. He has seen that city 
go down to a mere village of forty inhabitants, and 
come back to the present wonderful growth of today, 
a growth in which he took no small part in pro- 
moting. He served his city as City Commissioner, 
an office he filled with distinction, and wherein he 
lent every effort to encourage development. He has 




in his business activities directed his affairs in such 
a manner that his city would be benefited, as well 
as for his own individual profit, and is known as 
one of the most public sprited men of his commun- 
ity. Mr. Milby also takes a deep interest in Hous- 
ton, a city which he expects to see become the largest 
city of the South, due to the Deep Water Channel, 
and the many advantages it offers as a medium of 
progress. 

ENRY C. HOOK, for almost two decades 
a resident of Houston, and one of the best 
known automobile men of this section of 
the state, has for a number of years oper- 
ated one of the leading garages in the city, and 
has attained a commendable reputation for his 
activities in this business. Mr. Hook is the owner 
of the Hook's Garage, one of the finest and best 
equipped garages in the city, which he established 
several years ago and located, at 1017 Fannin at 
Lamar. Mr. Hook keeps his garage open twenty- 
four hours a day, and has a first-class mechanic 
on duty at all times to enable his friends and patrons 
to get the best service possible. He has a storage 
department, providing for the accommodation of a 
large number of cars, and has the usual repair, 
washing and greasing facilities. A modern system 
of washing and polishing insures the satisfaction 
of his patrons, and has won much favor among the 
automobile owners of the city. The repair depart- 
ment has all equipment for making first-class re- 
pairs on any make of car, in an efficient and sat- 
isfactory manner, and has a wrecking service oper- 
ated in connection with it. Other departments in- 
clude a well stocked automobile accessory depart- 
ment, including tires and tubes, and a filling sta- 
tion. Road service is another convenience Mr. Hook 
provides for his patrons, and a service car is kept 
ready to answer any call, either in Houston, or on 
the roads leading out of the city. 

Henry C. Hook was born at Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, the twentieth of October, 1874, son of David 
C. Hook, a native of North Carolina, who later 
went to Alabama, where his death occurred when 
the subject of this sketch was a child of two years. 
Mr. Hook's mother, before her marriage Miss Chris- 
tiana Frazier, later married again, and as Mrs. 
Claxton makes her home at Montgomery, at the 
age of seventy-nine. Mr. Hook attended the public 
schools near his home for a time, later studying 
alone, and still later, after coming to Texas, at- 
tending night school. In 1891 he joined his cousin 
in Bell County, Texas, and spent two years on his 
plantation there. He then went with the Santa 
Fe Railroad, in the water service department, and 
was stationed at Cleburne for a number of years, 
during which time he helped build the shops in 
that city. He then went to Mount Pleasant, where 
he engaged in the wholesale and retail paint busi- 
ness for three years, and also operated as a paint- 
ing contractor. Disposing of his interests there 
he went to Kansas City, Missouri, and was with 
the Kansas City Ice Company, as refrigerator engi- 
neer for two years. This was followed by a return 
to his birthplace and he spent a number of years 
in Montgomery, first as manager of two hotels 
and the power plant owned by D. P. West, and later 
with the Carolina and Virginia Chemical Works, as 
master mechanic. He came to Houston in 1905, and 
for a time was chief engineer for the Home Ice 



1214 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Company. This was followed by twelve years with 
the Henke Ice and Refrigerator Company, as chief 
engineer. He was then chief engineer with the 
Rice Hotel for one year, following this with a short 
period with the Magnolia Petroleum Company, and 
with the Houston Packing Company. Leaving the 
last named corporation, Mr. Hook went in business 
for himself, establishing the H. C. Hook Garage, 
which he has since operated. 

Mr. Hook is a Mason, Blue Lodge, Temple Lodge, 
Thirty-second Degree Scottish Rite, and is a member 
of Arabia Temple Shrine. Mr. Hook has many 
friends in the automotive industry who regard him 
as an authority in his field, and who consider his 
success well deserved. 

LEX CLARK, President of the Alex Clark 
Motor Company, Inc., of Houston, has re- 
cently come to Houston to make his home 
and business headquarters. The Alex Clark 
Motor Company was established the first of July, 
1925, and is the distributor in Southeast Texas for 
the Hudson and Essex cars, selling both wholesale 
and retail. The territory served by this company 
includes fifty-eight counties, in which some fifty 
dealers have been appointed, and the business is 
growing rapidly with every promise for a prosper- 
ous future. The Alex Clark Motor Company is well 
located, occupying a modern building on San Jacinto 
Street, at the corner of Walker, and has a force of 
about forty-five employees. The retail busines has 
grown very rapidly since the company was estab- 
lished and as the result of Mr. Clark's selling cam- 
paigns the number of Hudson and Essex owners has 
increased materially. Officers of the company, other 
than Mr. Clark, the President, are C. D. Welty, 
Vice-President, and H. E. Wyatt, Secretary. 

Alex Clark was born in London, England, Septem- 
ber 15th, 1887, and is the son of the late A. Clark 
and Mary (Punton) Clark, both of whom were na- 
tives of England. He attended the schools of Lon- 
don, and came to the United States as a young man, 
engaging in the publishing business in Kansas City 
for some years. Later he went to St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, and entered the automobile business, spending 
several years in that city. For eight years prior to 
coming to Houston he sold Hudson and Essex cars. 
In 1925 Mr. Clark came to Houston to take control 
of the Hudson-Essex distributorship here and has 
since been actively engaged in this work. 

Mr. Clark was married at Kansas City, Missouri, 
in 1910, to Miss Mary Mott, daughter of the late 
J. M. Mott, and Mary (Thomas) Mott. For several 
years J. M. Mott resided in Orange, Texas, where 
he was manager of the Lutcher-Moore Lumber Com- 
pany. Mr. and Mrs. Clark reside at 1651 Kipling 
Street, and have three children, a daughter, Lloyd, 
and two sons, James and Stanley. Mr. Clark is a 
Mason, Blue Lodge, St. Joseph, Missouri, and a mem- 
ber of the Kiwanis Club, the Chamber of Commerce 
and the First Presbyterian Church at Houston. 

ENJAMIN H. JOHNSTON since coming to 
Houston several years ago has found this 
city ripe in business advantages, and in 
addition to making a splendid record) in the 
automobile business takes pride in the accomplish- 
ments of his city and has been identified with all 
movements that have insured its progress and wel- 
fare. Mr. Johnston owns and manages the Johns- 




ton Motor Company, Ford, Fordson and Lincoln 
Dealers, and one of the most progressive automo- 
bile agencies in the city. He established the busi- 
ness the first of November, 1918, shortly after his 
arrival in the city, and has taken an influential 
part in the activities along automobile row, selling 
a record number of cars each year and establish- 
ing a reputation creditable along all lines. In 
1922 the firm moved into the fine new building at 
1119 McKinney Avenue, at San Jacinto Street, which 
they have since occupied. This building has many 
unusual features, including every precaution for 
safety, such as a complete sprinkler system, fire- 
proof construction, etc., and is one of the finest 
buildings dedicated to the automobile industry in 
the city. The building has two floors, each one 
hundred by one hundred feet, and is well arranged 
with fine offices and show rooms on the ground 
floor. Mr. Johnston sells in the neighborhood of a 
hundred cars each month, and has fifty employees. 
He operates a complete Ford agency, and has one of 
the best equipped service and parts departments in 
the city. 

Mr. Johnston was born at Fort Scott, Kansas, in 
1888, son of M. A. Johnston, a native of that state, 
and who moved to Dallas in 1904, a few years later 
removing to Houston, where he now makes his home, 
and is with his son in business. His mother, be- 
fore her marriage was Miss Minnie B. Burkholder. 
Mr. Johnston attended the public schools of Little 
Rock, Arkansas, and later of Dallas, where he fin- 
ished. Leaving school he went with the American 
Exchange National Bank of Dallas, and was with 
that institution for seven years. He then went 
with the Ford Motor Company of Dallas, as book- 
keeper in 1914, later being made chief clerk, and 
still later transferred to Fort Worth, as assistant 
branch manager. In 1917 he went to San Antonio 
as Ford dealer in that city, remaining there until 
1918. In that year he was attracted by the business 
future Houston offered and disposed of his San 
Antonio interests and came to this city, buying 
the Universal Car Company, and reorganizing and 
changing the name to the present firm name, the 
Johnston Motor Company, which he has since oper- 
ated. At the time he took over the business it was 
located in a small building, with a force of some 
twenty employees, but under his progressive man- 
agement the business grew and prospered until it 
has reached its present state of expansion, and is 
one of the largest automobile businesses in the city. 
Mr. Johnston was married at Dallas, Texas, the 
first of June, 1911, to Miss Helen Ramey, a native 
of that city and the daughter of the late T. E. 
Ramey. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston have one child, Ruth, 
and make their home at 3403 Audubon Place, where 
they have one of the most attractive residences 
in the city. Mr. Johnston is a member of several 
civic and social clubs, among them the Houston 
Club, the Houston Country Club and the River Oaks 
Country Club. Fraternally he is a Mason, Oak Cliff 
Blue Lodge No. 705, San Antonio Consistory, and a 
member of Arabia Temple Shrine Temple at Hous- 
ton. Although a resident of Houston but a few years 
he has impressed his influence on the industrial life 
of the city, and has made many friends who regard 
him as a conservative and energetic business man 
with a real future. 



1217 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN W. CANADA— For more than a de- 
cade J. W. Canada has been prominent in 
the farm paper publishing field in Texas. 
He established Southland Farmer at Hous- 
ton, is the editor and manager, and also the chief 
owner of the Southland Farmer Publishing Company, 
which publishes the paper and also owns the best 
equipped electrotype foundry in South Texas. 

From a modest beginning in 1911 Southland Far- 
mer has grown to be one of the strong farm papers, 
not only of Texas but of the entire South. Its 
editorial columns are quoted more widely than those 
of any farm paper in the whole country. Today it is 
read by one farm family of every five in the state, 
and is growing rapidly in both circulation and in- 
fluence in the farm life of the state. 

The interest of a farm paper are, or should be as 
broad as are the interests of the farmers them- 
selves. Naturally, therefore, Mr. Canada, as editor 
and also as an individual, has always taken a keen 
interest in whatever concerns the business of the 
farmer. In both capacities he has rendered an es- 
pecially distinctive service in the field of farm fi- 
nance. 

On organization of the Federal Land Bank of 
Houston, — and his work was more important than 
that of any other one man in having the bank lo- 
cated at Houston, — he busied himself in making 
known to farmers of South Texas personally the 
principles of the bank and its plan of operation, 
and aided in organizing a score or more of national 
farm loan asociations to the end that farmers might 
have ready access to the resources of the bank in 
the way of long time credits. Also the columns of 
Southland Farmer carried to farmers all over the 
state information they needed, not to be had in 
any other publication, so that they might avail them- 
selves of the benefits of the bank. He is secretary- 
treasurer and general executive officer of five as- 
sociations, covering the counties of Harris, Brazoria 
and Galveston. 

On enactment of the Agricultural Credits Act of 
1923, establishing the Intermediate Credit Bank of 
Houston, for the purpose of extending a longer term 
of credit on livestock and farm products than com- 
mercial banks could give Mr. Canada busied himself 
to find ways and means for extending its services to 
the farmers and cattlemen of South Texas especially. 

In co-operation with the officials of the Federal 
Land Bank, charged with administering the new 
act, and working with the attorneys of the bank, a 
special law was enacted, making possible the organi- 
zation of agricultural credit corporations, for the 
express purpose of handling cattle loans. In both 
planning and carrying out such a corporation some 
new principles in banking were adopted, namely, 
that such a bank should be not only owned in its 
entirety by its customers, but should be managed 
by them. 

Accordingly the Houston Agricultural Credit Cor- 
poration was organized in 1923, with Mr. Canada 
as manager, and W. S. Woodruff as assistant man- 
ager, and with a directorate of some fifteen of the 
leading cattlemen and business men of South Texas. 
Initial capital stock was $10,000, but with the proviso 
in the law that capital stock should be increased with 
each loan made to the extent of ten per cent of the 
loan. Also compensation for management is based 
on a percentage of the gross earnings of the bank- 



no fixed charges — so that any profits it may make 
on loans accrue as dividends to stockholders, and the 
stockholders are only those who make use of the 
bank. 

Operations the first year saw the capital increase 
from $10,000 to $60,000, and loans to cattlemen of 
$500,000. The source of funds for loaning is the 
Intermediate Credit Bank of Houston, with which 
the credit corporation rediscounts the notes of its 
members, such notes being secured by mortgages 
on the livestock they have. Thus a constant source 
of credit, for such time as may be needed, and at the 
rate of seven per cent per annum interest, is availa- 
ble for the livestock industry to all within the South 
Texas territory in which the corporation operates. 
This is the only banking concern of the kind in the 
United States. 

John W. Canada was born December 14th, 1871, 
at Summerfield, Guilford County, North Carolina, 
the son of William Canada. He was educated in 
public schools, preparatory schools and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, where he was given the de- 
gree of A. B. in 1896. He is a member of the Phi 
Beta Kappa. On graduation he established a pre- 
paratory school at the seat of the university and also 
continued his studies in the graduate school for five 
years. 

In 1900 he went to Colorado, and for some years 
was engaged in independent newspaper and maga- 
zine work, traveling over many western and southern 
states, studying their agricultural conditions and 
familiarizing himself generally with agricultural 
problems. He came to Texas in 1905, publishing 
weekly newspapers in Southwest Texas, coming to 
Houston in 1907, where he has been engaged in the 
publishing business since. He is also vice president 
and treasurer of the Western Chemical Corporation 
of Houston, engaged in manufacturing and handling 
products used by cattlemen and farmers. 

Mr. Canada was married in 1910 to Miss Verona 
Keener, at Lake Charles, Louisiana. They reside at 
La Porte, a suburb of Houston on Galveston Bay, 
some twenty-five miles from Houston, where they 
have a very attractive home. They have one child, 
ten years old, Jane Verona Canada. 

1RTHUR J. FITTGER, for more than a de- 
cade identified with commercial activities at 
5j Houston, has for the past several years been 
associated with the laundry industry, attain- 
ing a commendable reputation therein. Mr. Fittger 
is vice president and manager of the Ineeda Laundry 
and Cleaning Company, Incorporated, one of the 
largest laundries in the city. The Ineeda Laundry 
and Cleaning Company operates a complete laundry 
and cleaning business, giving to their patrons a 
a choice of several modes of handling the family 
wash, designed to meet the needs of the patrons, 
and also has a complete dry cleaning plant, equipped 
to handle all work, including the finest and most 
delicate garments. The Ineeda company has a large, 
modern plant at Smith and Rusk Avenues, where 
they occupy a two story building, each floor one 
hundred and fifty feet square, and employing two 
hundred operatives. They have every provision for 
handling the work in the various departments, using 
the most modern power equipment, and give special 
attention to the conditions under which their em- 
ployees work. The delivery service operates twenty- 
six cars, combining the laundry and cleaning serv- 




1218 




CZ/ (^ p^^iA^J^f 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




ices, and covers the entire city. The officers of the 
Ineeda Laundry and Cleaning Company are: J. W. 
Trimble, president; Arthur J. Fittger, vice president 
and manager; B. G. Sydnor, secretary and treasurer, 
and E. B. Sydnor, assistant secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Fittger was born at Galveston, Texas, the 
eleventh of December, 1890, son of Clem and Flor- 
ence Fittger, his father a native of that city who 
came to Houston with his family in 1898, and who 
now resides in this city. Mr. Fittger was educated in 
the Houston public schools, supplementing his edu- 
cation with a business course, after which he went 
with the Desel-Boettcher Company, remaining with 
this firm for ten years in the shipping department 
and as salesman. He left this firm in 1917 and went 
with the Ineeda Laundry Company, of which he 
was later made vice president and general manager. 
During the recent war he served in the Air Service 
at Ellington Field. 

Mr. Fittger was married at Houston, the fifth of 
February, 1920, to Miss Hazel Barry, who was born 
at Marlin and reared at Houston. They make their 
home at 4623 Polk Avenue. Mr. Fittger is a mem- 
ber of the Turnverein, an Elk, a T. P. A. and a 
Mason, Temple Blue Lodge, Thirty-second Degree 
Scottish Rite, and a member of Arabia Temple 
Shrine and Arabia Temple Patrol. 

A. STERLING has, since coming to Hous- 
ton, been an active figure in the financial 
circles of this city. As president of the 
American Building and Loan Association 
he has had an important part in shaping the des- 
tinies of that business. The American Building 
and Loan Association, with offices at 121-2 Hum- 
ble Building, was organized in December, 1921, with 
a capital stock of two and one-half million dollars. 
While this is one of the younger institutions of its 
kind in Houston, it is growing rapidly under the 
personal supervision of Mr. Sterling. 

The American Building and Loan Association is 
a model co-operative institution, composed of mem- 
bers who have thus associated themselves for their 
mutual benefit and financial advantage. The mem- 
berships are of two classes, designated "Savings 
Members" and "Borrowing Members." The sav- 
ing members use the Association as a place where 
they can deposit their savings, receiving the high- 
est rate of interest for same that is consistent with 
perfect safety. The borrowing members use the 
Association as a place where they can borrow funds 
at a normal rate of interest to buy, build, or pay 
upon their homes. It operates by authority of the 
Secretary of State of Texas, under articles of in- 
corporation; is chartered, supervised and controlled 
by the State of Texas, and is directly under the su- 
pervision of the State of Texas, Commissioner of 
Insurance. 

The object of the association is to furnish a means 
by which savers of small amounts will be able to 
receive as large a return as the more wealthy in- 
dividual, and at the same time have the highest 
grade of security, which is everywhere recognized 
as the first mortgage on improved real estate; also 
to furnish money to the borrowers at a low rate 
of interest with easy repayments (f 12.00 per month 
on each $1,000.00), so as to enable them to secure 
homes of their own, pay off mortgages or obtain 
money for necessary requirements. 



It receives money from any source at any time 
in sums ranging from $1.00 to $50,000. To par- 
ticipate in the benefits of the Association, one must 
become a member. 

Dividends on the money received on all shares 
have been allowed semi-annually at 7 per cent per 
annum. If the earnings are greater than 7 per 
cent the excess net earnings in excess of the legal 
reserve required by our Texas laws, will be credited 
to the members. Non-residents may become mem- 
bers and do business by mail as easily as residents 
of this city; remittances being made by personal 
checks, Post Office Money Order or Bank Draft. 
Money is loaned on first mortgages on homes and 
property in Texas. Payments are made monthly, 
this reducing the net amount of the debt from the 
outset. The interest rate is low, 8 and four-tenths 
per cent, and advantages we offer are unexcelled. 

The officers of the Association are: A. A. Sterl- 
ing, president; L. E. Norton, vice-president; L. R. 
Bryan, Jr., treasurer; Frank J. Breaker, secretary. 
The directorate is composed of the following well- 
known business men of Houston: A. A. Sterling, 
L. E. Norton, Wharton Weems, Thomas W. Hop- 
kins, L. R. Bryan, Jr., J. M. McGranahan, E. C. 
Brock, Frank J. Breaker, and A. A. Wright. Mr. 
C. J. Richards is membership secretary. 

Mr. Sterling is the owner of Chelsea Place, con- 
sisting of six and one-half acres and containing 
twelve building sites, each one hundred feet by 
one hundred and seventy feet in size. This is con- 
sidered one of the finest exclusive residence places 
in the city of Houston; having very high building 
restrictions. 

A native Texan, Mr. Sterling was born in Anahuac, 
Chambers County in 1881. His father, B. F. Sterl- 
ing, was a well-known business man of Chambers 
County. His mother was Miss Mary Bryan, a mem- 
ber of a prominent Texas family. The public and 
high schools of Chambers County supplied the foun- 
dation for Mr. Sterling's education, and a course in 
a Business College, provided him with his early busi- 
ness training. After leaving school, Mr. Sterling 
started on his varied business career, which began 
as a farmer. 

He continued to farm for five years, when he en- 
gaged in the produce business in Galveston, and 
continued in this business for three years. Later he 
engaged in the banking business at Batson, Hardin 
County, where he was for a period of ten years 
cashier of the bank at that place. He is now a 
director in the Saratoga State Bank at Saratoga. 
He came to Houston in 1919, and, in 1921, organized 
the American Building and Loan Association. 

Mr. Sterling was married at Batson, in 1910, to 
Miss Nellie Allen, a daughter of J. W. Allen, a 
well-known oil operator of Batson. They have two 
children, A. A. Sterling, Jr., seven years of age, 
and Nellie Frances, aged four years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sterling reside at 4315 Montrose Boulevard. Mr. 
Sterling is a member of both York and Scottish 
Rite bodies of the Masonic order and a Shriner of 
Arabia Temple. He is also a member of the Cono- 
pus Club. Mr. Sterling, in the midst of his private 
work, finds opportunity to give his time and as- 
sistance to many movements of a public nature, and 
is interested in and takes an active part in all move- 
ments for the advancement and growth of Hous- 
ton. 



1221 



MEN OF TEXAS 




FRANK STERLING, Senior member of the 
firm of Sterling and Baker, Investments, 
Humble Building, is well known in the busi- 
__ ness circles of Houston, where, prior to en- 
gaging in his present business, he was, for several 
years, active in insurance circles. The firm of 
Sterling and Baker deal in listed securities and 
high-class local securities, and make a specialty of 
selling high-class securities on the monthly pay- 
ment plan. In this manner, they afford an oppor- 
tunity to the average investor to secure good, high- 
class securities, which they probably would not se- 
cure in any other way. Associated with Mr. Sterl- 
ing as a partner in the Investment business is Mr. 
Harry V. Baker, well known business man of Hous- 
ton and South Texas. This firm was organized in 
1923, and has grown to large proportions since the 
time of its organization, as these two young men 
have a large acquaintance and a host of friends, 
and these have proven a valuable asset to them in 
the early days of their business venture. 

A native Texan, Mr. Sterling was born at Ana- 
hauc, Chambers County, November 14th, 1893. His 
father, S. H. Sterling (decased since July, 1901) 
was a member of a pioneer Texas family. His 
mother was Miss Carrie Huffman, whose family 
settled in McKinney, Collin County, at an early date 
and were active in their various lines in the North 
Texas city, and they were related to the old Lar- 
gent family, prominent in North Texas. Mrs. Sterl- 
ing died in March, 1914. Mr. Sterling's education 
was obtained in the public schools of Galveston. 
Soon after leaving school, Mr. Sterling began his 
business career in the Insurance business at Gal- 
veston with Grafton T. Austin, in 1908, and later 
associated with the firm of Adams and Porter, of 
Houston, in Marine Insurance. He entered the 
World War, enlisting in Company L, 359th Infantry, 
90th Division, and went overseas with his division, 
and was in the front lines during several engage- 
ments with them. He was discharged in June, 1919, 
with the rank of Sergeant. After receiving his 
discharge from the Army, Mr. Sterling returned to 
Houston, and entered the employ of the Humble 
Oil and Refining Company, and remained with this 
company for four years, or until he organized his 
present business in 1923. Mr. Sterling is a nephew 
of Mr. R. S. Sterling, Mr. F. P. Sterling, Mr. A. A. 
Sterling and Miss Florence Sterling, all well-known 
business executives of Houston. He is also a nephew 
of Mr. John Sterling, of Galveston, and a grandson 
of B. F. Sterling. 

Mr. Sterling is a member of the Glenbrook Coun- 
try Club and the Conopus Luncheon Club. He is a 
consistent member of the South End Christian 
Church. Mr. Sterling is much interested in get- 
ting the business of stock selling on a high plane 
and is an ardent worker in the movement to protect 
the public from fake promotion schemes. 

ARD FORD, one of the younger members 
of the business fraternity of Houston, with 
his associate, Mr. Dudley C. Jarvis, own and 
_^ operate the Ford-Jarvis Lumber Company 

and has been successful in building up a large and 
profitable business. The Ford-Jarvis Lumber Com- 
pany have a large planing mill at the corner of Ly- 
ons Avenue and H. B. and T. Railroad and are both 
wholesalers and manufacturers. They ship in the 




lumber from points on the Pacific Coast, which they 
rework and ship out again in the finished product. 
Mr. Ford was reared in an atmosphere of the lumber 
business, as his father, Mr. A. C. Ford, is a pioneer 
in this field in Texas, and is classed among the lead- 
ing lumber men in this portion of the country. His 
associate, Mr. Dudley C. Jarvis, is a graduate of the 
Rice Institute, having finished in this institution 
in the class of 1922, and during his spare time while 
attending college worked in the planing mill. He 
was a resident of Terrell, Texas, but has lived in 
Houston for the past few years where he is popular 
in the business and social circles of the city and 
active in all Houston's civic matters. 

Although a young man, Mr. Ford has had an ex- 
perience in all the branches of the lumber business, 
and in entering this great industry, Mr. Ford could 
have chosen the easier way, but he preferred to be 
the architect of his own future, and wished first to 
master the details of the business, and this he did 
before becoming active in the lumber industry. 

A native Texan, Mr. Ford was born at Fort Worth 
May 30th, 1898. His father, A. C. Ford, has been 
prominently identified with the lumber industry of 
the State for more than thirty years, and is one of 
Houston's leading lumbermen, where the family has 
resided for the past twelve years. His mother was 
Miss Mary Ward, a native of Jefferson, Texas, and 
a daughter of S. M. Ward, a well known banker and 
capitalist of Jefferson. His education was obtained 
in the University of Texas and Bingham College of 
North Carolina. After finishing college, Mr. Ford 
entered actively into the lumber business and has 
met with success. During the World War, he was a 
member of the Marine Aviation Service and was sta- 
tioned in Florida, during the greater part of the 
period. 

Mr. Ford resides with his parents at the Beacons- 
field Apartments, and is a member of the Country 
Club, the University Club and the Kappa Alpha 
fraternity. He is popular in the business and social 
circles of Houston, where he is regarded as one of 
the leaders among the younger business men, and 
his friends predict a brilliant future for this young 
lumberman who is yet in the morning of life. 

D. R. COFFEY, District Manager of the 
Woodmen of the World Life Insurance As- 
sociation at Houston, has been a resident 
of this city for more than a quarter of a 
century, and during the greater part of this time 
has been associated with fraternal work. Mr. Cof- 
fey became connected with the Woodmen of the 
World in 1907, and has been District Manager of 
the Houston district since 1915, working indefa- 
tigably during that time to build up the organi- 
zation in this section, and writing much insurance. 
Gen. R. H. McDill, of Dallas, is State Manager, 
and R. E. Miller, of San Antonio, Assistant State 
Manager, the state being divided into districts, each 
district in charge of a district manager, under 
whose direction all fraternal work in that district 
is carried on. Mr. Coffey has his offices in the 
First National Bank Building, and in addition to 
his work as District Manager of the Life Insurance 
Division of the Woodmen of the World, he is Clerk 
of Magnolia Camp, No. 13, Woodmen of the World. 
Ed. R. Coffey was born in Denton County, on 
the twenty-fifth of November, 1876, son of George 
D. Coffey and Nannie (Clarkson) Coffey, both of 




1222 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




whom were natives of Kentucky, who came to Texas 
during pioneer days and resided in Denton County 
many years. Mr. Coffey attended the schools of 
Colorado and Arizona, but, as was the case with 
many of the children of pioneer days, his educa- 
tion was largely gleaned from the school of experi- 
ence. As a young man he belonged to the National 
Guards of Arizona, in which state he resided until 
1897, when he came to Houston. Here Mr. Cof- 
fey spent several years in the hardware business 
and was also with the old Texas Postal Telegraph 
Company prior to 1907, when he became identified 
with Woodmen of the World Association work. 

Mr. Coffey was married at Houston the eigh- 
teenth of February, 1918, to Mayde Bauguss, 
daughter of Profesor Bauguss, well known edu- 
cator. Mr. and Mrs. Coffey reside at 5407 Chene- 
vert Street. Mr. Coffey is a Mason, thirty-second 
degree, Scottish Rite and Shrine, and belongs to 
the Woodmen of the World, the Woodmen Circle, 
the Macabees, the Tall Cedars, the A. I. U. and 
Eastern Star and the T. P. A. and is a member of 
the Episcopal Church. 

L. NOBLE, JR., has for the past several 
years been identified with oil activities at 
Houston, and although a young man, his 
name has come to have a special signifi- 
cance in this industry. Mr. Noble is secretary and 
treasurer of the Houston Production Company, and 
since taking this position in May, 1922, he has built 
up the business materially, and given his most care- 
ful attention to the operations of this company. 
The Houston Production Company concentrates its 
attention on Hull field, where they produce around 
eleven hundred barrels a day. Mr. Noble was pre- 
viously associated with the Link Oil Corporation, 
going with this firm in October, 1920, and at the 
time of his retirement, to become secretary and 
treasurer for the Houston Production Company, he 
was superintendent for the Link Corporation, look- 
ing after all the interests, including drilling. 

Mr. Noble was born at Dallas, Texas, the elev- 
enth of January, 1895, son of G. L. Noble, of that 
city. He graduated from the Houston High School 
in 1913, the following year attending the University 
of Texas, and later Cornell, from which he grad- 
uated in 1920 with the degree M. E. The period 
from May, 1917, until April, 1919, was spent in 
military service, with the One Hundred and Fifth 
Machine Gun Battalion, of the Twenty-seventh Di- 
vision, in which he enlisted as a private, coming 
out a lieutenant. Mr. Noble saw active service 
overseas, spending one year in France and Belgium. 
He was at the front from June the fourteenth until 
November the eleventh, 1918, at which time he par- 
ticipated in the fighting at Ypres and Cambrais, 
and also with the British army that broke the 
Hindenburg line, from September the twenty-seventh 
until October the fifteenth, 1918. In this last named 
conflict Mr. Noble saw many of his comrades killed 
or wounded, yet he came through without a scratch. 
After his discharge he returned to Cornell and fin- 
ished his work there, taking his M. E. degree, in 
1920, after which he came to Houston and began 
his business career in the oil business. 

Mr. Noble was married at Houston the seventh of 
March, 1923, to Miss Geraldine Dore, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, but a resident of Houston for thir- 
teen years, and daughter of James H. Dore, of the 




Houston Car Wheel Company, of Houston. Mr. and 
Mrs. Noble make their home at 1530 Sul Ross Ave- 
nue. In religious belief they support the Presby- 
terian faith and are members of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Houston. Mr. Noble is a member 
of the Houston Country Club, the University Club, 
the Cornell Club of Houston, and the Kappa Alpha 
fraternity of the University of Texas. He takes 
an active interest in civic development and has 
allied himself with all movements directed toward 
this end. 

RED T. SMITH, general manager of the 
Haverty Furniture Company, Inc., is well- 
known in furniture circles of Houston, 
where, by close application to the business, 
he rose from the ranks to his present position. Mr. 
Smith came to Houston in 1906, with the Haverty 
Furniture Company, Inc., in a minor position and 
now has complete charge of this large establish- 
ment, and is the second largest stockholder in the 
Company. The Haverty Furniture Company was 
established in Houston thirty years ago, and was 
incorporated under the present name January 1st, 
1922. This firm, located at 711 Fannin Street, 
sell to the retail trade only, and carry a full and 
complete stock of all kinds of furniture and house 
furnishings, from a price within the reach of all 
to the most expensive Period furniture. The Hav- 
erty Furniture Company, Inc., occupy six floors 
each fifty by one hundred and twenty-five feet; 
also a large warehouse, located at 109 Baker Street, 
of four floors, each sixty-five by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet. This firm employ fifty-five ex- 
perienced people in the various departments, and 
in the different classes of work in their large es- 
tablishment. Other officers of the Haverty Furni- 
ture Company, Inc., are: J. J. Haverty, president; 
Clarence Haverty, vice-president and treasurer, and 
J. R. Haverty, secretary. 

Mr. Smith was born at Dalton, Georgia, in 1887. 
His father, L. T. Smith, moved to the Indian Ter- 
ritory in the early 80's and spent the remainder 
of his life there, where he was continuously en- 
gaged in the mercantile business. Mr. Smith's 
education was obtained in the public schools of 
the Indian Territory, and Montague, Texas. 

Mr. Smith came to Houston in 1906 and began 
work for the Haverty Furniture Company as a col- 
lector. Later, he was advanced to the position of 
shipping clerk; then to salesman, and still later 
to the place of credit man for the company. In 
appreciation for the attention to the details of the 
business given by Mr. Smith, he was, in 1915, made 
general manager of the Haverty Furniture Com- 
pany, Inc. Mr. Smith was married in Beaumont, 
in 1906, to Miss Clara Bell Clark, a native Texan, 
who was reared and educated at Montague. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith reside at 4406 Travis Street. Mr. 
Smith is a member of the A. F. and A. M., with 
membership in Holland Lodge No. 1 of Houston, 
and is a member of the Scottish Rite body of 
that Order to the 32nd Degree, and a Shriner of 
Arabia Temple. Mr. Smith has the deepest inter- 
est in the man who aspires to better his condition, 
and is at all times ready and willing to render 
helpful service to his fellow man. This charac- 
teristic has been a dominant factor in the success 
achieved by this young man, who is still in the 
morning of life. 



1225 



MEN OF TEXAS 




!ENERAL JAMES CALVIN FOSTER, gen- 
eral of the Texas division of the United 
Confederate Veterans, has been a factor in 
the progress of Texas for a period of over 
two score years. General Foster is widely known 
throughout the State of Texas as a distinguished 
member of that rapidly diminishing body of patriots 
who fought in defense of their native land more than 
three score years ago, and although approaching 
that allotted ripe old age of four score years, he is 
still one of the most active and agile of the remain- 
ing group. He takes an active interest in every 
patriotic movement to do honor to, and to perpetuate 
the memory of the Confederate heroes. 

General Foster was born at Spartanburg, South 
Carolina, July 24th, 1847. His parents, Washington 
and Elizabeth Foster, natives of South Carolina, 
were well known planters who were prominent in the 
church organization and social life at Spartanburg. 
General Foster was educated in the schools of South 
Carolina and Wofford College. When the Civil War 
began, he was but a boy of fourteen, but as soon 
as he was old enough to shoulder a musket he en- 
listed in the army in Company A, First South Caro- 
lina Battalion, and did his bit with honor and dis- 
tinction. His division did service in North and 
South Carolina. The last battle his company fought 
in was at Bentonville, South Carolina. 

General Foster's first business experience was 
with the D. E. Converse Manufacturing Company of 
Spartanburg, South Carolina, and later decided he 
would come West. He moved to Arkansas, where he 
taught school and later went into the mercantile 
business at Shiloh, Arkansas. He traveled as a 
salesman for a house in Little Rock. Still later he 
came to Texas as a traveling salesman for a St. 
Louis firm. In 1907, General Foster first came to 
Houston, and he has made this city his home since 
that date. 

For the past decade General Foster has been re- 
tired from business activities, but has remained very 
active in the United Confederate Veterans organi- 
zation in Texas. His heart is in his work and he at- 
tends all the conventions, both State and National. 
At the Fort Worth convention in 1924, General Fos- 
ter was elected general of the Texas division with 
the rank of major general, and in 1925 at the con- 
vention at Abilene was re-elected. 

General Foster was married October 1st, 1873, at 
West Point, Arkansas, to Annie Buchanan Foster, 
the daughter of Andrew Park and Sibella Johnson 
Foster, both natives of South Carolina. Mrs. Fos- 
ter has always been very active in patriotic move- 
ments, and is president of the Jefferson Davis Chap- 
ter, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Foster were the parents of five children, Clar- 
ence Milton, deceased, three children who died in 
infancy, and one living daughter, Alice Ethel, who 
is now Mrs. J. T. Miller. His granddaughter, Guen- 
evere Miller, a student at Rice Institute, was given 
the signal honor as representative of the South as 
sponsor of honor at the United Confederate Veter- 
ans at Dallas in 1925, and was again appointed by 
General Freeman for the same honor at the Bir- 
mingham reunion in 1926. 

General Foster and family are members of the 
Methodist Church. General Foster had charge of 
the drive in Houston for the sale of Stone Mountain 
Memorial souvenirs, and was successful in making 




Houston one of the first cities of the South to con- 
tribute their quota. 

UDGE EDWIN WINFREE, for the past 
half a century an honored resident of Tex- 
as, and for about six years superintendent 
of the Texas Confederate Home, at Austin, 
has been indefatigable in his work in behalf of the 
Confederate Veterans. Judge Winfree, himself a 
Confederate Veteran, was appointed to the position 
of superintendent of the Confederate Home on the 
fifteenth of February, 1920, by the State Board of 
Control, to fill the vacancy created by the resigna- 
tion of Dr. J. C. Loggins. That this choice was a 
wise one was demonstrated by the capable and ef- 
ficient way in which he dispatched the duties of this 
office and administered the affairs of the home. 

The Texas Confederate Home was established in 
1889, when the John B. Hood Camp, U. V. C, ac- 
quired from the state a charter for the purpose of 
organizing and supporting a home for Confederate 
veterans, a work in which they were aided by the 
Albert Sidney Johnston Chapter, Daughters of the 
Confederacy. In 1891 the state made an appropria- 
tion for the work and several cottages were built, 
additional appropriations being made in 1895, and 
the home being added to at that time. Later a hos- 
pital was erected, which has since been converted 
into a barracks and supplanted by a new hospital 
building, built at a cost of twenty thousand dol- 
lars and equipped to care for a hundred patients. 
The present capacity of the Confederate Home is 
an average of three hundred and seventy-five, al- 
though four hundred can be accommodated, and 
a maintenance fund of ninety thousand dollars is 
now appropriated annually. In recent years hospital 
facilities have been taxed, as practically all con- 
federate veterans applying, for admission are al- 
most helpless and require constant attention, both 
day and night. In this work of providing com- 
forts for these heroes in their old age, Judge Win- 
free is particularly interested, and urges that what- 
ever is to be done, be done now, as in a few brief 
years there will not be any more Confederate sol- 
diers left. 

Judge Edwin Winfree was born in Chesterfield 
County, Virginia, the ninth of April, 1844, the son 
of Thomas Edwin and Elizabeth Marrion (Taylor) 
Winfree, the father a tobacconist, farmer, and land 
owner of Virginia. Judge Winfree attended the 
public schools of Virginia and also attended school 
at Manchester, Virginia, and at the age of seventeen 
years enlisted in the Confederate army, under Gen- 
eral Robert E. Lee, in Virginia, and was a member 
of the Twenty-second Virginia Battalion of Infantry 
with Major Frank Smith, Company C, Captain John 
W. Drewrys of "Drewrys Bluff" fame. Judge Win- 
free, with this company, was in the siege around 
Richmond, manning the heavy guns on the south 
side of the James River, and known as the South 
Side Artillery. Judge Winfree with his battalion, 
was in the fighting up until General Lee's surrender, 
which occurred on Judge Winfree 's twenty-first 
birthday. Judge Winfree, was regarded by his 
comrades as a brave, fearless and faithful soldier, 
and his name appears on the original rolls handed 
to General Lee from the battle field at Appomattox 
Court House for such service. Following the war 
Judge Winfree came to Texas, in 1873, locating at 



1226 





^2*^t^f £--4&^O^i S*4~4 ^Zc^ 




V,ffll^>^2^-~*c*^*-^tjr3%l^^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



Crockett, in Houston County. Here he organized a 
bank, of which he was cashier for many years, and 
also engaged in the mercantile business. He also 
studied law and was admitted to the bar and in 
1896 elected county judge, which office he held 
until 1914. He then went with the Louisiana & 
Texas Lumber Company, with which organization he 
remained four years, when he was again elected 
county judge, resigning this office six years later 
due to his advancing years. In 1919 he was sent 
to the State Legislature, serving until his appoint- 
ment as superintendent of the Texas Confederate 
Home at Austin, resigning from this position Sep- 
tember 1st, 1925. 

Judge Winfree was married at Crockett, Texas, 
in 1874, to Miss Willie Matlock, who is now de- 
ceased. To this union were born four daughters: 
Mrs. Mary Baker, Mrs. Helen Cone, Mrs. Adele 
Crawford and Mrs. Willie Powell. Judge Winfree 
was married for the second time to Mrs. Alice Bay, 
and to this union were born three children: Joseph 
Edwin Winfree, Houston attorney; Daniel Marrion 
Winfree, and Mark King Winfree (deceased). Judge 
and Mrs. Winfree reside in Park Place. Mrs. Alice 
Bay Winfree had one son by a former marriage, 
Calvin Bay. Judge Winfree is a Mason, York Rite, 
and has been a member of the Masonic lodge for 
more than fifty years. Judge Winfree's service in 
behalf of the Confederate soldiers of Texas has been 
faithful in the extreme, and he holds a recent cer- 
tificate from the House Regent of the Confederate 
Memorial Association, at Richmond, Virginia, cer- 
tifying that his name has been written on the honor 
roll in high esteem of his faithful services for the 
Confederate cause. 

AMES W. RICH, independent oil operator, 
and for a number of years a factor in pe- 
troleum circles in Houston, has been active- 
ly interested in the development of the pe- 
troleum and other mineral resources of this section, 
and is considered one of the best informed men here 
in such matters, both from a practical standpoint 
and from a scientific angle. For several years he 
has done exploration work in the Gulf Coast sec- 
tion of the State. This pioneering he carries on per- 
sistently and systematically and his efforts should 
be rewarded with success. With his associates he 
owns a twelve thousand acre lease near Wharton, 
in Wharton County, which is being developed by use 
of tortion balance, seismograph and test drillings. 
Since coming to Texas he has made many friends, 
is well known in the oil fraternity and has gained 
the confidence and respect of all with whom he has 
had dealings. 

James W. Rich was born at Mount Vernon, New 
York, the nineteenth of January, 1866. His boy- 
hood was spent in New York and in Philadelphia, 
where he attended the public schools, preparing for 
the University of Pennsylvania, but later deciding 
in favor of practical experience in the business 
world. He went to New York, where he gained his 
first business experience in the real estate and auc- 
tioneering business and was active in the develop- 
ment of city properties, engaging in this line from 
1889 until 1896. At that time he became interested 
in mining operations and spent the years from 1896 
until 1920 in the mica mines in New Hampshire. In 
1920 he came to Texas to gain practical experi- 
ence along geological lines in mining, and this ex- 





perience, combined with his first experience in deep 
well drilling in the Texas oil fields, suggested his 
present development program, a program which is 
being watched with interest. 

Mr. Rich was married at New York, the thirteenth 
of September, 1887, to Miss Esther A. Rogers, a 
member of a New York family. Mr. and Mrs. Rich 
reside in Houston at 1204 West Drew Avenue, and 
have two daughters — Mrs. E. B. Boss of Cliftondale, 
Massachusetts, and Eleanor M. Rich, at home. Mr. 
Rich maintains business headquarters in the Bank- 
ers Mortgage Building, and also at Wharton. He is 
a member of the Commercial League at Angleton, 
and is a life member of Hiawatha Masonic Lodge 
No. 434 of Mount Vernon, New York. 

OHN HABLIZEL, for a quarter of a cen- 
tury identified with industrial activities at 
Houston, is well known as the founder of 
the Texas Table Company, one of the larg- 
est table manufacturing enterprises in the state. 
Mr. Hablizel established this company at Houston 
in 1898, the oldest plant of its kind in the city, at 
that time beginning in a small way, and constantly 
expanding as trade conditions warranted. The 
Texas Table Company manufactures kitchen tables, 
kitchen safes, kitchen cabinets, made in both hard 
and soft woods, and supplies an extensive trade 
territory, including the entire state of Texas and 
a part of Louisiana. The business, in its present 
state of expansion, covers the city blocks at 2900 
Maury Street, where the plant is located. The fac- 
tory is housed in a modern, well-planned building, 
affording about eighty thousand square feet of floor 
space, with adequate equipment to meet the growing 
demands of the business. The Texas Table Com- 
pany owns its own property, which has been added 
to from time to time as conditions of the business 
justified expansion. Associated with Mr. Hablizel 
in the business are his five sons, Fred, Ernest, 
Henry, Julius and William. 

Mr. Hablizel is a veteran in the wood turners' 
trade, spending almost two decades in the business 
at New Orleans prior to coming to Houston. For 
thirteen years after coming to Houston he was 
with the August Bering Company, now the Bering 
Manufacturing Company, leaving this firm to estab- 
lish his own business. 

Mr. Hablizel was born at Algiers, Louisiana, the 
fifth of May, 1854, son of John and Mary Hablizel, 
his father a native of Switzerland, and the mother 
of Germany. The elder Mr. Hablizel was for many 
years a ship carpenter at New Orleans, and as a boy 
Mr. Hablizel first began to take an interest in the 
wood turning trade. He was educated in New Or- 
leans, attending both public and private schools, 
and after leaving school began his career. 

Mr. Hablizel was married at New Orleans, in 1880, 
to Miss Caroline Muller, daughter of Jacob Muller, 
veteran wood worker, and Margaret Muller, well 
known business woman. Mr. and Mrs. Hablizel 
have made Houston their home for almost forty 
years, living at 1508 East Alabama Avenue. They 
have reared a family of eight children, three daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Tillie Casey, Mrs. Emma Swenke, and 
Miss Bertha Hablizel, and five sons, Fred, Ernest, 
Henry, Julius and William, all of whom are active 
in the Texas Table Comany. Mr. Hablizel has been 
a member of the Sons of Hermann for more than 
two decades. 



1229 



MEN OF TEXAS 




C. McVEA, for a quarter of a century iden- 
tified with engineering activities of wide 
scope, has, during the past several years, 
as City Engineer of the City of Houston, 
been a factor in determining the future growth of 
this city. This position, one of the most difficult 
engineering positions in the state, and one offer- 
ing many problems to be worked out, has been filled 
with distinction by Mr. McVea, and he has brought 
to bear in the direction of municipal engineering af- 
fairs the characteristic energy that has significant- 
ly marked his career. This branch of the city gov- 
ernment handles many of the big problems of the 
municipality and covers street paving, water sup- 
ply, drainage, sanitary sewers, park development and 
bridge construction, and in addition to these matters, 
the engineer also has other problems to work out, 
such as developing the facilities of the Houston 
Ship Channel, and the handling of the development 
of the Municipal Belt Railway. In solving these 
problems, upon which much of the future progress 
of the municipality must depend, Mr. McVea has 
demonstrated his engineering and executive ability 
and his devotion to the best interests of his com- 
munity. Mr. McVea has in his department one hun- 
dred and fifty employees, and has under his direc- 
tion all the designing and supervising of all public 
improvements. He is thoroughly familiar with the 
peculiar needs of the city, incident to climatic and 
drainage conditions prevailing here, and gives his 
special attention to such matters. He also recog- 
nizes that, due to Houston's size, wealth and pecu- 
liar climatic and soil conditions, that there is a 
great demand for paving, and uses his influence 
to secure educational campaigns and definite meth- 
ods whereby the city may finance this work in an 
adequate manner. Under his administration the 
Engineering Department has shown a substantial 
increase, in some items practically one hundred per 
cent, and Mr. McVea has won the esteem of the 
entire city, as well as of his superiors in the mu- 
nicipal government. 

J. C. McVea was born at Waelder, Texas, the third 
of April, 1876, son of William McVea, a cattleman, 
who came to Texas in 1850, and Jane Crane McVea, 
a native of the Lone Star State. Mr. McVea began 
his education in the public schools of Waelder, and 
after finishing there entered Moulton Institute for 
a course prior to entering the University of Texas, 
where he finished in 1897, with the degree of C. E. 
The following year was spent with the United 
States Geological Survey, and after leaving this 
service Mr. McVea went to Flatonia, Texas, in 1898. 
Here he built, owned and operated the electric light 
plant for four years, after which he went with the 
Southern Pacific Railway, in an important position, 
and was later resident engineer for the H. E. and W. 
T. Railroad and the Houston and Shreveport Rail- 
road. In 1913 Mr. McVea became identified with 
the engineering department of the City of Houston, 
and in 1919, was made City Engineer, a position he 
has since held. 

Mr. McVea was married at Flatonia, Texas, in 
1904, to Miss Mary Faires, daughter of C. H. and 
Sarah Faires. Mr. Faires was a prominent stock- 
man and farmer of Flatonia, whose father came to 
Texas in 1832 as a colonist under Stephen F. Aus- 
tin. Mrs. McVea was reared and educated there. 
Mr. and Mrs. McVea have made their home in Hous- 




ton since their marriage, and live at 1318 Kipling 
Avenue. They attend the South Main Baptist 
Church, which they actively support. Mr. McVea 
is a member of the Houston Engineers Club, the 
Salesmanship Club, and the City Club. He is a 
member of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
and the American Society for Municipal Improve- 
ments. In engineering circles Mr. McVea is re- 
garded as especially well equipped to fill the posi- 
tion of City Engineer, his many special qualifica- 
tions for his office resulting most beneficially for 
the public good. He keeps in touch with all devel- 
opments in the engineering world, and is a deep 
student of those matters pertaining especially to 
municipal development, and has made many friends 
who wish him the success he is so justly entitled to. 

VERNON MILLER has spent the greater 
part of his life in Houston, having come 
here in 1903, when he was eight years of 
age. He is now engaged in the construc- 
tion and contracting business, with offices at 617 
Union National Bank Building. Although starting 
in business in 1921 Mr. Miller's business has already 
become firmly established and he now has work 
under way and in prospect for 1924 that is expected 
to aggregate more than a quarter of a million dol- 
lars. 

He is especially well equipped for general con- 
tracting work and maintains a force about fifty 
men and has a full complement of building machinery 
and equipment. Among important work for which 
he has appeared as general contractor is included 
the Bankers Mortgage Building, Hoblitzelle Build- 
ing, Crockett Street Bridge and the North Main 
Street tunnel. In addition to this a large amount 
of out of town work has been done under his super- 
vision. 

Mr. Miller was born at Alvin, between Houston 
and Galveston, on September 30, 1895. He is a son 
of A. B. and Adelaide (Woodward) Miller. His 
father is engaged in cattle raising and is a well 
known ranchman. 

After attending the public and high schools of 
Houston Mr. Miller entered the contracting and 
building business and was associated with the O. F. 
Holcombe Company until the outbreak of the World 
War in 1917. On June 1, 1917, he enlisted in the 
United States Navy and was assigned to duty on 
the U. S. S. Albatross. He remained in the navy 
for over two years, receiving his discharge on Au- 
gust 1, 1919. After returning to Houston he re- 
entered the building and contracting business. 

Every detail of a job contracted by Mr. Miller is 
supervised with the utmost care and no pains or ex- 
pense spared to do the work exactly in accordance 
with specifications. This painstaking care has re- 
sulted in the highest endorsement being given his 
work by clients whose building jobs he has handled 
to their entire satisfaction. 

In October, 1922, Mr. Miller was married at Fort 
Stockton, Texas, to Miss Evelyn Livingston, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Livingston. They reside 
at 2715 Helena Street. 

Mr. Miller is an enthusiastic booster for Houston, 
believing the city will attain a population of half a 
million people within the next decade. He is espe- 
cially interested in the development of the city's 
manufacturing and commercial activities. Mr. Mil- 
ler is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 



1230 




?■ 




^^ ^J&-<1JL^V-^J 



(21 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




OSEPH FINGER, architect, with offices in 
the Keystone Building, has for the past 
seventeen years practiced his profession in 
Houston and has gained popularity and dis- 
tinction throughout South Texas by his work as a 
designer of many prominent buildings. Mr. Finger 
is artistic in his designing, and withal adheres to 
the practicable, and the principles of permanency 
in his buildings. There are nine people in his or- 
ganization. Mr. Finger has specialized in commer- 
cial, industrial buildings, and apartments and hotels. 
Among the Houston structures which he has design- 
ed and built may be numbered The Plaza Apartment 
and Hotel, costing one million dollars, Keystone 
Building, costing five hundred thousand dollars. 
Temple Beth Israel, costing three hundred thousand 
dollars, addition to the J. M. West Building, costing 
two hundred thousand dollars, the building for M. M. 
Graves, costing one hundred and thirty thousand dol- 
lars, twelve-apartment building for Tillie Spinner, 
costing seventy-five thousand dollars, two manufac- 
turing plants for the Tennison Manufacturing Com- 
pany, costing one hundred and thirty thousand dol- 
lars, Cheek-Neal Coffee Company Building, Citizens 
State Bank Building, Wm. C. Penn Hotel, Tennison 
Hotel, DeGeorge Hotel, Zindler Building, Cockrell 
Apartment Building, Heidingsfelder Apartments, 
Kaiser Apartments, Concordia Club Building, Harris 
County School for Girls, Texas Packing Company 
Plant. In Shreveport, Louisiana, he built the Ricou- 
Brewster Building at a cost of six hundred thousand 
dollars; in Galveston he built the eleven-story Amer- 
ican National Insurance Building, the first skyscrap- 
er there, for W. L. Moody, Jr.; in Galveston he also 
built, among other buildings, the Broadmoore Apart- 
ment, at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars, for 
the American National Insurance Company. Among 
the many residences of importance built by Mr. 
Finger in Houston are those of Judge H. M. Gar- 
wood, M. M. Graves, H. B. Tennison and Simon 
Sakowitz. At this time Mr. Finger is building many 
buildings, among which are the new De George 12- 
story hotel and the 16-story San Jacinto Hotel. 

Mr. Finger was born in Austria March 7, 1887. His 
education was obtained in Austrian schools of archi- 
tecture and in various technical schools. Mr. Finger 
came to New Orleans in 1905 and three years later 
he came to Houston. 

Mr. Finger was married at Houston in 1912 to 
Miss Gertrude Levy, daughter of A. Levy, well 
known business man of Houston. They have one 
son, Joseph Finger, Jr. Mr. Finger is a member of 
the B. P. 0. E., Concordia Club, Glenbrook Country 
Club, American Institute of Architects, Texas Chap- 
ter of the American Institute of Architects and Tem- 
ple Beth Israel. He participates in a most substantial 
and active manner in all moves and enterprises that 
have for their object the advancement of the city of 
his adoption and its citizenship. Mr. Finger has 
contributed materially to the building of the city, 
and he is highly regarded and respected by all with 
whom he has had dealings. 

EORGE ALFRED HILL, retired contractor 
and business man, comes of a distinguished 
family that played a most important part 
in the early history of Texas. His father 
resident of Texas in the days when Texas 
part of Mexico and gave valiant service in 
the war that established her independence and gave 




to the world a new republic. Before Texas joined 
the Union, James Monroe Hill participated in the 
battle of San Jacinto, the conflict that definitely 
ended the war between Texas and Mexico. He was 
born in LaGrange, Georgia, in 1818, and came to 
Texas when 18 years of age. He resided in Wash- 
ington, Burleson and Fayette Counties and was a 
large land owner and stockman. He removed to 
Austin in 1870 on account of better living condi- 
tions and continued to reside there until his death 
in 1904. 

George Alfred Hill was born in Fayette County 
on March 23, 1853, a son of James M. and Jane 
(Hallowell) Hill. He attended the public schools 
of Fayette County and in 1869 began business in 
Galveston under the firm name of Quinn and Hill, 
cotton factors and commission merchants, and later 
was the head of Hill, Orwiss and Co. He was also 
connected with the Palmer-Sullivan Syndicate, con- 
tractors and railroad builders, and participated in 
the building of the Denver and Rio Grande, the 
Mexican National, Corpus Christi, San Diego and 
Rio Grande and the Mexican National Railway of 
Texas. He was right of way and franchise agent 
for the Palmer-Sullivan Syndicate and continued 
with this organization until 1884 when be engaged 
in buisness for himself again, doing paving con- 
tracting in Houston and Galveston. In 1875 he 
served as alderman for the City of Galveston. From 
1883 until 1886 he was engaged in dredge work 
and in shaping up the banks of the Houston Ship 
Channel and then operated sight-seeing excursions 
to old Mexico for a period of three years. 

For three years Mr. Hill was president and gen- 
eral manager of the Austin Dam and Suburban 
Railway, and then went to Beaumont as chairman 
of the safety committee of the Hogg-Swain Syndi- 
cate. In 1901 he again engaged in business for 
himself and erected the first earthen tanks in Texas 
for the preservation of oil, being associated in this 
work with Stilson Hutchins and X. B. Babbitt of 
New York. He succeeded in conserving three mil- 
lion barrels of oil and in conjunction with Hutchins 
and Babbitt engaged in the oil business at Beau- 
mont and Sour Lake and was one of the founders 
of Sour Lake and Grayburg. He then promoted 
the Beaumont, Sour Lake and Western Railway 
Company and built and operated the line from Hous- 
ton to Beaumont. He was with the road from 1905 
until 1909 when he sold his interests and bought 
the Houston Transfer Company, the oldest and larg- 
est transfer business in the city. At one time the 
entire equipment of this company paraded the 
streets of Houston, the procession being one and 
a half miles long. During his operation of the 
transfer company Mr. Hill served for eight years 
as United States mail contractor. In 1921 he dis- 
posed of his interest in the transfer company and 
retired from active business life. 

Mr. Hill was married at Calvert, Texas, in 1888, 
to Miss Julia McHugh, daughter of Captain T. J. 
and Ann (Shannon) McHugh. Captain McHugh 
came from England and served as county judge 
of Robinson County, and later was postmaster at 
Calvert for four years. Mr. and Mrs. Hill have 
two sons, Raymond M., 35, in the lumber business 
at Orange, Texas, with Lutcher Stark, and George 
A., Jr., 32, an attorney, of the firm of Kennerly, 
Williams, Lee and Hill, general attorneys, of the 



1233 



MEN OF TEXAS 




Houston Oil Company. Both sons served in the 
United States Army during the World War, Ray- 
mond M. being a non-commissioned officer with 
the American Expeditionary Forces in France and 
George A., Jr., holding a commission as Captain 
of Calvary here. Mr. and Mrs. Hill reside at 1211 
Marshall Avenue. 

For many years Mr. Hill was active in various 
fraternal organizations and at one time was a mem- 
ber of thirteen fraternities. He is a Mason and 
was active in the Knights of Pythias for a long 
time, organizing some 18 or 20 lodges in South 
Texas. He was formerly a member of the Houston 
Club and the Houston Country Club. 

Although retired from active business, Mr. Hill 
continues to maintain an active interest in the de- 
velopment of Houston. 

OHN MONROE McGRANAHAN, who has 

recently become identified with the lumber 
industry at Houston, has in the several 
years of his residence in this city, estab- 
lished a lumber business that ranks as one of the 
most progressive here, as well as one of the larg- 
est. The McGranahan Lumber Company, Incor- 
porated, of which firm Mr. McGranahan is Presi- 
dent, was established by him in 1922, and is one of 
the firms in the city making a record for progress. 
The McGranahan Lumber Company does both a 
wholesale and retail business, supplying all kinds 
of building material, including roofing, brick, ce- 
ment, etc., for all classes of construction. The busi- 
ness covers a block and a half, at Hill, Bryan and 
Morgan Streets, with fine yards and modern lum- 
ber buildings, and railroad frontage. They handle 
an extensive business, employing thirty men in the 
office and yards, and have furnished the material 
bill on many of the fine residences and buildings in 
the city. The McGranahan Lumber Company also 
finances material bills and builds and sells homes 
on easy payments, a system of lumber merchandising 
that is making Houston a city of homes. The offi- 
cers of the McGranahan Lumber Company are: Mr. 
McGranahan, President; W. A. Parish, Vice-Presi- 
dent; A. A. Sterling, Vice-President; J. A. Kelly, 
Secretary, and T. W. Hopkins, Treasurer. 

Mr. McGranahan was born at Mattoon, Illinois, 
the twelfth of September, 1889, son of Andrew and 
Alice McGranahan, his father a railroad man of 
that state. Mr. McGranahan was educated in the 
public schools of his native city, graduating from 
High School there. He came to Texas in 1904, 
locating at Fort Worth, where he was with the 
Burton Lingo Lumber Company for three years. He 
then spent eight years in Dallas as manager of the 
Burton Lumber Company of that city, and in 1917 
came to Houston as Vice-President and general 
manager of the Houston yard of the Burton Lum- 
ber Company. In 1922 he established his present 
company, of which he is president. He is also a 
director of the American Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. McGranahan was married at Dallas, in 1910, 
to Miss Zelma Lee Butts, daughter of Wallace and 
Cora Butts. They have two children, John Monroe, 
Junior, and Willard Burton. The family live at 1401 
Branard Street. Mr. McGranahan is a member of the 
Houston Country Club, the Houston Club, and fra- 
ternally is a Mason, a member of the Scottish Rite 
Bodies, and of Arabia Temple Shrine. 




OXIE H. THOMPSON, for many years a 
factor in the lumber business at Houston, 
is an executive in two of the largest lum- 
ber companies of Texas, and also has large 
timber interests in the state. Mr. Thompson is 
president of the Thompson Brothers Lumber Com- 
pany, and vice president of the Thompson-Tucker 
Lumber Company, both of which maintain home 
offices in Houston. Associated with Mr. Thomp- 
son in these companies for many years was his 
brother, the late Mr. Alex Thompson, who was vice 
president of the Thompson Brothers Lumber Com- 
pany and president of the Thompson-Tucker Lum- 
ber Company; Mr. J. Lewis Thompson, another 
brother, who is president of the Public National 
Bank of Houston, is associated with him in the 
lumber business. The Thompson's interests also 
include a number of saw mills in Trinity County 
and large timber interests in Southeast Texas. The 
Thompson Brothers Lumber Company and the 
Thompson-Tucker Lumber Company are among the 
largest shippers of lumber in this section. Mr. 
Thompson has offices in the State National Bank 
Building. 

Hoxie H. Thompson was born at Kilgore, in Gregg 
County, Texas, the fifteenth of July, 1880, the son 
of John M. Thompson and Emily (Holt) Thompson. 
John M. Thompson, a native of Georgia, came to 
Texas in 1845, seven years later going to Gregg 
County, where he settled at Kilgore, in the heart 
of the pine forests of the state. Shortly after going 
to Kilgore Mr. Thompson began in the lumber bus- 
iness, in a small way, gradually expanding his 
interests as conditions justified, and laid the foun- 
dations of the Thompson Brothers Lumber Company 
and the Thompson-Tucker Lumber Company inter- 
ests of today. He established the Thompson-Tucker 
Lumber Company at Kilgore in 1852, at which time 
he owned and operated a string of around ten 
saw mills. One of the pioneers in the lumber in- 
dustry in Texas, Mr. Thompson was throughout 
his career one of those men who saw the possi- 
bilities of this great resource of the Lone Star 
State, and set about in a conservative way to de- 
velop these resources. His name will ever be asso- 
ciated with the names of William Cameron and 
W. T. Carter, likewise pioneers in the lumber in- 
dustry, and three men to whom the industry of 
today owes much. Mrs. Thompson, who before her 
marriage was Miss Emily Holt, was a native of 
Caddo Parish, Louisiana. She came with her par- 
ents to Texas as a girl of nine years, the family 
locating at Kilgore, where she grew to womanhood. 
On July 18, 1871, she was married to John Martin 
Thompson. They had a family of six children, 
four sons and two daughters. 

Hoxie H. Thompson spent his early years at 
Kilgore, attending the schools there. Later, in 1893, 
the family removed to Sherman, and he entered 
Austin College there, taking preparatory work for 
the ensuing three years, and following this with 
four years of college work, taking the B. S. degree 
in 1901. Mr. Thompson then entered Cornell Uni- 
versity, specializing in civil engineering, and taking 
the C. E. degree in 1905. Immediately following 
he went with the Great Northern Railroad, spending 
1905 and 1906 in railroad work. He then returned 
to Texas, going in the lumber mills operated by 
his father, and working in all departments, learn- 



1234 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




ing the lumber business through practical exper- 
ience. In 1917 he was made president of the 
Thompson Brothers Lumber Company and vice pres- 
ident of the Thompson-Tucker Lumber Company. 

Mr. Thompson was married at Sherman, Texas, 
the twenty-seventh of December, 1906, to Miss 
Goree Gregg, a native of Sherman and the daugh- 
ter of Judge E. P. Gregg, a prominent attorney 
of North Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson reside 
in Houston at 5000 Caroline Street, and have one 
child, Hoxie H. Thompson, Jr. Mr. Thompson be- 
longs to the Houston Club, the Houston Country 
Club, the River Oaks Country Club, the University 
Club, the Lumbermen's Club, and is a Mason, and 
a member of the Shrine Temple in Houston. Mr. 
Thompson is one of the well known lumbermen of 
Texas, and like his father, has been active in the 
advancement of the lumber industry, as well as 
taking a deep interest in the civic progress of 
Houston. 

HARLES M. WOMACK, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Womack Construction Company, 
Inc., of Houston, has recently come to this 
city to make his home and business head- 
quarters. The Womack Construction Company was 
organized in 1907, and incorporated in 1916, and has 
its headquarters in Sherman, Texas. The Houston 
office was opened in 1925, Mr. Womack coming 
here at that time to take charge of this office. 
The Womack Construction Company is one of the 
largest road construction companies operating in 
Texas, and has handled all kinds of road building 
contracts in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, con- 
structing in the aggregate many millions of dollars 
worth of roads and bridges. This company also 
built all the roads and bridges around Monroe, Lou- 
isiana, and since the opening of the Houston of- 
fice has secured many large contracts in this sec- 
tion. The Houston offices are located at 2115 Con- 
gress Avenue. Officers of the company are: John 
H. Kirby, president; R. S. Womack, of Sherman, 
vice president and general manager, and C. M. 
Womack, subject of this sketch, secretary-treasur- 
er; W. P. Mayo, assistant secretary and treasurer. 
Charles M. Womack was born in Grimes County, 
Texas, the twenty-ninth of March, 1859, son of Abe 
Womack, and Addie (Lawrence) Womack. The fa- 
ther, now deceased, was a native of Georgia, who 
came to Texas in 1837. Mrs. Womack was a na- 
tive of Washington County, Texas. C. M. Womack 
attended the schools of Texas, but learned largely 
from the school of experience that is perhaps the 
greatest of all schools. During a business experi- 
ence covering around a half century, Mr. Womack 
has been engaged in various enterprises. He spent 
a number of years as a traveling salesman, and 
engaged in farming on the Brazos River and at 
Eagle Lake, for around a quarter of a century, and 
still owns farm lands at Eagle Lake. He spent some 
four years in the oil fields, and in 1915 was the 
founder of the Womack Construction Company, with 
which he has since been connected. 

Mr. Womack has been married twice, his first 
wife, whom he married at Courtney, Texas, in 1883, 
having been Miss Ottilie Stresau. One son, Mark 
G. Womack, of Monroe, Louisiana, was born to this 
union. Mr. Womack was married the second time at 
Houston, in March, 1909, to Miss Stella Greenwood, 




daughter of John W. Greenwood, and Annie (Dever- 
aux) Greenwood, native Texans. Mr. and Mrs. 
Womack reside at Tulane and Rochester Streets, and 
have one child, Charles M. Womack, Jr. 

|LARENCE B. COOPER recently established 
his residence in Houston and has become 
well identified with the business life of the 
city. Being familiar with the automobile 
supply business, he was first engaged in this field 
in Houston. Realizing the great future of Houston 
as a concentration point and market for cotton, he 
soon made his present connections as secretary of 
the Magnolia Compress and Warehouse Company, 
with offices in the State National Bank Building and 
with compress on Harrisburg Boulevard between 
Eighty-first and Brays Bayou. The other officers 
of the company are C. S. Kinney, president and gen- 
eral manager, and W. B. Lewis, treasurer. 

Clarence B. Cooper was born at Stribling, Ten- 
nessee, the twelfth of January, 1892, son of C. 
Cooper, a native Texan, who went to Tennessee as 
a boy and lived in that state until his death, and 
Clara Auferman Cooper, a native of Georgia, who 
since her husband's death has made her home in 
San Antonio. Mr. Cooper was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Nashville, Tennessee, later going to 
Vanderbilt College where he took the engineering 
course and graduated with the B. E. degree in 1913. 
He went with the engineering department of the 
United States government with headquarters at 
Nashville, and spent two years in engineering work 
on the rivers and harbors. He then went in busi- 
ness for himself as consulting engineer and con- 
struction engineer, engaging in this work for two 
years. This was followed by a year in the engineer- 
ing department of the N. C. & St. L. Railroad, from 
which position he resigned to enter military service 
at the entrance of the United States in the World 
War. Mr. Cooper served as first lieutenant in the 
Forty-second Division, Seventeenth Engineers of 
the Rainbow Division, spending one year in France, 
after which he was returned to the States, ranking 
as captain, as instructor at Camp Humphreys, Vir- 
ginia. He was made adjutant of that camp, re- 
maining there until his discharge from Jefferson 
Barracks, St. Louis, the nineteenth of August, 1919, 
He then went into the tire and accessory business at 
St. Louis, the firm name being the King-Cooper 
Service Company. After six months he disposed of 
his interest in this business and went on the road, 
covering the Middle States for the Blue Bird Ap- 
pliance Company. After six months with that cor- 
poration his father died at his home in Tennessee, 
and he returned there, later bringing his mother to 
San Antonio, where his brother, W. J. Cooper, makes 
his home. He was attracted with the future this 
state offered to the young man and after looking 
over various locations, decided on Houston, and with 
others, bought out an auto supply business with 
which he was identified until taking over the duties 
of his present office. 

Mr. Cooper is a Mason, Blue Lodge, Nashville, No. 
254, 18th degree Scottish Rite, Nashville. He is also 
a member of the Yacht Club and one of the most en- 
thusiastic promoters of this diversion. Mr. Cooper 
has made many friends in Houston, who regard him 
as one of the progressive young business men of the 
city. 



1237 



MEN OF TEXAS 




TIS S. VAN DE MARK, for more than a 
decade identified with building activities at 
Houston, and a recognized authority on con- 
struction matters, has been a factor in the 
industrial and commercial world, and has won the 
highest esteem of his fellow citizens through his 
real interest in the development of his community. 
Mr. Van De Mark is vice president of the American 
Construction Company, the largest construction com- 
pany in the state, and a real Texas institution, 
backed and managed by the foremost builders in 
the Lone Star State. This company, organized in 
1908, is now an enterprise of statewide scope, and 
has in its oz-ganization more than one thousand men, 
many of them skilled artisans, and equipped to do 
the highest type of construction work. The offices 
and headquarters of the American Construction Com- 
pany are in Houston, in the Gulf Building. S. Bailey 
Houx is president and treasurer, J. M. Mahon and 
Otis S. Van De Mark vice presidents, all of whom 
are men of recognized standing in the construction 
world. 

The work of the American Construction Company 
has been largely centered on the construction of fine 
office buildings, and buildings of the public type, as 
well as industrial construction. The list includes the 
Gulf Building, the Majestic Theatre of Houston, the 
Peden Iron and Steel Company Warehouses, the 
Bankers Mortgage Building, the Goggan Building, 
the Chamber of Commerce Building, the Scottish 
Rite Cathedral, the State National Bank Building, 
the Hermann Hospital, and Wharf and Warehouse 
Number Four, on the ship channel, all these buildings 
being located in Houston. In other parts of the state 
are the Southwestern Life Insurance Building, at 
Dallas; the Cotton Exchange Building, at Dallas; the 
North Dallas high school, at Dallas; the Johnson 
County Court House, at Cleburne; the Harris Coun- 
ty Court House, at Houston; the Littlefield Building, 
at Austin; the El Paso High School, at El Paso; the 
Gulf Refining Building, at Port Arthur; the West- 
brook Hotel, at Fort Worth; the general shops of 
the International and Great Northern Railroad, at 
San Antonio; the Sealy Hospital, at Galveston, and 
the new Union Station, at Galveston. The Amer- 
ican Construction Company also had the contract 
for the construction of Camp Logan and Ellington 
Field, representing an outlay of five million dollars, 
and one of the most stupendous construction works 
of recent years. 

Mr. Van De Mark has been with the American 
Construction Company since taking his C. E. degree, 
from Cornell University, in 1910, and has made an 
excellent record along all lines. He has personal 
charge of many of the activities of the company, and 
is one of the men on whom heavy responsibilities 
rest. He has a real executive ability, combined 
with a practical construction experience, as well as 
technical knowledge of construction work, that gives 
him prestige in the business world, and indicates still 
greater achievements in the future. 

Mr. Van De Mark was born at Clyde, Kansas, the 
sixteenth day of February, 1886, son of C. W. and 
Addie Stephens Van De Mark. He began his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native state and after 
finishing the high school there, entered Washburn 
College for a two years course prior to entering Cor- 
nell University, where he took the C. E. degree after 
three years, in 1910. He came immediately to Hous- 




ton and went with the American Construction Com- 
pany, where he is now vice president. In 1917 Mr. 
Van De Mark went to Washington, D. C, handling 
construction work for the Air Service, and in July, 
1918, was commissioned captain in the Air Service. 
He was discharged in February, 1919, and returned 
to Houston, with this exception having been located 
here since 1910. 

Mr. Van De Mark was married at Houston, the 
thirtieth of May, 1923, to Miss Annie Beth Lockett, 
daughter of J. W. Lockett, one of the leading attor- 
neys of Houston, and Ida Warner Lockett. Mr. and 
Mrs. Van De Mark make their home at Garden Court 
Apartments. Mr. Van De Mark is a Scottish Rite 
Mason, a member of the University Club and the 
River Oaks Country Club, and takes a deep interest 
in the various civic activities at Houston. He is well 
known in construction circles throughout the state 
and is one of the most progressive men identified 
with construction work. 

E. DIONNE, veteran old timer in the tim- 
ber business, has for half a century been 
active in this industry, operating in every 
branch of the business and for almost two 
decades has been at Houston, where he is well and 
favorably known as a timber estimator. Mr. Dionne 
is the only professional timber estimator at Hous- 
ton and is employed by most of the larger lumber 
companies, banks and individuals. He is considered 
a leading authority on estimating the quantity, 
value, grade, etc. of lumber standing in the forests. 
He came to Houston in 1908 and opened his offices 
and headquarters as a timber estimator and has so 
continued, his office now being at 231 West Twenty- 
first Avenue, in Houston Heights. 

Mr. Dionne has been in the timber business for 
more than half a century and during the course 
of his career has managed and operated every branch 
of the timber business in the forests and through 
the sawmills and also transportation by boat or rail. 
His first experience was gained in the forests of 
northern Michigan, where he spent more than a 
quarter of a century. He came to Texas in 1905 
and for three years had charge of logging opera- 
tions for the Trinity Lumber Company, at Grove- 
ton, after which he came to Houston. 

Mr. Dionne was born in Montreal, Canada, the 
twenty-first of July, 1858, son of Francis X. and 
Mary Dionne, old settlers of Canada, who moved to 
the state of Maine sixty years ago, a little later re- 
moving to Michigan. Mr. Dionne was educated in 
the schools of Michigan, attending school only a 
brief period and early beginning his career as a tim- 
berman. 

Mr. Dionne was married the first time at Man- 
istee, Michigan, in 1878 to Miss Elizabeth McGinley, 
by whom he had a family of four children, two 
daughters, Mrs. Lomie Hury and Mrs. Marie C. 
Green, and two sons, Joseph C. Dionne, publisher of 
the Gulf Coast Lumberman, one of the leading trade 
journals of the lumber industry, and F. Earle Dionne. 
Mr. Dionne's first wife died in 1893 and in 1905 he 
married Miss Leah Briggs, daughter of Billings M. 
and Maude A. Briggs, her father a well known con- 
tractor and builder. By his last marriage he had a 
family of two children, Mary Alice and Thomas G. 
Dionne. Mr. and Mrs. Dionne reside at 231 West 
Twenty-first Avenue in Houston Heights. Mr. 
Dionne is a member of the Lumberman's Club. 



1238 





£z<-^ 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




OSEPH WALTER NORTHROP, JR., archi- 
tect, came to Houston in May, 1911, from 
Boston, as supervising architect on the 
Rice Institute building, eight years later 
opening his present office in the West Building 
for general architectural practice. Mr. Northrop 
has designed several hundred buildings in Houston, 
and some of the most beautiful homes in the City 
stand as monuments to his skill as an architect. 
His contributions are sought by the leading archi- 
tectural magazines of the country, his work having 
been published by such magazines as the Archi- 
tectural Forum, of Boston; the American Architect 
and Country Life, of New York, and the National 
Builder, of Chicago. 

Among the local residences designed by Mr. North- 
rop might be mentioned the John H. Crooker and 
Mrs. T. A. Johnson residences, in "Shadowlawn"; 
the Geo. Dorrance residence in "Edgemont"; the 
H. M. Holden residence in "Colby Court"; and the 
Paul B. Miller residence in "Almeda Place." The 
Holden residence was one of the eleven houses 
selected for "Honorable Mention" by a jury of dis- 
tinguishd architects in an exhibition of the do- 
mestic architecture of the entire country, held un- 
der the auspices of the American Architect in New 
York City, in 1924. 

Mr. Northrop has also to his credit other work 
throughout the State, such as Trinity Episcopal 
Church and the Public Library at Marshall, and the 
Alexander Deussen country residence, near Fort 
Worth; and such commercial buildings as the Bon- 
ner Motor Company building and the two J. L. Jones 
buildings. The drawings for the base and plinth 
of the Sam Houston Monument, at the entrance to 
Hermann Park were also made in his office. 

Mr. Northrop was born in Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut, on July 21st, 1886. His father, Joseph Walter 
Northrop, Sr., is one of the best known architects 
of that city. His mother was Miss Mary Ogden, a 
member of a well-known Connecticut family. His 
early education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of Bridgeport, after which he entered the 
Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, 
where he remained four years and graduated in 
the class of 1907, with the degree of A. D. He then 
became a student of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, where he remained for three years 
and graduated from this Institution in 1910 with the 
degree of B. S. in Architecture. While attending 
Wesleyan University he was elected to the Phi Beta 
Kappa Honorary Fraternity. He is a member of 
Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. After leaving college, 
Mr. Northrop became associated with the architec- 
tural firm of Cram and Ferguson, of Boston, and 
was with this firm for one year when he was sent 
to Houston to supervise the erection of the Rice 
Institute buildings, where he remained for a period 
of eight years. 

Mr. Northrop was married in Houston in 1915 
to Miss Mary Harris, a native Texan, and a daugh- 
ter of Page Harris, Vice-President of the National 
Lumber and Creosoting Company. Her mother was 
Miss Sarah Binkley, a member of a well-known 
Texas family. They have two children, Joseph Wal- 
ter Northrop the 3rd, nine years of age, and Page 
Harris Northrop, aged eight years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Northrop reside at 5120 Sycamore Street. Mr. 
Northrop is a member of the University Club, the 




River Oaks Country Club, and the Texas Chapter 
of the American Institute of Architects. Mr. North- 
rop is well-known in the business and social circles 
of Houston. His work has done much to raise the 
standard of local residential architecture, as he has 
combined in this work an harmony of constructive 
beauty and artistic design that has been given na- 
tional recognition. 

OBERT D. RANDOLPH, who is well known 
at Houston for his numerous activities of 
financial and commercial importance inci- 
dent to the prosperity of the city, has been 
a resident of Houston for a decade and takes an 
active interest in civic development. Mr. Randolph 
is vice president and general manager of the Car- 
ter Investment Company, Incorporated, a firm mak- 
ing a large volume of real estate loans on city prop- 
erty in Houston, and also Harris and Jefferson 
counties. Their investments are located principally 
in Houston and Beaumont. The Carter Investment 
Company of which W. T. Carter, Jr., is president, 
and F. H. Nelms, secretary and treasurer, was in- 
corporated in 1923. Offices are maintained at the 
corner of Capitol and San Jacinto. Mr. Randolph is 
a director of the Union National Bank, one of the 
largest financial institutions in the city. 

Robert D. Randolph was born in Washington, 
D. O, the twentieth of March, 1891, son of the 
late Thomas P. Randolph, a native of Virginia, and 
Jane (De Can) Randolph, who now resides in Wash- 
ington, D. C. Until he was ten years of age, Mr. 
Randolph attended the public schools of Washing- 
ton, D. C. In that year however, the family re- 
moved to England, and for the next four years he 
attended the schools of that country. Returning to 
the United States he was in various schools until 
his entrance in the University of Virginia, in the 
engineering department. During his last year in 
college he visited Houston, and liked the city so 
well that he decided to forego college and remain 
here. For three months he worked for a construc- 
tion company, after which he organized the J. H. 
Richardson Construction Company, handling con- 
crete bridge construction work until 1915. He then 
sold his interest in this business, a partnership, and 
went with the W. T. Carter and Brother, remaining 
in Houston until the first of January, 1917, when 
he went to Beaumont to open the office there. In 
June of the same year he enlisted in Naval Air 
Service, and was sent to the Ground School in Cana- 
da, and later stationed in Washington, D. C, as 
Lieutenant Naval Air Service. Returning to Hous- 
ton he was for one year with Neuhaus and Co., after 
which he returned to the W. T. Carter Lumber Com- 
pany, and went to the mill at Camden, Texas. He re- 
signed this position the first of January, 1923, and 
returned to Houston, where he took an active part 
in the organization of the Carter Investment Com- 
pany, Incorporated, of which he has since been vice 
president and general manager. 

Mr. Randolph was married at Houston, the 
fourteenth of June, 1918, to Miss Frankie Carter, 
daughter of W. T. Carter, Sr., the founder of the 
W. T. Carter and Brother, and a pioneer lumberman 
of the Lone Star State. Mr. and Mrs. Randolph 
have a beautiful home at 14 Courtland Place, Hous- 
ton, and are among the most popular members of 
their social set. They have two children, Aubrey 
and Jean. 



1241 



MEN OF TEXAS 




OHN A. HARVIN is well known in the busi- 
ness circles of Houston, where for almost 
thirty years he has been connected with 
the Peden Iron and Steel Company. Begin- 
ning in a modest position with this company in 1895, 
Mr. Harvin has, through industry and close attention 
to the details of the business, been steadily advanced 
until now he is vice president and manager of the 
great establishment of the Peden Iron and Steel 
Company. It is through the efforts of such em- 
ployees as Mr. Harvin that the company's slogan, 
"The Largest Supply House of the Southwest," has 
become a reality. The Peden Iron and Steel Com- 
pany has a capital stock of $2,500,000.00 and an 
annual volume of sales aggregating more than $11,- 
000,000.00. In addition to the immense establish- 
ment of the Peden Iron and Steel Company in Hous- 
ton, they have branch houses in San Antonio, Fort 
Worth and Shreveport, Louisiana. They employ 
four hundred people and have forty men on the road, 
and ship their goods into New Mexico, Oklahoma, 
Louisiana, Arkansas, Republic of Mexico and to all 
points in Texas. Other officers of the Peden Iron 
and Steel Company are E. A. Peden, president; D. D. 
Peden, vice president; Charles Golding, vice presi- 
dent, and R. C. Terrell, secretary. 

Mr. Harvin was born in Calhoun County, Geor- 
gia, September 8th, 1860. His father, William E. 
Harvin, born in South Carolina but raised in Geor- 
gia, was a captain in the Confederate Army and was 
severely wounded in the battle of Gettysburg. He 
was taken a prisoner to Johnson Island, Lake Erie, 
and while confined a prisoner, died in 1863. His 
mother was Miss Frances Eudora Davis, a native of 
South Carolina, but lived for many years in Georgia 
and died there. Mr. Harvin's early education was 
obtained in the rural schools of Georgia, after which 
he was a student for two years at Davidson Col- 
lege, North Carolina. He was born on a farm, and 
as a youth was content to work on the farm like 
his pioneer ancestors, but a new age was taking 
shape during his boyhood, the age of commercial 
achievement. In looking about for a possible career, 
the law and the ministry were suggested to him, but 
he had determined to leave the farm for commercial 
pursuits, and decided on the state of Texas as the 
place, and set out on his great adventure. He 
arrived in Houston in January, 1895, and imme- 
diately began work with the Peden Iron and Steel 
Company. His first duties with the company were 
those of a general "handy man," and his first work 
was that of building some much needed shelving. 
After a few months of work around the store, he 
was sent out on the road as a traveling salesman. 
This did not appeal to Mr. Harvin, and convincing 
the heads of the company that he could be of more 
value to them in the store, he left the road after a 
period of three months as a "drummer" and was 
placed in charge of the warehouse and shipping, 
which position he held with satisfaction to his em- 
ployers for seven years. At the end of this period, 
he was made assistant manager, and later elected 
a director and appointed vice president and manager, 
which position he has since held. 

Mr. Harvin was married in Georgia in 1884 to 
Miss Mary B. Harvin, a native Georgian. They have 
one son, Harry Harvin, of Frankfort, Kentucky. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harvin reside at 2510 Travis Street. Mr. 
Harvin has always been active in all projects hav- 




ing to do with the progress, advancement and civic 
improvement of Houston, and believes that with 
thirty feet of water in the channel, Houston will be- 
come a great harbor, and the metropolis of the 
Southwest. 

HOMAS C. WHITE has for almost fifteen 
years been identified with the manufactur- 
ing interests of Houston, where he is Pres- 
ident and Manager of the Southern Brass 
Manufacturing and Plating Company. This com- 
pany are manufacturers of oil field supplies in 
brass, including valves, pump parts, etc. The South- 
ern Brass Manufacturing and Plating Compan|y 
have the largest plant in the South making bank 
fixtures, ornamental fixtures, memorial tablets, 
fancy metal designs and plates, and is the only 
plant of its kind south of St. Louis. The Southern 
Brass Manufacturing and Plating Company, located 
at 1208 Washington Street, was established in 1910. 
At the beginning, this company had only two thous- 
and square feet of floor space and live employees. 
They now have ten thousand square feet of floor 
space and employ twenty-five people. The trade 
territory of this company embraces all of the South- 
ern States. The plant is equipped with the very 
best machinery, and all is of the latest type. They 
also maintain a special drafting department. Other 
officers of the company are: W. S. Farish and 
W. W. Fondren, Vice-Presidents, both of whom 
are associated with the Humble Oil Company. The 
company contemplates adding to their plant, and for 
this purpose they have already purchased the neces- 
sary property. The addition is made necessary by 
their rapidly increasing business. 

Mr. White was born at Quincy, Illinois, in 1863. 
His education was obtained at the public and high 
schools of his native town. When sixteen years of 
age he was employed in a foundry and stove making 
plant, and has been engaged in this work practically 
all his life. He came to Texas in 1909. 

Mr. White was married in Houston in 1921 to Miss 
Minnie Perkins, a daughter of David Perkins, for 
many years a railroad conductor, residing in Hous- 
ton. They have one son, Thomas C. White, Jr. Mr. 
and Mrs. White reside at 802 Holman Avenue. Mr. 
White is a member of the Rotarians and the Pur- 
chasing Agents Association. He has always been 
active in the business, social and general community 
life of Houston and gives liberally of his time to all 
projects for the welfare, progress and advancement 
of this city. 

DRIAN B. GOODMAN, although a recent 
addition to the business fraternity of Hous- 
ton, is well known in the financial and 
grain circles of the State. Mr. Goodman is 
President of the Goodman Grain and Elevator Com- 
pany, wholesale dealers in all kinds of grain and 
manufacturers of molasses mixed feeds, feed meal, 
chops, rolled oats, etc. This company, established 
and incorporated in 1923, is located on the Houston 
Belt and Terminal Railroad. The plant has a bulk 
storage capacity of fifty thousand bushels and em- 
ploys forty people. The plant of the Goodman Grain 
and Elevator Company, including a grinding mill, 
is complete and modern in every detail, and is in 
every way a splendid plant. The trade territory of 
the Goodman Grain and Elevator Company includes 
all of South Texas. Mr. M. E. Goodman is Vice- 
President of the Goodman Grain and Elevator Com- 




1242 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



pany. 

A native Texan, Mr. Goodman was born at Nava- 
sota in 1885. His parents, Benjamin Goodman and 
Ernistine Goodman, were well known citizens of 
Navasota, where his father was for many years 
engaged in the grain business. Mr. Goodman's 
education was obtained in the public and high schools 
of Navasota. 

Mr. Goodman was raised in an atmosphere of the 
grain business, and after leaving school became as- 
sociated with the grain establishment of the Josey- 
Miller Company in Beaumont, where he remained 
for nineteen years. During this period, Mr. Good- 
man had complete charge of all buying and selling 
for this large company, from whom he severed his 
association in order to enter his present business, 
which has been a success from the beginning. Mr. 
Goodman has interests in many of the grain com- 
panies of the State. He is past President of the 
Lake Charles Grain Company and is a past Director 
in the Hesig-Norvell Company, wholesale grocers of 
Beaumont. Mr. Goodman was married in Lake 
Charles, Louisiana, in 1916, to Miss Elyse Bendel, a 
daughter of Sam Bendel, well known as a manufac- 
turer of Lake Charles. They have two children, 
Mary, five years of age, and Junior, aged two years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Goodman reside at 3421 Yupon Drive. 
In fraternal organizations, Mr. Goodman is a mem- 
ber of the B. P. O. E., in which organization he 
holds a life membership. He has faith in the future 
of Houston, and believes he chose the right city in 
which to establish his business, and make his home 
and rear his children. 

|OHN McLELLAND, architect, has combined 
in his work a complete harmony of con- 
structive beauty and artistic arrangement 
that distinguishes his work from that of 
other architects. Mr. McLelland studied his pro- 
fession extensively in Europe, and has brought the 
best of old world architectural beauty to America, 
and by practical application has united it with mod- 
ern ideas. The result classifies him as an excep- 
tionally gifted- Master Builder. Mr. McLelland came 
to Houston in 1911. Among the buildings that he 
has erected in the city may be mentioned Magnolia 
Park Junior High School, Pasadena High School, 
Crosby High School, Park Place Grade School, the 
Montrose School, Southmore School, Eastwood Epis- 
copal Church, Harrisburg Episcopal Church, and 
was Supervising Architect of the South End Junior 
High School and the Houston Heights High School, 
and built the residences of A. W. Crausbay and E. 
C. Wilson, which are numbered among the hand- 
somest in the city. Mr. McLelland also built the 
Court House at Livingston, Polk County, at a cost 
of |200,000.00, and various other structures there. 
At this time he has plans for many new buildings, 
among which is the Golfcrest Country Club club- 
house. 

Mr. McLelland was born in Greenock, Scotland, 
in 1877. His father, James McLelland, was for 
many years a business man of Greenock, Scotland. 
His mother was Miss Jessie Baird, a member of a 
prominent Scotch family. The public schools of 
Scotland supplied the foundation for Mr. McLel- 
land's education, after which he attended the Green- 
ock Academy and the Glasgow and W. S. Technical 
College, where he was a student of Architecture, 
and graduated from this Institution in 1898. Dur- 





ing the same year in which he graduated, Mr. Mc- 
Lelland began work as an architect in Greenock, 
Scotland, where he remained until 1906, when he 
came to Chicago and was sent from there to San 
Francisco by the Thompson Starrett Company, Con- 
tractors, as an estimator. He remained in San Fran- 
cisco during the rebuilding period of the city, fol- 
lowing the great fire in 1906, and in 1908 he went 
to Portland, Oregon, where he remained one year, 
after which he was in Los Angeles for one year. 

Mr. McLelland was married in Houston, in 1916, 
to Miss Bertha Diederich, a native of Indiana, and 
a member of a well-known family of that State. 
They have three children — Calvin, John M. and 
Douglas Haig. Mr. McLelland is a member of 
the A. F. and A. M., being a life member of Mother 
Kilwinning Blue Lodge, of Scotland, one of the 
oldest Masonic Lodges in existence. He is also 
Past Master of a Masonic Lodge of Scotland. He 
is a member of the American Institute of Architects, 
Texas Chapter American Institute of Architects and 
the Civitan and Golfcrest Country Clubs, of Hous- 
ton. Mr. McLelland served the City of Houston for 
two years, 1919 and 1920, as Architect. His offices 
are conveniently located at 309 Woolworth Build- 
ing. Mr. McLelland personally supervises all his 
work, and the number of his friends and clients has 
grown in proportion to the growth and progress of 
Houston. 

R. W. E. SATTERWHITE is connected with 
the Vaughan Lumber Company in the tie 
and timber department, as purchasing 
agent, coming with this company on Jan- 
uary 1st, 1925. He has a long experience and a wide 
acquaintance in the lumber trade. 

Born at Crockett, Texas, in 1887, a son of M. W. 
and Mary (Brashear) Satterwhite, he received his 
education in the public schools and the Crockett 
School and later attended a commercial college. He 
first engaged in the lumber business at Groveton, 
Texas, in 1909 and was there for eight years, during 
which time he mastered every detail of the manu- 
facture end of the business. He is thoroughly at 
home in a lumber mill and knows how to keep a plant 
running at the height of its productive capacity. 
After becoming thoroughly acquainted with the de- 
tails of the manufacture of lumber, Mr. Satterwhite 
turned his attention to its distribution and became 
connected with the Saner-Ragley Lumber Company 
and remained with this concern for three years as 
sales manager. 

In 1920 he was elected vice president of the Ragley 
Lumber Company and removed to Houston to as- 
sume charge of the company's affairs in this city. 
In the early part of 1923 he severed his connection 
with the Ragley interests and established his own 
business. 

Mr. Satterwhite was married at Groveton in 1912 
to Miss Edna Magee. They reside at 602 Anita. 

A man of pleasing personality and affable dispo- 
sition, Mr. Satterwhite is easily counted as one of 
Houston's exceptionally popular business men. He 
is known as a man of untiring energy and one who 
never fails to make good. He regards a contract to 
deliver a car load of lumber at a certain time as a 
solemn bond foundation of a square deal to every 
one. 

Mr. Satterwhite is a York Rite Mason and also a 
member of Arabia Temple Shrine. 



1245 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HE HOUSTON ARMATURE WORKS is 

one of Houston's most thriving business en- 
terprises doing work of a very special and 
highly technical nature. The firm repairs 
and rebuilds electric motors and generators of all 
kinds and rewinds and repairs armatures for same. 
The plant is located at Washington and Preston 
Avenues, and covers an area of 8,000 square feet. 
It has had a steady growth since it was first organ- 
ized in 1906. 

The Houston Armature Works was first organized 
by the late Fred E. Ward, who was considered one 
of the foremost armature winders in the United 
States, and an expert in the repair and rewinding 
of electrical equipment. His plant was the first in 
Houston to do winding by factory methods. Mr. 
Ward adopted the policy of doing the very highest 
class of workmanship and using nothing but the 
best material with an absolute guarantee. In 1920, 
Mr. Ward sold his interest to Mr. A. C. Kater, and 
Mr. Hal Willson, who have continued strictly adher- 
ing to the policies of Mr. Ward. The Houston Arma- 
ture Works stands today as a fitting monument to 
the character of its founder, who died in Los An- 
geles, California, September 16, 1923. Under the di- 
rection and management of Messrs. Kater and Will- 
son, the business has shown approximately a four 
hundred per cent increase. The capital of the corpo- 
ration has recently been increased to $26,000.00, and 
the plant is the largest of its kind in the State in 
point of invested capital, doing repair work exclus- 
ively. The most modern equipment only is used 
throughout. The latest type of machines used in 
forming armature coils, have recently been installed, 
which enables them to do this work efficiently and 
with dispatch. Special varnishing and impregnating 
equipment, electrically operated and equal to, if not 
superior to any in the most modern factories, is part 
of the installation. The very latest type of electri- 
cally heated and mechanically ventilated ovens for 
drying armature coils and other electrical apparatus 
are in use. The entire shops are laid out in a thor- 
oughly systematic manner so that the work pro- 
gresses step by step from the time it enters the 
factory to be uncrated and examined until it reaches 
the exit for final inspection, ready to be shipped 
back to the customer. The principles of scientific 
management are practiced not only in the shops 
themselves but in the office. Complete records and 
wiring diagrams of every individual job are on file 
in the office so that quick reference may be had 
when required by a customer. The Houston Arma- 
ture Works do much special work for the large oil 
companies, such as the Humble Oil and Refining 
Company, the Texas Company and the Gulf Produc- 
tion Company. They also give official service on 
General Electric, Westinghouse, Wagner, Century, 
Champion and U. S. Motors. All of the work done 
by this plant is of the highest grade and finish, and 
is equal to any done by any factory anywhere. 

In addition to the repair work, they carry in stock 
for sale a complete line of electrical equipment, 
especially bearings and pulleys for standard motors. 
They also have for sale, at all times, a high grade 
line of used electrical equipment. 

The business of this concern is growing so rapidly, 
that plans are now under way to erect a large mod- 
ern building to care for the expansion. They give 
employment to eighteen skilled operatives, all of 




whom are experts in their line. The success of the 
Houston Armature Works is due in large measure 
to the policies of Mr. Kater and Mr. Willson, who 
maintain that when better methods are used in 
their line of work, The Houston Armature Works 
will adopt them. 

EORGE B. NELSON, one of the leaders 
among the younger business men of Hous- 
ton, Texas, has been engaged in the boat 
building business all his life and is the 
third generation of the Nelson family to engage in 
this field of activity. He has made an enviable 
record in his business, as his boats hold all records 
for speed in this portion of the state, also two of 
his boats hold the 510 hydroplane championship of 
the Mississippi Valley Power Boat Association; the 
races of this association include competition from 
all portions of the United States. Mr. Nelson does 
not build boats for sale or for market, but on spe- 
cial orders only, and while he builds all kinds of 
boats, he specializes in racing boats. His business 
has grown in volume to the extent that parties de- 
siring his services have to place their orders much 
in advance of the time of delivery. He is well 
known in his chosen line and makes boats for all 
sections of the country, and his boats have won 
prizes in the big races wherever they have been en- 
tered. He has never failed to win in the Mississippi 
Power Boat Association, which is an association 
of boat clubs of the United States and the best rac- 
ers from every club are entered there for his com- 
petition. The boat building business of which Mr. 
Nelson is the sole owner is located at 6511 Canal 
Street. His plant is equipped with all of the mod- 
ern machinery for the building of his splendid craft. 
A native Texan, Mr. Nelson was born at Houston 
on April 3rd, 1897. His father, L. F. Nelson, a na- 
tive of New Orleans, Louisiana, was a boat builder 
during his lifetime and his reputation in this line 
was well known throughout the country. His moth- 
er, Mrs. Emma (Moeser) Nelson, was a native Hous- 
tonian and a member of one of this city's pioneer 
families. His education was obtained in the schools 
of Houston, which he left at an early age in order 
to engage in his life work, which has been inter- 
rupted only by the period he spent in the World 
War. 

Mr. Nelson was married at Houston on August 
2nd, 1922, to Miss Pauline Heinze, a daughter of D. 
E. Heinze, a native Houstonian and well known in 
the railroad circles of the Lone Star State. Her 
mother, Mrs. Antonio (Guy) Heinze (now deceased), 
was born in this city and was a member of a prom- 
inent Harris County family. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson 
reside at 6511 Canal Street. Although Mr. Nelson is 
one of the city's younger generation of business 
men, he has made his influence felt in the commer- 
cial life of this city, and has succeeded in building 
up a splendid business in his rather unique line of 
work. He has always been deeply interested in the 
civic matters of his home city and gives liberally 
of his time and means to the furtherance of any 
project for the advancement and progress of Hous- 
ton. Mr. Nelson inherited his liking for his profes- 
sion and it is his desire to build better and faster 
boats than have ever been turned out up to this time 
from any boat building establishment, and he be- 
lieves that his will lead the the entire country. 



1246 






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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




USSELL A. HEY, of Houston, Texas, has 
with the exception of two years spent in 
war work, devoted his entire business life 
to the various branches of the Baldwin Loco- 
motive Works. He is the Manager of the Houston 
Branch of this company, and is also Manager for 
the Standard Steel Works Company, of Philadelphia. 
The latter company manufactures locomotive 
springs, tire forgings, rolled steel wheels for loco- 
motive and passenger cars. The offices of these 
two companies were established in this city in 1919 
in order to handle more efficiently the sales of the 
Southern States which includes Texas, Louisiana, 
New Mexico and Arizona. Two men are employed 
as traveling salesmen in this territory, traveling out 
of Houston as headquarters. The Houston office is 
located at 1109 Second National Bank Building. Mr. 
Hey began with the Baldwin Locomotive Works at 
the main office in Philadelphia in 1914 as Secretary 
to the President of this large company and remained 
in this position for a period of five years. During 
this time he was in Washington, D. C, and engaged 
with the War Industries Board and remained in this 
work for two years, when he returned to Philadel- 
phia with the same company. He then went on the 
road as traveling salesman for the Baldwin Locomo- 
tive Works, with St. Louis as headquarters, covering 
the Southern States. He continued in this position 
until the Houston branch was opened and he was 
sent here as Manager. Since coming to Houston 
Mr. Hey has made many friends for his company 
and for himself. 

Mr. Hey was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
on June 9, 1899. His father, James H. Hey, also a 
native of Pennsylvania, was well known in the busi- 
ness circles of that State. His education was ob- 
tained in the public schools of Philadelphia. 

On December 18, 1924, Mr. Hey was united in 
marriage with Miss Gertrude Lucile Guyer, a native 
of San Antonio. Mr. and Mrs. Hey are popular in 
social circles of the younger set and reside at 101 
West Alabama. He is a member of the Glenbrook 
Country Club, the Lumberman's Club, the Houston 
Club and the Rotary Club. Mr. Hey is optimistic as 
to the future of his company in the Southwest, and 
believes that this is one of the most fertile fields 
in the entire country. He is enthusiastic in his 
praise of Houston, and believes that this city, with 
its many advantages, will soon lead the entire South- 
west in population, manufacturing industries, educa- 
tional advantages and in many other ways. He is 
ambitious for his firm, with whom he has been asso- 
ciated for many years, and thinks they made no 
mistake in establishing an office in this wonderful 
city. He is ambitious for his firm and his city, 
and is an ardent worker for the good of both. As 
a representative of the Standard Steel Works, he has 
succeeded in building up a large business for them, 
a business that is growing every month. 

OUIS DE SAVOYE, president of L. de 
Savoye and Co., Inc., cotton merchants and 
exporters, is well known in the cotton and 
financial circles, not only in the United 
States but in practically every country where irregu- 
lar cotton and linters are used. Mr. de Savoye came 
to Houston more than a quarter of a century ago 
and during this period thousands of bales of cotton 
have been exported and sold to New England and 
Southern spinners. The present company was or- 




ganized in 1920 and same was incorporated in 1923. 
They have offices in all the principal cities of the 
United States, Bremen, Germany; Manchester, Eng- 
land; Lille, France, and maintain offices also in Hol- 
land and Belgium. This firm handles from ten 
thousand to twenty-five thousand bales of cotton 
annually. Mr. E. A. Dent, well known in the busi- 
ness circles of the country, is the secretary and 
treasurer of the company and their offices are 
maintained in the Cotton Exchange. Mr. de Savoye 
has had a wide and varied experience in the various 
countries of the world in the cotton business and 
is known internationally as one of the best posted 
men in the business and his advice is frequently 
sought by men of experience, on all matters pertain- 
ing to the cotton industry and conditions govern- 
ing same. 

Mr. de Savoye was born in Algiers, Africa, a prov- 
ince of France, on September 22nd, 1863. His father, 
B. de Savoye, a native of France, was an officer in 
the French army commanding the arsenal in Algiers, 
and was killed there. His mother (now deceased) 
was Miss Marie Marzin, a native of Brest, France, 
where she was a member of a prominent family. 
His parents were married in Brest, but Mr. de Sav- 
oye, with a sister, Marguerite (deceased), were both 
born in Algiers, Africa. His education was obtained 
at the Saint Cyr Military Academy in France. When 
sixteen years of age, Mr. de Savoye entered the 
French navy as a cadet and remained in the navy 
for about twenty-two years, after which he entered 
the German navy and served with this country for 
a period of two years and then went with the Mer- 
chant Marine and spent three years in Africa. He 
came to America in 1894 and settled at Galveston, 
Texas, where he became associated with the South- 
ern Pacific navigation department, where he re- 
mained for several years, after which he entered 
the cotton business with S. Samuels and Company, 
and remained with this firm until coming to Hous- 
ton, where for many years he conducted his cotton 
business alone and was very successful, but as the 
business grew, it became necessary to enlarge and 
accordingly the present company was organized in 
1920. 

Mr. de Savoye was married at Hamburg, Ger- 
many, December 8th, 1894, to Miss Johanna Doroty, 
a native of Hamburg and a member of a prom- 
inent family of that city. They have four chil- 
dren, Robert H., Marguerite, Frances and Dorothy, 
all of whom reside in Houston. Mr. and Mrs. de 
Savoye reside at 2202 Sumpter Avenue. In frater- 
nal organizations, he holds membership in the Sons 
of Hermann and is active in this organization. Mr. 
de Savoye is enthusiastic as to the future of Hous- 
ton and believes that this city is destined to soon be- 
come the leading city and port in the South. With 
the great developments taking place in the Lone 
Star State and the millions of acres devoted to the 
fleecy staple, this port will soon become the leading 
shipping point of the Southwest. Mr. de Savoye has 
traveled to all points of the world, and while it is 
difficult for even his friends to induce him to talk 
of his travels, it is a known fact among his friends 
that few men have enjoyed the vast advantages of 
travel that have fallen to the lot of Mr. de Savoye, 
and he has profited in every way through his vast 
experience. 



1249 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RANK J. WOMACK is a man of big busi- 
ness. Today he is the chief official of four 
prosperous lumber concerns, besides having 

scored a success in a number of others. He is 

president of the Trinity River Sawmill Company, 
which owns and operates a sawmill at Leonidas, 
Montgomery County, and cuts forty thousand feet of 
lumber per day and employs one hundred and ten peo- 
ple. This company own the timber on twenty thou- 
sand acres of land which they have leased. Other of- 
ficers of the Trinity River Sawmill Company are 
Harry G. Cern, vice president; I. R. Palmer, secretary 
and treasurer, and John W. Hobbs, manager. Mr. Wo- 
mack is manager of the Foster Lumber Company, 
which has 120,000 acres of land situated in Mont- 
gomery, Polk, Hardin, Liberty and San Jacinto Coun. 
ties. Of this acreage 80,000 acres is cut-over land, 
and 40,000 acres of it is covered with second growth 
timber. This company has sold 25,000 acres of this 
land on the ground, without any advertising. Mr. 
Womack is interested in selling the cut-over lands 
only to those who can and will go on the land and 
farm it, thereby stimulating the idea of turning the 
cut-over lands into producing farms. The Foster 
Lumber Company operates a large sawmill located 
at Fostoria, Montgomery County, and they are 
cutting at this time 55,000 feet per day, and have 
been cutting more than 100,000 feet per day prior to 
November of 1922. One hundred and seventy men 
are employed in this work. This company has sev- 
enty-three lumber yards, but the business from Kan- 
sas City to Idaho is handled out of Kansas City. Mr. 
Womack is manager and vice president of the Trin- 
ity River Lumber Company, with offices in Hous- 
ton at 1603 Second National Bank Building. This 
company sell at wholesale only, and their product is 
marketed throughout the United States. B. B. Fos- 
ter, of Kansas City, is president of the Trinity River 
Lumber Company. Mr. Womack is manager of the 
Thomas S. Foster Estate, which owns 65,000 acres of 
timber located in Montgomery, Walker and San Ja- 
cinto Counties and now being cut by the Walker 
County Lumber Company, who are cutting under 
contract. 

Mr. Womack was born in Mississippi, in 1871, but 
was raised in Texas, coming to this state with his 
parents when an infant. His father, M. L. Womack, 
also a native of Mississippi, is now living at Cald- 
well, Texas, at the age of seventy-six years. He is 
retired from active business pursuits, but up to a few 
years ago, operated the Caldwell Cotton Oil Com- 
pany. Mr. Womack's education was obtained in the 
public schools of Burleson County. He started his 
business career in September, 1888, with the Wells 
Fargo Company at Houston. In October, 1889, he 
went with the legal department of the Santa Fe 
Railroad at Galveston as chief clerk and steno- 
grapher. He resigned this position December 31st, 
1904, and became associated with the Trinity River 
Lumber Company at Houston, resigning to go with 
Sealy and Company, bankers at Galveston in 1906. 
In 1907 he returned to Houston and has since that 
time been connected with the lumber interests here- 
tofore mentioned. 

Mr. Womack was married in 1902 to Miss Kate 
Haynes, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of 
Rev. W. A. Haynes, a prominent Presbyterian min- 
ister and president of the Woman's College at Gal- 
latin, Tennessee. They have two children, M. K., 




who is a student at the University of Virginia, and 
Charles C, attending the public school in Houston. 
Mr. and Mrs. Womack reside at 1402 Cleburne Ave- 
nue. Mr. Womack is a member of the Houston Club 
and of the Lumbermen's Club of Houston, and is 
ex-president of this organization. He has always 
been active in the business, social and general com- 
munity life of Houston, and gives liberally of his 
time to all projects tending to the welfare of this 
city, which he expects to continue growing in the 
steady, consistent manner which has marked its 
progress and advancement in the past, and is look- 
ing forward to an era of great business prosperity 
in all lines. 

KE B. McFARLAND came to Houston more 
than a decade ago, and since that time has 
been a prime factor in the lumber industry, 
operating one of the large retail lumber 
yards in the city. Mr. McFarland is general man- 
ager of the yards of the Temple Lumber Company, 
who owns the Heights Lumber Yard, at 425 West 
Eighteenth Street, Houston. The Temple Lumber 
Company occupies a modern yard at 3400 Polk Ave- 
nue, and employs thirty men in Houston. They have 
one of the most beautiful plants in the city, all the 
buildings being built along attractive lines, and the 
highest type of lumber buildings. The location is 
especially desirable, and affords opportunity to 
conduct the business along the most progressive 
plans. The Temple Lumber Company does both 
a wholesale and retail business, and also finances 
building, especially the building of homes. The of- 
ficers of the company are: T. L. L. Temple, Presi- 
dent, and H. G. Temple, Vice-President. Mr. McFar- 
land is the General Manager of the retail yards, the 
company also operating seven other retail lumber 
yards and two saw mills. Mr. McFarland is Presi- 
dent of the Houston Building and Loan Association. 
Ike B. McFarland was born at Brenham, Texas, 
in 1884, son of Bates McFarland, well-known attor- 
ney, whose death occurred at El Paso in 1919, and 
Betty Holland McFarland. His great grandfather, 
John D. Andrews, was one of the pioneer residents 
of Houston, coming here in 1837, and serving as the 
second Mayor of Houston. His home, at 410 Aus- 
tin Street, was the first two-story house built in 
the city, and was constructed by him shortly after 
his arrival here. Mr. McFarland was educated in 
the public schools of Rockport, after finishing there 
attending the University of Texas for three years. 
After leaving the university he went to Teague, 
Texas, engaging in the lumber business and build- 
ing the first house ever built there. After three 
years he went to Harlingen, Texas, in the Rio 
Grande Valley, where he spent six years, serving as 
first Mayor of Harlingen, and as County Commis- 
sioner of Cameron County. He then went to Tam- 
pico, Mexico, where he remained one year, in 1914 
coming to Houston, with the Texas Lumber Com- 
pany, later taken over by the Temple Lumber Com- 
pany, at which time Mr. McFarland was made Gen- 
eral Manager, a position he has held for the past 
five years. 

Mr. McFarland was married at Huntsville, Texas, 
in 1914, to Miss Mae Samuella Wynne, daughter of 
G. A. Wynne, a banker of Huntsville, and Ella Gibbs 
Wynne. Mr. and Mrs. McFarland make their home 
in Houston, at 1313 Castle Court. Mr. McFarland 
is a Mason and a member of the University Club. 



1250 




(c—^-^ce (^-~&sd-u>~- 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




RMMET POLK CROW, for more than a 
decade a resident of Houston, and a factor 
in commercial and industrial activities in 
this city, has had a wide influence on the 
prosperity of his community as the representative 
of industrial activities incident to the cotton busi- 
ness. Mr. Crow is assistant manager of Alexander 
Sprunt & Son, Inc. and vice president of the Ship 
Channel Compress Company, Inc., two organizations 
of importance to the business world of Houston. 
Alexander Sprunt & Son, Inc. is one of the oldest 
established businesses of the country, having been 
organized in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1865. 
Mr. Crow was with the company there for five years 
preceding his removal to Houston, in 1910, at which 
time the Houston office was opened. The Ship 
Channel Compress Company is of more recent origin, 
and was established to meet the growing demand 
for such an industry in this section. The compress, 
located on the bayou, has storage capacity for fifty 
thousand bales of cotton and furnishes employment 
for a force of from seventy to three hundred and 
fifty operatives, the latter number during the busy 
season. The Ship Channel Cotton Compress handles 
their own cotton and is one of the largest of such 
industries in this section. The office of Alexander 
Sprunt & Son, at 902-910 Cotton Exchange Building, 
is under the direction of H. M. Croswell, manager, 
and Emmet P. Crow, the subject of this sketch, as 
assistant manager. Mr. Crow has spent his entire 
business career in the cotton industry, making a 
deep and thorough study into the conditions this 
industry involves, and is one of the best informed 
men in his field in Houston. Emmet P. Crow was 
born at Wilmington, North Carolina, the first of De- 
cember, 1886. His father, the late John E. Crow, a 
native of North Carolina, was for many years in the 
brokerage business in Wilmington, and one of the 
most prominent men of that city. His mother, also 
deceased, was before her marriage Miss Emily Polk 
Davis, daughter of George Davis, who was attorney 
general of the Confederate states. Mr. Crow re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools of 
his native state, later attending Howell Military 
School, after which he entered upon his business 
career. He went with the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road, remaining with that company for twelve years, 
after which he became associated with Alexander 
Sprunt & Son, Inc., first in Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina, and later, after the opening of the office here, 
at Houston, and also since coming here has been vice 
president of the Ship Channel Compress Company, 
Inc., taking part in the various industrial activities 
of these enterprises. 

Mr. Crow was married at Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina, in 1909, to Miss Nannie W. Holladay of that 
city, a granddaughter of Alexander Q. Holladay, a 
former president of the A. & M. College of North 
Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Crow came to Houston in 
1910, at which time Mr. Crow was transferred to 
this city. They make their home at 2601 Travis 
Street, and take part in the various social activities 
of the community. Mr. and Mrs. Crow have a fam- 
ily of four children, Emmet, Jr., Fannie, Nancy and 
Marguerite. The family support the Presbyterian 
and Episcopal churches and take an active part in 
church affairs. Mr. Crow is a member of the Hous- 
ton Country Club, the Houston Club and the Hous- 
ton Chamber of Commerce and the Houston Cot- 




ton Exchange. Mr. Crow is familiar with the pro- 
duction of cotton and the conditions prevailing in 
two great cotton raising centers, as well as with all 
activities incident to cotton compress operation. He 
is a business man with keen insight into modern 
conditions and demands and has taken a leading 
part in industrial circles at Houston. Mr. Crow is 
also vitally interested in the development of the 
city and has been a factor in various civic move- 
ments since coming to Houston. His business asso- 
ciates find in him a man of highest integrity, stand- 
ing for fair methods and principles, and a man in 
every way an asset to the community in which he 
lives. 

ILKES A. DOWDY, during the decade of 
his professional career at Houston, has 
established a reputation in the field of 
municipal architecture that has brought his 
appointment to an important civic position. Mr. 
Dowdy is city architect of Houston, a position to 
vhich he was appointed in April, 1921. Since tha*. 
time he has planned and supervised the construction 
of all the public buildings to be erected, such as the 
new Central Police and Fire Department Building, 
the Southmore School, the Barnice School, the Coun- 
ty and City Hospital and many other smaller build- 
ings. Mr. Dowdy has for many years made a special 
study of public buildings from an architectural 
standpoint, and these new buildings, erected in 
accordance with his plans and under his direct super- 
vision, are perfect examples of municipal architec- 
ture. The new County and City Hospital, one of 
the finest buildings of its kind in the state, is per- 
fectly planned, each detail being the result of care- 
ful study on the part of Mr. Dowdy, and provides 
every hospital facility, as well as makes every pro- 
vision for the comfort of the patients. Mr. Dowdy's 
work as city architect has established the importance 
of this office and has proven no small factor in add- 
ing to the attractiveness of Houston as a city. 

Wilkes A. Dowdy was born at Marksville, Louis- 
iana, the twelfth of June, 1890, the son of R. O. 
Dowdy, a native of Tennessee, whose death occurred 
in Louisiana when his son was a small boy and Cecile 
Shoze Dowdy, of Louisiana, who now makes her 
home in Houston. Mr. Dowdy attended the public 
schools in different cities of the Lone Star State, 
finishing his education in the McKinley High School 
at St. Louis. He then went to Denver, Colorado, 
where he began work in an architect's office and 
where he spent two years. He came to Houston in 
1908 and went with a local firm of architects, later 
going with Sanguinet and Staats, also of this city, 
and with whom he remained a number of years. He 
then went in business for himself and for the ensu- 
ing five years did much construction work in this 
city, specializing in public buildings. He was 
appointed city architect in April, 1921, and now holds 
this position. 

Mr. Dowdy was married at Houston the twenty- 
fifth of October, 1922, to Miss Ruth Evelyn Lyles, 
a native of this city, who was reared and educated 
here. Mr. and Mrs. Dowdy reside at 402 Euclid 
Avenue. Mr. Dowdy is active in architectural cir- 
cles at Houston and has for many years taken a 
deep interest in civic improvement, especially in the 
beautification of the city through raising the stan- 
dards of construction of public buildings. 



1253 



MEN OF TEXAS 



P3PS1 C. BUKOWSKI has been actively associated 
with the business life of Houston for the 
past several years, and is now devoting his 
entire attention to the Labor Bank and 
Trust Company of Houston, of which he is vice 
president and trust officer. The Labor Bank and 
Trust Company, "Bank of the Masses", recently or- 
ganized in Houston, is the first of its kind to be 
established south of St. Louis, and west of Birming- 
ham. It is capitalized at $110,000, and more than 
85 per cent of the stock is owned by laboring people. 
There are about two hundred and twenty-five stock- 
holders. Other officers of the bank are, State Sen- 
ator Charles Murphy, president; C. L. Killingsworth, 
vice president and cashier; Norman Beard, George 
L. Edwards, S. H. Lewis and Mrs. Mary M. Wise, 
vice presidents. Directors are, Norman Beard, C. E. 
Belk, B. C. Bukowski, George L. Edwards, Murray 
B. Jones, Dr. Horace C. Feagin, Will F. Miller, H. 
McBroom, C. L. Killingsworth, Jackson Stanley, 
S. H. Lewis, L. B. Ryon, Jr., W. H. Lighthouse, 
Frank B. McCurdy and Charles Murphy. The bank 
is located at San Jacinto and Prairie Avenue. The 
labor bank idea is a new one, but wonderful success 
is predicted for the Houston institution. Houston 
alone has a labor payroll of more than $15,000,000 
a year, and the bank will attract business from 
other points throughout the state. 

Mr. Bukowski was born in Walker County, Texas, 
the nineteenth of December, 1894, son of John 
Bukowski, a native of German Poland, who came 
to Texas at the age of twenty-one and has been a 
merchant of Walker County for a quarter of a cen- 
tury, and May (Fosson) Bukowski, a native of Texas. 
Mr. Bukowski attended the schools of Walker Coun- 
ty, later attending the University of Texas. He 
entered into the mercantile business with his father, 
being in charge of same for two years. After the 
entrance of the United States in the World War, 
Mr. Bukowski enlisted in the latter part of 1917 
and served until discharged in March, 1919. He 
then came to Houston and accepted a position with 
the White Oil Corporation for eight months, after 
which he went into the drug business, and established 
the Main Street Pharmacy of Houston, Texas, to 
which he devoted his time until going with the 
Labor Bank and Trust Company of Houston. 

Mr. Bukowski was married at Houston, the twen- 
ty-eighth of August, 1920, to Miss Gladys Winfred 
Harvey, daughter of J. S. Harvey, secretary and 
treasurer of the Main Street Pharmacy, and a res- 
ident of Houston for many years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bukowski make their home at 2201 Mason Street. 
Mr. Bukowski is a thirty-second degree Mason, and 
a member of Arabia Temple Shrine, and takes an 
active part in the civic affairs of his city. 

JOE OLIVER, one of the younger element 
of progressive business men of Houston, 
enjoys a high measure of esteem for his 
activities in the insurance business during 
the past decade. Mr. Oliver is head of the firm of 
Oliver and Company, one of the leading insurance 
firms of Houston. This firm is the successor to 
Binz, Settegast and Oliver, which was established 
at Houston in 1913, and continued until 1918, at 
which time Mr. Oliver took over the interests of his 
associates, operating the business alone as Oliver 
and Company, until the first of January, 1924, when 




A. T. Robertson and R. L. Padgitt came with the 
firm, the name, however, remaining unchanged. Mr. 
Oliver's wide circle of acquaintances at Houston, 
and the high regard in which he is held by his asso- 
ciates, has been a determining factor in the success 
of Oliver and Company. The company, with offices 
in the Binz Building, represents six old line insur- 
ance companies at Houston and writes a record vol- 
ume of business annually. 

W. Joe Oliver is a native of Houston, where he 
was born the twenty-fifth of January, 1890. His 
father, the late S. A. Oliver, a native of Illinois, 
came to Houston in the eighties, and was associates 
with business and civic activities here until his death. 
His mother, whose maiden name was Miss Emma E. 
Settegast, is the daughter of the late W. J. Sette- 
gast, one of the most prominent men of his day, and 
is the sister of E. Edward Settegast and J. J. 
Settegast, both prominent business men of Houston. 
W. Joe Oliver attended the public schools of Hous- 
ton, later entering the Massey Business College, 
where he took a commercial course preparatory to 
beginning his business career, entering the insurance 
business on the completion of this course. After sev- 
eral years with different insurance companies at 
Houston, Mr. Oliver went in business for himself, 
establishing the firm of Vinson and Oliver, with 
C. L. Vinson as his associate. Later, in 1913, he 
went with the firm of Binz, Settegast and Oliver, 
which later became the present firm of Oliver and 
Company. 

Mr. Oliver was married at Houston the twenty- 
seventh of December, 1917, to Miss Runie Robinson, 
a native of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver have a very 
attractive home at 312 Mclllhenney Avenue, and are 
popular members of the younger social set. Mr. 
Oliver is a Mason, Blue Lodge No. 1189, thirty-sec- 
ond degree Scottish Rite, and a member of Arabia 
Temple Shrine. 

OBERT W. STERLING has, since coming 
to Houston a number of years ago, been a 
foremost figure in the field of engraving, 
and has become favorably known for his 
activities in this industry. Mr. Sterling is the pro- 
prietor of the Sterling Engraving Company, which 
he established in 1917, two years after his arrival in 
Houston. This firm has enjoyed a successful and 
prosperous business since its organization, and 
faces an assured future. Mr. Sterling does all kinds 
of engraving on copper and steel, employing from 
ten to twenty highly skilled employees who turn 
out the very highest class of work. Mr. Sterling per- 
sonally supervises all the work done in his plant, 
and is a careful, painstaking engraver, his work 
being recognized as the best. He occupies a mod- 
ern plant, 2401 Main Street, and has the most ap- 
proved type of equipment, and every facility for 
turning out the finest work. 

Mr. Sterling was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and 
spent his boyhood in that city, attending the public 
schools there. After finishing his education he be- 
gan work in the engraving plants of his native city, 
learning every phase of the business. Later his 
health failed and he went to Colorado, where he 
spent ten years. In 1915 he came to Houston, at- 
tracted by the wide opportunity for business ad- 
vancement in this city, and two years after coming 
here established the Sterling Engraving Company, 




1254 





.vW^c 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




which he has since operated. 

Mr. Sterling was married at Crockett, Texas, in 
1913, to Miss Caroline Steckler, well-known in that 
city. Mr. and Mrs. Sterling have two children, Alice 
Louise, and Virginia Lee. Mr. Sterling takes an 
interest in various civic activities and movements 
for the advancement of Houston as the business 
center of the Gulf coast territory. 

D. CRAIG, Cashier and one of the organ- 
izers of the Central State Bank of Houston, 
has for more than a decade been engaged 

in the banking business and is regarded as 

one of the most progressive men in this profession. 
The Central State Bank was chartered March 15, 
1923, and opened for business on April 2, following 
with a capital stock of $25,000.00, and at the close 
of business September 14, 1923, their statement 
showed they had a surplus and undivided profits of 
$4,100.00, with deposits of $150,000.00. As evidence 
of the care with which the bank is managed it is in- 
teresting to note that a ten per cent dividend was 
declared January 1, 1924. This is unusual for a new 
bank this size. The Central State Bank is located 
in Magnolia Park at 6645 Harrisburg Boulevard, 
which is regarded as a splendid location for a bank 
of the size of this, which employs three people. Other 
officers of the Central State Bank of Houston are: 
S. D. Simpson, President; F. A. Baldinger, Vice- 
President. The Directors are: S. D. Simpson, F. A. 
Baldinger, John B. York, Will F. Humphrey, W. E. 
James and George L. Ricker. 

A native Texan, Mr. Craig was born at Brenham, 
Texas, July 11, 1874. His father, Robert D. Craig 
(deceased) came to Texas from Mississippi as a 
young man and settled in Washington County, where 
for many years he was a well known farmer and 
rancher. His mother (now deceased) was Miss Mar- 
gurette Mildred Newman, a member of a pioneer 
Texas family. His education was obtained in the 
public schools of Coleman, Texas, where his parents 
had moved in 1882, where his father continued in the 
farming and ranching industry, and Mr. Craig re- 
mained in Coleman until 1902, when he went to San 
Angelo, Texas, and entered the employ of the West 
Texas Lumber Company, where he remained until 
1913, when he went to Ozona, Texas, as bookkeeper 
for the Ozona National Bank, and remained with 
this institution until 1918. He then came to Hous- 
ton and became associated with the American State 
Bank, where he remained for a short time and when 
the Citizens State Bank was organized, he went 
with that Bank, where he remained for two and one- 
half years, and during this period was Assistant 
Cashier and later Cashier. Leaving this bank, he 
returned to Ozona, Texas, as Cashier of the Ozona 
National Bank, but remained there only a short 
time when he again returned to Houston, with the 
Citizens State Bank as Cashier, but remained only 
a short time, when he assisted in the organization 
of the Central State Bank, where he has been Cash- 
ier since its organization. 

Mr. Craig has been twice married. His first 
marriage was in Coleman, Texas, and he has six 
children, the mother of whom was his first wife. 
The children are Lucien, Ogle M., Travis, Wayne, 
Mary Louise and Agnes. His second marriage was 
in Houston September 24, 1921, to Miss Addie Dick- 
inson, a native of Collin County, Texas, Mrs. Craig 
is a business woman and is the Assistant Cashier 




of the Central State Bank, and has been actively en- 
gaged in the banking business for four years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Craig reside at 6629 Harrisburg Boule- 
vard. Mr. Craig is interested in all matters having 
to do with the improvement, advancement and prog- 
ress of Houston and believes that this city will 
soon take its place as the metropolis of the entire 
Southwest. 

GORDON MAILLOT, member of the firm 
of Langham and Maillot, one of the largest 
insurance firms of Houston, was for almost 
ten years prior to forming this partnership, 
a member of other well known insurance firms of 
the city. The insurance firm of Langham and Mail- 
lot are the representatives of the Aetna Company 
for Southeast Texas, their territory comprising four- 
teen counties. They have six employees in their 
office, which is located at 304 Gulf Building, and 
four salesmen out of their Houston office. Mr. Mail- 
lot has had an experience in the insurance business 
extending over a period of sixteen years, and his 
partner, Mr. A. D. Langham, has been connected 
with various insurance companies in this city for 
a number of years. Both men are popular in the 
business circles of Houston and with the public in 
general, and their business has grown rapidly since 
this partnership was formed. 

A native Texan, Mr. Maillot was born in Austin 
on May 1st, 1878. His father, Charles G. Maillot 
(deceased) a native of Louisiana, came to Texas 
in 1874 and settled at Austin, where he was a mer- 
chandise broker and was well known throughout the 
state. His mother was Miss Clara Haralson, a na- 
tive of Austin and a member of a prominent and 
pioneer family. His education was obtained in the 
public and high schools of Austin, and after fin- 
ishing the latter, he entered the employ of the Tele- 
phone Company and remained with this company for 
a period of thirteen years, and during this time 
he was in practically every branch of this service. 
After leaving the Telephone Company, Mr. Maillot 
entered the insurance business, first as a member 
of the firm of Porter, Maillot and Company, where 
he remained for one year, and then formed the 
partnership of Maillot and Lubbock and this partner- 
ship continued for four years. He then became a 
member of the firm of Maillot and Bowen and con- 
tinued as a member of this firm for four years, 
when he formed the present partnership and has 
met with unusual success and knows the insurance 
business as few men know it. 

Mr. Maillot is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and is a member of Arabia Temple Shrine. He is 
also a member of the Houston Club, the River Oaks 
Country Club and the Houston Country Club, and 
is a director in the latter organization. His church 
affiliation is with the Episcopal faith. Mr. Maillot 
is a quiet unassuming gentleman, typical of the old 
South, and has been successful in all his business 
ventures, and is connected with some of Houston's 
largest financial and industrial institutions. Mr. 
Maillot has great faith in the future of Houston, 
which he believes is one of unlimited possibilities 
for continued growth and advancement, and he is 
identified with all movements tending to promote 
the growth and importance of Houston where he is 
regarded as one of the city's most progressive 
citizens. 



1257 






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MEN OF TEXAS 




RS. HENRY B. FALL is well known in the 
social and club circles of Houston and 
of Texas where for many years she has been 

active in furthering education and in her 

efforts to elevate the art of our people. Mrs. Fall 
has for the past eight years been president of the 
Houston Art League, which was established here in 
1900, and Houston is the first city in Texas to have 
an Art Museum, and has accomplished much. For 
a number of years the League has been vitally and 
actively interested in introducing and encouraging 
the study and appreciation of art and the crafts in 
the public schools of Houston. The League has 
brought, from time to time, national and interna- 
tional artists for lecture purposes. It has likewise 
sponsored the exhibition of paintings and art col- 
lections. It has expended for pictures in the pub- 
lic schools of Houston, during the years of its 
active work, the sum of $25,000,000. By the direct 
efforts of the League, the state laws have been 
amended exempting from taxation all art museums 
in Texas. The properties of the League are held in 
trust for the citizens of Houston, by the trustees, 
for the use of the public. The League desires to 
cultivate the arts and crafts in the children of the 
city. To assist in the architectural development of 
South Main Street in harmony with the Rice Insti- 
tute, Hermann Park and Hospital, the Miller Memo- 
rial and Autry House— to help beautify Houston. 

A native Texan, Mrs. Fall was born in William- 
son County. Her father, John King, came to Texas 
from Mississippi, and was a large land owner and 
planter. He served in the Civil War under General 
Jackson. Her mother was Miss Mary Manihan, a 
member of a well known Virginia family. Mrs. 
Fall's education was obtained at Baylor Female 
College, Belton, Texas, where she was a student for 
four years, and together with her literary studies, 
was a student of art and music. 

Mrs. Fall has been twice married. Her first mar- 
riage was in Taylor, Texas, to Mr. Henry Long, a 
prominent lumber man of Beaumont, and a member 
of the firm, Texas Tram and Lumber Company, 
whose death occurred a few years later, and her sec- 
ond marriage was to Mr. Henry B. Fall of Houston, 
a well known lumber man of this city. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fall reside at 107 Sul Ross Avenue. Mrs. 
Fall is president of the City Federation of Women's 
Clubs of the Fourth District of Texas; a member 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution; is 
past president of the Texas Federation of Women's 
Clubs, having served this organization in 1913-14-15. 
During her administration, she was instrumental in 
having passed the compulsory education law of 
Texas, also assisted in the building of the State 
School for Girls at Gainesville. It was during her 
administration that the Texas State Federation of 
Women's Clubs chartered, making it possible to 
handle the $10,000.00 endowment fund created dur- 
ing her regime of office. She was treasurer for 
four years of the Y. W. C. A. and was on the Com- 
mittee to the San Francisco Exposition, being ap- 
pointed by Governor Colquitt from Texas. Mrs. Fall 
is a member of the Baptist Church and is an active 
worker in this church, having helped in the organi- 
zation of the women's auxiliary to the Baptist Hos- 
pital, assisting in building the free ward, and has 
served as president of this organization for four- 
teen years. 




She has been very active in all lines of an educa- 
tional nature and the upbuilding of art in all its 
branches, also in all women's organizations, clubs 
and orders. Mrs. Fall came to Houston in 1905 and 
since that time has been active in the city's civic 
affairs, and has been prominently identified with all 
clubs in the city and state. Mrs. Fall is a woman 
of many accomplishments; has traveled extensively 
and has profited by all her experiences. She trav- 
eled abroad for many months and during this period 
corresponded for a number of Texas newspapers. 
She is well known to the citizenship of the state and 
is altogether a very accomplished, prominent and 
charming character. 

IRS. LEE J. ROUNTREE came to Bryan, 
Texas, in 1920, and has been actively iden- 
tified with the business, social and civic 
life of this city since that time. Mrs. 
Rountree is the president and managing editor of 
the Eagle Printing Company of Bryan, editing the 
Bryan Daily Eagle and the Bryan Weekly Eagle, 
the only newspapers here. She is numbered among 
the few successful women publishers of the country, 
which is accounted for in part by the close applica- 
tion to the publishing business which she learned 
under the able guidance of her deceased husband, 
Hon. Lee J. Rountree, one of Texas' best known 
publishers, most illustrious statesman and promi- 
nent citizen. Since her marriage, Mrs. Rountree had 
been closely identified with every branch of her 
husband's business and knew it in detail. Mr. Roun- 
tree was a native Texan, having been born at Kyle 
in 1868, where he was reared and educated. He be- 
came editor of a publication at Kyle and while en- 
gaged in his first newspaper work, was appointed 
chief clerk of the house of representatives, where he 
obtained his first knowledge of legislative procedure 
and legislative duties. After serving several terms 
in this capacity he removed to Georgetown, Texas, 
where he established the Georgetown Commercial, 
which he managed and edited for almost twenty 
years. He next went to Sulphur Springs, Texas, as 
editor of a paper there, but after a few months came 
to Bryan in 1919, after having purchased the Bryan 
Daily Eagle. Mr. Rountree was a man of liberal 
education and widely traveled, having visited South 
America, and had made several trips to Europe, 
besides having visited every portion of his native 
land. His knowledge of people and places and his 
vast travels had made him a broad-minded man 
and had given him the forethought that led to his 
progressive ideas which he had incorporated into 
law, through his influence and ability as a states- 
man, after being a member of the Texas Legisla- 
ture. He was president of the National Editorial 
Association for one term and was for several years 
orator of the Texas Press Association. He had 
risen to such a height in political circles that he 
was prominently and widely mentioned as splendid 
material for lieutenant governor of the State of 
Texas. He was elected to the office of member of 
the house of representatives in 1920, and served in 
the 36th, 37th and 38th legislatures. Mr. Roun- 
tree was a member of the A. F. and A. M. and had 
attained to the Knights Templar in this order, was 
a Shriner, a Knights of Pythias, an Elk, an I. O. O. 
F., and a prominent member of other orders. He 
was a member of the Methodist Church, this be- 
ing the religion of his forbears. He did much for his 



1260 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



community and State, putting forth at all times 
his earnest and diligent efforts. Mr. Rountree died 
at Austin, Texas, on May 2nd, 1923, while in the 
service of his State at Large, the summons to the 
great beyond coming to him at the close of a speech 
in the hall of the house of representatives. 

After the death of Mr. Rountree, Mrs. Rountree 
took over the management of his business and has 
made a success of it in every respect, and she is 
known as one of the leading business women of 
Central Texas, as well as a leader in many other 
fields of activity. 

A native Texan, Mrs. Rountree was born in Llano 
County. Her father, T. C. Mitchell, was a pioneer 
in Llano County, where throughout his life he was 
engaged in cattle raising, ranching and kindred lines. 
He was a representative citizen and highly esteemed 
by all who knew him. Her mother, Mrs. Lula Mar- 
garet (Clark) Mitchell, was a native of the Lone 
Star State and a member of a well known family. 
Mrs. Rountree's early education was obtained in 
the public schools of Texas, after which she became 
a student of the Southwestern University of George- 
town, where she finished her academic courses. 

Mrs. Rountree was married to Hon. Lee J. Roun- 
tree at Taylor, Texas, in 1902, with whom she was 
constantly associated in his business and publish- 
ing ventures throughout his life. She is a mem- 
ber of the Bryan Country Club, president of the 
Bryan Chamber of Commerce and on the board of 
directors of this organization. She is legislative chair- 
man for the State 4th District Federated Woman's 
Club, is a member of the Bryan Woman's Club, and 
many other of this city's business, social and civic 
organizations. She is a member of the Methodist 
Church and is an ardent worker in this church. Mrs. 
Rountree is a constant worker for the good of 
Bryan and her community, and voices her senti- 
ments along this line through the columns of the 
newspaper of which she is the publisher. In the 
midst of her private work, she finds opportunity for 
much work of a public nature, and is a leader in all 
civic matters of this city, where she is regarded as 
one of Brazos County's most progressive citizens. 

ARY CARSON, native Houstonian, opera 
singer and impresaria, has achieved dis- 
tinction in her native land and in Europe 
where she has appeared in grand opera in 
many of the leading cities. She is also a producer 
and has produced the Mary Carson Grand Opera in 
Houston during the seasons of 1921-22 and 1922-23. 
At the present time she is in communication with 
the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York City, 
endeavoring to arrange for a week's season in Hous- 
ton during the spring of 1925. She is known 
throughout the country for her sweet soprano voice 
and has spent more than half her life abroad study- 
ing under the great masters. She is the only per- 
son who has brought grand opera to Houston for 
a full week's engagement and with crowded houses 
during this period. Miss Carson's home and office 
is located at 808 Polk Avenue. 

Mary Carson is the daughter of George Kidd, Sr. 
(deceased since 1919) who was one of the best 
known citizens of Houston and for many years an 
officer of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Her moth- 
er was Miss Katherine Bledsoe Aldridge, a member 
of a well known Texas family, and was a musician 
of note, possessing unusual talent. Miss Carson has 
had unusual and exceptional educational advantages 




which started with her literary education in pri- 
vate schools of Houston, after which she began the 
study of music at the New England Conservatory 
of Music, where she remained for three years. She 
then went to Italy to study voice and had instruc- 
tion under Luigi Vannuccini, Isadore Braggiotti in 
Florence, Madame Norri-Baj and Rafaele Delli Ponti 
in Milan, and studied the art of acting under Fran- 
cesco Mottino and Adalgisa Maffi in Milan. She 
then returned to New York City in 1914 and coached 
with Pierre Monteaux and then studied under Ric- 
cardo Dellera, who is now with the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. Miss Carson has received many 
honors at the hands of her fellow artists and man- 
agers of the different opera companies throughout 
the country. She was offered appearances in the 
Royal Opera in Berlin, Milan, Hamburg and Vienna, 
but on account of the death of her father was com- 
pelled to return to America at once. Since then 
she has been repeatedly urged to return to Europe 
in order to complete her operatic career. The time 
seemed propitious in the spring of 1924 and on her 
reappearance in the European capitols, due to her 
broader experience, she scored even greater tri- 
umphs than on the former occasions. Her friends in 
America are hoping that Europe will soon release 
her long enough to again allow them to enjoy her 
marvelous talents. 

Mary Carson possesses a striking and pleasing 
stage presence, which is commented on wherever 
she has appeared. While singing in grand opera in 
Italy she appeared in the following cities of Italy: 
Milan, Turin, Cremona, Cesana and Pallamza. She 
has also had roles in the Century Opera in New York 
City and the Boston Opera in Boston and many 
other public engagements. Mary Carson has a host 
of friends in her native city and state as well as 
in other parts of the country and is very popular, 
not only in musical circles but with all classes who 
have been fortunate in coming in contact with her. 

ULIA ANNE CONLEY, owner of the Key- 
stone Studio, has been identified in photo- 
graphic circles in Houston for over five 
years and is one of the well known women 
in business here. The Keystone Studio is one of the 
best equipped and appointed studios in South Texas, 
and has the reputation of making excellent photo- 
graphs. The organization is made up of skilled peo- 
ple, and every care and consideration is given the 
patrons. A department devoted to home portraiture 
is maintained and is in charge of an operator es- 
pecially trained in this field of photography. Friend- 
ly and prompt attention is extended all who enter 
the studio, and its permanent clientele has grown 
rapidly in the past few years. 

Julia Anne Conley was born in McMinnville, 
Tennessee, daughter of W. L. and Martha (Ander- 
son) Owen, both natives of that State. Mrs. Conley 
was educated in the schools of McMinnville and since 
coming to Texas has devoted her efforts and study 
to photography and the operation of photographic 
studios. In August, 1924, she opened the Keystone 
Studio and has had marked success since that time. 
Mrs. Conley has one son, George DeBard, who is a 
student in the Houston public schools. Mrs. Conley 
possesses an attractive personality and has won the 
confidence and support, not only of the business 
fraternity of Houston, but of those who are in- 
terested in the art of photography. 




12B1 



MEN OF TEXAS 




]LORENCE M. STERLING, editor and pub- 
lisher of The Woman's Viewpoint, "A Mag- 
azine Serving Humanity," and devoted to 
the interests of the manhood and woman- 
hood of America and the problems of the greatest 
of all American Institutions, the home, has been 
a potent factor in bringing to the gentler sex the 
full realization of their responsibilities and the ful- 
fillment of their mission in the social, political and 
business world. The Woman's Viewpoint is sym- 
bolic of what the name of the magazine indicates, 
edited and published by women, is rapidly gaining 
a place of recognition among the leading periodi- 
cals of the country, and although yet in its infancy, 
it is destined to be a potent influence in the literary 
world for the molding of opinion, the uplift of the 
home, and the formulating of the character of the 
boys and girls who are destined to be our substan- 
tial citizenship of tomorrow. 

Florence M. Sterling, one of the outstanding 
champions of the woman's cause in the South, needs 
no introduction to the womanhood of Texas, where 
she has been long recognized as one of the leaders 
in the social, educational and political world. Her 
arduous labor in behalf of the social welfare has al- 
ready borne rich fruit in the formulating of char- 
acter, and in the advancement of the ideals in the 
communities where her influence has been felt, and 
a record of her interesting career will make a bright 
page in the history of American Womanhood. Miss 
Sterling has for many years been best known in 
the business world through her activities in the 
oil industries. For a period of fifteen years she 
was secretary of the Humble Oil Company, of which 
her brother, R. S. Sterling, was president, and much 
of the success of that great oil company was due to 
her efficient management of her department. The 
company in 1917 became known as the Humble Oil 
and Refining Company. She first became inter- 
ested in business as Secretary of the R. S. Sterling 
interests in 1906. Later a part of the R. S. Sterl- 
ing interests became the Humble Oil Company. Miss 
Sterling terminated her official connections with 
the Humble Oil Company in order to devote her 
time fully to the Woman's Viewpoint and the cause 
of American citizenship. 

A native Texan, Miss Sterling was born at Ana- 
huac, Chambers County, and was one of a family 
of twelve children, four girls and eight boys. Her 
parents were Captain Benjamin Franklin Sterling 
and Mary Jane (Bryan) Sterling. Captain Sterling 
was a veteran of the Civil War, born in Mississippi 
in 1831, and died at Houston, Texas, in 1917. Her 
mother was a native of Texas, born in Liberty Coun- 
ty, in 1838. Her parents were Scotch-Irish descent, 
and their ancestors were among the early settlers 
of Virginia. Captain Sterling had a general mer- 
chandise store, and was postmaster at Anahuac, 
also owned a considerable area of farm land. Miss 
Sterling received her education in the public schools 
at Anahuac, and gained a general knowledge of 
business in her father's merchandise establishment. 
She later went to Galveston and engaged in busi- 
ness with her brother, John L. Sterling, in the 
wholesale produce business. In 1906 she came to 
Houston to engage in business with her brother, 
R. S. Sterling, and, as stated above, was one of 
the principal factors in building up the Humble 



Oil Company, one of the largest and most success- 
ful oil companies of America. Throughout her en- 
tire career Miss Sterling has taken an active in- 
terest in woman's rights, and was one of the lead- 
ers in the long fight to secure woman suffrage in 
Texas. Miss Sterling is treasurer of the Houston 
Recreation and Community Service. She was pres- 
ident of the Houston League of Women Voters, vice- 
president of the Texas League of Women Voters, 
chairman of the Houston Own Your Home Commit- 
tee, and is a member and active worker of the 
D. A. R., and the U. D. C. Miss Sterling takes an 
interest in every activity for the betterment of 
women and children, and is intensely interested in 
educational matters, taking an interest in helping 
educate a great many children. Although her du- 
ties, both as Secretary and Treasurer of the great- 
est oil company of Texas, and later her duties as 
editor of Texas' leading woman's magazine, re- 
quires an enormous amount of arduous labor, she 
has always found time to devote to the welfare move- 
ments of City, State or Nation. The extent of her 
philanthropy will never be known, as the work that 
she has accomplished, and the liberal gifts that 
she has donated has been given unostentatiously for 
the pleasure she has received in making them, and 
not with the hope of publicity or pecuniary reward. 
Her Church affiliations are with The Christian 
Church, of which she has been a liberal benefactor. 
Her personality belies the general supposition that 
business women become stern and austere, for Miss 
Sterling's countenance radiates happiness and good 
cheer, with a smile for every one she meets, and 
everyone is happier for having known her. 

DNA W. SAUNDERS is well known in the 
music circles of Houston and South Texas, 
where for the past six years she has been 
a successful concert manager and through 
her efforts the people of South Texas have had 
the opportunity of seeing and hearing many of the 
great artists. Edna W. Saunders is not only the 
leading concert manager of Houston, but in the 
South. About one-third of her time is spent in the 
North and East, seeing new plays and operas and 
making contracts with artists to later appear in 
Houston and South Texas. In addition to the Hous- 
ton office, located in the Harris-Hahlo Building, she 
maintains offices in Beaumont and Galveston. Num- 
bered among the noted artists brought by her to 
Houston, Beaumont and Galveston are: Caruso, who 
sang in Houston to one of the largest audiences 
in his entire career; Rachmaninoff, Schumann- 
Heink, Heifetz, Louise Homer, Tetrazinni, Pavlowa, 
Galli Curci, Frieda Hempel, Fritz Kreisler, Chal- 
iapin, Mary Garden, and many others. She has 
also brought to Houston the Chicago Grand Opera 
Company, Scotti Grand Opera Company, the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra, Cincinnati Symphony 
Orchestra, the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, 
St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, John Philip Sousa's 
Band, the French Army Band and many other lead- 
ing attractions. 

A native Texan, Edna W. Saunders was born in 
Houston August 31st, 1880. Her father, John D. 
Woolford, deceased, was well known in the business 
circles of Houston and was one of the city's leading 
citizens, having held many positions of honor and 
trust at the hands of his fellowmen. He was for 




1262 




J?i# &£f£~ &- ft>7f/ea'ns tZ-Bre A3 



c^^>t^t>^Qjty ^tPU. 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



many years a public cotton weigher of Houston, 
and served the city as mayor with distinction from 
1900 to 1902; prior to which time he was alderman 
of the city for several years. Her mother was Miss 
Ianthe Dealy, a member of an old and prominent 
Texas family. Mrs. Saunders has had unusual edu- 
cational advantages, which began in the public and 
private schools of Houston. Later she was a student 
of the Stuart School of Washington, D. C, where she 
took special courses in music, English and reading. 
After this she became a pupil of the Gardner School, 
located at Forty-ninth Street and Fifth Avenue, New 
York City, where she remained for one year and 
received a diploma from this institution in general 
courses, music and special branches. She returned 
to Houston and made her debut in 1900. During 
the World War, Mrs. Saunders had entire charge 
of the public concert programs at the City Audi- 
torium, and during this period almost one hundred 
thousand people attended these concerts. Some won- 
derful programs were given and these concerts were 
entirely free to the public. Edna W. Saunders was 
for many years a member of the Woman's Choral 
Club and served in every office of this organization. 
She became president in 1913 and resigned this office 
in 1917 in order to start her present business. 

Mrs. Saunders resides at 1202 Lamar Avenue and 
is active in many of the organizations in the city. 
She is now business manager for the Symphony 
Orchestra Association, is a member of the Houston 
Country Club, and holds an honorary life member- 
ship in both the Salesmanship Club and the Kiwanis 
Club. She is a charter member and a director of 
the National Concert Managers Association, and is 
also district governor for the State of Texas. Mrs. 
Saunders is a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Houston, and takes an active interest in 
all civic matters and is interested in all projects 
having to do with the progress, development and 
advancement of Houston, where she is numbered 
among the most progressive women, not only of 
Houston, but of the entire South. 

OUIS A. GLOVER, Architect, with office at 
623 Binz Building, Houston, has won a 
name in the Southwest through the beauty 
of his architectural designing and the ad- 
vantages and the endurance of his structures. Mr. 
Glover came to Houston in 1890, when six years of 
age, grew to manhood here and was for several 
years associated with his father, who was among 
the pioneer architects of Housotn. Mr. Glover's 
principal line of work is schools, office buildings, 
apartment houses and stores. In association with 
William Ward Watkins, he is now building the City 
Library, and at present has more than one and 
one-half million dollars worth of work under con- 
struction. Mr. Glover built the following buildings 
in Houston: Stratford Hotel, Tel-Electric Company's 
Building, Hermann Building, Herford Apartments, the 
Houston Drug Company's $300,000 Building, Har- 
risburg High School, and in association with John 
Staub, the Heights High School. 

A native Texan, Mr. Glover was born at Fort 
Worth in 1884. His father, F. S. Glover, is one of 
th oldest architects of Texas, and retired six years 
ago from active practice of his profession. His 
mother was Miss Nannie J. Gee, a member of a well 
known Texas family. His early education was re- 
ceived in the public schools, and in Prof. Welch's 





private school in Houston, and later was a student 
in the University of Pennsylvania for two years and 
received from this institution a certificate in archi- 
tecture. After leaving college he engaged in his 
chosen profession and during the period of the 
World War in army camp construction work. 

Mr. Glover was married in Galveston in 1916 to 
Miss Elizabeth Dickson, a daughter of James W. 
Dickson and Annie (Andrews) Dickson, who were 
among the oldest residents of Galveston. Mrs. 
Glover's grandmother, Mrs. Andrews, was the first 
white child born in Galveston. Mr. and Mrs. Glover 
reside at 3118 Austin Street. He is a member of 
the Texas Chapter American Institute of Architects 
and of the Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fra- 
ternity and is a Shriner of Arabia Temple. Mr. 
Glover is optimistic as to the future of Houston, and 
believes it will soon become the leading city of the 
Southwest. 

R. BUNCH has, since coming to Houston, 
been an active figure in the insurance cir- 
cles of the city and as division manager 
of the Automobile Underwriters of Amer- 
ica he has had an important part in shaping the 
destinies of that insurance company. The Houston 
office was opened in 1916 and the district includes 
the city of Houston and their insurance is on auto- 
mobiles only. Mr. Bunch took over the manage- 
ment in 1920 and the business of this company has 
shown a rapid increase since that time. Three peo- 
ple are employed in the Houston office, which is 
conveniently located at 314 Chronicle Building. 
Much of the business of the Houston office of the 
Automobile Underwriters of America comes from 
the large dealers and the increase in business from 
individuals is growing rapidly since Mr. Bunch took 
charge of the office here. 

Mr. Bunch was born at Poulan, Georgia, August 
3rd, 1898. His father, W. L. Bunch, has for many 
years been engaged in the general merchandise busi- 
ness in Georgia, where he is well known in the busi- 
ness and financial circles. His early education was 
obtained in the public and high schools of Georgia, 
after which he attended a business college at At- 
lanta, which furnished him with his early business 
training. Mr. Bunch grew up in the mercantile 
establishment of his father and can not remember 
just how small he was when he sold goods in his 
father's store. He was later employed in various 
stores in different places in his native state and 
some of these were country stores where he was 
everything up to manager and did all the work that 
is expected of a man to do in a country store. 
Through the influence of his uncle, he was induced 
to come to Houston and to his present position, 
which he considers offers great possibilities for the 
future. 

Mr. Bunch was married in Houston on June 9th, 
1921, to Marie Harrison, a native of Kentucky and 
whose family resided at Alvin, Texas, for about 
twelve years. They have one daughter, June Marie, 
who is an infant. Mr. and Mrs. Bunch reside at 
Hyde Park. He is a consistent member of the Meth- 
odist Church. Mr. Bunch is considered one of the 
leaders among the young business men of Houston 
and is now getting a good start in the insurance 
world in his capacity of division manager of the 
Automobile Underwriters of America. 



1265 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RS. ANNA ALLEN WRIGHT. In the center 
of the oil fields at Goose Creek, there lives 
a little lady, Mrs. Anna Allen Wright, sur- 
rounded by the derricks and wells which 
have marked the invasion of the oil industry, who 
for many years has been associated with the life of 
this community, and who has taken a keen in- 
terest in this new world. Mrs. Wright, in number 
of years of residence, is the oldest resident of Goose 
Creek, and she knows much of the history of the 
earlier days, which she recounts in a bright, witty 
manner. Her small farm of seventy-five acres, was 
given her just before marriage by Colonel Ashbel 
Smith, in whose home she had spent all of her 
girlhood years, and she has spent her life since her 
marriage on this farm. Even the coming of the oil 
activities and the drilling of wells on her farm have 
not made it less her home, and she continues to occu- 
py the house here that she built so many years ago. 
A number of wells have been drilled on her land, and 
she has had many attractive offers for her farm, 
but she values the gift of her old friend far too 
highly to sell it. 

Mrs. Wright was born in Leon County, the third 
of December, 1858, the daughter of Robert Allen 
and Mary Jane Pate Allen. Her father was a farmer 
and land owner of Leon County and spent most of 
his life there. As a girl Mrs. Wright went to live 
in the home of Colonel Ashbel Smith, one of the 
largest land owners of the Goose Creek neighbor- 
hood, and one of the big men of his time. She at- 
tended the schools of Goose Creek, and until her 
marriage, lived in Colonel Smith's home as one 
of the family. 

Mrs. Wright was married at Houston, Texas, in 
1881 to George Wright, a brick maker, farmer and 
cattleman, whose death occurred in 1922. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wright had a family of five children: one 
daughter, Mrs. Caroline Long; and four sons: Allen, 
William Perkins, Clemmons, and George Eli Wright. 
These four sons and the daughter now live near their 
mother, within one or two blocks, and find their 
greatest pleasure in seeing that she has every wish 
fulfilled. Mrs. Wright is a member of the Episco- 
pal Church, where she has been a regular attendant 
for many years, and has taken an active interest 
in church work. 

At the time of her marriage to Mr. Wright, 
Colonel Ashbel Smith gave her seventy-five acres 
of land at Evergreen, one mile from Goose Creek, and 
this has been her home continuously, since that time. 
For many years the place was farmed, and kept in 
a high state of cultivation by Mr. Wright, but since 
his death, and with the advent of the oil industry 
in this field, drilling operations have centered here 
and a number of wells drilled on the land. In all 
these developments Mrs. Wright has taken a real in- 
terest. When the first workers came to the field she 
voluntarily offered to board them, and has since 
done many things which show the interest she takes 
in the welfare of her fellowmen. 

Mrs. Wright often recalls incidents of the early 
days of this section, and is personally acquainted 
with the men and women who have made this part of 
the state what it is. Her friendship with Colonel 
Smith and his family, and the many pleasant years 
which she spent under his roof, as a loved member 
of that family, is especially dear to her, and so high- 
ly does she regard her home that all offers she has 
received for it from various oil companies, have 




been turned down without consideration. She is, 
despite her more than six decades, unusually spry 
and energetic, and one of the most loved women of 
her community. She takes a real interest in those 
less fortunate than herself, and delights in a 
charity as simple and unostentatious as she herself is. 

RS. R. E. (PHENIE) SMITH of Humble, 
Texas, has been an active figure in the oil 
circles of this city and South Texas since 
1912. Mrs. Smith is one of the first stock- 
holders of the Humble Oil Company, now the Hum- 
ble Oil and Refining Company, her first purchase 
in 1911 being ten shares to which she has gradually 
added at various times. She has made it a rule 
always to put her earnings back into the company, 
and in this manner has acquired a large block of 
stock. For the greater part of her original stock 
Mrs. Smith paid $175 per share, which is worth 
many times this amount, and she is a rich woman 
in her own name. The fact that she has made a 
fortune from her investments with the Humble Oil 
and Refining Company, inspired others to purchase 
stock at higher prices, but which has proved to them 
also a great investment. In addition to her oil 
stock Mrs. Smith has proved herself to be a good 
business woman since she came to Humble with 
her husband more than twenty years ago. She is 
also a stockholder in the Humble State Bank. 

Mrs. Smith was born near Atlanta, Georgia. Her 
parents removed to Texas more than thirty-five 
years ago, and settled first in Grayson County, but 
later removed to Milam County, where they were 
engaged in farming for more than thirty years. 
Her father, J. Watson, was a native of Georgia, 
and a member of a well known family of that state. 
Her mother, Mrs. Laura (Reynolds) Watson, was a 
native of Alabama and belonged to a prominent 
family of that state. Mrs. Smith's education was 
obtained in the public schools of Tennessee and 
Arkansas. 

Mrs. Smith was married on January 28th, 1891, 
to Mr. R. E. Smith, a native of Robertson County, 
Texas. Mr. Smith has been active in the business 
life of Humble, Texas, since 1904, where he has 
been engaged in the hardware and grain business 
and interested in many other enterprises here. He 
recently entered the hardware business and owns 
the building in which the store is located. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith have two children, Calvert Smith, who 
owns an oil filling station at Liberty, Texas, and 
is one of the leaders among the younger business 
men of that city. He was married to Miss Mattie 
Dickinson, a member of a pioneer South Texas 
family. The other child of Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
is Vivian, now the wife of Mr. C. H. King, one of 
the successful young business men of Humble, and 
a member of a well known family of the Lone Star 
State. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the 
Baptist Church. Mrs. Smith, in addition to looking 
after her oil interests here, is active in civic mat- 
ters of Humble and gives of her time and means to 
further any project for the betterment of this pros- 
perous little city. She is enthusiastic in her praise 
of the Humble Oil and Refining Company, which she 
helped finance by her stock purchases in the early 
days. She has done much for the advancement of 
Humble and its people, and is regarded as one of 
its most progressive and public spirited citizens. 



1266 




Jzwl*~ AdleoA- W"^f£<Z^ 



7 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




ISS AGNES F. KATTMANN, of Houston, 
is one of the city's best known business 
women, where she is active president, 
treasurer and general manager of the A. F. 
Kattmann Tent and Awning Company. This company 
are the successors to Kattmann and Kneeland Tent 
Company, and was incorporated in 1900. They are 
manufacturers of canvas goods, which includes tents, 
awnings, wagon covers, tarpaulins, rice and hay cov- 
ers, horse covers, jail hammocks, coin sacks, cots, 
flags, banners and badges. They make a specialty 
of mildew-proof goods for the coast country. The 
immense business which this firm does is built on 
the quality and service of their products. They sell 
in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas and other 
states. They carry a large and complete stock of 
about thirty thousand dollars in value at all times. 
The A. F. Kattmann Tent and Awning Company own 
the property where their factory is located, and con- 
sists of two buildings located on a lot one hundred 
and fifty feet by one hundred and twenty-five feet in 
size, and a space where power machines are oper- 
ated, forty-eight by fifty feet in size. Twenty people 
are employed in the factory and five in the office 
and sales department. Other officers of the A. F. 
Kattmann Tent and Awning Company are R. F. 
Kattman, vice president, and E. S. Phelps, secretary. 
C. L. Kattmann, now deceased, was formerly presi- 
dent of the company and greatly assisted Miss Katt- 
mann for many years. 

Miss Kattmann was born in New Orleans. Her 
father, Dr. John Kattmann, was a well known physi- 
cian in New Orleans, where he practiced his pro- 
fession for many years and afterward in Houston, 
where he died in 1883. Her mother was Miss Kath- 
erine Rubb, a member of a well known Louisiana 
family. Miss Kattmann's education was obtained in 
the public and high schools of New Orleans. 

Miss Kattmann has had a wide experience in the 
line in which she is now engaged. She was manager 
of the Repsdorph Tent and Awning Company for a 
number of years and during this period of exper- 
ience decided that she would enter business for her- 
self, which she started with a small amount of 
money, but with a great fund of valuable exper- 
ience. She has had the management of this business 
since its establishment, and has made it the leading 
establishment of its kind in Houston; with much 
money invested and valuable property, all due to the 
efforts of Miss Kattmann, who is a thorough busi- 
ness woman, and who is known and esteemed 
throughout the city of Houston and South Texas. 

ORA H. NELSON has for more than a 
decade been prominent in Houston as a 
Teacher of Piano, Harmony and Theory, 
and is recognized as one of the best in- 
structors in the city. Mrs. Nelson has a large class 
and a waiting list, and many pupils come from near- 
by towns in order to obtain instructions from her. 
Her studio is located at 2912 La Branch Street. Mrs. 
Nelson is considered a very accomplished woman, 
and one that is able to instruct others, which ac- 
complishment is not always given to the best edu- 
cated people of the country. 

Mrs. Nelson was born in Minnesota. Her early 
education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of Albert Lea, Minnesota, and she com- 
menced the study of music at eight years of age. 
She later became a pupil of W. H. Sherwood in the 





Sherwood School of Music, Chicago, where she re- 
mained for one year, and then for several years 
she studied under Miss Blanche Strong, of Minneap- 
olis. She then went to Berlin, Germany, where she 
continued her studies for several years, and while 
there was a pupil of Arthur Schnabel, Marta Mala- 
testa and other teachers of note. 

Mrs. Nelson has done much public work, and her 
services in this line are in constant demand, but she 
has little time that she may devote to this work, 
desiring to give her time to her large class. She 
has a daughter, Olive, who graduated from the Hous- 
ton High School in the class of 1923, and she is a 
very accomplished girl, and gives promise of be- 
ing a wonderful musician. She is at present acting 
as assistant to her mother, and is preparing to be- 
come a concert organist. Mrs. Nelson is a member 
of the Christ Episcopal Church, and has played the 
pipe organ at this Church at the early service for 
the past seven years. She has seen tangible evi- 
dence of her success in the work accomplished by 
the many students who obtained their musical train- 
ing under her able supervision. Mrs. Nelson has 
never advertised in newspapers, as her many pleased 
and accomplished pupils are the best advertisement 
that a teacher may have. She is popular, not alone 
in the music circles of Houston, but with all classes, 
where she is regarded as one of South Texas' most 
accomplished and successful teachers. 

ORITA BARNELL, although a recent addi- 
tion to the music circles of Houston, was 
well known to Houstonians before locating 
here in 1922, through the fact that for the 
past decade she had entertained Houston audiences 
as a violinist and is regarded as one of the best 
artists of this generation. She was at the head of 
the violin department of the Texas College of Music 
and Art. Lorita Barnell is regarded as a thorough 
and accomplished teacher as well as talented concert 
artist. She has been on several continental tours 
and has appeared in most of the leading cities of 
the United States and Canada, and is particularly 
popular in New York City where there is a constant 
demand for her talent. She has appeared in con- 
cert in Berlin, Paris, London, Brussels, Antwerp 
and many of the other large, music-loving cities 
of Europe. Lorita Barnell was soloist with the 
Johnesque Italian Band for two years, during which 
time she appeared in practically all of the larger 
cities of the United States and Canada. 

Lorita Barnell was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 
1888. Her father, H. G. Elstro, was a well known 
building contractor of Cincinnati. Her mother was 
Miss Anna Harmon, a member of a well known 
Ohio family. Lorita Barnell has had unusual edu- 
cational advantages. Her literary education was 
obtained in the public and high schools of Cincin- 
nati. Before she had finished public school, she 
was well advanced in her study of music, and en- 
tered Notre Dame Academy, where she remained 
for five years, and then entered the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory of Music, where she continued her studies 
there for four years. She then went to Berlin, 
Germany, and became a student of the Royal Acad- 
emy, where she remained for two years, and then 
to De Vohr at Paris, France. 

Lorita Barnell resides in Park Place, Houston, 
and is exceedingly popular in the music circles of 
this city. 



1269 



MEN OF TEXAS 




NNE S. GIEZENDANNER, teacher of danc- 
" ing and its related arts, has, since coming 
to Houston in 1910, built up one of the lar- 
gest classes in Texas, and has established 
a reputation as a woman of great talent and many 
accomplishments. Mrs. Giezendanner conducts her 
classes in her home at 707 Hawthorne Street, and is 
the leading teacher in Houston and South Texas in 
the following: dramatic art, expression and the art 
of dancing, in every department. 

Mrs. Giezendanner is opening the first outdoor 
school of physical education in the South. In fact, 
there are no such institutions in the country except 
at Los Angeles and around New York City. For a 
number of years, Mrs. Giezendanner has devoted 
much of her time to the physical education of the 
children of the De Pelchin Faith Home, and recently 
has given then such instruction out of doors, in the 
city parks and in her own outdoor studio. She has 
from two hundred and fifty to three hundred pupils 
annually and has three able assistants. Her pupils 
are not confined to Houston but come from many of 
the towns surrounding the city. Mrs. Giezendanner 
is regarded as a very thorough and competent 
teacher, and great care is given to small children at 
her studio, where she gives instructions in class and 
private lessons. She does much public work per- 
sonally, and furnishes pupils for all occasions for 
public benefits without charge. 

Mrs. Giezendanner was born at Greensburg, In- 
diana. Her father, Eussell Sawyer, was a well 
known stone manufacturer of Indiana, and owned 
extensive stone quarries in that state. Her mother 
was Miss Eliza Thayer Stewart, a member of a 
prominent Indiana family. Mrs. Giezendanner has 
had unusual educational advantages, particularly in 
the arts which she teaches. Her early literary edu- 
cation was obtained at private schools in Indiana. 
She then graduated from the Teachers College at 
Indianapolis and in addition was granted a diploma 
certifying that she was equipped to instruct teachers 
of dancing. She was a student for four years at 
the New Orleans College of Oratory at New Orleans, 
and then entered the School of Natural Education in 
New York City and was a student there for one 
season. Mrs. Giezendanner has received instruction 
in dancing under the masters of this art. Among 
these instructors are Vernon Castle, Kurylo, Vestoff, 
Kosloff, Mary Perry King, Mrs. Hubble, Ruth St. 
Dennis, Ted Shawn, Moscogno, Kobeleff and many 
others. 

Mrs. Giezendanner was married in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, to Charles J. Giezendanner, who is widely 
known as an expert accountant and auditor, and is 
now connected with the Texas Company at Hous- 
ton. His father, William Giezendanner, is a well 
known manufacturer of crackers and confections in 
Indianapolis, Indiana. They have four children, 
Elizabeth Thayer, Stewart Sawyer, Margaret Hen- 
dricks and Charles J. 

Mrs. Giezendanner occupies a beautiful home at 
707 Hawthorne Street in Montrose, where she has a 
complete studio, modern in every detail, built for the 
purpose of dancing instruction. In addition to the 
lessons given in her home, Mrs. Giezendanner has 
daily classes down town, besides giving lessons at 
other places. She is a member of the Houston Music 
Council, the Houston Art League and the Houston 




branch of the Theosophical Society, and is very ac- 
tive in these organizations. She is also active in 
all denominations of the different churches in Hous- 
ton and gives her time and talent on all occasions, 
without regard or thought of the denomination. Mrs.. 
Giezendanner is a great civic worker and does much 
for the upbuilding of art in the different branches 
which she teaches. She does much charity work and 
gives hundreds of lessons free to children who are 
not able to pay for same. Mrs. Giezendanner never 
loses an opportunity to speak a good word for Hous- 
ton, which she believes will soon be at the forefront 
in every line, in addition to being the leading city 
of Texas in point of population. 

ARY WALDO is well known in the social and 
educational circles of Houston and of Texas, 
where prior to devoting her time to the 
Green Mask Players she, with her two sis- 
ters, successfully conducted a private school for girls 
in Houston for more than a decade. For the past 
year, Miss Waldo has taught French and dramatic 
art at Kinkaid School, a private school of Houston. 
Miss Waldo is one of the founders of the Green 
Mask Players, an organization of upward of three 
hundred active members in Houston, which is de- 
voted to the writing, producing and acting of the 
drama, art and kindred subjects. This organization 
is financed and supported by the leading men and 
women of Houston. During their season, the Green 
Mask Players present three to five plays, which are 
financial successes and are well supported, and form 
one of the best entertainments for the citizens of 
Houston that can be found in the city. 

A native Texan, Miss Waldo was born in Houston, 
October 11th, 1879. Her father, Jedediah Waldo, 
was one of the leading railroad builders and execu- 
tives of the Lone Star State, having been one of 
the builders of the Houston and Texas Central Rail- 
road and the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio 
Railroad, and vice president of the Missouri, Kan- 
sas and Texas Railroad. Her mother was Miss Mary 
Virginia Gentry, a member of a pioneer Texas fam- 
ily. Miss Waldo has had unusual educational ad- 
vantages, having attended the Adelphi Academy in 
Brooklyn, New York, for a period of four years, 
after which she entered a private school in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and remained there for four years. She 
then went to Paris, France, and made a study of 
the French language for one year, and returned to 
Houston where, with her two sisters, Misses Lula and 
Virginia Waldo, she conducted a private school, Miss 
Waldo teaching English and French from 1904 to 
1915. After the Green Mask Players was organized 
in Houston, she took the leading parts in acting 
for two years and for the past two years has been 
directing and producing in this organization, which 
has gained much public favor. 

During the World War, Miss Waldo was active 
in various parts of the country, giving readings and 
various other entertainment features for the sol- 
diers, and for the Red Cross, in which work she was 
also very active. She is a leader in the Little Theater 
movement in Houston and is an active worker in all 
civic and social organizations for the good of her 
city and its citizenship. Miss Waldo resides at 201 
Westmoreland, where she has one of the most beau- 
tiful homes to be found in Houston, where she is 
very popular in the educational and social circles. 



1270 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




LBERT S. MAIER, although a comparatively 
recent addition to the business fraternity 
of Houston, has been a factor in building 
J up a profitable business. Mr. Maier is 
president of the Public Laundry, Inc., located at 
1320 Congress Avenue, and was established and in- 
corporated in 1921. The Public Laundry, Inc. is 
equipped with all modern machinery for the purpose 
of doing the best work, and is sanitary in every 
detail. It has a dry cleaning plant in connection, 
in which is installed all modern methods of dry clean- 
ing. The Public Laundry, Inc. has a floor space 
of twelve thousand five hundred square feet and 
employs fifty people. Mr. Max Krost is vice pres- 
ident, secretary and treasurer, who, with Mr. Maier 
takes great pride in the work done by them and in 
the business, which has increased from the day 
the laundry was started. 

A native Texan, Mr. Maier was born at Palestine 
in 1894. His father, S. Maier, a native of Straus- 
berg, Germany, came to the United States when a 
mere boy and was a resident of Palestine for forty- 
five years. His mother was Miss Lucy Mayes, a na- 
tive of the Lone Star State, where she was a member 
of a prominent family of Kyle. Mr. Maier's educa- 
tion was obtained in the public schools of Pales- 
tine and he later attended the Ohio State Univer- 
sity, graduating from that institution in the class 
of 1917 with the A. B. degree. Immediately fol- 
lowing his graduation, Mr. Maier returned to Pal- 
estine and became associated with the Palestine Salt 
and Coal Company, where he remained for one year. 
He then enlisted in the World War, and was assigned 
to the Headquarters Division at Camp Bowie, Fort 
Worth. He enlisted as a private and was discharged 
as a sergeant major in July, 1919. All of his period 
of army service was spent at Camp Bowie. After 
receiving his discharge, Mr. Maier returned to Pal- 
estine and entered the employ of the Guaranty State 
Bank, where he remained for one year. He then 
went again with the Palestine Salt and Coal Com- 
pany, but remained only a short time, when he 
resigned his position in order to come to Houston 
and organize the Public Laundry Company, Inc. 

In fraternal organizations, Mr. Maier is a member 
of the A. F. and A. M. with membership in the Pal- 
estine Lodge. He is also a member of the B. P. O. E. 
Character, perseverance, foresight, efficiency, 
promptness and punctuality have been dominant fac- 
tors in the success achieved by this young man, who 
is still in the morning of life. 

|LAYTON LEE has for the past thirteen 
years been identified with the plumbing 
business of Houston and maintains the 
plumbing establishment bearing his name, 
at 706 East 20th Street. Mr. Lee came to Houston 
in 1910, and eight years later established his present 
business. He is engaged in general plumbing, has 
a well established business and confines his work 
mostly to Houston. Mr. Lee has a splendid location 
and employs five or six people at all times. He 
does plumbing in residences, stores and apartments, 
and during the ten years he has been in business 
in Houston, has built up a splendid reputation for 
good work, and is regarded as one of the most 
reliable men in his line of work. 

Mr. Lee was born in Paris, Arkansas, in 1883. 
His father, A. P. Lee, was a land owner and farmer 





city. 



of Arkansas, and has established a record by living 
on the same farm for the past fifty-five years. Mr. 
Lee's education was obtained in the public schools 
of Paris, Arkansas. He has been engaged in the 
plumbing business practically all of his business 
life. He began as a very young man, and worked 
in various cities and states, and came to Houston 
in 1910, and for eight years after coming here, he 
worked as a journeyman plumber, and then estab- 
lished his present business, which has grown stead- 
ily from the beginning, and due to Mr. Lee's ex- 
perience and close attention to the details of the 
business, has been a success from a monetary stand- 
point, as well as that of the satisfaction of his many 
customers. 

Mr. Lee was married at Wichita Falls, Texas, in 
1910, to Miss Jessie Horry, a daughter of Dan Horry, 
well known hotel proprietor of Wichita Falls. They 
have two children — Anna Dorris, seven years of 
age, and Clayton Lee, Jr., aged two years. Mr. 
Lee is a member of the A. F. and A. M., with 
membership in Houston Lodge. He is optimistic 
as to the future of Houston, and considers that 
her opportunities to become the leading city of the 
Southwest are far greater than any other city. 

EON DITTMAN for a number of years has 
operated one of the most modern bakeries 
at Houston and is highly esteemed for his 
connection with the business life of the 
Mr. Dittman is the owner of Dittman's Bakery, 
which he established in 1910 as a small bakery, 
under the name of the Houston Baking Company. 
Under his management the plant met with rapid 
growth, and in August, 1924, was moved into a mod- 
ern new building, designed especially for the bakery, 
and the name changed to Dittman's Bakery. The 
building, a brick and hollow tile structure, when 
completely equipped, represents an investment of 
around seventy-five thousand dollars, and is one of 
the most modern bakeries in the city with all facili- 
ties for turning out a high class product. Mr. Ditt- 
man specializes in bread, selling his product whole- 
sale exclusively, and is turning out around fifteen 
thousand loaves daily, employing a force of twenty 
operatives. The plant, located in the eighteen hun- 
dred block on Washington Avenue, is a two-story 
building, fifty by two hundred feet. 

Leon Dittman was born in Poland the twenty-fifth 
of September, 1892, the son of J. Dittman, a native 
of Poland, where he still lives. The elder Mr. Ditt- 
man, a wholesale baker for a lifetime, has recently 
retired, and is an octogenarian. Mrs. Dittman is 
also still living. Leon Dittman was educated in the 
schools of Poland, and as a boy spent a large part 
of his time in his father's bakery, learning the 
baker's trade there. When he was sixteen years of 
age he came to the United States, alone, coming di- 
rect to Houston. Here he began in a local bakery, 
two years later establishing his own small shop. At 
that time he did the entire work of the shop alone, 
adding to his equipment, plant and employees as 
his increasing trade demanded, and today is one of 
the leading bakers of Houston. 

Mr. Dittman was married in Houston, 1919, to 
Miss Eva Wiener. They reside in Houston. Mr. 
Dittman belongs to a number of Jewish organiza- 
tions and has many friends here who regard him as 
a business man of unusual attainment and a factor 
in the baking business. 



1273 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RS. LAURA SLAVENS WOOD, president 
of the Houston Branch of the Theosophical 
Society, national lecturer, teacher, organ- 
izer and leader, is probably the best known 
woman connected with the Theosophical Society in 
the state of Texas. Mrs. Wood has been a resident 
of Houston for eighteen years, and has been pres- 
ident of the Houston Branch of the Theosophical 
Society for ten years, during which time it has 
grown from a feeble beginning to a strong organ- 
ization, removing antagonisms and stimulating the 
mental and spiritual life of the city. She has held 
many offices in other organizations, among them 
being the Christian Temperance Union, Humane So- 
ciety and several women's clubs. 

Mrs. Wood was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on 
May 24th, 1865 Her father, Rev. Duke Slavens, 
was a prominent Methodist minister of his time. Her 
mother was Miss Mary H. Taylor of Winchester, 
Kentucky, a descendant of General Zachary Tay- 
lor. Mrs. Wood's early education was obtained in 
the public and high schools of Carrollton, Illinois, 
where at the age of fifteen years she graduated 
from the high school and then taught for a number 
of years. 

Mrs. Wood was married in Nebraska City, Nebras- 
ka, in 1889 to Edmund Stanford Wood, owner of 
the Logan Candy Company, of Houston, and well 
known in the business circles of South Texas. They 
have one son, Forest Edmund Wood, who is a grad- 
uate of the University of Texas, and was a major 
during the World War. Mr. and Mrs. Wood reside 
at 1245 Courtland Street. Mrs. Wood is one of the 
few women of the country who have cared to take 
up studies in college after their marriage, hav- 
ing entered the University of Texas in 1908 where 
she graduated in 1912 with the degree of B. A. and 
was granted the M. A. degree in 1913. She was 
elected a member of "Phi Beta Kappa," the mem- 
bership of which is limited to those of extremely 
high scholarship. Mrs. Wood is a member of the 
Woman's Club of Houston and the College Woman's 
Club. She is a staunch member of the Methodist 
Church. During the World War, Mrs. Wood, as na- 
tional war secretary of the Theosophical Society, 
was in charge of Theosophical work in all the army 
camps in the country, and in this way, through her 
efforts, many of the soldiers were made acquainted 
with the wonderful teachings of Theosophy. 

Mrs. Wood is devoting her life to the cause of 
Theosophy and trying to acquaint the public with 
the vital necessity of an understanding of the great 
Theosophical truths and their bearing upon the 
ideals of the future. 

The Theosophical Society is an unsectarian body 
of seekers after truth. Its main object is to form 
a nucleus of Universal Brotherhood and apply it 
along all lines that affect humanity, including re- 
ligion, philosophy and science. It is composed of 
students of all races and religions whose bond of 
union is not a common belief, but a comman search 
and aspiration for truth. They extend tolerance to 
all and see every religion as an expression of the 
Divine Wisdom and prefer its study to its condemna- 
tion, and its practice to proselytism. Theosophy re- 
stores to the world the Science of Spirit, teaching 
man to know the Spirit as himself, and the mind and 
body as his servants. 




ISS CARRIE V. BRADLEY came to Hous- 
ton, Texas, in 1904 and the following year 
engaged in the insurance business in this 

city, first as a partner, but since 1908 has 

been alone and has met with unusual success. Miss 
Bradley is the owner and Manager of the C. V. 
Bradley and Company, Insurance, located at 1109-10 
State National Bank Building, having moved from 
the Stewart Building, where she had her offices for 
sateen years. She writes all kinds of insurance 
except life, and has built up an excellent business. 
Miss Bradley started her career in the insurance 
business, which was the beginning of her career in 
the business world, at Taylor, Texas, and is the 
third woman m the Lone Star State to engage in 
this field of activity, and was one of the first to 
take up commercial life. She is the second woman 
to engage in the insurance business in this city, 
and in point of service, is one of the oldest business 
women of Texas. Miss Bradley has today more years 
of activity in the insurance business than has any 
woman of this State. She has built up her business 
through hard work and fair dealing with the public 
and holds this business in the same manner, as she 
says insurance is one of the easiest businesses to 
lose that there is, and constant work and attention 
to her clients, with whom she is constantly in touch 
are the main reasons for her success in her chosen 
line of work. Miss Bradley is well posted in refer- 
ence to insurance in the State as she has devoted 
her entire business life to the study of the different 
branches of insurance. 

Miss Bradley was born at Fayette, Missouri. Her 
father, George W. Bradley, was a native of Virginia, 
but lived the greater part of his life in Kentucky and 
Missouri, and died in Missouri. Her mother, (now 
deceased), was Miss Dorothy P. Wisdom, a member 
of a prominent Kentucky family. Her education was 
obtained in her native State. She came to Texas in 
1883 to make her home with a brother who was re- 
siding at Taylor, Texas, and soon after coming to 
the Lone Star State, she conceived the idea of en- 
tering the business world. She is today regarded 
as one of Texas' best business women, and her 
advice is frequently sought by women who desire 
to engage in business, and this advice is freely 
given, with the injunction that in business much 
labor is necessary, without which no woman or 
man can hope to succeed. Her life should indeed 
be an inspiration to the coming generation of busi- 
ness women, who if following in her footsteps can 
not fail. She is highly regarded by the business 
men of Houston and South Texas who know that 
she has always been a steadfast exponent of the 
highest standards of insurance business. She has 
for more than a score of years occupied a place of 
leadership in the business and civic life of Houston, 
on which she has indelibly impressed the seal of her 
usefulness and worth to the community. 

ARY LEE TRAMMELL, although one of 
the younger members in the educational 
circles of Houston, has since beginning to 
give instruction in her art here, built up a 
large class and established a splendid reputation 
among the people in the city of her nativity. Miss 
Trammell is a teacher of expression, and is one 
of the leading young teachers in Houston where 
she has about one hundred pupils and a large wait- 




1274 







Mc 



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'tfazA, 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



ing list. She has been teaching in the city for more 
than three years, and has three well appointed stu- 
dios, a large acquaintance and her work is sup- 
ported by the most prominent people of the city, 
where she is regarded as one of the best instructors 
in her line in South Texas. 

A native Houstonian, Miss Trammell was born 
September 28th, 1900. Her father, Henry Lee Tram- 
mell is well known in the cotton and mercantile bus- 
iness in South Texas. Her mother was Miss Carolyn 
Leverton, a member of a prominent and pioneer Tex- 
as family. Her early education was obtained in the 
public high schools of Houston, after which she en- 
tered Baylor University at Waco and remained at 
this institution for two years. She then went to 
the Anna Morgan School of Chicago, and graduated 
from this Institution with a diploma. She then at- 
tended Columbia University for supplementary work 
in 1920. She then spent one season in New York 
City under the able tutorage of Henry Gaynes Hawn. 
Miss Trammell studied violin for one year in the 
Chicago Music College and one season in the Lyceum 
Arts Conservatory. She then returned to Houston 
and began teaching and has been unusually success- 
ful, and goes to the East and North each summer to 
study. 

Miss Trammell resides at 204 Hawthorne. She 
is a member of the Baptist Church, and is an 
active worker in this church. Miss Trammell has a 
large family connection in Houston, which belongs 
to the pioneers of the Lone Star State. She has 
enjoyed unusual educational advantages, has a fine 
personality, and is altogether a very charming 
young woman, and her friends predict a wonderful 
future for her in her chosen field. 

LAIRE J. SINCLAIR CALAHAN, a resident 
of Houston for a quarter of a century has 
for the past ten years owned and operated 
the Sinclair Select Business School, and 
during this period has started many young men and 
women on the high road to success. Mrs. Calahan 
has seen tangible evidence of her success in the 
work accomplished by the many students who have 
obtained their business training in her school. In 
the Sinclair Select Business School, all branches are 
included in the curriculum for a thorough business 
course. Each department is under the direction of 
capable, expert instructors who are especially versed 
in the subject taught, and personal attention is given 
each pupil. The rooms are especially well lighted 
and ventilated and constructed throughout with a 
view of facilitating the work of teachers and pupils. 
The limit of the number of pupils is fifty and Mrs. 
Calahan has a large waiting list at all times. Thirty- 
two typewriters, including all makes, are in use in 
the school, which is located at 946 Arlington Street, 
Houston Heights, Houston, and has modern equip- 
ment throughout. 

Mrs. Calahan was born at Meringo, Ohio on May 
30th, 1886. Her father, Ezra L. Whitehead, was a 
resident of that part of Ohio for almost forty years 
where he was a land owner and farmer. Her mother 
was Miss Hattie Clark, a member of a prominent 
Ohio family. Her early education was obtained in 
the public and high schools of Meringo, Ohio, after 
which she came to Austin, Texas and entered the 
high school there, and later attended the University 
of Texas for a period of three years. She then went 
to Chicago where she was a student of the University 




of Chicago for a period of four seasons, and obtained 
a teacher's certificate, and also a teacher's certifi- 
cate from the Gregg University of Chicago. She 
returned to Texas and began teaching and has had 
experience in teaching in both public and private 
schools of the state, which she continued until she 
established the Sinclair Select Business School, 
which is considered one of the best schools of its 
kind in South Texas and has grown rapidly from the 
beginning, and has had a waiting list since its es- 
tablishment by Mrs. Calahan. 

Mrs. Calahan has been twice married. The first 
marriage was in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 1904, 
to L. B. Sinclair, who was for many years a promi- 
nent merchant tailor, and who died in 1912. They 
had one son— L. Burton Sinclair, Jr., who is eighteen 
years of age, and gives promise of a wonderful busi- 
ness man. She was married the second time in 
1920 to James Allen Calahan, who was for many 
years a well known cattle man of Texas, but who is 
now a member of the faculty of the Sinclair Select 
Business School. A branch under the same name 
is operated in Mexia, Texas, and is under the able 
management of Mrs. Pearl Terrell, and this school 
like the Sinclair school of Houston, is at all times 
filled to capacity. Mrs. Calahan is an exceptional 
teacher, in that she possesses the great art of im- 
parting her knowledge to her pupils and is a won- 
derful disciplinarian, and has unusual influence over 
her pupils. In addition to her other accomplish- 
ments, Mrs. Calahan is a thorough business woman, 
and has succeeded in establishing and maintaining 
one of the best business schools in South Texas. 

RS. LAURA F. BROUSSARD has been as- 
sociated with the floral business at Houston 
for the past decade, since 1920 operating 
one of the most distinctive flower shops in 
the city. The California Flower Shop, which Mrs. 
Broussard established in 1920, and which she has 
since operated, is attractive in every way, and she 
has given careful attention to each detail of this 
establishment. All the flowers sold in the California 
Flower Shop are grown by Mrs. Broussard, many 
of them in her beautiful gardens, and others in her 
greenhouses. She gives special attention to flowers 
grown in the open and has been exceptionally suc- 
cessful in this branch of horticulture. Her green- 
houses are most complete, and while small, are used 
to grow all kinds of flowers under glass. Mrs. Brous- 
sard gives careful attention to supplying flowers for 
funerals and weddings and supplies decorations for 
all occasions. Flowers from the California Flower 
Shop are featured at many of Houston's social func- 
tions and her customers are drawn from the best 
trade in the city. The shop also has a complete line 
of hedges and shrubbery and an extensive trade in 
these two items. The greenhouses are located at 
2523 Washington Avenue. 

Mrs. Broussard was born at New Orleans, daugh- 
ter of Judge John H. Ilsley, Associate Justice of the 
United States Supreme Court of Louisiana for many 
years, and Mrs. R. M. Cure Ilsley. Mrs. Broussard 
was educated in the public schools of New Orleans, 
graduating from the high school in that city, and 
also attending a convent there. 

Mrs. Broussard was married at New Orleans, in 
1900 to Joseph Broussard, well known cattle and 
stock man. They have four children, Leola, Antoin- 
ette, Mae and Joseph. The family make their home 
at 2523 Washington Avenue. 




1277 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RS. JOHN WESLEY GRAHAM is recog- 
nized as one of the leading music instruc- 
tors in the South and has the largest music 
class of any teacher in the State. Mrs. Gra- 
ham came to Houston in 1910 and established her 
first class in music, which has grown steadily, as 
has her reputation as a finished artist and instruct- 
or. She teaches piano and voice in her splendidly 
appointed studio in her home at 703 Dallas Avenue, 
where she has two assistants and a private secre- 
tary. In addition to her classes in voice and piano ; 
Mrs. Graham is a Director in many of the leading 
music organization of Houston. Numbered among 
these organizations is the Imperial D. O. K. K. 
Glee Club, and is the only woman director in the 
United States; she is the Director of Community 
Music in Houston and is the Director of the choir 
of the First Methodist Church, which is the largest 
choir in Houston, numbering almost three hundred 
people. She is chairman of the Music Department 
of the Houston State Fair, rendering three daily 
musical programs, and is one of the two women in 
Houston on the Board for the Salvation Army. In 
her teaching, Mrs. Graham has seen tangible evi- 
dence of her success in the work accomplished by 
hundreds of students who obtained their musical 
education under her able guidance and supervision. 
She has turned out some very noted artists, one 
pupil is now with the Metropolitan Opera Company 
of New York City; another pupil is engaged at the 
La Scala Theater in Milan, Italy, and "The Conner 
Twins," former pupils of Mrs. Graham, are in the 
Follies in New York City. One of her pupils won 
the scholarship to the Sherwood School of Music, and 
he is now touring the United States with the Chi- 
cago Glee Club; this pupil was a contestant with 
one hundred others from various conservatories in 
the United States. 

Mrs. Graham was born at Dahlgren, Illinois. Her 
father, S. N. Hallowell, was a well known merchant 
of Illinois. Her mother was Miss Elizabeth Brum- 
baugh, a member of a prominent Illinois family. Mrs. 
Graham has had unusual and exceptional educational 
advantages. Her literary and acdemic education 
was obtained in the public and high schools of Mount 
Vernon, Illinois, private schools of Saint Louis, Bos- 
cobel Seminary of Nashville, Tennessee, and Leban- 
non College for Young Ladies, from which she grad- 
uated and then took up her study of music in ear- 
nest in New York City, where for two years she 
studied under Buggi Pecia. She then went to 
Boston and studied for two years under Madam 
MacLure, following which she went to Paris, 
France, and studied for one year under Foresta. She 
then went to Milan, Italy,, and was under Giordanna 
for one season; she then went to Nice, France, where 
she was for one season a pupil of Jean De Reski. 
Mrs. Graham then went to South America, for the 
study of Spanish music, and while there was a pupil 
of many noted artists. Following this, she went to 
Berlin, and then to New York again, where she 
studied under Stark, and had lessons in the Radio 
System of teaching voice. 

Mrs. Graham was married in Illinois in 1909 to 
John Wesley Graham, President of the Graham Hat 
Company of Houston, the only wholesale hat com- 
pany in the city, and the largest establishment of the 
kind in Texas. The Graham home is at 703 Dallas 
Avenue and is one of the most attractive in the city. 




Mrs. Graham is a member of the Music Teachers 
Association of Texas and is a loyal member of the 
Methodist Church. Mrs. Graham has traveled ex- 
tensively, and goes abroad each year. Last year she 
went to South America and during the coming sum- 
mer she is going to China and Japan. She has a 
wonderful collection of diamonds, which have been 
collected from all portions of the world, among 
this collection are four stones which weigh more 
than twenty carats. Mrs. Graham is not only very 
popular in the music circles of Houston, but with 
all classes, and is held in the highest regard by all 
who are fortunate in knowing her, and is known as 
a woman with unusual talent and accomplishments, 
and a valuable addition to the music circles of the 
Lone Star State. 

^LLISON VAN HOOSE, 3617 Main Street, 
has been a resident of the city of Houston 
since 1915. During this period he has de- 
voted his time and attention to the teach- 
ing of voice and his studio has been the training 
place for some of the South's best singers. 

A noted musician and singer himself, Mr. Van 
Hoose has an international reputation and is in such 
demand as a teacher that he has frequently found it 
necessary to restrict his classes in order to give to 
his pupils the personal attention he feels is neces- 
sary for their proper training. The possessor of a 
beautiful, remarkably cultivated voice, he is in equal 
demand for^ "concert and solo work and is always 
booked many months in advance. His voice is lyric- 
dramatic and of never failing sweetness and power. 
He is unquestionably the greatest and best known 
figure in the musical circles of the South. 

Mr. Van Hoose is a native of Tennessee and was 
born at Murfreesboro in 1869, a son of Azor and Mis- 
souri Frances (Daniel) Van Hoose. He obtained his 
literary education in the public and high schools of 
Gainesville, Georgia, and his early musical training 
under his mother, who was a well known piano 
teacher. After completing high school he attended 
Howard College at Marion, Alabama, and then took 
up engineering work, continuing in this line of effort 
until he was twenty-six years of age. At that time 
he determined to realize a life time ambition to be- 
come a singer and went to New York, where he 
studied earnestly under Perry Avrill and Isadore 
Luckston. He went to Europe and continued his 
studies in Rome with Antonio Cortoni, in Paris under 
Fidele Koenig and Jean de Reska, and in London 
under Sir Henry Wood. He appeared with the Queens 
Hall Orchestra at London but before that time had 
sung the title roles in Tannhauser with the Dam- 
rosch-Ellis Opera Company. 

He soon became famous as an opera singer and 
appeared in grand opera in England, Norway, Ger- 
many, Denmark, Sweden and Italy. In 1911 he was 
made a member of the Legion of Honor for his work 
in benefit performances for the flood sufferers of 
Paris. 

Queen Victoria summoned him to Windsor Castle 
on three separate occasions to sing privately and he 
is the possessor of a beautiful ring tendered him by 
her in recognition of his work as a musician. He 
also was presented a ring by the present Dowager 
Queen of Italy, Marguerite, mother of the present 
King of Italy. 

After returning to America, Mr. Van Hoose ap- 
peared for three years in important roles with the 



1278 





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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Metropolitan Opera Company and was also with the 
Chicago Opera Company the same length of time. 
He sang for four years with the famous Melba and 
for two years with Madame Sembrich. He is widely 
known as a Victor artist and a number of his Red 
Seal records have had a phenomenal sale. 

During his residence in London Mr. Van Hoose was 
married at Westminster Abbey to Miss Marie Pearce, 
deceased since 1916. Besides his studio home at 3617 
Main Street, Mr. Van Hoose has a lovely summer 
home on the sea shore where he spends the heated 
term each year. 

Mr. Van Hoose has sung before nearly all the lead- 
ing clubs of the United States and is a member of 
the Kiwanis Club of Houston and is director of the 
Kiwanis Glee Club. He is a member of and director 
of the music for the First Presbyterian Church of 
Houston and is director of the Mendelssohn Club at 
Beaumont. 

Intensely interested in development of the musical 
life of Houston and of the South, Mr. Van Hoose is 
ever ready to lend his aid to any worthy musical 
movement. He is absolutely unselfish with both his 
time and talents and has done much to bring the 
city of Houston to its present high standing in the 
musical world. 

ARY ELIZABETH LE CAND, an estab- 
lished teacher of dancing in Houston, de- 
votes her talents to the training of a large 
class in the terpsichorean art. Miss Le Cand 
is a conscientious, as well as highly talented artist, 
and her work as a teacher, has met with marked suc- 
cess. Her pupils respond to her talent and enthu- 
siasm. The course of study comprises ballet and 
classic dancing, instruction in bar work, technique 
and plastique movements, Greek Interpretive, nature 
dancing, national and folk character, toe, tap and 
stage dancing, modern ballroom and baby work, giv- 
ing special attention to physical education and physi- 
cal expression. Miss Le Cand is thoroughly equipped 
for her work, as she received her training under 
the best known dancers in the country. Her work 
is colorful and finished and shows a rare grace 
and talent which has many times delighted large 
audiences. Miss Le Cand is a distinct asset to 
artist circles in Houston, which is fortunate in 
having so talented an artist, and so thorough a 
teacher. 

Mary Elizabeth Le Cand is a native of the Lone 
Star State, her birthplace being the City of Gal- 
veston. Her father, Frederick Eugene Le Cand, was 
born in Natchez, Mississippi. For many years he 
was a resident of the State of Texas, engaged in 
the cotton business, spending the latter part of his 
life in Galveston where he died in 1905. He was 
a 32nd Degree Mason, and a factor in the commercial 
and civic activities of the city. In 1896 he married 
Miss Sue Menard, a descendant of two prominent 
Galveston families, being a grand-niece of Michel B. 
Menard, the founder of Galveston, and a grand 
daughter of Gen.j Sidney Sherman of San Jacinto 
fame. Miss Le Cand was educated in the cities of 
Galveston and Houston, after which she decided 
upon a career of dancing as a profession. She is a 
graduate of the Vestoff-Serova school in New York 
City, and has also studied under Fokine, Moscagno 
and Ned Wayburn of New York, and also teaches 
the methods of Ruth St. Denis and Chalif. Miss Le 
Cand is a member of the Houston Music Council and 




the Woman's Advertising Association. She is in- 
terested in both social and civic activities and takes 
an active part in many public entertainments, her 
dancing being a feature on various occasions. Her 
work as a dancing teacher has been given much 
enthusiastic approval and she is recognized as one 
of the leaders in the terpsichorean art in Houston. 

U T. HUFFMASTER, well known musician 
and teacher of voice, piano and pipe organ, 
has been closely connected with the musical 
life of Houston for the past fifteen years, 
having come to this city and established his studio 
in 1908. He has a lovely studio-home at 709 Mar- 
shall Street, where he conducts classes of select 
pupils in piano and voice. Numbers of prominent 
musicians of Southern Texas have been trained 
under his direction. 

Mr. Huffmaster is a native of Texas and was born 
in Galveston in 1880, a son of James Taylor and 
Allen Augusta (Hapgood) Huffmaster. The elder 
Huffmaster was engaged in the banking business in 
Galveston for nearly fifty years. 

After attending the public and high schools of 
Galveston Mr. Huffmaster entered the New England 
Conservatory of Music at Boston, where he studied 
for two years. He then had three years study in 
the Faelten Piano Forte School and after that was 
a member of the faculty there for seven years. He 
studied voice under William W. Whitney for four 
years and had pipe organ training under the noted 
George E. Whiting of Boston for five years. 

Oratorio and operatic studies were with Emil 
Mollenhauer for two years and George Henschel for 
one year. Mr. Huffmaster was organist at Saint 
James Episcopal Church in Boston for five years and 
served the church of Saint John in that city in the 
same capacity for six years. As a concert singer and 
organist he was in great demand in Boston and 
throughout the East, where he made many public 
appearances before large and enthusiastic audiences. 

In 1916 Mr. Huffmaster was married at Galves- 
ton to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. V. D. Thompson. Mr. Thompson is repre- 
sentative of the telegraph company at the Cotton 
Exchange at Galveston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huffmaster have two lovely daugh- 
ters, Drusilla Virginia, six, and Ellen Catherine, 
three. 

For two years Mr. Huffmaster was organist and 
choir director at Saint Paul's Methodist Church at 
Houston, and is also conductor of the Woman's 
Choral Club, now in its thirteeenth year. For seven 
years he conducted the Houston Quartette Society 
and is a past Director of the Houston Festival Asso- 
ciation and had 250 voices appearing in conjunction 
with the New York Symphony Orchestra, under the 
direction of Walter Damrosch, Conductor. For the 
past thirteen years he has been Organist and Choir 
Master at Trinity Episcopal Church in Galveston 
and conducted the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation Glee Club there for eight years. For five years 
he was Director of the Galveston Quartette Society 
and still gives special teaching lessons in the Island 
City. 

Mr. Huffmaster is a real artist, a charming and 
cultured gentleman, affable and of pleasing person- 
ality and has contributed in no small degree to the 
development of the musical and cultural life of 
Houston and Galveston. He is a member of the 
Rotary Club and of Trinity Episcopal Church. 



1281 



MEN OF TEXAS 




RS. C. A. BUJAC (Emma J.) was one of the 

leading Pianists and Piano Teachers in 
Houston, Texas, where she had lived since 
1873, during which period, by her conscien- 
tious efforts, she won the respect and esteem of her 
many pupils and friends. She was also favorably 
known as a composer. One of her compositions, 
"Merci," (Thank You), dedicated to Mrs. C. Lom- 
bardi of Houston, Texas, has been played by John 
Philip Sousa at Houston and at Atlanta, Georgia, as 
well as by the "Fourth Mexican Cavalry Band" at 
Houston. On these and other occasions when it has 
been rendered, it has met with an enthusiastic re- 
ception. "Les Avants Coureurs" (The Drummers), 
dedicated to Mr. C. A. Bujac, and the "Commercial 
Travelling Fraternity," is another of her composi- 
tions which has been well received. 

Mrs. Bujac received her early education, both gen- 
eral and along musical lines, in New Orleans, Louis- 
iana, her native city. Later she studied piano under 
Dr. William Mason, Miss K. C. Linn, Messrs. Ernest 
Hutcheson and Conradi, and theory and harmony 
under Messrs. Edgar Robbins and Howard Thatcher. 
Mason's Technique, Hutcheson's Technique and the 
Progressive Series were used in her piano teaching. 

Her scrapbook, covering the years she was before 
the public, contains a most interesting collection of 
programs, press notices and the like, giving evi- 
dence of much earnest work in public musical af- 
fairs. Particularly noticeable was the attention she 
had given to piano ensemble work. She was a pop- 
ular organist, and had served terms as organist for 
the First Presbyterian Church and the Shearn Meth- 
odist Church. 

Mrs. Bujac was the daughter of Peter Lott and 
Emilia Catherine Preusch Lott, and a descendent of 
Peter Lott, who came from New Netherlands in 
1653, of Capt. Cornelius Lott, who served in the 
Revolutionary War, and Col. John Cannon of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bujac were married in 1875, 
to whom were given two children, Mathieu Jules 
Bujac, and Emilia Celeste Bujac, now the wife of 
Jesse Andrews, a member of the law firm of Baker, 
Botts, Parker and Garwood, with offices in Houston 
and in Kansas City, Missouri. 

With the passing of Mrs. Emma J. Bujac on Sat- 
urday, June 14th, 1924, not only the musical circles 
of Houston, but the entire community lost a valued 
and beloved member. Mrs. Bujac was loved by hun- 
dreds of friends here and it was always said of her 
that she was ever loyal toward those whom she 
counted among her long list of friends and ac- 
quaintances. Her lovable disposition, cultured mu- 
sicianship and fine generosity will long be remem- 
bered by all who knew her. 

RS. GUSTAV STOLZ, one of the most ca- 
pable of Houston's business women, has 
achieved a foremost place in the industrial 
world of her city, and has won distinction 
in the manufacturing field. Mrs. Stolz owns and 
operates the Houston Monument Company, a com- 
pany established in 1922, and which has since built 
up a large and profitable business in Houston. She 
is one of the few women operators of such an indus- 
try in the state, and displays a real executive ca- 
pacity and ability to conduct her business along suc- 
cessful lines. Mrs. Stolz owns the property on 




which the plant is located, at 2702 Washington Ave- 
nue, and is making plans for a new building, af- 
fording larger space and better facilities, to re- 
place the old building, which the business is rapidly 
outgrowing. She employs eight operatives, engag- 
ing in monumental work principally, but also does 
some building construction. Most of the work done 
by the plant is in marble and granite, and many 
very superior pieces of work have been turned out 
under the supervision of Mrs. Stolz. She is thor- 
oughly conversant with every phase of her business, 
takes a keen delight in her work, and the future 
promises her a continued prosperity. She is owner 
and manager of the business, and her daughter, Miss 
Elsie Stolz, is treasurer. 

Mrs. Stolz was born in Germany, and, after re- 
ceiving her education in that country, came to 
America, at the age of fifteen years. She was 
married at Victoria, Texas, in 1884, to Gustav Stolz, 
whose death occurred in Victoria, in 1916. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stolz had a family of five children, Charles 
W. Stolz, Mrs. L. C. Brady, Mrs. P. W. Seffell, Gus- 
tav Stolz, Jr., and Miss Elsie Stolz, who is treasurer 
of the Houston Monument Company. 

Mr. Stolz first began in the monument business 
more than four decades ago, at Victoria, in a plant 
he had been forced to take over in settlement of 
a debt. He built up a successful business, and at 
the time of his death, in 1916, Mrs. Stolz, who had 
always been interested in the work, decided to op- 
erate the business herself. She gave the undertak- 
ing the enthusiasm and attention that has marked 
her career in the business world, and not only ran 
the plant, but did a constantly increasing business. 
In 1922 she decided to remove to Houston, a city 
offering a greater opportunity for expansion and 
growth, and the plant in this city is the outgrowth 
of that decision. Since coming here she has had 
a most prosperous business, and the future looks 
especially promising. Her daughter, Miss Elsie, 
is her most able assistant, and, like her mother, dis- 
plays a remarkable business talent. 

GRACE CLARK, musician, composer and 
teacher, is one of the pioneer musicians of 
the City of Houston and has been identified 
with the musical, social and civic life of 
this city for a number of years. Mr. Clark is a 
teacher of piano, harmony, theory and composition 
and his classes are among the largest and most se- 
lect in the city. 

Mr. Clark was born at Independence, Texas, and is 
a son of Rev. Horace and Martha (Davis) Clark. His 
father, a well known Baptist minister in the early 
days of Texas, was president of Baylor Female Col- 
lege for twenty-one years, serving this institution 
from 1851 until 1871. It was at this institution that 
Mr. Clark largely received his literary education, be- 
ing the only boy permitted to attend the school. 

After completing his literary studies, Mr. Clark 
began the study of music in Houston under Mrs. 
L. P. Grunewald. Later he went to Boston where 
he was a student at the New England Conservatory of 
Music for two years and was one of four honor 
students out of a class of 104. The conservatory of- 
fered to pay his expenses for an extended course of 
musical instruction under the best masters of Europe 
at the close of studies there, but he decided to remain 
with the conservatory and become one of its teach- 
ers. He returned to Texas and began teaching 




1282 





&/77<Sj!^ 





TZrC^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



there and in 1902 went to Europe where he studied 
successively under Varetta Stepanoff and the Stern 
Conservatory in Berlin and the famous Lovengard. 
Returning to America he was a student of A. K. 
Virgil in New York for one season and for a similar 
period under Alvin Cady of Chicago. He also studied 
in Vermont under Wm. H. Sherwood for a year and 
was a pupil of Dr. Eugene Thayer, a noted organist. 

Mr. Clark is now devoting much of his time to 
the lecture platform and his lectures on music are 
in great demand in many of the cities of Texas. He 
also is selected as judge in many of the musical con- 
tests held by universities and colleges of Texas. 

Apart from his work as a teacher, Mr. Clarlc is 
nationally known as an author and has to his credit 
many compositions that have attained wide popular- 
ity. He has won three medals for compositions, two 
in Texas and one in Philadelphia. Hynes, Haden and 
Eldridge, music publishers of New York City, select- 
ed Mr. Clark as one of two Texas composers to con- 
tribute to their course of music to be used in public 
education. The course comprises from four to eight 
years work and is declared by able musicians to be 
one of the most comprehensive works of its kind 
ever published. 

Mr. Clark is very active in the State Music Teach- 
ers' Association of Texas, and is a member of the 
board of examiners for the standardization of teach- 
ers, a movement recently adopted and being carried 
out by the State Teachers' Association, in the cause 
of music education. 

Mr. Clark maintains his studio at 809 Dennis 
Avenue which is recognized as one of the musical 
centers of Houston. A man of marked versatility 
and magnetic personality, Mr. Clark takes an active 
interest in the musical life of Houston and has been 
identified with many of the more important musical 
orgaizations and movements here. 

|RS. C. SHEPHERD, President of Mrs. C. 
Shepherd, Inc., exclusive ladies' ready-to- 
wear house of Houston, is well known in 
the business world at Houston as one of 
the most successful merchants, as well as success- 
ful business women here. Mrs. Shepherd began 
her business career at Palestine, establishing a 
ladies' ready-to-wear in her home there in 1916, 
and shortly afterward moving her business to Hous- 
ton. Beginning with small capital, Mrs. Shepherd 
gradually expanded, and now her business ranks 
as one of the finest and most exclusive ladies' 
ready-to-wear shops in Houston, with the most mod- 
ern fixtures, and an attractive shop, at 921 Main 
Street. The business was incorporated in 1921, 
with Mrs. Shepherd as President, Mrs. Thomas 
Irby, Vice President, and Eugene J. P. Shepherd, 
Secretary-Treasurer. Mrs. Shepherd draws her pa- 
tronage from Houston's most discriminating women, 
and has one of the finest showings of women's gar- 
ments in the city, including complete lines of all 
ladies' wearing apparel. 

Mrs. Shepherd is a native Texan, her birthplace 
having been the city of Palestine, where she gained 
her first business experience. Her father, the late 
J. A. Roussel, a native of Louisiana, was a business 
man of Temple for many years. Mrs. Roussel, 
whose maiden name was Eugenia Pool, was a native 
of Marian, Alabama. Mrs. Shepherd attended the 
schools of Texas. 
Mrs. Shepherd was married at Waco, Texas, the 





twenty-third of October, 1901, to Mr. C. M. Shep- 
herd, son of the late J. Gordon Shepherd and An- 
gelina (Foster) Shepherd, both natives of Mobile, 
Alabama. Mrs. Shepherd resides at 1210 Colquitt 
Street, and has three children — Eugene James Pool 
Shepherd, Cora Foster Shepherd and George Mc- 
Niel Shepherd. Mrs. Shepherd belongs to the Hous- 
ton Chamber of Commerce, the Altrusa Club and 
the Episcopal Church, and is a leader among busi- 
ness women of the city. 

JALLIE R. PRITCHARD, one of the most 
discriminating artists and enthusiastic rep- 
resentatives of the terpsichorean art at 
Houston, has in the several years that she 
has engaged in the teaching of dancing, built up 
a large and successful school. Miss Pritchard 
teaches dancing in all departments, giving special 
attention to classic dancing, physical culture and 
physical expression. She has a class of around 
two hundred pupils, each of whom she makes a 
special problem, giving attention to his individual 
needs. Miss Pritchard enters into the spirit of 
her work as a dancing teacher and inspires her 
pupils to seek the highest skill. She has received 
the best professional advantages, and from child- 
hood has displayed a marked talent in her chosen 
domain of art, her dancing showing a natural grace 
of interpretation, which is distinctive. In addition 
to her work as a teacher, Miss Pritchard is in de- 
mand for all public entertainments, and has shown 
herself very generous in contributing to various pro- 
grams. Her dancing has been for a number of 
years a feature at Shrine entertainments, as well 
as on other occasions. 

Hallie R. Pritchard was born the twenty-ninth of 
November, 1905, the daughter of Charles T. Pritch- 
ard and Byrona (McKeen) Pritchard. Her father 
came to Houston when she was a child of two years, 
and has since been in the rice brokerage business 
in this city. Mr. Pritchard is one of the veterans 
in this line, and one of the oldest rice men in the 
State. Her mother is a descendant of two of the 
oldest Texas families, the grand-daughter of Col. 
Henry F. Fisher and Col. A. C. McKeen, and Miss 
Pritchard is of the fifth generation of native Texans, 
and also a direct descendant of Thomas McKeen, one 
of the signers of the declaration of Independence of 
the United States. Miss Pritchard was educated in 
the Houston public schools, graduating from the 
High School here, after which she went to New 
York, where she studied dancing for two years under 
Miss Nellie Foglesang, of Long Island, later study- 
ing with Vestoff Sorova, of the Russian Ballet. Re- 
turning to her home she opened her studio, at 616 
Elgin Street, to selected pupils, and, since 1924, 
has occupied a studio at the corner of Rusk and 
Louisiana, constructed especially for her use. Miss 
Pritchard makes her home with her parents at 3406 
Travis Street, and attends the Episcopal Church, 
where she is a teacher in the Sunday School and 
an active worker in church affairs. She is an honor 
member of the Conopus Club. Miss Pritchard is 
always ready and willing to help in any entertain- 
ment, and on many occasions has given her aid in 
staging benefits and other events. As an artist, 
her work shows an earnestness, happily blended 
with a real talent, that delights her audiences, 
and she is one of the most admired dancers in the 
city. 



1285 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ILLIAN CULMORE, Teacher of Dramatic 
Art, Writer and Producer of Pageants, and 
Club woman, is recognized as one of the 
leading women of the State in all matters 
having to do with the education, progress and de- 
velopment of the citizenship of Texas. She has re- 
sided in Houston since she was six years of age, 
and has been teaching here for the past twelve 
years, and is considered the leading teacher in her 
line in South Texas. She is now establishing in 
Houston a school for Dramatic Art covering all 
branches of the work, and will have capable in- 
structors at the head of each department, and plans 
to make this the leading school of its kind in the 
entire Southwest. Lillian Culmore has one of the 
finest homes in Houston, which will be devoted to 
the school, and she will maintain a theater and con- 
duct dramas for the benefit of the pupils attending 
this school. Her pupils are not limited to Houston 
but many come from the surrounding towns in order 
to obtain instruction under the able guidance of this 
talented woman. She has produced seven big page- 
ants in Houston. She wrote and produced the Page- 
ant of Texas History, which had eight hundred 
people in the cast, and this colossal undertaking was 
a huge success. Numbering among the many page- 
ants which she has produced are "The Torch Bear- 
ers," with eighteen hundred people in the cast; "Blue 
Crusaders," with six hundred people, and "New Era," 
with nine hundred people in the cast. 

A native Texan, Lillian Culmore was born in San 
Antonio. Her father, H. P. Reed, a native of Louis- 
iana, was a large land owner and planter of Bexar 
County. Her mother was Miss Rose Bullock, a mem- 
ber of a prominent Alabama family. Her early 
education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of Houston, after which she entered the 
Academy of Dramatic Art of New York City as a 
student under Franklin H. Sargent; and has studied 
under the famous dramatic teacher, Theodore Ursler 
Irvine. She then became a student of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago in the Department of Oration. She 
then spent five years under the direction of Marie 
Ware Loughton, the Director and Manager of the 
Out Door Players of Boston, after which she at- 
tended the Egan Dramatic School at Los Angeles. 
Beginning in April of 1923 she has been associated 
with the School of the Theater of New York City. 

Lillian Culmore was married in Houston to Mr. 
March Culmore, capitalist and Vice President of the 
State National Bank. Mr. Culmore is a member of 
one of Houston's pioneer families, his father, Charles 
Culmore, was for many years one of the leading at- 
torneys of Houston. Her home is situated at 401 
Pierce Avenue, and is one of the most palatial in the 
city. Lillian Culmore is a member of the Woman's 
Club, the Ladies' Reading Club, the Girls' Musical 
Club, the Woman's Choral Club and the Houston Art 
League, in all of which she takes an active interest. 
She is a consistent and earnest worker of Trinity 
Episcopal Church. She has had many years of ex- 
perience along the line of dramatic work and is 
considered one of the best in this section of the coun- 
try, in fact she is recognized as a finished artist. 
She is truly a woman of exceptional talent, and has 
appeared in many of the larger cities of the country, 
where she has proved to be very popular with the 
lovers of dramatic art. She was Managing Director 
of "The Little Theater" in Houston during its active 




existence and this organization made wonderful 
progress under her able guidance. She represented 
the Texas Federation of Woman's Club in a cam- 
paign for the good roads movement, which resulted 
in the Good Roads Bill being passed by the Texas 
Legislature. She has the distinction of being the only 
woman ever to attempt this work. In addition to 
her many talents, Lillian Culmore is a woman who 
has rare business ability, is a lover of home, is do- 
mestically inclined in every way, and is in fact a 
woman's woman. 

ATHERINE ALLEN LIVELY, teacher and 
composer of music, has a number of years 
been engaged in teaching piano, and in the 
composition of music. Mrs. Lively is one 
of the best known and most accomplished artists 
in her line in Houston, being an acknowledged and 
accepted composer. She made her musical debut in 
Chicago under Allen Spencer, and has appeared in 
concert with Nicklia Sokoloff, violinist, in all the 
largest cities of Texas, and with Bruno Steindel and 
Hans Letz, violinist, Chicago Symphony Orchestra. 

Mrs. Lively is a daughter of Captain W. A. Allen, 
pioneer minister and resident of North Texas; he 
named the town of Clarendon and founded the 
Methodist College at that place. He was captain in 
the Civil War. Her mother was, prior to her mar- 
riage, Miss Emma Bangs Carhart, a member of a 
prominent New York family, very musical and 
highly educated. Mrs. Lively inherited her mother's 
musical talent, and at the age of six years played 
the piano, and demonstrated to her teachers and 
others that she was a musician by nature. This, 
with her educational advantages has made of her 
an exceptional artist. Numbered among the mas- 
ters with whom she has studied are Allen Spencer 
of the Chicago Conservatory of Music, Earnest 
Kroeger of St. Louis, Arne Oldberg of Chicago, 
Wagner Swayne in Paris, France, Josef Lhevinne, 
Ernesto Consolo in Europe and William McCoy. Af- 
ter returning from Europe, Katherine Allen Lively 
was for a period of two years musical editor of the 
Houston Chronicle and in the same position for the 
Houston Post for one year. During the period that 
Mrs. Lively was engaged strictly in teaching, she 
turned out some very accomplished pupils, both in 
Houston and the surrounding towns who came to 
this city in order to obtain her services as an in- 
structor. She does much community work along 
musical lines, and has played for all the club and 
societies in Houston. For the past four years Mrs. 
Lively has given a large share of her time to com- 
position, and has been recognized in New York as 
one of the coming American composers since 1923. 
Numbers now being used extensively are, "Within 
The Walls of China," "LaClavel," "Pekita," and her 
latest song, published this year "Texas," a patriotic 
song, published in Houston. Mrs. Lively is the first 
Texas woman to have a composition accepted for the 
Ampico. "Within The Walls of China," is now re- 
leased over this instrument, and is also used in the 
finer moving picture theaters throughout America. 

Katherine Allen Lively is popular, not only in the 
musical circles of Houston, but with all who have 
the pleasure of knowing her. She organized the 
Junior Music Study Club, and is an enthusiastic 
worker in this organization, and is an honor mem- 
ber of the Salesmanship Club. 



1286 




^iX^c^t^c^. 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




1R. JOHN L. DICKENS, one of the best known 
educators, not only of Texas but through- 
out the country, came to Houston in 1918 
and established the Houston Bible Institute, 
of which he is president and owner, at 511 West Ala- 
bama Avenue. The Houston Bible Institute occu- 
pies a splendid two-story building of hollow inter- 
locking tile and stucco, which was built for the pur- 
pose of this school and is fifty-four feet by sixty 
feet in size and is one of the most modern estab- 
lishments in the country devoted to education. It 
is especially well lighted and ventilated throughout 
and constructed with a view of facilitating the work 
of both teachers and pupils. Dr. Dickens owns this 
building and the ground on which it was erected. 
This institute was established for the purpose of 
teaching the Bible, God's word and Christianity. 
Four teachers, who are especially well versed in 
Bible history, are employed and one hundred and 
twenty-five pupils are in attendance. The institute 
also has one of the largest and most complete 
libraries to be found in a college of its kind in the 
country. This is a growing institution and like all 
others, it takes time in which to acquaint the public 
with their object and purpose, and Dr. Dickens has 
succeeded in doing this. 

Dr. Dickens was born in Gibson County, Tennes- 
see. His father, Robert G. Dickens, was a farmer 
and large land owner of that state. His mother was 
Miss Mary M. Dickey, a member of a well known 
Tennessee family. Dr. Dickens' early education was 
obtained in the common schools of Gibson County 
and the high school at Newbern, Tennessee. He 
then entered Bethel College at McKenzie, Tennessee, 
where he remained for five years and graduated 
from that institution with the degree of B. A. He 
then became a student at the Lane Theological Sem- 
inary at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained for two 
years and then entered Cumberland University, 
where he remained for one year and received the 
B. D. degree. Dr. Dickens at this time was elected as 
professor at Bethel College and was later made pres- 
ident of this well known institution and remained 
with this college for a period of nine years. He 
then came to Texas as president of the Trinity Uni- 
versity, where he remained for one year, and then 
went to Weatherford, Texas, as president of the 
Young Ladies College at that place, where he re- 
mained for one year. Following this, Dr. Dickens 
returned to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where he re- 
mained for one year; also at Dyer, Tennessee, for 
two years and then in Kentucky and Mississippi, 
making a total of five years that he was away from 
Texas. In 1908, he returned to the Lone Star State 
and was pastor of a church in Galveston and South 
Houston for a period of ten years and then estab- 
lished the Houston Bible Institute. Dr. Dickens now 
has the degree of Ph. D. from Cumberland Univer- 
sity of Lebanon, Tennessee, the M. A. degree from 
McKendric College of Lebanon, Illinois, the L. L. D. 
degree from Butler College at Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and degree of S. T. D. from the University of Har- 
riman at Harriman, Tennessee. 

Dr. Dickens has been twice married. His first 
marriage was in Gibson County, Tennessee, to Miss 
Mattie J. Tiner, who died in Quanah, Texas, in 1893. 
Dr. Dickens was married the second time in 1895 
at Nesbitt, Mississippi, to Miss Mary E. Bridgeforth, 
a daughter of Oliver Bridgeforth, a prominent cot- 




ton planter of Mississippi. Dr. Dickens has two 
children, J. Ernest Dickens, thirty-two years of age, 
and Mrs. J. H. Shively. Dr. Dickens is a member 
of the A. F. & A. M., being a Master Mason of that 
order. He is a staunch and consistent member of 
the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Dickens has great 
faith in the future of Houston and believes that it 
will soon become the leading city of the Southwest. 
OY G. WATSON, former president and pub- 
lisher of the Houston Post, needs no intro- 
duction to the people of Texas, where for 
a period of eight years he conducted one of 
the leading metropolitan dailies of the Lone Star 
State, and during which period of time he was a 
potent factor in every important issue, political, civic 
and commercial, which had a bearing upon the de- 
velopment and progress of the South Texas metropo- 
lish, which was the city of his birth, and in which 
he had spent the greater part of his life. A chron- 
icle of the achievements of men of Houston who 
are deserving of creditable mention in the annals 
of Houston history would be incomplete without a 
brief resume of the part which he and his father, 
J. L. Watson, played in this rapidly growing metro- 
polis. The Houston Post has long been an impor- 
tant institution in the development of this city and 
has been under the control of the Watson family for 
over two score years. The Post was first established 
by J. L. Watson, Professor T. J. Girardeau and Dr. 
Young in 1885. The two former gentlemen, prior 
to that time had been proprietors of an afternoon 
paper known as the Herald, while Dr. Young was 
the owner of the Chronicle. The two newspapers 
were consolidated under the name of the Houston 
Post. This newspaper had its periods of financial 
tribulations, but due to the efficient management 
of J. L. Watson, was piloted through to a successful 
position which it always maintained as Houston's 
leading morning newspaper. 

A native Texan, Roy G. Watson was born in Hous- 
ton December 27th, 1890. His father, J. L. Wat- 
son, who was a newspaper man, came to this city 
from Kentucky in 1875. His mother, nee Nettie May 
Phillips, was a member of a well known Louisiana 
family. Mr. Watson received his elementary educa- 
tion in the schools of Lawrenceville, New Jersey, 
later attending Princeton University, graduating 
with the degree of Litt. B. in the class of 1914. He 
then returned to Houston, becoming associated with 
the Houston Publishing Company, Inc. He was 
made treasurer of this company in 1914 and in 1916 
became president of the company, which was the 
publishers of the Houston Post. Mr. Watson, on 
taking charge of this daily inaugurated many new 
and progressive ideas. He had ideas and ideals of 
his own and fearlessly championed any cause which 
he considered right, irrespectfve of the consequences. 
He successfully piloted the Post through a period 
of political discord and built up a reputation of being 
one of the cleanest dailies in the country. Mr. Wat- 
son sold the controlling interest in the Post in July, 
1924 and retired from active newspaper work. He 
spent a year traveling abroad, combining a pleas- 
ure seeking trip with the study of the economic 
conditions throughout the European countries. He 
has built a new home in Asheville, North Carolina, 
where he expects to reside a portion of his time, 
but still maintains his business interests in Houston. 



1289 



MEN OF TEXAS 




|RS. ROBERT L. COX came to Houston in 
1904 and since that time has been active 
in the music circles of the city, where she 
was one of the leading teachers of voice, but 
she is now devoting her entire time to the Treble 
Clef Club, of which organization she is Musical Di- 
rector and Director General. The Treble Clef Club 
was started in 1892 and has about two hundred 
members. This club has brought to Houston more 
of the leading artists to appear in public concert 
than any other organization in the city. Mrs. Cox 
has been one of the leading teachers in Houston, but 
has practically retired from teaching and devotes 
all of her time to the management of the Treble 
Clef Club, the success of which is largely due to her 
untiring efforts in enlisting the co-operation of her 
associates. She became associated with this club 
twelve years ago and it has, under her able guid- 
ance and supervision, become one of the leading 
musical organizations in the South. In devoting her 
entire time, efforts and accomplishments to the 
club, she is doing so without remuneration, but for 
the good of the club. Mrs. Cox has brought to 
Houston personally many of the most noted artists 
of the present day; among this number are Pader- 
ewski, John McCormack, Louis Graveure and Erika 
Marini. The artists that have been brought to 
Houston for the Treble Clef Club, under the per- 
sonal supervision of Mrs. Cox are numbered: Schu- 
mann-Heink, Nordica, Davis Bispham, Galli Curci, 
Alma Gluck, Albert Spaulding, Ignaz Friedman, 
Arthur Middleton, Pasquala Matzenauer, Frances 
Alda, Mary Garden, Florence Hinkle, Heifitz, Fritz 
Kreisler, Louis Graveure, Mischa Elman, Paul Alt- 
house, Frank LaForge, Cyrena Van Gordon, Salvi 
(the world's greatest harpist), Florence Macbeth 
and many others. Mrs. Cox is the originator of the 
Morning Musicales at the Rice Hotel, which were 
first given under her personal supervision, and have 
proven to be extremely popular and entertaining. 

A native Texan, Mrs. Cox was born at Corsicana. 
Her father, John Anderson, was at one time one of 
the cattle kings of Texas, and was widely known, 
not only in Texas, but in other states as well. Her 
mother was Miss Linnie Dixon, a member of a well 
known Texas family, a descendant of Dr. William 
Dixon, who built the third home in Corsicana and 
who was the first person to be buried in the ceme- 
tery at that place. Mrs. Cox has had an exceptional 
and unusual education, which began in the public 
and high schools of Corsicana and later was a stu- 
dent of the Athenean School for Girls at Columbia, 
Tennessee, where she completed her literary and 
academic courses. She then entered the College of 
Music at Cincinnati, where she remained for a num- 
ber of years, studying voice under Lino Mattioli and 
conducting, in which she has been highly successful, 
under Frank Van Der Stucken and Tecla Vigna. 
She then went to London, England, and studied for 
one season under George Henschel. Following her 
studies under Henschel, she studied for one season 
under Ira Aldrich, who is a cousin of the famous 
Jennie Lind, and one of the foremost instructors in 
the world. She then spent one season as a pupil of 
Oscar Seagle and went to Paris, France, where she 
was for two seasons under Lloyd D'Aubigne, and 
returned to Chicago, where she spent one season as 
a pupil of David Bispham. 

Mrs. Cox was married in Houston in 1905 to Dr. 




Robert L. Cox, who is one of the leading physicians 
and surgeons of Houston. They have one child, 
Lavoy Cox. The Cox home is at 1116 Jefferson 
Avenue, where Mrs. Cox has one of the most at- 
tractive studios in the State. Mrs. Cox has always 
been popular in the music circles of Houston and it 
is a loss to the music-loving people of the city and 
the citizenship in general, that Mrs. Cox has retired 
from active teaching, as she was regarded as one 
of the best instructors in South Texas, and many of 
the best musicians of the city obtained their musical 
education under her able guidance and supervision. 
One of her pupils is now teaching in New York City, 
with a studio in the Metropolitan Opera House Build- 
ing. 

ISS ANN FRANCES SPROULE. Miss Ann 
Frances Sproule has for the twelve years 
past been a resident of Beaumont, Texas, 
where she is the head of the Sproule School 
of Dancing, one of the largest and most efficient 
of its kind in South Texas, and the only one in the 
city. The studio is at Harmony Hall, Fannin Street, 
between Orleans and Park. 

Miss Sproule is ably assisted by her sister, Judith 
Trueheart Sproule, who has had the advantages of 
study under the same famous instructors and is also 
regarded as a most accomplished artist. 

The Misses Sproule go east, each year, and have 
taught in the Normal School of the American Na- 
tional Society of Dancing Masters and at their con- 
ventions, held in Los Angeles, California (1923), 
Chicago, Illinois (1924), and in Cleveland, Ohio 
(1925). 

The pupils of the Sproule School of Dancing range 
in age from three and one-half years on up to adults. 
The attendance is not confined to residents of Beau- 
mont, for many pupils come from other cities and 
towns, to obtain instruction, under the able tutelage 
of the Misses Sproule. 

Classes in Greek interpretative, classical ballet, 
acrobatic, American tap, musical comedy and mod- 
ern ball room dancing are conducted daily. 

A native Texan, Miss Sproule was born at Gal- 
veston. Her mother, Frances Garland Trueheart, 
was a member of a pioneer Texas family, one of the 
most prominent in the state. Her father, Henry 
Fletcher Sproule, was a native of Liverpool, Eng- 
land, who later became a well known cotton broker 
of the Island City. Miss Sproule's academic educa- 
tion was obtained in the public and high schools of 
Galveston and later she studied in England, Germany 
and France. 

Miss Sproule is a member of the American Na- 
tional Association of Dancing Masters and is the 
state supervisor for this organization. 

Among the masters of the art of dancing, under 
whom the Misses Sproule have studied, are Stefano 
Mascagno, Fokine, Chalif, Vestoff Serova, Oscar 
Duryea, Norma Gould of California, Ginner-Mawer 
and Espinosa, the last two of London. 

The Misses Sproule are popular in social circles 
of Beaumont and throughout the state, where they 
have a host of friends. They are ardent workers 
in all civic activities and ever ready to donate their 
art to charity or for the progress and advancement 
of their city and state. 



1290 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




ILLIAM LEWIS SACHTLEBEN came to 
Houston in 1911, and since that time has 
become well-known and popular in the the- 
atrical and advertising circles. At this time 
he is engaged in advertising pursuits, devoting most 
of his attention to the publicity of the Palace and 
Majestic Theaters of this city. For eleven years he 
occupied the position of manager of the Majestic 
Theater, now known as the Palace Theater. Here 
he gained invaluable experience, which is srving him 
in his present capacity. Being familiar with every 
department of the theater, he has become successful 
in his present field, realizing that the success or 
failure of a theatrical enterprise pretty much de- 
pends upon the advertising department. 

Mr. Sachtleben was born in Alton, Illinois, on 
March 29th, 1866. His father, William Sachtleben, 
was engaged in the mercantile business for many 
years, but thirty years ago retired from active 
business pursuits, and died in California at the age 
of ninety years. His mother was Miss Amelia 
Ubert, a member of a prominent Illinois family. His 
early education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of Illinois, and later he became a student 
of Smith Academy of St. Louis, where he remained 
for three years. He then entered Washington Uni- 
versity, where he remained for four years, and grad- 
uated from this institution in the class of 1890 with 
the degree of B. A. After finishing college, Mr. 
Sachtleben, with a classmate, Thomas G. Allen, 
started and finished a tour of the world on bicy- 
cles, and three years were required to make the 
trip. On this trip they visited every country in 
the world and all of the principal cities; many thrill- 
ing experiences were encountered on the trip, but 
nothing of a serious nature happened to these ad- 
venture-filled boys. This is on record as the only 
instance in which a feat of this kind has ever been 
accomplished. They were entertained by Kings, No- 
blemen, and people of note in every country. They 
have written several books on their travels; these 
books have been published and are sold all over 
the world. From 1897 to 1899, Mr. Sachtleben was 
in Alaska, and from 1900 to 1910 in Canada with 
the Osborne Company, in the advertising business. 
Mr. Sachtleben was married in St. Louis in 1903 
to Miss Mae Merriman, a member of a prominent 
Missouri family. Mr. and Mrs. Sachtleben reside 
at 4819 San Jacinto Street. Mr. Sachtleben is a 
member of the B. P. O. E. and takes an active in- 
terest in this organization. Mr. Sachtleben has 
made many friends in Houston and in South Texas, 
where he is recognized as a man of personality. 
In addition to his having traveled the wide world 
over, and having seen and experienced it all, Mr. 
Sachtleben is a linguist, speaking, reading and writ- 
ing many languages. 

ID. A. GREENBLATT is well known in the 
theatrical circles of the country and has 
been engaged in the show business all his 
life, the greater part of this time as a 
manager. For about ten years he has been asso- 
ciated with the Saenger Amusement Company, 
managing various theatres for them. For several 
years he was the popular manager of the Isis 
Theatre in Houston. In Monroe, Louisiana, he is 
taking the same keen interest in giving the people 
the very best in the amusement line. 

Mr. Greenblatt was born at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, 





April 24th, 1879. His father, M. Greenblatt, was 
well known in the business circles of that city. 
His mother was Miss Carrie Winter, a member of 
a prominent Pine Bluff family. His education was 
obtained in the public and high schools of Shreve- 
port, Louisiana. Soon after leaving school, Mr. 
Greenblatt entered the theatrical business and for 
ten years was connected with the Grand Opera 
House at Shreveport. He then went with Ehrlich 
Brothers and Coleman, and had ten theatres in 
Louisiana and Mississippi and managed a theatre 
at Monroe, Louisiana, for ten years. He was also 
with Innes Band and other road attractions through 
the South. In 1916, Mr. Greenblatt went with the 
Saenger Amusement Company, and in 1918 was sent 
to Houston as manager of the Isis Theatre, where 
he made many friends and where he is highly re- 
garded. 

Mr. Greenblatt is a member of the B. P. O. E., and 
takes an active interest in civic affairs. 

ILIFFORD E. DRESCHER, musician and 
teacher and owner of the Drescher Studio 
of Music at 1416 Alabama Avenue, while 
one of the youngest of Houston's prominent 
musicians, has established a wide reputation as a 
teacher and director since coming to this city in 
August, 1919. Mr. Drescher is a teacher of the saxa- 
phone, flute, violin and banjo and has over one hun- 
dred pupils studying these various instruments. He 
also has a large orchestra which is available for 
special occasions. 

Mr. Drescher was born at Spencer, Indiana, in 
1889 and is a son of Francis E. and Stella (Martin) 
Drescher. His father has been engaged in business 
at Spencer for a number of years, controlling a 
large furniture and undertaking establishment there. 

After receiving his literary education in the pub- 
lic schools and the high school at Spencer, Mr. 
Drescher entered the Metropolitan School of Music 
at Indianapolis, Indiana, where he studied for three 
years. He studied the flute under P. L. Montani and 
the violin under Walter Coffey and Albert Chevrot, 
the latter a first prize graduate of the Conservatory 
of Music at Paris, France. 

Enlisting in the United States army in June, 1918, 
in the air service, Mr. Drescher was assigned for 
training at Camp Dick, Dallas, and shortly after was 
transferred to the band, becoming a member of the 
famous Camp Dick musical organization which at- 
tained wide prominence during the war. He was in 
service for nine months and received his discharge 
at Camp Dick in February, 1919. In August of that 
year he came to Houston where he has been actively 
engaged in teaching since. 

Among the notable achievements of Mr. Drescher 
was the organization of the Houston Saxaphone 
Club, an organization composed of over sixty mem- 
bers and constituting the largest saxaphone club in 
the South. This is one of the best musical organ- 
izations in the city and under the directorship of 
Mr. Drescher has achieved a wide reputation and 
met with wonderful receptions on every public ap- 
pearance. 

Mr. Drescher is intensely interested in develop- 
ment of the musical life of Houston and is ever 
ready to lend his aid to any movement in this direc- 
tion. He is unmarried and is very popular in mu- 
sical and social circles of the city. He is a member 
of the Musician's Union. 



1291 



MEN OF TEXAS 




C. BARKLEY was born in Hill County, 
Texas, his birthplace being the little town 
of Itasca, and his birthday being Septem- 
ber 27th, that was in the year 1880. When 
he was a small child his family removed to Cherokee, 
in San Saba County, Texas, where he received the 
rudiments of an academic education at the West 
Texas Normal and Business College, of which F. M. 
Behrns was the head. 

With this equipment young Barkley began to 
make his own way, and he has been doing that ever 
since. When 16 years of age he began teaching 
school, alternating his employment in the summer 
months with the occupation of cowboy. He continued 
to double time, teaching in the winters and working 
on the ranches in the summers, until he reached the 
age of 22. All during these years he saved his earn- 
ings, he saved them because he had an objective. 
That objective was a law degree from a university. 
His opportunity came in 1902, when he entered the 
University of Texas, graduating from the law de- 
partment in June, 1904. 

In the early part of 1905 he moved to Houston, 
and is now one of the most prominent members of 
the bar of that city. While he is now but 43 years of 
age, he has taken high rank in his profession. 
Among the many large and important cases in which 
he has participated with distinction may be mention- 
ed the Red River boundary litigation between the 
States of Oklahoma and Texas, which went to the 
Supreme Court of the United States. 

Probably no member of the Houston bar has had 
a more varied legal experience than Mr. Barkley. 
He is a tireless worker, which, added to a natural- 
ly keen intellect, has made his opinions regarding 
complicated legal questions much sought after, his 
rugged honesty has added to the respect that is 
paid to them by the other members of his profes- 
sion. In a large measure his success has been due 
to the fact that he always appreciated the value of 
work, and no man has received more handsome 
dividends from this same hard work than has Mr. 
Barkley. But work, like most taskmasters that are 
able to pay rewards, never pays a dividend until a 
dividend is due. By this rule it may be safely said 
that the dividends of hard work are now due to 
K. C. Barkley, because he is receiving today divi- 
dends in the shape of a splendid law practice, the 
respect of his fellow men, and the rewards of suc- 
cess. All this may be traced back to the deter- 
mined work began when he was a 16-year-old boy, 
which effort has never decreased. 

Twenty years ago the young law student came 
to Houston. With the passing of those twenty years 
has passed the youngster who was inexperienced, 
and his place has been taken by a man whose in- 
tellect has ripened until today he is able to success- 
fully unravel the legal knots that tie themselves 
around the affairs of men. 

His father's name is J. N. Barkley. He now lives 
in Denver, Colorado. His mother's maiden name 
was Laura McCorkle; she has been dead many 
years. 

Mr. Barkley was married at Houston, in 1909, to 
Miss Nellie Bryant. They have three children — 
Ruth, Frances and Keitt, Junior. Mr. Barkley was 
a Sigma Nu Phi, at the University of Texas, is a 
member of the University Club and the Houston 
•Club, and fraternally is a Mason, 32nd degree, Scot- 




tish Rite, and is a member of Arabia Temple Shrine 
at Houston. He is active in religious and educa- 
tional life at Houston, and is a member of the Bap- 
tist Church. 

RS. K. C. BARKLEY is well known in the 
social and club circles of Houston and 
throughout the state, and is past president 
of the Treble Clef Club, one of the oldest 
and best known musical organizations in the city. 
The Treble Clef Club was organized in 1894, and 
has for its object the development, education and 
promotion of the Art of Music, and is supported, 
both morally and financially by the best people of 
Houston. Many of the great artists have been 
brought to Houston to appear in concert under the 
auspices of this club, and owing to the large seating 
capacity of the City Auditorium the prices of these 
concerts were much cheaper for the public, than 
in other cities. Mrs. Barkley was president of this 
club from 1922 to 1924, and during this period the 
club accomplished wonderful things, under the able 
guidance of its accomplished and hard-working 
president. 

Mrs. Barkley was born in Tennessee, but has 
been a resident of Houston since her early girl- 
hood. Her literary education was obtained in the 
public and high school of Houston. For many years 
she has studied music under able teachers, and is 
still a student of music. Mrs. Barkley is an accom- 
plished vocalist, and according to the great artists, 
has a wonderful voice. 

Mrs. Barkley was married in Houston to Keitt 
Carson Barkley, a prominent attorney of Houston. 
They have three children — Ruth, Frances Marion 
and Keitt Carson Barkley, Jr. She is a member 
of the Girls' Musical Club and of the Heights 
Woman's Clubs. Mrs. Barkley is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Christian Science Church and for many 
years has been a solo singer in this church. Mrs. 
Barkley has always been an active worker for the 
education and development of music in Houston, 
where she is very popular, not only in the music 
circles of the city, but with all who are fortunate 
enough to know her. She is active also in all mat- 
ters having to do with the civic improvement of 
Houston, and gives liberally of her time and accom- 
plishments to all public entertainments for the good 
of her city. 

ILLIAM H. HOGUE is well known in the 
financial and manufacturing circles not 
only in Houston, where he is general man- 
ager of the Magnus Company, Inc., but in 
the entire state, and Louisiana, where for the past 
fifteen years he has had charge of this territory. 
The Magnus Company, Inc., are makers of railroad 
locomotive brass and bronze castings, car journal 
bearings, logging car bearings, and brass and bronze 
equipment of all kinds. The plant of the Magnus 
Company, Inc., located at 1415 Hardy Street, was 
established in Houston in 1908, although the head- 
quarters of this company remained in Chicago and 
New York City. The Houston plant was small at 
first, but the business grew rapidly from the begin- 
ning, and they now have substantial buildings with 
sixteen thousand square feet of floor space and thir- 
ty thousand square feet of ground on which the 
buildings are located, making the Magnus Company, 
Inc. the largest plant of its kind in the South. In 




1292 




"M*y$i$c 




NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 



addition to their manufacturing department, they 
have a complete laboratory and testing department, 
and have in their plant between six thousand and 
seven thousand patterns. They have their own 
railroad switch trackage into their plant, and employ 
sixty-five people, many of whom are very high class 
artisans. 

Mr. Hogue was born in Columbus, Indiana, in 1877. 
His parents, Frank O. Hogue and Louise Hogue, 
were well known citizens of Columbus, where his 
father was for many years engaged in the drug busi- 
ness. His education was obtained in the public and 
high schools of Columbus, graduating from the lat- 
ter in 1897. After leaving school, Mr. Hogue began 
his business career with the Vandalia Railroad, 
where he remained for five years. He then spent 
one year in the office of the assistant general super- 
intendent of the Illinois Central Railroad, after 
which he went to St. Louis where he entered the em- 
ploy of the Commonwealth Trust Company and re- 
mained with this company for two years. He then 
became associated with the Magnus Company, Inc. 
in their St. Louis office, and remained there for 
two years. In 1909 he came to Houston as general 
manager of the Magnus Company, Inc. plant here. 

Mr. Hogue was married in Houston in June, 1914, 
to Florence Marion Kent. The Hogue residence is 
at 5511 Jackson Street. Mr. Hogue is a member 
of the York Rite body of the A. F. and A. M. and 
is a member of Arabia Temple. He is associated 
with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
is past president of the Rotary Club, and holds 
membership in the Houston Club. Mr. Hogue is a 
staunch and consistent member of the Episcopal 
Church. He is prominent in all activities that are 
projected for the civic betterment, advancement and 
progress of Houston, which he believes is destined 
to be the leading city of the Southwest. 

OHN H. ROACH, a resident of Hour ton for 
a number of years, has been a factor in 
the insurance business here, his construc- 
fLJ tive policies building up one of the largest 
insurance agencies in the city. Mr. Roach is the 
owner of the insurance business conducted under 
the name of John H. Roach & Company, a business 
established in 1919, as Gantt, Roach p.id Means. In 
1922 Mr. Roach bought out the interests of his as- 
sociates, changing the name to John H. Roach & 
Company, and has since operated the business alone. 
Mr. Roach represents six established insurance com- 
panies, writing fire, casualty, surety, bonding, tor- 
nado, and other forms of insurance. His business 
is exclusively local, and he annually writes a large 
volume of business on the books of the companies 
he represents. Mr. Roach has his offices in the 
Mason building. 

John H. Roach was born at Kahoka, Missouri, the 
second of October, 1885, the son of James H. and 
Hattie (Martin) Roach. The father, James H. Roach, 
a native of Illinois, engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Kahoka for a number of years, later enter- 
ing the real estate and insurance business, in which 
he was active until 1909, when he retired and moved 
to Houston. Mrs. Roach is a native of Kahoka. 
John H. Roach attended the public schools of Keokuk, 
Iowa, and, after leaving school, went with his 
father in the real estate and insurance business, re- 
ceiving his early business training under him. Later 





he engaged in the construction and engineering busi- 
ness for a year and a half. In 1908 he came to 
Texas, going to Matagorda County, where he was 
secretary to John E. Pierce, one of the biggest 
cattlemen of Texas. Later he went with the Bless- 
ing State Bank, of which Mr. Pierce is the largest 
stockholder. He was associated with Mr. Pierce 
until 1914, during these years handling insurance 
on the side. In 1914 Mr. Roach entered the insur- 
ance business in Matagorda County, giving his time 
exclusively to this work, and in 1916, went to New 
Orleans, where he spent one year with an insurance 
firm of that city. In 1917 he came to Houston, and 
was connected with various insurance firms here 
until 1919, when he went in business for himself. 
Mr. Roach was married at Austin, Texas, the 
eighth of December, 1915, to Miss Maude S. Clark, 
a native of Lincoln, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Roach 
reside in Houston, at 1407 Nebraska Avenue, and 
have five children, Hattie Maud, John H., Jr., Mary 
Stella, Charles Elmore and Leone Roach. Mr. Roach 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus, Fourth De- 
gree, the Knights of Columbus Luncheon Club, and 
the Salesmanship Club. 

ERBERT BARTELL has for more than a 
quarter of a century been identified with 
the business interests of Houston, where 
prior to the establishment of the Bartell 
Warehouse Company, Inc., he was for many years 
engaged in the real estate business in the city. 
Mr. Bartell is president and general manager of 
the Bartell Warehouse Company, Inc., and is en- 
gaged in moving and handling and storage of all 
kinds, but pays special attention to the moving 
and storage of household goods. They have four 
large trucks and five two-horse wagons in use in 
their work, and employ from twenty to thirty people 
at all times. Their commodious storage warehouse 
is located at Williams and Sterrett Streets. This 
business, located at 1105 Franklin Avenue, was 
established under the name of Scanlan and Bartell 
in 1897, and was incorporated and changed to the 
present name in 1917. Other officers of the Bar- 
tell Warehouse Company, Inc., are S. H. Green, 
vice-president, (inactive) and I. J. Howth, secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

Mr. Bartell was born in Denver, Colorado, August 
21st, 1880. His father, A. H. Bartell, also a native 
of Colorado, came to Texas and to Houston in 1893 
and resided here until his death. His mother was 
Miss Mary Branscomb, a native of Iowa. The pub- 
lic schools af Denver and Houston supplied the foun- 
dation for Mr. Bartell's education, and a course in 
a Houston business college provided him with his 
early business training. 

Mr. Bartell began his business career in 1897 
when seventeen years of age, in the real estate bus- 
iness with P. E. Scanlan, where he met with success 
and became well known as a practical real estate 
dealer. Later with Mr. Scanlan he engaged in the 
present business, and this partnership continued 
until 1915. The business was conducted independ- 
ently for a period of two years, and then incorpo- 
rated under the name of the Bartell Warehouse 
Company, Inc. Mr. Bartell has always been active 
in the business, social and general community life 
of Houston, and is interested in all agencies having 
to do with the progress and advancement of this 
city. 



1297 



MEN OF TEXAS 




EWIS R. BRYAN, senior member of the 
law firm of Bryan, Dyess and Colgin, of 
Houston, through his activities and success 
in the handling of noteworthy cases in the 
courts of the country, is one of the best known 
attorneys in Texas. Mr. Bryan was admitted to 
the bar in 1880 and immediately began the prac- 
tice of his profession. The law firm of Bryan, 
Dyess and Colgin, located on the eighth floor of the 
Second National Bank Building, is engaged in a 
general civil practice and are considered among the 
leading law firms of the state. Mr. Bryan has been 
identified with many cases of interest and value to 
the profession. 

A native Texan, Mr. Bryan was born in Brazoria 
County in 1858. His ancestors, both paternal and 
maternal, were among the very early settlers of 
the Lone Star State. His father, Moses Austin 
Bryan, came to Texas from Missouri in 1831. He 
was a nephew of Stephen F. Austin and was with 
General Sam Houston at San Jacinto and acted as 
interpreter for General Houston when the Mexican 
General Santa Anna was brought before him. His 
grandfather, Moses Austin, obtained permission 
from Mexico to colonize Texas with Anglo-Saxons in 
1820. After his death, this work was carried on 
by Stephens F. Austin. His mother was Miss Cora 
Lewis. Her family came to Texas in 1831. Her 
father, Colonel Ira Randolph Lewis, was an attor- 
ney and was a member of the Consultation Commit- 
tee in 1835. Mr. Lewis, with T. J. Chambers, was 
selected to endeavor to raise volunteers to come to 
the aid of Texas. 

Mr. Bryan's education was obtained in private 
schools, and later he attended Baylor University, 
graduating from that institution in 1877 with the 
B. S. degree. Mr. Bryan studied law under the law 
firm of Shepard and Garrett at Brenham, also under 
General John Sayles and Judge James E. Shepard. 
After his admission to the bar in April, 1880, he 
immediately took his place with ambitious beginners 
and able, seasoned advocates who already had made 
their mark. Mr. Bryan selected the town of La 
Grange in which to begin the practice of his pro- 
fession, where he remained for two years. He then 
returned to Brenham where he practiced law from 
1882 to 1890. From 1890 to 1901 Mr. Bryan was 
engaged in his practice at Velasco and Angleton and 
in January of 1901 removed to Houston, where in 
addition to his profession he has been closely con- 
nected with the commercial interests of the city and 
is president of the Colonial Land and Loan Company. 
Mr. Bryan was married in Brenham in 1891 to 
Miss Mattie Shepard, a native of Washington Coun- 
ty and a member of a prominent pioneer Texas 
family. Her father, Chauncy B. Shepard, came to 
Texas in 1837. Mr. and Mrs. Bryan have three chil- 
dren, L. Randolph Bryan, Jr., who is assistant vice 
president of the Second National Bank; Mrs. Paul 
G. Bell, wife of Lieutenant Paul G. Bell, of the reg- 
ular army, and Miss Cora Louise Bryan, at home 
with her parents. At the Diamond Jubilee of Austin 
College, Sherman, Texas, the degree of L. L. D. was 
bestowed upon Mr. Bryan by the trustees of that 
institution. 

The Bryan home is located at 802 Dennis Avenue. 

Mr. Bryan served as president of the State Bar 

Association in 1902-1903 and afterwards of the Har- 




ris County Bar Association. He is a member of the 
American Bar Association, the State Bar Associa- 
tion and the Houston Bar Association. 

His belief is in the Episcopal faith. Mr. Bryan's 
mature experience, wise counsel, sterling qualities 
of character, and high ideals have ever been an in- 
spiration to his friends. Genial, companionable, un- 
selfish, kind, his life has been delicately interwoven 
into the fabric of the good fellowship of Houston, 
where he is loved and respected by the entire 
citizenship. 

D. DYESS, Attorney at Law, a member of 
the well known firm of Bryan, Dyess & 
Colgin, is one of the younger members of 
the legal fraternity of Houston and in com- 
ing to this city in 1917 added an element of strength 
and purpose to the upbuilding of legal forces of 
the city. Mr. Dyess brought with him an experience 
gained as prosecuting attorney of Bell County and 
at once took his place among the men whose activi- 
ties are advancing the city's importance. The firm 
of Bryan, Dyess & Colgin are attorneys for the 
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company, Empire Gas and Fuel 
Company, Finnegan Estate, Farmers Life Insurance 
Company and many of the leading citizens and com- 
mercial interests of Houston, and is regarded as one 
of the leading law firms of the city. 

A native Texan, Mr. Dyess was born at Holland, 
Bell County, October 23rd, 1885. His father, J. 
B. Dyess, was a well known merchant of Holland, 
Texas, and Mr. Dyess' grandfather came to Louis- 
iana after the Battle of New Orleans. His mother 
was Miss Lula Geneva Stone, a native of Missis- 
sippi. His early education was obtained in the pub- 
lic and high schools of Holland, Texas. He has 
the distinction of having entered Baylor Univer- 
sity at the age of sixteen years, and graduated from 
that institution in the class of 1906 with the Ph. B. 
degree; he graduated from Yale in 1908 with the 
A. B. degree, and from the University of Texas in 
1910 with the degree of L. L. B. During the same 
year of his graduation from the law department of 
the University of Texas, Mr. Dyess established his 
home and office in Temple, Bell County, Texas, and 
began the practice of his profession alone, and con- 
tinued a general civil practice of law there until 
1912, when he entered the office of prosecuting at- 
torney and served in this office until 1916, when he 
again entered private practice. He continued his pri- 
vate practice at Temple for one year when he came 
to Houston, becoming associated with the present 
firm which at that time was called Hutcheson & 
Bryan. In 1918 the firm name became Hutcheson, 
Bryan & Dyess and remained so until June, 1922, 
when Captain Hutcheson retired, and the firm took 
its present name. 

Mr. Dyess was married in Houston on October 
17, 1912, to Miss Nellie Rucker, a native of the 
Lone Star State and a daughter of W. G. Rucker, 
prominent in the real estate circles of Houston. 
They have one son — A. D. Dyess, Jr. Mr. Dyess is 
connected with many of the commercial interests 
of the city and is a director in the Houston Building 
and Loan Association, and also of Doullot & Wil- 
liams, Inc., contractors and engineers. Mr. Dyess 
holds membership in the State Bar Association, the 
County Bar Association, the Houston Country Club, 
the University Club, the Yale Alumni Association 
and several other organizations and fraternities. 



1298 




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NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




RANK H. HURLEY, pioneer business man 
of Southeast Texas, and for around two 
decades a factor in the insurance business 
at Houston, has attained the highest esteem 
of his associates, and is regarded as one of the 
most experienced insurance men here. Mr. Hurley 
is a member of the insurance firm of Raphael Broth- 
ers, Inc., a firm established at Houston by the late 
Raphael Brothers, in 1886. Later, Mr. Hurley came 
with the firm, and after the death of Mr. Raphael, in 
1916, Mr. DeWitt A. Jones also joined the firm. 
Offices are in the Woolworth Building, the firm of 
Raphael Brothers representing six large insurance 
companies at Houston. This covers all forms of in- 
surance, including life. The business handled is 
largely local, both Mr. Hurley and Mr. Jones being 
real producers and writing a large volume of busi- 
ness annually on the books of the insurance com- 
panies represented. 

Frank H. Hurley was born at Galveston, Texas, 
the ninth of May, 1871. His father, C. W. Hurley, 
came to Texas before the Civil War, running the 
blockade out of Galveston during Civil War days. 
He was one of the early mayors of Galveston, and 
his name figures prominently in the history of that 
city, where he took a leading part in shaping and 
directing civic development until his removal to 
Houston in 1884. Frank H. Hurley's mother was 
before her marriage Miss Sue Roselle, also a mem- 
ber of a prominent Texas family. Frank H. Hurley 
received his early education in the schools of Galves- 
ton, later attending the public schools of Mobile, 
Alabama, in which city the family spent several 
years, and graduating from the Houston High 
School. He then went with the William D. Cleve- 
land Wholesale Grocery Company, remaining with 
that firm for sixteen years in various capacities. He 
was for five years travelling salesman for the firm. 
He then went with the Galveston Wholesale Grocery 
Company, representing that firm on the road for 
three years, after which he came to Houston and be- 
came associated with the mercantile brokerage busi- 
ness for five years. This was followed by an inter- 
val spent at Beaumont as manager of the shipping 
department of the Hezig-Norvell Wholesale Gro- 
cery Company, and three years later, in 1908, Mr. 
Hurley returned to Houston, entering the insurance 
business, first with E. H. Dumble, and later with 
the firm of Raphael Brothers, with which he has 
since been associated. 

Mr. Hurley was married at Houston, the twenty- 
sixth of April, 1894, to Miss Clara Hauptman, a na- 
tive of Washington, D. C. Mr. and Mrs. Hurley have 
three children, Sue Rozelle, Clara Pearl, and Frank 
H. Hurley, Jr., the family residing at 424 Emerson 
Avenue. Mr. Hurley supports the Methodist de- 
nomination in religious belief, and is active in civic 
and welfare work at Houston. 

UDOLPH H. HAFNER, cotton merchant 
and exporter, has for a quarter of a cen- 
tury been engaged in the cotton business 
and shipped many bales of the fleecy staple 
to the merchants and mills of Europe. Mr. Hafner 
came to Houston in 1916, where he remained until 
1918, and in 1920 returned to the South Texas 
Metropolis, where he has since resided. For fifteen 
years he was engaged in the cotton business in 
Liverpool, England, and came to America in 1915. 
Mr. Hafner's office is conveniently located at 1002 





Cotton Exchange Building. 

Mr. Hafner yas born at St. Gall, Switzerland. 
His father, J. H. Hafner, is now retired from active 
business pursuits. His education was obtained in 
the public schools, and through travel and practical 
experience. Soon after leaving school, Mr. Hafner 
started his business career in the commission bus- 
iness in his native country, but later went to Bur- 
gundy, France, then to Paris, and after a few years 
to Liverpool, where he engaged in the cotton busi- 
ness and remained there until coming to the United 
States. 

Mr. Hafner was married in London, England, on 
October 4th, 1907, to Miss Mary Darlington Fisher, 
a native of Liverpool. Mr. and Mrs. Hafner reside 
at 1403 Cleburne Avenue. Mr. Hafner is a mem- 
ber of the Houston Cotton Exchange, in which he 
is greatly interested. He is a member of the 
Episcopal Church. He has been successful in 
his business since coming here and has nothing but 
words of praise for the South Texas Metropolis 
and its citizenship. 

BERNARD HEROD, one of the younger 
members of the business fraternity of Hous- 
ton, has since becoming associated with the 
Black Bros. Furniture Company, Inc., been 
active in the business circles here. Mr. Herod has 
been Secretary and Treasurer of the Black Bros. 
Furniture Company, Inc., since 1916, and in Jan- 
uary, 1922, was made Manager of the store located 
at 710-12 Milam Street; this in addition to the of- 
fices in the company already held by him. This 
store has three floors, each 100 by 100 feet, also a 
large warehouse at 2308 Commerce Street. The 
Black Bros. Furniture Company began business in 
Houston in 1913, and in 1919 moved into the present 
store managed by Mr. Herod. This store ranks 
among the finest and best furniture stores in Hous- 
ton, and carries a large and complete stock of all 
classes of furniture from the average kind to the 
very finest and most artistic to be purchased. Other 
officers of the Black Bros. Furniture Company, Inc., 
are Albert H. Black, President, C. A. Herod, Vice- 
President and John B. Black, General Manager. 

A native of Kansas, Mr. Herod was born at Cha- 
nute in 1898. His father, H. B. Herod, is a native of 
Illinois, but lived many years in Missouri previous to 
coming to Texas in 1913. He is an expert auditor 
and is now in the employ of the United States Inter- 
nal Revenue Department. Mr. Herod's education was 
obtained in the public schools of Joplin, Mo., and 
the Houston High School. 

Mr. Herod began his business career in 1915 when 
seventeen years of age as bookkeeper for the Black 
Bros. Furniture Company, Inc., in September, 1916, 
he was made Secretary and Treasurer of this firm 
and in January, 1922, was made Manager of their 
store located at 710-12 Milam Street. Mr. Herod is 
a nephew of Messrs. Albert H. and John B. Black 
of the Black Bros. Furniture Company, Inc. Mr. 
Herod was married in Houston in 1920 to Miss Eileen 
McNeil, a native of Colorado. They have one child, 
Elizabeth Eileen. Mr. and Mrs. Herod reside at 
1215 Milby Street. Mr. Herod is a member of the 
A. F. and A. M. with membership in Temple Lodge 
No. 4 of Houston. He is also a member of the 
Chapter of this order. Mr. Herod is active in the 
social organizations of Houston, and is interested 
in all agencies working for the greater development 
and civic improvement of his city. 



1301 



MEN OF TEXAS 




UDGE PRESLEY K. EWING, Attorney at 
Law and pioneer among men of his profes- 
sion, for more than two score of years, has 
been handling noteworthy civil and crim- 
inal cases, and besides being one of the leading at- 
torneys of South Texas Judge Ewing is one of the 
ranking orators of the country. He is special at- 
torney for the United States Fidelity and Guaranty 
Company, the American Sulphur and Royalty Com- 
pany, and many other corporations of this magni- 
tude. Judge Ewing is said by his profession to have 
pioneered or developed more, or as many, great 
judicial principles as any lawyer of the entire 
South. He represents very few clients except on 
special occasions when he is called in for much of 
the leading litigation of this section of Texas. Judge 
Ewing came to Houston in 1882 and engaged in a 
general practice of law, but has made a special rec- 
ord in litigation over land and commercial interests 
and in the equity field or jurisprudence. For many 
years, Judge Ewing was associated with George 
Goldthwaite in a partnership under the firm name 
of Goldthwaite and Ewing, and later was in partner- 
ship with Henry F. Ring as an addition to the firm 
which was known as Goldthwaithe, Ewing and Ring, 
and still later was an associate of John Lovejoy. 

Judge Ewing was born in La Fourche, Louisiana, 
July 21, 1860. His father, Dr. Fayette Clay Ewing, 
was a well known physician of Louisiana. His 
mother was Miss Eliza Josephine Kittredge, a des- 
cendent of a prominent New England pioneer fam- 
ily. Judge Ewing was educated at the University 
of Mississippi, graduating from that institution in 
1881 with the L. L. B. degree, being first honor man 
of this class and receiving in addition the Ph. 
B. degree. He is an enrolled attorney of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States. Judge Ewing 
represented before the Trans-Mississippi Commer- 
cial Congress at Wichita, Kansas, in May, 1899, the 
plan of government appropriation for the deep water 
Gulf outlet from Houston; this was a turning point 
in the effort of the progressive citizens of Houston 
to attain the dream of having the world's commerce 
brought by ocean-going vessels to her doors, that is 
today a reality. In 1905 Judge Ewing was commis- 
sioned and served as Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Texas, and campaigned in the East in suc- 
cessive Presidential campaigns for the Democratic 
National Committee. 

Judge Ewing was married in LaFourche, Louis- 
iana, February 10, 1885, to Miss Mary Ellen Wil- 
liams (deceased since April 1, 1919). She had won a 
prominent place in "The Texas Women's Hall of 
Fame" for her entire life had been filled with deeds 
of public and philanthropic service, acts of patriotic 
devotion, and sympathetic helpfulness to the weary 
of foot and the saddened of heart. She was truly 
one of Texas' noted women whose life was devoted 
to welfare work in the interest of mankind. In her 
death, Houston and Texas lost a great leader for 
good. Judge Ewing has two daughters, Josie Vesta, 
now Mrs. Carleton W. Veatch, and Gladys, now 
Mrs. Albert C. Combes. Both daughters received 
their early education in the Houston schools, after 
which they attended the Finch School for Girls in 
New York City, and are graduates of that institu- 
tion, with post-graduate diplomas. Both are socially 
popular in Houston, and in the East and West. On 
June 12, 1923, Judge Ewing was married at Christ 



Church, Houston, to Miss June Throckmorton, a 
grand-niece of former Governor Throckmorton of 
Texas. 

'in 1914, on the death of Justice Lurton, and short- 
ly after, in 1916, at the death of Justice Lamar, and 
the resignaiton of Justice Hughes of the United 
States Supreme Court, Judge Ewing was endorsed 
for the Justice of that Court. Perhaps no man was 
ever more strongly or widely indorsed for that po- 
sition. Among those urging his appointment were 
Justices from four State Supreme Courts, including 
that of his own State, and the Senate of Texas was 
unanimous for his appointment, and he would have 
received the appointment if the President had given 
either to the South. At that momentous time, one 
of Texas' greatest statesmen, who at that time was 
a member of Congress, said: "He would make one 
of the illustrious judges on that exalted bench, whose 
labors would make not only for establishing justice 
but also for the abiding glory of the Supreme Court, 
as the finest arbiter under the Constitution of ques- 
tions affecting or determining the ultimate result of 
our system of free government." The Houston Post 
published the following: "He is a man in the prime 
of life and activity; he is recognized wherever he is 
known as one of the South's most eminent jurists, 
and his high personal character would splendidly 
accord with traditions of the august tribunal which 
his friends believe he would adorn." 

In fraternal and social organizations Judge Ewing 
is a member of the A. F. and A. M., being affiliated 
with Holland Lodge No. 1 of Houston, is a Knight 
Templar and a member of Arabia Temple Shrine; 
B. P. O. E.; the College fraternity, Beta Theta Pi; 
American Bar Association; Texas Bar Association, 
and was President of this organization in 1899. 
Judge Ewing is an author of note, having written 
various legal treatises and other articles of merit. 
Judge Ewing is one of the most progressive and 
helpful citizens of Houston and of Texas, where his 
influence is felt and known for the upbuilding of 
his city and State. 

A. ADAMSON, for nearly two decades one 
of the members of the Houston bar, has 
enjoyed the esteem of his fellow citizens, 
and as an attorney has earned distinction 
in the field of civil law, to which his practice is 
limited. Mr. Adamson began his law practice in 
Harris County and Houston, in 1905, since which 
time he has steadily advanced in his chosen voca- 
tion, and has a lucrative practice confined to civil 
law. The first year he was associated with his. 
brother, C. H. Adamson, whose health failed at the 
end of the year, when he left Houston. Later L. A. 
Adamson formed an association with Lane-Wolters 
and Story, which lasted until the first of January, 
1916, since which time he has practised alone. Mr. 
Adamson has his offices in the Chronicle Building 
and is well equipped professionally for any demands 
on his talent. 

L. A. Adamson was born in Boone County, Iowa,, 
fifty miles north of Des Moines, the eighth of March, 
1881, the son of Robert Adamson, a native of Ire- 
land who came to New York City in 1868, three 
years later coming to Iowa, where he was a farmer 
and stockman until his retirement in 1905. At that 
time the elder Mr. Adamson came to Texas, on 
account of the fine climate here, and has since made 
his home in this state, residing at the present time 




1302 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




at Houston, where he is honored as an octogenarian. 
L. A. Adamson's mother, whose maiden name was 
Miss Ruth E. Kerr, is also a native of the Emerald 
Isle, and like the father, makes her home in Houston. 
L. A. Adamson spent his boyhood on his father's 
farm in Iowa, attending the rural schools near his 
home for a time. Later he studied under his brother, 
and also took correspondence courses in law, a pro- 
fession for which he early showed great aptitude. 
When his father, Robert Adamson, came to Texas 
in 1905, L. A. Adamson also came to this state, 
taking the bar examinations here, and was admitted 
to practice in 1905. 

L. A. Adamson makes his home at 1008 Polk Ave- 
nue. He is a Mason, 32nd degree Scottish Rite, be- 
longing to Temple Lodge No. 4 and to Arabia Tem- 
ple Shrine. Mr. Adamson is one of the younger 
professional men of Houston, and takes a great 
interest in the development of this city. 

PT|RANK C. JONES, Attorney at Law, has for 
more than a quarter of a century practiced 
before the Houston Bar and has a host of 
clients who have found him a valued and 
loyal counsellor and champion. Mr. Jones is a 
member of the law firm of Gill, Jones, Tyler and 
Potter, which is recognized as one of the leading 
law firms of South Texas; their office is located at 
204 First National Bank Building, and are engaged 
in a general civil practice. This firm are General 
Attorneys for the Independent Oil Producers Asso- 
ciation, and are retained by the Humble Oil and 
Refining Company and various oil operators, The 
Fidelity Deposit Company of Maryland, Trezevant 
and Cochran, Continental Casualty Company, 
Pierce Oil Corporation, Texas Gulf Sulphur Com- 
pany, The Guiberson Corporation and many other 
companies and business people. Mr. Jones began the 
practice of law in Houston in 1896 under the firm 
name of Allen, Watkins and Jones, and continued 
under this name for several years, when Mr. A. C. 
Allen went on the bench, and the late Governor 
James S. Hogg came into the firm in 1905, the name 
was changed at that time to Hogg, Watkins and 
Jones. In 1907 Governor Hogg died and W. H. Gill 
came into the firm when Edgar Watkins moved to 
Atlanta, Georgia, and later went with the Interstate 
Commerce Commission; the firm was then under 
the name of Hogg, Gill and Jones. Hugh L. Stone 
came into the firm and later went to Pittsburg as 
General Counsel for the Gulf Oil Company. Wal- 
lace Tyler took Mr. Stone's place, and the firm 
then became Hogg, Gill, Jones and Tyler. The firm 
retained the name of Governor Hogg at the request 
of Mike Hogg, his son, and the other members of 
his family; Mike Hogg, at that time, worked for the 
firm on a salary, and when Mike Hogg left, the firm 
became Gill, Jones and Tyler. Hugh M. Potter, a 
man of strong personality and a graduate of Har- 
vard, came into the firm on a salary, and later be- 
came a member, with name of firm as it is today, 
Gill, Jones, Tyler and Potter. 

Mr. Jones was born at Kingsville, Johnson Coun- 
ty, Missouri, April 2, 1873, and was brought to 
Texas by his parents when an infant three months 
old. His father, Frank Jones, (deceased since 1905) 
was a well known lumber man of Texas, where for 
many years he was head man for William Cameron, 
and later was engaged in the lumber business for 
himself at Bonham, Texas. His mother was Miss 



Nannie E. Hunt, a native of Missouri and a member 
of a prominent family of that State. His early 
education was obtained in the Bonham High School, 
from which he graduated. He later attended Fan- 
nin College at Bonham for two years, and graduated 
from this institution; he then became a student of 
Richmond College, Virginia, and graduated from 
this college in the class of 1892 with the B. A. de- 
gree. He then entered the University of Texas and 
graduated from this institution in the class of 1896 
with the L. L. B. degree. During this same year he 
entered actively into the practice of his profession 
at Houston, where he has since continued. Mr. 
Jones, while attending college, was engaged in the 
lumber business with his father at Bonham during 
the summer vacations and it was during these pe- 
riods that he learned every feature of the retail 
lumber business. 

Mr. Jones was married at Bonham, Texas, Novem- 
ber 26, 1902, to Miss Bessie Baker, a native of the 
Lone Star State and a daughter of Frank C. Baker, 
famous as an explorer, and well known as a phy- 
sician, and who died in South America. They have 
two children, Margaret, who is a Junior in Wiscon- 
sin University, and Frank C. Jones, Jr., who grad- 
uated in June, 1923, at Wentworth Military Acad- 
emy, Lexington, Missouri. Mr. Jones is one of the 
leading Masons in Texas, being Past Master of Hol- 
land Lodge No. 1 of Houston, which is the oldest 
Masonic Lodge in the State, and Past Master of all 
Masonic bodies of Houston, both York and Scottish 
Rites. He is Past Grand Master of Texas and Past 
Grand Commander of the Knights Templars of 
Texas, and is Past Potentate of the Shrine of Gal- 
veston and Houston, and is Imperial Oriental Guide 
and is expected to become Imperial Potentate in 
1928, and has been a 33rd Degree Mason since 1909, 
and was appointed officer of the Supreme Council, 
33rd degree, Washington, D. C. In other organiza- 
tions he is a member of the Rotary Club, having 
been Vice-President of this organization; Beta Theta 
Pi, college fraternity; American Bar Association; 
State Bar Association and was President of this or- 
ganization in 1917; Chairman Ninth Region of the 
Boy Scouts and member of National Council, New 
York, and is also a local officer of this organiza- 
tion. Mr. Jones is a member of the Baptist Church, 
and is one of the Trustees of this church, which is 
erecting a new building at a cost of $1,000,000.00 
when completed; he is a Director of the Baptist Hos- 
pital, and is one of the building committee, which is 
erecting a building at a cost of $400,000.00. Mr. 
Jones does a great deal of civic club and fraternal 
work, and gives a large portion of his time to helping 
others. He is one of the most popular men of Texas 
and is known throughout the United States, where 
there are Shriners. He looks after the business end 
of the law firm, employing principles that are used 
by any other business man. He does a great deal of 
trial work, in which he is very successful, especially 
with juries. He is loyal to the city of his adoption, 
which had a population of less than thirty thousand 
people when he came here, but he is extremely opti- 
mistic as to the future of "The Deep Water City" 
and believes it will soon become the leading city of 
the entire Southwest. Mr. Jones has always been 
a leader in all fraternal and civic work in Houston, 
where he is regarded as one of the city's most 
progressive and public spirited citizens. 



1303 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ILMER SPERRY HUNT, lawyer and busi- 
ness man of Houston for the past three 
decades, is a lawyer whose years of ex- 
perience qualify him to speak with author- 
ity on legal matters, and especially on surety liti- 
gation, in which field he and his firm have special- 
ized for many years. Mr. Hunt is senior member of 
the firm of Hunt and Teagle, with offices in the 
Union National Bank Building, and do a general 
civil practice in the state and federal courts. Mr. 
Hunt was admitted to practice before the Supreme 
Court of the United States in 1902. 

Mr. Hunt was born at Ripley, Mississippi, the son 
of Dr. E. N. Hunt, a practicing physician of that 
state and a resident of Mississippi all of his life. 
His mother, whose maiden name was Katherine 
Sperry, was a native of Winchester, Virginia, whom 
Dr. Hunt met and married in Virginia during the 
Civil War while he was serving as surgeon with the 
Second Mississippi Regiment. After the war they 
returned to Mississippi to make their home. 

Mr. Hunt, the subject of our sketch, was educated 
in the public schools of his native state and later 
entered the University of Texas, where he took hi3 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1894, immediately 
moving to Houston to begin the practice. 

Mr. Hunt was married in Houston in 1902 to Miss 
Lucy Sherman Brady, daughter of Col. John T. 
Brady, an attorney who for fifty years took a 
prominent part in the professional and financial life 
of the city. Col. Brady was the first citizen to 
devote his time and money to the development of 
the Houston Ship Channel, which is today the 
greatest asset of the city. Mrs. Hunt is the grand- 
daughter of General Sidney Sherman, who raised a 
company in Kentucky in the year 1836 to fight for 
the indepedence of Texas and led the left wing of 
the Texas army at the battle of San Jacinto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt make their home at 2020 Craw- 
ford Street and have three children, a son, Wilmer 
B. Hunt, now a senior at Georgetown University, 
Washington, D. C, and twin daughters, Lennie Es- 
telle and Lucy Catherine, also away at school. 

Fraternally Mr. Hunt, at college, belonged to 
the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and is a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite, a Knight Templar, and a mem- 
ber of Arabia Temple Shrine. He belongs to various 
social and civic clubs, such as the Houston Club, 
Houston Country Club, University Club and the 
Shrine Club. He takes an active part in the Harris 
County Bar Association, of which he is past pres- 
ident, and is now a member of the Committee on 
Ethics. He is also a past president of the Lawyers 
Library Association and is president of the Lawyers 
Luncheon Club and trustee of the Houston Art 
Museum. 

Mr. Hunt is recognized as one of our leading law- 
yers and public spirited citizens. 

JUDGE ROBERT A. JOHN, attorney at law, 
has for almost two score of years prac- 
ticed his profession before the Texas bar, 

where he is regarded as one of the beacon 

lights of the legal profession. Judge John came 
to Houston in 1908 and is the general attorney 
for The Texas Company and president of the Texas 
Pipe Line Company. He first came with The Texas 
Company as trial lawyer, and from 1911 to 1914 
was chief attorney, and at that time became gen- 




eral attorney for The Texas Company and has con- 
tinued in that capacity, and is regarded as one of 
the chief authorities on oil matters in the state. 
Judge John has two assistants in his office and 
ten lawyers in his department, where the increas- 
ing complexities of modern business have tended to 
increase the value and importance of the legal work 
incident to a large oil company. 

A native Texan, Judge John was born in Bastrop 
County, September 7th, 1864. His father, Rev. 
Isaac G. John, (deceased since 1889) was a well 
known Methodist minister, founder of the Christian 
Advocate and editor of this magazine for nineteen 
years, was born in Indiana and came to Galveston, 
Texas, in 1856. His mother prior to her marriage 
was Miss Ruth Eblen, a native of Bastrop County, 
Texas, and a daughter of John Eblen, who came 
to Texas from Missouri in 1833, but was a native 
of Germany. His education was obtained in Craw- 
ford Academy, and the Southwestern University at 
Georgetown, Texas, where he graduated in 1884, 
with the A. B. degree. Francis A. Mood was pres- 
ident of the college during the period when Judge 
John was a student, and was recognized as a great 
teacher and a wonderful man, a genius in his line, 
and left his impression on each student who was for- 
tunate enough to come in contact with him. After 
leaving college, Judge John taught school for one 
year and read law a portion of this time, and then 
went in the law office of the firm of Fisher and 
Townes, composed of S. R. Fisher and John C. 
Townes, who later became professor of law and 
dean of Texas University. Judge John was admitted 
to the bar in 1885 and immediately established his 
home and office in Georgetown, where he continued 
his practice until 1899, and during this period he 
was city attorney of Georgetown, and county at- 
torney of Williamson County for five years. In 
1899 Judge John was appointed assistant attorney 
general of Texas by Governor Joseph D. Sayers, 
and served in this office during Governor Sayers' 
administration. In 1903 Judge John removed his 
practice to Beaumont, Texas, which presented a 
larger and more promising field, and remained there 
until 1908, where he succeeded his brother in a law 
firm there, and was later a member of the firm 
of Duff and John, and represented the Santa Fe 
Railroad. While in Beaumont Judge John was a 
candidate for the office of justice of the court of 
appeals, but was defeated by Judge John N. Hen- 
derson, who was on the bench at the time. In addi- 
tion to being general attorney for The Texas Com- 
pany, Judge John is president of the Texas Pipe 
Line Company, which has 2,777.58 miles of pipe 
lines, 89 per cent of which is in Texas. 

Judge John was married at Georgetown, Texas, 
in 1887, to Miss Margaret Houston Morrow, a daugh- 
ter of Captain J. C. S. Morrow, who was in the 
Civil War and now resides at Quanah, Texas. Her 
mother was Miss Nannie E. Houston, a daughter 
of General Sam Houston. They have nine children 
and ten grandchildren. The children are: Alfred 
M. John, a well known lawyer of Houston; Miss 
Margaret E. John, a teacher; Mrs. F. F. Baldwin, 
wife of a well known Houston attorney; Mrs. Ruth 
J. Seale, a graduate trained nurse; Mrs. Griffith 
C. Evans, wife of the professor of mathematics 
at Rice Institute; Miss Roberta A. John, teacher 
in Houston High School; Edward B. John, with the 



1304 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Texas Company; George O'Brien John, a student 
at the Allen Academy at Bryan, Texas, and Eliza- 
beth John, at home with her parents. Judge John 
is a member of the A. F. and A. M., the Knights 
of Pythias, State Bar Association, Harris County 
Bar Association and the Glenbrook Country Club. 
Judge John is truly a dignified lawyer and gentle- 
man of the old school, and has added an element 
of strength and purpose of fine capacity, and of 
judicial ability to the upbuilding legal forces of 
Houston and of the State of Texas. 

UDGE D. EDWARD GREER, during his 
practice of more than two score of years 
before the Texas bar, is recognized as one 
i= .__, ,_^„ of the outstanding lawyers of this day. 
Judge Greer is general attorney for the Gulf Com- 
panies in Texas and Louisiana, and has been iden- 
tified with much of the important oil litigation that 
has come before the courts of Texas. Judge Greer 
came to Houston in 1916 from Beaumont, and has 
in his Houston organization eleven lawyers, with 
offices on the 10th floor of the Gulf Building. The 
Gulf Companies have in their legal department at 
Fort Worth two lawyers, John G. Gregg and R. E. 
L. Batts, and in their legal department at Shreve- 
port two lawyers, J. S. Atkinson and Frederick E. 
Greer; these offices are under the jurisdiction of the 
Houston office. 

Judge Greer was born in De Sota County, Missis- 
sippi, April 25, 1856. His birth place was near the 
Tennessee line, ten miles from Memphis. His father, 
James Madison Greer, a native of Tennessee, was a 
great Democrat, a prominent lawyer and politician. 
His mother was Miss Mary Autry, an aunt of the 
late Judge James L. Autry, and a daughter of Mica- 
jah Autry, who was one of the early settlers of 
Texas, having removed to this State from Jackson, 
Tennessee, in 1835. He came first to New Orleans 
and there joined a band of volunteers for service 
in Texas' revolution against Mexico. He joined 
Travis' command at the historic town of Nacog- 
doches, Texas, and marched from that point in East 
Texas through San Antonio on the old Spanish Trail, 
and fell at the seige of the Alamo in 1836. He was 
a lawyer and had planned to practice law in Texas. 
Judge Greer's education was obtained in the com- 
mon schools of Mississippi, and after coming to 
Texas, studied law in the office of Judge Sam R. 
Frost, of Corsicana. He came to Corsicana in 1875 
to look after a large grant of land in Navarro 
County that was given to Micajah Autry. Judge 
Greer was admitted to the bar in 1880 and began 
the practice of his profession in Corsicana and re- 
mained there until 1888, when he removed to Dallas. 
He practiced his profession in Dallas until 1904, 
when he removed to Beaumont, and was retained 
by the Gulf Company until 1907, since which he has 
devoted his entire time to their interests. 

Judge Greer was married in Corsicana in May, 
1883, to Miss Hallie Read, a native of Virginia, and 
a daughter of Judge F. N. Read, a Judge of one of 
the courts of Virginia. The Read family is one of 
the oldest and most prominent in the State of Vir- 
ginia, and through this family connection, Judge 
Greer's wife is a member of the Colonial Societies. 
They have six children, Emma, now Mrs. H. L. Hol- 
man, of Beaumont; Mary, now Mrs. W. B. Pyron; 
Lena, at home with her parents; Hallie Read, now 
Mrs. R. E. Hardwicke; Frederick E., Attorney with 




the Gulf Companies, and Oden S., a student in New 
York. H. L. Holman is Assistant Treasurer of the 
Magnolia Petroleum Company. W. B. Pyron is 
Vice-President of the Gulf Production Company, and 
of the Gulf Pipe Line Company; and R. E. Hard- 
wicke is Attorney for the Venezuela Gulf Oil Com- 
pany, with headquarters at Caracas. Judge Greer 
is associated with many of the Houston enterprises, 
and is a Director of the Houston Building and Loan 
Association. The Dallas Companies, of which he is a 
Director, are: The American Trust Company; the 
Fidelity Union Insurance Company, and the Em- 
ployers Casualty Company. He is a member of the 
American State and County Bar Association, the 
Houston and the River Oaks Country Clubs, and the 
Episcopal Church. Judge Greer is a pioneer among 
men of his profession, and is a true type of the 
lawyer of the old school and a Southern gentleman. 
His ancestors were members of the legal fraternity 
and he comes of a great legal family. His cousin, 
the late James L. Autry, was a great lawyer and a 
man who was beloved by all classes. Judge Greer is 
highly regarded as a lawyer and a citizen and is one 
of the leaders of the Bar of Texas. In the field 
in which he has specialized for over fifteen years, 
namely, oil and gas law, he is considered an author- 
ity and his articles contributed to the '"Texas Law 
Review" and the "Central Law Journal" are fre- 
quently quoted. 

OBERT H. KELLEY is a member of the 
firm of Andrews, Streetman, Logue and 
Mobley, attorneys at law, and one of the 
largest legal firms at Houston. He joined 
this firm in 1910, at that time engaging in general 
practice, but of recent years limiting his work almost 
exclusively to railroad practice. Mr. Kelley's firm is 
retained by the Gulf Coast Lines and the Houston 
Belt and Terminal Railroad as general attorneys, 
handling both office and trial work. 

Mr. Kelley is a native Houstonian, having been 
born in this city the twenty-fifth of July, 1888. His 
father, R. E. Kelley, a native of Virginia, came to 
Houston in 1885 and was a newspaper man here and 
in Beaumont until his death in 1900. His mother, be- 
fore her marriage, was Miss Maria Hamilton, a na- 
tive of Washington, D. C, and now makes her home 
in Houston. Mr. Kelley attended private schools at 
Houston until he entered Georgetown University. 
He took the B. A. degree at the Catholic University 
of America in 1908, after which he entered the 
University of Texas, in the department of law, hav- 
ing the L. L. B. degree conferred on him by that 
institution in 1910. He returned to his home in 
Houston and entered the firm of Andrews, Street- 
man, Logue and Mobley. 

Mr. Kelley was married at Lynchburg, Virginia, 
the twelfth of October, 1911, to Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Young, a native of that city and the daughter of 
Dr. C. B. Young, a prominent physician of Lynch- 
burg. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley have an attractive home 
at 2516 Commonwealth Avenue, in Hyde Park. They 
have three daughters, Anne, Mary Elizabeth, and 
Frank Andrews. Mr. Kelley is a Knight of Colum- 
bus, fourth degree, a member of the Houston, Club, 
the Houston Country Club and the Harris County 
Bar Association, the Texas Bar Association, and the 
American Bar Association. In civic matters, he 
takes a deep interest, and has been identified with 
the various movements directed toward the develop- 
ment of the city. 



1307 



MEN OF TEXAS 




AM R. MERRILL, one of the recent recruits 
to the legal fraternity at Houston, came 
here a number of years ago, after around 
two decades of practice in Texas, and has 
established an enviable reputation for his knowledge 
of law and procedure, and is regarded as one of the 
most able attorneys of Houston. Mr. Merrill is a 
member of the law firm of Ball and Merrill, one of 
the foremost law firms of Houston, and composed of 
Mr. Merrill and Col. Tom H. Ball. The firm of Ball 
and Merrill was established the first of January, 
1922, since which time it has handled a large gen- 
eral practice, and has offices in the First National 
Bank Building. Mr. Merrill came to Houston in 
1912, at that time forming a partnership with H. H. 
Cooper under the firm name of Cooper and Merrill. 
This firm lasted until July, 1921, from which time 
until the first of January, 1922, when he became 
associated with Colonel Ball, he practiced alone. 

Sam R. Merrill was born in Collin County, on the 
twenty-fourth of December, 1876. His father, M. E. 
Merrill, a native of Texas, moved to the western 
part of the state in 1878, and has been a ranchman 
and cattleman at Lubbock for many years. Sam R. 
Merrill spent his boyhood on his father's ranch, at- 
tending the public schools of Plainview, and after 
finishing his public school work, entered the Uni- 
versity of Texas, in the law department, taking the 
L. L. B. degree in 1902. He then went to Amarillo, 
beginning his practice in that city as a member of 
the law firm of Bowman and Merrill. In 1904 he 
was elected county judge, serving until 1908, when 
he formed an association with H. H. Cooper and 
A. A. Lumpkin. The law firm of Cooper, Merrill and 
Lumpkin lasted until Mr. Cooper and Mr. Merrill 
removed to Houston, opening an office here as Coop- 
er and Merrill. Later Mr. Merrill left the firm, 
practicing alone until 1922, when he entered the law 
firm of Ball and Merrill. 

Mr. Merrill was married at Fort Worth, Texas, 
the twenty-sixth of April, 1906, to Miss Dela Triplett, 
a native of Hale County, and who was reared on her 
father's ranch in Western Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Mer- 
rill reside in Houston, at 910 West Main Street, and 
have five children, Sam A., Mildred, Frank L., Bruce 
R., and Helen Joyce. Mr. Merrill is a member of 
River Oaks Country Club, the Houston Club, and the 
Elks Club, and fraternally is a Mason, Temple Blue 
Lodge, 32nd degree Scottish Rite, and a member of 
Arabia Temple Shrine, at Houston. Mr. Merrill is 
interested in the beautification, development and 
growth of Houston, and since coming here has en- 
tered heartily into the spirit of progress that has 
made Houston the leading city of Southeast Texas. 

ESSE R. STONE, one of the prominent at- 
torneys of the Harris County Bar, and for 
upwards of a decade a resident of Houston, 
has taken an active part in the civic and 
professional life of this city, and is one of the best 
known and most accomplished patent lawyers here. 
Mr. Stone came to Houston in 1917, and has since 
been associated with the firm of Andrews, Street- 
man, Logue and Mobley, a firm handling a general 
civil practice. Mr. Stone specializes in patents, ana 
has charge of this department of the firm's prac- 
tice. The legal firm is one of the largest in Hous- 
ton, and, in addition to Frank Andrews, Judge Sam 
Streetman, John L. Logue and John A. Mobley, the 




members of the firm, has seven highly trained 
specialists, of whom Mr. Stone is one. The firm 
has offices in the Union National Bank Building. 
Prior to coming to Houston, Mr. Stone practiced 
law in the District of Columbia, where he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in June, 1915, specializing in pat- 
ents. Up to the time of his admittance to the Bar 
there he had been in the Patent Office at Washing- 
ton, D. C, for three and a half years, and was a 
recognized expert in this work. His brilliant record 
in Houston as a patent lawyer has brought him into 
more than local prominence, and he is considered a 
real authority on this phase of legal work. 

Jesse R. Stone was born at Madison, Wisconsin, 
the thirteenth of September, 1881, son of W. W. 
Stone, a farmer, who still makes that state his 
home, and Elizabeth Tripp Stone. He attended 
the public schools of Horicon, Wisconsin, until grad- 
uating from High School, after which he entered the 
University of Wisconsin, from which he graduated 
with the A. B. Degree, in 1899. He then went to 
Washington, where he was in the patent office, 
and attended George Washington University, taking 
the LL. B. Degree in 1915. 

Mr. Stone was married at Washington, D. C, in 
1906, to Miss Mildred Ruser, of New York City. 
They now make their home in Houston, at 1414 Cas- 
tle Court Boulevard. They have two children, Ray- 
mond and Catherine. Fraternally, Mr. Stone is a 
Mason, and takes a deep interest in Masonic activi- 
ties. He belongs to the University Club, and is a 
popular member of the social and civic cliques of 
the city. Mr. Stone's present recognition as a leader 
in his field of legal work, with his mental ability, 
poise, and distinction of character, suggests a fu- 
ture wherein he will attain a place among the most 
successful and widely known patent lawyers of the 
country. 

E. KURTH has been prominently identified 
with law and business affairs of Houston 
for upwards of a decade, and his name car- 
ries a prestige in the Harris County Bar 
that is a distinct asset to the city, with which it 
is associated. Mr. Kurth is a member of the law 
firm of Andrews, Streetman, Logue and Mobley, one 
of the leading law firms of Houston, and one that 
has had a remarkable growth since its establishment. 
The firm occupies the twelfth floor of the Union 
National Bank Building, and in addition to the mem- 
bers of the firm has a large legal staff, making it 
one of the largest law firms in this part of the 
country. Mr. Kurth specializes in banking, com- 
mercial and industrial matters, and handles a large 
part of the work in this field for his firm. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1913, becoming connected 
with the firm of Andrews, Streetman, Logue and 
Mobley at that time, and has since been with this 
firm, steadily advancing to a favorable position 
among the members of his profession in Houston 
and South Texas. 

M. E. Kurth was born at Keltys, in Angelina 
County, Texas, the twenty-fourth of July, 1890. His 
father, J. H. Kurth, a native of Germany, came to 
the United States and Texas as a young man of 
twenty, and engaged in the lumber business for 
many years, until his recent retirement. He still, 
however, looks after his lumber interests. M. E. 
Kurth's mother, who before her marriage, was Miss 
Hattie Gleam, was a native of Montgomery County, 




1308 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Texas, and is now deceased. Mr. Kurth was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Keltys and Lufkin, 
later going to Washington and Lee University, where 
he took the A. B. degree in 1911, after which he 
entered the University of Texas, taking the L. L. B. 
degree in 1913. Mr. Kurth then came to Houston, 
beginning his practice here in July, 1913, and prac- 
ticing alone until the following November, when 
he went with the law firm of Andrews, Streetman, 
Logue and Mobley, with which he has since been 
associated. 

Mr. Kurth was married at Houston the twenty- 
eighth of February, 1917, to Miss Isabel Fowler, 
a native of Texas, and the daughter of John Fowler, 
for many years a resident of this State, but now of 
Dayton, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Kurth have a very 
attractive home at 1603 North Boulevard, Edgemont 
Addition, and have two children, Mary and Aurelia. 
Mr. Kurth is a Director of the University Club, and 
a member of the River Oaks Country Club. Frater- 
nally he is a Mason, Temple Lodge No. 4, Thirty- 
Second degree, Scottish Rite, and a member of 
Arabia Temple Shrine. His present recognition, in 
keeping with his advancement in the past decade, 
suggests an unusually brilliant future for Mr. 
Kurth. 

ENRY J. DANNENBAUM, Attorney at Law, 
Houston, Texas, was born in the town of 
Columbia, on October 30th, 1871, of Ger- 
man-Jewish parentage. The family moved 
to Seguin in 1879. The subject of this sketch at- 
tended the public schools there, and in 1887 went 
to Emory & Henry College at Emory, Virginia, from 
which he graduated in 1890. Returning home, he 
read law in the office of Judge J. B. Dibrell and 
was granted a license to practice his profession in 
May, 1892. In the fall of that year he located at 
Houston, where he has since resided. 

Mr. Dannenbaum has always found time to en- 
gage in public and communal activities in which he 
felt an interest. He participated from the beginning 
in the affairs of the local Jewish community. His 
activity in the Independent Order B'nai B'rith, an 
international Jewish organization of benevolent ac- 
tivities, culminated in his election as president of 
District No. 7, of the order, composed of seven 
Southern States. While holding this position in 
1911, he accepted a temporary appointment under 
Attorney General Wickersham, and directed the en- 
forcement of the federal white slave law, known as 
the Mann act, throughout the United States. During 
this period of four months Mr. Dannenbaum had 
his headquarters in New York City. 

Locally, Mr. Dannenbaum has served as presi- 
dent of the school board and of the Civil Service 
Commission. For four years, 1915 to 1919, he was 
judge of the Sixty-first Judicial District of Texas, 
from which he resigned to resume the practice of 
law. During the war, by courtesy of the bar which 
monthly chose one of its members to occupy the 
judicial office during his absence, Mr. Dannenbaum 
was enabled to serve as chief of the enforcement 
division of the Federal Food Administration in 
Texas. 

As previously indicated, Mr. Dannenbaum feels 
a deep interest in the welfare of his race. This led 
him to go to New York City in the fall of 1921 and 
take charge of the campaign conducted there to 
raise funds for the rebuilding of Palestine as the 




Jewish National Homeland. After a stay of six 
months, he returned home, but broken in health, 
which he did not recover for some time. 

Mr. Dannenbaum reopened a law office in Hous- 
ton in October, 1923, and is enjoying a satisfactory 
practice. His wife, to whom he was married in 
1897, and their six children all live in Houston. 
He is not a member of any club or fraternal order, 
but is wedded to home life, his profession and lit- 
erature. He enjoys a good anecdote and tries to 
tell one, with poor results. 

UDGE JOHN T. ADAMS, an honored resi- 
dent of Orange for about three decades, 
began the practice of law here shortly 
after his arrival in the city, and has con- 
tinued to follow this vocation to the present time, 
steadily advancing to a position among the fore- 
most lawyers of this section. Judge Adams is a 
member of the law firm of Adams and Bruce, which 
was established in 1920, and which is composed of 
himself and Judge E. L. Bruce. The firm handles 
a general practice, and has an imposing list o± 
clients, including among the number some of the 
leading firms and individuals of the city. Offices 
are in the Petty Building. Judge Adams came to 
Orange in 1895, establishing his practice here at 
that time and served two terms as county attorney, 
later becoming a member of the firm of Adams and 
Huggins, with W. O. Huggins as his partner. This 
firm continued until Mr. Huggins removed to Hous- 
ton Later he became a member of the firm ot 
Bisland, Adams and Bruce, which continued until 
Mr Bisland left the firm, when it became known as 
Adams and Bruce. During Judge Adams' years of 
practice at Orange his standing as a lawyer has 
been stamped with the approval of the people by his 
election and appointment to several public offices. 
In 1907 he was elected to the state legislature, 
where he served with distinction, was appointed and 
served several months as county judge, and later, 
in October, 1919, he was appointed district judge, 
to fill an unexpired term. In the latter part of 1920, 
at the expiration of his term and without being a 
candidate to succeed himself, he left the bench and 
entered private practice. 

Judge Adams was born in Jasper County, Texas, 
the fifth of April, 1874. His father, R. F. Adams, 
a native Georgian, came to Jasper County m 184d 
and has been a stockman and farmer in that 
county to the present time. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Mary Goodman, is a native of 
Florida John T. Adams attended the public schools 
of Jasper County, later studying law in the office 
of K B. Seale, at that time a member of the state 
senate He was admitted to the bar in 1894, and 
after looking over the state decided to come to 
Orange, establishing his practice here, and so con- 
tinuing to the present. 

Judge Adams was married at Orange in January, 
1899, to Miss Mary Thomas, a native of Wales, Eng- 
land.' They have one child, Mattie, the widow of 
C. L. Adams, who has two children, John T. and 
Mattie Lee. Judge Adams is a Mason, a member of 
the Blue Lodge at Orange, Knight Templar at Beau- 
mont, and is an Odd Fellow. He is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club, the Orange 
Country Club, and is a leader in civic work in this 
city. 



1309 



MEN OF TEXAS 




HARTON E. WEEMS, for around a decade 
identified with the legal fraternity at Hous- 
ton, is held in high esteem by the bench and 
bar, and is a leader among the younger pro- 
fessional men. Mr. Weems is a member of the law 
firm of Vinson, Elkins, Sweeton and Weems, one of 
the largest law firms in the state and one that has 
had a remarkable growth. Mr. Weems has been con- 
nected with this firm since 1919, and was made a 
member of the firm in 1921, since which time has 
looked after much of the business end of the large 
practice handled by this firm, and has also handled 
a general law practice. Mr. Weems has made a 
splendid record as a lawyer, and his career is re- 
garded as one of unusual promise. Aside from his 
professional activities, Mr. Weems is actively iden- 
tified with the business life of Houston. He is vice 
president of the Guaranty Trust Company, president 
of the Guaranty Realty and Investment Company, 
president of the Houston Company, president of the 
North Side Realty Company, secretary and treasurer 
of the Ship Channel Industrial Site Company. 

Wharton E. Weems was born at Houston, Texas, 
the sixteenth of November, 1889, the son of Major 
B. F. Weems, a native of Virginia, who came to 
Texas as a young man and was a banker, insurance 
man and real estate man at Houston until his death 
in 1923. Major Weems was one of the Terry Ran- 
gers and served on the staff of General John A. 
Wharton throughout the Civil War, and was a well 
known pioneer in the development of Houston. His 
mother was Maria Nash (Carrington) Weems, a na- 
tive of Virginia, whose death occurred in 1921. Whar- 
ton E. Weems received his early education in the 
public schools of Houston, later entering the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, where he took the B. A. and M. 
A. degrees in 1912, after which he entered the law 
department of the University of Texas, taking his 
L. L. B. degree in the class of 1914. While in the 
University of Virginia, Mr. Weems became a mem- 
ber of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity and while at 
the University of Texas he was elected to the hon- 
orary legal fraternity, Phi Delta Phi. Mr. Weems 
then returned to Houston, beginning his law practice 
here in association with K. C. Barkley and John E. 
Green, remaining with them until he entered the 
Army, in October, 1917. Mr. Weems was commis- 
sioned first lieutenant in the Aviation Signal Corps, 
and sent to Washington, D. C. and later to Camp 
Dick, at Dallas, at the time that camp was opened, 
helping organize the camp and serving as executive 
officer, practically in charge of Camp Dick, until 
October, 1918. He was commissioned captain at 
that time and transferred to Washington, D. C, and 
assigned to the General Staff and sent to Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, in charge of that district. 
He was discharged in December, 1918, returning to 
Houston, and in the early part of 1919 going with 
the firm of Vinson, Elkins, Sweeton and Weems. 
Mr. Weems was married at Houston the second 
of November, 1918, to Miss Mathilda Booth, daughter 
of Horace Booth, traffic manager of the Interna- 
tional and Great Northern Railroad, and one of the 
most prominent railroad men of the state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Weems reside at 4301 Mount Vernon Avenue, 
and have two children, Elizabeth Virginia and Ben- 
jamin F. Mr. Weems is a member of the Houston 
Club, the Houston Country Club and the River Oaks 
Country Club. 




UDGE ROY F. CAMPBELL, for many years 
a well known lawyer of Houston and South 
Texas, was appointed special judge of Coun- 
ty Court at Law No. 2 of Harris County in 
1916 and served in this capacity until 1918 when he 
was elected to this office and was re-elected in 1920 
and again in 1922. In 1924 he was elected judge of 
the Eightieth District Court, which position he now 
holds. 

Judge Campbell was born in Houston on March 
6th, 1885. His father, Eli F. Campbell, a native of 
Ohio, name to Texas in the early 70's and was with 
the Houston and Texas Central Railroad as foreman 
of their shops here until his death in 1899. His 
mother was Miss Sophia E. Bohn, a native of Ger- 
many, and came to the United States as a girl and 
was reared and educated here, where she resided con- 
tinuously. His early education was obtained in 
the public schools of Houston, after which he worked 
his way through the University of Texas, where he 
was a student during the years of 1906 and 1907. 
He returned to the University of Texas in 1912 
where he remained for a few months and passed 
the examination prescribed for admission to the 
bar of Texas. After his admission to the bar, Judge 
Campbell returned to Houston and formed a partner- 
ship with Senator Charles Murphy and this partner- 
ship continued for a period of three years, when he 
became associated with George C. Scott in the prac- 
tice of law and continued with Mr. Scott until his 
appointment to the bench in 1916. 

Judge Campbell was married in Houston June 
10th, 1916, to Miss Nellie Meyer, a native of El- 
linger, Fayette County, Texas, and a daughter of 
O. A. Meyer, for many years a resident of the Lone 
Star dtate, where he was well known in the busi- 
ness circles. They have one daughter, Helen Eliza- 
beth. Judge and Mrs. Campbell reside at 2208 Dun- 
lavy. Judge Campbell is a member of the A. F. 
& A. M. with membership in Gray Lodge No. 329 of 
Houston, and is a member of the Houston Chapter 
Rose Croix and is also a 32nd degree Mason. He is 
also a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Dokeys 
and the Woodmen of the World. Judge Campbell 
has great faith in the future of the city of his nativ- 
ity and believes that the time is near at hand when 
Houston will be the leading city of the Southwest. 

OBERT F. CAMPBELL is a member of the 
law firm of Andrews, Streetman, Logue and 
Mobley, one of the leading law firms of 
Houston, occupying the entire twelfth floor 
of the Union National Bank Building, and one of the 
strongest law firms of Texas. Mr. Campbell handles 
insurance and railroad matters coming to the firm, 
and represents a number of the railroad and in- 
surance companies at Houston in a legal capacity. 
Mr. Campbell became associated with the firm of 
Andrews, Streetman, Burns and Logue in 1914, at 
which time he was admitted to the Bar, and has 
been with them since that time, having been made a 
member of the firm in January, 1922. 

Robert F. Campbell was born at Cleburne, Texas, 
the twenty-fifth of June, 1890, the son of Clark C. 
Campbell, a native of Louisiana, who came to Tex- 
as as a young man, and after many years as a 
railroad man was connected with the Internal 
Revenue Office. Mr. R. F. Campbell's mother, who 
was before her marriage Miss Annie Fariss, a native 




1310 



- I'lllflllllllBIII 1 




is&b^*^ k, ZM* 








Xj? c^ 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




of Alabama, has continued to make her home at 
Austin since her husband's death. Mr. Campbell 
was educated in the public schools of Austin, later 
entering the University of Texas, in the law depart- 
ment. After his admission to the Bar, in 1914, Mr. 
Campbell came direct to Houston, entering the law 
firm of Andrews, Streetman, Burns and Logue at 
that time. 

Mr. Campbell was married at Fort Worth, Texas, 
the twelfth of March, 1918, to Genevieve Carver, 
daughter of E. B. Carver of Fort Worth and Wichita 
Falls. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell make their home at 
the McVea Apartments, and have one child, Robert 
F. Campbell, Jr. Mr. Campbell is a member of the 
River Oaks Country Club, the Houston Club, and is 
a Mason, belonging to Blue Lodge, Temple, No. 4. 

RANK J. BREAKER, of Houston, Texas 
began his career in the business world with 
the Harris County Abstract Company and 
with the exception of the time spent in the 
World War, has been associated with this com- 
pany since that time. Mr. Breaker is manager of 
the Harris County Abstract Company and secre- 
tary of the American Title Guaranty Company, Inc., 
and in these capacities represents two of the most 
progressive business institutions of Houston. The 
Harris County Abstract Company was founded in 
1885 by Mr. Breaker's father, Mr. George H. Break- 
er, who is now the president of this institution, 
and L. F. Fox is vice president and treasurer. The 
American Title Guaranty Company, Inc., started 
business here in 1916 and these two firms employ 
twenty-five people, many of whom are experts in 
their particular lines. The abstract work is con- 
fined to Harris County but the title work extends to 
all portions of the Coast country and has built up a 
large business in this line of work, which is largely 
due to the accuracy and efficiency of this company. 
The offices of both companies are located on the 
third floor of the Union National Bank Building. 
After finishing his education, Mr. Breaker returned 
to Houston and entered the abstract business of his 
father in 1911 and worked in every branch of the 
business in order to become familiar with its every 
phase. He continued with this firm until he enlisted 
in the World War in July, 1917, and was assigned to 
the 111th Field Signal Corps of the 36th Division 
and received his training at Camp Bowie, Fort 
Worth, Texas. He went to France with this division 
and remained with it throughout his activity in 
France, returned with the same division and was dis- 
charged on June 19th, 1919, when he immediately 
came back with the Harris County Abstract Com- 
pany and in 1920 was made manager of same and 
has continued in this capacity. 

A native Houstonian, Mr. Breaker was born on 
June 13th, 1893. His father, George H. Breaker, a 
native of South Carolina, came to Texas in 1877. 
He is the founder of these firms and is still active 
in the business. His mother (now deceased) was 
Miss Lillie Trapp, a member of a pioneer Texas 
family. His early education was obtained in the 
public schools of Houston, after which he attended 
Washington and Lee University. Mr. Breaker was 
married June 24th, 1924, to Miss Margaret Chamber- 
lain, a native of Houston and daughter of Mr. Cham- 
berlain, proprietor of the Houston Optical Company 
and resident of Houston for thirty years. 




Mr. Breaker, who is regarded as one of Hous- 
ton's most progressive young business men, is inter- 
ested in many of the city's business projects and is 
a director in the American Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. with 
membership in Holland Lodge No. 1 of Houston. He 
is also a member of the Exchange Club, the Conopus 
Club and many of the social organizations of the 
city. He resides at 3617 Burlington Avenue. Among 
the business men of Houston, Mr. Breaker is recog- 
nized as a leader in his particular sphere. 

UDGE J. A. PLATT, attorney at law, during 
his practice of almost a score of years be- 
fore the Texas bar, has established a place 
of marked distinction among the people of 
the state, together with a creditable record in the 
esteem of the legal fraternity. Judge Piatt came to 
Houston in January, 1921, from Trinity County, and 
is vice president and general attorney for the West 
Lumber Company, South Texas Lumber Company, 
Fort Terrett Ranch Company, West Production Com- 
pany, South Texas Hardwood Company, West Build- 
ing Company and the Trinity Valley and Northern 
Railroad Company. Judge Piatt is in charge of the 
legal department of these companies and this work 
takes him into the various courts of the state. He 
devotes his entire time to his own companies. 

Judge Piatt was born at New Iberia, Louisiana, 
April 17th, 1884. His father, B. A. Piatt, a native 
of Georgia, was for many years engaged in busi- 
ness in Trinity County, Texas, but is now a resi- 
dent of Houston. His mother was Miss Felicia 
Mignes, a member of a well known family of Louis- 
iana. Judge Piatt's early education was obtained 
in the public and high schools of Groveton, Trinity 
County, graduating from the latter in the class of 
1900. He then entered the University of Texas 
and graduated from that institution in 1904 with the 
L. L. B. degree. Immediately following his grad- 
uation in law in 1904 Judge Piatt established his 
home and office in Groveton and began the practice 
of his profession. In 1908 he was elected to the of- 
fice of county attorney of Trinity County and 
served in this office until 1912. In 1914 he was 
elected to the office of district attorney of the 
Twelfth District and served in this office from 1914 
to 1918. In 1919 he was appointed to the office of 
district judge of the District Court of the Twelfth 
District, and served in this office in 1919 and 1920 
when he resigned in order to come into the present 
work, to which he has given his entire time. 

Judge Piatt was married in Groveton, Texas, in 
October, 23rd, 1913, to Miss Maude Dudley, a native 
of Trinity County and a daughter of J. E. Q. Dud- 
ley (deceased) a prominent lumber man of Trinity 
County and a native of Georgia. They have one 
son, J. A. Piatt, Jr. In fraternal, social and tech- 
nical organizations, Judge Piatt holds membership 
in the A. F. and A. M. of the Royal Arch degree, 
Houston Club, Country Estates Club, and the State 
Bar Association. He is a loyal member of the 
Methodist Church. Judge Piatt is optomistic as to 
the future of Houston and believes that this city 
will have attained a population of not less than 
five hundred thousand within the next decade. Judge 
Piatt is a true type of the southern lawyer and gen- 
tleman, in which are mixed the southern gallantry, 
together with the aggressive, purposeful and con- 
structive business instincts of the modern South. 



1313 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ORICK D. MATHES began the practice of 
law in Houston in 1916, and has continued 
to follow his vocation here to the present 
time, with the exception of eighteen months, 
while in the army during the World War. Mr. 
Mathes is associated with the firm of Baker, Botts, 
Parker and Garwood, one of the strongest and best 
known law firms of Texas, both in point of pres- 
tige and volume of practice. Mr. Mathes began 
with this firm shortly after being admitted to the 
bar, at that time handling justice court cases, and 
like matters. He is now specializing in insurance 
and tort litigation and some admiralty. The firm 
occupies a suite of offices in the Commercial Na- 
tional Bank Building and its members represent 
some of the finest legal talent in the state. 

Y. D. Mathes was born in Tampa, Florida, the 
fourth of January, 1891, the son of George M. 
Mathes and Lena Boyce (Mays) Mathes. George M. 
Mathes, army man and newspaper writer, spent 
most of his life in travel, and took a part in a num- 
ber of interesting expeditions. Many accounts of 
his travels, and stories were a feature of the maga- 
zines of his day. He was a student at the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, but resigned shortly before 
the Civil War and served as a captain in the Con- 
federate Army during the Civil War. His death 
occurred in Florida in 1906. Mrs. Mathes, a native 
of Tennessee, now resides in Chicago. Y. D. Mathes 
attended the public schools of Florida, later enter- 
ing the University of Chicago, where he took the 
L. L. B. degree in 1916. He came direct to Hous- 
ton, beginning his law practice at that time. In 
1917 he enlisted in military service and was sent 
to the officers training camp at Leon Springs, where 
he was commissioned second lieutenant and sent to 
Ellington Field, near Houston, where he was on the 
staff. He was later made first lieutenant. He was 
demobilized in February, 1919, and now holds the 
commission of captain, Reserve Corps, Judge Ad- 
vocate Department. He re-entered law practice at 
Houston with the same firm he was with before the 
war. 

Mr. Mathes was married at Houston the second 
of February, 1918, to Miss Cora Prudence Carr, a 
native of Illinois, who was reared in Louisiana. Mr. 
and Mrs. Mathes have one child, Mary Boyce Mathes. 
Mr. Mathes is a member of the American Legion and 
is vice commander of the American Legion, De- 
partment of Texas, to which he devotes a great deal 
of time, being a member of the district rehabilitation 
committee of the American Legion, for the 14th 
district, which embraces Texas, Oklahoma and 
Arkansas. 

ROVER REES, attorney-at-law at Houston, 
has attained an enviable reputation in his 
profession since beginning his practice here 
in 1916. Mr. Rees, who began the practice 
of law at Houston in th? early part of 1916, has his 
offices in the Scanlan Building. Prior to beginning 
his practice alone Mr. Rees was with Hutcheson & 
Hutcheson, a well-known Houston law firm, from 
the time he was admitted to the bar until February, 
1917. At that time he went with the law firm of 
Baker, Botts, Parker and Garwood, one of the most 
prominent law firms of the state, and was with 
this firm until May, 1917, when he enlisted in the 
service as a private in the field artillery of the regu- 




lar army at Fort Sam Houston. Mr. Rees was later 
sent to the Officers Training School, where he was 
commissioned a Second Lieutenant, then assigned to 
the Twenty-first Field Artillery, Fifth Division, and 
went overseas with this division, serving in France. 
He was retired in December, 1918, as Captain, and 
in 1923 was made Major of Artillery in the Reserve 
Corps. Returning to Houston after leaving service, 
Mr. Rees again went with the law firm of Baker, 
Botts, Parker and Garwood, remaining with them 
until September, 1919, when he became a member 
of the firm of Hutcheson, Bryan and Dyess, and re- 
mained with that firm until 1924, when he began 
practice alone. 

Mr. Rees was born at Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, 
on October 31st, 1891, son of Charles Rees and 
Ophelia Hardy Rees. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools near his home, later en- 
tering Louisiana State University, where he ob- 
tained his B. A. Degree in 1912. In 1912 he entered 
Harvard Law School, where he attended three years, 
receiving his LL. B. Degree in the class of 1915. 
On being admitted to the bar he came to Houston, 
establishing his first practice in this city, and has 
so continued to the present, steadily advancing to 
a position among the leading lawyers of the city. 

Mr. Rees was married August 11th, 1921, to 
Miss Consuelo Broussard, daughter of A. E. Brous- 
sard, of Breaux Bridge, Louisiana. Mr. Rees takes 
a deep interest in the civic accomplishments of 
Houston, and is regarded by his associates as one 
of the most promising of the younger attorneys of 
this city. 

EMPER W. STEPHENSON, attorney at 
law, resigned the position of district at- 
torney in January, 1922, in order to come to 
Orange, Texas, to become a member of the 
firm of Dies, Stephenson and Dies, with offices in 
the Bancroft Building. This law firm was estab- 
lished in January, 1922, by Martin Dies (deceased), 
Kemper W. Stephenson and Martin Dies, Jr., and 
is engaged in a general practice of law. When Mr. 
Stephenson joined this firm, he brought with him 
an experience as an attorney extending over a pe- 
riod of almost a decade, during which time he had 
handled many noteworthy cases. Following his 
graduation from the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Texas in 1913, Mr. Stephenson established his 
office and began the practice of his profession at 
Center, Texas. He continued his practice at Center 
until 1916, when he removed to the historic town of 
San Augustine, Texas, where he was engaged in a 
general practice of law until 1919 when he was ap- 
pointed to the office of district attorney of this dis- 
trict, which he later resigned. 

A native Texan, Mr. Stephenson was born at Cen- 
ter on May 22nd, 1886. His father, James Ste- 
phenson, a native of Georgia, came to Texas as a 
young man, was admitted to the bar and became one 
of the leading attorneys of the Lone Star State, 
and continued to practice his profession until his 
death, which occurred at Center, Texas. His mother 
(also deceased) was, prior to her marriage, Miss 
Donna Rushing, a member of a pioneer Texas fam- 
ily. His early education was obtained in the public 
and high schools of Center, Texas, where he grad- 
uated from the latter. He then entered the Uni- 
versity of Texas and graduated from that institu- 
tion in the class of 1913 with the LL.B. degree. 




1314 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




Mr. Stephenson, being loyal to the traditions of his 
native state, established his office in the town in 
which he was born and where he achieved his first 
successes. 

Mr. Stephenson was married at Shelbyville, Texas, 
on July 31st, 1916, to Miss Marguerite Kenna, a 
native of Mississippi and a member of a well known 
family of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson 
reside at 910 Seventh Street. They have one son, 
Ward Stephenson. Mr. Stephenson is a member of 
the Lions Club and is active in this organization. 
He also holds membership in the various bar asso- 
ciations. Mr. Stephenson never loses an opportu- 
nity to speak a good word for his city and his state 
and believes there are opportunities for development 
along every line in Texas. As a leader in one of 
the most honorable professions of men and as a 
champion of every worthy civic move, Mr. Stephen- 
son is one of the foremost citizens of his city. 

TAN LEY BEARD, in the decade and a half 
of his law practice at Houston, has secured 
and maintained a high position in his pro- 
fession, enjoying the esteem of the bench 
and bar of Harris County, and has entered into the 
life and spirit of Houston in a commendable way 
indicative of the interest he takes in the develop- 
ment of this city. Mr. Beard has a large and well- 
established general practice, taking him into all the 
courts of Harris County, and with excellent profes- 
sional training is well equipped for any professional 
demands. He practices alone, maintaining his of- 
fices in the Republic Building. Mr. Beard was ad- 
mitted to the bar and began the practice of law at 
Houston in 1910, engaging in practice here until 
1917, when he entered the army. He had been elect- 
ed to the State legislature in 1914, and re-elected 
in 1916, and was the first man to resign from that 
body to enlist in service when the United States 
entered the world war. Since his discharge from 
military service, Mr. Beard has returned to Hous- 
ton, resuming his law practice, and in every way 
living up to the indications noted at the beginning 
of his career for a brilliant future in the law. 

Stanley Beard was born at Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
the 26th of April, 1886. His father, T. G. Beard, a 
native of England, came to the United States in 
1885, and to Houston in 1889, and is one of the 
veteran railroad men of this city, having been with 
the Southern Pacific Railroad for many years. His 
mother, whose maiden name was Miss Corinne 
David, is a native of New Orleans, but has resided 
in Houston for many years. Stanley Beard attend- 
ed private schools at Houston and was a student 
in the Welsh Academy here, and also in Austin 
Academy, at Austin. He then entered Washington 
and Lee University, where the LL. B. degree was 
conferred on him in June, 1909. Mr. Beard then re- 
turned to Houston, where he was admitted to the 
bar in August, 1909, beginning his practice here 
the early part of 1910. In 1914 he was elected to 
the State legislature, and was serving his second 
term there when he resigned to enlist with the Unit- 
ed States Marines the 4th of April, 1914. He was 
sent to New Orleans, Louisiana, remaining there 
for six months, when he was sent to Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, and later to Quantico, Virginia, where he 
remained one year. He was commissioned lieuten- 
ant and sent to Paris Island, South Carolina, and 




after three months sent back to Norfolk, Virginia, 
as judge advocate. Six months later he was sent 
to Rhode Island, receiving his captain's commis- 
sion while on duty there, and receiving his discharge 
from that State, after which he returned to Hous- 
ton and resumed his law practice. 

Mr. Beard is an Elk, and is one of the most public- 
spirited of the younger professional men of Hous- 
ton, taking a deep interest in the welfare and ad- 
vancement of this city, and contributing generous- 
ly to all organized work toward this end. 

ATES F. WILSON, Attorney at Law, al- 
though a comparatively recent addition to 
the legal fraternity of Houston, Texas, has 
established a reputation as one of the lead- 
ers among the younger lawyers of this city. Mr. 
Wilson is engaged in a general practice of civil law, 
the greater portion of his time being devoted to 
title work and kindred lines for the Damon Wells 
Real Estate Company of Houston. He began his 
practice here in 1922, and has been associated with 
large real estate firms, specializing in title work. 
He has his office conveniently located at 826 Chron- 
icle Building. Mr. Wilson inherited his taste and 
talent for the legal profession from his father, who 
is regarded as one of the most able lawyers of his 
State, where he has been identified with many of 
the most important cases which have come before 
the courts of Missouri. 

Mr. Wilson was born at St. Charles, Missouri, on 
December 20, 1893. His father, C. W. Wilson, also 
a native of Missouri, has been a leader in the pro- 
fession of law of St. Charles for many years. His 
mother was Miss Julia Prayser, also a native Mis 
sourian, and a member of a well known family of 
that State. His early education was obtained in the 
schools of St. Charles, Missouri, and Westminister 
College, Fulton, Missouri, after which he pursued 
the study of law in his father's office for a brief per- 
iod, when he moved to Houston, where he again took 
up the study of law in his spare time until he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He first began a general prac- 
tice of the profession, but since removing to Hous- 
ton, has devoted practically all his time to title and 
kindred work. 

Mr. Wilson was married at Houston on Novem- 
ber 15, 1922, to Miss Margaret Gillespie, a native 
of Houston and a daughter of J. J. Gillespie, one 
of the city's old and well known citizens. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson reside at 2205 Rosewood Avenue. Since 
coming to Houston Mr. Wilson has become imbued 
with the Houston spirit and at all times wields his 
influence for a greater and better Houston. Mr. 
Wilson has made a host of friends here, and is 
popular, not only in the legal circles of the city, 
but in the business and social circles as well. In 
his work as a lawyer, along his chosen branch of the 
profession, although he is among the younger men 
who have specialized in this particular line, he is 
regarded as an authority on title and kindred law. 
He has done a great deal of this work for non-resi- 
dents and in this way he has become well known 
outside of the Lone Star State, as well as within its 
bounds. Mr. Wilson is a firm believer in the ethics 
of the profession, and is a worker for and a stead- 
fast exponent of its highest standards, and is re- 
garded as one of the most progressive young lawyers 
of the State. 



1315 



MEN OF TEXAS 




DWARD S. BOYLES has for a number of 
years past been identified with legal activi- 
ties at Houston, where his masterly hand- 
ling of corporation problems and his legal 
ability have won the highest esteem of bench and 
bar. Mr. Boyles is senior member of the firm of 
Boyles, Brown and Scott, succeeding Moody, Boyles, 
Walker and Scott. Mr. Boyles' practice is of a 
general civil nature, largely corporation work, and 
he is retained by many of the large firms of Hous- 
ton. He personally handles all work for the First 
National Bank of Houston and was during the lat- 
ter part of the war general attorney for the Texas 
food administration. Mr. Boyles concentrates his 
attention on civil work, especially in corporation 
matters, in which he has shown talents of a special 
order. Mr. Boyles has his offices in the First Na- 
tional Bank Building and is associated with L. D. 
Brown, J. T. Scott, Jr., Russell Scott, E. F. Gibbons 
and Pat N. Fahey, under the name of Boyles, Brown 
and Scott. 

Edward S. Boyles was born at Houston the eight- 
eenth of April, 1889, the son of Dr. J. M. Boyles, for 
three decades one of the outstanding medical men 
of Houston, and Margaret Campbell Boyles. Mr. 
Boyles was educated in Houston, attending Prof. 
Welch's Academy and the Houston high school. 
After a three years' academic course at the Univer- 
sity of Texas he entered the law school there and 
took his LL. B. degree in 1911, since which time he 
has practiced in Houston. 

Mr. Boyles was married at Yorktown, in DeWitt 
County, Texas, the thirtieth of October, 1918, to Miss 
Constance Weldon, daughter of S. E. Weldon, a 
cattleman and rancher of that county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Boyles reside at the Burlington Apartments. Mr. 
Boyles is active in commercial enterprises, con- 
trolling the A. B. C. Stores of Houston. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church, of which Dr. 
Jacobs, well known divine, is pastor, and was for 
many years chairman of the board of trustees. The 
legal firm of which he is a member belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce and the Real Estate Board 
and is active in civic advancement. Mr. Boyles is 
a member of the Houston Country Club, the Glen- 
brook Country Club and the University Club and 
belongs to the Delta Chi college fraternity, Austin 
chapter. Notwithstanding the exacting demands of 
his professional career, Mr. Boyles takes a deep 
interest in the development of Houston and has con- 
tributed to the success of most of the civic move- 
ments in recent years. 

UDGE CLAUDE POLLARD, Ex-President 
of the Texas Bar Association, and formerly 
Assistant Attorney General, has practiced 
before the Texar Bar for a period of over 
thirty years. He is a member of the firm of Pol- 
lard, Fisher and Gaines, who have offices on the 
8th floor of the State National Bank Building, Hous- 
ton, Texas. Other members of the firm are Judge 
Lewis Fisher and George C. Gaines, Jr., all three 
members of the firm having had a long experience 
in practicing before the bar of Houston. The firm 
engage in a general civil practice, and number 
among their clients many of the large corporations 
and representative citizens of Houston. 

Judge Pollard has long held a noteworthy place 
in the legal fraternity of Texas. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1895, when he was twenty-one years 




of age. He immediately began the practice of law 
at Carthage, and was shortly after elected County 
Attorney of Panola County, holding this position for 
four years until 1899. In 1901 he was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney of the Fourth Judicial District, com- 
prising four counties, of which Carthage was the 
headquarters. He held this position until 1905, 
when he was appointed Assistant Attorney General 
by R. V. Davidson, who was Attorney General at 
that time, and served as the Counsel for the Railroad 
Commission, also handling tax matters and pros- 
ecuting important cases against the railroads, retir- 
ing from the office of Assistant Attorney General 
he accepted the appointment as General Attorney 
for the St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railroad 
Company, with headquarters at Kingsville, Texas, 
serving in this capacity until 1917, when he came 
to Houston and became a member of the firm of 
McMeans, Garrison and Pollard. In 1925 he organ- 
ized the present firm. Throughout his legal career 
Judge Pollard has taken a potent interest in public 
matters, and has contributed a great deal to mat- 
ters pertaining to civic progress. Judge Pollard was 
the organizer of Kleburg County and wrote the 
bill, which was enacted into a law by the Legislature, 
making it a county. He also wrote the bill creating 
the South Texas State Teachers College at Kings- 
ville, Texas. He has contributed articles of merit to 
many of the law journals, and among interesting 
articles from his pen is a history of the Texas Bar 
Association for the Encyclopedia of Texas. 

A native of Texas, Judge Pollard was born at 
Carthage, Panola County, February 14, 1874. His 
father, Hamilton Pollard, a native of South Caro- 
lina, came to Texas in 1854, and was for a period 
of twenty-five years County Clerk of Panola County. 
His mother was before her marriage, Miss Sarah 
Jane Davis, a native of Alabama, and came to Texas 
with her parents before the Civil War and was 
among the pioneer settlers of Texas. Judge Pol- 
lard received his education in the schools of Car- 
thage, and when but eighteen years of age began 
the study of law, while he was working on a farm 
and in a country store, and later teaching the coun- 
try school until he took the law examination and 
was admitted to the bar. 

Judge Pollard was married in Fannin County De- 
cember 27, 1897, to Miss Julia Newton, a daughter 
of S. M. Newton, a native of Tennessee, who came 
to Texas before the Civil War, and was a well known 
farmer, ginner and business man of Panola County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Pollard have two children, Loraine 
and Claude Pollard, Jr. Judge Pollard is a Scottish 
Rite Mason, Knight Templar, and member of the 
Arabia Temple Shrine. He also holds membership 
in the Houston Club, Conopus Club, Traffic Club, 
the Harris County Bar Association, the American 
Bar Association and the Texas Bar Association, 
having served as President of the Texas Bar Asso- 
ciation during 1920 and 1921, and Vice-President and 
member of Board of Directors for several terms 
prior to that date. Judge Pollard has taken a keen 
interest in educational matters and during his resi- 
dence at Kingsville was on the Board of Education, 
serving for a period as President of that body, and 
a member of the Board of Education of the city of 
Houston. Since coming to Houston he has kept 
his hand on the pulse of public matters, and has 
taken an active interest in local, political and civic 
affairs. 



1316 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




OHN T. SCOTT, JR., native Houstonian, be- 
gan his professional career in Houston in 
June, 1920, as a member of the firm of 
Moody, Boyles, Walker and Scott. Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, Mr. Edward S. Boyles and Mr. Scott, 
of this firm, together with Mr. L. D. Brown, of La 
Grange, Texas, organized the present firm of Boyles, 
Brown and Scott, with whom are also associated 
at this time Mr. Russell Scott, Mr. E. F. Gibbons 
and Pat N. Fahey, This firm enjoys an extensive 
general civil practice, representing the First Na- 
tional Bank and numerous other institutions. 

Mr. Scott, in the several years of his practice in 
this city, has won the respect of the bench and bar 
and has attained a splendid reputation as a general 
practitioner. 

John T. Scott, Jr., was born at Houston the 13th 
day of June, 1894. He is the only son of John T. 
Scott, well known banker of this city, and Mattie 
Campbell Scott. He received his early education at 
the Houston Academy, after which he entered the 
University of Texas, graduating in 1916 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then entered the 
Law School of the University of Texas, receiving 
his L. L. B. degree in 1920, after an absence from 
the University of two years, while in military 
service. 

Mr. Scott was married at El Paso the 6th of 
September, 1921, to Miss Sadieruth Aldridge, the 
daughter of W. H. Aldridge and Frances Wooten 
Aldridge. Mr. Aldridge was a well known lumber- 
man of East Texas, who moved to El Paso in 1916. 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott live at No. 4 Waverly Drive, and 
have one child, Elizabeth Aldridge Scott. They are 
members of the First Methodist Church, where Mr. 
S.cott is serving on the official board. 

Mr. Scott takes a live interest in the development 
of Houston, and is connected with a number of new 
business enterprises of this city, among them the 
Houston Dispatch, of which he is Secretary, Damon 
Wells Company, Wademan's, Rettig's, The Gables, 
and Castor Oil Products Company, of which organi- 
zations he is a director. He is past President of the 
Glenbrook Country Club, a member of the Houston 
Country Club, and the River Oaks Country Club. He 
is President of the Exchange Club of Houston, Vice- 
President of the City and County Club, and a mem- 
ber of the University Club, where he served as 
Treasurer and Director for several years. Mr. Scott 
is a member of the Kappa Sigma, Phi Delta Phi and 
Sigma Delta Chi, college fraternities, the Harris 
County Bar Association, the Texas Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association; a Mason, being 
affiliated with Holland Lodge No. 1, Washington 
Chapter No. 2, Ruthven Commandery No. 2, and 
Arabia Temple Shrine; and an Elk, belonging to 
Houston Lodge No. 151. 

During the World War Mr. Scott served at home 
and overseas as a First Lieutenant with the 344th 
Field Artillery, 90th Division. In May, 1919, he was 
detailed with the British University Detachment, 
where he attended the University of Edinburg, and 
was discharged from the service in August, 1919. 
Mr. Scott is a member of the American Legion and 
of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and holds a Re- 
serve Commission in the Judge Advocate General's 
Section, 0. R. C. 

Mr. Scott is recognized as a leader of the young 
men of the city, and believes in Houston as "The 
city of opportunities for the young man." 




TIS MEREDITH. Mr. Meredith is a member 
of the firm of Carlton and Meredith, an 
association which was formed in 1919, 
shortly after Mr. Meredith entered the bar. 
The firm is composed of Mr. Meredith and L. A. 
Carlton, one of the foremost oil attorneys of Texas, 
and has offices in the Humble Building, at Hous- 
ton. The practice handled by the firm is chiefly 
limited to oil matters. 

Mr. Meredith was born at Hillsboro, Texas, the 
third of June, 1894. His father, W. J. Meredith, died 
when he was a small boy. His mother, who was 
Miss Carlton before her marriage, and a sister of 
L. A. Carlton, Mr. Meredith's associate in his law 
practice, lived subsequently at Beaumont and Hous- 
ton, and Mr. Meredith received his early education 
in the public schools of these cities. After finish- 
ing at the Houston High School, he entered the Uni- 
versity of Texas, in 1912, attending at intervals until 
1917, when he enlisted in the Naval Air Service, vol- 
unteering in June of that year. He was sent to 
Seattle, Washington, and later Key West, and served 
for one year after the close of the World War as 
a naval reserve officer. Mr. Meredith then re-en- 
tered the University of Texas, in the law depart- 
ment, taking his L. L. B. degree in 1919, after which 
he came to Houston and formed the partnership with 
L. A. Carlton, with whom he has since been asso- 
ciated. 

Mr. Meredith was married at Brenham, Texas, 
the twenty-second of March, 1922, to Miss Mary Wil- 
kins, a native of Galveston. They reside at 909 
Branard Avenue, and have one child, Mary Meredith. 
Mr. Meredith is a leader among the younger attor- 
neys at Houston, and is active in the civic life here. 

HOMAS B. BLANCHARD, attorney at law, 
has for the past decade practiced his pro- 
fession before the bar of Houston, and has 
been identified with some of the most prom- 
inent cases that have come before the courts of 
South Texas. Mr. Blanchard is a member of the 
firm of Wolters, Blanchard, Woodul and Wolters, 
one of the leading law firms of Houston, and per- 
sonally looks after trial work. He came to Hous- 
ton in 1913 and since that time has been engaged 
in a general practice _i law, with office located at 
818 Chronicle Building. The firm of Wolters, Blan- 
chard, Woodul and Wolters represents the Missouri, 
Kansas and Texas Railroad in several counties, the 
Texas Company in various matters, the Pullman 
Company, Houston Chronicle and various other 
industries, companies and local concerns and indi- 
viduals. 

Mr. Blanchard was born at Boyce, Louisiana, 
February 2nd, 1889. His father, F. A. Blanchard, 
belongs to a well known Virginia family and is a 
planter, residing at Boyce, Louisiana. His mother 
was Miss Sarah D. Barrett, a native of Nacogdoches, 
Texas, and a member of a pioneer Texas family. His 
early education was obtained in the public and high 
schools of Boyce, Louisiana, graduating from the 
latter in 1907. He then became a student of the 
Louisiana State University and later the University 
of Texas in a pre-legal course, and graduated from 
this institution in the class of 1913 with the degree 
of L. L. B. During the same year of his graduation 
from college, Mr. Blanchard came to Houston and 
began the practice of his profession with the firm 




1319 



MEN OF TEXAS 




of Lane, Wolters and Storey, and has continued 
through the changes in the personnel of this firm, 
and the present firm was organized in 1925. 

Mr. Blanchard was married at Boyce, Louisiana, 
December 16th, 1918, to Miss Edna I. Kelsoe, a native 
of Boyce and a daughter of E. H. Kelsoe, a pioneer 
merchant of Boyce, Louisiana. Mr. and Mrs. Blan- 
chard reside at 1421 Hawthorne Avenue. Mr. Blan- 
chard is a member of the York Rite body of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, the Houston Club, Texas Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Harris County Bar Association. He 
is a consistent member of the Episcopal Church. 
The name of Blanchard has been familiar to several 
generations in Louisiana, where the several members 
of this family have won distinction and honor. His 
uncle, Newton C. Blanchard, held various offices in 
Louisiana up to the United States Senate, having 
served as congressman, governor of the state, jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court of Louisiana, both houses 
of the state Legislature and died in 1922, and his 
memory will be honored by the citizenship of the 
state of Louisiana for many generations to come. 
Other members of the Blanchard family have been 
active in the political, social and business life of 
Louisiana. While yet a young man, Mr. Blanchard 
has gained considerable prominence as a lawyer, and 
is also one of the ranking orators of the state. 

OY L. ARTERBURY, Attorney at Law, of 
Houston, Texas, has been a member of the 
well known law firm of Garrison and Wat- 
son of this city since 1921, and does much 
of the work connected with the trial of cases handled 
by the firm, which is composed of John I. Garrison 
and Q. U. Watson. With offices located in the State 
National Bank Building, this firm is engaged in a 
general practice of law, and a large portion of their 
work is along the various classes of railroad prac- 
tice. Mr. Arterbury was admitted to the bar in 
1920, and shortly afterwards located in Houston, 
where he began the practice of law with the firm 
with which he is now connected. 

A native Texan, Mr. Arterbury was born at Bon- 
ham on October 10th, 1892. His father, John E. 
Arterbury, a native of Mississippi, came to Texas in 
1881, and is a resident of Fort Worth, where for 
many years he has been engaged in the contracting 
business, and is one of the leading contractors of 
his city. His mother was Miss Ellen Jones, a mem- 
ber of a prominent family of Pennsylvania. His early 
education was obtained in the public schools of Bon- 
ham, Texas, after which the family removed to Fort 
Worth and he became a student of the high school 
there and is a graduate of that school. He then en- 
tered Vanderbilt University and was a student of 
that famous institution from 1912 to 1917, where he 
pursued a straight academic course. He then re- 
turned to Texas and entered the Law Department 
of the State University and graduated from that in- 
stitution in 1920 with the L. L. B. degree, when he 
began the practice of his chosen profession, and in 
which he has been successful. 

Mr. Arterbury was married at Austin, Texas, on 
August 3rd, 1918, to Miss Hazel Piatt, a native of 
Trinity County, Texas, and a daughter of B. A. 
Piatt of that county, who is one of best known and 
beloved citizens of that portion of the State. They 
have one son, Bryant Piatt. Mr. and Mrs. Arterbury 
reside at 1113 Kenwood Avenue. Mr. Arterbury is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias and is active in 




this organization. He is also a member of the 
various social organizations of Houston, in which 
he is very popular. Among the younger lawyers of 
Houston, there are none who take a more active in- 
terest in their city, than does Mr. Arterbury, who 
gives of his time and means to every project having 
as its object the civic improvement and betterment 
of his city. In his work as a lawyer he is recognized 
as one of the coming young men in his profession. 

ALACE HAWKINS, one of the younger re- 
cruits to the legal profession, has attained 
an enviable reputation as a trial lawyer. Mr. 
Hawkins is connected with the legal depart- 
ment of the Magnolia Petroleum Company at Dallas, 
recently going there from Houston, where he was 
a member of the firm of Campbell, Simmons and 
Hawkins, one of the strongest legal firms of Hous- 
ton. Mr. Hawkins specialized in trial work and 
achieved the reputation of being one of the best 
trial lawyers in the city. 

Walace Hawkins was born at Brookhaven, Texas, 
the twenty-fourth of July, 1896, son of W. P. Haw- 
kins and Mattie (Meek) Hawkins. W. P. Hawkins, 
a native of Mississippi, came to Texas in the early 
'80s, settling in Goliad County, and later removing 
to Runnels County, where he has since been engaged 
in the mercantile and banking business. Mrs. Haw- 
kins is a native Texan. Walace Hawkins attended 
the public schools of Runnels County, later enter- 
ing Stamford College, and still later the University 
of Texas, following his work there with post-gradu- 
ate work at Ann Arbor, Michigan. The following two 
years he was principal of the Dublin, Texas, high 
school, resigning this position on his election to the 
thirty-fifth legislature. While serving as legislator 
the United States entered the World War and Mr. 
Hawkins resigned his place and entered the army 
in August, 1917, attending the First Officers Train- 
ing Camp at Leon Springs, where he was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant. He was sent to Colum- 
bus, New Mexico, attached to the Twenty-fourth 
Infantry, Regular Army, and commissioned lieuten- 
ant, and later transferred to Oklahoma, and still 
later to Georgia, where he was engaged in training 
men and companies until he was demobilized in 
February, 1919, ranking as captain at that time. 
He then returned to Austin, attending the Univer- 
sity of Texas, where he took his LL.B. degree in 
1920. He was made assistant attorney general un- 
der Attorney General Cureton, holding that office 
from January, 1920, until 1924. During this time 
much of the work handled in the attorney general's 
office was banking and insurance, and also the fa- 
mous Red River boundary case, on which Mr. Haw- 
kins spent one year and a half. In 1924 he resigned 
his position as assistant attorney general and came 
to Houston, joining the law firm of Campbell, Myer, 
Simmons and Hawkins at that time being organized, 
remaining with this firm until making his present 
connection with the legal department of the Mag- 
nolia Petroleum Company at Dallas. 

Mr. Hawkins was married at Austin, Texas, the 
fifth of August, 1921, to Miss Frances Booth, a 
native of Austin. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins have two 
children, Patricia and Harriet Hawkins. Mr. Haw- 
kins is a member of the Dallas County Bar Asso- 
ciation and the Texas Bar Association, and is re- 
garded as a young attorney with a very bright 
future. 

1320 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




South. 



ALVIN B. GARWOOD, one of the very able 
members of the Houston Bar, is associated 
with the law firm of Baker, Botts, Parker 
and Garwood, the largest law firm in the 
He joined this firm shortly after being ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1920 and is associated in the 
railroad department. The firm of Baker, Botts, Par- 
ker and Garwood occupies the sixth floor of the 
Commercial National Bank Building and has in 
addition to the four members of the firm a staff 
of highly trained legal specialists, and is not only 
the strongest in the South, but one of the most prom- 
inent law firms in the entire country. 

Calvin B. Garwood was born at Bastrop, Texas, 
the twenty-sixth of March, 1894, the son of Judge 
H. M. Garwood, a member of the law firm of Baker, 
Botts, Parker and Garwood, and one of the foremost 
attorneys of Texas. Judge Garwood contributed the 
interesting sketch of the bench and bar of Houston 
appearing in this work. Mr. Garwood received his 
early instruction at St. Thomas School at Hous- 
ton, later entering Georgetown College, at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and later the University of Texas, in the 
department of law. He left college in 1916 to enter 
military service, volunteering as a private in the 
infantry, with the Second Texas National Guard. He 
was later commissioned second lieutenant in this or- 
ganization, and, after the Second Texas National 
Guard was made a part of the 141st Infantry, U. S. 
A., he went to France with them, serving overseas 
until 1919. He was discharged the fifth of July, 
1919, as first lieutenant, and is now major of the 
Fifty-sixth Machine Gun Company, Texas National 
Guards. Returning from overseas, Major Garwood 
re-entered the University of Texas, in the law de- 
partment, taking his L. L. B. degree in 1920. He 
then came to Houston, going with his present firm. 
Mr. Garwood was married at Houston, the twenty- 
ninth of June, 1921, to Miss Christie Moore, a native 
of San Antonio, and the daughter of U. C. Moore, of 
that city. Mr. and Mrs. Garwood reside at 901 
Rosalie Street, and are leaders among the younger 
social set. Mr. Garwood is a member of college 
fraternities, and belongs to the University Club, and 
the American Legion, and is one of the most prom- 
ising of the young attorneys at Houston. 

EORGE A. HILL, JR., has been engaged in 
the practice of law since his admission to 
the bar in 1911 and today is one of the best 
known members of the legal profession in 
Southern Texas. His office is at 906 Scanlan Build- 
ing, where he is a member of the law firm of Ken- 
nerly, Lee and Hill, one of the strongest firms of 
legal talent in Houston. He became identified with 
this firm in 1917 when the style of the firm was 
Kennerly, Williams, Lee and Hill. Judge Williams 
retired from the firm in 1921 when the name was 
changed to Kennerly, Lee and Hill. The firm does 
a general civil practice in both the state and federal 
courts and appears as counsel for some of the lead- 
ing concerns of the South. 

Upon completion of his studies at the Univer- 
sity of Texas in 1911, and receiving his license as a 
member of the bar, Mr. Hill engaged in general prac- 
tice until 1917 when he was appointed assistant gen- 
eral attorney for the International and Great Nor- 
thern Railway Company. For a few months of the 
same year he was connected with the law firm of 




Bryan, Hill and Bryan before making his present 
connection. 

Mr. Hill is a native of Texas and was born at Cor- 
sicana on January 12, 1892. He is a son of George 
A. and Julia (McHugh) Hill and received his pre- 
liminary education in the public and high schools of 
Austin and Houston. From 1903 to 1905 he attended 
the West Texas Military Academy and from 1907 
to 1911 was a student at the University of Texas, at 
Austin, doing two years of academic work and two 
years in the law department. 

Mr. Hill comes of a family of prominent Texans. 
His father, a native of the state, now retired from 
active business, is a son of James M. Hill, who 
was in the battle of San Jacinto, the conflict that 
won for Texas its freedom from Mexico. He later 
was chairman of the commission that purchased the 
famous battle grounds for the state of Texas and 
made possible beautiful San Jacinto Park, a few 
miles from the city of Houston. 

James M. Hill, with his father and brothers, came 
to Texas from Georgia, about 1828 or 1830, and set- 
tled in Washington County, where they played im- 
portant parts in the early history of the state. Ben- 
jamin Harvey Hill, a member of the same family, 
was a member of the Confederate cabinet and later 
was United States Senator from Georgia. 

George A. Hill, Sr. was for many years engaged 
in the cotton business in Galveston and was also in 
the wholesale grocery business in Corsicana. He was 
president of the Austin Dam and Suburban Railway 
Company, manager of the Hogg-Swayne Syndicate 
and later land and tax commissioner for the B. S. L. 
and N. Railway and president of the Houston Trans- 
fer and Carriage Company. He is now retired and 
living in Houston. 

On June 24, 1916, Mr. Hill was married at Vic- 
toria, Texas, to Miss Mary Vandenberge, daughter 
of J. V. Vandenberge, president of the Levi Bank 
and Trust Company and a member of the well known 
law firm of Proctor, Vandenberge, Crane and Mit- 
chell, of Victoria. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are the par- 
ents of two interesting children, Joanne Vandenberge 
and George A., III. 

In 1918 Mr. Hill entered the United States army 
as captain of Troop C of the Seventh Regiment 
Texas Cavalry and received his training at Leon 
Springs. He served with the Seventh Texas during 
the war. 

While doing a general civil practice, Mr. Hill has 
specialized in federal tax matters and has a large 
clientele which he represents in matters pertaining 
to federal taxes. His clients include Sanger Broth- 
ers and the Perkins Dry Goods Company, two of the 
largest wholesale concerns of Dallas. He has re- 
cently been named by Judge Hutcheson of the Fed- 
eral District Court as attorney for the receiver for 
the Wilson-Stewart Farm Mortgage Company, the 
W. E. Stewart Land Company, Edinburg Irrigation 
Company and the Rio Bravo Irrigation Company. 
Between 300 and 400 cases are involved in these 
various receiverships and the properties in control 
of the receiver aggregate in value four million 
dollars. 

Mr. Hill is a member of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation, State and County Bar Associations, Houston 
Country Club, Houston Club, University Club, Kappa 
Alpha and Dhi Delta Phi fraternities. He is a com- 
municant of the Episcopal Church. 



1323 



MEN OF TEXAS 




ILLIAM FULTON TARVER, attorney at 
law, has for almost a quarter of a century 
practiced before the Houston bar, and dur- 
ing this period has been identified with 
many of the most prominent cases which have come 
before the courts of South Texas. Mr. Tarver was 
admitted to the bar in 1900 and immediately became 
associated with the law firm of Burt and Griggs of 
Houston, which was composed of Col. F. S. Burt and 
George B. Griggs, and remained with this firm for 
one year, after which he became a member of the 
firm and the name was changed to Burt, Griggs and 
Tarver. A year later, Mr. Griggs retired, and the 
firm became Burt and Tarver, which continued until 
the death of Col. Burt in 1910. Since that time, 
Mr. Tarver has practiced his profession alone. He 
has well appointed offices in the West Building, and 
was the first tenant to occupy offices in this build- 
ing after its construction by Mr. D. R. Beatty. 

Mr. Tarver is a native Houstonian, born in this 
city on Septemeber 25th, 1880. His father, Thomas 
Cary Tarver, a native of Tennessee, was brought 
to Texas by his parents at the age of five years, 
and has continued to make the Lone Star State his 
home since that time, and is essentially loyal to the 
customs and traditions of his adopted state. For 
many years he was one of the leading cotton men of 
South Texas, after which he became associated with 
the Houston and Texas Central Railroad, and re- 
mained with this railroad until he retired from active 
business pursuits in 1903, and removed to Liberty, 
Texas. His mother was Miss Fannie Ada Fulton, al- 
so a native Houstonian, and a member of one of the 
prominent pioneer families of this city. She was 
born at the old Fulton homestead, at the corner 
of La Branch and Rusk. His education was obtained 
in the public and high schools of Houston, where he 
graduated from the latter. After leaving school Mr. 
Tarver began the study of law, at spare times while 
regularly employed by day, and pursuing his law 
studies at night, and continued his studies along 
this line until he was admitted to the bar. 

Mr. Tarver was married at Austin, Texas, on 
June 24th, 1908, to Miss Annie Franklin, a native 
Texan and a member of a well known family of 
Brenham. Mr. and Mrs. Tarver have adopted two 
nieces, Margaret and Vivian Tarver, and to whom 
they have given the parental love and care. Mr. 
Tarver is known as one of Houston's most active 
citizens along all civic lines, and never loses 
an opportunity to speak a good word for the 
city of his nativity. He regards the legal profession 
as being peculiarly fitted for service to the public, 
and his future will be one of service to his city and 
state. 

ALPH W. PLUMMER, well known Lawyer, 
has been a factor in the business circles 
of this city for many years, being asso- 
ciated with Judge K. C. Barkley in the prac- 
tice of law. 

Mr. Plummer was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on August 2, 1886. His father, F. H. Plummer, also 
a native of Massachusetts, was engaged in the 
manufacturing business all his life and was for 
many years in the Chair Manufacturing industry in 
Arkansas City, Kansas. His mother was Miss El- 
sie Griffin, a member of a prominent Massachu- 
setts family. His early education was obtained in 





the public schools of Boston, and later studied law 
for a number of years. 

Mr. Plummer came to Houston in 1908 and for 
several years did accounting work, and was recog- 
uized as one of the best in his line. Later, he or- 
ganized the Keystone Tire Company of Texas, and 
was Vice-President of this company, which was en- 
gaged in the sale of the Keystone Tires and Tubes 
at wholesale, and later merged that company with 
the organization, which was known as the R. W. 
Plummer Company, Inc. Mr. Plummer was mar- 
ried in Houston in October, 1913, to Miss Verda 
Davis, a native of Michigan, and a member of a 
prominent family of that State. They have two 
children, Dorothy and Ralph W. Plummer, Jr. Mr. 
and Mrs. Plummer reside at 1312 Willard Street. 
Mr. Plummer is a member of the A. F. and A. M., 
with membership in Holland Lodge No. 1, of Hous- 
ton, and is a 32nd degree Scottish Rite of that order, 
and a member of Arabia Temple Shrine, and for 
one year was a member of the Arabia Patrol. He 
has participated in a most substantial and active 
manner in all moves and enterprises that have had 
for their object the upbuilding of the city of Hous- 
ton and its citizenship. Mr. Plummer is popular 
in both the business and social circles of the city, 
and is regarded as one of the leading young profes- 
sional men of the South Texas Metropolis. 

LUDLOW CALHOUN, attorney at law of 
Beaumont, Texas, has for nineteen years 
been engaged in a general civil practice 
of law in this city, and is known as one of 
the beacon lights of the legal profession. Mr. Cal- 
houn, with offices located at 323-325 V. Weiss Build- 
ing, has always practiced his profession alone, and 
has been associated with many of the most prom- 
inent cases which have come before the courts of 
South Texas since beginning the practice of law 
here. He was elected to the office of justice of 
the peace in Beaumont in 1908 and served in this 
capacity until 1910, when he was elected to the of- 
fice of city attorney and held this important of- 
fice for four years and established an enviable 
reputation in the manner in which he represented 
the city, during his regime. Mr. Calhoun has always 
been a loyal booster for Beaumont, and has con- 
fidence that this city will eventually be one of the 
largest of the Southwest, and this belief forms the 
foundation for loyal and beneficent service to his 
city and state. 

A native Texan, Mr. Calhoun was born at Sandy 
Point, Brazoria County, on November 23rd, 1882. 
His father, B. F. Calhoun (deceased), came to Texas 
from South Carolina in 1866 and was a practicing 
physician at that time. He first settled in Brazoria 
County and in 1883 came to Beaumont and con- 
tinued the practice of medicine here until his death 
on January 15th, 1922. Dr. Calhoun was one of 
the most prominent physicians of his day in the 
Lone Star State, and was a pioneer in his profes- 
sion in Texas, and was the oldest physician here 
at the time of his decease, being seventy-two years 
of age, but active at that time. His mother (also de- 
ceased), was Miss Mattie Baughn, a native of the 
Lone Star State and a member of a prominent fam- 
ily of Fayette County. His early education was ob- 
tained in the public and high schools of Beaumont, 
where he graduated from the latter. He then en- 
tered the University of Texas, where he first pur- 



1324 



NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TEXAS 




sued a literary course and later became a student 
of the law department and graduated from this insti- 
tution in the class of 1906 with the L. L. B. degree, 
after which he immediately established his office 
at Beaumont and began the practice of his chosen 
profession, and has met with unusual success. 

Mr. Calhoun was married at Waco, Texas, on De- 
cember 8th, 1910, to Miss Ladie Pearl Olive, a na- 
tive of Hardin County, Texas, and a daughter of 
Sidney Olive, well known in the business circles of 
East Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Calhoun reside at 1880 
Broadway. Mr. Calhoun is popular in the business 
and social circles of Beaumont, and throughout the 
state. As a leader in one of the most honorable pro* 
fessions of men, and as a champion of every worthy 
civic move, Mr. Calhoun is regarded as one of the 
foremost citizens of Beaumont and has a sure place 
among the leaders of his state. 

* DWARD TILGHMAN CHEW, attorney at 
law of Houston, has practiced his profes- 
sion in Texas for more than a quarter of 
a century and is well known at the bar of 
this state. Mr. Chew is engaged in a general civil 
practice of law, with offices in the Kress Building, 
and has occupied offices in this building since it was 
constructed. He began the practice of his profes- 
sion in the year 1899 with his father, F. F. Chew, 
under the firm name of F. F. and E. T. Chew, and 
this partnership continued until his father's death in 
1907, since which time he has practiced alone. Mr. 
Chew has a large practice and is regarded as an ex- 
ecutive in addition to being a successful lawyer. 

A native Houstonian, Mr. Chew was born on Sep- 
tember 3rd, 1876. His father, F. F. Chew (deceased 
since May 6th, 1907) was a native of Mississippi and 
a graduate of the university of that state, class of 
1858, and a member of the Delta Psi fraternity. He 
came to Texas with his brother, John C. Chew, in 
1859 and settled on the Brazos River, where they 
owned a large plantation. Mr. Chew continued to 
reside on and operate this plantation until the out- 
break of the Civil War, in which he was a partici- 
pant. After the close of the war, he came to Hous- 
ton and was one of Houston's first newspaper men 
and was a writer of note. He was connected with 
the old Houston Telegraph and was a writer on this 
early day paper and later became assistant editor 
and the circulation of this paper was largely due to 
his work. He later began the practice of law and 
for many years was one of the most prominent law- 
yers of this part of the state. In addition to being 
one of Houston's foremost attorneys, he was one 
of the builders of this city and was at all times 
at the head of all civic moves, and much of the work 
which has been carried out in Houston along the 
lines of civic improvement was started by Mr. Chew. 
He was closely identified with the social and com- 
mercial life of the city also and exerted an influ- 
ence for good throughout a wide range of the city's 
activities. The mother of E. T. Chew was Miss Julia 
A. Fuller and was born in Houston in the old Fuller 
homestead at the corner of Smith and Preston. Her 
father, Nathan Fuller, came to Houston in 1843, and 
was the third mayor of this city. He was also a 
pioneer in the business and civic life of the city and 
was prominently identified with Houston's early 
growth and advancement. Mr. E. T. Chew's early 
education was obtained in the various schools of 




Houston, after which he entered the law depart- 
ment of the University of Texas and graduated from 
that institution in 1899 with the L. L. B. degree, 
when he immediately joined his father in the prac- 
tice of law in this city, where he has since remained. 
Mr. Chew was married on August 10th, 1911, to 
Miss Bessie Atkeison, a native of Conway, Arkansas, 
but who was reared and educated in Missouri and 
is a graduate of Central College of Lexington, Mis- 
souri. Mr. and Mrs. Chew reside at 424 Hathaway 
Avenue. Mr. Chew is a member of the River Oaks 
Country Club and other social organizations of the 
city and of the college fraternity, Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon. Among the practitioners of civil law, Mr. 
Chew is one of the ablest in the Houston bar. 

OHN B. YORK, one of the highly esteemed 
attorneys of Houston, has had a wide and 
varied experience during his years of prac- 
tice here, and is well versed in both civil 
and criminal procedure. Mr. York is head of the 
law firm of York and Neeld, a firm handling a 
general civil and criminal practice, and one which 
has made a splendid record since its establishment 
in 1922. The firm of York and Neeld is composed of 
John B. York, the subject of this sketch, and H. H. 
Neeld, and has offices in the Kress Building. Mr. 
York has engaged in practice at Houston since his 
admission to the Bar in 1908, and the recognition 
accorded him by his contemporaries and clients alike 
is only in keeping with his demonstrated ability as 
an attorney. 

John B. York was born at Giddings, Lee County, 
Texas, the third of October, 1884, the son of Milton 
G. York, a native of East Texas, who came to Texas 
as a young man and was a farmer in Lee County for 
many years, and Matilda Ann (Heck) York, a na- 
tive of Texas. Mr. York attended the public schools 
at Giddings, later entering the University of Texas, 
in the law department, and taking the LL.B. Degree 
in 1908. After taking his degree and being admitted 
to the Bar Mr. York came direct to Houston, be- 
ginning his practice alone. A year later, in 1909, 
he formed an association with T. W. Menefee, the 
resulting firm being known as Menefee and York. 
This firm continued three years, at which time Mr. 
Kinard came with the firm and the name was 
changed to Kinard, Menefee and York, continuing 
until Mr. Kinard's death two years later, when it 
again became Menefee and York. Three years later 
this partnership was dissolved and Mr. York formed 
an association with Mr. VanVelzer which lasted 
until Mr. VanVelzer removed to California, when he 
formed the present firm of York and Neeld. Mr. 
York is a director of the Universal Land Company, 
a director of the Mutual Construction Company, a 
director of the Peoples Home Investment Company, 
and a director of the Central State Bank. He form- 
erly served for eight years as City Attorney of 
Magnolia Park, a suburb of Houston, and at pres- 
ent a trustee of the Harrisburg Independent School 
District. 

Mr. York was married at Houston the first of 
August, 1912, to Miss Katie Hall, a native of East 
Texas. They reside at 6917 Avenue "C" and have 
two children, Kathryn, and Marion Adele. Mr. York 
is a Mason, Blue Lodge, a Knight of Pythias, and 
a Dokey, and is a thoroughly public spirited citizen, 
interested in the growth of Houston. 



1325 



MEN OF TEXAS 




UDGE ROBERT HAMILTON WARD of 

Houston, Texas, for half a century has been 
an active member of the legal fraternity 
of Texas, and is well known in the bench 
and bar circles of this state, with offices in the Key- 
stone Building, is engaged in a general civil practice. 
Judge Ward was formerly general attorney for the 
Kirby Petroleum Company of this city, and occupied 
that position since the organization of this company. 
In 1921, at the time the Kirby Petroleum Company 
was organized, it took over the Bass Petroleum Com- 
pany, of which Judge Ward was general attorney 
with offices in Wichita Falls, Texas, and had been 
located in this North Texas city since 1919. In 
1922, the offices of the Kirby Petroleum Company 
were moved to Houston and are located in the Great 
Southern Life Building here. Mr. John H. Kirby, 
capitalist and one of the leading lumber men of the 
United States, is president of the company. Judge 
Ward read law in various law offices in Austin, 
Texas, and was admitted to the bar on February 
4th, 1874, and immediately began the practice of his 
profession at Austin and continued there until 1900. 
He then removed to San Antonio, Texas, and prac- 
ticed law there until 1919, when he became general 
attorney for the Bass Petroleum Company and re- 
moved to Wichita Falls, Texas, the headquarters of 
this oil company. While Judge Ward was engaged 
in the practice of law at Austin and San Antonio, 
Texas, he was identified with many of the most im- 
portant cases which came before the courts there. 
He had as partners in these cities some of the most 
able lawyers of the Lone Star State, who with Judge 
Ward became well known as the strongest law firms 
of the Southwest, Judge Ward has occupied many 
positions of honor and trust at the hands of his 
fellowmen, and was a member of t