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Full text of "The New England historical and genealogical register"

EALCX3Y COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01723 8533 



GENEALOGY 
974 
N42NA 
1894 



V;> 



NEW-ENGLANI 



HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



REGISTER 



1 3 94 



OLUME XJ 



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BOSTON 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

JSQ4 



V 



<5U 



Coitor. 
JOHN WARD DEAN, A.M., 

IS Somerset Street, Boston. 



paottsfjittg Committee. 

ALBERT HARRISON 1IOYT, A.M., JOHN WARD DEAN, A.M.. 

FRANK ELIOT BRAD1SH, A.E., GEORGE »ROW N KKAPPl A.M. 

WILLAKD SPENCER ALLEN, A.M. 



STotlor. 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 

CONTENTS — J ANU Alt Y , 18 94. 

*** Illustrations : 

1. Fpwers's Bust of LEVI WOODBURY (to face page 9). 

2. Noyes Inscription at Wequetequoe Cove {to face page IS). 

3. Noyes Anns {page 10). 

4. kutbgrapb of JOHN BRIANT {page 4$). 

5. Plan of the Ancient Line Feilde of Charlestown (jtM£r2 56). 

I. Memoir of Hon. Levi W'oowiruY. By Hon. Charles Levi Wo&doury , . . 9 

IT. Inscriptions at Norfolk, Ya, Camtnuttieatedby Edward W. James, Esq. . 17 

III. Notes Inscription And Memoranda. By James Atkins Xoyes, Ph. B. . . K3 

IV. Excise ox Bread in Boston- in 1731. Communicated bv the late Jeremian Co!~ 

burn, A.M. . . . ■ 20 

V. The Swoans of Washington. By Col. Thornton A. Washington . . . 21 
VI. Dfatks at Stratham, X. II. {Continued.) Communicated by Charles C 

Hard;/, Esq. ■ ' -~ 

VII. Letters or Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. (Continutd.) Comrimfti- 

eated by WkWam B< Trask, A.M 31 

VIII. British Officer? Serving in America. Communicated by Worthinyton C. 

Ford, Esq "..".. 26 

IX. Descendants of John Briant, Sen. ",By Dr. Percy Bryant .... -16 
X. Inscriptions At St. Augustine, Florid A; (Gontiime'd.) Communicated by B. 

Frank Leeds, Esq 53 

XL Ancient Line Feilde of Chahiictowx. By Geo. A. Gordon, A.M. . . 57 

XII. Kellogg Families of Colchester, By Jatrtes H. JPerrin, Esq. ... 59 

XIII. A Fkksii Note on the New-Englaxd Primer. By Rev. B. F. DeCosta, D.D. 64 

XIV. Kiutland or Kieexand Family. By V. C. Sanborn, Esq. .... 85 
XV. Snow Genealogy. {Continued.) By Mrs. Charles L. A'den .... 71 

XVI. Notes and Queried: 

iVote*.— Christmas at the Isies of Shoals, 73; Hibbins and Bellingharu ; 
Andre's Execution, 71. 

Queries.— Sherman, Soute, Bennet and Braley, 71: Ingersoll, Low. Gannett 
ami Wadleigh, 75; Medical Graduates of Bu'wdoin College; Smith; Paine, 76; 
Williams', Lon«bottom and Olds; John Heal; Settlement of the WeNh Tract: 
Phillips and Prnden ; Coffin; 77: Spencer; Day, Dickinson and Kellogg; Kel- 
io^i,, Miilerand D.-.vev; Cook, 78. 

"Replies.— Soldiers in Philips War, Stiff. 78; Rolfe; Esther Hanford ; Pey- 
ton ; Richard Jaques, 79; Keltars and Foote, M. 

Historical Intelligence. -rDr. Marshall's Genealogist's Guide, Third Edition, 

7S, Discovery of the Birthplace of the Apostle Eliot; Lincoln County Probate 

. Records; Deni-uii Souvenir Spoon; Dudley Family Reiics; Genealogies in 

PreDa.e.t.on, 50 ......' 73--31 

XVII. Societies and tueih Proceedings : 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society, 81 ; Old Colony Historical Society; 
Maine Historical Societv, S2; Rhode Isi.uiJ Historical Societv; New Haven 

Colony Historical Society, S3 a 1-83 

XVIII. Necrology of the New-England ftisjoRic Genealogical Society : 

Rev. Andrew P. Peabadv, D.D.: Francis Parkman. LL.D., 34; Hon. Leopold 
Morse, 8»; Hon. Asa Millet, M.D ; Gee-e Whitfield Averv, So; Abraham 
Aver-. , -87; Rev. Charles Morris Blake: John Farwell Anderson, Esq.; Hon. 
Samuel T. Armstrong; Hon. Frederick Billings; Jeremiah Coibnrn, A.M.: 
Samuel P. Fowler, Esq.: Hon. John P. Healv, SS; H?y. Thomas R. Lambert; 
William H. Montau'iie. Esq ; Rev. Elias Nason ; Ira B. Peck, Esq.; Samuel B. 
Kludge, Esq.; Nathaniel F. Satford, Esq*; Rev. Increase N. Tarbox ; William 
F. Weld, Esq. ; Henry A. Whitney, A.M. ; Cyrus Woodman, A.M., Vi S $-39 

,' . . " . . ., 89-100 

ons . . • 101-103 

1(13-104 

kanings in England. {Continued. \ By Hmry F. Waters, 



XIX. 


L\.'OK Notices 


XX. 


REcent Pcblicati 


XXI. 


Deaths 


XXII. 


GENEALOGICAL Gl 




A.M. 



105-144 



Committer on publication. 

ALBERT H. HOY T, WiLLARD S. ALLEN, 

FRANK E. BEADLSH, GEORGE B. KNAPP, 

JOHN WARD DEAN. 



Ho it or. 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 

CONTENTS-APRIL, 1894. 

*** Illustrations : 

1. Portrait of DAVID CLAPP {to face page 145). 

2. Autographs of Nicholas Clapp, Nathaniel Clap and David Clap [page 145), 

3. Autograph of David Clapp, Senior (page 148). 

4. PYNCHON ARMS (page 255). 

I. Memoir or David Clait, Esq. By William B. Trask, A.M 14-5 

II. British Officers Serving in America. [Continued.) Communicated by 

WortMngton C. Fore 1 , Esq 157 

III. Gov/ SlMOS Bradsbrebt's. AnceSTR^. By kiac J. Greevipood, A.M. . . 16S 
IY. Rev. Stephen PeabobS and Wife. By William C. Todd, A.M. ... 171 
V. Memoranda by Robert Foster op Kingston, Mass. Communicated by 

Charles E. Briggs, M.D 182 

YI. Letters of Col. Thomas. Westsrook and others. {Continued.) Communi- 

cared by William B. Trask., A.M. 1S4 

VII. Snow Gent.ai.ogy. (Continued.) ByJlfrs. Chftrles L. JLldm .... 188 
YIII. Rev. William Adams of New York, with Adams and Bradford descent. 

By Miss i Emily ■ Wilder Leavilt ISO 

IX. Connection op the Family of Edison, the Inventor, with Digby, XT. S. 

By Judge A. W. Sevan/ 1J9 

X. Martin's or M.rtea's Vineyard? By Cnvies E. Banks, M.D. ... 201 
XI. Some Descendants or Rev. John Robinson of Leyden. By Hon. Ariel S. 

Th»rs*on 20-i 

XII. The Maverick Family. By Isaac John Greenwood, A.M 20/' 

XIII. Notes and Queries : 

A r o/es.— Weems, Towson, Wallace, Payne, of Virginia, 210; Family Records, 
211: Rev. Thomas Davies ; Crane Epitaphs'; King, 212; Gorham, Graham* 213. 

Queries. — The Parentage of Dr. John Bishop; Tfcomas Hubbard, 213; Xing, 
Hyde, Stow?!!. Sawyer, 214; Bott, May, Xeale, Smith and Wiley; Ball; Family 
Record of Cape. John R. Russell, 215; Haiietl; Fones; Mary Valentine; Owen 
and Gilmore, 216: Birth-, exact dates wanted; CoristaDtin'e Phipps; Samuel 
Sharpe; Asa Adam.-; Morton, 217; Fuller; Fiske Family; Thomas Broad; 
Hazard; Carow or Caroe; Dr. Daniel Gilbert, 218; Joanna Brown; Clarke; 
Bracken.; Mason; Wall; Mary Kingsiey; Abijah Adams, 219. 

Historical Intelligence.— Heraldry ; List of British Officers serving in America, 
219; Suffolk Manorial Families; Collections of the Connecticut Historical 
Society * SparLawk ; Remich ; Genealogies in Preparation, 220 . . . 210-233 

XIV. Societies and their Proceedings: 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society, 221 ; Old Colony Historical Society ; 
Rhode Island Historical Society, 222; Connecticut Historical Society; Maine 
Genealogical Society, 223; Maine Historical Society; Wyoming Historical 

Society, 221 " 221-224 

XV. Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society: 

Hon. Charles Henrv Bell, LL.D.; Hon. John James Bell; Gyles Merrill, 225; 

Henry Wheatland, M.D., 226; Augustus Russ, 223 224-228 

XVI. Book Notices 229-23S 

XVII. Recent Publications 238-240 

XVIII. Genealogical Gleanings in England. (Continued.) Bv Henry F. Waters, 

A.M . . ". . . . 241-276 

Site |U v u*-<*;mjIautf pstoricat ami (Bttttttogtrol Register, 

DesiEmed to gather up and place in a permanent form the scattered and decaying record.- of 
the domestic, civil, literary, religious and political life of the people of the United States, and 
particularly of New Fn^iacd, i* piibii.-hed quarterly by the New-England Historic Genealo- 
gical Society, Bostou, in January, April, July and October. Each number contains not less 
than 96 octavo pages, with a portrait, usually on steel. Terms $3.00 a year in advance. 
Subscriptions should be sent to Benjamin E. Torelt, Treasurer, 

18 Somerset Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
O" Entered at the Post-OSce in Boston, Massachusetts, as second-class mail-matter. 

Committee cm publication. 

ALBERT H. 110 YT, WILLARD S. ALLEN, 

FRANK E. BRADISH, GEORGE B. KNAPP, 

JOHN WARD DEAN. 



Visitor. 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 



CONTENTS — APRIL, 1894. 

*** Illustrations : 

1. Portrait of DAVID CLAPP {to face page 145). 

2. Autographs of 'Nicholas Clapf, Nathaniel Clap and David Clap (page 145). 

3. Allograph of David Clapp, Senior (gage 148). 

4. PYNCHON ALMS [page 255). 

I. Memoir op David Clapp, Esq. By William B. Trask, A.M 14-5 

II. British Officers Serving in America. (Conii.'i'/t^.) Communicated by 

Worthington & Fore 1 , Esq .157 

III. Gov. Simon Bp. s,Dsri:i-i:i's Ancfsiry. By Isaac J. Greenwood, A.M.. . . 16S 

IV. Rev. Stephen Peabod3T and Wife-, By "William C. Todd, A.M. ... 171 
V. Memoranda by Robert Fosteh of Kingstox, Mass. Communicated by 

Charles E.Briggs>U.D 1S2 

VI. Letters of Col. Thomas Westr-rook and others. (Continued.) Communi- 
cated by WilUam B. Trask, A.M. 184 

VII. Snow Genealogy. {Contimted.) By Mrs. Charles L. Aldji .... 188 
VIII. Rev. William Adams of New York, with Adam-' and Bradford descent. 

By Miss Emily IVtfder Leavilt ISO 

IX. Connection of the Family of Edison, the Inventor, with Digby, N. S. 

By Judged. W. Savory lJ'.} 

X. Martin's or M <rtha's Vineyard ? By Charles E. Banks, M.D. ... 201 
XI. Some Descendants or Rev. John Robinson of Leyden. By Hon. Ariel S. 

Thurston 201 

XII. The Maverick Family. By Isaac John Greenwood, A.M 207 

XIII. Notes and Queries : 

Notes. — Weems, Towson, Wallace, Pavtie, of Virginia. 210; Family Records, 
211; Rev. Thomas Davies ; Crane Epitaphs-; Kin-, 212 ; Gorham, Graham, 213. 

Queries. — The Parenfase of Dr. John Bishop ; Thomas Hubbard, 213 ; King, 
Hyde, Stow?!!, Sawyer, 214; Bott, May, Neale, Smith and Wiley: Ball; Family 
Record of Capt. John R.Russell, 215; Haiiett; Eones: Mary Valentine; Owen 
and Giini'tre, 216; Births, exaet dates wanted; Cortstalitrne Phipps; Samuel 
Sharpe; Asa Adam.-: Morton, 217; Fuller; Fiske Family; Thomas Broad; 
Hazard; Curbw or Curoe; Dr. Daniel Gilbert, 218; Joanna Brown; Clarke; 
Brackett,; Mason; Wall; Mary Kingsiey; Ahijah Adams, 210. 

Historical Intelligence. — Heraldry ; List of British Officers serving in America, 
219; Suffolk Manorial Families^ Coll etions of the Connecticut Historical 
Society ; .Sparhawk ; Remich ; Genealogies in Preparatioji,v220 . . . 210-220 

XIV. Societies and their Proceedings; 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society, 221 : Old Colony Historical Society; 
Rhode Island Historical Society, 222: Connecticut Historical Society; Maine 
Genealogical Society, 223 ; Maine Historical Society ; Wyoming Historical 

Society, 221 221-224 

XV. Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society: 

Hon. Charles Henrv Bell, L.L.D.; Hon. John James Bell; Gyles Merrill, 225; 

Henry Wheatland, M.D., 226; Augustus Rus>, 223 224-223 

XVI. Book Notices 229-238 

XVII. Recent Publications 238-240 

XVIII. Genealogical Gleanings in England. {Continued.) By Henry F. Waters, 

A.M ". 241-276 

She |Uu><gmjIuiui tfustoricat ami 6cn£aIorjkal Jterjistcr, 

Desisned to gather up and place in a permanent form the scattered and decaying records of 
the domestic, civil, literary, religious and political life of the people of the United States, and 
particularly of New Fngiand, i* published quarterly by the New-England Historic Genealo- 
gical Society, Bostou, in January, April, July and October. Each number contains not less 
than 96 octavo pages, with a portrait, usually on steel. Terms $3.00 a year in advance. 
Subscriptions should be sent co Benjamin B. Tore.lt, Treasurer, 

18 Somerset Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
O" Entered at the Post-OSSce in Boston, Massachusetts, as second-class mail-matter. 

Committee on ^publication. 

ALBERT H. HOYT, WILI.ARD S. ALLEN, 

FRANK E, BRADISH, GEORGE B. KNAPF, 

JOHN WARD DEAN. 



Ebt'tot. 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 

CONTENTS — JULY, 1894. 

*** Illustrations : 
1. Portrait of GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK (to j r ace page 277). 

I. Memoib of George Chf.yne Shattcck, M.D. By i?«:. Caleb Davis Bridlee, 

D.D .' 277 

II. Letters of Col. Thomas Westbroox and others. {Continued.) Conimuni- 

cated by William E. Trash. A.M. 280 

III. The Bent Family. By Allen II. Bait, Esq 2S8 

IV. Probate Forks of Massachusetts ' . . 236 

V. British Officers Serving in America. {Continued.) Communicated by 

Wortkington C. Ford, Msq ".299 

VI. Letter of Jonathan All-ex of Marshfield, 1722. Commanicated by Mrs, 

Charles L. Alden 310 

VII. Family of John Savage of Middletowx, Conn. By James Francis Savage, 

A.B 311 

VIII. Three Letters Written ix Cipher by Gov, John Leverett — newly 
erofght to light. Deciphered by William F. Upham, Esq., and communi- 
cated by Hoe. George Sheldon 316 

IX. Aged Residents cf StoxiNgton, Ct.. in 1893. Compiled by Mrs. Harriet A. 

Stanton 322 

X. Abstracts of the Early Wilis of Suffolk Cocxty. Mass. (Continued.) 

Prepared by Walter K. Watkins, Esq .323 

XI. President Lincoln's Ancestry. By Hon. Joseph H. Barrett, A.M. . . . 327 
XII. Morton's New English Caxaan. By Rev. B. F. DeCosta, D.I). . . . 329 

XIII. Matthew Field of London: his Family and Arms. By Osgood Field, F.S. A. 331 

XIV. Inscriptions at Norfolk, Va. [Concluded.) Communicated by Edward W. 

Jfawice, Esq 336 

XV. Deaths at Stratham, N. H. {Concluded.) Communicated by Charles C. 

Hardy, Esq. 337 

XVI. Notes axd Queries : 

Notes. — Viiffinia Genealogies, 313: Fuller; Francis Family Record, 345; 
Shaw; AFtenaimsc* :.- e i fShays's Rebellion; Revolutionary Service, 346; Lady 
Mowlson and Radcl ; i ( oll< sre, 405. 

Queries.— Alden Queries; Markham, 347; Shaw and Befcl ; Baxter and Tay- 
lor; Jackson; Wood-EIderkin ; Ellis arid Abrams, 348. 

Historical Intelligence.— Williamson's Bibliography cf the State of Maine: 
Centenary of Fort Defiance, 34S; Butler; Provincial Flag of Pennsylvania; 
Town Histories in Preparation ; Genealogies in Preparation, 349 . . . 343-350 
XVII. Societies and their Proceedings: 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society, 350 ; Rhode Island Historical So- 
ciety ; Old Colony Historical Society, 351 350-3-51 

XVIII. Necrology of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society : 

Hon. William Gaston, LL.D., 351; Francis G. Pratt, Jr.; Samuel Kidder, 
353; Linus P. Brackets, M.D. ; Edwin F. Waters; Henry T. Beckwitb, 354; 
Hon. Horatio G. Jones, D.C.L , 355; Francis O. French, 356, Charles F. 
Crebore, M.D., 357; Hon* Alvah A. Eurraye; Nathaniel G. Chapiu, Esq., 353; 

Randal! G. Barrel!, Esq., 360 351-360 

XIX. Book Notices - . 360^370 

XX. Recent PrBLiCATtoNS 371 

XXI. Deaths ..." 372 

XXII. Genealogical Gleanings in England. (Continued.) By Henry F. Waters, 

A.M " . 373-103 



(Tflinmittee on -Jpublicatiim. 

ALBERT H. HOYT, WILLARD S. ALLEN, 

FRANK E, 8RADI3H, GEORGE B. XNAPP, 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 



Hotter, 
JOHN WARD DEAN. 

CONTENTS-OCTOBER, 1894. 



*>* Illustrations : 
1. Portrait of JOHN CDDMAK Uofacs page 409>. 

I. Sketch of the Life of Rev. John Codman, DD 409 

II. Descendants of Daniel Morrison of Newbury, Mass. By Hon. Leonard 

A. Morrison ;'.; 

III, Marriages in GmrcESTER, Mass.. 1729 420 

IV. Dorothy Stanton. By Edicard D. Harris, Esq 421 

V. British Officers. Serving in America. [Continued.) Communicated by 

Worthmgton C. Ford, E<q 424 

VI. Letters of Cot.. Thomas Westrrook and others. {Continued.) Communi- 
cated by William B. Trask, A.M 136 

VII. Burials at Warren and Baerixgton, II. I H2 

VIII. The La kin Family. By ifon. Samuel A. Green, M.D. . . . . . 444 

IX. Diart of Rev. William Howes op Chiljlark. Communicated by Charles 

E. Banks, M.D. 412. 

X. William Hack and his Descendants. By Christopher A. Back, Esq. . 453 

XI. Letter of William Stevens, 179-5 156 

XII. Abstracts of the Early Wills or Suffolk County. Mass. [Continued.) 

Prepared by Walter K, .Watkins, Esq. 437 

XIII. Letter of Paul Jones, 1777 461 

XIV. Inscriptions .u St. Augustine, Florida. [Continued.) Communicated by 

B. Frank Leeds, Esq 461 

XV. Notes and Queries: 

.Vofes.-^PropbPal of Marriage by Daniel Hubbard, 465- Holmes; Dwight,466. 
Queries. — Carwithin, 466; The Massachusetts Medical Society ; Argall and 
Percival; Ebenezei Lamb, 427; Ri tiai-d Wattles; Walker-Odell ; Mrs. Clark 
and her escape from the Indians; Fuller, 460. 

Replies. — Martin's or Martha's Vineyard, 46S; Inscriptions at Norfolk, Va.; 
Vincent's London, 469. 
Historical intelligence.— The Campbells of Craignish in Scotland, £69 . . 465-469 
XVL Societies and their Proceedings ; 

Rhode Island Historical Ssdety | 'Mifinje Historical Society .... 470 

XVII. Necrology of the New-England Historic Gen;: u/ gical Society : 

Rev. James H. Means. D.D.. i70; Hon. Benjamin F. Nbnrse, 471: Hon. Ste- 
phen M. Allen, A.M., 472; Rev. Joh'n Cordner, LL.D.; Bvt. Col. Edward B. 
Biasland, 47:2; Hon. Franklin Haven, 474; Charles W. Parsons, M.D., 475 470-47-5 

XVIII. Book Notices 476-4S0 

XIX. Recent Publication; 4S0 

XX. Genealogical -Gleanings in England. {Continued.) Br Henry F. Waters, 

A.M •.".... 481-516 

TT For advertisement of Memprial Biographies, Vol. V.. see page 4 of the cover. For other 

advertisements see pages 3 and 4. 

<Ttte ynv-^ncjliini gtetonral and ©eitcnlogirat Agister, 

Designed to gather up and place in a permanent form the- scattered and decaying records of 
the domestic, civil, literary, religious and political life of the people of .the United Stare-, and 
particularly of New England, is published quarterly by the New-Eiigiand Historic Genealo- 
gical Society, Boston, in January, April, July and October. Each number contains no*, ltsu 
than 96 octavo pages, with a portrait, usually on steeL, Terms S3. 00 a year in advance. 
Subscription;, should be sent to Benjamin B. Torrey, Treat irer, 

13 Somerset Street, Boston, Massachusetts. » 
O" Entered at the Post-Office in Boston, Massachusetts, a? second-class mail-matter. 

Ccmm'tu: on .^JuLiU'catiou. 

ALBERT II. HOVT. WILLYRD S. ALLEN, 

FRANK E. BRADISH, GEORGE B. KNAPP. 

JOHN WARD DEAN. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



Abrams, Query, 34S 

Abstracts of Early Wills ia Suffolk Co., Mass., 

323, 457 
Adams, Abijah, Query, 219 
Adams, Asa, Querv, 217 
Adams, Rev. William, of Madison Square 

Church, X. T. City, 190 
Aged Residents of Stonington, Conn., 20 
ADeil, Queries. Sir 

Ancient Line Feilde of Charlestown, 57 
Andre's Execution, Note, 71 
Argall & Percivall, Query, 467 
Autographs, see Illustrations. 

Ball, Query, 215 
Barrett, Query, 77 
Barrington, R. I., Burials at, 412 
B axtei , Query , 343 
Beal, Query, 348 
Bellingham, Note, 74 
Bennett, Query. 71 
Bent Family, 288 

Biographical > ketches 'see also Necrology)— 
I.apham, ^\ illiam Berry, 372 
Virgin, William Wirt, 104 
Winters. William, 103 
Youns, Elizabeth C, i04 
Births, Dates wanted, 217 
Bishop, John. Query, 213 
Book Notices — 

Ancestry and Kindred of Children of Ed 

ward thompkins, 235 
Appleton's Early Wills Illustrating Ances 

try of Harriot Coffin, 231 
Armorial General de Fiance de D'Hozier, 

231 
Arnold's Vita! Records of Rhode Island, 

362 
Banta's Banta Genealogy. 231 
Barber-E.ro Genealogy. 235 
Bates and Fletcher Genealogical Register, 

307 
Bent's Bent Family, 179 
Benin's Joseph Bonaparte en Amtrioue, 

233 
Betts's American Colonial Ilistorv, 232 
Biddle's Sketch of Owen Bflddle, 235 
Boardman's Agricultural Bibliography of 

Maine, 364 
Brailee's Sermons for the Church, 300 
Burhuns's Burhans Genealogy, :_',c/7 
Burnhatr.'s Burt Genealogy, 367 
Chapman's Chapman Genealogy, 2:31 
Chessman's Chessman Geneaiostv, 170 
Christ Church. Cambridge, W 
Claflin's Bramt ton Sketches, 99 
ClaflinN Personal Recollections of John G. 

Whittier, 100 
Clark's Oliver Cromwell, 476 
Clutterbuck's Clutterbuck Family, 173 
Cowles Family Tree, 235 
Cowley's Memoir of lion. Josiah Gardner 

Abbott, 232 
Crane's Descendants of Heary Crane of 

Milton. 335 
Dean's Freeman's Oath, 478 
DeCosta's Story of Mt. Benedict, 100 
Descendants of John Bedell, 368 
Dexter's Social Distinctions at Harvard 
and Yale, 177 



Bcok Notices- 
Dodge's Dodge Genealogy, 367 
Doggett's History of the Doggett-Daggett 

Family, 234 
Drake's 'Our Colonial Homes, 07 
Dudley Family, 235 
Earle's Customs and Fashions in Oid New 

Ed grand, 97 
Eaton-.- Olivestob Hamiltons, 235 
Ellis's Descendants of Rowland Ellis and 

Sallie Abrams.. SOS 
First General Court of Society of Colonial 

Wais, 478 
Foster's Oxford 3l~en, 229 
French's Notes on Surnames of Francus, 

&C..231 
Fuller's Descendants of Thomas Fuller of 

Dedham. 235 
Gallup's Gallup Genealogy, 231 
Granger's Launrelot Granger, 231 
Green's Historical Sketch of Gruton, Mass., 

303 
Greenwood's Maverick Family and Ances- 
try of Gov. Simon Bradstreet, 368 
Guild and Putnam's Ancestral Chans. 364 
Hammond's Hammond Genealogy, 234 
Heywood'a History of Westminster, Mass., 



ad Reprints, Nc 



Historical Manusc 

3, 478 
Hooker's Hooker Notes, 3(58 
Huntington's Warren-Clarke Genealogy. 

Keith's Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison, 

231 
Kendall's Memorial of Josiah Kendall, 231 
Kimber's Descendants of Richard Ivimber, 

479 
King's Handbook of Sew York City, OS 
Leach's Ancestry of Hon. Levi P. Morton, 

Leavens's Leavens Name, 368 

Leavitt's Rev. William Adam9 of Madison 
Square Church, New York City, 368 

Letter from A. J. Turner relating to Turner 
Genealogy, 235 

Magazine of Daughters of the Revolution, 
301 

Mass. Society of Sons of American Revo- 
lution, 99 

Mayo's King Family. 235 

Metcalf's Barnabas Metcalf and his De- 
scendants, 179 

More's History of the More Family, 234 

Morris's Felt Genealogy, 231 

Morris's Morris Gene sfogy, 179 

Morrison's Allison Famirv, 2-54 

Muskett's Suffolk Manor ia! Families, 353 

Nourse'a History of Harvard, Mass., 365 

Koyes'3 Noyes Inscription and Memoranda, 
235 

Ogden3 of South Jersey, 367 

Orcutt's Good Old Dorchester. 96 

Parker's Ainsworth Genealogy, 3<V 

Parker's Family Records, Parker-Pond- 
Peck, 285 

Patterson's Lincoln County Probate Rec- 
ords, 366 

Pedigree of Robert Barclay-Aiiardice, 235 



Index of. Subjects. 



Book Notices— „ , 

Perkins's History of Handel and Haydn 

Society, 03 
Philliinore's Pedigree Forms, 304 
Phillimore's Stiff Family, 3H7 
Philliniore's Trotman Family, 235 
Philliinore's Watts Family, 307 
Piper's Genealogy of Elisha Piper, 179 
Plamb»s The Plumbs, 234 
Poole's Descendants of Edward Poole of 

Weymouth, 235 
Pbor-Poore Family Gathering, 90 
Raymond's Souvenir of Sherburne Centen- 
nial Celebration, 98 
Raymond's Washington at Tnrrytown, 08 
Records and Papers of New London County 

Historical Society, 3.'", 
Records of Reformed Dutch Churches of 
Hackei.sack and Schraalenburgh, X. J-, 
100 
Register of Society of Colonial Wars, 38(5 
Rich's Rich Genealogy, 367 
Ripley's In-erso!ls of Hampshire. 23.5 
Rowland's Life of George Mason, '...'. 
Runyan's .Osborn Family, 308 
Runyan's Ruivyan Family, 30S 
Sali.-bury's Family-Histories and Genea- j 

logies, 80 
Sanborn's Kirkland or Kirtiund Family, i 
235 ' 

Sanford's Sanford Genealogy, 307 
Savary's Savary Genealogy, 234 
Sharpes, The, 235 | 

Sharp's Cftou Court and Perkins Family, | 

231 
Sketch of Life of Caleb Davis Brad lee, 00 
Smith's Index Library, 362 
Start's Start Family, 470 
Stearns's Jlesheck Weare, 364 
Stearns's Stearns Family Record. 357 
Stock-bridge's Memorials of the Mauran \ 

Faiuih, 234 
Stuart's Duncan Stuart Family, 307 
Talcott's Talcott Papers, 95 
Treat's Treat Family 23'. 
Trowbridge's Hoadlev Genealogy, 307 
Twichell's some Old Puritan Love-Lttters, 

100 
Upton's Upton Family Records, 307 
Wake's Wait Genealogy, 235 
Walker's Diury of Rev. Daniel Wadsworth, 

478 
WestQn Records, 233 

Whiteomb's Wliitcomb Memorial, 3G7 I 

Wills of English Pynchons, 479 
Wilson's U Uson Genealogy, 307 
Bott, Query. 215 

Sowdoin College, Medical Graduates, Query, 70 ; 
Brackett, Query, 219 

Bradstn-et, Au.-estrv of Gov. Simon, MS 
Bn.le v, Query, 75 
Bryant, De-c> ndants of John Briant, of Scttu- 

a'te, Ma>s., 40 
British Officers Serving iu America., 1754-1774, : 

36, 157, 210, 299, 424 
Broad, Thomas, Query, 218 
Brown, Joanna, Query. 210 
Burials a: Warren and Harrington, K. I.. 442 j 
Butler, Query, 340 

Campbells of Craignish, 469 
Carwithen, Query, 406 
Christmas at ine'DIes of Shoals, Note, 73 
Clark, Mrs., Escape from Indians, Query, 468 j 
Clark. Query, 2i0 
Codm'an, Rev. John, D. D., 409 
Coffin, Query, ~7 I 

Connecticut Historical Scciety Collections, 2-20 
Contributors and contributions to Volume 
Xl.VIIL- 
Alder, Mrs. Charles L. 

Letti-r of Jonathan Aldcn of MarshSeld j 

(172-'}, 310 
Snow Genealogy, 71, 1S8 ' 



Contributors and contributions— 
Banks, Charles Edwaid. 

Diary of Rev. William Homes of Chil- 

ina'rk. 440 
Martin's or Martha's Vineyard? 201 
Barrett, Joseph II. 

President LincoiS's Ancestry, 327 
Bent. Allen II. 

The Bent Family, 2SS 
Bradlee, Caleb Davis. 

George Cheyne Shattuck, M.D., 277 
Brines, Charles E. 

Memoranda bv Robert Foster of Kings- 
ton, Mass., is : 
Bryant, Percy. 

Descendants of John Briant cf Scituate, 
Mass., 4G 
Byington, Ezra Hoyt. 

Necrology of New-England Historic Gen- 
ealogical Society, S3, 224, 351, 470 
Colburn, Jeremiah. 

Excise or. Bread in Loston in 1734, 20 
DeCosta, B. F. , ^ , , . 

A Fresh Xote on the New-Lug. and 
Primer, 64 
Morion's New-English Canaan, 329 

Slatthew Field of London, Mercer, 331 
Ford, Worthington I hauncey. . 

British Officers Serving in America (L>t>4- 
1774), 3H, U-7,299, 124 
Gordon. George Au rustus. 

Ancient Line Feilde of Charlestown, 57 
Green SamurJ A. 

Lakin Family, 444 
Greenwood, Isaac J. 

Guv. simou Bradstreet's Ancestry, 16S 
Maverick Family, 207 
Hack, Christopher A. 

William Hack and his Descendants, 4j3 
Hardy, Charles C. 

Deaths in Stratham, N. II., 27, 337 
Harris, Edward Dc ibieday. 

Dorotiiv Star.to:',4j.'x 
James, Edward W. 

Inscriptions at Norfolk, Va., 17. 336 
Letter" of William Stevens, 1705, a Sea- 
man Impressed by The British, 450 
Leavitt, Emiiy Wilder. 

Ke%. William Ada. us of Madison .square 
Church. New York City, 190 
Leeds, B. F<-ank. 

Inscriptions in the Old Protestant Grave- 
vara at St. Augtixtine, F!a., 53, 401 
Morrison. Leonard Allison. 

Descendants of Daniel Morrison of New- 
bury, Mass., 413 
Noyes, James Atkins. 

Noyes In.-x-nution and Memoranoa. i* 
Perrin, James H'. 

Kellogg Families of Colchester, Conn., 59 
San horn, Victor C. 

The Kirtiaud or Kirkland Family, bo 
Savage, James Frauds . 

Family of John Savage of Middletown, 
Conn., 311 
Savary, Alfred W. 

Family of Edison, the Inventor, 199 
Sheldon. George. 

Tiiri'e Letters writt'.n by Gov. Leveret, 
in 1675, 110 
Stanton, Harriet A. 

Aged Residents of Stonmgton, Conn., 



Thurston, Ariel Standish. 

Some Descendants of Rev. John Robinson 
of Levdeh, Holland, 204 
Todd, William C. , , ,„_.„ . ., 

Lev. btephen Peaoody and Wife, of At- 
kinson, N. H.. 171 
Trask, William I'd.-:--.-. 

lett-rs of Col. Thomas Westbrook and 

Cnhers, 31.1-1. JeO, 436 
Memoir of David Clapp, 145 



Index of Subjects. 



Contributors and contributions — 
Washington, Col. Thornton A. 

The~8 words of Washington, 21 
Waters. Henry F. 

Genealogical Gleanings in England, 105, 
241, 373, 481 
Watkins, Waiter K. 

Abstracts of Early Wills in Suffolk Co., 
Mass., 323, 457 
Woodbury, Charles Levi. 

Meuipir of Hon. Levi Woodbury, LL.D., 3 
Cook, Querv, 78 
Crane, Epitaphs, Note, 212 
Curow or Guroe, Query, 2la 

Davies, Thomas, Note, 212 
Day, Query, 78 

Deaths in Siiatham, X. II., 27, 337 
Denison Fapiilj , Souvenir Spoon of, SO 
Descendants of Daniel Morrison of Newbury , 

413 
Descendants of John Briant of Scituate, Mass., 

46 
Descendants of Rev. John Robinson of Leydea, 

Holland, 204 
Dewey, Query, 78 
Diary of Rev. William Holmes of Chilmark, 

446 
Dickinson, Querv, 78 
Dorothv Stun- on, 4.1 
Dndley Family Relies, 80 
Dwiglit, Note, 4-.,0 

Edison, tire Inventor. Connection of Family 
with Digby, N. S., 109 

Eliot, Apo.-sle, i)i^.;jverv of Birthplace of, So 

Ellis, Querv, 3<S 

Errata, 104, 240, 372, 400, 480 

Excise on Bread in Boston in 1734, 20 

Family of John Savage of Middletown, Conu., 

311 
Family Records, Note. 211 
Field, Matthew of London. Mercer, 331 
Fiske Family, Query, 218 
Foote, Correction, 81 
Fort Defiance, Centenary of, 346 
Foster, Memoranda by Robert, of Kingston, 

Mass., 182 
Francis Family Record, Note, 315 
Fuller, Note, 34S 
Fuller, Query, 21S, 408 

Gannett, Query, 75 

Genealogical Gieaaings in England, 105, 241, 
373, 481 
Genealogies — 

Adams, 190 

Bent, 2t8 

Bradford, 196 

Briant, 4(5 

Hack. 453 

Kellogg, 5J 

Kirtland or Kirkiand, 65 

Morrison, IV', 

Savage, 311 

Snow, 71. 168 
Genealogies in Preparation— 

Bateh.81 

Boardman, 220 

Buzzed, H29 

Cowles, 226 

Dodge, 220 

Fairweatheti si 

Hamblen, 81 

Harriman, 81 

Hitchcock, 81 

Hubbard, .'.50 

Lamborn, 220 

Lanman, 210 
Gilbert, Daniel. Query,218 
Gilmore, Query-, al6 
Gloucester, Marriages in (1729), 420 
Gorham, Note, 2ia 



i Hack, William and his Descendants, 433 
! Hallett-Fones, Query, 210 
i Hnnford, Esther, ttepiy, 79 
I Hazard, Querv, 2ia 

Heraldry, 219 ' 

Hibbins, Note, 74 
J Historical Intelligence, 79, 219,348, 469 
; Historical Societies, Proceedings of— 

Mai'ne,'82, 2:47470 
j Maine Genealogical, 223 

NewEngland Historic Genealogical, 81, 

New Haven Colony, 83 
j Old Color.v. S2, 222,351 

Rhode Island. 83, 222, 351, 470 

Wyoming Historical and Genealogical, 224 

i Holmes, Note. 400 

! Hubbard, Thomas, Query, 213 

; Hyde, Query, 214 

[ illustrations- 
No yes Arms. 10 
j Noyes Inscription, 18 

Plat of the Ancient Line Feilde of Charles- 
town, 56 

Power's Hast of Levi Woodbury, 9 
j Pynchon Arms, 255 
I Autographs: 
! Briant, John, 4',*) 
! Clap, David. 145 

Clap, Nathaniel, 145 
! Oiapp, I -avid 14a, 146 

Clapp, Kitfrblaa, MG 

Shattuok, lie.... C, 277 
! Portraits: 
j Clapp, David, 145 
; Codman, John, 409 

Shattuok, George Cheyne. 277 
j Tabular Pedigrees : 

Bott, 215 
j Browne, 209 

May, 215 

Meredith, 332 
j Mowlson, 4..-J 

Pinchon, 200 

Stephen, 257 
Indian Affairs in Maine, 31, 184, 280. 436 
1 Ingersoll, Query, 75 
I Inscriptions at Norfolk, Va., 17, 336, 469 
i Inscriptions in Mid Frotestant Graveyard at 
St. Augustine, 1 ia., 53, 461 

I Jackson, Query, 348 

' Jaques, Richard, Reply, 79 

Kellogg, Correction, 81 
1 Kflh.-'. Querv, 78 

Kellogg Families of Colchester, Conn., 50 
I King, Note, -212 
j King, Querv, 214 
j Kingsley, Mary, Query, 219 
1 Kirtland or Kirkiand Family, 00 

j Lakin Family, 444 
! Lamb, Query, 467 
Letter of William Stevens, 1705, a Seaman Im- 
pressed l'v the British, 450 
Letters— 

Aideti, Jonathan, 310 

Bonn, John H., 331 

Browning, Charles II., 341 

Canedy, William, l?n 

Dumnierj William, 35, 184, 160 

Hubbard, Daniel, 485 

Jones, Baa!, 401 

Leverett, John, 310-321 

Minot, John, 31 

Mountfon, Edmund, 185 
-Pynchon, John, 317 
1 Sanders, Thomas. 185 

i Stacev, SaiRiiel, 33 

Stevens, William-, 456 
I Tucker, H. W.,320 



Index of Subjects. 






Letters— 

Upham, William P., 31S 

Washington, J. B.,. 25 

Washington, Samuel T., S3 

Wenimgenit, 280 

West brook, Thomas, 35, 185 

WiHard, J.. 3-1 
Letters of Co!. Thomas Westbrook and Others, 

31, 134, 280, 436 
Letters written by Gov. Leverett in 1075, 316 
Lincoln, Ancestry of President, 327 
Lincoln County Probate Records, 80 
Longbottom, Query, 77 
Lew, Query, 75 

Maine, BibRograpfc? of, 348 

Maine, Iudian Af'iirs in, 31, 184, 280, 136 

Markharo, Queries. 347 

Marriages in Gloucester, Mass., (1729), 420 

Marshall's Genealogist's Guide, 79 

Martin's or Martha's Vineyard? 201, 403 

Mason, Querv. 2Ht 

Mass. Medica! -Society, Query, 407 

Maverick Family, 20,7 

May, Query, 215 

Memoirs — 

Clapp, David, 145 

Codman, Johta. 400 

Shattuck, George Cheyne, 277 

Woodbury, Levi, 9 
Memoranda b/ Robert Foster of Kingston, 

Mass., 182 ' 
Miller, Query, 78 
Morton, Query, 217 
Morton's New English Caiman, 329 
Muster Rolls, 230-288, 4:;G~441 

Neat, Query, 215 

Necrology of the New-England Historic Genea- 
logical Society— 

Allen, Stephen Merrill, 472 

Anderson, John Farwell, 83 

Armstrong, Samuel Turell, S3 

Avery, Abraham, >7 

Avery, George Whitfield, 80 

Beckwith, Henry Truman, S54 

Bell, Charh-s Henry, 225 

Bell, John James, 225 

Billings Frederick, 88 

Blake, Charles Morris, 88 

Blasland, Ed*mrd B., 473 

Brockett, Linus Pierpont, 35-1 

Bun age. Alvah An srust us, 353 

Burred, Randall Gardner, ICO 

Chopin, Nathaniel Gates, 35-3 

Colburn, Jeremiah, 88 

Cordner, John, 473 

Crehore, Chaiies Frederic, 357 

Fowler, Samuel Page, 8-8 

French, Francis Ormond, 350 

Gaston, William, 351 

Haven, Franklin, 474 

Healy, John Plumer, 88 

Jones. Horatio Gates, 355 

Kidder, -Samuel, 353 

Lambert, Thomas Kicker, 89 

Means, James Howard, 470 

Merrill, G vies, 225 

Millet, Asa. Sfi 

Montague. William Henry, 89 

Morse, Leopold, ^o 

Nason, Elias, s'.i 

Nour.-e, Benjamin Franklin, 471 

Parkrr.au, Francis, 8! 

Parsons, Charles William, 475 

Peabody, Andrew Preston, 64 

Peck, Ira Ballon, 89 

Pratt, Francis Greenleaf, 353 

Rindge. Samuel Laker, S3 

Buss, Augustus 22 s 

Safford, Nathaniel Foster, 89 

Tnrbox. Increase Niles, 89 

Water.-, Edwin Forbes, .154 

Weld, William Fletcher, 89 



Necrology— 

Wheatland, Henry, 2N» 

Whitney, Henry Austin, 83 

Woodman, Cyriis, 89 
New-England Primer, A Fresh .Vote on, 04 
Norfolk, Va., Inscriptions at, 17. 330, \£*3 
Notes and Qu< ries, 73, 2 10. 343, 405 
Noyes Inscription and .Memoranda, 18 

Obituary Notices, see Necrology end Biograph- 
ical Sketches. 
Old*. Query, 77 
Owen, Query, 210 

Paine, Query, 70 
Payne, Note, 210 
Peabody, Rev. Stephen and Wife, of Atkinson, 

N. H.', 171 
Peyton, Replv, 79 
Phillips, Query, 77 
Phipps, Constantine, Query, 217 
Portraits, see Illustrations. 
Probate Forms of Massachusetts, 206 
Proposal of Marriage bv Daniel Hubbard, Note, 

405 
Provincial Flag of Pennsylvania, Query, 349 
Pruden, Query, 77 

Queries, 74, 213, 347, 4G6 

Read. John, Query, 77 

Recent Publications, 101, 238, 371,450 

Remick, Note, 220 

Replies, 78, 46-5 

Revolutionary Service, Note, 316 

Robinson, Some Descendants of Rev. John, of 

Leyden, Holland, 204 
Rolfe, Reply, 79 
Russell, Family Record of John R., Query, 215 

St. Augustine, Fla., Inscriptions in Old Protes- 
tant Graveyard, 53 

Sawyer, Query, 214 

Sliarpe. Samuel, Query. 21.7 
| Shaw, Note, 346 
j Shaw, Query, 3JS 

I Shays's Rebellion, Reminiscence of. Note, 340 
I Sherman, Query, 74 
I Smith, Querv, 70, 215 
\ Snow GenealoL'v, 71, 188 
! Soldiers in Philip's War, Reply, 78 
j Soule, Querv, 74 

Sparhawk, Note, 220 

Spencer, Query, 78 

Stanton. Dorothy. 421 

Stiff, Elias, Reply, 78 

Stonington, Conn., Aged Residents of, 322 

Stowelf, Querv, 214 

Stratham, N. II., Deaths in, 27, 337 

Suffolk Manorial Families, 220 

Suffolk Wilis, abstracts of, 3:5, 457 

Swords of Washington, 21 

Tabular Pedigrees, see Illustrations. 
Tavlor, Query. 343 

Town History in preparation, .Dtenieid, Ma=s., 

349 
Towson, Note, 210 

Valentine, Mary, Query, 210 
Vincent's London, Reply, 409 
Virginia Genealogies and Charles II. Browning, 
j Note, 343 

I Wadieigh, Quer> , 75 

i WalkerOdell, Query, 468 

| Wall, Querv, 219 

| Wallace, Note, 210 

\ Warren, R. I.. Burials at, 442 

Waters's Gene.dogicai Gleanings in England, 
j 105, 241,373, 4? i— 

Abbott, John (1003), 275 
I Argall, Samuel ( 11.25), 483 
I Arnold, Richard (1644), 37-4 



Index of Subjects. 



Waters'? Qieaeaiogical Gleanings iu England— 
Ashrieid, Patience (1708), 400 
Aylett, Nicholas (1618), 396 
Ball. Anne (1654), 273 
Barnardj-ton, XaihunM (1653), S79 
Barrett, Elizabeth (1594), 515 
Beamis, John (1604), 495 
Bell, Edward (1576), 247 
Bendish, Mary (1693), 275 
Bennett, Richard (1676), 114 
Benson, George (1632), 129 
Berrisford, Richard (1644), 374 
Biand, Elizabeth (15(93), lil 
John (16&0), 113 
Thomas (1618), 111 
(1074), 113 
(1700), 114 
Blande, John (1632), J12 

William (1506;, 111 
Bovlson, Thomas (1648), 105 
Boylsto-a, Edward (1675), 107 
Thomas (J6C8), 106 
(1669), 107 
Bieare, Jaue (1665). 106 
Breedon, Jane (1632), 12S 

Thor as (1689), 127 
Zacheus (lfx-6), 127 
Brett, Thomas (1616),251 
Browne, John (1596), 482 
Browne'!, Johane L590), 103 
Brumpstead, Ann (1058), 127 
Brumpsted, Thomas (1690), 127 
Buliockc, Edward (1621), 129 
Burpell.. He-ter ( 1664), 273 
Campe, John (1C ■■')), 399 
Carter, John (1650), 133 
Charleton, Pbillippa (1677), 378 
Cohuan, John (1505), 513 
Conyers, John (lo04), 393 
Corh.'im, John (15-6), 133 ' 
Dalyber, Robert (1633), I2S 
Davey, Margaret (1614), 138 
Davie, Isabell (1607), 110 
John (1576), 137 
John (167ej>, 111 
(172.-), 141 
Lawrence (10-.'l), 1-3-3 
William (1707), 141 
Davie3, Dorothi- (1634), 253 
Davy, John (1603), 141 

Robert (1j70), 137 
Davye, Gilbert (1585), 138 

John (1655), 139 
Donghtie, Francis (16,34), 119 
Dyre, William (1690), 143 
Eliot, Edward flV.'O), 300 

James (1623), 398 
Eliote, John (1612), 305 
Eliott, John (1606), 394 
Elliot, Roger (16u3), 305 
Elliott, Austin (Hju.ji, 394 
Bennett (1622), 306 
Nicholas (1613), 396 
Fiiiilep (1501), 403 
Ellyot, George (i.YH), 336 
Ellyott, Thomas i".557), 339 
Elyot, George, (Wl), 305 
Thomas (1551), 387 
Elyott, John (1557). 390 
Eve-ed, R.-iife (15-39), 248 
Eyl'.eot, Hewgl. (1613), 390 
Eawne, Dorothv (1666), 264 

Luke (1666). 263 
Eryer, Richard (1687), 203 
Fulalore, Margaret (1629), 121 
Goodwyn, IV ier (166i), 385 
Grave, Elizabeth (1587), 409 
Grene, Timmu> (1537), 38.5 
Gurdon, Robert (1570), 516 
Hacker, John (1054), 274 
Hail, John (1614), 373 
(1646), 374 
William (1506;, 108 
Hamilton, Andrew (1741), 406 



Waters's Genealogical Gleanings in England- 
Hampton, Lawrence (lo;7), 272 
Hiirinan, William (1592), 108 
Hart, Thomas (1701), 466 
Haynes, George (1584), 389 

John (1551), 3S8 
Herdson. Anne (1668), 136 
Ilewett, Thomas (1576). 126 
Hext, Edward (1742), 403 
Kighlord, Katherine (164S), 132 
Ineram, Mary (1614), 131 

RandolBh (1641), 131 
Kave, Matthew (1612), 503 
Lancaster, Robert (16>5),5C0 
Lane, Edmond (1604), 481 
Lucas, Bridget (1657), 276 
Maior. Jerman (lu61). 383 
Moretoft, Valentine (1641), 332 
Morgan, Elizabeth (1633), 267 

John (1621), 267 
Morlev, Robert (16nj), 301 
Morris, Judith (1645), 113 

Mary (1653), 276 
Myllett, John (1004), 392 
Newell, Jane (1657), 134 
Newport, Christofer (1618), 271 

Christopher (1610), 270 
Northcote, Katherine (16S5),495 
Oldfield, John (1657), 265 
Owfeild, Katherine (1664), 265 

Samuel (1644), 265 
Parker, John (1627), 508 
Robert (1625). 507 
Thomas (1325), 508 
Parkins, Elizabeth r 165:;), 511 
Pettus, John (1614), 504 

Thomas (1613), 505 
Piggott, John (1639), 334 
Pir.chion, Henry (1630), 253 
Pinchon, Edward (1627), 252 
John (157-(),246 
(1610), 250 
Mary (1651), 254 
Rose ( 1599}, 249 
William (1612), 251 
Pole, An tie (1713), 493 

Carolu- (1731), 493 
Dorothv (1651), 491 
Jane (1P54), 492 
John (170.3), 492 
William (1636), 490 
(1742), 494 
Poole, William (15>-7), 439 
Pordage, Joshua (1GJ1), 3-84 
Power, Anne (1638), 110 

Anthony ('633), 109 
Stephen (16 5), 110 
Pratt, John (1731), 500 
Priaulx, Peter (16?6). 274 
Pynchou, John (1654). 254 
Nichas (1.33.., 211 
William (1662), 255 
Pynchvn, V.'vllvam (1552), 242 
Radcliffe, Anthony (162.3), 266 
Randell, Margaret (1646). 110 
Randolph, Barnard (1533), 431 
(1628), 484 
Edmond (1654), 486 
Edward (1703), 487 
John (1628), 435 
Thomas (1661), 437 
William (1647), 435 
Bandoii-he, Harbert (1604), 433 
Isabell (15.^5), 482 
Read, William (1656), 381 
Reede, Th..ma> (1'57), 382 
Rich, Nathaniel (10.:i);,267 
Rous. Anthonv (1555), 515 
St. Nlchoi.K, 'iiim.thy (1606), 119 
Salter, George (1651). 128 
Saltoastall, Barnard (1632), 510 
Dorothy (1658), 511 
Jane (16 W), 666 
John (1500), 500 



In de x of Su hje cts. 



Waters'a Genealogical Gleanings in Eug 
JMtltoiistall— 

Marj (1748), 513 
Peter (1659), 511 
Richard (iooi),50l 
(10,19), 505 
(1667), 611 
(1688), 512 
Samuel (1617),504 
Susan (1012),502 
Scott, John (hv2), 379 
Scrogges, Edward (1622); 124 
' Franci-' (4563), 122 
John (1593), 123 



Th,.U; 



,1 S'J), 



l.'O 



Scrogss, Am 
Seabngbt, M 
SewaU, Willi 
Sidey, Willi: 

Simpson, An 

m 

Pe 

Sanson. Mar 
Smith, Eliza 
Southcot, lh 
Southcott, T 

Spencer, Ali 

Stanley, Tho 
Tatton, Will 
Taylor, Join: 
Thome, Wil 
Tuttie, Johii (1057), 143 
Tutty, William (1610), 142 
Ward, Bennett (1742), 496 
Webb.Benett (1004), 392 
Weston, Jerome (1604), 250 
Whetcombe, John (159>), 40S 
Wjiltcombe, Symon (1637), 403 
"White, Edmund (io:',2), HS5 
(1074), 136 
Wilkinson, Henry (1646), 117 
Wilson, Jane (loe>7), 248 
Mary (1662), f36 
Robert (163:0, 129 
Rowland (1049), 133 
(165*), 133 
Thomas fK>-'), 248 
Wraxhall, Abraham (1057), 374 



Wattles, Richr.rd. Querv, 468 
Weems. Note, 210 

Welsh Tract, Settlement of, Querv, 77 
Wiley. Query, 215 
"Williams, Query, 77 

Wills, Administrations and Abstracts- 
See also Waters's Gleanings. 

Ballantyne, William (1667), 320 

Bragg, Jonathan (4669), 324 

Bran, George (1669), 325 

Brown, Hugh (1670), 325 

drivers, Abraham (1609), 325 

Copp, William (1062), 459 

Craze, Ricliard (1670), 400 

Crocum, Francis (1669), 324 

Davenport. John (1070), 458 

Doble, Tobias (1669), 325 

Dunckle, Eluathan (1070), 459 

Fisher, Anthony (1670), 459 

Fi.iiiv, John (1670), 409 

rrench, Jacob (1669), 323 

Gay, Hezekiah (1669), 324 

Grose, Edmund (1670), 459 

Gross, Clement (1669), 326 

Hawkins- James (1670), 460 

Holdsworth, Joseph (H370), 45S 

Jonson, Marv (1669), 32o 

Kirtland. John (1616), 07 

Matthews, John (1670), 459 

Mav, John (1070), 400 

Mires, Richard (1670), 325 

Millard, Thomas (1070), 326 

Minot, John (1669), 325 

Moor, Joseph (1070), 45S 

Pepper, John (1070;, 45S 

Phillips, Nicholas (1670), 400 

Savel, William (1009), 323 

Wardell. William (1070), 45S 

Willi , .Michael (10*19), 324 

Wood, Nicholas (1070), 457 

Woodward, William (1669), 323 

Woody, John and Isaac (1670), 327 
Wood-Eiaerkiu, Query, 34j 



TEE 



NEW-ENGLAND 



Historical and Genealogical 

REGISTER. . 

VOL. XLVIII.-r JANUARY, 1894. 

Whole Number, 189. 




B S T N : 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 
1894. 



% 



/ 



. 



NEW-ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AKD GENEALOGICAL 
REGISTER. 



JANUAEY, 1894. 



MEMOIE OF HON. LEVI WOODBURY, LL.D. 

By Hon. Chaki.es Levi Woodbury, of Boston. 

It was observed by your Committee on Publication that although 
a memoir of Gov. Woodbury of New Hampshire had been published 
in the first volume of their Memorial Biographies, yet that the 
volumes of the REGISTER contained uo adequate notice, and the 
writer was requested to supply a brief capitulation of this gentle- 
man's career. Besides the memoir above referred to, three volumes 
of the writings, speeches, lectures and judicial opinions of Levi 
Woodbury were published immediately after his death. The con- 
gressional debates in which he participated, the Reports 1 of the 
United States Supreme Court, Woodbury and Minot's Reports of 
the Circuit Court, and the documents submitted by the Treasury 
Department to Congress, will supply much not included in these 
volumes. His correspondence has not been edited. 

Levi Woodbury was born in Francestown. New Hampshire, Dec. 
2, 1789. His father, the Hon. Peter Woodbury, in youth had set- 
tled there, where he became a successful merchant and farmer. For 
thirty years he was an active magistrate, justice of the peace and 
quorum for the county, which he also several times represented in 
the senate. The family were descendants of John Woodbury, who 
settled at Cape Ann, 1(523-4, and was one of "the Old Planters" 
who settled Salem, 1626-7, before the Bay Charter was granted. 
Under the charter government Woodbury was elected a freeman 
of the Corporation, and several times a deputy of the General Court. 
He also held many other public employments until his death in 1 641. 
He was one of the" five Old Planters to whom 1000 acres was granted 
in that part of Salem afterward* incorporated as Beverly, where he 
and his brother William planted and their descendants multiplied. 

The descent of Mr. Woodbury in the male line is briefly: John 1 
Woodbury; his youngest sou Peter, 2 bapt. 19. 2. 1640; his son 
vol. XLViir. 2 



10 Levi Woodbury. [Jan. 

Joslah, 3 bora June 15, 1682 ; his son Josiah, -8 bora Feb. 16, 1708 ; 
his son Peter, 5 bora March 28, 1738 ; his son Peter, 6 born Jan. 17, 
1767, who married Mary "Woodbury. These last were the parents 
of Levi. 7 Mary, his mother, was descended from Peter,' through his 
son Peter, 3 born in 1661, whose son Peter, 4 born 1705, was father 
of James, 6 born 1738, who was father of Mary. James Woodbury, 
grandfather of Levi, had served in the French war at Lake George, 
and was also one of the provincial rangers who were with Wolfe 
the next year at the capture of Quebec. Each grandfather was 
born in Beverly, and James settled in Xarraganset No. 4 (Amherst), 
in 1765 or '6, on land given him by his father in the part now Mt. 
Vernon. 

As Peter signed a petition in 1770 relative to town affairs in 
Amherst, he was already living there. lie was an ardent rebel, 
and was a member of Capt. Taylor's company that marched from 
Amherst in Dec. 17 75, to Winter Hill. His name is fifth on the 
list of those in Amherst who in April, 1776, pledged to resist with 
arms and fortune the encroachments of the 13ritish parliament on 
American liberty. He was of the legislature who formed the first 
Constitution of Xew Hampshire in the name of the people, and was 
frequently on the Committee of Public Safety. Two of his sons, 
Levi and Jessie, served in the army and afloat under the flag, and 
the youngest, Peter, enlisted at the age of thirteen years, but his 
father stopped it. 

James Woodbury was a signer in 1776 of the pledge to resist 
with arms, also was on committees and other public service during 
the revolution. The blood of other families of the settlers of Essex 
County before 1641, through the wives of his ancestors, floAved in 
his veins ; such as Richard and William Dodge, Conant, William 
Woodbury, Herrick, Batchelders, Osmond Trask, Goodells, &c, 
also the Ipswich families of Perkins, Rogers, Wade and Bumharn. 
Many also of respected individuals in Massachusetts, Maine and 
New Hampshire were allied through their descent from females of 
the Woodbury stock. These facts show that Mr. Woodbury was 
thoroughly of that early Xew England stock whose memory the 
Register seeks to preserve. 

The subject of this notice was the second of ten children born to 
his parents, and was named after his uncle Levi, who had been 
captured in the privateer Essex, and died in Dartmoor prison in 
England near the close of the revolutionary war. He entered 
Dartmouth College, was graduated with distinction in 1800, and 
entered on the study of law, winch he pursued under Judge Gould 
at Litchfield, Conn., Hon. Samuel Dana at Boston, and Hon. Jere- 
miah Smith at Exeter, N. H. Whilst a student he had acquired 
considerable local celebrity by speeches and resolutious"at war meet- 
ings in his native county, and September, 1812, he commenced the 
practice of law at Francestown with industry and met with success. 



1894.] , Levi Woodbury. 11 

In 1817 he was elected clerk of the Senate, and became one of the 
trustees under the new act as to Dartmouth College. In course of 
the same year he was appointed one of the associate justices of the 
Supreme Court of New Hampshire. In conjunction with Chief 
Justice Richardson he prepared the first three, volumes of the Report 
of that state. 

In 1819 he married Miss Elizabeth^. Clapp, the daughter of the 
Hon. Asa Clapp of Portland, Maine, and removed his residence to 
Portsmouth, the old provincial capital of the state. In 1822 he 
was nominated for governor, and elected, — the vote in the town of 
his residence being Levi Woodbury 900, all others 34. In June 
he was inaugurated as governor. In his inaugural he says, " Among 
the most sacred of those principles my education and political faith 
have always led me to rank the general diffusion of knowledge, 
equality of rights, liberty of conscience, and a strict accountability 
of all public servants." These objects he pursued through his whole 
public career. In 1823 the New Hampshire Historical Society was 
formed with Gov. Plainer as president and Mr. Woodbury vice 
president. Next year he became its president, and always took a 
great interest in its objects. In 1824 he was defeated for governor, 
and returned to his profession. In 1825 he was elected from Ports- 
mouth to the legislature, which elected him speaker, and before the 
close of its session he was elected to the United States Senate. 
His industry and capacity shown in committees and in debate soon 
placed him among the most vigorous of the Democratic cohort. On 
his inauguration Gen. Jackson tendered him the mission to Spain, 
which he declined. He declined being a candidate for re-election, 
but a few days after the close of his term he was elected to the 
state senate. Gen. Jackson re-organized his cabinet in May, 1831, 
and invited Mr. Woodbury l o take the portfolio of the navy depart- 
ment, which he accepted, and entered on its duties. Having served 
some years on the naval committee, Mr. Woodbury was not unpre- 
pared lor the duties of the office. He despatched a frigate to chas- 
tise the Malays at Quallah Buttoo who had plundered a Salem ship ; 
made a valuable report on the live oak supply of the country, in- 
troduced the commuting of the spirit ration of the sailors for money, 
re-organized the method of alloting service among the officers, re- 
vised the Navy regulations, and restrained the power of subordinate 
officers to inflict punishment on sailors. He visited personally all 
the navy yards of the United States, and despatched a sloop-of-war 
to carry Mr. Roberts, the agent, to conclude commercial treaties 
with Siam and Muscat. He also sent a fleet to Charleston to sus- 
tain the custom authorities against the nullifying threats of re- 
sistance by some sugar importers, and provided a ship-of-the-linc 
to support our minister. Mr. Nelson, in the Bay of Naples* in en- 
forcing demands for indemnity on the Neapolitan government. His 
plans for the gradual improvement of the navy and for better ad- 
ministration of its affairs were much commended. 



12 ^ Levi Woodbury. [Jan. 

The petition of the United States Bank for a re-eharter, and the 
withdrawal of the treasury deposits, raised an intense political ex- 
citement. The nomination of Mr. Taney as Secretary of the Treas- 
ury was rejected by the Senate. Mr. Woodbury then was nomi- 
nated fur that post, and confirmed without objection ; he held the 
position during the remainder of Gen. Jackson's term, and haying 
been re-appointed by Mr. Van Buren, held it during his adminis- 
tration. During all this time political controversy focused on the 
fiscal policy of the United States, and the Secretary was conse- 
quently the objective point of attack from the opponents of the ad- 
ministration. Any history of the controversy is too long for this 
article, but it. ended with a final divorce of the government from 
dependence on the banks for keeping its revenues, and the enact- 
ment of the sub-treasury system. Before the end of Gen. Jackson's 
term Mr. Woodbury had the satisfaction of seeing the national debt 
paid in full. The 'specie circular'' and "the gold bill" show Ids 
efforts to strengthen the specie basis of the country. The distribu- 
tion of the surplus revenue among the states contrary to his remon- 
strance, brought on the suspension of the banks, in 1837. Deprived 
of the revenue in their hands, and forbidden by law to use the 
depreciated paper of the banks, the public credit was in danger, but 
under his guidance the treasury weathered the storm. " The public 
credit was maintained without the aid, almost in defiance of the 
moneyed classes " (R. Rantoul, Jr.) . The struggle between fallacies 
and truth had logically led to the first sub-treasury law, whereby the 
government kept in its own possession the revenues it collected, and 
disbursed from its own treasury. It was re-enacted in 1846 as the 
Independent Treasury, and is still the basis of the treasury system. 
The use of banks by the treasury, authorized in the war of seces- 
sion, is practically, but not exclusively, relegated to negotiations 
concerning loans and war debt. Mr. Woodbury, by remarkable 
industry and excellent methods of business, was able to give due 
attention to the numerous miscellaneous subjects in charge of his 
department, many of which may be seen in some dozen or two vol- 
umes of treasury documents emanating during his term. Among 
these I will refer to a report on the rise and progress of cotton in- 
dustry in the United States, and to another on the losses sustained 
from banks and bank paper. 

In 1838 he was offered and declined the chief justiceship of Xew 
Hampshire. In 1840 Mr. Van Buren was defeated for re-election, 
and in the winter after Xew Hampshire elected Mr. Woodbury to 
the United States Senate. So on his retirement from the cabinet 
he began his term March 4, 1841, as senator. A question was in- 
formally submitted to him whether he had not lost his residence in 
New Hampshire by his absence on public business and t!*us become 
ineligible. He prepared and showed senators a brief on the point, 
which they considered conclusive, and no motion was nnuic in the 



1894.] Levi Woodbury. 13 

senate, nor has the point again been mooted. An extra session of 
Congress was called, when Mr. Woodbury at once took ground 
against the charges made on the late administration, and the new 
policy projected in the finances with such thorough information and 
logical force as materially aided to renew the confidence of the de- 
feated democracy. The plans to re-charter a United States bauk 
were vetoed by President Tyler, and the democrats appealed to the 
people to repeal what else the Whigs had enacted. The campaign 
of 1844 opened on the old issues, and on the annexation of Texas, 
which he had supported in the senate and advocated before the 
people. The democrats were successful, and President Polk tend- 
ered the mission to the Court of St. James to Mr. Woodbury, which 
for family reasons he declined. On leaving the cabinet Mr. Wood- 
bury had resumed the practice of law, travelling the circuit in the 
vacations of Congress, as was the habit of the leading lawyers of 
Kew Hampshire. 

In August, 1845, Mr. Jttstice Story resigned from the bench of 
the supreme court, and Mr. "Woodbury was appointed to succeed that 
distinguished jurist. He accepted, and held all the courts of the 
Fall circuit. He was confirmed by the senate on its assembling. 
His remarkable industry and great powers of tracing a legal prin- 
ciple through many precedents and analogies now found a new and 
fertile field. His decisions in the circuit court can be found in the 
three volumes of Woodbury and Minot's Reports. In the supreme 
court his opinions are reported in from four to eleven Howard's reports. 
His contributions to constitutional law, to questions of admiralty 
jurisdiction, conflicts of state and federal jurisdiction, and the limits 
of executive power, were important, but in every branch of law his 
opinions show judicious discrimination of the true principle involved 
in the issue before him. 

Mr. Woodbury's labors told on his iron frame, and though ill he 
completed the Spring circuit of 1851, and after delivering before 
Trinity College, Hartford, an address July 31, he returned home 
hoping that mental rest aud exercise on his farm would bring back 
his usual health; but in vain, and the absent members of his family 
were summoned to his side. He died Sept. 4, 1851. 

Demonstrations of regret at his loss came from his fellow citizens 
and from the bar of his native state, from the circuit court he had 
presided over, from the circuit court of Xew York, and that of 
Pennsylvania and many others, and from the supreme court at 
Washington. The judges of the supreme court and the leaders of 
the bar bore witness to his courteous patience on the bench, to his 
ability, integrity and professional learning. It would exceed the 
limits of this article to repeat all that was eloquently said by dis- 
tinguished leaders of all parties in commendfition of the deceased, 
but I may bo pardoned for referring to some special characteristics 
they commemorated without repeating the universal testimony they 
bear to his industry, ability, learning and integrity. 
VOL. XL VIII. 2* 



14 Levi Woodbury. [Jan. 

In the Supreme Court at "Washington, Hon. J. J. Crittenden, 
attorney general, in offering the resolutions of the bar, said : 

Judge Woodbury was a man who for a long series of years occupied a 
most conspicuous position. The continued confidence reposed in him by 
his country, and the numerous honors which he shared, all testify to his 
greatness, and will be his noblest monument. * * * Judge Woodbury 
was a man who wore his honors, great as they were, meekly, and it was 
his distinguishing merit that he thought much less of thern thau of the 
duties they entailed. 

Chief Justice Taney replied : 

His life had been passed mainly in the public service before lie became a 
member of this court. And in the various and important offices, judicial 
and political, to which he had beeu appointed, he was always found equal 
to the duties imposed upon him, and never failed to distinguish himself by 
the extent and accuracy of his information upon every subject connected 
with his official duties, or upon which he was at any time called upon to 
act. * * * We all feel we have lost an able, upright and learned 
associate, and most truly and sincerely deplore his death. 

In the New York Circuit Court Mr. J. Prescot Hall moved, and 
the Hon. Benjamin F. Butler, United States attorney general under 
Presidents Jackson and Van Buren, seconded the resolutions of the 
bar. Mr. Justice Nelson replied : 

He was truly an able and painstaking judge. Patient if possible to a 
fault in listening to the arguments and authorities of counsel; and what is 
of equal if not higher merit, indefatigable in weighing the arguments and 
searching out the authorities referred to, so that counsel might be sure the 
client could have the benelit of them in the investigations and judgment of 
the court. * * * The private virtues and worth of the deceased were 
as exalted as his public character. Remarkable for the kindness of his dis- 
position and amiability of temper, his intercourse with his brethren of the 
bench and bar was most agreeable and pleasant, ever ready to extend 
courtesy and respect where it was due, and especially guarded at ail times 
against uttering an offensive word that might wound the feelings of an 
associate. 

Mr. J. Prcscott Hall, Mr. Butler, late attorney general of the 
United States, and Judge Betts of the District Court also were 
among the speakers. 

In Pennsylvania Mr. George M. Dallas, seconding the resolutions 
presented by Mr. Ashmead, said : 

He had uniformly exhibited talents of the most solid and brilliant char- 
acter, accompanied with unvarying purity of moral purpose, and adorned 
by an unfading glow of true patriotism; such a citizen as Lev- Woodbury 
was invaluable to any country, and he felt pride and pleasure in being per- 
mitted even briefly to bear his testimony to his merit. 

Mr. Justice Grier, with whom was Judge Kane, replied : 

The country has lost a most able and learned judge, a pattern of assiduity 



1894.] Levi Woodbunj. 15 

in the performance of bis public duties, and the members of this court have 
to lament the loss of a beloved companion and brother. 

Chief Justice Shaw presided over the bar meeting in Massachu- 
setts. The resolutions, after expressing their opinion on his char- 
acter and ability, proceed : 

That in recalling the prominent traits of Judge Woodbury's public and 
private character we cannot forget the unvarying kindness which disting- 
uished his intercourse with the members of tins bar, nor the exact and ready 
attention to the slightest call of official or personal duty, which enabled him 
in the passage of every day to coutributs iomething to the service of his 
fellow men. 

At the proceedings in Belknap County, N. H., the Hon. Lyman 
B. Walker moved, and Gen. Franklin Pierce seconded the resolves. 
Hon. John J. Gilchrist, the Chief Justice, said: 

The patient industry, the self-devotion, the determination to do his duty 
which he brought to the discharge of his various official responsibilities, are 
known ic us all. The vigor in debate, the powerful reasoning which he 
brought to bear upon the important subjects that came before him both as 
an advocate and a senator, his consistent and -unvarying fidelity to his poli- 
tical principles, and his dignified bearing, will long be remembered, not 
only in his own state but by the American people. 

An appreciative, sympathetic and eloquent tribute to his memory- 
was the eulogy of Hon. Robert Rantoul, Jr., delivered at Ports- 
mouth at the request of the city government, where all is so well 
said it is difficult to select an extract, but Mr. Rantoul was a cher- 
ished friend and understood him. I cite the closing paragraph : 

He believed the world to he upon the whole a good world, and worthy 
of its Maker; but lie would not have so believed if he had not recognized 
in it what is its best quality, its capacity for improvement; this, which is 
sometimes the only consolation tor the philanthropist grieving over the vice 
and misery around him, was the inspiring fact ever present in his thoughts, 
and impelling him in his exertions to assist the improvement and promote 
the progress in whose indefinite development the hopes of all good men 
centre. "Without indulging in sanguine visions of the sudden transforma- 
tion of man and society which the nature of man makes impossible to be 
realized, and which the wisdom of experience repudiates, he believed in 
what experience demonstrates — progress. He rejoiced in past progress; 
he felt and realized a present continuing progress. He trusted and con- 
fided in a future and indefinite progress. For this he struggled and toiled; 
to this be sacrificed ease and pleasure and health, and at last life itself, in 
the protracted martyrdom of overtasked powers, strained till the strings of 
life were broken in the service of ids fellow men. In this as in all things, 
he lived quite up to the doctrine which it is so much easier to preach than 
to practise, the doctrine of the illustrious school to which he belonged, in 
which Jefferson, Madisou, Langdon and Jackson were exemplars, that a 
statesman owes all his powers to his country. 

Mr. "Woodbury's taste for science had early led him to form col- 



. 






1G Levi Woodbury. [Jan. 

lections of the botany and mineralogy of his native state ; to these he 
afterwards added conchology. He delivered many public lectures 
before the National Institute and various college and historical 
societies, in which his earnest desire to promote progress, self-knowl- 
edge and independence of opiuion among his countrymen, is mani- 
fest. Jlis eulogy on Gen. Jackson in 1845 showed a high appre- 
ciation of that remarkable man, formed through years of confidential 
intercourse. 

In his eulogy Mr. Eantoul referred to the confidence of the 
democratic party in Mr. Woodbury, although he was withdrawn 
from polities, and continued : 

It is only a very few months since his native state of New Hampshire in 
full convention of the prevailing party here, again unanimously presented 
Mr. Woodbury's name for the presidency, and it is no disparagement to 
other eminent men who may have been thought to deserve the honors and 
to be competent to discharge the duties of that high station, to say -that no 
event was more probable than his election to succeed the present incumbent 
in that office. 

A summary of I113 speeches and views would not be appropriate 
here. I will say that the Compromises of 1850 received his warm 
support, as tending to preserve the Union he loved from perils he 
clearly foresaw. In the matter of religious liberty and toleration, 
won in New Hampshire in 1819 after twenty years of conflict, by 
repealing the power of towns to settle ministers and tax the minority 
for their support, when governor he avowed his adhesion to the 
new liberty. Again in 18-18 he invoked in a letter the same prin- 
ciples in behalf of a charter for the College of the Holy Cross at 
"Worcester, and again in 1850 in the New Hampshire Constitutional 
Convention lie sought to remove constitutional disabilities from 
Catholics, which at a later day was accomplished. 

Mr. Woodbury had a pleasing and flexible voice, and was a ready 
and impressive speaker at the bar, in the senate, before the people, 
and on the bench, placing less reliance on the flowers of oratory 
than on the logical array of the facts he wished to impress. "He 
was courteous in debate/' remarks Mr. Rantoul. "He never allowed 
political prejudices to poison the sanctity of private intercourse." 

The domestic life of Mr. Woodbury was singularly happy. At 
home he loved to have his family about him even when at work. 
Mrs, Woodbury always made her parlors attractive, and he joined 
in their social life more than would be expected. His wife and 
children survived him. The children were : Charles Levi : Mary 
Elizabeth, who married Judge Montgomery Blair, subsequently 
postmaster general under President Lincoln ; Frances A., who mar- 
ried A. H. Lowery, Esq., of Xew York ; Virginia L., who married 
Hon. G. V. Fox. assistant secretary of the navy under President 
Lincoln, and Ellen C. de Q. , unmarried. 

The engraving which illustrates this article is taken from a bust of 



1894.] „ Inscriptions at Norfolk, Va. 17 

Mr. "Woodbury made when he was Secretary of the Treasury. The 
bust was modeled by a young Vermont man, a self-taught genius, 
then at the threshold of art, seeking some recognition among the 
public men at "Washington, but who soon became the celebrated 
sculptor, Hiram Powers. 



INSCRIPTIONS AT NORFOLK, VA. 

Cornmnn'.cated by Edward W. James, Esq., of Norfolk, Va. 

The following inscriptions taken from Cedar Grove Cemetery, 
Norfolk, Va., may prove of interest to New Englanders and per- 
sons of New England descent. 

In memory of Cap' Life Holden, a native of Shrewsbury, Mass., and for 
more than thirty years a resident of this City, who departed this life Feb. 
25th, 1841, aged 60. It is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption. 

Sacred to the Memory of Julia Ann Bryant, who was Born at Provi- 
dence, R. I. June 17 th 1803; And Died in Norfolk V a June 9 th 1845, Aged 
42 years. 

Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection and the life: he that believeth 
iu me, though he were dead, yet shall he live. John xi. Chap. 25 ver 

In Memory of John Padelford, Born in Taunton, Mass. Dec. 6, 1796: 
Died Aug. 25, 1826. Amiable and bland in his manners, generous and 
just in his dealings, he won the affectionate regard of all who knew him. 

Memory of Porteous Deming, a native of West Milton Vermont, who 
departed this life, Nov r 12 th , 1833. in the 29 th year of his age. 

Not youthful bloom, nor manly strength, could shield him from thy sting 
0! Death, nor love's most fond endearing ties, restrain his spirit from the 
skies. 

Erected by his only surviving Son, To the memory of Stephen Harris, 
a native of Boston Mass, but for the last 36 years previous to his death a 
citizen of this Borough, where he died on the 26 th day of October, 1836. 

Charles L. Brockwell, Born in Lyme Connecticut, Dec: 31 st 1802, 
Died Feb. 12 th 1S48. 

Raised to the memory of Martha P. Fobes, consort of Alpheus Fobes, 
Jun. She was born at Taunton Mass, and died in this Borough, June 6, 
1833, aged 33 years & 4 months. She lived a christian and died in triumph. 
Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord. 

Our Mother Mrs Mary Clarke. Born in Portsmouth. N. II., June 9, 
1792; Died in Norfolk, Va., May 28, 1868. 
Christ iu me, the hope of glory. 

Mrs Ellen M. McMath, Born in Portsmouth N. H. Mar 29 th , 1824 
Died in Norfolk, Va., June 7, 1852. 

Sacred to the memory of Warren Ketchum, who departed this life Sept. 
3 rd 1814 Aged 43 years. A native of Vermont hut for the last eight years 
a resident of this City How sweet O Lord is death to me Since death will 
bring my soul to thee. 



18 - Noyes Inscription and Memoranda. [Jan. 

Sacred to the memory of Sylvanus Crockett son of Jonathan & Catharine 
Crockett, of Thomaston Maine, who died at Norfolk Va, on board suhoouer 
Corro, Oct. 7, 1S-14. 



NO YES INSCRIPTION AND MEMORANDA. 

By James Atkins Notes, A.B., Pb.B., of Cambridge, Mass. 

A PHOTOGRAPH of the light-brown stone tablet which covers the 
remains of Rev. James Noyes in the ancient Palmer burying ground 
upon a sloping hill on the east side of Wequetequoc Cove, midway 
between Stonington, Connecticut, and "Westerly, Rhode Island, is 
reproduced in fae-simile on the opposite page. 

Rev. James Noyes was a son of Rev. James Noyes of Newbury, 
Mass., and grandson of Rev. William Noyes, rector of Cholderton, 
Co. Wilts., England. lie was born in Newbury, Mass., 11 March, 
1639—40 ; was graduated at Harvard College, 1659 ; ordained 10 
Sept. lb'7'4, as the first minister of Stonington, Conn. ; married 11 
Sept. 1674, Dorothy, daughter of Thomas and Anna (Lord) Stan- 
ton. Rev. James Noyes was one of the founders of Yale College. 

The photograph was taken in 1889 under the direction of Judge 
Richard A. Wheeler of Stonington, Conn. The tablet was,recut 
before the photograph was taken.* George W. Marshall, LL.D., 
Rouge Croix, Heralds' College, London, says that the only 
Noy-Noye-Noyes arms recorded are those of William Noy of 
Bury an, Co. Cornwall, England, who died 1593, and whose grand- 
son was William ^oy, Attorney General to Charles I. These arms 
were granted by Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, and the blazon is as 
follows :f 

Coat — Azure 3 cross.es botony in bend Argent. 

Crest— On a chapeau Azure turned up Plrtuina a dove Argent in fche beak 
an olive branch Vert. 

The epitaph was written by Rev. Eliphalet Adams, Harvard 
College 1694, who died 1753 ; pastor in 1720 of the First Con- 
gregational Church, New London, Conn. The original draft was 
in 1889 in the Sunday School Library Room of the First Congrega- 
tional Church, Stonington, Conn. j 

Rev. William Noyes, rector of Cholderton, Co. Wilts., Eng. (a 
town 11 miles from Salisbury), matriculated at University College, 

* These arms appear to be wrongfully assumed bv this branch of the family. Also tho 
bend her." i« reversed, probably a mistake of the ^tone cutter. 

t This lii.ii-oirn^ differs from that in Vivian's Visitation of Cornwall and Burke's General 
Armory ; Ihk i- that on record in ihe Heralds' Co'l. go, London. 

t Refereitpt*. — Heraldic Journal, Boston, 1866. Vol. II., p. 84. New-England Historical 
and G-'tKMi.O'.'a' Registku, Vol. XIII.. pp. 26-1*9. Caulkins's History of New Lend n, 
Conn., p :>85. Wheerer's Hi-t. Firs! Chinch, Stoninjrton, Conn., p. '.'94. Kd. E. Salis- 
bury's Family Hi-t. and Gen., Vol. I., Pt. I, pp. xvii», 2 >2, 266, 316, 3')9; Vol. HI., supple- 
ment, Pedigree Charts, Lord, V., VI. Sibley's Harvard Graduates, Vol. II., p. 4-5. 









V J 






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if'*) 



i 






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1 ^ t># „ 

i ^®b 

rvAy 







i .-•... — .'toiVti'j 



LwSi 



1894.] 



IFoyes Inscription and Memoranda. 



19 



Oxford, 15 Nov. 1588, ae. 20 years, and was graduated B.A. 31 
May, 1592. He married Anne Parker. He died intestate before 
30 April, 102-2, -when an Inventory was made and widow app. 
adm. 28 May, 1G22. (Court of Archdeacon of Sarum). She bur. 
at Choldcrton, 7 March, 1657, ce. 82 yrs. (per Parish Register). 
Her will is at Somerset House, London ( TTootton, 130), and men- 
tions sons Jnmes and Nicholas in New England. Will made 18 
March, 1-655-, proved 21 April, 1658, at London. 

Their sons, Rev. James and Deacon Nicholas Noyes, in March, 
1G33, embarked for New England in the Mary and John of Lon- 
don, with their cousin Rev. Thomas Parker, and were among the 
settlers of Newbury, Mass., May, 1G35. 

Rev. James Noyes, born in England about 1008; matriculated 
at Brasenose College, Oxford, 22 Aug. 1G27, but was not grad- 
uated; died at Newbury, Mass., 22 Oct. 1G56, ve. 48: married 
1633, Sara, eldest daughter of Mr. Joseph Brown of Southamp- 
ton, Co. Hants, Eng. She died 13 Sept. 1691, at Newbury, 
Mass. His will made 17 Oct. 1656, proved 20 Nov. 1G5G, men- 
tions wife Sara and children, brother Deacon Nicholas Noyes and 
cousin Rev. Thomas Parker. Inventory of estate amounting to 
£657 lis. 4d. Her will made 11 Nov. 1681, proved 29 Sept. 
1691. Inventory of estate amounted to £1108.* 

The branch of the Noyes family of East 
Mascalls, Co. Sussex, England, represented 
by Thomas Herbert Noyes, B.A. Ch. Ch. 
Oxford, claim the following arms : j 

— Azure 3 crosses crossiet in bend Argent. 
On a chapeau Guies turned up Ermine 
j a oove urgent in the beak an olive branch Vert. 

!/f Dr. Marshall is of the opinion that these 
'j arms have been wrongfully assumed. 

In the Visitation of Berks at Heralds' Col- 
lege, no arms are entered with the partial 
pedigree of this family. 

A cut of the arms of Noyes of East Mascalls 
from the Archaeological Collections of Co. 
Sussex, 1857, vol. ix., page 310, is given in the margin. 

* References— Repstrnm Universitatis, Oxon, II., r>. 166; III.. 17!. P. 565 Hist. New- 
born, Co. Berks., England, hy W. Money. Founder's of New England, bv S. G. Drake, 
p. 68. Old 2«ew Eng, Traits, by G. Lunt, App. Ii. and III. Mather's Aiagnaiia, Ed. 1n53-5, 
Vol. I., r>. 4S4. Coffin's Newbury, 1-5, 23, 312, 3-56. Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian, 
by 8. A. EonwY, p. 114. Savage's Gen. Diet., Vol. 111., p. 296, Noyes. Rkq„ xii., 
64, Wyi ot VV'idow Anne Noves; xiii., 4i>3, Burial of Mrs. Anne Noyes. Parish Notes, by 
Rev. E. P. Barrow, rector of Choldercon in 1SS9, page 8. N. Y. Gen. and Biog. Rec, 
xx., p. 6o, 139 —Foster's Alumni Oxonienses. 

t References.—? Burke's General Armory, Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain and 
Irelandi Watford's County Families, Fahbairu's Crests of the families of Great Britain and 
Ireland, Lower's PafronyaiieaBritaunica, Archaeological Col lections of Co. .Sussex, England, 
Notes and Queries, London. — 2 i series, Vol. ii.. IS9-47S ; 2d series, Vol. \ii , 35: 4th series, 
Vol. i., 390-556; 4iL series, Vol. ii., 13-LS7. The Genealogist, Vol. vi., 184*2, p. 67. 




^A Coat— A: 

m\ Crest- O 

Sil a dove Arge 



20 - Excise on Bread in Boston. 



EXCISE OX BREAD IX BOSTON IX 1734. 

Communicated by the late Jeremiah Colbcp.n", A.M., of Brookline, Mass. 

The following petition of the Bakers of Boston. October, 1734,* 
the original of which is presented by mc to the New-England. His- 
toric Genealogical Society, will, I think, interest the readers of the 
Register. 

Suffolk ss. To the Selectmen of the Town of Boston. 

The Petition of us the Subscribers Bakers 
of Loaf bread within the said Town. 
Humbly Sheweth — 

That your petitioners for Maney years past have Laboured under 
great discouragement with respect to the Assize on bread, and have lately 
laid a true State of our Case before you, Since which on the last day of 
'January last, you were pleased to Agree on a Xew Assize of bread, whereby 
we apprehend we have not Suitable Encouragement, especially when we 
Consider that Faggotts, Labour, Yeast <fcc a . is Considerable dearsr than 
formerly. 

That your petitioners humbly apprehend if the Assize of Bread 
w r as to" be Sett here in Boston, as it is in England, it would be upou the 
most just foottiug, which method of regulating such Assize is demonstrated, 
in a Book Entitled, "An Exact Abridgement of all the Statutes in force 
and use, from Magna Charta 9. H. 3 d . to the beginning of the Reign of 
King George. Vol 1. page 120. 

Wherefore your petitioners humbly pray you would take the 
affair into your Consideration, and make an allowance for the difference of 
"Wheat, which is one fifth part, it being most Certain that the Wheat in 
England is as much above Sixty pounds # J Bushell, as our Wheat, here is 
above fifty pounds W Bushell. 

And your petitioners as iu duty bound Shall 
Ever pray &c a . 

John Harrod 

W m S.PEAKMAN 

Grafton Ef.veryear. 
In behalf of y e Rest. 

P.S. We have Seen y 6 Book above Mentiond and there it expresly Says 
Averdupoys weight in the Table. 

Of the signers of this petition, William Speakman was one of 
the first wardens of Trinity Church ; and land for that church was 
purchased of him.t 

* Bakers were ordered to stamp their loaves " with the first and last letters of their 
ntmies." The weight of bread was prescribed as follows: il The penny white loaf, 3 ok. 
6dw.; wheatm, 407;. In dw.; household, 6 oz. 10 dw.; sixpenny w beaten loaf, 1 lb. 13 
OZ- 13 dw."— Drake's Hist, of Bostmu p. 599. 

t '• April 25, 17*28. Land was at this time purchased of William Speakman at the comer 
of Summer-Street and Bi.-hop's-ailey, now Hawley Street."— Drake, p. 533. 



1894.] The Sicords of Washington. 21 



THE SWORDS OF WASHINGTON, 

By Col. ThofwXtox A. Washington", of "Washington, D. C. 

Jx an appropriate receptacle, in the library of the Department of 
State, may be seen the veritable " : Battle Sword r ' worn by General 
Washington, first as a colonel in the Continental service of Ver- 
ginia, and afterwards as Commander in Chief of the Army during 
the entire period of our Revolutionary struggle. 

A manuscript history of the sword lies upon it, from which the 
following ext7-aet was transcribed by the writer : 

To each of my nephews, William Augustine Washington, George Lewis, 
George Steptoe Washington, Bushrod Washington and Samuel Washing- 
ton, I give one of the swords or cutteaux. of which I may die possessed, 
and they are to chuse in the order they are named. These swords are 
accompanied with an injunction not to unsheath them for the purpose of 
shedding blood, except it be for self defence or in the defense of their 
Country and its rights, and in the latter case, to keep them unsheathed and 
prefer falling with them in their hands to the relinquishment thereof. 

This sword was received under the foregoing provision of General Wash- 
ington's will, by Samuel Washington, and was presented to the United 
States by his son Samuel T. Washington, Feb. 7, 18-13, through the Hon- 
orable George W. Summers, member of Congress from Virginia. 

The sword whose history is referred to hi the above extract, is a 
handsome, well preserved blade, and is what is known in military 
parlance as a straight sabre, showing but a slight deviation from a 
right line. It ha* a fine hilt, unprotected by a guard, unless a slight 
" S " shaped piece of metal between the hilt and blade may be so 
regarded. The hilt is wrapped alternately with bright steel rib- 
bon, and some green material, probably a species of shagreen. 

The writer has taken the pains to make a careful examination of 
the proceedings of Congress in connection with this matter as re- 
ported in the Congressional Globe, Vol. 12, 1842-3, Library 
House of Representatives, and is happy in being able to assert that 
the record appears to bear indisputable evidence that in the matter 
of the presentation and gift, both parties were actuated by motives 
purely patriotic and disinterested. 

House of Representatives. 

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1843. 
* * * * # * * 

Mr. G. W. Summers now rose and addressed the House, viz : 
" Mr. Speaker, Samuel T. Washington, a citizen of Kanawha County in 
the Commonwealth of Virginia, and one of my constituents, has honored 
me with the commission of presenting, in. bis name, and on his behalf, to 

VOL. XL V III. 3 



. 



22 - The Swords of Washington. [Jan. 

the Congress of the United States, and through that body to the people of 
the United States * * * * the sword worn by George Washington, 
first as Colonel in the Colonial Service of Virginia, in Forbes' campaign 
against the French and Indians, and afterwards during the whole period of 
the war of Independence, as Commander in Chief of the American Army. 

It is a plain cutteaux, or hanger, with a greet) hilt and silver guard. On 
the upper ward of the scabbard is engraven 'J. Bailey, Fishkil!.' It is 
accompanied by the buckskin belt and clasp, whereon are engraven the 
letters • G. W.' and the figures ' 1757.' These are all of the plainest 
workmanship, but substantial and in keeping with the man and the times 
to which they belonged. 

The history of this sword is perfectly authentic, and leaves no shadow of 
doubt as to its identity." * * * * 

Here the speaker quoted the item already given, of General Washing- 
ton's will bequeathing the swords, and resumed: 

"In the disposition of the swords among the 5 nephews therein enumer- 
ated, the one now presented fell to the lot of Samuel Washington, the de- 
visee last named in the clause of the will which I have read. 

This gentleman, who died a few years since, in the county of Kanawha, 
and who was the father of Samuel T. Washington, the donor, I knew well. 
I have often seen this sword in his possession and received from him the 
following account of the manner in which it became his property in the 
division made among the devisees. 

He soys he knew it to have been the side arms of General Washington 
during. the Revolutionary War. not that used on occasions of parade and 
reviews; but the constant service sword of the great Chief; that he had 
himself seen General Washington wear this identical sword (he presumed 
for the last time), when in 179-4 he reviewed the Virginia and Maryland 
forces, then concentrated at Cumberland, under command of General Lee, 
and destined to cooperate with the Pennsylvania and New Jersey troops, 
then assembled at Bedford, in suppressing what has been called ' the 
Whiskey insurrection.' 

General Washington was at that time President of the United States, 
and as such, Commander in Chief of the U. S. Army. It was known that 
it was his intention to lead the army in person on that occasion had he 
found it necessary, and he went to Bedford and Cumberland prepared for 
that event. * * * * 

Samuel Washington held the position of Captain at that time himself 
and served in the campaign, many of the incidents of which he has related 
to me. 

He was anxious to obtain this particular sword and preferred it to all 
the others, among which was the ornamented and costly present of the 
great Frederick. 

At the time of the division among the nephews, without intimating what 
his preference was, he jocosely remarked, ' that inasmuch as he was the 
only one of them who had participated in military service, they ought to 
permit him to take choice.' This suggestion was met in the same spirit in 
which it was made, and the choice being awarded him, he chose this, the 
plainest and intrinsically the least valuable of any, simply because it was 
the ' battle sword.' 

I am also in possession of the most satisfactory evidence, furnished by 
Colonel George C. Washington, of Georgetown, the nearest male relative 
of General Washington now living, as to the identity of this sword. His 



1804.] „ The Swords of Washington. 23 

information was derived from his father, William Augustine Washington, 
the devisee first named in the clause of the will I have just read, from bis 
uncle the late Judge Bushrtid Washington, of the Supreme Court, and 
Major Lawrence Lewis, the acting executor of Geueral Washington's will, 
all of Whom concur in the sentiment that the true service sicord was that 
selected by Captain Samuel Washington. 

It remained in this gentleman's possession, until his death, esteemed hy 
him the most precious memento of his illustrious kinsman. It then he- 
came the property of his son, who, animated hy that patriotism which so 
characterised ' the father of his country,' has consented that such a relic 
ou^ht not to be appropriated by an individual citizen, and instructed me, 
his representative, to oiler it to the Nation, to be preserved in its public 
depositories as the common property of all." 

******** 

Mr. Adams then rose to submit a resolution and made an eloquent speech 
thereon, viz : 

"Mr. Speaker, I submit the following joint resolution: 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in Congress assem- 
bled, that the thanks of Congress be presented to Samuel T. Washington 
of Kanawha County, Virginia, for the present of the sword, used by his 
illustrious relation,- George Washington, in the military career of his early 
youth, in the seven years war, and throughout the war of our national in- 
dependence. * * * * 

That these precious relics are hereby accepted in the name of the Nation ; 
that they be deposited for safe keeping in the Department of State of the 
United States, and that a copy of this resolution, signed by the President 
of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, be trans- 
mitted to the said Samuel T. Washington. 

Received, unanimously adopted and returned to the House of Representa- 
tives where it was also unanimously adopted." 

An eloquent speech was also made in the Senate on the occasion by 
Senator Archer of Virginia. 

It was resolved also by the House that 20,000 copies of the entire pro- 
ceedings on the occasion be printed for distribution. 

Mr. Briggs, House of Representatives, begged permission to amend the 
journal before that resolution was agreed to. He begged to move an 
amendment to the journal by the addition of .the following letter of Mr. 
Samuel T. Washington to Mr. Summers, accompanying the sword and 
cane which was yesterday presented to Congress: 

Coals Mouth, Kenawha Co., Va.. 
My dear Sir: Jan. 9, 1843. 

With this you will receive the war sword of my grand-uncle, General 
George Washington, and the gold-headed cane bequeathed to him by Doctor 
Benjamin Franklin. 

These interesting relics I wish to be presented through ycu, my dear 
Sir, to the Congress of the United States on behalf of the Nation. 

Congress shall dispose of them as may seem appropriate, and best cal- 
culated to keep in memory the character and services of those two illustri- 
ous fouuders of our Republic. 

I am, Sir, with esteem, yours, 
To Hon. George W. Summers, Samuel T. Washington. 

House of Representatives. 



24 - The Swords of- Washington. [Jan. 

The motion to amend was agreed to, and the resolution of the gentleman 
from Virginia was agreed to. 

The relics referred to in this joint resolution were the sword of 
Washington and the gold-headed cane left to him by Doctor Frank- 
lin, which was also presented to Congress on the same occasion by 
Samuel T. Washington, but that portion of Mr. Summers's speech 
relating to the cane was not quoted, as this article was intended to 
be confined to the swords. 

Concerning the final disposition of the four remaining swords, 
the authentic records are as follows : 

The sword left by General Washington to his nephew, William 
Augustine Washington, son of his half brother Augustine, and who 
by the terms of the will had the first choice, was left by him to his 
son, the Honorable George Corbin Washington, of Georgetown. 
D. C, and by him to his son Col. Lewis "William Washington of 
''Belle viewy' near Halltown, Jefferson County, W. Va., and the 
same who was captured by John Brown's men at the time of his 
notorious raid upon Harper'^ Ferry in 1855. 

The sword which was left by General AVashington to his nephew 
Judge Bushrod Corbin Washington, and who had the fourth choice, 
also passed into the possession of the above-named Col. Lewis Wil- 
liam Washington. See extracts from the will of the Hon. George 
Corbin Washington, deceased, of which the original is of record in 
the office of Register of Wills, at Rockville, Montgomery County, 
Maryland. 

******** 

" 1 give and bequeathe to my said son. Lewis William Washington, the 
sword of General George Washington, devised to me by my father (Col. 
William Augustine Washington), and also the sword and pistol (one of them 
being lost) of the said General George Washington, devised to me by my 
uncle Bushrod Washington." 

Will proven July 2i, 18o4, at Rockvilie, Montgomery County, Maryland. 

Extract from Judge Bushrod Corbin Washington's will : 

" 14th Item. The sword left to me by General George Washington, I 
give to the aforesaid George C Washington, under the same injunction 
that it was left to me." 

In order to make the history of the last two above-mentioned 
swords complete, the writer addressed Major James Barrpll Wash- 
ington, son of the late Col. Lewis William Washington, now asso- 
ciated with the Baltimore & Ohio It. K. Co., at Pittsburg, and re- 
ceived a prompt reply. As his letter fully covers the question in 
point, it is here submitted entire, in so far as it relates to the history 
of the swords : 



1894.] - The Swords of Washington. 25 

Pittsburg, Jan. 3, 1898. 
My dear Cousin : 

I am in receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo, ***** 

The swords of General Washington, of which you write, as having been 
inherited by my father, came into his possession in 1854, as bequests from 
his father. 

One was the sword sent by Frederick the Great of Prussia, to General 
Washington, with the complimentary address, "From the oldest General 
in K a rope to the greatest in the world." 

My groat-grand-father, William Augustine Washington, being given by 
the General's will the first choice of the swords, selected this one. 

This sword was taken by a raiding party of John Brown's men from my 
father's house near Harper's Ferry in 1859, and delivered to John Brown, 
who wore it until his capture by the U. S. Marines, when my lather re- 
covered it. In 1871 it was sold with other Y\"ashington relics to the State 
of New York, and was placed in the State Library at Albany, where, I 
believe, it now is. 

The other sword, inherited through Judge Bushrod Washington, was the 
one known as the General's mourning sword aud was worn by him upon 
funeral occasions. Ail its mountings are black, while the hilt of the other 
one is of cut and polished steel, giving the appearance of having been stud- 
ded with diamonds. 

The mourning sword, after my father's death in 1871, was given by his 
widow to her son, my half-brother, and I think is still in his possession 
* * * and I have no doubt he will gladly give you any further informa- 
tion about it. 

******** 

Far from having any objection to your using my name in connection 
with these matters, I think it would add to the authenticity of their history 
to give the source from which the information was obtained. 

Very sincerely, your friend and relation, 

J. B. Washington. 

A letter of later date than the above, from Mrs. Ella B, Wash- 
ington, widow of the late Col. Lewis William Washington, fully 
corroborates, if such a thing were considered necessary, the above 
facts as related by Major James Barroll Washington. The w mourn- 
ing sword" is still in the possession of her son, Mr. AYilliam de 
Hurtbern Washington, now (1893) residing in New York City. 

General Washington's nephew, George Lewis, son of his only 
sister, Betty (Washington) Lewis, who married Col. Fielding 
Lewis, of I redericksburg, Va., was the second name mentioned in 
that clause of General Washington's will devising the swords. 

The writer is fortunate in having before him an article which 
appeared in the Baltimore American newspaper of April 23, 1889, 
giving an account of an interview had with the Honorable James T. 
Bristoe of Maryland, formerly Secretary of State, which has every 
appearance of truthfulness, and in which is related quite a number 
ot historical facts in relation to this sword. From it the following 
extract is made : 

VOL, XLVII2. 3* 



2(3 .. The S words of Washington. [Jan. 

"The children of Colonel Fielding Lewis and his wife, Betty, the only 
sister of General Washington, were Fielding. George, Elizabeth, Lawrence, 
Robert and Howell. To his nephew George Lewis, General Washington, 
in his will, bequeathed one of his swords. The bequest was in these words: 
[Here appears in full that item of the will relating to the swords.] Major 
Lewis died in 1821. During his life time he gave the sword bequeathed to 
him to his eldest son, Samuel. This Samuel Lewis had 4 sons and 2 
daughters and he bequeathed the sword to his eldest son George W. Lewis, 
a prominent lawyer of Westmoreland County, Virginia. In his early life, 
his youngest brother Henry Howell Lewis, now of Baltimore City, Mary- 
land, being then in the United States Navy, and the only military member 
of the family, having expressed an earnest desire to possess the sword of 
Washington, in a spirit of generosity he gave it to him, and afterwards by 
his last will and testament confirmed the gift." 

It would appear that Mr. Henry Howell Lewis, who died in 
Baltimore, Maryland, March 17, 1*93, must have given this sword 
to his daughter, Miss Virginia Tayloe Lewis, several years prior to 
his death, as the following copy of a bill introduced into the Senate 
by Mr. Evarts oc' Aew York, March 31, 1888, would indicate : 

A Bill 
Authorizing and directing the Secretary of War to purchase from Miss 
Virginia Tayloe Lewis a sword of Washington. 

Whereas, General George Washington, by the provisions of his will, be- 
queathed to certain of his relatives the several swords of which he died 
possessed ; and 

Whereas, among these is the sword which is of exceeding historic value, 
as that worn by him upon the occasion of resigning his commission at An- 
napolis, and at his public receptions while President: Therefore, 

Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress Assembled, that the Secretary of War be and is 
hereby authorized and directed to purchase from Miss Virginia Tayloe Lewis, 
a direct descendant of George Lewis, the devisee under the said will, she 
being the present owner, the said sword, for the sum of twenty thousand 
dollars; and that such sum be paid out of any money in the Treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, and when so purchased, the same to be deposited 
in the State Department. 

As final action was not taken by Congress upon this bill intro- 
duced by Senator Evarts, it is presumed that the sword is still 
(1893) in Miss Lewis's possession. 

George Steptoe Washington of Harewood, Virginia, now in Jef- 
ferson County, W. Va., second child of Col. Samuel Washington, 
oldest full brother of General Washington by his fourth wife Ann. 
(Steptoe) Washington, by the terms of the will had the third choice 
of the five swords. Alter his decease the sword selected by him 
passed into the possession of his son William Temple Washington, 
who owned a handsome and valuable estate adjoining " Harewood," 
called "Meg Willie." 

A few years prior to the late civil war, Mr. William T. Wash- 
ington removed with his family from Jefferson County, Virginia, to 



1394.] - Deaths in Slratham, JV. H. 27 

the vicinity of Falmouth, nearly opposite to the town of Fredericks- 
burg^ on the Rappahannock River. 

After the beginning of hostilities and the occupancy of the Federal 
armies of the country in that vicinity, Mr. Washington's residence 
and plantation fell within the Federal lines, and so remained during 
the greater portion of the four years struggle. 

La consequence, it is thought, of pecuniary embarrassments, due 
doubtless largely to the vicissitudes of war, Mr. Washington parted 
with this sword' to Mr. George Wi Riggs, at that time a member 
of the widely-known banking house of Riggs & Company, Washing- 
ton. I). C. . 

This, the George Steptoe Washing-ton sword, was deposited at 
Mti Vernon in 1892, by the heirs of the late George W. Riggs, of 
Washington D. C, where it may now be seen. 



DEATHS IN STRATIIAM, N. H., COMMENCING 1741. 

kept bv Dea. Samuel Lane, and cor 
C. Hardy, Esq. 

[Continued from to!. 47, page 430.] 



Transcribed from a Record kept bv Dea. Samuel Lane, and communicated by Charles 
C. Hakdy, Esq. 



1753. 
Dec. 21. Samuel Wiggins Daughter Died. 
Dec. 21. the Same Day Sma" Wiggiri another Dau r Died. 
Dec. 22. Satchel Clarks wife Died. 
Dec. 28. widow Phebe Wiggings child Died. 

iu the year past have Died iu this Town 57 Persons. 
1754. 
Jan.l. [o- 3] Thomas Moores Son John Died. 

John Hunifords wife Died. 

Joseph Youngs child Died. 

John Barkers child Died. 

Benj n Leavits child Died. 

Benj c Rickor Died at Jona 11 Jone3'. 

Benj" Potters child Died. 

Jonathan Jones Died. 

Benjamin Leavits little Dau r Died. 

Bradstreet "Wiggins child Died. 

James Leavit Died. 

Moses Kennisons child Died. 

Mrs. Coker Died. 

Tilton Larrance child Died. 

John Wiggin child Died. 

W m Ash* child Died. 

Moses Leavit Esq r Died. 

George Veasey Juu r child Died. 

old m r Mathew Thompson Died. 



Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan. 


27. 


Febr. 


12. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


13. 


Febr. 




Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


ID. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


23." 



28 - Deaths in SVratham, 1ST. II. [Jan, 

Apr. 5. Thomas Cotton? child Died. 

Apr. Tho s Odel had a child Dead-born. 

May 4. old Rebecca Merlin Died. 

May 28. Daniel MefrUs wife Died. 

June 5. Richard Palmers wife Died. 

June 9. Dn. Edward Taylers child Died. 

June 17. IJenj Barkers child Died. 

Aug. 23. Samuel Wiggins child Died. 

Sept. 4. Eliohalet Wiggins child Died at his fathers. 

Sept. o. Abraham Tiltons child Died. 

Sept. 9. Sachel darks child Died. 

Sept. 17. Aud r Wiggin Jim r wives Dau r Dolly Swett Died. 

Sept. 20. Tuftiu Wiggins little Dau r Died. 

Sept. 27. Tuftin Wiggins child Died. 

Oct. 2. Tuftiu Wiggins child Died. 

Oct. 12. Dn. Robinsons Granddaughter Lidia Meril Died. 

Oct. 12. Daniel Masons child Died. 

Oct. 29. John Thirstons wife Died. 

Dec. 24. widow Barkers Negro child Died. 

in the year past have Died in this Town 38 Persons. 
1755 

Jan. Joseph Hoits young child Died. 

Jan. 15. John Thirstons child Died. 

Felr. 4. widow Sarah Leavit Juu r Died. 

Febr. 5. L l William Moores child Died. 

March. '7. Eben r Barkers child Died. 

Mar. 7. W ni Moore Jun r wile Died. 

Mar. 11. old Mrs Shaw Died. 

Apr. 2. Richard Galleys child Died. 

Apr. 4. a child Died that lived at John Hoags. 

Apr. 22. Ezra Barkers Wife Died. 

May 26. old Mrs. Hill y e mother of Joshua Hill Died at Daniel Aliens. 

May 31. Josiah Aliens child Died. 

June 28. Enoch Merrils wife Died. 

Sept. 21. Theophiius Rundlets wives Mother Died. 

Oct. 12. Morris Flings child Died. 

in the year past have Died in this Town 15 persons. 
1756. 

Jan. 15. Sam 1 Wiggins child Died. 

Jan. 23. Col. And? Wiggin Died, aged about 86. 

March 17. the widow Joanna Chase Died. 

Mar. 26. Volintine Clarks child Died. 

May 4. Iccabod Clarks child Died. 

May 15. Iccabod Clark another child Died. 

May 29. Miles Leavits child Died. 

June 4. Iccabod Clarks child Died, 

June 8. Iccabod Clark another child Died, 

Oct. 12. Moses Thirston Died. 

Nov. 10. Thomas Briers wife Died. 

Miles Leavit Died at Albany this year. 

Dec. 21. Lieut. Thomas Rollings Died. 

Dec. 29. David Jewels wife Died. 

in the year past have Died 14 persons. 



1894.] - Deaths in Strcttham, X. 71. 



old m r Kick 1 Crocket Died. 
Thomas Chase Shot to Death by his son. 
Dol. Jewets child. 

George Veazev Jun r young child Died. 
Moses Chases "wife Died. 
Jude Aliens young child Died. 
Rev d M r Adams young child Died. 
Sam 1 Marvels child Died. 
Tiltou Larrance young child Died, 
Enoch Merrils young child Died. 
Eben r Barkers child Dietf. 
Ezra Barkers child Died, 
widow Lydia Leavits child Died. 
Enoch M'erriis 2 nd wife Died. 
. John Leavits Son Drown*. 
the widow Foisom (Tho s Odeis Mother) Died. 
Rebecca Sceaveys child Died. 
Lieut Simon Wiggin Died. 
Ephraim Leavit Died. 

Tho s Chase son of y e wid Lydia Chase Died coming from Hal- 
ifax. 
Simon Pottle Died. 
William Calleys Son Died. 
, Cotton Dockums child Died. 
Samuel Bovnton Died. 
M r Pottles' Dau r Judith Died. 
Anna Pottle Died at m r Pottles. 
Joseph Wiggins Son Jonathan Died. 
Bradstret Wiggin Died. 
Richard Palmers child Died. 
Ephr m Greens child Died, 
the widow Mary Mason Died. 
Sam' Clark Died. 
Jn° Stockbridges child Died. 
Abner Thirstons child Died. 
Sam 1 Gates child Died. 
Walter Wiggin Jun r child Died, 
in the year past have Died 36 Persons. 
1758. 
Jan. 15. Jona u Pipers young child Died. 

Sam 1 Goodhue a young child Died. 

Sam 1 Pevys child Died. 

Joseph Hoiis child Died. 

George Veazey Jun r wife Died. 

Mary Thirston Died at Enoch Mervils. 

John Wiggins Grandson Drowned. 

Abraham Morgan Died. 

the widow Mary Wiggins child Died. 

W" Hash child Died. 

the wid. Palmer (Tuftin WW-lis Mother) Died. 

Sam 1 Marbles child Died. 

Tuftin Wiggins wife Died. 



1757. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


15. 


Jan. 


31. 


Mar. 


2. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


29 


Apr. 


15. 


Apr. 


IS. 


May 


23. 


June 


22. 


June 


•>o. 


June 


2G. 


July 


2. 


July 


6. 


July 


8. 


July 


27. 


July 


31. 


Aug. 


11. 


Aug. 


11. 


Aug. 




Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


5. 


Sept. 


16. 


Sept. 


17. 


Sept. 


27. 


Sept. 


28. 


Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


22. 


Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


27. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


19. 



Apr. 


27. 


Apr. 


29. 


May 


17. 


June 


24. 


July 


3. 


July 


7. 


July 


16. 


Aug. 


3. 


Aug. 


4. 


Aug. 


22. 


Sept. 


6. 



30 



Deaths in Stratham, JV". H. 



p« 



Sept 
Oct. 


22. 

27. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nor. 


26. 


Nov. 


29. 


Nov. 


30. 


Dec. 


1. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


7. 


Dec. 


21. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


25. 


Dec. 


27. 


Dec. 


29. 


Dec. 


29. 


ii 


the 


1759. 


Jan. 


4. 


Jan. 


5. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jau. 


14. 


Jan. 


31. 


Jan. 


31. 


Feb r . 


8. 


Feby. 


14. 


Feb. 


19. 


Marcl 


5. 


Marcl 


18. 


Marcl 


18. 


March 27. 


Marcr 


31. 


Apr. 
Ap<\ 
Apr. 
May 


20. 
24. 
27. 
13. 


May 
May 

May 
June 


25. 

20. 

28. 

4. 


June 


23. 


June 


24. 


Aug. 


3. 


Aug. 


5. 


Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 


10. 

0. 


Sept. 


4. 



Benj a Barkers Infant child Died. 
Benja 11 Cottons child Died. 
Joseph Morrils child Died. 
Elisha Leavits child Died. 
Jnip.es Mcrrils child Died. 
Elisha Leavit Died. 
Andrew Wiggiii Esq r child Died. 
David Jewels child Died. 
Sam 1 Hardy Died. 
And r Wiggiii Esq. child Died. 
Moses Chases child Dead born. 
Sam 1 Gates child Died. 
John Leavits Jun r child Died. 
John Clarks child Died. 
Joshua Kenisons wife Died. 
Daniel Masons Son Nicolus Died. 
Daniel Masons little Daughter Died. 
year past have Died 30 persons. 

Daniel Masons son "Ward Died. 

Moses Boyntons little Dau r Died. 

John Kundlets child Died. 

John Rundlet another child Died. 

Sam 1 Neals child Died. 

Benj a Barkers child Died. 

Moses Chases wife Died. 

wid. Elizabeth Leavits child Died. 

Cotton Dockums child Died. 

Daniel Merrils child Died. 

Daniel Merril another child Died. 

Sometime in Jan 17 Jude Aliens young child Died. 

Mr. John YViggin Died. 

John Thirstons first Twin Died. 

John Thirstons other Twin Died. 

Simon Wiggins child Died. 

John Thirstons child Died. 

widow Annis Lary Died at Moses Kennisons. 

Ste n Bordmans child Died. 

Abr" Keimison Died. 

L< W m Moores wife Died. 

Joseph Mason Jun 1 wife Died. 

The-' Odels Dau r Lydia Died. 

John Hiltous child Died. 

Joseph Hoits wife Died. 

Jona n Jones 8 young child Died. 

John Speeds child Died. 

Joseph Clarks child Died. 

Nath 1 Averys child Died. 

Tho 6 Runnels child Died. 

Satchel Clarks child Died. 

Satchel Claris young twin Died. 

John Barkers child Died at Hampton Buried here. 

widow Mary Wiggins child Died. 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 31 

Sept. 6. Samuel Aliens DauJ Died. 

Sept. 21. Sam 1 Pottles child Died. 

Oct. 7. wid. Lydia Leavits child Died. 

Oct. 25. Stephen Thirstons child Died. 

Nov. 15. Ephr m Greens child Died. 

Nov. [18 ?] Eph ra Greens other child Died. 

Nov. SO. Jacoh Loe* [perhaps Lee 9 ] child Died. 

Dec. 7. Richard Scammins child Died. 

Dec. 21. Rich' 1 Scammin another child Died. 

Dec. 22. James Merrils child Died. 

Dec. Nath 1 Watsons child Died. 

David Jewels child Died, 
in the year past have Died 46 persons. 
1760. 

Margaret Grace child Died at Scammins. 

Joseph Robinsons child Died. 

John Taylers child Died. 

John Jewets child Died. 

George Veazey Juiv child Died. 

John Robinsons child Died. 

George Veazey Jun r child Died. 

Dorothy Jewets child Died. 

m r Joshua Neal Died. 

l>enj a Leavits child Died. 

Josiah Chases Child Died. 

Moses Bpyntons child Died. 

Joshua Kennison Died in the army. 

Mitte Palmer Died. 

Mary Runnels Died. 

Martha Doller Died at Jn° Leavits. 

Cotton Dockums wife Died, 

Joseph Hoag Died. 

David Stevens Son Died in y e army. 

Joshua Rolings Son Elisha Died coming from y e Army. 

— Wentworth Died w" 1 y e Small Pos at Murrays. 
In the past year have Died 21 Persons. 

[To be continued.] ■ 



Jan. 




Pel/ 


9. 


Feb. 




Marc 


h 14. 


Marc) 


b 23. 


March 29. 


Apr. 


20. 


Apr. 


21. 


April 


28. 


May 


4. 


Jims 




July 


9. 


Aug. 


29. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


25. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 




Dec. 


17. 



LETTERS OF COL. THOMAS WESTBROOK 
AND OTHERS, 

RELATIVE TO INDIAN AFFAIRS IN jIAINE. 

Communicated by William Blake Tra^k, A.M., of Dorchester, Mass. 

[Continued from Vol. xlvii.. page 453.] 

Marblehead, Oct : 4, 1725. 
lIon d S* 

Our not hearing of any very late damages done by the Indians, and 
Cap' Smith's being still detain'd by them after the limited time, gives me 
some hopes that we shall, in a little time, be so happy as to have peace in 



32 Letters of Col. Thomas JVestbrooh and others. [Jan. 

our borders, that we may again improve and ipjoy our Eastern Plantations. 
And that which I most build my hopes on is, that I think that the eyes of 
the Governm* seem to be more open now than they have bin formerly, and 
are more inclin'd to taike those measures which may secure the honour and 
Interest of the province, & the Indians have justice done them, the latter of 
which, without we have a Tender regard to, we may not Expeckt a lasting 
peace. 

J snail now give you my thoughts on some heads, which I think, very 
nessesary to Establish our Intirest with them Tribes. And the first thing 
I shall speake to, is the Affaire of the lands they claime, which, I believe, 
will be the only dilicult point, that the Goverm 4 will have to Treat with 
them on. I am very sensible it was the greatest handle the Jesuites made 
use of, whereby they mov'd them to make Warr, by telling them it was our 
intent to take away all their CouTTtrey, not only that we bought of them, 
but what we had not bought, and to make them & their Children, in time, 
miserable. It's my Oppinion, if there were some measures tackeu to Assure 
them that some Considerable part of that Country should aliwayes remaiue 
to them & their Children, to plant and Improve, and that no man should be 
able to bye it, and if they did, it should not be valide, while they or any of 
their Children were alive, As it is at Natick, and some other parts of our 
Province, where we have justly made reserves for them. If we put It to 
ourselves & Examine by y e golden rule of doing as we would be done by, 
I think, we should chearfully come into it. And, as I remember, at the 
last treaty, they had no Assurance that their planting feilds at Nerigwalk, 
and other Planting grounds, should be aliwayes injoyed by them. Many 
of them often tould me, that they Expeckted the English would, in a little 
time, endeavour to tacke them away, as they had done by the Western In- 
dians. We should Consider, they have a Native right to all the lauds they 
have not sould. I have often admired at the Weakness of many People, 
when they have said, if We should Continue any land to them they would, 
emediatelv sell it to the french. and they would settle it; but no man that 
is acquainted with that part of the Countrey can think so, when there might 
be so many reasons given why they would not. Besides, there might be Ex- 
ceptions made against it. No frenchman, that is a man of any Considera- 
tion, who is not under our Governm' would venture to lay out his substance 
near so great a Province when they aliwayes he lyable to be Destroyed & 
We have an instance to Confirme this iD the settlement the french made at 
S' Johns River, where the Indians gave them Liberty to plant & Improve, 
who, after they were Destroy'd by Capt Southarick, never made any more 
atempt. Notwithstanding we have had so long a peace with France It- 
must be Confest, the Indians are barbarous & Cruell to us in time of Warr, 
and God makes use of them as a rod in his hand, and its to be fear'd he 
uses it with more severity on us because we have not dealt justly by them 
in many things. I can think of nothing that would sooner macke them 
easy in this Affaire of y r Lands then by letting them know what great caire 
the" Governm 1 has taiken to Confirme the lands to the Naticks & other In- 
dians in pur Province, and It would not be amiss that some of our Indians, 
that would maike the best Appearance, be at the Treaty, & there Assure 
them of the great proffit & advantage that they reap by it, whereby they 
are babied to raise Corne, sheep and Cattle, & that many of them, that 
are industrious, live Aery well. 

If the Governm' should ereckt Traiding houses (which I think very nes- 
sesary to keep them in our Interest) It's my Oppinion that it would give 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. 33 

more satisfaction not to Confine the traide to them houses only, for they 
are a jealous people, and love freedome, & if they bought cheaper there 
then others could afford, and they had not liberty to trye, they would not, 
so apparently, see their Obligation & Dependance on y' Publick. As to 
letting them have rum, I think it best, it be not wholly restrain'd from them, 
for there are many amongst them, that maike a Temperate, moderate, use 
of it, and never Disguise themselves at all, & many of them will not drinke 
any, believe it best that matter be left to the [prjudence of them that are 
interested with the stores, and that they be Exceeding cautious before they 
are well acquainted with the Indian that they don't let any of them have 
more than a dram at a time, but, I need not say any thing more on this 
head, the temptation of selling them any for pro flit being wholly tacken of 
from them that have the caire of the stores. If they be men of any princi- 
palis of Honour & justice and have the good of their countrey at heart, and 
I think few or none will sell them rum only for ye Proffit they get on it, 
the Indians giving them so much trouble after they are made drunck which 
made the most sober, considerate, indians tell me, that nothing would more 
supress that base Custome than by ereckting Publick stores, for it was the 
temptation of getting proffit on other goods that eaus'd many people to let 
them have rum, and many of our quarrells with them arose from their 
drunken revills. I think it would be best, also, in my Oppinion, that those 
Truckmasters should have orders not to trust any Indian, for it might be 
a Temptation to them, as it was in South Carolina, in the last Warr they 
had. After they are a great deale in debt to make Warr and then all is 
paid, besides its aa Incouragm* to Idleness, and I Observ'd many quarrells 
with them arose from our demanding what was due from them. And yet 
there are some of the most Considerate influencing men amongst them 
which I have Observed after they have bin hunting a great while have met 
with little or no success, and therby their familyes brought to be very nes- 
sesitous, now if it were left to those that are intrusted with the stores, at 
such times to give them a small matter of Genie or other nessesaryes that 
they stand in need of, the prudent timeing of those gifts would greatly in- 
gage them. As to bringing them over to our Religion, I hope by Gods 
Blessing, in time, it might be Effeckted. And I hope the publick will be so 
happy in their Choice to have those men whose Conversation will be Ex- 
emplary and inofensive, for the indians will be most with them. 1 Observ'd 
the Jesuits allways gain'd more on them by their blamless, watchful car- 
rage to them then by any other of their artful] methods. Example is be- 
fore preceipt w th them, their Religion being all superficiall, & they having 
but little internal sence of their duty when at their Devotions. If the 
Governm' would give those that have the caire of those houses some rules 
and methods to use with them, which they in their wisdome think propper 
to gaine them over to the protestant Faith, I have great reason to think, by 
Gods Blessing, in time may have a good Effeckt. but at present, they are 
so biggotted to the Romish faith that it will require great patience & strength 
of Resolution in those endeavours. There might be many things conserted 
which at present does not Ocur to my minde, which I hope the publick will 
not be wanting in if they should come into auy termes with them. I'me 
sure if we look into Govern 1 " Burnet's last speach, whereby be is laying 
downe the great and happy Consiquence of their keeping in good termes 
with those Tribes of Indians bordering ou him, And the freuch on the other 
side of us Assidously & Artfully plotting and Contriving to keep them in 
their intirest, it highly conserns this Province to taike some methods to get 

VOL. XLVIII. 4 



34 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [Jan. 

them into our Interest who have suffered so much & which now groans 
under the burden of this unhappy Warr. 

S r if you think my thoughts on these things may be of service desire they 
may be Communicated. 

To Coll. Stephen Minot , Yo r Obed 1 son 

Merch* John Minot. 

In Bostou. 
Mass. Arch. 52: 294, 295, 296. 



Sir, His Hon' the L< Gov. (who is very ill of the Gout) bids me tell 
you, That you must dispatch the enclosed to Cpt. Smith without a Minutes 
Delay It being of great Consequence that he sh d soon receive it. 

His Hon r Having promised the Indians enlisted by Cpt. Bourn (being all 
those of the County of Barnstable) to dismiss them in the Fall that so they 
attend their Whale Fishing, directs you as soon as you have Opportunity 
to send them up to Boston in Order to their Return Home & let none of 
them be detain'd on any Pretence whatsoever. The thirty Indians of 
Bristol County must be Continued till further Order. Take special Care 
that the Garrisons be strengthen'd & protected & that Scouts be sent out 
as often as the Number of the Men will allow. His Hon 1 has sent Orders 
to Cpt. Grant to march to Norridgewock with his Comp a of voluntiers. 
You must take Care that the Design be conceal'd, And give him what 
Assistance is necessary. In your last List you sent no ace' of the Soldiers 
that were dead, deserted, kill'd or Dismiss'd, W eh Honour expects as soon 
as may be, [Hand writing of 

To Col. Westbrook. [No date.] Secretary Yvlllard.] 

Mass. Arch. 52 : 297. 



[Gov. Dummer seems concerned at the Indians delay of Coming in, but 
directs Capt Thomas Smith to remain at St Georges till further order. The 
Indians having signified their doubts of being ready in forty days the Gov- 
ernor expresses his readiness to lengthen out the time so far as necessary, 
without a limitation of fourteen days, " there not being the least Founda- 
tion for it in the Transactions of the Governor* with the Indians." And 
when these Penobscot Indians come in, Capt. Smith is desired to forward 
them to Boston without delav.] 
[No date."] 

Mass. Arch. 52: 297. 



[The Lieut. Governor directs Secretary Willard to inform Col. Pepper- 
rell that his letter of the 29th was received, and that according to the 
Colonel's desire, he sends a commission for an Ensign, which is enclosed. 
"As to Breddeanes Debt to you, you have not said that it was contracted 
before he entered into the Service, W ch is the only Case wherein the Law 
provides for the Dismission of soldiers. However, his Hon r hopes he shall 
soon have Occasion to dismiss him with many others in the service, And in 
the Mean Time Advises you to secure yourself out of the Mau's Wages."] 

Mass. Arch. 52: 298. 



[Captains Grant and Bragdou are instructed to march to Norridgewock 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas. Westbrook and others. 35 

after the enemy, "Taking effectual Care that no Hostility be acted by you 
any where to the Eastw d of the Kennebeck River, but at Norridgewock, 
And that Nothing be done on that side the River contrary to the Cessation 
agreed on with the Penobscot Tribe. You must be very exact iu your 
Journal iu Noting down every Thing that is worthy of your Observation,. 
& send an Ace' of your Proceedings."] 

Mass. Arch. 52: 298. - ^g^gg^ 

May it Please your ITon r 

I rec d your Hon" Orders from Secretary Willard Esq r Dated the 4 th ' 
Curr' at Portsmouth where I had been s. day or two. I immediately sent 
forward Capt Smith and the next morning came to Berwick to forward Capt 
Grant in his Orders pursuant to your Hon" Directions, but he march'd out 
four or five days before. I sent Orders to the respective Officers to deliver 
the Indians Anns and Ammunition to M r Mountfort and then send them to. 
Boston by the first Conveyance. RP Secretary did not inform me that the- 
Cessation of arms was out, but by your Hon" Orders to Cap' Grant it seems 
to me it is over, however, not being certain, I shall not give any Orders to 
y e Eastward of Kennebec River till! have your Hon" particular Directions. 
The Officers in general are very urgent to go to Boston to make up their 
Rolls, particularly Cap 1 Canady whom I have assur'd I wou'd ask your 
Hon r for leave. I am Your Hon" most 

Berwick OctoV 7 th , 1725. Dutifull serv' 

P.S. I am not Certain where Tho s Westbrook. 

Cap' Grant is marching, but by what 
I understand from y e People here, 
he is ouely ranging on y e heads of y e 
Towns, & will be in again iu four or 
five days I am ut Supra. T. W. 

Mass. Arch. 52: 299. 



Sir, Since my last to you I have no other Advice from the Penobscot 
Indians but that they have sent to Canada to call in their People that are 
there to our Treaty at Boston, And that those of them that come in to S' 
Georges make strong Professions of their Disposition to Peace, & say they 
wait only for the Return of the Messengers from Canada. 

If the War should continue after all these Overtures I shall endeavour 
by the Help of God to push it on the next Winter with more vigour than 
ever, And as the Penobscot Indians retire in that Season to a Place near 
Menis & other Parts of Nova Scotia where they are entertain'd & subsisted 
by the French, I am thinking to send a Force there to dislodge them. But 
shall do Nothing in this Affair without your Privity & Approbation, As 
you have his Maj te3 Commission for y e Governm' of that Countrey. And I 
must pray you would take this Proposal into your Consideration & give me 
your Answer to it as soon as possible. [William Dummer.] 

[To L' Gov r Armstrong, no date.] 

Mass. Arch. 52 : 302. 



May it please your Honour, 

Being iuform'd of y e Arrival of y e Heads or Representatives of y' 



3b* British Officers serving in America. [Jan. 

several Tribes of y e Indians in Order for a Peace, I humbly take Leave to 
acquaint Your Hon 18 That they have one of my Schooners in their Hands, 
w ch they took from me some Time y e Summer before last. 

The last Time y e Indians were at Boston I came up, hoping to have re- 
deem'd my vessel, & accordingly when your Hon r met w ih y s Counsel to 
have an Interview w 01 tliem I prefer'd a Petition, Praying Liberty to pur- 
chase herof y e Indian who had her in his Keeping who was then at Boston, 
but it was answer'd y' it was not consistent w th y e Honour of y e Governm' 
to buy y* of y e Indians w ch they had unjustly taken away, especially when 
they were suing for a Peace w ,h us, And that it was hoped y* I & every 
Body else y l had anything in their hands w eh they had taken from us should 
have it frankly restored to us, without buying it of them, wheu they came 
to a Treaty w th us. And therefore I would humbly entreat y* when y° 
Affair comes in Agitation I may not be forgot. 

My Neighbour John Chapman has y e like Request, who has a vessel & 
servant w' s them. I am your Hon" most 

Marb 1 .!)* Nov. 15 th 1725. Obedient & humble Serv 4 

[To Lt. Gov. Dummer.] Sam 11 Stacey. 



Mass. Arch. 52 : 308. 



[To be continncd.] 



BRITISH OFFICERS SERVING IX AMERICA, 1751-1774. 

Contributed by Wokthingtox Chauncey Ford, Esq., of Washington, D. C. 

Having occasion to consult the "Army List" of the English 
army for the period of the French and Indian Avar, and experienc- 
ing no little difficulty in determining the particular officer I wished 
to locate, it occurred to me that a complete list of such officers and 
regiments as served on the American continent before the Revolu- 
tion, would be useful to others. I was fortunate enough to find a 
complete set of these annual " Army Lists " in the Astor Library, New 
York, and from these "official" registers the following names have 
been taken. The arrangement in the "Lists" is by regiments ; but 
I have made it alphabetical, not only for greater convenience for 
reference, but also as better showing the rise of an officer in rank, 
and his change from regiment to regiment. The list is intended to 

coo 

be full, and I have taken no risks in confusing names, however 
similar, or however probable the identity might appear. W hatever 
error lies in the list, is due to too great fulness ; and doubtless it 
could be compressed in some fifty or sixty instances ; yet in the 
absence of positive evidence, I prefer to enter a name twice, to run- 
ning the danger of combining the names of what might prove to be 
of different officers. 

This insertion of more than one rank under a name is made com- 
paratively safe by the custom of giving the date of a commission 



1894.] ^British Officers serving in America. 37 

conferring rank in the army as well as in the regiment. For ex- 
ample, at a wide interval the following entries were found : 

Graydon, Alexander, Ens 11 in 60 th 23 August, 1758. 

Lieut 60 th 14 September, 17 GO. 
Graydon, Alexander, Lieut. 44 lh 10 March, 1764. 

Army 14 Septem. 17G0. 

This may be read : Graydon was promoted to a lieutenancy in 
the GOth regiment on 14 September, 1760, and received a commis- 
sion in the 44th regiment, of the same grade or rank, on 10 March, 
1704. For general promotion, However, his lieutenant's commis- 
sion dated from 14 September, 1760. In such cases the identity of 
the two entries is fully established. Nor can there be any reason- 
able doubt in the instances of regimental promotion, where in the 
same regiment a name gradually rises from ensign upwards. Ji is 
only where a transfer is made from one regiment to another, in dif- 
ferent ranks, that doubt can occur ; or where a promotion occurs in 
a regiment not serving in America. 

In 1754 the only American regiments noted were the four Inde- 
pendent companies of Xew York, and three Independent companies 
of South Carolina. In 1755, Braddock's command was added, 
noted in this list as Br. In 1756 the first numbered regiment ap- 
peared on the returns, — the 62d, or Royal American. Beginning 
with 1758 other regiments were added, and the 62d became the 
GOth — still known as the Royal American, and remained in service 
in America till 1773 — a longer service than any other regiment. 
The American life of each regiment, and the names of the respective 
colonels, will form a useful introduction to the list of officers.. 



First regiment, second batta.ion, 1758-1764. 

1758-1763, James Sinclair. 

1764, Sir Henry Erskine, Bt. 

Eighth (or the King's) regiment of Foot, 1769-1773. 

1769-1772, Daniel Webb. 

1773, Bigoe Armstrong. 

Ninth regiment of Foot. 1764-1765, in Florida; 1766-1769, in America; 
1770, in Ireland. 

1764-1769, William Whitmore. 
Tenth regiment of Foot, 1768-1773. 

1768-1773, Edward Sandford. 
Fourteenth regiment of Foot, 1768-1773. 

1768-1773, Hon. William Keppel. 
Fifteenth regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758-1767, Jeffery Amherst. 
Sixteenth regiment of Foot, 1768-1773. 

1768-1773, James Gisborue. 
Seventeenth regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758-1759, John Forbes. 

1760-1767, Robert Monckton. 

VOL. XLVIII. 4* 



3 - British Officers serving in America. [Jan. 

Eighteenth (or Royal Irish) regiment of Foot, 1768-1773. 

1768-1773, Sir John Sebright. 
Twenty-first (or Royal North British Fuzileers), 1766-1773. 

1766-1770, William, Earl of Panmure. 

1771-1773, Hon. Alexander Mackay. 
Twenty-second regiment of Foot, 1758-1765.* 

1758-1762, Edward Whitmore. 

1763-1765, Hon. Thomas Gage. 
Twenty-sixth regiment of Foot, 1768-1773, 

1768-1773, John Scott. 
Twenty-seventh (or Inniskilling) regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758-1761, William, Lord Blakeney. 

1762-1767, Hugh Warburton. 
Twenty-eighth regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758-1759, Philip Bragg. 

1760-1767, Hon. George Townshend. 
Twenty -ninth regiment of Foot, 1766-1773. 

1766-1769, George, Earl of Granard. 

1770-1773, William Evelyn. 
Thirty-first regiment of Foot, 1766-1773, with the exception of 1769, 
when it was in Minorca. 

1766-1773, James Adolphus Oughton. 
Thirty-fourth regiment of Foot, 1764— 1769.f 

1764-1769, Lord Frederick Cavendish. 
Thirty-fifth regiment of Foot, 1 758-17 64$ 

1758-1764, Charles Otway. 
Fortieth regiment of Foot, 1758-1765. 

1758, Perigrine Thomas Hopson. 

1759, John Barrington. 

1760, Vacant. 
1761-1765, Robert Armiger. 

Forty-second regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758-1767, Lord John Murray. 
Forty-third regiment of Foot, 1758-1763.§ 

1758-1761, James Kennedy. 

1761-1762, Shurington Talbot. 

1763, Hon. Bennet Noel. 

Forty-fourth regiment of Foot, 1758-1765. 

1758-1765, James Abercrombie. 
Forty-fifth regiment of Foot, 1758-1765. 

1758-1761, Hugh Warburton. 

1762, Andrew Robinson. 

1763—1765, Hon. John Boscawen. 
Forty-sixth regiment of Foot, 1758-1767. 

1758—1764, Thomas Murray. 

1765-1767, Hon. William Howe. 
Forty-seventh regiment of Foot. 1758-1763. 

1758-1763, Peregrine Lascelles. 



* In 176 * and 1765 this regiment was in Louisiana* 
+ In Louisiana in 1764 and 1765. 
1 In Florida in 1764. 
5 In Jamaica in 1764. 



1894.1 ' British Officers serving in America. 39 

Forty-eighth regiment of Foot, 1758-17G3. 

1758-1763, Daniel Webb. 
Fifty-second regiment of Foot, 1766-1773. 

1766-1773, John Clavering. 
Fifty-fifth regiment of Foot. 1758-1763. 

*1758, George Augustus, Viscount Howe. 

1759, John Frideaux. 

1760-1762, James Adolphus Oughton. 

1763, William Gansell. 

Fifty-eighth regiment of Foot, 1758-1763. 

' 1758-1763, Robert Anstruther. 
Fifty-ninth regiment of Foot, 1766-1773. 

* 1766-1773. John Owen. 
Sixtieth (late 62d) regiment of Foot, 1758-1773.* 

1758, James Abercrombie. 

1759-1773, Jeffery Amherst. 
Sixty-second regiment of Foot, 1756-1757. 

1756-1757, John, Farl of Loudoun. 
Sixty-fourth regiment of Foot, 1769-1773. 

1769-1773, John Fomeroy. 
Sixty-fifth regiment of Foot, 1769-1773. 

1769-1770, Hon. Alexander Mackay. 

1771-1773, Edward Urmston. 
Sixty-ninth regiment of Foot, 1768-1769. 

"1768-1769, Hon. Charles Colville. 
Seventy-seventh regiment of Foot, 1758-1763. f 

1758-1763, Archibald Montgomery. J 
Seventy-eighth regiment of Foot, 1758-17G3. 

1758-1763, Simon Fraser.§ 
Eightieth regiment of Foot, 1758-1763.f 

1758-1762, Thomas Gage. 

1763, Montague Wilmot. 

Ninety-fourth (or Royal Welsh Volunteers), 1762-1763.t 

1762-1763, Hon. John Vaughan. 
' Ninety-fifth regiment of Foot, 1762-1763.t 

1762-1763, Ralph Burton. 
Corps of Rangers, 1762-1763-f 

1762-1763, Joseph Goreham.§ 



The construction of the table will speak for itself. Where no 
number of a regiment is given, the date is that of the rank in the 
army. This will assist in tracing the service of the officer elsewhere 
than in America. The quartermasters and adjutants were, as a 
ride, taken from the lieutenants or ensigns of the regiment. In 
one or two of the regiments the ranks of first and second lieutenants 
occur, but they correspond w T ith the more usual ranks of lieutenants 
and ensigns. In some instances the rank of lieutenant was given, 
but the officer served as an ensign. This was so unusual, hardly 

* In 1773 this regiment was in two battalions : one in Jamaica, and one in Antiqua. 

f Disbanded in 1764. 

t Lieutenant-Colonel commandant. 

9 Major commandant. 



40 



British Officers serving in America. 



[Jan. 



twenty cases coming to my attention, that no special note is made 
01 it, and the rank ot ensign given. 



Name. 

Abercrombie, James 



Abercrombie, James 
Abercrombie, John 
Abercrombie, William 
Abercromby, James 
Abercromby, James 
Abercromby, James 
Abercromby, James 
Abercromby, Kobert 

Abercromby, William 
Achmuty, Thoruas 

Ackland, Dudley 
Adair, Job a 
Adderley, Frauds 

Addison, Nicholas 
Addisou, Richard 
Addison, Thomas 
Addisou, Thomas 
Adlam, John 
Adlam, Johu 

Adlam, John 
Adlam, William 
Agnew, James 
Agnew, James 

Aikman, Joseph 



Airey, Joseph 
Alcock, William 
Aldridge, Christopher 

Allan 

Ailaz, James 



Rank. Kcgiment. Date of Commission. 



Lt. 



Allen, Jann 



Maj r Gen 

Colouel 

Colouel 

Lt. Gen. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Major 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Capt 

Capt 

Lt. Col. 

Surgeon 

Ensign 

Q r W 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Ensigu 

Capt. 

Major 

Adj't. 

Capt. Lt. 

Capt. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Major 

Colonel 

Adj't. 

l 9t Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

1 st Lieut. 

Major 

Q r M r 

Surgeon 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 



44 
60 

42 

1 

62 

35 

44 
78 
42 
44 
44 
44 
27 
27 
27 
8 

Br. 

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

28 

35 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 
58 

44 

21 

21 

21 

21 

N. Y. 

52 

40 

40 

40 

95 

62 

60 

60 

44 



31 January, 1756. 
13 March, 1756. 
27 December, 1 757. 
31 March, 1759. 
16 February, 1756. 
7 May, 1757. 
6 February, 1756. 
26 March, 1758. 
21 July, 1758. 
25 July, 1760. 
5 May, 1762. 
19 April, 1759. 
12 December, 1761. 
16 November, 1764. 
10 March. 1753. 

21 July, 1758. 
7 March, 1762. 

23 November, 1768. 

10 March, 1760. 
6 September, 1765. 

6 September, 1767. 

22 April, 1762. 

26 December, 1770. 

24 June, 1744. 
19 May, 1760. 

7 February, 1757. 
19 March, 1758. 

7 April, 1761. 

30 September, 1761. 

28 September, 17G2. 

17 December, 1757. 

3 January, 1762. 
12 December, 1764. 
21 September, 1757. 

' 8 May, 1758. 

18 November, 1768. 
6 October, 1769. ■ 

4 March, 1762. 

3 May, 1765. 

26 November, 1755. 
18 March, 1758. 
18 July, 1764. 

4 March, 1761. 
17 January, 1756. 
6 May, 1761. 

2 October, 1761. 
9 November, 1755. 



1894.1 ^British Officers serving in America. 



41 



Allen, James 

Allen, Richard 
Alleyne, David 
Alt, Henry 

Amherst, Jeffery 



Amherst, Jeffery 
Amiel, John 
Ancram, "William 

Anderson, Ephraim 
Anderson, Robert 
Anderson, William 
Angus, William 
Aunersley, William 
Anstruther, James 

Anstruther, Robert 

Anstruther, William 
Appreece, John 

Arbuthnot, Alexander 



Arbuthnot, Robert 
Arbuthnot, 



Archbold, George 
Archbold, John 
Archbold, Thomas 
Armiger, Robert 
Armstrong, Eigoe 

Armstrong, Thomas 

Armstrong, 



Ensign 


62 


Adj't. 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


35 


Capt. 


35 


Capt. Lt. 


43 


Capt. 


1 


Lieut. 






22 


Capt. 


60 




44 


Col. 


15 




60 


Maj. Gen. 




Lt. Gen. 




Ensign 


60 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 






34 


Ensign 


44 


Ensign 


55 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


Ensign 


42 


Surgeon 


34 


Ensign 


58 


Lieut. 


58 


Maj. Gen. 




Col. 


58 


Capt. 


26 


Ensign 


8 


Ensign 




15 


Lieut. 


15 


Capt. 


42 


Ensign 


46 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


2 d Lieut. 


40 


Lieut. 


40 


Lieut. 


47 


Capt. 


47 


Maj. Gen. 




Colonel 


40 


Maj. Gen. 




Col. Com' 


60 


Lt. Gen. 




Colonel 


8 


Ensign 


35 


Lieut. 






64 


Capt. 


64 


Ensign 


48 



25 December, 1755. 

18 August, 1756. 

1 December, 1756. 
16 February, 1756. 

5 October, 1760. 
21 March, 1758. 
25 December, 1758. 

21 September, 1754. 
8 March, 1757. 

12 September, 1760. 

19 September, 1761. 

22 May, 1756. 

30 September, 1758. 

25 June, 1759. 

19 January, 1761. 
3 June, 1771. 

26 June, 1760. 

23 June, 1762. 

30 May, 1764. 

8 August, 1758. 
25 March, 1761. 

6 October, 1769. 
25 June, 1759. 

20 January, 1762. 

27 August, 1756. 
12 December, 1759. 
25 June, 1759. 

28 December, 1755. 

I January, 1766. 
25 December, 1761. 

15 April, 1766. 
3 October, 1757. 

II January, 1758. 
8 July, 1760. 

19 July, 1758. 

31 October, 1762. 
1 January, 1756. 

8 December, 1756. 

3 July, 1755. 

9 October, 1761. 

22 June, 1755. 

23 May, 1759. 
25 June, 1759. 

10 December, 1760. 
10 July, 1762. 

16 December, 1767. 
25 May, 1772. 

20 October, 1772. 
9 April, 1756. 

1 April, 1762. 

4 December, 1767. 

2 February, 1770. 



42 



British Officers serving in America. 



[Jan. 



Arnold, John 


Chaplain 


9 


Arnot, Hugh 


Capt. 


80 
46 


Arthur, Thomas 


Ensign 


43 




Lieut. 


43 


Ashe, Dudley 


Lieut. 


1 


Ashe, John 


Lieut. 


2S 


Astle, Daniel 


Ensigu 


42 
15 


Atkinson. William 


Ensign 


Aubrey, Thomas 


Ensign 


9 


Aylrner, Richard 


Ensign 


17 




Lieut. 


17 


Aylward, Peter 


Capt. 


9 


Babbidge, James 


Q r M' 


15 




Ensign 


15 


Babbington, Charles 


Ensign 


55 




Lieut. 


55 


Bacon, William 


Ensign 


28 




Capt. Lieut. 


40 


Baggs, John 


Ensign 


1 


Baggs, Philip 


Capt. 


G9 


Baggs, Stephen 


Chaplain 


C9 


Baillie, Alexander 


Ensign 


60 


i 


Lieut. 


60 
21 


Baillie, Alexander 


Lieut. 


1 




Capt. 


1 


Baillie, Charles 


Capt. 


78 


Baillie, David 


Lieut. 


78 


Baillie, Henry 


Capt. 


94 


Baillie, Richard 


Capt. 


44 


Baillie, Richard 


Capt. Lieut. 


35 




Capt. 


35 


Baillie, William 


Lieut. 


62 




Q r M r 


60 




Capt. 


60 


Baillie, William 


Lieut. 


42 


Bain, James 


Ensign 


77 


Baines. William 


Surgeon 


95 


Baker, Thomas 


Ensign 


28 


Baldwin, Thomas 


Ensign 


47 


Balfour, David 


Ensign 


77 




Ensign 


1 


Balfour, Henry 


Lieut. 


1 




Adj' 


1 




Captain 


80 




Captain 


1 


Balfour, Lewis 


Ensign 


1 


Ball, Edward 


Lieut. 


59 


Ball, George 


Lieut. 


59 



5 April, 1759. 

28 December, 1757. 
16 August, 1760. 
22 November. 1756. 
14 August, 1762. 
22 November, 1756. 

27 April, 1756. 
22 October, 1762. 

13 December, 1765. 

14 September, 1760. 

26 October, 1762. 

6 August, 1759. 

16 September, 1762. 
24 July, 1762. 

21 December, 1758. 

10 September, 1762. 
16 September, 1758. 
6 October, 1761. 

22 November, 1756. 

11 June, 1762. 

2 February, 1757. 

28 October, 1762. 

28 February, 1766. 

9 December, 1756. 

27 July, 1758. 

29 November, 1771. 
2 February, 1757. 

30 November, 1761. 

10 January, 1757. 

26 July, 1757. 

12 January, 1760. 

6 June, 1757. 

24 June, 1758. 
14 April, 1759. 
19 January, 1756. 
14 April, 1759. 

4 October, 1760. 

31 January, 1756. 

7 January. 1758. 

7 April, 1762. 

27 March. 1765. 
19 May, 1761. 

2 June, 1762. 

14 January, 1763. 

15 March, 1755. 

25 February, 1757. 

13 September, 1760. 

8 October, 1761. 

31 December, 1762. 

28 January, 1763. 

14 December, 1759. 



1894.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



43 



Ball, Robert* 

Balueavis, Patrick 



Bam ford, "William 

Banks, John 
Barber, John 
Barbnt, Theodore 
Barbutt, Hor. Pearse 

Barbutt, James 
Barclay, David 
Bard, William 
Barker, Samuel 
Barker, William 

Barker, . 

Barnsley, Thomas 



Barnstedt, 

Barre, Isaac 

Barrington, John 
Barron, Edward 

Barron, George 
Barrow, Thomas 
Barry, Henry 



Barry, Samuel 

Bartman, George 
Bass, Robert 
Basset, Charles 
Basset, Henry 
Bassett, James 
Bassett, Richard 

Basset, Thomas 
Bastide, George 
Batt, Thomas 

Battersby, James 
Batut, John 

Baud in, Harrington 



Chaplain 64 

Ensign 42 

Lieut. 42 
Capt. Lieut. 42 

Lieut. 35 
Capt. Lieut. 35 

Ensign 46 

Lieut. 95 
Capt. Lieut. 48 

Ensign 15 

Lieut. 15 

Capt. 15 

Lieut. 42 

Ensign 80 

Ensign 15 

Lieut. 1 6 

Ensign 34 

Ensign 62 

Adjutant 60 

Lieut. 60 

Capt. 60 

Lieut. 62 

Capt. 2S 
Lieut. Col. 

Colonel 40 

Adj't. 60 

Ensign 60 

Lieut. 60 

Ensign 16 

Ensign 52 
2 d Lieut. 

Lieut. 52 

Ensign 16 

Lieut. 16 

Capt. 44 
Apoth. Mate Br, 

Lieut. 47 

Major 10 

Lieut. 29 
Ensign 



Lieut. 
2 d Lieut. 
Lieut. 
Capt. 

Ensign 
Lieut. 



62 
40 
18 
18 
29 
14 



Lieut. 

Lieut. 5S 

Capt. Lieut. 58 

Capt. 58 

* Also spelled Bell. 



5 August, 1758. 
28 January, 1756. 

1 April, 1758. 
23 August, 1763. 

16 February, 1756. 
25 December, 1762. 

25 July, 1758. 

7 March, 1760. 

21 November, 1757. 

9 June, 1758. 

26 September, 1760. 
11 October, 

25 July, 1757. 

8 September, 1761. 

22 May, 1759. 

17 June, 1761. 

7 September, 1762. 

26 December, 1755. 

18 August, 1756. 

2 December, 1756. 
30 May, 1759. 

10 January, 1756. 

27 February, 1760. 
29 January, 1761. 
9 June, 1759. 

1 May, 1760. 

16 April, 1762. 

13 April, 1772. 

11 March, 1768. 

22 February, 1763. 

23 September, 1772. 
21 March, 1765. 

26 December, 1770. 

25 December, 1756. 

1755. 

24 November, 1755. 
11 September, 1765. 
7 December, 1764. 

28 June, 1771. 

7 December, 1764. 

14 February, 1756. 
18 March, 1758. 

16 December, 1767. 

3 June, 1771. 

2 February, 1770. 

26 December, 1770. 

17 March, 1761. 

3 July, 1755. 

27 December, 1755. 

18 October, 1760. 



44 



British 0$ 



icers serving in A; 



Baugh, Thomas 



Baugh, William 
Bay, John 
Bayard, Robert 



Baylie, John 
Bayne; Duncan 
Bayntun, Harry 
Beall, Levin 
Bean, James 
Beard, Arthur 
Beatson, James 
Beaumont, Hammond 
Beaumont, John 
Beaver, Samuel 
Becher, John Gainsford 

Beckers, Henry 
Beckwith, John 



Belcher, Fred. John 
Bell, Jdhn 

Bell, Thomas 
Bell, Thomas 
Bellew, Patrick 
Bellew, William 
Bennet, Thomas 

Bentham, Edward William 
Bentinck, Rodoiphus 

Benzell, Adolphus 

Berkenhout, John 

Bertrand, John 

Berwick, Nicholas 
Bethuen, James 



Bevan, John 
Beven, Morgan 



[j. 



Bewes, George 



Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Major 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

1 st Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Surgeon 

Ensign 

Lieut. Col. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Major 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Surgeon 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Capt. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Q r M r 

1 st Lieut. 

l rt Lieut. 

Capt. Lieut, 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

2 d Lieut. 

1" Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 



55 
55 
34 

GO 
80 
GO 
60 
60 
65 
77 
46 
28 



4 October, 1745. 
26 December, 1755. 
24 July, 1758. 
8 February, 176?. 



26 December, 1757. 
16 July, 1758. 
18 April, 1759. 

4 October, 1765. 

16 August, 1708. 
10 January, 1757. 

5 August, 1759. 

17 October, 1759. 
Bangers 25 September, 1761. 

28 August. 1756. 
15 July, 1767. 

18 March, 1761. 
14 November, 1770. 
2 February, 1757. 
23 December, 1767. 

10 December, 1771. 
2 January, 175S. 

11 June, 1748. 
2 March, 1750-1. 
18 July, 1758. 
27 April, 1756. 
13 January, 1756. 

. 12 May, 1757. 
7 April, 1762. 
16 June, 1762. 

15 August, 1762. 

16 February, 1756. 

16 November, 1764. 
1 August, 1770. 

17 April, 1769. 

18 February, 1756. 
14 May, 1761. 
24 November, 1755. 
2 Jauuary, 1757. 
26 August, 1756. 
7 August, 1760. 

7 December, 1764. 
13 September, 1769. 

8 December, 1762. 
13 February, 17C2. 
6 December, 1765. 
21 February. 1772. 
25 May, 1772. 

28 June, 1755. 
10 January, 1760. 

29 September, 1761. 
10 April, 1769. 
27 February, 1772. 



64 
26 
29 
46 

16 

80 

44 

44 

62 
60 
27 
55 
1 
35 



16 
62 

1 



British Officers 



1894.] 

Billings, John 

Bird, Henry 

Bird, Thomas Taylor 
Bird, William 

Birniere, Henry 

Birniere, John de 



Bishop, Johu 
Bishop, Robert 
Blacker, Henry 
Blacker, William Latham 
Blackett, William 
Blachmore, Robert 
Blackwood, William 

Blair, Alexander _ 
Blair. Simon 
Blake, W. Todd 
Blakeley, John 
Blakeney, John 



Blakeney, Robert 
Blakeney, Theophilus 

Blakeney, William, Lord 

Blane, Archibald 
Blennerhassett, John 
Blizard, Conway 
Blood, Thomas 
Bogges, John 
Bolton, Francis 
Bolton, Mason 



Bomford, Thomas 

Bonniville, Hiacinthe de 
Borough, William Blakeney 

Borry, David 
Bosomworth, Abraham 
Boseawen, Hon. John 



A double commission apparently. 
VOL. XLVIII. 5 



l/icers serving m . 


Lieut. 




Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 




Lieut. 


8 


Ensign 


16 


Ensign 


17 


Ensign* 


17 


Ensign 




Ensign 


10 


Ensign 


55 


Lieut. 


44 


Lieut. 


18 


Lieut 


45 


Surgeon 


64 


Ensign 


65 


Ensign 


65 


Capt. 


14 


Lieut. 


10 


Ensign 


18 


Lieut. 


18 


Lieut. 


G9 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


27 


Surgeon 


47 


Lieut. 


27 


Q r M r 


27 


Capt. Lieut, 


. 27 


Capt. 




Capt. 


27 


Lieut. 


27 


Lieut. 


35 


Capt. 


35 


Col. 


27 


L;. Gen. 




Ensign 


60 


Ensign 


10 


Capt. Lieut. 


, 15 


Ensign 


64 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


Lieut. 


15 


Q r M r 


9 


Capt. Lieut. 


, 9 


Capt. 


9 


Ensign 


64 


Lieut. 


64 


Capt. 


60 


Lieut. 




Lieut. 


26 


Ensign 


60 


Capt. 


62 


Maj. Gen. 




Colonel 


45 



America. 45 

21 December, 1754. 

8 March, 1757. 

3 October, 1764. 

22 February, 1768. 
22 July, 1769. 
14 April, 1763.- 

25 December, 1765. 
22 August, 1770. 

14 September, 1779. 

22 November, 1755. 

9 August, 1760. 

4 February, 1769. 

15 March," 17 GO. 
18 April, 1766. 

15 Mav, 1771. 

16 May, 1766. 

29 May, 1761. 
11 September, 1765. 
4 March, 1767. 

26 December, 1770. 

24 June, 1761. 
20 July, 1757. 

17 August, 1763. 
1 April, 1760. 

10 December, 1755. 
13 Februarv, 1757. 
7 March, 1762. 

25 August, 1762. 
25 December, 1765. 

27 April, 1756. 
13 April, 1756. 

30 August, 1761. 
27 June, 1737. 

11 September, 1747. 

4 December, 1756. 
6 February, 1772. 

30 October, 1762. 

12 January, 1770. 

5 May, 1756. 

I October, 1757. 

II February, 1756. 

31 July, 1762. 

23 March, 1764. 
1 January, 1766. 
12 July, 1770. 
31 December, 1755. 
25 December, 1762. 

I April, 1767. 
15 September, 1760. 
20 January, 1755. 
4 March, 1761. 

II November, 1761. 



46 



.Descendants of John Briant, Sen. 



[Jo 



Botteler, "William 


Lieut. 


55 


29 December, 1755. 




Capt. Lieut. 


55 


28 November, 1759. 


Botet, Anthony 


Lieut. 


10 


25 May, 1765. 


Boucher, James 


Ensign 


31 


22 March, 1762. 




Lieut. 


31 


29 July, 1765. 


Bourke, Bingham 


Ensign 


28 


27 April, 1756. 




Lieut. 


28 


24 April, 1762. 


Bourne, John 


Chaplain 


43 


3 January, 1740-1. 


Bourne, Obadiah 


Capt. 


8 


27 August, 1756. 


Bouquet, Henry 


Lieut. Col. 


62 


3 January, 1756. 




Colouel 




19 February. 1762. 


Bowden, John 


Ensign 


46 


16 August, 1762. 




[To be continued.] 






/v- M 


1 





DESCENDANTS OF JOHN BRIANT, 

ATE, MASS. 



SEN., OF SCITU- 



ByDr. Fekcy Bkyant, of Buffalo, N.Y. 

The name Bryant can be traced back to Sir Guy De Briant, who lived 
in the time of Edward III., and whose descendants had their seat in the 
Castle of Hereford in the marches of Wales. Arms: the Held is Or, three 
piles meeting near in the base of the Escutcheon, Azure. No connection 
has been established between this family and the first of the name who 
came to America with the early settlers of Plymouth Colony, but this will 
probably be accomplished when the effort is made. 

About the year 1640, there were in the Plymouth Colony, four families 
of the name of Bryant, namely: John Briant of Taunton, John Briant, 
Sen. of Scituate, Stephen Briant of Plymouth, and Lieut. John Briant of 
Plympton. It does not appear from any records examined by the wri er, 
that these families were related (except as shown by a deed first discovered 
by Dr. Lapham, that Lieut. John of Plympton was a son-in-law of Stephen). 
Tradition, however, gives it that John, Sen. of Scituate and Stephen of 
Plymouth were probably brothers. 

Genealogies of two of these families have appeared in the Register; 
that of Stephen Briant of Plymouth, Vol. 24, page 315, by Mr. John A. 
Boutelle, and Lieut. Johu Briant of Plympton, Vol. 35, page 37, by Dr. 
"William B. Lapham. 

In this paper* the writer will confine himself to the family of John 
Briant, Sen. of Scituate. 

He was a prominent person in the early his- ,. - 

tory of Plymouth Colony, and throughout his iffi>4C^. /Jj/ l f~-i ri ^i. < £*<r 
life was active in public affairs ; was a land 
owner, and was actively engaged in the survey 
of public lands. He was a member of the General Court at Plymouth in 

* Tbc writer is indebted to Mr. William H. H. Bryant of Bryantville. Mas?., for many 
valuable suggestions, whica have aided much in the collection of material for "his paper. 
Without his assistance, so generously orltred at all times, much that is here given would 
be wanting. 



1894.] - Descendants of John B riant. Sen. 47 

1657, and again in 1677-78. The date of his arrival in America is not 
known, though there is a tradition that he came from Kent, Eng. in the 
Ann. lie lived in Barnstable previous to moving to Scituate. The first 
appearance of his name in the records of the Colony occurs among the list 
of freemen in 1639, and in 1643 he is mentioned among the list of 105 
men of Scituate aide to bear arms. 

He married three times: first. Mary, daughter of George and Mary 
(Jenkins) Lewis of Barnstable, Nov. 4, 1643, by whom he had seven chil- 
dren. She died July 2, 1655. He married the second time, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Rev. William Witherill of Scituate. He married the third 
time, Mary, daughter of Thomas Highland of Scituate. His will is dated 
Nov. 4, 1684. He died Nov. 20, 1684. 

His children, born in Scituate, were: 

2. i. John, 2 b. Aug. 17, 1644; in. Mary . 

ii. Hannah, b. July 25, 1G4G; m. John Stodder of Bingham, 1665. 

iii. Joseph, b. ; d. June 16, 1669. 

iv. ' Sarah, b. Sept. 29, 164S. 

v. Maky, b. Feb. 24, 1650; d. April 8, 1652. 

vi. Martha, b. Feb. 26, 1652. 

\\i. Samuel, b. Feb, 6, 1654; d. 1690, in Phipps' expedition to Canada, 

sergeant; inventory of estate, £47. 
viii. Elizabeth, b. Aug. — , 1665; d. Dec. 17, 17S3. 

3. ix. Daniel, b. ; m. Dorothy . 

x. Mary, b. . 

xi. Benjamin, b. Dec. — , 1669; d. in 1701, unm.; will proved Jan. 5, 
1702; inventory of estate, £164. 

4. xii.^ Joseph, b. , 1671; m. . 

xiii." Jabez, b. Feb. 18, 1672; d. 1697, unm. Letter of administration 

June 29, 1697. 
xiv. Ruth. b. Aug. 16, 1673; m. William Wanton, afterwards governor 

of Rhode Island. 

5. xv. Thomas, b. July 15, 1675; m. Mary, dau. of Gershom Ewell. 
xvi. Deborah, b. Jan. 22, 1677. 

xvii. Agatha, b March 12, 1678. 
xviii. Ann, b. Nov. 20, 1679. 
xix. Elisha, b. . 

2. Lieut. John 2 Bryant (John, 1 Sen.), married Mary . He was 

born in Scituate, Aug. 17, 1644, died there Jan. 26, 1708; will 
proved Feb. 12, 1708; inventory of estate £395. His children, 
born in Scituate, were: 

6. i. John, 3 Jun., b. March 27, 1678; m. Deborah Barstow, Jan. 1, 1707. 

7. ii. Jonathan, b. Jan. 1, 1679; m. Elizabeth . 

iii. Mary, b. Sept. 3, 1682; m. Jabez Rose, May 6, 1707. 

8. iv. David, b. Aug. 17, 1684; m. Hannah Church. 
v. Joshua, b. Nov. 14, 1687; d. June 9, 1709. 

9. vi. Samuel, b. Jan. 15, 16S9; m. Abigail Turner, 
vii. Martha, b. Aug. 22, 1691. 

3. Daniel* Bryant (John, 1 Sen.), married Dorothy , planter, 

date of birth not recorded; but in will of his father, he is mentioned 
in order after his brother Samuel. His children, born in Scituate, 
were: 

i- Mercy, 3 b. Nov. 21, 1688. 

ii. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 4, 1692. 

iii. Dorothy, b. March 5, 1693. 

iv. Racuael, b. Julv 3, 1695 ; d. Nov. 20, 1695. 

v. Rachael, b. Jan! 10, 1697. 

vi. Elisha, b. June 30, 1701. 



10. 


i. 




ii. 


11. 


115 . 




iv. 


12. 


v. 




vi. 


13. 


vii. 




viii. 



48 Descendants of John Briant, Sen. [Jan. 

4. Joseph* Bryant (John} Sen.), born at Seituate in 1671. In will re- 

ceives with bis brotber Thomas, bis father's house and farm; also 
land at White Oak Plain. His children, born in Seituate. were: 

i. Erin, 3 b. Feb. 18, 1604; m. Benjamin Perry, Feb. 20, 1712. 

ii. Joseph, b. Jan. 3, 1696. 

iii. Judith, b. Jan. 24, 1698; m. John Dwelley, Dec. 20, 1721. 

5. Thomas 2 BRYANT (John. 1 Sen.), born in Seituate. July 15, 1675; mar- 

ried Aug. 2$, 1707, by Joseph Otis. Justice of Peace, Mary, daughter 
of Gersliom Ewell of Seituate, and grand-daughter of Henry Ewell, 
a soldier in the Pequod War. He died in Seituate in 1748. will 
proved Dec. 23, 1748. Esquire. Estate estimated from will over 
£10,000. A distinguished man of his time, Selectman, Justice of 
Peace, and Representative to the Legislature in 172o-30-33-34. 
Their children, born in Seituate, were : 

Benjamin, 3 b. Oct. 13, 1708: m. Abigail Randall. 

Mary, b. Nov. 6, 1711 ; in. Thomas Turner of Seituate, Feb. 14, 1733. 

Seth, b. Feb. 12, 1714; m. Elizabeth Baker. 

Thomas, bapt. April 29, 1716; in. Sarah . Had dau. Sarah, 

and probably others. 
Peleg, b. July 27, 1718; m. Mary Jenkins. 
Hannah, b. Aug. 20. 1720. Not mentioned in will. 
Lemuel, b. Feb. 25, 1721; m. Abigail Barstow. 
Nathaniel, b. Nov. 23, 1724; d. in infancy. 

6. John 3 Bryant (John 2 Lieut, John 1 Sen.), born in Seituate, March 

27, 1678; married by Rev. Nathaniel Ells, Jan. 1, 1707, Deborah 
Barstow of Seituate. He died March 7, 1716. His widow married 
Nathaniel Winslow of Marshfield, Eeb. 19, 1718. His children, 
born in Seituate, were: 

i. John, 4 b. Oct. 13, 1707; d. April 19, 1708. 

ii. Deborah, b. June 17, 1709; m. Snow Winslow of Marshfield, Nov. 
6, 172S. 

iii. Agatha, b. July 16, 1712; m. Oliver Winslow of Marshfield. 

iv. Susannah, b. May 11, 1714; m. Nathaniel Winslow of Marshfield, 
Feb. 3, 1731. 

v. " John, b. April 23, 1716; d. in Seituate, Oct. 20, 1793. In 1732 Isaac 
Winslow was appointed his guardian. He sold his farm in Marsh- 
field to Oliver Winslow in 1737. 

7. Jonathan 3 Bryant (John 2 Lieut., John 1 Sen.), born in Seituate, 

Jan. 1, 1679; married Elizabeth . She died April 17, 1711. 

Their children, born in Seituate, were: 

i. Margaret, 4 b. April 15, 1707. 
ii. Ruth, b. March 15, 1709. 

8. David 8 Bryant (John 2 Lieut., John 1 Sen.), born in Seituate, Aug. 

17, 1684; married by the Rev. Nathaniel Ells, July 31, 1706, Han- 
nah Church (widow). He died at Seituate, June 21, 1731. In- 
ventory of estate £2,151, Gentleman. His g vvife died in 1736. Their 
children, born in Seituate, were: 



i. David, 4 b. Feb. 14, 1707; m. Hannah . 

ii. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 16, 1709. 

iii. Mary, b. May 4, 1711; in. John Curtis of Hanover, Nov. 6, 1733. 

She d. June 2, 1797. 
iv. Jacob, b. Jan. — , 1714. 



1894.] -Descendants of John Br ianf, Sen. 49 

v. Barsheba, b. Sept. 18. 1716; m. Samuel Palmer, Jun. of Scituate, 

Sept. 20, 1733. 
vi. Deborah, b. . 

9. Samuel 8 Bryant (John* Lieut., Joint 1 Sen.), born in Scituate, Jan. 
15, 1G89; died there in 1753. Wheelwright; married Abigail 
Turner of Scituate, Feb. 14, 1711, by Rev. Nathaniel Ells. Their 
children, born in Scituate, were: 

i. Joshua, 4 b. Jan, C, 1713. 

15. ii. .Samuel. Jun., bapt. July 29, 1716; m. Mary Bucks, 
iii. John, b. Dec. 21, 1718. 

It. Abigail, b. July 21, 1723. 

10. Benjamin 3 Bryant (Thomas. 2 John 1 Sen.), born in Scituate Oct. 13, 

1708, yeoman; married Abigail Randall of Scituate, Sept. 11, 1729, 
by Rev. Nathaniel Ells. He moved to Windsor, Conu. about the 
year 1750. His children, born in Scituate, were: 

i. Mary,* b. June 29, 1730. 

ii. Lucy, b. March 25, 1732. 

16. iii. Benjamin, b. Oct. 17, 1734; m. Ruxby Perry, 
iv. George, b. June 15, 1736. 

v. Lillie, b.. April 22, 1738. 

vi. Betty, b. Feb. 15, 1739. 

vii. Consider, b. June 9, 1742. 

viii. Ruth, bapt. Aug. 5, 1744. 

ix. Prince, b. July 27, 1746. 

x. Abigail, b. June 7, 1748. 

11. Seth 3 Bryant (Thomas' John 1 Sen.), born in Scituate, Feb. 12, 

1714; married by Rev. Shearsjashub Bourn, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Deborah (Randall) Barker of Scituate, Aug. 17, 
1736. She was great-granddaughter of Robert Barker of Pem- 
broke, and great-great-granddaughter of William Randall of Scituate. 
He moved to Marshfield about the same year. He died there in 
1772. Will proved Aug. 7, 1772; Gentleman. Inventory of estate 
£1,059. His wife died Feb. 7, 1788. His children, born in Marsh- 
field, were: 

i. Ruth, 4 b. Oct. 25, 1736 ; m. Abner Dingley of Duxbury, Jan. 4, 1759. 

17. ii. Nathaniel, b. Oct. 10, 1738; m. Hannah Barker, dau. of Capt. 

Samuel Barker. 

18. iii. Seth, b. Aug. 4, 1741 ; m. Sarah . 

19. iv. Joseph, b. Feb. 13, 1743; m. Sarah Little. 

v. Charles, b. July 20, 1751 ; m. Jerusha of New Castle, Me. 

vi. Vashti, b. June 22, 1755; m. Abijah Brown of Scituate, June 29, 
1790. 

12. Peleg 3 Bryant (Thomas, 2 John 1 Sen.), born in Scituate, July 27, 

1718; he died there in 1772; married Mary Jenkins of Scituate in 
April, 1740. Will dated Sept. 27, 1771. Gentleman. Their chil- 
dren, born in Scituate, were: 
5- Mary Ewell, 4 bapt. July 15, 1744. 

20. II. Pkleg, bapt. Oct. 19, 1746 ; m. Lydia Collamar. 

iii. Ann, bapt. April 3, 1748 ; m. Joshua Lincoln of Scituate, Jan. 6, 1767. 

iv. Rhoda, bapt. Dec. 3, 1749. 

v. James, bapt. June 30, 1751. 

vi. Edward, bapt. June 10, 1753. 

vii. Martha, bapt. Oct. 2, 1757; m. Calvin Curtis of Hanover, Nov. 7, 

VOL. XL vii i. 5* 



50 - Descendants of 'John Briant, Sen. [Jan. 

13. Rev. Lemuel 3 Bryant (Thomas? John 1 Sen.), baptized Feb. 25, 

1721. A distinguished minister of Braintree, Mass. Was graduated 
from Harvard in 1739. Ordained Dec. 4, 1745. Published a ser- 
mon on "Moral Virtue" in 1747- John Adams speaks of a con- 
troversy between Mr. Bryant and Miles, Porter and Bass, which 
" broke out like the eruption of a volcano and blazed with a por- 
tentous aspect for many years." He married Abigail Barstow, Aug. 
23, 1749. Died at Hiugkaui, Mass., Oct. 1, 1754. Was interred at 
Scituate. 

14. David 4 Bryant {David? John* Lieut., John 1 Sen), born in Scituate, 

Feb. 14. 1707; married Hannah . Their children, born in 

Scituate, were : 

i. David, 5 bapt. Sept. 6, 1730; m. Lydia . 

ii. Jonathan, bapt. June 6, 1731. 

iii. Hannah, bapt. Nov. 4, 1733. 

iv. Ruth, bapt. March 25, 1735. 

v. Ann, bapt. March 23, 1739. 

15. Samuel 4 Bryant (Samuel? John 2 Lieut., John 1 Sen.), born iu Scit- 

uate in 171G; married Mary Bucks of Scituate in October, 1745. 
Housewright. Their children, born in Scituate, were: 

i. Abigal,* b. Dec. 31, 1747. 

ii. Sa_muel, b. Dec. 26, 1743. 

iii. Ira, b. Aug. 28, 1750. 

iv. Elijah, b. Nov. 8, 1751. 

t. Molly, b. July 23, 1753. 

21. vi. Zina, b. Jau. 1, 1755; m. Eunice Wade, 
vii. Snow, b. Oct. 6, 1753. 

16. Benjamin 4 Bryant (Benjamin? Thomas? John 1 Sen.), born in Scit- 

uate, Oct. 17, 1734; married by Rev. David Barnes, July 16, 1757, 
Ruxby, daughter of Benjamin Perry of Scituate. He moved to 
Chesterfield, Mass., about the year 1780. Their children were: 

22. i. Eli, s b. . 

ii. Asabel, b. . 

And probably others. 

17. Nathaniel 4 Bryant (Seth? Thomas? John 1 Sen.), born in Marsh- 

field, Oct. 10, 1738; married in February, 1763, Hannah, daughter 
of Capt. Samuel and Patience ( Howland) Barker of Scituate. She 
was fifth in descent from John Howland who came over in the May- 
flower, and sixth in descent from John Barker of Scituate. He 
moved to Newcastle, Me. in 1766, and the same year purchased of 
Richard Bowers one hundred acres of land on the westerlv side of 
Damariscotta Pond, half a mile below the Great Salt- Water Falls. 
Here he built a wharf, the remains of which are yet to be seen. He 
was one of the first to establish ship-building on the Damariscotta 
River. His son, Nathaniel, afterwards extensively developed ship- 
building in Newcastle. Nathaniel, Sen., died in Newcastle, July 9, 
1772. Inventory of his estate £2,149. His widow, Hannah, mar- 
ried Prince Barker. Nathaniel's children were: 

23. i. Nathaniel, 4 b. May 2, 1705; m. Betsy Wall, Oct. 1, 1605. 

ii. Hannah Barker, b. March 25, 17U8; m. Enos Clapp, Sept. 21, 1788. 
iii. Patience, b. Sept. 30, 1771 ; in. William Watr-rs, May 3, 1792. 

iv. Asenath, b. ; m. Eliphalet Connor of Thomaston, Me., July 

25, 1790. 



1894]. ' Descendants of John' Briant, Sen. 51 

18. Seth* Bryant (Scth, 3 Thomas, 7 John 1 Sen.), born in Marshfield, 

Aug. 4, 1741; married Sarah . Their children, born in 

Marshfield, were: 

i. Charles, 5 b. Oct. 11, 1764. 

ii. Charlotte, b. March IS, 17C6. 

iii. Ll'CY, b. Jan. 10, 17GS. 

iv. Nancy, b. Feb. 24, 1770. 

v. Elizabeth, b. July 13, 1772. 

vi. Folly, b. Jan. 2, 1775. 

19. Capt. Josi:rn 4 Bryant (Selh* Thomas, 7 John 1 Sen.), born in Marsh- 

field, Feb. 13, 1713; master mariner. Married in 1788, Sarah, 
daughter of Thomas Little of Marshfield. He died there May 6, 
1796. Will dated May 3, 1796; Esqr. His first wife died Nov. 
9, 1792. He married secend time Unice Otis of Scituate, July 1st, 
1795. (No children.) She afterwards married, Nov. 17, 1799, 
Willis Gift of Marshfield. Capt. Joseph's children were : 

i. Joseph,* b. Dec. 3, 1789. He went to Castine, ire., when twelve 
years old, and lived with his uncle Otis Little. He m. Sept. 23, 
1816, Sarah Little of Bremen, Me. They had three children. His 
wife d. May 6, 1822. He m. second time Abigail Curtis of Sharon, 
Mass! They had nine children. In 1835 he moved to Bangor, 
where he d. March 31, 1S63. 

ii. Sally, b. xVug. 28, 1791 ; m. William Witherle of Castine, Me., Dec. 
25, 1815. Their children were: Sarah II., William H. and George 
H. He d. in April, 1860. His widow d. in July, 1860. 

20. Peleg 4 Bryant (Pcleg, 3 Thomas, 3 John 1 Sen.), born in Scituate in 

1746; married by Rev. David Barnes, Lydia Collomar of Scituate, 
Nov. 19, 1767. He died there in 1781. Letter of administration 
is dated April 18, 1781. Their children, born in Scituate, were: 

i. Ann, 5 b. in 1773. 
ii. Mary, b. in 1777. 
iii. Lydia, b. in 1779. 

21. Zina* Bryant (Samuel* Samuel? Jofai 3 Lieut., John 1 Se?i.), born in 

Scituate, Jan. 1, 1755; married by the Rev. David Barnes, Unice 
Wade of Scituate, Sept. 9, 1782. Their children, born in Scituate, 
were : 

i. Nancy,* b. Aug. 27, 1784. 

ii. Zebalon, b. Sept. 5, 1786. 

24. iii. Gridley, b. Aug. 26, 1789; engineer, d. June 13, 1867. 
iv. Joseph, b. April" 28, 1792. 

v. Foster, b. March 17, 1799. 

22. En 5 Bryant (Benjamin,* Benjamin? Thomas, 3 John 1 Sen.), born in 

Chesterfield, Mass.; married Susan Warren of Williamsburgh, Mas3. 
He died at Chesterfield in 1845; land owner. Their children 
were: 

25. i. Benjamin,* b. in 1797; m. Eliza Benjamin. 
And probably others. 

23. Nathaniel 5 Bryant (Nathaniel* Seth? Thomas, 3 John 1 Sen.), born 

at Scituate, May 2, 1765; ship builder. A wealthy and iniluential 
business mau of Newcastle, Me. He had yards at Newcastle and 
Nobleborough, and carried on an extensive shipbuilding trade. 



52 „ Descendants of John Briant, Sen. [Jan. 

From his yards was launched the first square rigged three master 
built, on the Damariscotta. the ship Betsy. During Napoleonic 
wars lost several vessels. He married Oct. 1, 1795, Mi>s Betsy 
Wall of Bristol. Me. He died Jan. 9, 1835. His wife died Sept. 
12, 1 846. Their children, born in Newcastle, were: 

26. i. Harriet,* b. May 21, 179G; m. Lieut Joseph Smith, U. S. N. 

27. ii. Ctjshing, b. July 18, 1797; m. Arlitta, dau. of Dr. Josiah Myrick. 
iii. Julia, b, Oct. 24, 1798; m. Lewis Haiues. 

24. Gridley 6 Bryant {Zina? Samuel* Samuel? John 2 Lieut., John 1 

Sen.), born in Scituate, Aug. 26, 1789; engineer. Left fatherless 
at an early age, and when fifteen years old was apprenticed to a 
builder in Boston. Obtained contract for building the United States 
Bank, and other public buildings in Boston. In 1823 he invented 
the portable derrick. Built in 182G the first railroad in America 
(between Boston and Quincy). For many years he was engaged in 
the celebrated law suit against Ross Winans for the patent for the 
eight-wheeled car and appliances for general railway use. He died 
at Scituate, June 13, 1867. 

25. Benjamin 6 Bryant {Eli, 6 Benjamin* Benjamin? Thomas? John 1 

Sen.), born in Chesterfield, Mass.; married in June, 1823, Eliza 
Benjamiu of Worthington, Mass. He died there Aug. 9, 1854. 
Their children, born in Chesterfield, were : 

i. Monroe Benjamin, 7 b. in 1824 ; manufacturing jeweler of New York 

City, 

ii. Eleanor, b. in 1826. 

iii. Jonathan Pomeroy, b. in 1828. 

iv. Francis Dwight, b. in 1830. 

v. Elizabeth Susan, b. in 1832. 

vi. Ezra Starkweather, b. in . 

vii. Eliza Ann, b. in . 

viii. Cornelia King, b. in . 

26. Harriet 8 Bryant {Nathaniel? Nathaniel? Seth? Thomas? John 1 

Sen.), born at Newcastle, May 21, 1796; married March 1, 1818, 
Lieut. Joseph Smith, U. S. N. (afterwards Rear Admiral). She 
died in 1855, from injuries received in a railway accident. Admiral 
Smith died Jan. 17, 1877. (See Register, 31 : 437.) Their chil- 
dren were: 

i. Anna Elizabeth 7 Smith, unm., living: in Washington, D. C 

ii. Com. Albert 7 Smith, U. S. N. ; d. at Charlestown Navy Yard. 

iii. Lieut. Jos-Epn 7 Smith, U. S. N. During the Civil War he commanded 

the Congress, and was killed in the encounter with the Merrimac, 

March 8, 18G2. 
iv. Josephine, 7 d. young. 

27. Major Cushing 6 Bryant {Nathaniel? Nathaniel? Seth? Thomas? 

John 1 Se?i.), born at Newcastle, July 18, 1797. Shipbuilder; mar- 
ried Sept. 25, 1821, by the Rev. Kiah Bailey, Miss Arlitta, daughter 
of Dr. Josiah and Mary (Clark) Myrick of Newcastle. She was 
seventh in descent from Thomas Clark of Plymouth, who came in 
the Ann in 1623, and fourth in descent from Joshua Myrick of Har- 
wich, Mass. He was graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy, N. H. 
Ensign, 2d Mass. Infantry, 1816. Commissioned Major by Gov. 



1894.] Inscriptions at St. Augustine, Florida. 



53 



Brooks, July 13, 1819. Died of pneumonia while serving as en- 
rolling officer Oct. 6, 1863. His wife Arlitta died of diphtheria, 
Dec. 18, 18(31. Their children, horn in Nobleborough, were: 

2S. i. Nathaniel CrsmxG, 7 b. March 27, 1823; m. Mary Eliza Southall. 
ii. JOSEPH Myutck, b. July 1, 1825 ; unm. 
iii. Edward Livingston, b. June 3, 1828; d. at San Francisco, May 22, 

1851. "Was first officer of Brig. Colonel Fremont. 
iv. Helen Maria, b. Sept. 25, 1830 f d. March 23, 1833. 
v. Charles Carroll, b. May 2, 1832: d. at Portland, Ore., Nov. 17, 

1873. Had two daughters, who died of diphtheria in 1880. 

28. Commander Nathaniel Gushing 7 Bryant, U.S. N. (Cashing? Na- 
thaniel? Nathaniel* Selh,* Thomas, 2 John 1 Sen.), born at Noblebor- 
ough, Me., March 27, 1 823 ; married by the Rev. Mr. Bush, Sept. 19, 
I860, Miss Mary Eliza, daughter of Mark John and Mary (Yardley) 
Southall of Ashton-Under-Lyne, Lancashire, Eug. Was graduated 
from U. S. Naval School, Philadelphia, 1843; standing fourth in a 
class of thirty-nine. Lieut. 1850. Commander 1862. Served through 
the Mexican War and the American Civil War. On retired list from 
Sept., 1864, though he served until April, 1865. He died at his 
home, Cedar Falls, Iowa, Sept. 19, 1871. Their children were: 

i. Peijcy,* b. April 19, 18G2. Was graduated from medical department, 

Columbia College, New York City. 
ii. Walter, b. Oct. 1, 18G3. Was graduated from University of Iowa. 



INSCRIPTIONS IN THE OLD PROTESTANT GRAVEYARD 
AT ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA. 

Communicated by B. Frank Leeds, Esq. 
[Continued from vol. xlvii., page 436.] 

Row 11. 
Israel A. Smith, who died Sep. 1, 1830, aged 20 years and 6 mos. 
A heavy white marble monument on a raised brick foundation. 



Maria Frances, dau r of Jackson Browne French of Burlington, New 
Jersey, who died Feb. 4, 1832, aged 29 years. 
Head and footstones. 



Mrs. Lydia Boyce, a native of Newberry District. So. Car., who 
departed this life on the 27 tu day of September," 1830, aged 40 years. 
A white marble monument. 



John Scobie, a native of Perthshire, Scotland, who departed this life 
August 31, A.D. 1841, aged 64 years. 

Margaret Westrav, wife of Nathaniel C Scobie, born March 25, 1810, 
died Dec. 6, 1850. " 
These two horizontal slabs on raised coquina foundation. 



54 Inscriptions at St. Augustine, Florida. [Jan. 

Carpenter, 1883. 

This inscription on marble tablet which is let into the upper face of a 
moulded slab of coquina. The slab is slightly tilted and lies east of the 
Margaret W. Scobie slab. 



Thomas H. Dummett, who departed this life the 31 8t of Aug. 1830, aged 
64 years. 



John Houston M. J. Madison, born May 5, 1820, died Dec. 20. 1853, 
and his son John Ripley Madison, born March 26, 1851, died May 6, 1852. 

The slightly depressed lot containing the above two horizontal stones is 
curbed, and midway of the east curbed line there is a block inscribed with the 
names Dummett — Madison. 



Two children's graves directly adjoin preceding, the western one with 
glazed brick edging to it, the other with white marble edging and headstone 
containing the name Willie. 



North of this line of graves and southeast of the Douglas Pacetti grave 
are the two following: 

Single grave with cement curb and head and footboard but no inscription 
— an evergreen euonymus within curbing. 

A grave with palings around in very shaky condition — no mark. 



Directly adjoining above north — Rebecca Nattiel, died April 11, 1879, 
aged 7-2 years. 

Another similar headboard contains simply the letters J. N. Perhaps 
husband of R. N. 

A nicely curbed lot, the ground within depressed. No stoues. 
The north side of lot two feet from north fence. 



Southeast of the just-mentioned curbed lot, the corners touching, there is 
a large lot filled with lilies, not yet in flower, surrounded with a paling 
fence. Also a single grave north of this with fence surrounding it — a 
large water oak against its north side. No monuments in either enclosure. 



W m Thomas, Jr., of New York City, who departed this life Dec. 27, 
1840, aged 23 years. 
Marble head and footstone. 



North of and directly adjoining the above a mound, and adjoining this 
mound northwardly another and shorter. — Neither marked. 

As the Thomas grave and these two are so close together, the interred 
may be related. 

These succeed, though some distance — 10 feet north— from the two children's 
graves mentioned above on this page. 



Row 12. 
A mouud with two graves covering the east end of it— the more southerly 
has a cedar tree against its footstone. — No inscriptions. 



1894.] Inscriptions at St. Augustine, Florida. 55 

The adjoining lot with coquina curbing has an obelisk at its centre — this 
of granite on several foundation stones — the lowest of coquiua C ft. square. 

Its inscription as follows : 

Mrs. Julia G. Smith — who died in New York December, 1861. Erected 
by her husband Buckingham Smith, who died in New York Jan. 1871. 
A cedar in this lot has pushed one of the stones of the curbing aside. 



A headstone — broken — the remnant 18 inches square, simply rests against 
the inner face of curbing of the Julia G. Smith lot. Contains following 
inscription : 

"William C. Kent, of Utica, New York, who died 



Hannah Smith, wife of late Josiah Smith, who died in November, 1857 
aged 80 years. 
Marble head and footstone. 



Anita Amelia Smith, wife of Dr. John B. Porter, surgeon TJ. S. army, 
and daughter of Josiah and Hannah Smith of St. Augustine, born Feb. 18, 
1815— died July 25, 1850. 

A 6x10 marble table on raised coquiua foundation, with marble slab contain- 
ing inscription resting on the former. 



Sarah S. Williams, wife of John Williams, and daughter of Lemuel and 
Sarah Williams, of New Bedford, Mass. She died 25 th Feb. 1839, aged 
27 years. 

Vertical head and footstone. 

Cast iron fence around lot in good condition. 



Charlotte Smith, dau r of David Smith and Laura Ufford, born at Pitcher, 
Chenango Co., New York, 8 th May, 1833. — Died at Saint Augustine 6 th 
Dec. 1877. 

Upright heavy granite headstone with two granite foundation stones below. 



Oscar Ashton, born Jan. 21, 1839, died May 8, 1860. 
Vertical head and footstone — a water oak 14 inches in diameter west of head- 
stone. 



Douglas D. Pacetti, born March 11, 1862, died June 12, 1879. 
Wooden headboard with paling fence around grave— an Acacia Fame: 
ithin fence. 
The wooden headboard has been replaced by marble head and footstone. 



A child's grave with paling fence around, a cherry laurel within, >u 
6tone. 



Matilda DeLancy, died Dec. 23, 1875, aged 77 years. Erected by her 
affectionate daughter. 
A low vertical head and footstone of marble on cement foundation. 
[To be continaed.] 




PLAT OF THE 
ANCIENT LINE FEILDE 

Of 

CHARLESTOWN. 



1894.] The Ancient Line Feilde of Charhstovm. 57 



THE ANCIENT LINE FEILDE OF CHARLESTONS. 

By Geo. A. Gokdok, A.M., of Somerville, Mass. 

The extensive territory, partitioned among the early inhabitants 
uf Charlcstown, lying without the settlement and accommodations 
at the harbor, or port, was denominated in common speech and in 
the public record under several divisions, such as : the east feilde, 
the south feilde, the high feilde, the line feilde, Cambridge feilde, 
Mistick feilde, Rockfeilde and Waterfeilde. The names of these 
fields indicate in a general way their location. 

Among the papers pertaining to a suit prosecuted before the 
Middlesex County Court, during the closing years of the seventeenth 
century, has been preserved a pen and ink map, which, by the 
courteous permission of Theodore C. Hurd, Esq., Clerk of the 
Courts, has been phototyped for the Register, and appears on the 
preceding page. 

Comparison with the descriptions of lots, entered in the Charles- 
town Book of Possessions' (1G38), as reprinted in the Third Report 
of the Record Commissioners of the City of Boston, 1878, shows 
this to be a plat of the southern portion of the ancient r 'line feilde." 
Nothing appears on its face to determine its date ; but a column 
of figures in the lower left hand corner, not here shown, would 
warrant the assignment of a very early date, perhaps anterior to 
any known map of the locality. The names of certain inhabitants, 
admitted in 1637, Thomas Call, James Garrett and Matthew Smith, 
in connection with the descriptions in the Land book, covering the 
most of these properties, may assist in the determination, as also the 
following abstract from the Charlestown Town records : 

Charlestowne The ix month the 13 th day 

1637. 
Such as are to fence at - It was agreed y l : for the ^rownd at New Towne 

newtowne line beyond Line beyond Weuotamies "such as fence not to 

•neuotaimes: doe it with , t , J . -. it „ . , ,, r , ., 

4 railes, by y e 20 lh of y e ' 00se theire pportions there. & to goe turth tor it, 

2 d month, or loose theire the fences to bee finished by the 20 th of ye 2 d month 

Land & goe farth r & the fence to bee 4 railes 

That A footway bee made That A ffooteway bee made over ^Venotomies 

over Wenotom'ies lliver & a way bettween the Lotts lefte 3 pole wide 

Such as have not bought And such as have not bought, or built & fenced, 

builL or fenced to have no t to have ppriety untill they have bought, or 

no ppmety till they have bflflt) & fen ^ # 

The territory is entirely within the limits of Arlington, to-day, 
resting for three quarters of a mile on the western bank of Mystic 
river, from the pond down to the mouth of Alewife brook. Mystic 
vol. xlviii. 6 



58 . Tlie Ancient Line F elide of Gharlestown. [Jan. 

river and pond, to-day, bear the same names they did two hundred 
and fifty years ago, but Menotomy river has long been known as 
Alewife brook and marks the present boundary between Cambridge 
and Arlington. Agreeable to this map, the strip of land along the 
margin of this little stream was reserved for a highway, but, if it 
ever was so improved, no memory or known record thereof exists. 
The bridgeway, now Broadway and Warren streets in Arlington, 
extended from the foot bridge to the bridge below Cooke's mills, 
above the present Arlington cemetery and Gas works. The high- 
way, leading across the lots to "mistick weare," is substantially 
the line of the present Medford street. The other way, affording 
an approach to the river, lower down and below the islands, is now 
River street. 

The names, written upon these lots, are all of well known early 
inhabitants of Charlestown. The lots of the most may be identified, 
in language corresponding with their position on this map, with 
entries in the Charlestown Book of Possessions. Some of the lots, 
even thus early, had been sold, and appear under other proprietors. 

Capt. Edward Johnson, the proprietor of the lot at the top of the 
plat, was a carpenter at Charlestown and a leading citizen. Sub- 
secmently he was a promoter in the settlement of Woburn, where 
he served till his death, as town clerk, and as representative to the 
General Court, of which he was Speaker. He was the author of 
the " Wonder Working Providence." His possessions [29], en- 
tered in the Charlestown Lands, include his several lots on this map, 
as follows : 

6. ffoure acres of earable land by estimation, more or lesse, scituate in the 
line feilde, butting southwest upon Cambridge line, northeast upon the 
bridge way, bounded on the northwest by Nicolas Stowers and on the southe 
east by A high way. 

.7. foure acres of land by estimation, more or lesse, scituate in the line 
■feilde, butting southwest upon the bridg-way, north east upon mistick 
pond, bounded on the north west by Ed Carrington and Pru Wilkinson and 
• on the south east by J a Browne. 

The lot next adjacent to Edward Johnson on the Cambridge line 
was that of Thomas Call, and is described in the same Possessions 
[73] , as follows : 

3. ffoure acres of earable land by estimation, more or lesse, scituate in 
the line feilde, butting northeast upon the Bridgway, bounded on the west 
by Edward Johnson, and ou the southeast by Nicolas Stowers, A triangle. 

The vacant lot of two acres between Ralph Sprague and Edward 
Johnson, bordering on the pond, was possessed by Pro ; Wilkinson, 
the sole instance of a female proprietor. 

The lot at the southwest corner of the bridgway and Menotomy 
river was that of John Martin. 

The opposite lot of Mr. Wetherell, the school master, was sold to 



1894.] 



Relloyg Families of Colchester, Conn. 



59 



John Stretton, who possessed the vacant lot between Martin and 
Hennon Garrett. 

The list comprises thirty-six names, in modern spelling, viz. : 



Thomas Alien 
W n l.atclmlder 
Wf Brackenbury 
Jumes Browne 
John Barrage 
Thomas Call 
E<lw d Carjrington 
Edward Convers 
Stephen Fosdick 
Herman Garrett 
James Garrett 
John Gould 



James Hayden 
Robert Hale 
Samuel Hall 
Benj 1 Hubbard 
James Hubbard 
Edward .Johnson 
Richard Kettell 
Robert Long 
Thomas Lynde 
Francis Norton 
"Walter Palmer 
James Pembertou 



Robert Rand 

Robert Sedgwick 
Dan 1 Shepherdson 
Matthew Smith 
Ralph Sprague 
Nicholas Stowers 



Zachai 



•>ymrnes 



Joshua Tead 
John Tid 
Nicholas Trerice 
W m Wetherell 
Tho 9 Whittemore 



THE KELLOGG FAMILIES OF COLCHESTER, COXX. 

By James H. Perri.v, Esq., of Lafayette, Indiana. 

The chief sources from which the following is taken are the town records 
of Hebron, Colchester, Hadley and Hatfield; Judd's History of Hadley; 
Randall's Colchester Epitaphs, in the Register for 188'J ; and the Kellogg 
articles in the Register, xii., 201-6, xiv., xv., 125-32. The last articles 
mention four early Kelloggs, antecedents unknown : 

i. Lihut. Joseph, of Farmington, Boston, and Hadley, descendants 
given. 

ii. Nathaniel, Hartford 1C39, removed to Farmington. 

iii. Samuel, supposedly brother of the above Nathaniel, settled at Hat- 
field. 

iv. Daniel, settled at Norwalk 1635, descendants given. 

The present article gives some account of the Samuel falsely supposed 
to be a " brother of the above Nathaniel." As Nathaniel was adult in 
1G39, while Samuel was not married until 1664, they seem unlikely to 
have been brothers, especially as Samuel is not mentioned in the will of 
Nathaniel.* An account is also given of the descendants of f>benezer and 
Jonathan Kellogg, sons of Lieut. Joseph, referred to in the Register for 
April, I860, as having removed to Colchester. Pedigrees of allied families 
have been traced back, whenever possible, to the first person of the name in 
Colchester. 

The writer will be grateful for any information concerning the ancestry 
of the Samuel Kellogg whose descendants are here given. 



#_,&ePorda of the Particular Court, Hartford, ii. 118. will of Nathan" Keloi, June 4 
16.), : Being weak in body * * * gjv«H whole estate to dear and loving wife Elizabeth Kelog 
dumu' her life, after her death alt his houses and lands in Farmington to his brother .Mm 
Kelog and to sister Jane Aallisun and sister R-ichel Cane, altdwelling in old Ensland. they 
to p. >v to cousin Joseph Keiog's three children >ix pounds sterling to be divided equally 
betwixt them • » «. Inventory Dec 21 16-57, £3CG:5. 



60 Kellogg Families of Colchester, Conn. [Jan. 

1. Samuel 1 Kkllogg- was probably born prior to 1642; died at Hat- 

field, Mass., Jan. 17, 1711. Married 1st, Nov. 24,1664, Sarah, 
widow of Nathaniel Gunn of Hartford, and daughter of Robert 
Day,* of Hartford. She was killed by the Indians, 19th Sep. 1677. 
Married 2d, March 20. 1679, Sarah, daughter of Thomas Rooff of 
Westfield.J She died Jan. 5, 1719. 
Children : 

2. i. Samuel,- b. Hadley, April 11, 1669. 

At Hatfield: 

3. ii. Nathaniel, b. June 4, 1671. 
iii. Ehexezer, b. June 2, 1674. 

iv. Joseph, b. Sept. 0, 1676; killed by the Indians Sept. 19, 1C77. 

v. John, b. April 25, 16S0; resided at Hatfield; d. probably nam. 

Will 1755. 
vi. Thomas, b. Oct. 21. 1681; d. unra. Hatfield prior to 1758. 
vii. Sakah, b. April 13, 1683; m. May S, 1701, " by Rev. Isaac Chauncy," 

to Abraham Morton of Hatfield. 

2. Samuel 2 Kellogg (Samuel 1 ) was born at Hadley, April II, 1669; 

removed after 1701 to Colchester, Conn., where he died August 24, 

1708. Married 1690 Hannah 3 Dickinson, § who was born 16G6, 

died August 3, 1715. Will of Mrs. Hannah, dated Colchester, 

April . 18, 1745, mentions following children. Proved Jan. 7, 

1715-6. 

Children, all born at Hatfield: 

4. i. Samuel, 3 b. May IS, 1694. 

5. ii. Joseph, b. June IS, 1696. 
iii. Haxxati, b. Sept. 11, 1699. 

iv. Eunice, b. August 3, 1701; m. July 11, 172S, Benj. Qufterfield. 

3. Sergt. Nathaniel 2 Kellogg (Samuel 1 ) was born at Hatfield 1671 ; 

died at Colchester August 22, 1757. Married 1st, Margaret 

who died Dec. 13, 1747, ve. 71; married 2d, May 29, 1748, widow 
Priscilla Williams of Colchester. Will dated 1756; proved 1757; 
mentions numbers of his children and graudchildren. ( Vide Ran- 
dall's Colch. Epitaphs.) 

The following curious extract is from the old Colonial Record3 
of Connecticut :j| 

" At a meeting of the Governour and Council May 24, 1712. Present, 
The Honourable Gurdon Saltonstall, Esq r Governour etc 

"Whereas Jonathan Bigelo went from Hartford post to New London, 
in a deep snow last winter, being agreed by Major Talcot and M r Lord, 
deceased, to find a horse and subsistence at his own cost, and allowed 
double post wages, the said Bigelo nevertheless applied to M' Tainter, 
justice of peace at Colchester, to have a horse impressed for him 
from Colchester to New London, and the said justice having impressed 
for him a good horse of Nath u Kellogge of the same town, which horse 

* Robert Dav came in " Elizabeth," from Ipswich, Co. Suffolk, England, to Boston, Apr. 
1631, se. 30, with wife Mary, w. 28. Vide Hist. Hartford. 

t Thomn=; Root was at Salem 1637; Hartford 1639; removed about 1659 to Northampton, 
where he was one of the seven founders of a church 1661 ; died there July 17, 1694. 

t Judd. 

$ Nathaniel 1 Dickinson came to Wethersfield from England 1637. Rep. 1646-c6. (Re- 
moved to Hadley 1659. Died June 16, 1676.) 

Nathaniel 2 Dickinson, son of above, born Antrnst 1643, or perhaps four vears earlier; rn. 

1st, 1662, Hannah , who died Feb. 23, 1679; rn. 2d, 16">0, widow Elizabeth Gillett; 

m. 3d, 1684, Elizabeth, widow Samuel Wright. He died Oct. 11, 1710. 

Hannah 3 Dickinson, daughter of above, born 1666. 

D Transcribed and published by Charles J. Hoadly, State Librarian. 



1894.] ' Kellogg Families of Colchester, Conn. 63 

cbester May 6, 1720; married May 27, 1745, Anna Dewey of 
Hebron. Children at Hebron : 

i. Anna, 3 b. April 18, 1746: m. June 17, 1773, Solomon, son of Thomas 
Teirin, Jr., and Jerusha Porter (see Porter Gen., 1893). Resided 
at Vernon, where she d. Sept. 8, 182(5. Childrea: 1. Anna, m. 
Reuben Sumner. 2. Jerusha, m. Henry P. Sumner. 3. Solomon, 
m. Salem, Ya., Sarah Neal, dau. Joel Bott aud Lucy May ; d. 1S33, 
New Orleans, leaving son James Joel, who m. Margaret, dau. 
Judge Samuel Cason of Indiana, 4. Aaron, m. Lois Lee. 5. 
Asahel, post. ext. 

ii. Daniel, b. Sept, 10. 1747; m. May 31, 1770, Rachel Taylor of 
Chatham. Revolutionary soldier. 

iii. Mary, b. Sept. 3, 1749. 

iv. Hannah, b. June 16, 1752; d. inft. 

v. Hannah, b. May 7, 1756. 

vi. Chaki.es, b Aug. 8, 1763 ; d. inft. 

vii. Abigail, b. June 19, 1705. 

viii. Charles, b. July 18, 1772. 



Som-e Descendants of Lieut. Joseph Kellogg. 

1. Ebenezer 8 Kellogg (Joseph 1 ) was born at Hadley Nov. 13, 1C77; 

married July 6, 1706, Colchester, Mabel Butler, who died Sept. 3, 
1742, te. 60. He died August 22, 174G. Children: 

i. Abigail, 3 b. June 25, 1707; in. Samuel Gillett. 

ii. £bkxezer, b. Jan. 30, 1709-10; m. May 10, 1752, Abigail 2 " Row- 
; lee"; d. Feb. 9, 1788. (Elnathan 1 Rowley and Abigail Cone m. 
Dec. 26, 1723. Abigail 1 dau. b. Oct. 2, 1730.) 

1. Abigail, b. Jan. 27, 1754; d. young. 

2. Ebenezer, b. March 16, 1756. 

3. Abiaail, b. Dec. 29, 1758. 

4. Mabel, b. August 3, 1763. 

5. Butler, b. July 21, 1766; m. Jan. 9, 1783, Sarah Treadway. She 
d. Jan. 9, 1845, aa. 73. 

iii. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 25, 1712. 

iv. Makv, b. Jun. 3, 1715; m. Merrils. 

v. Prudence, b. Dec. 24, 1717; m. May 6, 1736, Wm. Roberts, son of 
Win. Roberts aud Elizabeth Northain, who were m. July 20, 1705. 

2. Jonathan 2 Kellogg (Joseph 1 ) was born at Hadley Dec. 25, 1679; 

married Jan. 3, 1710-11, Ann, daughter of James Newton of 
Kingston, R. I. She was born April 13. 1692; died August 14, 
1769. Jonathan died August 8, 1771. Children: 

i. Jonathan, 3 b. at Colchester Sept. 18, 1712; m. Jan. 5, 1735, Mary 
Riles. 

1. Margery, b. Sept. 6, 1738. 

2. Martin', b. "last Sabbath in January, 1740-1;" m. Feb. 4, 1762, 

Sarah Treadway (?) See p. 64. 
ii- Joseph, b. June 6, 1714; d. probably June 16, 1762. Married Jan. 

15, 1740-1, Sarah Clark, dau. John Clark and Mindwell , b. 

August 13, 1723. 

1. Silas, b. August 25, 1742. 

2. j^fiw, b. Mav 21. 1745. 

3. Sarah, b. August 11, 1749. 

4. Anna, b. Sept. 23, 1752. 

)»• Margaret, b. August 10, 171G. 
Iv. Stephen, b. March 15, 1724. 

v. Sins, b. Jan. 11, 1732-3; m. June 21, 1763, Sarah Kook. 
1. Molly, b. April 26, 1769. 



64 , The New-England Primer. [Jan, 

2. -Joseph, b. Dec. 2, 1770; d. youug. 

3. Sarah, b. July 11, 1772. 

vi. Martin, b. Feb. 15, 1734-5; m. Feb. 4, 1762, Sarah Treadway (?). 
See p. 63. J y J 

1. Bethiah, b. Oct. 24, 17C2. 

2. Martin, b. Dec. 16, 1764. 

3. Jonathan, b. May 4, 1767. 

4. JSce, b. Feb. 4, 1770. 



Disconnected. 
William, son of Moses Kellogg, boru at Colchester, Jan. 28, 1756. 

Israel Kellogg and Abigail Northam married at Colchester, Jan. 
31, 1752. He died Feb. 12, 1784, ae. 63. She died June 9, 1780, a?. 50. 
Children: 

i. • Jonathan, b. Oct. 10. 1754. 
ii. Israel, b. May 18, 1756. 
iii. Amos, b. Aug. 5, 1753. 
iv. Abigail, b. Nov. 15, 1760. ■ 

Aaron Kellogg married at Colchester, July 10, 1740, Mary, dau. Ben- 
jamin Lewis. Children: 

i. Lucy, b. Mar. 21, 1741 ; d. inft. 

ii. Lucv, b. Feb. 19, 1742 ; m. May 26, 176S, Eliphalet Chamberlin. 

iii. Solomon, b. July 14, 1744. 

iv. * Aaron, b, Aug. 9, 1746 ; m. July 3, 1766, Rhoda Jones. 

v. Lvdia, b. Feb. 23, 1749. 

vi. Mary, b. Aug. 23, 1751 ; m. May 31, 1763, Isaac Foote. 

vii. Hannah, b. Mar. 17, 1754. 

viii. Daxiel, b. Sept. 3, 1756. 

ix. Lovina, b. Mar. 10, 1760. 



A FRESH XOTE OX THE XETT-EXGLAXD PRIMER. 

By the Rev. B. F. DeCosta, D.D., of Mew York City. 

The New England Primer is too well known to be described, 
and yet it has raised very many difficult questions. The origin of the 
Primer has been a moot question, yet it is now beyond doubt 
that the world owes the origin of the immortal Primer to the Church 
of England, and that it was an improvement on the ancient Horn 
Book ; though it is probable that among the Greeks, and even the 
Egyptians,* the Primer idea had its place, the instruction of children 
being committed to women. The writer has not been able to carry 
out the desire to attempt a very much fuller investigation than 
those who have preceded him ; but, in doing so, he would begin 
with the Egyptians and the Greeks. Before the seventeenth cen- 

•Tliis is suggested to me by a relic on the Egyptian Collections of the New York Histori- 
cal Society. 



1894.] ,■ The New-England Primer. Go 

tury, the Primer was being formulated, and it is singular that 
there should have been so much speculation with regard to the 
origin of the famous lines, 

"In Adam's fall 
We sinned all," &c. 

Those who desire to study the subject, and make needed correc- 
tions of some statements of the Hon. J. Hammond Trumbull, in 
the Sunday School Times, April 2d and May 6, 1882, might turn 
to a rather obscure book, entitled "St. Augustine's Manuell," Lon- 
don, 1577, where 1 find "Adam's fall" done up in rhyme. Also 
an examination of the Lenox copy of the Primer would show the 
error in regard to the portrait he mentions. 

Let me quote as follows from the "Manuell" : 

1 Bv Adams shine. 

2 Death did begvn. 

3 And by his fall. 

4 We perish all. 

5 But Christ is iust. 

6 In him haue trust. 

7 And his iustice. 

8 Makes thee right -wise. 

9 As you are. So were we. 

10 As we be. So shall ye. 

11 So discust, dye thou must. 

12 But lvue for euer. 

13 In Christ thy Sauer. 

14 Fast and pray. 

15 Fitie the poore. 
1G *Kepent amend. 

17 And siune no more. 

18 Whilest though hast breath. 

19 Kemember death. 

20 As graue I passe. 

21 From that I was. 

22 I hope agavne. 

23 With Christ to raigne. 

24 Both ill and iust. 

25 Death brynges to dust. 

26 Yet none tell can. 

27 The houre nor when. 

28 By favth take hold. 

29 In Christ be bold. 

30 From canekred rust. 

31 Christ shall make iust. 

St. Augustine's Jfanuell, London, 1577. 

I am informed that they have in the British Museum specimens 
of a " Horn book" printed on folio, single sheets, without date ; but 
to which conjectural dates of 1620, 1700, 1750, are assigned. They 

Line 10 is repeated twice in full, the third time to 16, and then as follows : 



16 


God geueth all. 


17 


Christ obtaineth all. 


18 


The holv Ghost. 


10 


Certifietii all. 


20 


Faythe appre 


21 


hendeth all. 


22 


Workes testifieth all. 



QQ - The Kirtland or Kirkland Family. [Jan. 

have also au edition of the Primer of King Henry VIII. in the 
Museum library, but without the "A. B. C. and Catecliisin pre- 

Th'e following I have not been able to examine, but I hope that 
some one with leisure may do so. 

John TTayland r - 

Printed in English, for children, after the use of Sarurn looo. 

Gahriel Harvey 

Pieces of Poetry prefixed to Primers Almanacs, &c. 
Thomas Milles ; . 

The Customer's Alphabet and Primer, 1604. 
Francis Loowick > 

An essay concerning an universal Trimer, lo/l>. 

Who will take up the investigation and give the full story of the 
genesis of the New England Primer ? 



THE KIRTLAXD OR KIRKLAXD FA]\IILY. 

By V. C. Sanborn, of La Grange, 111. 

Although from time to time many facts have come to light as to the 
ori-in of the Kirkland family, no published collection of these facts exists. 
The four principal sources of information about this family are: ? 

1. Dr. Lothrop's Memoir of Rev. Samuel Kirkland, in Sparks s 
" Library of American Biography." 

2. Savage's ?« Genealogical Dictionary." _'. . . 

3. Mr. F. W. Chapman's "Kirtland Family" (Register, Vol. xiv.), 
and his published " Pratt Genealogy." 

4. Lewis and New-hall's " History of Lynn." _ 

Dr. Lothrop's account was the earliest, forming a basis for future re- 
searches; and as his account has been very generally accepted, it seem3 
advisable to quote it here, in order, by the genealogy given later, to em- 
phasize the corrections which have been made by discoveries subsequent 
to 1845, when Dr. Lothrop published his memoir. He says: 

"The Kirkland familv, as the name shows, is of Scotch descent. In this 
country it may be traced back to Saybrook. Ct., in 1 63o. Among the ob 
heads of families who were the early settlers of that place, the name of 
John Kirkland appears, who is said to have come from Silver bt., London. 
He had a son John, who was the father of ten children ** whom Rev. 
Daniel Kirkland was the youngest but one, and born in 1/01. 

In fact, John Kirtland was not one of the early settlers of Saybrook. for 
he did not move there till 1672, nor have I been able to find any authority 
for the statement that he came from Silver St., London. Mr. Chapman I 
believe, discovered in the Saybrook records the connection between John 
Kirtland of Saybrook and Nathaniel of Lynn; and Mr S. G. Drake pub- 
lished in his "Founders of New England" (Register Vol. nv .) the sail- 
in* list of the Hopew$tl in 1635, with names of the brothers 1 hilip and 



1804.1 The Kirtland or Kirlcland Family. 67 

Nathaniel Kirtland as passengers. Lewis and Newhall's " History of 
Lynn" gives much fragmentary information about Philip and Nathaniel; 
and Savage supplements this with many dates and facts. But an essential 
Jink in the Lynn records seems to have been overlooked by these authors, 
namely, that "in 1633, when Philip and Nathaniel were hut 24 and 22 years 
of a-c respectively, there were tiro Philip Kirtlands in Lynn. This point 
establishes a connection between the American settlers and a certain John 
Kirtland of Buckinghamshire, whose will I quote hereafter. 

Before tabulating the early generations, let me say a word as to the 
family name, All the records show that the name of our family was spelled 
"Kirtland." " Kyrtland" or "Kertland" from 1616 to 1773, both in this 
country and in England. On what authority rests the present spelling, I 
Cannot sjiy; Dr. Lothrop thought that the family was of Scotch descent; and 
probably the change from Kirtland to Kirklaud, as a supposed original 
spelling, was made about 1780 by Rev. Samuel Kirkland, and soon after 
was adapted by his connections. His brother Joseph, writing in 1773 to 
another brother, John, announcing the death of their father, Rev. Daniel 
Kirtland. signs his name and directs his letter " Kirtland." This letter is 
now in the possession of Major Kirkland of Chicago. 

The name "Kirtland" is not to be found in English records or pedigrees, 
so far as I have been able to ascertain. In Essex, in the loth century, 
Peter de Kirteling appears as the witness to a grant of laud ; but no further 
mention of tl)3 name occurs. No family of that name registered its pedigree 
at the Herald's Visitations of Buckinghamshire or elsewhere. '"•Kirtland" 
may be derived from " Curtland" (meaning lack-land), and Burke's 
" General Amory" describes the arms of Curtland (no location given) as, 
Or, three cinquefoils pierced gides. The name "Kirkland" however, is an 
old English name; the family being situated principally in Cumberland, 
and the " General Armory" gives the coat of — '• Kirkland ": (Kirkland, 
County Lancaster, Brampton, County Derby; founded by Gamel. Lord of 
Kirkland, County Derby, and Eastbourne, County Sussex, temp. William I.) 
Sable, three mullets argent within a bordure engrailed or, quartering Kirk- 
land (ancient) Sable, three mullets argent." 

A clue to the origin of the American family is furnished by the will of 
John Kirtland of Newport-Pagnell, Bucks., England, dated 1616. Mr. 
II. F. Waters printed this will in the Register, Vol. xli., page 60, and 
I quote his abstract: 

" John Kirtland of Tickford in the parish of Newport-Pagnell, County Bucks., 
Gentleman, 12 Dec, 161H, proved 1 Aug. 1017. To son Nathaniel all that part 
of my dwelling house in Tickford wherein I now inhabit, sometime called by J 
the name of Emberton's,* adjoiniug to the tenement in tenure of William Con- V 
Ingham and to the house and ground of me the said John Kirtland. sometime" 
Thomas Horton's. Legacies to Mary Kirtland my now wife, sons Fraucis and 
Joseph Kirtland and daughters Abigail, Susanna and Mary Kirtland. To my eldest 
sou John Kirtland the house or tenement sometime Thomas Horton's (next the 
alnjve) and adjoining a tenement of heirs of William Barton deceased. Wife 
Mary and her five children as above. To godson John Kirtland, son of my 
brother Philip Kirtland, \\<, 4d, and to the rest of the children of the said 
Philip 2s Gtl each to be paid unto the said Philip for their use. To the children 
of my brother Fras. Kirtland 2s Gd apiece. To Francis Foster clerk 10s. Wife 
Mary to be executrix, friends Geo. Hull and Jno. Horley of Newport-Pagnell to 
be ovtTMtrs. 

" r'hjlip Kyrtland one of the witnesses. Weldon, 82." 

♦ " I'aganus de Emberton, of Tykford Priory, Bucks., 1187," Dugdale's " Monasticon." 



68 \ The Kirtland or Rirhland Family. [Jan. 

From the above it will be seen that the American Kirtland family starts 
with : — 

1. (John 1 ?) Kirtland, — of whom we know only (from his son John's 

will) that he had, — 

2. i. Joiix.- born about 1580. 

3. ii. Philip, born about 15S5. 

iii. Francis, born about 1590, married and had children. 

2. John 2 Kirtland (John ?*) of Tickford in the parish of Newport-Pag- 

nell, Bucks., "Gentleman"; his will quoted above, names the fol- 
lowing children : 

i. John. 3 iv. Josefh. 3 

ii. Nathaniel. 3 v. Abigail. 8 

iii. Francis. 3 vi. Susanna. 3 

vii. Mary. 3 

3. Philip 2 Kyrtland or Kertland (John? 1 ) probably of Sherring- 

ton, Bucks., witness to his brother John's will in 1616, mentioned 
in that will as having son John and other children. No record of 
his taking passage for New England. Lewis says Philip Kertland, 
first shoemaker of Lynn, Mass., came there in 1635. This may have 
been Philip 2 the father or Philip 3 his sou; the latter we know came 
over in 1 635. Probably Lewis confused the two, as have others. The 
first defiuite record of Philip Kertland Senior is in 163S. when 10 
acres in Lynn were granted to " Philip Kertland Senior 1 '' and 10 
acres to " Philip Kertland Junior." (Lewis & Newhall). _ In 1643 
the father's signature appears on Goody Armitage's petition, a fac- 
simile of the signatures being given in the Register for January 
1879, page 61. (This may have been the signature of son Philip, 
but I think he was then 'on Long Island.) Children of Philip* 
by wife unknown, — 
i. John 3 , born 1607, mentioned by name in his godfather and uncle 
John's will, 1616. In 1659 he made deposition as to his brother 
Philip's estate. Residence unknown; perhaps at Saybrook, 
where lived his sister Susanna Wastall, who in 16S3 gave to h^r 
''childless brother John" a small house and lot in Saybrook. 
Perhaps also this is the John who was supposed by Dr. Lothrop 
to have been the father of John 4 . No record is found of his 
death. 

4. ii. Philip 3 , born 16H. 

5. iii. Nathaniel, 3 born 1616. ^ ^ 

iv. Susanna, 3 birth unknown, married John Wastall or Westall of 
Wetherslleld. He was a Deputy there in 1643, Goodwin ;ays, and 
moved to Saybrook in 1653, says Savage; selectman in Saybrook, 
a prominent man there, and ailovved to keep an Inn in 1663. He 
died in 1683, and left a srood estate to adopted son John 4 Kertland. 
Susanna Wastall died 1684. 

4. PuiLir 3 Kvrtland or Kertland (Philip, 2 John? 1 ), born in 1614, was 

too young to be mentioned by name in his uncle John's will in 161 6; 
he was one of the other "children of brother Philip" there men- 
tioned. His earliest definite record is on the sailing list of the ship 
Hopewell from London April 1, 1635,— " Philip Kyrtkmd, from 
Sherrington in Bucks., aged 21 ; Nathaniel Kyrtland from Sherring- 
ton in Bucks, aged 19." " (See under Philip 2 for possible items about 
him in Lynn records.) In 1638 was granted 10 acres by town of 



189 4.] The Kirtland or Kirliand Family. 



69 



Lynn. In 1640, lie and his brother Nathaniel, 8 with many other 
Lynn people, settled on Long Island, but Philip 3 must soon have re- 
turned to Lynn, from the dates of his children's births on the Lyun 
records. In 1652 he bought from Nathaniel Tyler his house and 
lands in Lynn. Philip 5 died before 1059, for we find in Salem 
Court Files July 17th, 1659, the following: 
«« Deposition of John Kirtland, aged about 52. I often heard my brother 
l'hylip say oft tiiues that his wife should have all hee had to dispose of so 
long as she live ; and to my best remeraberance hee gave £15 to his dafter 
Mary and £10 to his dafter Sara, £10 to his dafter Susanna aud ,£10 to 
his dafter Hanna, this to be giuen to them at ye day of marriag, the 
land not to be sould so long as she liues." 

William Hardier of Lynn, aged about 65, stated that when Philip 
Kertland was going to sea he told him substantially as above. 
On October 14th, 1659, Evan Thomas (a viutner who came to 
Boston from Wales, with wife Jane and four children, in 1640), 
announces his intention of marrying the widow Alice Kertland of 
Lynn; and he made convevance of estate in trust for her children 
April 24, 1661. By wife Alice, Philip Kertland had the following 
children, all born in Lynn: 

i. Mary 4 , born June 3, 1640. 

H. Sarah 4 , born September 27, 164G, married John Davis, October 

5, 1661. 
Hi. Susanna 4 , born March S, 1652. 

y" SmSSnX H» s ' bo ™ J « ne 12 ' 1G5i ' 

5. Nathaniel 3 Kyrtland or Kertland {Philip,- John'? x ), born in 1616. 

He was an infant (or perhaps unborn) at the date of his uncle John's 
will. Came over with his brother Philip 3 on the Hopewell and settled 
in Lynn. Not named in the division of land in Lynn, 1633; in that 
year was defendant in law suit brought by Isaack Disberowe (Re- 
gister, 1887, page 36 L). Went to Long Island with his brother 
Philip, and, Savage says, staid there some years, marrying Parnell 

and settling in Southold, L. I. Returned to Lynn before 

1658, was selectman there 1678, and died there in 1686 {Lewis fy 
Newhall). Savage gives the following children : 

6. i. Nathaniel, 4 born at Southold, L. I. 

ii. Philip 4 (perhaps a sou of Philip 3 ), probably born on Long Island. 
Married Ruth Pierce (Query: daughter of Capt. Michael Pierce?) 
October 14, 1677. Was a soldier in Kin? Philip's war, at Hadley, 
credited from Lynn, April 6, 1676 (Register, 1887, page 79). In 
1685 with other Lynn ex-soldiers, petitioned for a tract of land in 
the Nipmugg Country, on account of services in the late wars. 

iii. Ann 4 , born in Lyun April 16, 1658. 

7. iv. John 4 , born in Lynn, August, 1659. 

v. Hannah 4 , born in Lynn, April 15, 1602. 

vi. Elizabeth 4 , born in Lynn, March 20, 166-1, married William 5 Pratt 
of Saybrook, son of Lieut. William Pratt. 

viii. MaSha 4 , } twinS ' b0rn iQ LynD ' May 15 ' 16G7 ' 

6. Nathaniel* Kertland or Kyrtland {Na/haniel, 3 Philip," John? 1 ). 

Fined at Lynn in 1667, with two others for " Prophaining ye Lord's 
Day by going to William Crafts' house and drinkeing of his Sider and 
Rosteing of his aples without his or his wife's consent" {Lewis 4" 
New/toll). Was a soldier in King Philip's W'ar, credited to Capt. 
VOL. xlviii. 7 



70 The Kirtland or Kirkland Family. [Jan. 

Manning in 1G7G (Register, 1888, page 95). Married Mary 
Rand (probably daughter of Robert of Lynn), who survived him, and 
in 1G90 married Dr. John Henry Burcbsted of Lynn (Lewis $" New- 
hall). Children were: 

1. Nathaniel 8 born May 3, 1677. 

ii. Mary 8 , born Feb'y 1," 1680. 

Hi. Piuscilla*, born April 9, 1683. 

Iv. Elizabeth*, born June 22, 1CS5. 

7. Lieut. John 4 Kertland or Kirtland (Nathaniel. Philip' JohnV), 
adopted in minority by his aunt Susanna 3 (Kertland) Wastall. Mr. 
Chapman in his Pratt Genealogy quotes Saybrook Records, Vol. 1, 
page 78, year 1672: 

" This agreement, between Mr. John Wastall of Saybrook and Mr. Natha- 
niel Cortland (sic) of Linne in Mattachewsetts. . . Ye said Cortland 
doth resign up his sonne John to ye disposal of ye said Wastall and his 
■wife Susanna. . . . The said Wastall both promise that ye said John 
Cortland shall succeed in ye estate of ye said Wastall." 

John Kertland married Nov. 18th, 1G79, Lydia, daughter of Lieut. 
Wm. Pratt, an early and influential settler of Saybrook, and upon 
the death of Mr. and Mrs. "Wastall succeeded to a good estate left 
by them. John Kirtland was somewhat prominent in local affairs, 
and was appointed Lieutenant of the fort at Saybrook in 1702 and 
again in 1708. (Colonial Records of Ct., Vols" 4 & 5). He died 
January 20, 1716, having had the following children : 

i. John,* born July 11, 1681, married 1st, Temperance Buckingham ; 2d, 
Lydia Belden. 

ii. Priscilla, born February 1, 16S3, married Thos. Jones. 

iii. Lydia. born October 11, 1685, married 1st, Mr. Griffin; 2d, 

Conklin. 

iv. Elizabeth, born Jan'y 27, 16SS, married John Chapman. 

v. Nathaniel, born Oct. 24, 1600, married 1st, Sara Chapman; 2d, 
Phoebe De Wolf. 

vi. Philip, born May 28, 1693. 

vii. Martha, born August 11, 1695, married Rev. H. Wills. 

viii. Samuel, born Jan'y 19, 1C99, married Martha Whittlesey. 

ix. Rev. Daniel, born June 17, 1701 (Yale 1720), ordained first pastor 
cf Newent church at Norwich, Ct. , 1721, married July 15, 1723, 
Mary Perkins, probably daughter of Jabez Perkins aud Hannah 
(Lothrop), and had five sons and seven daughters, among them 
Rev. Sam'l Kirkland, Missionary' to the Oneidas, and father of 
President John Thornton Kirkland of Harvard University. 

x. Parnell, born October 16, 1704, married John Tully. 

Mr. F. W. Chapman's "Kirtland Family" (Register. Vol. xiv.), 
to which I have alluded, gives the family record of John 4 Kirtland, 
from the point reached above, for several generations; and so this 
article is merely intended to present a record of the first three 
generations in this country, and to call attention to their English 
connection. 

The will of John Kirtland, which Mr. "Waters discovered and printed 
(Register, Vol. 41, p. 60) is valuable in the proof it furnishes as 
to the location of the family in England; and it is to be hoped that 
further research will be made to trace the pedigree of the English 
Kirtlands or Kirklands. 

Both Sherrington and Newport Pagnell are towns in the northern 
part of Buckinghamshire, within a few miles of each other. 



1894.] - The Snow Genealogy. 71 



THE SXOW GENEALOGY. 

By Mrs. Charles L. Alben, of Troy, N. Y. 
[Continued from vol. xlvii., page 342.] 

John 1 Snow (Nicholas 1 ), born about 1638; died 1692 in Eastham. 
He married Sept. 19, 1667, in Eastham, Mary Smaller, daughter 
of John and Ann (Walden) Smalley, born in Barnstable, ll°Dec. 
1647. She and her twin brother Isaac were baptized in Barnstable 
Church, 27 Feb. 1648. She died in 1703 in Eastham. She mar- 
ried 2d, Ephraim Doane. We fin'd no will of John Snow. The 
Inventory of the estate of John Snow was made by John Freeman 
and William Walker, April 4, 1 692. " He doubtless lived within the 
present town of Eastham. The settlement of the estate of John 
Snow, late of Eastham, deceased, at the County Court held at Barn- 
stable April y e 19, 1692, as followeth; after debts paid, one third 
part of his real estate, to Mary Snow, widow, relict of sd deceased 
during her natural life, and one third part of the personal estate for- 
ever; and ye rest of sd personal estate for bringing up ye children 
of sd deceased, saving her paying to each of the daughters lour 
pounds apiece as they come of age or married ; & the sons of the 
said deceased to have the lands & housing according to law." 
Children, born in Eastham: 

i. Hannah, 3 b. Axis,. 26, 1670. 
ii. Mary, b. March 10, 1672. 

Abigail, b. Oct. 14, 1673. 

Rebecca, b. July 23, 1676. 

John, b. May S,"l67S. 

Isaac, b.< Aug. 10, 1683. 

Lvdia, b. Sept. 29, 1635. 

Elisha, b. Jan. 10, 1686. 

Phebe, b. June 27, 16S9. 

Elizabeth 2 Snow (Nicholas 1 ), born about 1640; died June 16, 1678, 
in Eastham; married in Eastham, Dec. 13, 1665, Thomas Rogers, 
son of Lt. Joseph Rogers of the Mayflower. He was born in 1638 
in Plymouth, and died in Eastman, 1678. 
Children, all born in Eastham: 

i. Elizabeth Rogers, 3 b. Oct. 8, 1666. 

ii- Joseph Rogers, b. Feb. 1, 1667; m. Prudence?; settled in Eastham, 
and had Sarah, b. Nov. 20, 1691; Elizabeth, b. Sept. 20, 1693; 
Joseph, . . . . " Deacon John Payne says, ' Joseph Rogers died 
of a strange distemper, of which he hadlong laid sick, April the 
29th, 1696.'" 

ib- Hannah Rogers, b. March 20, 1669. 

iv. Thomas Rogers, b. March 6, 1670-1 ; " died 9 days old." 

v. Thomas Rogers, b. May 6, 1672; m. Sarah Treat, Dec. 10, 1700, 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Treat. He settled in Truro, and his 
children were all born and baptized there June 13, 1716. exceot 
the last, baptized Sept. 22. 1718. Sarah, b. Oct. 27, 1701 ; Fhcbe, 
b- Nov. 1, 1703; Elizabeth, b. March 27, 1706; Lucy, b. June 6, 
1708; Hannah, b. April 6, 1710; Thomas, b. Dec. 11, 1712; Joseph, 





iil. 




iv. 


34. 


v. 


35. 


vi. 




vii. 


36. 


vlii. 




Lx. 



37. 


I. 


S3. 


ii. 




iii. 


39. 


iv. 




v. 



72 f The Snow .Genealogy. [Jan. 

b. March 24, 1715; Huldah, b. Aug. 13, 1717. (For further par- 
ticulars iu regard to this family see Treat Genealogy, published 
by John Harvey Treat, of Lawreuce, Mass.) 

\i. Eliezar Rogers, b. Nov. 3, 1673; settled in Plymouth; m. Ruha- 
mah, and bad Elisabeth, 169S; Thomas, 1701 (who married Pris- 
cilla Churchill, and had Ruth 1722, Priscilla 1723, Desire 1725, 
Willis 1727, Samuel 1728, Thomas 1730, Hannah 1734, Eleazur 
1736, Priscilla 1730, John 1740); Hannah, 1703; Experience, 1707, 
m. Samuel Totman; Eleazur, 1710; Willis, 1712; Abijah, 1714; 
Meriah, 1716; Ruth, 1718. 

(This family I find in Davis's Landmarks of Plymouth ). 

rii. Nathaniel Rogers', b. Jan. IS, 1675. Nothing further known of 
him or his sisters. 

9. Jabez 2 Snow (Nicholas 1 ), born about 1642; died in Eastharn, Dec. 
20, 1690; married in Eastharn, probably about 1670, Elizabeth ? 

Lieut, Jabez Snow was in Capt. John Gorliam's Company in the 
Canada Expedition, 1690. He w:ss a prominent man in Eastharn. 
He left no will. The probate records show he had niue children. 
His "sis daughters" to have '"fourteen pounds & four shillings 
each." 

Children, born in Eastharn: 

Jabez, 3 b. Sept. 6, 1G70. 

Edward, b. March 26, 1672. 

Sarah, b. Feb. 26. 1673. 

Grace, b. Feb. 1, 1674-5. 

Thomas, b. April 2, 1677; d. April 2, 1697, in Eastharn; never mar- 
ried. "His death is mentioned by his cousin John Paine in his 
Diary, ' About the 22 d or 23 d of March, Thomas Snow, our faith- 
ful & trusty apprentice, was taken down, & lay sorely ill of a 
violent fever, and died on the 2 d of April, 1697, early in the morn- 
ing.'" 

Elizabeth, probably \ before 

Deborah, " j 1690. 

Rachel, " 1685. 

10. Ruth 2 Snow (Nicholas*), born about 1644; died in Eastman, Jan. 17, 
1716-17; married Dec. 2, 1666, in Eastharn, John Cole, son of 
Daniel Cole and Mary, his wife. He was born probably at Ply- 
mouth or Duxbury, 1644, and died in Eastharn, Jan. 6, 1725-6. 
He was a lieutenant. He made his will Oct. 20, 1717; mentions 
John, Joseph, Ruth, Hepsibah, Hannah, Mary and Sarah. He 
settled in Eastharn. 

Children, born iu Eastharn - 

i. Ruth Cole, 3 b. March 11, 1667-S; m. March 21, 1688-9, in Eastharn, 
W m Twining, son of W™ and Elizabeth (Deane) Twining, and had 
Elizabeth, 1690; Thankful, 1697; Ruth, 1699; Hannah, 1702; 
William, 1704; Barnabas, 1705; Mercy, 1708. 

ii. Lt. John Cole, b. March 6, 1669; d. Dec. 13, 1746; m. about 1693, 
Mercy or Mary Mayo. (Mr. Jqsiah Paine says she was a widow.) 
She d. Feb. 17, 1731, and they had Jonathan, b. Oct. 4, 1694; 
John, Oct. 14, 1696; Mary, Aug. 25, 169S : Jarws, Oct. 23, 1700; 
Nathan, Jan. 21, 1702-3: Joshua, March 20, 1704-5; Moses, July 
22, 1707; Phe.be, Oct. 29, 1709-10; Thankjul, Oct. 20, 1712; Joseph, 
Oct. 13, 1714; Thankful, Oct. 19, 1716. 

iii. Hepsibah Cole, b. June , 1672. 

iv. Hannah Cole, b. March 27, 1675. 

V. Joseph Cole, b. June 11, 1677: m. Feb. 4, 1701-2, Elizabeth Cobb, 
daughter of James Cobb. She d. March 16, 1714. They had : 
Gershom, b. March 1, 1702-3; Ruth, March 11, 1704-5; Patience, 



40. 


vi. 


41. 


vii. 


42. 


viii. 



1894.1 Notes and Queries. 73 

Dec. 8, 170G; Eliz.. Teb. 10, 1708-9; Sarah, March 8, 1710-11; 
Reliance, Aug. 2, 1713, d. Aug. 23, 1729. 

11. Hannah 3 Snow (Nicholas 1 ), born probably in Eastham about 1G4G; 

" married in 16S3, Giles Rickard, son of Giles and Hannah (Dunham) 
Rickard, and appears by his will to have only had an adopted child. 
Desire Doten." Davis says Hannah was probably daughter of Nich- 
olas Snow; but, if so, it seems strange that he did not provide for 
her or her sister, Rebecca, in his will, as they were unmarried. 
There are some slight indications of a second Nicholas 2 Snow 
(Nicholas 1 ), who may have died before his father; and these might 
have been his daughters. But if this is so, it seems strange they or 
he were not referred to in Nicholas 1 Snow's will. 

12. Rebecca 2 Snow (Nicholas 1 ) probably born in Eastham in 1648; 

married Samuel Rickard of Ply rup ton, son of the " 2d Giles," in 
1G89, and had: 

i. Rebecca, 3 b. 1091. 

ii. Hannah, b. 1693. 

iii. Samuel, b. 

i\\ Bkthiaii, b. 1698. 

v. Henry, b. 1700. 

vi. Mary, b. 1702. 

vii. Ei.kanah, b. 1704; m. Keturah Bishop. 

via. Mehitabel, b. 1707. 

ii. Eleazcr, b. 1709. 

[To be continued.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 
Notes. 

Christmas at THE Isles of Shoaxs. — From the records of the Church of Gos- 
port [Isles of Shoals] :— 

At a Ch h meetg. at y e Pastors House. Jan'y 3 d 1746-7. 

5. The Ch h by a Vote Agree y' y e next Lecture Day be Turned into a Day of 
Fasting & Prayer on y e acct of y e Deadness of Eeligion, & y e abounding of Sin 
among us. 

6. The Ch h by a Vote, Say y l y? are Willingy* Elinor Crocket & Sarah Randel 
should come to y e Sacrameut to morrow, y e Pastor having Informed y m y l these 
^ omen Declared to Him y' y r was no Rioting, nor Revelling at either of y r 
Houses, on y e 25 th of y e last month. 

7. With respect unto a Rumour of y r being Bad Carrvines on at Charels 
Kand.-ls ye 2o ffi of y<= last month, y e Ch h by a Vote Chose M r Gibbons Mace 
Joseph Mace Jun r & Sam 1 Muchamore, to Go unto his Wife Rebecca & acquaint 
her y 1 y< Ch h Expect, either y< She appear immeadiately at y e Cb> Meetg. & give 
an Acct. about y e s d Rumour, or y' she send y m an Ace'. 

8. Rebecca Randel appeared in y e Ch h meetg. & Declared, y* it was against 
her mind yt yr wag ^-^g f Guns at y e Time above, but she coud not Help it. 
She was sorry for y« Carryings on among us. As to y e Observing of y e Day, 
*he said she had been us'ed to it. & her husband woud Commit a great Deal of 
Sin. if she did not on y l Day dress Victuals. & y l she cou'd not do as she woud 
do : wmpon y C^ by a Vote, said y? were Satisfied w th her Acc { of v e matter, 
if it was as She had now Related it. Yraxk W. Haceett. 

A etc; Castle, A". II. 

VOL. XL Yin. 7* 



74 "" JSTotes and Queries. [Jan. 

Hibbins and Bellingham. — Mrs. Ann Hibbins, "whose will is printed in the 
Register, vi., 283, was the widow of William Hibbins, a merchant of Boston. 
As is well known she was executed for witchcraft in June, 1656. Previous to 
her marriage to Mr. Hibbins she had a husband by the name of Moore, and her 
sons John,Joseph and Jonathan are named in her will. It has been often stated 
that she was a sister of Governor Richard Bellingham. 

Capt. Charles Herv.ey Townshend, of New Haven, Ct., has sent us some 
entries from the Bostou, Lincolnshire register, which he copied some years 
ago from Col. Joseph L. Chester's transcript. From them we infer that it was 
Mr. Hibbins's first wife (Hester) and not his last wife (Ann) who was a sister 
of Gov. Bellingham. The entries are : 

" William Hibbin and Hester Bellingham married March 4th, 1632-3." 

" Child of Mr. Richard Bellingham Recorder bur. April 7, 1626." 

Another child Mar. 27, 1623. 



Andre's Execution". — It is a singular fact that a man is now living whose 
father saw Andre hung. That father was Jesse Davenport, of Canton, born 
1761, died 1830, a neighbor of my young days. The son is Samuel Davenport, 
now of Neponset, and possibly his brother Lemuel, of Maiden, is also living. 
That father's children by his first wife are all dead, of whom Jesse, jr., died 
about three years ago, aged about 90. But that father married, 2d, 181"), and 
the sous born in 1817-19 show the great length of two generations. The older 
Jesse kept a journal, and I have a copy of it from 1794 to 1817. Perhaps the 
older part is in existence. Andre stood in a cart, which was started away to 
make his suspension. That journal stated that he went to Boston to attend 
Gov. Bowdoin's funeral. John Spake, M.D. 

New Bedford, ATass. 



Queries. 

Sherman, Soule, Bennet and Braley.— Edmund Sherman,* or Shearman, 
born 1641, died 1719, in Portsmouth, R. I., son of Hon. Philip* Sherman, 

(Samuel, 3 Henry, 2 Henry 1 ) married before May 7, 1674. Dorcas . Who 

was she? According to Austin's Genealogical Dictionary she was mother of all 
his children. I would like her parents, and date of birth and death. Their 
son, David Shearman, born Jan. 1, 1680, married Abigail Hathaway in Taunton 
Dec. 27, 1710; he of Dartmouth, she of Freetown. (See N. E. Hist, and Gen. 
Register, Vol. xiii., page 254.) Who were her parents and grandparents? 
Edmund Shearman was of Portsmouth first; afterwards, Nov. 13, 1694, of 
Dartmouth, "one of those who received a confirmatory deed of Dartmouth" 
from Bradford, and in list of proprietors printed in the Register is the one 

printed Sherman. John Sherman was his brother. On these old records 

the name is generally Shearman. 

George Soule,* of the Mayfioirer, had two sons, George 2 and Nathaniel 2 Soule, 
who received their father's Dartmouth lauds, and were amongst the first pro- 
prietors. George'- Soule married Deborah . Who was she? and was she 

the mother of his son William? George Soule made his will March 1, 1697; 
entered July 1, 1704; speaks of sons William, John, Nathan; daughters De- 
borah, Mary Davoll, Sarah. His wife Deborah in her will speaks of William, 
Nathan, Mary dan. of George Soule, daughters Sarah, Mary Davoll. and Lydia 
Browned. "Dated 4 Jan. 1708-9." I would like all particulars in regard to 

Deborah. The oldest son, William, married a Hannah . Was she the 

mother of all his chddren. especially the oldest son, William? and who was she? 
and who were her parents? 

All these were of Dartmouth. Their son, William, had a wife, Rachel, and lived 
in Dartmouth the early part of his life, and then removed to Tiverton. Who 
was she and her parents? Was she the mother of Thankful Soule, who was 
born the 9th day of February, in the year 1718-19, William's oldest child? She 
married in Dartmouth John Bennett Jan. 24. 1739-40. 

Robert Bennett is found in Newport, 1655-1669, with wife Rebecca and child- 
ren—Joseph, born 1644; Robert, born 1650; John, born 1652; and Jonathan, 



]894.] Notes and Queries. 75 

1059. I would like the parenage of both Robert and Rebecca ( ) Bennett, 

and anv further particulars in regard to this family, aside from what Austin's 
Genealogical Dictionary gives. ""Robert 2 Bennett removed to Portsmouth, and 
hud two wives, Anne Corey and Joanna. Who was she? His son, Robert' 
Bennett, removed to Tiverton, married Almey. Who was she? Was she the 
mother of all his children, especially John? In his will dated 6 Oct., 1746, he 
speaks of sou John, son Robert, son William, son Jeremiah — all of Dartmouth; 
daughter Sarah, wife of Thomas Gray; daughter Mary, wife of Joseph Cook; 
daughter Anne, wife of Job Cooke. Who was James Bennett? who was oue of 
the first organizers of " Church of Christ" at Little Compton, R. I., 1704? He 
had married Ruth 4 Rogers, daughter of John Rogers, and ELizabeth 3 (Pabodie) 
Rogers (Elizabeth 2 (Alden) Rabodie, John 1 Alden). In a deed, 1696, he speaks 
of himself as of Roxbury. I would like his parentage. Did Ruth have any 
children? 

Jloger 1 Braley, or Brayley, or Bralee, by wife Alice, had in Portsmouth, R. I. 
(see Arnold's Vital Record, vol. iv., page 58) Elizabeth Brayley, born June 25, 
1G97; Roger, 2 born November 15, 1698; Alice, born March 28. 1700; Ambrose, 
bom Dec" 4, 1701; John, born March 26, 1703; Grace, born Feb. 22, 1704-5; 
Sarah, born March 25, 1707. Ambrose went to Middleboro, married Mary 
Renolds, and had a family there. Johu went to Freetown, and he or his son 
John in Revolutionary war killed. Roger 2 went to Middleborough, married 
Hannah (who was she?) and had Alice, born July 29, 1722; Roger, born April 6, 
1724. He then married Margaret Shearman, born 1711, daughter of David and 
Abigail (Hathaway) Shearman, of Dartmouth, and had Abigail, born April 1, 
1734; David, born" Sept. 1, 1735; Russell, March 17, 1737; Solomon, born Nov. 
19, 1738. He then removed to Rochester, and had Lydia, born July 29, 1740; 
Israel, born May 15, 1742; Elijah, born March 5, 1744; Hannah, born Feb. 2, 
1746, married Barnabas Hammett, of Long Plain, Mass. ; Caleb, born Dec. 16, 
1747; Ezekiel, born Dec. 6, 1749; Margaret, born Aug. 18, 1752; George, born 
Dec. 3, 1754.. Any further particulars in regard to this family I would like, but 
particularly the parentage of first Roger Braley and Alice his wife. 

Address: Mrs. Charles L. Alden. 

4 Gale Place, Troy, JV. Y. 



Ingersoll, Low, Gannett and Wadleigh. —David Ingersoll, of Gloucester, 
married Mary Sargent Dec. 10, 1718. Want the Christian name of her father 
and the maiden name of her mother. Samuel and Mary (Norwood) Sirgent 
had a daughter, Mary, born Nov. 1, 1696, and John and Hannah (Howard) Sar- 
gent had a Mary, born Dec. 10, 1699. Did either of these Marys marry David 
Ingersoll? 

Nathaniel Low married Abigail Riggs, of Gloucester, July 15, 1722. Want 
the Christian name of the father and "the maiden name of the mother of this 
Nathaniel Low. Was he a son of John and Anna Low and grandson of John 
and Sarah (Thorndike) Low? Did he have a brother, John Low, born Feb. 22, 
1691, who married Anna Annable, April 18, 1718? 

Matthew Gannett, born in Scituate, 1688, married Mary Bacon in 1718. Their 
children : 

1. Elizabeth, born 1719, married Nicholas Byram; married, 2d, Thomas 
Hay ward, June 4, 1746. 

2. Mary, born August 4, 1721, married John Edson, Feb. 7, 1743. 

3. Susannah, born Nov. 13, 1723, married Daniel Edson, Jan. 1, 1746. 

4. Mehitable, born April 14, 1724, married Zebulon Cary, Oct. 8, 1747. 

5. Sarah, born July 31, 1729, married David Pettingill. He died April i, 
1755. 

She married, 2d, Amos Ford, May 29, 1766. Want the Christian name of the 
father and the maiden name of the mother of this Mary Bacon. George and 
Mary Bacon, of Roxburv, had a daughter, Marv, born August 13, 1701. Jona- 
than and Elizabeth (Giles) Bacon had a daughter, Mary, born Sept. 18, 1702. 
Josiah Bacon (son of Michael 3 Bacon) and Marv, his wife had a daughter, 
Mary, born Oct. 20, 1703. Did either of these Mary Bacons marry Matthew 
Gannett? 

Jonathan Wadleigh, of Exeter, N. IL, had a daughter, Hannah, who married 
Joseph Noyes, of Newbury, 1715. He married for a second wife Mrs. Ann 
(Wilson) Hilton, widow of Winthrop Hilton. Want the maiden name of this 



76 JSTotes and Queries. [Jan. 

Jonathan Wadleigh's first wife, and the names of her parents and where they 
lived. Warren Ladd. 

677 County St., New Bedford. Mass. 



Medical Graduates of Bowdoin College. — Information respecting the 
following early graduates of the Medical Schoolof Maine is much desired for 
use in the General Catalogue : 

1822. Green Berry Bowles, of Bedford County, Va. ; AsaQuimby, of Albion, 
Maine. 

1823. John P. Haynes, of Bedford County, Va. ; Eber West, of Tolland 
Conn. 

1824. Clark Lillybridge, of Stafford, Conn., and of South Carolina. 
1823. Martin M. H. Markoe, of St. Croix, W. I. 

1S26. John Adams, of Bloomtield, Me. ; Benjamin Ayer, of Alua, Me. 

1828. Henry Gilmour, of Stafford, Conn. 

1829. Jacob Blaisdell, of Fort Covington, N. Y. ; John Plant, of Benson, Vt. 

1830. Octave C. Fortier, of Quebec/P. Q. 
1832. ■ Porter K. Lovell, of San Domingo. 

Brunswick, Me. Geo. T. Little. 



Smith.— A fraament of an old family record. — Cather Smith Died July the 
fifth day 1759 in the fifty-ninth year of his age. 

Lemuell Smith Died August the sixth day 1759 aged one year and seven 
months one Day. 

Phylip Smith Died Nov. ye 21 day in 1659 aired thirty years and three months 
and 27 Days. 

Aaroi Smith Ju, was in a Battel in 1758 march and has been missing Ever 
Since aj?ed 25 years and Eleven months when mising. 

Dr. Nathane'l Smith Died March 9th 1774 aged 72. 

Jemima Whiten Died February 14 1774. 

Note. — The first entry in above record refers to Aaron, son of Ichabod Smith 
of Hadley; the next three are his children. Aaron jr. was one of Roger's 
Rangers, and was captured near Ticonderoga, March 13, 1758. Nathaniel was 
brother of Aaron, and first physician of Amherst. The date of his death is, by 
mistake, given in Judd's Hadley as 1789. Franklin Leonard Pope. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 



Patxe. — The undersigned, who is preparing a work entitled " The Signers of 
the Declaration of Independence, their Ancestors and Descendants," is very 
anxious to obtain any one or more of the following data : 

1. Date of marriage of Robert Treat Paine, the " Signer," to Sally Cobb — 
the year was probably 17G9, not 1770, as various authorities give it, as their 
eldest child was born May 14, 1770. 

2. Dates of birth and death of Mai*y Ann Smith Paine, daughter of the 
" Signer's" son, Robert Treat — originally called Thomas — Paine. (She is said 
to have died in Boston in November. 1S02, aged three years and eight months.) 

3. Date of birth of Robert Treat Painereldest son of Robert Treat — for- 
merly Thomas — Paine, son of the " Signer.'" (Said to have died in Boston 
November 12, 1802, " aged one year and two months.") 

4. Date of marriatre of Robert Treat Paine, the Astronomer — who died June 
3, 1885 — to Anne W. Stevens. (This Robert Treat Paine was the second son 
of Robert Treat — formerly Thomas — Paine, above-named). 

5. Dates and places of birth and death of Eliza or Elizabeth Baker, whom 
the said Robert Treat— formerly Thomas — Paine married February 22, 1795. 

6. Names of her parents. 

7. Date of birth of Olive Lyman, who married Henry Paine, youngest son of 
the "Signer." (She was a daughter of Theodore and Sarah— Emerson— Lvman). 

8. Dates and places of birth and death of Lucy Lyman Paine, daughter of 
said Henry and Olive (Lyman) Paine, who became the first wife of Russell 
Sturgis. Frank Willing Leach. 

254 South 23d Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



1S04.] . Notes and Queries. 77 

WlLMAafs, Longbottom and Oi.ds. — Williams. — In Norwich, Conn., are 
recorded children of Joseph and Mary Williams as follows: Moses, 1724; 
Dorothy, 1726; Joseph, 1729; Elijah, 1730; PriseiUa, 1732; Sarah, 1734; 
Mar?, 1730; Anne, 1739; Sibol (sic) 1741; Asa, 1744; Hannah, 1746. " En- 
tered Sept. 25, 1750, at desire of Joseph Williams." I would be glad of any 
information respecting the antecedents of this Joseph Williams, whose children 
•were apparently born in some other town. 

Ijtughtdtom. — From whence came Daniel Longbottom, who married Nov. 12, 
1723, Mary Caswell, and whose children in Norwich, Conn., record are: Elijah, 
1721; Elizabeth, 172(3; Judith, 1720; Lydia, 1734; Anne, 1736; Daniel. 1740. 

/;,,',-,.. f;.—josiah Barrett, born 1G83, married 1710, Mary Dill, of Concord, re- 
married to Littleton. In 1737 was one of first settiers of Hardwick. east of 
Ware river, afterwards New Braintree, where he was living in 1749, and per- 
haps removed so Sunderland. Would like to know in what town he was living 
from 1720 to 1737. 

0/,\s. — Joseph Pease, of Somers, or Enfield, Conn., born 1712; died 1800; 
married Prudence Olds. Who were her parents? 

Elizdbethi N. J. Franklin Leonard Pope. 



John Head.— In the account of the eminent lawyer, John Read, in Apple- 
ton's Cyclopaedia of American Biogragraphy, it is stated that he was born in 
Meiidon, Mass., but Todd's History of Redding, Conn., states that he was born 
in Connecticut, without naming the place, and the assertion is borne out by 
Read's own statement in a letter to Francis Wilks. the Colonial Agent, in 1739, 
that Connecticut " is my native Country." The history of the Read-Reed-Reede 
Families says that John was a son of'Sarnuel Read, of Mendon, born in 1673. 
That would" make him rather old for those clays at the time of his graduation in 
1<;;>7. There was a John Read born in Norwich, August 15, 1679, son of Josiah, 
but he apparently lived and died an undistinguished life in Norwich. Can any 
one inform me where Read was born, and when? 

SI 5 Asylum Avenue, Hartford, Conn. Miss Mary K. Taixott. 



Settlement of the Welsh Tract. — Can any of the subscribers, or others, 
give any account of the early settlement of the "Welsh Tract," a grant of 
30,000 acres Irom Wm. Penn, about 1701, to a party of emigrants from Wales? 
—said land being close by Newark, Del. By what ship and at what date did they 
come? Was there a man named John Welsh, and Frances his wife, among 
them? From what port did they sail? 

I have worked for a long time to get on the track of this John Welsh and 
Frances his wife, and my experience~often is, that the locality where informa- 
tion is naturally expected is not so fruitful as a distant place. 

Frank Olcott Allen. 

Chesnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Phillips and Prtjden.— Phillips.— Rev. George Phillips, who came to America 
with Gov. Winthrop and settled at Watertown, Mass., had a son, Zerubabel, 
who settled on Long Island (Southampton?). Whom did he marry, and who 
Were his children? 

Prudden.— Rev. John Prudden (Harvard 1663) son of Rev. Peter Prudden, of 
Milford, Conn., became the minister at Jamaica, L.I., 1670, and Newark, N. J., 
1674. Whom did he marry, and where was she born and when deceased? I 
will be grateful for a reply. Mrs. Ethan Allen Weaver. 

West Philadelphia, Penn. 



Coffin.— The Register for 1870 contained a short genealogy of the Coffin 
family, which is sadlv deficient in the matter of places. I wish to learn the place 
of birth of the children of 37, Abner Coffin, p. 311. He was at various dates 
called "of Exeter," but in what part he lived does not appear. Can any one 
tell me on what records the births of his children can be found? And whence 
did Mr. Silvauus J. Macy obtain the dates as printed in the Register? 

Wm. S. Appleton. 



78 Notes and Queries. [Jan. 

Spexcer.— Eliphaz Spencer, born April 27, 1733, in Suffield, Conn. ; son of 
William and Hannah (Copeley) Spencer. (See Goodwin's notes, p. 316.) Did 
Eliphaz Spencer marry, and" if so, who? What children did he have? He 
probablv removed with his father to Sheffield, Mass. 

IIS fork St., Xew Haven, Ct. Geo. D. Seymour. 



Day, Dicklxsox axd Kellogg. — Robert Day came in Elizabeth from Ipswich, 
County Suffolk, to Boston, in April. 1634, aged 30, wife Mary aged 28. 

Nathaniel Dickinson was at Wethersfield, 1637'. 

Samuel Kellogg was in Hadley as early as 1G69; married 1st, 1664, Sarah, 
widow of Nathaniel Gunn of Hartford. 

Information concerning ancestry of above will be paid for. 

Lafayette, Indiana. J. H. Perrix. 

Kellogg, Miller axd Dewey.— Joseph Kellogg, born Hatfield, Mass., June 
18, 1696; married Oct. 23, 1717, Colchester, Conn., Abigail Miller. 

Daniel Kellogg, born Colchester, Conn., May 6, 1720; married May 27. 1745, 
Ann Dewey, of Hebron, Conn. 

Information concerning ancestry of Abigail Miller or Ann Dewey will be paid 
for. J- H. Perrix. 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Cook. — Will all persons who have facts pertaining to the genealogy of the 
descendants of Richard,' George and John Cook please communicate same to 
W. Burt Cook, Jr., Ithaca, N. Y. Richard, George and John Cook are known 
to have crossed to America, circ. 1634 from Gloucestershire (?), England, and 
to have settled, Richard in Cambridge, George in Boston, and John in Salem. 



Replies. 

Soldiers rx Philip's War: Elias Stiff.— In the Register, xli., p. 209, 
amongst the soldiers credited under Capt. William Turner, June 24, 1678, oc- 
curs : 

Elias Stiff 02. 04. 06. 

The name of Stiff is a very rare one both in England and America, and I was 
not previously aware of its occurrence in Massachusetts, though cognizant of the 
fact that there are several families of the name in Virginia. As to the latter 
the guess may be hazarded that they came from Gloucestershire, though at 
present the only reason for the suggestion is that the very distinctive name of 
Jacob Stiff occurs both in Virginia and Gloucestershire. By a parity of rea- 
soning we may suggest that Elias Stiff came from Berkshire. In that county, 
at least as early as the middle of the sixteenth century, there were several 
settlements of the name, one of them being at Lamborne. I have several of 
their wills, and all the entries of the Stiffs in Lamborne parish register down 
to 1766, and I find the name of Elias Stiff occurring pretty frequently from 
1631 to 1762. 

Thomas Stiff, of Lambourne, weaver, mentions in his will, 1643, three sons, 
Elias, Thomas and Francis. Elias Stiff would appear then to have been s. p. 

On August 1, 1631, one Elias Stiff (query the son of Thomas, 1643) married 
Susan Bother (querv Bocoer). 

On April 14. 1647," was baptized " Elias the sonne of Francis and Margaret Stiff 
of Lambourne." 

On Sept. 24, 1670, we find the burial of Susanna the wife of Elias Steefe, and 
on Dec. 13, 1685, was buried Ellis Stiffe of Lambourne. 

Whether any one of these may be identified with the Massachusetts soldier it 
is impossible at present to sav. But these entries may afford a clue. 

It may be well to add that I have a very large number of references to Stiff 
in other parts of England, Gloucestershire, Xorthants, Hampshire and Suffolk, 
the Christian name of Elias only occurs in Berkshire. 

Is anvthinsr more known of "this Elias Stiff, or of others of his surname in 
Massachusetts? W. P. W. Puilllmore. 

124 Chauncy Lane, London. 



1894.1 JVotes and Queries. 79 

Rolve (ante, vol. 31, page 143). — The Register for July, 1877, says of 
Enoch Carter Rolfe, M.D., that he was descendant of Henry 1 Rolfe of Newbury 
who died March 1, 1643, through John, 2 Benjamin, 3 Benjamin 4 and Henry* who 
removed to Concord, New Hampshire. Nathaniel, born in Newbury, 1712, died 
ot Concord. N. H., 1808. Benjamin, 7 born in Haverhill, Mass., May 31, 1758, 
died in Rumford. Me., Oct. 1, 1828, and John, 8 his father, who was born in Con- 
cord March 7, 1785, and died in Rumford, Me., April 23, 1854, &c. I judse you 
have been misled by the genealogy given in the third (3d) volume of the Regis- 
ter, which makes "Honour the wife of Henry his father, confounds his sou and 
brother, and makes other mistakes. 

I think the following more probably his descent: Henry 1 and Honour Rolfe 
of Newbury, Benjamin 2 born 1638 and Apphia Hale married 1659, Henry 3 born 
1677 and Hannah Tappan, Nathaniel 4 born Jan. 1713-4, my ancestor, married 
Hannah Rolfe* (John, 4 John, 3 Benjamin. 2 Henry 1 ). 

Benjamin,* born May 31, 1752, married Molly Sweat, removed to Rumford, 
Maine, John. 6 born 17So ; married Betsey Abbott, Enoch C. 7 If this is wrong 
I should be glad of correction, and to learn of all facts relating to the Rolfe 
family from any one having such information. H. P. Rolfe. 

Great Falls, Montana. 



Esther Hanford (ante, vol. 47, page 214).— I have to reply to Dr. Banks, 
Haynes Hanford, of Norwaik (son of Capt. Samuel and Jasabell Haynes, and 
gra'ndson of Rev. Thomas Hauford) married Elizabeth Ketclunn, and had five 
children: 1. Jedediah; 2. Joseph, born in 1742 ; 3. Esther; 4. John, born in 
1755; 5. Mary. 

403 West 126th St., New York. Rosell L. Richardson. 



Peyton.— (Vol. 47, page 418.)— The will of Henry Peyton, Esq., given by 
Mr. Waters at the above reference, will be found in full in my " Virginia 
Genealogies, 1801," page 481, with a complete record of Henry Peyton's Amer- 
ican descendants to 1891. Horace Edw. Hayden. 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



RicnARD Jaqees (ante, vol. 47, p. 841).— Wheeler's History of Brunswick, 
Topsham and Harpswell states on page 841. that Lieutenant Stephen Jarmes, 
who killed Eather Ralle, settled in Harpswell, and that his descendants •• still 
reside in this vicinity." G. T. Little. 

Boicdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. 



Historical Intelligence. 

Dr. Marshall's Genealogist's Guide, Third Edition. — The second edition 
of '-The Genealogist's Guide; being a General Search through Genealogical, 
Topographical and Biographical Works, Family Histories, Peerage Claims, etc.," 
published in 1885, has for some time been out of print. The author, George 
W. Marshall, LL.D., F.S.A., Rouge Croix Pursuivant of the Herald's College, 
has determined to issue a third edition, with a supplement containing a large 
number of additional references, and to add also a complete Catalogue of 
Printed Parish Besristers, and references to extracts from Registers, both 
print. -d and manuscript. His new edition of the Guide will be privately printed 
for subscribers onlv, and will be limited to 250 copies. The subscription price 
will be 25 shillings" Subscriptions will be received by Messrs. Belling & Sons, 
London Printing Works, Guildford, England. Those who desire the work 
should sond in their orders earlv. The work is in piess, and will be issued as 
soon a? the subscription list is complete. 

The catalogue of Parish Registers will be much extended from the privately 
priuted work issued in 1891. 



80 Notes and Queries. [Jan. 

Discovery of the Birthplace of the Apostle Eliot.— The birthplace of 
Eev. John Eliot of Koxbury has till last year been unknown, though it has gen- 
erally been supposed that he was born at Nazing in Essex, where a brother of 
his and two sisters were baptized, ami where his father Bennet Eliot died [ante, 
Register, 2S : 140-5 ; 39 : 3(15-71). In 1893. a descendant, Ellsworth Eliot, M.D., 
of New York city (whose address is No. 48 West 36th street), visited England, 
and made some genealogical searches. lie found on the parish register of St. 
John Baptist at Widford, Herts., a record of the marriage of his parents, viz. : 
" Bennett Eliot and Letteye Aggar were married the 30tirof October 1508." On 
the same register is found the baptism of the Apostle, as follows : " John Elliott 
the sonue of Bennett Elliott was baptized the fyfte daye of August 1004." The 
baptisms of his sister Sarah in 1599, his brother Philip in 1002^ and Ins brother 
Jacob iu 1000 are also there recorded. Between 1006 and 1010, the family seems 
to have removed to Nazing. Dr. Eliot lias made arrangements through the 
rector of Widford, Rev. John Traviss Lockwood, to have a memorial Window 
placed in the church in memory of his ancestor, and has issued a circular to 
other descendants inviting those interested to contribute towards the expense 
of the window. 



Lincoln County Probate Records. — The Maine Genealogical Society, 
Portland, Maine, have issued a prospectus for publishing probate records of 
Lincoln county, Maine, compiled by William D. Patterson of Wiscasset. Maine. 
Lincoln county, which was organized in 1700, included nearly all the territory 
north and east of the Androscoggin river. Some of the territory was taken 
in 1789 to form Washington and Hancock counties; in 1799 Kennebec county; 
Waldo in 1827; Androscoggin and Sagadahock in 1854: and Knox in 1S6"0. 
The wills will be giyen verbatim and an abstract of other records. 

The work will be issued in monthly parts of 16 pages, at 25 cents a part, pay- 
able in advance. Twenty parts will form a volume, and a title page, preface 
and index will be furnished. Much valuable historical matter, concerning the 
early.history of Maine, will be contained in this work. 



Souvenir Spoon of the Denison Family.— A souvenir or memorial spoon 
has been issued by the Denisons at Mystic, Connecticut. On the inside of the 
bowl of this spoon is a view of the first house built in Mvstic by Capt. George 
Denison in 1008, which was taken down in 1883. These dates" appear on the 
back of the handle. The top of the handle represents the Denison coat-of-arms 
with the motto: Domus Grata, as copied from the tombstone at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, and along the handle, extending down to the bowl, are the let- 
ters composing the name D E-N-I-S-O-N. It is a handsome, heavy teaspoon, and 
is admired by those who have seen it. It is not the intention of the originator 
to otter it for sale as a speculation ; but those interested can obtain one by send- 
ing three dollars— a price, we are told, which will not cover the cost— to Mr. 
Charles Hyde Denison, 97 Front street. New York city, or Miss E. E. Cottrell, 
Greenfield, Mass. 



Dudley Family Relics.— Mrs. Elizabeth C. Young, of Medford, whose obi- 
tuary is printed in this number of the Register; presented, on the 14th of Novem- 
ber, 1881, to the New-England Historic Genealogical Society the following relics 
preserved under glass in a frame : Four caps which were made before the birth 
of the first child of William and Sarah (Williams) Dudley, who was born June 
19, 1774. Several ruffles worked or embroidered by that child when she was 
thirteen years old for her mother to wear to commencement at Harvard College. 
A silver tea-spoon, being one of six given to the above Sarah Williams by her 
brother Henry Howell Williams previous to her marriage to Mr. Dudley. A 
knitting sheath which had been in the Dudley family through seven seta-rations. 
Mrs. Young, the donor, was a grandchild of William and Sarah Dudley, being 
a daughter of their first child above referred to. 



Genealogies in- Preparation.— Persons of the several names are advised to 
furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 



1894.] Societies and their Proceedings. 81 

end other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 
especially service under the U. S. Government, the holding of other oilices, 
graduation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and 
dates of births, marriages, residence aud death. When there are more than one 
christian name they should all be given in full if possible. No initials should 
be used when the full names arc known. 

Balch. — A genealogy in preparation by Galusha B. Balch, M.D., Yonkers, New 
York. 

Fainceather.— By Walter C. Fainveather, P. O. Box 11, St. John, New Bruns- 
wick. For some time past Mr. Fainveather has been collecting material for a 
genealogy of this family. He has very full records of his immediate ancestors 
and their descendants, and is very anxious to extend his work further back. 
Information sent to him at the above address will be thankfully received. 

Hamblen. — H. F. Andrews, Audubon, Iowa, is compiling a genealogy of this 
family. 

Harrimnn.— H. P. Rolfe, 317-19 Central Avenue, Great Falls, Montana, is in- 
vestigating the genealogy of this family and has much information from town 
and county records. 

Hitchcock. — The Hitchcock family history which has long been in preparation 
is now ready for the press, and will be printed as soou as 150 copies are sub- 
scribed for. The price will be So a copy. The volume will contain 600 pages 
or more, and will trace the family in its two branches from Matthias of Water- 
town, Mass., and East Haven, Conn., and of Luke of Wethersfield, Conn., from 
1635-1886. Subscriptions and genealogical data should be addressed to Mrs. 
Mary L. Hitchcock, Amherst, Mass. 



Kellogg — Foote. — In the article on the Kelloggs of Colchester which appears 
in this number, pp. 59-64, under the head of " Disconnected Items." it is stated 
that Mary, daughter of Aaron Kellogg, married May 31, 1763, Isaac Foote. This 
is incorrect; the Mary who married Isaac Foote may have been the daushter 
of Abner Kellogg. J. H. Perrlx. 



SOCIETIES AND THEIR PROCEEDINGS. 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society. 

Boston, Massachusetts, Wednesday, October 4, 1893. — A stated meeting was 
held at the hall of Boston University, at three o'clock this afternoon. Bev. 
Alonzo A. Miner, D.D., was chosen chairman, and Walter K. Watkins secretary 
pro tern. 

Rev. George M. Bodge, of Leominster, Mass., read a paper entitled "A 
Representative New-Ensland Church in its Genesis and Growth.'" A bible was 
exhibited by Mr. Bodge which has been claimed to have belonged to Rev. John 
Rogers, the proto-martyr, but which the late Mr. George Offor pronounced to 
be of the edition of 1561— six years after the martyr's death (Mass. Hist. Coll. 
x -< 4*1). This bible was exhibited at the Leominster celebrations of 1843 and 
1893. 

John Ward Dean, the librarian, reported 61 volumes, 122 pamphlets and 3 
other articles had been received as donations since the June meeting. 

I he Council made its monthly report. Five candidates for resident and one 
lor corresponding memberships were nominated. 

* ODr r, -'*ident and one corresponding member, nominated at the June meeting, 
were balloted for and elected. 

v ' *", zra II ' B - vin g ton > D.D., reported the recent deaths of nine members. 

AowwJur J— A stated meeting was held this afternoon at three o'clock, the 
P n l l r William Clatiin, LL.D., in the chair. 

David G. Haskins, Jr., reDorted resolutions on the death of the Rt. Rev. 
William Ingraham Kip, D.d'., LL.D., bishop of California, who was for four- 
VOL. XLVIII. 8 



82 Societies and their Proceedings. [Jan. 

teeu years honorary vice-president of the Society. The resolutions were unani- 
mously adopted. 

Hou. Thomas Weston, Jr., of Newton, read a paper on "William Bradford 
and his Influence on Plymouth Colony." 

William Stanford Stevens. M.D., the corresponding secretary, reported the 
acceptance of live resident members. 

The librarian reported as donations during the last month, 59 volumes, 57 
pamphlets and 6 other articles. 

George A. Gordon, the secretary, read the report of the Council. One resi- 
dent and one corresponding member were nominated by the Council. 

Five resident members and one corresponding member were elected by ballot. 

The historiographer reported the deaths of three members of the Society. 

December 6. — A stated meeting was held this afternoon at 3 o'clock, President 
Claflin in the chair. 

Prof. Marvin I). Bisbee, of Dartmouth College, read a paper on " The Influ- 
ence of Bishop Berkeley on New-England Thought." 

The report of the corresponding'secretary was read by the recording secre- 
tary. Seven persons elected as resideut members have accepted their member- 
ship. 

The librarian reported 42 volumes and 23 pamphlets as donations. 

The Council, by its secretary, made its monthly report and nominated seven 
candidates for resident members and one as a corresponding member. 

One resident and one corresponding member, nominated in November, were 
elected. 

The historiographer's report announced the deaths of three life and two resi- 
dent members. 

Hou. Thomas Weston and Messrs. Aaron Sargent, Warren Bartlett Ellis, 
George S. Mann and Charles Frank Mason were unanimously elected by ballot 
as a committee to nominate officers for the ensuing year. 

Messrs. Austin J. Coolidge and Henry E. Woods were elected a committee to 
audit the treasurer's accounts. 

On motion of Mr. Oliver B. Stebbins the Council was requested to consider 
the expediency of, and if deemed expedient, to propose to the Society some plan 
for celebrating the Society's Jubilee or 50th Anniversary which occurs next 
year. 

Old Colony Historical Society. 

Taunton, Massachusetts, Tuesday, August S, 1S93. — The quarterly meeting 
was held this evening, by adjournment, in Historical Hall, the president, Rev. 
S. Hopkins Emery, D^D., in the chair. ' 

President Emery made a brief address. Sketches of members who had died 
recently were read, namely: Hon. James Brown, Capt. Sylvester N. Staples, 
Capt. William Henry Phillips, Lysander Soper, Charles W. Hartshorn, Dea. 
Edgar Hodges Peed "and Moses Day Kimball. 

An interesting letter from Director Elisha Clarke Leonard of New Bedford 
was read. 

Bradford Kingman, Esq., of Brookline, the historian of North Bridgewater, 
now Brockton, delivered an historical address. 

Capt. John W. D. Hall, the librarian, reported valuable donations during the 
last quarter. 

Maine Historical Society. 

Kittery Point, Maine, and Portsmouth, X. H., Friday and Saturday, September 
8 and 9, 1S93-— The Field Day Excursion of this Society this year was held in 
these places. The party landed in the Great Orchard of Sir William Pepperrell 
on Friday forenoon, and were welcomed by Mr. Moses A. Safford, chairman of 
the committee in charge. They proceeded to the hotel where dinner was served, 
after which historic residences and other places of interest were visited. 

In the evening a meeting was held in the parlor of the hotel, the president of 
the Society, Hon. James P. Baxter, in the chair. Sp?eches were made by Presi- 
dent Baxter. Revs. Henry V. Emmons, Henry S. Barrage and E. C. Oummings, 
Mr. Frank W. Hackett, Paymaster Joseph Foster, U. S.N., Mr. Moses A. Saf- 
ford, and the secretary Mr. Hubbard W. Bryant, who presented in the name of 



1894.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 83 

John S. IT. Fogg, M.D., of South Boston, Mass., a parchment deed bearing the 
autographs of several noted men in the history of Maine — Samuel Maverick the 
King's commissioner, Capt. Francis Chaniperuowne, and Roger Garde mayor of 
Gorgeana. 

Saturday morning after breakfast the party found a steamer in Waiting, and 
were taken up the Pascataqua and were shown many interesting localities on 
both sides of the river. On their return they landed at Portsmouth, where they 
were shown objects of interest iu that time-honored place. In the afternoon, 
after dinner, they returned home. 

Rhode Island Historical Society. 

Providence, Tuesday, October 3, 1893.— The regular quarterly meeting of the 
Society was held in its cabinet this evening, Geu.^Horatio Rogers the president 
in the chair. 

Amos Perry, LL.D., the librarian, reported as donations during the last quar- 
ter, 55 volumes, 212 pamphlets and 31 other articles. 

A committee was appointed to confer with the executor of Charles "W. Par- 
sons, M.D., a vice president of the Society, who bequeathed to it four thousand 
dollars on certain conditions. 

November 14. — A meeting was held this evening. 

Hon. William T. Davis, of Plymouth, Mass., read a paper on " The Pilgrim 
and the Plymouth Colony, with some reference to the controversy concerning 
the boundary liue between that colony and Rhode Island." 

New Haven Colony Historical Society. 

New Haven, Conn., Thursday, Sept. 28, 1893.— The English Memorial Building 
presented to the Society by Henry F. English, Esq., as a memorial of his father 
Hon. James E. English, and of "his mother Caroline Fowler English, was for- 
mally dedicated this day. A large audience numbering over four hundred per- 
sons was present, including delegates from many sister societies. The exer- 
cises were opened with prayer by the Rev. Newman Smyth, D.D., and included 
an address by Hon. Simeon E. Baldwin, an oration on the life of Hon. James 
E. English by Horace Day, Esq., and a paper on the history of the Society by 
its present secretary, Thomas R. Trowbridge. Remarks were made by Gen. 
Francis A. Walker, president of the American Statistical Association, Prof. 
Herbert B. Adams, secretary of the American Historical Association, Judge 
Harden of the Georgia Historical Society, and Hon. Charles A. Reed of the 
Old Colony Historical Society. At the close of the exercises a collation and 
informal reception was held in the exhibition halls. 

Monday, Nov. 27. — The annual meeting of the Society was held this day. 
The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 

President. — Hon. Simeon E. Baldwin, LL.D. 

Vice-President. — Eli Whitney, Esq. 

Secretary. — Thomas R. Trowbridge, Esq. 

Treasurer. — Dwight E. Bowers, A.B., LL.B. 



NECROLOGY OF THE NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC 
GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Prepared by the Historiographer, Rev. Ezra Hoyt Byington, D.D., of Newton, Mass. 

The sketches of deceased members prepared for the Register are of 
necessity brief, because the space that can be appropriated is quite limited. 
All the materials for more extended memoirs which can be gathered are 
preserved in the archives of the Society, and they will be available for use 
in preparing the ''Memorial Biographies," of which four volumes have 
been issued and a fifth volume is in press. The income from the Towne 
Memorial Fuud is devoted to the publication of these volumes. 



84 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

Rev. Andrew Preston Peabody, A.M., D.D.. LL.D., was elected a resident 
member of this Society January 3, 1883; became a member of the Council- in 
1S89, and took a prominent part in carrying forward the business of the Society 
until he resigned his seat in the Council in June, 1892. He was quite frequently 
present at our stated meetings, and contributed from time to time valuable his- 
torical papers. His death, on the 10th of March, 1893, removed from us one of 
the most useful and distinguished of our members. 

He was born in Beverly", Mass., March 19, 1S11. His ancestry was of the 
best Puritan stock. He was of the seventh generation from Lieut. Francis 
Peabody, who came to New England in 1635. His name is enrolled in the fol- 
lowing "certificate dated April 2, 1(335, found in the "Augmentation Office," in 
Rolls Court, Westminster Hall, London : " Theis underwritten names are to be 
transported to New-England, imbarked in the Planter, Nicholas Traice, Master, 
bound thither. The parties have brought certificate from the minister of Great 
St. Albans in Hertfordshire, and attestacons from the Justices of the Peace, 
accoriting to the Lords order." 

Lieut. Peabody settled at Ipswich, from which place he removed to Hampton, 
N. H., and later "to Topstield, Mass., where he became one of the most promi- 
nent men of the town, both for property and enterprise. He is termed in the 
early records " Husbandman." Among his descendants have been men disting- 
uished for piety and patriotism. Some have acquired large fortunes. Among 
these should be counted George Peabody of London, the eminent banker and 
philanthropist, whose benefactions, amounting to several millions of dollars, 
have no parallel in history. Others have been distinguished in literature and 
science, and in professional life. 

Dr. Peabody was graduated at Harvard in 182G, when he was only fifteen 
years of age. He was a private tutor at Meadville, Penn., for some years, after 
which he entered the Divinity School at Harvard, and was graduated in 1832. 
He was tutor in mathematics" at his Alma Mater in 1832. He was ordained and 
installed as pastor of the South Church (Unitarian) in Portsmouth, N. H., in 
1833, and continued in that office for twenty-seven years. In 1860 he was ap- 
pointed Plumer Professor of Christian Morals in Harvard College, and preacher 
to the University. He resigned these positions iu 1881. He was acting presi- 
dent of Harvard in 1862, aud again in 1868-9. He was editor of the North 
American Review from 18.53 to 1863. He was a frequent contributor to the 
Christian Examiner, the Whig Review, the New-England Magazine, the North 
American Review, and to various other publications. He published a number 
of volumes of lectures and sermons, besides a large number of occasional ser- 
mons. His most elaborate work, published in 1887, was his " Lectures on Moral 
Philosophy." 

In his character and personal qualities he was pre-eminently a Puritan of the 
very highest type, although his theological views were quite different from those 
of the Puritans. He was, above all else, an apostle of righteousness. As a 
preacher, and teacher, and author ho stood for the things that are true and just. 
He had great skill in commending the truth to the conscience. He was a very 
diligent student down to the last year of his life, and his learning was varied 
and profound. His character was as simple as it was elevated. When he was 
convinced that he had been mistaken in his judgments, and that he had done 
injustice to any one, he was prompt and generous in his efforts to make full 
reparation. He was decided in his religious opinions, but as free as any man 
from sectarian narrowness. He preserved to a remarkable degree in his old age 
the fresh feelings of youth. He did not seem to be an old man. During his 
last years all his powers, except perhaps the memory, seemed to be unimpaired. 
Dr. Peabody was one of the few men who have been able to bring forth fruit 
in old age as fine as that of earlier years. 

Francis Parkman, A.B..LL.B., LL.D., was born in Boston, Sept. 16, 1823, 
in a fine old house of the colonial period, fronting on Bowdoin Square, and he 
has always had a home in Boston. Many of his ancestors were ministers. The 
family line is traced back to Elias Parkman, who came to New England in the 
early years of the Colony, — was a freeman in Dorchester in 1633.— -and after- 
ward removed to Hartford, and finally settled in Bo:-,ton. The great-grandfather 
of Francis Parkman was the first minister of Westboro', Mass. His father, 
from whom he was named, was also a minister, of whom pleasant traditions 



1894.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 85 

have come down to us. Harvard College has received the endowment of two 
professorships from a member of this family. 

Mr. Francis Parkman was graduated at Harvard in 1844, and studied law two 
years after his graduation. He was attracted towards literary pursuits more 
strongly than towards a professional career, and before completing his course 
at the Law School he decided to devote himself to historical studies. He went 
abroad for a time, and after his return he spent several months among the 
Rocky Mountains, living for a time among the Dacotas and other tribes of wild 
Indians. His health was broken by the exposure of these journeys, and he was 
a sufferer for the remainder of his life. His first book was an account of the 
Rocky Mountain region and its inhabitants. Four years later he published " The 
Com-piracy of Pontiac aud the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada." His 
third book was a novel, with the title " Vassall Morton." In 1866 he published 
his "Book of Roses." The same year "The Pioneers of France in the New 
"World " was published. In 1803 he published " The Jesuits in North America in 
the Seventeenth Century," and in 1869 " La Salle and the Discovery of the Great 
West." He also published " The Old Regime in Canada" in 1874, and " Count 
Frontenac and the New France under Louis XIV." in 1877. " Montcalm and 
Wolfe," in two volumes, appeared in 1884. 

Mr. Parkman was a diligent and enterprising student. He made a number of 
visits to France, aud examined the original documents which were the authori- 
ties for his histories. He is regarded by some judicious critics as the most 
philosophical of American historians. 

He was elected a resident member of the New-England Historic Genealogical 
Society Sept. 6, 1865. He was also a prominent member of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, and for two years its president. 

Hox. Leopold Morse, a member of this Society, elected February 6, 1884, 
died at his residence on Commonwealth Aveuue, Boston, December 15, 1892. 
Mr. Morse had represented the City of Boston in Congress from 1877 to 1885, 
and from 18*57 to 18S9. Although the nominee of the democratic party, he was 
widely supported by those who did Dot affiliate with that party. He had by his 
own exertions attained a position as one of the leading merchauts of Boston, 
his house (Leopold Morse & Co.) being among the most prominent and wealthy 
in the clothing trade. Not alone had he the trust of his brother democrats. 
There was a confidence extending beyond party ties, among the merchants of 
Boston, that his sagacity, mercantile intelligence and integrity could serve the 
general interests and commerce of the city greatly to their advantage. So he 
did. Boston during the last sixty years has profited much by the ability and 
comprehension of the merchants who have represented her in Congress, and the 
names of Lawrence, Appleton, Hooper, Rice and Morse as representatives of her 
material interests will fill an honorable place in her history. In Congress Mr. 
Morse served on important committees with credit, and was influential both for 
his native good sense aud keen perceptions and for his generous and courteous 
spirit. The cause of the humble and the influential of his constituents found 
alike a prompt and vigorous aid from him. In banking and real estate his 
judgment stood hiirh among the business men of Boston. Mr. Morse's health 
became somewhat impaired for two years before his death, which rendered visits 
to European springs necessary. He was a liberal giver in a good cause, and 
was prompt to sympathize with distress and misfortune. He founded and en- 
dowed the "Boston Home for aged and infirm Hebrews and Orphanage" at 
West Roxbury, in his life — which continues in successful existence. 

Mr. Morse was bom Aug. 15, 1831, in the town of Wachenheim in the Rhenish 
Palitinate, Bavaria, and came to this country in 1848, where he joined an elder 
brother then in trade at Sandwich, N. H. In the keen struggles of the town 
meetings aud the March elections of that political battle-ground, the American 
lessons of self-government and constitutional liberty were planted in his breast 
as the rule of rfght. Not only did Mr. Morse become a citizen of this republic, 
but he gave a bond to fate of the permanency of his adoption by wedding an 
estimable lady descended from the old Puritan stock of Essex County (Miss 
Ray), who with two of their sons survive him. 

After he became of age he soon reached Boston and entered into business 
which by his tact, ability and integrity was developed into large proportions. 
In after life he remained grateful to those older merchants who gave him a 

VOL. XLVILI. 8* 



80 - Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

business credit when Lis state was small and interested themselves in h's pro- 
gress, and never shrunk from avowing his obligation to them Mr Morse had 
a large heart, a generous hand and a good head, coupled with rare business 
qualities. An exemplary husband and a kind father, and an unflinching friend 
A striking evidence of the esteem in which Mr. Morse was held bv all "ranks in 
this city was shown in the composition of the vast gathering at his funeral 
The leading merchants, distinguished members of the professions "the ma*- 
nates of political and city life, were blended with his workmen who had loved 
him. men and women, the old and crippled whom he had served in some wav 
and the stalwart citizens whose principles he had represented in Congress 
Every race and every religion dwelling amongst us were represented in the'-reat 
and serious throng who came to look their last on the inanimate remains of one 
whose honorable, kindly and useful life had endeared him to them bevond the 
mere affinities growing from a similarity of political principles. Boston has 
lost in him a public-spirited and able citizen who promoted and sought her wel- 
fare with fidelity and success. 

F»j Hon. Charles Levi Woodbury, of Boston. 



18G5, 
e. 



iMa Millet, M.D., elected a resident member of the Societv August * 18G 
died at East Eridgewater, Mass., March 21. 1S93, in the eightieth vear ofjbis as*. 
Dr. Millet was a descendant of Thomas Millet of London (South wark). who 
T*6- tV V . P r , a I T GreeQ oway) came to New England on the ship Elisabeth in 
ltw. He settled hrst in Dorchester, afterwards in Gloucester, where for sev- 
eral generations the name was a common one. Thomas Millet, the Grandfather 
of our member, removed to Leeds, Me. He was a revolutionary soldier and a 
manner on the Hancock, the war-ship ordered by the Continental Congress and 
built by Massachusetts in 177G. His wife was Eunice Parsons. Their son, 
Zebulon 1 arsons Miliet, married Deliverance Rich of Sandwich, Mass., and 
resided m Leeds, where Asa Millet was born. June 22, 1813. 

Hejitted for college at Monmouth and Waterville Academies in his native 
state, and took a partial course in Waterville College (now Colby University - ) 
in the class of 1836. After a few years spent in teaching he devoted himself to 
the study of medicine, graduating from the Medical School of Maine at Bowdoin 
College m 1842. He began the practice of his profession in Mattapoisett. Mass 
removing in 1847 to East Bridgewater. From 1854 to 18G2 he resided in Abin<*- 
ton and from 1802 to 1873 in Bridgewater. returning in the latter year to East 
iSridgewater, where he remained to the close of his life. The whole half cen- 
tury of his professional career was thus speut in the Old Colony, where he was 
thoroughly known and respected. 

iifl* , a * a mem ^er, and at one time a vice-president, of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society He belonged also to the Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution Although a man of strong political convictions and connected from 
tlie hrst with the republican party, he never held political office except as a mem- 
ber of Governor Andrew's Council in 1865, to which position he was elected bv 
the legislature to till a vacancy caused bv resignation. He served in the arm v for 
a short time as contract surgeon in 18G1, until sickness compelled him to return 
home but as member of the Surgical Aid Corps he made several visits to the 
front during the progress of the war. 

Dr. Millet was married in 1*43 to Miss Huldah Allen Bvram of East Bridge- 
water, daughter of Capt. Branch Byram and Anne Washburn. She survives 
r^ 1 * S^.if? 8 «"» two daughters. The sons, all graduates of Harvard, 
are h rank D Millet, the artist, widely known in connection with the Columbian 
Exposition, Josiah B. Millet, of the publishing house of J B Millet Co Bos- 
ton, and Charles S. Millet, M.D., of Rockland." 
By Bev. Charles C. Carpenter, A.M., of Andover, JIass. 

n^ E ? P f^ IIITFIELD AVERY ' MD ' of Hartford > Ct., a life member, elected 
Oct. 7, 1868, was a sou of David and Rebecca (Morgan) Averv, and was born 
at Hampton Conn. Sept. 27, 183.J. His grandfather, Rev. David Averv. a 
descendant of one of the early settlers of Groton, Conn., graduated at Yale 
College in 1-09 served in the Revolutionary War, married Haunah Chaplin, 
daughter of the founder of Chaplin, Conn., and preached at Wrentham. Mass, 
and at Chaplin. Dr. Avery's father, born at Wrentham in 1787, graduated at 
.Brown Lniversity, and taught for a time in Providence, R. I. He was a student 



1894.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 87 

of the classics and of English Literature, and was active in the cause of anti- 
slavery and of temperance. 

Dr. Avery had expected to make teaching his life work, but was led to decide 
on studying medicine, graduated in 1861 at the Yale Medical school, and was 
then made house physician at the New Haven Hospital. 

At the opening of' the war he was appointed, by Gov. Buckingham, Assistant 
Surgeon of the 9th Connecticut volunteers, and showed great zeal and efficiency 
in the hospital on Ship Island, where he was first stationed. 

In 1862 he went with General Butler to New Orleans, and the following year 
was put at the head of the St. James Hospital there, and for two years under 
General Butler he had charge of all the sanitary arrangements of the city. 
He was appointed in December, 1863. surgeon of the first New Orleans Volun- 
teers, and subsequently held, during his ten years' residence in New Orleans, 
various important offices, civil and military, among others that of High Sheriff. 
During his administration of the latter office, the impartiality of his conduct won 
the approval of very many, even among those who had previously been opposed 
to him. 

During the terrible epidemics of cholera and of yellow fever, he was one of 
the few physicians who remained st his post, and was on duty night and clay 
for weeks. 

He made many friends in the city through his devotion to his patients, and in 
more than one case' he took to his owu rooms some northern man, although an 
entire stranger, and faithfully cared for him. 

In November, 1871, he removed to Hartford, Conn., where he held positions 
of trust. For several years he was surgeon of the 1st Regiment National Guards, 
examiner for the Soldier's Home, and a member of the pension examining board. 
He was also a member of the Hartford Medical Society, and from May, 1S74, 
he was attending physician at the American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. 
He endeared himself' to the pupils of this institution by his affectionate interest 
in their welfare. 

In his profession he was an enthusiast, and seemed specially gifted for a sur- 
geon and physician. He had trained himself to use either hand indifferently, 
had quick powers of observation, fertility of resource, great decision and reso- 
lution, and keen sympathies. His iron will led him to persist in accomplishing 
whatever he undertook, and his courage and genial humor inspired confidence 
and cheer among his patieuts. 

f> Notwithstanding his strength of character and of body he had an extremely 
sensitive organization, and his interest and anxiety for his patients told upon 
him. 

He took great delight in standard literature, and " his intellectual hunger 
seemingly was never satisfied." He was especially interested in military history 
and the events of our late war were vividly present to his mind. He had a 
deeply religious nature and thought much and spoke often of the claims of duty 
and of the future life. 

Overwork, with little change of scene or relaxation, wore upon him, and he 
died at Hartford, February 23, 1893. 

Dr. Avery was twice married, first in 1872 to Lydia L. Shipman, of Jewett 
City, Conn., and second in 18S4 to Elizabeth P. "Keep, of Hartford, Conn., 
who, with his four daughters, survives him. 

By Francis E. Blake, Esq., of Boston. 

Abraham Avery, A.M., a life member, elected March 1, 1865, was bom in 
Wilbraham, Mass., Nov. 15, 1824. He was the son of Abraham and Elizabeth 
(Bliss) Avery, and was the fourth to bear the name. 

For many "years he was a member of the well-known firm of Rand. Avery & 
Co., printers and publishers, Boston, from which he retired in 1877. He was 
a man of excellent judgment and decided opinions, but retiring in his habits, 
exhibiting a quiet dignity of manner and courteous and kindly in his bearing. 
He never'entered public "life, his tastes being for literary pursuits. The degree 
of Master of Arts was conferred upon him by Wesleyan University in 1879. 

He married Nov. 19, 1851, Margaret Cook, daughter of William S. and Mar- 
garet Camp of Middletown, Conn., by whom he had three children, two 
daughters surviving him. His death occurred in Boston April 3, 1893. 

By Francis E. Blake, Esq., of Boston. 



88 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

Rev. Charles Morris Blake, A.M., M.D., of San Francisco, Cal., a cor- 
responding member, elected Jan. 7, 18S0, was born December 24. 1819, in 
Brewer, now Holden, Maine, lie was the son of Charles 6 and Mary (Winches- 
ter) Blake, and descended from William 1 Blake, of Dorchester, through Ed- 
ward, 2 Jonathan, 3 John, 4 John.* 

He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1842, and at Jefferson Medical College 
in 1845. He studied theology under Dr. Albeit Barnes, and in 1853 was ordained 
a Presbyterian minister at Valparaiso. Chili, where, for several years, he was 
pastor and preacher to the Scotch miners. In 1S49 he went to California, and 
from 1851 to 1857 was the editor of the Pacific News in San Francisco. He 
received the degree of M.D. from the University of California in 1876. 

Upon the breaking out of the war in 1861 he offered his services to his country 
and was commissioned chaplain of the United States Volunteers, in August of 
that year. In July, 18G3, he received a commission as captain of the 3d United 
States Colored Troops, and at the siege of Fort Wagner was wounded in the 
head, from the effects of which he suffered the remainder of his life. Later he 
again served as chaplain at various hospitals and posts, a greater part of the 
time being on the frontier. 

In 1882 he became a resident of San Francisco, where he died June 3, 1893. 

Mr. Blake had a life of varied experience. He was a man of energy and ac- 
tivity, of genial nature, easy and fluent in conversation, and a cultivated Chris- 
tian gentleman. For many years he was much interested in genealogy, freely 
expending money and labor in tracing the lineage, not only of the Blakes, but 
also of other families in which he was specially interested — Winchester, Dupee, 
Farrington, &c. To him belongs the credit of making known the existence of 
the records of the baptism aud marriage of William Blake the emigrant to New 
England about 1636, which were found at Pitminster parish, Somerset County, 
England. 

Mr. Blake married August IS, 1844, Charlotte A. Farrington. Of his five 
children two only survive, Charles E. Blake aud Charlotte A. Brown, both of 
them physicians in San Francisco. 

By Francis E. Blake, Esq., of Boston. 

John Farwell Anderson, Esq., of Portland, Maine, a resident member, 
elected May 3, 1876, was born at Portland, July 22, 1823; died in that city Dec. 

25, 1887, aged 64. For a memoir and portrait see Register, vol.43, pp. 131-32. 
The memoir was reprinted as a pamphlet. 

Hon. Samuel Turell Armstrong of Boston, Mass., a resident member, 
elected April 15, 1845, born at Dorchester, April 29, 1784, died at Boston, March 

26, 1850, aged 65. For a memoir see Memorial Biographies, vol. 1, pp. 232-6. 
For a memoir with portrait see Register, vol. 44, pp. 137-41. 

Hon. Frederick Billings, LL.D., of Woodstock, Vt., a resident member, 
elected October 3, 1888, born at Royalton, Vt., Sept. 27, 1823, died at Wood- 
stock, Vt., Sept. 30, 1890, aged 67. For a memoir and portrait see Register, 
vol. 45, pp. 259-67. Reprinted as a pamphlet. 

Jeremiah Colburn, A. M., of Brookline, Mass., a life member, elected Nov. 
4, 1857, born at Boston Jan. 12, 1815, died at Boston Dec. 30, 1891, aged 76. 
His father, Calvin Colburn, was born at Leominister, Mass., Feb. 20, 1773, and 
died at Boston, Feb. 14, 1834, aged 61. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Catharine Sybil Lakin, was born at Groton, Mass., May 20, 1780, and died at 
Grotou Jan. 15, 1858. aged 77- For a memoir and portrait see Register, vol. 
47, pp. 425-33. Memoir reprinted as a pamphlet. 

Samuel Page Fowler, Esq., of Danvers, Mass., a resident member, elected 
June 4, 1862, was born in that town April 22, 1800, and died there Dec. 15, 1S88, 
aged 88 years. For a memoir and portrait see Register, vol. 46, pp. 339-45. 
Reprinted as a pamphlet. 

Hon. John Plumer Healy, LL.D., of Boston, a resident member, elected 
Nov. 3, 1852; was born at Washington, N.H., Dec. 28, 1810. and died in Boston 
Mass., Jan. 4, 1882, aged 71 years. For a biographical sketch see Register, 
vol. 36, page 338 ; and for a memoir and portrait see Register, vol. 4G, pp. 207- 
210. 



1894.] „ Book Notices. 89 

Rev. Thomas Ricker Lambert. D.D., of Boston, a life member, was born at 
South Berwick. Me., July 2, 1809, and died at Boston Feb. 4, 1892. For a 
memoir and portrait see Register, vol. 47, pp. 293-96. 

William Hekry Montague, Esq., a resident member, one of the fire original 
members or founders of the Society, which was fully organized by the choice of 
officers January 7, 1845. He was born at Granby, Mass., Feb. 29, 1804, and 
died at Boston," Mass., May 15, 18S9, aged 85 years. A portrait and memoir was 
published iu the Register, vol. 44, pp. 341-52, and reprinted in pamphlet form. 

Rev. Euas Nason, A.M., of Xorth Billerica, Mass., a life member, elected 
January 5, 1848, was born at Wrentham, Mass., April 21, 1811, and died in 
North Billerica, Mass., June 17, 1877, aged 66. A memoir, with portrait, was 
published iu the Register, Vol. 43, pp. 9-34, and was reprinted in pamphlet 
form. 

Ira Ballou Peck, Esq., of Woonsocket, R. I., a life member, elected March 
2, 1853, was born at Wrentham, Mass., February 12, 1805, and died at Woon- 
socket June 27, 1888, ajred 83. A memoir aud portrait were published in the 
Register, Vol. 43, pp. 237-42. 

Samuel Baker Rindge, Esq., of Cambridge, Mass., a life member, elected 
February 2, 1870, was born at East Cambridge, Dec. 26, 1820, and died at Cam- 
bridge, May 3, 1S83, aged 62. For memoir and portrait see Register, Vol. 45, 
pp. 3-7. 

Nathaniel Foster Safford, Esq., of Milton, Mass., a life member, elected 
September 3. 1873, was born at Salem, Mass., September 19, 1815, and died at 
Milton, April 22, 1891, aged 75. For memoir and portrait see Register, Vol. 47, 
pp. 9-19. The memoir was reprinted in pamphlet form. 

Rev. Increase Niles Tarbox, D.D., of Newton, Mass., a resident member, 
elecied January 7, 1863, was born at East Windsor, Ct., on Saturday, February 
11, 1815, and died at Newton, May 3. 1888, ased 73. For memoir and portrait 
see Register, Vol. 44, pp. 9 to 23. The memoir was reprinted. 

William Fletcher Weld, Esq., of Boston, Mass., a life member, elected 
June I, 1870, was born at Rosbury, Mass., April 15, 1800, and died at Philadel- 
phia, Pa., November 30, 1881, aged 81. For memoir and portrait see Register, 
Vol. 45, pp. 115-117. 

Henry Austin Whitney, A.M., of Boston, Mass., a life member, elected 
February 6, 1856, was born at Boston, October 6. 1826, and died at Boston, Fel- 
ruary 21, 1889, aged 62. For memoir and portrait see Register, Vol. 45, pp. 
175-186. The memoir was reprinted. 

Cyrus Woodman, A.M., of Cambridge, Mass.,. a life member, elected Jan- 
uary 2, 1867, was born at Buxton, Maine, June 2, 1814, died at Cambridge, 
March 30, 1889, aged 74. For memoir and portrait see Register, Vol. 43, pp. 
345-349. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



[The Editor requests persons sending bocks for notice to state, for the information of 
reader-., the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent by 
mail.] 

Family-Histories and Genealogies, a Series of Genealogical and Biographical 
Jlnnnyraphs on the Families of MacCardy, Mitchell. Lord, Lynde, Digl'j, New- 
digate, lino, Willoughby, Griswnld, Wolcott, Pitkin, Ogden, Johnson, Diodati, 
Lee, U,cke, Cole, DeWolf, Drake, Bond and Sinnyne, Dunhar and Clarke, and 
a Notice of Chief Justice" Morrison Remick Waite. With 23 Pedisree-Charts 
and 2 Charts of Combined De-cents. In three volumes. By Edward El- 
bridge Salisbury and Evelyn McCurdy Salisbury. 1892. Privately 



90 _ Booh Notices. [Jan. 

Printed. (Press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, New Haven") . Vol. I., 
Parts I. and II., xli., xxvi., 721 pp.; Vol. II., xvi., 503pp.; III., x., 312 
pp.; Vol. III., Supplement Charts. 

It mar safely be claimed, in behalf of antiquarian research, that there is no 
nobler field for literary labor than that in which is gleaned and recorded— either 
in the form of Biography, Genealogy, or History— the true nobility of a worthy 
ancestry. Out of this field, in the beginning of the last year, liave come to 
us two works of such considerable size and value as to render them somewhat 
phenomenal contributions to the annals of the Colony and State of Connecticut. 
We refer to Dr. Stiles' Revised Edition of the History and Genealogies of Ancient 
Windsor* and to Prof, and Mrs. Salisbury's Family -Histories and Genealogies, 
connected mostly with the old town of Lyme, Conn. 

Both of these towns— Windsor at the head of navigation on the Connecticut 
Piver, and Lyme (then a part of Saybrook) near to its mouth, upon the seaboard- 
were of nearly the same date of settlement; both were peculiarly rich in the 
inheritance of that "best blood" (middle-class), which gave and "still gives to 
Old England its stalwart strength among the nations of the earth: both were 
" mother-towns," sending forth colony after colony into the wilderness beyond 
them; and of both it may be said, even to the present day, that they are abund- 
antly honored in their children in this fair land. Consequently, the simultaneous 
appearance of two such works as those above-mentioned is an event of no small 
iuterest, not only to the many whose descent is derived from these two towns, 
but as strongly indicative of that wider appreciation of the value of such books 
which now obtains in the present generation of Americans. 

It is, however, more particularly of Prof, and Mrs. Salisbury's remarkable 
volumes that we wish to speak, in the present instance; since, both as regards 
their extent, accuracy, minute and loving detail and charming literary style, no 
less than for the superb luxuriousness of their mechanical make-up! they are, 
in every respect, remarkable. The rive quarto volumes under present notice 
may be considered as supplementary to the two volumes of a similar character 
printed by Prof. Salisbury in 1885, and which dealt chiefly with the irenealosical 
lines of his own descent. Together they present a most remarkable instance of 
similarity of tastes and of felicitous literary co-operation between man and 
Wife; and irresistibly suggest the wish that the same loving hands may, in due 
course of time, present us with a History of Lyme, Ct., for which, indeed, these 
volumes seem to form a natural ground-work and preparation. 

The wish to which Ave have thus given expression, and which we are sure 
will be echoed by all who consult these volumes, is greatly stimulated by the 
very appetizing Preface and " Introductory Notes on Lyme"," in the first volume 
of these Family-Histories. In this the author aptly remarks that " No one can 
ever know how much of heroic struggle and devotion to duty and affection, in 
the lives of the settlers of our old towns, has been hidden and lost in the lapse 
of time. 'They had no poet, and died.'" True! they "had no poet" then; 
but in these latter days the Lord hath raised up these " veracious chroniclers," 
who have saved their memories to us and to our children, for our edification and 
strengthening. And every page of these Genealogies furnishes absolute proof 
of the fitness of the same chroniclers to give us a history of this grand old Con- 
necticut town. 

In the MacCurdy, Mitchell, Buchanan genealogies we are treated to ^omemost 
delightful glimpses of the characteristics of the Scotch and Scotch-Irish race, 
whose successive immigrations (beginning about 1720), into America brought to 
our colonial era a new accession of back-bone, and a little later added to the 
establishing of our newly-won liberties " the creed, the spirit of re>i~tance and 
the courage of the Covenanters," fully justifying Lord Montjoy's remark (in 
1784) that " America was lost to the English Crown by Irish emigrants." 

John McCurdy. of a family once prominent in the Isles of Bute, in the West 
of Scotland, emigrated (a?. 21) in 1745, from Ireland; settled at Lyme in 1752, 
and married Anne Lord, whose decision of character over-ruled the very natural 
disfavor with which her father regarded her Irish lover. A man of great public 
spirit, enterprise and benevolence, an active patriot in the Revolution. McCurdy 
became one of the wealthiest and most prominent citizens of his county. A 

• The History ;ind Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, 1G35-1S9I. Br Henry 
E. Stiles, A.M., M.D Hartford, Conn., 1892. 2 vols, royal octavo. 



1894.] _ Booh Notices. 91 

stout Presbyterian and " always catfechising his family on Sunday night, he was 
wont to include his daughters' suitors, whose visits were at the usual courting- 
time of the period. This practice could have given little alarm to young men 
already well drilled in the Catechism ; but we can think of nothing which would 
more effeatually disperse the lovers of the present day ! " These daughters, 
educated at New York and Philadelphia, were ladies of elegance and dignity, 
yet well versed in all practical details of housewifery. They had great beauty. 
One of them married the famous Rev. Dr. Nathan Strong of Hartford; another 
was the wife of Rev. Henry Chauning of New London, whose nephew William 
Ellery Channing was taken into his'house after the death of his father, and 
from" there sent to Harvard College at the expense of bis aunt Sarah (McCurdy) 
Channing, who had inherited a large estate from her father. Another daughter 
of Mr. McCurdy, wife of Capt. Elisha Hart, was the mother of seven daughters 
known as " the beautiful Miss Harts," one of whom was the wife of Commodore 
Isaac Hull. The biography of Judge Charles Johnson McCurdy, in this mono- 
graph, is a carefully considered and most felicitous tribute of filial affection 
from the pen of bis daughter Mrs. Salisbury. 

The Mitchell family of Chester, Conn, (descendants of William of Glasgow 
and Agnes Buchanan his wife, settlers of 1755) derived from an ancestry which 
suffered much for conscience-sake in Scotland ; while Asmes Buchanan was an 
aunt of the Rev. Claudius Buchanan, the eminent Scottish missionary to India. 
This William Mitchell was a brother of James Mitchell of Wethersfield, Conn., 
who was the father of Chief Justice Stephen Mix Mitchell, and great-grand- 
father of Donald Grant Mitchell, the author. 

Among the families commemorated in these volumes is a group of disting- 
uished English origin, namely : Dishy, from Elizabeth Digby, granddaughter 
of Simon Digby of~Bedale, executed for high treason iu the reign of Elizabeth, 
and a near relative of John Digby first earl of Bristol; Willoughby, from 
Deputy-Governor Francis Willoughby, who settled in Charlestown, Mass., in 
163S; Newdigate, from John Newdigate, settled in Boston 1632; Ogden, from 
John Ogden. the pioneer settler of Elizabeth, New Jersey ; Marvin, from Reinold 
Marvin of Lyme; Clarke, from Hon. Daniel Clarke of Windsor, Conn., and his 
brothers; Lord, from Thomas Lord of Hartford, 1*335; Pitkin, from William 
Pitkin of East Hartford; Locke, Cole, Bond, Swayne, Lee, Drake, Griswold 
and Wolcott, most of them from well-known heraldic families of landed proprie- 
tors in England. The three last-named families have also received new exami- 
nation and enlargement in Dr. Stiles's Windsor History; and may well congratu- 
late themselves that they have been thus simultaneously and so thoroughly, ex- 
ploited from two such competent sources of authority. In regard to the English 
connections of the Griswold and Drake emigrant ancestors, both these authori- 
ties seem, in the main, to asree; though the Salisbury book presents for the 
Drake ancestry a stronger claim of direct social distinction in England than is, 
perhaps, claimed for it in the Windsor book. While we have no absolute infor- 
mation as to the social position and pecuniary means of John Drake, the emi- 
grant in England, our best assurance that he possessed both is to be found, 
perhaps, in the fact that, in the little Windsor coilimunity — thoroughly imbued, 
as it must have been in that generation, with respect for social position a^d rank. 
as it existed in the land of their birth* — John Drake seems to have been an hon- 
ored citizen, with good means for the period; and his son Job, a shoemaker,t 

• The line of descent of John Drake of Windsor, Connecticut, given in Dr. Stiles's His- 
tory of Windsor, is identically the same as that given in the Salisbury book, but in the 
latter it is amplified. The Plantagenet descent of John Dr;ike is given, and the marriages 
of these Drakes with the Grcnville or Granville, Prideaux, Champernon, Gilbert, Deny, 
Raleigh, Fortescue, the Duke of Marlborough and many other ancient families and per-ons 
of distinction are mentioned. John Drakeof Windsor was great nephew of Queen Eliza- 
beth's famous commander Sir Bernard Drake ; and he was related to many other of her moat 
distinguished naval and rnilitarv men. The pedigrees used were furnished to Mr. and Mrs. 
Salisbury by Sir William Richard Drake and Rev. W. T. Tyrwhitt Drake, present repre- 
sentatives of the family in England, the latter of whom wrote : " It will give me great pleas- 
ure to be useful in the genealogy of the American branch of the family." 

t It is well known that in the* time of the early generations of the settlers there was little 
call for the learned professions, except that of the ministry, while there was a constant de- 
mand tor the various trades which sustain social life. Many of the settlers, previ<ni>!y un- 
used to handicrafts, learned them before they came over, to n't themselves for the necessities 
of their new conditions as colonists. Others were obliged to learn them here. The Drakes 
ranked with the best Windsor families. 



92 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

esteemed a worthy husband for the daughter of Mr. Henry Wolcott, who was 
Windsor's most eminent and wealthiest man. 

We have, also, in these Family-Histories, a most interesting group of families 
of European Continental origin, such as Diodati — (Deus dedit), a hisjh family 
tracing back through English and Swiss lines to the Italy of the Middle Ages — 
and first in America in 1715 or 1717; Jfei, of the Mei family of Lucca; De Wolf,* 
from Balthazar of Wethersfield, Ct., 1604, and Lyme, 1684, whose child was " be- 
witched to death" by Nicholas and Margaret Young — according to extant 
records of the Particular Court of Connecticut, a branch of which family re- 
moved from Lyme to Nova Scotia, 1760: and another branch to Bristol, Rhode 
Island ; Parmciin, since Parmelee, probably of Swiss origin, from John Parmeiin, 
a first settler of Guilford, Ct. 1639, who was of Rev. Whitfield's party from 
Counties Surrey, Kent, and Essex, and who went with Gov. Eaton to New 
Haven ; Lynde, of Dutch origin (probably the Belgic family of Van der Linden), 
a family which gave to Massachusetts Colony a famous succession of Judges 
and Chief Justices, and which is a markedly legal family to the present day; 
Moo, which to us appears to be of Dutch origin, though our authors credit it 
to an old English (Saxon — locale, Kent,) stock f — perhaps afterwards identical 
with the name of Mau-es, and Howes. 

All these genealogies are abundantly fortified by notes and references to 
authorities; and interspersed with such a delicious infinity of minor details of 
biography, personal characteristics and antiquarian commentary, as to render 
them of interest even to the genera! reader. They are (Vol. III.) further illustrat- 
ed by the twenty-nine (folded) Pedhiree-charts of the above named and other 
families (including two Pedigree-charts of Combined Descents), bearing the 
coats-of-arms of the respective families, and elegantly printed on bank-note paper. 
Prefixed to Vol. III.', as a motto, are these words of Prof. Goode on the Scientific 
Value of Genealogical Facts : " The time is coming when the sociologist and the 
historian will make an extensive use of the facts so laboriously and systemati- 
cally classified by genealogists.'' 

Of the external appearance of these volumes it can be truly said that they 
are sumptuous. With a personal knowledge of nearly all of the many hund"ed 
family-histories published in the United States, for the past fifty years or more 
(many of which have been elegant and costly), we hesitate not to place these 
volumes at the head of the listT, as specimens of the " Art Preservative" of all 
arts. After launching upon the sea of Literature two such noble vessels as the 
Histories of 18S5 and 1692, we may venture to renew the expression of a nope 
that Prof, and Mrs Salisbury will not " rest upon their oars". h. k. 8. J 

The Life of George Mason, 1725-1792. By Kate Mason Rowland. New 
York : G. P. Putnam's Sons. The Knickerbocker Press, 1892. Two volumes. 
8vo. Vol. I. pp. 454; Vol. II. pp. 527. Price S8. 

These two volumes present the main facta in the career of an eminent Ameri- 
can statesman and patriot of the Revolution. A Virginian by birth and train- 
ing, he was the immediate neighbor of Washington. Their estates joined in 
part, and both fronted on the river Potomac. They were friends from youth, 
Mason being seven years the elder. There was a bond of sympathy between 
them in respect to social position aud business activities, and also in principles 
of conduct and standards of life. In the inception and prosecution of the war 

•A William de Wolve was witness to a deed in England in 1066. Arms are given, by 
Burke, to a De Wolfe family in England. Beithazar De Wolf established himself with the 
early English settlers in Lyme, wrote a good English hand, and took part with them in 
town affairs as one of them. There is no evidence that his family were of recent foreign 
oriein. though some of his descendants have that impression. 

fThe Saxon family of Hoo, described in " Family-Histories and Genealogies," which settled 
in Kent, are traced from the time of Henry I. In the reign of Henry III. they are men- 
tioned as seated in Suffolk; in 1286, in Bedfordshire. In 1292 Robert de Hoo, the supposed 
ancestor of the Hoos in this work, who married Beatrix daughter of Alexander Earl of An- 
derville in Normandy, held lands in Herts., Bedford, Cambridge and Oxford. His grand- 
son, Sir Thomas de Hoo, through his wife the heiress of John Lord de St. Leaer, held 
large estates in Sussex, Northarnptonrhire and Herts. He was followed by a succes- 
sion of descendants who held large possessions in many counties, including Norfolk and 
Suffolk. In the iine of the Suffolk branch descended Joa?\c Hoo, the mother of John >'e\v- 
digate of Boston. 
t The foot-notes are by another hand. 



1894.] 



Booh Notices. 93 



of the Revolution they were in full accord, and while they were at variance 
politically late in Mason's life, as to the adoption of the Federal constitution, 
this circumstance did not disturb their amicable social relations. Mason's Vir- 
ginian contemporaries in public affairs, seemingly without exception, have borne 
testimony to his excellence in those qualities which make up the ideal of a 
statesman; to 5ns learning, and his zeal and fidelity in the public cause. He is 
known in the record distinctively as "George Mason of Gunston," or, some- 
times, more specifically, "of Gunston Hall," the one appellation being that of 
the estate and the other that of the mansion where he dwelt. " The loss of many 
manuscripts, letters, and, in some instances, public records by fire, or other- 
wise, has prevented the preparation of what, in strictness, might be called a 
complete biography of him. But diligence and friendly zeal have rescued much 
in the way of data" that is perfectly authentic and clearly adequate for the proper 
llmnujg of his character and life work, and thus, in the hands of his present 
biographer, he has been made to appear to this and the succeeding generations 
n distinct and impressive historical figure. The volumes bear evidence that the 
search has been thorough, and there appears to be no reason to suppose that 
anything important can ever be added. For this reason, and because of their 
litcrarv merit arid general historical instruct! veness, they will have rank in their 
propel category iii American standard literature. 

Considerable space is given in the first volume to the ancestry of the subject, 
whose great-grandfather was also George Mason, a colonel in the army of the 
king at the battle of Worcester. That defeat prompted Mason's flight to 
America. In Virginia the heads of the family, from the beginning, appear to 
have been men of large proprietorship in land, and in each generation were 
public characters in the councils of peace or w r ar. The first George Mason was 
manifestly a sturdy monarchist.' His descendant of the fourth generation was 
not less distinctively a republican in his political doctrines and theories, and, as 
the narrative shows, became a republican in action and eventually one in the 
party sense. He is described in his early manhood as a planter and philosopher, 
a recluse rather than a politician, and as having reluctantly gone into the public 
arena. He had, for the period and the situation, an extensive library, in which 
among the works mentioned were those of Locke, Sydney, Montesquieu, 
Machiavelli and Junius. The presence of others of the great doctrinaires may 
be inferred. He was not a man to buy books for the mere ornamentation of 
his rooms, and, therefore, when the political crisis approached, was duly pre- 
pared to become, what he is described to have been, " the pen of the Revolution 
in Virginia." 

Another phrase of panegyric applied to him, and deservedly, was " the Con- 
stitution maker." The Virginia bill of rights and the first draft for a constitu- 
tion of the State (which latter was but slightly modified by the convention), 
were unquestionably of his authorship. The bill of rights was written by him 
probably earlier than May 17, and certainly earlier than May 27, 177G. In either 
case it antedates all others in the history of the United States. .Tefl'erson in the 
Declaration of Independence repeated its cardinal maxims and adopted many of 
its phrases. That the Massachusetts bill of rights is framed upon the model 
of that of Virginia is the statement of Bancroft, the historian; and Mason 
himself, in enclosing, in 1778, a copy to a friend in London, avows the author- 
ship and remarks, " This was the first thing of the kind upon the continent, and 
has been closely imitated by all the States." It has been continued without 
change at the head of each of the three Constitutions which Virginia has 
adopted. The original constitution is also preferred, at this day, by many Vir- 
ginians, to either of its successors. When the first revision was made by a 
conception in 1829 John Randolph of Roanoke, a delegate, appeared in each 
day's session with crape on his hat and sleeves, "in mourning," as he said, 
" for the old constitution." 

In the Convention of 1776 which adopted that constitution Mason was the 
master, spirit, though Patrick Henry is to be reckoned in many respects his 
P«'er. Madison, who was also a member, was then but 25 years of age. In 
pome sense Mason was hi the public service of Virginia, as member of the 
Iveirislature or otherwise, during the interval between that date and the assem- 
bling #f the Federal constitutional convention in 1787. In becoming a member 
of tir.s letter body he found himself to be, as he distinctly intimates, in a com- 
pany of luminaries. In a letter written soon after the opening of the sessions, 
vol. xLvm. 9 



94 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

bo P.iys, " America has certainly, upon this occasion, drawn forth her flrst char- 
acter's ; there are upon this convention many gentlemen of the most respectable 
abilities, and, so far as I can discover, of the purest intentions." The word 
" respectable" as thus used had, at that date, as is well known, a stronger sig- 
nificance than present usasce £;ives it, and the phrase has all the force of that 
preceding, " first characters." It is manifest not only that Mason had great 
weight In the convention, but that he went hand in hand, cordially, with the 
majority till near the end of the proceedings, and was as much a : ' Federalist"' 
as any. Certain changes made in the constitution in the closing stage aroused 
his opposition, which he never afterwards forebore; and he was oue of the 
three delegates in the convention who refused to sign the document when finally 
engrossed. 

This opposition was nominally a defence of "state rights," and the matter 
is so set forth in the biography." The author is at some pains to show that the 
political principles herein avowed by Mason were identical with those with 
which the secessionists entered upon the war in 1861. She goes farther and 
ranks many of the leading Virginians of 1787 in the same category with Jenvr- 
son Davis and his coadjutors, naming especially Mason. Henry, R, H. Lee, Jef- 
ferson and Madisou. While it is admitted that in 1787, and later, Madison was 
a Federalist, it is claimed that eventually he took the side of state rights. This 
phrase " state rights 1 ' is used, however, in a broader than the literal sense, and 
in one connection the author supplements it with another which brings out 
nearly the full meaning, where she speaks of certain words of the constitution 
as having been perverted to serve " as an argument against state rights and the 
doctrine "of secession." While in the formal declarations of the leaders of 
secession and in certain utterances and writings of the Virginians above named 
there may be an identity of phraseology, it may be held to be an unwarrantable 
inference" that these men of ITS", who" were subject to a particular condition of 
things and a particular set of apprehensions, as to dangers then threatening, 
would approve the action of those who began war in 18151, surrounded by quite 
other conditions and apprehending perils and losses of quite another sort. But 
whatever opinions the reader may" hold as to the merits of the political con- 
troversy involved in the civil war, the relation here given of the action of 
George Mason and others, in the formative period of the Federal constitution, 
is highly instructive, and will be helpful in making clear the progress of events 
as more broadly stated in the pages of general history. 

By Daniel W. Baker, Esq., of Boston. 

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society, Vol. IV. The Talcott Papers: 
Correspondence and Documents (chiefly official) during 'Joseph Talcotfs Gov- 
ernorship of Connecticut. Vol. I. 1724-36. Edited by Mary K. Talcott. 
Hartford: ' Published by Conn. Hist. Soc 18'J2. 

It is very unsafe to pronounce any space of locai history dull or unfruit- 
ful in advance. Connecticut antiquarians themselves have always regarded 
the period after the elose of the French-Jesuit aggressions early in the 18th 
century, and before the French and Indian war, as little more than a time of 
material expansion, with few salient or pregnant incidents. The very Society 
which issues this volume thought it unlikely to prove of great importance. It 
turns out to be of a great deal, and of curious interest and even novelty in a variety 
of ways. Nowhere can one gain a clearer view of the springs which swelled 
into the torrent of the Revolution. The reader winces with a sense of personal 
humiliation in seeing men of as great ability, acuteness, force and resolution as 
any in England itself, compelled' to pass their whole political careers in dex- 
terous skulking and elaborate diplomatic " filibustering," with never a hope 
of relief in open defiance or even sincere objurgation. Being human, rhey 
must inwardly have raged over the meanness, as they certainly worried night 
and day over the insecurity, of the position; and they giadly seized the chance 
of ending it. A mass of" fresh documents and correspondence on the famous 
"Winthrop-Lechmere land-title case brings this into the clearest relief. The 
whole future of the colony hinged on this case; the first adverse decision, mak- 
ing the British primogeniture law also the law of Connecticut, would have been 
highly disastrous but for the cool and wary judgment, patience and skill with 
which the executive of the colony kept the intestate estates unsettled for many 
years, or got them settled by compromise, in hope of a reversal ; and the final 



3894.] 



Booh J\ r oiices. 95 



reversal after a Massachusetts case had been decided for the colony, though it 
brought a long sigh of relief, did not undo the alienation of feeling so long 
cankering in silence. Along the same line was the steady and unfaltering, but 
very anxious and often despondent effort to keep the transoceanic government 
froin reviewiag the colonial laws. Talcort/s correspondence with the agents 
in London makes one share bis nervous apprehensions even now; neither of 
them concealed from themselves the fact that the general government could at 
any moment, and were quite likely to, declare the charter a mere revokable con- 
tract. Politics with them was the art of lulling and steering oft* a perfectly 
irresistible but rather clumsy and short-sighted set of masters. The later en- 
forcement of the navigation laws, which lost England the colonies, is plainly pre- 
figured here. Of internal matters, much the most important and novel is 
the conclusive testimony, in great mass, that the Connecticut government and 
people not only meant honestly to guard the fair interests and improve the 
mental and spiritual condition of the "remnant of Indians, but that they worked 
strenuously and steadily to chat end. The slurs cast on their good faith are 
wholly undeserved; some scamps sold the Indians liquor, and others tres- 
passed on their land or stole their crops, but the bulk of the people were 
neither hypocrites nor robbers. Among other things, the interminable bound- 
ary dispute with New York is not more unreadable than the other writings 
on the STibject; the abortive efforts to supply the pressing need of currency 
are interesting, and the abjectly apologetic letter of the Bishop of London 
to the Governor, asking that Episcopalians may not have to pay taxes to the 
Congregational Church, is curious and notable; and the letter of that village 
Machiavelli, Capt. James Packer of New London, on taking advantage of Mas- 
sachusetts' " hard times," is worth the price of the book. The personal element 
is of great interest. Talcott himself wins high respect; not a man of surface 
brilliancy, but much of Washington's stamp, an upright, laborious, solid, skilf id 
administrator, seeking the best counsel and able to profit by it. Wilkes and 
Belcher are what they are elsewhere ; the former an honorable, kindly, capable 
man of business; the latter a coarse-natured and bragging politician, with a 
strong tinge of the blackmailer in him — truculent half-disguised threats are 
forever cropping out. Much of the most valuable matter in the book has been 
gathered by the editor, Miss Talcott. in addition to that previously in possts- 
sion of the Society; and her extremely thorough and copious annotation has 
added greatly to its usefulness, making it intelligible to every reader without 
further research. Its coming accords most happily with the Winthrop Papers 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society. The second volume will be welcomed. 
By Forest Morgan, Esq., of Hartford. 

History of the Handel and Haydn Society, of Boston, Massachusetts, Vol. 1. 

From the foundation of the. Society through its seventy-fifth season, 1815-1890. 

Chapters, I.-III. By Chaulks C. Peukixs. Chapters IV-XV. By John 

S. Dwigiit. Boston": Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 18S3-1893. 

The authors of this work, Mr. Charles C. Perkins and Mr. John S. Dwight, 
have produced a carefully written and valuable addition to musical literature. 
The great work accomplished by the Handel and Haydn Society of Boston is 
well known and recognized. The members love mu>ic not only for its own 
sake, but for the great good that it can do in ennobling and uplifting human 
nature, and ever strive to give the best work of the great composers to the 
public, knowing that to be the best way to elevate the public taste. 

The following passage from " Luther's Table Talk" is quoted at the beginning 
of the Introduction to the book before us : " Next unto theology I give the place 
and highest honour to musiek, for thereby all anger is forgotten, the devil 
is driven away, unchastity, pride, and other blasphemies are expelled." 

High words of praise indeed, but none too high. Rightly does Luther 
rank music next to theology as a means of purifying human nature. In the 
world, where there are continual temptations to turn aside and labor too 
much for the meat which perisheth, even perhaps for the useless and hurtful 
things of life, the mind, the heart of man needs to be frequently reminded of 
the higher things (the only tangible things) of life, of eternity itself. Men 
take, and should take, due care for their temporal affairs, but in the incessant 
rush and hurry of life, the constant demands upon us, is there not crave danger 
that we may dimly see, perhaps, alas, even lose of sight of, the spiritual life? 



. 






96 - Book Notices. [Jan. 

As Christianity plainly teaches that there can be no sound and enduring basis 
for right living -without right thinking, in a word that belief precedes action, so 
the emotional nature, another great source of the spiritual life, needs to be fed 
and stimulated as well. The ideal life is the only real life. All other phases of 
life are as perishable as the vapor that vanisheth. Religion is a matter of the 
heart as well as of the head. And properly-guided emotion, enthusiasm, is 
absolutely necessary to its highest, fullest development. Surely next to right 
belief comes fervor and warmth of heart. Christian feeling and aspiration 
may not reach its goal through the reasoning faculties alone, but rather through 
the quicker and surer means of the religious affections. Thought is often com- 
plex, not so impulse. No great movement for the benefit of mankind was ever 
carried to a successful issue without this underlying, all-permeatiug priuciple 
of enthusiasm. No force in the world, no power of darkness, can cope with 
rightly-grounded enthusiasm. Emotionalism crystallizes thought into action, 
and makes it the most powerful force in the present and for all time. And to 
this grand faculty sacred music ministers unceasingly. It makes for all that is 
trne, beautiful and enduring, even for righteousness itself. 
By Bev. Daniel Bollins, of Cambridge. 

Good Old Dorchester. A Xarratire History of the Town, 1630-1S93. By Wil- 
liam Dana Orcutt. Cambridge : Published by the Author. John Wilson 
& Son, University Press. 1893» Svo. pp. 497. Price $4 in maroon cloth, or 
$5 in white vellum cloth, gilt top. For sale by George E. Littlefield, 67 Corn- 
hilt, Boston. 

This work, as the title indicates, is a narrative history of Dorchester during 
its entire existence. The author has done well to cause the book to be printed 
in its present form. Although there must be, necessarily, much that has before 
seen the light, he has introduced many new points. These will be readily recog- 
nized by those familiar with Dorchester history. The matter contained in four 
of the chapters of the book are designated: "Colonial Times, 1630^-1688"; 
" Provincial Times. 16S9-1783 " ; " The Revolution to the Rebellion, 1784-1860 " ; 
"Modern Times, 1861-1893." 

In this brief notice it is unnecessary to hint to the readers of the Register 
the importance of a book, in design and execution containing so much vital to 
the historian, especially in regard to the incipiency, history and progress of our 
free schools, as also our municipal and ecclesiastical governments. These sub- 
jects of themselves are sufficient, one would think, to recommend a careful re- 
reading and recital; for Dorchester lays claim, as is well known, to the free 
school, a model town government, early mills, &c, from Israel Sloughton, in 
1034, down to the present time, including the famous chocolate mills of Waiter 
Baker & Company. 

The History of Dorchester, published by a committee of the Dorchester An- 
tiquarian and Historical Society, in 1839, largely in the shape of Annals, is nearly 
out of print, and the price is" enhanced. It was intended, in a great measure, 
for a book of reference rather than for consecutive reading; a repository of 
facts, names and dates. The late Hon. James Savage used to say, " bocks are 
not made to read, but to be used for reference." Taking this view, the Dor- 
chester history of 1859, as far as it goes, would perhaps be considered quite as 
valuable as the book of 1893. while the latter might be thought more attractive, 
in the general acceptation of the term, and not the less readable. All this may 
be said without the least disparagement to the former volume. Both have their 
place, and may each properly stand side by side on the shelves of the students 
of American historv. 

Mr. Orcutt has furnished for his book portraits of Richard Mather, William 
Stoughton, Capt. John Percival, Edward Everett, Thaddeus Mason Harris, John 
Codman, Nathaniel Hall, Ebenezer Clapp, Jr., and Lucy Stone. The anecdotes, 
reminiscences and biographical sketches presented serve as a counterpart, to 
some extent, to the drv details, if they mav so be called. The histories of the 
early homes are interesting and entertaining. The illustrations, about fifty in 
number, include portraits, views, churches, old houses, &c, fac-sirnile signa- 
tures to the school document of 1641. and other autographs of individuals of 
former times. The cut entitled " A view of the Watering Place at Tinian." iu 
' the East Indies, on page 412, taken from an old work called " The World Dis- 
played," printed in Dublin. Ireland, in 1779, suggests the probably correct 
spelling of a familiar point of land in Dorchester, looking seaward. 



18.04.] 



Booh Notices. 97 






It gives us pleasure to commend this volume to the favorable attention of the 
public. The paper, print, and fine margins of the book, coming from the well- 
known University Press, arc all that the most fastidious lover of nice books 
need desire. It has also a good index. 

By William B. Trask, A.M., of Dorchester, 3Iass. 

Customs and Fashions in Old New England. By Alice Morse Earle. New 

York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1893* 12mo, pp. 3S7. Price SI. 25. 

The author of that interesting and instructive book, " The Sabbath in Puritan 
New England," needs no introduction to the American public. So far as may be 
Inferred from a necessarily rather hasty examination of Mrs. Earle's latest 
work, it would appear that it fully sustains her reputation for careful and ex- 
tensive research in the annals of our dearly-loved New England. This book 
will be glaidly welcomed and eagerly read by New-England people, and by all 
whose honest pride it is to trace their descent from New-England forefathers. 

There will be a difference of opinion in regard to the value set by the author 
on the influence of Puritan belief and actiou on the history of our native land. 
While evidently meaning to be just in her estimate, there yet permeates her 
writings a spirit altogether too common at present among many of our writers, 
a spirit of depreciation of the grand work wrought by our Puritan ancestors 
in laying the foundations of our great Republic here in the wilds of the new 
world. No one can have carefully read our colonial history, at least have care- 
fully measured its results, without making due allowance for the powerful in- 
fluence of the Puritan spirit in New England and in Old England. It is not too 
much to say that no other force in that period of history cau for a moment 
compare with the mighty influence for religious and political freedom exercised 
by this the then dominant English spirit. Without excusing its excesses, surely 
we must admit that the reign of Puritanism was necessary in England at a time 
when the Crown was weakand incapable of protecting its subjects at home or 
abroad. Puritanism with its stirring note aroused England from her lethargy 
and restored to the English-speaking race their ancient privileges which they 
had well-nigh lost; it restored England to her former position of prestige 
among the European nations ; it made possible the building-up in our western 
world a strong and enduring system of government "of the people, by the 
people, for the people." No uation can ever cope with the tenacious, the stay- 
ing qualities of our English race as long as it retains its old-time vigor; no race- 
has so well carried out the idea of civil" and religious liberty at home and abroad. 
The American spirit, the English spirit, stands for loyalty to truth and duty, 
for firm faith and trust in God. 

By Bev. Daniel Bollins, of Cambridge, Mass. 

Our Colonial Homes. By Sa.mtjel Adams Drake. Boston: Lee & Shepard, 
Publisher;,. 189-1. Roval Svo. pp. 211. Cloth, full gilt, gilt edges, $2.50; 
fall leather, gilt title, gilt edges, §1.50. 

Mr. Drake, v,ho has won an enviable reputation by his previous works as an 
accurate aud graceful writer on antiquarian subjects, has brought forth a timely 
volume on a subject that is now engrossing much interest among the descend-- 
ants of American colonial families, particularly the members of the Societies of 
Colonial Wars, and the Societies of Colonial Dames. They will gladly welcome it. 
The homes here described are the Hancock house and the home of Paul Revere in 
Boston; the Cradock house and the Royal! house in Medford; Edward Everett's 
birthplace and the Minot homestead in Dorchester; the Quincy mansion, the 
Adams mansion aud the birthplace of the two Presidents Adams in Quincy; the 
Old Ship in Hingham ; the old Witch house in Salem ; the Collins house and the 
birthplace of Gen. Putnam in Danvers; the last residence of James Otis in An- 
dovcV; the Wayside Inn in Sudbury; the home of Sir William Pepperrell in 
KHury ; the early home of John Howard Paine in East Hampton; the old In- 
dian house in Deerfield; the Leonard house in Raynham, and the old Stone 
house in Guilford. 

^ Mr. Dr&ke, in his Preface, says: " One end which I proposed to myself in 
this bnv.k, besides presenting house and home historically, was to gather up as 
many diMiuct types of the colonial architecture of New England as possible, 
from the rude farm house of the first settlers to the elegant mansions of a later 
generation; as it seems to me nothing could give half ^so clear a picture of a 
century and a half of colonial life." 
VOL. XLVIII. 9* 



98 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

King's Handbook of Xew York City: an Outline History and Description of the 
American Metropolis. With over One Thousand Illustrations from Photographs 
made expressly for the Work. Planned, Edited and Published bv JJoses King. 
Boston, Mass. : Second Edition. 1893. 12ino. pp. 1007. Price $2. Sold by 
Moses King, No. 4 Post Office Square. Bostou. 

This handsome volume of over one thousand paces, with more than a thousand 
original engravings direct from photographs, is the second edition, revised, 
enlarged and improved, of a very useful and handy book. The first edition of 
the -work was published in 1S:>2, and the whole of an edition of ten thousand 
copies was, we are informed, sold in less than six weeks. This edition consists 
of twenty thousand copies. 

Mr. King has had much experience in preparing such works, and this is de- 
cidedly the best that he has produced. Every visitor to New York, and those 
who wish to study its present condition and its history, should have a copy of 
the book. The life-long resident of the metropolis of our couutrv can Yearn 
much from its pages that it Avould be difficult to obtain without its "aid. It is 
an admirable hand-book in every respect. 

Souvenir of the Sherburne Centennial Celebration, and Dedication of a Monument 
to the Proprietors and Em-ly Settlers, held Wednesday, June 21, 1893; also 
Sketches of Families and oilier Historical Data. Published by Marcius D. 
Raymond. Tarrytcwn, X. Y. 1893. Larce Svo. pp. 111. Price §5. Ad- 
dress, M. D. Raymond, Pubbsher of The Argus, Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Washington at Tarrytoicn. A Paper read before the Tarrytoicn Historical Society, 
Tuesday Eve, December 16, 1890. Bv Marcius D. Raymond. Published 
by the Author by Request. Tarrytown, N. Y. 1893. 8vo. pp. 18. 
_ The centenary of the settlement of Sherburne. N. Y., was celebrated in a fit- 
ting manner on the 21st of last June by the dedication of a monument in honor 
of the early settlers. Mr. Raymond of Tarrytown was chosen the historian of 
the occasion, and has given us in the volume* before us a full report of the pro- 
ceedings. The edition was limited to 126 copies. After distributing copies to 
the subscribers to the Forefathers' Memorial Fund, only fifty copies were left 
for sale, and of these not more than half remain unsold. The book is printed 
in the best style, and many tine portraits and other encravincs illustrate it. 
There are twenty-three portraits. Those of six of the eleven proprietors have 
fac-similes of their autographs as they appear on an old deed. The celebration 
was a very interesting occasion, and the proceedings are fully detailed iu this 
book. The Centennial Oration was bv Rev. Lewis R. Eoote, D.D., the Historical 
Address was by the editor, Marcius D. Raymond, and the Centennial Poem was 
by Philo L. Hatch, M.D. 

The second book, whose title is given above, is an account of "Washington's 
connection with Tarrytown, N. Y., from his arrival there in the campaign of 
1776 to his last visit to the place in 1783. Much of romantic interest is found in 
this narrative, which is an interesting addition to our local history. 

History of Westminster, Massachusetts (first named Xarraaanset Xo. 2), from the 
date of the Original Grant of the Township to the Present Time— 1728-1893. 
With a Biographic-Genealogical Register of its Principal Families. By William 
Sweetzer Heywood. Lowell. Mass. : Vox Populi Press, S. W. Huse & Co. 
1803. 8vo. pp. xvi.+9G3. Price SI. 50. 

This bulky volume of nearly one thousand paces, by one of the members of 
our Society, is a vast storehouse of information relating to the history of West- 
minster. All the topics which are looked for in a town history are taken up and 
satisfactorily treated of. The wars with the Indians, with the French, the mother 
country, and the seceding states, are fully narrated, as are also the ecclesiastical, 
educational, literary and social history of the place. The biography of natives 
and residents receives due attention. Much statistical information is given. 
Genealogy has. a liberal share of the book, about four hundred and fifty paces, 
nearly, one half of the volume, being devoted to a " Biotrraphic-Genealoglcai 
Record.'" The work seems to be compiled with care, judgment and cood taste, 
and is well indexed. The engravings are of a high orde'r and are numerous, 
consisting of two maps, seventeen portraits, and twenty-five landscapes, dwel- 
lings, etc. We congratulate the citizens of the town on havinc so satisfactorv 
a history. 



1894.] Boole Notices. 99 

Tlie Poor-Poore Family Gathering at Peabody, Mass., September 10, IS 90. 

Salem: Printed at the Saiem Tress, 1803. Pamphlet. Svo. pp. o2. 

This was the fourth triennial re-union of this family, and its proceedings 
are recorded in these 'well-printed pa^es, which contain, besides, obituaries of 
deceased members aud a list of attendance, exhibiting relative kinship. 

The secretary, Dr. Alfred Poore, of Salem, has been gathering, for the last 
fifty years, material for a Poor-Poore Genealogy, of which the first velnrae 
was published in royal quarto, entitled John Poore and his F/mily. Salem : 1SS1. 
The industrious devotion illustrated in long travels and much correspondence 
expended in the preparation of this initial volume, suggested the formation of an 
association, as likely to prove valuable in accuracy of statistics, and agreeable 
in bringing into pergonal acquaintance widely-scattered individuals of the race. 
Such an association was formed in 1SS1 and its benefits have been apparent. 
The fruits of organization are distributed after every meeting in printed records 
like the present. 

Dr. Poore, in 1858, published Researches of the Merrimack Valley, chiefly pre- 
senting the genealogy of Richard Bailey, of Rowley, a maternal ancestor. To 
that was added a department of Notes and Queries relating to the Merrimack 
Valley, and double-columned pa;res of Passing Events, Marriages, Deaths, etc. 
The enterprise deserved a better success than it received, antedating, as it did, 
all similar publications, except the Register. 

•By Geo. A. Gordon, A.M., of Somen Me, Mass. 

The Massachusetts Society of the Sor.s of the American Revolution, with the Xa- 
tional and State Constitutions, 1893. Printed by the Rockwell and Churchill 
Press, Boston, Mass. 1S93. 8vo. pp. 172. Copies of this volume can be 
purchased of William B. Clarke & Co.. 3-10 Washington Street, Boston, price 
§2; by mail $2.12. 

The Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, who issue 
this volume, *is a branch of the National Society of "Washington. The constitu- 
tions of both societies are given. Brief sketches of the ancestors of members 
of the Massachusetts society are given, with the descent of each from " some 
ancestor who with unfailing loyalty rendered material aid to the cause of 
American Independence, as a soldier or as a seaman, or a civil officer in oue 
of the several colonies or States, or ,of the United Colonies, or States as a 
recognized patriot." 

The book is handsomely printed, aud is illustrated by fine eugravings. 

Brampton Sketches: Old-Time Xew Ennland Life. By Mary B. Claflin. New 

York: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. 1S93.. 12mo. 

Brampton is another name for the town of Hopkinton, Mass., and the sketches 
are of events transpiring in that locality. The author reproduces the old-time 
meeting house, school house, doctor, lawyer, minister, peculiar characters and 
queer people. The pen pictures are pleasantly drawn. The illustrations, to- 
gether with the excellent typography, make it an attractive contribution to the 
literature of a by-gone period in New-England life. 

By Hon. Charles Carleton Coffin, A.M., of Boston. 

A Slight Sketch of the Life of Caleb Dacis Bradhe, D.D., Pastor (pro tern.) of 
Christ Church, Longicood." By E. R. L., a graduate of Boston University. 
Boston: Printed, not published. 1893. Svo. pp. 18. 

Dr. Bradlee, whose life is here sketched, has held the offices of corresponding 
and recording secretary of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society, and 
is the author of " Sermons for All Sects" noticed by us in January, 1889, and 
other publications. His life has been a very useful one, and his ministerial, 
literary, historical and philanthropic labors are well told in the pamphlet before 
us. The author, we are informed, is Miss E. R. Lynch of Boston. 

Christ Church, Cambridge: Some Account of its History and Present Condition. 

Especially prepared for Visitors. Cambridge. 1893. Fcp. ito. pp. 88. 

This historical account of Christ Church in Cambridge is by Mr. Samuel F. 
Batcheldm* of that city. It contains much valuable and interesting matter rela- 
tive to this church which was organized in 1759. It is printeu in fine style and 
seems to be carefully compiled. 






. 









. 100 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

Records of the lie/armed Dutch Churches of Hackensack and Schraalenburgh, New 
Jersey. With the Registers of Members, Marriages, Baptisms and the Consis- 
tories to the beginning of the Nineteenth Century. 
Part I. Being the Records in possession of the Church of Hackensack, JV. J. 

Printed for the Society. 1391. Royal Svo. pp. xxiii.-f-349. 
Part IT. Being the Records in possession of the (South) Church of Schraalen- 
burgh, Ni J. Printed for the Society. 1691. Royal 8vo. pp. vi.+387. 
The two handsome volumes are the first issues of the Collections of the Hol- 
land Society of New York, founded in 18S5. Soon after the organization of 
this Society, we are told in the Preface, "The attention of the trustees was 
called to the importance of securing copies of the records of the ancient Dutch 
churches of the country. If only for the purpose of tracing the lineage of the 
descendants of the early Dutch settlers, these records are of great value. The 
practice of baptizing their children within a very few days of their birth, was 
almost universal with members of the Dutch Church; and as the baptismal 
records usually contain, in addition to the father's name, the maiden name of 
the mother, they afford peculiar aid to the genealogist. Additional value is 
given to the marriage records by the fact that they frequently mention the birth- 
places of the several parties." 

"Family names," we are told in the Introduction, "were not common among 
the Dutch immigrants. Persons of the same baptismal names were disting- 
uished from each other iu various ways." Sometimes by their trades, as Jan 
Kuyper (John the cooper) ; sometimes by the place of birth or residence, as 
Jan Van Wyck (John from Wyck) j and at other times by affixing the father's 
baptismal name with the addition of s. se, or sen, indicating the relationship, 
as Jan Pieters or Fietersen (John the son of Peter). This makes the study of 
Dutch genealogy very difficult. 

The Holland Society has acted wisely in devoting the two parts of the first 
volume of {he Collections to the records of baptisms and marriages of two of 
the early Dutch churches, of which fortunately a large portion are preserved to 
the present time, 
The books are well printed, on fine paper, and are thoroughly indexed. 

The Story of Mt. Benedict. By B. F. DeCosta. Somerville Citizen Press. 8vo. 

pp. 14. Pamphlet. 

The author writes of scenery familiar to his boyhood and of events in which 
a member of his family was associated. The narrative very clearly shows the 
steps taken to suppress this early attempt to establish a convent under the very 
shadow of Bunker Hill; the community, in its rage against popery, incurring a 
debt for a succeeding generation to pay with interest. A view of the convent 
building is reproduced with au impossible background. The site, historically 
known as Ploughed Hill, will soon be level with the adjacent streets, and the 
convent with the canal will live only in history. This little pamphlet, for its 
accuracy and faithfuiuess, will possess a greater value to the future antiquarian 
than its modest dimensions would warrant. 

By Geo. A. Gordon, A.A[., of Somerville. 

Some Old Puritan Love-Letters — John and Margaret Winthrop. 1618-1638. 

Edited bv Joseph Hopkixs Twichell. New York : Dodd, Mead & Company. 

1893. 12mo. pp. 187. Price $2. 

These letters of Gov. Johu Winthrop and his wife Margaret, daughter of Sir 
John Tindal, give us a good idea not only of the love letters of the Puritans at 
the time of the settlement of the Massachusetts Colony, but they also furnish 
much insight into the social condition of the Puritans of Old England and New 
at that period. Mr. Twichell has performed a good work in collecting, editing 
and printing these letters for the instruction of the New-England people of 
to-day. They make a handsome volume. 

Personal Recollections of John G. Whittier. By Mary B. Claflix. New York: 

Thomas Y. Crowell £ Co. 1893. 16mo. Price 75 cents. 

It is a small but beautifully printed volume. The poet Whittier was a fre- 
quent visitor in the home of the author, who has brought together her recollec- 
tions of many pleasant hours. It is a welcome contribution. 

By Hon. Charles Carleton Coffin, A.M., of Boston. 



1894.] ' Recent Publications. 101 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS, 

Presented to the New-England Historic Genealogical Society from Ji'ly. 15 to 
Dec. 1, 1S93. 

Prepared by Walter K. Watxixs, Assistant Librarian. 

I. Publications written or editei 5y Members of the Society. 

Brief History of the Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society. By the Secre- 
tary, Henry EL Sprague. Boston : Little, Brown & Co. 1S93. Roval 8vo. pp. 
183. 

The Cable Family. By Charles E. Banks, M.D. Svo. pp. 6. 

Diocese of Massachusetts. The Enlargement of its' Diocesan Library. By 
Rev. Edmund F. Siafter, D.D. Boston. 1893. 8vo. pp. 8. 

Thomas Vcnner, the Boston Wine Cooper and Fifth Monarchy Man. By 
Charles E. Banks, M.D. Boston. 189,3. Svo. pp. S. 

Antoine L'Espenard, the French Hugenot of NewRochelle. Bv Gen. Charles 
W. Darling, A.M. New York. 1893. 8vo. pp. 20. 

Land Transfer Reform. By John T. Hassam. Boston. 1S93. 8vo. pp. 12. 

Col. Thomas Gilbert, the Leader of New England Tories. By John C. Crane. 
Worcester. 1893. 8vo. pp. 19. 

The Haines Arms. By Andrew M. Haines. 12mo. pp. 12. 

Waterloo : The Campaign and Battle. By J. Watts" de Peyster. New York. 
1893. 8vo. pp. 32. 

America. The Study of Nations, &c. 1893. Svo. pp. 22. 

The Episcopal Address. By Rt. Rev. William Stevens Perry. 1893. Svo. 
pp. 11. 

Memorial Address, 30 May, 1S92. By Frank W. Hackett. 1893. 8vo. pp. 12. 

Bi-ceutenniai Souvenir of Newcastle," N. H., by Chester B. Curtis. Historical 
Address, by Frank W. Hackett. Concord, N. H. 1893. 8vo. pp. 51. 

Memoir of Jeremiah Colburn, A.M. By John Ward Dean, A.M. Boston. 
1893. 8vo. pp\ 11. 

Memoir of William Henry Montague. By John Ward Dean. Boston. 1S90. 
8vo. pp. 14. 

Address in Presentation of College Charter and Keys. By Joseph F. Tuttle. 
Crawfordsville. 1893. Svo. pp. 16. 

The Congregational Year-Book, 1893. (Henry A. Hazen, D.D.). Boston. 
1893. Svo. pp. 438. 

Leifs House in Vineland. By Eben Norton Horsford. Graves of the North- 
men. By Cornelia Horsford, Boston. 1893. 4to. pp. 40. 

Bills of Mortality, 1810-1849. City of Boston. Bv William H. Whitmore. 
With an Essay on the Vital Statistics of Boston from*1810 to 1841. By Lemuel 
Shattuck. Boston. Printed for the Registry. 1893. 8vo. pp. xliii.-f-S7. 

Statistics of Comb-making in Leominster, 1852. By Caleb C. Field, M.D. 
Withan Introduction by Samuel A. Green, M.D. Worcester. 1893. 8vo. pp. 14. 

The Poor-Poore Family Re-union, 10 SeDtember, 1S90. Salem. 1893. 8vo. 
pp. 61. 

II. Other Publications. 

Collections of the Holland Society of New York. Vol. I. Part 1. Hacken- 
eack Church Records. Part 2. Schraalenburgh Church Records. Printed for 
the Society. 1891. Royal Svo. pp. xxiu.-f-349 and vi.-(-387. 

Iowa City, a Contribution to the Eaiiv History of Iowa. By Benjamin F. 
Shambaugti, M.A. Iowa City. 1893. Svo. pp. 116. 

Statistics of Public Libraries in the United States and Canada. By Weston 
Flint. Washington. 1893. Svo. pp. xiii.-f-213. 

Cayuga County Historical Society Collections. Number Ten. Auburn, N. Y. 
1893. 8vo. pp. 57. 

History of the Medford High School. Bv Charles Cummings. Boston. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 37. 

Farewell Discourse by Rev. C. R. Eliot, Minister of the First Parish, Dor- 
chester. Boston. 1893. Svo. pp. 12. 

The Eastport Sentinel. A Historical Sketch, 18 18-1893. Eastport. 1693. 
4to. pp. 21. 

Salem at the World's Columbian Exposition. Salem. 1893. Svo. pp. 56. 



102 Recent Publications. [Jan. 

Benjamin Franklin and the University of Pennsylvania. "Washington. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 450. 

Historical and Scientific Society of Manitoba. Annual Report for 1892. The 
Social Customs and Amusements in the Early Days in the lied River Settlement 
and Rupert's Land. "Winnipeg. 1893. 8vo. pp. 23 and pp. 7. 

History of Higher "Education in Ohio. By George W. Knight and John R. 
Commons. Washington. 1891. Svo. pp. 258. 

The Proceedings and Transactions of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science. 
Halifax. 1892. 8vo. pp. 132. 

The United Empire Lovalists. By Rev. W. A. Ravmoud, M.A. Saint Stephen, 
N. B. 1893. Svo. pp. 46. 

Sir Edmund Andros. By Henry Ferguson, M.A. Svo. pp. 30. 

Past and the Present of Steam Navigation on Long Island Sound. By Henry 
Whittemore. New York. 1893. 8vo". pp. 71. 

Papers and Reports preseuted to the Connecticut Historical Society at the 
Annual Meeting of the Society, May 23, 1893. Hartford. 1893. Svo. pp. 49. 

Seventh Annual Report of the Society for the History of the Germans in 
Maryland, 1S92-1893. Baltimore. 1S93. Svo. pp. 83. 

Minutes of the General Association of the Congregational and Presbyterian 
Churches of New Hampshire. Bristol, N. H. 1893. Svo. pp. 100. 

Two Hundredth Anniver.sarv of the First Congregational Church, Old Lyme, 
Conn., 1093-1893. By Rev. Arthur Shirley. Lyme. 1893. Svo. pp. 17. 

Manual of the Cavuga Countv Historical Society, 1876-1893. 1893. Svo. 
pp. 30. 

Proceedings of the New-Ensrland Methodist Historical Society, 16 January, 
1S93. Boston. -1S93. 8vo. pp. 35. 

Vermont. A Glimpse of its Scenery and Industries. By Victor J. Spear. 
Montpelier. 1893. Svo. pp. 64. 

Capt. Samuel Smedley of Fairfield, Conn. By Arthur D. Osborne. 8vo. 
pp. 11. 

Tho Origin and Progress of Boston University. Boston. 1893. 8vo. pp. 64. 

American Loyalty, Washington Founder, Webster Expounder of the Federal 
Constitution. By Henry R. Jackson, LL.D. Savannah, Ga. 1893. Svo. pp. 37. 

By-laws of the Historical Society of Watertown. Watertown. 1893. 12mo. 
pp. 15. 

A Slight Sketch of the Life of Caleb Davis Bradlee, D.D. Boston. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 18. 

The History of Illinois and Louisiana under the French Rule. By Joseph 
Wallace. Cincinnati. 1893. 8vo. pp. ix.+433. 

General George H. Thomas. A Critical Biography bv Donn Piatt, with con- 
cluding chapters by Henry V. Boynton. Cincinnati. 1893. Svo. pp. 658. 

A Souvenir of the Conant Memorial Church. Printed for Hezekiah Conant. 
Boston. 1893. 8vo. pp. xi.-fl.30. 

War of the Rebellion Official Records. Washington. 1893. Vol. XLI. Part 
IV., pp. 1310. Vol. XLII. Part I., pp. 1125. Atlas Parts XVII. to XX. 

Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Mrs. David Hewes. San 
Francisco. 1893. Svo. pp. 42. 

Collections of the Surrey Archaeological Society. Vol. XL Pfc. II. London. 
1893. 8vo. pp. 285. 

Transactions and Reports of the Nebraska State Historical Society. Vol. V. 
Lincoln, Neb. 1893. 8vo. pp. 295. 

The Medical Register of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Vol. XXXI. 
William T. White^ M.D., Editor. New York. 1893. 12mo. pp. cliv.-f-334. 

Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada for the year 
1892. Vol. X. Ottawa. 1893. 4to. 

Worcester Town Records, 1811-1816. Edited by Franklin P. Rice. Worces- 
ter. Society of Antiquity. 1891. 8vo. 



Genealogies. — The following genealogical works have been presented to the 
Society, and notices of them will appear in the April number: — 

The Treat Family : A Genealogv of Trott, Tratt and Treat for Fifteen Gen- 
erations and Four Hundred and Fifty Years in England and America. Contain- 
ing more than Fifteen Hundred Families in America. By John Harvey Treat, 
A.M. Salem, Mass. : The Salem Press Publishing and Printing Company. 1893. 
Royal Svo. pp. xii.-f 637. 



1894.] - Deaths. 103 

Armorial General de France de D'Hozier (Complement). Notice Ge'nealogi- 
que sur la Fauulle Sohier de Vermadois. Paris : Librairie de Firmin-Didot et 
Cie. 1884. Folio pp. 55. 

The Plumbs. 1635-1800. By H. B. Plumb. Perly, Luzerne County, Pa. : 
Second Edition. 1893. Oblong folio, pp. 102. 

Launceiot Granger of Newbury, Mass., and Suffield, Conn. A Genealogical 
History. By James N. Granger. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Case, Lock- 
wood <jc Brainard Company. 1893. 8vo. pp. 587. Price §7.50; bv mail §7.86; 
to be obtained of the author, 42 Falls St., Niagara Fails, N. Y. ' 

Memorial of Jpsi&h Kendall, one of the First Settlers of Sterling, Mass., and 
of Some of his Ancestors and of his Descendants. By Oliver Kendall. Provi- 
dence : Printed by the Author. 1884. 4to. pp, xviii.-4-135. Only 120 copies 
printed. Price §3 in cloth, or si in half morocco. 

A Frisian Family. The Bauta Geuealogy. By Theodore M. Bauta. New 
Fork. 189'3. Royal 8vo. pp. xiii.+412. 

A Record of the Ancestry and Kindred of the Children of Edward Thomp- 
kins, Sr. Printed for the Compiler. 1893. Royal 8vo. pp. 65. 

Early Wills illustrating the Ancestry of Harriot Collin. By her grandson. 
"William S. Appleton. Boston: Press of David Clapp & Son. 1893." 8vo. pp. 
86. 

The Felt Genealogy. A Record of the Descendants of George Felt of Casco 
Bay. Compiled by John E. Morris. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Case, 
Lockwood £ Brainard Company. 1893. 8vo. pp. 567. 

History of Clare and the Daleassian Clans of Tippexary, Limerick and Galway. 
By the Very Rev. B. White, P.P., V.G. Dublin : M. H. Gill & Son, 50 Upper 
O'Connell Street. 1S93. 8yo. pp. 398. 

The History of the Allison Family in Europe and America, A. D. 1135 to 1893. 
By Leonard Allison Morrison. Boston, Mass. : Published by Damrell & Uphani. 
18*93. 8vo. pp. xiv.-f-312. 

A Genealogical History of the Gallup Family of the United States. By John 
D. Gallup, Agawam, Mass. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Hartford Printing 
Company. 1893. 8yo. pp. 329. 

The History of Edward Pool a of Weymouth, Mass., and his Descendants. By 
Murray Edward Poole, A B. Press of the Ithaca Democrat. 1893. 8vo. op. 
164. 

Notes of the Family of Kin?, 'of West Hall, Dorset. Bv Charles Herbert 
Mayo, M.A., R.D. December," 1893. J. A. & S. T. Sawtell, Printers, Sher- 
burne. 8vo. pp. 12. 

Family Records. Parker— Pond— Peck. By Edwin Pond Parker, D.D. 
1636-1892. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Com- 
pany. 1S92. 8vo. pp. 51. 

Collections relating to the Family of Trotman. Edited by W. P. W. Fhille- 
more. Printed for Private Circulation by John White, Stroud, Gloucestershire. 
1892. Svo. pp. 76. 

The Pedigree of Robert Barciay-Allardiee, Heir Apparent of Line of Prince 
David Stuart, Earl Palatine of Strathearn, the Earls of Monteith and Airth. 
Lords Graham of Kilpont and Kilbryde: and the Families of Barclay of Mathers 
and Ury, and Allardice of Allardice. 1892. Broadside, 17 by 48 inches. 



DEATHS. 

Mr.WnxiAM Winters, of Waltham Abbey. Telegraph for Waltham Abbey, Cheshunt 

in Es*ex, England, a writer on local and Districts" July 28, 1893. This 

ana family history, and perhaps the obituary is chiefly compded from that 

best known inhabitant of that ancient newspaper. The ancestors of Mr. 

town; died there on Sunday, July 23, Winters's father, he thinks, settled at 

1893, in his 59th year. His father, an Cambridge, and were known chiefly as 

Bgncultnral laborer, died when he was humble, godly people. About the close 

two years old, and he was bred under of the last century his grandfather re- 

t.ic ron-t discouraging circumstances. moved to the village of Walkern, Herts, 

feme time before Mr. Winters died he In this village Mr. Winter* was bom on 

prepared nn autobiography, extracts Tuesday morning, August 31, 1S34. 

from which are printed in " The Weekly When he was four years old his mother 



104 



Deaths. 



[Jan. 



married Mr. W. Perry of Waltham 

Abbey. In this town he attended school 
till he was eight years of age, when he 
went to work in a silk printing factory 
in Waltham, far some time alternating 
between the factory and school. After- 
wards he obtained employment In the 
Entield Gun Factory, where he worked 
two years and a half. From En held he 
went to work for a neighboring farmer, 
and for five years was employed in 
looking after cattle, during which time 
he never had one day's holiday. 

"When he was about twenty years of 
age he obtained employment in the 
Royal Gunpowder Factory at Waltham 
Abbey, where he remained twelve years. 
"While thus employed he devoted him- 
self to study, and endeavored in some 
degree to make up for the deficiencies 
of his early years. 

In 1876 he became pastor of the 
"Ebenezer Baptist Chapel, Fountain 
Square, which was founded on strict 
aud particular Baptist principles." lie 
had previously been a member and a 
deacon of this ' congregation, and he 
served as pastor uutil within a few 
months of his death, when the disease 
which ended his days first developed 
symptoms of paralysis. He became a 
member ^of the Essex Archaeological 
Society in 1871, and a Fellow of the 
Royal Historical Society in 1874. 

On the 26th of June, 18-57, he married 
Miss Mary Maynard, the eldest daugh- 
ter of James and Mary Maynard, then 
of London. Later on he purchased the 
bookselling and stationery business of 
his wife's grandfather, Mr. W. Maynard, 
who carried on that business for forty 
years under the shadow of '.he Old 
Abbey Church, Waltham, where the 
remainder of his life, up to within a few- 
weeks of his death, was passed. His 
success in this business was so great 
that in a few years he was able to give 
up his connection with the Gunpowder 
Factory. Much of his time during the 
latter part of his life was devoted to 
literary and antiquarian studies. He 
contributed to the Register for April, 
1874 (vol. 29, p. 170), an article on 
•'The Pdgrims of Nazing," and to the 
number for October. I88i (vol. 39, p. 
36-5), one on the "Eliot Family." The 
articles contain much genealogical mat- 
ter relating to families which emigrated 
from Nazing to New England, par- 
ticularly that to which John Eliot the 



Apostle to the Indians belonged. In 
1882 he published a pamphlet entitled 
"Memoirs of the Pilgrim Fathers John 
Eliot and his Friends of Xazing and 
Waltham Abbey" (Svo. pp. 88). In 
ISS.j he published "Our Parish Regis- 
ters of Waltham Holy Cross " (12 mo.). 
He also wrote: Visitors' Handbook of 
Waltham Holy Cross, 1870 ; Visitors' 
Handbook of Cheshunt ; The Life and 
Writings of A. M. Topiady, 1S72 ; an 
account of the musical talent of the 
Wesley family, 1874 ; Biographical 
Notes on John Foxe, the Martyrologist ; 
Boy Life or Early Struggles of Great 
Men ; a small work on the Immortality 
of the Soul ; and many other books 
and pamphlets. 

Mr. Winters was buried, not in the 
Churchyard of the Abbey near which 
he had so long lived and labored ; 
but this having been closed to all 
burials, his body rests, in hope, in the 
New Cemetery, a short distance south- 
east of the town, yet within sound of 
the bells of the old" Abbey, as they peal 
forth the hours and quarters, or sum- 
mon worshippers withiu its walls. 

There is an excellent likeness of Mr. 
Winters in a periodical entitled "The 
Earthen Vessel and Gospel Herald " for 
January, 1891, of which he was the 
editor." Ellsworth Eliot, M.D., of New 
York city, to whom we are indebted for 
some of the facts in this obituary, visited 
him last year, and he writes me : " I 
could not but notice the great respect 
which was shown him by numerous 
persons." 

Hon. William Wirt Virgix, Judge of the 
Supreme Judicial Court of Maine, died 
in Portland, Maine, January 23, 1893, 
aged 69 years, 4 months and 5 days. 
His wife and one son, Harry R. Virgin, 
Esq., of the Cumberland Co. bar, sur- 
vive him. 



Mrs. Elizabeth C. YorxG, of Medford, 
Mass., died in that city August 21, 
1893, aged 88 years and 8 months. She 
was a daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
(Dudley) Rumrill, and the widow of 
George Young. Her mother was Sarah, 
daughter of William* and Sarah (Wil- 
liams) Dudley. 5 William Dudley was 
descended from Gov. Thomas 1 Dudley, 
through Gov. Joseph, 3 William, 3 and 
Thomas, 4 his father. 



Errata.— Page 76, 1. 19, for Cather Smith read father Smith ; 1. 23, for Roger's 
Rangers read Rogers's rangers. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 105 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

By Hbnb.y F. Waters, A.M. 
[Continued from Vol. xlvii., page 532.] 

Thomas Boylson citizen and clothworker of London, 1 July 1643, 
proved 19 August 16-18. I do intend and purpose to settle a sermon or 
lecture within the parish church of Burton upon Trent in the County of 
Staff, upon the third day in every week forever, to be preached by an able, 
learned aud Orthodox preacher of the Protestant Religion, to begin about 
cine of the clock in the forenoon, and for maintenance of the same have 
delivered into the hands of the Right Worshipful Company of Cloth- 
workers, whereof I am a member, the sum of eight hundred pounds. 
They shall make a yearly payment of one aud thirty pounds and four shil- 
lings for the maintaining of the said sermon &c. and to the Clerk or Sex- 
ton sixteen shillings per annum for his attendance and toleing of the bell 
for the said Lecture. In case the said Lecture be not continued, with an 
Orthodox divine minister of the Protestant Religion, according to my 
desire, the one half of the said yearly payment shall be yearly paid to the 
Treasurer of Christ's Hospital, for the better maintenance of the poor children 
harbored in the. said Hospital, and the other half to the use of the poor of 
the said Company of Clothworkers &c. To my nephew John Boylson 
(whom in another clause he describes as Minister of Wesson) my lands, 
tenements &c. in Ansley in the parish of Rolleston, Staff., his mother to 
receive the rents during her Widowhood and have her habitation in the 
dwelling house there. To my nephew Henry Boylson, brother of said 
John, my lands aud tenements &c. called Lawrence Hey, in Rollston afore- 
said. To Richard Boylston my messuage wherein I now dwell, in Fan- 
church Street London, out of which he shall pay to my old maid Margery, 
during her life, a yearly sum of ten pounds, by fifty shillings a quarter. I 
give to my sister in law, widow of John Boylson deceased, five pounds. To 
my sister Jane Cotehett, widow, at Burton, fifty pounds. To my sister 
Katherine Jackson twenty pounds. To my brother Jackson, her husband, 
five pounds. To my kinsman Samuel Brackley and his wife one hundred 
pounds and to their daughter thirty pounds. To the sons of my said brother 
John deceased I give as followeth, viz' to Edward Boylston, who was mine 
apprentice, five hundred pounds, so as he discharge his brother Thomas 
Boylson, pewterer, of all such money as he now oweth unto him, otherwise 
so much abated out of the five hundred; to the said Thomas three hundred 
pounds over and above that whieh is to be abated out of the said five hun- 
dred pounds, and the lease of the house wherein he dwelleth,in Fanchurch 
Street. To William Boylson lately apprentice with his brother, the said 
Thomas Boylson pewterer, three hundred pounds. To my kinswoman 
Mary, now wife of William Ball, one hundred pounds and to her husband 
five pounds. To Catharine Boylson one hundred pounds. To Elizabeth 
Boylson one hundred pounds. To Thomas Boylson, son of my brother 
Edward Boylson deceased, and to his wife and children (the said Thomas 
being a bad husband) eight huudred pounds, to remain in my executor's 

VOL. XL VIII- 10 















«T 



10G Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

hands, to be paid &c. in his good discretion. To Thomas Jennings, son of 
Robert Jennings, who was mine apprentice and is now my partner, two 
hundred and fifty pounds, desiring my executor to have a care of him, that 
he be brought up iu the fear of God. My will is that his father, Robert 
Jennings, shall remain partner with the said Edward and Richard Boylsou 
and five years more &c. To the said Robert Jennings fifty pounds. To 
the daughter of my late brother in law Thomas Ducksberry ten pounds. 
To the widow of Thomas Ducksberry, sou of the said Thomas deceased, 
twenty pounds. To her daughter Elizabeth Ducksberry, which lived with 
me, fifty pounds. To her other daughter, Mary Ducksberry, thirty pounds. 
To the widow of William Hewes five pounds. To Margaret Gooday, for 
herself and her son George, thirty pounds. To the widow of Daniel Hewes 
five pounds. To the Parish fifty pounds. To the said John Boylson one 
hundred pounds and to his wife twenty pounds. To the said Richard 
Boylson one hundred pounds. The rest and residue of my personal estate 
to my said kinsman Richard Boylsou and I make him sole executor. I 
name and entreat my loving friends M r Thomas Burnell and Mr. Talbot 
Fitch to be overseers, and give to the first twenty pounds and to the other 
ten pounds. 

A codicil was added 17 July 1G48. Essex, 128. 

Jaxe Breare of London, widow, 29 May 1665, proved 15 June 1665. 
Reference to a debt of two hundred pounds due by bond from one Jonathan 
Newton. Testatrix indebted to cousin Thomas Blamer one hundred and 
sixteen pounds. To my uncle Thomas Boylstone and to Katherine his 
wife ten pounds apiece. To my cousins Elizabeth Smith and Anne Boyl- 
stoue, daughters of the said Thomas Boylstone and Katherine his wife, ten 
pounds apiece. I have a bond from my father John Butten for payment of 
two hundred and fifty pounds. Out of it I give to my sister Mary Butten 
one hundred and fifty pounds and to my sister Katherine Butten one hun- 
dred pounds. I give to my father my silver tankard and six silver spoons 
and to my mother, Katherine Butten my diamond ring. To Jane Rycroft 
twenty shillings. To John Marshall and Nicholas Beebee ten shillings 
apiece. To John Becke five shillings. The said Jane Rycroft, John Mar- 
shall, Nicholas Beebee and John Becke being the servants of the said 
Thomas Boylstone. To the said Ann Boylston, my cousin, my gold ring 
enamelled with blue. The residue to my uncle Thomas Boylstone, whom 
I make sole executor &c. Hyde, 60. 

Thomas Boylston, citizen and cooper of London, 11 July 1668. proved 
7 December 1668. My body to be buried at the discretion of wife Kath- 
erine, whom I make sole executrix, and she shall bestow but one hundred 
pounds upon my funeral. My wife shall receive the rents &c. of my mes- 
suage or tenement, with the yard, garden &c, wherein I now dwell, and the 
rents &c. of the tenement now in the occupation of Robert Dix, in the 
parish of St. Gabriel Fauchurch in London, which I lately purchased of 
Sir John Lee, until my son Allen Boylston shall attain the full age of one 
and twenty years, towards the maintenance of herself and my said 'son ; 
and, after he shall attain his said age, then the full moiety of the said mes- 
suage &c. wherein I now dwell unto my said wife, so long as she shall re- 
main my widow, for her own habitation, with her family only. The other 
moiety I give to my sou Allen Boylstoo. I give so much of the said mes- 
suages &c. whereof I am seized in fee simple, immediately after the de- 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 107 

termination of the estate and estates hereby given unto my said wife, unto 
my son Samuel and my daughter Anne Boylston forever, to be parted and 
divided betwixt them, and so much as I hold by lease I give to them dur- 
ing my lease. (Other property in the same parish bequeathed.) I give to 
my wife Catherine the rents &c. of my messuages, lands <fcc. which I pur- 
chased of my brother Henry Boylston, being iu the City of Lichfield, and 
of a house and land at or near Fenny Stratford in Bucks which I bought of 
one John Sotners, until my daughter Anne attain her full age of one and 
twenty or be married. After that I give them to Anne. In the event of 
the said three children dying before attaining full age &c. I give my said 
messuages &c. to my daughter Elizabeth Smyth and all her children, she 
to pay to my said brother Henry Boylston one thousand pounds. The per- 
sonal estate to be divided into three equal parts (according to the Custom 
of the City of London) of which one third to my wife another third to my 
said three children, Allen, Samuel and Anne (my said daughter Elizabeth 
Smith having already received her portion upon her marriage) and the 
remaining third is at my own disposing. Then follow certain bequests,, 
among which one to son in law John Smith and Eiizabeth his wife, and to- 
grandchildren John and Thomas Smith and Catherine Smyth, to sister 
Anne Serjeant, to the poor in the Almshouses, belonging to the Company of 
Coopers of London, at Radcliffe, to the poor of Lichfield (on S' Thomas' 
day) and to Francis Rose and John Marshall. Reference to a gift made 
by an aunt Sibell Allen deceased to testator's children and a bond given to- 
cousin Thomas Marshall that this gift shall be discharged. "Wife Catherine 
to be executrix. Hene, 152. 

Thomas Boylston of Bewdley in the Co. of Worcester gen', 29 August 
1667, proved 16 July 1669. I give &c. all my goods &c. to my dear and 
loving wife Alice and make her my sole executrix &c. 

Among the witnesses were Margaret Boylston, Mary Boylston and Su- 
sanna Boylston. Coke, 82. 

Edward Boylston of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch, London, citizen and 
cloth worker of London, 11 December 1675, proved 20 December 1675. 
My body to be buried in the parish church of St. Dionis Backchurch Lon- 
don, in or near the grave of my uncle Mr. Thomas Boylston, there interred.. 
To my sister M™ Sarah Boylston, the widow of my brother Mr. Richard 
Boylston deceased, five hundred pounds. To the eight children which she 
had by my said brother, her late husband, one hundred pounds apiece- To- 
every of the children of my brother Henry Boylston one hundred pounds 
apiece. To every of the children of my sister Elizabeth Wakefield one- 
hundred pounds apieee. To my brother John Boylston, Doctor in Divinity, 
one hundred pounds. To my loving friend John AIsop of St. Dionis, &c, 
scrivener, fifty pounds, and also ten pounds to buy him mourning, to be- 
woru at my funeral. The residue to my friend Thomas StausaH, citizen 
and clothworker of London, whom I appoint sole executor. Dycer, 122. 

[The following extracts are from the Register Book of St. Dionis Eackchurch,. 
Loudon (vol. 3 of the Register Series of the Harleian Society's Publications). 
The wills of the persons whose names are iu italics are printed in this group. 
Chr^teninjrs St. Dionis Backchurch. 
12 Feb. 1C.14 } 5, Thomas son of Edward Boylson. 
30 June una Edward " " 

3 May 1618 John " " 

12 Dec. 1619, Elizabeth dau. " " 



108 " Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Burials. 

11 May 1G21, Anne wife of Edward Boylson buried. 

22 Aug. 1623, Edward Boylsonne buried. 
6 Sept. 1C25, Johu Boylson and Edward Boylsoune, sons of Edward Boyl- 
soune, buried. 

18 Aug. 1648, Thomas Boylston of Fenehurch parish, buried. 

29 Dec. 1675 Edward Boylston, brought from the St. Gabricll Fenehurch, 
buried in the North Isle, 10 feet deep. 

They are evidently the New Eugland family of Boylstons, a pedigree of 
which, by Thomas B. Wyman, is printed in the Register, vol. 7, pp. 145-50. 
Thomas Boylston the ancestor of tne New England family came here in the 
Defence in 1635, aged 20. and settled at Watertown. In a deed dated 26th of the 
5th mo. 1652, he names his kinsman " Richard Boyson," citizen and cloth-worker 
of London. See Suffolk Deeds, vol. i, p. 247. See also Bond's Watertown 
and Wymans Charlestown, under Boylston. — Editor.] 

William Harman of Moore Hall in the parish of Sutton Canfield, in 
the County of Warwick, gen', 1 August 1592, proved 9 October 1592. To 
be buried in Sutton church at the feet of my cousin Francis Atkinson late 
deceased. I have dwelt the most part of my time at Hampton in Arden, 
in the County Warwick. To Thomas Wyrley son to Thomas YVyrley. late 
deceased Esq., and Dorothy his wife, my sister, five pounds. Ellinor At- 
kinson daughter to Thomas Atkinson and Elizabeth his wife, both late de- 
ceased. Abraham Harman alias Cupp my reputed son. 

I give and bequeath unto my " cozenn" Mr. Henry Sewell of Coventrie, 
alderman, four pounds and to Mr. Henry Briers of Coventry, alderman, 
four pouuds, whom I do constitute and make my overseers of this my last 
will and testament. The residue to Sibell Foxall, widow, late wife to 
Richard Foxall of Coventry, mercer, late deceased, whom I make my sole 
executrix &c. Harrington, 177. 

[William Harman, son of Hugh of Morehall : his elder brother John married 
Sibbell Fowler; on his decease she doubtless married Richard Foxall. Their 
sister Dorothy married Thomas Wirley of Hampsted in Staffordshire. 

For the pedigree of this family, see Harleian Society's Vol. XII. Visitation 
of Warwickshire, p. 105. 

Henry Sewall mentioned in the will, married Margaret Grazebrook, daughter 
of Margaret (Keerte) Grazebrook, a greatniece of Hugh Harman, probably by his 
sister Margaret (Harman) Luson; hence the relationship mentioned of cousin. 
See Salisbury Memorial, Ft. 1, p. 156. — Walter K. Wations.] 

William Hall of Borton in the parish of Crepredie, 6 August 1596, 
proved 21 October 1596. My two daughters Joane and Mary Haull. My 
son William Haull. If my wife marry before my son be at the age of 
twenty one years she shall deliver these things before mentioned (certain 
personal property) unto Henry Sewell my brother in law, whom I do will 
shall have the education and bringing up of my said son William from the 
time of her marriage until he shall accomplish the age of twenty one years 
&c. John Haull (a brother). Henry Showell a witness. Drake, 69. 

[William Hall was probably of the Hall family of Oxfordshire, of which a 
partial pedigree of the Banbury branch of the family is given in Harleian 
Society publications, regular series, vol. 5. — W. K. Watklss.] 

Johane Brownell of St. Michael the Archangel, Coventry, widow, 22 
July 1588, proved 22 April 1590. To be buried in the parish church of 
St. Michael near unto my late husband there. My son William. My son 
Sampson Brownell. My sou in law Robert Bagnalde and Margaret his 
wife, my daughter. Their children Elizabeth Bagnalde and Edmoud Bag- 
nalde and the other six, Ellen, Thomas, Wynifred, Robert, Francis and 
Richard. Richard Butler and Elizabeth my daughter. I give to the said 



1894.] Genealogical Gleaningsui England. 109 

Elizabeth my gold ring with five stones fixed in the same and my little 
beer pot gilt. To Richard Butler and Elizabeth their daughter, to either 
of them one silver spoon with a " Lyou " on the end of them and to Rachel 
their daughter five shillings in money. Thomas Salter, my son in law, and 
Sence his wife. Johane their daughter. To my sister Alice Saunders a 
white silver pot with a cover and to Richard Shewell my godson a silver 
spoon with a maiden head upon it; and to Anne Howcott my goddaughter 
a silver spoon with a maiden head upon it. The poor of the said city. To 
my " coo c en " Samuel Saunders a hoop ring of gold with these letters upon 
it T. M. E. I do give and bequeath to my cousin Joice Shewell a hoop 
ring of gold. To the said Robert Bagnalde and Margaret his wife a stone 
pot garnished with silver, with a cover gilt without, a ring of silver and 
gilt about the neck thereof. My will is that my daughter Margaret should 
have the cover of the standing cup which my husband did give her. My 
cousins Richard Saunders, Thomas Saunders, Isabel Saunders and Bridget 
Saunders. My said two daughters Margaret and Elizabeth. My said son 
William Brownell to be full and sole executor. Drury, 24. 

William Sewall of the city of Coventry, vintner, 29 June 1624, 
proved 11 September 1624. To be buried in the parish church of St.. 
Michael's Coventry. . Elizabeth Symes, wife of Thomas Symes of Coven- 
try brasier, and Anne Sewall both natural daughters of me the said William 
Sewall to be mine executors. To Elizabeth my messuage in the High 
Street wherein I now dwell, with the shops thereunto belonging &c. (and 
other property). Reference to a deed, bearing date 17 December 17 
James, made between Samuel Miles of the one part and me the said Wil- 
liam, hj the name of William Sewall of the city of Coventry draper, of the 
other part. To my said daughter Anne the messuage &c. now or lately in 
the tenure of Agnes Dudly, widow, or her assigns (and other property). 
A messuage in Well Street in the tenure of Richard Saunders, baker. 
Samuel Siraes my godson, one of the sons of my son in law Thomas Symes. 
John, Thomas, Ellen and Elizabeth Symes (other) sons and daughters of 
Thomas Symes my son and Ellizabeth his wife. Others. 

I give and bequeath to my brother Henry Sewall and Margaret his wife 
twenty shilllings apiece. To my sister Gibbous, wife of Mr. William Gib- 
bons, to buy her a ring in which my name shall be engraven, forty shillings. 
To my daughter Lucy Tadlowe, wife of Mr. Henry Tadlowe, three pounds 
six shillings eight pence to buy her a cup of plate on which my name shall 
be cut. To the band of Artillery soldiers in Coventry forty shillings to buy 
them powder, to be paid them upon the day of my funeral. Bequests to 
the poor in Bablacke &e. My two kinsmen Henry and Richard Sewall, 
sons of my brother Henry Sewall. Byrde, 79. 

Akthoxy Power of Kenellworth, Warwick, gen*, 21 December 1632, 
proved 1 May 1 633. To Anne Power, my beloved wife, all my right and 
title that I have by virtue of any mortagege &c. to this intent that she shall 
be a good mother to my younger children to raise them portions and that 
my eldest son shall have no hand in the forenamed mortgages. My two 
daughters Hanna and Mary Power. Stephen Power my second son. 
William Power my third son. Anthony Power my fourth son. My brother 
Thomas Power. To Henry Power my eldest son all my inheritance lands 
in Kenellworth and my signet gold ring. Wife Anne to be executrix and 
my friends Thomas Devis and Thomas Wright, both of Kenellworth, yeo- 
men, to be overseers. 

VOL. XL VIII. 10* 






• 



>3Jtod 



110 • Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Commission issued, 1 May 1633, to Richard Sewell, uncle (avunculo) of 
Stephen Power, son and executor of the will of Anne Power deceased who 
while living was relict and executrix of the above Anthony Power de- 
ceased &c. 

Commission issued, 11 May 1640, to Stephen Power (the son) to ad- 
minister de bonis non, Richard Sewell the former administrator being now 
also dead. Russell, 33. 

Anne Power of Kenellworth, Warwick, widow, 15 January 1632. 
William Power my third son. Anthony Power my fourth son. My two 
daughters Manna and Mary Power. My brother in law William Power. 
My two brothers in law Thomas Power and George Hill. Mr. Henry 
Wright, Richard Walton and Elizabeth Ambler. The poor of the Aug- 
mentation. Henry West my brother in law. Mr. Francis Phippes Mr. 
Richard Shewell Mr. Abraham Randall and William Power my brothers 
and dear friends. 

Administration granted, 1 May 1633, to Richard Sewell uncle of Stephen 
Power the natural and lawful son of the deceased during his minority. 
The will was proved 5 February 1638 by Stephen Power the son &c. 

Russell, 39. 

Margaret Randell of the City of Coventry, widow, 4 May 1646 
proved 22 May 16-16. To be buried in the Drapers' Chapel within St. 
Michael's Church, Coventry, near the bodies of my father and mother. My 
nephew Stephen Power. My two nieces, the daughters of my sister Power, 
namely Hannah Lee, the wife of Thomas Lee, and Mary Holbech, the wife 
of Amilian Holbech. My nephew Anthony Power. To my nephew Samuel 
Sewall, son of my brother Richard Sewall, my close or pasture called 
Quarry field, without Newgate on the West side of the Cawsey or pave- 
ment leading from Coventry towards Whitley on the London road. To my 
niece Elizabeth Seires, daughter of my brother Richard Sewall and wife of 
Edmocd Seires, my close &c. on the back side of the said Cawsey. To my 
niece Anne Sewall, daughter of my brother Richard Sewall a tenement on 
the south side of St. Michael's Church. Another tenement to niece Pru- 
dence Sewall, daughter of my said brother Richard. To my nephew Stephen 
Power my parcel of land called Rowley Hill in Stoke, in the County of the 
city of Coventry. The residue to Stephen Power, Hannah Lee Mary Hol- 
bech and Prudence Sewall equally. The said Stephen Power to be sole 
executor. 

John Brownell one of the witnesses. Twisse, 59. 

Stephen Power of Kennelworth, Warwick, gen s , 25 July 1648 proved 
15 May 1655. To my brother in law Thomas Lee of Kennelworth, gent', 
the yearly rent arising out of certain lands near Coventry called Barons 
Fields (in trust). My brother Henry Power. The said Thomas Lee's 
children. The two children of my sister Mary Holbech. My brother Wil- 
liam Power. My uncle Thomas Power. The poor of Kilfmgworth [sic~\ 
aforesaid. My brother Anthony Power. As for my debts owing to me by 
the State of England for arrears due to me for my service as a soldier, being 
two debentures, one of them of two hundred forty five pounds nine shillings 
two pence, the other of thirty seven pounds or thereabouts now in the 
hands or custody of my cousin Valeutiue Hill, I devise and bequeath the 
same as followeth: seven pounds thereof to the said Valentine Hill, twenty 
pounds to William Pynson of Coventry, gen', five pounds to my said uncle 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. Ill 

Power and the rest to my three brothers and two sisters, to be equally 
divided amongst them. I am engaged and stand bound, as surety with the 
said Valentine Hill and for the proper debt of the said Valentine, uuto 
Major Tackington, in the sum of twenty pounds for the payment of ten 
pounds 6zc. My brother Thomas Lee to be sole executor and my brother 
Henry Power and my brother Amiliyou Holbech to be overseers. 

Aylett, 144. 

[The preceding eight wills seem to refer to the Sewall family of Coventry 
(England) to whom the father of Judge Samuel Sewall of Boston and Major 
Stephen Sewall of Salem belonged,. Henry F. Waters. 

William Sewall, whose will is given, was brother of Henry Sewall the Mayor 
of Coventry 15S9 and 160G, who was the great-grandfather of Chief Justice 
Samuel Sewall of Boston. Anne, wife of Anthony Power and mother of 
Stephen Power, was a daughter of Henry Sewall, Mayor of Coventry, as was 
also Margaret wife of Abraham Randall. 

A pedigree of the Sewall family, compiled by Mr. William H. Whitmore, can 
be found on pp. xi. to xxi. of the introduction to the Sewall's Diary, published 
in Mass. Hist. Coll.. Fifth Series, Vol. V. 

Prof. E. E. Salisbury, LL.D.. has also given a pedigree in Vol. I. of the 
Salisbury Memorial, and also referred to these wills. — Walter K. Watkins.] 

William Blande of London gentleman. 31 July 1596, proved 17 Sep- 
tember 1596. My body to be buried at Whitechapel with my two children. 
Two parts of my land of my manor of Tattingston to be sold by my execu- 
trix and all my goods &c. to be sold towards the payment of my debts. My 
debts paid, of the overplus my wife Judith shall have the one moiety, and 
my son William to have the third part and the child that she now goeth 
withall to have, the other fourth part. My wife Judith to be executrix, and 
I do request my brother Thomas to be my overseer. 

Thomas Blande was one of the witnesses. 

Confirmed by sentence diiriuitive the second session of the Paschal Term 
A.D. 1600. Drake, 63. 

Elizabeth Bland, now wife of Thomas Bland of St. Martin's within 
Ludgate, gen 1 ., and late executrix of the last will and testament of Mar- 
garet Smithe my late mother deceased. Will made 19 July 1593 aud proved 
20 July 1593. One hundred pounds to be divided amongst my children 
had by my late husband William Yeardly, gen', deceased, viz' Jasper Yeard- 
ley, Margaret Yeardley, Anne Yeardly, Elizabeth Yeardley and Mary 
Yeardley, to be paid at days of marriage &c. To my brother Michael 
Harrison's children. My sister Sara Sawle. To Alice Haiwarde for her 
pains taken with me. My Aunt Alice Eccles. My husband Thomas 
Bland to be my whole executor. Nevell, 57. 

Thomas Bland of Suudridge, Kent, gen', 18 Nouember 1617, proved 
15 May 1618. The poor of Suudridge and of St. Bennet's near Paul's 
Wharf. The children of my brother John Bland and of my brother Greg- 
ory Bland. My sister Elizabeth Burye and her children. My god daugh- 
ter Judith Gilbie and the children of my sister Gilbie. My god daughter 
Jone Hope. My daughter in law Ellen Lewis, Margaret Bail and Euame 
Whitlatche. My brother Peter Blande and his children. My wife Mary. 
My son George Blande. My daughter Elizabeth Blande. My wife to 
have the occupation and use of the house and lauds which I hold by lease 
of Mrs. Cranwell and her son. My son George to be executor and I do 
nominate as overseers my sons in law William Ball and John Lewis and 
John Blande. To son George my messuages &c. in the parishes of St. 



112 . Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jim. 

Peter's and St. Bennet's near Paul's Wharf, with remainder to the heir 
male of my brother John Blande, and next to my right heirs. My mes- 
suages in Shoreditch to my son George and his son Thomas Blande. John 
Sale referred to. The children of my son in law William Ball. My 
daughter in law Margaret Sale. My son in law Jasper Yardley and my 
daughters in law Elizabeth Cooper and Mary Yardley. 

"Wit. John Blande, Thomas Langhorne, Elizabeth Blande, the mark of 
Raphe Farrington and the mark of Sibbell Farrington, his wife. 

Meade, 47. 

[A pedigree of this family of Bland appears in the Visitation of London, 
1633-4 (Harleian So. Pub., Vol. 1. p, 79). To it evidently belonged the Virginia 
family of that name, and perhaps the Maryland family. The following notes 
relate to these families. The printed Itegisters of the parish of St. Ant holins, 
London (also published by the Harleian Society), give baptisms &.c. of the 
family of John Bland, the father of the Virginians. Henry F. Waters.] 

Jon.v Blaxde of London, grocer, 24 September 1627, proved 20 April 
1632. I will that my body be decently carried to the church betweeu 3 
and 4 clock in the afternoon with some few of my friends and neighbors 
and buried in the parish church of S* Antholin's where I dwell. I will uot 
have above fifty pounds bestowed at the most upon my said burial besides 
mourning for my children and others. Gifts to Christ Hospital and to 
poor prisoners. According to the city of London laws my wife is to have 
the thirds of my estate and the other third my children, and the other third 
is at my dispose. Out of my third I bequeath unto my well beloved wife 
Susan Blande five hundred pounds towards her widowship. If she marry 
then my son Thomas shall have one hundred pounds of it, John fifty aud 
Susan Blande, my daughter, fifty pounds, if unmarried; the rest of the five 
hundred pounds to be divided amongst the rest of my children unmarried, 
by equal portions, at twenty one, the sons and the daughters at eighteen. 
To daughters Anne and Elizabeth Blande twenty pounds apiece over and 
above their parts of the children's third. My wife Susan to allow her 
mother fifteen pounds per annum during life, if she continues a widow, so 
long as her mother liveth. If she chanceth to marry aud her mother living 
then during my mother's life. The five hundred pounds bequeathed to my 
children they shall enjoy till their grandmother be dead and buried. Sous 
Thomas and John and daughter Susan under twenty one. Son in law 
Emanuel! Probie and my daughter Mary Probie. I give and bequeath my 
Ham house, after my wife's decease, among my youngest children resting 
from Edward Blande and so to the youngest, according to a surrender 1 
make in the court for the use of my will. Thomas, John and Susan Blande 
shall allow to their grandmother Mary de Deblere, out of their legacies, 
three pounds per cent per annum, for every hundred pounds so long as she 
shall live; and if they be not of age then their legacies to be put out to use 
and my mother to have three per cent per annum out of it, the rest to be 
towards the bringing them up which are not of years. To Grace Bonde a 
mourning gown. Mr. Robert Edwardes' son Thomas. I give unto all my 
godchildren twenty shillings apiece except Lawrence Lowne'3 daughter and 
Gregory Blande's son or daughter, for Lownes played the knave with me 
and Gregory Blande likewise deceaved me, so they nor theirs shall have one 
penny of mine. To my brother Gillye forty shillings, and to each of his 
children by my sister forty shillings apiece, Judith Lownes not to have any 
thing, the wife of Lawrence Lownes. To Bedlam ten shillings. To St. 
Gregory's Church where I was christened, to make a stock for the poor to 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 113 

buy flax with, five pounds. Similar bequests to St. Antholin'9 church. 
West hum church, Aldermary church, St. Stephen's church, Coleman St., 
for the purchase of flax to spin or woollen yarn to knit. Johane Lang- 
borne, my cousin Thomas Langhorne's daughter, Susan Northers and 
Frances Langhorne. To my son Thomas Bland my gold seal ring with 
my arms upon it. To John my silver mark to seal letters with. My 
cousin Samuel Bland. My cousin William Blande's children and my 
cousin Mary ; his late wife. My cousin George Blaude and Thomas, his 
son. Elizabeth my cousin Holrawood and each of her children. My sister 
Burie. Edward Burye. Margaret Everett, my sister's daughter. Cousin 
Rosse, my sister's daughter. Elizabeth Burye, my sister's daughter. (All 
referred to as sisters of cousin Burye.) The Lady Ilarbert, my niece, and 
each of her children. My cousin Robert Brawler and his wife and daugh- 
ter. Thomas Northey, Mr. Isaac Jones, Mr. William Cookaine, John 
Duckett, Mr. Isaac Pennington, the Trinity House for old sailors. The 
executors to be my loving wife Susan and Thomas my son and John my 
second son, and the overseers to be my son in law Emanuel Probye, my 
cousin Samuel Blande Robert Edwardes and Thomas Northey. 

Audley, 44. 

John Bland of London merchant, 3 May 1680, proved 23 June 1680. 
I do give and bequeath all the jewels plate and household stuff belonging 
to me to my dear wife Sarah Bland, feeling no greater grief under my 
many adversities and infirmities I now labor under than her necessary 
abseuce in Virginia about my unhappy affairs and estates there, she having 
"bin" the principal comfort of my past life and by her exemplary virtue, 
discretion, affliction (sic), prudence and patience having deserved much 
more from me than I am able to gi'-'e, being worthy of my whole confidence 
and entire trust, which nevertheless by reason of the great distance she is 
now at and the many contingencies and accidents which may happen thereby 
I do think fit by a conjunction with her to commit to my choicest friend 
Thomas Povey Esquire, one of the Masters of Requests to the King's 
Majesty, who best understands all my affairs, interests and intentions, I do 
therefore make and constitute my said dear wife Sarah Bland and my said 
worthy friend Thomas Povey to be the executors &c. Many years since I 
purchased a house &c. at Tangier and have laid out upon it several con- 
siderable sums of money for the improvement thereof. It has been taken 
and seized upon in my absence and without my privity by the Governor 
there and is still possessed and applied to the service of his Majesty, for 
which I have not yet obtained satisfaction &c. This entrusted to Thomas 
Povey. All other lands and tenements &c. to the two executors, who are 
to raise money to pay the debts I shall be found to owe and a competent 
provision for my daughter in law Frances Bland and my grandson John 
Bland, her son, yet being in his infancy. 

The first grant of probate was made, as above, to Thomas Povey, power 
reserved for Sarah Bland, the widow, to whom a grant of probate was issued 
27 May 1682. Bath, 76. 

Thomas Bland of London, gen* 26 August 1674, with a codicil dated 
30 October, 1674, proved 29 January 1674. To my grand children Jane 
and Sarah Moyser two hundred and fifty pounds apiece, to be employed at 
interest or laid out in buying of several annuities for them. To my grand- 
son Joseph Day fifty pounds, to be employed to put him out to some decent 



114 - Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

calling when he shall attain to fifteen years of age. To my daughter Sarah 
Day tiie wife of Joseph Day one aunuity or yearly rent charge of ten 
pounds by the year during her natural life, issuable and payable out of my 
lands and tenement at Mildenhall iu Suffolk. I give to my son in law 
Joseph Day and Sarah his wife ten pounds apiece to buy them mourning. 
I appoint my sou Richard Bland and my sou iu law Joseph Day and Sarah 
his wife to be executors and do appoint them to give all my linen to my 
grandchildren. 

Iu the codicil he speaks of his grandson Joseph Dav as " now deceased." 

Dycer, 2. 

Thomas Bland of London, merchant, 25 November 1700, proved 13 
January 1700. To my sister Sarah Day ten pounds every year during her 
natural life, she was living with my executors. Ten pounds to Mary 

Keemish if she shall live to be lawfully married. Ten pounds to 

Keenish, ray sister's grandson, at one and twenty. Twenty pounds each to 
Sarah and Margaret Bland, my brother's two daughters if they live to be 

lawfully married. My cousin Lawrauce "Pendrill. To Ann the 

servant in my cousin PendriU's house forty shillings. To my said sister 
Sarah Day ten pounds for her mourning cloths at my funeral. To every 
person whose name is inserted on the back of this will one gold ring of the 
value about ten shillings. To my cousin Sarah Pindrell the wife of Mr. Law- 
rance Pindrell all my lands, plantations mortgages, houses, tobacco houses 
&c. in Ann Arundell County in the Province of Maryland, and also (after 
the payment or other accomplishment of the said contingent legacies) all my 
negroes, cattle, horses, mares, household stuff, debts in money and tobacco, 
ready money, plate, goods and chattels whatsover, either in England or 
Maryland or elsewhere. And I make my cousin Lawrance Pindrell and 
Sarah his wife my sole executors. Dyer, 2. 

July 1652. The twelvth day Adeou issued forth to John Bland y e nrall 
& lawful Brother of Edward Bland late in Vergiuia Batcbelor deed haveing 
goodes etc. to Adster y° goodes, chatties & debets of y e said deed hee being 
sworne freelv Adster etc. 

Fol. 134 Admon. Act Book, 1G52. 

[John Bland, London, Grocer, will proved 1C32, was son of Adam and Jane 
(Atkyns) Bland. He married Susan Deblere or Duclere of the City of Ham- 
bur?, and had twelve children; he is spoken of as of Syth Lane, Loudon and 
Plaislow, Essex, Eagi. 

Emanuel Proby mentioned, was fourth son of Sir Peter Proby, Lord Mayor 
of Loudon, afterward Lord Carysf ort. His sister Elizabeth married Win. Bury, 
gent. 

William Blande of London, sent., an elder brother of John, married Judith 
Woodery, daughter of Thomas of Groby, Ens. Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Bland of St. Martin's, was the sister-in-law of the above William and John Bland. 
Her husband was under-sheritl' of Middlesex. His will follows hers, by which 
we see that he had at least three wives; his first was Alice Gerniaine. (See p. 
147, Siau-rhter's History of Bristol Parish, Va., 1S79.) 

John Bland of London, merchant, whose will was proved 1680, had with other 
issue Giles whose wife Frances and son John are mentioned. Frances was 
daughter of Thomas Probey, [Povey] Master of Requests. The wife of the 
testator was Sarah, daughter of Giles Green, a member of Parliament for Corfe 
Castle, Dorset, time of Charles I.— See Richmond Critic, 9 July, 1388. — W. K. 
Watkins. ] 

Richard Bennett of Noansamond River in Virginia 15 March 1674, 
proved 3 August 1676. To the parish where I now live and have so long 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 115 

lived three hundred acres which Thomas Bolton holdeth by lease and on 
which he now lives; the rents to be received yearly by the churchwardens 
of the parish and disposed towards the relief of four poor aged or im- 
potent persons whom they judge to stand in most need of help; and this 
to continue and be done forever as long as the laud continues. To Richard, 
son of Thomas Buxton the rents and profits of that parcel of laud on which 
Edrnond Belson now liveth, to him and his heirs forever, the same to be 
paid unto him when he shall come to be twenty years of age; bnt if he 
lives not to that time or afterwards die without issue. To my daughter 
Anne fifty pounds sterling besides her debts which she now oweth me. To 
my grandchildren Elizabeth, Anne and Bennett Scarburgh, or any other of 
my daughter Scarburgh's children which shall be born hereafter, all that 
parcel of laud lying on Pocomoke River on the Eastern shore in Maryland, 
being two thousand eight hundred acres by Patent, to them and either of 
them, their, or either of their, heirs forever, and also two thousand five 
hundred acres by Patent, lying in Wiccomoco River on the Eastern shore 
in Maryland. To my cousin Silvester the wife of major Nicholas Hill 
twelve thousand pounds of tobacco. To my cousin Mary the wife of Mr. 
Luke Cropley of London twenty pounds sterling. To Richard Ilubard of 
Pigg Point one thousand pounds of tobacco. To Michael Ward and the 
widow of John Lewis, to each of them one thousand pounds of tobacco. 
To Charles Howard and Richard Higgins, to each of them one thousand 
pounds of tobacco, and, more to Charles Howard, the land which he lives 
of (sic) for eleven years. To John Chilcotes and Thomas Garratt, to 
each of them two thousand pounds of tobacco. To William Kitchen and 
John Blye, to' each of them one thousand pounds of tobacco. To Pat- 
rick Edmonston and the widow Reddick, to each of them one thousand 
pounds of tobacco. To John Worter who married the relict of John 
Salsbury one thousand pounds of tobacco. To William Yearret of Pagan 
Creek and to the wife of Mr. Thomas Taberer. to each of them two 
thousand pounds of tobacco. To Elizabeth Cutland of Chuchatuke Creek 
and Thomas Jordan of the same place, to each of them two thousand 
pounds of tobacco. To James Day twelve thousand pounds of tobacco. 
And if Mr. Tabbarer see cause he may add three thousand more to it. I 
give to all my servants that now liveth with me, both Christians and 
Negroes, to each of them one thousand pounds of tobacco, only the two 
hirelings excepted, viz' Richard Higgins and John Turner. 

The rest of my personal and real estate and all lands, stock, of what 
nature or kind soever it be, to go to my grand child Richard Bennett, to him 
and his heirs forever, my said grandchild now residing in Bristol, and in 
default of such heirs then to come to the children of Theodarick Bland and 
Charles Scarburgh. Lastly I do declare and ordain and appoint James 
Jofey, M r Thomas Hodges and Edmond Belson, or any two of them, also 
Robert Peellee to be overseers. 

Wit: John Speire, En Tarle, Charles Howard, George Davis. Proved 
in Nansamond court the twelvth of April 1675, by the oaths of M r En 
Tarte (sic) Charles Howard and George Davis to be the last will and testa- 
ment of Major General R: Bennett. Teste Jn° Lear Cier: Cur. 

Bence, 99. 

[Richard Bennett was a nephew of Edward Bennett, who resided for a time 
at Delft and was largely engaged in the Virginia trade, being a member of the 
Virginia company. The nephew, being his partner, came over to supervise his 
plantations. 



116 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Richard was a Burgess 1629 to 1631, member of the CounciljI642-9, Governor 
1C52 to 1655 -when he -went to England as agent for the Colony. Returning in a 
few years he held various offices, and was" in 1606 made Major General of the 
train bauds. 

In 1642 he had been one of those Virginia Puritans who had sent to New 
England for ministers, but in the last part of his life he became a Quaker. 

His daughter Ann married Theoderick Bland, a son of John and Susan 
(Duclere) Bland, a man said to have been "in fortune and understanding 
inferior to no man in Virginia." See Richmond Critic, 9 July, 1888. See also 
note by R. A. Brock in these Gleanings, Register, vol. 42, p. 394; and Appleton's 
Cyclopaedia of American Biography, vol. 1, p. 237. — W. K. Watkus'S.] 

William Seabright of London Esq. 19 January 1618, proved 7 
November 1G20. To be buried in the parish church of St. Edmund the 
King in Lombard street, where I do dwell, in the chancel withiu the vault 
there where the body of my most dear, virtuous and late loving wife doth 
rest in the Lord, as near unto her as possibly and conveniently may be 
placed. My said wife's grandchild Elizabeth, the elder daughter of Sir 
James Boucher, knight. Frances Boucher one of his daughters. My 
godson Thomas Boucher, eldest son of the said Sir James, James Boucher, 
his second son, John, his third son, Richard, bis fourth son, William, his tilth 
son, and Henry Boucher, the youngest of the said Sir James. The good 
will I bear to every of them, chiefly for their good grandmother's sake. 
My will and desire is that after such time as the portions given to the said 
sons shall be paid by mine executors, then by the judgments of my loving 
and kind brother in law Thomas Morley their uncle, John Burnell, Richard 
Brigges, Edmond Page and Thomas Freeman their friends and cousins, or 
the more ( part of them for the time being, every of their said positions shall 
be pat forth at use at the best rates they can upon as good security as they 
can for every hundred pounds by the year for aud towards their mainte- 
nance until such time as the said friends &c. shall in their discretions think 
fit. My niece Sarah Astin one of the daughters of my late loving sister 
Eleanor Astin, widow deceased, (to whose last will and testament reference 
is made). My nephew Edward Seabright. Reference to will of M my good 
father" — " whose executor I am." My late brother in law Thomas Astia. 
My late brother Thomas Seabright, gen 1 , deceased, made me his only 
executor. Have brought up all his five children. My cousin Edward 
Broad Esq. who married with my niece Judith. Elizabeth Blounte the 
late widow and administratrix of my nephew William Seabright deceased. 
My best and loving cousin Sir Thomas Coveutrye, knight, H. M. Solli- 
citor General who married with my niece Sara, sithence deceased. My 
cousin Johu Burnell who married Anne my said brother's youngest daugh- 
ter. Reference to " my good father Edward Seabright." The two children 
of my niece Sarah Coventrye, Thomas and Elizabeth. My loving siiter in 
law Anne late the widow of my said brother and now the wife of Thomas 
Walsh, gentleman. The parish of Woolverley in. the Co. of Worcester the 
place of my birth, where I was bred up a great part of my youth. I give 
and bequeath to my brother Thomas Morley a gown. To my sister his 
wife and to one of his daughters, being my god daughter, two gowns of 
silk "grogaron." To my brother Isaac Morley a cloak. Others. My 
cousin xMrs. Burnell, widow. My cousin John Huntbach and my niece his 
wife. My brother Walshe and my sister his wife. My cousin Page aud 
his wife. My cousin Brigges aud my cousin his wife. My cousin Simon 
Jenckes and his wife. My servant Edmund Nuttinge. My late servant 
Thomas Hale. My loving cousin Edward Broad Esq. and my loving niece 



1S94.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 117 

his wife and their three children. My niece Anne Burnell and her chil- 
dren. My niece Theodicia Seabright. My nephew Edward Seabright's 
children and hers. My nephew William Astiu's children (as I take it four 
in number). My loving and kind cousin Mrs Susan Colles widow. My 
loving sister in law Alice Boucher. Soame, 97. 

[The testator of the above was Town Clerk of London and married Eliza- 
beth, sister of Thomas Morler of London and aunt of John Motley of Charles- 
town, Mass. The pedigree of the familv of Seabright or Sebright is given in 
the Visitation of Worcestershire (printed by the Ilarleian Society) and also in 
the Visitation of Essex for 1012 (Harleian So..). See also Register for April, 
1892, iu the pedigrees of Burned and Morley, there published. 

Hexry F. Waters. 

By deed dated April 2, 1624, "Edward Sebright of Prestwood, in y e Conn- 
tie of Start'ord Esq r v- Cozen & next heire of William Sebright Late of y c Cittie of 
London Esq'' deceased & Theodosea v* wife of y s' 1 Edward" convey to 
"Henrv Cullicke of v° IlamLett of Milton in y« Townshipp Parish or ffeilds of 
Prittlewell in v e Hundred of Kotchf ord, in y c Countie of Essex yeoman ", lauds 
in the parishes of Vorthshoberie, Much Wakering alias Wakering Magna and 
other parishes in the Hundred of Rotchford, Co. Essex, England; also lands in 
Stray field (late Carters alias Friends): land called BangoldLand; the moiety 
of Yokefieete and Carters Lanes. 

This deed was recorded in Boston il iu y e Booke of Records for deeds [IV. 
325] for v" Countie of Snffolke in New England" at the request of " Richard 
Ely, & Elizabeth his wife, ye wife of & executrix vnto y e Late John Cullicke of 
Boston ni'ehaat." John T. Hassam.j 

Henry Wilkinson of Nottingham town, skinner, 25 November 1642, 
proved 27 March 1(546. To be" buried in St. Peter's church within the 
town of Nottingham. To Mr. Robert Buckland, citizen and leatherseller 
of London, fifty shillings to make him a gold ring to wear for my sake. 
To Mrs. Anne "Ball of London fifty shillings, to Mr. John Ball of London 
forty shillings and to Mr. Richard Ball of London forty shillings (for 
rings «fec). To my cousin Alice Barense of Gedliuge three _ pounds. To 
my cousin Dorothy Johnson of Ratclifte three pounds. To my cousin 

Joane Skelinton of Roudiugton three pounds. To my cousin Asher 

of Roudiugton three pounds. To my cousin Anne Wilkinson at the Black 
Wall three pounds. To my cousin' Isabel Blood in New England three 
pounds. To my cousin Margaret Atkinson of Nottingham four pounds.^ To 
my brother John Wilkinson forty shillings. To my cousin Robert Wilkinson 
three pounds. To my cousin Richard Wilkinson three pounds. ' To my 
cousin Jeffery Wilkinson three pounds. To my cousin John Wilkinson, 
my brother John's son, three pounds. To my cousin Mary Wilkinson four 
pounds. To my brother George Attenborowe twenty shillings and to my 
sister Mary his wife five pounds. Also to William, Jarvis, George and 
Richard Attenborowe. mv sister's sons, to every one of them three pounds. 
To Anne Kirke and Elizabeth (Jripel, my sister's daughters, three pounds 
each. To Richard Barnes of Gedlinge, my sister's son, three pounds. To 
my sister Jane Hardnett five pounds and my gimball gold ring and one pair 
spoon silver and double gilt. To my cousiu Anne Beke one hoop ring of 
gold. My cousins Richard and Jeffery Wilkinson and their brother John. 
William and Henry Wilkinson and their other brother at London. Henry 
the son of Robert Wilkinson, my sodson. My brother Hardnett and Mary 
his wife. My cousin Gelstrape Carpenter at Wilford. John Wilkinson, my 
cousin, citizen and blacksmith of London and my cousin George Wilkinson 
of Roudiugton, his brother. My loving friend Mr. Richard Hardnett 

YOL. XLVIII. 11 



118 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

citizen and skinner of London. My brother in law Richard Hardnett, 
skinner, to be executor. 

Admon. granted (as above) to Richard Hardnett the executor of Richard 
Hardnett &c. to administer the goods &c. Twisse, 37. 

f Isabel Blood was the wife of Richard Blood of Groton, Mass.— Editok.] 

Judith Morris of Dedham, Essex, widow, 25 January 1G45, proved 
17 March 1645. To certain preachers of the Word, viz' M r Newcotne and 
Mr. Smith of Dedham. Mr. Stanton of Ipswich, Mr. Edes of Laffbrd (Law- 
ford?) Mr. Cair of Ardleigb, Mr. Seaborne of Langham, Mr. Cooke who 
was sometimes preacher at Basted and Mr. Astey, forty shillings apiece. 
To Richard Jacomond's son, late of East Marsye, forty shillings. To 
Richard Jacomond forty shillings and to his daughter that is blind four 
pounds. To Martha and Elizabeth Jacomond. daughters of Richard 
Jacomond, all my wearing apparel. To Judith Coffeild my god daughter 
twenty shillings and a floekbed. To the iiij or children of Stephen Hart, 
that is to say, John, Steven, Sarah and the youngest that went with her 
father to New England, five pounds apiece. Anne Willes, my god daugh- 
ter, and her brothers. To John Collens son of the widow Collins of 
Higham forty shillings, to be paid to his mother. My goddaughter Mary 
Warren and her brothers and sisters. John Morris. My brother Josuah 
Warren. William Morris at four and twenty. Thomas Morris, servant 
with Goodman Groome of Colchester. Sarah Groome my god daughter. 
Her father William Groome. Mary Groome. The four children of Josua 
Warren, viz* Josua. Sarah, Elizabeth and Hester. Mr. Strangmanes three 
children. The widow Woodward dwelling in St. James Parish in Col- 
chester. Goodman Chapline of the same parish. Goodman Munson of 
Colchester. Thomas Roofe of Colchester, carrier, and his children. To 
the town of Copford five pounds towards the binding forth of two poor chil- 
dren apprentices. Certain poor widows in Copford. The eldest son of 
Parnell Cutler, sometimes my servant. Mary Harrison that dwelleth with 
Mr. Barrowes. To Rebecca Scolding, my god daughter now in New Eng- 
land, twenty shillings. The widow Pease of Colchester. To Simon Stone 
in New England forty shillings. The wife of Nathaniel Baker of Strat- 
ford. William Groome, my girl's father. Goodman Wood of Dedham, 
shoemaker, and his children. The poor of Stratford. The widow Frende 
and the widow Beckwaye. Mr. Nicholas Prigg. I give unto Joseph 
Morse in New England twenty shiliiugs if he be living; if he be dead then 
my will is that William Stone in New England shall have the twenty shil- 
lings. Thomas Jacomond now servant to Mr. Barn ton of Colchester. To 
John Bentley my bible. Robert Makeu of Dedham. Sarah Warren, the 
wife of Thomas Beale, and her two children. Hester the wife of Mr. 
Strangeman above mentioned. I nominate and appoint Clement Fenne of 
Dedham, clothier, and John Morris of Colchester, merchant, to be my 
executors and Christopher Vyue of Langham supervisor. 

All that my sixteenth part which I have in a ship wherein John Hay- 
ward goes master and all that I lent to the Parliament, with the proiits, if 
any be, and all my other goods and chattels &c. not before bequeathed and 
given, except twenty shillings not before mentioned, which twenty shillings 
I now give to a kinswoman in Colchester, but all the rest of my estate un- 
bequeathed I do give and bequeath unto my cousin Stephen Harte's chil- 
dren in New England, to be equally divided between them, my funeral be- 
ing discharged and all other necessaries aud expences being allowed to my 



1804.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 119 

executors. And my executors shall have power to make sale of that six- 
teenth part in the ship abovesaid and send the money to New England to 
those children to whom it is given. 

Witnessed by Isaac Ham and Samuel Deacon. Probate was granted to 
John Morris, Clement Fenne, the other executor, being dead. 

Twisse, 33. 

[The above will, it will be noticed, contains a number of New England names. 

II. F. W. 

Stephen Hart, named in this will, came to Now England (it is said in 1632,) 
and settled at Cambridge (then Newtown). He removed soon afterwards to 
Hartford and thence to Farmington. A volume was published in 1875 entitled 
" Geuealogical History of Deacon Stephen Hart and his Descendants by Alfred 
Andrews." Published by Austin Hart. The compiler states that Stephen Hart was 
bora about 1603 at Braiutree in Essex count}', England. See also Paige's History 
of Cambridge, page 574; Memorial History of Hartford County, Conu., vol. i., 
p. 242; and" Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, vol. 2, p. 3G7-S. 

Simon Stone, also named, settled at Watertown, Mass. See Bond's History 
of Watertown, pp. 5S4 to 501, for an account of him and his descendants. 
William Stone was, I presume, the person who settled at Guilford in Connecti- 
cut in 1639. See Smith's History of Guilford and Savage's Genealogical Dic- 
tionary. — Editor.] 

Francis Doughtie of Hampsteed in the parish of Oldsbury and County 
and Diocese of Gloucester, gen 1 , 16 May 1634, proved 31 October 1634. 
To my sou Francis my white horse or nag. To Spencer Achley, ray 
daughter Frances' son, twenty shillings, to be paid by my executrix within 
six mouths eext after my decease. To John Dauyes, the son of ir.v daugh- 
ter Margaret, ten shillings, to be paid in like manner. To the three chil- 
dren of my son Francis, that is to say, Mary, his daughter, and Francis 
and Eliah, his sons, thirty shillings, to be paid in like manner. The rest 
of my goods, moveable and unmoveable whatsoever, I give and bequeath 
to my daughter Elizabeth (excepting what I have passed by my deed bear- 
ing date 15 May 1634, made to certain uses to rlurnfrey Hooke, alderman 
of the City of Bristol, Thomas Lloyd of the same, Adam Baynham of Yate 
gen* and William Maye of Chert field gen', this excepted) and I make my 
daughter Elizabeth my whole and sole executrix &c. 

One of the witnesses was Fr: Doughtie minist r . Seager, 86. 

[The above will and the deed to Humfrey Hooke and others, to which it re- 
fers, gave rise to a great contention in New England, as appears from Lech- 
ford's Note-Book, pp. 133-5, 137, 171-3 and 250 (I refer to the pages of the 
printed book). Elizabeth Doughtie, the daughter and sole executrix of the 
above testator, became the wife of William Cole of Sutton in the parish of 
Chew Magna, in the County of Somerset, gentleman (as he calls himself iu a 
bill of complaint to the Gov., Council and Assistants of the Jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts Bay) and brother of John Cole of Farrington. Somerset, yeoman, 
who made a deposition about Hamsteed Farm in KJ39. William and Elizabeth 
Cole were then in New England, as was also her brother Francis Doughty, who 
at that time called himself a planter of Dorchester in New England. He was 
called a clerk in the bill of complaint by William Cole and his wife, and seems 
to have been a minister at Taunton (Mass.), and afterwards to have removed 
to Long Island. Henry F. Waters.] 

Timothy S l Nicholas of the parish of St. Marys in the Isle of Ely 
within the Co. of Cambridge gen', 13 June 1606, proved 17 September 
1606. Testator calls him>elf the youngest son of Vincent St. Nicholas, 
late of Ashe next Sandwich in the Co. of Kent, gen' deceased, and declares 



120 - Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

his age to be about thirty years, wishes his body to be buried within the 
parish church of Ahe near the grave of his father, (if it should please God 
to call him out of this transitory world at or near Ashe) and orders a monu- 
ment to be laid upon the resting place of his body not exceeding the value 
of thirteen pounds six shillings eight pence. To the poor of Ospringe in 
Kent and of St. Marys. To every godchild. '• I promised for them they 
shoulde coustantlie professe renouncinge all poperye and Romishe Kelictes 
and supstition." Loving brother Henry Harfleete and Thomas, his sou. 
Brother Thomas St. Nicholas. Niece and, god daughter Dorothy Brett (at 
her age of sixteen years). Sister Brett's other daughter Deborah Brett. 
Niece and god daughter Deborah St. Nicholas, eldest daughter of brother 
Thomas. Niece Dorothy St. Nicholas (another daughter). Brother Steb- 
binge. Nephew Henry Harfleete. My nieces Mary. Omer (sic), Susan 
and Martha Harfleete. Godson John Harfleete son of William Harflete of 
Sandwich gen'. Cousin Parries children. James. Ellen, Francis and Judith, 
and his wife (my niece and faithful cousin). Linen &c. in their house at 
St. Mary Magdalens in Barmondsey near London. My cousin Christopher 
Lasheforde. Cousin Francis Maunocke and her children. Mary Lashe- 
ford daughter of my uncle Lasheford (if she survive her husband) and her 
children. ''And I doe geve unto ray reverend and deere frendes the zeal- 
ous preachers of Gods Worde and his faithefull mynisters (viz c ) to Mr. 
Thomas Willson my reverend teacher & instructer sixe Angells to my 
deere frend Mr. Anthony ffeilde of Chillenden sixe Angells To Mr. 
Willm Syms my faithefull frend fower Angells To my deere and lovinge 
brother Stebbinge and my moste approoved faithefull frend sixe Angells 
To Mr Beniarnyn Solley my oulde schoole fellowe and Christian frend 
Thirtie shillings To Mr Jacob Twentye shillinges. To Mr Suape Twentye 
shillinges To Mr Dampard T wen tie sbil Hnges To Mr Stoughton Twentie 
shillinges To Mr Egerton Twentie shillinges To Mr Brownesmithe 
Twentye shillings moste humblie thanckinge them for their faithefull en- 
devor and for their earnest labour and paines for the instructyou of my 
conscience and the consciences of many men in the knowledge of Gods 
truthe and relligion. And their legacies I bestowe uppou them as a testi- 
monie of my love and thanckfullnes towerdes them." Sundry servants &c. 
To Mr James Pallmer the son of Sir Thomas Pallmer, knight, my vyoil 
which I have often promised him. My loving friend Mr. Thomas Geili- 
brand of Sandwich. Cousin Rowland Engeham and cousin William Enge- 
ham. 

u And whereas I haue in truste heretofore receaved of my aforesaid deere 
frend Mr Willm Syms ffiftye powudes of lawfull money of Englande to the 
intente that I shoulde p r chase therewith to the onely use of his two sonnes 
(viz') Zacharye and Willm Syms and of their heires landes or heredyta- 
mentes of the yearelie valewe at the tyme of the purchase thereof of Three 
pouudes of lyke money and that untill suche purchase should be so made 
there shoolde be by me pavd towerdes the education or mavntenfice of the 
said Zacharie and Willm Syms the sonnes Three poundes of laweful! money 
of Englande yearelie at the ffeastes of the natyuitie of St e John Baptiste 
and of the uativitye of oure Lord Christe by even porcous: nowe therefore 
to thintent that I maie faithefullie pforme the said truste I doe geve" &c. 
(Then follows a lengthy provision lor raising three pounds a year for them.) 
Nephew John St. Nicholas, second son of brother Thomas. Cousin Edward 
Upcher of Soham in Cambridgeshire. Brother Thomas and said nephew 
John St. Nicholas to be executors. Stafford, GO. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 121 

Margaret Fulalove of London, widow, 25 September 1629, proved 14 
October 1G29. Imprimis I do give and bequeath unto my cosen Zacherie 
Simes, whom I do make and ordain sole executor of this my last will and 
testament, the sum of forty shillings and to my cosen his wife my Phillip 
aud Cheatiy gown and best stuff petticoat, my stuff kertle and waistcoat, 
all my wearing linen and twenty shillings to make her a ring. To my said 
coseu Simes' three children I do give and bequeath as followeth ; unto 
William Simes three shillings of lawful money of England, unto Sarah 
Simes also forty shilliugs of like money and to Mary Simes twenty shillings 
of like money. I do also give and bequeath untc the said Sara Simes (a 
lot of bedding aud household stuff, among others) two sallet dishes, one 
maudlin cup, a brass scummer and a brass warming pan. If any surplusage 
be remaining I give to my brethren Thomas and John Hickman, to each 
twenty shillings and twenty' shilliugs to each of my own sisters and forty 
shillings to be distributed amongst my said own sisters children. To Mar- 
garet Hayes ten shillings. To my cousin Grantham twenty shillings and 
to his wife twenty shillings. To Hulda Crooke twenty shilliugs. To Sara 
Grantham twenty shillings. To Caleb Grantham twenty shillings. To my 
cousin Attaloone an angel and to his wife forty shillings and a Kersey 
cubbord cloth. Forty shillings to her daughter. To my cousin Godkin's 
wife twenty shillings and twenty shillings to Mr. "William Simes. A silver 
spoon for Mary Simmes and tipt pot for my cousin Zachary. 

Wit: William Symmes, Mary S\rnrnes, her mark, Finer Godkin. 

Archd. of London, B. 7 L. G2. 

Against this is entered, on margin, Parish of St. Michael Bessingshawe. 

Married at St. Saviours Southwark, 13 August 1622, Zachery Simmes 
and Sara Baker. 

[Zacharie Simes, named by the testator as a cousiu or nephew, and as execu- 
tor of her will, was evidently the Rev. Zechariah Syms or Symmes, who was 
the minister of Charlestown, Mass., from Dec. 22, 1624 till his death Feb. 4, 
1670-1. He was the son of Rev. William Symmes, whose father, William 
Symmes, was a firm protestant in the reign of Queen Mary. 

Rev. Zechariah Symmes was bom in Canterbury, Kent, April 5, 1599, was 
educated at Emmanuel College, Crmbridge University, and received his A.B. in 
1620. In 1621 he was chosen lecturer at "St. Antholin's in London. About 1625 
he removed to Dunstable, Beds., where he was rector for eight years. He came 
to New England in the Griffin, which arrived Sept. 18, 1634. He had a brother 
William who was living, probably in England, in 1664, as he names him in his 
will of that date. 

The William Syms who had sons Zacharye and William, according to the 
preceding will of "Timothy St. Nicholas, 1606*: as well as the Mr. William Simes 
named by the above Margaret Fulalove, was, I presume, the father of our New 
England minister. See The Symmes Memorial, by Rev. John A. Vinton, Bos- 
ton, 1873. — Editor.] 

Thomasine Owfield (vol. 47, page 498) : 

[In the note to the will of Thomasine Owfleld at the above reference, Mr. Waters 
says: "This will binds all the foregoinrj wills to that of Thomasine J: ansen 
already given." As the wills are arranged in the Register, this is an error. 
Mr. Waters arranged the wills in the April, July and October numbers of the 
Register in groups, but in printing them they got disarranged, so that an ex- 
planation is necessary. The will of Thomasine Owrield and~those following it 
on pages 49S to 505 were placed by Mr. Waters between those of Roger Owfleld 
and Abell Makepeace on paije 289. The wills referred to in the note above 
quoted as bound to the will of Thomasine J; ansen are those of Richard Walter 
(p. 285), John Moore (p. 286), Elizabeth Walter (p. 2Sii), Margaret Gardiner 
(p. 268), John Gardyner (p. 283) and Roger Owfleld (p. 289). 






. 












122 „ Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

There is also an omission in the editorial note, vol. 47, pns;e 400. The Rosrer 
Williams and Pembertou matter in the Register, vol. 43^ pages 200 to 301, 
should have hem referred to. The will of Roger Pembertou, the father of 
Robert, the testator, will there be found, and much other genealogical matter 
relating to the Pembertons. We find there the baptism at St. Albans of Robert 
Pembertou, Dec. 2Sj 1086* and his burial there May 20. 1G2S: also the baptisms 
of his sisters Elizabeth and Teela. the Latter of whom is mentioned in his 
father's will and his own as the wife of Mr, Robert Wooley. lie is omitted in 
the pedigree copied from the Visitation of Hertfordshire, 1634, on page 205 of 
vol. 43, but is named in the will of his father. — Editor.] 

Ludlow (a>/te.\o\. 42, pp. 1S1-IS4) : 

[On page 183 of Vol. 42 of the Register, in the English Ludlow genealogy 
published by you, with special reference to Roger Ludlow of Massachusetts and 
Connecticut, t rind the following foot-note appended to the name of Gabriel 
[Ludlow] 8 , of Froine, bapt. at Warminster, 27 Aug. 1634: — 

'■He is said to have been the ancestor of the New York Lucllows. — G. D. 
Scull." 

I do not know whether the exact connection of the New York Ludlows with 
the English genealogy can be a matter of interest to any of your readers. If 
so, here it is : — 

The New York Ludlows, together with the Philadelphia branch of the family, 
to which belonged the Rev. John Ludlow, D.D., Provost of the University of 
Pennsylvania from 1834 to ls."i2, and his sons John Livingston Ludlow, M.D., 
and Judge James Ryley Ludlow, are descended from Gabriel Ludlow, who 
landed in New York, in his 32d year, on Nov. 24, 1694, and on April 5, 1*307. was 
married in New York to Sarah, a daughter of the Rev. Joseph Hanmer, D.D. 

In a memorandum-book belonging to Gabriel Ludlow, the entries in which are 
in his handwriting, which book is in the possession of Alfred Ludlow Carroll, 
M.D., of New York, appears the following note: — 

" Gabriel Ludlow, son of Gabriel Ludlow, was born Nov. the 2 d , 1603, which 
was on Monday night at 12 o'clock, at Castle Cary." 

The next note in the memorandum-book chronicles the birth of a brother, M. 
Ludlow, at '•ftroom" [Frome], on Dec. 2, 1666. 

A letter written early in 1883 to the Vicar of Castle Cary, enquiring wdiether 
any record survived of the baptism in his parish of Gabriel Ludlow, son of 
Gabriel, in 1663, brought the satisfactory response that the record does survive, 
and the following certified copy of it: 

"Copy of the baptismal certificate of Gabriel Ludlow. 
' Christenings in the year 1663. 
December. 

The first day of this moneth Gabriell the sonne of Gabriel! Ludlow of froome 
and of Martha his wife was Christened.' 

I hereby certify that the above is a true copy of an entry in the Register of 
Baptisms for the Parish of Castle Cary in the County of Somerset. 
Revenue As witness my hand this 10th day of March, 1883. 

Stamp, Id. A. W. Grafton, Vicar." 

Thomas W. Ludlow, Cottage Lawn, Tankers, V. T. 

—Editor]. 

Francis Scrogges of Patrnar hall in the parish of Aldebury, Herte, 
gentleman, 3 Juue 1585. proved 4 November 1585. To my wife Diouise 
(certain grain &c) and my whole team of horses being in number five, mostly 
in the keeping of John Anthony my servant and esteemed at the value of 
sixteen pounds (and other property). To my sou Henry one hundred pounds, 
to my son Thomas twenty pounds, to my son William forty pounds, all 
within two years next after my desease. To my son Francis one hundred 
pounds, to be paid him at his full age of two and twenty years. To my 
daughter Susan twenty pounds within one quarter of a year next after my 
decease. To my daughters Grace and Lettece Scrogges one hundred pounds 
apiece at one and twenty or days of marriage. I give to my son John 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 123 

Scrogges all that my manor called Patmar hall and all my other lands &c 
to hold for three years after my decease upon condition that he shall stand 
bound unco Thomas Meade of Bardene, Essex, yeoman, and unto William 
Deane my son in law in the sum of live hundred pounds to pay the legacies 

I have given to his bi others and sisters, and then he shall hold the 
manor and lands absolutely and without condition. Provision made if he 
refuses &c. Henry the second son, Thomas the third son. then William, 
then Francis the fifth son, then the daughters, Alice, Elizabeth, Susan, 
Jane, Grace and Lettece. To my sister Katherine Surrye forty shillings 
and to Raff Surrye her son four pounds. Dionise my wife shall have her 
abode and dwelling in the three chambers next the kitchen in the said 
manor house, that is to say, over the larder there. Certain tenements <Scc 
at Watton at Stoue, Great Munden and Little Muudeu made over to the 
use of said wife, she to release to ray son John all her right of dower in 
my manor, &c. Son John to be executor. Brudenell, 48. 

Thomas Scrooges of Trymley S* Mary, Suffolk, 28 May 1589, proved 

II June 1539. To be buried in the church of Trimley St. Mary. My 
servants Jaue Lambe, Elizabeth Fowles, Ann Battle and William Batle. 
Barnaby Gowldinge. Thomas Lambe gen 1 . Lawrence Hudson of Trim- 
ley S l Mary. Thomas Sugar my godchild- I am to pay to the widow 
Shemynge's sister in Hertfordshire and to Philip Newman and to one of 
Thomas Newman's children (for parcel of the purchase of Melton mill) &c. 
Bennett Newman my tenant. I give my lands, tenements &c. in Shotley 
to my brothers William and Henry and my sisters Elizabeth Anton and 
Susan Paye and their heirs forever. My brothers William and Henry 
Scrogges to be executors and William Smith ah Randes of Walton and 
John Talbott overseers. If the said Bennett Newman shall think good to 
take my mill and lands in Melton I give him towards the purchase the seven 
pounds ten shillings which he shall owe me at Michaelmas next. 

Leicester, 59. 

John Scrogges of Patmer Hall in the parish of Alberry in the Co. of 
Hartford gen', 13 August 1592, proved 14 May 1593. To be buried in 
the parish church of Albery. To Mary Scrogges my loving wife all my 
goods, debts, ready money and all such plate as she brought with her &c. 
To my cousin Edward Newporte one ounce of gold for a remembrance. 
To my three brothers, Henry, William and Francis Scrogges, to each of 
them one ounce of gold for a remembrance. To my three sisters, Alice 
Leake, Elizabeth Anton and Susan Paye, forty shillings apiece for a re- 
membrance. To my three sisters, Jane Deane, Grace Crabbe and Lettice 
Scrogges, to each of them half an ounce of gold, to be paid and delivered 
by my executor, also for a remembrance. To my mother in law Dyonice 
Burton ten pounds, to buy her a mourning gown and a ring for a remem- 
brance. To my brother in law Mr. Randolfe Symmes one ounce of gold 
for a remembrance and unto my sister in law Anue Symmes, the wife of 
the said Randolfe, forty shillings likewise for a remembrance. My ser- 
vants. The parish of Albury. To my loving cousin Edward Turnor Esq. 
an ounce of gold for a remembrance. To my niece Dorothy Symmes, the 
daughter of my brother Sy fries, one ounce of gold. To my mother in law 
Dennice Scrogges forty shillings for a remembrance. 

Now concerning the custody and bringing up of my son Edward Scrogges, 
of whose education and good nurture, both of body and mind, I have 









I 11 



124 .Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

especial care and regard, aud of whose inheritance, concerning the well 
ordering thereof, I have also great respect, I commit unto my most kind 
and loving mother in luw Dvonice Burton, to whom I have taken order 
that the wardship of my son shall be assigned and made over, either medi- 
ately or immediately from M r Sergeant Spencer who hath the grant thereof 
&c. i£c. she to bring up my said son in good letters and nurture. My wife 
to be executor and ray cousin Edward Turner overseer. Philip Godwynue 
one of the witnesses. 

Proved by M 1 * Mary Scrogges. Nevell, 36. 

Sir Thomas Stanley, knight, 26 February 1605, proved 13 May 1607. 
To be buried in the parish church of Albury, near my pew door, in the 
county of Hertford. The poor of that parish. I do give and bequeath 
all my lands in Sussex or elsewhere, as also my house without Temple Bar 
near London, to my brother Richard Stanley and his heirs forever, paying 
out of the said lands and house to ray wife one hundred marks yearly during 
her life. To Dyonis Sims, my wife's kinswoman, forty pounds, within forty 
days after her marriage. To my wife's son Edward Scroogs, a black cloak 
and one to his uncle 1'Ienry Scroogs. To my cousin Joane, wife of Richard 
Scarlett of Loudon, a gown of cloth. To my cousin Jone Gambell of 
London a gown of cloth. My servants. Six poor men that shall carry me 
to the church. My wife Mary to be full executrix. One little table of 
"currall" that standeth at Lee House in Sussex, which is my wife's mother's, 
Mistress Burton, my will and mind is that the same table shall be delivered 
to her again. To my cousin Edward Stanley in the Co. of Cumberland a 
gray gelding called Roger. Hudlestou, 40. 

Edward Scrogges of Aldbury, Herts., Esq. 2 April 1622, proved 
9 October 1622. My body to be buried amongst my ancestors in Aldbury 
church. I do will and appoint that my loving wife Penelope (if it please 
God of his goodness and mercy to restore her to her health and perfect 
senses again and that she shall and do live and continue unmarried in my 
house called Patmer Hall, of perfect sense and understanding fit and able 
to govern, maintain and bring up my children in learning and virtue) for 
and towards the maintenance and the bringing up of my said children shall 
have the use and occupation of all my movable goods &c. within my house 
of Patmer Hall and so much of my lands, tenements and rents (except 
Patmer Hall woods aud Shaw woods) as are now iu my hands aud pos- 
session by lease or otherwise till John Scrogges, mine eldest son, shall ac- 
complish his full age of one and twenty years or be married. My two 
younger sons Edward and Francis Scrogges. To my daughters Penelope 
Scrogges, Smythie Scrogges, Emlyn Scrogges, Susan Scrogges and Ana 
Scrogges two hundred pounds apiece. Reference to jointures settled on 
mother, Dame Mary Stanley, and wife Penelope Scrogges. Provisions for 
descent of property. The residue to John Smythe E?q. my father in law 
and my loving mother his wife, Dame Mary Stanley, whom I do make, 
ordain and constitute my executors &c. Savile, 91. 

Anne Scroggs of Earles Colne, Essex, maiden, 28 August 1641. proved 
18 September 1641. I the daughter of Edward Scroggs late of Aldbury, 
Herts., Esq. To my brother John Scroggs Esq. fifty pounds, he to pay 
unto my brother William Harlakenden, executor, my whole portion of six 
hundred pounds, together with all the interest thereof due unto me upon 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings. in England. 125 

accompt to the flay of my death. My sister Goad's legacy shall be paid by my 
executor and my brother Edward's legacy likewise, viz% one hundred pounds 
to my sister Goad and to my brother Edward Scroggs filty pounds. Small 
bequests to Sister Scroggs, to nieces Margaret Scroggs and Susanna Goade, 
to Christopher Purple my nepliew and Mary Purple my niece and old Mr. 
Purple their grandfather and to his wife, to Richard Harlakenden of Colne 
Prior Esq. and his wife, and to Jane Clench and to my aunt Hawkesbee, 
widow, and her daughter Ludgater. And to my cousin Sara Simmes (who 
is now in New r Engfand) live pouuds. To Mr. Daniel Rogers of Wethers- 
field five pounds. ' To Mr. Till, preacher of the Word, twenty shillings 
and to my brother Sutton twenty shillings. To Mr. Josselin minister of 
Earies Colne forty shillings and to my cousin Dracott rive pounds. Jacob 
Garret of Colne Wake, Avery Saunders of Earies Colne and John Viall 
of Wethersfield. To Samuel Burton my godson forty shillings and to Mrs. 
Coseu of Earies Colne twenty shillings. To my sister Smith the wife of 
William Harlakenden the full sum of three hundred pounds and all such 
monev aud other good? us are now in her custody and keeping. And if 
any of those parties to whom any legacies are formerly given do depart this 
life before they be due and payable theu the said legacies shall remain aud 
be due to my sister Smith Harlakenden ; and I make and ordain Mr. Stephen 
Marshall, preacher of God's word at Finchingfieid, and my brother in law 
Mr. William Harlakenden of Earies Colne, gentleman, executors &c. 

Evelyn, 115. 

[The cousin Sara Simraes, described as " now in New England," -was, I sup- 
pose, the " Mrs. Sarah Symmes" who had a grant of land in Cambridge, 1639, 
and died there 10 June 1653 (Savage). She was undoubtedly oue of the daughters 
of the Randolph Symmes referred to in the preceding wills. Her relationship 
with these parties must have been, I think, through the Burtons and not 
through the Scrogcres line. The match of Sir Thomas" Stanley with the widow 
Scroggs is shown in the Stanley pedigree, printed in the Visitation of Cumber- 
land for ltJi'5 (Harleian Society's Publications.) A very imperfect pedigree of 
Scrog.ses may be found in the Visitation of Hertfordshire, also published by 
the Harleian Society. It may prove an interesting piece of geuealogical work to 
attempt to enlarge "and amend that pedigree with the help of the notes I have 
here given. 

The reference to " Randall Symmes" and his wife in the following will would 
seem to make that worthy of preservation in connection with the foregoing 
wills. Hexry F. Waters. 

Anne Scroggs, the daughter of Edward, whose Will precedes hers, had a 
sister Smith or Smithee who married William Harlakeuden, son of Thomas 
and Dorothy (Cheney) Harlakenden. William, who was executor of his si-ter 
in laws will, died 18 March 1674. His wife Smithee was buried 28 June 1631, 
as we find by the diary of Ralph Josselin, who preached her funeral sermon, 
published in 1652 : 

"26 June 1651. Mrs Harlakenden died; ye 28, Mrs Smitha Har. buried, i 
Justices wch had each bur'd a wife carried her to ye grave, 2 Thess. iv. 13. 18." 

This Ralph Josselin is of the same family as John, the author of Two Voy- 
ages to New England and New England's Rarities (whose pedigree is printed in 
the Register, Vol. xl.. p. 290, and iu Josselyn's Voyases, ed. "of 1865), and of 
Henry who was identified with Capt. John Mason in New England. He is the 
beneficiary mentioned for the sum of forty shillings. In his dairy is also to be 
found '-Roger Har. ob. in New England* 1637, or thereabts." This refers to 
Roger Harlakenden, who came in the Defence, 1635. with wife Elizabeth, who 
at his death married Herbert Pelham. For will of Ro<rer Harlakenden see Re- 
gister, ii., p. 181. In the Defence also came Rev. Thomas Shepard, of Cam- 
bridge, who had been at Earies Colne; as is evidenced by the ghost story iu 
which he is mentioned, in Richard Baxter's " Certainty of the world of Spirits 
fully evinced." 



126 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Richard Havlakenden, mentioned in the will, was brother of Roger of New 
England; he married for a second wife Mary, daughter of Sir Edward Denny. 

The sister of Roirer and Richard. Mabel, married Gov. John Haynes of Con- 
necticut. As suggested by Mr. Waters, we find Sarah Simes of Cambridge 
died 10 June, 1653. Her will, dated i April, 1653, mentions " brother John 
Stedman" and "brother William French " (born in Halsted, Essex County, 
Eng.), but no relative of the name of Simes. French was one of those who 
came in the Defence, and is put down as servant to Harlakenden, probably 
to avoid detection. The age of Sarah Simes, who was al&o of the party, was 
giren f.s thirty. 

(See Topographer and Genealogist, Vol. i, pp. 228-258, edited by John Gough 
Nichols F.sT A., for a full pedigree of Harlakenden families; also Register, 
Vol. xv-., pp. 327-329). W. K. Watkixs.] 

Thomas FIewett, citizen and clothinaker of London, 10 October 1575. 
proved 19 June 1576. My body is to be buried in the parish church of St. 
Clement where I am a parishioner. The poor of the parish of Wales in 
the Co. of York where I was born. To my worshipful and loving friends 
and cousins Mr. Edward Osborne and Anne his wife, to either of them a 
ring of gold, price three pounds. To my godson Hewett Osborne live 
pounds. Mv cousin William Hewett. clothworker, and my cousin his wife. 
My cousin Nicholas FIewett, clothworker and my cousin his wife. To my 
cousin Randall Syfnes a ring of gMd, price forty shillings, and to his wife 
a ring of gold, price twenty shillings. To my cousin Richard Syhles of 
Welforde a yard and half of pewke, price twelve shillings a yard. My 
son in law John Hawkes. draper. Richard Foster, clothworker. My ap- 
prentices William Dawkes, Robert Bate, Henry Parker and Thomas White. 
My cousin George Monnox, gen', and his wife. Mr. Anthony Bridges of 
Ham and 'his wife and Thomas Bridges my godson. My cousin Sturdi- 
vaunt, swordbearer of London. Mr. Lewsey, gent'. To my cousin Dum- 
mer a ring, price thirty shillings. My cousin Sandforde. Mr. Megges, 
draper. My son in law Richard Staper and his wife. My sons Henry and 
William FIewett. Henry Clyderowe. My daughter Bridget Hewett. Mr. 
Richard Raynoide, draper. Robert Dove, merchant taylor. Thomas FIewett, 
wiredrawer, Nicholas Hewett, scrivener. The house I now live in, with 
shop, &c. I give to my well beloved wife Elizabeth, to have and hold during 
her natural life, remainder to Henry Hewett my son and heir apparent. 
To my said wife Elizabeth my manor or grange of Sherox in the county 
of Nottingham or York or elsewhere, now in the tenure or occupation 
of Johu Raines and others, to hold for her life, remainder to my son Henry 
&c. Others mentioned, among whom, cousin John Wyghte's wife, Jasper 
Wraye and Mrs Wraye of Edmundton and Thomas Wraye her son. John 
Browne and his wife &c. My daughter Staper's four children now living. 
Mr. William Save of Yesnam and -my cousin Robert Saye his eldest sou. 
Mr. Edmund Burton. My very friend Mr. Boswell of the Court of Wards. 
To my son William one hundred pounds over and besides his portion. I 
make and ordain my dear and well beloved friend and cousin Mr. Edward 
Osborne, alderman, and Flenry FIewett my son my executors, and give to 
the said Mr. Edward Osborne, for his painstaking, twenty pounds. And I 
make and ordain my loving friends William Dummer and John Browne my 
overseers to see this my last will and testament in all points performed, as 
my special trust is in them. And I give to each of them six pounds thirteen 
shillings four pence. Carew, 14. 

[The Edward Osborne above referred to was the well-known Lord Mayor of 
Loudon, arid ancestor of the Duke of Leeds, about whom the romantic story is 



1894.] ^Genealogical Gleanings in England. 127 

told of his leaping into the Thames from London Bridge to save from drowning 
the only daughter of Sir William Hewett, then Lord Mayor, to whom young 
Osborne was at that time apprenticed. The damsel afterwards became the wife 
of her preserver with the full conseut of her father, who is reported to have 
refused her hand to certain of the nobility and others, and to have bestowed it, 
together with a great dower, upon his former apprentice with the declaration 
that " Osborne saved her life and Osborne shall have her." Richard Staper 
who married the daughter of Thomas Hewett, was probably the father of the 
Hewyt Staper who married Elizabeth, daughter of Roger Owfeilc'e. 

Henry F. Waters.] 

Ann Brumpstead of St. Martin in the Fields, Middlesex, widow, 5 June 
1658, proved 30 September 1658. To be buried in St. Martin's near late 
husband John Brumpstead deceased. To my two daughters Mary Breedon, 
wife of John Breedon, and Ruse Brumpstead five pounds apiece, to buy 
them mourning, and all my household goods in the Kings Head except my 
plate and the standards belonging to the house. To my daughter Rose a 
silver tankard of the value of five pounds and six silver spoons. To my 
daughter Mary Breedon six silver spoons. To my son in law Master John 
Breedon, her husband, five pounds to buy him mourning and the sum of ten 
pounds more. To my daughter in law Lucy Brumpstead ten pounds and 
also (for my grandchild Thomas Brumpstead) six silver spoons. To my 
cousin Thomas Pearson ten pounds. To my son Thomas Brumpstead my 
dwelling house known as the King's Head and all the residue of my goods 
and chattels &e. Wootten, 524. 

Thomas Breedon, 22 October 1682, proved 1 April 1689. Wife Mary 
to be sole executrix and to have all my outward estate &c, she to pay all 
my debts and to pay to my son John when he shall come to the age of 
twenty-four years two hundred pounds and the same to sons Zaccheus and 
Robert at twenty-four, and to my daughter Mary Aylemer and her three 
children twenty shillings apiece and to my grandson John Breedon twenty 
shillings. 

In presence of Z. Sedgwicke, Thomas Jenings. 

[The Probate Act Book shows that the testator wa3 of Crowton ia 
Northampton]. Ent, 48. 

Zaciteus Breedon of London, mariner, now bound to Carolina and 
Maryland, 21 September 1685, proved 1 September 1686. I give and be- 
queath unto my loving cousin Lawrence Stephenson, citizen and ironmonger 
of London, twenty pounds, to buy him mourning, and twenty pounds more. 
The residue to my honored father Thomas Breedon of Southmorton, Oxon, 
gen'. And I appoint my said cousin Lawrence Stevenson full and sole 
executor. Lloyd, 114. 

Thomas Brumpsted of Midgham, Berks Esq. 26 February 1689. 
proved 20 October 1690. Two leases I hold from the Dean and 'Chapter 
of Westminster settled on my wife in part of her jointure. My brother 
M r Charles Brumpsted and my friend M r Edward Noell to sell the manor 
of Midgham and the lands which I lately purchased from Mr. Richard 
Garrett and all other my estate in Berks. After payment of my debts the 
residue to be equally divided between my daughter Lucy Brumpsted and 
my sou Charles (both under twenty-one). If either die the share of him 
or her so dieing to go to the survivor and my sou John. If both die then 
both shares to my son John. To the said John the messuage or inn called 















. 



128 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

the King's Head, in the Strand, after the death of my wife Martha. (Other 
property, including the Greyhound Tavern in the Strand.) Brother and 
sister in law Sir John Friend and the Lady Anne his wife. Brother in law 
and sister Timothy Dodd and Elizabeth his wife. My brother in law 
Robert Breedon. Dyke, 146. 

Jane Breedon of Great Chesham, Bucks, widow, 15 September 1628, 
proved 15 February 1632. To my two sous Zacheus and Benaia Breedon, 
ten shillings apiece. To Bethsheba Grover, my daughter, twenty pounds 
(and certain household stuff). Priscilla Grover, her daughter. To Banna 
Wigge, my daughter, other twenty pounds &c. To Obadiah Tailer, my 
grandchild, twenty pounds if he shall live .to have children &c. The poor 
of Great C'uesham. The residue to my daughter Abigail Gladman. I 
make Elkana Gladman, my son in law, full and sole executor, and my well 
beloved kinsmen Humphrey Greeneway of Great Chesham, Glover, and 
Isaac Raveninge ah Carter, of West Wickcoinbe, overseers. 

Russell, 12. 

[The above seemed worth saving on account of the meution of a son Zacheus 
Breedon, thus sunuesting a relatiouship with our Capt. Thomas Breedon of 
Boston. H.I\ W.] 

Robert Dalyber of Selliettes in the parish of Stoke Abbot, Dorset, 
yeoman, 20 March 1632, proved 27 May 1633. To be buried in the 
churchyard of Stoke Abbot before the church porch, between the Thorn 
and the Church porch there, near the place where my father was buried. 
And my will and desire is that I may have a tomb set over me, and towards 
that charge I give thirteen shillings four pence. The poor and the church 
remembered. I give to my second son Tristran Daliber fifty pounds; to 
be paid in two years and ten pounds more of the money due upon bond by 
Edward Cotherington, gen', at Michaelmas 1640. To son Samuel fifty 
pounds and also twenty pounds (as above) in May 1635. To son Joseph 
fifty pounds and also ten pounds (as above) 1640. To my daughter Mary 
Dalyber fifty pounds. To my daughter Sara Daliber fifty pounds. To 
my youngest daughter Rebecca Daliber fifty pounds. My two sons in law 
"Walter Burt and John Lesty. Josias Burt eldest son of Walter. Tue 
three sons of John Lesty, John, Edward and William. My wife. The 
residue to my eldest son Robert Daliber whom I make sole executor. ■» 

Russell, 48. 

George Salter of Dedham, Essex, grazier, 7 September 1653, proved 
18 July 1654. To my son Samuel Salter my house and lands in Rattles- 
den, Suffolk, he paying to my loving wife four pounds a year during her 
natural life, she payiug the fine at his admittance. And my son Samuel 
shall pay unto my daughter Abigail in New England, if she be yet living 
or if she hath any children, ten pounds within two years after my decease, 
and to give to my daughter Hanna in xs'ew England, if she be yet living 
or if she have any children, ten pounds within four years after my wife's 
decease. If either of them die and leave no children her portion shall be 
giveu, half of it to my son Theophilus and half of it to my daughter surviving; 
and if both of them depart and leave no children I give it unto my son 
Samuel. To my son Thomas five pounds and to Theophilus five pounds. 
Five shillings ea;h to my daughters Abigail and Hannah. The remainder 
to my wife whom I ordain to be my sole executrix. 

Proved by the oath of Mary Salter the relict and executrix. 

Alchin, 65. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 129 

[A Theophiins Salter, of Ipswich 1648, was cm June 30, 1653, sentenced to 
pay £5, the witness and fees, for endeavouring to marry Mary Smith Avithout 
her friends' consent, according to Felt. — \V. K. Watkins.] 

Edward Bullocke of Queen's College, Oxford. Bachelor of Arts, 10 
October 19 th James, proved 2 November 1621. My body to be buried in 
the church of the parish of St. Peters' in the East, Oxford. To my aunt 
Mrs. Priscilia Bullocke one hundred pounds. To aunt Mrs. Sarah Knighte, 
wife of Thomas Knighte, of Worliugham Suffolk, parson, forty pounds. 
To my uncle Rowland Wilson, citizen and vintner of London, and to Mary 
his wife five pounds apiece to buy them rings. To my uncle Richard Newell 
of London, clothworker, and Jaue his wife five pounds apiece to buy them 
rings. To the aforesaid Thomas Knighte ten pounds. To Michael Dover 
of London, scrivener, forty pounds, and I forgive him twenty pounds he 
oweth me &e. To William Tifiiu of London, mercer, his three children, 
viz* Benjamin, Mary and Alice, live pounds auiece. To the children of 
the within specified Rowland Wilson, viz'. Rowland and John, Mary, Eliza- 
beth, Jane, Sarah and Mabel, five pounds apiece. To Sarah Titiiue's four 
children, John, Richard, Mary and Jane, twenty pounds apiece. To the poor 
of St. Paneras in Soper Laue, Loudon, ten pounds and of St. Peter's the 
East in Oxford ike pounds. Five pounds to be bestowed in books towards 
the Library of Queen's College, Oxford. To my loving friend Mr. Tomp- 
sod, who was my tutor, forty shillings to buy him a ring. To the minister 
that shall preach at my funeral twenty shillings. The residue to my loving 
uncles Melchesidick Bullocke and William Tiifine, whom I make my sole 
executors &c., and I do make Rowland Wilson and Richard Newell super- 
visors. 

Wit: Adam Airay, Avery Thompson, Thomas Midleton. Dale, 96. 

George Benson. Will written and subscribed with my own hand at 
my house at Patchinge July seventh 1629, proved 30 April 1632. My 
wife (whom I make my executor) shall have one fourth part of the clear 
temporal estate which it shall please God to grant rue at my decease, aud 
the rest to be equally divided amongst my children, whom I hope she will 
be careful to bring up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. To the 
poor of each of the two parishes committed to my charge I do give twenty 
shillings. To every of them that shall be my covenant servants at my decease 
I do give five shillings. Overseers of this my will I do appoint my trusty 
friends and loving brethren Mr. Henry Carleton and Mr. Thomas Vicers. 
And I do desire aud hope my loving nephew Mr. Rowland Wilson will be 
a friend unto my children as he hath been to me at all times. 

Commission issued to Henry Carlton to administer the goods &c. during 
the minorities of George, Michael, Edward and Alice Benson, the children, 
for the reason that he named no executor. Audley, 40. 

Robert Wilson citizen and draper of London, 2 January 1639, proved 
18 January 1639. My body to be buried in the parish church of St. Bennett 
Sherhogg in Cheap Ward in London, if 1 shall die in Loudon or no further 
out of the said city than Stoke Newington, Midd. Mention of Theophiius 
Biddulye aud Robert Birkenad, now copartners with me. My goods &c. 
to be divided into three equal parts, according to the ancient custom of the 
city of Loudon, one part for Catharine Wilson my well beloved wife, one 
to and among all my now children &o. and the third I reserve for the 
performance of my will, in legacies &c. I give to my wife my lease and 

YOL. XLVIII. 12 









. 



130 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

interest of and in my now dwelling house in Cheap Side London and the 
lease of my house in Stoke Newington &c. Son Thomas (under twenty- 
one) to have ray lease cLc. of two messuages &c. in Pater Noster Row. now 

or late in the tenure &c. of Row and Edward Johnson, he to pay a 

certaiu annuity to my sister Margaret Verney. If Thomas should die before 
he reaches the said age then the lease to go to my son Richard (subject to 
the same condition). To my sister in law Anne Wilson, widow, lace the 
wife of Samuel Wilson my brother deceased, forty pouuds, and six pounds 
for mourning. To her son Samuel Wilson, whom I have [.laced apprentice 
with Mr. Rowland Wilson, fifty pounds &c, and fortv shillings also for 
mourning. To every other of the six children of my said late brother 
Samuel, viz' Anne, Roda, Sara, Symon, Rowland and Robert Wilson, fifty 
pounds apiece (with provision for education &c. during their minorities). 
I give seventeen pounds to be bestowed in mourning for the said six other 
children. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother Richard Wilsou the sum of 
one hundred marks, to be paid him within one year next after my decease, 
or sooner if his urgent occasions require the same and he make request 
therefor to my executrix. And, if he come not over from Virginia, if he send 
sufficient authority for the same his legacy shall be sent unto him in such 
commodities as he shall send for. I forgive him also and acquit and dis- 
charge him from all such sums as he doth now owe me by bond, book or 
any other obligation whatsoever. And I give him my interest in the shop 
in Soper Lane which I hold by lease from him. I give to my godson 
Kobert Wilson, son of my said brother Richard, fifty pounds, to be paid at 
the accomplishment of his age of one and twenty years. I give to my 
brother Richard's other son, Richard Wilson, fifty pounds (as before). I 
give to the hist child of my said brother Richard which was born in Vir- 
ginia, begotteu of the body of Katheriue, now or late his wife, twentv-five 
pouuds, to be paid at the accomplishment of his or her age of twenty-one. 
To my sister Margaret Varney one annuity of twelve pounds, payable to 
the messuages &c. in Pater Noster Row aforesaid, to hold during her 
natural life, &c, and I forgive and remit unto her all the debts she 
oweth me, by book or otherwise. I give to John Varney, sou of my sistt r 
Varney, fifty pounds (at one aud twenty) and to Katheriue Varney, tier 
daughter, fifty pounds. To my sister, for mourning, six pouuds and to each 
of her two children forty shillings apiece. To my brother in law Edward 
Lycoris and to Mary his wife, my sister, fifty pounds; and twelve pouuds to 
them also for mourning. I forgive unto my brother in law Edward Browninge 
twenty pounds which he did borrow of me and twenty pounds more. I 
I also give to my said brother in law Edward Browning and his wife, my 
sister, twelve pounds for mourning; and to such child of my said brother 
Browninge and his now wife as shall be living at my decease, twenty 
pouuds. To Sarah Watson, my said sister's daughter by a former husband 
"deceased, fifty pouuds (at one and twenty) and my executrix to allow four 
pounds a year toward the better education and maintenance of the same 
Sara &c. Provision in case she be put to service aud bound apprentice. 
To Mary Watson, sister of the said Sarah, twenty pouuds &c. To Ann 
Smith, daughter unto my sister Anne Smith deceased, fifty pouuds (at one 
and twenty). To my mother in law Mrs. Rudd ten pounds and also six 
pounds for mourning. To my sister in law Margaret Rudd four pounds 
for mourning. To my sister Anne Rudd ten pouuds in money aud also five 
pouuds for mourning. To my brother in law William Williams and Eliza- 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 131 

beth his wife ten pounds for mourning and also to the said Elizabeth five 
pounds. I forgive to my brother Thomas Rtidd, my wife's own brother, the 
money he oweth me by book, for goods he had of me (about three score 
pounds) and I give him five pounds for mourning, and five pound* more as 
a legacy. Sundry bequests to friends. To my cousin John Awbrey the 
elder forty shillings. To cousin Mr. Gilbert Harrison, alderman, and to my 
loving kinswoman, his wife, four pounds apiece to mike them rings. To 
my cousin Christopher Clarke four pounds to make him a ring. To my 
cousin Mary Morgan three pounds. To Magdalen Burnett widow, my 
wife's aunt, forty shillings. To Elizabeth Burton daughter of Elizabeth 
Burton, my wife's kinswoman dwelling with me, ten pounds. To my aunt 
Ferris and her daughter forty shillings apiece. One hundred pounds to 
the Company of Drapers. To sundry Hospitals and parishes &c. To my 
cousin Ledir.gham and his wife twelve pounds for mourning. To his son 
my godson thirty pounds. The residue to my wife Catharine whom I make 
sole executrix. I give my lands called Gallyons, lying in Eastham and 
Woolwich, which I purchased of the Lord Savage, to my son Robert Wil- 
son, with remainder to sons Richard and Thomas and next to my two eldest 
daughters Anne and Katharine Wilson. A messuage &c. in Swan Alley 
near Coleman Street to my son Richard. Coventry, 11. 

[Hotten gives in his original lists, p. 105, under date of 6 July, 1635, in the 
Paul of London bound for Virginia, Katherine Wilson, age 28 years, and 
two children, Robert and Richard Wilson, a<ie 6 and 5 years respectively. 

On p. 94. under date 20 June. 1635, in the Philip for Virginia, was Richard 
Wilson. The age of this Richard is sriven as 19 years, which, however, may be 
an error, and-the above the Wilson family of Virginia alluded to in the will of 
Robert Wilson. — W. K. Watkins.] 

Rape (Randolph) Ingram: citizen and iremonger of London. 14 June 
1644, proved 19 December 1 644. Wife Mary. My four sons, Rowland, 
John, Raph and George Ingram (all under one and twenty years of age). 
To my mother, Mary Ingram, one hundred and fifty pounds. My brother 
William Ingram and his wife. Mv brother Robert Ingram and his wife 
and six children, viz f Mary, Anne, Richard, Sarah and one other whose 
name I do not remember. My brother in law William Harrison. My 
brother Thomas Ingram. My brother Arthur Ingram. The children of 
my brother and sister Harrison, viz 1 Mary and Alice. Mr. Rowland Wil- 
son the elder and his wife and Mr. Rowland Wilson the younger and his 
wife. My cousin Mary Crispe the wife of doctor Crispe deceased. Mr. 
Henry St. John and his wife. Mr. John Wood and his wife. Others 
named. Wife Mary to be executrix and Mr. Rowland Wilson the eider, 
Rowland Wilson the younger, Mr. Henry St. John and my brother Robert 
Ingram to be overseers. To old Mrs. Carleton at Rotterdam ten pounds 
and to Mr. Edmand White of Rotterdam ten pounds. To Mary Soames 
now dwelling in Duke's Place five pounds. And my desire is. in regard 
of these troblesome times, to be privately buried in a decent manner, and 
no mourners to be thereat but my own family. 

Commission issued to Rowland Wilson Sen r and Rowland Wilson jun r 
executors of the will of Mary Ingram who had departed this life before 
taking upon herself the burden of executorship. Rivers, 16. 

Mart Ingram: widow, 10 October 1644, proved 19 December 1644. 
My three sisters, Katherine, Jane and Dorothy. My mother in law Mary 
Ingram. My brother Robert and his wife and their children. My brother 









. 



132 , Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

William Ingram and his wife. My brother Harrison and his wife and their 
two daughters. Thomas and Arthur Ingram. My loving kinsman Rowland 
Wilson the elder and Rowland Wilson the younger to be full and sole 
executors &c. Mrs. Mary Grispe the elder. Mrs. Mary Soame. Mrs. 
Boylston. All the children of Mary Crispe. Others. For mourning I 
leave to my uncle and cousin Wilson to take care of and order and to see 
me decently interred. Rivers, 1G. 

Ka.thf.rixe Highlord of London widow. 22 May 1G48. proved 20 July 
1648. My body to be buried in a strong wainscot coffin within the parish 
church of Rennet Sherfug. London, as near unto the place there where my 
first husband, Robert Wilson, lyeth buried as conveniently may be. It 
shall be buried by night, within three days after my decease, without any 
vain glory or pomp, a; id no more than friends and near acquaintance to be 
invited to my burial. Bequests to the poor and to sundry prisons. The 
poor where I sometimes lived in Mark Lane. To my dear mother Mrs. 
Anne Rudd twenty pounds for a ring and ten pounds for mourning. To 
my sister Margaret Rudd. for a ring and mourning, one hucdred pounds. 
To ray sister Martin twenty pounds for a ring and ten pounds for mourning. 
To my sister Williams twenty pounds and ten pounds for mourning. To 
my sister Gower ten pounds for mourning. To my brothers in law M r 
Gower, Mr. Martin and Mr. Williams six pounds apiece for mourning cloaks. 
To my brother Thomas Rudd one bundled pounds and ten pounds for 
mourning and to my sister, his wife, five pounds for mourning and ten 
pounds for a ring. To William and Anne Williams, my sister's children, 
twenty pounds apiece to be paid at the accomplishment of their several ages 
of one and twenty years, and to Katherine and Margaret Williams my 
cousins (at one and twenty) fifty pounds apiece. To Robert Birkinhead, 
my sister's son, fifty pounds at one and twenty. To Theophilus Birken- 
head and Susan Birkenhead twenty pounds (at one and twenty). To 
Thomas Rudd son of my brother Thomas one hundred pounds at twenty 
one. To Anne Rudd, his daughter, twenty pounds at one and twenty. To 
my aunt Mainwareing and my aunt Ferris ten pounds apiece. To my cousin 
Samuel Wilson for mourning t.Sn pounds. To my sister in law Anne Wil- 
son ten pounds. To my cousin Sara Fowke twenty pounds. To my cousins 
Robert Wilson and Rowland Wilson fifty pounds apiece at one and twenty. 
To John Warney, Katherine Warney. Sarah Watson, Mary Watson, my 
cousins, and to the son of my cousin Anne Wil.-on deceased twenty pounds 
apiece at one and twenty- To Robert Wilson and Richard Wilson, my 
cousins now in Virginia fifty pounds apiece at one and twenty. To my 
sister Greene and my sister Browning twenty pounds apiece to make them 
rings and for mourning. My cousin Sarah Parham. Mr. Taylor in Cole- 
mau St. minister. My cousin Anne Smith. My daughter Katherine Aus- 
tin and her now husband. My daughter Mary Wilson (under seventeen 
years of age). My daughter Martha Wilson (uuder sixteen). My son 
Robert Wilson. My grandchild Thomas Awsten. My cousins Margaret, 
Katherine and Edith Rudd. Elizabeth, John, Robert and Richard Rudd. 
My cousin Thomas Rudd, son of my uncle Thomas. Certain messuages 
&C the manor of Keythorpe in the County of Leicester which I purchased 
of Francis Wayte Gen' the one half I give to my sou Richard Wilson and 
the other half to Thomas, my son Robert to have it all in his custody until 
both my sons accomplish the age of one and twenty years. My said son 
Robert to be full and sole executor and my sen in law Thomas Awsten and 
my brother Thomas Rudd overseers. Essex, 116. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings hi England. 133 

Rowland Wilson the younger of London Esq., one of the sheriffs of the 
City of Loudon, 16 February 1649. First I do request my de;ir and loving 
wife that she accept of three thousand five hundred pounds (being; the por- 
tion I had with her) and all my Jewells, plate and household stuff (besides 
her jointure which I do hereby confirm) iu lieu and satisfaction of her cus- 
tomary part appertaining to her by the custom of London out of my per- 
sonal estate, which if she will accept of then I do will my father shall bear 
the funeral charges for my burial and satisfy and pay all my debts out of 
the residue of my estate hereafter id this will bequeathed to him. To my 
brother in law Samuel Wilson and his wife one hundred pounds apiece. 
To my brother John Carleton and his wife one hundred pounds apiece and 
to Bijdey Carleton one hundred pounds and to Samuel Carleton my best 
saddle horse. To my sister Mary Crispe three hundred pounds. To 
William Hirdson and his wife fifty pounds apiece. To Anne Coxe and her 
daughter fifty pounds in lieu of what I owe them. To Joane Hasell tea 
pounds. To Mrs Ingram, my cousin Raphe Ingram's mother, fifty pounds. 
To Mr. George Cokaiue and his wife, uow being with me. fifty pounds 
apiece. Certain bequests to the poor &c. To my brother White, for the 
use of his three eldest children, three hundred pounds. To my cousiu 
George Wilson ten pounds. Others. The rest to my father Rowland 
Wilson Esq. My wife Mary to be sole executrix and M r Thomas Smith 
the accomptant overseer. 

Commission 2 April 1650 to Rowland Wilson the father to administer 
(with the will annexed) Mary Wilson the relict and executrix having re- 
nounced. Pembroke, 56. 

John Carter of London, gentleman, 25 July 1649, proved 4 October 
1650. Brother William Carter and his wife and their son William Carter. 
My brother in law Gabriel Miller and his son William Miller. William'3 
mother, my sister, Anne Miller. Her two children Anne and Matthew Miller. 
My brother in law Richard Aspelin arid my sister Aspelin, his wife and her 
two daughters. My brother in law Thomas Smiuell and his wife, my sister, 
Elizabeth Sminell. My sister in law Edith Carter, late wife of my brother 
Nicholas Carter, and her daughter Barbara Carter. My brother in law 
Thomas Colpott and his sons John Colpott and Thomas Colpott. The 
parish of Eaton in Bedfordshire where I was born. My cousin Francis 
Wiltou of that parish. My cousin Anne Wilson. Mrs. Wilkinson whose 
son lives with my said cousin Wilson. My cousin Samuel Wilson's wife. 
My cousin Thomas Fowke's wife. My cousin Symon Wilson. My cousins 
Rowland Wilsou and Robert Wilson. I make said cousins Anne Wilson, 
Samuel Wilson and Thomas Fowke executors dec. 

Then follows a letter For my couziu Anne Wilson at the Naggs- 

head Tavern near Blackwell Hall, and for my cozen Samuel Wilson mer- 
chant in Bishopsgate Street near Gressum College and to my cozen Thomas 
Fooke grocer near Lawrence Church &c. Reference made to his departure 
from England. My cozen William Miller I hear isjaow come for Ireland. 

Pembroke, 165. 

Rowland Wilson of London, Esq. and citizen and vintner of London, 
5 February 1651 proved 1 June 1654. My body to be buried in the parish 
church of St. Martin Outwich, where I now dwell. My wife Mary shall 
hold for life my house and site of the late Priory of Merton alias Marten &c. 
in Surrey which I purchased of Sir Francis Clake, knight, on or about 19 
vol. xlviii. 12* 



134 - Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

June 1624, and lands purchased of William Carpenter 16 August 1635 and 
3 January 1623. After her decease I give said premises in trust to Samuel 
Wilson merchant and Thomas Boultou cooper (my friends) to sell the same 
and dispose of tlie proceeds according to ray will. To Ellis Crispe son of 
my daughter Mary Howe my tenements in Wimbledon, Barnes, Mortlake, 
and Wauodsworth Surrey &c. chargeable with annuities unto his brethren 
and sisters, Tobias, Samuel, Edward, Rowland and Hester Crispe. I give 
my messuage or dwelling house &c. in St. Martyn Outwich unto my grand- 
child, Ellis Crispe, and the two tenements thereunto adjoining unto my 
grandchild Tobias Crispe. I give to my two grandchildren Edmond 
White and Rowland White, sons of my late daughter Elizabeth White, my 
copyhold lands at Tottenham High Cross in Middlesex. My lands at Bowe 
and Bromly in Middlesex I give to my daughter Mary Rowe, uuw wife of 
Col. Owen Rowe, for life and after her decease to my grandchildren Edward 
Crispe aud Ro viand Crispe. To my grandchild Samuel Crispe the Tavern 
called the Kings Arms over against Iremonger Lane's End in St. Lawrence 
in the d Jewry, London, aud the two tenements adjoining, in Basishaw 
Street in the parish cf St. Michael Basishaw. Other lands and houses 
bequeathed. A yearly annuity to Wiliiam Heardson and Anne his wife. 
The Worshipful Company of Vintners whereof I am a member. My 
lands, tenements- and hereditaments in Greegarth in the parish of Kendall 
in Westmoreland to my grandchild Ellis Crispe, subject to a trust. Refer- 
ence to the sous of said daughter Mary Rowe by her late husband Doctor 
Tobias Crispe. Rowland, Ellis and Mary Carleton, children of Mary 
Carleton, daughter of my said daughter Mary Rowe. My brother in law 
Christopher Sands, late husband of my sister Rebecka aud her children. 
My cousin George Wilson. My godsou Rowland Ingram. My sister in 
law Jaue Newell. My godson Benjamin son of my brother in law William 
Tiffen. All my other lands &c. to the said Samuel Wilson and Thomas 
Boylston (in trust). To the wife of the said Samuel W T ilson five pounds 
for a ring and to my cousin Thomas Boylston's wife five pounds for a 
riDg. 

In a codicil dated 12 April 1654 he appointed his wife Mary Wilson aud 
grandson Samuel Crispe executors instead of Samuel Wilson and Thomas 
Boylstou. Andrew Middletou and George Thimbleby to be overseers. 
Another codicil was added 26 April 1654. Alchin, 41. 

The same will was also registered the next year (1655) in Book Aylett, 
321, where also appears record of a sentence for confirmation of the said 
will in a cause promoted by Mary Wilson the relict and Samuel Crispe the 
graudchild, executors of the said Will and Testament, against Edmund 
White the younger, Elizabeth Cox otherwise White, aud Mary D<ivy, 
otherwise White, grandchildren also of the deceased. Aylett, 321. 

Dated 25 May 1655. 

Jane Newell of Merton Abbey, Surrey, widow, 28 December 1657, 
proved 26 February 1657. To be buried with decency and good order, 
without any pompe or vain show. To my kiusmau Richard Newell the 
threescore pounds which I have settled in the hands of my cousin Thomas 
Boylston in trust, to be paid to him when he sets up his trade of vintner, 
as by writing dated the eight and twentieth day of November last past. If 
he die before this sum is due him I give twenty pounds thereof to his father 
Thomas Newell, ten pounds to my cousin Josias Solmes, ten pounds to 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 135 

Jane the daughter of Robert Newell. Gifts to Richard Newell, to cousin 
Solutes' children, to cousin Samuel Crispe, the writer of the will, to Mary 
Bodwell, to Mr. John Dawes, minister, and to Elizabeth Maiur. Forty 
shillings tc my sister Wilson to bestow on the poor. The residue to my 
loving cousin Henry Middleton and to Alice his wife, and I do appoint my 
said cousin Henry Middletou to be my sole executor, and I desire my cousin 
Thomas Boykton and my cousin Samuel Crispe to be overseers, and I give 
to each of them twenty shillings. 

Wit: Tobias Crispe, Samuel Crispe. Wootton, 80. 

Mary Wilson, in the Co. of Surrey, widow, 8 September 1659, proved 
3 October 1662. My body to be buried in Martin's Outwich Church, Lon- 
don, near my late deceased husband. To my daughter Mary Rowe one 
hundred and fifty pounds. To my son Col. Owen Rowe fifty pounds. To 
all my grandchildren living at ray decease fifty pounds apiece, viz' Ellis, 
Tobias, Samuel, Edward and Rowland Crispe, Mary Carleton, Hester 
Brett, Edmond White, Elizabeth Cox and Mary Dauye. To my son Col. 
Rowe's three daughters, Susanna. Sarah and Hannah, two pounds apiece. 
To Rowland and Mary Carleton. children of my grandchild Mary Carleton, 
twenty pounds apiece. To Edward Brett one hundred pounds and Mary 
Brett ten pounds, the two children of my grandchild Hester Brett. To 
Samuel Wilson, my kinsman, ten pounds and to his wife five pounds. To 
my cousin Thomas Boylston ten pounds, and to his wife five pounds, and to 
his daughter Elizabeth five pounds. To Mary, Josiah and Sarah Solute, 
three of the children of my cousin Edward Solme. To my cousin Alice 
Midleton fifty pounds. To Andrew Midleton five pounds and to his wife 
five pounds. To Anne Hindson five pounds. Bequests to George Thimel- 
bee, Rowland, John and Ralph Ingram. George Ingram my godson. My 
cousin Bishop widow. Mary Bodwell and her sister Anne Tiffin. Grace 
Dawson and her two daughters Jane and Beck. Mary Crisp, daughter to 
my grandson Ellis Crisp. Alice Clarke, daughter to my cousin Anu Cox. 
My old uncle of the North Countrey. My ten grandchildren. I will 
that Ellis Crispe shall have his grandfather's gold seal ring. My grandson 
Samuel Crispe to be sole executor, and for overseers I appoint my two 
grandchildren John Carleton and Tobias Crisp. My godson John Crispe, 
one of the sons of Sir Nicholas Crisp. And whereas my grandson Tobias 
Crisp opened and read this my will contrary to modesty and ingenuity I do 
for his so doing revoke my legacy to him of part of a pearl hatband and 
give his part to my daughter Row. 

Sealed 10 September 1659. A codicil, added 16 September 1661, con- 
tains bequests to cousin Dorothy Scott, Mrs. Middletou and Mr. Scott at the 
Abbey gate and his wife and to others. In this she calls herself of Mar- 
tine (MertonJ Abbey. Laund, 133. 

Edmund White of London Esquire 4 August 1632, proved 19 Feb- 
ruary 1632. My body to be buried in the parish church of St. Laurence 
in the Jewry, Loudou, as near unto the body of my late wife Elizabeth as 
conveniently may be. I have heretofore partly advanced my son Edmond, 
and have given unto him one thousand five hundred pounds and have also 
partly advanced my daughter Elizabeth in marriage with Gabriel Newman, 
citizen and goldsmith of London, and given with her one thousand pounds, 
and have advanced my daughter Sarah in marriage with George Hadley, 
citizen and grocer of London, and have given aud secured to give with hur 



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I 

I 

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13G , Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

one thousand pounds. I hereby devise and appoint, that these several sums 
of money given for the advancement of my said three children shall he put 
into Hotch pot together with that moiety or half part of my goods and per- 
sonal estate &c. which by the Custom of London shall belong unto mv chil- 
dren at the time of my death and that then the same shall be equally divided 
amongst my four children, viz' Edmond, James, Elizabeth and Sara, to the 
end that all my children may be equally advanced out of my personal estate 
according to the ancient and laudable Custom of the City of Loudon. The 
ether half commonly called the Testator's moiety, deviseable by me, I do 
dispose of as followeth. Then follow certain bequests. Among others to 
daughter in law Elizabeth White, the wife of my said son Edmond. ten 
pounds to buy her a ring. To his children living at my decease one hun- 
dred pounds apiece. The children of my daughter Elizabeth Newman. 
The children of my daughter Sara Hadley. My sister Alice Fowlar of 
Mickleton, Glouc.. widow. My brother John "White of Patrichborne, Kent. 
My nephev; John Fowlar of Mickleton, the son of my said sister Alice 
Fowlar. My kinsman Thomas Fowlar of London, cordwainer. My 
nephew Edmond Fowlar. another of my sister Alice Fowlar's sons. My 
niece Joane Fowlar her daughter. Thomas White the son of mv late 
brother Thomas White the elder deceased. Agatha Walker the daughter 
of my late brother Thomas White the younger, late of Hackney, Midd*, 
deceased. Her sister Ann. The poor of Mickleton in the Co. of Glouces- 
ter where I was born. My kinsman William Davies, son of Thomas 
Davies, citizen and merchant tailor of London. The Company of Haber- 
dashers. Property at Powick in the Co. of Worcester. My son Edmond 
to be executor. My grandson Edmond White, son of my son Edmond. 
My son James White. Russell, 14 

Anne Herdso.n of Merton, Surrey, widow, 30 July 1668, proved 16 
March 16G8. To be buried in Merton Churchyard near my bite hasband. 
Bequests to the Right Honorable the Lady Whitlocke. to Mary the wife of 
Col. Owen Rowe, to Lady Whitlock's son Saniuel Whitlock. to Robert 
Wilson the son of Robert Wilsou of Merton Esq., to Rowland Wilson sou 
of Samuel Wilson of London, merchant, and to Lis mother, to Allan Boyls- 
ton soti of Thomas Boylston of London, winecooper. and to his mother, to 
the grandchildren of Rowland Wilson Esquire deceased, to the three chil- 
dren of Mr. Ellis Crispe, to my cousin Mary Bowman daughter ri m? 
brother John Besford deceased, to Eiizaheth Moore daughter of mv hs-otl ■:■■: 
Thomas Besford deceased, to Jane Randolph wife of John Randolph of. 
Westberry in the Co. of Salop and her children John and Will jam, to the 
poor of Westberry, to Mary daughter of Alice Besford late of Westberry, 
widow, deceased, and to her sister Martha, and to others. The two chil- 
dren of my late husband's brother who heretofore lived near Kendall in 
Yorkshire. My nieces Mary Bowman and Elizabeth Moore to be joint 
executrices and Samuel Wilson of Bishopsgate Street, London, merchant, 
and Thomas Boylston of London, winecooper, to be overseers. 

Coke, 32. 

Edmund White the elder, citizen and haberdasher of London, 26 Nov- 
ember 1674, proved 5 December 1C74. To my sou Edmund all my estate, 
right, title, interest &c, granted to me by the decree of the Judicature for 
Determination of Differences touching Houses burnt or demolished by 
reason of the late dismall Fire in London, of and in those tofts and grounds 






oY 






1894.] Genealogical Gleanirigs in England. 137 

in St. Laurence Jewry London and of the messuages &c. by me lately 
erected thereon. My said son is now indebted to me in the sura of five 
hundred pounds. I did heretofore send unto my son in law Ilumfrey Davie 
of Boston in New England the sum of six hundred pounds upon a mortgage 
of lands. Three hundred pounds of it is hereby remitted. I have two 
hundred and fifty pounds capital adventure in the East India Stock in the 
name of my son in law M r William Coxe. The household goods in the 
house of my said son in law William Coxe, wherein I now dwell, I give to 
my daughter Elizabeth Coxe, his wife. Personal estate to be divided into 
two equal parts, of which one part to my three children, Edmund White, 
Elizabeth Coxe and Mary Davie. The other part for legacies. Ann 
Rogers of Hackney, my nephew John White, my cousin Baker and his 
wife, my cousin Ellis and his wife, my cousin Lane and his wife, my brother 
in law Gabriel Newman, the widow Halsted, relict of Abraham Halsted. 
Others. Coke, 150. 

Robert Davy of Credyton ah Kyrton, Devon, clothier, 30 March 1570, 
proved S June 1570. To be buried in the parish church of Crediton als 
Kyrton. To my two sons. Laurence and Ellis Davye my lease &c. of the 
Will Parkes in Crediton &c. and to Ellis my lease of a tenement in East 
town. Crediton. To four of the daughters of Giles Froste, named Sybbly, 
Katherin.e, Christian and Margaret, forty shillings apiece, to be paid at their 
several marriages. My son in law Richard Potter. My godson Robert 
Davie son of Gilbert Davie. The son of John Brodemeade which he had 
by Ware's daughter dwelling at Tyverton. My godson Robert Phillip son 
of John Phillip^ My god daughter Annye Chease daughter of Robert 
Chease by his first wife. P>ery of John Phillippe's children. My ser- 
vants John and Alice Ley. John Davve the younger, my son, dwelling in 
Exetor To Laurence Davy mv son my new house and garden lying over 
against the " bastyn " gate. John Davye son of my eldest son John Davye. 
Robert Davye my godson, son of John Davy my eldest son. Laurence 
Davye son of the aforesaid John Davye. Richard Davy of Bowe son of 
Thomas Davye deceased. John Ivensall. Thomas Davie's daughter late 
the wife of one Kempe of North Bovie. To my eldest son John Davy my 
lease &c. of the house belonging to the Prebend of Carswell which he now 
dwelleth in. My executors to be Laurence and Ellis Davie. 

A codicil added 17 April. Bequests to three of Johan Averie's daugh- 
ters, Elizabeth, Peternell and Johan. The said Johan my daughter. Five 
of my son John Davie's daughters, named Elizabeth, Christian, Mary, Amye 
and Margaret. Lyor. 22. 

Jonx Davie the elder of Crediton, Devon, gen'., 15 October 1575, 
proved 30 October 157G. To be buried in the church of Crediton. The 
poor within the two towns of Credyton. To my wife Elizabeth my man- 
sion house in which I now dwell, in the east town of Crediton, for forty 
years if she live so long and after her death to my son Lawrence Davie. 
To my son Lawrence ten pounds in money and ten pounds more which I 
owe unto him of his grandfather's "bequeathe," to be paid at his full age of 
one and twenty. My daughter Christian Davie. My daughter Mary 
Davie. My daughter Agnes Davie. My daughter Margaret Davie. Ref- 
erence to bequests made to the children above named by their grandfather. 
My daughter Wilmott Davie. Mv kinsman Roger Davie. My son John 
to have the residue and to be my executor: and for overseers I do appoint 
my brothers Gilbert Davie, Lawrence Davie and John Davie of Exeter. 

Carew, 28. 



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138 e Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Gilbert Davye of Credyton, Devon, gen*. 5 March 20 Eliz: proved 8 
November 1585. To he buried in the church of Creditor). To the twelve 
governors &c. of the church twenty pounds, to be distributed aropngst twenty 
poor persons. Robert Davye my ton and heir apparent. Gilbert. Law- 
rence, Roger, John and Robert Trobridge, my daughter Christian's chil- 
dren. My son in law George Trobridge, their father. Christian his wife, 
my daughter. (Their daughter?) Mary at eighteen or day of marriage. 
My brother Ellys Davye. Isly brother Lawrence Davye. Anne Davye, 
my son's wife, and Gilbert Davye her son. Robert Alford and Thomasin 
his wife, my sister. My brother Lawrence Davye's children (being four 
of them). To my wife Mary that tenement or Barton called Bishops Lei^h, 
in the parish of Bishops Morchard, Devon, to hold for forty years (if she 
so long live) iu full satisfaction and recompence of her dower for all other 
my lands &c. The remainder to my sou Robert. Other bequests to 
Robert. Reference to an Indenture from nephew John Davye of Crediton, 
gentleman. Cousin Roger Davye. Thomas, son of Ellys Davye. John 
Northcotte of Crediton gen'. My brother John Davye of Exon gen\ My 
nepnew John Davye of Credytou gen 1 . Brudeueil, 49. 

John Cor ham the younger of Ottery S l Mary. Devon, 24 June 1585, 
proved 11 March 1586. The poor of Otery. To my brother William 
Corharn my bow and arrows. My brother in law David Axon. My 
brother John Davye and my sister his wife. Raphe Baston and Katherine 
his wife. Edward his son and Christian their daughter. My si~ter Charity 
Corharn. My sister Joane Weare. Such child as my wife shall be by 
God's grace delivered of. My sister Agnes Corharn. Agnes, Joane and 
William Corharn, children of my brother William. Wife Alice to be sole 
executrix. 

William Corharn, gen', one of the witnesses. Spencer, 16. 

Lawrence Davie of Crediton, Devon, clothier, 22 December 14 a 
Elizabeth, proved 6 February 1601. My body to be buried in the church 
of Crediton. To my son Nicholas Davy and my daughter Mary Davie all 
my lease, title and interest in the Will Parks ground Sec the which lease 
was granted by Anthony Harvie Esq. To my daughter Mary Davie one 
hundred pounds at day of marriage. To my brother Ellis Davie twenty 
shillings. To the poor of the two towns of Crediton forty shillings. 
Towards the separation of the lower well in Kerton in the East town twenty 
shillings, with the rive shillings that remained in my hand before. If my 
daughter Mary do happen to die before she be married the hundred pounds 
shall come to my son John Davy and her part of the lease &c. shall come 
to my son Nicholas Davie. If Nicholas happen to die before marriage then 
his portion of said lease shall sjo to my daughter Mary, My brother John 
Davie of the city of Exon shall be my whole and sole executor and ''mais- 
ter " John Trobridge and my cousin Robert Davie overseers. 

Montague, 22. 

Margaret Davey of Exeter widow, 30 November 12 th James proved 
20 January 1614. To be buried in the parish church of St. Mary Arches, 
Exeter. The poor of the citv. The poor of Sandford in the parish of 
Kyrton. The parish of Calverley. The poor of Loxbeare and of Temple. 
My grandchild Johanna Ilaydon. Frances Haydon daughter to my son in 
law Gideon Ilaydon and George Haydon, his son. My brother Ames 
Southcott. Margaret Blackaller, daughter of Thomas BlackaUer of the 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 139 

parish of St. Thomas, Devon. My brother Humphrey Southcott. My 
daughter Margaret Haydoii. My daughter Julyan Davey. My (laughter 
Mary Davey. My sister Mary Blackaller. My sister Wood. My daugh- 
ter Davey's servants. My cousin Richard Southcott. My cousin Gilbert 
Sweete. My brother Thomas Southcott. My son John Davey. My sister 
Mary Ford. Gideon Haydon my son in law to be executor and my son 
Johu Davey and Mr. Peter Haydon to be overseers. Eudd, 1. 

Thomas Southcott of Calverley in the parish of Calwoodley, Devon, 
gen 1 , 2Q April 1618, proved 20 November 1621. The poor of said parish. 
The poor of Loxbeare. The poor of Tiverton. To my daughter Mary 
Colman ten pounds for to buy a piece of plate with as a token of my love 
unto her. To my daughter Elizabeth Waltham (a like bequest). To my 
son George Southcott (a like bequest) and to his wife. To my wife Mar- 
gery the use of all such goods as I have at Newton Petroocke, which I had 
by the intermarriage with her, during her natural life, and then to my 
executor. The residue to Richard, my son, whom I make sole executor; 
and I ordain and make my cousin Johu Davie Esq. and my brother Humfry 
Southcott my overseers. 

John Davie, William Colman and Humfry Southcott wit: 

Dale, 90. 

Humfry Southcot of Chilton in Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon, gen', 20 
May 1643, proved 21 May 1617. To the poor of Calverly ten pounds to 
be employed with those legacies and sums of money which were given to 
the said parish by my brother Thomas Southcott and my sister Margaret 
Davie, my cousin Mary Colman and others, entreating my overseer and 
executor, with my cousin Prowse, now parson of the said parish of Calver- 
ley, and his successors, being there resident to set down and order the dis- 
posing and ordering of all as may continue forever. My godson Bernard 
Southcott. My brother Robert Southcott if living at my decease. Ten 
pounds per annum quarterly to be paid him out of my lauds at Coddiford 
as an addition to the annuity he is to have and now hath from my cousin 
Nicholas Foord during his life. Ellen Bussell if living <Scc. Her husband. 
The residue to my cousin and gouson Thomas Southcot, willing him to 
have the advice in all his proceedings, in this my last will, with my true 
and ever faithful nephew Sir John Davie, Baronet, whom I make my only 
overseer of this will. Fines, 209. 

John Davye of Greedy in Sandford, Devon, Esq. 20 June 15 th Charles 
(1639), proved 7 August 1655. To be buried within the chapel of Sand- 
ford. The poor of Creditou and Sandford. To the twelve governors of 
the goods and hereditaments of the church of Crediton twenty pounds for 
and towards a workhouse &c. Have disbursed one hundred pounds towards 
the purchase of lands to be made over to the twelve governors for the main- 
tenance of an P^nglish school master in Crediton &c« Provision for con- 
venient rooms for wife in mansion house at Crediton, also garden plot and 
orchard. To said wife all such goods as she brought with her and such 
moneys as she hath put iuto the hands of others for employment of the 
same, viz' into the hands of my brother Thomas Hele one hundred pounds, 
in my cousin Gilbert's hands twenty pounds, in my cousin Hamon's hands 
two hundred pounds, in Henry Knight's hands two hundred pounds, in my 
sister .Lack's hands twenty pounds, net doubting but she will employ the 
same for the best benefit of mine and her daughter Isabel Davie. Certaiu 



140 , Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

articles of silver to her. To my son Hum fry five hundred pounds. To 
my daughter Margaret Davie one thousand pounds for a marriage portiou. 
In the mean time I give her fifteen pounds per annum for her present, main- 
tenance. My son and heir shall give them their diets or twenty pounds 
apiece yearly until they be married. To my daughter Isabel one thousand 
pounds for a marriage portion, iu the meantime she to be educated and 
maintained by her mother. Forty shillings apiece unto Sir John Younge, 
knight, John Willoughby of Pehembury Esq., my beloved brothers iu law, 
and Humfrey Southcott of Chilton, gen 1 , my beloved uncle, whom I make 
overseers &c, the same forty shillings to be bestowed in a ring or some 
such other memorial as they shall like best. The residue to my son and 
heir John Davie whom I make sole executor. 

Wit: Mary Willoughby, John Willoughby, Humfrey Southcott and John 
Aynell. 

Proved by the oath of Sir John Davie, Baronet, the son and executor. 

Entered on the margin " T. dfii Johannis Davye mi tl3 ." 

Aylett, 101. 

[The testator, Sir John Davie, who was created a baronet Sept. 9, 1641, was 
the father of Humphrey Davie, a merchant of London and Boston, whose son 
John graduated at Harvard College in 1681. The testator was the only sou of 
John Davie, thrice mayor of Exeter, England, who married Margaret, daughter 
of George Southcote of Calverly in Devon. Besides their son John, they had 
one daughter Margaret, wife of Gideon Haydon. 

Sir John Davie, bart., was twice married ; first to Julian, daughter of William 
Strode of Newnhara, by whom he had four sons : 1. Sir John, his successor; 2. 
William, a counsellor at law, who married Margaret, daughter of Sir Erancis 
Clark of Putney in Surrey; 3. Robert; 4. Humphrey, the "New England immi- 
grant. He had also four daughters : 1. Mary, married to John Willoughby of 
Payhembury in Devon; 3. Julian; -i. Margaret, married Thomas Bear of Hun- 
some, Devon. Sir John married 2d, Isabel Hele, by whom he had one daughter, 
Isabel, who married Walter Yonge of Coliiton, Devon, created a baronet in 
1681. 

Humphrey Davie, son of the testator, married 1st, Mary, daughter of Edmund 
White, an abstract of whose will is given above. He emigrated in 1062 to 
Boston, Mass. He married for a second wife Sarah Richards, widow of James 
Richards and daughter of William Gibbons. He was admitted a member of the 
Artillery Company in 1605. He died at Hartford, Ct., Feb. 18, 1688-9. His 
widow married Jonathan Tyng. See Reg stkr, vol. i., p. 169; Wotton's Eng- 
lish Baronetage, 1741, vol. i"i.,"pp. 263-9 ; Baronetage of England by E. Kimher 
and R. Johnson, 1771, vol. i., pp. 416-19; Baronetage of England by Rev. Wil- 
liam Betham. 18'0'i, vol. i., pp. 453-7; Whitman's History of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company, ed. 1842, pp. 175-6. — Editou.] 

Dame Isabell Davie, late the wife of Sir John Davie of Credie in the 
parish of Sundford, Devon, Baronet deceased. Her will made 20 July 
1656, proved 18 November 1657. I do desire that there should be no 
mourning given at my funeral nor hearse set upon my grave. My executor 
to bestow and lay out twenty pounds for six and twenty rings with a de.tth's 
head and this Eoesie, to witt, •' God be your guide," to be given one to each 
of my brothers and sisters and one apiece to each of my sons in law and 
daughters in law living at the time of my death. To my sons in law Wil- 
liam Davie, Robert Davie and Humphry Davie, to each of them half a 
dozen silver spoons. To my cousins Richard Rowe and Joane Ford and 
my servant Elizabeth Wareman twenty shillings apiece. The poor of 
Sandford and of Creditor.. My daughter Isabel Young and her children. 
The residue to said daughter and she to be sole executrix. 

Ruthen. 433. 



Sir Johx Davy of Greedy. Baronet, 13 April 1685. proved 9 June 1G93. 
To be buried in the parish church of Sandford near my ancestors and rela- 
tions. The manner of my funeral I leave to my executor, my dear brother 
William Davie, and I do hereby make him whole executor of this my last 
will and testament, desiring him to be dutiful to my honored mother aud 
kind and respectful to all others our relations. And I give him all. my 
goods, chattels and personal estate. 

Proved by Sir William Davie, Baronet &c. Coker, 94. 

Sik John Davie of Greedy in Devon. Baronet, 31 January 1677. proved 
19 October 1678. To be buried iu the vault or burying place which I 
made in the chancel of the church or chapel cf the parish or hamlet of 
Sandford at or upon my father's death. The poor of Crediton and of Saud- 
ford and the other poor of Upton Hellions. To Dame Amy, my dear, lov- 
ing and faithful wife, all the jewels, plate and books, cabinets aud trunks 
which now are or were hers at the time of her marriage with me (and 
other property). My two nephews, John Davie and Nathaniel his brother, 
sons of my late brother Robert deceased. My nephew William Davie, 
second son of my late brother William Davie of Dyra Esq. deceased. The 
study at Creedy Widger (in Upton Hellions) which was my father Rey- 
nells. My nephew John Copplestone. son and heir of my cousin John 
Copplestoue of Bowden Esq. My niece Mary Copplestone, eldest daughter 
to my brother in law Arthur Copplestone of Bowdon Esq. My sister and 
their children, Charles Quicke, son of John Quick jun r of Newton S 1 
Cyers (now St. Cyres) Esq. my kinsman. Provision for a workhouse in 
Crediton and for an English schoolmaster in Sandford. Sir Walter Yonge 
of Coleton, Baronet, Thomas Reynell of Ogwells, Richard Beavis of Clist- 
house, my nephetv, and John Copplestone of Bowdon Esquire, my near and 
dear relations. Richard Beavis of Clisthouse, Devon, Esq. my well beloved 
brother in law. Reeve, 109. 

Sir William Davie of Creedy, Devon, Baronet, 10 February 1706, 
proved 27 May 1707. To Dame Abigail Davie, my dear wife, all the 
jewels, plate, rings and cabinets which were hers at the time of my marriage 
with her or have been given uuto her at any time since (and other pro- 
perty). My father John Pollixfen Esq. and my brother John Pollixfen 
Esq. My daughters Margaret, Frances and Trephina Davie. My brother 
Wollcombe Pollixfen. My daughter Mary Davie. My copyhold estates 
in Stratton, Somerset, &c. Poley, 104. 

Sir Johx Davie late of Creedy, Devon, Baronet, 25 April 1727, proved 
13 July 1728. To my son and heir John Davie all those several pictures, 
with the frames thereto belonging, that is to say, the picture of my uncle 
Sir John Davie, of my father and mother, of myself and my late Lady, his 
brother James and his owu, and my will and desire is that the same shall 
be and remain to the heirs male of my family successively. Provision for 
son Humphrey Davie. To my son William Davie my messuage &c. in 
Holsworthy. Devon. A settlement of lands in Crediton for daughter Mary 
Bishop. My son John Davie Esq. and my son in law Christopher Savery. 
My daughter Mary's four daughters, Elizabeth, Jenny, Mary and Sarah 
Bishop. My second daughter Sarah Savery has already received her por- 
tion. To my third daughter Elizabeth Davie two thousand five hundred 
pounds, to be paid her on the day of her marriage. 
VOL. xlviii. 13 


















fJBsd 






142 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Item, I further give, devise and bequeath unto my two sons Humphry 
Davie and William Davie and to their heirs for ever all those my lands at 
or in New England, lying and being near Boston, Groton, Milton, Rumley 
als Rumney Marsh. Kennebeck River, Swan Island or elsewhere, or any 
of them in New England in America or in any other town, province. Is- 
land, district or place in New England aforesaid, late or heretofore the 
estate of Edmund While of London, merchant deceased, or which was for- 
merly purchased by or in the name of Humphry Davie late of Boston, mer- 
chant deceased, for the use of or in trust for the said Edmund White. The 
poor of Saudford parish, My sons Humphry and William Davie to be 
executors. Brook, 205. 

[Sir John Davie, bart., the testator, was the son of Humphrey Davie referred 
to above in the preceeding note on the will of Sir John Davie, the first 
baronet. He was a graduate of Harvard College in 1681, and a memoir of him 
will be found in the- third volume of Sibley's Harvard Graduates. Fie married 
about 16'J2 bis step-si>t^r, Elizabeth, daughter of James and Sarab Richards of 
Hartford, Ct. He had the following children, ail born in the town of Groton 
(originally a part of New London), Ct., namely: 1. Mary, born June 30. 1603, 
married Rev. Thomas Bishop of Barnstaple, Eug. ; 2. Sarah, born October 
21, 1695, married Christopher Savery of Shilson, near Modbury, Devon; 3. 
Elizabeth., born March 17, 1697-8., married Ebeuezer Mussell of London; 1. 
John, born July 27, 1700, married Elizabeth, daughter of John Acland of Collitom 
Devon, and succeeded to the baronetcy in 172S, on the death of his father: 5. 
Humphrey, born April 12, 1702, a bachelor; 'J. William, born March 21, 170.3-6, 
married Ellen, daughter of Nicholas Jackson of Bristol, merchant. Sir John, 
the testator, about 1707. on the death of his cousin William the fourth baronet, 
succeeded to the baronetcy. He died in 1728. See Sibley's Harvard Graduates, 
vol. iii., pp. 231-6; Caulkius's New London, pp. 41.V7; Savage's Genealogical 
Dictionary, vol. ii., pp. 14-13; and the other authorities cited in the preceding 
note.— Eouor.] 

William Tutty of St. Stephens Coleman Street, London, gen*, 10 
October 1640, proved 9 January 1640. To my beloved wife Anne Tutty 
all my plate and household stuff and my seal ring; only I desire her that 
my children may enjoy the plate that was given them at their baptizing, 
every one their own. Whereas my son William Tutty hath already had a 
liberal and competent part of my estate in his maintenance in the LTuiversity 
of Cambridge and in a parcel of books, bought by me of Nathaniel Mickle- 
thwayte, my wife's son, executor of Paul Micklethwaite late Doctor of Di- 
vinity deceased, and given to him, amounting to the sum of about forey 
pounds, I therefore give uuto him only the sum of ten pounds &c. 

Item, because I have already given unto my eldest daughter Anne, lately 
married with Alexander Knight of Ipswich in New England beyond the 
seas, a competent marriage portion, I therefore give unto her, in full of her 
child's portion, the sum of ten pounds more to be paid her also by mine 
execQtrix within one year next after my decease. The residue of my estate 
to be divided into two equal parts, the one part whereof I give unto my 
wife Anne Tutty and the other half part to be divided equally amongst the 
rest of my children now living, viz' John, Joseph, Benjamin. Samuel, Eliza- 
beth, Dorcas and Hester Tutty. My said wife to be full and sole executrix. 
Commissary of London, Vol. 28 (1639-42), fol. 234. 

[Alexander Knight, named in this will, resided at Ipswich, Mass., as early as 
1635. He is said by P. Vincent in his History of the Pequot War, published in 
1637, to have kept an inn at Chelmsford, Eng. (Coll. Mass. Hist. Society, vol. 
xxvi., p. 41.) The date of his marriage with Hannah or Anne, daughter of 



1894.] Genealogical Ghanivgs in England. 143 

William Tuttv, I Lave not found, though her father speaks of her as "lately 
married" in ic^O.— Editor.] 

JOHN Tuttif, citizen and fruiterer of London (son of William Tuttie 
late of London, gentleman, deceased) 3 September 1657, proved 3 October 
1057 (with a codicil dated 5 September). To my sister Hannah knight 
of New England for her children, or such of them living, or in case they 
be all deceased then for her own use if living at the time. I shall herein 
appoint for the payment of this and other legacies fifty pounds. lo my 
brother William f uttie of Tottende (s/c-Totteridge?) fifty pounds, lo 
mv sister Dorcas Tuttie one hundred pounds. To my sister Hester Blissett 
Sixty pounds. To my sister Elizabeth Ten- forty pounds. To her son 
Nicholas Tew ten pounds. To my brother Samuel all that he owes me 
upon any account whatever, whether in frames or money, lo each of his 
four children ten pounds to bind them forth to learn trades. To my brother 
MicklethwaMu twenty pounds to buy him two pieces of plate, lo my 
uncle John fcing forty shillings. To Richard Davies, shoemaker, five pounds. 
To Mary Prosser, widow, ten pounds. To Anthony Haiie, trimmer, ten 
pounds. To Thomas Higo-eson ten pounds. One hundred pounds among 
the poor. My wife Rachel to be sole executrix. Ruthen, 3/2. 

William Dtre of the Co. of Sussex in the territories of the Province 
of Pennsylvania Esq. I will and bequeath unto my eldest son William 
Dyre, now at Boston in New England, all my plantation or land in the 
Broad Kill, in Sussex County aforesaid, called Rurnbley Place, containing 
two thousand acres, more or less, with ten cows, four two year old heifers, 
six two year old stears coming to this Spring. To my second sou Edmund 
Dyre one plantation lying upon Loves Creek in the said County, contaiu- 
iucr six hundred acres' formerly called Sundialls (but now Beavorwick) and 
four hundred acres formerly in partnership with Stephen Whittman, now 
bounding upon the lands of Jeremiah Scott and Thomas Branscomb and to 
the Southward partly on John and William Roads and to the Eastward 
upon the marshes or Town Creek, with six cows and their increase and 
two two year old steers. To my youngest son James Dyre four hundred 
acres of land on Mispillen Creek in the County aforesaid and also three- 
hundred acres in the fork of the Broad Kill, in the County aforesaid part 
binding upon the Beaver Dam and Westward upon Prime Hook Creek, 
with one hundred acres of marsh adjoining, also two hundred acres m New 
Castle County, about seven miles from the town, butted ana bounded as 
per " Pattent," with six cows. To my eldest daughter Sarah Dyre five 
hundred acres between Cold Spring and the Cypress Bridge in Sussex 
County, butted and bounded as bv the Certificate and Plat or Draught tor 
the same may appear, with six cows. To my youngest daughter Mary 
Dyre three hundred acres known bv the name of the White Horse, lately 
bought of Charles Pickering, and two hundred and fifty five acres in Angola- 
Neck, in the County of Sussex, some time the land of Richard Shoulster, 
with six cows. I give unto my dear and well beloved wife Mary Dyre 
twenty five hundred acres in Cedar Neck in Sussex County, as by brant 
and survey for settlement of part for the whole, as also ninety six acres 
adioinin- the town of Lewis (Lewes) in Sussex County, with two town 
lots in the same town, the same being begun to be built upon and improved 
(and other personal estate), this for her natural life and afterwards to my 
said children, or other ways as she shall think fit and necessary. I give 
her also one debt due by bond from Hendrick Vandenborgh of Newcastle 









I 



144 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

for forty odd pounds silver money and a debt for six pounds, in monev or 
corn, due from justice Andreson of Newcastle and five pounds, in wheat or 
pork, due from Samuel Curtis of Allawayes Creek in West Jersev, and a 
debt, by account or bill of Capt. William Markbam fur near about twenty 
pounds, and a debt of seventy odd pounds silver money due from William 
Alsberry, due by mortgage, and now in the hands of Capt. Stephanus Van 
Courtland of New York, with all other debts due to me from any other 
persons whatsoever within the said Government of New York. 

I give to my wife all my land and horses iu the Pequit in Narra^anset 
Country in New England, with all my right and title of inheritance to the 
estate of my late father William Dyre deceased upon Rhode Island, within 
the Province of Providence Plantation, and also one island called Dyers 
Island, lying bet veen Prudence and Rhode Island, and the balance of Mr. 
Thomas Lloyds bond for rive hundred and ten pounds silver money pavable 
at New York the twenty sixth of May next ensuing, beitis above one hun- 
dred pounds, and twenty acres of land lying at Reading in New England and 
two islands called Clabbord Islands in Cascoe Bay in New England, the same 
being all for her proper use and behoof during her natural life and after- 
ward? to be divided amongst my said children as she shall think fit. My 
said dear and loving wife Mary Dyre and my said eldest son William Dyre 
to be my whole and sole executrix and executor for the managing my said 
estate; further it is my will and desire that my said wife have one hundred 
and fifty pounds silver money of New England, in the hands of Sir Ed- 
mund Andros. I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twentieth day 
•of Eebruary 1687-8, and I request my friends Mr. John Hill and Mr. 
Samuel Gray to be assisting to my wife and children in the management of 
their affairs in these parts. Also I humbly request his Excellency Sir Ed- 
mund Andros, Governor General of New England, to be assistant to my 
said wife and children in their affairs in the parts of New England, the said 
Sir Edmund to be feoffee in trust to my said estate in the part3 of New 
England. 

In the presence of us, Charles Sanders and William Rodeney. 

The Evidences, viz' Charles Sanders and William Rodeney attested in 
•open Court, held for the County of Sussex the fifth day of the fourth month, 
called June, one thousand six hundred eighty eight, that this above writter, 
together with the other sheet of paper hereunto annexed, is the Act and 
Deed of Major William Dyre deceased and that the said Major William 
Dyre did acknowledge the same to be his last will and testament. Testis 
^Norton Claypoole, Clerk and Deputy Register. 

Registered in the Public Registry of the Co. of Sussex in Book A, folio 
95, 96 and 97. 

Proved at London 4 September 1690 by the oath of William Dyre the 
son &c, power reserved for Mary Dyre the relict when she should come to 
ask for probate. Dyke, 136. 

[William Dyre, the testator, was a son of Mary Dyer, the victim of the per- 
secution of the Quakers, who was hanged on Boston Common. June 1, 1660. He, 
himself, petitioned the General Court of Massachusetts for clemency to his 
mother. His father, William Dyre or Dyer, a milliner from London, settled 
in Boston in 1635, was admitted freeman of Massachusetts March 3, 163o-C, was 
disarmed in 1637, and in 1633 removed to Rhode Island. See Austin's Genea- 
logical Dictionary of Rhode Island, pp. 290-2; Record of the Dyer Family, by 
Cornelia C. Joy-Dyer; Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, vol. 2, p. 89 ; Chand- 
ler's Criminal Trials, vol. 1, pp. 31-C3; and the general histories.— Emtok.] 



THE 



NEW-ENGLAND 



Historical and Genealogical 
' REGISTER 

VOL. XLYIIL-APRIL, 1894. 

Whole Number, 190. 




BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 
1894. 



I 






PTs 



M 



'CLirtjcL- '19 C aA/i- 






NEW-ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL A3D GENEALOGICAL 
REGISTER. 



APRIL, 1894. 



MEMOIR OF DAVID CLAPP. 

Communicated by William Blake Trask, A.M., of Dorchester, Mass. 

Nicholas Clapp, the first ancestor of David in this country, 
and the son of Richard, was from Dorchester, Dorset, England. 
On the 23d of August, 1G30, he signed the Church Covenant of 
our New England Dorchester, drawn up by Rev. Richard Mather 
and others. 

The Clapp family settled, originally, in Saleombe Regis, county 
of Devon, where Roger, cousin to Nicholas, was horn. This place 
is situated about twelve miles from the city of Exeter, and a little 
to the eastward of Sidmouth. 

David was ot the sixth generation in descent from Nicholas, 1 
through Nathaniel, 2 Jonathan. 3 David 4 and David. 5 Fae-simile 
autographs of Ids first, second and fourth ancestors, in this country, 
are here given. 

It is understood that Nicholas Clapp ^. # /? (\ ,<atL.*f& 
settled on land in Dorchester between <^\C^t?^aA (s^nffa 
what is now Upham's Corner and .-«. 

Cottage street, the present Bos- f ) /*P , 

ton street being on the east ; where /// // . c / jQ / 
three generations of the family Qr/affiaMwZ (/+■£*> 
were born. In the year 1754, 

David, of the fourth genera- /T^V • / /y */2 

tion, moved his residence to ^/J O^t^UCA/ ( \sC°fO 
the north-easterly side of \£) <* 

Jones's hill, in Dorchester, what is now Stoughton street bounding 
it on the north. For this tract of land of twelve and a half acres 
he paid £146. 13. 4. Said land was conveyed to him the 12th 
of May, 1755, by Thomas Kilton and wife Sarah, of Dorchester. 
On the 6th of February, 1800, in the house built by his father 
David 5 in 1794, on the portion of land inherited by him, David, 6 
second son and third child of the said David 5 and Azubah (Capen) 
Clapp, was born. 

vol. xlviii. 14 



I II 















- 



146 __ David Clapp. [April, 

David. 5 father of the subject of this memoir, in the eighteenth 
year of his age, was engaged with his father, David, 4 in throwing 
up the fortifications on Dorchester Heights, in March, 177G. He 
was, also, a substitute for his father, who was drafted in the Dor- 
chester company the next year, and as a member of that company 
wTiS stationed at Cambridge to guard General Burgoyne's army, 
then prisoners of war. They continued there five months. Soon 
after his return home from Cambridge he was drafted as one of nine 
privates, who with a sergeant and corporal were sent to Noddle's 
Island (East Boston) to guard the fort at that place. "At the 
time I was at the Island," he says, in his diary, " there were only 
ttwo dwelling houses and two families, the inhabitants, I think, no 
more than twelve."' "At several times in the years 1779, '80 and 
'81 I enlisted," he writes, " as a soldier and served under Captain 
Champney and Captain Clapp twenty-two months at Dorchester 
Heights." See "Clapp Memorial," pages 223, 247 ; Hist. Dorches- 
ter, page 348. The above David 5 died May 15, 1846, in his 87th 
year. About three acres of land left by him on " Jones's Hill " 
came into possession of his son David" who retained it intact until 
the year 1889, when the upper portion of the estate was sold in 
house lots. "A street through the centre from Gushing avenue is 
laid out, to which it is proposed to give the name of Salcombe street, 
thereby .associating this estate, which has been occupied by four 
generations of Clapps, with the old family estate in England." 

A fac-simile of the autograph , ». -, . 

of David, 5 born in 1759, is here ^^y^^/JJ^f \3%£t/&f~b 
given. cpj-*— / f 

At the present time little can be gathered in relation to the early 
life of Mr. Clapp. Presumably, with other boys, his companions 
and school-fellows, he coasted down Jones's hill, skated on Royal's 
pond, and attended the dame school of his native district, as was 
almost universally the case, the teacher receiving the customary fee 
from each pupil of nine pence (twelve and a half cents) a week. 
Like other lads he doubtless was familiar with the tall trees, shrubs, 
fruits and flowers of his neighborhood ; on Sundays with his parents 
he probably sat, forenoon and afternoon, under the preaching of 
Rev. Thaddeus Mason Harris, whom, later in life, he designates as 
"one of the most faithful and affectionate of pastors and best of 
men," "a man of overflowing sympathies," who "had a kindness 
and tender-heartedness towards all." The family afterwards be- 
came connected with the Second Church, of which Rev. Dr. 
John Codman was pastor. 

From the " woman's " school to the " master's " would be the next 
step in his educational progress, the " brick school house " being a 
short distance only from his home. The following, to the point, is 
the substance of an interview held a i^ew months since by a member 
of the family, w T ith an aged female acquaintance and school-com- 
panion of our friend : 






' 






1894.] r David Clajip. 147 

In calling upon a school-mate of uiy father's, after his death, the first 
thing she said about him was, " He was a good boy; he was never known 
to do anything wrong." She described him, as all his later friends have known 
him, as being conscientious and studious, as well as a lovable character. 
In his studies she referred to his excellence in spelling, in which he took a 
prize when oaiite a small lad. 

The school they attended was on what is now Boston street, near Deacon 
Ciapp's tannery, and opposite the old burying-ground. It was a small 
one-story building, and in the one school-room were gathered together both 
boys and girls. The room in the winter was heated by a large, open fire- 
place, and, although the wood was piled on generously, the cold often pene- 
trated the open cracks in the floor, much to the discomfort of those troubled 
by cold feet. It was not a luxurious room, nor was the life of those who 
daily gathered there one of ease and luxury. Those were plain and simple 
homes from which they went forth, and the school-life was of the same 
character. They studied the common branches, plain, elementary, but 
solid; thorough as far as they went. There was a religious element in the 
instruction given ; hymns were taught, and the Assembly's Catechism. Two 
instructors were well remembered by the names of Bennett and Gould. 

Holidays were few in those days of Dorchester schools, and excursions 
for pleasure by the studeuts were unkuown. Two weeks a year would 
nearly cover all the vacations enjoyed. 

This school-mate of Mr. Ciapp's referred to above, although in her uinety- 
first year, has recalled clearly to her memory those early days, and described 
them thus to us with warm praises of him with whom they are connected. 
Of the above students she remembers the names of Nazro, Downer, Mose- 
ley and Humphreys. 

John Everett, a younger brother of Echvard Everett, though 
several years older than Mr. Clapp, was for a short time, as he 
relates, a school-mate in the old brick school-house. This John, a 
"bud of promise early blighted," died suddenly, Feb. 12, 1826, 
aged twenty-five years. He delivered an oration before the Wash, 
ington Society in Boston, and an ode before the same society, ot 
which he was a member, July 4, 1824. See Loring's Hundred 
Boston Orators, page 407 . Another school-mate, was Foster Thayer, 
afterwards a Congregational minister. Still another, James Bailey, 
has been discovered. On the 21st of April, 1820, David received 
from his teacher, Warren Goddard, a reward of merit, "for his 
persevering ddigence, rapid improvement in the various branches to 
which he has directed his attention, and truly unblemished deport- 
ment." 

Our friend did not enjoy the privilege of going to school the year 
round. On the 15th of April, 1819, when thirteen years old, 
according to his journal he went to work in the tannery of Deacon 
James Humphreys, where he had for wages seven dollars a month. 

On the 24th of May, 1820, in the fifteenth year of his age, he 
engaged to serve Mr. James "White for five dollars a month, which 
was a reduction in price, but the labor probably was less. Mr. 
"White had his summer residence in what is now the Holbrook 






148 „ David Clapp. [April, 

house, Crescent avenue, Dorchester. Many years before that, he 
carried on the hook-store in Court street, Boston, -which bore the 
sign of Franklin's Head. 

The juvenile diary of young David, now extant, commenced this 
day, May 24th. Though not intended for the public eye, it is 
entertaining and instructive to the general reader : the spelling, 
punctuation and composition remarkable ; much of it suitable to be 
put in print without alteration or correction. 

June 17th, the anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hill, "Mister 
"White gave me," he says, " this writing book," in which the fact is 
entered, "one quire of paper, and half a dozen pens," the old- 
fashioned goose quills, which, occasionally required mending, for 
this was long before the introduction of metallic pens. 

He left Mr. White November 1st, and renewed his schooling 
December 7th, now under the tuition of "Master Pierce," the next 
May returning to Mr. White's, where ho remained until the 5th of 
November; but to school again, December 26th, the day after 
Christmas. 

At length his seat in the old brick school-house became vacant, 
the studious tenant and left to learn a trade, as was the custom 
among boys of those days after finishing their studies at school. On 
the thirteenth of May, 1822, at the usual age of sixteen, he commenced 
his apprenticeship at the printing business, with Mr. John Cotton, 
Junior, of Boston, who had served his time with Munroe & Francis ; 
David boarded with Mr. Erastus Bartholomew, blacksmith and 
engine-builder, in Water street. (See ''Bartholomew Family," 
173-175 for sketch and portrait.) Mr. Cotton's building was then 
known as in Marlborough street, Number 47 ; a few years later it 
became 184 Washington street. 

Mr. Clapp, writing in his diary of September 6, 1822, thus 
remarks: "We have left off printing the Christian Register." 
This was volume second, number four of the Register, edited by 
David Reed. Robert M. Peek, No. 4 Spear's Buildings, Congress 
street, then commenced printing the Register. He was succeeded, 
June 13, 1823, by John B. Russell, of the same place. On the 
29th of May, 1823, he writes : " R. M. Peck has begun to print 
the Boston Medical Intelligencer, at our office." " We shall in 
future print books, I expect. We have now begun one entitled 
' Parental Monitor.' " " Nov. 3. Finished the f Parental Monitor,' 
the ' Orphan,' and the ' Revenge,' and begun the r Uncle and Nephew.' " 
Nov. 24, 1822, he states that "Mr. Cotton has dismissed his other 
apprentice, and I am now left alone, with neither master, journey- 
man, nor apprentice to work with." A little later he writes : "I 
still continue to work alone, with nobody but the mice, who scamper 
around the silent office as if they thought it had been deserted on 
purpose to oblige them." He was at that time in the seventeenth 
year of his age. 



1894.] . David Clapp. 149 

He continued working on the Intelligencer, for Messrs. Peck 
and Cotton. There were about 260 subscribers to this periodical, 
which was edited by Dr. Jerome V. C. Smith, afterwards mayor 
of Boston, assisted by Dr. George Parkman. He relates some 
pleasant reminiscences of Dr. Parkman " whose name is so tragically 
connected with that of Professor "Webster."' "It fell to my lot for 
a year or two during my apprenticeship to become well acquainted 
with Dr. P.," while assisting Dr. Smith in editing the first two or 
three volumes of the Medical Intelligencer. Dr. Parkman gave 
Mr. Clapp instruction in the French language, eveuings, at his 
house in Cambridge stiect. 

June 17, 1823. Mr. John Cotton has bought the Medical Intelligencer 
of Mr. Peck. I expect to print it alone, for the present. 

July 20. Mr. Crocker has begun to print a new publication at our office, 
entitled Evangelical Repertory. 

Feb. 10, 1824, at 18 years of age, he writes : — 

I have hud the kine pox at last, after being inoculated, once by Dr. 

Parkman, three times by Dr. Smith, and once by myself, the last of which 

took. 

Importance is attached to this subject, as, according to his account, 
the small pox then prevailed in the vicinity of Boston, and he, by 
vaccination, may have been instrumental in warding off the disease 
from himself. 

Mr. Cotton made an arrangement with Francis Y. Carlisle to work 
in the printing-office, Mr: Cotton to find type, paper, etc., and Mr. 
Carlisle to have half the profits ; Mx. Clapp, who was then engaged 
alone on the Medical Intelligencer, to exchange work with 
Mr. Carlisle. Soon, however, the latter having an opportunity 
of becoming foreman of the Christian Register office, left Mr. Cot- 
ton for the above purpose, which Mr. Clapp regretted, for he was 
thus left again entirely alone. Messrs. Carlisle, Crocker and 
Oliver, before leaving Mr. Cotton, were engaged in printing a small 
book for Mr. John Barnard, of about one hundred pages, 18mo, enti- 
tled " The Sparrow," which was finished about the middle of Decem- 
ber following, Mr. Clapp assisting in the work. 

Mr. Cotton ha.3 purchased the Atheneum or Spirit of the English Mag- 
azines, of Munroe & Francis, and intends for the future to publish it in his 
office. We commenced the first number of this volume last month. Samuel 
Clap Jr., my cousin, came as an apprentice to Mr. Cotton about the begin- 
ning of March, so that my long career of printer's deviltry has at leugth 
terminated, but as John Cotton Jr. will be the foreman of the office I shall 
be less my own master than I have been during most of the time for two 
years past. 

It appears that John Cotton senior was not a practical printer, 
but carried on the ship and house painting business in Batterymarch 
street, and was also engaged in the manufacture of painted car- 
pets, so that the affairs of the printing-office were delegated to the 

VOL. XLVIII. 14* 



150 _ David Clapp. [April, 

junior member, but the care and labor fell upon his industrious 
and faithful journeyman, Mr. Clapp. 

In the words of another : — 

He early assumed pressing and important responsibilities iu the printing- 
office whieh he had entered as an apprentice at the age of sixteen years. 
Owing to a peculiar combination of circumstances, in less than two years 
after he commenced his apprenticeship he found himself in such a position 
that the chief responsibility of the office devolved upon him; and such was 
hi? strict attention to business, his unswerving integrity, his ambition to 
excel in his profession, united with his faithfulness to his nominal employer, 
and the rare tact which lie even then showed in harmonizing the disagree- 
ments of differing parties, that he was found to be equal to the demands of 
this difficult and responsible position. It is exceedingly interesting to gather 
from the journal facts showing how steadily and surely, in the course of 
two years or less, he worked his way upwards in spite of his native diffi- 
dence and his ignorance of men and of business, to a position as master 
printer, for in reality before he was eighteen years of age, very much of the 
chief responsibility of the office rested upon Iris shoulders. And it is very 
pleasant and gratifying to observe, in his modest account of himself during 
this period, how his successful performance of many most difficult and deli- 
cate tasks won for him the confidence of those whom he regarded with highest 
respect and esteem. 

He quietly remarks : — 

If I have been of service to him [John Cotton senior] in conducting the 
affairs of 'the office with faithfulness aud fidelity, as he has been pleased to 
acknowledge, it has been entirely the effects of the kind treatment which I 
have invariably received from him, and the confidence which he has in so 
gratifying a manner reposed in me. 

May 14, 1826. Last week Mr. Cotton commenced printing a new edition 
of Thatcher's Modern Practice. He has procured a new press (one of 
Smith's patent) and has employed two pressmen in order to keep the press 
going all the time while printing the above work. He has, also, employed 
one more compositor. The appearance of the inside of the office is rather 
different from what it was two or three years ago, when all the work that 
was done in the office, both at case and press, was done by me. The new 
press cost about S230. 

This was a superior article to the old Eamage press used during 
the early part of his apprenticeship, when '"the printing of each 
sheet, on both sides, required four separate impressions, or four 
f pulls ' as they were called, -with the bar working of the screw. 
While one pressman was engaged in this process, a companion 
attended to the inking of the type by the two leather-faced balls 
then in use." He writes : — 

Feb. 6, 1827. This is my freedom day; twenty one years of age; my 
apprenticeship ended and manhood attained. Though I am, at present, 
considerably out of health, the occasion calls for an expression of gratitude 
to the Giver of every good, for so large a share of health as I have thus far 
enjoyed, and for the many other blessings with which I have been favored. 
I shall stay with Mr. Cotton for the present, at the rate of eight or nine 
dollars a week, and go on in much the same manner that I have done. 



1894.] „ David Clapp. 151 

After working a while for wages at the same place, Mr. Clapp 
formed a partnt-rship, in 1831, with John Cotton senior and Henry 
S. Hull, under the firm name of Clapp & Hull, which was soon 
dissolved. Mr. Clapp and Mr. Cotton then became partners, the 
firm name being D. Clapp Jr. and Co., till the year 1*34, when 
Isle. Clapp bought out the business and continued printing and job- 
bing on the old corner, 184 "Washington street, uutil l^Gl, when 
Franklin street was widened on the north side, and the building 
taken down, Mr. Clapp having been a worker there thirty-nine 
years. The business was then removed to No. 334 (afterwards 
re-numbered 564) AYashington street. In 1864, his eldest son, 
John Cotton Clapp, was taken into partnership with his father, and 
in 1882 they removed to 3"> Bedford street. In July, 1889, the 
Bedford street building being taken down, the firm went to their 
present location, 115 High street. 

The Boston Directory was printed in this office from 1829 to 
1846, and the New-England Historical and Genealogical Register 
from January 1866 to the present time. Much pamphlet and book 
work has been done by the firm of David Clapp & Son, an especial 
attention having been given then and now to genealogical and his- 
torical productions. Among them may be mentioned volumes of 
the Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society, including the 
History of Dorchester, the '' Clapp Memorial/' Szc, &c. The latter, 
compiled by Ebenezer Clapp Jr., was published in 1876. As one 
of the committee of publication of that valuable work — Messrs. Otis 
and David Clapp being associates — it is fitting and just for the only 
survivor to bear witness, from personal knowledge, to the fact that 
a large amount of matter was added through the untiring efforts and 
labors of the modest and unassuming printer, in text and notes, 
judiciously compiled, of a biographical, genealogical, historical and 
illustrative nature. Several visits for tins purpose were made to 
Newport and Warwick, in Rhode Island ; Scituate, Massachusetts, 
and perhaps other places ; to the first and last mentioned the writer had 
the pleasure of accompanying Mr. Clapp. From Warwick, by inter- 
view and correspondence, a large amount of original matter was 
obtained concerning the family of George Gilson Clapp. See page 
283 and onwards of the " Clapp Memorial " volume. The same 
general fact may be mentioned as to his prompt assistance in refer- 
ence to other parts of the book. 

As a historian, he was thorough, counting no time spent in patient 
research for the verification of data as lost, and his published papers, of 
which there have been many, have been accepted as reliable.* 

The publication before mentioned, the Medical Intelligencer, 
printed by ^Ir. Clapp, commencing in 1823, edited by Drs. Smith 
and Parkman, in its early days ; succeeded by Dr. Chandler Rob- 

* See "Ancient Proprietors of Jones's Hill, Dorchester." pp. 63, printed in 1S83; and 
" Morton and Taylor Estates in Dorchester,'* pp. 8, printed in 1892. 



' 









152 „ David Clapp. [April, 

bins Jr., Who took the place of Dr. Farkman as joint editor with 
Dr. Smith, in 1824, was subsequently merged with another period- 
ical, and called the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal ; contin- 
ued in octave form, edited at first by Drs. John C. Warren, Walter 
Channing, and John Ware. It became the property of Mr. Clapp 
in 1834, and was issued from his press without the omission of a 
single number until December, 1874, on reaching its ninety-first 
volume, when the work was purchased by a company of medical 
gentlemen and removed to another publication house, Mr. Clapp 
having been connected with its issue for about fifty years. 

Francis Minot, M. D., of Boston, who for a time edited the 
Journal, writes : — 

My acquaintance with Mr. David Clapp began in the early part of 
1855, when an effort was made by several of the younger members of the 
medical profession in Boston to revive the standard of the Boston Medical 
and Surgical Journal, which for some time had fallen into a condition of 
decrepitude. Although doubtful of our success, Mr. Clapp cordially sec- 
onded our efforts, and before long the subscription list contained the names 
of a large number of our profession, not only in Massachusetts, but in almost 
every part of the country ; and its reputation as a scientific journal has 
steadily increased, until it has become one of the most valuable medical 
periodicals in the United States. 

It was impossible to be associated with Mr. Clapp without being im- 
pressed with his character as a man of honor, as well as with his kiudness 
and courtesy towards all with whom he came in contact. Modest and re- 
tiring in his disposition, he was one of the most intelligent of men. while 
his ability and knowledge in every department of his art, and his familiarity 
with the requirements of medical journalism, contributed greatly to the suc- 
cess of his undertaking. 

About the year 1828 or '29, he made proposals for establishing 
in Dorchester a circulating library. To this end he wrote a pleasant 
letter to the Rev. Mr. (afterwards Dr.) Harris, his earliest minister, 
asking advice on the subject, thinking he should soon be obliged to 
resign his printing business on account of ill health ; but the project, 
probably, was not carried into effect. 

Mr. Clapp never held a public office, or seldom went from home 
for any purpose until the infirmities of age compelled him to retire. 

St. Matthew's Church was the first incorporated religious society 
in South Boston, dating back to June 24, 1816. The connection 
of Mr. Clapp with this Church began in 1843, in which year his 
wife and himself were confirmed. He was chosen junior warden in 
1846. In 1858 he became senior warden, which office he held 
until his death. He wrote for publication a number of articles con- 
cerning "The Early Days of St. Matthew's." These were printed 
in a paper called the St. Matthew's Echo. They contain a valuable 
summary of the history of the Church for several years, with some 
account of its rectors. 

Mr. Clapp was made a member of the Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanic Association in Boston, in 1839, and subsequently a life 



1894.] ^ David Clapp. 153 

member. On the 7th of March, I860, he joined the Xew-England 
Historic Genealogical Society, and was connected with the Boston 
Old School Boys Association for a short time before his death. 

On the 9th of April, 1SS»5, he married Mary Elizabeth Tucker. 
a daughter of Atherton Tucker, of Milton, where she was born the 
25th of August, 1808; They had six children, all living, namely : 
Mary Susannah : John Cotton, married Julia Curtis Crane ; Eliza- 
beth Atherton ; David Capen, married Constance Leocadie Pierrelee ; 
Caroline Tucker, married Albert A. Chittenden ; Sarah Ellen, mar- 
ried Samuel Newman Chittenden. 

He retired from active business in 1892, gradually failing in 
health until his decease, May 10, 1893, at the advanced age of 
87 years, 3 months. The funeral services took place at St. Mat- 
thew's Episcopal Church, on Sunday afternoon, May 14th, at one 
o'clock, in the Church where he had been warden nearly fifty years ; 
the present rector, Rev. Albert E. George, Rev. Dr. James I. T. 
Coolidge (a former rector), Rev. Alfred E. Washburn, Rev. John 
T. Magrath, and Rev. Frederick M. Brooks, officiating. In the 
morning the rector preached a sermon appropriate to the occasion, 
which was printed. The interment took place in the old cemetery 
at Dorchester, corner of Boston and Stoughton streets. His esti- 
mable wife followed soon after, passing away Oct. 2, 1893, aged 85. 

Mr. Clapp was a remarkable man. Having been acquainted with 
him nearly a half century, we can safely say there are but few 
among our acquaintances of whom we should dare to use language 
applicable to him. His great diffidence and modesty curtailed 
somewhat his status with the public. The golden rule was to him, 
we doubt not, a standard of duty in his business transactions : 
conformity thereto his aim and object. His religious views 
were well denned and positive. He was straight-forward, 
upright and honorable. During his apprenticeship, early life, and 
later manhood, he seemed to have had a commendable degree of 
firmness and self control, based, as we believe,. on principle, with a 
sincere desire to do his whole duty, as he understood it, in his deal- 
ings with his fellow men. 

Let others speak, as we are pleased to know they do, in com- 
mendation of our friend. 

Albert H. Hoyt, A.M., for many years editor of the Register, 
uses the following language : 

My acquaintance with Mr. Clapp began in 13G7 or 1868, and during 
the eight years of my service as editor of the Register I met him very 
frequently, sometimes daily. The acquaintance thus begun was continued 
to his death. I was impressed with his quiet disposition, his strict sense 
of justice and fairness, and his intelligent mind. He was, of course, a 
master of his craft and art. But he was more than this; he had a very full 
knowledge of some important periods of New England history, while the 
history of many of his contemporaries in Boston, and of events which oc- 
curred during his active life, was at his ready command. In this way he was 



. 















154 David Clapp. [April, 

of constant assistance to contributors to the history of our local affairs, lie 
had a clear and terse style of expression, and his suggestions were often helpful 
to those whose writings came under his eye. He touched nothing with hi3 
pen, as proof-reader, that he did not improve. His own frequent con- 
tributions to the (i Notes and Queries" of the Transcript are of permanent 
interest and value. No one who had dealings with Mr. Clapp, or who met 
him socially, could have failed to be impressed with his modesty, his re- 
finement of feeling and manners, and his unfailing kindness. 

Mr, David "W. Lothrop, of West Medio rd, for many years 
connected with Mr. Clapp 's office, furnishes the subjoined estimate 
of his associate : 

When, in 1842. I first saw and became connected with Mr. Clapp in his 
office, I was struck with the gentle, spiritual glow resting on his coun- 
tenance, so rarely seen among business men. Then his modesty ; his simple, 
unpretentious manners seemed to sit so easily upon him, and so to become 
him, that I regarded him as a man of remarkably happy elements. Not 
long after, on a particular matter of business which I thought I might ex- 
plain to him, he seemed much pleased at what I had to say, and I was 
gratified; but I soon found he knew more about it than I did. 

In business, Mr. Clapp was industrious, frugal, and remarkably faithful 
and prompt to his patrons — which latter did much to win him success. His 
manner was quiet, with little talk. Noisy and blustering men he dreaded; 
yet was frequently obliged to meet them, and at times suffered from them. 
Mr. Clapp's aim was not to do a great or showy business, for which he was 
not well fitted, but a moderate and honest one. 

Although Mr. Clapp was not ambitious, in its broadest meaning, he took 
a reasonable pride in his business, and studied to give a respectable stamp to 
his typography, particularly to the books from his press relating to history 
and geuealogy. His proof-reading, which he always attended to himself, 
was very careful and thorough, though often trying to the nerves. He was 
too conscientious to delegate it to others, and would seek to correct errors 
in quotations and dates when he thought they might be wrong; also to 
make the sense clear by proper punctuation. Consequently, authors were 
frequently under great obligations to him for the accuracy of their pro- 
ductions. In reading proof he employed no one to go through the manu- 
script while he looked at the printed matter, but glauced from one to the 
other, with a result remarkable for correctness. In this way, during hi3 
long term of service in the printing business, the amount of his labor was 
prodigious. 

In one sense of the word, Mr. Clapp wa3 a timid man — not born with 
the frowning brow or club of Hercules. I have thought sometimes he 
felt and regretted his deficiency in this regard. In moral courage, however, 
he had much to compensate therefor. His was the courage of right, 
the timidity of wrong. His opinions he deliberately formed, and held 
to them with reasonable tenacity. 

Another noticeable characteristic of Mr. Clapp was his reticence. He 
said little to others of his opinions or business; enough to him was Ids own. 
He rarely spoke of religious subjects, especially during the business hours, 
though his veneration for the Deity was evidently profound. Apparently, 
as a consequence, he ever seemed happy to make the acquaintance of and 
respect persons of a religious character. To him a Christian was the highest 
style of man. 



1894.] , David Clapp. 155 

Intellectually, Mr. Clapp had a very fine head and brain, and this latter 
was well cultivated by his own efforts. He never aspired to become a 
noted writer, yet his productions were clear. In his early life he was a 
respectable French student. 

During an unbroken term of forty-six years (save a few months ab- 
sence) with Mr. Clapp in the Medical Journal office, from 1842 to 18S8, I 
trust we respected and appreciated each other. Our tempers seemed to fit 
remarkably well for what we had to do, and we never passed an angry word. 

John Ward Dean, A.M., editor of the Register, says : 

My acquaintance with Mr. Clapp began in the autumn of 1804, when he 
contracted for printing the Historical and Genealogical Register. I. being 
a member of the publishing committee, saw him frequently. In October, 
]875, I became the editor of the Register, which had just completed its 
twenty-ninth volume. My predecessor was Col. Albert H. Hoyt, who had 
edited the work for the eight preceding years. 

At my first acquaintance with Mr. Clapp he impressed me as a man of 
sterling integrity, who was conscientious in all his business transactions: a 
longer acquaintance confirmed the impression. He took a deep interest in 
the success of the Register, and in fact he was one of the original mem- 
bers of the Register Club that for a few years bore the pecuniary responsi- 
bility of this periodical. I am glad of this opportunity to acknowledge the 
literary assistance which I received from him during upwards of seventeen 
years that our connection continued. He was a careful proof-reader, but 
was not content with the ordinary work of proof-reading. He scrutinized 
the articles carefully, and often detected errors in the manuscript that had 
escaped the eye of the editor. In a periodical so largely composed of 
names and figures, this was an important assistance. 

It gives me pleasure to recall his friendship, and I shall long honor his 
memory for his many noble qualities. 

The Rev. John Wright, D.D., of St. Paul, Minn., once a rector 
of St. Matthew's Church, writes : — 

David Clapp was one of the whitest souls I ever knew. His friendships 
were strong, his spirit gentie, and his piety sincere and unobstrusive. He 
was wonderfully self-contained, and when lie expressed himself uttered the 
wise and the right word. He disliked contention, of any kind, and Was 
always foremost as a peace-maker. And when I preached a sermon from 
the text " Love is the fulfilling of the law," he came to me to ask for the 
manuscript that he might publish it at his own expense. While I declined 
to comply with his request, the incident shows how large-hearted was his 
love for his fellow men. For thirteen years I was associated with him in 
the work of St. Matthew's Church, and in all that time I never witnessed 
in him other than attractive traits of character. 

Mr. Oliver B. Stebbins of South Boston, a near neighbor to 
Mr. Clapp, uses the following language : — 

He was a good citizen, kind friend, an able and conscientious adviser in 
all that pertained to the welfare of the community in which he had spent 
so many years of his life. His gentle manners, kindliness of disposition, 
wise counsels, unassuming deportment, ready willingness to render assistance 
when required, his virtuous life and high character, all rendered him a man 
worthy to be honored, respected and beloved. 



156 '- David Clapp. [April, 

T3ic Rev. James I. T. Coolidge, D.D., a former rector of St. 
Matthew's Church, in two communications to the children of Mr. 
Clapp, thus expresses himself: — 

I loved your father almost with a child's love from the first. I sought 
and relied upon his advice, and believe I never went wrong when I followed 
it. Sometimes when I have tried to speak the word of our blessed Lord 
and my heart began to fail me. as 1 looked over the congregation the rev- 
erent and believing attention of your father has been an inspiration, for I 
knew that I had at least one whose sympathy was ail my own. 

As the rector, so also the parish, of St. Matthew's has evavy reason to 
remember and honor him with deepest gratitude. It was not possible for 
ODe to be more devoted to its best interests. His long service as its senior 
warden was the sincere work of disinterested desire for its best growth and 
prosperity. No one was a more generous supporter of ali its burdens. 
Every appeal for labor or money received from him a ready answer up to 
and beyond his proportion. He loved his Church, ami as often as the 
Sundays came it was his welcoming smile which made all feel that we were 
brothers one of another in the Household of God. Especially was he 
thoughtful of strangers ; and so quietly and simply was his service rendered 
that T believe many wist not who it was that made them welcome. I 
always felt that when the offerings were gathered the gifts were more abun- 
dant because the plate was presented by him. 

The present rector of St. Matthew's Church, the Rev. Albert E. 
George, remarks : — 

Anyone who had intimate acquaintance with this good man will bear me 
out in the statement that his life was as nearly the ideal one of humanity as 
any thing human could be. He had that attractive simplicity which natur- 
ally evolved itself from his heart because he had a deep love for all that 
was good and true. Simplicity must be accompanied with other character- 
istics. Modesty and sweetness of temperament will soon make themselves 
known. He had these, and because they were his in a marked degree no 
one ever could be his enemy, much more no one desired to be his enemy. 
He never met you in a way which would convey any other impression 
except that of love and kindness. There was a depth to his spirituality. 
His long service as senior warden of St. Matthew's Church, through many 
periods of anxiety and discouragement, was never broken by any disloyalty 
to his Church or tyranny over those who served as rectors. There is not a 
rector living who is not ready to declare that the inspiration of his life was 
an honor to the parish and a stimulation to the joy of being a Christian. 
He never used his office for any other purpose except the glorification of the 
highest objects. Always peaceable, kind, courteous, discreet and loving, he 
sought the opportunity where these could be shown. Men never mistook 
his motives. You knew him before he acted upon any measure; you found 
in him the same gracious, tender and pleasing disposition afterwards. He 
was a model warden, and stands out before the Episcopal Church in this 
city as such. 

Above all, he was a Christian in the best sense. He lived the life he pro- 
fessed; no false notes were ever heard. He did not go to Church out of 
mere sentimentality. He went because he knew it to be more than a duty. 
It was his real pleasure. His venerable form adorned the sacred place. Al- 
ways generous, always seconding any nobie undertaking, he identified Lis zeal 
to the very last with those works which would show forth the Lord's praise. 



1894.] British Officers serviny in America. 157 



BRITISH OFFICERS SERVIXG IX AMERICA, 1751-1774. 



Contributed by 



Name. 

Bowden, Thomas 



WOKTHIXGTOX CkATTNCET FORD, Esq. 

[Continued from page 46.] 



of Washington, D. C. 



Bowen, John 
Bowes, Frederick 
Boyde, Thomas 

Boyle, Richard 
Boyle, Stephen 
Brabazon, Edward 



Braddock, Edward 
Bradstreet, John 



Bradstreet, Samuel 

Bragg, Philip 

Brawn, Benijah 

Bray, Edward 
Breden, Alexander 
Brehm, Dietrich* 
Breney, James 
Brereton, Edward 

Brereton, George 
Brereton, Robert 
Brewer, John 
Bridges, Thomas 
Bright, Allen 
Brigstock, James 

Brigstock, Robert 



Brightman, Jacques 
Briscoe, Robert 



Rant. 

Adjut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Capt, 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Adjt. 

Capt. 

Colonel 

1 st Lieut. 

Capt. 

Colonel 

U. Gen. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Surgeon 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Adj 1 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Chaplain 

Capt. 

1 st Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 



Lieut 



Regiment. 

46 

46 

46 

45 

64 

16 

16 

29 

95 

22 

22 

22 



60 

40 
40 

28 



31 

35 

55 

62 

94 

22 

22 

62 

45 

95 

94 

69 

60 

60 

62 
60 
58 
22 
22 



Date of Coirtnission. 

23 April, 1757. 
22 July, 1758. 
27 August. 1762. 
30 June, 1755. 
1 January, 1766. 
1 January, 1766. 
4 February, 1769. 

15 June, 1764. 
17 February. 1760. 
27 April, 1756. 

16 January, 1759. 
13 November, 1762. 

1755. 
5 September, 1745. 

8 March, 1757. 

19 February, 1762. 
29 June, 1755. 
10 November, 1761. 
10 October, 1734. 

10 August, 1747. 

9 November, 1760. 
3 November, 1768. 

11 October, 1762. 

27 December, 1755. 
20 February, 1756. 

28 September, 1761. 
27 April, 1756. 

20 November, 1758. 
30 December, 1755. 
11 January, 1740-1. 
26 February, 1760. 
20 July, 1760. 
7 September, 1768. 
24 April, 1761. 

3 June, 1771. 

16 February, 1747-8. 
1 January, 1756. 
14 February, 1760. 

4 February, 1756. 
21 September, 1756. 
1 July, 1762.' 



t Som 
VOL. XLVIII 



stimes entered Brehin, Dietrich and Di.nrich. 
lo 









" 















158 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Briscoe, Robert 


Capt. 


65 


22 February, 1771. 


Briscoe, Spencer 


Ensign 


GO 


4 October, 1770. 


Briscoe, William Musg. 


Ensign 


31 


3 October, 17G4. 


Bnstow, Robert 


Apothecary 


Br. 


1755. 


Brittman, John 


Ensign 


GO 


1 June, 1759. 


Broderick, St. John 


Ensign 


GO 


19 April, 1759. 


Brodie, George 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


11 January, 1769. 


Brodie, James 


Ensign 


45 


25 March, 1758. 




Lieut. 


45 


7 February, 1761. 


Bromhead, Benjamin 


Major 


69 


15 June, 1764. 


Bromhead, Boardmaa 


Capt. 




10 December, 1755. 






9 


27 August, 1756. 


Bromhead, Edward 


Chaplain 


31 


9 January, 1763. 


Bromhead, John 


Capt. 


69 


18 July, 1766. 


Bromley, Edward 


Major 


31 


25 April, 1765. 


Brooke. Robert Bounds 


Ensign 


8 


6 November, 1772. 


Broughton, Charles 


Ensign 


5S 


26 January, 1758. 


Brown , Andrew 


Ensign 


44 


9 May, 1757. 




Lieut. 


44 


25 July, 1758. 


Brown, Arch. Mont. 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


22 August, 1755. 




Adj't. 


N. Y. 


15 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


00 


15 June, 1760. 


Brown, Hon. Arthur 


Capt. 


28 


10 December, 1755. 




Major 


28 


16 December, 1763. 


Brown, Charles 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 1760. 


Brown, Francis 


Lieut. 


28 


9 April, 1756. 




Capt. 




28 March, 1763. 




Capt. 


28 


25 December, 1765. 


Brown, Henry 


Chaplain 


27 


19 June, 1758. 


Brown, Henry 


Lieut. 


22 


25 October, 1756. 


Brown, Plenry 


Lieut. 


22 


17 May, 1757. 


Brown, Henry 


Captain 


60 


18 April, 1761. 


Brown, John 


Lieut. 


62 


9 February, 1756. 




Capt. 


60 


15 September, 1760. 




Capt. 


60 


14 January, 1764. 


Brown, John 


Captain 




31 December, 1761. 






N.Y 


. 24 April, 1762. 


Brown, John 


2* Lieut. 


21 


3 June, 1767. 


Brown, Mountford 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 1760. 




Lieut. 


35 


4 May, 1762. 


Brown, Robert 


Eusign 


46 


22 November, 1756. 




Lieut. 


46 


16 November, 1758. 


Brown, Thomas 


Lieut. 


35 


16 February, 1756. 


Brown, William 


Lieut. 


35 


31 July, 1758. 


Brown, William 


Ensign 


42 


16 July, 1758. 




Lieut. 


42 


20 March, 1759. 


Brown, William 


Ensign 


60 


13 December, 1756. 




Lieut. 


60 


31 October, 1759. 


Brown, William 


Capt. 


52 


24 June, 1771. 


Browne, Arthur 


Ensign 


58 


18 October, 1760. 


Browne, Charlotte 


Matron Hos. Br. 


1755. 


Browne, Thomas 


Lieut. 


10 


13 September, 1770. 


Browne, Thomas 


Capt. 


26 


3 March, 1772. 









. 



If IS 

r 






fl 






• 



• 



voitf 



1894.] British < 


Ifficers serving in A 


merica. 1 


Browne, Warham 


Ensign 


35 


24 January, 1758. 




Lieut. 


35 


7 April, 1760. 


Browne, William 


Lieut. 


14 


6 June, 1766. 


Browne, William 


Lieut. 


14 


10 June, 1766. 


Browne, 


Ensign 


31 


26 December, 1770. 


Browning, William 


Major 


4G 


2 February, 1757. 


Bruce, Lewis 


Chaplain 


47 


22 July, 1758. 


Bruce, Hon. Thomas 


Major 


60 


27 May, 176S. 




Lieut. Col. 


65 


16 March, 1770. 


Bruere, George 


Lieut. 


18 


4 February, 1769. 


Bruere, John 


Lieut. 


14 


17 April, 1763. 


Bruyeres, John des 


Ensign 


35 


27 July, 1759. 


Buckley, Thomas 


Lieut. 


29 


1 May, 1767. 


Bulkley, Richard 


Lieut. 


45 


25 June, 1755. 


Bulkley, Richard 


Ensign 


59 


30 October, 1772. 


Burchill, John 


Ensign 


48 


29 September, 1760. 




Lieut. 


48 


20 May, 1762. 


Burden, George 


Ensign 


95 


27 February, 1760. 


Burke, John 


Ensign 


22 


21 September, 1756. 




Lieut. 


22 


16 January, 1759. 


Burn, James 


Lieut. 


52 


21 October, 1758. 


Burnand, Dennis Ger. 


Capt. 


60 


14 January, 1756. 


Burnet, Charles 


Ensign 


78 


8 May, 1760. 


Burnett, John 


Ensign 


28 


26 July, 17G2. 




Lieut. 


28 


8 March, 1764. 


Burnett, John 


Lieut. 


8 


21 April, 1768. 


Burnett, Peter 


Q r M r 


14 


10 June, 1768. 




Ensign 


14 


24 July, 1772. 


Burnett, Robert 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


21 February, 1772. 


Burns, George 


Ensign 


45 


3 July, 1755. 




Lieut. 


45 


14 August, 1759. 




Lieut. 


60 


14 July, 1769. 


Burnsides, Anthony 


Lieut. 


48 


6 May, 1761. 


Burrege, J. Leake 


Lieut. 


44 


16 September, 1760. 


Burrent, John 


Ad jut. 


60 


7 June, 1764. 


Burton, Edward 


Ensign 


64 


11 September, 1765, 


Burton, George 


Ensign 


1 


27 April, 1756. 




Lieut. 


1 


14 April, 1758. 


Burton, George 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 1760. 


Burton, Ralph 


Lieut. Col. 


48 


15 October, 1754. 


Burton, Ralph 


Colonel 


95 


10 December, 1760. 


Butler, Piers 


Lieut. 


22 


16 February, 1755. 




Capt. Lieut 


;. 22 


26 May, 1760. 




Capt. 


22 


12 November, 1761. 


Butler, Pierce 


Capt. 


29 


30 July, 1760. 




Major 


29 


23 April, 1766. 


Butler, Pierce 


Ensign 


46 


2 February, 1757. 




Lieut. 


46 


18 August. 1762. 


Butler, Walter 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


, 25 June, 1725.* 


Butler, William 


Major 


65 


16 May, 1766. 


Butrick, George 


Q"M' 


46 


15 March, 1764. 




Q r M< 


18 


11 July, 1767. 




• Or 1728. 







159 



160 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Butterwiek, Robert 


Ensign 


15 


19 September, 1765. 


Byrd, George 


CaptT 


53 


27 December, 1755. 


Cadogan, George 


Capt. Lt. 


So. Ca. 


25 April. 1747. 


Cahilj, Moses 


Lieut. 


65 


28 February, 1766. 


Cabler, James 


Lieut. 


60 


6 May, 1757. 


Calder, Patrick 


Lieut. 


64 


3 October. 1757. 




Capt. Lt. 


64 


12 Julv, 1770. 


Calderwpod, James 


Capt. 


26 


24 July, 1767. 


Calderuood, Samuel 


Ensign 


35 


14 September, 1761. 


Calderwood, William 


Ensign 


16 


10 June, 1772. 


Caldwell, David 


Surgeon 


9 


7 October, 1762. 


Caldwell, John 


Lt. Col. 


8 


27 October, 1772. 


Cameron, Alexander 


Capt. 


78 


21 July. 1757. 


Cameron, Alexander 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


25 February, 1761. 


Cameron, Alexander 


Ensign 


46 


10 September, 1762. 


Cameron, Allan 


Capt. 


77 


22 Julv, 1757. 


Cameron, Allan 


Ensign 


78 


23 June. 1762. 


Cameron, Archibald 


Ensign 


15 


9 July. 1760. 


Cameron, Archibald 


Lieut. 


42 


25 Julv. 1762. 


Cameron, Donald 


Lieut. 


78 


30 September, 1758. 


Cameron, Duncan 


Ensign 


78 


25 September, 1759. 


Cameron, Duncan 


Ensign 


15 


8 July, 1760. 


Cameron, Duncan 


Lieut. 


43 


14 August, 1762. 


Cameron, Evan 


Ensign 


78 


5 January, 1757. 




Lieut. 


78 


9 June, 1758. 


Cameron, Hugh 


Lieut. 


78 


12 January, 1757. 




Capt. 


78 


25 September, 1759. 


Cameron, Samuel 


Lieut. 


40 


4 July, 1755. 




Q r M 1 


40 


24 April, 1762. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


42 


28 January, 1756. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


62 


3 February, 1756. 


Campliell, Alexander 


Major 


77 


7 January, 1757. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


78 


7 May, 1757. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


77 


29 July, 1757. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Ensign 


77 


4 November, 1758. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Ensign 


78 


23 July, 1760. 


Campbell, Alexander 


CaptT 


78 


5 October, 1760. 


Campbell, Alexander 


Lt. Col. 


95 


22 March, 1761. 


Campbell, Allan 


Capt. 


42 


15 March, 1755. 




Major 


42 


15 August, 1762. 


Campbell, Archibald, Sr. 


Lieut. 


42 


5 May, 1756. 


Campbell, Archibald 


Lieut. 


78 


23 January, 1757. 




Capt. 


78 


29 April, 1760. 


Campbell, Archibald, Jr. 


Lieut. 


42 


28 July, 1757. 


Campbell, Archibald 


Capt. 


42 


16 July, 1758. 


Campbell, Archibald, Jr. 


Ensign 


42 


21 Julv, 1758. 




Lieut. 


42 


14 February, 1760. 


Campbell, Archibald, Sr. 


Ensign 


42 


24 July, 1758. 




Lieut. 


42 


26 July, 1760. 


Campbell, Archibald 


Captain 


42 


4 December. 1759. 


Campbell, Archibald 


Lieut. 


42 


30 July, 1760. 


Campbell, Archibald 


Lieut. 


29 


13 February, 1762. 




Captain 


29 


2 August, 1769. 









- 



1894.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



161 



Campbell, Archibald 


Captain 


42 


Campbell, Archibald 


Lieut. 


77 


Campbell, Archibald 


Ensign 


69 


Campbell, Archibald 


Lieut. 


26 


Campbell, Ch. Kenning. 


Lieut. 


95 


Campbell, Colin 


Lieut. 


15 


Campbell, Colin 


Ensign 


35 




Lieut. 


35 


Campbell, Colin 


Lieut. 


77 


Campbell, Colin 


Ensign 


35 




Lieut- 


35 


Campbell, Colin 


Ensign 


44 


Campbell, Donald 


Lieut. 


62 




Q r M r 


60 




Capt. Lt. 


60 




Capt.. 


60 


Campbell, Donald 


Ensign 


42 




Lieut. 


42 


Campbell, Donald 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


Campbell, Donald 


Q r M r 


60 


Campbell, Donald 


Lieut. 


77 


Campbell, Duncan 


Major 


42 


Campbell, Duncan 


Lieut. 


42 


Campbell, Duncan 


Q r M r 


42 


Campbell, Duncan 


Q r M r 


26 


Campbell, Duncan 


Ensign 


26 


Campbell, George 


Lieut. 


80 


Campbell, George 


Ensign 


42 




Lieut. 


42 


Campbell, James 


Surg. Mate 


Br. 


Campbell, James 


Lieut. 


62 


Campbell, James 


Lieut. 


42 


Campbell, James 


Lieu*. 


22 


Campbell, James 


Ensign 


48 




Lieut. 


48 


Campbell, James 


Ensign 


77 




Lieut. 


77 


Campbell, James 


Capt. Lieut 


, 34 


Campbell, James 


Lieut. 


69 


Campbell, John 


Lieut. 


42 




Capt. Lieut 42 




Captain 


42 


Campbell, John 


Capt. Lt. 


42 


Campbell, John, Sr. 


Captain 


22 


Campbell, John 


Captain 


42 


Campbell, John 


Major 


78 


Campbell, John 


Captain 


78 




Major 


78 


Campbell, John 


Lieut. 


77 


Campbell, John, Jr. 


Capt. Lieut 


22 




Captain 


22 


Campbell, John, Sen. 


Lieut 


42 


VOL. XLVin. 


15* 





29 April, 1762. 
13 June, 1762. 

I September, 1768, 
25 December, 1770. 

7 March, 1760. 

4 September, 1754. 

II April, 1756. 

27 July, 1759. 

13 January, 1757. 

23 August, 1758. 

5 October, 1760. 

9 November, 1764. 

4 January, 1756. 
18 August, 1756. 

14 April, 1758. 

29 August, 1759. 

5 May, 1756. 

24 July, 1758. 

6 December, 1756. 
20 August, 1759. 

6 June, 1757. 

] 1 February, 1757. 

17 December, 1755. 

23 July, 1758. 

3 September, 1766. 

13 July, 1767. 

1 March, 1770. 

28 December, 1757. 

8 May, 1759. 

24 July, 1762. 

1755. 

30 January, 1756. 

14 December, 1756. 

8 March, 1757. 
23 August, 1758. 

15 June, 1760. 

17 September, 1760. 
27 June, 1762. 

31 October, 1762. 
20 November, 1765. 

16 May, 1748. 

2 August, 1759. 
26 July, 1760. 

16 February, 1756. 
16 February, 1756. 

9 April, 1756. 

6 January, 1757. 
9 January, 1757. 
5 October, 1760. 
30 July, 1757. 
5 July, 1758. 
26 May, 1760. 
15 July, 1758. 









nuO 



.' 



162 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Campbell, John, Jr. 


Lieut. 


42 


15 September, 1758. 




Lieut. 


42 


25 December, 1705. 


Campbell, John 


Ensign 


78 


27 September, 1753. 




Lieut. 


78 


13 December, 1759. 


Campbell, John 


Adj' 


77 


11 Julv, 1759. 


Campbell. John 


Major 


17 


11 Julv, 1759. 


Campbell, John 


Captain 


27 


25 March, 1762. 


Campbell, Mungo 


Captain 


77 


15 September, 1758. 




Captain 


55 


17 September, 1760. 


Campbell, Oliver 


Ensign 


21 


25 April, 1765. 


Campbell, Robert 


Ensign 


62 


17 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


60 


23 March, 1758. 




Capt. 


60 


27 April, 1762. 


Campbell, Thomas 


Ensign 


62 


28 December, 1755. 




Lieut. 


60 


4 December, 1756. 


Campbell, William 


2 d Lieut. 


94 


20 February, 1760. 


Campbell, 


Ensign 


78 


12 December, 1759. 


Candler, Edward 


Ensign 


35 


11 June 1760. 


Cane, Edward 


Lieut. 


35 


7 April, 1755. 




Capt. Lt. 


35 


11 June 1760. 


Cane, Edward 


Capt. 


43 


8 April, 1762. 


Capel, Joseph 


Capt. Lt. 


28 


8 March, 1757. 




Captain 


28 


3 October, 1700. 


Carbonell, Thomas 


Ensign 


46 


2 February, 1757. 




Q 1 M* 


46 


25 February, 1757. 


Carden,* John 


Ensign 


17 


24 July, 1759. 




Lieut. 


17 


29 April, 1762. 


Carden, John 


Capt am 


60 


25 February, 1760. 




Captain 


60 


25 December, 1765. 


Carden, John 


Ensign 


60 


7 August, 1771. 


Cargill, Abernethy 


Ensign 


17 


18 September, 1760. 


Carleton, Christopher 


Lieut. 


31 


29 July, 1763. 




Capt. Lieut 


. 31 


25 December, 1770. 




Captain 


31 


25 May, 1772. 


Carleton, George 


Chaplain 


52 


1 May, 1772. 


Carmichael, Robert 


Lieut. 


10 


25 December, 1770. 


Camcross, Hugh 


Ensign 


95 


3 February, 1760. 




Lieut. 


95 


26 June, 1762. 


Carr, Maurice 


Major 


29 


13 February, 1762. 




Lieut. Col. 


29 


23 April, 1766. 


Carre, Stair Campbell 


Ensign 


62 


7 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


60 


7 Mav, 1757. 




Lieut. 


60 


8 May, 1764. 


Carrique, John 


Ensign 


16 


20 November, 1765. 




Lieut. 


16 


4 Februarv, 1769. 


Carrol, Edward 


Ensign 


16 


18 April, 1766. 




Lieut. 


16 


20 May, 1771. 


Carrol, Frederick 


Ensign 


16 


1 January, 1766. 




Lieut. 


16 


4;February, 1769. 


Carrol, William 


Ensign 


58 


11 February, 1758. 


Carson, 


Adj't. 


N.Y. 


5 July, 1755. 


Carson, William 


Q r M f 


40 


4 February, 1760. 



* In three years his came is printed as Garden. 



. 



:, 












. 







- 












1894.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



163 



Carter, Gilbert 


Ensign 


29 


13 February, 1762. 


Carter, John 


Captain 


43 


20 June, 1753. 


Carter, William 


Lieut. 


65 


6 February, 1759. 


Cary, Hon. Luc. Ferd. 


Major 


60 


4 April, 1765. 


Cathcart, Andre w 


Lieut. 


15 


27 September, 1757. 




Captain 


15 


21 August, 1765. 


Catherwood, Robert 


2 d Lieut. 


40 


2 April, 1757. 




Lieut. 


40 


10 October, 1761. 


Catherwood, "William 


Surgeon 


40 


7 February, 1757. 


Caullield, Jolm 


Chaplain 


17 


12 April, 1764. 


Cavendish, Ld. Fred. 


Colonel 


34 


30 October, 1760. 




Maj. Gen. 




7 March, 1762. 


Chadwicke, James 


Lieut. 


16 


1 January, 1766. 




Captain 


16 


4 February, 1769. 


Chalmers, James 


Surgeon 


31 


1 April, 1744. 


/~1K V • 


Captain 
Ensign 


62 

46 


3 January, 1756. 
16 August, 1762. 


Chandler, Edward 


Chapman, Benjamin 


Lieut. 


18 


11 September, 1765. 




Captain 


18 


2 June, 1771. 


Chapman, Eussell 


Lieut. Col. 


62 


5 January, 1756. 


Charlton, Denis 


Ensign 


28 


19 March, 1762. 




Lieut. 


28 


28 March, 1763. 


Charlton, John 


Surgeon 


17 


25 April, 1762. 


Charleton, John 


Ensign 


60 


4 October, 1760. 


Charteris, Harry 


Captain 


62 


8 January, 1756. 


Chave, John 


Q r M r 


17 


18 April, 1762. 


Cherrington, John 


Surgeon 


Br. 


1755. 


Chester, William 


Lieut. 


69 


8 April, 1762. 




Captain 


69 


12 August, 1768. 


Chetwode, Charles 


Ensign 


45 


1 October, 1755. 




Lieut. 


45 


25 February, 1760. 


Chetwynd, Hon. William 


Ensign 


52 


21 February, 1772. 


Chisholme, James 


Captain 


21 


20 December, 1756. 




Major 


21 


19 February, 1766. 


Chisholme, John 


Ensign 


78 


17 January, 1757. 




Captain 


78 


4 September, 1759. 


Christie, Gabriel 


Captain 


48 


13 November, 1754. 


Christie, Gabriel 


Lieut. Col. 


60 


24 December, 1768. 


Christie, James 


Ensign 


60 


25 December, 1765. 


Christie, John 


Ensign 


60 


28 July, 1758. 




Lieut. 


60 


15 November, 1765. 


Christopher, John 


Ensign 


17 


21 March, 1758. 




Lieut. 


17 


18 September, 1760. 


Chute, Eusebius 


Lieut. 


9 


14 July, 1759. 


Clanchy, James 


Ensign 


64 


13 December, 1770. 


Clapp, Thomas 


Ensign 


44 


6 August, 1760. 


Clarke, Henry 


Ensign 


59 


28 June, 1769. 


Clarke, James 


Captain 


45 


12 March, 1755. 


Clarke, John 


Captain 


46 


13 October, 1762. 


Clarke, John 


Lieut. 


59 


23 July, 175'J. 


Clarke, John 


Ensign 


48 


19 March, 1758. 




Lieut. 


48 


8 March, 1759. 


Clarke, Thomas 


Captain 


N. Y. 


14 March, 1743-4. 



, 















bO 






164 



British Officers serving in Ai 



[April, 



Clans, Daniel 
Clavering, John 

Clement, Robert 
Clements, Henry 

Clements, Theophilus 
Ciephane, James 
Clerk, George 
Clerk, George 

Cloas, 

Clowes, George 
Clunes, Gordon 
Cochran, Gavin 
Cochron, John 
Cockburn, Sir James, Bt. 
Cockburne, John 

Coekburne, William 
Cockburn, William 
Cockburn, William 
Codd, Robert 
Colchester, Duncomb 
Coklen, Rich. Nicola 
Cole, Arthur 
Colhoun, -Alexander 

Colley, Johnson 
Collier, Samuel 
Collins, Cba. Husbands 

Collins, George 
Collins, Thomas 
Collingvvood, Gilfrid 
Colquhoun, James 

Colville, Hon. Charles 

Comberbach, Edward 

Compton, William 
Congalton, Henry 
Connor, Fitz Maurice 

Conolly, William 

Conran, Henry 
Conte, Peter le 
Conte, Marquis de 
Conway, Archibald 
Conynghame, John 
Cook, Robert 



Captain 

Colonel 

Maj. Gen. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Lieut. Col. 

Major 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Adj't. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Capt. 

Ensign 

Captain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Surgeon 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Surgeon 

Lieut. 

Adj't. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Colonel 

Maj. Gen. 

Capt. Lt. 

Captain 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

2 d Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 



GO 

52 



43 
43 
69 
78 
44 
77 
60 

8 
42 
62 

1 
48 
35 
35 

1 
15 
42 
59 
59 
42 
28 

N. Y. 
N. Y. 
58 
60 
45 
45 
60 
35 
45 
22 
22 
69 

62 
60 
65 
60 
16 
16 
18 
18 
10 

8 

Rangers 

58 

29 

1 

1 



7 July, 1761. 
1 April, 1762. 
15 August, 1761. 

24 December, 1770. 
10 December, 1755. 

7 March, 17G2. 
15 June, 1764. 

4 January, 1757. 

3 July, 1755. 

14 September, 1760. 

18 December, 1756. 

14 September, 1770. 

19 July, 1758. 

15 January, 1756. 
18 September, 1760. 
22 March, 175S. 

26 November, 1756. 

25 March, 1757. 

22 January, 1755. 

16 July, 1758. 

16 September, 1760. 
18 December, 1770. 
25 December, 1770. 

27 August, 1766. 

8 March, 1764. 
25 June, 1737. 

25 May, 1755. 

4 January, 1756. 
6 February, 1759. 
27 June, 1755. 

20 March, 1756. 
30 October, 1760. 

12 March, 1754. 

5 March, 1750-1. 

26 May, 1760. 

1 July, 1762. 
23 April, 1758. 

27 February, 1761. 

28 December, 1755. 

23 August, 1758. 
16 May, 1766. 

18 May, 1764. 

19 May, 1759. 

4 February, 1769. 
8 April, 1767. 

2 June, 1771. 

1 October, 1766. 
25 December, 1770. 
25 September, 1761. 
25 September, 1759. 

13 February, 1762. 
27 April, 1756. 

18 July, 1758. 












» .1 



1894.] 



British Officers serving in Ameru 



165 



Cook, William 


Lieut. 


1 


Cook, William 


Lieut. 


62 


Cooke, Matthew 


Adj't 


95 


Cooke, William 


Lieut. 


27 


Cooper, Cunningham 


Lieut. 


62 


Cooper, David 


Lieut. 


14 




Aclj't 


14 


Cooper, William 


Lieut. 


28 


Cope, John 


Captain 


18 


Cope, John 


Lieut. 


48 


Coraoce, John 


Captain 


20 


Corrance, John 


Major 


8 


Cornish, William 


Adj't 


31 




Lieut. 


31 


Corry, Ralph 


Captain 


28 




Major 


28 


Cosnan, John 


Captain 


45 


Cotterell, William 


Captain 


45 


Cottey, William 


Ensign 


46 


Cottnam, George 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


Cottnam. Samuel 


Captain 


40 


Cotton, William 


Lieut. 


27 


Cotton, William 


Ensign 


31 




Lieut. 


31 


Cottymore, Richard 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 




Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


Couehe, William 


Apothecary 


Br. 


Coutts, James 


Ensign 


22 




Lieut. 


22 


Coventry, George 


Captain 


N. Y. 


Coventry, George 


Ensign 


55 




Lieut. 


55 


Cowart, Jame3 


Lieut. 


48 


Cox, Nicholas 


Captoin 


47 


Cox, Richard 


Ensign 


46 




Lieut. 


46 


Coxeter, Henry 


Ensign 


60 


Cramahe, Hect. Theo. 


Captain 


15 


Crampton, Josiah 


Adj't 


10 




Lieut. 


10 


Cranfurd, Andrew 


Ensign 


77 


Craufurd, Archibald 


Ensign 


77 




Lieut. 


77 


Crause, Charles 


Lieut. 


65 


Crawfurd, Henry 


Ensign 


52 




Lieut. 


52 


Crawford, John 


Lieut. 


26 




Capt. Lt. 


26 


Creed. Francis 


Lieut. 


34 


Creed, Francis 


Ensign 


27 


Creedlaud, Simonides 


Ensign 


44 




Lieut. 


44 



I January, 1757. 

22 January, 1756. 
3 July, 17*62. 

27 April, 175G. 

II January. 1756. 

1 June, 1763. 

24 Julv, 1772. 
27 April, 1756. 

25 December, 1770. 
27 June, 1755. 

27 April, 1756. 

23 November, 1708. 

11 March. 1762. 

29 Julv, 1763. 

2 May, 1751. 

27 February, 1760. 
2 October, 1755. 

30 July, 1745. 

27 January, 1764. 

5 September, 1746. 

15 October, 1754. 

2 February, 1757. 
10 April, 1765. 

12 August, 1763. 

26 September, 1754. 

3 July, 1758. 

1755. 
10 March, 1761. 

16 December, 1762. 
25 August, 1761. 
25 December, 1755. 

24 July, 1758. 

6 November, 1755. 

2 July, 1753. 

21 September, 1756. 

25 July, 1758. 

3 September, 1759. 
12 March, 1754. 

4 December, 1769. 
21 March, 1765. 
24 November, 1762. 

24 July, 1757. 

31 December, 1761. 

26 May, 1769. 

8 December, 1759. 

6 November, 1765. 

7 March, 1760. 

27 January, 1772. 

27 Julv, 1762. 
27 March, 1758. 

25 December. 1758. 
6 November, 1761. 






- 






fiiO 



' 



166 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Crofton, Edward 



Crofton, Edward 
Crofton, Edward 
Crofton, George 
Crofton, Henry 

Crofton, James 

Crofton. John 

Crofton, Malby 
Crofton. Walter 

Crogan, "William 
Crookshanks, Charles 
Crosbie, Walter 
Crosley, Leonard 
Crosthwaite, W. Ward 
Crotty [or Crottie], Andrew 

Crow, Richard 
Crownfield, Henry 
Crozier, John 
Cruikshanks, Charles 
Cruickshanks, John 



Crymble, Edward 

Cuming, Thomas 
Canison, Thomas 
Cunningham, James 
Cunninghame, James 
Cunuinghame, William 
Cuppaidge, George 

Currie, Samuel 

Cuthbert, James 
Cuthbert, John 
Cuyler, Cornelius 

Cuyler, Cornelius 
Dagworthy, Ely 
Daliston, Thomas 
Dalling, John 
Dalling, John 
Dalrymple, Hew 

Dalrymple, James 
Dalrymple, John 



Lieut. 


31 


6 September. 1756. 


Capt. Lt. 


31 


29 July, 1765. 


Captain 


31 


24 November, 1769. 


Ensign 


44 




Lieut. 


45 


25 September. 1759. 


Ensign 


46 


2 February, 1757. 


Ensign 


4S 


29 March, 1758. 


Lieut. 


48 


19 August, 1759. 


Ensign 


62 


18 January, 1756. 


Lieut. 


60 


24 March, 1758. 


Lieut. 


48 


25 January, 1758. 


Captain 


48 


13 April, 1759. 


Ensign 


48 


6 May, 1761. 


Ensign 


46 


24 July, 1758. 


Lieut. 


46 


19 October, 1762. 


Ensign 


16 


22 February, 1771. 


Lieut. 


62 


28 December, 1755. 


Lieut. 


45 


29 June, 1755. 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 1760. 


Ensign 


47 


2 August, 1762. 


Ensign 


44 


15 September, 1758. 


Lieut. 


44 


16 August, 1760. 


Lieut. 


48 


10 November, 1755. 


Ensign 


52 


6 November, 1765. 


Captain 


29 


25 December, 1770. 


Captain 


N. Y. 


17 April, 1757. 


Ensign 


47 


1 March, 1760. 


Lieut. 


47 


24 February, 1762. 


Lieut. 


16 


25 December, 1770. 


Capt. Lt. 


58 


26 January, 1758. 


Captain 


58 


18 October, 1760. 


Ensign 


18 


23 July, 1771. 


Ensign 


42 


6 February, 1759. 


Captain 


45 


1 October,' 1755. 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


12 September, 1766. 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


9 March, 1764. 


Ensign 


26 


18 April. 1766. 


Lieut. 


26 


26 December, 1770. 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


14 March, 1766. 


1 st Lieut. 


21 


21 February, 1772. 


Captain 


15 


3 December, 1762. 


Lieut. 


78 


18 January, 1757. 


Ensign 


55 


31 May, 1759. 


Lieut. 


55 


8 September, 1761. 


Capt. 


46 


9 May, 1764. 


Lieut. 


44 


15 November, 1755. 


Chaplain 


15 


19 October, 1762. 


Major 


28 


2 February, 1757. 


Lieut. Col. 


43 


27 February, 1760. 


Ensign 


31 


8 April, 1763. 


Lieut. 


31 


19 February, 1766. 


Captain 


58 


28 December, 1755. 


Capt. Lt. 


26 


26 December, 1755. 









.' 






' 






1894.] 



British Ojji 



icers servi 



w 



merica. 



167 



Dalrymple, John 

Dalrymple, Robert 

Dalrymple, William 
Daltou/Blundel 

Dalton, James 
Dalway, Robert 
Daly, Peter 

Daly. Peter 
Dalyell, James 

Dame, George 

Dame, Theophilas 

Daniel, John 
Danks, Benonie 
Dann, Charles 
Darby, John 

Darby, Robert 
Darby, William. 

D'Arcy, Peter 
D'Arcy, Robert 
DAripe, Isaac Aug. 

Darrell, John 

Davers, Sir Charles, Bt. 
Davers, Charles 
Davies, Daniel 
Davies, Rowland 
Davis, Michael 

Davis, , - 

Davison, William 
Day, Lawrence 
Dayrell, Paul 

Dead, Thomas 
Dealy, Peter 
Deane, Richard 
Dechair, John 
Delacherois, Mich. 
Delamaine, Thoma3 
DeLancy, James 

DeLancey, John 



Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lt. Coi. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

l rt Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 
Captain 

Captain 
Captain 
Ensign 

Major 
Lieut. Col. 
Surgeon 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lie; 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Surgeon 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Captain 

Surgeon 

Chaplain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 



14 
14 
31 
31 
14 
43 
40 
94 
10 
•21 
27 
42 
62 
80 
1 
8 



8 

95 
Rangers 

34 

17 

17 

55 

17 

17 

47 

95 

15 
it. 15 

31 

31 

44 

48 

5S 

64 

62 

60 

15 

52 

95 

52 

52 

95 

55 

31 

46 
9 

60 

60 

46 

18 



27 December, 1763. 

6 January, 1772. 

7 May, 1767. 

22 August, 1770. 
27 March, 17C5. 

27 April, 1756. 

22 October, 1762. 
7 March, 1760. 

24 January, 1766. 
16 Februarv, 1756. 
21 July, 1758. 

11 July, 1759. 
15 January, 1756. 

28 December, 1757. 

13 September, 1760. 
4 January, 1762. 

26 December, 1770. 

23 November, 1768. 

27 March, 1770. 

2 March, 1760. 

25 September, 1761. 
25 December, 1764. 

21 September, 1756. 

14 May, 1759. 

25 Februarv, 1757. 

6 May, 176*2. 
20 June, 1766. 

11 Jauuarv, 1758. 

22 April, 1762. 

25 September, 1757. 

26 September, 1764. 
10 November, 1762. 

10 August, 1765. 

28 October, 1761. 
28 March, 1758. 

11 February, 1758. 
20 February, 1768. 
9 January, 1756. 

9 May, 1757. 
13 August, 1756. 

3 May, 1765. 

7 March, 1760. 

9 May, 1766. 

6 March, 1771. 
28 June, 1762. 

4 December, 1759. 

11 August, 1765. 

10 December, 1755. 

12 July, 1759. 

15 November, 1765. 

8 March, 1757. 

12 February, 1759. 
19 November, 1771. 



. ) 
























168 _, Gov. 


Br ad street's u 


incest) 


y- [ A i 


Delap, Robert 


Ensign 


10 


4 December, 1769. 


Delgaruo, John 


Ensign 


8 


19 December, 1768. 


Delhuntry, Lawrence. 


Lieut. 


26 


28 February, 1766. 


Deinere, Paul 


Captain 


So. Ca 


. 26 June, 1754. 


Demerc, Raymond 


Captain 


So. Ca 


. 31 January, 1741-2. 


Dernier, George 


Ensign 


60 


29 March, 1758. 




Lieut. 


60 


13 July. 1761. 




Lieut. 


60 


9 October, 1767. 


Denny, Edward 


Ensign 


59 


13 February, 1762. 


Denshire, George 


Captain 


9 


15 July, 1767. 


Denty, Thomas 


Ensign 


58 


21 May, 1759. 


Derby, John 


Chaplain 


43 


11 November, 1761. 


Desuoielles, 


Lieut. 


60 


26 February, 1756. 


Despard, Andrew 


Ensign 


59 


13 February, 1762. 




Lieut. 


59 


26 December, 1770. 


Desseausr, Joseph 


Col. Com' 


62 


2 January, 1756. 


Dewitt, Peter 


Ensign 


60 


1 May, 1757. 


Dickson, Alexander 


Captain 


16 


17 June, 1761. 




Major 


16 


20 May, 1771. 


Dickson, Hugh 


Lieut. 


29 


7 December, 1764. 


Dinsdale, John 


Lieut. 


52 


31 December, 1759. 


Disney, Daniel 


Adj't 


44 


20 January, 1753. 




Lieut. 


44 


29 June, 1755. 




Capt. Lieut. 


80 


16 August, 1760. 




Captain 


'80 


4 October, 1760. 


• 


Captain 


44 


22 September, 1764. 


Disney, Francis 


Captain 


21 


19 February, 1766. 


Dixon, Charles 


Lieut. 


60 


21 December, 1771. 


Dixon, Thomas 


l at Lieut. Rangers 


25 September, 1761. 


Dobson, Henry 


Lieut. 


47 


27 June, 1755. 




Captain 


16 


28 February, 1766. 


Dobbyn, John 


Ensign 


9 


21 November, 1763. 




[To be continued.] 






4 *- 9 


H 





GOV. SIMON BRADSTEEET'S AXCESTBY.* 

By Isaac J. Gree>twood, A.M., of New York city. 

A manuscript volume of personal memoranda by the Rev. Simon 
Bradstrcet of New London, Conn., second son of Gov. Simon 
Bradstreet, contains this entry : 

"March 12, 1670-71, I baptized my child. He was named Simon, it 
being my own and my Father's name and Grandfather's." 

Going back another generation, we learn from Mather and 
Hutchinson, that the governor's grandfather was "a Suffolk gentle- 
man of fine estate," whose son Simon was, under Dr. Chaderton, 

« See Reg. i., 75; viii., 313; Ls., 113; xxxviii., 200. 



1894.] - Gov. Bradstreet* s Ancestry. 169 

one of the earliest fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. 
Afterwards, he was a minister of Lincolnshire, and a non-conformist 
at home, as well as when preaching abroad, at Middleburgh. The 
latter's son, Simon, born in llorbling, Lincoln, March, 1603, was 
also for a brief period at Emmanuel College, whence he removed 
to the family of Theophiius Clinton, fourth Earl of Lincoln, serving 
as his steward, and living subsequently, in the same capacity, with 
the Dowager Countess Of Warwick. 

Thomas, Earl of Lincoln, father of Theophiius, died in January, 
1618-19, a^. 48. He was father of eight sons and nine daughters, 
of whom the Lady Arbella, together with her husband Isaac John- 
son, sailed for Xew England in the Spring of 1630, on a ship named 
in her honor ; Bradstreet himself being a passenger on the same vessel. 
Johnson's mother, Elizabeth, was daughter and heir of the l\ev. 
Laurence Chaderton, D.D., Prebendary of Lincoln, above alluded 
to; who was also one of the translators of King James's Bible, and 
the first master of Emmanuel College. This institution was built 
in 1584 by Sir Walter Mildway, whom the Queen greeted, on his 
coming to Court, with the remark, " Sir Walter, 1 hear you have 
erected a puritan foundation."' 

The Horbling parish register, not beginning till 1653, ha3 here- 
tofore barred further investigation, as to the family in that locality. 
Fortunately the Bishop of Lincoln's transcripts have been recently 
examined with the following results : 

Baptisms. 

From the 4 April! 1602 to the 24 Aprill next. 
1.-— (1602,) Samwell sonne of Simian Brodestrete, Sf-pteni r 19* 
From the 24 day of April .... (torn) . . vnto the eyght of Aprill 1604. 
2. — (100£.) Simon soone of Simon Bradstret, March 18. 

From (Lady Day) the 25 March 1605 to the 25 March 1606. 
3.— (160|,) March 9. Mercief daughter of Simon Bradstreet. 

From the 25 March 1606 to 25 March 1607. 
4. — (160f-,) Februarie 8. John| sonne of Simon Uradstreete. 

The transcripts from which these four extracts have been taken 
are each signed by the Vicar, Simon Bradstreet ; the earliest found 
during his incumbency dates "from the 3 daie q£ October 1596 
vntil the 3 of the same in the year 1597"; it is signed "Syinon 
Broadstreet Vicar' ibm." 

His own burial occurs in the transcript, running "from the 25 of 
March 1620 vnto the 25 March 1621." 

(162?,) Simon Bradstreete, Minister (Friday), Februarie 9. 

• The baptisms all took place on Sunday ; the years are inserted according to the com- 
putation then in use. 
t The infant was buried two davs later. 
X Was he. ancestor of the Baronets Bradstreet of Ireiand ? 
VOL. XL VIII. 1 6 



170 - Gov. BradstreeVs Ancestinj. [April, 

His will, recorded in the Consist. Co. of the Bishop of Lincoln, 
is as follows : 

In the name of God Amen The xx day of Decemher 1620 I Simou 
Bradstreete of Horblinge in the County of Lincolne minister and preacher 
of Gods worde doe ordayne and make this my last will and testament in 
manner & forme following ffifst I bequeath my soule into the hands of 
Almightie God my faithfull Creator and in Jesus Christe his sonne my 
Savio r & Redeemer and my bodie to the earth from whence it was taken 
and my worldly goods I thus bestow, Item I give and bequeath to Saumell 
Bradstreete my oldest sonne xl ? to be paide at the age of xxj t: '" yeares Item I 
give to Simon Bradstreete my second sonne xP to be paide at the age of xxj ue 
yeares as is aforesaid Item I give to John Bradstreete my youngest sonne 
xl 8 when he shall accomplish the age of xxj tie yeares as is aforesaid And 
my will is further that. Margaret my wife shall have my house w th the Close 
to the said house adjoyning and alsoe the medowe and all other things to 
the said house appertayniug w ch I bought of one Richard "Watson of North 
Rawcebv in the foresaid County of Lincolne dureing her natural] life. 
And further my will is that after her decease that the said house medowe 
and all the apptennces thereto belonging or apptuyninge shalhe soide and 
the price thereof to be equallie devyded amongst my three sounes if then 
they be all living, if not, to him or them that doth surviue or live Item I 
give to the poore of Horblinge and Brigend x 3 to be distributed according 
to the discrecon of my Supviso" All the rest of my goods not given and 
not bequeathed I giue to Margaret my wife whome I make my sole and 
only Execute 7 of this my last will And I desire James Lambley gentleman 
Robert Taverner and Thomas Wright to be Superviso" of this my last will 
In wittnes whereof I have sette my hand & seale the day and yeare above 
written — Simon Bradstreete — James Lainley, Robert Taverner, Thomas 
Wright. 

Probatum fait temoi testam' apud Lincoln' xiij die Aprilis anno dni 
1621 coram venli virs Rogers Parker sacre theolog' Profess' Decano et 
Surr' venlis viri croferi Wivell II dcoris R cU pris dni Georgij g'viden' dia 
Lincoln' Epi vicar' gehlis &c Commissuq' fuit onus execurjois liusdem 
testam" Executrici in eod' noiat' prius vigore Comiss' &c iul'at' saluo j u re 
&c. 

The name Simon has lorn? continued in the family, and is still 
preserved in the line of the Irish Baronets, whom Hutchinson 
alludes to as connected. However, contemporary with Simon, the 
Vicar of Horbling, was the Rev. Symon Bradstreet of Hasset, co. 
Suffolk, living 1630,* and Symon Bradstreete, citizen and grocer 
of Londou, who died in February, 1627-8, as we learn from his 
proof of will given in Mr. AVaters's Gleanings, f The latter leaves 
all his property to his nephew and executor, Samuel Bradstreete, 
and apparently discards his daughter Margaret, who, without his 
"love, leave or consent," had married Edmund Slater, citizen and 
mercer of London. Slater, in his license of 23 May, 1625, for a 
marriage at Lamborne or Birchanger, Essex, is called of St. Mag- 

« Reg. xxxviii., 342. 
t Reg. xxxviii., 205. 



1894.] Itei\ Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, IT. II. 171 

nus (London) ; his wife of Bishop's Stortford, Herts., and her 
father as of Brainford, .Middlesex, brewer. Four years later, 7 
May, 1G29, Edmund Slater, gent, of Bisliop's Stortford, Herts., 
widower, aged 30; has license of marriage at St. Bennet, Paul's 
Wharf, to Grace Grlascocke, aged 21, with consent of her father, 
Henry Glaseoeke, gent, of Farnham, Essex. Bishop's Stortford 
lay some thirty miles north of London; close to the westerly border 
of Essex, with Farnham and Birchanger just above it. 

If we may judge from what can be gathered in the MSS. of the 
Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, the family name of Bradstreet is 
of pure cockney origin, originating in Bread Street, that locality in 
the metropolis where was anciently established a bread market. 
Thus in 1273 Master Thomas de Bread Street, clerk, received the 
grant of a quit rent issuing from a tenement in the parish of All 
Hallows, Bread Street. His name also occurs as "de Bredstrate," 
and "de Bradstrat,'' till in 1291 we find him Rector of Tollesbery, 
Essex, acting as deputy of the Bishop of London, for collecting 
from the neighboring church of Heybridge, the tenth lately granted 
King Edward I. at Ely. In 1293 Walter de Bredstrete received a 
tenement in the parish of All Hallows de Bredstrete, under the will 
of Peter, son of John le Long (sec Gal. Husting Wills) ; and 
William de Bredstrate, bokeler, had a grant in 1243 of land in 
Wood Street, parish of St. Alphege. 



REV. STEPHEN PEABODY AND WIFE, OF ATKINSON, 
NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

By William C. Todd, A.M., of Atkinson, N. H. 
Read before the New-England Historic Genealogical Society, February 7, 1894. 

In the general attention now given to the men and customs of a 
century ago, an old-time pastor and his wife deserve special recog- 
nition. 

Rev. Stephen Peabody, the first settled minister of Atkinson, 
N. H., was born in Andover, Nov. 11, 1741. He was a descend- 
ant of Lieut. Francis Peabody, who came to this country in the 
"Planter" in 1G35. He was the son of John and Sarah (Ingalls) 
Peabody. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1769, a 
classmate of Theophilus Parsons. He was a poor boy, and used 
to tell in after life of his struggles to obtain an education, earning 
his board at college by waiting on the table, and carrying with him 
from home the linen he needed during the term, which his loving 
sisters had laundered. He was twenty-eight years old at gradua- 
tion, the pater omnium of his class, and it was not a little to his 



172 ftev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, K. H. [April, 

credit that his age did not alter his resolve to obtain an education. 
Having fixed upon the ministry for his profession, lie studied in 
the family of a minister, for it was before the day of theological 
seminaries, and defrayed his expenses by working on a farm and 
teaching school. 

He was ordained at Atkinson as pastor Nov. 25, 1772. This 
town was a part of land purchased of the Indians by (lie inhabitants 
of Pentucket, now Haverhill, Mass., and set off into New Hamp- 
shire as a part of Plaistow, and had been separated from that town 
and incorporated Sept. '6, 1767, five years before tin; settlement of 
Mr. Peabody. It seem3 strange to this generation to learn that 
the reason for the separation was that the people mi<jdit have 
their own church and minister. In their application fo the legisla- 
ture for an act of incorporation, the petitioners state: "That by 
reason of the great distance of their dwellings from the meeting- 
house they undergo many and great difficulties in attending the 
public worship of Almighty God there, and that tin- said meeting- 
house is not large enough to accommodate more than half the in- 
habitants of said town." At that period, as is well known, the 
church was an institution of the town ; the town as :t corporation 
was holden for the support of the minister ; and each citizen was 
assessed for the support of religious worship, as for other expenses. 

The small salary offered Mr. Peabody well illustrates the econ- 
omy of the times. The record is as follows: "Voted, To give Mr. 
Stephen Peabody one hundred and sixty pounds, lawful money, as a 
settlement, upon condition that the salary begin at sixty-six pounds, 
thirteen shillings and four pence, lawful money, the first year, and 
add on forty shillings per year till it amounts to eighty pounds per 
year." 

"Voted, To give Mr. Stephen Peabody ten cords of wood per 
year so long as he carries on the work of the ministry in Atkinson." 
No increase was ever made in this salary during his long ministry. 

The people used to settle their tax individually with the minister, 
with most of whom he had running accounts for artirlcs furnished, 
or services rendered, and at the close of the year his rash receipts 
were often very small, as can well be imagined, lie was settled 
for life, as was the old custom, and remained with his people forty- 
seven years. In Hampstead, an adjoining town, a contemporary. 
Rev. John Kelly, whom many now living remember, was pastor of 
his church fifty-six years. The ministerial itineracy of a later period 
was unknown. Soon after his settlement the Revolutionary war 
began, and he entered Poor's regiment as chaplain, for he was a 
brave man and a patriot. 

And it may not be out of place here to say, that in praising and 
honoring those who fought in the war of 1861-Go, we should not 
forget the soldiers of the Revolution who endured hardships to which 
soldiers now are strangers, Avith no motive but pure patriotism to 



1894. J Rev. Stejihen Peahody of Atkinson, M 11. 173 

draw them into the service. At the beginning of the Revolutionary 
war the Continent:!] Congress sent the following circular for signa- 
tures, which deserves to be more generally known to this generation : 
"We, the subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage and promise that 
we will to the utmost of our power, at the risk of our lives and 
fortunes, with arms, oppose the hostile proceedings of the British 
fleets and armies against the United American Colonies.'' Every 
male citizen of Atkinson, ninety-seven in all, signed this pledge. 
In the last war the town in filling its quota was obliged to pay many 
soldiers eight hundred dollars each, as bounty, to induce them to 
enlist. 

On his return to his people Mr. Peabody discharged faithfully all 
the duties of his pastorate, and they were many and varied. He 
must preach two sermons on the Sabbath, for in those days of few 
books and papers the sermons gave food for thought and discussion 
during the week. They were long sermons, too, and the people 
were not tired of listening, though seated in a cold church never 
warmed, and on hard sears with no cushions. All attended church, 
for it was not respectable to do secular work or seek amusement on 
the Sabbath. The prayer meetings at which he was expected to 
be present were more numerous and better attended than now, and 
more pastoral visits must be made. 

Mr. Peabody kept a diary, simply a record of what he did each 
day, without a reflection or any statement that did not relate to 
himself, written in a fine hand and condensed. That for 1783 has 
been preserved, and throws much light on the life of a clergyman at 
that period. Some entries will be given. 

"Oct. 3. Catechised the children at John Dustin's." All the 
children must be taught the Westminster Catechism, and from Sun- 
day to Sunday the pastor would give notice what families would be 
visited during the week "to catechise the children," and question 
them on the points of doctrine found in that little book, once so 
revered, now hardly known. At the appointed time the children 
would be gathered in the best room, dressed in their Sunday clothes, 
with clean faces, to receive their spiritual teacher, and when each 
child answered readily every question, beginning with "What is 
the chief end of man?" and the pastor commended the faithfulness 
of both children and parents, all eyes sparkled at his words of 
praise. Parents were proud of their children, and children proud 
of themselves. 

"April 13. Wrote John Little's Will." This entry shows that 
a pastor's duty was not confined to religious instruction. He was 
the scholar of the town, and must give advice, and write documents 
where some education and legal knowledge were required, and he 
felt as willing to aid his people as they felt free to call on him. 
There were but few lawyers, so abundant now. 

"July 16. Went to Commencement." No clergyman of that 

VOL. XLVIU. 16* 



174 Rev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, JV. H. [April, 

day neglected to visit Cambridge on that occasion, if only from 
religious motives. The strict Puritan theology of the time then 
prevailed at Harvard. It was regarded as the nursery of the 
church, where they could receive large draughts of spiritual life as 
well as mingle with the scholars of New England. For many 
weeks after his return the minister would tell his people what he 
had seen and heard, and they were no more tired of hearing than 
he was of telling. 

"Married Jonathan Johnson to Molly Follansbee ; Moses At- 
wood to Judith AVadley, all of Hampstead for a dollar a piece." 
Again, "Married Major Moore to widow Little for two dollars." 
These entries show how little it cost to get married a century ago, 
and explains in part why so few then led single lives. As a 
"Major" was quite an important personage years ago, and from 
regard for his dignity would pay the highest price where his happi- 
ness was so deeply concerned, it would seem that two dollars were 
a big fee. With no knowledge on the subject, it is to be hoped 
our clerical friends arc now more liberally rewarded. One can 
certainly afford to pay well for a union with a good wife, and if he 
gets a poor one he may as well begin first as last to pay dearly for 
his folly. 

"Nov. 6. At Mr. Dow's mill raising." Even in the youth of 
many now living it was quite an event to raise a building. The 
timbers were large, some of them big enough to give timber for a 
modern house, and all the men of the town must assemble to aid. 
The minister went, too, for he could see the people and talk with 
them. Prayer was generally offered before the work began. Re- 
freshments were provided in abundance, and New England rum 
was never wanting, of which the minister would take a little with 
the rest — only a little. It was long before the days of temperance ; 
it was a pure liquor, not the often poisonous mixture now drunk, 
and if the people became a little excited their heads were clear the 
next day. 

"Dec. 26. Got my wood." Most pastors of that day were set- 
tled for so much money and so many cords of wood, and so it was, 
as has been stated, with Parson Peabody. Word would be given 
out that on a given day, all must bring the minister's wood, and a 
merry time they had of it, for it Was a labor of love, and all rejoiced 
to take part. No one could work too hard, and the heart of the 
pastor was not more glad than those of his people at the big pile 
before his door. No sworn surveyor measured the allowance, no 
short sticks were slyly put in — the minister must be kept warm, for 
they well knew how welcome they were to his fireside. 

To add to his means of support he had bought a little farm. He 
did much of the work on his land with his own hands, and in his 
diary he speaks of " getting in the corn," and " husking it," " killing 
the hog and cow," and other such necessary farm labor. The out- 



189-4.] JR&v. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, X. II. 175 

of-door exercise kept him in robust health, as it would clergymen 
now. He was a large man, over six feet in height, of great strength, 
with a keen black eye, swarthy complexion, and curling, bushy 
hair. lie could do every kind of farm work, tor which his early 
life had prepared him, and whether holding the plough, hoeing corn, 
wielding the scythe, harvesting, or gathering his fruit, about which 
he was very select, bearing in mind his guests, no one of his neigh- 
bors could surpass him. He knew no fear, and in his youth he 
had been a famous wrestle]-, and, it was said, bad men had not im- 
frequ£i*tly experienced his ''muscular Christianity " in a way they 
did not forget, when ihey had excited him to holy anger. His farm 
work was a bond of union between him and his people. He was 
one of them, worked as they worked, did as they did, and in all his 
labors, in time of need, their willing hands were ever at his service. 
It was the advantage of a long pastorate, that the minister knew 
all his people. The population was then stationary, with no foreign 
mixture, and as the years rolled on the children and grandchildren 
of his first charge grew up around him, their history was familiar 
to him, and they seemed like a part of his own family. At funerals 
Mr. Peabody could drop a sympathetic and sincere tear, for a friend 
had departed, and at weddings he was the life of the company, giv- 
ing loose to his exuberant spirits, and interspersing good advice 
with the cheerful talk befitting the occasion. 

Mr. Peabody was very hospitable, and his diary gives evidence 
of the amount of company he entertained. Almost every day he 
speaks of persons who have dined or lodged with him, and when the 
labor of giving names was too great he would write, "full of com- 
pany." 

Before the introduction of railroads it was the custom of the 
farmers of Vermont and New Hampshire to bring their produce in 
their own conveyances to the seaport towns, and exchange for 
groceries and other needed articles. These journeys were usually 
made in winter, as it was their season of leisure, and in sleighs for 
ease of transport. Often, however, the snow would suddenly dis- 
appear, so that the farmers made all possible expedition, travelling 
much in the night. So well known was Mr. Peabody's hospitality, 
that many of them would stop at his house, and they were welcome. 
His doors were left unfastened at night : the big back-log gave heat 
to his sitting room ; and they would enter, warm themselves, chat 
with the good pastor in his adjacent bed-room, and depart, their 
faces unseen, and, perhaps, as in the old days of chivalry, their 
names unasked. 

He was a gentleman in his appearance, and paid full regard to 
the proprieties of dress demanded at that period of a clergyman. 
If when at work in the field, in a plain farmer's dress, it was an- 
nounced that polished visitors had come to see him, he would quickly 
prepare to meet them, in his best dark garb, with his white cravat, 






- 



176 Rev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, iV. II. [April, 

his silk stockings meeting the breeches at the knee, and the silver 
buckles worn then by gentlemen. 

He was a man of large views, and one of his first anxieties was 
tj provide for his people better means of education, and aided by a 
few friends he established Atkinson Academy in 1787, though it 
was not incorporated till 1791, the oldest in the state after Phillips 
at Exeter. Money was scarce, and to raise the necessary rands 
was no easy task, and from his own limited resources he expended 
freely, and incurred debts that embarrassed him to the end of his 
life. One of the means then common to secure money for such ob- 
jects was lotteries, for there were no moral scruples in regard to 
them. In the year 1791 a petition was presented to the Xew 
Hampshire legislature, it which it was stated : " That lotteries are 
now established in Massachusetts for raising funds to support acad- 
emies, and for various other purposes, by which considerable sums 
are daily drawn from the citizens of this state." And after enlarging 
upon the benefit to be obtained from the lottery, the petition prays : 
"That we might have liberty to raise one thousand pounds, or such 
other sum as may be thought proper, to be disposed of for the ac- 
complishment of the above purpose." Massachusetts was authority 
then as now in morals. 

The petition was at once granted Feb. 17, 1791. Then, as the 
town was so near the boundary, a petition was presented to the 'leg- 
islature of Massachusetts for permission to sell tickets in that state. 
It was refused, not on moral grounds, but the thrifty Old Bay State 
wished to reap fully ail the advantages to be obtained from the cul- 
tivation of it own territory — it believed then as now in a " Home 
Market." The good man had made several journeys to Boston on 
this errand, and it was with a sad heart that he turned his horse 
homeward from his unsuccessful mission. 

The lottery scheme was a failure, for but few tickets could be 
sold in a section so sparsely settled as Xew Hampshire. His ef- 
forts, however, in favor of the infant institution were not relaxed, 
and were rewarded by success. It soon gained a wide reputation, 
and students flocked thither from far around, many of whom, as 
Levi Woodbury, Gov. Kent, Jonathan Cilley, President Brown, 
in after years gained a national reputation. Grace Fletcher, wife 
of Daniel "Webster, was one of the pupils, and an old lady, one of 
her schoolmates, told me she was a pale, delicate, modest girl, whom 
all loved. It was, I think, the first academy in the country to ad- 
mit ladies to its privileges. The tradition is that " Polly " Peabody 
told her father she was going to the academy. He was amazed at 
such a proposition, for up to that time but few girls had received 
more than an elementary education, but he could deny his only 
daughter nothing, and she and some of her companions wore ad- 
mitted, sat with the boys, joined their classes, and co-education was 
established. The advocates of women's riahts should give merited 



1894.] Rev. Stephen PeaJbody of Atkinson, A 7 ". //. 177 

credit to "Polly" Peabody and Atkinson Academy for this advance 
movement in the higher education of women. Parson Peabody re- 
ceived many pupils into his family, as he had erected a large house, 
and they were ever after grateful for the instruction and refining 
influence of his home, largely due to his wife, of whom will be 
spoken later. 

One of these pupils, the late Rev. Dr. Samuel Oilman, has told 
how his mother, left a poor widow with four children, had taken 
him, her only son, a little boy of seven years, to Mr. Peabody 's 
home, and related her condition and anxiety for the child's future. 
"Madam," was his reply, "leave your little boy with us. He shall 
be one of us, and enter the academy. If Providence blesses your 
efforts to secure for yourself a livelihood, well and good ; you may 
remunerate us in the usual way. Bat, if you are doomed to strug- 
gle with adversity, be not anxious about your son ; be sure he shall 
have a home and an education." His wife was sitting near knitting, 
and smiled approval of her husband's words. "Was not this practi- 
cal Christianity? It can well be imagined with what a light heart 
that mother drove back the next morning to her home in Glouces- 
ter. It should be added that the debt was fully paid in after years, 
so far as money could pay it. It is an illustration of the kindness, 
unselfishness and hospitality of this clergyman during his whole life. 

Not content with the establishment of the academy, in his wish 
to cultivate the people generally he started a library, with the lead- 
ing citizens its shareholders, which was continued long after his 
decease, and had a marked influence in forming an intelligent com- 
munity. The books were carefully selected, every one instructive, 
in marked contrast to the volumes burdening so many shelves of 
our modern libraries. It was before the day of cheap fiction. 

With all these traits that could not fail to be appreciated, it is 
not to be wondered at that he had a strong hold on the respect and 
affections of his people. Ng child passed him that did not take off 
his hat, or make a courtesy, and it may be said that at that period 
every child was taught at home and at school to show this civility to 
the passing stranger, and punished for disobedience. In far off Ham- 
merf'est, in Norway, a few years ago, the writer was struck with 
this attention to a stranger, recalling the instruction of his boyhood. 
Are our children better now for its disregard ? 

In the church at the close of the service, the congregation rose, 
and remained standing till Mr. Peabody had left the house, bowing 
on each side as he passed down the aisle followed by his wife. He 
was never spoken of, or to, lightly, but usually as " Sir Peabody," 
or " Parson Peabody." 

He was not a learned man, and his theological library was said 
not to have contained more than fiftv volumes, yet his talents were 
certainly very respectable. He was not unfrequently called upon 
to pseach at the ordination exercises of his brother clergymen, and 



. 












178 Bev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, N~. II. [April, 

once preached the annual sermon before the Xew Hampshire legis- 
lature. His sermons were written in a fine hand, on small sheets 
of paper, for economy was required even in small things. Sermons 
then were divided into many heads, but he rarely went beyond 
"fifthly." He had the attention of his hearers, of the older portion 
from interest, and the younger people seated in the large galleries 
were kept in order by tithingmen, regularly appointed by the town 
at their annual meetings to look after unruly boys. Mr. Peabody 
did not hesitate himself to stop in his sermon and rebuke any im- 
propriety in the house of God. After the religious exercises had 
been finished, it was the custom of the town clerk to read the inten- 
tions of marriage, when all, especially the young, were eager listen- 
ers. It was certainly a proof of his ability that his people were for 
so long a time united under his teachings. But it was a period of 
faith, of adherence to time-honored views, before the "divers and 
strange doctrines " that have since divided the churches had crept 
in. It was a sufficient ground of belief that " Parson Peabody " and 
the Bible said it. An unbeliever in the old Orthodoxy was looked 
upon with suspicion, and suffered in his social intercourse as a 
dangerous associate, especially for the young. An old Boston 
teacher who had taught Edward Everett came to spend his declin- 
ing years in the town, but found it prudent to conceal his Unita- 
rianism/and Avhen asked his religious belief would evade a direct 
answer by saying: "My wife is a Methodist." He attended the 
service, and contributed as did his neighbors. 

Mr. Peabody had a happy temperament and joyous nature, and 
was fond of a joke. He was quick to see the humor of any inci- 
dent, and told a story or anecdote with much glee, often rising and 
using action to add to the effect, and joining heartily in the laughter 
that followed. He was i. fine singer, revelled in music, and often 
the first thing heard in his house in the morning was his loud melo- 
dious voice in some song, like " The bright rosy morning peeps 
over the hills," arousing the sleeping inmates. When riding alone, 
or at home, the impulse would seize him, and he would break out 
in some favorite tune. He joined in the singing at the church, and 
if there was any deficiency he supplied it, sometimes taking the 
place of the choir. He played the violin, and would draw from its 
chords exquisite music, and it was thought that he woidd gladly 
have danced but for his profession. 

In his domestic relations Mr. Peabody was fortunate. He mar- 
ried his first wife Jan. l'J, 1773, soon after his settlement. She 
was Mary Haseltine, daughter of Deacon John and Mary (Ingalls) 
Haseltine, of Bradford, Mass., and an aunt of the missionary Mrs. 
Judson and of Miss Abigail C. Haseltine, so long the able princi- 
pal of Bradford Female Seminary. She was a devoted wife and 
mother, whose chief happiness was in her family. She died Sept. 
10, 1793. Becoming a widower at an early age, according to the 



' 



1894.] llev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, JS r . 11. 179 

custom of that class he began to ]ook for another wife, and in due 
time married Mrs. Elizabeth Shaw, widow of Rev. John Shaw, 
pastor of the First Church of Haverhill, Mass. Her history was 
specially identified with that of Mr. Peabody and his Society, and 
it is not easy to speak too strongly in her praise. 

She was one of three remarkable sisters, daughters of Rev. Wil- 
liam Smith, of Weymouth, Mass., and' was said not to have been 
inferior to either of her sisters. One of them married President 
John Adams, and the third married Richard Craneh, and was the 
mother of the late Judge Craneh, of Washington, D". C. Her 
father had educated her with great care, and as the wife of Mr. 
Shaw she oceupied a prominent social position. The clergy of that 
period mingled much with each other, to discuss theological and 
other questions continually arising in their parishes, and to talk 
about new books, then rarely appearing, and give to themselves and 
their families the benefit of the best social intercourse. It was a 
custom then, long since passed away, to hold protracted meetings 
for three or tour successive days, in aid of a revival, at which all 
the ministers of the surrounding towns with their wives were gath- 
ered. As few events but death caused a change of pastorate, the 
clergymen became very intimate with each other and their families, 
and so rare a woman as Mrs*. Shaw w-as well known and admired, 
not the least by Mr. Peabody. As a widower he consulted her 
about the new wife for whom he was in search. "What kind of a 
woman do you want?" she asked. "One just like yourself," was 
the gallant and sincere reply. Soon after Mr. Peabody mounted 
his horse, and was on his way to visit the lady recommended, when 
he heard of ihe sudden death of Mr. Shaw. Other thoughts at 
once took possession of him, and he turned his horse and went 
home. 

As might be expected, others besides Mr. Peabody were anxious 
to console the interesting widow in her bereavement, and among 
them the Rev. Isaac Smith, a cousin and youthful admirer. He 
was preceptor of Byfield Academy, the oldest in the state, and 
which has been one of the most useful. But Parson Peabody was 
only six miles from Haverhill, and Mr. Smith was fifteen, and nat- 
urally the former went oftener and staid later, in his visits to the 
lady, and the result w^as then as now to be expected — he won. 
Mrs. Shaw's domestic, with her eyes and ears open to passing 
events, a trait by no means lost now in that class, kept herself well 
informed. She favored Mr. Smith, had regretted his early disap- 
pointment, and had encouraged him to renewed efforts. The even- 
ing when the momentous question was settled, it rained hard, and 
for that reason, probably, each had selected it, thinking he would 
have a clear field and no interruption. But the distance had told, 
and when after dark Mr. Smith presented himself at the door Lydia 
said to him sharply : " You are altogether too late, sir ; Parson 



■ 






■ , 



180 Rev. Stephen Peabochj of Atkinson, J\ T . H. [April, 

Peabody has long ago dried his coat by the kitchen fire, and has 
been sitting with Mrs. Shaw a whole hour in the parlor." Mr. 
Smith turned home to Byfield and never married. His face was 
said ever after to have worn a melancholy expression, his mind no 
doubt filled with the thought of what "might have been." 

A word should be said of this domestic Lydia Springer. She 
spent her life in the service of this one family, regarded more as a 
friend than a servant. On the death of her mistress, she was re- 
tained by her daughter. Her wages were fifty cents a week, the 
ruling price then, from which she saved a considerable sum. 

No greater blessing could have been bestowed on the people of 
the little town and on the infant academy than the advent of Mrs. 
Peabody. She became to them as a superior being. With a cul- 
tivation and refinement to which they had not been accustomed, her 
whole appearance was an inspiration, for her person was very pleas- 
ing, and she did not neglect the attractions of dress. By her visits 
to Boston and Quincy, where she met the best society of the day, 
she could bring back information of new books and authors, uot 
neglecting the latest fashions for her own benefit and that of her 
friends. There was a charm about her conversation and a kindness 
and sweetness in her smile and whole manner that won every heart. 
She had many students of both sexes in her family over whom she 
tenderly and carefully watched, who idolized her, and would never 
in her presence do or say a rude thing. Everything connected with 
her lifted them up to something purer and better, and even when 
they left her home she followed them by her correspondence, giving 
them needed advice, precious from such a source. She always 
turned the conversation at the table, and elsewhere, to instructive 
topics. Familiar with the best literature, she would quote from 
such authors as Shakespeare, Pope, Addison, and would interest 
them by reading such books as Hannah More's Tracts, then recently 
published, which had such a wonderful and healthy circulation. 

"With all these accomplishments, she was not above attention to 
the common duties of a large household and the requirements of a 
poor clergyman's wife. She aided her solitary maid in her work, 
mended the stockings and attended to the clothing and appearance 
of the little boys in her family, and was above no labor ; but, how- 
ever engaged, or however dressed, she Avas always a lady to those 
around her. Careful about her attire, an elaborate "queenly head 
dress," as one who remembered her styled it, seemed to have im- 
pressed itself as peculiar to her, and it is represented in the portrait 
of her by Stuart still in existence. It is safe to say that no other 
lady in that vicinity ever exerted such an influence, or was so widely 
remembered. 

She died suddenly April 0, 1815, in the 60th year of her age. 
John Quincy Adams, then in London, wrote to his mother, under 
date of June 30, 1815, as follows : "My aunt Peabody was, next 



' 






1894.] Rev. Stephen Peabody of Atkinson, A 7 ". II. 181 

to you, one of the earliest and kindest friends and guardians of my 
childhood. Since that time every recollection that I have of her 
is of acts of kindness to myself and to my children. The news of 
her decease, therefore, could not but painfully affect me, and the 
sentiment was deepened by that of the impression with which I 
knew you must have been affected by the event." Mrs. Abigail 
Adams, wife of President John Adams, wrote of her : "Few persons 
held so eloquent a pen, or could find such ready access to the heart. 
I scarcelv ever received a letter from her which did not draw in- 
voluntary tears from my eyes. Her imagination was brilliant, her 
affections pure and ardent, her wit and playfulness full of good 
humor, unalloyed with acrimony. To know her was to love and 
respect her. How many owe to her the good seed which she 
planted in their infant minds, and which, I doubt not, will be her 
crown of rejoicing.'' 

Two children by Mr. Shaw survived her, a son and a daughter. 
Her son, William Smith Show, was graduated at Harvard ; was 
private secretary of his uncle. President John Adams ; studied law 
and was clerk of the United States District Court. He was one of 
the principal founders of the Boston Athenaeum, to which he gave 
his valuable collection of coins, tracts and curios. He died in Bos- 
ton, April 25, 1826. 

The daughter, Elizabeth Quincy Shaw, became the wife of the 
late Joseph B. Felt, well known as an historian and antiquary, 
whose acquaintance she had made while he was a student at Atkin- 
son Academy, and an inmate of her mother's family. 

The death of his wife was a severe blow to Mr. Peabody, already 
beginning to feel the approach of old age. The sunshine of his life 
was gone. He could not sing and joke as of old. He was feeble 
in the discharge of his parish duties, and rarely wrote a new ser- 
mon, but would read from Henry's or Scott's Commentaries. To 
the last he retained the affection of his people, charitable to all 
omissions in one who had served them as pastor so long and so 
faithfully. He died May 23, 1819. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peabody sleep side by side in the burying ground 
in the center of the village, over three hundred feet above the 
sea-level ; where can be had a view, on which they loved to 
look, of the Monadnock and other mountains to the west and 
north ; and of the spires of many villages extending for miles 
south and east to the ocean at Newbury port. A few years ago a 
loving grandson erected a handsome monument to replace the old 
broken stones, preserving the original epitaphs that record none too 
strongly the merits of the departed. Those who knew them cher- 
ished warmly years after their decease the memory of " Sir "' and 
"Ma'am Peabody," and spoke to their children and their children's 
children of their many virtues and hallowed influence. 

Mr. Peabody left two children by his first wife, a son and a 
vol. xlviii. 17 



• 












- 



182 Memoranda by Robert Foster. [April, 

daughter. The son Stephen (Harv. 1794), born Oct. 6, 1773, 
was judge of the Court of Common Pleas, of Hancock County, 
Maine, and died April 12, 1851, at Bucksport. He had four sons : 
Stephen, George, William and Leonard, all deceased, of whom 
only Leonard left children. Leonard married Mary, a daughter of 
Hon. William Todd of St. Stephen, New Brunswick. His son, 
Harry Ernest Peabody, was graduated from Harvard in 1887, and 
from the Yale Divinity School in 1891. He is now a Presbyterian 
clergyman of Trinidad, Colorado. 

Mr. Peabody's daughter Mary, usually called " Polly," married 
Stephen Peabody Webster of Haverhill, N. IL, but left no chil- 
dren. 

For this sketch of Mr. and Mrs. Peabody the writer is indebted to 
the recollections of aged people, and, specially, to a magazine arti- 
cle of the Rev. Dr. Samuel Oilman, written nearly fifty years ago, 
from a heart full of gratitude for youthful training in their home. 
Mr. Geo. A. Gordon, my personal friend for fifty years, com- 
mencing in school-boy days, also, has supplied important facts in 
regard to Mr. Peabody and his family. 



MEMORANDA BY ROBERT FOSTER, OF KINGSTON, 

MASS. 

Communicated by Charles E. Briggs, M.D., of St. Louis, Mo. 

I send for publication some entries made in a memorandum book 
by Robert Foster of Kingston, Mass., a Royalist who left Massa- 
chusetts during the Revolutionary war, but subsequently returned 
to this country, some of his children marrying here. 

The facts and dates are probably unknown to many of his de- 
scendants. 

" Kingston N. E. in the County of Plimouth Robert Foster born April 
the 11 th 1737 old Style new the 22. His wife in the same town Born in 
August the 3 Day 1747 married the 9 Day of June 1766. 
Robert Foster Ju r Born February 9'" 1767. 
Elizabeth Foster Born 19 th Day July 1769. 
Charles Foster Born Novem br 3 Day 1772. 
Nathaniel Foster Born August 25 lh 1774. 

The two twins Born in Lunenburg John & Lydia August the 3 Day 
1780. 
My dear Daughter Lydia Drowned in a Large Iron Kettle In July the 
twenty-fourth Day 1782 being one year & Eleven months and twenty -one 
Days old. 

Son Joseph Born in Lunenburg June 21 Day, of a Saturday In the year 
of our Lord 1783. 



1894.] - Memoranda by Robert Foster. 183 

Samuel Born in Liverpool at the old House belonging to Benajah Col- 
lins in the month of October 14 Day 1786." 



" I Robert Foster was put into Plymouth Jail October 21-1776 — Locked 
up Close." 



" Came from Kingston with the family September the 10 th at Eight oj 
Clock in the Evening. The next Sunday arrived at Sandwich which was 
the 12 th Day, and was there to the 25 th . Then Sailed for Nova Scotia- 
Arrived at Lunenburg the 28 th Day of the same month 1779. 

Lunenburg Taken by the americans the First Day of July 1782. 
1 Maphrodite Brig. 
I Large Topsail Schooner. 
1 small Sloop. 
1 small Schooner. 
The Town surprised about Sun Rise and many of the principle Inhabi- 
tants Plundered of their Interest. 

1 Robert Foster Lost 

2 barrells Sugar G. 0. 0. 
1 Hh d Rum 

&c &c. 

1 Great Coat new. 

about twenty shillings Cash. 
. 1 Pair Silver Shoe Buckles. 

2 guns. 

which in my circumstances is a very great Loss Considering the Losses 
heretofore sustained." 

[Note. — The plundering was interrupted by Mrs. Foster's apology for the 
disorder of her household caused by her attention having been directed to the 
care of her children suffering from the small-pox. The abrupt departure of the 
looters saved also various articles of value brought to her by her neighbors, 
who probably thought that her house might be spared, because she came from 
Massachusetts. 

The maiden name of Mrs. Robert Foster was Elizabeth Bartlett. She wa3 a 
daughter of Dorothy Wadsworth, and was first cousin to the General Wads- 
worth (of the Revolution), who was grandfather of Henry Wadsworth Long- 
fellow. Through the Wadsworths the poet traced his descent from the heroine 
of Miles Standish's Courtship. Mrs. Foster's father was grandson of Benjamin 
Bartlett, who married Sarah Brewster, and great-grandson of Robert Bartlett, 
who married Mary Warren, the daughter of Richard Warren. Collateral lines 
of the Bartletts in this country and in England are well known. 

In 1792, the year after the return of the Foster family to this country, Miss 
Elizabeth Foster married Captain Morton of Plymouth, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion in Col. Bailey's regiment. Through her some mementoes of earlier days 
have come down : — some articles of female finery, pieces of rose-colored bro- 
cade, some quaint bits of jewelry, and, perhaps the most characteristic, a 
representation of George III. (Frye pinxit), and one of Queen Charlotte dated 
1773. They are before me as I write, and seem to be hand-colored mezzotints 
not badly doue. They come from the shop of Caringtou Bowles, St. Paul's 
Churchyard.] 



"John Cobb Yessell seized in February 1787. 

Thomas Foster of Plymouth Esq Departed this Life January the 23 d 
Day 1777 in the Seventy-Second year of his Age. 






. 









• 



184 Letters of Col. Thomas ^Yestbrook and others. [April, 

[Note. — TheTkomas Foster whose death is recorded is probably the uncle 
of Robert Foster. His uncle Thomas was born in 1705, according to Mr. Davis, 
itr the " Anqient Landmarks of Plymouth." He (Thomas Foster) is evidently 
the loyalist mentioned on page 113 of this book. There is an error of'two years 
in his age, and the "graduate of Harvard 1745" there mentioned may be his 
son Thomas, born 1727. but probably not the father as stated. 

These Fosters came from John Foster of Marshtield, who married about ltit34, 
Mary CnilHngworth of Lynn. John Foster was son of Thomas Foster of Wey- 
mouth aboutl640.] 

My Brother John Foster Departed this Life July 5 th 1753 (1785?) John 
Brit of Newbury informed me on the Island of Cape Britton. 

February the 12 th 1785 the Worst Storm in the Winter. It began in 
the Evening and Continued till the next Day. 

Came from Liverpool May the 15 th 1791 with my family and was tea 
Days corning." 



LETTERS OF COL. THOMAS WESTBROOK 
AND OTHERS, 

RELATIVE TO INDIAN AFFAIKS IN MAINE. 
Communicated by William Blake Trask, A.M., of Dorchester, Mass. 

[Continued from page 36.] 
Sir, 

The Peace bein^ concluded with the Delegates of the Eastern* In- 
dians, I have determined upon a Reduction of the Forces on that Frontier, 
And therefore I desire you would repair to Falmouth in Casco Bay with 
all convenient Speed. & reduce the Soldiers according to a List of the 
Numbers I shall allow to each respective Place w ch you have herewith dd 
you. The Rest of [the] Men must be forthwith dismiss'd. And in their 
Dismission you must have a just & impartial Regard to those that have 
been longest in the Service, who are on that Ace' first eutituled to this 
Benefit, And more especially the Men contained in the other List, who must 
be immediately discharged. The Garrisons at Fort George & Fort .Mary 
must stand according to their last Establishing. And if there be wanting 
Men at either of those Forts, you must supply them out of the Forces be- 
fore their Reduction. 

You must Notify the sev 11 Places in that County that the Peace is con- 
cluded. And give Directions in Writing, as from me to the sev H Com- 
manding Officers for the Observation of it & also. That they see a faithful 
Duty perform'd, And that they be not off from their Guard, The Danger 
not being wholly over till the Ratification, But in the mean Time, If any 
Indians come in, cultivate a good understanding with them [and] Friend- 
ship. After you have fully perform'd the sev 11 Articles of this Instruction, 
and are return'd Home to your Family you will look upon your self Dis- 
miss'd from his Majesties Service as Commander in Chief of the East" 
Forces. Thus Giving you hearty Thanks for your Faithfulness, Diligence 

* On the next page he writes, " Western as well as Eastern." 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 185 

& Good Conduct in that Important Trust, I hereby Dismiss you & your 
Company (whom you must forthwith Disband) from his Majesties Service. 

Endorsed: L* Gov. Orders to Coll. 
Westbrook for Dismissing the Forces. [William Dummer.] 

Dec. 21, 1725. 

Mass. Arch. 52: 309-311. 



Portsm Jan^ 28 th 1725. 6. 
May it Please your Honour, 

I have been East as far as Falmouth, and dismisstt the forces agree- 
able to your Honours orders, and have given directions to the Commanders 
of Each party Remaining (Pursuant to Yo r Honours order) to observe the 
Peace made with the Delegates of the Eastern Indians. 
I am Your Honours 
Mass. Arch. 52: 312. Most Dutifull Servant 

Tho" Westbrook. 



Agemogen* Reach Feb* 18 th 1725 [6]. 
May it Please your Honour, 

Pursuant to your Honours Orders I made the best Dispatch I cou'd 
to land the Indians at this place, but not finding any Indians here We fir'd 
two Gunns and the next day six Indians came to us who inform'd that the 
Tribe was at Mount Desert. We thereupon made sail and went up into a 
large Bay on the Back of Mount Desert where we found them. When 
they had done trading they Consented to our Departure, and the twentieth 
of Jan y we sail'd for S' George's. Night coming on We harbour'd in 
Agemagen expecting next day to have gain'd S' Georges, but contrary to 
what the Indians told us & our own Expectations we were wholly debarr'd 
moving by reason of Ice. The Weather continuing extreara cold at times 
we are still detain'd but the first oppertunity I shall make all possible Dis- 
patch home. Sundry of the Indians came seven or eight miles on the Ice 
to trade with us, and as far as we can discover there is only Ice to be seen. 
I have no news to Communicate to your Hon r so Conclude and am 

Your Hon" most 
Mass. Arch. 52: 313. Dutifull & Obedient Serv*. 

Thomas Sanders. 



Agemogen Reach, Feb r y 18 th 1725^6. 
May it please your Horn* 

These Serve to Enclose a Letter deliv'd me by the Cheifs of the Ind?* 
for your Hon r : And as we are frozen up here I tho't it proper to send it by 
the first Opportunity not knowing but it was of importance. The Indians 
seem to be very well Satisfied in y e Trade (but by perswasion of the Jesuit.) 
disapprove of some Artickles in their Submission, but Capt. Beane being 
present found y' he misinterpreted them, & he inform'd you cf the true mean-- 
ing y r of w ch was to their Satisfaction. The weather hitherto has been very 
Cold and all the bays are so frozen y' y" no moving by water unless on to 
the Sea. Having nothing farther at present to Add I Conclude & Am 
Mass. Arch. 52, 314. Y r Hon" Obedient Humble Serv'. 

Edmund Mountfort. 

• Aggamoggin (Strait at Deer Isle). See article by William Willis, cm the Language of 
the Abuaquies, Coll. Maine Hist. Society, iv., 104. 
VOL. XLVIII. 17* 






- 












■ 



186 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. [April, 

Falmouth March y e 3, 1725-6. 

May it please your Honour, y e 26 of february theire came in fourteen 
Indeus to S' Georges and -brought the express which accompanyes this, 
and I as soon as posibel brought it to falmoth, but, through some Difficulty, 
for wee drew our boate ten miles on y c Ice. for I was obliged to make our 
number of men smaller by reason of our Stores being spent. Wee have not 
had anything but bread above this month and but little of that, for we depend- 
ed on Capt. .Saunders and he being disappointed Capt. Gyles sent his Leu', to 
take charge of the garison, but I thought it not proper to deliuer it by 
reason of so much Ice iu y e river that I could not bring of y e men and ray 
things. I hope it will not be long before Capt. Gyles will bee dowu with 
y e sloope, and I shall deliuer y e Garison to his sattisiaxshon and shall hasen 
to Boston to waitt upon your Honour. 

I am your Honours most humble and 
obedient Servant att Command, 

Muss. Arch. 52, 314. William Caned y. 



Letter to the Lords of Trade &c. 
March 25 [1726?] 
My Lords, 

Some few Months after the Departure of his Excy Governo r Shute 
for G'. Britain I did myself the Hon' to write to y rr L' Jps Giving you some 
Ace 1 of the Difficulties of this Province with Respect to the lad. War, 
which has bin [injeited by the Govern r . of Canada, who has supplied the 
Salvages -with all Stores of War & has shelter'd them within his Governm* 
from our Pursuits, & has received them in Triumph with the Scalps of his 
Majesties Subjects slain by this barbarous Enemy: W ch conduct of the 
said French Gov r (as I suggested to your Lordships in my former Letter 
seems to me to be a notorious Violation of the Treaty of Utreicht, and in 
some Respects makes the War with the Indians more difficult than if the 
French were our declared Enemies; For by our Successes in the last eight 
Months We have driven them from their Settlem" in our Neighbourhood to 
the French Territories from whence they make their Incursions upon us in 
small sculking Parties & after Mischief done retire thither again, where I 
am cautious of allowing any of our Companies to pursue them till I can 
know his Majesties Pleasure in this Respect. And I must further inform 
your Lordships That notwithstanding the advantages we have lately had over 
the Enemy, and the Distress & Circumstances We suppose they are reduced 
to, The Expence of the War is so great & insupportable to this Province that 
Unless it shall Please God to put a speedy End to it. It will inevitably 
ruine us ; w ch I humbly offer to your Lordships Consideration that you 
would please to make such a Representation thereof to his Majesty as you 
shall think necessary for His Majea'- V [to] know [for] the Safety & protec- 
tion of these His Provinces. 

I should not trouble your L d! ships any farther but that the French Gov- 
ern 1, of Canada has given me to understand that Hee shall Address a Com- 
plaint to His Master on the Acc° of the Death of a Priest who was killed 
by our Forces in the Fight at Xorrigawalk of w ch please to take y e follow- 
ing account. In the Action at Norridgewock, within this Province. w ch 
was in Aug* last, our Forces destroy'd a great number of the Indians & 
broke up that Settlement, among whome was Sebastian Ralle a J<r^uit & 
Missionary to that Tribe, and the great Incendiary of this War, who wa3 



1804.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 187 

slain in Fight, Making actual Resistance to the Forces, at the same time 
attempting to kill an English Captive in his Hand and refusing to give 
or titke Quarter, To which Ace' of ye Death of the s d Raile Coll. Harinan, 
the Commander of the Forces at Norridgewock made solemn Oath before 
me in Council, As appears to y" L dap3 by the Minutes of Council trans- 
mitted to you by the Secry of the Prov. * This Jesuit had all almg 
pushed the Indians upon their rebellions Marching at the Head of Two 
Hundred arm'd Salvages through one of the Frontier Towns of this 
Province, before the War was declared, threatening Destruction to them If 
they did not speedily quit the said Town, Of all w cla & more to y e purpose 
His Excy. Gov r Shute is well knowing. This I thought proper to hint to 
y" LoVd'shtpps in Order to obviate any Complaints that may be made by 
the French Gov', whose Conduct in Exciting & Supporting the Indians iu 
this "War & Drawing down many remote Tribes, with whom We have no 
Concern, to their Assistance, y e truths of which I have sufficient Testimon- 
ies to support aid shall lay them before y rr Lordship, If it be necessary, for 
y rr Satisfaction Should rather have put Him upon offering an apology 
then a Complaint, all which I humbly Submit to your L d shipps, & am with 
the greatest respects y e Lord=hip[s] Most Obed' & humble serv' 

Mass. Arch. 52. 317, 318. D[ummer]. 

[The action of the Massachusetts Council on this subject, at an earlier 
date, to which allusion is made by Gov. Du miner, may properly be inserted 
here, copied from the Council Records, volume 8, pages 71, 72. J 

At a Council held at the Couucil Chamber, in Boston, on Saturday, 
August 22, 1724. 

Present 
His Honour "W ni Duramer Esq', Lt Gov r . 
Penn Townsend, Add. Davenport, Adam Winthrop, 

Natli 1 Byfield Esq r3 , John Clark Esq", Daniel Oliver Esq", 

Edw d Bromfield, Thomas Fitch, Thomas Palmer. 

Captain Johnson Harman being arrived from the Eastward with twenty 
seven Indian Scalps, together with the scalp of Sebastian Ralie, the Jesuit 
and Missionary among the Norridgewock Indians, and the 
Standard of y e s d Tribe of Indians." was directed to attend in Account of Capt» 
i~i •> . i i i -s.- • <• i • ,r i . Herman's Action 

Council, Ami there gave a short .Narrative ot his March to at N'urridgewook. 

Norridgewock (with four companies of Soldiers under his 
command) & of his Action at the s d Place, the twelvth instant, where he 
destroyed a great number of the enemy, many of whom being slain or 
drown'd in the River, he could not recover their bodies. 

His Honour the Lieut' Governour, in consideration of the 
extraordinary Service of the s d Captain Harman, presented Capt» Harman 
him with a Commission for Lieu ts Colonel of His Majestys coiouei! euC3 
Forces Eastward uuder the Command of Coll Thomas 
"Westbrook. 

Coll. Johnson Harman made solemn oath that the Twenty 
seven Scalps above ment'd (which were produced iu Coun- sworn as to 27 
cil) were the Scalps of Rebel or enemy Indians slain by him Seal?* of the in- 

j i l-< i i • r\ ill i i j i rtiau nftemyayia 

and the forces under his Command, and that they had taken four Prisoners. 

Four Indian Prisoners. 

•The Flinch srovernor and others, who had taken sides with the Indians, alleged that 
Ralle's death was contrary to the amity between the two n itions, the French and English, 
and that eiuclty had been u-eJ towards him ; whereas R-.ile was " slain in this Province," 
says Gov. Dummer, "fighting against his il< jetties subjects." 



188 - The Snow Genealogy. [April, 

Pursuant to the Act, entituled an Act to encourage the prosecution of 
the Indian Enemy & Rebels. 

Advised & consented that a "Warr* he made out to the 
y. 4 rfm"° W ' d f ° r Treasurer, to pay unto the said Coll. Johnson Harman. the 
sum of Four Hundred & five pounds for Twenty seven In- 
dian Scalps, & the further sum of Twenty pounds for four Indian Prisoners 
elain & taken as aforesaid; the said sum to be by him distributed to the 
Officers and Soldiers concern'd therein, as the said Act directs. 

Coll Johnson flarman likewise made oath that the other 
Coll. Harman Scalp was the Scalp of Sebastian Ralle, a Jesuit, who ap- 
JeeuU's Scalp! 6 P^ared at the Head of the Indians and obstinately resisted 
the Forces, wounding sev 11 of the English *5b resolutely re- 
fusing to give or take Quarter. 
ofr'SAl'm 6 Pursuant therefore to a Resolve of the General Assem- 
bly to encoumge b] v , pass'd at their Session begun & held the 13 th of July 

y bring? Sebus- , --./V ,, i e ,, - ■ . J 

tian Kaile. 1/20, in the words following, VIZ. 

"This Court being credibly informed that 3Ions r Ralle the Jesuit residing 
among the Eastern Indians has not only on several occasions of late 
affronted ilis Alajestys Governmen' of this Province but has also been the 
Incendiary that has instigated and stirred up those Indians to treat his 
Majestys subjects settling there in the abusive, insolent, hostile manner 
that they have done, Resolved that a Premium of One Hundred pounds be 
allowed and paid out of the Public Treasury to any person that shall ap- 
prehend the s d Jesuit within any part of this Province & bring him to 
Boston & render him to Justice." 

£ioo to Coll. irar- Advised & consented that a Warr 1 be made out to the 
man &c. for Seb. Treasurer to pay unto the said Coli Johnson Harman the 
above s d sum of One Hundred pounds for his service in the 
destruction of the s d Sebastian Ralle,* the s d sum to be divided among the 
Officers & Soldiers, as is directed in the Act for encouraging the Prosecu- 
tion of y e Indian enemy &c. 

[To be continued.} 



THE SXOW GENEALOGY. 

By Mrs. Charles L. Aldex, of Troy, N. Y. 
[Continued from page 73.] 



13. Anne 3 Snow [Mark, 2 Nicholas 1 ), son of Mark Snow and Jane (Prence) 
Snow, born in Eastharn, July 7, 1656; married Oct. 14, 1684, 
Eldad Atwood, son of Stephen and Abigail (Dunham) Atwood, born 
probably about 1651, and died 1715. Children, born in Eastharn: 

i. Mary 4 Atwood, b. Xov. 4, 1634. 

ii. John 4 Atwood, b. Ausr. 10, 1G86; m. Thankful "Williamson, Sept. 

15, 1721, and had (1) William, 1 ' b. April 14. 1721; (2) Mary, b. Oct. 

28, 1723 ; (3) John, b. Sept. 25, 1725 ; (4) Thankful, b. May 28, 1727 ; 

(5) Ephraim, b. March 9, 1728; (6) Timothy, "b. July 5, 1731; (7) 

• See more in regard to Father Rale or Ralle, Register, xlvi., 26, 136-139, 226-228, 3o\5 ; 
xlvii., 377, 483. 



189-1.] , The Snow Genealogy. 189 

Simeon, b. Nov. 3. 1733. (2) Mary* Atwood married Richard At- 
wood. Oct. 22. 174-8. Ho was son of E'.eazur and Joanna Strout. 
b. March 31. 1717. They hail Mary 6 Atwood, b. at Eastham, Aug. 
16, 1749; m. 1st, John Thompson: 2d. George Brooks: 3d, Mark 
Hatch. Her sou James 7 Brooks, b. Oct. 14. 1789, lived in Orring- 
ton, Me.; m. Elizabeth Rartlett, and had Rose. 8 the youngest of 
thirteen children, m. Joseph W. Porter of Bangor. Maine, May 4, 
1877. 

iii. Anna 4 Atwood, b. Jan., 1T..S7-S. 

iv. Deboeah 4 Atwood, b. March, 1690; perhaps married in Eastham, 
Jan. G, 1725-6, Seth Rvder, and had (1) Deborah Ryder, b. Aug. 6. 
1727 ; (2) Mary Ryder, 'h. Ana. 6, 1735. (Register, 1852, page 235.) 

v. Sarah* Atwood, b. April, 1692. 

vi. Eldad 4 Atwood, b. July 9, 1695. 

vii. Ebenezer 4 Atwood, b. March, 1697-8. 

viii. Benjamin 4 Atwood, b. June, 1701. 

13a. Mary 3 Snow (Mark? Nicholas 1 ), daughter of Mark Snow and Jane 
(Prence) Snow, born in Eastham, Nov. 30, 1661 ; married William 3 
Niekerson, son of Nicholas 2 Nickerson (William 1 ), Jan. 22, 1690.* 
They had: 

i. Mary 4 Nickerson. b. March 17, 1692; d. yonng. 

ii. Nicholas 4 Nickerson, b. March 19, 1693. 

[Freeman's Hist, of Cape Cod calls third child 

iii. "William* Nickerson, but Mr. Josiah Paine says he is not on the 
records.] 

iv. Ebenkzer* Nickerson, b. June 13, 1697 ; m. Elizabeth Mayo of Chat- 
ham, Mass. He was of Harwich, and had (1) Mary, Aug. 3, 1727; 
(2) Hannah, 1728; (3) Mary, 1730; (4) Elizabeth, 1732; (5) Seth, 
Oct. 21, 1737; (61 Xathan, Nov. 22, 1739. 

v. Jane 4 Nickerson, b. April 6, 1699 ; remembered in her grandmother's 
will by Jane (Prence) Snow. 

vi. Mary 4 Nickerson, b. Aug., 1701. 

vii. Thankful 4 Nickerson, b". July 26, 1705; perhaps the one who mar- 
ried Benjamen Bangs in 1737. 

14. Nicholas 3 Snow (Mark, 2 Nicholas 1 ), son of Mark and Jane (Prence) 
Snow, born in Eastham. Dec. 6. 1663, and died in Rochester, Mass.. 
probably in 1754. He removed to Harwich in 1706. Captain 
Jonathan Bangs, John Freeman. Thomas Freeman, John Grey and 
Nicholas Snow •• having been appointed to settle the bounds between 
this town (Harwich) and Eastham — ' the matter being in contro- 
versy,' and having been joined by Samuel Knoyies, Samuel Mayo 
& Joshua Doaue on the part of Eastham, the matter was amicably 
arranged, & to the agreement were affixed the signatures & seals of 
the agents, the 16 day of October in the 4 th year of ttie reign of our 
gracious Lady Queen Anne." On March 14, 1714, he was chosen 
proprietors' clerk, and was also chosen one of the persons to divide 
the lands of Harwich. He removed to Rochester near 1729, and 
was one of the proprietors there. Snow Pond was named after him, 
and his homestead was on its banks. 

He married Lydia Shaw, daughter of Jonathan and Phebe (Wat- 
son) Shaw, on the 4 April, KvS ( J. In taking a hasty abstract of his 
will from Bk. 13, page 304, Plymouth Probate Records, I did not 
notice the name of his wife — so infer she died before him — or the 
name of his sou Mark, but as the estate was divided into eight parts. 

* When I sent Mark' Spot's family to the Register in January, 1S93, 1 did not know 
of the marriage of his daughter Mary*, and so insert her family here. 









") 



190 JRev. William Adams. [April, 

I think he must have been alive. He first gives to grandson Joshua 
£25; to infant granddaughter, daughter of my daughter Pliebe Burge 
deceased, £15 6. 6. The rest of the estate is divided into eight 
parts. 

Eldest son Jonathan. 

Son Nathaniel. 

Children of Joshua. Grandson Joshua to have § & Mary 4- of |th. 

To son Prince's children. Joseph to have } of {, Mary £ of £ & 
Hannah £ of £. 

To Thankful Burge. 

To Sarah Hammond. 

To Granddaughter Phebe Burge. 

To Prince Snow 1 shilling " because of his leaving me and hi3 
family as he did." 

Jouathan & Nath'I executors. 

Admitted to Probate 1754. 
Dated 1751. 

Children : 

43. i. Jonathan, 4 b. Jan. 30, 1691-2. 

ii. Makk, b. April 3, 1695. Probably the " Mark Snow of Eastham & 
Sarah Lamjford of Boston," who married by " License from Lieut. 
Gov. Wentwortb," '• At Hampden Falls, New Hampshire, by Rev. 
Theophilus Cotton, 22 December, 1725." I would like to know 
more of this family. There were Snows in New Hampshire a little 
later, with raanv Mark Snows among them. 

Nathaniel, b. Oct. 16, 1697. 

Joshua, b. Aug. 9 or 18, 1700. 

Thankful, b. Feb. 17, 1702. 

Sarah, b. March 30, 1703-4. 

Phebe, b. Nov. 7, 1705. The Burgess Genealogy says : " Zacheus 
Burgess, son of Jacob and Mary (Hunt) Burgess, was born March 
9, 1705 : m. 1st, Temperance, who died Dec. 8, 1748, and had Jo- 
siah, 1730 ; Ruth : Thomas, b. May 23, 1741 ; Elisha, b. 1743 ; Jedidah, 
b. 1745 ; Mary. He married 2d, Phebe Snow, daughter of Nicholas 
Snow, and had Phehe i . He married 3d, Joanna Barrows, July 23, 
1752." 
48. viii. Phence, b. Dec. 26, 1707. 

[To be continued.] 



44. 


iii. 


45. 


iv.' 


46. 


v. 


47. 


VI. 




vii. 



EEV. WILLIAM ADAMS OF MADISOX SQUARE 

CHURCH, NEW YORK CITY, 

WITH HIS ADAMS AND BRADFORD LINES OF DESCENT. 

By Emily Wildee Leavitt, of Boston. 

The Adams Line. 
1. Henry* Adams is said to have come to New England about the year 
1634, and in February, 1641, he received a grant of forty acres of 
land in Braintree, Mass., from the town of Boston, of which it then 
was a part. In the petition for the formation of the first church in 
Braintree, we find the names of Henry Adams, Thomas Adams, 
Henry Adams, Jr., John Adams, Christopher Adams and Samuel 









f ,1 



1894.] , Rev. William Adams. 191 

Adams. Henry Adatns, Sen. died October 6, 1646; his will was 
probated 8, 4, 1647 ; his children (so far as definitely known) were: 

i. Henry. 2 iv. Jonathan. vii. Josef-h. 

ii. Thomas. 2. v. Peter. viii. Edward. 

iii. Samuel. vi. John. 

ix. Ursula, who was mentioned in his will. 

2. Peter* Adams. In his will of 1646. Henry Adams mentions his sou 

Peter; in 1652, Peter Adams with his wife and son John appeared 
at Medfield, Mass., where, in 1652, he is recorded as having a family 
of three persons. In the Indian raid of 1675 his house was burned, 
and he was one of the signers of a petition to the Great and General 
Court for aid. He died in 1630. and the inventory of his estate was 
taken October 23, 1690. His children were: 
3. i. John. 3 

ii. Peter, b. April, 1653. 

iii. Hannah, b. June 16, 1655. 

iv. Mary, b. March 1, 16G1. 

v. Jonathan, b. July 11. 1GC3; d. May 15, 1664.. 

vi. RUTH, b. June 20," 16*35. 

vii. Joseph, b. August 25, 16GS. 

viii. Samuel, b. April 2, 1671, 

ix. Henry, b. January 6, 1673. 

3. John 3 Adams, son of Peter and Rachel Adams, was brought to Med- 

field when a boy. The first mention of his name on the town books 
was his appointment to the office of M hog-reave " in 1686. This 
needful- but rather undesirable office was as a joke usually given by 
the towns-people to the newly married man, and here serves as the 
first point of identification of this John Adams, as lie was married ia 
1685. From this time he is always recorded as "John son of Peter • 
Adams," to distinguish him from his two cousins of the same given 
name who were holding offices at the same periods, namely, John 
Adams the Miller (son of Henry Adams), and John Adams the 
cordwainer (sou of Edward Adams). As his occupation was never 
mentioned he was probably a yeoman or husbandman. In 1692 
John Adams of Medfield sold to Robert Harrington of Watertown, 
Mass., six acres of land in >Yatertown butted by the land of Richard 
Bloyce, and his wife Michal Adams relinquishes her right of dower. 
In Canterbury, Conn, town books, vol. 2, page 21, John Adams 
of Medfield, Mass., on December 8. 1708, bought four hundred acres 
of land at Canterbury of William Johnson (one of the first proprie- 
tors ,of the place). March 16, 1718, the town of Canterbury con- 
firmed to John Adams and to Samuel Adams, Jr. (his son), three 
hundred acres of land by Rowland's Brook, the bounds beginning 
at a heap of stones on the top of the hill on the west side, ran by 
Paine's land and that of Eleazar Brown ; and another parcel of forty 
acres of land. John and Samuel Adams being settled inhabitants 
by the vote of the inhabitants of the town June 15, 1718. In April 
30, 1723, John Adams received one and a half shares in the common 
and undivided lands. 

March 10, 1720, Joseph Adams of Medfield, Mass., bought of 

John Cady secundus, a mansion house and eighty acres of land in 

Canterbury. This was a brother of John, who was then settled in 

* that town. March 12, 1720, John Adams deeded to his son Richard 



192 Rev. William Adams. [April, 

land by that which he had before given to his son Isaac, which he 
had previously purchased of William Johnson. Ou the same day he 
deeded land to his other son, John Adams. Jr. 

John Adams married at Medfield, Mass., April 2, 16*95; Michal, 
daughter of Richard and Michal (Jennison) Bloyse. also spelled 
Blo)ce and Bloice, of Watertown, Mass. They had children: 

i. Samuel, 4 b. February 25, 1685. 

ii. Marie, b. March 11, 1GS7. 

iii. Patience, b. March 21, 1090; d. May 28, 1C98. 

iv. Item, b. December 10, 1091. 

v. Josiaii, b. October 4. 1093. 

4. vi. Joun, b. December 14, 1095. 

vii. Isaac, b. January 30. 1097. 

viii. IviCHAiii/. b. September 28, 1699. 

ix. Joshua, b. July 22, 1701; d. April 1, 170G. 

x. Abigail, b. April 23, 1703: d. May 14, 1706. 

xi. B«thia, b. February 8. 1704-5: d, April 15, 1706. 

xii. Mktial (son), b. March 1, 1700-7. 

All these births are recorded at MedSeld, Mass. 

This John Adams's will was drawn February 14, 1724; in it lie 
provides for his wife Michal and for his daughter Mary, who was 
to live with her mother; he gave his son Samuel a quarter part of 
his '' wearing clothes " ; leaves to his three sons " who now live with 
me " his home lot to be equally divided between them, which lot is 
bounded south by * my sou Richard Adams's land, west by my son 
Samuel's laud, east by the hundred acres I purchased of William 
Johnson; also three fourths of the forty acres more lying northwest 
of the said home lot which I bought of William Johnson and Mr. 
Paine for the convenience of a saw mill. To my cozen (i.e. niece) 
Ruth Adams who now lives with me, five pounds provided she con- 
tinues to live with my wife during the whole time," that is during 
her minority; he also mentioned his daughter Ruth Paine and his 
youngest son Michal Adams. 

John Adams died February 2G, 1724; his widow Michal Adams 
died April 14, 1752. The settlement of his estate is recorded in the 
Canterbury books, vol. 5, page 393, where we read: " Whereas Mr. 
John Adams of Canterbury late deceased, died seized of about one 
hundred acres of land bounded by that of Isaac Adams on the north, 
west by the land of the heirs of Mr. John Adams, east by the laud 
of Elisha Paine, and John Adams gave the said land to his four 
sons Samuel, John, Isaac and Richard, who were the then surviving 
sons of the said John Adams, and the said heirs held the land in 
common until about 1734, when Richard died and left one only 
child, Lucy, whereupon she held the land in common with the other 
heirs until 1743, when Samuel died leaving only two daughters, 
Amy, late wife of Thomas Nowling, dec, and Menitable, late wife 
of John Smith, dec, whereupon his share descended to these daugh- 
ters; Mehkable died in 17.50 and left four children; whereupon 
these heirs held the land in common, it is now desired to make a 
more natural division, etc." 

4. John 4 Adams, son of John and Michal (Bloyce) Adams, born at Med- 
field, Mass., in IGdo, seems to have resided quietly on the large 
estate which his father had bought in Canterbury all the earlier 



1894.] , Rev. William Adams. 193 

years of his life, and it is not until the father was advanced in years 
that the children began to have any public mention. As one of the 
patriarchal families of the olden times, they appear to have lived in 
one community and to have cultivated the lauds together. March 
12, 1728, the elder John, the first of that given name in the town, 
made over to his son John, then ahout twenty-eight years old, fifty 
acres of the land " together with one quarter part of the land which 
1 bought of William Johnson." This was near the close of the 
father's life, and the brothers went quietly on their way ; Samuel and 
Richard marrying and then dying young, leaving only daughters; 
Isaac marrying and then removing from the town; so, in 1752, when 
the final settlement of the whole estate was made, there was the one 
only son John left "on the old place," as country people always 
term the original homestead. This John Adams's life is wholly 
made known to us by the few deeds which he gave from time 
to time. January 16, 1752, Isaac Adams of Canaan, Litchfield 
county, Conn., makes over to his brother John all his rights given 
by our father John Adams. April 17, 1752, John and Abigail (his 
wife) Adams acknowledge the receipt of a legacy from the estate of 
their father Josiah Cleveland of Canterbury, which had been be- 
queathed to them in a clause in his will of December 28, 1750, in 
which Josiah Cleveland mentions his daughter Abigail Adams and 
his grandson Benjamin Brown. In 1746, John and his wife were 
of the people who formed the Separatist Church in Canterbury 
which gave rise to so much dissension in that village. John Adams 
was made a member of the early church in 174-1, and his wife Abi- 
gail in 1745. His own will was drawn May 4, 1762, and the 
estate was administered that same year; in it he mentions wife Abi- 
gail A-dams. Mrs. Abigail Adams's estate was administered Feb- 
ruary 19, 1782, and mention is made of her "eldest son Benjamin 
Brown." 

In precisely what year John Adams and the widow Abigail 
(Cleveland) Brown were married has not yet been ascertained, but 
the Canterbury town records give the births of the following chil- 
dren: 

i. Lois, 6 b. November 17, 1741. 

ii. Mary, b. June 23, 1743. 

5. iii. Johx, b. February 12, 1744. 

iv. Lydia, b. June 12, 1746. 

v. Cornelius, b. March 21, 1743. 

vi. Ebenezer, b. October 6, 1749. 

rii. Abigail, b. June 13, 1751. 

viii. Samuel, b. May IB. 1753. 

ix. Ruth, b. March 13, 1757. 

In a little graveyard in the northern part of Canterbury the 
tombstones of both John and Abigail Adams have recently been 
found: " Here lies the body of Mr. John Adams who died January 
16, 1762-3, in his 66 th year." On that of his wife is inscribed: 
" Here lies the body of Mrs. Abigail, wife of Mr. John Adams who 
died December 15, 1782. 

5. John* Adams, son of John and Abigail (Cleveland, Brown) Adams, 
born in Canterbury, February 12, 1745; served in the army during 
the Revolution in the rank of lieutenant, and later was made a cap- 

VOL. XLVIII. 18 





















I 

I 



194 ; liev. William Adams. [April, 

tain. He married 1st, at Putney, Vt., October 5, 1769, Mary, 
daughter of Deacon Joshua and Jemima (Davenport) Parker, who 
was born at Needham, Mass., September 23, 1747, died at Canter- 
bury October 11, 1708; he married 2d. November 2, 1802, widow 
Hannah Faucet. lie died December 10, 1818. Children, all by 
the first wife : 

6. i. Jonx, 6 b. September 18. 1772. 

ii. Joshua, b. December i, 1774. 

iii. M.utv, b. May 27, 1777. 

iv. Parker, b. Slay 6, 1779. 

v. Abigail, b. October 31. 17S1. 

vi. Anna, b. January 2, 17S4. 

vii. Moses, b. September 28, 1786. 

viii. LrchiiA, b. March 20, 1789. 

ix. Aukklia, b. March 10, 1703. 

x. Charles, b. Juue 11, ll'Jo. 

6. John 6 Adams, son of John and Mary (Parker) Adams, born Septem- 
ber 18, 1772; was graduated at Plainfield, Ct. Academy 1795. 
After which he formed a private school in the north part of Canter- 
bury, and showed such skill iu both management and development 
of his scholars as to at once make it a marked success. "In the 
spriDg of 1796, he was induced to remove his school to Canterbury 
Green, where it was immensely popular. Canterbury was never 
more flourishing than during the continuance of this school. He 
had in a large degree the art of calling out the best in a pupil, and 
awakening enthusiasm for school studies and master; he was espe- 
cially kind to indigent young men, and often assisted them pecu- 
niarily."* 

" Iu 1S00 he was appointed rector of Plainfield. Conn. Academy, 
and in 1803 preceptor of Bacon Academy of Colchester, Conn.; June, 
1810, "he was chosen principal of Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., in which office he continued twenty-three years. In 1833, 
he resigned this position and removed with some of his family to Illi- 
nois, where he invested his property in the new lands. Possessed 
of a constitution of unusual soundness, he discovered in his seventy- 
second year he had both the power and opportunity of doing great 
good. Always interested in the young, he volunteered his services 
for their advantage, and after he had passed the period allotted to 
man, organized in the state of his adoption several hundred Sabbath 
schools, many of which have grown into churches. While resident 
in Andover he took part iu the organization of several of the great 
national charities. The degree of LL.D. was conferred on him by 
his alma mater in 1854. His three sons are graduates of Yale Col- 
lege in the classes of 1821, 1825, 1827. He died in Jacksonville, 
111., April 24, 1863, in his 91st year, retaining to the last the full 
possession of his faculties, a sound judgment and a most cheerful 
Christian hope."| 

John Adams married 1st, May 8, 1798, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Gamaliel and Judith (Perkins) Ripley who was born March 12, 
1776, died February 23, 1829; he married 2d, August 30, 1831, 
Mrs. Mabel Burrett; he died April 24, 1863. His children, all by 
the first wife, were : 

* Miss Larnod in History of Windham County, Ct„ vol. 2, p. 304. 

t Taken from an Obituary Record of the Graduates of Yale College deceased during 
he academic year ending July, 1863. 



:>» » J 



1804.] . Rev. William Adams. 195 

i. Mary. t b. April 7, 1709. 

ii. Gamaliel, b. July 2. 1800; d. April 29, 1S02. 

iii. John, b. March 20, 1802. 

iv. Ripley Perkins, b. January 11, 180-1. 

v. Elizaueth Ripley, b. July 7, 1805. 

7. vi. William, b. January 25. 1807. 

vii. Harriet Hannah, b. January 14, 1809. 

viii. Akby Ann, b. March 10. 1SU. 

ix. Emily J.snk. b. January 2, 1813. 

x. Henry, b. April 30, 1813; d. April 15, 1816. 

xi. Pikebe Phillips, b. July 24, 1817. 

7. William 7 Adams, son of John and Elizabeth (Ripley) Adams, born 
at Colchester, Conn.; was prepared for college at Andover by his 
father, and entered Yale, whence he was graduated 1830, one of the 
foremost among men who have achieved high reputation as scholars 
and divines. He returned to Andover and took the theological 
course: then was first settled over a church in Brighton, Mass. At 
the end of three years he removed to a pastorate of the Broome 
Street Presbyterian Church in New York. After nineteen faithful 
years of work, his people built the Madison Square church, whither 
they all removed. 

Of a courtly, dignified, graceful presence, ready of speech, his 
affable manners and polished deportment rendered him a marked 
man in all assemblies. A scholar of more than ordinary accuracy, 
variety and elegance, he, more than most, was called upon on occa- 
sions of public interest in church and state. In 1873, he was chosen 
to speak the welcome to the American Evangelical Alliance, " and 
none of all the thousands present will ever forget the majestic grace, 
fervor of imagery and eloquence of his address of welcome to the 
learning and genius of the church beyond the sea; he spoke extem- 
poraneously, but his words were the keynote of the whole series of 
meetings.''* He delivered the address at the Centennial celebration 
at Lexington, Mass.; and was one of the few who at their own 
charge were sent to ask of the Emperor of Russia liberty of worship 
for the dissenters from the Greek church in the Baltic provinces. 
He was made a member of the New York Historical Society, June 
18, 1844. In the spring of 1874 he resigned the pastorate of the 
Madison Square church to accept the presidency of the Union 
Theological Seminary of New York, which he had been instrumen- 
tal in forming. 

Rev. William Adams married 1st, July 13, 1831, Susan P., a 
daughter of Thatcher and Mary (Bradshaw) Magoun of Medford, 
Mass., who died May 22, 1S34; he married 2d, August 12, 1835, 
her sister, Martha Bradshaw Magoun, who was born October 17, 
1812, died June 13, 1385; he died August 31, 1880. He had 
children — 

By the first wife: 
i. "Wllliam, 8 who was b. and d. November 24, 1832. 

By the second wife : 

ii. Thatcher Magoun, b. November 25, 1837; m. January 5, 18 — , 
Frances Robbins. 

• History of New York, by Mrs. Martha J. Lamb, vol. ii. p. 762. 



. 












196 Rev. William Adams. [April, 

ill. William, b. January 31. 1840; in. May 14, 18C7, Helen Coolidge. 
William Adams d.'juiv 14, 1SSS. They had children : 

1. Henri/ 3 Coolidge, b. February 9, 1809; m. February 7, 1891, Clara 

Corlies, and had — 1. Dunbar Wright, b. November 15, 1S91; 2. 
Dorothy, b. March 2, 1893. 

2. William,'' b. March 26, 1870. 

3. Thatcher. 9 b. March 23. 1874. 

4. Margaret,* b. March 31, 1876. 

5. John Brown* b. June 19, 1877. 

6. Thomas Safford, 3 b. September 11, 1879. 

iv. Mary Elizabeth, b. May 30, 1842; m. November 9, 1864, John 
Crosby Brown, and had : 

1. William Adams* b. December 29, 1885; m. March 30, 1892. Helen 

Gilman Noyes, and had a son, John Crosby, b. December 22, 
1S92. 

2. Eliza Coe 9 b. Septembers, 1858; m. November 9, 1887, Edward 

C. Moore. 

3. Mary Magoun, 9 b. December 22, 1869. 

4. James Crosby * b. September 28, 1872. 

5. Thatcher Magoun, 9 b. March 8, 1876. 

6. Amy Brighlhurst 9 b. April 28, 1873. 

v. Susan Magoux, b. February 28, 1S47 ; m. February 8, 1872, Eugene 
Delano, and had : 

1. William Adams, b. January 21, 1874. 

2. Martha Magoun 9 b. July 24, 1875 ; d. August 17, 1876. 

3. Moreau,* b. June 14, 1877. 

4. Caroline, 9 b. May 6, 1879. 

5. Susan Magoun, 9 b. March 13, 18S3. 

6. Eugene 9 b. February 26, 1887. 

vi. Henry Stuart, b. April 8, 1849 : d. October 10, 1852. 



The Bradford Line. 

1. William* Bradford, son of William 1 and Alice (Hanson) Bradford, 
was born March, 1588. His father died in 1591, when his grand- 
father, William Bradford, took him; but the grandfather died in 
1596, and he then went to live with his uncle Robert Bradford, who 
resided in the little village of Scrooby, a place five miles from Aus- 
terfield and near the estate of the Brevrsters, in Nottinghamshire. 
He joined the church where Rev. Richard Clifton and Rev. John 
Robinson preached, and was soon numbered among the " Separatists," 
and became a leader among them. His early educational advan- 
tages were apparently very limited, but he so applied himself to 
study that he became proficient in Dutch, Latin, French and Greek ; 
he also devoted himself to the study of Hebrew, as he desired to 
read the scriptures in their native tongue. 

He went with the community which migrated to Holland, and 
was one of the most influential amongst them. On coming of aae 
he received a considerable property from his father's estate, but did 
not succeed in some commercial undertakings; he learned the art of 
"fustian or frieze weaving." November 15, 1613, William Bret- 
foort, fustian worker, a young man from Osterfeldt, EDg., was af- 
fianced to Dorothea May from Witzbutz (Wisbeach, Cambridge, 
Eng.). The baDns were published in Leyden, but the marriage took 
place elsewhere, as on December 9, 1613, William Eretfoort, aged 
23 years, was married to Dorothea May, aged 16 years, in Amster- 
dam, Holland. 



1891.] ' Rev. William Adams. 197 

They embarked for England July 22, 1620, and after many mis- 
haps and troubles, ou September 6, 1620, set sail from Plymouth. 
Eng., with the first company of Pilgrims in the Mayflower, and 
reached Cape Cod harbor, N. E., on the following November. 
"While they were at anchor, and when he was absent from the ves- 
sel, his wife Dorothea fell overboard and was drowned. 

From this time onwards William Bradford's part in the fortunes 
of the community was important and powerful. Soon after the first 
governor, William Carver, died, Bradford was elected to that office, 
which he held by annual election until his death, excepting the 
years 1633, '34, '36, '38 and '44. He took a prominent part in all the 
councils, which were held at his house, and iu all the affairs civic, 
political and military ; from his house at the foot of Burial Hill each 
Sabbath morning the little company of worshippers, who all assem- 
bled there, marched in procession up the steep ascent to the fort 
at its top, where the religious services were held. As he lived the 
history of the times he wrote them, and this history, so long missing, 
is now that which gives his posterity the best pictures of the lives 
and events of those who so valiantly and bravely lived and died. 

William Bradford married 1st, Dorothy May, who died December 
9, 1620; he married 2d, Mrs. Alice, daughter of Alexander Car- 
penter of Wrentham, Eng., and the widow of Edward Southworth, 
who died March 2&, 1670; he died May 9, 1657. His children 
were : 

i. John, 3 son of his first wife, who was of Duxbory, 1615; deputy to 
the General Court, 1052; lieutenant of Marshfield, Mass., in 1G33; 
m. Martha, daughter of Thomas and Martha Bourne of Marsh- 
field, and then removed to Norwich, Conn., where he d. in 1C78, 
s.p. 

2. ii. "William, b. January 17, 1624. 

iii. Mercy, m. Benjamin (or Joseph) Vermages, 

iv. Josephs b. 1G30; m. May 23, 16G4, Jael, daughter of Kev. Peter 
Hobart of Hingham, Mass. 

2. Major William 8 Bradford, son of Governor William and Alice 

(Carpenter, Southworth) Bradford, born June 16, 1624, in Ply- 
mouth, Mass.; removed to Kingston, Mass.; he was appointed 
Assistant ; was deputy governor ; one of Governor Andros's council 
in 1687; chief military officer of the Plymouth colony. He mar- 
ried 1st, Alice, daughter of Thomas and Welthean Richards of Wey- 
mouth, Mass., who died at Plymouth, December 12. 1671 ; he mar- 
ried 2d, the widow Wiswell ; he married 3d, Mrs. Mary, daughter 
of Mr. John Atwood of Plymouth, and the widow of Rev. John 
Holmes of Duxbury, Mass., who died June 6, 1714—15; he died 
February 20, 1793, aged 74 years. His children were: 

i. John, 4 b. February 20, 1653. 

ii. William, b. March 11, 1C55. 

iii. Thomas. vii. Mercy. 

iv. Samuel. viii. Meletlvh. 

v. Alice. ix. Mary. 

3. vi. Hannah. x. Sarah. 

3. Hannah* Bradford, daughter of Major William and Alice (Richards) 

Bradford, who was born in Kingston, Mass., iu 1661-2 ; married 
Joshua Ripley, a grandson of William Ripley who with his wife 
and four children came from Hingham, County Norwich, Eng., to 

VOL. XLVIII. 18* 



xi. 


Joseph. 


xii. 


Israel. 


xiii. 


David. 


xiv. 


Ephraeu. 


XV. 


Hezekiah. 









. 









tjx .aoT 



198 Rev. William Adams. [April, 

Hingham, Mass., in ] G33. His son John married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Peter Ilobart of Hingham, and their son Joshua, with 
his wife Hannah Bradford. lived in Hingham until 16S9, when they 
went to Norwich, Conn., whence they removed to the upper part of 
that state, where he bought of Isaac Magoun, the first settler, sixty 
acres of land on both sides of Merrick's Brook. The first town 
meeting of Windham was held June 11, 1092, when Joshua Ripley 
was appointed town clerk ; he was also town treasurer. " He was 
a man widely known and respected, as of sterling sense and judg- 
ment; he was one of the first justices of the peace in Connecticut, 
and was appointed May, 1698, when that office was first instituted; 
was the first representative sent by Windham to the General Assem- 
bly, appearing there May, 1699." He was also one of the seven 
pillars or counsellors, and justice of the quorum in 1726. His wife 
was "a noble and useful woman, remarkable not only for intelli- 
gence and accomplishments, but for her skill in the art of healino-. 
She was the first, and for a long time the only physician in the sel- 
lement, and it is said that the first male physician, Dr. Richard 
Huntington, received much of his medical knowledge from her." 
Joshua Ripley married November 28, 1682, Hannah Bradford, and 
their children were : 

i. Alice Ripley, 4 b. in Hinsrham, September 18, 1683. 

ii. Hannah Ripley, b. in Hingham, March 2, 1684-5* 

iii. Judith Ripley, b. in Hingham, October, 1686. 

iv. Joshua Ripley, b. iu Hingham, May 13, 1688. 

v. Margaret Ripley, b. in Norwich, Conn., November 4, 1690 

vi. Leah Ripley, ] . . ..*_.« 

vii. Rachel Ripley, | twins ; b - m Windham, Conn., Apiil 19, 1693. 

viii. Hezekiah Ripley, b. in Windham, June 10, 1695. 

4. ix. David Ripley, b. in Windham, May 20, 1697. 

x. Irene Ripley, b. in Windnam, August 28, 1700. 

xi. Jekusha Ripley, ) . . , . Trr . „ 

xii. Ann Ripley, | twins; b. in Windham, November 1, 1701. 

4. David* Riplet, son of Joshua and Hannah (Bradford) Ripley, bora 
in Canterbury, May 20, 1697; married March 21, 1720, "Lydia, 
daughter of Eliezer and Lydia Carv, who was born March" 24\ 
1705-6, at Bristol, R. I., and died April 9, 1784 ; he died February 
16,1781. They had children : 

i. Faith, 6 b. May 1, 1722. 

Li. Lydia, b. February 20, 1723-4. 

iii. Ann, b. August 27, 1726. 

iv. Irene, b. February 1, 1727. 

v. David, b. February 7, 1730-1. 

vi. William, b. July 12. 1734. 

vii. Gamaliel, b. April 19, 1736; d. May 30, 1739. 

viii. Alithea, b. April 24, 1738. 

5. ix. Gamaliel, b. October 20, 1740. 

x. Hezekiah, b. February 3, 1742. 

xi. Bradford, b. December 30, 1744. 

xii. Hannah, b. February 23, 1750. 

>. Gamaliel 6 Ripley, son of David and Lydia (Carey) Ripley, born 
October 20, 1740; married 1st, December 15, 1764, Elizabeth 
Hebard, who died January 10, 1765; he married 2d, January 23, 
1772, Judith, daughter of Jacob and Jemima (Leonard) Perkins, 
who was born April 14 (or March 2), 1747; died July 6. 1803. 
He died April 15, 1799. They had children : 






























































.* 












1894.] Family of Edison, the Inventor. 199 



i. Roswell, 6 b. December 31, 1765. 

iv. Gamaliel, b. February 8, 1774. 

v. Elizabeth, b. March 'IS), 1776. 

vi. David Bradford, b. April 19, 177S. 

vii. Zeftianiaii, h. October 17, 1779. 

viii, Lydia, b. December 4, 1780. 

ix. William, b. May 27. 1782. 

x. Jabez Perkins, *b. March 23, 178S. 



CONNECTION OF THE FAMILY OF EDISON, THE IN- 
VENTOR, WITH DIGBY, NOVA SCOTIA. 

By Judge A. W. Savary, of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. 

Among the Loyalists from New York who settled in and near 
Digby at the close of the Revolutionary war, were quite a number 
of Dutch, and some of German extraction. Among these Loyal- 
ists appears John Edison, of whom, and of Samuel and Moses 
Edison a little later, the following records were compiled for me 
by the late William H. Taylor, clerk of the Vestry of Trinity 
Church, and' town clerk of Digby, from the "Grant of confirmation 
of the township of Digby," the "deed of partition of the 'Hatfield 
Grant,' " same township, from town meeting records, and records of 
cattle marks, and from the records of Trinity Church, Digby. 

John Edison owned lot No. 15 in the North Range of the Hat- 
field Grant, 200 acres ; No. 49, Middle Range, 200 acres ; and 
half of lot No. 25, South Range, 100 acres. — (These were wilder- 
ness lots, five to ten miles from the town or village of Digby and 
shore settlements.) A tax was levied Sept. 21, 1789, to defray 
the church expenses, and therein the name of John Edison appears 
without any amount opposite. Another tax was levied Dec. 5, 
1796, in which he was assessed 5 3 . 6 d . At a town meeting held 
April 1, 1799, he was appointed one of the directors of the town 
marsh at the head of St. Mary's Bay, and continued such in 1800 
and 1801. He was appointed assessor of poor rates at a town 
meeting held April 4, 1808. 

Samuel Edison, grandfather of the inventor, purchased the 
possession of pew No. 36 in Trinity Church, Sept. 26, 1792, and 
in the assessment for church expenses Dec. 5, 1796, he was rated 
2 3 6 J . He was granted a sheep mark May 3, 1803, which, evidently 
because he had removed away, was transferred to James Budd, 
Nov. 3, 1812. He was appointed overseer of the marsh, April 4, 
1808. 

Moses Edison, at a town meeting April 6, 1801, made an agree- 
ment to fence the marsh. 









I 



! 
200 r Family of Edison, the Inventor. [April, 

The first decade of the century had not closed before the superior 
fertility of the prairie and alluvial soil of Upper Canada had begun 
to attract the attention of the struggling settlers of Western Xova 
Scotia, and a strong stream of migration from Digby and vicinity 
to that laud of promise set in, and flowed for many years. With 
that stream early went. Samuel and Moses Edison : the former taking 
with him a young family, among whom was Saimuel Edison, Jr., 
the father of the inventor. The latter became afterwards a resident 
of Ohio, in which state Thomas A. Edison was the first of his line 
who was born under the American flag. 

The late Charles Budd, who, born in the last century, long repre- 
sented Digby in the Xova Scotia legislature, gave me approximately 
the date of Samuel's migration, corresponding with that of the 
transfer of the sheep mark, and with the result of a published in- 
terview of Mrs. M* L. Rayne with the inventors aged father, at 
Port Huron, Michigan', last summer. It was in the year 1811, 
when the younger Samuel was 8 years old. Mr. Budd also in- 
formed me that the first Samuel's wife was a Miss Roop : of a family 
now numerous in Digby and Annapolis counties, and also claiming 
a New York German or Dutch extraction. A descendant of this 
family, Miss Maria Roop, a clever newspaper correspondent, a few 
years ago married a (maritime) Capt. Dow Roop, of Xova Scotia. 
Her brother informs me that the wife of Samuel Edison was xVnn, 
half-sister of his father ; and if so she was dau. of Major Isaac Roop, 
of Xew York loyalist forces, or X". S. Militia. I can find nothing on 
the other church records, registry of Probate or of Deeds, to verify 
this, or to show that John was the father of Samuel and Moses, 
except that he had lots in the Hatfield grant and they had not. rais- 
ing the presumption that they were under age when the loyalists 
came over, and that he was head of a family. There are descend- 
ants of Edison women in Digby, but the only representatives of the 
name are colored people, descendants of a negro whom the first 
Edison brought with him from Xew York. 

It is hard to conceive that John Edison, the pioneer, whose hardy 
hands felled the first tree, rooted out the first stump, and guided the 
plow that turned the first furrow on those wild N Hatfield grant " lots, 
could ever have been a " banker of high standing," as stated by Mr. 
Lanier in the December number of the "Review of Reviews," nor 
the son of any such banker ; and as tradition in unhistorie American 
families generally post-dates the advent of the immigrant ancestor 
to about the third or fourth generation back, I suspect (notwith- 
standing Mr. Lanier's suggestion of 1730 as about the year of 
the immigration to America), that the ancestors of Edison from 
the times of the first settlement of the Dutch colony, have been, 
like those of many another illustrious American, worthy tillers of 
the soil, toiling in contented obscurity, until his genius shed a 
peculiar and undying glory on the name. 



1894.] -Martins or Martha's Vineyard? 201 



MARTIN'S OR MARTHA'S? 
What is the proper nomenclature of the Vineyard? 

" Martin's Vineyard some call it Marthaes Vineyard." 

Whitfidd, The Light Appearing (1651). 

By Charles Edward Banks, M.D., of Portland, Me. 

In the Register many years ago (xii. 33), the question pro- 
pounded in the sub-title of this article was asked by the Editor of 
that volume, and as far as known to the writer it remains unan- 
swered. 

Without any knowledge that this subject was ever under discus- 
sion, the writer of this had observed on an old map of New Eng- 
land the title Martin's Vineyard applied to the ancient Isle of 
Capawock, and upon a desultory search to ascertain whether this 
name had ever been similarly attached to the Vineyard by other 
cartographers, was not able to find upon any chart of the seven- 
teenth century, one only excepted, where the topography and local 
nomenclature of the coast became mutually intelligible, that the 
name Martha's Vineyard had ever been applied to the island now 
bearing that name. 

An examination of contemporary literature of that period, printed 
books, letters, public records, legal documents, etc., confirmed this 
curious fact, and as a result of this extended search the writer feels 
safe in saying that in the public and private records of the seven- 
teenth century, the name Martin's is applied to the Vineyard, to 
the practical exclusion of Martha's, and this phenomen has the re- 
peated sanction of Mr. Thomas Mayhcw himself, the " Governor 
and Lord of Capawock," in public and private papers. 

The records of the Vineyard, registeries of deeds and wills and 
court books, as examined for me by B. T. Hillman, Esq., of Ed- 
gartown, do not bear out this general statement however. Mr. 
Hillman writes to me : " I have examined a large number of deeds 
recorded in this volume (Vol. I. Deeds), and only find one in 
which the name of the island is given as Martin's Vineyard. There 
may be others, for I have not examined every deed in the volume. 
The name Martha's Vineyard seems to have been used both in the 
Court records and in the Deeds." I am indebted to him for valu- 
able assistance in the investigation of this subject, and in this con- 
nection I might also refer to his statement to me in this same letter 
that the adjoining island is called M Xomans Land " in the first 
record of conveyance, instead of M Xo Mans " as sometimes written. 


















baa 






202 __ Martin 's or Martha's Vineyard ? [April, 

That an island south of Cape Cod was called Martha's Vineyard 
by the explorer Gosnold in 1602 is well known (3 Mass. Hist. Coll., 
via. 75), and it seems certain that lie applied it to the small isle, 
now called No Man's or Neman's Land, lying directly southwest 
from the Vineyard of to-day, at a distance of three miles. That 
this prenomen was finally transferred to the present Martha's Vine- 
yard seems equally certain ; but that the name Martin's was used 
up to about 1700, even by the residents of the Vineyard, by local 
historians and patographers, by public officials throughout Xew 
England and Xew York, must be accepted by the reader upon the 
array of authorities which follows. What gave rise to this confusion 
in the seventeenth century, for in the next it was settled by the 
colonial government of Massachusetts as "' Martha,* is not easily 
explained. Such a difference of names, so long persisted in, must 
have had some substantial basis in fact, for it is not credible that 
accident or chance or mistake will account for all this mixture. In 
the following tables is appended a list of references to documents, 
etc., which show when, where and how the two names were used : 

" MARTIN'S " VINEYARD. 

Date. Author. Book or Document. Reference. 

1638 Underbill, John. Newes from America. passim. 

1642 Lechford, Thomas. Plaine Dealing. 107. 

1643 Winthrop. John. Journal. ii. 151. 

1644 Commissioners of United Colonies, Records. passim. 
1647 Paine, Thomas. Suffolk Deeds. i. 86. 

1647 Davison, Nicholas. " " i. 91. 

1648 Good News from NewEngland. 

1649 Winslow, Edward. GloriousProgress of Gospel. etc. 

1650 AVilliarns. Roger. Letter to John Winthrop, Jr. 

1651 "Whitfield, Henry. The Light Appearing. 

1651 Ressev, Anthony. ) T .. . . ,-, ., t> 
, r , r. v * . T , J ( Letters ot, in further Pro- 
16ol Endicott. John. r e . ^, , , 
,£-.. .,, T -> T , 1 gress ot the Gospel, etc. 
16ol Ahen, Rev. John. ) & . l 

1652 Butler, Nicholas. Suffolk Deeds. i. 196. 
1654 Johnson. Edward. Wonder Working Providence. 226. 
1654 Massachusetts Colonial Records. " iv. (i.) 199. 
1656 New York Colonial Documents. i.565, ii.134. 
1658 Plymouth Colony Records. x. 209. 
1660 Maverick, Samuel. Description of New England. 

1660 Folger, Peter. Deed, in N. E. Hist. Gen. Reg. xii. 33. 

1662 Plymouth Colon v Records. x. 275. 

1663 Plymouth Colonv Records. x. 293. 

1664 Patent to Duke of York, 2 Maine Hist. Coll. iv. 191. 

1665 Royal Commissioners, 2 Maine Hist. Coll. iv. 300. 

1666 Mayhew, Thomas. York County Deeds. iii. 161. 

1666 [Eliot, Rev. John.] Roxbury Church Records. 

1667 New York Colonial Documents. iii. 169. 
1667 Plymouth Colony Records. x. 330. 
1699 Morton, Nathaniel. New England Memorial. 





X. 


356. 


.Col. Doc 


. iii. 


215. 
157. 




iii. 


•248. 


gland. 


pa; 


>sim. 




vi. 


48. 




vi. 


65. 


/Col. Doc 


.iii. 


328. 




iii. 


552. 


England 




42. 




iii. 


752. 




iii. 


798. 




vi. 


288. 




iv. 


2,8, 



1894.] 31artin , s or Martha's Vineyard ? 203 

1671 Commission to Thomas Mayhew as Governor, 

issued by Lovelace. 

1672 Plymouth Colony Records. 

1674 Andres, Edmund. Commission of, N. Y 

1675 Josselyn. John. Two Voyages, etc. 

1677 New York Colonial Documents; 

1678 Hubbard. Rev. William. History of New En< 

1679 Plymouth Colony Records. 

1681 Plymouth Colony Records. 

1682 Dongan, Thomas. Commission of, N.Y/Col. 

1688 New York Colonial Documents. 

1689 [E. R. and S. S.J Revolution in New 

Justified. 

1690 New York Colonial Documents. 

1691 New York Colonial Documents. 

1692 Cadillac. M. de la Mothe. 1 Blaine Hist. Coll. 

1693 New York Colonial Documents. iv. 2, 8, 10. 

It is also desirable that such books and documents as disclose the 
name * Martha's " should be cited, and they are herewith appended : 

" MARTHA'S " VINEYARD. 

Date. Author. Book or Document. Eeference. 

1610 Strachey, William Travaille into Virginia. 

1641 Vines. Richard. Hough's Nantucket Papers. 4. 

1663 Winthrop, John, Jr. 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. 

1678 Gookin, Daniel, et ah. 2 Maine Hist. Coll. iv. 383. 

1676 Sewall, Samuel. Diary. i. 26. 
1689 Briefe Relation of the .State of New England. 19. 

1692 Acts and Resolves of the Province of Mass. Bay. 

1693 Phips, William. New York Colonial Doc. iv. 6. 
1696 Mayhew, Matthew. Conquering Grace, etc. 

The maps of the period are disappointing as a rule, but they 
give corroborative evidence in the same proportion as the documen- 
tary and printed authorities, viz : — 

Martin's. Martha's. 

1670 Ogilby. 1610 [Brown, Genesis i. 457.] 

1677 Hubbard. 1671 Novi Belgii, etc. 

French (Mass. Arch. ii. 61). 

1688 Blome. 
1702 Mather. 

It should be said that the "Novi Belgii " map of 1671 gives the 
name of Martha's Vineyard to the present Xo Man's or Noman's Land, 
and "Texel" is applied to the present Vineyard, a name that first 
was given to it in the Carte Figurative (161G), and is repeated in 
the West Indische Paskaert (1621), the Ammo del Mare (1646), 
and in Blaen's (1662, 168.3). As a curiosity of development of 
nomenclature it may be noted that " C. Wack : ' in the Novi Belgii 



201 Descendants of Rev. John Robinson. [April, 

map, meaning Cape AVack, is an effort to render Capawoek into 
English. In Drake's Old Indian Croniele (p. 51), a unique title 
appears, " Nope or Marthas Vineyard." No other occurrence of 
this singular word has come to the notice of the Avriter. 

As to the probability of evidence in favor of either name, the 
case for " Martin " must overcome the statement of John Brereton, 
the historian of Gosnold's voyage, that an island, generally consid- 
ered to be Noman's Land, received in 1602 the title of "Marthaes 
Vineyard." It is known that a Capt. John Martin was with Gos- 
nold in this voyage, and later figures as an associate of Gosnold in 
the early settlement of Virginia. The suggestion that it was this 
companion's name, John Martin, which was intended to be honored 
by the baptism, is quite within the probabilities ; as much so as 
Point Gilbert, which was named by him for Bartholomew Gilbert, 
another companion, and Tucker's Terror, which he applied to a 
shoal or reef for another voyager. 

Brereton's relation is not above criticism, for many errors as to 
sailing courses, longitude and other kindred subjects, and he may 
be, perhaps, successfully impeached on the subject of " Marthaes 
Vineyard." 



SOME DESCENDANTS OF THE REV. JOHN ROBINSON 
OF LEYDEN, HOLLAND. 

Communicated by Hon. Ariel Standish Thckston, of Elmira, N. Y. 

A short time before the death of Gov. Lucius Robinson I re- 
ceived from him the enclosed genealogy, showing him to have been 
a lineal descendant of the Puritan divine John Robinson of Leydon, 
— the friend of my ancestor Myles Standish, whose will contains a 
bequest to his son Isaac's daughter " Marcye," whom tf I tenderly 
love for her grandfather's sake." Of course, I know nothing of 
its authenticitv. 



The Genealogy of the Family of John Robinson, of Church at Leyden, 
who died 1625, March 1. 

His sons, John and Isaac, with their mother came to America. John 
settled at, or near, Cape Ann; Isaa: settled first at Scituate, Mass., after- 
wards moved to Barnstable in 1639. [There is but little doubt that this is 
a mistake. See note at the end of the article. Isaac came, but probably 
no other member of the family.] 

1. Peter, a son of Isaac, lived at Windham, Ct. (Scotland Society) in 
1735, with seven sons and two daughters. 

2. Peter second, married Ruth Fuller 1725, had eight sons and four 
daughters. Eliab was Peter second'9 seventh son; Ralph was Eliab's first 





















' 















1894.] Descendants of Rev. John Robinson. 205 

son; and Eliab Weeks was Ralph's first son, and lived at Lisbon, Ct. in 
1850, and had one son. 

3. Israel, son of Peter, married Sarah Sabin 1724, and Deborah Chap- 
man 1737. Sarah Robinson had three sons, and Deborah C Robinson 
one daughter. 

4. Thomas, son of Peter, married Anna 1724, had three sons and three 
daughters. Died March, 17S3, aged 85 years. 

Reuben, son of Thomas, born Jan. 17, 1725, married Esther Palmer 

Jan. 1749. 
Asa, son of Thomas, born Oct. 17. 1726, married Mary French Oct. 

1749, died 1811, aged 86. 
Abiah, daughter, born May 16, 1727, married Jonah Palmer 1754. 
Anna, born March 17, 1730, died in infancy. 
Anna, born May 1, 1733, married Ebenezer Luce 1749. 
Levi, son of Thomas, born March 17, 1736. 

5. Benjamin, fifth sou of Peter, married Jerusha Brigham March 1729, 
had two sons and three daughters. 

6. Joseph, son of Peter, married Mehitable Read July 1735, had four 
sons and three daughters. 

7. Isaac, seventh son of Peter, married Deborah Hibbard D-^c. 1737. 

1. Sinuon, [?] first daughter of Peter, married Josiah Smith Nov. 13, 1746, 
and had five sons and three daughters. 

2. Martha, second daughter of Peter, married Barnabas Allen, grand- 
father of Deacon Barnabas Allen of Westminister, Conn. 

End of Peter's Family. 
Reuben's Family. 
Reuben, son of Thomas, son of Peter 1st, married Esther Palmer Jan. 
12, 1749, had four sons and five daughters, as follows: 
Esther, born July 18, 1749, died July 19. 1749. 
Zipporah, born Jan 31, 1751, married John Welsh Nov. 1772. 
Zopher, born Feb. 19, 1753, married Charity Coburn Nov. 1780. 
Clifferd, born Jan. 8, 1756, married Lucy Morgan Oct. 1779. 
Reuben, born Jan. 13, 1759, married Urania Kingsley Aug. 1779. 
Hannah, born Feb. 21, 1761, married Jesse Parsons. 
Esther, born Feb. 6, 1764. married Ward well Green Oct. 1783. 
Asnath, born June 26, 1766, married Levi Green June 1785. 
Eliel, born Sept. 24, 1768, married Roxana Spaiford. 
Asa's Family. 
Asa, son of Thomas, born Oct. 17, 1726, married Mary French Oct. 
25, 1749, died 1811, aged 85 years, and had eight children, as follows: 
Levi, born Oct. 26, 1750, married Lavonia SpafFerd Dec. 1780. 
Phebe, born Oct. 2, 1752. died Jan. 23, 1814. 
Thomas, born Jan. 2, 1755, died at Stonington Nov. 13, 1776. 
Asa, born June 6, 1757, married Olive Hunnington Sept. 17, 1777. 
Zimrue, born March 30, 1761. 
Mary, born June 15, 1764. 
Zilpah, born Aug. 12, 1767. 
Charity, born June 16, 1772. 
Children of Levi Robinson. 
Levi, son of Asa, married Lavonia SpafFerd Dec. 1780, died Jan. 23, 
1814. Left two daughters: 

Lucy, daughter of Levi, born Dec. 2, 1785. 

VOL. XLVIII. 19 



206 Descendants of Rev. John Robinson. [April, 

Lavonia, daughter of Levi, born Aug. 29, 1795. 
Children of Asa. Jr. 
Asa Robinson, Jr. married Olive Huntongton Sept. 17, 1777. 
Thomas, son of Asa, born Aug. 7, 1779. 
Whiting, son of Asa, born Sept. 2, 1782. 
Olivia, born April 21, 1785, must have died. 
Olivia, [?] son of Asa, born March 19, 1788. 
Lewis, son of Asa, born Dec. 14, 1790. 
Betsey, born Dec. 26, 1793. 
Nathan, born Aug. 15, 1796. 
Polly, born Feb. 25, 1800. 
Children of Reuben Robinson. 
Reuben Robinson, Jr., son of Reuben, son of Thomas, son of Peter 1st, 
son of Isaac, son of John Robinson, pastor of Church of Leyden, had five 
sons and four daughters, as follows: 

Eli Palmer Robinson, born Dec. 11, 1780, died Dec. 14, 1851. Mar- 
ried Mary Saxton 1S00, born April 19, 1780. 
Urania, married James Woodferd. 
Bradford, married Wiihelmina Sanfer. 
Fanny, married Reuben Fish. 
Nancy, married Samuel Baldwin. 
Benjamin Franklin, married Bede Munson. 
Charles Kingsley. 
Isaac Newton. 

Elmina Malissa, married Bangs. 

Family of Eli P. Robinson. 
Eli P. Robinson had four sons and one daughter, as follows : 
' Orrin Robinson, born Dec. 3, 1802, died Jan. 30, 1835. 
William Saxton, born Oct. 1, 1805, died Nov. 30, 1838. 
Lucius, born Nov. 4, 1810, died March 23, 1891. 
John Milton, born Feb. 23, 1814, died Dec. 24, 1885. 
Mary, born Oct. 29, 1822. 
The descent of Gov. Robinson is as follows : Rev. John 1 Robinson, of 
Leydon, died March 1, 1625; Isaac 2 Robinson, of Scituate, Mass.; Peter 3 
Robinson, of Windham, Conn, in 1835, seven sons, two daughters; Thomas 4 
Robinson, married 1724, three sons and three daughters, died 1783; Reu- 
ben 5 Robinson, 1st, married Esther Palmer, four sons and five daughters; 
Reuben 8 Robinson, 2d, born 1757, married Uranu Kingsley Aug. 1779; 
Eli Palmer 7 Robinson, four sons and one daughter; Lucius 8 Robinson, bom 
Nov. 4, 1810, governor of New York, died March 23, 1891. 



Note bt the Editor of the Register. — The late Rev. Henry M. 
Dexter, D.D., contributed to the Register for April, 1866, an article en- 
titled, " Did the Widow of John Robinson emigrate to America? " In this 
article Dr. Dexter gives strong reasons for believing that she never came 
to New England. 

The settler at Cape Ann was Abraham Robinson, not John. (See 
Babson's Gloucester, page 134.) I have seen no evidence that Rev. John 
Robinson had a son by the name of Abraham. The list of his children in 
1622 gives the names of his children as James (or, a3 Mr. George Sumner 



1894.] .. Maverick Family. 207 

reads it, John), Bridget, Isaac, Mercy, Feo.r and Jacob. (Register, vol, 
15. p. 30). 

Rev. John A. Vinton, in his Giles Memorial (Boston, 1S64), devotes ten 
pages Cpp. 3G3 to 372), to the "Family of John Robinson of Leyden." 
The reader who wishes to kuow more about this family is referred to that 
book. The children of Gov. Robinson's father and grandfather are not 
given there. 

Judge Sewall had an interview with Isaac Robinson probably at Barn- 
stable, in April, 1702, and was told by him that he was then 92 years old, 
and was "y e son of Mr. Robinson, pastor of y e ch. of Leyden part of w ch 
came to Plim . But to my uisappointm' " adds Judge Sewall, "he came 
not to New England, till y e year [1631] in w ch Mr. Wilson was returning 
to England after y e settlem' of Boston." See Register, vol. 14, p. 13. 



THE MAVERICK FAMILY. 

By Isaac John- Greenwood, A.M., of New York city. 

Some twenty years since, looking over the late Col. Joseph L. 
Chester's MS. catalogue of Oxford graduates, my attention was 
drawn by him to the name of "John Maverick, 1595, Exeter 
College, from Devon, Minister." 

Foster's Catalogue, much fuller in details, reads as follows : 

"Maverick, John of Devon, cler. fi]., Exeter Coll., matric. 24 Oct. 1595, 
aged 18; B.A. 8 July 1577; M.A. 7 July 1603; then in orders, rector of 
Beaworthy (s.w. of Hatherly), Devon, 1615. (See Foster's Index Eccl.)." 

This was undoubtedly "the godly Mr. Maverick," whom Roger 
Clap, born on the Devonshire coast, at Salcomb (between Sidmouth 
and Branscomb), speaks of as living "forty miles off," and who, 
after establishing a congregation at Dorchester, X. E., died Feb. 
3, 1636-7, being, according to "YVintbrop, "near sixty years of 
age." 

Though we hear nothing of his wife, she is alluded to in 1665, by 
Col. Cartwright, in his " Memorial* concerning the Massachusets," 
who observes : 

"If any of the commissioners think it more convenient for them to stay 
in those parts, that they may haue leue to do so. For Mr. Maverick hath 
his mother, wife, children & brothers living there, and nether estate, nor 
employment here." 

And Samuel Maverick, writing from Rhode Island Oct. 9, 1668, 
to Secretary Sir William Morice, says that his mother "presents 
her humble service." (See Sainsbury's Calendar of Colonial Papers, 
vol. 3, p. 415, No 1288). This Secretary Morice, who died in 

• Clarendon Papers, N. Y. Hist. Soc. Coll., 1869, p. 103. 



' 












• 






208 Maverick Family. [April. 

Dec. 1G76 aged 74, was son of Jevan Morice, fellow of All Saints 
College, Oxford, of an ancient Welsh family, doctor of laws and 
chancellor of Exeter, Devon, in 15i'4, and ancestor of the extinct 
Baronets Morice of Werrington, Devon, on the borders of Cornwall, 
a few miles s.w. of Bcaworthy. 

The widow Maverick, in 16G8, must have been well advanced in 
years, since by his own deposition,* taken in December, 1665, her- 
eon Samuel was then "aged G3 yeares or therabouts." 

Samuel, the eldest son of the Rev. John Maverick, born about 
1602, had settled in New England as early as 1624, f near the con- 
fluence of Charles and Mystic Rivers, where with the help of his 
neighbor, David Tomson, j he had built a small fort. He was an 
episcopalian and loyalist, and frequently embroiled with the colonial 
government ; finally, after one of his several voyages to the old 
country, he was, in April 1G64, appointed one of the four Royal 
Commissioners to visit the colonies and inquire into grievances. 
For his services he received from the Duke of York, through a 
grant from Gov. Lovelace, a certain house and lot in New York 
City, on the Broadway. This gift he acknowledges in a letter of 
Oct. 15, 1GG9, to Col. Rich. Nicolls, his associate in the Commis- 
sion, and we hear not of him again till in a deed of Mar. 15, 1G76 
(recorded Albany, L.l, p. 133), his trustees, John Laurence and 
Matthias .Xicolls, of New York, confirm to AVilliam Vander 
Scheuren this same property on Broadway, which the latter had 
bought from the Deacons of the City, by whom it had been pur- 
chased at a public sale made for the benefit of Maverick's daughter, 
Mary, wife of Rev. Francis Hooke of Kittery. Neither the time 
nor place of Maverick's death, nor the depository of his will have 
been, as yet, ascertained. No records of so early a date are pre- 
served by the Dutch Church, who evidently held the lot for a short 
period, but, after a careful examination of conveyances in the City 
Register's office, the writer has satisfactorily located the position 
of the Maverick Lot. May 30, 1667, Gov. Nicolls granted a lot on 
Broadway to Adam Onckelbach, which is described in later deeds 
as bounded south by house and lot of William Vander Scheuren, 
and which finally in Oct. 1784, when known as No. 52 Broadway, 
was sold to John Jay, Esq., the future governor, who here erected 
a fine stone mansion. At this time the lot adjoining to the south 
was in the tenure and occupation of John Slidell, save some 64 feet 
on the easterly or New Street end, which had been sold in 1683 by 
Vander Scheuren to William Post (L. 13, p. 8; L. 35, p. 170). 
S Udell's sons in 1819 sold the greater portion of the lot, facing on 
Broadway, with a frontage of 214. ft., and a depth 110 ft., to 

* Suffolk Deeds, iv., 323. 

t Letter of Ma* 30, 1G69, to Rev. Sampson Bond, at the Bermudas; a native of Northill, 
Cornwall.— Mass.'Hist. Soc. Coll.. 4th «., vol. viii, p. 318. 

J Thomson's widow, Amias (Coles) is supposed to have married Maverick.— Reg., v. 47, 
p. 76. 



1894.] v Maverick Family. 209 

Robert Lenox ; while the remaining few inches, with a lot adjoin- 
ing to the south, known as Xo. 18, was sold by them on the same 
date to David Gelston. From the foregoing facts we gather that 
the original Maverick Lot was 26£ feet wide, located on the easter- 
ly side of Broadway, running through to Xew Street, and be- 
ginning 125 feet south from the Church Street (afterwards Garden 
Street, and now Exchange Place) ; and that it corresponded with 
the present No. 50 Broadway. 

Though extinct in the Xew England States, the Maverick fam- 
ily has existed for the past one hundred and fifty years in Xew 
York City, where Andrew Maverick, a young painter, 24 years 
of age, was admitted a freeman July 17, 1753 ; his name occur- 
ring on the Poll List of Feb., 1761. He was baptized at the Xew 
Brick Church, Boston, Feb. 9, 1728-9 : one of the numerous fam- 
ily of John 4 Maverick (Paul 3 , Elias 2 , Eev. John 1 .) an importer of 
hard woods on Middle Street (now Hanover St.), at the sign of 
the "Cabinet and Chest of Drawers," John's grandson Samuel 
(son of Samuel deceased), an apprentice of Mr. Isaac Greenwood, 
ivory turner &c, was mortally wounded, March 5, 1770, in the 
Boston Massacre. Andrew, who came to Xew York, married 
about 1754 Sarah, dau. of Peter and Bethia Ruston or Rusnton, 
and Mr. Rushton, in a will of 17G5, proved Aug. 14, 1767 (L.25, 
p. 534), leaves his entire estate, after the death of his wife Bethia, 
to his grandson Peter Rushton 5 Maverick.* The latter, born in the 
city April 11, 1755, a silver-smith, etcher and engraver, was in 
Aug. 1775 an Ensign in Capt. M. Minthorms Co., of Col. John 
Jay's 2dReg't of X. Y. Militia, and on July 23, 1788, represented 
the Engravers in the X. Y. Federal Procession ; he died in Dec. 
1811, and was succeeded by his three talented sons, Samuel, 7 An- 
drew 7 and Peter. 7 

The name Maverick, one of unusual occurrence, is akin doubtless 
to Morris, Morrice, or Maurice ; we get nearer to it in the original 
Welsh Mawr-rwyce, "a valiant hero." 

Xath. Maureick,f chief clerk of the Town Clerk, London, died 
24 Xovember, 1630, and John Mavericke was a settler located iu 
Charleston, S. C, in 1672. 

One other entry to the name is given by Foster : 

"Maverick, Radford, J of Devon, pleb., Exeter Coll. matric. 17 Nov. 
1581 aged 20; rector of Trusbam (n. of Chudleigh), 1586, and vicar of 
Islington, Devou(?) 1597. (See Foster's Index Eccl.)." 

* Dr. John Greenwood of N. Y. writing in Nov., 1S03 to P. R. Maverick, alludes to a lot 
on Middle St., Boston, belonging to estate of his late father, Isaac G., and which adjoined 
land of Maverick's grandfather. 

t Smith's Obituary, Camden Soc. Pub. 

X Radford was a Devonshire family name. 
VOL. XLVIII. 19* 



210 Mates and Queries. [April, 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

Notes. 

Weems, Towsox, Wallace. Payne, ov Virgixl*.. — li I wish to protest in the 
Register against some of the mistaken deductions" of Hayden's " Virginia 
Genealogies." In it there are " some pedigrees for which there is not the least 
foundation in fact." 

First, on p. 350. Hayden gives the descent of the Weems family of Maryland 
as follows: An Earl of Wemyss' youngest son, James, who was slain at the 
battle of Preston Pans (in Sept. 17-1-5), was the father of David Weems who 
was brought to Maryland and was the father eventually of live sons, progenitors 
of well-known Maryland and Virginia families. I have not quoted the exact 
words of Hayden's " unreliable deductions," hut give only the substance in brief. 

In Wood's' Douglas' Peerage of Scotland, under ll Earls of Wemyss," it will he 
found that the only ; ' Earl of Wemyss" who " had a younger son James" that 
would come anywhere near the dates required by Hayden to make- his assertion 
have some semblance of truth, was James Wemyss, fourth Earl of Wemyss, b. 
1690, d. 1756. He had a younger son James Wemyss, b. 1726, who instead of 
being slain at Preston Pans in 17-15, d. in 178G at Edinburgh, forty-one years 
after the battle. This youngest son James was, just as Hayden says, the father 
of a David Wemyss who was b. if 61, but who, although he was considerable of 
a traveller, was never in Maryland nor America. However, this does not mat- 
ter, since he d. s.o. and unm. in 1783; at Madura. 

Second, on p. 274. Hayden gives a glorious descent for the Towson family of 
Maryland aud Virginia from that great historical character, Oliver Cromwell, 
the Lord Protector, briefly as follows : Oliver Cromwell, the Protector, had 
Henry, who had Richard/ whose daughter was the mother of Gen. Nathaniel 
Towson, U. S. army, father of Thomas Towson, of Williamsport. Md. As 
originally the surname of the Protector was Williams, the locating his alleged 
descendant at " Williamsport" was a very pretty idea from the fertile imagina- 
tion of the Rev. Mr. Hayden, but genealogists require better evidence of 
descent than this. However, this is only a small matter, for there has been 
recently published a work that upsets Hayden's distinguished Unease of the 
Towsous and Cromwells of Maryland: this is Weyland's House of Cromwell. 
From it I learn that Richard Cromwell, a grandson of the Lord Protector, d. 
in 1759, and his only daughters were: 1, Elizabeth, who d. at Hampstead in 
1792 (see Gent. Mag., Nov. 1792): 2, Anne, d. at Berkhampstead in 1777; 3, 
Eleanor, d. infant; 4, Letitia, d. at Hampstead in 1789. All were unmarried and 
without issue, so no daughter of Richard Cromwell (son of Henry, son of the 
Protector), could have been the mother of Gen. Nathaniel Towson. of Mary- 
land, nor does the name of Towson, nor Cromwell of Maryland, appear in any 
connection in the account of the descendants of the Lord Protector. 

Third, p. 689, ic. Hayden deduces the descent of a Virginia family named 
Wallace from the " Wallaces of Galrigs," Scotland, and then gives these latter 
a long line of distinguished ancestors, reaching into A.D. 1100, namely, the 
" Wallaces of Ederslie." Brieily, Hayden's scheme of desceut for the Wallaces of 
Galrigs from the more prominent Wallaces of Ederslie, in order to give the Vir- 
ginia Wallaces a very long line, is William Wallace of Ederslie (whose lineage 
is traced back to A. D. 1100), d. 1554. had William of Ederslie, had John, had 
William, had William, a Glasgow merchant, d. 1713, father of William Wallace 
of Galrigs, d. ante, 1734, a Commissioner for Ayr. 1714-1720, who was the alleged 
ancestor of the Virginia Wallaces. " There is not a scintilla of evidence for all 
this." In giving "this descent for the Commissioner of Ayr, Hayden refers 
to Paterson's History of Ayr and Wigton. Evidently he personally never saw 
this valuable work, as he evidently has not taken pains to verify references ; 
if he had he would have found out how the Wallaces came into pos-.e^ion of 
Galrigs, and the true lineage of the alleged ancestors of the Wallaces of 
Virginia. 

In Paterson's work, vol. I., p. 4S6, his deductions are disproved as fol- 









i 



1894.] Notes and Queries. 211 

lows : — " William Wallace, the Commissioner of Ayr, had susine of Galrigs as 
heir to Robert Wallace, his great-graadfather (not John, as Hayden states), 
and to the deceased William Wallace, his grandfather, of the eight marks of 
land of RobertFand, S May 1714." According to Paterson the Commissioner's 
father was " William Wallace of Galrigs the younger," a tutor (not a Glasgow 
merchant: William the merchant was an entirely different person), brother to 
Hugh Wallace, who had susine of an annuity in 170S, son of " Mr. William 
Wallace of Garricks, 1052,*' who d. in 167-, son of " Robert Wallace in Galrix, 
1609." and subsequently "of Galrix (Galriss), who d. in Sept. 1642, son of 
" William Wallace of Gariggs, granted susine in 1573," &c, &c. 

Fourth, p. 250. Here Haydea wrongfully makes Dolly Payne, wife of Presi- 
dent Madison, of descent from a Scotch earl. He says Mrs. Madison was a 
granddaughter of John Payne, and his wife Anna Fleming granddaughter of 
" Sir Thomas Fleming of New Kent, Co. Virginia, temp. 1616, secoud son of 
the Earl of Wigton." There may have been a "Sir Thomas Fleming." and 
"Dolly" may have been descended from him, but no Earl of Wigton ever 
had a son " Sir Thomas." According to Wood's Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, 
the first Earl of Wigton, so quoted in 1G0G, was John, sixth Lord Fleming, 
who d. in 1619. He was twice married, and had by first wife, Lillias Grabaur: 
1, John, 2d Earl: 2, James, of BoghaiL, d. 1622; 3, Malcolm, of Gilberton ; 
4, Alexander, ami six daughters j and by his second wife, Sarah Maxwell, 
he had only two daughters. John Fleming, 2d Earl, d. 1650, had only John, 
3d Earl, and Sir William, who d. s.p , his graud-nieee, Countess Passmure, was 
proved as his heir. Ilayden's noble descent for Mrs. Madison is "made out 
of whole cloth." Charles H. Browning. 

Ardmore P. O., Montgomery Co., Ycnn. 



Family Records.— There is an old book, Sermons by John Preston, owned 
by Mrs, A. E. Austin, of Meriden. Conn., and descended to her from her great- 
grandmother Ruth Smith. The book says: "Two Hundred and Fifty Two 
years ago in 1C34 this book was imprinted at Loudon by R. V. for Nicholas 
Bourne and are to be sold at the north entrance of Royal Exchange. The Fifth 
Edition." Copied into this book are three pages of family records of which 
below is a true copy : 

" This Book was brot from England by David Edwards who settled at Sataw- 
ket on Long Island. His wives name was Mary Swayzy their daughter Mar- 
garet was married to Joshua Smith of Coram in Bronkhaven. their daughter 
Ruth inherited this book who was married to John Birdsey of Middletield "Con- 
necticut an is now in 1829 in the 83 1 year of her age since last January — She 

has bequeathed this Book as a token of affection to" balance of page torn 

off. 
On another page is the following : 

"Ananias Smith Born March y e 7, anog domi 1729-30 
Isaac Smith Born January y e 1, 1731 
Mary Smith Born March "pi, 1733 
Bethiar Smith Born September y? 27, 1735 
Sarah Smith Born June y e 1, 1733 
Jonathan Smith Born May y e 8 anog domi 1741 
Dauiel Smith Born y e 20 th ' of March anog Domi 1744 
Rath Smith was born y e 22 1 of January Anog Domi 1746 
Phebe Smith Born June y e 16 Day Anog Domi 1749 " 
On another page is the following : 

" Johu Birdsey Jun. was Born the 16 March 1737 John Birdsev jun marrved 
to Ruth Smith on 5th Day of August. AD 1779 whose first child was a Son Still 
born on the 29 th of October 1780" and their Second is a Daughter named Phebe 
Smith Birdsey born November 3 d 17.32. Their Third is a Daughter named Ruth 
born March 8th 1786. 

Their fouth is a Son named John, Born March 5, 1783. 
Their fifth is a Daughter named Sarah Born the 31 st Day December 1790" 
[The book from which the above was taken was shown to me by Mrs. 
Grosvenor W. Curtiss of this city. The title page is missing, but is of no con- 
sequence to our purpose. I begged her to copy out the very interesting re- 
cord, hoping you'll hud a place for it in the Register. I am inclined to think 
a deal of it is new, for it gives some marriages lomr in doubt.] 
Hartford, Ct. Frank B. Gay. 



212 JS T otes and Queries. [April, 

Rev. Thomas Davies. — I have in my possession a pamphlet, which for some 
reason appears to be excessively rare, entitled: " A Biographical Sketch of the 
Rev. Thomas Davies, A.M., Missionary of the Society for Propagating the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, in Several of the Towns of Litchfield County, Conn., 
from the year 1761 to the year 17GG. By a Minister of the County. New 
Haven : Printed by Stanley & Chapiri. 1843." It is a duodecimo of fifty-nine 
pages with an engraved portrait of Mr. Davies, said to have been taken from a 
likeness made " in England at the age of 2.">." As a literary performance, this 
biography is unusually creditable, and I should be glad to know who was its 
author. 

It appears from this work that on Christmas clay, 1764, Mr. Davies preached 
a sermon at the dedication of the Church at Great Barrington, Mass., re- 
specting which his biographer says : " It was printed at the Providence press 
soon after its delivery, and some copies of it are said to be still extant. Those 
who remember to have perused it speak of it as having been characterized by 
much neatness, simplicity and purity of style in its composition, and to have 
set forth a statement of the order and form of worship prescribed by the 
Episcopal Church, defended with much clearness, candor and force of reasoning.' 7 
I have sought in vain to and a copy of this printed sermon in any of our large 
libraries and collections. In a letter written to the Society in December, 17G4, 
Mr. Davies wrote : " If the honorable Society desire. I would transmit au exact 
detail of proceedings in that town [Great Barrington] since I united the people 
as a Church, together with a copy of my sermon which I shall preach at the 
opening of their Church." But no copy of the sermon is nosv to be found in the 
archives of the Society in London, nor in the British Museum. Any information 
of the existence of a copy of this production would be highly appreciated. 

86 Jit. Vernon St., Boston. Franklin Leonard Pope. 

Crane Epitaphs. — The following inscriptions have been taken from head- 
stones in the old Presbyterian burying ground at Orange, New Jersey, which Is 
now in a shameful state of neglect : 

Here Lyes y e Body of 
Rebekah wife of 
Azariah Crane Aged 
4S years Dec a June 
y« 15th 1730. 
Here lies y e Body of Nancy 
& her Child wife of Joseph 
Crane She Died Jan r - V 7 : 1774. 
In y e 24 th Year of her Age. 
Thou Reader of this Stone 
Shall quickly hither Come 
Death Sure will Bring the Down 
The Grave is thy Long home, 
Perhaps you Reed & thotless turn away 
But Death forbids you long f rom hence to Stay. 

These stones, however, are in a good state of preservation, and the inscrip- 
tions have been copied verbatim. C. Sidney Crane. 
218 West 44 St., Nevo York City. 

King.— The following extracts from the Parish Register of SouthohL Suffolk 
County, England, relating to the King Family, have been communicated to the 
Register by Rnfus King, Esq., of Yonkers, N, Y. :— 

1602, Dec*. 12, William King and Judith Cocke, married. 

1603, Sep. 21, Judith, dau. of W. and J. King, baptised. 

1604, Feb. 3, Henrv, son of W. and J. King, baptised. 
1607, Oct. 23, Eliza, dau. of W. and J. King, baptised. 
1609, Sep. 28, William King, buried. 

1614, Jan. 16, Edmund Awstens and Susan King, married. 
1620, Jan. 10, Robert Howse and Margaret King, married. 
1622, Nov. 14, Mary, daughter of William and Ann King, baptised. 



1894.] r Notes and Queries. 213 

1633, Oct. 12, John, son of Jeilery and Sarah Kins, baptised. 
1635, Nov. 5, Joseph, son of Jeffery King, baptised. 

1638, Oct. 18, Child of Jefl'ery King, buried. 

1639, Aug. 7, Henry King, buried. 



Gorham — Graham. — Correction should be made, in ray History of Ancient 
Windsor, Conn., Vol. II., P. 214, note — for "Gen. A. Hamilton Graham of 
Mass., etc."— read " Gen. A. Hamilton, Nathaniel Gorham of Mass." Also, p. 
215 of same, " William Van Murray "—should read " William Vans Murray."' 

Henry R. Stiles. 



Queries. 

The Parentage oe Dr. John Bishop oe Bradford and Medford, Mass. — 
Dr. John Bishop appears in Bradford about 1718-19. Bradford Church records 
give: Sarah, w. of Dr. John Bishop, adm. Feb., 1719-20. 

Sarah, of John & Sarah, born , 1720. 

John, " " " " bapt. March 18, 1721-22. 

In April, 1723, Dr. John Bishop moved to Medford, and died there about 
1739, leaving widow Sarah and children Sarah and John. John Williams, the 
early settler, and wife Jane, had a son John, who married Rebecca Coleby, 
daughter of Anthony Coleby aud wife Susanna. This John was the father of 
Sarah Williams who was the wife of Joseph Boud and mother of Sarah Bond 
the wife of Dr. John Bishop. 

Joseph Bond, the husband of Sarah Williams and father of Sarah Bond wife 
of Dr. John Bishop, was son of John Bond and Hester Blakeley. Joseph Bond 
was of Haverhill, Mass. The date of this daughter's marriage to Dr. Bishop is 
desired. 

Savage, Wyman and others make Dr. Bishop the son of Samuel Bishop, 
who was the oldest son of Thomas Bishop, merchant, of Ipswich, Mass.. who 
appeared there as early as 16§Gj and died in 1670. " The Cogswells in America " 
make Samuel Bishop's son John (after emigrating from Ipswich, Mass.) a 
resident of Connecticut and give him a wife not of the Bond family. 

If this be true Dr. Johu Bishop could not have been of the line of Thomas 
Bishop of Ipswich, 1634-1670. 

From whence did he come? From the old country direct, or from some other 
line of American Bishops? 

In the historical sermon delivered at Bradford Dec. 20th, 1S20, by Rev. G. B. 
Perry, we find: " The following are the names of physiciaus who have resided 

in this place. It is not known that they stand in order of life: Bailey, 

John Bishop, from Ireland, Ezekiel Chase, &c." 

The authority for Mr. Perry's statement was the oral ovidence given him by 
a laboring man, about one hundred years after Dr. Johu had left Bradford. The 
laboring man was about ninety years old when he conversed with Mr. Perry. 
Will this point to a foreign pareuta^e for Dr. Bishop? 

Dr. John Bishop's daughter married Beujamin Leathe, both of Medford, 
April 26, 1738. 

The doctor's son, John, married Abigail Tufts, daughter of Dr. Simon Tafts, 
the physician of Medford. 

If the descendants of the Leathe. Bond and Tufts families have any records 
relatiug to Dr. John Bishop, will they kiudly address the subscriber, who has 
been collecting Bishop and Holmes genealogical material for thirty years past, 
with the intention of contributing the same, without charse, to the public? 

I will cheerfully <jive twenty-five dollars for the proof of the parentage of 
Dr. John Bishop, of Bradford and Medford, Mass. 

Lake George, Warren County, New York. Nathaniel Holmes Bishop. 



Thomas Hubbard. — The distinguished Thomas Hubbard, whose obituary 
you have re-published in the Register, vol. 47, p. 480, from the Massachusetts 
Gazette, was a great-grandson of Richard Hubbard of Salisbury, concerning 
whose emigration an entertaining tradition is preserved in Eaton's history of 



214 JYotes and Queries. [April, 

Candia. His -wife was probably a daughter of the patriarchal Richard Goodale, 
as Mr. Goodale had a daughter oi tiiat name, and their son Richard (the Hon. 
Mr. Hubbard's grandfather) spoke in two deeds of "my grandfather Mr. 
Richard Goodale." Any doubt on this point arises from the fact that the wife 
of the younger Richard Hubbard was a granddaughter of Mr. Goodale, nee 
Martha Allen, sister of Peter Ayer's wife, both being daughters of Mr. William 
Allen, whose wife was Ann Goodale. 

The second Richard Hubbard was a blacksmith, and lived in Salisbury most 
of his life. During a short period, including the years 1697-1700, his residence 
was in Boston, lie was born in 1015 and lived to "old age in Salisbury. 

In 1718 he executed an interesting conveyance to four of his grandchildren : 

" Richard Hubbard son of my son John Hubbard. 

" Richard Langdon sou of my daughter Mary Langdon. 

" Thomas Hubbard son of my sou Joseph Hubbard. 

" Hubbard Stevens son of my daughter Dorothy Stevens." 

The land conveyed was in Amesbury, and in the year 1727 Messrs. Langdon 
and Thomas Hubbard joined in a deed conveying away their half interest. Both 
were residents of Boston at the time, one described as a merchant and the other 
as a gentleman, and their wives Thankful and Mary joined to release their rights 
of dower. 

John Hubbard sariy settled in Kingston, N. H., and the son Richard was 
grandfather of Dr. John Hubbard, governor of Maine. A sister of Richard, 
named Anna, married Rev. William Tompson of Scarborough, and was blessed 
with three children — William Tompsou, Esq. of Scarborough; John, the urbane 
Rarson Tompson of South Berwick ; and Anna, wife of Joseph Gerrish. who 
numbered among her grandchildren Governor Goodwin of New Hampshire. 

Mary Langdon was the progenitor of the distinguished Portsmouth family of 
the name. 

Joseph Hubbard was a blacksmith in Boston. The records show his mar- 
riage, Aug. 4, 1G0S, to Thankful Brown of Sudbury, and the birth of their dis- 
tinguished son in 1702. 

It occurs to me that a thorough" genealogy of the posterity of Mr. Richard 
Goodale would show a great many men of active minds and commanding 
characters. Charles Thorntox Libby. 

Portland, Maine. 



King, Hyde, Stowell, Sawyer.— The Boston Marriage Records contain the 
intentiou of marriage of John King of Boston and Mary Stowell of Newton, 
Mass., published April 2, 1718. Papers on file in the probate ofiice, Cambridge, 
show that John Stowell, of Wtiertowh, administered on the estate of Benjamin 
Stowell, of Newtown, in 1729. He certifies to having given notice to heirs 
Samuel Stowell, Ruth O and Mary King. 

Richard King, of Watertowu, Mass., with John Stowell and Samuel Stowell, 
were, in 1733, among the sixty grantees of township' No. -4, afterwards known 
as Paris, Maine. 

Samuel Hyde, of Newton, married Mary King of Cambridge in 17fk", and 
became a grautee in township No. 4 on the right of Richard King, of Water- 
town. 

Joseph Sawyer had a sou, Richard K. Sawyer, born June 25, 1779. 

1. Is anything known of the ancestry of John King? 

2. Who were the parents of Mary Stowell? 

3. Is there any record of the names of the children of John and Mary 
(Stowell) King? 

i. Who was Mary King who married Samuel Hyde and what relation was 
she, if any, to Richard King of Watertown? 

5. Was Richard K. Sawyer's middle name King, and was he related to 
Richard Kins of Watertown? 

In 1797 Eliza Southgate, a granddaughter of Richard King, just mentioned, 
wrote to her mother, Mary (King) Southgate, as follows: 

" I believe I have got some news to tell you, that is I have found one of your 
acquaintance and relation ; it is Mrs. Sawyer; before bhe was married she was 
Polly King and she says you kept at their house when you were in Boston." 

tonkers, New York' ' Ruixs King. 



1894.] 



Notes and Queries. 



215 



Bott, May, Neal, Smith and "Wiley. — Further information about any of 
the following persons will be paid for, and the ancestry of Miles Bott or John 
May is especially desired. 

Miles Bott =* Sarah Neal. John May = Anness Smith, 

prob. born 
before 1735. 



More chil.? 



I 
(?) 



Joel Bott = Lucy Mav, 
b. 17C1 ; b. 1759." 

m. 17S6. 



Bott, 

lived at Richmond 

during war. Is 

said to have been 

very wealthy. 



Sarah, 

b. in 

Roanoke Co. 

Va., 1795. 



dau. : 



Bobert Wilev, 

had (1840) 

estate in 

Roanoke Co., 

on which 
are said to have 

been some 

150 slaves. 



Robert Wiley, 

a colonel in 

Confederate army. 

Removed 1SC5, to 

Danville, Ky. 



Oscar. 



Byron. 



Benjamin. 



I 
Lucy. 



I I 
More 
chil.? 



dau. 



Address J. H. Perein, Lafayette, Indiana. 



Ball. — The following note has been prepared by a descendant of John Ball, a 
Concord freeman. Does any person bearing the name of Ball, or any reader of 
the Register, know any facts concerning the personality or history of any 
individual named below? Such information will be thankfully received. 

1. John Ball, a Coucord freeman, brought with him from England, where he 
lived iu Wiltshire, his two sons, Nathaniel and John. He died in Concord Oct. 
1, 1655. 

2. John Bali married Elizabeth Pierce of Watertown, Mass., and had five 
children. By a second marriage with Elizabeth Fox he had one child. He 
(John Ball) was killed by Indians at Lancaster, Mass., Sept. 10. 1675. 

3. John Ball, born 1644, and married Sarah Bullard, a daughter of George 
Bullard. of Watertown. They had seven children. He was by trade a weaver, 
and died May 8, 1722. 

4. James Ball, born in Watertown 1670. He married Elizabeth Eisk, and 
died in 1729 or '30. Number of children not known, except that there were at 
least two. 

5. John Ball, born in Watertown 1097. He married Lydia Perry, and re- 
moved to Worcester, Mass.. where he died in 1756. At least four children, two 
of whom, with the mother, were the executors of his will. 

6. Joseph Ball, born in Worcester in 1750, and married Lucretia Stearns. 
He removed to West Bloomfieid, N. Y., in 1796, and died there in 1817. He 
had eight children. 

7. Isaac Ball, born in West Bloomfieid 1785, and died there in 1850. Was 
twice married and had six children. The sixth child, Samuel A., was by his 
second wife Lucinda Adams Ball. Fra>k W. Ball. 

Leliog, X. T. 



Family Record of Capt. John R. Russell.— There is in ray possession the 
tattered family record, in his own excellent penmanship, of Cape. John Rhodes 
•ell of Marblehead, whose bronze statue, the gift of Massachusetts,, has 



Russ 



be.-n placed oil the Trenton monument. It states that he was the son of Cant. 
John Rossell, S.-nr., who was thus designated to distinguish from his son, who, 
in his youth, did not use a middle name; that never or very rarely having been 



21 G 2Fotes and Queries. [April, 

done prior to the present century. The record further states that he married, 
first, on June ICth, 1778. Lois, daughter of Capt. Samuel Hooper of Marble- 
head, and that she died in April, 180i. 

Among the list of children by his second marriage is interpolated this state- 
ment, In his handwriting: "Lois Nicholson was born Aug. 15, 17:32 — her son 
Samuel Hooper -was born Nov. 23. 1704." 

A gravestoue iu St. Michael's churchyard at Marblehead reads thus: "Lois 
wife of Samuel Hooper, died 1772, aged 30." What was the kinship between 
the above Hoopers, and between them and " Merchant John" Hooper and his 
wife Eunice, who was daughter of Samuel Hooper? 

Also who were the parents and other ancestors of Capt. John Russell, Senr., 
who died in 1811 aged 83? The Hoopers and Russells were prominent families 
there from the earliest settlement. The early church and town records of 
Marblehead should be put iuto print for preservation and public enlighteumeut. 

203 West 14th St., New York City. John Russell Kemble. 



Hallett — Pones. — Can any one inform me when "William Ilallett married 
Elizabeth Fones-Winthrop-Feke? She was the daughter of Thomas Foiie.- of 
London, Eng. and Anna his wife a daughter of Adam Wiuthrop of Groton. Eng. 
April 25, 1621), she married Henry Wiuthrop, second son of Gov. John Winthrop 
of Massachusetts, who was a sou of Adam Wiuthrop above-mentioned. Henry 
was accidentally drcv>^d at Salem, Mass., on the day following his arrival iu 
New England, July 2, 1030: his wife, with the only child of this marriage, 
Martha Joanna, aud Margaret the wife of Gov. John Winthrop of Mass., ar- 
rived in Boston. Ma?s. iu November, 1031. Elizabeth Fones-Winthrop married 
secondly in New England (probably Boston), before the year 1G3G, Lieut. Robert 
Feke (Feake, Fekes, Feecx, Feac'.i . who in conjunction with Capt. Daniel Patrick, 
both having been in John Underbill's trocp, invested largely in lands in Connec- 
ticut, chiefly in and about Greenwich. Early in 1647 Robert Feke went to Eng- 
land, leaving his lands in charge of William Hallett (born about 1G16 in Dorset- 
shire, Eng.), and Mrs; Feke. In August, 1647, we have a hint at an improper 
intimacy between Hallett and Mrs. Feke; this is again mentioned in March, 
1648; in April, 1G43, Mrs. Hallett is with child, and in July of the same year 
there is again some mention as to the validity of her marriage with Hallett. 
(See Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 2d Serv, vol. 6,"pp-2-13; Winthrop's New Eng- 
land; Some Old Puritan Love Letters, pp. 53, 05. 131, by J. H. Twichell; N. E. 
Gen. and Bio. Record, vol. 11 ; Doc. Col, Hist, of N. Y. ; Cal. N. Y. Hist. Man.) 
Any information that might lead to the discovery of the date of this marriage 
would be very welcome; also any information regarding the life of William 
Hallett previous to 1647. , John L. Delaeield. 

475 Fifth Ave., Xew York City. 

Mart Valentine, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Gooch) Valentine, 
born Nov. 14th, 1747, married Joseph Ballard, and lived in Vermont. See 
" Daniels's History of Oxford," page 380, Note 1. Also, " Valentines of Amer- 
ica," page 124. in which the author relates that Mary Valentine married " Zac- 

cheus Ballard, and that Elizabeth married a Ballard, wherein the names 

of Mary and Elizabeth are reversed. As parties still living know that Zaccheus 
married Elizabeth, would like to be put in communication with the descendants 
of above-named Joseph and Mary (Valentine) Ballard, or receive any informa- 
tion relative to them. E. S. Ballard. 

Davenport, Iowa. 



Owen and Gilmore — G'cen. — Josias Owen (son of Josias, son of John, of 
Windsor) settled in Hebron, Conn. He married Mary Hosford, Dec. 31st, 
1698; one of their sons, Noah, was born May 14th. 1701 "(Stiles's Hist, of Win- 
sor). I shall be grateful for any information concerning this Noah Owen and 
his descendants, especially anything that connects him with Noah Owen, born , 
in 1755 in Colchester or Hebron. 

Gilmour. — Elizabeth Gilmour married at Castleton, Vt., Feb. 1797 : Noah 

Owen. Her father was Jonathan Gilmour, a descendant of Gilmour, one 

of the Scotch Irish settlers of Londonderry. Is there any record of this 
family? Elizabeth H. Fitch. 

S3S Logan Ave., Cleveland, O. 



1894.] - Notes and Queries. 217 

Births, exact dates wanted : — 
Samuel Hanson, of Delaware, 1740. 

Mary Hanxhurst, wife of Robert Coles, died 1656. 

Susanna Holmes, " " Valentine Wightmau, of Groton, 1703. 

Ichabod Hopkins, of Oyster Bay, 

died 25 Jan. 1730. 
William Hopkins, of Providence, 1616. 

Dinah Hopkins, wife of Nehemiah Merritt, 1740. 

William Hough, of New London, 1645. 

Mary Hughes, " " John Scott, of Spencertowu, N. Y., 

died 13 July, 1805. 
William Hyde, of Hartford, " 6 Jan. 1681. 

Bhinebedc, N. Y. Douglas Merritt. 

Coxstaxtixe Piiipfs. — We all know that the peerages long printed the ances- 
try of Sir Constantine Phipps (Lord High Chancellor of Ireland, 1810), as 
derived collaterally from our Sir William Phips. His grandson was the first 
Baron Mulgrave, an Irish peerage, ancestor of the Marquis of Normandy. But 
in Notes and Queries for Oct. 9, 1875, (5th S. IV. 237), Alfred S. Gatty wrote 
that he had some papers connected with a family of Phipps of Highgreen, in 
the parish of Ecclesfield, Co. York, dated 1777. 

Therein it appeared that George Phipps of Highgreen was a brother of Sir 
Constantine P. and that George had a daughter Eliza who married Dr. Thomas 
Fairfax, and left daughters Prances Cotton and Elizabeth Middleton, who sold 
certain lands to their cousin Samuel Phipps of Lincoln's Iun. 

Has this genealogical clue ever been followed up, to ascertain the true line of 
Sir Constantine Phipps and the possible origiu of our Sir William? 

W. H. W. 



Samuel Sharpe. — Bancroft, in his History of the United States, vol. 1st, 
page 279, referring to the Company of Massachusetts Bay, writes : " The pas- 
sengers for Salem included six shipwrights, and an experienced surveyor, who 
was to give advice on the proper site "for a fortified towu, and with Samuel 
Sharpe, master-gunner of ordnance, was to muster all such as lived under the 
government, both planters and servants, and at appointed times to exercise 
them in the use of arms." I would like to know more of this Samuel Sharpe; 
where he lived, maiden name of his wife, names of his children, date of their 
birth, and who and when they married. Was he the ancestor of Mr. Sharpe 
whose widow, Deborah Sharpe, married Joseph Gannett about 1GS2? 

New Bedford, Mass. Warren Ladd. 



Asa Adams,* third child and second son of Samuel and Phebe (Pellet) Adams 
(Samuel,* David, 4 Hervey, 3 Edward, 2 Hervey 1 the immigrant, of Braintree, 
Mass. Colony), was born in Canterbury, Windham County, Connecticut, Nov. 17, 
1766. He married successively two sisters of one Allen Family, Hanover, Conn., 
and with the second and their children is said to have moved to Greene, Che- 
nango County, N. Y., formerly called the "Genesee Country." Can any one 
tell aught of the family? 

Also of Uezekiah, a brother of Asa. He was also born in Canterbury, some 
ten years later. " Went West," is his brief history in Conn. Address, 

29 Division Street, Providence, B. I. John Q. Adams. 



Mortox. — Who were the parents, and in the male line remoter lineal ancestors, 
of Joseph Morton, who came to Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, in 1760, and 
having returned to Massachusetts to settle his affairs there, took ship at Boston 
for return in company with a friend, and on engaging in a friendly wrestling 
match with the latter on the deck of the vessel, fell overboard into "the harbor 
with his companion and was drowned, his companion escaping? Whom did he 
marry? Was he a descendant of Morton, the London agent of the Pilgrims at 
Leyden who came over in 1623? A. W. Savart. 

Annapolis, N. S. 

vol. xlviii. 20 



' 















218 JVotes and Queries. [April, 

Fuller. — Samuel Fuller of Barnstable came in '• Mayflower," married Jane 
Lothrop, 1035: his sou Samuel baptized 1037-8, married Anna, daughter of 
Capt. Matthew Fuller, and died about 1690. Samuel Jr. and wife Anna had 
Matthew, married Patience Young 25 Feb. 1692-3. 

Joseph married Thankful Blossom and had Benjamin. This Benjamin mar- 
ried aud had : 

Temperance. 1702, married Joseph Blossom 1737. 

Hannah, 170-1, married Rev. Joseph Bourne 1713. 

John, 17015, married Marian Nye 1728. 

James, 1711, married Temperance Phinney. 

The undersigned desires to know the maiden name of the wife of the above 
Beniamin Fuller, and will pay ten dollars for the information. 

31 Xeto .St., New York City. Eow. L. Norton. 



Thf. Fiske Family.— In editing the transcript of the parish papers of Cratfield, 
Suffolk, England, made by the late Rev. VV. Holland, M.A., Rector of Hunting- 
field, it became necessary to examine the original documents. Among them I 
found an indenture of the register for the year 1565, containing anions entries 
of the Plimpton, Mills. Baker, Grimsby, Newson, Gilberde, Brokbanke, Saun- 
ders, Button. Curdie and Long families. ••William Fyske, sonne of Jefrey Fyske 
and of Christian his wyfe was baptized the last daye of September." "in 1566 
"William Fyske aud Jefery Fj ske were contributors of xx s. aud x s. respectively 
towards the enfranchisement of the parish lands. J. J. Raven. 

Fressingfield liectory, England. 



Thomas Broad — Married Rebecca . Would like any information re- 
lating to them, their children or ancestors, with dates. 

Dr. Nathaniel Tolman was born August 3, 1716, in Needham. He married 
November 21), 1743, Mehitable Dewing. They lived in Needham. When and 
where did he die? 

His great-grandfather, Thomas Tolman, married Experience . Would 

like her last name aud date of marriage; also dates of birth of both. 

31 Green St., Lynn, Mass. Mrs. G\ J. Pickford. 



Hazard. — Information is wanted concerning Thomas Hazard, a native of 
Wales, Eng., who in 1036 was admitted to freemanship at Boston, Mass. In 
about 1052 he removed to Newtown, Long Island, N. Y., where he became one 

of the first magistrates. He married Martha and had several children, 

one of whom, Jonathan, lived at Newtown and left a large number of descend- 
ants. Robert, another son, settled in Rhode Island, and originated the Hazards 
so famous in that State. Joseph L. Delafleld. 

475 FtjU Are., Xcto York City. 



Curow or Ccroe. — Robert Curoe, baker, Whitebread Alley, Boston tax list, 
1823. He had wife Jane, and a son William Curow, who died 12 April 1S38, 
aged 16 yrs. 4 mos. and was buried in South B. Y. Boston. He has also a dan. 
Frances Maria, bapt. at Cathedral, 6 June 1827, sponsors Thomas Penderson 
and Margaret Root. His widow m. 5 Oct. 1834, James Gordon of Boston. His 
daughter Frances M. m. at NewYork, 23 May 1840, Edward F. Mayuard of Boston. 
Has any one met the name of Curow on any record? He is said to have been a 
Scotchman or Scotch-Irishman from the north of Ireland; I am told that Cul- 
ross is pronounced Curow. Is that so? \Y. H. W. 



Dr. Daxiel Gilbert married Jan. 17, 1820, Susan D. Lanman, born Aug. 1, 
1807, died Aug. 5, 1831. They had one child: Augusta G., b. Nov. 17, 1826. 
What was the ancestral line of Susan D. Lanman, aud has she descendants liv- 
ing? Mrs. M. P. Ferris. 

Garden City, X. Y. 



1894. ] . Notes and Queries. 219 

Joanna Brown. — Can any one give information as to the parentage of Joanna 
Brown who married Daniel Harris of Roxbury in 16S2? W. 

Hartford, Ct. 

Clarke.— If any of yonr readers can give the ancestry of Audley Clarke of 
Newport, II. I., who married Margaret Hulin Feb. 7th. 1760, it will be greatly 
appreciated bv Charles P. Brittox. 

28 New Street, X. Y. 



Brackett. — William, of Capt. John Mason's Laconia Company. Tvho reached 
Portsmouth, N. II., in 1630. Any information as to where he lived before 
he left England, etc., would be appreciated. R. L. B. 

Bensonhurst, X. Y. 

Mason.— I should like information regarding the families of the wives of three 
generations of Peter Mason. Mary Etobart, who married Peter Mason July 
8th, 1703. Margaret, daughter of Jonathan Fanning and Elizabeth "Way, mar- 
ried Peter Mason in 174L Elizabeth Farnum, who married Peter Mason in 
Salisbury, Ct., May 26, 1774s. L. B. Mason. 

New York City. 



Wall.— I would like to hear from anyone who can give data concerning the 
ancestry of Betsy Wall, born at Bristol, Lincoln County. Me., March 25, 1768. 
She married Nathaniel Bryant of Noblesboro' Oct. 1, 17J5. 

Buffalo. X. Y. Percy Bryan/t. 

Mary Kingsley.— I should like information regarding the family of Mary 
Kingsley, whp married June 16, 1763, Enoch, son of Josiah Clark and Thankful 
Sheldon. Also regarding their son Enoch's wife's family, Abigail Kirkland, 
whom he married December 6, 1S01. N. M. K. 



Abijah Adams. — Can any one give the ancestry and descendants of Abijah 
Adams of Killingly, Windham County, Conn., some three generations aso? 
Providence, B. I. J. Q. Adams. 



Historical Intelligence. 

Heraldry.— The Societe Beige de Libraire, Bruxelles, Belgique, will pub- 
lish the Dictionnaire des Figures Heraldiqup, par le Comte Theodore de Renesse, 
membre Suppleaut du Conseil Heraldique. It is practically a dictionary of heraldic 
figures with the names of the bearers, somewhat similar to the " Papworth 
Ordinary of British Armorials," but founded on the famous " Armorial General" 
by the late J. B. Rietstap, in which the surnames are arranged alphabetically; 
these two volumes, containing about 105,000 coats of arras, are at present the 
most important work on general European heraldry: and the forthcoming dic- 
tionary, which may be considered a companion, will fill a much needed place in 
European heraldic "bibliography. 

The society will issue this work in about fifteen numbers, each number con- 
taining about one hundred two-column pases, with one plate of arms; the cost 
of each number being four francs. Subscription, will be received by Monsieur 
Oscar Schepens, Director of the Society at Bruxelles. 

A. D. Weld French. 



The list of British officers serving in America, 1755 to 1774.— This 
list has called out information from the descendants of these officers. It is 
to be hoped that this may lead to a regular compilation, giving more in detail 
the services and army records of these ofiicers, both in America and elsewhere. 



220 _ Notes and Queries. [April, 

The compiler of the list has expressed the wish that any person who can con- 
tribute such information will send it to hitn for record and preservation. The 
address is Mr. Worthingtoa C. Ford, Metropolitan Club, Washington, D. C. 

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society. — The second volume 
of the Collections has for some years been " out of print " and scarce. A num- 
ber of copies have lately been found in the loft of a bindery — where they had 
remained for over twenty years. The volume contains J. H. Trumbull's 
paper on Ahronquin Geographical Names; Papers on the Church Controversy, 
Hartford, 1656-59; Correspondence of Silas Dcane, 177-4-76. The Society will 
be pleased to know of other historical societies and libraries which lack this 
volume. Frank B. Gay, Secretary. 

Ha Word, Conn. 



Suffolk Manorial Families. — The first part of the work of Joseph J. Mus- 
kett, Esq., under this title, announced by us in the Register for October, 1891, 
page 315, we learn is in print, and will soou be issued. Among pedigrees will 
be found that of Winfhrop of Suffolk and America, together with wills and 
other evidences. The second part will give, amongst others. Downing of Suf- 
folk and New England; aud the third part Burroughs of Suffolk and New Eng- 
land. Many of the pedigrees in the first and second parts will be altogether 
new to genealogists. The address of Mr. Muskett is 11 Talbot Road, South 
Tottenham, London, to whom subscriptions and remittances should be addressed. 



Sparhawk.— The Philadelphia Repository and Weekly Register for 1803: 
V Deaths. May 14, 1803, Dr. John Sparhawk aged 72 a native of Massachusetts, 
but has resided in this city upwards of forty years." 



Remich.— An interesting accouut of the copy of the Landing of the British 
troops in Boston, 1768, owned by the Essex Institute and mentioned in the 
Register, Vol. 47, p. -476, may be found in the Essex Institute Collections, 
Vol. V. W. K. Watkixs. 



Genealogies in Preparation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 
furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 
and other information which they think rnay be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family his'tory or character be communicated, 
especially service under the U. S. Government, the holding of other offices, 
graduation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and 
dates of births, marriages, residence and death. fcWhen there are more than one 
christian name they should all be given in full if possible. No initials should 
be used wheu the full names are known. 

Bonrdman.— A Genealogy of the Boardman Family, descendants of Samuel 
Boreman of Wethersfield, is beina; compiled by Miss Charlotte Goldthwaite of 
Hartford, Ct. Communications from members of the family and others inter- 
ested are desired. 

Bazzdl.— Rev. H. L. Buzzell of Fairhaven, Mass., is compiling a genealogy 
of the Buzzell, Buswell, Boswell and Bussed FamUies in America, and will be 
glad of any items relating to these families. 

Cozcles. — A genealogy in preparation by Capt. C. D. Cowles, U. S. A., 141 P 
St., Washington, D. C. 

Dodge.— The Genealoarv of the Dodge Family of Essex Co., Mass., by Joseph 
T. Dodge of Madison, Wis., is in press and to be published in May. 

Lamborn.— The Genealogy of the Lamborn Family, which has been in prepar- 
ation for the past seven years, is now in press and will be ready for delivery in 
July of the present year. The large number of descendants fillins prominent 
public and private positions of honor in all parts of this country will make thi3 
a desirable book of reference in public libraries. Price, $6.00. 

Lanman.— Sirs. M. P. Ferris, Garden City, N. Y., has in preparation a history 
of the Lanman Family. Correspondence of descendants desired, and any notes 
bearing on Lanman or Landman. 



1894. ] ' Societies and their Proceedings. 221 



SOCIETIES AND THEIR PROCEEDINGS. 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society. 

Boston, Massachusetts, January 3, 1S04. — The annual meeting was held iu the 
hall of Boston University, 12 Somerset street, this afternoon at three o'clock. 
Iu the absence of President Claflin and the vice-presidents, the Hon. Dr. 
Samuel A. Green -was chosen president pro tern. On taking the chair, Dr. Green 
made a brief address. 

The monthly report of the Council was presented, and seven resident members 
■were elected. 

The business of the annual meeting was then taken up, and the reports of the 
Council, the treasurer, the trustees of the Kidder Fund, the corresponding 
secretary, the historiographer and the librarian were presented and accepted. 

Hon. Thomas Weston, chairman of the nominating committee, reported a list 
of candidates for oilicers for tne ensuing year, and three members of the 
Council for the term ending in ISO 7. A nomination paper, signed by twenty 
members, naming one cand'date for the Council, was presented, and his name 
was added to the list. Messrs. C. B. Tillinghast and Warren Hapgood were 
appoiuted tellers. A ballot was taken, and all of the officers and two members 
of the council reported by the nominating committee were elected. The candi- 
date for the Council on the nomination paper was also elected. 

The annual address of the president, the Hon. William Claflin, LL.D., was 
read in his absence by the recording secretary. 

John T. Hassam, A.M., chairman of the special committee on the Preserva- 
tion of the Probate Files of Suffolk County, made a report which was accepted 
and ordered to bo printed with the proceedings. 

Hon. Thomas Weston offered resolutions that the Society puts on record its 
sense of indebtedness to Hon. Joseph B. Walker, the "Rev. Elisha B. Andrews. 
D.D., LL.D., vice-presidents, and John T. Hassam, A.M., counsellor, who this 
year retire from office. 

On motion of Frank E. Bradish, A.M.. the Society invited the Corporation, 
Instructors and students of Boston University, iu the hall of which their meet- 
ings are held, to attend the stated meetings. 

It was voted that the president's address, the several annual reports, the 
necrology and the proceedings at this meeting be referred to the Council, with 
full authority to print them. 

The following are the oilicers for 1S94 : 

President. — William Cailin, LL.D., of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Vice-Presidents.— Walbridire Abner Field, A.M., of Boston, Massachusetts; 
Joseph Williamson, A.M., of Belfast, Me. : Frederick Smvth, A.M.. of Manches- 
ter, N. II.; James Barrett. LL.D., of Rutland, Vt. ; Herbert Warren Ladd, 
A.M., of Providence, R. I.: Edward Elbridge Salisbury, LL.D., of New Haven, 
Conn. 

Recording Secretary.— George Augustus Gordon, A.M., of Soinerville, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary. — William Stanford Stevens, A.M., M.D., of Boston, 
Mass. 

Treasurer. — Benjamin Barstow Torrey, of Hanover, Mass. 

Librarian.— John Ward Dean, A.M., of Medford, Mass. 

The following are members of the Council for 189-t : 

Ex Officiis.— William Claflin, LL.D. : Walbridge A. Field, LL.D.; George A. 
Gordon, A.M. ; Benjamin B. Torrey; William S. Stevens, A. M., M.D. ; John 
W. Dean, A.M. 

For the term ending in 1895. — William Tracy Eustis, of Boston, Mass. ; 
David Greene Haskins, Jr., A.M. LL.B., of Cambridge, Mass. ; Newton Talbot, 
of Boston. Mass. 

For the term ending in 1896.— Ezra Hoyt Byington, D.D., of Newton, Mass. ; 
Charles Carleton Coffin, A.M., of Boston, Mass.; Don Gleason Hill, LL.B.^of 
Dedham, Mass. 

VOL. xlviii. 20* 



222 - Societies and their Proceedings. [April, 

For the term ending in 1S97. — Francis Everett Blake, of Boston, Mass. ; 
George Kuhn Clarke, LL.B., of Xeedham, Mass.; Albert Alonzo Folsom, of 
Brookline, Mass. 

February 7.— A stated meeting was held in the hall of Boston University 
this afternoon at three o'clock. Rear Admiral George E. Belknap, U.S.X.. was 
chosen chairman of the meeting. 

A paper by William C. Todd, A.M., entitled "Rev. Stephen Peabody and 
"Wife of Atkinson, X. H.," was read by the secretary, Mr. Todd being necessa- 
rily absent. 

Resolutions of respect to the memory of the Hon. William Gaston, LL.D., 
a member of the Society, were passed. 

Reports of the Council, the librarian and the corresponding secretary were 
presented. 

Five resident members and one corresponding member were elected. 

March 7. — A stated meeting was held at the hall of Boston University this 
afternoon at three o'clock. Charles Sidney Ensign, LL.B., was chosen chair- 
man. 

Rev. Ezra Hoyt Byington, D. D., of Xewton, read a paper on "The Puritan 
Party in England." Remarks followed from several members. 

Reports of the Council, the corresponding secretary, the librarian and the 
historiographer were presented. 

Three resident members and one corresponding member were elected. 

An amendment to the By-Laws, reported at the annual meeting, was adopted. 

Old Colony Historical Society. 

Taunton, Mass., January 1G. 1S04. — The fortieth annual meeting was held 
this day in Historical Hall, the president, Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, D.D., in 
the chair. The president delivered a brief address, and read biographical 
sketches of deceased members. 

Reports of the auditor and the corresponding secretary were presented. 

Rev. Ezra H. Byington, D.D., of Xewton, Mass., read a paper on " The 
Pilgrim and the Puritan in Early New-England History." 

Mr. Edwin M. Hills, chairman of the nominating committee, reported the 
following list of candidates for officers and directors. An election followed, 
and all of the candidates were elected. 

President. — Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, D.D., of Taunton. 

Vice-Presidents. — Hon. Edmund II." Bennett, LL.D., of Taunton; Rev. William 
L. Chaffin, of Xorth Easton. 

Becordintj Secretary and Librarian. — Capt. John W. D. Hall, of Taunton. 

Corresponding Secretary. — Hon. Charles A. Reed, of Taunton. 

Treasurer. — John F. Montgomery, Esq., of Taunton. 

Auditor.— Capt. George A.^Washburn, of Taunton. 

Historiographer.— Edmund W. Porter, Esq., of Taunton. 

Directors. — Hon. William E. Fuller, of Taunton; Gen. Ebenezer W. Peirce, 
of Freetown; Henry M. Lovering, Esq. of Taunton; Hou. John S. Brayton, of 
Fall River; Elisha C. Leonard, Esq., of Xew Bedford; James M. Cushman, 
Esq., of Taunton. 

Capt. John W. D. Hall, the librarian, made his annual report, with a list of 
donations. 

Rhode Island Historical Society. 

Providence, Tuesday, December 12, 1S98. — A stated meeting was held this 
evening at eight o'clock in the Society's Cabinet in Waterman street. 

Rev. Dr. George H. Clark, of Hartford, Ct., read a paper on "Rev. John 
Wheelwright, the First Heretic of the Boston Pulpit." Rev. Dr. Clark is a 
descendant of Wheelwright. 

January 9, 1S94.— The Seventy-Second Annual Meeting was held this evening, 
the president, Gen. Horatio Rogers, in the chair. 

President Rogers made a brief address, congratulating the Society on its 
prosperous condition. 

Amos Perry, LL.D., the librarian, reported that 284 volumes, 1324 pamphlets 
and 184 other articles had been received during the year. 



. 















1894.] 



Societies and their Proceed i?igs. 223 



The treasurer reported the annual receipts to be §4,075.85, and the expendi- 
tures $4,656.03, leaving a balance of $19.7,9 in the treasury. 

Reports were also received from the committees on the grounds and buildings, 
on the library, and on publication. 

The annua! election took place and resulted as follows: 

President. — Horatio Rogers. 

Vice-Preside nts. — George M. Carpenter, E. Benjamin Andrews. 

Secretary and Librarian. — Amos Terry. 

Treasurer. — Richmond P. Everett. 

Nominating Committee. — Albert V. Jencks, James E. Cranston, Edward I. 
Nickerson. 

Library Committee. — William D. Ely, Howard W. Preston, Amos Perry. 

Lecture Committee. — Amos Perry. Reuben A. Guild, William B. Weeden. 

Publication Committee. — Prof. W. H. Munroe, James G. Vose, Amasa M. 
Eaton. 

Committee on Grounds and Buildings. — Edwin Barrows, Isaac II. Southwick, 
Jr., Isaac C. Bates. 

Committee on Geneaological Researches. — Henry E. Turner, John O. Austin, 
George T. Hart. 

Committee on Necrology. — Wilfred H. Munroe, Samuel II. Webb, Amos Perry. 

Finance Committee. — Robert H. I. Goddard, Charles H. Smith, Richmond P. 
Everett. 

Audit Committee. — Lewis J. Chace, James Burdick, Ferdinand A. Lincoln. 

Procurators.— For Newport — George C. Mason. Wnonsocket — Latimer W. 
Ballou. Faictucktt — Samuel M. Conaut. North Kingstown — David S. Baker, Jr. 
Hopkinton — George H. Olney. 

Connecticut Historical Society. 

Hartford, March 6, 1S94. — At the stated monthly meeting held this evening, 
the Librarian presented a report upon the library of Dr. D. Williams Patterson, 
late of Newark Valley, N. Y., and formerly of Winstcd, Conn., which bad been 
recently acquired by purchase for the sum of 85,000. It includes about 1100 
books and 1100 pamphlets, besides a large number of manuscripts. The collec- 
tion adds over 300 printed genealogies and some 200 volumes of local history to 
those already on the Society's shelves, the history being largely that of New 
England, New York, and the Wyoming country. From the pamphlets over 800 
are additions to the historical collection. 

At the same meeting, Mrs. Kate B. Knight, President of the Connecticut 
Woman's Board for the Centennial Exposition, presented to the Society a col- 
lection of writings by Connecticut women which had been exhibited at Chicago. 

The paper of the evening was by the Rev. W. de L. Love, on " Samson Occom 
and the Christian Indians "of Connecticut, and the removal to the Oneida coun- 
try." 

Maine Genealogical Society. 

Portland January 17, 1894. — The annual meeting Avas held this evening in 
Baxter Hall, the president. Hon. Marquis F. King, in the chair. 

Dr. Albion K. P. Meserve read a paper dealing, for the most part, with the 
history of Monument Square in Portland. 

President King made some remarks on the work and prospects of the Society. 

Three active members and one corresponding member were elected. 

Frederick O. Conant, the secretary, read his annual report. 

Millard F. Hicks, the treasurer, made his report. The annual receipts 
amounted to 8456.37, and the expenditures to $281.15, leaving a balance of 
$175.22 on hand. • 

Joseph F. Thompson, the librarian, reported the additions to the library 
during the year. There are now 925 volumes. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 

President. — Marquis F. King. 

Vice-President. — Dr. A. K. P. Meserve. 

Secretary. — Frederick: O. Conaut. 

Treasurer.— Millard F. Hicks. 

Librarian.— Joseph P. Thompson. 

The deaths of seven members were reported. 



224 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

Maine Historical Society. 

Portland, T/nnsdo.y, January 25, JS94.— The mid-winter meeting was held 
this afternoon and evening in Baxter Hall, the president, Hon. James Phinney 
Baxter, A.M., in the chair. 

Rev. Ephraim C. Cummings read a paper on " The Capuchin and Jesuit 
Fathers of Pentagoet." A discussion followed in relation to the Catholic mis- 
sions, and the French and English contests in America, in which President 
Baxter, Rev. Asa Dalton. D.D., and Hon. George F. Talbot took part. 

Rev. John Carroll Perkins gave an account of some old papers recently fouud 
in the tower of the First Parish meeting-house, some of which he exhibited and 
read. 

A sketch of the life of Gen. David Cobb, of Gouldborough. Me., lieutenant 
governor of Massachusetts, by Hon. Joseph W. Porter, was read in his absence 
by Rev. Henry S. Barrage. D.D. [A portrait and memoir of Gen. Cobb are 
printed in the Register, vol. 18, pp. 5-17-] 

Rev. Henry O. Thayer, of Gray, read a parer containing additional matter 
concerr.ihg Francis Small, the ancestor of the Smalls of Zvlaine. 

Mr. Parker M. Read, of Bath, read a paper on Rev. Francis Winter. 

Hon. George F. Emery read a paper entitled " A Red Letter Day," relating to 
the excursion of the Society in September last to Kittery. 

Mr. Charles S. Forbes read a paper ou " The Presumpscot River." 

Resolutions expressing sympathy and good wishes for William B. Lapham, 
M.D., of Augusta, who has clone much to illustrate the history of Maine, but 
who was then confined by a serious illness, of which he has since died. 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., February 10, 1S94.— -The annual meeting of the Society 
was held at the Society's Rooms, at 12 M., the president, Calvin Parsons, Esq., 
in the chair.* 

The corresponding secretary reported 423 additions to the library — 189 
volumes and 229 pamphlets, with yearly files of local papers. 

The treasurer's report showed a balance on hand of $152.44, and interest on 
invested funds, S272.2G. 

The Society has taken possession of its new and handsomely finished perma- 
nent home with renewed life, and good promise for future business. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 

President. — Sheldon Reynolds. 

Vice-Presidents.— Rev. Henry L. Jones, S. T. D.; Hon. Stanley Woodward; 
Eckley B. Coxe ; Capt. Calvin Parsons. 

Corresponding Secretory.— Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden. 

Treasurer. — Andrew H. McClintock. 

Secretary. — Sidney R. Miner. 

Librarian. — Hon. J. Ridgway Wright. 



NECROLOGY OF THE NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC 
GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Prepared by the Historiographer, Rev. Ezra Hott Byixgton, D.D., of Newton, Mass. 

The sketches of deceased members prepared for the Register are of 
necessity brief, because the space that can be appropriated is quite limited. 
All the materials for\nore extended memoirs which can be gathered are 
preserved in the archives of the Society, and they will be available for use 
in preparing the '"Memorial Biographies," of which four volumes have 
been issued and a fifth volume is in press. The income from the Towne 
Memorial Fund is devoted to the publication of these volumes. 



1894.] .Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 225 

Hex. Charles Hene.y Bell, A.B.. A.M., LL.D., a life member, elected June 
3, 18G8, was born in Chester, N. H., November 18, 1823, and died iu Exeter, 
N. H., November 11, 1893. 

He came of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His paternal ancestors were ainong the 
early settlers of Londonderry, N. IL, from which colony a large number of 
eminent men have descended. He was prepared for college at Pembroke Acad- 
emy and Phillips Exeter, and was graduated at Dartmouth 1814. He studied 
law with Bell & Tuck, and with his cousin Samuel 1). Bell. He was an active 
and successful lawyer for a little more than twenty years, when his tastes led 
him to retire from the practice of his profession, and devote his time to other 
pursuits. He had a long and eminent career in the public service. In 1858 he 
became a member of the legislature of his native state. He was afterwards 
speaker of the house of representatives; a member of the state senate, and 
president of that body. He was a member of the senate of the United States in 
1S79, and in 1880 was elected governor of New Hampshire by a large popular 
majority, and during his term of two years he discharged the duties of the 
office with fidelity and ability. His father and his uncle had preceded him in 
this office. He resided for forty years iu Exeter. N. II., and was president of 
the Board of Trustees of ExeterAcademy and a trustee of Robinson Female 
Seminary. He was an industrious student of New-England history, and was 
for several years president of the New-Hampshire Historical Society. He was 
the author of a number of historical works, among which are the " Historical 
Sketch of Phillips Exeter Academy," " History of Exeter," " Memoir of Johu 
Wheelwright," and " The Bench and Bar of New Hampshire"; which last was 
published after his death. 

Gov. Bell was a facile and vigorous writer. He had leisure for thorough 
investigation, and he has contributed very much toward the history of his 
native "state. He had a large and well-selected library, which was especially 
rich iu works relating to the~history of New England. He is spoken of as the 
model American gentleman, with cultivated tastes, gentle, dignified and courtly. 
His powers were remarkably well balanced. His judgment was seldom mistaken. 
It is a matter of congratulation that in this country there is already a large 
number of men of culture, who have leisure to do thorough work outside the 
range of the ordinary duties of professional men. 

Gov. Bell was twice married. In 1847 lie married Sarah A . Gilman of Exeter, 
who died in 1850. In 18G7 he married Mrs. Mary E., widow of Joseph Taylor 
Gilman, and daughter of Harrison Gray of Boston, who survives him. 

Hon. John James Bell, A.M., LL.B., a resident member, elected June 3, 
1808, was the son of Samuel D. Bell, LL.D., chief justice of New Hampshire, 
and a grandson of Samuel Bell, LL.D., a justice of the Superior Court in that 
state, governor of the state, and United States senator. The honors that have 
been crowded upon the members of this family for three generations are almost 
without a parallel in New England. 

Johu J. Bell was born in Chester, N. H., October 30, 1827, and died in Man- 
chester, N. II., August 22, 1893. He received a thorough academical education, 
and was graduated from the Harvard Law School iu 1827. He received the 
degree of A.M. from Dartmouth College. 

He was president of the New-Hampshire Historical Society and a member of 
the American Antiquarian Society. lie was a man of books, and read with an 
eye to utility. He had a great fondness for historical studies, aud he delivered 
a number of valuable historical addresses. 

He was an able lawyer, though his tastes led him to turn aside from his pro- 
fession at various times, and to devote to other pursuits the powers which 
would have given him a high rank in his profession. He was for some years a 
prominent member of the legislature of New Hampshire, and also a member of 
the constitutional convention of that state. He was president of a number of 
railroads and a director in several business corporations. He was an able, 
faithful and ready man, one to whom his friends looked for counsel. 

He married April 13, 1881, Cora L. Kent of Exeter, who survives him. 

Gyles Mekuill, Esq. of Haverhill. Mass., was a Resident Member of thi3 
Society, elected Dec. 4, 1878. He was born in Haverhill, Mass., March 13, 1816, 
and died in Haverhill, Jan. 23, 1894. 



226 jfecrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

Mr. Merrill belonged to an old New-England family, which has been traced 
through seven generations to Nathaniel Merrill, who came from England hi the 
early years of the Bay Colony. He was a resident of Newbury in 1635, and he 
died in 1635. His son Donald was born in Salisbury in 1642. Dea. Moses Mer- 
rill was born in Newbury in 16S3. His son of the same name, also a deacon, was 
borii in 1707. Rev. Gyles Merrill of the next generation was born in 1739. He 
was for a long period the pastor of the Congregational Church in the North 
Parish of Haverhill. Moses Merrill was his son. born in 1770, and he was the 
father of Gyles Merrill who has just parsed away. Mr. Merrill traced the his- 
tory of his family back to the emigration from England. All his ancestors were 
of English blood. There has been uo admixture of foreign blood in any genera- 
tion. All his ancestors came to this country before 1650. 

For three generations at least the family have resided in the North Parish of 
Haverhill, on the same place. The house was erected more than a century ago. 

Mr. Merrill received a good common-school education, and spent his early 
years on the farm, teaching school in the winter season. In 18-40 he became 
the bookkeeper of a firm that was engaged in building the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road. In 1847 he removed to Roxbury, aud took a position in the office of the 
Norfolk Lead Company. In 1S.32 he became an officer of the Sullivan Railroad 
of New Hampshire. In 18o9 he was chosen superintendent of the Vermont 
Central and Vermont & Canada Railroads, a position of very great labor and 
responsibility, which he held until 1873, when impaired health compelled him to 
relinquish the arduous duties of the position. The company whose general 
manager he was built and leased a number of railroads. At the time of his 
resignation the system included nearly 800 miles of railway, extending through 
Vermont and Massachusetts, and into . Connecticut, New York and Canada. 
More than live thousand men were employed by this Company. Mr. Merrill was 
the directing head of this system, and managed it with irreat efficiency aud 
wisdom. Twenty years ago he was well known all through northern New Eug- 
land. 

On relinquishing the business, he removed to the old home of the family in 
North Haverhill, in March, 1874. He remodeled the old homestead, and gath- 
ered into it the old heir-looms of the family. He was 'pleasantly occupied with 
his private business, and with the ati'airs of the Church of which his grand- 
father had been the pastor. ' He was fond of reading, and of historical investi- 
gation, and he was a successful antiquarian. He made a tour in Europe in 
1878, with his wife, visiting England and Scotland and a number of the Conti- 
nental countries. He also traveled extensively in the Southern and Western 
States of this country. Most of his later years have been spent in his home in 
the country, amid the scenes familiar to him in his childhood. It was a typical 
New-England home; such as a man of abundant means, with simple and culti- 
vated tastes, would love to provide for his declining years. 

The writer of this sketch has been acquainted with Mr. Merrill for more than 
thirty years. He was a good man. singularly modest and unassuming in charac- 
ter, of strict integrity, and broad benevolence. It has been said of him that he 
" counted as friends all who knew him, but never made an enemy/' He married 
Nov. 28, 1849, Eliza Watson Newbury, a teacher in Roxbury. She died in 1890. 
They had four sons, two of whom' survive. One of them occupies the old 
homestead. 

Henry Wiiea-tlam), A.M., M.D., a corresponding member of this Society 
and president of the Essex Institute, died at Salem, after a lingering illness, 
27 February, 1893, in his eighty-second year. He was the sixth child and fifth 
son of Richard and Martha (Goodhue) Wheatland, and was boru at Salem. 11 
January, 1812. His father, sou of Peter and Bridget (Foxcroft) Wheatland, 
born id England, at Wareham, in the county of Dorset, 20 October, 1762, went 
early to London, and thence, soon after, to sea. After serving three years in 
the British navy,— being stationed principally in the West Indies during the 
period of the Revolutionary war, — "he came to Salem, upon the conclusion of 
peace in 1783, and there continued to reside until his death, 18 March. 1S30. 
Until about the year 1800 he followed the seas, In the East India trade. After- 
wards he enuraired in. mercantile business at Salem, from which he retired not 
long before his death. 

Dr. Wheatland's mother was his father's second wife, his first wife Mar- 



1894.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 227 

caret Silver of Salem (who bore him no children), having died 9 June, 
1789. His second wife. Mrs. Martha (Goodhue) Wheatland, was the 
daughter of Stephen, son of Benjamin Goodhue, and his wife Martha, daughter 
of Benjamiu Prescott and Rebecca Minot his wife. Stephen was brother to 
Hon. Benjamin Goodhue, first member of Congress from the Essex district 
under the Federal Constitution. Through this line Dr. Wheatland was de- 
scended from Rev. Francis Higginson, the first minister iu Salem, and w:is 
fourth cousin to William Hiekling Prescott, the historian, and more nearly re- 
lated to the descendants of Hon. Roger Sherman, who married his grand-aunt 
Rebecca Prescott, the grandmother of Hon. William M. Evarts and of the 
Hons. Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar and George Frisbie Hoar. 

By the death, one week earlier, of his brother George (H. C. 1824) in his 
ninetieth year, Henry became the last survivor of his father's children. Early 
deprived of the companionship of his mother, who died 13 August. 1826, aged 56 
years, (3 months, 11 days, he became for a time a member of the family of 
Benjamin Goodhue, his bachelor uncle, at, Salem. At the age of sixteen he 
entered Harvard College, graduating there in 16:32. two years after the decease 
of his father. He studied medicine under the noted surgeon. Dr. Abel L. Per- 
son of Salem, and received his medical degree at Harvard in 188?. His studies 
of the animal organs and tissues attracted him to deeper research in compara- 
tive anatomy and biology, and thus led to the abandonment of any purpose to 
practise his profession. 

He acquired a wide and minute knowledge of animal life and organisms, and 
to this he added such acquisitions in botany, geology and mineralogy as made 
him a useful instructor and guide to the young in every department of natural 
history, and the welcome companion of men renowned for high attainments in 
natural science. By his methodical and industrious habits, he rained time to 
improve the opportunities which his social position and his familiarity with the 
public records afforded, for the study of local history and genealogy. By this 
means he accumulated a fund of interesting facts, of many of which he became 
the sole repository, and no small part of which, it is feared, has been lost by 
his decease. 

The great work of his life, however, was the upbuilding of the Essex Insti- 
tute, which was formed by uniting the Essex Historical Society and the Essex 
County Natural History Society. This union was effected in 1818, chiefly 
through his instrumentality. Since then, as before while a member of the 
older societies aboveuamed, he continued assiduous in his efforts to promote the 
study, and to diffuse a knowledge of science, history and art ; particularly, 
though not exclusively, iu his native county. His labors to this end were pur- 
sued with equal zeal and self-denial. He not only gave his entire time and 
energy to this service gratuitously, but he devoted to it his modest patrimony 
and whatever else he acquired or saved by his frugality. He had the satisfac- 
tion of seeing his devotion repaid by the firm establishment and steady growth 
of the Institute, and by the foundation of the Peabody Academy of Science (an 
institution intimately related to the older corporation), as well as of feeling that 
his life work would be surely carried on by successors who have grown up 
under his eye and tutelage, who fully appreciate his labors, and who cherish 
for him the sincerest affection. 

Dr. Wheatland was made a corresponding member of the New-England His- 
toric Genealogical Society, April 7. 1810. lie was vice president and one of the 
original trustees of " The Peabody Academy of Science for the County of 
Essex"; a trustee of " The Peabody Museum of Archaeology " ; a member of 
"The American Antiquarian Society" and of " The American Historical A>so- 
ciation"; and a member and one of the founders of " The American Association 
for the Advancement of Science," ic. <£:. 

Dr. Wheatland married 3 February, 18j8, MaryC, daughter of Hon. Elishi 
and Catherine (Orne) Mack of Salem. She was born 2.5 September, 1816, and 
died there 13 February, 1SG2. They had no children. His remains were de- 
posited in Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem. In a sermon preached at the 
North Church on the Sunday following his death, a tribute was paid to his 
character and life work by his pastor Rev. Edmund B. Willson. and memorial 
addresses in his honor were delivered by members of tii" Institute, at a s > fcial 
meeting on the evening of 17 April, 1893. See other notices of him aim tributes 
in Prescott Memorial (1870), passim; Goodell's Address on Semi-centennial 
Anniversary of the formation of Essex Historical Society, 1871, pp. 21-23; 












. 






228 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

Memorial number of the Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, now in 
press. 

By Abner C. GoocleU, Jr., A.M. 

AracsTrs Rtjss, A.M. was elected a resident member of this Society 1 No- 
vember, 1SS2, and died iu Boston, 7 June, 1S92. 

He was born in Boston, on Hawkins street, G February, 1S27, and was thus 
sixty-five years old at his death. His parents were Daniel Russ, born at Dam- 
ariscotta, "Maine, and Sarali Bakeman, born at Castine, Me. Mr. Buss spent his 
boyhood in the city near the place of his birth, and attended school at the old 
Boylston School on Fort Hili, and also the school on East street, until near 
twelve years of age, when, from some trouble with his eyes, lie was obliged to 
give tip his studies, and his only education afterwards was gained from general 
reading and contact with the world. His parents were poor, with a growing 
family, and like other lads thus situated he was expected to be self-supporting 
as soon as able. He was employed for some time in the hardware store of 
" Oliphant Brothers " on Pearl street, where he gained some knowledge of old- 
time business ways, and learned book-keeping. Iu 1851, at the au r e of twenty- 
four, he went to California, across the isthmus, and joined Mr. Moses Ellis in 
business. Some time after he went with a cargo of merchandise to the Sand- 
wich Islands, and established a business there at the port of Honolulu, remain- 
ing about two years, when he returned to San Francisco and joined Mr. Ellis 
again. Eater on he came back to the East, again crossing the Isthmus, with 
the purpose of purchasing goods for the California house, but, while iu Boston, 
was persuaded by his friend, John C. Danforth, then the law partner of Hon. 
John C. Park, to" leave his business career and enter upon the study of the law. 
He decided upon this course, studied in their office, and was admitted to the bar. 
Subsequently he became a partner of Mr. Danforth. This connection lasted 
several years, when Mr. Buss opened an office alone at No. H Tremont street. 
From there he removed to Pemberton square, No. 1j, and then No. 26, but 
finally located at No. 20, where he has been for many years, having rooms in the 
upper stories in which he kept house, with his brother Mr. Charles E. Eu>s and 
his sister Miss Eucv Buss. From time to time he has been associated in his 
law business with R. Yv r . Nason, Hon. J. W. McKim. Judge J. M. F. Howard 
and W. G. Pattee. Some seven vears ago he united in business with Hon. M. 
O. Adams, with whom he continued. About the same time he removed his 
apartments to Hotel Bellevue, Beacon street, where his unmarried sister still 
made his home for him. During the summer months he lived upon one of 
the "Brewsters," an island in the lower harbor, which he had improved and 
built a commodious house upon. Going back and forth to and from the city 
each dav in his fine yacht, entertaining friends iu his cordial and simple manner, 
it is probable that "some of the happiest hours of his life were passed in thi3 
free " sea-^irt island." All who have enjoyed his genial hospitality there have 
surely seen him at his happiest. Surveying his course, and summing up the 
character and result, we must look upon him as, in the best sense of the term, 
a " self-made man." With limited educatioual advantages in youth, he was one 
of the best read men iu the profession ; and not only in the literature of law, 
but in nearly every branch of human science. He early began the practice of 
buying a new book each week, and thus became possessed of an immense and 
varied library. The method of his business and the perfect system of his office 
have been for years the admiration of his associates in the profession. His 
clientage was extensive, permanent, and of the best class. Great interests and 
important trusts were left to his administration and counsel. Some of the 
most important cases tried before the courts of Suffolk in the last thirty years 
have been conducted by Mr. Russ. He was a prominent member and officer of 
the Boston Bar Association. But he was widely connected in varied concerns 
beyond his profession ; one of the founders and promoters of the Boston Yacht 
Club, president of the Old School Boys Association, a trustee of the Warreu 
Street Chapel, a conscientious worker in the city politics, though never seeking 
or accepting office, his life was full of the best and highest activities of his day. 
Dartmouth College honored its own records in conferring upon Mr. Buss, in 
18SG, the honorary decree of Master of Arts. , 

Mr. Russ never married, but has kept the old tics of home unbroken with his 
brother Charles and sister Lucy, who, with another sister, Mrs. Nancy Hearsey, 



1894.] Booh Notices. 229 

survived him. He was a man of simple tastes aud manners, direct of speech 
and address, straightforward in dealings, loyal to the cause of his clients, de- 
voted to friends. His loss in all these relations will be deeply felt and widely 
deplored. 
By the liev. George M. Bodge, A.M., of Leominster, Mass. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



[The Editor requests persons sending books for notice to state, for the information of 
readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent by 
mail.] 

Oxford Men and their Colleges. By Joseph Foster. Hon. M. A. Oxon, author 

of Alumini Oxoriiens.es, the British Peerage and Baronetage, &c, &c. Oxford 

and London: James Parker & Co. 1503. Illustrated 4to; pp. 6(34; each 

column is regarded as a page. Price £1. 11. 6. 

Oxford Men: 1SS0-1SG2. With a record of their schools, honors and degrees. 

Bv Joseph Foster, Hox. M. A. Oxox, author, &c. (as above). Oxford and 

London : James Parker & Co. 1893. Illustrated. 4to; pp. 686. Price £1.11. 6. 

These two superb volumes are alike in size, type and binding, and are similar 

in the manner of illustration. They are a continuation and completion of the 

author's series of volumes of fame, "eutitled Alumni Oxonienses. The latter of 

the two is avowedly a supplement to the series, and coutains the matriculation 

register from 1880 to and including 1592. The former may be described as the 

capital, of which the series, thus brought dowu to date, is the Corinthian column. 

It contains a historical sketch of each of the colleges aud halls constituting the 

University, setting forth the main facts pertaining to the particular institution 

from the beginning. For distinction it may be called the historical volume. 

The illustrations of both are profuse and artistic; and by "artistic" is 

meant that the work is faithfully and fitly done, not that every picture is an 

esthetic gem. There are plenty of that sort, while many are copies of the 

quaint conceits of designers and limners who lived when the art of engraving 

was in its infancy. But what the artist of to-day has attempted in the one sort 

or the other, whether by the use of the graver or by the photographic process, 

he has achieved, leaving nothing to be desired in his proper province. 

The first impressiom of one whc should hastily glance through these pages 
might easily be that the author's intent was mainly to exhibit the various archi- 
tecture of the university buildings, an impression arising from the fact that the 
views of facades and interiors "of existing structures are not only numerous, 
but usually, if not invariably, a full quarto page is given to each. But when 
the reader reverts to the text of the historical volume this impression is quickly 
dissipated, and to his mind one vista opens into another, almost without num- 
ber, disclosing facts pertaining not only to architecture but to biography, 
archaeology, portraiture, the vicissitudes of dynasties, ecclesiastical turns and 
overturns, the expansion of college curriculums, and to changes in the domestic 
life, the table-fare, the permitted\hversions and the college "discipline; and all 
this, whether broadly stated or hinted forth by instances whence a rule or usage 
may be inferred, extends over a period of more than six hundred years. On 
one page the dinmess of Oxford's remote antiquity is made tangible by the 
picture of a time-worn structure entitled 'Hall, name unknown;" and on two 
pages of the companion volume are photographed groups representing the 
"University Eight" ; and the "University Eleven" for the year 1893. The 
frontispiece of the historical volume is a fine portrait of the present chancellor 
or chief officer of the University, Lord Salisbury, whose lineaments are familiar 
to readers of American newspapers and periodicals as those of a contemporary 
man; and one soon encounters, as he turns the pages, the visages of Edward 
II., Henry VIII. and Elizabeth, who in their respective reigns did something 
for the University. Many engravings appear of grotesque heads and ngures 
comprised in the architecture of the college buildings ; also of designs in orna- 
TOL. XLVIII. 21 



230 . Book Notices. [April, 

mental string-course*, parapets and battlements, of coats of arms, of specimens 
of antique furniture and table-ware, and one of the identical brazen-nose door- 
knocker — of date A. D. loot — whence "Brasenose College" gets its name. 
The fail-page illustrations of existing architecture are usually, and perhaps in 
every instance, done by a photographic process which yields a tinted impression. 
This faint haze of color adds much to the effect, especially in interiors. 

Accompanying these pleasing reminisences of by-gone days are pages of dry 
facts, or. if the cynics of literature please, " dry-as-dust."' To the' historian 
these are invaluable and indispensable, as are the pages of the ledger and city 
directory to the man of business. Xo historian may ever desire to know, for 
example, who was principal of Balliol College iu the year 12s2, but should it so 
happen he wants the exact fact and not a tradition or surmise of it. This book 
supplies that fact, with thousands like it, extending through the six centuries. 
Lists are given of all the masters of the colleges' of the University from the 
beginning to the present time, with an outline in brief of the public career of 
each, setting forth his college of matriculation, honorary degrees, offices of 
dignity in church or state, with mention of any remarkable achievements, 
exact dates being supplied in each case. A complete list of the officers in each 
college in the year 16i>8 is al*o a part of the record. The historical sketches of 
the colleges are but brief, considering the period covered, but reference is made 
in each to any more complete narrative which may exist. Nearly all of them 
have been condensed from fuller narrative*, in some instances by the authors of 
such narratives, and all but a very few of the sketches have been prepared by 
Oxford historians. The record has, therefore, the stamp of authenticity, and 
offers to the student or inquirer the unique advantage of opening the whole field 
to his view at once. In their special ways both volumes are standard works of 
reference, and the historical volume is also a definite contribution to good 
literature. 

A variety of excerpts of pleasant antique flavor might be made from these 
pages did space permit. A note as to the antiquity itself may be ventured. It 
would be difficult at this distance, and perhaps also on the spot, unless some 
precipe definitions were agreed upon, to decide which college has priority in 
that particular. The writer of the sketch of Merton College says: "Meiston, 
the earliest of English colleges, and the model of all the rest, dates its pedigree 
from the year 12G4. having been founded by Walter de Merton, chancellor to 
Henry III." The writer for Balliol says: " The origin of Balliol College is 
traced to certain payments made by John Balliol, not long after 1260, for che 
support of poor students at Oxford." He adds that in 1282 it was " placed upon 
an established footing," the method or plan of organization being that of Merton 
College. The writer for University College says', in substance, that that insti- 
tution has its origin in a bequest iu the will of William of Durham who died in 
the year 1249. The first application of the gift, so far as known, was in 1253, 
when a house and land were bought, the deed for which still exists. This first 
house stood on land now occupied by the north-east corner of Brasenose College, 
the removal of University College to its present site being of date 1343. He 
follows his statement with this remark: " Anyhow, the college is the oldest 
foundation in the University, although it was organized as a college, in the sense 
in which we understand that word, later than Balliol and Merton Colleges." 

The fact seems to be that several of these earliest colleges grew out of exist- 
ing monasteries, and that a mouastic regimen was maintained for a while. 
Merton was, however, founded as a secular college, and the founder provided 
that " no monk or friar should be admitted on his foundation at all" — that is, 
admitted as a student or fellow. Under this strict definition the oldest collegiate 
building at Oxford — the choir of a chapel erected in the latter part of the 13th 
century — is claimed for Merton, with the proviso, " if we exclude fragments 
of monastic buildings afterwards converted to collegiate uses." 

The prestige derivable from antiquity is curiously illustrated by the language 
of the writer for Worcester College, his phrase here italicized being probably 
without parallel in the written histories of eleemosynary institutions. Having 
stated that in 1753 and 1773 the college quadrangle was rebuilt in part, he adds : 
"Fortunately, funds ran short for further reconstruction, so that the old Bene- 
dictine tenements still form the southern side of the quadrangle" — that is, 
tenements occupied by Benedictine monks, dating, apparently, from the year 1883. 
Whatever are the merits of tins dispute (if there be one) the point for readers 
on this side of the ocean perhaps is, that, giving the three colleges first named 



1894.] ^ Boole Xotices. 231 

an average date, the world had yet to wait two centuries and the third part of 
another to have it announced that such a place as America existed, and to wait 
128 years more for the landing on Plymouth Rock. From the date of the bequest 
of William of Durham to the date of that of John Harvard, which founded 
America's oldest collegiate institution, is a period of 389 years. There is 
authority in the text for saying that " Hertford is the youngest college of the 
University." It was chartered, after a reorganization, in 1740, but traces its 
origin to Hert or Hart Hall, of elate about 1280. Nevertheless, the last chapter iu 
the book is entitled " Keble College.'' and describes that institution, winch was 
chartered in 1870. No college was chartered at Oxford between 1710 and 1870. 
Keble College appears to have substantially the same dignities and privileges as 
the others; but there is a technical or legal distinction which doubtless war- 
rants the statement of the writer for Hertford. That technicality is indicated 
by the writer for Keble. who says: "The charter [of Keble] authorized the 
incorporation of this college within the University of Oxford; but this incor- 
poration has not been carried out, and its constitution differs from that of the 
other colleges." 

By Daniel W. Baker, Esq., of Boston. 

Notes on the Surnames of Francus, Franceis, French, etc., in Scotland, with an 
account of the Frenches of Thornyiiykesi. By A. D. Weld French, F. S. A. Scot. 
Boston : Privately Printed. 1803. 8vo. pp. 109. 

The writer of this volume is already well and favorably known in Great 
Britain and this country as the author of the "Index Armorial." His first 
work, however, on armory was on the coats of arms of the surname of Williams. 
The present title does not fully indicate its antiquarian and historical impor- 
tance, for this volume goes far back to the very foundation stones of history. 
Much of the earliest information has been gathered from the ancient abbey 
archives in England. Scotland and Normandy. And although there are a few 
gaps in the historical records, yet practically this original search begins at the 
very end of the 11th century and continues down to the dawn of the 17th cen- 
tury, a period of more than 500 years. No one but the historical and geneal- 
ogical author can fully realize the amount of work, perseverance and study 
necessary to have completed this volume. Dissecting the work, we classify it 
under the following four headings : — 

First. Surnames, on which subject the preface is particularly interesting. 
Nor does the interest fail on this theme in the body of these records. As an 
illustration, we cite an instance as found in the Family of Ay ton, where, start- 
ing with Francus, we have Franciscus, Franceis, Franceys, Francys, Frauncays, 
Frances, Fraunches and finally Franche. 

Second. Historicaily. The translations of the ancient unpublished Nor- 
man charters specially indicate the then prevailing custom of individual donation 
to the abbeys, the existing system of land tenure, historic and genealogical 
information, as well as early" prototypes of some French and Anglo-Norman 
surnames; similar illustrations by charters are given for Scotland. Many his- 
torical events crop out in dilferent parts of this work iu connection with the 
surnames in Scotland, of which the following is a partial synopsis: — 

In the year 129fi, Roll of submission of King John Baiiol to his liege lord 
King Edward the First of England. 

Arrangements in 1302 for the defence of Kirkintilloch castle. 

Taking of Edinburgh ca-tle from the English in 1312-13. 

King Edward the Second's flight in 1314 after the battle of Bannockburu. 

Third. General Notes on the surname; beginning at the end of the 11th 
century, we find " Robertus ffraunceys, one of the few recorded knights of the 
2d Robert de Brus in English history." The earlier Norman charters recorded 
give the Latin form of the surname ; they are all identified with the Valognes 
district of the Cotentin, the Normandy home of the Braces, in which locality 
are many records of the surname of Franceis, which at a later period appears in 
the Annandale of Scotland as feudatories of the Bruces. Besides the last 
named feudality there are many associations of the name in connection with 
the old Earls of" Dunbar, even before the recorded charters of the Frenches undei 
these Earls. 

There are indications that William Franceis under the different orthographical 
changes of this surname, so often found as a witness to the abbey charters as 



232 Book JSfotices. [April, 

well as those of the Braces, may have been the same personage. la continua- 
tion we find much genealogical information about the Francois of Ayton ami 
Linlithgow, the latter family being specially distinguished as having furnished 
the second master mason to the Crown of Scotland. 

Fourth. L.ur.DS of Tuon.vYDYicr.s, which comprises Part Second of this 
work, is the unpublished records of that family for more than 200 years, begin- 
ning with the latter part of the 14th century and continued to the opening of the 
17th century; this was during the reigns of Kings, Robert the 3d, the five 
Jameses, Queen Mary, and ending with the reign of King James the 6th of Scot- 
laud, who became in 1603 the first Scotch King of England. This period com- 
prises many interesting epochs in Scotch history, including the Reformation. 
Several members of the family of French of Thornydykes held positions immedi- 
ately under the last named sovereign. 

Although this work is privately^priuted and limited to the small edition of 
300 copies, this disadvantage to the general public is somewhat overcome, from 
the fact that Mr. French has donated copies to the leading Historical, Geneal- 
ogical, and Free libraries of our country. 

By Charles E. Hurd, Esq., of Boston, 

Memoir of the Hon. Josiah Gardner Abbott, LL.D., read before the Old Besidents 
Historical Association. By Ctiaiu/es Cowley, LL.D. With the Proceedings 
of the Bar, &c, £c. Boston : Little, Brown & Co. 1S92. 8vo., pp. 92. 
A volume of more than passing interest — albeit designed primarily for private 
circulation — is a memoir of the late Hon. Josiah Garduer Abbott, LL.D., whose 
lamented death took place at his summer home at Wellesley Hills, Mass., June 
2, MJftl. Its contents consist of a eulogy originally prepared for and delivered 
before the Old Residents Historical Assocfatiou of Lowell — where Judge 
Abbott "won his spurs " in the legal profession, and passed many honorable and 
happy years — by it? author, Hon. Charles Cowley, LL.D., who was a law-student 
in the ofiice of Judge Abbott, and hence wrote cori amore: tributes from Senator 
Hoar.Gov. Russell, Congressman Stevens, Gen. Butler and other eminent personal 
friends; proceedings of the Bar of the County of Middlesex, in view of the 
death of their distinguished associate, and similar proceedings of the Bar As- 
sociation of the City of Boston; and an appendix, giving Judge Abbott's draft 
of a proposed address to the people of the United States, protesting against the 
decision of the Presidential Electoral Commission (of which he was a member) 
in 1877, and his letter declining the Republican nomination for Attorney-General 
of Massachusetts in 1861 ; the" whole prefixed with an admirable portrait of the 
illustrious subject of the work. 

Amid this wealth of material in moderate compass — there are less than 100 
octavo pages in the book — its chief interest centres in the discriminating and 
eloquent pages of Judge Cowley. The career which he has here sketched so 
succinctly was one of more ^ha"n ordinary brilliance, even for New England in 
its heroic days; and this volume cannot fail to be of value as an inspiration to 
those who are yet " in the gristle" of early manhood, as well as a pleasure to 
all who take pride in our American institutions, which have developed such men. 
By the Bev. John S. Colby, of Marlboro', X. H. 

American Colonial History, illustrated by Contemporary Medals. By the late 
C. Wyllys Betts. Edited, with notes', by William T. R. Marvin, A.M., and 
Lymax Hayxes Low. New York: Scott Stamp and Coin Company Lt'd. 
1891. 8vo., pp. 332. Price S3. The book can be obtained of Messrs. T. R. 
Marvin & Son, 73 Federal St., Boston. 

As the first essay into this field by American Numismatists, who have followed 
in its plan the model set by the British Museum, this work is particularly 
deserving of attention. It will prove of great value to collectors and students 
of American Colonial history, in which so much interest is manifested at the 
present time. The late Mr. Betts was an enthusiastic student of American 
history as exemplified by contemporary medals, in distinction from coins, and 
this work is the result of his labors. 

The medals described, engravings of many of which are given, were mostly 
struck hi Europe, and the legends they bear are in various languages — Latin, 



..-. 



189-4.] 



Booh Notices. 233 



German, French, Dutch, Spanish, etc, : translations of these have been uniform- 
ly sup-plied; to many readers 'this will greatly increase the interest with which 
they Avill study these pieces. The queer macaronic legends on the medals 
satirizing John Law have been discussed in the notes, and the minute distinc- 
tions in the almost endless series of the Vernons carefully tabulated for easy 
reference. By " America" the author seems to have intended to include the 
New "World of'the western hemisphere, otherwise pieces like those on Cook's 
voyages, and the like, could have no proper place in the volume. 

The editors, Messrs. Marvin and Low, have added much to the value of the 
work by their copious notes. 

1S15-1S32. Joseph Bonaparte en Amerique. Par Georges Berth*, accom- 
pagne d'un Portrait d'apres une Gravure de M. Rodolphe Piguet. Paris Libra- 
l-ie de la Xouvelle Revue, 18 Boulevard Montmarte, 1833. (Droits de traduction 
et de reproduction reserve's) 12mo., pp. x.v-f-423. Prix, 3 fraucs 50. 

The frontispiece is an interesting and little known portrait engraved from 
one by Gombaud, taken at Bordentown in 1831, in the Mailliard collection. This 
work of research, among the living, in MS3. and printed authorities, both 
French and American, is dedicated to a well-known Philadclphian and man of 
letters, Admiral Macaulay. Its information, beside that obtained from this 
source, was derived from the son of Joseph Bonaparte's confidential secretary 
and friend, M. Mailliard. Many old Philadelphia families opened their treasures 
to its agreeable author, M. Benin, who has had the advantage, beside speaking 
excellent English, of residing some time iu Philadelphia, where his energy in 
pursuing this subject commended itself to his many friends in the Pennsylvania 
Historical and American Philosophical Societies. 

The arrangement is good, the authorities given, and an easy fluent style 
describes every phase of Bonaparte's career while a sojourner here, his domestic 
life, his residence, its furniture and its numerous works of art, his circle of 
foreign exiles and his American friendships, which included Daniel Webster, 
his correspondence, and the many anecdotes and incidents which give color to 
the life of one who was perhaps the most popular foreigner who dwelt among 
ns at a time the nation was peculiarly sensitive to strangers. This interesting 
book, a useful addition to American history, is completed by a good index. 

***** 

Town of Weston. Records of the First Precinct 1746—1754, and of the Toiai 
1754—1803. Boston : Alfred Mudge &. Son, 1893. Svo. pp. 558. 

These records are printed at the expense of the town of Weston pursuant to 
a vote passed by the town March 28, 1892. They have been copied by Mary 
Frances Peirce, under whose charge they have been printed. She has taken 
great pains to have an accurate copy, and has done her work in a very satisfac- 
tory manner. She has prefixed an historical and explanatory Preface, and has 
added an Index. Three important documents are given in an Appendix. We 
are told in the Preface that " by a vote of the General Court in 1746, the north 
part of Weston was united with parts of Lexington and Concord to form what 
was called the Second Precinct. The remaining part of Weston was then called 
the First Precinct, and records of the same were kept from 1746 to 1754. At 
that time, the Second Precinct was incorporated as a town under the name of 
Lincoln, and the records of the First Precinct were no longer kept separate 
from those of the town. Those of the latter, after 1754, were kept in what 
had been the precinct book." 

It is encouraging to find that so many of the towns of Massachusetts are 
printing their records, and thus placing "them beyond the reach of loss by fire 
and other causes. We hope that their example will be followed by other towns 
and cities, till the local records of the whole state are safe from destruction by 
accident or malice. 

The book makes a handsome volume. 

The Treat Family : A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt and Treat for Fifteen Gen- 
erations and Four Hundred and Fifty Years in England aud America. Contain- 
ing more than Fifteen Hundred Families in America. By Jou>' Harvey Tee.*t, 
A.M. Salem, Mass. : The Salem Press and Publishing Company. 1893. Royal 
8vo, pp. xii.-j-637. Price §7.50. 
VOL. XLVIII. 21* 



' 


















f304 



234 Book JVotices. [April, 

A History of the, DoggetfrDaggett Family. By Samuel Bradlee Doggett. 
Boston : Press of Rockwell ami Churchill. 1S94. Svo. pp. GSQ. 

The History of Ufton Court and the Parish of Ufton in the County of Berks, 
and of the Perkins family. Compiled by A. Mary Sharp. Loudon: Elliott 
Stock, 62 Paternoster How. 1S92. Crown 4to. pp. 276. Price 25 shillings. 

The Warren-Clarke Genealogy. A Record of Persons related within the Sixth 
Degree to the Children of Samuel Dennis Warren and Susan Cornelia Clarke. 
By Rev. Charles White Huntington. Privately Printed. Cambridge : John 
Wilson & Son, University Press. 1S94. Royal Svo. pp. 238. To be obtained 
by descendants at $2 a copy, of Fiske Warren, 5 Chestnut Street, Boston. 

History of the More Family and an Account of their Re-union in 1S90. By 
David Fellows More. With a Genealogical Record. By Charles Church 
More. Binghamtou : Samuel P. More. 18937 Royal Svo. pp. xxxi+409. 

Armorial General de France de D' Hazier (Complement). Xotiee Genealogique 
sur la Famille Sohier de Vermadois. Paris : Librairie de Firmiu-Didot et Cie. 
1894. Folio pp. 55. 

The Plumbs. 1635-1800. By IT. B. Plumb. Peiiy, Luzerne County, Pa.: 
Second Edition. 1893. Oblong folio, pp. 102. 

Lanncetqt Granger of Newbury, Mass., and Stiffield, Conn. A Genealogical 
History. By James N. Granger. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Case, Lock- 
wood & Brainard Company. 1893. Svo. pp. 587. Price 87. 50; by mail $7.66; 
to be obtained of the author, 4.2 Falls Street, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Memorial of Josiah Kendall, one of the First Settlers of Sterling, Mass., and of 
Some of his Ancestors and of his Descendants. By Oliver Kendall. Provi- 
dence : Printed by the Author. 1894. 4to. pp. xviii.-f-135. Only 120 copies 
printed. Price 83 in cloth, or 84 in half morocco. 

A Frisian Family. The Bant'i Genealogy. By Theodore M. Ba>~ta. New 
York. 1893. Royal Svo. pp. xiii.+412. 

A Genealogy. Edward Chapman af Ipswich, Mass.. 1642-1G7S, and his 
Descendants. By Jacob Chapman. A.M. Concord, N. H. : Printed by the 
Republican Press Association. 1893. Svo. pp. 139. Price, 84. 

A History and Genealogy of the Descendants of William Hammond of London, 
England, and wife Elizabeth Penn, through their son Benjamin of Sandwich and 
Rochester, Mass. By Koland Hammond, A.M. ; JI.D. Boston: David Ciapp 
& Son, Printers. 1894. Price -$4. To be obtained of the Author, Dr. R. Ham- 
mond of Campello, Mass. 

A Genealogical and Biographical Record of the Savery Families (Savory and 
Savary) and of the Severy Family ( Severit, Savery, Savory and Savary). By 
A. W. Savary of Annapolis Royal, X. S. Assisted in the Genealogy bv Miss 
Lydia A. Savary of East Wareham, Mass. Boston : The Collins Press/ 1893. 
8vo. pp. 276. 

The Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States, 1SS0-93, 
in chart form, showing the descendants of William Henry Harrison, President of 
the United States. 1S41, and Notes on Families Related. By Charles P. Keith, 
Philadelphia. 1893. Royal Svo. pp. 96, and large folded chart. 

Memorials of the Mauran Family. Collected in Part by James Eddy Mauran. 
Compiled by John C. Stockbrldge. Providence. 1893. 8vo. pp. 171. 

The Felt Genealogy. A Record of the Descendants of George Felt of Casco 
Bay. Compiled by John E. Morris. Hartford, Conn.: Press of the Case, 
Lockwood & Brainard Company. 1S93. Svo. pp. 567. 

The History of the Allison Family in Europe and America, A.D, 1135 to 1893. 
By Leonard Allison Morrison. Boston. Mass. : Published by Damreil & 
Upham. 1893. 8vo. pp. xiv.-f-312. Price 83,75. 

A Genealogical History of the Gallup Family of the United States. By John 
D. Gallup, Aijawam, Mass. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Hartford Printing 
Company. 1893. 8vo. pp. 329. 

Early Wills illustrating the Ancestry of Harriot Coffin. Bv her grandson, 
William S. Appleton. Boston: Press'of David Clapp & Son. 1393. 8vo. 
pp. 86. 



1894.] . Book Notices. 235 

A Record of the Ancestry and Kindred of the Children of Edicard Tliompkins, 
Sr. Printed for the Compiler. 1803. Royal Svo. pp. 65. 

The Olhestob JTamiltons. By Rev. Arthur V'extwortii Hamilton Eaton, 
B.A. New York: Privately Printed. 1893. Royal 4to. pp. 32. 

The Ingersolls of Hampshire. A Genealogical History of the Family in the line 
of John Jnqersoll of WestfieW, Mass. Compiled by Lieut. Charles Stedman 
Kiplky.U.S. N. Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers. 1893. Svo. pp. 107. 
Price §5. To be obtained of W. K. Watkins, 18 Somerset Street, Boston. 

Henry Crane of Milton, Mass., 1654, and Some of his Descendants. Compiled 
for Mr. Albert Crane. A.B.,LL.B. Boston: Privately Printed. 1893. Svo. 
pp. 26, with folding pedigree. 

A Sketch of Owen Biddle, with a Short Account of the Parke Family, together 
with a List of his Descendants. By Henry D. Biddle. Privately Printed. 
Philadelphia: 1892. Svo. pp. 87. 

The History of Edward Poole of Weymouth, Mass., and his Descendants. By 
Murray Edward Poole. A.B. Press of the Ithaca Democrat. 1893. Svo. 
pp. 164. 

Notes of the Family of King, of West Hall, Dorset. By Charles Herbert 
Mayo, M.A., R.D. December, 1S93. Sherburne : J. A. & S. T. Sawtell, Print- 
ers. Svo. pp. 12. 

Family Records. Parker-Pond-Peck. 1G36-1S92. By Edwin Pond Parker, 
D.D. Hartford, Conn. : Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company. 
1892. Svo. pp. 51. 

Collections relating to the Family of Trotman. Edited by W. P. W. Phille- 
more. Printed for Private Circulation by John White, Stroud, Gloucestershire. 
1892. 8vo. pp. 76. 

The Pedigree of Robert Barclay- Allardice, Heir Apparent of Line of Prince 
David Stuart, Karl Palatine of Strathearn,the Earls of Monte ith and Airth, Lords 
Graham of TCilp.ont and Kilb'ryde; and the Families of Barclay of Mathers and 
Dry, and Allardice, of Allardice. 1S92. Broadside, 17 by 4S inches. 

A Letter from A. J. Turner relating to the Genealogy of the Turners of the Tribes 
of John and Jonathan. Portage, Wisconsin. 1S94. Svo. pp. 6. 

Genealogy of the Barber-Eno Family of Homer, JV. Y. Newark, N. J. 1S93. 
8vo. pp. 4*0. 

A Genealogical Sketch of a Branch of the Wait or Waite Family of America. 
By D. Byron Waite. Canadice, N. Y. 1893. Sq. 16mo. pp. 22. 

The Sharpes. Devoted to the History, Genealogy and Literature of the Sharpes. 
Published monthly. Each number contains 8 pages. Nos. 8 to 15. August 
1893 to March 1894. Address, W. C. Sharpe, Seymour, Ct. 

Cowles Family Tree. April, 1893. Washington, D. C. : Broadside. 

The Kirkland or KirHand Family. By V. C. Sanbqrn [of Chicago, 111.]. 
Boston : Press of David Clapp & Son. 1S94. 8vo. pp. 5. 

Noyes Inscription and Memoranda. Bv James Atkins Noyes, A.B., of Cam- 
bridge. [Boston. 1S941. 8vo. pp. 4. 

Descendants of Ensign Thomas Fuller of Dedham. By Francis II. Fuller of 
Lincoln, Maine. 1893. Svo. pp. 8. 

History of the Dudley Family. By Dean Dudley. No. IX. Wakefield, Mass. 
Dean Dudley, Publisher. Svo. pp. 130. Price Si a number. 

We continue in this number our quarterly notices of works lately published 
relating to genealogy. 

The Treat Family", the first book on our list, shows great research in England 
and America. The author states that he has devoted ten years of constant labor 
to the preparation of this work, and the book itself shows" tiiat the labor has been 
well expended. The surname seems to have been originally Trott, and in this 
country it was spelled by the early settlers Trat, Trot, Tret, Treat and in other 
forms. The first settler was Richard, who settled at Wetherstield, Ct. His 
son Robert was governor of Connecticut. The family has been a prominent one 
in New England history, and the. author has done a good sevvice to family his- 
tory by tracing it out so thoroughly and preserving it in print. The book before 
us is well indexed, handsomely printed, and is illustrated by engravings of a high 
order of merit. 



236 Book Notice*. [April, 

The History of the Doggett Family is also very thoroughly traced in America, 
and considerable matter is given concerning the English families. The author 
has devoted to this work his spare time since the year 1S7G. Ke has produced 
a very valuable book, which he has brought out in a handsome style, illustrated 
■with tine engravings, such as portraits, views of buildings, etc. It has full in- 
dexes. The family is to be congratulated on having so good a record preserved 
in print. 

Miss Sharp's book on Uftoii Court and the Perkins family is valuable for the 
historical and genealogical information preserved in it. The Perkinses of Ut'ton 
were an old Catholic family who owned the manor of Uftoii from 1411 till nearly 
the close of the last century. The present mansion of Ufton Court, a pic- 
turesque house in Berkshire, dates from the time of Elizabeth, and has been 
standing for more than three hundred years. The book shows thorough re- 
search, "and much interesting and instructive historical matter of bygone times 
can be gleaned from its pages. The Appendix is devoted to genealogical matter 
relating to families of the name of the Perkins, Parkyn, etc. One chapter is 
" A Poll of the Pioneers of New England of the name of Perkins." The volume 
is " printed on tine paper, fully illustrated and tastefully bound in roxbugh bind- 
ing." "Although the book is'mainly concerned with Ufton Court itself, much 
valuable information is given concerning the parish and the neighboring district 
with the ancient families formerly holding property in Berkshire." 

The book on the "Warren-Clarke Genealogy is something new in this kind of 
literature. The author says that "in a rough way [it] may be said to include 
all those related within the sixth degree to the children of Samuel Dennis War- 
ren and Susan Cornelia Clarke." The book seems to be carefully compiled, 
and makes a handsome volume. Mrs. Warren is a daughter of the late Hev. 
Dorus Clarke, D.D., a historiographer of this Society. 

The next book, on the More family, makes an elegant volume, profusely illus- 
trated with tine views and portraits. The Historical Committee of the More 
family deserve great credit for their work in bringing out the book in so credit- 
able a style. Messrs. David F. and Charles C. More are entitled to praise for 
their work- in compiling the volume. The genealogical portion is well done, 
and many well-written biographies are found here. This family is of Scottish 
descent, and an account of the Mores of Scotland is given. The book has a 
good index. 

The book on the family of Sohier de Vermandois gives a good account of this 
ancient French family, an offshoot of which is found in America. A large fold- 
ing tabular pedigree is jriveu. The book makes a handsome volume. 

The volume on the Plumbs is a second edition of the work noticed by ns in 
July, 1S91. It is much enlarged, and will be found very interesting, particularly 
to those bearing the name. A good index is given. 

The Grangerbook is another noble contribution to American family history. 
The author has bcon unusually successful in collecting his material and tracing 
out the scattered branches of "the family. He has carefully arranged the full 
and precise details which he has collected, and has furnished a full index to the 
work. The book is handsomely printed on superior paper, and is illustrated by 
numerous portraits and other engravings. 

The Kendall book is another fine volume, for which the author deserves great 
praise. Much genealogical matter relative to Josiah Kendall and his descend- 
ants is preserved here r . It is illustrated with engravings of a high order of 
merit. The book has a good ind.-x. 

The next book is on the Banta family. The American family is descended 
from Epke Jacobse, who " came from Friesland. Netherlands, to New Amster- 
dam, February, 1059." and subsequently removed to Bergen, N. J. His children 
bore the surname of Banta. The book is handsomely printed on line white 
paper, and is illustrated by fine portraits and other engravings. The family in 
this country is well traced, and much interesting matter has been gathered con- 
cerning the* family in Holland. It is well indexed. A folding chart gives the 
ancestors of the author in various lines for six generations. 

The Chapman book is by the Rev. Jacob Chapman of Exeter, who has done 
mnch for New England family hi-tory. He has spent the best part of fifteen 
years in this work, and has published Ave valuable volumes, namely, the Folsom, 
the Philbrick, the Weeks, the Lane and the Chapman genealogies. This book is 
well compiled, well printed and well indexed. It is embellished with portraits. 






. 






1894.] 



Booh Notices. 237 



The Hammond book gives the descendants of Benjamin Hammond, an early 
settler on Cape Cod, concerning which family an article by Mr. Philip Baltell 
•was printed in the Register for January 1876 (vol. 30, pp. 2S-32). It shows 
great industry and judgment in the collection and arrangement of the materials. 
The book is well printed and indexed, and is illustrated with tine portraits. 

The Savary book is by Judge Savary of Annapolis. X. S.. who has been long 
engaged in collecting materials relating to the several families, as our readers 
are aware, the results of some of his researches having appeared in the Register. 
The work is now completed, and can be obtained by those interested at a mod- 
erate price. It contains many points outside of a mere genealogy. It is well 
printed aud indexed, and is embellished with portraits and other engravings. 

The book on the ancestors of Ex-President Harrison makes an elegant 
volume. The large folding chart, 2-1 inches by 32 inches, shows ranch labor. 
The author states that " all the known ancestors who lived in America are men- 
tioned in this chart." The introduction to the book contains much interesting 
matter. Several pages each are devoted to the follwing families: Armistead, 
Bacon, Basset, Bedell, Burwell, Cary, Harrison, Irwin, McDowell, Ramsey, 
Symmes and Tuthill. A good index Is furnished. 

"The book on the Man ran family contains the result of the labors of the late 
Mr. James Eddy Mauran of Newport, R. I., with those of Rev. Dr. Stock- 
brdge. Mr. Mauran spent much time and money in collecting materials illus- 
trating the history of the Maurans, which can be traced into France and Italy. 
The American family is descended from Giuseppe Carlo (Joseph Charles'; 
Mauran, born June 3, 1748. in Viilafranca. in the province of Nice (then in 
Italy), who came to New England, aud settled in Rhode Island. The family is 
one of much distinction in that state. 

The book on the Felt family is a work of much merit. Mr. Morris, the author, 
has succeeded in collecting details of the various branches of the descendants 
of George Felt, an early settler at Casco Bay in Maine. The book is well ar- 
ranged, and has good indexes. 

The book on the Allison family, by the Hon. Leonard Alison Morrison, gives 
an account of the family " in Scotland, England, Ireland, Australia, Canada and 
the United States." Mr. Morrison is the author of the " History of Windham, 
N. H.," and several other meritorious works illustrating local and family history. 
The genealogy is well traced. The book is illustrated by portraits aud other 
engravings, and has an index. 

The book on the Gallup family seems to be carefully compiled, and is well 
arranged. The immigrant ancestor was John Gallop, who was prominent in 
early New England history. An Appendix gives valuable historical and gene- 
alogical matter relating to the family. T;ie book has a good index. 

The wills illustrating the ancestry of Harriot Coffin illustrate the history of 
several early New England families. The book has " two very good points. It 
puts into print a number of early wills, thus securing them from loss in case of 
accident to the originals; aud it shows in small compass all that is known of 
the ancestry of one person," namely, the author's grandmother, Harriot Cothn. 
The book has an index. 

The Tompkins book gives the ancestors and kindred of the children of Ed- 
ward Tompkins, senior, on the paternal aud maternal sides. It is well com- 
piled, and is illustrated bv tabular pedigrees. 

The book on the Hamilton* of Oiivestob, by the Rev. Mr. Eaton of New York 
city, author of li The Church of England in Nova Scofcia." '-Acadian Legends 
and Lvrics," etc., is an interesting account of an interesting family. 

The" book on the Ingersolls of Hampshire County, Massachusetts, contains a 
full record of that familv. It is well compiled. 

The book on the Crane" familv is a reprint of the articles on that family in 
the forty-sixth aud fortv-seventh volumes of the Rkgister, with important 
additions. A tabular pedigree is given. It is well printed, and illustrated by 
engravings. 

The book on Owen Biddle contains a memoir of that patriot of the Revolu- 
tion, and also other matters historical and genealogical. It contains a record of 
the descendants of Mr. Biddle, and an account of the Parke famiiy, with which 
he intermarried. The book is well printed. 

The Poole hook gives the descendants of Edward Poole, an early settler of 
"Weymouth, Mass. ~ The author, Mr. Poole, of Ithaca, N. Y., has made a book 
deserving of much credit. 



. 






238 . Book Notices. [April, 

The Notes on the King Family are a reprint from the " Notes and Queries for 
Somerset and Dorset," of which periodical the author. Rev. Mr. Mayo, is one of 
the editors. Much interesting genealogical matter is preserved. 

The next book is on the Parker family, descended from William Parker, an 
early settler of Connecticut -with some account of the Pond and Peck families. 
It is well compiled. 

The Cowles family tree is a reduced copy of an original made about 1853, and 
now in the possesion of Mr. William A. Cowles. It "is printed for Capt. Calvin 
P. Cowles, Adjutant. General U. S. A., who is preparing a genealogy of the 
family. The tree shows several generations of the descendants of John Cuwles, 
an early settler of Connecticut. 

The Barclay-Allardice pedigree gives the ancestry of Robert Barclay-Allar- 
dice, Esq., University Club, Edinburgh, Scotland, a native of Hamilton, Canada, 
through the Graham and Stuart families to Robert II. of Scotland. 

The Turner pamphlet is in the form of a letter of A. J. Turner of Portage, 
Wisconsin, to Dr. F. J. Turner of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, giving 
an account of his line of the Turners. 

The book on the Earber and Eno families furnishes brief accounts of those 
families. It is by George R. Howe, Esq., of Newark. N. J. 

The pamphlet on the Waite family gives a brief account of Thomas Waite of 
Portsmouth. R. I., and his descendants. It is a good beginning for the full 
history of that family. 

Mr. Sharpe of Seymour, Ct., still continues the publication of his monthly 
periodical, '• The Sharpes." Eight new numbers have been received since our 
last notice. It is a good form for preserving genealogical materials. 

The Trotman pamphlet is a collection of, Matter from wills, parish registers 
and other sources, illustrating the genealogy of the family of that name. Mr. 
Philliraore has collected a large amount of material that will be indispensable in 
compiling a genealogy of the family. It is illustrated with a portrait of John 
Trotman, inventor of the li Trotman Anchor." 

The Kirkland pamphlet and the " Xoyes Inscription and Memoranda" are 
reprints from the Register for January 1801. 

The pamphlet on the Fuller family is a reprint from the " Dedham Historical 
Register" for October 1803. It gives a record of the early generations of the 
Dedham family. 

The ninth number of Mr. Dudley's " History of the Dudley Family" is issued. 
This number, with another which will soon be issued to be devoted entirely to 
an index, will complete the work, and make a volume of over a thousand pages. 
This number contains genealogical and biographical matter relating to several 
families descended from Governor Thomas Dudley, and is illustrated with 
portraits. In the whole work a mass of information is preserved relative to the 
Dudley family and its kindred. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS, 

PRESENTED TO THE NeW-En'GLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY FROM DEC. 1, 

1893, to March 15, 1894. 
Prepared by Walter K. Watkixs, Assistant Librarian. 
I. Publications written or edited by Members of the Society. 

Refutation of the alleged ill-treatment of Captain Fenton's wife and daughter. 
By Samuel A. Green, M.D., 1804. 8vo. pp. 44. 

The Career of Benjamin Franklin. By Samuel A. Green, M.D. Phila. 1894. 
8vo., pp. II. 

Origin and Growth of the Library of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 
By Saniuel A. Green, M.D. Cambridge. 1893. 8vo. pp. 35. 

Memoir of Hon. Levi Woodbury, LL.D. By Charles Levi Woodbury. 
Boston. 1804. 8vo. pp. 10. 

The University Library and the University Curriculum. By Wm. F. Poole, 
LL.D. Chicago; New York ; Toronto. 1804. lGmo. pp. 55. 

Memoir of "the Hon. Josiah G. Abbott, LL.D. By Charles Cowley, LL.D. 
Boston. 1892. 8vo. pp. 92. 



1894.] Recent Publications. 239 

An Alphabetical Abstract of the Record of Births in the Town of Dedham, 
Mass. 1S44-1S90. Compiled by Don Gleason Hill. Dedham. 1894. 8vo. pp. 
xviii. + 208. 

Sixth Report on the Custody and Condition of the Public Records of Parishes, 
Towns and Counties. By Robert T. Swan. Boston. 1894. Svo. pp. 07. 

Noyes Inscription and Memoranda. By James Atkins Xoyes, A.B., Ph.B. 
Boston. 1894. Svo. pp. 4. 

Rev. Stephen Peabody and Wife of Atkinson, N. H. By Wm. C. Todd, A.M. 
Boston. 1894. Svo. pp. 13. 

On a Painting of St. Barbara in the Church of St. Lawrence, Cucklington, 
Somerset. By the Rev. F. W. Weaver, M.A. 1S93. pp. 12. 

II. Other Publications. 

Uniforms of the Army of the United States, illustrated, from 1774 to 18S9, 
authorized by the Secretary of War. Washington. Folio pp. 71 — plates 44. 

Stephen Ambrose Walker. 1S93. Svo. pp. 36. 

Dr. George Chandler. 1894. 4to. pp. 14. 

Memorial of Rev. J. II. Bisbee. 1893. 12rao. pp. G4. 

Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. New Series. Vol. VII. 
London. 1893. Svo. pp. 323. 

Catalogue of the Library of the Long Island Historical Society. 1863-1S93. 
Brooklyn. 1893. 4to. pp. 801. 

Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey. 
Journal of the Governor and Council. Vol. V. 175G-170S. Vol. VI. 17G9- 
1775. Trenton. 1893. Svo. pp. 538 and 581. 

Annual Reports of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio for the 
year ending Dec. 4, 1893. Cincinnati. 1893. Svo. pp. 1G. 

Annual Report of the President of Tufts College. 1392-1S93. Boston. 1894. 
12mo. pp. 52. 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic: Association Proceedings, 17 Jan. 1S94. 
Boston, 1894. 8„vo. pp. 48. 

George Bancroft and his Services to California. By Theodore H. Hittell. 
San Francisco, Gal. 1894. Svo. pp. 20. 

On Some Social Distinctions at Harvard and Yale before the Revolution. By 
Franklin B. Dexter. Worcester. 1894. Svo. pp. 28. 

Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College, 1.392- 
1893. Cambridge. 1894. Svo. pp. 234 + 77. 

Bulletin of the Essex Institute. Vol. XXV., Nos. 7, 8, 9. Salem. Svo. 
pp. 35. 

The Unveiling of the Bronze Memorial Group of the Chicago Massacre cf 
1812. Chica^o7 1893. 4to. pp. 23. 

Ann Radclitfe (Lady Mowlson.) By A. McF. Davis. 1894. Svo. pp. 10. 

Proceedinjs of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin at its 4lst Annual 
Meeting. Madison. 1894. Svo. pp. 173. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Paterson, X. J. Minutes, &c, 1813-1S92. 
By Wm. Nelson. Paterson. Svo. pp. vi.-r4S2. 

Register of Members of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution in the 
District of Columbia. Washington. 1893. Svo. pp. G7. 

Raleigh's New Fort in Virginia. 1553. By Edward G. Dave*, pp. 11. (Re- 
print.) 

Fifteenth Anniversary aud Re-consecration of the First Independent Christ 
Church, Baltimore. Baltimore. 1894. Svo. pp. 43. 

Proceedings of the Bostonian Society at the Annual Meeting, Jan. 9, 1894. 
Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 68. 

Pioceedings of the New Jersev Historical Society. Vol. XXII., whole scries, 
Nos. 1, 2 and 3. Svo. pp. 177. 

Translations and Reprints from the Original Sources of European History. 
Phila. 1S94. Svo. pp." 16. 

By-Laws of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. Boston. 1893. 8vo. 
pp. 17. 

_ The American Folk Lore Society. Officers, By-Laws, Branches and Publica- 
tions. 1394. Svo. pp. 16. 

Vigintennrai Record of the Class of 1S73, Yale College. Buffalo. 1313. Svo. 
PP, 72. 






240 Recent Publications. [April, 

Historical Work in Massachusetts. By A. McF. Davis. Cambridge. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 57. 

A Memorial of Charles Henry Bell. Exeter. N. H. Privately printed. 139-1. 
8vo. pp. 22. 

Catalogue of Andoyer Theological Seminary, 1893-1891. Andover. 1894. 
8vo. pp. 27. 

Proceedings of Massachusetts Grand Lodge, F. A. M., 13 and 27 Dec. 1893. 
Boston. 1894. Svo. 

The Story of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers. Boston. 1894. 
8vo. pp. xxxv.+476. 

Publication* of the Scottish History Society. 

Vol. XIII. Memoirs of the Life of Sir John Clerk, of Penicuik, from his 
own Journals, 1G76-1755. Edinburgh. 1892. 8vo. pp. xxxi.+27S+16+10. 
Vol. XIV. Journal of Hon. John'Erskine of Carnock, 1G83-16S7. Edin- 
burgh. 1S93. 8vo. pp. xhv. +259+16+5. 

Vol. XV. Miscellany of the Scottish History Society. First Volume. 
Edinburgh. 1893. Svo. pp. 1xxv.+595tC. 
Names of the Soldiers of the American Revolution in Maine. Augusta. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 50. 

Year Book of the Society of Sons of the Revolution in the State of New 
York. New York. 1893. 4to. pp. 418. 
List of Persons whose Names have been Changed in Massachusetts, 1780- 

1892. Boston. 1893. 8vo. pp. 522. 

Proceedings at the Public Opening of New Haven Hist. Society Building, 
erected by Henry F. English. Published by the Society. New Haven. 1394. 
8vo. pp. 91. 

Collections N. Y. Hist. Society, XXL, 1888. Deane Papers, Vol. III. New 
York. 1889. Svo. pp. 490. 

Proceedings at the 150th Anniversary Celebration of Waltharn, 1888. Waltham. 

1893. Svo. pp. 104. 

Professional and Industrial Historv of Suffolk County, Mass., in 3 volumes. 
Boston. RS94. 4to. 

History of the 52d PtCgiment, Massachusetts Volunteers. Boston. 1S93. 
8vo. pp. 20+1+iii. 

History of 54th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, 13G3-13C5. 
Boston. * 1894. Svo. pp. xvi.-f452. 

Rose Neighborhood Sketches. Wayne County. N. Y. By Alfred S. Roe. 
Worcester. ^1893. 4to. pp. xvi.+443. 

History of the Town of Harvard, Massachusetts, 1732-1893. By Henry S. 
Nourse, A.M. Harvard. 1894. 8vo. pp. G05. 

Town of Weston. Records of the First Precinct, 174G-1754; and of the 
Town, 1754-1803. Boston. 1893. Svo. pp. 553. 

Records of Rev. Roger Viets, Simsbury, Conn., 1763-1300. By Albert C. 
Bates. Hartford. 1893. Svo. pp. 83. 

The Early Records of the Town of Providence, vols. III. and IV. Providence. 
1893. 4to. pp. xiii+296 and v.-f 298. 

Proceedings October 2 to 7, 1892, at the 250th Anniversary of the Incorpora- 
tion of the Town of Woburn. Mass. Woburn. 1893. Svo. pp. 233. 

The Grasshopper in Lombard Street. By John Biddulph Martin. London. 
1892. 4to. pp. XX.+32S. 

Journal and Correspondence of Maryland Council of Safety, July 7— Dec. 31, 
177G. Baltimore. 1893. 4o. pp. X.+595. 

The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States. By 
Francis Wharton. G vols. Washington, D. C. 1889. 

Catalogue of Tufts College, 1393-1894. Boston. 1894. 12mo. pp. 138. 

Magazine of the Daughters of the Revolution. Published Quarterly at 64 
Madison Avenue, New York city, Jan. to Oct. 1893. Royal Svo. pp. 44+43+54 
+59. Price one dollar a year, or 30 cts. a number. 



Errata. — Pasre 1S8, 1. 9 from bottom, for son of Mark read daughter of Mark ; 
page 104, 1. 14 from bot., /or his son read Robinson's son. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 241 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX EXGLAXD. 

By Henry F. Waters, A.M. 

[Continued from page 144.] 

Nichas Pyxchox citizen and * bocher " of London, 15 February 
1528, proved 22 April 1533. I bequeath and recommend my soul unto 
Almighty God my mak?r and redeemer and to the. most glorious Virgin 
his mother, our lady Saint Mary, and to all '' tholy and blissid company of 
Saintes in hevin." And my body to be buried in the church of St. Nichas 
Flesh shambles of London before the image of our lady there, where the 
body of my late wife lyeth buried. To the high altar of the foresaid church 
for my tithes and oblations negligently forgotten or withholden, in discharge 
of my soul and conscience, ten shillings. To Edward Pinchon my son, in 
the name of his full portion and part of all my goods &c. to him after the 
use and custom of the City of London belonging, thirty three pounds six 
shillings eight pence, to be delivered to him when it shall fortune him to 
come to his full age of twenty one years. A like bequest to sons William, 
Robert and John Pynchon. And I charge all my said children on my 
blessing that they shall hold themselves contented and pleased with my said 
bequests to them made and that they be loving and kind to my wife their 
mother and be ruled after her, and if they or any of them grudge or hold 
not them contended with my said bequests or will not be ruled after my said 
wife then I will that the portion and part of him or them so not contented 
nor ruled shall be abated and " mynishid " after the discretion of my said 
wife. Provisions as to the decease of any of them. And if it fortune all 
my said " childeru " before their said lawful ages to decease then I will 
that " oofi hundreth mrc " (marks) of their portions shall be applied towards 
the gilding of the Rood loft of the said "paroche" church of St. Nichas 
and the residue bestowed in deeds of charity for the wealth of my soul. 
"Itfii I will that assone after my diseeas as conueniently may be there 
shalbe ordeynid an honest able preest of good conuersacion to sing in the 
foresaid church of Saint Nichas for my soule my late wifes soules our 
fathers and mothers soules and all chren soules by the space of three yeres 
complete. And I bequeth to hym for his salary in that behalf vij u vj 3 viij d 
by the yere. And I will that another preest shall sing in the churche of 
Writtell in the Countie of Essex for my soule and for the soules of my 
father and mother and all chren soules by the space of oon hole yere."' To 
Parnell my "suster" forty shillings sterling and my gown next the best, 
and to every of her own children six shillings eight pence. To John Pinchon 
my cousin dwelling in Writtell, in discharge of my soul and conscience, 
twenty shillings. " I bequeth to the place of ffrier mynours in London to 
thentent that they shall say a trigintall of masses and pray for my soule 
xl* st. Itfii I bequeth to eu r y of thorder of ffriers Preachours, Carmelites, 
Augustines and Crossid friers to thentent that they shall doo in eu r y of their 
Couent churches for my soule and all chren soules oofi trigintall of masses 
x* st. a pece siu x! s ." Bequests to the prison houses. To every poor man 
and woman keeping chambers in Pentheecst Lane, Hunt's Alley and 
Scaldinghouse Alley in the parish of St. Nichas four pence apiece. Ten 

VOL. XLVUI. 22 



242 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

pounds to bo applied in buying of coals in the "Winter season, in ten years 
next after my decease, to be distributed amongst the most needy of the poor 
in St. NiehSs. To Geffrey Boyland of Mountnesing my best ring: To 
frier John Burthau towards his exhibition at the University sixty six shil- 
lings. Watkin Bissett my servant. " Itm I will that lxvj' viij d shalbe 
distributed in peny doole among poore people at tyme of my buriall and 
at my monthes minde." To the " warkes " of the church of our Lady of 
Woodford, of Harnesey, of West Tilbury and of East Tilbury. The residue 
to Agnes my wife to her own proper use. I make and ordain the said 
Agues, John Marty n, butcher, and John Hone, tallow chandler, my ex- 
ecutors, and Sir John Mundye knight, alderman of London, overseer. 

Hogen, 2. 

[The Pynchon family, though closely connected with London, had long held 
lands in Essex. In A. D. 1277-S, in sixth year of Kiu;r Edward 1st, Richard 
Pinchon, citizen of London, owning property at Latton, County Essex, be- 
queaths it to his daughter Agnes. In 1476, and eleventh year of Kins' Edward 
IV., John Pynchon of Writtle. in Essex, purchased land in that village. Henry 
Pynchon is one of the witnesses to the "deed. In 1179, in nineteenth year of 
King Edward IV., John Pynchon. father and son. are witnesses to a deed of land, 
situated at Brumfield, County Essex. The name also appeai-s in connection 
with lands in the eastern and southeastern parts of the same county. There 
are also traces of the family as living from time to time in the city of Loudon. 
According to Stow's Chronicles, p. 70S. the Clothworkers' Hall in the city 
of London, in which Queen Elizabeth entertained the Dutch Ambassadors in 
1585, was situated in Pynchon Lane in the heart of the city, near Tower street. 
In 157G there was a John Piuehin living in London, an attorney of the common 
law, some time of the Middle Temple, and owning a house at Westminster. 

There are also traces of the family in Northamptonshire. Thomas Chichele of 
Higham-Ferrers, in that county, married Agnes, the daughter of William 
Pynchon, Esq., whose arms are the same as those of the family at Writtle. 
This Agnes Pynchon was the mother of Henry Chichele, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury during the reigns of the Lancastrian Kings, Henrv IV., V. and VI., and 
Founder of All Soul's College, Oxford. 

The first appearance of the name in England, however, is found in connection 
with the manor of Tattershall, county Lincoln, which was granted to Eudo 
together with one Pinco, his sworn brother in arms, though otherwise not allied, 
Eudo to hold immediately of the King, Pinco his of St. Cuthbert of Durham. 
The son of Pinco was Hugh, fi's Pinconls. Hence the name Pineon— Pinchon. 
From this point the family would seem to have drifted into the adjoining county 
of Northampton and thence to Loudon and Essex. — T. R. Pynchon. j 

Alice Spencer late the daughter of Thomas Spencer, citizen and cloth- 
worker of London, 13 November 1543, proved 22 November 1543. To 
be buried iu the cloister of All Hallows the more iu Thames Street, ni°-h 
unto my father. My mother in law Agnes Spencer. Refers to the will of 
father Thomas Spencer. Tenement called the Wild Man in All Hallows 
belonging to the Goldsmiths. Three tenements in St. Alban's, Wood 
Street, belonging to the Clothworkers. My cousin John Hyde. My 
cousin Richard Lambe, brewer. My cousin George Hyde. Agnes Hyde, 
his daughter. My cousin John Pynchon, tailor. All my godchildren 
wheresoever they be found. Francis Pope, merchant tailor of London to 
be executor. 

Among the witnesses was John Pynchon, marchaunt Taillour. 

Spert, 27. 

Wtlltam Pynchtn of " Wryttyll" in the Co. of Essex, "yeman," 13 
July 1551, proved 5 September 1552. My body to be buried in the church- 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 243 

yard of All Saints in Writtle. I bequeath for my tjthes and oblations 
negligently forgotten a cow or else twenty shillings in money, at the election 
of Mr. Vicar. Towards the reparations of the church twenty shillings. I 
will that twenty shirts and twenty smocks and forty bushels of wheat be 
given and divided amongst the poor folk in Writtle and Roxwell, and that 
same to be don by the discretion of the church wardens and two or three 
honest men of the parish. Elizabeth my wife to have all that my house 
and garden called the Swan, with the " Orteyarde " called the Safforn gar- 
den thereto belonging, and Calpat held and the " mede, orteyard " and gar- 
den, the barn and the barn yard now in the tenure of William Jervyes, for 
term of her life natural. After her decease I will the same to remain to 
George Pyuchyn my son. And if the said George die without issue then 
I will that all the premisses remain to John Pyuchyn mine eldest son and 
his heirs forever. To the said Elizabeth my wife two of my best beds, 
with all things belonging to them, the bed in the wardens chamber, with 
the appurtenances thereunto belonging, except and reserved. To the said 
Elizabeth forty pounds in money, to be paid her by six pounds thirteen 
shillings four pence* yearly until it be paid. To the said Elizabeth " tenne 
fearme able kyne and fortye Ewyes" of two or three years age. a dozen of 
silver spoons next the best, the best salt saving one, a goblet, a little silver 
pot, a dozen of pewter platters, a dozen of pewter dishes, eight saucers, six 
pottingers, six " coysshous," that is to say, two of the best, two of the 
second and two of the '; redde," a carpet, the best saving one, the bed- 
steddles, the counter and the " cheestes that been nowe at the Svumne," 
painted clothes for hanging, the best that she can choose, saving them that 
be in the wardens chambers, a cupboard, the best saving one. two brass 
pots, two brass pans, two kettles and two postnets, and of everything else 
touching household and not before named such part as may be spared, the 
house for my son first being furnished of that it shall need. Provided 
always that if my said wife will not be contented and agreed to take in the 
name of her third the house and lands above expressed which I have given 
her for term of her life together with nine pounds of money to be paid 
yearly during her said life, that is to say, out of the lands I have given 
Edward my son five pounds by the year and out of the lands that I have 
given George my son forty shillings by the year and out of the lands that 
I have giveu Henry my son other forty shillings by the year, but refusing 
the same, which I trust she will not do, will ask, demand and claim the 
third of my lands contrary uuto my meaning and contrary unto her promise 
made unto' me in that behalf, to the trouble, vexation and hindrance as well 
of my children to whom I have given my lands a3 also of other to whom 
I have sold some lands, then I will that all and every gift, beqnest or legacy 
before mentioned be clearly void and stand as nought. And if she be con- 
tented &c then she shall stand bound to discharge my lauds of the said 
third by all such ways and means as shall be devised by mine executor or 
his learned counsel before the legacies before written be delivered unto her. 
Whereas I do intend to give, as beneath doth appear, an house to Richard 
Allyn, my wife's brother, another house to Edmund Church's wife, another 
house to Grove's wife, my said wife's sisters, if my said wife do claim, ask 
or challenge the third of my lands, contrary to my meaning and to her 
promise, then I will that all such gifts to her said brother and sisters, of 
houses as abovesaid, shall likewise be void, frustrate and nought. To Ed- 

• See foot note on page 114 of my Gleanings, Part I. Tuh sum is equivalent to ten 
marks. 



244 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

ward Pynchyn my son my house, with orchard, garden and dovehouse 
called Skygg's and Tumor's, with Skygg's field, Bridgemead and Chere- 
mead at the end of Bridgemead, windmill field, Clement's field next unto 
the windmill, the little " brome " and all the little crofts in Widford parish, 
by the little "brome and by yonde " the same that divideth the parishes of 
Writ tie and Widford, with all the crofts lying together towards " Byffortye 
amedynge by yonde " Skygg's gate on the right hand as we go to the 
watermill on this side Adam Salmon's "pyghtell," and a "pyghtell" that I 
bought of Ramsall lyinjj right over against Skygg's wall, upon this condi- 
tion, that he shall pay his mother yearly five pounds out of the same lands 
during her life. If he die without issue all these lands &c. shall remain to 
John Pynchyn, my eldest son, aad his heirs forever. To George, my son, 
my tenement called Hasylls, with the lands lying and adjoining to the 
same, " that ys to say Bocho rs Croofte ffcosters Croofte norryes mede, other- 
wyes callid Swanne mede and a Croofte and a mede late belonging to an 
Obite and bought of Mr. Celye as they lye all togyther in lenngith bytwene 
the Ryver that rynneth from Wryttell bridge towardes lordes myll and the 
same that leadeth frome Wryttell to Loweford bridge, one headde abut- 
tynge upon the same tenemets callid Hasylls and thother hedde abuttynge 
upon a mede of Penny fathers nowe in the tenure of Mr. Bygges, and 
Loweford Leaf and Bryckes Brydge meade with all the reentes cofdynge 
into the said Hasylls," upon similar condition to pay out of these lands forty 
shillings a year to his mother &c. If he die without issue all the said lands 
to remain to John mine eldest son. To Henry, my son, my tenement and 
garden called the " Sterre," now in the tenure of Prentyze, three crofts of 
arable laud and a mead thereto belonging lying all together at Cowbriiige 
nigh unto ' ; Patcho" Foorde," a mead at Cowbridge now in the tenure 
of Thomas Argoo and two crofts late belonging unto the Chapel Chauntry, 
whereof one 1 do occupy &c and the other is now in the tenure of Ri< hard 
Asser, and the crofts at " Toustrete and Harvies hoopes " at Oxney Green, 
&c. (upon similar condition of payment of forty shillings a year to his 
mother). Remainder, as before, to sou Jolm. The tenement called Dun- 
mowes, now in the tenure of Reede the wheelwright, the tenement wherein 
mother Brewer now dwelleth and the little house adjoining wherein Ayre 
sometime dwelled (other lands) two crofts, whereof one I bought of late 
M r . Pawue and his wife and Mr. Thomas Byddell their son and the other 
I bought of Thomas Byddell uncle unto Thomas Byddell before named, 
shall be sold and the money thereof coming equally divided between my 
two daughters Agues Pynchon and Margery Pynchon and paid them at 
their full age or day of marriage. If not sold for so much as it is worth 
then the rents thereof coming to be equally divided between them. I will 
that Dennys Pynchyn my daughter have all these lands and tenements 
that I bought lately of Mr. Mamie and his brothers, now in the tenure and 
occupation of John Squyer. Remainder to John mine eldest son. To 
Joane my daughter, now Brytton's wife, my tenement at the church gate 
late my brother Borreli's and wdierein my said brother dwelled. To Emme 
Brytton, the daughter of the said Joane, the tenement next adjoining to 
the same, wherein Roydon the shoemaker now dwelleth. To Joyce Pyn- 
chyn my daughter, now the wife of John Athye, my tenement on the 
North side of Greenbury wherein John Clerke now dwelleth. To Eliza- 
beth Athye, her daughter, the tenement next adjoining, wherein Thomas 
Smythe now dwelleth. To Elizabeth Pynchon, the daughter of John Pyn- 
chon and Heiyu his wife, my two tenements, late Salmon's, wherein John 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 245 

Newton and Thomlyn now dwell. To the same Elizabeth the land called 
Cookes or Coekes in Roxwell. bought of M r . Browne (and other land). I 
will that two tenements adjoining Ilasylis and two on the N. end of Green- 
bury shall be the poor's forever, and my executor, and after his decease the 
church wardens, shall place in the said houses such person or persons as 
they shall think good, there to dwell without any rent therefore to be paid. 
I will that Thomas Badcock and Joanne his wife have all the house wherein 
he now dwelleth, called Skygg's and Tumor's, with all the lands I have 
given Edward Pynchyn my son, from the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- 
angel next after my decease unto the end and term of ten years next fol- 
lowing, if they do live so long, paying therefor yearly thirteen pounds, &c. 
To Richard Allen, my wife's brother, my tenement and garden at the 
North end of the town, where Gregory Joyce now dwelleth. But if his 
sister, my wife, do refuse the portion I have appointed her &c. then thi3 
gift be made void and stand for nought. To Edward Church and Agnes 
his wife, my wife's sister, and their heirs my tenement wherein Cocks now 
dwelleth, upon the same condition. To Robert Grove and Joanne his wife, 
sister also to my wife, &c. the tenement wherein Rose now dwelleth, upon 
upon the same condition. To William Plowright the tenement where 
mother Lukes now dwelleth. to give and to sell. To Thomas Plowright 
the tenement where Mauuselld the miller now dwelleth, to give and to sell. 
To Joanne Plowright the tenement where Roger the weaver now dwelleth, 
to give and to sell. To Mary Plowright the tenement where Brette the 
carpenter now dwelleth, to give and to sell. I will that the tenement next 
unto Peter Brewer's, where the weaver now dwelleth, be sold and the 
money thereof coming be distributed amongst my servants, by discretion of 
John Pynchon my sou. Sundry small gifts to John Genyns and his wife 
and William Genyns (a godson) and every other of their children. To 
Margery Kinge the wife of John Kinge and to Lettys Kinge the wife of 
Robert Kynge. To William Kynge the son of John Kinge and to William 
Kynge the son of Robert Kinge, to every of them a silver spoon. Certain 
other bequests to members of the Plowright family- To every of my 
daughters Agnes, Margery aud Dennyce so much household stuff as shall be 
worth three pounds in money, at their election. To Richard Dakyn, clerk, 
three shillings four pence in money. The residue of all my lands and 
goods herein not given nor bequeathed I give and bequeath unto John Pyn- 
chon mine eldest son, whom I make and ordain my sole, executor &c. And 
my brother Richard Everard and my cousin, Robert Kinge my supervisors 
and for their pains herein to be taken I give unto either of them ten shil- 
lings &c. 

Wit: William Harper, clerk, Rychard Dakyn, clerk, John Jenyns and 
Thomas Badcocke. Horn, 47 (Consistory Court of London). 

[The "Warden's chamber mentioned above was probably the official home of 
the Warden of the College of St. Mary, of Winton, commonly called New Col- 
lege, Oxford, on the occasion of his business visits. A part of the endowment 
of New College consisted of the landed property of au alien Priory, located in 
"Writtle, whose estates were scattered through Essex, more particularly toward 
the east, and in the neighborhood of Bradwell on the Sea, about twenty miles 
distant on the English channel. These buildings and lands at Writtle were pur- 
chased by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, and founder of New 
College. Oxford, and, together with the livings of Writtle and lloxwell, given to 
the College. The chapel, chantry and obit are specified in the text. As one of 
the principal functions of thesy Priories was to look after the poor and to en- 
tertain strangers, it is not unlikely that a hostel was maintained for this pur- 

VOL. XL VIII. 22* 



246 . Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

pose after the Priory estates came into the possession of the College, and passed 
into the hands of the Pynehons, who seem from these wills to have been fur 
several generations the leasees of large portions of the College property. That 
for several generations they took a special interest in Xew College, Oxford, as 
is shown by gifts and the education of their sons, is evident from the succeed- 
ing wills. About four miles west of Writtle there is another property called 
the "Warden's House, probably on College land. Writtle lies a mile west of 
Chelmsford, a place of some importance, upon the Eastern Counties R. R., 
twenty-sis miles from London. The church, which is pleasantly situated upon 
the village irreen, is very beautiful, and bears the impress of the architectural 
genius of William nf Wykeham. The chancel is nearly filled with the monu- 
ments and memorial tablets of the Pynchon family. 

Springfield is situated nearly a mile to the north-northeast of Chelmsford. 
This also is a picturesque village, and has a very ancient church with a low, 
square tower, inscribed beneath the battlements : •• Prayse God for all the good 
Benefactors." There are some tine brasses in the interior commemorative of the 
Tyrrel family. There is a tablet on the wall of the vestry-room with the name 
of Wiliiam Pynchon inscribed upon it as one of the Church Wardens, dated 
1624. This is the William Pynchon who was oue of the original patentee s of 
the Massachusetts Bay Company, and who sis years later assisted, in 1630, in 
bringing that charter to America, a memorable and somewhat hazardous under- 
taking.— T. R. P.] 

John Pixchon of YvYittle, Essex, gent. 10 November 1573 proved 11 
December 1573. My body to be buried in the church of Writtle. To the 
reparations of the church twenty shillings. To the poor of Writtle three 
pounds six shillings eight pence. And as touching all my lands and tene- 
ments within the parishes of Writtle, Brad well near the Sea, or elsewhere 
in the County of Essex, I will that Jane my wife have and enjoy all the 
same during her natural life, upon condition that she bring up my children 
until their full ages or days of marriage, and upon condition also that she 
pay yearly unto William Pinchon, my eldest son, at his full age, so much of 
annuity or yearly rent as, together with the revenue of my copy holds and 
customary lands in Bradwell, shall amount unto the yearly value of twenty 
pounds, and that she pay unto John Pinchon, my second son, and to Edward 
Pinchon my third son, at their several ages, to either of them one yearly 
rent or annuity of ten pounds, and to Elizabeth my daughter, at the day of 
her marriage, five hundred marks, so that the said Elizabeth, my daughter, 
do make to my wife, mine executrix, and mine heirs a good and sufficient 
release in the law of all her right and title that she the said Elizabeth hath 
or ought to have to Cookes lands in Roxwell and to all the profits and rents 
due unto her since my father's death; and also upon condition that she, my 
said daughter, upon request, shall release unto John Newton and his heirs 
and assigns forever all such right, title and interest as she might have or 
claim by any legacy or gift of my late father, her grandfather, of aud in 
certain tenements by me to him, the said John Newton sold. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto John Pinchon, my second son, all those 
my lands and tenements called Whelers, &c. in Wikestreet, now in the 
several tenures &c. of Robert Tunbridge and John Thornton, and also of 
one field called Lowfford, near nnto Lowfford bridge, containing twenty 
acres or thereabouts and now in the tenure &c. of John Aware, gent., to 
have and to hold &c. after the decease of Jane my wife; remainder to 
Edward, my third son, then to my right heirs. I give to Edward, my third 
son, my lands and tenements called Skigges and Tumors, now in the tenure 
&c. of John Dockley, and the great brome and meades thereto belonging 
in the tenure of Thomas Reede's widow, and a croft of land called Clovil- 
hill Croft lying at Byfortie and the hoopes called Challfe hoopes now in 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 247 

the tenure of Hopkin. after the decease of my wife; remainder to John, 
my second son, then to my right heirs. Certain other lauds &c. to my wife. 
If my three sons do die without issue of their bodies lawfully begotten 
then I do give and bequeath all my lands and tenements to Elizabeth, my 
daughter, and her heirs forever. 

Item, I do give all those my lands in Shcnfield. which I lately bought of 
old Symonde deceased, to George Mannffield and Denis his wife, my sister, 
&c., remainder to the right heirs of the said Denis. As for my farms of 
the parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and of the manor of Esthall and 
Shellmarshe and Garlsmondes marshe I will that Jane my wife have, take 
and receive the profits of every of them and the stock during her natural 
life, paving the yearly rents and doing all other things which I and mine 
assigns are boumleu by the several leases to do &c. The residue of the 
term I give to William Pinchon mine eldest son &c. To my singular good 
Master Mr. Doctor White, warden of the new College of Winchester in 
Oxford, my best gelding, I mean that he make his choice, or else ten pounds 
in money, at his like choice, most humbly beseeching him that, as he hath 
been always special friend and great good master to me and mine in my 
life, so he will continue the like to my wife and my poor children when I 
am gone. To my very loving friend Mr. Bedell, for a remembrance, a ring 
of gold of the weight of forty shillings. I give for like remembrance 
unto my loving friend M r . Tatem, the Vicar of Writtle, my best gown. 
The residue of my goods and chattells to Jane my wife whom I do make 
and ordain my sole executrix; and my special good brother in law M r . 
Peter Osborne my supervisor, to whom I do give, for a remembrance, a 
ring of gold of the weight of three pounds six shillings eight pence. 

Md. the saied will is written with my owne hand in five Pagines of Pap 
/And everie Pagin subscribed with myne owne hand/ Per me Johem 
Pinchon. Peter, 38. 

[Jane, the wife of the above-mentioned John Pynchon, was the daughter of 
Sir Richard Empson, of Northamptonshire, who was beheaded at London on 
Tower-hill. Aug. 15th, 1510, in the early part of the reigti of Henry 8th. From 
this date the Pynchon arms are quartered with the Empson on the monuments 
in the chancel of Writtle Church. Mary, another daughter of Sir Richard 
Empson, married for her second husband Edward Bulstrode of the ancient 
family of the Bulstrodes, of Bulstrode Park. County Bucks, not far distant 
from Windsor, and in the immediate neighborhood of Horton and Wraysbury. 
Bulstrode "Whitlocke was of this family. 

Doctor White mentioned above was Thomas White, D. C. L., Warden of St. 
Mary's College of Winchester at Oxford, commonly called New College, ap- 
pointed Sept." 17th, 1553. He was educated upon the foundation of Winchester 
School, as was also Archbishop Chiehele, and held many distinguished posi- 
tions. He died June 12th, 15S8, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral.— T. R. P.] 

Edward Bell of Writtell, Essex, gen'., 20 November 1576, proved 
18 February 1576. Mentions wife's mother Mrs. Philipp Rutter. Wife's 
sister Johan Hardinge. My brother Thomas Wilbore and my sister his 
wife. Brother Philip Wilbore. Cousin Thomas Pagitt. Brother James 
Bell. The poor of New-land in the County of Gloucester. Uncle William 
Matthewe. Sister (by the mother's side) Dorothy Marshe and her children. 
Brother William Trend's children. Sister Alice Hagett and her children. 
Cousin Thomas Hall. The school and almshouses by me begun at New- 
land. Brother Henry Marshe (husband of Dorothy). My daughter Anne. 
Son Edward. Youngest son James Bell. Wife Margaret. My eldest son 



'■ 









248 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

William Bell. To Mr. Edward Pynclion. To Edward Pynclion the son 
of John Pynchon deceased and to his brother John Pynclion. 

Daugbtry, 8. 

The same will was registered again in Langley, 14. 

Thomas Wilson Esq. one of the Principal Secretaries to onr most dread 
Sovereign Lady Queen Elizabeth and one of her Highness Most Honourable 
Privy Council, 19 May 23 Eliz : proved 9 July 15S2. To be buried in Saint 
Katherine's church without any charge or pomp at all. My very good 
and loving friend Sir Francis Waisingham, knight. My brother in law 
Sir William Wynter, knight. Matthew Smythe Esq. my cousin. My 
house at Edmonton and my lands there. My lands, tenements <Scc. in the 
Co. of Lincoln wherein I have any estate of inheritance. My daughter 
Mary at marriage or at twenty one years of age. My daughter Lucrece at 
marriage or twenty one. My son Nicholas Wilson to be sole executor. 
My overseers (Waisingham, Wynter and Smythe) shall take a straight 
accompt of my brother Godfrey Wilson touching his dealings in mine affairs 
at Durham, and finding him to have dealt honestly to give unto him one 
hundred pounds, or else to give him nothing. Tirwhite, 32. 

Jane Wilson of Writtle widow, late the wife of the Right Hon. 
Thomas Wilson Esq., one of Her Majesty's priucipal Secretaries, deceased, 
her will made 10 November 1587, proved 14 February 1587. My body to 
be buried in the church of Writtle. I give and bequeath to William Pin- 
chon, my eldest son, all my lands and tenements in Writtle, Roxwell, 
Bradwell near the Sea, or elsewhere in Essex, and all my leases of the 
parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and of the manor of East Hall in 
Bradwell aforesaid, upon condition he pay to John Pinchon my second son, 

pounds. I give to Edward Pinchon my youngest sou my lease which 

I had and purchased of Ashely, gent., of a messuage &c. in Lou- 
don near unto the Duke of Norfolk's place, sometime, and belonging there- 
uuto (he to make a release of his rights in certain lands). The residue to 
son William Pinchon whom I make my sole executor. 

In a codicil (without date) the testatrix specified certain gifts which had 
been left blank in her will. To her son John she willed three hundred 
pounds &c. and she named as overseers the Right Worshipful her loving 
brother '-Mr. Osborne of the Excheker " and her very good friend Mr. 
Home dwelling in Gratious Street. Rutland, 11. 

Ralfe Evered of Kingsworth, Herts., gent., 15 February 31 st Eliza- 
beth, proved 2 June 1589. I give to Elizabeth my wife, all my lands and 
tenements in Broometield and Writtle in the Co. of Essex to hold for life, 
doing no waste, and all my lauds and tenements in Benington, Herts., to 
hold for life &c. 

Item, my will and mind is that if it happen any other my lands and ten- 
ements in the Co. of Essex or elsewhere to descend and come unto Raphe 
my son after my decease and after the death of Elizabeth Pynchion my 
mother or Mary Evered my grandmother, then I will that the said Eliza- 
beth my wife shall also have the said lands and tenements towards the good 
education and bringing up of my said son Raphe in learning during his 
minority, if the said Elizabeth my wife do so Ions; live. I give unto Joane 
Evered and Anne Evered, my sisters, to either of them twenty marks, to 
be paid within two years after my decease, if they happen at that time to 
be of the age of eighteen years ; if not then at their age of eighteen. To 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 249 

Mary Evered my sister ten pounds, within one year &c. To Andrew Gray 
Esq. my master, fifty shillings, to buy or make him a ring-. To Elizabeth 
my mother one pot or piece of plate of the value of five marks which I 
now have. To my cousin Unas Barker forty shillings (for a ring). To 
my cousin Anthony Evered forty shillings (for a rin^). To my cousin 
Thomas Wale twenty shillings (for a ring). To Robert Younge five pounds. 
The residue to Elizabeth my wife and Ralfe my son whom I imike executors 
of this my last will and testament. The said Robert Younge and Urias 
Barker to be supervisors. Elizabeth Upton a witness. Leicester, 52. 

Rose Pixchon of Writtle widow, late the wife of William Pinchon 
Esq. deceased, her will made 20 March 1508, proved 19 April 1599. My 
body to be buried so near as conveniently may be to the place where my 
6aid late husband lieth buried. The poor of Writtle and the poor of Pin- 
ner. My friends Mr. Edward Hunte and Thomas Baker. Pinner in the 
Co. of Middlesex where I was born. My brother Mr. George Redinge. To 
my daughter Elizabeth one thousand pounds for and towards her advance- 
ment in marriage. To my daughter Jane eight hundred pounds at eighteen 
or day of marriage. To my son Henry eight hundred pounds at twenty 
one. To my son William eight hundred pounds at twenty one. To my 
son Christopher eight hundred pounds at twenty one. My executor shall 
have the occupation, possession, use and profit of all my leases of the rec- 
tories and parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and my leases of East hall, 
Garmondes marsh and Shell mershe and my leases of the water mill, wind- 
mill and pasture grounds in Writtle and Roxwell granted by the Wardens 
and Scholars of St. Mary College of Winchester in Oxford until such time 
as Edward, my son shall accomplish the age of twenty and four years, pay- 
ing such rents and performing such covenants as are reserved and comprised 
in the said lease: at twenty four the said Edward to enter upon the said 
leases and take the profits "&c, remainder to Henry my son. I give unto 
my loving sister in law, the wife of my brother in law, M r . John Pinchon, 
three angels to make her one ring to wear in remembrance of me and one 
black gown. To my loving neighbors M r . Edward Hunt and his wife three 
angels to make either of them a ring &c. and to either of them one black 
mourning gown. My loving friend Thomas Baker. My cousin M r . Thomas 
Reydinge. My goddaughter Johane Whitebread. Certain servants. To 
every of the children of my brother in law Mr. John Pinchon twenty shil- 
lings. To my uncle Mr. Edward Pinchon one black cloak and to his wife 
one black gown. To my uncle Mr. Henry Pinchon one black cloak. And 
I do forgive my said uncles all such money as they or either of them do or 
both owe me. " My very loving friend Jerome Weston of Roxwell Esq. to 
be sole executor. ' Nevertheless my will, mind and intent is that if Edward 
my son after that he shall accomplish the age of twenty and one years will 
take upon him to pay my debts, discharge and pay my legacies which then 
shall be unpaid and do execute and perform all other things which my said 
executor is to pay, do and perform by force of this my will &c. &c. that 
then he shall enter and take the profits of all my said leases and of the 
lands, tenements and hereditaments in the same devised and have all other 
my goods &c. to his own use. If mv said executor, Jerome Weston, shall 
refuse to take upon him the execution &c. then I ordain and make my 
loving brother in law M r . John Lesrgat my sole executor. And I do desire 
my loving brother in law M r . John Pinchon to be overseer, ami for his 
pains to be taken do give unto him three pounds and one mourning gown. 

The witnesses were John Legatt, Edward Hunt, Edward Pmci.on, John 
Willyams and Henry Glascocke. Kldd > 27 - 















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250 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Sir Jerome Westox, knight, of Roxwell, Essex, 28 December 1C03, 
proved 21 November 2 GO i. To my son William "Weston oue annuity of 
fifty pounds out of my manor of Barwick Hall in Essex, during his life. 
To my daughter Winifrede Weston eight hundred pounds at day of mar- 
riage or eighteen. To my daughter Margaret Weston eight hundred pounds 
at day of marriage or eighteen. I forgive my son in law John Williams 
such debts as he oweth unto me. And for that there are divers " imper- 
fect'' reckonings between ray sou Sir Edward Pincheon and myself, the per- 
fecting whereof might unhappily be a cause of breach of love and concord 
which I most of all other things desire to preserve between my son Sir 
Richard and him, I have therefore by this my will declared what course 
my will is shall be taken herein for the better preservation of peace between 
them &c. Then follows the appointment of auditors of the account and 
referees to decide the matter ; their names Henry Glascock, William Love- 
day and William Courtman, gentlemen. My executors to be Sir Richard 
Weston my son and Sir Edward Pincheon my son in law. A further devise 
to Anne Williams, his daughter, wife of John Williams Esq., of an annuity 
of ten pounds to be paid out of oue annuity of twelve score pounds which 
he received yearly of Sir William Lee of Newman Regis in the Co. of 
Warwick, during the life of the said Sir William Lee. 

Proved by the two joiut executors. Harte, 84. 

[Sir Richard Weston mentioned above, afterwards Earl of Portland, of 
Skreens. Roxwell, married Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rose Pynehon, 
and a sister of Sir Edward. Arms of Weston and Pynehon impaled at Skreens. 
— T. R. P.] 

John Pinchon* of Springfield, Essex, gen'. 29 August 8 James, proved 
12 September 1G10. To the poor of Springfield forty shillings. All my 
houses, tenements and lands in and near Weeke Street in the parishes of 
Writtle and Bromefield, now in the tenure &e. of Thomas Eve and John 
Drane shall be conveyed unto Robert Robinson for such price and upon 
such conditions and covenants as the said Robert Robinson and myself have 
lately heretofore agreed upon. Provision in ease of the bargain coming to 
nought. The money accruing to go for the payment of my debts and the 
advancement of mv daughter; in marriage and the performance of this my 
will. 

And I charge my son William Pinchou, upon my blessing, that so soon 
as he shall come unto his lawful age, or within short time after, that he 
either join with my executrix in the conveyance thereof or else consent 
uuto the conveyance thereof either unto the said Robert Robinson or unto 
any other person or persons that will purchase the same of my executrix. 
Furthermore I will and devise that during the natural life of Frances my 
wife my two sons William Pinchou and Peter Pinchon shall have, receive 
and enjoy for their maintenance the yearly rents and profits of all my lauds 
and tenements lying at or near Cookesaull Greene in the parish of Writtle, 
now in the tenure and occupation of William Crowe, William, my son, to 
have twenty pounds a year of the rents and profits thereof and Peter fifteen 
pounds to his own use. And after the decease of the said Frances my 
wife I give and bequeath all my said lands and tenements at or near Cook- 
saule Green, both freehold and copyhold, unto my said son Peter Pinchon 
and to his heirs and assigus forever. I give and bequeath unto the said 
Frances my wife all my houses, lands and tenements in Springfield during 
her natural life; and after her decease I give and bequeath them unto my 
said son William Pinchon and to his heirs forever. My said wife to keep, 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 251 

maintain and bring up all my six daughters decently in good education 
until they and every of them shall have and receive the legacies and por- 
tions to them by me given in this my will. And I give and bequeath unto 
every of my said daughters, viz'. Amies Pinchon, Frances Pinchou, Jane 
Pinchon, Alice Pinchon. Isabel! Pinchon and Susanue Pinchon. the sum of 
two hundred pounds apiece out of and with the moneys which shall be 
raised upon the sale of my said lands and tenements lying in and near Weeke 
Street aforesaid and out of all the rest of my goods &c. not devised in this 
my will. Twenty shillings to Andrew Gilbert my servant. The residue to 
the 6aid Frances Pinchon. my well beloved wife, whom I name, constitute 
and make sole executrix of this my last will and testament, requiring her, 
of all love, to see the same performed and my children decently brought 
np, as my trust is in her that she will. My friend Ilumfrey Baldwin of 
Springfield to be overseer, unto whom, for his pains, I give ten shilliags. 
Hamer, 57 (Consistory Court of London). 

[This John Trnchon of Springfield was the father of William Pynchon the 
founder of Springfield, in New England, upon the Connecticut river, in Massa- 
chusetts. He was educated at the Uuiversitv of Oxford. Matriculated at New 
College Dec. 20th, 1577, and took his B.A. degree April 6th, 1581.— T. R. P.] 

Memorandum, that in the month of October Anno Domini 1611 William 
Pinchon late of Writtle in the Co. of E??ex gen'., being sick iu body but 
of good and perfect mind and memory, did make and declare his testament 
and last will nuncupative in form following, or in words of the like effect, 
viz*, my will and desire is that my brother Sir Edward Pynchon shall pay 
all my debts and bring my body to the earth, and the overplus I give and 
bestow upon him, 'for he hath " bin " a kind and loving brother unto me 
and is best worthy of it. 

" Sententia pro valore test 1 . William Pinchion " &c was pronounced 23 
May 1G12. iu a suit between Sir Edward Pynchon, knight, natural and 
lawful brother of the deceased, on the one part, and Jane Hone als Pyn- 
chon and Henry Pynchon, who claimed as administrators of the goods &c. 
of the said deceased. 

Commission issued 20 June 1618 to Edward Pynchon, brother of the 
deceased, to administer according to .he tenor of the will &c. 

Fenner, 45. 

Thomas Brett late of Terliugin Essex gen'., 15 January 1 615, proved 
13 November 1616. My body to be buried in the parishchurch of Brome- 
field, entering into the church porch where my father was buried. To Mr. 
John Hankyn thirty pounds during the minority of his three daughters, 
Bridget, Elizabeth and Johane Hankyn, i. e. ten pounds apiece, to be paid 
to each at day of marriage or age of twenty one. To John Cunigley and 
to Sara Cunigeley, the children of John Cunigeley of Polsted, twenty pounds 
to be paid to the said John Cunigeley, he to pay ten pounds to his two chil- 
dren, each at day of marriage or age of twenty one. To Matthew Lyther 
the younger ten pounds. To Giles Crane and to Mary his wife ten pounds. 
To my cousin John Porter my tenement called Philles. with the land &c. 
in Little Baddowe. Essex, which said tenement is mortgaged to Mr. Thomas 
Emerye of the same town. And I would earnestly desire the said Mr. 
Emerye to release the said mortgage, my cousin John Porter paying him 
whatsoever is due to him upon the same. 

Item, I do give, will and bequeath unto William Pinchou, son unto my 
sister Frances Pynchon, all that my tenement and lands lying and being in 









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252 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Bromefield in the Comity of Essex, to him and to his heirs upon this con- 
dition that the said William Pinchon shall pay unto Anne Pinchon his 
sister twenty marks of lawful money of England, within one year after the 
said William Pinchon shall quietly enjoy the said tenement and lands. 
Also I give, will and bequeath unto Peter Pinchon, brother unto the said 
William, twenty marks and to Frances Pinchon twenty marks and to 
Jane Pinchon twenty marks and to Alice Pinchon twenty marks and to 
Isabel Pinchon twenty marks and to Susan Pinchon twenty marks, all to 
be paid out of the said tenement and lands by the said William Pinchon to 
his said brother and sisters above written if the said William shall quietly 
enjoy the said tenement and lands without any trouble or molestation. To 
William IJowson the younger of Chelmsford, Essex, all my lauds and tene- 
ments, both free and copy, according to the custom of the manor, lying and 
being in Witham in the Co. of Essex. To Matthew Lyther the elder my 
gelding and all my furniture belonging to him, with my best boots. To 
Elizabeth Mall, late servant with M : . John Hankyn, twenty pounds at day 
of marriage. To Elizabeth Wylie ten pounds. To the poor of the town 
of Stoke four pounds. To the poor of Broomefield four pounds, viz', twenty 
shillings every Christmas day after my decease until the said four pounds 
be fully paid. To Walter Lyther the son of Mathew Lyther ten pounds, 
with the yearly use and increase of the same, to be paid when he shall 
come and attain to the age of one and twenty years. To Alice Ayas the 
daughter of John Ayas ten pounds, Mathew Lyther the elder or Mathew 
Lyther the younger shall have the use of the said ten pounds until the said 
Alice shall intermarry or attain the age of one and twenty years. My 
mind and. will is that Susan Ayas mother unto the said Alice shall have the 
profit and yearly use and increase of the said money until the time above 
specified. To Richard Rhodes, the writer hereof, forty shillings. To John 
Colman, Mathew Lyther's man, forty shillings. I do make and ordain my 
executors to be my loving cousiu Mr John Porter and Mathew Lyther the 
elder. And all my goods and chatties unbequeathed, my funeral expenses 
being paid, I give and bequeath unto my cousin John Porter. And I do 
make Mr John Hankyn, minister of Stoke, supervisor. 

John Gollman (sic) and Richard Rhodes witnesses. 

Memorandum, I do give and bequeath to Amie my daughter wife of 
Edmond Chapman Esq., over and above those goods of mine which she and 
her mother hath carried away, the sum of twenty two shillings in gold, to 
be paid unto her by my executors, or one of them, within six weeks after 
my decease, being lawfully demanded. And also I do give to Jane my wife 
one other piece of gold of twenty two shillings, with the residue of my 
goods which she hath already carried away. To the poor of the town of 
Chelmsford forty shillings which is in the hands of Richard Browne, Bailiff 
of Chelmsford. 

A Senteutia pro valore of the above will was pronounced 13 November 
1616 in a case between John Porter and Matthew Lyther, the executors 
named in the will, on the one part; and Anne Brett als Chapman, natural 
and lawful daughter of the said deceased, on the other part. 

Cope, 103. 

Nuncupative will of Sir Edward Pi.vcnON, knight, of Writtle in Essex, 
5 March 1626, proved 8 May 1627. First he said and declared that his 
debts should be paid out of his College leases; that his daughters should 
have two thousand pounds; that the leases should be conveyed to Mr. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in -England. 253 

Hone and Mr. Christopher Pinchon whereby the said debts and portions 
might, be paid. He gave to the Lady Weston a ring or piece of plate of 
five pound value, to Thomas Casbolt twenty pounds, to Sara Eve five 
pounds, to the cook five pounds, to John Fletcher ten pounds. Hh willed 
John Turneedge to be abated forty shillings yearly of his rent. To each 
of his other servants he gave forty shillings. To the poor of Writtle five 
pounds and of Roxwell five pounds. To M r . South vicar of Writtle five 
pounds. To M r . Leveutrope ten pounds. To Jeremy Williams ten pounds. 
To William Pinchon of Springfield a piece of plate of ten pounds. To 
Mr. Hone five pounds and to Mr. Christopher Pinchon five pounds. And 
be nominated and appointed his son John Pinchon to be his executor. 

No names of witnesses are registered. The will was proved bv John 
Pinchon the son. Skynner, 50. 

[A noble monument was erected to the memory of Sir Edward by his wife 
Dorothea Weston, the sister of Sir Richard Weston, afterwards Earl of Port- 
land, upon the north side of the chancel of Writtle Church, within the rails, on 
which are emblazoned the Pynchon arms, quartered with the Empson. This 
establishes the connection between these two families beyond all doubt. — T.R.P.] 

Henry Pinchion in the Co. of Middlesex gen 1 .. 3 May 1630, proved 
2 December 1G30. To be buried in the parish of St. Andrews Holborn. 
To the poor five pounds. To Joan Damm daughter of Mr John Damm. 
a cutler in Holborn, one hundred pounds. To Elen Damm wife of the 
said John forty pounds because she hath been ever careful of me. To 
Francis Damm son of the said John twenty pounds because he was ever 
willing to do my commands. To John Damm son of the said John ten 
pounds. To Elen Damm daughter of the said John teu pounds. To my 
brother Mr Christopher Pinchion a ring of gold to the value of five pounds. 
To my sister Jane Hone wife to Bartholomew Hoane five pounds to be 
bestowed in a ring or as she shall please. And if any man or woman shall 
justly demand any debt due to them from me I desire my executor to give 
any such person twelve pence in full payment of their debt. I give and 
bequeath to my loving friend Mr. Thomas Ryley, servant to Mr. Meautys, 
five pounds. And of this my last will and testament I constitute and ordain 
Mr. John Damm of Holborn aforesaid my true and lawful executor. 

Probate was granted as above to John Damm the executor named in the 
will, letters of administration of the goods of the deceased which had been 
granted to a certain Christopher Pinchion in the month of May last (as if 
the deceased had been intestate) having been revoked. 

Sentence for the confirmation of the foregoing will was pronounced 2 De- 
cember 1630 (testator being called of the parish of St. Andrews Holborn) in a 
case between John Damm the executor &c. on the one part and Christopher 
Pinchion and Jane Hone, wife of Bartholomew Hone, brother and sister of 
the deceased, on the other part. Scroope, 111. 

Dorothie Da vies the only daughter of Matthew Davies late Doctor 
of Divinity and vicar of Writtle iu Essex, 13 April 1634. proved 2-1 Octo- 
ber 1634. Mary Davies, widow, my dear and right well beloved mother to 
be my sole executrix. Lands in Roxwell and Writtle, viz', my farm or 
tenement called Owsdon's, now in the occupation of Henry Sharpe. My 
capital messuage called the New House, the lands for the most pare in the 
occupation of Francis Purchase. Edward Bogges the son of my beloved 
half brother. Christmas day my birthday. I bequeath the reversion of 
my house and lauds called Newhouse, in the possession or occupation of 

TOL. XL VIII. 23 



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254 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

my mother Mary Davies and the said Francis Purchase, unto Thomas 
Boages son of the said Mary Davies my mother and my well beloved half 
brother. To Sir Thomas Elliott, knight, my uncle, twenty shillings to buy 
him a ring. To Edward Boosey and Jane his wife, my sister, twenty shil- 
lings apiece (for rings). To Edward, Mary and Elizabeth Boosey, son and 
daughters of my brother Edward Boosey Doctor in Divinity, ten shillings 
apiece. To Thomas Newbr.rgh and Mary his wife my sister, now in Ire- 
land, twenty shillings apiece (for rings). To their four children, by what 
name or names they be baptized, ten shillings apiece. To John Elliott 
gen*, my uncle and to Anne Elliott his wife twenty shillings apiece (for 
rings). To Anne Elliott daughter of my said uncle twenty shillings to 
buy her a ring. To Mary Elliott the daughter also of my uncle John 
Elliott (the same). To- Edward and Susanna Eliott, children of my said 
uncle John, ten shillings apiece. Item, I give unto Johu Pinchone my 
uncle and unto Hannah his wife twenty shillings apiece in several to be 
paid to them and either of them to buy them and either of them a ring. 
To Hannah and Sarah Pinchone daughters of my said uncle Johu Pinchone 
twenty shillings apiece (for rings). To my aunt Elizabeth Young widow 
twenty shillings to buy her a riEg. To John Young her son twenty shil- 
lings to buy him a ring. The same to Elizabeth and Edward Young, 
children of Aunt Young. To my well beloved kinsman John Lukyne my 
great English bible, Mr. Bilston's books and three silver gilt spoons which 
my god mother gave me. To Constautine Young, my aunt Young's son, 
one good book to be delivered to him upon demand. To John Piuchone 
son of my uncle John Pinchone one good book &c. To my kius women 
Alice Briggett and Jane Lukyne, sisters of my kinsman Johu Lukyne. one 
handkerchief apiece presently after my death. To Anne Cragge my white 
box now standing in the New house and one other box now remaining in 
the house of my uncle John Eliott in London. To John Collyu the son of 
James Collyn of Chelmsford, my godson, twenty shillings. I do heartily 
desire my well beloved brother Edw T ard Boosey of Willingall Spain, Essex, 
to be overseer &c. Seager, 87. 

Mart Pinchox wife of Christopher Pinchon, citizen and woodmongei 
of London, and wife and now executrix of the last will and testament of 
Maximilian Dancy late of London, merchant, deceased, her will made 
5 March 1650, proved 26 April 1651. Whereas. the said Christopher Pin- 
chon and I the said Mary, his wife, by our Indenture of assignment, under 
our hands and seals, bearing date 19 January 1649, did grant &c. to John 
Symonds citizen and cutler of Loudon and Miles Skinner of London mer- 
chant one Indenture of Lease, bearing date 30 November 1635, made and 
granted by and from Richard Russell of Rederith, Surrey, mariner, bv the 
name of Richard Russell of Ratclitie, Middlesex, mariner, unto the said 
Maximilian Dancy of certain messuages or tenements, wharves and other 
premises &c. in Rederith for the term of one hundred four score and nine- 
teen years from the date of the said Indenture at and for the yearly rent of 
one pepper corn payable as in and by the said Indenture of lease is appointed 
(the foregoing assignment was for "the purposes of a Trust). Myles Skin- 
ner the surviving trustee. My daughter Mary Dancy. My son Maximilian 
Dancy. My friend Mr. Thomas Perryman. Grey, 94. 

John Ptkchox of Writtle Esq. 22 March 1650, proved 20 October 
1654. Lands held of the Warden and scholars of St. Mary College of Win- 






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1894.] 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



255 




Chester in Oxford, commonly called New College in Oxford. My uncle 
Sir Thomas Tempest, knight. My cousin John Tempest, his son. My 
wife Anne Pynchon. My lands in Bradwell juxta mare. Essex. My 
daughters. Their mother my wife. My sou if God send me oue. 

Alchin, -453. 

[This John Pynchon, who died in 1654, was the son of Sir Edward Pynchon 
and his wife Dorothy Weston, and the father ofi 
Bridget Pynchon. who married William, Baron Petre 
of Writtle* for his second wife. He was buried in 
the chancel of Writtle Church. Upon the memorial 
tablet which covers his body are engraved the ac- 
companying amis of the Pynchon family, with the 
following inscription: " Here lyetu the body of 
John Pynchon of Writtle Esq. sou of Sir Edward 
Pynchon of Writtle Kii't. who departed this life the 
30 th day of July, 1654 : and also the body of Edward 
Pynchon Gent, son of the said John Pynchon Esq. 
who departed this life the l:? ,h of Feb'ry 1072 : and 
also Ann, wife of the said John Pynchon Esq r who 
departed this lifeye 10 th day of May 1075."— T.R.P.] Fyxckon. 

"William Pyxchon, of Wrasbury, alias Wyrardisbury, in the County 
of Bucks, gentleman, 4 October 16(32, proved 8 December 1662, by John 
Wickens, special executor, under the limitations specified in the said will. 

My chief executor is at present absent. To Elizabeth, Mary and Rebecca 
Smith, daughters of rny sou Master Henry Smith, and to his son Elisha 
Smith twenty pounds apiece, to be paid by my son M r . Henry Smith at the 
time of their marriage, as he did unto Martha Smith, out of a bond which 
he owes me, of two hundred and twenty pounds; to my daughter Anne 
Smith the rest of the said bond (of 220' 1 ') with the overplus of interest. 
To the children of my daughter Margaret Davis, of Boston in New Eng- 
land, deceased, videlicet unto Thomas. Benjamin and William Davis, ten 
pounds apiece to be paid by my sou M r . Henry Smith. To my son Master 
John Pynchon, of Springfield iu New England (a sum) out of the bond 
which he owes me of one hundred and six pounds, dated 15 April 1654. 
Whereas my son M r . Henry Smith hath promise to pay unto me his debts 
which have been long due to him in New England and a horse of his at Barba- 
does, for the satisfaction of an old debt that he owes me, in my Quarto Vellum 
Book, in page 112, I bequeath them to the children of my son Master 
Elizur Holioke in New England &c. To the poor of Wravsberie three 
pounds. Son M r . Johu Pynchon of Springfield in New England to be 
executor, to whom the residue, provided he pay to Joseph and Johu Pyn- 
chon and to Mary and Hetabell Pynchon twenty pounds apiece. Mr. 
Wickens, citizen and girdler of London, and Mr. Henry Smith of Wrays- 
bery to be overseers. Eriend M r . John Wickens to be my executor 
touching the finishing of my administration business concerning the estate 
of Master Nicholas Ware in Virginia, whose estate is thirty pounds in a 
bill of Exchange to Capt. Pensax and about eighteen thousand of tobacco, 
in several bills made over by M r . Nicholas Ware to Capt. Johu Ware of 
Virginia <fcc. To beloved sister Jane Tesdall of Abington twenty pounds; 
to sister Susan Piatt twenty pounds, as a token of my cordial love; certain 
clothiug to Mary, Elizabeth and Rebecca Smith. Laud, 156. 

[The will cf Master Henry Smith of Wraysbury, who married Anne, one of 
the daughters of the foregoing testator and is mentioned in the above will, has 
already "been given in my Gleanings for April 1S93 (n. 281 of Register). My 



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256 . Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

friends in New England can give a better account than I of "William Pincbon 
himself and of his family connections in New England. As to his connections in 
old England and especially with the Pincbon family of Writtle the wills I have 
given speak pretty clearly. My friend Dr. Mar-hall writes me from Heralds' 
College that in both the Visitations of Essex now in the College (that of 1614 
and that of 1634) in which the pedigree of this family is entered it begins with 
John Pincbon and Jane his wife. So too does the Visitation of London of 1633-34, 
see Harl. So. Pub.). But the Visitation of Essex of 1612 published by the Harle- 
ian Society gives Nicholas Pincbon of London as the father of John. This can- 
not be true, as any clear headed reader will see who shall carefully examine and 
compare the wills I have given. Nicholas Pincbon undoubtedly belonged to the 
Writtle family for he ordered that a priest should sing in the church of Writtle 
for his soul and the souls of his father and mother &g. for one whole year; aud 
he mentions his ;i cousin" John Pinchon dwelling in Writtle. For "cousin" 
the most probable heading, in modern language, is nephew; so the reference may 
be to that very John Pinchon with whom the pedigree starts in the Visitations 
now in the College of Anus. John died in 1573, and of his will I hare given 
a large abstract. Let any one read it and compare it with the will of William 
Pynchyn of Writtle who died in 15.52 and he cannot have the least doubt that 
John was the eldest son and heir of William. The latter calls himself " ye- 
ln.in," while the son, who had risen in the world, calls himself gentleman. 
William Pinchon, I suspect, was an inn-keeper who owned and occupied the 
Swan, in which there was a room called the Warden's Chamber, probably because 
the Warden of New College, Oxford, was in the habit of lodging there when he 
visited Writtle to look af tev the landed property of his College in that neighbor- 
hood. John Pinchon, the son, I would suggest, acted as bailiff or laud steward 
for the Warden of New College aud held the lease of East Hall in Bradwell, the 
windmill and other properties of the College. William Pinchon named a daugh- 
ter Dennys Pinchon. John Pinchon referred to his sister Dennis as the wife of 
George Mansfield. William Pinchon gave to his son Edward certain property 
called Skyggs and Tumors, with remainder to John. John Pinchon bequeathed 
Skyggs and Turnors to his son Edward. William Pinchon. after making be- 
quests to two married daughters and their children, bequeathed to Elizabeth 
Pinchon, the daughter of John and Helen Pinchon, certain lands in Iloxwell 
called Cookes or Cockes. John Pinchon gave his daughter Elizabeth five hun- 
dred marks upon condition that she should release her title to Cookes land in 
Roxwell and to all the profits and rents due since the death of John's father. 
William Pinchon also gave to the same Elizabeth certain real estate then occu- 
pied by John Newtou. John Pinchon also required his daughter Elizabeth to 
surrender to John Newtou all the interest which she might claim, by legacy or 
gift " of her grandfather," it certain tenements which John Pinchon had sold 
to the said John Newton. All this, I claim, abundantly proves my proposition 
that the John Pinchon who heads the pedigree in the Visitations of Essex 
in the College of Arms, as well as in the Visitation of London 1633-4, was 
not the son (a younger son at that) of Nicholas Piuchon, but was the eldest 
son and heir of the William Pinchon of Writtle who died in 1552, and that the 
nearest relationship which Nicholas Pinchon bore to him could have been that 
of uncle only. 

Another statement which I dispute is that Nicholas Pinchon was of Wales. 
I find not the least evidence to support this statement. On the contrary the 
evidence of his will points to Writtle as his early home and that of his parents, 
and this family name is found in Essex, and in the very next Hundred to Writ- 
tie, fully a century earlier. In Morant's Essex (vol. 1, p. 305 &c.) I note that 
certain lands in the manor of Barrow Hall in Wakering Magna were conveyed 
in 1407 to John Pyncherne, that in 1420 Robert Warenor and others granted 
their il maner of Barwe Hall " to Thomas Pynchon and Alice his wife, and that in 
1458 Thomas Pynchon, son of the last mentioned, and Elizabeth his wife granted 
this maner and certain lands and tenements in Prittlewell, Canvey Island &c. to 
William Lawzell gen'. &c. "Bradwell juxta mare, where the Pinchon family after- 
wards held the manor of East Hall by lease from the Warden and Fellows of 
New College, Oxford, was, again, in the very next Hundred North of the last 
and North^East of the Hundred in which lies Writtle. In my opinion this is 
the neighborhood where one should look for the earlier generations of our 
Pinchon family. 



1894. 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



257 



Sometime ago I foimd in the Stowe MSS. at tlie British Museum (MS. 612, 
L. 63 b ) * the folio-wing pedigree, -without dates : — 



JOH'ES STEPHEN 



filia & here? Joh'is Atheward 
(or Altheward). 



Ric'us Stephen^ filia 



Campyn. 



1 Elizabeth, 
uxor K : ci. 
Evcrard. 

Ric'us Everard. 
Ric'us Everard. 



3 Johanna, uxor 
Stephen Sampforth, 



T 



John Sampforth: 



1 Joh'es Pinchon. 2 Edw. 
Pinchon. 



T 



3 nenric 
Pinchon. 



4 uxor Thoniae Young. 

(Male is9ue given, &c.) 

:Oioni?ia filia 
Kici. Everard 
de Walthani Magna. 



Will's 2 Joh'es 

Pinchon. Pinchon. 



3 Edw. 
Pinchon. 



Joh'es 
Sampforth. 



N'ich'us 
Sampforth 



Will's 
Sampforth. 



No dates are given in this pedigree, but from another source I learn that the 
Richard Everard who married Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Stephens gen'., 
died (or -was buried) 29 Nov. 1561. It might be worth the while for au expert 
specialist to follow this matter up. It looks as if the pedigree had been con- 
structed to show the descent of certain property of the Stephen family through 

* The Stovve MSS. in the British Museum contain, in my judgment, one of the richest 
and most valuable'heraldic and genealogical collections in the Museum. My attention was 
first called to thorn nearly ten years ago by Mr. Kensington, one of the well known officials 
in the MSS. Department. There was no index to them". The only guide to their use was a 
bound Catalogue such as was made np for the auction sale of these MSS. This asa rule, 
simply indicated that such and such numbers were genealogical and heraldic, giving but 
the slightest indications of the real nature of their contents. Only quite recently have the 
authorities begun to put these collections in order and, as I have understood, with a view 
to indexing them. The numbers of both books and leaves have been changed. Those 
given above are the new numbers. According to the old numbering they were MS. 656, 
L. 56*>. xjp to the present time the only wav ro arrive at a knowledge of the contents of 
these volumes has been to go through them leaf by leaf, as I have done with most of them. 
I have yet to find the antiquary who knows much about them ; on the contrary, I have had 
the gratification of making known to most of my friends their genealogical value. Among 
them I found a pedigree of John Rogers the 'martyr which Col. Chester knew nothing 
about, and which differs somewhat from the pedigrees already known to that distinguished 
antiquary. Here also I found an account of the Dummer family which I regret that I 
could not have come across in Col. Chester's lifetime that I might have called his attention 
to it. It was a petition of Edmund Dummer of Swathling in the parish of North Stone- 
ham in Southampton, with a pedigree attached, setting forth his -claim to a descent from 
the ancient family of Cummer of bommer and indicating the Hue of descent. I made it 
known to Prof, and Mrs. Salisbury, and take it for granted that it has been noticed in their 
new volume of Family Memorials, which I understand has been recently published but 
which I have not vet had the pleasure of examining. I found too an excellent pedigree of 
the family of Moo'die of Garsdon and one of Dunch of Wittenham showing the ancestry of 
our Lady Deborah Moody and her husband. A grant of arms to Hopefor Kendall of 
Milend, Middlesex, at once suggests Boston and Bengali's Dock. A pedigree ot Fairfax 
shows the inteimarriage of Ann Fairfax with Maior Lawrence Washington and afterwards 
with Col. George Lee. The Arms of Sir Richard Temple of Stow in the Co. of Bucks. K. B. 
and Bar', would interest some of our Boston friends, as would also a beautiful collection of 
arms, without pedigrees, probablv indicating Temple matches. There is a roash, torn and 
incomplete Pinckney pedigree. The best pedigree of Jekyll I have found I hope soon to 
make use of in m v account of the family of John Jekyll of Boston, Massachusetts. I hive 
extracted also a large pedigree of Tindall, beginning with Henrictis Comes Lutzenburgh 
(father of Henricus "Imperator Germanic) and including the family ol Sir John Tmdall, 
one of whose children is thus described, viz'. " Margareta uxor Joins \Vmthrop ar. qui 
migrauit in novam Anglia'm." One of the curiosities in this collection :s a Mil o! very 
rude and ancient wall paper, showing on the back of it the ancestiy of Jesus Chnst and ot 
King Josiah. Another curious pedigree is that of the Greek Gods and the Titans. 

Hexut F. Watees. 

VOL. XLVIII. 23* 



'258 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

the male issue of the. four daughters and co-heirs of Richard Stephen. At any 
rate it agrees finely with my theory of the descent of the Pinchon family of 
Writtle from William Pinchon. and is itself confirmed by the will of William 
Pinchon, who mentioned a brother Richard Everard- If true, however, it shows 
that the wife Elizabeth mentioned in that will was not his first wife and the 
mother of his sons, for she was evidently an Allen and had sisters xigiies wife 
of Edmond (or Edward) Church and Joan wife of Kobert Grove. 

Besides the pedigrees of this family published in the Visitations of Essex 
and London, the only others I have seen here in print are those in Morant's 
Hist, of Es-ex (11-65), Gyll's Hist, of Wraysbury and F. G. Lee's Hist, of 
Thame. Morant deduces the family from Nicholas Pinchon of Wales, one of 
the Sheritt's of Loudon A. D. 1532, "but gives no evidence in favor of it, only 
referring to a p digree which he describes as " now before us.' 1 He speaks of 
John Berners, Esq. as having sold the manor of Purges probably to the Pinchon 
family. If so there is not slightest evidence that Nicholas Pinchon had any- 
thing to do with it. In fact I have not found a bit of evidence to show that he 
owned any land at all, whether in Essex or elsewhere ; and I would ask why, 
since he made a will, did he not make a testameutary disposition of real estate 
if he had any? William Pinchon of Writtle, who was undoubtedly a kinsman of 
Nicholas and possibly his brother, did possess considerable landed property; 
and this, as we haVe seen, descended chielly to his sons and especially to John, his 
eldest son and heir. The latter doubtless made large additions, and probably 
through leases from the Warden and Fellows of New College of their manor of 
East Hall and other estates which we know he held. These leases we have 
traced, through the eldest male line, to his great graudson John Pinchon who 
died in 1654. 

ThG pedigree given in Gyll's History of Wraysbury also shows Nicholas as 
the father of the John Pinchon who married Jane Empsou and died 29 Nov. 
1573. This was nndoubledly taken from Morant. It then continues the line 
through John's son William w r ho married Rose Redding and died 13 Oct. 1592. 
We arc told that William and Rose were the parents of Sir Edward (of Writtle) 
" who died 6 May 1625," Henry, who is described as of Wraysbury, Chris- 
topher and a Nicholas, wh j is also described as of Wraysbury in 1053. This 
Nicholas is giveu as the father of William Pinchon who went to Connecti- 
cut and returned and was buried 7 Nov. 1602. William's son John, we are told, 
was of New England and had a daughter married to Henry Smith. 

This, surely, is the wildest of guesswork. Some of the statements deserve to 
be called sheer nonsense. In the first place, Henry Pinchon is shown by the 
record to have been of St. Andrew's Holboru. In the next place William and 
Rose Pinchon had no sou named Nicholas. According to the epitaph in Writtlo 
church (see Morant) thev had six sous, and we know just who they were, viz*. 
Peter, who was eldest so'n and heir at the death of his father, John, who was 
eldest brother and heir of Peter at his death, Sir Edward, who was eldest brother 
and heir of John, at the latter"s decease, Henry, William and Christopher. There 
was no Nicholas among them. Thirdly, William Pinchon of New England and 
Wraysbury could not have been a grandson of William and Rose Pinchon. for 
he was too old. He was three score years and ten at his death in 1662. Now 
Peter, eldest son and heir of William" (and Rose) died in his minority without 
male issue. John, the next brother and heir, also died a minor and without 
male issue, and at his death (1 June 40 :h Elizabeth) his brother Edward, who 
succeeded as eldest brother and heir, was then a lad only seventeen years old. 
His young kinsman William Pinchon of Springfield (afterwards of New Eng- 
land) was then living a boy of six. Moreover Sir Edward Pinchon of Writtle 
who, we are told, died 6 May 1625, must have come to life again to make his 
will (q. v.). We have only to note and compare these facts to show how ridicu- 
lous such guesses are. 

Merely noting that Dr. F. G. Lee's History of Thame contains the same old 
error (borrowed I suppose fiom Morant) of the descent from Nicholas Pinchon. 
let me now sugsest the true line of ancestry of our William Pinchon. He was, 
I believe, that William Pinchon of Springfield to whom Sir Edward Pinchon 
bequeathed a piece of plate of ten pounds (see his will). This William was 
undoubtedly Sir Edward's cousin german, the eldest son and heir of John Pin- 
chon of Spriugrield (who died 1610). We have seen that he named in his will 
two sisters, Jane and Susan, which were the names of two of the daughters of 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 259 

John and Frances (Brett) Pinchon. and we know that he gave to that beautiful 
town which he founded in Western Massachusetts the name of Springfield, 
undoubtedly in memory of his old home in England. His father. John Pinchon, 
was clearly the second son of John and Jane Pinchon of Writtle, as is shown 
by his possession of the lands &c. in Wike Street (see the wills of himself and 
his father). 

It may be well just here to iusert certain notes gathered years ago in the 
Public Record Office, Fetter Lane. From mv notes of Lay Subsidies in Chelms- 
ford Hundred, Co. Essex, I find that in the39«> of Eliz: (1597) John Pynchon 
gen 4 , was taxed for lands in Springfield, while Pose Pinchyn. widow, and Edward 
Pinchyn jun r . gen', were also taxed for lands in Writtle. Later I find that in 
the 23 d of James (I) the name of William Pynchon appears ou the Subsidy List 
of Springfield, instead of his father's, and for the same amount (eight shilliugs), 
and agaiu on the list taken the -1 th of Charles (I). 

Turning to my notes of Fines I ~et much more valuable information. In the 
Fines of Hillary Term 35 Eliz. (1502) I find the following:— 

Thomas Wale quer. and Henry Pynchon, gen. and Margaret his wife 
deforc, for certain premisses iu Radwinter (Essex), with a warranty against 
the heirs of Margaret. 

This must be Henry the son of William and brother of John Pinchon of Writ- 
tle, whom his niece (by marriage) Mrs. Rose Pinchon referred to in her will 
(1599) as then living. 

In the Fines (for Essex) of Michaelmas Term 37- 8 of Eliz : (1595) I find : 

John Pynchon gen. quer. and Jasper Vessy aud Margaret his wife def. 
for one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 30 acres of land, 6 acres of 
meadow, 20 acres of pasture and 4 acres of woodland &c. in Daubury. 
Consideration 100£ sterling. 

Paschal Term 38 Eliz : John Pynchon gen. quer. and Robert Pease 
gen. aud Martha his wife, def. for one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 20 
acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, 16 acres of pasture &c. in SpriDgfieid. 
Consideration 80£ sterling. 

Hillary Term 5 Car (I) Thomas Home quer. and William Pinchon gen. 
and Ann his wife, deforciant, for one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 
26 acres of land and 10 acres of pasture in Springtield. Consideration 
60£ sterling. 

Here we learn, first, that Henry Pinchon was married (a fact not known 
before), and we get the Christian name of his wife; secondly, the exact year 
when John Pinchon of Springfield acquired his estate in that town ; and thirdly, 
the year when William Pinchon, his son and heir, sold that estate, and we get, 
in addition, the Christian name of William's wife. These last facts are of 
immense value; for I note that in that very Term (HiU. 5 Tar.) our (Governor 
Winthrop was making conveyances of real estate, and we know that in that very 
year Gov. Winthrop made New- England his home, and with him went a gentle- 
man of some importance named WUliam Pinchon who founded our .Springfield, 
and he too had a wife named Aun. All this, in connection with the mention, in 
his will, of two of his sisters (to which I have already referred) makes our 
case about as strong as circumstantial evidence can make it. 

We are now therefore prepared to construct a pedigree of the family, and 
have prepared a table Which will be found on the next page. 

It will be noticed that I do not. in this pedigree, indicate the exact relation- 
ship which Nicholas Pinchon of London bore to William L'inchon of Writtle, 
for, I confess, upon further consideration, it seems too doubtful. 1 he ques- 
tion of their exact relationship hinges entirely upon the identiikatio"ri of that 
"cousin John Pynchon dwelling in Writtell " mentioned in Nicholas l'iueuon's 
will. John, the son of William Pinchon, was probably living at the time 
(1528-9). Nicholas Pinchon made that bequest, since, as we have sec-u, fie was 
old enou-h to be married and have issue before July 1551, wnen his father's 
will was made. But is it so probable that he was anything but a mere child 
in 1528-9, and, if so, id it very likely that a mere child wouid be described as 






PINCHON PEDIGREE. 

- PINCHON of Writtle. 



•=Nichoias Pinchon: 

cit. ami butcher 

Of London. Will, 

1533, mentions 

"cousin John 

Pinchon dwelling 

in Writu-11." 



Agues . . . 
survived 
her hus- 
band. 



of 
Nicholas 
Finchon. 



Edward. William. Robert. John. 



dau. of— William Pinchon^Elizabeth, da. 

Rich. Ste- of* Writtle, per'ps of ..... called 
phen, and an inn keeper. a sister of Ki- 
sister of Will, 1552, calls chard Allyn or 
Rich. Ever- Richard Everard Allen by her 
ard's wife. brother. husband. 



T 



Edward, gets=, da. 

Skygges and of 

Turners with living 
remainder to loyyT 
bro. John. 
Living 15W. 



Henrys 

living 

in 1599. 



;Margaret, 
da. of 

(see Fines). 



I II I I 
Joane= Brytton. 

Joyee=John Athye. 

Agne3. 

Margery. 

Dennys=George ManniTeld. 



Elizabeth 
gets Cookes land 
in Roxwell from 
William Finchon. 



of .Sir Richard Emp- Esq., LL.l). Married 
sou, knight. Will 15 July, 1570, at Terling 



proved 14" Feb., 15S7 



1 2 2 

Helyn, da. of=John Pynchon of Writtle, eldest=Jane, da. and coheir=Rt. Hon. Thos. Wilson 
.... Named | son and heir. Probably bailiff 
inwillofWil-i for lands owned by New Coll.. 
liaml'inchou I Oxford. Held the manor of East 
her father-in- 1 Hall in Bradwell of New Coll. 
law. | Died i'J Nov., 1573 (Inq. p. m.). 

Will names sister Dennys, and 

I refers to da. Elizabeth as owning 

I Cookes land in Roxwell since 
death of his father. 



(P. R.). Will proved 
9 July, 35S^. 



(Qu j— Elizabeth=Geoffrey Gates (or Gatts) 
these of Bury -St. Edmunds, 

two?) — Jane=Andrew Paschal (or Fascull) 
of Springfield. 



William Pinchon^Rose. da. of . . 



eldest son & heir. 
Obt. 13 Oct. 34 
Eliz.(Inq.p.m.). 



Redding of Pinner 
Midd. and sister of 
George Redding. 
C son's and 3 daus. 
(epitaph). Will 
pro. 19 April, 1399. 
Mentions bro. John 
Pinchon, his wife 
and children. 



2 I 
John Pinchon of= 
Springfield. Gets I 
lands, &c, in i 

Weeke Street, 
Writtle, fromhis 
father, inq. p.m. j 
Anno IX.Jaco'oi. 
Will 1610, orders 
lands in Weeke 
Street sold. 



Frances, da. of 
. .. . Brett and 
sister of Tho- 
mas Brett of 

Terling, whose 

will (1676) 
name? her and 
her children. 



Edward Pinchon. 
Gets Skygges and 
Tumors from his 
father. 



1 I 

Peter, son 
and heir. 
je. 15 yrs. 
in 15ST2. 



2 ! 

John, brother 

and heir of 
Peter. Obiit 
incustod R'ne 
lo Junii A . 
XL Eliz.(Incj, 
p.m.) 



Sir Edward Pinchon=Dorothy, da. of Sir 



ot Writtle, knt., bro. 

ther ." 

Aged 

decease. Will 1627. 

Bequest to Win. Pin. 

ebon of Springfield 



Jerome Weston, 
eir of John. I knt., of Roxwell, 
yrs, at John's | who in will (ICoi) 
calls Sir Edward 
Pinchon son in- 
law. 



John Pinchon of Writtle, Esq. Mary, uxor Walter 

Married and left issue. Overbury, Esq. 

Will 1654. - 

Elizabeth. 



T 



Henry, 
obt. s. d. 
will 1C30. 

William, 
obt. s. p. 
will 1612. 

Christopher 
married and 
had issue 
(see Vis. of 
London). 



Elizabeth, 1 
uxor. Rich.! 
ard Weston! 
aft. Earl of 

Portland. 

Jane, uxor 
Bartholo- 
mew 
Hone. 



Anne. 



1 I 

WILLIAM PINCHON 
of Springfield, Essex; aft. of 
N. E. Returned to England. 
Buried at VYiayshury, Bucks. 
Will proved S Dec. J662. Names 
sisters Jane and Sasan. 



2 I 
Peter. 



I I I 

Annes. 



Alice. 



Jane, uxor Susanna, 
.... Tesdall. uxor 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 261 

" my cousin dwelling in "WritteU " ? To my mind such a description rather Bug*- 
pests a grtfwn man or, at least, one nearly approaching maturity. On the other 
hand I have not seeu elsewhere the slightest evidence of the existence of any 
other John Pinchon "dwelling in WritteU" than this very John, the sou of 
William Finchon. Of course it is possible to assume that William Pinchon had 
two groups of children by separate matches and born a considerable interval 
apart. John Pinchon being the eldest born by the first wife. In the absence of 
certain knowledge I must leave the whole matter as an open question. For 
the same reason I do not show on the pedigree the exact maternity of William 
Pinchon's children, although the little extract from the Stowe MSS. shows 
pretty clearly that John, Edward and Henry at any rate, were his issue by the 
daughter of Richard Stephen. 

Nor have I gathered any evidence to confirm the statement that Jane the 
(second) wife of John Pinchon of Writtle was a daughter and co-heir of Sir 
Richard Empson, knight. I take that statement from the visitations. By the 
wav, I notice that while Mofarit savs that Sir Richard Empson was beheaded 
17 August 1509, Dr. F. G. Lee says he was executed 18 August 1510, a discrep- 
ancy of a year and a clay. 

The marriage of the widow, .Mrs. Jane Pinchon, with Secretary Wilson, 
Morant seems to doubt. And we should not. gather from the will of the Secre- 
tary any evidence at all of a connection with the Pinchons, while his widow 
Mrs. Jane Wilson, though she describes herself as his widow, does not refer to 
his children or family in any part of her will. Now in September 1891, when 
I accompanied my friend Mr. Frank F. Starr into the County of Essex on a 
hunt after Goodwins, I was able to secure the following from the Parish Regis- 
ter of Terling : — 

Married 
1576, 15 July~the R'. Worshipf 1 . Mr. Thomas Wilson Esq., Master of 
the Requests, to Mrs Jane Pinchiu of Writtle gen'., wid., p virt. dispens. 
concessae ab Edwino Epo. Lond. A . Dili 1-376 et A . Rg ne . Eliz. XVIII. 

Mr. John Pinchon of Writtle in his will named a brother in law Mr. Peter 
Osborne and his widow, Mrs. Jane Wilson, referred to the Right Worshipful 
her loving brother Mr. Osborue of the Exchequer. Just how the relationship 
came about I cannot now say. Moraut's Hist, of Essex (vol. i. p. 323) under 
So. Fambridge, gives some account of the Osborne family (whence the Osbornes 
of Chicksands, "Bedfordshire) from which it appears that there was a Peter 
Osborne, born A. D. 1521, active and zealous for the Reformation, Keeper of 
the Privy Purse to K. Edw. VI. who granted to him and his heirs the office of 
Treasurer's Remembrancer in the Exchequer. In Qu. Elizabeth's reign he was 
one of the High Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Anairs. 

According to Morant. Edward the son of Johu Pinchon was knighted and 
died s. p. His father left him Skyggs and Turnors. but that may have been 
only a reversionary interest, since his uncle Edward, the brother of Johu, who 
inherited this propertv from his father (with remainder to John) outlived his 
eldest brother, as is shown by the will of Mrs. Rose Pinchon, who referred to 
him as " uncle Edward " aud still living and having a wife then living. In con- 
nection with this I have noted elsewhere that an Edward Pinchon is said to 
have married Catherine daughter of Thomas Bolstred. 

I have followed the Visitations in giving to John and Jane Pinchon two 
daughters, viz'. Elizabeth, the wife of Geffrey Gates, and Jane the wife of 
Andrew Paschal. I believe however that Elizabeth, at any rate, was that 
daughter of John by his first wife (Helyn) to whom her grandfather left Cookes 
lands &c. in Roxwell. while as to Jane it is noticeable that we do not get any 
mention of her in wills, especially that of her assumed mother. Nor have I evi- 
dence to confirm the statement that Elizabeth, one of the daughters of William 
and Rose Pinchon, became the wife of Richard Weston, afterwards Earl of Port- 
land, though I see no reason to doubt it. 

What relation Ralfe Evered bore to this family and who the Elizabeth Pyn- 
chion was whom he called " my mother" I cannot say. 

Hannah, wife of John Pinchon, whom Dorothy Davies (1634) called "uncle" 
in her will, was. I have fouud, one of the daughters of Edward Elliot of New- 
land by Jane, his wife, one of the three daughters and co-heirs of James Gedge 
of Shentleld aud Newland Esq. She had three brothers, Thomas (afterwards 



262 . Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Sir Thomas Elliot), Edward, on whose goods admon. was granted to his sis- 
ters Dorothy and Sanaa, 14 May 1002, and John Elliot. Mrs. Pinchon's sister 
Dorothy -was, I suppose, the wife of John Colien of Writtle, gen'., and another 
sister, Elizabeth, was married to Mr. John Yonge or Young of lloxwell. 

The Inquisitiones post mortem in the Public Record QtYice concerning the 
estates of this family I have not personally examined, bnt in Add. MSS. 19935- 
199S9, British Museum, beius Jckvli's Collections for a Historv of the Co. of 
Essex, I rind (B. 3, L. 119) that by an Inquisition held 4 Sept. XVIII Eliz ; it 
was found that John Pinchon Esq. died 29 Nov. A°. 17 (?) Eliz: and William 
Pinchon was his son and heir and of the age of twenty years on the 25 th day of 
April last. 

By an Inquisition held 19 Dec. 35 Eliz : it was found that William Pinchon 
died 13 Oct. last and Peter was his son and heir and of the age of fifteen years. 

By an Inquisition held 4 July -10 Eliz : it was found that John Pinchon, brother 
and heir of Peter Pinchon, son and heir of William Pinchon, Esq., died in Ward 
of the Queen 1 June last and Edward was his brother and heir and of the age of 
seventeen years. 

Stowe MS. N°. 93 (old number^ also contains an Alphabetical Table of Post 
Morteins, Essex Co. , arranged in diifereut groups according to the different reigns. 
The first (small) group covers the reign of Henry VII, though I noted one 
which was taken 22 E. IV. Then comes a large group headed " Temp. H. 
Octavi, Virtute Bris." Next "Escaetriae Virt. Officii temp. H. Octavi." Then 
"Inq. capt. in Com. Essex temp. Ed. VI Virt. Bris." The next was headed 
" Maria et Ph'us et Maria." In none of these lists did I notice any Piuchons. 
In the next list following (a long one) which was headed "Inq. capt. temp. 
R'nae Eliz : " I found the three referred to above, i. e. that of John in the 18 th 
year, William in the 35 th year, and John in the 40 th year of that reign. Then 
follow two "Inq. Capt. temp. E. Eliz: Virt. Officii" (no Pinchons). The next 
list, headed " Inq. Virt. Bris. temp. Jacobi Rs," contains one, that of John Pin- 
cheon, Anno 9 of that reign. This must be an Inquisition held after the death 
of John Pinchon of Springfield, the father of our William Pinchon of Massa- 
chusetts. 

All these Inquisitions (especially the first and last) should in my opinion be 
carefully examined by any one who purposes to make an exhaustive study of 
the history of this family. 

From my notes taken a" few years ago from the Calendars of Fines I learn that 
in Hillary Term of 1653 William Pynchon Esq. was a plaintiff ("quer.") against 
Andrew Kinge and others " deforc." for real estate in Wyrardisbury. Co. Bucks., 
and again in the same Term against Jo. Bland Esq. and others, for real estate 
in the same place. This means of course that he was a grantee and the others 
were grantors of such property . I have not examined the Feet of Fines them- 
selves in these cases, but think'it well to call attention to them. It was probably 
in that year (1G53) that he settled down in Wraysbury. I have no note of any 
Nicholas Pinchon purchasing land there in that year. I question the statement 
in Gyll. 

In conclusion I would say that I have spent a sreat deal of time, from first to 
last, over this problem, and my notes, I find, cover a good deal of space in 
these Gleanings, but I have by no means made an exhaustive study of the whole 
family. That I leave, as in all such cases, to the special enquirer, my own 
attention beine: limited to one or two doubtful links in the direct chain of ances- 
try of onr New England family. I trust that in this respect the careful reader 
will admit that if I have not absolutely proved I have at any rate shown it to 
be altogether probable that our William Pinchon was that William Pinchon of 
Springfield (Essex) eldest son and heir of John Pinchon of Springfield, who 
died in lfilO, that I have shown conclusively that this John Pinchon of Spring- 
field was the second son of John Pinchon of Writtle, who died in 1.573. and, 
finally, that I have absolutely proved that this John Pinchon of Writtle was the 
eldest sou and heir of William Pinchon of Writtle, who died in 155?, and not a 
son of Nicholas Pinchon of London. Henry F. Waters. 

William Pynchon of Wrasbury, whose will dated October 4, 1GG2, is printed 
on page 255, was the oldest son of John Pynchon of Springfield, and 
grandson of John and Jane Pynchon of Writtle. He was educated at Oxford, 
matriculating at Hart Hall, afterwards Hertford College, Oct. 14th, 1596, when ' 
he was eleven years old. It was then the custom to send boys to the Halls of 



1894.'] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 263 

Oxford at an early age. It was, no doubt, here that he acquired his familiarity 
With Latin, Greek and Hebrew, and accumulated those stores of theological 
and patriotic learning that he drew f rom later in Life in writing his various 
works. He was in 1G24 one of the church-wardens of Springfield parish in 
England. Married Anna Andrew, daughter of William Andrew of Twiwcll. 
County Northampton. One of the principal projectors of the settlement of 
New England. A patentee and assistant named iu the charter of the colony of 
Massachusetts Bay, granted by Charles 1st, March 28th. 102s. Very active in 
the organization of the Company, and present at ail the meetings in London ; 
also at the great meeting at Cambridge Aug. 26, 162f9. at which many of the 
assistants agreed to remove to New England " in case the whole government, 
together with the patent, were legally transferred and established to remain 
there." Sailed from the Isle of Wight March 2'Jth, 1030, in the fleet of three 
vessels that carried the charter over. In the same year the founder of Roxbury ; 
in 1G3G the founder of Springfield on the Connecticut river, upon the great 
Indian trail leading from the Narraganset andPequot country, via the Westin-ld 
river, to the Mohawk country above Albany, so that parties of Indians were 
constantly passing his door in both direction*. It was in this way that he be- 
came widely known and very influential among the various Indian tribes of the 
West, as well as those of New England. 

It was to him, and not to the Connecticut people, that the Mohawks sent, as 
proof of death, the scalp and hands of Sassacus the Peqiiot sachem who had 
fled to them for refuge after the destruction of the fort at Mistick. For many 
years, the name in common use among the Mohawks for the New Engianders, 
was " Pynchon's men," out of re<pect for their nearest New England neighbour 
at the mouth of the Agawam on the Connecticut River, just as they named the 
Dutch " Corlear's men" out of respect for Antony Von Coriear, the first 
of the Dutch with whom they were brought into intimate relations. And, so 
deeply rooted was their esteem for him and his family, more than a hundred 
years after this, in 1751, the chiefs of the Mohawks requested the Massachu- 
setts Government: "that Brigadier Dwight and the Colonel Pynchon of 
that day might be improved in future interviews, and as to Colonel Pynchon in 
particular they urged their acquaintance with his ancestors and their experience 
of their integrity." Sole magistrate and administrator of Indian affairs for ail 
Massachusetts west of Wachuset mountain. In 1G50 the author of the book 
entitled " The Meritorious Price of our Redemption." Iu 1652 returned to Eng- 
land. In 1G.">3 bought lands iu Wraysbury, County Bucks, near his Bulstrode 
relations in the adjoining parish of Horton, and directly opposite Masna Charta 
Island iu the Thames, and the field of Runnymede. Died Oct. 2'Jtb, 1GG2, and 
was buried in Wraysbury church-yard. His gold seal ring with the Pyuchon 
arms engraven upon it is still in existence and the possession of one of his de- 
scendants in the line of primogeniture. His only sou John Pynchon remained 
in New England, aud from him are descended all who bear the name iu America. 
— T.R.P.f 

Richard Fryer, citizen and fruiterer of London, 15 December 1GS6, 
proved 2G February 1687. He mentions lands, messuages, tenements and 
hereditaments in the parish of Staines aud in the parish of Eaisbury, in 
County Bucks, which he had lately purchased of John Pinchon, the elder, 
and John Pinchou, the younger, of New England, gentlemen. His legatees 
are wife Frances Fryer, son Peter Fryer, daughter Susanna Peake, son-in- 
law William Peake, Mary, Johanna and Elizabeth Fryer, daughters of 
brother Robert Fryer, late of Old Winsor, County Berks, fisherman, deceased 
and sister Elizabeth Whittle, of Old Winsor, widow. Ex ton, li. 

Luke Fawne citizen and stationer of London, 11 February 1665 and 
again signed, sealed, published and declared 17 March 16G5 (after several 
interlineations and erasures &c.) proved 29 March 1666. Imprimis I give 
and bequeath unto my kinswoman Mrs. Flizabeth Clement, living near 
Boston in New England, eldest daughter of my brother M r John Fawne, 
the sum of fifty pounds &c. to be paid into her own hands withiu four years 



2G4 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

after iny decease, and to her son Fawne Clement the like sum (at oue and 
twenty). To all the rest of the children which my said kinswoman now 
hath fifty pounds equally between them to be divided. To my slaughter 
in law Jane Serjant twenty pounds. To my cousin Stephen Serjant. her 
son, one hundred pounds, at four and twenty, and thirty pounds more to be 
laid out in putting him forth apprentice. To Jane Serjant, his sister, twenty 
pounds, in four years. To my kinsman Mr. Samuel Dixon one hundred 
pounds, in six months, and to his sou Samuel Dixon twenty pounds at one 
and twenty. To my cousin Capt. John Cressett and his wife thirty pounds 
to buy them mourning. To Edward Cresset the younger fifty pounds and 
to Elizabeth Cresset fifty pounds and to John Cressett the younger and 
Joseph Cressett twenty pounds apiece, in two years. To my cousin Valen- 
tine Shuckbrowe and Bridget his wife ten pounds and to her three children 
Jane, Sarah and Anne Youngers threescore pounds, equally to be divided 
between them in three years. To Valentine Younger forty shillings. To 
John Younger, Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, fifty pounds in one 
year. To my loving cousins Mr. Jonathan Mathew and Bridget his wife 
and their children now living one hundred pounds, equally between them 
to be divided, in four years. To Benjamin Mathew fifty pounds in four 
years. To my servant Brabazon Aylemer ten pounds. Sundry other ser- 
vants and friends. My cousin Mr. Henry Browne and his wife. Cousin 
Elizabeth Cressett, daughter of Capt. John Cressett. To my cousin Sarah 
Browne thirty pounds and to my cousin Samuel Symonds twenty pounds. 
The residue to my wife Dorothy Fawne, and I make her my said wife and 
my cousin Capt. John Cresset and my friend M r John Macook of London, 
stationer, my executors &c. Mico, 43. 

Dorothy Fawke of Hackney, Middlesex, widow, 15 September 1G66, 
proved 18 October 1666. My brother Thomas Weaver, the son of Ed- 
ward Wearer the elder. William, Robert and Thomas Heatley the three 
sons of my sister Elizabeth Heateley wife of Gabriel Heateley, apothecary, 
deceased. The Company of Stationers. Mr. Thomas Heatley and his 
wife. Anthony Dowse, stationer. The residue to John Weaver sou of 
Edmond Weaver the younger whom I make my whole and sole executor. 

Mico, 141. 

[The following extracts from Smith's Obituary (Camden Society Publica- 
tions) are interesting in connection with the foregoing wills : 

1656 April 2 Mrs Fawne wife to Capt. Luke Fawne, bookseller in 
Paul's church yard, buried. 

1665 (6) March 20 Capt. Luke Fawne bookseller at ye Parrott in Paul's 
church yard died. 

From the records of Essex County (Massachusetts) I learned that Robert 
Clements was married unto Elizabeth Fane the 6 th of the 10 th mo. 1C32. 

I also have the followiug note from the Registry of Deeds of Essex Co. 
(Mass.) B. 30, L. 33) : 

Robert Clement Sen r of Haverhill in the Co. of Essex and Elizabeth Clement 
his wife, which Elizabeth was and is ye daughter of Mr. John Fawne formerly 
of Haverhill in New England, to our son Fawne Clement of Newbury all and 
singular ye sum or sumes of money to us or either of us given or bequeathed by 
will as a legacy to us or either of us and more especially referring to a legacy 
given by Mr. Luke Fawne formerly of ye city of London, Stationer, or by any 
other person or persons whatsoever. 5 March 1707 (8). 

Wit: James Sanders, Joseph Kingsbury. 

The following memorandum also I took from Essex Co. Deeds, B. 37, L. 152 : 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 265 

A memorandum belonging to Fawne Clements; recorded 15 m Septem- 
ber 1720. 

M rs Clements Daughter of M r John Fawne & Elizabeth Fawne w ch 
Elizabeth Clements was nese to one Luke Fawne a stationer in Paul's 
Church Yard at ye signe of y e Parriot who Died a little before y e fire & 
gave Mrs. Clements £300 & Left it in y e hands of one M r John Cresitt in 
Charter house Yard in London & M r Edward Clements at y e signe of y e 
Lamb in Ab Church Lane & M r Edward Henning march' in London & M r 
Jerrat Marshal in London. 

This Intelligence I had of y e Reverend M r Emmerson minister of Pas- 
cataqua — w ch he had of the Leiv' Governor Vaughn of Pascataqua. 
Boston May 7 th 171 6. John Camel 1. 

Boston September 13 th 1720 y e aboves d John Campbell made oath y' by 
Yertue of y e abovementioned Relation w cn he Received from y c Reverend 
M r John Emmerson he Printed & advertisement of it in y e News Letter 
N° 62 C J May 7 th 1716. Samuel Lynde Justice Peace. 

Henry F. Waters.] 

John Oldfield of London, Esq., 30 — 1C56, proved 3 November 1G57. 
To be buried in Creechurch, in the chancel where my beloved wife Kath- 
erine was laid, in the North side of the ehaucel. To my daughter Elizabeth 
Cowper my house at Bow &c, and, for her maintenance, the lease of the sugar 
house iu Billiter Lane, London, which is clear forty pounds per annum. 
To my two grandchildren John and Ann Fleetwood, son and daughter of 
my daughter Katherice, wife to Col. George Fleetwood, I say to John 
Fleetwood five hundred pounds, to be paid to his father, now Sir George 
Fleetwood, upon security &c, and to Ann Fleetwood five hundred pounds, 
payable (as above). My cousin Elizabeth Ward. Richard Turvile my 
servant. My kinsman John Short, now with me. The poor of Bowe, 
where my house is, and of Katherine Creechurch, where I now dwell. 
Christ Hospital, for their poor children. The poor of Ashborne, where I 
was born. My brother William Oldfield. My sister Margaret Oldfield 
and her grandchildren, daughters of my cousin John Oldfield deceased. 
My son George Cowper Esq. to be my executor. And I desire my loving 
friend Richard Turvile and my cousiu Simon Smith to be my overseers. 
And I give to Simon Smith ten pounds and to my cousin Martha Smith his 
wife ten pounds, to be paid to his own hands withiu three mouths after my 
decease. Ruthen, 452. 

[I suppose the above testator to have been the Johu Owf eilcle of Asheborne 
in the County of Darby referred to in the will of Ko-rer Owfeilde (Reg. 47, p. 
289). See also will of Thomazine J: anson (p. 2S2). The will of Symou Smith 
appears on p. 401. Col. George Fleetwood, otherwise called Sir George Fleet- 
wood, was, I suppose, that regicide, one of Cromwell's lords, who is said to 
have died in America.] 

Samuel Owffjld of Gatton, Surrey, 6 December 1636, proved 10 
February 1644. To my wife Katherine all my lands, tenements and here- 
ditaments whatsoever in the Realm of England. 

cS, the relict i 

Rivers, 46. 

[On the margin was written T m Samuel Oicfeild temp'e mortis suae D'ni Sarn- 
uelis Oicfeild militis def.—K. F. W.] 

Dame Katherine Owfeild, widow relict and sole executrix of Sir 
Samuel Owfeild, knight, deceased, her will made 8 February 1643, proved 

VOL. XLVIII. 24 












IIIVJX .JOT 



266 .Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

10 November 1664. Refers to indenture bearing date 16 May 1637. 
Husband tben known as Samuel Owfeild of Gatton, Surrey. Certain real 
estate in Gatton and other parishes in Surrey and in Thames Street, St. 
Bennet near Paul's Wharf and also at Paul's Wharf and St. Peter's Hill, 
London, being late the inheritance of William Smith citizen and mercer of 
Lowdon deceased.- William Owfeild, son and heir apparent. Roger Ow- 
feild. second son. John Owfeild. third son &c. The said Sir Samuel is 
since deceased leaving issue William (Roger and John since deceased) 
Samuel, James and Edward Owfeild his sons and also seven daughters (that 
ia to say) Sarah (since deceased) Tomasine, Katherine, Anne (since de- 
ceased) Margaret, Mary and Elizabeth. Brian Janson referred to. My 
said sons. My eldest daughter Thomasine Goodwyn. Reference to the 
wills of Roger Owfeild late of Loudon, merchant, deceased, and of Thora- 
zine Owfeild widow, relict of the said Roger. Bruce, 117. 

Anthony Radcliffc citizen and merchant tailor of London, 11 Feb- 
ruary 1 st Charles, proved 25 June 1628. To my sister Dorothy Gerrard 
one hundred pounds, to be by her disposed and bestowed at her will and 
pleasure as she shall think best. To my sister Elizabeth Harvey the like 
sum of one hundred pounds and to my sister Anne Moulson the like sum 
of one hundred pounds. To my cousin Anthony Radciiff thirty three 
pounds six shillings and eight pence. To my cousin Parsons and his wife 
thirty three pounds six shilling eight pence. And the same to my cousin 
Elizabeth Radcliffe. Ten pounds each to my cousin Sara Shorter and my 
cousin Parsons, widow. Five pounds each to my cousin Chapman, my 
cousin Massam, widow, and rny cousin John Pasfield. Bequests to the 
poor and to hospitals. Five pounds each to my friend Mr. John Moulson 
and his wife, Mr. Samuel Aldersey and his wife and Mr. Arthur Tumor 
and his wife. Forty shillings to my old friend and acquaintance Clement 
Cotton. The poor of St. Christophers parish and of St. Bartholomews by 
th^ Exchange. And I do hereby make, ordain and appoint my well beloved 
brother in law Mr. Alderman Moulson my sole and only executor. 

Then follows a Schedule, added 24. September 1627. In it he expresses 
his desire that his body should be buried in the parish church of Harrow 
" where the Bodyes of my ffather and Mother and divers of my ffrieuds lye 
buried."' My late sister Dorothy Gerrard is dead. I will and bequeath 
the sum of one hundred pounds to Sir Gilbert Gerrard ku\ her eldest son, 
or to his children, if he die before me. If my sister Elizabeth Harvey die 
before me her bequest to go to her children. My cousin Elizabeth Rad- 
cliffe is but weak and sickly of body. My cousin Anthony, her brother, 
and Parson's wife, her sister. 

Proved by Mr. Thomas Moulson the executor. 

Archd. of London, B. 7, L. 23. 

Mense Maij 1603 vicesimo sexto die emanauit comissio Edwardo Rad- 
ciiff filio na 11 et ttimo Anthcnij Radciiff nut) de Harrow sug montem in 
Com Midd ar def Hentis etc. ad admlstrand bona iura et credita dci def. 
etc. 

[Abstracts of the wills of Sir Thomas Mowlson and Lady Ann Mowlson were 
gwen in the Register for January. 1S'J3. The former will was written in 1G3C, 
the latter in 1657. These two wills have been the only sources up to date from 
which the family connections of Lady Mowlson could be ascertained. The 
death of her brother Anthony in 1628 necessarily precluded mention of his name 
in either of the above-mentioned instruments. Mr. Waters, in furnishing the 
above abstract of the will of Anthony liadcliffe, has therefore added another 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 267 

name to the list of relatives which has been gleaned from his contributions to 
the Register relating to this subject. It will be observed tbat the testator 
leaves a bequest to his " sister Anne Moulson," and that he appoints his " well 
beloved brother in law Mr Alderman Monlson his sole and only executor." 
Three sisters are mentioned in this will — Dorothy, married to a Gerard, Eliza- 
beth, married to a Harvey, and Ann. Lady Mow fson. The Sir Gilbert Gerard, 
legatee in Lady Mowlson's will, is the son of Dorothy. Mr. " Cary Mildinay 
otherwise Harvey," mentioned in the same will, probably furnishes the con- 
necting link with Elizabeth. Anthony Radcliffe seems to have taken an interest 
in the parish of St. Christopher's, for he leaves a bequest to the poor of that 
parish. His designation of the parish church of Harrow as the spot where 
the bodies of his father and mother and others of his friends lie buried, fixes 
with sufficient accuracy the home of the family. — Andkew McFauland Davis. 

Lady Mowlson was related by marriase to prominent Puritans and patriots of 
her day. Her nephew, Sir Gilbert Gerard, married Mary, daughter of Sir Francis 
Harrington and first cousin of Oliver Cromwell and "of John Hampden. Sir 
William Masham, in whose family two of our New England divines, Roger 
Williams and John Norton, were chaplains, though at different times, married 
a sister of the wife of Sir Gilbert Gerard. Lady Joan Barringtou, the wife 
of Sir Francis Harrington, was a daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell, aud con- 
sequently an aunt of Oliver Cromwell, "the Protector. "John T. Hassam.] 

Sir John Morgan of Chillworth, Surrey, knight, 2G March 1621, proved 
4 April 1G21. To my dear and loving wife all my plate &c. Lands in 
Shalford and Albury, Surrey, and elsewhere. Wife to be executrix and 
brother in law Sir Nathaniel Rich, knight, and friends Sir George Stough- 
ton, knight, cousin James Elliott, Mr. George Duncombe of Clifford's Inn 
to be supervisors. To my daughter the Lady Anne Randall fifty pounds 
of the hundred' and fifty pounds which my son in law Sir Edward Randall 
oweth me. To my nephew George Theoballs fifty pounds. To my cousin 
Thomas Anton my lesser bay mare. My friend Mr. Peter Phesant. My 
servant Robert Willoughby. My friend Mr. Thomas Davies. 

Proved, as above, by Dame Elizabeth Morgan. Dale, 32. 

Dame Elizabeth Morgan, 28 November 1632. proved 22 May 1633. 
For her burial two hundred pounds; tor a tomb for her and Sir John Mor- 
gan forty pounds. The silver vcyder and the eight silver plates my Lady 
Wroth to have for life, aud then after to M r John Sutherton. The rest of 
the plate to him. The jewel in my Lady Wrpth's keeping she to have for 
life and afterwards to my Lady Warwick's daughter, iny Lady Mandevill. 
One hundred pounds to cousin Grimsditch's children, my cousin their mother 
to have the benefit of it for life and then equally to the four daughters. Ten 
pounds to Elizabeth Browne (and certain linen). The poor of Lee parish 
and this parish Wonuersh aud Shutfor. Sir Nathaniel Rich to be sole 
executor. To Nathaniel Browne, her sister's son, she giveth the benefit of 
two hundred pounds for and towards his maintenance and bringing up untii 
he be of the age of eight and twenty years. This was written by me aud 
it was delivered by my Lady Morgan in the presence of my Lady Wroth 
and my self, John Machell. Russell, 42. 

Sir Nathaniel Rich, 2 December 1635, acknowledged about 23 Octo- 
ber 1636, with a Codicil added 10 November 1636, proved 1 December 
1636. I nominate and appoint the Right Hon. the Lord Mandevill sole 
executor. I would be buried at Standon, Essex, in the parish church 
there. I would have my executor erect some monument for me, where- 
ever I be buried, the same not exceeding the sum of fifty pounds, or a hun- 



. 






• 



268 . Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

drecl marks. I would only have ray sisters and brothers in law and their 
children and all my servants to have mourning suits of black cloth. My 
manor of Stondou and all my lauds in Essex I give to my nephew Na- 
thaniel Riche, when ho comes to the age of one and twenty years; in the 
mean time my executor to receive the rent and to allow him four score 
pounds per annum for his education for some time at the University of 
Cambridge and then at Lincoln's Inn, it being my desire that he should 
study and profess the Law. I give the profit of seven of my shares in the 
Barmudas, now called the Sofiier Islands, to my sister Grimsdiche and her 
husband during their lives, if they will go and inhabit upon them, and one 
hundred and fifty pounds in money for the transporting of themselves and 
such of their children as they shall think fit to carry with them. I give 
one other share to my nephew Robert Browne now residing in the said 
Sonier Islands, he having one other share there already, upon the gift of 

my sister Wroth lately deceased. I give one other share there to 

Browne, one other of the sons of my sister Browne deceased, who hath 
been hitherto educated by my noble friend the Countess of Leicester, mother 
to Sir John Smith. The residue of my shares there, being live, I give for 
the maintenance of a free school in those Islands, which my desire is should 
first be erected out of the profits of the said five shares and then laid for- 
ever to the said school, the schoolmaster to be nominated and chosen by my 
executor and his noble lady and, after their decease, by such religious and 
discreet feoffees as they shall appoint; and my desire is that some of the 
Indian children to be brought either from Virginia or New England, or 
some other continent of America, such as my executor shall think fittest, 
may be brought over there to be instructed in the knowledge of true re- 
ligion. In case my said brother in law Mr. Grimsdich and his wife will 
not, within one year after my decease, go thither # in their own persons to 
live there then I will not that either of them have any benefit by this gift, 
unless by the hand of God they shall be hindered &c. &c. 

I give to Nathaniel Browne, now in New England with Mr. Hooker, the 
two hundred pounds which by my sister Morgan's will was bequeathed un- 
to him and fifty pounds more, as my own gift; which two hundred and fifty 
pounds I would have Mr. Hooker employ during the minority of the said 
Nathaniel Brbwne for and towards his education, paying himself for his 
charges. I give unto Samuel Browne, one other son of my said sister 
Browne, one hundred pounds in money, the same to be employed during 
his minority for his benefit as my executor shall think most fit. The Rec- 
tory of Neverne in Pembrokeshire in Wales to my executor in trust to 
make sale thereof and dispose of the money for the performance of this 
will. I give to Thomas Grimsdich, the eldest son of my brother Grimsdich, 
who is now in the Isle of Providence, the forty pounds per annum annuity 
which my Lord of Warwick is to pay during the life of the said Thomas. 
To Thomas Allaby my servant one hundred pounds. To Jonas Anger ten 
pounds per annum for life, and ten pounds in money. To William Jesopp, 
more than formerly in my life time I have given him (fifty pounds) I give 
all my wearing linen and apparel. Whereas there is in M r Gofles hand 
(that was sometime steward to my Lord of Warwick) a statute taken in his 
name, for a thousand pounds, debt due to my said Lord and myself, where- 
of one half belongs to me, I do hereby give unto that my dear and noble 
Lord the said five hundred pounds as a testimony of my humble affection to 
him and thankfulness for his love and favor towards me. To the Right 
Hou. my very noble lord the Earl of Holland one hundred pounds and an- 



1894. 



Genealogical Gleanings in England- 



269 



other hundred pounds to his noble lady, part of the money which his Lord- 
ship oweth me. The diamond ring which I usually wear, it being my sis- 
ter Wrothe's legacy to me, I give to my brother Wroth. (Other gifts to 
friends). My Library, books and papers, J give to my said noble Lord the 
Lord Mandevill, the sole executor of this my last will and testament, pray- 
ing him that at least with part of them he would furnish a library to be set 
up in the free school at the Somer Islands, as formerly I have appointed. 
The late Lady Warwick's picture I give unto my lord Riche, her son. To 
my worthy friend Mr. Wharton, minister at Felsted in Essex, thirty pounds 
as a testimony of my special love unto him and thankfulness for his care 
bestowed in the education of my nephew Nathaniel Riche. To my dear 
friend M r John Pym my best gelding and a ring of twenty pounds. To 
my very loving cousin Mrs. Martha Wilford twenty pounds. 

Pile, 123. 

[BROWNE OF SNELSTON, DERBYSHIRE, 



Thomas Browne of Snelston^Margarel, daughter to 
co. Derby. 



Chetham, of 
the family of Chetham near Manchester 
& related to Humphrey Chetham founder 
of the Cheatham Free Library & Blue 
Coat School at .Manchester. 



I 

Rudolphus Browne. 

A son Balphe 
was buried 
April IStli, 1077. 



I 
Nicholas Brpwne==EIianor dr & heires9 to Ralph 
of Sneteton buried I Shirley Esq. q£ Shirley, Der- 
Jan. IS, 1587. byshire, of Staunton Harold 
His wife died & Braylesford. co. Leicester. 

April 28, 150a. Her first husband was Tho- 

mas Vernon, 2d son of Hum- 
phrey Vernon of Clifton and 
Ilarleston, Derbyshire, as by 
the marriage settlement made 
1515, May 5. The Shirleys of 
Shirley & of Staunton Harold 
were represented in 1011 by a 
Baronet, in 16/"7 by Baron 
Ferrars, & in 1711 by Fail 
Ferrars of Staunton Harold. 



Thomas Browne, 
d. without issue. 



Sir Wm. Browne, b. in !55S=Mary Savage, 



Gertrude Browne. 



at Suelston, served for st 
ral years in the Low Coun- 
tries and d. there in 1010, 
August: was Lieut. Gover- 
nor of Flushing. 



b. in Germany, 
naturalized in 
1G00. 



William Browne, Ann Browne, d. young, 
d. young, but nat- naturalized bv Act oi 
uralized by act of Parliament, 1001. 

Parliament, 1601. 

bapt. Nov. 10, 15&4. Barbara Browne, 
d. an infant, but 
naturalized 1004. 



Percy Browne= Rich, dau. Mary Browne, 

naturalized j of Col. Nathaniel b. in Holland, 

1022; j Richof Standon, naturalized 

b. about 1002. ' Essex ; d. before 1622. 

i 1035. 



Nathaniel Browne, sent 
over to N. E. under the 
charge of the Rev. Thos. 
Hooker, about 1633-4; 
mar. in N. E. and had 10 
sons. 



Robert Browne, went to the 
Providence I-land, West In- 
dies; named after Robert 
Sydney, Far! of Leicester; 
was ordaiued a minister and 
appointed to a church in 
Somers Islands in 1055, and 
d. there iu 1060. 



me! ...... Browne, educated 

ene. by the Countess of Leices- 
ter, widow of Robert Syd- 
ney, 1st Farl of Leicester 
of the Sydney family; his 
name supposed to be' Wm. 
as a Wm. Browne was out 
in the Providence Islandd. 

When I was preparing my memoir of Rev. Nathaniel Ward, the compiler of 
the Massachusetts Body of Liberties and author of the Simple Cooler, I ascer- 
tained that the patron of the living of Stondon Massey, Essex, when held by 
Mr. Ward, was £ir Nathaniel Rich. Col. Joseph L. Chester, who had assisted 
me much in my researches, liindly sent me an abstract of the will of Sir 
Nathaniel, which I had printed in the Historical Magazine for April, 18G7, 
pp. 206-7. 

VOL. XL VIII. 24* 












10T 



270 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

In 1SS2 the late G. D. Scull, Esq., then residing at Oxford, England, prepared 
a book entitled "Sir "William Browne, knight, 1556-16^0; and Sir Nathaniel 
Rich, knight, lG3u," which he presented to the New-England Historic Gene- 
alogical Society. The bock, which still remains in manuscript, is before me. 

Sir Nathaniel Rich was prominent on the patriot side, and was active in 
American colonial enterprises. A biographical notice of hirn will be found in 
Brown's "Genesis uf the United States." vol. 2, pp. &79-8fi; but Mr. Scull's 
memoir is longer and gives more details. 

The Nathaniel Browne mentioned in Sir Nathaniel Rich's will as " now in 
New England with Mr. Hooker," is also named in the preceding will of his aunt 
Lady Morgan. Miss Mary K. Talcott states that he married Dec. 23, 1017, 
Eleanor, daughter of Richard Watts. In 10.34 he removed from Hartford to 
Middle town, Ct„ where he died in 105S. He had sons — Thomas died young, 
Nathaniel of Middletown. John of Middletowu, and Benoni. The pedigree at 
the head of this note is from Mr. Scull's book. 

What is knowu of later descendants of Nathaniel Browne of Hartford, Ct. ? — 
Editor.] 

William Sidey of St. Peter Cheapside, London, geir, 27 June 1711, 
proved 11 August 1713. To my wife Dorothy Sidey the lease of my little 
house in Day's Court, wherein I now dwell, and the remainder of the years 
to come therein, being about twenty years. If she die before the expira- 
tion of said term I give the same to my loving sister Susanna Marriott. 
My wearing apparel I give unto my two nephews Side Marriott and Ed- 
ward Marriott both of New England in America, equally to be divided be- 
tween them. My freehold estate or farm called Chiggborrows, in the Co. 
of Essex, in the parishes of Little Totham and Much Totham, containing, 
by estimation, one hundred and thirty acres or thereabouts, now in the 
occupation of Sarah Browne, widow, I give to my sister Susanna Marriott 
for life, then to my nephew Sidey Marriott and his heirs forever, subject to 
the payment of one hundred pounds to my said nephew Edward (Marriott). 
My body to be buried near the corpse of my dear mother and niece in the 
parish churchyard of St. Mary Mattellou ah Whitechapel, Middlesex. And 
I do make my loving wife my sole executrix, to whom I have been married 
above twenty years last August by one Mr. Saltmarsh, formerly belonging 
to the Portuguese Embassador and now Chaplain to his Grace the present 
Duke of Norfolk, and do desire that no contention may arise from my sif- 
ter about my marriage, but she behave herself lovingly to my wife, and my 
wife to do the same to her. Leeds, 195. 

Christopher Newtort of London, mariner and one of the six Masters 
of His Majesty's Navy Royal, 16 November 1616, proved 27 October 1618. 
Being now by God's grace and assistance to go with the next wind and 
weather Captain of the good ship called the Hope of London for to sail in- 
to the East Indies, a long and dangerous voyage &c I give and bequeath 
unto my loving wife Elizabeth my now dwelling house situate and being 
upon Tower Hill, London, in the parish of All Hallows Barking together 
with my garden adjoining thereunto, only and for and during her natural 
life. After her decease I give and bequeath my fee simple of my said 
house and lease of my said garden &c. unto my two sons jointly together, 
by name Christopher and John Newport. If they die without issue then 
to my daughter Elizabeth &c. To my said daughter Elizabeth four hun- 
dred pounds (now employed in the East India Company), to be given her 
at her day of marriage or full age of twenty one years. To my daughter 
Jane five pounds in three months, and no more, in regard of many her 
great disobediences towards me and other misdemeanors, to my great heart's 
grief. 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 271 

Item I give and bequeath unto ray said two sons Christopher and John 
and to my said daughter Elizabeth; equally between them all and singular, 
my stock and adventure in general which I have in the Virginia Company 
&c. I make and ordain of this my last will and testament my loving wife 
Elizabeth and the Right Worshipful Sir Thomas Smith, knight, Governor 
of the East India Company, my full and whole executors. And I give to 
the said Sir Thomas Smith one diamond ring of the value of ten pounds of 
lawful English money. And as overseers I make and ordain my very good 
friends Mr. Matthias Springham and Sir. John Goodfellow, to each of 
whom I give a ring of forty shillings apiece. In Bantam Road this tenth 
of September 1G17. It appears that his son Christopher was then Master's 
Mate in the same ship. Meade, 92. 

Christofer Newport. Master's Mate of the Hope, 27 April 1618. 
proved 22 September 1 6 IS. A remembrance to the Hon. knight Sir 
Thomas Smith and to sundry friends (named). Among the gifts were 
Howes Chronicle, books of voyages, a jar of green ginger, a Cheshire 
cheese &c. To my loving mother Mrs. Elizabeth Newport one China box 
one Japan dish, three small China painted dishes &c. To my brother John 
Newporte a sword enlaid with silver, a pair of hangers and a small hoop 
ring of gold &c. To my sister Elizabeth Newport two pieces of branched 
damask, one red and one red and -'yallowe" a China box, two gold rings 
one with a spark of a diamond and one with a garnet &c. To my aunt 
Amye Gluntfield one gold ring with garnet unset. To my kinswoman 
Elizabeth Gluufield one China box. To Elizabeth Chapell, Mr. Melson's 
daughter, one China box. To Dr. Meddowes preacher of God's word at 
Fanchurch six China dishes painted. To my sister Jane Newport ten 
pounds, conditionally that she have reformed her former course of life. 
But if she continue in her wonted courses then my will is that she have 
nothing. To my Aunt Johane Ravens ten pounds, iu consideration of 
twenty four ryalls of eight remaining iu my hands, which moneys I received of 
Henry Ravens deceased for her use, with an old silver cup. To Christo- 
fer Ravens (in consideration of a gift from his brother Henry Ravens). 
My liuen, books and instruments belonging to the sea to be sold at the 
mast and the same registered in the purser's hook. I give all to my brother 
John Newport and my sister Elizabeth Newport and I make them my 
executors. Aboard the Hope in the Road of Saldamin 27 April 1618. 

Proved by John Newport, power reserved for Elizabeth Newport when 
she should come to seek it. Meade, 85. 

[Next preceding the above will is the registered copy of the will of his 
cousin Henry Ravens to whom he refers. He also made his will on board of 
the Hope, as Master. H. F. W.] 

[Many references to Capt. Christopher Newport in " The Genesis of the 
United States" will be pointed out bv the Index. There is a sketch of him on 
pp. 956-9.3S, of Sir Thomas Smith pp. 1012-1013, and of Mr. Matthias Spring- 
ham p. 1022. Glunffield, I take to be Glanffield, i.e. Glanville. Sir Francis and 
Richard Glanville were members of the Va. Co. of London. — See p. 808. Mr. 
Melson may be the Mr. Melshawe mentioned in the Va. Records, p. 178. Dr. 
James Meadows, Medust, etc., p. 940. 982. In September, 1009, Henry Ravens, 
master's mate, and Thomas Whittimrham, cape merchant of " The Sea Venture, " 
were sent after "The Tempest " from " the still-vex'd Bermoothes " for Vir- 
ginia, and were never heard of again (p. 1053) in our records. He was probably 
of the same farniiy as Henry Ravens, master of " The Hope"; or as our earliest 
records are so incomplete, he may have survived the Bermudas, voyage— and the 
master's mate of 1009 mav have been the master of 1017. 



272 • Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Mr. John Newport, the only sou and heir of Capt. Christopher Newport, at- 
tended the meetings of the Va, Co. of London, from time to time, during 
1619-23, probably before and after. 

On November 17, 1619, he desired the Virginia Court to lay out some of his 
laud in Va. for liim, ami they wrote to Gov. Yearclley to do so. In the following 
February his mother sent six men to Virginia, at her charge, on board " The Jona- 
than." July 10. 1C21 , •• upon the humble petition of Mrs. Newport, widoW, the 
Va. Court ordered the Governor and Council in Va. to set out thirty-two shares 
of land in Va. heretofore bestowed upou Captain Christopher Newport, her late 
husband, deceased, in reward of hi-> service, with an addition of three whole 
shares for the six men sent in " The Jonathan." in any place not already disposed 
of, which is commended to the care of Capt. Hamor, to see it done according 
to Mrs. Xewporfs desire.'' 

On May 11, 1623j the Virginia Court confirmed the "32 shares to Mr. John 
Newport, descended unto him by the death of his father. Captain Christopher 
Newport, which confirmation having been read and approved in the preparative 
court, as also in the morning by the committee, was now put to the question and 
ordered to be sealed." 

The exact location of these lands in Virginia is. I believe, still doubtful. As 
to New Tort Newse, as yet I have seen no reason for changing the opinions ex- 
pressed in The Genesis, pp. 956, 058. — Alexander Brown, of Norwood, Pa.] 

Lawrence Hampton of London, taylor, 9 November 1G27, proved 
12 February 1G27. To the poor of Twickenham (Twickenham) Middlesex 
twenty shillings. To ray sister Philadelphia Hampton twenty pounds. 
Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother William Hampton ten pounds 
of lawful money of England to be paid unto him within twelve mouths 
after his return from Virginia in the parts beyond the seas. And if my 
said brother shall happen to die or depart this life before his return from 
Virginia in' this realm of England then I give and bequeath the said ten 
pounds unto my sister Philadelphia if she be then living. To Thomas 
Garret my father in law tweuty shillings. To and among the servants of 
my brother Henry Rand, citizen and joiner of London, forty shillings to be 
divided amongst them Sec. All these legacies to be paid out my lands in 
Twickenham. To my said brother Henry Rande and my sister Anne his 
wife all my lands, tenements ev:c., freehold and copyhold, in Twickenham, 
Middlesex. The said Henry to be executor. One of the witnesses was 
Keneliue Winslowe. Archd. of London, B. 7. L. 17. 

[The present "Hampton " River was named by Lord De La Warr in 1610 
"Southampton" River for Henry Wriothesiey, Earl of. Southampton, the early 
friend of Shakespeare. On May 17, 1620, frhe name of Smythe's Hundred (ex- 
tending on the north side of James River from " Tanks Wayonoke down to the 
mouth of the Chicahomine River ") was changed to Southampton Hundred. The 
" Chicahomine " River was then called " Southampton "' River, and the name of 
the original river of that name was soon after contracted into "Hampton" 
River. William Hampton settled in that region about that time, and that fact 
may have had something to do with the change in the name of the river. There 
is some confusion about the first settler of the name. Ilotteu apparently gives 
the names of tvo Wm. Hampton's, each coming on the Bona Nova, ami each 
having a wife Joane (see pp. 253, 201) ; one, " age 40, arrived in the Bona Nova 
in 1620 " ; the other, '• age 31, in the Bona Nova 1621." The Bona Nova arrived 
in Virginia, on her 2d voyage, in the fall of 1620; on her 3d voyage, not long 
before March 2.5, 1622. The references are possibly to the same man and his 
wife. They were living in "Elizabeth Cittie beyond Hampton River— Beiuge 
the Companyes land," — in 1625, and still there iu 1635. 

In 1560, the manor-house at Twickenham was leased to Catherine and Barnard 
Hampton (which Barnard had been clerk of the Council to Edward VI., Queen 
Mary, and Queen Elizabeth). William Hampton of Virginia may have been to 
the manor born. 

The Hampton family of South Carolina (of whom Gen. Wade Hampton) was 
originally from Virginia.— Alexander Brown.] 



' 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 273 

Anxe Ball of London, widow, 13 March 1653, proved 9 October 
1654. My body to be buried in the parish church of St. Dnnstan's in the 
East* in Loudon, near to the body of my late husband. The poor of said 
parish, the poor of Stanmore and the poor of Weald in the parish of Har- 
row on the Hill. My cousin Cicely Gilbert if living at the time of my 
decease. My daughter Anne Young. Richard Cooke son of my late 
deceased daughter Mary Cooke. My grandchild Thomas Ball (a minor). 
My daughter in law Susan Ball. My daughter Barbara Reeve, to whom I 
have " bin" kind and helpful at her second marriage. My daughter Jane 
Pindar. Those messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments which I 
have near Battle Bridge in the parish of St. Olave Southwark in the 
Co. of Surrey, the inheritance whereof I purchased of Lady Welde and 
her son. My son Richard Ball. My daughter Margaret Allott. My 
daughter Elizabeth Gouidi. Their children. My sons in law William 
Robinson. John Cooke, William Pindar, James Goughand Thomas Reeve. 
My brother Master Thomas Burnell, and his wife. My son John Ball. 
My daughter Anne Young to be executrix. Alchin, 46. 

Hester Buiixell of the Spittle, Midd. widow, 14 March 16G3, with 
codicil dated 17 May 1GG4, proved 15 October 1664. To be buried in the 
parish church of St. Allhallowes (sic) Barkiug, near my late dear husband. 
Cousins John Burnell Esq., Thomas Burnell and his wife and Henry 
Burnell and his wife. Brother Henry Wollaston Esq. and his wife. Brother 
Thomas Wollaston. Cousin Sarah Edlin widow. Brother Robert Smith 
and his wife. Cousin Dr. Edmund Trench and his wife. Cousin Dr. 
Roger Drake, and his wife. Cousin Dr. Samuel Winter and his wife. 
Cousin John Crowther and his wife. Cousin Stephen White and Hester 
his wife. Cousin Edmund Trench, sou of the said Dr. Trench. Cousin 
Thomas Marlow and Anne his wife. Mr. Samuel Slater the elder and 
Mr. Richard Kentish. Cousin Elizabeth Goffe. Cousin Katherine Burcher. 
Cousin Bowtell. Cousin Lucy Manistey wife of Clement Manistey. If it 
shall please God that I die at Dr. Samuel Annesley's house then I give 
unto the said Dr. Annesley and his wife four pounds apiece. The poor of 
Stanmore Magna, Midd. Cousin Ann Woodrotfe wife of Thomas Woodroffe. 
Cousin Elizabeth daughter of my cousin Frances Ilassell. Cousin John the 
son of my said cousin Hassell (to be placed out an apprentice). Cousin 
Edward Hassell, brother to the said Elizabeth and John. Cousin HasselFs 
other two daughters not before named. Mary Burnell daughter of Henry 
Burnell. Cousin William Johnson. Henry Wollaston, grandson to my 
brother Henry Wollaston Esq. Cousin Henry Barrington, grandson to 
Henry Wollaston Esq. Ursula Berrisford, grand daughter to Henry Wol- 
laston Esq. My chamber at Hunterscombe. Thomas Burnell son of 
John Burnell Esq. and the daughter of John Burnell Esq. To my Cousin 
Farmer I give the gilt owl which her mother gave me, to use for and during 
the term" of her natural life; and after her decease I give the same to her 
nephew Thomas Marlow. Others named. Bruce, 109. 

[The two foregoing wills still further extend our knowledge of the English 
connections of John Morley of Charlestown, whose mother Katherine was the 
onlv sister of Mrs. Anne Ball and sister, also of Thomas the husband of Hester 
Bufnell. Mrs. Bali's husband was Richard, son of John Ball of Wellingborow 
(Northampton), as it is shown in the pedigree of Y/ounge (Vis. of London 
1G33-4). Her daughter Anne was married to James Yong of London, merchant, 
In my extracts from London Marriage Licenses (Hist. Coll. of Essex Institute 
1892)" will be found, on paice 39, the marriage Allegation of Thomas Gate Esq. 
and Anne Morley, the sister of our John Morley. Henry F. Waters.] 



274 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Johx Hacker of Limehouse, Stepney Middlesex, planter, 7 January 
1653, proved 8 .June 1654. I give unto William Rookeing of Virginia, 
planter, one heifer of three years old, with calf, or at least with a calf by her 
side, and one fowling piece and shot bag which was his father's, to be deliv- 
ered unto him in Virginia, within six months after my disease, at my plan- 
tation. To my man James, now resident in Virginia, a weaning calf. To 
my loving wife Elizabeth Hacker, during her natural life, the lease of a 
small cottage and garden &e. in Freethorne, in the Co. of Gloucester, and 
after her decease then to come and be. during the remainder of the lease, 
unto my son John Hacker. To my wife Elizabeth and my son John all 
my whole estate and plantation in Virginia, with my household stuff, goods, 
corn, tobacco and stock of all sorts of cattle whatsoever ami servants what- 
soever as are or shall be bound unto me during the terms of their apprentice- 
ships. If my said wife marry with another man then her part to come and 
return unto my sou John and his heirs &c, remainder to my kinsman Ralph 
Hacker, son of my brother Thomas Hacker of Penzauce, in the Co. of 
Cornwall, glover, and his heirs &c, lastly to my right heirs. My said wife, 
during my son's nonage, shall receive his part of the profits yearly of my 
plantation for and towards his education and bringing up. To my wife all 
my personal estate in England. My wife and son to be executors and lov- 
ing friends Master John Westrop and Captain Abraham Reade to be over- 
seers. 

Proved by Elizabeth Hacker the relict &c, power reserved for John 
Hacker &c. Alchiu, 23. 

[John Hacker came to Virginia in the Hopwell, at the age of 17, in lG2t. In 
1C35 he had a patent granted him of 150 acres on the west side of upper Chip- 
poaks Creek; fifty of this was due him for his personal adventure and one 
hundred for his two servants Abraham Hill and Charles Hould. William Rooke- 
ing came over in the Bona Xova in 1019, and was aged 26 in 1024. In 1630 Wm. 
Rookins had 150 acres in the county of James City, the said land beimr called 
" the flying point." There was also due him 50 acres for his wife Jane Baxter, 
and 100 for Robert Risby and John Allen.— W. K. Watkes'S.] 

Petkr Priaulx of Melkesham, Wilts, clerk, 18 May 1677, proved 
26 August 1686. Five pounds to the use of the parish church of Melkes- 
ham. The same to the poor of Melkesham and also of Rusper, Sussex. 
To my dear kinsman Mr. John Priaulx of Salisbury Wilts, linen draper, 
my freehold messuage &c. in Horsham, Sussex, called Jenhams and another 
called Birds. Bequests to John and Henry Stone sons of my dear brother 
Mr. John Stone of Rusper. My dear kinswoman Bridget Greenfield now 
dwelling with me. Peter Priaulx younger son of Doctor John Priaulx 
late Canon Residentiary of the Close of New Sarum deceased. William 
Priaulx younger son of Mr. Paul Priaulx of the city of London merchant. 
Elizabeth Stone the daughter of my brother Mr. John Stone. My sister 
in law Elizabeth Gurney the now wife of Mr. John Gurney of Rusper in 
Sussex. Reference to decease of honored father M r . William Priaulx of 
Rusper, Sussex, Clerk. Brother Mr. John Stone senior to be executor. 

Mr. John Stone, the executor named in the will, having died in the life 
time of the testator, commission issued to Elizabeth Gurney (wife of John 
Gurney) sister on the mother's side and next akin to Peter Priaulx de- 
ceased &c. Eloyd, 109. 

[See the Pryaulx and Mercor wills, with notes on the Bachiler family in 
Register, vol. 47, pp. 510-15. — Editor.] 



1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 275 

William Tatton* of St. Mary Aldermary London, 9 July 1GG5. proved 
2G February 1665. Not knowing (in this the Lord's visitation by Pesti- 
lence in this City) how uncertain my hour may be &c. To be buried in 
the chancel of the parish church aforesaid in the same grave where my 
most loving wife was buried, at the upper end of the S. isle at the very 
corner of the pews on the left hand (before you step up where the ground 
is raised) under a broken stone. Mr. Richard Bagnall and my sister in 
law Anne Machen to be overseers and assistants to my son William Tatton 
whom I do constitute and aDpoint to be my sole executor (afterwards 
referred to as only son). Conditional gifts to the poor of St. Martin's in the 
Fields and of the parish or borough of Newcastle under Lyne in the Co. 
of Stafford (bread to be distributed on the Seaventh day of February, if it- 
be Sunday, or else on the Sabath day next following the Seaventh of Febru- 
ary yearly). My mother in law Ellen Machen of Newcastle under Lyiie, 
widow, provided she be married to no man beside her husband Richard 
Machen deceased. The two children of my sister Illage (now Weston). 
The three children of my brother George Tatton. The two children of 
my sister Susan Miiles. The two children of my brother and sister in law 
John and Alice Harrison of Newcastle under Line. John Machen now in 
Virgiuia. I desire. Mr. Hugh Piers and Mr. James Whitchurch to assist 
my executor about my shop. I aiso desire that my executor and overseers 
will take care of Sam: Aylworth and provide him a good place and procure 
what favor for him they can. 

Commission issued 29 July 1G32 to Anne Cumberlege, wife of John 
Cumberlege M. D., relict and administratrix of the goods of William Tat- 
ton the younger deceased, while he lives the son, executor and residuary 
legatee under the will of the said deceased, to administer the goods &c. by 
the said executor left unadministered &c. Mico, 3-L 

[John Madiera, age 18 in 1635, came over in the Paul of London. — W.K. W.] 

Mary Bendisii senior of London, spinster, 17 April IG93, proved 
9 June 1C93. To my niece Mary Bendish of London junior ten pounds 
and to my niece Sarah Tookie of London senior, being the daughter of 
Job Tookie, ten pounds. To Thomas Bendish of London, son of Edmond 
Bendish of Norfolk, five shillings to buy him a ring. To my niece Rachel 
Bendish all the remainder of my goods, money and estate, both real and 
personal, after the pavment of the above said three legacies, and I do make, 
constitute and appoint her to be sole executrix &c. Coker, 92. 

[See Tookie wills and notes in the Register, vol. 44, pp. 9G-S; vol. 46, p. 
456.— Editor.] 

John Abbott of St. Saviours Southwark, Surrey, gen'. 2 February 
1692, proved 13 July 1G93. My sister in law Sarah Reynolds of Stam- 
ford, Lincoln, widow. My niece Ruth Brinknoll. The widow of my late 
cousin John Abbott. William Surflet and Thomas Webb. To the poor of 
Mr. Matthew Barker's church. 

Item, I do give and bequeath unto my loving son Josiah Abbott (who, if 
living, is, I suppose, at Boston in New England) the sum of fifty pounds of 
lawful money of England to be paid to him within the space of one year 
next after my decease (if he shall be then living): if he be dead and leave 
any child or children, by him begotten or to be begotten, then I bequeath 
and appoint the same fifty pounds to his child or children. My son Samuel 
Abbot: (at twenty three years oi age). My cousin James Foe. My loving 



276 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April. 

daughter Mary Eyton. Her husband, my son iu law, Sampson Eyton, 
hosier. Coker, 104. 

[Josiah Abbott married about 1686 Hannah, b. 22 Jul}-, 1CG2, the daughter of 
John and Mary (Ballard) Farrington of Dedham, and had John, b. in Boston 
22 Aug. 1GS7, and Hannah, b. 1690. 

31 Dec. 1690. Josiah Abbott cordwainer of Boston, and Abraham Browne 
cordwainer of Boston, agree that the said Browne should take the nine months 
old daughter of said Abbott and feed, clothe aud educate the said daughter Han- 
nah as his own child till she reach the age of eighteen or marries. In consider- 
ation of this Abbott grants him eight acres of land known as Purgatory in Ded- 
ham, and sixteen acres of land in Xatiek called Wapensett near Dedham, this 
land being formerly the estate of John Farriugton deceased of Dedham, which 
Abbott received by marriage with Hannah daughter of John Farrington, it hav- 
ing been settled on her bv order of the Suffolk County Court. — Sittfulk Deeds, 
L. 15, ITS. 

Later, 2d Nov. 1711, John Abbott of Newport. R. I., son and heir of Josiah 
and Hannah Abbott, for £20 paid by John Everett, junior, of Dedham, grants 
live acres in Naponsett Field butting in Dorchester, also eight acres in Purga- 
tory, his mother's, formerly a Farrington. — Sujfoik Deeds, L. 26, 70.— W. K. W.] 

Mary Morris of the Liberty of the Tower of London, widow, 15 
February 1653, proved 27 February .1650. To Master Thomas Baylye 
and Mistress Katherine Bayley and Master Nicholas Humphrey, to each of 
them twenty shillings. To my son Thomas Newman a mourning cloak, 
hat and other things fitting for mourning. To Mistress Jane Humphry 
my silver tankard and to Mistress Susan Perrye my ring with a white stone 
aud to Jane Bannister my ring with a small diamond aud a ruby. To 
Thomas Newman all those forty and eight acres of land in the Lew ward 
and ten acres of land in Scotland and one hundred and twenty foot of land 
next the State house, at the Bridge, all lying aud being in the island of 
Barbados, and all moneys, merchandizes, debts, bonds and specialties what- 
soever that are any ways due, owing or belong unto me or my late husband 
Thomas Morrice deceased by or from any person or persons &c. in the 
island of Barbados. In case my son Thomas Newman shall not be living 
at the time of my death then I give and becpaeath all such lands &c. unto 
my son iu law George Newman &c. And I give the money due for the 
service of my late husband from Capt. Reade (two and twenty months 
service) unto my son Thomas &c. To my sister Elizabeth Katherine all 
my ready money, share of prize money &c. &c. And I make and ordain 
my brother John Parris of the Barbados and my said sister Elizabeth 
Katherine jointly and severally executors dec. 

Wit: Thomas Parris, Peter Pery. Alchin, 21. 

Bridget Lucas, wife of Edward Lucas, citizen and plaisterer of Lon- 
don, 16 October 1657, proved 19 November 1657. To my kinswoman 
Mary Bishopp now resident in Virginia (certain articles of clothing). John 
Bishopp her brother. My cousin Elizabeth Perry. My brother and sister 
Whitwick. My daughter Sarah Hide. My daughter Martha Leeke. My 
three sons Luke, Silvanus and Timothy Hide. To my two daughters 
Martha Leeke and Sarah Hide such household stuff &c. which were mine 
before my intermarriage with my husband Edward Lucas. The lease of 
my house iu Rood Lane I leave to my brother (?) Silvanus Hide. To my 
sou Timothy Hide the lease of the house called the Key in Rood Lane. 
Other estates to other children. My son John Hide and Elizabeth his 
wife. My kinswoman Lydia Messenger. My other son Paul Hide. My 
brother Booker's son. My cousins Henry Sharpe and Elianor HarJowe. 
My son Ralph Leeke. My son William Edwards and his wife. 

Ruthen, 456. 



V 






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/«•* 



sw- 




7/^^- ^\ iL^itu^^ 



THE 



HlSTOEICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

REGISTER. 

VOL. XLVIIL-JULY, 1894: 

Whole Numbf.k, 101. 




BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

1894. 



.Ill 






• 



NEW-ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
REGISTER. 



JULY, 1894. 



GEORGE CHEYXE SHATTUCK, M.D. 

By the Rev. Caleb Davis Beadlee, D.D., of Boston, Mass. 

In writing a brief sketch of the life of George Cheyne Shattuck, 
M.D., for the New-England Historical and Genealogical 
Register (with the hope of writing a larger' notice at a later date) , 
I am embarrassed at the beginning by, two thoughts. First, as to 
whether I am not too nearly related to the subject of my memoir to do 
full justice to his merits, as we are told that those near to a mountain 
cannot clearly describe it ; and secondly, whether I am not too well 
acquainted with the merits of my friend, so as to be liable to be 
charged with exaggeration by those who did not know him, for 
certainly after a study of his character for over thirty years, I have 
not been able to discover in it any rough edges whatsoever, for he 
seemed to me to reach, as nearly as any hitman being possibly 
could, the highest standard cf moral and spiritual growth. 

George Cheyne Shattuck was born in Boston, Mass., July 22(1, 
1813. He was the sou of Dr. George Cheyne and Eliza (Cheever) 
Shattuck, and grandson on his mother's side of Hon. Caleb Davis, 
all of Boston. 

The father of young Shattuck was a man thoroughly steeped in 
benevolence, and he tried always to give where two parties would 
be helped at the same time. He once subscribed to a large number 
of dictionaries in order to help the poor author, and then gave the 
books to needy students that they might get aid in their studies. 

A poor student went to him for medical advice, and he asked for 
his pay only one favor, viz., that the student would deliver a note 
for him at a certain store on "Washington 6treet. The young man, 
to his great astonishment, found when he delivered the note that it 
was an order to the tailor for a whole suit of clothes for his benefit. 

The mother of the boy was also exceedingly generous, and I was 
informed by one of her friends that she would give anything away 
that she thought any other person needed more than she did. 
vol. xlviii. 2o 



in 



' 



.M 






i 

■ 



278 _ George Cheyne Shattuck. [July, 

So the young boy came into the world enveloped by charity, and 
his own nature was richly in accord with the royal beneficence that 
surrounded him. Previous to his entrance into Harvard College he 
attended a grammar school in Boston, and at the age of nine en- 
tered the Latin school, where he remained for three years, and was 
then sent to the " Round Hill School/' Northampton, that was under 
the care of Dr. Cogswell. It was at the " Round Hill School " 
where he probably obtained that thorough idea of education, moral, 
physical and spiritual, that led him afterwards to become the founder 
of St. Paul's school, Concord, New Hampshire. 

In the early part of his life his love for study w r as perhaps some- 
what over-stimulated by a kind but exacting father, who, on days 
that were given by the school especially for rest and recreation, 
insisted that his son should have private teachers, so that there was 
hardly a pause from constant study till the time he entered college, 
but it was a touching sight to behold the complete obedience of the 
child, and his patient and loving self-surrender. 

He entered college in 1827, receiving his A.B. in 1831 ; amongst 
his classmates, well known to all, w r ere Francis Gardner, John 
Hopkins Morison, John Lothrop Motley, Nathaniel Bradstreet 
Shurtleff, "Wendell Phillips and many others. 

It was his desire, I think, from earliest youth to enter the medical 
school at graduation, whilst it was his father's wish to prevent him 
from doing so, as undoubtedly he thought his physical strength 
would not be equal to the demand made upon the profession of a 
physician, and, in the spirit of the perfect obedience that he had 
always exhibited, he entered the law school, where he remained one 
year, a perfect martyr to his fidelity, when the father, deeming any 
further opposition unwise, allowed him to follow his own course, so 
that he received his degree of M.D. in 1835. Almost all of his pro- 
fessional life was spent as an instructor. He visited Europe several 
times for rest and study, and always returned refreshed and in- 
vigorated both in mind and body. 

April 9th, 1840, he married Miss Anne Henrietta Brune of 
Baltimore, Maryland, who was the daughter of Fredk. William and 
Anne (Clarke) Brune. 

For nearly twenty years he was a professor in the Harvard Medical 
School; professor of Clinical Medicine, 1855-1859, and professor 
of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1859-1873. For a large 
number of these years he was the Dean of the Medical Faculty, 
and those who know all about his unruffled patience, his wise judg- 
ment, and his courteous manner can clearly conceive how well he 
must have filled such an office, and what respect and affection he must 
have secured for himself. 

For thirty-six years he was one of the visiting physicians of the 
Massachusetts General Hospital. He was also president of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, 1872-1874. He wa3 a Fellow of 



1894.] . George Cheyne Shattuch. 279 

the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the American 
Statistical Society. He was a member of the New-England His- 
toric Genealogical Society. He gave medical instruction by lectures 
in St. James College, Maryland, and in Trinity College, Con- 
necticut, and positively would not receive any compensation either 
for his instruction or his expenses. 

Soon after his marriage he changed his church relations, as a 
Unitarian, and became an ardent Episcopalian, devoting his life 
and strength and means to the building up of that Church. 

To the Church of the Advent, where he worshipped, and of 
which he was one of the earliest friends, he made large donations 
every week, and at one time his gift was twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars. 

He was also the founder of St. Paul's School, Concord, as we 
have intimated, and to this institution he gave during his life one 
hundred thousand dollars or more, and, what is better, gave his 
time and his advice, and very frequently Ins presence and medical 
help. 

He gave very largely to a school in Minnesota that bears his 
name. 

" He was," says Dr. Eliot, a member of almost every society 
board in his diocese, a delegate to every diocesan and every general 
convention, a Trustee of the General Theological Seminary, and of 
other bodies beyond the diocese." 

It is said that at one time he thought of studying for the minis- 
try, but instead of doing so he became the foremost layman in the 
Church, and we might say the leading layman of all churches of 
whatever name, for his mind was broad, his sympathies were great, 
his love was widespread, and whilst theologically he might perhaps 
be classed as the most strict of Episcopalians, his heart was greater 
than his creed, and all true Christians received from him a holy 
welcome. 

It is something very remarkable that notwithstanding his busy 
life as physician, as teacher, and churchman, he was most delightful 
in his conversation, full of good humor, and a host whose hospitality 
was unbounded. His spiritual, mental and social nature seemed to 
be beautifully blended, so that on whatever side you looked he 
seemed especially great on that side, and yet, with all this real 
greatness he was one of the most modest and most unassuming of men, 
giving of necessity some of his charities publicly, but giving quietly 
and unostentatiously large sum3 of money known only to the re- 
cipient and himself, and recorded in the " Great Book of God." 

On March 22d, 1893, he passed away to God; his wife, his lov- 
ing and faithful companion for many happy and holy years, follow- 
ing him soon afterwards, January 6th, 1894. Two sons, a daughter, 
and grandchildren survive our departed friend, to whom he never 
gave an hour of pain nor a moment of regret till he left them bereft 



' 















280 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [July, 

of his presence, his counsel and his help. About two weeks before 
he fell asleep I had the privilege of sitting by him, and of listening 
to his genial words. I beheld a composure the most complete, a 
resignation not to be surpassed : and the true Christian hero was 
wonderfully and sweetly revealed. 

What a life, what a death, and how grand must have been the 
entrance into the other life, and what a legacy our friend has left 
for the uplifting of our souls. 

Peace be to his ashes ! 

Sacred be our memory of him ! Joyful the thought that we shall 
meet him again in God's holy City ! 



LETTERS OF COL. THOMAS WESTBROOK 
AND OTHERS, 

RELATIVE TO INDIAN AFFAIRS IN MAINE. 

Communicated by William Blake Trask, A.M., of Dorchester, Mass. 

[Continued from page 18S.] 

St. Georges, Octob r 4 th 1726. 
Great Gov r : 

I rec d . your Letter, as also the peice of Cloath & return you 
thanks y r for as also for the Prisoners you sent to me. I cannot send you 
any News from Canada as my Young men I sent their are not return'd, 
and I can't resolve on comeiog to Boston untill they come & briu? me 
News from Canada, & then I shall send you what News I have ; <k if I 
can, conveniently, I will wait on y r Hon 1 at Boston y B winter. In as mutch 
as you sent me the Ace" of the Cape Sables men's Actions I shall likewise 
send to you if I hear of any such things. I have talk'd with my people 
about the Truck house being at S'. Georges Garrison, but most of them 
choose it should be mov'd to y e mouth of the River, or any other place you 
think fitt Near ye Sea; the reason is y' S' Georges River is sometimes 
frozen, so that they can't come to it in y r Canoes. I don't take on me to 
direct y r hon r . only mention these things to you. I have on[e] request to 
y r Hon™ w ch is that you would be pleas'd to Order a Gunn Smith at 
S' Georges to mend our Locks &c. I have nothing, at present, farther to 
add, but remain Y r Good Freind 

At a Meeting of v e Cheifs of the ^ _*■■_ _, .. c . 

Tribe they chang'd his Name from Wenungenit |_X] Cheif Sachem. 

Wenemuit to Wenungenit who was 
their former Sagamore. 
Mass. Arch. 52 : 327. 






- 









'. 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Wcstbrook and others. 281 

A Muster Roll of the Sloop George, a Transport iu his Maj u " Service 
Eastward, John Stratton Blaster, from March 8 th to April S th 1722. 
John Stratton Master & Pilot George Turrel Seaman 

Roger Talbut Mate Ca?sar Negro. Serv'. to Capt Goffe. 

The Sloop a 60 T. 

Mass. Arch. 92: 28, 29. 



Muster Roll of the Scout in y e County of York under y e Care of Coll . 
John Wheelwright from Julv 9 th to Sept r 5 th 1722. Examined Decern. 
10 th 1722. p' Jer. Allen Treas 1 . 
Jeremiah Moulton Serj'. York Jn° Richinsou 
Jn° Furbush Leut. Walter Abbitt Voluntier 

Henry Daniel Voluntier Jer Foulsome Ditto 

Abell Moulton Do. John Snow 

Sam !1 Banks Do. Andrew Haley 

John Hutching James Smith Voluntier 

Henry Simson, Voluntier Sam 11 More Serv' to Wm Grow Voluntier 
Joseph Austin Do Wm Gowing 

Jacob Courtiss Do Dan 11 Williams 

John Battin Servt to Nicho. Sewill Voluntier 

Limuel Bickford Serv' to Eliz Skilling 
W ra Farnill Son to Thomas Farnili John Benitt 

Solomon Staples Son to John Staples John Holmse 



Isaac Rarnock Son to Joshua Ramock James Powell 


W m Moggridge Voluntier W m Dudley 




Daniel Forgison 


Benj*. Barnes serv' 


to Nicho. Morrill 


w. 


alls Novem 1 8 th 1722. 




Mass. Arch. 91 : 34, 35. 




Joe 

p*. frc 


[N Wheelwright. 


Muster Roll of Capt. Joseph Heath & Com 


im May 2 d to Noven 


14 th 1722. 








Joseph Heath Liev* 


Jn°. Willkinson 


Sen' 




Ditto Heath Capt 


James Coller 


« 




George Allen Liev' 


Nicho' Edgar 


" 




Theophilus Colby Sarj' 


Adam Brown 


(,< 




Jacob Ciark " 


Rob' Hunter 


« 




Jabez Bradbury " 


Edward Jackson 


" 


Run to the Iudians- 


Sam" Harnden Corp . 


Thomas Skinner 


a 


Run 


John Stinson " 


William Harris 


u 




Sam 11 Truei " 


Thomas Drake 


" 


Run 


John Hunter Sen' 


David Allen 


Corp 3 




John Smith " 


W m Alexander 


Sen' 




Patrick Greegory " 


W" Muggeridge 


" 




Rob'. Anderson " 


Eben* Nutting 


u. 




Dan" Reding 


Jonath" Foster 


a. 




Luke Welles " 


John Green 


U- 




James Mackfaden " 


Sam 11 Ball 


it 




George Harris " 


Joseph Anderson 


u. 




John Anderson " 


William Rutter 


"• 




Josiah Webb kt 


James Holt 


u. 




Joseph Skillings " 


Jabea Stanley 


it 




YOL. XL VIII. 25* 









282 Letter's of Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. [July, 



George Hamilton Sen 4 
W m Kelley 
Simon Holden " 

Peter Ayre " 

James Morrisson " 
John Follev " 

Rob'. Hewghs 
Nath 11 Wood " 

Tho 8 Clark « 

Mass. Arch. 91 : 39-41. 



John Pike Sen' 
John Mackfedress " 

Joseph Lake " 

Edward Marry " 

W m Drake " 
Hezek. Hall 

Job Sacomocho " 

John Curry " 

John Dell Clerk 



Muster Roll of Col . Shadrack Walton and Company from July to 
Noveiu 7 1722. 



Sha d Walton Colo 11 . & Cap' 
Jacob Tilton Cap'. L" 
James Brintnal 2 d L" 
Benj a . Lennard Serj' 
Nath 11 Towns Do. 
Sam u Cheake Do 
Pel ah Whittemore Do 
Dan" Davis, Corp 11 
Jer. Prickman Do. 
Josiah Flanders Do 
Step. Whitteker Do 
Barth Flagg Sent 11 
W m McPhetres Do 
Benj a Smith Do 

John Goold Do 

Isaac Howard Do 
Hew Mahurin Do 
Jms. Jamerson Do 
John Clark Do 

Josiah Hadlock Do 
Sam 11 Weed Do 

Dan 11 Granger " 
Tim . Lovejoy " 
W ra Hamilton « 
Job Swinerton " 
Obdiah Fearn « 
Benj n . Ray " 

John Cromwell " 
Rob. Knowlton " 
Tho' Dennis ■ 

John Lowden " 
George Gilbart. Ipswich 
serv' to Rob* Calef 
Joseph Buckman " 

Mass. Arch. 91 : 4244. 



Wiil m Busbe 

Pet r Abbut Sent 11 . 

Moses Cooper " 

Isaac Kent " 

John Haddenbells " 

Sol. Nelson " 

Arm r Hamilton " 

Phil: Fowler " 

Ab™ Stickuey " Bradford 

serv' to Benj" Thirston 
Nath 11 Davis " Newbury 

serv' to Moses Richardson 
Benj*. Larrabee " 
W ra Groves " 

Tho' Cob 

Jm 8 Fitchany " 

Sam u . Gyles 

serv' to Jn° Gyles 
Rob. Cox " Run 

Jon\ Taylor- " " 

Jabez Fuller " " 

Isaac Keens " Dead 

Rob. Jone3 " " 

Sam 11 . Roods « " 

Isaac Brown " " 

John Leach " " 

John Indian " " 

Tho 8 Frazer " 

Isaac Evaret " 

Pel: Whittemore " 
Tho 8 Harris " 

serv' to Coll. Walton 
Alex Gorden " 

Phil: Nills Clerk 

Sam 11 Dowse Commissary 








































































' 













. 






1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 



283 



Muster Roll of Capt. John Peuhallow 
14 th 1722. 



& Co. from Jan" 7 5 th to Novem' 



Jno. Penhallow 


Cap 1 : 


Eb n : Ingoldsbry 


Sent 1 


John Butler 


Lieut: 


Sam 11 Hopkins 


" 


Benj 8 : Smith 


Serg ( : 


Dan 1 M a : Entire 


" 


W m Boreman 


Serg': 


Gilbert Ash 


K 


Jon a . Preble 


Serg': 


Jon* Carey 


a 


Rich d . Walford 


Clerk 


Sam 1 : Love 


" 


Tho 8 Dill* 


1 


Pat: Hogg 


u 


Tho s Motherwel 


| 


Tho 8 Robertson 


«( 


John Morrison 


V Corp 18 : 


David Southack 


a 


Wta Burns 


I 


John Bowman 


K 


Wm Fair weather 


J 


Rob 1 : Poor 


(( 


Henry Miles 


Sent 1 : 


Sam 11 Pike 


(( 


James Burns 


" 


Sam 11 Lacock 


" 


Tho' Burnham 


<( 


George Villers 


« 


Tho 3 Turner 


« 


Benj a : Barns 


IC 


Rich d Pearce 


K 


Nath a : Barns 


u 


Tho' Motherwel 


(( 


Rob' Heart 


a 


Pearce Shortwel 


U 


Joseph Scot 


u 


John Jacksont 


(( 


John English 


« 


Sam': Hunt (a) 




Peter Harratt 


a 


Joseph Averil 
Sam 11 Brookins ( 


iC 


Step: Strater 


a 


b) « 


John Blake 


« 


Sam" Pike 


a 


Simon George 


" 


George Darling 


(c) « 


Will: Chaney 


" 


Benj a : Felex 


Sent 1 


Philip Carey 


<i 


Benj a : Lobden 


« 


John Wells 


U 


Colum: Smith 


u 


Rob': Vain 


(( 


Enoch Stratton 


« 


John Airey 


u 


Sam u : Hill 


« 


Beuj a Hoit 


« 


John Wood 


u 


Joseph Nedd 


K 


Urian Anger 


« 


James George (d) 


" 


Hugh Holdman 


(c 






Anth : Dyer 


« 


John Gooch 


Commiss 1 


Tho 9 : Burnham 


M 







* Killed 

George Town 9 ber : 14 th : 1722. 
Mass. Arch. 91 : 45-47. p' John Penhallow. 

t Woanded. (a) Deserted- (6) EilledT (c) Wounded. (d) Servt to Majr Tylstone. 



to November 20th 1722. 



Johnson Harmon 


Capt. 


Jn° Goddard 


Lieu' 


Zebulon Harmon 


Ens. 


William Card 


Serj*. 


Moses Banks 


Serj'. 


Rich d Jaques 


Corp u 


Do. Jaques 


Serj 1 . 


Jn° Lane 


Oer. 



Jarmon's Company from Feb. 28, 


Sam 1 . Sanders 


Corp u . 


Jn°. Carlile 


Corp 11 


Thomas Cook 


Sent u . 


Ditto Cook 


Corp u . 


William Rowse 


Corp 11 . 


Ditto Rowse 


Sen 1 . 


John Card 


Corp u 


Ditto Card 


Sent u 



284 



Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [July, 



Thorn' Eaton 


Do 




Ephra. Ayers 


Sen 411 


Moses Eaton 


Do 


Kil'd 


Obadia Hoult 


(( 


Johnson Harmon jun r 


Do 




Thorn 3 Varell 


fi 


Aimer Elerreman 


Do 


Run 


Thorn 3 Bradbury 


" 


Sam" SlodUbridge 


Sen 1 . 




W m Bradbury 


" 


Abell Wray 


Do 




Rich d Flood 


if 


Cornel* Conner 


Do 




Thomas Webber 


" 


Jos: Easman 


Do 




Sam 11 Clough 


it 


James M. c Farling 


Do 




James Merritt 


(i 


Sam 1 . Forguson 


Do 




serv* to Jo n Poor 




James Gray 


Do 




Jno. Herren 


« 


Eben r Clough 


Do 




James Smith 


" 


Jos: Smith 


(C 




Geo. Cary 


M 


Nath u Clough 


«{ 




Thomas Lewis 


<« 


Wyat "Moor 


it 




John Fovell 


U 


John Pike 


" 




Henry Allen 


(( 


Josiah Linscott 


" 




Ezek" Carr 


« 


Jn°. Parker 


" 




Nehemiah Wood 


CC 


Solomon Steward 


« 




Jn° Whitton 


u 


John Mitchell 


« 




Nehemiah Robinson 


it 


James Woodsides 


" 




Thomas Dan forth 


« 


Job Young 


a 




W m Woodsides 




Jeremiah Dow 


u 




James Tyler 




John M c Clncas 


" 




Rich d Brawn 




Nathan 11 Abbott 


" 




William Fowler 




Edw d treble 


a 




Jn° Wells 




Mass. Arch. 91: 52-54. 


i u . Moc 




Company from April to 




Muster Roll of Maj r . San 


idey & 


Novembe: 


1722. 










Sam" Moodey 


Maj r 




John Thomas 




Benj: Larraby 


Cap' 


Lev 4 


John Tray 




Joshua Moodey 


Lev 1 




Rob* Thomson 




Joseph Bean 


Pilot 




Jiim: M c Causland 




Peter 0! liver 


Serg* 




W m Fitsimmons 




Jonath: Page 


Do 




Sam" Smith 




Grades Kuowles 


Armour r 


Jam" Maxwell 




John Robins 


Corp u 




Tho Perry 




Solomon Pike 


Do 




W m Martin 




James Irish 


Do 




Darby Collity 




Jonath: Pratt 


Do 




James Betts 




Peter Walton 


Do 




W ra Taiier 




John Owen 


Sen u 




John Young 




Joseph Seeks 






Sam 11 George 




W m More 






James Quack 




Laurence Baylie 






Geo: Farnham 




Gideon May 






Jam' Jackson 




James Carter serv* to 






Tho: Nailer 




Eph. Lincoln 






James Cunningham 


Sent 1 dec 4 


Eben r Taiier 






Robert Taiier 




Eben r Peirce serv* to 






Reno ld : M c Donald 




Ebeu r Taiier 






David Brvant 





284 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [July, 



Thorn' Eaton 


Do 




Ephra. Ayers 


Sen™ 


Moses Eaton 


Do 


Ivil'd 


Obadia Hoult 


" 


Johnson Harmon jun* 


Do 




Thom 8 Varell 


u 


Aimer Herreman 


Do 


Run 


Thorn 3 Bradbury 


" 


Sam 11 Stocfcbridge 


Sen 1 . 




W m Bradbury 


" 


Abell Wray 


Do 




Rich d Flood 


<( 


Cornel* Conner 


Do 




Thomas Webber 


" 


Jos: Easman 


Do 




Sam 11 Clough 


it 


James APFarling 


Do 




James Merritt 


u 


Sam 1 . Forguson 


Do 




serv* to Jo n Poor 




James Gray 


Do 




Jno. Herren 


It 


Eben r Clough 


Do 




James Smith 


" 


Jos: Smith 


u 




Geo. Cary 


it 


Nath u Clough 


«( 




Thomas Lewis 


<« 


Wyat Moor 


it 




John Fovell 


u 


John Pike 


" 




Henry Allen 


a 


Josiah Linscott 


« 




Ezek" Carr 


« 


Jn°. Parker 


" 




Nehemiah Wood 


" 


Solomon Steward 


« 




Jn° Wbitton 


<( 


John Mitchell 


« 




Nehemiah Robinson 


u 


James Woodsides 


« 




Thomas Dan forth 


« 


Job Young 


« 




W m Woodsides 




Jeremiah Dow 


u 




James Tyler 




John M c Clucas 


" 




Rich 8 Brawn 




Nathan" Abbott 


» 




William Fowler 




Edw d treble 


St 




Jn° Wells 




Mass. Arch. 91 : 52-54. 


A Moc 




Company from April to 




Muster Roll of Maj r . San 
22. 


idey & 


Novembe: 


Sam" Moodey 


Maj r 




John Thomas 




Benj: Larraoy 


Cap' 


Lev 4 


John Tray 




Joshua Moodey 


Lev 4 




Rob* Thomson 




Joseph Bean 


Pilot 




Jam: M c Causland 




Peter 0! liver 


Serg 1 




W m Fitsimmons 




Jonath: Page 


Do 




Sam" Smith 




Graues Knowles 


Armour* 


Jam" Maxwell 




John Robins 


Corp u 




Tho Perry 




Solomon Pike 


Do 




W m Martin 




James Irish 


Do 




Darby Collity 




Jonath: Pratt 


Do 




James Betts 




Peter Walton 


Do 




W ra Taiier 




John Owen 


Sen u 




John Young 




Joseph Seeks 






Sum 11 George 




W m More 






James Quack 




Laurence Baylie 






Geo: Farnham 




Gideon May 






Jam' Jackson 




James Carter serv* to 






Tho: Nailer 




Eph. Lincoln 






James Cunningham 


Sent 1 dec 4 


Eben r Taiier 






Robert Taiier 




Eben r Peirce serv' to 






Reno 1 *: M c Donald 




Ebeu r Taiier 






David Brvant 





' 












: q»0 "Jo 






284 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [July, 



Thorn' Eaton 


Do 




Ephra. Ayers Sen 111 


Closes Eaton 


Do 


Kil'd 


Obadia Hoult " 


Johnson Harmon jun r 


Do 




Thorn 8 Varell 


Aimer llerreman 


Do 


Run 


Thorn 9 Bradbury " 


Sam 11 Stockbridge 


Sen 1 . 




W m Bradbury " " 


Abell Wray 


Do 




Rich d Flood 


Cornel* Conner 


Do 




Thomas Webber " 


Jos: Ea-man 


Do 




Sam 11 Clough " 


James M c Farling 


Do 




James Merritt " 


Sam 1 . Forguson 


Do 




serv 1 to Jo n Poor 


James Gray 


Do 




Jno. Herren " 


Eben r Clough 


Do 




James Smith " 


Jos: Smith 


u 




Geo. Cary 


Nath u Clough 


a 




Thomas Lewis " 


Wyat Moor 


«« 




John Fovell " 


John Pike 


« 




Henry Allen " 


Josiah Linscott 


« 




Ezek" Carr " 


Jn°. Parker 


" 




Kehemiah Wood " 


Solomon Steward 


" 




Jn° Whitton " 


John Mitchell 


« 




Kehemiah Robinson " 


James Woodsides 


« 




Thomas Dan forth " 


Job Young 


u 




W m Woodsides 


Jeremiah Dow 


a 




James Tyler 


John M c Clucas 


" 




Rich d Brawn 


Nathan" Abbott 


" 




William Fowler 


Edw d Preble 


m 




Jn° Wells 


Mass. Arch. 91: 52-54. 


i u . Moc 






Muster Roll of Maj r . San 


>dey & 


Company from April to Novembe; 


1722. 








Sam 11 Moodey 


Maj r 




John Thomas 


Benj: Larraby 


Cap 1 


Lev* 


John Tray 


Joshua Moodey 


Lev 1 




Rob* Thomson 


Joseph Bean 


Pilot 




Jam: M c Causland 


Peter 0! liver 


Serg' 




W m Fitsimmons 


Jonath: Page 


Do 




Sara" Smith 


Graues Kuowles 


Armour' 


Jam 9 Maxwell 


John Robins 


Corp u 




Tho Perry 


Solomo.-i Pike 


Do 




W m Martin 


James Irish 


Do 




Darby Collity 


Jonath: Pratt 


Do 




James Betts 


Peter Walton 


Do 




W ra Taiier 


John Owen 


Sen u 




John Younof 


Joseph Seeks 






Sam 11 George 


W m More 






James Quack 


Laurence Baylie 






Geo: Farnham 


Gideon May 






Jam' Jackson 


James Carter serv* to 






Tho: Nailer 


Eph. Lincoln 






James Cunningham Sent 1 dec 4 


Eben r Taiier 






Robert Taiier 


Eben r Peirce serv' to 






Reno ld : M c Donald 


Ebeu r Taiier 






David Brvant 









' 









1894. j Letters. of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 



285 



Tho s Wilcox 






Tho s : Whittaker 






Tho* Allen 






Eben r : Gustin 






Sam 11 Atkinson 




John Hackett 






Joshua Giant 






Sam !1 Jordan 






Eben r Chinnery 




Solora: Jordan 






Jacob Key 






Benj: Larrabee Jun r 






Josh: Cromwell 




Dav d : Gustin 






Caleb Haddocks 




Joseph Thomas 






John Tucker 






Jerem: Sabin 






Johu Graues 






W m Stevens 






Henry Duren 






Primus Negro 






Tho* Duren 






serv* to Maj r Moodey 




James Evens 






Joseph Corey 


Watertown 


Benj: Twitchell 




James Fly 






Mass. Arch. Si : 


55-57 

Coll J 






>m A 




Muster Roll of 


ohn Wheel 


wright & Company fire 


.ug". 22 t 


Novem. 27 th 1722. 












John Wheelwright Capt. 


Wells 


Jona*. Stra^ton 


Cen { 




Jeremiah Mculton 


Lieut. 


, York 


Adorn Brown 


u 




Benj m . Poole 


Lieut. 


Reding 


John Ashly 


ii 




Josiah Winslow 


Lieut. 




William Bunn 


a 




Sam" Poole 


Serj' 


Reding 


James Dishon 


a 




William Cbeuers 


Serj : . 


Cambridge serv* to Charles Dryer 


m 


Ebenezer Chub 


Serj*. 




Sam" Bunn 


a 




Barnebes Wixon 


" 




William Woodard 


a 




Josiah Gibbs 


« 




Thomas Reed 


a 




Eliazer Parker 


« 


Cambridge Jacob Mills 


« 




Nath u .Wheelwright'Clerk Wells 


Georg Phillips 


K 




Jethnel Peck 


Clerk 




John Hastings 


« 




Thomas Wier 


Corp 11 


i 


John Mackdanill 


(( 




Matthew Bunn 


" 




servt to Sam 11 Tucker 




Sam 11 Hinkly 


a 




Nath u Lawrence 


Cen* 




Sam 11 Cash 


a 




Zacheriah Hicks ser- 


Do 




Josiah Kene 


it 




vant to Thomas Willis 




Abell Moulton 


a 


York 


Abraham Morss 


Do 




Eliazer Fisher 


Cent. 




James Powill 


a 


York 


John Haws 


u 




Wiiiiam Duly 


a 


Berwick 


John Evens 


u 




Dauid Jones 


«•' 




Joseph Steel 


u 




William Harmon 


« 


Wells 


Joseph Arther 


u 




Henry Maddocks 


" 


Wells 


Robert Paterson 


Cen* 




"Sam'^Banaks 


Cen m York 


Thomas Hamon 


« 




James Smith 


u 


York 


William Kine 


« 




John Denis 


If 




Jacob Hamblinton son 




Robert Lambert servt " 




to Isriell Hambliu 


[»ic] 


Cen' 


to Peleuah Rosson 






Hugh Stile3 




<( 


Joshua Wamskum 


< ; 




Gabrill Peacock 




a 


James Coorpuck 


" 




William Brown 




u 


Andrew Baxter 


" 




Joseph Philips 




ii 


servt to Mr Baxter 






servt to Stephen Cook 




Henry Hopkins run 


Do 





286 



Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. [July, 



Emanuel Hal! servt Do 

to Thomas Bening 

Dauid House " 

John Baker " 

Dauid Edwards " 

Robert Home u 

William Mogridg " 

Philip Downs servt " 

to Thomas Clark ? 

"William Ross " 

William Earle run " 

Jacob Curtiss " 

John Fowl " 

John Pease serv 1 . u 

to Daniel Goold 

John Toiler servt to " 

Capt. Billings 

Charles Camble « 

John Benit " 

Joseph Peck " 

John Russill " 

Charles Gilmore " 

Thomas Huse " 

Richard Dean " 

Casper Orth serv 1 " 
to Seth Pope 
Benjamin Lake Cen" 1 

Edward Paul " 

William James u 

Caleb Hercey " 

Robert Doocks " 

William Barber serv* " 

to John Drew 
Mass. Arch. 91: 58-61. 



Sam u Luke Cen m 

William Week3 " 

Jona'. Sturdiuant " 
Lazarus Numocks run i£ 

Joseph Tray serv' to " 

Cap' Barker run 

York James Colwell " 

Ichobod Dunham " 

John Williams " 

Sam !1 Wasnom serv* " 

to Coll. Otis run 

Isaac Charles run " 

servt to m r Gorum 

Ebenezer Boltwood " Barwick 

William Hartwell " 

John Martin " 

Peter Joseph servt to " 

Thomas White 

Jona 1 . Denison servt " 

to Richard Hall 

Philip Brown serv' " 

to John Fowls 

Isaac Shute " 

John Richinson " Kittry 

William Williams run " 

Arther Low " 

John Staples " 

James Leget " 

Tho* Mahone servt to " 

Edw d Ruggles 

Alixander Gording " 



Muster Roll of Capt Samuel Hinckes & Company, from March 28th to 
Decern' 5 th 1722, at Winter Harbour. 

Sam 11 Hinckes, Capt. Portsm Matt: Robinson Cent. Biddiford 

Solomon Smith, Cent. Biddiford Tho 5 . Alexander " Mbhed. 

Deserted Aprill 14 th 
Tho". Russell " Charlstown Tho'. Jones " England 

Ebenezer Williams " Dyed ye 21" Aprill Jn°. Warmagehan " Mbhed. 

servt to Captain Hincks 



Robert Baily 



England, rec. a 



Furlow & afterwards dismissed 



Jn°. Bagshaw 
Samuel Jordan 



Wells. 
Interpreter 
Bidd: 
Nehem: Pitman " Oyster River Matthew Short Chaplain left y e Fort 

Nov. ye 21st 
Mass. Arch. 91 : 77. 



1894.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 



287 



Muster Roll of ye Sloop Merry meeting, Thomas Saunders, from 
24 th of August to y e 13 th December 1722. 



Thomas Sanders Master & Pylott 
Thomas Sanders Jun r Mate 
Joseph Page Seaman 

Jacob Row Do 

Mass. Arch. 91: 83,84. 



Benjamin Eluel Do 
Joseph Sanders Do 
The Sloop ab' 75 Tons 



Muster Roll of the Sloop George, a Transport in His Majesties Service 
Eastward. 

John Stratton Master & Pylott 

Roger Talbott Mate 
Archibald Wilson Seaman 

The Sloop ab'oO Tons mounted a" 4 Guns 
Boston December 17 th . 1722. 
Mass. Arch. 91 : 85, 86. p r Roger Talbott. 



George Wilson Ditto 
Francis Loude " 



Muster Roll of the Sloop Virgin, a Transport in His Majesties service 
Eastward, Caleb Prat master. 

Caleb Prat Master & Pilot Ebenezer Chenery Seaman 

William Prat Mate Re Sloop ab l 45 Tonus 

Boston, Dec r . 7 th 1722. 
Mass. Arch. 91 : 89. Caleb Pratt. 



A Muster Roll of Sloop Endeavour, Jacob Parker Master, from Aug 8t 28 
to Jan. 8, 1722. 

Jacob Parker Master & Pilot 
Step Hunniwell Mate 
Jacob Parker jun r Sailor 



Ditto 



Mass. Arch. 91: 90, 91. 



Rob. Craige 
Jos: Green " 

Sam' J Pryar " 

Boston, Jan 8 th 1722 
p r Jacob Parker. 



Muster Roll of Fort George at Brunswick, Capt. John Giles Commander, 
from Aug. 14 1722 to Jan. 15, 1722-3. 

William Harper Cent 1 . 

David M c Clewer serv' u 

to John Giles 
John Harper " 

Wyman Bradbury " 

Thomas Eaton supply " 

the place of Wyman 

Bradbury sometime 
W m Stevenson " 

Andrew Denning " 

James Stevenson " 

Robert Deniug " 

W m Stevenson Jun r . Son 

to James Stevenson 



John Giles 


Capt. 


Isaac Gardner 


Leiut 


Samuel Eaton 


Serg't 


Tho: Trigoath 


Do. 


Tho" Cowell 


Gunner 


Henry Mitchell 


Cent 1 . 


Rowland Norton 


Do 


Eben*. Stanwood 


Do 


Moses Harper 


'< 


James Beverlin 


u 


Robert Lithgow 


« 


Hugh Mitchell 


M 


David Dening son to 


re 


Andrew Denning 








I 




































2S8 



The Bent Family. 



And r Dening Jun son to Cent 1 . 

And r Dening 
John Maicom " 

Ja\ Stevenson Jun r . " 

John Cochrane " 

Mass. Arch. 91: 92, 93. 



W* m Cochrane 

James Cochrane son to 

John Cochrane 
James Harper Clark 



[July, 

Cent 1 . 



Boston July 17 th : 1723 

p r John Gyle3 



Bragdon & Company from Sep' 1723 to 

John Grover Son to 

Andrew Grover 
Eben r Allen Serv* to 

Caleb Preble 
John Backer 
Jo 9 Faver 
Eben r . Young 
Aquialah Haines 
Abr a . Batten 
Nathan' 1 Adams 
John Batten Servant 

To Nicholas Sewall 
Joseph Paisturd 
John Dill Son in Law 

To IF Bettle 
Benj a . Whittum 
Joseph Hauny 
Sam 11 Backer Son To 

Tho* Backer 
John Harmon Clark 
Darbee Manuil Sent Pun 

Boston June 18 th : 1724. 

p r Arthur Bragdon. 



[The dates of individual entrances into their respective companies, time of 
service, wages of each, and a few other particulars in the original lists are 
omitted in print.] 

[To be continued.] 



Muster Roll of Cap 1 , 


. Arthi 


Jan. 1723-4. 




Arthur Bragdon 


Capt 


Joseph Sov.ard 


L l 


Rich d Gowall 


Ens 11 . 


Nicholas Sewall 


Sent. 


Joseph Smith 


Do. 


Joseph Linscut 


Corp" 


John Rackley Jr. 


Do. 


Hezekiah Adams 


« 


Job Young 


« 


John Bean 


Sent 1 . 


James Tompsou 




James Cambell 




Daniel Smith son to 




Ja' Smith 




Benj a . Austeen 




Samuel Shaw 




Andrew Whittum 




John Garey 




Joseph Bracey son to 


W m Bracey 




Job Young Jun r 




Jo n Simpson Jun r Sen 


' 


to Jo'. Seward 




Mass. Arch. 91 : 96, 


97. 



THE BENT FAMILY. 

By Allen H. Bent, Esq., of Roxburv, Mass. 
1. John 1 Bent, who sailed from Southampton, Eng., in 1638, and 
became one of the first settlers of Sudbury, Mass., was born in the parish 
of Penton-Grafton, some seventy miles south-west of London, in the 
county of Hants. The ship's list gives his age as 35, but according to the 
parish records he was baptized on the last day of November 1596, his 



















'■ 
























1894.] - The Bent Family. 289 

father being Robert Bent (1566-1631 ). In 1639 John's sister Agues 
Blanch ard unci mother started for New England, but both died during the 
passage. John Bent's house lot, about six acres, was on the north-east 
side of the old road that runs from what is now Wayland Centre to Sud- 
bury Centre, about a quarter of a mile from the former, and here he lived. 
a farmer, until his death Sept. 27, 1072, aged nearly 76. His will is dated 
thirteen days before his death, his wife Martha and oldest son Peter being 
named as executors. His widow lived until May 15, 1679. 

Children of John and Martha, the first five being born in England, the last 
two in Sudbury, Mass. : 

i. Robert, bap. Jan. 10, 1624-5; d. at Newbury, Mass., Jan. 30, 1648, 
as. 23. 

ii. William, bap. Oct. 24, 1626 5 d. voung probably. 

2. iii. Peter, bap. April 14, 1629. 

iv. Agnes, in. about 1046 Edward Rice of Sudbury, and was the 
mother of all his children, for she is mentioned iu her father's 
will in 1072, which is sufficient proof that she did not die, as Barry 
and others say, soon after her marriage. She died in Marlboro' 
June 4, 1713, re. S3. 

3. v. John, b. about 1C35. 

4. vi. Jo.sF.rH, b. May 16', 1641. 

vii. Martha, b. about 1043; m. June 5. 16G3, Samuel How of Sudbury, 
where they had seven children, the youngest being David, the 3rst 
proprietor of the Wayside Inn. made famous by Longfellow. 

2. Peter 2 Bent (Joh n 1 ), as well as his father, was one of the petitioners 

for the township of Marlboro' in 1656, and soon after settled there, 
where he had a grant for a mill, which was probably in the part 
which afterward became Southboro*. During King Philip's War his 
son was scalped by the Indians, his house garrisoned and burnt. He 
died iu " Old England sometyme in May 1678," aged 49. His will is 
dated Dec. 21, 1674, at which time he was about to start for Eng- 
land. He returned between these two dates, however. 

Children of Peter and Elizabeth Bent, the first three born in 
Sudbury, the others in Marlboro' : 

5. i. Peter, b. Oct. 15, 1653. 

ii. Martha. Probably the Martha living in Boston in 1090. 

iii. Elizabeth, b. Dec! 2, 1058. 

iv. Agnes, b. Aug. 19, 1601; m. July 9, 1684, Caleb Johnson of Sudbury. 

v. John, b. Jan. 8, 1663 ; d. April 20. 1676, at Cambridge, whither the 

family had removed for safetv after Philip's war. 

vi. Zacheus, b. about 1607; d. March 20, 1690, re. 23. 

vii. Patience, b. 1670. 

6. viii. Hopestill, b. Jan. 17, 1672. 

3. John* Bent (John 1 ) bought in 1662 land on west side of the old 

Connecticut Path, in what is now the town of Framingham. The 
first petition for the incorporation of this township was headed by 
Corporal John Bent, who was chosen one of the tythiugmen at the 
second town meeting in 1701, and in Framingham he died in Sept. 
1717, aged about 82. He was twice married, first July 1, 1658, to 
Hannah, daughter of John Stone of Cambridge, and second to Martha, 
daughter of Matthew Rice. The three children are by the first 
wife: 

i. Hannah b. May 6, 1661 ; m. Feb. 20, 1€81, John, son of John Adams 
of Cambridge. 

7. ii. JonN, b. Nov. 29, 1089. 

8. iii. David, b. about 1091. 
vol. xlvih. 26 












. 









. 



290 The Bent Family. [July, 

4. Joseph 2 Bent (John 1 ), was married June 30, 1666, to Elizabeth, 

daughter of John Bourne of Marshfield. aud moved thither. He 
was constable in 1669. He moved back ro Sudbury before 1671, 
however, and was killed accidentally in the summer of 1675 (a^ed 
34) by a pistol shot from his brother Peter. Joseph was the father of 
six children, five of whom were living in 16S6, at the settlement of 
the estate of John Bourne, their grandfather, though the names of 
two daughters are not known. The children of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth whose names are known, the two youngest being born at Sud- 
bury, were: 

i. Joseph, b. Oct. 11, 1667; d. young. 
9. ii. Experience. 

iii. Elizabeth, b. 1673; m. Oct. 11, 1701, Thos. Joyce of Marshfieid. 

10. iv. Joseph, b. March 5, 1675. 

5. Peter 3 Bent (Peter", John 1 ), of Marlboro' married his second cousin, 

Abigail, daughter of Richard Barnes, Feb. 27, 170.3, and died 
March 3, 1717, aged 03. The widow Abigail died at Southboro', 
Feb. 4, 1768, aged 84. 

Children of Peter and Abigail, all born in Marlboro": 
i. Beuxah, b. March 27, 1705; d. uum. in Southboro' April 17, 1783, 
aj. 78 

11. ii. Peter, b. March 20. 1707. 

12. Hi. John, b. Sept. 21, 170S. 

iv. Abigail, b. Sept. 1, 1710: d. nnm. in Southboro' July 29, 1787. 
v. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 5, 1712; d. unm. in Southboro' 1798, probably, 
vi. Jabez, b. Jan. 28, 1716; d. young, probably. 

6. Hoeestill 3 Bent (Peter' 2 , John 1 ), of Sudbury, married Nov. 27, 

1701, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Brown of Sudbury, and died 
Aug. 18, 1725, aged 53. He saw service in the disastrous Canadian 
campaign of 16'J0, in the first of the French and Indian wars, and on 
his tombstone in the old burial ground in what is now the town of 
"Wayland, is called an ensign. 

Children of Hopestill and Elizabeth: 
i. Martha, b. Sept. 15, 1701; d. Dec. 22, 1722. 

13. ii. Peter, b. May 17, 1703. 
TuoMiS, b. July 2D, 1706. 
Hoi'estill, b. Nov. 1. 1703. 
Sarah, b. April 22, 1711: m. July 10, 1729, Jeremiah Wesson of 

Sudbury. 
Elijah, b. Aug. 15, 1713. 
Micah, b, April 29, 1716. 
Elizabeth, b. June 1-1, 1720. 

7. John 3 Bent (John 2 , John 1 ), of Framingham, married Nov. 15, 1711, 

Hannah, daughter of David Rice, and died in 1759, aged 70. 
Children of John and Hannah, all born in Framingham: 

18. i. Matthias, b. July 2, 1712. 

ii. Hannah, b. July 10, 17H; m. first, in 1731, Richard Rice; second, 
Nov. 30, 1738, Capt. Jeremiah Belknap. She d. 177-1, aired 60. 

iii. Martha, b. March 7, 1720; m. March 10, 1710, Samuel Brewer, and 
removed to Rutland. 

19. iv. John, b. May 4, 1730. 

8. David 3 Bent (John", John 1 ), of Framingham, married Jan. 1, 1713, 

Mary, daughter of Thomas Drury, and died Feb. 15, 1730, aged 
about 40. 

Children of David and Mary, all born in Framingham : 



14. 


iii. 


15. 


iv. 




v. 


16. 


vi. 


17. 


vii. 




viii. 



1894.] The Bent Family. 291 

20. i. John, b. Oct. 22. 1713. 

ii. David, b. March 22, 1717; d. Aug. 17. 1726. 

iii. Mary, b. Aug. 5, 1718; m. Sept. 24, 1741, David Goodenow of Rut- 
land, Mass. 
iv. Lydia, b. April G, 1721 ; m. 1739 Wra. Beal of Natick. 
v. Sarah, b. Jan. 12, 1727; ru. 175] Bezaleel Rice. 

21. vi. David, b. March 30, 1730 (posthumous; . 

9. Experience 3 Bent (Joseph-, John 1 ), was of Sudbury in 1G90, bought 
house and land in Plymouth in 1701, sold it in 1708, when he was 
of Middleboro', and in 1712 bought land in Plympton adjoining his 
Middleboro' property. As a young man he is alluded to as a house 
carpenter, but later in life as a yeoman. Ke married in 1703 
Abigail, daughter of George Sampson of Duxbury, and died prob- 
ably in 1751 at Middleboro'. 

Children of Experience and Abigail : 

22. i. Joseph. 

ii. Elizabeth, m. John Griffith. 

iii. Rachel. 

iv. Alice, in. Barnabas Raymond. 

10. Joseph 3 Bext (Joseph 2 , John 1 ), was brought up in Marshfield, first 

by his grandfather John Bourne, and afterward by John Man, who 
was appointed guardian in 1G3G. Joseph was a blacksmith, and 
after his marriage, Oct. 27, 1C98, to Rachel, daughter of Jonathan 
Fuller of Dedham, lived in Milton, where he died March 31, 1728, 
aged 53. His wife died July 5. 1725, aged 51. 
Children of Joseph and Rachel : 
i. Mary, b. Jan. 21, 1700; m. June 10, 1725, John Davenport of Dor- 
chester. 
Joseph, b. Sept. 20, 1701. 
John, b. Oct. 15, 1703. 
Rachel, b. Aug. 21, 1705; m. Feb. 8, 1722, Nathauiel Vose of 

Milton. 
Elizabeth, b. Jan. 13, 1703; m. Dec. 1, 1725, David Copeland of 

Bridsrewater. 
Sarah,"!). April?13, 1710; im.Feb. 12, 1730, Elijah Vose. 
Ebexezer, b. April 23, 1712. 
Experience, b. Oct. 12, 1714; d. Oct. 23, 1714. 
ix. Thankful, b. July 5, 1716; m. 1734 Stephen Davenport of Milton. 

11. Peter 3 Bext (Peter s , Petei*, John 1 ), of Marlboro', was perhaps the 

most prominent of the early Bents, was selectman ten years, 
representative to the General Court five years, and a member of the 
first three Provincial Congresses. In 1770 he was one of the six 
largest taxpayers in Marlboro', besides owning lands in Southboro' 
and Westboro'. His will is dated Feb. 1, 1786, but he did not die 
until March 11, 1798, aged 91. His widow lived till June 3, 1803, 
when she was 93. They were buried in the old burial ground near 
the present Fitchburg Railroad station in Marlboro'. 

Children of Peter and Mary Bent, all born in Marlboro': 
i. Peter, b. Oct. 22, 1733; d. Aug. 3, 1740. 
ii. Sarah, b. June 21, 1735; m. April 13, 17S4, Alpheus Woods, and d. 

Feb. 16, 1825, se. 80. 
iii. Mary, b. 1737 ; m. March 22, 1758, Josiah Fay of Southboro', whose 
daughter Elizabeth Fay m. Uriah Brigham, and had Peter Beat 
Brigham (1807-1877) the proprietor of the famous •' concert hall " 
on Court street, Boston. 
iv. Jajjez, b. Feb. 28, 1739; d. Aug. 5, 1740. 



23. 


ii. 


24. 


iii. 




iv. 




v. 




vi. 


25. 


vii. 




viii. 





















■1 .1 



292 The Bent Family. [July, 

v. Patience, b. Feb. 13, 1741; in. Capt. Seth Newton, and d. at South- 

boro' Jan. 23. 1837, ae. nearly 9(3. 
vi. Deborah, b. June 24, 1713 ; d. July 9, 1745. 
vii. Anne, b. June 30, 1745; d. unmarried April 17, 1328. 
viii. Peter, b. Jan <3, 1747: m. 1779 Anne Walker, but d. Aug. 31, 1301, 

leaving no children. 
ix. Jabez, b. Jan. 29, 1749 : d. urmi. May 2(3. 1S17, a?. 68, the last of the 

male line of Bents in Marlboro', where the family had lived for 

almost 1(30 years. 
x. Deborah, b. March 5, 1751 ; d. Peb. 20, 1755. 
si. Abigail, b. Jan. 29, 1754; m. Sept. 12, 1771, Beuajah Brigham. 

12. John 4 Bent (Peter 3 , Peter 3 , John 1 ), was a farmer at Southboro', and 

Sergt. in Capt. Timothy Brigham's Co. of militia in 1757. There 
is no record of his marriage or death, but his name appears on 
land transactions as late as 1784. 

13. Peter 4 Bent (Ilopeslili*, Peter 3 , John 1 ), married April 18, 1727, 

Mary, daughter of Rev. Samuel Parris, in whose family the Salem 
Witchcraft Delusion began. As there is no record of Peter's death, 
nor of the deaths of his sons, it is probable the family moved away 
from Sudbury, though they were still there in 1757. 

Children of Peter and Mary Bent, all born in Sudbury: 

i. Mary, b. Juno 28. 1727. 

ii. Martha, b. March 11, 1729. 

iii. Dorothy, b. Dec. 31, 1730; m. Nov. 9, 17G2, Richard Mills. 

iv. Eunice, b. Nov. 15, 1732. 

v. Susannah, b. Sept. 17, 1734; m. Dec. 5, 1765, Ebenezer Moore. 

vi. Catherine, b. Sept. 23, 173G; m. Jan. 4, 1753, William, son of 

Samuel Russell of Sudbury, and a descendant of William of 

Cambridge. 
vii. Abigail, b. Oct. 30, 1738; m. June 18, 1765, Jason Glozen (Gleason). 
viii. Peter, b. Sept. 10, 1741 ; m. probably June 17, 1774, Sarah Pratt of 

Newton. 
ix. Samuel, b. Aug. 15, 1743 ; nothing further known. 
x. Anna, b. Dec. 10, 1745. 
xi. Hopestill, b. July 15, 1748; nothing further known. 

14. Thomas 4 Bent (HopestilP, Peter 3 , John 1 ), of Sudbury, married May 

28, 1733, Mary, daughter of Samuel Stone, and died July 26, 
1775, aged 69. His wife died the same day, and both were buried 
in the old burial ground at what is now Wayland. All four of 
their sons marched to Concord on the 19th of April, 1775. 
Children of Thomas and Mary Bent, all born in Sudbury: 

i. Lucy, b. Jan. 13, 173(3; m. July 19, 1755, Nathan Livermore of 
Weston. 

ii. Thomas, b. July 4, 1733; m. Submit Parker, and removed to 
Framingham. 

iii. Lois, b. Dec. 3, 1740; m. Feb. 3, 1762, James Glover. 

iv. Mary, b. June 21, 1743; m. Capt. Benj. Edwards (1732-1303) of 
Framingham, and d. there in Feb. 1824. 

v. Jason, b. May 9, 1750; m. Aug. 17, 1773, Anne Glover, and died in 
Sudbury in 1786. 

vi. Martha, b. March 21, 1752; m. Dec. 5, 1782, James Inglis. 

vii. Samuel, b. Jan. 1, 1755; m. Feb. 6, 1777, Molly, daughter of Wm. 
Hunt of Sudbury, and removed in 1780 to Fitzwilliam, N. H., 
where his decendauts still live. He had nine children, the fifth 
being Hyman (1788-1872) , who m. Leviuah J. Allen, and had eleven 
children, the fourth being A. Allen, treasurer of Boylston Street 
Land Co., Boston, and father of Allen H. 



1894.] The Bent Family. 293 

viii. Jonathan, b. April, 22, 175S; m. first, in 1778, Experience Smith; 
second, in 1S03, Ruth. Haynes, widow of Reuben Rice; and is the 
ancestor of mojt of the Bents still living in Sudbury. 

ix. Eunice, b. Feb. 14, 1763; m. Aug. 8, 1782, Thomas Glover, Jr., of 
Sharon. 

15. Hofestill' 1 Bent (BbpestilP, Peter 7 , John 1 ), lived a short time in 

"Waltham, but moved back to Sudbury, where he died in 1772, aged 
64. He married first, October 22. 1733. Beulah, daughter of Jona- 
than Rice, and second. April 26, 1763, Mrs. Anna Fiske, of "Wal- 
tham, who d. Jan 7, 1793, ae. 80. 

Children of Hopestill aud Beulah. all born in Sudbury : 

i. Jonathan, b. April 24, 1735. was in the Crown Point expedition in 

1755, and died Dec. 25 of that year. 
ii. Lydia, b. June 15, 1738. 
iii. Peter, b. July 8, 1741; m. Lucy, daughter of Samuel Stone of 

Framiugton. No children. 
iv. Elizabeth, b. March 25, 1744; m. Feb. 11, 1762, Micah Rice, 
v. Timothy, b. March 24, 1747; enlisted in the Continental Army, but 

died or was killed previous to 1770. 

16. Elijah 4 Bent (HopestilP, Peter 2 , John 1 ), married Sdsannah. daughter 

of Samuel Stone, and is variously called on the old records house- 
wright, yeoman and inn-holder. He spent most of his life in Ease 
Sudbury (now Wayland), but died at his sou's in Barre, May 2, 
1797, aged 83. His widow died in Barre July 3, 1801, aged 80. 
Children of Elijah and Susannah : 

i. Elijah, b. Oct. 7, 1739; nothing further known. 

ii. Dorcas, b. Jan. 1, 1742. 

iii. Silas, b. April 14, 1744 ; m. June 24, 1765, Mary Carter, and removed 
to Barre about 1766, thence to Rutland (Mass-) about 1763. and in 
1788 to Marietta, Ohio. His son Silas jr. of St. Louis was the 
father of Capt. Charles Bent (1799-1S47) first Governor of New 
Mexico, of Col. William Bent (1S09-1869), from whom Bent's 
Fort and Bent Co., Colo., are named, and of Capt. Silas Bent 
(1820-1887) of St. Louis. 

iv. Susannah, b. May 21, 17*8. 
. v. Joel, b. Feb. 22, 1750; m. July 13, 1768, Mary Mason of Barre, 

where he was chosen selectman, town clerk and representative. 

vi. Stephen, b. July 15, 1752; nothing further known. 

vii. Rurus, b. Feb. 13, 1755; m. Jan. 13, 1777, Mary Wyman, and lived 
in East Sudbury (Wayland). 

viii. "Abigail, b. Sept. 3, 1757; m. May 1, 1777, David Curtis, son of 
Joseph, and descendant of Henry Curtis of Sudbury. 

ix. Nathan, b. March 12, 1760; m. Aug. 28, 1777, Abigail Goodenow, 
and removed to Winchester, N. H., about 1797. 

17. Micah 4 Bent (BbpestilP, Peter', John 1 ), of Sudbury, a blacksmith, 
married in 1737, Grace, daughter of David Rice, and died about 
1760. 

Children of David and Grace, all born in Sudbury : 

i. Davtd, b. March 18, 1739 ; removed to Nova Scotia. 

ii. Wllllam, b. June 8, 1741 ; the ancestor of the Bents now living at 

Cochituate, Mass. 
iii. Anne, b. April 3, 1744; m. May 12, 1763, Daniel Felch of Natick. 
iv. Sarah, b. March 19, 1746. 

v. Jane; m. 1766 Jonas Harrington, 3d, of Weston. 
vi. Martha. 
vii. Elizabeth. 
vol. XLVin. 26* 



294 The Bent Family. [July, 

18. Matthias 4 Bent (John 5 , Jo/in 2 , John 1 ), of Framingham, selectman 

thirteen years, married Feb. 26, 1746, Abigail, daughter of Joseph 
Stone, and died in July 1709, aged 87. His widow died Nov. 16, 
1814, aged 90. 

Children of Matthias and Abigail : 
i. Anne, b. Oct. 14, 1747; m. John Eames. 

ii. Matthias, b. Sept. 15, 1752; deacon and town treasurer of Framing- 
ham, where he was twice married. 

19. John 4 Bent (John 5 , John 3 , John 1 ), of Framingham, married Oct. 23, 

1751, Molly, daughter of John Stacy, and died Sept. 14, 1818, aged 

88. 

Children of John and Molly, born in Framingham: 
i. John, b. July 1G, 1752 ; m. Sarah Stone. 

ii. Josiah, b. Oct. 20, 1755: m. Mary Abbe, and removed to Petersham. 
iii. Maey, b. Oct. 2!), 1755; m. April 23, 1776, Capt. John Trowbridge. 
iv. Martha, b. April 14, 1753. 

20. John 4 Bent (David 5 , John 2 , John 1 ), of Framingham, married in 

1737, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Reed of Sudbury, and died 
probably in 1750, aged 37. His widow m., 1751, Joshua Harrington. 
Children of John and Elizabeth, all born in Framingham : 

i. Samuel, b. Feb. 23, 173S; d. May 29, 1742. 

ii. Betty, b. Nov. 3, 1741 ; d. June 20, 1742. 

iii. Betty, b. May 1, 1743. 

iv. Lucy, b. Jan. 2G, 1745. 

v. Samuel, b. July 10, 1749; nothing further known. 

21. David 4 Bent (David 3 , John 2 , John 1 ), blacksmith, moved when a 

young man from Framingham to Rutland, Mass., where he bought 
a farm in the southern part of the town, a portion of it lying in 
what afterward became the town of Paxton. At his death he owned 
half pew in Rutland meeting-house and two-thirds pew in Paxton 
meeting-house. He was captain of one of the companies that 
marched from Rutland to Cambridge upon receipt of the news .of 
the Battle of Lexington, and saw active service in the following 
year. In August 1787 a cyclone destroyed his barn, blacksmith 
shop and orchard of nearly 200 apple-trees. (See Sidney Perley's 
Historic Storms of New Englaud.) 

David Bent died between Jan. 9 and Feb. 6, 1798, aged nearly 
68. His first wife, to whom he was married April 3, 1751, was 
Lucy, daughter of Peter Moore, and his secoud wife, to whom 
he was married October 2, 1783, was Martha, daughter of James 
Browning. 

Children of David and Lucy, all born in Rutland: 

i. Micah, b. June 24, 1751 ; d. Sept. 29, 1756. 

ii. John, b. Feb. 3, 1754; d. Sept. 26, 1750. 

iii. David, b. April 3, 1756; m. 1775 Phebe Whittemore of Paxton. 

iv. Lucy, b. June 4, 175S; m. 1774 Joseph Green of Leicester. 

v. Petee, b. May 19, 17G0; enlisted in the Continental Army, but died 

or was killed before his service expired. 
vi. Phebe, b. Feb. 8, 1763; m. Nov. 17, 1780, John McClenathan, jr., of 

Hubbardbton. 
vii. Abigail, b. Jan. 17, 1705; d. Jan. 26, 1767. 
viii. Rufus, b. April 10, 1767: nothing further known. 
ix. Darius, b. Aug. 13, 1769; m. March 0, 1797, Isabel Boice; was in 

Boston 1806 to 1S09, and afterward went to Montreal, Canada. 



1894.] The Bent Family. 295 

x. TruimKUS, b. Sept. 1, 1771, and moved to Rutland, Vt.; the grand- 
father of Hon. Charles Rent of Morrison. 111. 

xi. Phinehas, b. Sept. 15, 177G; m. Dec. 31, 1798, Polly Frink, and re- 
moved to Vermont. 

Child of David and Martha, born in Rutland, Mass.: 
Samuel BfiOWjoarG, b. Nov.. 27, 1784; married first, 1807, Hannah 
(daughter of Lieut. Oliver Watson of Spencei), by whom he had 
Samuel Watson Bent of Boston, father of S. Arthur Bent of the 
Bostoniau Society: and married second, 1816, Catherine (daughter 
of Rev. Joseph Avery of Holden), by whom he had Judge 
George Bext of Nebraska. 

22. Joseph 4 Bent (Experience*, Joseph", John 1 ), of Midrlleboro', a nail- 

maker, married Oct. 17, 1728. at Plymptou, Jemima, daughter of 
Francis Billington, jr. 

Children of Joseph and Jemima: 
i. Sarah; b. Jan. 27, 1730. 
ii. John, b. Feb. 27, 1732; m. May 1G, 1753. Bethiah Morse, and was 

the ancestor of Hon. Bartlett Bent of Middletown. Ct. 
iii. Alice, b. Jan. 1&. 1734; m. Sept. 11, 1753, at Taunton, to William 

Rayment. 
iv. Joseph, b. Jan. 6, 1736; mariner and sail-maker of Plymouth. No 
record of marriage or death. 

v. William, b. ; m. Aug. 29, 1768, Sarah, daughter of Zabdiel 

Sampson of Plymptou, but nothing further is known of him. 

23. JosErn 4 Bent (Joseph*, Joseph*, John 1 ), of Milton, married Feb. 13, 

1724, Martha Houghton. He was a captain in the Crown Point 
expedition of 1755, and died of dropsy Dec. 7, 1755. at Albany, 
N. Y.,' aged 54. His widow lived till Dec. 4, 17GG, when she 
was 65. 

Children of Joseph and Martha, all born in Milton : 

i. Joseph, b. Aug. 27, 1725 ; d. same day. 

ii. Lemuel, b. May 2, 1727; kept a tavern on the Canton turnpike in 
Milton; was selectman, lieutenant under Col. Winslow at the 
expulsion of the Acadiaus in 1755 ; and captain of a company on 
the expedition to Crown Point in 175!). and at Halifax in 1761. 

iii. Abigail, b. April 16, 1730; d. Aug. 9, 1733. 

iv. Eunice, b. May 22, 1732: m. Dec. 6, 1750, Win. Pierce, jr. 

v. Joseph, b. March 9, 1735; m. Dec. 6, 1758, Mehitable, daughter of 
Capt. John Crehore. 

vi. William, b. Nov. 13, 1737; moved to the part of Stoughton which 
afterward became Canton, where he married Nov. 24, 1763. Chloe, 
daughter of Geo. Blackmail; kept the Easrle Inn at Ponkapog; 
was sergeant in the Canadian expedition 1759; and captain of a ._ 
company during the Revolution. His eldest son Leipuel moved to 
Virginia, previous to 1792. when he was of Alexandria.""" - «& 

vii. Martha, b. Julv 4, 1739; d. March 10, 1740. ,- 

viii. Rufus, b. March 10, 1742; m. Dec, 6, 1767, Mrs. Ann (Middleton) >■' 
McKenzie, and was the father of Aun Bent who opened a store 
on Washington street, Boston, in 1795, which she kept for nearly *- 
forty years. 

24. John 4 Bent (Joseph*, Joseph 2 , John 1 ), of Milton, blacksmith, married 

Feb. 6, 1728, Elizabeth, daughter of William Badcock. His wife 
died May 7, 1750; but no record is found of his death. 
Children of John and Elizabeth, all born in Milton: 
i. Jesse, b. Nov. 1, 1729; m. Dec. 6, 1758, Hannah Vose of Milton, and 

moved to Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia, about 1764. 
ii. Rebecca, b. April 19, 1731. 
iii. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 11, 1733. 






r 



296 . Probate Forms of Massachusetts. [July, 

iv. Prudence, b. April 29, 1735; ra. Dec. 6, 1761, Amaziah Crane of 
Milton. 

v. Sesaxxah, b. Feb. 14, 1737; m. Dec. 6, 17C2, Seth Crane. 

vi. Rachel, b. May 30, 1739; d. Dec. 9, 1742. 

vii. Lydia, b. Sept. 9, 1711; m. Dec. 6, 1700, Silas Houghton of Milton. 

viii. Sarah, b. Nov. 7, 1743. 

ix. Rachel, b. Sept. 23, 1745 ; m. Dec. 6, 1763, Ezekiel Blake of Milton. 

x. Johx. b. Aug. 4, 1747; moved to Nova Scotia with his brother, and 
married Mary Lunt of Eastport, Me. He is the grandfather of 
Dr. Charles Bent, who has been mayor of Truro. 

xi. Noah, b. Sept. 2, 1749; nothing further known. 

25. Ebenezer 4 Bent {Joseph*, Joseph 2 , John 1 ), of Milton, yeoman, mar- 
ried Jan. 9, 1735, Deborah, daughter of Jonathan Fairbank of 
Dedham, and died Feb. 15, 1786, aged 73. His widow died Aug. 
17. 1798, at Quincy, aged 34. 

Children of Ebenezer and Deborah, all born in Milton : 

i. Eleaxor, b. Sept. 28, 1735; m. Dec. 6, 1757, Elijah Underwood of 
Braintree. 

ii. Ebenezer, b. Aug. 22, 1737; m. first, Dec. G, 1765, Hannah Shepherd 
of Milton; and second, July 9, 1771, Mrs. Ruth Crouch of Dor- 
chester, and was the father of William and Adam Bent of Boston, 
who were among the very first piano manufacturers in this country, 
of Charles Bent (1790-1852; the founder of the firm of Bent 
and Bush, Boston, and of Ebenezer, Jr. of Quincy, who was father 
of Maj. Luther S. Bent of Steeltou, Fa. 

iii. Samuel, b. March 1, 1739; nothing further known. 

iv. Nedabiah, b. Jan. 21, 1742; m. Feb. 8, 1769, Miriam Ruggies of 
Braintree, whither he removed, living in the part that was later 
incorporated as Quincy. 

v. Mary, b. Feb. 1, 1744; m. 1773, Samuel Newcomb of Braintree. 

vi. John, b. July 10, 1746 ; m. Dec. 11, 1769, Hannah Coller of Dedham, 
and had Josiah Bent, the founder of Bent's cracker bakery, which 
was started in 1801; the latter (Josiah) being father "of Rev. 
Josiah, who died at Amherst in 1839, and of Rev. Nathaniel T. 
who died at Worcester in 1856. Rev. Nathaniel T. was father of 
Wm. H. Bent of Taunton. 

vii. Deborah, b, July 8, 1748. 

viii. Sarah, b. March 24, 1751. 

ix. Elizabeth, b. April 13, 1754. 



PROBATE FORMS OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



In the Register for January 1863 was printed an article entitled 
"New Frobote Forms in Massachusetts," specifying the changes 
which would prove advantageous to the genealogist in tracing the 
identity of individuals in the distant future, and otherwise. We 
have recently learned some facts about their origin and the manner 
of their introduction, a record of which is worth preserving. 






' 



' 






1894.] Probate Forms of Massachusetts. 297 

The Revised Statutes of 1836 provided, in chapter 83, as follows : 

Sec. 8. — The several judges of probate shall, from time to time, make 
rules for regulating the practice and conducting the business in their re- 
spective courts, in all cases not expressly provided for by law; and they 
shall, within one year after this act shall take effect, return a statement of 
their rules and course of proceedings to the supreme judicial court, and shall 
make a like return of all their rules thereafter made, as soon as conveniently 
may be, after making the same; and the supreme judicial court shall have 
power to alter and amend all such rules, and to make other and further rules, 
from time to time, for regulating the proceeding in all the probate courts of 
the Commouweath, as they shall judge necessary, in order to introduce and 
maintain regularity and uniformity in the said proceedings." 

This provision was incorporated into the General Statutes in 
chapter 117, section 19. 

No steps Avere taken to put in operation this provision of law 
until after the passage of the act of 1858 creating the office of Judge 
of Probate and Insolvency for each of the fourteen counties, in the 
place of both the Judges of Probate and the Judges of Insolvency, 
of whom there were then twenty-seven, the two oftices having pre- 
viously been consolidated for Dukes County. 

Judge William A. Richardson, then of Lowell, had been Judge of 
Probate for Middlesex County something more than two years, and 
was one of about five re-appointed to the newly created consolidated 
office of Judges of Probate and Insolvency from among the twenty- 
seven Judges of Probate and Judges of Insolvency. 

He had long been impressed with the necessity for a new system 
of forms for general use throughout the Commonwealth, to supersede 
the great variety which had been adopted from time to time by the 
judges separately in the several counties, each according to his own 
ideas and practice without consultation with others. However 
familiar one might have been with the forms and practice in his own 
county, when he had business elsewhere he was obliged to send for 
forms and instructions at great inconvenience. 

Judge Richardson had been engaged on the revision of the 
statutes for more than three years as one of the commissioners who 
framed the General Statutes of 18G0, and it occurred to him 
that this provision for making rules of practice might afford the 
means of establishing the much needed forms, alike for all the 
counties. 

At a meeting of the newly appointed Judges of Probate and In- 
solvency at Boston, he presented his views, and suggested the 
appointment of a committee to carry them into execution. A 
committee was thereupon appointed, consisting of Judge John 
Wells, of Chicopee, for Hampden ; Judge William A. Rich- 
ardson, or Lowell, for .Middlesex; and Judge Samuel F. Lyman, 
of Northampton, for Hampshire. 

As much printing would be required, and no means were pro- 












iq* 






298 . Probate Forms of Massachusetts. [July, 

vidcd for paying the expense, Judge Richardson made an arrange- 
ment with Messrs. Wright and Potter, the State Printers (who were 
then engaged in printing the work of the commissioners on the 
General Statutes), to print the forms in full for such counties as so 
desired, and in blank for such counties as might afterwards order 
them, in expectation that all the counties would eventually adopt the 
forms, as they did in fact. 

Judge Lyman, who had been Register of Probate for many years 
and was accustomed to Hampshire forms only, resigned soon after 
he saw the first forms printed, giving as a reason that the changes 
were too radical for him. Judge Wells resided so far from Boston, 
where the forms were printing, that he could give no attention to 
the work and was rarely in Boston during its progress. 

The result was that the whole labor devolved upon Judge Rich- 
ardson, who gave more than two years devoted study and care to the 
work. He had been for several years a member of the New-England 
Historic Genealogical Society, and in framing the forms he always 
kept in view the advantages to genealogists in future years, after 
the records had accumulated, of having facts about heirs, next of 
kin, minors, &c, accurately presented and recorded. 

The result was that the forms, on examination by the Supreme 
Court, to whom they were presented, proved satisfactory, and on 
April 11, 1861, Chief Justice Bigelow entered of record the order 
which, after describing the forms, closed as follows : 

" And whereas said forms have been examined, considered and 
approved by this court ; 

"Therefore, in order to secure regularity and uniformity in the 
proceedings of the Probate Courts in the several counties, it is 
ordered, that copies of all said forms be filed with this court and 
recognized as standard forms to be adopted and used in all the 
Probate Courts of this Commonwealth/' 

Probably we should not have had a tmiform system of forms, at 
least for an indefinite period of time, but for the gratuitous labor of 
Judge Richardson and his successful arrangement for printing the 
blanks, as the undertaking would have been little understood and 
too expensive for trial. These forms have been in operation now 
more than thirty years, and nobody would wish to return to the old 
diversified system. 

In the case of Baxter vs. Blood (128 Mass., 543) the Supreme 
Court, considering the legal effect of these forms, held that a 
notice not in accord with the prescribed form given by a probate 
court was void, and that all proceedings dependent upon it were 
invalid. 

Judge Richardson has since been. Secretary of the Treasury of 
the United States, and Judge of the Court of Claims (IT. S.) at 
Washington, of which he is now the Chief Justice. 



1894.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



299 






BRITISH OFFICERS SERVING IN AMERICA, 1754-1774. 

Contributed by Worthington Chatjxcey Ford, Esq., of Washington, D. C. 
[Continued from page 168.] 



Name. 


Rank. 


Regiment. 


Date of Commission. 


Don, John 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


2S August, 1771. 


Donaldson, Alexander 


Ensign 


42 


18 July, 1758. 




Adj 1 . 


42 


20 March, 1759. 




Lieut. 


42 


8 May, 1760. 


Donaldson, Henry- 


Ensign 


77 


11 March, 1762. 


Donaldson, John 


Lt. Col. 


55 


25 December, 1755. 


Donnellan, John Ormsby 


Lieut. 


60 


31 July. 1761. 


Douell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 1760. 


Douglass, James 


Lieut. 


1 


27 April, 1756. 




Q r . W. 


1 


19 February. 1757. 


Douglass, James 


Ensign 


15 


11 May, 1760. 




Lieut. 


15 


6 May, 1762. 


Douglass, James 


Ensign 


42 


31 J illy, 1759. 


Douglas, John 


Lieut. 


78 


18 June, 1757. 


Doughs, William 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


23 February, 1768. 


Doule, Robert 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


26 December, 1770. 


Dowal, Alexander 


Ensign 


48 


12 May, 1757. 


Dow, Archibald 


Ensign 


60 


6 April, 1759. 




Lieut. 


60 


12 December, 1760. 


Dowe, Alexander 


Ensign 


28 


10 November, 1761. 




Lieut. 


28 


20 March, 1763. 


Dowe, James 


Lieut. 


42 


16 March, 1764. 


Dowe, John 


Ensign 


60 


4 May, 1757. 




Lieut. 


60 


24 May, 1758. 




Q r . M* 


60 


22 October, 1758. 


Downes, Edward 


Lieut. 


46 


21 September. 1756. 




Capt. Lt. 


46 


IS August, 1762. 


Downing. William 


Ensign 


55 


27 December, 1755. 




Lieut. 


55 


13 June, 1759. 


Drayton, Stephen 


Ensign 


44 


6 June, 1757. 




Lieut. 


44 


15 September, 1758. 


Drew, Robert 


Lieut. 


62 


13 January, 1756. 


Drought, Thomas 


Ensign 


80 


25 December, 1757. 




Lieut. 


80 


28 July, 1758. 


Drummond, Charles 


2 d Lieut. 


94 


2 January, 1762. 


Drummond, Robert 


Surgeon 


42 


5 August, 1758. 


Drummond, Robert 


Lieut. 


44 


2 July, 1755. 


Duer, Samuel 


Ensign 


17 


25 July, 1766. 


Du Fez, George 


Captain 


60 


8 Maivh, 1757. 


Duff, James 


Lieut. 


77 


11 January, 1757. 


Duffe, Hon. Lewis 


Captain 


8 


17 December, 1761. 


Duffield, Francis 


Ensign 


60 


10 April, 1769. 


Dugdale, Henry 


Lieut. 


45 


25 Noyember, 1754. 




cy. M r . 


45 


4 June, 1760. 



' 





















300 



British Officers serving in America. 



[July, 



Dunbar, Baziel 


Lieut. 


62 


Dunbar, James 


Lieut. 


80 


Dunbar, Jobn 


Lieut. 


48 


Dunbar Patrick 


Lieut. 


15 


Dunbar, William 


Lieut. 


43 




Capt. Lt. 


43 




Captain 


43 


Dunbar, William 


Lieut. 


44 




Captain 


44 


Duncan, Alexander 


Captain 


55 




Major 


bb 


Duncan, Charles 


Ensign 


60 


Duncan, John 


Lieut. 


44 


Duncan, Richard 


Q r . M*. 


44 




Ensign 


44 


Dundas, Alexander 


Captain 


34 


Duudonald, William, Earl of Captain 


17 


Dunlap; Samuel 


Ensign 


47 




Lieut. 


47 


Dunn, George 


Ensign 


14 


Dunn, Thomas 


Lieut. 


15 


Dunnet, Johu 


Ensign 


77 




Ensign 


17 


Dunnet, John 


Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


Dunster, James 


Ensign 


60 


Dupee, 


Surgeon 


Rangers 


Duperron, Philip 


Lieut. 


17 




Adj 1 . 


17 


Duperon, Philip 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


Duplessis, Louis Victor 


Ensign 


60 


Duport, Robert 


Ensign 


47 


Durand, Charles 


Lieut. 


95 


Duser, 


Captain 


60 


Eagle, George 


Surgeon 


27 


Ecuyer, Simeon 


Lieut. 


62 




Capt. Lt. 


60 




Captain 


60 


Eddingstone, James 


Ensign 


1 




Lieut. 


42 


Edgworth, Essex 


Ensign 


28 


Edwards, Arthur 


Surgeon 


10 


Edmeston, Andrew 


Ensign 


44 


Edmeston, Robert 


Lieut. 


9 




Captain 


9 


Edmondstone, Charles 


Captain 


18 


Edmoudstone, John 


Ensign 


48 




Lieut. 


48 


Edmondstone, William 


Captain 


48 


Edwards, John 


Chaplain 


16 


Egerton, Scroope 


Lieut. 


31 


Elliott, John 


Ensign 


27 



12 January, 1756. 

31 December, 1757. 

3 July, 1755. 

22 January, 1755. 

20 June, 1753. 

25 December. 1758. 

8 April, 1761. 

6 June, 1757. 

22 July, 1758. 

28 December, 1755. 
14 February, 1760. 

3 September. 1766. 
25 April, 1757. 

31 March, 1758. 
16 September, 1758. 
25 August, 1762. 
2 February, 1757. 
31 January, 1759. 

4 May, 1760. 

2 March, 1770. 

3 February, 1764. 
16 September, 1758. 
2 December, 1760. 
20 August, 1761. 

31 March, 1760. 
25 September, 1761. 
27 April' 1756. 
2 February, 175S. 

14 April, 1759. 
16 April, 1761. 

1 April, 1758. 

15 September, 1759. 

7 March, 1760. 
12 January, 1756. 

4 April, 1745. 

25 January, 1756. 
14 February, 1760. 
27 April.. 1762. 

2 March, 1757. 

9 July, 1762. 

8 March, 1757. 
14 August, 1765. 
12 January, 1763. 

18 January, 1757. 

19 December, 1768. 
27 May, 1758. 

5 May, 1757. 

23 August, 1758. 
23 March, 1758. 

14 January, 1767. 

15 August, 1764. 
22 November, 1756. 



• 









' 









1894.] British 


Officers servi 


ng in 


America. J 


Elliott, John 


Lieut. 


42 


2 August, 1759. 


Elliott, John 


Lieut. 


1 


14 Februarv, 17 GO. 


Elliot, John 


Ensign 


17 


8 April, 1762. 


Elliot, Robert 


Major 


43 


2 Februarv, 1757. 


Elliott, Robert 


Lt. Col. 


55 


23 March," 1761. 


Ellis, Hercules 


Ensign 


55 


29 August, 1756. 




Lieut. 


44 


8 August, 17G0. 


Ellis, John Jomer 


Ensign 


18 


6 April, 1770. 


Ellis, Thomas 


Ensign 


55 


31 January, 1761. 


Ellis, Thomas 


Q r . M'. 


14 


17 May, 1762. 


Ellison, H. Peter 


Lieut. 


G4 


1 January, 17GG. 


Elphinstone, John 


Lieut. 


47 


2 July, 1755. 


Ellington, Richard 


Eusign 


22 


5 July, 1758. 


Elriugton, Thomas 


Captain 


95 


17 February, 1760. 


Elwes, Henry 


Lieut. 


22 


10 May, 1757. 


Elwes, John 


Lieut. 


44 


25 December, 1756. 


Engel, James Samuel 


Q r . m 


60 


24 February, 1757. 




Lieut. 


GO 


11 May, 1759. 




Ensign 


45 


25 February, 1760. 


Erskine, Sir Henry 


Colonel 


1 


17 December, 1762. 




Maj. Gen. 




25 June, 1759. 


Ervin, Thomas 


Lieut. 


45 


8 March, 1757. 


Etherington, George 


Lieut. 


62 


16 February, 1756. 




Captain 


GO 


17 April, 1759. 




Major 


60 


4 October, 1770. 


Etherington, Thomas 


Ensign 


47 


1 February, 1759. 




Lieut. 


47 


27 May, 1760. 




Lieut. 


60 


13 September, 1766. 


Evans, John 


Lieut. 


60 


29 February, 1756. 


Evans, John 


Capt. 


18 


16 December, 1767. 


Evans, Simon 


Ensign 


28 


8 April, 1762. 




Lieut. 


28 


16 December, 1763. 


Evans, William 


Lieut. 


28 


8 March, 1757. 




Capt. Lt. 


28 


28 March, 1763. 


Evatt, John 


Lieut. 


1 


3 September, 1762. 


Evelyn, "William 


Colonel 


20 


3 November, 1769. 


Everest, John 


Lieut. 


64 


16 May, 1766. 


Ewer, Garnet 


Ensign 


47 


5 December, 1756. 




Lieut. 


47 


23 May, 1759. 


Eyre, Robert 


Captain 


9 


31 July, 17G2. 


Eyre, Thomas 


Lieut. 


44 


8 November, 1755. 


Eyre, William 


Major 


44 


7 January, 175G. 




Lt. Col. 


55 


17 July, 1758. 




Lt. Col. 


44 


29 October, 1759. 


Faesh, George 


Lieut. 


62 


51 February, 1756. 


Faesh, John 


Captain 


62 


21 January, 1756. 


Faesh, Rodolph 


Captain 


62 


27 December, 1755. 


Fahie, Richard 


Ensign 


60 


31 May, 1758. 


Fairfax, William Henry 


Ensign 


28 


22 November, 1757. 


Falkner [Falconer], Thomas Captain 1 


44 


5 November, 1755. 


Falle, Philip 


Lieut. 


95 


7 March, 17 GO. 




Adf. 


95 


22 March, 1761. 




Capt. Lt. 


95 


26 June, 1762. 


YOL. XLVIII. 


27 







301 



•' 



K 

I 


















; 












302 - Britisl 

Farmer, Jasper 
Farmer, John 

Farmer, John 
Farmer. Joseph 
Farmer, Robert 
Farquhar, Thomas 
Farquhar, "William 
Farquhar, William 

Farquhar, "William 
Farquarsou, Alexander 

Farquarson, Charles 

Farquarson, George 
Farquaharson, Robert 

Farquharson, "William 
Fan-ant, Henry 
Farren, George 
Faunce, Thomas 

Feltham, Jocelyn 
Fenuer, Samuel 

Fenton, James 
Ferguson, Adam 
Ferguson. "William 
Fermor, Henry 

Fetherston, "William 

Field, James 
Fife, Archibald 
Figge, James 

Fisher, Garnet 
Fisher, Minne 
Fitzgerald, Edward 
Fitzgerald, G. R. 
Fitzgerald, Hunt 

Fitzgerald, Martin 
Fitzgerald, Maurice 
Fitzpatrick, William 

Fitzsimons, Francis 
Fleming, Edward 

Fleming, Michael 
Flaming, Wiiliam 
Fleming, William 



Ucers serv; 


big in J. 


Inner ica. [Ju 


1 st Lieut. 


21 


6 April, 1767. 


Lieut. 


23 


2 May, 1751. 


Capt. Lt. 


23 


3 October, 1760. 


Captain 


22 


2 July. 1702. 


Lieut. 


31 


7 September, 1756. 


Major 


34 


2 Juue, 1761. 


Ensign 


44 


19 April, 1759. 


Major 


15 


12 March, 1754. 


Ensign 


47 


24 March, 1758. 


Lieut. 


47 


25 September, 1759. 


Lt. Col. 


44 


19 September, 1753. 


Ensign 


42 


22 July, 1757. 


Lieut. 


42 


29 July, 1758. 


Lieut. 


77 


6 January, 1757. 


Captain 


77 


16 September, 1758. 


Lieut. 


42 


29 March, 1750. 


Ensign 


35 


31 July, 1758. 


Lieut. 


35 


30 August, 1761. 


Ensign 


80 


25 September, 1760. 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


, 31 March, 1753. 


Chap". 


65 


4 May, 1761. 


Ensign 


47 


14 April, 1759. 


Lieut. 


47 


15 February, 1761. 


Lieut. 


26 


1 January, 1766. 


Ensign 


22 


20 September, 1760. 


Lieut. 


22 


19 August, 1762. 


Lieut. 


1 


15 February, 1756. 


Chap n . 


42 


10 August, 1762. 


Ensigu 


45 


10 September, 1762. 


Ensign 


18 


15 February, 1768. 


Lieut. 


18 


3 June, 1771. 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


25 Juue, 1762. 


1 st Lieut 


21 


18 November, 1763. 


Lieut. 


35 


29 November, 1756. 


Adj't. 


9 


7 January, 1767. 


Lieut. 


59 


27 Mav, 1758. 


Capt. Lt. 


59 


28 May, 1770. 


Ensign 


55 


8 September, 1761. 


Ensign 


27 


13 October, 1762. 


Capt. 


10 


27 March, 1767. 


Lieut. 


69 


5 November, 1766. 


Ensign 


35 


25 September, 1759. 


Lieut. 


35 


4 May, 1762. 


Ensign 


2S 


9 April, 1756. 


Ensign 


60 


21 June. 1769. 


Ensign 


64 


2 March, 1768. 


Lieut. 


64 


26 December, 1770. 


Lieut. 


1 


27 December, 1756. 


Adj't. 


16 


28 February, 1756. 


Lieut. 


16 


14 August, 17 65. 


Capt. 


64 


25 December, 1770. 


Capt. 


29 


29 December, 1763. 


Major 


64 


12 December, 1767. 



1894.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



303 



Fletcher, George 


Captain 


35 


Fletcher, Henry 


Lt. Col. 


35 


Fletcher, Thomas 


Ensign 


42 




Lient. 


42 


Fletcher. William 


Surgeon 


65 


Forbes, Charles 


Lieut. 


1 


Forbes, Charles 


Lieut. 


62 




Capt. Lt. 


CO 


Forbes, Charles 


Captain 


42 


Forbes, Daniel 


Adj<. 


60 


Forbes, David 


Eusign 


34 


Forbes, Donald 


Lieut. 


62 


Forber, Gordon 


Capt. 


34 


Forbes, John 


Colonel 


17 


Forbes, John 


Chap n . 


29 


Forbes, Lauehlan 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


Forbes, William 


Captain 


46 


Forbes, William 


Major 


35 


Ford, Edward 


Adj'. 


26 




Ensign 


26 


Forde, Thomas 


Lieut. 


34 




Adj't. 


34 


Fordyce, Charles 


Captain 


14 


Forrester, William 


Major 


27 


Forster, Anthony 


Lieut. 


16 




Captain 


16 


Forster, Christopher 


Ensign 


1 




Lieut. 


1 


Forster, Edward 


Captain 


17 


Forster, George 


Lieut. 


8 




Adj't. 


8 




Capt. Lt. 


8 




Captain 


8 


Forster, John 


Lieut. 


47 


Forster, John 


Captain 


46 


Forster, John Hill 


Ensign 


64 


Forster, William 


Lt. Col. 


1 


Fortescue, John 


Ensign 


27 




Lieut. 


27 


Fortescue, Hon. John 


Ensign 


10 


Fortye, Thomas 


Lieut. 


35 


Foster, Mathew 


Lieut. 
Captain 


47 




Captain 


28 


Foster, Thomas 


Ensign 


31 


Fowke, William 


Ensign 


8 


Fowler, Alexander 


Lieut. 


18 


Fownes, Thomas 


Captain 


16 


Foxon, Charle3 


Ensign 


27 


Foxon, John 


Lieut. 


22 


Foxon, John 


Capt. Lt. 


46 


Francis, Turbot 


Ensign 


44 




Lieut. 


44 



8 April, 1755. 

16 February. 1758. 

17 July, 1738. 

I June, 1750. 
20 June, 1770. 

15 February. 1756. 
31 December, .1755. 

22 March, 1758. 
15 August, 1762. 

23 August, 175S. 
28 November, 1764. 

II Februarv, 1756. 

12 April, 1764. 

25 February, 1757. 

26 August, 1767. 

11 December. 1756. 
14 April, 1758. 

11 February. 174S-9. 
31 October* 1762. 

13 January, 1757. 

1 January, 1766. 

3 August, 1762. 

25 December, 1762. 

9 September, 1763. 

2 August, 1765. 

1 January, 1766. 
20 May, 1771. 

5 June, 1758. 

19 September, 1760. 

20 August, 1751. 

26 September, 1757. 

2 May, 1766. 

27 March, 1770. 

25 December, 1770. 

4 July, 1755. 

25 December, 1765. 

12 July, 1770. 

24 December, 1755. 
27 April, 1756. 

1 October, 1758. 

6 May, 1772. 

8 March, 1757. 

26 June, 1755. 

3 February, 1762. 

4 August, 1762. 
29 July, 1763. 

10 June, 1771. 
12 August, 1768. 
6 January, 1772. 

25 December. 1765. 
8 March, 1757. 

16 January, 1759. 
25 April. 1757. 
24 July, 175S. 



304 



British Officers serving in America. 



[July, 



Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser. Alexander 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Alexander 

Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Archibald 

Fraser, George 
Fraser, George 
Frazer, Hugh 
Fraser, Hugh 
Fraser, Hugh 



Fraser, Hugh* 
Fraser, James 



Fraser, James 
Fraser, John 

Fraser, John 

Fraser, John 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, Malcolm 

Fraser, Malcolm 
Fraser, Malcolm 
Fraser, Malcolm 
Fraser, Robert 

Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Simon 

Fraser, Simon 

Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Simon 

Fraser, Simon 
Fraser, Thomas 



Lieut. 78 

Lieut. 78 

Captain 78 

Lieut. 9 

Ensign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Ensign 78 

Ensign 78 

Eusign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Ensign 60 

Lieut. 78 

Lieut. 27 

Adj't. 78 

Ensign 78 

Q r . M r . 78 

Lieut. 78 

Capt. 78 

Lieut. 78 

Q r . M r . 78 

Captain 78 

Lieut. 42 

Ensign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Lieut. 78 

Captain 78 

Lieut. 78 

Q r . M r . 78 

Ensign 48 

Lieut. 48 

Ensign 60 

Ensign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Ensign 78 

Ensign 78 

Adj'. 78 

Ensign 48 

Lieut. 48 

Lieut. 42 

Lieut. 62 

Ensign 60 
Lt. Col. Com. 78 

Lieut. 78 

Capt. Lt. 78 

Ensign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Captain 78 

Ensign 78 

Lieut. 78 

Lieut. 78 

Cantain 78 



12 February, 1757. 

22 July, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 
25 October, 1766. 
15 January, 1757. 
27 September, 175S. 

13 December, 1759. 
4 October, 1760. 

7 April, 1760. 

23 June, 1762. 

23 June, 1760. 

24 April, 1761. 

4 September, 1754. 
12 January, 1757. 

9 June, 1758. 

22 April, 1759. 

29 April, 1760. 

23 October, 1761. 

4 January, 1757. 
12 January, 1757. 
27 September, 1758. 

20 July, 1758. 

19 January, 1757. 
22 April, 1759. 

24 January, 1757. 

15 April, 1760. 

30 January, 1757. 

27 September, 1758. 

10 March, 1760. 

25 March, 1762. 
25 August, 1762. 
18 July, 1757. 

25 September, 1759. 
18 June, 1758. 

9 July, 1760. 

24 July, 1761. 

17 May, 1757. 

21 February, 1759. 

28 July, 1758. 

31 January, 1756. 

10 December, 1756. 

5 January, 1757. 
5 Jauuary, 1757. 

27 September, 1758. 
9 January, 1757. 

18 June, 1758. 

16 January, 1757. 
21 January, 1757. 

25 September, 1759. 

8 February, 1757. 
16 January, 1757. 



* Some of these Frazers may be identical. 









I 



I 






1894. J British Officers serving in . 


America. 3 


Fraser, William 


Ensign 


80 


27 December, 1757. 




Lieut. 


80 


25 September, 1760. 


Fraser. William 


Ensign 


44 


23 March, 1758. 


Freeman, James 


Ensign 


59 


13 February, 1765. 


Friend, Richard 


Ensign 


1 


2 February» 1757. 




Lieut. 


1 


29 September, 1761. 


French, Broderick 


Lieut. 


45 


10 February. 1753. 


French, Christopher 


Captain 


22 


25 October," 1756. 


French, Jeremiah 


Captain 


29 


1765. 


French, John 


Captain 


48 


11 February, 1756. 


French, John 


Ensign 


35 


15 December, 1758. 




Lieut. 


35 


14 September, 1761. 


French, ■ 


Q r . M r . 


55 


18 June, 1757. 


Fuge, John 


Ensign 


52 


23 September, 1772. 


Fuller, Peake 


Captain 


46 


26 October, 1763. 


Fullerton, George 


Lieut. 


62 


1 February, 1756. 


Fulwood, George 


Captain 


17 


2 February, 1757. 


Furlong, Jonathan 


Major 


14 


27 March, 1765. 


Fuser, Lewis Valentine 
[also F.] 


Lieut. 


62 


27 February, 1756. 


Capt. Lt. 


60 


15 July, 1762. 




Captain 




27 September, 1762. 




Captain 


60 


30 December, 1763. 




Major 


60 


7 August, 1771. 


Gabbett, Joseph 


Lt. Col. 


16 


7 February, 1759. 


Gabbett, Joseph 


Captain 


16 


20 November, 1765. 


Gabbett, Thomas 


Lieut. 


16 


18 June, 1766. 


Gage, John Lewis 


Ensign 


31 


20 February, 1766. 


Gage, Hon. Thomas 


Colonel 


80 


5 May, 1758. 




M. Gen. 




5 March, 1761. 




Colonel 


22 


29 March, 1762. 


Galbraith, Jame3 


Lieut. 


64 


12 November, 1767. 


Galbraith, Tho. Brabazon 


Ensign 


55 


17 August, 1760. 




Ensign 


28 


3 October, 1760. 


Gale, William 


Ensign 


59 


7 December, 1764. 


Gallot, Charles 


Lieut. 


62 


27 January, 1756. 


Gamble, Thomas 


Lieut. 


44 


7 July, 1755. 


Gamble, Thomas 


Ensign 


43 


8 April, 1762. 


Gamble, Thomas 


Ensign 


15 


26 September, 1762. 




Lieut. 


16 


28 November, 1770. 


Gansell, William 


Colonel 


55 


20 August, 1762. 


Gardiner, Luke 


Captain 


35 


24 Januarv. 1758. 


Gardiner, Robert 


Ensign 


59 


17 July, 1770. 


Gardner, Samuel 


Captain 


47 


22 December, 1753. 


Gardiner, Valentine 


Ensign 


55 


4 November, 1755. 




Lieut. 


55 


23 July, 1758. 


Garrigues, John 


Ensign 


46 


26 August, 1762. 


Garstin, Chich r Fortes. 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


4 January, 1760. 




Capt Lt. 


94 


2 January, 1762. 


Gates, Horatio 


Captain 


N. Y. 


13 September, 1754. 




Major 


45 


24 April, 1762. 




Major 


60 


27 October, 176k 


VOL. XLVm. 


27* 







305 



■ 



' 

















































































1 







































































306 



British Officers serving in America. 



[July, 



Gaule, William 


Ensign 


17 


24 July, 1759. 




Lieut. 


17 


8 Apri'l, 1762. 


Gawton, Thomas 


Chap n . 


G2 


25 December, 1755. 


Gay, Thomas 


Ensign 


58 


22 May, 1759. 


Gellie, George 


Ensign 


46 


16 November, 1758. 




Q r . m;. 


46 


16 July, 1758. 


Geyte, Charles William le 


Captain 


94 


28 February, 1760. 


Gibson, Thomas 


Ensign 


47 


1 July, 1755. 




Lieut. 


47 


9 June, 1758. 


Gifford, James 


Captain 


14 


21 August, 1765. 


Gilbert, Rog. Pomroy 


Ensign 


15 


25 September, 1757. 


Gilbert, Walter Raleigh 


Ensign 


16 


26 December, 1770. 


Gilchrist, Alexander 


Ensign 


78 


25 September, 1759. 




Lieut. 


78 


4 October, 1760. 


Gildart, Francis 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


12 February, 1755. 


Gillan, John 


Ensign 


55 


5 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


55 


31 May, 1759. 


Gilmau, George 


Ensign 


27 


28 September, 1762. 




Adj't. 


27 


6 September, 1765. 


Gilmer, Richard 


Ensign 


28 


27 April, 1756. 




Lieut. 


28 


19 February, 1761. 


Gisborne, James 


Colonel 


16 


4 March, 1766. 




M. Gen. 




30 April, 1770. 


Gladwin, Henry 


Captain 


80 


26 December, 1757. 




Major 


80 


13 December, 1760. 


Glazier, Beamsley 


Lieut. 


60 


8 March, 1757. 




Captain 


60 


16 June, 1760. 




Captain 


60 


25 December, 1765. 


Gleadowe, George 


Ensign 


34 


17 May, 1763. 


Gnielling, 


Captain 


62 


5 January, 1756. 


Goddard, Henry 


Q r . M r . 


47 


24 April, 1755. 




Lieut. 


47 


23 June, 1755. 




Capt. Lt. 


47 


27 May, 1760. 




Capt. 


47 


15 February, 1761. 


Goddard, John 


Lieut. 


29 


7 December, 1764. 


Godfrey, C. Newland 


Capt. Lt. 


52 


22 April, 1762. 


Goldfinch,* John 


Capt. Lt. 


14 


15 July, 1767. 


Goldfrapp, Jn° George 


Ensign 


60 


21 March, 1766. 


Goldsmith, Thomas 


Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


19 August, 1742. 




Captain 


So. Ca. 


5 May, 1756. 


Goldsworthy, Charles 


Captain 


94 


30 June, 1760. 


Goodacre, William 


Ensign 


9 


24 June, 1767. 


Gordon, Andrew 


Lieut. 


26 


8 April, 1767. 




Captain 


26 


7 September, 1768. 


Gordon, Ann 


Ensign 


46 


3 February, 1757. 


Gordon, Ann 


Lieut. 


42 


16 August, 1762. 


Gordon, Archibald 


Captain 


27 


14 October, 1742. 




Major 


27 


16 July, 1758. 


Gordon, Arch. Kinlochf 


Lieut. 


65 


26 August, 1767. 


Gordon, Benjamin 


Captain 


1 


2 February, 1757. 


Gordon, Cosmo 


Lieut. 


78 


24 July, 1757. 



* Goldsmith in the return of 1771. 

t In some returns the Gordon is dropped, making the name Arch. Kinloch. 






■ 












-) ■ -•■r 



1894.] British 


Officers serving in A 


[m erica. 3 


Gordon, Francis 


Ensign 


60 


7 May, 1757. 




Lieut. 


60 


29 August, 1759. 


Gordon, George 


Q r . M r . 


78 


15 April, 1760. 


Gordon, George 


Ensign 


65 


12 January, 1770. 


Gordon, Henry 


Lieut. 


62 


12 February, 1756. 




Captain 


60 


16 April, 1759. 


Gordon, Hugh 


Lieut. 


77 


31 January, 1757. 


Gordon, James 


Ensign 


26 


25 January, 1771. 


Gordon, John 


Lieut. 


1 


22 November, 1756. 


Gordon, John 


Ensign 


9 


20 December, 1765. 


Gordon, John 


Ensign 


42 


31 July, 1758. 


Gordon, John 


Captain 


48 


21 November, 1757. 


Gordon, John 


Captain 


60 


IS September, 1760. 


Gordon, John 


Captain 


77 


7 January, 1757. 


Gordon, John 


Captain 


N. Y. 


5 April, 1762. 


Gordon, Joseph 


Chap n . 


21 


12 January, 1757. 


Gordon, Patrick 


Captain 


1 


16 February, 1756. 


Gordon, William 


Lieut. 


46 


2 February, 1757. 


Gordon, "William 


Ensign 


52 


19 December, 1768, 


Gordon, William Augustus I s " Lieut. 


40 


2 July, 1755. 


Gore, Charles 


Lieut. 


35 


24 February, 1756. 




Captain 


35 


11 June, 1760. 


Goreham, Joseph 


Maj. Com* 


Rangers 


25 September, 1761. 


Gorrell, James 


Ensign 


60 


30 May, 1759. 




Lieut. 


60 


2 March, 1762. 


Gough, John 


Ensign 


8 


9 December, 1767. 




Adj*. 


8 


4 October, 1770. 


Gould, Bulkley 


Ensign 


59 


26 December, 1770. 


Gould, Richard 


Lieut. 


47 


23 August, 1758. 


Gower, Edward 


Ensign 


14 


20 June, 1766. 




Lieut. 


14