Skip to main content

Full text of "A new guide to Shrewsbury"

See other formats


THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



ONE SHILLING 




J>TEW GUIDE 



TO 



s SHREWSBURY 



BY R. BRADLEY 






FULL-PAGK ILLUSTRATIONS tt .MAP 



Shrewsbury? : 

(I. LIVESEY. ST. I' 



ESTABLISHED OVER 100 YEARS. 



J. & B. BLOWER, 

HOUSE AGENTS, LICENSED VALUERS, 



GOOD'S WAREHOUSED 



BY ROAD OR RAH 




Upholstery, and General Furnishing Show Rooms, 

PRIDE HILL. 

Storage Repository (specially built,) and Manufactory, 

CASTLE GATES. 

Antique Furniture at Lilleshall House, 

TOP OF BUTCHER ROW. 



Immense Stock to select from, and every Article marked in plain figures 

at lowest prices. 




Visitors to this 

interesting 

old Town and 

County, 

are invited to inspect our 

extensive Premises where they 

will see a display of 

high-class Goods 

of genuine quality, combined 

with low prices. 



R. MADDOX & Co. 

Jfurntsljittfi Drapers anb utfittcrs, 

PRIDE HILL & HIGH STREET, 

SHREWSBURY. 



w 

CO 

D 
O 



O 



H 

u H 



a. ^ 

2 



W 

PH 



H 
w 
cu 
oi 
< 
U 




SCULL BROTHERS, 



R.C.P., 

(LATE G. EVANS,) 



Specialists, 

CLUMBERS, 

& VEflTIIiATIflG EflGIflEEHS, 

31, CASTLE STREET, 



SHREWSBURY. 



Consulting Engineer & Inspector : C. E. SCULL 



SCULL BROTHERS-^ 

Beg to call the attention of the Nobility, Gentry, and Public to the 

new system of Cast Iron Domestic Drainage, which ensures no broken 

pipes or joints. Earthenware done away with. Imperishable Joints 

perfectly Air and Gas tight. Efficiency guaranteed. 



ESTIMATES FOR ESTATE DRAINAGE &. WATER SUPPLY. 



olf ^ir\ds of dumps' 
jlydraulic 



SHEET LEAD & PIPE WAREHOUSE. 

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS :---" SCULL BROTHERS, SHREWSBURY." 



jetton 




HEAD MASTER: MR. THOMAS STONES. JUNIOR CLASSES: MRS. STONES, C.M.. 1st CLASS. 
RESIDENT UNIVERSITY AND TRAINED MASTERS. 

Very healthy situation, house stands in its own grounds. Home comforts with care- 
ful supervision. Spacious and well-ventilated School and Class-rooms. 

Boys prepared for Commercial Life, Civil Service, Medical preliminary, and other 
examinations. 

Gymnasium, Playground and Field for Cricket, Football, &c., adjoining the house. 



BRITISH & FOREIGN BIBLE 

AND 

RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S DEPOT, 
33, Castle Street, Shrewsbury. 

L WILDING, 

PRINTER, 

BOOKSELLER, 

BOOKBINDER, 

STATIONER 



assorln|cnf of :f?fiofqgi[ap6ic ^Viavs of 
and ;Ceu}fi6ourIioo(f. 



NEWSPAPERS, + PERIODICALS-;- AND-;- MAGAZINES 

DELIVERED PROMPTLY. 



Publisher of 

THE POPULAR 6n. GUIDE TO SHREWSBURY, 
Containing Map of Town specially drawn. 

GUIDE TO HAUGHMOND ABBEY, &c. 
ROAD MAP OF SHROPSHIRE, &c. 
NORTH WALES. 

DIRECTORY OF SHREWSBURY & DISTRICT. 



W. & H. E. TANNER, 

WHOLESALE 4 RETAIL 

Ale, Porter, Cider, and Spirit Merchants. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

WORTHINGTON & CO.'S CELEBRATED BURTON & PALE ALES, 
ALSO AGENTS FOR COMBE & CO. '8 LONDON STOUT. 



DINNER ALES, (specially brewed for Family use), at 1/8, 1/6, 1/4, 1/2, 

i/-, and rod. per gallon. 
LONDON & BURTON STOUTS, KIL. 3S /-, 3 o/- ; FIR. 17/6, i 5 /-. 



DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 
BOTTLERS OF 

WORTHINGTON'S PALE & DINNER ALES. COMBE'S LONDON STOUT. 
ST. PAULI BREWERY Co.'s 
AND BRUSTER & Co.'s 

DEVONSHIRE & AMERICAN CIDERS. 

FINE OLD MATURED WHISKIES, at 247-, 22/-, zi/-, and i8/- per Gallon. 

LIBERAL DISCOUNT ALLOWED TO THE TRADE. 



. 

\ T 
I LAGE 



CORN EXCHANGE STORES, SHREWSBURY. 

Telegraphic Addrass : "TANNER BROS., SHREWSBURY. 11 



Temperance and Commercial Hotel. 

GOOD ACCOMMODATION FOR CYCLISTS. 
6, CASTLE GATES, -i^- 

OPPOSITE THE STATION, 

-^i- SHREWSBURY. 

ESTABLISHED 1837, 

JOHN coN^zev, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

FHU1T, FISH, GfllWE flNfi POUIiTKY OEflliEH, 

73, Mardol, Shrewsbury. 

H fresb supply of jfisb and gsters Bailg. TRnenbam Xahc See. 

ORDERS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO. 



^mM^<m^^ 

1 s*j!K4W&^s/&l f 

rf s .<xO^' A **C*A?&J/I ^..XkV V 



"- v\ T\ 6V^ ^T. ^C i C-'_j ' JV TX > C /* 

4Si\ 




TELEGRAMS: "JONES. FLORISTS, SHREWSBURY." 



JOflES & SOJ1S, 

1Flur8er\>men, Seebsmen & jfloriste 

SHREWSBURY. 



CUT FLOWERS A SPECIALITE 

AWARDED 3 SILVER MEDALS AND HUNDREDS OF PRIZES 
FOR CUT FLOWERS. 



GARDEN + SEEDS + V&- 

-Bfr + FLOWER + SEEDS 



CATALOGUES FREE. 



DUTCH, FRENCH, & ENGLISH BULBS. 
FRUIT TREES, ROSES, CLEMATIS, SHRUBS, &c. 

STOVE & GREENHOUSE PLANTS or ALL KINDS. 
CATALOGUES FREE. 



collecfion oj" ^f)ow, }?anq jladus 
in iHe 



IST PRIZE AND SILVER MEDAL FOR BEST COLLECTION S.H.S., 1891. 



3Fine Collection of 1barb, Iberbaceous plants. 

CATALOGUES FREE. 



The Oldest Boat Building Establishment in Shrewsbury. 



ELMS, BOAT BUILDER 



Boats of every description built to order and forwarded to any part of the kingdom. 

A quantity of New and Second-hand Boats of every class in Stock suitable for rivers 

or ornamental waters, or built to order on the shortest notice. 




Those who delight in a Row on the Severn will do well to pay Mr. ELLIS a visit, 
and inspect his magnificent FLEET of BOATS at his Boathouse, adjoining the Quarry 
and opposite the Grammar Schools, where every information can be gained for Trips 
between Shrewsbury and Gloucester, at moderate charges combined with prompt 
and courteous attention. 



OARS, SCULLS & CANOE PADDLES ALWAYS IN STOCK, 

AND EVERY REQUIREMENT FOR THE BOAT BUILDING TRADE. 



JS3utU>tn0 ^Establishment Colebam, near Bngltsb 

AND RESIDENCE 2O, WrL* COP, SHREWSBURY. 



J. P. A\/\THIAS, 

(Formerly J. COGGIN), 

ESTABLISHED OVER FIFTY YEARS. 



jZoi\fedionei[ 



CHESTER STREET, 
SHREWSBURY. 



, Cfjpi^tening and Biptfjcla^ Cake: to 
at gjopt notice:. 



AltBERT E. 




printing Worfcs : St. Julian's Briars. 



BOOKSELLER, STATIONER, PRINTER, 

ai^cf f icfuije 



FANCY GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



A LARGE SELECTION OF MEDALLION VlEWS OF SHREWSBURY AND 

NEIGHBOURHOOD, ALSO Fl<ITH's, VALENTINES, PoULTON's, &C. 

UNMOUNTED PHOTOGRAPHS. 



SPECIAL 1s. COPYRIGHT VIEW BOOK, CONTAINING 20 REAL 
PHOTOGRAPHS, JUST PUBLISHED. 




o6acconi0 and Cigar Qtterc(5anf, 
SHOPLATCH & GENERAL MARKET, 

SHREWSBURY. 



The jfteqowqecr ^Hrcws6urv fa^c |32aqu factory, 



THE BEST RESTAURANT C) 



, / FOR DINNERS, 



TEAS, 

CONFECTIONERY - LUNCHEONS, 

REFRESHMENTS. 

-H ESTABLISHMENT.^ ALES & STOUT. 

ffie fairwa .Sfafion, 





" BERLIN HOUSE." 

16 WYLE COP, SHREWSBURY. 



(i<?9<?ral Draper, |T|<?reer, /T^illi^^r, Rosier 9 Jlab^rdastyer, 9e 



JONES, 

WATER LANE POSTING STABLES. 



Hunters, Hacks, Harness Horses, and Cobs for Hire by day, week, or longer period. 

Licensed to Hire all kinds of Conveyances. 

FIRST-CLASS WEDDING TU RN-OUTS. 

Nothing but First-class Turn-outs with Steady Drivers in Livery. 



HORSES ALWAYS ON SALE. 



H 



PS 

3 Cu 
CL n 



o 

1 



H 

H <"D 

M D 

H 3 

O S- 



o 
tr 



i m 

i ? 

^ ? 

^ ^ 

IBM 

/, ~ * 



p' l-H 

r* & I 

I M 



m 

o 

m 



' g m 

o 

i 

M 
2 

H 



W 



03 

ffi 

Q 

> 

g 
W 



o s 

C I 

M 

L D- 



H 



d 

M 



r 

M 



c 

D 



r 

H 
n 

g 

r 
r 



pa 
O 

tD 

m 
po 
H 



. M. 



24, 5/ c 52, MARDOL. 

ESTABLISHED 1790. 



w 
o 


O 



w 



w 



fc 

O 

I I 

05 





Pu, 



Pi 
O 

O 




w 
fc 

O 

< 

|H 

O 

W 

fa 
fc 

O 

O 

Q 
525 



W 



w 



w 



The above is a business which has long enjoyed considerable popularity, both on account 
of its representative nature and the high quality of the goods dealt in. Practically speaking, 
the greater portion of them are of Mr. Phayre's own manufacture, and he is thus able to 
guarantee their absolute purity and wholesomeness. A further department of the business 
has to do with the supply of flour, wheat meal, oatmeal, and the celebrated " Hovis " Bread. 
Mr. Phayre occupies two sets of premises. His principal establishment at 51 * 52, 
MARDOL, is devoted to the general confectionery, and bakery and comprises a smart- 
looking shop with a display of sweets, cakes, pastry &c., in one window, and a big show of 
crisp bread in the other. At the rear is an extensive bakery, well-equipped and distinguished 
by cleanliness and good order. Mr. Phayre contracts for the supply of pastry to any 
amount. At No. 24., in the same thoroughfare, on the opposite side is the Grocery and 
Provision department, where first-class quality in Shropshire Cheese and Hams is always 
obtainable. As also. Teas of perfect purity, from I/- per lb., that at 2/- being specially 
noted for delicious flavour and strength. 



ai\d 



Esfa6lisfin\cnf, 



25, MARDOL, SHREWSBURY. 



. ^Established to supplg (Booos of sterling value ano merit at 

THE LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH. 

EXTENSIVE MILLINERY & COSTUME SHOW ROOMS. 
Ir>fai)ts, ^ildr^rjj ar?d ^adies' (Tyillipery Dept. " up to date." 



UNDERCLOTHING, CORSETS, PINAFORES. 




Great attention given to Hosiery : Men's and Women's in immense 
variety at Cash Prices. 

WOOLS, YARNS, PACKET WOOLS, AT CASH PRICES. 

Laces from 3^d. per dozen, to some of the best makes in vogue. 

Xace Curtains from l/OJ to 10/6 per pair. 

PURE CALICOES, PURE HOLLANDS, CAMBRICS, FLANNELS. 



ALL GOODS MUST BE PAID FOR ON OR BEFORE DELIVERY 



I 

HUMPHREYS & HEICHWAY, 
o 
Mine anb Spirit Merchants, 



Ui 
fc 

R 

(0 



Jli 



ESTABLISHED 1805. 



TEA & COFFEE BLENDERS, 

-/GX FAMILY GROCERS, 



-i- and -- JIgriculfural -;- ^ccdsimcn, 
7 MARDOL, SHREWSBURY. 



CO 

^ 


Q: 




HENRY LEE & Co., 



-^ Italian TKHatebousmen, 

DEALERS IN 

HIGH-CLASS TEAS AND COFFEES. 



CHOICEST SELECTION OF FRESH DESSERT FRUITS 



agents tor California!! Xigbt IDlmes. 



17 THE SQUARE, SHREWSBURY. 



ESTABLISHED MORE THAN ZOO YEARS. 

/\DNiTT & HAUNTON 

BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS, 
PRINTERS, LITHOGRAPHERS AND BOOKBINDERS, 

THE SQUARE, SHREWSBURY. 



S.P.C.K. DEPOT FOR SHREWSBURY & DISTRICT. 
Society's Bibles & prater Boofes in all Bindings. 



Books from 2o. eacb. 
Iprager ano lbmn Books from 6t>. eacb, 
JSibles from 60. eacb. 

THE LARGEST STOCK OF BOOKS IN THE COUNTY 

For selection from all the best Publishers. 

Vold/i\e$ ii? ?l??aijt BiQdip^S- 
THE NEWEST ALBUMS'^ 

IN EVERY STYLE OF BINDING. 

PHOTO SCREENS PLAIN & ILLUMINATED. 



OODS 

In Antelope, Eussia, Morocco, Calf, and all other Leathers. 



SoocU ^uitaBle: J^OP Ppe^ent?; in gpe:at 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, OIL and WATER COLORS, 

At the same discount as allowed by any of the London Houses. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT: 

Every requisite kept in Stock. Photos of Shrewsbury and Neighbourhood by 
all the principal Photographers. 



FANCY AND PLAIN STATIONERY. 

jus <i)c. all rcu$ desi 



ems. 




oods ;Dep6f 

14 HIGH STREET, SHREWSBURY. 

Specialities : 

WEDDING, BIRTHDAY & COMPLIMENTARY PRESENTS 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 



Heafficr and }ancy ^Soods, fiijask, T0[orcesfei{ and 
@fiina, }^ai\cv Jewellery, r-ienfal 
Indian Ceedlewoi^, efc. 



AN INSPECTION INVITED. 



IRONMONGERY STORES, 

2 DOORS FROM POST OFFICE, 



FRANK T. BLOWER 

Is now offering an entirely New Stock of Furnishing and General 
Ironmongery Goods, at prices never before excelled in this neigh- 
bourhood. Good value guaranteed, quality reliable. Joseph Haywood 
and Co.'s celebrated Cutlery. Lawn Mowers, Rollers, Arches, Flower 
Baskets, Garden Tools, Watering Pots, Travelling Trunks, Baths, &c. 

The Workshop's Department is a special feature at this 
establishment. Good Workmen only. Gas Fitter, Bell-hanger, 
Tinman, &c. 

Ikttcben IRanoes fijefc or repaired. 

NOTE THE ADDRESS: &, PRIDE HILL. 





BOTTLED, 




SHREWSBURY 




NEW GUIDE 



TO 



SHREWSBURY 



BY R. BRADLEY 



FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAP 



Shrewsbury : 
J. G. LIVESEY 

ST. JOHN'S HILL PRESS 

1893. 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 



Sbrewsburg : 

PRINTED BY J. G. LIVESEY, 
ST. JOHN'S HILL. 




preface. 



FEW words, by way of preface, seem called 
for in the circumstances under which this 
little work is issued. Its aim may be said to 
be three-fold to take up the thread of 
Shrewsbury's history at the point where precedent 
Guides and Hand-books had, of necessity, left it; to help, 
briefly and popularly, Salopians themselves (and the 
younger generation especially) in forming an adequate 
conception of the distinguished place and part which 
their old town has occupied and played in the past ; and 
to make known, as widely as may be, its picturesque 
beauties, its modern residential advantages, and the great 
attractiveness of its surroundings. It does not presume to 
the dignity of a History. It seeks simply to act the 
humbler part of a Guide, recalling the more important 
incidents of Shrewsbury's record, bringing the continuity 
of that record fairly "up to date," and pointing out, en 
passant, the town's more salient features of material 
interest. In doing this, and in noting, here and there, 
certain suggested improvements of the town's sanitary 
conditions, argument, whether for or against such 
suggestions, has been purposely avoided, the author 
limiting himself, as a general rule, to a statement of 
accomplished facts. 



Grateful acknowledgments are due and gladly here 
accorded to the Rev. W. H. Draper, M.A., Vicar of Holy 
Cross ; to Mr. W. Burson (the author of several contri- 
butions to local history) ; to Mr. J. Williams (Clerk of 
Town Council Committees, Guildhall) ; and to Mr. 
Dove (Superintendent of the Quarry grounds), for the 
valuable information and assistance they have severally 
extended to this work in its progress through the press. 

Thanks are due also to Mr. J. Laing, Art Publisher, 
Castle Street, Shrewsbury ; Messrs. Frith and Co., 
Photographic Publishers, Reigate ; and to Mr. T. 
Hudson, Landscape Photographer, London, for views 
from which the majority of the illustrations are repro- 
duced. 

And lastly, thanks are respectfully offered the Right 
Rev. the Bishop of Shrewsbury (Sir Lovelace Stamer, 
Bart.) for kindly permitting the use of the new engraved 
view of St. Chad's Church. 

R. BRADLEY. 
SHREWSBURY, 

August, 1893. 



Jnbcy. 



PAGE 

A GLANCE AT SHREWSBURY'S PAST .. 114 

A ROUND-ABOUT RAMBLE 

RAILWAY STATION .. .. .. . . 15 

THE CASTLE . . . . . . . . 16 

FREE LIBRARY AND MUSEUM . . . . . . 20 

COUNCIL HOUSE . . . . . . ..22 

ST. MARY'S WATERGATE . . . . . . 24 

CHURCH . . . . . . . . 25 

SALOP INFIRMARY . . . . . . . . 29 

ALMS HOUSES . . . . . . . . . . 30 

POST OFFICE .. .. .. .. . . 31 

ST. ALKMOND'S . . . . . . . . 32 

ST. JULIAN'S . . . . . . . . 33 

BUTCHER Row . . . . 34 

SHIRE AND GUILD HALL .. .. 35 

OLD MARKET HOUSE . . . . . . 36 

WORKING MEN'S HALL . . . . . 37 

Music HALL BUILDINGS .. .. 37 

LORD CLIVE'S STATUE . . . . . . . . 38 

IRELAND'S MANSION . . . . . . 39 

NEW MARKET HALL AND CORN EXCHANGE . . . . 39 

THEATRE ROYAL . . . . . . . . 40 

BELLSTONE . . . . . . . . 40 

ROWLEY'S MANSION . . . . . . . . 40 

AUSTIN FRIARS .. .. .. ..41 

WELSH BRIDGE .. .. .. . . 41 

ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH . . . . . . . . 42 

MILLINGTON'S HOSPITAL . . . . 42 

THE MOUNT . . . . . . . . 42 

MILITARY DEPOT . . . . . . . . 42 



872931 



vi Snfcej. 

PAGE 

SHELTON OAK . . . . . . . . . . 42 

SHREWSBURY SCHOOL . . . . . . . . 43 

KENNEDY MEMORIAL CHAPEL . . . . . 45 

ANCIENT SHREWSBURY SHOW . . . . . . 45 

THE QUARRY . . . . . . 47 

STATUE OF HERCULES . . . . . . 49 

,, SABRINA .. .. -.50 

FOUNTAIN . . . . . . . . 50 

FISH HATCHERY .. .. .. . . 51 

JUBILEE BATHS . . . . . . 5 1 

MODERN SHREWSBURY SHOW . . . . . . 52 

ST. CHAD'S CHURCH . . . . . . . . 52 

EYE, EAR, AND THROAT HOSPITAL . . 54 

KINGSLAND BRIDGE . . . . . . 54 

OLD EMBATTLED TOWER . . . . 54 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH . . . . 55 

JUDGES' LODGINGS . . . . . . 55 

GREY FRIAR'S CONVENT . . . . 55 

GREY FRIAR'S BRIDGE . . . . . . - 55 

ENGLISH BRIDGE . . . . . . 56 

THE ABBEY CHURCH . . . . . . . . 57 

STONE READING PULPIT . . . . 59 

HOSPITAL OF HOLY CROSS . . . . . . 61 

WHITEHALL .. .. .. .. .. 61 

LORD HILL'S COLUMN .. .. .. ..62 

CHURCH OF ST. GILES . . . . . . . . 63 

MINERAL SPRINGS . . . . . . . . 63 

WYLE COP .. .. .. .. ..67 

CLOTHWORKERS' OR SHEARMEN'S HALL . . 67 

REMAINS OF OLD ST. CHAD . . . . . . 67 

THE DISPENSARY . . . . . . . . 70 

SCHOOL OF ART AND SCIENCE . . . . . . 70 

NEW BOROUGH POLICE STATION . . . . . . 70 

EXCURSIONS 

HAGHMON . . . . . . . . . . 72 

BATTLEFIELD ... . . . . . . . . 73 

CONDOVER . . . . . . . . . . 74 

HAWKESTONE .. .. .. -.74 



PAGE 

WROXETER . . . . . . . . . . 76 

THE WREKIN . . . . . . . . 76 

BUJLDWAS ABBEY . . . . . . 77 

WENLOCK PRIORY . . . . . . . . 77 

ACTON BURNELL . . . . . . . . 77 

CHURCH STRKTTON . . . . . . .78 

BOSCOBEL AND TONG . . . . . . 79 

AQUATIC EXCURSIONS . . . . . . . . 79 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

WATER SUPPLY .. .. .. .. 81 

BANKS . . . . . . . . . . 82 

CLUBS . . . . . . . . . . 83 

HOTELS . . . . . . . . . . 84 

RESTAURANTS . . . . . . . . 84 

LIVERY STABLES . . . . . . 85 

BOATS AND BOATING . . . . . . . . 85 

FERRIES . . . . . . . . . . 85 

FISHING . . . . , , . . . . 85 

INLAND REVENUE . . . . . . . . 86 

BOROUGH POLICE . . . . . . . . 86 

GENERAL CEMETERY . . . . . . . . 87 

POSTAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . 87 

HACKNEY CARRIAGE REGULATIONS 88 



Xist of Illustrations, 

MAP 

ENGLISH BRIDGE . . "".-. . . FRONTISPIECE 

IRELAND'S MANSION . . . . TO FACE PAGE i 

THE CASTLE .. . . . . . . 15 

THE SQUARE' . . . . . . . . 35 

NEW MARKET HALL . . . . . . 39 

SHREWSBURY SCHOOL FROM THE SEVERN . . . . 43 

IN THE QUARRY BY THE SEVERN . . . . 47 

IN THE QUARRY DINGLE . . . . 50 

ST. CHAD'S CHURCH . . . . . . . . 52 

ABBEY CHURCH . . . . . . . . 60 

HAGHMON HILT. AND CASTLF. 72 



(Blance at Shrewsbury's past. 




|HE border lands of Shropshire, and especially 
the regions watered by the Severn, are richly 
crowded with places of antiquarian, archaeolo- 
gical, and historical interest, yet none surpass, 
either in these aspects or in natural picturesqueness, 
beauty, and salubrity of situation, the ancient town of 
Shrewsbury the capital of the County. Encircled, or 
very nearly so, by a broad and winding river, and seated 
upon twin hills, that rise gently towards its centre 
.from the water's edge, it possesses natural advantages 
of residence and defence that must, even in the very 
primal times of human settlement in these lands, have 
singled it out as a favourite site for habitation. Its 
earliest days as a dwelling place run so far back they 
are lost in the mists of remotest antiquity. Silures, 
Britons, Saxons, and Normans have made it, in turn, 
a hut, a palace, or a fortress, each occupying race 
giving to it a name or names variously expressive of 



2 a lance at Shrewsbury's past. 

the different features they saw in it most striking and 
significant. " Careg Hydwyth " the shrub-covered 
rock was one of its primitive appellations, and this 
distinguishing characteristic of the river-encircled mound 
was one that likewise struck long subsequent dwellers 
the Saxons, who also styled their settlement here 
" Scrobbesbyrig." To the Ancient Britons it was 
similarly "Pengwerne" the Hill of Alders. But to 
the forerunners of these, and even yet to their racial 
representatives the Welsh, whose warm love for 
the land and ardent poetical temperament sought 
more enthusiastic phrase, it was " Amwythig " the 
Delight ! And a delight it is still, as any eye for the 
picturesque and any heart for the appreciation of the 
survivals of a far-receding antiquity must recognise and 
acknowledge. Standing upon an elevated and somewhat 
spacious peninsula, and originally and for many ages 
limited no doubt to the area circumscribed by the river, 
it has, in later times, and most rapidly and exten- 
sively in quite recent years, over-passed the stream and 
spread along the meadows beyond into suburbs known as 
Frankwell, Castlefields, Coleham, Abbey Foregate, and 
Belle Vue. On the narrow neck of the town-built penin- 
sula the Normans erected a strong Castle, and now (close 
under the shadow of its two surviving towers) we moderns 
have interpolated a Railway Station. The town is, as' 
might be supposed from its origin and vicissitudes, irregu- 
larly built happily without any so-called comprehensive 
plan ; and so, being (also happily) little " mauled " by 
the mistaken improvements of the modern architect, it 
retains a character and individuality more distinct and 
special than most other English towns boasting perhaps 
equal antiquity. It has two main lines of thoroughfare 



H lance at Shrewsbury's past. 3 

indicated by the obligations of its position and old-time 
defences the one communicating between and over the 
two great bridges, and the other intersecting that line 
from the direction of the Castle Gate on what may be 
termed the " land side." A narrow margin of meadow 
and garden ground runs, with public path-way, round 
the outer circle of the old town alongside the Severn's 
banks, and here and there one may still detect surviving 
relics of the massive stone walls that once served to 
secure its inhabitants from the predatory inroads of " the 
rebel Welsh," or the even more to be dreaded visits of 
Cromwellian rebels, in the disastrous days of the Civil 
War. From all points along the line anciently followed 
by the town's mural defences there are views and " bits" 
of peculiar beauty, meadow, water, and woodland, 
enhancing the picturesque attractiveness of the scene. 

What a history must be that of Shrewsbury ! If, 
instead of its past being revealed to us in disjected 
patches and in tantalising glimpses only, we might read 
the whole course of its days in veritable sequence and in 
the graphic detail and searching light that some 
omniscient eye and mind might yield for us, what a 
striking, wonderful, and profoundly interesting historical 
panorama it would be ! It has for ages shared in no slight 
measure the disasters, the troubles, the triumphs, and the 
glories of the great country whereof it has always formed 
an honourable part, and wherein through many a year of 
martial conflict and civil turmoil it ever constituted a 
post of high importance ; for it was no petty spot hid in 
ignorable obscurity, but a place that had inevitably to be 
reckoned with, and, therefore, was ever coveted and 
struggled for by whatever power or party aimed at the 



4 a (Blancc at Sbrewsbur^'s past. 

mastery in the state. Let us glance over its past. We 
have here neither time nor space for more. The Ancient 
Britons, having driven out precedent dwellers, estab- 
lished a colony on the hill of Pengwerne, their little 
wattle-built city being the capital of the old Principality 
of Powis. Then came the turbulent exterminating 
Saxons, and they, expelling the Britons, changed the 
name of the spot to Scrobbesbyrig, and greatly added to 
its opulence and importance. In the time of Alfred it 
was one of the principal cities of England ; it had a 
mint of its own in the days of Edward the Elder ; 
Ethelred kept his Christmas here in 1006 ; and Edward 
the Confessor often honoured the place with his presence 
and burthened it with his court. Next, after the decisive 
catastrophe of Hastings and the Conquest, the Normans 
arrived upon the scene, and they, dispossessing the 
vanquished Saxons, at once parcelled out Salopia, as 
they had done other parts of the Kingdom, among 
themselves. Shrewsbury, together with nearly the entire 
county round about, fell to the share of the famous 
Roger cle Montgomery, a relation of the Conqueror him- 
self, and one of his chief lieutenants, afterwards created 
Earl of Shrewsbury, Arundel, and Chester. It was this 
potent baron who built the Castle, and he it was also 
who built and richly endowed the Abbey a Benedictine 
foundation dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul as, it is 
said, " a grateful and pious offering to Heaven for the 
success of his arms." But these vast possessions did not 
remain loag to the great Earl's family, for (Earl Hugh 
having been killed in some conflict with the Welsh in 
Anglesey), the third Earl, Robert de Belesme, forfeited 
all by repeated treason and rebellion. During several 
subsequent centuries Shrewsbury was frequently the scene 



H (Blance at Shrewsbury's past. 5 

of conflicts between the restless Welsh and the dominating 
Norman power, and, as being one of the chief military 
posts along the Welsh Marches, was often visited, not only 
by the Lords of the Marches, but by successive Kings of 
England. In the struggle between Stephen and the 
partizans of the Empress Maud, the former took the 
Town and Castle (then held by a Fitzalan) by storm, 
putting the garrison and the inhabitants to the sword 
and inflicting a cruel vengeance. King John held a 
Council here " on Welsh affairs ;" and, following upon 
that event, a number of noble Welsh hostages, given by 
the Prince of Powis for his people's good behaviour 
and loyal vassalage, were afterwards put to death in 
Shrewsbury by an officer of the King. This act of 
cruelty was soon afterwards avenged by the Welsh under 
Prince Llewellyn, who, after signal successes over the 
interposing forces of the Lord of the Marches, suddenly 
appeared before Shrewsbury, which at once submitted 
and was entered by him without opposition, his fol- 
lowers plundering the town and slaughtering many of 
its people. From the reign of John to that of the 
First Edward, Shrewsbury was in the very centre of the 
bitter conflict that, with little interruption, was carried 
on between the Welsh and English, until at length, 
through the defeat and death of Llewellyn and of David, 
the final submission of the Principality was enforced. 
It is said that during that period the town sustained and 
suffered the rigours of no fewer than seven sieges. 
Edward II. marched with an army through Shrewsbury 
from Worcester. In the reign of Richard II. another 
Council or Parliament was held here, the place of 
assembly being the Abbey, or rather the now vanished 
Chapter House adjoining. In the succeeding reign, 



6 a <3lance at Shrewsbury's past. 

the border troubles with the Welsh broke out anew, 
the prime instigator of the revolt being the famous 
Owen Glyndwr said to have been lineally descended 
from Catherine, one of the daughters of the unfortunate 
Prince Llewellyn. So great for a time were the 
successes of Glyndwr, and so formidable did he 
threaten to become, defying the authority of the 
Lords Marchers and dominating the border lands 
even up to the very walls of Shrewsbury, that Henry IV. 
determined to inflict such chastisement upon these 
Welsh disturbers of the national peace as should set 
the question of their subjection finally at rest and 
vindicate his supreme royal authority. He had sent 
several armed expeditions against Glyndwr, but all 
in turn had failed. He now, therefore, set himself 
more vigorously and resolutely to the task of bring- 
ing the Welsh again into subjection. He directed 
that the royal forces should approach the scene of 
operations from three different directions. One division 
was to rendezvous at Shrewsbury under his own personal 
command ; the second at Hereford, under the Earls of 
Stafford and Warwick ; and the third at Chester under 
Prince Henry. Again, however, were Henry's plans 
doomed to be frustrated. He failed to bring Glyndwr 
to an action, for the Welsh Chieftain discreetly with- 
drew his forces into the recesses of their mountain 
valleys, whither the English could not follow ; and the 
King was eventually constrained his soldiery being only 
engaged for a limited service to commence a retreat 
which closed disastrously. The continued success of 
the Welsh and the discomfiture of the forces of the 
King had the effect of encouraging the latter's enemies, 
particularly the noble northern house of Percy, to try 



21 Olance at Sbrewsbur^'s past. 7 

their hand at overturning a throne the latter had done 
much to set up. A correspondence was opened between 
Glyndwr, Earl Percy, and the Scotch Lord Douglas, and 
others of the disaffected nobility of the North, with 
the result that they soon mustered a force of some 1 2,000 
men, and began their march southward in the direction 
of Wales. This was in the midsummer of 1403. Learn- 
ing that the Northumbrian forces were marching upon 
Wales, there to be joined by the Welsh bands under 
Glyndwr, and that they were concentrating upon 
Shrewsbury, Henry, who fortunately had still a fairly 
strong body undisbanded, abandoned his previous 
intention of marching north, and immediately hurried 
westward. He reached Shrewsbury about the igth 
or zoth of July, fortunately just in time to frustrate 
any intended junction of the forces of Glyndwr and 
of the Percies. His object was to strike the rebels 
in detail, without giving them time or opportunity for 
collecting or concentrating their strength. In this he 
succeeded. It was on the 2ist of July, 1403, on 
ground about four miles westward from the town 
since known as Battlefield that was fought one of 
the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever fought 
upon English soil, and one that the genius of Shaks- 
peare has immortalised. It was here, as every 
reader of Shakspeare knows, that the valiant Falstaff 
performed such feats of endurance and of valour, 
fighting, as he averred, against tremendous odds, 
" a long hour by Shrewsbury clock !" Percy fell, and 
with his fall, the rebels lost heart, and fled in 
disorder and dismay, pursued by their pitiless enemy, 
who inflicted upon them a great slaughter. It 
is said that on that fatal day there fell on both sides 



B (Blance at Sbrewsburg'8 past. 

2,300 knights and gentlemen, besides 6,000 private 
men, the vast majority of them being of Percy's 
following. The Earls of Worcester and Douglas were 
taken prisoners ; the former (with Sir Theobald Russell 
and Sir Richard 'Vernon) were shortly afterwards be- 
headed at the High Cross in Shrewsbury. Douglas, 
however, was released without ransom. The body of 
Percy, found among the slain and buried by a kinsman, 
was, by Henry's order, exhumed and exposed to public 
gaze in the Market Place of Shrewsbury, and afterwards 
quartered and hung upon its several gates. Most 
of the dead were interred in the fields where they 
had fallen, though some of the more notable found 
more honoured resting places in the Blackfriars and 
St. Austin's Friars in Shrewsbury. To gratefully com- 
memorate his great victory, Henry founded a Collegiate 
Church on the scene of the battle since known as 
Battlefield Church and placed in it five Canons whose 
duty it was to pray for the souls of all that fell on 
that memorable and fatal field. This Church was 
thoroughly restored in 1861. Through all changes, 
vicissitudes, and conflicts that variously disturbed the 
course of our island's history during the subsequent 
two or three centuries Shrewsbury bore no insignificant 
share. In the Wars of the Roses the town continued, 
in the main, steadily attached to the Yorkist cause. 
In 1460, after the defeat and death of his father, at 
Wakefield, the Earl of March visited Shrewsbury, 
entreating aid in his attempt to avenge his father's 
wrongs ; and it was with an army largely raised in 
this neighbourhood that he afterwards gained his great 
victory at Mortimer's Cross, and eventually secured the 
Crown. So conscious was he of the fidelity of the 



a (Blance at Sbrewsburg's past. 9 

Salopians, that he ever looked upon the borough and 
its burgesses with especial favour. In the troubled 
reign of Richard III. it is (by some authorities) held 
that the Duke of Buckingham, for conspiring against 
the sovereignty of that tyrant, was executed in Shrews- 
bury (and not at Salisbury as others contend) before 
the High Cross by Richard's order and without legal 
trial. So great, however, grew the popular hatred of 
Richard's rule that renewed conspiracies arose to end 
it. When Henry, Earl of Richmond, landed in England 
on his expedition to wrest the Crown from Richard, he, 
landing at Milford Haven without opposition, marched 
to Shrewsbury, where, after some little show of hesitancy 
on the part of " Maister Mytton," he and his followers 
were received by the burgesses with every demonstra- 
tion of joy and welcome. Henry was, it is said, first 
proclaimed King on his entrance into this town ; and 
it certainly was by the help of large numbers of Salopians 
who then joined his standard that he afterwards won 
the decisive victory of Bosworth Field. So keen and 
lasting was his remembrance of Salopian loyalty to 
his cause that he, after attaining the crown, visited 
Shrewsbury on several occasions. In 1488 he sojourned 
here several days ; in 1490, he, with his Queen and 
Prince Arthur visited the town, and attended a solemn 
mass, sitting under rich canopies in the choir of the old 
Collegiate Church of St. Chad ; and, five years later, he 
was again here, being then loyally entertained by the 
Corporation at a sumptuous feast in the Castle. From 
this time forward for some two centuries and a half 
Shrewsbury appears to have pursued quietly the even 
tenour of its way, free from the distracting contentions 
and turbulences that, from time to time, marked the 



10 a <3lance at Shrewsbury's past. 

course of English history outside its walls. Wales, 
whose persistent antagonism to English authority had 
so long kept the lands and towns of the Marches in 
a chronic state of unrest, had been effectually "pacified," 
and thus, no doubt, Shrewsbury, so important in keep- 
ing Welsh marauders in check, had gradually been 
left in peace, if not neglect, losing, with its whilome 
perils, much of the royal attention wherewith through 
many ages it had been conspicuously honoured. At 
any rate history makes no mention of any event of 
national or regal interest in association with Shrewsbury 
until we come to the days of the unhappy Charles 
and the Great Rebellion. In 1642, Charles, in the 
beginning of his armed conflict with Parliament and 
people, had raised the royal standard at Nottingham, 
but, not meeting there with the loyal response he had 
hoped for, marched on to Derby, and thence, knowing 
how well affected was the town and fortress on the 
Severn, he proceeded to Shrewsbury, where he was 
welcomed by a vast assemblage of citizens and gentle- 
men from the surrounding country. During his stay 
here he took up his residence at the Council House a 
building at the head of Castle Gate, wherein it had been 
the custom for the Lords of the Marches to sojourn and 
hold their court. The Princes Rupert and Maurice 
were also stationed here. The town was by Royal order 
made a garrison, and a fort called Cadogan's Fort 
was erected on the Mount, to prevent attack upon the 
town from the adjacent heights. He also established 
here a royal mint, where a good deal of the silver plate 
of his loyal Salopians was converted into the coin of 
which he and his cause then stood in such urgent need. 
After Charles's departure, and through the subsequently 



a (Blance at Shrewsbury's past. " 

varying fortunes of the Civil War, Salop remained true 
to the Royal cause, though it is not to be supposed there 
were not many amongst her burgesses who sympathised 
with the Parliamentarians. Indeed, it is manifest that 
such was the case, for in the early part of the year 1644 
or 1645 the town, held till then by the Royalists, was 
suddenly captured, almost without a blow, by a Re- 
publican band under Colonel Mytton, internal treachery 
admitting the assailants under cover of night through 
the water-gate or postern nearest the river. The whole 
of the Magazine belonging to Prince Maurice fell into 
the hands of the victors. The loss of Shrewsbury, 
esteemed the gate of North Wales and the strongest of 
the King's garrisons, was naturally regarded by the 
Royalists as a most severe blow. In connection with 
the disastrous troubles of those years, one of the many 
tragedies that marked in blood the domination of the 
Parliamentary party, was the execution of Captain John 
Benbow, who, for alleged apostacy and treason to the 
people's cause, was, by the triumphant Roundheads, 
shot on the green in front of the Castle of his native 
town he being a Salopian and uncle of the famous 
Admiral Benbow, whose exploits at sea in the reigns of 
Charles II. and Ann are not surpassed in all the long 
and glorious roll of England's naval achievements. 
After the restoration, Charles II. visited Shrewsbury, and, 
impressed, no doubt, by memories of its loyalty to his 
family, and admiring the beauty of its situation and 
the evidences of its growing importance, he then 
offered to raise it to the dignity of a " city," but, (so 
runs the story) the burgesses preferred to remain 
burgesses, and declined the .proffered honour, thus 
earning for themselves the cognomen of " Proud 



12 a (Blance at Sbrewsburg's past. 

Salopians ! " In 1687, James II. spent the 25th August 
in the town, keeping his Court at the Council House. 
He was entertained with great hospitality by the in- 
habitants, the conduits running wine, and bonfires and 
illuminations welcoming the royal guest. 

Shrewsbury's latter history partakes wholly of a 
pacific and, necessarily, of ^ somewhat prosaic, yet pros- 
perous character. Its extension has been steady, though 
slow, and great improvements have, in course of years, 
been made in the condition of its streets, markets, and 
public edifices. It is, perhaps, to be regretted, from an 
archaeological and antiquarian point of view, that a large 
portion of the ancient town wall, with its towers and 
gates, has disappeared, and that so many other mural 
relics of the past have in like manner succumbed to the 
attacks of the modern builder ; still there may be 
compensation in the reflection that what the town has 
thus lost in antiquarian interest it has more than gained 
in general convenience and facility of access, in sanitary 
efficiency, and in the amenities of its modern aspect. 
Within the limits of what may be considered its latter-day 
or comparatively recent history within, say, the last 
century the appearance of the old town has undergone 
little short of transformation, even while its streets 
and thoroughfares not only occupy their ancient 
position and direction, but preserve, in most cases, 
their old and (to strangers) very singular nomenclature, 
as, for example, " Wyle Cop," " Dog-pole," " Mardol," 
" Bell-stone," and " Shoplatch," &c. Among the more 
noteworthy changes that the bye-gone century has 
brought about in Shrewsbury, and which will receive 
fuller reference in subsequent pages, may be mentioned 



a Glance at Shrewsbury's past. 13 

the building of St. Chad's Church on its present 
site, after the collapse of the ancient edifice on Belmont 
through the sudden giving way of one of its central pillars ; 
the restoration of the Abbey Church, and the making 
of the new road-way adjoining it ; the re-building of 
the "Welsh" and "English" Bridges, the General 
Infirmary, the New Shire Hall, the Music Hall, the 
Gaol, the Post Office, the General Railway Station, 
the New Market, and the Eye and Ear Hospital ; 
the erection of the extensive School Buildings on 
Kingsland, and the removal thither of the famous 
old School from its ancient location in the town 
opposite the Castle ; the building of the New Military 
Depot at Copthorne ; the laying out of the beautiful 
and picturesque grounds near the suburb of Meole as a 
Public Cemetery ; the throwing of a new and graceful 
Bridge over the Severn between the old town and the 
suburb of Kingsland ; the opening of the Free Public 
Library and Museum in the ancient and imposing range 
of buildings formerly occupied by Shrewsbury Schools ; 
the establishment of the spacious and commodious 
Smithfield for the sale of all descriptions of cattle and 
live stock ; and last, though by no means least in im- 
portance and attractiveness, the laying-out, planting, and 
beautifying of the incomparable public park known as 
" The Quarry" a work that is largely to be credited to 
the successful enterprise, generosity, and good taste of 
the Shropshire Horticultural Society. 

The Municipal History of Shrewsbury runs far back 
into antiquity. It may, however, be summed up briefly. 
It is a Corporation by prescription. Its charters bear 
the signatures of most of our English sovereigns, from 



14 a <Blance at Sbrewsburg's past. 

William the Norman down to James II. Under the 
Municipal Reform Act of 1835, it was divided into five 
Wards, each of which returned six Councillors with two 
Aldermen, and these constituted the Town Council. In 
the year 1891, however, by an order of Privy Council, 
there was a rearrangement of the Wards, to render them 
more consistent with the present numbers and distribution 
of the electorate. There are now ten Wards, each of 
which returns three Councillors. The Borough has sent 
members to Parliament from the very beginning of 
Parliaments ; and for centuries it returned, with but 
few omissions, two representatives to the national 
Council. By the Re-distribution of Seats Act, 1885, 
however, it was deprived of one of its members. Since 
then it has, of course, returned one member only. The 
population of the Borough has not varied very greatly 
during recent decades. At the census of 1881 it was 
returned at 26,481 ; while at the last, in 1891, it stood 
at 27,967 males being 12,712, and females 14,248; 
and the number of houses was stated as inhabited, 
5,600 ; uninhabited, 405 ; making a total of 6,005. 




a 1Rotmt>*about IRamble. 




|ES : undoubtedly, the best way of consulting 
the convenience and pleasure of the Visitor 
and Stranger to our old Town, is to meet 
him immediately on his arrival, and accom- 
pany him through the more interesting and attractive of 
Salopian scenes, recalling such memories of the past 
and narrating such circumstances of the present as they 
may severally and variously suggest. That is what we, in 
the character of Guide, now purpose doing, gossiping 
on objects of historical and architectural interest as we 
ramble on, yet not loitering too long with any by the 
way. Starting, then, at 

THE SHREWSBURY RAILWAY STATION, 

The visitor will probably be struck with (internally) its 
inadequacy and inconvenience. Formerly it may have 
been ample for the traffic passing through it, but now, 
so largely has that traffic increased, it is notoriously 



16 B 1Roun&=about "Ramble. 

unequal to the growing demands upon its resources ; and 
it is greatly to be desired that the plans of extension 
and improvement said to be contemplated by the Joint 
Companies most concerned will ere long be carried 
out. The present buildings are of freestone, in Tudor 
Gothic ; they comprise two storeys to the front, and 
are surmounted by a tower and clock. Externally, as 
viewed from the approach outside, the buildings have a 
certain air of importance that might fairly impress a 
stranger with the idea that their internal accommodation 
was of an equally respectable order, but that idea is 
not, as we have indicated, quite borne out by the facts. 
Quitting the perplexities of the place, therefore, not with- 
out some sense of relief, we outside pause a moment to 
note, not only the architectural pretension of the station 
itself, but the effigy and monument to a former honoured 
citizen and parliamentary representative of Shrewsbury, 
Mr. William James Clement occupying the centre of the 
station-yard, and also, high up on an over-shadowing 
rock to the left, the remains of what anciently was one of 
the strongest and most imposing of Norman fortresses 
along this Western border-land. This is 

SHREWSBURY CASTLE. 

* 
Leaving the Station Yard, and turning to the left up 

Castle Gate, we ascend by the steps of " The Dana " 
(so-called after the gentleman who devised it), and a 
few paces to the right, enter the precincts of the Castle, 
now occupied as a private residence. From the very 
earliest times this rock, commanding as it does the 
otherwise undefended isthmus of the peninsula within 
which the town stands, has no doubt been fortified. 
Here, on the site of an old Saxon stronghold, the 



a "Roundabout "Ramble. 17 

fortunate Norman Baron, Roger de Montgomery, soon 
after the subjugation of the country by his great patron 
William the Norman, erected a strong fortress, his object 
being, of course, to keep a closer grip upon the broad 
and rich territories assigned to him by the Conqueror 
as his share of the spoil, and also to restrain the 
turbulent Welsh, who, with many of the dispossessed 
and discontented Saxons, still gave the invaders frequent 
and serious trouble. The place was held by descendants of 
its founder till the reign of Henry L, when it became a 
royal fortress, its defence being entrusted to a Constable 
(usually the Sheriff), and a part of its vast estate was 
parcelled out to various Knights, on the condition of their 
keeping castle-ward for a certain number of days each 
year. When, however, by the incorporation of Wales with 
the rest of the Kingdom, all apprehension of Cambrian 
incursions had vanished, the importance of the Castle 
as a fortress vanished also. With the abandonment of 
its old uses, and as the one-time urgent need of 
its maintenance as a defensive post disappeared, the 
anciently formidable stronghold fell into neglect and 
decay. Leland, who saw it in the reign of Henry 
VIII., describes it then as being " nowe much in ruine." 
In the time of the Civil War, however, it recovered 
somewhat of its ancient importance. Its crumbling 
walls were repaired and strengthened, its gates ad- 
ditionally fortified, and it was garrisoned for the King. 
After its treacherous surrender to the Parliamentarian 
forces in 1645, as already noted, it escaped the general 
fate which so many similar buildings, as well as 
Churches, met with at the hands of the Cromwellian 
despoilers. After the Restoration, the property of the 
Castle was again vested in the Burgesses of Shrewsbury, 



is a IRoun&sabout "Ramble. 

but by them it -was soon again surrendered to the 
Crown. It was afterwards presented by Charles II. to 
Francis, Viscount Newport, ancestor of the Earls of 
Bradford. It still for a number of years retained some 
show of its former warlike stateliness, but by the middle 
of the eighteenth century it had lost almost all evidences 
of its former magnitude, and, undergoing the perhaps 
inevitable transformations and limitations consequent 
upon its later adaptation to modern residential purposes, 
it became gradually shorn of its mediaeval baronial 
dignity, till now, despite the massive structure and 
commanding altitude of its two surviving round towers, 
it is difficult for the spectator to fully realise the extent 
and strength of the great feudal fortress which 
once crowned this hill and dominated the sur- 
rounding country. The portions now remaining are the 
two massive round towers of the ancient Keep, (temp 
Edward I.,) the walls of the inner court, an interior 
Norman arch, and a postern gate. The castle and 
grounds are now the property of Lord Barnard, as heir 
to the late Duke of Cleveland. In the garden, adjacent 
to the "watch tower," is the spot where Captain Benbow, 
as already stated, was shot in 1651 for alleged desertion 
of the Parliamentary cause and espousal of that of the 
King. In this garden for many years it was customary 
for the Knights of the Shire, on their election, to 
be girt with their swords by the Sheriff a custom 
that now, in deference to the spirit of modern reform, 
finds more honour in the breach than in the observance. 
Ascending now the Mount and the Watch Tower, we 
gain a wide and very striking view of Shrewsbury and 
its surroundings a view, indeed, of incomparable 
interest, richness, and beauty. To quote here the graphic 



a IRoun&sabout "Ramble. 19 

description of it given by the author of " An Account of 
Shrewsbury" (published in 1808), " Immediately below 
the spectator the Severn winds with great majesty. The 
eye, after viewing awhile the town with its spires and 
turrets, the Free Schools" (now the Free Library and 
Museum), "The House of Industry" (now replaced by 
the imposing and spacious Shrewsbury Schools) "crown- 
ing the green eminence of Kingsland, and, on the other 
side, the extensive suburb of Abbey Foregate, with its 
venerable church, is led to survey the most extensive 
amphitheatre of mountains which the island can boast. 
The Wrekin is connected by the gentle hills of Acton 
Burnell and Frodesley (over which the gigantic summit 
of the Brown Clee is conspicuous) with the Lawley 
and Caradoc, generally called the Stretton Hills ; from 
whence the Longmynd, Stiperstones, and Long Moun- 
tain form an uninterrupted chain, with the bold and 
precipitous cliffs of Cefn-y-Castyll, Moel-y-Golfa, and 
Breidden, surmounted by an obelisk in honour of the 
late Lord Rodney : thence the horizon is bounded by 
the stupendous Berwyn range, losing their blue summits 
in the clouds : While the northern view is terminated 
by the humbler but beautiful eminences of Grinshill. 
Pymhill, Hawkstone, Haughmond, &c., round to the 
Wrekin : the whole of this vast circle inclosing a finely 
wooded and beautifully diversified champaign country 
of gentle hill and dale, watered by various streams 
eminently fertile both in arable and pasture and amply 
justifying the eulogium of an ancient British poet, who, 
after gazing, as he tells us, on the plains of Shropshire 
from the height of Charlton Hill, calls it ' the Paradise 
of the Cymru ! ' " 



20 a TRoun&*about "Ramble. 

Quitting the Castle precincts, and returning into 
Castle Gates, we next come to 

THE FREE LIBRARY AND MUSEUM, 

for so the ancient buildings formerly occupied by the 
" Shrewsbury School" are now styled. These dignified 
and spacious buildings date from the middle of the 
fifteenth century, when, in gracious compliance with 
Salopian petition for a better public school than the 
town then possessed, King Edward the Sixth honourably 
associated in name with so many other ancient 
educational endowments in different parts of the king- 
dom " laid the foundation of a Shrewsbury School." It 
was endowed out of the whilom revenues of suppressed 
monastic and collegiate foundations, the tithes of Astley, 
Sansaw, Clive, Leaton, and Almond Park (the property 
of St. Mary's), with those of Frankwell, Betton, Wood- 
cote, Horton, Bicton, Calcott, Shelton, Whitty, and 
Welbeck (belonging to St. Chad's), being appropriated 
to that purpose. In 1882, however, when the ancient 
educational foundation was transferred to a pleasanter 
and altogether more desirable situation upon Kingsland, 
beyond and overlooking the river, this old building, 
disused as a school, was converted into a Public Free 
Library and Museum. It stands substantially as it did 
of old, unaltered and intact, except in certain minor 
internal details necessary to adapt it to its new uses. It 
forms two sides of a quadrangle, with a tower at the 
angle. Over the main gateway between the quaint 
effigies of a schoolboy and a graduate attired after the 
fashion of three centuries ago may be noted a mural 
inscription in Greek, a quotation from Isocrates, to 



a 1RounD*about "Ramble. 21 

the effect that " If you love learning, you will be 
learned." Besides the Free Library, a valuable and 
interesting Museum (formed by inclusion of the collec- 
tions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Natural 
History Societies) has here found a suitable home, and has 
since been largely added to by private donors. Especial 
attention should be given by the visitor to the excep- 
tionally interesting series of Borough Charters, and also 
to the old and well-preserved views here exhibited, 
some by Paul Danby, R.A., depicting the town as 
anciently existing, and its old-time Bridges with their 
embattled gates and towers. 

Here is also a large and varied collection of Roman 
remains of all kinds from the ruins of Uriconium, the 
modern Wroxeter, about four miles south-east from 
Shrewsbury. 

On the ground floor are the Library and the Public 
Reading or News Room, the latter being very largely 
availed of, not only by the burgesses, but by residents 
of the surrounding neighbourhood. The Library is 
open every working day and Bank Holiday, from 3 p.m. 
to 5 p.m., and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Museum 
rooms are open daily (except Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas-day) from 10-30 a.m. to dusk during 
the winter months, and from 10-30 a.m. to 7-30 p.m. 
during the summer months. It is closed on Fridays (for 
cleaning) until 2 p.m., and at other special times by 
order of the Library and Museum Committee of the 
Town Council. The Museum and Library (not the 
Reading Room) are wholly closed to the public during 
the month of August in each year. 



22 a Roundabout "Ramble. 

A little way higher in Castle Gate, on the left, 
stands an edifice of exceptional interest, and once of 
high importance in the social and legal activities of 
Shrewsbury and "The Welsh Marches." It is known 
still as 

THE COUNCIL HOUSE. 

It must not, however, be confounded with modern ideas 
or uses of a Town Council, with which it has not and 
never had the least to do. Its name arises from 
the fact that it was anciently used as the occasional 
residence and court of the Lord President of the 
Marches of Wales. Although the principal seat of the 
Presidents was the Castle of Ludlow, they were ac- 
customed to hold here a court one term in the year 
for the despatch of business affecting this district, as 
they did another usually at Bewdley, and occasionally at 
Hereford. There is reason to believe that the builder 
of the Council House was a Mr. Peter Newton, himself 
a member of the Marches Council, about the year 1500, 
and by him or his son subsequently conveyed to the 
family of Knight, by whom, again, it was granted to 
Sir Andrew Corbet, Knt., Vice-President of the Marches ; 
and it was probably from a member of the family of 
Corbet that the place, coming by grant to the Shrews- 
bury Town Council, was eventually appropriated as 
the residence of the Lord of the Marches on his 
yearly visit to the town. But the Town Council appear 
to have divested themselves of their interest in the 
property in 1583, and since then it has been held by 
various private owners. The buildings form three 
sides of a small court. They are approached by a 
picturesque old timbered gateway, said to have been 



H 1Roimo*about "Ramble. 23 

erected in 1620. They have been long converted into 
three separate dwellings. The great hall, with the 
chamber over the same, 50 ft. by 26 ft., remains 
substantially unmodernised. Many and imposing have 
been the scenes of solemn state and festal hospitality 
this old hall has witnessed. So long as the Court of the 
Marches was held here, it was the duty of the Corporation 
annually to meet and escort the President and his retinue 
with all civic pomp from the Town Gates to the Council 
House ; and it was his lordship's frequent habit to 
recognise the honour so done him and his office by 
entertaining the Corporation at sumptuous feastings. 
And besides these exchanges of corporate and presiden- 
tial courtesies, these buildings have witnessed more 
sumptuous and stately entertainments when royalty 
has been host or guest. Sir .Henry Sydney (father 
of the hero of Zutphen) held his court here as 
President of the Marches between the years 1558 and 
1586. Charles the First, in the early days of the Great 
Rebellion, of which later he was the unhappy victim, 
made it his temporary residence. His Majesty stayed 
here with his two sons and nephew (Prince Rupert) 
for a short time in 1642, and it was probably here that 
occurred the memorable incident anent the refusal by 
the burgesses of the King's offer to make their borough 
a city that won for them ever afterwards the epithet of 
" proud." The last royal or distinguished personage 
who sojourned at the Council House was King James 
II., who, in 1687, held his court here, and was attended, 
with no little pomp, by the Mayor and Corporation and 
the Noblemen and Gentlemen of the county. The 
last visit of the Council of the Marches was in 1683 
four years before the visit of King James when the 



24 B 1RounD*about "Ramble. 

Lord President (Duke of Beaufort) with Lord Newport 
and Chief Justice Jones, attended with all the pomp and 
ceremonial customary on such occasions. The Court of 
the Marches was dissolved in the first year of William and 
Mary, it being then declared to be "a great grievance 
to the subject," and " an intolerable burden to Wales 
and the Borders at all times." 

Before leaving this spot, it may be of interest to 
recall the fact that the New Presbyterian Church, closely 
adjoining the Council House Gate, occupies the site of 
an ancient chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas an edifice 
that probably dated from the days that saw the erection 
of the chapel of St. Michael, within the Castle precincts, 
by the great baron Roger de Montgomery. Undoubtedly 
a building of great antiquity, it had latterly fallen from 
its sacred to very base uses, and was even occupied 
as a stable prior to its final demolition. 

Resuming our way up Castle Street, and entering the 
first turning on the left (opposite the Raven Hotel) we 
come in sight of St. Mary's Church and the General 
Infirmary. But before noticing more particularly either 
of these, let us glance at the narrow lane which on our 
left leads down to the Severn. This is 

ST. MARY'S WATER GATE, 

And it was along this lane and through the Gate at its 
foot, that, on a February night in the year 1644-5, a 
Parliamentary force, under the command of Colonels 
Mytton and Bowyer, secretly and by treachery entered 
and captured the town almost without striking a blow. 



H TRounD*about "Ramble. 25 

Only seven men and one officer are said to have fallen 
in the affair, which resulted in depriving King Charles 
of one of his principal strongholds in the West, and 
placing all its munitions, forces, and advantages at the 
disposal of his rebel enemies. 

Here, too, in the open space between the head of 
Water-gate and the Infirmary anciently stood a Dominican 
Friar}'. At the dissolution of the monasteries, in the 
reign of Henry VIII, the "rooks" were dispersed and 
their " nest" dismantled. It was in this priory that two 
sons of Edward IV. Richard and George Plantagenet 
are said to have been born. Here, too, it was that many 
of the more distinguished persons who fell at the Battle 
of Shrewsbury were interred. 

ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

Was anciently a "collegiate," and is believed to have 
been founded by King Edgar, though probably upon 
the site of a precedent Church destroyed by the 
Danes. In the time of Edward the Confessor the landed 
estates of this Church consisted of twenty hides, or 
two thousand four hundred acres, of which ten were in 
Burtune (probably Broughton, near Sansaw), Heslie 
(Astley), Mitton in the parish of Fittes, besides half a 
hide in the Hundred of Overs, and a virgate in the 
Manor of Meole. These possessions it retained until 
the reign of William the Conqueror, but, soon after his 
seizure of the crown, it was despoiled of a large portion 
of them. In the reign of Henry VIII. its yearly revenues 
(according to Dugdale) were only ^13 is. 8d. in the 
money of that period, while, according to another survey 



26 a Roundabout IRamble. 

in the same reign, the yearly revenues were ^32 45. 2d. 
On the suppression of the College in the succeeding 
reign (Edward VI.) the greater part of the tithes were 
given to the newly-founded Shrewsbury School. Of 
the old College there are no existing remains, nor is 
it known at this day where exactly it was located. The 
Church is cruciform, with a singularly graceful tower 
and spire 2 1 6 feet in height, and one of the highest in 
England. Happily it has escaped much of the meddling 
and mauling that has been the ruin of too many of our 
old ecclesiastical buildings. Architecturally, the Church 
presents examples of almost every development of Gothic, 
and thus graphically illustrates the different phases of 
its growth and history. The interior is spacious, 
dignified, and impressive. Its very silence is eloquent 
of centuries ; a hoar and holy antiquity seems here 
enshrined. The great window which terminates the 
Chancel, and which occupies the place of one destroyed 
during a hurricane in 1571, contains in its lower divisions 
the magnificent glass which once filled the chancel 
window of Old St. Chad's, and which escaped the 
sudden ruin which befell that ancient edifice as described 
elsewhere. It represents the Stem of Jesse, or genealogy 
of Christ, and comprises some forty or fifty figures. Jesse 
is represented at the bottom as in a deep sleep, and from 
his loins issues the vine, branching upward. Three 
of the compartments, originally ranged below the 
genealogy, still remain, two of them nearly perfect, 
and containing figures of warriors in armour, each 
kneeling under a beautiful foliated tabernacle. The 
whole of the painted window glass in this Church 
merits very careful examination. The great east window 
is especially noteworthy both for its magnitude and its 



S IRoun&sabout "Ramble. 27 

beauty. The glass here is not only very ancient but 
artistically of a high order, displaying combinations 
of colour whose sweetness, chasteness, and tenderness 
is in pleasant contrast with too much that is crude 
and glaring in many modern attempts at ecclesiastical 
glass-painting. There is a particularly fine triple-lancet 
window in the north aisle, containing illustrations of 
incidents in the life of St. Bernard. The glass of this 
was brought from the Church of St. Severin, at Cologne, 
where it had long lain neglected after rescue from the 
spoliation of the Abbey of Altenburg. 

The Pulpit, singularly chaste, artistic, and appropriate 
in design, merits careful examination. It was designed 
by Mr. S. P. Smith, of Shrewsbury. It is of Caen and 
fine Grinshill stone, and consists of five sides of an 
irregular octagon, three sides having sculptured panels, 
two being niches for figures. The subjects in the panels 
are " the Nativity," " the Crucifixion," and " the 
Ascension ;" these were the work of the celebrated 
sculptor Richardson. The architectural portion of 
the carving was executed by Mr. George Landucci, 
of Shrewsbury. 

St. Mary's contains several tombs of considerable 
antiquity. In the spacious and strikingly beautiful 
"Trinity" chapel on the south side of the chancel, is 
an ancient stone altar-tomb, bearing the recumbent 
mutilated figure of a cross-legged Knight in linked 
armour, supposed by some to be that of Hotspur, but 
with greater probability alleged to be that of one of 
the Laybornes or Leybournes, Lords of Berwick in the 
1 4th century. It is to be noted that the crossing of 



28 a Roundabout "Ramble. 

the legs indicates that their owner had in life either 
shared in the Crusades or had made a pilgrimage to 
Jerusalem. In the present instance the attitude may be 
accounted for by the circumstance that this Leybourne 
of Berwick chanced in a tournament at Worcester to 
mortally wound a young nobleman one of the 
Mortimers of Wigmore, and it is presumed that it was 
in expiation of this unhappy fatality he made a pilgrimage 
to the Holy Land. In the little north Chapel, placed 
upright against the wall under a small window, is an 
alabaster slab whereon are boldly graven two full-size 
figures, male and female, the male in armour, and both 
in the attitude of prayer : they represent Nicholas 
Stafford, Esq., and his wife, and date from the middle 
of the 1 5th century. Close by, in the same Chapel, is a 
memorial to that famous Salopian hero and "true patterne 
of English courage" and "skilled and daring seaman," 
Admiral Benbow, who, it will be remembered, died at 
Kingston, Jamaica, in 1702, from wounds received in his 
prolonged and glorious fight with the French fleet off 
Carthagena. At the west end of the church, within the fine 
oak screen separating the small area under the tower from 
the nave, is a monument and statue (the figure seated) 
of the late Dr. Butler, some time Head Master of 
Shrewsbury School, and afterwards Bishop of Lichfield, 
who died in 1844, and was interred on the western side 
of the churchyard here. It is a pity that a better site 
for so fine a monument in memory of so great a 
scholar and so able a Bishop has not been found. 
Opposite this monument is one to the memory of 
another distinguished Salopian Colonel Cureton, who, 
as this memorial sets forth, fell in an engagement 
with the Sikhs at Ramnugger, in November, 1848. 



H "Roundabout "Ramble. 29 

The Royal Arms that, in gilt relief, adorn the west 
inner wall of the tower, formerly occupied a more 
prominent position in front of a small gallery that once 
disfigured the west end of the nave. In the nave is a 
tablet to the memory of James Burney, organist of this 
Church, who died, aged 80, in 1789, and whose younger 
brother was father of Madame D'Arblay, the celebrated 
authoress of "Evelina" and "Cecilia." On the west 
wall of the Tower is an inscription to the memory of 
a Robert Cadman, who, in 1840, lost his life in an 
attempt to descend from the top of the spire (to which 
he had re-affixed the vane) by means of a rope attached 
to it and carried thence to a field on the opposite side 
of the river ; but, the rope breaking, the mad adventurer 
fell, in presence of a large crowd of spectators, into 
St. Mary's Friars, near the present Water-gate, and was 
thus killed upon the spot. 

THE SALOP INFIRMARY 

Was established in the year 1745, and was one of the 
earliest of its kind in the kingdom. It originally appro- 
priated to its philanthrophic uses a mansion on this site 
erected by Corbet Kynaston, Esq., but as its needs grew, 
the premises were found too limited, and in 1827, 
they were pulled down to make way for the present 
stately and commodious structure, which was opened in 
1830. Although, unavoidably, the view of the elevation 
from the St. Mary's side is somewhat marred by its 
limitations, the prospect towards the country on the 
side commanding the Severn and views of the Abbey 
and English Bridge and the suburbs beyond, with the 
Wrekin in the remoter distance, is one of singular 



30 a IRoun&sabout IRamble. 

r 

variety and beauty. The institution, replete with every 
appliance for the relief of human disease and suffering, 
is maintained by voluntary subscriptions and benefactions, 
local Physicians and Surgeons of Shrewsbury gratuitously 
devoting to it their valuable services. It is managed 
by eight Directors, annually elected from among the 
Trustees, their executive official being the Secretary, 
who receives a salary of ^100 a year. The anniversary 
is held in what is known locally as "the Hunt Week"- 
or perhaps we ought more correctly to say that the Hunt 
Ball is held on the night of the Infirmary Anniversary 
in each year, when, in accordance with a custom worthy 
of all honour and observance, the nobility and gentry 
of town and county assemble in large numbers, and, 
after the business meeting, accompany the newly-elected 
Treasurer to Church, where a sermon is preached and a 
collection made on behalf of the funds of the Institution. 
It has long been a pretty custom at these services for the 
collection to be made by some young lady and gentleman, 
usually of our county aristocracy, standing, each with 
a " plate," in the vestibule. For many years St. Chad's 
was the Church attended on these occasions, but, owing 
to some objection raised by a late vicar of that Church 
as to the mode in which the collections were made, St. 
Julian's has latterly been the scene of the distinguished 
and charitable gathering. 

In St. Mary's Street, opposite the Church, stand 
THE ALMS HOUSES, 

Built of brick and forming three sides of a quadrangle. 
The entrance is by a central gate, over which are 



a TRoun&*about "Ramble. 31 

the armorial bearings of the Company, with the motto 
"Unto God only be honour and glory." Here are 18 
dwellings. The occupants receive also an annuity of 
10 with fuel and clothing. The charity was originally 
founded, certainly prior to 1468, some allege by King 
Edward VI., but more likely by the Drapers' Company. 
The buildings were re-erected in their present style 
in 1825. 

At the corner of St. Mary's Street and Pride Hill is 
THE POST OFFICE, 

Occupying the site of the old Butter Market, and 
adjacent to the spot where anciently stood the High 
Cross, and whereabout was enacted many a tragic and 
stirring episode in Salopian history. The present com- 
modious Post Office was erected by Government in 1876, 
and opened for public business the year following. It 
is modern modified Gothic in style, and is an elegant 
and substantial structure. On the ground floor is the 
public office, 36 ft. by 21 ft., fronting Pride Hill, where 
is the principal entrance. The Post-master's Room 
and the Sorting-office occupy the second story facing 
St. Mary's Street. The top floor is occupied by the 
Telegraph Department, the instrument room being a 
spacious apartment lighted from a large central lantern- 
light in the roof. The cost of the buildings, including 
office fittings, was ^8,300. The site, sold by the 
Corporation to the Government, cost 1 ,200. Shrewsbury 
being a postal centre of considerable importance, a very 
large amount of correspondence passes through this 
office, and a large staff is employed. 



32 B IRounCtsabout IRamblc. 

Retracing a few steps along St. Mary's Street, and 
following a short narrow thoroughfare known as Church 
Street, we should note on our left, in St. Alkmond's 
Square, a fine old half-timbered " black and white " 
mansion a portion of what originally was the residence 
of Mr. T. Jones, who, according to his monument in the 
adjoining Church of St. Alkmond, was " six times Bailiff, 
and First Mayor of Shrewsbury." The place is historically 
interesting as having been the lodging of the Duke of 
York when, in 1642, he accompanied his father King 
Charles I. on his visit to Shrewsbury. It was also the 
residence for a short time of Prince Rupert when he 
rejoined his royal uncle here after the Battle of Worcester. 

ST. ALKMOND'S 

is of great antiquity and interest. The original 
foundation is ascribed to Elfleda, daughter of Offa, the 
powerful king of Mercia. Afterwards King Edgar, by 
the advice of his great prelate Dunstan, established in it 
ten priests, for whose maintenance he bestowed rich 
prebends in land. It was in a flourishing state at the 
Conquest. It was, however, effectually disendowed, if 
not disestablished, about a century later, when the then 
Dean (Richard de Belmeys), in excess of zeal for the 
enrichment of the newly-founded Abbey of Lilleshall, 
surrendered, by consent of the Pope and King Stephen, 
the whole of its estates to that Augustinian institution, 
which had been likewise dedicated to St. Alkmond. The 
once rich Collegiate Church thus sank into a poor 
vicarage. In 1795, the parishioners, warned by the 
disastrous fate of Old St. Chad's, determined to entirely 
pull down their own "ancient, handsome, curious, and 



H Roundabout "Ramble. 33 

substantial church," and to erect a new one. The 
existing edifice is the result. It is whispered that 
in certain quarters there is a desire to see this 
Church " disparished," and given over to uses as " a 
church-house" for assemblies of the local clergy, but 
whether the parishioners will ever be persuaded to look 
upon it as superfluous and be prevailed upon to consent 
to lose the distinctive character and centre of their 
of their parish as a parish, is more than doubtful. 

ST. JULIAN'S, 

Close by, may be conveniently glanced at now. This 
Church, though much modernised in a style that in 
some aspects is hardly so congruous and harmonious as 
one would like to see, and concealing much of what is 
really very ancient, dates far back into Saxon times, but 
when or by whom it was founded is not known. 
Whatever may have been its original endowments, they 
would seem to have been by Henry V. diverted to the 
church at Battlefield, which his father had founded. 
St. Julian's then becam'e a mere stipendiary curacy. In 
1750 the church was wholly re-built, though some few 
portions of the old building were retained, particularly 
the tower, and in the east wall is preserved a small 
efligy of a female, supposed to represent the patroness 
of the church St. Juliana. From the time of its 
re-building down to its more intelligent restoration 
in 1883 84, this church must have presented a strange 
mixture of architectural incongruities and even absurdities; 
but, fortunately, local taste had improved in the interval, 
and alterations then effected remedied its old disfigure- 



34 a Roundabout IRamble. 

ments and inconveniences. There are several stained 
glass windows, admirable in design and colour, and 
a number of mural monuments in the aisles and 
chancel. 

Passing from St. Julian's along Fish Street (where 
hangs the sign of " The Three Fishes," significant of the 
ancient cognizance of the Abbots of Lilleshall, who 
had a town residence hereabout) and where once was 
held a little local fish market, we now, leaving St. 
Alkmond's Square on our right, enter 

BUTCHER ROW, 

where, on either hand, are survivals of some of the 
more antique dwellings in Shrewsbury, several highly 
imposing even in their decadence, and all combining 
to make up, from different points of view, " bits " 
which the lover of the picturesque, if he be also a devotee 
of the camera, will be strongly tempted to have a " snap 
shot " at ! The oak-timbered buildings to the left, as 
we look towards Pride Hill, remain much the same as 
they were when first erected ; they are of a substantial, 
not to say massive, style of domestic Tudor, with 
plenty of carved ornamentation about their door jambs, 
cornices, and gables. It is believed that here the 
Chantry Priests of the Holy Cross at St. Alkmond's 
had their habitation, and that here, too, was the 
town residence of the Abbot of Lilleshall. Of course 
the modern name of this passage arises from the 
circumstance of its having been for many years 
occupied by the Shrewsbury butchers, until they were 



B TRounfcsabout IRamble. 35 

relegated to other more suitable premises in the New 
Market Hall. 

Quitting the Row by a narrow passage distinguished 
by the name of "Grope-lane," we emerge into High Street, 
and note on the opposite side of it a place of public 
worship known as " High Street Church," although it is 
really a Unitarian Chapel, and was originally founded in 
1662 by the Independents ; but it is chiefly noteworthy 
as having once had for a brief while as its Minister 
no less a celebrity than the author of "Christabel" 
and "The Ancient Mariner." But, the "shackles of 
preachership " did not suit Coleridge. 

Next is the Square a central open space where are 
located some of the principal shops, offices, and public 
edifices of the town, and here is 

THE SHIRE AND GUILD HALL, 

Which occupies the site of the ancient Town Hall 
described as a " large, strong timber building with a 
high clock turret," and was erected in 1837, from 
designs by Sir Robert Smirk. Its cost was ^12,000, 
raised by a county-rate. On the gth of November, 
1880, the whole of the interior of the building was destroyed 
by fire. It was, however, speedily restored with such 
liberality, judgment, and success that, on the holding of 
the first assizes in the new courts, Mr. Baron Huddleston 
characterised them as being, if not the best, certainly 
among the best Law Courts in the Kingdom. The Hall 
has a handsome stone exterior in the so-called Italian 
style. Its internal accommodation is spacious, elaborate, 
and complete. On the ground floor, entered by a fine 



3& H IRoun&sabout "Ramble. 

vestibule are two well-appointed law courts, one of 
them being also used as a place of meeting for the 
Shrewsbury Corporation and the Shropshire County 
Council, and a noble room called the Grand Jury Room, 
where hang several noteworthy portraits, including those 
of General Lord Hill, the late Sir Baldwin Leighton, 
Bart., the Hon. T. Kenyon (for many years Chairman of 
Shropshire Quarter Sessions), and Alfred Salwey, Esq. 
(formerly Chairman of Quarter Sessions, and subsequently 
Chairman of the Shropshire County Council). In different 
parts of the roomy edifice, as allocated under agreement 
between the authorities severally representing the County 
and Borough, are the offices of the Clerk of the Peace 
for the County, the Town Clerk for the Borough, the 
Clerk to the County Council, the Organising Secretary 
for Technical Instruction, and the Clerk of Committees 
of the Town Council, besides other offices and com- 
mittee-rooms. Adjoining to and connected with the 
Shire Hall are the County Police Offices. 

THE OLD MARKET HOUSE, 

Occupying the southern portion of the Square, is a fine 
example of an ancient " Booth-hall." It was erected 
in 1 596. The basement is an arcade, under which the corn 
market was formerly held. In the centre of the 
principal front, facing west, are the arms of Queen 
Elizabeth, under a rich canopy, with the date of the 
building's completion. Over the northern end is a 
canopied niche, within which is a carved effigy, alleged to 
be that of Richard, Duke of York (father of Edward IV.), 
removed hither in 1791 from the Tower of the old 
Welsh Bridge. Over the arch at the south, in a similar 



a Roundabout "Ramble. 37 

niche, is the figure of an angel, bearing a shield with 
the arms of France and England, brought hither from 
the outer gate of the Castle, on its demolition in 1825. 
Here also, high up on the wall, is an ancient sun-dial, 
its gilt numerals almost obliterated. The upper portion 
of the building is now used as a Borough Police Court, 
and here are offices for certain of the Corporation's 
officials, namely, the Borough Surveyor, the Financial 
Clerk, and the Sanitary Inspectors. 

WORKING MEN'S HALL, 

Situate at the south-east corner of the Square, was 
erected in the year 1863, from designs by Mr. J. L. 
Randal, of Shrewsbury, at a cost of .3,200. Here is a 
large lecture hall ; also a public refreshment room, 
open daily. 

THE MUSIC HALL BUILDINGS 

Have their main entrance from the Square, immediately 
opposite the south end of the Market-house. They 
were erected in 1840. The large concert hall is 90 feet 
long by 42 feet wide, and is 38 feet high. There is an 
orchestra at the south end, with seating for a chorus 
of 150, while the body of the hall is capable of seating 
some 600 persons. Here is also a very handsome-looking 
organ, presented to the Choral Society by the late Rev. 
R. Scott, B.D., many years ago ; but, whatever may 
have been its quality and tone originally, now-a-days it 
stands useless and mute useless, at any rate, except as 
an imposing piece of ornamental furniture. The rest 
of the building is divided into lesser convenient 
rooms, used for exhibitions, meetings, and committees. 



38 a Koun&sabout "Ramble. 

Parties desiring the use of the Hall or lesser rooms may 
obtain all information by applying to the Secretary, Mr. 
V. C. L. Crump. 

Closely adjacent, in Market Street, is the old 
BOROUGH POLICE STATION, but this will soon be 
vacated, and the staff, offices, and business transferred 
to the new and more convenient buildings now (1893) 
nearing completion on Swan-hill the first street to the 
left below the present offices. 

LORD CLIVE'S STATUE 

Occupies a worthily prominent position at the north end 
of the Square. It is of bronze, on a pedestal of polished 
Penrhyn granite, and is the work of Baron Marochetti. 
It was erected in 1860, and cost about ^2,000, collected 
through the instrumentality of a metropolitan and 
nationally representative committee. Lord Clive, it is 
needless to say, shares with Warren Hastings the glory 
of winning for England her mighty Empire of India. 
He was not only a Shropshire man, but intimately 
associated with Shrewsbury, he having been its Mayor 
in 1768, and having sat in Parliament as one of its 
representatives from 1761 to 1774. 

Hereabout, the buildings that overlook the Square 
and occupy the line of the High Street close by, possess, 
architecturally, features so varied, so elegant, so sub- 
stantial, and so picturesque, as to constitute a scene 
such as few other provincial towns in the country can 
show. On the one hand are the stately County Buildings 
(or Shire and Guild Hall), and on the other the County 
Club, and the large drapery establishment of Messrs. 




Sedgwick, Engraver, Blackfriars, London. From Photo by Frith, Reigate. 

NEW MARKET HALL. 



B 1Roun&*about "Ramble. 39 

Harding & Co., with the Old Salop Bank at the corner, 
while opposite are to be particularly noted the new and 
strikingly ornate offices of the Alliance and Salop 
Insurance Company, and the extensive premises of 
Messrs. Maddox and Co., a portion of these last (erected 
in 1592) being remarkable externally as among the best 
preserved examples of the old "black and white" timbered 
edifices that even Salopian street architecture can boast. 
On the opposite side of the street, stands the famous 

IRELAND'S MANSION, 

Four stories high, with four projecting ranges of bow- 
windows, terminating in high pointed gables, and 
ornamented with curious carved work. The main street 
entrance has a fine Tudor archway. The Mansion 
was anciently, when Salopia's aristocracy were content 
to dwell within the walls of Salopia's capital, the 
residence of the Irelands of Albrighton, whose arms are 
still to be seen blazoned upon its front. 

Passing into Pride Hill (so called from a residence 
of the Pride family anciently situate here), and descending 
towards Mardol Head, we arrive at 

THE NEW MARKET HALL & CORN 
EXCHANGE. 

Extensive in the area it covers, imposing in its magnitude, 
convenient and comprehensive in its plan, and 
of no mean merit in architectural style, these buildings 
will compare favourably with those for like pur- 
poses in other of our more important provincial towns. 
They were erected by the Corporation in 1869, from 



4 H IRounDsabout IRamble. 

designs by Mr. Griffiths, of Stafford, and entailed what, 
by many, was deemed an excessive outlay, upwards of 
^60,000 being expended upon them before they were 
finished. On the ground-floor is an arcade, a separate 
section appropriated to the use of the butchers and 
their stalls, and a spacious hall for the sale of vegetables, 
fruit, poultry, &c. Above is the Corn Exchange, a lofty 
spacious room, 90 feet by 45 feet. A square and 
elegant tower, 150 feet in height, dominates the whole 
edifice, and contains a large four-dial clock. The 
markets are held on Wednesdays and Saturdays ; and 
butter, cheese, and bacon fairs are held monthly. 

THE THEATRE ROYAL, 

In " Shop-latch," opposite the south-eastern angle of the 
Market Hall, and occupying the site of the ancient 
mansion of the Lords of Powis, was erected in 1834 by 
Mr. Bennett, of Worcester. It is classic in style, and 
niches in its front elevation contain figures of Shakspere, 
and of Tragedy and Comedy. Mrs. Maddox is proprietress, 
and Mr. W. H. Maddox manager. 

BELLSTONE, 

Or, as anciently called, " Bente Stone," lies between St. 
John's Hill and Barker Street, opposite the Market 
Hall ; the buildings were erected in 1582, by Alderman 
Edward Owen, of Shrewsbury. They have been con- 
siderably modernised, and are now occupied as a branch 
of the National Provincial Bank of England. 

ROWLEY'S MANSION 

Is a fine old picturesque Tudor mansion in Hill's Lane, 
between Barker Street and Mardol. It is believed to 



H "Roundabout "Ramble. 41 

date from 1618, and to have been built by a wealthy 
brewer named William Rowley. No doubt, a residence 
of such importance must originally have been surrounded 
by considerable private grounds, but now, sadly dilapi- 
dated and shorn of its ancient glory, what remains of 
it is used as a furniture store and auction mart, and it 
is closely surrounded by narrow lanes of meaner 
dwellings, many of them in similarly picturesque 
decadence. 

THE AUSTIN FRIARS 

Presents a remnant only of the old Friars Eremites of 
St. Augustine that once occupied a large space between 
this point and the Quarry. The land whereon the 
Friary and its Church stood was given to the Augustinian 
Order here by Henry III. about the middle of the 
thirteenth century. 

THE WELSH BRIDGE, 

Which we now approach a strongly-built and hand- 
somely designed structure of five arches was erected in 
1795, at a cost of ,8,000, half of which sum was con- 
tributed by the town. It is 266 feet long and 39 feet 
wide. Anciently, at the Mardol end of the old Bridge, 
was a massive embattled tower, destroyed in 1770. 
Over and from this bridge radiate the roads leading from 
Shrewsbury into Wales. It forms the entrance also from 
the main town into the " Welsh " suburb of Frankwell, 
where still survive several exceptionally old and fine 
examples of our " black and white " timbered houses. 



42 a Roundabout "Ramble. 

ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH 

Is in this suburb. It is Early English in style ; but it is 
not ancient, nor has it otherwise any features of special 
architectural or historic interest. 

MILLINGTON'S HOSPITAL 

Occupies a commanding eminence at the extremity of 
Frankwell. It was founded in 1734 by Mr. James 
Millington, a draper of the town, who endowed it 
largely, and its present income is stated to bei,ooo per 
annum, under the management of trustees. 

THE MOUNT, 

on the Holyhead Road and overlooking the Severn, is, 
irrespective of its own attractions and the scenic beauties 
it commands, chiefly noteworthy for having been the 
birth-place and long the residence of the famous 
naturalist and philosopher, Charles Darwin, the author of 
" The Origin of Species." 

THE MILITARY DEPOT 

(or Barracks) of the 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment is 
situate at Copthorne, about a mile from the centre of 
the town. 

SHELTON OAK 

Still stands a venerable weather-worn relic of departed 
years and greatness in what are now the private grounds 
of a residence called Shelton Priory, though why "priory " 



a "Roundabout "Ramble. 43 

it is hard to divine, seeing that it never really was one. 
The grand old tree is hollow at its base, and so capacious 
that it might seat a dozen persons inside it. The story 
is, that from its branches the Welsh prince Owen 
Glyndwr watched the progress of the battle fought at 
Haghmon, in July, 1403, when Henry IV. utterly routed 
the Percies and their following with tremendous 
slaughter. But that Glyndwr and his forces were 
dallying ingloriously here within sight of a conflict so 
sanguinary and so decisive, is, however, discredited by 
fuller and better historic information, it being now 
pretty clear that the Welsh leader was otherwise 
sufficiently busy against his enemies in South Wales at 
the very time when he was supposed to have been 
perched in his secure watch-tower of the Shelton Oak. 
Still, as a matter of poetic and legendary association it 
is unquestionably pleasant, in presence of this hoary 
veteran of the woods, to picture the Welsh Chieftain 
in its leafy summit, with his wild, motley followers 
gathered idly around below him, cursing, perhaps, the 
swollen river which interposed impassably between them 
and the battle ! 

Returning towards the town, it will be convenient 
here to diverge a little from the more direct way, in 
order to visit, en passant, 

THE SHREWSBURY SCHOOL, 

Which occupies the site of a former building known as 
the House of Industry. The School, which, as already 
stated, was founded in the reign of Edward VI., and 
originally occupied the buildings in Castle Gates, now 



44 B TRounDsabout IRamble. 

converted into the Free Library and Museum, was 
transferred hither in 1882. The School has a distinguished 
history, and many men famous in various departments 
of learning and affairs have been educated here. To 
enumerate all would be impossible, but such names as 
Wycherley, George Sandys (the great traveller), Lord 
Brooke, Sir Fulke Greville, Sir Philip Sidney (the Hero 
of Zutphen and a poet of repute), Judge Jeffreys, Charles 
Darwin, Sir Thomas Jones (a Judge in the time of 
Charles II. and James II.), George Saville (Marquis of 
Halifax), Viscount Cranbrook, Mr. Cecil Raikes (late 
Postmaster-General), Sir W. Jenner (Physician to Her 
Majesty), General Phayre, Mr. Thomas Wright (the anti- 
quarian), Mr. Vernon Hugo, Mr. Robert Richardson, and 
Mr. Horatio Nelson (three members of the Council 
of India), Chief Justice May, Dr. Morgan (the eminent 
physician), Sir George Osborne Morgan, Dr. Thompson 
(Archbishop of York), Dr. Fraser (Bishop of Man- 
chester), Professor Munro, F. A. Paley, R. Shilleto, 
Professor Mayer, and Professor H. B. Kennedy, 
bear brilliant testimony to the high position it holds 
among the great schools of England. It attained very 
high eminence between 1798 and 1836, during which 
period it had the advantage of being ruled by masters 
distinguished as Dr. Butler (afterwards Bishop of 
Lichfield) and Dr. Kennedy (referred to by Thomas 
Carlyle as " Kennedy of Cambridge, afterwards great as 
master of Shrewsbury School"); and in 1868, by the Public 
Schools Act, it was legislatively recognised as one of 
the seven great public schools of the kingdom. The 
appointment of head and second master rests with the 
Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge. The present 
headmaster is the Rev. Prebendary W. H. Moss, M.A. 



H "Roundabout "Ramble. 45 

The school proper is a fine edifice of brick, with a central 
tower, and overlooks the Severn, the Quarry grounds, 
the town, and a wide range of delightful landscape. 
It has ample accommodation for over 300 boys. The 
masters' residences are detached, yet closely adjacent. 
The grounds are spacious and beautifully laid out and 
kept ; and include racquet and ball courts, and cricket 
and football fields, some eleven acres in extent ; there 
is also a large swimming bath, 'and, on the river side, 
a convenient boat-house for the use of the boys fond of 
rowing. A school regatta and athletic sports are held 
annually. The Library has a large and valuable collection 
of books, manuscripts, &c. 

In close proximity to the School, and in fact within 
the area of its grounds, stands the KENNEDY MEMORIAL 
CHAPEL, the cost of which (^7,000) was defrayed by Old 
Salopians and other friends who desired thus to provide 
a lasting memorial of Dr. Kennedy, the school's former 
distinguished head master. 

THE ANCIENT SHREWSBURY SHOW. 

It was on these lands, now occupied by the buildings 
and grounds of Shrewsbury School and the elegant villa 
residences round about, that anciently was annually 
celebrated with much feasting and junketing, on " the 
day of Corpus Christi the feast of the Holy Sacrament 
or body of our Lord " what was known far and wide as 
"Shrewsbury Show" an occasion when certain of the 
guilds and incorporated companies of the town (sixteen 
in number) held high festival, marching hither (after 
attending mass at St. Chad's Church) in procession, each 
company headed by its " King " in " regal " guise on 



46 B Roun>*about "Ramble. 

horseback, and attended with much gaudy display of 
regalia, banners, emblematic devices, and music, to 
their several pavilions or "arbours," where they regaled 
themselves and their friends, including the Bailiff or 
Mayor and members of the Corporation, in right 
hospitable style. The feastings and amusements lasted 
three days. The burgesses themselves likewise kept 
"open-house" for all comers during the festival, laying 
out their tables, sumptuously furnished, in front of their 
own dwellings, in the open air weather permitting, 
and we must assume, in view of such jovial customs, 
that English weather in those good old times, when 
England won her enviable epithet of " merry," was 
more genial than it is, as a rule, in these degenerate 
days ! But, like most other good things, the festival or 
"show" was abused, or at any rate misused, and so, 
from bad to worse, degenerated until, finally, it was 
suppressed, and Shrewsbury's streets witnessed its 
parade and pageant no more. The "arbours," pur- 
chased by the Corporation, were cleared away, 
and the ground appropriated to other more useful 
and profitable, though probably less entertaining pur- 
poses. The ornate entrance or portico that once 
adorned one of these curious guild "arbours" that of 
the Shoemakers is now located in the Quarry 
" Dingle," where it forms quite an interesting relic 
of picturesque antiquity. 

Descending the declivity from the Schools to the 
Severn, and passing on our left the very elegant, com- 
modious, and well-appointed Boathouseof the PENGWERN 
BOAT CLUB and, beyond this, the Old Boathouse Inn, 
quaint and picturesque we cross the river at the " School 
Ferry," and enter 




Sedgwick, Engraver, Blackfriars, London. From Photo by Frith. Reigate 

IN THE QUARRY, BY THE SEVERN. 



B Roundabout "Ramble. 47 

THE QUARRY, 

Which, with its varied aspects, wide undulating green- 
sward, ornamental grounds, and magnificent umbrageous 
avenues is undeniably one of the most beautiful and 
delightful public parks in England. Lying pleasantly 
between the partly circling river and the line of the 
ancient town-walls, it has been a place, wholly or in 
part, appropriated to the use, diversion, or recreation of 
the burgesses of Shrewsbury from time immemorial. It 
now comprises an area of upwards of twenty-three 
acres. The earliest glimpse we get of the condition of 
these lands lying between the old town walls and the 
river, and between the two bridges, is that they were 
" common " ; but in very early times they were 
gradually appropriated to freeholders and enclosed, 
though a portion, lying nearest the Welsh Bridge, 
appears always to have been reserved for the use of the 
burgesses, and here it was, no doubt, that, under the 
name of " The Quarrel " or " Dry Quarry," a place was 
set apart for the open-air performance of miracle plays 
and for popular amusements, including, it is said, bear 
and bull-baiting popular amusements with Englishmen 
in bygone days. The name originally assigned to this 
particular portion of the waste ground, " Behind the 
Walls," gradually became applied to the whole area as 
now existing. As to the origin of the name " The 
Quarry " divers derivations have been suggested for it, 
one party finding its source in an ancient British or Celtic 
word, "quare" or "chwarae," signifying "a place of play"; 
and another party contenting themselves with the supposi- 
tion that it simply comes to us from the circumstance 
that here was formerly a " quarry," whence a soft 



48 B 1RounJ>*about "Ramble, 

red sandstone was dug for use in the buildings of the 
town when other more durable material could not con- 
veniently or safely be obtained from places more remote. 
However, "The Quarry" it long has been, is, and, we 
trust, will still be for ages yet to come. When, in the 
seventeenth century, it was resolved to improve the 
grounds for public use and pleasure, the different private 
rights of individuals to plots within it were bought up 
by the Bailiff and Corporation, in trust for the bur- 
gesses, but among these individual owners there appears 
to have been one who declined to come to terms and 
yield possession of his allotment, and thus it happens 
that there is still, almost in the middle of the 
grounds, a plot of land, sixteen yards square, and 
marked by a rough grey boulder stone at its centre, 
the freehold of which is vested, by descent, in the 
family of Harley, of Rossall, to whose representative 
the Corporation of Shrewsbury still pay an annual 
rent or acknowledgment of 4/6. The grand avenues 
of limes than which there are no finer in Europe, 
not even those of the famed " Unter den Linden!" 
were laid out and planted by the Corporation, as trustees 
of the Burgesses, in the year 1719. Originally, the 
avenues were of greater extent than they now are, being 
continued along the whole of the southern boundary, 
where now runs the wall of St. Chad's terrace ; but, in the 
days now happily past I of civic vandalism and dis- 
regard both of public rights and sylvan beauty, many of 
the trees were ruthlessly cut down. Since then, and 
especially in 1879, every effort has been made to repair 
the mischief so done. Within a comparatively recent 
period the grounds have been brought, by great outlay, 
excellent taste, and unremitting care, to their present 



B Roundabout "Ramble. 49 

state of perfection and beauty ; and for the attainment 
of this resuh the thanks of the town are equally due to 
the Corporation and the Shropshire Horticultural 
Society, the exceptional magnitude, splendour, and 
success of whose annual Shows, held in the grounds on 
two days in August, has, from its large surplusses, 
enabled its management, with public-spirited liberality, 
to assist in improving and beautifying it greatly, and 
particularly in erecting the new Lodge for the super- 
intendent, the elegant Band Stand, the new ornamental 
entrance gates, and levelling and railing the banks of 
the river within the Quarry limits. 

At the bottom of the Central Avenue stands a statue 
of HERCULES. It is a copy, in lead, of the Earnest- 
Hercules, and was cast at Rome. How it came to 
England we do not know, but for about a century and 
a half it stood in front of Condover Hall, in this county ; 
thence, in 1 804, being bought by a Shrewsbury plumber, 
it was brought to this town : and, after passing through 
divers ownerships, it came ultimately into the possession 
of J. B. Minor, Esq., of Astley House, who presented it 
to the town. It was then placed near the entrance to 
the Quarry, but, on the erection of the new Gates, it 
was removed to its present site. 

It may be interesting to observe that some of the 
older lime trees, forming the avenues, bear cut in their 
bark the date of their original planting. The earliest 
of these dates is 1743 ; and, among other dates, are 
1760, 1764, 1777, and 1790. Some of the tallest trees 
have attained a height of 170 feet. 



so a Roundabout IRamble. 

In the Dingle are several objects of interest. Here 
is the recumbent statue of "SABRINA" a poetic 
personification of the Severn, the base upon which it 
reclines being inscribed with an illustrative quotation 
from Milton. " Sabrina," or Sabra, be it here noted, is 
said to be derived from an old Celtic word Sabhrann 
signifying a boundary, which word the Romans latinised 
into Sabrina, and the poets subsequently adopted as their 
own. The sculptor was Mr. Hollins, of Birmingham, 
and the donor of it was the Earl of Bradford, Lord 
Lieutenant of Shropshire. Here also is the relic of the 
SHOEMAKERS' ARBOUR the Doric entrance or portico 
removed hither from Kingsland ; it now encloses a pretty 
grotto and fountain, surrounded with beautiful ferns. 
In the tympanum are mutilated effigies of SS. Crispin and 
Crispinianus the patron saints of the craft and with 
them this inscription : 

" We are but images of stoune, 

" Do us no harme, we can do noune." 

It bears what appear to be the arms of the Guild, 
and the date " 1679," and on either side are still faintly 
discernible bas-reliefs of certain emblems of the shoe- 
makers' craft, namely, a big riding boot, a lady's boot, 
and a clicker's knife. 

The ornamental FOUNTAIN in the centre of the 
Dingle was the gift of the Shrewsbury District of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows (M.U.) in 1889, 
and bears an inscription to that effect. It is of cast 
metal, and certainly lends a graceful interest to the 
spot, but it might be brought into more artistic keeping 
with its surroundings were its present metallic aspect 



H TRoun&sabout TRamblc. $i 

exchanged fora "roughed" coating of paint in imita- 
tion of stone. 

In the Dingle, close to the ornamental sheet of 
water, is the " HATCHERY," where, under the auspices 
of the Shrewsbury Angling Society, salmon are hatched 
from ova and "cultivated" through various phases 
of progression until mature enough to be turned free 
into the Severn, there to feed and migrate, and return 
and fatten, and finally, with becoming sense of the 
fitness of things, find fate on the tempting bait and 
hook of the Salopian angler ! The Hatchery is well 
worthy inspection by anyone interested in such matters. 
Mr. J. Williams, the Shirehall, is Secretary of the 
Shrewsbury Angling Society. 

At the eastern extremity of the grounds, adjoining 
St. Austin's Priory, between Claremont Bank and the 
River, are located the 

NEW "JUBILEE" BATHS. 

They are most elegant, commodious, and complete. 
They cover an area of 1,600 square yards. They have 
two frontages of 250 feet each, with separate entrances 
for males and females, that for the latter being on the 
Quarry side. There are spacious swimming baths, and 
excellent slipper baths, with every requisite and con- 
venience, for both sexes. Erected at a cost of ^,7,000, 
by public subscription, they are a lasting memorial of 
the fiftieth anniversary of the accession of Her Majesty 
Queen Victoria. The fund for their erection was 
inaugurated and mainly raised during the mayoralty of 
Mr. George Butler Lloyd in the years 1889-90, and, 



52 H 1RounO*about "Ramble. 

consistently with that circumstance, the foundation 
stone was laid by Mrs. George Butler Lloyd, on Whit- 
Monday, 1893, with all due ceremonial, in presence of 
the Mayor (Mr. George Evans), H. D. Greene, Esq., 
Q.C., M.P. (the Member for the Borough), the Members 
of the Corporation, the Bishop of Shrewsbury (the Right 
Rev. Sir Lovelace Stamer, Bart.), and an influential 
assemblage. The work was carried out under the 
direction of Mr. J. Chappel Eddowes (Borough 
Surveyor). 

THE MODERN SHREWSBURY "SHOW." 

However widely known and largely attended may have 
been " the ancient Shrewsbury Show " the grand 
parade of local Guilds already described, it could never 
have equalled in either respect the grand annual "Show" 
that, by a happy evolution, now occupies its place. The 
Floral Show inaugurated by the Shropshire Horticultural 
Society a few years ago, has, from modest beginnings, 
grown year after year in magnitude' and attractiveness, 
until now it is, beyond dispute, the greatest show of its 
kind in the kingdom. It is held yearly in the Quarry 
grounds, on two days in the latter part of the month of 
August, the first day being distinguished by the patronage 
of the county's rank and fashion, and the second by the 
presence of the masses in their tens of thousands from 
all parts of the country. 

ST. CHAD'S CHURCH 

Is situate immediately outside the south wall of the 
Quarry. Begun very shortly after the accidental des- 



a Roundabout "Ramble. 53 

truction of old St. Chad's, it -was completed and con- 
secrated in 1792, at a cost of .19,352. It is especially 
noteworthy as being one of the very few " round " 
churches in this country. The body of the edifice 
covers a circular area 100 feet in diameter, and a 
similar partly intersecting lesser circle is occupied 
by an inner vestibule. It has seats for a congregation 
of 2,000 persons. On either side of the entrance, 
under the tower, are vestries. The font, of grey 
marble, was purchased from the parish of Malpas 
in 1842. The pulpit, a rather striking, and indeed 
almost dazzling object, sure to attract attention, was 
the bequest of Mrs. Henry Morris, senr., of Swan Hill, 
Shrewsbury. The organ is a fine instrument by Messrs. 
Gray and Davidson, of London. The painted windows 
in this church are exceptionally fine and numerous, and 
merit careful inspection. The chancel window is filled 
with a painted glass reproduction of the famous picture 
by Rubens of " The Descent from the Cross ; " and the 
two lesser side lights contain "The Visitation," and 
" The Presentation in the Temple." Hanging in the 
outer vestibule are the old battle-tatter'd colours of the 
gallant 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment; while around them 
are mural memorials to the officers and men of that 
regiment who fell in the Indian Campaigns and during 
the " Mutiny." 

The Vicar of St. Chad's is the Right Rev. Sir 
LOVELACE STAMER, Bart., Bishop of Shrewsbury. 

Following the ancient boundary of the Town Walls, 
we shortly reach 



54 a "Roundabout "Ramble. 

THE EYE, EAR, AND THROAT HOSPITAL, 

In Murivance, a singularly striking building architec- 
turally, illustrating the novel shapes to which brick-work 
may be put by artistic ingenuity, with a general result 
that must be admitted to be handsome. It stands at 
right-angles with St. John's Row and Kingsland Bridge 
Road. It was designed by Mr. C. O. Ellison, architect, 
of Liverpool, and erected by the Messrs. Treasure and 
Son, builders, of Shrewsbury. Its cost was ,10,000, 
chiefly raised by public subscription. The foundation 
stone was laid in 1879 by the then President of the 
Institution the Earl of Powis. 

THE NEW KINGSLAND BRIDGE 

Is a graceful structure of iron on the bow and girder 
principle, connecting this part of the town with the 
suburb of Kingsland. It was opened for public traffic 
in July, 1882. Here a half-penny toll is imposed for 
each foot passenger. 

Continuing our way along the Town Walls, we pass, 
on our immediate right, an 

OLD EMBATTLED TOWER, 

The only one surviving of the many that once formed 
part of the mural defences which, in the reign of 
Henry III., were thrown up round the town by way of 
protecting it against the inroads of the then turbulent 
Welsh. It is square, and consists of two stories, the 
upper being originally entered by a low, pointed door- 
way from the top of the wall. 



B IRoim&sabout "Ramble. 55 

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, 

Dedicated to St. Mary of Help and St. Peter of Alcantara, 
is on the Town Walls. It was erected in 1856, from 
designs by Mr. E. W. Pugin, at the cost of the Earl of 
Shrewsbury. Commodious newly-erected Day Schools 
for Roman Catholic children are also adjacent here. 

THE JUDGES' LODGINGS, 

Which front towards Belmont, we pass on the left. They 
are roomy, not without a certain dignity, and occupy a 
most commanding and pleasant situation. They are the 
property of the County, and are maintained for the use 
of the Judges of Assize, and for the purposes of the 
Magistrates at Quarter Sessions, and of the County 
Council. 

Between this point and the English Bridge, and 
nearer the river-side, may be seen what remains of the 
Franciscans' or GREY FRIARS' CONVENT, which was 
founded here in the early part of the i4th century by 
Hawise, wife of John de Chorlton, Lord of Powis, and 
heiress of the ancient Princes of Powisland. The visitor 
may, from the river towing-path, be able to discriminate 
what survives of this ecclesiastical relic among the 
cottage dwellings with which it has gradually become 
more and more confounded and confused. 

THE GREY FRIARS' BRIDGE 

Is for the accommodation of foot passengers only, and 
connects the Wyle Cop and Beeches Lane, through 



56 a 1RounO*about IRamble. 

Julian's Friars, with the suburbs of Coleham and Belle 
Vue. 

Following hence the river-side path, we soon come 
upon another strikingly pretty phase of the picturesque 
beauty which distinguishes the whole circling course of 
the Severn round Shrewsbury. The broadly curving 
stream, with willow-clothed islets mid-way, and the 
spire of the Congregational Church rising on the further 
side, and the massive tower of the old Abbey Church 
beyond, is here spanned by the seven fine arches of 

THE ENGLISH BRIDGE, 

Which, supplanting an older structure built by the 
great Earl Roger, was erected in 1769 from designs 
by Mr. John Gwynn, architect, of London, and a 
native of Shrewsbury. Its cost was ^16,000, wholly 
raised by voluntary contributions. The bridge, 410 feet 
long and 35 feet wide, is remarkable for strength, and 
grace, and massiveness, and is one of the handsomest 
of its kind in the Kingdom. 

Passing over the Bridge, immediately in front, on the 
right, is the CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH (the Minister 
of which is the Rev. T. Townsend) ; on the left is 
SHREWSBURY COLLEGE (conducted by Mr.W. T. Tutton, 
F.R.G.S.) ; while in the Foregate, beyond the Railway 
Bridge whose unsightly squareness and bareness sadly 
mars an otherwise pretty prospect rises the massive, 
ruddy, time-worn Tower of 



a 1RoimD*about IRamble. 57 

THE ABBEY CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND 
ST. PAUL. 

This Church is all that remains of what was anciently 
one of the richest and finest abbeys of the Benedictine 
Order in England. It was founded, as already stated, 
by the Conqueror's favourite lieutenant, the great Roger, 
first Norman Earl of Montgomery, in 1083, by way of 
"grateful and pious" acknowledgment of Heaven's 
blessing upon his arms. His new Abbey he located on 
or near where was already a small church built by a 
Saxon thane named Siward and he, probably in associa- 
tion with the aforesaid thane, obtained its dedication 
to St. Peter (as was the precedent Saxon church) and 
St. Paul. He himself, in the year 1094, assumed the 
monastic habit, and entered his newly-founded monas- 
tery only a few days before his turbulent life ended for 
ever, and he was interred " in the new church, between 
the two altars." The monastery .was richly endowed. 
Its glebe lands are estimated to have amounted to 3,120 
acres, portions of its more distant possessions lying in 
Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Cheshire. 
The second and third Earls of Montgomery (in succes- 
sion to Roger) were also buried here, the latter having, 
by his repeated treasons, forfeited his earldom and 
estates to the King (Henry I.), and consequently the 
Abbots became tenants in capite and barons, with a seat 
among the spiritual peers of the realm. In the reign of 
Stephen the Abbey acquired a remarkable accession of 
sanctity owing to its then becoming the resting-place for 
the remains of Saint Winefrede, which, by some shrewd 
practice on the part of the monks of St. Peter and St. Paul, 
were " conveyed " from their previous place of burial at 



58 a lRounD*about IRamble. 

Gwytherin, in Denbighshire, to the Salopian abbey, 
which, presumably, they imagined to be in need of such 
miracle-working attractions, and which was soon further 
enriched with many other like relics of sanctity. The 
place prospered. In the 26th year of Henry VIII. 
preceding the dissolution of the monasteries its 
possessions were estimated to be of the yearly value of 
572 155. sd., equal to upwards of ^4,700 of our present 
currency ; and even this estimate is believed to be below 
their actual value. The Abbey, and the monastic 
buildings which anciently crowded round it, were often 
the scene of regal, legislative, and other remarkable 
gatherings. It is highly probable that our early kings, 
in visiting Shrewsbury, made the Abbey their place of 
sojourn. The Parliament of Edward I., as well as the 
"Great Parliament" of Richard II. (1398) were, no 
doubt, held within its walls. It was at this latter 
assembly that the unfortunate Welsh Prince David was 
tried, and sentenced to death, on the charge of high 
treason a sentence that was carried out in Shrewsbury. 
Early in the year 1539-40, the monastery, after an 
existence of between four and five centuries, was by 
royal mandate dissolved, and the abbot and his monks 
dispersed, though not without being assigned " compen- 
sating " pensions, such as they were. The buildings 
and site of the vacated monastery were disposed of to 
lay speculators, and, alas ! the work of demolition soon 
began, every greedy hand that could, in the scramble, get 
a grip upon its fabric being in selfish haste to clear it off, 
and appropriate the proceeds, before any change in the 
royal policy and purpose might baulk it of its plunder ! 
Useless here to trace the secular hands through which 
the monastic property subsequently passed. Suffice 



B 1RounC=about Gamble. 59 

it simply to say that one little fragment of the 
old buildings was suffered to survive the isolated 
stone READING PULPIT, which, anciently part of the 
Refectory, now remains so striking and even pathetic 
an object amid the alien surroundings of a coal- 
yard, and separated by a modern road-way from 
the consecrated edifice with which anciently it was so 
intimately connected. It probably dates from the 
1 5th century, or earlier. It is octagonal, and its 
roof internally culminates in a Gothic dome. In the 
centre of its under-section is a fine bas-relief repre- 
senting The Crucifixion, with St. John and the Virgin 
Mary at the foot of the Cross. In the outer stone 

panels are other bas-reliefs of interest. 



For long, too long, the grand old Abbey remained 
a sort of common quarry for building materials. With the 
dawn of the present century, however, the public consci- 
ence showed some signs of awakening, if not of practical 
repentance. The lamentable condition of the Church's 
fabric at length began to attract serious attention. Its 
renovation was resolved upon. Urgently needed struc- 
tural restorations of a partial character were made ; and, 
in 1886, by the liberality of an anonymous donor the 
present fine Chancel was re-built, from designs by Mr. 
j; L. Pearson, R.A., yet the transepts still lack their 
northern and southern extensions. The magnificent 
west window 46 ft. high and 23 ft. wide was com- 
pletely restored in 1888. The restoration of the nave 
roof and clerestory is now proceeding (1893) under the 
same architect. 

The Church contains several ancient monuments 
of great interest. Here is an effigy supposed to be that 



60 B lRoim&*about IRamble. 

of the Abbey's founder ; an alabaster altar tomb 
removed hither from Wellington old Church, with 
recumbent figures of William and Ann Charlton, the 
former of whom died in 1544; also an effigy presumed 
to be that of Walter de Dunstanville, first lord of Idshall 
(Shifnal), circa 1 196 ; and an altar tomb with effigies of 
Richard Onslow (speaker of the House of Commons in 
Elizabeth's reign) and his wife, brought hither from old 
St. Chad's. Between the Vestry and the steps into the 
Sanctuary are a number of inscribed tiles which 
deserve careful examination, some among them bearing 
allusions to the families of Talbot, Leighton, Broughton, 
Heytesbury, Beauchamp, and Fitzwarin. The Reredos 
is a triptych, with panels illustrating the Passion. 
In the south aisle is a large oil painting representing 
" Women at the Holy Sepulchre," the work of Mr. John 
Bridges. The stone figures in the canopied niche 
between the belfry windows in the western front is 
generally supposed to represent King Edward III., in 
whose reign the tower was probably built. In the 
square, shallow piers of the tower's basement are 
modern figures of the Abbey's tutelary saints PETER 
and PAUL. Within the north porch, against the eastern 
wall, are two recumbent stone effigies, originally part of 
an altar-tomb in St. Alkmond's Church. 

The ancient abbey buildings, with their precincts, 
covered no less than nine acres. The Abbey itself was 
an imposing structure, cruciform, with two fine towers, 
one over the transept and the other at the western end 
of the nave. But, as already indicated, only about a 
third of the ancient Church survived the ravages of the 
iconoclasts let loose upon it at the dissolution. Still, 




Sedgwick, Engraver, Blackfriars, London. From a Photo by J. Lting, Shrtwtburf 

THE ABBEY CHURCH. 



B 1Rounfc=about TRamblc. 61 

even now, the edifice, externally and internally, strikes 
the beholder with a sense of its singularly massive 
amplitude, its solemn stateliness and impressiveness. 

The present vicar is the Rev. W. H. Draper, M.A. 
The services are Sundays : Holy Communion, 8 a.m. ; 
Matins, 1 1 a.m. ; Evensong, 6.30 p.m 

THE HOSPITAL OF HOLY CROSS 

Is on the north side of the Church, from which it is 
separated only by the Foregate. Built and endowed in 
1852 by the late Daniel Rowland, Esq., in memory of 
his brother, the Rev. W. G. Rowland, who was curate of 
the Abbey Church during the long period of 32 years, 
the buildings comprise rooms for five inmates. 

WHITEHALL, 

A fine old Tudor mansion, stands in extensive grounds 
between Whitehall Place and the Abbey Foregate. It 
was erected fully three centuries ago by a famous 
Elizabethan lawyer named Prince, after whom it was 
long known as Prince's Place, until, for some reason or 
other, about which antiquarians are not yet quite agreed, 
its designation was altered to that of " Whitehall " 
popularly accounted for, however, by the undeniable fact 
that, under some passing freak of vandalism, it was for a 
time " whitewashed! " The property, after being held by 
divers owners, among them being the Earl of Tankerville, 
finally came by purchase into the possession of the 



62 a Roundabout "Ramble. 

late Bishop Butler, and is now held, though not occupied, 
by his grandson, the Ven. T. B. Lloyd. Archdeacon of 
Salop. 

At the top of the Abbey Foregate, on a suitably 
commanding site, is 

LORD HILL'S COLUMN, 

Raised by public subscription in 1815-16 to commemorate 
the signal and glorious military services of General Lord 
Hill during the war against the First Napoleon in the 
Peninsula and during the hundred days which culminated 
with the decisive victory of Waterloo. The total cost 
was about ^6,000. The inscription on the base of the 
monument records the battles in which the Shropshire 
hero took part. The column, including the colossal 
statue upon its summit, is 133 feet high the largest 
Doric Column in the world. Inside the shaft is a spiral 
stair of 172 steps, by which the curious visitor may, 
for a small gratuity, ascend to the top, and thence 
survey a far-extending and delightfully varied panorama 
of the surrounding country. The attendant who has 
charge of the column, and who is usually an old soldier, 
resides at the neat little Doric lodge close by. The 
first care-taker was a veteran named Sergeant Davies, 
of the Welsh Fusileers, and a Shropshire man, who had 
been orderly-sergeant to Lord Hill at the Battle of 
Waterloo. The last was Sergeant Sanson, of the 53rd 
(Shropshire) Regiment, whose widow now (1893) holds 
the position formerly held by her husband. 

A short distance on the Wenlock Road stands 



a "Roundabout "Ramble. 63 

THE CHURCH OF ST. GILES. 

It dates from the time of Henry I., who founded it for 
the use of an adjoining hospital for lepers. About the 
middle of the fifteenth century it was parochialiscd, 
being joined to the parish of Holy Cross without the 
Monastery. In 1857, however, it was formed into a 
separate ecclesiastical district, and has since had an 
incumbent of its own, the Rev. H. Stokes being the 
present Vicar. 

From this point it were easy, if time permitted, to 
extend our ramble along Sutton-lane as far as the 

MINERAL SPRINGS 

That lie picturesquely and almost hidden in the wooded 
hollow near what is known as Burnt Mill. That the 
waters of these springs possess peculiar medicinal virtues 
there can be no doubt. The fact is locally notorious. 
Referring to them in 1841, Dr. T. Ogier Ward, in his 
"Medical Topography of Shrewsbury" says : 

" I have found it most beneficial in those cases for which sea 
water is usually recommended. It yields the same salutary stimulus 
to the stomach, and obviates, both mildly and effectually, the habitual 
costiveness of hypochondriac patients. In chronic diseases of the 
skin this water has been found a very valuable remedy, both internally 
and externally applied ; and I am happy to bear testimony that a 
twenty years' attendance at the Salop Infirmary, as well as in private 
practice, has furnished me with abundant proofs of its success in 
scrofulous complaints. In addition to its properties in common with 
sea water, it enjoys one evident advantage in containing iron ; and it 
is now well ascertained that small and repeated doses of this valuable 
metal produce far more beneficial and permanent effects upon the 
constitution than the much larger ones formerly prescribed." 



64 B Roundabout "Ramble. 

Not unnaturally, seeing waters so possibly useful for 
the relief and amelioration of disease apparently running 
to waste, there have been efforts by enthusiastic persons 
the writer among the number to concert measures 
whereby they might be more profitably utilised for the 
public good. The last attempt in this direction was 
made under what appeared to be especially favouring 
circumstances. In December, 1892,3 number of local 
gentlemen interested in the subject assembled, under 
the presidency of the Mayor (Geo. Evans, Esq.), in the 
rooms of Messrs. Adnitt and Naunton, The Square, and, 
after full discussion, during which the dominating opinion 
was strongly expressed in favour of something practical 
being done to bring our local mineral springs into wider 
and more convenient public use with the view of 
enhancing the health-giving attractions of Shrewsbury as 
a residential town, an influential committee was formed, 
with Wm. Phillips, Esq., as chairman, for the purpose of 
making thorough examination of "the sources of mineral 
waters available within the borough or conveniently 
adjacent to it," and "to co-operate with any committee 
which the Town Council might appoint for the same 
purpose." The Town Council, acceding to representa- 
tions made to them by a deputation, appointed a Special 
Committee, with Mr. J. A. Lea as chairman, to inquire 
into the question in concert with the outside Committee. 
Thus the initial energy and independent character of the 
original Committee was merged and lost in the municipal 
one, though this possible disadvantage had some com- 
pensation in the fact that the inquiry might thus be aided 
by the trained assistance of official and scientific experts 
where and when necessary. Two or three meetings of 
the joint Committee were held. A fresh analysis of the 



B IRoun&s-about IRamble. 65 

Sutton Spa waters was made in March, 1893, by Mr. T. 
P. Blunt, M.A., F.I.C., F.C.S., the county analyst, whose 
report sets forth that the solid contents of an imperial 
gallon are : 

GRAINS. 

Sodium Chloride .. .. .. 1174-5 

Calcium Chloride .. .. .. 299-15 

Magnesium Chloride .. .. 31*52 

Barium Chloride .. .. .. 15 -99 

Barium Carbonate . . . . . . 14-79 

Silica . . . . . . 3-2 

Iron Carbonate .. .. .. 0-14 



1546-29 



Saline Ammonia, driven off during evaporation, 0-14 grains per 
gallon. Organic matter very small in quantity. Nitrates represented 
by less than o-i grains per gallon of Nitrogen. One gallon contains 
1 6 cubic inches of dissolved Carbonic Acid Gas, in addition to that 
combined with the Barium ; also a small quantity of Oxygen and 
Nitrogen, derived from the air. This Water is a powerful Saline 
purgative. It is especially remarkable as containing considerable 
quantities of Baryta in the forms of the Carbonate and Chloride of 
Barium. 

Mr. Blunt also gives it as his opinion that 

" The Sutton Spa water is a powerful saline aperient, and its 
purgative properties would not be liable to be affected by transference 
in pipes to a distance. From the information in the possession of 
your Committee, it does, not, however, appear that the quantity of 
the water at present yielded by the well at Sutton Spa is very large, 
or that the nature of its constituents are sufficiently exceptional to 
justify any great expenditure in bringing it to the centre of the 
town." 



66 B IRounDssabout "Ramble. 

Without our here entering into any lengthy detail, it 
must suffice to say briefly that the result of this semi- 
official investigation was of a character to effectually set 
the Mineral Water agitation at rest for another generation, 
at least. The modest vision some had pictured of the 
"waters" being brought to a convenient point within 
the town say, at the New Baths in the Quarry instead 
of being left in a position practically unavailable for the 
town's general advantage, was quietly dissipated. Prac- 
tical men decided that the idea, though pretty, was not 
practical. It was accordingly relegated to the local 
limbo of all such ineffectual dreams whether ever to 
reappear or not, who shall say ? There is now some 
proposal or suggestion of Saline Water Baths from 
local brine springs to be provided in connection with 
the new Jubilee Baths in the Quarry, but for the present 
(1893) this minor scheme remains in the nebulous 
uncertainty best understood as the " committee stage." 

Someday, perhaps, what nature has so bountifully 
provided will be better utilized. Pending that day, and 
assuming rather that the visitor needs now no such 
refresher as a mineral drink, unless from the familiar 
stopper'd bottle, with or without a suspicion of something 
stronger, we now return townwards as rapidly as may be. 

Re-crossing the English Bridge, and merely remark- 
ing that the suburbs of Coleham and Belle Vue and 
Meole Brace may be reached by divergence along the 
road on our immediate left at the Bridge, we soon begin 
to ascend 



a Roundabout "Ramble. 67 

WYLE COP, 

Noting on our right the singularly picturesque and skil- 
fully restored frontage of the old " Unicorn Hotel," 
and pausing a moment before the ancient dwelling, 
higher on the left, to read the quasi-antique mural 
inscription which, ignoring the fact that Henry of 
Richmond was not King until after Bosworth, records 
the interesting fact that this is "Ye auneient house in 
which King Henry the VII. slept when he went to Bosworth 
Field, August, 1485." 

At the junction of Milk Street with High Street and 
Wyle Cop. opposite St. Julian's Church, there stood until 
quite recently an old edifice, faintly and curiously eccle- 
siastic in some of its features, that had once been the 
CLOTHWORKERS' or SHEARMEN'S Hall, and subsequently 
used at different times as a theatre, a chapel, a court of 
justice, a shop, and a warehouse. It has now, however, 
been wholly removed, and replaced by a new and hand- 
some building, after designs by Mr. Oswell, architect, of 
Shrewsbury, in a style which may be best described 
perhaps as modernised Tudor, adapted to commercial 
uses, for Messrs. Hall, Wateridge, and Owen, auctioneers, 
land agents, and surveyors, as their COUNTY AUCTION 
MART. 

A few steps along Milk Street, brings us to 
THE REMAINS OF OLD ST. CHAD'S. 

On the site of this most ancient Church, or closely 
adjacent, during the old British and early Saxon occu- 
pation, stood, it is credibly assumed, the Palaces of 



68 B TRoun&sabout IRamble. 

the Princes who ruled this region ; and it was 
round this royal centre that the town first gathered itself 
and gradually grew. The origin of Old Saint Chad's is 
lost in obscurity. It is conjectured that the first church 
was built by the Saxons ; but there is no distinct historic 
evidence in proof of the presumption. The first mention 
we find of a church here is in Domesday Book, which, 
with characteristic brevity, records that at that date it 
" held i hides " of land. Whatever may have preceded 
it, a Collegiate Church was here erected about the time 
of the Conquest, under the patronage of the Bishop of 
Lichfield and Coventry. It underwent restoration in the 
reign of Henry III, and again in the reign of Richard II, 
when it was almost wholly re-built after a destructive fire, 
caused by the negligence of a workman while repairing 
the lead of the roof, and who, trying to escape the 
anticipated punishment of his carelessness, was drowned 
in fording the Severn. It was after this fire that was 
built the church of which some partial ruins still remain. 
From the beginning of the fifteenth century onward 
until the reign of Henry VIII. and Edward VI., in the 
middle of the sixteenth, the history of the church pre- 
sents little of special interest ; but in the reign of the 
latter monarch the church's original collegiate foundation 
was dissolved, and the site of the college granted to 
secular owners, the church being thenceforward parochial 
only. The characteristics of the ancient building were 
mainly Norman, though it bore ample evidences of later 
developments of the Gothic. Its dimensions are stated 
to have been as follow : east to west, i bo feet ; width 
of nave and aisles, 53 feet; and transepts 92 feet. In 
the east or chancel window was the fine stained glass 
which now (as stated on page 26) occupies a similar 



S Roundabout IRamble. 69 

position in the Church of St. Mary, and illustrates the 
genealogy of Christ from "the root of Jesse." This 
church would seem to have been fated to catastrophe. 
Once more, and this time irretrievably, though not by 
fire, destruction overtook it. On the gih of July, 1788, 
at four o'clock in the morning, just as the chimes had 
gone " for the last time," almost the whole of the edifice 
collapsed with a tremendous crash. One of the stone 
pillars supporting the central tower had given way, and 
the superincumbent masonry and spire toppled over, with 
all the weight of ten ponderous bells, into the nave 
beneath, carrying with them the whole intervening struc- 
ture and even crushing through into the crypt below. 
Thus, in one disastrous moment, the fine old Church 
became suddenly an undistinguishable heap of ruins. 
Happily, however, the catastrophe entailed no loss of 
human life. Since that day no divine worship has been 
celebrated on this most venerable site, where the services 
of the church, Romanist or Protestant, had before been 
observed continuously for some five hundred years 
or, assuming the tradition be true that here the palace 
of the Princes of Powys was converted into a church by 
one of the Mercian Kings as early as 780, then for no 
less than a thousand years ! The only portion that 
remains of this once important Church is " the Lady 
Chapel." The ruins of the crypt were explored in 1889 
by the Shropshire Archaeological Society. The con- 
ditions then revealed indicated that the original crypt 
must have been 31^ feet in length, divided into four 
bays, and 22^ feet in width, divided into two bays. 

In the burial ground, near the pathway leading from 
Belmont to College Hill, is the grave of Captain John 



70 B 1Roun5*about IRamblc. 

Benbow, who, as already recorded, was shot at the Castle 
in 1651 for his loyalty to the cause of King Charles II. 

Close by here, in Milk Street, is the SHREWSBURY 
DISPENSARY- an institution whose object is, by means 
of combination among the humbler classes, and by aid 
of voluntary subscriptions, to afford medical attendance 
and medicine to the sick poor. By payment of 53. 
annually members are entitled to the benefits of the 
institution and attendance at their own homes if 
necessary. 

THE SCHOOL OF ART AND SCIENCE 

Occupies part of the premises on College Hill, adjoining 
the rear of the Music Hall, formerly known as 
" Vaughan's Place " a fine old building dating from 
the 1 4th century, built by Sir Hamo Vaughan, and once 
the town residence of the Myttons, of Halston. The 
large room (probably the dining-hall of the ancient 
mansion) is worth inspecting. The Art School here is 
conducted by Mr. C. Cortissos, a certificated master 
from .South Kensington, and the Science Classes by Mr. 
Harrison, B.A. The Secretary is Mr. F. Goyne. 

On the opposite side of the street are the offices of 
the SHROPSHIRE SHEEP BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION (Sec- 
retary, Mr. J. Mansell), and of Messrs. MANSELL, 
TURNBULL, and LLOYD, the well-known Stock Salesmen, 
Land Agents, and Land Surveyors. 

At the bottom of the street, on Swan Hill, is the 
new BOROUGH POLICE STATION, with the office of the 



a "Roundabout "Ramble. 71 

Inspector of WEIGHTS AND MEASURES now (1893) 
fast nearing completion, and of an aspect so spacious, 
imposing, and decorative, that one cannot but regret it 
did not find a location more suitable, and where it 
might have been seen to better advantage. 

Hence, we turn to the right into Market Street, and 
so once more into the Square, where our long, yet we 
trust not uninteresting, " Round-about Ramble " ends. 





JEW towns have prettier, pleasanter, or more 
picturesque natural surroundings than Shrews- 
bury. Turn which way the explorer may, he 
will find within easy distance, whether by 
road, river, or rail, scenes of great historic interest and 
surpassing beauty and attractiveness. Amongst these, 
we would here refer briefly to : 

HAGHMON.* An ancient demesne, about four miles 
distant, whose distinguishing features are the " high 
mound" or hill, still partly clothed with grand sylvan 
survivors of "the forest primeval," and the venerable 
ruins of the old Augustinian Abbey, that once reared its 
towers and spread its cloisters at the hill's foot. It is 
stated by Mr. W. Burson (to whose concise account of 
the Abbey and of Battlefield we would refer the reader 
for fuller information) that a house of Austin or Black 

* We have adhered to the ancient form of this name. 



73 

Canons was founded here between 1130 and 1138, and 
that it developed into its higher dignity in or before 
1155, its real founder being William FitzAlan, head of 
the powerful baronial house which held vast estates in 
Shropshire, including this domain. Of the existing 
ruins, the portion immediately in front of the small 
opening which now forms the doorway was the Refec- 
tory; on the left was the lavatory and the cloisters, 
whose eastern boundary was, and is, the Chapter House. 
The property is now possessed by the Rev. George Wm. 
Pigott-Corbet (formerly Pigott), to whom it descends 
in the female line from the Corbets, and who, there- 
fore, assumes by royal license the name and arms of that 
family. From the heath-covered summit of the hill, an 
extensive and delightful view is obtained, with the Severn 
winding like a silver thread through a level and fertile 
vale. It commands the field whereon the famous battle 
of Shrewsbury was fought. Upon its brow is a thicket 
still called " the Queen's Bower," from a popular legend 
that here Queen Eleanor watched the progress of the 
fight. Another story associated with the battle and this 
hill is that Earl Douglas, in attempting to escape from 
the field, and trying here to leap his horse over a pre- 
cipitous crag, fell and was taken prisoner. The towers 
of Sundorne Castle (the seat of the owners of Hagh- 
mon) are visible amid the trees to the west in the 
middle distance, while far beyond are to be discerned 
dimly the spires of distant Shrewsbury. 

BATTLEFIELD. This famous field the scene of 

" The bloody rout that gave 
" To Harry's brow a wreath to Hotspur's heart a grave," 



74 JEjcursions. 

lies two miles north west of Haghmon Abbey. An 
account of the battle is given on pages 6, 7, and 8. 
The CHURCH of Battlefield was originally erected in 
grateful commemoration of King Henry's triumph, and 
the King himself has been generally credited therewith, 
but it is believed by some that the real founder was " a 
staunch Lancastrian " priest named Ive, rector of Fitz in 
1399, and of Albright Hussey from 1398 to 144.7. The 
Church underwent entire restoration in 1861. (For a 
full description of the edifice see the handbook by the 
Rev. W. G. D. Fletcher.) 

CONDOVER.- Four miles from Shrewsbury is the vill- 
age of Condover (over-Cound or Upper Cound, to 
distinguish it from another place lower on the Cound 
Brook), it is very ancient, originating, it is believed, with 
the Saxons. In its early vicissitudes, after the Norman 
Conquest, the Manor passed and re-passed between 
Kings and private grantees divers times, until Henry 
VIII. granted it to Sir Henry Knevett, who soon after- 
wards sold it to Thomas Owen, Lord Chief Justice of 
the Court of Common Pleas, whose son, Sir Roger, was 
the builder of Condover Hall in 1598. The property 
subsequently passed by maternal descent to the family 
of Cholmondeley, the present owner being Reginald 
Cholmondeley, Esq. The hall is one of the finest 
examples of Tudor domestic architecture in the king- 
dom, and it contains many paintings and artistic treasures 
well worth going ten times the distance to see. The 
gardens, too, are remarkable for their extent and beauty. 

HAWKSTONE. This uniquely picturesque spot is 
distant twelve miles by road, or it may be reached by rail 



^excursions. 75 

to Wem, and thence by road four miles. It has for 
centuries been the seat of the distinguished Shropshire 
family of Hill, and was greatly extended and adorned 
by the famous General Lord Hill. On a rock within 
the Park are the ruins of " Red Castle," built by 
Henry de Audley in the reign of Henry III. A quaint 
and now somewhat antiquated " Guide " describes the 
scenery about Hawkstone as " alluring to the admirers of 
Nature as well as to persons of Taste and Curiosity," and 
he adds that " the Mansion itself has become an addi- 
tional attraction to the multitude of beauties which have 
allured visitors to Hawkstone Park from every quarter of 
the World ! " And verily, in sober truth, this is so. 
And if it be possible for us to add anything more to 
" allure" the visitor of " Taste and Curiosity," it must be 
found in the reminder that Hawkstone is the seat of a 
family long distinguished for its private worth, and emi- 
nent for its public services. But what go we there for 
to see ? Well (pace the old Guide already quoted) there 
are or were" The Hall," " The Gardens," " The 
Summer House," " The Awful Precipice," " The Elysian 
Hill," " The Citadel," " Fox's Knob," " Giant's Well," 
"Gingerbread Hall," "Grotto," "Gulf," "Hermit's Cave," 
" Indian Rock," " Lion," "Lover's Leap," "Menagerie," 
" Neptune's Whim," " Newfoundland Point," " Obelisk," 
" Raven's Shelf," " Reynard's Banqueting House," 
" Roman Camp," " Scene at Otahite," " Scene in 
Switzerland," " St. Francis' Cave," " Tower Glen," 
" Vineyard," " Vis-a-vis," and, lastly, " Patience." We 
might add largely to the list of attractions, but these 
will, we think, be sufficient to prove how there is more 
than enough to " allure " the Pilgrim of " Taste and 
Curiosity " to Hawkstone. 



76 Excursions. 

. 

WROXETER. About five miles along the London 
Road, passing ATCHAM (where was born Ordericus, 
historian and chaplain to William the Conqueror, and 
where there is an old and most interesting Church, 
dedicated to St. Etta whence the name of the place 
and a fine Bridge over the broad Severn), and Attingham 
Hall (the seat of Lord Berwick), brings us to the remains 
and they are but scant indeed of what was, fifteen 
hundred years ago, the important Roman station of 
Uriconium. The foundations and ruinous walls of a few 
buildings, with fragments of tesselated pavement, are all 
that can now be seen to attest the one-time existence 
here of a city that is supposed to have covered an area 
of more than 300 acres. The Church, which combines 
late Norman with almost all subsequent styles in its 
reparations, contains several altar-tombs with effigies. 

The WREKIN. Continuing the drive from Wroxeter 
(six miles) or by rail from Shrewsbury to Wellington 
(rail 10 miles and road 3) we reach the famous Shrop- 
shire hill yclept " The Wrekin," remembered proudly and 
affectionately in the toast drunk by Salopians, wherever 
assembled, the wide world over! It is nearly 1,300 feet 
high. The prospect from its wooded summit compre- 
hends thirteen counties. The author of " The Severn 
Valley," describing the scene, well says : " It is a won- 
derful panorama of river, dale, and dingle, wood beyond 
wood, rock beyond rock, and hill rising beyond hill, 
their blue tops swelling, to.wering, vanishing, melting 
into the azure sky, the whole forming one solemn picture 
beyond the reach of pen and pencil." The visitor fond 
of geological exploration will find this an unrivalled field 
for study. Conveyances are run from Wellington to the 



Bjcureions. 77 

foot of the hill, where there is a well-appointed refresh- 
ment " Pavilion," and, about half-way up the ascent, is 
" The Cottage," where refreshments may also be obtained. 

BUILDWAS ABBEY. Ruins of a fine old Cistercian 
Abbey, pleasantly situate on the banks of the Severn, 
and believed to have been founded by Roger de Clinton 
in 1 135. Twelve miles from Shrewsbury, reached by the 
Severn Valley Railway. 

WENLOCK PRIORY. Resuming our journey by the 
same line, a distance of four miles from Buildwas, and 
through the beautiful ravine of Farley, we reach the 
quaintly pretty little town of Wenlock, and explore the 
ruins of one of the oldest and most important religious 
houses in Shropshire. Here are remarkably beautiful 
examples of early pointed architecture. The Chapter 
House (Norman in style) is of especial interest. Another 
noteworthy feature is the two-storied Cloister, 100 feet 
in length. The Priory was founded by St. Milburga in 
the seventh century, and, being destroyed by the Danes 
about a century later, was afterwards rebuilt by Leofric, 
Earl of Mercia ; and was again restored and largely 
added to by the Norman baron, Roger de Montgomery, 
in 1080, for monks of the Cluniac Order. There is also 
much of antiquarian and architectural interest in the 
town of Wenlock, particularly the parish Church and 
the Guild Hall, the latter for its old carved oak wain- 
scoting and furniture. 

ACTON BURNELL. Following the road from Shrews- 
bury to Wenlock, through Berrington and Pitchford 
(both possessing ancient churches worth passing exam- 
ination), a distance of nine miles, Acton Burnell is 



78 Bjcursfone. 

reached. Here are the ruins of a castle built by Robert 
Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells. In the reign of 
Edward I., a parliament was held here. In the Church 
are fine monuments, one supposed to be to Sir Nicholas 
Burnell, and dated 1382. About a couple of miles to the 
south of the village is an ancient Roman paved way, 
popularly known as "The Devil's Causeway." 

CHURCH STRETTON. This pleasant little town, lying 
in secluded quiet between high sheltering hills that may 
without exaggeration be described as mountainous, is a 
favorite resort for persons fond of Nature, not only in 
her placid but in her wilder moods, and who seek reno- 
vated health in pure air and variety of scene. On the 
one hand rise, from out a luxuriantly wooded valley, the 
heathery treeless heights of the Longmynd, while, on 
the other, Caer Carodoc rears its bare and rugged 
shoulders to the skies. According to ancient tradition, 
it was on this hill that, about the middle of the first 
century, the famous British Prince Caractacus and his 
Silurian followers made a last desperate yet futile stand 
against the advance of the Roman legions under Ostorius. 
During the last century it was customary for a number 
of the Salopian admirers of the heroic British prince to 
assemble annually upon the summit of Caradoc, and 
there listen to an oration or poem spoken by one of 
their party in honour of Caractacus. This pretty custom 
has, however, long been discontinued, though it might, 
one would imagine, not unprofitably be revived. A prince 
and warrior whose personal presence when vanquished 
and a captive could inspire even his enemies in the courts 
of Imperial Rome with respect and admiration, might 
well, in his own land and on the scene of his last great 



Bjcursions. 79 

though unsuccessful exploit, be esteemed worthy such 
commemoration for his prowess and patriotism. The 
hills and valleys amidst which Church Stretton and 
All Stretton lie afford opportunity for many delight- 
ful rambles, especially for those capable of mountain 
climbing. The Carding Mill Valley, with its rocky, 
winding streamlet and sequestered waterfall, is a favour- 
ite scene of exploration, the magnitude and wildness of 
it being always impressive, whether under sun or cloud. 
In both Church Stretton and All Stretton there are 
plenty of lodging-houses, with ample and excellent 
accommodation. The Church is large, of Saxon origin, 
cruciform, and archaeologically interesting. The Rector 
is the Rev. C. Noel-Hill, M.A. Hotels : The Church 
Stretton Hotel (nearest the Railway Station) is a very 
commodious, well-appointed and high-class house ; 
Manageress, Miss Palmer. Buck's Head, Proprietor, 
Wm. Hyslop ; King's Arms, Proprietor, G. B. Leas ; 
The Raven, Proprietor, Wm. Houldey. 

BOSCOBRL AND TONG. By rail to Albrighton (21 
miles) for Boscobel, in whose oak Charles II., after 
defeat at Worcester, was concealed until he could escape 
from the country ; and for Tong, where is an imposing 
castle, belonging to the Earl of Bradford, and a Church, 
founded in 1400 and recently restored, whose perfect 
architectural beauty and splendid monuments (chiefly 
to the Pierrepoints, Vernons, and Stanleys,) are a wonder 
and delight. 

AQUATIC EXCURSIONS may very agreeably be made 
on the Severn (weather and water permitting), to such 
pleasant river-side spots as Shelton, Berwick, the Isle, 
Uffington, Atcham, &c. At Uffington, be it noted, is 



8o Excursions. 

the popular hostelry of " The Corbet Arms," where is 
a pretty bowling green, with umbrageous alcoves, close 
by Severn side, and where "teas" are to be enjoyed as 
in perhaps but few other places a phenomenon due 
in part possibly to precedent appetising ramblings amid 
the closely adjacent sylvan wilds of Haghmon ! 




T. PMMMEft Castle Restaurant ' Castle Street 

CONFECTIONER. 



CATERER. 




" Ob, pailin ! prince of C.il;c compounded ! 
TZbe moutb Uqutflea at the vert name but tbcrc.' 

LUNCHEONS, DINNERS, AND TEAS. 

Parties of 6, 8, or 10 can have Tables or Private Rooms reserved for them by 
Post or Telegram. 

BALLS & PARTIES CATERED FOR IN TOWN OR COUNTRY. 
T. PLIMMER, PROPRIETOR. 



WL. Gaseels, 

<84 GROCER, 8> 

Tea Dealer 1 , and Italian 




(OPPOSITE THE GENERAL POST OFFICE,) 

PRIDE HILL, SHREWSBURY. 



CASSELS 

is Noted for 



GRAPES 
MELONS 

ORANGES 
LEMONS 

^XSXXGX' 




PINE APPLES 



TOMATOES 
PEACHES 

s XSXj<6/= 



CRYSTALISED AND BOTTLED FRUITS. 
SPECIAL SELECTION IN HIGH-CLASS TINNED GOODS. 



TEAS, Noted Blends - 

,, Superb China 
COFFEES, Superior Value 



at 1/4, 1/6, 1/8, 1 10. 
at 2/4, & 2/6. 
at 1/4, 1/6, 1/8. 



BRITISH & FOREIGN WINES. 



GOODS SEWT ANY DISTANCE CAREFULLY PACKED. CARRIAGE PAID ON 
GOODS VALUE ,1. 



General 3nformation. 




WATER SUPPLY. 

HREWSBURY possesses a dual water supply 
that is, from two different sources, distributed 
to consumers in the town by different means. 
One is from a natural spring Broad well 
near Crow Meole, beyond Kingsland, and is conveyed in 
pipes to a reservoir, whence it is distributed to numerous 
" conduits " throughout the town. This water is used 
for potable purposes, and is not carried by pipes into the 
dwellings of the inhabitants, but is supplied from 
" conduits," as they are locally termed, or public " taps " 
in the streets. The other supply is from the Severn, for 
common uses other than potable, and this is conveyed 
inside most of the houses throughout the borough. It 
is important in considering the water supply to keep 
clearly in view its two wholly distinct sources. The 
river supply is plenteous ; the spring supply is both 
plenteous and pure, though " hard." When boiled, how- 
ever, this hardness is reduced one-half; and Mr. Baldwin 
Latham, the eminent consulting engineer, testifies that 
"it is remarkably free from dangerous impurities as dis- 
coverable by the chemist, and contains no albuminoid 
ammonia " the latter fact evidencing its great purity. 
The water supply is in the hands of the Corporation. 



82 



General Sntormation. 



It may be useful to subjoin here an analysis made by 
Mr. R. H. Harland, F.I.C., F.C.S., of the town's drinking 
water supply. The results are expressed in grains per 
gallon : 



Color 

Suspended Matter 

Total Hardness 

Permanent Hardness 

Total Solid Matter 

Loss on Ignition 

Total Mineral Matter 

Chlorine 

Chloride of Sodium (Salt) 

Phosphoric Acid 

Free Ammonia 

Albuminoid Ammonia 

Nitrogen as Nitrates 

Oxygen required to oxidise the 

organic matter in 2 minutes 
Ditto ditto in 4 hours 

Microscopical Examination 



BANKS. 



Pale blue, clear 
None 
20 deg. 
12 

28-00 

I-I2 

26-88 

i-59 
2-62 
Faint Trace 

None 

None 

2600 ,, 

0028 

0104 ,, 

No Deposit 



Eyton, Burton, & Co. (Salop Old Bank), the Square ; 
Manager, Mr. S. B. Ebrall. Draw on Robarts, Lubbock, 
and Co., 15 Lombard Street, London, E.G. 

Birmingham District and Counties Banking Co., Ltd., 
6 High Street ; Manager, Mr. A. Gill ; London Agents, 
Williams, Deacon, & Co. 

Lloyds' Bank, Ltd., i Pride Hill ; Manager, Mr. G. 
Baker. London House : Lombard Street. 

National Provincial Bank of England, Bellstone ; 
Manager, Mr. S. Jackson. 

Salop Town and County Savings Bank, i College 
Hill ; Mr. Matthews, Actuary. 



General Information. 83 

CLUBS. 

The SHROPSHIRE COUNTY CLUB, in the Square, op- 
posite the Guild Hall, has mainly a membership of 
gentlemen of the County, elected by ballot. It is now 
(1893) undergoing extensive alterations, and its internal 
accommodation is being largely increased. Secretary, 
Mr. H. W. Adnitt. 

The SHREWSBURY CLUB, in Dogpole, is conducted 
on a very similar principle, and has a large and influential 
membership, chiefly gentlemen of the town. Secretary, 
Mr. V. C. L. Crump. 

The " BEACONSFIELD '.' on Pride Hill is, as its title 
implies, the rendezvous of Salopian Conservatives. It 
has a good billiard room, capital reading room, conve- 
nient bar, and excellent luncheon rooms. Secretary 
Mr. W. H. Lea. 

The " GRANVILLE " in Hill's Lane, off Mardol, is the 
rallying-point of the local Liberal (we suppose we should 
for the present say " Gladstonian ") party. The reading 
room, with its old oak wainscotting, is one of the 
finest in Shrewsbury ; the billiard room is spacious and 
pleasant ; and all other accommodation is everything 
that can be desired. Secretary Mr. J. E. Jones. 

The LIBERAL UNIONISTS have recently opened a 
Reading Room in Kenneth Chambers, Dogpole, and it 
well answers its purpose as a place of meeting for gen- 
tlemen, of both town and county, who follow the Duke 
of Devonshire and Mr. J. Chamberlain in preference to 
Mr. Gladstone on the Irish Home Eule question. It is 
well supplied with newspapers and magazines, and is 



84 (Beneral Information. 

very suitably and comfortably furnished. A. P. Heywood 
Lonsdale, Esq., is President. Hon. Sees. : W. Toye, Esq., 
Castle House; C. B. H. Soame, Esq., Dawley. Mr. S. 
Brame, Liberal Unionist organiser for the district, will 
receive names of intending members. 

HOTELS. 

RAVEN, Castle Street. Manageress, Miss S. Collett. 

LION, Wyle Cop. Manageress, Miss Hodgson. 

GEORGE, Market Street. Proprietor, Mr. G. Fox. 

CROWN, St. Mary's Street. Proprietor, Mr. H. Wise. 

CLARENDON, Pride Hill. Proprietor, Mr. G. H. Hyles. 

UNICORN, Wyle Cop. Manager, Mr. C. Kerry. 

TURF HOTEL, Claremont Hill. Proprietor, Mr. John 
Hyslop. 

BRITANNIA, Mardol. Proprietor, Mr. J. Bray. 

ELEPHANT & CASTLE, Mardol Proprietor, Mr. Miller 

LION AND PHEASANT COMMERCIAL HOTEL, Wyle 
Cop. Proprietor, Mr. R. W. Morgan. 

GRAPES HOTEL, Chester Street. Prop. Mr. R. Ince. 

ST. JAMES'S TEMPERANCE HOTEL, Castle Street. 
Proprietor, Mr. Barnett. 

THOMAS'S TEMPERANCE HOTEL, Castle Street. 
Proprietress, Miss Thomas. 

JONES'S TEMPERANCE HOTEL, Castle Gates. Pro- 
prietress, Mrs. Jones. 

RESTAURANTS. 
PLIMMER'S, Castle Street. 
DAVIES', Castle Gates. 
DEAKIN, P., Bellstone. 
JONES', Shoplatch. 
GOUCHER'S, Shoplatch. 
" THE WELCOME" (Temperance), Castle Gates. 



(Beneral Information. 85 

LIVERY STABLES. 

Mr. H. Franklin Swan Hill and Raven Hotel. 
Mr.W.J.P.Pugh Bridge Inn, English Bridge, Wyle Cop. 
Mr. F. W. Jones Water Lane (off Castle Street). 
Mr. Jones Abbey Foregate. 
Mr. Jones Lion Hotel, Wyle Cop. 

BOATS AND BOATING. 

Boats for use on the river may be hired from 
Mr. R. ELLIS at the River-side, adjacent to the Quarry, 

and at 13 Old Coleham. 

Mr. W. HUDSON at the River-side, near the Quarry. 
Mr. H. HUDSON Smithfield Road. 
Mr. W. GRIMSEY Boat House Inn, opposite the Quarry 

The PENGWERN boats are available only for members of 
that Club. 

FERRIES 

Are available at three convenient points upon the river 
within the Borough, two being between the two bridges, 
and the third between the suburbs of Castle Fields 
and Cherry Orchard. The toll is in each instance one 
halfpenny per passenger. 

FISHING. 

With the view of protecting and improving the 
Severn as a fishing stream, the Shrewsbury Severn 
Angling Society was formed and has been in existence 
some eleven or twelve years. With the same object the 
riparian owners have recently formed themselves into 
an Association under the name of " The Shropshire 
Severn Angling Association." The annual ticket of 



86 <5eneral Information. 

membership of the Shrewsbury Severn Angling Society 
is 5/- per annum, the Honorary Secretary being Mr. J. 
Williams, 3 Swan Hill Court ; and Fishing tickets, 6/- 
each (inclusive of i/- license of the Fishery Board), are 
also issued by the Shropshire Severn Angling Association, 
and may be obtained from Mr. F. A. Wolryche Whitmore, 
or from some of the Fishing Tackle makers in the town. 
Salmon rod licenses may likewise be obtained from Mr. J. 
Williams on behalf of the Severn Fishery Board. The 
6/- license, which we should advise to be taken out by 
the visitor piscatorially inclined, carries with it the 
privilege of fishing in a considerable portion of Severn 
waters, as within the County of Salop there are but few 
riparian owners who are not members of the Association. 
It should be added that the i/- license can be obtained 
from Mr. HY. SHAW, Naturalist, High St. ; Mr. J. W. 
ROBERTS, Fishing Tackle Maker, St. Mary's St. ; Mr. 
ALFRED MORRIS, ditto, Frankwell ; and Mr. HARRY 
THOMAS, ditto, Mardol Head. Accommodation for 
anglers and every information respecting the fishing will 
be readily supplied by the Manageress, Raven Hotel ; 
Mr. G. J. Fox, George Hotel ; Mr. C. Kerry, Unicorn 
Hotel ; Mr. Hyles, Clarendon Hotel ; and Mr. Wise, 
Crown Hotel. 

INLAND REVENUE. 

The office is situate two doors below the Lion Hotel, 
on Wyle Cop. 

BOROUGH POLICE. 
HEAD OFFICE MARKET STREET, SHREWSBURY. 

CHIEF CONSTABLE Henry Blackwell (also Inspector 
of Explosives and Common Lodging Houses, and Chief 



General Jntormation. 87 

Inspector under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act). 

CHIEF CLERK, STATION INSPECTOR AND INSPECTOR 
OF HACKNEY CARRIAGES Richard Russell. 

THE GENERAL CEMETERY 

For the whole of the town parishes, including Meole 
Brace, is very pleasantly situated on the Kingsland side 
of the river, on the road to Bishop's Castle, and beauti- 
fully laid out. It was formed in 1856, and comprises 27 
acres, of which 15 are consecrated. Its gently undulat- 
ing slopes are largely planted with trees and shrubs. 
There are two chapels one Episcopal and one Noncom- 
formist. The cost of the whole was ^13, 414. The 
grounds are open daily from 7 a.m. until sunset, except 
on Sunday, when it is closed from 10 a.m. till 2 p.m. 

POSTAL INFORMATION. 

CHIEF OFFICE, PRIDE HILL. HEAD POSTMASTER, 
F. E. ADAMS, ESQ. 

There are four deliveries of letters daily, namely, at 
7.0 and n.o a.m., and 1.40 and 6.0 p.m. 

The principal despatches are made at 2 a.m., 7.50 
a.m., 8.45 a.m., 9.45 a.m., ioa.m., 10.45 a.m., 12 noon, 
1.30 p.m., 2.45 p.m., 4.30 p.m., 5.15 p.m., 5.45 p.m., and 
9.30 p.m. 

There are 12 town sub-offices, and 31 town letter- 
boxes. 

The Head Office is open on Week-days for the sale 
of stamps, registration of letters and parcels, and delivery 
of callers' letters, &c., and for money order, postal order, 



(Beneral Information. 

savings bank, insurance and annuity, and inland revenue 
license business, from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Telegraph business is transacted on Week-days from 
7 a.m. to 10 p.m., and on Sundays from 8 a.m. to 10 
a.m., and from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

HACKNEY CARRIAGE REGULATIONS IN 
THE BOROUGH. 

There are public Hackney Carriage Stands at the 
General Railway Station, in the Square, and in St. Mary's 
Street. 

FARES : 

For every Hackney Carriage hired and taken s. d. 

within the Borough for the first mile . . i o 

For every succeeding mile within the Borough . . 06 

Additional half-fare to be paid between 12 o'clock 
at night and 6 o'clock in the morning. 

3d. to be paid for waiting every quarter of an 
hour. 

If Passengers return, half-fare to be charged ; Every 
Passenger beyond two, to pay 6d. for the first 
mile, and ^d. for every succeeding mile. 

Half-fare to be charged for Children above three and 
under twelve years of age. 

If there be more than one Passenger inside, zd. to be 
paid for each package carried outside, and which 
cannot be carried inside. 



NORWICH UNION 

LIFE INSURANCE SOCIETY 

FOUNDED 1BO8. 

1beaJ> fficc : SURREY STREET, NORWICH. 
Secretary & actuary : J. J. W. DEUCHAR, F.F.A.F.I.A. 

Funds over 2,000,000. 

Bonuses added 2,775,000. 

Claims paid 20,000,000. 

This being a "Mutual Life Office" there are no Shareholders, and the Entire 
Profits thus belong to the members in whose interest alone the Society is conducted. 
Bonuses declared every 5 years. In 1891 the ordinary Bonus averaged g/2. per 
Cent- per annum, a rate seldom equalled by any Office. Intermediate Bonuses 
are allowed. For Prospectuses and full particulars apply to 

THOMAS RusSELL, 20 Severn St., Shrewsbury, 

Agent for Shrewsbury & Dis.ric'. 
ESTABLISHED 1797. 

NORWICH UNION 

FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY 

Head Office : SURREY STREET, NORWICH. 
Secretary: C. E. BIGNOLD, Esq. Assistant Secretary: C. A. B. BIGNOLD, Esq. 

Amount Insured 290,000,000. 
Losses paid 9,000,000. 

Lowes/ Rales of Premium. Losses from Lightning, or Ci>al Gas, covered. 

PROMPT AND LIBERAL SETTLEMENT OF ALL CLAIMS. 

All kinds of Property insured. In case of Fire the whole of the Expenses are paid 

by this Office. 

Prospectuses and full information to be obtained from 

THOMAS RUSSELL, 20 Severn Street, Shrewsbury. 

AGENT FOR SHREWSBURY 4 DISTRICT. 

Also Agent for The " NORWICH & LONDON " ACCIDENT INSURANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Liberal and immediate settlement of Claims. Bonus to Policy Holders. 



ESTABLISHED 1863. 



i ; .V 

J. LAI NG, 38 CASTLE ST., 

SHREWSBURY, 



cr, jKiniafurc ainfci(, ^c. 



FAMILY & PRESENTATION PORTRAITS 

IN OIL & WATER COLOURS. 



GILDING AND FRAMING IN ALL THEIR BRANCHES. 



PICTURE CLEANING AND RESTORING. 



ARTISTS' MATERIAIaS AT MODERATE PRICES. 



SPECIAL SERIES OF ETCHINGS or 

of 




3 & 4 SHOPLATCH, SHREWSBURY. 



Parties Supplied with Lunchaons or Dinners. Distance no object. 

AGENT FOR UPTON'S TEAS, 1,'-, 1/4. 1/7. 



PURVEYOR 

THops 



LATE F. & T. HAMMONDS, 



**^ %, 



FISHMONGER <& FRUITERER, 

39 Castle Street, Shrewsbury. 

WENHAM LAKE ICE sent to all Parts of the Country. 

R. W. BIRCH, 

fi|iqBi ( aI ^ /Eratsed Wafssi 1 Maqufactufei 1 

14 CLAREMONT STREET, SHREWSBURY. 



SUPPLIED IN SYPHONS. 



dealers in Bottle^ Hies ant) Stouts. 

NOTED FOR PORK PIES. 

John palmer, 

PORK PIE & SAUSAGE ESTABLISHMENT 

xSX WHOLESALE & RETAIL X3\. 

9 & 10 MARDOL, SHREWSBURY. 

CELEBRATED SHREWSBURY BRAWN. 
N.B. THE TRADE SUPPLIED ON REASONABLE TERMS. 



Refreshment Rooms, 3 St. John's Hill, Shrewsbury. 



S. COCK, 



-^i- CONFECTIONER, -i^- 

Bridal and Birthday Cakes Made to order. Tea and Coffee 
Booms. Servants' Registry. 



CONFECTIONERS & REFRESHMENT CATERERS. 

TEA, COFFEE, AND REFRESHMENTS, 



A. \ L [lUMpLEBY, 

36 Wyle Cop, Shrewsbury. 

Comfortable Sitting 1Room & Beoroom, 

MRS. E. JENKS, KENNETH LODGE, DOGPOLE, SHREWSBURY. 

SUPERIOR FURNISHED APARTMENTS, 

MRS. WILLIAMS, 27 ABBEY FOREGATE. SHREWSBURY. 

MONTHLY, PRICE ONE PENNY. 

DELIVERED TO ANY ADDRESS, IS. PER ANNUM ; PER POST, IS. 6d. 

THE SHREWSBURY & SHROPSHIRE 

RAIL-WHY GUIDB 

AND 

READY REFERENCE TIME TABLE, 

With Diary for the Month and Railway Map. 

THE MOST COMPLETE, 

THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, 

AND BEST GUIDE ISSUED. 



LIVESEY'S RAILWAY GUIDE. This old-established 
publication has (since coming under the control of Mr. 
J. G. Livesey) been considerably improved, having received 
gi eat and various additions to its already full and useful 
contents, until now it is undeniably one of the completest, 
readiest of reference, best, and cheapest of our local 
railway guides. Skretv^bury Chronicle. 

Printed & Published by J. G. LIYESEY, ST. JOHN'S HILL, SHREWSBURY, 

AND SOLD AT ALL THE RAILWAY BOOKSTALLS, AND LOCAL 
AND COUNTY BOOKSELLERS. 




REFRESHMENTS 




At 3, Bellstone, 



(Adjoining the National Provincial Bank,) 



-5- Shrewsbury. 




MANUFACTURER OF THE CELEBRATED 

<& SH REWSBU RY -- CAKES. fs> 



^icH poiu|cT and^ride Gafycs n|adc lo order. 



PERSONAL AND PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL ORDERS 
INTRUSTED TO P. DEAKIN. 



THE TURF HOTEL, 

CLAREMONT HILL, SHREWSBURY. 

THE NEAREST HOTEL TO THOSE BEAUTIFUL GROUNDS KNOWN AS 

THE QUARRY. 

Everp Hccommofcation for ^families anfc tourists. 

BOATING & CYCLIST PARTIES. 
DINNERS AND SUPPERS SUPPLIED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 

JOHN HYSLOP, Proprietor. 

THOMAS MEREDITH, 

-^1-28 MARDOL, SHREWSBURY, -i^- 

Mbolesale ano TRetail provision /l&ercbant. 

NOTED FOR HOME-CURED HAMS & BACON. 

ALL KINDS OF TINNED MEATS, SAUCES, PICKLES, &c. 
SPECIALITY IN TEAS AT 1/8 & I/- 

ESTABLISHED 1853. 

IiftflDUGCI & DflVlES, 



SCULPTORS, 



(Beneraf Cemefetg (WlatrBfe 

SHREWSBURY. 



a^d Estimates Forwarded pree 09 



gHUKER & SON, 

41 & 42 PRIDE HILL, 

69 WYLE COP, 
SHREWSBURY. 



THE LARGEST & BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

and Builder' Ii ( onniongei l i( 

TO BE FOUND IN THE DISTRICT. 
- > >-<< 

Bicycles by the Best and Cheapest Makers. 



JOINS' TOOIiS. 



BEST TABLE & POCKET CUTLERY. 

Every Article connected with the Trade at Store Prices. 

PLEASE NOTE THE ADDRESS : 

41 & 42 Pride Hill, and 69 Wyle Cop, 

SHREWSBURY. 



iifC Hi6ei[ar t^ionisf Jlssociafioq. 



KENNETH CHAMBERS, SHREWSBURY. 



president : 
A. P. HEYWOOD-LONSDALE, ESQ. 

Chairman of Committee J. PARSON SMITH, ESQ. 

Vice-Chairman W. TOYE, ESQ. 
Honorary Treasurer J. H. SPROTT, ESQ , 
Honorary Secretary T. BROWN, ESQ. 
Organizing Agent S. BRAME. 



^jZomrqif fee 

OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A.M. TILL 10 P.M. 




List of Daily and Weekly Papers and Serials provided. 



XonDon : 

Standard. 
Telegraph. 
Graphic, (Weeklv.) 
(Daily.)' 
Times ,, 
News ,, 


astrmingbam : 

Daily Post. 

,, Gazette. 
Mail. 
Rural World. 
Weekly Post. 
,, Mercury. 


3Liv>erpool : 

Courier. 


dRancbestet : 

Exam, and Times. 


Wolverbampton : 

Express & Star. 
Midland E/ening News. 



Shrewsbury Chronicle. Wellington Journal. Strand Magazine. 

A LARGE SUPPLY ALSO OF BACK NUMBERS OF 
MONTHLY MAGAZINES. 

Contributions of Magazines and Books Solicited. 

ALL UNIONISTS RESIDENT IN THE COUNTRY ARE INVITED TO USE THE READING ROOM WHEN IN TOWN. 



The object of the Association shall be to maintain the Legislative Union 
between Great Britain and Ireland, and to resist any attempt to destroy it. 

Working Men may have a Ticket for the use of the Room on payment 
of the nominal sum of I/- per annum other subscriptions may vary from 2/6 to 
i is. and upwards. 

T. BROWN, Hon. Secretary. 
S. BRAME, Organizing Agent 




EDWARD CLARKE 



GENERAL 




WARWICK HOUSE, 

WYLE COP & DOGPOLE, 



SHREWSBURY. 



DWARD CLARKE has had a long experience in catering for the tastes of the 
Shropshire public, as prior to his establishing the business at Warwick House in 
1874, he was for 1 6 years with the old and reputed business of the late Thomas 
all, of Shrewsbury, where he obtained the fullest insight into a trade that numbered among 
s patrons the best families in Shropshire and adjoining counties. Since that period he has 
iligently followed on the same lines, and has a good repute for supplying the best class of 
jods at the most moderate cost. The premises occupy a central position at the junction of 
Vyle Cop and Dogpole, facing the Lion Family Hotel. The Stock is valuable and compre- 
;nsive, including the best standard makes in Linens, Sheetings, Blankets, Flannels, and all 
inds of Scotch and Manchester Goods. The Dress department is a special feature in the 
usiness, having with the aid of competent assistants made Dress Making a particular study, 
aking every effort to secure the Newest, Choicest, and most Reliable Materials that can be 
stained, so that the Stock, for variety of designs and materials, will favourably compare 
ith any in the West Midlands. 

Family Mourning receives the most prompt attention, no impediment is allowed to 
iterfere in the execution of orders. 

The Fancy, Hosiery, Glove and Lace Department are well represented with the 
est production from such makers as Dent's, Morley, and others of world-wide fame. 

Gents' Outfitting is a distinctive feature. The WREKIN Shirts, home-made by 
xperienced hands, is a special and superior article, that has given wide-spread satisfaction. 



Patterns and particulars at all times courteously submitted. 



General Posting Establishment. 




HENRY FRANKLIN, 

SWAN HILL, COLLEGE HILL, AND RAVEN HOTEL LIVERY STABLES. 

Superior Horses and Carriages of every description on Job or Hire 
for any period. 

HEARSES &. MOURNING COACHES. 



ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. TERMS MODERATE. 



Chief Office : 1 SWAN HILL, SHREWSBURY. 



ESTABLISHED 1875. 



MARSHALL BROTHERS, 



SMITHFIELD ROAD, SHREWSBURY. 

Designs and Estimates forwarded Free on application. 

THE SHOW-ROOMS CONTAIN THE LARGEST AND FINEST DISPLAY OF MONUMENTS 
WORK IN THE MIDLANDS. 

lElepbant anb Castle/ 

MARDOL, SHREWSBURY. 

EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION FOR VISITORS 
AND CYCLISTS. 

Large Room Suitable for Excursionists 

CATERING FOR SMALL OR LARGE PARTIES. 




GOOD STABLING AND LOOSE BOXES. 

E. MILLER, PROPRIETOR 



tfDON 

-^i- FAMILY & COMMERCIAL, -i^- 

Next door to General Post Office, centrally situated in the main 
thoroughfare, 5 minutes walk from the Railway Station. 

A GOOD COMMERCIAL ROOM. 

Dinjncj ai\d J^rivafe fifing ^ooms wiff) every comjorf. 

GEO. H. HYLES, Proprietor. 

EDWARD T. JEJ1KS, 

(LATE BLOWER &. JENKS.) 

68, WYLE COP, SHREWSBURY. 



(Beneral & jf urnisbing Jronmonoer 

BEiiMWjlGEii, WHITESMITH, 

COOKING RANGE AND GAS FITTER, &c. 



ALL. GOODS SUPPLIED OF BEST QUALITY. 



First-class Workmen employed to carry out all repairs. 

ffilaremmtt $jt0ij ifrctjaal, 

SHREWSBURY. 

IN UNION WITH THE LONDON COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

^'PRINCIPAL: MRS. HINTON-JONES, ***- 

ASSISTED BY REV. W. HINTON-JONES. 

Certificated Resident Foreign and English Governesses and 
Visiting Masters. 




" 



CYCLISTS, TOURISTS, FAMILY & COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

LIVERY & BAIT STABLES, 

H&jotnino tbe Welsb Brifcge, /Ifoarfcol, Sbrewsburs. 



This old-established Hotel has been recently renovated, and is now 

replete with every home comfort. It is situated on the banks of the 

river Severn, and is within 3 minutes walk of the Railway Station, 

Post Office, Cattle and General Markets. 



ORDINARY Ofl TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS. 



SPECIAL CONTRACTS FOR PRIVATE DINNERS. 
First-class Rooms for Commercial Gentlemen. 



REFRESHMENT CATERER. 



Visitors may rely upon every attention, and moderate charges. 



J. BRAY, 

PROPRIETOR. 



SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION FOR FOREIGN BOYS. 




en 
> 
O 


5 

Q . 



rt . 

o 2 
^ 



O -3 
K ;j 
O 3^ 



w 

O 




WM. R. HUSSEY, 
la^ Tailoring E^abli^ge 

WYLE COP, SHREWSBURY. 



.;&.jl. ijespecffullY sblicifs orders foij ifie ensuing 



THE STOCK is LARGE. 

THE LATEST STYLES. 

AND ENTIRELY NEW. 



PERFECTION OF STYLE AND FIT GUARANTEED, 

Combined with the very best Workmanship at prices which defy Competition, and 
must command a large Trade. 



OUR .NEW 



ARE CAREFULLY SELECTED FROM THE MOST FASHIONABLE RANGES OF 

Gbeviots, Saxonies, anfc Dicunas. 

VERY CHOICE SUITS at 60/- IRISH AND SCOTCH SUITINGS at SO/- 

THE NEW RAGING OR FIELD COAT IN DRABS, WATERPROOF, VENETIAN & TWEED, 
FROM 38/- TO 65/- 



-*^i- TROUSERINGS, -i^- 

Durable, Stylish, and the latest Woollen Fabrics from 12/6 upwards, fitting perfectly. 

SPECIALITY ffnickerbocfters & JBreecbes maDe in tbe latest 6tle. 

WM. R. HUSSEY, 18 WYLE COP. 



ESTABLISHED 1325. 




Brown, 



GOLDEN CANISTER TEA STORES, 

BOROUGH PROVISION STORES, 

1 HIGH STREET, 

SHREWSBURY. 



OUR RICH 

CHINA, + INDIA + AND -i- CEYLON 




STILL MAINTAIN THEIR REPUTATION FOR 

PURITY, STRENGTH 4, FLAVOUR. 



OUR 




ARE SPLENDID VALUE, 
Best on the Market; always perfectly Fresh from the Roast & Mill. 



AGENTS FOR -f 

W. & A. GILBEY'S WINES & SPIRITS. 

LISTS ON APPLICATION. 
STORE PRICES FOR CASH. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 



Form L9-50m-7,'54 (5990) 444 



g 
rs. 



Y. 



Sole Agents for the Celebrated Bluthner Pianos. 



E. F. ALLEN & Sox.s respectfully beg to inform the Public that from the 
fact of this Branch being under the personal supervision of Mr. Au 
it is a sufficient- guarantee that all business entrusted to him will be thoi 
and efficiently carried out. 



THE LIBRARY 



DA 



Bradley - 



' ^fii .n 

' Jl v 



^ t\ 




DA 
690