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Full text of "New Hampshire, lake region inscriptions : Whiteface Intervale, Sandwich, Perkins ground, New Durham, further memorials of Meredith"

44 

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Copy 1 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Lake Region Inscriptions: 
WHITEFACE INTERVALE, SANDWICH. 

PERKINS GROUND, NEW DURHAM. 
FURTHER MEMORIALS OF MEREDITH. 




Class. 
Book 






NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Lake Region Inscriptions : 
WHITEFACE INTERVALE, SANDWICH. 

PERKINS GROUND, NEW DURHAM. 
FURTHER MEMORIALS OF MEREDITH. 




WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS : , r y 

PUBLISHED BY FRANKLIN P. RICE 

// 

1900. 



Fifty Copies Printed. 



6^4 



69784 



CATURDAY, September 2d, 1893, at half-past ten in 
the forenoon, we left Wolfborough on the steamer 
Lady of the Lake, bound for Centre Harbor. We made 
our way toward our destination in the face of a strong 
northeast wind and lowering clouds, and our prediction of 
a coming storm of tvvo or three days' duration seemed 
fully justified after a brief consultation with the veteran 
pilot Lovett, whose long experience rendered him wise in 
weather matters. We descended from the pilot-house 
mentally resolving to seek a safe retreat as we made land, 
and there await clear skies and a more genial atmosphere 
before we pursued our journey further northward. But 
scarcely had we taken a turn of the boat before the wind 
shifted, and, after changing from one quarter to another, 
settled in the northwest, the clouds broke and rapidly 
drifted away, and by the time we reached the landing the 
sun was the unresisted monarch of the mountain and the 
lake. 

Nothing was now in the way of carrying out our original 
intention to reach upper Sandwich, and the region made 
classic by Belles, that night, and, after a dinner at the hotel 
near by, of which the less said the sooner forgotten, we 
secured seats in the stage-coach, and soon were travelling 
rapidly around Red Hill on the road to Moultonborough. 
Our companions in the coach were two or three substan- 
tial citizens of Sandwich returning at the end of the week 
from "down country" to their homes, and a bibulous 



individual, whose frequent resort to a well-filled bottle, 
pressing importunity to share its contents, and occasional 
witty retort, distracted our attention at times from the 
glories of the autumnal afternoon that gave an additional 
charm to the region through which we were passing. 

Proceeding over the travelled route to Centre Sandwich, 
a change was made to a mail wagon, the large coach going 
no further. In this vehicle we were the only passengers, 
and the transit to North Sandwich Post Office was quickly 
made. Here we were to leave the public stage and pursue 
the remainder of our journey by private conveyance. 
While waiting for the postmaster (with whom we had ne- 
gotiated to take us on our way) to sort the mail, a fisher- 
man appeared with a string of brook trout the like of 
which our Massachusetts eyes had never before seen. 
Whether he was a genuine disciple of the gentle Izaak, or 
was influenced by grosser motives, we did not ascertain, 
but he was of a sufficiently conventional type to give the 
stereotyped reply, "over there," with a motion of his fore- 
finger that indicated fully a third of the circle of the hori- 
zon, in response to our inquiry as to where he obtained 
such beauties. 

As the day waned the chill increased until it became 
really cold, and we began to experience the effects of one 
of those sharp changes in the weather so characteristic of 
New England, but which are especially marked among 
the mountains. Just at sunset we started on our four-mile 
drive, behind a fine span that maintained an even pace, up 
hill and down, to the end. From the top of the high hill 
a mile or more on our way we saw the full grandeur of the 
Sandwich Range from Chocorua to the " Dome" stand out 
in the twilight, the cleft head of old Whiteface right in front 
being conspicuous, but the depths of the immense basin 



that intervened between us and its rugged sides were al- 
ready lost in darkness, through which twinkled the early- 
lamps of the small settlement at its base. We made the 
descent over the steep and hazardous road, and a few 
minutes later drew up before the hospitable door of Mr. 
William McCrillis, the principal resident and owner at the 
"Intervale." In the sitting room we found a cheerful fire 
in the open fireplace and a cordial welcome to the circle 
gathered, which included several who were, like ourselves, 
strangers and pilgrims. The cheerful warmth and a good 
supper dissipated the temporary feeling of discomfort 
incident to our cold ride, but a night's rest was needed to 
relieve our fatigue after the long and hard journey of the 
day. Our sleeping apartments were in a small cottage 
adjacent to the main dwelling, and thither we retired, our 
demur at lockless doors and the absence of other city safe- 
guards creating some amusement among the members of 
the family and the other guests. 

Sunday morning we awoke in full realization of the 
poet's expression : 

" Through Sandwich notch the west-wind sang 
Good morrow to the cotter"; 

but, though the breeze sighed mournfully around the 
house, and at times assumed a menacing tone, we were out 
soon after sun-up, enjoying the scene before us. In front 
the broad green Intervale, level as a floor, stretched to the 
distance of nearly a mile, abruptly bounded on the north 
by the Sandwich peaks running nearly from east to west 
— the unique and ever-changing Chocorua, the lowly 
Paugus or Toad-back, the commanding heads of Passa- 
conaway (highest of the range) and Whiteface, the mass- 
ive Sandwich Dome or Black Mountain, with Mount Israel 
close by — all together made a picture which once seen 



could never be effaced from memory. The air at first 
chill, almost frosty, soon had a tonic effect, and we went 
in to breakfast only to return and remain out of doors the 
entire day. 

Succeeding days until the 13th of September were 
passed on this highland farm, a period of great benefit and 
enjoyment, mentally and physically. At an elevation of 
about eleven hundred feet, the Intervale affords practically 
all the natural attractions and advantages of the popular 
mountain resorts without their artificial accompaniments. 
The land, divided into two or three farmsteads, is held in 
possession of descendants of the original settlers. The 
grandfather of William McCrillis came to this place late 
in the eighteenth century, and here representatives of the 
family remain to-day, offshoots of that Scotch Presbyterian 
stock that peopled southern portions of New Hampshire 
at an earlier period. Full evidence of this is presented 
in both the fore- and surnames on the stones in the 
little graveyard on the Intervale, a list of which is here 
preserved. 

Mr. McCrillis (now deceased) was a man of intelligence 
and ability, his mind well-stocked with practical informa- 
tion, and we are greatly indebted to him for knowledge 
gained. Mrs. McCrillis will ever have a warm place in our 
memories, not only for her possession of those womanly 
qualities that mark the true lady, but for her genuine and 
kindly interest in the happiness and welfare of her guests. 
With the family, which comprised three generations, and 
the several guests, we passed the time pleasantly, and left 
the place with real regret. 

Of the novel experiences while here, the chief and never- 
to-be-forgotten one was our ascent of Whiteface, under- 
taken and achieved on Saturday, the 9th of September, 



with a party of six, under the leadership of the Rev. Frank 
S. Adams, of Reading, Massachusetts, (since gathered to 
the silent majority), who had made the ascent before. 
The distance from the McCrillis house to the top is four 
miles by the path, although the buildings when viewed 
from the Intervale seem to stand right at the base of the 
niountain. The path, which passes over the west ridge, 
is rough and steep, and half of the way maintains an ex- 
acting angle over ledges with steps breast-high at some 
places, making the climb difficult, slow, and exhausting 
to those new to the work. The front of Whitcface from 
the summit to within a point two-thirds down its surface 
is hollowed into an immense bowl, the result of a landslide 
that occurred early in this century, and the cleft at the top 
gives the appearance of two peaks when seen from certain 
points. The mountain is in VVaterville, just over the line 
of Sandwich. Its height, as given in the guide-books, is 
4007 feet, a little under that of Passaconaway, whose sum- 
mit seems but a step away. Except the satisfaction of 
saying that you have been there, the view from the top 
does not repay the required effort to reach it, compared 
with what may be had from Chocorua (which we climbed 
a year later) at less expenditure. But the mountain in 
itself is a grand study, and is one of the most wonderful 
features of the Sandwich Range. An acquaintance with 
one such would furnish to an appreciative mind food 
for contemplation to last a year ; yet we met parties of 
"climbers" from the cities who were going through the 
whole system in a week, running up and down the moun- 
tains like rats. 

Most of our visit at the Intervale was during the day- 
time passed in the open air. Mornings and evenings we 
took a singular satisfaction in piling slab-wood (which here 



8 

was sold at fifty cents a cord) on the open fire in the sit- 
ting-room, and seeing it burn, and enjoying its genial 
influence. Other intervals of time were filled up in ex- 
ploring the nearby region, in gathering vials of fir balsam 
from the trees, and in a visit to the sap-orchard for which 
the McCrillis farm has been for many years famous. The 
product of the several hundred trees, some of which had 
been tapped for more than fifty years, according to figures 
given by the owner, was over ninety thousand pounds of 
sugar and syrup — enough to return a small fortune in 
money. 

The reading while at the Intervale of Frank Bolles's 
At the North of Bearcamp Water — with the scenes and 
characters of which we were destined to become better 
acquainted the next year — was doubly interesting in the 
presence of the grand object-lesson of the region he so 
minutely and vividly describes. 

In the work of copying the inscriptions in the burial 
ground Mr. McCrillis was greatly interested, and to him we 
are indebted for the genealogical notes concerning the 
McCrillis and Foss families, and for other information. 

We made our homeward journey on Wednesday, the 
13th of September, by the route we had come. The only 
passenger in the coach beside ourselves was a lad from 
Maine, who was making his way to Chicago, mostly on 
foot, to visit the Columbian Exposition. He took to the 
road again at Centre Harbor. We crossed the Lake to 
the Weirs, and as the train bore us away, our backward 
glance from the car-window caught the double head of 
old Whiteface rising above the top of Red Hill. 



Whiteface Inscriptions. 



With Genealogical Notes 

on the 

FOSS AND McCRILLIS FAMILIES. 



Whiteface Inscriptions. 



2^ can. 



1. Rebecca, j wife of | Dea. John Bean, | Died | May 22, 
1845,7^.56. 

Jesus said unto her, I am the resur- 
rection, and the life; he that believeth 
in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live. 

JScnnctt. 

2. Abner Bennett, | Died Nov. 17, 1871, | M. 72 yrs. 3 mos. 
26 ds. 

We have said farewell to Father, 
For the last time clasped his hand; 
He has gone to join his loved ones, 
In that brighter, happier land. 
Heaven retaineth now our treasure, 
Earth the lonely casket keeps; 
And the sunbeams love to linger, 
Where our precious Father sleeps. 

3. Sarah P. | wife of Abner Bennett, | Died Aug. 28, 1883, 
I N.. 79 yrs. 7 mos. 6 ds. 

One dear friend has drooped and faded, 

One sweet voice has fled ; 
One sweet brow the grave has shaded. 

Our dear Mother now is dead. 

She has gone to Heaven before us, 

See, she turns with outstretched hands; 

Pointing to the glorious beauties, 
Of that bright eternal land. 

iSurlctfif). 

4. Freeman L. Burleigh | Died Nov. 20, 1850, | /E. 20 y'rs, 
2 m's. 

5. Sarah A. Burleigh | Died | May 15, 1870, | M. 34 yrs. 
ID ms. 



12 

6-7- William Burleigh, | Died | Oct. 20, 185 1, | JE. 65 y'rs, 
7 mo's. I Dolly | His Wife, | Died Sept. 15, 1864, ^. 68 y'rs, 4 
mo's. 

8. Wm. H. Burleigh | Died | Jan. 15, 1847, I ^- 22 y'rs. 

9. Betsey Chase | wife of | William Chase, | Died | Mar. 11, 
1848, I JE. 74. 

10. William Chase, | Died | Aug. 3, 1863, | AL. 89. 
11-14. Oliver K. died | Jan. 27, 1864, | JE. 10. | Nancy A. 

died I Jan. 26, 1864, | JE. 8. | Martha E. died | Jan. 26, 1864, 
I JE. 5. I Lydia a. died | Jan. 29, 1864, | JE. 3 y'rs. | Children 
of Lemuel | & B. S. Chase. 

15. Sacred | to the memory of | Mrs. Peggy | Wife of Capt. 
I Stephen Fellows, Jr. | who died June | 9, 1823 aged | 38 years. 

How transient is the life of man 
At most a brief contracted span. 

iFoflfl. 

16. Emeline S. I Wife of | Stephen N. Fogg, | Died | June 
29, 1843. I JE. 26. 

Calm on the bosom of thy God, 
Fair spirit rest thee now; 
E'en while with us thy footsteps trod, 
His seal was on thy brow. 

17. Dolly, | wife of | Isaac Foss, | Died | Apr. 28, 1859, | 
JE. 86. 

18. Isaac Foss, | Died | April 8, 1854 | JE. 80. 

19. [John B. Foss, who died in 189 1, is buried here.] 

20. Louisa J. | Wife of | John B. Foss, | Died | Jan. 25, 1881, 
I JEt. 69 yrs. 3 mos. 

21. Miss I Sarah Foss, | Died | Nov. 27, 1825 | aged 36 
years. 

22. Sarah L. | Dau. of John B. & | Louisa J. Foss, | Died | 
Aug. 25, 1861, I ^t. II yrs. 3 mos. 



13 
JFoUjlfr. 

23. Fidelia, | Wife of | O. P. Fowler, | Died | Mar. 2, 1871. 
I ^t. 40 y'rs & 6 mos. 

(Sfrant. 

[Several members of the Grant family are buried here.] 

flatten, 

24. Andrew M. Hacketi', | Died | Mar. 24, 1859, | M. 36, 

25. Anson M. Hackett, | Died | May 13, 1841, | JE. 15. 

26. Hannah Hackett, | Died | Sept. 15, 1841, | JE. 2 y'rs. 

27. Hannah M. Hackeit, | Died | Oct. 15, 1840, | AL. 43. 

Father I will that they also whom | thou hast given me, be with 
me where I am. — Jesus. 

28. Hiram Hackeit, | Died | Sept. 2, 1854, | AL. 26 yrs & 
10 mo. 

Suns and stars may pale aw-ay; 
Mortal man must turn to clay : 
But spirits which to men are given. 
Through Christ immortal shine in heaven. 

29. John Hackett, | Died | Mar. 16, 1855, | JE. 6;^. 

30. Lucy M. Hackett, | Died | June 18, 1841, | JE. 23. 

31. Mary J. Hackett, | Died | Aug. 31, 1862, | JE. 31. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. — Rev. 14: 13. 

32. William Hackeit, | Died | April 2, 1841, | ^. 4 y'rs & 
9 mo. 

33-34. Father Mother | Winthrop Hadley, | Died | Nov. 
8, 1886, I JE. 88 yrs. 

At rest. 

Sybbel Worthen I Wife of Winthrop Hadley, | Died | April 
24, 1882, I JE. 83 yrs. 

Gone home. 

35. Julia A. Hadley, ( Died | May 14, 1856, | JE. 26. 

JetoelL 

36. Alvah Jewell, | Died | May 2, 1856 | JE. 37. 

Bcnncg. 

37. Nancy B. Kenney | wife of j Daniel R. Kenney | Died | 
May 16, 1853 I JE. 35. 



H 

38. Abigail, | Wife of | Neal McCrillis, | Died | Oct. 19, 
1879 I JEt. 80 yrs. 6 mos. | & 14 dys. 

39-40. Father & Mother. | Andrew McCrillis | Died | in 
Rochester, N. H. | June 19, 1872, | ^t. 71 yrs. 3 mos. | Mary 
C. McCrillis | Died | in Rochester, N. H. | Jan. 8, 1859, | .^t. 

55 yrs. 

There is rest in Heaven 
We rest togather 

41. Francella, I daughter of | William & | M. S. McCrillis 
I Died I Aug, 14, 1855, | JE. 3 yrs. 4 mo. | & 5 d'ys. 

42. Sacred | to the memory of | Mr. | Henry McCrillis | 
who died August | 15, 18 14 in the | 67th year of | his age. 

43. Margaret | Relict of the late | Henry McCrillis, | Died 
I Apr. 5, 1855 I JE. 97. 

44. Mary N. | daughter of Neal & | Abigail McCrillis, | Died 
I Sept. 10, 1841, I JE. 18. 

Mary hath chosen that good part, | that shall never be taken 
away from her. LuKE lO: 12. 

45. Miss I Nancy | McCrillis, died | July 3, 1833 | JE. 36 
yrs. 10 m. 

46. Neal McCrillis | Died | Dec. 2, 1878, | -^t. 86 yrs. 9 
mos. & 2 dys. 

47. Sacred | to the memory | of William | McCrillis Son 
I of David & Sally | McCrillis who | Died April nth | 1815 | 

Aged 3 years. 

48. [William McCrillis, resident at Whiteface Intervale at 
the time these Inscriptions were copied in 1893, has since de- 
ceased and is buried in this ground.] 

49. In memory of | Andrew | McGaffey | who died Aug. | 
20, A. D. 1825 I aged 82 years. 

[A revolutionary soldier.] 

50. Apphia, I Wife of | Eliphalet McGaffey, | Died | July 22, 
1883, I ^t. 85 yrs. 3 mos. | & 8 ds. 

51. Delia Louisa, | daughter of | Elden & | M. McGaffey. | 
Died Aug. 6, 1855, | ^. 2 y'rs i mo. & 20 d. 



15 

52-53- Father Mother | Elden McGaffey | Died | Aug. 9, 
1859, I rE. 40 yrs. | Mehitable | Wife of | Elden McGaffey | 
Died I Jan. 28, 1890, | JE. 74 yrs. 

54. Eliphalet McGaffey | Died | Jan. 2, 1881, | ^t. 8oy'rs, 
8 mos. I & 14 ds. 

55. Fr.'^nklin, I Son of | Elden & Mehitable | McGaffey | 
Died I Jan. 19, 1850, | JE. 2 months & | 15 days. 

56. Ida Anna, | daughter of | Elden & | M. McGaffey, | Died 
I Sept. 12, 1852 I JE. I year & 2 mo. 

57. Irene McGaffey, | Died | Sept. 11, 1888, | JE. 74 yrs. 

58. John | son of | Josiah S. and | Mary McGaffey | died | 
Feb. II, 1832 I JE. 4 years. 

59. Josiah S. McGaffey, | Died | Mar. 21, 1842, | JE. 56. 

60. Louisa McGaffey, | Died | Mar. 13, 1853, | JE. 27. 

61. Lydia, I wife of I Sam'l McGaffey, | Died | June 20, 1844, 
1 JE. 78. 

62. Neal McGaffey, Esq. | Died | Nov. 30, 1852, | JE. 63. 

63. Peggy McGaffey, | Wife of | Neal McGaffey, | Died | 
April 2, i860, I JE. 72. 

64. In Memory | of | Mr. Samuel McGaffey, ( who died | 
May 25, 1832, I In the 73d year of his age. 

[A branch of the McGaffey family settled in Auburn, Mass.] 

65. Emily, | Wife of | Jonathan M. Morrison, | & daughter 
of I Eliphalet & | Apphia McGaffey, | Died | Aug. 28, 1869, | 
JE. 43 yrs & 8 mo. 

66. Eliza H. | dau. of | R. M. & L. J. | Penniman | Died | 
Feb. 9, 1870 I JE. 24. 

67. ISABELL I daughter of | Robert M. & | L. J. Penniman | 
Died I Nov. 21, 1859 | JE. 3 yrs. 8 mos. & 3 d. 

68-69. King N. | Died Jan. 19, 1863 | JE. 4 yrs. & 9 mos. | 
Infant son | Died Nov. 18, 1863 | ^. 16 days. | Children of R. 
M. & L. J. Penniman. 

70. Lydia J. | Wife of | Robert M. Penniman | Died | Dec. 
7, 1882, I JE. 61 yrs. 



i6 

71. Polk Penniman | Son of | R. M. & L. J. | Penniman | 
Died I Sept. 22, 185 1 | JE. 3 years. 

72. Robert M. Penniman | Died | Nov. 22, 1875 | ^. 55 
yrs. & 1 1 mos. 

73. Sacred | to the memory | of | Caleb Philbrick, | who 
died Apr. 15 | 1831, | aged 22 years | 2 mo. 

74. Mary | Wife of | Samuel Quimby | Died | Jan. 3, 1866 

1^.71. 

She being dead yet speaketh. 

75. Samuel Quimby | Died | April 15, 1874 | JE. 80. 

76. Daniel Rowe | died | Nov. 30, 1845, JE. 78. 

77. Fannie, | wife of David B. Row^e, | Died | July 16, i860, 
I iEt. 5 7y'rs. 

78. Jane Rowe | wife of | Daniel Rowe, | Died | Mar. 27, 
1852,^. 75. 

79. Betsey, | wife of | Nehemiah Webster, | Died | June 24, 

1884 I JE. 87. 

She is not dead but sleepeth. 

80. John F. Webster, | Died | July 20, i860, | JE. 20. 

81. Nehemiah Webster, | Died | Nov. 2, 1866, | JE. 77. 

82. Sewell B. Webster, | Died | April 20, 1882, | .^t. 54 

yrs. 

Asleep in Jesus blessed sleep. 



17 



FAMILY OF ISAAC FOSS. 



Isaac Foss, b. April 4, 1774 ; d. April 8, 1854. 
Dorothy Batchelder, his wife, b. Feb. 13, 1773 ; d. April 28, 
1859- » 

Children : 

Abigail, b. April 5, 1799 ; m. Neal McCrillis. 

Peggy, b. Nov. 3, 1800. 

Jonathan, b. Nov. 9, 1802. 

Hannah, b. Nov. 6, 1804. 

Betsey, b. Feb. 7, 1807 ; d. Dec. 11, 1828. 

John, b. Nov. 25, 1812. 



i8 



McCRILLIS FAMILY. 



Henry McCrillis, b. Jan. 20, 1747 ; d. Aug. 15, 1814. He m. 
[probably in 1776] Margaret McGaffey. She was. b. Feb. 27, 
1758 and d. April 5, 1855. They removed sometime between 
the years 1790 and 1800 from Epsom, N. H. to Sandwich and 
settled at Whiteface Intervale. 

Children : 

Jane, b. April 5, 1777 ; d. Oct. 17, 1814 ; m. Philbrick. 

John, b. Dec. 30, 1779 ; d. Sept. 18, 1854 ; m. Furber, and 
2d, . 

Henry, b. Sept. 4, 1781 ; d. ; m. Cox (widow). 

David, b. Sept. 14, 1783 ; d. , 1871 ; m. Veasey. 

William, b. !Bept. 13, 1785 ; d. Nov. 4, 1809, unm. 

Peggy, b. Dec. 22, 1787 ; d. April 2, 1859 ; m. McC^affey. 

James, b. May 14, 1790; d. Aug. 5, 1819. 

Neal, b. March 31, 1792; d. Dec. 3, 1878; m. Abigail 
Foss. [Parents of William, below.] 

Mary, b. April 5, 1794 ; d. Jan. 3, 1876 ; m. Sam'l Quimby. 

Nancy, b. Sept. 15, 1796 ; d. July 3, 1833, unm. 

Elizabeth, b. Jan. 25, 1799 ; d. Oct. 22, 1882 ; m. Doten. 

Andrew, b. March 27, 1801 ; d. June 19, 1872 ; m. Webster. 



William McCrillis, son of Neal and Abigail (Foss), b. April 30, 
1821 ; m. Jan. 28, 185 i Mary S. Watson of Tamworth, who 
was b. May 25, 1825. 

Children : 
Francella, b. April 9, 1852 ; d. 1855. 
Abby O., b. Feb. 3, 1854. 
Mary F., b. June 15, 1856. 
Alonzo, b. Aug. 2, 1858. 
Sarah L., b. Jan. 30, 1863. 
William Neal, b. Oct. 6, 1868. 



Perkins Burial Ground. 

NEW DURHAM (north part). 



[Copied September i, 1893.] 



Perkins Burial Ground, 

NEW DURHAM (north part). 



3|crtiius. 

1. William Perkins | Died | Aug. 4, 1858, | ^t. 84 yrs. 

Death is certain — the hour unseen. 
[Probably born in Rochester.] 

2. Rachel | Wife of | William Perkins | Died | Mar. 28, 
1837, I YEt. 63. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 
[Maiden name Varrel.] 

3. Deborah | Second wife of | William Perkins | Died | Oct. 
26, 1848 I /E. 70 yrs. 

Resting in hope of a glorious resurrection. 



[Children of William and Rachel Perkins :] 

4. Willl^m Perkins, Jr., | Died | Aug. 25, 1826 | ^t. 25 yrs. 

Gone but not forgotten. 

5. Zacheus S. Perkins | Died | March 16, 1876 | ^t. 80 yrs, 

9 mos. 

His toils are past, his work is done. 

And he is fully blest; 
He fought the light — the victory won, 

And enters into rest. 

[Other children of William and Rachel Perkins, buried else- 
where, were : Betsey, m. Charles Hardy ; Sarah, ni. Solomon 
Horn ; Tryphena, m. Micajah Bryant ; Rachel Ferguson, m. 
George Felton ; Mary Berry, m. Nathan W. Goddard ; Edward, 
Thomas J. and Andrew J.] 



22 

6. Betsey | Wife of | Z. S. Perkins, | Died | Dec. 7, 1880, | 
JEt. 83 yrs, 1 1 mos. 

Dearest Mother, thou hast left us, 

Here thy loss we deeply feel; 
But 'tis God that hath bereft us. 

He can all our sorrows heal. 
[Maiden name Caverly.] 

[Children of Z. S. and Betsey Perkins :] 

7. Charles | SonofZ. S. & | Betsey Perkins | Died | Aug. 12, 
1828, I JEt. 3 yrs. 

Early plucked as early bliss. 

8. Mary Ellen | youngest daughter of Z. S. and Betsey Per- 
kins, I Died I May 20, 1857, | ^t. 15 y'rs, 9 mo. 

In the morning of life she passed away, 
From among the household band; 
Her Father called and she could not stay, 
From her home in the better land. 

9. Susie A. Perkins | Died | Oct. 6, | 1884, | ^t. 54 yr's i 

mo. I & 1 1 ds. 

Gentle Susie, thou hast left us. 

For a home so bright and fair; 
And our hearts are sad and lonely 

For thy kind and loving care. 

10. Sarah H. Perkins, | Died | Oct. 14, 1887, | ^t. 65 y'rs, 

6 mo. 

A precious one from us has gone, 

A voice we loved is stilled ; 
A place is vacant in our home, 

Which never can be filled. 

11. Elizabeth R. | wife of Levi L. Chick, | Died | May 5, 
1887, I ^t. 59 y'rs, 6 mo. 

Rock of ages, cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in thee. 
We miss thee everywhere. 
[Elizal^eth-Rachel, dau. of Z. S. and Betsey Perkins.] 

[Other children were : Mary H. (m. Solomon Rice and died 
Feb. 20, 1840) ; Benjamin, Daniel, Thomas, George-Newell 
and Jane.] 

Lore. 



X 



Further 

Memorials of Meredith, 



In 1 89 1 a small edition of a fourteen-page pamphlet entitled 
Memorials of Meredith, New Hampshire, was published by the 
compiler of these pages, who was informed by the Librarian of 
the New Hampshire Historical Society that it was the first sep- 
arate publication relating to the history of that town. The In- 
scriptions here printed were copied on the 19th of June, 1892, 
and it seemed proper to include them in the same covers with 
the New Durham and Sandwich inscriptions gathered the follow- 
ing year. 



Further 

Memorials of Meredith. 



BURIAL GROUND 

about one mile from Meredith Village, on a lane just off the main road to 
Centre Harbor. 



1. Sacred | to the memory | of David H. | son of John and 
I Hannah Bachelder | who departed | this life | April 4th | 1822 
I M 2 years & 9 months. 

2. In memory of | Eliza A. | dau^ of John & | Hannah 
Bachelder | who died [ Sept. 15,1836 | M. 23 yrs. 3 mo. | & 15 
d's. 

3. In memory of | Hannah | wife of John Bachelder ( & 
daughter of David | & Hannah Hobson | who died Jan. 30, | 
1837, I M 56 yrs. 

4. Susannah I daughter of John | & Hannah Bachelder | 
died Oct. i, 1826. | M. 2 years 8 ms. | & 6 days. 

JSartktt. 

5. Sacred | to the memory of | Mr. | Abiel Bartlett | who 
died August 16 | 18 16 | aged 67 years. 

Retire my friend, dry up your tears 
I must ly here till Christ appears, 
And at his coming hope to have 
A joyful rising from the grave. 



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6. Sacred to | the memory of Mrs. | Maria | wife of Abiel 
Bartlett | who died April 2, | 1826 | aged 76 years. 

7. in I memory of | Salome Corliess, | who died Sept. 25, | 
1816 I aged 2 yrs. 6 months. 

So, blighted by disease & death 
The lovly youth resigns her breath 

8. Ephraim Cram | died June 29, | 1839 I ^ ^9 years | & 6 
mo. 

9. In I memory | of Mary | wife of | Ephraim Cram | who 
died I March 25, | 1826 | Aged 72 years 

10. In I memory of | Hannah Gennis, | died Jun. 6, 1837, 
I in the 44 year | of her age 

Traveller as you pass by 
As you are now so once was I 
As I am now so you must be 
Prepare to die and follow me 

11. Mrs. Hannah | wife of David Hobson, | died Jan. 14, 
1825 ; I aged 83 years. 

12. Moses Kenny | died j July 23, 185 1, | M. 74. 

Hane* 

13. James W. Lane | died | Apr. 11, 1836 | vE. 32 yr. & 9 
mo. 

14. Wn.LARD I son of J. W. & | Nancy Lane | died | Dec. 15, 
1835 I ^. 5 yrs & 2 m. 

[The above on one stone.] 

UraiJitt. 

15. Daniel I son of I Nehemiah & j Nancy Leavitt | died 
Oct. 18, I 1816 I aged 2 yrs 4 mo. 



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1 6. John D. Leavitt, | Died | Mar. 27, 1866 | JE. 39. 

Affliction sore, long time he bore, 

Physicians strove in vain 
Till God was pleased to give him ease 
And take away his pain. 
[He was injured by the falling of the floor of the town hall in Meredith, 
March 11, 1855, and died from the effects eleven years after.] 

17. JosiAH P, I son of I Nehemiah & | Nancy Leavitt | died 
Dec. II, I 1818 I aged 6 years. 

18. Mrs. I Nancy | wife of | Nehemiah Leavitt Jr. | died Aug. 
5, 1829 I Aged 41 yrs. | 8 mos. 

19. Nancy P. | daughter of | Nehemiah Leavitt Jr. | & Nancy 
Leavitt | died Feb. 26, | 1836, | JE. 17 years & 3 m. 

20. Nehemiah Leaviit, Jr. | Died | Aug. 20, 1850 | M. 6^. 

Here to thy bosom mother earth, 

Take back in peace what thou hast given : 

And all that is of humanity born 
O God in peace recall to heaven. 

prescott. 

21. Mrs. Hannah | wife of | Reuben M. Prescott | died 
March 19, 1834, | aged 23 years | Daughter of John | & Hannah 

Bachelder 

So fades the lovely blooming flower, 
Frail smiling solace of an hour 

So must our transient comforts fly 
And pleasures only bloom to die. 

22. Reuben M. Prescott Esq. | died March 23, | 1830 | 
aged 32 years. 

23. In I Memory of | David Robinson, | who died | Feb. 14, 

1834, I M. 75. 

No darkness now obscures his mind. 

The darkness all is left behind; 
And objects lately half concealed 

In full resplendance stand reveal'd. 

24. In I Memory of | Elizabeth, wife of | David Robinson, 
who I died Nov. 19, 1833, | JE. 70. 

She feels no pain, she fears no want. 
Her portion's all that God can grant. 

She sees the Saviour as he is, 

And dwells in heaven with him & his. 



SEP 3 1900 



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25. James | Towle | died Nov. 28, | 1815 | ^ 78 y'rs | 

26. Tryphena I Towle | died Dec. 2 | 1815, | JE 68 y'rs. 

[These on a double stone.] 

27. Horace Twichell | died | Oct. 17, 1844 | ^ 27 y's 4 



d's. 



TOWLE BURIAL GROUND. 

By the roadside, about one mile from Meredith Village, on the old 
road to Centre Harbor. 



1. Lavinia Towle | died | March 25, 1800 [ aged 3 years 

2. John W. Towle | died | Oct. 30th 1800 | aged 2 months 

3. Lettice Towle | died | Feb. 4, 1804 | aged 4 days 

4. Lavinia Towle | died | July 22, 1804 | aged 2 years | & 
3 months 

5. In Memory of | Mary Towle | who died | Nov. 27, 1815 
I aged 8 years 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



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