(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Newmark's anniversary industrial expostion in celebrating of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Newark, New Jersey"

Pass F f 44 
Rnnk M U( 7 2 . 



*^OFFICIAL PROGRAMME^ 

NEWUnti AHNIVERSA 
INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

▼• MAY l3''-JUNEy' 1916 




In Celebration of 

The 250th Anniversary 

of the Settlement of Newark, New Jersey 



lO Cents 







REO 2 TON TRUCK 

Chassis, $1700, Complete — ^Delivered 
With Driver's Seat and Cab 

SWING THE AXE ON THE 
HIGH COST OF DELIVERIES 

THE YEARS OF SERVICE ARE 
BUILT IN AND GUARANTEED 

CATALOG UPON REQUEST 

REO MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Factory Branch for New Jersey 

37-39 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Telephones Mulberry 3030-3031 




REO QUICK DELIVERY 



$1,120 Complete— Delivere<' with Body, Top, Windshield, 
Electric Sta) i;er and Lights 



immB ^ a^a^B 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 

INDUSTRIAL 
EXPOSITION 

In Celebration of tKe 2504i Anni\)ersary 
of Axe Settlement of Newark, Klew Jersey 



€1 




Auspices of the Committee of One Hundred 
Direction of Manufactures and Trades Committee 

MANUFACTURES AND TRADES COMMITTEE 

AUGUSTUS V. HAMBURG, Chairman. EDWARD E. GNICHTEL, Treasurer 

J. SMITH, Jr. R. C. JENKINSON F. L. EBERHARDT 

R. A. HENSLER R. DENBIGH 

MERLE LEACH DOWNS. Managing Director 



J.J. SCANNELL, Publisher, Paterson, New Jersey 



FIRST REGIMENT ARMORY 
MAT 13fK to JUNE 3rcl, 1916 



\ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiii 



.NC]S|72 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



H. D. INIiNOR, Proprietor 



NANKIN GARDEN 

Restaurant Company 

"America's Greatest Oriental Restaurant" 




CABARET de LUXE from 7:00 to 12 p. m. 



Private dining room 

For Banquets and 
Theatre Parties 



SOCIETY DANCE 

Every Evening except 
Saturday and Sunday 



The first restaurant to be awarded 100% by Newark's Board of Trade 
MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR FRIDAY NIGHT CARNIVAL 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

ANNIVERSARY PROGRAM (MAY 1st TO OCTOBER SOtii) 129 

COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED (List) 13 

COMMITTEE OF FIFTY (List) 125 

EXPOSITION— Building 103 

Exhibitors (Alphabetic List) 115 

Floor Plans 105-107 

Program 109 

HISTORY OF NEWARK 17 

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 137 

MAYORS OF NEWARK (Terms of Office and Pliotos) 93-95 

NEWARK'S— Churches 61 

Fire Department 89 

Park System 69 

Police Department 83 

Schools 53 

THE INDUSTRIAL CITY ( Newark) 33 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON 5 

FRANKLIN MURPHY 7 

UZAL H. McCARTER 9 

OFFICERS, COMMITTEE of ONE HUNDRED ii 

AUGUSTUS V. HAMBURG 15 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, HANUFACTURES AND TRADES 

COMMITTEE 97 

MEMBERS, MANUFACTURES AND TRADES COMMITTEE 99 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE, MANUFACTURES AND TRADES 

COMMITTEE 101 

NEWARK— First Map of 21 

First Picture of 25 

Birds-eye View of, 1790 29 

Birds-eye View of, 1892 31 

Birds-eye Views of, 1916 45-47-49-51 

City Buildings 35-37-39-41 

Group of Churches 67 

Group of Schools 59 , 

DR. ADDISON B. POLAND 53 : 

REV. FR. JOHN A. DILLON 57 ' 

MICHAEL T. LONG 83 

PAUL J. MOORE 89 

REV. AARON BURR 63 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




A "THATCHER" Combination 
Range for Coal and Gas in- 
sures a Cool Kitchen all Sum- 
mer with the latest improve- 
ments for Cooking Comfort. 



The "Thatcher" Newark Plant in 1916 



A "Thatcher" House 
Heater insures a 
warm house all winter 



We are proud of Newark's growth and of the part that 

Thatcher 

has taken in it. Three generations of Newark housewives have learned to depend on 
"Thatcher" Heaters and Kitchen Ranges — since 1850 

THATCHER FURNACE COMPANY 

General Offices and E^xhibit Rooniis: 131-137 AVEST 3oTH ST.. NEW YORK 



Round the world the Shooks they go 
Made by Hill & Mount you know. 



WMF. CARTER 



AUTOMOBILE 

SHEET METAL PARTS 



RADIATOR 



V 




IF YOU DESIRE 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

We will be pleased 
to serve you 

265-267 Halsey Street 
Newark, N. J. 

Telephone Market 8612 



HILL & MOUNT 

ESSEX BUILDING 
NEWARK, N. J. 



MINER'S 

Transparent 

Rouge 




The 
Ideal Rouge 
for All Occasions 

Will not wash off 
while Bathing. 
Not affected by Perspiration. 
At Drug and Dept. Stores. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 




NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



AN IDEAL 

HARDWARE 

STORE 

A place every visitor to 
Newark sboiild see — -a min- 
iature I^xposition in itself. 
16,000 articles on display. 

E^xhibitiuisr the product of 90 
Newark manufacturers alone. 

AVe specialise: 

FACTORY SUPPLIES 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

TOOLS FOR ALL TRADES 

A hearty vrelcome to all. 

LUDLPW 
&5QUIER 

PXPERTS IN HARDWARF 

07-99 MARKET STREET 

239 WASHINGTON STREET 



Official Photographers 

to the 

Committee of 100 

The fact that we have been selected 
to make the portraits of the Cele- 
bration Committee of One Hundred 
and to make photos of Exhibition 
Exhibits should satisfy anyone — 
everyone — of our ability and stand- 
ing as high class artist photographers. 

We make photos of people, places, 
objects and events — indoors and 
outdoors. 

KOENIG'S STUDIO 




BROAD STREET, Cor. William 
NEWARK, N. J. 



TREFZ 



"Taste Tells 



ff 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 




Franklin Murphy 

Chairman of the Committee of One Hundred 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



HAHNE& Co. 

BROAD, NEW AND HALSEY STREETS 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Distributors of Dependable, Desirable 

Merchandise for Every Member of 

the Family and for the Home. 




This store is building for the future on deeds of the present. 

The center plank of its platform is SERVICE. 

— Good Service in Quality of Merchandise. 

— Good Service in Correctness of Style. 

— Good Service in Fairness of Price. 

— Good Service in Variety. 

— Good Service in Newness and Freshness of Merchandise. 

We buy in world markets for as little as we can and sell 
for as little as we can afford. 

From pins and needles to the complete equipment of the 
home, you can buy from our large stocks with assurance of 
getting articles worthy of your money. 

This is "The Store Helpful." 

WELCOME to use the many store conveniences. You can 
spend an entire day in this big store without once going out- 
side — pleasantly and profitably. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 




UzAL H. McCarter 

Chairman of the Executive and Finance Committee of the Committee of One Hundred 



10 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



NEWARK'S NEW MILLION DOLLAR HOTEL 
BUILT FOR NEWARK'S BIRTHDAY 

THE ROBERT TREAT 

Operated mider directiuu of United Hotels Company 
Management, CHARLES A. CARRIGAN 




Named after Ihe founder of the City of Newark. Built and opened 
to commemorate the 250th Anniversary, May, 1016. A Metropolitan 
Hotel in all its appointments; conducted with the idea to please 
Commercial, Permanent and Tourist patronage. 

Erropean Plan. HOO Rooms. 275 Baths. 
Rates: $1.50 per day and upwards; with Batli, $2.00 per day and upwards 

THE UNITED HOTELS 

THE ROBERT TREAT, Newark, N. J. 



The Bancroft Worcester, Mass. 

The Nonotuck Holyoke, Mass. 

The Lawrence Erie, Pa. 

The Ten Eyck Albany, N. Y. 

Hotel Utica Utica, N. Y. 



The Onodaga Syracuse, N. Y. 

Royal Connaucht Hamilton, Ont. 

The Portage Akron, Ohio 

The Jefferson Peoria, 111. 

The Tutwiler Birmingham, Ala. 



Make Special Reservations during Anniversary Celebration, May to October 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



11 




IIkxhy Wellington Wack 

Executive Adviser 

Matthias Stratton David H. Merbitt 

Secretary Treasurer 

OF THE COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED 



12 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




BALUNTINE'S W BREWERIES 



Freeman, Ferry, Ox- 
ford, Christie Streets 
and Fleming Avenue 



NEWARK 
NEW JERSEY 



Malt Houses and Grain Ele- 
vator Front and Rector 
Streets and Passaic River 



Buy Your Wrapping Paper 

FROM A NEWARK HOUSE 

The J. E. Linde Paper Company 

is a Newark Corporation, employing 
Newark citizens and owning its own 
warehouse in the heart of Newark. 

FULL LINE OF WRAPPINGS, TWINE, 
TOILETS, TISSUES, Etc. 

J. E. LINDE PAPER COMPANY 

48-50 LAFAYETTE STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

PATRONIZE HOME PRODUCTS Telephone Market 7926 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



13 




COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED 

CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



Franklin Murphy 

CHAIRMAN 

D. H. Merritt 

TREASURER 

Matthias Stratton 

SECRETARY 



FRANKLIN MURPHY 

CHAIRMAN 
COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED 



James Smith, Jr. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Alexander Archirald 

HON. SECRETARY 

James R. Nugent 

COUNSEL 

UzAL H. McCarter 

CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Henry Wellington Wack 

EXECUTIVE ADVISER 

His Honor Thomas L. Raymond 

MAYOR 

Former Mayor Jacob Haussling 

HONORARY MEMBER 




UZAL H. McCARTER 

CHAIRMAN 
EXECUTIVE AND FINANCE 



ALEXANDER ARCHIRALD 
GEORGE B. ASTLEY 
CHARLES BRADLEY 
GEN. R. HEBER BREINTNALL 
ALRERT H. BIERTUEMPFEL 
JOSEPH B. bloom 
PHILIP C. BAMBERGER 
ANGELO R. BIANCHI 
EDWARD T. burke 
STANISLAUS BULSIEWICZ 
JAMES F. CONNELLY 
JOHN L. CARROLL 
RT. REV. MGR. PATRICK CODY 
WILLIAM H. CAMFIELD 
JOSEPH A. CARROLL 
FRANK W. CANN 
WILLIAM I. COOPER 
FORREST F. DRYDEN 
DR. WILLIAM DIMOND 
JOHN H. DONNELLY 
RICHARD DENRIGH 
ALFRED L. DE VOE 
PATRICK J. DUGGAN 
HENRY M. DOREMUS 
DANIEL H. DUNHAM 
LABAN W. DENNIS 
J. VICTOR D'ALOIA 
MRS. HENRY H. DAWSON 
FREDERICK L. ERERHARDT 
CHARLES EYTEL 
JOHN ERR 

CHRISTIAN W. FEIGENSPAN 
REV. JOSEPH F. FOLSOM 



rabbi SOLOMON FOSTER 
JOHN R. FLAVELL 
WILLIAM H. F. FIEDLER 
LOUIS A. FAST 
HENRY A. GUENTHER 
ALBERT T. GUENTHER 
JOHN F. GLUTTING 
EDWARD E. GNICHTEL 
GEORGE J. GATES 
AUGUSTUS V. HAMBURG 
HERMAN C. H. HEROLD 
WILLIAM T. HUNT 

C. WILLIAM HEILMANN 
RICHARD A. HENSLER 
HENRY HERELER 

MRS. HENRY A. HAUSSLING 

MISS FRANCES HAYS 

RICHARD C. JENKINSON 

LEOPOLD JAY 

MRS. FRED C. JACOBSON 

NATHANIEL KING 

GOTTFRIED KRUEGER 

WILLIAM B. KINNEY 

DR. JOSEPH KUSSY 

J. WILMER KENNEDY 

WILLIAM O. KUERLER 

RT. REV. EDWIN S. LINES, D.D. 

CHARLES W. LITTLEFIELD 

CARL LENTZ 

FRANKLIN MURPHY 

UZAL H. MC CARTER 

D. H. MERRITT 

REV. T. AIRD MOFFAT 



WILLIAM J. MC CONNELL 
ANTON F. MULLER 
JOHN F. MONAHAN 
JOHN H. MC LEAN 
JOHN METZGER 
JAMES R. NUGENT 
JOHN NIEDER 
PETER J. o'tOOLE 
WILLIAM P. o'ROURKE 
JOHN L. o'tOOLE 
EDWARD J. o'bRIEN 
PATRICK C. O'rRIEN 

benedict PBIETH 

LOUIS PFEIFER 
MICHAEL J. QUIGLEY 
THOMAS L. RAYMOND 
JOHN F. REILLY 
DR. SAMUEL F. ROBERTSON 
GEORGE F. REEVE 
FRED. H. ROEVER 
MORRIS R. SHERRERD 
EDWARD SCHICKHAUS 
JAMES SMITH, JR. 
GEORGE D. SMITH 
JULIUS SACHS 
ERNEST C. STREMPEL 
A. A. SIPPELL 
J. GEORGE SCHWARZKOPF 
RERNARD W. TERLINDE 
CHARLES P. TAYLOR 
FRANK J. URQUHART 
DR. A. G. VOGT 
CHRISTIAN WOLTERS, JR 



14 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Stewart Hartshorn Co. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Spring Shade Rollers 

WOOD :: TIN 

for Window Shades, Awnings, 
Car Shades, Porch Curtains 



Main Factory 
EAST NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

branch factories : 
Muskegon, Mich. Toronto, Canada 



LINDE & GRIFFITH COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS 

Foot of Fourth Ave., Newark, N. J. 



BISHOP & BISHOP 

Successors to Bercfei.s & Co. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

Patentees of Pearl Setting Without Clamps 

336 Mulberry Street, Newark, N. J. 

N. Y. Office: Maiden Lane Safe Deposit Co. 
170 Broadway 



A. YESKEL 

Wholesale Dealer and Manufacturer of 

JUTE, COTTON AND BURLAP BAGS 

Second-hand Bags of all kinds Bought and Sold 
Potato and Flour Bags a Specialty 

11 Peshine Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Telephone 2773 Waverly 
'Phone Connection 0pp. Market Street Depot 

BOICE & PLAIN 

PATTERN MAKERS 

Dealers in Pattern Letters, Leather Fillets, etc. 

15 Aeeing Street, Newark, N. J. 



H. J. RUESCH MACHINE CO. 
Jewelers' and Silversmiths' Machinery 

401-411 MULBERRY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Rolling Mills, Draw Benches, Wire Drawing Machinery, Power Screw 
Presses, Drop Presses, Foot Presses, Rotary Shears, Gang Slitters 



Telephone Orange 128 



Six Miles Ride from Newark 



McCLOUD'S TAVERN 

MUSHROOM AND CHICKEN DINNER OUR SPECIALTY 

Fresh Mushrooms and Broiled Spring Chicken 

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR TABLES 

MT. PLEASANT AND PROSPECT AVES., WEST ORANGE, N J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



15 




Augustus V. Hamburg 

Chairman of the Manufactures and Trades Committee of the Committee of One Hundred 



16 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Newark 

0ppekheim,6liins&6 

Broad and William Streets 

QamerUxCsjoremosi Spedadsis 

Women's, Misses', Juniors' and Girls' High 
Grade Wearing Apparel 

The "buying power" created by the 
six wonderful establishments of 

Oppenheim, Collins & Co. 



NEWARK 
NEW YORK 



BROOKLYN 
PHILADELPHIA 



BUFFALO 
CLEVELAND 



Places them in a position to offer the best and smartest 
to be had in style, material and workmanship 

AT MODERATE PRICES 




'F. &W." Fitting 




Cesspool with 
Bell-Trap 




The "Lynn" 
Drain Trap 



CENTRAL 
FOUNDRY 

CAST IRON PRODUCTS 

Cast Iron Soil Pipe and Soil Pipe 
Fittings 

"F & W" Fittings— take the place of 
two or more ordinary fittings 

Universal Pipe — "Joint" and "Pipe" are 
"one." 

Tlie "Lynn" Drain Trap for Automobile 
Washstands, Hospitals, Breweries, etc. 

Manhole Frames and Covers; Valve, Ser- 
vice and Roadway Boxes; Cesspools; etc. 

Ornamental Lamp Posts and Lighting 
Standards 

Ask for Literature 

CENTRAL. 

New York — 90 West Street. 

Newark — Foundry at Ft. of Lockwood St. 

Six other Foundries. 




Soil Pipe Fitting 



Universal Pipe 




Manhole Frame 
AND Cover 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



17 







^VS^/JCtirt'' 



r^I- 







History of Newark 

NEWARK'S KNACK AT MAKING THINGS 
Written by Frank J. Urquhart 

Photos Loaned by Dr. Wm. S. Disbrow 




EWARK has always known 
how to make things. There 
is no more gainsaying this 
than there is disputing the 
fact that the town came into 
being in mid-May, 1666. It has been "in 
the breed," to use a homely old expres- 
sion, since the beginning. Moreover, 
there is proof enough at hand that the 
founders expected, sooner or later, that 
the community was going to do one kind 
of manufacturing or another. The sharp 
and comprehensive glances of the very 
pioneer committee of the settlers, who 
came here and traversed the ground at 
least once before the actual settlement, 
saw the possibilities that abode in the 
almost innumerable brooks and stream- 
lets splashing down the nearer hillsides, 
affording ample water power. 

There was also a certain deftness about 
them that the close reader of their Old 
Minute Book soon detects. Whatever 
they did they did well. Three-quarters 
of a century ago, men engaged in re- 
moving the last surviving traces of 
ancient homes — habitations of the second 
or third generation of Newark folk- — 



took special note of the extreme stability 
of even the crumbling ruins. The ob- 
servers, good workmen themselves, mar- 
veled at the traces of excellent work- 
manship that they were able to discern. 

We all of us know, today, by our re- 
markably well laid out Broad Street, by 
its ingenious accommodating of itself to 
the contour of the blufif which still sur- 
vives along the river front, and by its 
gratifying width — that the founders 
were no ordinary men. They saw far — 
very far — ahead, and they utilized every 
physical advantage they discovered in 
this wilderness, thus permitting us to 
realize their breadth of vision and their 
capacity for doing whatever it seemed 
meet and fitting for them to do, far 
better than most of their neighbors. 

They were neat, orderly and system- 
n.tic in their work. This is not hearsay ; 
the Old Minute Book proves this for us. 
over and over again. They had system 
and method. They at once went at the 
draining of the marshes— and the marsh 
was all about them, in the very center of 
the town. They told oflf the able-bodied 
Contmucd on page ig 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Established 1845 
'NEWARK'S OLDEST REAL ESTATE FIRM' 

E. E. BOND & CO. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

FACTORIES, SITES 
764 BROAD STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



IN BUSINESS OVER EIGHTY YEARS 

C. B. SMITH & CO. 
Wholesale Druggists 

and Dealers in 
Manufacturers' Supplies 

ACIDS, CHEMICALS, OILS, Etc. 
and Makers of 

EMERSON'S DEAD SHOT 

For Worms in Horses and Cattle 

EMERSON'S LIVER TONIC 

SMITH'S FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

H. B. FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

57-59 Green St., Newark, N. J. 



One of the Largest Buyers in the United 
States of Butcher and Packer Offal. 

Always in the Market 



STANDARD 
TALLOW CO. 

Tallow, Grease, Hides 
Skins, etc. 

General Oeeice and Rendering Works : 
BLANCHARD STREET, NEWARK 

Telephone 3575 Mulberry 



Highest Prices paid for Shop Fat, 
Suet, Bones 

Telephone Call will bring our Wagon 



LATHER 
BRUSHES 

Tlie Bristles anchored 
permanently in a solid 
settingof Hard Rubber 



rw TRADE ^ 



Write for Descriptive Literature 



GOLF HEADS 

Non-Absorbent 

Made of "Condensite" 

The Driver or Brassie 

with a 10 per cent. 

more "go" in it. 



THE HARDRIGHT CO. :: Belleville, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



19 



men into squads to ditch the pubHc 
lands, seeing to it that each did his full 
and proper share. They fined hini if he 
failed in this ; the "slacker" had no 
rest, lie could not live in idleness upon 
his own acres. It was necessary that he 
should ditch his own land, in order that 
the few highways and the lands of 
others might be relieved speedily in 
times of Hood and in prolonged rainy 
weather. So it was also when it came 
to building the roads (which was largely 




"Wake-up Drum" — 16G6 

a matter of widening and straightening 
and "short-cutting" the Indian trails) ; 
each man did his part. On "burning" 
days — when the salt meadows were to 
be cleared by flame and when brush was 
to be similarly disposed of in clearings — 
the proper sort of day, after a rain, with 
the wind from the proper quarter and 
after due notice to the town by drum- 
beat, was an imperative necessity. 

When it came to the building of their 
first grist mill (on the north side of the 
]:)resent Clay Street, a short distance to 
the west of Broad Street) they were ex- 
ceedingly particular that it should be 
done in the best manner. Two or three 
tried to build it, and the town shook its 
head — the builders did not measure up 
to the high standard required. At last 
Robert Treat took the job into his own 
hands — and the mill was soon in o]:)era- 
tion. This was one of the last public 
services Robert Treat gave to the com- 
munity before returning to Connecticut. 

Ten years or so after the settlement, 
the town meeting voted a fine upon the 



luckless shoulders of anyone who should 
mar or otherwise seriously deface one 
of the trees which the town's officers 
had set aside to be kept inviolate (mani- 
festly for the beautification of the town). 
They would not tolerate slovenliness nor 
untidiness any more than they would 
laziness. They were striving for a 
comely, well ordered village — and they 
surely got it. A hundred years later, 
during the first three or four decades 
after the War for Independence, travelers 
who found their way to Newark, many 
of whom were cultured Frenchmen and 
Englishmen, wrote with great enthu- 
siasm in their books of the village. One 
counted it the most beautifid village he 
had seen in his travels over a large part 
of the world, and many spoke of it as 
beautiful. All this was the fruitage of 
the earnest, high-minded efiforts of the 
first generations, who gave Newark a 
masterful push along right lines. 

But to return more closely to the 
making of things, to the early, albeit 
faint, manifestations of the people's 
trend toward the industries. Newark 
had a tannery as early as 1698, and a 
son-in-law of Robert Treat, Azariah 
Crane ( son of Jasper the Founder, who 
probably laid out the town) built and 
owned it. 

Newark had one or more boat builders 
from the very beginning. It had coop- 
ers and men of other trades. Sometimes 
it subsidized skilled mechanics to settle 
here, by giving them land, free. It was 
not long before the town could manu- 
facture almost everything it needed in 
the way of utensils ; farm implements 
and such things that it could not make it 
got from New York, bartering its farm 
produce for the goods. 

Early in the Eighteenth Century, the 
thrifty Newarkers discovered that the 
red sandstone, of which there was an 
abundance and which they had already 
begun to use for foundation stones for 
their homes, was marketable. Where 
was their first quarry? No one can be 
absolutely certain today, but we may 
rest assured it was not very far from 
Mill Brook (First River) — the stream 
upon whose banks Robert Treat erected 
the first grist mill. Once upon a time 

Coiitiiutcd on page 25 



20 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Packard Cars for Hire 

HOUR— DAY— WEEK— MONTH 
ESTABLISHED TWELVE YEARS 

BEST AND CLEANEST SERVICE 

Telephone Mulberry 789 
AUTOMOBILE RENTING CO. 

11 EAST KINNEY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

J. S. KiNSEY, President L. C. KinsEy, Treasurer 



American Oil & Supply Co, 

OILS, GREASES, ACIDS 
CHEMICALS 



52-54-56 LAFAYETTE STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



21 




22 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Teleplione 3639 Mulberry 




Entrances: 
575 Broad Street 
3 Central Avenue 



Factory on Premises 




OPTICIANS 

575 BROAD STREET 

CORNER CENTRAL AVENUE 

NEWARK, N. J. 



BOEGER-MEYER MACHINE & TOOL CO. 
Engineers :: Machinists :: Manufacturers 

Machine Tools, Automatic and Special Machinery, 
Gear Cutting, Tools, Dies, Moulds 

59-65 McWHORTER STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



"BETTER THAN IVORY" 

Hyatt-Burroughs Billiard Ball Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Patented Bakelite Billiard and Cue Balls 

141-149 COMMERCE STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone 1298 Branch Brook 

JAMES G. BRIERLEY ;; Mortuarian 

Son of the Late JOSHUA BRIERLEY 
402 BROAD STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Private Chapel Attached Automobile Service 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



23 



The following is a key to the map on preceding page, with the names 
of the owners of the various plots designated upon the map 



S. E. SECTION 

A— Robert Treat* 

B — Abraham Pierson 

C — Robert Denison 

D — Thomas Johnson 

E — George Day 

F — Nathaniel Wheeler 

G — Joseph Riggs 

H — William Camp 

I — Martin Tichenor 

J — Stephen Freeman 

K — John Curtis 

L — John Baldwin, Sen'r 

M — Thomas Staples 

N — John Baldwin, Sen'r 

O — Michael Tompkins 

P — Jonathan Tomkins 

Q — Ephraim Pennington 

R — Seth Tompkins 

S — The Tailor's Lot 

T — Thomas Pierson, Jun'r 

U — Samuel Harrison 

V — John Brown, Jun'r 

W — Edward Riggs 

X — Hugh Roberts 

♦Azariah Crane 

S. W. SECTION 

A — Meeting House Lot 

B — Capt. Treat's Recompense 

C — John Johnson 

D — Parsonage Home Lot 

E — John Brown, Sen'r 

F — Stephen Bond 

G — Zachariah Burwell 

H — Ephraim Burwell 

I — Thoam Ludington 

J — John Brooks 

K — Thomas Lj'on 

L — Joseph Johnson 

M— John Treat 

N — Samuel Lyon 

O — Henry Lyon 

P — Joseph Walters 

Q — Samuel Camfield 

R — Robert Douglass 

S — Francis Lindsley 

T— Mathew Williams 



N. E. SECTION 

A — Lauranc Ward 
B — John Catlin 
C — Samuel Kitchel 
D — Josiah Ward 
E — John Rogers 
F— Robert Kitchel 
G — Jeremiah Peck 
H— Obadiah Bruen 
I — -The Seaman's Lot 
J — -Thomas Richards 
K — John Harrison 
L — Aaron Blatshly 
M — Stephen Davis 
N — Samuel Plum 
O — John Crane 
P — Jonathan Sergeant 
Q — Robert Lymon 
R — Jolin Davis 

*and Abraham Pierson, Jun'r 



N. W. SECTION 

A — Samuel Swaine 

B — Richard Harrison 

C— Edward Ball 

D— John Morris 

E — John Ward, Sen'r 

F — Mathew Camfield 

G — John Gardner 

H — Jasper Crane 

I — Thomas Pierson, Sen'r 

J — Benjamin Baldwin 

K — Thomas Huntington 

L — Alex Munroe 

M— The Elder's Lot 

N — John Ward, Jun'r 

O — Ricliard Laurance 

P — Delivered Crane 

Q— Hans Albers 

R — Samuel Rose 

S— The Miller's Lot 

T— Samuel Dod 

U— Daniel Dod 

V— The Corn Mill 



Continued on page 25 



24 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Dooner & Smith Chemical Co. 

CHEMICALS, TANNING MATERIALS 
ACIDS, ALCOHOLS, AMMONIA 

PAINTS, OILS, BRUSHES 
MANUFACTURERS' SUPPLIES 

374-376-378 MULBERRY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Established 1875 

THE CHARLES BURROUGHS CO. 
Machinery 

Complete Plants for Manufacturing and 
Moulding Compositions 

141-149 COMMERCE STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



S^e/^VourOrd^^^ 




Telephone 190 Mulberry 



COUSE & BOLTEN 

Manufacturers of 

Pure Oak Tanned Leather Belting 
The Bolten Waterproof Leather Belting 

42-44-46 LAFAYETTE STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



25 



there were ancient quarry holes along 
the north bank of Mill Brook, nearly up 
to the present Branch Brook Park. One 
of the most ancient quarries, however, 
was on the north side of Bloomfield 
Avenue, a little west of Belleville 
Avenue. This was long, long before 
the Clifton-Bloomfield Avenue quarries 
were so much as dreamed of. 

Well, all the stone taken out of these 



they found the outcroppings in abun- 
dance. One could literally fill his saddle 
bags with the ore, just picking it off the 
ground. So they moved their earthly 
possessions up the trails through the 
Caldwell and Roseland region, and be- 
yond, and sat themselves down, per- 
manently, on the banks of the Whippany 
River. Soon their forge fires were 
alight, and they burned without cessa- 




Oldest Picture of Newark — Original Trinity Church, Erected 1744 



quarries for market was rolled or hauled 
down the hillside and to the dock near 
where Mill Brook lost itself in the Pas- 
saic. Thence it was deposited upon the 
staunch, light-draft boats of the period. 
All this made a sort of business centre 
at what is now the Broad and Clay 
Street neighborhood, and it looked at 
one time as if the business heart of the 
community would fix itself there. 

About the year 1700, possibly two or 
three years later, enterprising Newark 
men learned, presumably from the 
Indians, of what for that time were rich 
deposits of iron ore on the hills of 
Morris County. They got the Red Men 
to show them where the iron was. and 



tion until the War for Independence and 
for a goodly time thereafter. 

Thus the present Whippany w^as be- 
gun — yes, and the flourishing Morris- 
town, also — by Newark folk. It is said 
that when Washington first found his 
way to Morristown, and rode his horse 
out into the neighboring country, nothing 
interested him so much as the forges. 
He knew that from these he was to get 
cannon balls for his guns. He noted, 
further, that the men at the forges were 
fine, muscular, upstanding chaps. "I 
must have some of these men for my 
army." he is reported to have said — and 
no doubt he got them. 

Continued on f^age 27 



26 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Organized 1855 
This Company in addition to the Fire Business, issues Tornado Policies 

Firemen's Insurance Company 

OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



ASSETS 
Bonds and Mortgages.... 
State, County and Municipal 

Bonds 276,640.86 

Railroad Bonds 602,550.00 

Miscellaneous Bonds 387,500.00 

Railroad Stocks 930,486.00 

Bank Stocks 362,125.00 

Miscellaneous Stocks 215,250.00 

Real Estate 1,074,129.63 

Cash on hand and in bank 198,592.70 

Agents' Balances 481,851.96 

Interest and Rents due and ac- 
crued 52,842.89 

Re-Insurance due on paid losses 6,635.01 



STATEMENT, JANUARY 1, 1916 

LIABILITIES 

$2,491,700.00 Capital Stock $1,0-0,0,000.00 

Reserve Re-Insurance Fund 2,955,812.47 

Reserve for Unpaid Losses and 

all other Liabilities 382,113.55 

Net Surplus 2,708,837.43 



Gross Assets $7,080,304.05 

Assets not Admitted 33,540.60 



Total Admitted Assets $7,046,763.45 



Total Liabilities $7,046,763.45 



A successful record of 60 years. 

Losses paid during that time 

exceed $17,000,000.00 



Daniel H. Dunham 
President 



John Kay 
Vice-President 



Neal Bassett 
Vice-President 



Albert H. Hassinger 
Secretary 





* 

H. B. Good, President 




R. C. Good, Vice-President and Treasurer 




J. 0. Amberg, Secretary 


MAX HERTZ 




Leather Manufacturer 


GOOD BROS. LEATHER CO. 




Tanners and Leather 


54-78 OLIVER STREET 


Manufacturers 


NEWARK, N. J. 






NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 




Jacob Schaefer, President Ira T. Dolson, Treasurer 


Compliments of 






Independent Tallow Co. 


HESS, HARBURGER & 


Dealers in 


DRUCKER 


HIDES, SKINS, FAT, BONES 


Leather Manufacturers 


AND BEEF SCRAPS 


C8-82 Amsterdam Street 


Office: 601 FERRY STREET, NEWARK 


Newark, N. J. 


Factory: Meadow Street 


65 DuANE St., New York, N. Y. 


Teleplione Market 1831 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



27 



With the opening of the War for In- 
dependence, all these stirrings of early 
industry came well nigh to a standstill 
in and near Newark. War was too 
close to her doors. She was on the edge 
of hostile territory, from the time New 
York fell into the hands of the British 
in the fall of 177G, until the Declara- 
tion of Peace, in 1783. The able men, 
the men of red blood, as we would say, 
were in the regiments of the Continental 
line or were serving for longer or shorter 
periods in the militia. The soil had to 
be tilled, in order that the people might 
have food. So all industries, except 
farming languished. 

But throughout all those grim, dark 
years, men of brains and initiative were 
moving here and there about New Jer- 
sey, men of the Continental Army, the 
bright young gentlemen of the Generars 
staff — Alexander Hamilton and others. 
They were "live wires" ; they hustled. 
They had to, to keep up with their chief, 
Washington. They saw the possibili- 
ties of the region, and when peace came 
and the creation of the industries was 
recognized as vital if the new country 
was to get up on its feet, stand erect 
and maintain its dearly-bought inde- 
pendence — these men were ready with 
facts and with figiires to stir the people 
to the new order of things. 

To start an industry in the first two 
or three decades after the War for Inde- 
pendence, was to create a patriotic en- 
terprise. The shop or mill owner was 
looked upon as, in a sense, a public bene- 
factor. Hamilton, in Washington's 
Cabinet, jireached eternally the great 
need for manufacturing, the fostering of 
the useful arts. Mis gospel was that of 
hundreds of other men ; so the wheels 
began to turn. 

Hamilton remembered Passaic Falls, 
from his old campaigning days. He 
remembered Newark, too. He came 
here, repeatedly, to confer with some of 
the leading men of this town as to the 
establishment of a manufacturing com- 
munity. Many of these conferences 
were held in the home of Klisha Bou- 
dinot which stood on the site of the new 
Public Service Terminal building. They 
decided that their proposed new town 
should be named after the then Governor 



of the State, Paterson. The town had 
a name, when it was still a toss-up 
in the present Springfield, in the section 
(then far out of the town of Newark) 
along the Passaic, near the present 
whether it should be built on the brook 
Fourth Avenue ; or at Passaic Falls. 
Hamilton favored the Falls, and he won. 

In the meantime, new shops were 
springing up, feebly, to be sure, but in- 
creasing steadily in numbers, here in 
Newark, around our beloved old Four 
Corners. And an interesting fact about 
that beginning is that the Newark men 
in the van in all of these innovations 
were almost without exception veterans 
of the then very recent war. 

Why was this? The writer will let 
the reader figure it out, contenting him- 
self only with reminding him of what 
has already been said, that the in- 
dustries created after the war were 
looked upon as patriotic enterprises. 
The men who had risked their lives that 
America might be free, were real pa- 
triots. They now turned the same splen- 
did courage to that best of all uses of 
which the world has any knowledge, 
the fostering of peace through work, 
through industry. 

Moses Combs, who really put the 
town's industries on a well organized 
and practical basis, beginning with his 
shoemaking plant, was a soldier of the 
Revolution. Captain Pennington, who 
became Governor of New Jersey, was a 
hatter before the war and returned to 
his trade for a short time when it was 
over. Elisha iJoudinot, already men- 
tioned, was connected with the Conti- 
nental Army. The real organizer of 
the stage coach lines here and for many 
years a sort of transportation magnate, 
was Lieutenant Colonel John Noble 
Cummings. and there were more of pre- 
cisely the same stuff. Newark has never 
done them half enough honor. 

The first Inde])endence Day celebra- 
tion in Newark of which we have any 
record was in 1788. The account of the 
festivities is mo.st instructive. The war 
was but five years behind the people. 
They were sick and weary of the clash 
of arms. The comnnmity was just stag- 
gering back to its feet after the fearful 

ContUiiicd on page 2Q 



28 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



GOOD COAL FOR ALL PURPOSES 



FAMILY TRADE 
OUR SPECIALTY 




502 BROAD STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



ESTABUSHED 1857 



COOK & GENUNG COMPANY 
Everything in Masons' Materials 

Main Office: 16 JERSEY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



I FOUR YARDS 



16 Jersey Street, Newark, N. J. Cottage St. and L.V.R.R., Irvington 
434 Ogden Street, Newark, N. J. 1:34 UHie Street, Newark, N. J. 



. o 










u 


2*5 










z =» 


>-" >• 










^'"S 


H « 










OS 4> 












§c« 








H 




>■ = 


M H 






W 




^1 


to -a 
OS .5 

2iE 


• 

o 
u 


S 
s 






Z u- 




^ 

J 


g 


O 
H 


^ 






§ 

js 


P-H 

u 


^ 

« 








•^ 

>■»<» 

g 


1— 1 

Q 














^ 


o 

c 








o 




z -s 

T3 


•-1 . 

o 










P 


z" 






U) 




^ g. 


.<i3 










g t 


i^ _ 










O o 


a u 










CS p 


< 73 










ffl (S 


^.H 












gE 










J3 



CHARLES M. HENRY 

Insurance 

15 CLINTON STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone 7401 Market 

DAVIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Contracting Engineers 

Electric Wiring, Electric Motors 
Electric Supplies 

54-56 CLINTON STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



29 



tirain upon its resources of every sort. 
They had a procession; yes, but there 
was nothing martial about it. A half 
troop of horse was the only trace of the 
military spirit, and the gentlemen in the 
saddle do not appear even to have worn 
uniforms. All the music they seem to 
have had was the ancient and honorable 
fife and drum. And the paraders were 
nearly all of them connected with one 
industry or another, except the school- 
bovs, who marched with their books un- 



River, at the foot of the present Bridge 
Street, the laying down of the rough log 
road across the marshes to the Hacken- 
sack, and the building of a bridge across 
the Hackensack. Before this great work 
could be so much as started, the men of 
means and initiative felt it was neces- 
sary to erect a new church, as the old 
one was too small. So the present First 
Presbvterian Church was built, and 
finished in 1791. About that time the 
Academy was erected at Broad Street 




Newark East of Broad Street, 1790 



der their arms. Of course, the farmers 
were in greatest number, but it is sur- 
prising how many other callings were 
represented. Here they are : 

Tanners, curriers, cordwainers, car- 
penters and joiners, quarrymen, stone 
cutters, masons, blacksmiths, scythe 
makers, coach and chair makers, paint- 
ers, wheelwrights, comb makers, clock 
and watch makers, tailors, hatters, sad- 
dlers and harness makers, coopers, 
butchers, bakers, weavers, dyers and 
fullers, tobacconists, ditchers, furnace 
men. millers, ship carpenters. 

One may call this Independence Day 
demonstration the beginning of a new 
epoch for Newark, the formal erection 
of the industries to a place of deserved 
prominence and dignity. 

But there was needed one more mas- 
ter-stroke, to really put Newark unon 
the industrial map. Tt was the building 
of the first bridge across the Passaic 



and the present Academy Street, to pro- 
vide the town with a good school, and 
take the place of the building in Wash- 
ington Park, ruined by the English in 
1779. Then they were ready for the 
bridges. These were began in 1792 and 
completed early in 1795. 

Now was the town of Newark ready 
to wax and grow strong. This great 
improvement shortened the connection 
between New York and westward by 
several hours. From the beginning of 
the settlement Newark had been side- 
tracked as it were, being off the main 
line of travel. The East and West 
traffic passed through Elizabeth. To 
and from Elizabeth slow, clumsy and 
sometimes dangerous vessels moved the 
people and their goods, so. generation 
after generation. Newark had dozed and 
drowsed upon its hillsides, a pretty little 
village, and notliing more. 

Continued on f>age 31 



30 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



ZIEGEL, EISMAN (Sf CO. 

Manufacturers of 

^y Genuine Kangaroo Shoe Leather 

IN ALL GRADES AND FINISHES 
Tannery— NEWARK, N. J. Salesrooms— BOSTON, MASS. 




VAN KEUREN & SON 
Paving Contractors :: Building Material 

501 PASSAIC AVENUE, EAST NEWARK, N. J. 



A. THEOBALD 

Rendering Plant 

HARRISON AVENUE, KEARNY, N. J. 



TURNER MACHINE COMPANY 
Hat and Fur Dressers' Machinery 

Machine Tools, Turner Turrets, etc. 
Special Machines 

28-40 EAGLES STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 
Danbury, Conn. 

DiiNTON, Manchkster, England. Stockport, England 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



31 



All that vanished, when the bridges 
were open. Newark now came into its 
own. Its shops and factories ninltiplied. 
Several lines of stages carried people 
into and out of the town, six days a 
week. Wagons and drays moved out 
the finished product and brought in the 
raw material in ever-increasing volume. 

Soon came Newark's wizard of m- 
vention, Seth Boyden, from New Eng- 
land, only a youth, to devise machinery 
for the making of better goods, and 
cheaper and in greater volume. Labor 



There is but one thing more to say, 
and this in conclusion. With the coming 
of the industries the pretty village of 
Newark sickened. The Newarkers of 
a hundred years ago and more had, 
somehow lost the neatness and orderli- 
ness of the founders and their immedi- 
ate successors. The new generations, 
following the War for Independence, be- 
came too intent on their work ; they 
piled their rubbish high about them. 
Broad Street became a wallow of mud. 
The people prospered, but they neglected 




Newark, 1892, Looking Southwest from Clark's Chimney 



came down from the countryside in re- 
sponse to the demand. Then the early 
immigrants, the industries, increasing 
steadily, decade by decade. In the early 
Thirties of the last century the first 
railroad poked its clumsy length into 
Newark by the way of the first Centre 
Street bridge, around into Market, up 
to Broad, down into Broad and William 
Streets, and still further down later. It 
was closely followed by the Morris and 
Essex, which, for years hauled its trains 
with horses down Broad Street, through 
Park Place to Centre Street, thus to the 
line of the original road. 

Development followed swiftly after 
that. We know the result today; we 
see it all around us. 



their town. It was most regrettable, but 
Newark was simply following the order 
of things incidental to almost every 
other American village that had sprung 
suddenly out of quiet, easy-going ways, 
into a feverish striving in industrial 
activity. 

But we are changing all that today ; 
we have been changing it for the last 
two decades or so. Newark is now 
learning how to be rich and powerful 
and prosperous and at the same time 
attractive to live in. The new and 
greater, broader era is now with us. 
Newark is going to be a beautiful city. 
Indeed, it is so already to a far greater 
degree than most of us seem to com- 
prehend. 



32 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Telephone 2210 Harrison 

SCHWARZ BROS. COMPANY 
Removers of Dead Animals 

Dealers in Hides, Skins, Fat and Bones 
1100 HARRISON AVENUE KEARNY, N. J. 


ESTABLISHKD 1885 

CHRISTIAN LUTZ 

Cafe 

323 HALSEY STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 


SUPERIOR LEATHER CO. 
Upholstery Leather 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 


F. A. SHAEFFER 

Manufacturer of 

Fancy Colored Leather 

55-63 RERGEN STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 


Progressive Paper Box Co. 

P)U^-|) AND Seventeenth Avenue, Newark 


Specialty Paper Box Co. 

216-228 HicH Street, Newark, N. J. 


United Paper Box Co. 

;!() Bedford Street, Newark, N. J. 

DAVID SCHIFFENHAUS 
Paper Boxes 

7:!-7r Nichols Street, Newark, '.:. J. 


SPECIAT. DROP FORCINGS 

as good as can be made. 

VALVE STEMS forgkd solid from VALVE STEEL 

Twenty Sizes Carried in Stock 

STRIEBY & FOOTE CO. :: Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



33 



Newark, the Industrial City 



OH 



NEWARK'S KNACK AT D()IN(; THINCiS 
Bv William E. Sackeit 




IE genius that made a Sett- 
ers' holiday of the opening 
(if the first grist mill and of 
tlie first saw mill in Old 
Xewark, was instinct with 
the prophecy of a proud industrial des- 
tiny that the New Newark — the Newark 
of today — has more than fulfilled. And 
there is greater yet for her behind the 
veil of the future ! By the time her next 
quarter-millennial feast is due she will 
have become that American Metropolis 
which Alexander Plamilton glimpsed on 
the west shore of the Hudson, away 
back in the Revolutionary days when he 
wrote the charter of the Society for the 
Promotion of Useful Alanufactures. It 
is not a far cry to the time when all of 
Essex will be Newark ; and the ag- 
grandized city, now the fourteenth in 
population in the country, will reach 
out for Jersey City and Hoboken, over 
there; for Paterson and Hackensack, 
up there ; and for Elizabeth, down yon- 
dt ^ and gather them all under her 
wing into one great municipality that 
will challenge even Greater New York's 
metropolitan supremacy. 

Bifj Business Figures 

r>ut that is prophecy; and prophecy 
is not the purpose of this book. The 
Newark of today has indeed, already 
achieved a greatness that the dream of 
the prophet is not needed to glorify. 
She has let nothing stand in the way of 
her resistless march to pre-eminence. 
When the seas defied her expansion, she 
wrested the meadows from them and 
planted her mills where the waters had 
been. She has pressed herself, through 
marsh and across meadow, into 23y^ 



squares miles of territory ; and, on the 
front of the bay and river which vainly 
challenged her efforts at expansion, she 
has a wharf frontage of IOI/2 miles. 
The tonnage of the business she does at 
that front reached nearly five millions 
last year, and its estimated value was 
close to forty millions. And, restless 
ever, she is now again planning, on her 
bay front, a new industrial city with a 
new water expansion that will give her 
a new station among the humming cen- 
tres of the nation. 

Her water freightage is, of course, 
but a part — and a small part — of her in- 
dustrial activity. The Exposition her 
manufacturing captains opened in the 
First Regiment Armory, three or four 
years ago, showed that. It was varied 
and imposing enough to attract 175,000 
visitors ; and the profits enabled the 
Board of Trade to get out a large vol- 
ume exhibiting the details of the city's 
busy workshops. That volume, sought 
all over the world for its pointers, lists 
?.")2 distinct lines of industrial endeavor 
in which Newark is engaged. Her 
manufacturing industries, indeed, en- 
gaged a capital of $175,000,000, and 
distributed $00,000,000 among their 
75.000 operators last vcar. In their 
shops thev transformed '$150,000,000 of 
raw material into $250,000,000 of the 
finished product. Twenty-three freight 
delivery yards were needed for the hand- 
ling of their stuff, and 254 freight trains 
daily for its transportation. The ton- 
natre delivered in the citv last year 
reached the fine total of 3.785.027. and 
that which went out aggregated 1.122.- 
072. Six railroads helped to carry this 
inland freight of hers ; while the under- 
river tubes, and twenty-three admirably- 
Continucd on page 35 



34 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



The New Jersey 
Fire Insurance Company 



Capital $1,000,000 



HOME OFFICE: 
40 CLINTON STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 




DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 
NEW AND SECOND-HAND 

BARRELS 

Let us know what you have to 
otter and what you have to buy 

John Ebersberger 

NEWARK AND PATERSON 



Telephone 7244 Market 

N. J. LAMP WORKS 

All Kinds of Auto Radiators, 
Lamps, Fenders, etc.. Repaired 
Eind new ones made to order 

All Work Guaranteed 

21 WILLIAM STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Compliments of 

EDWARD C. MOORE 
COMPANY 



INDUSTHIAL EXPOSITION 



85 




AL 



36 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Established 1787 



Telephone Mulberry 3277 



JOHN L. & WM. PASSMORE MEEKER 

Monuments 

196 MARKET STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone Harrison 5610—5611 



Factories: Harrison, N. J. 



NEW JERSEY TUBE COMPANY 
Roll and Sheet Brass Tubing and Brass Rods 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 




L. LAWRENCE & CO. 
Copper Work of all descriptions 

SCORED CYLINDERS 

Repaired by Patented Electric Process. Filled with a 

silver and nickel alloy (eliminates grinding). No warping 

or enlarging of cylinder bore. Same piston and rings used. 

Reshipped 24 hours after received. 

292 HALSEY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 
Branch for Repairing Scored Cylinders: 1522 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Ile. 



Telephone Mulberry 2479 

MODERN PRINTING CO. 

Printers 

Engraving, Lithographing, 
Bookbinding, Electrotyping 

653 Broad Street (Next to Arcade) 
Newark, N. J. 



Telephone Connection 

HERMAN LUTTER 

Manufacturer of 

Wagons and Automobile 
Bodies 

Expert Repairing and Painting 

141-143 Frelinghuvsen Avenue 
Newark, N. J. 



TlllltllMllllltlMIIIII 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



37 



managed trolley lines carry her busy 
populace back and forth, and up and 
down, and all around. 

Shopping and Feeding 

These figures tell the story of a mag- 
nificent, as well as of a bustling, com- 
munity. And Newark is a big one — 
with nearly fifty-six thousand buildings 
within her boundaries. The last annual 



ninet}'-six dry goods stores. It takes 
1,489 grocers, 537 butchers and 244 
bakers to feed them ; 77 milk dealers 
to wet their morning porridge; and 1G5 
shoe dealers to keep their feet off the 
ground. They need 480 doctors to keep 
them well ; have their prescriptions filled 
at 171 drug stores and their teetli at 
187 dental parlors. And, although they 
have 69"3 confectionery stores to keep 




Free Public Library 



rcportof herbuilding department showed 
an investment of $10, !)()(», 000 in new 
buildings in 1914 — and that was a 
modest accretion ; in 1913 she had added 
$lG.OOO,000's worth to her homes and 
business structures. .\t the moment of 
this writing, she Iiad a population of 
three hundred and ninety-nine thousand ; 
bv the time it gets into print, she will 
probably have acquired the one thousand 
more needed to bring the figure up to 
the four hundred thousand mark. 

They shop in eleven well-appointed 
department stores and two hundred and 



them sweet, they find it necessary to 
maintain 504 lawyers in good style to 
see that they don't get into scrapes. 

The statistics in all other directions 
keep pace with the magnitude of these 
details. Her financial in.stitutions em- 
brace nine national banks, nine trust 
comi)anies and five savings banks. .\ 
trust company and a savings bank are 
in the first rank of their kind. Their 
combined cajntal exceeds $30,000,000; 
and their deposit accounts with 220,000 
Contmucd on page S9 



38 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



THE 

WARD-GEHIN 

COMPANY 

Firemen's Insurance Building 

Broad and Market Streets 

Newark, N. J. 

MANAGING AGENTS 
FIREMEN'S INSURANCE BLDG. 

KINNEY BUILDING 
NATIONAL STATE BANK BLDG. 

Especially Equipped for 

Appraisals and Management of 

Realty Investments 

Telephone One Hundred Market 



Compliments of 

D. PRICE & CO. 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Ladies' Outer Apparel 

MARKET STREET, COR. HALSEY 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Compliments of 

PLAZA THEATRE 

400 Springfield Avenue 
Newark, N. J. 



CHICAGO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



TRADE f^^i^v^ MARK 



AMERICAN ALUMINUM WARE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Household and Cooking Utensils 

ADVERTISING NOVELTIES :: METAL SPECIALTIES 

GENERAL OFFICE AND FACTORY 

374-380 JELLIFF AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 




INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



39 







40 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Established 1881 



JOHN J. CAVAGNARO 

Engineer and Machinist 



SPFXIALTIES: 

MACHINERY FOR SILK FINISHING, CALENDERING AND 

EMBOSSING, MANUFACTURE OF ALIMENTARY PASTES, 

WATCH CASE MAKING, WIRE WEAVING, ETC. 

HYDRAULIC PRESSES 

SPECIAL MACHINERY AND PARTS 



N. Y. Office and Shop: Main Office and Shops: 

255-257 CENTRE STREET FIFTH AND ESSEX STREETS 
NEW YORK HARRISON, N. J. 

'Phone 1212 Spring 'Phones \ ,„„f, > Harrison 



Calile Address : "Johcavag/' Western Union Code 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



41 




pi- 



fc , 




5>3 


f "3^ , 






.^'^V-' 


""": 


- -—-. 



~'---'^*.v>i^ >^ 




Post Office 



depositors, reach a total of $140,000,000 ; 
their loans approximate $70,000,000. 

The Billion Dollar Mark 

Allied with these, financially, are two 
big life and three fire insurance com- 
panies. The combined resources of the 
city's national and state banks and trust 
and insurance companies go above the 
billion dollar mark ; it's the first time 
in her history when the city has been 
able to boast of her ten-figure greatness. 
There are, besides, more than 200 build- 



ing and loan associations which have 
become the savings banks of nearly 
70,000 shareholders; and these take in 
a trifle short of $30,000,000 a year. 

Her municipal equipment is on the 
same scale. It costs her $10,000,000 a 
vear to "keep house." But her ratables 
reach a total of $420,311,000 and her 
own 95 public buildings, parks and pro- 
pertv of other classes are valued at up- 
wards of $70,000,000. This does not 
include some millions advanced on ac- 
count of the big flume with which she is 
Continued on page 43 



42 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



THE J. H. LADEW CO. 

Tanners 



SOLE LEATHER 



BELTING BUTTS 



Lincoln Highway and Passaic River 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Oscar Barnett Foundry Co. 

Lyons Avenue and Coit Street 
Irvington, N. J. 



Handsome, Durable 



FRon 

OLD CARPETS 



Also Weavers of 

RAG CARPETS 

WRITE OR CALL FOR CIRCULAR. 

Oriental Rug Co. 

Hackett St. off Plane 

h4EWARK. N.J. 



Geometric Lathes and 
Transfer Presses for 
Bank Note Engravers 

Foot Presses for Jewelers 
or Sheet Metal Workers 

MACHINERY BUILT 
TO ORDER 



WILLIAM H. 
CHAPMAN 

227-229-231 MULBERRY ST. 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Cable Address: "Chapman," Newark, N.J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



43 



to restore the i'assaic River to its 
mountain-stream purity. Her city hall, 
accounted one of the finest municipal 
buildings in the coimtry, represents a 
value of $3,000,000 ; the handsome pub- 
lic library, of $700,000; and Centre 
Market, of $900,000. These, with assets 
of other kinds, such as improvement 
assessment arrears, make her public debt 
of $;39.O00,OO() secure, with a total of 
nearly $10(),U()(),000 of possessions. 

The city had 255 miles of paved 
streets at the beginning of last year; 
and her 85 miles of brick and concrete 
sewers and 220 miles of pipe sewer 
tokened an outlay of $5,770,090 when 
the last published figures were made up. 
The reservoirs of her new water plant 
have a storage capacity of 9,285,700,0(M) 
gallons ; and the plant is equal to a 
gravity supply of 50,000,000 gallons per 
day ; the present daily consumption is 
42,000.000 gallons. She is lighted by 
1G2 flaming arcs, 2,565 arc electrics. 
2,000 c. p. lamps, 207 incandescents and 
2,037 gas lamps. 

Recreation Spots 

But it is not all work and no play with 
Miss Newark. She likes her recreation ; 
and the County Park Board has pro- 
vided her, in Branch Brook, with a splen- 
did reserve that landscape artists every- 
where rank as the finest artificial park 
in the country. Of her own parks — 
those she owns — ^Military Park, in the 
heart of the city, is the largest, and. 
more than all the others rich with his- 
toric associations. The city holds that 
grateful breathing spot at a value of 
$6,000,000. Washington Park, a little 
to the north of it, is set down as worth 
about $2,000,000; and Lincoln Park, 
at the other end of Broad Street, is 
quoted by the appraisers at $1,200,000. 
These are. however, only three of the 
city's recreation centres. There are 18 
others, besides the public playgrounds 
which she has opened for her little ones. 

For the rest, Newark, with a death 
rate of 14.3. can hold her own for health, 
and it is a new assurance of her growth 
that her birth rate is more than twice as 
big. And with a mean tem])eraturc of 
53.1° she is a decidedly salubrious ])lace 
to live in. 



Still the 
WONDHR CAR 

of 1916 

CAR COMPLETE 
DELIVERED 



$680 




"25" 

ASK ANY OWNER 

Remember! 
"We Sell Satisfaction" 



WILSON -WARD 
MOTOR CO., Inc. 

OI'I'ICIC AND SALKSROOMS : 

12 14 Wn>LL\M ST., NEWARK 

Service Station: 12-14 Chapkl Ct. 

(45 Steps from Broad) 

Telephone Mulberry .")41 



44 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




A moderate sum 
now provides a 
box for the cas- 
ket that will keep 
the casket per- 
manently safe 
from dampness, 
decay and weight 
of earth. 



Ask Your Undertaker about the 

American Cement Burial Case 

Made in Newark by 
MEAD-SUYDAM COMPANY 

Delivered direct to the Cemetery and set and hermetically sealed 
by our own experienced men. 



SERVICE IS OUR POLICY 



GRAY & DAVIS 




SERVICE STATION 



STORAGE 
BATTERIES 



^WilllrJl^ I 



STARTING AND 
JGHTING SYSTEMS 



STARTER & BATTERY SERVICE CO. 

230 CENTRAL AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



45 




46 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Telephone 1167 Mulberry 



Material for Sale 



ROBERT HAMPTON & CO, 
Contractors 



t »i|aHt|aif ROOFING AND WATERPROOFING 

mam 



^Meric^' 



Rock Asphalt and Cement Work 
138-140 NORFOLK STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



NATIONAL OIL & SUPPLY CO. 

Oils, Greases, Soaps, Acids 
Chemicals 

174-180 FRELINGHUYSEN AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 




Ask for "CORDOVAN''~ihc 
best wearing leather in shoes 

H. HAHN & STUMPF 

MAIiniSON, N. J. 



Ideal Brand 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

Will Please Your Trade 
j Why Experiment i 

I ORDER EROM YOUR GROCER | 

PENN PAPER BOX CO. 

(iO McWuoRTHR Stuki:t, Newark, N. J. 

MORRISON FOUNDRY CO. 
Iron Castings 

101-111 (loTTHART St., Newark, N. J. 

J. H. APPLEGATE :: Coal 

158 Elm Street, New^ark, N. J. 



ISBELL-PORTER CO. 
Foundry 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



47 




1 "jw* 



w 



.s:!.- 




48 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



You Can 
Celebrate the Celebration 

in no better way than by promptly making arrangements at 
our offices, or at our Exposition Booth (Space No. 3, Sec- 
tion E), to do your financial business with the strong, long- 
established, conveniently-located and carefully managed 

Fidelity Trust Company 

PRUDENTIAL BUILDING, NEWARK, N. J. 



With a capital, surplus and undivided profits of more than 
^6,000,000, resources of .$28,000,000, and deposits of .$20,000,- 
000, this institution is the largest of its kind in New Jersey. 
It pays interest on deposits in its Banking and Saving De- 
partments, loans money on collateral and on bond and 
mortgage, acts as executor of wills and as administrator of 
estates, guarantees New Jersey real estate titles, buys and 
sells Public Service Corporation investment securities and 
conducts the largest and best equipped Safe Deposit Vaults 

in the State. 

You are invited to talk these matters over 
with our officers 



UZAL H. McCARTER, President 



Frederick W. Egner, Vice-President 
Jerome Taylor, Vice-President 
Edward A. Pruden, V.P. & Trust Officer 
Frank T. Allen, V.P. and Publicity Mgr. 
Louis Hood, General Counsel 
Paul C. Downing, Treasurer 
James H. SilacklETon, Secretary 
Clarence G. ApplETon, Comptroller 



Henry Schneider, Asst. Sec'y-Treasurer 
Edward W. Campbell, Asst. Sec'y-Treas. 
Charles G. Titsworth, Title Officer 
Simon P. Northrup, Asst. Title Officer 
Francis Laeferty, Solicitor 
Theodore Hampson, Asst. Trust Officer 
Herbert R. Jacobus, Asst. Trust Officer 
Edward E. Felsberg, Supt. of Vaults 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



49 




i)0 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




Telephone Market 3309 

The Interstate 
Smelting and Refining Co. 

Fine Silver and Silver Solder. 

Sweep Smelters. Refiners of 
Gold, Silver and Platinum. 

23-25 Commercial Street 

Newark, N. J, 



New York 



Boston 



THE MOTOR CAR 
EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Automobile Accessories, Tools 

and Hardware, Shop Equipment 

at Wholesale Only 

21 Halsey Street, Newark, N. J. 



1868 48 Years in Business 191f> 

J. BROCKIE & COMPANY, Inc. 

Originators of Guaranteed Awnings 
8 RAILROAD PLACE NEWARK, N. J. 

Selected by the Committee of One Hundred to erect the Bunting 
Decorations for the 250th Anniversary 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



51 




52 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




SCHNEFEL BROS. 

Manufacturers of 

Manicure Implements 
and Sets 

Surgical Forceps 

684-686 SOUTH 17th STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Our Autos Everywhere 



BEYER & SON 

Dry Cleaners - Dyers 

Office: 233 FERRY STREET 
Works: 2-10 ALYEA STREET 

NEWARK, N. J. 



Open Evenings 



Telephone 6903 Market 



EXECUTOR 



ADMINISTRATOR 



FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

C. W. FEIGENSPAN, President 

Capital and Surplus, $2,137,661.25 
Resources, $8,514,217.44 



GUARDIAN 



TRUSTEE 



"NEWARK'S BEST" 

THACHER GARAGE, Inc. 

MODERN FIREPROOF— 22,000 sq. ft.— CONCRETE STEEL 

CLINTON AND BADGER AVENUES, NEWARK, N. J. 

Repairing — All Makes 
SPECIALIZING POPE HARTFORDS 

Big Stock of Repair, Parts on hand. Desirable "Used Cars" bougiit 
and sold. "See us — it Pays." 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



53 



Newark's Educational Advantages 

Concise Description of the School Facilities 
of the City of Newark 




ROM the start, Newark has 
realized the worth of the 
school. The Puritans who 
founded her caught the in- 
fection from the Puritans of 
the East. She had not yet coined the 
word, but that "Efficiency" of which one 
hears so much nowadays, was the up- 
building idea that entered into all her 
enterprises. She thought that her 
children ought first to be shown "How," 
if they were to be fitted to "Know 
How" ; and as soon as she had made a 
clearing for her cabin homes she began 
to think about the school. 

Within ten years of the time when 
she had felled the first tree, she had her 
little classroom for the new population 




Dr. Addison E. Poland 
city superintendent of schools 



of the colony. John Catlin was not an 
Elliott or a Hibben, or a Butler, by any 
means. The times did not call for it. 
The primitives schooled their children 
in reading at home ; the school room was 
only for writing and 'rithmetic and the 
trowser-dusting birch. But Catlin's 
name will live immortal in our annals as 
that of our first School Master. A tab- 
let at Broad and Commerce Streets 
marks the spot where he swished the 
rod of discipline. 

Burr and Princeton 

And, as typifying her expanding edu- 
cational aspirations, the starting of the 
great Princeton University of today, by 
the Rev. Aaron Burr, in the old Meet- 
ing House on Branford Place, was a 
fete-day event. The Reverend was the 
father of the Aaron Burr who is famous 
in American history as the duelist with 
Hamilton, and later became Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States. He was, 
when he founded the college that has 
grown into Princeton, the pastor of the 
old First Church on Broad Street, and 
afterwards the College's first President. 

And so, with incidents of more com- 
mon place character, the school idea has 
broadened and deepened and lengthened 
here till Newark has — well, one might 
say, accumulated — one of the proudest 
educational establishments in the coun- 
try. Her school properties are worth 
between ten and eleven millions of dol- 
lars. Under the eye of Dr. Addison B. 
Poland, selected as her School Superin- 
tendent fifteen years ago because of his 
pre-eminence among the educators of 
the country, are 4 High Schools. 5.^) 
Continued on page 55 



54 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Geo. W. Maulbetsch /^JoSDE M4^fc^«v Richard L. Whittemore 

President /^^^{c^^ ^'^^ Secretary-Treasurer 

Established 1886 ("^fc:!^/)^©:^^) Incorporated 1902 




MAULBETSCH & WHITTEMORE CO. 
Cases and Satchels for Musical Instruments 

CORNER CROSS AND SPRING STREETS, NEWARK, N. J. 

Wholesale Only Long Distance Telephone 



ESSEX CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, Inc. 
Building Construction 

85 AND 87 ACADEMY STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



A. G. Reimold, President J. V. Chapot, Secretary A. G. H. Reimold, Treasurer F. Chapot, Manager 

REIMOLD, CHAPOT & COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Fine French Chamois and Fancy Leather 

Producers of Moellon Degras, Kid and Sheep Shoe Leather 
108-116 ADAMS STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



a. G. Reimold Ed. F. O'Rourke A. G. H. Reimold 

President and Treasurer Vice-President and Secretary Assistant Treasurer and Manager 

WOBURN DECREASING COMPANY 

Largest Extractors of Grease from Leather 

A Necessity to the Successful Tanner 
WOBURN, MASS. HARRISON, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



55 



Elementary Schools, and 2 Industrial 
Schools. The opportunities the elemen- 
tary and high schools open to the com- 
munity are known of all men. The 
children bring the tidings of them home 
to us every day of the week. Those in 
the vocational schools are quite as varied 
and mavbe even more valuable in the 




Boys' Industrial School 

practical work of life. In the Boys' 
Industrial School pupils are tutored in 
woodwork, printing, electricity, etc. ; 
and in the girls they are given lessons 
in sewing, dressmaking, millinery, cook- 
ing, and in other things every woman 
ought to know. 

Besides, there are 10 classes for defec- 
tives, 7 for the deaf and the blind, 1 for 
cripples, and .") for open-air work and 
study. Summer schools are maintained 
in 2 High and 30 Elementary School 
buildings, and the experiment of all-year 
schools is being tried also. The ambition 
of her young folk who can devote only 
their evenings to learning "How," makes 
it necessary to conduct evening high 
school classes in six schools, besides 
other classes in the two industrial 
schools and in seventeen of the ele- 
mentary schools. 

$3,000,000 a Year 
For the instruction of the 70.000 who 
flock to these great educational cen- 
tres — for some of them are among the 
most pretentious and ornate and well- 
equipped in the United States — the city 



maintains a corps of 1,810 teachers for 
the day classes, 441 for the evening 
classes, and 132 for the all-year institu- 
tions. And it costs Newark a pretty 
penny too! The balance sheet of 1915 
exceeded $3,000,000. Of this imposing 
total, the railroads contributed $437,725 ; 
$53,500 came from the State Fund; 
$1,450,000 from the State School Tax. 
and Newark City paid the rest of the 
bill. Of course she is also heavily repre- 
sented in the state tax and state fund 
contributions. But Newark holds it 
among the very best of her investments 
and pays the bill with smiling satis- 
faction. The 70,000 enrollment repre- 
sents 19% of the city's population. In 
1880 the ratio was only 13%. New 
rigors in the enforcement of attendance 
laws account for the nearly fifty per 
cent, better showing. 

All the modern ideas are incorporated 
in the splendid system thus briefly 
sketched. There are school playgrounds, 
gymnasiums, vocational instruction, 
evening lectures, that are every one a 
treat, for the masses ; nurses to watch 
the youngsters and physicians to cure 
them of their ailments ; and Dr. Poland 




South Side Hich School Auditorium 

is trying, in the Cleveland School, a 
modification of the much vaunted Gary 
System that he expects to increase the 
school capacity, if generally employed, 
fifty to sixty per cent. It is a system of 
alternating classes by which the school 
Continued on page 37 



56 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



NEWARK'S 
ANNIVERSARY V 



IS THE 
PRIDE OF GIANTS 



"^■■"Mif 



The world's largest producers of Electrical 
Devices for Ignition — Magnetos, Coils, 
Spark Plugs, Starting and Lighting Sys- 
tems, Ammeters, Batteries, etc. 



SPLITDORF ELECTRICAL CO. 

NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone Mulberry 1124 



THE PITTS COMPANY 



Krueger's 

Celebration 

Beer 

The Modern 
Treat 



INCORPOUATRD 



Slag Roofing, Cement Work 

58 PARK STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



"The Home Beaiitifier" 

Victor 
Liquid Wax Dressing 

CLEANS, PRESERVES, POLISHES 

Floors, Ftirniture, Auto Bodies, 

Linoleum, Leather Goods 

Easily Applied. Rapid and Efficient. 
Use Victor Polish and Dusting Mops 

MADE IN U. S. A. BY 

VICTOR SPECIALTY CO., Inc. 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



57 



children, set oil in groups, rotate in 
their class work. 

Boys Lodyiny House School 

The first of the public schools was in 
the old "Boys' Lodging House," in 
which the Rev. C. H. Yatman was the 
moving spirit. The distinction of being 
the most venerable of the standing pub- 
lic school buildings is divided between 
that on State Street near Broad, and 
that on Market Street opposite the 
Court House. They have survived since 
1847. The contrast between them and 
the imposing Central High School on 
High Street, and the more ornate and 
quite as imposing South Side High 
School, tells the story of the greater city 
picturesquely. The latest of the build- 
ings to be completed, the AIcKinley in 
the heart of the Italian Colony, is, too, 
a model of educational completeness. 
These notations are not invidious. The 
city is studded with temples of learning 
that outshine the university of even 
modern days in some larger cities. 
Nearly $700,000 was spent on the Cen- 
tral Manual Training School on High 
Street. The South Side High is valued 
at nearly $150,000. The block-long 
Normal School on Belleville Avenue at 
Fourth, which the city built for its own 
use, but turned over to the State, repre- 
sents an investment of $375,000. The 
schools on Burnett Street and the Lafay- 
ette, Morton and Newton Schools have 
a value exceeding $300,000 each, and 
there are a half dozen others close to 
that line. 

The Parochial School Aid 

The city's free school equipment is 
supplemented by a parochial system that 
aids it substantially in its duty to its 
young. Under the fostering and en- 
lightened care of the Rev. John A. Dil- 
lon, Superintendent of Schools in the 
Newark Catholic Diocese, the parochial 
schools have grown enormously in effi- 
ciency and power. They are graded as 
our city grammar schools, and their 
diploma opens the door of the City High 
Schools to their graduates. 

They relieve the communities in this 
Diocese of the instruction of more than 
fiO.OOO pupils. More than 13,000 of the 
total are tutored in the 26 schools in 




Rev. John A. Dillon 

SUPERINTENDENT PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS, 
NEWARK CATHOLIC DIOCESE 

Newark, by a corps of about 250 teach- 
ers, carefully trained for their lifework 
in the Catholic Normal School at Con- 
vent Station. Their equipment here 
runs up into the millions in value and 
money has not been spared in providing 
facilities for the army of little students. 
The St. Rose of Lima School building 
on Orange Street in the Roseville Sec- 
tion, cannot have cost less than $150,000. 
That of St. Columba's School on South 
Street represents another outlay of 
$100,000. St. Benedict's is a type of 
many other edifices that come up to the 
$75,000 mark. And altogether, they 
make a splendid — indeed, in view of the 
pressure for public school room a 
needed — complement to the system the 
city has built up to prepare her rising 
citizenship for the luring possibilities of 
the vears ahead of it. 



58 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 

1843 1916 

I MEEKER FOUNDRY CO. 
Malleable Iron Castings 

I 95 CLAY STREET 

I NEWARK, N. J. 



Gardner Meeker, President David M. Meeker, Vice-President 

Stephen M. Miller, Secretary and Treasurer 



Telephone VVaverly 133 Family Trade a Specialty 

TEGEN & WIEBKE COMPANY 

Dealers in 

All the Best Grades of Coal 

Pockets: 99-127 Badger Avenue, Newark, N. J. 
Office: Clinton Avenue and Bergen Street 



QUALITY FIRST QUALITY LAST QUALITY ALWAYS 

Quality is the Watchword in the production of 

DUBOIS BEER 

Telephone or write for a case. Know for yourself. Be Your Own Expert. 

DU BOIS BREWING COMPANY 

310-312 JELLIFF AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 

Prompt, Efficient Service for Family Trade. Telephone Waverly 1181 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



59 




60 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



NEWARK BRUSH CO. 

Brushes of Every Description 



The Section 



The Brush 




Reliable Sectional 
WHEEL BRUSH 

for 
Practical Polishers 

12 inch diameter Brush. 
2y2 inches face made with 
Four Sections, Malleable 
Iron Flanges, vSteel Hub. 

253 MULBERRY STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



\: 




"V.^^^ 



SECURE— a.s strong as the Lathe that runs it. SAFE 
EFFICIENT Three times the wear of ordinary wheels. ECONOMICAL 



Established 1852 



BALBACH SMELTING & REFINING CO. 

Smelters and Refiners 

of Ores, Bullion and other materials containing 
Gold, Silver, Platinum, Copper and Lead 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



61 



Newark at Worship 

A Little Talk about her One Hundred and Seventy-nine 

Churches; the People who go to them, 

and the Others who don't 

Written by William E. Sackett 




N Newark's early history the 
Church was, so to speak, the 
Municipal Building also. 
The pioneers of 1666 were 
a well-established congrega- 
tion of Presbyters from Branford, Con- 
necticut, that came here to build a 
church and a city for the church to con- 
trol. The church went up on Broad 
Street, about opposite the place which 
gets its name from the old Connecticut 
town ; and became — to be more exact, 
was made — the centre of the new town's 




Old First Church 



civic and political as well as of its reli- 
gious activities. One could not vote in 
the Town Meeting unless he had a 
"First Church" membership card. 

The Theocracy — about the last of its 
kind to be attempted in this country — 
ran things here for many years. Its 
atmosphere lingered till the Theocracy 
expired in giving birth to the Presby- 
terian College which has grown into 
Princeton University. The old church's 
pastor of that day was the Rev. Aaron 
Burr — a name made even more famous 
in American annals by the wit and 
polish and exploits of the pastor's 
son, who first slew Hamilton, next 
became Vice-President of the United 
States, and wound up a career, as 
romantic as it was brilliant, with 
a plot against the life of the nation 
that had so honored him. The chief 
distinction of the elder Burr rests 
on his having become the first Presi- 
dent of Princeton College. And 
even to this day, the tradition of the 
city's religious birth is reflected in 
the preponderance of its Presby- 
terian Churches. 

Some More Reminiscences 

So, if space pennitted, one might 
go on weaving romances about the 
beginnings of scores of the one hun- 
dred and seventy-nine churches, 
chapels and mission houses that do 
so nmch for the uplift of the people. 
There, for instance, is the Old 
House of Prayer, up near the 
Lackawanna Station — well, the pop- 
ular nunor that it was once a 
Washington headquarters is a mere 
superstition ; but it is true that the 
Hessians housed in it on their way 
to the drubbing Washington gave 
Continued on page 63 



62 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Louis ScHLESiNGERjNc. 

NEWARK,N.J. 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

THE RECOONIZED LEADING AND BEST 
IIPPED REAL ESTATE OFFrCE IN TME STATQ 

ESSEX BUILDING 



KEp 



The First National Bank 

BELLEVILLE, NEW JERSEY 

Capital $100,000 

Surplus and Profits $154,000 
Total Resources $1,370,000 

"The Bank where you feel at home" 

Commercial and Savings 
Departments 



Model Storage Warehouses, Inc. 



54-56 BELLEVILLE AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 
1900 Sixteen Years 

FURNITURE HANDLING SPECIALISTS 



1916 



Proper Handling of Household Goods is an art. We are artists in our line. 

Packing, Storing, Moving and Shipping Household Goods is our business. 

The smallest job is none too small, or the largest none too large for us to 

handle. Well Organized. Highly Efficient. 

Telephone 706 Branch Brook Silver and Safe Deposit Vaults 



HOERL FRICTION CLUTCHES and GAS ENGINES 

Manufactured by 

Newark Gas Engine and Mfg. Co. 

676 NORTH SIXTH STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



S. WILDSTEIN 

218 Waverly Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

Dealer and manu- 
facturer of 




Bags, Bagging 

Burlaps and 

Barrel Covers 

A1.SO all kinds of 
Scrap Bagging 

Tel. 4234 Waverly 



Trusses, Abdominal Support- 
ers, Elastic Stockings and 
Surgical Appliances 

"46 Years of Practical Experience" 

Reinhold Schumann 

23 William Strkkt, Nkwark, N.J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



63 



them in Trenton a little later. On the 
portals of Old Trinity — up in Military 
Park — a plate, implanted there by pat- 
riotic S. A. R., tells how, in 1776, 
"Washington and his army passed be- 
neath this tower on their masterly 
retreat to the hills beyond the Delaware 
to gather strength for the bold blow at 
Princeton and Trenton," that turned the 
tide of the Revolution. 

So it goes. The older of the church 
buildings "look" the history there is in 
them. From the Old Church at Lyons 
Farm came the First Baptist congrega- 
tion that founded what is now known 
as the Peddie Memorial. The Halscy 
Street Methodist is the mother church 
of the line of beautiful places of wor- 
ship that faith has scattered all over the 
city. From such beginnings as these, 
the denominations grew and grew ; one 
church no longer answered ; and many, 
and more, had to be provided for them, 
till now the city is studded with temples 
that make it at once beautiful and good. 

Of the 179 places of worship there 
are 35 Presbyterian Churches, 31 Catho- 
lic, 35 Baptist, 18 Methodist Episcopal, 
17 Episcopalian, 11 Synogagues, 10 
Lutheran, 8 Dutch Reformed, 4 Evan- 
gelical, 3 Congregational, 2 Christian 
Science, 2 Independent, 2 Greek Ortho- 
dox, 2 Seventh Day Baptist, a Metho- 
dist Protestant, a Reformed Episcopal, 
a LTniversalist. and a Christadelphian. 
For the rest, there are two "undenom- 
inational," and 3 African Methodist 
Episcopal Churches. The colored folks 
have also three of the array of Baptist 
Churches. A few of the edifices are 
small ; they are for new congregations 
or in mission fields. But the great, great 
majority of them are expensive and 
ornate edifices that contribute grace- 
fully to the perspective of the city's 
landscape. The investment they repre- 
sent runs up into many millions — 
twenty would be a conservative estimate. 

The Church Population 

The number of churches is not, how- 
ever, a wholly reliable guide for a com- 
parison as to attendance. At the altars 
of the 31 Catholic Churches more de- 
votees gather than around the pulpits of 




Rev. Aaron Burr 
founder of princeton college 

the 125 or more Protestant Churches. 
The congregations in the Catholic 
Churches exceed the Protestant congre- 
gations, in the item of membership, by 
maybe twenty thousand. There is 
nothing like an accurate church census 
anywhere. But the approximate figures 
collated by the Rev. Dr. Davis W. Lusk 
are quoted everywhere as authoritative. 
According to them. 50,000 represents 
the actual membership of the Protestant 
churches in the city. To these may be 
added another 50,000 representing rela- 
tives who go to church with them. That 
makes a total of 100,000 for the local 
Protestant community. 

The Catholics count all who have been 
baptised into the faith as members ; 
there were 120.000 of these in the city 
last year. As each parish is assessed 
according to its membership, it may be 
taken for granted that the total, offi- 
cially furnished, is not exaggerated. Tt 
may even be a bit under the mark ; and 
the Catholic poptdation may actually 
exceed the 120,000 mark. Presides the 
Catholics and Protestants who thus 
account for 220.000 of our 400.000 ix)i)U- 
Coiitiiiucd on page 65 



64 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



See Our Shaper Run at the Exposition 



We are manufacturers 
of 'High Duty' Shapers 
and Automatic Gear 
CuttingMachineryand 
invite you to visit our 
plant. 




95-111 NEW JERSEY 

RAILROAD AVENUE 

NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone Connection 



JOHN RYAN :: Cooperage 

SOUTH, ADAMS and CLIFFORD STREETS 
NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone Branch Brook 3785 

HEWITT BEARING METAL COMPANY 
Brass Founders 

Manufacturers of the Hewitt Bearing Bronze Composition 

Brass. Acid Metals. High Tensile Strength Manganese Bronze 
Heat Resisting Metals and Babbitt for General Machine Work 

BERKELEY AVENUE and NORTH SIXTH STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



C. FRANZ, President and Treasurer 



R. G. HOLBROOK, Vice-President and Secretary 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



65 



lation, there are about 5, 000 church 
folks of uiiscellaneous denominations — 
hke those of the Greek Church, whose 
Pope is the Czar of Russia. 

In the background is an unafliHated 
population of some 115,000 that does 
not go to church anywhere. There are 
not many of them, however, without 
their religious leanings, x^s the Catholic 
system is rigid, and that of the Pro- 
testants loose, in the matter of gathering 
the faithful to the fold, the assumption 
is that if these were forced into either 
Church, far the larger number would 
go to the Protestant side. Those thus 
brought within the Protestant atmos- 
phere have been estimated as high as 
100,000. But that is an outside esti- 
mate ; and indeed there is no way of 
telling anything about it — it is all specu- 
lation. There may be some infidels and 
scoflFers in the vast unattached throng; 



but even they would not care to be count- 
ed entirely out of the church atmosphere. 

Sixty Thousand Hehvews 

These speculations are all on the as- 
sumption that the estimate of G(),ooo 
Hebrews in the city approaches ac- 
curacy. The Jewish population grows 
quite as rapidly, proportionately, as tlie 
Catholic. An estimate of ten years ago 
i:)laced their number at only 50,000. 
They are quite as devoted to their tem- 
ples as the Catholics to theirs, and can 
claim few of the community of 115,000 
unattached. The men are as regular in 
their attendance at the synagogues as are 
the women ; and the Men's Forward 
Movement, by which the Protestant de- 
nominations are trying to induce the 
husbands to go to church with their 
wives and participate in church work, is 
hardlv necessarv in the ITouse of Israel. 




North Jersey Motor Vehicle Co 



J. B. Stobaeus, Jk., President 



313 CENTRAL AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



66 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




MADE IN NEWARK 
RPHY 



c^HOE 



The Johnson &MurphyShoe 

WORN ALL OVER THE WORLD 



NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 
U. S. A. 



Cable Address : "GlEakidd, Newark' 
Western Union Code 




Frankfort General Insurance Co. 

One of the oldest, largest and strongest in the world. All kinds of 

Liability, Automobile, Workman's Compensation, 

Accident, Health and Burglar Insurance 

JAY & JAY, General Agents 

Fire Insurance Specialists 
KINNEY BUILDING, BROAD AND MARKET STREETS, NEWARK 



Established 1848 Incorporated 1900 

J. WISS & SONS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of High Grade 

Shears, Scissors and Razors 

Cutlery, Pruning Shears, Tinners' Snips, etc. 
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



TNDUSTRIAI. EXPOSITION 



67 




68 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Before You Leave the Exposition 
Be Sure to Visit 

Murphy Varnish Company 

Space 6, Section K, Main Floor 

and see the beautiful model of 
their Newark Plant, at Chestnut, 
McWhorter and Vesey Streets 

There are other interesting 
things to see and some one 
who can answer questions 



Murphy Varnish Company 

Founded by Franklin Murphy 
FRANKLIN MURPHY, Jr., President 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



69 



Places Where Newark Plays 

Big Parks and Little Ones and others not Parks al all inhere 

Iicr people sport in "off hoars" — their Facilities, 

their Trees, and their Monuments 



UT then Newark can play as 
hard as she can work — and 
maybe with even more zest. 
Playroom is one of her 
neediest needs ; and, in pro- 
viding herself with it, she thriftily hits 
a second bird with one stone. Her play- 
grounds provide, beside the recreation 
centres, a group of breathing spots for 




run — or rather in the short run, because 
they soon jump values up all around 
them and so win back for the city in 
taxes more than she risks to get them. 
Newark has a lot of these fine in- 
vestments, to say nothing of the play- 
grounds and minor recreation centres ; 
and her Shade Tree Commission is 
doing what it can to give the whole city 




IIfj.lKk Par k WAV 



the homes that have them none too 
abundantly. She finds it pays to keep 
people well as well as to make them 
happy. The well man is likely to be a 
happy man, the happy man to be a well 
one ; and the happier and healthier they 
are the greater the power of their arms 
and the longer the endurance. Plans 
that make for the either that brings both 
have their economic, as well as their 
sanitary, aspects ; they find compensa- 
tion in the workshop, in the counting 
room, and in all the varied activities of 
her busy life. And the breathing spots 
pay for themselves, too, in the long 



a park-scape aspect. Two of the great- 
est parks in the State are within her 
limit. One of them is noted among land- 
scape artists everywhere as the most 
beautiful artificial park in the country. 
Neither is under Newark's immediate 
control ; neither is therefore part of her 
numicipal equipment; a specially created 
County Park Board is named by the 
Supreme Court Justice presiding in the 
local circuit to manage them. But 
it nmst not be forgotten that the bulk 
of the county bills are footed by 
Newark, and that the fund tliat mam- 
Continued on page 71 



70 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Established 1864 



LYON & SON'S 

Brewing Company 

BREWERS OF 

Lager Beer, Ales and Porter. 
Kent Ale, Brown Stout. 

MOST SANITARY BOTTLING 



Office— 97 CANAL STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Telephone Market 4700 

Bottling Department — 109-111 Commerce Street 

Telephone Market 5574 



Establsihed 1868 



Capital $400,000 



New Jersey 

FIDELITY AND PLATE GLASS 

Insurance Company 

Automobile, Burglary and Plate Glass Insurance 




%VCECti^ 



C. W. FEIGENSPAN, President 

H. C. MITCHELL, Vice-Resident and 

General Manager 



Telephone Waverly 74 

NEWARK RUG WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS 01'' 

Rugs from Old Carpets 

Carpet Cleaning 
146 Avon Avenue, Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



71 



tains them is derived in large measure 
from iier taxpayers. So that, both from 
the geographical and financial stand- 
points they are quite as local to this 
community as if they were all the com- 
munity's own. 

Three other parks within the city 
limits but also within the County Park 
Commission's dominion, are fine ex- 
amples of what the park builders happily 
call "Neighborhood Parks." They are 
the East Side, the West Side and the 
River-bank — laid out and operated with 



redolent, every foot of it, of the his- 
torical past, and part of the city's glory. 
The reference is now of course to 
Military Park, the elm shaded Com- 
mon of the old settlers. If that little 
patch of green were not so dear to the 
taxpayer's heart, it might be accounted 
a bit too dear for the taxpayer's purse. 
It is less than the hundredth part the 
size of Branch Brook, let us say for the 
contrast, but it is worth more than twice 
as much. The $6,000,000 Newark holds 
it to be worth is but a tithe of the wealth 




Winter Sport, Branch Brook Park 



special regard to the immediate local 
surroundings and needs. The East Side 
is down on Adams Street toward the 
Newark meadows ; West Side is on 
"The Hill" ; River-bank on the Passaic 
front near Market Street. The twelve 
and a half acres in East Side Park have 
been laid out at an expense of $124,372 
for land and $53,878 for furnishings. 
There are twenty-three acres in West 
Side and the Park Board has spent all 
told something around $400,000 on it. 

The Historic "Green" 

The city herself has now twenty-two 
parks, all of the neighborhood variety, 
save the one, in her very heart, that is 



they would pour into her treasury if 
her tradesmen could only have it set ofiF 
to them in 35 x 100 lots and made part 
of the commerce that swells up all 
around it But even they wouldn't take 
it if they were given a chance ; and the 
community gladly tolerates even its 
array of seedy "benchers" for the senti- 
ment of local loyalty its lawn of velvet, 
its towering elms and planes, its ancient 
church and its old liberty pole inspire. 
l'>ranch Brook Park is the largest of 
the Comity parks within tiie city limits, 
and, as has been intimated already, the 
most ornate. Viewing the 380 acres 
reserve as art has made it today, one 
Continued on page 73 



72 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



THE HISTORY OF NEWARK 

would be incomplete without the story of the M. & B. 
Clothing Store — an institution that has clothed the men 
of Newark to their satisfaction and profit — an establish- 
ment that has been 

51 YEARS AT IT 

51 years at the same old stand — 51 years selling good cloth- 
ing for men and boys — 51 years building a reputation second 
to none in New Jersey. 

VWamhaimall 

CLOTHING, HATS, SHOES, FURNISHINGS 
807-813 BROAD STREET (Near Market), NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone 3051 Market 



Open Day and Night 



HUBERTS TURKISH BATH 

Private Rooms, Swimming Pool 50 x 16, Artesian Water, Electric 
Light Batlis, Turkisli Bath, Electric Massage, Barber Shop 

Ladies' Day, Tuesday only, 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. 
FRANK RUBER, Proprietor 10 WEST PARK STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone 1366 Branch Brook 

JAMES L. TOBIN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Apparatus for the Laboratory 

277-283 Oraton St., Newark, N. J. 

THOMAS \V. TOBIN, Proprietor 



Newark Purse Frame Mfg. Co. 

Purse and Bag Frames and Fancy 
Metal Goods 

548-556 South Euventh Street, Newark 

ORPHEUM THEATRE 
Moving Pictures 

69 Pacific Street, Newark, N. J. 

LEADER THEATRE 
Moving Pictures 

990 South Orange Avenue, Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



73 



would never suspect that all that garden 
of flowers, of running stream and lake, 
of woodland patches surrounding great 
fields of velvet green that appeal to 
one's sense of magnitude, of nooks and 
crannies, of arbors and rustic refuges, 
could have been evolved from anything 
so unpromising as the swamp it was. 
There isn't a spot in it that is not worth 
visiting for the pleasure of seeing — 



It would be idle to attempt to picture 
the beauty spots where all is so beauti- 
lul. The park has cost the county some- 
thing over $3,500,000 ; and its care with 
that of the others has grown to be so 
mighty an undertaking that the Com- 
mission has found it necessary to have 
a fitting administration building. That 
is going up now — a $70,000 home ot 
brick and terracotta that fits in with the 




Swimming Pool, Bk-.-knch Brook Park 



thousand-hued flower beds terraced from 
the hill tops to the lake-front; rustic 
bowers and summer houses ; a patch of 
refulgent rhodendrons that fairly light 
the wayside and the chrysanthemum and 
begonia show recurring season sights. 

And so it goes — everything that is 
brightest, showiest, most restful, in 
nature. And for the more restless, the 
busier things of sport — nets for tennis ; 
wickets for croquet ; bases for "the fan" ; 
goals for the kicker; links for the 
golfer; boats for the gondolier and 
a winding panorama of water to go on ; 
the bandstand on the lake-edge for the 
multitude that flocks there as often as 
the cornet blows the signal ; swings and 
turn-stiles ; side-bars and slides and 
punching-balls and all the gym-cracks 
the youthful soul is devoted to. 



landscape about it. A fieldhouse in the 
upper mall makes a pleasing perspec- 
tive, too. At the other extreme of the 
reserve is the picturesque fountain for 
which the city is inexcusably reluctant 
to sup])ly the water ; and over towards 
the Rosevillc corner is the big stone that 
tells how the "Boys in Blue" camped 
there on their way to "the front" in the 
days of the Civil War. 

Race Course for the People 

Weequahic. in the Southern section of 
the city verging on the Elizabeth line, is 
one of the younger brood of County 
Commission parks With time to grow 
it will be eventually as handsome a re- 
serve as Branch Brook. It is almost as 
Continued on page 75 



74 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



We are Better Equipped than 
ever before to Serve You 

We now have much greater and better facilities than ever 
before in our history — which means that L. S. Plant & Co. 
acknowledges no superior in the State of New Jersey. 

The completion of our 
New Main Floor Annex 

has enabled us to expand most of our departments so 
that now they are completely equipped to handle their 
patronage. 

For dependable merchandise at moderate prices visit 
L. S. Plaut & Co. 

Women's Apparel and Furnishings, Men's Furnishings, 
Clothing and Furnishings for Boys and Young Men, Dry 
Goods, Home Furnishings, Jewelry, Toilet Articles, etc. 

Visit our New Soda Fountain and 
Candy Department. 




THE SHOPPING CENTER OF NEW JERSEY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



75 



expansive, with 315 acres ; but, with 
only about $800,000 spent on it so far, it 
is not as expensive. It has however, 
special features that attract particular 
throngs. There's its race track, for in- 
stance, its exclusive feature. Much of 
the park land was in use for many years 
as the Fair Ground of the State Agri- 
cultural Society ; and the race course is 
the heritage of the Commission from 
that Association. But it has all been 
made over, and re-topped into the fast- 
est half-mile course in the East; and a 



caron games, checkers, roller-skating 
and all the other et ceteras. Houses on 
the ground are furnished with lines of 
indoor games; the girls are tutored in 
sewing, rafia work and reed weaving; 
and clubs for music, oratory and the 
drama are encouraged among the young 
of both sexes. 

The Recreation Commission super- 
vises all of these increasingly popular 
play places that are doing so much for 
the pleasure of little ones whose lives 
would be cheerless without, and to keep 




A Bit of Phillips Park when the Snow King's on the Job 



circle inside the running track for ath- 
letic games, too. The Road Horse As- 
sociation airs its trotters there often ; 
and the track has become so popular 
that the old grandstand is no longer 
equal to demands upon it. The Commis- 
sion has therefore added to the track 
equipment, at an expense of $40,000, a 
grandstand of concrete, 2,371 feet long 
and 71 feet wide. 

Both engaged in recreation and beau- 
tification work, the Play Ground and 
Shade Tree Commissions are close allies 
of the park chiefs in city and county. 
The play ground idea is to utilize the 
waste places for the outing and amuse- 
ment of the youngsters ; and they are 
fitted with all the appliances that make 
for youthful sport. In most of them 
are the parallel bars, swings, teeters, 
slides, great strides, sand boxes, basket 
ball, bowley ball, baseball, shuffle board. 



all, of whatever station, out of the street 
life that is so demoralizing. One of 
them, that at Vailsburg, just acquired, 
cost $15,000. And, then, there's the 
bath house facility for the refreshing 
and invigorating plunge. These bathing 
resorts are completely equipped. One 
of them, the Montgomery Bath, cost 
$110,000. It is claimed to be the finest 
in the country ; safe to say it is one of 
the finest, at any rate. 

All the City a Park 

These beneficent enterprises of the 
other departments are handsomely cli- 
maxed by the work of the Shade Tree 
Commission. Those other departments 
are devoted to the making of parks in 
spots ; the aim of this one is to make a 
park-site of the whole city, with tree 
Continued on page jj 



76 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



BERKOVITZ, 
GOLDSMITH & SPIEGEL 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Sheep Skins, Skivers & Goat Skins 

of every description for Traveling Bags, Suit Cases, 

Belts, Poeketbooks, Caps, Shoes, Bookbinding, 

and Leatlier Novelties 

Factoriks: NEW YORK AVE., McWHORTER and GARDEN STS. 

NEWARK, N. J. 

Office and Salesroom : 35 Spruce Strkf.t, New York City 

Cable Address : BERKGSPir'.r., A. B.C. Code. Write for Samples and Quotations 



ESSEX FOUNDRY 

Makers of "Fittings that Fit" 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

Soil Pipe and Fittings, Steam and Drainage T'ittings, Flanges and 
Flange Uttings, Roller Stands, Wash Tray Legs, Cesspools, etc. 



^ ^ ELECTROTYPER :: NICKELTYPER 

PRINTING PLATES for all purposes in Copper and Nickel-Steel 
22-24 PROSPECT STREET (Mundv Building), NEWARK, N. J. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed Telephone 4110 Market 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



77 



planting as its chief activity. The tree 
is a fine investment in itself. A strip- 
ling that can be put down and framed 
around for $4, grows to be worth 
$100 all by itself, in a few years. You 
have to cut its hair and trim its beard 
and amputate a limb once in awhile ; but 
the cost of it all is a bagatelle as com- 
pared with the profit of its nursing. 

The policy of the departments in both 
county and city is not to transplant but 
to put down seedling trees, from the 
department nursuries and set them out 
where they are to stay forever, when 



The kindliest thing God ever made, 
His hand of very healing laid 
Upon a fevered world, is shade. 
His glorious company of trees 
Throw out their mantles, and on these 
The dust-stained wanderer finds ease. 
Green temples, closed against the beat 
Of noontime's blinding glare and heat, 
Open to any pilgrim's feet 
The white road blisters in the sun ; 
Now half the weary journey done. 
Enter and rest, O weary one ! 
And feel the dew of dawn still wet 
Beneath thy feet, and so forget 
The Inirning highway's ache and fret. 
This is God's hospitality. 
And who so rests bcncatli a tree 
Hath cause to thank Him gratefully. 

— Theodosia Carrison. 
in Everybody's Magazine. 




Park Avenue 



they are two or three feet high. That's 
why some of our old streets look so 
young; and why we have to wait for 
our parks to grow up to us. They are 
not all like Military that came to us 
with a heritage of great elms. Every- 
body is jealous of those; no one sees 
one fall without a sigh. .\ plucky 
woman drove the axe-man away from 
the big elm at the head of East Park 
Street some years ago; and the noble 
old tree stands there yet. as a monu- 
ment to her heroic public spirit. 



XcuHirk's Moiiiinu'iits 

Glimpses of monuments here and 
there give an added touch of art to the 
tree and flower decorations of the town. 
jMore than that, some of them tell of 
the achievements of Newark's great sons 
on the larger stage of life. A statue of 
Erederick Frelinghuysen at one end of 
Military Park and of "Phil" Kearny in 
ihr mid.st of his guns at the other, re- 
mind of Newark's eminence in states- 
Con fi"»rrf on page 79 



78 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



TAe CoalTha^ Satisfies The Coal T/iat Satis f/es 

r/ie Coal nat Sat/^f/es 
T/ie Coal T/2ai ^ai/sf/es T/?e Coal That Sat/sf/es 

T/?e Coal T/?a t sSat isf/e s 
The Coal Thai 3a^/sf/es The Coal T/ial Sa.tisf/e& 

The Coal That Sat/sf/es 
The Coal Th(Zt ^aiisf/es Tlie Coal That Sal/sf/es 

The Coal Th^t Sat/sf/es 
The Coal Thai Sat/sf/'es The Coal That Sal/sf/es 

The Coal TAat Satisfies 
The Coal That Sal/jf/es The Coal That Sal /sf/'es 

The Coal That Saf/sf/es 
T/?e Coal That 3ah'shes The Coal That Sahsf/es 

The Coal That Sat/sf/es 

LEHIGH VALLEY 

ANTHRACITE 

Th e Coal That Sailsfles 

The Coal That Sallsf/e s The Coal That Sah'sf/es 

The Coal That Sails f/es 
The Coal That Sat/sf/es The Coal That Sat/sf/'es 

The Coal That Sal/sf/'es 
The Coal Thai Sat/sf/es The CoclI Thai Sat/sf/es 

The Coal T/ial Sal/sf/^s 
The Co 0.1 Thai Sat/sf/cs The Coal That Sat/sf/es 

The Co(zl T/74.1 Sat/sf/es 
The Coal Thai Sal/sf/es The Coal That Sal/sf/es 

The Co a. I Tha I Sn t/sf/'e s 
The Co dl That Sat/sf/es The Co a. I Tha,l Sat/sf/es 

The Coal That Saf/sf/es 
The Coal That Sat/sf/es The Coa.1 Thai Sat/sf/'es 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



79 



menship and in war. The Frelinghiiy- 
sen name has been blazened on the 
scroll of American scholarship and 
state-craft for more than a century. 
One of the family was Burr's successor 
as President of Princeton College ; and 
two generations of the family have given 
New Jersey two noted figures in the 
United States Senate. He whose monu- 
ment adorns Military Park was one of 
these honored two. As a Senator he 
won nation-wide recognition for the 
finish of his oratory. President Hayes 
gave him a seat in his Cabinet with the 
portfolio of Secretary of State ; and 
his statue stands in front of the family's 
homestead now occupied by his son, 
President Frelinghuysen of the Mutual 
Benefit Insurance Co. of this city. As 
for Kearny, every veteran knows the 
story of his wild cavalry dashes during 
"The War." The monument in Mili- 
tary Park, was kicked around and neg- 
lected in the dust of the corridors of 
the State House in Trenton for many 
vears till the S. A. R. rescued it, dusted 



it off, and set it up with military honors 
under the liberty pole. 

The figure in bronze of Vicar General 
Doane, just outside the park gates, com- 
memorates the work of a Prelate of 
great civic and church activity. In 
Washington Park, a bit up the street, is 
the statue of Seth Boyden, famed as the 
inventor of the malleable iron process. 
The equestrian monument of General 
Washington at the Washington Place 
corner, is the handsome gift to the city 
of Amos H. Van Horn ; and C. W. 
Feigenspan is to erect in Clinton Park 
an even more imposing monument of 
General Bartolomeo Colleoni, on horse- 
back — a reproduction of a historical 
creation of Andros Verricchio, the 
Venetian sculptor. The Hikers" monu- 
ment at Madison Park is a notable con- 
tribution to the city's statuary ; and one 
roaming through Branch Brook Park 
occasionally encounters amid the leaves 
the chiseled face or form of one im- 
mortal in art or music or literature, 
or arms. 



ONE OF NEWARK'S OLDEST KNIT GOODS MANUFACTURERS 



NEWARK KNITTING WORKS 

OTTO SEISS, Proprietor 

Branch of Herman Seiss, Apolda, Germany, Maker of Fancy Knit Goods 

Makers of High Class 

Fancy Knit Goods 

587 SOUTH TENTH STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Ladies , Men's and Children's Pure Worsted Sweaters 
Shetlands and Angora Sweaters a Specialty 



Boston 



New York 



Chicago 



80 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



World Wide Service 

Money sent to all parts of 
the world 

Funds transmitted by Cable, 
Telegraph or Wireless 

Letters of Credit and Trav- 
elers' Checks issued, avail- 
able in all parts of the world 

Prompt and Satisfactory 
Service Guaranteed 



AMERICAN 
NATIONAL BANK 

SPRINGFIELD and BELMONT AVES. 
NEWARK, N. J. 



SOW YOUR LAWN WITH THE 

"Forbes" 
Lawn Grass Seed 

FROM 

NEW JERSEY'S 

LARGEST SEED STORE 

Delivered to you at 3()c. quart, 

4 quarts for $1.00 ; $G.OO a bushel 

(20 lbs.) 

J. F. NOLL & CO. 

SEEDSMEN 
115 MULBERRY STREET, NEWARK 

'Phone 4579 Market 




HARDMAN TIRE Sc RUBBER CO. 

30 WILLIAM STRELET- 

NEWARK,NEW JERSEY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



81 




A Bit of Clinton Park 



1. Fountain designed by H. A. Capara, Consulting Landscape Arcliitect. 

2. A Close View — Sparrows at Bath. 

3. Winter Aspect — Jack Frost, Non-Consulting Landscape Arcliitect. 



82 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



1 



1856 Established in Newark 1916 

SIXTY YEARS 



DIXON & RIPPEL 

Manui'acturEhs of High Grade 

BRUSHES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

High Grade Painters' Brushes 
Special Brushes Made to Order 

Sole Manufacturers of the Original Celebrated 
DIXON & RIPPEL PATENT AND ENAMELLED LEATHER BRUSHES 

NEWARK. NEW JERSEY 



SPECIAL AND DECORATIVE EFFECTS 

BEAVER ENGINEERING CO, 

Electrical Contracting Engineers 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 
Official Decorator for this Exposition 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



83 



Newark's Police Protection 

The Transformation of the "Leather Head" into "The 

Finest" — Modern Methods that have made the 

Policeman the Friend of the People 




KWARK began her police 
business with a constable. 
That is orthodox ; all new 
c(iinmunities start out that 
way. The glamour that 
hangs around every first of his line 
hovers over the memory of Thomas 
Johnson whom the Town Fathers, in 
January, 1668, named, first of his kind, 
"to beare the Ofifice of Constable in Our 
Town for the Year Insuing." One con- 
stable kept "Our Town" in order for 
five years, when a second one was ap- 
pointed ; but by 1684 it had become so 
inconceivably wicked that it was found 
necessary to increase the force to eight. 
The first of the Constables was, in a 
way, a general utility man for the com- 
munity. He was not only to arrest 
people, but was a sort of "whip" for 
the Town Fathers. He came around 
for a fine from every non-attendant at 
the Town Meetings, and generally busied 
himself in making life as uncomfortable 
as he could for his fellow men. From 
th's primitive conception of the police 
function, the idea has branched out into 
the beneficence that makes the police- 
man of today the friend of the people, 
rather than the terror the unsophis- 
ticated picture him. He guides us, 
awake; guards us while we sleep; finds 
our little ones when we lose them (feeds 
them too, sometimes), and keeps the 
jo- -ider" from crushing us under his 
naut at the street crossings. Chief 
Oi rolice, Michael T. Long, indeed, 
counts the trafiice service his men ren- 
der at the points where vehicle and way- 




AllCHAEL T. LONC. 
CHIEF OF POLICE 

farer swarm, as one of the most humane 
of his department activities. 

The "Leather Heads" 

But the city has not jumped from her 
constable swathes into the great uni- 
formed service of today. She has 
reached it progressively. Next after 
"Our Town's" constable, came the 
"Night Watch," as they were officially 
called, but the irreverent populace dub- 
bed them "Leather Heads" because they 
wore helmets like unto that which dis- 
Continued on page 85 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



*^; 



f* 




Wholesale and 
Retail 

LUMBER 



Manufacturers 
of 

BOXES 
CRATES 
SHOOKS 



National Box and Lumber Co, 

INCORPORATED 

348-356 SOUTH STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



( Machinery 
MATCH ^ Splints 

( Chemicals 

AMERICAN SPLINT 
CORPORATION 

We furnish any material used 
in Manufacturing Matches 

Works at Aspen, Town of Kearny, N.J. 
Sales office: 141 Broadway, N. Y. 



E. W. McCLAVE & SON 



INCORPORATED 



PROMPT SHIPPERS 

Yellow Pine, Hardwoods 
White Pine, Douglas Fir 

for Export and Domestic Trade 

Offices, Distributing Yards and Mills: 

18 Broadway, New York City 
Harrison, N. J. East Newark, N. J. 

Norfolk, Va. Mobile, Ala. 



D. WAHLERS 

Manufacturer of 

Birch Beer 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



Merigold Electro Plating 
Company 

Klectro Deposits of Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, 

Brass, Rose Gold, Green Gold, Silver, Oxides, 

Bronzes, etc. 

Works: 97 Chestnut St., Newark 



THE KOLBA WRECKING 
CONSTRUCTION CO., Inc. 



28 Peshine Avenue, Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



85 



figures the fireman's form divine. This 
was the only token of their pre-emin- 
ence among the citizens. It was not 
until 1846 that they were given the club 
that has since won world-wide recogni- 
tion as the token of their authority. 
And only when "Our Town" had be- 
come a city did she add a uniform to 
the helmet and the club, and so dress 
her "Finest" up for the modern day 
parade. 

The town had meanwhile been divided 



in Roseville, and enjoys the distinction 
of being the first Police Chief in the 
United States to reach the position as 
the result of a Civil Service examination. 
Under his command are 761 men, with 
13 Captains, B2 Lieutenants, 55 Ser- 
geants and 11 Matrons, and the cost of 
maintenance last year was $1,026,432. 
The record of their work in the sup- 
pression of crime is the most notable, 
even if it be not the most interesting, 
feature of the Chief's annual report. 




Mounted Squad 



into "Watch Districts." When she was 
incorporated in 1836, she started in with 
a captain and twelve of the "Leather 
Heads." It was not till 1854 that they 
were designated as "Police" and decor- 
ated with the shields. Three years later 
the city had her first Chief of Police in 
the person of Henry A. Whitney ; and, 
under the administration of fifteen suc- 
cessors, the department has grown into 
the great machine for good it is today. 
Chief Long is the fifteenth of his line. 
Within the last month he has struck the 
thirtieth anniversary of his advent into 
the department. He had served with the 
detective bureau for some years before he 
was made captain of the Police Precinct 



Last year they bagged six brokers, four 
artists, twenty-two doctors, a dozen law- 
years and even five clergymen. There 
were three Japanese, eight Turks and 
even a native of Africa in the list. The 
Russians, Poles and Austrians made up 
the bulk of the police court crowds. 

Thumb-Print Sensations 

Newark was the first city in the 
country to adopt the Bertillon thumb- 
print system of identification. The 
Chinese used the thumb-print for signa- 
ture fifteen hundred years ago ; but it 
is only within the last fifteen or twenty 
years that the worth of the finger-mark 
began to be appreciated in police work. 
Continued on page Sj 



86 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Christian Feigenspan 

A CORPORATION 
BREWERS AND BOTTLERS OF 

Lager Beer, Ale and Porter 



CHRISTIAN W. FEIGENSPAN, President and Treasurer 
EDWIN C. FEIGENSPAN - Vice-President 

J. AUGUST STENGEL - - Secretary 



Visitors are cordially invited to inspect 
our model plant 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



87 



Boston tried it first on this side of the 
sea, and Newark was next to follow 
suit. Superintendent Schwartz is full 
of stories of the effective operation of 
the system in fixing guilt. The first con- 
viction in the United States on thumb- 
print proof was on evidence procured 
by our local department; and the first 
murder fixed on its perpertrator in the 
country by fingermarks was in the 
courts of this county. 

A remarkable instance of the worth of 
the system was furnished in connection 



police sleuths and is now serving his 
term in the State's Prison for the crime. 
But arresting men has been after all 
a comparatively inconsiderable propor- 
tion of the work of the department. The 
police help in so many directions that 
the men of the force have to be not only 
level-headed and cool-headed but in- 
formed. There is hardly a minute in 
the day when an officer is not confronted 
by the question of should he act, and 
how far can he go ? He is the moment- 
ary judge and juror in every new situ- 




Measuring and Photo Galleky 
Bureau of Identification 



with the robbery of the house of Ex- 
Senator Ernest R. Ackerman, of Plain- 
field. "Second-story men" got away 
with a necklace worth $17,000. Supt. 
Schwartz inspected the porch-posts 
down which the thief had slidden when 
escaping, and detected finger-marks that, 
upon an examination of his records here, 
proved to be those of a "crook" of na- 
tion-wide activities. That man had 
never been even so much as suspected ; 
and w^as even then away off in Chicago. 
He was hunted in his haunts by the 



ation. So he must know "The Law and 
the Gospel," the law of the land, the 
law of humanity, the law of discretion 
and the law of force. His requirements 
for the information that fits him to do 
his fullest duty and yet never exceed it, 
has led to the establishment of a De- 
partment School where he is tutored and 
advised, warned and inspired. Chief 
Long is particularly proud of this "Col- 
lege," and lauds it as his chief aid in 
keeping his department up to the stand- 
ard of any other in the country. 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Established 1880 



Telephone Mulberry 344 



UNION STEAM LAUNDRY 

Shirts, Collars and Cuffs Our Specialty 

We also have a Rough Dry Department in which we do 
a high grade class of work 

888 BROAD STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



New Jersey Toilet 
and Towel Supply Co. 

Blauvelt & Farrington, Inc. 

CLEAN TOWELS SUPPLIED 

Offices and stores supplied with a fine Oak 
Cabinet, Comb, Brush, Whisk Broom, Soap, 
Clean Towels, etc., at reasonable rates. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Write or tele- 
phone and agent will call. 

WE KEEP THE CITY CLEAN 

69-73 New Street, Newark, N. J. 

Telephone 363 Mulberry 



Telephone 2947 Waverly 



Carl Schoenert & Sons 

INCORPORATED 

AUTOMATIC HIGH-GRADE 
MACHINE TOOLS. EXPERIMEN- 
TAL WORK. ALL LABOR-SAVING 
MACHINERY AND TOOLS. 



631-633 South 20th Street 
Newark, N. J. 



Established 1865 



CHAS. W. WALKER'S 
SONS & CO. 



Manufacturers of 



Oak Tanned Leather Belting 

274 Market St., Newark, N. J. 

Telephone Mulberry 2017 



Telephone Market 10277 

Mercer 
Russian & Turkish Baths 

The most Utxurious baths in the State 

Sleeping Accommodations 
for 150 Men 

32 Mercer Street, Newark, N. J. 



HENRY G. TRAUTWEIN 

109 Peshlne Avenue 




Don't wait for this to happen 



METAL 
CEILINGS 

are applied over 
old plaster in 

Kitchens 
Dining Rooms 
Bedrooms 
Bath Rooms 
Halls, Sto.-es 
Garages, Etc. 

Tel. Wav. 8044 
or write us 



WIGDER MFG. CO. 

Everything in Manicure Line 

360 Fourteenth Ave., Newark, N. J. 



THE PARKES FILE CO. 

Manufacturers of Fine Files 

115-117-119 Verona Ave., Newark 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



89 



The Fire-Fighters of Newark 

The Blaze of 1836 would not have eaten out the City's 
Heart if she had been equipped as today 




I^WARK has had some not- 
able fires, and some appeal- 
ing ones, too, as for instance, 
that of two or three years 
ago, that cost the lives of 
twenty-seven young women. But she 
has had none that stunned her civic 
senses as the great blaze of 1836. Sweep- 
ing the block bounded by Market, Broad, 
Mulberry and Mechanic Streets, that ate 
out her very heart. A boarding house 
blaze in the same locality in 1845 gave 
the town a fresh fright ; and someone of 
a flamboyant frame of mind, made a 
lurid picture of the showy blaze that 
has got into history. But the epoch 
making blaze of local annals was that 
of 1836. 

The City's Equipment 

If the city had had at command, at 
that visitation, the splendid fire fighting 
machine over which Fire Chief Paul J. 
Moore presides, the flames might have 
been stayed wdiere they began. If the 
ravages of the Fire Devil had demanded, 
he could have rung to the rescue 16 
horse-drawn engines, 4 horse-drawn 
steamers, 21 combination chemical en- 
gines, 2 horse-drawn hook-and-ladder 
trucks, 6 motor-driven fire engines, a 
motor-drawn combination chemical en- 
gine, and an electric-drawn hook-and- 
ladder truck. There are many mighty 
machines in the department; and one 
among them, the Amoskeag in No. 3 
Engine House, with a capacity of 1,300 
gallons a minute, can pump a three-line 
one-and-a-half inch nozzle stream some 
feet higher than the shining tower of 
the Prudential Building. 

But the periled colony of 1836 had 
only a volunteer force — enthusiasts, but 
only amateurs after all — with a wheezy 
engine or two to fight the flames. The 
department records do not show when 



the half-paid service came into being. 
But when the steam fire engine replaced 
the old hand-pump contrivance, the 
volunteer had to make way for the com- 
petent engineer; and the old timer sur- 
vived only to man the machine and 
stretch the hose and climb the ladder. 
In 1889 the city put them out of com- 




FiRE Chiei- Paul J. Mooku 

mission entirely with the all-paid depart- 
ment that has grown in proportions until 
it has become what it is today. 

The present force consists of 466 
trained men ; has, besides the Chief, 2 
Deputy Chiefs and 5 Battalion Chiefs 
for its administration ; and is divided 
into 39 organized companies housed in 
33 buildings. The value of the plant 
is a trifle short of $1,500,000; the cost 

Continued on page gi 



90 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



C AWLEY, CLARK & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Dry Colors, Pulp Colors and Chemicals 



Office and Works: 
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



Branches: CHICAGO, ILL.; SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



UNIVERSAL 
Caster and Foundry Co. 

The oldest and largest Caster 
Manufacturers in the world 

Casters for Every Purpose 
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



ELECTRICAL GOODS 




Telephone Mulberry 144 




IIIIIIIMIIHIIMIMIIIIIIIlfi 



Telephone Market 5297 

NEWARK APRON CO. 

Mfrs. of Aprons and House Dresses 

73-77 Nichols Street, Newark, N. J. 

MAXWELL & SON 

Mfrs. of Saratoga Potato Chips 

Chipmunk Brand Nut Meats 

Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



91 



of maintenance, $713,430 ; and it was 
effective in keeping the year's losses, on 
1,795 calls, down to less than a million 
dollars. 

A Man and a Horse 

Scarce a man in the department has 
reached his position except through his 
baptism of fire ; and the Commissioners 
keep even these seasoned and practiced 
heroes abreast with the times in the 




"Dick" 

matter of fire fighting science by requir- 
ing them all to attend the department 
"College" once a week. The Dean of 
the force, as one might say, is Captain 
Thomas of No. 19 Engine Company — a 
naval veteran of the Civil War, serving 
in Captain Cushing's Man-of-Warsman 
Schokokon, who entered the service in 



1873. Of course he is one of the figures 
in the department. But the talk of the 
firemen is not all about the men. Their 
horses are their pets and pride. There 
are 142 of these; but one of them is 
specially notable because he holds the 
record for "runs." That's old "Dick" 
of Engine Company No. 12's team of 
three ; and, each horse being known by 
a number, his is 5G. Paul Moore, now 
the Chief of the Fire Department, helped 
to initiate him when he came into the 
service fifteen years ago. A feature of 
the fiftieth anniversary fete of the 
paid Fire Department of New York a 
year ago, was a procession of horses 
that had made records in the matter of 
the number of responses to alarms. The 
l)est of them was about 1,700; "Dick" 
beats that, two-to-one, with a record of 
3,700. During the years he has been in 
the department he has not been "absent 
from duty" except for 33 days when 
recovering from injuries sustained in 
the service. He was laid up once by a 
nail in the foot and again as the result 
of a collision. "Dick" is a flea-bitten 
gray, nineteen years old, fifteen and a 
half hands high, and 1,400 pounds in 
weight. "And," Chief Moore says, "he's 
as good a fireman as the best of us." 

If there only were space to exploit 
department lore ! But there is'nt ! And 
yet, where is there a richer field for it 
than a firehouse? 



STUMPF & BINDER 



Manufacturers of 




Fine Gold and Platinum Chains 

Swivels, Spring Rings and Snaps 

in Gold and Platinum 

ALSO GOLD PLATFD 

50-58 Columbia St., Newark, N. J. 

RICHARDSON BUILDING, FOURTH FLOOR 
Telephone 7289 Market 



92 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Telephone Waverly 2624 

Irvington Motor Car Garage 

JAMES MONAHAN, Proprietor 

Renting, Repairing, Storage 
Supplies 

STANDARD GASOLINE. POLARINE OILS 

1084-1088 CLINTON AVENUE, IRVINGTON, N. J. 



WM. H. HKICHENTIIAL, Piopuelor Established 1893 Telephone 3SS1 Bianch Brook 

Manhattan Carpet and Linoleum Co. 
CARPETS :: RUGS 

Special — $1.10 Inlaid Linoleum, 79c. sq. yard 

OILCLOTH AND LINOLEUM 

Window Shades, Mats and Mattings of All Kinds 

JUNCTION OF BROAD ST. and BELLEVILLE AVE. 
Newark, New Jersey 




ONLY 



ONLY 



SCHALK BREWERY, Inc. 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

ONLY 
Choice Hops :: Barley Malt Beer 



ONLY 



ONLY 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



93 




Photo Loaned by Albert H. Hewes 



94 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



German Savings Bank 

772 BROAD STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Assets over $8,400,000. Surplus $495,000. 

4 and 31/2 PER CENT. INTEREST 

Deposits made the first three business days of every 
month draw interest from the first of the month. 

Officers 

GOTTFRIED KRUEGER, President 

JOHN FISCHER, First Vice-President 
AUGUSTUS F. EGGERS, Second Vice-President 
WM. G. TRAUTWEIN, Secretary and Treasurer 



William H. Barkhorn 
Joseph M. Byrne 
Herman Bornemann, Jr. 
Augustus F. Eggers 



Trustkes 

Wm. H. F. Fiedler 
John Fischer 
Christian W. Feigenspan 
Gottfried Krueger 
Wm. F. Hoifmann 



Robert A. Osborne 
Gustavus Staehlln 
Edward Schictchaus 
Herman C. Schuetz 
Wm. G. Trautwein 



FRANKLIN 

I B 04 B ROAD 



SAVINGS 

B A. iM k: 

STREE T 




IVlerrItt G. Perkins 
WInton C. Garrison 
John P. Contrell 
Joseph M. RIker 



MANAGERS 

Henry IVI. Doremus 
Herbert P. Gleason 
Adrian Riker 
William Scheerer 
Jay Ten Eyck 



Assets 
$6,600,000 



George W. Jagle 
Daniel H. Dunham 
Carl H. Lebkuecker 
Edgar J. Haynes 
Wm. G. Brenn 



4% INTEREST TO $1,000. 

Deposits made by third business day of any month 
draw interest from the first of that month 



1 eleph lie Mulberrj n67 

HASTINGS & CO. 

Formerly with Richardson Bros. 

Practical Saw Makers 

All Kinds of Saws Repaired 

in the best possible manner 

Knives and Springs of every description 

made from the best sheet metal 
Sheet metal cut to order. Jig and Band 
Saws made to order and repaired. Jobbing 
given prompt attention. Job grinding. Ivory, 
Pearl and Metal Saws a Specialty. Lawn 
Mowers sharpened. 

41-49 Commercial Street 
Newark, N, J. 




INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



95 





Powers of the Mayor 

^E may give permission to examine public records. He has 

3 power to revoke general licenses, to sign temporary loan 

(5(] bonds, to sign record of engrossed ordinances, to approve 

^ bills allowed by Council, to approve all resolutions passed by 

•^^'^ Council, to sign all warrants. 

To grant the following permits: For street stands during the holidays; 
to allow banners across public streets, and for fireworks exhibitions. 

To appoint the following olhcers subject to approval by tlie Council: 
Tax Commissioners, Police Commissioners, Fire Commissioners, Comp- 
troller, Auditor, Members of the Board of Health. 

To appoint the following officers not subject to confirmation by Council: 
City Counsel, City Attorney, Assistant City Attorney, Excise Conunis- 
sioners. Trustees of Free Public Library, Assessment Commissioners, 
Police Justices, Private Secretary, Clerk in Executive Department, 

Member ex-officio of the following connnissions: Sinking Fund, Public 
Library, Newark City Home, Finance Connnittee. 

Term changed lo two years, 1857. 
Newark was incorporated in 1836. 
Made a Port of Entry in 183^^. 



96 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



HIGH GRADE 

PEARL BUTTONS 

MADE IN NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 
ACKNOWLEDGED 

The Leading Style Factor 

for Triiinning This Season's Garments 

Novelty Pearl Dress Buttons 
Staple Pearl Dress Buttons 
Pearl Dress Slides and Buckles 



Our exhibit illustrates some of the interesting 
processes in the mamifactnre of our product 



Hamburg Button Co, 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

Salesrooms: 1140 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 337 West Madison Street 



Address all correspondence to the 
New York Office 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



97 



Newark's Anniversary 
Industrial Exposition 

MAY 13th to JUNE 3rd, 1916 




EXECUTIVE 
OFFICERS 



Auspices of 
MANUFACTURES AND TRADES 

COMMITTEE OF THE 
COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED 



© KoEMdL Studio 
^ 1916 



98 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



. A-T-SCHLICHTING ^, 
Glassware 

-— ^ Bar AMD Hotel Supplies 
BeerPumps,Etc. 
263 Market St.. N ewark. N.J. 

Phone 1234 Mulberry 

Copyright .19I5,BY A. T.ScHLiCHTiNG. 



SLICK - SHINE 
SILVER PASTE 

Gives the Brilliancy of Newness 
to SILVERWARE 

SLICK - SHINE 
FURNITURE POLISH 

Makes your Furniture, 

Piano and Woodwork 

LOOK LIKE NEW 



GEISER & PLUM 

845 BROAD STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 

New Jersey Real Estate 

FACTORIES 
SITES 

LOFTS 

WATER FRONTS 
GARAGES 

STORES 

Appraisals of Property 
Expert Testiinoni] 

Our service includes advice of 

trained factory force familiar 

with construction, equipment 

and shipping facilities. 



Telephone 5681 Branch Brook 

PARK THEATRE 

The House of Good Pictures 
and Music 

ARNOLD DAVIS, Manager 

Bloomfield Ave. and Ridge St. 
Newark, N. J. 



Telephone Mulberry 1838 

Ludwig Achtel-Stetter 

RESTAURANT and CAFE 

842-844-846 Broad Street 
Newark, N, J. 

Banquet Halls C. R. R. Depot 



'Phone 3547 Mulberry 



Established 1872 



NEWARK NICKEL 
PLATING CO. 

W. IT. Rergfels 6t Co., Proprietors 

Electro Platers in Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass and Copper 

Tableware of all kinds re-silvered equal to 

new, Brass Bedsteads, Chandeliers, Fenders, 

Brass Tables and all kinds of Brass Goods 

refinished 

Rear of 40 Walnut St., Newark 



GOODWIN THEATRE 




Paramount Pictures 

863 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



yj 




MEMBERS MANUFACTURES AND TRADES COMMITTEE 



100 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



SEE OUR EXHIBIT BEFORE YOU LEAVE 





The Motors and Fans that made the Star Famous 

MADE IN NEWARK 

STAR FAN AND MOTOR WORKS 

245-247 NEW JERSEY RAILROAD AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



3^5 to 1 h.p. Direct Current 

All Voltages from 6 to 500 

Also Dynamos and 

Charging Sets 




Telephone Branch Brook 2882 



KANOUSE-BLUDWINE Co., Inc. 



Kanouse — the Perfect 
Spring Water 

Bottled at the Springs 



Drink BLUDWINE 

The New Sparkling 
Refreshing Beverage 



The Softest of all Waters. No Drugs. No Alcohol. 
10 BELLEVILLE AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



1,000 WATCHMEN in Your Plant or Store Assures of 
FIRE PROTECTION 

"Automatic" Sprinklers extinguish 

thousands of fires each year 
Ask for Booklet "Pursuit of Safety" 

''Automatic'' Sprinkler Co. of America 

Department Office: 416 ESSEX BLDG., NEWARK, N. J. 
H. S. NiEMiTZ, Dept. Manager 




INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



101 





ADVISORY MEMBERS 
Manufactures and Trades Committee 





© 



g) l^cMid. Studio 



102 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Dine at the Most Popular RESTAURANT 

in Newark 

NOTED FOR ITS SEA FOOD SPECIALTIES 

THE HOME OF REAL CABARET 

14 — Well-Known Artists and Performers — 14 
Continuous Cabaret 

Rusiness Men's Lunch, 11:30 to 2:30 
Eight -Course Dinner, 5:30 to 9:00 

A la Carte at all hours. Dancing Every Evening 

Johnson's Restaurant and Cafe 

GEORGE JOHNSON, Proprietor 
PLANE STREET, Just North of Market, NEWARK, N. J. 



WARDROBE TRUNK 
$20.00 



Roomy — not bulky. Rig enough 
— yet small enough. Holds six 
suits or twelve dresses. 

Only trunk with a removable gar- 
ment rack. 

Can't cost excess. 

The most-for-your-money trunk 
on the market. 

For sale by all leading stores. 



Manufactured by 

Neverbreak Trunk Co. 

NEWARK, NEW .lERSEY 



Official Sculpture and 

Plastic Decorations of 

Newark's 250th 

Anniversary 



Pylons and City Hall 
Decorations by 

DOMINIC A. WALSH 

Sculptor 

NEWARK and RELLEVILLE 
New Jersey 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



103 




Pr^ET? 



1 iJi ."'i 



P. 1^ i 




104 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




SBlunShoe 



ELEVEN BIG BEST STORES 

The elements of quality are built into the class styles 
of today just as thoroughly as into the good old- 
fashioned shoes we made fifty years ago. 
Newark's representative families find the shoes and 
the service satisfactory at our well-located store. 



689 BROAD STREET, opp. Military Park 
NEWARK, N. J. 




f5daranteesh6e<:o1 

Ten Stores in Greater New York 

Factory: 511-519 East 72nd Street, New York. 



BAKER PLATINUM WORKS 

BAKER & CO., Inc. 

MURRAY and AUSTIN STREETS, NEWARK, N. J. 
Refiners and Workers of Precious Metals 



h- C. Becker 



L. C. Becke;r, Jr. 



L. C. BECKER & SON 
Building Contractors 

415 Thirteenth Avenue 
Newark, N. J. 

Telephone Market 8608 



HiiiiiitiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



Telephone Waverly 3856 

New Amsterdam Theatre and 
Auditorium 

Fine Iviquors, Rumanian Lunch. 
Catered affairs my specialty 
I. ITZKOWITZ, Proprietor 

83-85 Sixteenth Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Newark's Most Popular Auditorium for Dances, 

Receptions, Entertainments, Banquets, Amateur 

Theatricals, Etc. 

TURNBULL AUDITORIUM 

283-285 Market St., Newark, N. J. 

Two blocks from corner of Broad & Market Sts. 

For information apply to J. S. WARD. 

Telephone Market 4311 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



105 




106 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



The D. L. & W. Coal Co. 



SUMMIT POCKETS 



NEWARK 
POCKETS 



HARRISON 
POCKETS 




MONTCLAIR 
POCKETS 



BLOOMFIELD 
POCKEITS 



PATERSON POCKETS 

Our Trade Mark is a Guarantee of Quality- 
our Facilities an Assurance of Service 

S. G. MEMORY, Sales Agent 
NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



Wm. H. Brown 



H. E. Krumnow 



Call Market 1181 and ask for 
MALE — H K L P— FEMALE 
The Employment Exchange 

29 CEDAR STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Telephone 5772 Market 

BECKER 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Builders 

Mason, Concrete and Carpenter 
Construction 

Office: 361 GROVE STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 



COLONIAL STAMPING WORKS 

All Kinds of Metal Stampings 
METAL BEDSTEAD TRIMMINGS 

Newark, N. J. 

J. E. STEVENSON & CO. 

Wholesale Dealers in Fruit and Produce 

44 Commerce Street, Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



107 




H] 



^\ 



c 



ZT 



^T 



CI 



ZllTIOl 



riTZri^l 9 



^ p 



gMO X r. Tf ly j-gi 



O 



108 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



E. S. WARD & CO. HUGH SMITH & CO. 

Established 1879 Established 1862 



General Leather Co. 

Tanners and Manufacturers of All Grades 

LEATHER 

FOR MOTOR CAR, VEHICLE and FURNITURE TRIMMING 
NEWARK, N. J., U. S. A. 



Merchants National Bank 

770 BROAD STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

AT THE FOUR CORNERS 

This bank has ample CAPITAL and SURPLUS to render it firm 
in any emergency. Its service is prompt and sure. It has 
every department and equipment necessary for the transaction 
of banlcing along modern lines. 

Open a deposit and checking account, rent a Safe Deposit Box. 
Send your Household Valuables to our Storage Vault while your 
aoartment or home is closed. Let our Trust Department attend 
to the drawing of your will. 

JOSEPH M. RIKER, President 

J. S. RIPPEL, Vice-President ARTHUR L. PHILLIP, Cashier 

WILLIAM H. WARREN, Assistant Cashier 

WM. C. MORTON, Trust Officer and Supt. Safe Deposit 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



109 




nsbUS TRIAL EXPOSITION 




FIRST WEEK'S 

CONCERT PROGRAM 

Voss' First Regiment Band 

INFANTRY N. G. N. J. 

Andrew E. Voss, Chief Musician 




PRESIDENTIAL DAY — Saturday, May 13th 

Opening Exercises at 4 o'clock 

Addresses by AUGUSTUS V. HAMBURG, Chairman Manufactures and 
Trades Committee; HON. THOMAS L. RAYMOND, Mayor of Newark, 
and HON. NEWTON T. BAKER, Secretary of War, who will official^ 
open the Exposition. 



Saturday Evening, May 13tli 

Jubilee Ch. Bach Selection— Reniick's Hits, No. 16. .B. Lampe 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Overture 

Selection— Robin Hood R- de Koven 



COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED DAY 
Monday Afternoon, May 15th Monday Evening, May 15th 

GvERTiiRE-Bride Elect ]. P. Sousa OvERTURE-Zampa '^"t'"''', 

SELECTION-Chin-Chin Ivan Caryll SELECTION-The Firefly R- Fnml 

SELECTION— Broadway Review B. Lampe Selection— In the Limelight L. heist 

Balance of program by selection or request Balance of program by selection or request 

NEWARK TRAFFIC CLUB AND RAILROAD DAY 



Tuesday Afternoon, May 16th 

Selection — Carmen B/re( 

SELECTION— Sari E- Kalman 

Medley Overture — Remick's Hits. .8. Lampe 
Balance of program by selection or request 



Tuesday Evening, May 16th 

Overture — Poet and Peasant Sitppe 

Selection— The Blue Paradise Eysler 

Descriptive — A Hunting Scene. .. .Biicca/ossi 
Balance of program by selection or request 



Wednesday Afternoon, May 17th 

Overture — Der Tambour der Garde A. E. Titl 

Selection — Sunny South Lampe 

Medley — Popular Hits Berlin and Snyder 

Balance of program by selection or request 



FOUNDERS' DAY 

Wednesday Evening, May 17th 

Selection — Metropolitan Opera House Tobani 

Selection — The Highwayman..../?, de Koven 

Descriptive— A Sleighride Party .. .Mic/iuc/is 

Balance of program by selection or request 



FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS' DAY 



Thursday Afternoon, May 18th 

Selection — II Travatore y^rdi 

Selection— The Wizard of the Nile. .Hcrfr^rf 

Selection — Popular Potpourri WHmark 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Thursday Evening, May 18th 

Overture- Jubel ^''f'' 

Selection— Katinka R- Friml 

Descriptive— Return of the Scouts. . .C/ement 
Balance of program by selection or request 



Continued on page iil 



110 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




THE ROYAL RESTAURANT 



^ 



^ 



^ 



New Jersey's most up-to-date American 
and Oriental Restaurant 

98 MARKET STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



American Dinner, 12 to 4 p. m., 25c.; Chinese Dinner, 11 a. m. to 7 p. m., 3.5c. 



Have Your Galvanizing done by 

New Jersey Galvanizing 
and Tinning Works 

Hoops, Band Iron and all kinds of 
Castings Galvanized and Tinned 

Avenue D and Murray Street 
Newark, N. J. 

'Phone Waverly 734 Estimates Furnished 



S. J. Connolly F. J. Briscoe 

Members of Builders' and Traders' Exchange 

W. H. CONNOLLY CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Builders 

495-497 TwELETh AvE., Newark, N. J. 
'Phone 377 Mulberry Established 1886 



Compijments of 

SEILER BROTHERS 

Sanitary Milk and Cream Co. 

273 Plane Street and 

Cor. Waverly Ave. and Somerset St. 

Newark, N. J. 



JOHN E. ORTNER & CO. 

M A N I' !•• ACT TREKS O J* 

Fancy Metal Goods 

Bag and Pocket Book Trimmings 

Trimmings in Gold and Sterling Silver of 
all descriptions. Electro-Plating 

481 Washington St., Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



111 




fl IlSDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION "? 

F> g. O G R. AJVL 

COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS DAY 




Friday Afternoon, May 19th 

Selection — Faust Ch. Gounod 

Selection — The Blue Paradise. .. .Ed. Eyslcr 

Medley — Remiek's Hits B. Lampe 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Friday Evening, May 19th 

Overture — Raymond Mm. Thomas 

Selection — The Prince of Pilsen...G. Luders 

Descriptive — A Hunting Scene. .. .Bucca'ossi 

Balance of program by selection or request 



LABOR DAY 

Saturday Afternoon, May 20th Saturday Evening, May 20th 

Overture — Poet and Peasant Suppe Overture — Light Cavalry Suppe 

Selection — Princess Pat V. Herbert Selection — Prince of Woodland Weberbauer 

Descriptive — Cavalry Charge G. Luders Descriptive — Forge in the Forest Michaelis 

Balance of program by selection or request Finale — Newark Knows How F. C. Voss 



SECOND AND THIRD WEEK'S 

CONCERT PROGRAM 

BY 

Theo. J. Vincentz's Band 

Theo. VincEntz, Conductor 



BUY IN NEWARK DAY 

Monday Afternoon, May 22nd Monday Evening, May 22nd 

Overture — Poet and Peasant Snppe March — Newark's Exposition. . .F. Bogenhard 

Selection — Maritana Wallace Overture — Morning, Noon and Night. .Suppe 

Potpourri — Remick No. 16 Lampe Selection — Adele Briquet 

Descriptive — The Jolly Blacksmith. . . .Suckley 
Balance of program by selection or request (with all effects) 




BUY IN NEWARK DAY 

Tuesday Afternoon, May 23rd Tuesday Evening, May 23rd 

OvERTi'RF — Fest Leutner Overture — Orpheus Offenbach 

Selection — Wang Morse Popular Selection — Remiek's No. 15 Lampe 

FANTASIA of Students' Songs Douglas Descriptive — The Midway Plaisance. . . rofcan/ 

Balance of program by selection or request (with all effects) 

GOVERNORS' DAY 

Wednesday Afternoon, May 24th Wednesday Evening, May 24th 

Overture — Jubel von Weber Overture — Raymond Thomas 

Grand Fantasia — Martha Flotow Selection — The Princess Pat Herbert 

Selection — Shameen Dhur Olcott Operatic Potpourri — Broadway Review Lampe 

Balance of program by selection or request Balance of program by selection or request 

AUTOMOBILE DAY 



Thursday Afternoon, May 25th 

Overture — Pique Dame Suppe 

Selection — Prince of Woodland Weberbauer 

Hichland Patrol — TheWeeMacGregor Amers 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Thursday Evening, May 25th 

Overture — Romantique Keler-Dela 

Selection — Faust Gounod 

Descriptive — A Hunting Scene . . . .Buccalossi 
(with all effects) 



MAYORS' DAY 



Friday Afternoon, May 26th 

Overture — The Jolly Robbers Suppe 

Selection — II Trovatore Verdi 

Popular Songs Remick 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Friday Evening, May 26th 

Overture — Light Cavalry Suppe 

Selection — The Grand Slam Witmark 

Hesitation — First l.ove Hohmann 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Continued on page iij 



112 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




Manufactured by 

WAYNE MFG. CO. 

Newark, N. J. 




RICHMOND BROS. CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Buttons and Small Metal 
Novelties 

173-177 Chestnut St., Newark, N. J. 

Founded 1860 



Edward K. Wetherill, President 

Lewis E. Huff, Vice-President 

Allen C. Sinclair, Secretary and Treasurer 

CALL ON US IF YOU CAN 

ADAM HEBELER & CO. 

Wholesale Produce Dealers 

Always a Full Line of Seasonable 
Produce 

46-48 Commerce St., Newark, N. J. 

Telphones 9400-9401 Market 



Newark Industrial Stocks 

We make a specialty of the Stocks of the Celluloid Co., 

Crocker Wheeler Co., National Lock Washer Co., New 

Jersey Zinc Co., Singer Manufacturing Co. 

J. S. RIPPEL 

18 CLINTON STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



POST & FLAGG 

MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

Investments :: Stocks :: Bonds 

KINNEY BUILDING (2nd Floor), 790 BROAD STREET, NEWARK 

Telephone 1970 Mulberry Alfred L. Dennis, Resident Partner 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



113 




^'' 
H-'^ 



Industrial EXPOSITION "^' 
^ F> g, O Q R,A.TVI 




LADIES' DAY 

Saturday Afternoon, May 27th Saturday Evening, May 27th 

OvKRTURE — Semiramide Rossini Overtire — Turner's Motto Kiesler 

Selection — Chin-Chin Caryll Fantasia — ADreaiti Pictureof theSouth Lampe 

Grand March — Tannhauser Wagner Descriptive — A Hunt in the Black Forest Volker 

Balance of program by selection or request (with all ePfects) 



SUBURBAN DAY 



Monday Afternoon, May 29th 

Overture — All America Loscy 

Popular Selection — Along the RlaUo. . .Feist 

Sextette from Lucia Doni:ctti 

Balance of program by selection or request 



Monday Evening, May 29th 

Overture — Tambor der Garde Till 

Selection — The Only Girl Herbert 

Descriptive — The Jolly Blacksmith. . .Sucfc.'c}' 
(with all effects) 



ARMY AND NAVY DAY 



Tuesday Afternoon, May 30th 

American Republic Shie!e 

Grand National Fantasia Batens 

Potpourri — The North and South. .. .Bendix 
Balance of program by selection or request 



Tuesday Evening, May 30th 

Promenade — Come to Newark and Have 

a Jubilee Fecher 

Overture — All America" Losey 

Descriptive — Battle of San JuanHill. . .Su'cef 



GUEST DAY 

Wednesday Afternoon, May 31st Wednesday Evening, May 31st 

Overture — In Smiles and Tears Coiiradi Overture — Ungarishe Lustpiel . . . .Ke/er-Be/a 

Fantasia — Martha Flotow Selection — Gems of Stephen Foster. .Tobani 

Potpourri — Around the World Klein Humoresque — Moorish Processional Luscomb 

Balance of program by selection or request Balance of program by selection or request 

ELECTRICAL DAY 

Thursday Afternoon, June 1st Thursday Evening, June 1st 

Overture — The Golden Hive Brespant Overture — Stradella Flotow 

Oriental Caprice — Arabian Twilight Luscomb Selection — Mile. Modiste Herbert 

Selection — Louisiana Lou Jerome Concert VALSE--Estelitta W'itmark 

Balance of program by selection or request Balance of program by selection or requist 

FLORAL DAY 

Friday Afternoon, June 2nd Friday Evening, June 2nd 

Overture — The Champion Wiegand Overture — The Night Vi'anderer Aledo 

Fantasia — Uncle Tom's Cabin Lampe Selection — The Opera Mirror Meyrellis 

Selection — Sparklets Glogan Characteristic — The Porto RIcans. . .Mi'ssuJ 

Balance of program by selection or request Balance of program by selection or request 



CLOSING DAY 
Saturday Afternoon, June 3rd 

Overture — Tonight VC'e Say Farewell Anderson Descriptive — A Hunting Scene Bucolossi 

Selection — Sari Kalmann Balance of program by selection or request 

Saturday Evening, June 3rd 

March — Take Me Back to Dear Old Newark Selection OF American COLLEGE SoNCS Tobani 

II eberbauer Descriptive — Frolics at Music Temple 
Overture — Tone Pictures of the North (with all effects) Wachsman-Jacobi 

and South Bendix "America" 

Balance of program by selection or request 



114 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



How to Spend the Day 

Is there a lull in the program — a gap you would 
fill to best advantage — something to make the holi- 
day complete and yet not tiresome? 

Try a Trolley Trip. Become acquainted with the ex- 
panse of the greater Newark. Ride out to Eagle Rock, 
to picturesque Caldwell, or stop off at Verona Lake. 

Fast Line for Perth Amboy with connection for shore 
resorts or trolley express service to New Brunswick, 
Trenton, Camden and Philadelphia. 



Visit Public Service Terminal 



Be Comfortable at Home 



Learn of the innumerable conveniences and comforts 
of gas and electric appliances. 

The electric fan at the turn of a switch will banish all 
stufTmess; the gas range, ready on the instant, makes 
no unnecessary heat; the gas water heater will have 
the refreshing bath ready just when wanted. 

There are many more gas and electric devices for 
cooking and other household uses that save in time 
and energy, and at a minimum of cost. 

Visit Public Service Show Rooms 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



II f) 





Newark's Anniversary Industrial Exposition 

FIRST REGIMENT ARMORY, NEWARK, N. J. 

May 13th to June 3rd, 1916 

GENERAL TELEPHONE 
through which all exhibitors may be reached — 
Mulberry 3830 

Public Telephone Booths and Operators 

Main Exposition Floor, Kast Side, near Main Entrance 
SPACE E3 

Office of the Manufacturers and Trades Committee 

Main Floor, near luitraiice Lobby. Telephone Branch Brook 400 

Office of Merle L. Downs, Managing Director 

Main Floor, near Entrance Lobby. Telephone Branch Brook 400 

Receiving and Shipping Clerk Office 

Dickerson vStreet Entrance. Telephone Branch Brook 401 

Manufacturers and Trades Committee 

Augustus V. Hamburg, Chairman; Edward E. Gnichtel, Treasurer; James Smith, Jr., 

Richard C. Jenkinson, Richard A. Hensler, Richard Denbigh, Frederick L. EbErhardt, 

Merle L. Downs, Managing Director 

Advisory Members 

Benjamin S. Whitehead, Curtiss R. Burnett, James M. Reilly, James L. O'Tooee 

General Staff 

Claude E. Holgate, Press Representative; Theodore Fettinger, Advertising Representative; 
Duncan M. Robertson, Secretary; John A. Smith, Floor Superintendent; John A. 

Reitz, Lieutenant of Exposition Police. 
Decorations designed by and installed under the direction of James A. Betelle, of Guilbcrt 

& Betelle, 665 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
Carpenter work made and installed by Schaedel Bros. & Co., 118 Bruce Street, Newark. 
Decorations and Booths made and installed by M. A. Singer, Decorator, 206 E. 27th St., N. Y. 
Signs made and installed by Hapward Sign Co., 282 Market Street, Newark. 
Electrical effects made and installed by Beaver Engineering Co., 59 Mechanic St., Newark. 
Floor coverings furnished and laid by Hahne-Stagg Co., Broad Street, Newark. 
Ellis Adding Typewriter used by the Management. 

Sculptor work by Dominic A. Walsh, 243 Cortlandt Street, Belleville, N. J. 
The exhibition is protected againt fire by a system of Gamewell Auxiliary Fire Alarm Boxes 
and special box 742, connected directly with the City Fire Alarm System. This system fur- 
nished and installed by New Jersey Fire Alarm Company, 776 Broad Street. Newark, N. J. 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS 

ALLSOP & ALLSOPP ; C-T 4 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 13 Columbia Street, Newark. 
ALPHA ALCOHOL UTENSIL CO R-14 

Cooking Utensils. 107 Hamilton Street, Newark. 
ANTI-HYDRO WATER PROOFING CO P-17 

Waterproofing Materials and Methculs. 178 Washington Street, Newark. 

ART METAL WORKS S-1 

Art Metal i'roducls. 9 Mulberry Street, Newark. 
ATLANTIC ELECTRIC VEHICLE CO S-U. 12.13 

Electric Motor Vehicles, 893 Frelinghuysen Avenue, Newark. 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 







//, 



<^'/iV. NEWARK 






When you help to celebrate 
Newark's great birthday, remember 

Newark's Famous Bottled Beer 

Brewed from the best materials obtain- 
able, under absolutely san- 
S^Tr > itary conditions. The finest 

i'-i/^iX productof the brewer's art 









Keep a case on hand at home 

Geo. W. Wiedenmayer, Inc. 
596 Market St. Newark, N. J 



Telephone 7976 Market Established 18.57 

LOOK FOR THE RED HORSE 

THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED HARNESS 

SHOP IN NEWARK 

5S Years Making Good Harness and Still At It 

Mfrs. Harness, Canvas Goods & Strap Work 




G, M. Aschenbach Harness Co. 

349 PLANE STREET (Cor. Branford Place), NEWARK, N. J. 



SEND FOR 
SAMPLE 



YES, SIR ! 



SEND FOR 
SAMPLE 



'Phone 7519 Market 



Reasonable Rates 



We will send a man to apply your 
Initials or Monogram on your Auto- 
moliile any time, any place, $1.50 com- 
plete. 21 styles, sizes and colors to 
pick from. Guaranteed beautiful and 
perfect work. Applied in 20 minutes 
without any annoyance or delay. 

Decalcomanie Transfer Designs made to 
order for Name Plates or any purpose. 

Auto-Monogram Supply Co. 

185 Mahket St., Nkwark, N. J. 

SALESMEN WANTED 



See the 

MODERN STORAGE 
ROOMS 

S. Cantek, Manager 

Furniture Stored, Packed and Shipped 
Auto Vans for Long and Short Distance Moving 

Office : 
54-56 Academy St., Newark, N. J. 



tNDtlSTRlAL EXPOSITION 11/ 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS- r:o/if//?<zprf 

BALDWIN, W. G., Inc F-1 

Martha Washington Candy. 19 Central Avenue, Newark. 
BAL, WILLIAM, Inc P-7 

Trunks and Ba,u,s. 7 Vesey Street, Newark. 
BANISTER, JAMES A., CO T-7 

Boots and Shoes. .^70 Orange Street, Newark. 
BENSON, H. J. & F. S.... R-10 

T'.rass Workers. Belleville Avenue, Glenridge. 
BOARD OF TRADE H-1 

800 Broad Street, Newark. 
BUEHLER BROS Carteret-10 

Chocolate Pudding. 269 Walnut Street, Newark. 

BREWSTER SONS F-13 

Cliocolate. 60 Nassau Street, Newark. 
CARTER, GOUGH & CO CT-6 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 46 Mull)erry Street, Newark. 
CELLULOID COMPANY R-1 & 2 

Celluloid and its Products. 295 Ferry Street, Newark. 
CENTRAL STAMPING CO 0-3 

Stamp Metal Products. 591 Ferry Street, Newark. 
COLLEGE OF MUSIC R-3 

Music Publishers and Instruction. 17 Center Street. Newark. 
CONCESSIONS CATERING CO O-l 

Welch's Grape Juice. Kinney Building, Newark. 
COMBINATION RUBBER CO.. T-4 

Rubber Tires, Hose, etc. Franklin Avenue, Bloomfield. 
COMBINED BREWERS OF NEWARK L-11 

Brewing of Beer. 800 Broad Street, Newark. J. M. Reilly, Secretary. 
COUSE & BOLTON R-U 

Leather Belting. 42 Lafayette Street, Newark. 
CORT, THOMAS, Inc T-9 

Boots and Shoes. Fourteenth Avenue, Newark. 
CROCKER-WHEELER CO H-2-6 

Electric Machinery and Apparatus. Ampere, N. J. 
DONIGIAN, A. K F-10 

Rugs and Carpets. 506 Broad Street, Newark. 
DURAND & COMPANY CT-3 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 49 Franklin Street, New^ark. 
DRIVER HARRIS WIRE CO.. E-5 

Wire and its Products. Harrison, N. J. 
EASTERN MARBLE MOSAIC CO Milford-14 

]\Iarble and Mosaic Work. 37 Orange Street, Newark. 
EDISON CHEMICAL WORKS V-3 

Chemicals and their Products. West Orange. 
EDISON STORAGE BATTERY CO V-2 

Storage Batteries. West Orange. 
ELLIS ADDING TYPEWRITER CO P-5 

Adding Typewriters. .338 Elizabeth Avenue, Newark. 
ESSEX COUNTY MOSQUITO EXTERMINATION COMMISSION S-3 

Mosquito Extermination Work. 790 liroad Street, Newark. 
ESSEX COUNTY OPTOMETRIC SOCIETY S-4 

Demonstrating the Science of Optometry. 452 Clinton Avenue. Newark. 
ESSEX PRESS, Inc S-10 

Printing Exhibit. 22 Lawrence Street, Newark. 
ESSEX VARNISH CO K-7 

Varnishes, Paints and Wood Finishes. 84 Vesey Street, Newark. 
FABER, EBERHARD P-3 

Lead Pencils and Commercial Rul)l>er Goods. New and Colden Streets, Newark. 
FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY X-2, 3, 4 

Banking Room. 963 Broad Street, Newark. 



118 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



N. W. HOVLAND COMPANY, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

SHOE LASTS 

Do you want to see how good a Shoe Last can really be? Do you want 

to see how much style, snap and general character a Last can have? 

If so, just write — that's all. 

SPECIAL CARE GIVEN TO REMODELLING, ALSO 

860-862-864 SUMMER AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



BEAVER MACHINE 
AND TOOL CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Special Machines and Tools, 
Jigs, Fixtures and Dies 

Estimates given on all work 
13-15 Franklin Street, Newark 

Telephone 2931 Market 



ERNST GIDEON BEK 
MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of High Grade 
Sterling and Gold Bags 

5 Oliver Street, Newark, N J. 



DAY, CLARK & CO. 

MAKERS OF 

Fine Jewelry 

449 Washington St., Newark 



Marshall N. Shoemaker 

M. AM. SOC. C. E. 

Architect and Engineer 

810 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 



PERCY B. TAYLOR 

MEM. AM. SOC. M. E. 

Consulting Engineer 

Essex Building, Newark, N. J. 



Telephone 7946 Market 

W. A. BIRDSALL & CO. 

makers of the 
Gibraltar and Waco Boilers 

Jobbers of Equipment for Heating, 
Plumbing and Vacuum Cleaning 

44-46-48 Mechanic St., Newark 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 119 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS—Continued 

FEDERAL BUTTON CO L-7 

Buttons and Pearls Goods. 365 Market Street, Newark. 
GALARD COMPANY Carteret-13 

PlumlMng Accessories. 335 Sixth Avenue, Newark. 

GAMON METER CO F-U 

Water Meters. 282 South Street, Newark. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO T-1 

Electric Machinery and Apparatus. Newark. 
GOLDSMITH, L., & SONS P-9 

Trunks and Leather Goods. 169 Mulberry Street, Newark. 
GOULD & EBERHARDT X-7 

Machinery and Tools. Green Street and New Jersey Railroad Avenue. 
HAMBURG BUTTON CO L-4 

Buttons and Pearl Goods. 149 New Jersey Railroad Avenue, Newark. 
HANKINSON, HENRY B Stratford-9 

Stained Glass. 154 Wright Street, Newark. 
HAUSSLING SODA APPARATUS CO M-1 

Soda Apparatus. 60 Arlington Street, Newark. 
HARTSHORN, STEWART, CO R-15 

Spring Shade Rollers. Grant Avenue, East Orange. 
HASTINGS, A. J., & CO Milford-18 

Machinery and Tools. 41 Commercial Street, Newark. 
HELLER BROS. COMPANY W-6 

Files and Rasps. 865 Mt. Prospect Avenue, Newark. 
HETZEL, ESTATE OF J. G P-15 

Rooiing Materials and Methods. 67 Main Street, Newark. 
HILTON COMPANY H-1 1 

Men's Clothing. 793 Broad Street, Newark. 
HOLT, FRANK, & CO E-8 

Silversmiths. 739 Broad Street, Newark. 
HORSTMAN CO., THE F. W W-7 

Machinery. 196 Coit Street, Irvington. 
HOWE-BAUMAN BALLOON CO F-8 

Rubber Toy Balloons. 187 Mulberry Street, Newark. 
IDEAL FIRE DETECTOR CO T-5 

Fire Detecting Systems. 374 Plane Street, Newark. 
INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS Carteret-12 

Fraternal Organization. 535 Morris Avenue, Elizabeth. W. F. Bingham, Secretary. 
JOHNSTON & MURPHY T-8 

Boots and Shoes. 42 Lincoln Street, Newark. 
JONES & WOODLAND CO CT-1 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 2 Garden Street, Newark. 
KANOUSE-BLUDWINE CO., Inc E-1 

Carbonated Beverages. 10 Belleville Avenue, Newark. 
KAUFMAN, K., & CO P-10 

Leather Bags. 169 Mulberry Street, Newark. 
KERR, THE W. B., CO CT-7 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 144 Orange Street, Newark. 
KOENIG'S SONS, E. G Carteret-16 

Photographers. 875 Broad Street, Newark. 
KREMENTZ & CO CT-2 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 49 Chestnut Street, Newark. 

LARTER & SONS CT-5 

Manufacturing Jewelers. Parkliurst and Austin Streets, Newark. 
LAUTER COMPANY R-4 

Pianos. 593 Broad Street, Newark. 
LOCK JOINT PIPE CO E-7 

Lock Joint Piping and Fittings. 2 Rutledge Avenue, East Orange. 
LOEWENBERG CO., THE K-4 

Sporting Goods. 58 Colden Street, Newark. 



120 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




Electrical Indicating 
Instruments 

Standard of the World! 

An A.C. or D.C. Instrument for every purpose — 
laboratory, central station or for any form of 
commercial electrical measurement or testing. 

The Weston A. C. Switchboard Instruments 

are unrivalled with respect to mechanical and 
electrical design and workmanship and hence 
with respect to performance. 

Competent engineers know that these Weston 
Instnmients are the only types that perfectly 
meet the practical requirements of service, and 
they likewise know the initial cost is little, if 
any more, than the cost of inferior instruments, 
and that because of their continuous accuracy 
and serviceability these Weston Instruments 
are much more economical to adopt than in- 
struments of any other make. 




A. C. S«'itchboar€l 
Wattmeter, Model IG" 



Model 1 Portable D. C. Voltmeters 

are guaranteed to an accuracy of ^^ of 
1% (in terms of full scale length). They 
are dead-beat. The knife-edge pointer 
travelling over a mirror, readings may 
be made within Ho of a division of any 
part of the hand-calibrated scale. 

In external appearance they are very 
handsome. The metal case has an ex- 
ceedingly durable royal copper finish. 
The base is of selected mahogany, highly 
polished. 




Model 1 



Weston A. C. Switchboard Instruments are fully described in 
Catalog 16. Model 1 and the various other D. C. Portable In- 
struments are described in Bulletin 501. 

No matter what your requirements may be, state them and we 
will forward appropriate Bulletins. 

Weston Electrical Instrument Company 

Waverly Park, Newark, N. J. 



NEW 10RK 


BOSTON 


CHICAGO 


DETROIT 


MONTREAL 


BUFFALO 


PHILADELPHIA 


ST. LOUIS 


TORONTO 


BERLIN 


CLEVELAND 


PITTSBURGH 


DENVER 


WINNIPEG 


LONDON 


CINCINNATI 


RICHMOND 


SAN FRANCISCO 


VANCOUVER 


PARIS 



PETROCRAD, JOHANNESBURG, S. AFRICA 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 121 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS— Co/7fz////rf/ 

LOVELL & McCONNELL MFG. CO V-5 

Electric Horns and SiMn^il-^- 1-^4 Writ>ht Street, Newark. 

J ' JDLOW & SQUIER S-9 

Small Tools and Hardware. 97 Market Street, Newark. 

MANUFACTURERS CAN CO., THE S-6-7 

Motalware and Containers. 426 Mulberry Street, Newark. 

MARSHALL & BALL H-9 

Clothiers. 809 Broad Street, Newark. 

MORRIS MANUFACTURING CO Milford-16 

Elevator Closing Devices. 10 Cross Street, Newark. 
MEAD-SUYDAM COMPANY p.ll 

Undertakers' Supplies. Park Avenue and North Thirteenth Street, Newark. 
MONROE CALCULATING MACHINE CO P-6 

Calculating- Machines. Mitchell Street, Orange, N. J. 
MURPHY VARNISH COMPANY K-6 

Varnishes, Paints and other Wood Finishes. 224 McWhorter Street, Newark. 
NATIONAL OIL & SUPPLY CO X-8 

Oils and Greases. 174 hrelinghuyst-n .\venue, Newark. 

NELSON, L R., ELECTRIC REPAIRING & MANUFACTURING COMPANY.. P-S 

h.lectric Machinery and Repairs. 1 Bond Street, Newark. 
NEWARK MADE LEATHER T-11* 

Newark Leather Manufacturers. Essex Building, Clinton Street, Newark. 
NEUBARTH, SAMUEL F-14 

Charlotte Russe and Peanut Butter. 171 Market Street, Newark. 
NEWARK LEATHER MACHINERY CO T-10 

Leather Manufacturing Machinery. 125 New Jersey Railroad Avenue, Newark. 
NEVIN, FRED E E-9 

Newark Made Fountain Pens. 537 West 123d Street, New York. 
NEWARK WIRE CLOTH CO r.12 

Wire Cloth and Screens. 228 Verona Avenue, Newark. 
NEWARK SIGN COMPANY r.16 

Advertising. 27 Treat Place, Newark. 

NEWARK EMBROIDERY WORKS H-8 

Embroidery and .Vrt Needle Work. 78 Shipman Street, Newark. 
NE^A^ARK CUT GLASS COMPANY K-5 

Cut Glass. 21 Academy Street, Newark. 
ORIENTAL RUG COMPANY E-5 

Rugs and Carpets. 25 Hackett Street, Newark. 
OHLSON, J. OSCAR 4-Milford 

Health Bread and Crackers. 383 Broad Street, Newark. 
ORIGINAL LINOLITH COMPANY 15-Milford 

Composition Floors. 4 Twentieth .-Xvenue, Irvington, N. J. 
OSMUN-COOK COMPANY E-4 

Dental Ealjoratory Equipment. 7 West Park Street, Newark. 
PADDLEFORD COMPANY, CO L-8 

Antiseptic Liquid Preparations. 154 Wright Street, Newark. 
PARKES FILE CO ll-Carteret 

Manicure Sets. 117 Verona Avenue, Newark. 
PEERLESS COMPANY, THE p.4a 

Raincoats. 54 Clinton Street, Newark. 
PHOENIX LOCK WORKS p.l4 

Locks and Hardware. Third Avenue and Fourth Street, Newark. 
PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATION L-2 

Household Equipment. Newark, N. J. 
PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATION M-3-4-5 

Gas and Electric Service. Newark, N. J. 

PRUDENTIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF AMERICA K 1-8 

Life Insurance. Newark, N. J. 



122 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 




Call the Borden Wagon 

and ask the salesman to serve you regularly. Then you are 
sure that you arc getting the purest, the richest, the most 
nourishing milk you can huy. Give your family the best. 








PASTEURIZED 

is rich, creamy milk — full of the body- 
building elements that you and your 
family need. 

Borden's Grade "A" Milk is produced and 
handled under the most rigid sanitary regula- 
tions. It is pasteurized to destroy all harmful 
germs and served to you in bottles that have 
been thoroughly cleansed and sterilized before 
filling. You can depend on the high quality 
and uniform richness of every quart of Bor- 
den's Grade "A" Milk. 

When Buying Milk or Milk 
Products, always ask for 

BORDEN'S 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 123 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS— Co/zr/zzf/rrf 

RIKER BROS CT-3 

.Mamifactiirins' Jewelers. 42 Court Street, Xevvark. 
RIVOLI SILK HOSIERY CO H-7 

Silk Hosiery Manufacture. 461 Mulberry Street, Newark. 
RUBBERSET COMPANY L-9' 

Ruliher and Celluloid Articles. 56 Ferry Street, Newark. 
SACKS IRON FOUNDRY X-1 

Machinery and Castings. Haniliurg^ Place, Newark. 
S. B. R. SPECIALTY CO r.7 

Autoniol)ile Accessories. 17 llamburg Place, Newark. 
ST. MUNGO MFG. CO. OF AMERICA F-9 

"Colonel" Golf Ralls. 121 Sylvan Avenue, Newark. 
SCHALK BREWERY, Inc K 2-3 

Brewing of Beer. 13 Lewis Street, Newark. 
SCHLESINGER, LOUIS, Inc S-2 

Real Estate. 31 Clinton Street, Newark. 
SCHOULER CEMENT CO 9-MiIford 

Cement Building- Construction. 154 Frelinghuysen Avenue, Newark. 
SLOAN & CHASE MFG. CO W-2 

Special Machinery. 351 Sixth Avenue, Newark. 
SOMMER, JOHN, FAUCET COMPANY 15-Carteret 

Wood Faucets. 30 Morris Avenue, Newark. 
SOCIAL SERVICE EXHIBIT, THE A-B-D 

Social Welfare. 90 Treacy Avenue, Newark. Rev. Rabbi Solomon Foster. 
SPLITDORF ELECTRICAL CO L-1 

Electrical Accessories. 98 Warren Street, Newark. 
STANDARD OIL CO. OF N. J R.6 

Oils, Greases and Waxes, Oil Stoves and Heaters. 31 Clinton Street, Newark. 
STANDARD WIRELESS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 12-Milford 

Amateur Wireless Equipment. 11 Pavonia x'\venue, Arlington, N. J. 
STAR FAN AND MOTOR WORKS 10-Milford 

Exhaust Fans and Motors. 93 Chestnut Street, Newark. 
THATCHER FURNACE COMPANY 0-5 

Furnaces and Heaters. 36 St. Francis Street, Newark. 

TONKS BROS L-5 

Buttons and Pearl Goods. 227 High Street, Newark. 

UNIVERSAL CASTER & FOUNDRY CO S-8 

Furniture and other Casters. 574 Ferry Street, Newark. 

WADSWORTH CHOCOLATE COMPANY F-4 

Chocolate. 276 Jeliff Avenue, Newark. 

WAGNER PASTRY COMPANY F-5 

Pies and Pastry. 18 Johnson Avenue, Newark. 

WARD BAKING COMPANY F-5 

Bread and Cakes. Fourth Avenue, East Orange. 
WEBSTER LOOSE-LEAF FILING COMPANY P-2 

Ofifice Filing Systems. 582 Broad Street, Newark. 

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CO L-3 

Electrical Apparatus. 165 Broadway, New York. 

WHITEHEAD & HpAG COMPANY S-14 

Metal and Celluloid Novelties. Susse.K Avenue and First Street, Newark. 

WHITESIDE & BLANK CT-1 

Manufacturing Jewelers. 19 Liberty Street, Newark. 

C. T. WILLIAMSON WIRE NOVELTY COMPANY F-7 

Wire Novelties. 60 Badger Avenue, Newark. 

J. WISS & SONS COMPANY R-13 

Cutlery and Small Tools. 33 Littleton Avenue, Newark. 



124 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



EsTABUSHED 1858 



L. LELONG & BROTHER 

GOLD AND SILVER 

Refiners, Assayers and Sweep Smelters 

OF JEWELERS' AND SILVERSMITHS' SWEEPINGS, Etc. 

Bullion of any grade of fineness and Coarse Bars Refined 

Fine Gold and Silver and Anode Gold and 

Anode Silver always on hand 

HALSEY, MARSHALL AND NEVADA STREETS, NEWARK, N. J. 



A. M. JACK 
Mfr. of Fine Gold Jewelry 

From Factory to Consumer (Save One Third) 
Special Order and Repairs 

45 Lawrence Street, Newark, N. J. 



B. J. Riley, President E. C. Baldwin, Treasurer 

The B. J. Riley Mfg. Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF METAL GOODS 

Telephone 7182 Market 

249 N. J. Railroad Avenue, Newark, N. J. 



Automobile Repairing 

and Machine Work in 

all its branches 

Full Line of Accessories, 
Tires and Tubes 

Washing and Polishing Done 
Night and Day 

Washington Park 
Garage Co., inc. 

Paue F. Devine, General Manager 
Telephone 840,^ Market 

9-13 LOMBARD Y ST., NEWARK 

Just a Step from Broad Street 



Established 1895 

WM. H. TAYLOR 
& CO. 

manufacturers of 

FANCY PUTINUM CHAINS 

Also Swivels, Snaps and 

Spring Rings in Gold 

and Platinum 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 

08 ORCHARD ST., NEWARK 

Teleplione Market 6:")9r) 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



125 



THE COMMITTEE OF FIFTY 



MRS. GEORGI-: BARKER 

CHAIRMAN 

MRS. GALEN J. PERRETT 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

MISS J. ISABELLE SIMS 

SECRETARY 

MRS. HENRY YOUNG, JR. 

TREASURER 

MRS. JOHN I.. CONTRELL 

CHAIRMAN HOSPITALITY COM. 

MRS, FREDERICK S. CRUM 

CHAIRMAN SCHOOLS COMMITTEE 

MRS. SOLOMON FOSTER 

CHAIRMAN PHILANTHROPY COM. 

MRS. JOHN W. HOWELL 

CHAIRMAN RELIGION COMMITTEE 

MISS ALICE KIRKPATRICK 

CHAIRMAN PAGEANT COMMITTEE 

MRS. FRANKLIN MURPHY, JR. 

CHAIRMAN ENTERTAINMENT COM. 

MRS. L. H. BOBBINS 

CHAIRMAN PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

MRS. FRANK H. SOMMER 

CHAIRMAN women's CLUBS COM. 

MRS. HENRY G. ATHA 
MRS. LOUIS V. ARONSON 



MRS. JOSEPH M. BYRNE 
MRS. FREDK. C. BREIDENBACH 
MBS. JOS. B. BLOOM 
MRS. JOHN L. CARROLL 
MRS. A. N. DALRYMPLE 
MRS. HENRY DARCY 
MRS. R. DIEFFENBACH 
MRS. SPAULDING FRAZER 
MRS. CHR. FEIGENSPAN 
MRS. H. R, GARIS 
MRS. R. ARTHUR HELLER 
MRS. CHARLES F. HERR 
MRS. R. C. JENKINSON 
MRS. NATHAN KUSSY 
MRS. WILLIAM B. KINNEY 
MRS. JENNIE B. KINGSLAND 
MRS. ALBERT LYNCH 



MRS. ROBERT M. LAIRD 
MISS MARGARET MC VETY 
MRS. E. ERLE MOODY 
MRS. FREd'K H. MOONEY 
MRS. UZAL H. MC CARTER 
MRS. WILLIAM P. MARTIN 
MRS. JAMES R. NUGENT 
MRS. BENEDICT PRIETH 
MRS. CHAUNCEY G. PARKER 
MRS. CHARLES J. PRAIZNER 
MRS. A. ROTHSCHILD 
MRS. EDWARD S. RANKIN 
MRS. E. J. STEVENS 
DR. SARA D. SMALLEY 
MRS. FRANCIS J. SWAYZE 
MRS. T. MANCUSI UNGARO 
MRS. A. VAN BLARCOM 



SLOAN & CHACE MFG. CO., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of Precision Machinery 




Bknch Lathes and .\ttachmEnts 

Bench Milling Machines 

Bench Drill Presses 

Bench Tapping Machines 
Fixtures, Jigs and Gauges 
Gun Barrel Rieling Machine 



Sixth Avenue .\nd 

North Thirteenth St. 

NEWARK, N. J. 

RosEviLij': Avenue Station 
Lackawanna Railroad 



Gear CiTTiNG Machines 
Pinion Cutting Machines 
Rack Cutting Machines 
Punches and Dies 

Special Machine Work 
Caktridce Vent Drilling ^Machine 



126 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Styles 

Satisfy 
IduMen 

The HILTON CO. 

Succesors to Geo. Watson Co. 

793 BROAD ST., NEWARK, N. J. 

Stores also in New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Providence, 
Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Chicago 



They express the vir- 
ility of youth with the 
dignity of distinctive 
conservatism-in other 
words, they are DIF- 
FERENT. 

And remember, they 
are the original work 
of the HILTON CO.— 
and not the product 
of some wholesale 
house burdened with 
two separate profits, 
one for the maker and 
one for the middleman 
who sells it to you. 

Suits and Overcoats 

$12.50, $15, 18, $20, 

$22.50, $25— up to 

$40 



J. A. & S. W. Granbery 

(a corporation) 
MAKKRS OF 

Gold Jewelry 

31-33 East Kinney Street 
Newark, N. J. 



Telephone Farragut 9525-9875 



coLAizzrs 

Table d'Hote and Restaurant 

A. J. CoiAlzzi, Proprietor 

37-39 West 24th Street 
New York, N. Y. 




INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



127 



Telephone 7455 Market 




THE BORDEN PRESS 

The Best Printing in the City 

245 MARKET STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



At the Sign 
of the Hobbv 



WE PRINTED THIS PROGRAM 



•Phone 1904 Wav. Residence: 131 Schley St. 

KIRCHNER, Inc. 

G. KiRCHNF.R, Proprietor 

Iron, Steel, Ornamental and 
Structural Work 

Stairways, Fire Escapes, etc. Repairs 
Concrete Filled Columns 

Shop : 140-142 Corr St., Irvington 

Near Clinton Avenue 



ENGRAVINGS 

Line, Half-Tone, Color and Benday 
Plates 

MADE TO PRINT PERFECTLY 

Newspaper and Commercial Work 
SERVICE AND QUALITY 

Art Photo-Engraving Co. 

Star Eagle Building 
Branford Place, Newark, N. J, 

Telephone Market 2336 



BREWSTER SONS COMPANY 



Manufacturers of "DAIRY MAID" 
CHOCOLATE AlVD COCOA 




TRADK 5_ Q_ g_ MARK 

Scannell s Original 
Service 

I published this book for the Committee 

Publisher of Historical and Statistical Records 
for Boards of Trade and 

Industrial Exposition Programs 

I will go any place. Write or wire for me. 

J. J. SCANNELL, Proprietor 

/ can publish such a hook for luuj Committee 

References 

Paterson Industrial Expositson, Paterson, N. J.. Chamber of Coinmerce 
. National Silk Style Show, Paterson, N. J., Chamber of Commerce 
Newark's Anniversary Industrial Exposition, Newark, N. J. 
Committee of One Hundred and hundreds of others 

PATERSON, NEW JERSEY 



128 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



'Vh! What a Treat 



ff 



HENSLER'S 

POPULAR 

BEER 




ON DRAUGHT AND 
IN BOTTLES 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



129 



Newark's 250th Anniversary 

MAY TO OCTOBER, 1916 

Under the Auspices of the Committee of One Hundred 
COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED. Officks: Kinney Building 

PROGRAM OF EVENTS 

Watch Newspapers for further changes 



May 1. 8 a. m. — Salutes, Music, Church Bells 
and Factory Whistles. 

10 a. m. — Parade of Local National Guard 
—Boy Scouts and Other Organizations, 
Gen. Edwin S. Hine, Commanding. 

2 p. m. — Historic Ceremonies in Proc- 
tor's Palace Theatre, formally opening 
the 250th Anniversary of the Founding 
of Newark in 1666. 

Overture — By Newark Musicians' Club Orchestra. 
Assisted by Local No. 16, American Federation 
of Musicians — C. Mortimer Wiske, Conductor. 

"America" — - Newark Musicians' Club Chorus, 

Orchestra and Audience 

Invocation — Rt. Rev. Edwin S. Lines, D. D. 

Anthem — "Union and Liberty" Horatio Parker 

Newark Musicians' Club Chorus of Sixteen Voices 
— Direction of Frank C. Mindnich. 

Dedicatory Address — • Franklin Murphy 

Chairman Committee of One Hundred 

Address — The City — 

Hon. Thomas L. Raymond, Mayor 

Address — The State — 

His Excellency, James F. Fielder, 
Governor of New Jersey. 
Address — Brief Reminiscences of Fifty Years Ago 

Hon. James L. Hays 
Overture — By Orchestra Weber 

Celebration Ode — • Reading by the Author, 

Lyman Whitney Allen, D. D. 

Historic Address — Hon. Francis J. Swayze, Justice 

of the Supreme Court of N. J. President of the 

N. J. Historical Society. 

"Festival March" — By Orchestra Henry Hadley 

"Star Spangled Banner" — Newark Musicians' Club 

Chorus, Orchestra and Audience 

Benediction — Rt. Rev. John J. O'Connor. 

Assisted by Rt. Rev. Monsignor Isaac P. Whelan. 

May I. Opening Day. Musical Festival, 

to last until May 4, inclusive. Six perform- 
ances. First Regiment Armory. Addresses 
on the opening night by Franklin Murphy, 
Mayor Thomas L. Raymond and Uzal H. 
McCarter. Invocation by Rabbi Solomon 
Foster. 

May 3, 4, 5. Ordinary Agencies' (Prudential 
Insurance Company) Eighth Annual Con- 
vention, bringing in delegates from all 
parts of the United States. 

May 4. National Championship Wrestling 
of U. S. (Trials). National Turn Verein, 
211 Bruce Street. 



May 4-5. Improved Order of Redmen, 
Grand Council Convention. 

May 6. National Championship Wrestling 
of U. S. (Finals). National Turn Verein, 
211 Bruce Street. 

May 6. Second Annual Dual Athletic Meet, 
Central Com. and Manual Training High 
School, and East Orange High School, 
Weequahic Park. 

May 5, 19. First Presbyterian Church Par- 
ticipation. 

May 8, 9. Volunteer Newark Tour through 
the State of New Jersey, under the aus- 
pices of the New Jersey Auto and Motor 
Club. 

May 9. Banquet to Sporting Editors of New 
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
etc. 

May 9, 10. Congregational Conference of 
New Jersey at the First Congregational 
Church ; with unveiling of a tablet placed 
to the honor of the "Founders" of Newark 
by the Conference. 

May 10. Dedication of three Civic Monu- 
ments, at Puritan Landing Place, Bran ford 
Place and at the Public Library. 
Unveiling of a Tablet marking site of the 
parsonage of Dr. Aaron Burr, Broad and 
William Streets, by Princeton Club. 

May 12. New Jersey Day. 
Musical Pageant, First Presbyterian Church. 

May 13. President Wilson's Day, Open- 
ing Newark's Industrial Exposition. 

Banquet to the President, by tlic New- 
ark Board of Trade, Robert Treat Hotel. 

Opening of the Robert Treat Hotel, 

Newark. 

8 p. m. — Gymnastic Championships, of 
the A. A. U. of tlic United States, at Y. M. 
C. A. 

Annual Paradp, The Road Horse Associa- 
tion of New Jersey. 

Reception by the Women's Committee of 
Fifty to the Wives and Daughters of the 
Committee of One Hundred and the Com- 
mittee of Three Hundred and other Ladies. 
— The Washington, 4 to 6 p. m. 



130 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Russell-Loewus & Froehlich, Inc. 

Blenders and Wholesale Liquor Dealers 



49-51-53 MECHANIC STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 



Cari. H. Wolf, President 



Wm. J. WoESTENDiEK, Treasurer 



NEWARK BAY SMELTING & REFINING CO. 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

Buyers of all Copper Bearing Material 

Producers of Brass, Composition and Copper Ingots 



Telephone Market 6172 



U. S. AUTO COMPANY 

226 CENTRAL AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



N. J. DISTRIBUTORS 

"EMPIRE" 



EASTERN DISTRIBUTORS 

"DIXIE FLYER" 



I I 

I i 

i £ 

I I 

I W. F. DAY & BRO. j 

I I 

I Catering 

I ICE CREAM AND CAKES | 
I 899 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. i 



I I 
I I 



FEDERAL BUTTON CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Ivory, Pearl and Composition 

Buttons 

365 Market St., Newark, N. J. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



131 



May 13, 17. Congress of Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. 

May 15. Knights of Columljus — Night Pa- 
rade. 

May 16. Knights of Columbus — Convention 
Day. 

May 17. Founder's Day. 

2 p. m. — Parade of New Jersey National 
Guard and Civic and Fraternal Bodies. 
Hon. R. Wayne Parker, Grand Marshall ; 
Major Wm. H. Campfield, Grand Marshall, 
Civic and Fraternal Bodies. 

8 p. m. — Special Religious and Historic 
Ceremonies in First Presbyterian Church, 
His Honor Mayor Thomas L,. Raymond, 
Rev. Wm. J. Dawson, D. D., Gov. Marcus 
H. Holcomb of Connecticut, Gov. James F. 
Fielder of New Jersey, and Former Gover- 
nor Franklin Murphy, Chairman Commit- 
tee of One Hundred, will speak, and other 
distinguished men and women, including 
descendants of Robert Treat and the 
Founders of Newark, will attend. Special 
Music ; an oration by Dr. Dawson ; prayer. 

May 17. Knights of Columbus Banquet. 

May 18. Tall Cedars of Lebanon parade, 
ceremonial and banquet. 

May 18-19. Special services Friday evening 
and Saturday morning — Temple B'nai 
Jeshurun. 

May 18, 19, 20. Amateur Boxing Cham- 
pionship A. A. U, Palace Ball Room. Aus- 
pices A. A. U. 

May 19. Nova Caesarea Chapter Daugh- 
ters of American Revolution to place me- 
morial tablet. Camping Ground, Woodside 
Phillips Park. May 16th alternative date. 
Opera under auspices of the Prudential 
Insurance Company Athletic Association, 
"The Sultan of Sulu." 

May 19, 20. Know Your City Day — 

.■\uspices Committee of Fifty. Visit the 
City's philanthropic, educational and pri- 
vate and public institutions. 

May 20. Unveiling of bronze tablet by 
South Side High School, on Divident Hill, 
Weequahic Park. Field Games, Princeton 
Club of Newark, Weequahic Park. 

May 20, 21. Special Anniversary Services 
in all Churches and Synagogues. 

May 21. Union Jewish Service Temple 
B'nai Jeshurun. 

9 a. m.— G. A. R. Parade. 

May 22. Convention New Jersey State As- 
sociation Master Plumbers, and Exhibits. 

May 23. Banquet and Ball of aliove. 

May 24. Exhibits of above. 

May 25. Knights of Pythias Field Day and 
Parade. 



May 25, 26. Golf Championship of the 
City of Newark, Forest Hill Links. 

May 27. 3 p. ni. — Bohemian Clubs and 
L'd.nes Parade. 

May 27. 1 ]>. m. — Parade Essex County Ju- 
nior Christian Endeavor Annual Rally. 

May 28. Open-air Union Religious Ser- 
vice, Weequahic Park, at Pageant Am- 
phitlu-alrc. capacity 40,000. 

May 30. 9 a. m.— G. A. R. Parade. Essex 
Troup, J. O. U. A. M. Recreation Dept. 
2 p. m. — Parade Italian-American State 
League. State Association of P. O. Clerks 
entertained by Branch 17, United National 
Association of P. O. Clerks. 

May 30, 31, June 1, 2. 8 p. m.— The New- 
ark Historic Pageant. 4,000 actors, a 
liand of 92 pieces, amphitheatre, capacity 
40,000. Seats on sale at Lauter's. 593 Broad 
Street. i 

June 1. Close of Newark Anniversary 
Poem Competition. 

June 2. Parade, ceremonial. Salaam Tem- 
ple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

June 3. 2 p. m. — June Walk, Sunday 
Schools of Essex County. Parade, Loyal 
Order of Moose. Reception, Huron Club 
— Krueger Auditorium. Harness Racing, 
Road Horse Association of New Jersey. 

June 5. Orphans' Auto Day — Outing — Pa- 
rade. 

June 6. Public and Parochial School Pa- 
rade. Woodmen of the World. Conven- 
tion, Continental Hotel. Night Parade. 

June 6-9. Convention International As- 
sociation Chiefs of Police. Parade, 
Banquet, etc. 

June 7. Parade Independent Order of For- 
esters. 

June 8. 3 p. m. — Physical Training Exhi- 
bition, Weequahic Park — High Schools. 

June 9. 3 p. m. — Physical Training Exhi- 
bition — Weequahic Park — Elementary 
Schools. Prudential Golf Tournaments, 
Jvme and October. Prudential Tennis 
Tournaments during summer and fall. 
Prudential Home Office Baseball League of 
Eight Clubs playing series throughout the 
summer. Prudential Athletes will enter all 
open athletic competitions. Possible par- 
ticipation of the Prudential in parades and 
in pageant. 

June 10. Spanish-.Vmerican War Veterans' 
Day. American Federation of Homing 
Pigeon Fanciers. 

June 10. National Interscholastic Track 
and Field Events, Weequahic Park. 

June 11-12. Annual Celebration Turners 
and United Singers of Newark Concert, 
afternoon and evening. 



132 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Don't Fail to Visit 

the Landing Place 

of 

ROBERT 
TREAT 



REIN BRAU BREWERY 

AND FAMILY RESORT 



COMMERCIAL WHARF 
NEWARK, N. J. 



BRING YOUR WIFE AND CHILDREN 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



138 



June 13. Exempt Firemen's Association of 
Newark Parade. 

June 14. Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics — Parade and Field Day. 

June 15. Parade Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

June 16. N. J. State Organization United 
Brotherhood Carpenters' Convention. 

June 16. Prudential Field Day Exercises 
with athletic events of all kinds, and girls' 
contests. 

June 16, 17. Annual Convention Grand 
Council of New Jersey and Delaware Uni- 
ted Commercial Travelers. 

June 17. Surf Casting Tournament. 
Afternon Parade Lithuanian Society. 
Night Auto Parade. 

Afternoon Motor Cycle Parade, auspices 
N. J. Motor Cycle Club. 
Harness Racing — Road Horse Association 
of New Jersey. 

June 19. Independent Order of Good Tem- 
plars (tentative). 

June 19-23. Springfield Avenue Merchants' 
Week. 

June 24. Elementary Schools City Ath- 
letic Championships. 

June 25. Military Field Mass — Weequahic 
Park — Knights of Columbus. 

July 3. Polish Day — Polish Falcom Conven- 
tion, Polish Alliance of New Jersey. Af- 
ternoon parade (15,000 in line). 

July 4. Fireworks Display Weequahic Park 
(under consideration). 
Prudential Excursion to Seashore early in 
July. 

Harness Racing — Road Horse Association 
of New Jersey. 

July 8. 2 p. m. — United Slavic Societies of 
Newark — Native costume (8,(X)0 in line). 

July 8. Championship Cricket match. New- 
ark Cricket Club and Essex County Cricket 
Club. 

July 15. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

July 20, 21, 22. Inter-Club Matinee of 
the Junior League of Amateur Driving 
Clubs. 

July 29. Canoeing — New Jersey State 
Championship. 

Aug. 5. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Aug. 19. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Aug. 23, 24, 25, 26. International Bait and 
Fly Casting Tournament. 



Aug. 26. Scottish Day at Weidenmayer's 
Park. 

Award of $1,000 in Cash Prizes, Newark's 
Anniversary Poem Competition. 

Sept. 2. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Sept. 3-4. Seventh Annual Convention As- 
sociated Young Men's and Young Women's 
Hebrew Associations of New Jersey. 

Sept. 6, 7, 8, 9. National Convention, 
League of American Municipalities. 

Luncheon by Mayor Thomas L. Raymond 
to attending Mayors. 

National Convention, American Society of 
Sanitary Engineers and Plumbing In- 
spectors. 

Sept. 8, 9. Field and Track National 
Championships, A. A. U. The largest 
1916 Athletic Events in the World. Wee- 
quahic Park. 

Sept. 11, 12. State Convention, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. Pa- 
rade, 2,500 in line. Banquet. 

Sept. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. International 
Steam and Operating Engineers' Conven- 
tion and Exhibition — Krueger Auditorium. 

Sept. 14. Annual Reunion of Kearny's 
First New Jersey Brigade Society, com- 
posed of the surviving members of the 
First, Second, Third, Fourth, Tenth, Fif- 
teenth, Twenty-third, Fortieth Regiments 
of New Jersey Volunteers. 

Sept. 16. National All-Round Champion- 
ship A. A. U. Weequahic Park. 

Sept. 16. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Sept. 20. Boy Scouts Field Day and Rally 
— Weequahic Park. 

Sept. 20. Order Sons of Italy— Celebration 
and Parade, 3,000 in line. 

Sept. 30. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Oct. 14. Harness Racing — Road Horse 
Association of New Jersey. 

Oct. 15-29. Exhibition at Newark Mu- 
seum Association — 3rd floor Library, of 
Competition prints under auspices of 
Newark Camera Club. Sundays, 2-9 
p. m.; Week Days, 12-6:30, 7:30-9:30. 

Oct. 20. Newark Camera Club Piiotographic 
Contest Awards. 

Oct. 30. Publication Memorial Volume. 

Dates to Be Fixed — 

Royal Arcanum Parade. 

School Exhibits. 

Art Exhibits. 

Trades and Industrial Parade. 

Automobile Parade. 

Historical and Municipal Parade. 



134 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



Complete Organization 

The Union National Bank invites 
accounts of merchants, manufac- 
turers and others seeking the 
prompt and courteous service of 
a bank equipped to supply every 
commercial banking need within 
its own organization. 

UNION NATIONAL BANK 

NEWARK, N. J. 
'^he largest National Banl^ in New Jersey 



AUGUST GOERTZ & CO. 
Metal Specialties 

272-286 MORRIS AVENUE, NEWARK, N. J. 



OPfice Telephone 9334 Market Residence Telephone 3104-J Branch Brook 

RICHARD KENNEDY CO. 
Builders 

Alterations to Stores, Factories and Residences 

Expert on Boiler Setting, Ovens and Furnaces. Saves Fuel and Expensive 
Repairs. Jobbing promptly attended to. Estimates 

CENTURY BUILDING (Room 501), 142 MARKET STREET, NEWARK 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



135 




Photos by McBride 

Military Park — To and From the Tube 
The tides of life flow on, flow on 



136 NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



AETNA 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF HARTFORD, CONN. 
Assets, $124,238,552.93. Surplus, $17,977,212.82 

Aetna Accident and Liability Co. 

Assets, $4,383,809.23. Surplus, $2,220,053.96 

The Automobile Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Assets, $2,377,857.39. Surplus, $1,910,443.94 

All Forms of Life, Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Branch Office: ESSEX BUILDING 

LIFE LINES CASUALTY LINES 

Term Insurance Automobile — Full Coverage 

Accident and Health 

Straight Life Workmen's Compensation 

Limited Payment Life Liability— All Forms 

Fidelity and Surety Bonds 

Endowment Insurance Plate Glass 

Monthly Income Burglary and Theft 

Fire — All Forms 
Group Insurance Miscellaneous Lines 



LIFE DEPARTMENT CASUALTY DEPARTMENT 

B. F. Reinmund, Manager Wm. N. Heard, Manager 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



137 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



ACCOUNTANTS Page 
Puder & Puder 142 

ACIDS 

American Oil & Supply Co 20 

APRON SUPPLY 

Newark Apron Co 90 

ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER 
Marshall N. Shoemaker.... 118 

ASSAYERS 
L. Lelong & Bros 124 

AUDITORIUM 
TurnbuU Auditorium 104 

AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS 

Automatic Sprinkler Co. of America 100 

APPARATUS FOR THE LABORATORY 
James L. Tobin & Co 72 

AUTOMOBILES 

North Jersey Motor Vehicle Co 65 

U. S. Auto Company 130 

Wilson-Ward Motor Co., Inc 43 

AUTO MONOGRAMS 
Auto Monogram Supply Co 116 

AUTO RADIATORS 
Wm. F. Carter 4 

AUTOMOBILE RENTING 
Automobile Renting Co 20 

AUTO TIRES 

Hardman Tire & Rubber Co 80 

AWNINGS & TENTS 
J. Brockie & Co 50 

BAGS & BURLAPS 

Samuel Wildstein 62 

A. Yeskel 14 

BAG FRAMES 
E. Poeter & Co 138 

BANKING 

The American National Bank 80 

Federal Trust Co 52 

Merchants' National Bank 108 

Franklin Savings Institution 94 

Union National Bank 134 

The German Savings Bank 94 

Fidelity Trust Co 48 

First National Bank of Belleville 62 

BANKERS & BROKERS 

Post & Flagg 112 

J. S. Rippel 112 

BARRELS 
John Ryan 64 

BAR SUPPLIES & POLISHES 
A. T. Schlichting 98 

BATHS 

Ruber's Turkish Baths 72 

Mercer Turkish & Russian Bath 88 

BEARING METAL 
Hewitt Bearing Metal Co 64 



BIRCH BEER Page 
D. Wahlers 84 

BOILERS 
W. A. Birdsall & Co 118 

BOXES 

National Box & Lumber Co., Inc 84 

BREWERIES 

P. Ballantine & Sons 12 

Du Bois Brewing Co 58 

Christian Feigenspan Corporation 86 

The Jos. Hensler Brewing Co 128 

Gottfried Krueger Brewery Co 56 

Lyons Bros. Brewing Co 70 

Schalk Brewery 92 

Trefz Brewery 6 

George W. Wiedenmayer, Inc 116 

BRUSH MFG. 

Dixon & Rippel 82 

The Hardrlght Co 18 

Newark Brush Co 60 

BUILDERS 

Becker Construction Co 106 

L. C. Becker & Son 104 

W. H. Connolly Co 110 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 
Essex Building Construction Co 54 

BUILDING MATERIALS 
Van Keuren & Son 30 

BUTTON MFG. 

Dorf man Bros 142 

Federal Button Co 130 

BUTTONS & SMALL METAL NOVELTIES 

Richmond Bros. Co 112 

CAFE 
Christian Lutz 32 

CANNED GOODS 
Wilkinson & Gaddis Co 46 

CARPETS & RUGS 

Manhattan Carpet & Linoleum Co 92 

CARRIAGE BUILDER 

Herman Latter 36 

CASES FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Maulbetsch & Whittemore Co 54 

CASUALTY INSURANCE 

Commercial Casualty Ins. Co 70 

New Jersey Fidelity & Plate Glass Insur- 
ance Co 70 

CATERING 

W. F. Day & Bros 130 

CEMENT WORK 
The Pitts Co 56 

CHEMICALS 

American Oil & Supply Co 20 

Dooner & Smith Chemical Co 24 

National Oil & Supply Co 46 

CHOCOLATE & COCOA 
Brewster Sons Co 127 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

Wm. M. Brown 138 

The Geo. W. Knight Co 138 



138 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



iriiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiii 



To the Dental Profession 

Treat yourself to a new outfit 
like shown in Armory and 
you will find everything up- 
to-date in our Salesroom. Be 
sure and make us a visit. 

OSMUN-COOK COMPANY 

7 West Park St., Newark, N. J. 



E. POETER & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

High Grade Metal Ware 

FOR LEATHER GOODS TRADE 
NEWARK, N. J. 



WM. M. BROWN 

Civil Engineer 

Essex Building, Newark, N. J. 



Prize Cups, Medals, Badges, 
Class Pins 

The Marshall Company 

207 Market Street, Newark 



Telephone 5650 Market 

HODECKER BROS. 

ELECTRO-PLATING 

Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Brass 

Oxidizing, Bronzing, Polishing and Lacquering. 
Special Finishing and Fancy Coloring. 

373-375 Market Street, Newark 



ALLSOPP & ALLSOPP 

makers of 

Fine Platinum and Gold 

Jewelry 



<&> 



Compliments of 

Hedden Iron Construction 
Company 

New York City 

West Elizabeth, N. J. 

Newark, N. J. 



The 
GEO. W. KNIGHT CO. 

Mechanical, Electrical and 
Sanitary Engineers 

Firemen's Bldg., Newark, N. J. 



iilillllllllllllllllllilillF 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



139 



CLOAKS & SUITS Page 

D. Price & Co 38 

Oppenheim, Collins & Co 16 

CLOTHING 

The Hilton Co 126 

Marshall & Ball 72 

COAL 

J. H. Applegate 46 

The D., L. & W. Coal Co. (Wholesale) 106 

The Fairlie & Wilson Coal Co 28 

Lehigh Valley Coal Sales Co. (Wholesale). 78 
Tegen & Wiebke Co 58 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

A. Hebeler & Co 112 

J. B. Stevenson & Co 106 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 
Percy B. Taylor 118 

CONTRACTORS 

Richard Kennedy Co 134 

Linde & Griffith Co 14 

CONCRETE PIPE 
Lock Joint Pipe Co 142 

COPPER WORKS 
L. Lawrence & Co 36 

CUTLERY 
J. Wiss & Sons Co 66 

DEAD ANIMALS REMOVED 
Sch warz Bros. Co 32 

DECALCOMANIE 
Auto Monogram Supply Co 116 

DENTAL SUPPLIES 
Osmun-Cook Co 138 

DEPT, STORES 

Hahne & Co 8 

L. S. Plaut & Co 74 

DISINFECTING 
Electric Fluid Disinfecting Co 140 

DROP FORCINGS 

Strieby & Foote Co 32 

DRUGGIST (WHOLESALE) 
C. B. Smith Co 18 

DRY COLORS & PAINT MFG. 

Cawley, Clark & Co., Inc 90 

DYERS & CLEANERS 
Stephen Beyer & Son 52 

DYNAMOS 

3tar Fan & Motor Works 100 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Davis Electric Co 28 

Beaver Engineering Co 82 

ELECTRICAL GOODS 
Agens & Co 90 

ELECTRIC LAMP MFG. 

Clinton Electric Lamp Co 94 

ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS 

Western Electric Instrument Co 120 

ELECTRO PLATING 

Hodecker Bros 138 

Newark Nickel Plating Co 98 

Merigold Electro Plating Co 84 



ELECTROTYPER Page 
William Snell 76 

EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE 
Brown & Krumnow 106 

ENGINEER & MACHINIST 
John J. Cavagnaro 40 

FAMILY GARDEN RESTAURANT 
Rein Brau Brewery Garden 132 

FAT RENDERING 

Independent Tallow Co 26 

A. Theobald 30 

FAUCET MFG. 
John Sommer Faucet Co 142 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Firemen's Insurance Co 26 

New Jersey Fire Insurance Co 34 

FOUNDRY 

Oscar Barnett Foundry Co 42 

The Central Foundry Co 16 

Isbell Porter Co 46 

Universal Caster & Foundry Co 90 

FRICTION. CLUTCH & GAS ENGINES 

Newark Gas Engine Mfg. Co 62 

GALVANIZING & TINNING 
New Jersey Galvanizing & Tinning Works 110 

GARAGES 

The Thacher Garage 52 

Irvington Motor Car Garage 92 

Washington Park Garage Co., Inc 124 

GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

Public Service Corporation 114 

GLASSWARE 
A. T. Schlichting 98 

GOLF STICKS 
The Hardright Co 18 

GOLF BALL MFG. 
St. Mungo Mfg. Co. of America 142 

HARDWARE 

Ludlow & Squier 6 

HARNESS MAKER 
G. M. Aschenbach Harness Co 116 

HIDES & SKINS 
Schwarz Bros. Co 32 

HOTELS 

Hotel Lenox 142 

Robert Treat Hotel 10 

ICE CREAM 
W. F. Day & Bros 130 

IGNITION— STARTING & LIGHTING 

SYSTEM 

Splitdorf Electric Co 56 

INSURANCE 

Aetna Life Insurance Co 136 

Chas. H. Henry 28 

Flindell & Co 28 

IRON CASTING 
Morrison Foundry Co 46 

IRON WORKS 

Hedden Iron Construction Co 138 

Kirchner, Inc 127 

JIFFY CHOCOLATE PUDDING 
Buehler Bros 142 



140 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



"Watch Dog" Water 
Meters 

EFFICIENT 

ECONOMICAL 

DURABLE 

GAMON METER COMPANY 

288-296 South Street 

Newark, N. J. 
Literature on Request 



F. C. Lanoch, Pres. 



A. DoMiNiCK, Treas. 



Electrical Fluid Disinfecting 
Company 

INSECT EXTERMINATING FLUID 

Disinfectant Fluid for All Purposes 

and Sanitary Supplies 

We are exterminators of all kinds of insects. 

Contracts made to rid any place of same. 

All kinds of buildings taken care of on 

monthly payments. 



Belleville. N. J. 



Newark. N. J. 




Telephone 

2172 

Mulberry 



C. B. ZAMPOL 
Ornamental Plastering 

42 Division Place, Newark, N. J. 



THE GLOBE ART MFG. CO, 

Silversmiths 

GOLD AND SILVER ELECTRO-PLATERS AND COLORERS 

All Kinds of Jewelry, Silverware and Plate Repaired and 
Refinished like new 

69-79 WINTHROP STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Telephone 3661 Branch Brook 



WHY KEEP CHICKENS 

unless they Show a Profit 

Feed Swift's Meat Scraps 

and insures profits thru maximum egg production and 
vigorous, healthy growth of young stock 

Manufactured by SWIFT & COMPANY 

HARRISON STATION, NEWARK, N. J. 

For Sale by Leading Feed Dealers 

Insist on SWIFT'S Telephone Arlington 500 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



141 



JEWELRY MFG. Page 

Allsopp & Allsopp 138 

Ernst Gideon Bek Mfg. Co 118 

Bishop & Bisliop 14 

Day. Clarlc & Co 118 

J. A. & S. W. Granbery 126 

A. M. Jack 124 

Tiie Marshall Co 138 

C. Rech & Sons 142 

Stumpf & Binder 91 

KNIT GOODS 
Newark Knitting Works 79 

LAMP WORKS 
New Jersey Lamp Works 34 

LAUNDRY 

Thos. F. Crowley & Co 88 

LEATHER BELTING MFG. 

Couse & Bolten 24 

Chas. W. Walker's Sons & Co 88 

LEATHER M'F'G'S. 

Berkovitz, Goldsmith & Spiegel 76 

Good Bros. Leather Co 26 

H. Hahn & Stumpf 46 

Max Hertz 26 

Hess, Harburger & Drucker 26 

Reimold, Chapot & Co 54 

F. A. Schaeffer 32 

Superior Leather Co 32 

E. S. Ward & Co 108 

Woburn Degreasing Co 54 

Ziegel Eisman & Co 30 

LIQUOR DEALER (WHOLESALE) 
Russell-Loewus & Froelich, Inc 130 

LUMBER 

E. W. McClave & Sons, I'nc 84 

Hill & Mount 4 

National Box & Lumber Co., Inc 84 

MACHINERY 

The Charles Burroughs Co 24 

Wm. H. Chapman 42 

H. J. Ruesch Machine Co 14 

Turner Machine Co 30 

MACHINERY MANUFACTURERS 
Boeger-Meyer Machine & Tool Co 22 

MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

Meeker Foundry Co 5S 

MANICURE FITTINGS 
Widger Mfg. Co 88 

MANICURE AND SPECIAL FILES 
The Parkes File Co 88 

MANICURING & SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Schnefel Bros 52 

MFG. OF ALUMINUM GOODS 
American Aluminum Ware Co 38 

MFG. OF MACHINE TOOLS 
Gould & Eberhardt 64 

MFG. OF PATENTED BAKELITE BILLIARD 

& CUE BALLS 
Hyatt-Burroughs Billiard Ball Co 22 

MASONS' MATERIALS 
Cook & Genung Co 28 

MATCH MFG. SUPPLIES 
American Splint Corporation 84 

MEAT SCRAPS 
Swift & Co 140 



MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING Page 
The Geo. W. Knight Co 138 

METAL CEILING 
Henry G. Trautwein 88 

METAL GOODS 

Colonial Stamping Works, Inc 106 

John E. Ortner & Co 110 

B. Poeter & Co 138 

The B. J. Riley Mfg. Co 124 

METAL NOVELTIES 

Eckelhofer Bros 142 

August Goertz & Co 134 

MILK & CREAM 

Borden's Milk Co 122 

Seller Bros. , Inc 110 

MONUMENTS 
J. L. & Wm. P. Meeker 36 

MOTOR CAR EQUIPMENT 
Motor Car Equipment Co 50 

MOVING 

Modern Storage Rooms 116 

MOVING PICTURE THEATERS 

De Luxe Theater 142 

Goodwin Theater 98 

Leader Theater 72 

New Amsterdam Theater 104 

Orpheum Theater 72 

Park Theater 98 

Plaza Theater 38 

OPTICIAN 
Anspach Bros 22 

OILS 

American Oil & Supply Co 20 

National Oil & Supply Co 46 

Standard Oil Co 38 

PAPER BOX MFG. 

Penn. Paper Box Co 46 

Progressive Paper Box Co 32 

David Schiffenhaus 32 

Specialty Paper Box Co 32 

United Paper Box Co 32 

PAPER DEALER 
J. E. Linde Paper Co 12 

PATTERN MAKERS 
Boice & Plain 14 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Van Keuren & Son 30 

PEARL BUTTON MFG. 
Hamburg Button Co 96 

PHONOGRAPH PARTS 
Eckelhofer Bros 142 

PHOTO ENGRAVINGS 

Art Photo Engraving Co 127 

N. J. Engraving Co 126 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

R. G. Koenig's Sons 6 

PIPES 

The Hardright Co 18 

PLATINUM CHAIN MFG. 
Wm. H. Taylor & Co 124 

POLISH 

Victor Specialty Co 56 



142 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



VICTOR JACOBY, Proprietor 



HOMELIKE 

Catering to a discriminating 

clientele 
All Modern Appointments 

Moderate Rates 
American and European 

CENTRAL AVENUE (Near Broad Street), NEWARK, N. J. 




Telephone 880 Waverly 

MARTIN R. EVERETT 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and 
Contractors 

Structural and Ornamental Steel 
and Iron Works 

Emmett Street and Avenue D 
Newark, N. J. 



Frank A. Eckelhofer 
President 



Frederick Eckelhofer 
Treasurer 



ECKELHOFER BROTHERS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Cast Metal Goods & Novelties 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Sprinkler Tops, Atomizers, Powder Tops, 

Trimmings for Glassware. Special Goods to 

Order. Handles and Trimmings for Barber 

Brushes, Bitter Tubes, Screw Caps. 

Irvington, N. J. 
Telephone Connection 



Telephone 7256 Market 

L. E. BAEDER 

Wagon Builder :: Automobile Work 

Machine Forging and General Jobbing. Varnish, 
Trucks, Whips, Stirrers, etc. 

139 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

C. RECH & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

line Gold Chains 

481 Washington Street, Newark, N. J. 



COLONEL GOLF BALLS 

St. Mungo Mfg. Co. of America 

Newark, N. J. 



A. H. PuDER, c. p. A. 



H. S. Puder, B. C. S. 



PUDER & PUDER 

Account Auditors and 

Systematizers 

Essex Building, 31 Clinton St., Newark 

Telephone Mulberry 1656 

Try Buehler's 

JIFFY CHOCOLATE 

PUDDING 

THE DELICIOUS DESSERT 




DENTAL 
CREAM 



C. 0. PADELFORD CO. 
Newark, N. J. 



LOCK JOINT PIPE CO. 

Ampere, N. J. 

DORFMAN BROS. 
Button Manufacturers 

46-50 Lawrence Street, Newark, N. J. 

Compliments oe 
DE LUXE THEATRE 

404 South Orange Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

JOHN SOMMER FAUCET CO. 

Corner Central and Morris Avenues 
Newark, N. J. 

Telephone 1708 Branch Brook 



INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 



143 



PRINTING Page 

Borden Press 127 

Modern Printing Co 36 

PRECISION MACHINERY MFG. 
Sloan & Chace Mfg. Co 125 

PUBLISHER 
J. J. Scannell 127 

PURSE FRAME MFG. 
Newarli Purse Frame Mfg. Co 72 

RANGES & HEATERS 
Thatcher Furnace Co 4 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

E. E. Bond & Co 18 

Geiser & Plum 98 

Jay & Jay, Inc 66 

Louis Schlesinger, Inc 62 

The Ward-Gehin Co 38 

REFINERS— PLATINUM 
Baker & Co., Inc 104 

REFINERS & SMELTERS 
L. Lelong & Bros 124 

RESTAURANTS 

Ludwig Achtel-Stetter 98 

Colaizzi's 126 

George Johnson 102 

McCloud's Tavern 14 

Nankin Garden Restaurant 2 

Royal Restaurant 110 

The Washington Restaurant 50 

ROOFING 

The Pitts Company 56 

Robert Hampton & Co 46 

RUG MFG. 
Newark Rug Works 70 

RUGS MADE FROM OLD CARPETS 

Oriental Rug Co 42 

SARATOGA CHIPS 
Maxwell & Son 90 

SAW MFG. 
Hastings & Co 94 

SCALES 

The Fairbanks Co 144 

SCULPTORS 

Dominic A. Walsh 102 

C. B. Zampol 140 

SECOND HAND BARRELS 
John Ebersberger 34 

SEEDMEN 
J. F. Noll & Co 80 

SHEET BRASS & TUBE MILL 
New Jersey Tube Co 36 

SHOE DEALER 
I. Blyn & Son 104 

SHOE LASTS MFG. 

N. W. Hovland Co., Inc 118 

SHOE MFG. 

Johnson & Murphy 66 

SHOCKS & LUMBER 

Hill & Mount 4 

National Box & I^umBer, Inc 84 

SILVERSMITHS 

The Globe Art Mfg. Co 140 



SMELTERS & REFINERS Page 

Balbach Smelting & Refining Co 60 

The Interstate Smelting & Refining Co 50 

Newark Bay Smelting & Refining Co 130 

SOIL PIPES & FITTINGS 

Essex Foundry 76 

SPRING ROLLER MFG. 
Stewai-t Hartshorn Co 14 

SPRING WATER & NON-ALCOHOLIC 

DRINKS 

Kanouse-Bludwine Co 100 

STARTER & BATTERY SERVICE 

Starter & Battery Service Co 44 

STEEL MATS 
Wayne Mfg. Co 112 

STORAGE 

Modern Storage Rooms 116 

STORAGE— MOVING— PACKING 

Model Storage Warehouse 62 

STRUCTURAL IRON & STEEL 

Martin R. Everett 142 

SURGICAL APPLIANCES 
Reinhold Schumann 62 

TALLOW 
Standard Tallow Co 18 

TANNER 
The J. H. Ladew Co 42 

TOILET ARTICLES 

C. O. Padelford Co. 142 

Est. Henry C. Miner, Inc 4 

TOOL MAKERS 

Beaver Machine & Tool Co 118 

Carl Schoenert & Son 88 

TOWEL SUPPLY 

N. J. Toilet & Towel Supply Co 88 

TOY BALLOONS 

Howe Baumann Balloon Co 90 

TRANSPORTATION 
Public Service Corporation 114 

TRUNK MFG. 
Neverbreak Trunk Co 102 

UNDERTAKER 

James G. Brierley 22 

UNDERTAKERS' SUPPLIES 
Mead-Suydam Co 44 

VARNISH, COACH COLORS. ENAMELS 
Murphy's Varnish Co 68 

WAGON BUILDER 
I>. E. Baedei- 142 

WAREHOUSE 

Modei-n Storage Rooms 116 

WATER METERS 
Gamon :\Teter Co 140 

WATER PROOFING 
Robert Hampton & Co 46 

WRECKING & CONSTRUCTION 
The Kolba Wrecking & Construction Co., 

Inc 84 



144 



NEWARK'S ANNIVERSARY 



A NEW BRANCH 



HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

NEWARK 



90-92 ACADEMY STREET 



Scales 

Valves 

Trucks 

Machine Tools 

Transmission Machinery 

Gas Engines 

Pulleys 

Belting 

Shafting 

Hangers 

Dart Pipe Unions ^ 

Mill and Factory 

Supplies 





You have always known of 
FAIRBANKS' SCALES 



Prompt Service is insured by large stocks and 
motor truck delivery 

THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



Albany 




Philadelphia 


Baltimore 


Telephone 4982 Market 


Pittsburgh 


Boston 




Providence 


Buffalo 
Hartford 


NEWARK, N. J. 


Syracuse 
London 


Newark 




Glasgow 


New Orleans 




Hamburg 


New York 




Paris 



REO THE FIFTH 

Four and Six Cylinders 




The ''Incomparable Four," $920 
Completely Equipped — DELIVERED 

Service, Satisfaction and 
Low Cost of Maintenance 

Seats Five Comfortably 
Timken & Hyatt Roller Bearings throughout 

CATALOG UPON REQUEST 

REO MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Factory Branch for New Jersey 
37-39 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Telephones Mulberry 3030-3031 



6 Cylinder, 7 Passenger, $1295 Delivered 



REO THE FIFTH 

4 or 6 Cylinders 
Built for Service, Comfort and Style 




The new "Sheer-Line" Reo "Six" Seven-Passenger 
Touring Car, $1295 Complete— Delivered 

Four Cylinder, $920 Complete— Delivered 

CATALOG UPON REQUEST 



REO MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Factory Branch for New Jersey 
37-39 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, N. J. 

Telephones Mulberry 3030-3031 



THE BORDEN PRESS