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JSLAJTJ 'rSl^TFTl.^!;; ;.' viT'. J v .liVTi^.-l .. 



~s 




PUBLISHED AT 2 WEST FORTY-FIFTH STREET, NEW YORK 



Design Copyright. 1906. by The II. W. Czay Co. 



2°.fl316 



••• • • •• 






INDEX 



PAGE 

Agujari, Lucrezia. Francis Rogers 117 

American Guild of Organists 23, 56, 93, 130, 

161, 193, 220, 248, 275, 330, 369 
American Guild of Organists, Twentieth Anniver- 
sary 130 

Another Ode to Discord, John F. Runciman 152 

Appeal, An 88 

Bach Choir, The 160 

Balakirev, Mili. Ellen von Tidebdhl 78 

Bani, Brigitta Giorgi. Francis Rogers 1J7 

Borodin, Alexander. Ellen von Tidebdhl 78 

Burlington Public School Music Festival 160 

Caffarelli and Farinelli. Francis Rogers 47 

Calendar of Concerts, A 88, 124, 155 

Christmas Music 59 

Church Notes 23, 24, 28, 58, 88,^94, 129, 132, 

163,194,221,249. 276 

Clemson Prize Anthem 58 

Composers vs. Russian Dancers. Paul Morris 238 

Concerts of the Month 16 

Correspondence 16, 155 

Cui, Cesar. Ellen von Tidebohl 78 

Development of the Lied. Sigmund Spaeth ,10, 42 

Easter Music 195 

Ecclesiastical Music. Dr. G.' Edward Stubbs . . 17, 

52, 89, 125, 156, 189, 215, 243, 271, 294, 326, 364 

Editorials 5, 37, 73, 108, 122, 144, 177, 205, 

233,261,289,317, 349 
4t Enigma Variations." Elgar. Short Studies of 

Great Masterpieces, No. 2. Daniel Gregory 

Mason 354 

Examination Papers of the American Guild of 

Organists 299 

Facts, Rumors and Remarks 51, 55, 123, 186, 

213,240,247,270, 362 

Farinelli and Caffarelli. Francis Rogers 47 

Five, The. Ellen von Tidebohl 78 

French Music, The War and. Gilbert Elliott. Jr. 

266 
French Organ Music, Past and Present. Harvey 

Grace 357 

Future in Music, The. Sydney Grew 13 

Gabrielli, Caterina. Francis Rogers 83 

Grassini, Guisippina. Francis Rogers 117 

Institute of Musical Art, The 155 

"Istar," "Symphonique Variations," d'Indy, 

Short Studies of Great Masterpieces. No. 1. 

Daniel Gregory Mason 322 

Messiter, Dr. A. H. An Obituary 294 

Mingotti, Regina. Francis Rogers 82 

Moussorgski, Modest. Ellen Von Tidebdhl 78 

Municipal Song Contest of the City of Baltimore. 16 
Music and Mathematics. Daniel Gregory Mason 

211 

Music, The Future in. Sydney Grew 13 

Music Published during the Last Month 28, 

63, 99, 135, 168, 198, 225, 250, 277, 305, 336, 373 
Music School Settlement Community Orchestra. . 188 



PAGE 

Musical Times Prizes 363 

My Musical Life. Rimsky-Korsakov . . .114, 150, 

182,210 

New York Oratorio Society, The 51, 95 

Notes from Paris. Gilbert Elliott, Jr 154, 213, 

241, 363 
Novelties in the Realm of Sacred Music in Russia. 

Ellen von Tidebohl 45 

Obituary 96, 165,214,294, 298 

Organ Notes 22, 132, 165 

Organ Recitals. . . .24, 61, 96, 124, 133, 165, 222, 

298,368,371 

Organ Specifications 22, 25, 60, 219 

People's Symphony Concerts 241 

Prizes for Musical Compositions 16, 87, 363 

Requirements for the Guild Examinations for 

1917 369 

Rimski-Korsakov. Nikolai. Ellen von Tide- 
bdhl 78 

Russian Dancers vs. Composers. Paul Morris 

238 
Sacred Music in Russia, Novelties in the Realm 

of. Ellen von Tidebdhl 45 

Saint Paul's Church Midday Services 24 

Saint Thomas' Festival Chorus 95 

Service Lists. . . .23, 24, 28, 59, 94, 129, 132, 163, 

194, 221, 276 
Short Studies of Great Masterpieces. Daniel 

Gregory Mason 322, 354 

Some Famous Singers. Francis Rogers — 47, 83, 117 

Suggested Service Lists 27, 62, 98, 135, 168, 

198,224,249,276,304,335,373 

Suggestion, A. Henry F. Gilbert 80 

Summer School of Church Music 219, 334 

Vacancies and Appointments 24, 132, 165, 

223,249,305 

Various Notes 23, 87, 88, 129, 164, 188, 214, 

242.268, 325 
War and French Music, The. Gilbert Elliott, Jr.. 266 
Warren, Samuel P. "An Appreciation." Walter 
C. Gale 21 



•Reviews of new flDustc 

Ah! County Guy. John Pointer 27 

Album de Salon, No. 1 134 

Albums for the Organ, No. 6 26 

All Hail the Virgin's Son. Clarence Dickinson 372 

Angels from the Realm of Glory. H. Sanders 27 

Arise Shine, O Jerusalem. T. Adams 27 

Bourree; from the Suite in F. C. H. H. Parry 

62 

Break Forth into Joy. W. G. Alcock 27 

Bright Star Shining, A. J. Sebastian Matthews. . . 26 

Brixham Town 27 

But Lo, the Dawn. J. Sebastian Matthews 27 

Canticles at Evensong. C. W. Douglas 98 



IV 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Chimes of Gloucester Cathedral. Arc. C. Lee 

Williams 26 

Christ is Born of Maiden Fair. H. MacKinnon.. . 27 

Christmas Bells. J. Sebastian Matthews 373 

Christmas Pastoral, A. T. Tertius Noble 372 

Christmas Rose, The. William Lester 372 

Country Dance Tunes. Sets 7 and 8. Cecil 

Sharp 224 

Dearest Jesus, Gentle, Mild. Arc. by Clarence 

Dickinson 26 

Development of Symphonic Music, The. T. W. 

Surette 62 

Easter Cantata, An. H. B. Day 98 

Eighty Amens. Clarence Dickinson 98 

Elevation in G. Major. E. Lang 224 

Emmanuel. C. B. Searle 27 

English Folk-Chanteys. Cecil Sharp 134 

Far from my Heavenly Home. H. Brock way 

224, 372 

Festival Toccata. Percy E. Fletcher 26 

Fierce Raged the Tempest. J. Sebastian Mat- 
thews. . 372 

Folk Songs from Sommerset. Cecil Sharp 134 

Fountain Reverie. Percy E. Fletcher 26 

Four Arabian Songs. W. Dichmont 27 

From Heaven High the Angels Come. Tradi- 
tional 372 

Fulfillment. A. P. Risher 168 

Funeral Music. Twelve Selected Pieces. Albums 

• for the Organ, No. 7 167 

Gigue. From Suite in F. C. H. H. Parry 62 

God that Madest Earth and Heaven. LeRoy M. 

Rile 224 

Good King Wenceslas. Arc. by W. G. Ross 97 

Grasshopper and the Ant, The. Bournell 134 

Grieve Not the Holy Spirit. T. Tertius Noble 

98 

Heliotrope. C. W. Douglas 224 

Holy Communion. James Baden Powell 373 

How Lovely, Lord of Hosts. T. C. Whitmer 224 

If Doughty Deeds my Lady Please. John 

Pointer 27 

Invocation. E. Paladilhe 134 

In Yonder Manger. Reimann-Dickinson 372 

Joseph, Tender Joseph, Mine. Traditional 373 

Keeper, The 27 

King's Hunt, The. John Bull 97 

Last Supper, The. Cecil Forsyth 97 

Leezie Lindsay. English Folk Song 168 

Little Door, The. J. Sebastian Matthews 26 

Lord of All Being. Mark Andrews 372 

Lord's Prayer, The. Willis Ailing 98 

Lord's Prayer and Offertory Sentences. E. S. 

Seder 225 

Love Lasts Forever. Bishop J. H. Darlington. . . 224 

Minster Bells, The. H. A. Wheeldon 98 

Missa Penitentialis. C. W. Douglas 167 

Moon of Love. Dwight Fiske 167 

Name above Every Name, The. J. Sebastian 

Matthews 372 

Ocean Rhapsody, An. F. E.* Ward 224 

Offering. E. F. Laubin 98 



PAGE 

O Hark to the Bells' Glad Sound. Oliver King 

372 

O How Amiable. Mark Andrews 26 

O Perfect Love. A. M. Read 225 

Organ Works of J. S. Bach. Book XV. Ed. by 

Ivor Atkins 269 

Out of the Deep. J. C. Marks 97, 167, 225 

Peterborough Sketch Book. L. M. Isaacs 97 

Pilgrim and the Winds, The. A. G. What- 

hall 167 

Piper of Hamelin, The. A. C. Graham 167 

Praeludium Pastoral. John Stainer 26 

Prelude in G. H. Purcell 97 

Recital Series of Original Composition for the 

Organ. 'Vol. 8 98 

Roman Soldiers, The. English Folk Songs 168 

Save us, O Lord, While Waking. Hugh Blair 26 

Saviour Christ is Born. P. Fehrman 26 

Serenade. H. A. Wheeldon 98 

Sicut Cervus. Ralestrina 27 

Slow Minuet. From Suite in F. C. H. H. 

Parry 62 

Soul at Heaven's Gate, The. Reimann-Dickinson 

98 

Spring Song, A. Philip James 167 

Sun of my Soul. Mark Andrews 372 

Tema Con Variazioni. A. C. MacKenzie 62 

Ten Students Songs, of Finland. Kurt Schind- 

ler 98 

They Shall Reign Forever. Bishop J. H. Darling- 
ton 224 

There be None of Beauty's Daughter. John 

Pointer 27 

Three Folk Songs. Max Reger 134 

Three Psalm-Tune Postludes for the Organ. 

H. Grace 167 

Thyre the Fair. William Lester 134 

Twenty Short and Easy Pieces for the Organ 134 

Two Traditional Hebrew Melodies. T. Tertius 

Noble 26 

Virgin's Lullaby, The. J. Sebastian Matthews. . . 27 

Vox Ultima Cruris. G. Rathbone 134 

Walking by Faith. Bishop J. H. Darlington 224 

Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea, A. John Poin- 
ter 27 

When I was a Young Girl. English Folk Song. . . 168 
When shall we be Married, John. English Folk 

Song 168 

Why Seek ye the Living among the Dead. G. 

A. Burdett 225 



TRcvicvos of Hew Soohs 

Great Modem Composers. Daniel Gregory 
Mason 120 

'Hjetory of American Music. L. C. Elson 122 

Larger Forms of Musical Compositions, The. 

Percy Goetschius 185 

Music and Musical Instruments of the Arabs, The. 

F. Salvador-Daniel 122 

Opera Book, The. Edith B. Ordway 122 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



1915 Christmas Music 1915 



ANTHEMS 

For Mixed Voices 



AGUTTER, A. Net 

A Christmas Cradle Song 16 

BAUSTON, E. C. 

The Earth Has Grown Old (Carol Anth.) .08 
BAXTER, F. N. 

Behold I Bring You Glad Tidings 12 

BENNETT, W. V. 

There Were Shepherds 12 

HASSARD T. 

While Shepherds Watched (Carol Anth.) . 12 
MARSCHAL-LOEPKE, G. 

Christ's Incarnation (Ten. and Bass Solo) .20 



Net 
.12 



NUNN, E. C. 

While All Things Were in Quiet Silence 

PEARCE, C. W. 

Come to Bethlehem 12 

Of the Father's Love Begotten 16 

TOLLWACKE, W. J. 

While Shepherds Watched 12 

Hallelujah 1 For Unto Us 08 

Tis the Birthday of the Saviour (Carol) .08 
Wise Men from the East 12 

WATTS, H. E. 

From East to West 08 



-IMPORTANT REVISION- 



Every number in Schirmer's Octavo Edition 
has been reduced in price from 33 Yz to 50% 
This reduction in some instances represents 
an increased purchasing power of half again 
as much music as formerly. Send for 
Catalogue II giving complete list (Sacred 
and Secular Music) with revised prices. 



-REFERENCE BOOKS FREE- 



Bound volumes of uniform size are issued 
regularly containing about twelve of the most 
meritorious of the new Anthems published 
by G. Schirmer. Similar collections are 
issued in Secular music. To obtain these, 
state number in choir, whether Men's, 
Women's or Mixed voices, and include 
3 cents to cover postage. 



.Organ Music for Christmas. 



Net 



BEST, W. T. 

A Christmas Fantasy on Old Christmas 

Carols 50 

GRISON, JULES 

Christmas Offertory 75 

HARKER, F. F. 

March of the Magi 75 

MACFARLANE, WILL C. 

Evening Bells and Cradle Song 60 



MAILLY, A. Net 

Christmas Musette 40 

ROGERS, JAMES H. 

Christmas Pastorale 60 

WESLEY, S. S. 

Hols worthy Church Bells 60 

YON, PIETRO ALESSANDRO 

Christmas in Sicily 60 



A SPLENDID CHRISTMAS GIFT 

J. S. Bach's Organ Works 

Edited by Ch. Marie Widor and Dr. Albert Schweitzer 

First Five Volumes Ready 
Price, each volume, Paper, $2.00 net Cloth, $5.00 net 

For the first time the principles underlying the interpretation of these works are elucidated ; 
for the first time two artists are associated for the purpose of explaining the performance of 
the several compositions in the light of their mature consideration and long experience. The com- 
poser's ideas have been made both the starting point and the goal of the editors. 

I. Preludes and Fugues of the Youth Period 

II. Preludes and Fugues of the First Master-Period 

III-IV. Preludes and Fugues of the Mature Master-Period 

V. Organ Concertos and Organ Sonatas 



-FOR SALE BY ALL MUSIC DEALERS- 



Catalogues 
sent on 
request 



Published by 
New York G. SCHIRMER ^ton 



Selections 

sent on 

approval 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



AUSTIN ORGANS 



TWO TESTIMONIALS OF RECENT WRITING 

From Professor Albert Riemenschneider, organist and musical director, Baldwin- 
Wallace College, Berea, Ohio, under date of September 10, 1915: 

"It certainly is always a pleasure to know that the organ I am to play is an Austin. 
It is half the battle won." 

From Gordon Balch Bevin, organist and choir director, Second Presbyterian Church, 
Cleveland, Ohio: 

"/ found the new console — after playing a recital on the Denison Avenue Congre- 
gational Church organ, Cleveland — such a help that I must write and tell you so. I 
believe that you have achieved, if not the ultimate in console design, at least the very 
best console now in use. Never have I given a recital with such perfect comfort; 
it is so easy to get at every accessory that the player can give himself up to the 
music itself. The new touch I regard as the greatest help since the invention of 
combination pistons. It is delightful, and most restful on the hands. Tonally the 
organ was excellent, as was to be expected, but your new console with several striking 
new features is a most unusual departure, and I feel that it will be of the greatest 
value to have the organists become acquainted with its worth/' 



AUSTIN ORGAN CO. 

158 WOODLAND ST., HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 



HUTCHINGS 
Organ Company 



Making no claims that it cannot substanti- 
ate by demonstration. 

It has the most simple electric action in the 

world, wonderful in its repetition 

and certainty. 

Its tonal work has never been questioned — 
is acknowledged to be the best 



Plant at 

Waltham, Mass. 



18 Tremont Street 
BOSTON 



156 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 



Northwestern University 

EVANSTON-CHICAGO 

The University School of Music offers courses in Piano. 
Organ, Violin, Voice and Theory of Music leading to aca- 
demic degrees. Also courses in Public School Music, and 
Piano and Voice Pedagogy. Literary Studies in the College 
of Liberal Arts or Evanston Academy included without extra 
cost. Thorough Preparatory School maintained. Refined so- 
cial environment and beautiful situation on the wooded shores 
of Lake Michigan. 

The professional String Quartette, the student Symphony 
Orchestra of sixty, the A Cappella Choir, the Evanston Musi- 
cal Club, and the great North Shore Musical Festivals, with 
Choruses totaling over 2,000 voices, offer unparalleled prac- 
tical advantages. 

Send for detailed description of courses and book of 

Evanston views. 

PETER CHRISTIAN LUTKIN, Dean 
EVANSTON-ILLINOIS 



TRINITY SCHOOL 

OF CHURCH MUSIC 

Daily Training in the Music of the 
Episcopal Church for Organist* and 
Choirmasters. 

Catalogue on request 

FELIX LAMOND, Director 

90 Trinity Place New York 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Oratorio Society of new York 

Founded by Dr. LEOPOLD DAMROSCH 
1873 
LOUIS KOEMMENICH, Conductor— 43d Season. 

Program 

1. JOAN OF ARC Op. 135 M. Enrico Bossi 

(1913) »86i 

Prologue and three scenes for solo voices, mixed 

chorus, male chorus, boys' choir, orchestra, organ. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, DEC. 8th, 1915, at 8.15 

Mice. Marie Sundelius Miss Rose Bryant 

Mrs. Grace D. Northruf 

Mr. Morgan Kingston Mr. Clifford Cairns 

First Performance in America 

236th Regular Concert 

2. "THE MESSIAH" Georg Friedrich Haendel 
TUESDAY AFTERNOON, DEC. 28th, 1915. at 2:15 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, DEC 30TH, 1915, at 8.15 
Mme. Corinne Rider-Kelsey 

Mme. Henriette Wakefield 
Mr. Lambert Murphy Mr. Vivian Gosnel 

88th and 89th Performances by the Society 

3. "THE CREATION" Joseph Haydn 

Followed by a modern work. 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL xsth, 1916, at 8.15 

Miss Florence Hinkle 

Mr. Paul Reimers Mr. Marion Green 

Twelfth Performance by the Society — last sung in 1894 

also 

Schicksalslied Brahms 

Evening All Single 

Concerts Concerts Performance 

Parquet $5-oo $7*oo $2.00 

Dress Circle 4-00 5.00 1.50 

Balcony: front 2.50 3.00 .75 

Balcony: rear 1.50 2.00 .50 



EDWIN H. LEMARE 

Organ Recital Tour United States and Canada 



Mr. Lemare will be available 
for Organ Recitals after the 
closing of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition December 4th. 



MANAGEMENT 

THOMAS J. DONLAN 

503 Fifth Avenue - - New York 




Four New Volumes of The Musicians Library 



Bound in paper, each, $1.50 postpaid 
In full cloth, gilt, each, $2.50 postpaid 



A complete list of all the volumes (75), including Portraits of Editors and full particulars 
of the Easy Payment Plan, will be sent free on request 



MODERN RUSSIAN PIANO MUSIC 

(Two Volumes) 
Edited by Constaniin von Sternberg 

Vol, I. Akimenko to Korestchenko 

Vol, II. Liadoff to Wrangell 
Russia, the latest of the nations to develop a 
national school of composers, is to-day producing 
the most original, spontaneous and vital music in 
Europe, Based firmly upon the riches of folk- 
song the ethnical note is sedulously cultivated 
by men whose unquestioned erudition is still their 
servant, not their master ; the result is a Mood of 
music which shows in its beauty and strength 
the joy of its creation. In these two volumes 
of the MUSICIANS LIBRARY are contained 
piano pieces of the highest musical and pianistic 
merit, never needlessly complex, and demon- 
strating the difference between "dignified modern* 
ity and its frenzied caricature, called modernism*' 



SIXTY IRISH SONGS 

Edited by William Arms Fisher 

Issued in two editions. High voice. Low voice 

The age-old folk-music of Ireland is regarded 
by many critics as the richest and most varied 
in the world. In this volume of THE MUSI- 
CIANS LIBRARY the editor has collected, be- 
sides famiHar and favorite airs, a large propor- 
tion of wordless traditional tunes to which he 
has successfully wedded suitable lyrics of modern 
Irish poets— thus presenting the most significant 
volume of Irish song that has been published, 
For all these airs the editor has written accom- 
paniments which express, through modern musi- 
cal resources, their racial and emotional spirit; 
thus making of them songs that present-day 
singers will delight in. 



OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

BOSTON 



CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. 

NEW YORK 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



W$t €rnt st ill Skinner Company 

CHURCH ORGANS 

Posfan, 4Ha*& 



y^'HE Erzahler is a hybrid. It is neither 
■ ^j Flute, Reed, String or Diapason. The 
^^^^ tone is polyphonic in character, 
sounding two notes at the same time, 
the fundamental note and its octave, with equal 
prominence. It is the chameleon of organ 
stops. It changes its color to suit its surround- 
ings. It is a tone of great beauty and sig- 
nificance. 

This stop named itself. Its talkative quality 
made the name indispensable. The German 
form "Erzahler" was used in preference to 
"story-teller," the latter being too colloquial. 

The stop is widely appreciated both by players 
and builders, some of whom are using it under 
its proper name. One or two others are using 
it under the name of Gemshorn, which it does 
not even resemble. 

Its inventor expects that the stop will be accord- 
ed its proper name when any possible credit 
will be post mortem. The ethics of the profes- 
sion seem to forbid that a builder shall receive 
credit for his productions during his life time. 




ISSUED ON THE 15? OP EVERY MONTH 
SUBSCRIPTION $L PER ANNUM 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS 

COPYRIGHT l«S BY THE H. W. GRAY COMPANY 



SUMMARY l^OF CONTENTS 



EDITORIALS 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LIED 
SIGMUND SPAETH 

THE FUTURE ON MUSIC 
SIDNEY GREW 

CONCERTS OF THE MONTH 

ECCLESIASTICAL MUSIC 
DR. EDWARD G. STUBBS 

SAMUEL P. WARREN — AN APPRECIATION 

WALTER C. GALE 

THE AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS 

REVIEWS OF NEW MUSIC 

SUGGESTED SERVICE LIST 

MUSIC PUBLISHED DURING THE MONTH 



\bt 



ro 



are fit merely to blow or strum or pick or 
pound on some instrument or other; as long 
as they are pounding or picking or strumming 
or blowing they appear to be somebody; as 
soon as they stop their noise, they again be- 
come — nobody I" 

It is to be hoped that these letters — more 
are to be printed — will be collected, with others 
referred to, and published in book form. 



editorials 



*VV%E SPOKE some time ago of the 
III letters written by Pauline Viardot to 
^^V' the Kapellmeister and composer, 
Julius Rietz. A second instalment has 
been published in the Musical Quarterly. 
They are even more interesting than the first 
in showing the character of a remarkable 
woman and celebrated singer. Her comments 
on English composers, musicians, and audi- 
ences are delightfully malicious. She had few 
illusions, although in art she was an idealist. 
In a splenetic moment she abused all players 
of instruments : "Remember, my friend, what 
musicians in general really are — persons who 



aN INTERESTING essay might be 
written on musicians as letter writers. 
How voluminous as correspondents 
were some musicians! Look at the seven 
thick volumes of letters written by Hans von 
Buelow; the many volumes of Liszt's corre- 
spondence ; the letters of Berlioz and Tschai- 
kowsky. How did they all find time to do it? 
And how much ground these writers covered ! 
We have only a few letters of Bach, and they 
are chiefly on business. There is no volume . 
of letters by the superb Mr. Handel. Haydn 
no doubt might have been an entertaining 
correspondent ; witness the entries in his note 
book when he was in London. Karajan has 
edited some of his letters, but they are not 
especially valuable. M. Romain Rolland 
thinks that Mozart's letters should be among 
the books of every library. It is true they 
are charming by reason of their simplicity, 
ingenuousness, good nature, sympathetic out- 
look. These letters are of a singularly hon- 
est man to whom music and his family were 



THE tyEW MUSIC REVIEW 



everything in life. M. Roll^nd. reminds us 
that Mozart had been carefuftjrt&fucated; he 
knew a little Latin.;. he\had v learned French, 
Italian, and £ng$£h*jfke had read "Telemaque" 
and knew wtto ETamlet was; he owned some 
ty)oK$v-M:jie works of Moliere and Metastasio, 
.'•.Rtfems of Ovid, Wieland, Ewald von Kleist, 
:* Moses Mendelssohn's "Phadon," the works 
of Frederick II, and some mathematical 
treatises. But one will not find in his letters 
discussions of pictures, statues, literature, po- 
litical or economic subjects. 



CHERE are two imposing volumes of 
letters by Beethoven. The Goncourt 
Brothers might look on them as per- 
sonal documents. While they are valuable, 
they have not the flavor or the charm of let- 
ters written by lesser composers. There was 
a time when Mendelssohn was considered the 
prince of letter-writers among musicians. The 
English used to call attention to Mendelssohn's 
skill in letter-writing as in sketching neatly. 
But Mendelssohn in everything was a bit of 
a prig. There has been much talk about his 
"sunny disposition." This disposition was 
often in the shadow cast by composers then 
living. There is no doubt that Mendelssohn 
was jealous, envious, call it what one will, of 
Schumann, Chopin, Berlioz. He praised the 
dead in unstinted language. 



CSCHAIKOWSKY was a self-torturer 
like Rousseau. His letters are an 
amazing revelation of character; an- 
other volume of "Confessions"; but we are 
drawn towards Tschaikowsky while we often 
doubt the sincerity of Rousseau. The letters 
of Bizet are full of vivacity. Yet for judg- 
ments pronounced in these letters, written 
when he was young, his position as a com- 
poser has been assailed. M. Jean Marnold 
and others argue that because he held these 
opinions, "Carmen" is only for the bourgeois 
and the music for "L'Arlesienne" is of little 
account. Perhaps it is best, after all, never 
to write a letter, but to preserve the letters of 
all correspondents. 



aMONG the most remarkable letters of 
musicians are those written by Liszt 
and Berlioz to the Princess de Witt- 
genstein. What was the peculiar fascination 
exerted by this woman? Mme. Viardot saw 



a good deal of her at Weimar and did not 
like her. She said that she was always af- 
fected. "I am not prudish. ... I can 
even admire a liaison of that sort, and prefer 
it infinitely to the hypocritical virtue of an un- 
faithful wife; but, good heavens! I can feel 
no sincerity between Liszt and the Princess, 
for sincerity cannot be otherwise than simple." 
It is not easy to fancy friendship between 
Mme. Viardot and the Princess. 

But Henri Marechal, the composer, was a 
man of the world who met the Princess at 
Rome and afterwards corresponded with her. 
He gives a graphic description of her in his 
"Souvenirs d'un Musicien." He became ac- 
quainted with her in 1873. To him she was 
indeed an Altesse — an Altesse Imperieuse, 
born to command and to be obeyed. She had 
passed the time when a sensible woman is 
too anxious about her dress. Her hair was 
still black ; her face had the color that Roman 
fever leaves; she was thin-lipped, but her 
eyes were marvellously brilliant and intelli- 
gent. She was smoking an enormous cigar. 
Mme. Judith, the actress, in her book of scan- 
dalous gossip, tells how George Sand, super- 
intending a rehearsal of one of her plays, sat 
astride a chair and smoked an old clay pipe. 
Marechal soon found in the opinions of the 
Princess the plumed romanticism of Liszt, the 
concise romanticism of Berlioz, and "the pro- 
lix and dogmatic" romanticism of Wagner. 
These three musicians had influenced her 
judgment or clouded her mind. Perhaps this 
was because she was not happy in expressing 
herself in speech, for after a long correspon T 
dence which took place afterwards, Marechal 
stated that in her letters there was a lofty 
view of art and a grandeur of aspiration that 
should be the catechism of all artists worthy 
the name. In his opinion the three composers 
owed the best of their works to this influence. 

What? But Berlioz's "Fantastic Sym- 
phony," "Romeo and Juliet," and "Damnation 
of Faust" were composed before he was well 
acquainted with the Princess. 



^* AS anyone thought of publishing the 
Jl complete correspondence of the Prin- 
^" / cess with Liszt, Berlioz, and Marechal ? 
The last named includes some of her letters 
in his chapter about her, and we have the 
letters of Liszt and Berlioz to the Princess. 
She was a born letter- writer, if the letters to 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Marechal are a fair sample ; witty, spontane- 
ous, sharply critical, at times affectionate but 
without gush, graphically descriptive, full of 
surprises. Here is a curious passage about 
Wagner : "Several Frenchmen have been re- 
marked at Bayreuth. Excellent! For if Wag- 
ner had parodied, mocked, censured the 
French in the first place, then there might 
have been a cause for maintaining rancor 
against him. But he went to Paris as to a 
modern Heliopolis. He was dazzled by the 
Opera House. He would have given his life 
to be with Gluck, Meyerbeer, Lulli, Cherubini, 
Spontini and others who were naturalized 
there. Instead of that, the first time he al- 
most died of hunger, and the last time he was 
vilified, hissed, as everyone knows." 

Marechal would write a letter of one or 
two sheets. The reply would take from a 
dozen to fifteen pages. The Princess had her 
own ideas about the "ideal" opera; one so 
perfect that, as Marechal says, the good Lord 
alone would have been capable of writing the 
music. 

Occasionally, in the letters published by 
Marechal, there is an anecdote. "The Duke 
of X once said, to get rid of subscribing for 
an atlas: 'I don't believe in geography.'" 
Here is a story with a moral, that may be 
consoling to the • "unappreciated" American 
composer: There was once a man that set 
off a magnificent firework. No one applauded. 
Astonished, he looked about him ; all the spec- 
tators were blind. He wished to take his re- 
venge. He invited men of his own trade, the 
most celebrated. He said to himself, "They 
will be surprised, ravished." At the first 
rocket everyone hissed and made the devil's 
own din. This is the fate of everyone bring- 
ing before his amiable contemporaries either 
a new idea or a new form of expression. The 
Princess found the story in Schopenhauer. 

At times in her admiration of Liszt she 
plunged into bathos. "He is finishing 'Via 
Crucis.' That which he composed last year 
can be likened only to an odoriferous flame 
exhaled by Creation around the throne of its 
Creator." Yet the woman that wrote this 
also wrote of Wagner : "His 'Parsifal' is only 
a succession of scenes without visible relation- 
ship, illuminated by music; but it is nothing 
more or less than a set of dioramas, which 
one sees in the large cities, in which one ad- 
mires, one by the side of the other, a view of 



Archangel and one of Pekin; the interior of 
a Gothic cathedral and a Hindu pagoda." 

As Marechal says, this Princess was cer- 
tainly Somebody. 



V'V^ AGNER in his many letters is usually 
III asking assistance in some form or 
^^^ other; sometimes actually begging; 
often complaining. By the letters addressed 
by many musicians to Liszt, which have been 
published, two stand proudly out : Berlioz and 
Buelow. Read the letters of Berlioz to the 
Princess. He writes as if he were the proud- 
est aristocrat in France, addressing the intelli- 
gent woman, not the Princess. If anything, 
his tone is the nobler. He freed his mind on 
every subject. She had asked him what he 
was doing, thinking, reading. He answered 
that he frequented reading-rooms and when 
he went to the Institute he found time to read 
the "Biographie Universelle" in the library. "I 
am beginning to be tired of men who were not 
artists. These poor little rascals called great 
men inspire in one only an irresistible horror. 
Caesar, Augustus, Antony, Alexander, Philip, 
Peter, and so many others are only bandits. 
And then the biographers contradict them- 
selves. One clearly sees that they are sure of 
nothing, that they know nothing. When I re- 
flect that I myself have forgotten certain 
events, certain characteristic details of my life, 
I ask how a stranger's pen, at a distance of 
two thousand years, can retrace the events in 
the life of men whom the writer has neither 
seen nor known. History is a cheat, as are 
so many other accepted things." 



CHE indefatigable Mr. O. G. Sonneck of 
the Library of Congress, with Mr. 
Walter R. Whittlesey, assistant in the 
Music Division, has published a catalogue of 
first editions of Stephen C. Foster's songs. 
Mr. Sonneck in the preface does not vie with 
Mr. Percy Grainger in purple praise of Fos- 
ter as a melodist, but he does say that some of 
the songs possess "the beauty and power of 
imperishable folk-songs." "The deeper the 
historical interest in a man of genius grows, 
the more ramified the desire for bibliographic 
knowledge about his work is likely to become." 
One reason for bibliographical interest about 
these songs is the rarity of the original edi- 
tions. "The question whether or not all songs 
published with Foster's name as composer 



8 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



really were composed by him has been left to 
others for an answer." 

The book will interest all those who recog- 
nize the fact that Foster gave to this country 
songs that are the nearest approach to native 
folk-song. It has been said that he knew 
nothing about music. This is not true. He 
played the flute — he wrote a waltz for four 
flutes when he was 13 years old — and the 
flageolet; he studied the piano, and became 
a pianist of no mean ability ; he was well ac- 
quainted through study with the works of 
Mozart, Beethoven, and Weber. Nor was he 
uneducated, as some say ; he knew some Latin 
and Greek and was proficient in French and 
German. Fond of improvising, according to 
report, he sang his own melodies with a plain- 
tive sweetness. He wrote his own verses be- 
cause he thought the difficulty of harmonizing 
sounds with words made this necessary. 



CHERE are music critics in the West, 
excellent ones in Chicago. We quote 
from the Oconte (Wis.) Reporter: 
"Mrs. Louise Linder, the accomplished pianist, 
showed herself an artist gem of the purest 
water. Her technic seemed perfect and to 
the writer most marvellous, reminding him 
of a winding brook, the water rippling over 
the myriad of white pebbles, while the sun in 
the dewy morn overflows the whole vista with 
his sprays of gold, just dispersing the impish, 
laughing, singing, and since early dawn danc- 
ing fairies, while reflecting all the colors of 
the rainbow from the tiny scales of the thou- 
sands of the wily and basking minnows swim- 
ming hurriedly past the beholder, oblivious to 
his surroundings." 

The Boston Globe read this fine burst and 
remarked: "Different from one-finger play- 
ing/' 



CHE London Daily Telegraph speaks of 
Tausig's version of Bach's Toccata and 
Fugue in D Minor as "a truly awe- 
inspiring example of musical fright fulness." 
The same may be said of any transcription for 
the piano of an organ work by Bach. When 
there is so much beautiful music written by 
him for the piano, why do pianists persist in 
playing transcriptions and attempting to imi- 
tate the majestic roar of the mightier instru- 
ment ? 

A still more "awe-inspiring example of mu- 



sical fright fulness" is the proposition to hold a 
peace jubilee with a chorus of 30,000, huge 
orchestra, etc., in either this city or Chicago. 
Let it be in Chicago by all means. Will not 
Mr. Henry T. Finck, who is never weary of 
protesting against "Jumboism" in art, come 
at once to the rescue? 

Sir Henry Wood recently conducted Tschai- 
kowsky's Pathetic Symphony in London. He 
slightly accelerated the pace of the third move- 
ment, "which always has the effect of a march 
to battle." This led the Pall Mall Gazette to 
remark: "The progress to the disillusion of 
the fourth is so poignantly impressive that it 
is almost questionable whether the perform- 
ance of the latter is desirable in days when 
the pessimist is abroad. If music is to bring 
comfort we prefer that it should end in a note 
of victory." Why not, then, omit the final 
movement? The composer- was not wholly 
pleased with it and said shortly before his 
death that he should rewrite it. 



^Y%R. WLADIMIR CERNIKOFF gave 
J I I a recital in London October 13 to 
^'l ▼ show the qualities of the Clutsam 
Cradle Keyboard. A rocker like the one fixed 
to a child's cradle takes the place of the ful- 
crum pin on the key, so that the resistance to 
the touch is lessened, while there is exact uni- 
formity for black as well as white. By re- 
ducing the duration of the hammer's contact 
against the string a fuller and longer volume 
of tone is said to be effected. A critic ob- 
served that "rare effects and delicate nuances 
in execution are available to a degree that they 
certainly have not been under the old system." 
This is all very well, and no doubt this cradle 
keyboard is an ingenious device. Some years 
ago we heard a young woman exploit in pub- 
lic the Janko Keyboard. There was much talk 
about it then. What has become of the key- 
board ? We have heard "rare effects and deli- 
cate nuances" produced by Messrs. de Pach- 
mann, Paderewski, Gabrilowitsch, Siloti, 
Copeland, Bauer, not to mention others, by 
the manipulation of a common or garden key- 
board. 

We are informed by a London critic that 
Marguerites in Gounod's "Faust" are of two 
kinds : those who visualise the part and those 
who sing the music, and they seldom meet. 
The reviewer proceeds: "Miss Carrie Tubb 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



sang the music splendidly." Miss Tubb! 
Absit omen! And yet she may be svelte or a 
fausse maigre on and off the stage. 



should have more than one suit when he is 
travelling incog. 



3N THIS performance of "Faust" Mr. 
Robert Radford as Mephistopheles 
wore black and thus excited remark. 
Why should there always be the customary 
red? Victor Maurel years ago excited atten- 
tion in Paris because he wore a black doublet. 
The last time we saw him in the part, when 
he was with the San Carlo Company, one of 
his costumes was of mouse color. Nothing is 
more absurd than the usual costume worn by 
Mephistopheles when he is among the vil- 
lagers. Anyone dressed in this manner would 
have been taken by the honest folk as a fan- 
tastic wandering juggler or a madman. The 
Prince of Darkness is a gentleman. Coleridge 
tells us how he arrayed himself when he once 
visited his snug little farm, the earth, to see 
how his stock went on : 

And how then was the Devil drest? 

O! he was in his Sunday's best: 

His jacket was red and his breeches were blue, 

And there was a hole where the tail came through. 

Here is an authority to be quoted against us. 
We shall not quibble or debate whether 
Mephistopheles is not one of Satan's chief ad- 
visers. Nor shall we go into the symbolism 
of colors. Caraccioli in his "Livre a la mode" 
says that the color rose is libertine, affected 
by daughters of joy; that red is used chiefly 
by women, wrinkled by debauchery, to paint 
the face. Some affirm that red is symbolical 
of cruelty, wrath, fire, zeal — and even 
modesty. We read in "La Liturgie Sacree" 
(1678) that red is worn in the church in mem- 
ory of the apostles and the martyrs, because 
it is the color of the blood which they shed in 
defence of the faith. There is a curious appli- 
cation of red to our Saviour found in a learned 
work, "Lettres sur Jesus-Christ," by CI. Ros- 
signol (Paris, 1841). An author of the 17th 
century says that red is symbolical of charity. 
See how learned men, deep thinkers, dis- 
agree. As a lover of the theatre, we have seen 
for years Satan, Samiel Mephistopheles, 
any potentate or imp of the infernal regions, 
rise on a trap in a red glare. The color red is 
associated in the minds of the great majority 
with Satan, his court, his cohorts, his dwelling 
place. Still we maintain that Mephistopheles 



*Vf^ R - EDWIN EVANS contributed an 
1 I I entertaining article to the Pall Mall 
"^1 %> Gazette about war audiences. He 
finds a marked difference between this musi- 
cal season and the last. The chief question 
during the promenade concert season was 
whether Wagner's music should be played. 
"The discussions that took place were not ir- 
relevant. On the contrary, psychologically 
they touched the very heart of things. But 
they took no account of the new power of 
audiences, the one factor of material impor- 
tance. The problem was to 'carry on' for an 
indefinite time of stress — to maintain music as 
a going concern. Its solution depended not 
upon arguments in favor of this or that music, 
but upon the readiness of audiences to sup- 
port any music." Now, under present condi- 
tions the largest audience that can be got to- 
gether does not balance the accounts, and the 
taste of the minority cannot be consulted. The 
loyal nucleus is nowhere progressive, "for 
that is the prerogative of minorities." It has 
no great curiosity concerning new music, hence 
"novelties" must go, for they do not attract 
the majority. (It is so in this country, and 
Mr. Grau was wiser in his day and generation 
than the children of light.) "The nearest ap- 
proach to an audience of which the nucleus 
is not adverse to adventure will be found at 
some of the chamber concerts." Mr. Evans 
thinks the Royal Philharmonic Society is a 
special .case. "The axis of its audience has 
been for some time inclining towards mild ad- 
venture, and even the extreme right is becom- 
ing accustomed to the sensation." Mr. Bee- 
cham has a bundle of scores under his arm 
and "an infectious buoyancy of spirit." Think 
of it ! Stravinsky's "Petroushka" on the open- 
ing night ! "That is as far as he dares to go. 
"His personality may carry the audience along 
so far. It is worth risking. Ta go further 
would be to cater deliberately for a minority, 
and there would be audible groans in the box- 
office." 

The question now is of ways and means. 
"The turn of the cognoscenti will come later 
on. I am not sure that a course of musical 
plain living is not good for us. The fare has 
been over-rich and there was some musical 
dyspepsia about." 



IO 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




Cbe Development of tbe tied 

By Sigmund Spaeth 

HE term "Kunstlied" was first ap- 
plied by the Germans merely to the 
contrapuntal arrangement of a 
song by a skilled musician. Later, 
lowever, the word acquired a much larger 
meaning and was used to describe almost any 
song written with conscious art by an indi- 
vidual composer. As it is now understood, 
the shorter form, "Lied," refers in the techni- 
cal phraseology of music to the most serious 
and advanced type of "Kunstlied" or "art- 
song." It is assumed to be a composition for 
a single voice, with instrumental accompani- 
ment, and exhibiting a close relation between 
words and music. 

As may be imagined, the "Volkslied," with 
its easy, tuneful melody, repeated through as 
many stanzas as might be desired, found much 
more general favor than the early, artificial 
attempts at the "Kunstlied." A small group of 
German composers of the eighteenth century 
devoted themselves to writing "arias" and 
"odes," in which the devices of art were given 
a much greater importance than the natural 
beauties of melody and harmony. Yet these 
composers, while they made very little im- 
pression on their own generation, must be 
credited with laying the foundations of the 
art-song of the future. They insisted upon 
a correct correspondence of musical and ver- 
bal accents, and attempted to give expression 
to the details of meaning in the texts which 
they employed. 

In this group was J. P. Kirnberger, a 
scholarly musician, who has been called the 
inventor of the "durchkomponiertes Lied," 
that is, the form of song in which the music 
follows the words throughout, instead of re- 
maining the same for each stanza. Whether 
or not Kirnberger merits this honor, a greater 
importance must be attached to the work of 
C. P. E. Bach, who, by his settings of Gel- 
lert's "Geistliche Oden," became, according 
to his biographer, C. Bitter, "the founder and 
creator of the German 'Lied' in its present 
sense." 

But while the composers of "Arien und 
Oden" could make little headway against the 
popularity of the "Volkslied," the latter 
quickly succumbed when met upon its own 
ground. The surprising victory of the 



"Kunstlied" was won by the simple device of 
composing melodies similar in character to 
the folk-tunes but so much better fitted to 
their words that even the dullest intelligence 
perceived the difference. This compromise 
between art-song and folk-song is generally 
known as "volksthumlich," a term which, 
while really untranslatable, may be suggested 
by the English word "popular." As it was 
used successfully by the greatest German 
composers, the importance of this "folk-like" 
form of song must not be underrated. It was 
the first real attempt to retain the full beauty 
of a melody while still adapting it consistently 
to the meaning of its text, and while it did 
not attain the ideal balance of such perfect 
songs as Schubert's, it was still a vast im- 
provement over the uninspired artificialities 
of the "arias" and "odes." 

J. A. Hiller was the first composer to se- 
cure general recognition for his "volksthum- 
liche Lieder," all of which appeared in "Sing- 
spiele" or light operas. His contemporary, J. 
A. P. Schulz, won even greater success, 
largely because of the care with which he se- 
lected his verses. The rapid development of 
German lyric poetry proved the best incen- 
tive to artistic song-writing, and the com- 
posers both of "popular" songs and of true 
"art-songs" profited much by the inspiration 
of such writers as Korner, Brentano, and 
Uhland. 

The genius of Goethe was almost entirely 
responsible for the songs of two composers 
of the end of the eighteenth century, J. F. 
Reichardt and C. F. Zelter. The latter was 
one of the blindest worshippers of the great 
poet, and in return for this devotion Goethe 
did Zelter the honor of preferring his settings 
to those of all other composers, even Bee- 
thoven and Schubert. Needless to say, this 
judgment has not been shared by unpreju- 
diced critics, and Zelter's songs now rest in 
a well-merited oblivion. Reichardt's work 
was of a higher grade, chiefly because he 
gave his text every chance to speak for itself. 
His settings were practically musical declama- 
tions, in the rhythm of the verses, with the 
melody always subordinate to the words. By 
this method he established himself as the fore- 
runner of Schubert and Schumann. His 
theory was in the main correct, but he lacked 
the inspiration of the true musical creator. 
Reichardt's setting of Tieck's Lied der Nacht 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



ii 



may be regarded as his best song. Both Zel- 
ter and Reichardt won popularity in their day 
by their ballads, a form of German song first 
used successfully by J. JR. Zumsteeg. The 
latter's versions of Lenore and Ritter Toggen- 
burg are among his best songs, but their in- 
terest is now chiefly historical. 

The great German composers of this time 
were slow in giving serious attention to the 
"Lied." They were occupied with the larger 
forms of composition and evidently hesitated 
to waste melodic inspiration on works of such 
slight compass. The real possibilities of the 
song-form had not as yet been sounded, and 
the ease with which the composers of the 
"volksthiimliche Lieder" produced their melo- 
dious trifles naturally led the more serious 
musicians to consider the "Lied" as quite un- 
worthy of their powers. Johann Sebastian 
Bach clearly proved his ability to write artis- 
tic songs through the remarkable arias in his 
cantatas and by the dramatic nature of his 
choral works. But he left very few specimens 
of actual "Lieder." His Erbauliche Gedanken 
eines Tabakrauchers is admittedly genuine, 
but the charming little song Willst du dein 
Herz mir schenken? is now generally at- 
tributed to Giovannini. A simple and sincere 
love-song, Bist du bei mir, and the "Geistliche 
Arien," Gieb dich zufrieden and Schlummert 
ein, ihr matten Augen, may be included among 
Bach's contributions to the development of 
the "Lied." 

Handel's influence on song-writing was ex- 
ercised chiefly through his oratorios and 
operas. A volume of his "German, Italian, 
and English Songs and Airs" has been pub- 
lished by the Handel-Gesellschaft, but it is 
difficult to say how many of these are genuine. 
Many of the English songs are undoubtedly 
adaptations of Italian melodies to English 
words. A Hunting Song, for bass voice, is 
among the few whose originality is undis- 
puted. 

Gluck really belonged to the period of the 
"Arien und Oden," but his theories were far 
in advance of those of his contemporaries. 
The reforms which he carried out successfully 
in the field of operatic composition he tried 
to apply also to song-writing. In his preface 
to "Alceste" he spoke Qf the relation of music 
to poetry as "much the same as that of har- 
monious coloring and well-disposed light and 
shade to an accurate drawing, which animates 



the figures without altering their outlines." 
A letter written by Gluck to La Harpe in 1777 
contains the sentence: "The union between 
the air and the words should be so close that 
the poem should seem made for the music no 
less than the music for the poem." The prac- 
tical demonstration of these theories, how- 
ever, was disappointing. Gluck's best efforts 
were unquestionably confined to his operas, 
and the few songs which he wrote, chiefly 
settings of Klopstock's odes, are distinctly un- 
inspired. Willkommen, O silberner Mond is 
a good example of his work. 

With the advent of Joseph Haydn the Ger- 
man "Lied" began to show a very definite im- 
provement. Haydn's prolific inspiration ex- 
pressed itself in more than forty original 
songs, and he also arranged a number of Scot- 
tish and Welsh national melodies. His set- 
tings have been disparaged as being purely 
instrumental in character, with no regard for 
the accent or the meaning of the words. This 
is only partly true. Haydn was, as a rule, un- 
fortunate in his choice of texts, but even when 
they were clearly uninspired he sincerely at- 
tempted to make his music express their 
meaning. In many cases his melodies are far 
superior to the words. 

Ein kleines Haus is a good example of 
Haydn's earlier style. The chief theme is 
given in the introduction, and the greater part 
of the accompaniment consists of the melody 
itself, simply harmonized. Although the song 
is quite short, it is "durchkomponiert" or 
"synthetic" in its method. The significance of 
the words is well brought out by the setting 
of such phrases as "das schone Gluck, Freund, 
neidest du es mir?" and "ich theilt' es gern 
mit dir," while the accompaniment clearly sug- 
gests the "Lied der Lerche" and "der Arbeit 
froher Muth." 

Lob der Faulheit is an effectively humorous 
bit of dramatic burlesque. The word "Faul- 
heit" is set to a musical imitation of a yawn, 
and the line, "ach ! ich gahn' ! ich werde matt" 
is punctuated with rests, giving a very realistic 
impression of sleepiness. This effect is in- 
creased by the chromatic progressions and 
broken octaves of the accompaniment. The 
two measures added after the voice is silent 
give a finishing touch of snoring somnolence. 

Liebes Mddchen, hqr' mir zu is a charmingly 
melodious song of the "popular" style, 
strophic in form and with a graceful accom- 



12 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



paniment. The simple words demand no dra- 
matic realism for their expression, but fit the 
melody to perfection. This is distinctly the 
best of Haydn's German songs. 

In his settings of English words, however, 
Haydn shows still greater progress toward the 
ideal combination of text and music. The 
Mermaid's Song ("Die Seejungfer") is full 
of sparkling life, with imitations of the danc- 
ing waves in the accompaniment. A dramatic 
contrast is exhibited in the Shepherd Song 
("Schaferlied") between the sprightly advice 
of the optimistic mother and the halting ca- 
dence of the desolate shepherdess who has lost 
her lover. Sympathy, with text adapted from 
Metastasio, is an elaborate song, protracted 
to a rather wearisome length. Its chief merit 
lies in its variety of harmonic color. She 
never told her love ("Stets barg die Liebe 
sie") from Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" 
may be considered Haydn's most successful 
English song, and shows how much he could 
accomplish when favored by poetic words. 
With a full appreciation of the dramatic force 
of the few lines, he built up a truly synthetic 
musical interpretation in which the introduc- 
tion and the intermediate instrumental pas- 
sages are quite as important as the actual vocal 
part and its accompaniment. Of the thirty- 
nine measures of the complete song, eighteen 
are entirely instrumental, while in six of the 
remaining twenty-one the voice is given but 
a single note. The Spirit Song and O tuneful 
voice ("O siisser Ton") were both results of 
Haydn's second visit to England, being writ- 
ten "for an English lady of position." The 
second of these is probably his most elaborate 
song. It is synthetic in form and there are 
strong dramatic touches. Musically, however, 
it is not as interesting as some of Haydn's 
simpler "Lieder." It would seem natural to 
include in this list the famous Austrian na- 
tional hymn, Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser, 
Haydn's best known and most popular song. 
But while its stirring melody is a fine expres- 
sion of patriotism, it is clearly intended to be 
sung by many voices in unison or harmony, 
and therefore plays no part in the develop- 
ment of the "Kunstlied." Moreover, it is ad- 
mittedly based upon a popular Croatian folk- 
song, which separates it still further from the 
type of art-song under discussion. 

While Haydn was primarily an instrumental 
composer (his songs often give the impression 



of being fragments of string-quartets), Mo- 
zart made a special study of the voice and its 
possibilities. His extreme versatility and the 
genius for vocal composition displayed in his 
operatic airs would seem to have made Mozart 
an ideal composer of "Lieder." Yet his con- 
tributions to the literature of art-song are 
comparatively insignificant. An explanation 
may be found in the oppressive poverty which 
pursued the composer all through his life. He 
was practically forced to devote himself to 
those forms of music which promised an im- 
mediate financial return. At a time when 
song-recitals, in the modern sense of the word, 
were absolutely unknown, no professional ad- 
vantages could be secured by writing "Lieder." 
It may be assumed, however, that if Mozart 
had lived longer, and had ever attained to 
comparatively easy circumstances, the work of 
the German poets and the constant improve- 
ments in the structure of the pianoforte would 
have inspired him to write songs quite as re- 
markable as those of Schubert himself. 

Das Veilchen will bear comparison with the 
work of any of the later composers of art- 
song, and may unhesitatingly be called the 
most perfect "Lied" written up to that time. 
The simple theme, first stated in the intro- 
duction, is admirably fitted to Goethe's text. 
Particularly effective is the phrase, "Es war 
ein herzigs Veilchen," which is again beauti- 
fully introduced at the very end of the song. 
The violet's yearnings ("Ach! denkt das Veil- 
chen, war' ich nur die schonste Blume der 
Natur!") are expressed by a change to the 
key of G minor. (The song as a whole is in 
G major.) This changes, in turn, to B-flat 
major, as the violet's hopes of recognition in- 
crease. The disappointment is foreshadowed 
by still another change of key, this time to a 
gloomy E-flat major. The return to the orig- 
inal key is managed with extraordinary skill, 
every chord seeming to have an emotional sig- 
nificance. There is a gentle tragedy in the 
phrase "ertrat das arme Veilchen," following 
which a real dramatic climax is built up on 
the words "und sterb' ich denn, so sterb' ich 
doch durch sie." The pathos of the situation 
is intensified by the quiet comment of the clos- 
ing phrases: "Das arme Veilchen! Es war 
ein herzigs Veilchen!" 

Der Zauberer is a coquettish little pastoral, 
somewhat similar to the French "bergerettes" 
of the same period. There is a suggestion of 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



13 



dramatic treatment in the phrase, "Ich seufzte, 
zitterte," but otherwise the song is conven- 
tional. Abendempfindung is a fairly elaborate 
setting of an artificial and banal text. It is 
"durchkomponiert ,, in form, and the accom- 
paniment exhibits a number of ingenious mod- 
ulations. An Chloe, likewise "durchkom- 
poniert," has a delightful melody, which, how- 
ever, is thoroughly instrumental in character. 
There are several instances of unnatural ac- 
centuation, and the constant repetition of in- 
dividual words and phrases gives the impres- 
sion of studied artificiality. Very different in 
character is Ungliickliche Liebe, a highly dra- 
matic song written in a style approximating 
recitative. The contrast is well brought out 
between the resentful defiance of the first part 
and the desolate sorrow of the concluding 
lines. There is an evident suggestion of flick- 
ering flames in the accompaniment to the 
words "Ihr brennet nun," adding a realistic 
detail to the picture of the lovelorn maiden 
burning the poems of the unfaithful one. 

Another dainty pastoral in the manner of 
Der Zauberer is Die Verschweigung. Its 
strophic form causes one very bad accent in 
the second stanza, but this single defect may 
well be forgiven in view of the captivating 
melody, characteristically Mozartian in its 
simplicity. Sehnsucht nacht dem Fruhling, a 
children's song, also strophic in form, has a 
rollicking tune which might easily pass for 
a real folk-song. It fulfils its purpose admir- 
ably. The beautiful Wiegenlied beginning 
"Schlafe, mein Prinzchen, schlaf ein," was for 
a long time attributed to Mozart, but has been 
conclusively proved the work of Bernhard 
Flies. The question of authorship, however, 
does not affect its value as a simple, melodious 
lullaby. Sei du mein Trost, Das Lied der 
Trennung, and Ich wiird' auf meinem Pfad 
may be added to the list of Mozart's contribu- 
tions to the literature of the "Kunstlied." 

{To be concluded.) 

THE FUTURE IN MUSIC 
By Sydney Grew 

I HE inner relationship of music and 
poetry has ever been a subject of 
importance to musicians, though 
not of necessity to poets. The lat- 
ter, in general, have proved themselves able 
to build up, and to support, their art alone. 




The definite character of their poems, the con- 
crete nature of their material, and the more or 
less pronounced tangibility of their thoughts, 
are qualities which have combined to make of 
poets a grandly self-contained group of men 
and women — self-contained, if not altogether 
self-sufficient. Few poets have felt it within 
them to rear their art upon abstract founda- 
tions. Shakespeare, but a few generations 
removed from the vast architectural energy 
of the late Middle Ages, had no use for the 
sublime abstraction which expressed itself in 
churches and palaces; and Tennyson, whose 
life and work linked together the elderly Bee- 
thoven and the juvenile Strauss, had no need 
for the spreading immensity of thought and 
feeling which belongs to music. At times, how- 
ever, poets arise whose nature demands some 
of the essential qualities of music. Such poets 
are generally men and women of less sophisti- 
cated spirit than is common among their 
family. Their view of things is less verbally 
direct, .though their interests and sympathies 
are no less "poetical." The nineteenth cen- 
tury, opening with the maturity of William 
Blake, gave us two men poets of this class — 
Browning and Whitman — Browning, whose 
love-passion transcends Wagner's and whose 
intense artistic intellectuality surpasses Bee- 
thoven's (so far as perfection can exceed per- 
fection) ; and Whitman, whose tender human- 
ity and pervading romanticism equals Bach's 
and whose apprehension of cosmic facts has 
not yet been paralleled by musician. Among 
women poets of the century, Christina Ros- 
setti was touched with the same transcendental 
spirituality. But, in the main, poetry has ex- 
isted independently of music. It was a great 
art before music was an art at all, and most 
poets will ever continue their works by ways 
unknown and unknowable to musicians. 

The case is entirely different with us. Of 
all musicians, Mozart and Beethoven alone 
were able to fix themselves upon points of en- 
tire and absolute independency. Bach seems 
ever to have had running through his veins 
the blood of poetry. His instrumental works 
speak with a clarity almost verbal. The great 
fugues stand out from a background of 
words, and the preludes are pictures of defi- 
nite happenings. The suites are stories. Even 



H 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the experimental pieces for clavier have a po- 
etical definiteness, such examples as the reci- 
tatives in the little-known Fantasie-Prelude 
in A minor (Peter's Ed., No. 215, p. 1), 
having less intellectual ambiguity than many 
passages of the "Hamlet" speeches, of the 
"Rabbi-ben-Ezra" of Browning, or of the "Ode 
on Immortality" of Wordsworth. It is, indeed, 
scarcely an exaggeration to say that nearest 
to Wagner in the domain of poetically de- 
pendent music is Bach. Palestrina, so far as 
we know, wrote no line that was not directly 
associated with words; and Haydn never re- 
moved his finger from the pulse of what was 
then the natural world of everyday life and 
conduct. But Mozart and Beethoven (and 
Schubert also, in so far as he inclined toward 
these two men) achieved at once a spiritual 
abstraction and a material absolutism which 
finds its parallel in the sister art only with 
such poets as Tennyson. I feel that Mozart, 
set in a world where words were unknown, 
would have sang as birds do ; and that Bee- 
thoven, cast into a revolutionary existence 
which was otherwise confined to expression 
by means of gesture, painting and sculpture, 
would still have poured out his spiritual mes- 
sages ; whereas Bach and Wagner, placed sim- 
ilarly, would have been well nigh speechless. 
And as Bach and Wagner are neither smaller 
nor greater than Mozart and Beethoven, nor 
in any way less significant in the general 
scheme of things musical, it may be taken as 
proven that music (in one aspect) depends 
upon poetry in a way unique among great 
arts. 

The present is one of those initiatory pe- 
riods when music draws most closely to po- 
etry — now, for the first time in history, to 
secular poetry. We of the twentieth century 
constitute an age of enquiry and experiment. 
We are pioneers, clearing the way for the 
future. There is little or nothing of a com- 
pleting value in our labors. Bach, while he 
set up a sign-post for the twentieth century, 
at the same gathered together and completed 
what had been prepared by three or four 
earlier generations. Beethoven leaped like a 
young gladiator into the arena of his day, and 
before his thirtieth year had marked the vic- 
tory for his own. We to-day have no Bach 
or Beethoven. Our composers are akin to the 
men of the seventeenth century — to Kuhnau, 



Krieger, Bohm, Pachelbel and the host of 
others whose names attend historically upon 
Bach's. Oun»music is as much a striving for 
freshness and newness as was Galluppi's and 
Paradises; and like the pianoforte sonatas of 
the latter, so will it {i.e. our music) eventu- 
ally become, not "classical" or "ancient," but 
merely "old-fashioned" and "obsolete." 

The future of music might, therefore, be 
prognosticated from a consideration of the 
standpoint of music and poetry in a state of 
mutual influence and interaction. The same 
could perhaps be said in part of poetry. We 
see how Browning's understanding love of 
music affected his poems (which, despite the 
accepted literary view, have a perfection lack- 
ing in the forms of his contemporary, the 
superb stylist Tennyson — "The Lotus-Eaters" 
is structurally commonplace beside "Charles 
Avison"). In the same way we see how Wag- 
ner's art depended upon his attitude to poet- 
ical thought. We can see even more clearly 
how entire phases of musical development 
have moved in agreement with prevailing po- 
etic characteristics and conditions. This last 
is so true that only a brief acquaintance with 
the circumstances under which the modern 
mind developed is needed to show us, not only 
why modern music should arise when it did, 
but also why it could not (by any human pos- 
sibility) have arisen at any other period. 
That is to say, a brief study of medieval 
thought shows us that the art of Bach and 
Beethoven was as impossible in Greece and 
Rome two thousand years ago, when the pre- 
vailing poetical attitude of mankind was dif- 
ferent from that of to-day, as it is now in 
Patagonia or Greenland, where equally non- 
modern conditions prevail. Hence the above 
remark that the constructively critical mind 
could hazard a forecast of the future of music 
from a study of its past in association with 
poetry. For the present, however, I have 
merely to produce from the foregoing a justi- 
fication of the generally held belief that the 
command of music (so gradually but surely 
passing from Teutonic peoples) is destined 
eventually to rest for a while with those of 
Anglo-Saxon origins, of which the most rep- 
resentative dwell in England and northern 
America. 

It is necessary to assume that, different 
though they be in method and manner, music 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



15 



and poetry have fundamentally the same in- 
spirational bases. It is necessary to assume 
also that the race great in poetry is eventually 
great in music — though this latter is no as- 
sumption in the light of Dante and Palestrina, 
and the great Teutonic minnesingers and 
religious poets and Bach and Beethoven. 
We thereupon discover immediate evidence 
that the English-speaking world is well 
equipped for musical pre-eminence. The suc- 
cessive ages of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, 
Wordsworth, and Browning and . Whitman, 
prove our permanent possession of the finest 
poetical spirit. The collateral ages of 
Dunstable, Orlando Gibbons, Handel (who 
was an English musician of foreign extrac- 
tion, born and bred abroad), and Delius and 
Elgar, prove our further possession of those 
mysterious depths of soul which, passing be- 
yond the range of the mind, escape the power 
of poetry and rest almost undisturbed with 
music. And the contemporary Anglo-Saxon 
poetical and musical energy proves that we 
have not yet reached a stage of careless men- 
tality and spiritual sluggishness, in which 
alone lies the ultimate ruin of these two arts. 
And if Anglo-Saxondom has no poetical 
bar against winning first place in music, 
neither has it any general economic bar. 
Throughout England and America to-day is 
a ruthless determination to achieve new and 
better conditions of life and thought — a de- 
termination which, floating on similar waves 
of revolutionary reform, carried to fruition 
the wonderful generations of Palestrina, 
Bach, Beethoven and Wagner. Music never 
flourishes in a stagnant world. It belongs to 
what is eternally moving. When a generation 
is decadent, its music is not music; when it is 
weak and feeble, its music is weak and feeble 
likewise. Great music comes from man only 
when his soul is stirred by sympathetic un- 
derstanding of his fellows. Music scarcely ex- 
isted prior to the new humanism of the 
Renaissance. It had no home in the close, 
reserved intellectualities of Greece and Rome, 
nor in the symbolizing imaginativeness of the 
Middle Ages. It belongs exclusively to the 
modern dispensation, of which no more vital 
demonstration is made to-day than in England 
and the United States. 



Already we are doing no small work in mu- 
sic; but our efforts lack unified spontaneity. 
Much of the music we send out lacks, indeed, 
sincerity — or if not that, at least disinterested- 
ness. The spirit of jealousy and self-glorifi- 
cation is still abroad. We have not yet reached 
the high and pure level of Bach and Bee- 
thoven, where nothing was tolerated or con- 
sidered but what aided the recording of beau- 
tiful experiences. We still have our worldli- 
ness in our Liszts and Raffs, and our small- 
ness in our Matthesons and Hummels. 

As the world changes, however, we shall 
change with it. In the main, all things musi- 
cal are harking forward. Only unconsciously 
are we building upon the past. Of the score 
of musical geniuses at work to-day, Strauss 
is probably the only one whose creations will, 
a century hence, stand out as sui generis. We 
have no compact personality of the order of 
Palestrina, Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, 
Brahms and Wagner. Our novelties have not 
the air of inevitability found in culminating 
art. We belong to Marlowe rather than to 
Shakespeare. But if the garden flourishes 
weeds, it is a sure sign that it will flourish 
choice flowers. Only the desert is hopeless; 
and we who are immediate heirs to the nine- 
teenth century are not by any means set in 
an arid land. As we apprehend the thoughts 
expressed in poetry from Coleridge, Words- 
worth and Shelley, to Browning, Longfellow 
and Whitman, so shall we translate them into 
the finality of music, and so shall we produce 
the English response to the work of 
Beethoven. 

One thing is assured : This coming Anglo- 
Saxon musical genius will be as much poet 
as musician, as great a master (or under- 
stander) of words as of sounds, as capable 
of dramatic insight as of lyrical vision, and 
as true to himself as sincere to his art. Such 
men are rare; but they exist, and we have 
had a full measure of them. Our English 
and American composers will most effectually 
hasten the day, first by reading poetry into 
whatever contains it, and, secondly, by devel- 
oping in themselves unreserved spontaneity of 
thought and unmitigated sincerity of feeling — 
for of such is the Kingdom of Art. 



i6 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



THE MUNICIPAL SONG CONTEST OF THE 
CITY OF BALTIMORE 

The mayor of Baltimore, the Hon. James H. 
Preston, announces the offer of $250 in gold for the 
best original musical setting of the prize poem on 
"Baltimore," to be used as the Municipal Anthem. 
The judges of the competition will be Harold 
Randolph, Director of the Peabody Conservatory of 
Music; Henrietta Baker Low, former Supervisor of 
Music in the Baltimore Public Schools; John Itzel, 
composer and conductor. The competition will close 
December 1, 1915. All manuscripts must be addressed 
to The Municipal Song Contest, care of Frederick 
R. Huber, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 



The programme of the Second Eisteddfod of the 
American Druid Society, of Shenandoah, Pa., No- 
vember 25, is as follows : 1. Chief choral competition, 
mixed voices (not less than sixty in number), O 
Father Whose Almighty Power, Judas Maccabaeus, 
by Handel. Prize, $200; A silver cup to successful 
leader, donated by Mr. Luke Bowen. 2. Male chorus 
(not less than thirty-five voices), Little Church, by 
Becker. Prize, $100. 3. Glee, mixed voices (twenty 
to thirty in number), Last Rose, by Ambrose Lloyd. 
Prize, $50. 4. Children's choir, two parts: I Sing 
Because I Love to Sing, by Pinsuti. First Prize, $25 ; 
Second Prize, $15; Third Prize, $10. 5. Male quar- 
tette, Annie Laurie, by A. Geibel. Prize, $10. Prize 
donated by Dr. W. N. Stein. 6. Duet, tenor and bass, 
The Battle Eve, by Theo. Bonheur. Prize, $8. 7. 
Duet, soprano and alto, O Lord, We Adore Thee, by 
Geo. Mark Evans. Prize, $8. 8. Soprano solo, in 
key of E, I Know That My Redeemer Liveth. by 
G. F. Handel. Prize, $5. 9- Tenor solo, in key of D, 
I Am Waiting, by Birch. Prize, $5. Prize donated 
by John Perrong. 10. Alto solo, in key of F, Alone 
on the Raft, by Paul Rodney. Prize, $5. 11. Bari- 
tone solo, Sailor's Grave, by A. S. Sullivan. Prize, 
$5 . 12. Bass solo, in key of D, The Bugler, by Pin- 
suti. Prize, $5. 13. Children's solo, ages eight to 
fifteen years, The Touch of His Hand on Mine, 
Great Revival Hymns No. 2. Prize, $3. 14. Tot's 
solo, ages eight year and under, My Jesus, I Love 
Thee, Great Revival Hymns No. 2. Prize. $3. 15. 
Piano solo, ages fifteen years and under, iEolian 
Harp, by. Sydney Smith, Century Edition. First 
Prize, $2.50; Second Prize, $1.50; Third Prize, $1. 
16. Amateur solo (for those who have never won a 
prize), Perfect Day, by Cary Jacobs. Any key. 
Prize, $5. Adjudicators: Music, J. Powell Jones, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Editor, New Music Review, The H. W. Gray Com- 
pany, 2 West 45/fc Street, New York City. 



Dear Sir: 



s. 



A paintr is jere 
Ze best of jurop 
En dif iu dusinck 
Zat ai ce tu moes 
Drai mi en julci 
Me drain is bolo 
Mai colorein fein 
Ein fuol of biuti. 



Nq, this not English as sung in "opera in English," 
though it easily could be. It is a mock-English aria 
in Rutini's Opera, I matrimoni in maschera, Venice, 

1765. 

Isn't the phonetic spelling of "And full of beauty" 
deliciously Italian? But "And if you do think" 
takes the cake., 

Very truly yours, 

O. G. Sonneck. 



Concerts of tbe month 

^OLIAN HALL 

15. Aft. Song Recital, Caroline Hudson-Alexander. 

16. Aft. Song Recital, Elizabeth Gutman. 

16. Eve. Violin Recital, Ferencz Hegediis. 

17. Aft. Piano Recital, Winifred Christie. 

18. Eve. Song Recital, Mary Jordan. 

19. Aft. Song Recital, Mme. Chilson Ohrman. 

19. Eve. Violin Recital, David Hochstein. 

20. Aft. Joint Recital, Harold Bauer-Pablo Casals. 

20. Eve. Violin Recital, Vera Barstow. 

21. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, John 

Powell, Soloist. 
23. Aft. Song Recital, Christine Miller. 

23. Eve. Margulies Trio. 

24. Aft. Piano Recital, George Copeland. 

25. Eve. Song Recital, Lois Ewell. 

26. Aft. Violin Recital, Albert Spalding. 

26. Eve. Edith Rubel Trio. 

27. Aft. Piano Recital, Leo Ornstein. 

27. Eve. Violin Recital, Sascha Jacobsen. 

28. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Julia 

Culp, Soloist. 

29. Aft. Piano Recital, Louis Cornell. 

29. Eve. Piano Recital, Victor Wittgenstein. 

30. Aft. Joint Recital, Andre Tourret Camille 

Ducreus. 
30. Eve. Flonzaley Quartet. 

1. Aft. Piano Recital, Arthur Shattuck. 

2. Aft. Piano Recital, Katherine Goodson. 

2. Eve. Song Recital, Seymoure Bulkley. 

3. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Harold 

Bauer, Soloist. 

3. Eve. Piano Recital, Charles Cooper. 

4. Aft. Piano Recital, Erriest Hutcheson. 

4. Eve. Joint Recital, Shanna Cumming — Harry 

Rowe Shelley. 

5. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Harold 

Bauer, Soloist. 

CARNEGIE HALL 

1. Eve. Operatic Concert Benefit of Italian War 

Sufferers. 

2. Aft. Song Recital, Mme. Schumann-Heink. 
a. Eve. Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

o. Aft. Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

7. Aft. Song Recital, John McCormack. 

8. Eve. Song Recital, Percy Hemus. 

9. Aft. Song Recital, Mme. Frances Alda. 

11. Eve. Philharmonic Society. 

12. Aft. Philharmonic Society. 

13. Aft. Piano Recital, Leopold Godowsky. 

14. Aft. Philharmonic Society. 

16. Aft. Piano Recital, Mme. Fannie Bloomfield 
Zeisler. 

16. Eve. Concert and Meeting of the Humanitarian 

Cult. Soloists: Mme. Rappold, 
Godowsky and Hartman. 

17. Aft. Piano Recital, Ernest Schelling. 

18. Eve. Philharmonic Society. 

19. Aft. Philharmonic Society. 

20. Aft. Symphony Concert for Young People. 

21. Aft. Song Recital, John McCormack. 
23. Aft. Song Recital, Herbert Witherspoon. 

An interesting programme book of organ recital's 
is issued by Cornell University. It contains a list 
of thirty-eight recitals played by the University 
organist, James T. Quarles. with short biographical 
sketches of each composition. Of these recitals 
twenty were given in Sage Hall on the organ built 
by the E. M. Skinner Co. in 1909, and eighteen in 
Bailey Hall on a new organ, four manuals, seventy- 
nine stops, built by J. W. Steere & Co. in 1904. A 
brief summary of the programme presented reveals 
the following data: 

Total number of pieces performed 199 

Works by J. S. Bach 13 

Sonatas, Symphonies, Suites and Overtures.. 26 

Miscellaneous 68 

Transcriptions 92 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



17 



Ecclesiastical music 

EDITED BY 

G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc. 





J HE Bishop of Chester's attack upon 
The English Hymnal has brought 
forth vigorous answers in defence 
of the book. Mr. Geoffry Shaw, 
inspector to the board of education, who read 
a paper at the Summer School of Music at Ox- 
ford last month on "The Organization of Sing- 
ing," declares that The English Hymnal rep- 
resents a decided musical advance* in hymn 
books. "It is admirably suited to congrega- 
tional singing, and attention has been given 
to the keys of the tunes from that point of 
view. One can find in the book soft and 
plaintive tunes as well as the broad and stir- 
ring types of melody — indeed, many of the 
former kind are some of the most beautiful 
hymns in all music. I cannot tell what a reve- 
lation this book has been to some of us, and 
what an inspiration it has been to all of us. 
If authority were to ban this book, the cause 
of Church music would receive a terrible set- 
back." 

The Archdeacon of Aston (The Ven. G. L. 
H. Gardner), one of the Church music re- 
formers who preached a sermon before the 
Summer School, says that, viewed broadly, 
this hymnal is an enormous advance on what 
has preceded it. "When one has the oppor- 
tunity of joining in some of its words and 
some of its tunes, the effect, after what one 
is usually accustomed to, is like going into the 
fresh air after being shut up in a stuffy room. 
Many of the hymns and most of the tunes 
bring to us a larger and nobler conception of 
worship. It will be a serious loss if this ef- 
fort to raise our psalmody to better things 
is put on an index expurgatorius by author- 
ity." A contributor to the Morning Post 
(London) says: "It is a significant com- 
mentary on the Bishop of Chester's action that 
at the Summer School of Church Music re- 
cently held at Oxford, all the hymns were 
chosen from The English Hymnal." 



|REAT is the force of example I 
"Popular Vespers," which has 
hitherto been the "attraction" at a 
certain West Side church, has now 
invaded the East Side. This up-to-date "ser- 
vice" (?) can now be heard at 

Church, with all the distinctive characteristics 
of the original model — special solos for the 
violin, harp, voice, cornet, wood-wind, and 
what-not. 

But the Methodist Episcopal Church is not 
to be outdone by the "Protestant Episcopal" in 
"drawing" the general public. We are told by 
the New York Times that: 

"The New York Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church gave its approval yes- 
terday to several essentially modern methods 
of drawing people to church. Among them 
were: 

"Holding moving-picture performances in 

the churches or the church buildings. 
"Utilizing brass bands or orchestras to 

draw the general public. 

"It was at the first annual 'church efficiency* 
conference of the New York Conference, held 
yesterday at Grace Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in West 104th Street, that these 
methods were described. The Rev. Dr. Chris- 
tian F. Reisner, the pastor of Grace Church, 
was the prime mover in calling the conference 
together, and the clergymen present were 
called on for definitions of the term 'church 
efficiency.' Dr. Reisner described it as 'de- 
livering the goods.' " 

|R. W. T. BEST, when he was at 
the height of his career and uni- 
versally acknowledged to be the 
world's finest organist, could not 
help feeling that the concert organist did not 
command the respect and homage accorded by 
the public to the concert pianist. This atti- 
tude on the part of music lovers he resented 
bitterly on the ground that it was exceedingly 
unjust and inconsistent. 

It is not customary for pianists to look upon 
organists as their equals in the concert world. 
And for this reason the opinion of the great 
von Bulow, who regarded the organ as an in- 
strument of paramount importance, and Mr. 
Best as a player of amazing ability, is of pe- 
culiar interest. The famous pianist happened 
to be in Glasgow when Mr. Best was giving 
recitals in St. Andrew's Hall (then known as 




i8 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the Public Hall), and after attending one of 
the performances he thus expressed himself 
to a reporter of the Glasgow Herald (Novem- 
ber 23, 1877) : 

"I never met with an organ so good in Ger- 
many, the instruments there not having the 
same amount of expression and flexibility — 
most delicate and exquisite nuances — that 
hearing the diminuendi and crescendi was to 
me a new sensation. If I would longer listen 
to an organ like this, and a player like Mr. 
Best, I would, were I not grown too old, 
jeopardize my pianistical career, and begin to 
study the organ, where certainly I would be 
able to display much more eloquence as Bee- 
thoven's and Chopin's speaker. In short, de- 
spite having been exceptionally fatigued by 
your consecutive concerts and numerous re- 
hearsals, I listened with the most eager atten- 
tion from the first to the last note of Mr. 
Best's recital." 

Since that time there has been an extraor- 
dinary adyance made in organ construction, 
and consequently in organ playing. The piano 
has remained practically what it was. Yet the 
most eminent organists cannot command the 
concert prices paid to hear such men as Pade- 
rewski, Bauer, Godowsky, Gabrilowitsch, and 
Rosenthal. The explanation is perhaps to be 
found in the fact that the piano is the instru- 
ment "of the masses," whereas the organ is but 
little understood and (comparatively) little 
appreciated. 

LERGYMEN who undertake to 
sing the priest's part in the choral 
service "perform a most responsible 
duty, which is in most cases very 
unworthily carried out/' according to Dr. 
A. H. Mann of Kings College, Cambridge. 
During a lecture recently delivered at Nor- 
wich on "Improvements in Various Parts of 
Our Musical Service," this distinguished or- 
ganist took occasion to say: 

"With regard to the Preces, Versicles, and 
Responses, these should form a kind of duet 
between the clergyman and the choir, and to 
secure a proper and satisfactory effect there 
ought to be no ugly gaps ; strict time and even 
pitch should be observed, and a oneness of 
spirit should be displayed by clergy and choir. 
If the 'cantor' fails to stick faithfully to his 
note and to keep absolutely strict time, it is 
impossible for the choir to take up their re- 




sponse satisfactorily. If a clergyman likes, he 
can perform his part in such a way that no 
choir, not even if it consisted entirely of an- 
gels, can get into any time at all, neither com- 
mencing nor continuing; he can easily cause 
these 'duets' to become a fearful failure; 
therefore he has a most responsible duty to 
perform, a duty which I am obliged to admit 
is, in most instances, very unworthily carried 
out. Frequently a choir is blamed for singing 
the responses badly, and the poor, unfortunate 
choirmaster is roundly rated for the same, 
whilst the whole blame for such work ought 
to b$ showered on the clerical head." 

There are indeed few choirmasters who 
have not suffered blame for the shortcomings 
of the clergy in choral matters; if lectures on 
the part of representative musicians will right 
the evil, by all means let us have more of 
them. 

In England the unaccompanied choral ser- 
vice is much more in vogue than it is in this 
country; consequently, the work done by the 
precentor is of more importance to the chor- 
isters. There is a vast difference between the 
ordinary service with responses by choir and 
organ, and the type heard in the Anglican 
cathedrals and large parish churches. In the 
one case the incompetent cantor is at the mercy 
of the organist, who publishes, through the 
organ, every deviation from the path of recti- 
tude. When there is criticism on the part of 
the congregation it is apt to fall where it be- 
longs — on the offending cleric. 

In the other case, the choristers (and the 
organist who trains them) are at the mercy 
of* the cantor, who "makes" or "breaks" them 
according to his musical ability or incompe- 
tency. 

Without the instrumental standard to serve 
as a criterion, the average person in the con- 
gregation cannot always tell when choristers 
are worried by bad intoning. The cantor often 
goes scot free, the choristers bearing the 
blame. 

In an unaccompanied service perhaps the 
most dangerous kind of clergyman is the one 
who cannot comprehend key relationship. 
Such a man will at times change the key in 
the middle of a succession of responses ! Only 
very expert singers can survive that sort of 
treatment. 

Inability to maintain pitch is very common. 
We once heard a certain choir carried down a 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



19 



major fourth in the unaccompanied Litany by 
a cantor who shirked the blame and accused 
the singers of untune fulness. He could not 
(or would not) see that the comparatively 
lengthy sentences of the priest's part neces- 
sarily exerted a dominating influence over the 
very brief responses of the choir. 

One of the most sensible methods of dealing 
with this problem is to do away with the 
choral service entirely when trained precentors 
are lacking. A read service is far better than 
one chorally maltreated. The priest's part is 
musically of paramount importance, because 
it embraces practically all of the service, the 
responses being, in comparison, exceedingly 
brief. 

A good choir, doing the short part well, 
cannot make up for a bad cantor, doing the 
long part ill. 

We have only a short extract from Dr. 
Mann's lecture — we hope he. said something 
about the deplorable habit of drawling. 
Clergymen who indulge in it exert a most per- 
nicious influence over the "attack" and "mu- 
sical vitality" of choristers. To quote an 
Anglican writer: "Dragging is particularly 
disastrous. It becomes contagious, and reacts 
upon the choristers. In fact, the method of 
singing the priest's part always affects the 
choir in every portion of the service. A crisp, 
flowing, prompt delivery keeps the choristers 
on the qui vive, whereas a drawling, sluggish 
method produces a lifeless effect which in- 
variably influences the singers." 

Haberl, who is, perhaps, the greatest au- 
thority on liturgical singing, says : 

"As a rule, the style of singing should be 
lively, crisp, fresh, at times very animated, al- 
ways with an easy, rhythmic swing through- 
out, and not that wretched habit of slow, lum- 
bering, tedious drawling which has already 
earned such a bad name for liturgical music." 

|N THE total absence of sensation- 
alism which characterizes the mu- 
sical services of the cathedrals and 
parish churches of England, there 
is much for American organists to admire — 
and to imitate. The "personal element" is 
kept in the background, and the key-note in 
choral affairs is churchliness. One might well 
exclaim, "Why not? What else would one 
expect in churches?" 

Nevertheless, there seems to be a growing 




tendency in certain quarters on this side of the 
Atlantic to secularize church mu^ic. One of 
the symptoms of this tendency is seen in the 
publication of the names of soloists on service 
lists — a custom copied from the concert room. 

In Anglican churches solos are not sung as 
"special attractions." Indeed, "offertory 
solos" (as they are called in our choirs) are 
seldom sung in the cathedrals. In most of 
the English choirs chorus anthems are chiefly 
used, and if they happen to contain a treble 
solo there is not the slightest fuss made about 
it. In large buildings two or three treble 
voices are often utilized as one solo voice. 

At St. Paul's, London, the entire corps of 
boys is sometimes employed in rendering a 
composition designed for a single treble. 

Sensationalism is dear to the American 
heart, but we should certainly keep it where it 
belongs — outside the churches. 

A short while ago it was announced in cer- 
tain newspapers (from information given at 
headquarters) that a most remarkable boy 

singer had been engaged at- Church 

at a fabulous salary and that he would be 
"heart for the first time at the 'noon service' " 
on a given date. 

This kind of thing would not happen in 
London, for instance, or in Birmingham, or 
Manchester, or Liverpool. "Individualism" 
and personal notoriety in Anglican choirs of 
the better class may be said to be practically 
non-existent. 

LONDON curate, being somewhat 
doubtful in his mind as to the "con- 
gregational" advantages • of plain- 
song, has sent the following letter 
to the Guardian: 

"May I ask which is the more congrega- 
tional — Gregorian tones or Anglican chants? 
I am prompted to ask this question because, at 
Solemn Vespers at a Brighton church on the 
occasion of the first anniversary of the war, 
I noticed that the chanting by a men's choir 
(and without organ accompaniment) received 
the support of one voice in the congregation, 
and that a lady's ! The congregation possibly 
numbered fifty. I am aware that not a few of 
the Anglican chants are undignified and jiggy ; 
but do they not lend themselves more readily 
to congregational usage than the unexpected 
inflections of the ancient Plainsong?" 
We predict that he will be more perplexed 




20 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



than ever when he reads the replies to his com- 
munication* Gregorian enthusiasts will tell 
him one thing, and those of the opposite camp 
will tell him another. 

To get at the truth he should visit a num- 
ber of churches and compare notes. Let him 
go to St. Albans, Holborn, Westminster 
Cathedral, and St. Paul's (the night congre- 
gational service) and he will learn much. 

It is well to remember, in testing this vexed 
question of Gregorians versus Anglicans, that 
chanting is not always a fair criterion. Good 
congregational singing is the rule rather than 
the exceptions in denominational churches 
where hymn singing of the "Gospel song" 
type is specially cultivated, and chanting not 
attempted. 

And in the "established" churches one will 
often find lusty hymn singing and weak chant- 
ing. Theoretically, the Gregorian system 
should lead to the best congregational results 
because it is a strictly unisonous system. We 
are told again and again that chants and hymn 
tunes are pitched too high and that people 
cannot sing them. Plainsong tunes are all 
low. But theory and practice do not always 
go hand in hand. If it were really true that 
plainsong could solve the congregational prob- 
lem, "Anglicans" would hardly maintain their 
general popularity, which is so much in evi- 
dence. 

N REPLY to a correspondent who 
asks why we advocated, in a recent 
issue, the substitution of the mono- 
tone Confession for the so-called 
"Ely" setting, we would say that unity in 
choral worship is best served by adhering to 
the ferial use. The "Ely Confession" should, 
strictly speaking, be called after the organist 
who invented it, Mr. Robert Janes, and not 
after the church in which he officiated as or- 
ganist. Not long after Janes took charge of 
the music at Ely (he was appointed organist 
and choirmaster in 1831) he undertook to 
create a fresh interest in the choral service by 
introducing new settings for certain portions 
of it. It is said on reliable authority that his 
intention was to elaborate many of the re- 
sponses after the style of his "Confession," 
but for some reason his plans were not car- 
ried out. There is an argument — and a very 
sound one — against the alteration of the an- 
cient musical responses. These old melodies 




are based upon certain inflections that have 
been in use for ages, and it is desirable that 
they should be perpetuated forever in order 
to provide a form of "common worship" for 
the Church. 

The old Litany which was sung in Cran- 
mer's time contains these ancient inflections, 
which are represented by the major scale 
numbers 4, 4-2, 4-2-3, 4-2-3-4, 2-4-5-4, 

4-5-4-2-3-4. 

These musical "forms" should not be 
changed, representing as they do the monotone 
and ferial responses. 

It is fortunate that Janes is the only or- 
ganist who ever "popularized" his own indi- 
vidual setting to the Confession. It would be 
lamentable if we had in common use Confes- 
sions by Smith, Brown, and Robinson! 

Yet these gentlemen have as good a right 
(if there exists a right) to invent a Confes- 
sion as ever Janes had ! 

Strange to relate, Janes never wrote any 
other music that became famous. He edited 
a Psalter which was used at Ely for some 
time, but as a composer he is practically un- 
known. He was an industrious teacher. 
Dickson says of him: "Janes had a very 
large teaching connection in Norfolk and Suf- 
folk, and in later years was wont to relate 
how he rode long distances on horseback to 
fulfil his engagements; also how he had ar- 
ranged a pair of lamps, attached to his saddle 
like pistol holsters, to light his lonely road at 
night through the fen country. It is said that 
his income at this time could not have been 
expressed in less than four numerals." x 

I OW to make the Eucharist the cen- 
tral service of praise and thanks- 
giving is a problem that has always 
occupied the minds of Churchmen 
of the so-called "advanced" school. Whether 
it will ever be satisfactorily solved remains to 
be seen. Organists look upon the music used 
in the various churches throughout the land as 
a sort of barometer, which indicates with un- 
failing accuracy "High" and "Low" areas of 
churchmanship. While the Prayer Book 
teaching regarding the relative importance of 
the Communion Office is quite definite, it 
somehow fails to make itself felt. The gen- 
eral musical neglect of the Eucharist proves 
this. Just what percentage of churches in- 
dulge in musically "Glorified Matins" we do 




THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



21 



not know, but it is certainly very high — prob- 
ably eighty-five per cent. In certain dioceses 
it is much lower, but take the country at large 
from Maine to California, the figure we name 
is not far out of the way. A contributor to 
the Living Church (Chicago) maintains that 
one serious drawback to general enlightenment 
regarding the relative importance of the vari- 
ous services is to be found in the order in 
which they are now placed in the Prayer Book. 
He says: 

"Rearrange the contents of the Prayer 
Book, so as to let the Eucharist come first, 
immediately followed by the Collects, Epistles, 
and Gospels. Let the daily offices come next 
— Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, Litany, 
Prayers and Thanksgivings, Psalter. Then 
this be followed by the occasional offices, in 
the present order, including the Penitential 
office for Ash Wednesday, with such new of- 
fices as have been found desirable. 

"The present arrangement of the Prayer- 
Book is unfavorable to the attainment of a 
right idea of the chief place of importance 
of the Holy Eucharist, not only as the chief 
act of worship, but as the solemn perpetual 
sacrificial act of the whole Church, through 
which is presented to God all other offerings 
of self-dedication, prayer, intercession, and 
thanksgiving. Let this come first, and not 
in the middle of the book as if it were a sec- 
ondary and supplementary part of divine ser- 
vice, or a sequel to Morning Prayer. The 
Eucharist is not only God's own service, but 
the only service that is God's own service. 
We should therefore give Him our best. The 
inside of our worship should be right, and to 
have it so the outside should be right also. 
Give the service more warmth and spirituality. 
Make it glow with devotion. Make it most 
beautiful, impressive, inspiring, not only by 
removing the effects of those evil influences 
which the Continental divines exerted on the 
English divines, but by supplying those ele- 
ments of worship which we inherit from the 
ancient Church, and which we lack." 

If this advice were to be followed, perhaps 
we would be able to get rid of the "Old 
Chant," which is now the favorite American 
setting for the climax of the Communion Of- 
fice! 



Samuel P. Warren 

Hi Appreciation 

By Walter C. Gale 
HE passing away of Samuel P. 
Warren on October 7 removed one 
of the most distinguished of con- 
temporary organists; in fact, he 
was universally regarded as the Dean of Or- 
ganists in America. 

The son of an organ builder, Mr. Warren 
was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1841, and 





his first church position was as organist of 
the American Church there. From 1861 to 
1864 he studied in Berlin : organ, theory, and 
composition with August Haupt; piano with 
Gustav Schumann, and instrumentation with 
Wieprecht. In 1865 he became organist of 
All Souls' Church, New York, and in 1867 ne 
went to Grace Church. 

It was while at this latter church that he did 
his best work and rendered his greatest ser- 
vice as organist, choir-director, teacher, and 
composer. It was while there, too, that he 
amassed the main part of a remarkable musi- 
cal library, including some very valuable man- 
uscripts and first editions. 

His main efforts were directed toward en- 
hancing the status of church music, and de- 
veloping a sound taste for the organ as a re- ( 
cital and concert instrument. For many years 



22 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



he gave weekly recitals, primarily for students 
of the organ, and aimed to present at these all 
the best classic and modern works of organ 
literature. His playing of Bach was especially 
noteworthy and masterly ; he also had unusual 
ability for improvisation, but could rarely be 
induced to exhibit it. A man of prodigious 
mental energy, he acquired great learning and 
technical skill, all his work showing a remark- 
able finish and care of detail. Once, during a 
lesson, when he was insisting upon a small de- 
tail in phrasing an inner part, I said that the 
part was so covered up at this point with the 
other parts, that a listener could never hear 
how it was phrased. He thereupon had me go 
with him into the chancel. Looking at the 
stained glass window there, he pointed out 
that one of the most beautiful spots in the 
window was hidden by a small architectural 
ornament at the top of the altar, but that that 
was no reason why that part of the window 
should not be beautiful. 

Showing the amazing capacity for work 
which was characteristic of him, he told me 
that at one period of his study with Haupt he 
began his organ practice every day by playing 
through all of the six Trio-Sonatas of Bach ; 
and as a study in transposition, he transposed, 
at sight, in all keys, all of the forty-eight pre- 
ludes and fugues of the same master's "Well- 
tempered Clavichord." 

As a composer, Mr. Warren wrote chiefly 
songs and anthems for the church service, and 
transcribed many orchestral works for the or- 
gan. He was one of the small group of com- 
posers who first tried to lift American church 
music to a higher plane, musically, and helped 
pave the way toward the splendid modern an- 
thems which some of our American writers 
have succeeded in producing. 

He had a wonderful personality, and those 
who came under his influence felt that they 
received something from him (aside and apart 
from mere technical training, great as that 
was) as rare as it was beautiful, but the few 
that were permitted to get really close to him 
realized his sweetness of nature and beauty 
of soul. 

In May, 1893, the solo quartet that had 
worked with him during many years was re- 
placed by a new one, which was a great blow 
to Mr. Warren ; as he himself expressed it, he 
was deprived of his "Pillars." 

The next year Mr. Warren himself left the 



church, the authorities having decided to in- 
stall a boy choir in place of the mixed quartet 
and chorus. He declined to undertake the 
training of such a choir under the conditions 
which then existed. Some few years later a 
choir-school was established there, and the ser- 
vices today are more of the English Cathedral 
type, a great change from the representative 
American service of Mr. Warren's time. 

Upon leaving Grace Church, Mr. Warren 
became organist at the Munn Avenue Presby- 
terian Church in East Orange, New Jersey, a 
post which he filled until last May, when he 
retired from church work. The committee at 
this church, in speaking of finding a successor 
to him, said : "We want a man just like Mr. 
Warren," to which the reply was made, 
"There is no man like Mr. Warren." 



The increasing scope of use of the orchestrially 
voiced pipe organ is shown in the large instrument at 
the San Diego Cal., exposition, and which has been 
built by the Austin Organ Co. To the organ ex- 
pert and organ lover the specification will have 
large interest, especially when it is remembered that 
the instrument will be, after the exposition retained 
as a regular feature of the public garden. The 
massive instrument is a gift to the people of San 
Diego from the brothers John D. and Adolph So- 
vecjles. It will be housed in a specially designed 
concrete building — amply protected from the weather. 
It will be tonally more massive and much more 
varied in orchestral color than the famous Salt Lake 
organ. This comparison will better indicate the rich- 
ness and musical value of the San Diego gift than 
any other. 

The specification is full of fascinating particulars 
both as to tone and elaborate mechanical accessories. 
The great organ— thirteen stops will have a dominat- 
ing diapason family, with diapasons at 16, 8, 4 and 
2 foot pitch, and reinforcement of tibia major 8 
foot, horn diapason 8, and stentorphone 8. A pun- 
gent cello at 8 will be a characteristic orchestral 
feature, two large scale flutes at 8 and 4, and a 
family of four reeds at 16, 8 and 4 pitch. 

The swell— sixteen stops, will have a quintation 
16 and posaune 16 as foundation, with five lighter 
and varied diapasons, several flutes, mixture, and 
four reeds to include vox humana. 

The orchestral organ— ten stops — will feature as 
string effects — contra viole at 16, orchestral viole and 
celeste, and violina, two flutes at 8 and 4, French 
horn and clarinet, concert harp, etc. 

Solo organ — grand diapason, tibia plena in dia- 
pasons; big gamba, flute ouverte, orchestral oboe, 
heavy pressure reeds at 16, 8 and 4, chimes, drums, 
cymbals. Eleven stops. 

The pedal organ — twelve stops — will have reeds at 
32, 16 and 8, strings at 16 and 8, large scale diapa- 
sons and bourdon. 

The mechanical features are very generous, and 
the instrument will have sixty speaking stops and 
eighty mechanicals — including combination pistons, 
couplers, etc. All the combination pistons are im- 
mediately adjustable. Nine pistons on great ; eleven 
on swell : seven on orchestral ; six on orchestral and 
six on pedal. All manuals have the unison on and 
off piston. The various couplers include all possible 
or desirable accessions. The console will be de- 
tached and movable. Two wind pressures will be 
used. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



23 




4. WAMtCN ANDREWS. A O.O., WARDCW 
HAROLD V. MILLIOAN. F.A.O.O.. GEN. tlC 



S. LCWIR CLMCR, A.A.O.O., RUR-WARDCN 
VICTOR SAICR. A O.O . QCN.TRCAS. 



FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE, NEW YORK 



HEADQUARTERS 

A largely attended meeting of the Council was held 
October 25 at the offices of the Guild. Among the 
important meetings and services announced for the 
early part of the season are a large dinner to celebrate 
the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the 
Guild, the usual recitals, a service at St. Andrew's 
Episcopal Church, New York, and a memorial service 
for the late Samuel P. Warren, a founder of the 
Guild and for many years one of its examiners. 
Those present at the meeting were: 

Messrs. J. Warren Andrews, 
S. Lewis Elmer, 
Harold Vincent Milligan, 
Dr. Victor Baier, 
Lawrence J. Munson, 
Dr. William C. Carl, 
Clifford Demarest, 
Clarence Dickinson, 
Albert Reeves Norton, 
John Hyatt Brewer, 
Warren R. Hedden, 
Frank Wright, 
Philip James, 
T. Scott Buhrman, 
George Henry Day, 
Herman B. Reese, 
Gottfried Federlein, 
Frederick Schlieder, 
Frank L. Sealy. 

The following were elected Colleauges: 

Charles M. Balzcr Sheboygan, Mis. 

Mrs. Louis J. Bangert Buffalo, N. Y. 

La Verne Butts Lake wood, Ohio. 

Miss A. H. Hayner Lake wood, Ohio. 

Miss M. L. Dick Kearney, Neb. 

Miss Lola List Massillon, Ohio. 

F. W. Mueller Minneapolis, Minn. 

C F. Pfatteicher Andover, Mass. 

George Arthur Smith Worcester, Mass. 

Adolf C. Torovsky Baltimore, Ohio. 

Raymond S. Wilson Syracuse, N. Y. 



GUILD EXAMINATIONS FOR 1916 
The fee for the Fellowship will be $15 instead 
of $20, which was announced in our last issue, and 
the required pieces will be: Bach, Fantasia and 
Fugue in G minor, Bridge & Higgs' Edition, Book 8, 
pp. 127 to 135, or No. 4, Book II (Peters' Edition), 
and Final (Allegro), 7th Sonata, Op. 89, Guilmant. 



ILLINOIS 

Under the auspices of the Chapter the following 
programme was rendered at St James* M. E. Church, 
Chicago, on October 21 : 

Sposalizio Liszt-Lemare 

Concert Overture Bullis 

John Doanc 

Andante from First Sonata Borowski 

Le Bonheur Hyde 

Herbert E. Hyde 

Finale. C Minor Sonata Andrews 

Curfew Horsman 

Tina Mae Haines 

In addition, there were several choral numbers 
sung by the quartet choirs of three of the leading 
churches under the direction of Miss Tina Mae 
Haines, who is the organist and director of St. 
James' M. E. Church. 



KANSAS CHAPTER 

The Chapter held its first fall meeting at the 
home of Dean Skilton. Mr. Skilton spoke of the 
N. A. O. Convention at Springfield, Mass., and later 
in conjunction with his busy Chapter arranged many 
important meetings for the year, among them a 
public service to be given in Hutchinson, Kansas, 
in December. 

Arthur Nevin, the prominent American composer 
who has recently accepted the Professorship of 
Music at the University of Kansas, was a guest at 
this meeting and delighted his hearers with a talk 
on his experiences with the Blackfoot Indians, who 
inspired him to write his "Poia," which was produced 
in the Royal Opera House, Berlin, in 1910. 



NORTHERN OHIO CHAPTER 

Monday evening, October 4, 1015, the meeting of 
the Northern Ohio Chapter opened with a good 
attendance and much enthusiasm. It was preceded 
by a dinner at the Second Presbyterian Church, at 
which thirty- four sat down. 

Among plans proposed for the season's work was 
an exchange of organists for the public recitals be- 
tween this Chapter and several Chapters surrounding 
us. The subject of Guild extension through smaller 
towns of Northern Ohio was also discussed. 

After the business meeting a recital was given 
by Mr. Gordon Balch Nevin, who has recently come 
to be organist of this church. 



Various Dote$ 

Under the direction of Arthur Rose, M.A., 
Mus.Bac, selections from Costa's oratorio Eli were 
rendered by the choir of the West-Park Church, 
West Eighty-sixth Street, this city, on October 31, 
at 8 p.m. 

The service list for October 24, at the First Pres- 
byterian Church, Chicago, 111., F. S. Moore, O. and C, 
included: The Lord is God, Costa; Sing a Song 
of Praise, West; The Woods and Every Sweet 
Smelling Tree, W T est. 

Mendelssohn's Elijah will be presented at St. Bar- 
tholomew's Church, New York City, A. S. Hyde, 
O. and C, on four successive Sunday afternoons. 
The first performance is on October 17. A portion 
of the oratorio will be performed each Sunday. 

The following was the service list at the Brick 
Presbyterian Church, Rochester, N. Y., Harry 
Thomas, choirmaster. September 12: Prelude: 
Autumn Sketch, Brewer; Te Deum in F, Schilling; 
Light of the World, Starnes; Lead Me, Lord, Wes- 
ley ; Saviour, Thy Children Keep, Sullivan. 

This is the second of a series of special musical 
services held at this church on the last Sunday night 
of each month until June, 1916. 

Following in their order will be given in part The 
Messiah, Elijah, Gaul's Israel, Maunder's Olivet to 
Calvary, Manney's Resurrection and Haydn's Cre- 
ation. 



24 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Trinity School Boy Choir of West Ninety-first 
Street, this city, rendered Merbecke's choral com- 
munion service on All Saints' Day last at St Agnes' 
Chapel, under the direction of Arthur Rose, who 
presided at the organ. The rector, Rev. Lawrence T. 
Cole, D.D., assisted by the Rev. John A. Linn, was 
the celebrant. The choir boys are all pupils of the 
school, which holds this service yearly. 

The fourth annual series of free organ concerts 
given by the American Organ Players' Club at the 
Central High School occur on the first Thursday of 
each month. These recitals are part of the winter's 
programme of education and entertainment given 
by the Board of Education. The players announced 
are: November, S. K. Kollock; December, Benj. L. 
Kneedler; January, Rollo Maitland; February, Wm. 
C. Young; March, Alice M. Zahn; April, Frederick 
Maxson. 

The service list at the First Congregational Church, 
Washington, D. Q. % October 3, William Stansfield, 
O. and C, included: Glorious is Thy Name, Mozart; 

Be Joyful, Calkin; O Great is the Depth, Men- 
delssohn ; How Many Hired Servants, Sullivan ; The 
Lord is My Light, Marsh ; O Gladsome Light, Sulli- 
van; Guide Me to the Light, Squires; The Heavens 
are Telling, Haydn. 

The service lists for October at Grace Church, 
Utica, N. Y., De Witt C. Garretson, O. and C, in- 
cluded : Great Peace Have They, Smith ; Communion 
in Db, Woodward; Evening in Bb, Hall; Blessing, 
Honor, Glory, Spohr; Te Deum in D, Clough- 
Leighter; Grieve Not, Stainer; Come Up Hither, 
Spohr ; Evening in Bb, Hall ; They That Sow, Gaul ; 
The Radiant Morn, Steane; In the Beginning, 
Stainer ; Thou Wilt Keep Him, Williams ; Blest are 
the Departed, Spohr, 

The following programme was presented at their 
concert on October 22 at the Methodist Church, 
Babylon, by the Babylon Choral Society, W. W. 
Bross, director: Evening Hymn, Reinecke; Spanish 
Serenade, Elgar; The Slave's Dream, Matthews; 
Love's Garden of Rose, Wood; Requiem, Homer; 

1 Know of Two Bright Eyes, Clutsam; Bid Me to 
Live, Hatton ; Violin Solos, Nocturne, Chopin-Sara- 
sate; La Precieuse, Couperin-Kreisler ; Canzonetta, 
d'Ambrosio; and Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, Col. 
Taylor; Soloists: Miss E. C. Smith, violinist; Mr. 
H. W. Hindermyer, tenor. 

The concerts for the coming year to be given by 
the Oberlin Musical Union have been announced, and 
they are exceedingly interesting. The Messiah will 
be sung for the forty-second time in Oberlin on 
December 16, with local soloists and accompaniment 
by the Oberlin Conservatory Orchestra and the large 
new organ in Finney Memorial Chapel. For the 
May Festival the directors of the Musical Union 
have chosen the Verdi Requiem, which was received 
with such enthusiasm last year. The programme for 
the first night of the festival will consist of Beetho- 
ven's Ninth Symphony, given by the Union and the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of 
Mr. Stock. The Union will also isng on that even- 
ing Wolf -Ferrari's Vita Nova, which has been sung 
only a few times in this country. Dr. George Whit- 
field Andrew will conduct the performances of the 
choral works. The Chicago Orchestra will also give 
a symphony programme. The soloists for the May 
Festival concerts have not as yet been announced. 



oratorio The Last Judgment, Louis Spohr. Christ- 
mastide, Friday, December 24, Christmas Eve Carol 
Service. Holy Innocents, Tuesday, Decemeber 28, 
The Divine Birth, F. E. Ward (the composer at the 
organ). Conversion of St. Paul, Tuesday, January 
25, 1916, Gloria Domini, T. Tertius Noble (the com- 
poser at the organ). Lent, Tuesday, March 14, 
Vexilla Regis, Harry Rowe Shelley (the composer 
at the organ). Tuesday, April 11, Gallia, Ch. Gou- 
nod ; Psalm 149, Anton Dvorak. Organist, Dr. Vic- 
tor Baier. Tuesday, April 18, The Message from the 
Cross, Will C. Macfarlane (the composer at the 
organ). Good Friday, April 21, at 8 p.m., The 
Crucifixion, John Stainer. Organist, H. D. Hodgson. 
Eastertide, St. Mark's Day, Tuesday in Easter Week, 
April 25, Love Triumphant, P. Marinus Paulson. 
Organist, Daniel R. Philippi. Tues, May 2, Easter 
Carols. Tuesday, May 9, Easter Cantata, H. Brooks 
Day (the composer at the organ). 



Vacancies and Jtypoittntms 

Robert A. Sherrard on September 1 commenced 
his new duties as organist and musical director of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Johnstown, Pa. 

# i 

Carl Paige Wood, of Taunton, Mass., former di- 
rector of Denison Conservatory of Music, Granville, 
Ohio, has been appointed organist and assistant pro- 
fessor of music at Vassar College. 

Harold Tower, organist of St Paul's Church, 
Minneapolis, and for several years the secretary of 
the Minnesota Chapter, American Guild of Organists, 
has accepted the position of organist and choir- 
master at St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rapids, 
Mich., and will begin his duties about November 1. 

Rollo Maitland, F.A.G.O., has resigned his position 
as organist and choirmaster of the Walnut Street 
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, to accept a sim- 
ilar position at the Memorial Church of St. Paul 
(Protestant Episcopal), Overbrook, Pa. 

Bert E. Williams, A.A.G.O., has resigned his posi- 
tion as organist of St. John's Evangelical Protestant 
Church, Columbus, Ohio, to accept a similar position 
at the Broad Street Presbyterian Church, which is 
ranked as the largest and wealthiest church in Co- 
lumbus. Miss G. Gossage succeeded Mr. Williams at 
St. John's. 



ST. PAUL'S CHURCH MIDDAY SERVICES 

The following are the special midday musical 
services for the coming season to be held at noon 
in St. Paul's Church, New York City, Edmund 
Jaques, O. and C: Wednesday, November 24, 
Thanksgiving Eve. Advent, Tuesday, November 30, 



Organ Recitals 

Mr. FRANK KASSCHAU, at Flatbush Congregational 
Church, Brooklyn, X. Y., October 19. 

Con Amore — Detnier. 

First Movement, Second Sonata — Merkel. 

Pastorale — Foote. 

Melodie in E — Rachmaninoff. 

Fifth Organ Symphony — Widor. 

Prelude to "The Deluge" — Saint-Saens. 

Intermezzo — Caellerts. 

Prayer (Chimes) — Flagler. 

Wedaing Chorus — Faulkes. 
Mr. ROY L. SCOTT, at inaugural recital on the new Mol- 
ler organ at the Masonic Temple, Newburgh, N. Y., 
October 12. 

Processional March — Rogers. 

Venetian Love Song — Nevin. 

To a Wild Rose— Mac Do* ell. 

Funeral March, of a Marionette — Gounod. 

Cantilene — Salome. 

Grand Chorus — Salome. 
Mr. WALTER HEATOX, at Memorial Church of the Holy 
Cross, Reading, Pa., November 8. 

Fantasie in A minor — Rinck. 

Passacaglia on a Theme by Zeller — Hepworth. 

Meditation-Elegie — Borowski. 

Rain; Romance; From Tropical Scenes — Pascal. 

Air Du Dauphin (Paraphrased by W. T. Best)— Roeckel. 

Midnight (Norwegian Idylles) — Torjnssen. 

Will o' the Wisp — Nevin. 

Sophonisb (Overture) — Paer. 
Mrs. W. T. MILLS, at the First Presbyterian Church, Co- 
lumbus, O., October 28. 

Theme in E Varied — Faulkes. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



25 



Intermezzo in C — Faulkes. 
Largo — Handcl-Lemare. 
Spring Song — McFarlanc. 
Supplication — Frysinger. 
Gavotte—^Elgar-Lemare. 
At Evening — Kinder. 

Finale from Seventh Sonata — Guilmant. 
Mediation — Sturges. 

Torchlight March — Meyerbeer-Thunder. 
Mr. ALFRED BRINKLER, at St. Stephen's Church, Port- 
land, Me., October 28. 
Festival March — Foote. 

Largo from New World Symphony — Dvorak. 
Prelude in B minor — Bach. 
Finlandia — Sibelius. 
Adoration — Callaerts. 
Scherzo — Faulkes. 

March from the Meistersingers — Wagner. 
Nocturne — Brinkler. 
Capriccio — 
Toccata from 5th Symphony — Widor. 

Mr. CARL SCHMIDT, at Erasmus Hall High School, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., November 14. 
Alleluia — DuBois. 
Noel— Buck. 

Overture, William Tell — Rossini. 
Vision — Rheinberger. 
A Highland Scene — Andrews. 
Sonata, Pastorale — Rheinberger. 

Mr. PHILIP JAMES, at the Boys' High School, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., October 17. 
Concert Overture in C major — Hollins. 
Three Short Pieces — Lenormand. 
Scherzo in A flat — Bairstow. 
At Sunset— Diggle. 
Festival Toccata — Fletcher. 
Winter Sketch — Shackley. 
Novellctte, op. 60, No. 1 — C6sar Cui. 
Marche Slav — Tschaikowsky. 

Mr. S.- G. PEASE, at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 
Ontario, Cal. Program by American composers, Octo- 
ber §. 

Finale in B fiat — Maxson. 
Suite for Organ, No. 1 — Rogers. 
Nocturnette — Demorest. 
A Moonlight Serenade — Nevin. 
Prelude in D minor (Op. 28, No. 3) — Kramer. 
Oriental Sketch. No. 3, in C minor — Bird. 
Let Us Have Peace — Ball. 
Mediation in D flat — Kinder. 
At Sunset — Diggle. 
Concert Overture in A — Maitland. 

Mr. WILLIAM S. JOHNSON, at the Cathedral of St 
John the Divine, Quincy, 111., October 17. 
Es ist das Heil uns kommen her Kirnberger. 
Chant du Soir — Bossi. 
Choral — Minuet — Boellmann. 
Pastel Op. 92 No. 1— Karg-EIert. 
Ariel — Bonnet. 
Laus Deo— Dubois, 

Mr. C. H. DOERSAM, at the Second Presbyterian Church, 
Scranton, Pa., December 7. 
Fantasie and Fugue in C minor — Bach. 
Chorale-Preludes — Brahms. 
Six Pieces for Violin and Organ — Rheinberger. 

Mr. EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, at First M. E. Church, 
Fort Dodge, la.. October 8. 
Overture to Tannhauser — Wagner. 
Minuet in A — Boccherini. 
Caprice (The Brook)— Dethier. 
The Last Hope — Gottschalk. 
Overture to Der Freischutz — Von Weber. 
The Magic Harp (Pedal Etude)— Meale. 
Scherzo— Dethier. 

Andante Cantabile from Fifth Symphony — Tschaikowsky. 
Overture to The Merry Wives of Windsor — Nicolai. 

Mr. H. F. SPRAGUE, at Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio, 
October 26. 
Sonata Pontificate — Jacques Lemmens. 
Adagio from Grand Concerto — Vieuxtemps. 
Paques Fleuris — Alphonse Mailly. 
Cantabile — Clement Loret. 
The Storm — Jacques Lemmens. 
Tantum Ergo — Cesar Franck. 
Pastorale — Cesar Franck. 
The 150th Psalm — Cesar Franck. 

Violin — 

Enti** acte — Getry. 

Paroles du Coeur — Radoux-Massart. 
Offertoire, Duo — Joseph Callaerts. 
Toccata — Joseph Callaerts. 

Mr. CLARENCE WELLS, at St. Mary's Church. Burling- 
ton, N. J., The Dedication of the Organ, October 1. 
Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 
Berceuse — Kinder. 

Funeral March and Hymn of the Seraphs — Guilmant. 
Autumn — Joh nston . 
Soring Song — Macfarlane. 
Pilgrims' Chorus and March from Tannhauser — Wagner. 

Mr. T- W. HILL, at the First Universalist, Haverhill, Mass., 
September 13. 



Choral Prelude— Bach. 
Funeral March — Chopin. 
Romantic Suite in A — Brinkler. 
Love of Peace — Dorey. 

Festival Music, Prize Song, Meistersingers — Wagner. 
Isolde's Love Death, Tristan and Isolde — Wagner. 
Pilgrim's Chorus, To the Evening Star, Grand March, 
Tannhauser — Wagner. 

Prof. S. A. BALDWIN, at the College of the City of New 



York, New York City, October 6. 
ugue in C minor — Bach. 
Andante con Moto from Fifth Symphony — Beethoven. 



Prelude and Fugue in 



Sonata No. 5 in C minor — Thayer. 

Idylle— Quef. 

Arioso, in the ancient style — Rogers. 

Second Concert Study — \ on. 

Intermezzo — Hollins. 

Walhalla Scene — Wagner. 

Mr. D. R. PHILIPPI, at the Panama-Pacific Exposition, San 
Francisco, Cal., July 25. 
Prelude in E flat— Bach. 
Dreams — Wagner. 

Andante Lamentoso— Tschaikowsky. 
Cantilene, Scherzo — Macfarlane. 
Finlandia, Op. 26, No. 1 — Sibelius. 
Night— Worth. 

Prelude in C sharp minor Op. 3 — Rachmaninoff. 
Chant Sans Paroles — Lemare. 
Andante Cantabile, Finale — Widor. 

Mr. ALFRED BRINKLER, at St. Stephen's Church, Port- 
land, Me., September 21. 
Prelude — "Lohengrin" — Wagner. 
In the Twilight— Harker. 
Suite in F — Corelli. 
Adagio— Widor. 
Suite in A (new) — Brinkler. 
Russian Romance — Friml. 
Will o' the Wisp — Nevin. 
Marche Heroique de Jeanne d'Arc — Dubois. 

Mr. HAMLIN HUNT, at Plymouth Church, Minneapolis, 
Minn., October 4. 
Concert Overture in C major — Hollins. 
Prayer and Cradle Song — Guilmant. 
Fantasie and Fugue, G minor — Bach. 
Canon, B minor — Schumann. 
Praeludium, from Sonata No. 19 — Rheinberger. 
The Angelus — Shuey. 
Prelude, C sharp minor — Rachmaninoff. 
Vorspiel Parsifal — Wagner. 
Reverie, and Melody — MacDowell. 
Toccata— Bartlett. 

Mr. NORMAN LANDIS. at the Presbyterian Church, Flem- 
ington, N. J., September 23. 
Prelude Heroique — Faulkes. 
Nocturne — Ferrata. 
Lamentation — Guilmant. 
Concert Study — Yon. 
Prelude to "Parsifal" — Wagner. 
Desert Sunrise Song — Landis. 

Introduction and Finale from the 94th Psalm Sonata — 
Reubke. 



ORGAN SPECIFICATION 

Specifications of the organ being built by the J. W. 
Steere Organ Co. of Springfield, Mass., for the 
Church of the Epiphany, Lexington Avenue and 
Thirty-fifth Street, of which Sam Dyer Chapin is 
organist and choirmaster: 

Great Organ 

1 16' Diapason 7 4' Principal 

2 8' Diapason 8 2' Fifteenth 

3 8' Gamba 9 8' Trumpet 

* V Clarabella 10 8' Diapason (In choir 

5 8' Doppel Floete starting room) 

6 4' Harmonic Flute 

Swell Organ 

11 16' Bourdon 18 4' VioKna 

12 8' Diapason 19 2' Flautino 

13 8' Salicional 20 3Rks.Mixture 

14 8' Aeoline 21 16' Fagotto 

15 8' Voix Celeste 22 8' Cornopean 

16 8' Gedackt 23 8' Oboe 

17 4' Echo Flute 

Choir Organ 

24 16' Contra Viole 30 8' Puintadena 

25 8' Diapason 31 4' Flute d'Amour 

26 8' Dulciana 32 8' Vox Humana 

27 8' Viole d'Orchestre 33 8' Clarinet 

28 8' Concert Flute 34 Chimes 

29 8' Unda Maris 

Pedal Organ 

35 16' First Diapason 40 10-2/3 Quint (from No. 

36 16' Second Diapason 37) 

(from No. 1) 41 8' Octave (from No, 

37 16' Bourdon 35) 

38 16' Gedackt (from No. 42 8' Flute (from No. 37) 

11) 43 8' Violoncello (from 

39 16' Gamba (from No. No. 24) 

24) 



26 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Couplers and Accessories 



Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Swell 
Choir 
Choir 
Choir 
Choir 
Choir 
Choir 
Choir 
Great 
Great 



to Great 
to Great 4' 
to Great 16' 
to Swell 4' 
to Swell 16' 
to Choir 
to Choir 4' 
to Choir 16' 
to Pedal 
to Pedal 4' 
Unison Off 
to Great 
to Great 4' 
to Great 16' 
to Choir 4' 
to Choir 16' 
to Pedal 
Unison Off 
to Pedal 
to Pedal 4' 



To be operated by 
Oscillating Tablets 



Adjustable Combinations 
Pistons under respective Manuals, visibly affecting Regis- 
ters. 

Swell and Pedal 1-2-3-4-5-0 

Great and Pedal 1-2-3-4-0 

Choir and Pedal 1-2-3-4-0 

On and Off Pistons on each Manual, affecting 
Pedal Stops. 
Entire Organ 1-2-3-4-0 (Not affecting the Registers). 
Pedal Movements 
Balanced Swell 
Balanced Choir 

Balanced Crescendo (adjustable) 
Sforzando (Full Organ) Reversible 
Reversible Great to Pedal 
Pedal to raise Chime Dampers (Reversible) 
All Couplers Reversible 
Unison Couplers (Reversible) 



Reviews of new music 

ST. CECILIA SERIES, No. 49, 51 and 5a. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

We have here an interesting series of numbers 
of a publication that has proved very valuable to 
both church and concert organists. No. 49 is an 
arrangement of Two Traditional Hebrew Melodies 
by T. Tertius Noble. They are named "Memorial 
of the Departed" and "Passover Table Hymn." Both 
are organic in style and give fine opportunity for 
clean playing of massive chords, as well as tonal 
contrasts. These melodies have been much appre- 
ciated at Mr. Noble's recitals. Nos. 51 and 
52 (published as one number) contain a Concert 
Overture in D minor by H. A. Matthews. This work 
will receive a warm welcome by reason of its dig- 
nity and suitability to the organ. It is effectively 
laid out for the king of instruments and the nature 
of the themes is enhanced by the harmonic fresh- 
ness of their setting. Nimble-fingered organists will 
find much to interest them in this overture. 

FESTIVAL TOCCATA. Percy E. Fletcher. 
PRELUDIUM PASTORALE. John Stainer. 
FOUNTAIN REVERIE. Percy E. Fletcher. 
Original Compositions for the Organ (New 
Series), Nos. 41, 42 and 43. 
THE CHIMES OF GLOUCESTER CATHE- 
DRAL. Arranged by C. Lee Williams. 
ORGAN TRANSCRIPTIONS. Edited by 

Herbert Brewer. No. 19. 
ALBUMS FOR THE ORGAN, No. 6. 

London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 
Gray Co. 

Recitalists will find Mr. Fletcher's two pieces give 
them a great deal of effect with very little trouble. 
The Toccata consists of a simple theme played in 
semiquaver chords divided between the hands, with 
a hymn-like subject by way of contrast. 

In the "Fountain Reverie" we have a slow subject 
in the tenor register accompanied by soft rippling 
arpeggios. A somewhat more agitated middle sec- 
tion provides effective relief. Like the Toccata, the 



"Reverie" lies well under the hands, and is attractive 
and well-writen music. 

One of the best numbers in the two sets of organ 
pieces by Stainer is here reprinted. The "Praeludium 
Pastorale" is an ingenious harmonization of a bass 
which slowly descends from C to CC, the operation 
taking about eighty bars of six-quarter time to per- 
form. The result is an unexpectedly pleasing piece 
of music, easy to play and pleasant to hear. 

In the May issue of The Musical Times, London, 
some account was given of the tunes played by the 
chimes of Gloucester Cathedral. Four of these melo- 
dies have been arranged for organ solo by Mr. C. 
Lee Williams, two being made the basis of extended 
works and thus acquiring an interest beyond the 
merely local and historical. 

The sixth of Novello's Organ Albums, like its 
predecessors, contains a selection of excellent pieces 
in handy form. Some of these have already become 
widely popular, while all are by composers whose 
names are a guarantee of excellence. The contents 
of the album are: "Nocturne" Dunhillj Postlu- 
dium," Faulkes; "Andante Tranquillo," Higgs; "In 
Springtime," Hollins; "Madrigal," Lemare; "Tri- 
umphal March," Lemmens; Allegro in B flat, Men- 
delssohn ; Chorale Prelude on "Rockingham," Parry ; 
"Praeludium Pastorale," Stainer; "Romance," Tchai- 
kovsky; "Romance," Sandiford Turner; "Festal 
Commemoration," John E. West 

SAVE US, O LORD, WHILE WAKING. An- 
them. Words from an ancient source, music by 
Hugh Blair (Novello's Short Anthems, No. 226). 

London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Dr. Blair's setting of the words of an old evening 
antiphon would serve admirably as a close to Even- 
song. The music is simple and devotional, and there 
are no repetitions of words. It should, if possible, 
be sung unaccompanied. 

O HOW AMIABLE. Mark Andrews. 

London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The composer employs in this anthem a soprano 
soloist and a chorus of female voices (two sopranos 
and alto), the accompaniment being for organ. It 
is a melodious work, with excellent organ part and 
many descriptive instrumental passages — the sparrow 
twitters on the choir flute stop, and the swallow 
warbles on the swell oboe with great effect. It is 
dedicated to the organist and choir of Wellesley 
College. 

THE LITTLE DOOR. 

A BRIGHT STAR SHINING. 

J. S. Matthews. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

These two carol-anthems may be recommended 
with confidence to choirs who are seeking effective 
carols for special services. Both are tuneful, and 
both contain striking passages which the average 
choir could bring out with little rehearsal. 

SAVIOUR CHRIST IS BORN. P. Fehrmann. 
DEAREST JESUS, GENTLE, MILD. Tra- 
ditional. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 
Gray Co. 

Fehrmann's carol for solo soprano and unaccom- 
panied chorus will doubtless be in request for the 
coming festive season. It is a flowing composition, 
quite easy to sing, and it affords opportunity for 
good vocal effects. The superimposed soprano solo, 
"All lowly in a manger," is cleverly done, the back- 
ground employing the Passion chorale. "Dearest 
Jesus" is a simple chorus, the melody of which is 
repeated by the soprano soloist, and the final chorus 
is a cappella. Both are edited by Clarence Dickin- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



27 



son, and form Nos. 47 and 48 of the "Sacred 
Choruses" series. 

SICUT CERVUS. Palcstrina. 

New York: G. Schirmer. 
This is one of Palestrina's finest motets for four- 
part chorus — of course, unaccompanied. It contains 
the celebrated melody for the tenors, and vocal 
counterpoint, which should give pleasure to all the 
chorus. The words are Latin, and the editing has 
been well done by Nicola A. Montani. It is issued 
in full conformity with the motu proprio of Pius X. 

THE VIRGIN'S LULLABY. J. Sebastian 

Matthews. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This is the tuneful lullaby "Red are the roses'* 
from the cantata "The Eve of Grace," appropriately 
published in separate form at this time, as it is 
essentially a Christmas solo. 

FOUR ARABIAN SONGS. William Dichmont. 
Boston: Oliver Ditson Company. 
Mr. Dichmont has caught the Eastern flavor in his 
four songs, and his music vividly reflects both the 
wildness and languor of the Arab race. The songs 
are named "The Bedouin's Bride," "From My Tent," 
"Song of Jami" and "Slave Song." A word must be 
said for the characteristic accompaniments. 

AH! COUNTRY GUY. 
A WET SHEET AND A FLOWING SEA. 
THERE BE NONE OF BEAUTY'S DAUGH- 
TERS. 
IF DOUGHTY DEEDS MY LADY PLEASE. 
John Pointer. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 
Gray Co. 

The above group is a set of choruses for male 
voices (two tenors and two basses), which instantly 
commands attention. Mr. Pointer's unique and in- 
teresting treatment of the voice parts will be palpable 
to even the superficial observer, whether it be in the 
love ditty of Sir Walter Scott, "Ah 1 County Guy," 
or Cunningham's bold setting of "A wet sheet and 
a flowing sea." Conductors of male voice choirs will 
be glad to find such a wealth of new works. 

THE KEEPER. 
BRIXHAM TOWN. 

Old Folk Songs. 
London : Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

These two ancient English folk songs are unique, 
both as to music and typography. The publishers 
have, with the help of the De Vinne Press, produced 
something quite unusual. 

EMMANUEL. Chester B. Searle. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Mr. Searle names his work "A Meditation on the 
Spiritual Coming of Our Lord." It is designed for 
chorus, soloists (soprano, tenor and baritone), organ, 
harp and trumpets, ad libitum, and it is suitable for 
general use in the church service. The words are 
arranged from holy scripture. The composer's work 
shows a good command of both vocal and instru- 
mental forces. His choruses are interesting, without 
being involved, and his part- writing is generally satis- 
factory. His writing for the solo voices is straight- 
forward, but is somewhat lacking in the melodic vein 
and control of accentuation. The time of perform- 
ance is forty-five minutes. 

BUT LO, THE DAWN. 

London : Novello & Co. 

Gray Co. 

This excerpt from The Paschal Victor forms an 
effective Easter anthem. It commences with a short, 
brilliant chorus not difficult of execution, and is 



succeeded by a tenor solo, For this is He, melodious 
and grateful for the soloist. A chorus for tenors 
and basses, The grave could not retain Thee, and a 
four-part chorus, The word of power is spoken, 
serve as an interlude introducing a capital short 
baritone solo, Who once was slain. The final chorus, 
But lo the dawn, gives opportunity for fine choral 
work, many big effects being possible. 

BREAK FORTH INTO JOY. Walter G. Alcock. 
ARISE, SHINE, O JERUSALEM. Thomas 

Adams. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Dr. Alcock's Christmas anthem is of the solid 
kind, choral throughout, .relief being afforded by a 
beautiful little carol for sopranos only, with a cap- 
ital organ accompaniment. Mr. Adams can always 
be depended upon for something in a popular vein, 
and this anthem is no exception to his usual work. 
It is both bright and pleasing and eminently suited 
to the festive season. 

CHRIST IS BORN OF MAIDEN FAIR. Hugh 

MacKinnon. 
ANGELS FROM THE REALMS OF GLORY. 

H. Sanders. 
London: Novello & Co. New York: TheH.W. 

Gray Co. 

The first number is a capital little carol, simple 
and unpretentious, but well worth a hearing. 
"Angels from the realms of glory," a Christmas 
anthem of rather elaborate design, was awarded the 
Clemson Gold Medal in 1913. It contains two well- 
written choruses and a soprano (or tenor) solo, 
all of which will repay rehearsal. 



J. S. Matthews. 
New 7 



York: The H. W. 



Suggested Service Cist for January, m 

Second Sunday after Christmas. January 2 

Te Deum in F Stammers 

Benedictus / nu . 
Jubilate j Chant 

Introit, His salvation is nigh Whiting 

Offertory, Hail to the Christ Barnby 

Communion Service in Eb Stammers 

Nun^Dlmittis \ in Eb Stammers 

Anthem, Sing, O Daughter of Zion Schwars 

Offertory, Angels from the Realms Cowen 

The Epiphany. January 6 
Te Deum ) . _. rr _ , 

Jubilate f ,n F ; Henr y Baker 

Benedictus-y Chant 

Introit, Arise shine Elvev 

Offertory, Brightest and best E. V. Hall 

Communion Service in F Baker 

k£2&*A** ***"• 

Anthem, O send out Thy light Macfarren 

Offertory, Behold the Lord the Ruler Thome 

First Sunday after Epiphany. January 9 
Te Deum ] 

Benedictus fin Bb G. J. Bennett 

Jubilate J 

Introit, Ascribe unto the Lord Travers 

Offertory, Rejoice Ye with Jerusalem Stainer 

Communion Service in Bb Bennett 

NrSttis}- Bb *»■» » 

Anthem, The grace of God Barnby 

Offertory, Ascribe Unto the Lord Blair 

Second Sunday after Epiphany. January 16 

££ } «-d *"> 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, Almighty and Everlasting God. . ./. S. Smith 



28 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Offertory, Behold, the Days Come Woodward 

Communion Service in E Alfred Baker 

Nun^Dimittis} in D Parr * 

Anthem, Thou Wilt Keep Him Ham 

Offertory, There Shall Come Forth a Star. Mansfield 

Third Sunday after Epiphany. January 23 

Ju e b5a e r}-D *■* 

Benedictus — Chant 

Introit, Let Every Soul be Subject Stainer 

Offertory, Ponder My Words Culley 

Communion Service in C Trimnell 

SSttisi * C Trimnell 

Anthem, I Will Magnify Thee Goss 

Offertory, O Come- Before His Presence Martin 

Fourth Sunday after Epiphany. January 30 

!£%?] - » Brewer 

Benedictus — Chant 

Introit, The Lord is My Light Hiles 

Offertory, I Desired Wisdom Stainer 

Communion Service in Eb " Brewer 

NuTSittis 1 » » Brewer 

Anthem, God, Who Madest Earth and Heaven. Davie s 
Offertory, Hymn of Peace Calcott 



music Published during the East month 

SACRED 

ANDREWS, MARK.— "O how amiable." Anthem. 

For Female Voices. (No. 403, Church Music Review.) 
15 cents. 

BOYLE, I.— "Wilt not Thou, O God, go forth with 

our hosts?" Anthem for Intercession. 15 cents. 

pEHRMANN.— "Saviour Christ is born." Arr. by 
C. Dickinson. (No. 47, The Sacred Choruses.) 12 
cents. 

JJARWOOD, BASIL.— Te Deum and Benedictus 

in E minor. (Op. 28.) 25 cents. 

HOLLINS, ALFRED.— "The Name of the Lord." 

Anthem. (No. 1057, Novello's Octavo Anthems.) 12 
cents. 

LOUFENBERG.— "Dearest Jesus, gentle, mild." 

Arranged by C. Dickinson. (No. 48, The Sacred 
Choruses.) 8 cents. 

MATTHEWS, J. SEBASTIAN.— "A Bright Star 

Seining." (No. 404, The Church Music Review Series.) 
5 cents. 

'The Little Door." (No. 405, The Church Music Re- 
view Series.) 10 cents. 

"The Desire of All Nations." (No. 406, The Church 

Music Review Series.) 12 cents. 

"Dark. Dark Was the Night." (No. 407, The Church 

Music Review Series.) 10 cents. 

"The Virgin's Lullaby." Sacred Song. 60 cents. 

All the above from the Cantata, "The Eve of Grace." 

]^OORE, J. G. — "God guard our Empire Lands." 

Intercessional Hymn for use in time of war. 5 cents. 

OUSELEY, F. A. G.— "Thou art my Portion." 

Anthem. (No. 872, The Musical Times.) 5 cents. 

SEARLE, C. B.— "Emmanuel." Sacred Cantata. 

75 cents. 

SEWELL, S.— "O God the Father, Whom we 

praise." Hymn and Tune on card. 5 cents. 

7IARKS, M. C— Psalm 95 ("Venite, exultemus 

Domino.") New Edition. For Choir and Organ. 30 cents. 

70MLINSON, H. W.— "Out of the deep have I 

called unto Thee." Anthem. 12 cents. 

SECULAR 

gANTOCK, GRANVILLE.— "The Great God 

Pan." Part I. "Pan in Arcady." Vocal Score. 
$1-75. 

BROOKE, A. AMY.— "Song of England." For 

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CUTLER, EDWARD.— "The Olden Time." Four- 
part Song. (No. 1 31 6, Novello's Part-song Book.) 12 
cents. 

£)E MONTFITCHET, MARY.— "Villanelle-Lul- 

laby." Song for medium voice. 60 cents. 

£)ONIZETTL— "The Daughter of the Regiment." 

Comic Opera. Concert and Acting Edition. Edited and 
arranged by Emu. Kreuz. 75 cents. 

FULLER SISTERS.— Folk Songs. Illustrated by 

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"The Keeper." (No. 5, Broadsides.) 10 cents. 

"Brixham Town." (No. 6, The Broadsides.) 10 cents. 

GARIBALDI'S HYMN.— Italian National Air. 

Arranged as a Four-part Song. (No. 13 17, Novello's 
Part-Song Book.) 8 cents. 

LENNARD, LADY BARRETT.— "The Canadian 

Guns." Song for Baritone. 60 cents. 

POINTER, JOHN.— "Oh, County Guy." Part 

song for two tenors and two basses. (No. 68, The 
Modern Series.) 12 cents. 

"A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea." Part song for two 

tenors and two basses. (No. 69, The Modern Series.) 12 
cents. 

"There Be None of Beauty's Daughters." Part song 

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"If Doughty Deeds My Lady Please."' Part song for 

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COLBORN, A. G.— Larghetto Espressivo. (No. 3, 

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QZERNY, CHARLES.— Studies of Mechanism. 

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HOLBROOKE, J.— Triumphal March. (Op. 236.) 

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forte Solo. $1.25. 

MACKENZIE, A. C. — Tema con Variazioni. From 

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PARKER, C. S.— "The Reveille." Song. Arranged 

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SHARP, CECIL J., and GEORGE BUTTER- 
worth. Music and Notation of "Hunsdon House." 
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JURNER, H. SANDIFORD.— Reverie in Db. 

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The following are included in the service lists for 
October at St. Peter's Church, New York City, 
G. H. Day, O. and C. : Lord, for Thy Tender Mercy's 
Sake, Far rant ; Communion in Eb, Cruickshank ; Re- 
joice in the Lord, Elvey; Evening in Eb, West; 
I Will Lay Me Down, Gadsby; Te Deum in F, 
Dykes; Ave Verum, Mozart; The Radiant Morn, 
Woodward ; The Lord is Exalted, West ; One sweetly 
Solemn Thought, Ambrose ; Teach Me Thy Ways, 
Spohr; Ponder My Words, Culley; Souls of the 
Righteous, Noble; Whoso Dwelleth, Martin; God 
Shall Wipe Away All Tears, Field. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



29 



Organists 

J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West, New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue. 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
2 West 45th Street, New York, or # 

295 Claremont Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

STANLEY R. AVERY 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER ST. MARK'S 

CHURCH 

Piano, Organ, Theory, Choir Training, Conducting, Recitals, 

Composition, Orchestration. 
Address; ST. MARK'S CHURCH, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M.. L.R.A.M. 
Organist and Music Master, H 00 sac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 
Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 336 Chelsea. 44 West 12th Street, New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 
Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 

Address: New Haven, Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.O., 
F.A.G.O. 

"TURPIN PRIZE MAN" 
Specialist in Coaching by Correspondence in Harmony, 

-o . :_*. .*. ir «.» *: — t — \.G.O. Examination- 

Rhinebeck, N. Y. 



"Counterpoint, etc. Preparation for A.G.6. Examinations 
ArM,*»««- * z The Choristers' School,'* ' 



Address: 



CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 

GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC. 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST, DIRECTOR 

First Baptist Church 

Flemington New Jersey 

GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster, St. Peter's Church 
Address: 423 West 20th Street, New York 
Telephone: Chelsea — 7724. 

H. BROOKS DAY 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 
Organist and Choirmaster of St. Luke's Church, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Address: 417 Pierre pont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave., N. Y. 

~~ CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 

412 Fifth Avenue, New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

CONCERT ORGANIST AND TEACHER OF SINGING 

Organist and Choirmaster of Gethsemane Church, Organist of 

the Jewish Reform Temple, Instructor in Theoretical 

Subjects at the MacPhail Violin School, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



ROY KINNEY FALCONER, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Presbyterian Church 

Jersey City New Jersej 

Address: 1 Apollo St., Jersey City, N. J. 



KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, 

Morristown, New Jersey. 

J. HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church. Charleston, 
VV. Va. Director of Music Charleston High School, 
Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 
Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 

DEWITT COUTTS GARRETSON 
A.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 
Organist and Choirmaster Grace Church. 
Utica. N. Y. 

E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster 
First Congregational Church 
Address: P. O. Box 675, Fall River, Mass. 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 
49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster Second Congregational Church, 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Director of Music Mount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Solo Organist and Consulting Choirmaster 
Organ Recitals and Instruction. 
Member Examination Committee of 

American Guild of Organists 
Candidates prepared for Guild Examinations. 
Address: 170 West 75th Street,' New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH. GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Calvary Baptist Church Address: 362 West 35th St 

F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 



EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Park Street Church, Boston, Mass. 

Organist and Choirmaster. 

Send for new circular. 

Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and Cran- 

ford Philharmonic. 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 



30 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 

New York. 

Instructor of Music Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
305 West 97th Street 
'Phone, 7380 Riverside. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 

St. Thomas' Church, New York 

ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR. AND COACH 

Address: 1 West 53d Street 

EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 

Organist and Choirmaster 

National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 

Organ Recitals 

Address: Washington, D. C. 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 

MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Mill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
The South Church, E. 85th Street, New York 
Telephone: Morningside 7587 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. ^ 

JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St. 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 

ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 

Berea, Ohio 

FREDERIC ROGERS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Advice to Church Organ Committees a Specialty. Specifica- 
tions, Design, Purchase, etc. Twenty-five years' 
experience, England, Canada and United States. 
Address: Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

' MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared for Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 West 55th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House, 

and St., Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 



KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church, Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 
Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Some rvi lie, N. J. 
Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SAMUEL P. -WARREN 

Studio: 201 West 87th St., New York 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 

Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

CLARENCE WELLS 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Mary's Church. 

Supervisor Public School Music, Burlington, N. J. 

Course in Public School Music for teachers and supervisors. 

Circular upon request. 

Estey Hall, Philadelphia. 238 Wood St., Burlington. 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church and 

Temple Israel. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 



Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., 



Brooklyn. 

'Phone 3170-L Williamsburg 



ALFRED R. WILLARD . 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St Paul's 
Conductor, Orpheus Club. 
Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 
Address: St Paul's School. 8 East Franklin Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and 20th Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Organist and Choirmaster St Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish, 

N. Y. The Earle, 103 Waverly Place, New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster, First Presbyterian Church, 

Brooklyn. Director of Music, Packer Collegiate 

Institute. 

Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Organ BHIden 

If the purchase of a PIPE OROAN is contemplated, address 
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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 31 

CHRISTMAS MUSIC 



CANTATAS 

PRICE 

The Eve of Grace. (New) By J. S. Matthews $1.00 

For Soprano (or Tenor) and Baritone (or Contralto) Soli, Chorus and Organ. Time of per- 
formance, about 50 minutes. 
A most attractive Libretto by Van Tassel Sutphen. The music expresses the true Christmas spirit. 

Emmanuel. (New) By Chester B. Searle 75 

A Meditation on the Spiritual Coming of Our Lord. For Soprano (or Tenor) and Baritone 
Soli and Chorus. Time for performance, 45 minutes. 

Before the Paling of the Stars. (New) By B. J. Dale SO 

For Chorus and Orchestra. The words a Christmas Hymn by Rossetti 
Short and effective for a good chorus. 

The Holy Child By Thomas Adams 50 

The Nativity By Thomas Adams 50 

Yule-Tide By T. Anderton 75 

Christmas Oratorio By J. S. Bach 1 .00 

Parts 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6, each 50 

Blessed are They Who Watch By Hugh Blair 75 

The Cradle of Christ By J. F. Bridge 75 

Noel By G. W. Chadwick 1 .00 

Christmas Eve By N. W. Gade 50 

The Two Advents By G. M. Garrett 75 

Blow Ye the Trumpet in Zion By C. Warwick Jordan 50 

Christmas Cantata By Julius Harrison 50 

The First Christmas Morn By Henry Leslie 1 .25 

Bethlehem By J. H. Maunder 1.00 

The Shepherds' Vision By Horatio Parker 25 

Ode on the Nativity By C. H. H. Parry 1 .25 

The Star in the East By F. J. Sawyer 1.25 

The Logos (The Word is Flesh Become) By D. Stanley Smith 50 

The Divine Birth By F. E. Ward 75 

The Story of Bethlehem By J. E. West 75 

NEW CHRISTMAS ANTHEMS 

And There Were in the Same Country By B. Lambord 15 

Brightest and Best By R. Kinder 12 

Angels from the Realms. (Clemson Prize Anthem) . . By H. Sanders 15 

The Desire of All Nations By J. S. Matthews 12 

The Heralding Star By J. S. Matthews 12 

Jesu, Thou Dear Babe. (Traditional) Arr. by C. Dickinson 12 

Child Jesus By Robert Schumann 12 

The Saviour Christ is Born By P. Fehrmann 12 

O Fair, O Wondrous, Holy Night By C. Von Weber 10 

The Song of the Angels. (Traditional) Arr. by C. Dickinson 12 

Of the Father's Love Begotten By E. C. Bairstow 12 

Silent Night By F. Griiber. Arr. by J. E. West 5 

Ring Out, Wild Bells. (New Year's Day) By P. E. Fletcher 12 

NEW CHRISTMAS CAROLS 

Carol Book 7. Containing six new carols by L. Stokovski, L. Jewell and F. D. Jamison. Price 10 

per 100, net 5.00 

Cradle Song By G. V. Evans 5 

Christ Was Born on Christmas Day By C. M. Spurling 5 

Noel By J. Jeffreys 6 

When Jesus Came to Bethlehem By H. A. Chambers 5 

A Song of the Virgin Mother By £. L. Bainton 5 

A Bright Star Shining By J. S. Matthews 5 

The Little Door By J. S. Matthews 10 

Dark, Dark Was the Night By J. S. Matthews 10 

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32 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



JUST PUBLISHED 

Ten Student Songs 
of Finland 

Edited by KURT SCHINDLER 

BOOK I. 50c. 
No. Separately, Price 

1 Summer Evening Selim Palmgren 10c 

2 I'm Coming Home Selim Palmgren 12c 

3 Finnish Lullaby Selim Palmgren 12c 

4 Fight R. Faltin 12c 

5 Song of Kullervo Toivo Kulle 15c 

BOOK II. 50c. 

(In the Press) 

No. Separately, Price 

6 In Harvest Time Oskar Merikanto 12c 

7 Maryatta's Cradle Song..S. Palmgren 12c 

8 The Poor Girl Oskar Merikanto 10c 

9 Dotty, Ditty Axel Tornuad 10c 

10 Song of Exile Jean Sebelius 12c 

BOOK II Published Also for Mixed Voices 

English Version by Jane and Deems Taylor ' 

and K. S. 



NEW PART SONGS 



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PRICE 

A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea - - 12c 

There Be None of Beauty's Daughters - Z2c 

Ah! County Guy -------- 12c 

If Doughty Deeds My Lady Please - - 15c 

By JOHN POINTER 

Send for copies on examination 



NOVBLLO'S HANDBOOK FOR MUSICIANS 

Edited by Ernest Newman 

Just Published 

The Interpretation of the Music 

of the 

Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth Centuries 

as revealed by Contemporary Evidence 

by 
ARNOLD DILMETCH 

Price, $5.00 Net 



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Twenty-two Illustrative Pieces 
$1.75 



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Appreciation of Music Series 
Volume II. 

Great Modern 
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BY 

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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



33 



Aids for Choirmasters and Organists 

FROM THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

G. SCHIRMER New York 



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Musical Ministries in the Church 

Studies in the history, theory and administra- 
tion of sacred music 
BY WALDO SELDEN PRATT 
Third edition enlarged 
In six chapters, "Religion and the Art of 
Music," "Hymns and Hymn-Singing," "The 
Choir," "The Organ and the Organist," "The 
Minister's Responsibility" and "The History of 
Hymnody." 

Cloth. Net, $1.25 

The History of Music 

A handbook and guide for students 
BY WALDO SELDEN PRATT 
A comprehensive survey of the whole range of 
facts and tendencies that constitute the material 
of the history of music 

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The Choirtrainer's Art 

BY DR. A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 
Part I takes up the management of the choir 
members, the practice room, practices and re- 
hearsals. Part II treats of methods of voice pro- 
duction. Part III treats of the value of words, 
words and music, fixed plain-song (monotones, 
versicles, responses, litany), psalm chanting, Mer- 
becke's communion service, accuracy and expres- 
sion, hymns and anthems and services. 
Cloth. Net, $2.00 

Johann Sebastian Bach 

The organist and his works for the organ 
BY A. PIRRO 
With a preface by Ch. M. Widor 
Translated ' from the French by 
Wallace Goodrich 
The author describes the organ works of Bach 
and traces the development of his style from his 
first attempts down to his final work. 
Cloth. Net, $1.25 

Practical Points for Choral Singers 

BY ROBERT SIMMONS 
Suggestions and information every capable 
choral conductor would give to his singers, from 
time to time, at rehearsals. The author's advice 
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is so often seriously injured by choral work, 
is specially needed and much to the point. 
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Dictionary of Organ Stops 

English and Foreign, Ancient and Modern, 

Practical, Theoretical, Historical, Aesthetic, 

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BY JAMES I. WEDGEWOOD 

This work is not only descriptive in character, 

but embodies considerable constructive criticism 

in the principles of tonal design. 

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Choir Training in Church and School 

BY HAROLD E. WATTS, Mus.Doc, Oxon. 

Many organists and choirmasters find them- 
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Organ Accompaniment to the Psalms 

BY CHARLES W. PEARCE, Mus.Doc. 

Cantab., F.R.C.O. 
If there be one part of the church service 
which tests the knowledge, capability and taste 
of the organist more than another, that part is 
the accompaniment of the Psalms. The author 
has had great experience in both Anglican and 
Gregorian chanting, and has treated both sys- 
tems with equal fairness. 

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A Biographical Dictionary of Musicians 

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Second Edition 

It covers its subject — the life and works of 
every musician (composer and performer), 
every writer and theorist on musical subjects, 
and every man or woman who has played a part 
or exercised an influence on the art of music 
— more thoroughly than has ever before been at- 
tempted in the same compact form. 

Cloth, net, $3.50; half morocco, net, $6.00 

The Organist's and Choirmaster's 

Register and Service Record 

BY J. H. STRICKLAND KING 

A conveniently and attractively arranged blank 
book for keeping in clear and concise form rec- 
ords of attendance, salary and efficiency of choir 
members; together with a record of the music 
performed at each service of the Episcopal 
Church. An invaluable aid to the systematic 
choirmaster. 

Cloth. Net, $1.50 

Hints for Boy Choristers 

BY RONALD M. GRANT 

A pocket-sized pamphlet setting forth in col- 
loquial and easy style the most important points 
of boy-choir training. It is written primarily 
from the boy's point of view. It also includes 
brief departments dealing with vocal exercises 
and the rudiments of music. A clever and 
straightforward aid to the boy chorister, or to 
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Paper. Net, $0.15 



IF UNABLE TO OBTAIN AT LOCAL DEALERS ADDRESS THE PUBLISHERS 



34 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



AUSTIN ORGANS 



We have emphasized at times the rapid development of our mechanical 
system which has perfected within the past two years an entirely new type 
of console control, and has added to the already generous mechanical aids. 

But as to tonal qualities we have of late received so many assurances of 
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call the attention of the general public to Austin tone, as being paramount 
in our organ building. Those interested may have for the asking generous 
proof of what the world of artists thinks of tone characteristics and tone 
blend of our output. 

For information address the factory. 



AUSTIN ORGAN CO. 

158 WOODLAND ST., HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 



HUTCHINGS 

Organ Company 



Making no claims that it cannot substanti- 
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BOSTON 



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cost. Thorough Preparatory School maintained. Refined so- 
cial environment and beautiful situation on the wooded shores 
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The professional String Quartette, the student Symphony 
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35 



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The Seven Last Words of Christ 

By A. MONESTEL— Price, 75c. postpaid 

This short Lenten cantata is possessed of much melodic beauty and emotional force. The 
composer is a master in the art of writing effectively for voices, and the chorus parts are at once 
fluent, significantly independent, and withal not difficult of performance. An English adaptation 
has been made of the original Latin text (which is mostly biblical) ; it is as faithfully literal as 
the exigencies of the musical phrases would permit. As a work especially for Passion Week, this 
new cantata is recommended to choirmasters in both Protestant and Catholic churches. 

WHAT MUSICIANS AND PRESS SAY ABOUT THE BOOK 



Melodious, well-written and extremely effect- 
ive. Its melodic flow will make a direct appeal. — 
Musical America. 

Abounds in pleasing melody and effective har- 
mony and is admirably suited to the text. — 
Musical Courier. 

The work proved to be very effective, and is 
so constructed as to be within the range of most 
choirs. — JV. Y. Evening Post. 

This short Lenten cantata is possessed of 
much melodic beauty and emotional force. The 
composer is a master in the art of writing effect- 



ively for voices, and the chorus parts are at 
once fluent, significantly independent, and withal 
not difficult of performance. — The Musician. 

The work was given under my direction at the 
People's Church, St. Paul, Minn., and achieved 
a fine success. Not only that, but we enjoyed 
doing it. I do not believe there is a finer Lenten 
cantata, and certainly none more suitable, or 
more grateful to the performers. We really were 
as delighted with it as were those who heard 
it. — Prof. Malcolm Dana McMillan, Organist 
and Choirmaster of the People's Church, St. 
Paul, Minn. 



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in nature tends towards a goal, or rather, 
every goal is in its turn a point of departure: 
nature gives us the spectacle of a perpetual 
vicious circle." 



SI 39 

@®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®® 

-\V* CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS is al- 
7 11 ways delightful when he writes to 

^"' ▼♦ newspapers about subjects in 
which he is interested; or when he girds up 
his loins to discuss music: witness his argu- 
ment in behalf of Gounod's oratorios — that 
they will live long after his operas. We have 
never read his comedies; but we know some 
of his poems and have dipped into his "Prob- 
lemes et Mysteres," with its prologue on the 
metronome and celestial space. It is a little 
book with a melancholy conclusion : "Nothing 



5IGARO of November 7 published an 
article by M. Saint-Saens on the San 
Francisco Exposition. What he says 
of the orchestra is worth a translation: 
"When I arrived at San Francisco, the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra, conducted by M. 
Muck, was giving concerts, each one of which 
was devoted to a particular nationality. I 
heard an Italian concert. There was a fine 
overture by Cherubini, who was director of 
the Paris Conservatory; whose works do not 
appear on our programs. I also attended a 
French concert — a piquant affair — for M. 
Muck is a German, but the Pacific Coast is so 
far from Europe! At this concert my Sym- 
phony in C Minor was performed in a mas- 
terly manner, one that seemingly could not 
be surpassed; it was surpassed, however, for 
reasons that I shall explain later." 

M. Saint-Saens then praises the orchestra 
that had been gotten together for his concerts 
by Mr. George W. Stewart. "The docility 
and the good nature of this orchestra were 
equal to its proficiency. I had to contend with 
only one fault, which is nearly general to-day, 
but was carried to an extreme by the fine or- 
chestra from Boston. 

"Fifty years ago, orchestras always played 



38 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



too loud; to-day, it is the reverse. As soon 
as the indications 'piano* and 'diminuendo* ap- 
pear, everything fades away. Twenty violins 
playing in unison are scarcely heard. Melodic 
phrases are no longer sung; a mass of impor- 
tant details passes unperceived. I was obliged 
to be insistent in order to persuade the players 
that 'piano* was not synonymous with 'pianis- 
simo* and that melodic phrases should be sung. 
In the score that M. Muck had used, I was 
not a little surprised to find 'pianissimo' indi- 
cated in pencil, even in a place where the 
composer had written 'crescendo* ! Like 'for- 
tissimo/ the 'pianissimo' should be excep- 
tional, and then it produces a great effect ; but 
its abuse in a large hall is a mistake. I have 
demanded this extreme 'pianissimo' at the be- 
ginning of the Adagio in my symphony, and 
also the suppression of the 'vibrato,' the con- 
stant use of which is one of the evils of mod- 
ern interpretation. It also should be excep- 
tional and reserved for emotional passages. 
In a word, to the general astonishment, the 
later performance of my symphony surpassed 
the first and the orchestra of the Exposition 
covered itself with glory." 



*Wy R > GEORGE DOSTAL, a tenor, 
1 I I thinks that the vocal music in these 
^" ■ \ older Italian operas "is, to my mind, 
very lovely indeed." But there is a fly in the 
ointment. "What spoils the works is the tin- 
panny orchestration. I've sometimes won- 
dered why capable musicians have never in- 
terested themselves in adapting the scores of 
works like 'Favorita' and 'Puritani' to mod- 
ern standards. These works should not be 
permitted to languish because of sketchy 
scoring." 

This reminds us of Mrs. Windsor's remark 
in "The Green Carnation" twenty years ago: 
"Yes, 'Faust' is always nice; a little thread- 
bare though, now. Old operas are like old 
bonnets, I always think. They ought to be 
remodeled, retrimmed, from time to time. If 
we could keep Gounod's melodies now, and 
get them reharmonized by Saint-Saens or 
Bruneau, it would be charming." 

There has been much nonsense written 
about the "tin-pan accompaniments," the 
"guitar orchestra," of the old operas. To re- 
orchestrate "La Sonnambula," "I Puritani," 
"La Favorite," would ruin them. The mel- 
odies were, of their day, written for great 



singers who could be dramatic in bel canto. 
To accompany them with modern harmonies, 
to reorchestrate, would ruin the pleasing 
naivete. The operas then would be truly in- 
tolerable. We believe there have been at- 
tempts to reorchestrate Schumann's sym- 
phonies, but they have been lamentable fail- 
ures. Could anything be simpler, more guitar- 
like than the accompaniment to the oboe and 
clarinet solos in the second movement of 
Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony? Yet, 
who would have it otherwise? 



'%/%'^E were much interested in the advice 
III given to English organists who think 
^^^ of settling in this country by Mr. 
Percy A. Sholes, the editor of The Music 
Student. He visited us last season and is 
coming again. When he was here, he was 
struck by our extravagant manner of living. 
He writes under the sub-head, "The Lavish 
American. My informants here, English peo- 
ple, told me that a good deal of the expense of 
American living is pure extravagance, and 
especially in little things. Candy, ice cream, 
and soda drinks run away with money. Un- 
necessary car riding (with the universal 
American five-cent fare — even for the short- 
est distance), boot-blacking (at fen cents) 
outside, when a brush and a tin of polish at 
home would save the money ; shaving (at ten 
cents or fifteen cents) — all these minor ex- 
penses add up. The American seems to the 
Englishman very careless in money matters, 
and I suppose the newly-arrived Englishman 
must seem to him mean." 

And yet, as the story goes, it was an Eng- 
lishman of high degree that said to Abraham 
Lincoln: "At home, no gentleman blacks his 
own boots." To which Mr. Lincoln replied: 
"Whose boots does he black?" All Ameri- 
cans are not extravagant. For example, we 
prefer beer at five cents a glass to ice cream 
soda at ten or fifteen cents. For years we 
have blacked our boots — that is, when we 
happened to think of it. We have shaved at 
home and abroad since the down thickened on 
our chiselled lips and hardened cheeks, not 
with a safety razor, for we feared that we 
would then hack and gash. Nor are we de- 
pendent on hot water. At a tender age a 
passage in Cobbett's "Advice to Young Men" 
made an indelible impression: "I once heard 
Sir John Sinclair ask Mr. Cochrane John- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



39 



stone whether he meaned (sic) to have a son 
of his (then a little boy) taught Latin. 'No/ 
said Mr. Johnstone, 'but I mean to do some- 
thing a great deal better for him/ 'What is 
that?' said Sir John. 'Why/ said the other, 
'teach him to shave with cold water and with- 
out a glass.' " • 

Did not the great Due de Brissac say to 
himself, while holding the razor open and in 
readiness for the first stroke: "Timoleon de 
Cosse, God hath made thee a gentleman, and 
the King hath made thee a Duke. It is, never- 
theless, right and fit that thou shouldst have 
something to do ; therefore thou .shalt shave 
thyself." 



^/%/^HY does not Mr. Sholes, inculcating 
III thrift, urge English organists com- 
^^V^ ing to this country with the thought 
of settling here, to grow a fine area of whis- 
kerage? Thomas Campbell calculated that 
a man who shaves himself daily and lives to 
the age of seventy spends, during his life, as 
much time in shaving as would suffice for 
learning seven languages. Southey verified 
the statement, finding the assertion of Camp- 
bell inaccurate only because it fell short of 
the truth. 



^YI^R- EDWIN EVANS, who writes 
J I I agreeably about music for the Pall 
^"1 ▼ Mall Gazette, seeing Mr. Thomas 
Beecham conducting music by Mozart at an 
orchestral concert, was moved to this reflec- 
tion: "His familiar platform manner, which 
would lend itself so easily to caricature, ap- 
peared suddenly, as in a flash, to be the one 
and only way in which Mozart should be con- 
ducted. ... A conductor of the period 
would, as a matter of course, have adopted 
an elaborate arabesque of gesture that suited 
the contemporary manners and costume." 

The successful physician cultivates a sooth- 
ing and, at the same time, authoritative bed- 
side manner, but this manner is for all 
patients. Should a conductor change his man- 
ner of conducting to suit the music being in- 
terpreted? Should Mr. Walter Damrosch, 
or Dr. Muck, for example, imitate Mr. Crea- 
tore when music by Schoenberg or Stravin- 
sky is upon the desk? Should he muss his 
hair and make X's and Y's with arms and 
legs directing the Finale of Tschaikowsky's 
Fourth Symphony? 



<\V* R. EVANS believes that much of the 
J I I unrest that now prevails in the 
^"1 ▼ musical world results from a strug- 
gle to regain qualities that dominated in the 
i8th century. "The spirit of the Encyclo- 
paedists is abroad once more. At least, before 
the present crisis, an intellectual scepticism 
was the prevailing note, and Arlequin had at- 
tained greater actuality than poor romantic 
Pierrot." 

The following paragraph recalls the man- 
ner of thought and expression that set the 
lamented Vernon Blackburn apart from other 
English writers about music : "It was a com- 
placent age in music. Like Jules Renard's 
peacock, its composers are 'si surs d'etre 
beaux qu'ils sont incapables de rancune.' 
They may have quarreled incessantly and bit- 
terly about rival conceptions of musical 
beauty, but these were quarrels of aesthetics. 
Underlying the controversies that surrounded 
the Italian comedy and the reforms of Gluck 
is an indefinable something that makes them 
duets of intellectual dandies. Even the tech- 
nical polemics concerning Rameau's theory of 
harmony could scarcely have taken the form 
that they did had they not been conducted by 
self-satisfied gentlemen in silk and lace, with 
powdered wigs and ornamental swords. And 
it is this supreme complacency that makes 
eighteenth century music such a relief from 
the unsatisfied cravings of the later nine- 
teenth." 



SOME of the pianists now before the 
public find relief in going back to 
Couperin, Rameau, Daquim, D. Scar- 
latti. It is wholesome for them and for their 
audiences, provided they catch the spirit of the 
period in which these beautiful pieces were 
composed. Mr. Paderewski is never more de- 
lightful than in the interpretation of minia- 
tures to which the great Couperin gave fanci- 
ful titles, titles that put one in mind of pic- 
tures by Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard. Nor 
need the greatest pianist look on these pieces 
as unconsidered trifles. To play them as they 
should be played calls for the finest technic, 
the most exquisite taste, the most delicate 
fancy. The later piano pieces of Debussy — 
those that he has written since he escaped 
from Massenet and the demands of publishers 
for the pleasure of the bourgeois — go back to 
Couperin and the others. 



4Q 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



3T IS not extravagant to find the expres- 
sion of arrogant militarism in the music 
of Reger and the later Strauss. We 
confess we are not passing sleepless nights in 
expectation of hearing Richard Strauss's "Al- 
pine" symphony, with its battalion of horns. 
One Alp horn, judiciously employed, would be 
enough. There is the suggestion of crawling 
glaciers and majestic, awe-inspiring, snow- 
covered mountains in the introduction to the 
Finale 'of Brahms's first symphony, and how 
comparatively simple are the means of evok- 
ing the vision! Chauvet produced the same 
effect in a little piano piece that was afterward 
skillfully orchestrated by Henri Marechal. 



^^%UCH has been written, by his pupils 
/ I I and others, of the late Theodor 
^" " ^ Leschetizky as a pedagogue and as a 
man. He was in his eighty-fifth year and had 
been in the habit of marrying. Most men 
would have stopped willingly with the radi- 
antly handsome Annette Essipoff, who was his 
second wife; but he left her, possibly because 
he was not wholly satisfied with her technique, 
and married another pupil, Miss Benislawka. 
After that we lost count. 

Mr. James Huneker once said that Liszt is 
chiefly famous for having invented the Liszt 
pupil. As in old days, young pianists who 
had only been introduced to Liszt, or had seen 
him at a distance, or could identify his photo- 
graph, spoke and wrote glibly and with a fine 
display of emotion about "dear old Weimar," 
and advertised themselves as "a pupil of 
Liszt," if not "the pupil of Liszt." So the 
Leschetizky pupils are thicker than blackber- 
ries. One cannot escape them. Go to Putney, 
Vt, or Tarbell, N. H., Hyannis, Mass., Spo- 
kane, Monterey, Terre Haute, and throw a 
stone at random, you will hit at least one 
Leschetizky pupil, resident or sojourning. 

Let it be said to the credit of this distin- 
guished and influential man that he disclaimed 
any copper-bottomed, nickle-plated, patented 
method. He laid down certain principles, 
which were much like those of Oskar Raif of 
Berlin. That these principles were often car- 
ried to an extravagant length, distorted or 
wholly misunderstood by young men and 
women who were constantly prating about 
"the method," was not the fault of either 
teacher. 



VV% E READ that in London the inhabi- 
III tants do not like to venture out 
^^^ at night. • Therefore, the leading 
theaters are giving afternoon performances, 
and concert hours are earlier. The first con- 
cert of the Royal Philharmonic Society this 
season began at 6.15 p.m., and the London 
Symphony Orchestra, having consulted their 
subscribers about the advisability, has followed 
suit. The Classical Concert Society has 
changed its hour from 8.15 p.m. to 6 or 
thereabouts. 

Some years ago a deep German thinker — 
was it not Heinrich Pudor? — wrote a pamph- 
let advocating many changes in the manage- 
ment of concerts. He insisted that the morn- 
ing was the time to hear music, and he gave 
many reasons in support, most of which would 
strike an ordinarily sane reader as grotesque. 

Mr. Amarinth wished that Sir Augustus 
Harris would start morning opera — say, from 
12 to 3 p.m. "One could drop in after break- 
fast at eleven, and one might arrange to have 
luncheon parties between the acts." Lady 
Locke objected. She thought it would spoil 
one for the rest of the day. "One would be 
fit for nothing afterward." "Quite so," said 
Mr. Amarinth, with extreme gentleness. 
"That would be the object of the performance, 
to unfit one for the duties of the day. How 
beautiful! What a glorious sight it would 
be to see a great audience flocking out into 
the orange-colored sunshine, each unit of 
which was thoroughly unfitted for any duties 
whatsoever. It makes me perpetually sorrow- 
ful in London to meet with people doing their 
duty. I find them everywhere. It is impos- 
sible to escape from them. A sense of duty 
is like some horrible disease. It destroys the 
tissues of the mind, as certain complaints de- 
stroy the tissues of the body. The catechism 
has a great deal to answer for." 



®F COURSE, if one eats a light break- 
fast and has not heard the chimes or 
seen the seven stars the midnight be- 
fore, his receptivity is greater than if he hears 
music after a pompous, swollen dinner that 
includes stewed meats and claret. But how 
can any artist sing or play in the morning? 
That artists can force themselves by the 
thought of a pecuniary reward is shown by 
the fashion of morning musicales, liberally en- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



41 



couraged by landlords, who hope that patrons 
of art will be patrons of his luncheons. How 
can an opera party, wholly or half gorged, the 
women flushed in the face and neck, the men 
longing for tobacco and the interchange of 
new stories, be in the mood to appreciate any 
music except that of a musical comedy? Per- 
sons who wish to appreciate good music should 
attune their minds and bodies beforehand, as 
there are preparatory lectures before the Com- 
munion service in many towns. As E. T. A. 
Hoffmann recommended certain wines for the 
composer of an opera, symphony, mass, so 
a true connoisseur will shape his luncheon or 
dinner to the character of the recital, concert, 
opera. If we were £oing to hear Mr. George 
Copeland play, we should not indulge ourselves 
in a New England boiled dinner; while we 
would order one if Mr. Busoni shortly after- 
ward were to give one of his thunderous re- 
citals, including a transcription of Bach's Art 
of Fugue (complete). The same dinner should 
not be ordered for "Pelleas and Melisande" 
and "Gotterdammerung." 

In Utopia the musical critics are under 
surveillance during the season. Their diet is 
regulated; a course of reading is prescribed; 
every effort is made to bring them into the 
concert hall or opera house without bodily or 
mental prejudice, with a mind like a tabula 
rasa. And in Utopia only the fit are allowed 
to give concerts. 



CHERE is complaint among "artists" 
this season that the public does not 
appreciate them. The complaint is 
heard not only here; the winds bring it from 
Boston and Chicago. A correspondent in 
Boston informs us that the concert halls, 
when there is a recital, are largely papered. 
Messrs. Paderewski, Kreisler, McCormack, 
and Gabrilowitsch have been eminently suc- 
cessful, but the rank and file of pianists, sing- 
ers and fiddlers draw few hearers. There is 
no curiosity about newcomers, no matter what 
their reputation may be abroad. Even the 
chamber concerts of the Flonzaley and 
Kneisel Quartets have been poorly attended 
thus far this season. The Rabinoff-Pav- 
lowa combination giving excellent perform- 
ances of opera and ballet was wretchedly sup- 
ported by the public. There is a brave at- 



tempt to revive interest in the Cecilia Society, 
but there seems to be little interest in the per- 
formance of choral works. 

One reason why certain givers of recitals 
do not draw all men and women unto them 
is that they charge too high a price of ad- 
mission. Mr. Boanerges, the eminent pianist, 
and Mme. Slanciato ask $2 or $1.50 for an 
orchestra chair, whereas their performance is 
really worth not over fifty cents. 

There is the same complaint in London. 
Mr. Legge, of the Daily Telegraph, has writ- 
ten sensibly on this subject, and advised the 
army of concert givers to lower their prices. 



/^\R. E. H. THORNE has been giving 
1 1 organ recitals in London. The Daily 
'^^ Telegraph, reviewing one, began the ar- 
ticle : "A very eminent living organist once said 
that to the majority of Britons, Bach's music 
was synonymous with 'stodge,' and he attrib- 
uted the fact to the slovenly way in which the 
greatest of all writers for the organ was 
usually played by the majority of English or- 
ganists. It is probably true that recent im- 
provements in organ construction have se- 
duced many performers from the strictest 
paths of musical virtue." This is all true; 
but is this true : "Austerity is a proper attribute 
of Bach"? It appears that Dr. Thorne em- 
phasized "the devotional side as fully as pos- 
sible." Is the music of Bach for the organ 
always inherently and deliberately devotional 
any more than the serious music of any great 
composer? Even vulgar and tavern music 
aroused in Sir Thomas Browne a deep fit 
of devotion and a profound contemplation of 
the first composer. But there is much cant 
in the writings about Bach's music, possibly 
because Bach himself was a cantor. 

Too many builders have gone astray in their 
attempt to make the organ an imitator of the 
orchestra. This is an old story and it is not 
necessary to dilate on it. Gretry, hearing 
Mehul's "Uthal," in which violas take the place 
of violins, cried out: "Six francs for an E 
string." The lover of organ music, hearing a 
modern opera with all the modern improve- 
ments, sanitary plumbing, continuous hot 
water, pneumatic cleaning service, may well 
exclaim: "A dollar for a true diapason 
tone." 



42 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Cbe Development of ttoe Cied 

By Sigmund Spaeth 
{Concluded) 

With the possible exception of Beethoven, 
Carl Maria von Weber is the most important 
German song-writer before Schubert. His 
careful study of the "Volkslied" and his in- 
stinct for melody enabled him to compose a 
number of songs possessing the true ring of 
folk-music. But even more interesting are his 
art-songs, most of which carry out the theory 
of his own statement : "Strict truth in decla- 
mation is the first and foremost requisite of 
vocal music. . . . Any vocal music that 
alters or effaces the poet's meaning and in- 
tention is a failure." 

Weber's settings of Korner's patriotic 
poems, "Leyer und Schwert," won him the 
greatest popularity in his own time. In the 
light of the later development of the "Lied," 
however, his most successful song is undoubt- 
edly Das Madchen an das erste Schneeglock- 
chen, to the text of F. von Gerstenbergh. The 
opening lines are a good illustration of 
Weber's "truth in declamation." On the 
phrase "Schneeglockchen ist's" the key 
changes suddenly from G minor to G major, 
effectively suggesting the delight of the girl 
at finding the flower. From this point on the 
harmonic development is most ingenious, re- 
turning finally to the original minor key on 
the word "erkaltet." The second part of the 
song, containing the soliloquy of the lonely 
maiden, suggests in the beginning of its mel- 
ody the second part of Schubert's Wanderer. 
There are good dramatic touches throughout 
this portion. 

Equally correct in its declamation is Meine 
Lieder, meine Sange. Both melody and har- 
mony are quite simple, with the exception of a 
single bold experiment in dramatic expression 
when on the word "Grabeshallen" the voice is 
carried from the low A-natural to the E-flat 
an octave and a half above. 

Ich sah ein Roschen am Wege stehn is a 
tuneful imitation of the folk-song style, with 
no attempt to express more than the general 
meaning of the text. The Wiegenlied is also 
"volksthiimlich," with a slight suggestion of 
the air of the well-known Annchen von 
Tharau. Wenn Kindlein siissen Schlummers 
Ruh', while obviously composed in the spirit 
of a lullaby, suffers from the awkwardness of 



its text, which, with • the naively simple mel- 
ody, gives an impression of incongruity. More 
successful is Der kleine Frits, in which even 
the precocious utterances of the youthful hero 
cannot destroy the gentle humor of both words 
and music. 

In Meine Farben a more elaborate treat- 
ment is discovered, but still exhibiting a clear 
intention to make the melody of prime impor- 
tance. This tendency is less evident in the 
Sonett, a song of considerable charm and 
freshness, but in its structure nothing more 
than a series of short cadences woven together. 
As a result, the accentuation is unusually good. 
Unbefangenheit is a brignt, sparkling song, 
whose harmonic variation accords well with 
the text. There are several touches of humor, 
particularly in the pianissimo "asides" ad- 
dressed to the brook and the grassy bank. 
Sind es Schmerzen, sind es Freuden, to the 
text of Ludwig Tieck, is one of Weber's most 
interesting dramatic songs. He uses effec- 
tively the device of an accompaniment in trip- 
lets against a melody in common time to sug- 
gest the agitation of the speaker. The change 
to the minor and to the slow six-eight time on 
the words "So schlage denn, sterbendes Herz" 
emphasizes the atmosphere of gloom, which 
reaches its climax in the low A on the word 
"Grab." The rest of the song well portrays 
the gradual overcoming of doubt and mental 
waverings, emerging in the final triumph of 
the lover's enthusiastic resolve. 

Beethoven's importance in the development 
of the "Lied" is two-fold. Not only did he 
treat this form of composition with the respect 
which it merited (thus establishing a prece- 
dent for composers in the larger forms), but 
he also emphasized the significance of the ac- 
companiment, and paved the way in this re- 
spect for Schumann and the later romanticists. 
Beethoven had little of Mozart's genius in 
composing music of a supremely vocal char- 
acter. He was inclined to disregard the con- 
venience and even the limits of the human 
voice, particularly in the great choral works 
of his later life. But his mastery of instru- 
mental harmonies and his unique gift of mel- 
ody made it possible for him to produce a 
number of beautiful songs, most of which, 
whether by accident or design, are distinctly 
singable. 

The cycle An die feme Geliebte would in 
itself be sufficient to establish the reputation 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



43 



of Beethoven as a song-writer. The six poems 
of the series are by A. Jeitteles, but their con- 
nection is entirely Beethoven's own device. 
He brings out the essential unity of the cycle 
by making the music continuous, modulating 
from the key of one song into that of the 
next, and introducing again in the final song 
the melody of the first This melody may 
well rank with the most beautiful of Bee- 
thoven's slow themes. Another composer 
would probably have saved it for a sonata or 
a symphony. It appears five times in the first 
song of the cycle, Auf dem Hugel sits 9 ich, but 
with a different accompaniment each time. 
The second song, Wo die Berge so blau, is in a 
more rapid tempo, and both its melodic and 
harmonic materials are of the simplest kind. 
There is an ingenious imitation of an echo in 
the accompaniment after the words "mochte 
ich sein." An interesting device also is the 
monotone on the sentence "Dort im ruhigen 
Thai schweigen Schmerzen und Qual," sug- 
gesting quiet calm, while the accompaniment 
repeats the first theme in a new key. A slight 
dramatic touch is added in the third stanza by 
the slowing of the tempo and the sudden 
change to a minor chord on the words "innere 
Pein." In the third song of the cycle, Leichte 
Segler in den Hohen, the light, rapid accom- 
paniment in triplets suggests first the fleecy 
clouds above and then the rippling brook be- 
low. There is a change to the minor at the 
beginning of the third stanza, and a well-de- 
fined atmosphere of grief in the harmonies ac- 
companying the words "Klagt ihr, Voglein, 
meine Qual!" The minor continues to the 
end of the song, but with a light, airy accom- 
paniment in the fourth stanza, addressed to 
the West Wind, and finally a return to trip- 
lets, as the brook is again introduced, with a 
concluding "ritardando" and the harmonies of 
sorrow on the phrase "Meine Thrarten ohne 
Zahl." Although the sentiments of the fourth 
song, Diese Wolken in den Hohen, are some- 
what similar to those of the third, a contrast 
is afforded by the more cheerful tone, which 
is supplied largely by the rippling six-eight 
rhythm of the accompaniment, with little em- 
bellishments and twirls to suggest the "Vog- 
lein munt'rer Zug." A rapid introduction 
leads into the joyous Es Kehret der Maien, es 
bliihet die Au', whose melody has the spon- 
taneous quality of a folk-song. Again there 
comes the touch of sadness at the end, as the 



lover realizes that all these joys are not for 
him. The final song, Nimm sie hin, denn, 
diese Lie der, contains another beautiful mel- 
ody, closely allied in spirit to that of the open- 
ing song which is soon directly introduced. 
After one complete statement of the original 
theme there is a rapid working-out of its com- 
ponent parts, leading to the triumphant "was 
ein liebend Herz geweiht!" with which the 
cycle ends. 

These six songs give an insight into Bee- 
thoven's method of composing the "Lied." So 
far as the melody is concerned, the form is 
practically strophic, for in each stanza the 
vocal* part is essentially the same. But the 
variation of the accompaniment gives the song 
as a whole the "durchkomponiert" or synthetic 
quality, so much so that the repetition of the 
melody is often scarcely noticeable. This type 
of song, with its modifications, was later very 
popular with Schubert. 

Als die Geliebte sich trennen wolte, with 
words by Beethoven's friend Breuning, is a 
curious mixture of the strophic and the syn- 
thetic. There is little variation of melody or 
accompaniment in the first three stanzas, but 
the final stanza is quite distinctive, with the 
repetition of the closing sentence almost in the 
manner of a Coda. The same device, more 
elaborately carried out, is to be found in the 
M allied (text by Goethe), in which the melody 
is thoroughly "volksthumlich" except for the 
variation at the end of the third stanza. 

Beethoven's setting of Mignon's famous 
song, Kennst du das Land (op. 75) is prac- 
tically strophic in form. The first part of 
each stanza is expressed by a beautiful mel- 
ody, more dramatic in character than any folk- 
song, while the refrain, "Dahin ! dahin mocht' 
ich mit dir, O mein Geliebter, zieh'n," both 
changes the rhythm and quickens the tempo, 
with effective repetitions of the word "dahin." 
The same scheme is repeated in all three 
stanzas. 

Of the purely strophic songs, the Opferlied, 
with verses by Matthisson, is one of the best. 
In spite of the exact duplication of the two 
stanzas, the words and music are in harmony 
throughout. 

A more elaborate form appears in Das 
Gliick der Freundschaft, in which there are 
distinct variations both of melody and har- 
mony in all the stanzas, and again the coda- 
like device at the end. Mit einem gemalten 



44 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Band goes a step further, being "durchkom- 
poniert" in its first three stanzas, after which 
the music is ingeniously led back into the open- 
ing melody. This, in turn, is developed to the 
climax of a florid measure, almost like a ca- 
denza, and the song ends with a distinct coda. 

There is a natural progression from this 
type to Beethoven's purely synthetic songs, 
with dramatic suggestion or direct imitation. 
One of the simplest of the latter is Marmotte, 
representing the dreary tune of an organ- 
grinder. The combination of its monotonous 
music with the incongruous mixture of Ger- 
man and French words gives a very realistic 
effect. A comparison with Schubert's Lexer- 
mann is manifestly unfair, as Marmotte makes 
no pretense of serious dramatic significance. 
Der Kuss is also not to be taken seriously. It 
is merely a clever musical representation of 
lightly humorous words. Beethoven has 
caught the spirit of the joke and his burlesque 
dramatic treatment is most effective. Less 
successful is his serious treatment of Sauter's 
rather trivial words in Der Wachtelschlag. 
The supposed note of the quail figures largely 
in the music, being fitted in turn with the 
words "fiirchte Gott," "liebe Gott," "lobe 
Gott," "danke Gott," "bitte Gott," and "traue 
Gott." Anyone who has heard the toy whistle 
known as a "Wachtel" in a children's orches- 
tra may well imagine the effect of the same 
notes in a serious song. 

Beethoven seems to have had a curious con- 
viction that any verses of a sacred character 
were necessarily good poetry. This is the only 
possible explanation for his setting of six re- 
ligious pieces by Gellert, of which only one, 
Die Ehre Gottes aus der Natur, could have 
given him a real inspiration. Beethoven's 
music to this short pofem is full of a noble 
sincerity, and justly popular. The first of 
this series, Bitten, shows an interesting poly- 
phonic accompaniment in which the inde- 
pendence of the bass part is particularly no- 
ticeable. Number two, Die Liebe des N'dchs- 
ten, is so banal in its text as to destroy any 
possible distinction in the music. The last of 
the series, called Busslied, is more elaborate 
and, on the whole, more interesting than the 
others. 

Beethoven's most dramatic songs are the 
two settings of Italian words, La Partensa and 
In questa totnba oscura, the two songs from 
"Egmont," and the immortal Adelaide. La 



Partensa ("Der Abschied"), to the words of 
Metastasio, is fairly conventional in its 
method, with obvious concessions to the Italian 
style, but displaying a nice sense of the sig- 
nificance of the text. In questa totnba oscura 
is a fine piece of declamation, almost operatic 
in its effect, yet based upon a very simple 
theme. The two songs from the incidental 
music to "Egmont" are too well known to re- 
quire much comment. Die Trommel ge- 
rilhret makes the most of its fairly obvious 
opportunities for realistic imitation, the noise 
of drum and fife and the marching of the sol- 
diers all being clearly portrayed. Freudvoll 
und leidvoll is tenderly sentimental in spirit, 
with a very close sympathy between words 
and music, especially in such phrases as 
"langen und bangen," "himmelhoch jauch- 
zend," "zum Tode betriibt," and in the con- 
cluding sentence, "gliicklich allein ist die Seele 
die liebt!" 

As for Adelaide, even though Beethoven 
himself professed to think ill of it, it must be 
unhesitatingly included among the great songs 
of all time. With the "Lied" it has little in 
common, for it is cast in the larger form of a 
"scena," or a chamber cantata. As Beethoven 
particularly expressed to the poet Matthisson 
his delight at the text, it may be assumed that 
it was a real inspiration to him, and that his 
later contempt was largely due to the song's 
being preferred by the public to his manifestly 
greater instrumental works. The fundamental 
dramatic feature of Adelaide is to be found 
in the various musical expressions of the name 
itself, and it is around these that the melodies 
of the song are grouped. The first is in the 
mood of quiet calm, and the name is twice ut- 
tered in the same spirit. The accompaniment 
becomes slightly more agitated, and the third 
and fourth repetitions of the name show the 
increasing stress of emotions. There is a brief 
return to the mood of calm, with a slight dra- 
matic touch in the phrase "Wellen rauschen" 
and its contrast "und Nachtigallen floten." 
In the course of developing this passage the 
name again occurs three times, each time with 
greater insistence. A sudden change in the 
tempo introduces a new theme, which, how- 
ever, is clearly the outgrowth of the opening 
melody. The description of the flower, 
sprung from the lover's grave, bearing on its 
petals the name of Adelaide, brings out the 
most melodious passages of the entire song, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



45 



reaching a climax in the name itself, now ut- 
tered with all the pathos of hopeless yearn- 
ing. The closing measures are devoted to the 
repeated utterance of the beloved name, first 
with despairing grief, then with passionate 
abandon, and finally with quiet resignation. 

Beethoven's improvement of the instru- 
mental accompaniment was the last of the 
preliminary stages in the development of the 
"Lied." The earlier composers of the 
eighteenth century had emphasized the im- 
portance of correct declamation, Haydn had 
restored melody to its rightful place, Mozart 
had shown the advantage of a thorough 
knowledge of the voice, and with Weber had 
tested the dramatic possibilities of the "Lied." 
The experimental period was thus complete. 
The materials were at hand, awaiting the touch 
of a genius who could afford to concentrate 
his ability upon this one form of composition ; 
and the man supremely fitted for this work 
appeared in the person of Franz Schubert. 




novelties in foe Realm of Sacred music in 
Russia 

Ellen von Lidelbokl 

USSIAN sacred, music has pre- 
served till the present day its own 
style, with all its characteristic 
traits. A choir of male voices sings 
"a capella" at church services, organ playing 
and string instruments are not allowed ; solos 
were introduced not long ago, soprano parts 
were sung by boys. 

It is true that sacred music must always be 
governed by religious requirements and in 
Russia it remains under the severe control 
of the highly placed clerical officials and they 
are, as is well known, very conservative. 
Nevertheless, our Russian composers made 
an attempt towards the renovation of Rus- 
sian sacred music; they tried to reform it, 
giving to the anthems and motetts a real 
aesthetic development in their choral structure, 
whilst still remaining true to the traditions 
and forms of Russian church-chants. Thus 
did Tschaikowski, Rimski, Korsakow and 
many others, introducing a new development 
in the harmony, offering some contrast to that 
which was used before. 

The result of such an innovation was that 
Tschaikowski's "Mass" was sequestrated and 



forbidden for many years to be sung at church 
services. At present a fresh stream of free- 
dom seems to pass through the heavy scent of 
incense: the works of sacred music by our 
contemporary composers are performed at 
church services, female voices are introduced 
in the choir. The result of this new direction 
given to sacred music was that our composers 
undertook the creation of music of this style. 

S. RACHMANINOW COMPOSES SACRED MUSIC 

Some years ago S. Rachmaninow composed 
a "Mass" appropriate to Russian church ser- 
vices and last season he presented a series of 
anthems for a "Vigil." It was performed for 
the 'first time on March ioth at the Large 
Hall of the House of Nobility, and was re- 
peated five times at five soirees, as the large 
number of concert-goers could not get admit- 
tance to the first performances. 

The work consists of twelve separate parts, 
each having its own development, its climax 
and finale. Rachmaninow is entirely objective 
in this work. He created something new and 
refreshing in the realm of Russian sacred 
music. He thoroughly grasped the spirit of 
the Orthodox Faith, with its deep feeling and 
mysticism, and used for his Psalms the themes 
he found in the old songs of Byzant and Kiew, 
together with other motives belonging to the 
time of the early Russian Christian era. 

Rachmaninow developed the element in the 
test appropriate to the ceremony of the church 
service in a masterly manner and expressed 
the thought and feeling of an Orthodox be- 
liever, overwhelmed by an elevating impulse 
towards the heights of heaven. 

The sources of sacred music in Russia are 
similar to those of the folk-lore, and the con- 
trapuntal conditions are the same. 

The immense musical value of Rachmani- 
now's songs for a "Vigil" consists in the 
union of old sacred harmony with a choir 
founded on a modern structure. Profound 
sincerity of love and faith is apparent through- 
out the whole work fitted for church services 
and also concerts. In both cases the music 
suffices for all exigencies he required. It is 
difficult to decide exactly which of the twelve 
anthems is the best. Each has its incompar- 
able charm. The "Alleluja !" displays a fanci- 
ful flight of imagination in rising to the 
heights of heaven; the "Cherubin" and "the 
Angel's" songs are illuminated by a dreamy 



4 6 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



mysticism. In one word, it is the work of a 
great master. 

Rachmaninow's music fulfilled the real des- 
tiny of music to revive and inspire the spirit 
of man. There are sublime things in this com- 
position and its depth is impenetrable. 

The well trained choir "a capella" of the 
Synod College was conducted by N. Danilin, 
a musician, who is greatly appreciated in the 
branch of sacred music. 

S. Yondin, a singer of Mr. Zimin's opera, 
sang the solos. The whole was a model per- 
formance and made a splendid impression. 

Rachmaninow himself was present, and was 
enthusiastically greeted by the audience. 

• 

A CANTATA OF SACRED MUSIC BY ALEX. GRET- 
SHANINOW 

A second novelty of sacred music was a 
cantata by Alexandre Gretshaninow, which 
bears the following heading: "Let us praise 
our Lord with strings and organ !" 

These words will shed some light on the 
aims the composer had in view introducing 
orchestra and organ-playing into the cantata 
for a sacred choir. It was performed at Kus- 
semitzki's Symphony Concert on February 
24th for the first time, and was an event of no 
little interest. 

As we have already mentioned, the choir 
sings a capella, string instruments and or- 1 
gan playing not being allowed. Introducing 
them in his cantata, Gretshaninow appears as 
a reformer in this branch of art. How far he 
has succeeded in it, the future will decide. 

The cantata has three movements: an in- 
troduction on the words: "Bless me and my 
soul, O Lord!" It is of a fresh and bold 
spirit. The middle part changes into gloomy 
mysticism, as it illustrates a sunset and the 
darkness of night. The second movement en- 
titled "The powers of heaven!" has a theme 
belonging to an early Slavic Christian era and 
is of a pathetic character. An invisible choir 
of children voices gives to this part of the 
cantata a trait of purity and innocence. The 
impression is deepened by a solemn bell-ring- 
ing. A part in it with an uncommon rhythm 
of f-4 produces the effect of joyful hopes. A 
solo for contralto forms the transposition to 
the conclusion, which is full of grandeur and 
solemnity with wealth of beauty. 

Alex. Gretshaninow began his career as a 
composer by writing and improvising sacred 



music; as his musical endowment was well 
appropriate to this branch of art. He re- 
mained entirely national in it. His "Anthems" 
for church services, his "Masses," his "Credo" 
are works of a great master and are admitted 
at Russian churches. But Gretshaninow is a 
man who never abates his efforts: he learned 
from the past and lives now for the present. 
Foreign influence is an unavoidable factor. 
And this is felt in his later compositions, as 
also in the cantata. There is something of the 
"Parcival Shinmung," but the Russian theme 
and harmony of the early Slavic Christian 
era brings us back to our nationality. 

We owe great gratitude to Gretshani- 
now, as he has shown to what a large extent 
Russian sacred music may be developed; but 
as it needs an orchestra and organ playing for 
its performance, no one can foretell when the 
time will come for it to be heard at church 
services. At present it remains as a precious 
addition to symphony performances, as the 
music of the cantata is supremely great and 
pure. It always will bring a certain amount 
of brightness to a concert. 

It was performed in Moscow and in Petro- 
grad at the regular symphony concerts by 
Russemetzki, who conducted it with entire 
mastery. Every detail came out with wonder- 
ful clarity, and his orchestra has again given 
a convincing proof of its high quality. The 
whole staff of his chorus was there, and the 
work scored a decided success. 

A CANTATA BY SERGE TANEIEW 

The third novelty of sacred music was a 
cantata by Serge Taneiew, performed for the 
first time at Kussewitzki's Eighth Symphony 
Concert. It bears the following heading: 
"After having read a Psalm." 

A profound religious feeling underlies this 
poem written in 1859 by a Russian poet, 
Chomkarow. The contents of it are as fol- 
lows : "The voice of God resounds through the 
thunderstorm: Israel! you have erected 
temples with glittering gold, with perfuming 
incense, with lights burning day and night. 
What use to God is all this splendor? God 
Himself created the earth with all its wealth, 
He Himself set the sun and the stars in the 
sky to illuminate the world. ... A gift of 
another kind is wanted by our Lord, a gift 
reconciling Him with men — He asks from 
them a heart purer than gold, a strong will 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



47 



for work; they must be brethren, who love 
their brethren and have truth and justice in 
their judgment" 

In this religious idea S. Tanelew found 
scope for profoundest emotions and for his 
power of illustrating great thoughts by music. 

Let us pass to the cantata itself. It has 
three separate movements with three divisions 
in each of them. 

The "introduction" is of an extraordinary 
splendor. The chorus is sometimes divided 
into two parts, united by a complicated con- 
trapuntal structure to wonderful harmony. 

The second movement has besides the chorus 
a quartet of striking beauty in its varied color 
and delicate texture, illustrating the wealth on 
earth and heaven given by God to men. 

The third movement is again passionate and 
strong. It has' a beautiful aria for contralto, 
the theme of which is used for a fugue sung 
by a double chorus at the close. 

As we may see, the cantata is conceived on 
a noble plan, and is able to elevate people by 
the thoughts and feelings of a great soul. It 
is a truly monumental work on account of its 
spiritual grandeur, nobility and sublimity of 
the pervading ideas, bearing the features of 
logical evolution, close connection and unity. 

S. Taneiew towers high above the range of 
men. He is an individuality proud, noble and 
unique, a descendant of the classics in his 
music. But a great man invariably oversteps 
traditions and so did he, enlarging his orches- 
tration, building up his choruses on new con- 
trapuntal combinations with harmonic tunes 
and a balance of sounds which never shock 
the ear. In one word, he showed himself a 
composer immensely great in his craftsman- 
ship. The treatment of the chorus and or- 
chestra raise the cantata to a work of great 
importance and make it an admirable addition 
to symphonic music. 

S. Russewitzki may be highly praised for 
the rendering of the cantata. The choral 
numbers were sung with strict clearness and 
the quartet was sung by artists of a high rank : 
Mme. Koshitz (soprano), Mme. Sbruewa and 
Mme. Dobbert for the second performance 
(both beautiful contraltos), Mr. Philippow 
(tenor) and P. Tichonow (bass). 

S. Taneiew's cantata was performed twice 
in Moscow and one time in Petrograd by S. 
Russewitzki, with the care and reverence 
which a sacred cantata demands. 




Some famous Singers no. 2 

By Francis Rogers 
FARINELLI AND CAFFARELLI 

Carlo Braschi ("Farinelli"), 1705-1782 
Gaetano Majorano ("Caffarelli"), 1 703-1 783 

|F ALL the male singers of the 
eighteenth century none seems to 
have been so richly gifted by na- 
ture, or to have put his gifts to 
such good use, as the male soprano, Carlo 
Broschi, known in history as "Farinelli." 
His supremacy as a vocalist is comparable 
with that of the greatest singer of the nine- 
teenth century, Rubini, but certain features 
of his extraordinary career make his story 
absolutely unique in the annals of singing. 

Broschi was born in Naples in 1705. One 
story has it that he was of noble parentage, 
but it is much more probable that he was of 
humble origin and that his voice and musical 
precocity in childhood were so remarkable as 
to determine his parents to prepare him for 
the career of an evirato. His uncle, Carlo 
Farinelli, was a violinist and composer of 
note, and from him he borrowed the name by 
which he was always known. It has been 
said that he derived the sobriquet front his 
father's dealing in flour {farina), but this ex- 
planation seems far-fetched. 

He studied under the most justly cele- 
brated of all singing-masters, Niccolo Por- 
pora, who in 1722 took him to Rome and in- 
troduced him to the operatic world in his own 
(Porpora's) opera, "Eumene." His success 
with the public was immediate; in this boy 
of seventeen were revealed all the qualities 
that go to make a great singer. 

In order to emphasize the perfection of Fa- 
rinelli's vocal technique the ingenious Por- 
pora had devised for him a veritable tour de 
force. In the orchestra of the theater was a 
trumpeter highly renowned as a virtuoso 
player. Porpora had written for Farinelli an 
air with trumpet obbligato, which threw the 
voice into immediate comparison with the 
brass instrument. The issue of the contest 
was wholly favorable to the singer ; in breath- 
control, in the attack and sustaining of tones 
and in the execution of florid passages he 
was pronounced incomparable. His high 
rank as an artist was established once for all. 

Farinelli continued his studies with Por- 
pora for two years and then, fully equipped 



48 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



for universal conquest, made a grand tour of 
the operatic capitals of the continent, Vienna, 
Venice, Naples, Milan and Bologna. His 
vocal supremacy was undisputed till he ap- 
peared in Bologna, where for the first time he 
heard Bernacchi, another evirato, called "the 
king of singers." They were cast for the 
same opera, in the course of which was a duo 
for their two voices. Farinelli sang first and, 
according to the custom of the time, displayed 
every vocal trick and ornament that he was 
capable of performing. Brilliant and effec- 
tive as these all were, Bernacchi, when his 
turn came, repeated them note for note in 
even greater perfection, adding to them some 
marvelous inventions of his own. The 
younger man wa£ humble-minded enough to 
see that he still had something to learn and 
modestly requested Bernacchi to impart to 
him some of the secrets of his lovely 
art. 

Farinelli soon reached the very summit of 
technical skill and everywhere was acclaimed 
as the greatest singer of the day. Bernacchi, 
a past master of the florid style of sing- 
ing, had developed in him such flexibility and 
brilliance of execution that sometimes not 
even the violins in the orchestra could follow 
the flights of his voice. Vocal perfection he 
had now achieved; in 1731 he began to de- 
velop his art in another direction. 

In that year he sang to the Emperor of 
Austria. The monarch listened to him with 
interest and delight and then said : "Hitherto 
you have aroused amazement in your hearers 
by your wonderful facility; why not now try 
to touch their hearts by the simplicity and 
truth of your musical expression ?" Farinelli, 
always ready to profit by wise counsel, acted 
on the Emperor's advice and, without dimin- 
ishing the brilliance of his style, became 
gradually a great emotional singer. 

In 1734 Porpora brought him to London as 
a member of the company that was competing 
with Handel's for popular approval. He 
made his debut in Hasse's "Artaserse." His 
success was immediate. The very first note 
he uttered was so exquisite that the audience 
applauded it for full five minutes before al- 
lowing him to continue his aria. Subsequent 
appearances in other operas amply confirmed 
the initial verdict of the public. One fashion- 
able lady, while listening to Farinelli, cried 
ecstatically from her opera box, "One God; 



one Farinelli !" This incident is immortalized 
pictorially in Hogarth's "Rake's Progress." 

Senesino, the celebrated male soprano, who 
was in the same company, was at first dis- 
posed to be jealous of the young artist, but 
when he heard him sing was so overcome 
with honest admiration that, quite forgetful of 
the role he himself was supposed to be play- 
ing, he rushed across the stage and clasped 
him enthusiastically to his bosom. 

The great world of fashion, headed by roy- 
alty, lavished upon him not only compliments, 
but also costly gifts of all sorts. His annual 
income during the three seasons he spent in 
England was said to be in the neighborhood 
of £5,000. Afterwards, when he returned to 
Italy, he built himself a sumptuous villa, 
which he appropriately named "English Folly." 

In 1736 Farinelli started for Spain and on 
his way stopped in Paris. He sang at court 
and gave such delight to his hearers that even 
the unmusical and usually unresponsive Louis 
XV presented him with a handsome portrait 
of his royal self as a special mark of his ap- 
proval. 

As it was at this point in his career that 
Farinelli was translated from the enviable but 
familiar position of an extremely popular 
singer to an exalted sphere in which no other 
singer before or since has ever dwelt, it is 
worth while, before he passes from the ken 
of ordinary mortals, to pause a minute and 
make an effort to see and hear him as he was 
seen and heard by his contemporaries. 

His face was not handsome, although the 
suavity of his nature gave it a certain charm 
of expression. In stature he is described as 
being "as tall as a giant and as thin as a 
shadow, therefore, if he had grace, it could 
be only of a sort to be envied by a penguin or 
a spider." For a man of such a build as this 
to gesticulate much would have likened him 
to a lonely windmill, and in this we may find 
the explanation of his immobility while sing- 
ing, which was remarked by all that heard 
him. 

But in the days of Handel and Hasse and 
Porpora, when musical virtuosity was the 
most highly prized of all qualities, an undis- 
tinguished countenance, an ungainly physique, 
and the lack of histrionic skill were not in 
themselves hindrances to a successful career. 
Both Cuzzoni and Farinelli, who often ap- 
peared together, were instances of this fact, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



49 



for they owed their extraordinary renown to 
musicianship and to vocal beauty and skill 
alone, just as Rubini did a hundred years after 
them. 

Of the perfection of Farinelli's voice there 
could be no two ways of thinking. Mancini, 
a voice teacher of the first competence, wrote : 
"His voice was thought a marvel because it 
was so perfect, so powerful, so sonorous, so 
rich in its extent, both in the high and in the 
low registers, that its equal has never been 
heard in our times." Another contemporary 
critic records that "he had a voice propor- 
tioned to his gigantic stature, extending be- 
yond the ordinary compass near an octave, in 
notes equally clear and sonorous." After 
making due allowance for the extravagance of 
praise always accorded to favorite singers by 
their partisans, we cannot escape the conclu- 
sion that Farinelli's voice and vocal technique 
were completely satisfying to the musical con- 
noisseurs of his day, whose taste in singing 
had been formed by such accomplished artists 
as Bernacchi and Senesino. 

Farinelli arrived in Madrid in 1737, plan- 
ning to return to northern Europe after a 
short stay; he remained in Spain for twenty- 
two years. In 1737 the king, Philip V, was 
suffering from a nervous depression so pro- 
found that nothing could dispel his melan- 
choly. He neglected all his royal duties and 
was fast approaching the frontier of hope- 
less insanity. The queen, hearing of the 
coming of the world-famous Farinelli, be- 
thought herself of a possible means of 
cure for her consort. She engaged the 
singer to perform some of his most touch- 
ing airs in a chamber adjoining the king's. 
The experiment was wonderfully success- 
ful. Even as the savage mood of Saul 
yielded to the song of young David, so did 
the King of Spain's melancholy succumb to 
the lovely voice of Farinelli. Deeply stirred, 
Philip thanked him effusively and promised 
him any boon he might ask. The singer, with 
characteristic tact, prayed that His Majesty 
would deign again to shed the luster of his 
presence on his long-neglected court. The 
king affably granted this request, submitted 
himself to the ministrations of the barber for 
the first time in many days, and soon re- 
gained his lost health of mind. 

To preclude all possibility of a relapse 
Farinelli was engaged as court singer ex- 



traordinary. His yearly salary amounted to 
something like $15,000, with a coach and 
equipage thrown in. His majesty presented 
him with his picture set in diamonds, valued 
at £1,200 sterling ($6,000). The queen gave 
him a gold snuff-box with two large diamonds 
in the lid, and the Prince of Asturias made 
him a present of a diamond button and loop. 
He was likewise dignified with the order of 
Saint Jago. For all this his only duties were 
to sing four songs for the king every evening. 
These songs were of a gently sentimental char- 
acter and always the same. As Philip survived 
the making of this contract by ten years, it 
would seem that Farinelli must have sung his 
little group of songs some 36,000 times. All 
things considered, it must be admitted that he 
was not overpaid ! 

Philip's successor, Ferdinand VI, inherited 
his father's admiration for Farinelli's sing- 
ing, and, in addition, discovered in him such 
excellent qualities of heart and head that he 
made him his confidential adviser and in 1750 
bestowed on him the cross of Calatrava, an 
order of the most exalted sort. Farinelli de- 
veloped a pretty talent for politics and diplo- 
macy, too, and, what was more remarkable, 
bore his honors with such generosity, mod- 
esty and tact as to antagonize nobody. 

In connection with his duties as a court 
functionary he established a court opera, 
which under his management gave excellent 
performances, but there is no record of his 
ever having played in them. 

Such was his happy and prosperous life 
when in 1759 tne death of Ferdinand changed 
his situation completely. For political rea- 
sons the new king found it necessary to ban- 
ish him from Spain. He possessed great 
wealth and a great name, but more than a 
score of years at court had quite unfitted him 
for any career or companionship now open to 
him. He was fifty-five years of age, his voice 
was gone, he had long since lost touch with 
the friends and colleagues of his youth, and 
felt himself too old to form new ties. For a 
time he thought of settling in England, but 
finally selected Bologna for the home of his 
declining years. 

Dr. Burney called on him there in 1771 
and paints for us a rather pathetic picture of 
the old man. Surrounded by all the luxury 
and comfort that money could supply, Fari- 
nelli passed his time in rehearsing the glories 



5o 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



of his palmy days. The present brought him 
solace only through a fine collection of pic- 
tures and musical instruments. He did not 
sing for Dr. Burney, but played for him on 
some of his favorite instruments, and regaled 
him with stories of his early triumphs in Eng- 
land and of his career as a Spanish courtier. 

In such lonely and unedifying fashion he 
spent the last twenty years of his life. He 
died in 1782. 

Farinelli was the perfect vocalist par ex- 
cellence; the art of singing, as practised by 
the male sopranos, in him attained its fullest 
possible development. In his youth he out- 
sang all rivals, including the veterans, Ber- 
nacchi and Senesino, and for a time stood 
alone on the loftiest pinnacle of popular favor. 
Then, through his retirement to the Spanish 
court, when his powers were at their zenith, 
he withdrew himself from all possibility of 
comparison with his contemporaries even 
more completely than Jenny Lind did a cen- 
tury later. But for this early retirement, his 
great art would inevitably have come into 
rivalry with that of a singer who seems to 
have been almost, even if not quite, his equal 
— Caffarelli. 

Gaetano Majorano, remembered only under 
the sobriquet of "Caffarelli," which he de- 
rived from the name of his benefactor, Pas- 
quale Caffaro, was born at Bari, in southern 
Italy, in 1703. His father was a mere peas- 
ant, but the boy's aptitude for music was early 
recognized by Caffaro, later director of the 
Royal Chapel and the Conservatory in Naples, 
who took him into his own home and directly 
oversaw his education. 

In due course young Caffarelli became the 
pupil of Porpora. Tradition has it that the 
famous master for several years would allow 
him to sing nothing but a page or two of vo- 
calises. Such a monotonous routine must 
have sorely tested the patience of both master 
and pupil, but finally Porpora dismissed the 
boy from his school, saying, "Go ; I can teach 
you nothing more. You are already the most 
skilful singer in Europe." 

This tale is more easily digestible if taken 
with several grains of salt, but there is no 
doubting that when Caffarelli made his debut 
in Rome in 1724 he achieved a brilliant suc- 
cess. According to the custom of the day, he 
assumed the part of a woman, in which his 



lovely voice, his technical mastery and his 
handsome person won golden opinions. In 
the course of the next few years he gained 
celebrity throughout Italy and by some critics 
was ranked beside the great Farinelli himself. 

Caffarelli's charms were especially enslav- 
ing to the ladies, with whom his affairs and 
entanglements were without number. On one 
occasion, in order to avoid castigation by a 
jealous husband, he spent the night in an 
empty cistern. This escapade left him with 
a severe cold that cost him a month in bed 
and awakened in him such a terror of irate 
husbands in general that he hired a body- 
guard of bravos to accompany him in his 
walks abroad. 

He was not heard in London till 1738, when 
he appeared in Handel's "Faramondo" and 
"Serse," as well as in other operas of less 
merit. It is worth recalling that it was for 
Caffarelli that Handel wrote his familiar Largo 
(the opening air in "Serse") "in a clear and 
majestic style," as Dr. Burney prophetically 
put it, "out of the reach of time and fashion." 

Unfortunately, the English climate did not 
agree with his voice and so prevented him 
from duplicating his Italian triumphs, but as 
soon as he left England his voice regained 
all its lovely qualities and Italy, now that Fa- 
rinelli had disappeared into Spain, acclaimed 
him as the first male singer of the time. 

In Turin the Prince of Savoy praised him 
to the skies, but admitted to him that his 
daughter, the princess, did not believe that 
any singer could ever equal Farinelli. Caf- 
farelli replied impressively, "To-night she 
shall hear two Farinellis." An English woman 
had cried, "One God; one Farinelli!" Un- 
fortunately history does not record the Italian 
princess's views on theology. 

There are other tales told of Caffarelli's 
arrogance and conceit. Once, while he 
was filling an engagement in Naples, he 
learned that a new singer, Gizziello, was 
to make his debut in Rome the next 
evening. Caffarelli posted straightway to 
Rome, arriving at the opera house just in time 
to hear Gizziello's first air. At its conclusion 
he leaped to his feet, shouting, "Bravo, Giz- 
ziello, bravissimo, and it's Caffarelli that says 
so." Twenty-four hours later he was back 
in Naples singing his own opening air. 

Wherever he sang he received enormous 
fees, which were, however, in his opinion, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Si 



never commensurate with his value as an art- 
ist. In 1740, for a three-months' season in 
Venice, he was paid more than $3,000 — a very 
large salary in those days. 

In 1750, although he was no longer young, 
he created a furore in Paris. Louis XV sent 
him a snuff-box in token of his august appro- 
bation. Caffarelli was impudent enough to 
tell the king's messenger that the box was 
inferior to a drawerful of boxes that he had 
accepted from other admirers, adding, "the 
king might at least have given me his por- 
trait." "But that," said the messenger, "is an 
honor reserved for ambassadors." "Indeed," 
replied the singer, "but all the ambassadors in 
the world would not make one Caffarelli." 
The story was carried to the king, who 
laughed over it, but at the same time sent Caf- 
farelli a passport signed by his own hand, with 
orders to use it within ten days. 

Caffarelli, like Rubini, was extremely 
thrifty in his ways and amassed a fortune 
large enough to purchase him a dukedom and 
to house him in a sumptuous palace at Santo 
Dorato. He was able, too, to preserve his 
voice well on into old age. David Garrick 
heard him sing in church in 1764 and wrote: 
"The principal part was sung by the famous 
Caffarelli, who, though old, has pleased me 
more than all the singers I have heard. He 
touched me; and it was the first time I have 
been touched since I came to Italy." Dr. 
Burney heard him a few years later and 
found his voice still pleasing. He died in 

1783. 

Like most of the great singers of his time, 
Caffarelli was a good musician. That he was 
one of exceptionally good taste we may infer 
from the fact that Handel, who habitually in- 
sisted on having his music sung as he wrote 
it, paid him the compliment of allowing him 
occasionally an ad libitum passage. His lovely 
voice was equally expressive in both cantabile 
and bravura music. His trill — in those days a 
most important ornament in song — was per- 
fect and his execution of florid passages 
without a flaw. He is said to have been the 
first singer to embellish with rapid chromatic 
scales. Porpora, his teacher and an excel- 
lent judge of voices, declared that Caffarelli 
was the greatest singer Italy had produced. 
It is a pity that Farinelli's early retirement de- 
prived the public of the opportunity to com- 
pare his art directly with that of Caffarelli. 



j| facti, Rww* m Kenarks j| 



@ 



N. H. Allen will be associated with Dr. Arthur 
Mees, of New York, in rehearsing the societies of 
the Litchfield County Choral Union preparatory to 
the festival at Norfolk in June. R. P. Paine, the 
regular conductor, on leave of absence for a year, 
is spending the winter in New York. 

* * * 

The first subscription concert of the Schola Can- 
torum of New York, Kurt Schindler, conductor, 
will be held at Carnegie Hall on January 12, 1916. 
The programme will consist of the music of Russia 
and Scandinavia and will include Five Finnish 
Student Songs for Male Chorus, the English version 
of which is by Jane and Dennis Taylor and Kurt 
Schindler. The second concert with orchestra will 
be held on March 7. 

* * * 

The Russian Cathedral Choir, under its choir- 
master, I. T. Gorokhoff, of Moscow, will give a 
concert of church music, folk songs and secular songs 
at iEolian Hall on December 21, when the follow- 
ing programme will be rendered : The Lord's Prayer, 
the customary chant; In Thee Rejoiceth, Fatyeeff; 
The Cherubic Hymn, Tschaikovsky ; Meet Is It, 
Tcherepnin; My Soul Shall Exult in the Lord, 
Balakireff; Herod Sought to Slay, Gretchaninoff ; 
Thou Only Art Immortal, Kastalsky; Lord, Hear 
My Prayer, Arkhangelsky ; A Minor Epic Lay, 
Kastalsky; The Plume-grass, Sakhnovsky; A Leg- 
end, Tschaikovsky; Chorus of Villagers ("Prince 
Igor"), Borodin; Dunai, Arkhangelsky; The Sun 
and the Moon, Gretchaninoff; The Shades of Night, 
Arkhangelsky. * * * 

The Musical Art Society of New York gave its 
regular Christmas Concert on December 14 at Car- 
negie Hall, Frank Damrosch conducting, and the 
choir of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, under 
Miles Farrow, the organist and choirmaster, assist- 
ing. The programme was as follows : Adoramus Te, 
Palestrina; Gloria Patri, Palestrina; Two Old Ger- 
man Christmas Songs, Geborn ist der Emanuel, 
Es ist ein Ros* entsprungen, Praetorius; Gaudete 
omnes, Sweelinck; Salve Regina, Arens; Three Old 
French Christmas Songs, Les Voisins, Le sommeil 
de l'enfant Jesus, Chanson joyeuse de Noel, Gevaert; 
Motet, Tota pulchra es, Bruckner; Vom Himmel 
hoch, Karg-Elert; Die Vatergruft, Cornelius; Three 
Part Songs, Der Schmied, John Anderson, Schon 
Rohtraut, Schumann ; Two Russian Songs, The Two 
Roses, Spring Delight, Cui; Neue Liebeslieder, 
Brahms. * * * 

NEW YORK ORATORIO SOCIETY 

The New Y'ork Oratorio Society gave, on Wed- 
nesday, December 8, a brilliant performance of 
Bossi's dramatic oratorio, Joan of Arc. this being 
the first performance of the work in this country. 
The work made a strong impression, being thor- 
oughly modern in spirit and yet free from the ex- 
treme dissonance characteristic of much modern 
music. The orchestra played well, and the chorus, 
which was augmented by the boy choristers of St. 
Andrew's Church and the Church of St. Edward 
the Martyr, sang with good tone and precision. 
Marie Sundelius gave a very satisfying performance 
in the title role. Morgan Kingston was the tenor 
and the other soloists were Clifford Cairns, bass; 
Grace D. Northrup, soprano; Miss Rose Bryant, 
contralto, and Master Hinchman, boy soprano. 
Mr. Cairns' strong declamation of the spoken part 
was one of the features of the evening. 



52 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Ecclesiastical music 

EDITED BY 

G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc. 




CORRESPONDENT writes: "I 
notice that a great number of an- 
thems for so-called Harvest Home 
Festivals are published in England, 
while few are issued here. Is the 'Harvest 
Home' the same as Thanksgiving? What is 
the origin of these 'festivals'? With the ex- 
ception of Thanksgiving we do not seem to 
have anything of the kind in this country." 

Exact information regarding the history of 
the Harvest Homes is somewhat difficult to 
give. There is no form of service of thanks- 
giving for harvest provided in the Church of 
England Prayer Book. It would appear, 
therefore, that harvest festivals are modern, 
—dating back say seventy years or so. The 
American Thanksgiving Service, on the other 
hand, dates from 1789. 

In former times in England special thanks- 
giving prayers were issued by authority in 
years of abundance. In the year 1796, for in- 
stance, such prayers were used. Also in 1847. 
The Vicar of Moenstow is supposed to have 
had something to do with popularizing mod- 
ern harvest festivals. In 1843 he commenced 
to hold such services in his parish. Since then 
these festivals have grown in favor rapidly 
and this fact accounts for the increased out- 
put of harvest anthems mentioned by our 
correspondent. 

Furthermore, in England these festivals 
cover the whole period of harvest-tide, while 
here in America we have one single day de- 
voted especially to thanksgiving. 

Lammas-day may have had an influence in 
establishing the modern "Harvest Home" fes- 
tival. In former times a loaf was offered on 
the first of August as an offering of first- 
fruits. The literal sense of the word "Lam- 
mas" is "Loaf-mass." It is not difficult to 
perceive the possible connection between the 
old Lammas-day festival and the modern 
"Harvest Home."* 

It is a somewhat curious fact that here in 

♦In the "Sarum Manual " Lammas-day is called 
the "Benediction of the first-fruits." 




the United States we use comparatively little 
harvest festival music in our churches. A na- 
tion that feeds the whole world out of an 
over-plus of grain and general produce has 
peculiar reasons to be grateful. Yet we con- 
fine our harvest anthems and hymns almost 
entirely to the day set apart by the authorities 
as Thanksgiving Day. 

IN excellent rendition of the Brahms 
"Requiem" was given at the Ca- 
thedral of St. John the Divine on 
the evening of November 28th. 
Mr. Miles Farrow is to be congratulated upon 
the increasing efficiency of his choristers. The 
machinery of the choir school is now in full 
swing and the outcome (predicted in this 
paper more than two years ago) is up to "ex- 
pectation." Just what the annual percentage 
of change in the treble force is we do not 
know, but it is small enough to make the 
yearly repetition of such works as the "Re- 
quiem" quite feasible. In the ordinary choir, 
half starved for material, and depleted by con- 
stant loss of treble voices, the case is far dif- 
ferent. It is fortunate for the cause of church 
music in this country that there is at least one 
cathedral center of influence which demon- 
strates the close relationship between musical 
facilities and results. 

II HE Catholic Choirmaster (Balti- 
more, Md.) gives an interesting ac- 
count of the problem of church 
music reform in the Roman 
and criticises (very courteously, 
we are bound to confess) the attitude taken 
some time ago by this paper in regard to boy 
voice culture in Catholic choirs, on the ground 
that artistic vocal training is not — at present 
at least — the most important desideratum. We 
read: "The New Music Review makes the 
following comments regarding boy choir 
training, and musical conditions in the Cath- 
olic Church: 

" 'Our readers have probably noticed that 
we have often spoken in disparaging terms of 
the Catholic choirs in this city, and in this 
country at large. We have done this not from 
any desire to find fault merely for the sake 
of criticism. We have taken the ground that 
the cause of church music in general suffers 
from the neglect of artistic and scientific voice 
culture in Catholic choirs. Whatever stan- 




Church, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



53 



dard of excellence exists in "boy choir" sing- 
ing in the United States to-day we owe entire- 
ly to the Episcopal Church — a body that is 
quite small, and about one-sixteenth as large 
as the Catholic Church. 

" The Russian Church — or Eastern 
Church, as it is sometimes called — is still 
smaller (in this country), and yet its musical 
influence is already bearing fruit through the 
choir of St. Nicholas Cathedral. The advan- 
tage enjoyed by the Catholic Church through 
the control of material in the parish schools is 
enormous — in fact, it is incalculable. This 
advantage has been wasted.' 

"While granting that The Review is part- 
ly justified in its criticism of the musical con- 
ditions as found in many of our churches to- 
day, it is well to consider that there are far 
more important problems confronting the 
Catholic choirmaster than that of boy voice 
training. 

"The Review fails to grasp the greater pur- 
pose of the church music reform movement 
when it lays such stress upon the purely vocal 
aspects of the matter. 

"It does not necessarily follow that a func- 
tion is essentially devotional or edifying mere- 
ly because a certain method of voice produc- 
tion is used by the members of the choir. The 
advantage of beautiful tone quality as an aid 
in the proper rendition of true church music 
is admitted, but at this period of the music 
reform movement in the Catholic Church 
there are far more vital points to be consid- 
ered than the question of correct or incorrect 
vocal methods. 

" 'Boy choirs/ even those considered well 
trained and highly efficient from a vocal stand- 
point, can be heard rendering the most atro- 
cious non-liturgical music. Witness the many 
choirs composed of boys and men still singing 
the florid Masses and Vespers by Rossini, 
Mercadante, Haydn, Giorza and his compan- 
ion 'imitators.' No amount of vocal perfec- 
tion can possibly atone for the unliturgical 
style of these compositions, by the use of 
which the real purpose of church music is 
frustrated. No amount of editing, cutting of 
the repetitions in the texts can make them 
liturgical, devotional or religious in character. 
The consideration of mere vocal beauty is of 
secondary importance, and can well be post- 
poned until the greater objects in the church 
music reform movement shall have been 




achieved. These objects are: ist. The elimi- 
nation of the trashy, operatic, and undevo- 
tional style of music from the repertoire of 
our choirs, and the publication of a 'White 
List* of acceptable liturgical music for use in 
all the dioceses of the country. 2d. The inau- 
guration of a course of 'sacred music* in all 
the seminaries. This course should be com- 
pulsory, not elective, and be made a live issue 
instead of the dead letter it now is in most 
seminaries. • It would provide practical in- 
stead of purely theoretical instruction. 3rd. 
The establishment of at least one model choir 
in every diocese (preferably at the Cathedral) 
which would serve as an object lesson to all 
the other choirs of the diocese w r here the va-. 
rious styles of approved music could be heard 
under the most favorable conditions." 

J HERE ought to be SQme sharp term 
of reproach by which the habitual 
musical grumbler can be called to 
order. There are people who are 
positively unhappy unless they "growl" over 
fancied wrongs. A member of the querulous 
tribe recently sent the following to a promi- 
nent London journal : 

"I should like to draw attention to the 
feeble arrangement of having no boys to sing 
in the choir at St. Paul's on Sundays, so that 
the choral celebration, which many people at- 
tend specially on account of hearing beautiful 
music, is shorn of its chief glory. It seems 
weak beyond words to say that the Cathedral 
Church of a great metropolis like London can- 
not have boys' voices for the music because 
they are having holidays, or there is illness in 
the school. In no other great church would 
it be tolerated. Take, for instance, the Roman 
Catholic Cathedral at Westminster, and see 
to what a pitch of beauty Dr. Terry has raised 
the singing, till there is said not to be another 
cathedral in Europe to equal it; and if the 
Church of England is to hold her place the 
music in the services at St. Paul's should not 
lack boys' voices. 

"There must be very many lads who would 
consider it a high honor to sing there when 
the boys of the regular choir cannot, and I 
cannot see why an emergency choir should 
not be formed, composed of lads out of parish 
churches in London. I have no doubt the 
cathedral authorities will say 'Quite impossi- 
ble,' but it. certainly ought not to be. For 



54 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



three Sundays now, and one of these the Ordi- 
nation Sunday, there have been no boys in St. 
Paul's choir, and if any hymn wants a clear 
boy voice it is 'Come, Holy Ghost, our souls 
inspire.' " 

The writer evidently has a disease which 
we would term querulitis. If there is any 
church on earth where choral affairs are man- 
aged with more scrupulous care and exact- 
ness than they are at St. Paul's we would like 
to know the name of it. 

It takes a dangerous epidemic in the choir 
school, or something equally serious, to inter- 
fere with the customary musical routine at 
the Cathedral. Such catastrophes do happen 
once in a while, but they are of rare occur- 
rence. The average "Grumpy", knows very 
little of the things he complains about. 

An "emergency choir," composed of "lads 
out of parish churches in London," woultf 
make a sad rendition of the St. Paul's service. 
For practical reasons such a choir could not 
be formed. 

Even if it could be organized it would not 
be called into requisition once in a blue moon. 

Furthermore the acoustics of St. Paul's Ca- 
thedral are bewildering to the uninitiated. An 
"emergency choir" would pieet with enter- 
gencies that would astonish not only them but 
also the unfortunate congregation compelled 
to listen to them ! 

|AXV amusing anecdotes concerning 
Dr. Edward Hodges are to be 
found in the American musical 
journals of his day, when as organ- 
ist of Trinity, he was the most prominent 
church musician in New York. 

We learn, however, from the London Choir 
something new about this talented though ec- 
centric man. 

"Dr. Hodges composed several anthems, 
most of which remain unpublished. He had a 
certain gift of humor, both conscious and un- 
conscious: One MS- bears the inscription 'an 
anthem for the edification and consolation of 
disappointed candidates, occasioned by a re- 
cent appointment at Gloucester Cathedral, 
1832.' The words are taken from Ecclesias- 
tes: 'The race is not to the swift,' the last 
four wor3s of the verse being continuously re- 
peated. 

"The Bristol Reference Library contains sev- 
eral MS. anthems by Hodges, andean exam- 




ination of them soon reveals the reason why 
they never found favor with publishers. One 
of them bears the following inscription : 

"Funeral Anthem for King William IV and 
my aunt Sarah, who both died at the same 
age and on the same day, June 20, 1837. Bris- 
tol, July 6, 1837. Finished June 29, 1837, 
9.10 P.M. 

"The detailed title of another effusion re- 
veals the eccentricities of the composer : 

"A Provisional Anthem which was not sung 
at Trinity Church, New York, November 10, 
1852, on occasion of the Consecration of a 
Provisional Bishop, although the words were 
read by the Bishop of Pennsylvania, composed 
for the benefit ,of Posterity by Edward 
Hodges, Mus.Doc. (Cantab.) 

"The words of this anthem are taken from 
.the third chapter of the First Epistle to Tim- 
othy, and the opening passages are laid out 
thus by the worthy doctor, the various voices 
enumerating in succession the necessary quali- 
fications of a bishop: 

"Bass. — A bishop then must be blameless. 

"Tenor. — The husband of one wife. 

"Alto.— Vigilant. 

"Treble.— Sober. 

"Bass. — Of good behavior. 

"Tenor. — Given to hospitality. 

"Treble. — Apt to teach. 

"Alto. — Not given to wine. 

"The first part of this anthem is written on 
a ground bass, and goes far to show that Dr. 
Hodges was no mean musician." 

& HAVE been asked to recommend 
the "best" psalter for use in male 
choirs having only tolerably good 
material, and lacking certain facili- 
ties which are common to choirs in the larger 
cities. 

Let us say at once that there is no "best" 
psalter — at least as far as general agreement 
among organists is concerned. The mere fact 
that new systems of pointing are constantly 
being published is quite sufficient proof that 
there is something to be desired in the "best" 
psalter now in use — whichever that may be. 
The Cathedral Psalter has the largest sale 
at present. Whether it will continue to hold 
that distinction remains to be seen. As the 
singing of the Psalms is the most difficult task 
that choirs undertake, it is just as well to have 
the psalter read in ordinary choirs — especially 




THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



55 



in those composed of boys who are deficient 
vocally, and who also have difficulty in the 
first of the "Three Rudiments" — reading. 

For the chief trouble in psalm chanting is 
not a musical one. Very few boys under 
twelve years of age read well, for the simple 
reason that reading and elocution are neg- 
lected in the public schools. 

In large and progressive cities this may not 
be the case. But male choirs are springing up 
in villages and small towns where educational 
advantages are not of the highest type. "Boy" 
choirs in such places should be consigned to 
the requirements of a read service. 

Where psalm chanting is imperative (from 
the "will" of the rector, or other unfortunate 
cause), two rules should be observed, espe- 
cially in the training of the younger boys. 

i. The recitation should be practised sepa- 
rately. 

2. Control of breath should be taught. 

No matter what system of pointing may be 
used, the recitation is the thing that gives 
most trouble. Yet how very seldom is it re- 
hearsed apart from the other portions of the 
psalm- verse ! 

The music of the chant (Anglican system) 
lies outside the recitation, so to speak The ca- 
dence should be taught separately, and then 
the two joined evenly without a "hitch." The 
Cathedral Psalter provides for the elimination 
of the "fence" (as it is sometimes called) by 
an accent marking the beginning of the music 
of the chant. 

Other psalters manage the matter in other 
ways — but in every "pointing" the recitation 
requires special rehearsing. Lack of breath 
control leads to loss of tone, and a weak, 
"gasping" effect. Choristers of experience, 
with a quick sweep of the eye, estimate the 
geography of the region from the beginning of 
the psalm-verse to the colon. They note the 
general extent, the commas, and (in very long 
verses) the special breath marks. Inexperi- 
enced singers do nothing of the sort. They 
scarcely look beyond their noses, and they 
meet with divers difficulties long before they 
reach the colon, — at which point their lungs 
are in a state of collapse. 

Good chanting involves the observance of 
many rules, but of none more vitally impor- 
tant than those which take care of good read- 
ing and full breathing. The boys of St. Paul's, 
London, are especially remarkable for their 




command of breath in chanting. There is a 
verve and "ring" to their psalter work that 
is quite exhilarating — more particularly in 
Psalms of a joyful and dramatic character. 

We repeat, however, in choirs of the aver- 
age type in villages and small towns the Psalms 
should be read. And in other places where 
they are sung, the faithful observance of the 
two rules we have given will be found bene- 
ficial, whether the psalter pointing be "best" 
or "worst." 

R FREDERICK BRIDGE has had 
all sort of compliments showered 
upon him during his long years of 
service at the Abbey. Yet we ven- 
ture to say that he will prize his new "song 
school" more than his musical titles. He is, 
indeed, a man to be envied ! We read : 

"A new Choir School for Westminster Ab- 
bey was opened in Dean's-yard recently. The 
old School contained accommodation for only 
twenty boys, but the new Choir House is de- 
signed for thirty boys and two Assistant-Mas- 
ters, in addition to the Head Master, matron, 
and domestic staff. On the entrance-floor 
there are three classrooms, dining-hall, and 
Head Master's study. The dining-hall and 
two of the classrooms are convertible into one 
long room 68 feet by 16 feet ; these rooms are 
paneled in oak and fitted with bookcases, etc. 
In the basement are the gymnasium and 
changing-room, and at the rear are four prac- 
tising-rooms for the use of the choristers. On 
the roof there is a covered playground for the 
boys, 106 feet long, with access from the 
School and from the sick quarters. The cost 
of the building, which is now the most con- 
spicuous feature on the west side of Dean's- 
yard, and also includes a residence for a 
Minor Canon, has been about £30,000. 



In spite of war conditions, concerts in New York 
and all over the United States are more numerous 
than ever and there seems to be a steady revival of 
local mixed choruses. No matter what the con- 
ditions are, choruses of male voices and choruses 
of women's voices flourish, but it is only in pros- 
perous times that the two bodies can be persuaded 
to join forces. The expense of a concert given by 
a mixed chorus with orchestra and soloists is of 
course large and the returns rarely come within 
speaking distance of the outlay. But we cannot 
have national music without national choruses, and 
one enthusiastic chorus singer will do more for the 
cause of music than a hundred mere listeners. The 
generous donors of funds to the various orchestras 
might with benefit open their purses also to the 
various organizations struggling to promote choral 
music. 



56 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




4. WARRCN AMUHtWS. A CO., WARDEN 
HAROLD V. MULLIGAN, F.A.G.O.. GKN. SIC 



t. LEWIS CLMCR. A.A.G.O., SUB-WARDEN 
VICTOR BAICR. A O.O . OCN.TRCAS. 



M^mm^m^m 



&S22S£> 



FOUNDED 1898 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE. NEW YORK 



HEADQUARTERS 

The next annual meeting of the Guild will be held 
at the Hotel McAlpin, New York, on Thursday, De- 
cember 30. All members of the Guild are invited. 

The following amendments to the Constitution 
will be voted on (this will be the last notice given 
of this meeting) : 

Article 2. Section 6, b. After January 1, 1916, 
there shall be an initiation fee of two dollars ($2) 
charged to all new members, payable to the General 
Treasurer at Headquarters, when application for 
membership is presented. 

Article 3, Section 4, j. If five or more organists, 
living remote from the center of jurisdiction of a 
Chapter, desire to organize a branch of said Chapter, 
application may be made in writing to the Dean 
of said Chapter, and if good reason is shown by the 
applicants, authority may be granted by the Council 
to form such a branch. All branches shall be under 
the jurisdiction of Chapters of which they are a 
part. 

k. The officers of branches of Chapters shall be 
Sub-Dean, Secretary, Treasurer and such other 
officers as may be considered advisable. Said officers 
shall be elected by the branch of Chapter and be 
ratified by the Dean. 



NORTHERN OHIO CHAPTER 

The regular meeting of the Northern Ohio Chapter 
was held in the library of the Physics Building, 
Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, Mon- 
day evening, November 1, 191 5. 

After a short business meeting we adjourned to 
the laboratory to listen to a lecture by Mr. Dayton 
C Miller on his experiments with flutes, violins, 
clarinets and organ pipes. Mr. Miller is at the head 
of the Physics Department of Case School, is a 
scientist of wide reputation, and his original in- 
vestigations with sound vibrations and the photog- 
raphy of the same are of unusual interest to the 
layman, as well as to the professional scientist and 
musician. 



WEST TENNESSEE CHAPTER 

The West Tennessee Chapter held its first meet- 
ing of the fall at the studio of Enoch Walton on 
Tuesday morning, November 9. Ernest F. Hawke 
presided. 

It was decided that commencing with December 
the Chapter will meet bi-monthly, and in the inter- 
vening month a recital will be given, followed by a 
social hour. The first recital will be given by 
Mr. Hawke in January, the date to be announced at 
the next meeting. Ten minutes of each meeting is 
to be spent upon current musical topics, led by Mr. 
Walton. 

It was agreed that Mr. Hawke give at each reg- 
ular meeting an analysis of some organ composition, 
and a request was made that Mendelssohn's First 
Sonata be chosen for December. 

Paul Stalls was appointed Sub-Dean in place of 



W r alter W. Boutelle, who has moved to Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

E. H. La Fayette gave a most interesting address 
on "Organ Music in the Theaters/' showing the 
great versatility necessary for the organist in this 
field. At the close of the address a discussion was 
led by Mr. La Fayette upon awakening interest for 
larger and better organs in the churches. 

The next meeting will be held December 7, at the 
studio of Miss Belle S. Wade, Woman's Building. 



VIRGINIA CHAPTER 

One of the most interesting recital programmes 
of the Guild has been received at Headquarters 
and that is the following programme of new com- 
positions for the organ, played by the composers, 
who are all active members of the Virginia Chapter. 
It will be noticed that the numbers are all examples 
of the higher forms in music and not merely novelties 
written for the occasion. The recital was given at 
Grace Church, Richmond, Va. : 

L fm ? 'r U « si o a n d Sche "° } Walter Edward Howe 

2. Melody and Intermezzo E. H. Arts 

3. The Pilgrims 1 

Meditation V .' Leslie F. Watson, A.A.G.O. 

March Postlude J 

4. Violin Solo, "Andantino" W. Henry Baker 

Miss Doris Baker. Violinist 

5. Toccata in D minor Ernest H. Cosby, A.A.G.O. 

6. Eventide and March of the Magi . . . F. Flaxington Harker 

7. Nocturne and Scherzo Furioso. .Wm. H. Tones, A.A.G.O. 

8. Fugue in E minor W. Henry Baker 

A complimentary organ recital to the Chapter 
was given by Walter Edward Howe, assisted by 
Charles Borjes, violinist, at St. Paul's Church, Nor- 
folk, Va., on October 31. Following was the 
programme : 

Grand Choeur Georges MacMaster 

a. Gavotte Edwin Lemare 

b. Allegretto in B minor Alexander Guilmant 

Meditation from Thais I u ^ es Massenet 

Fugue in D major John Sebastian Bach 

Romance, from Violin Concerto Wieniawski 

a. Sprine Greeting Nathan Hale Allen 

b. Benediction Nuptiale Theo. Dubois 

Concerto Toccata Pietro Allesandro Yon 



ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

A special Vesper service was held at St. Vincent's 
Church, Chicago, on November 1 for the Illinois 
Chapter. Mr. W. Middelschulte and Dr. T. Lewis 
Browne were the soloists, and the service, sun£ by 
the full choir of the church, was under the direc- 
tion of Walter Keller, whose Magnificat in C and 
Salve Regina in G occupied places on the pro- 
gramme. 

After the regular monthly dinner on November 4 
the Chapter attended the second organ recital of the 
new Austin organ in St. Paul's Church, Chicago, by 
Will C. Macfarlane, municipal organist of Portland, 
Me. Assisting Mr. Macfarlane was the St Paul's 
choir under the direction of John Allen Richardson. 

On November 14 a service for the Chapter was 
held at Trinity Episcopal Church, Chicago, under 
the direction of the organist and choirmaster, Irving 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



57 



C. Hancock, assisted by Mr. Arthur Fraser, Mr. 
Rossetter G. Cole, Mr. Harrison M. Wild and Miss 
Alice R. Deal, organists. The programme was as 
follows : 

Prelude, Jubilate Amen Kinder 

Song of Sorrow Nevin 

Organ, Intermezzo and Scherzo Rheinberger 

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in A flat A. H. Mann 

Organ, Fantasia (ms.) J. P. Steen 

Anthem, Saviour Abide With Us Hanforth 

Offertory. I Beheld and Lo Elvey 

Organ, Finale in A flat Thiele 

Postlude, Finale, op. 205 Bartlett 

A Chapter public service was held at St. James* 
Church, Chicago, on November 21. The organists 
on this occasion were Mr. John W. Norton, organ- 
ist and choirmaster of St. James* ; Mr. Albert Cots- 
worth, Mrs. William Middelschulte and Mr. Robert 
R. Birch. The choral numbers were by St. James* 
Choir and the quartet of St. Paul's Universalist 
Church. The programme contained the following 
numbers : 

Organ. Romance Svensden 

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in D minor Walmisley 

Organ, Andantino Alkan 

Finale from E minor Sonata Ritter 

Anthem from "The Beatitudes" Cesar Franck 

"Blessed he, who, from earth's dreams, awaking." 
Offertory Anthem, Angel Voices Ever Singing. .. .Macfarlane 
Organ, Song of Sorrow Nevin 

Toccata in F Crawford 

Anthem, There is Land of Pure Delight Shelley 

Public services have also been given under the 
auspices of the Chapter at St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, John Allen Richardson, organist and choir- 
master, with Walter Keller, Katherine Howard Ward 
and Palmer Christian as soloists, and at St. Patrick's, 
Dr. J. Lewis Browne, organist and choirmaster, with 
Florence Hodge and Hugo P. Goodwin as soloists. 
These programmes will be published later. 

CENTRAL NEW YORK CHAPTER 

The Central New York Chapter opened its third 
year with a supper and recital at St. Paul's Church, 
Syracuse, N. Y., on Wednesday, November 10, 1915. 
A great many organists were present from Syracuse, 
Utica, Little Falls, Watertown, Ithaca, Oswego and 
Auburn. 

A fine supper was served at the Parish House by 
the ladies of the church. A business meeting fol- 
lowed, and this adjourned to the church for the 
recital. 

The recital was given by J. Fred Wolle, of Beth- 
lehem, Pa., one of the greatest exponents of Bach 
in America, and was the formal opening of the 
new four-manual Casavant organ. The following 
is the programme : 

1. A few Fugues from the Art of Fugue Bach 

(a) The Theme with animated counterpoint. 

(b) A new Theme combined with the original. 

(c) The Mirror: 

1. The Image; the original Theme transformed. 

2. The Reflection; the exact counterpart of the pre- 

ceding, with all the parts reversed. 

2. (a) Aria in A minor Bach 

(b) The Little Post Horn Air. 

(c) Chorale: My Heart is Deeply Longing. 

(d) Chorale: AH Mankind Must Perish. 

3. Pastorale Sonata, Third Movement Rheinberger 

4. Melody Jonas 

5. Minuet Shelley 

6. Scherzo, from the Second Organ Symphony Widor 

7. An Old Christmas Hymn: 

A Rose Breaks Forth in Bloom Brahms 

8. Siegfried's Death March, from Die Gotterdammerung, 

Wagner 

9. Fragment, from Lanier's Flute Sidney Lanier 

10. Finale Thiele 

Dr.^ Wolle made several interesting notes on his 
selections. He considered his first group of Bach 
a novelty and experiment and had prepared it espe- 
cially for this recital. 

The recital was open to the public and the large 
auditorium was filled. 



November 3. The Prelude and Offertory were 
played by George A. Burdett, organist of the Har- 
vard Church, Brookline, Mass.; the Postlude by 
A. W. Snow, organist of the Church of the Advent, 
Boston, and the service accompanied by George H. 
Lomas, organist of St. Paul's. 

The anthems sung at this service were from 
Psalm 46 by Dudley Buck, a founder and the first 
honorary president of the Guild. The organ num- 
bers were: 

Moderato Maestoso Borowski 

Moorish Nocturne (ms. ) Burdett 

Allegro Moderato from Sonata Parker 



On Wednesday evening, at the Harvard Musical 
Association, November 10, a large representative 
gathering of Chapter members listened to an address 
by Professor Walter R. Spalding, of Harvard Uni- 
versity, on "Church Music from the Standpoint of a 
Layman." The speaker was highly critical # of com- 
mon carelessness in vocal articulation and suggested 
that this, with insufficient study and performance by 
the organist, was largely responsible for the lack of 
interest in church attendance. 

The thirty-eighth organ recital of the Chapter was 
presented Monday, November 15, at the Park Street 
Church, Boston, with the following programme : 

Prelude and Fugue in A minor Bach 

Scherro (Sonata No. 1, in F) Lemare 

Melodia, Opus -59 Reger 

Toccata in D Kinder 

Mr. Tohn Hermann Loud 

Fugue in G minor (the greater) Bach 

Die Antworte Wolstenholme 

Symphony No. 5 Widor 

2. Allegro Cantahilc. 

5. Toccata. 

Mr. Everett E. Truette 

Pastorale (Sonata XIT) Rheinberger 

Scherzo (Svmphony IV) Widor 

Concerto No. 2 in B flat Handel 

1. Andante maestoso — Allegro. 

Mr. W. Lynnwood Farnam 

On November 29 the thirty-ninth organ recital was 
given at the Arlington Street Church with the fol- 
lowing programme: 

Vision II. M. Dunham 

Choral in A minor Cesar Franck 

Miss Violet Hernandez 

Nocturne, Op. 6, No. 1 Russell King Miller 

Suite in G minor Everett E. Truette 

Allegro Symphonique 

Miss Ella L. Gale 

Concerto in D minor W. F. Bach 

Largo e spiccato. 
Allegro moderato. 

Noel Alsacien Guilmant 

Allegro, Op. 81 Guilmant 

Miss Daisy A. Swadkins 

Offertoire in B flat King Hall 

Sonata in A minor G. E. Whiting 

Miss Ida Louise Treadwcll 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 

The sixty-fifth public service of the Chapter was 
given at St. Paul's Church, Pawtucket, R. I., on 



SOUTHERN OHIO CHAPTER. 

On the evening of December 1 the first regular 
meeting of the Chapter was held at the home of 
Mr. Durst, with a large attendance. After the cus- 
tomary business meeting, the following musical 
programme was given: Pastorale. Elegie Fugue, 
Adagio d'Ariane (three duos for piano and organ), 
by Guilmant, played by Messrs. Ritchey and Durst ; 
Solitude, Godard-Guilmant ; Cantique d' Amour, 
Strang; Saki (from Persian Suite), Stoughton, 
played by Mr. Schehl; Suite in G minor, Rogers; 
Pastels, Karg-Elert, played by Mr. Durst. Mr. 
Durst's home contains an excellent large two-manual 
organ. After the musical programme refreshments 
were served. 

On Wednesday evening, December 8, under the 
auspices of the Chapter, Mr. Charles Heinroth, of 
Pittsburgh, gave a recital at Christ Church. 

During Christmas week a series of noon organ 
recitals will be given by the following organists: 
W. H. Grubbs, Mrs. # L. A. Rixford, C. Hugo Grimm, 
Alois Bartschmid, J. A. Schehl. 

The first of the special music services at Christ 
Church was given Sunday evening, November 28. 



58 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Mr. C. Hugo Grimm's new cantata, The Coming 
of the Anointed, was performed by a quartet, chorus 
of thirty-five voices, with string quartet, harp and 
organ, under the direction of Mr. Edwin W. Glover. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 

The Chapter held its regular monthly meeting 
Monday evening, November i; sixteen members 
present. 

A short business meeting was held, after which 
we adjourned to the First Congregational Church, 
where we gave our nineteenth public recital, Messrs. 
W. F. Skeele, Roland Diggle and Ray Hastings 
being the organists, assisted by the choir of the 
church. 



CLEMSON PRIZE ANTHEM 

Attention is called to the Clemson Anthem Com- 
petition, which is still open, for the Clemson Gold 
Medal (value $50) and an additional prize of $50 
given by the H. W. Gray Co. (agents for Novello & 
Co.). The competition is open to all musicians re- 
siding in the United States and Canada, whether 
members of the Guild or not. The conditions of the 
competition are as follows: 

The prize will be awarded to the composer of 
the best anthem submitted, provided it is of sufficient 
all-around excellence. The text, which must be 
English, may be selected by the composer, but the an- 
them must be of reasonable length (six to eight 
printed pages of octavo), and it must have a free 
accompaniment. Only one anthem may be submitted 
by each competitor, and a successful competitor shall 
not be eligible for re-entry. 

The manuscript, signed with a nom de plume, or 
motto, and with the same inscription upon a sealed 
envelope containing the composer's name and ad- 
dress, must be sent to the General Secretary, 90 Trin- 
ity Place, New York, not later than January 1, 1916. 

To insure return of manuscripts, stamps should 
be enclosed. 

The successful composition becomes the absolute 
property of the Guild, and shall be published by the 
H. W. Gray Co. 

The adjudicators will be Walter J. Clemson, M.A., 
A.G.O.; R. Huntington Woodman, F.A.G.O, and 
Samuel A. Baldwin, F.A.G.O. 



gMrcl) Dotes 

West's Seed-Time and Harvest was presented 
November 21 at the Madison Avenue Baptist Church, 
New York, under the direction of William W. Bross. 

The Life Everlasting, by H. Alexander Matthews, 
was rendered by the choir of the Holy Apostles, 
Philadelphia, in November, under the direction of 
Mr. Charles Wheeler, O. & C. 

Mendelssohn's sacred cantata Lauda Sion was ren- 
dered by the choir of the Memorial Presbyterian 
Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., October 31, under the 
direction of S. Lewis Elmer, O. & C. 

The Collegiate Church, New York City, H. H. 
Duncklee, O. & C, service list for November 21 
included: The Lord God Planted a Garden, Ware- 
ing; Love Divine, Stainer; A Song of Thanks- 
giving, Maunder. 

The new cantata The Eve of Grace, by J. Sebas- 
tian Matthews, will be given at St. Peter's Church, 
Morristown, on Thursday evening, December 30, 
by the choir of seventy-five voices, under the com- 
poser's direction. 

At the Brick Presbyterian Church, New York, 
November 21, the choir, under direction of Clarence 



Dickinson, sang Mendelssohn's Elijah. Soloists: 
Inez Barbour, soprano; Rose Bryant, contralto; 
Charles Harrison, tenor, and Frank Croxton, bass. 

The harvest cantata A Song of Thanksgiving, by 
Maunder, was presented November 19 by the choir 
of St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
under the direction of Bauman Lowe, O. & O, 
assisted by R. K. Biggs, O. & C, of St Ann's-on-the- 
Heights. 

Garrett's Harvest Cantata was presented Novem- 
ber 21 at St. Peter's Church, New York, under di- 
rection of G. H. Day; soloists: Mrs. Gertrude 
Hornidge, soprano; Miss Antoinette Cherbuliez, 
contralto; William Hendricks, tenor; Mme. A. 
Regis-Rossini, harpist. 

Foster's Seed-Time and Harvest was sung Novem- 
ber 21 in the West End Presbyterian Church, New 
York, under direction of Harry Horsfall. This 
work was also given in the evening at Lafayette 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, under di- 
rection of John Hyatt Brewer. 

The Song of Miriam, Schubert's beautiful but 
rarely heard cantata for soprano solo and chorus, 
was given at the four o'clock service at the Church 
of the Ascension, New York, November 21. The 
work was given under the direction of Jessie Craig 
Adam and the solo part was sung by Mrs. Marie 
Stapleton-Murray. 

Beginning Sunday, December 5, a portion of the 
oratorio Messiah, by Handel, will be rendered for 
four successive Sundays by the choir of the Church 
of the Divine Paternity, New York City, under the 
direction of J. Warren Andrews. O. & C. Soloists : 
Miss E. Harris, soprano; Mr. J. B. Wells, tenor; 
Mr. Tom Daniels, bass. 

The following programme was rendered on 
Founder's Day (November 9), Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege, South Hadley, Mass.: Verset de Procession, 
Dubois; Processional (Old Dutch Melody), A.D. 
1626; Venite Exeltemus in D, Boyce; Te Deum in 
Bb, Macfarlane; Ein Feste Burg, Luther; The Lord 
is My Shepherd, Bischoff; St. Ann's Fugue, Bach. 



The choir of St. John's Church, Yonkers, N. Y. t 
G. O. Bowen, O. & C, presented a concert of secu- 
lar music on November 23. The programme in- 
cluded: Matona, Lovely Maiden, Lassus; Gavotte, 
Bach; Menuet, Mozart; By Moonlight, Spicker; 
Gipsy Life, Schumann; Ave Verum, Mozart; Five 
Indian Sketches. Burleigh ; In Absence, Buck ; Span- 
ish Serenade, Elgar. 

The second monthly musical service at St. An- 
drew's Church, Richmond, S. I., was presented No- 
vember 21, when Tozer's Two Harvests was sung 
by a choir of thirty voices, with harp, organ and 
solo quartet. Soloists: Miss Molly Merritt, soprano; 
Mrs. A. Oakley Fora, contralto; Robert Milner, 
tenor; C. C. Homann, bass: Mrs. Eastman, harpist; 
Robert Grant Walker, O. & C. 

On October 31 Gaul's Holy City was sung by the 
vested choir of St. Andrew's Memorial Church, 
Yonkers, N. Y., assisted by Master Allan Audley 
Hilditch, the boy soprano of the Cathedral of St. 
John the Divine, together with the special soloists, 
Margaret Henry Sands, soprano; Dorothy Bolton 
Thomas, contralto: George W. Bagdasarian, tenor, 
and Paul F. Eichhorn, baritone. 

We regret to report that Christ Church, Norfolk, 
Va., was very badly damaged by fire November 3, 
the organ being completely destroyed and many 
memorials in the church ruined. It will be at once 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



59 



rebuilt. Christ Church is well known as one of 
the leading churches in the South, particularly in 
respect to the excellence of its music. The organist 
and choirmaster is Mr. J. J. Miller. 

The following were included in the service lists 
for November at St. John's Church, Jersey City, 
N. J., Philip James, O. & C. : Communion in F, 
Schwarz; The Soul Triumphant, Noble; Gloria and 
Only Begotten Son, Kallinikoff; Now Heaven in 
Fullest Glory Shone, Haydn ; Hail, Gladdening Light, 
Martin ; Whoso Dwelleth, Martin ; Tarry with Me, 
Baldwin; Praise the Lord, Maunder; The Requiem, 
Brahms. 

The cantata was rendered by over sixty voices. 
Master Hilditch sang several solos and attracted 
wide attention. Assisting the choirmaster and or- 
ganist, Robert E. H. Terry, were Miss Ella Pearce, 
at the piano; Miss Amelia Galloway, violin, and 
James Gray, 'cello. The chancel and chapel were 
decorated with chrysanthemums and autumn leaves 
and the churchyard gates were adorned with wreaths 
in commemoration of All Saints. 

J. Edward Fisher, organist -and choirmaster of 
Cobourg Methodist 'Church, Ontario, has been ap- 
pointed captain to the 139th Battalion, C. E. F. 
(Overseas Contingent), and an assistant organist 
will be in charge during his absence on duty. He 
is a member of the American Guild of Organists 
and N. A. O. and is well known in Western Canada, 
being for some time organist of the Metropolitan 
Church Regina and conductor of the University 
Glee Club, Saskatchewan University. 

The following organ pieces have been played by 
Mr. Clarence Wells at St. Mary's Church, Burling- 
ton, N. J., during the month of November, on Sun- 
day evenings: Andante from Fifth Symphony, 
Tschaikowsky ; Wiegenlied, Harker; Pontifical 
March, Lemmens; Meditation and Toccata, d'Evry; 
Elegie, Massenet ; Jour de Noces, Archer ; At Even- 
ing, Kinder; Finale in D minor, Matthews; Minuet, 
Beethoven; March from Aida, Verdi; At Twilight, 
Stebbins; Prayer, Borowski; Humofesque, Dvorak; 
The Swan, Saint-Saens ; March from Suite, Rogers ; 
Sonata in the Style of Handel (First Movement), 
Wolstenholme. 

The Lyric Club of Charles City, la., under the 
direction of F. Parker, rendered the following pro- 
gramme at the first concert of their second season in 
the Congregational Church, November 22: Fly, 
White Butterflies, Gaul; Night Sinks on the Wave, 
Smart; Indian Cradle Song, Matthews; Summer 
Evening, Berger; When I Bring to You Colored 
Toys, Carpenter; The Sleep That Flits on Baby's 
Eyes, Carpenter; Summertime, Ward-Stephens; In 
Springtime, Daniels; Ungeduld, Schubert; Im 
Abendroth, Schubert; Wiegenlied, Brahms; Immer 
Leiser Wird Mein Schlummer, Brahms; Ste. Mary 
Magdalene, d'lndy. 

St. Ann's Church, Amsterdam, N. Y., Russell 
Carter, organist and choirmaster, recent service 
lists contain the following: Communion in Eb, 
Cruikshank; Te Deum in Bb, Stainer; Magnificat 
and Nunc Dimittis in F, Garrett; Magnificat and 
Nunc Dimittis in F, Simper; Master, What Shall I 
Do?, Bowes; Hail, Mightiest Lord, Smith; O for 
a Closer Walk with God, Foster; O Come, Let Us 
Worship, Himmel; Evening and Morning, Oakeley; 
O Zion, Blest City, Hiles; Praise the Lord, O My 
Soul, Watson; O Thou, Whose Constant Mercies, 
Maunder; One Sweetly Solemn Thought, Ambrose; 
Crossing the Bar, Woodward; The Sun Shall Be 
No More Thy Light, Woodward. 



Christmas music 

NEW YORK CITY 

CATHEDRAL OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE, Miles Far- 
row, O. and C. 
Communion in E — Parker. ' 

Calm on the listening car of night — Parker. 

ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Edmund Jaques, O. and C. 
Angels from the realms of glory — Smart. 
Kvrie in C — Hall. 
Glory to God— Noble. 
Sanctus in F — Gadsby. 

ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S CHURCH, Arthur S. Hyde, O. 
and C. 
Te Deum in A flat — Harwood. 
Three Kings have journeyed — Cornelius. 
Sanctus in F — Gounod. 

BRICK CHURCH, Clarence Dickinson, O. and C. 
The shepherd's story — Dickinson. 
The shepherds' Christmas song — Reimann. 
O fair, O wondrous holy night — Weber. 
From heaven high — Traditional. 
Jesu, Thou dear babe — Traditional. 
Glory to God in the highest — Mozart. 
A Christmas carol — Reger. 
Christmas song of the olden time — Liszt. 
The Saviour Christ is born — Fchrmann. 
Silent Night — Damrosch. 

CHURCH OF THE HOLY COMMUNION, David McK. 
Williams. O. and C. 
Communion in E flat — Lloyd. 
Jesus meek and mild — Gavert. 
Before the heavens were spread abroad — Parker. 
Hallelujah Chorus — Handel. 

CALVARY CHURCH, John Bland, choirmaster. 
Te Deum in A — Martin. 
Jubilate in F— Col-Taylor. 
Communion in A — Martin. 
Behold, I ' bring you glad tidings — Barnes. 
Hallelujah Chorus — Beethoven. 

CHURCH OF THE BELOVED DISCIPLE. George R. 
Bangs, O. and C. 
Communion in E — Parker. 
Hark! the glad sound — Foster. 

CHURCH OF THE HEAVENLY REST, J. Christopher 
Marks. O. and C. 
Te Deum in C— Marks. 
Jubilate in G — Calkin. 

Hark! what means those holy voices — Sidley. 
Communion in F — Stainer. 
There were shepherds — Woodman. 

PARK AVE. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, W. T. Ruther- 
ford, Jr., O. and C. 
Say, where is he born — Mendelssohn. 
There were shepherds — Foster. 
Glory to God in the highest — Pergolesi. 
See amid the winter's snow — West. 
There dwelt a king — West. 
When Christ was born — Brown. 

Shepherds, shake off your drowsy sleep— Besancon carol. 
What chold is this — Traditional. 
Holy night, peaceful night — German Folk-song. 

CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Harry M. Gilbert, 
O. and C. 
Behold, all the earth sitteth still— Huntley. 
Glory to the Trinity — Rachmaninoff. 
Christmas Day — von Hoist. 

CHURCH OF ST. EDWARD THE MARTYR, Miles PA. 
Martin, O. and C. 
Calm on the listening ear of night — Parker. 
Common of the Mass in G minor — Noble. 
The hvmn the anirels sane — West. 

FIFTH AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH, Harold V. Milli- 
gan, O. and C. 
Glory to God— Noble. 
There were shepherds — Foster. 
Arise, shine — Saint-Saens. 
Like silver lamps — Barnby. 

ST. PETER'S CHURCH, George Henry Day, O. and C. 
The First Nowell — Traditional. 
When Jesus was born — Mendelssohn. 
Communion in E flat — Eyre. 
Calm on the list'ning car of night — Parker. 

BROOKLYN 

GRACE CHURCH, Frank Wright, O. and C. 
Te Deum in B flat— Stanford. 
Communion in E flat — Eyre. 
Before the heavens were spread abroad — Parker. 

CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, J. Trevor Garmey, 
O. and C. 
Te Deum in B flat— Stanford. 
Jubilate in G— Calkin. 
Communion in A — Whiting. 

CHURCH OF ST. MARK, Alfred R. Boyce, O. and C. 
Communion in A — Thome. 
O holy night — Brewer. 



6o 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Te Dcum, Jubilate in B flat — Stanford. 

Communion in C — Tours. 

O come redeemer — West. 
ST. PHILLIP'S CHURCH, B. Scudder, O. and C. 

There were shepherds — Vincent. 

Te Deum in G — Hopkins. 

Communion in F — Tours. 
MEMORIAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Brooklyn, N. Y., 
S. Lewis Elmer, O. and C. 

O Sing to God— -Gounod. 

Like silver lamps — Barnby. 

My heart ever faithful — Bach. 

Song of the Angels — Arr. Dickinson. 

Break forth— Bach. 

The shepherd's story — Arr. Dickinson. 

No candle was there — Liza-Lehman. 

Christmas Night — Arr. Damrosch. 

When Christ was born — Stokowsky. 

The Cradle of Christ — Bridge. 

Infant so gentle — Gascone. 

NEW YORK STATE 
ST. ANDREW'S MEMORIAL CHURCH, Yonkers, R. E. H. 
Terry, O. and C. 
For unto us is born a child — Adlam. 
Communion in E flat — Adlam. 
O sing to God — Gounod. 
GRACE P. E. CHURCH, Nyack. Henry P. Noll, O. and C. 
Te Deum in B flat — Stanford. 

Zion that bringest — Stainer. 
Hallelujah Chorus — Handel. 
Communion Service — Tours. 

GRACE CHURCH, Utica, N. Y., De Witt Couts Garret- 
son, O. and C. 
Communion in E flat — Cruickshank. 
Let us now go even unto Bethlehem — Field. 
Te Deum in D— Clough-Leitcr. 
Communion in E — Parker. 
Rejoice in the Lord — Hollins. 
For unto us a child is born — Handel. 

VARIOUS 
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, Willimantic, Conn., 
Charles H. Caswell, O. and C 
A child is born — Chadwick. 

Christians, awake, salute the happy morn — Maunder. 
Beside Thy cradle — Bach. 
The shepherd's Christmas Song — Dickinson. 
Hallelujah Chorus — Handel. 
The Christ Child— Hawley. 
The virgin lullaby — Buck. 
In a garden wild — Jewell. 

ST. MARK'S SCHOOL, Southboro, Mass., Dcnison Fish, 
O. and C. 
Nazareth — Gounod. 
A Joyous Christmas Song — Geveart. 
When the crimson sun had set — Westminster Carol. 
Good King Wenceslas. 
The First Nowell. 
Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht. 

ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, St. Louis, Mo., 
C. Galloway, O. and C. 
A Christmas Pastorale — Selby. 
Communion in D — Garrett 
When I view the Mother — Chadwick. 
And the Glory of the Lord — Handel. 
Marche de Fete — Gigout. 

ST. PETER'S CHURCH, Morristown, N. J., J. Sebastian 
Matthews, O. and C. 

1 heard the bells on Christmas Day — Matthews. 
Communion in F — Andrews. 

Calm on the list'ning ear of night — Parker. 
ST. MARY'S CHURCH, Jersey City, N. J., W. E. Hicks, 
C, and Walter Price, D. 
Glory to God — Lee. 
Communion in E flat — Eyre. 
Adeste Fideles — Arr. Novello. 
Sevenfold Amen — Stainer. 
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, Jersey City, N. T., 
W. E. Hicks, C, and Emma H. Clarke, O. 



Behold, I bring you good tidings — Goss. 
The grace of God — Andrews. 



Recital commencing at 7.45 as follows: 
Silent Night — Arr. Becker. 
Ring out, wild bells — Leopold Damrosch. 
The Nativity—John S. Churchill. 
Hallelujah Chorus— Handel. 

There will be a half hour's recital by the Symphony 

Suartet of strings, beginning at 7.15, and the number will 
: Schubert's Quartet in A flat. 
ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, Bound Brook, N. J., 
Herbert Lloyd, O. and C. 
Te Deum in C — Smart. 

There were shepherds abiding in the field — Vincent. 
When all things were in silence — Stevenson. 
ST. TAMES'S P. E. CHURCH, Newark, N. J., Sidney A. 
Baldwin, O. and C. 
Te Deum— Willan. 
Jubilate — Tours. 
Kyrie — Marks. 

Offertory, O come. Redeemer of mankind — West. 
Sanctus — Marks. 

Gloria in Excelsis and Nunc Dimittis chanted. 
Postlude, Hark the herald angel sings — Mendelssohn. 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. Jersey City, N. J., Philip James, 
O. and C. 

Te Deum in A flat — Schumann. 

Jubilate in B flat— Schubert. 

Communion Mass in G — Weber. 

For unto us (Messiah) — Handel. 
CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER, Morristown, N. J., Mrs. 
K. E. Fox, O. and C. 

The First Nowell— Traditional. 

Communion in E flat — Eyre. 

There were shepherds — Willan. 
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Orange, N. J.. 
W. Ralph Cox, O. and C. 

Arise, shine — Maker. 

There were shepherds — Buck. 

A joyful Christmas song — Gevaert, 

Bethlehem — Silver. 

Angels from the realms of glory — Cox. 

O little town of Bethlehem— Cox. 

Sleep, Holy babe — Cox. 

See, amid the winter's snow — Cox. 

Birthday of a King — Neidlinger. 
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Lincoln, Neb., J. Frank 
Frysinger, O. and C. 

There were shepherds — Gaul. 

Behold, I bring you good tidings — Goss. 

Te Deum Laudamus — Wolstenholme. 

Cantata, The Christchild— Hawley. 
TRINITY CHURCH, Toledo, Ohio, H. F. Sprague, O and G. 

Communion in G — Calkin. 

Glory to God— Noble. 

There were shepherds — Shelley. 

Te Deum in C-— Jordan. 

Jubilate Deo in B minor — Noble. 
ST. STEPHEN'S P. E. CHURCH, Harrisburg, Pa., Alfred 
C. Kuschwa, O. and C. 

Communion in E flat — Allum. 

Calm on the listening ear of night — Parker. 

O Holy night — Adams. 
CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER, Say re, Pa., Horace H. 
Kinney, O. and C. 

Te Deum in B flat — Buck. 

Jubilate in D — Sullivan. 

Communion in F — Tours. 

Nazareth — Gounod. 

Sing, O heavens— Gaul. 
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Philadelphia, Pa„ 
H. A. Matthews. O. and I . 

The Story of Christmas — Matthews. 

Christmas Carols of all nations. 
CHRIST CHURCH. Norfolk, Va., J. J. Miller, O. and C 

Te Deum — Lemare. 

Benedictus — Stainer. 

There were shepherd* — Steanc. 

Hail the King — Bartlett. 

Messe Solennelle (complete) — Gounod. 



ORGAN SPECIFICATION 

The contract for the new organ in St. John's 
Church, Jersey City, has been awarded to the Austin 
Organ Company. The scheme, which was prepared 
by the organist and choirmaster, Mr. Philip James, is 
as follows: 

GREAT ORGAN 

Tibia Clausa 16 feet 

First Diapason 8 feet 

Second Diapason 8 feet 

Gross Gedeckt • . . . . 8 feet 

•Gross Flute 8 feet 

•Hohl Flute 8 feet 

Octave 4 feet 

• Flute Harmonic 4 feet 

•Trombone x6 feet 

•Tuba (Heavy Pressure) (85 pipes) 8 feet 

•Clarion 4 feet 

* ciiimes jo notes 

•Enclosed in Choir Swell Box. 

SWELL ORGAN (73-NOTE CHEST) 

Bourdon x6 feet 

Diapason Phonon 8 feet 

Spitz Floete 8 feet 

Gedeckt 8 feet 

Mo\\r\e 8 feet 

Viole d'Orchestre 8 feet 

Viole Celeste 8 feet 

Flauto Traverso 4 feet 

Piccolo 2 feet 

Mixture Ill Ranks 

Double Oboe Horn 16 feet 

Cornopean 8 feet 

Oboe 8 feet 

Vox Humana (Separate Chest and Tremolo) 8 feet 

Tremolo 

CHOIR ORGAN (73-NOTE CHEST) 

Dulciana x 6 feet 

Diapason 8 feet 

Concert Flute 8 feet 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



61 



8uintadena 8 feet 

nda« Maris 8 feet 

Dulciana 8 feet 

Flute d'Amour ; 4 feet 

Clarinet 8 feet 

Tremolo 

SOLO DIVISION (AUGMENTED PROM GREAT) 

Tuba 8 feet 

Gross Flute 8 feet 

Chimes 

PEDAL ORGAN (AUGMENTED) 

Contra Bourdon (Large Scale) 3a feet 

Diapason 16 feet 

Violone 16 feet 

Bourdon 16 feet 

Gedeckt 16 feet 

Dulciana 16 feet 

Octave 8 feet 

'Cello 8 feet 

Dolce Flute 8 feet 

Contra Fagotto 16 feet 

Trombone - 16 feet 

Tuba • 8 feet 



Swell to Great 16 

Swell to Great 8 

Swell to Great 4 

Choir to Great 16 

Choir to Great 8 

Choir to Great 4 

Swell to Swell 16 

Swell to Swell 8 

Swell to Swell 4 

Swell to Swell 2 

Choir to Choir 16 



Choir to Choir 8 

Choir to Choir 4 

Swell to Choir 16 

Swell to Choir 8 

Swell to Choir 4 

Great to Pedal 8 

Swell to Pedal 8 

Swell to Pedal 4 

Choir to Pedal 8 

Choir to Pedal 

(Quint Coupler) 6 



Eight combination pistons for Great, Pedal and Couplers. 
Eight combination pistons for Swell, Pedal and Couplers. 
Eight combination pistons for Choir, Pedal and Couplers. 
Eight combination pistons for Entire Organ. 
Five combination pedals for Pedal Organ and Couplers. 
Two combination pedals for Swell Organ. 
Two combination pedals for Great Organ. 
Three combination pedals for Entire Organ. 
All combinations adjustable and all visibly effect the stops. 
Austin Patent Cancelcrs over each manual and pedal stop 
groups. 

ACCESSORY 

Great to Pedal reversible pedal. 

Balanced Swell Pedal and Stop Key Indicator. 

Balanced Choir and Great Pedal and Stop Key Indicator. 

Balanced Crescendo Pedal (Adjustable) and Stop Key In- 
dicator. 

Sforzando Pedal with Indicator. 

Stop Key to control Choir-Room Shutters. 

The instrument will be situated on both sides of the chancel 
with a movable console. Electric-pneumatic key and stop 
action. 



Organ Recitals 

Prof. S. A. BALDWIN, at the College of the City of New 
York, December 1. 
Fantasia in F minor — Mozart. 
Tone Poems — King. 
Toccata in F — Bach. 
Melodia — Bossi. 

Grand Chocur Dialogue — Gigout. 
In the twilight — Harker. 
Suite in D— Foote. 

Mr. De" WITT COUTS GARRETSON, at First Presbyterian 
Church. Ilion, N. Y. t November 8. 
Festival Prelude on Ein Feste Burg — Faulkes. 
Variations on an American Air — Flagler. 
Overture, Pique Dame — Suppe. 
To a water lily — MacDowefl. 
Scherzo-Pastorale — Federlein. 
Grand March from Alda — Verdi. 
Herbstilied — Garretson. 
Menuct — Beethoven. 
Fanfare — Lemmens. 

Mr. W. R. HEDDEN, at Washington Irving High School, 
New York City, December 12. 
Chant Triomphale — Gaul. 
Cantabile — Loret. 
Pastoral- Sonate — Rhei nberger . 
Prelude du Deluge — Saint-Saens. 
Concert Overture — Faulkes. 
Melody in B flat— Whiting. 
Grand Cboeur in A — Salome. 
Off crtoi re— Galeotti. 

Allegro Maestoso (3d Sonata) — Guilmant. 
Invocation — Mailly. 
Marche Pontificate — Lemmens. 

Mr. W. S. JOHNSON, at the Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine, Quincy, 111., November 28. 
Invocation — Guilmant. 
Persian Suite — Stoughton. 
Lied — Chauvet. 



The Little Shepherd — Debussy. 

Marche Triomphale — Dubois. 
Mr. W. A. McNEILIS, at the First Baptist Church, Logan, 
W. Va., November 19. 

Festival Fantasie on Ein Feste Burg — Faulkes. 

Adagio from L'Arlesienne Suite — Bizet-Barrell. 

The Question, The Answer — Wolstenholme. 

Autumn — Ebeling. 

Triumphal March — Ebeling. 

Jerusalem the Golden — Spark. 

Serenade — Schubert-Lemare. 

Minuet — Beethoven-Rogers. 

Evensong — Johnston. 

Toccata in D — Kinder. 
Mr. H. F. REBERT, at Franklin and Marshall College, 
Lancaster, Pa., November 18. 

Grand Choeur in A — Kinder. 

At Evening — Kinder. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 

Sonata in the Style of Handel (Two Movements)— 

\Y olstenholme 

Reverie — Rebert. 

Chanson de Joie — Hailing, 

Processional March in D — Frysinger. 

At Twilight — Frysinger. . 

Overture to '"The Merry Wives of Windsor" — Nicolai. 
Mr. S. WESLEY SEARS, at St. James's Church, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., November 28. 

Marche Pontificate — Widor. 

Aria — Bach. 

Andante Con Moto — Schubert 

Lamentation — Guilmant. 

Toccata in D — Kinder. 

Cantile na — Rheinberger. 

Funeral March — Wagner. 

In Paradisium — Dubois. 
Mr. J. R. FRAMPTON, at the Iowa State Teachers College, 
Cedar Falls, la., November 28. 

Aria in D — G. W. Andrews. 

Andante Cantabile, op. II — Tschaikowsky. 

Gavotte (Mignon) — A. G. Thomas. 

A night in the desert — Holliday. 

Organ Symphony II — Widor. 
Mr. ALFRED PENNINGTON, at the Immanuel Baptist 
Church, Scranton, Pa., November 25. Being the sec- 
ond of his programmes by American composers. 

Toccata in G minor — Matthews. m 

First Movement of Grand Sonata in A minor— Whiting. 

Evensong — Johnston. 

On the Coast — Buck. 

Norfolk Fantasie — Allen. 

A Springtime Sketch — Brewer. 

Triumphal March — Buck. 

Variations on the Hymn-Tune, "Duke Street" — Kinder. 

Fantasia in C minor — Bartlett. 

Evening Bells and Cradle Song— Macfarlane. 

Dragon Flies (Dedicated to Mr. Pennington) — Gillette. 
Mr. CLARENCE EDDY, at St. Mary's Church, Burlington, 
N. J:, October 1. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 

Berceuse — Kinder. m , _ , _ ., 

Funeral March and Hymn of the Seraphs — Guilmant 

Autumn — Johnston. 

Spring Song— Macfarlane. 

Pilgrim's Chorus and March from Tannhauser— Wagner. 

Mr. G. H. DAY, at Macedonia Church, Flushing, N. Y., 
November 1 o. 

Prelude, Act III (Lohengrin)— Wagner. 

Minuet — Beethoven. 

Caprice in B flat — Guilmant. 

Elegie — Massenet. 

Gavotte (Mignon) — Thomas. 

Scherzo (Sonata V) — Guilmant. 

Prelude and Fugue in B flat — Bach. 

Meditation — Sturges. 

Toccata in G — Du Bois. 

Barcarolle — Offenbach. 

Spring Song — Hollins. 

Coronation March — Meyerbeer. 
At Val Alst Avenue M. E. Church, Long Island City, De- 
cember o. 

Pastoral Suite — Demarest. 

Springtime Sketch — Beebe. 

Will o' the wisp— -Nevin.. 

Slav March — Tschaikowsky. 

Fugue in G minor — Bach. 

Liebestraum — Liszt. 

Humoreskc — Dvorak. 

Scherzo — Dethier. 
Mr. E. R. KROEGER, a lecture recital at the Women's 
Club, St. Louis, Mo., November 16. 

Valse Caprice — Scott. 

La Nuit (The Night)— Huss. 

Orientate — Stcherbatcheff. 

Seguidilla — Albeniz. 

Traumerei — Strauss. 

Gardens in the Rain — Debussy. 

Goldfish — Debussy. 

Dance of the Daughter of Satan — Rebikoff. 

Jeux d'Eaux (Frolic of the Waters) — Ravel. 
Mr. W. C. HAMMOND, at the Second Congregational 
Church, Holyoke. Mass., November 29. 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor — Bach. 

Largo, op. 2, No. 2 — Beethoven. 



62 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Reviews of new music 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYMPHONIC 

MUSIC. Thomas Whitney Surette. 
National Federation of Music Qubs Press, 1915. 

Mr. Surette, widely known as a lecturer on musi- 
cal subjects, has written and published this book 
under the auspices of the National Federation of 
Music Clubs, with the avowed purpose of providing 
them with a course of study. He has done his work 
well. After a brief introduction, some "practical 
directions for study/' and three preliminary chapters 
on the antecedents of the symphony, he takes up and 
illustrates the various aspects of symphonic literature 
as follows: "The Classic Symphony" — Haydn's Sym- 
phony in D major and Mozart's "Jupiter"; "The 
Epic Symphony" — Beethoven's Fifth, Eroica, and 
Ninth Symphonies; "The Lyric Symphony" — Schu- 
bert's "Unfinished"; "The Realistic Symphony" — 
Tschaikowsky's "Pathetique" ; "The Folk Sym- 
phony"— Dvoraks "From the New World"; "The 
Neo-Classic Symphony" — Brahms's Second and 
Third Symphonies, and "The Mystic Symphony" — 
Cesar Franck. 

This classification is ingenious and on the whole 
sufficiently accurate. Mr. Surette has, indeed, a 
special gift for generalizing artistic tendencies in 
striking and memorable phrases, as when he says.: 
"The classic is the universal untainted by contact 
with any human idiosyncracy, the romantic is per- 
sonal and the realistic actual." He is often felicitous, 
too, in suggesting by description, comparison or 
metaphor the peculiar effect of certain passages in 
the works studied. Thus in commenting on the lull 
just preceding the recapitulation in the first move- 
ment of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, he says: "Just 
as after excitement and the stress of energetic action 
we lapse into quiet and repose, so the energy of 
music may lapse and die down until it is only a 
faint echo of itself." 

Mr/ Surette's method is, as it should be in a book 
of this kind, stimulating rather than minutely in- 
structive; he aims to awaken the reader's interest 
in the aesthetic truths of music and the discrimina- 
tions to which a sense of them leads; and for this 
purpose he calls to his aid many references to the 
other arts and to illustrations drawn from every-day 
life. His allusions range from Byron, Carlyle, Emer- 
son, Whitman and Jane Austin (sic) to Dostoieffsky, 
Meredith and Conrad. 

The author's style is uneven. At his best he is 
coherent and fluent. Here he is at his worst — he is 
speaking of the rationale of the sonata form : "Both 
the novelist and the dramatist had evolved the plan 
of first stating the problem and presenting the char- 
acters, etc. ; second, developing the plot with di- 
versity and rapidity of action ; and third, solving the 
problem and unifying the situations, etc. Or the 
composer perhaps thought on life itself, and remem- 
bering its youth, manhood and old age." 

There are some errors which should be corrected 
in a second edition. Emerson's sentence on page 144 
is carelessly proof-read. The paragraphs on pages 87 
and 88 seem to have got entangled. Tschaikowsky's 
Pathetique Symphony is in B minor, not E minor 
(page 135). 

The book should answer admirably the purpose 
for which it was written, and will also interest the 
general reader. 

TEMA CON VARIAZIONI. A. C. Mackenzie. 
BOURREE; SLOW MINUET; GIGUE. From 

Suite in F. C. Hubert H. Parry. 
London : Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Violinists will be glad to have Sir Alexander 
Mackenzie's "Tema con Variazoni" from his set of 
pieces for violin and pianoforte, Op. 37 (the Suite 
which includes the ever-popular "Benedictus," first 
played by the late Lady Halle as far back as 1880 



at one of the never-to-be-forgotten Monday^ Popular 
Concerts), published separately. The piece is an ex- 
cellent example of variation- form, as each of the 
eight variations to the pleasing theme, with its 7 4-8 
bar rhythm, is in thorough contrast, and the music 
lies always gratefully under a skilled player's fingers. 
Messrs. Novello & Co. have also issued separate 
editions of the "Bourree," "Slow Minuet" and 
Gigue" from the Suite in F ("Lady Radnor's Suite"), 
by Sir Hubert H. Parry, lately reviewed in these 
columns. 



Suggested Service Cist for febnary, 1916 

Purification of St Mary the Virgin. February 2 

Te Deum in Eb Forcier 

Benedictus ) m,«„* * 
Jubilate ) Chant 

Introit, Blessed are the Undefined Sewell 

Offertory, And He Shall Purify Handel 

Communion Service in G Horsman 

fe^ittis } «- ^ Horsman 

Anthem, Blessed are the Pure in Heart.. Macfarren 
Offertory, The Lord is in His Holy Temple. .Stainer 

Fifth Sunday after Epiphany. February 6 
Te Deum ] 

Benedictus \ in G Maunder 

Jubilate J 

Introit, O Give Thanks Elvey 

Offertory, Let the Peace of God Stainer 

Communion Service in G Maunder 

Magnificat } • ^ w . 

Nunc Dimittis } ,n G Maunder 

Anthem, Let My Prayer Martin 

Offertory, I Will Magnify Goss 

Sixth Sunday after Epiphany. February 13 
Te Deum ) • t- „ . 

Benedictus } ,n F Morley 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, I Desired Wisdom Stainer 

Offertory, Behold the Lord Thome 

Communion Service in C Monk 

IKS** } in F "«*» 

Anthem, Thou Wilt Keep Him Ham 

Offertory, The Shadows of the Evening Hour, 

Baldwin 
Septuagesima. February 20 
Te Deum 1 

Benedictus V in G Walford Davie s 

Jubilate J 

Introit, Teach Me, O God Attwood 

Offertory, The Angel of the Lord Andrews 

Communion Service in G Davies 

Nu^ Dimittis \ in G V"™* 

Anthem, O Hearken Thou Noble 

Offertory, The Sun is Sinking Andrews 

St Matthias. February 24 

Te Deum in C W. H . Hall 

Benedictus ) ru~~* 
Jubilate \ Chant 

Introit, Come Unto Me Couldrey 

Offertory, Be Thou Faithful Macfarren 

Communion Service in G Hall 

NuTDiLtis }-*» »«« 

Anthem, The Sun Shall Be No More.... Woodward 
Offertory, Then Shall the Righteous.. Mendelssohn 

Sexagesima. February 27 

Te Deum ) • t? ~f* 

Jubilate J ,n F Tours 

Benedictus — Chant 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



63 



Introit, Cast Thy Burden Mendelssohn 

Offertory, I Will Love Thee Macfarren 

Communion Service in F Tours 

Magnificat 1 ; n F Tours 

Nunc Dimittis ] ln * ; I ours 

Anthem, Blessed Are the Merciful Hiles 

Offertory, Lord of Our Life Field 



music Published during m East month 

SACRED 

ARENSKY, A.— "We Praise Thee" and "Oh, Praise 

the Lord of Heaven." Edited by C. W. Douglas. (No. 
7, A Cappella Choruses.) 12 cents. 

gONAVIA-HUNT, H. G.— Service for the Holy 

Communion, on Monotones (G and E). 8 cents. 

gROOKS, F.— "I give my song, myself, to Thee." 
Hymn and Tune. 5 cents. 

DICKINSON, C— "Jesu, Thou dear Babe." Tra- 
ditional cradle song from Hayti. (Christmas.) (No. 45, 
The Sacred Choruses.) 12 cents. 

FOUR CHRISTMAS CAROLS.— (No. 873, The 

Musical Times.) 5 cents. 
No. 1. "In Bethlehem, that noble place." B. J. Dale. 
No. 2. "Sleep. Holy Bable." R. Walker Robson. 
No. 3. "The First Christmas Night." \V. H. Sangster. 
No. 4. "There dwelt a King." John E. West. 

QIBSON, S. O.— "Trust in God." Hymn for time 

of War. 8 cents. 

QOODEVE, MRS. ARTHUR.— "Now in this our 

hour of need." For War time. 5 cents. Words only, 
$1.25 per 100. 

HICKOX, W. H.— "God of our fathers." Hymn 

for use in time of War. 5 cents. Words only, $1.00 
per 100. 

TENNER, P.— "Safe Home." A Requiem. 12 cents. 

KINDER, RALPH.— "Brightest and Best." Hymn- 
Anthem for Christmas and Epiphany. (No. 408, The 
Church Music Review.) 15 cents. 

MENDELSSOHN (Adapted).— "Brightest and best 

of the sons of the morning." Hymn and Tune. (No. 
934, Novello's Parish Choir Book.) 6 cents. 

NOBLE, T. TERTIUS.— "Grieve Not the Holy 

Spirit." Anthem. (No. 409, The Church Music Re- 
view.) 12 cents. 

pEATY, R. — "Praise the Lord! ye heavens, adore 

Him." and "Glorious things of thee are spoken." Tunc 
composed as an alternative to the Austrian Hymn. 5 cents. 

ROSS, W. G.— "Good King Wenceslas." Old Carol 

arranged with varied harmonies. (No. 227, Novello's 
Short Anthems.) 8 cents. 

SCHUMANN, R.— "Child Jesus." Christmas. Ed- 
ited by C. Dickinson. (No. 46, The Sacred Choruses.) 
12 cents. 

STOREY, N.— "Te Deum laudamus" in G. 15 cents. 

WARD, FRANK E.— Six Christmas Carols: "O 
Little Town of Bethlehem," "There Came a Little Child 
to Earth," "Come ye lofty," "Like silver lamps," "Once in 
Royal David's city" and "Come sing with holy gladness." 
12 cents. 

Six Easter Carols: "A Morn's roseate hue," "Christ, 

the Lord, is risen to-day," "How calm and beautiful the 
morn," "The day of resurrection," "The morning purples all 
the sky" and "The strife is o'er." 12 cents. 

WILLAN, HEALY.— Arr. by. "Christmas Song of 

the 14th Century." For four voices and organ. (No. 
49, The Sacred Choruses,) 8 cents. 

WINN, ROWLAND.— "Two Kyries." On Card. 

5 cents. 

SECULAR 

HUTCHISON, THROSBY.— "The Sleeping Lake" 

(Der Triiumende See) (Op. la). Song for Mezzo- 
Soprano or Baritone. English and German Words. 60 cents. 

SCHINDLER, KURT.— "Ten Student Songs of 

Finland." For male voices. English Version by Jane 
and Deems Taylor and K. S. 



BOOK I 50c 

Separately Price 

No. 1. Summer Evening Selim Palmgren 10c 

No. 2. I'm Coming Home Selim Palmgren 12c 

No. 3. Finnish Lullaby Selim Palmgren 12c 

No. 4. Fight R. Faltin 1 2c 

No. 5. Song of Kullervo Toivo Kulle 15c 

SCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 281 contains the 

following Music in both Notations: 
"Through love to light." Unison Song. A. C. Mackenzie; 
"Singing joyfully." Two-part Song. Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. 
6 cents. 

SCHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

Published in two forms. A. Voice Parts in Staff and 
Tonic Sol-fa Notations, with Pianoforte Accompaniment 
(8vo). B. Voice Parts only, in Tonic Sol-fa Notation. 

A. B. 

No. 801. Serbian National Anthem. Unison Song. 

Arranged by John E. West. 5 cents — 

No. 1144. "If." Unison bong. Myles B. Foster. 6 cents — 

WAGNER.— "Oft when the hours." ("Elsa's 

dream," from "Lohengrin.") 60 cents. 

INSTRUMENTAL 
ARCHER, J. STUART.— Ballade in E. (No. 44. 

Original Compositions for the Organ, New Series.) 75 
cents. 

BULL, JOHN.— "The King's Hunt." (From Album 

of Selected Pieces for Pianoforte Solo. Edited by 
Granville Bantock.) 50 cents. 

gUNNETT, E. — Twelve Original Compositions for 

the Organ. $3.75. 

BYRD, WILLIAM.— "O mistris myne." (From 
Album of Selected Pieces for Pianoforte Solo. Edited 
by Granville Bantock.) 50 cents. 

'The Carman's Whistle." (From Album of Selected 

Pieces for Pianoforte Solo. Edited by Granville Bantock.) 
50 cents. 

pARNABY, GILES.— "Rosasolis." (From Album 

of Selected Pieces for Pianoforte Solo. Edited by 
Granville Bantock.) 50 cents. 

pURCELL, HENRY.— Prelude in G. (From Ten 

Selected Pieces for Pianoforte Solo. Edited by Norman 
P. Cummincs and VV. H. Cummings.) 25 cents. 

SCHUMANN.— Pianoforte Works. Edited and 

Fingered by Agnes Zimmermann. Six Books. (The 

Novello Edition, No. 226a-226b.) Paper cover. Each $2.50. 

SHARP, CECIL J.— Music and Notation of Coun- 
try Dances, in separate numbers. 10 cents each: 

;;Ribbon Dance" . 1 Fronx Set t 

\V e won't go home till morning" J 

"Haste to the wedding" ) From 

"Three meet," or "The Pleasures of the Town" J Set II 
"Grimstock" 1 

"Jenny Pluck Pears" V From Set III 

"The fine Companion" J 

"Goddesses" "I 

"Jamaica" I 

"My Lady Cullen" \ From Set IV 

"Nonesuch," or "A la mode de France" 
"The Black Nag" J 

"Chelsea Reach" *) 

"Hyde Park" \ From Set V 

"Lady in the dark" J 

WALLACE, W. VINCENT.— "Maritana." Con- 
cert Edition. Arranged by Emil Kreuz. 1st Violin, 
$2.75; 2nd Violin, $2.25; Viola, $2.25; Violoncello and Basso, 
$3.75. 

BOOKS 

£)OLMETSCH, ARNOLD.— "The Interpretation of 

the Music of the XVIIth and XVIIIth Centuries." 
(Handbooks for Musicians. Edited by Ernest Newman.) 
$5.00 net. 

Appendix. Consisting of Twenty-two Illustrative Pieces. 

$1.75. 

]V|OONIE, J. A.— "First Steps in Sight-Singing." 

Part I. 25 cents. 



6 4 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Organists 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West, New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue. 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 

s West 45th Street, New York, or _ 

295 Claremont Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

STANLEY R. AVERY 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER ST. MARK'S 

CHURCH 

Piano, Organ, Theory, Choir Training, Conducting, Recitals, 

Composition, Orchestration. 
Address: ST. MARK'S CHURCH, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

FRANK C BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.CO.. A.R.C.M., L.R.A.M. 
Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 
Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West 12th Street, New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 
Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 

Address: New Haven. Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F JLCoTT 
F.A.G.O. 

"TURPIN PRIZE MAN" 

Specialist in Coaching by Correspondence in Harmony, 

Counterpoint, etc. Preparation for A.G.O. Examinations 

Address: "The Choristers' School," Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 



GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC. 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST, DIRECTOR 

First Baptist Church 

Flemington New Jersey 

ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Recitals Concert Tours 

Organ Openings 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral St. Louis. Mo . 

GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster, St. Peter's Church 

Address: 423 West 20th Street, New York 

Telephone: Chelsea — 7724. 

H. BROOKS DAY 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 
Organist and Choirmaster of St. Luke's Church, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Address; 417 Pierrepont Street, B rooklyn, N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave.. N. Y. 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 
412 Fifth Avenue. New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

CONCERT ORGANIST AND TEACHER OF SINGING 

Organist and Choirmaster of Gethsemane Church, Organist of 

the Jewish Reform Temple, Instructor in Theoretical 

Subjects at the MacPhail Violin School, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



ROY KINNEY FALCONER, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Presbyterian Church 

Jersey City New Jersey 

Address: x Apollo St, Jersey City, N. J. 

KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, 

Morristown, New Jersey. 

J. HENRY FRANCIS ~ 

Choirmaster and Organist of St John's Church. Charleston, 
W. Va. Director of Music Charleston High School, 
Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 
Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 

E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster 

First Congregational Church 

Address: P. O. Box 675, Fall River, Mass. 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 
49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster Second Congregational Church* 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Director of Music Klount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Solo Organist and Consulting Choirmastxx 
Organ Recitals and Instruction. 
Member Examination Committee of 

American Guild of Organists 
Candidates prepared for Guild Examinations. 
Address: 170 West 75th Street, New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Calvary Baptist Church Address: 36a West 35th St. 

F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia, 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 



EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

NORMAN LANDIS 

Flemington, N. J. 

O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flemington, N. J. 

CM. — First Reformed Church, Somerville, N. J. 

Conductor Frenchtown, N. J., Choral Society. 

ORGAN RECITALS 



JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Park Street Church, Boston, Mass. 

Organist and Choirmaster. 

Send for new circular. 

Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and Cran- 
ford Philharmonic. 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



65 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR . 
St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 
New York. 
Instructor of Music Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
£05 West 97th Street 
'Phone, 7380 Riverside. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 

St. Thomas' Church, New York 

ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR, AND COACH 

Address: 1 West 53d Street 

EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 



Organist and Choirmaster 
hedral 
Organ 
Address: Washington, D. C. 



rgam 
National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 
Organ Recitals 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 

MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Mill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
The South Church, E. 85th Street, New York 
Telephone: Morningside 7587 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 

JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St. 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 

ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 

Berea, Ohio 

FREDERIC ROGERS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Advice to Church Organ Committees a Specialty. Specifica- 
tions, Design, Purchase, etc. Twenty-five years' 
experience, England. Canada and United States. 
Address: Kalamazoo, Michigan. 



MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared por Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 We st 55th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House, 

2nd St., Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 



KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church, Watertown, N. ,Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 
Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville, N. J. 
Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SAMUEL P. WARREN 

Studio: 201 West 87th St., New York 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 
Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 
Address: 634 So. Michig an Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

CLARENCE WELLS 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Mary's Church. 

Supervisor Public School Music, Burlington, N. J. 

Course in Public School Music for teachers and supervisors. 

Circular upon request. 

Estey Hall, Philadelphia. 338 Wood St., Burlington. 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church and 

Temple Israel. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 

'P hone 3179-L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor. Orpheus Club. 

Director: Nladison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St Paul's School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

Baltimore, Md. . 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and aoth Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

rmaster St. Luke's Char 

The Ear le , 103 Waverly P l ace, New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster, First Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn. Director of Music, Packer Collegiate 
Institute. 
Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Organist and Choirmaster St. Luke's Chapel, Trinity. Parish, 



Organ Builders 



If the purchase of a PIPE OROAN is contemplated, address 
Hbnry Pilchbr's Sons, Louisville, Ky., who manufacture the 
highest grade at reasonable prices. Correspondence solicited. 



Ru 



ssian 



Anth 



ems 



The only editions of these anthems, with English texts 
(translations), suitable for all seasons of the church year. 
Thirty different selections are ready in quantity. Send 
for circular stating number of parts, depth of second bass 
and prices. 

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66 THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 

CHRISTMAS CAROL SERVICES 

ADESTE FIDELES-No. i Contains: 

Adestc Fidclcs H\mn God Rest You, Merrv Gentlemen Traditional 

Christmas Morn T. Adams Sleep, Holy Babe /. B. Dykes 

The First Nowcll Traditional Silent Night Michael Haydn 

Good King Wenceslas " O Little Town of Bethlehem J. Barnby 

CHRISTMAS BELLS— No. 2 Contains: 

It Came Upon the Midnight Clear Wcstlake From Far Away 7. B. Dykes 

Sweet Christmas Bells J. Stainer Sleep. Holy Babe /. T. Field 

What Child Is This? Old English Angels from the Realms of Glorv H. Smart 

Good Christian Men Old German 

BETHLEHEM— No. 3 Contains: 

See Amid the Winter's Snow 7. Goss There Came a Little Child Robert Jackson 

In the Fields With Their Flocks 7. E. West Bethlehem 7. Varley Roberts 

The Midnight Masse Robin H. Legge 

THE NATIVITY— No. 4 Contains: 

Once in Royal David's City H. 7. Gauntlett A Cradle Song C. Erskine 

Saw You Never in the Twilight B. Tours A Cradle Song of the Blessed Virgin Barnby 

Child Divine T. Adams Come With Us (Arranged) 7. Stamer 

Sing the Holy Child Christ M. B. Foster Infant So Gentle (Arranged) 7. Stainer 

Little Children, Wake and Listen 7. H. Mee 

CHRISTMAS MORN— No. 5 Contains: 

Hark! the Herald Angels Sing Mendelssohn The Loving Heart C. Erskine 

With the Angelic Host Proclaim Hymn Shepherds! Shake Oft /. Stainer 

Christmas Morn T. Adams Ring Oin\ Ye Bells 7. H. IVallis 

Now Dies in David's City 7. Swire Of the Father's Love Begotten Hymn 

NOEL— No. 6 Contains: 

O Little Town of Bethlehem 7. Barnby We Three Kings of Orient Are 7. Stainer 

It Came Upon the Midnight F. Wcstlake All This Night Bright Angels Sing 7. T. Field 

There Dwelt in Old Judea R. Jackson Holy Night, Peaceful Night 7. Barnby 

In a Manger Bed S. Cross Christmas Bells 5. Cross 

IN EXCELSIS— No. 7 Contains: 

When Christ Was Born L. Stokovski As I Kept Watch F. D. Jamison 

Would I Had Been a Shepherd t \ L. Jewell God Give Ye Merry F. D. Jamison 

O Tender Babe Jesus L. Jewell Once in Royal David's City F. D. Jamison 



EMMANUEL— No. 8 Contains: 



Jesu in Bethlehem Max Bruch Sing Songs of Joy "| 

Ring, Christmas Bells Carl Reinecke The Bells Are Chiming > 

'Tis Christmas Eve Charles I. Rice Oh Poor and Crippled Children J 



So Many Centuries Ago Charles I. Rice 



Norwegian Carols 

arranged by 

Harvey B. Caul 



Price 10 cents each book, or $5.00 net per hundred 
Any of the above Carols may be had separately. Price 2 cents each, net 



CHRISTMAS TABLEAUX WITH MUSIC 

Compiled by Rev. JOS. T. RUSHTON 
Depicting by means of tableaux, scenery, dialogue, etc., the Story of the Nativity. 

PRICE 25 CENTS 
Words and music of the Hymns and Carols, 10 cents or $5.00 per 100 



THE MANGER SERVICE 

A Christmas Service for Churches, Sunday Schools and Children's Festivals 
Depicting incidents of the Nativity of our Lord. With words and music; illustrations showing scenery, costumes and details of 

arrangement; spoken parts and directions for actions 

Compiled by MRS. H. S. CHURCH 
Complete hook, with directions, etc., $1.00 Words and music only, 10 cents each, or $5.00 per 100 

A SUNDAY SCHOOL CHRISTMAS CAROL SERVICE 

With Hymns, Carols, Responses and Order of Service 

Compiled and composed by W. R. WAGHORNE 

Price 10 cents each, or $5.00 per 100 

THE H. W. GRAY CO. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

NOVELLO C& COMPANY, London, Ltd. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



67 



POPULAR MARCHES SS ORGAN 



No. 

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VOLUME 1. 

Marche Triomphale F. Archer 

The Bride's March, from "Rebekah" J. Barnby 

Harvest Thanksgiving March J. B. Calkin 

March for a Church Festival E. T. Driffield 

Imperial March E. Elgar 

March to Calvary, from "The Redemption". Ch. Gounod 

Religious March G. A. Macfarrcn 

March, from "Abraham" B. Molique 

March in B flat E. Silas 

Festive March in D Henry Smart 

March in G B. Tours 

March in D minor Agnes Zimmcrmann 



VOLUME 2. 



March for a Church Festival W. T. Best 

Professional Wedding March H. R. Bird 

Festal March T. B. Calkin 

Solemn March, from "The Black Knight' r E. Elgar 

Festal March G. Elvey 

Marche Solennellc Ch. Gounod 

March, from "St. Polycarp" F. A. G. Ouseley 

March, with Pastoral Trio B. Luard-Selby 

March in G H. Smart 

Jubilant March J. Stainer 

March in F J. H. Wallis 

Commemoration March John E. West 



No. 

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VOLUME 3. 

Festal March George Calkin 

Festal March C. S. Heap 

Triumphal March Alfred Hollins 

Secular March G. A. Macfarrcn 

Solemn March ("Story of Savid") . . . . A. C. Mackenzie 

Pilgrims' March (Symphony No. 4) Mendelssohn 

Marche Religicuse G. Merkel 

Bridal March and Finale C. Hubert II. Parry 

Marche Serieuse B. Luard-Selby 

Grand Solemn March Henry Smart 

March and Chorus ("Tannhauser") R. Wagner 

Festival March Herbert W. Wareing 

VOLUME 4. 

Marche Religieuse J. Baptiste Calkin 

Wedding March William Faulkcs 

Marche Triomphale Alex. Guilmant 

March in E flat Lefebure-Wely 

Funeral March ("Dream of Jubal")..A. C. Mackenzie 

Solemn Processional March C. J. B. Meacham 

Schiller-March G. Meyerbeer 

March in E flat R. Schumann 

Nuptial March B. Luard-Selby 

Marche Funebre P. Tschaikowsky 

Grand March (Introduction to the 3rd Act of 

"Lohengrin") R. Wagner 

Bridal Chorus ("Lohengrin") R. Wagner 

Price $2.25 each. Cloth, $3.25 each. 



ALBUMS Si 



NOVELLO'S 

ORGAN 



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NO. 1. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 

Interlude Xb. Dubois 

Chanson de Matin Edward Elgar 

Fantasia on the old melody "Urbs Beata"..W. Faulkes 

There is a green hill far away Ch. Gounod 

Marche Triomphale Alexandre Guilmant 

Ave Maria A. Henselt 

Grand Choeur No. 2 Alfred Hollins 

Andantino in D flat Edwin H. Lemare 

Chanson Triste P. Tschaikowsky 

Prelude to "Lohengrin," Act I R. Wagner 

Romanza W. Wolstenholme 

Allegretto in E flat W. Wolstenholme 



NO. 2. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 

Chanson de Muit Edward Elgar 

Alia Marcia Myles B. Foster 

Minuetto Alexandre Guilmant 

Lied H. Hofmann 

Barcarolle 4 H. Hofmann 

Spring Song Alfred Hollins 

The Curfew Edward J. Horsman 

Pastorale in E Edwin H. Lemare 

Ave Maria d'Arcadelt Franz Liszt 

Cantique d'Amour Theo. Wendt 

The Seraph's Strain W. Wolstenholme 

Le Carillon W. Wolstenholme 



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NO. 4. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 

Arietta S. Coleridge-Taylor 

Souvenir de»Printemps Joseph Holbrooke 

Andante in D Alfred Hollins 

Pavane in A Bernard Johnson 

Harmonies du Soir Sigf rid Karg-Elert 

Grand Cortege Edwin H. Lemare 

Allegro alia Marcia A. L. Peace 

Visione J. Rheinbergcr 

Chant sans Paroles P. Tschaikowsky 

Prelude to Act III. ("Die Meistersingcr") . . .R. Wagner 

Allegro Pomposo John E. West 

Canzona W. Wolstenholme 



NO. 5. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 

Jour de Noces J. Stuart Archer 

Festival Prelude on "Ein' feste Burg" W. Faulkes 

Legend Harvey Grace 

Allegretto Pastorale II. M. Higgs 

Benediction Nuptiale Alfred Hollins 

Sursum Corda John N. Ireland 

Alia Marcia Tohn N. Ireland 

Adagio Cantabilc Edwin H. Lemare 

Fanfare J. Lcmmens 

Intermezzo B. Luard-Selby 

Easter.Morn John E. West 

Finale in B flat W. Wolstenholme 



NO. 3. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 
No. 

1. Scherzo in A flat Edward C. Bairstow 

2. Melody S. Coleridge-Taylor 

3. Serenade H. Hofmann 

4. Bridal March Alfred Hollins 

5. Berceuse Edwin H. Lemare 

6. Melodie in E S. Rachmaninoff 

7. Aubade A. Strelezki 

8. Nocturne in C sharp minor P. Tschaikowsky 

9. Procession to the Minster ("Lohengrin") . .R. Wagner 

10. Passacaglia John E. West 

11. Fantasia upon the Plain-song Melody 

"Ad Cocnam Agni" Healey Willan 

12. Allegretto in A flat W. Wolstenholme 



NO. 6. TWELVE SELECTED PIECES. 
No. 

1. Nocturne Thomas F. Dunhill 

2. Postludium William Faulkes 

3. Andante Tranquillo H. M. Higgs 

4. In Springtime Alfred Hollins 

5. Madrigal Edwin H. Lemare 

6. Triumphal March T. Lemmens 

7. Allegro in B flat F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 

8. Choral Prelude on "Rockingham". .C. Hubert H. Parry 

9. Pfacludium Pastorale J. Stainer 

10. Romance in F minor Tschaikowsky 

1 1. Romance in A flat H. Sandiford Turner 

12. Festal Commemoration John E. West 

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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 69 



tKfje GTrtumpfj of tfie Cross 

A New Lenten Cantata 

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EASTER MUSIC— 1916 PUBLICATIONS 

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(For mixed voices unless otherwise stated) 

Composer Author of Words Solo Voices Price 

Bartlett, Homer N. 12,923. I Heard a Great Voice as of a Trumpet. Biblical. Baritone $.16 

Berwald, W. 12,919. O Swing the Gates Wide Open. Lizzie De Armond. Tenor 16 

Dressier, Louis R. 12,918. Behold the Risen King. George Cooper. Soprano or tenor 12 

12,918-Obb. Violin obbligato for above 25 

H enrich, C. W. 12,910.. Why Seek Ye the Living Among the Dead ? Biblical 16 

Spence, William R. 12,908. The Day of Resurrection. J. M. Neale. Soprano or tenor 12 

West, John E. 12,905. Awake, Up, My Glory. Biblical 16 

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Various. 12,889. Six Easter Carols (Eleventh series). ($4.00 per hundred.) 05 

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3. Wm. Arms Fisher. Christ Hath Risen. * 

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Nov. 23, 1915 
Mr. Ernest M. Skinner, 

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SUMMARY WOF CONTENTS 



EDITORIALS 

ELLEN VON TIDEBOHL 

A SUGGESTION 
HENRY F. GILBERT 

SOME FAMOUS SINGERS 

MINGOTTI AND GABRIELLI 

FRANCIS ROGERS 

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^t 



JLQ 



not in the dogmatic, pontifical or wildly rhap- 
sodic manner of these young gushing prophets. 



^^^HERE is nothing so sobering as the 
ll reading of by-gone criticism; it is 
^^^ enough to prevent anyone of deserved 
repute from collecting his newspaper or maga- 
zine articles, revising them with anxiety about 
the punctuation, and then putting them be- 
tween covers. How strange, how inexplicable 
seems to us now certain articles by Reichardt, 
Weber, Schumann, Berlioz, Chorley, Hans- 
lick! 






Editorials 



IS 



ji^ ERTAIN persons are rushing into print 
i\ with articles about Schoenberg, Stra- 
^•^ vinsky, Omstein, speaking wisely about 
their theories and achievements, their proc- 
esses, their influence, when these writers have 
had no thorough musical training, when it is 
doubtful whether they could read a score of 
Haydn, analyze a fugue, or play on the piano 
a simple choral of Bach, written in the old 
clefs. Abler persons, having taste and enthu- 
siasm, have written curiously about music, but 



a LIFE of Rossini by the Escudier 
Brothers was published in Paris sixty- 
two years ago. There are digressions, 
excursions in this book that are still acute, 
sane, stimulating. Liszt, in one of his letters, 
expressed his admiration for the manner in 
which views were expressed although he did 
not agree with some of them. 

There is a preface to this book written by 
Mery, then a conspicuous figure in French 
literature. Cesar Franck set music to his 
"fimir de Bengador," a song that is not so 
well known as it should be. In this preface 
Mery talks about harmony and melody, schools 
and systems, as though music had been his 
sole study. Let us see how he wrote about 
Rossini's operas. The quotation is long but it 
is worth reprinting, as an awful warning in 
criticism and enthusiasm. 



74 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



If Rossini had written only "Moisa" and 
'Guillaume Tell/ he would still be the aston- 
ishment of ages to come; but he was not con- 
tent with this sublime antithesis; he has 
wished to strike all the keys of the human key- 
board; he has come down from Sinai to en- 
chant all the cares and anxieties of this vale 
of tears ; he has left the burning bush to con- 
verse face to face with man, always in an un- 
heard-of language, that charms the ear, de- 
lights the soul, and is an eternal festival in the 
heart. He has exhumed from the lagoons that 
lamentable history of jealousy and furious pas- 
sions in which the roarings of the African ti- 
ger are wedded to the greatest accents of love ; 
he has exhumed from the ruins of the Euphra- 
tes that sombre legend of Ninus, in which cries 
of remorse, hymns of the Magi, terrible appari- 
tions, the voluptuous pleasures of adulterous 
queens, the shocks of sepulchres are blended 
with the melodies of Babylonian fetes in the 
hanging gardens of Semiramis; he has drawn 
from the two seas that bathe Corinth, bitnaris 
Corinthi, a magnificent poem which faded 
away in the huge ear of the deaf; then he 
created three marvellous women in extremely 
different walks of life — Ninetta, the village 
girl, the Lady of the Lake, the Cinderella of 
fairy tales ; the three Graces of Music, the three 
eternal sweethearts of the universe; he has 
created the three expressions of human laugh- 
ter, the three gaities of life, the three sage fol- 
lies of this sad world, "L'ltaliana," "Le Bar- 
bier de Seville," "Le Comte d' Ory;" three 
masterpieces, where hilarity, amorous drunk- 
enness, aristocratic debauch, sparkle with a 
verve that transforms the orchestra into an 
olympian firework." 

As the gentleman in a box at a political con- 
vention held in Buffalo remarked on a famous 
occasion: "Hot stuff!" 

And on the next page we read that Rossini's 
"Stabat Mater" is as immortal as the "Memory 
of Calvary." 



^/^rOW Rossini was a genius. No sane 
1 i person disputes this. His "Barber of 
^^ ^ Seville" is still a joy ; there are superb 
pages in "William Tell;" there is beautiful 
music for Desdemona in "Otello," and the song 
of the gondolier, singing lines of Dante, has a 
melancholy charm that few composers have 
equalled. But where are the other operas men- 
tioned by Mery to-day? Are they undeserv- 



edly neglected? We confess that we should 
like to hear "Cinderella," "La Gazza Ladra," 
"Le Comte d'Ory," but where are the singers 
that could do justice to the music or make the 
performance endurable ? There are fine pages 
in Rossini's Mass. We confess to a weakness 
for the "Stabat Mater," although it was com- 
posed as Rossini once remarked, "Mezzo- 
christiano." 

Rossini was also a man of biting wit and 
shrewd common sense ; he himself in his later 
years said that he thought his "Barber" would 
live and he hoped that one or two acts of 
"William Tell" would be remembered. Did 
he not snicker over Mery's dithyramb? 

It is a pity that there is no adequate life of 
Rossini and his times. We read that some 
Englishman is at work on a life of Donizetti. 
Whatever became of the elaborate life of Don- 
izetti, written by Francis S. Saltus, of this 
city ? Is the manuscript in existence ? 



-\V*R- G. K. CHESTERTON is some- 
J I I times amusing. In an article about 
<^| %, "Christmas Music" contributed to 
the Daily Chronicle of London, he begins by 
saying that he knows nothing about music and 
his favorite instrument is the telephone. "At 
least I get through on the telephone ; somebody 
has an impression that I am saying something; 
and that is more than can be said for some of 
the most modern music, though conducted with 
the fullest orchestration." The rat-catcher 
and other ornaments of his country town 
moved his soul on a Christmas Eve by singing 
carols. "The singing may not have been very 
good, but it was not very bad; not so bad as 
some drawing-room singing. Yet fashionable 
people of the advanced or cultivated kind pre- 
fers to find a kind of torture in such very or- 
dinary tones." 

"Wow," says Mr. Chesterton, "I suppose 
my rat-catcher had conducted an orchestra in 
my garden consisting entirely of the singing 
of 200 cracked dinner bells, of the shrieking 
of 5,000 slate pencils, the scraping of iron 
spades (as a substitute for violins), the unre- 
mitting repetition throughout the proceedings 
of the first line of 'God Save the King* on a 
piano with the last note missing; with some 
hundred choruses of nocturnal cats, for those 
who dislike them, and plenty of tearing and 
rending of calico for some who dislike that. 
Suppose, I say, he had culled all these flowers 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



75 



of melody to express Christmas, the very same 
fashionable people would probably have talked 
of him as a great Futurist Musician, and said 
he was rather wonderful. If the Christmas 
'wait/ or mummer is moderately good he is 
despised; but if he had been immoderately 
bad he would have been worshipped. They 
treat a man as their inferior if he has produced 
something of beauty; they treat him as their 
superior if he has produced nothing but ugli- 
ness." 

Mr. Chesterton, first saying that he knows 
nothing about music, writes a column about it. 

Certain young enthusiasts in this country 
not knowing anything about music, but neg- 
lecting to proclaim their ignorance, write 
pages about the art. 



CHEN there are the inquisitive persons 
who are always asking what this so- 
nata or that fantasia means ? Witness 
the man that wrote not long ago to a music 
periodical asking if it were true that Rach- 
maninoff's Prelude in C sharp minor was 
"supposed to represent the feelings of a man 
who has been buried alive by mistake and 
wakes and realizes his position." If it did, the 
fact should have been mentioned in the pian- 
ist's program, so that the hearer could have 
dilated with the proper emotion. 



<Wy LfeON DAUDET, the son of Al- 

y I I phonse Daudet, is writing his 
^"1 ▼♦ memoirs. Three volumes were 
published in Paris last year. They contain 
many malicious, abusive, malignant pages. 
Few men that he knew, from Turgenief to 
Maupassant, escape. In the second volume, 
"Devant la Douleur," Daudet makes a curious 
study of "Wagneromanie" in France, the pas- 
sion that once raged for "metaphysical and em- 
bryological" music. 

Daudet noted the outbreak of this mania in 
the hospitals where he was busied as a young 
physician in 1887. He gives various causes: 
reaction; then the coming and going of 
French medical students, who took courses in 
German, and of German students visiting 
Paris to pursue the course in bacteriology; 
also because German metaphysics, "the curse 
of my generation," is the natural introduction 
to German music. As Nietzsche is the "third 
wave of Germanic impregnation" in Paris 
since 1870-71, so Wagner was the second. 



The reaction was against the materialism 
arising from the evolution theory. The foggy 
mysticism, the ethnic horizon, the excessive 
and sudden emotions that characterize the 
Wagnerian drama gave promise of deliverance 
to young and laborious France. It was as if 
the giants and dwarfs, the prophetic bird and 
the personifications of fire, iron, fate had 
opened a window and let in fresh air. Any 
student that protested in the name of propor- 
tion and traditional equilibrium was a bore, 
behind the times, a ninny. Daudet and others 
— he smiles now at his folly — admired espe- 
cially Wagner's librettos. "We studied his 
most chimerical characters with an insane ar- 
dor, as if Wotan had harbored in his breast 
the enigma of the world; as if Hans Sachs 
had revealed free, natural, spontaneous art." 



CHERE is an amusing description of a 
Lamoureux concert in those days, with 
"Pere Lamoureux" distributing the so- 
norous and heavenly manna. As soon as the 
neophyte took his seat, he fell into a trance 
and spoke only in exclamatory monosyllables 
to his companions. Those below in the or- 
chestra seats, who had payed a high price, 
were considered an ignorant, frivolous herd. 
"Too often a huge woman would discommode 
a whole row of auditors, while Charles 
Lamoureux with his baton raised, eyes dart- 
ing sparks under his spectacles, waited un- 
til the disturber was at rest. What murmurs, 
sometimes invectives !" 



aLPHONSE DAUDET, loving clarity 
and sunlight, was a crazy admirer of 
Wagner's music but found the librettos 
boresome. There are little sketches of Pugno 
playing at the Daudet's ; of Massenet, and of 
de Sivry, the brother-in-law of Verlaine. This 
de Sivry, who had the appearance and odor of 
a brandied cherry, used to play and sing "Tris- 
tan" at one o'clock in the morning, now and 
then stopping, to say "Catulle Mandee is a 
very bad man." One does not know how per- 
fidious Catulle Mandee is." In the third 
volume there is an account of Massenet at the 
house of Gustav Dreyfus. "Komm doch, Herr 
Massenet will etwas spielen." Massenet would 
go to the piano, strike a few chords, clasp his 
head with his hands, cry out that he suddenly 
had the headache, wait to be entreated, sit 
down again, and finally play a polka of 1830, 



/6 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



saying to the girls : "Why don't you dance !" 
and to fat Seligman, seizing him by the arm- 
pits : "Tanzen, balliren, valsiren !" For Mon- 
sieur Massenet had a vein of irony. "When 
I whispered in his ear : "What a fetid crowd !' 
he answered, chewing like a rabbit, 'My dear 
friend, it's modern society, it's a whirlpool, a 
whirlpool, a whirlpool.' They say that paying 
a visit to a widow recently bereaved, he began 
in a sympathetic tone : 'It's truly sad/ and then 
went on, 'sad, sad, sad, sad/ humm it to a 
gala tune. He w r as indeed capable of it." 



she uses the form "proven," but her statement 
is sound. Mme. Lehmann points out that reci- 
tative teaches "self-reliance, dramatic feeling, 
sense of style, authority, and variety of tone 
color." This is all true. 



CO go back to the Wagnermania. The 
young at that time were interested out- 
side of Wagner only in Reyer's "Si- 
gurd" and Lalo's "Roi d'ys." They were pro- 
foundly ignorant about Rameau, they ignored 
Gluck. As for Bizet and "Carmen," they said : 
"Pooh, pooh, yes, no doubt ; it's a pity he died 
so young!" Musical criticism was extremely 
mediocre. The reasons for which critics of 
the preceding generation had attacked Wagner 
seemed to Daudet and his friends what they 
really were, wretched and absurd. They re- 
proached him for his din, his obscurity. "This 
Wagner," exclaimed Zola, "bores us with his 
promentories. In his dramas one is always at 
the extremity of a cliff." 



^^^HE Daily Telegraph (London) review- 
II ing a. Bach concert noticed an air of 
^•^ deep solemnity in the performance. 
The singers and players seemed to be suffering 
from attacks of acute melancholia. "While it 
is impossible not to approve the spirit of reve- 
rence, it is not to be denied that too great 
sacrifices can be made to it, especially when 
the fact that Bach was a human being with 
human emotions is lost to view." 

Might not this criticism be made of oratario 
performances in this city? When will singers 
understand that rectitative is not always to be 
sung as if it were oracular," a message from 
the tripod at Delphi, or from a burning bush. 
The most prosaic sentence is delivered with 
the solemnity of a family vault. Words that 
are commonplace are emphasized as if they 
were examples of plenary inspiration. Mme. 
Liza Lehmann, in her preface to "Studies in 
Recitative," just published in London, says: 
"The vocalist who can deliver a recitative 
faultlessly is a proven artist." It is a pity that 



/^T LGAR in his "Enigma" variations for 
\JF* orchestra painted musical portraits of 
^^ his friends. Others have thus painted 
in tones either miniatures or full length por- 
traits. Rheinberger wrote a beautiful little 
fugue for organ and entitled it "Fesca." 
Tschaikowsky, in his piano trio, depicted the 
character, tastes, habits, of Nicholas Rubin- 
stein ; Schumann in "Carnaval" pictured Chop- 
in. Pierre de Breville drew piano-portraits of 
several French composers. We remember 
with a shudder Hans Koessler's symphonic 
variations "Dedicated to the Manes of Johan- 
nes Brahms," in which one variation shows 
Brahms as a friend ; another, as the friend of 
children; still another as a friend of nature 
and a humorist. And now comes Mr. Eugene 
Goossens, a member of the Philharmonic 
String Quartet in London, who in a string 
quartet played in December, portrays one of 
his colleagues in each of the three movements. 
The critic of the Daily Telegraph, hearing the 
music, inferred that Mr. Beck with, to judge 
by the first movement, is a man of restless 
energy and high vitality. "It is to be presumed 
that the consecutive fifths at the close depicted 
absence of pedantry, and not lack of musician- 
ship." Mr. Jeremy, on the other hand, is a 
poet and a dreamer; while Mr. Sharpe, the 
hero of the finale, is a genial soul with a strong 
predilection for that popular air, "You're here 
and I'm here." But the Pall Mall Gazette 
took a serious view of the work which stamps 
the composer, "as one of the very small num- 
ber of men who may perhaps mould the mu- 
sical history of this generation." This critic 
says much in a few words. Mr. Goossens, ac- 
cording to him, is "a lyrist who cynically ap- 
propriates the processes of emotional insula- 
tion." If there be such a thing as poetic jus- 
tice, "he should end by wallowing in romance." 
And here is a sound view of .a mooted point. 
"It is right that a young composer should learn 
from his predecessors. That much is ad- 
mitted. We happen to be of those who also 
claim for him the right to learn from his con- 
temporaries, provided that he does so with 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



// 



discrimination not confining himself to their 
mannerism. ,, 

The writer then speaks of "the ironic pre- 
cision of Ravel;" "Stravinsky's hint to pre- 
serve polyphony from the ultimate harmonic 
fusion which is its ruin." 

Speaking of a singer, Mme. Baron Forari- 
ova, this critic praises her mezzo-soprano voice 
and adds: "The designation is so often mis- 
used by being applied to sopranos who are half 
proficient, that w r e emphasize the rarity of the 
genuine type that combines the best portions 
of two registers." 



*Yyy R * HERMAN KLEIN, whose vol- 
1 I I ume °f memoirs is conspicuous for 
^'l ^ inordinate self-appreciation, recently 
wrote a letter defending Sir Arthur Sullivan 
from the charge of writing pot-boilers after 
he had gained popularity. This led Mr. Robin 
H. Legge to speak of Sullivan as a "patriot," 
who forty years ago started the crusade on be- 
half of British music which is now preached in 
every quarter. Forty years ago many English 
musicians opposed Sullivan in this crusade. 
Not daunted, he founded the National Train- 
ing School that furnished the basis for the 
Royal College of Music. He strove to make 
the provincial musical festivals British 
throughout as far as possible. He encouraged 
English students to steer clear of Brahms and 
Wagner. He championed the cause of the 
British orchestral player. "To the day of his 
death he never forgave the Germans for their 
maliciously unkind treatment of his "Golden 
Legend on the occasion of its production in 
Berlin." But does Mr. Legge in his heart of 
heart think that "the Golden Legend" is a 
great work ? 



%/%^^E are now informed that Sullivan, 
III shortly before his death, was writing 
^ / ^' a serious opera with St. Cecilia as 
the heroine and with the thought of Mme. 
Clara Butt. This statement is made by the 
Lady's Pictorial. But what became of the 
score? Ten to one, if there were any such 
opera even in embryo, Mme. Butt would have 
insisted on interpolating "Abide with me" with 
a cabinet organ in the orchestra. The same 
writer says that Saint-Saens was anxious to 
arrange a performance of "Samson et Delilah" 
at Co vent Garden with Mme. Butt as the 



temptress ; but at the time this opera was not 
allowed on the English stage on account of its 
Biblical subject. We have seen fat ladies 
as Delilah. Mme. Butt would probably have 
been the tallest with the possible exception of 
Mme. Flahaut. 



SULLIVAN'S genius was undoubtedly 
in comic opera. His serious works are 
conventional and mediocre. "Ivan- 
hoe," "The Golden Legend," "The Prodigal 
Son," are not to be ranked from a purely mu- 
sical view with many of his operettas. There 
is no greater nonsense than the cry that he 
failed to rise to his opportunities; that he 
wasted his talents for the sake of money and 
immediate popular success. 



^%^%E have noted Sullivan's work in be- 
III half of the British orchestral player. 
^^^ No less a man than Sir Charles V. 
San ford has come out as a chauvinist in a 
letter written to the London Times. He states 
first that the British Government has always 
been conspicuous for its isolated attitude to- 
wards the art of music which it persists in 
treating as a frivolous luxury. The yearly 
endowment is £13,000 against a sum of six 
figures given to the other arts and to litera- 
ture. The Government deliberately hampers 
the work of the two English music schools and 
inflicts a disaster on the Royal Irish Academy 
of Music. 

"But there is another aspect, and a serious 
one, of the question. From the days of Han- 
del to the time of Queen Victoria the country- 
was overrun by hordes of German players and 
teachers. During the last thirty years this in- 
vasion has been steadily checked and repelled 
by the great educational work of these schools 
amongst home-bred musicians; the result can 
be seen (to mention only one branch) in the 
British orchestras, which are admitted even by 
foreign conductors to be the finest in the 
world, as they undoubtedly are." 

"The finest in the world?" Sir Charles 
should hear the Boston symphony orchestra, 
the Chicago orchestra, the Philharmonic or- 
chestra of this city when it is at its best, the 
Metropolitan House Orchestra under a con- 
ductor like Toscanini. There are orchestras 
in Paris, Dresden, Vienna, that are by no 
means inconsiderable. 



78 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




Cbe "five" 

By Ellen von Tidebohl 

|ESAR CUI was one of the "Five," 
the five great men, who were closely 
bound together by the striving to- 
wards perfection. They felt the 
same fervent devotion to Russian art and 
formed an intimate circle in order to raise the 
national music to the height that other nations 
had already attained. At present they are 
widely known tp the whole musical world: 
Mill Balakirev, Alexander Borodin, Modest 
Moussorgski, Nikolai Rimski-Korsakov and 
Cesar Cui. 

Cesar Cui is the only one still living of the 
"Five." He celebrated his 8oth anniversary 
in January, 1915, and still continues his work 
of composition and writing.- His soul in which 
from his youth sparkled a fine enthusiasm for 
all good and noble things, is illuminated till 
the present day by a sacred fire. He remained 
always faithful to his high principles and 
ideals, carrying upright the standard of his 
beloved art. 

It was at the epoch of 1860-70, when the 
work of the "Five" went on at Petrograd. 
They were sarcastically called "The Mighty 
Clique" by their antagonists, with whom the 
struggle for saving the national music had 
begun. 

The "Five" were all dilettanti in mu- 
sic: Borodin was a doctor of medicine and 
chemistry and worked hard in the realm of 
science. Moussorgski was an officer of the 
Guards and later a functionary (bureaucrat), 
Rimski-Korsakov was in the Russian Navy. 
Cesar Cui was an engineer in military service. 

Music was for them a "passe temps," al- 
though a thing of love. Nevertheless led by 
their exceptionally high musical gifts, they 
studied seriously and attained the glory which 
surrounds their names. Mili Balakirev was 
the only one who entirely devoted himself to 
music. By reason of his superior attainments 
and technical musical education, he deeply in- 
fluenced the others of his group. Under his 
sway they became conscious of what their aim 
was to be. 

Cesar Cui was born in Vilna, 1835; his 
father was French, his mother Polish. He was 
lucky enough to have for his teacher Monius- 
zko, a famous Polish composer, who early rec- 
ognized the exceptionally brilliant musical en- 



dowment of the boy- Cesar Cui entered the 
Military Academy of Engineers of Petrograd. 
With time he was named there professor and 
distinguished himself by very valuable scien- 
tific essays and works in the branch of forti 
fication. He attained the rank of General and 
has received numberless marks of distinction, 
Eight members of the Imperial family wcrt 
his pupils for the subject of fortification, 

The complicated functions could not prevent 
Cesar Cui working in music and composing 
He is of the Romantic School of Chopin, 
Schubert, Schumann, Liszt. Russian melodies 
are seldom heard in his music. He liked 




NIKOLAI RIMSKI-KORSAKOV 

miniature- form even for orchestra and for 
some of his operas. His melodies are rather 
sweet and smooth, not adapted for tragic ex- 
periences. Sincerity of feeling and beauty in 
melodic line and harmonic structure are the 
characteristic features of his compositions. He 
scrupulously worked out every detail, but there 
is a lack of breadth and fanciful flight in his 
conception. He never cared for Wagner's mu- 
sic and was quite indifferent to it. He com- 
posed piano-pieces, chamber-music, pieces for 
orchestra and operas, ten in number. The 
number of his songs (Lieder) amounts to 3oo 
and was a rich donation to his nation. He is 
working and composing till the present day 
with freshness of mind. 

The antagonists of the "Mighty CliqtH 
were composers, musicians and critics, who 
recognized as noteworthy only the western mu- 
sic, especially Italian music and operas. They 
despised entirely Russian music and behaved 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



"5 



Despotic, he required that the work should 
be revised, following his instructions to the 
letter, so much so that one found frequently 
entire passages of his own in the works of 
others. He was blindly obeyed, for his influ- 
ence was marked. Young, with bright, spark- 
ling eyes, a handsome beard, speaking with 
force and frankness, ready to improvise at a 
moment's notice, repeating without an error 
any piece once played over to him, he exer- 
cised an ascendency greater than anyone else. 
While appreciating the slightest sign of talent 
in another, he yet could not but feel his own 
superiority, as the other must needs acknowl- 
edge it. It seemed as if some magnetic force 
emanated from his person. 

But in spite of his great intelligence, and his 
brilliant faculties, he could not understand that 
a thing good for himself might be of no value 
to others, for those who, developing under dif- 
ferent conditions, possessed different natures ; 
and that their musical progress must follow a 
different path, and accomplish itself through 
slower growth. He required, moreover, that 
the tastes of his scholars should conform to his 
own. The slightest swerving was cruelly at- 
tacked by him. Raillery, parody were brought 
into play to humiliate the pupil; the latter 
would change color and renounce for a long 
while, if not forever, the opinion he had ex- 
pressed. 

A pupil in my position had to exhibit his 
work to Balakirev in its embryonic state. 
Balakirev would at once make his corrections, 
pointing out in what way it would be neces- 
sary to work over this embryo. Thus he 
would praise the first two measures, and then 
criticize and ridicule the next two. Strange 
circumstance, fecundity and rapidity of pro- 
duction were not approved by Balakirev, who, 
however, himself possessed the talent for im- 
provisation in the highest degree. 

He was at this time between 24 and 25 years 
of age, and he had already to his credit several 
romances of the finest invention, an overture 
on a Spanish theme, another on a Russian, and 
the music for "King Lear." This was not 
much, and yet it turned out to be his most pro- 
ductive period, for his fecundity diminished 
as time went on. 

In entering the Balakirev group, I took, so 
to speak, the place of Goussakovsky. The lat- 
ter had just completed his studies and had 
gone abroad for a long stay. His was a 



powerful talent in composition, joined to a 
strange, disordered and sickly nature. This is 
at least what both Balakirev and Cui stated. 
His music was fine, in a style redolent of 
Beethoven and Schumann. Balakirev guided 
him in composition, but he left nothing in a 
completed form; he flitted from one subject 
to another and his sketches were frequently 
not transcribed, but only survived through the 
memory of Balakirev. 

As for myself, I did not give much trouble 
to the leader of our group. I was always 
ready to remodel, following his advice, the 
parts of my symphony, and I finished them 
while profiting from his advice and improvisa- 
tions. 

In short, the Balakirev group, during the 
winter of 1861-1862, comprised Cui, Mous- 
sorgsky and myself. It is certain that Balaki- 
rev was as necessary to Cuit as to Moussorg- 
sky; in the capacity of advisor, censor, edi- 
tor and professor, without which they could 
make no progress, who would have replaced 
him in giving advice and correcting their 
works in the matter of form? Who would 
have prescribed the proper pitch ? Who would 
have guided them in orchestration and, at a 
pinch, orchestrated for them? Who would 
have corrected their simple faults of compila- 
tion? 

Of all his friend-pupils, I was the youngest; 
I was but seventeen (17) years of age. What 
I most needed was plenty of piano playing, 
good exercises in harmony, counterpoint, and 
ideas as to form. Balakirev should, before all, 
have seated me at the piano and taught me to 
play well. It .would have been easy for him, 
as I adored him, following his slightest sug- 
gestion implicitly. Instead of this, he judged 
me as inapt to become a good pianist, and, be- 
sides, did not deem it indispensable. He could 
not teach me harmony and counterpoint, ex- 
plain the syntax of music to me, for he had 
not studied them methodically himself, con- 
sidering them, at bottom, needless ; and so, im- 
posing on me at our first meeting, the compo- 
sition of a symphony, he turned me aside from 
all study. 

I was well aware that I was ignorant of 
many things ; but I was convinced that Balaki- 
rev knew everything, and he very dexterously 
concealed from me, as he did from others, the 
insufficiency of his knowledge. On the other 
hand, he was a good practitioner in the color- 



8o 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



with great bitterness towards the "Five," hu- 
miliating them in the Press and by every kind 
of aggression. It was then, that Cesar Cui 
launched out as a critic on matters of music. 
He cleverly expounded their aim expressed 
their opinion and defended the principles and 
ideals which the intimate circle of the "Five" 
had set for themselves. Cesar Cui's work was 
not lost — he helped Russian music to be recog- 
nized at its right value. 

Cesar Cui may fully rejoice at the victory 
Russian music has won in a certain measure 
owing to the efforts he has made. On the 
occasion of his 8oth anniversary, his compa- 
triots in Petrograd, Moscow and other large 
towns hastened to manifest their enthusiastic 
feelings to the venerated old man, who pos- 
sesses the faculty of a great soul — sincerity of 
feeling and a complete lack of egoism. 

In his operas, Cesar Cui gives great impor- 
tance to dialogues and recitatives. In this he 
followed the path marked out by Dargomysh- 
ski, the reformer of Russian opera. His 
"Stone-Guest," (theme of Don Juan) was a 
model of a new kind of opera, highly appro- 
priate to the Russian stage and style at a time 
when a new inspiration in the national opera 
was eagerly looked for. The "Five" owe great 
gratitude to Dargomyshski as the operas "Bo- 
ris Godounow," "Chavantshina," by Mous- 
sorgski, Borodin's "Prince Igor," Rimski-Kor- 
sakov's masterpieces were composed under 
the sway of the "Stone-Guest," a work of a 
new plan and from a new point of view in art. 

Cesar Cui composed in 1910 an opera, "The 
Captain's Daughter," the music of which is a 
real proof of the fresh inventive power of the 
old man. A romance by Poushkin, an entirely 
national writer, was used by Cesar Cui as 
subject for his opera. It was a difficult task to 
represent Russia at the reign of Catherine II, 
a tihie signalized by a peasant-rebellion on the 
banks of the Volga. The leader of the revolt 
was a highway robber, who named himself 
Tsar Peter III, assumed the airs of a despot 
and issued autocratic commands. Adventur- 
ers and peasants gathered around him and did 
much harm to the country. They were van- 
quished by military force, the robber Pougat- 
shew brought to Moscow in an iron cage and 
executed. 

It was a difficult task to illustrate by music 
such an event in Russia with all its character- 
istic traits, represented by Poushkin in mar- 



vellous descriptions. The subject was perhaps 
not appropriate to the musical endowment of 
Cesar Cui, and nevertheless "The Captain's 
Daughter" is an effective and very interesting 
opera. The songs of the lovers, the Captain's 
daughter with an officer and scenes of home 
life at the Captain's house in the fortress, are 
overflowing with beautiful melodies. The' mu- 
sic is bright and melodious and of lively 
rhythms, but the scenes with the masses lack 
sometimes force and expressiveness. 

Zimin's opera, a private enterprise in Mos- 
cow, chose "The Captain's Daughter" for 
opening the season of this winter, 1914-15* and 
gave it with all the care such a work required. 
Cesar Cui was present at one of its perform- 
ances and expressed his delight of seeing his 
production so well rendered. The beloved com- 
• poser and highly venerated man, who during 
his long life trod the path of sincere love of 
his art and single-minded devotion in the field 
of music, had the great satisfaction of receiv- 
ing marks of esteem. and profound veneration 
from his countrymen at his advanced age of 80 
years. 

In his person were venerated the "Five" 
who had so immensely pressed forward the 
national music. 




J\ Suggestion 

By Henry F. Gilbert 

[UBLICITY is one of the best 
friends of the Creative artist. It is 
as necessary to his continued devel- 

| opment as sunshine or rain to the 
growth of a plant. One can develop alone up 
to a certain point. But beyond this point one 
is apt to lose one's way ; to become too critical 
of one's self ; or not enough so ; and to get out 
of touch with actuality. If the work of a cre- 
ative artist is withheld from all publicity and 
consequent criticism, his work, as it cannot 
develop, of necessity degenerates. Criticism is 
a fine thing. It is good that thfere are critics. 
And although it is the fashion for most mu- 
sical composers to make fun of them, a group 
of honest criticisms frequently is of great 
value to the composer himself. Criticism in 
the long run undoubtedly exerts a constructive 
influence on an art. It is certainly a good 
thing that there are persons who stand upon 
the highroad and continually call our attention 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



81 



to it, lest we creative artists should wander 
too far from it in following certain enchanting 
by-paths. These by-paths, however enchant- 
ing to us may eventually lead us so far from 
the highroad of human thought and emotion 
that our work shall at last be of no significance 
to even the most broadly cultured persons. 
Therefore give us publicity. Without it we 
cannot develop. 

I am living at present in Cambridge, Mass. 
That pleasant city is as you doubtless know 
the seat of Harvard University and of Rad- 
cliffe College, and in consequence the home of 
many persons of learning and refinement. One 
frequently senses an almost old-world feeling 
of true culture here, while a high ideality and 
general intellectual "tone" is much in evidence. 
About every other month during the winter I 
receive an invitation to attend an amateur the- 
atrical performance. You must know that at 
Radcliffe College there is a little private thea- 
tre, seating perhaps three hundred. Now every 
few weeks on the stage of this theatre, there is 
performed a play which has been written by 
one of the students in the class in play-writing 
conducted by Prof. George P. Baker, profes- 
sor of dramaturgy at "Harvard" and "Rad- 
cliffe." The plays are cast, staged and pro- 
duced under the personal supervision of Pro- 
fessor Baker himself. The characters are sus- 
tained by the members of one of the most 
excellent amateur companies which it has ever 
been my fortune to become acquainted with. 
This company is permanently attached to the 
theatre in the nature of a stock company and 
is of course the most vital factor in the gen- 
eral scheme. That general scheme is as fol- 
lows: Professor Baker with his extensive ex- 
perience in teaching the art of writing plays, 
came to the conclusion a few years back that 
much time was being wasted, and much mis- 
directed energy was being spent, by his stu- 
dents in their attempts to write for the stage, 
they having no practical acquaintance therewith. 
It is by this time almost a commonplace piece 
of knowledge that a drama may "read" well 
and interestingly, but in its try-out on an ac- 
tual stage "fail to come across." In a word, 
Literature and Drama are two distinct arts 
which may or may not overlap as the case may 
be. And it can be quite definitely conceded 
that a method of procedure which is adapted 
to encourage literary excellence will in all 



probability be a very poor method of produc- 
ing a good playwright. 

Therefore Professor Baker dreamed of an 
experimental theatre in which should be played 
upon an actual stage the dramatic composi- 
tions of his pupils; where the pupils them- 
selves could witness the stage presentation of 
their dramatic conceptions, noting their strong, 
and their weak points, and eventually learn 
more of stage craft from these practical ob- 
ject lessons than from any number of theo- 
retical demonstrations. 

This dream was finally realized a few years 
ago in the founding of the "Workshop," the 
name of which well expresses its aim and 
function. The present home of the "Work- 
shop" is the little theatre at RadclifTe College, 
but I hear various rumors to the effect that 
it is to have its own private theatre before 
very long. On these delightful "Workshop" 
evenings a small but carefully chosen audience 
of — say two hundred — is invited to witness 
the performance. Each member of the audi- 
ence is urged to write a criticism of the play 
— to tell honestly how the play affected him — 
what is his opinion of it as a dramatic pro- 
duction — and to send this criticism to the 
Workshop Committee. After these criticisms 
have been read by the committee the signa- 
tures are removed and they are then passed 
over to the author. Thus not only does the 
student-author profit greatly by the object les- 
son of seeing his work actually performed, 
but he is able to feel the pulse of the public 
concerning it, as well. The practice of remov- 
ing the signatures before handing the criti- 
cisms to the author works well, as it has a 
tendency to bring out more honest and fear- 
less criticism, besides eliminating the awkward 
and unnecessary personal element. 

At the last quasi-private performance which 
I attended at the "Workshop," the play pre- 
sented was found to display such marked tal- 
ent and to be so effective from the actual stage 
standpoint as to require but very slight changes 
to render it a well-nigh perfect thing. It was 
later submitted in the annual Craig competi- 
tion for playwrights where it won the first 
prize. It is soon to be produced at a Boston 
theatre. 

To my mind it would be a waste of words 
to defend or to seek to justify the existence of 
the Workshop. Its value and use are self- 
evident. There is no question but that it is a 



82 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



fine thing, and that it is accomplishing the end 
for which it was created — i. e., to teach play- 
writing in the most practical manner — in a 
wonderfully efficient way. 

Now what I contend for is the establishment 
of a similar practical "Workshop" in the Art 
of Musical Composition. 

Every one who has studied orchestration 
and attempted writing for orchestra knows 
how difficult it is to attain to a just and cor- 
rect estimate of all the various dynamic and 
colorful effects of which the orchestra is cap- 
able, and to reproduce these effects with a 
sure hand. Also, if he has the misfortune to 
be an American composer, he knows from bit- 
ter experience how difficult it is to obtain a 
performance — or even a tryout in rehearsal — 
of his work. But yet one such performance, 
or tryout, will frequently teach him more than 
years of study and solitudinous pondering. 
Now, I therefore suggest that someone of our 
endowed schools of music engage a good or- 
chestra for, say two hours, every month or so, 
for the sole purpose of reading over, or trying 
out, compositions by students, of course in the 
presence of the students themselves. It al- 
most goes without saying that would-be com- 
posers would certainly derive immense benefit 
from such a course of procedure. 

It is all very well to say, as was said to me 
not long ago by an eminent composer here in 
America that "no such thing is necessary," 
that "the principles of orchestration can be 
learnt from books ; look at the masters ; what 
advantages had they?" and so on. The fact 
remains that no one can really learn orchestra- 
tion without some practical experience. It is 
certainly true that a few fundamental prin- 
ciples of orchestration can be acquired from 
books but it is also true in this as in many 
other things that an ounce of practice is worth 
a pound of theory. As for the masters, most 
of them either grew up with an orchestra, 
played in one, or like Haydn had one in con- 
stant attendance to try out all sorts of new 
effects with, and to fiddle with as he pleased. 

An American composer, who is today at the 
top, admitted not long since that the attitude 
of one of our German orchestral conductors in 
persistently refusing him a hearing had un- 
doubtedly delayed his development at least fif- 
teen years. It is known that even Wagner 
himself changed certain details of orchestra- 
tion after hearing actual effects in rehearsal 
and I believe that investigation would reveal 



many similar cases among those who are ac- 
cepted as past masters of the art of orchestra- 
tion. 

I attend all the performances at Professor 
Baker's "Workshop" and can personally tes- 
tify to the rising quality of the students* dra- 
matic output at "Harvard" and "Raddiffe" 
during the last two or three years. 

Not only would the establishment of an or- 
chestra for the purpose of trying out students' 
compositions be of inestimable value to the 
student of orchestration but these rehearsals 
should be of a quasi-public nature. Profes- 
sors, fellow students, composers and all those 
interested in the development of musical com- 
position in America should be invited, and a 
sort of publicity be thus secured. The final 
result of all this would be not only self-criti- 
cism, but the criticism of others so necessary 
to the development of the composer. 

Although I have had this idea in my mind 
for some years, I am not the first to bring it 
foryard. Some time ago Professor Rubner, 
of Columbia University, in a short note to one 
of our musical journals, spoke of the desir- 
ability of the establishment of such an orches- 
tra ; and I have no doubt there may have been 
others who have also suggested it, but whose 
writings I have not seen. I do not wish to 
bring this idea forward as an entirely new sug- 
gestion, but I do wish to emphasize its value 
and to earnestly urge its adoption. There has 
been much discussion within the last few 
months concerning the best use that could be 
made of a "million dollars" should such a sum 
be given to further the highest interests of the 
art of music in this country. Let me suggest 
that a part of it might be spent in the way 
outlined above to the great profit and educa- 
tion of that most important factor in our na- 
tional musical art — the composer. 

(Professor Riibner of Columbia University 
has already made the same suggestion. Pro- 
fessor Parker of Yale University adopted the 
plan some years ago. The orchestra is the 
New Haven Orchestra which gives a series of 
concerts under Professor Parker's direction 
and the advanced students are allowed to not 
only play their composition but also to conduct 
them. The Institute of Musical Art might 
combine with Columbia and engage one of the 
New York orchestras for a series of students' 
concerts such as Mr. Gilbert suggests, at a 
comparatively small expense, to the lasting 
benefit of all concerned. — Editor.) 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



83 




Some famous Singers no 1 

By Francis Rogers 

Regina Mingotti — (1728-1807) 
Caterina Gabrielli — (1730-1796) 

I HE operatic world of the eigh- 
teenth century was, to all intents 
and purposes, an Italian world — 
Italian librettos, music composed 
according to Italian traditions, singers trained 
in the- Italian school. Francesca Cuzzoni, the 
first great prima donna of whom we have de- 
tailed knowledge, was an Italian, as was her 
rival, Faustina, who after a memorable con- 
test of song superseded her in popular favor. 
For twenty years Faustina retained the crown 
of Queen of Song, but finally, in her turn, 
succumbed before the youthful and gifted 
Austrian, Regina Mingotti. 

Regina Valentini (Mingotti) was born in 
1728 in Naples, where her father, an officer 
in the Austrian army, was temporarily sta- 
tioned, but she passed all her childhood in 
Silesia. Her father died while she was still 
very young, leaving her to the care of an 
uncle, who placed her in an Ursuline convent. 
Here she learned to read and write and re- 
ceived such musical instruction as the estab- 
lishment could impart. Already her musical 
talent was sufficient to occasion remark. 

Her uncle's death, which occurred when 
she was only fourteen years old, brought her 
childhood x to an early close, and compelled 
her to return to her mother's house. Her 
mother was poor and utterly unsympathetic 
with Regina's musical aspirations ; to her way 
of thinking, a woman's ambitions should 
never extend beyond the performance of her 
household duties. In such an environment the 
young songstress was completely miserable 
and before long, in order to escape from it, 
married an elderly Italian named Mingotti. 
This Mingotti was the impresario of the 
Dresden opera and probably recognized in the 
young girl the promise of a profitable career. 
After giving her legal title to the use of his 
name and placing her under the tuition of 
Porpora, he disappears from the pages of his- 
tory. 

Under the great Italian master Regina must 
have made rapid progress, for it was not long 
after her marriage that she made her debut at 
the opera. Despite her youth and inexperience, 
the public at once discovered in her unusual 



qualities and soon began to speak of her as a 
possible successor to the hitherto incompar- 
able Faustina, who, with her husband, Hasse, 
had long been established at the Dresden 
opera. There is a tradition to the effect that 
this nascent rivalry was so distasteful to the 
older woman as to determine her to absent 
herself from Dresden for a time. 

In 1748, Mingotti made a trip to Naples, 
where she sang in Galuppi's "L'Olimpiade" 
with such unequivocal success that all the 
opera houses in Italy were open to her, but 
she was under contract in Dresden and soon 
returned to fulfil her engagement. 

She found Hasse and Faustina firmly in- 
trenched and ready for war a V outrance. Be- 
hind Faustina were all the resources of a 
highly developed art, the prestige of a long 
and brilliant career, and, in addition, the sup- 
port of an influential and resourceful hus- 
band. Against such weapons as these Min- 
gotti could oppose a lovely voice, an art still 
only in the bud and the charm of youth. 

The battle was hotly contested. There sur- 
vives a somewhat apocryphal tale of an at- 
tempt made by Hasse to display the girl at a 
disadvantage. Her strong point was her 
bravura; her cantabile was not yet perfected. 
To emphasize this disparity, Hasse, as direc- 
tor of the opera, wrote and assigned to her a 
difficult adagio. Fortunately for her, she had 
time to prepare herself for the test, and, with 
Porpora to train her for it, was able when 
the moment came to render the adagio in such 
artistic fashion as to convert probable defeat 
into complete victory. 

In singing, more than in any other form of 
art, except dancing, the vitality of real youth 
is one of the most valuable qualities. Faus- 
tina was fifty; Mingotti twenty. The issue 
of the contest could not long remain in doubt, 
and Faustina had soon to relinquish her 
crown to her young rival. The queen was 
dead ; long live the queen ! 

Mingotti remained in Dresden till 1751, 
when she was engaged by Farinelli to sing 
at his court opera in Madrid. The as- 
tute Farinelli well understood the profit of 
advertising a singer's art as something ex- 
traordinarily rare and precious, and forbade 
Mingotti to sing anywhere but at the opera 
itself; she was not even allowed to practise 
in a room from which her voice might be 
audible in the street. A special order from 



84 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the king himself was her only justification 
for breaking these rules. It is not hard to 
imagine how greatly such exclusiveness en- 
hanced the beauty of Mingotti's voice in the 
ears of the public. 

For two years Mingotti remained in Spain, 
the idol of the court and of all musical con- 
noisseurs. In addition to her handsome sal- 
ary, she was the recipient of innumerable 
costly gifts from her admirers, including a 
diamond necklace from the queen. From 
Spain she went to Paris; thence to London. 

It is in London that we hear her sing, so 
to speak, for the first time. Hitherto all we 
know about her art is derived from vague and 
often unreliable sources; at this point we be- 
gin to get our testimony at first hand. Dr. 
Burney heard her often and knew her per- 
sonally and well. He tells us that "her style 
was always grand^and such as discovered her 
to be a perfect mistress of her art; and she 
was a most judicious and complete actress, 
extending her intelligence to the poetry and 
every part of the drama." 

A certain lack of tenderness and feminine 
grace seems to have rendered her especially 
successful in masculine roles, but, notwith- 
standing this quality, among her most popu- 
lar airs, while she was in London, was the 
pathetic adagio that Hasse had written for 
her undoing. As to the range and quality of 
her voice we are somewhat in the dark. Prob- 
ably, it was a soprano of the usual compass, 
clear and brilliant in timbre rather than mel- 
low or sympathetic. 

She had no distinction of appearance. Her 
figure was too plump for grace ; her features, 
though expressive, were commonplace. 

For ten years Mingotti was the principle 
figure in the operatic world of London. The 
giving of opera was then, as now, a precarious 
business and we encounter Mingotti's name 
frequently in accounts of the operatic feuds, 
failures and successes of the time. She was 
a favorite with the public, although, as she 
told Dr. Burney in 1772, "she was frequently 
hissed by the English for having a toothache, 
a cold or a fever, to which the good people in 
England will allow every human being is lia- 
ble, except an actor or a singer." Other sing- 
ers, too, found the English public rough and 
overexacting, but as it was liberal with its 
money, most of them, Mingotti included, ac- 
cepted with more or less philosophy the hard- 



ships and exactions along with the pounds and 
shillings. 

The names of the operas in Mingotti's rep- 
ertory — mostly settings by mediocre compos- 
ers of neo-classic librettos — say nothing to us 
to-day. Such as these operas were, they 
served to present her satisfactorily to the con- 
noisseurs of her day, and after her final de- 
parture from London in 1763, continued for 
a time to bring her wealth and fame on the 
continent. 

Just when she withdrew altogether from 
public singing, we do not know; despite her 
youth, she seems to have retired about 1765. 
She had always regarded Dresden as her 
home, but in 1772 Dr. Burney found her set- 
tled comfortably in Munich, enjoying the fa- 
vor of the court and the companionship of 
congenial friends. She conversed eloquently 
and intelligently with the doctor in three lan- 
guages 011 various musical subjects and then 
sang to him "for near four hours." He 
thought her voice better than ever, as well it 
might be, for she was only forty- four years 
old. 

In 1787 she removed to Neuburg on the 
Danube. Three years later she made a last 
visit to London to introduce a pupil. Lord 
Mount Edgcumbe heard her sing privately 
at this time in "a tremulous, but still strong 
voice, some of her most admired songs." She 
died in 1807. 

Mingotti succeeded to many of the laurels 
accorded to Cuzzoni and Faustina, but there is 
little in her story to make us think that she 
was their artistic equal. A brilliant, intelligent 
woman with a beautiful voice, she made *n 
enviable name for herself, but her career 
seems dull and colorless, indeed, in comparison 
with that of Faustina and that of her alto- 
gether bewitching and reckless contemporary, 
Gabrielli. 

The term "prima donna" has a decidedly 
romantic flavor; it connotes public adulation 
and a private life full of jewels and luxury 
and affairs of the heart. And yet when one 
goes below the surface of things one is apt to 
meet with disillusion, for almost all the famous 
prima donnas have owed their celebrity to a 
number of quite unromantic causes, such as 
willingness to sacrifice all unnecessary comfort 
for the sake of their art and to work tirelessly 
towards perfection in it. It is a relief, then, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



8.; 



to encounter in one's reading the prima donna 
of our uninstructed imagination, a joyous, 
spontaneous creature like Malibran, to whom 
all the tasks qf life were easy and whose brief 
career was fuller of real living than the lives 
of any other half dozen prima donnas, such 
another radiant, captivating being, though of 
a less noble character than Malibran, was 
Gabrielli. 

Prince Gabrielli, who knew a thing or two 
about good eating, good singing and pretty 
women, was strolling in his garden one after- 
noon, when suddenly a most ravishing song 
assailed his ears. At first he thought it must 
be the voice of a nightingale, but it was too 
early in the day for the nightingale's serenade. 
When he paused in his promenade to listen 
attentively he recognized that the song must 
issue from a human throat and that the singer 
was singing in his own kitchen. The mysteri- 
ous song-bird was brought before him. It 
was Caterina, a bewitching lass of fourteen, 
daughter of his cook. 

Caterina was born in Rome in 1730. She 
evinced at an early age her musical gifts, but 
her father was too poor to have her educated 
properly. Yet she managed to acquire some- 
thing of a good musical style through her 
own instincts and occasional visits to the gal- 
lery at the opera. Her person was as lovely 
as her voice. 

Her discovery by the prince rescued her 
once and for all from the kitchen, for he, per- 
ceiving in her the promise of a brilliant ca- 
reer, placed her first under a Spanish master 
of singing and then under Porpora himself. 
She made her debut in Lucca in 1747 in Ga- 
luppi's "Sofonisba*" and justified in every way 
the expectations of her noble patron. Within 
a short time Gabrielli, as she called herself 
in honor of the prince, or "la cochetta" or "la 
cochettina" (the little cook), as she was often 
styled in reference to her origin, was sought 
after by all the impresarios in Italy. 

Notwithstanding her youth and lack of ex- 
perience, she was placed in close association 
with some of the most accomplished singers 
of her time, notably, Guadagni, the male so- 
prano, to whom tradition grants the honor of 
being the first of her many lovers. She was 
ambitious and intelligept and before long had 
developed a technical skill quite in keeping 
with the natural beauty of her voice. She had 
a stupendous success in Naples in 1750 in 



Jomelli's "Didone." Metastasio heard her at 
this time and was so struck by her qualities 
that he persuaded her to accompany him to 
Vienna, where he was all-powerful in operatic 
circles. There he took her under his especial 
protection, coached her in all her parts and 
introduced her at court. Emperor Fran- 
cis I became so infatuated with her singing 
that he would attend the opera only when she 
was in the cast. 

Her reputation as a captivator of hearts was 
soon as great as her artistic fame. As with 
Sontag three-quarters of a century later, to 
see Gabrielli was to fall in love with her, but 
Gabrielli always yielded to her impulses as 
consistently as Sontag held herself within the 
limits. of the convenances. So unscrupulous a 
coquette never walked the operatic stage or 
enslaved and tormented the hearts of men. 
She loved the stage and all that went with 
it. By preference she sought the society of 
her professional colleagues, but as they were 
too poor in purse to supply the demands of 
her extravagance, she plundered ruthlessly her 
rich admirers from the court, in order to spend 
their bounty in making merry with her stage 
associates. 

At one time the ambassadors of France and 
Portugal were rivals for her favor. The 
Frenchman, suspicious that his was a losing 
suit, managed to surprise the Portuguese in 
clandestine company with Gabrielli. Mad with 
jealousy, he drew his sword and thrust at his 
fickle charmer. Fortunately, her corset turned 
the point of his weapon, so that she was only 
scratched, but at the sight of her blood the 
Frenchman, in an agony of contrition, fell on 
his knees and implored her pardon. As the 
price of her forgiveness he surrendered to her 
his sword. It was her plan to keep the weapon 
among her souvenirs, bearing the inscription, 

"With this sword Monsieur dared 

to strike Gabrielli," but the tactful Metastasio 
dissuaded her from this bit of effrontery. 

She made her home in Vienna for fifteen 
years, amassing fame and wealth and emulat- 
ing Don Giovanni himself in the length of her 
list of amorous conquests. In 1765 she went 
to Sicily and Naples, where she was received 
with the greatest cordiality. 

Her voice and her beauty were now in their 
fullest flower and her popularity as a singer 
was unbounded. Her own will had for so 
long been the sole guiding principle of her life 



86 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



that now she was all but completely unman- 
ageable. If she did not feel in the mood for 
singing she would only whisper her part, or 
else refuse to sing it at all. In order to evoke 
her best efforts the management would often 
place her lover for the moment in the front 
row of the theater. This device usually 
achieved the desired result, but sometimes her 
indifference was invincible and even Cupid's 
darts could not arouse her from her apathy. 

One evening she was expected for supper at 
the vice-regal palace. The appointed hour ar- 
rived and passed, but no Gabrielli. Indignant, 
the affronted viceroy sent a messenger to her 
house to ascertain the cause of her absence. 
There she was found reading in bed, having, 
so she said, quite forgotten the engagement. 

Not long after this piece of impudence she 
sang her part at the opera so carelessly that 
the viceroy, at the end of his patience, had her 
arrested and put into prison. But she was too 
much for him, for during the twelve days of 
her incarceration she gave banquets for her 
fellow-prisoners, sang to them and played the 
Lady Bountiful so magnificently that the vice- 
roy, to pacify his resentful subjects, had to 
restore her to liberty. It is reported that 
about this time the Neapolitan managers were 
paying her some $4,500 a night, which fee, if it 
ever was paid her, would put her at the head 
of all the great money-making singers of her 
century, and on a level with Patti and Caruso, 
reputed to be the greatest moneymakers among 
living singers. But the prudent historian puts 
a question mark after all figures mentioned in 
operatic history — in the pursuit of accuracy di- 
vision is more serviceable than multiplication. 

In 1767 Gabrielli took Parma by storm. 
Her most important captive was the Infant 
Don Philip, whose infatuation was complete. 
This unfortunate man was partially crippled 
and not at all to the taste of the self-willed 
Gabrielli, who, oblivious of his rank, treated 
him like a dog. On one occasion, hoping to 
conquer her proud spirit, he locked her into 
her own apartment, but was called "a cursed 
hunchback" for his pains. 

She soon tired of Parma and her princely 
suitor and made her way to Russia, where she 
demanded a salary of 5,000 ducats. When the 
Empress Catherine remonstrated that this was 
larger than the salary of a field-marshal, Ga- 
brielli replied saucily, much as Caffarelli had 
replied on a similar occasion, "In that case, 



madam, pray get your field-marshals to sing 
for you." The empress yielded the point good- 
humoredly. Gabrielli remained three years in 
Russia and might have made a longer stay, had 
she not been so imprudent as to have an affair 
with Prince Potemkin, one of the empress's 
own favorites. 

Gabrielli had never been willing to submit 
her capricious self to the caprices of the Eng- 
lish public and it was not until 1775, when her 
powers were decidedly on the wane, that she 
consented to brave the criticism of London. 
Her continental reputation had prepared her 
audiences for something quite extraordinary 
and they were especially keen to compare her 
with Agujari, who at that time was their reign- 
ing favorite. 

Gabrielli seems to have taken little pains to 
please her new public. Even on the opening 
night her embellishments were common-place 
and carelessly executed. Not once did she ex- 
hibit the most essential of all ornaments, ac- 
cording to contemporary taste, the shake. 
Nevertheless, her debut was far from a fail- 
ure, and as the season advanced she won a 
considerable popularity and the London audi- 
ences, which had disgusted Mingotti by their 
unreasonableness, appear to have treated Ga- 
brielli and her indifference with singular re- 
straint. Occasionally, when for any reason 
she preferred not to sing, she would substi- 
tute for herself her sister, an inferior singer 
who always travelled with her, but even this 
shabby treatment aroused no great resentment. 

Three operas are mentioned in connection 
with her London engagement: "Didone," by 
Sacchini, "La Yestale," by Vento and "Cajo 
Mario, ,, by Piccini — all dead and forgotten 
now. As Browning says, 

"But in music we know how fashions end." 

Dr. Burney tells us a good deal that is in- 
teresting about this famous prima donna. He 
found much to praise in her voice and execu- 
tion, but thought her singing as a whole in- 
ferior to Agujari's. Her beauty and charm he 
considered altogether exceptional. He wrote: 
'There was such grace and dignity in her ges- 
tures and deportment as caught every unpre- 
judiced eye; indeed, she filled the stage, and 
occupied the attention of the spectators so 
much, that they could look at nothing else 
while she was in view." Fanny Burney, too, 
admired heartily her mature loveliness of per- 
son. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



87 



On closer acquaintance the doctor found 
her "the most intelligent and best-bred vir- 
tuosa with whom he had ever conversed, not 
only on the subject of music, but on every sub- 
ject concerning which a well-educated female, 
who had seen the world, might be expected to 
have information." He could discover "no 
indications of low birth in her countenance or 
deportment, which had all the grace and dig- 
nity of a Roman matron." 

Lord Mount Edgcumbe, writing half a cen- 
tury later could only recall that as Dido she 
took great pains to keep her hoop-skirt free 
from the flames of the funeral pyre on which 
she was supposed to be incinerating herself. 

She stayed in London but one season, and 
in 1777 we find her singing in Venice with the 
male soprano, Pacchierotti. On the opening 
night of their engagement Pacchierotti was al- 
most prostrated in advance by the mere pres- 
tige of his colleague's name, and when from 
the wings he heard her first phrases, he cried 
in his misery, "Ah! woe is me! I am un- 
done !" Fortunately, he was able to pull him- 
self together before his own entrance and to 
do honor to the famous company in which he 
found himself. 

Three years later Gabrielli was associated 
in Milan with Marchesi, another much ad- 
mired male soprano. He was in his full prime, 
she had reached the half -century mark, but 
she still retained enough of her old magic to 
sustain creditably the struggle for popular ap- 
probation. Fully half of the critical Milanese 
public could not be persuaded she was not the 
greater of the two artists. 

After this brilliant season she retired defi- 
nitely from the stage and made a home for 
herself in Rome. For more than thirty years 
she had been the best paid prima donna in 
Europe, but she had also been the most extra- 
vagant, so that now there remained to her an 
income only large enough to keep her in de- 
cent comfort. Of the remaining years of her 
life we know little or nothing. She died in 
1796. 

The extraordinary brilliance of Gabrielli's 
career furnishes one among many instances of 
the fact that great success need not be depen- 
dent on either a great voice, a great musical 
or dramatic gift, or great personal charm, but 
often is the result of a happy admixture of 
qualities none of which are truly great. Ga- 
brielli's voice, lovely as it was, was not so 



perfect an instrument as Agujari's or Band's ; 
in spite of her native grace of bearing, her 
carelessness must often have detracted sorely 
from her effectiveness as a musician and an 
actress ; she was a very pretty woman, but the 
perfection of her beauty was undeniably 
marred by a squint in one eye. But, even ad- 
mitting these imperfections, we find that 
the harmonious blending in her of all quali- 
ties render her, rather than Mingotti, Agu- 
jari or Banti, the real successor of the immor- 
tal Faustina, and enabled her to retain her 
queenly crown quite as long as had her lovely 
and talented predecessor. 



PRIZES FOR MUSICAL COMPOSITIONS 

A competition is announced, open to all composers 
in Missouri and in that part of Illinois included in 
a circle of fifty miles radius with St. Louis as a 
centre. The competition is to have no age or other 
restriction, except as specified. The competition to 
be divided into four classes, as follows : Orchestral 
Work, Chamber Music Composition, Piano Compo- 
sition and Song Composition. The prizes are offered 
by the St. Louis Art League, and the following are 
the classes into which the competition is to be di- 
vided, and the amounts to be awarded : 1. Orchestral 
composition (symphony, symphonic poem, overture, 
etc), $150; 2. Chamber music composition (string 
quartet or quintet, or piano and strings, trio, quar- 
tet, quintet), $100; 3. Piano composition, $50; 
4. Song composition, $50. 

The identities of the contestants must be concealed 
under pseudonyms, in accordance with usage in such 
cases. Contestants are required to enclose with their 
manuscripts a sealed envelope containing name and 
address with the pseudonym written on the outside 
of the envelope. The judges, three in number, will 
be musicians of high attainments, living in different 
cities and will judge the manuscripts submitted on an 
agreed scale without conference. The Music Com- 
mittee of the League, or a representative of the 
League acting with the Music Committee, are charged 
wkh the designation of the judges. All manuscripts 
entered for the competition should be sent by March 
1, 1916, to Mr. Louis Albert Lamb, 5746 Chamberlain 
Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. The St. Louis Art League 
Music Committee, from whom the announcement 
comes, consists of E. R. Kroeger, E. A. Taussig, 
Louis Albert Lamb, Mrs. Morris Skrainka, chair- 
man; Hans C. Toensfeldt, secretary; Mrs. William 
F. Saunders. 



In our December issue, regarding the organ at 
the San Diego Exposition, an error was made in 
reference to the donors. The donors of this massive 
instrument are Messrs. John D. and Adolph B. 
Spreckels. 



As the San Diego Exposition is to be kept open 
during the whole of 1916, the organ will be heard 
by thousands of visitors who have not as yet made 
the trip to California. The instrument has proved 
to be the most attractive musical feature of the 
exposition during the past year, and the popularity 
of the recitals seems to increase. Since the official 
opening on January I, 191 5, the daily open-air re- 
citals have only been suspended seven times by un- 
favorable weather. 



88 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



J\ Calendar of Concern 

JANUARY 

•EOLIAX HALL 

15. Aft. Philharmonic Society of New York, Con- 
cert for Young People. 

15. Eve. Piano Recital, Germaine Schnitzer. 

16. Aft. Young Men's Symphony Orchestra, 

Arnold Volpe, Conductor. 

17. Aft. Song Recital, Olive Fremstad. 

17. Eve. Piano Recital, Hunter Welsh. 

18. Aft. Joint Recital, Harold Bauer-Pablo Casals. 

18. Eve. Margulies Trio. 

19. Aft. Song Recital, Cecil Fanning (postponed). 

20. Aft. Song Recital, George Harris, Jr. 

20. Eve. The Singers' Club of New York. 

21. Aft. Piano Recital, Herma Menth. 

22. Aft. Piano Recital, Leo Ornstein. 

22. Eve. Song Recital, Sophia Kassmir. 

23. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Ernest 

Hutcheson, soloist. 

24. Aft. Recital, Percy Grainger, pianist-com- 

poser. Benefit St. Christopher's 
Home, Dobbs Ferry, New York. 

24. Eve. Violin Recital, Maxmillion Pilzer. 

25. Aft. Song Recital, Louis Graveure. 

25. Eve. Flonzaley Quartet. 

26. Aft. Song Recital, Robert Maitland. 

27. Aft. Violin Recital, Albert Spalding. 

27. Eve. Nylic Chorus Society, Bruno Huhn, con- 

ductor. 

28. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Louise 

Homer, soloist. 

29. Aft. Piano Recital, Dora Berliner. 

30. Aft. Symphony Society of New York Louise 

Homer, soloist. 

31. Aft. Song Recital, Adelaide Fischer. 
31. Eve. Song Recital, Vivian Gosnell. 

CARNEGIE HALL 

15. Aft. . Joint Song Recital, Florence Hinkle, 
Herbert Witherspoon. 

15. Eve. Russian Symphony Society. 

16. Aft. Song Recital by John McCormack. 

20. Eve. Philharmonic Society, Yolanda Mero, 

soloist. 

21. Aft. Philharmonic Society, Yolanda Mero, 

soloist. 

22. Aft. Symphony Concert for Young People. 

23. Aft. Philharmonic Society, Fritz Kreisler, 

soloist. 

FEBRUARY 

JEOLIAX HALL 

i. Eve. Song Recital, Gine Ciaparelli-Viafora. 

3. Aft. Piano Recital, Ethel Newcomb. 

3. Eve. New York Chamber Music Society. 

4. Aft. Piano Recital, Herbert Fryer. 

4. Eve. Concert by the Jan Hus Choral Union. 

5. Aft. Piano Recital, Claire Norden. 

5. Eve. Piano and Organ Recital, Sarah Sokol- 

sky-Freid. 

6. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Marcia 

van Dresser, soloist. 

7. Aft. Piano Recital, Carl Friedberg. 

7. Eve. Calvary Choir with John Bland, tenor. 

8. Aft. George Hamlin, Song Recital. 

8. Eve. Kneisel Quartet. 

9. Aft. Piano Recital, Harold Bauer. 

10. Aft. Piano Recital, Louise MacPherson. 

10. Eve. Piano Recital, Margarete Volavy. 

11. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Josef 

Hofmann, soloist. 

12. Aft. Piano Recital, Ernest Schelling. 

13. Aft. Symphony Society of New York, Josef 

Hofmann, soloist. 

14. Eve. Song Recital, Grace Whistler. 

15. Aft. Piano Recital. Yolanda Moro. 
15. Eve. Piano Recital, James Friskin. 



AN APPEAL 

The Franco-American Committee of the National 
Conservatory of Music and Declamation (founded 
under the patronage of Mr. Whitney Warren, mem- 
ber of the Institute), 14 Rue de Madrid, Paris-j- 
courtesy of Camille Saint-Saens, Gabriel Faure, 
Theodore Dubois, Emile Paladilhe, Gustave Char- 
pentier, Ch. M. Widor, Paul Vidal. Whitney Warren-- 
makes an appeal to all friends and patrons of music 
on behalf of the composers, graduates of the Con- 
servatory, and also its present students, whether 
mobilized or not, who are victims and sufferers by 
the war. 

"There is no one who does not owe a debt to music 
for the profound emotions it imparts, and with this 
thought we come to ask you to give us the means, 
in these unhappy times, of sending aid to its com- 
posers. The war has for the time being completely 
stopped all possibility of work, both for those who 
take active part in it and those who remain behind. 

"Our committee has for its sole purpose to assure 
the combatants of our absolute solidarity, to occupy 
ourselves with their moral and material welfare, to 
afford them the tranquility of mind necessary for the 
accomplishment of all their duty before the enemy, 
by giving them the assurance that those who are 
dear to them will not want for succor in their 
absence. 

"It is to aid us in filling this double task that we 
ask you to respond to our appeal, and to send us 
your gifts, in whatever form you prefer, whether in 
money or merchandise. 

"Even the smallest gifts will be thankfully re- 
ceived." 

Gifts of money may be addressed to M. Blair 
Fairchild, Treasurer of the Committee, Franco- 
American, Banque Lazard, 5 Rue Pillet-Will, Paris. 

Gifts of merchandise, food, clothing, etc., and all 
communications, should be addressed to Miles. Nadia 
et Lili Boulanger, care the Conservatory, 14 Rue de 
Madrid, Paris. 



A chorus of over eighty voices has been formed 
from among the employees of the Xew York Life 
Insurance Company, and is under the musical di- 
rection of Mr. Bruno Huhn, the well-known musi- 
cian. The object of the organization is primarily 
to promote greater social intercourse among the 
employees and to furnish an opportunity for those 
who have musical ability to study high-class music 
and present it to their friends and the society's 
subscribing members. Two concerts will be given 
during the season in /Eolian Hall. West Forty-third 
Street, Manhattan, upon the evenings of Thursday, 
January 27, and Thursday, April 27. At these con- 
certs the society will render unaccompanied part- 
songs and works with organ and piano accompani- 
ment, and it will be assisted by professional soloists. 
Subscriptions may be sent to 'Edward M. Franklin, 
346 Broadway. 



The choir of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 
under Miles Farrow, the organist and choirmaster! 
gave valuable assistance to the Symphony Concerts 
for Young People at the concert which was given at 
Carnegie Hall on December 18. The concert opened 
with Adeste Fidelis for solo, organ, orchestra and 
chorus, and after the symphony the chorus sang a 
number of carols from various sources. Gounod's 
Nazareth, for baritone, chorus and orchestra, was 
impressive, and highly enjoyable were some of the 
solos given by the boy sopranos of the chorus. One 
of Walter Damrosch's arrangements, Three Kings 
Have Journeyed (Cornelius), preceded Adam's O 
Holy Night, for tenor, chorus, organ and orchestra, 
which closed the programme. Mr. Farrow proved 
himself to be a most capable conductor and the choir 
gave every evidence of good training. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



89 




j$ ecclesiastical music ® 

fiSe edited by (ex 

£8 G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc. 68 

® @ 

IE have on more than one occasion 
maintained that the huge size of 
our modern hymnals militates 
against congregational singing. The 
Episcopal hymnal contains six hundred and 
seventy-nine hymns, and as many of them are 
provided with several settings there are per- 
haps eight hundred tunes more or less. Other 
hymnals are nearly as large. A notable excep- 
tion however is the one used by the Christian 
Science churches. The English books are 
also "overgrown." The "English Hymnal" 
contains 744 hymns ; the old edition of Hymns 
Ancient and Modern 638; the new edition 
643; "Church Hymns" 658; the "Congrega- 
tional Church Hymnal" 775; the "Baptist 
Church Hymnal" 802; the "Methodist Hymn 
Book" 981 ; the "Primitive Methodist Hym- 
nal" 1 108, and the "Moravian Hymnal" 851. 
Of course some of the tunes are duplicates — 
as the total number is over seven thousand 
(in the English books) it is fortunate that 
there are some repetitions. 

Out of this enormous collection there may 
be possibly two hundred tunes that are, strict- 
ly speaking, "congregational" in style. A dis- 
tinctively congregational tune is one that 
"teaches itself," as it were, and appeals to the 
people so forcibly that they refuse to be silent 
when it is sung by the choir. Almost any 
tune, however, that is not pitched too high and 
that is tolerably melodious can be made "con- 
gregational" by constant use. 

Clergymen who bewail the lack of singing in 
their churches can learn something from 
Harry Lauder — if they are willing to take a 
lesson from one who is a past master in the 
art of teaching "theatrical congregational 
singing." Scotch songs are not very well 
known in this country, but it only takes the 
versatile "Harry" about a quarter of an hour 
to start a whole theatre full of people singing 
melodies they never sang before. Given a lit- 
tle patience, much repetition, coupled with 
persistence and the right kind of encourage- 
ment and the thing is done. 



In most churches far too many tunes are 
used. This is particularly disastrous in cases 
where the people are not provided with the 
musical notation of what is sung. Episcopal 
and Roman Catholic congregations suffer in 
this respect. In the denominational churches 
on the other hand there are plenty of hymn 
books in the pews, containing words and 
music. It is astonishing that the need of 
hymnals with notation is not more generally 
appreciated. 

The Methodist congregations have always 
been celebrated for their hearty singing. It is 
seldom that one can find a well managed, 
"live" Methodist church without plenty of 
music books in the pews. But if we are to 
believe the Rev. Dr. Harris there has been a 
decline in the singing of the Methodists. He 
says in the Southern Methodist, "One now 
hears only lighter songs sung without fervor 
or feeling, and instead of the faces of the 
modern congregation reflecting hope and joy 
as they sing, they who do sing look as though 
they are suffering with indigestion. Some 
congregations do their singing by proxy, and 
the choirs they pay warble in an unknown 
tongue." 

We do not believe the case to be as bad as 
this with our Methodist brethren. Perhaps 
the good doctor suffers himself at times from 
gastric disturbances. 

JR. CHARLES W. PEARCE recent- 
ly gave some excellent advice in 
the London Organist and Choir- 
master regarding the introductory 
voluntary in its relation to the church service. 
Although his remarks are supposed to apply 
particularly to village church music they de- 
serve the attention of all organists who treat 
the ingoing voluntary as something extrane- 
ous to the service. We read: 

"The first thing which engages the [critical] 
attention of the holiday organist-listener at a 
village church service is of course the intro- 
ductory voluntary. As it would be unkind as 
well as unfair to describe the playing of any 
particular in-going voluntary one may happen 
to have heard, the best — because most helpful 
— thing to do is to offer our village brethren 
a few practical suggestions with respect to this 
first use of the organ in Divine Service: — 

"(1) Don't choose too long a piece for an 
'in-going voluntary/ 




90 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



"(2) If you are obliged to cease playing be- 
fore the natural conclusion of the piece you 
have chosen, take care that you leave off at 
some well-defined perfect cadence [in the 
original key, if possible]. 

"(3) Be sure that the voluntary you choose 
is: 

"(a) not beyond the solo capabilities of your 
organ, nor of your own executive skill and 
technique. 

"(b) of a style suitable not only for Church 
use, but for the beginning of Divine Service. 

"Judging from the large number of opening 
voluntaries we have heard played from printed 
music in village churches, we are inclined to 
think that there must be a vast amount of 
piffle provided by enterprising and advertising 
composers and publishers for this purpose. 

"No one can dispute the fact that a pre- 
lude — if it is to fulfil its object of introducing 
something — ought to be at least suggestive 
of that which is to follow. At any rate it 
should contain nothing of a character irrele- 
vant or foreign to that of the thing to which 
— by its position on the programme — it ought 
to lead up. Nor should it be suggestive of 
mere dulness and boredom ; for the Divine 
Service which closely follows upon the prelu- 
dial or in-going voluntary is full of life, and 
demands an intellectual vigor and freshness 
from every single member of the congrega- 
tion. The opening voluntary, if it is to be of 
any use, must in some way prepare the minds 
of the village worshippers for the musical ser- 
vice in which they are called upon to take their 
own active share." 

PRESBYTERIAN contributed an 
article some time ago to a New 
York weekly, on the subject of 
hymns. He states that he had ex- 
amined a well known hymnal, widely used in 
Presbyterian churches, for the purpose of 
tracing the origin of the hymns and classify- 
ing the authors. The result of his investiga- 
tion will interest, and perhaps surprise our 
readers. We quote: 

"My first thought was to discover what pro- 
portion of Presbyterian authors would be 
found in a book that was in general use 
among Presbyterian churches. I rather ex- 
pected to find them constituting at least a 
plurality, while Methodists would come in 
second, Congregationalists third, etc. 





"Well, my study of this index showed that 
out of 291 authors of hymns there were — 

Presbyterians 25 

Congregationalists 38 

Unitarians 27 

Baptists : 27 

Methodists n 

Independents \ 8 

Dutch Reformed 3 

Universalists 3 

Plymouth Brethren J 

Roman Catholics 6 

Quakers 3 

Moravians 2 

Distinctively poets (men) 13 

Distinctively poets (women) 13 

Episcopalians 105 

HE Russian Cathedral choir gave 
its annual concert on the night of 
.December 21st. This is perhaps 
the only choir of boys and men in 
this country that can engage the attention of 
the professional critics of the daily press with- 
out being severely handled. The choristers 
had some very nice things said of them, al- 
though they did not entirely escape censure. 
According to the Sun, — 

"The music was all interesting and some of 
it was extraordinarily beautiful. The church 
numbers served to give to those who had not 
previously heard Russian cathedral singing an 
idea of the splendid impressiveness of the 
liturgy. Unfortunately the choir did not sing 
as well as it did last winter. There seemed 
to be several new boys in the ranks and some 
faces were missing. Probably some of the 
better trained boys have reached the age when 
the voices change and can no longer be em- 
ployed. 

"At any rate, the intonation of the choir 
was faulty much of the time and this greatly 
marred the effect of the singing. Those who 
are acquainted with Russian choir singing in 
its native surroundings know that bad intona- 
tion is not one of its common faults. But on 
the whole there was some remarkably inter- 
esting singing in the concert and the audience 
must certainly have found the whole entertain- 
ment stimulating and memorable." 

Faulty intonation was mentioned also in the 
reports in the Tribune and Times. 

From the latter we quote: 

"The choir has the deep basses characteris- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



9i 



tic of the Russian choristers, that are made 
unceasingly prominent in performance. Its 
quality as a whole is not always notable for 
beauty and fusion of the tone, and the promi- 
nence of the deep bass contrasted with the so- 
pranos gives sometimes an impresion of emp- 
tiness in the middle. Nor was the intonation, 
especially of the boys' soprano voices, invari- 
ably true. Mr. Gorokhoff has trained the 
choir to an extremely plastic and expressive 
delivery, following accurately his freedom in 
tempo, with great variety and contrast in dy- 
namics and eloquent modeling of phrase." 

The lack of tonal beauty among the boys 
of the Russian choir is not easily accounted 
for. The best choirs will at times sing off the 
key, but they are not often accused of impurity 
of timbre. There is a well equipped choir 
school connected with the St. Nicholas Cathe- 
dral, and the treble "material" is not only care- 
fully selected, but it is subjected to a contin- 
uity of training that can never be secured in 
average choirs. Exquisite timbre is to be ex- 
pected as a matter of course from choristers 
who have the advantages of the choir school 
system. 

Is it possible that certain peculiarities of 
Russian liturgical music demand (for the sake 
of general effect) a treble timbre that differs 
from the standard heard in English Cathedrals 
and in the best Episcopal choirs in this coun- 
try ? It is in the instantaneous response to the 
"dynamic" wishes of the director that the St. 
Nicholas choristers are supremely wonderful. 
In this respect they easily outclass all other 
choirs in this country whether composed of 
men and boys or men and women. They have 
the advantage of always singing without ac- 
companiment, both at rehearsals and in 
church. This not only disciplines the ear to 
a marvelous extent, but teaches the singer to 
watch the choirmaster very closely. In ordi- 
nary choir the choirmaster plays the organ 
and is not a "conductor" at all in the real sense 
of the term. If organs were to be abolished in 
our churches (they are not used in the Greek 
church) choirs would become more efficient. 

|T THE service held in memory of 
Lord Roberts at St Margaret's, 
Westminster, comparatively little 
British music was used. 
Sir Charles V. Stamford, 'who keeps an 
ever watchful eye over Anglican music, secu- 





lar and sacred, in a letter addresed to the 
London Times deplores the fact. We read: 

"Did the authorities of St. Margaret's, 
Westminster, wish to give a very practical il- 
lustration of Mr. Balfour's dictum 'We British 
have always taken a gloomy joy in self -depre- 
ciation' on Saturday last? They commemo- 
rated our most famous modern British soldier 
by a specially-announced selection of Russian 
music. We yield to no country in our appre- 
ciation of and admiration for Russian com- 
posers; but on such an occasion as this there 
are considerations of fitness and of decency, 
which should have prevailed within a few 
yards of the grave of Henry Purcell." 

The music on this occasion included Tschai- 
kowsky's anthem "How blest are they whom 
Thou hast chosen and taken unto Thee," an 
ancient Russian setting of the Te Deum, and 
a solemn march by Borowski, which was 
played on the organ after the Benediction. 

|R. WALTER J. CLEMSON, of 
Taunton, Mass., has revived the old 
country custom of the singing of 
carols by "the people" on Christ- 
mas Eve, following the example of the com- 
munity carol singing in Madison Square. 
The work he has accomplished in Taun- 
ton is quite remarkable and it is to be 
hoped that the example he has set will be 
followed by other musicians of note through- 
out the country. His method is to gather to- 
gether singers from all available sources for 
some half dozen rehearsals in a public build- 
ing easily accessible to all, and to prepare a 
number of well-known carols for performance 
"in the open" on Christmas Eve. This year 
he confined his chorus to three numbers — all 
sufficiently well known to enable persons out- 
side the main "choir" to join in. 

We quote from one of the Taunton papers : 
"On Friday night the singers gathered at the 
Armory at 9.00 and held a preliminary re- 
hearsal. Shortly after 10.00 they proceeded to 
the Green, where there was a vast crowd 
awaiting them, showing the widespread inter- 
est taken in this part of the Christmas cele- 
bration. Automobiles were packed about the 
enclosure in every vantage point and the Green 
itself was so filled with people that it was 
with difficulty that the singers reached the 
spot near the fountain allotted for them. Ar- 
riving here, Mr. Clemson sprang to the top of 



9 2 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




a packing case placed at the base of the foun- 
tain, and with a megaphone called to the trum- 
peters at the balcony of the Taunton Inn. Un- 
der his direction an inspiring fanfare rang out 
upon the still, cool air, and this was followed 
immediately by the impressive strains of 
'Adcstc Fideles,' 'Holy Night* and 'Away in 
a Manger.' " 

In order to give the Taunton people who 
could not go to the Green a chance to hear the 
carols, Mr. Clemson divided his main chorus 
into five divisions, which, under their respec- 
tive conductors, visited various parts of the 
city and repeated the musical programme. 

To facilitate this plan automobiles were 
placed at the disposal of the singers by the 
city authorities and by persons interested in 
the movement. The revival of this ancient 
custom of carol-singing is in every way most 
praiseworthy. 

INQUIRIES reach this department 
of the Review, from time to time, 
regarding the opportunities af- 
forded to organists by the so-called 
"photo-play" companies. In a previous issue 
we pointed out the fact that there is a growing 
demand for theatrical players, and we con- 
tended that this demand would, sooner or 
later, for financial reasons, attract musicians 
of ability from the various churches. Corre- 
spondents have asked for information regard- 
ing instruction in this field of organ playing. 

As far as we know there is no school in 
New York for the would-be theatrical organ- 
ist. Some time ago we were informed that 
the organist of the Cort Theatre contemplated 
the organization of such a school, but whether 
the plan materialized or not we cannot say. 
Mr. Richard Henry Warren, who is now 
organist of one of the most important theatres 
in Boston, is interested in this kind of teach- 
ing, and he may in the future provide special 
courses for Boston organists. There are sev- 
eral theatrical musicians of note in New York 
who would perhaps consent to take pupils. 

As a rule the men who have made a success 
of this new callingliave been self-taught. The 
first requisite is a natural aptitude for the 
work — without which failure is practically 
certain. A writer in Musical Opinion (Lon- 
don) gives the following description of the 
duties of the musical director of a "film" 
theatre. 



"In the first place it is necessary to realize 
what is expected of the conductor responsible 
for the music at a cinematograph theatre. The 
job is no sinecure. The performer must be a 
skilful improviser, with some sense of fitness 
and any amount of patience. There is very 
little music of any note that has been written 
especially for bioscope purposes; and even 
that which has is by no means arresting in 
quality. The work of the concealed musician 
at a picture palace is to provide a continuous 
and varied, sympathetic and always appro- 
priate accompaniment to the action depicted 
on the screen. As no special masterpieces 
have been evolved for the purpose, the per- 
former has to draw upon his memory and 
construct a kind of pasticcio of all he can re- 
call cemented with deft bits of improvisation, 
to emphasize the psychological interest — too 
often lack of interest — purveyed by the pic- 
ture shown. The work imposed upon the un- 
fortunate operator is really very trying, and 
in many cases the appropriateness of the 
snatches and the deftness of their association 
and assembling deserve high praise. Often, of 
course, a mere unmeaning medley of odd 
reminiscences of completely unconnected snip- 
pets is the result, but not seldom a good deal 
of skill and tact are displayed in the selection 
and combination of the items employed. 

"The art of cinema accompanying is one 
of the sealed mysteries. Why it should ever 
have arisen is an unanswered query; the laws 
of its practice are unwritten and the tribe of 
exponents has not yet arrived at the dignity of 
a royal charter. Nevertheless, when all is said 
and done, the pressing up into a consistent 
whole of fragmentary reminiscences and dis- 
connected snaps of dissimilar and unrelated 
compositions, so that they form a more or less 
consistent sequence in at least partial appro- 
priateness to the exhibited picture-play, is an 
achievement of distinct skill and by no means 
of easy performance." 

This has reference chiefly to pianists, but it 
applies equally to organists. The playing of 
some of the theatre soloists is very remark- 
able and as far as technique is concerned fully 
up to what is heard in the average organ re- 
cital of the better class. While some players 
manage to combine church and secular work, 
the best results naturally follow when either 
the one or the other is studied as a distinct 
specialty. 




THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 

J. WARRCN AnuKfcWtt. A G.O., WARDCh 
HAROLD V. MILLIGAN. P.A.O.O.. GEN. SEC. 



93 



S. LEWIS ELMER. A.A Q.O., SUB-WARDEN 
VICTOR BAIER. A O.O . GCN.TREAS. 



FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE, NEW YORK 



HEADQUARTERS 

At the regular monthly meeting of the Council 
of the Guild, at the general office, 90 Trinity Place, 
New York, December 27, 1915, the following com- 
mittee was appointed to nominate a Warden and 
other officers for the ensuing year, viz.: Warren R. 
Hedden (chairman), John Hyatt Brewer, R. Hunt- 
ington Woodman, Carl G. Schmidt, Walter C. Gale. 

On his Western trip, which began January 10, the 
following was the itinerary of the Warden of the 
Guild, J. Warren Andrews : Monday, recital in Alli- 
ance, Ohio ; Tuesday, recital, reception and dinner 
with the Warden as guest at St. Paul's Church, 
Chicago, 111. ; Wednesday, recital in Woodstock, 111. ; 
Thursday, recital in House of Hope hurch, St. Paul, 
Minn., with reception by the Minnesota Chapter; 
Friday, inaugural recital at the Hammond Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, Superior, Wis. ; Saturday, re- 
ception in parlors of the church ; Sunday, church 
services in Superior; Monday, recital in St. Paul's 
Church, Duluth, Minn. ; Tuesday, recital in Plymouth 
Church, Minneapolis, Minn.; Thursday, recital in 
Huntington, Ind. ; Friday, recital in Martin's Ferry, 
Ohio. 



THE GUILD EXAMINATIONS 

It is now only four months before the annual 
examinations of the Guild, and the chairman of the 
committee wishes to remind the officials of Chapters 
and all persons who intend to enter for the tests 
that it is time to take the matter into serious con- 
sideration, in order that preparation may be made. 
Information will be gladly furnished by W. R. 
Hedden, chairman, 170 West Seventy-fifth Street, 
New York. 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 

The following programme was presented at the 
Harvard Club of Boston under the auspices of the 
Chapter on December 12, with Mr. Homer Humphrey 
as soloist: 

/. S. Bach. Prelude and Fugue in A minor 
Josef Rheinberger. Sonata in D flat major. Op. 154. 
Fantasy. 

•Pastorale. 

Introduction and Fugue. 
Gabriel Pierne. Cantilene and 'Scherzando. Op. ,29. 
Edward Elgar. Sonata in G major. Op. 28. 

Andante espressivo. 
Cesar Franck. Finale in B flat major. Op. 21. 

New England Notes 

On Monday evening, January 10th, an animated 
discussion of "Organ Arrangements" took place in 
the rooms of the Howard Musical Association, Bos- 
ton, about 60 members being present. Messrs. Will 
C. Macfarlane and John A. O'Shea spoke for, and 
Messrs. Henry M. Durham and George A. Burdett 
against such "arrangements." The arguments ad- 
vanced on both sides were pertinent and strong. 

Mr. Everett E. Tructo advocated a middle ground, 
but deprecated modern programmes in which ar- 
rangements and transcriptions predominated. 

If such arrangements were confined to secular 



buildings complaints would lose some of their force ; 
but the advocates of strict organ playing decry the 
use of any music other than that written for the 
instrument as foreign to its spirit, and to that extent 
a debasement of its purpose and dignity. 

The speakers were all very much in the vein, and 
an extremely interesting discussion was followed by 
the usual supper. The Annual Dinner will take 
place on January 26th at the Boston Art Club. 



PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER 

The Pennsylvania Chapter gave its thirty-fourth 
public service on the evening of Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 14, in the Second Presbyterian Church, Phila- 
delphia, Harry Alexander Matthews, organist and 
director of music. The choir of the church, under 
Mr. Matthews' direction, rendered the following 
anthems : To Whom, then Will Ye Liken God, 
Horatio Parker; Souls of the Righteous, Rejoice 
To-day with One Accord, T. Tertius Noble; The 
Twilight Shadows Fall, D. D. Wood. The visiting 
organist was Mr. Edwin Arthur Kraft, of Trinity 
Cathedral, Cleveland, Ohio, who played the organ 
prelude (Paean, by Mr. Matthews) and a short re- 
cital, as follows : 

Concert Overture, D-minor. . . .H. Alex. Matthews 

Scherzo Gaston I )etlvier 

The Magic Harp J. A. Meale 

The Brook Gaston Dethier 

Ride of Ihc Valkyries Richard Wagner 

The organ postlude (Coronation March, by Tschai- 
kovski) was played by Henry S. Fry, of St. Clem- 
ent's Church, Philadelphia. 

The Chapter will give its thirty-fifth public service 
on Tuesday evening, February 1, in the Church of 
the Atonement, West Philadelphia. The service 
will be sung by the Cantaves Chorus of female 
voices under the direction of Miss May Porter, or- 
ganist and musical director of St. Paul's Presby- 
terian Church. Mrs. Dorothy Johnstone Baseler, 
harpist, will assist. A service sung by female voices 
alone will be a decided novelty, and the occasion 
should be one of much interest. 

The thirty-sixth public service will be given early 
in Lent at St. Clement's Church, Philadelphia, where 
the choir will sing a new cantata by H. Alexander 
Matthews, The Triumph of the Cross, under di- 
rection of Henry S. Fry, organist and choirmaster 
of the church. The composer will be at the organ. 



CENTRAL NEW YORK CHAPTER 

At the regular meeting of the Chapter in Utica, 
N. Y., on January 3, 1916, a lecture on "The Exam- 
inations" was delivered by Warren R. Hedden, of 
New York, chairman of the Examination Committee. 

On December 7 this busy Chapter gave a public 
service at the First Presbyterian Church, Little 
Falls, N. Y. The combined choirs of three local 
churches sang under the able direction of Reba 
Broughton Maltby, A.A.G.O., with Julia Etta 
Broughton as organist. The opening organ solos, 
the Pastorale, by Arthur Foote; Waldweben, from 
Siegfried, by Wagner; the celebrated air of Bach 



94 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



and d'Evey's Concert Overture were played by the 
Dean of the Chapter, De Witt Coutts Garretson, 
A.A.G.O., and Mr. Frank Bullock, of Little Falls, 
played, as a Postlude, Percy Fletcher's new Concert 
Toccata. The choral numbers included Tarry with 
Me, Baldwin, and Fierce was the Wild Billow, Noble. 



VIRGINIA CHAPTER 

Among other events, the following organ recital 
was given under Chapter auspices by William H. 
Jones, A.A.G.O., at the First Presbyterian Church, 
Norfolk, Va., on December 13. The programme, in 
which Mr. Jones was assisted by Miss Helen Smith, 
soprano, and Miss Ethel Nicholson, violinist, was as 
follows : 

Sonata in A Minor Borowski 

Nocturne in D flat '..... Chopin 

Soprano Solo: "The Lord Is My Shepherd" Liddle 

Benediction Nuptiale ; Frysinger 

Sposalizio (Wedding Strains) Liszt 

Spring Song. . .- Mendelssohn 

Concert Caprice J. Stuart Archer 

Soprano Solo: "Ave Maria" Schubert 

With Violin Obligate 
Fantasia on Scotch Songs and National Airs. . . .Macfarlane 



MISSOURI CHAPTER 

Two recent notable events of this active Chapter 
were an organ recital by Ernest R. Kroeger, A.G.O., 
at the Church of the Messiah, St. Louis, Mo., on 
December 5, the programme of which included the 
Pastorale Sonata of Rheinberger and novelties by 
Armstrong, E. M. Read, Kroeger, Foerster, Mans- 
field and Dubois, and a performance of Handel's 
Messiah at the Fry Memorial Church, St. Louis, 
under the direction of Alpha T. Stevens. 



MICHIGAN CHAPTER 

Charles Frederic Morse played the following pro- 
gramme at St. Paul's Cathedral, Detroit, Mich., on 
December 9 for the Michigan Chapter : 

1. Concert Overture in 8 minor James H. Rogers 

a. Ricercare Patestrina -1 524-1 594 

3. Pavane, the Earl of Salisbury. . .William Byrd 1546?- 1621 

4. Prelude and Fugue in F minor Handel 

5. Meditation Edward J. Sturges 

Prelude and Air de Danse Debussy 

from the Scene Lyrique "L'enfant Prodigue" 
Arranged by Mr. Morse 

Weinachtsabend op. 66 No. 1 Otto Mailing 

Finale to Act a Madam Butterfly Puccini 

6. Sonata No. 5, op. 80 Guilmant 

Allegro appassionato 

Adagio con molt* espressione 
Scherzo — altegro 



ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

Under auspices of the Chapter, a Thanksgiving 
Vesper service was given at the Presbyterian 
Church, Woodstock, 111., for the benefit of the 
Woodstock Hospital. The programme rendered by 
the choir, under the capable direction of Mrs. Fidelia 
Hamilton, was as follows: 

Honor the Lord Stevenson 

Praise the Lord Smart 

Pilgrims' Chorus Wagner 

Jubilate Deo Schubert 

And the organ numbers were: 

Cantilene Nuptiale Dubois 

O Salutaris Hostia Gounod 

Menuetto Boccherini 



gburcl) Dotes 

Nevin's Adoration was presented by the choir of 
the First Presbyterian Church, Shelbyville, Ind., 
December 26, under the direction of Homer P. 
Whitford, F.A.G.O. 

The cantata Bethlehem, by Maunder, was pre- 
sented December 19 by the choir of the Collegiate 



Church, New York, under the direction of H. H. 
Duncklee, O. & D. 

William Reed's Christmas cantata, The Message 
of the Angels, was presented December 19 by the 
choir of the West Presbyterian Church, Toronto, 
Can., under the direction of W. J. McNally, O. & C 

Matthews' The Story of Christmas was presented 
by the choir of the Eliot Church, Boston, Mass., 
December 20, under the direction of E. E. Truette, 
O. & C. 

Gaul's The Ten Virgins and a miscellaneous 
programme was presented December 12 by the 
choir of Zion Lutheran Church, Lebanon, Pa., on 
Mr. H. W. Siegrist's twentieth anniversary as or- 
ganist and choirmaster of the church. 

The choir of the Memorial Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., assisted by Mr. M. Milcke, violin- 
ist, and Mr. A. F. Pinto, harpist, presented Sir 
Frederick Bridge's cantata The Cradle of Christ, on 
January 2, Mr. S. Lewis Elmer, O. & C. 

On Sunday evening, January 16, the Rector and 
organist of Zion Church, Wappingers Falls, will 
exchange pulpits, consoles and choir stalls with St. 
Paul's Church, Poughkeepsie. 

On Sunday evening, January 2, Zion Church choir 
sang Gaul's "Israel in the Wilderness," under the 
direction of Henry E. Duncan, organist and choir- 
master. 

During December the following works have been 
presented at the First Reformed Church, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., under the direction of W. R. Hedden, O. & C : 
He Shall Redeem Thee, Gounod ; The Night is Far 
Spent, Steane; Behold, I Create (Holy City), Gaul; 
Prepare Ye the Way, Garrett; O Sing to God, 
Gounod; The Story of Bethlehem, West; Like 
Silver Lamps, Barnby ; Before the Heavens, Parker ; 
Hail, Gladdening Light, Field. 

At the special musical service on January 2 at 
St. John's Church, Charleston, W. Va., the follow- 
ing programme was presented: Song of Joy, Fry- 
singer; Hail to the Lord's Anointed, Havergal; 
Gloria Patri, Anglican Chant; Evening in Eb, Kim- 
mins; There Were Shepherds, Foss; How Sweet 
the Name of Jesus Sounds, Reinagle ; Blessed is He 
That Cometh, Cruickshank; The Radiant Morn has 
Passed Away, Woodward ; O God, Our Help in Ages 
Past, Croft; Introduction to Third Act, Lohengrin, 
Wagner. J. Henry Francis, O. & C, assisted by 
C. M. Estill, organist. 

Mr. Stanley R. Avery presented the following 
programme of his own compositions in the First 
Unitarian Church, Minneapolis, Minn., Novem- 
ber 2: A little overture for violin, 'cello, piano and 
organ; Cavalier's Song, Song of Jenny, and The 
Street Sweeper — three songs for baritone : Then and 
Now, Day and Night, and Gloriana — tnree songs 
for soprano; Salutation, for violin, 'cello, piano and 
organ ; Song of the Timber Trail, for baritone^ solo 
and male chorus; Scherzo, for violin and piano; 
two love songs, On a Balcony and Earl Haldan's 
Daughter; three songs for soprano; Fair Luna and 
Song of the Bell two chorus for mixed voices. 
Soloists: M. C. Ozias, soprano; M. G. MacPhail, 
piano; William MacPhail, violin; Dr. R. R. Moor- 
house, baritone, and C. Erck, 'cello. 

The thirteenth concert (seventh season) of the 
Choral Society of Upper Montclair, N. J., Mark 
Andrews, conductor, was held at the Presbyterian 
Church on January 4. The programme consisted 
of Haydn's Creation. 

The following programme was presented Decem- 
ber 7 by the McNeill Club of Sacramento, CaL, 
Egbert A. Brown, director: A Vintage Sons:, Men- 
delssohn; King Olaf's Christmas, Buck; Villanelle, 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



95 



Del Acqua ; Songs My Mother Taught Me, Dvorak ; 
The Musical Trust, Hadley; Hymn to the Madonna, 
Kremser; Tar's Song, Hatton; The Dawn, Ham- 
mond; Mad Scene, Lucia, Donizetti; Kyrie at Sea, 
Durrner; Sunset, Van de Water; Star Spangled 
Banner. 

We should like to again call attention to the 
midday musical services held in St. Paul's Chapel, 
Trinity Parish. The hour is 12 to 1, just when the 
neighborhood is crowded with workers from the 
surrounding skyscrapers enjoying a brief respite 
from their labors. What better offering could Trin- 
ity Parish make to the cause not only of church 
music, but to religion? The mother church, "Old 
Trinity," might hold a short choral service daily 
at the same hour; it would surely find plenty of 
worshippers. On December 24 the special chorus of 
women and men trained and conducted by the organ- 
ist and choirmaster, Edmund Jaques, gave a splendid 
performance of the Christmas cantata, The Divine 
Birth, by Frank E. Ward, the composer at the organ, 
and assisted by two competent soloists, George 
Carre and R. Norman Julhffe, which was enjoyed 
by a large audience, which filled the church. The 
next service will be on January 25, when T. Tertius 
Noble's Gloria Domini will be given, r Great credit 
must be given to Mr. Jaques for his work, in which 
he is most ably supported by the Vicar, Dr. William 
Montague Geer, S.T.D. 

On Monday evening, December 27, a celebration 
was held in the Parish Hall of St. Luke's Church, 
Germantown, Philadelphia, in honor of Mr. George 
Alex. A. West, F.R.C.O., who has served there as 
organist and choirmaster for the past twenty-five 
years. 

The Rector, Rev. Samuel Upjohn, D.D., eulogized 
the work of Mr. West and made manifest the sym- 
pathetic bond which exists between the Rector and 
organist. 

Mr. Henry H. Bonnell, many of whose fine 
hymns Mr. West has successfully set to music, 
spoke on the subject of church music and eloquently 
set forth its message to the world of to-day. 

Professor Walter Henry Hall, of Columbia Uni- 
versity, based his remarks on the subject, "A Musi- 
cal Silver Wedding." In speaking of the mischief 
that could be made by an ill-regulated music com- 
mittee (as analagous to the third party which in- 
variably attends marital infelicities) he said: "A 
celebration of 25 years of service means much more 
than a tribute to an able and distinguished musician. 
It is a protest against fickle and unstable musical 
arrangements, and, above all, in this case it is a 
triumph for the theory of responsibility to one 
head. The notable excellence of the music at St 
Luke's would have been impossible under the sec- 
tarian music committee theory, which too frequently 
causes musical divorce." 

Mr. Percy Chase Miller was spokesman for the 
Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Guild of 
Organists, of which Mr. West is Dean. He said 
that the respect and popularity of the Dean was evi- 
denced by his repeated election to that office. 

On behalf of the Rector and Vestry of the par- 
ish Mr. Reed A. Morgan presented a purse of gold 
to Mr. West, who acknowledged both the gift and 
the celebration in a speech as graceful as it was 
fitting. 

The New Music Review extends its felicita- 
tions and hopes to be represented at Mr. West's 
Jubilee Anniversary. 



Kelsey, Henrietta Wakefield, Lambert Murphy, 
Vivian Josnell. 



MESSIAH PERFORMANCES 

The usual Christmas performances of the Messiah 
by the New York Oratorio Society were given on 
Tuesday afternoon, December 28, and Thursday 
night, December 30. The soloists were Mdme. Rider 



Louis Koemmenich conducted, with an orchestra 
of sixty, and large audiences enjoyed the time- 
honored work, the rendering being fully up to the 
high standard set by this society. 

The rendering of the Messiah December 14, 1915, 
by the Festival Chorus, assisted by the choir of 
the Church of the Redeemer, was one of the musical 
events of the season in Morristown, N. J. The 
chorus is made up of eighty voices and is under 
the musical guidance of Kate Elizabeth Fox, who 
is organist and choir director of the Church of the 
Redeemer, where the performance was given. The 
soloists were Miss Jessie E. MacGowan, soprano, 
of Newark; Mrs. Anne Laurie Leonard, contralto; 
John W. Nichols, tenor, and Henry G. Miller, bass, 
of New York. 



Under the direction of Professor Walter Henry 
Hall, with an orchestra of sixty, this able body of 
singers gave a brilliant performance of the Messiah 
at Carnegie Hall on Monday, December 20. The 
soloists were Marie Stoddart, soprano ; Gildroy Scott, 
contralto; Daniel Beddoe, tenor, and Robert Mait- 
land, bass. The same work was sung by the chorus 
with the same soloists in Brooklyn at the Academy 
of Music on December 16. 



The annual rendition of Handel's Messiah was 

S'ven in Oberlin on December 16 by the Oberlin 
Musical Union and the Conservatory orchestra. 
With but few exceptions, the Messiah has been per- 
formed annually in Oberlin for nearly fifty years. 
This year particular interest was attached to the 
performance on account of the use for the first 
time with the chorus of the great organ recently 
installed in Finney Memorial Chapel. The soloists 
were with one exception local artists. Mrs. Mar- 
garet Jones-Adams sang the soprano parts, Mr. 
Charles H. Adams the baritone, Mr. Herbert Har- 
roun the tenor. The contralto solos were sung by 
Mrs. Pearl Kepple-Miller, contralto soloist of the 
Euclid Avenue Presbyterian Church of Cleveland. 



In the list of interesting performances of the 
Messiah this season must be numbered that given by 
the Yonkers High School Chorus at Yonkers, N. Y., 
on December 22. The chorus was trained and con- 
ducted by George Oscar Benson, the Supervisor of 
Music in the schools. Competent soloists assisted, 
and there was a large and enthusiastic attendance. 
There has been much discussion as to whether a 
school chorus can give an adequate rendering of 
such music. The performance in question gave ample 
proof that it can be done. It is unnecessary to point 
out the advantage of such training to the children, 
and only by such performances can we hope to edu- 
cate the children in the higher form of music and 
a love for choral singing. 



ST. THOMAS' FESTIVAL CHORUS 

Under the leadership of Mr. T. Tertius Noble, 
this chorus gave its second concert in December, 
in St. Thomas' Church, the regular choir of the 
church being augmented to about 100 and an or- 
chestra of 50 pieces assisting. The works given 
were Bach's Sleepers, Wake, and Mr. Noble's Gloria 
Domine, and as an orchestra intermission, Men- 
delssohn's Fingal's Cave Overture. Both cantatas 
were ably performed, and the choir took another 
step toward establishing itself as one of the most 
respected of the choral organizations of the city. 



96 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Obituary 

Charles B. Hawley,' composer and organist, died 
December 29, at Eatontown, N. J., from an attack 
of paralysis. 

Mr. Hawley was fifty-seven years of age and was 
born in Brookfield, Conn., and came to New York 
in 1875. He studied vocal music and composition 
and later became assistant organist at St. Thomas' 
Church. He was director of the Broadway Taber- 
nacle Choir for seventeen years and director of the 
Metropolitan College of Music for ten years, and 
was organist and choirmaster of the Madison Ave- 
nue M. E. Church for the past four years. 



Organ Recitals 

Dr. H. J. STEWART, at the Panama-California Exposi- 
tion, San Diego, Cal.. Dec. 18th. A program selected 
in honor of the marriage of President Wilson. 

Wedding March — Mendelssohn. 

Cantilene Nuptiale — Dubois. 

Elsa 'a Brautgang zum Munster (Lohengrin) — Wagner. 

Bride's Song (Rustic Wedding Symphony) — Goldmark. 

Introduction, 3d Act and Bridal Chorus (Lohengrin) — 
Wagner. 

Benediction Nuptiale — Dubois. 

Invocation from the Messc de Manage — Dubois. 

Wedding March (Feramors) — Rubinstein. 

F. C. BUTCHER, at St. Stephen's Church. Pittsfield, Mass. 
First organ recital of Historical Series upon the De- 
velopment of the Organ. 

ENGLISH SCHOOL. 

Fantasia (on the Flemish Chorale "Laet ons met herten 

reijne")— Dr. John Bull (1563-1628). 
Voluntary in F — Matthew Lock (1632-1677). 
Toccata in D minor — Dr. John Blow (1648-1708). 

FRENCH SCHOOL. 

Three Old Chorales. 
Gavotte — Old French. 
Rigaudon — Lulli (1633-1687). 

GERMAN SCHOOL. 

Choral Prelude ("Lass Mich dcin scin") — Strungk (1601- 

1664). 
Fuga in C — Buxtehude (1637-1707). 
Choral Prelude "In dulci jubilo*' — Buxtehude. 

ITALIAN SCHOOL. 

Canzona in G minor — Frcscobaldi (1582- 1664). 

Andantino in G major — Michelangelo Rossi (died 1660). 
P. S. CHANCE, at the Presbyterian Church, London, Ohio, 
Dec. 17th. 

Sonata in G minor, Op. 36 — Halsey. 

Fugue in D major — Bach. 

Nocturne. Op. 50, No. 6 — Foote. 

Will o' the \Visp — Nevin. 

Variations on an American Air — Flagler. 

Finale in B flat — Wolstcnholmc. 
SETH BINGHAM, at Vassar College, Poughkecpsie. N. Y M 
Dec. 15th. 

The Birth of Christ, op. 48 — Mailing. 

Roulade — Bingham. 

Prelude and Fugue in G major — Bach. 

Yieux Noel — Cesar Franck. 

Noel Angevin — Cesar Franck. 

Andante (Grande Piece Symphoniquc) — Cesar Franck. 

Scherzo — Viernc. 

Christmas Musette — Mailly. 

Toccata — Widor. 
T. TERTIUS NOBLE, at St. Thomas' Church, New York, 
Dec. 19th. 

Fantasia and Finale — Rheinberger. 

Prelude Solcnnelle — Barnes. 

Prelude and Fugue, in B minor — Bach. 

Andante Con Moto — Beethoven. 

March Funebre — Chopin. 
Dr. G. W. ANDREWS, at the Oberlin Conservatory of 
Music, Oberlin, Ohio, Dec 7th. 

Fantasia in G major — Bach. 

Vision — Rheinberger. 

Canon — Schumann. 

Spring Song — Mendelssohn, 

Finlandia — Sibelius. 

Largo (New World Symphony) — Dvorak. 

In the Morning— Grieg. 

Chromatic Fantasia — Tliielc. 

At the Convent -Borodine. 

Con Grazia — Andrews. 

Serenade in A flat (No. 2) — Andrews. 

Prelude and Fugue on Bach — Liszt. 
FREDERICK ROCKE, at the Cathedral of All Saints, 
Albany, N. Y.. Dec. 16th. 

Sonata No. i, in F- -Mendelssohn. 

(a) Andantino- Wolstenholme. 

(b) Finale — Wolstcnholme. 

Choral Prelude, "In dulci juhile" — Bach. 
Offertoirc sur deux Noels — Guilmant. 
(a) Noel —Dubois. 



(b) Musette— Mailly. 

Symphonic Poem, "Cordc natus ex parentis — Fearce. 
Mr. W. P. STANLEY, at the Ponce De Leon Ave. Baptist 
Church. Atlanta, Ga., November 9. 

Symphony No. 1 — M aqua ire. 

Minuet — Boccherini. 

Scherzo-Pastorale — Federiein. 

Caprice, In Springtime — Kinder. 

Epithalamium — Woodman. 

Slavic Dance — Dvorak. 

Andante Cantabile — Dethier. 

Song of Triumph — Turner. 
F. E. WARD, at the Church of the Holy Trinity, New York, 
Dec. 5th. 

Prelude and Fugue in A minor — Bach. 

Melody in C — Salome. 

Song without words — Lemare. 

Adagio — Raff. 

Toccata from Fifth Symphony — Widor. 
R. G. APPEL, at the Episcopal Theological School, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Dec. 7th. 

Festival March — Bantock. 

Sonata in B-flat minor (Second Movement) — \* 01 f rum. 

Song of Toy — Frysinger. 

Kyne Efeison — Keger. 

Toccata — Bossi. 

Choral- Prelude, '*In dulci jubilo" — Bach. 

Berceuse — Dickinson. 

Military March, No. 1. in I) — Elgar. 
DAVID McK. WILLIAMS at the Church of the Holy 
Communion. New York, Dec. 22d. 

Concerto in D — Handel. 

Adagietto — Bizet. 

Intermezzo — Bizet. 

Prelude and Fugue in B — Saint-Saens. 

Sicieliene — Bach. 

Grand Choeur Dialogue — Gigout. 

Elegie— Massenet. 

OfTerttiire in F — Batiste. 
F. F. DARKER, at St. Paul's Church, Richmond, Va., Dec. 

1 St. 

Concert Fugue in G major — Krebs. 

Christmas in Sicily — Yon. 

Choral — Preludes — Brahms. 

Messe De Manage — Dubois. 
PROF. F. B. STIYEN. recently at the Oberlin Conserva- 
tory of Music, Oberlin, O. 

Prelude in D major — Bach. 

Sonata No. 6 — Mendelssohn. 

Two Songs— -Waldeinsamkei? — Regcr. 

Nur \\>r Die Schnsucht Kennt — Tchaikovsky. 

(Arranged for Organ by Frederic B. Stiven and Arthur 
W. Politt.) 

Waldweben (Forest Murmurs) —Wagner-Rogers. 
Elfentanz — B. Johnson. 

Fantaisic Symphonique — R. G. Cole. 
PROF. S. A. BALDWIX. at the College of the City of 
New York, New York, Dec. 15th. 

Sonata in A minor — Andrews. 

Adagio from Sonata. Op. j?. No. 2— Beethoven. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 

Reverie in D flat — Turner. 

Will o' the Wisp — Nevin. 

Pilgrims' Chorus and To the Evening Star — Wagner. 

Finlandia — Sibelius. 
W. S. TOHNSTON, at the Cathedral of St. John, Quincy, 
111..* Dec. 26th. 

The Shepherds in the Field— Mailing. 

March of the Magi Kings — Dubois. 

Holy Night — droller. 

Christmas Musette -Mailly. 

Noel — d'Aouin 

Hosanna — Dubois. 
WARREN R. HEDDEN, at the Manual Training School 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 9th. 

Toccata in D minor — Bach. 

Andantino— -Chauvet. 

Fragment Symphoniquc — Lcmaigrc. 

Reverie — Saint-Saens. 

Toccata Dubois. 

Invocation — Mailly. 

Autumn Sketch — Brewer. 

Andantino — Lemare. 

Sortie Solennellc — Salome. 

J. T. Qt'ARLES, at. Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y., Dec. 

17th. 
In dulci jubilo — Bach. 
Es ist ein' Ros' entsprungen — Brahms. 
Wie schon lencht' uns der Morgenstern — Karg-Elcrt. 
Die Geburt Christi— Mailing. 
Christmas Pastorale — Mei kcl. 
Two Noels — Guilmant. 

DENISOX FISH, at the Church of the Atonement, Tcnafly, 
N. J., Jan. 4th. 
Adagio (Sonata Pathctique) — Beethoven. 
Aria, "Caro Mio Ben" — Giordani. 
Mcnuett (from Symphony in E flaO — Mozart. 
Excerpts from "Parsifal" — Wagner. 
Melisande — Sibelius. 
Warrior's Song-- Heller. 
Melody in G — Cadman. 
Cantique d'Amour — Strang. 
"Jubilate Deo" — Silver. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



97 



EDWIX ARTHUR KRAFT, at Trinity Cathedral, Cleve- 
land. O., Dec. 2 1 st. 
Concert Overture in D minor — Matthews. 
Melodic — T»chniko\vsky. 

Minuet in C minor from "L'Arlesienne" (M.S.) — Bizet. 
Fugue in D major — Guilmant. 

Largo from Symphony "From the New World" — Dvorak. 
Overture to "Rienzi" — Wagner. 
Christmas Pastorale — Harker. 
Largo — Handel. 
Gavotte — Martini. 
Christmas — Dethier. 

RICHARD TATTERSALL, at Old St. Andrew's Presby- 
terian Church, Toronto, Can., Dec. 2d. 
Fantasia and Fugue in G minor — Bach. 
Andante, with variations, from the Septet — Beethoven. 
Sonata N'o. 20 in F major — Rheinberger. 
Persian Suite — Stoughton. 
Triumphal March — Bantock. 



Reviews of new music 

PETERBOROUGH SKETCH BOOK. The Six 
Pieces for the Pianoforte by Lewis M. Isaacs. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

It is not often that a reviewer, when he has just 
finished reading through a group of piano compo- 
sitions by a comparatively unknown composer, will 
feel impelled to go back to the beginning and read 
them all through a second time. But such is the 
case with Mr. Lewis M. Isaacs' "Peterborough Sketch 
Book." Mr. Isaacs has written some delightful piano 
music, which, though not descriptive in an extreme 
sense, is poetic and none of the pieces in any way 
belies its title. The music was written at Peter- 
borough, where Edward MacDowell used to live 
during the summer, and Mr. Isaacs has dedicated it 
to the memory of the lamented composer, who was 
Mr. Isaacs' teacher. The music, however, contains 
fewer reminiscences than one would expect under 
the circumstances. In fact, there are no literal rem- 
iniscences at all, but the spirit which breathes through 
the pieces is akin to the same poetic muse which 
animated MacDowell. This is not an adverse criti- 
cism — a "Peterborough Sketch Book" in the style of 
Brahms, for example, would indeed be an anomaly, 
so thoroughly docs the spirit of Edward MacDowell 

Sermeate the very woods and meadows about old 
fonadnock. And, moreover, these pieces are very 
"pianistic," thoroughly in the idiom of the piano. 
It would have been wise, perhaps, to facilitate read- 
ing at the piano by those who are not virtuoso 
pianists to have provided a fingering for the more 
complicated passages. But while these pieces are 
not in the "easy" class, they present few difficulties 
to those who have a proper command of their 
instrument. 

The first of these pieces is entitled "To Mount 
Monadnock." The log cabin where MacDowell 
worked the last seven years of his life looks toward 
Monadnock and "the setting sun." And Mount 
Monadnock is visible from almost everywhere about 
Peterborough. This is the piece which has been 
played, while still in manuscript, with so much suc- 
cess by Harold Henry on his tours. The impressive- 
ness of Monadnock is well suggested. "In the Pine 
Grove" is next, with its quiet restfulness, while the 
"Forgotten Romance" seems to suggest one's efforts 
to recall something long passed from memory. The 
"March of the Woodland Sprites" is bright and 
joyous, although written in a minor key, and "The 
Churchyard at Nightfall" is mysterious and un- 
canny, though these ghosts are not very fearsome. 
"Sunset: A Processional" is a fitting conclusion to the 
group, a stately march movement, which is dignified 
and impressive. 

The musicianship shown in these pages is worthy 
of high praise, and there is no effort to be caco- 
phonous and ultra modern. It is only spoiled food 
that has to be disguised with ill-smelling chemicals — 
it is only poor music that needs cacophonous dis- 
cords to make it sensational. 



GOOD KING WENCESLAS. Old Carol. Ar- 
ranged with varied harmonies by W. G. Ross. 
(Novello's Short Anthems, No. 227.) 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 
Gray Co. 

This famous old carol is such a standing dish 
that most choirs will be glad to find it served up 
in a new guise. Mr. Ross, in laying it out for treble 
and tenor solo, chorus and a well-written organ part 
has done this very effectively. The harmonization 
is ingenious, though one or two of the augmented 
triads are perhaps somewhat too spicy to be quite 
in keeping. 

PRELUDE IN G. Henry Purcell. 
THE KING'S HUNT. John Bull. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The Purcell Prelude is extracted from an "Album 
of Ten Pieces," edited by Messrs. Norman P. and 
W. H. Cummings. It makes a capital study in rapid 
two-part playing, and is a bright piece of music. 

Dr. John Bull's naive descriptive variations are 
edited by Professor Granville Bantock. This version 
is taken from an album of pieces by the old vir- 
ginal composer. 

THE LAST SUPPER. Cecil Forsyth. 

New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

This is a meditation for baritone solo and chorus, 
especially suitable for performance in Holy Week. 
The text, which tells of the institution of the Lord's 
Supper, is well selected and forms a good base on 
which to build a first-rate work. It is such a libretto 
that has long been required for popular use, and 
which is suitable for ordinary parish churches. The 
story is told by a Narrator, baritone, in music which 
is highly reverent in style and vocally interesting. 
The opening theme, used as the leading motiv of 
the work, is excellent in design, developed with much 
skill, and serves to maintain continuity. Mr. Forsyth 
has divided the work, only thirteen pages in all, 
into five sections. The first section deals with the 
betrayal, told by the Narrator in solemn strains, the 
portion, "He that dippeth his hand with me in the 
dish," being particularly striking by reason of its 
harmonic treatment. Section two is a short, unac- 
companied chorus, "Let not your heart be troubled," 
which shows the composer to be gifted in writing 
dignified and reverent music of simple style. The 
third part is the Institution. In the two portions, 
"This is my body" and "This cup is the new testa- 
ment," the composer has succeeded in modulating 
in a way which imparts great solemnity to the text. 
Part four is given to the chorus, again unaccom- 
panied. The words, "I will not leave you comfort- 
less," are clothed musically in a simple, expressive 
and devotional style. In the fifth part the Narrator 
has a fine recitative which leads to the final chorus, 
"This is my commandment," a chorus of fine spirit, 
ending in triumphant phrases, "These things I com- 
mand you, that ye Iovp one another," which make a 
fine contrast. The work may be strongly recom- 
mended to choirmasters who do not desire to pre- 
pare a long cantata at a time when Easter music de- 
mands attention. "The Last Supper" will fulfil 
worthily all that is required at a Maundy Thursday 
musical service, and it is warmly recommended for 
that solemn occasion. 

OUT OF THE DEEP. Christopher Marks. 
New York: The H. W. Gray Co., sales agents 

for Novello & Co., London. 

A Lenten anthem of nine pages by the composer 
of "The Day Is Past and Over" is an arrangement 
of the well-known song, "Out of the Deep." It 
opens with a short chorus, which leads into a solo 
for soprano or tenor, and concludes with a chorus 
made up of the original theme. It will undoubtedly 
be a welcome addition to the Lenten programs of 
both large and small choirs. 



98 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



THE RECITAL SERIES OF ORIGINAL 
COMPOSITIONS FOR THE ORGAN. Vol. 8. 

London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The latest volume of this well-known collection 
of recital music contains six works. As they have 
already been noticed separately in these columns, 
a bare mention of them will suffice: Pa vane in A 
(Bernard Johnson), Finale Jubilante (John E. 
West), Scherzo in F minor (H. Sandiford Turner), 
and Reverie in Db, by the same composer (reviewed 
above), Scherzo Fugue (E. H. Lemare), and Epi- 
logue (Harvey Grace). 

The volume is handsomely bound, and would be a 
suitable book for presentation. 

THE ANGELUS. W. Vincent Wallace. 

New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

The music is religious in style, extremely tune- 
ful, and well adapted for an evening anthem; more- 
over, it is far from stereotyped in style, and will 
afford welcome relief. It is of the Rossini type 
of church music, possessing many of the Italian 
composer's characteristics, and no little of his vein 
of melody. It may be attempted by choirs of the 
most modest pretensions with certainty of success, 
and Mr. Elliot Button, the editor of the new edi- 
tion, is to be felicitated upon the work of arrange- 
ment. 

TEN STUDENT SONGS OF FINLAND. 

Kurt Schindler. 
New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

These two books of songs are for male voices in 
four parts. The titles are as follows: Summer 
Evening (containing, in addition to the four parts, 
a super-imposed soprano, or tenor, solo) ; I'm Com- 
ing Home; Finnish Lullaby; Fight; Song of Kul- 
lervo; In Harvest Time; Maryatta's Cradle Song; 
The Poor Girl; Dotty, Ditty, and a "Song of Ex- 
ile," the last named being a trio for tenor, baritone 
and bass. This is Mr. Schindler's first contribu- 
tion to male- voice singing and it is a valuable one. 
The selection has been admirably made; the music 
is wonderfully "taking," and possesses a flavor all 
its own. The distribution of the parts shows the 
hand of the experienced craftsman, and the text, 
much of which has been translated by the editor, is 
worth special notice. 

GRIEVE NOT THE HOLY SPIRIT. T. Ter- 

tius Noble. 
New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

This anthem is a characteristic example of the de- 
votional spirit which is so commendable in Mr. 
Noble's church music. A tenor (or soprano) solo 
of serious character opens the anthem and affords 
opportunity for both sustained and declamatory 
singing. The composer uses the same theme for the 
subsequent chorus, and this contains many impres- 
sive passages, especially the portion for soloist and 
chorus, "And be ye kind one to another." A strik- 
ing feature of the work is the rich harmonization. 

AN EASTER CANTATA. H. Brooks Day. 
New York: J. Fischer & Bro. 
The text of this cantata is compiled from the 
portion of St. John's Gospel which tells of the 
crucifixion and resurrection of our Lord, and some 
carols of Phillips Brooks. The work is laid out 
for soprano, tenor and baritone soloists, four-part 
chorus (with occasional doubling of each part), 
and organ accompaniment. Orchestral parts can 
also be had. Mr. Day's work shows the hand of 
the practiced musician. He has not sought to ob- 
tain exaggerated effects, but has subordinated his 
art wholly to the text he illustrates, and in doing 
this has produced an excellent short cantata. A 



religious spirit pervades the whole work, and this 
will be sure to make it of practical use in the church 
service. This Easter Cantata should enhance Mr. 
Day's reputation as a church composer. 

EIGHTY AMENS. Clarence Dickinson. 

New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

Mr. Dickinson has compiled these Aniens from 
various sources and has arranged them for mixed 
and female voices. The editor argues in his preface 
that it is no more desirable to use the same Amen 
every Sunday than to repeat the same Te Deum or 
Magnificat. His suggestions on the use and per- 
formance of these short compositions will be found 
valuable. 

THE CANTICLES AT EVENSONG. Charles 

Winfred Douglas. 
New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

Canon Douglas is an authority on Plain Song, 
and this little book is the forerunner of a Psalter 
which he will presently publish. The edjtor states 
in his preface that these "Psalm tones have been 
compiled with the purpose of providing greater 
melodic wealth than is afforded by the Sarum 
Tonale, while retaining the greater part of the 
latter in its accustomed order as a basis." To this 
end he has collected mediations from Continental 
sources, in forms presented by the Vatican An- 
tiphoner. He has also made use of the work of 
the Benedictines of Solesmes. Canon Douglas' 
work will be of distinct value to choirs who use 
Plain Song, and his book may be safely recom- 
mended as affording variety combined with purity. 

THE LORD'S PRAYER. Willis Ailing. 

New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

This is a simple musical setting of the Lord's 
Prayer as used at St. MarkVin-the-Bouwerie, New 
York. 

SERENADE lw A Wh^Mnn 

THE MINSTER BELLS J H - *• WneeMon. 

New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

Two capital little organ pieces, forming Nos.63 
and 64 of the valuable St. Cecilia Series. The 
Minster Bells will be especially valuable to or- 
ganists who have a set of chimes at their com- 
mand. 

OFFERING. Edward F. Laubin. 

THE SOUL AT HEAVEN'S GATE. Reimann- 

Dickinson. 
New York: The H. W. Gray Co. London: 

Novello & Co. 

These solos are suitable for the Offertory. Mr. 
Laubin's song is for a low voice. Words and 
music are both interesting and appeal strongly to 
the sentimental. The second number is a sacred 
folksong for All Souls, Easter or General use. It 
is arranged for soprano, alto and bass soloists, or 
it may be sung throughout as a solo for a medium 
voice. It is a quaint little composition of the 17th 
century, and, like the first-named solo, is distinctly 
sentimental in character. 



Suggested Service Cist for IDarcb, 1916 

Quinquagesima. March 5 

Jubilate™ J in F Horsman 

Benedictus — Chant 

Introit, Lord, Who Shall Dwell Roberts 

Offertory, O Lord, Who Hast Taught Vs... Marsh 

Communion Service in E Elvey 

Magnificat ] . P _.. 

NuncDimittis } ln E Elv *y 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



99 



Anthem. See What Love Mendelssohn 

Offertory, Behold, How Good and Joyful.. .Clarke 

Ash Wednesday. March 8 

Benedicite in Eb Clark 

Benedictus ) ru*~*. 
Jubilate J Chant 

Introit, Come and Let Us Return Goss 

Offertory, Blessed is He Selby 

Communion Service in C Monk 

NurStds } - Dmin - ™«W" 

Anthem, Hear Us, O Saviour Hauptmann 

Offertory, Turn Thou Us Purcell 

First Sunday in Lent March 12 

Benedicite in Eb Martin 

Benedictus ) rko«* 
Jubilate \ C* 1 * 1 * 

Introit, Jesu, Word of God Gounod 

Offertory, All Ye Who Weep Gounod 

Communion Service in F Dykes 

NuTSttis } in F "*« 

Anthem, Be Merciful Unto Me Ouseley 

Offertory, Blessed Jesu Dvorak 

Second Sunday in Lent. March 19 

Benedicite in G Blair 

Benedictus ) n««* 
Jubilate \ Chant 

Introit, Ave Verum Elgar 

Offertory, I Come Not to Call Vincent 

Communion Service in F Elliott 

NuTSttis } inD *'«"' 

Anthem, I Will Arise Wood 

Offertory, Save Me, O God Hopkins 

Annunciation of the Virgin Mary. March 25 

Benedicite in F Ham 

Benedictus ) nu . 

Jubilate \ Chant 

Introit, Give Ear, O Shepherd Whiting 

Offertory, Send Out Thy Light Gounod 

Communion Service in C Carpenter 

NuTDfmittis J in G ***** 

Anthem, Come, Now, Let Us Reason Briant 

Offertory, Incline Thine Ear Hitnmel 

Third Sunday in Lent March 26 

Benedicite in G Gladstone 

Benedictus ) ru*~* 
Jubilate { Chant 

Introit, Seek Ye the Lord Bradley 

Offertory, Give Ear Unto My Prayer Arcadelt 

Communion Service in B Flat Calkin 

{Sfffi**} inF "«< 

Anthem, Holiest Breathe Martin 

Offertory, Lead, Kindly Light B. Smith 



music Published during tbe Cast IDotttb 

SACRED 

ANON.— A Soldier's Funeral Hymn. On Card. 

o8c. 

gONAVIA-HUNT, NOEL A.— "Lead, kindly 

light." Hymn-Anthem. o8c. 
CROFT.— 17 God, our help in ages past." Adapted 

to Arthur Sullivan's arrangement of the tune "St. 
Anne" by Sir Frederick Bridge, C.V.O. (No. 935, Novello'a 
Parish Choir Book." 06c. 

DICKINSON, CLARENCE.— "Eighty Amens." 

Arranged for mixed, male and female voices. 35c. 

EDWARDS, ALBERT.— "In God I find a refuge." 

A paraphrase of Psalm xci. 05c. 

fETHERSTON, REV. SIR G. R.— "O Love, who 

fo/medst me to wear." Hymn and Tune. 08c. 

FOUR CHRISTMAS CAROLS. (The Musical 
Times, 873.) Words only, $1.50 per 100. 



QERMAN, EDWARD.— Intercessory Hymn. Re- 
vised Edition. In D flat. (No. 933A, Novello's Parish 
Choir Book). 08c. 

J-JAM, ALBERT.— "I heard the voice of Jesus 
say." Anthem for Bass Solo and Chorus of Men's 
Voices. 12c. 

LAUBIN, EDW. F.— "Offering." Sacred Song. 

60c. 
NOVELLO'S CHRISTMAS CAROLS: 

No. 377. "From the East came Monarchs wise." 

C. M. Spurling. 05c. 
" 378. "The Snow lies thick." 

Geoffrey Shaw. 06c. 

pOLLARD, J. — "Saviour, hear us as we pray." 

Vesper Hymn in time of War. On Card. 05c 

REIMANN-DICKSON.— "The Soul at Heaven's 

Gate." A sacred folk-song. (Solo or Trio.) 60c 

STEVENS, C. L. F.— "The Prayer Sincere." Hymn 

and Tunc. 05c. 

^AGNER.— Kyrie eleison. On Card. Adapted by 
C. \V. Randle. 05c. 

SECULAR 

gARTON, AMY M.— "The Supreme Hour." Song. 
60c. 

GARDINER, H. BALFOUR.— "And how should I 

your true love know?" Old English Melody. Arranged 
for s.s.a. unaccompanied. (No. 456, Novello's Trios, Quar- 
ters, &c, for Female Voices.) 06c. 

KING, OLIVER— Echo Song. Four-part Song. 

(No. 874, The Musical Times.) 05c. 

LYNE, F. E. — "We are coming, Mother Country." 

Patriotic Song. 15c. 

RATHBONE, G.— "Vox ultima crucis." Eight- 
part unaccompanied Chorus. (No. 1319, Novello's Part* 
Song Book.) 12c. 

SCHINDLER, KURT.— "Ten Student Songs of 

"Finland." For mal*» voices. English version by Jane 
and Deems Taylor and K. S. 

Separately 
Book 11. 50c. Priced 
No. 6 In Harvest Time Oskar Merikanto 12c 

7 Maryatta's Cradle Song.Selim Palmgrcn 12c 

8 The Poor Girl Oskar Merikanto 10c 

9 Dotty, Ditty Axel Tornuad 10c 

10 Song of Exile Jean Sebelius 12c 

SCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 282 contains the 

following Music in both Notations: — 
"Drive the cold winter away." Unison Song. 16th cen« 
tury; "Sleep, Holy Babe." Carol. By J. B. Dykes; "The 
Star.'* Unison Song. By Bert hold Tours.. 06c. 

SCHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

Puh'ish-d in two forms. A. Voice Parts in Staff and 
Tonic Sol-fa Notations, with Pianoforte Accompaniment 
(8vo). B. Voice Parts only, in Tonic Sol-fa Notation. 

A. B. 
No. 1225. "The Pilgrims." Hymn. 

A. Weidig. 06c. 
f "The year now is fled." Unison Song. 
I Danish Air; 
m t ,, n J "Boys and Girls, come away." Unison 
I33 °* Song. Spanish Troubadour / 



_. Air. Words 

and Arrangement by Edmondstone 
. Duncan. 06c. 

( "Santa Claus." Unison Song. Old 
" 1231.K Spanish Carol. Words and Arrange- 
ment by Edmondstone Duncan. 06c. — 
Old Danish Carol. Unison Song; "Sir 
" mm- Noel-" Unison Song. Danish Air. 
**j*«"| Words and Arrangement by Edmond- 

! stone Duncan. 06c. — 

f "Come, let us dance and play." Christ- 
" 12*1 J mas Unison Song; Russian Twelfth 
JJ M Night Song. Words and Arrangement 

I by Edmondstone Duncan. 06c. — 

INSTRUMENTAL 

ALBUM DE SALON, No. 1 (Novello Edition, 

No. 523A).— Russian and Polish Dances and Melodies. 
For Pianoforte Solo. $1.25. 

COULDERY, CLAUDIUS H.— Second Bagatelle, 

in G ("Sunrise"). For Pianoforte. 25c. 

MENDELSSOHN-BARTHOLDY, F.— Complete 

Works for the Pianoforte. In five Books. (The No- 
vello Edition, No. 143A-143E.) Books 1-4, $1.00 each. 
Book 5, 50c. 

SMART, G. R.— "Soaring." For Organ. 75 cents. 

WHEELDON, H. A.— "Serenade." For Organ 
(No. 63, The St. Cecilia.) 50c. "The Minster Bells." 
For Organ. No. 64, The St. Cecilia.) 50c. 



IOO 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Organists 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West, New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue. 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
a West 45th Street, New York, or 
295 Claremont Avenue, Montclair. N. J. 

CLIFTON C. BRAINERD, M.A. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER. 

Church of the Good Shepherd Vice-Principal, Wadsworth 

Street School, Hartford, Connecticut 

Address: 48 Huntington Street 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.C.O.. A.R.C.M., L.R.A.M. 
Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 
Late • Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West 12th Street, New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 
Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 

Address: New Haven, Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.oT" 
F.A.G.O. 

"TURPIX PRIZE MAN" 

Specialist in Coaching by Correspondence in Harmony, 

Counterpoint, etc. Preparation for A.G.O. Examinations 

Address: "The Choristers' School," Rhineheck. N. Y. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 



GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC. 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST, DIRECTOR 

First Baptist Church 

Flcmington New Jersey 

ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Recitals Concert Tours 

Organ Openings 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral St. Louis. Mo. 

GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster, St Peter's Church 

Address: 42 2 West aoth Street, New York 

Telephone: Chelsea — 7724. 



H. BROOKS DAY 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Luke's Church, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Address: 417 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave.. N. Y . 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERX ORGANIST 
Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 
• 412 Fifth Avenue, New \ ork 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, .Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
OR GAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

CONCERT ORGANTST AND TEACHER OF SINGING 

Organist and Choirmaster of Gethsemane Church, Organist of 

the Jewish Reform Temple, Instructor in Theoretical 

Subjects at the MacPhail Violin School, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 
Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, 

Morristown, New Jersey. 

J. HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church. Charleston, 
W. Va. Director of Music Charleston High School, 
Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 
Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 



E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster 

First Congregational Church 

Address: P. O. Box 675. Fall River, Mass. 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 
49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster Second Congregational Church, 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Director of Music Mount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HKDUEX. Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Concert Organist and Consulting Choirmaster 
< >rgan Recitals and Instruction. 
Member Examination Committee of 

American Guild of Organists 
Candidates coached f»»r Guild Examinations. 
Address: i;o West 75th Street, New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Calvary Baptist Church Address: 36a Wert 35th St 



F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, i;th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 



EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral 
Cleveland. Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 



NORMAN LANDIS 

Flcmington, N. J. 

O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flcmington, N. J. 

CM. — First Reformed Church, Somenrille, N. J. 

Conductor Frcnchtown. N. J., Choral Society. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

JOHN HERMAN LOUD, FA.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Park Street Church, Boston, Mast. 

Organist and Choirmaster. 

Send for new circular. 

Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and Cran* 

ford Philharmonic. 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



101 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

St. tylichael's Fpiscopal Church, 

New York. 

Instructor of Music Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
305 West 97th Street 
'Phone, 7380 Riverside. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 

St. Thomas' Church, New York 

ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR, AND COACH 

Address: 1 West 53d Street 

EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 



Organist and_ Choirmaster 
hedrs 
Orgai 
Address: Washington, D. C. 



rgan 
National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 
Organ Recitals 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 



MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Mill School, Pottstown, Pa. 



A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
The South Church, E. 85th Street, New York 



Telephone: Morningside 7587 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 



JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St. 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 

ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 

Berea, Ohio 

FREDERIC ROGERS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Advice to Church Organ Committees a Specialty. Specifica- 
tions, Design, Purchase, etc. Twenty-five years' 
experience, England, Canada and United States. 
Address: Kalamazoo, Michigan. 



MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared for Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 West 55th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House, 

2nd St., Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 



KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church, Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



EDWARD JOHN SMITH 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
•"- # First Methodist Episcopal Church; 
\ *•„ and The Amasa Stone Memorial 
- j * * . Chapel (Western Reserve 
*•" •** .*• -University), Cleveland, 
* " • * ** * ( )hio 

AUTHOR OF ^ffigfo. AN D UNIVERSITY HYMNS" 

HAROLD/'JDWER 

ORGANIST AND "CHOIRM ASTER 
St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rrpids/ Michigan, 
formerly organist St. Paul's, Minneapolis »", .* 

ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER: 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 

Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville, N. J. 

Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 

Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, HI. 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church and 
Temple Israel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 

'Phone 2170-L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor, Orpheus Club. 

Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St. Paul'* School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and 20th Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish, 

N. Y. The Earle, 103 Waverly Place, New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster, First Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn. Director of Music, Packer Collegiate 
Institute. 
Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Organ Builders 

If the purchase of a PIPE OROAN is contemplate^ address 
Henry Pilchbr's Sons, Louisville, Ky., who manufacture the 
highest grade at reasonable prices. Correspondence solicited. 

GIVEN FREE 

$1.50 Worth of Music 

If you are a lover of music send us ten cents 
and we will mail you a sample copy of The 
Foyer. We will also mail you all particulars 
regarding the above offer. 
You will like The Foyer. It is devoted ex- 
clusively to Music and Drama ; it is always 
brimful of interesting and instructive read- 
ing, and each issue contains several pieces 
of Selected vocal and instrumental music. 
Regular Prices 

15 cents a Copy. $1.50 for a Year 
29 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, Pa. 



138 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



JUST PUBLISHED 

Che 3Last Supper 

A LENTEN MEDITATION 

For Baritone Solo and Chorus 
with Organ or Orchestra 

The words from the Scripture 

THE MUSIC BY 

CECIL FORSYTH 



Price, 25 cents 



Of moderate difficulty, within the capacity 
of an average choir. The work may be 
strongly recommended to choirmasters who do 
not desire to prepare a long cantata at a time 
when Easter music demands attention. 

Time of performance, nine minutes. 



A Sample Copy Sent on Examhtation 



THE H. W. GRAY COMPANY 
2 West 45th St New York 

Sole Agents for NOVELLO 8s CO. Ltd. 



FOR LENT AND EASTER 

{^he^aschal'^Tictor 

A Cantata 

Set to music for Tenor (or Soprano) 
and Baritone Soli, Chorus and Organ 
or Orchestra 

The words written and arranged by 
VAN TASSEL SUTPHEN 

The music composed by 
J. SEBASTIAN MATTHEWS 

Price, $1.00 

From a review. 

The work has all the qualifications -which go 
to make up a popular cantata. It moves with 
freedom and confidence from beginning to 
end and is distinguished by artistic restraint 
as well as good musicianship. There is un- 
doubtedly a definite mission for such a work 
as this, and it is confidently recommended 
to the notice of choirmasters. 

Time of performance, one hour. 

A Sample Copy Sent on Examination 

THE H. W. GRAY COMPANY 
2 West 45th St. New York 

Sole Agents for NOVELLO 8s CO., Ltd. 



Shakespeare Tercentenary Celebration 

The following Compositions have been suggested by the BOARD OF EDUCATION for 

use in Elementary Schools 



SINGING GAMES 

Cents 

Old Roger $ .08 

The Gallant Ship 08 

Looby Light 08 

Our Shoes are made of Leather 08 

London Bridge - 08 

The Jolly Miller 08 

A-Hunting we will go 08 

Oats Peas Beans 08 

Nuts in May 08 

Three Dukes 08 



PART SONGS 

Cents 

Over Hill, over Dale $ .08 

Under the Greenwood Tree 05 

Who is Svlvia 06 

Hark, Hark the Lark 06 

Come unto these Yellow Sands 06 

You Spotted Snakes 06 

How Sweet the Moonlight 08 



THE GUILD OF PLAY BOOK OF FESTIVAL AND 
DANCE. Mrs. C. T. Kimmins $2.50 



COUNTRY DANCES cents 

Brighton Camp $ . i© 

*Galopede. 
Sweet Kate IO 

•Bean Setting. 

Rufty Tufty 10 

Row well ye Mariners 10 

Gathering Peascods jo 

Ribbon Dance .j© 

Mage on a Cree .10 

The Butterfly lo 

* Bo-peep. 

^Shepherd's Hey. 

•Only issued in book form. 

tlik above contain both thk mt'sic and a full description 
of the Dance 

SONGS 

Twenty Son<?«. Dr. Arne $ .75 

Containing- -Blow Blow thou Winter Wind. 
When Daisies Pied. 

Twelve Sonus, Henry Purcell 1 . ^5 

Containing — Full Fathoms Five. 

CANTATA 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, 
DELSSOHN 



MEN- 



.50 



COPIES OF THE ABOVE MAY BE HAD ON APPROVAL ALSO A COMPLETE LIST OF SHAKESPEARE MUSIC 

THE H. W. GRAY CO. 

2 WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK 
Sole Agents for NOVELLO CO., Ltd. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



139 



NOVELLO'S EDITION 

OF THE 

Favorite Operas 

ADAPTED FOR 

CONCERT USE 

Price 
t. Faust .....,$ -50 

2. II Trovatore .,•***«*, .75 

3. Tannhauser ..,,.. J5 

4. Maritana 75 

5. Bohemian Girl 75 

6. Daughter of the Regiment 75 

7. Flying Dutchman {Selection. Act II, 

female voices) . .. « 50 



Copies sent on examination. 



Orchestral Farts may also be had on hire. 

THE H* W, GRAY COMPANY 
2 West 45th St New York 

Sole Agents for NOVELLO & CO., Ltd. 



NOVELLO'S HANDBOOKS FOR 

MUSICIANS 

Edited by Ernest Newman 

The Interpretation of the Music 

of the 17th and iSth Centuries 
as revealed by Contemporary Evidence 
BY ARNOLD DOLMETSCH 
(From Introduction) 
Until far into the 18th century several im- 
portant problems were left to the player. Thus, 
before we can play properly a piece of old 
music we must find ojit: 

Firstly, the Tempo, which frequently 

is not indicated in any way ; 
Secondly, the real Rhythm, which very 
often differs in practice from the 
written text; 
Thirdly, the Ornaments and Graces 
necessary for the adornment of the 
music ; and 
Fourthly, how to fill up the Figured 
Basses in accompaniments. 
These various problems will be considered 
here, in turn. 

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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



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editorials 



3T seems to us that the roaring lions of 
the daily press in this city were not 
courteous towards "La Somnam- 
bula." We admit that the revival was a mis- 
take, and for two reasons : the opera is lost 
in the huge auditorium ; there are few sing- 
ers now living who can sing Bellini's music. 
We are not ashamed to say that we are fond 
of "La Somnambula," and remember grate- 
fully several performances ; among them one 
in which the singers were Etelka Gerster, 
Ravelli, and Del Puente ; another, of a bur- 
lesque nature, at Bryant's Minstrels in 



Fourteenth Street, when Dempster was the 
sweet-voiced tenor and Nelse Seymour im- 
pressive in sinister roles — we shall never 
forget his Duke in "Lucrezia Borgia." 

The story of "La Somnambula ,, is not for 
us too simple and naive. There is the jeal- 
ous lover, the jealous maiden, the amorous 
count, the slandered young woman; pray 
what more would one have? The count, 
after all, is a fine fellow, reminiscent, delight- 
ing in scenes revisited and the thought of 
companions no more — Thackeray alludes to 
him more than once. The tenor is no more 
of a milksop, ass if you please, than the 
ordinary tenor of Bellini's period. Is th,ere 
no beauty in the air of Amina, "Come per 
me sereno" or in "Ah, non credea"? Nor 
are we disturbed by the "guitar" accompani- 
ments ; on the contrary, they are well suited 
to the simplicity of the story and the pure 
outline of the melodies. Perhaps some 
would prefer the accompaniment re-orches- 
trated, say by Humperdinck. 

In one of his books Taine, describing an 
Italian afternoon, speaks of a band in the 
distance playing airs by Bellini, and he adds 
that Italy is in those airs. We do not find 
it necessary to call in the aid of Chopin and 
Wagner to bolster up our liking for this gen- 
tle, pathetic melodist. We can find beauty 
in "La Sonnambula" as in "Tristan," "Al- 
ceste," "The Barber of Seville," "Otello," 
"Siegfried," "Figaro" and so on through the 



146 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



catalogue. But to perform "La Sonnam- 
bula" in the Metropolitan Opera House is 
foolishness. And with all due respect to the 
Spanish soprano, again we ask, where are 
the men and women in the company who 
can/ sing Bellini's music as it should be 
sung? The last of the tenors visiting us to 
do this was Mr. Bonci. 



CHE Vossiche Zeitung has informed a 
palpitating world that there is reason 
to doubt the truth of the report that 
Kaiser William intends to write a new Ger- 
man national anthem with music by Richard 
Strauss. This journal believes that the 
present national anthem, "in view of the 
English origin of the tune and the badness of 
the text," is to be abandoned ; a new anthem 
will be obtained by open competition. This 
led the London Times to remark sourly that 
these open competitions are well known in 
Germany, especially in connection with ar- 
chitecture. "They always lead to violent 
disputes, and the Emperor then intervenes 
and appoints the 'artist' whom he always 
intended to appoint." 

There was a time when the Kaiser 
frowned on Richard Strauss. Perhaps he 
really in his heart of heart hankers after 
Leoncavallo, the man who worked in vain 
to immortalize the Roland of Berlin. We 
all know that William in time of peace had 
his head full of grand ideas concerning 
music, literature, painting, sculpture, the 
drama. Baron von Berger, the manager of 
the German theatre at Hamburg once re- 
marked in a courteous manner: "His (the 
Kaiser's) ideas, which he has executed by 
Lauff, prove that he has a good eye for the 
dramatic possibilities of events in history. 
If the works of the poet Lauff are to some 
extent failures, Lauff alone can be held re- 
sponsible for that. He is not powerful 
enough to be able to realize the powerful 
ideas of the German Emperor." Let us 
hope that Baron von Berger was at once re- 
warded with a first class decoration. 



^/^OT only Joseph Lauff but Wildcn- 
1 I buch also dramatized certain ideas of 
^^ ^ William for the stage. L'Arronge 
collaborated with him in the rearrangement 
of Lortzing's opera "Regina." The "Song 
to Algir" was orchestrated by Becker, and 



it is said that it was composed for the most 
part by Count von Moltke. Was this song 
ever sung by one of our German Societies? 
We remember hearing that in Boston the 
late B. J. Lang rehearsed it at a meeting 
of a Society, but it never was on the pro- 
gram of a public performance. Perhaps 
some Boston correspondent can inform us. 
It is also said that the Kaiser's cartoons 
were done by Knackfuss ; his landscapes and 
seascapes by Karl Saltzmann, his historical 
pictures by Roechling. 

Some one has recalled the fact that Pedro 
V, during his six months' reign in Portugal 
— he was afterwards Emperor of Brazil- 
wrote a national anthem which was in favor 
until the revolution of 1910. 

Meanwhile Germany is using Austria's 
national hymn for "Deutschland, Deutsch- 
land ueber Alles." 



3T WAS suggested that orchestral 
parts of Strauss's "Alpine" symphony 
sent from Germany to the Philhar- 
monic Society of New York, were seized 
by the British navy as secret codes. Did 
the humorist remember an old story told 
about Sir George Martin, organist of St. 
Paul's Cathedral, just before the breaking 
out of the South African war? He was 
then in the Transvaal examining on behalf 
of London schools of music. It was an- 
nounced in the Press that he had been ar- 
rested at Johannesburg as a spy. A number 
of mysterious documents were found in his 
possession. No one could decipher them, 
and his assertion that they were musical 
scores was laughed at. President Kruger, 
however, remembered he had a granddaugh- 
ter who was studying music. She was 
called in, but she could make nothing out of 
them. At last a musician was discovered 
who solved the mystery. The scores were 
in old notation. Miss Kruger, who was 
learning to play the banjo from tonic sol-fa f 
was unacquainted with it. All this turned 
out to be a joke on Sir George invented and 
circulated by Sir Frederick Bridge. 



/^R. ETHEL SMYTHE is apparently 
I 1 as hard to please as Mr. Joseph Hoi- 
^^ brooke. Her opera "The Boatswain's 
Mate," was produced with due pomp and 
ceremony, nevertheless in an article pub- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



147 



lished in the English Review, she takes a 
dismal view of conditions in England. She, 
boldly states that "since Purcell's time there 
has been no music in this country." "Co- 
vent Garden ! I hope the war has finally 
killed that unspeakable institution. But 
how like it to have achieved the unmerited 
honor of a military funeral !" Ungrateful 
Ethel ! Two of her operas "The Wreckers" 
and "Der Wald" were produced at that "un- 
speakable institution." 



CHERE was a time when extracts from 
criticisms appearing in Western 
newspapers were published in the 
East and in London as food for laughter. 
Mme. Homer and Mr. Spalding gave a con- 
cert some weeks ago in Fitchburg, Mass. 
We quote from a painstaking review pub- 
lished in a local journal. 

"Mme. Homer sang three groups of songs 
the first in French and German during 
which the audience frankly consulted the 
program for translation, a group of English 
ballads and one Area from "Lamson and 
Delia." * * * She has a charming stage 
presence, dramatic power, a marvellous 
range of expression and sings like an angel. 
The only announcement she makes in her 
manner that she can sing is doing it.. She 
has no preliminary or complimentary graces 
beyond a very pleasing attitude to her audi- 
ence. * * * Mr. Spalding was not born. He 
has been, however, carefully and expensive- 
ly made, and if not quite a genius he is at 
least an extremely creditable product. At 
times during his playing the divine spark 
hovered near, but never quite ignited. * * * 
In many of the mannerisms Mme. Homer 
hasn't. Mr. Spalding has. But much may 
be forgiven him on this score, seeing that he 
refrained from cuddling his violin under his 
chin, regarding it reverently or otherwise 
trying to indicate to the audience that he is 
never separated frQm it except to eat and 
sleep. Also he might have used a little 
more self-control and restrained himself 
from playing Dvorak's best seller for an en- 
core, but evidently he has never been told 
that no graphaphone owner is allowed to 
operate within city limits, unless he pur- 
chases a record of the Humoreske and 
pledges himself to play it at least once a 
week." 



CHE Renaissance, Paris, has been ask- 
ing Frenchmen whether Wagner's 
music should be played in France 
after the war. M. Gailhard, the first to bring 
out operas by Wagner at the Paris Opera, 
thinks it would be best to let things slide 
for awhile, "until our very righteous hatred 
of the enemy has had time to calm down." 
He points with pride to "our own com- 
posers, a magnificent bevy." If he were 
manager of the Opera, he would not stage 
works by Wagnor. M. Jacques Rouche, 
who became manager just before the war 
broke out, declares that Wagner cannot be 
revived directly after the war, "but nothing 
can ever efface his glory for long, and it 
will be no more possible to boycott Wagner 
in France than it would be to banish Bach, 
Beethoven and Mozart." M. Andre Mes- 
sager answered, "Get on with the war; it 
will be time to think of Wagner afterwards." 
Saint-Saens objects to Wagner because "the 
crushing beauty of his works is so tremen- 
dous that it quite obliterates their defects 
and because our young musicians — incapa- 
ble of imitating these beauties — assimilate 
the defects and risk making French music 
lose its special characteristics — viz : regu- 
larity, clarity, and taste." But if Wagner 
should become forbidden fruit, everyone 
will want to play it. It is no easy matter, 
he concludes, to decide how far Wagnerism 
should be suppressed. M. Rodin thinks no 
harm would be done in keeping Wagner 
silent for awhile, but Beethoven should not 
be boycotted. "Wagner," he says, "is a bit 
too close to us for every one to consent to 
hear his music after the war ; but Beethoven 
has long since passed away, and, in any 
case, his work is too sublime for any one 
to think of exclaiming against it." 



CHE Daily Telegraph (London) pub- 
lished the following note: "It seems 
to have escaped notice that, whereas 
Mr. Goossens, who 'impersonates' Thomas 
Linley at the conductor's desk in the per- 
formance of 'The Critic' at the Shaftesbury 
Theatre, dresses for the sake of 'historical 
acuracy,' acording to the fashion of the 
period, the handing to him by Dangle of a 
conductor's baton constitutes a curious ana- 
chronism. All musical historians, at any 
rate, seem agreed that conducting with a 



148 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



stick was unknown in this country until the 
fashion was set by Spohr at a concert of 
our venerable Philharmonic Society on 
April 10, 1820. * * * A 'History of the 
Baton' would make interesting and instruc- 
tive reading, and we commend the idea to 
some person with a taste for delving into 
the musical past." 

There is such a book, written in German. 
The Daily Telegraph will find it in the cata- 
logue of Breitkopf and Haertel. 



3F Chauvinists in England protest 
against the performance of German 
music, there are Germans equally 
foolish. The music critic of the Deutsche 
Tages-Zeitung recently expressed amaze- 
ment that Germany which produced and 
loves Beethoven, Bach, Brahms and Schu- 
mann should stoop so low as to acknowl- 
edge indebtedness to composers of any 
other country. "Germany is the 'Land of 
Music,' and outside Germany there is no 
music." England is the country of "abso- 
lute artistic infertility." The only French 
composers worthy of mention have suc- 
ceeded in imitating German models. In 
Russia there is only Tschaikowsky ; his 
music is not Russian; what is good in it 
shows undisguised German influence. Bel- 
gium has no composers. What a delightful 
state of mind! 



aND now in England a committee has 
been formed "to encourage the in- 
troducing of Russian music into the 
United Kingdom," for England "far too 
long has lent itself to the obsession of the 
music of a single country — Germany." Mr. 
Evans, of the Pall Mall Gazette, answers 
sensibly that "the remedy is not the substi- 
tion of any one nation for Germany, nor is 
there at the moment any urgent need for 
propaganda on behalf of Russian music." 
We remember that Sir Henry Wood was 
reproached by London critics some years 
ago for paying undue attention to music of 
Russian composers, good, bad, and indiffer- 
ent, and it was whispered that his prefer- 
ence was due in large measure to the fact 
that his wife (his first one) was a Russian. 
To go back to Air. Evans. He states that 
fifteen or more years ago he and some 
others attempted to divert to the Russian 



nationalists some of the exaggerated appre- 
ciation then exclusively given to Tschai- 
kowsky. "The music that was not either 
German or modelled on the German tradi- 
tion was merely tolerated in our concert 
rooms. Under the pretext that music is in- 
ternational, the extreme conservatives then 
upheld the narrowest of national creeds, 
and an alien one at that. It has always 
been the progressive element that stood for 
real internationalism in music, and the van- 
guard has made much headway since then. 
There is of course still an 'Extreme Right 1 
party, claiming that there is one way of 
making music, and three B's are its proph- 
ets. It is hard to understand why the -world 
of music alone should harbor retarding in- 
fluences of such strength. Amateurs of 
painting do not confine their visits to the 
National Gallery. Readers of novels do not 
devour again and again the works of Field- 
ing and Richardson. But there is a class of 
musician that rejects all work not sanc- 
tioned by generations. Possibly it is more 
difficult to read just one's standards in 
music than in the other arts. Especially 
after a certain age. * * * The German 
classics still occupy more space in our pro- 
grams than is desirable, if we are to foster 
our native music and the contemporary 
music of Europe. But do not let us substi- 
tute one nationalism for another. The doors 
are now open, as they have not been for 
generations, for the British composer, and 
his confreres of -France, Russia, and other 
countries on equal terms. If there is to be 
any favoritism, let it go to the encourage- 
ment of our own countryment. Even if we 
have to deny ourselves, once in a while, 
some classical stalking horse of conductors, 
the doors must be opened ever wider/* 



y^PNGLISH composers, however, have 
VjT" been doing some queer things of late. 
^^ Mr. de Lara suggested some time 
ago that musicians might derive inspiration 
from classic masterpieces of literature. 

Mr. Leopold Ash ton thereupon chose 
"The Old Curiosity Shop" and wrote a 
piano quartet, in which the violin represents 
Little Nell, the viola the Old Dealer, and 
the violoncello Mr. Daniel Quilp. 

But Mr. Joseph Holbrooke went him one 
better by writing a string quartet "The 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



149 



Pickwick Club." The Times said of this 
extraordinary work that with the aid of a 
synopsis printed in the program it could 
make out what some the characters and epi- 
sodes were, "but we were hazy about the 
fat boy and Sam Weller. We made sure of 
'the dignity of Pickwick* because it was 
represented by four notes from the National 
Anthem. * * * There were two tunes to 
assure us that the work was true British 
born, and so the audience accepted it in a 
spirit of patriotic resignation." 

Mr. Legge, of the Daily Telegraph, was in 
doubt about Winkle and Snodgrass. "I re- 
gretfully missed the pic-nic and the card 
party." He suggests that composers should 
turn to "Sanford and Merwin," "The Pil- 
grim's Progress," "Sherlock Holmes," or 
they should go to the British Museum: 
"Think of Mr. Joseph Holbrooke galvaniz- 
ing into life the legends of the mummies 
that have lain in peaceful sleep for thou- 
sands of years, think of the time when the 
'idea' has become so highly developed that 
composers will translate into terms of 
music those quaint Egyptian figures who 
never seem to have had a full-face portrait 
done on a Cleopatra's Needle, for they al- 
ways stand sideways, or those queer birds, 
crows, cranes, eagles, or whatever they are 
that figure so largely in ancient Egyptian 
hieroglyphics! It really is a solemn 
thought!" 



aPROPOS of Mr. Lionel Tertis play- 
ing the viola at a concert in London, 
the inquiry was made whether play- 
ers or composers were the first to suffer that 
instrument to fall into neglest? Did the 
viola pass into fne hands of second-rate 
men because composers made no demands 
on it, or did composers stop making any 
effective use of it because good players 
were scarce? 

It seems to uslhat this question is a su- 
perficial one, not based on sound premises. 
There is beautiful music for the viola in 
Charpentier's "Impressions of Italy," and in a 
suite by Bossi ; effective music for it in 
Strauss's "Don Quixote." Mr. Loefifler has 
shown an affection for the viola. No one 
of those composers was inspired by Mr. 
Lionel Tertis, skilful performer though he 



may be. "Just as musical historians now 
write of Vieuxtemps and the Belgian school 
of violinists, they will, or should, write in 
years to come of Tertis and the English 
school of viola players." We are glad that 
Mr. Tertis, a fine artist, who once came near 
being a member of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, is honored in his own land, but 
there are excellent viola players outside 
England, and they, too, are appreciated. 

It must be said that a solo viola cannot 
be heard in a long work w r here it is con- 
stantly employed without its peculiar tone 
satisfying quickly the ear and then becom- 
ing monotonous. If there is mention of 
"Harold in Italy," the viola there is 'not em- 
ployed as it would be in a concert. 



^y%R. ROBIN H. LEGGE, considering 
1 I I Spanish music in the Daily Tele- 
^1 ▼ graph, says: "The idea of the, 
Spaniard that obtains here is the toreador in 
'Carmen' or, musically, Moszkowski's Spanish 
Dances. It is safe to say that these latter 
pieces have done more to engender an entirely 
wrong idea of Spain than all the rest of the 
pseudo-Spanish music in existence." Now it 
is well known that Spanish audiences have 
never really accepted "Carmen." Mme. Maria 
Gay has pointed out offenses against realism : 
as the cigarette chorus, whereas, according to 
her, smoking is not allowed in the tobacco fac- 
tories of Seville, and Spanish women are not 
given to smoking. Mr. Legge gives another 
example: the final scene, representing the en- 
trance of the toreador into the bull-ring, Car- 
men leaning on his arm : "As true to English 
life would it be for the most eminent of 
jockeys to walk down the Newmarket Race- 
course before a great race, his lady-love hold-, 
ing him by the arm! ... If the book is a 
distortion of the fine tale, so in a sense is the 
music as representative of Spain." Outside 
the Habanera taken from Yradier's melody 
and the entr'acte before the second act, "there 
is nothing that is not French in the music." 

There is one composition, known to many, 
that at least approaches Spanish music: that 
is Chabrier's "Espana." Debussy's "Iberia ,, 
and Ravel's Rhapsody have charming pages, 
but "Espana" is Spain. Rimsky-KorsakofFs 
Caprice on Spanish Themes is Spain as im- 
agined in the Petrograd of winter. 



182 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




my musical Eif e 

By Rimsky-Korsakov. 
From Les Annates. 

TRANSLATED BY EDWARD BIDDLE. 
Ill 

(Continued) 

My nomination as Professor at the Conserva- 
tory — My ignorance — / learn my profes- 
sion, 

| HE summer of 1871 was marked by 
an important happening in my 
musical life. One fine day Azant- 
chevsky, the new Director at the 
Conservatory in St. Petersburg, sought me 
out and, to my utter astonishment, proposed 
that I should fill the post of professor of 
practical composition and instrumentation, 
and also to direct the orchestra class. Evi- 
dently Azantchevsky's idea was to stir the 
waters that had become stagnant under his 
predecessor's sway in the teaching of these 
things, by appointing a young man. 

The performance of my Sadko at one of 
the concerts given by the Russian Musical So- 
ciety during the previous season had for its 
object, no doubt, the establishment of rela- 
tions with me; and thus to prepare public 
opinion for my nomination to the Conserva- 
tory. 

Conscious of my entire lack of preparation 
for the proffered post, I gave no positive an- 
swer to Azantchevsky and begged him to let 
me think the matter over. My friends advised 
me to accept. Balakirev, who alone was 
aware of my want of preparation, advised me 
also to consent, with the object of introducing 
into the Conservatory one of his adherents in 
that inimical field towards himself. Finally 
the persistence of my friends and my own 
self-deception triumphed and I accepted the 
proposal. I was to assume office in the Au- 
tumn, without for the time being giving up 
my career in the Navy. 

If I had only begun to study, if I had known 
a little more than I did, I would have clearly 
seen that I could not assume such a function, 
that it was both foolish and disloyal on my 
part. But, as the author of Sadko, Antar and 
La Pskovitaine, works that held their own 
and did not sound badly; were approved by 
the public, and by a goodly number of musi- 
cians, I was, nevertheless, but a dilettante and 



knew nothing — I confess it openly and assert 
it before all. I was young, full of confidence 
in myself, and this assurance was encour- 
aged: I accepted, therefore, the post of Pro- 
fessor. Now, not only was I incapable of 
properly harmonizing a choral, had never 
written anything in counterpoint, had only the 
vaguest notions as to the construction of a 
fugue, but I did not even know the name given 
to augmented and diminished intervals, nor 
to chords, save the dominant one ; although I 
could vocalize (solfa) no matter what piece at 
the first reading and decipher all the chords. 
In my compositions I sought diligently for 
correct vocalization and I attained it intui- 
tively and by ear. It was the same intuition 
that guided me in spelling. My ideas as to 
musical form were equally vague, particularly 
in that of the rondeau; I who instrumented 
my compositions with sufficient color, did not 
possess the necessary knowledge for the tech- 
nique of stringed instruments, and for the em- 
ployment of horn, trumpet and trombone. It 
goes without saying that, never having di- 
rected an orchestra, or even studied a single 
choral composition, I possessed not the 
slightest conception of the matter. 

To be sure, it is more important to com- 
prehend and divine the interval and the note 
(Taccord) than to know the name of one or 
the other ; at need, these terms can be learned 
in a day. Certainly it is more important to 
color one's instrumentation than to know the 
instruments as the drum-major of a military 
band knows them, and whose instrumenta- 
tion is reduced to routine. To be sure, it is 
more moving to compose an Antar or a Sadko 
than to understand how to harmonize a protes- 
tant choral or to write counterpoint for four 
voices, necessary evidently only to organists. 
But, at the same time, it is disgraceful not 
to know such things and to learn them from 
one's pupils. Besides, the lack of a- technical 
knowledge of harmony brought about, soon 
after the composition of La Pskovitaine, a 
stoppage in my inspiration that had for its 
foundation always the same used-up methods, 
and only the developments in technique that 
I applied myself to study have rendered pos- 
sible the renewal of my creative faculty, by 
means of a fresh current, and re-awakened in 
me flights leading to future activity. 

Be it as it may, I had no right to profess to 
scholars destined for different branches of 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



151 



being given ; but he did not even stay for the 
end of the second act. 

I believe that it is not merely his ailing con- 
dition, but a certain pride of genius that keeps 
him apart and explains his complete indiffer- 
ence for Russian musical life. Then again the 
recognition by foreign celebrities of a certain 
merit in Russian music has always been be- 
stowed (and is so still) with an air of con- 
descension. 

There could be no question then of pre- 
senting Moussorgsky, Borodine and myself 
to Berlioz. Was it because Balakirev felt it 
awkward to ask the favor in view of the in- 
difference shown by Berlioz, or had the 
French composer himself bespoken protection 
from having to make the acquaintance of 
these "Russian hopes" ? At any rate we asked 
nothing of Balakirev in the way of an intro- 
duction. 

During his six (6) concerts Berlioz had 
performed his fantasy, "Harold," an episode 
in "The Life of an Artist," several of his over- 
tures, fragments from "Romeo and Juliette" 
and "Faust," as well as some smaller pieces ; 
also the third, fourth, fifth and sixth sym- 
phonies of Beethoven, and fragments from 
Gliick's operas. In a word, Beethoven, Gliick 
and "himself." I should, however, add the 
overtures from the "Tireur" Magique and 
Weber's "Oberon." It goes without saying 
that Mendelssohn, Schubert and Schumann 
were excluded and even more so Liszt and 
Wagner 

The execution was superb. The influence 
of playing under a celebrity affected the Rus- 
sian orchestra. Berlioz's gestures were sim- 
ple, easily understood and graceful. No, striv- 
ing after extreme shadings. 

Nevertheless — and I repeat what Balakirev 
told me himself — at the rehearsal of one of 
his own pieces Berlioz missed the time and 
began directing three beats instead of two — 
or vice versa. The orchestra, avoiding looking 
toward his baton, continued to play in proper 
time and all passed off as it should. 

And so it was, Berlioz, distinguished or- 
chestra-leader of his day, had come amongst 
us when already burdened with years and ail- 
ments, and with weakened faculties. The pub- 
lic was not aware of it, and the orchestra for- 
gave it in him 

I do not recall exactly whether it was in the 
Spring or the Autumn of 1868 that the first 



performance of Wagner's "Lohengrin" was 
given at the Theatre Marie. 

Balakirev, Cui, Moussorgsky and I occupied 
a box together with Darjomijsky. We man- 
ifested all our scorn towards "Lohengrin." 
Darjomijsky particularly was irrepressible in 
expressions of raillery and bitter criticism. 
At this time half the "Niebelungen" had al- 
ready been written and the "Meistersinger" 
finished ; that opera where Wagner with an 
able and experienced hand opened a way in art 
that conducted much further than the one in 
which we were engaged, we the Russian ad- 
vance guard. 

It was also during this season that "Boris 
Godounov" was presented by Moussorgsky at 
the direction of the Imperial Theatre. The 
reception committee was then made up of 
Naprovick, chief of orchestra at the opera, of 
Maufan, chief of the orchestra of French 
drama, of Betz, chief of the orchestra of Ger- 
man drama and the double-bass, Giovanni 
Ferrero. It (the opera) was black-balled. 

The novelty and the particular character 
of the music astounded the honorable commit- 
tee. They blamed the author also for the ab- 
sence of a female role of more or less 
importance. In fact, in this first version the 
act introducing the Poles did not exist, nor 
the character of "Marina." 

Moussorgsky, vexed and mortified, took 
back his score. But on reflection he resolved 
to revise it entirely and to make additions to 
it. He created the act introducing the Poles 
in two tableaux as also another tableau; the 
scene where it is recounted that anathema has 
been pronounced against the "impostor" was 
suppressed, and the "innocent one" who ap- 
pears in this scene was transferred to a dif- 
ferent one. Moussorgsky had undertaken this 
work with the purpose of again offering his 
"Boris" to the rnanagement of the Imperial 
Theatre. 



A pamphlet entitled "Suggestions on the Rating of 
Regents' Examination Papers in Music" is to be 
issued by the New York State Department of Edu- 
cation. It was written by Russell Carter, supervisor 
of music in the public schools of Amsterdam, N. Y M 
and examiner in music for the State Department of 
Education. Mr. Carter also holds the position of 
organist and choirmaster of St. Ann's Church, 
Amsterdam, and is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Central New York Chapter of the 
American Guild of Organists. At the last meeting 
of the New York State Teachers' Association, in 
Rochester, he was elected president of the Music 
Section. 



152 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




Another Ode to Discord 

By John F. Runciman. 

\NY years ago the first intentional 
"unprepared" discord was written 
by Monterverde. Since 1643 P er " 
haps a couple of hundred new and 
intentional ones have been put to paper, and 
certainly as many millions that were not meant. 
It was left for Professor Sir Charles V. Stan- 
ford to discover that music was beginning, 
so to speak, to be overrun with discords, that 
the public would not listen to music that was 
not full of discords, that harmonious music, 
in ancient and still generally accepted meaning 
of the phrase, no longer holds the attention of 
anyone. So another Charles, Mr. Charles L. 
Graves, of Spectator fame, wrote an Ode to 
Discord, and the first Charles set it to music 
(at least, I supposed it must be called music) 
in which the vile tricks and manners of mod- 
ern and popular composers were caricatured 
and saterized. The opening line of Mr. 
Graves' "poem" was brilliant. "Hence, loathed 
melody" had point. The rest, I regret to say, 
fell far beneath that level. Mr. Graves' humor 
exhausted itself in one single stroke. Sir 
Charles's sense of humor seemed never to be 
aroused at all. He lost his temper and with the 
aid of a gigantic drum which someone lent him 
he administered a prodigious castigation to the 
composers who wrote music of a kind he does 
not like, or, at least, does not, and perhaps 
cannot write. Only the blows of his bitter 
wit were like the blows given with the best 
will in the world by the drummer to the giant 
drum. The drum-beats, for all the size of the 
machine, made no effect; and Sir Charles 
Stanford's strokes failed just as dismally. 
And the truth is that the "progress" of music, 
since Monteverde first ventured to set down 
an unprepared dominant seventh, has largely 
consisted in properly using new discords — 
combinations of notes which each generation 
in turn declared to be ear-splitting and un- 
holy, and which each succeeding generation 
accepts as delightful, if not indeed absolutely 
platitudinous and stale. 

My own Ode began thus : "Hence, loathed 
con-con-cord-y." This scans more like a well- 
enough known line from a predecessor of Mr. 
Graves, and it possesses more sense than Mr. 
Graves'. For, if up-to-date composers have 
discarded concords (in the technical sense), 



only one or two have put away melody from 
them as the unclean thing. It is hard to dis- 
cover much melody in Stravinsky; harder to 
find any in Scriabine — save where he has 
"lifted" it from Chopin ; and utterly impossible 
to unearth a trace of it in the achievements 
of that wonderful being, if not wonderful 
composer, Schonberg. But concords? it may 
be asked — why bid them go hence? Quite 
true; the request or command is superfluous. 
Has the reader ever considered how many, or 
rather, how few, concords there are in the 
musician's vocabulary? Let us see what he 
has when writing in two parts. There is the 
octave, which is often effective but aftener 
dull ; there is the fifth, unbearable, rancous and 
thin unless used with consummate skill ; there 
is the third, in its major or minor form, and 
finally there is the sixth, also either major or 
minor. Six in all! My inspiration, like Mr. 
Graves', gave out at the end of the first line. 
He went on — to his own destruction ; I left 
off there, and my line remains as a start, a 
hint of inspiration, for him who shall come 
after me and hate discords more viciously than 
I do. As for myself, I have given up with 
my failure all ambition to be numbered 
amongst the great poets ; and to-day, with no 
intention of telling the public what they can 
learn out of any dictionary of music, or text 
book of harmony, I propose to say something 
concerning the part the use of discords has 
played in the development of music as we 
know it to-day, as our grandfathers knew it 
and as it was known to their grandfathers. 

Just for the benefit of the reader unversed 
in technicalities let me remark that a discord 
is not of necessity unpleasant to the ear as a 
discordant voice or German band is. Stainer 
in his excellent little handbook of harmony 
points that a concord sounded alone perfectly 
satisfies the ear and we demand no more, while 
a discord leaves us unsatisfied in a state of 
suspense, awaiting the next chord. There are 
only four concords on which we may end a 
piece of music; the third (E C) (or with the 
E flattened to make the minor form), or more 
satisfactory still the triad (G E C) (also 
with the E flattened if the minor is required). 
Of course as many C's, above or below may be 
added, the chord remains the same; it is the 
tonic common chord. The first inversion, a 
beautiful chord, and a concord, too, does not 
leave us with a sense of rest. (C G E) sug- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



153 



gests something to follow, and still more so 
does the second inversion (E C G), which 
indeed is considered a discord. The composer 
who limits himself to strict concords may use 
any save the last, and for his final chord he 
has virtually only one — the tonic common 
chord in its major or minor form, because 
the third alone is indefinite and may be part 
of the inverted common chord in the key of 
A minor. 

With this preamble let us see what Monte- 
verde did. Before his time music made up 
entirely of common chords and first inver- 
sions had been abandoned as intolerably mon- 
otonous; but discords could only be taken as 
prepared suspensions. The dominant seventh 
was the most used of these: (F D B G) ; the 
F had first to be sounded as part of a con- 
cord and then held, while the other parts 
moved to their respective positions, D, B and 
G; finally either all the parts moved simul- 
taneously to another concord or one or 
more could be left "suspended" to form an- 
other discord. In all cases the F had to 
descend one semitone before the discord was 
"resolved," either, as I have just said, on a 
concord or another discord; it might in no 
circumstance ascend. Monteverde's heroic 
defiance of rule seems a trifling matter nowa- 
days. Without any preparatory sounding of 
the objectionable discordant F, without, in 
fact, any warning to the ear at all, he struck 
the whole chord bodily. Every theorist in 
Europe screamed and writhed; but Monte- 
verde had invented the most serviceable and 
hardest worked chord in music. He had 
opened the flood gates to all sorts of wild in- 
novations, and the pedants foresaw "the end 
of all"; but he had also opened out the way 
for the whole of modern music. Hardly a 
piece of music written since does not make 
use of Monteverde's discovery. Its enchant- 
ing loveliness quickly fascinated all musicians ; 
and much of the music composed afterwards 
its incessant employment is nothing less than 
a weariness to our ears and a nuisance. 

Of as great importance as the discovery of 
the chord itself, in its unprepared state was 
the hint it threw out, that no discord need be 
prepared, and then that none need necessarily 
be resolved. But the second inference was a 
long time in coming. It is rare to find an 
unresolved discord in Bach or Handel, through 
greater and ever greater freedom obtained. 



The criticism of the pedants compelled Hay- 
dn, Mozart and for a time Beethoven to use 
the appoggiature to disguise from the eye the 
unprepared tonic discords in their cadences; 
they wrote them so that they looked all right, 
though they sounded, as the pedants in- 
sisted, all wrong. But they always re- 
solved there "disagreeable" chords. One nota- 
blt exception is the devilish din at the opening 
of the finale to the ninth symphony. Even the 
beginning of the much discussed C quartet 
of Mozart is not an exception. In spite of 
the "false relations" each discord in turn is 
resolved so as to please the * most pedantic 
mind in that respect, and in the end all winds 
up satisfactorily. Not until Wagner do we 
find sevenths, diminished sevenths, ninths and 
heaven knows what besides struck and left 
at that — left, so to say, unburied, though their 
life-work is done. 

Handel and Bach when they observed, or 
evaded, the rules did not obey the dictates of 
text books or copy the procedure of musicians 
who had been dead some hundreds of years. 
That is what our academic musicians do ; their 
"models" are selected from a music that is as 
dead as Latin and Greek, a music that means 
nothing save to those of us who have thought 
it worth while to master the language in which 
it is written and certainly means little enough 
to the academic mind. That music was still 
a living tongue to the composers born in the 
17th or early part of the 18th century ; its rules 
no more hampered them than the rules of Eng- 
lish grammar hamper a writer to-day. Yet 
even Bach and Handel knew perfectly well 
the value of discords to give strength, expres- 
siveness and beauty to their work. They 
achieved discords without breakage of regu- 
lars by the license permitted in the use of 
"passing notes." If we read a fugue of Bach 
vertically, bar by bar, we will find each bar 
full of these discords; each part pursues its 
way resolutely and while the main harmonic 
body obeys rule the constant clash of colliding 
parts fills the music with incessant harshness 
which would shock the ear were they not so 
swiftly over. Were these collisions avoided 
the music would not possess one-tenth of its 
strength — nay, would have no strength at all, 
would not be Bach. Macfarren long ago said 
that Handel's slow introductory eight-part 
choruses, say in Israel in Egypt, did not sound 
so "loud" as the rapid fugues which follow; 



154 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



but he did not perceive that the apparent 
greater loudness was really greater strength; 
that the strength was due to roughness, the 
roughness due to discords, and the discords 
due to the free use of passing notes. The 
Viennese composers used passing notes to a 
certain extent ; but their work was not essen- 
tially or mainly polyphonic and the appoggia- 
ture served them instead. Some of Beet- 
hoven's Sonatas — for instance, the Pathetique 
— are crammed with discords got by this de- 
vice. 

Turn we now to the latest composers, Rich- 
ard Strauss, Borodin, Stravinsky and Scria- 
bine. They all have written polyphonic music 
which, of course, contains endless passing 
notes; but these are no longer employed for 
the sake of getting discords ; indeed they most 
frequently occur not between concords but 
between discords. The appoggiature also is 
common, though no longer written in small 
notes to elude the vigilant eye of the theorists, 
for often the "leaning note" leans not against 
a concord, but against a discord. Technically, 
then, what have they added to the musician's 
resources? Simply this: when their music is 
good they have employed all the discords be- 
loved of the older masters without any eva- 
sions or any endeavor to conform to rule or 
any pretext of doing so. We have grown used 
to dissonances and our ears no longer require 
the momentary rest afforded by frequent con- 
cords; if a discord neither demands prepara- 
tion nor resolution, and if it sounds beautiful 
and is expressive, there is no reason on earth 
why a piece of music should not consist wholly 
of series of discords. When Monteverde 
wrote the first unprepared dominant seventh 
he little dreamed of the way or to what far 
away end he was pointing. From Monteverde 
to Scriabine the line is unbroken, each succes- 
sive generation growing bolder in attacking 
dissonances and still bolder in the manner of 
quitting them. I heard a gentleman give a re- 
cital of his own pianoforte works not long 
ago. They seemed to consist entirely of 
minor seconds — B and C struck together — and 
the effect to my mind was excruciatingly 
abominable. But that is how Bach's music, 
Beethoven's, Wagner's, struck their contem- 
poraries; and heaven knows what we shall 
get accustomed to in time. One things is 
certain — that the most daring modern spirit 
is only following in the steps of the mightiest 



masters. The one thing that matters is tHis: 
when we have grown accustomed to the dis- 
cords and they no longer shock, startle or even 
surprise us, will the music be found to mean 
anything, will it be found to be strong and 
beautiful? 



NOTES FROM PARIS 

BY GILBERT ELLIOTT, JR. 

M. Rouche, director of the Opera, has been pre- 
senting a scene from Vincent d'Indy's Chant de la 
Cloche at the Thursday afternoon matinees. 

Charpentier is doing little composing these days. 
The auxiliary hospital of his beloved working girls 
took up a great deal of his time, and now still fur- 
ther demands on it are being made by the exhibition 
known as Concours des Cocades de Mimi Pinson, 
which they are holding under his direction in the 
Petit Palais des Beaux- Arts for the benefit of the 
wounded. Meanwhile Wis namesake, Victor Char- 
pentier, is giving weekly Sunday matinee perform- 
ances of Berlioz's Damnation de Faust in the 
Theatre des Champs Ely sees with an orchestra and 
chorus known as the Association des Grands Con- 
certs and made up largely of refugee musicians from 
the Monnaie and Concerts I save of Brussels, the 
orchestras of Grand Liege and Anvers and the Con- 
certs Populaires of Lille and Rheims. Last but not 
least. Charpentier the boxer is driving an aeroplane 
and recently received the Medaille Militaire for 
bravery- 

The French musical journal S. I. XI. expired 
shortly after the war began. The corresponding 
German publication Die Musik lasted until a few 
months ago, when it quietly gave up the ghost. But 
if music in France was more severely affected by 
the war at first, it is also making a better recovery, 
and the other day the fourth issue of a new musical 
journal, La Musiquc Pendant la Guerre, made its 
appearance. It is published by the Comptoir Gen- 
eral de Musique, nbis Boulevard Haussmann, Paris. 

The latest list of French musicians killed on the 
field of honor contains eight names and includes 
that of the composer Joseph Conte, killed at Arras, 
June 21, 1915. 

The heads of the famous publishing house of 
Augener, Ltd., have been interned. 

The discussion aroused by the campaigns of Saint- 
Saens and d'Indy against German music have now 
reached a stage which is well summed up by Charles 
Tenroc, the musical critic of Comccdia, in an article 
on the project of a league for the preponderance of 
French music in France. He rather creates two 
categories of German musicians, which may be 
termed the clean and the unclean. To the first belong 
Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Gluck, Haydn and Schu- 
mann. To the second belong Strauss, Reger, 
Mahler, Weingartner, etc. Wagner is debatable 
ground. He had talent, no doubt, but there is just 
a smack of the strafer about him. The best plan 
would be not to bar him entirely, but to give him 
the benefit of a long rest. 

The war seems to have stimulated Claude De- 
bussy into renewed activities. Not only has he edited 
the works of Chopin, but he has composed six 
sonatas for divers rare combinations of instruments, 
such as the flute and harp. The first of these for 
'cello and piano has alreadv been published. He has 
also written a little song whose title in English would 
be Christmas of the little children who no longer 
have any homes. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



155 



Corropondencc 

Whitman Conservatory of Music 
Walla Walla, Washington 

February 24, 1916. 
Editor, The New Music Review, 

2 West 45th Street, New York City. 
Dear Sir: I am enclosing in this letter copy of 
programme of the performance The Merry Wives 
of Windsor. An interesting feature of the per- 
formance was that since no English translation of 
this opera was found to have been published, a 
very excellent translation was made by one of our 
students, Miss Bernice Richmond. The perform- 
ance from a point of ensemble singing and acting 
was generally accredited to have been the best the 
conservatory has thus far achieved. The regularly 
occurring opera performance by conservatory stu- 
dents has caused considerable interest throughout 
the Northwest, and quite a number of people, in- 
cluding some of the foremost musicians, came quite 
a distance to see the performance. I thought this 
would be an interesting item for your paper and am 
therefore sending it. 

In addition I am also sending a programme of the 
performance Elijah, given by the Whitman Choral 
Society January 25, which was also an excellent 
performance. 

Sincerely yours, 

Eli as Blum, Director. 



Mexico, March 1, 1916. 
To The New Music Review, 

No. 2 West 45th Street, New York. 

Dear Sirs: In your issue of last June, which I 
have only recently received, there is an article on 
Cesar Franck in which I have noticed the following 
statement : "The Trio in F minor is the only one of 
the four which gives us any taste for Franck's latest 
work." 

Now, then, the three trios, Op. 1, are respectively 
in F sharp minor, B flat and D. The trio Op. 2 is 
also in D major. 

The author of the article probably had in mind 
the great Quintette, which is in F minor, probably 
the greatest of its kind in the modern repertory and 
only rivalled by Brahms's, but which is not men- 
tioned at all in the said article. 

The Franck trios have been in my library for a 
long time and only recently our Chamber Music 
Society has looked them over, with not very satis- 
factory results. They are undoubtedly interesting as 
studies, but would hardly interest even a veteran 
chamber music audience. 

The foregoing is respectfully submitted by 

Yours faithfully, 

D. Mazenet. 

I am interested to learn that these articles are 
read with such close attention in far-away Mexico, 
and grateful to Mr. Mazenet for calling to my 
notice the error in the article on Franck. Of 
course I should have said, "The Trio in F sharp 
minor," as I was referring to the first of the Trios, 
Opus 1. The great Quintet in F minor, to which 
Mr. Mazenet refers in terms of well-deserved praise, 
is not an early work, but one of the ripest of the 
composer's maturity, belonging to the same period 
as the Violin Sonata, the Symphony, the Quartet 
for Strings and the three great Chorales for Organ. 

Daniel Gregory Mason. 



15. 
16. 
16. 


Aft. 
Aft. 
Eve. 


17. 
18. 


Eve. 
Aft. 


19. 

21. 
23- 
24. 


Aft. 
Eve. 
Aft. 
Aft. 


24. 
25. 

26. 

27- 

28. 


Eve. 
Aft. 
Aft. 
Eve. 
Aft. 


28. 
30. 
30. 


Eve. 
Aft. 
Eve. 


31. 
31. 


Aft. 
Eve. 


3. 
4. 


Eve. 
Eve. 


6. 


Eve. 


7- 
7- 
8. 


Aft. 
Eve. 
Aft. 


9. 
10. 
11. 


Aft. 
Eve. 
Aft. 



11. Eve. 



13. 
14. 



Eve. 
Eve. 



J\ Calendar of Concern 

MARCH 

^EOLIAN HALL 

Song Recital, Robert H. Hamilton. 

Song Recital, Julia Culp. 

Folk-song Recital, Marjory Kennedy- 
Fraser and Patuffa Fraser. 

Song Recital, Gertrude Hale. 

Joint Recital, Harold Bauer-Ossip Ga- 
brilowitsch. 

Piano Recital, Leo Ornstein. 

Kneisel Quartet. 

Song Recital, Marcella Craft. 

Song Recital, Clara Clemens-Gabrilo- 
witsch. 

Song Recital, Emmy Destinn. 

Joint Recital, Harold Bauer- Pablo Casals. 

Song Recital, Louis Graveure. 

Song Recital, Vida Milholland. 

Joint Recital, Estella Neuhaus-T. Howe 
Clifford. 

Song Recital, Charlotte Lund. 

'Cello Recital, Boris Hambourg. 

Concert by Edith Chapman Goold, Will- 
iam C. Carl, William Enderlin, Edwin 
Grasse and Heinrich Meyn, Benefit 
Blind Men's Improvement Club. 

Lecture, Eric Fisher Wood. 

Song Recital, Elsa Kellner. 

APRIL 

Piano Recital, Herbert Fryer. 

Recital of Dickens' Pickwick Papers, 
Frank Speaight. 

Concert by the Pupils of Helen Augusta 
Hayes. 

Song Recital, Craig Campbell. 

'Cello Recital, Max Gegna. 

Joint Recital, Susan Metcalfe-Casals- 
Pablo Casals. 

Piano Recital, Harold Bauer. 

Song Recital, Julia Allan. 

Joint Recital, Estella Neuhaus-J. Howe 
Clifford. 

Violin Recital, Master William Kroll, 
Assisted by Lazar S. Samoilof, Bari- 
tone. 

Joint Recital, Lisbet Hoffmann, M. Stern- 
bach and Theodor V. Hemert. 

Song Recital, Reinald Werrenrath. 



INSTITUTE OF MUSICAL ART 



The third annual public concert by students of the 
Institute of Musical Art took place under the aus- 
pices of the Auxiliary Society of the Institute on 
Saturday evening, February 26, at 8.15, at iEolian 
Hall. Those who attended the concert last year 
recall with pleasure the performances of the or- 
chestra and soloists, and the programme of the con- 
cert was an event of equal interest. The following 
programme was rendered: Symphony No. 2, in 
D major, Beethoven — First movement: Adagio molto, 
allegro con brio — Students' Orchestra. Concerto for 
the Piano in Eflat major, Liszt — Allegro maestoso; 
quasi adagio; allegretto vivace — Miss Ruth Elin. 
Concerto for the Violin in D major, Beethoven — First 
movement: Allegro, ma non troppo — Mr. Elias 
Breeskin. Overture, Sakuntala, Goldmark — Students' 
Orchestra. Romance for Flute, Saint-Saens; 
Scherzo, Widor — Mr. William M. Kincaid. Vor der 
Klosterp forte, Grieg — Soprano and contralto # soli, 
women's voices, organ and orchestra — Miss Lillian 
P. Eubank and Mrs. Mary Winetzky— Students' Or- 
chestra and chorus. Concerto for Piano in G major, 
Beethoven — First movement; Allegro moderato— 
Mr. Milton Suskind. Military March, Schubert — 
Arranged for full orchestra by Leopold Damrosch — 
Students' Orchestra. 



188 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Uarioiu Dotes 

Clarence Dickinson gave a recital in the Presby- 
terian Church at Dobbs Ferry-on-Hudson on Tues- 
day afternoon, March 21, at five o'clock. The pro- 
gramme comprised works of Rachmaninoff, Mail- 
ing, Dickinson, Wagner and Tschaikowsky. 

On Thursday afternoon, in the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Jersey City, Mr. Dickinson re- 
peated the Lecture Recital on "Programme Music" 
given in his recent historical series at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. At this recital he had the assist- 
ance of the violinist, Herbert Dittler. 

Miss Edina Cowling, who is studying this vear in 
the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, gave the fol- 
lowing programme on March 22: Fugue in E minor, 
Handel-Guilmant ; Andante con moto, Christmas- 
Musette, Alphonse Mailly ; Marche Funebre et Chant 
Seraphique, Guilmant; Intermezzo from First Sym- 
phony, Widor; Walther's Preislied, Wagner-Custard ; 
Sonata in G minor con moto, Edgar Tinel. 

On March 22 the Choral Art Club of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., A. Y. Cornell, conductor, presented the fol- 
lowing programme at their second private concert: 
Abend auf Golgotha, Othegraven; Laudi Alia Ver- 
gine Maria, Verdi; O Padre Nostro, Zandonai; 
Stabat Mater, Verdi; Graceful Tune, Grainger; My 
Robin is to the Greenwood Gone, Grainger; Shep- 
herd's Hey, set by Grainger; News from Whydah, 
Gardiner. 

The programme of the second private concert of 
the Westwood Musical Club, Westwood, N. J., Philip 
James, conductor, on February* 25, included : Hail, 
Land of Freedom, Turner; Selections for Orchestra 
from Mme. Butterfly, Puccini; Vision Fugitive, 
Massenet ; The Honey Rover, Schwarz ; Smile Again, 
My Bonnie Lassie, Nevin ; O Don Fatale, Verdi ; 
Old Folks at Home, Van der Stucken; Song of the 
World Adventurers, Converse; Route Marching, 
Stock; The Soul Triumphant, Noble. 

The Lyric Club of Charles City, la., a chorus of 
women's voices under the direction of Frank Parker, 
gave its second concert March 21, when the feature 
choral works were Charles Villiers Stanford's new 
Fairy Day cycle and Harry A. Matthew's Choral 
Ballad for Women's Chorus and tenor solo The 
Slave's Dream. Smaller choruses by Gaines, 
Kramer, Fielder, Woodman, Lacombe and Kernochan 
were also given. Holmes Cowper, tenor, of Des 
Moines, was soloist; Marie Howland, the accom- 
panist. 

The Columbia School Chorus, Chicago, under the 
direction of Miss L. St. J. Westervelt, presented 
the following among their programme on March 7 : 
Philomel, Thy Magic Singing, Scarlatti; Under the 
Greenwood Tree, Arne; Coronach, Schubert; The 
Bridegroom, Brahms-Saar; The Lotos Flower, Ru- 
binstein; The Merry Maidens, Rubinstein; Young 
Love. Bantock; The Gateway of Ispahan, Foote; 
A Spirit iFlower, Campbell-Tipton ; When Soft 
Winds Blow, Guedy; Spring's Greeting; Koch; The 
Two Clocks, Rogers; The Zincali, Smith. 

The University Philharmonic Society, Grand Fork, 
N. D., W. W. "Norton, conductor, on February 20 
presented the following programme at their monthly 
concert : Triumphal March from Aida, Verdi ; Over- 
ture, William Tell, Rossini; Aria, Hear Ye, Israel 
(Elijah), Mendelssohn; Waltz Intermezzo from 
Jewels of the Madonna, Wolf-Ferrari; Intermezzo 
from Cavalleria Rusticana, Mascagni; Duet, Miser- 
eri, from II Trovatore, Verdi; Swan Song and 
Lohengrin's Farewell from Lohengrin, Wagner ; Der 
Asra, Rubinstein; Elegie, Massenet; Solveig's Song, 



Grieg; Sextette from Lucia di Lammermoor, Doni- 
zetti. 

The programme of the fourteenth concert of the* 
Mount Kisco, N. Y., Choral Society, G. D. Richards, 
conductor, on March 29, included: Song: of the 
Vikings, Faning; My Noble Knights, Meyerbeer; 
My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land, and O Happy 
Eyes, Elgar; Robin Good fellow, Morgan; The 
House of Memories, Aylward; The Pipes of Gor- 
don's Men, Hammond; Peer Gynt Suite No. 1, for 
Orchestra, Grieg; Land- Sighting, Grieg; Chorus, 
Eleven Vocal Dances, Schubert; A Burst of Mel- 
ody, Seiler; Blow, Ye Gentle Breezes, Blow, Marks; 
Suite for Orchestra, Three Dances (from the musk 
to Henry VIII), German; Fair Ellen, Bruch. 

The St. Cecilia Club, New York, V. Harris, con- 
ductor, presented the following programme at their 
last concert of the season on March 21 : Invocation 
to St. Cecilia, Harris; The Gateway of Ispahan, 
Foote; May Eve, Taylor; Pastoral, Von Hoist; 
Ronde Populaire. Perilhou; To the Springtime, 
Grieg; Evening in the High Hills, Grieg; In Ola 
Valley, Grieg; Rotnamsknut, Grieg; The Four 
Winds, Smith; The Zincali, Smith; Ave, O Maria, 
Zandonat; Ein Schwan, Grieg; The Two Clocks, 
Rogers; The Shepherd's Hey and Colonial Song, 
Grainger; Maguire's Kick, Stamford-Grainger; 
Dance of Gnomes, MacDowell; The Bird of the 
Wilderness, Horsmann. 

The following concert was given March 17 by the 
Glee Clubs of the Hartford (Conn.) Public Schools 
under the direction of R. L. Baldwin: A Song of 
the Sea, Stewart; My True Love Hath My Heart, 
Hammond; Piano solo — In Autumn, Moszkowski; 
Viking Song, Coleridge-Taylor; Swing Along, Cook; 
Indian songs — From the Land of the Sky-blue 
Water, Far Off I Hear a Lover's Flute, and The 
Moon Drops Low, Cadman; Autumn Storms, Grieg; 
My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose, Hastings ; When 
Song is Sweet, Souci; Spring's Awakening, Webster; 
Trombone solos— O Dry Those Tears, Riego; Co- 
lumbia Polka, Rollinson; The Way of the World, 
Hatch; The Romance of a Cake Shop, Osborne; 
Jenny Kissed Me, Webbe ; Barbara Frietchie, Jordan. 

A general invitation was recently extended through 
the press to all persons who play any orchestral 
instrument to join the Community Orchestra of the 
Music School Settlement. 55 East Third Street. The 
response to this invitation was gratifying and the 
orchestra has established a flourishing nucleus for 
work and growth. It is now desired to renew this 
invitation and to announce that a hearty welcome 
will be extended to all instrumental amateurs, old 
and young, of both sexes, who wish to meet with 
this orchestra for the enjoyment of regular orches- 
tral playing. The instruments chiefly needed now 
to bring up the orchestral balance are the brass, 
cornets and trumpets, trombones and horns; of the 
wood-wind, bassoons and a second oboe; of the 
strings, violas' cellos and double bass. Players of all 
instruments, however, will be gladly accepted. There 
are no tests or examinations. The orchestra meets 
for rehearsal every Tuesday evening at eight, at the 
Music School. Players desiring to join the orchestra 
need only present themselves before any rehearsal. 
The orchestra is conducted by Arthur Farwell, di- 
rector of the Music School, and works of Beethoven, 
Schubert, Chopin and other composers are in re- 
hearsal. A concert is being planned for the spring. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



157 



knowledge, is to dictate to musical authorities 
what is to be done, no doubt many mistakes 
will be made and the services suffer. It is not 
long since that a Canon of a cathedral actually 
proposed that 'to shorten the service/ in future 
only single instead of double chants should be 
used for the Psalms! But no conscientious 
organist ought to object to any reasonable sug- 
gestions made by those who, after all, are re- 
sponsible for the ordering of Divine Service, 
and no clerical authority ought to treat the or- 
ganist as a man who is paid to play but not to 
suggest! I think, however, that the seventy 
years of The Guardian's life have been years 
of real progress, and I hope another seventy 
years will still see our beautiful Church music 
in constant use to the glory of God and the 
edification of those who, with Milton, love to 
hear — 

'The pealing organ blow 
To the full-voiced quire below, 
In service high, and anthems clear.' " 

Considering the long period covered by the 
remarks of the eminent Abbey organist, he 
has given rather a meagre account of choral 
development in the Church. In fact, from the 
Churchman's point of view, he has totally ig- 
nored the most important advance — that which 
was caused by the Tractarian Movement! 
During the time of Goss — who succeeded Att- 
wood in 1838 and was, in turn, succeeded by 
Stainer in 1872 — eucharistic music was re- 
stored to its ancient high position. No greater 
contrast can be imagined than that between 
the general character of the services at St. 
Paul's Cathedral in the slovenly times of Syd- 
ney Smith (who was instrumental in the ap- 
pointment of Goss) and in the days of those 
ecclesiastical giants, Liddon and Church, who 
were warmly interested in the great work in- 
augurated by Stainer. What happened in the 
time of Liddon was the result of what was 
started thirty years previously by Keble, New- 
man, and Pusey. Catholic doctrine, ritual, 
and music go hand in hand — a fact that Sir 
Frederick Bridge has — accidentally, we sup- 
pose — lost sight of. 

]HE well-known setting to "Lord, 
for Thy tender mercies' sake" is so 
universally ascribed to'Farrant in 
all of our choir service lists, we 

would call attention to the following, which 

we take from a contemporary: 




'The simple little anthem, 'Lord, for Thy 
tender mercies' sake,' has become widely 
known since it appeared as a supplement in 
the Musical Times of 1845. I* fi rst appeared 
in print about the middle of the eighteenth 
century in a publication called the Cathedral 
Magazine, Earlier copies of it appear in 
manuscript in some of the old cathedral books, 
and the general opinion is that it dates from 
Charles the First's time. This assumption at 
once disposes of Farrant's claim to the music, 
as he died in 1 580. It was not until two hun- 
dred years later that his name was first asso- 
ciated with the music. It is now generally 
supposed to have been the work of Robert 
Hilton, who was organist of St. Margaret's, 
Westminster. The words of the anthem are 
taken from a book of Christian Prayers and 
Holy Meditations, which was compiled and 
published in Elizabeth's reign." 

Hilton was buried at St. Margaret's in J657. 
Hawkins, the historian, states that he lies in 
the cloisters of Westminster Abbey, and that 
an anthem was sung in the Abbey before his 
body was brought out of his house for inter- 
ment! Notwithstanding the doubt that ap- 
parently exists regarding the anthem in ques- 
tion, Hilton's name never appears in connec- 
tion with it in printed service lists. It is sung 
very often in this country (especially in Lent) 
and is invariably ascribed to Tallis. In 1625 
Hilton published the collection called "Catch 
that Catch can, or, A Choice Collection of 
Catches, Rounds, and Canons for three or 
four voyces." His Service in E Minor is 
printed in Rimbault's cathedral music. Some 
of his anthems are preserved in manuscript 
form in the British Museum. 

HE news of the death of Sir George 
Martin came as no surprise to his 
friends in this country. Alarming 
reports regarding his health had 
been prevalent for a long time before his final 
illness. Probably no English composer of 
modern church music has held a higher posi- 
tion in the estimation of Americans than that 
held by the distinguished organist of St. 
Paul's. His anthems and services are known 
throughout the length and breadth of the land. 
They are marked not only by a churchly 
style, but also by a freshness and a vitality 
that have made them extraordinarily popular 
with choirs. It is not, however, through his 




158 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



compositions alone that Sir George Martin be- 
came known to so many church musicians on 
this side of the ocean. He was a genial man, 
always ready with a kind word, and ever 
courteous to the thousands of organists who 
made themselves known to him at the Metro- 
politan Cathedral. 

His history is familiar to every church or- 
ganist who has kept pace with the growth of 
Anglican music during the past quarter of a 
century. 

It was but a very short time ago that Sir 
-George Martin, notwithstanding his advanced 
age and feeble condition of health, conducted 
for the last time one of the great choral fes- 
tivals for which St. Paul's Cathedral is so 
justly famous. The occasion was St. Paul's 
Day (the dedication festival in celebration of 
the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul). In 
one of the London journals we read: 

"The first Celebration of the day was in the 
Chapel of St. Dunstan at 7.15 a.m., and at 8 
a.m. there was a second Celebration in the 
Chapel of St. Michael and St. George, where 
Matins was said later. At 10 a.m. the princi- 
pal forenoon service took place. Tallis's five- 
part Litany was sung in procession. The 
Bishop of London wore his cope and mitre, 
and the Bishop of Willesden was also vested 
in a cope, as were the Archdeacon of London 
(Canon-in-residence) and Canons Newbolt 
and Alexander. The Dean had for some days 
been unable to fulfil his engagements owing to 
a severe cold, and could not therefore attend 
the Festival Services; Dr. Simpson, who last 
year suffered a great bereavement, was also 
absent. The Litany was very finely rendered 
by the Minor Canons and the choir, and the 
procession was an imposing and impressive 
spectacle. The Introit was the Rev. James 
Baden Powell's 'Hail! Festal Day/ and the 
music of the High Celebration was that of Mr. 
Charles Macpherson (the Sub-Organist of St. 
Paul's), in E flat. The accompaniment in- 
cluded some brass instruments and tympani. 
This setting to the Communion Office contains 
some very striking passages, and the render- 
ing was most inspiring. During the Commu- 
nion of the people, Mozart's Ave Verum, 
'Jesu, Word of God Incarnate,' was sung. At 
the close Sir George Martin's Psalm cl. was 
sung. Sir George, who has not been well re- 
cently, conducted." 

At the afternoon service, however, when 




Mendelssohn's St. Paul was sung, Mr. 
McPherson conducted, and the organ was 
played by Dr. Marchant, organist of St. 
Peter's, Eaton Square. An account of the 
funeral of Sir George Martin will be given 
in a future issue of this journal. 

R. CARLTON MICHELL objects, 
in the columns of Musical Opinion, 
to the tune called Miles Lane, 
which, he says, is generally sung 
in English churches to "All hail the power of 
Jesus' Name." (In this country, "Corona- 
tion" is the favorite.) He mentions Smart's 
dislike to the tune: 

"There is a story told of Henry Smart, in 
connection with this tune, when he was or- 
ganist at St. Pancras, which may be worth re- 
peating. The only singers he had were the 
school children, and they sat at the side of the 
organ in the west gallery, — a large school, the 
boys in tiers one above another on one side, 
and the girls in pretty white caps and aprons 
on the other, similarly placed. The hymn 
'All hail the name' was announced, to be sung 
4 to the praise and glory of God.' At that 
time it was the custom to play an interlude 
between each verse sung; I think there are 
seven to this hymn. The tale goes that Smart, 
who hated 'Miles Lane,' on this occasion 
raised the pitch in each interlude, with the re- 
sult that while the children managed well in 
the last verse to 'shout in universal song,' they 
failed to come anywhere near 'crowning' it! 
So the bass schoolmaster took up, or rather 
took down, the refrain two octaves below 'lord 
of all' ! But that, you know, was in the good 
old days!" 

We have heard this story before in a slightly 
different form. A similar tale is also told of 
W. T. Best. 

The probability is that Smart never did any- 
thing of the kind. He was a devoutly relig- 
ious man, and it is hardly conceivable that he 
ever sacrificed the dignity of public worship 
simply for the sake of emphasizing his disap- 
proval of a certain tune. 

It is possible that Best may have perpe- 
trated a trick of this sort, for he was some- 
what prone to do the "unusual" when suffer- 
ing from a severe attack of musical disgust. 

The Smart "yarn," however, fits in very 
well with a peculiar custom that once obtained 
at St. Pancras. When Henshaw was organist 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



159 




he was in the habit of playing elaborate inter- 
ludes between the verses of the hymn, and the 
practice was kept up after his time. Now, 
Smart was marvelously clever in improvising, 
and if anyone could insidiously lead a congre- 
gation from key to key without immediate de- 
tection, he was the man. He may have amused 
himself in experimenting in this fashion — per- 
haps at rehearsals — but that he deliberately 
did so in divine service for the purpose of 
getting the singers (and congregation) into 
vocal difficulties, because of his dislike to the 
music, is beyond belief. 

I HE decline in the attendance at 
church services continues to be dis- 
cussed very seriously in religious 
papers here and in Great Britain. 
Organists and choirmasters are especially in- 
terested in the subject — for they are fre- 
quently blamed by both the clergy and the 
laity for failure to "attract" congregations. 
A writer in the Ecclesiastical Review (Dub- 
lin) takes the ground that good preachers are 
too scarce — and that persons who magnify the 
importance of the sermon are too numerous. 
He says: 

"We are disposed to hold that, as in Eng- 
land, so in Ireland, one factor which militates 
against Church-going is to be found in the 
low standard sought for and attained in the 
average sermon. 

"We cannot admit that the fault lies entirely 
with the clergy. The laity must take upon 
themselves at least an equal share of the cen- 
sure for this state of affairs. Were our people 
to demand a higher standard in the pulpit 
and more carefully prepared sermons, they 
would probably get them. The random visitor 
to a Scotch Kirk, in any but the most remote 
districts, will in all likelihood hear a sermon 
worthy of his interested attention. It is un- 
likely that the average Scotch divinity student 
is either more earnest or more eloquent than 
his compeer in Ireland. But Scotch Presby- 
terians insist that their ministers shall be care- 
fully trained in the art of preaching, and that 
no man shall be called to occupy a pulpit with- 
out a rigid scrutiny of his powers of preach- 
ing. We have unfortunately brought up our 
people likewise to regard public worship as in- 
complete without a sermon or address, and to 
consider the pulpit the dominant feature of a 
church, the unhappy custom has sprung up 



in Dublin of advertising in the public Press 
the names of all the preachers for the ensuing 
Sunday. This tends to lay undue emphasis 
upon the sermon, and to encourage what is 
known in Scotland as the Sermon-taster/ who 
roams from church to church sipping the 
honeyed words of his favourite preachers. 
The true object of our public services, to ren- 
der to Almighty God the worship which is His 
due, tends to become obscured by this false 
emphasis laid upon the sermon. 

"There is too much preaching in our Church. 
Our people demand a sermon as a condition 
of their attendance, except at early celebra- 
tions. Yet, unlike the Scotch Presbyterians, 
they take little or no pains to secure that the 
sermon shall be a good one." 

A striking proof of the effect of good 
preaching is to be found in at least half a 
dozen New York churches (all of them "de- 
nominational"), where no special effort is 
made to "draw" the people by "popular" 
music. It is very difficult to get a seat in these 
places of worship for the reason that the 
preaching is not only excellent but superla- 
tively so. And it needs no advertising. On 
the other hand there are numbers of churches 
where the necessity of attracting congrega- 
tions by musical services is plainly admitted. 

A very curious article appeared not long ago 
in a prominent New York journal, advocating 
a new kind of service for use on Sunday af- 
ternoons in Episcopal churches. The writer 
(a curate in a well-known parish) obtained 
permission from his rector to change the regu- 
lar Evensong, and to substitute a "made up" 
service of his own ! We quote : 

"I eliminate the Confession and Absolution, 
and use for prayers, collects from our endless 
store. Instead of canticles, Russian anthems 
of like length and meaning are used after the 
single psalm and after each lesson, as well as 
for the offertory. 

"The address of ten minutes' length is on 
Church teaching. The hymns are well known, 
one before the Benediction being sung kneel- 
ing. In addition, I am trying to use strings, 
although at present we have only a 'cello ; and 
several pieces are played at the conclusion of 
the service. The singing is, of course, unac- 
companied, and is not only devotional but acts 
as a foil to the instrumental part of the serv- 
ice. That this is an ambitious thing to do I 
freely admit; however, we are warned never 



i6o 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



to preach down to people, and if we obey that 
injunction and then proceed to play down to 
them, it seems to me we had better not play 
at all. It is a contradiction in terms. I be- 
lieve that people would prefer better music 
if they" could have it, and the Russian music 
rarely fails to satisfy. Not only is there a 
rich store of material in this Russian music, 
but we can also use much of the old music, 
such as we find in the English and Yattendon 
and Oxford hymnals. The latter, however, I 
feel has to be used more sparingly than Rus- 
sian, because the appeal it makes is hardly so 
instantaneous as that of the more modern ma- 
terial. In fact, Horatio Parker says sonr 
where that we have no place left to-day, save 
a few jails, in which the work of Palestrina 
and his kind can be properly given. In con- 
clusion, I feel that we have to keep in mind 
the necessity of trying to do God's work in 
His way. We must fight the world, but not 
with weapons of the world's choosing. A de- 
votional service is one of the means God has 
given us, and I submit with all humility that 
the above service is devotional and attractive, 
but attractive because devotional and not in 
spite of the fact." 

The exact advantage of this new kind of 
service will seem problematical to the average 
organist. The portions of the regular service 
that are eliminated cannot be improved upon 
by the substitutions mentioned. We are in- 
clined to doubt whether the use of stringed 
instruments can possibly add to the religious 
or devotional effect of any service whatever. 
Russian music is peculiarly adapted to the 
Greek ritual, and although some of it can be 
"Anglicized," the great mass of it will not 
bear transplantation. And, unless we are 
mightily mistaken, the distinguished Yale pro- 
fessor has been misquoted. The jail that at 
present is most celebrated for reforms of all 
kinds has not as yet made any marked ad- 
vance in the polyphonic school of the sixteenth 
century, although Mr. Osborne may, after he 
has disposed of his enemies, perform further 
miracles at Sing Sing. If "the work of Pales- 
trina and his kind" is "properly given" at Au- 
burn, or Elmira, or elsewhere, we have yet to 
hear of it. Take it all in all, the Evensong 
service as it stands in the Prayer Book needs 
little revision — certainly not what is recom- 
mended in the article quoted. All this kind of 
experimentation shows a peculiar unrest 




among those of the clergy who, to borrow a 
phrase of Caesar, are "desirous of new 
things." 

| HE concert given at Aeolian Hall 
last month by the male choir of 
Calvary Church received some ex- 
cellent notices from the daily press. 
The Evening Post, the Sun, the Mail, and the 
World all spoke in the highest terms of the 
work of the choir. Mr. John Bland, the 
choirmaster of Calvary Parish, is to be con- 
gratulated upon the excellent singing of his 
boys and men. A Russian program of con- 
siderable difficulty was adequately presented, 
and Mr. Bland contributed several tenor solos. 

[N admirable performance of Par- 
ker's "Hora Novissima" was given 
at the Cathedral of St. John the 
Divine on the evening of Quinqua- 
gesima by the Cathedral choir. Mr. Miles 
Farrow conducted and Mr. Lefebvre presided 
at the organ. The soloists were Miss Grace 
Kerns, soprano; Mrs. Benedict Jones, con- 
tralto; Mr. Wheeler, tenor, and Mr. Glenn, 
bass. 




i 



An interesting musical event in southern New 
ersey will be the Burlington Public School Music 
festival, to be held May 4 and 5, under the direc- 
tion of Clarence Wells, Supervisor of Music 

Eight hundred grade children and the High School 
Glee Clubs will take part and the programme will 
include folk-son^s and dances, action songs in cos- 
tume, sight singing demonstrations, part songs and 
choruses, "The Wreck of the Hesperus," Longfellow- 
Anderton, a cantata for mixed voices, "The Lady of 
Shallott>" Tennyson-Bendall, a cantata for female 
voices and "Hiawatha's Childhood," Whitely, an op- 
eretta for unchanged voices, the music of which is 
founded on original Indian melodies. 

Well-known Philadelphia soloists have been en- 
gaged, including Emily Stokes Hagar, soprano; 
Henry Gurney, tenor ; Henry Hotz, bass, and two boy 
sopranos. The chorus will be accompanied by the 
Trenton Orchestra, Albert Winkler, director. . 



Negro melodies and the B minor Mass — simple 
primitive music and one of the most complex choral 
compositions ever written — these were contrasted at 
a rehearsal of the Bach Choir of the Bethlehems 
this week when the choir, following a practice ren- 
dition of the chorus Sanctus, listened to selections 
by the colored quartet of Fisk University. The ap- 
pearance of the Fisk singers was arranged for by Ehr. 
H. S. Drinker, President of Lehigh University and 
of the Bach Choir, who heard them while in Nash- 
ville, Tenn., last fall, attending the inauguration of 
Dr. F. A. McKenzie, an alumnus of Lehigh, as the 
President of Fisk. 

The Bach Choir will give its eleventh festival at 
Lehigh University on May 26 and 27. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



161 




4. WARREN ANDREWS. A CO.. WAROC 
HAROLD V. MILLI6AN. F.A.G.O.. GEN. «KC 



S. LEWIS ELMER, A.A.G.O., SUS-WARDCN 
VICTOR SAIER. A O.O . GCN.TREAS. 



FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE. NEW YORK 



GUILD EXAMINATIONS 

Wednesday, May 31, and Thursday, June 1, are 
the dates for the annual examinations of the Guild 
in New York and other cities. For information 
apply to Warren R. Hedden, Chairman of Exam- 
ination Committee, 170 West 75th Street, New York. 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 

The following programme was played by Mr. 
W. Lynnwood Farnam at the Harvard Club, Boston, 
on Sunday afternoon, February 27: 

1. Allegro Vivace (from 5th Symphony) Widor 

2. Impressions Karg-Elert 

Clair de lune 
Harmonies du soir 

3. Sketch in D flat Schumann 

4. Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C major Bach 

5. Lar ghetto ( from Clarinet, Quintett) Mozart 

6. Scherzo ( from 2nd Symphony) Vierne 

7. Theme, Variations and Finale in A flat Thiele 

Quite an interesting discussion was held recently 
at the Harvard Musical Association, when two hours 
were consumed with the much debated subject of 
arrangements for the organ. 

Proponents — 

Mr. Will MacFarlane 
Mr. John O'Shea 

Opponents — 

Mr. George A. Burden 
Mr. Henry M. Dunham 

Middle Ground- 
Mr. E. E. Truette 
Other sneakers were Mr. John Herman Loud, Mr. Samuel 

Carr and Mr. Ernest Skinner. 

The Dean in his opening remarks voiced his 
thought on the subject of arrangements pro ancj con 
as the opportune and the ideal. 

Mr. MacFarlane. speaking for arrangements, 
argued that arrangements were necessary; that 
every organist played arrangements, citing the ac- 
companiment of oratorios, etc., in church; that a 
large public, through the medium of arrangements, 
were enabled to hear and enjoy excerpts from ora- 
torio, opera, symphony and overture who never 
would otherwise hear them, and finally that the mod- 
ern perfected organ rendered feasible and effective 
such orchestral arrangements. 

Mr. John O'Shea followed, speaking for arrange- 
ments, dwelling mainly on the proposition laid down 
that arrangements were necessary to complete the 
education of both student and general public. 

Mr. Dunham, opposing arrangements, made his 
main argument on the great wealth of original organ 
music, which was in a large measure crowded out 
by the study and performance of arrangements, and 
that the playing of arrangements unfitted the per- 
former for straight organ work. 

Mr. Burdett, also opposing, followed a psycho- 
logical trend claim that the earnest and sincere 
organist with a right and pure heart and thinking 
"straight" would not play arrangements. 

Mr. Truette in his paper advocated a middle 
ground, urging a judicious admixture of both orig- 
inal compositions and arrangements, but deploring 
the tendency to overdo in making arrangements the 
principal part of the programme. 



Mr. John Herman Loud proclaimed himself a 
purist and a classicist, acknowledging at the same 
time the impeachment that he himself plaved ar- 
rangements, and only recently gave an entire pro- 
gramme of Wagner and was about to give another. 

Mr. Samuel Carr and Mr. Skinner each spoke 
pertinently and effectively, the former resenting a 
thinly veiled attack upon an organist and his pro- 
gramme at a recent concert in the Old South Church 
on the new Skinner organ and the latter defending 
himself and his organ against an open attack, ending 
with the remark that the organ was the great mes- 
sage bearer of the century and his organ delivered 
the message to four hundred thousand people in 
Boston who never heard a symphony concert. 



PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER 

The Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Guild 
of Organists gave a public service on Tuesday even- 
ing, February 1, in the Church of the Atonement, 
West Philadelphia, the choir for the occasion being 
the Cantaves Chorus of women's voices, with their 
director, Miss May Porter, at the organ. Mr. F. H. 
Bendig, organist of the church, Mr. Clarence 
Bawden, organist, and Mrs. Dorothy Johnstone 
Baseler assisted. Public appreciation of these Guild 
services is very gratifying, and this occasion was 
no exception to the rule, the large auditorium of the 
church being filled, and many persons being unable 
to obtain seats. The programme follows: 

Organ and Harp Prelude, "Romariza" Schmeidler 

flymn 520 

Magnificat and Nunc Dimitis J. E. West 

Anthems— "The Lord Is My Shepherd" ? CM,.,k*r* 

"The Almightv" } Schubert 

"He in Tears That Soweth" Hiller 

"Ave Maria" Brahms 

Offertory, "Triumphant Zion," contralto solo, sung by Miss 
Elizabeth Bonner, with the composer, Clarence" Baw- 
den, at the organ. 

Hymn 408 

Organ Postlude, Toccata " Tombelle 

Harp Solo, Pastorale Rameau 

The Rev. Charles W. Shreiner, rector of the 
church, conducted the service, and the sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Phillips Endecott Osgood, of 
the Chapel of the Mediator. 

The next public service of the Chapter will be 
held on the evening of Tuesday, March 28, at St. 
Clement's Church, Philadelphia, when the choir of 
the church, under direction of Henry S. Fry, will 
sing a new cantata, The Triumph of the Cross, by 
Harry Alexander Matthews. 



CENTRAL NEW YORK CHAPTER 

On February 3 a public service was presented 
under Chapter auspices at Grace Church, Utica, 
under the direction of De Witt Courts Garretson, 
organist of the church, assisted by his admirable 
choir and Mr. Andrew Allez, of Christ Church, 
Cooperstown, who played as a Prelude the Intermezzo 
from the A minor Sonata by Rheinberger, and Mr. 
Earl B. Collins, of Syracuse, who played Callaerts' 
Toccata as a Postlude. The choral numbers in- 
cluded the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in Aflat 



1 62 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



by Mann; God That Madest Earth and Heaven, 
Broome; and Randegger's Praise the Lord. 

Another Chapter public service was held Feb- 
ruary 20 at Trinity Church, Watertown, N. Y., under 
the direction of the organist and choirmaster, Gerald 
F. Stuart. The choir of forty voices rendered 
Mann's service in Aflat; The Wilderness, by Goss, 
and Stainer's O Clap Your Hands. Miss Wilhelmina 
Woolworth and Miss Edith Henderson assisted with 
organ numbers. 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

A festival service was given by the Chapter at 
St. Mark's Church, Evanston, on February 3. Mr. 
Stanley A. Martin, organist of St. Mark's, directed 
the service. The programme was as follows: 

Organ Finlandia Sibelius 

Mr. W. D. Belknap 

Nunc Dimittis in B flat Lutkin 

Versicles and Responses Tallis 

Organ (a) Prelude Saint-Saens 

(b) Romance in A flat Turner 

(c) Grand Choeur (Seventh Sonata). .Guilraant 
Mrs. George Nelson Holt 

Organ (a) Finale in B flat (Fourth Sonata) Mendelssohn 

(b) Caprice in B flat Guilmant 

Mr. Mason Slade 

Offertory Anthem Tschaikovsky 

{Hymn to the Trinity) 

On February 13 a Chapter service was sung by 
the choirs of Trinity Church, Chicago (Irving C. 
Hancock, organist and choirmaster) and Grace 
Church, Oak Park (Arthur R. Fraser, organist and 
choirmaster) at the latter church. Following was 
the programme : 

Processional Hymn 516, "Onward, Christian Soldiers" 

H. R. Fuller 
Collects 

Magnificat in A flat Dr. A. H. Mann 

Solo Organ Numbers 

a. Sunset Dr. Roland Diggle 

b. Fantaisie Symphonique Rossetter Cole 

Robert Birch 
Organist and Choirmaster. Emmanuel Church, La Grange 

Anthem — "I Beheld and Lo" Sir George Elvey 

Solo Organ Numbers 

a. Finale, Opus 205 Homer N. Bartlett 

b. Clock Movement Joseph Haydn 

((From the Eleventh Symphony) 

c. Toccata in F major Charles M. VVidor 

Irving C. Hancock 
Organist and Choirmaster, Trinity Church, Chicago 

Gallia — A Motett Charles Gounod 

Compline 

Nunc Dimittis in A flat Dr. A. H. Mann 

Orison Hymn No. 642 Dr. J. B. Dvkes 

Recessional Hymn No. 62 "From the Eastern Mountains" 

Dr. A. H. Mann 



Musical Topics was very interesting and greatly en- 
joyed. The second and third organ sonatas of 
Mendelssohn were analyzed by Mr. Hawke and 
proved very instructive. 



VIRGINIA CHAPTER 

Under the auspices of the Chapter, the following 
programme was presented recently at the First Pres- 
byterian Church, Norfolk, Va., by William H. Jones, 
A.A.G.O., organist, assisted by Miss Helen Smith, 
soprano, and Miss Ethel Nicholson, violinist: 

Sonata in A minor Borowski 

1. Allegro ma non troppo 2. Andante 

3. Allegro con fuoco 

Nocturne in D flat ; Chopin 

Soprano Solo: "The Lord Is My Shepherd" Liddle 

Benediction Nuptiale Frysinger 

Sposalizio (Wedding Strains) Liszt 

Spring Song Mendelssohn 

Concert Caprice J. Stuart Archer 

Soprano Solo: "Ave Maria" Schubert 

With Violin Obligato 
Fantasia on Scotch Songs and National Airs. .. .Mac farlane 



WESTERN TENNESSEE CHAPTER 

On February 8 the Chapter met at the studio of 
Mrs. Bessilee E. Reese in Memphis, the Dean, Mr. 
Ernest F. Howke. presiding. Great interest was 
manifested in the letters from the Warden, J. War- 
ren Andrews, pertaining to the welfare of this busy 
Chapter. Beginning in March, it was decided to 
hold bimonthly meetings. Enoch Walton was ap- 
pointed chairman for the next public recital, to be 
given in March. Mr. Walton's talk on Current 



NORTHERN OHIO CHAPTER 

On Monday evening, February 7, 1916, the second 
exchange organ recital, which the Northern Ohio 
Chapter is holding with adjacent Chapters of the 
Guild, was given at the Euclid Avenue Presbyterian 
Church, Geveland, Mr. Herbert E. Hyde, organist 
and choirmaster of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 
Chicago, representing the Illinois Chapter, gave a 
programme which was a delight to the layman and 
an inspiration to the musician. 

A dinner and business meeting at which thirty 
were present preceded the recital. Considerable time 
was given to discussion of Guild extension work, 
which the Northern Ohio Chapter has undertaken 
in accordance with the recent constitutional amend- 
ment. Mr. Hyde's programme was as follows: 

1 . Caprice Hcroique Bonnet 

2. Reverie Bonnet 

3. Andantino Chauvet 

4. Chromatic Fantasie Thiele 

5. Praeludium (Sonata No. 14) Rheinberger 

6. Cradle Song Gneg 

f. Menuet a V Antico Seeboeck-Hyde 

8. LcBonheur (ms. ) Hyde 

9. Choral Song and Fuge Wesley 

10. Vision Rheinberger 

1 1 . Sonata No. 1 Borowski 

((a) Allegro ma non troppo 

(b) Andante 

(c) Allegro confuoco 

Mr. William Treat Upton, organist and choir- 
master of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Cleveland, 
gave the following programme at that church on 
February 17: 

1. Fantasie and Finale from Sonata No. 10 in B minor 

Rheinberger 

2. Cantilena in G 

Nocturne in B minor Arthur Foote 

3. Lamentation Guilmant 

4. Intermezzo Rogers 

Evening Song Bairstow 

Spring Song Mac farlane 

Lied des Chrysanthemes Bonnet 

Canzonetta Mark Andrews 

5. Hora Mystica Bossi 

6. Concert Piece No. 2 H. \V. Parker 

On the same evening Mr. Vincent Percy gave the 
following recital in the Hough Avenue Congrega- 
tional Church : 

1. Persian Suite R. S. Stoughton 

The Courts of Tamshvd (Alia marcia) 
The Garden of I ram (Lento) 
Saki (Allegro scherzando) 

2. Prelude in B minor Bach 

3. Benediction Nuptiale Dubois 

(Second movement of the "Messe de Marriage.**) 

4. Scherzo Rogers 

5. Marche Funebre et Chant Scraphique 

F. Alexandre Guilmant 

6. First Concert Study Pietro Allesandro Yon 

The following Chapter recital was given Feb- 
ruary 20 at the First M. E. Church, Medina, Ohio, 
by John Beck, assisted by the church choir and Mr. 
Fred Bokley, baritone: 

1. Prelude in 1") flat major Rogers 

2. Processional "Call to Worship" 

3. Invocation 

4. "Suite Gothique" Boellmann 

(a) Introduction — Chorale 

(b) Menuet Gothique 

(c) Priere a Notre-Dame 

5. Nocturne Frysinger 

6. Capriccio Lemaigre 

7. "Vision" » Rheinberger 

8. Anthem "Great Ts the Lord" Diggle 

9. Offertory Solo "Thou Shalt Keep Him in Perfect Peace" 

Speaks 

Mr. Bohley 

10. "Jubilate Deo" , Silver 

11. "At Evening" Kinder 

ia. "Ave Maria' (16 century) Liszt 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



165 



SOUTHERN OHIO CHAPTER 

Following are the programmes of the Chapter's 
series of half-hour organ recitals presented recently 
at Christ Church, Cincinnati: 

W. A. Grubbs, Organist 

Christmas Offertorium Leramens 

Chorus of Shepherds 
Gloria 
Adoration 

Chorus 

Morning Song, Op. 28, No. 2 Kramer 

Adagio from C minor Sonata Guilmant 

Spring Song Hollins 

Melody in C West 

Toccata in D Kinder 

Mrs. Lillian Arkell Rixford, Organist 
Two Movements from Sonate in G minor. .. .Rene L. Becker 

Preludium — Festival 

Prayer 

Scherzo in D minor. Op. 155, No. 3 William Faulkes 

Preludium in D minor Gordon Balch Nevin 

;: Sunse? ?iVingM } CHfford barest 

(From a Pastoral Suite) 

Mr. C. Hugo Grimm, Organist 
Concerto in F major Handel 

Allegro moderate 

Andante maestoso 

Ada trio — Allegro 

Elegy Sibelius 

Reverie du Soir Saint-Saens 

(From Suite Algerienne) 

Prelude Alkan 

Offertory Jarnefelt 

Processional Carl W. Grimm 

Alois Bartschmid, Organist 

Third Concert— Fantasia O. Dienel 

Canzona W. Wolstenholme 

Scherzo E. Gigout 

Prelude C. Saint-Saens 

Meditation A. Klein 

Finale Symphonie No. 2 C. M. Widor 

J. Alfred Schehl, Organist 

Jubilate, Amen Kinder 

Fantasie in A minor Grabert 

A Shepherd's Tale Gillette 

Saki, from Persian Suite Stoughton 

Christmas in Sicily ) vr^« 

Toccata S Yon 



MICHIGAN CHAPTER 

At St. Paul's, Flint, Michigan, a Chapter evensong 
and recital was given February 20 by Mrs. A. J. 
MacKinnon, organist, assisted by St. Paul's Choir, 
Edward C. Kelley, choirmaster, and Mrs. B. C. 
Crampton, soprano. The programme was as follows : 

Evening Service Simper 

Organ-Overture to Occasional Oratorio Handel 

Andante Maestoso 
Adagio 

March 

Choir — Gloria from Twelfth Mass Mozart 

Organ (a) Pastorale from Sonata No. 1 ..Guilmant 

(b) ^uick March Wely 

Solo — "Rolling in Foaming Billows" (Creation) Haydn 

Mr. Kelley 

Choir — Gallia Gounod 

Solos (a) "I Love to Hear My Saviour's Voice" ... Glover 

(b) "Brightest and Best" Rubinstein 

Master Howard Loraine 
St. Paul's Boys' Choir 

Choir — Damascus Triumphal March (Naaman) Costa 

Organ — "Hallelujah Chorus (Mount of Olives) . .Beethoven 

J. L. Edwards, Sub-Dean of the Chapter, gave 
the following Chapter recital at St. John's Church, 
Detroit, on February 22: 

Sonata No. 10 in B minor Op. 146 Josef Rheinbcrger 

Prelude and Fugue 

Theme tilth Variations 

Fantasie and Finale 

Fountain Reverie Percy Fletcher 

Cantilene Pastorale Alex. Guilmant 

Allegro Vivace (5th Symphony) Charles Marie Widor 

Offering for Guild and Parish Funds 

Scherzo Heinrich Hofmann 

St. Cecilia Offertory No. 2 Edmond Batiste 

Evening Song Reginald Goss Custard 

Pomp and Circumstance No. 1 Edward Elgar 



the local churches, was the guest of the Chapter 
and gave an interesting talk on the music of the 
church service. 

A motion was unanimously carried voicing the 
thanks of Missouri Chapter for the action of the 
Council in electing Mr. Louis Hammerstein an 
Honorary Associate of the Guild, thereby approv- 
ing the Chapter's previous action. 

At the Church of the Holy Communion, St. Louis, 
Mr. Ernest P. Stamm gave the following organ 
recital February 13, under Chapter auspices: 

Persian Suite Stoughton 

In the Twilight Harker 

Capnccio Lemaigre 

In Paradisum ) n„K«:-, 

Fiat Lux f Duboi » 

Scherzo Dethier 

Cantilene Meyer-Helmund 

Fanfare d'Orgue Shelly 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 

The Chapter's annual dinner was held recently at 
the Hotel Hollenbeck, Los Angeles. During the 
evening the following programme of chamber music 
was presented: 

Eduard Napravnik (1839-) 

Allegro con spirito, from Trio Op. 62, for Piano. Violin 
and Violoncello 

The Fuhrer-de Zielinski Trio Club 
Georges Bizet (1838-1875) 

Agnus Dei" with Violin obligato 
Mr. H. C. Cassidy 
Violin oglibato by Miss Bessie Fuhrer 
Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) 

Sonata in D minor, for Violoncello 

Prelude — Allemande — Sarabande — Giga 
Miss Lucy Fuhrer 
Charles Whitney Coombs (1859) 
"Song of a Summer Night" 

Mr. H. C. Cassidy 
Josef Rheinberger (1 837-1 901) 

Quartet Op. 38, for Piano, Violin, Violo and Violoncello 
Allegro non troppo— Adagio — Menuetto— Finale 
The Fuhrer-de Zielinski Trio Club and 
Mr. Sydney C. Peck, Viola, Assisting 



ONTARIO CHAPTER 

A general meeting of this Chapter was held in 
Old St. Andrew's Church. Toronto, on February 23. 
Tea was served at 6.30, followed by the meeting, at 
which Mr. Healey Willan spoke on The Orchestral 
Use of the Organ During Church Service. Follow- 
ing the meeting was an organ recital by Mr. Richard 
Tattersall, with the following programme: 

1. Prelude and Fugue in C minor Healey Willan 

2. "Finale" from "Pathetic Symphony" Tschaikowsky 

3. Sonata in D minor, No. 1 Guilmant 

(Introduction — Allegro — Pastorale— Finale) 

4. "Scherzo" (Sonata in E flat) Horatio Parker 

5. "Allegro" (6th Svmphony) Widor 



MISSOURI CHAPTER 

Missouri Chapter held its first meeting of 1916 
on Monday, January 31. Mr. George D. Markham, 
in charge of the music at the St. Louis World's Fair, 
and chairman of the Music Committee of one of 



Church notes 

Come, Let us Sing and Hear My Prayer, by 
Mendelssohn, were presented February 25 by the 
choir of St. Andrew's Memorial Church, Yonkers, 
N. Y., under the direction of R. E. H. Terry, O. & C. 

Vexilla Regis, by Shelley, was presented March 14 
at St. Paul's Chapel, New York, E. Jaques, O. & G, 
with the following soloists: Mrs. E. B. Harper, 
soprano ; Mr. F. Martin, bass. The cantata was pre- 
ceded by two pieces in memory of the late G B. 
Hawley. 

At St. John's Church, Los Angeles, Cal., on Sun- 
day, February 20, a special musical service was given 
consisting entirely of compositions by Edward Ship- 
pen Barnes. Among the works rendered were : Bow 
Down Thine Ear. The Comforter, The Fatherland, 
The Shadow of the Almighty, Magnificat and Nunc 
Dimittis, etc. Before the service Dr. Roland Diggle, 
the organist and choirmaster, played a number of 
Mr. Barnes's organ compositions. 



164 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



The choir of the First Presbyterian Church, Little 
Falls, N. Y., Julia E. Broughton, organist, rendered 
the following works at special musical services this 
winter: Forty-sixth Psalm, Buck; Stabat Mater, 
Rossini; Excerpts from Elijah, Mendelssohn; Com- 
ing of the King, Buck; Light of Life, Geibel. 

Ernest H. Cosby, organist and choirmaster of All 
Saints' Episcopal Church, Richmond, Va. f celebrated 
the fifteenth anniversary of his association with the 
church on the first Sunday in March. A special 
musical programme had been arranged and the serv- 
ice was festival in character. The chair numbers 
forty boys and fourteen men. 

William G Carl arranged a musical service in 
memory of the late Sir George C. Martin at the Old 
First Presbyterian Church, New York, Sunday, 
March 5. The list included the Festival Te Deum, 
written for the sixtieth anniversary of the reign of 
the late Queen Victoria; Whoso Dwelleth Under 
the Defense of the Most High, choral response, and 
the organ numbers. 

Maunder's Penitence, Pardon and Peace was per- 
formed at St. Mary's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., on 
March 5 by the united chancel choir and parochial 
chorus, 70 voices, under the direction of Prower 
Symons, A.A.G.O., O. and C. The work was pre- 
ceded by extracts from Mendelssohn's O Come, Let 
Us Sing." The soloists were Charlotte Radcliffe 
Symons, soprano, and W. J. Horton, tenor. This 
was the sixth festival performance in St. Mary's in 
twelve months and marked the first anniversary of 
Mr. Symons' incumbency. 

The choir of the Church of the Holy Trinity, 
New York City, Franke E'. Ward, O. and C, on 
March 5 sang the following numbers in memory of 
the late Benjamin Fulton Lambord : Magnificat in D, 
Anthem — Suffer Little Children, Lambord; a. Offer- 
tory in D minor, b. In Paradisum, Dubois ; Four 
pieces: The White Lily, Twilight, Spring Song, 
Novelette, Lambord; Funeral March and Song of 
the Seraphs, Guilmant. 

On Sunday afternoons at four o'clock at St. Bar- 
tholomew's Church, New York City, A. S. Hyde, 
O. & C, the following works will be sung: Febru- 
ary 27 — Excerpts from The Beatitudes, Franck; 
March 5 — Motet for women's voices : The Twenty- 
third Psalm, Parker; March 12 — Cantata: Thou 
Guide of Israel, Bach ; March 19 — Excerpts from 
Stabat Mater, Dvorak; March 26 — Excerpts from 
The Messiah, Handel; April 2 — Stabat Mater (a 
capella). Palestrina; April 16 — Motet: Gallia. Gou- 
nod; April 23 (Easter Day), Motet: Lord, We Will 
Be Glad, Mozart ; April 30 — Excerpts from The Light 
Light of the World, Sullivan. 

Dvorak's Stabat Mater will be given on April 13 
in St. Thomas' Church, New York City, at 8.15, by 
the festival chorus and full orchestra under the 
direction of T. Tertius Noble, O. & C. Cards of 
admission may be had on application to Chorus Sec- 
retary, 1 West Fifty-third Street. Stamped en- 
velope must be enclosed. 

On April 25, at 11 a.m., a dedication service will 
be held in the church, and on April 27, at 8.15 p.m., 
a performance of Gloria Domini by Noble will be 
given by the festival chorus and full orchestra. A 
new Te Deum in G minor specially written for the 
dedication service will be sung for the first time at 
this service. 

At the Federated Church, Nome, Alaska, on Sun- 
day evening, December 26, the following programme 
was presented at the Christmas concert. Such a 
programme is not often rendered so near the North 
Pole : Doxology ; Hymn — Joy to the World, No. 71 ; 



Anthem — Glory to God in the Highest, Choir ; Scrip- 
ture; Violin Solo — Selected, Miss Bertha Johnson; 
Anthem — There Came Upon the Midnight Air, Choir ; 
Soprano Solo— Hail the Night, All Hail the 
Morn, Mrs. Elsie Poteet; Hymn— O Little Town of 
Bethlehem, No. 76; Anthem — There Came Three 
Kings, Choir; Offering and Offertory, Miss Helen 
Lomen ; Bass Solo — Mizpah, Mr. Elmer Reed ; An- 
them — Cantata Domina, Choir; Hymn — Carol, No. 75. 
F. R. Cowden, director, and Miss H. Lomes, organist. 



Uarious notes 

The Norristown (Pa.) Choral Society, Ralph 
Kinder, conductor, presented Haydn's Spring and 
Dvorak's Stabat Mater at their ninth concert on 
February 15. Soloists: Miss H. Buchanan, soprano; 
Miss B. Leonard, contralto ; Dan Beddo, tenor ; W. F. 
Newberry, bass. 

The Litchfield (111.) Choral Club is entering upon 
its second year and is instituting a vigorous campaign 
for musical entertainments of a high order. In its 
first year it gave two excellent programmes of varied 
choral numbers. One programme given at the Litch- 
field-Hillsboro Chautauqua made a feature of folk- 
songs. This year three concerts are to be given, 
the first, a historical costume concert, originated and 
developed by the conductor, Miss K. V. Dickinson, 
was given February 3. The second concert will be 
given by outside talent and at the third the club will 
present Deems Taylor's The Highwayman. 

Six scholarships for free tuition in the Guilmant 
Organ School for next season were announced at 
the banquet given the members of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation by Philip Berolzheimer, February 28, at the 
Hotel Brevoort. A contest open to both young men 
and women over sixteen years of age will be held 
in September under the direction of Dr. William C. 
Carl, director of the school. Over one hundred 
guests attended the dinner. The favors were gold 
fountain pens, given to every one present. An enter- 
tainment by professional artists followed the dinner. 

Pupils of Mr. Frank Parker at his studio in Charles 
City, la., presented the following song recital on 
January 26: Madrigal, Chaminade; Evening Love 
Song, Shipman; For You Alone, D'Hardelot; The 
Mother Heart, Gaines ; My Little Love, Hawley ; 
Evensong, Homer; Irish Mother's Lullaby, Lang; 
I Am Thy Harp, Woodman ; A Red, Red Rose, Hast- 
ings; Uncle Rome, Homer; When the Dew is Fall- 
ing, Schneider ; Son£ Cycle, The Perfect Year, Mat- 
thews; Five Quatrains from the Rubaiyat of Omar 
Khayyam, Rogers; Charm of Spring, Clarke; 
Husheen, Needham ; I Bring You Heartsease, Brans- 
combe; On Jhelum River, a Kashmiri Love Story, 
Wood f orde-Finden. 

The Babylon Choral Society, W. W. Bross. di- 
rector, presented the following programme at their 
concert in the Methodist Church, Babylon, N. Y., 
on February 2Q: Sacred Folk-songs — Silent Night, 
Holy Night, Old German; A Joyous Christmas 
Song, Old French; Slumber Song of Infant 
Jesus, Old French ; Harp Solos — From Concerto, 
Zabel ; Ballade. Zabel ; Contralto Solos — A Birthday, 
Cowen ; Absent, Metcalf ; The Morning Wind, Brans- 
combe; Sacred Folk-songs — Deep River, American 
Negro Spiritual; Dig My Grave, American Negro 
Spiritual; Part Song — Echo is a Timid Maid, Mac- 
farlane; Harp Solos — Marguerite au Rouet, Hassel- 
mann ; Barcarolle, Hasselmann ; Irish Romance, East- 
man ; Contralto Solos — What the Chimney Sang, Gris- 
wold; Long Ago, Homer; The Star, Rogers; Can- 
tata — Christmas Eve, Gade. Soloists: Miss Hilda 
Deighton, contralto; Mrs. L. F. Eastman, harpist 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



165 



Organ notes 



A recital of unusual interest took place at the 
factory of the Hutchings Organ Company, Waltham, 
Mass., on the morning of February 16, when the 
Bach Concerto in A minor for four claviers and 
orchestra was rehearsed and performed before a 
small gathering of invited guests. The event was 
made possible by the fact that the organ built for 
St. John's Church, Helena, Ark., was provided with 
twin consoles and that a small theatre organ was 
playable in the factory at the same time. The fol- 
lowing organists took part : Albert W. Snow, Church 
of the Advent. Boston; George A. Burdett, late of 
the Harvard Church, Brookline; Walter N. Kilburn, 
All Saints', Ashmont; W. Lynnwood Farnam, Em- 
manuel Church, Boston, and Marshall S. Bidwell, 
First Baptist Church, Medford, Mass. The dispo- 
sition of parts was as follows : Clavier I. Great 
Diapason of theatre organ. Clavier II. Swell Flutes 
8 and 4 ft. of theatre organ. Clavier III. Choir 
Flutes 8 and 4 ft., Console I of St. John's Church 
organ. Clavier IV. Swell Flutes 8 and 4 ft., Con- 
sole I of St. John's Church organ. Clavier V (or- 
chestral part). Great Flutes 8 and 4 ft, Pedal 16 and 
8 ft., Console II of St. John's Church organ. Few 
gradations of tone were possible, but these were 
effected by shutting off 4 ft. stops and by the alter- 
nation of the various claviers and pairs of claviers. 
The concerto is said to be one of those composed 
for strings by Antonio Vivaldi and adapted and 
much elaborated for four pianofortes and orchestra 
by J. S. Bach. The work has just been arranged 
for two pianofortes by Mr. Farnam. 

The American Organ Players' Club of Philadel- 
phia held its midwinter festival on Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 15. The chief events were a "suest" recital 
by Charles Heinroth of Pittsburgh, played on the 
new organ in St. Clement's Church, followed by a 
get-together dinner, at which a large number of the 
club were present. Dr. J. M. E. Ward was toast- 
master and the guests of honor were Dr. Hugh A. 
Clarke, Professor of Music at the University of 
Pennsylvania ; Rev. Charles Hutchinson, D.D., Rector 
of St. Clement's, and Charles Heinroth, of Carnegie 
Hall, Pittsburgh, the latter being an "honorary" 
member of the club. Mr. Heinroth s recital displayed 
that virtuosity and amplitude of technique for which 
he is so well known, and was heard by an audience 
which completely filled the church. Programme: 
Passacaglia, J. S. Bach; Andante (clock movement). 
Symphony in D, Jos. Haydn ; Chromatic Fantasie, 
Thiele; Lamentation. Guilmant; Caprice. The Brook, 
Gaston Dethier ; Clair de Lune, Karg-Elert ; Praelu- 
dium, Jarnefelt; Organ Concerto No. 10, G. F. 
Handel; Nocturne, G. Ferrata; Farandole, Georges 
Bizet. 



Arthur Bates Jennings has resigned his position of 
organist and choirmaster of the Independent Pres- 
byterian Church, Savannah, Ga., to accept a call to-, 
St. Stephen's P. E. Church, Sewickley, Pa. 



Uacanclcs and Appointments 

Karl Krueger, assistant organist of St. Luke's 
Church, New York City, has been appointed organist 
and choirmaster of St. Ann's Church-on-the-Heights, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. He will go to St. Ann's May I. 

Mr. William Anderson, organist and choirmaster 
of St. Mark's Church, New Britain, Conn., has been 
appointed organist and choirmaster of St. John's 
Church. Stamford, Conn. Mr. Anderson is a pupil 
of Dr. G. Edward Stubbs. and has made a great suc- 
cess of the boy choir of St. Mark's, New Britain. 
He was recently elected organist of St. John's 
Church, Youngstown, Ohio, but declined the position, 
as he desired to remain in the eastern part of the 
country. The musical opportunities at St. John's, 
Stamford, are unusual. There is a fine organ, and 
good material for a choir of boys and men. 



Obituary 

Francis H. Hastings, one of the leading citizens 
of the town of Weston and one of the most widely 
known manufacturers of church organs in the coun- 
try, died on Wednesday, February 23, in his eightieth 
year. Funeral services were held on Friday after- 
noon at his late residence. 

Mr. Hastings was born in Weston in 1836, and at 
nineteen years of age went to Boston (Roxbury) 
to enter the employ of E. & G. G. Hook, organ 
builders. He was admitted to partnership in 1865 
and has been the principal owner since the death 
of Elias Hook in 1881. 

In 1887 Mr. Hastings moved his business from 
Roxbury to a new and larger factory building he had 
erected on a portion of his old homestead at Kendal 
Green, Mass., and in 1893 a corporation was or- 
ganized to carry on the business under the firm 
name of Hook & Hastings Company. 

Mr. Hastings was devoted to his art, giving it his 
whole energy for nearly sixty years, and was recog- 
nized as the leading organ builder in the country. 

During his later years he built up a strong organi- 
zation of younger men, who have been in charge of 
the management for some years and who will con- 
tinue the business. 



Organ Recitals 

KARL KRUEGER. at St. Luke's Church, New York City: 
Fugc in G minor — Bach. 
Canzona in A minor— Guilmant. 
L'Angclus — Massenet. 
Arioso — Rogers. 

Prelude — "Hansel and Gretel" — Humperdinck. 
Scherzo from string quartet — Tchaikovsky. 
Pastorale Svmnh. No. 2 — VVidor. 
Fiat Lux — Dubois. 

Dr. J. L. BROWNE, at the Baptist Church, La Porte, Ind., 
January 19. 

Prelude in G minor and Fugue in C minor — Bach. 

Andante from Suite in F (paraphrased), Bird. 

Concert Prelude in D minor — Kramer. 

Hymnus — Von Fielitz. 

Scherzo Symphonique — Browne. 

Meditation — Elegie (First Suite) — Borowski. 

Love Song — Ferrata. 

Romanza — Keller. 

Alia Marcia (ms) — Browne. 
Mr. P. C. MILLER, at University of Virginia, Charlottes- 
ville, Va., January 16. 

Toccata and Fugue, F minor — Noble. 

Meditation — E. d'Evry. 

Cantilene Pastorale — Guilmant. 

Sonata I — Borowski. 

Clair de Lune — Karg-Elert. 

Humoresque — Ward. 

Evening Song — Bairstow. 

Nocturne — Foote. 

Hosannah — Dubois. 
S. SALTER, at Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 16: 

Fantasie and Fugue in G minor — Bach. 

Andante Con Moto from the Fifth Symphony — Beethoven. 
Scherzo in G minor — Bossi. 

Cantabile — Loret. 

Prelude in C sharp minor — Rachmaninoff. 

Piece Heroique — Franck. 
T. SCOTT BUIIRMAN. at the Scotch Presbyterian Church, 
New York, the Last of a Series of Twelve Relttals, 
February 27: 

Scotch Fantasia — Macfarlane. 

Gondoliera — Goss-Custard. 

"Clock Movement," from 4th Sym. — Haydn. 

Prelude and Fugue in G — Bach. 

Rondo Giochcvole (Mss) — Buhrman. 

Overture to Tannhauser — Wagner-Warren. 
CHARLES II. MORSE, at Dartmouth College, Hanover, 
N. H., February 13: 

Toccata in F — Bach. 

Lullabv in E Flat — Macfarlane. 

Epithalamium (Wedding Hymn) in F — Woodman. 

Serenade in A — Harker. 

MHodie in E — Rachmaninoff. 

Allegro Appassionato, from Sonata V — Guilmant. 



i66 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



PROF. \V. T. UPTON, at the Oberlin College, Oberlin, 0|( 
February 25: 

Fantasie and Finale, from Sonata Xo. 10, in B minor — 
Rheinberger. 

Cantilena in G, and Nocturne in B minor — Foote. 

Lamantation — Guilmant. 

Lied des Chrvsanthemes — Bonnet. 

Intermezzo — Rogers. 

Evening Song — Bairstow. 

Gavotte — Dethier. 

Hora Mystica — Bossi. 

Concert Piece Xo. 2 — Parker. 

A. RIEMENSCHXKIDER, at the Baldwin-Wallace Col- 
lege, Berea, O., February 13: 

Sonata in C minor — Baldwin. 

Cradle Song and Walter's Prize Song — Wagner. 

Chanson de Joie — Higgle. 

Eventide and Toccata in A — Frysinger. 
FREDERICK MAXSOX, at Holy Trinity Church, Bethle- 
hem, Pa., January 1 1 : 

Festival Prelude — Faulkes. 

Evening Song— Bairstow. 

Prelude and Fugue in E Flat (St. Ann's) — Bach. 

Grand Chorus in I) — Maxson. 

Madrigal — Maxson. 

Sonata, C Minor- Salome. 

Concert. Overture in 1) minor — Matthews. 

"Evening Chimes" — Wheeldon. 

Marche from "Arianc" — Guilmant. 
HERBERT F. S PRAGUE, at Trinity Church, Toledo, O., 
February 22: 

Prelude and Fugue in E flat (Saint Anne's) — Bach. 

Xocturne in B flat — Field. 

Song of Joy — Diggle. 

Second Rhapsodie on the Breton Canticles — Saint Saens. 

Nocturne in I) — Faulkes. 

Hunting Song — Mendelssohn. 

Second Sonata. "O Filii" — Lemmens. 
CHARLES GALLOWAY, at the Washington Universty, 
St. Louis, Mo., February 20: 

Passacaglia in C minor — lialscy. 

Rondo-Caprice — Buck. 

Sonata 1, in A minor — Barowski. 

A Springtime Sketch— Brewer. 

Concert Fugue in G — Krcbs. 

At Twilight — Frvsinger. 

Grand Criorus — Ilolhns. 
D. R. MACLEAX, at the First Church, Newton, Mass., 
February 1 5 : 

Finale from Sonata XVIII — Rheinberger. 

Cantilena from Sonata XI — Rheinberger. 

Melodic — Rachmaninoff. 

Liebesfreud — Kreislcr. 

Intermezzo from Sonata VII — Guilmant. 

Reve Angelique — Rubinstein. 

Serenade from Concerto. Opus 38 — Lindner. 

Scherzo — van Goens. 

Finale in E flat major — Guilmant. 
HENRY S. FRY, at the Drcxel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa., 
February 1 o : 

Fantasie — Overture — Fricker. 

Humoreskc — Ward. 

Sketch a la Minuet— Reiff. 

Reve Angelique — (Kamennoi Ostrow) — Rubinstein. 

The Tragedy of a Tin Soldier — Nevin. 

Variations on an Evening Hymn — Fry. 

Coronation March — Tschaikowsky. 

R. L. AUCHENBACH, at St. John's Reformed Church, 
Reading. Pa., February 14: 

Scherzo Symphonique — Frysinger. 

Prelude and Fugue in C minor — Bach. 

Air and Variations in A — Haydn. 

(Symphony in D) — Haydn. 

Tavanay — Vincent. 

"Idyl— Sellars. 

Notturna — Xaprawnik. 

The Caravan — Maunder. 

March from "Abraham" — Molique. 
EDWIX ARTHUR KRAFT, at Trinity Cathedral, Cleveland, 
O., February 15: 

Triumphal March : Xoble. 

Spring Song, "From the South" — Lcmarc. 

Caprice — Faulkes. 

Overture to "Der Freischutz" — Von Weber. 

Serenade- Wheeldon. 

Pavanc — Tohnson. 

Toccata in 1) minor-- Xevin 

Memory's Hour — Silver. 

Spring Day — Kinder. 

Rhapsody — Cole. 

Under the Arbor — Thome. 

March Russe — Schminke. 
WM. S. JOHN SOX, at the Cathedral of St. John, Quincey, 
111., February 13: 

Requiem Aeternam — Harwood. 

Fugue in E flat major (St. Ann's) — Bach. 

Echoes — Bcllairs. 

Capriccio 'La Caccia" — Fumagalli. 

Ronde Francaise — Boellmann. 

Finlandia — Silebius. 
DR. O. A. MAXSFIELD, at Wilson College. Chambersburg, 
Pa., February 28: 

March (in D) for a Church Festival — Best. 

"O Star of Eve" (Tannhauser) — Wagner. 

Fantasia in C minor. Op. 11 — Mozart. 



Scene Pastorale, in E flat (The Storm) — Lott. 

Sonaja in B flat, Op. 65, No. 4 — Mendelssohn. 

Andante Grazioso in G minor — Peace. 

Double Chorus, "Fixed in His Everlasting Seat" (Sam- 
son) — Handel. 

Carillons de Dunkerque — Thomas Carter. 

Cooncert Overture in C, No. 3, Op. 50 — Mansfield. 
DR. G. W. ANDREWS, at the dedication of the orgna 
in the auditorium of the new Kent State Normal Col- 
lege, Kent, O., February 2: 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor — Bach. 

Canon in B minor — Schumann. 

Vision — Rheinberger. 

Spring Song — Mendelssohn. 

In the Morning — Grieg. 

Nuptial March— Guilmant. 

Largo, New World Symphony — Dvorak. 

Beside the Spring — Strauss. 

Allegretto — \ olkman. 

March in C minor — Andrews. 

Con Grazia, Aria in D major, Pastoral Scene — Dethier. 

Chromatic Fantasia — Thiele. 

D. C. Garretson, at the M. E. Church. Lowville, N. Y., 

February 9: 
St. Cecelia Offertory — Batiste. 
Madrigale — Simonetti. 
Intermezzo — Callaerts. 

Prelude and Fugue in D minor — Mendelssohn. 
Invocation — Mailly. 
Caprice — Sheldon. 
Minuet in A— rBoccherini. 
Berceuse — Halsey. 

Fugue from Second Organ Sonata — Thayer. 
HAROLD TOWER, at St. Mark's Pro- Cathedral. Grand 

Rapids, Mich., February 4: 
Fantasia in G major — Bach. 
Minuet — Lully. 

Sonata in C minor — Salome. 
The Little Shepherd — Debussy. 
Second Arabesque — Debussy. 
Concert Variations — Bonnet. 
Moonlight— d'Evry. 
Barcarolle— Pollitt. 
Will o' the Wisp — Xevin. 
Romance — Sibelius. 
Pomp and Circumstance — Elgar. 
W. C. HAMMOXD, at Mary Lyon Chapel, Holyoke, Mass., 

February 2: 
Sonata Xo. 4 in B flat major — Mendelssohn. 
Adagio, Fifth Symphony — Dvorak. 
Le Petit Berger and Romance — Debussy. 
Prelude and Fugue in E minor — Bach. 
Autumn Xight — Frysinger. 
Minuetto — Hizot. 
Toccata in D — Kinder. 
PROF. S. A. BALDWIX. at the College of the City of New 

York, Xcw York, February 13: 
Concerto in G minor — Camidge. 
Harmonies du Soir — Karg-Elert. 
Prelude and Fugue in E major — Bach. 
Idylle— Ouef. 

Arioso, in the Ancient Style — Rogers. 
Dithyramb — Hardwood. 
Melody in E — Rachmaninoff. 
Overture to A Midsummer Night's Dream — Mendelssohn. 

E. HAROLD GEER, at Vassar College, Poughkeepsic, X. Y., 

January 26: 
Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 
Rhapsodie Number 1, in E major — Saint-Saens. 
Scherzo, from the Fifth Sonata — Guilmant. 
Licbestod, from Tristan and Isolde — Wagner. 
Scherzo, from the Fourth Symphony — Widor. 
Le Petit Berger — Debussy. 
La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin — Debussy. 
Concert Toccata in C — Mansfield. 
J. LAWRENCE ERB, at the University of Illinois, Urbana, 
111.. January 23: 
Fugue in G minor — Bach. 
Communion, Op. 4, Xo. 3 — Deshayes. 
Berceuse in E — Hollins. 
Sonata Xo. 1 in F minor — Mendelssohn. 
The Oucstion — Wolstenholme. 
The Answer- -Wolstenholme. 

'To the Evening Star" (Tannhauscr) — Wagner. 
Marche Heroique — Diggle. 

R. K. BIGGS, at St. Ann's Church on the Heights, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., February 28: 
Caprice Heroique — Bonnett. 
Elfes— Bonnett. 
To Spring — Grieg. 
Prelude to Lohengrin — Wagner. 

Introduction to Third Act of Lohengrin — Wagner. 
Elizabeth's Prayer from Tannhauser — Wagner. 
Evening Star from Tannhauser — Wagner. 
March from Die Meistersinger — Wagner. 
Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde — Wagner. 

PAUL S. CHANCE, at the Presbyterian Church. London, 
O., February 26: 
Fifth Sonata, Op. 80 — Guilmant. 
Meditation — Sturges. 
Toccata and Fugue in D minor — Bach. 
The Question and the Answer — Wolstenholme. 
Fantasia on "My Old Kentucky Home" — Lord. 
Etude de Concert, Op. 7, No. 2 — Bonnett 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



167 



Reviews of new music 

THREE PSALM-TUNE POSTLUDES FOR 
THE ORGAN. Harvey Grace. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The revival of the Choral Prelude has been a 
feature of modern organ composition, and the idea 
of incorporating Psalm Tunes in the form of a con- 
cluding voluntary is equally legitimate and welcome. 

Mr. Harvey Grace has so treated the tunes known 
as "Martyrs," "London New" and "The Old Hun- 
dredth," and has contributed a most useful series to 
the church organist's repertoire, which we venture to 
predict will be widely used. The first is a fine old 
tune, from the Scottish Psalter (1635) and is in the 
Dorian Mode. The "flavor" of the tune is apparent 
throughout by suggestive phrases in manual and 
pedal, the complete statement of each phrase occur- 
ring at intervals in the highest voice, as in the 
ordinary choral prelude. The piece concludes most 
effectively with the tune above free Modal counter- 
point. 

"London New" has a stately movement of minims 
in 6-2 3-2 time, the tune 'being given out at intervals 
on the Tuba. A free peroration suggested by the 
theme brings the short work to an effective and tri- 
umphant conclusion. 

Of the three pieces the "Old Hundredth" appeals 
to us especially by the ingenious canonic treatment 
and the effective figure of the accompaniment. The 
harmonic structure is dignified and effective, and the 
climax attained by the thrice-repeated statement of 
the first phrase, a major third higher each time, is. if 
startling, undeniably effective. Altogether, we think 
Mr. Grace has again succeeded in producing work 
which we can only describe as dignified and worthy 
of the instrument for which it is written. 

FUNERAL MUSIC: TWELVE SELECTED 
PIECES. (Albums for the Organ, No. 7.) 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The pieces in this Album are mostly of the 
standard type which organists must be prepared to 
provide on occasion. Such are the Funeral Marches 
by Beethoven (Aflat). Chopin, Handel ("Saul"), 
Tchaikovsky (C minor), and Mendelssohn ("Song 
without words"). Players who want a change from 
these rather well-worn works will here find excellent 
material in the chorus "Blest are they that mourn," 
from Brahms's "Requiem," admirably arranged by 
John E. West, an effective Funeral March by William 
Faulkes, arrangements of "I know that my Re- 
deemer liveth," and "O rest in the Lord," Schubert's 
"Marche Solennelle* in E flat minor, the Finale from 
Tchaikovsky's "Pathetic" Symphony, and a touching 
little "Lament" by John E. West. The Album should 
be very useful to organists in these times, not only 
on account of the intrinsic excellence of its con- 
tents, but because it brings under one cover so much 
necessary music that is likely to be in scattered copies 
and not always at hand when wanted. 

THE PIPER OF HAMLIN. A. Cyril Graham. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This is a cantata for two sopranos and alto, 
chorus and tenor or soprano solo, with piano accom- 
paniment The accompaniment is also scored for 
orchestra, the instruments employed being strings, 
two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, 
tympani, traps and harp ; a condensed form of this 
orchestration may be used. The choral sections are 
generally in two parts, with occasional three- and 
four-part writing, a simplified version being pro- 
vided for optional use. The solo part of the Piper 
should be sung by a mature artist, but it could be 
made effective by a good boy soprano. Browning's 
text is closely followed and the quaint old poem 



gathers fresh interest by reason of Mr. Graham's 
sparkling music. The solo part is a model of light 
opera writing, and its effect in the hands of a good 
singer would be immense. The Piper's "Bargain" 
song, with chorus, is charmingly made, while the 
chorus following it, "The Fate ot the Rats," is a de- 
scriptive piece of writing that would do credit to 
any work, and it is a model of simplicity withal. 
Perhaps the best portion of the work is that in 
which the Piper claims his reward. The music ac- 
companying this is worthy of Sullivan. It is certain 
that schools and choirs who are seeking a cantata 
for commencement or concert use cannot do better 
than give the Piper of Hamlin. 

THE PILGRIM AND THE WINDS. Alfred 

G. Wathall. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

A meditation for chorus of mixed voices with 
piano or organ accompaniment, text by Emil F. 
Lundstrom. The composer has succeeded in cloth- 
ing this poem with music of a high order. His 
knowledge of vocal effects is excellent, and his 
writing maintains interest without calling too severely 
upon the compass of the voices. A frequent 
doubling of the parts demands musicianship on the 
part of the choir, and the dramatic setting which the 
composer has supplied will require intelligent singers 
in order to give an adequate performance. 

MISSA PENITENTIALIS. Charles Winfred 
Douglas. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The above setting of the Holy Eucharist by Canon 
Douglas is especially suitable for Advent and Lent. 
The editor explains that the various portions of this 
service, excepting the Agnus Dei, have been used 
for centuries during the two penitential seasons. 
The melodies are collected from various European 
sources, and their form is based upon the Solesmes 
use. It is a matter of felicitation that the editor 
has omitted bar lines, thus allowing the melodies to 
have their natural flow and rhythm, and the words 
their proper accent. An accompaniment has been 
provided, but the clever organist is allowed perfect 
freedom, and can adapt the accompaniment to the 
needs of his choir. The work can be safely recom- 
mended to those who have Plain Song predilections. 

OUT OF THE DEEP. J. Christopher Marks. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Dr. Marks' popular song is here arranged as an 
anthem for four-part chorus and soprano or tenor 
soloist. The solo has been such a favorite that few 
words are needed to recommend it in its new form. 
It is sufficient to say that the melody lends itself 
excellently to four-part harmonization, and that 
the soloist has ample opportunity for obtaining effect 
in the portion, "I look for the Lord, my soul doth 
wait for Him." 

A SPRING SONG. Philip James. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

A delicate and graceful little three-part song for 
women's voices, poem by Thomas Nash. It has also 
a dainty accompaniment. 

MOON OF LOVE. Dwight Fiske. 

London : Novello &Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This vocal waltz, with refrain, has a good melody 
designed entirely for the popular approval which it 
is certain to obtain. It is easy to sing and play and 
will appeal strongly to those whose sentiment is 
greater than their technique. 



i68 



THE NEW MUSIC. REVIEW 



FULFILLMENT. Anna Priscilla Risher. 

London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This short love song is simple in form and refined 
in feeling. It has a well-turned melody and in the 
accompaniment good use is made of chromatic 
chords without unduly disturbing the tonality. A 
word of recognition is due the composer for an 
earnest effort to make a good short song. 

WHEN SHALL WE BE MARRIED, JOHN? 

THE ROMAN SOLDIERS. 

LEEZIE LINDSAY. 

WHEN I WAS A YOUNG GIRL. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The unique series of English folk-songs is rapidly 
gaining favor, judging by the frequent appearance 
of new numbers. Melody only is given, and the 
songs are printed on single sheets, quaintly illus- 
trated. They are admirably typographed by the 
De Vinne Press, "at the price of ten cents plain 
and twenty-five cents colored." 



Suggested Service Cist for may, iw 

Second Sunday after Easter. May 7 

£„& } »» e «* *•*» 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, Now is Christ Risen West 

Offertory, Awake, Thou That Sleepest Stainer 

Communion Service in E flat Hadley 

jftsaSitH. } * Eflat **» 

Anthem, Behold, Ye Despisers Parker 

Offertory, Jesus Christ is Risen Gaul 

Third Sunday after Easter. May 14 
Te Deum 1 

Benedictus Y in F Andrews 

Jubilate J 

Introit, The Lord is My Shepherd Wareing 

Offertory, I Will Mention Sullivan 

Communion Service in F Andrews 

SftEKttu I in F *■*"" 

Anthem, The Strife is O'er Steane 

Offertory, I Am Alpha Roberts 

Fourth Sunday after Easter. May 21 

Te Deum in C Baldwin 

Benedictus ) r u™+ 
Jubilate J Chant 

Introit, The Lord is My Strength Smart 

Offertory, I Heard a Great Voice Cobb 

Communion Service in Aflat Priest 

SSSLu I in c L » tki » 

Anthem. Sing Praises Gounod 

Offertory, I Will Sing Sullivan 

Fifth Sunday after Easter. May 28 

£J&£. 1 ! » c "«*» 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, Worthy is the Lamb Handel 

Offertory, Come, Ye Faithful E. V. Hall 

Communion Service in C Martin 

Magnificat ) . c Martin 

Nunc Dimittis \ 

Anthem. God be Merciful West 

Offertorv, When It was Yet Dark Woodman 



3URDETT, G. A.— "Why seek ye the living among 
the dead?" Easter anthem on themes of "I Know That 
My Redeemer Liveth." (Messiah.) (No. 4*7. The Church 
Music Review.) 15 cents. 

[)EARLE, DUNCAN W.— Kyrie eleison. On Card 

6 cents. 

DOUGLAS, CHARLES WINIFRED.— "St. Dun- 

stan Edition of Plainchant. 

"Missa Penitentialis." Voice part modern notation. 10 

cents. 

"Missa Penitentialis." With organ accompaniment. Vo- 
cal score. 75 cents. 

"Missa Paschalis." With organ accompaniments. $1.00. 

"Missa Paschalis." Voice part modern notation. 10 

cents. 

FETHERSTON, REV. SIR GEORGE RALPH.- 

"On the Fount of Life Eternal." Processional Hymn 
for Patronal Festival. 8 cents. 

QOODEVE, MRS. ARTHUR.— "Now in this our 

hour of need." Setting No. 2 to the tunc of "As a 
Nation." On Card. 5 cents. 

HAM, ALBERT,— "The Souls of the Righteous." 

Unaccompanied Anthem. 12 cents. 

HOPKINS. E. J.— "In my distress I cried." An- 

them for Lent or general use. Edited by John E. West. 
(No. 876, The Musical Times.) 5 cents. 

HOWELL. C. M.—Veni Creator and Vesper Hymn. 
8 cents. 

KING, OLIVER.— "I will love Thee, O Lord." 

Anthem for ltaritone Solo and Chorus. (No. 1058, 
Novello's Octavo Anthems.) 12 cents. 

LANG. E.— "God is my Strong Salvation." Sacred 

Song. 60 cents. 

MARKS, J. CHRISTOPHER.— "Out of the Deep/ 

Anthem for soprano (or tenor) solo and chorus. (No. 
4ij, The Church Music Review.) 15 cents. 

ftjUMFORD, S.— Vesper Hymn ("Eternal Master, 

Lord"). On Card. 5 cents. 

PAYNE, W. BRUCE, and K. M. E. LILLING- 

STOX.— "Grant Us Thy Peace." A War Vesper. 
Words only. On Card. $2.50 per 100. 

ROBSON, R. WALKER.— "My Beloved is mine." 

Easter Anthem. (No. 1059, Novello's Octavo Anthems.) 
\2 cents. 

g NEED, F. L. — Communion Service in G. 25c. 
JARRIS, F. J.— Vesper Hymn. For use in time of 

special danger. On Card. 8 cents. 

WELSH, E. G.— "Send forth Thy might, O Lord of 

might"' Hymn for time of war. 5 cents. 

SECULAR 

gRSKINE, JOHN.— "Stars of the Summer Night." 

Chorus for male voices. 10 cents. 

piSKE, DWIGHT.— "Moon of Love." Vocal walU. 

60 cents. 



music Published anting tbc Cast month 

SACRED 

ALLWORK, R. L.— Responses to the Litany. 

Adapted from the Liturgy of the Russian Church. 25 
cents per dozen. 



TAMES, PHILIP.— "A Spring Song." Three-part 

** song for women's voices. S. S. A. (No. 83, The Mod- 
ern Series. ) i j rents. 

RUSHER, ANNA P.— "Fulfillment." Song. 60c. 
SCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 284 contains the 

following music in both notations: — "Water Parted.** 
Unison song. T. A. Arne. 6 cents. 

SCHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

Published in two forms. A. Voice parts in staff and 
tonic sol-fa notations, with pianoforte accompaniment (8vo). 
B. Voice parts only, in tonic sol-fa notation. 

A. B. 
No. 1090. "Sir KRlamore." Two-part song 8 cents. 

Arranged by IT. ftalfour Gardiner. 

^ATHALL, A. G.— "The Pilgrim and the Winds." 

A meditation for chorus of mixed voices with piano- 
forte or organ accompaniment. 25 cents. 

INSTRUMENTAL 
pOXELL, W. J.— "Soliloquies." Seven Pieces for 

Pianoforte <olo. $1.25. 

GLADSTONE, F. E.— Toccata for Organ. 75c 
QRACE, HARVEY.— Three Psalm-Tune Postludes. 

For organ, i. "Martyrs"; 2. "London New"; 3. 'The 
Old Hundredth." -<; rents 

LISZT - DICKINSON. — "Resurrection," from 

"Christus." Orchestral parts, trombone, i t 12 cents; 
trombone, 11, 12 cents; trumpets, 1 and 11. 12 cents; tim- 
pani. 12 rents. 

[SJOVELLO'S ALBUMS FOR THE ORGAN.— 

No. t. Twelve selected pieces. (Funeral music) Paper 
cover. $1.75; cloth, $2.50. 

REIM ANN-DICKINSON.— "The Soul at Heaven's 

Gate." Orchestral parts. Violin, 12 cents; violoncello, 
12 cents; harp, 12 cents. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



169 



Organists 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West, New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue. 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
2 West 45th Street, New York, or 
395 Claremont Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

CLIFTON C. BRAINERD, M.A. 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Organist and Choirmaster, Church of the Good Shepherd 

Vice-Principal, Wadsworth Street School 

Address: 48 Huntington Street 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.C.O.. A.R.C.M., L.R.A.M. 
Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 
Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West isth Street, New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 

Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 
Addres s; New Haven, Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.O., 
F.A.G.O. 

"TURPIN PRIZE MAN" 

Specialist in Coaching by Correspondence in Harmony, 

Counterpoint, etc. Preparation for A.G.O. Examinations 

Address: "The Choristers' School," Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 

GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC. 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST. DIRECTOR 

First Baptist Church 

Flemington New Jersey 

ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Recitals Concert Tours 

Organ Openings 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral St. Louis, Mo . 

GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster, St. John's Church, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 

H. BROOKS DAY 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 
Organist and Choirmaster of St. Luke's Church, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Address: 417 Picrrepont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave., N. Y. 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 
41a Fifth Avenue, New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

CONCERT ORGANIST AND TEACHER OF SINGING 

Organist and Choirmaster of Gethsemane Church, Organist of 

the Jewish Reform Temple, Instructor in Theoretical 

Subjects at the MacPhail Violin School, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 
Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, 
Morristown, New Jersey. 

J. HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church, Charleston, 

W. Va. Director of Music Charleston High School, 

Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 



Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 



J. FRANK FRYSINGER, F.I.G.C.M. 

Head of the Organ Dept., The University School of Music 
Organist and Choirmaster, The First Presbyterian Church 

Lincoln, Nebraska 
ORGAN RECITALS 

E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster 



Mass. 



First Congregational Church 
Address: P. O. Box 675. Fall River, 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 

UNIVERSITY 
49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster Second Congregational Church, 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Director of Music Mount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Concert Organist and Training of Boys' Voices 

Organ Recitals, Instruction in Piano, Organ, Harmony 

and Counterpoint 

Member Exam. Committee of American Guild of Organists 

Candidates coached for Guild Examinations by mail 

Address: 170 West 75th Street, New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Calvary Baptist Church Address: 362 West 35th St 

F.AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St Mark's Church, Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 

EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

KARL KRUEGER, M.A. 

Assistant Organist, St. Luke's Church, New York 

Recitals and Instruction 

Address: Convent Avenue and 141st Street 

NORMAN LANDIS 

Flemington, N. J. 

O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flemington, N. J. 

CM. — First Reformed Church, Somerville, N. J. 

Conductor Frenchtown, N. J., Choral Society. 

ORGAN RECtTALS 

JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Park Street Church, Boston, Mass. 

Organist and Choirmaster. 

Send for new circular. 

Address: 140 Boylston Street Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St Bartholomew's Church. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and 
ford Philharmonic 



Cran- 



FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 



170 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 

New York. 

Instructor of Music Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
;?05 West 97th Street 
'Phone, 7380 Riverside. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 

St. Thomas' Church, New York 

ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR, AND COACH 

Address: 1 West 53d Street 



EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 



Organist and Choirmaster 
hedral 
Organ 
Address: Washington, D. C 



rgani . 
National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 
Organ Recitals 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre. Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 



MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 



A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
The South Church, E. 85th Street, New York 
Telephone: Morningside 7587 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 



JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 

ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 

Berea, Ohio 

FREDERIC ROGERS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Advice to Church Organ Committees a Specialty. Specifica- 
tions, DesigTK Purchase, etc. Twenty-five years' 
experience, England, Canada and United States. 
Address: Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared for Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 West 55th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House. 

2nd St., Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 



KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church, Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



EDWARD JOHN SMITH 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Methodist Episcopal Church; • 

and The Amasa Stone Memorial 

Chapel (Western Reserve 

University), Cleveland, 

Ohio. 

AUTHOR OF "CHURCH AND UNIVERSITY HYMNS* 

HAROLD TOWER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 

formerly organist St. Paul's, Minneapolis 

ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 

Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville, N. J. 

Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church , Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

# ^ ORGAN RECITALS. 
Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 
Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, I1L 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church aad 

Temple Israel. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
^ RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 
Thone *i7o-L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor. Orpheus* Club. 

Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St. Paul's School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and aoth Street New York Gty 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish, 

N. Y. The Earle, 103 Waverly Place, New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster, First Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn. Director of Music, Packer Collegiate 
Institute. . 

Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Organ Builder* 

If the purchase of a PIPE OROAN is contemplated, address 
Hbnry Pilchbr's Sons. Louisville. Ky., who manufacture the 
highest grade at reasonable prices. r orresnonHenre solicited 

A. A. G. O. Young man desires organ position. Ex- 
perienced in the training of quartets, mixed choruses, 
and boy choirs in Episcopal and evangelical churches. 
Thoroughly competent to teach harmony, counter- 
point, theory, form, appreciation, orchestration, his- 
tory, etc., in music schools. References. Address, 
R. S., New Music Review. 

FOR SALE 

Three Manual Church Organ 

Address J. GLENNAN 

Organist Mixed Choir of St Patrick's Church 

J882 COLUMBIA ROAD, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



203 



GRIEG 

SPECIAL NEW YEAR NUMBER 



OF 

TheMUSIC student 

(With Portrait r ver) 

Editor: PERCY A. SCHOLES, Mot. B. Ozon. 

Th« most complete Handbook on tho Lif • and 
Works of Grieg svsr published in this country 

SOME CONTENTS 
Letter from Madame Grieg 
"My First Success/ 9 by Grieg 
Some Influences in the Life of Grieg 
The Songs of Grieg 

G. C. ASHTON JONSON 

The Piano Works of Grieg 

PERCY A. SCHOLES 

Grieg's Chamber Music 

MARION M. SCOTT 

Organ Arrangements of Grieg 

E. C. BAIRSTOW 

Grieg and the Pianola 

G. W. T. REED 

Scandinavian Instruments 

E. VAN DER STRAETEN 
By mail, 16 cants (Plaasa sand stamps) 

THE MUSIC STUDENT, Ltd. 

30, Carlton Terrace, Child's Hill, London, N. W. 

American Agents 1 
The H. W. Gray Co., 2 West 45th Street, Now York 



The Musical Monitor 

is the OFFICIAL MAGAZINE of the 
National Federation of Musical Clubs 



(T It is the one musical magazine which every 
music lover should read. 

(f It contains helpful material on the work 
of the National Federation, Teachers' Asso- 
ciations, and individual dubs. The Depart- 
ments of Education, Library Extension, Course 
of Study, Public School Music, Sacred Music, 
American Music, Young Professionals and 
Students' Extension, and Community Music 
are covered by the chairmen of these several 
departments. 

fT Timely articles from our foremost au- 
thorities, reviews of new musical publications, 
notes of the activities of artists and schools 
make it invaluable to you. 

(T You as an individual cannot afford to miss 
the monthly visit of this magazine. 



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$1.00 A YEAR 



ADDRESS — 

THE MUSICAL MONITOR 

Mrs. David Allen Campbell, Editor 
116 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, DL 



Something to Sing 

Compiled by W, J. Baltzell 

Editor of The Musician 

Price, 75 cents postpaid 



A beautifully bound book, full sheet music 
size, containing 50 delightful songs. Easy enough 
for home or social circles, yet good enough for 
serious study. An ideal collection when one is 
asked to **sing something." Introduction by dis- 
tinguished voice specialists, complete suggestions 
for each song. Value at teachers' special price, 
in separate sheets, $12. 

*'A unique and interesting volume on new lines. 
The critical commentary on each song, old or 
modern, renders it an invaluable aid to vocal 
teachers for use with pupils in the first year of 
study." — Musical Courier. 



Something to Play 

Old and New Masterpieces 
Price, 75 cents postpaid 

Forty-five charming pieces for the piano, easy 
to moderately difficult. March, waltz and other 
dance rhythms. Descriptive, popular, and semi- 
classical pieces. Your favorite book when you 
want to "play something." Gives fascinating 
practice in scales, chords, left-hand melodies, and 
other points in technique. Value at teachers' 
special price, in separate sheets, $11. 

"The title well describes the book. It would 
indeed be a music lover hard to please who could 
not find in its varied and interesting contents 
many things with which to while away a pleasant 
hour at the piano. The numbers are of medium 
difficulty, not exceeding grades III-IV" — Musical 
Courier. 



Oliver DitSOn Company, 150 Tremont St., Boston, Mass- 
ChaS. H. DitSOn C& CO., 8-10-12 E. 34th St., New York City 



172 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



H. E. PARKHURST'S 



HCHURCH: 

ORGANIST 

A COLLECTION OF 

PRELUDES, OFFERTORIES AND 
POSTLUDES 

Containing full directions concerning all 
duties of a church organist and offering a 
large number of compositions which will 
be found of inestimable value. The sphere 
of the practical organist is either in church 
work or in concert-playing, and it is to the 
needs of all such that this excellent col- 
lection is devoted. 



CONTENTS 

Duties of a Church Organist— Sixteen 
Preludes by Beethoven, Schubert, Grieg, 
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played it myself last Sunday . . . etc., etc." 
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Ohabei Shalome, Boston. 



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SPECIAL NEW YEAR NUMBER 

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(With Portrait Cover) 

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The most complete Handbook on the Life and 
Works of Grieg ever published in this country 

SOME CONTENTS 
Letter from Madame Grieg 
"My First Success." by Grieg 
Some Influences in the Life of Grieg 
The Songs of Grieg 

G. C. ASHTON JONSON 

The Piano Works of Grieg 

PERCY A. SCHOLES 

Grieg's Chamber Music 

MARION M. SCOTT 

Organ Arrangements of Grieg 

E. C. BAIRSTOW 

Grieg and the Pianola 

G. W. T. REED 

Scandinavian Instruments 

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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 178 




Carl Fischer's Choir Music Edition 

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THREE ANTHEMS 

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GRIEG 

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Th« most complete Handbook on the Life and 
Works of Gries; ever published in this country 

SOME CONTENTS 
Letter from Madame Grieg 
"My First Success/ 9 by Grieg 
Some Influences in the Life of Grieg 
The Songs of Grieg 

G. C. ASHTON JONSON 

The Piano Works of Grieg 

PERCY A. SCHOLES 

Grieg's Chamber Music 

MARION M. SCOTT 

Organ Arrangements of Grieg 

E. C BAI 

Grieg and the Pianola 

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My Favorite Songs by World Famous Artists 



My Favorite Songs 

By GERALDINE FARRAR 

HIGH VOICE LOW VOICE 

PRICE, $1.00 EACH, POSTPAID 

The various numbers have been sought out 
with indefatigable zeal, largely from treasures 
of song buried or neglected in the works of great 
writers, and are, therefore, in many ways, new 
to the average teacher or singer. Songs from 
other lands, such as Russia and Scandinavia, 
are also included. The book contains a bio- 
graphical sketch, portraits, with a striking por- 
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My Favorite Songs 

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Books I and II High Voice Low Voice 

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The favorite songs of this highly praised 
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affection as well as proved their acceptability 
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206 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Musique des Anciens," in which he described 
the instrument and eulogized the player; but 
his description does not exactly tally with that 
given by Forkel or Koch. Returning to Ger- 
many, the next year, Hebenstreit was ap- 
pointed court conductor at Eisenach. In 1714 
he was a Katnmer-Musikus at Dresden. Death 
took him in 1750. The instrument disap- 
peared. Some think that Bach was led to 
write his clavier concertos by knowing Heben- 
streit's for pantalon and violin. Living at 
Dresden, our Hebenstreit received a salary 
equivalent to $1,500, a huge sum for that 
time. He left pupils, among them Bender and 
Gumpenhuber. A musician named Noelli at- 
tempted to put the pantalon back in fashion 
tow r ards the end of the eighteenth century. 



aH these forgotten virtuosos! Who 
knows to-day of Charles Eulenstein, 
a surprising virtuoso on the jewsharp, 
who made a sensation in London (1827-28) 
by producing beautiful effects on sixteen jews- 
harps. Alas, his teeth were so injured thereby 
that for a time he took to the guitar, but a den- 
tist contrived a glutinous covering for his 
teeth so that he could again delight aristo- 
cratic audiences. The story of his life, which 
has been published, although music lexicons 
ignore the fact, is a pathetic one, for he had 
many trials and tribulations in his early years. 
He did not die until 1890 (in Styria). 



^VX E are told that Eugen d'Albert, born 
I I 1 at Glasgow, the son of a composer 
^^^ of dance music who was certainly 
not a German, educated partly in England, a 
country which he afterwards abused, now 
calls himself a Swiss citizen. It was not so 
many years ago that he boasted furiously of 
his German citizenship. Studying in Berlin 
of the 'eighties, when d'Albert played there 
as a young Boanerges of the piano, we re- 
member it was noised about that the youth, 
with a fine regard for his mother, wished it 
to be understood that his father was Carl 
Tausig. 

And now comes Mr. Richard Northcott 
with his privately printed biographical sketch 
of Donizetti, in which it is asserted that Doni- 
zetti was grandson of a Scotchman whose 
name, Donald Izett, was corrupted to Donizetti 
when he went as a valet to Italy. Does this 
account for "Lucia di Lammermoor" ? 



5ORTUNATE is the critic that finds out 
a new phrase when he comes to re- 
viewing a pianist's recital. The critic 
of the Pall Mall Gazette heard Mr. William 
Murdoch play in April. "Except when be 
falls into the undignified expedient of creating 
a spurious irridescence by means of the sus- 
taining pedal, he has a directness of expres- 
sion that carries all before it." 

Speaking of critics, we must still look to- 
wards the West. There is the Black Oak 
correspondent of the Braymer Bee, for ex- 
ample. 

"Prof. J. D. Wheeler gave an entertain- 
ment on his violin last week which was very 
fine. He imitated the old cane mill, the mule, 
the old sow and pigs, the Arkansas traveler, 
the old spinning-wheel, and various other 
things. Rev. Lawrence Wheeler preached a 
couple of good sermons, and then C. W. Lane 
passed around the hat. The collection was 
65 cents for the young preacher, who thanked 
the audience for their good behavior, and dis- i 
missed them to their homes." 1 

"And various other things" is vague. The 
catalogue of Prof. Wheeler's imitations should 
have been full and precise. And what was 
his reward, if the preacher received only 65 
cents? That in view of all these painful cir- 
cumstances the audience was well behaved 
speaks loudly for the growth of "culture" in 
the West. 



CHE critic of the Pleasant Valley ( Arfc) 
Palladium also went to a concert 
"The third number on the programme 
was a saxophone solo by Miss Birdie Puffer. 
Musicians are agreed that the saxophone is 
an instrument out of which but few can get 
real music, but Miss Birdie played it beauti- 
fully. She is a popular member of our most 
exclusive social set, and is also noted for hav- 
ing once whipped a gentleman who did not 
appreciate her saxophone playing." Truly a 
formidable virtuoso! No wonder that the 
critic of the Palladium was enthusiastic over 
Miss Birdie's, performance. Some years ago 
the husband of Mme. Clara Butt assaulted the 
critic of the London Times because he did not 
fully appreciate Mme. Butt's singing in a con- 
cert, but in Arkansas a virtuoso, though a 
woman, in her desire to raise the standard of 
taste in the community uses a whip as a stimu- 
lant and a corrective. Our colleagues in New 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



207 



York should keep Miss Birdie and this inci- 
dent in mind. She may yet visit this city in 
pursuit of favorable press notices. 



CHE London Times, discoursing on "Lux- 
ury in Music" urges the need for econ- 
omy of resources. "If music is to go 
on at all in a third war season — and very soon 
concert-givers will have to consider their plans 
for such a season — it is quite clear that they 
will have to use the resources which lie ready 
to hand. If music is regarded not as an ex- 
pensive luxury, but as one of the spiritual 
needs of the community, it will be worth while 
for the various organizations to draw more 
together to secure one another's help, to ar- 
range their programmes in co-operation rather 
than in competition. In some instances it may 
be necessary to be content with a humbler 
standard of performance than we have been 
used to. The ability to do that is the test of 
the true musical instinct. People who merely 
want music for the luxury of a superfine 
performance are the bane of musical enter- 
prise at all times; they are negligible now. 
Each local area must use what resources it 
possesses to the best advantage for the in- 
trinsic qualities of the music. If this were 
done in London the result would be fewer 
concerts, better programmes, and a higher level 
of intelligent interest among audiences." 



CHESE remarks might be pondered with 
profit by the directors of choral so- 
cieties in our smaller cities. If the 
people of the town will not hear an oratorio 
or a cantata unless some justly or unjustly 
celebrated singer is engaged for the solo pas- 
sages, there is no genuine interest in music, 
and the fancied necessity for importation is a 
sad commentary on the proficiency of local 
singers. We remember musical activity in 
a small town near the Connecticut River in 
the 'sixties. A Choral Union was liberally 
supported by the people. It gave at least one 
concert a season. We recall one in which 
Mendelssohn's "Walpurgis Night" was per- 
formed. The solo passages were sung and 
sung well by singers in church choirs. The 
people took a pride in this fact. Not one of 
these singers was a professional, as the term 
is rightly understood. There was an importa- 



tion: The Germania orchestra from Boston. 
Rossini's "Stabat Mater" was performed in 
the same way. "II Trovatore" was performed 
as an opera in the Town Hall. This town is 
now a city. There is a college for women, 
with a Professor of the Musical Department, 
with teachers that have studied in Europe and 
all that ; but there is not the same general in- 
terest in music. Concerts are given, but for 
the most part by singers and players from 
New York and Boston. The Choral Union 
died long ago, and no body of singers has 
taken its place. 



^/%rEW YORK and Boston heard during 
1 I the season now at an end many 
^^ ^ young — and some middle-aged — sing- 
ers, violinists, pianists, whose names were un- 
familiar even to those who make it a busi- 
ness to be acquainted with musical activities 
throughout the country. Some of these "art- 
ists" were unprepared for concert work ; many 
had only moderate ability as executants and 
none at all as interpreters. They played and 
sang as they had been taught. One song was 
like unto another. And so with piano pieces : 
there was no differentiation in sentiments, 
moods, or emotions. They ventured because 
they wished to secure press notices for use in 
towns of the Middle West and West. They, 
or their managers, argued that they could find 
in the newspapers at least one favorable line 
to be quoted. Nor did they, as a rule, hesitate 
to garble a notice ; to quote something mildly 
pleasant without the corrective clause. This 
evil has grown to such an extent, that the 
critic now endeavors to frame his review so 
that nothing flattering, nothing that may be 
misconstrued by a local manager of a society 
or a club can be printed in Miss Maud's or 
Mr. Eglantine's circular. 



-\V*R- PERCY GRAINGER contributed 
711 an entertaining article "Modern and 
^'l ▼ Universal Impulses in Music" to 
The Etude. In the second column he char- 
acterizes Richard Strauss as "the great hearted 
Bavarian." This shows the kindly nature of 
Mr. Grainger. Having discussed in an enter- 
taining manner the more striking innovations 
of ultra modern composers — as Cyril Scott 
and Schonberg, who have "liberated us from 



208 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the inevitability of harmony," although Mr. 
Grainger does not dislike harmony — "I adore 
it" — he wishes to realize his boyhood's dream, 
to bring his "beatless" music before the world. 
"Ever since a young child I have heard in my 
head a polyphonic sort of music in which no 
kind of rhythmical regularity whatever ob- 
tains, in which not only no regular standard 
duration of beat is either stated or felt, but 
in which the various polyphonic parts do not 
obey rhythmic impulses in common. On the 
contrary, each part will, as a general rule, feel 
its beat impulse at a different moment, thus 
producing a rhythmic clash of a basicly dif- 
ferent nature from the mere syncopations pos- 
sible under our present system." This dream 
must be realized by some one, if not by Mr. 
Grainger, for "the path of the spirit of change 
and the instinct for ever wider universality" 
imperiously demanded in its scheme the in- 
clusion of the liberation inherent in 'beatless 
music/ which will be to the whole art of mu- 
sic much what 'prose' is to literature, while 
our present-day music on a rhythmically regu- 
lar basis can be compared with 'poetry.' In- 
cidentally, are there any rhythms in the world 
more enthrallingly subtle and complex than 
the always utterly irregular rhythms of ordi- 
nary every-day speech?" 

This reminds one of De Quincey hearing the 
opera with Grassini as the chief singer. "And 
over and above the music of the stage and the 
orchestra, I had all around me, in the intervals 
of the performance, the music of the Italian 
language talked by Italian women, for the 
gallery was usually crowded with Italians; 
and I listened with a pleasure such as that 
with which Weld, the traveler, lay and 
listened in Canada to the sweet laughter of 
Indian women, for the less you understand 
of a language, the more sensible you are to the 
melody or harshness of its sounds." This con- 
clusion bears on the question of all operatic 
performances in English. 



aND Mr. Grainger finds that it took a 
man of Stanford's "international cul- 
ture, complex personality, creative 
originality . . . and symphonic rendition to 
exploit the full compositional possibilities of 
Irish countryside ditties and to achieve in his 
arrangements of them a monument to autoch- 
thonous song ranking right alongside Brahms's 



immortal 'Deutsche Volkslieder.' " To this 
it might be said that these Irish ditties 
and German folk songs were more beautiful 
in their rude and fragrant simplicity, far more 
characteristic, than in the sophisticated ver- 
sions of Brahms and Stanford. 



CHE passionate lovers of folk songs, 
those who chase after them as Jones 
after a butterfly that is not in his col- 
lection or Smith after a rare bug, should in- 
troduce here the Siberian convict songs, sung 
recently in London at a concert in aid of Rus- 
sian prisoners of war; an ironical choice for 
the occasion. It appears that a Swede named 
Hartvelt was enabled by the Russian Govern- 
ment to visit convict settlements in Siberia and 
record the songs he heard. "Naturally the 
whole gamut of the emotions is touched on," 
wrote Mr. Legge, "the whole limited life and 
experience of these unhappy creatures; and 
the result is of the rarest ethnographical and 
musical interest." The melodies and words 
are said to be recorded faithfully. Hartvelt 
added a piano part. 



CO those who are still demanding that 
all operas should be sung in English 
at the Metropolitan Opera House and 
elsewhere in this country, we commend the 
saying of Sir Thomas Beecham that he finds 
himself unable to interpret faithfully accord- 
ing to the composer's intention through the 
medium of a translation. "More than fre- 
quently," he says, "the note and the word are 
so closely joined that a disruption of the two 
not only place the artists who are singing at 
a considerable disadvantage, but actually alters 
the sound of the music to a degree that seri- 
ously impairs its value and significance." He 
cites "Otello" and "Lucia di Lammermoor," 
although the English translation of the former 
libretto is an unusually good one in every way. 
Sir Thomas is not the first to make this com- 
plaint. Years ago Heinrich Dorn showed in 
an essay with musical notation how the char- 
acter of the music in Gounod's "Faust" was 
changed and greatly impaired when the opera 
was sung in German. 

It is not necessary to dwell on the wretched 
translations of many librettos. When "The 
Magic Flute" was revived in London by Sir 
Thomas Beecham on April 15 the audience 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



209 



grew merry over the latest translator, who 
made the group of ladies discovering Tamino 
lying prostrate from terror of the snake to 
sing: 

"All very fine, each one would stay with him 

alone, 
It can't be done, it can't be done." 

But perhaps Mr. DeKoven's "Canterbury 
Pilgrims" "will persuade us when it is produced 
at the Metropolitan Opera House. Mr. De- 
Koven, having told us in print that the music 
of Debussy and Richard Strauss will soon be 
forgotten because it is without melody, praises 
the tunefulness of his own opera, but he is 
equally enthusiastic over Mr. Percy Mackaye's 
libretto. "His work is distinctive, forceful, 
magnificent — and how it does lend itself to 
musical expression ! Oh, I tell you it is a big 
thing." 



/^^ HE Evening Post recently quoted from 
fl Mr. Charles Z. Lincoln's work on 
^^^ "The Civil Law and the Church" some 
interesting judgments. The plaintiff in the 
old action of Soltau vs. De Held showed that 
objectionable bells wejre rung five times a 
day on week days, six times on Saturday, and 
innumerable times on Sunday, beginning at 
5 A. M. He obtained a permanent injunction 
against the local beadle. There was a ques- 
tion whether country choirs had a right to 
remuneration. The court remarked: "The 
choir is made up of amateurs often but little 
instructed in the science of melody; and this 
part of the church service is, in such places, 
rather the observance of religious duty than 
the exercise of professional art and cultivated 
taste." In Texas the Court of Appeals de- 
clared the unmusical intonation of a member 
of the congregation or the cracking and eating 
of nuts a criminal disturbance of divine ser- 
vice. Was it in Texas that a jail sentence was 
imposed on a worshiper who "groaned aloud" 
or whispered confidentially to a friend that if 
the preacher "fooled with him, he would 
shoot him" ? 



this salary two services and one choir-prac- 
tice a day were expected. It is said that the 
grievance comes from the fact that in cathe- 
drals the stipend often stands at the original 
endowment, while the cost of living has in- 
creased ten-fold. "The result must inevitably 
be either that an indifferent organist is secured 
(one satisfied to settle down to a life of ob- 
scurity), or else the capable organist appointed 
has to delegate his duties more or less, and 
accordingly soon falls foul of his chapter." 



®RGANISTS in England are complain- 
ing of small salaries paid in cathe- 
drals. The Observer drew attention 
to Rochester Cathedral. The vacancy there 
was advertised at the sum of £ 140 a year. For 



3N too many churches of this country 
the salary of the organist is inadequate. 
Then there is the gifted amateur, gen- 
erally a man of means, who offers his services 
for nothing, he is so fond of the organ. Some- 
times the church is indebted to him, because 
he has enlarged or renovated the organ at his 
own expense. If only he would acquire a 
respectable pedal technic, and let the vox hu- 
mana alone ! 

Let us go back to folk songs, not necessarily 
the convict songs of Siberia heard in London ; 
not the Siberian folk songs brought over to 
New York by Mr. Votitchenco. Mr. Robin 
H. Legge, who has the commendable habit of 
writing sanely about music, freed his mind 
when he declared that no school was ever 
brought into being by the deliberate, "I might 
almost say the cold-blooded," study of folk 
music. We all love folk music — no folk mu- 
sic is unworthy, but let us not lose our heads 
over it. . . . Fundamentally, the idea of 
this deliberate and dogged cult of folk music 
seems to me to be thoroughly unhealthy. It 
is the shutting-out of that inevitability which 
is the life-breath of great impulsive art. One 
of two things is bound to happen; either the 
finished work will, so to speak, creak like bad 
stage machinery; or (if the musicians have 
enough of the divine fire) it will soar up and 
beyond and far away from the printed themes, 
repudiating them, forgetting them. And who 
shall say what the 'idiom' will be — the idiom 
of 'Lord Rendal,' or 'the Flowers of the 
Forest,' or 'the Londonderry Air'? No. If 
it is a work of genius it will be the composer's 
own ; it will owe nothing to 'Lord Rendal' or 
the others. But it may owe something to the 
tram-lines of Brixton, or the cinemas of 
Brighton, or perhaps — who knows? — to some 
terrifying dug-out in Flanders." 



2IO 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




Illy musical Eife 

By Rimsky-Korsakov. 
From Les Annates. 

TRANSLATED BY EDWARD BIDDLE. 
VI 

(Concluded) 
Home of an artist — Disorder and genius — 
Borodine's cats. * 

|MONG all my musical companions, 
Borodine was the one I saw most 
of. During these last years his 
affairs and his mode of life un- 
derwent marked changes. Giving up gen- 
erally but little time to music, and in answer 
to those who reproached him about it, saying 
that he was as fond of chemistry as music, he 
gave up less and less time to the latter. 

But it was not science that occupied him 
more especially. He had become one of the 
active organizers of the medical school for 
women, became associated with all sorts of 
societies established for the benefit and en- 
couragement of studious youth, especially 
feminine youth. The meetings of these so- 
cieties, his functions as treasurer of one of 
them, the proceedings in connection with them, 
took all his time. I found him rarely at his 
laboratory, still less often at the piano ; when 
I would arrive, he had either gone out to at- 
tend a society meeting or he was on his way 
back from one, or going about on affairs con- 
nected with these societies, or in the midst of 
writing letters and balancing his treasurer's 
accounts. If one adds to this his lectures, his 
participation in the Council of the School of 
Medicine, one understands that no time was 
left for music. It has always appeared 
strange to me to see certain ladies of the 
Stassov Society, who showed so much en- 
thusiasm for Borodine's musical talent, push- 
ing him into all sorts of charitable commit- 
tees, taking from him the time that he might 
have consecrated to the composition of won- 
derful musical works. 

Then, again, knowing his goodness and 
yielding disposition, his scholars at the School 
of Medicine and the young students assailed 
him with all sorts of requests, to which he 
bound himself to accede. His apartment, 
poorly planned, suggestive of a long passage- 
way, did not permit of his secluding himself 
and being excused from receiving. Everyone 
penetrated there, no matter at what hours, tak- 
ing him from his dinner or tea, and the ex- 



cellent Borodine rose from the table, listening 
patiently to requests or complaints and prom- 
ising to forward the wishes of his solicitors. 
His time was thus taken up for entire hours 
by disjointed conversations, and he seemed al- 
ways full of business, and finishing up some- 
thing or another. I was profoundly pained 
for this bungling and unproductive expendi- 
ture of time. 

It is to be observed also that nis wife, 
Catherine Sergueievna, suffered continually 
from asthma, did not sleep through the night, 
and only arose at mid-day. Borodine cared 
for her at night, arose early, and thus did not 
procure a due proportion of sleep. The en- 
tire domestic life of the couple was full of 
disorder: no fixed hour for dinner and other 
meals. Arriving one night after 10 o'clock, 
I found them about to sit down to dinner. 
Without taking into account the young chil- 
dren that they adopted successively and 
brought up, their lodgings continually served 
as an asylum for numerous relatives, poor or 
on their way somewhere, who fell ill and even 
lost their reason, and Borodine cared for them, 
established them in hospitals and visited them. 
The four rooms composing his apartment 
were often occupied by several of these visi- 
tors, some sleeping on the divans and others 
even on the floor. It often happened that the 
master of the lodgings could not even touch 
the piano, as someone was sleeping in the ad- 
joining room. The same disorder prevailed at 
table: several cats that the Borodines har- 
bored would get upon the table, put their noses 
in the plates, or jump upon the backs of the 
guests. These felines luxuriated in the pro- 
tection of Catherine Sergueievna. Their biog- 
raphies would be recounted. One was called 
"Fisherman," because he succeeded perfectly 
in catching small fish through holes in the ice 
of the frozen rivers. Another, named "Le- 
long," had a habit of seizing other cats and 
bringing them to the Borodines', who housed 
them. More than once it has happened to me 
to dine with them and to see one of these cats 
cross the table to my plate. I would chase 
him off; then Catherine Sergueievna would 
take up his defense and recite his biography. 
Another placed itself on Borodine's neck and 
heated him pitilessly. "Come, sir, this is too 
much this time," Borodine would say. But 
the cat never stirred and stretched itself com- 
fortably on his neck. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



211 




music ana mathematics 

By Daniel Gregory Mason 
| HE analogy between music and 
mathematics has been so often as- 
serted that there is no longer any- 
thing novel about it — it has be- 
come almost a truism. Yet, like many tru- 
isms, it has frequently been ill understood. 
Seldom is justice done to the logical quality 
of good music, largely because this logic is 
less intellectual than emotional, and many 
people resent the idea of a logic of feeling; 
even less is the creative, beauty-seeking ac- 
tivity of mathematics realized, the humdrum 
associations of school closing our minds to 
all that is most essential in it. Naturally 
enough, the relation of the two activities, each 
so misunderstood, is seldom clearly grasped. 
All the more refreshing is it to find, in Mr. 
Bertrand Russell's delightful essay on "The 
Study of Mathematics," the following sen- 
tences, which, read with the simple substitu- 
tions suggested in brackets, will be seen to 
throw a flood of light on the sister art: 

"The characteristic excellence of mathe- 
matics [music] is only to be found where the 
reasoning [development] is strictly logical; 
the rules of logic are to mathematics [music] 
what those of structure are to architecture. 
In the most beautiful work, a chain of argu- 
ment is presented in which every link is im- 
portant on its own account, in which there 
is an air of ease and lucidity throughout, and 
the premises achieve more than would have 
been thought possible, by means which appear 
natural and inevitable. Literature embodies 
what is general in particular circumstances 
whose universal significance shines through 
their individual dress; but mathematics 
[music] endeavors to present whatever is 
most general in its purity, without any ir- 
relevant trappings." 

The second sentence here in particular, 
through the emphasis it justly lays upon econ- 
omy, coherence, and richness of result with 
simplicity of means, may be used as a touch- 
stone for finding the best in the music of all 
periods. It applies perfectly to a fugue of 
Bach or a symphony of Beethoven, and with 
some qualifications to the best modern work, 
to a symphony of Brahms or a symphonic 
poem of Strauss. It instantly exposes diffuse- 
ness such as Schubert's, or non-sequacious- 
ness such as Tschaikowsky's, the turgidities of 



Mahler, the irrelevancies of Reger. It ac- 
counts in large measure for the slackness and 
transiency of interest of so much contem- 
porary music, thrown off hastily, without that 
long distilling and redistilling of the thought 
that alone can free it from all inert matter, 
and concentrate what is vital in it to its es- 
sence. The inde fatigability of Beethoven's 
workmanship, as evidenced by the sketch 
books, has often been remarked, and its con- 
tribution to the vitality of his music correctly 
pointed out ; yet it may be questioned whether 
sufficient emphasis has been laid on the fact 
that what the sketch books so strikingly re- 
veal is far less frequently elaboration than 
condensation. We are reminded of Steven- 
son's "If I only knew what to omit, I could 
make a classic out of a daily paper." On 
page after page we see Beethoven struggling 
to compress into eight measures what has oc- 
curred to him in sixteen, to reduce the eight 
to five or three, in some cases to delete the 
matter altogether, since it proves unnecessary. 
His aim is always to get the desired effect 
with the fewest possible notes, realizing as 
he does, and as all the greatest artists do, 
that an extra note is not merely a superfluity, 
but a distraction. Hear his own description 
of the process: "From the glow of enthu- 
siasm I let the melody escape. I pursue it. 
Breathless, I catch up with it. It flies again, 
it disappears, it plunges into a chaos of di- 
verse emotions. I catch it up again, I seize 
it, I embrace it with delight. Nothing can sep- 
arate me from it any more. I multiply it then 
by modulations, and at last I triumph in the 
first theme. There is the whole symphony." 

The sketch books show that by far the 
most laborious part of composition for Bee- 
thoven was this determination of the chief 
ideas, the "exposition." Yet he exaggerates 
when he says that "there is the whole sym- 
phony," for we find him grudging effort to 
no detail, however minute, that makes its con- 
tribution to the elegance and force of the 
whole. In the sketch book of 1803, for ex- 
ample, we can retrace his exact steps in deal- 
ing with the recurrence of the principal theme 
in the Waldstein Sonata. First he noticed 
that the original key of C major would have 
a monotonous effect at this point unless re- 
lieved against some strongly contrasting key. 
He therefore, introduced a digression occu- 
pying in the sketch seventeen measures. 



212 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Most composers, even had they noted at all 
the necessity of a digression, would have been 
amply satisfied with the passage thus 
sketched ; Beethoven reduces it, in the finished 
sonata, to seven measures. How much of its 
force does his work owe to this splendid con- 
ciseness! That excellence and mediocrity dif- 
fer in a somewhat similar way in mathematics 
is indicated by a comment of Mr. Russell's : 

"In the great majority of mathematical 
text-books there is a total lack of unity in 
method and of systematic development of a 
central theme. . . . Much space is devoted 
to mere curiosities which in no way contribute 
to the main argument. But in the greatest 
works, unity and inevitability are felt as in 
the unfolding of a drama; in the premises a 
subject is proposed for consideration, and in 
every subsequent step some definite advance 
is made tow r ard mastery of its nature." 

Why is it that excellence of this kind is 
so seldom found in modern work? It will 
not do to answer, as some conservatives may, 
that the free modern forms, like the symphonic 
poem, are intrinsically inferior to the classic 
sonata type. We see more and more clearly 
that the sonata had grave dangers of its own, 
that its literal repetitions encouraged laziness 
in the composer and inattention in the audi- 
ence, and that as practiced by all but the great- 
est it carried along in its musical stream a 
good deal of sand. Schubert's recapitulations 
of his themes are of a length not "heavenly" ; 
Schumann's, Tschaikowsky's, Dvorak's devel- 
opment sections are often perfunctory; even 
Brahms, as Mr. Ernest Newman points out 
in his "Richard Strauss," does not always 
avoid the effect of watering the wine to fill 
the bottle. On the other hand, Strauss him- 
self has shown again and again how the sym- 
phonic poem can be given a conciseness, logic, 
and force in no way inferior to those of the 
symphony. "Till Eulenspiegel," for example, 
admirably fulfils the demands suggested by the 
Russell passage, in the brevity of its 
premises (the two Till motives) in the close- 
ness of its texture, in the avoidance of ir rele- 
vancies, and in the richness of the results 
finally attained by an always logical musical 
imagination. 

The particular scheme of structure used, 
then, is unimportant in comparison with the 
degree of intellectual and emotional concen- 
tration brought to bear upon it by the com- 



poser. Whether, indeed, the type of expres- 
sion favored by modern music is helpful to 
this concentration may still be asked. Does 
the subordination of emotion to picture and 
realistic suggestion, as we find it in program 
music, help or hinder a logic that is charac- 
teristically a logic of emotion? The last sen- 
tence of the passage from Mr. Russell's es- 
say with which we began will suggest, what 
is the conviction of many of us, that music 
cannot well hamper itself with the "irrelevant 
trappings" of particular circumstances, with- 
out jeopardizing the general emotional expres- 
siveness which is its truest power. This, 
however, is a thorny question, into which we 
need not go. 

For there is plenty to account for the short- 
comings of the music of our period in the 
general conditions of the life of that period. 
The thousand distractions among which we 
live, the economic temptations proceeding 
from a large and thoughtless public, the over- 
facility of production which, especially in 
Europe, stimulates the composer's pen to out- 
distance his imagination — all this militates 
against that "intending of the mind" which 
is as indispensable to artistic creation as to 
scientific discovery. "No more solitude," 
says M. Romain Rolland in his diagnosis of 
modern German music, "no more long silent 
times, years lived with the work. The first 
idea that comes is accepted by the com- 
poser. . . . Mahler's themes have the 
slightly commonplace air of certain ideas of 
Beethoven in the first sketches. But Mahler 
rests contented with that." 

And so solid work is rare ; the patience for 
it is lacking. "Let me suggest a theme for 
you," writes Thoreau to a friend, "to state 
to yourself precisely and completely what that 
walk over the mountains amounted to for 
you, returning to this essay again and again 
until you are satisfied that all that was im- 
portant in your experience is in it. Don't 
suppose that you can tell it precisely the first 
dozen times you try, but at 'em again. . . . 
Not that the story need be long, but that it 
will take a long time to make it short." It 
will take a long time to make it short! — is not 
that the familiar conviction of all true ar- 
tists? And is it not too evident that most 
modern composers work on the exactly oppo- 
site principle, that it will take only a short 
time to make it long? 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



213 



j| facts, Rumors ana Remarks |j 



Verdi's Requiem will be sung by the National 
Open-Air Festival Society at the Polo Grounds, New 
York, on Sunday afternoon, June 4. The soloists 
will be Mme. Lucile Laurence, Maria Gay, Giovanni 
Zenatello and Leon Rothier. The conductors will be 
Louis Koemmenich and Arnaldo Conti. An orches- 
tra of 120 will assist. 

One of the features of the performance of Shake- 
speare's Tempest, now being played at the Century 
Theater, is the music, specially written for the occa- 
sion by Elliot Schenck, played by an adequate or- 
chestra conducted by the composer. The opening 
number in Act I, representing the storm, is par- 
ticularly effective, and the two solos sung by Ariel, 
Full Fathom Five and Where the Bee Sinks. Men- 
tion should also be made of the setting of honor, 
riches and marriage blessing. 

The National Music Festival of America, Inc., 
Black Mountain, North Carolina, will give its ini- 
tial performance next August. The programme will 
consist of Hadyn's Creation, Mendelssohn's Elijah 
and two Wagner choruses, Hail Bright Abode and 
Finale, Act I, Tannhauser. The various choruses are 
now being rehearsed and the auditorium, to seat 
20,000, is in process of construction. F. S. West- 
brook, of Black Mountain, N. C, is the energetic 
secretary, and an orchestra of 200, under Walter 
Damrosch, has already been engaged. 

Children's choruses are becoming more and more 
a feature of the May Festival. Cincinnati, The North 
Shore, Evanston, 111., Ithaca, Ann Arbor, all give an 
important part to the youngsters, some taking part 
in an Oratorio, others singing special music. Each 
year sees an addition to the list of Public School 
Music Festivals, and so far a high standard has been 
maintained. Burlington, N. J., gave a two-day Fes- 
tival on May 4 and 5, under the direction of Clar- 
ence Wells. Eight hundred children and the High 
School Glee Clubs formed the major attraction. The 
programme contained Folk Songs and Dances, Ac- 
tion Songs in Costume, Sight-singing Demonstra- 
tions, Part Songs and Choruses and three Cantatas, 
Bendall's The Lady of Shalott, Anderton's Wreck 
of the Hesperus and Miss Whiteley's Hiawatha's 
Childhood. The singing was excellent and much 
credit is due the conductor, W. Wells. 

The summer session of the School of English 
Folk-Song and Dance will be held at the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass., June 24 
to July 15. 

The summer school is organized by the United 
States branch and will be under the direction of Mr. 
Cecil J. Sharp. Its purpose is not only to give stu- 
dents a practical and theoretical knowledge of Eng- 
lish folk songs and dances, which shall enable them 
to qualify as teachers or performers in these sub- 
jects, but also to spread a knowledge of these whole- 
some dances and songs in our own schools and com- 
munity life. 

Classes in folk songs, children's singing games, 
Morris, country and sword dancing are held daily 
throughout the session, and, in order that the stu- 
dents may have as many opportunities as possible of 
seeing the dances adequately executed by expert per- 



formers, a private demonstration is given by the 
staff every morning. The course also includes daily 
lectures and discussions upon the theory, history and 
folk lore of the songs and dances. 

Three or more classes are held simultaneously in 
each of the chief subjects and are graded so as to 
meet the requrements of every student, whatever 
the extent of his knowledge. The school is organ- 
ized in such a way that students may, without dis- 
advantage, begin their course on any Saturday of 
the session. 

Examinations for certificates in folk dancing, ele- 
mentary, and advanced, and in country dancing and 
singing games, are held in accordance with the regu- 
lations issued by the English Folk Dance Society in 
the middle of each week of the session. 

On June 5 Die Walkure will be given in the Yale 
Bowl, New Haven, with an all star cast, Arthur 
Bodansky conducting and the orchestra of the Met- 
ropolitan Opera House. 



news from Paris 

All too rare, in the past, have been the occasions 
on which the Parisian public has had an opportunity 
to hear the works of our young American com- 
posers. It is, therefore, the more surprising that 
such an event should occur recently during the tur- 
moil of a conflict which is shaking Europe and its 
institutions to their foundations. One of the nu- 
merous benefit concerts, however, which have been 
of inestimable value in raising funds for the relief 
of war suffering, furnished the occasion, and the 
result was the presentation of John Beach as a 
young American composer of remarkable gifts and 
technical equipment. 

The concert was given at the Theatre Rejane, wit- 
ness of so many triumphs of the famous actress in 
Madame Sans Gene, on March 29. The beneficiaries 
were the family of a prominent French musician, a 
prisoner in Germany since the early days of the 
war, and the orchestra was that of the well-known 
Concerts Monteux under the able direction of Ar- 
mand Ferte. 

Mr. Beach's work, which opened the second half 
of the performance in a stage setting, is called La 
Fete de Pippa, and is a dramatic monologue for a 
single character and orchestra ; the text being drawn 
from the introduction of Browning's Pippa Passes. 
The scene takes place in the chamber of Pippa, a 
little working girl of Asolo in northern Italy, on 
the morning of the single holiday she enjoys during 
the year. There is a short introduction, and the 
curtain reveals Pippa's rising and her joyful antici- 
pations of the pleasures of a day of liberty. As in 
Browning's verses, she ponders over the different 
uses to which she can put the day, and, full of good 
anticipations, enthusiastically makes ready to go out ; 
the music gradually rises to a climax, coincident with 
Pippa's joyous departure. And as she disappears 
the familiar Years at the Spring floats back and 
finally dies off into the distance. A few quiet chords 
after the curtain bring the little work to a close. 

This Conte lyrigue, as it is styled in the pro- 
gramme, takes exactly thirty minutes to perform. 
Its orchestration is delicate, but very effective, and 
the continuous flow of the melody, especially the 
beautiful music for The Years at the Spring at the 
end, were cause for much favorable comment. The 
part of Pippa was excellently sung in French by 
Madame Suzanne Cesbrun, of the Opera Comique. 
The performance was received enthusiastically by a 
large audience which numbered many prominent 
Paris musicians. Mr. Beach, who is already known 
to Americans through the Wa-Wan Press, is a 
pupils of Andre* Gedalge. 



214 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Uariotu note* 

The Choral Club, of Hartford, Conn., under the 
direction of R. L. Baldwin, presented at the second 
concert of their ninth season, on Friday evening, 
April 14, the following programme : Laudate Domi- 
num, Converse; The Way of the World, Hatch; 
Alexander, Brewer ; Concerto in D major, Paganini ; 
The Song of the Timber Trail, Hunt; The Dawn, 
Hammond; Menuett, Mozart; I Bear It, and the 
Maid in the Valley, Herbeck; Nocturne, Chopin; 
Habanera, Sarsate; Summer Evening, I'm Coming 
Home and Finnish Lullaby, Palmgren-Schindler. 

Mr. E. R. Kroeger presented on April, 10 at the 
Musical Art Hall, St. Louis, Mo., a piano recital con- 
sisting entirely of his own compositions. Pro- 
gramme: Suite in F minor, Opus 33, for piano; 
Memory, a Song Cycle, Opus 66; piano solos — 
Elegie, Opus 13 ; Under the Leaves, Opus 85, No. 3 ; 
Momento Capriccioso, Opus 85, No. 1 ; By the 
Waters of Lethe, Opus 46, No. 2; Chant Arabe, 
Opus 31, No. 2; March of the Indian Phantoms, 
Opus 80; Sonata in F sharp minor, Opus 32, for 
violin and piano. 

The following concert was presented April 11, 
by the Senior Class of the Crane Normal Institute 
of Music, Potsdam, N. Y.: The Daffodils, Hall; 
Cradle Song of the Virgin, Brahms; Evening, Lu- 
cantoni; The Lorelei, Liszt; Hungarian Dance, 
Brahms; A Birthday, Cowen; Song of the Shirt, 
Homer; The Gypsies, Brahms; Life and Death, Tay- 
lor; The First Primrose, Grieg; Autumn Violets, 
Bartlett; Chanson Provencale, Dell' Acqua; From 
the Land of the Sky Blue Water, Cadman; The 
White Dawn, Cadman; Viennese Popular Song, 
Kreisler; Let Erin Remember, Let Now the Harp, 
Turn Ye to Me; The Boy with the W f hite Cockade. 

The following programme was presented April 
25, by the Choral Society of Upper Montclair, under 
the direction of Mark Andrews, cond, assisted 
by Miss H. Wierum, soprano ; H. Eeisenberg, violon- 
cello. Programme : Strike, Strike, the Lyre, Cooke ; 
Kol Nidrei, Bruch ; Gipsy Dance, Jeral ; Three Fish- 
ers, Macfarren ; As Discords 'Neath a Master's hand, 
Andrews ; O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me and 
O Had I Jubal's Lyre, Handel ; I'm Seventeen, Come 
Sunday, arranged by Grainger; Elegy from Orfeo, 
Chanson Napolitaine, Casella; O Can Ye Sew Cush- 
ions, arranged by Bantock; Kitty of Coleraine, ar- 
ranged by Lloyd ; Three Gipsy Songs, Brahms ; Om- 
nipotence, Schubert-Spicker. 

The Musicians' Club of Pittsburgh held its April 
meeting, April 6. The Associated Artists of the city 
were the guests of the musicians at dinner, and for 
the program of compositions by the members of 
the club, which was given later in the evening. The 
program was as follows: Humoreske, The Jolly 
Friar, Sunrise — for piano, Whitmer ; The Homeland, 
She Walked Within the Garden Close. Gaul ; A Lit- 
tle Song of Cheer, Summer, Wentzell; Serenade, 
Humoreske — for piano, Gerwig; Ah! Love, But a 
Day — Browning, Song from Pippa Passes — Brown- 
ing, My Lord Comes Riding — Grace von W. Hen- 
derson, Whitmer; Exile— George Seibel, Russell; 
Andantino, Allegretto, Scherzino — for violin; Whit- 
mer; Christ Is Risen, Song of the Winds and 
Streams, Oetting; Fantasie-Impromptu — for Piano, 
O'Brien. 

The success of the Music Teachers' National As- 
sociation meeting at Buffalo last December, and the 
rapidly-growing interest in the work of the Asso- 
ciation, has led to a number of new plans for the 
coming year. The officers for 1016 are : President, 
J. Lawrence Erb, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. ; 
Secretary, Charles N. Boyd, 4259 Fifth Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. ; Treasurer, Ralph L. Baldwin, 81 Tre- 
mont Street. Hartford, Conn., and Waldo S. Pratt, 
Editor, 86 Gillett Street, Hartford, Conn. Execu- 



tive Committee, the above officers with William 
Benbow, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Kate S. Chittenden, New 
York City; Rossetter G. Cole, Chicago, HI.; 0. G. 
Sonoeck, Washington, D. C. ; Calvin B. Cady, Kew 
York City ; D. A. Clippinger, Chicago, 111. ; Charles 
H. Farnsworth, New York City, and Francis L 
York, Detroit, Mich. 

The thirty-eighth annual meeting will be held at 
New York City, December 27-29, 1916. 

At the Buffalo meeting it was decided to. elect a 
group of Counselors, to aid the Executive Commit- 
tee in its work, and the following gentlemen were 
chosen : Rossetter G. Cole, Chicago, 111. ; J: Law- 
rence Erb, Urbana, 111.; Charles H. Farnsw<mh, 
New York City ; Peter C. Lutkin, Evanston, J1L, 
and Waldo S. Pratt, Hartford, Conn. 

President Erb has appointed several committees 1 
to make a canvas of the situation in their .particular j 
line, and to make a report at the annual meeting 
They are also encouraged to suggest readers of 
papers along their lines for the annual meeting. 
The committees so far appointed are : 

Community Music — Miss Chittenden, Chairman; 
Messrs. Pratt, Benbow, Cole and Lutkin. 

Standardization — Mr. Farnsworth, Chairman; 
Messrs. Cady and Weidig. 

Public School Music and Accrediting — Mr. Bald- 
win, Chairman; Messrs. York and Clippinger. 

©bttuarp. 

We regret to announce the following deaths : 

John F. Runciman, a valued contributor to The 
New Music Review, who died in London, an April 
11, was the author of several books, but was best 
known as the musical critic of the Saturday Review, 
which post he held until his death. He was also the 
editor of The Chord, and the correspondent of sev- 
eral American papers. He wrote a life of Purcefl 
and a study of Wagner for "The Musician's Library,' 
of which he was editor, but his most widely read 
book was "Old Scores and New Readings," which 
is a collection of articles contributed to the Saturday 
Review. It is a complete expression of his person- 
ality. The chief characteristic of his criticism was 
its severity. He was a musician of wide culture and 
eclectic tastes; but his dislike of what he called the 
"academic school" of native composers was almost an 
obsession, and more than once brought him into con- 
flict with the law of libel. Closely connected with 
this trend of ideas — in fact its complement — was a 
complete inability to see any good in Brahms. He 
had a tendency to express unbounded admiration for 
music which was not known in this country, and 
then to demolish it when it became familiar. He 
undoubtedly, however, did good service in helping 
to destroy some of the conventions which hampered 
the growth of native music in the last years of last 
century, and his critical violences were the result 
of an entirely honest detestation of shams and af- 
fectation, which was his heritage from his sturdy 
north country ancestry. He was die master of a 
vigorous and picturesque style which attracted many 
who had no special interest in music, and made many 
musicians forget how little they agreed with his 
judgments. He also wrote a good deal of literary 
criticism in the Saturday Review. 

The women's choir organized in October at the 
First Parish, Watertown, Mass., by Edith Lang, 
O. & C, has performed successfully the following 
numbers during the winter at Vespers and the Choir 
Concert : Sanctus, Gounod ; All Thru the Night, Old 
Welsh; God is Love, H. R. Shelley; Blessed are the 
Pure in Heart, Huhn ; The Lord is My Shepherd, 
Mendelssohn; He in Tears that Soweth, Hiller; The 
Heavens Are Telling, Hayden; Seven Old Christ- 
mas Carols. Arr. by E. Lang; The Lady of Shalott, 
Bendall ; The Dream Robber, Edith Lang ; It was a 
Lover and His Lass, Edith Lang ; Estudiantina, Arr. 
by N. Clifford Page. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



215 




ecclesiastical music 33 

EDITED BY 29 

G. Edwakd Stuebs, Mus. Doc kS 

si m 

HE Anglican correspondent of the 
Chicago Living Church is evidently 
in sympathy with certain critics 
who have been in the habit of com- 
plaining occasionally, in the columns of a 
prominent London journal, about the music 
at St. Paul's. 

He says: 

"The announcement is made that Mr. 
Charles Macpherson, assistant organist of St. 
Paul's, has been appointed as the organist in 
succession to the late Sir George Martin by 
the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral. This 
was not quite unexpected, and perhaps it will 
prove to have been a wise decision. 

"It is earnestly to be hoped that the new 
organist will show that he is more in sym- 
pathy with Church music reform than was his 
immediate predecessor. Mr. Macpherson 
was born in Edinburgh in 1870, the son of an 
architect, and at the age of only nine years 
he left home to become a member of St. 
Paul's choir school and a boy chorister at 
the great London Cathedral. Later on he 
learned the organ under Dr. George Martin, 
as well as theory under Dr. C. W. Pearce. 
About 1891 he became a student of the Royal 
Academy of Music, where he won a medal 
for the composition of a wind sextette. He 
was appointed sub-organist of St. Paul's in 
1895. Mr. Macpherson is Professor of Har- 
mony at the Royal Academy of Music and a 
Fellow of the Academy, and a Fellow and 
Member of the Council of the Royal Col- 
lege of Organists. He has published several 
compositions, both ecclesiastical and secular. 
He is brother of Minor Canon Macpherson, 
of Ripon, and son-in-law of Canon Newbolt, 
of St. Paul's." 

There is a trace of half-heartedness in this 
that will offend those of our readers who 
know Mr. Macpherson. And the implication 
regarding his distinguished predecessor will 
be equally unpalatable. 




HE New York Medical Record re- 
cently contained the following re- 
markable account of the vocal 
treatment of a "falsettist" by Dr. 
HaHock, assistant physician in the department 
of neurology in Cornell University Medical 
College. As far as we know, there has never 
before been an authentic "cure" of this kind 
reported in any important journal. Choir- 
masters and teachers of singing will perhaps 
be astonished to learn that the chest register 
can be developed in cases where it has ap- 
parently never existed. 

Dr. Hallock was called upon to treat a tele- 
graph operator for a slight illness not con- 
nected in any way with the vocal organs. He 
says: 

"In speaking he used the falsetto voice and 
never had spoken in the normal register. Be- 
fore dismissing him, in connection with the 
illness for which he came, I advised him to 
go to some elocution or singing teacher to 
learn to speak in his normal voice. The pa- 
tient said he had not supposed that anything 
could be done to change his voice, but he 
would be glad to go to such a teacher and 
would take my advice. 

"It occurred to me later that I would like 
to try the experiment myself, so I sent for 
him, and he came in due time. I took him 
to the piano. All I know about the piano is 
thumb exercises, but I found that he knew 
less, for he could not carry a tune correctly, 
nor even a single note. He was consistently 
sharp or flat. His musical ear was decidedly 
defective. As I sounded various notes in the 
scale, he sang them in the falsetto, although 
this was difficult because of his defective ear. 
I brought him down in the descending scale 
as far as his voice would go, and then I 
sounded the next lower note. He promptly 
sang some note in the upper scale, any note,, 
all in the falsetto. I tried the experiment sev- 
eral times, always with the same result. I 
sat quite puzzled and beaten. I had not the 
least idea, in these circumstances, how I was 
to proceed with a case like this, and doubted 
if it would be possible to make any progress 
at all with him. 

"Suddenly an idea came to me, and I asked 
him to clear his throat and made him repeat 
this several times while I listened carefully. 
In that noise of clearing his throat, I heard 
the man's natural voice, or thought I did, the 



2l6 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



suggestion of it, enough to begin on. I re- 
quested him to cough and clear his throat 
again and again. The natural voice was evi- 
dent to me at the very end of the coughing 
noise. I asked him to notice that as he cleared 
his throat, the sound naturally separated into 
something like two parts, the cough and a 
noise which followed it. (It might be repre- 
sented, though not correctly, by the word 
'a-hem/) I perceived that I might use this 
reaction to the cough, as it might be called, 
the second part, the sort of rebound, if I 
could get hold of it. All I had to do then 
was to get him to prolong the second sound. 
I made him repeat the exercise and, little by 
little, got him to accentuate this second part 
of the cough. Then I asked him to divide 
this cough-clearing process, consciously, into 
two parts, much as if he were to say 'a-hem/ 
He learned to do this, though it was difficult 
for him, as he often broke into the falsetto. 
In this way he finally produced out of this 
second sound a good full tone in the normal 
register. All this took me about an hour, and 
I was satisfied that I had struck a method by 
which to bring out his natural voice. 

"In speaking he still lapsed into the fal- 
setto, of course; up to this time in his life 
he had never used the slightest suggestion of 
the normal voice, it was fixed in the falsetto. 
I saw him again on the following day, and al- 
though he was able to produce the normal 
register tone, when carefully guided to it, the 
voice would still break often, and whenever 
he spoke it was in the falsetto. I practised 
with him, going from one note to another, 
until he got a range of an octave in the nor- 
mal register. That was all I needed for prac- 
tical purposes. His voice became more and 
more free. He said that the voice sounded 
strange to him and was quite in doubt as to 
whether it was not an artificial voice that I 
had produced. I continued to work with him, 
developing this tone, and got him to speak by 
first singing a simple word, then speaking it 
in a singing tone. From one word, I easily 
got a few more out of him. The voice still 
broke occasionally, but it was a simple matter 
now to keep it fairly steady in the normal. I 
gave him some simple exercises with simple 
phrases, such as 'good morning,' hello, 
Charley/ 'wake up/ 'how's the parrot to-day ?' 
and such nonsense, spoken on a full breath and 
in a 'bold, bad man' sort of way. I told him 



to practice a little at the piano at home the 
exercises I had done with him, and also the 
exercises in speaking, to blurt the phrases 
out to any one who happened to be near him. 
And he did it. 

"On the fourth day I picked up a volume of 
Longfellow and asked him to read three or 
four verses. He did it without a break, and 
so well that I fetched in a lady who happened 
to be in the house at the time and who was 
well acquainted with the patient. I seated her 
comfortably in an armchair and put him 
through his little stunt. She was utterly as- 
tonished ! I saw him every day for about a 
week, and then less and less often. His nor- 
mal voice was thoroughly established, a good 
manly baritone. He telephoned to every one 
he knew within a hundred miles so that they 
might hear his new voice. He was not sure 
for a considerable time that it would last 
One day, however, a couple of months from 
the time I began with him, I asked him to 
speak again in the old way. He was unable 
to utter a sound in the falsetto; he had for- 
gotten how. This seemed to me fairly stupid, 
but he could not do it. 

"This happened some years ago. I never 
reported the case because I imagined such 
cases must be well enough known to the spe- 
cialists, and it did not seem to me that it 
would be of particular interest. Recently, 
however, I had occasion to speak of the case 
in the presence of several physicians, one of 
whom was afflicted in the same way. I re- 
lated the case for his benefit. As he seemed 
interested, I told him I would like to try and 
straighten him out if he cared to have me to 
do so. A reputable older physician, connected 
with one of New York's leading hospitals, 
who was present, expressed the opinion that 
such cases are structurally defective and incur- 
able. I never saw the young doctor again." 

It is possible that the case of this tele- 
grapher was, in technical medical parlance, 
"atypical/* There is comparatively little 
known about the "falsetto" register. The 
term itself is used in a very confusing, indefi- 
nite, and unscientific way even in standard 

works on singing. 

# 

Dr. Hallock's report is valuable in giving 
additional and extraordinary information re- 
garding a subject that is too little studied 
and too much misunderstood. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



217 




J HE following legend, which is sup- 
posed to be of Russian origin, ap- 
peared not long ago in one of the 
English ecclesiastical journals: 

"Christ and St. Peter, walking about the 
earth, came to a village one day. In one 
house folk were singing so finely that Christ 
stayed to listen, whilst St. Peter went on. 
He turned back and found Christ still at His 
post. St. Peter went on again, and looked 
back: Christ was still listening. St. Peter 
went on again, and then glanced back a third 
time — and Christ was still listening. Then 
he went back and heard a splendid folk-song 
in the house, stayed a while, and went on to 
another house where also there was singing. 
There St. Peter stayed, but Christ passed on. 
St. Peter hurried up and looked astounded. 
'What is the matter?' asked Christ. 'I could 
not make out why you stopped to listen to 
folk-songs and passed by the house where 
hymns were being sung.' 'Oh, my dear son/ 
said Christ, 'there was a good scent in the 
house where folk-songs were being sung; but 
there was no reverence about the place where 
they were chanting hymns.' 

The lesson conveyed by this story is a strik- 
ing one. A folk-song sung with sincerity 
means something. A hymn sung with an 
empty mind and a cold heart means nothing. 

We must confess, however, that we are sur- 
prised at St. Peter's astonishment! But per- 
haps one should not analyze a legend of this 
kind too closely. 

R. REGINALD GOSS-CUSTARD, 
speaking at a complimentary din- 
ner recently given in his honor at 
the Players Club, paid a hearty 
tribute to the musical appreciation of the 
American audiences that had come under his 
personal observation during the two months 
of his recital tour in this country. Particular 
mention was made of the enthusiasm shown 
at operatic and orchestral performances. 

Mr. Goss-Custard did not hesitate to de- 
clare that this country was, as contrasted 
with England, a distinctly musical one. He 
said : "Leaving out of consideration the seri- 
ous influence of the war, which has, of course, 
been detrimental to musical activities, and 
looking back to ante helium conditions, I be- 
lieve, from what I have observed here, that 
the Americans are comparatively more warmly 




interested in music, and more appreciative. 
I have been struck with this fact not merely 
at recitals, but especially at orchestral concerts 
and at the opera. I do not think that the 
performances at Queen's Hall and Covent 
Garden reflect on the part of the listeners the 
high degree of musical enthusiasm that is 
manifested at similar functions in New York 
and Boston." 

When asked for his opinion regarding 
American organs, he replied: "I have been 
very much astonished at the excellence of the 
instruments I have heard and particularly the 
ones I have played upon. Three of them com- 
pare most favorably with the very best we 
have in England." 

Regarding the war Mr. Goss-Custard was 
not at all optimistic, excepting as to the final 
outcome. To musicians in England it has 
caused distress that is not fully appreciated 
by those not immediately concerned. He may 
himself be obliged to report for military duty 
as soon as he gets back to his native heath! 
The numerous friends he has made here sin- 
cerely trust that he may not be called upon 
to leave his family and profession. 

|N reply to a communication from 
an organist and choirmaster in 
the diocese of Illinois asking for 
further information regarding Eng- 
lish and American prayer-book revision, and 
its outcome musically, we can only say that in 
course of time the services of the Church 
may be simplified and shortened. 

As we have remarked before in these col- 
umns, the so-called "Protestant Episcopal 
Church" keeps an ever watchful eye upon the 
Church of England. Revision of the Ameri- 
can prayer book is a matter that is apt to be 
influenced by what takes place across the 
ocean. 

The opinions expressed by American clergy- 
men are to a certain extent re-echoed in this 
country. Within the past year countless let- 
ters have appeared in British journals relative 
to the Church services. We give some very 
recent examples from clergymen who desire 
alterations in Matins and Evensong: 

"Eighteen months ago most of us were 
looking forward with hope to a revival of 
religion consequent on the conditions brought 
into being by the war. We have seen nothing 
of the kind; rather the tendency has been in 




218 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the opposite direction. We cannot help feel- 
ing that, as there can be no fault found with 
the religion of Jesus Christ, there must be 
something very radically wrong with the way 
in which we have been presenting it. And so 
we are compelled to ask ourselves whether, 
if we continue to use the old methods only, we 
shall not still be courting the same failure. 

"I have specially in mind the questionable 
value of our Matins and Evensong in one 
crucial connection, for as things are it is 
mostly through them, and especially through 
the latter, that we first bring the Gospel to 
the people. Matins and Evensong as they 
stand are absolutely unfitted to represent the 
religion of Jesus Christ to the people. The 
reason of their failure is that they are beyond 
the understanding of the ordinary member of 
most congregations, and a complete enigma to 
the stranger in church. It is the paradox of 
the Gospel that simplicity best becomes the 
infinite depth of it — and simplicity is the last 
thing which people find when they 'go to 
church' in the Church of England." 

We frequently find emphasis placed upon 
the need of simplicity and brevity: 

"After more than fifty years in the ministry 
I feel most strongly that both these services 
need much reform to remove their drawbacks 
and to render them to us men and women of 
the twentieth century, especially to the less 
educated and spiritually advanced among us, 
something like what they were to those living 
when newly drawn up, more than three hun- 
dred and fifty years ago. 

"Both Matins and Evensong require ab- 
breviation, and Evensong should no longer be 
almost a mere echo of Matins. No doubt this 
likeness disinclines many to attend the former, 
which should be adapted to the wants of the 
less educated and less advanced in the spiritual 
life. The Old Testament Lessons should be 
shortened and, if possible, less numerous ; and, 
when possible, one Psalm of moderate length 
selected for Sunday use, and not more than 
two or three when they are short should 
suffice." 

In the following we find the opinions that 
were expressed in an article by the Rev. Dr. 
Peters of New York, which we quoted some 
time ago in this paper : 

"If the unfortunate outsider has to listen 
to a long account of the misdeeds of certain 
Kings of Israel and Judah in the First Les- 



son and to a controversial chapter from some 
Epistle in the Second which he cannot possibly 
understand, it is rather in the nature of offer- 
ing him a stone in place of bread, so he re- 
frains from church-going altogether. The 
custom moreover of going straight through 
the Psalter is open to improvement. Certain 
sets of Psalms might be chosen for certain 
Sundays. At present, for instance, on a Peni- 
tential Sunday we often sing very jubilant 
Psalms quite out of harmony with the gen- 
eral character of the service. 

"The whole difficulty would seem to lie in 
Matins and Evensong themselves. They are 
so hidebound in character by hard-and-fast 
tradition as to be incapable of presenting the 
Gospel to the 'outsider/ even to many a regu- 
lar churchgoer." 

Abbreviation of the Psalter is always men- 
tioned in letters of this kind. Here is another 
example : 

"There are countless Church-people, to 
whom our present services seem intolerably 
antiquated, stereotyped, inadequate to present i 
needs, and unreal. Is it too much to hope that! 
before long steps may ,be taken, with the 
necessary sanction of Parliament, to provide- 
in addition to the revised prayer book which 
Convocation are now preparing — an alterna- 
tive and optional Form of Evensong? It 
might be on the lines of the present Order for 
Evening Prayer — a short Introduction, Con- 
fession, Absolution, leading up to Praise and 
Prayer, etc. — but simpler, in modern but good 
and reverent English, with fewer Psalms." 

The whole subject of revision is for many 
reasons a difficult one for Church authorities 
to cope with. Our readers will find a similar- 
ity between letters printed on the subject here 
and in England. We wish we could give our 
correspondent a more detailed prognostication 
of what may come in the way of change — all 
we can say is that there are three objects in 
view, greater simplicity, brevity, and elasticity. 

All three may be attained, but when no one 
can tell. There will be opposition to any 
change, much controversy, and consequent de- 
lay in final action. 

EFORM in Sunday-school music is 
so seldom preached by educators 
who do effective work in other mu- 
sical directions, we read with satis- 
faction the opinion of Mr. George Whelpton, 




THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



219 



as expressed in The Continent (Chicago) : 
"What suits the traveling evangelist does 
not suit the Sunday-school. 'Almost per- 
suaded' and 'It is well with my soul' have 
done good work at the psychological moment 
in great missions, but they do not represent 
the normal experience of Sunday-school chil- 
dren. There is an endless supply of this kind 
of music, and every traveling mission leaves 
a good supply in the local churches and schools 
to continue the demoralizing process. An- 
other source of corruption is the catchy, 
rhythmical, ragtime music now finding its way 
; into many schools. This sort of music has a 
; psychological effect on the nervous systems 
of the children, but it has no educational or 
devotional value whatever. 

" 'Children go to Sunday-school,' says 
Mr. Whelpton, 'for religious instruction and 
churchly training, not to sing cheap gospel- 
songs and light, catchy music for the amuse- 
. ment of their elders. Standard church- 
hymns and other distinctively churchly music, 
adapted to Sunday-school needs, should alone 
be sung." 

It is said tliat the late D. L. Moody ap- 
proved of "Sankey" hymns for revival pur- 
poses only. That there is a legitimate use for 
► inferior hymns and tunes in the Salvation 
r Army, and in certain mission fields where 
musical intelligence is at a low ebb, must be 
granted. But to expose Sunday-school chil- 
dren to the pernicious influence of bad music 
is to violate an elementary principle of educa- 
tion. 



SUMMER SCHOOL OF CHURCH MUSIC 

Announcement is made of the School of Church 
Music which will be held at Cambridge, Mass., this 
summer. It will extend over two weeks, from 
June 23 to July 8, with headquarters at the Episco- 
pal Theological School. The aim of the school is 
the same as that of the successful gathering at Cam- 
bridge last vear, namely, to draw into consultation 
those who have to do with this important depart- 
ment of church work. 

A unique feature of the school will be a demon- 
stration course in practical choir training and con- 
ducting to be given by Mr. A. Madeley Richardson, 
M.A., Mus.Doc. Oxon., late organist of Southwark 
Cathedral, London, instructor at the Institute of 
Musical Art, New York. The course will be illus- 
trated by a boy choir and will afford an unusual 
opportunity for the study of voice production and 
interpretation as applied to the usual forms of musi- 
cal expression in the church. This practical course 
will be supplemented by a course of lectures by 
Dr. Richardson on selected topics, such as Organ 
Accompaniment, the Strutcure and Rendition of the 
Psalms, the Choral Service, Choir Organization and 
Management Dr. Richardson has also arranged to 



give private instruction in composition, etc., at spe- 
cial rates to students in the Summer School. 

There will be a class in Plainsong with practice 
in rendering traditional melodies to the psalms, 
hymns, etc., under the direction of the Rev. Win f red 
Douglas. Mus. Bac. The History of Church Music 
with Reference to the Hymn Tune, the Carol, the 
Anthem, and Settings will be dealt with by Mr. 
Richard G. Appel, A.M., of the Cambridge Theo- 
logical School. The contributions of the different 
schools of church music, including the Modern Rus- 
sian, will be considered. 

Opportunity will be given to hear some of the 
notable organs in the vicinity of Boston and to 
visit organ factories. There will be the usual series 
of organ recitals. 

A registration fee of $5 is charged to defray the 
expenses of the school and admits to all classes 
and privileges. Applications for registration and 
further information may be made to Mr. Richard 
G. Appel, director, 15 Hilliard Street, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Among those connected with the school in 191 5 
may be mentioned Dean P. C. Lutkin, Northwestern 
University, Evanston, 111.; Canon Charles W. Doug- 
las, New York City; Professor W. R. Spalding, 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.; Mr. Walter 
Clemson, Dean of the American Guild of Organists, 
Taunton, Mass.; Rev. Fred W. Fitts, St. John's 
Church, Roxbury, Mass.; Mr. Warren A. Locke, 
St. Paul's Cathedral, Boston, Mass.; Mr. S. F. 
Batchelder, St. James' Church, Cambridge, Mass.; 
Mr. H. W. W. Downes, St. Stephen's Church, Bos- 
ton, Mass.; Mr. H. M. Barnes, St. Paul's Church, 
Concord, N. H.; Mr. Verne R. Stillwell, Grace 
Church, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Rev. Harvey Officer, 
O.H.C., West Park, New York; Mr. Henry King 
Fitts, St. Luke's Cathedral, Portland, Me.; Mr. 
Walter G. Dawley, St. George's School, Newport, 
R. I.; Mr. Raymond C: Robinson, Central Church, 
Boston, Mass. ; Mr. Henry L. Gideon, Temple Israel, 
Boston, Mass.; Mr. J. N. Ashton, First Parish, 
Brookline, Mass. 



ORGAN SPECIFICATION 

The following is the specification of the new C. S. 
Haskell organ for the Westminster Presbyterian 
Church, Elizabeth, N. J., Thomas Wilson, O.: 

Great Organ 27. Viola da C.amba... 8ft. 

1. Double Open Dia- 28. Unda Maris 8 ft. 

pason 16 ft. 29. Quintadena 8 ft. 

2. Open Diapason, 1st 8 ft. 30. Doppel Flute 8 ft. 

3. Open Diapason. 2d. 8 ft. 31. Flute d'Amour 4 ft. 

4. Gemshorn 8 ft. 32. Piccolo Harmonique 2 ft. 

5. Philomela 8ft. 33- Clarinet 8ft. 

6. Octave 4 ft. 34- Tuba (in Swell 

7. Flute Harmonique . 4 ft. Box) . 16 ft. 

8. Fifteenth 2 ft. 35- Tuba (in Swell 

9. Mixture 3 rks. Box) 8 ft. 

10. Trumpet 8 ft. Echo Organ 

Swell Organ 36. Muted Viole 8 ft. 

11. Bourdon 16 ft. 37. Aetheria 8 ft. 

12. Open Diapason 8 ft. 38- Viole Celeste 8 ft. 

13. Salicional 8 ft. 39- Vox Angelica 8 ft. 

14. Clarabella 8 ft. 40. Fern Flute 8 ft. 

15. Aeoline 8 ft. 41. Vox Humana 8 ft. 

16. Vox Celeste 8ft. 42 Chimes ..Snace provided 

17 Stopped Diapason.. 8 ft. Pedal Organ 

18. Fugara 4 ft. 43* Contra Bourdon ... 16 ft. 

19. Flute Traverso 4 ft. 44- First Open Diapa- 

20. Flautino 2 ft. son 16 ft. 

21. Mixture 3 rks. 45- Second Open Dia- 

22. Cornopaean 8 ft. pason 16 ft. 

23. Oboe 8 ft. 46. Bourdon 16 ft. 

Choir Organ 47. Dulciana 16 ft. 

24. Dulciana 16 ft. 48. Lieblich Gedeckt ... 16 ft. 

25. English Open Dia- 49- Viclone 16 ft. 

pason 8 ft. 50. Flute 8 ft. 

26. Dolce 8 ft. 5i- Violoncello 8 ft. 

52 Pausone 16 ft. 

PROF. S. A. BALDWIN; at the College of the City of New 
York, N. Y., April 30. 
Magnificat in D minor — Lemaigre. 
Liebstraum — Lemare. 
Passacaglia in C minor — Bach. 
Sposalizio — Liszt. 
Waldweben. Siegfried — Wagner. 
Andante Cantabile in B flat— Tschaikowsky. 
Overture, Prometheus — Beethoven. 



220 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




4. WARRCN AnwniMt, A G.O., WAROih 
HAROLD V. MILLIGAN. FA CO.. OKN. •EC. 



S. LEWIS ELMER. A.A O.O.. BUB-WAROCII 
VICTOR ■Alt*. A Q.O . SCIl.TRCAt. 



FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE. NEW YORK 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 

The forty-third organ recital of this Chapter was 
given at the Old South Church, Boston, on March 
30. by Mr. Everett E. Truette, organist and music 
director of the Eliot Church, Newton. The pro- 
gramme, which consisted entirely of the composi- 
tions of Alexandre Guilmant, in commemoration of 
the fifth anniversary of his death (March 30, 191 1), 
was as follows: 
Funeral March and Hymn of Seraphs. Op. 17 

(Inscribed in memory of his mother) 
First Sonata in D minor, Op. 42 

(Inscribed in Homage to Leopold II, King of the Bel- 
gians) 
Introduction and Allegro — Pastorale — Finale 
Lamentation, Op. 45 

(Inscribed in memory of the Abbe Henri Gros. who 
was killed in the bombardment of Paris in 1870) 
Invocation in B flat, Op. 18 
Fugue in D, Op. 25 
Elevation in A flat. Op. 25 
Fifth Sonata in C minor. Op. 80 

(Inscribed to Mr. Clarence Eddy) 
Allegro Appassionato — Adagio — Scherzo — Choral and Fugue 



CENTRAL NEW YORK CHAPTER 

Under Chapter auspices Miss Clara V. Drury 
gave the following programme on April 10 at the 
Dutch Reformed Church, Herkimer, N. Y. She was 
assisted by Miss May Turnbull, soprano; Miss Alice 
Watson, contralto; J. Preyse Lloyd, tenor; Peter 
Jones, Basso, and Leo Hahn, violinist. 

PROGRAM 
Prelude and Meditation from 1st Suite Borowski 

(a) Madrigale Simonetti 

(b) Intermezzo Callaerts 

Quartette — "My Faith Looks Up to Thee" Schnccker 

(Violin Obligato) 

Caprice in B Johnson 

Violin Solo — "Sweet Spirit Hear My Prayer" Hone 

Berceuse (by request) Dickinson 

Great Tocatta in C Bach 

Quartette— Festival Te Deum in E Hat Dudley Buck 

(a) Invocation Mailly 

(b) Gavotte Dethier 

Violin Solo — "Lullaby" Fi iml 

Scherzo Federlein 

Tocata Frysinger 



NORTHERN OHIO CHAPTER 

On Monday evening, March 6, 1916, Mr. Sidney C. 
Durst, of Cincinnati, O., representing the Southern 
Ohio Chapter, A.G.O., gave an organ recital before 
the Northern Ohio Chapter, at the First Unitarian 
Church, Cleveland. His brilliant programme con- 
tained four novelties in the compositions of the pres- 
ent day Spanish writers, Eduardo Torres, choirmas- 
ter of the Cathedral of Seville, and Luis Urteaga, 
organist and choirmaster in Zumaya. These works 
were new to Cleveland, and were received with spe- 
cial interest and pleasure. 

April 3, 1916, the N. O. Chapter met at the Euclid 
Avenue Christian Church, Cleveland, for dinner and 
business meeting. These were followed by an organ 
recital given by Mr. Frederic B. Stiven, organist of 
this church, with the following programme: 

Agitato, from Sonata No. u Joseph Rheinberger 

En Bateau Claude Debussy 

Trois Pieces Pour Orgue Cesar Franck 



Sjonge D'Enfant Joseph Bonnet 

Variations de Concert Joseph Bonnet 

Poem Zdenko Fibich 

Gavotte Moderne Edwin H. Lemare 

Final, from First Symphony Louis Vierne 

A service under the auspices of the A.G.O. was 
held in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Cleveland, Sun- 
day evening, April 9. Mr. Geo. G. Emerson, organ- 
ist and choirmaster of the church, conducted the 
service, assisted bv Mr. William Treat Upton and 
Mr. Charles E. Clemens, visiting organists. The 
programme was as follows: 

Prelude. 

(a) Fantasie from Sonata No. 10 Rhcimberger 

(b) Evening Song Bairstow 

Choral Service ( Festal) Tallis 

Magnificat ( Festival in E-flat) J. E. West 

Excerpts from the Sabat Mater G. Rossini 

Postlude, 

(a) Scherzo Symphonique Concertant Lcmmens 

(b) Im Garten, Laendliche Hochzeit Goldmark 

(c) Introduction to Third Act of Lohengrin Wagner 



ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

On April 12 the following programme was given 
under Chapter auspices at St. Paul's (by the Lake) 
Church, Rogers Park, 111: 

Allegretto (Sonata No. 4) Mendelssohn 

Marche Religeuse Guilmant 

Mr. Mason Slade. Organist and Choirmaster 
Christ Episcopal Church 

Prayer to Notre Dame (Gothique Suite) Boellmann 

Toccata (Gothique Suite) Boellmann 

Clock Movement (nth Symphony) Haydn 

Communion in G Batiste 

Mr. Irving C. Hancock, Organist and Choirmaster 
Trinity Episcopal Church 

The combined choirs of Christ, Trinity and St. 
Paul's sang Stainer's Crucifixion with Mr. A. J. 
Strohm at the organ. 

At St. Paul's Universalist Church, Chicago, on 
April 18, the Chapter presented the following pro- 
gramme, under the direction of Mrs. Wilhelm Mid- 
delschutte : 

Bonum Est (new) Mrs. H. H. A Beach 

St. Paul's Quartet 

Meditation and Toccata d'Evry 

Mr. Herbert E. Hyde 
Organist and Director St. Peter's Episcopal Church 

Quartet in D major Haydn 

Allegretto — Largo — Menuett — Presto 

The Kortschak Quartet 
(Hugo Kortschak, 1st violin; Herman Felber, 
2nd violin; George Dasch, viola; Emmeran 
Stoebcr, 'cello) 

Domine Jesu (from the "Requiem") Verdi 

St. Pauls Quartet 
Address — "Making Melody" 

Dr. Brigham 

Cantabile Franck 

Concert Overture in B minor Rogers 

Miss Tina Mae Haines 
Organist and Director, St. James' Methodist Church 

Quartet in D major Cesar Franck 

Larghetto — Scherzo 

The Kortschak Quartet 

Cantabile and Final (Seventh Sonate) Guilmant 

Mr. Hyde 

Into the Silent Land Foote 

St. Paul's Quartet 

Mr. Charles E. Clemens, organist of the Euclid 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, Cleveland, Ohio, gave 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



221 



a recital under auspices of the Chapter at St. James 
M. E. Church, Chicago, on May 8. Preceeding 
the recital a dinner in honor of Mr. Clemens was 
given in St. James's Parish House. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 

The twenty-first public recital of this Chapter 
was given at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, San 
Pedro, Cal., on March 6, with th6 following pro- 
gramme : 
Preludio, 3rd Sonata Guilmant 

(a) Sonatina Bach 

(b) Motctt Bach 

Mr. John A. Bettin 

Nunc Dimittus Bettin 

Wilmington Night School Chorus 

Second Sonata Mendelssohn 

Allegro, Fugue 

Romance Lindsay 

Chanson de Joie Hailing 

Jubilate Deo Silver 

Mr. P. Shaul-Hallett 

Theme and Variations Douglas 

Finale in £ minor Douglas 

Mr. Ernest Douglas 

On April 3, at the Hollenbeck Hotel, Los An- 
geles, the Chapter held its annual meeting and elec- 
tion of officers. After the meeting the following 
programme was given: 

Quartet The Coral Grove Pearson 

Song — Tenor Mother o'mine Tours 

Song — Contralto Dost Thou Know That Sweet Land 

(Mignon) Thomas 

Address Mr. Arthur K. Wyatt, Pasadena 

§fuartet Spring Song Pinsuti 
ong — Bass Land of The Long Ago Lilian Ray 

Quartet Four Little Mice (The Sphinx) Thomas 

Soprano — Mrs. D. J. Kennelly 
Alto — Miss Blanche Bisbee 
Tenor — Mr. George Brown 
Bass— Mr. F. Brooks Cole 

Quartet of All Saints Church, Pasadena 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 



Dean Walter J. Clemson of the New England 
Chapter, American Guild of Organists, was unani- 
mously re-elected to his sixth term last evening at 
the Harvard Musical Association Building, 57A 
Chestnut Street. He came to this country from 
England in 1885 as organist and choirmaster of St 
Thomas' Episcopal Church in Taunton, later organ- 
izing its famous boy choir. 

Dean Clemson is a fellow of the Guild of Church 
Musicians of London and is a member of the St. 
Botolph Club, the Tavern Club, the Harvard Musi- 
cal Association and the Boat and Country Club of 
Taunton. 

Other officers chosen were Benjamin L. Whelp- 
ley, subdean ; John D. Buckingham, secretary, fourth 
term; Wilbur Hascall, treasurer, sixth term; Henry 
M. Dunham, Hamilton C. MacDougall and Arthur 
Foote, executive committee. 

Rev. Henry Wilder Foote reviewed "The Devel- 
opment of the English Hymn." 



Ctotrcl) Dotes 

On April 30, John Hyatt Brewer completed a pe- 
riod of thirty-five years as organist and choirmaster 
of the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn. 

The First Presbyterian Church of York, Pa., will 
soon give the contract for a new $10,000 organ. 
The organ is the gift of two members of the church 
whose names are withheld at their own request. 
Harold Jackson Bartz. F.A.G.O., is the organist and 
choirmaster at this church. 



The choir of the Welsh C. M. (Pres.) Church, 
Cincinnati, O., under the direction of David Davis, 
presented on April 21 Stainer's The Crucifixion. 

The following concert was presented April 7 by 
the Treble Clef Club of the Methodist Church, 
Osage, la., under the direction of Frank Parker. 
Programme: Passing By, Purcell; All in an April 
Evening, Black; The Hour of Dreaming, Hahn; 
Ah! Love, But a Day, Beach; Wanderer's Night 
Song, Rubinstein; The Angelus, Chaminade; Glori- 
ous Forever, Rachmaninoff; Prologue (from Pag- 
liacci), Leoncavallo; Oh, Lovely Night, Ronald; 
Would God I Were the Tender Apple Blossom, Old 
Irish; God Gave Me Heart to You, Olive Chryse 
Parker; Hymn to the Night, Campbell-Tipton; The 
Lady of Shalott, Bendall. 

Dubois's The Seven Last Words was presented 
at the Good Friday Service by the choir of the 
Fourth Church, Hartford, Conn., under the direc- 
tion of R. L. Baldwin. 

The programme of the special musical service pre- 
sented April 30 by the choir of St. Andrew's Memo- 
rial Church, Yonkers, N. Y., under the direction of 
R. E. H. Terry, O. & C, included : Magnificat in C, 
Gadsby; With Verdure Clad, from The Creation, 
Haydn; The Redeemer, Edwards, and on Sunday 
evening, May 28, The Daughter of Jairus, Stainer. 

A performance of Gounod's Faust, in Concert 
Form, will be given on May 22 at St. Mark's M. E. 
Church (colored) by a chorus of seventy-five voices 
under the direction of E. Aldama Jackson, with an 
orchestra of 50 pieces. This is a chorus which has 
reached a remarkable degree of proficiency and the 
performance promises to be very creditable. The 
colored race are natural singers and the work of 
this and other colored choirs in the city would do 
credit to many of the leading metropolitan choirs. 
The soloists on this occasion will be Miss Minnie 
Brown, soprano; Miss Ethel Clark, contralto; 
Charles Waters, Tenor; George Taylor, bass. 

During Lent the choir of Trinity Church, Toledo, 
O., under the direction of Herbert Sprague have 
presented the following works: The Prodigal Son, 
Sullivan; The Crucifixion, Stainer, and The Dark- 
est Hour, Moore. 

A recital of Sacred Music was presented May 9 
in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York, 
by the combined choirs of The Musical Art Society 
and the Cathedral. Dr. Frank Damrosch conducted 
the first part and Mr. Miles Farrow the second. 
The choirs were assisted by Mr. Edouard Dethier, 
violin, and Mr. C. W. Lefebvre, organ. A large 
congregation filled the Cathedral. Programme: Or- 
gan, Prelude in C minor, Bach; Processional, Sol- 
emn March, Chauvet; Or Sus, Serviteurs Du Seig- 
neur (Psalm, CXXXIV, Motet six voices), Swee- 
linck; Motet and Doxology, Adoramus Te, Gloria 
Patri, Palestrina; O.Filii et Filiae (Easter hymn 
from "Christus" for women's voices), Liszt; Vom 
Himmel Hoch Da Komm' Ich Her (Canzona for 
soprano solo, chorus, solo violin and organ), Karg- 
Elert; Arioso (violin and organ), Bach; Blessing, 
Glory and Wisdom (Anthem for double chorus), 
Bach; City of High Renown (Chorus from "Hora 
Novissima"), Parker; Here Yet Awhile (Double 
Chorus from "Matthew Passion"), Bach; Reces- 
sional, Pontifical March, de la Tombelle. 



ST. THOMAS'S CHORAL SOCIETY 

A notable musical event of the Lenten season was 
the performance by this society on April 14, under 
the direction of Mr. T. Tertius Noble, of Dvorak's 
Stabat Mater. The chorus numbered 120, including 
the regular choir of St. Thomas's, and was assisted 
by an orchestra of 40 pieces and the following solo- 
ists, viz. : Louise MacMahon, soprano ; Emma Van- 
der Veer, contralto; Reed Miller, tenor; Harold 



222 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Land, bass. Besides the principal choral number, 
two short orchestral works by Mr. Noble were given, 
A Song of Lamentation and A Reverie. On April 
27 the same society will present Mr. Noble's Gloria 
Domini and Festival Te Deum in G minor. 



Organ Recitals 

E. H. UEER, at Grace Church, Providence, R. I. 

Allegro Appassionato, from Fifth Sonata— Guilmant. 

Matnath Yad (Hebrew Melody)— Noble. 

Let Petit Berger — Debussy. 

Spring Song — Mendelssohn. 

Scherzoso, from Eighth Sonata— Rheinberger. 

Meditation — Sturges. 

Toccata, from Fifth Symphony — Widor. 
DR. H. J. STEWART, at the Panama-California Exposi- 
tion, San Diego, Cal., April 8. 

Overture. Czar and Zimmerman — Lortzing. 

Adoratio — Dubois. 

Fantasia in B flat minor — Callaerts. 

Scene de Ballet. Dance of the Hours. (La Giaconda) — 
Ponchelli. 

The Voice of the Chimes — Luigini. 

Spring Song — Mendelssohn. 

Marche Nuptiale — Callaerts. 

MISS G. SWITZER, at Trinity Church, Dallas, Texas, 
April 27. 
Marche Religieusc — Guilmant. 
Cantilene— Drdla. 
Minuet — Boccherini. 
Praeludium — Nevin. 

Toccato and Fugue in D Minor — Bach. 
Pastorale — Whiting. 
Scherzo from Fifth Sonata — Guilmant. 

DENNISON FISH, at Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn., 
Apr. and. 
Toccata in D minor — Bach. 
Minuet in E flat — Mozart. 
Parsifal (Three fragments) — Wagner. 
Song of India (from Sadko) — Rimsky-Korsakoff. 
Rustic Echo (in 7-8 time) — Rebikoff. 
Berceuse (from L'Oiscau de Feu) — Stravinsky. 
Melody in G flat— C. W. Cadman. 
March in C — C. W. Cadman. 
Tristan and Isolda (Fragments) — Wagner. 
The Swan — Palmgren. 
The Swan — Saint-Seans. 
Melisande — Sibelius. 

Irish Tune from County Derry — Arr. by Grainger. 
Gloria in Excelsis — Harrison. 

G. ALEX. A. A. WEST, at the Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Feb. 24th. 
Sonatina in A minor — Karg-Elert. 
March, Jean D'Arc — Dubois. 
Andantino — Wolstenholme. 
Chorale (D minor) — Caesar Franck. 
Scherzo — Dethier. 

At St. John's Church, Washington, D. C, Apr. 1st. 
Sonata No. 1 — Borowski. 
Reverie — Deth ier. 
Scherzo— Dethier. 

Prelude to the Deluge — Saint Saens. 
Intermezzo — Hollins. 

Pastorale, Chorale e Recitativo — Karg Elert. 
Two Ballades — Wolstenholme. 
March for a Church Festival — Best. 

KARL KRUEGER. at the Wanamaker Auditorium, New 

York, Apr. 10th. 
Suite Gothique — Boellman. 
Intermezzo from The Jewels of the Madonne — Ermanno 

Wolf Ferrari. 
Toccata from O Edipe a Thibis — de Mereaux. 
Finale from Sonata I — Guilmant. 
L'Angelus — Massanet. 
Scherzo, Op. 11 — Tschaikovsky. 
Fiat Lux — Dubois. 

Andante from Symphony V — Beethoven. 
Tocatta from Symphony V — Widor. 

PERCY CHASE MILLER, A.M., at St. John's Church, 
Washington, D. C. Mar. 18th. 
Concerto, Cuckoo and Nightingale — Handel. 
Evensong — Martin. 
Allegretto — Tours. 
Suite in F—Corelli— Noble. 
Humoresquc — Ward. 
The Minster Bells— Wheeldon. 
Laus Deo — Dubois. 

DR. FRANCIS HEMINGTON, at the Church of the Epiph- 
any, Chicago, 111., Apr. 3rd. 
Sonata in C minor — Baldwin. 
Vorspiel to Lohengrin — Wagner. 

Andante con moto (Symphony in B flat No. 5) — Schubert. 
Marche Militaire — Schubert. 
Moment Musicale in F minor — Schubert. 
Serenade — Schubert. 
Gavotte Moderne — Tours. 
Toccia (Gothic. Suite) — Boellmann. 



II. T. WADE, at Lake Eric College, Painesville. Od.. Mar. 
26th. 

Sonata, G minor — Merkel. 

Three Tone Poems, Oups 54 — Mailing. 

Morgenstimmung — Grieg. 

Cannon, B minor — Schumann. 

Spring Song — Hollins. 

Andante, from Concerto, G Minor — Mendelssohn. 

Vorspiel "Parsifal" — Wagner. 

Good Friday Music 'Parsifal" — Wagner. 
W. C. HAMMOND, at Skinner Memorial Chapel, Mt. Holy, 
oke, Mass., Mar. 18th. 

Fantasie — Rousseau. 

Adagio in E — Merkel. 

Caravan of the Magi — Maunder. 

Une Larme — Moussorgsky. 

Silhouette — Rebikow. 

Oriental Sketch — Rebikow. 

Andante with Variations — Beethoven. 

Two Hebrew Melodies — Traditional. 

Prelude to Parsifal — Wagner. 
H. H. FREEMAN, at St. John's Church, Washington, D. C, 
Mar. 25th. 

First Sonata in D major — Peace. 

Beceuse in D major — Lemare. 

Toccata in D minor — Edwards. 

Fugue in D major — Gaul. 

Forest Vesper (Nocturne) — Johnston. 

Fantassia in E minor — West. 

Allegretto Scherzando— Marks. 

Grand Choeur in G major — Faulkes. 

F. MAXSON, at Grace M. E. Church, Wilmington, Del.. 

Mar. 2nd. 
Fantasie Svmphonique — Cole. 
In Springtime — Hollins. 
St. Ann's Prelude — Bach. 
Berceuse — Dickinson. 
Concert Overture, D minor — Matthews. 
Evening Chimes — Wheeldon. 
Burlesco e Melodia — Baldwin. 
Madrigal — Maxson. 
Marche, from Ariane — Guilmant. 

PROF. C. P. WOOD, at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. f 
Mar. 19th. 
Andante Sostenuto — Widorfl 
Cantilene Pastorale — Guilmant. 
In Paradisum — Dubois. 
Andante and Final — Maquaire. 

V. V. LYTLE, at First Presbyterian Church, Erie, Pa., 
Mar. 1 2th. 
March Pontificate — Tombelle. 
Anitra's Dance — Grieg. 
Asa's Tod — Grieg. 
Oriental Sketch No. 3 — Bird. 
Pedal Etude — de Bricquevello. 
Grand Chorus in D — Guilmant. 

PROF. S. A. BALDWIN, at the College of the City of New 
York, N. Y. 
Passacaglia and Fugue — Mason. 
Evansong — Johnston. 
Tocatta in F— Bach. 
Angelus — Renaud. 
Canzone — Renaud. 
Symphony in D minor — Lemare. 
Berceuse — Shelley. 
Piece Svmphonique — Grieg. 

DR. F. HEMINGTON, at the Church of the Ephiphany, 
Chicago, 111., May 1. 
Concert Overture in B minor — Rogers. 
Berceuse — S. Rosseau. 
Fiat Lux (Let There be Light)— Dubois. 
Sonata in F minor — Mendelssohn. 
Spring Song — Lemare. 
\ ariations on Russian Hymn — Thayer. 
Allegretto in G — Rubinstein. 
Military March Pomp and Circumstance — Elgar. 

KARL KRUEGER, at St. Luke's Church, New York City, 
April 13. 

Sonata I — Mendellssohn. 

Fuge in G major — Bach. 

Pastorale — Cesar Franck. 

Andante from Symnh. VI — Tschaikovsky. 

Intermezzo from The Jewels of the Madonna — Wolf- 
Ferrari. 

Intermezzo from Midsummer Night's Dream — Mendelssohn. 

DEWITT C. GARRETSOX. at the Methodist Church, Her- 
kimer, N. Y.. April 14. 
Finlandia — Sibelius. 
Spring Song — Hollins. 
Caprice — Sheldon. 
Andantino in D flat — Lemare. 
Grand March from Aida — Verdi. 
Moment Musicale — Schubert. 
Largo from New World Symphony — Dvorak. 
Autumn Song — Garret<ion. 
Sonata in C minor, last movement — Thayer. 

G. H. FEDERLEIX, at the Moravian Church, Dover, O., 

April 3. 
Prelude in Fugue in A minor — Bach. 
Gavotte — Debat-Ponsan. 
Sunset and Evening Bells — Federlein. 
Intermezzo — Bonnet. 
Lohengrin Prelude — Wagner. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



223 



Air du Nord — Wolstenholme. 

Meditation — Sturges. 

Serenade — Gounod. 

Burlesca e Mclodie — Baldwin. 
FREDERICK MAXSON. at the Central High School, Phila- 
delphia. Pa., April 6. 

Concert Overture, D minor — Matthews. 

In Springtime — Hollins. 

Sonata (in the style of Handel) — Wolstenholme. 

Ah! Mon Fils (Le Prophete)— Meyerbeer. 

Burlesca E Mclodia — Baldwin. 

Berceuse — Dickinson. 

Fantasie Symphonique — Cole. 

Will 'o the Wisp — Nevin. 

Wedding March — Ferrata. 

R. F. MAITLAND. at the First M. E. Church, Asbury Park, 
N. J., Apr. 7th. 
Toccata in F — Bach. 
Romance in D flat — Lemare. 
Nocture No. 3 — Liszt. v 

Chanson de Matin — Gillette. 
Hosannah — Dubois. 

H. F. SPRAGUE. at Trinity Church, Toledo, O., Mar. 22nd. 
Prelude in Fugue in D major — Bach. 
Pastorale — Whiting. 
Memories — St. Clair. 
Humoresque — Ward. 

Grand Onertoire de Sainte Cecile in D — Batiste. 
First Rhapsodie on the Breton Canticles — Saint Saens. 
Cradle Song — Hauser. 
Third Sonata Pascale — Lemmens. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS, at Trinity Church, Toledo, O., 
Mar. 14th. 
Sixth Sonata — Mendelssohn. 
Prelude and Fugue in A minor — Bach. 
Serenade — Pierne. 

Procession du St. Sacrement — Chauvet. 
Roulade — Bingham. 
Vision — Toriussen. 
Final from First Symphonie — Vierne. 

I. H. UPTON, at North Church, Portsmouth, N. H., Mar. 
17th. 
Offertoire in E — Dubois. 
Lamentation — Guilmant. 
Spring Song — Hollins. 
Light — Stevenson. 

Fugue in E flat (St. Anne's)— Bach. 
Legend — Federlein. 
Canzone Delia Sera — d'Evry. 
Andante (b) Gavotte — Camidge. 

REGINALD GOSS-CUSTARD, at St. Thomas' Church, 
N. Y., Mar. 27th. 
Marche Pontificale (From the Second Symphony) — Widor. 
Madrigal — Lemare. 
Villanella — Ireland. 

Vorspiel, Tristan and Isolde — Wagner. 
Prelude and Fugue in D major — Bach. 
Improvisation. 

Waldweber (Forest-Murmurs) Siegfried — Wagner. 
Overture, Euryanthe — Weber. 

F. E. WARD, at The Church of the Holy Trinity, New 
York. N. Y.. Mar. 19th. 

Fourth Symphony — Widor. 

Evensong — Johnston. 

Canzona in A minor — Guilmant. 

Finale, Fifith Symphony — Beethoven. 
E. A. KRAFT, at Ohio Wesleyan School of Music, Delaware, 
O., Mar. 1 6th. 

Concert Overture in D minor — Matthews. 

Melodie-;-Tschaikowsky. 

Minuet in C minor from L'Arlesienne — Bizet. 

Overture to The Merry Wives of Windsor — Nicolai. 

Andante Cantabile from Fifth Symphony — Tschaikowsky. 

Scherzo — Dethier. 

Overture to Der Freischutz — Von Weber. 

The Magic Flute — Meale. 

The Brook— Dethier. 

Toccata in D minor — Nevin. 

Springtime — Kinder. 

March Russe — Schminke. 
E. K REISER, at Independence Boulevard Christian Church, 
Kansas City, Mo., Mar 12th. 

Concert Overture in B minor — Rogers. 

Largo from the New World Symphony — Dvorak. 

The Tragedy of a Tin Soldier (New)— Nevin. 

Spring Day (New) — Ralph Kinder. 

C. H. MORSE, at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H., 
Mar. 1 2th. 

Prelude to The Deluge — St. Saens. 

Arioso in C minor — Handel. 

Pastorale in F — Whiting. 

Allegretto in B minor — Guilmant. 

Andante in G — Batiste. 

Figure in E flat major (St. Ann's) — Bach. 

Ave Maria — Schubert. 

Andante Cantabile — From an Organ Symphony — Widor. 

Theme and Variations in A major — Hesse. 
A. RIEMENSCHNEIDER, at the Bald win- Wallace College 
School of Music, Berea. O., Mar. 12. 

Suite D minor. Op. 54 — Foote. 

Nocturne — Harker. 

Scherbo Pastorale — Federlein. 



Berceuse — Gounod. 
Humoreske — Ward. 
Overture to the Flying Dutchman — Wagner. 

W. M. JOHNSON, at Cathedral of St. John. Quincey, 111., 
Mar. 1 2th. 
Fiat Lux — Dubois. 
Nocturne — Foote. 
Suite Gothique — Boellmann. 

H. SYNNESTVEDT, at the Chapel, Bryn Athyn, Pa., Mar. 
19th. 

Prelude and Fugue in G major — Bach. 

Meditation — Kinder. 

Marche Pontifical*; — Tombelle. 

Sonata No. 6 in D minor — Mendelssohn. 
J. T. GARMEY, at Church of the Holy Trinity, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Mar. 10th. 

Sonata No. 6 — Mendelssohn. 

Sc he rzo — Bossi . 

Elevation — Rousseau . 

Short Prelude and Fugue in E minor — Bach. 

Melodie in E — Rachmaninoff. 

Choral in A minor — Franck. 

W. J. KRAFT, at the Morris High School, New York. Mar. 
12th. 
Tocatta in G minor — Matthews. 
Supplication — Frysinger. 
Reverie. 

Andante Cantabile from Symphony No. IV — Widor. 
Astarte — Intermezzo — Mildenberg. 
Scotch Fantasia — Macfarlane. 



Uacancies and Appointments 

James Clayton Warhurst, who has been serving 
the North Baptist Church, Camden, N. J., for the 
past sixteen and one-half years as organist and choir 
director, has resigned to accept a similar position at 
the Gethsemane Baptist Church, Philadelphia. Dur- 
ing Mr. Warhurst's stay at the North Church the 
membership of the choir has been maintained around 
75 voices, and the work done by the chorus has 
always been a feature of the church work. The 
choir will be kept together as a choral society under 
the direction of Mr. Warhurst, and it is hoped to 
increase the membership to 100. 

E. Harold Geer, Organist and Choirmaster at the 
First Congregational Church, Fall River, Mass., has 
accepted the appointment as Assistant-Professor in 
Music at Vassar College. He will be the official 
organist of the college, and will have charge of the 
organ teaching. 

Percy Chase Miller, A.M., A.A.G.O., a former 
pupil of T. Tertius Noble, at York Minster, after- 
wards organist and choirmaster at St. John's Church, 
Georgetown, D. C, and more recently assistant at 
St. James's Church, Philadelphia, has been appointed 
organist and director of the boy choir at Grace 
Church, Mount Airy, Philadelphia. The appoint- 
ment dates from M'ay 1. • 

Mr. W. Leroy Raisch, of the graduating class of 
Trinity School of Church Music, has been appointed 
organist and choirmaster of Trinity Church, Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey. 

W. Beaufort Buchanan, of the same school, has 
been appointed organist and choirmaster of the 
chapel of the Incarnation, New York City. 

Harry Thomas has resigned as choirmaster at 
the Brick Presbyterian Church, Rochester, N. Y. t 
after a service of twenty-one years. 

C. C. Boyle, for the last sixteen years organist 
and choirmaster of the Lewis Avenue Congrega- 
tional Church, Brooklyn, has resigned to return to 
the Sumner Avenue Baptist Church, Brooklyn, with 
which he was formerly connected for a period of 
thirteen years. In all his sixteen years at the Lewis 
Avenue Church, Mr. Boyle did not miss a single 
Sunday service. 

Dr. A. Madeley Richardson, for the past year or- 
ganist and choirmaster at the Metropolitan Temple, 
and previously connected with Calvary Baptist 
Church and the South Reformed Church, has been 
appointed organist and choirmaster of the First Con- 
gregational Church of Montclair, N. J. He will 
succeed Clarence Reynolds, who resigned recently. 



224 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Reviews of new music 

WALKING BY FAITH ) James Henry 
LOVE LASTS FOREVER J Darlington 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Two simple songs, words and music by the Bishop 
of Harrisburg. Walking by Faith will be found 
suitable for use as an offertory solo, the music being 
unpretentious and at the same time effective. Love 
Lasts Forever is a valse song for soprano or tenor, 
with an attractive melody. It is dedicated to the 
"Lighthearted Men and Women of the Lighthouse 
for the Blind." 

HELIOTROPE. Winfred Douglas. 

London : Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

A well-made four-part chorus for women's voices 
(two sopranos and two altos). The composer has 
the gift of writing melodiously for the voices and his 
work is wrought in the modern style. His clever 
modulations deserve a special word of commen- 
dation. 

GOD, THAT MADEST EARTH AND 

HEAVEN. Le Roy M. Rile. 
THEY SHALL REIGN FOREVER. Bishop 

J. H. Darlington. 
FAR FROM MY HEAVENLY HOME. Howard 

Brockway. 
London: Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

Mr. Rile's anthem is a four-page unaccompanied 
Vesper Hymn, for male voices (two tenors and 
two altos). It is simple in style and should produce 
a good effect. Bishop Darlington's anthem, dedicated 
to the organist and choir of the Cathedral of St. 
John the Divine, New York, is interesting because 
of the varied treatment of the text There are solos 
for bovs' voices, and a duet and trio, also for boys, 
as well as a vigorous concluding chorus. Far From 
My Heavenly Home is an excellent setting of Lyte's 
well-known hymn, which is sure to become popular. 
Mr. Brockway has the faculty of maintaining inter- 
est in the local parts, as well as providing a good, 
albeit restless, accompaniment. 

ELEVATION IN G MAJOR E. Lang. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This is an expressive melody for solo stops of the 
organ, with a finely contrasted church "tone," which 
is introduced with much skill. The registration is 
marked with care, and should produce good organic 
effects. 

AN OCEAN RHAPSODY. Frank E. Ward. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This rhapsody was originally composed for or- 
chestra and is here arranged for organ and violin, 
with 'cello and harp ad libitum. The composer has 
succeeded wonderfully well in adapting his work 
to the genius of the two instruments indicated, and 
in its now form it will emphatically appeal to both 
performers and listeners. It is a finely developed 
composition, one which should be heard frequently 
in recitals. 

COUNTRY DANCE TUNES, SETS 7 AND 8. 
Cecil J. Sharp. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

These dance tunes, by reason of their melodious 
vein, are certain to become both popular and useful. 
For the most part they consist of three parts, for 
piano solo, and comprise "Rounds" for four, six or 
eight, or "for as many ps will." Thev are drawn 
from ancient sources, principally Playford and his 



contemporaries, and contain compositions by Byrd, 
Bull and other eighteenth century composers, at 
which time country dances were at their heighest 
favor. The revival of these dances at the present 
time is heartily to be commended, and Mr. Sharp's 
excellent arrangements will satisfy the most critical. 

O PERFECT LOVE. Angelo M. Read. 

London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This solo, for medium or high voice, will be found 
suitable for weddings, the words being taken from 
the Episcopal Hymnal. Mr. Read's music is simple 
and tuneful. 

WHY SEEK YE THE LIVING AMONG THE 

DEAD? G. A. Burdett. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The composer of this Easter anthem has taken 
Handel's I Know That My Redeemer Liveth as the 
foundation of his work and has certainly built a 
very attractive and singable composition upon it 
First, the organ, announces the theme, and this is 
quickly followed by a short baritone solo, and the 
alto (to whom is allotted a large portion of the 
solo work) soon after takes up the thread of the 
story, and here the composer has cleverly arranged 
Handel's strains to fit the text. "Lo, He is not 
here, but is risen." After interspersed vocal parts 
for the chorus, the whole choir takes up the chorus, 
"Alleluia! Christ is risen from the dead!" in the 
course of which Mr. Burdett has provided some very 
interesting work for his singers. The anthem, by 
reason of the effective treatment of Handel's aria, 
is sure to become popular, whether Handel would 
have approved of it or not is another matter. j 

HOW LOVELY, LORD OF HOSTS. T. Car! 
Whitmer. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. : The Western Theological Sem- 
inary. 

A motet for contralto solo, chorus, violin, harp 
and organ. The text is a paraphrase of Psalm 84, 
and the musical treatment is of the modern school. 
The vocal parts contain only moderate interest for 
the singers, but the work is cleverly scored for the 
instruments which the composer has selected. 

LORD'S PRAYER AND OFFERTORY SEN- 

TENCE. E. Stanley Seder. 
London : Novello & Co. New York : The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

The setting of the Lord's Prayer is rather too 
elaborate for use in the ordinary service, but it might 
be sung with effect in the Eucharistic Office. Tht 
offertory sentence "All tilings come of Thee" would 
serve as a welcome relief to the abominable chant so 
generally used. 

OUT OF THE DEEP. J. Christopher Marks. 

LorHon : Novello & Co. New York: The H. W. 

Gray Co. 

This sacred song has been heard in many churches 
during the Lenten season and has rapidly become 
a favorite. It is published for high and low voice. 



Suggested Service List for Inly, iw 

Second Sunday after Trinity. July 2 

Te Deum ) • r- o« r • 

Benedicts f ,n F StncUnr 

Tubilate — Chant 

Introit. Thine, O Lord Kent 

Offertory. Thou Shalt Remember Parker 

Communion Service in E flat A. H. Brewer 

JSSStti. ! in Eflat A.H.Bre^r 

Anthem. The Path of the Just Roberts 

Offertory. Hail. Gladdening Light Martin 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



225 



Third Sunday after Trinity. July 9 

Jubna e t U e m } inA E.W.Naylor 

Benedictus — Chant 

Introit, Lord of All Power Barttby 

Offertory, I Will Extol Thee Hudson 

Communion Service in E A.S.Baker 

JSf&tti. } inEflat «■*■**" 

Anthem, God That Madest Fisher 

Offertory, The Lord Will Comfort Zion Hiles 

Fourth Sunday after Trinity. July 16 

Te Deum in C /. E. West 

Benedictus ) m^„* 
Jubilate J Chant 

Introit, Behold, I Come Atkins 

Offertory, Hear, O Thou Shepherd Federlein 

Communion Service in G Lowe 

Nunc l Dimittis } in F Button 

Anthem, Saviour, Source of Every Blessing. Horsman 
Offertory, Keep Me, Lord Matthews 

Fifth Sunday after Trinity. July 23 

Ductus } «-G M.J. Monk 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, Be Ye All of One Mind Godfrey 

Offertory, Thus saith God Hosmer 

Communion Service in G Horsman 

N^DiUis } in Efl * ; "— 

Anthem, As Now the Sun's Declining Rays.. James 
Offertory, I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes Roberts 

St. James. July 25 
Te Deum 1 

Benedictus \ in B flat /. Smith 

Jubilate J 

Introit, Blessed is the Man Stainer 

Offertory, Jerusalem, Jerusalem Mendelssohn 

Communion Service in B flat /. Smith 

NuTDiLtis } inBflat '•**•* 

Anthem, Happy and Blest are They .. .Mendelssohn 
Offertory, Then Shall the Righteous. .Mende Isso hn 

Sixth Sunday after Trinity. July 30 

Te Deum ) . t- n+.h*. 

Benedictus ) mF D ? ke * 

Jubilate — Chant 

Introit, I Will Magnify Shaw 

Offertory, O Love the* Lord Thayer 

Communion Service in F Dykes 

Magnificat ) . P n„h*. 

Nunc Dimittis J ln F °y kes 

Anthem, Praise the Lord Royle 

Offertory, Heaven is Our Home Sealy 



Itlmic Published during the Cast month 

SACRED 

ADAMS, J. H.— "Masonic Grace." Before and after 

meat. On Card. 05c. 

gEESLEY, G. J.— "The Daylight Fades." Hymn 

and Tune. On Card. 05c. 
BROCKWAY, HOWARD.— "Far from My Heav- 

enly Home." Anthem for mixed voices. (So. 428, 
The Church Music Review). 15c. 

CHAMBERS, H. A.— "Through the Day Thy Love 

has spared us." Evening Anthem. (No. 878, The 
Musical Ttmes). 05c. 

[)ARLINTON, J. H.— "They Shall Reign For- 

ever. Anthem. 12c. 
"Walking by Faith." Sacred Song. 60c. 

£)ICKINSON, CLARENCE.— "Easter" (White 

Lilies of Our Lord). No. 33, Sacred Choruses. Or- 
chestral parts, Harp, 12c: Violin, 12c: Violoncello, 12c; 
Trumpet X 12c; Trumpet II, 12c; Trombone I, 12c; Trom- 
bone II, 12c; Timpani, 12c. 



EVERETT, C. DAVID.— "The Lord's Prayer." 

08c. 
Vesper. ("This Night and All Our Life"). 05c. 

GERMAN, EDWARD.— "Emyn Ymostyngian" 
Intercessory Hymn. Welsh translation by Parch. 
Gwilym Williams, New Quay (Llyfr Cor Plwyfol Novello, 
Rhif 16). 08c. Words only, 75c per 100. 

QREEN, GERALD B.— "Hymn to the Father." 

On Card, 06c. Words only, per 100. 

HODGE, HERBERT.— "A Short and Simple Set- 
ting of the Communion Service," in F. 28c. 
KINGSTON, MATTHEW.— "Ho ! Every One 

That Thirsteth." Anthem for Bass Solo and Chorus. 
Revised Edition. 12c. 
RILE, R. M.— "God That Madest Earth and 

Heaven." Vesper hymn for male voices. (No. 421, The 
Church Music Review.) 10c. 

RUSLING, G. A.— Kyrie Eleison, Gloria, and 

Vesper Hymn. 08c. . 

SCEATS, GODFREY.— "Magnificat and Nunc 

Dimittis " Set to Continental Variants of the Fourth 
and Third Tones, with Organ Accompaniment. 08c. 

SECULAR 

DARLINGTON, J. H.— "Love Lasts Forever." 

Valse Song. 60c. 
DOUGLAS, WINFRED.— "Heliotrope." Four-part 

chorus for women's voices. (No. 65, The Modern Se- 
ries.) 15c. 
HOLBROOKE, J.— "Triumphal March." Chorus 

part only. 1 *c. 
REAY, JAMES.— "Right and Empire." Song. 60c. 

SCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 286 contains the 

following Music in both Notations: — "The Diver." 
Unison Song. E. T. Loder. 06c. 

SCHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

Published in two forms. A. Voice Parts in Staff and 
Tonic Sol-fa Notations, with Pionoforte Accompaniment 
(8vo). B. Voice Parts only, in Tonic Sol-fa Notation. 

No. 1235. "Queen Mab." Unison Song. A. B. 
C. H. Lloyd 12c. — 

INSTRUMENTAL 

COLERIDGE-TAYLOR, S.— First Entr'cte from 

"Nero.*' Pianoforte Conductor part. 75c. 

LANG, E. — "Elevation in G major. Organ (No. 
66, The St. Cecilia.) 50c. 

WARD, F.E.— "An Ocean Rhapsody." For or- 
chestra, arranged for violin, and organ, with 'cello and 

harp, ad. lib. $2.00. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circulation, 
etc., required by the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912, of 
The New Music Review and Church Music Review, pub- 
lished monthly at New York, N. Y., for April 1, 19 16. 
State of New York, County of New York, ss.: 
Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared H. \V. Gray, who, hav- 
ing been duly sworn according to law, deposes and says that 
he is the Editor of The New Music Review and Church 
Music Review, and that the following is, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of 
the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the Act of August 24, 19 12. embodied 
in Section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the 
reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, 
managing editor, and business managers are: 

Publisher, the H. W. Gray Co., 2 West 45th Street, N. Y.; 
Editor, H. \V. Gray, 29 West 12th Street, N. Y.; Managing 
Editor, none; Business Manager, none. 

2. That the owners are: The H. W. Gray Co., Inc., 
2 West 45th Street, N. Y. (Give names and addresses of 
individual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and 
the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding 
1 per cent, or more of the total amount of stock.) 

H. W. Gray, 29 West 12th Street, N. Y.; Est. of H. 
Binney, 2 Rector Street, N. Y.; G. E. Stubbs, 311 West 
101st Street, N. Y.; F. S. Converse, Westwood, Mass.; F. B. 
Miles, Concord, Mass.; M. Randall, Pottstown, Pa.; S. A. 
Trench, 2815 Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J.; E. Stubbs, 311 
West 1 01 st Street, N. Y. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: 
(If there are none, so state). None. 

H. W. Gray, Editor. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 22nd day of 
March, 19 16. 

M. A. Fowler, 
(Seal) Notary Public, Kings County. 



(My commission expires March \o, 19 16.) 
Certificate Filed in New York County. 



226 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Organists 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West. New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue. 

MARKf ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
a West 45th Street, New York, or 
^ 395 Claremont Avenue, Montclair. N. J. 

CLIFTON C. BRAINERD, M.A. 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Organist and Choirmaster, Church of the Good Shepherd 

Vice-Principal, Wadsworth Street School 

Address: 48 Huntington Street 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M.. L.R.A.M. 
Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 
Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West iath Street,' New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 
Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 
Address: New Haven, Conn. 

NORMAN' COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.O., 
F.A.G.O. 

THE CHORISTERS' SCHOOL 
Rhinebeck, New York. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 



GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC. 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST. DIRECTOR 

First Baptist Church f 

Fleoiington New Jersey 

ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Recitals _ Concert Toura 



Address: Christ Church 



Organ Openings 
Cathedral 



St. Louis, Mo. 



GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster, St John's Church, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 

H. BROOKS DAY ~ 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 
Organist and Choirmaster of St Luke's Church, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Address: 417 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave., N. Y. 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 
41a Fifth Avenue, New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

of Gethsemane Church 

Organist Reform Jewish Temple 

Official Organist of The Apollo Club, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



J. 



KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, 

Morristown, New Jersey. 

HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church. Chariestoa, 
W. Va. Director of Music Charleston High School, 
Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 
Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 

J. FRANK FRYSINGER, F.I.G.C.M. 

Head of the Organ Dcpt., The University School of Mask 

Organist and Choirmaster, The First Presbyterian Church 

Lincoln, Nebraska 

ORGAN RECITALS 

E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster 

First Congregational Church 

Address: P. O. Box 675, Fall River, Mass. 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 

UNIVERSITY 
49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster Second Congregational Church, 

Holyoke, Maas. 
Director of Music Mount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Concert Organist and Training of Boys* Voicn 

Organ Recitals, Instruction in Piano, Organ, Harmony 

and Counterpoint 

Member Exam. Committee of American Guild of Organists 

Candidates coached for Guild Examinations by mail 

Address: 170 West 75th Street, New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. * 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Calvary Baptist Church 

Address: 301 West 57th Street 

F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 

EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

KARL KRUEGER, M.A. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St. Ann'9 Church-on-the-Heights 

Brooklyn, New York 

44 Morningside Drive, W„ New York 

NORMAN LANDIS 

Flemington, N. J. 

O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flemington, N. J. 

CM. — First Reformed Church, Somerville, N. J. 

Conductor Frenchtown, N. J., Choral Society. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Park Street Church, Boston, Mass. 

Organist and Choirmaster. 

Send for new circular. 

Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St Bartholomew's Church. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Cub of Elisabeth and Cran- 

ford Philharmonic 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST % 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia. Fa. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



227 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 
St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 

New York. „ M m *_ 

Instructor of Music _ Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
305 West 97th Street 
•Phone, 7380 Riversi de. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 

St. Thomas' Church. New York 

ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR. AND COACH 

Address: 1 West 53d Street 



EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 

Organist and Choirmaster 

National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 

Organ Recitals 

Address: Washington, D. C. 



EDWARD JOHN SMITH 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Methodist Episcopal Church; 

and The Amasa Stone Memorial 



AUTHOR OF 



Chapel (Western Reserve 
University), Cleveland, 
Ohio. 
'CHURCH AND UNIVERSITY HYMNS- 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 



JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 



MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxok.; F.R.C.O. 
Telephone: Morningside 7587 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 



JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St 



ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 

ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 

Berea, Ohio 

MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared for Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 West 5 5th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House. 

2nd St, Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 



HAROLD TOWER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 

formerly organist St. Paul's, Minneapolis 

ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 



Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 
Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville, N. 
Studio: Flemington, N. J. 



J. 



SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn. 



C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 

Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 

Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church and 
Temple Israel. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 

'Phone 2179L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor, Orpheus Club. 

Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St Paul's School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and aoth Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS, 
list and Choirmaster St Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish, 
The Earle, 103 Waverly Place, New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster, First Presbyterian Church, 
.Brooklyn. Director of Music, Packer Collegiate 
Institute. 
Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Drgani 



Organ Bsllflm 



If the purchase of a PIPE OROAN is contemplated, address 
Hbnrt Pilcrbr's Sons, Louisville, Ky., who manufacture the 
highest grade at reasonable prices. Correspondence solicited. 



KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGAftTST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church. Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



KINETIC ORGAN 
BLOWER 

has proven to be the most satisfactory organ 
blower manufactured 

Awarded the GOLD MEDAL at the Panama Pacific Exposition 



KINETIC ENGINEERING CO. 

MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS 
6050 Baltimore Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

NEW YORK. .... 41 Park Row. Room 836 

BOSTON. 12 Pearl Street. Room 89 

CHICAGO. 1464 Monadnock Block 



228 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



SHORT PRELUDES 

FOR THE 

ORGAN 

These Short Preludes are intended for use chiefly as Introductory Voluntaries to Divine Service, more especially in 
those churches where the time allowed for such is, of necessity, somewhat limited. 



No. 



3- 
4. 

5. 
6. 

I: 

9- 
10. 



2. 
3. 

4. 

I: 
I: 

9- 
10. 



13. 

14- 

15. 
16. 

\k 

19. 



BOOK I. 

Andante Grazioso Thomas Adams 

Andante VV. G. Alcock 

Largamente George J. Bennett 

Andante Religioso Myles B. Foster 

Andantino Alfred Hollins 

Adagio Cantabile Alfred Hollins 

Larghetto Charles T. May 

Andante con Moto John E. West 

Andantino quasi Allegretto John E. West 

Andante W. Wolstenholme 



BOOK II. 

Andante con Moto Thomas Adams 

Con Moto W. G. Alcock 

Moderato H. A. Chambers 

Marzialc, poco Lento Myles B. Foster 

Moderato Alfred Hollins 

Andantino Alfred Hollins 

Adagio Charles J. May 

"Hymnus" — Andante e Sostenuto Tohn E. West 

Andante Serioso John E. West 

Adagio W. Wolstenholme 



BOOK III. 

Moderato e Legato Thomas Adams 

Moderato W. G. Alcock 

Andante con Moto George J. Bennett 

Andante H. A. Chambers 

Grazioso molto Espressivo Myles B. Foster 

"Song without Words'* — Con Moto Alfred Hollins 

Andante Alfred Hollins 

Andante Dolente John E. West 

Andante Pastorale John E. West 

Adagio W. Wolstenholme 



No. 

1. 
2. 
3- 
4- 
5- 
6. 

I: 

9- 
10. 



BOOK IV. 

"Elevation" — Andante e Legato Thomas Adams 

Andante Religioso Myles B. Foster 

"Simplicity" — Andante Buttv M - G,lho1 ? 

Largamente R. G. Hailmr 

"Dialogue" — Andante Grazioso Charles H. Lloyd 

Andantino Arthur \V. Marchant 

Con Moto Moderato William Sewell 

Andante Amabile William Sewell 

Andante Clement M. Spurling 

Andante Sostenuto F. Cunningham Woods 



3- 

4- 
5- 
6. 

7 s. 
9. 

20. 



BOOK V. 

"Invocation" — Andante Grazioso Thomas Adams 

Andante con Moto Percy E. Fletcher 

Poco Adagio Myles B. Foster 

Andante Espressivo Ignace Gibsone 

Adagio Alfred Hollins 

Poco Lento Charles H. Lloyd 

Andante Dolente Arthur W. Marchant 

Andantino con Tenerezza William Sewell 

Andante con Moto Clement M. Spurling 

Adagio Molto F. Cunningham Woods 



BOOK VI. 

Dolente Edmund T. Chipp 

Andante Sostenuto Myles B. Foster 

Andantino K. G. Hailing 

Con Moto Alfred Hollins 

"Communion" — Cantabile T. Lemmens 

Andante Religioso Arthur W. Marchant 

Lento Charles J. May 

Larghetto Albert Robins 

Adagio e Mesto William Sewell 

Andante Affetuoso William Sewell 



Price 50 Cents Each Book. 



ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS 

FOR THE 

ORGAN 



(NEW SERIES) 



No. 
1. 
2. 
3- 

4- 
5- 
6. 



Seven Chorale Preludes C. H. H. Parry 

Prelude in C W. Wolstenholme 

Festival Prelude on "Ein, Feste Burg" W. Faulkes 

Meditation W. Faulkes 

Postludium W. Faulkes 

Jour de Xoces J. Stuart Archer 

Cantilcne R. G. Hailing 

Ite Missa Est (Edited by John E. West) 

J. Lemmens 
Triumphal March (Edited by John E. West) 

J. Lemmens 
Fanfare (Edited by John E. West)... J. Lemmens 
Contabile (Edited by John E. West)..). Lemmens 

Finale (Edited by John E. West) J. Lemmens 

A Fantasy C. Edgar Ford 

On ter mezzo (A Marriage Souvenir) 

W. Wolstenholme 

Legend Harvey Grace 

Meditation Alfred Hollins 

Barcarolle A. W. Pollitt 

Cantique Edward Elgar 

Prelude and Fugue in C (Edited by John E. West) 

J. L. Krebs 
Epilogue W. W olstenholme 



$i.75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
.50 

.50 

.75 
.50 
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vbt 



3fcD 



The text is an adaptation of d'Annunzio's 
tragedy. Mr. Henry Russell once announced 
the first production of this opera on any stage 
for a Boston holiday; but he made many 
announcements. No opera based on this 
tragic story — Dante's not Mr. Russell's — 
has yet had immediate success or any life. 
Will Zandonai's be an exception? 



3C 



ZFE 



nc 



3fi 



arfi 



ztc 



^tutorials 



3T £=r£=: II f£Z 9i fC II f i 



fN |spite of Mr. Surette's entertaining 
diatribe against opera published in the 
Atlantic, some time ago, the Metro- 
politan Opera Company announces its plans 
for 1916-17. Gluck's "lphigenia in Tauris" 
is to be sung in German. Why in German? 
It is a French opera; it was written for the 
Paris Opera. The music is wedded to a 
French text and the force of diction cannot 
be the same in German, no matter how com- 
petent the German singers may be in their 
own language. Zandonai's "Francesca da 
Rimini " is comparatively a new work, for it 
was produced in Turin in February, 1914. 



•g» IZET'S" Pearl Fishers" will be added 
Il3 to ^ e P resent repertoire. Why? 
The opera has already been performed 
at the Metropolitan, (Jan. 12, 1896,) with 
Mme. Calv6 as the heroine. Only two 
acts were then sung if we are not mistaken. 
(The first performance was in English at 
Philadelphia in August, 1893.) The opera 
gave little pleasure. Mme. Calv6 naturally 
did not wish to be confined to " Carmen" 
with an occasional appearance as Santuzza. 
"The Pearl Fishers" was undoubtedly pro- 
duced for her benefit; but the opera fell flat. 
Surely it is not now announced from any feel- 
ing of reverence for the composer. It is 
one of his weaker works. There has been 
talk about "the exotic color" of certain scenes. 
Unfortunately these scenes were taken from 
the score of his "Don Procopio" with the 
libretto based on an Italian farce by Gam- 
baggio. 

Then we are to have "The Canterbury 
Pilgrims " by Messrs. Mackaye and de Koven, 



234 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



introducing our old friend the Wife of Bath. 
.The composer has assured us that his opera 
is a remarkable one. 



For once Miss Kellogg was too modest; the 
performance was excellent. 



/y^HERE will be revivals: "Thais" for 
d Mme. Farrar. The laurels of Miss 
Garden will not let Mme. Farrar 
sleep. Will she outstrip her predecessor? At 
any rate, the performance will be an interesting 
one, and Mme. Farrar will probably sing the 
whole of the looking-glass scene, which Miss 
Garden abridged. But "Thais" is not Mas- 
senet at his best. As M. Jean-Aubry recently 
pointed out in his apology for the composer, 
there is an absence of truth ; there is the con- 
stant struggle to please, "the languorous in- 
sipidity of a conventional emotion." 

"Lakmg" is not for a theater so large as 
the Metropolitan. We remember Miss Van 
Zandt as the maiden; later Miss Lipkowska. 
We recall the tenor Ravelli, who was then 
associated with Adelina Patti, and later 
Clement. Delibes's little opera is for a little 
theater. Where are the singers for it in the 
Metropolitan? Will Miss Hempel take the 
part of Lakm6 only for the sake of the "Bell " 
aria? 

• It is a pleasure to see that "The Marriage of 
Figaro" will be revived. Old opera goers 
listening to the "Letter" duet will remember 
Mmes. Sembrich and Eames, and the exquisite 
purity and charm of their singing. What a 
beautiful picture was Mme. Eames as the 
Countess! Yet her fine singing of the air at 
the beginning of the second act seldom brought 
a hand, although the music could have been 
written only by Mozart. Edouard de Reszke 
was a logy Count. The music was too high 
for him. Perhaps the most dashing Count 
we ever saw, the one that might have been 
the younger blade in Rossini's " Barber, " was 
Carlton with Miss Kellogg as Susanna and 
Mrs. Seguin as Cherubino. Who was the 
Countess? Mme. Van Zandt? Miss Kellogg 
in her malicious but entertaining and valu- 
able memoirs, says that in producing "The 
Marriage of Figaro" in English she had to 
bring to it her best experience and judgment 
as cultivated in London productions. (She 
had taken the part of Susanna there with Tiet- 
jens as the Countess, Nilsson as Cherubino, 
and Santley as the Count.) "We finally gave 
a very creditable English perfQrmance of it." 



WJ^ONIZETTI'S "L'Elisir d'Amore" is 
T^/ another opera that should be per- 
formed in a small theater. It is 
hard to say whether "L'Elisir d'Amore" or 
"Don Pasquale" is the more delightful, but 
the hearer-spectator should be near the foot- 
lights. What if Donizetti had devoted himself 
exclusively to comic opera? We should not 
then have had the trio in "Lucrezia Borgia" 
or the last act of " La Favorita " or a few pages 
of " Lucia, " but there might have been lighter 
works that would still give pleasure. For Don- 
izetti not only had the gift of melody — the fatal 
gift of melody in certain instances as shown in 
his grand operas — he had a sense of the hum- 
orous and the ability to express it ; more than 
this his "conversation-music," as shown espe- 
cially in "Don Pasquale," is chatty, spark- 
ling, suited to the situation and the dialogue. 



^ft* WO books, published this year in Paris, 
^^^ have come across the Atlantic: one * 
"La Musique Frangaise d'aujourd'- 1 
hui," by G. Jean-Aubry, with a preface by 
Gabriel Faur6 ; the other a peculiarly moving 
volume, "Les Artistes Morts pour la Patrie 
(Aoftt I9i4-D6cembre 1915) " by Paul Ginisty. 
The latter book is a list of painters, en- 
gravers, sculptors, workers in metals, actors, 
singers, composers, players of musical instru- I 
ments, architects, workmen at Sevres, weavers 
of tapestry, pupils of the National School 
of Decorative Arts, who died in defense of 
France. Each section is prefaced with an 
article written by one speaking authorita- 
tively. There is a short biographical sketch 
of each man that gave up his life for his coun- 
try. M. Dalimier of the Beaux Arts in the 
general preface rightly describes this little 
book as profoundly emotional by reason of its 
simplicity, its "implacable sternness. " Each 
page, he says, evokes broken hopes, futile 
dreams, brave efforts suddenly checked, an 
unfinished task — a life of an artist prematurely 
extinguished. The book bears witness to the 
patriotism and devotion of artists, who, dead, 
are now praying that France, "after the 
victory they have prepared," may be still 
greater, more beautiful, more radiant. They 
impose a task on the comrades that will stir- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



235 



vive them; they hand the torch to them, who 
in turn must pass it to the following genera- 
tion. True reverence for the valiant dead 
will be the carrying on their work in art for 
the glory of France. The final word is not one 
of lamentation; it is of inspiration: "Let 
us work!" 



^ft HE preface to the list of slain composers 
^^ and musicians is written by Widor. 
He cites certain cases: that of the 
young organist Ribollet, who, having lost 
a leg, asked if it were not an affectation for 
him to wear the Cross of War and the mili- 
tary medal; that of Amad6e de Vallombreuse, 
who with six splinters in his body, barely 
recovering from typhoid fever, is serving in 
the office of the Staff, burning with desire to 
go again to the front. No, says M. Widor, 
France has not degenerated; her sons to-day 
are worthy of her great ancestors. 



HMONG those slain, or dead from wounds, 
or sickness, are many first prize men 
of the Paris Conservatory. Marcel 
Cassadesus, 'cellist of the Capet Quartet and 
Society of Ancient Instruments, an accom- 
plished virtuoso, told his brother the day of 
mobilization that he knew he should not 
return. He was killed by a shell the day he 
first went under fire. Jules Ecorcheville, 
widely known as critic and historian of music, 
a pupil of C6sar Franck, founded the Inter- 
national Society of Music which has for its 
organ S. I. M. His age ranked him with 
the reserves, but he went into active service 
as an infantry lieutenant. He had been twice 
named for bravery, before he fell at the head 
of his company, shouting: "Forward! Do 
your duty!" 

There have been various reports concern- 
ing the manner in which the composer Alb6ric 
Magnard was slain. His music is not wholly 
unknown here. The Boston Symphony or- 
chestra with Vincent d' Indy, guest conductor, 
performed his "Chant Fun&bre " in December, 
1905. The son of a famous journalist, 
Magnard lived quietly in the village of Baron. 
In September, 19 14, the Germans marched 
for two days through the village. A notary, 
Robert, was held as hostage. At th£ end of 
two days, a group of bandits set out to pillage 



Magnard's house. They found the door 
closed, but a shutter was open. An arm 
passed through the opening. There were 
four shots of a revolver. A Prussian was 
killed; another was wounded. The rest ran 
away in search of incendiary material. 
They returned and set fire to the house. 
Magnard was in his room on the first floor. 
When he saw the flames beginning to creep 
to the rez-de-chaussie he shot himself with 
the last ball of his revolver, not to be burned 
alive. Suspecting the end, he had sent 
away his household in time. Maillieux and 
Mayer, composers, the former a brilliant 
pianist, were killed on the field of battle. 
Gabriel Mogey, violinist, who had toured 
with success, was told by one of his teachers, 
"You were not made for war." To aid a 
wounded comrade, he crossed ground swept 
by cannon. A ball went into his intestines 
and he died in the hospital the next day. 
Philippe Moreau, assistant conductor of the 
Colonne Concerts, composer, essayist, son of 
the dramatist, was numbered among the 
missing in August, 1914. His friend and 
teacher Xavier Leroux does not wholly despair 
of him. Phal, a brilliant violinist, went as a 
soldier and was promoted to a lieutenancy. 
Killed before a trench while he was observing 
the German line, he was so mourned by his 
men that they covered with oak leaves the 
litter that bore his body to the rear. It was all 
that they could do in reverence. On a picture 
in the hall of the Conservatory the names of 
twenty-eight pupils that have fallen in battle 
are inscribed. The names of thirty -fh r e other 
musicians are given in this little volume, which 
has no note of complaint, no empty raving 
against the enemy. There is the expression 
of stern resolve, of unconquerable trust in the 
future. Those who have been pleased to 
speak lightly of the "decadence" of France 
as shown in her art now know that whims 
and caprices are not necessarily symptoms of 
decay in art or life; that the experimenters, 
the radicals, even the poseurs, in the hour of 
trial have shown themselves physical and 
moral heroes. 



^^*0 our mind the most striking chapter 

^^ in M. Jean-Aubry's book is Gabriel 

Faur^'s preface. The latter asks 

whether in this year of war the appearance 



236 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



of a book consecrated to music may not 
appear untimely, if not shocking. The an- 
swer is in M. Jean-Aubry's chapter on French 
and German music, for the writer shows that 
while the former has steadily progressed in 
tendencies and varied character, German 
art since the death of Wagner has steadily 
declined. Faur£, however, asks whether we 
should forget what French music owes from 
its contact with the great German classics. 
He observes the intention — we, less courteous, 
might say, the obsession — of M. Jean-Aubry 
in believing that the only genuine French 
music is that which attaches itself to the 
traditions of Rameau and the clavecinists of 
the 17th and 18th centuries. Modern com- 
posers, says M. Jean-Aubry, wish infinitely 
varied expression as opposed to the unity of 
scholastic composition; they wish the expres- 
sion of full liberty, expressive music, music of 
impressions. 1 1 Couperin and Rameau did not 
wish for anything else. ,, M. Faur6 answers 
that this point of view, apparently broad, is in 
truth rather narrow; nor can he understand 
how scholastic discipline can cramp expression 
or put an obstacle in the way of the manifesta- 
tion of impressions and emotions. Surely one 
is free to translate his thought as it seems best 
to him. If Saint-Saens, Franck, and d'Indy, 
prefer the symphonic form which came from 
Germany, do they not nevertheless show taste, 
clearness, a sense of proportion, qualities that 
are essentially French? Victor Hugo surely 
does not draw ,from Racine; he, undergoing 
the influence of Goethe, Schiller, Byron, is 
none the less a French poet. 



+gl/% OR does M. Faur£ share the objection 
H+l of M. Jean-Aubry to the art that 
purposes to be utilitarian or to serve 
any other cause than that of free life and 
beauty. It matters not whether Wagner 
was preoccupied by philosophical specula- 
tions; that Franck and d'Indy have had moral 
or religious, and Bruneau and Charpentier 
sociological preoccupations; it matters^not 
whether these preoccupations were deliberate 
or unconscious, if the result is music of deep, 
noble, beautiful emotion. Art has good 
reasons for being voluptuous, but there 
should be room for those who look on life 
more seriously to translate it as they see it. 



JUL FAURE asks what is the future of 
fll J French art after the war. After 
* the War of 1 870 the most import- 
ant intellectual manifestation was naturalism 
in all arts. Then came a reaction which had its 
origin in "Parsifal " ; hence the " Rose-Croix" 
occultism, pre-Raphaelism, etc.; there was a 
movement towards asceticism and immobility. 
Later, thanks to the continuance of a peace 
that one thought would never be disturbed, 
painters feverish for something new created 
impressionism, intentionnisme, cubism, etc., 
while some composers, less audacious, en- 
deavored in their work to suppress sentiment 
and substitute for it sensation, forgetting that 
sensation is the first step of sentiment. 

The terrible struggle will bring back com- 
mon sense: "The taste for clear thought, 
sober and pure form, sincerity, contempt for 
startling effects; in a word, all the virtues that 
can restore its admirable character to art, so 
that, profound or subtle, it will forever re- 
main essentially French. 



^^HE essays of M. Jean-Aubry treat of 
%A^ Massenet, Faurd, Debussy, Ravel, 
Roussel, Chabrier, d'lndy, Chausson, 
Duparc, Dukas, Schmitt, de S6verac, Satie, 
Vines, Mme. Bathori-Engel, Nin. These are 
chiefly eulogistic rather than critical. They 
would be called in the cant of certain modem 
reviewers "appreciations," though the one 
dealing with Massenet, one of the best, is 
finely discriminative, and the two on Debussy 
are somewhat analytical. These with 
"Music and its Friends, " "the French Origins 
of the Music for the Modern Piano" essays 
on "Baudelaire and Music," "Verlaine and 
Music," and one or two others were written 
before the present war. 

The essay on "French Music and German 
Music" is a study made after August, 1914. 
M. Jean-Aubry begins by quoting a remark of 
M. Romain Rolland made in 1905 that French 
art was quietly about to take the place of 
German art, yet he said in the same article 
that he had never concealed his preference 
for German music; that he considered Strauss 
to be the leading musical personality in 
Europe. M. Jean-Aubry then raps Saint- 
Saens on the knuckles for suddenly discover- 
ing that France has a national music, and, 
in a virulent attack on Wagner, insisting, in the 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



237 



name of French music, on the revival of com- 
positions that are hopelessly out of date. 



♦fl/% OW, it is absurd, says this essayist, to 
l|^l deny the genius of Wagner, as it 
is childish to justify admiration for 
Beethoven by saying he was a Fleming. To 
inveigh against Wagner because he was a 
German is as absurd as it would be to hate 
Haydn, Mozart, Schubert, because they were 
Austrians, or Liszt, because he was a Hun- 
garian. The grandeur of German music from 
Bach to Wagner is a universal truth. But 
since the death of Wagner, musical Germany 
echoes Bayreuth when it does not imitate 
Brahms or Berlioz. " Richard Strauss him- 
self, in spite of his powerful orchestral works 
and the incontestable value of ' Salome' and 
4 Electra, ' in spite of his prodigious orchestral 
competency, has only the appearance of 
genius; he is one of the most precise personi- 
fications of modern Germany in its essence and 
expression; he could be taken as the symbol. " 
For Strauss relies on orchestral force and 
violent sensation. There is the disproportion- 
ate multiplication of orchestral material, the 
self-satisfaction pushed to naive vanity (as in 
the "Sinfonia Domestica)" — assurance in bad 
taste. The writer then discusses ' ' The Legend 
of Joseph " as a proof of decadence in German 
art. Three months after M. Jean-Aubry 
heard this work, the military genius of Ger- 
many "revealed to us in its turn that this 
also was an illusion; that German might, 
great as it could be, failed precisely in those 
intellectual virtues that insure success and 
justify it in the eyes of the world. " 



'Z l 



'HE temple of musical Germany, for 
twenty years, has no longer been 
at Bonn, Weimar, Munich, Bay- 
Teuth: it has been at Essen. The modern 
German orchestra, with Strauss and Mahler, 
shared in the preoccupations of artillery and 
projectiles rather than in those of true music: 
it wished to be the rival of Krupp." 

German composers sought quantity of 
instruments. They did not inquire into the 
new resources of instruments. They sought 
to amaze, to stun. Hearing a work by Strauss 
for the first time, one was often carried along 
with it, but after the first assault the mind 
soon perceived the emotional inanity, the 



absence of matter that is truly musical. A 
saying of Debussy in 1903 is quoted: "Should 
we not have known the 'Ring, ' as a whole, 
long ago? We should then have been clear 
of it,*and the pilgrims of Bayreuth would no 
longer have bored us by their tales." 

European music would not have gone back 
one step if the productions of Strauss and 
Mahler had been suppressed ; but the French 
musical vocabulary would have suffered 
without Rimsky-Korsakoff, Albeniz, and De- 
bussy. Still there are Frenchmen obsessed 
by German conceptions who call the moder- 
ation of French compositions feebleness; the 
violence of German compositions, power. 

Then there is a lament over the disregard 
of the musical past in France. "It has been 
thought that if men like Saint-Saens, d'Indy, 
Debussy, Dukas bothered themselves with 
French composers of the 16th, 17th, 18th 
centuries, it was only through curiosity; but 
they were searching there and finding there 
the justification of their own musical tenden- 
ciesandtheconfirmation of their French taste." 

The great public still ignores the attempt to 
awaken an interest in the glories of the past. 
It welcomes virtuosos rather than music. 
It crowds a hall to hear a tenor and cares little 
for a work. ' ' But in music, as in other things, 
it is the minority that triumphs in the end." 

fT is strange that M. Jean-Aubry, com- 
paring modern German music with the 
productions at Essen, did not refer to 
Max Reger, whose death is announced. To 
our mind, Reger's music and the devoted 
Regerites are characteristic of Kultur. His 
music is certainly "efficient. " A past master 
of counterpoint, he wrote enormously as 
though he would conquer by mass and impact. 
There is little in the long list of his composi- 
tions that has 'aesthetic charm or beauty. 
With the exception of a few songs, his music 
is cerebral. There is a certain "militarism" 
in his expression, a prejudicing arrogance in 
his invention and style. In spite of M. Jean- 
Aubry, Strauss has imagination; with all his 
extravagance, brutality, occasional vulgarity, 
there are many pages of tenderness, grandeur, 
and beauty, not parochial, not national, but 
of direct appeal to all hearers. Reger wrote 
as one associated in the Krupp industry; but 
not as a silent partner. 



238 



THE' NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



©oraposers vs. Russian gauccrs 

By Paul Morris 



s7l 




HAT is to become of program 
music? For a century its ad- 
mirers have been waging war on 
pure music, and in recent years 
they seem to have been getting the better of 
the argument. Bach, Haydn, Handel, and 
Mozart all but neglected the programmatic 
idea. Beethoven employed it very spar- 
ingly. With Mendelssohn, Schumann, Weber, 
Wagner, and Liszt it gained more prominence 
and to-day it seems to have almost every com- 
poser in its clutch. Pure music was on the de- 
cline before the greatest of Brahms' workswere 
composed, and to-day only a very few of its 
adherers such as Max Reger, Georges Enesco, 
Emmanuel Moor, and Sergei Rachmaninoff 
have attracted great admiration. The real 
idols of the musical world to-day write mainly 
in a programmatic vein. Richard Strauss, 
Claude Debussy, Sir Edward Elgar, and Igor 
Stravinsky, the leaders of musical thought in 
Germany, France, England, and Russia, have 
paid little attention to pure music in their 
compositions. 

But when the program idea seemed to 
have gained a complete triumph, an organiza- 
tion calling itself the Serge de Diaghileff 
Ballet Russe began to tour Europe featuring 
program music in a way that put it to 
ridicule. 

The pantomime ballet, as presented by Mr. 
Diaghileff 's troupe is a direct outgrowth of the 
movement which has made music descriptive 
of definite things. Modern stagecraft, the 
opera ballet, and other influences have also 
figured in its development, but the music 
and the story have been the two principal 
factors, barring the interpretive side of the 
art. 

The logical thing for the ballet, it seems, 
would have been to have taken program 
music as its foundation, and to have pictured 
in pantomime on the stage the things which 
the composer had in mind when he wrote it. 
The leaders of the Ballet Russe took the pro- 
gram music with unerring logic, but strange 
to tell, instead of taking the program as 
outlined by its creator, they, in nearly every 
case, wove about the music new fanciful 
stories to suit their own tastes. It is hardly 



likely that the Ballet Russe was intention- 
ally humorous in this distortion, but it has 
unwittingly staged some of the best musical 
jokes ever imagined. Take for example the 
ballet "Scherherazade," which was one of its 
first productions and which up to the present 
time has been one of its most successful pan- 
tomimes. It is set to the music of Rimsky- 
KorsakofFs familiar symphonic suite which 
bears the same name. The composer was 
careful to prepare an analysis of his own pro- 
gram, which he had printed on the score. 

In his own words this is what he wished his 
music to express: "The Sultan Schahriar, 
convinced of the infidelity of women, had 
sworn to put to death each of his wives after 
the first night. But the Sultana Scherhera- 
zade saved her life by entertaining him with 
stories which she told him during a thousand 
and one nights. Overcome by curiosity, the 
Sultan put off from day to day the death of his 
wife, and at last entirely renounced his bloody 
vow. 

"Many wonders were told to Schahriar by 
the Sultana Scherherazade. For the stories the 
Sultana borrowed verses of the poets and 
the words of popular romances, and she fitted 
the tales and adventures one within the other. 

44 1. The Sea and the Vessel of Sindbad. 
II. The Tale of the Prince Kalander. III. 
The Young Prince and the Young Princess. 
IV. Feast at Bagdad. The Sea. The Vessel 
is Wrecked on a Rock on which is Mounted 
a Warrior of Brass. Conclusion." While 
the exact details of the Arabian Nights 
stories which Rimsky-Korsakoff has painted 
are not clearly defined the general character 
of the music of each section of the work is 
suggested in the title. There are three Prince 
Kalander narratives, and many Young Princes 
and Princesses, but there is only one vessel 
wrecked on a rock on which is mounted a 
warrior of brass. It without doubt refers 
to the third Prince Kalander story. 

In the Ballet Russe production of ''Scher- 
herazade, " the first section is played as a 
prelude. The other three sections are played 
without pause to represent one continued 
story. The curtain rises upon a gorgeous 
scene representing the interior of the harem 
of the Sultan Schahriar. The story is that of 
the prelude to the Arabian Nights. The 
Schah Zeman is incredulous when the Sultan 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



239 



praises his favorite wife, Zobeide, and suggests 
that to test her fidelity he pretend to go on a 
hunting trip of several days' duration leaving 
the harem to amuse itself. Hardly has the 
hunting party left the room when the place 
is in an uproar. The women of the harem 
start a search for the fat eunuch who holds the 
keys which open bronze and silver doors 
leading to the apartments of negro slaves. 
He is found and wheedled into opening the 
doors and the slaves rush into the arms of the 
waiting women. Finally a golden door which 
separates Zobeide's black lover from the 
harem is unlocked and with a bound he is in 
her arms. A voluptuous orgy follows and 
when it is at its height the Sultan suddenly 
appears upon the scene. After calmly sur- 
veying the mad orgy he orders his men to 
slaughter both the wives and slaves. A wild 
massacre follows. Zobeide pleads for her life, 
but when she finds it is useless stabs herself 
to avoid the fate of the other inmates. 

Here is an example of music expressing two 
totally different things and so far as the casual 
listener is concerned it fits one as well as the 
other. Wild dancing is presented in the 
ballet to Rimsky- Korsakoff's sea music and 
at the point where the composer represented 
the magnetic rock drawing the steel nails from 
the vessel the slaves are still dancing madly 
with the women of the harem. The music 
pictures the sinking of the vessel just as the 
Sultan discovers the treachery of his wives. 
They are massacred to the music of the drown- 
ing sailors. 

Another distortion of program music was 
seen in the ballet arranged to the music of 
Debussy's " L'Apr£s Midi d'un Faune." The 
Prelude, as it was named by the composer, was 
inspired by a story of the same name by 
Stephane Mallarm£. Translated by Edmund 
Gosse it reads as follows: 

"A faun — a simple, sensuous, passionate 
being — wakens in the forest at daybreak and 
tries to recall his experience of the previous 
afternoon. Was he the fortunate recipient 
of an actual visit from nymphs, white and 
golden goddesses divinely tender and indul- 
gent? Or is the memory he seems to retain 
nothing but the shadow of a vision, no more 
substantial than the arid rain of notes from 
his own flute? He cannot tell. Yet surely 
there was, surely there is an animal whiteness 



among the brown reeds of the lake that shines 
out yonder. Were they, are they swans? 
No! But Naiads plunging? Perhaps! Vaguer 
and vaguer grows the impression of this de- 
licious experience. He would resign his wood- 
land godship to retain it. A garden of lilies, 
golden headed, white stalked, behind the 
trellis of red roses? Ah ! the effort is too great 
for his poor brain. Perhaps if he selects one 
lily from the garth of lilies, one benign and 
beneficent yielder of her cup to thirsty lips, 
the memory will be forced back. So, when 
he has glutted upon a bunch of grapes, he is 
wont to toss the empty skins into the air and 
blow them out in visionary greediness. But no, 
the delicious hour grows vaguer; experience 
or dream, he will never know which it was. 
The sun is warm, the grasses yielding; and he 
curls himself up again, after worshiping the 
efficacious star of wine, that he may pursue 
the dubious ecstasy into the more hopeful 
boskages of sleep.' ' 

Contrast with this delightful . atmospheric 
story the program of the ballet which 
Waslaw Nijinsky conceived for the Ballet 
Russe. A faun, dreamily reclining in a small 
hillock, is disclosed as the curtain rises. He 
is awakened from his reverie by the approach 
of a group of nymphs. Scenting the presence 
of beings that stir his sensual yearnings, he 
leaves his perch and descends toward them. 
Surprise, fear, curiosity are registered by their 
actions. One of them had started to disrobe 
before his presence was discovered. Startled 
they flee, leaving behind one of the garments. 
They come back for the lost wearing apparel. 
The faun advances toward them, but fore- 
seeing their purpose in returning, anticipates 
them and stands upon the garment. In dis- 
may they disappear, leaving him to settle 
down into voluptuous dreams over the filmy 
reminder of their visit. 

It is said that still a third interpretation is 
to be added to "L'Apr&s Midi d'un Faune." 
Miss Maude Allan, the dancer, has departed 
for London where she expects to stage a new 
dance to be set to the same music. 

Both the "Scherherazade" and "L'AprSs 
Midi d'un Faune" productions of the Ballet 
Russe called forth a volley of protests. The 
widow of the composer of the former tried to 
put a stop to its use in ballet form except with 
a program similar to that of her husband. 



240 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Debussy, backed up by most of the French 
critics, protested against the distortion of his 
beautiful story of the Faune. But in time 
both of the objecting parties were won over 
and the ballets have been presented regularly 
during the American tour. Perhaps the 
fault lies in the idea of program music. 
It cannot express very definite things and the 
Russians have shown that, so far as the gen- 
eral public is concerned, almost any piece of 
program music may have several interpre- 
tations all of which are equally good or bad 
as the matter may be. 

To show the attitude of the originators of 
the ballets, a story is told of Mr. Nijinsky: 
He was at a dinner in Paris shortly after his 
version of the Faun was first produced by the 
Russian troupe. He was being congratulated 
on the success of the adaptation. 

"And what do you think of the poetry of 
Mallarm£?" asked one of the gentlemen with 
whom he was talking, referring to the author 
of the poem which had inspired Debussy to 
write the Faun. 

"Who is Mallarm6?" asked the dancer, in 
reply. He did not know the name of the man 
who conceived the story of "L'Aprfes Midi 
d'un Faune." 

Again in the Ballet called "Le Spectre de 
la Rose" there occurred a complication of the 
same nature. The music is that of Weber's 
"The Invitation to the Waltz. " The com- 
poser had a definite program in mind when 
he wrote it, judging from a letter which Mme. 
Weber wrote to his biographer Jahns. This 
is the story it was supposed to tell. The 
dancers meet. He asks for the next dance 
(measures 1-5); she gives an evasive reply 
(5*"9) » h e makes his invitation more urgent 
(9-13) ; she accepts (13-16) ; they begin a con- 
versation; he starts (16-19); she answers (19- 
21); he speaks more ardently (21-23); she 
answers more warmly (23-25); the dancing 
begins; he asks if she is ready to begin (25- 
27); she answers in the affirmative (27-31); 
they take their position in readiness for the 
dance (31-35); they dance; finally it is over, 
she thanks him; he answers, and then all is 
still. 

In place of this the ballet has taken its 
story from a poem of Th^ophile Gautier. 
Instead of picturing an introduction and a 
conversation between two dancers, the open- 



ing strains in "Le Spectre de la Rose" ac- 
company a girl, alone, falling to sleep on her 
return from a ball. She holds a full-blown 
rose in her hand. It is a symbol of romance, 
and in her dreams it comes to life in the form 
of a young man clad in rose-colored tights. 
Just where Weber intended the dance of his 
pair to commence, the ballet is enlivened by 
the phantom of the rose, bounding into the 
room where the girl is sleeping. First he 
dances alone. Then they dance together. 
As Weber's music indicates the end of the 
waltz the spectre bounds out of the room, 
leaving the girl to awaken disappointed that 
her vision was not real, just at the point 
where the composer intended the music 
to register the sadness of the two dancers at 
parting. 

Not only has the Ballet Russe made music 
represent stories different from those which 
the composers imagined, but it has in a few 
cases used pure music to tell a story. Schu- 
mann's "Carnaval," while its separate num- 
bers were inspired by love affairs and other 
interesting things in the life of the composer, I 
did not have any program. A complete ' 
story of a romantic nature centering around 
some of the characters of the old Italian 
puppet show is mimed by the ballet dancers 
to their ballet, which is set to an orchestrated 
version of the "Carnaval." It is not likely i 
that the Russians had any idea of adding an 
interpretation or of creating a new program 
for the music which they appropriated for 
their ballets, as did Miss Isadora Duncan in 
her dance settings of Beethoven's seventh 
symphony and other masterpieces of orches- 
tral writing. They merely took what music 
seemed most appropriate for their uses from 
the compositions at their disposal. The real 
outcome of their distortions of the ideas of 
composers seems to have been to discredit 
program music rather than to bring ridicule 
upon themselves. They have not used quiet 
music to express restlessness, or sad music to 
express joy. As a rule the general emotion of 
their ballet has had something in common 
with the general feeling of the composer. 

By a curious coincidence the Russian Ballet, 
which has aimed at a perfect union between 
music and action, instead of bringing out new 
and effective descriptive qualities in music, 
has proven conclusively that, so far as the 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



241 



general public both in Europe and America 
is concerned, it can not in itself picture love, 
hate, the sounds of nature, or any other very 
definite things. Naturalism, which has crept 
into the modern drama, has no place in the 
art of the symphonists. The function of pro- 
gram mttsic is to accentuate and heighten 
the emotion which is pictured in pantomime, 
or told in the composer's " program notes." 
It can make a scene of passion seem more 
passionate; it can cause a restful scene to 
seem more restful; it can greatly strengthen a 
big dramatic climax, but its definite descrip- 
tive powers are very limited. 





! 



If acts, gtatuovs, and Remarks 



I 
D 



The Mid-day Musical Services at St. Paul's Chapel, 
New York City, were brought to a close on May 9th, 

f when H. Brooks Day's Easter Cantata was sung. 

I During the past season eleven of these services have 
been held and the total audience amounted to 10,872, 
surely a sign of appreciation. Edmund Jaques (O. & C. ) 
is responsible largely for this conspicuous success. 



The examination of candidates for the Artist's 
Diploma of the Institute of Musical Art took place 
on Monday evening, May 22d, before a jury consist- 
ing of Messrs. Harold Bauer, Carl Friedberg, Iwan 
d'Archambeau of the Flonzaley Quartette and Engelbert 
Roentgen, late solo 'cellist of the Vienna Imperial Opera. 

The following candidates will receive diplomas: 
Piano, Miss Marion R. Kahn, Miss Helen Whiteman, 
Mr. Charles G. Vardell; 'Cello, Miss Marie L. Roemaet. 

The institute announces the engagement of Carl 
Friedberg as teacher of advanced students of piano. 

Mr. Friedberg is not only one of the leading concert- 
pianists of Europe, but has made a great reputation as 
head of the Meisterschule of the Cologne Conservatory 
where he taught for about ten years. 

J. J. McClellan is to be congratulated on the comple- 
tion of the great organ in the Mormon Tabernacle, 
Salt Lake City, Utah, which has just been rebuilt. 
The original instrument was built over forty years ago by 
Utah craftsmen, under the direction of Joseph Ridges. 
The original case has been retained and many of the 
pipes, but the entire mechanism has been changed from 
the old tracker system to electric. It is stated in the 
Deseret Evening News that there are seventy-three notes 
on each manual instead of the usual sixty-one. The 
opening and dedicatory recital was played by Professor 
McClellan on May 12th. 

George S. Dunham conducted the performance of 
Verdi's Requiem given by the Boston People's Choral 
Union on April 30th. The soloists were Mme. Anita 
Rio, Miss Henriette Wakefield, James Harrod, and Wil- 
fred Glenn. 

Five Hundred Public Organ Recitals have been 
given in the Great Hall of The College of the City of 
New York by Samuel A. Baldwin, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Music, on Sunday and Wednesday afternoons, 
beginning with the opening of the organ on February 
11, 1908. 



In these recitals the great hall and its organ are 
dedicated to the service of the City. 

Though the educational side has been kept uppermost 
and the great masterpieces of organ composition have 
been frequently heard, the programs have been con- 
structed with the idea of interesting the many thousands 
that attend these recitals. 

The programs for 1915-1916 contain 505 numbers and 
271 different compositions, 90 of which were given for 
the first time at these recitals. 

During the five hundred recitals there have been 
3742 performances of 750 different works, embracing 
every school of organ composition, as well as many 
transcriptions for the instrument. 

An interesting volume containing the complete pro- 
gram with analytical notes is issued by the College. 



Another round of long service in one church is that 
of John Hyatt Brewer, who has just celebrated his 
thirty-fifth anniversary as organist and choirmaster of 
the Lafayette Ave. Presbyterian Church. There was 
held a special service on May 21st, when the program 
included two anthems by Mr. Brewer, "It is a good 
thing to give thanks unto the Lord, " and " O God, the 
Rock of Ages," and the Rev. David Gregg gave an 
address in which he referred to Mr. Brewer's thirty-five 
years of holy service. On May 22d a dinner was 
given to Mr. and Mrs. Brewer at the Apollo Club Hall 
by the church "family" and Mr. Brewer was presented 
with a box of gold eagles, and Mrs. Brewer with a jewel 
case. The choir also presented Mr. Brewer with a 
gift of gold. Miss Elizabeth Tudor shared in the 
celebration, it being her tenth year as soprano soloist 
of the church. 

The Trustees of the People's Symphony Concerts, 
at a special meeting, held Feburary 21, 19 16, deter- 
mined to raise an Endowment Fund of One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars, the money to be deposited, and the 
interest used for the purposes of the Society, i. e. t to 
bring the best music to students and workers at mini- 
mum prices. 

Toward this fund Mr. S. R. Guggenheim has already 
pledged Ten Thousand DoUars f UT. James Douglas 
has pledged Five Thousand Dollars, and a committee 
has been formed by the members of the People's 
Symphony Concerts Auxiliary Club to undertake the 
raising of Ten Thousand Dollars from among their own 
number, and from students and wage earners generally 
— a total of Twenty-five Thousand Dollars. 

Additional pledges toward this fund are solicited, 
which are to be payable when the entire amount of 
One Hundred Thousand Dollars shall have been 
pledged. 

The Treasurer is Albert Strauss, 1 William St., N. Y. 



Hews f ram garis 

The patriotism of more than one Italian composer 
has been questioned since the beginning of the war. 
Early in the struggle it was darkly hinted that Puccini 
had voiced pro-German sentiments. This belief took 
such a firm hold that for a time his operas were under 
the ban at the Paris Opera Comique, until the gentle- 
man, perhaps scenting the way the cat was going to 
jump m his own country, issued a rather tardy denial. 
More recently none other than Leoncavallo has been 
the culprit. Replying to attacks by the Popolo d* Italia 
and VAvanti, anent fis "Roland von Berlin" of ill- 
starred memory, the burly little Italian denies that he 
ever wished to render homage to the Kaiser in this 
opera, which was composed when Rome and Venice were 
feting the Emperor who then styled himself a pacifist. 
As to his latest work, "Mameli," he declares that he 
has written it with all his soul as a patriotic Italian 
and an artist. 



242 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



There is a strong movement on foot in Geneva and 
Lausanne for the formation of a symphony orchestra 
for French Switzerland. Deprived, as they have been 
in the last two years, of the customary visits of the 
leading French orchestras, and not caring greatly to 
have any German organization in their midst, if indeed 
such an organization was now available, French 
Switzerland has been suffering rather from a dearth of 
music. It is pointed out that the idea is an entirely 
feasible one, as the number of musicians furnished 
to foreign musical organizations by French Switzerland 
in the last decade has been remarkable considering the 
size of the country. 

Little by little director Rouche is putting the Paris 
Opera on a normal footing. It opened with two 
matinee performances per week, consisting of separate 
acts from various operas, which were designed as much 
as anything to furnish employment to some of the 
artists who have been forced into idleness by the war. 
The success of this innovation was so great and the 
attendance was so large that it was decided to mount 
entire operas for these performances, which occurred, 
on Thursdays and Sundays. In this way " Faust " and 
"Samson and Delilah" were successfully given several 
times. Now has come a still further step and the 
Thursday performance has been changed to an evening 
affair. Wayfarers crossing the Place de 1 'Opera, which 
is fairly well lighted, and seeing the Opera brilliantly 
illuminated, with limousines rolling up to the door as of 
yore, must have thought for the instant that they were 
back in pre-war days. 

An auditor at the last Colonne Lamoureux concert 
who heard Saint-Saens play his third piano concerto 
with an almost flawless technique, and mindful of the 
decay of the powers of even such a pianist as Liszt in 
his later years, was constrained to ask, "How does he 
do it?" "He never stopped," was the answer. In 
truth the grand old man of French music has to-day a 
pearly scale which many a younger executant might 
envy. Besides the concert work which he still contin- 
ues, he has been indefatigable in raising money for the 
poorer artists and their families who have been rendered 
destitute by the war. 

Inquiry has revealed the fact that practically all the 
provincial conservatories of France, including those of 
Cette, Clermont-Ferrand, Nantes, Aix, Saint Etienne, 
Nimes, Perpignan, Toulouse, Lyon, Rennes, Dijon, 
and Nancy, are open and functioning as usual with a 
very slight diminution in the number of pupils. In 
the last named place, the director, who is the well-known 
composer, J. Guy Ropartz, reports that the work was 
carried on only under difficulties. When the German 
long-range cannon recently commenced to bombard 
Nancy, it was found that the conservatory building was 
in the line of fire. Consequently the courses had to be 
given in the domiciles of the professors until a kindly 
firm of music publishers placed some rooms at the dis- 
posal of the management, where the teaching could 
again be organized. 

A new one act opera by Xavier Leroux, " Les Cadeaux 
de Noel" (The Christmas Presents), had its first per- 
formance at the Op£ra Comique on Dec. 25, 191 5. 

No less than six performances on consecutive days 
were lately given in London of Elgar's "Dream of 
Gerontius," together with two sections, "To Women," 
and "For the Fallen," from his new choral work. The 
chorus was the famous Leeds Choral Union, and Dr. 
Coward conducted. 



Uavtcms flotes 



The Guilmant Organ School of New York made its 
yearly demonstration of the high quality of musicians 
and executants it is producing, on the occasion of in 
Commencement, May 25th, held as usual at Old First 
Church. The program throughout was of a very solid 
character and every number received a thoroughly cap- 
able and in some cases a most brilliant rendering. Six 
free scholarships were announced for next season. The 
Alumni Association, at the reception which followed 
the Commencement Exercises, presented the director. 
Dr. Wm. C. Carl, with a handsome gift to mark the 
fifteenth anniversary of the School. The program 
was as follows: 

Processional: Song of Victory (MS.), Milligan; 
Premiere Symphonie, Guilmant; Fantasie in F minor, 
Brosig; Marche Nuptiale, Guilmant; Allegro from the 
Sixth Symphony, Widor; Finale in B flat, Cesar Francis 
Sonata in A minor (first movement), Mark Andrews; 
Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, Bach; Processional: 
In dulci Jubilo (MS.), Schweitzer; Presentation of the 
Class for Graduation, Dr. William C. Carl, Director of 
the Guilmant Organ School; Presentation of Diplomas, 
Rev. Dr. Howard Duffield, Chaplain of the Guilmant 
Organ School. 

One of the greatest musical programs ever given at 
the Panama-California Exposition is being arranged 
for the Music Teachers' Day, Thursday, July 6, in 
honor of the delegates to the convention of the Music 
Teachers' Association of California which meets in San 
Diego, July 5th to 8th. 

A continuous program of music and entertainment is 
assured for the delegates which will last from early 
morning until late in the evening. In the morning 
there will be an organ recital by a prominent organist 
from the northern part of the State, with a soloist; a 
lecture, and a concert by the Mando Quintette, which 
will also accompany the classic dances to be given on 
the lawn in front of the pergola. In the afternoon there 
will be a concert by prominent soloists, and another 
organ recital. The evening program will be given by 
the People's Chorus of San Diego, assisted by several 
soloists of State and national reputation. The entire 
program of music for the day will be given at the pipe 
organ pavilion, containing the largest outdoor pipe organ 
in the world, which has been donated for the day. 

A strong effort is being made by local musicians to 
make the coming convention the largest State conven- 
tion of Music Teachers ever held in the United States. 
Under the direction of Albert F. Conant, General 
Vice-President of the Music Teachers' Association of 
California, and Willibald Lehmann, President of the 
San Diego Music Teachers' Association, circular 
letters have been sent to more than 600 members of the 
Music Teachers' Association in the United States, 
stating the plans for the convention and the enter- 
tainment to be accorded the delegates at the Bxposi- 
tion on Music Teachers' Day. 

Bennett's "May Queen" together with a miscella- 
neous program was presented May 23d by the Philhar- 
monic Society of Huntington, Ind., under the direction 
of J. L. Swihart. 

The New London Choral Union under the director- 
ship of Alban W. Cooper, Organist of St. James Ep. 
Ch., gave a most successful rendering of Handel's 
"Messiah" on May 10th. The chorus work was 
especially enjoyed for its attack and expression and the 
soloists, who came from Worcester, Mass., were re- 
ceived with much favor. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



243 



jj gcclesiastical plusic 

Q EDITED BY 

JJ G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc. 




TYPE of musical service that is 
somewhat rare in the United 
States is by no means uncom- 
mon in England, where (even 
in time of peace) military functions of an 
imposing kind often take place in cathedrals 
and parish churches of the larger sort — 
which are, architecturally speaking, young 
cathedrals. The "military service* ' needs 
for its full effect a great and magnificent 
building. In an ordinary church, with its 
carpets, cushions, hassocks, and other ab- 
sorbents of sound (which kill resonance), 
an assemblage of bands would produce a 
most deafening racket. In a spacious edifice 
with a tiled or stone floor and lofty roof the 
effect is vastly different. 

St. Paul's Cathedral is used perhaps more 
than any other church in London for military 
services, and for great musical functions in 
which bands are employed to lend addi- 
tional effect. The Abbey also is the scene 
of many imposing services of a national de- 
scription. Very recently a service was held 
there in which military bands took an impor- 
tant part. 

We read in Musical News: 
"The great Anzac Service in Westminster 
Abbey was principally dependent upon music 
for its impressiveness. In addition to the organ 
music, the combined bands of the Australians 
and New Zealanders rendered splendid ser- 
vice. The Abbey Choir, of course, were in 
their usual places, but the bands were sta- 
tioned in the nave, near the organ screen. 
Before the service Sir F. Bridge played Beet- 
hoven's Military March in D and his own 
arrangement of the beautiful Scotch Air, ' The 
Flowers of the Forest.' The bands then 
played Handel's Largo, and, as the King 
entered, a Fanfare was played before the 
National Anthem. The service included the 
fine hymn 'For all the Saints,' to Barnby's 
tune, the Doxology, Rudyard Kipling's 'Lest 
we forget, ' to all of which the combined bands 
and organ lent wonderful effect. The choir, 



organ, and band kept splendidly together, 
the time being indicated from the organ screen 
by Mr. Stanley Roper, assistant teacher of 
the choristers. Wesley's ' Ascribe, ' a magni- 
ficent specimen of our great cathedral school , 
was finely rendered, and the service concluded 
with the famous 'Amen' by Orlando Gib- 
bons. After a short pause, the long roll on 
the side-drums introduced the National An- 
them, sung by the thousands present with 
splendid effect, and then, after a few moments 
of silence, 'The Last Post, ' played by sixteen 
buglers, came floating down from behind the 
high altar. It was beautifully played, per- 
fectly in tune and without coarseness. So 
concluded one of the finest commemoration 
services ever held in the Abbey. The King 
expressed to the Dean and the Musical Di- 
rector his great pleasure and satisfaction with 
the service. Dr. Alcock assisted at the organ, 
and played as a concluding voluntary Smart's 
Solemn March." 

The musical management of such a ser- 
vice requires no little skill and experience. 
The opportunities for effect are numerous 
— but so are the dangers of disaster. The 
larger the space and the greater the num- 
ber of "units" involved in the musical 
performance, the more exacting is the 
generalship and the more praiseworthy the 
success. 




HE theory that church music 
should be made positively at- 
tractive to people, and that it 
should not be made secondary 
to liturgical requirements, is somewhat start- 
ling to say the least. But there is no deny- 
ing the fact that it is gaining ground in 
certain quarters. We have at times called 
attention to the curious "services" which are 
advertised in the Saturday evening and 
Sunday morning papers. Many of these 
are little more than concerts disguised under 
another name. That a large number of 
them take place in Episcopal churches is 
not easily explained. We are now told by 
the New York Sun that the Presbyterian 
churches may make a special feature of 
"attractive" music as a means of drawing 
people from photo plays and other places of 
amusement. 

From a recent issue we quote : 



244 THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 

"In order to compete with the 'movies' means of supporting these recitals. All receipts 

j .1 j- • o j ^.i- i- -L from this source are devoted to this purpose 

and other diversions on Sunday the church exclusively. 

must make itself and the service more attract- Doxology. Prayers and Benediction. 

ive, according to the Rev. Dr. W. P. Merrill, 8 - Nevin > °p- ? l • ;a- v • " In my ^ e Ag hbor ' s garden" 

. , ^ . „ _ , _, , v lolin, Cello, Harp, and Organ 
pastor of the Brick Presbyterian Church, 

who spoke last night at the Presbyterian Can anything more preposterous be im- 

men's dinner in the Brooklyn Academy of agined? How in the name of common sense 

Music. This was attended by more than can a congregation sing, with any degree of 

6oo ministers and laymen of the Brooklyn religious feeling, a. hymn that is descriptive 

Presbytery. of the Birth, Crucifixion, Resurrection, and 

" 'The simple Gospel is not enough,' said Ascension of Jesus Christ, after listening to 

Dr. Merrill. ' I hope that I shall not be mis- a secular concert? And what has "My 

understood, but in order to compete with neighbor's garden"to do with Prayer, Bene- 

Sunday amusements the modern church must diction, and Doxology? 

have the best of music and the most interest- If we are to entice people away from the 

ing services or otherwise Ithe ♦minister will " movies' ' by this kind of thing the sooner 

find his congregation drifting away to the the U. S. Government appoints a Board of 

movies and the concerts, no matter how Censorship for church music the better it 

spiritual his sermons may be. ' will be for the religious health of the nation. 

"Other speakers at the dinner were Wil- By way of comparison let us turn from 

Ham McCarroll, former Public Service Com- this Episcopalian Sunday matinee to a de- 

missioner, who acted as toast-master; John scription of the worship held in Russian 

H. Finley, State Commissioner of Education, churches. The following refers to Russian 

and the Rev. Robert W. Anthony, executive churches in general, and to the Cathedral of 

secretary of the Church Extension Board of St. Vladimir at Kieff in particular, 

the Brooklyn Presbytery, under whose auspices "The walls of all churches in Russia are 

the dinner was given." painted all over with immense pictures. . . . 

To those interested in church music reform The Eastern Church abhors dumb walls and 

this theory of "attraction first" and "religion the restriction of movement and attitude 

afterward" will hardly commend itself. For implied by pews. Every wall and every 

with the cart before the horse how is it pos- pillar is painted with pictures of the Saints, 

sible to journey in the right way? We are and of incidents recorded in Holy Writ. . . , 

moved to inquire what is the "best" music The Russian, by painting the walls blue and 

for church use? If it is attractive music crowding them with the Saints, imparts to 

from the sensual point of view (which is the them a character of infinity. He gives to the 

drawing point) it will be, nine times out of ten, worship a background of eternity. He paints 

irreligious. Here for instance is a specimen in the spiritual landscape of the church. . . . 

program of a Sunday afternoon "service There are no pews, no chairs. There is al- 

redtal" in a well-known Episcopal church in ways a crowd, a promiscuity of rich and poor, 

a celebrated New Jersey winter resort. of well-dressed and tattered, a kaleidoscopic 

mingling of people and colors, people stand- 

'• ^ /M -violiA;'Ceho;Harp M ^l g n an ,HOSanna '' in e and P"*** P^ple kneeling, people 

2. Jtranek -.••.•••, Cossack Lullaby prostrated, people pushing their way to the 

3. Friml, Op. 66 . m .' . . . . °.'. an . . . !**" Legende Altar » P e °p!e handing candles over one an- 

Violin, 'Cello, Harp, and Organ ^ other's heads, people pushing their way out, 

4 ' ° Uef ' (Arrangement by WiihelmjY ^ churchwardens wandering about collecting 

Violin and Organ alms, no irritation at the pushing, no anger 

5 ' "**' vloUn! 'Cello/ HaV P /and"6rgaT ng ***** through discomfort. The lights are dim, 

Hymn 517— "Sing, ye faithful." being mostly those of the worshipers them- 

The congregation is asked to sing heartily . c ,, ,. Al , ,. , ,. 

6. Improvisation selves, of the candles they have lit before 

Organ Solo votive shrines. There is no organ music, 

7. Durand Chaconne , ^ ^, . , 6 m ' 

Violin, 'Cello, and Organ but an unearthly and spontaneous outburst 

A "silver" offering is asked, as this is our only of praise from the souls of the choir, and the 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



245 



clergy, and the laity worshiping together. 
It is a strange and wonderful crowd where 
noble faces, broad shoulders, and beautiful 
forms predominate rather than clothes or 
uniforms." 

Well may we wonder what the devout 
parishioners of Kieff would think if they were 
to spend a Sunday at Atlantic City! 




T is seldom that the secular press 
contains any complaints about 
the performance of church ser- 
vices. A correspondent of the 
New York Sun, however, protests vigorously 
against the haste shown by the clergy and 
congregation of Lutheran and Protestant 
Episcopal churches in "getting through" 
the non-musical portions of the service. 
We read : 

"Is there no way to apply the law against 
exceeding the speed limit in church? 

" I confine my subsequent remarks to the 
Lutheran and Protestant Episcopal churches ; 
I have forgotten my experience at the services 
of other sects. But as regards the two de- 
nominations named, in nearly every- church I 
have attended the congregation has rushed 
through the Lord's Prayer, the Creed, and 
other non-musical responses with a haste that 
suggested fear of missing a moving picture 
engagement. Of course, where the part taken 
by the people required singing, as with the 
Gloria Patri, the Gloria in Excelsis, etc., the 
words were r given * decently and in order.' 
But when words were said by the congregation 
they were said hurriedly, breathlessly, and with 
slovenliness. And the fault persists to-day. 

"Can't our rectors or pastors impart more 
dignity and impressiveness to the non-musical 
vocal participation of the pews in the service? 
Don't violate the speed limit." 

The writer says, "in nearly every church." 
It would be interesting as well as instructive 
to know whether he found any difference in 
the "speed limit" in churches where mono- 
tonic recitation is customary. 

As a rule/choirs and congregations are large- 
ly influenced by the style of singing adopted 
by the precentor. And this is particularly 
the case when a bad precentor does all the 
monotoning, and by a process of contagion 
infects the people and choristers with his 
choral delivery. 



Given a thoroughly competent cantor and 
a well-ordered choral service, infractions of 
the "speed law" should be decidedly rare. 
Drawling and dragging are the common 
defects of most choral services — and they 
are caused by unmusical, untrained clergymen. 

Are services that are carried on with the 
so-called "conversational voice" more apt to 
be hurried than those which are monotoned? 
The Sun correspondent does not touch upon 
this question. We imagine from his use 
of the adjective "non-musical" that his 
high-speed experiences were confined to read 
services. 

As a marked contrast to what he complains 
of in Lutheran and Episcopal churches we 
would call attention to the congregational 
recitation of the Lord's Prayer in "Christian 
Science" meeting houses. How the people 
in these places of worship are taught to re- 
spond in such an impressive way we do not 
know. But their responsive recitation is, 
we are bound to confess, astonishing in its 
earnestness and unanimity. 




HE appearance of a new addition 
to Hymns Ancient and Modern, 
which is called "A Second 
Supplement," shows another 
brook trickling into a boundless ocean. We 
believe that Sir George Martin was right 
when he said: "We use an absurd number of 
hymns, and the result is that the solid and 
dignified hymns and tunes are lost sight of 
in a crowd of trivial compositions." 

What is now needed is a vast burning of 
say half a million "contributions" to the 
hymnody of the Church. 'Tis a bonfire de- 
voutly to be wished for — but instead of it we 
shall probably see Helicon piled on Par- 
nassus to the end of time. 

The editor of the Times (London) calls the 
new work a "further selection from the vast 
wealth of English hymnology." But he 
intimates that it is something of a muddle. 
"It is not a new suit, and it is not exactly 
a patch on the old garment, but it is rather 
in the way of being an additional, but not 
necessary, extra piece of clothing which you 
can put on or do without as you will;" with a 
selection of additional musical trimmings (I 
may add) to be substituted, at your pleasure, 
for some of the old ones if you think they are 



246 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



getting worn-out and thread-bare. That is 
to say, the proprietors of Hymns Ancient and 
Modern have come to the conclusion that 
English Church people in general have shown 
no willingness to adopt a new hymn book — 
even the New Edition (1904) of their own 
book. They surrender to public opinion; 
they continue the publication of the Second 
Edition of 1875 with its Supplemental Hymns 
of 1889; they make no change in it; they only 
add a Second Supplement of 141 new hymns 
and tunes, with what you may term a Third 
Supplement of Alternative Tunes for some of 
the hymns contained in the old collection. 
Four years ago there was also added a Fourth 
Supplement of 'Varied Harmonies for Organ 
Accompaniment of certain tunes.' This is 
all rather confusing, but we English folk are 
fond of makeshifts, and anything of the 
nature of a muddle is rather congenial to us." 

The Organist and Choirmaster (London) 
is more outspoken. We read: 

"This book fills us with sorrowful disap- 
pointment. It seems to us that Hymns An- 
cient and Modern^ having got into wrong hands, 
would be far better left as the late Dr. W. H. 
Monk left the dear old book in 1889. The 
New Edition of 1904 proved a ghastly fail- 
ure. This 'Second Supplement* of 19 16 is — 
we are convinced — a still greater failure, be- 
cause even less does it meet the requirements 
of ordinary parochial congregations of the 
present day. Has congregational hymn-tune 
writing become a lost art? Did it die out 
with Dykes, Monk, Stainer, Redhead and 
Oakeley? Compare their work with, let us 
say, the following half-a-dozen tunes selected 
at random from this new book : — 646, a tricky 
melody full of pitfalls and snappy rhythm; 
684, of a far more objectionable part-song 
style than any tune by (let us say) Dykes or 
Barnby; 689, one of the worst specimens of 
four-part writing we ever remember to have 
seen; in one place the 4th, 5th, and 6th degrees 
of the scale of E major are sounded together 
at the distance of only a second between them, 
and there are " howling* ' consecutive 5ths in 
the penultimate bar; 690, another piece of 
atrocious part-writing with false relation in 
the last strain; 711, a most unthinkable pro- 
cessional; and 735, which would be blatantly 
vulgar as a part-song, but which is infinitely 
intolerable in this respect as a hymn-tune. 



Again, if hymn-tune writing in the part-song 
style is so unspeakably sinful from the modern 
faddist's point of view, why was 694 admitted 
into this new book? 




LEADING article in a recent 
issue of the Church Times (Lon- 
don) refers to the excellent 
influence that is being exerted 
Dy certain colleges in Cambridge where the 
best examples of the old polyphonic school 
are liberally drawn upon in the chapel services. 
The undergraduates of these institutions 
become familiar with genuine religious music, 
and those who in after years take holy orders, 
seldom fail to work for a higher standard of 
church music. The writer maintains that: 
" All this makes it seem the more sad that 
the great foundations of St. Paul's and West- 
minster cannot, in Holy Week at any rate, 
rise to a High Mass each morning in honor 
of the Passion of our Lord, adorned by the 
works of our best native writers, living and 
dead, and so make, by the way, an act of 
thanksgiving for the treasures God has be- 
stowed on the English Church. On Palm 
Sunday, it is true, there was at St. Paul's a 
Gibbons anthem, but it was, so to say, 
washed down by copious draughts of Men- 
delssohn, Sullivan and Gounod, to say nothing 
of other things we forbear to mention. It is 
not because there are no Anglicans who can 
appreciate music which is at once Catholic 
and national, for rumor has it that they were 
at least in as strong force as those of the 
Roman obedience in the great basilica last 
week." 

Articles of this kind often draw invidious 
comparisons between the music at the Abbey 
and St. Paul's, and that at Westminster 
Cathedral. 




HE Dean and Chapter of St. 
Paul's Cathedral, London, have 
granted permission for the erec- 
tion of a memorial tablet to the 
late Sir George Martin. Among the eminent 
musicians who are serving on the committee 
for carrying out the work are Sir Frederick 
Bridge and Sir Edward Elgar. In regard to 
this we quote from a contemporary: 

"Memorials to musicians at the Cathedral 
are scanty. Westminster Abbey is the home 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



247 



of the Musicians' Corner, in close propinquity 
to the poets. The most recent erections at 
St. Paul's that we can remember are those to 
the memory of Sir Arthur Sullivan and to St. 
Cecilia, the patron saint of the Worshipful 
Company of Musicians, and there are others 
to Goss and Stainer. But the Cathedral is 
obviously the right place for the tribute to 
its late organist, and we trust that donations 
will pour in, despite the numerous war calls 
upon the public purse." 




LAYMAN states in the Reformed 
Church Review (Lancaster, Pa.), 
that the modern Church is " sap- 
ping its best life-blood" by a 
widespread system of secularization which 
pervades most of the activities that are 
carried on in the average parish. What he 
says has an important bearing upon the 
deterioration of church music. We read: 

" The sacred edifice heretofore dedicated 
to the worship of Almighty God has now, with 
its parish-house, its club, and other auxiliaries, 
become the center of secular functions. We 
now go to church to hear sermons on the 
minimum wage, adequate housing of the 
poor, the regulation of moving pictures and 
the dance-halls, how to vote, and the latest 
vice-investigation report. From this center 
agents and detectives of Law and Order soci- 
eties make report of nightly investigations; 
and it is said even ministers of the Gospel 
keep silent watch during the hours of the 
night and assist in rounding up inmates from 
disreputable houses. They appear as prose- 
cutors and witnesses before grand and petit 
juries in the Quarter Sessions Court. Billiard- 
and pool- tables are being installed, dancing 
classes are organized, and all sorts of amuse- 
ments offered to entice the youth within its 
sacred precincts. A child returning home 
from Sunday-school recently was asked by 
its mother the subject of the lesson. It was 
how to keep the streets clean. Another Sun- 
day, kindness to dumb animals furnished the 
subject of the lesson, and this was in a graded 
Sunday-school up to date. A good woman 
who had suffered greatly with a recent sorrow 
brought herself to church longing for some 
comforting word. She heard a sermon on 
the Charity Organization Society and the 
Visiting Nurse." 



It stands to reason that secularization 
which is general in its scope and influence 
cannot fail to lower the tone of sacred music, 
— and of everything sacred. This writer 
tells us further that: 

11 Ministers of the Gospel are willing to 
preach on every subject under the sun except 
the Gospel, and when they begrudgingly 
hand it down they almost tell us it is not 
divine, but a man-made thing. They have 
relegated to the brush-heap most of the sacred 
beliefs, such as the miracles, original sin, 
the vicarious atonement of Jesus Christ, the 
efficacy of baptism and the Holy Communion, 
and many of them even deny the validity 
of their own divine office as ministers of God. 
They prefer to hold their office from the 
people, not of God. All comes from man, 
nothing from God. Perhaps this is the reason 
so many ministers look down on empty pews 
and complain bitterly that their members 
do not come to hear the sermons prepared 
with so much labor." 



If the war is long protracted, may we see the evolu- 
tion of operas in which all the parts will be cast for 
females? Or, if war settles down more and more into a 
trade and women enter the munition factories and 
Government departments at an increasing rate, shall we 
come in time to a realisation of Mr. De Lara's idea of 
operas in which the respective parts shall be taken by 
the different instruments in the orchestra? That is, 
presuming we shall then have anyone left to fill the 
orchestras. In any case, grave difficulties are already 
being experienced in the touring opera companies in 
getting sufficient male singers for principals, chorus 
and orchestra; and the Military Service Bill will hit 
them harder still. An example on the music-hall stage 
suggests that the girl baritone and bass, as well as the 
girl tenor, may be discovered and developed; or we 
may have to put up with girls in tights on the opera 
stage, after the fashion of the principal boys of pan- 
tomime. Yet why go to the pantomime stage for our 
comparison, after all, since among the operas in which 
ladies enact male parts may be mentioned "Fidelio," 
41 Masked Ball," "Huguenots," "Hansel and Gretel," 
11 Figaro," "Le Jongleur de Notre Dame," "Rosen- 
kavalier" and "Tales of Hoffman." With precedents 
such as these, there is certainly no reason why the idea 
should not be pushed further. Men have even taken 
women's parts in opera with success. I have known 
operas produced by regiments both at Gibraltar and 
Cairo in which all the female parts were taken — and 
very successfully taken — by young soldiers and officers; 
and at a performance of "Faust" at Zurich last year 
the part of Siebel was sung by a man. 

Musical Opinion. 



248 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 




J. WARREN ANDREWS, A.G.O., Warden 
HAROLD V. MILLIGAN, F.A.G.O., Gen.Sec. 



S. LEWIS ELMER,:A.A.G.O., Sub-Waria 
VICTOR BAIER, A.G.O., Gen. Treat. 



FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

GENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE, NEW YORK 



gkadjquavtcvs 

The Council held a regular Meeting at the Guild 
Headquarters May 29th. Those present were Dr. 
Baier, Messrs. J. Warren Andrews, S. Lewis Elmer, 
Warren R. Hedden, Lawrence J. Munson, Albert R. 
Norton, John Hyatt Brewer, Clifford Demarest, Frank 
Wright, and T. Scott Buhrman. 

Mr. Hedden, Chairman of the Examination Com- 
mittee, reported that there were about eighty candidates 
taking the examinations this year; among whom are 
many men of prominence in the profession. 

A new Chapter is about to be formed in Nebraska, 
in which a large number of organists throughout the 
State have manifested their interest. 

A new Branch Chapter is being formed in California, 
to be known as the San Jose, a Branch of the Northern 
California Chapter. 

The following amendment of the By-Laws was 
adopted. 

RULES FOR CHAPTERS 

"25. Dues to be three dollars ($3.) a year, beginning 
April 1st. Each Chapter to remit to the General 
Treasurer, not later than November of each year, one 
dollar ($1) for every active member. The Guild is 
under contract to supply every member with a sub- 
scription to the official newspaper of the Guild, and in 
April of each year, the Treasurer of each Chapter shall 
send to the publisher of said paper a list of every mem- 
ber of the Chapter (with addresses) enclosing also a 
payment of fifty cents (50c.) for every name. " 



GUILD ORGAN AND THEORY TESTS 

The Annual Examinations were held in nineteen cities 
in the United States and Canada, May 31st and June 
1st. 

Eighty-nine candidates presented themselves. War- 
ren R. Hedden had charge in New York City, where 
Prof. Horatio Parker and Prof. S. A. Baldwin judged 
thirty-one candidates at the Organ on the first day. 

On the second day Mr. Hedden supervised the theo- 
retical examination of thirty-seven candidates. 

In spite of the increased cost of the certificates the 
number of candidates was the largest in the history of 
the Guild. The Chapters of New England and South- 
ern Ohio each had ten candidates, and North Ohio 
presented seven. 



DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA CHAPTER 

A Solemn Vesper Service under the auspices of the 
Chapter, was sung at Immaculate Conception church 
on the evening of May first. This was the second of 
this season's series of Service Recitals given by the 
D. C. Chapter. The program consisted of Antiphones, 
Psalms and "Magnificat," Gregorian, sung by the 
regular choir (boys) of the church. "Regina Coeli," 



Giorza. An address on Church Music by Rev. M. J. 
Riordan. "Salve Regina," H. W. Howard, sung by 
Mrs. Edith Meloy White. "O Salutaris f ,, E. Dethier, 
sung by the Quartette of Sacred Heart church (Miss 
Latimer, Mrs. White, Messrs. Young and Madigan 
with Mr. Armand Gumprecht at the organ). . "Tan- 
tum Ergo," Riga. "Holy God," choir and congrega- 
tion. The service was under the direction of Mr. 
Harry Wheaton Howard, organist of Irnmaculatc 
Conception church and Dean of the Chapter A. G. 0. 



NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER 

The following is the resume" of the activities of the 
Chapter for the season now closing. 

There have been three public services — two more 
had been arranged for but circumstances arose which 
rendered it necessary to defer one of them — (a service 
at Appleton Chapel under the direction of Dr. Davison 
and having the services of the Harvard chorus). 

The other one which would have been of extraor- 
dinary interest, was an evening of organ and orchestral 
music — our organists participating with the New 
England Conservatory orchestra — Geo. W. Chadwick 
conducting. This failed of consummation at the last, 
after all details had been settled, by reason of some 
sort of conflict with the Musicians' Union. 

There have been eight recitals given — two social 
meetings (very successful and popular) — the annual 
dinner, and May 1st the annual meeting for election 
of officers and members of the executive committee. 

There have been eighteen meetings of the executive 
committee. 

The publicity committee reengaged for the season 
Mr. Edward F. Collins, whose work in that line in the 
interests of the Chapter was satisfactory and successful. 

The roster of the Chapter shows a list of 223 col- 
leagues and 141 subscribing members. 

The grim reaper gathered in five of our colleagues- 
Messrs. Goodridge, Morss (Sargent) Nash, Shaul and 
Wilbur. 

Three resignations have been received. 

One transferred. 

Twenty new colleagues have been admitted with 
more to follow. 

The courtesies of the Chapter have been extended 
throughout the season to one — a member of the Cali- 
fornia Chapter. 

One of our honorary associates, the Rev. H. W. Lyon, 
of First Parish Church, Brookline, also died, and the 
Rev. Dr. Conrad of the Park St. Church was elected 
by the council to the vacancy. 

The report of the treasurer, briefly: 

Cash on hand, May 1, 1915, $831.14 — receipts from 
all sources, $1128.58— total, $1959.72. 

Total disbursements, $1050.95. Leaving cash on 
hand, May 1, 19 16, $908,77 — 700 of which is on interest 
at 4%. 

This report reveals the sound financial standing and 
prosperity of the Chapter. The otherwise general 
prosperity of the Chapter and the high standing and 
attainments of the newly elected colleagues bear evi- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



249 



dence of the zeal and unwearied watchfulness, and 
attest the wise administration of the Chapter's affairs, 
by our executive committee in conjunction with the 
unselfish and generous efforts of the Dean, sub-Dean 
and treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. Buckingham, 

Secy. N. E. Chapter. 
Boston, Mass., May 3, 1916. 



The California Organ Company as heretofore has 
done their share toward the Chapter's pleasure with 
an outing and dinner. 



PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER 

The Pa. Chapter gave its Thirty-seventh Public 
Service on Tuesday evening, May 16th, in the Memorial 
Church of St. Paul, Overbrook, Philadelphia. The 
choir of the church, under the direction of Rollo F. 
Maitland, sang Stainer's Evening Service in B flat, 
and a cycle of anthems, as follows, covering the more 
important seasons of the Church year. 

Advent — The Night is far spent Bruce Steane 

Christmas — A joyful Christmas Song P. A. Gevaert 

Epiphany — Three Kings have journeyed Peter Cornelius 

Lent — Is it nothing to you (from the Crucifixion) 

John Stainer 
Easter — Behold, I shew you a Mystery D. D. Wood 

George Alexander A. West, Dean of the Chapter, 
played the organ prelude — Pastorale, Recitative and 
Chorale, by Sigfrid Karg-Elert, and Uselma Clarke 
Smith played the Finale from Vierne's First Symphony 
for the organ postlude. This was the concluding 
service of the season's series. 

The Pa. Chapter brought the season's activities to 
a close with the annual dinner, held at the Hotel Rit- 
tenhouse, Philadelphia, on Tuesday evening, May 23d. 
Over eighty members and guests were present and the 
occasion was one of the most successful m the Chapter's 
history. George Alexander A. West, Dean of the 
Chapter, presided and acted as toastmaster, and ad- 
dresses were made by Leopold Stokowski, conductor 
of the Philadelphia orchestra, Prof. Hugh A. Clarke, 
of the University of Pennsylvania, Ralph Kinder, 
organist of Holy Trinity Church, Rev. Alexander 
MacColl, D.D., pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
Church, and Harvey M. Watts, of the Philadelphia 
Ledger. The list of guests of honor included several 
prominent out-of-town organists, among them Walter 
C. Gale, Warden-elect of the Guild, and Arthur Scott 
Brook, President of the National Association of Organ- 
ists. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 

The Chapter held its regular monthly and also the 
annual meeting at the Hotel Hollenbeck, Monday 
evening, April 3d. 

Final arrangements were made for the 22d Public 
Recital at St. Paul's for May 1st, after which the an- 
nual meeting and the election of officers took place. 

Secretary's report for the year ending March 31,1916: 



Regular meetings 

Present 

Membership 



members 154. guests 
This 



his year * . 50 

Last " 55 

ix have been added and we have lost 16; 12 have been dropped 
account non-payment of dues; 2 resigned and a moved away. 

Public Recitals: a 

Congregational Church, 
Pint Congregational, 
First Presbyterian. 
St. Andrew's Presbyterian 



Long Beach 
Los Angeles 
Pasadena 
San Pedro 



During the past year the Chapter Has had the pleas- 
ure of the following: 

A visit and organ recital by the Warden, a visit to 
the ^Eolian organ at Birkels, organ recitals by Dr. 
Andrews, Mr. Erb, Mr. Macfarlane and Mr. Biggs. 

Entertainment by Mr. and Mrs. Wylie, Mr. and Mrs. 
Engstrom and Mr. and Mrs. Nicolai. 



©httvch flotes 

The following program was presented by the choir 
of Trinity Church, Newark, N. J., A. L. Faux, O. & C, 
at their second annual concert on May 25th: 

Hey-Ho Robin, Lambord; All through the night, 
Arr. Lutkin; Barcarolle from "The Firefly," Fnml; 
Kitty of Coleraine, Arr. Lloyd; O can ye sew cushions? 
Arr. Bantock; Cargoes, Gardiner; Ballade and Polo- 
naise, Vieuxtemps; The Goslings, Bridge; Russian Folk 
Songs, " Volga Boat Song, " arr. Tuthill; " In the Fields, " 
Rubetz; Serenade, Elgar; My Bonnie Lass, German. 

The choir of Gethsemane Church, Minneapolis, 
Edmund Sereno Ender, O. & C, went to Anoka, Minn., 
on May 23d, and gave a sacred concert. The works 
presented were: Mendelssohn's "Hear My Prayer," 
Gounod's " Gallia, " Buck's Festival Te Deum in E flat, 
Martin's "Ho! Every One," and Brackett's "Softly 
Now the Light of Day " for men's voices. On May 25th 
the same choir gave a secular concert in Minneapolis, 
presenting works by Sullivan, Elgar, Pinsuti, and 
Cowan. 

Maunder's "Penitence, Pardon, and Peace" and 
Stainer 's "The Crucifixion" were presented during April 
by the vested male choir of St. Peter's Church, Auburn, 
N. Y., under the direction of E. E. Scovill, O. & C. 
"The Holy City," Gaul, and "The Forty-sixth 
Psalm," Buck, were also recently given by the choir. 



Vacancies audi appointments 

Frederick W. Mueller, formerly Organist of the 
First Baptist Church of Minneapolis, has been ap- 
pointed Organist and Choirmaster of Calvary Baptist 
Church of the same city. 



Suggested JSeruict ^ist for 
August, 1916 

TRANSFIGURATION OF CHRIST, 

Seventh Sunday after Trinity, August 6 

Te Deum \ 

Benedictus V in E Barnby 

Jubilate ) 

Introit, Jesu, Word of God Elgar 

Offertory, The Lord is King H. J. King 

Communion Service, in E Barnby 

jassu-i" 5 <-* 

Anthem, The Lord is Great in Zion Best 

Offertory, The Lord is my Light HUes 

Eighth Sunday after Trinity, August 13 

Te Deum, in C Stanford 

Benedictus I ™ . 

Jubilate f Chant 

Introit, The Lord is my Shepherd D. 5. Smith 

Offertory, O God of Love West 

Communion Service, in C Le Jeune 

J8EKt*f «»*«•* *~** 

Anthem, Saviour, Thy Children Keep Sullivan 

Offertory, The Shadows of the Evening Hours Baldwin 



250 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Ninth Sunday after Trinity, August ao 

Te Deum, in E flat Bywater 

Benedictus \ nu n ~+ 
Jubilate \ Chant 

Introit, Cast thy Burden Mendelssohn 

Offertory, O Praise God Blair 

Communion Service, in B flat Ruff net 

NrKttisf- D *-*■- 

Anthem, Blessed are they Tours 

Offertory, Grant to us, Lord Barnby 

St. Bartholomew, August 24 

BSrf *»f •• *— « 

Benedictus, Chant 

Introit, Blessed is the Man 0. King 

Offertory, Then Shall the Righteous Mendelssohn 

Communion Service, in F Somervell 

SdSW-* 5 -™ « 

Anthem, The Pillars of the Earth Tours 

Offertory, The Sun shall be no More Woodward 

Tenth Sunday after Trinity, August 27 

Te Deum ) 

Benedictus > in F Smart 

Jubilate ) 

Introit, Lord, I Call West 

Offertory, I am Alpha Roberts 

Communion Service, in D Worth 

EESW" *r 

Anthem, Lord of our Life Field 

Offertory, Tarry with me Baldwin 



ffliVLSit gublished during tftc 
%i\zt fjfcoutfe 



SACRED 



PRIDGE, SIR FREDERICK.—" God's goodness hath 
been great to thee." Motet. For the Shakespeare Ter- 
centenary. 19 16. 08c. 
PURDETT, G. A.— "Strong Son of God." Hymn- 

anthem. (No. 431, The Church Music Review.) 12c. 
pEDERLEIN, G. H.— "Hear, O Thou shepherd of 
Israel." Anthem for Tenor Solo and Chorus. (No. 418, 
The Church Music Review.) 15c. 

QEHRKEN, W. H.— "Communion Service in E 

major." (No. 430. The Church Music Review.) 50c. 

TSAACA, LEWIS M.— "The Lord is my Shepherd." 

Duet. 60c. 
TUTKIN, P. C— "What Christ Said." Motet for 
Baritone Solo and Chorus. (No. 432. The Church Music 
Review.) 15c. 

MACPHERSON, CHARLES.— " Magnificat and 
Nunc Dimittis in A." For double choir with Organ 
Accompaniment (ad lib.). 75c. 

MALLARD, CYRUS S.— " Come and Worship. " A 

carol anthem. (No. 416, The Church Music Review?) 10c. 

"O praise the Lord." Anthem. (No. 420, The Church 

Music Review.) 12c. 

PRENDERGAST, W.— "For those within the veil." 

Memorial Hymn-Anthem. 12c. 
STEWART, A. M.— "O perfect love." Wedding 

Hymn. 06c. 

VITTORIA, T. L. DA.— "Jesu, the very thought is 
sweet." (Jesu dulcis memoria.) Motet for Four Voices. 
English and Latin words. Edited by John E. West. (No. 879. 
The Musical Times.) 05c. 

WORTH, JOHN W. "Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis 
in D." (No. 419, The Church Music Review.) 15c. 

SECULAR 

gLGAR, EDWARD.— "To Women" (Op. 80, No. 2). 
("The Spirit of England," No. 2.) For Tenor or Soprano 
Solo, Chorus, and Orchestra. 30c. 
"For the Fallen" (Op. 8o, No. 3). ("The Spirit of Eng- 



land," No. 3-) For Tenor or Soprano Solo, Chorus, and Orchet. 
tra. 50c. 

TOOMIS, W. H— "The Wraggle Taggle Gypsies." 
Song. 60c. 

MOZART, W. A.— "The Alphabet." Part song far 
female voices. Old Scotch air. Loch Lomond. (No. $|. 
The Modern Series.) 05c. 

CCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 287 contains the 
following Music in both Notations: — "If I were a flower." 
Two-part Song. G. J. Huss. "The West Wind." Unison 
Song. J. Barnby. 06c. 
CCHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

Published in two forms. A. Voice Parts in Staff and Tonic 
Sol-fa Notations, with Pianoforte Accompaniment (8vo.). B. 
Voice Parts only, in Tonic Sol-fa Notation. 

A. & 
No. 122 1. "Where the pools are bright and deep." 

Unison Song. — 06c 

C. H. Lloyd. 
HTUTHILL, B. C— " Volga Boat Song. " Russian Folk- 
song arranged for male chorus. (No. 89. The Modem 
Series.) xoc. 

INSTRUMENTAL 

A DAMS, J. H. — "Shadow Dance." Intermezzo for 

pianoforte. 6oc. 
PALFE— "The Bohemian Girl." Concert Edition. 

Arranged and Re-scored by Emil Kreuz. 1st Violin, Si. 25; 
2d Violin, $1.75; Viola, 1 1.75; Violoncello and Bass, $3 00. 

GAUL, H. B.— " La Brume " (The Mist) . Organ. (No. 

^ 67. The St. Cecilia.) 50c. 

HELD, PAUL.— " Jacob's Dream. " For violin, harp, 

and Organ. 1 1.50. 

HOLBROOKE, J.— "Pierrot." Ballet Suite for 

Pianoforte Solo. 1 1.50. 

JOHNSON, BERNARD.— "Pavane in A." Ar- 

J ranged for Small Orchestra. Pianoforte Conductor, 35c 
String Parts (4), a5c. each; Wind Parts, Si. so. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circulation, 
eta., required by the Act of Congress of August 24. 19x2, of The 
New Music Review and Church Music Review, published 
monthly at New York, N. Y., for April 1, 1916. 
State of New York, County of New York, as.: 
Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and county 
aforesaid, personally appeared H. W. Gray, who, having been duly 
sworn according to law, deposes and says that he is the Editor 
of The New Music Review and Church Music Review, 
and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, 
a true statement of the ownership, management (and if a daily 
paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publcation, for 
the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act of 
August 24. 191 2. embodied in Section 443, Postal Laws and 
Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, 
managing editor, and business managers are: 

Publisher, the H. W. Gray Co., 2 West 45th Street, N. Y.; 
Editor, H. W. Gray, 29 West 12^ Street, N. Y.; Managing 
Editor, none; Business Manager, none. 

2. That the owners are: The H. W. Gray Co., Inc., 2 West 
45th Street, N. Y. (Give names and addresses of individual 
owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names and 
addresses of stockholders owning or holding z per cent, or more 
of the total amount of stock.) 

H. W. Gray, 29 West 12th Street, N. Y.; Est. of H. Binney. 
2 Rector Street, N. Y.: G. E. Stubbs. 3" West 101st Street. 
N. Y.; P. S. Converse, Westwood, Mass.: P. B. Miles. Concord. 
Mass.; M. Randall. Pottstown. Pa.; S. A. Trench, 2815 Boule- 
vard. Jersey City, N. J.; E. Stubbs, 3" West 101st Street, 

3- That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding 1 per cent, or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: (If there 
are none, so state). None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of 
the owners, stockholders, and security holders, if any. contain 
not only the list of stockholders and security holders as they 
appear upon the books of the company but also, in cases where 
the stockholder or security holder appears upon the books of 
the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the 
name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is 
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which stockholders and 
security holders who do not appear upon the books of the com- 
pany as trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity other 
than that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to 
believe that any other person, association, or corporation has 
any interest direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other 
securities than as so stated by him. 

H. W. Gray. Editor. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 22nd day of March, 
1916. 

M. A. Fowler. 
(Seal) Notary Public. Kings County. 

(My commission expires March 30, 191 6.) 

Certificate Filed in New York County. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



251 



dhgantsts 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director, Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West. New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
2 West 45th Street. New York, or 

295 Claremont Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

CLIFTON C. BRAINERD, M.A. 

Hartford. Connecticut 
Organist and Choirmaster, Church of the Good Shepherd 
Vice-Principal. Wadsworth Street School 
Address: 48 Huntington Street 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

F.R.C.O.. A.R.C.M.. L.R.A.M. 

Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac. N. Y. 

Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West 12th Street.lNew York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 

Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 
Address: New Haven. Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.O., 
F.A.G.O. 

THE CHORISTERS' SCHOOL 
Rhinebeck, New York. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 

GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC, 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST. DIRECTOR 
First Baptist Church 
Remington New Jersey 



Recitals 



ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 



Organ Openings 
Address: Christ Church Cathedral. 



Concert Tours 
St. Louis, Mo. 



GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster, St. John's Church, 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

H. BROOKS DAY 

Fellow of the American Guild of Organists 
Organist and Choirmaster of St. Luke s Church, 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Address: 417 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave., N. Y. 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and'Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 

412 Fifth Avenue, New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist- Director, Second Presbyterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
of Gethsemane Church 
Organist Reform Jewish Temple 
Official Organist of The Apollo Club, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 
Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, Morris- 
town, New Jersey. 

J. HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church, Charleston, 

W. Va. Director of Music, Charleston High School. 

Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 

Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 

J. FRANK FRYSINGER, F.I.G.C.M. 

Head of the Organ Dept., The University School of Music 
Organist and Choirmaster, The First Presbyterian Church 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
ORGAN RECITALS 

E. HAROLD GEER 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Choirmaster 

First Congregational Church 

Address: P. O. Box 67s. Fall River, Mass. 

WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 

UNIVERSITY 

49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster, Second Congregational Church, 

Hoi yoke, Mass. 

Director of Music, Mount Holyoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Concert Organist and Training of Boys* Voices 
Organ Recitals, Instruction in Piano, Organ, Harmony 

and Counterpoint 

Member Exam. Committee of American Guild of Organists 

Candidates coached for Guild Examinations by mail 

Address: 170 West 75th Street, New York. 

ARTHUR B. JENNINGS, A.A.G.O. 

INDEPENDENCE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
SAVANNAH. GA. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Calvary Baptist Church 
Address: 301 West 57th Street 

F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church. Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral. England. 

Organ. Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 

EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral, 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

KARL KRUEGER, M.A. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Ann's Church-on-the-Heights 
Brooklyn. New York 
44 Morningside Drive, W., New York 

NORMAN LANDIS 

Remington, N. J. 

O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flemington, N. J. 

CM. — First Reformed Church, Somerville, N. J. 

Conductor Frenchtown, N. J., Choral Society. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Park Street Church, Boston. Mass. 
Organist and Choirmaster. 
Send for new circular. 
Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and Cranford 
Philharmonic. 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia. Pa. 



252 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

St. Michael's Episcopal Church. 

New York. 

Instructor of Music Head of the 

Washington Irving High School Department of Methods 

Conservatory of Musical Art 
30s West 97th Street 
'Phone, 7380 Riverside. 

T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 
St. Thomas' Church, New York 
ORGANIST, COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR. AND COACH 
Address: 1 West 53d Street 



EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 

Organist and Choirmaster 
National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 
Organ Recitals 
Address: Washington. D. C. 



JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 

MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc, Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
Telephone: Morningside7S87 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 

JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago. 111. 

Address: St. Paul's Parish House. Madison Ave. and 50th St. 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 
ORGAN RECITALS PUPILS RECEIVED 

Lessons given on the large new 74 Stop Austin Organ 
Berea, Ohio 

MORITZ E. SCHWARZ 

Assistant Organist Trinity Church, New York. 
Recitals and Instruction. 

Address: Trinity Church, New York. 

FRANK L. SEALY 

Organist New York Oratorio Society 

and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

Organ Recitals and Instruction 

Pupils Prepared for Guild Examinations 

Address: 7 West 55th Street 

ERNEST ARTHUR SIMON 

Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 

Address: Christ Church Cathedral House, 

2nd St.. Louisville. Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo. Ohio 

KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati. Ohio 



GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church. Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 



EDWARD JOHN SMITH 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Methodist Episcopal Church; 

and The Amasa Stone Memorial 

hapd (Western Reserve 

University), Cleveland, 

AUTHOR OF "CHURCH AND UNIVERSITY HYMNS- 
HAROLD TOWER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 
formerly organist St. Paul's. Minneapolis 

ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 

Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville. N. J. 

Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church. Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 
Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 
Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

A. CAMPBELL WESTON 

Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church and 
Temple Israel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 

'Phone 2179-L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor, Orpheus Club. 

Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St. Paul's School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and 20th Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 
Organist and Choirmaster St. Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish. 
N. Y. The Earle, 103 Waverly Place. New York 

R. HUNTINGTON WOODMAN 

Organist and Choirmaster. First Presbyterian Church, 
Brooklyn. Director of Music. Packer Collegiate 
Institute. 
Address: 131 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



©vrjan guilders 



If the purchase of a PIPE ORGAN is contemplated, address 
Hfnry Pitcher's Sons, Louisville, Ky., who manufacture the 
highest grade at reasonable prices. Correspondence solicited. 



KINETIC ORGAN 
BLOWER 

has proven to be the most satisfactory organ 

blower manufactured 

Awarded the GOLD MEDAL at the Panama Pacific 

Exposition 

KINETIC ENGINEERING CO. 

MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS 

6050 Baltimore Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
NEW YORK, - - - 4 i_Park Row, Room 836 



BOSTON, - 
CHICAGO, - 



12 Pearl Street, Room 80 
1464 Monadnock Block 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



253 



SHORT PRELUDES 

FOR THE 

ORGAN 



These Short Preludes Jare intended for use chiefly as Introductory Voluntaries .to Divine Service, more especially in those 
churches where the time allowed for such is, of necessity, somewhat limited. 
No. BOOK I. No. BOOK. IV. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
xo. 



x. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4- 

I: 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 



Anaante Grazioso T nomas Adams 

Andante W. G. Alcock 

Largamente George J. Bennett 

Andante Religioso Myles B. Poster 

Andantino AlfredHollins 

Adagio Cantabile Alfred H oil ins 

Larghetto Charles J. May 

Andante con Moto John E. West 

Andantino quasi Allegretto l? hn E. West 

Andante W. Wolstenholme 



BOOK II. 



Andante con Moto Thomas Adams 

Con Moto W. G. Alcock 

Moderato H. A. Chambers 

Marziale poco Lento Myles B. Foster 

Moderato Alfred Hollins 

Andantino Alfred Hollins 

Adagio, Charles J. May 

"Hvmnus" — Andante e Sostenuto John E. West 

Anaante Serioso 4?^ n ^* ^ cst 

Adagio W. Wolstenholme 



BOOK III. 



Moderato e Legato Thomas Adams 

Moderato W. G. Alcock 

Andante con Moto George J. Bennett 

Andante H. A. Chambers 

Grazioso molto Espressivo Myles B. Poster 

"Song without Words" — Con Moto Alfred Hollins 

Andante Alfred Hollins 

Andante Dolente John E. West 

Andante Pastorale l°hn E. West 

Adagio W. wolstenholme 



1. 
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5. 
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7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



I. 

2. 
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6. 
7. 
8. 
9- 
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3. 

4- 
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7. 
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Andante Religioso Myles B. Poster 

" Simplicity" — Andante Barry M. Gil holy 

Largamente R. G. Hailing 

"Dialogue" — Andante Grazioso Charles H. Lloyd 

Andantino Arthur W. Marchant 

Con Moto Moderato .• William Sewell 

Andante Amabile William Sewell 

Andante Clement M. Spurling 

Andante Sostenuto F. Cunningham Woods 



BOOK v. ; 



"Invocation" — Andante Grazioso Thomas Adams 

Andante con Moto Percy E. Fletcher 

Poco Adagio Myles B. Poster 

Andante Espressivo Ignace Gibs one 

Adagio Alfred Hollins 

Poco Lento Charles H. Lloyd 

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Andantino con Tenerezza William Sewell 

Andante con Moto Clement M. Spurling 

Adagio Molto F. Cunningham woods 



1B00K VI. 



Dolente Edmund T. Chipp 

Andante Sostenuto Myles B. Foster 

Andantino R. G. Hailing 

Con Moto Alfred Hollins 

"Communion" — Cantabile .J. Lemmens 

Andante Religioso Arthur W. Marchant 

Lento Charles J. May 

Larghetto Albert Robins 

Adagio e Mesto William Sewell 

Andante Affetuoso William Sewell 



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ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS 

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No. 
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7. 
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9. 

xo. 
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12. 

13. 
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IS. 

16. 
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18. 
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20. 

21. 



Seven Chorale Preludes C. H. H. Parry 

Prelude in C W. Wolstenholme 

Festival Prelude on "Ein Feste Burg" .... W. Faulkes 

Meditation W. Faulkes 

Postludium W. Faulkes 

Jour de Noces J. Stuart Archer 

Cantilene R. G. Hailing 

Ite Missa Est (Edited by John E. West). J. Lemmens 
- " rf - ' ' -\ West) 



Triumphal March (Edited by John E, 



J. Lemmens 

Fanfare (Edited by John E. West) J. Lemmens 

Cantabile (Edited by John E. West) .... J. Lemmens 

Finale (Edited by John E. West) J. Lemmens 

A Fantasy C. Edgar Ford 

Intermezzo (A Marriage Souvenir). W. Wolstenholme 

Legend Harvey Grace 

Meditation Alfred Hollins 

Barcarolle A. W. Pollitt 

Can tig ue Edward El gar 

Prelude and Fugue in C (Edited by John E. West) 

J. L. Krebi 

Epilogue W. Wolstenholme 

Suite Ancienne F. W. Holloway 



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No. 

22. Fantasia and Fugue C. H. Parrv 

23. Voluntary W. G. Alcock 

24. Impromptu W. G. Alcock 

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27. Twelve Miniatures H. M. Higgs 

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31. Festal Prelude Thomas P. Dunhill 

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33. Romance H. R. Woledge 

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38. Tone-Poems Oliver King 

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40. Nocturne H. R. Woledge 

41. Festival Toccata Percy E. Fletcher 

42. Praludium Pastorale J. Stainer 

43. Fountain Rfiverie Percy E. Fletcher 

44. Ballade in E J. Stuart Archer 



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HE Afiwde Illustri (Paris) of Feb. 
23, 1863, contained a picture of 
Mme. Rimsky-Korsakoff at a 
party given by Prince Walewski. 
Over a hoopskirt of enormous size was the 
dress of Salammbd, sewn with gold stars and 
embroidered with a symbolical serpent. The 
letterpress stated that the strikingly original 
costumes for these balls were designed by 
Worth. Now, who was this Russian? Cer- 
tainly not the wife of the composer, for, ac- 
cording to biographical sketches, he did not 
wed his wife Nadeja Pourgold until 1872. 
Flaubert's "Salammbd" was published 



in November, 1862. It appears that the 
heroine appeared in all the masked balls of 
the next carnival. There was a Salammbd 
craze, as there was a Salome craze in this 
country after the performance of Strauss's 
opera at the Metroplitan, the first and, alas, 
the last at that opera house. 

Salammbd quickly made her way into 
opera-bouffe. In Offenbach's "Br£silien" — 
text by Meilhac and Hatevy — these lines are 
in the rondo : 

Sur les mines de Carthago 
On la vit pleurer Salammbd. 

In 1866 she appeared as a Sicilian slave in 
11 Didon" with music byBlangini,the younger. 
During a short scene in the first act she sang 
an Italian Complainte. Flaubert did not go 
to the theater, but complained of the rudeness 
of the authors who did not send him passes. 




E speak of the novel because Verdi 
might have written the music of 
the opera founded on it. It is 
interesting to speculate, espe- 
cially during the dull season, about operas 
that might have been written by famous 
composers. New York has seen Reyer's 
11 Salammbd " and did not care for it, although 
there was temporary interest in M. Sal6za, the 
tenor, making his fall down a long flight of 



262 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



steps. ' ' Salammb6, " text by Zanardini, music 
by Nicolo Massa (Milan, 1886), has probably 
not been performed outside of Italy. 

When the novel was read to the Goncourt 
brothers they called it declamatory and melo- 
dramatic. Sainte-Beuve said it was an opera; 
Gautier wrote: "It is not a historical work; 
it is not a novel; it's an epic poem. " It is 
strange that Flaubert was willing to think of a 
libretto for the stage. He scorned the idea of 
having any one illustrate the romance; but he 
not only thought of an opera; he took upon 
himself the task of shaping the libretto. And 
he and Gautier at once thought of Verdi as 
the one fitting composer. The newspapers 
spoke of the plan when Verdi was in Paris in 
1863. Was anything said to him directly? 

Did Flaubert think next of Berlioz? He 
held him in high honor. He once wrote: 
"There's a man for you! What hatred of 
mediocrity, what fine anger against the in- 
famous bourgeois, what contempt for on! 
I am no longer astonished at our mutual 
sympathy. Would that I had known him 
better! I should have adored him!" Berlioz 
admired extravagantly ' l Salammb6 ' ' ; but 
he was then busy with his "Trojans at 
Carthage" and he wrote to Flaubert for 
information about costumes. We do not 
know whether Flaubert ever asked Berlioz to 
write music for "SalammbG." Gautier was 
so slow in making the libretto that Flaubert 
finally drew up his own scenario. It has been 
preserved. It differs greatly from that of 
Camille Du Lode's to which Reyer set music. 
Flaubert's libretto shows how a great writer, 
in the mad desire to win success on the stage, 
is willing to comply with all the conventions 
and do an ordinary piece of work. His 
romance was ruined in the libretto, cheapened, 
distorted. When the opera of Reyer was 
finally produced in Paris after performances in 
Brussels and Rouen, M. Anatole France 
exclaimed, the fact that the ghost of Flaubert 
did not appear in the opera house protesting 
made one doubt gravely the immortality of 
the soul. But Flaubert would probably have 
been content, for his own scenario was no 
more faithful or effective. 

Victor Mass£ was the next composer 
mentioned, but the task was finally given to 
Reyer. The task of uniting the libretto was 
allotted to Catulle Mendfes. He and Flaubert 



quarreled, and in spite of a reconciliation, the 
former was thrown overboard. A scenario 
arranged by Jules Barbier did not please. 
At last Du Locle went to work. Flaubert 
died in 1880. The opera was not produced 
until 1890 and then in Brussels, not Paris. 




HE operas that Verdi might have 
written! We know that he 
thought seriously of a "King 
Lear." " Romeo and Juliet" 
tempted him, but, by his own confession, 
when he was too old to express passion. 
Would "Salammb6" have inspired him? 

Rossini after "William Tell" meditated a 
"Faust." Goethe's poem also was in the 
mind of Meyerbeer, but he feared the reproach 
of Germans shouting "Desecration!" The 
list of subjects considered for the operatic 
stage by Schumann, Mendelssohn, in turn, is a 
long one, but neither composer was fitted by 
nature for this sort of composition. 

The question comes up, why was Flaubert, 
who objected strenuously to any performance 
of " Madame Bovary " in a theater, 60 anxious 
to have "Salammbd" turned into an opera? 




ATALIA MACFARREN, the 
widow of Sir George Mac- 
farren, died some weeks ago at 
the age of eighty-nine. She 
was chiefly known in this country as the 
translator of librettos and German songs. In 
an obituary notice published in London it is 
stated: "As she possessed a fine contralto 
voice and showed a marked talent for acting, 
she was offered an operatic engagement in an 
English company touring in America. She 
accepted, but finding theatrical life uncon- 
genial, she soon threw up her engagement and 
returned to England." What was the 
company? When did it visit the United 
States? What parts did she take? 




E are interested in contemporane- 
ous criticism in London. The re- 
views of concerts and singers and 
players have a more personal 
note than in former years, when the warmest 
praise was the statement that such and such 
a part in oratorio was "in the safe hands" 
of this one or that one. A Miss Dorice Gay 
sang in June. The Pall Mall Gazette ob- 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



263 



served: "Her only serious defect is that she 
sometimes produces the first note of a phrase 
as the Egyptians produced the Pyramids — 
by means of an inclined plane. A minor 
detail is her pronunciation of the French '«,' 
which made her sing Verlaine's famous line 
as if it ran, ' Le ciel est par dessous le toit, ' 
which might have been true of some places, 
but not of the prison of which he wrote. " 

Here is a fine example of the criticism 
complimentary. The critic of the Daily 
Telegraph heard Miss Fanny Davies, pianist, 
and Mr. Sammons, violinist, play the "Kreut- 
zer" sonata. "There was a special interest, 
for while Miss Davies adheres rightly enough 
to the traditions of the school in which she 
was musically educated, Mr. Sammons re- 
gards even the most 'classical' classics, also 
rightly enough, suggesting an appeal to in- 
dependence and individuality of thought. 
In spite of their varied outlook they both re- 
strained their independence, or difference, of 
view, and merged these views in one ; and the 
result was a most interesting and musical 
performance. " One would have supposed the 
performance would have been a case of pull 
devil, pull friar. No; the Times said the 
sonata was " thoughtfully M played. We have 
heard too many "thoughtful" performances. 
While the players are thinking hard, the 
hearer nods. 

The Times said of M. Vallier that he had 
"perhaps specialized in Massenet's "Vision 
Fugitive" too much. There is an old saying, 
" Beware of the man of one book. " This was 
quoted in the case of a Frenchman who had 
committed peculiarly atrocious murders and 
had read and re-read "The Mysteries of 
Paris" — the only book with which he was 
acquainted. Beware of the singer of one song ; 
of a song in the interpretation of which he 
fondly believes he excels all others. There are 
few baritones, professional or amateurs, who 
are not firmly convinced that they have the 
one and only effective rendering of the 
prologue to "Pagliacci." 



HE critic of the London Times 
heard two piano pieces, "Rus- 
sian Impressions," by Miss Har- 
riet Cohen. He made a sensible 
remark: "It is difficult to imagine why com- 
posers of this country are hastening to unite 




musical impressions of Russia now that they 
have discovered the richness of the impres- 
sions recorded by the Russians themselves." 
What is to be said of American composers 
who, not knowing French intimately, not 
speaking it correctly, nevertheless gaily set 
music to French poems of a frank or subtle 
nature? 




ISS BESSIE BINGHAM, who in 
June gave her first recital in 
London, must have a pleasing 
personality, for see how easily 
she was "let down" by the Pall Mall Gazette: 
"Miss Bessie Bingham's charm is partly de- 
rived from her inexperience, for it is only a 
youthful singer who will conscientiously sing 
with such constant intensity." We are also 
told that she has an "infinitesimal lisp — just 
enough to be interesting." This intensity 
and the lisp are "not merely pardonable but 
attractive when one feels there is a real ' singer 
in the making' behind it all." 

Mr. Moiseiwitsch, although he played 
Chopin delightfully, while "he is not of the 
race of Titans, but is justly reckoned with the 
6\ite of pianists," did not escape so easily. 
"Time was when long, unkempt hair and a 
flowing tie were the hallmark of the pianist. 
That, the gods be thanked, has passed away. 
Mr. Moiseiwitsch, however, threatens us 
with a dangerous precedent. He wears a 
moujik's blouse made of black silk — a 
polished version of national dress. As the 
influence of music widens we may logically 
expect Choctaw pianists with features from 
the milliner and tomahawks and scalps 
supplied by a theatrical costumer whose 
name will appear on the program. To those 
who really appreciate fine playing, the blouse 
was nothing but a source of irritation." It 
seems to us that the mistake of Mr. Moisei- 
witsch was in donning this costume for the 
interpretation of pieces by Chopin: it would 
have gone with compositions by realistic 
Russians. Playing the works of Bach, he 
should have come out with a wig. 



OMMEND us to Lady Cunard 
who has been talking in Lon- 
don about music, "the high- 

est art of all countries, because 

it is an intangible thing, and is the effect of 




264 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



the creative soul. " Having thus defined 
music, Lady Cunard said boldly that it 
stands higher than the art of the painter, 
11 because it is the effect of a spiritual inspira- 
tion, which comes from — can anyone say 
whence? " Music will have reached its zenith 
about twenty years from today. After that, 
11 we shall gradually slip back to the period of 
two or chree centuries ago, and we shall begin 
all over again." At present the baneful 
influence of the revue on music must be 
counteracted. There is immediate need of 
patrons." Patrons! Was it not George I 
or George II who, according to Thackeray, 
liked train oil on his salads, and gave an 
enlightened patronage to bad oysters? 




R. AUSTIN BIERBOWER of 
Chicago does not think so high- 
ly of music. "The enjoyment 
of music has a tendency to relax 
one's aggressiveness and make him passive." 
Musicians of the highest type and those most 
sensitive to music are unpractical — Mr. Bier- 
bower prefers "impractical" — weak, "disquali- 
fied for the greatest intellectual and volitional 
achievements. What we enjoy in music is a 
kind of stupor. Eating is thought grosser 
because the food enters the stomach ; but in 
music sound goes into the ear. Listening to 
one of Beethoven's sonatas is not greatly 
different in kind from eating a beefsteak." 
Listen to this: "No pleasure is more intense 
than that of lovers in their caresses. But it 
has no educational value, being indulged in by 
the lowest and coarsest, who take as much 
out of it as do others. And music should not 
be considered of a higher order, which is 
simply a feeling of the same kind. One 
highly cultured in music need not be culti- 
vated in anything else." Incidentally Mr. 
Bierbower tells a story of an epicure in Baltic 
more who requires his oysters roasted while 
standing on end. 



OME admire the late Max Reger 
for his fecunditv. Others have 
written an amazing number of 
compositions, and their names 
are hardly known to concert goers. There 
have been authors with a great baggage — 




Hugo, the elder Dumas, George Sand, are 
illustrious examples, — but in their bag- 
gage, as in that of Balzac, is much rubbish. 
Does anyone in these days believe in the 
plenary inspiration of Bach, Handel, Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven? Those who marvel at 
the fecundity of Reger should read a little 
essay on 4 ' La F£condit£ de Flaubert ' ' by Remy 
de Gourmont. He argues that this fecundity, 
as it is generally understood, might be con- 
sidered a disease like unto that of trees that 
yield abundant fruit, but. this fruit is poor, 
gritty, worthless. There is another fecundity, 
that of Racine, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Mal- 
larm6, which is prudent and rich, measured 
and magnificent, that of the tree which 
produces only little fruit so that it can nourish 
and concentrate for it all the power of its 
sap. 




R. FRANCESCO BERGER, dis- 
cussing that form of music known 
as the Intermezzo, breaks out in 
italics when he speaks of the In- 
termezzo in "Cavalleria Rusticana. " "Like 
every other true work of art, it will not bear 
analysis; the profound impression it creates 
being due to a wonderful combination of sim- 
plicity with beauty. Such works are not 
manufactured; they are inspired, born com- 
plete. They come to enchant, to entrance, to 
enrich us mortals, from another world — the 
land that we call 4 supernatural. ' And like 
everything that is of superhuman origin, this 
piece has been denounced, ridiculed, spat 
upon, by the Pharisees. . . . Mascagni's 
Intermezzo delights humanity today, and it 
will delight generations as yet unborn, be- 
cause it is so * human'; and it is the human 
in the great classics that makes them great, 
not their learning. " 

We regret that we are obliged to omit a 
burst of eloquence ending: "The pine- wood 
decks itself with hoar-frosts not for the 
umbrella maker; nor does the golden corn- 
field wave for the muffin-man." 

While we are glad to see that Mascagni in 
his later years has one friend who applauds 
the Intermezzo, — Mr. Berger, no doubt, is 
able to whistle the greater part of it, — we do 
not like to hear the Intermezzo on the organ, 
not even at a vesper service. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



265 




HERE are books with the 
songs of American birds in 
notation. Dr. R. H. Bellairs 
wrote not long ago to the Lon- 
don Ttfww.'Jthat on his way to church he 
heard a wild bird, probably a thrush, singing 
the arpeggio of the common chord in tune, 
"absolutely in tune. " He adds that in his 
experience the only birds that ever sing 
correct musical intervals are aliens, the 
cuckoo and the parrot. This led the Rev. 
Percival Clementi- Smith to write, also for the 
Times, that he had frequently heard the 
white-throat or willow wren sing "in correct 
chord structure its liquid mellifluous octave." 
He agreed with Dr. Bellairs that a thrush 
singing "the arpeggio of the common chord 
in tune" would indeed be wellnigh unique"; 
but some years ago at the Earl's Court Irish 
Exhibition he saw and heard a trained black- 
bird sing "The Wearing of the Green" in 
perfect tune. (By the way some insist that 
the tune of "The Wearing of the Green" is an 
old Scotch air.) Mr. E. M. Tresen Dawson 
also wrote: "I have heard a blackbird, near 
the Quantocks in Somerset, distinctly whistle 
the chord of six-three (the first inversion 
of the common chord) , in the following manner 
— 3, 2, i,6, 3. He always began on the third, 
and always accented the sixth. I heard this 
often, two years running." 



of their sound like a musical instrument, 
send forth an echo, and seem to unite their 
song." 




OW many know the rhapsody 
about singing birds in God- 
frey Goodman's "Fall of 
Man. " This Goodman was one 
of the chaplains to Queen Anne. "Hearke, 
hearke the excellent notes of singing birds! 
What variety of voices! how are they fitted 
to every passion! The little chirping birds 
(the wren and the robin) they sing a mean ; 
thfe goldfinch, the nightingale, they join 
in the treble; the blackbird, the thrush, 
they bear the tenour; while the four-footed 
beasts, with their bleating and bellowing, 
they sing a bass. How other birds sing in 
their order, I refer you to the skilful musi- 
cians: some of them keep their due times; 
others have their continued notes, that all 
might please with van Ay; while the woods, 
the groves, and the rocks, with the hollowness 




R. GEOFFREY SHAW is of 
the opinion that when young 
Jones on the way to his office 
hums 



I'm P. C. Forty-nine; 

Anyone can have this little job of mine, 

he is unconsciously doing more for the prin- 
ciple of Nationality in Art than all the 
festivals of British music and all of Mr. de 
Lara's concerts at which only music by 
British composers is performed. Down with 
the cry "Art for Art's Sake" and up with 
"Art for Life's Sake." A concert of modern 
"English" music is a dreary farce, "for the 
music performed is mostly second-hand foreign 
stuff, — written by Englishmen." The true 
English idiom is in the works of Tallis, Byrde, 
Gibbons, Purcell, "all of them just as great as 
afterwards Beethoven and Schubert became." 
The one hope for English music is that it 
should be English. "The greatest art in the 
history of the world has always been national." 




R. PAUL MORRIS in his interest- 
ing article, "Composers vs. Rus- 
sian Dancers," published in the 
July number of The New Music 
Review, calls attention to the perversion by 
the dancers of Mallarm^'s poem, "A Faun's 
Afternoon " ; also to the utter disregard shown 
by them for the printed argument of Rimsky- 
Korsakoff's "Scheherazade." But is there any 
valid objection to the story invented by the 
dancers for Schumann's "Carnaval" music? 
Mr. Morris says: "Schumann's 'Carnaval,' 
while its separate numbers were inspired by 
love affairs and other interesting things in the 
life of the composer, did not have any pro- 
gram." True. We know that the various titles 
were added after the music had been written. 
But is not the story as danced in fullest sym- 
pathy with the fantastic music? We shall 
never hear this suite of pieces played again 
without seeing the faces, figures, and panto- 
mime of the Russian dancers. 



266 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



r~ 



J i_ II— f C 



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I 



I <£fat WLtiv aud fgvencb 3^lustc 1 



^ i— >i_^i r: 



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By Gilbert Elliott, Jr. 

USIC, and likewise the other arts, 
will long bear scars of this strug- 
gle. There are those, pretend- 
ing to be well informed, who tell 
us that we shall be pleased if the war is 
finished in five years. Whether they are false 
prophets or not, it is only too true that as ieach 
day the righting becomes more bitter and 
peace seems more remote many are anxiously 
asking themselves if an end can be reached 
before the voice of the musician be utterly 
drowned by continual battle thunder. 

To be sure, in the principal cities of the 
belligerents music is not utterly absent. 
There are still a few concerts, there is still 
some opera, and there is even a bit of choral 
and chamber music and an occasional recital 
for charitable purposes. But what is their 
significance; is this "war music* ' an indica- 
tion of the triumph of art over the maelstrom 
created by conflict, or is it only music's death 
agony? The musical situation in the French 
capital at this moment cannot act as an in- 
fallible barometer, yet a careful examination 
of its main points will give us an inkling of 
what effect the war will have on French music 
at least, and naturally the musical situation of 
the other belligerents will prove somewhat 
similar. 

There is no doubt that immediately prior 
to the outbreak of hostilities France was liter- 
ally enjoying her musical golden age. This 
was due to two causes. Primarily, of course, 
it can be traced to the remarkably large 
number of musicians (and especially com- 
posers) of very great talent; and her numer- 
ous and vigorous musical activities. There 
was, however, a second and more vital factor 
on which this musical prosperity was based; 
a factor that is very easily overlooked. I 
refer to the sound economic condition of 
France immediately preceding the war. At 
no period in her history was she more flourish- 
ing, and it was this material prosperity upon 
which the vast superstructure of concert halls, 
opera houses, orchestras, music publishing, 



etc., was reared. And in this connection it 
is worth noting that this economic factor is 
absolutely necessary for a musical golden age 
in any country. In spite of individual ex- 
ceptions, genius cannot continue to greatly 
flourish in face of disparaging economic con- 
ditions, and musical history furnishes us with 
numerous examples of the emigration of a man 
of genius to a more prosperous country, such 
as Beethoven leaving Bonn-am-Rhine for 
Vienna, and Lully leaving Florence to shine 
in the brilliant court at Paris. 

If, then, we examine the present French 
musical situation to obtain some idea of the 
future, we must bear in mind both the out- 
ward manifestations of musical activity and 
the underlying economic aspect of this 
situation. 

As far as the French musicians themselves 
are concerned the situation is not at all bad. 
Although the goodly fellowship of "poilus" 
numbers many of the best of the younger men 
— such as Florent Schmitt, who is in the 
trenches; Maurice Ravel, who is said to 
occupy the hazardous post of bomb thrower 
on an aeroplane; Louis Aubert, Andrg Gail- 
lard, Reynaldo Hahn, Louis Diemer, and 
many others less widely known — the fates 
have thus far been wonderfully kind. A 
complete list of losses up to November ioth 
gives the name of eighty musicians killed and 
nine prisoners of war. By far the greater num- 
ber of these are instrumentalists. Among the 
dead, however, is the composer Alberic Mag- 
nard, who has written the operas " Berenice" 
and " Guercceur," four symphonies, and many 
lesser works. His fourth symphony was 
performed in Paris recently for the first time 
as a memorial tribute and appeared to be a 
work of some power and originality. Among 
the prisoners appears the name of Paul Paray, 
a former Prix de Rome, who is at Darmstadt. 
Undoubtedly many unknown men, for whom 
the future had greater things in store, must 
have succumbed, but that no more of those 
who have already " arrived " should have been 
taken seems little short of marvelous. 

Turning, for a moment, from the musicians 
themselves to the various concert and operatic 
organizations, we find that while conditions 
are not quite so satisfactory they are never- 
theless encouraging. Naturally the orchestra 
ranks were sadly depleted by the mobilization. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



267 



Yet the commencement of the second season 
of " war music " finds most of the holes patched 
up and activity recommenced. On the theory 
that one good orchestra is worth two poor ones 
the Colonne and Lamoureux organizations 
temporarily buried the hatchet and the new 
4 ' Concerts Colonne-Lamoureux ' ' are now 
started on their second season with a really 
good orchestra under the alternate leadership 
of Gabriel Piern6 and Camille Chevillard. In 
this contingency the seven women violinists, 
who regularly form a part of the Colonne 
orchestra, have proved a great aid. Not 
being affected by the mobilization they 
formed with the older members a nucleus for 
the present organization. The old "Soci£t6 
des Concerts du Conservatoire' ' was less 
fortunate in filling its ranks, but has, never- 
theless, reorganized and is giving Sunday 
concerts in the Grand Amphitheatre du Sor- 
bonne for the benefit of "L'CEuvre Frater- 
nelle des Artists. " 

The Op6ra Comique had no less than one 
hundred and thirty-one of its personnel mobil- 
ized (of whom ten have been killed and nine- 
teen wounded), but it recovered very quickly 
after the commencement of hostilities and has 
since played regularly. Its orchestra, under 
the baton of Paul Vidal, is probably the best 
that can be expected considering the circum- 
stances. The management, unfortunately, 
seized the war as an excuse for a policy of 
nothing but favorites, tried and true. For a 
time, owing to a mysterious report of his war 
sympathies, even Puccini was under the ban, 
and the repertoire consisted of Massenet, 
Carmen, and Louise. These rumors, however, 
having been satisfactorily dispelled, Puccini 
was triumphantly restored to the repertoire. 
Recently Alfred Bruneau's "Le Tambour" 
has been announced. While it is not a 
novelty it is perhaps a forerunner of a little 
broader policy on the part of the management. 
Amomg the smaller orchestras and musical 
organizations the Concerts Touche and Rouge, 
various women's orchestras, and a few cham- 
ber music societies have managed to survive. 

And last but not least the reopening of the 
Opera has come as the crowning feature of 
French "war music." This took place Decem- 
ber 9th , and may be looked upon as the last 
in a long series of steps by which since the 
first days of the war, when not even piano 



playing was permitted in Paris, French 
musical organizations have gradually resumed 
a large portion of their former activity. A 
very interesting gala "Representation Russe" 
is to take place on December 29th, for the 
benefit of the British Red Cross. Under the 
baton of the composer Serge Diaghilew's ballet 
will present Igor Stravinsky's "Oiseau de 
Feu." The program also includes "Sche- 
herazade" and the "Danses Polovtsiennes " 
from Borodine's "Prince Igor." 

Let us look a minute at the music publishers, 
that most important field of musical activity. 
Here again, though the situation is peculiar, 
we find that the war has not been able to 
wither their operations. Unfortunately as 
far as the bringing out of new music is con- 
cerned, there has been almost nothing until 
lately. Now we have a new pianoforte trio 
by Maurice Ravel and a sonata for 'cello and 
piano, the first of a set of six for various 
instruments, by Debussy. But in spite of 
this paucity of new publications French music 
printers are working overtime and the win- 
dows of French music stores are full of new 
music on which the ink is scarcely dry. 
What means all this activity and what is all 
this new music? It is one of the ways in 
which the Allies are trying to beat Germany, 
and this new music consists of French editions 
of the classics on which Germany has hitherto 
held almost a monopoly. 

There are several of these. The most com- 
prehensive and interesting is that of Durand 
and Fils. A large number of their volumes 
have already appeared. Their significant 
feature is that they have not been edited by 
the usual ragged musical hacks, such as those 
who make the frightful English translations 
of the German songs in the Peters edition, 
for instance, but the editors are the most 
capable of the modern French composers, 
who, for reasons largely patriotic, have given 
their aid. Thus we find the Beethoven piano- 
sonatas edited by Paul Dukas, a man, by the 
way, who never does anything hastily or care- 
lessly; the complete works of Chopin edited 
by Claude Debussy, a Roger Ducasse edition 
of Schubert, a Saint-Saens edition of Mozart, 
a Faur6 edition of Schumann, complete piano 
works of Mendelssohn edited by Maurice 
Ravel, a Ropartz edition of Haendel, and so 
forth. The work is a really monumental one, 



268 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



and new volumes are constantly being added. 
Beautifully engraved and printed and put on 
the market at a very moderate price it is 
bound to make the German editors look to 
their laurels even in neutral countries where 
they have been long established. 

On the whole, then, we may say that the 
French situation of the moment, outwardly 
and visibly, is remarkably promising. The 
war has not only not succeeded in causing a 
halt in French musical activities, but from the 
ending of the first days of confusion they have 
been steadily bettering their position, al- 
though the enemy is still only a few hours' 
taxi-ride from Paris. Apparently the cessa- 
tion of hostilities is all that is necessary to set 
almost the entire machinery of French music 
in full motion once more. 

But what of the other factor, the general 
economic situation? Will its silent pressure 
produce a weary period of musical stagnation 
in France after the war? Here we are dealing 
with a big question which it is difficult to 
answer accurately. It is only too true that 
the drain on the resources of the French people 
caused by the war has been frightful . It is only 
too true that she has already rolled up a vast 
debt on most of which she has yet to pay the 
first coupon. The enemy is in possession of 
one of the richest portions of her territory, the 
increased burden of taxation which must 
inevitably come sooner or later has been thus 
far postponed, and many other disastrous 
symptoms of changed economic conditions, 
due to the war, have not yet begun to make 
their appearance. Nevertheless, so vast are 
the resources of the French stocking that the 
acute pinch of distress has not yet made itself 
felt. After a year and a half of war, theaters, 
operas, and concerts are still well attended and 
expensive seats are as much in demand as ever. 
There seems to have yet been no cut down on 
luxuries, such as music lessons for the children ; 
and, judging from the protests over the short- 
age of taxicabs, there has yet been no general 
decision to economize and walk. Cafes and 
tea rooms are everywhere crowded, and all 
signs force one to the conclusion that the 
French are living about as comfortably as 
usual. 

Accordingly, if peace were declared to- 
morrow, or within a reasonable time, French 
musical life would be able to pick up almost 



immediately, not a great deal the worse for 
its experience; injured, one might say, neither 
in its personnel nor in its financial backing. 
Should the war, however, continue to drag 
on for two or three more weary years at the 
present fearful rats of expenditure, it is 
bound to prove too much of a strain even for 
the Gibraltar-like structure of French eco- 
nomics, and French music, like the other 
features of French life, must suffer in the years 
of depression that will follow. 



Various Hotcs 

At the University of Illinois, Urbana, 111., on June 
22d, was held what is probably the first conference on 
record devoted to a consideration of Community Musk. 
It was a part of a Better Community Conference which 
was organized under the auspices of the University, 
and whose scope was state wide. The Director of tne 
School of Music of the University presided, and the 
following topics were discussed: 
"Communitv Music: Religious, Patriotic, and in the 

Home. W. D. Armstrong, Alton. 
"Music as a Civic Factor." Kenneth A. Bradley, 

Director Bush Conservatory of Music, Chicago. 
"Music Study for a Better Community. " 

O. R. Skinner, Director Skinner School of Music, 
Bloomington. 

M. L. Swartout, Director Millikin Conservatory 
of Music, Decatur. 

Henry V. Stearns, Director of Music, Illinois 
Women's College, Jacksonville. 
About forty were in attendance, and at the close of 
the discussion an organization was formed, with Mr. 
J. Lawrence Erb, Director of the School of Music, 
University of Illinois, as chairman. Mr. Kenneth 
Bradley, Director of the Bush Conservatory of Music, 
Chicago, was delegated to extend the greetings of the 
conference to the Illinois State Music Teachers' 
Association, and to make a report to that body at its 
next meeting. In addition to the papers named above, 
Prof. Elias Bredin, Director of the Department of Music, 
Eureka College, Eureka, read a most illuminating 
paper on the Community Music Festival, in another 
of the sections. The papers were highly illuminating, 
and showed a breadth of acquaintance with the subject 
which augurs well for the future of the conference. 
Plans will be formulated in the near future for the next 
meeting. 

The next meeting of the Music Teachers' National 
Association will be held in New York City. The 
sessions will extend from Wednesday morning, Dec 
27th, to Friday afternoon, Dec. 20th. They will be 
held in Rumford Hall, No. 50 East 41st Street, a 
singularly attractive and comfortable hall about mid- 
way between the Public Library and the Grand Central 
Station. This hall is *vell known to musical people in 
New York, as it is often used for special recitals and for 
the rehearsals of more than one of the prominent musi- 
cal societies. 

The official Hotel Headquarters will be at the Murray 
Hill Hotel, which occupies the block on Park Avenue 
between 40th and 4 1 st Streets. The Hotel and the Hall 
are only a few steps apart. There are many other fine 
hotels in the immediate neighborhood. 

The annual meeting of the Oliver Ditson Society for 
the Relief of Needy Musicians was held at the resi- 
dence of the late Oliver Ditson, 233 Commonwealth 
Ave., Boston, May 26, 1916. The following often 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



269 



were elected: President, Arthur Foote; Vice-President, 
Charles H. Ditson; Secretary, Arthur R. Smith; 
Trustees, Arthur Foote, A. Parker Browne, G. W. 
Chadwick. 

As usual, a large number of cases of destitution have 
been assisted during the past year. Application may be 
made to any of the above officers. Address care Arthur 
R. Smith, 88 Summer St., Boston. 

The twenty-sixth annual celebration of the American 
Organ Players' Club was held on Tuesday, June 23d in 
Estey Hall, Philadelphia. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: President, John M'E. Ward; Vice-President, 
Henry S. Fry; Secretary, Bertram P. Ulmer; Treasurer, 
Herbert S. Drew; Librarian, Laura vVood-Grebe. 
Directors: Frederick Maxson, Rollo F. Maitland, 
Uselma C. Smith, Stanley T. Reiff, and Jas. C. War- 
hurst. 

The report of the Executive Committee is always an 
interesting document of which we print the following 
resume* : Bach received 11 renditions: Fugue in D 
major, 4 times (once with Prelude) ; Prelude and Fugue, 
B minor, 2 times; Fugue, E flat; Fugue d-la-gigue; 
Prelude and Fugue in C; Fantasia, C minor; Prelude 
and Fugue, E minor (wedge) ; each once. 

Twenty-four original compositions by members of 
the Club were played: Kinder, 7, Maxson, 5; Reiff, 4; 
Fry, 3; Wadlow, Morgan, Maitland, Porter, Ward, 
Wood, and Crozier, each 1. Nineteen recitals were 
played in this Series. 

The Second Series comprised seventeen recitals. 
Bach again heads the list with 11 performances as 
follows: Toccata and Fugue, D minor twice; Prelude 
and Fugue, B minor; Fugue C major; Air from Suite 
in D; Prelude E flat; Gavotte from Sixth 'Cello Sonata; 
Passacaglia in C; Prelude and Fugue in C; Fugue in 
gigue form, each once. Twelve original compositions, 
vocal and organ, by Club members were played. 

The entertainment was "anti-serious and partici- 
pated in by H. S. Fry, Stanley Reiff, Percy C. Miller, 
Harry Banks, and Rollo Maitland. 

The honor guest was Mark Andrews, who played and 
sang some of his monologues to the approval of a 
hilarious audience that packed the hall. Refreshments 
were served by the Club officers. Four candidates 
passed the required examination and were elected to 
active membership. 

"The Soul Triumphant," by H. R. Shelley, was 
presented June 18th by the Nyack Arts Club, Nyack, 
N. Y., under the direction of H. P. Noll, conductor. 
Mr. Shelley, the composer was at the organ. 

The Pittsburgh Musical Institute presented June 5th. 
Wagner's drama "Siegfried." Mr. C. N. Boyd, 
director, told the story and the excerpts were played 
by Mr. D. Russell and Mr. W. H. Oetting. 

The following program was presented June 9th, by 
the Lyric Club. Charles City, la., F. Parker, director: 
"The Elves," Bornschein; r '0 Happy Sleep," Wood- 
man; "A Masquerade," Barbour; "The Heart's 
County," "The Cock Shall Crow," "Go, Lovely Rose," 
and "Don't Care," Carpenter; "The Lake of the 
Dismal Swamp," Matthews; "The City of Joy," 
Deems Taylor; "The Foolish Virgins," Kernochan. 



Jfteuiexus of Qtvo pftustc 

The Organ Works of John Sebastian Bach. Book XV. 

The Little Organ Book. Edited by Ivor Atkins, 

with an introduction by Ernest Newman. 

London: Novello & Co., Ltd.; The H. W. Gray Co., 
New York. 

M. Widor, in his preface to Schweitzer's "J. S. 
Bach, " speaking of the Chorale Preludes, mentions the 
difficulty he had in understanding certain passages. 



He felt that on one page Bach was writing absolute 
music, and on the next appeared to be expressing some- 
thing in the nature of a program. Asking Schweitzer 
how one was to know what idea lay behind such 
passages, he was told that a knowledge of the words 
of the hymns would make all clear. 

Many an English organist must have found himself 
in the same difficulty. He was probably well aware of 
the beauty of the Preludes, but yet felt that somehow he 
had not got at the true inwardness of the music. How 
could he, without a key? In many cases the chorale 
melody was so hidden by arabesques as to be all but 
indistinguishable, and generally there was no more 
than a German title to help the player to get at the 
idea that seemed to be at the back of the music. 

There can be no greater testimony to the intrinsic 
beauty of these works of Bach than the fact that in 
spite of this ignorance of the melodies and the texts 
from which the Preludes usually derive their poetic 
bases, many of our organists have long since placed 
them among music which, by reason of a rare combina- 
tion of technical finish, expressiveness, and intimate 
nature, is for the most part outside the sphere of 
criticism. The growth of this appreciation of the 
Chorale Preludes will receive a decided impetus from 
the new Edition which Messrs. Novello are bringing 
out, the first volume of which lies before us. 

It may be said at once that it is exactly what or- 
ganists have required, but have so far been unable to 
obtain, either at home or from abroad, — a carefully 
edited version of the Preludes, with each number 
preceded by the chorale melody which it treats, and a 
verse of the hymn to which it was most frequently sung, 
the text being given in German and English. The 
harmonization of the melodies in all but a few cases is 
by Bach, and is chiefly from the Cantatas. The trans- 
lations are from standard sources, the majority being 
from the pen of Caroline Winckworth. There are also 
some quaint specimens from "Gude and Godly 
Ballates" (1568) and Bishop Coverdale's 'Goostly, 
Psalmes and Spiritualle Songes" of about the same 
date, while the Rev. G. R. Woodward's valuable collec- 
tion, "Songs of Syon," has of course been drawn on. 
The editor, save in one instance, has adopted the Bach 
Society version of the music, and retains also Bach's 
grouping of the notes, even though this is at times 
contrary to modern custom. There is much in his 
contention that the original grouping often serves as a 
valuable clue to the phrasing. In the absence of 
authoritative slurring, it certainly seems advisable to 
hold fast to anything which may take its place. Most 
organists, too, will agree with Mr. Atkins that "these 
little Preludes should be printed without the customary 
network of phrase-marks. " What have some of us not 
suffered from certain German editions, wherein the 
editor, with Teutonic thoroughness, has divided and 
sub-divided the phrases, with slurs within slurs, and 
dots cast round as if from a pepper-pot! After all, the 
Preludes are mostly constructed on short figures, the 
phrasing of which is obvious. Mr. Atkins has therefore 
contented himself with a dot to signify the release of the 
finger at the end of a phrase, or a short upright line in 
cases where the break should be more pronounced, and 
a comma at the end of each line of the choral in certain 
cases where the player might be likely unintentionally 
to tie the final note. He has also retained the old use 
of the pause in this connection. The registration 
suggested is invariably excellent, and the editor has 
done well to point out in his prefatory remarks on the 
subject, that many of the Preludes sound equally well 
loud or soft, and lend themselves to great variety of 
treatment. In this, as in other respects, Mr. Atkins is 
particularly to be commended for not having unduly 
dotted the "i's" and crossed the "t's." Bach has 
suffered a good deal from over-editing. 

Mr. Ernest Newman contributes a long Introduction 
which is an important addition to the literature of the 
subject. It is in three parts, the first being historical, 
the second dealing with the various forms used by Bach, 
and the third with the poetical, pictorial, and symbolical 



270 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



side of the works. We note, by the by, a slight differ- 
ence between him and the editor on a small point. 
Mr. Newman says that "for a full understanding of the 
Preludes, it is necessary to be acquainted not only with 
the chorale melody and Bach's form, but with the whole 
of the words of the hymns." (The italics are his.) 
Mr. Atkins admits that "the ideal course would have 
been to have given the hymns in their entirety," but 
says that this course was impossible owing to the great 
length of some of them. "Fortunately, however," he 
goes on, "as with English hymns, the first verse gives 
a very fair idea of the drift of the hymn." As Mr. 
Newman quotes some striking instances of the first 
verse being misleading, it seems a pity that a com- 
promise was not effected in such cases by printing the 
verses that mattered most. 

_ Mr. Newman does not dwell unduly on the pictorial 
side of the Preludes. He draws attention to a few of the 
more striking examples, and refers the reader to the 
pages of Schweitzer and Pirro for fuller particulars. 

It may be questioned whether this feature of the 
Chorale Preludes was so much lost sight of by Spitta or 
Mosewius as is generally supposed. Mr. Newman says 
that Spitta "was unable or unwilling to see many 
illustrations of it that are patent enough to us," and 
that Mosewius, "though insisting strongly on it, . . . 
failed to see that what was true of the vocal music was 
true of the instrumental works also." It may be 
suggested that Spitta did not dwell on the point because 
it was too obvious (even for him), and that Mosewius 
drew attention to the tone-painting in the vocal works 
because its presence there was somewhat of an innova- 
tion, whereas in the organ works it was a convention. 
Mr. Newman quotes Ziegler, one of Bach's pupils, as 
saying that "his master always urged on him the im- 
portance of playing the Chorales not merely as music 
but 'according to the tenor of the words. ' " 

Many of Bach's predecessors and contemporaries 
wrote Chorale Preludes in which the tone-painting is 
as obvious as that of John Sebastian himself. In his 
Prelude on "Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar," 
and in certain settings of "Vom Himmel hoch," Bach 
employs scale-passages to depict the angelic flights. 
Buttstedt (1666-^1727) uses the same material in deal- 
ing with the subject, — indeed, the opening and closing 
passages of his Prelude on "Vom Himmel kam" is 

Sjrhaps more successful pictorially than Bach's, 
anff (1630-1706), Lubeck (1654-1740), Tunder (1614- 
67), Walther (1 684-1 748), and others, wrote Preludes 
in which attempts to illustrate the words are obvious, 
and sometimes surprisingly successful. Occasionally 
they wrote sets of Variations dealing with the senti- 
ments of the verses in order. Even Pachelbel at times 
forsook the somewhat mechanical form that bears his 
name, and became descriptive. (See, as perhaps the 
best example, his delicious little piece on "Vom 
Himmel hoch," wherein he treats the pastoral side 
of Christmas.) 

John Caspar Vogler (1697-1765) wrote a long Prelude 
on the Passion Chorale, " Jesu Leiden, Pein und Tod, " 
which in idiom, richness of arabesque, and intensity of 
expression, recalls so strongly Bach's "O Mensch, 
bewein," that it is actually mcluded in some editions 
of Bach, and ascribed to him. We mention these 
examples, because it seems to us that there is a ten- 
dency to regard Bach as having done something new in 
writing tone-pictures, whereas he merely did better 
what others had done before him. But after all, the 
tone-painting is a detail that may be — and often is — 
too much insisted on, with the result that occasionally 
the music is regarded as describing physical rather than 
psychical states. It is as examples of intimate expres- 
sions of moods that these pieces make their final and 
lasting appeal. On this aspect of them we cannot do 
better than quote the words with which Mr. Newman 
ends his Introduction: 

"It is along the converging lines of the poetry and 
the music of these Preludes that the reverent student 
of them will work. The closer his familiarity with 



them, the more he will be amazed both at the emo- 
tional heights and depths of this great nature and at 
the incomparable skill and resource of the musician 
'With this key,' said Wordsworth of the sonnet, 
'Shakespeare unlocked his heart.' The Chorale 
Preludes are the key to the very heart of Bach. If 
everything else of his were lost, from them we could 
reconstruct him in all his pathos and almost all his 
grandeur. " 



We believe that this edition, from a musical and 
literary point of view, as well as on account of its 
convenient arrangement and comprehensive nature, 
will be regarded as one of the most valuable contribu- 
tions to the organists' library that have appeared for 
some years. 



There is a slump in Futurist music in the belligerent 
countries just now, but in America stock seems to hi 
rising. Leo Ornstein is well to the fore with recitals 
and new compositions, and Edgard Varese has arrived 
in New York from Paris, and is planning a series of 
concerts of ultra-modern music. Some of us who may 
have difficulty in understanding what these young men 
would be at will find all made clear by the following 
remark of Mr Varese: — 



"My conclusion is that the musical art is endeav- 
ouring to purge itself of its pictorial or descriptive 
side, to express a psychic state proper to the indi- 
vidual projecting into space the time in which it was 
conceived." 



So now you know. But the Futurist composer is 
likely to have his nose put out of joint by Mr. Isador 
Berger, who has just been expressing his psychic state 
by writing Abstractist music. Abstractist music is 
merely the expression in sound of Abstractist pictures. 
Abstractist pictures are an attempt to represent ideas 
without form. Mr. Berger has been explaining how 
the idea came to him. He stood watching the faces 
of the people who looked at the pictures, and noticed 
that nine out of ten, standing before a given picture, 
wore the same expression. Aengle's " Cosmic Spectra" 
made them thoughtful, at Phillips's "Moods" they 
wore a look of dissatisfaction; at Carlsen's "Wedding 
March" they brightened up (as might be expected); 
yet, says Mr. Berger, there were no pictures there, 
simply a riot of line and colour. What could be more 
natural than to set these riots to music, using bright 
instruments to represent bright colours, sombre to 
represent sombre, and so on. No sooner said than done. 
In "Moods" nothing was resolved,' the colours being 
a mass of dots and lines, however looked at, "and the 
eye could not gaze at any one part of the picture without 
being drawn aside to some other part, " the effect being 
to irritate the beholder, as might well be the case. In 
Mr. Berger's orchestration of "Moods" nothing is 
resolved. He starts off with two dominant seventh 
chords, — not, it seems to me, a particularly up-to-date 
proceeding, since Beethoven began his first symphony 
in much the same way, and old Bach had long before 
kicked off with a chord of the added sixth. Berger, 
however, improves on these out-of-date composers by 
leaving his chords unresolved, the oboe taking up its 
parable with a plaintive melody "like a lost child." 
The melody, we are told, does not resolve (how should 
it?) but "collides with the more sombre instruments, 
and there is no logical sequence to the ensuing chords. 
The cacophonous result does indeed accomplish its 
object, namely it leaves the hearer dissastified, " — 
which I can quite understand, indeed it is the only point 
on which one feels clear. 

Musical Opinion. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



271 



\ Ecclesiastical piusic j 

Q EDITED BY [ 

D t 

SJ G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc. £ 

1^— * * aM WM mM ■ *— »* * — ■»— * 




E have referred, in a previous 
issue, to the persistent demands 
that find voice in English jour- 
nals, regarding alterations in the 
services of Morning and Evening Prayer. 
The following defense of these services in 
their present form we quote from a contribu- 
tor to the Guardian (London). 

"The attacks upon Matins and Evensong 
now being made recall to my mind the words 
of a certain Roman priest who, like myself, 
had seceded from the Church of England. 
On the occasion to which I refer I was paying 
him a visit in Rome, and we were discussing 
the merits and demerits of the services of the 
branch of the Church we had left, and com- 
paring them with those of the Communion 
to which we belonged. His remarks were not 
quite what I expected to hear, and his almost 
plaintive murmur, ' We have nothing that can 
take the place of the Anglican Evensong,' 
staggered me at the time, as the Roman 
services were still comparatively new to me, 
and their novelty prevented one from seeing 
their defects. But as he went on to dilate 
upon the flimsiness of the Roman services — 
the Mass, of course, excepted — the merits of 
the Anglican Evensong shone out and have 
continued to shine more brightly for me. 
Neither Benediction nor Vespers can supply 
the place of Evensong; for, whatever the 
defects of the sermon may be, or if there be no 
sermon, there are the two substantial Lessons 
to meditate upon, as well as the Psalms for 
the day. It is therefore not the fault of the 
service if we go away empty, but the fault of 
our education, which has produced a frame 
of mind and a condition of heart which is 
unable to appreciate it. 

" When men of sound judgment and common 
sense range themselves on opposite sides in 
discussing a question like the one referred to, 
we may be certain that the truth lies some- 
where between them. The framers of Matins 
and Evensong were well aware of this, and 
these services are what they were intended to 



be — viz., helps to public worship and medita- 
tion, freed from the faults of Rome as well as 
from the defects of Dissent. " 

Most of our readers are probably out of 
sympathy with those (not only in England 
but here also) who would change the Prayer 
Book. The above, coming from an Anglo- 
Roman source, is peculiarly interesting. 




X one of his recent papers on 
church music, Sir Frederick 
Bridge intimates that the chant- 
ing of the Psalms is better now 
than it used to be; but he deplores the custom 
of using a high pitch for the choral responses. 
He says : 

"In many of the country cathedrals forty 
or fifty years ago I have heard the daily 
service rendered often by a very small staff, 
yet with reverence and taste. As to chanting 
the Psalms, seventy years ago I suppose the 
only pointed Psalter was the one by Janes, of 
Ely. Now we have abundant choice, and it 
must be acknowledged that much more 
attention is given to this part of the service 
and to the Responses than was formerly the 
case. I may venture upon one remark with 
regard to the Responses. These are so much 
.more devotional when taken at a low pitch, 
and I am convinced that a low note also for 
intoning — say G, or even F, if it can be main- 
tained — would do much to make this vexed 
point more acceptable to congregations. One 
hears the Prayers sometimes almost shrieked 
on a! very high A, or even B, and how this can 
be reconciled with the direction to say the 
Confession in a 'humble voice' I cannot 
understand." 

The unaccompanied type of service has 
one drawback that is serious — it places the 
choir entirely at the mercy of the cantor. 
Organists who keep their choristers in a high 
condition of vocal training dislike to "give 
notes' ' (as the expression is) on the organ. 
They expect the priest to exercise a reasonable 
amount of common sense, and they take it for 
granted that he will avoid extremes of pitch. 
It is inartistic to "pull up" the precentor 
every now and then by announcing the note he 
should take, when he himself should be guided 
by the context, and should be able to do the 
right thing in the right place without any 
prompting from the organ. 



272 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



Unaccompanied services are far more com- 
mon in England than they are here, and it is 
probable that what Sir Joseph Bridge com- 
plains about is (to a large extent) due to musical 
incompetence on the part of the clergy. 

If the "Ely Confession" and the "Tallis 
Festal Responses'' were to be done away with 
entirely, or used only for special occasions, 
there would be a great gain in the devotional 
character of the choral service. But so strong 
is the force of habit, and so accustomed have 
clergymen and congregations become to the 
wrong use of these settings, reform seems to 
be almost hopeless, no matter how vigorously 
it may he urged by organists. 

So it is quite likely that we shall continue 
to hear "shrieking on high A," to quote the 
Abbey organist, until the millennium. 




E wonder how many American or- 
ganists are acquainted with the 
Janes pointing of the Psalms. 
However clumsy that system 
may appear in comparison with " modern' ' 
pointing, it was at all events free from com- 
plexity. This is more than can be said of a 
certain pointing that is now in almost univer- 
sal use. Before the time of the Ely organist 
choristers had to depend upon memory in deal- 
ing with the words between the recitation and 
the colon. In cathedral choirs, daily services 
and daily rehearsals minimized the danger of 
mistakes. But in parish churches, where 
week-day choral services were the exception 
and not the rule, the chanting of the Psalms 
must have been a hazardous undertaking. 




E are now living in an "age of 
systems" so to speak. Not only 
are there a great many different 
"Psalters" in the market, but 
there are three or four new ones on the stocks, 
and shortly to be launched. We are so often 
requested to recommend the "best" we can- 
not resist the temptation of quoting the 
following from Musical Opinion: 

"The most frequently asked question asked 
of the unfortunate writer of these notes is 
4 What do you consider is the best Psalter ?' This 
persistent staggerer most often comes from 
colleagues who do not state what their point 
of view is, whether Anglican or Gregorian. 
So that, rather than recommend the 'Barless' 



to a plainsong church or the ' New Helmore' 
to an inveterate Anglican place of worship, 
I have adopted an unvarying formula in 
reply to all queries of this kind. It is: 'Ask 
your vicar; he probably knows more about 
these things than any mere musician!' The 
result of this course (which, as a time-saving 
device, I have had printed on a postcard) is 
that I have acquired the reputation of being 
a satiric anti-clerical whose views on most 
things are necessarily suspect. 

"This is really most unkind. All I want to 
do is to avoid friction. I have never yet had 
anything to do with a church where I have 
had, or any predecessor or successor of mine 
has had, the slightest voice in choosing the 
Psalter. It is true that I have had only three 
church appointments in twenty years, so 
that my own experience may not be normal, 
but I have consulted a good many of my 
confreres from time to time, and they all tell 
me the same thing, — namely that they have 
all f ound one or other of the standard Psalters 
in use and have never been given any oppor- 
tunity for changing it. So that what I am 
going to write now is intended to be passed 
on to the reverend clergy of this realm in case 
they should ever require information on a 
subject which lies within their province 
(apparently) to decide upon. 

"If you are content with the traditional or 
meditative method, in which the music is 
innocuous, rather than illustrative, and where 
the words color the music, then the nearer 
you get to the old cathedral tradition the 
better (I am now leaving plainsong out of 
account, for the moment). I believe the real 
cathedral tradition was very free in the matter 
of rhythm and very beautiful in effect. It 
grew up apart from pointed books and was 
crystallized by the daily use of singers who 
knew the words of the Psalms practically by 
heart. But the 'Cathedral Psalter,' in its 
inception, was a smart title rather than an 
accurate one, and I believe that half a century 
ago the feeblest provincial cathedral choir 
would have been ashamed of 'imaginary bars' 
or any other devices of the same kind. 

"It is possible that the actual results of 
the old cathedral tradition were incapable of 
exact transcription into printed form. Pro- 
bably they were set down most approximately 
by Elvey, and again in the Psalter prepared 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



273 



for Wells Cathedral by Mr. Lavington. They 
exist also in 'The Sudbury Psalter* and I 
believe that the most perfect type of medita- 
tive Anglican chanting could probably be 
secured by the choirmaster who first assimi- 
lated the general contents of these three books, 
then studied the accents in Dr. Hopkins's 
'Temple Psalter/ and finally pointed some 
large type Prayer Books, marking just the 
syllable on which the reciting note is left, and 
leaving the rest to fate. No doubt such 
advice as this seems somewhat inconclusive, 
but then Anglican chanting is not yet a settled 
art, and it suffers from being too much in the 
hands of the doctrinaire theorist." 




HE honorary degree of Doctor of 
Music was conferred upon Mr. 
Miles Farrow, organist of St. 
John's Cathedral, by the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, Pa., at the recent 
commencement exercises held on the 14th of 
June. Although not as well known in the 
East as some of our nearby colleges, the 
University of Pittsburgh is a very old institu- 
tion, dating back to 1787. 

We extend our hearty congratulations to 
Mr. Farrow. 




EW YORK choirmasters have not 
forgotten the remarkable con- 
certs given some years ago in 
Carnegie Hall by the Mendels- 
sohn Choir of Toronto. It was conceded at 
that time that no such singing had ever been 
heard in this city. In view of the European 
war, and the active part Canada has taken in 
it, the following account of a recent concert, 
written by a correspondent of the Musical 
Times, is of peculiar interest : 

"A great number of the men have gone 
overseas to fight for their King and country, 
and although the male- voice section had been 
reduced through war contingencies, the whole 
choir numbered 220 voices, and its singing 
was as beautiful as ever, combining that 
finish and detail one is accustomed to hear 
at the great musical competitions in the Old 
Land. The sopranos were brilliantly clear 
and chaste; the contraltos had a rich mellow 
quality; the tenors were always sweet and 
refined; and the basses had that wonderful 
diapason rounded tone that gives the solid 



and majestic support so essential in a cappella 
singing. 

"Although I have been privileged for years 
to hear the finest performances at the English 
musical festival competitions, I am bound 
to say that never has it been my good fortune 
to hear anything more refined and finished 
than the work done by the Mendelssohn Choir. 

"Dr. Vogt is certainly one of the greatest 
choral conductors of this century, and you 
have only to see him at work, and hear the 
wonderful effects that he secures from his 
choristers, to realize this. He is full of per- 
sonal magnetism, and secures the interpreta- 
tion of his fine ideas with the ease of a magician. 
He is a great personality, a diplomat in the 
highest sense, gentle and winsome, yet firm, 
and possesses the great gifts of authority and 
command which secure obedience through the 
channels of love and respect. 

"The tone of the Choir is wonderful — it is so 
refined, pure, and liquid. The ff's are dis- 
tinguished by an absence of anything coarse, 
and the piling up of a great volume of resonant 
tone is almost ' oceanic ' in power, yet always 
pure and solid. The pp's are soft, fine, and 
very velvety, always retaining a phenomenal 
purity, even to the faintest echo. The tnfs 
also impressed me 'very much* — there was a 
warmness and plasticity in the tone, giving the 
listener a feeling that any conceivable ex- 
pansion or contraction could be executed at 
will, and such was undoubtedly the case, for 
I have never before heard such 'real* cres- 
cendos and diminuendos. The shading was an 
outstanding feature in the performances, and 
the colors used were certainly wonderfully 
blended and tastefully laid on by the master 
musician conducting." 




PROMINENT editorial has just 
appeared in the Church Times 
(London) giving rather a gloomy 
account of music as it is ren- 
dered to-day by English village choirs. 

It is rather difficult to draw the line between 
small parishes and village churches. If the 
following onslaught, which we give only in 
part for lack of space, represents the true 
condition of things, it does not speak well for a 
country that has enjoyed the advantages of 
centuries of musical growth. 
England is a very small place, about the 



274 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



size of one of our " medium* ' states. The 
smaller towns and villages are not more than 
a few miles from famous centers of musical 
influence — of which there are over a hundred, 
including Cathedrals, Collegiate Chapels, 
and large parish churches. One would think 
that much influence in a little spaoe would 
count for something. But we read: 

"When Longfellow's village blacksmith 
heard his daughter's voice in the choir it 
seemed to him like her mother's voice singing 
in Paradise, and, the poet adds, with his hard, 
rough hand he wiped a tear out of his eyes. 
Not having been in America, we have no 
knowledge of the quality of the village 
maiden's vocal performance, but the country 
which has given us the American organ is 
scarcely likely to be prolific of good singing. 
It is more probable that, under stress of 
emotion, the blacksmith's parental pride 
took the place of the musical sense, causing 
him to overlook any defects of voice-produc- 
tion. Here, in England, it is the blacksmith's 
son who is heard in the choir, and perhaps the 
blacksmith himself, if he happens to be a 
harmonious one. And here again there is too 
often something for tears, something to wail 
and knock the breast. But they are tears of 
self-pity that every one had to endure such 
frightfulness. 

"It happens sometimes, but less frequently 
than could be desired, that a priest is a com- 
petent musician, with a knowledge of what is 
best in Church music and with an understand- 
ing of the possibilities of the human voice. 
Such a man, appointed to a country benefice, 
will have to suffer, until such time as he can 
effect a cure, unutterable pain whenever the 
Church offices are sung by the well-meaning 
but incompetent men and boys composing 
the village choir. Under the existing system 
the people have grown up accustomed to a 
state of musical things that is simply torture 
to a sensitive mind and ear. The organ to 
begin with, if there is one, is coarse of tone, its 
pipes made of cheap metal, its stops ill- 
balanced, and, as often as not, it is more or 
less out of tune. Or it may be that the in- 
strumental accompaniment is supplied by a 
harmonium, better named by one who had 
suffered from its infliction, the nasal organ. 
The curious thing about this unhappy inven- 



tion is that any one who can grope his way 
about a piano is assumed to be able to play 
the harmonium with ease, whereas it is an 
instrument that only very few people can 
play. A foolish tradition, not an old one, 
but old enough to have become deep-rooted, 
requires that everything that is musically 
rendered in choirs and places where they sing 
must be rendered in the country church in 
cathedral fashion, so that Matins and Even- 
song, the two offices to which another bad 
tradition gives the chief importance, are 
choral throughout. The Psalms and Can- 
tides, prose-poems which demand the utmost 
care and intelligence in those who recite them, 
are scrambled through with no attention to 
their meaning or beauty, for the simple 
reason that so much and so difficult chanting 
is beyond the powers of any but a thoroughly 
trained choir. Moreover, the Anglican chant, 
depending as it does on harmonic rather than 
melodic effect, has to be sung in parts by a 
scratch team of vocalists, no one group of 
whom is equal to the work put upon it. The 
reciting notes are often far too high ; the tenor 
part occasionally soars to levels difficult for 
the average tenor choirman to reach ; the alto 
is considered practically negligible, and, as for 
the bass, that part being, as a matter of course, 
undertaken by any one who cannot get quite 
so high as the so-called tenors can, the ensemble 
is pitifully bad. When to this are added the 
stark and ugly melodies of the chants, the 
unskilled accompanying, the unintelligent 
recitation, the faulty voice-production of 
men and boys, and the false taste in the choice 
of hymns and hymn-tunes, we get a combina- 
tion of horrors enough to set any musical 
persons longing for an absolutely plain 
service." 

Perhaps the picture has been too highly 
colored. We hope so. If it is "true to 
nature" the only remedy is to abolish the 
choirs, organists, and organs! 



R. ARTHUR HENRY MESSI- 
TER, who was organist and 
choirmaster of Trinity Church 
from 1866 to 1897 died on July 
2d, in his eighty-third year. An account of 
his life will be given in a future issue. 




THE NEfV MUSIC REVIEW 



275 




J. WARREH ANDREWS, A.O.O., Wardra S. LBWI8 ELMER. F.A.O.O., Snb-WudM 

HAROLD V. MILUGAN, F.A.G.O., Gsn.Sec. VICTOR BAIBR, Mm. Doc, A.G.O., On. Trwu. 

FOUNDED 1896 

AUTHORIZED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

CENERAL OFFICE, 90 TRINITY PLACE, NEW YORK 



Headquarters 



Those present at the regular meeting of the Council 
in New York, Monday, June 26th, were: Warden 
Andrews, Dr. Baier, Messrs. Milligan, Buhrman, 
Coombs, Demarest, Hedden, Schlieder. Routine 
business was transacted. Th* Examination Committee 
Chairman, Mr. Hedden reported ninety-one candidates 
examined in nineteen examination centers. Miles 
I 'A. Martin was elected to fill the unexpired term of 
Philip James whose resignation from the Council was 
accepted with regrets. David McK. Williams was 
elected to fill the unexpired term of Clement R. Gale. 
Rev. Dr. Charles S. Hutchinson, Philadelphia, Mrs. 
Stearns and Messrs Berry and Wilson of Cincinnati 
were elected Honorary Associates. T. Scott Buhrman 
was added to the Console Committee. 

Chairman Warren R. Hedden reported the names of 
64 candidates who passed the 191 6 examinations and 
they were elected, as follows: 



Hope Leroy Baumgartner, Mus.B., Savannah, Ga. 
Conrad E. Forsberg, Erie, Pa. 

Ezra Harold Geer, A.M., Mus.B., Vassar College, Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y. 

Herbert John Jenny, Lexington, Ky. 

Walter Keller, Mus. Doc., Chicago, 111. 

Daniel Joseph Murphy, Scranton, Pa. 

Hugh McKinnon. New York, N. Y. 

Wilson T. Moog, Mus.B., Northampton, Mass. 

Miles I* Anson Martin, New York, In. Y. 

Neille Odell Rowe. Wooster, O. 

Charles Sanford Skilton, B.A.. Lawrence, Kan. 

Mrs. Edith R. Smith, Redlands, Cal. 

Mrs. Estelle D. Swift, Berkeley, Cal. 

Carl Paige Wood, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

ASSOCIATES 

Albert O. Anderson, Rochester, Minn. 
Beecher Aldrich. New York, N. Y. 
Miss Rena I so be 1 Bisbee, A.B., Watertown, Mass. 
Alfred R. Boyce, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Edward Shippen Barnes, New York, N. Y. 
Russel P. Broughton. Oberlin. O. 
Clifton C. Brainerd. M.A., Hartford, Conn. 
Rev. H. C. Briggs, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
R. Miles Beard, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss Dora Connor, Toronto, Canada. 
Miss Kate Marion Chapin, Auburndale, Mass. 
Howard A. Cottingham, Cranford, N. J. 
Sidney C. Durst, Cincinnati, O. 
Prank J. Doorley, Sidney, O. 
C. W. Dieckmann, Decatur, Ga. 
Miss Ethel Davis, Mus.B., Marshall, Mo. 
William R. Davis, Millbrook. N. Y 

Karl H. Eschman, A.M., Dennison University, Granville, O. 
Roy S. Greenough, New York State School for the Blind, 
Batavia, N. Y. 

Hugo P. Goodwin. Chicago, 111. 

Clifford Fowler Green, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Miss Bertha St. John Graves. Boston, Mass. 

George Gansz, Philadelphia. Pa. 

C. Arthur Hackney, Unionville, Conn. 

Miss Violet Hernandez, Waltham, Mass. 

Walter Edward Howe. Norfolk. Va. 

Charles E. Hall. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Miss Jeanne tte Hart Howe. Natick, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Hutchins. Toledo. O. 

Llewellyn Jones, Scranton. Pa. 

Wesley Krehbiel Kuhnle, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Oliver H. Kleinschmidt, St. Louis. Mo. 

Charles H. Lawrence, Sac City, Sac Co., la. 



Miss Emilie Leschke, Hartford, Conn. 
Thomas H. Larimore. Wheeler Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 
Miss Pearl I. Malsfaey, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Miss Ruth Muzzy, San Francisco, Cal. 
E. Willis Pritchard, Owego, Tioga Co., N. Y. 
Miss Laura Bell Parkin, Youngstown, O. 

Homer F. Rebert, Franklin and Marshall Academy, Lancaster, 
Pa. 
J. Alfred Schehl, Cincinnati, O. 
Miss Edith Elgar Sackett. Highwood. N. J. 
Richard G. Stock. Jersey City, N. J. 
Mrs. Blanche M. Sencindiver, Catonsville, Md. 
Adolph Steuterman, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. J. L. Van Name, Mariner's Harbor, S. I.. N. Y. 
John Boynton Wilson, B.A., Washington, D. C. 
Homer Emerson Williams, New York, N. Y. 
Charles J. Young, Cincinnati, O. 
John Yoakley, Cincinnati, O. 



VIRGINIA CHAPTER 

The annual meeting of the Chapter was held on 
May 27th, at the Jefferson Hotel, Richmond. 

The meeting and election of officers took place at 
12 noon. At 1 f.m. a luncheon was served in a private 
dining-room of the hotel. 

The following officers were elected: 

Dean, Wm. H. Tones, A.A.G.O., Norfolk. 

Sub-Dean, W. Henry Baker, Richmond. 

Secretary, Miss Bessie Marsden, Norfolk. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Leslie F. Watson. A.A.G.O.. Richmond. 

Librarian, Miss Jessie T. Brewer, A.A.G.O., Danville. 

Auditor, Mr. F. Flaxington Harker, A.R.C.O., Richmond. 

Registrar, W. E. Howe. A.A.G.O.. Norfolk. 

Exec. Comm., Mr. Leslie F. Watson, A.A.G.O., Richmond. 
Mr. Ernest H. Cosby, A.A.G.O., 
Mr. Louis E. Weitzel, Richmond. 



WESTERN NEW YORK CHAPTER 

The annual meeting of the Chapter was held June 
28th, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. O. M. Myers, at 
Pittsford, where members and guests were entertained 
at dinner. Headquarters of the Chapter i? in Rochester, 

Officers were elected as follows: 

Dean, Walter Henry Carter. 
Sub-Dean, Norman Nairn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Wallace Miller. 
Treasurer, Miss Lucy McMillan. 
Registrar, Miss Gertrude- Miller. 
Auditors, I. J. Perduyn. 
Elmer Fisher. 
Exec. Comm., Mrs. Jeannette G. Fuller, Rochester. 
Miss Alice C. Wysard, Rochester. 
George E. Fisher, Rochester. 

Other Executive members who hold over are: 

Miss Louise Newman. 
Fred C. Lee. Rochester. 
Elliott C. Irvin, Rochester. 
William Irving Lyon. Batavia. 
George Parker, Syracuse. 
Emil Keuchen, Buffalo. 

Plans for next season include a series of recitals by 
out-of-town organists and the usual guild church ser- 
vices, while local organists will give recitals in various 
towns in Western New York. 



276 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



CENTRAL NEW YORK CHAPTER 

Friday evening, June 2, 19 16, Miss Julia Etta 
Broughton, Sub-Dean of the Chapter gave the in- 
augural recital on the pipe organ recently installed in 
the new Methodist Episcopal Church, Canajoharie, 
N. Y., by C. E. Morey of Utica, N. Y. She was 
assisted by W. Scott Murtfeldt, violinist, of Syracuse, 
and Florence Hallett Forte, soprano and choir director 
of the church. 



MISSOURI CHAPTER 

The Chapter closed its season with the annual guest- 
evening and alfresco dinner on the evening of May 29th. 
Interesting talks were given bv the members present 
upon the work of the Chapter during the past year and 
its mission for the future betterment of the organists' 
standing. 

©hurch Jlotes 

The following were included in the service lists for 
June, at Grace Church, Utica, N. Y., De Witt C. 
Garretson, O. & C: "Communion in C," Tours; 
"King All-glorious, " Barnby; "Evening in E flat," 
Parker; "The Day is Gently Sinking to a Close, " 
Tames; " I Am Alpha and Omega, " Stainer; " Te Deum 
in E, " Parker; "As Pants the Hart, " Spohr. 

The fourth annual festival service of the combined 
choirs of St. Ann's Church, Amsterdam, N. Y., and St. 
John's Church, Johnstown, N. Y., was sung in St. 
Ann's on Sunday evening, June 1 ith, and in St. John's 
on June 18th. As usual, the service consisted of full 
choral even song and anthems, including Handel's 
"Hallelujah Chorus." Edward Bevington is Choir- 
master and Mrs. G. W. Randall, Organist of the Johns- 
town Church; Russell Carter is Organist and Choir- 
master of the Amsterdam Church. The combined 
choirs number about seventy voices. 

These festival services serve to unite two parishes 
whose interests have been very close for over a century. 
Both churches are lineal descendants of old "Queen 
Anne's Chapel" which stood about three miles west of 
Amsterdam from 17 12 until 1820. It was the first 
Anglican house of worship west of the Hudson River 
in New York State. The Johnstown Church was built 
in 1766, but both churches were served by one rector 
until 1835 when new St. Ann's was built within the 
present limits of the city of Amsterdam, and the two 
existing parishes were formed. 

The following concert was presented by the boys and 
men choir of St. Andrew's Memorial Church, Yonkers, 
N. Y., under the direction of R. E. H. Terry, 0. & C, 
June 7th. Program: "Glory and Love to the Men 
of Old" (Faust), Gounod; "Romance," Conti; 
"Gavotte," Henkel; " Obstination, " Fontenaille; 
"The Land of the Sky- Blue Water," Cadman; "Dark 
brown is the river," Nevin; "Katrine," Terry; "Drink 
to me only with thine eyes, " English; "All through the 
night " (Trio), Welsh; "Comin' thro' the Rye," 
Scotch; "A Miserere," Terry; "My little sweetheart," 
Terry; "A Southern Lullaby," Terry; "Voices of the 
woods," Rubinstein-Watson; "Venetian Song," Tosti; 
"Doan' you?" Terry; "A May Morning/' Denza; 
"Reveries," Terry; "I never knew," Terry; "Which 
flower I love," Terry; "Hedge roses," Schubert; 
"Mighty lak' a rose," Nevin; "Barney McCracken," 
Terry; "At end," Terry; "Mother Machree," Ball; 
"Tommy Lad," Margetson; "Song of the flag" from 
"The Knickerbockers, " De Koven. 

Rossini's "Stabat Mater" was presented June 1st 
at St. Paul's Church, Milwaukee, Wis., under the 
direction of W. H. Williamson, Choirmaster. 

An evening of music, was presented at the Oceanside 
Presbvterian Church, June 8th, Prower Symons, 
Organist, and Mrs. Symons, soprano. Program: 



"Grand March, from 'Aida,'" Verdi; "Prayer and 
Cradle Song," Guilmant; "Song to the evening star" 
from " Tannhaeuser, " Wagner; "Pilgrims* Chorus," 
Wagner; "Hope," Reichardt; "Morning Hymn," 
Henschel; " Humoreske, " Dvorak; "Toccata and 
Fugue in D minor," Bach; "March Religieuse," 
Guilmant; "Air du Dauphin," Roeckel; "Mignon," 
Thomas; "The Lost Chord," Sullivan; "Spring Song," 
Mendelssohn; "Death of Asa," Grieg; "Serenata," 
Moszkowski; "Grand Offertoire in D," Batiste. 

At the Church of Our Father, Reading, Pa., June 1st, 
an organ recital and concert was presented by R. C. 
Evans, O. & C. , with the assistance of the choir. Soloists: 
Miss M. Wagner, soprano; Mrs. L. F. Evans, contralto; 
Mr. D. W. Heffelfinger, tenor; Mr. C. J. Young, 
baritone; Mr. D. W. Weidner, bass, and the organist 
was assisted by Mr. H. Dorwin, violinist, and Mr. J. 
Geonnitti, harpist. The program included : ' ' Cantilene 
Nuptiale," Dubois; "Priere and Berceuse," Guilmant; 
" Prelude and Fugue in E minor, " Bach; " By Babylon's 
wave, ' ' Gounod ; ' ' Sextet ' ' (Lucia) , Donizetti ; ' ' Why 
art thou cast down," Spicker; "Evening bells and 
cradle song," Macfarlane; "Meditation, Mietzke; 
1 ' Honor and Arms ' ' (Samson) , Handel . 

The following concert was presented by the Choral 
Club of the Madison Avenue Baptist Church of New 
York, June 27th. Program: "My love's like a red, 
red rose," Garrett; "Stars of the summer night," 
Hatton; "From the land of the sky-blue water," 
Cadman; "Tell her I love her so," De Faye; "A birth- 
day," Cowen; "Absent," Metcalf; "The Spanish 
serenade," Elgar; "Voices from the woods," Arr. from 
Rubinstein; "The trumpeter," Dix; "An open secret, " 
Woodman; "An old Scottish lullaby," Arr. by Ban- 
tock; "The Erl-king^s daughter," Gade; Soloists: 
Mrs. F. C. Haights, soprano; Miss H. Deifjhton, con- 
tralto; Mr. F. Thomas, tenor; Mr. V. Archibald, bass, 
and Mr. W. J. Simmons, baritone; W. W. Bross, 
director. 

"The Triumph of the Cross," by H. A. Matthews, 
was presented June 15th, at the Presbvterian Church, 
Flemington, N. J., under the direction of Norman 
Landis, O. & C. Soloists: J. B. Wells, tenor, and E. S. 
Shaw, bass-baritone. 

The following concert was presented by the Choir of 
the Church of the Redeemer, Morristown, N. J., 
June 14th, under the direction of Kate Elizabeth Fox. 
Program: " Spring Song, " Pinsuti;" O'er the Meadows." 
(unacc.) Smith; "Kol Nidrei," Bruch; "Gavotta," 
Martini; "Day-break." Faning; "Barcarolle," Offen- 
bach; "The Lute Player," Allitsen; "The Trumpeter," 
Dix; "Farewell in the Desert," Adams; "The long 
day closes," Sullivan; "Cantilena," Gottermann; 
"Scherzo," Van Goens; "Herbstblume," Popper; 
"Weary Wind of the West," (unacc.) Elgar; ''As 
Torrents in Summer, " (unacc.) Elgar; "The Lowland," 
Branscombe; "When you come home, " Squire; " Haste 
to the Fair," Russell; "The Lost Chord," Sullivan. 
Soloists: Miss F. Christmas, violoncellist; Mr. H. G. 
Miller, basso. 

Suggested Jicrutcc %\s\ for 
Jicptcmbev, 1916 

Eleventh Sunday after Trinity, September 3 

TeDeum } . r .. „ 

Benedictus f in G Armes 

Jubilate. Chant 

Introit, We Love the Place, O God Stubbs 

Offertory, God came from Teman SteggaU 

Communion Service in G Armes 

Magnificat ) . r Ammmat 

Nunc Dimittis \ m u Armes 

Anthem, The Path of the Just Roberts 

Offertory, Lift Thine Eyes Mendelssohn 



THE NEIV MUSIC REVIEW 277 

Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, September 10 C 0X » J- — " Jesu. Redeemer of our race. " Hymn for 

use in time of War. 05c. 

TeDeum i £)ARLINGTON, JAMES H.— "The Question." 

?^ ctus f inG ^"^ nER^H^RO^EY.^WarHymn of the Allied 

Jubilate ) „, , Nations." 08c. Words only, $1.25 per 100. 

Introit. Lead me, Lord ...Wesley QEHRKEN, W. H.— "The Office for the Holy 

Offertory, The Woods and every Sweet-Smelling Communion in E major. " 50c. 

Tree West (JRETCHANINOFF, A.— "Praise the Lord, O my 

a>mmunion Service in D Adlom Do j£*. \ s Fffi£tt&g£f V> c . Edit « d ^ c ' * 

Nu^cSttis} " G *«** HALUC. WHALEEY.--TWO Kyries and Vesper 

Anthem, Praise the Lord Royle T AMBORD, BENJAMIN— "Sing, Oh, Sing this 

Offertory, Abide with me Barnby blessed morn. " (Short anthem for Christmas.) (No. 427, 

The Church Music Review.) 1 ac. 

Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, September 17 ^ W ^^%J^'^^^ ^f^ * 

TUTKIN, PETER CHRISTIAN.— "What Christ 
Te Deum ) Said - " Motct fw Baritone Solo and Chorus. (No. 43a, 

■dj. .(.Tiij. r* r i3~.~-tt The Church Music Review.) 15c. 

Benedictus V in B flat G. J.Bennett MALLA RD, CYRUS S.—" Nearer My God to Thee." 

Jubilate ) , (No. 433. The Church Music Review.) 10c. 

Intrdit, Above all Praise Mendelssohn Q VENDEN, C. T— " The Son of God goes forth to 

Offertory, Blessed be the God Wesley w War." Processional Anthem. 8c. 

Communion Service, in B flat Bennett pARTRIDGE, R. A.— "Break forth, O Earth, in 

Magnificat ) . ^ „ „ Praises," Hymn and Tune. 05c. 

ESttis m B ^ Bennett P°WELL, T. BADEN.-" Supplement to the Service 

a~+u~~ t>~.:<. a n~A :« xj:« tj„i: mam t~..»» of the Holy Communion. " (Requiem.) 25c. 

a£™^:::::::::::« s ™ i! SI. G - w -" Trave,lere ' H ^ n " ^ 

St. Matthew, September, 2 1 

SECULAR 

Te Deum ) 

?^?^ tUS f in ° FiM C 00K » HoN - Mrs - HERBERT.-" The Seasons." 

Jubilate ) ^ Short Cantata for Children. 50c. 

Introit, Blessed is the Man Statner JJAGUE, ELEANOR— "Preguntale a las Estrellas." 

Offertory, Awake, awake Statner * x (Go ask of the high stars gleaming.) (No. 7. from Folk 

Communion Service, in D Field Songs from Mexico.) 60c. 

X>r Q rr«;fi^«* i Noche Serena." (Serene Night.) (No. 11, from Folk 

Magnificat / . D fiM Songs from Mexico.) 60c. 

Nunc Dimittis f .'■""*"* ' * _, , H ARW0 °D, BASIL.— "To music, to becalm his 

Anthem, How Beautiful are the Feet Handel A x fever. " (Op. 30, No. 1.) Part-Song for five voices. 12c. 

Offertory. The Pillars of the Earth Tours J-JECKSCHER, CELESTE D.— " Norse Maiden's 

Lament." Part-song for Women's Voices. 12c. 

Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity, September 24 H^ELLS^H.— ^ In youth is pleasure. " Madrigal 

n..n«,« > TAM°BORD?BENJAMIN.— 4 ' May Morning.'' Part- 
ie ueum I *-* song for female voices. (No. 88, The Modern Series.) X2C. 
Benedictus- in F Garrett \4EHNER, GUSTAV.— "Ye singers all." Four- 
Jubilate ) iTA part Song. A Cappella. (No. 90, The Modern Series.) 

Introit, Thou shalt Shew me A.Gray "*:„„„.. ^ TT „ A L . „ x , . . , e ^ 

Offertory, Ho! Every one Martin M ERI * ILL ' C * H -~~ Amphion. Madrigal for five 

Communion Service, in F Garrett poiNTER, JOHN.-" Lament." (Op. 21, No. 1.) 

Magnificat I • p Garrett Four-part Song. (No. 880. The Musical Times.) 05c. 

Nunc Dimittis \ r QCHOOL MUSIC REVIEW.— No. 288 contains the 

Anthem, Lead, Kindly Light Pvghe-Etans ^ following Music in both Notations.— "Sigh no more. 

Offertory, The Lord is my Shepherd Schubert } ad . ics " c Unwon Song. R. J. s. Stbvens; "O mistress mine." 

J J r Unison Song. Traditional Air. 06c. 

q* it m.*i ««H ah An^i. c MUfflW , n S CHOOL SONGS.— Edited by W. G. McNaught. 

St. Michael and All Angels, September 29 o Published in two forms A% Vo ice Parts in Staff and Tonic 

Sol-fa Notations, with Pianoforte Accompaniment (8vo). B. 

Te Deum ) Voice Parts only, in Tonic Sol-fa Notation. 

Benedictus > in F Tozer *• B - 

Jubilate J ^' ' l22 °- " When daisies pied. " Unison Song. — 06c. 

Introit, Let the BrightSeraphim ....Handel .. I235 . -Queen Mab." Unison Song. 1 "* 8 ' — 06c. 

Offertory, There was War m Heaven Crutckshank C. H. Lloyd. 

Communion Service, in F Tozer Bo <* 254. Ei ?, ht Shakespeare Songs by various 

»» . c . » Composers. Second Set. Unison — 25c, 

Magnincat J. in F Toter " *S5- Seven Shakespeare Songs by various 

Nunc Dimittis ) Composers. Third Set. Two-part — 35c. 

Anthem, The Angel of the Lord Gray CTEVENS, C. L. F.— " Sing a New Song. " 8c. 

Offertory, God, Thou Art Great Spohr u 

WOOD, CARL PAIGE.— 4< The Lads of Liege." 

— — — — - Part song for male voices. 25c. 

SKlusic published during the 

%*S\ IJfcOntll INSTRUMENTAL 

SACRED RACH, J. S. — Organ Works. Book 15. "Orgelbuch- 

*-* lein" (Little Organ Book.) Edited by Ivor Atkins. With 

ANDREWS, MARK.— "Lord of All Being." An- ^J n ^8?ffiSS n %*?* Jf ^ m ^Jj^°- f f!lA Rratttl » 

A them for Bass Solo and Ouartet or Chorus, (rfo. 424. The C L ?, ME J1 S ' J' ^ V'T *? memor y of the BraVe ' 
Church Music Review) 12c March for Pianoforte. $1.00. 

"Sun of My Soul." Anthem for Contralto (or Bass) Solo PISKE, DWIGHT.— "Moon of Love." Pianoforte 

andS. A. T. B. Chorus (or Quartet). {So. 42S. The Church Music Solo. (Waltz.) 60c. Orchestral parts. Set of 12 parts. 

Review.) 12c. $1.00. 

PROWNING, S— "Ave Maria." For Bass Solo and r r° MLINS0N ' H. W.— "Iona." Prelude for Piano- 
±J Chorus. 15c. forte, soc. 



278 



THE NEIV MUSIC REVIEW 



©voauists 



J. WARREN ANDREWS 

Organist and Choir Director, Church of Divine Paternity, 

76th St. and Central Park West, New York. 

Organ Recitals 

Special course of Ten Lessons in Organ. Send for catalogue 

MARK ANDREWS 

Organ Recitals 
a West 45th Street, New York, or 

295 Claremont Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

CLIFTON C. BRAINERD, M.A. 

Hartford, Connecticut 
Organist and Choirmaster, Church of the Good Shepherd 
Vice-Principal, Wadsworth Street School 
Address: 48 Huntington Street 

FRANK C. BUTCHER, Mus. Bac. (Dunelm) 

P.R.C.O., A.R.C.M., L.R.A.M. 

Organist and Music Master, Hoosac School, Hoosac, N. Y. 

Late Assistant Organist of Canterbury Cathedral, England 

WILLIAM C. CARL 

Director of the Guilmant Organ School. 
'Phone, 326 Chelsea. 44 West 12th Street, New York 

ROBERT A. H. CLARK, A.A.G.O. 

Organist and Choirmaster, Christ Church, New Haven, Conn. 
Supervisor of Music, Derby, Conn. 

Address: New Haven, Conn. 

NORMAN COKE-JEPHCOTT, F.R.C.O., 
F.A.G.O. 

THE CHORISTERS' SCHOOL 
Rhinebeck. New York. 

CHARLES WHITNEY COOMBS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Luke's Church, New York 

GRACE LEEDS DARNELL, MUS. BAC, 
F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST, DIRECTOR 
First Baptist Church 
Flemington New Jersey 



Recitals 



ARTHUR DAVIS 

CONCERT ORGANIST 



Organ Openin 
Address: Christ Church Cathedral. 



Concert Tours 
St. Louis, Mo. 



GEORGE HENRY DAY, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster, St. John's Church, 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

CLIFFORD DEMAREST, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST. 

Instruction in Organ and Theory. 

Coaching for A.G.O. Examinations. 
Address: Church of the Messiah, 
34th St. and Park Ave.. N. Y. 

CLARENCE DICKINSON 

CONCERT ORGANIST 

Organist and Director of Music, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

Temple Beth-El and Union Theological Seminary 

412 Fifth Avenue, New York 

CHARLES HENRY DOERSAM, F.A.G.O. 

Organist-Director, Second Presbvterian Church, Scranton, Pa. 
ORGAN RECITALS 

EDMUND SERENO ENDER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
of Gethsemane Church 
Organist Reform Tewish Temple 
Official Organist of The Apollo Club, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

KATE ELIZABETH FOX, F.A.G.O. 

ORGAN RECITALS 
Organist and Choir-Director, Church of the Redeemer, Morris- 
town, New Jersey. 



J. HENRY FRANCIS 

Choirmaster and Organist of St. John's Church, Charleston, 

W. Va. Director of Music. Charleston High. School. 

Conductor of the Charleston Choral Club. 

Visiting and Consulting Choirmaster. 

J. FRANK FRYSINGER, F.I.G.C.M. 

Head of the Organ Dept., The University School of Musk 

Organist and Choirmaster, The First Presbyterian Church 

Lincoln, Nebraska 

ORGAN RECITALS 

E. HAROLD GEER 



CONCERT ORGANIST 
Organist and Choirmaster 
First Congregational Church 
Address: P. O. Box 67s. Fall River, 



Mass. 



WALTER HENRY HALL 

PROFESSOR OF CHORAL MUSIC AT COLUMBIA 

UNIVERSITY 

49 Claremont Avenue, New York. 

WILLIAM CHURCHILL HAMMOND 

Organist and Choirmaster, Second Congregational Church, 

Hoi yoke, Mass. 

Director of Music, Mount Hoi yoke College. 

W. R. HEDDEN, Mus. Bac, F.A.G.O. 

Concert Organist and Training of Boys* Voices 
Organ Recitals, Instruction in Piano, Organ, Harmony 

and Counterpoint 

Member Exam. Committee of American Guild of Organists 

Candidates coached for Guild Examinations by mail 

Address: 170 West 75th Street, New York. 

EDWARD F. JOHNSTON 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASf ER 



Calvary Baptist Church 

301 West 57th Street 



Address 



F. AVERY JONES 

Organist and Choirmaster of St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia. 

Late Assistant Organist of Hereford Cathedral, England. 

Organ, Piano and Coaching in Oratorio. 

Estey Hall, 17th and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia. 

EDWIN ARTHUR KRAFT, F.A.G.O. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Cathedral, 
Cleveland, Ohio 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 

KARLKRUEGER, M.A. 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Ann's Church-on-the-Heights 

Brooklyn, New York 
44 Morningside Drive, W„ New York 

NORMAN LANDIS 

Flemington, N. J. 
O. and CM. — Presbyterian Church, Flemington, N. J. 
CM.— First Reformed Church. SomervilTe. N. J. 
Conductor Frenchtown, N. J., Choral Society. 
RF-CITA-- 



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JOHN HERMAN LOUD, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Park Street Church, Boston, «Mass. 
Organist and Choirmaster. 
Send for new circular. 
Address: 140 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAUMAN LOWE 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
St. Bartholomew's Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Conductor Mendelssohn Glee Club of Elizabeth and Cranford 
Philharmonic. 

FREDERICK MAXSON, F.A.G.O. 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Address: First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WILLIAM NEIDLINGER 

ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 

New York. 



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Washington Irving High School 



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305 West 97 th Street 
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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



279 



T. TERTIUS NOBLE, F.R.C.O., A.R.C.M. 

Organist and Master of Choristers, 
St. Thomas* Church, New York 
ORGANIST, COMPOSER. CONDUCTOR, AND COACH 
Address: 1 West 53d Street 

EDGAR PRIEST, A.R.M.C.M. 

Organist and Choirmaster 
National Cathedral SS. Peter and Paul 
Organ Recitals 
Address: Washington, D. C. 

JOHN D. M. PRIEST, B.A. OXON. 

Strand Theatre, Hartford, Cona. 
CONCERT ORGANIST 

JAMES T. QUARLES 

Organist of Cornell University 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Address: Ithaca, New York 

MALLINSON RANDALL 

The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

A. MADELEY RICHARDSON 

M.A., Mus. Doc., Oxon.; F.R.C.O. 
Telephone: Morningside7S87 
Address: 490 Riverside Drive. 

JOHN ALLEN RICHARDSON 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Chicago, 111. 

' Address: St. Paul's Parish House, Madison Ave. and 50th St. 

ALBERT RIEMENSCHNEIDER 

Director, Baldwin-Wallace College School of Music 
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and Fifth Ave. Presbyterian Church 

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Organist and Choirmaster Christ Church Cathedral, 
Louisville, Ky. 
CONSULTING CHOIRMASTER. INSTRUCTION. 
Address: Christ Church Cathedral House, 

2nd St., Louisville, Ky. 

HERBERT F. SPRAGUE 

CONCERT ORGANIST 
Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio 

KARL OTTO STAPS, A.R.A.M. 

ORGAN RECITALS 

Head Organ Instructor Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 

Organist and Choirmaster St. Paul's Cathedral 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

GERALD F. STEWART 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Trinity Church. Watertown, N. Y. 

Address: Trinity House, Watertown, N. Y. 

EDWARD JOHN SMITH 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

First Methodist Episcopal Church; 

and The Amasa Stone Memorial 

Chapel (Western Reserve 

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AUTHOR OF "CHURCH AND UNIVERSITY HYMNS" 



HAROLD TOWER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 

formerly organist St. Paul's, Minneapolis 

ELIZABETH VAN FLEET VOSSELLER 

Founder of Flemington Children's Choirs. 

. Music Supervisor of Public Schools of Somerville, N. J. 

Studio: Flemington, N. J. 

SYDNEY WEBBER 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 
Trinity Church, Waterbury, Conn. 

C. GORDON WEDERTZ 

ORGAN RECITALS. 
Instructor of Organ and Piano, Chicago Musical College. 
Address: 624 So. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

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Organist and Choirmaster South Congregational Church anl 
Temple Israel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
RECITALS AND INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 463 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 

"Phone 3I79-L Williamsburg 

ALFRED R. WILLARD 

Organist and Choirmaster, Old St. Paul's 

Conductor, Orpheus Club. 

Director: Madison Avenue Temple. 

Address: St. Paul's School, 8 East Franklin Street, 

, Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID McK. WILLIAMS 

ORGANIST AND CHOIRMASTER 

Church of the Holy Communion 

Sixth Ave. and 20th Street New York City 

Lessons and Recitals 

ROBERT J. WINTERBOTTOM 

ORGAN RECITALS. 
Organist and Choirmaster St. Luke's Chapel, Trinity Parish, 
N. Y. The Earle, 103 Waverly Place, New York 

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CHORAL TECHNIQUE & INTERPRETATION 



BY 

HENRY COWARD. 

Mus. Doc Oxon. 
Price, Cloth, gilt, $2.J0. 

PRESS NOTICES. 



" The title and the author's name together will be sufficient 
to secure for this book a wide circle of musical readers. No 
one has done more than Dr. Henry Coward to further the 
remarkable advance in choral technique which has been so 
efficient in this country in recent years. Dr. Coward has 
spent his life in perfecting a system of choral training which 
he has exemplified in his Sheffield Choir, and carried 
triumphantly over the English-speaking world and even 
further. In this book he tells precisely what this system is 
and so fortifies precept with example, illustrating his points 
with quotations from musical masterpieces, that it places a 
valuable manual of instruction in the hands of every choir- 
master. It has been his aim to give ' such advice and 
instruction that no single problem connected with choral 
singing shall remain unsolved. ' Those who know his work 
will not need to be assured that the book is eminently 
practical, but it may be added that it is written in the plain 
and forthright style which is characteristic of the author." — 
The Times, January 15, 19 14. 

" The author is one of the most brilliant examples of a 
man climbing from unpropitious surroundings to a high 
artistic plane, and it is always interesting to learn the # factors 
that have contributed to such marked advancement. For 
many years past Dr. Coward held the first place as a 
conductor of choral societies, and although of late years 
several other musicians have shown themselves equally 
capable of securing fine performances, he must always be 
regarded as laying the foundation of what may be termed the 
new choral technique. Dr. Coward therefore writes with 
the authority of one who has verified the truth of his 
theories and proved the correctness of his methods by 
practical results of the most convincing kind. Choir 
trainers may not always agree with Dr. Coward's views of 
interpretation, and, truth to tell, they are more technical 
than aesthetic, but it is not too much to say that in this book 
will be found all the chief principles of the impressive 
delivery of choral music. Moreover, the book is written 
with a directness and clearness of expression which reminds 
one of the learned professor's answer to the young lady who 
expressed her enjoyment of his recent lecture : ' I am so 
glad you were able to follow me. I took great care that 
what I said should be understood by the meanest 
intelligence.'" — The Referee, January 1 1, 19 14. 

" Dr. Coward's great work, the publication of which has 
been eagerly anticipated by conductors, voice-trainers, and 
choralists generally, is hot from the press. In it the fathet 
of British choralism— that is to say choralism with art in it — 
gives away all his secrets. Aspiring organists and choir- 
masters have long sat at his feet eager to learn the secret of 
the marvellous power that the Sheffield doctor has wielded 
over the thousands of choralists with whom he has come in 
contact. Some of them by assiduous attention have 
assimilated some of the methods of the master; but it has 
been realised that behind the whole there is the personality 
of the man, his grit, his grip, his intense earnestness, and his 
determination to achieve success, however exacting the task 
before him. " — Sheffield Independent, December 20, 1 9 1 3. * 



" The book is a bewildering mine of information on the 
subject of choral technique ; I can find no ' single point 
missing. But this is not all. Dr. Coward, in a spirit of 
tremendous enthusiasm, acknowledges that there may be 
some point overlooked or not elucidated with sufficient clear- 
ness, and therefore he invites queries, these to be addressed 
to him at the publishers. There are some excellent words of 
wisdom for the use of the choral conductor — which, indeed, 
are equally applicable to any other musical conductor. ' The 
man who lacks tact,' says Dr. Coward, 'is not fit to be a 
conductor. ' * Making rehearsals enjoyable is a valuable kind 
of tact. One of the best methods is to turn a petty annoyance 
into a pleasantry.' Dr. Coward brings his valuable treatise 
to a close with a series of appendices, in which is much wisdom 
as to hints on private practice, the necessity of a high ideal, 
singing with Latin words. There is a capital index, and a 
complete list of the musical examples used as illustrations, 
with the special point indicated for which they were selected. 
Altogether a most interesting and useful book." — Daily 
Telegraph, January 31, 1 914. 

11 What that method is, and how it may be applied to 
choral singing, is told unreservedly and lucidly in 
Dr. Coward s book ' Choral technique and interpretation.' 
This book is something more than an exhaustive and, to 
choral conductors, an invaluable text-book of what may be 
conveniently described as ' choralism.' It is an unconscious 
autobiography of one of the most notable figures in the world 
of music. Ilenry Coward has written himself into these 
pages. We can visualise the man as he stands before a 
chorus, sure of himself, blunt and forceful, labouring at an 
idea, and gradually crystallising it into an apt phrase or a 
still more felicitous quotation or anecdote ; persistent, 
insistent, prepared to bully or wheedle a choir into 
submission, and finally ' getting there' by sheer force of his 
genial, dogged, characterful personality. He has put into 
the book, freely and fully, all he knows. He lays oot for 
the benefit of inexperience all the harvest of thirty years of 
labour, study, and a degree of minute specialisation which in 
choral music has no parallel among even the great choir- 
trainers who preceded or are contemporary with him." — 
Sheffield Daily Telegraph, December 26, 1913. 

*• There can be no doubt that few living musicians are better 
entitled to discourse on the subject of choral singing than 
Dr. Coward, whose book on ' Choral technique and 
interpretation ' is certain to be widely read, and its precepts 
carefully considered. As a conductor his interpretations may 
not always commend themselves to one's judgment, but as a 
choir-trainer it is no exaggeration to assert that his labours 
have marked a new era in chorus-singing. For this reason 
his clear exposition of the methods by which he has achieved 
his aims has an obvious value, and his book is the more read* 
able because of the lively style and genial enthusiasm that 
characterise it. His description of his conduct of a rehearsal 
is full of suggestive points by which every choir-trainer may 
profit, whether he employ them with literal exactitude of 
not."— Yorkshire Post, January 14, 1914. 



Lokdon : NOVELLO AND COMPANY, Limited. 
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THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



281 



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Meditation W. Faulkes 

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Jour de Noces J. Stuart Archer 

Cantilene R. G. Hailing 

Ite Missa Est (Edited by John E. West). J. Lemmens 
Triumphal March (Edited by John E. West) 

T. Lemmens * 
Fanfare (Edited by John E. West).... J. Lemmens 

Cantabile (Edited by John E. West) T. Lemmens 

Finde (Edited by John E. West) J. Lemmens 

A Fantasy C. Edgar Ford 

Intermezzo (A Marriage Souvenir). W. Wolstenholme 

Lenend Harvey Grace 

Meditation Alfred H oil ins 

Barcarolle A. W. Pollitt 

Cantique Edward Elgar 

Prelude and Fugue in C (Edited by John E. West) 

J. L. Krebs 

Epilogue W. Wolstenholme 

Suite Ancienne F. W. HoUoway 



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Nocturne Thomas F. Dunhill .75 

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Caprice de Concert J. Stuart Archer x.oo 

Romance H. R. Woledge .50 

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Romanza Alfred Hoi litis .50 

Festa Prelude Alec Rowley 1.00 

Romance with Variations J. Stuart Archer .50 

Tone-Poems Oliver King 1.00 

Allegretto Scherzando J. Stuart Archer x.oo 

Nocturne H. R. Woledge .50 

Festival Toccata Percy E. Fletcher x.25 

Prreludium Pastorale J. Stainer .50 

Fountain Reverie Percy E. Fletcher 1.00 

Ballade in E J. Stuart Archer .57 



(To be continued.) 



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THE NEW MUSIC REYIEW 



347 



MUSIC FOR THANKSGIVING 




ANTHEMS FOR MIXED VOICES 




NO. NET NO. 


NST 


Edward Shippen Barnes 


F. Ffaurington Harker 




5964 He shall come down like rain - - 12 


4713 Sing to the Lord 


20 


A Thanksgiving anthem of the pastoral type, 


Modeled after the great English anthems, and 




with an effective soprano solo. 


produces an effect of great dignity. 




W. Berwald 


James H. Rogers 




5611 Sing to the Lord of harvest - - - 12 


5754 Lord how manifold - 


12 


A spirited and powerful anthem, but not 


This favorite Thanksgiving text has been here 




difficult. Short soprano solo. 


set in a dignified and practical manner. 




John Hyatt Brewer 


4644 taste and see 


8 


5351 let the nation be glad .... 15 


In contrast with the above, this anthem is 




A Thanksgiving anthem with a patriotic theme. 


delicate and charming, but easy, and equally 




A big festival anthem. 


suitable for Thanksgiving use. 




Arthur Dorey 


Harry Rowe Shelley 




6466 taste and see 8 


3718 Come, ye thankful people, come 


12. 


A charming, quiet anthem, intended to be sung 


Virile and spirited. Contains easy solos and a 




without accompaniment. 


short unaccompanied passage of great beauty. 




Mylea B. Foster 


C. Lee Williams 




6454 Praise the Lord, my soul - - 15 
A big anthem, but of only moderate difficulty, 


5682 And the Lord God planted a garden 


15 


An unusual and charming text, convincingly 




with an effective solo for m.-sop. or alto. 


set to music. A most effective anthem. 




CANTATAS 




G. M. Garrett 


Myles B. Foster 




Harvest cantata 40 


Seed time and harvest - 


50 


This well-known work never loses its popu- 


Melodious and charming. A great favorite 




larity. A most serviceable and dignified work. 


with choirmasters and the public. 




Sample copies on examination Complete catalogues on request 




For Sale by All Music Dealers 




3 E. 43d St. G. SCHIRMER New York 



Arise! Shine For Thy Light Is Come 

Christmas Anthem 



»t 



By George B. Nevin No. 12,838 

One of the most popular Christmas Anthems of 1915 
Also issued for quartette or chorus of men's voices. No. 1 3,028 



12c. 



12c 



From The Diapason — " There is a fresh and vigorous fluency in all his work 
that wins it a high place in the regard of musicians and of public; it is the spon- 
taneity born of perfect command of his resources." 

The Christian Advocate — " A Christmas Anthem of unusual beauty." 

A list of Mr. Navfn's compositions will be sent frae upon rcqaast 
Send for oar Free Offer of Christmas Music 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 15© tremont street, boston 

CHAS. H. DITSON 4 CO. 8.10-12 east 34th St.. new yosk city 



3 i6 THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 

*$\it %xnts\ PL HUinner C^mpatig 

CHURCH ORGANS 

BOSTON. MASS. 



September 13, 1916. 



By a unanimous vote of the City Council of 
the City of Portland, Oregon, the contract for the 

great organ for their new City Auditorium has been 

awarded to 

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SUMMARY WOF CONTENTS 



EDITORIALS 

SHORT STUDIES OF GREAT MASTERPIECES 

DANIEL GREGORY MASON 

VARIOUS NOTES 

ECCLESIASTICAL MUSIC 
DR. G. EDWARD STUBBS 

THE AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS 

SUMMER SCHOOL OF CHURCH MUSIC 

SUGGESTED SERVICE LIST 

MUSIC PUBLISHED DURING THE LAST MONTH 



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Editorials 






17 4— —J fi 



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relating to war, total depravity, the doom of 
sinners. He asks the reader whether he 
would rather sing 

The Son of God goes forth to war, 

A kingly crown to gain, 
His blood-red banner streams afar, 

Who follows in his train? 

Or Dr. Patten's improved version: 

The Son of God goes forth in love, 

Who follows in his train? 
All ye who put world peace above 

What war or greed may gain. 




R. SIMON N. PATTEN of the 
University of Pennsylvania is 
not content with his reputation 
as an economist. He wishes 
to be known as a re-writer of hymns. For 
many years hymns have been tinkered by 
those who complained of theological opinions 
expressed therein and by others who thought 
they could better the poetic expression. 
Even Newman's "Lead, Kindly Light," has 
not escaped. Dr. Patten's aim is to meet 
"modern needs. ' ' A pacifist — the word itself 




R. PATTEN evidently has no use 
for the Churui Militant. How 
he must be distressed by count- 
less verses in the Old Testament ! 
How he must shudder at the thought of the 
God of thp Hebrews inciting them to battle! 
An economist is hardly the man to improve 
on Newman, Heber, Faber, Charles Wesley, 
or even Dr. Isaac Watts. Yet Dr. Watts did 
not escape criticism as a writer of prose in 
John Wesley's time. The latter wrote in his 
journal (February 1769): "I abridged Dr. 
Watts's pretty treatise on the Passions. 
His 177 pages will make a useful tract of 
four and twenty. Why do persons who treat 



is hideous! — he wishes to change expressions the same subjects with me write so much 



317 



318 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



larger books? Of many reasons is not this 
the chief? We do not write with the same 
view: their principal end is to get money, 
my only one to do good." Not an amiable 
remark. Correcting his brother's posthu- 
mous poems, the Rev. John remarked: 
"Many of these are little, if any, inferior to 
his former poems, having the same justness 
and strength of thought, with the same beauty 
of expression; yea, the same keenness of wit, on 
proper occasionsasbrightandpiercingasever. " 




ANY plays, operas, operettas, and 
musical comedies fail, yet we 
have not seen the word "fiasco" 
in the newspapers for a long 
time; now "fiasco" in Italian means simply 
"bottle." Even the Oxford Dictionary says 
the significance is doubtful; but we recently 
came across an ingenious explanation. Not 
the Italian's, who said when he was reproached 
for the weakness of the word: "We mean, of 
course, an empty bottle, and an empty bottle 
is hollow." A writer in the Daily Chronicle 
of London says that when a workman in the 
glassworks at Venice spoiled a fine jug or 
goblet he was blowing, he shaped the ma- 
terial into a common flask or bottle; so the 
intended work of art became a fiasco. 

A Frenchman calls a failure on the stage a 
"four" (an oven) ; that is to say, as the inside 
of an oven is very dark, a theatrical piece in 
which he cannot see any light, any chance for 
life, any "pep," isa "four." This explanation 
has been given. Is it the true, the only one? 




R. STUBBS, quoting from Musical 
Opinion about the polyphonic 
daring of Byrd, as shown by an 
Ave Verum recently published 
for the first time, says: "Byrd's music is 
practicallv unknown in New York churches — 
as indeed is most of the best music of his 
time. It is not at all to the credit of our 
choirs that this is the case. " 

This reminds us that Mr. Geoffrey Shaw 
deplores the fact that the majority of leaders 
in English music to-day are on the side of 
foreigners; they are foreigners by education 
and environment. "A concert of modern 
1 English' music is generally a dreary farce, 
which might be entitled 'Carrying coke to 
Newcastle, ' for the music performed is mostly 



second-hand foreign stuff — written by Eng- 
lishmen. How different it is from the real 
English music! Few musicians realize that 
there is a definite English idiom in music, and 
that most of our modern composers are 
writing in a foreign idiom. Soak yourself in 
the spirit of our traditional songs, study the 
works of our great composers, Tallis, Byrd, 
Gibbons, Purcell, and many others (all of 
them just as great as afterwards Beethoven 
and Schubert became) and you will find this 
English idiom; you will then know the Eng- 
lish musical speech. " 

How little we know of these composers in 
this country! How little we know of the 
contemporaneous music, orchestral and cham- 
ber, of the younger English school! 




HE London Times recently dis- 
cussed the publication of music 
in Braille at the National In- 
stitute for the Blind. Accord- 
ing to Mr. H. C. Warrilow, a blind organist 
and musical director, there are two types of 
blind musicians. There are the highly talented 
who in all circumstances would have made 
their mark, and there are those with a certain 
aptitude who would probably not have be- 
come musicians if they had not been blind. 
The latter take up music because they are 
blind. They receive a special education. 
"They may do very useful work as organists 
of small country churches, as teachers and 
tuners, especially if, as is hoped, in the future 
some system of small grants can be made to 
pay for their work. M 

It appears that in England the blind musi- 
cian's library has been limited. It is now to 
be enlarged in Braille. The classics are to 
be the groundwork: Bach's organ works, 
Mendelssohn's, Bach's well tempered clavi- 
chord, Beethoven's Sonatas, then there will 
be modern things, pieces by C6sar Franck, 
Parry's Choral Preludes; and for the piano, 
pieces by Chopin, Brahms, Debussy. We 
also note regretfully that there will be tran- 
scriptions of overtures for the organist. 
Complex modern music intensifies former 
difficulties in transcription. "The Braille 
system cannot represent a score; the blind 
reader's fingers have, so to speak, to collate 
the parts. In the case of a piano piece, what 
the right hand plays must be first described. 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



319 



then what the left hand plays; the memory 
must fit the two together. How best to help 
the memory, how much of each to give at a 
time, is the problem of the transcriber. Where- 
as formerly a long phrase, say, 16 bars of the 
right-hand part, would be given before the 
left was begun, now it is found best to dove- 
tail them together as closely as possible. " 

One of the later members of the Braille 
Musical Magazine issued bi-monthly by the 
National Institute — it is now in its 13th vol- 
ume — contains Stanford's song "Drake's 
Drum," a part song by Havergal Brian, and 
Debussy's Ballade in F. 




PAMPHLET of 44 pages, entitled 
"The National Music of Poland : 
its Character and Sources," by 
Marguerite Walaux, is published 
:>y George Allen and Unwin, Ltd., London, for 
the Polish Information Committee. It is one 
of a series including sketches of Polish history, 
literature, art, etc. Mr. Emil Mlynarski, 
formerly conductor of the Warsaw Opera 
and Symphony orchestra and now conductor 
of the Scottish orchestra, is the author of a 
preface in which he describes Mme. Walaux's 
brochure as "very informative." He says: 
" I am not aware of any existing work in the 
English language which deals so well in so 
brief a space with this subject so near to my 
heart." He deplores the fact that far too 
little of the wealth of Polish music is known 
in England. 

Of course there is much about Chopin's 
music in this pamphlet, and these pages are the 
least interesting. We find the inevitable quo- 
tations from Liszt, Schumann, Huneker, Ehl- 
ert, Niecks, Kleczynski. We find all the expect- 
edstockremarks:howChopinsaidtoSchumann 
that his Ballades had been inspired by poems 
of Mickiewicz; how the Sixth Prelude "preci- 
pitates the soul into frightful depression" 
(George Sand), etc., etc. More information 
about "another musical genius," Stanislas 
Moniuszko, would have been welcome. 



CCORDING to Mme. Walaux, Po- 
lish music reveals the soul of a 
heroic people " in all its individu- 
ality, agonies, joys, hopes, aspira- 
tions, loves and hates, and in its most marked 




peculiarities." She cites two songs, Wi- 
bicki's "Poland not yet Lost" and Ujejski's 
"With the Smoke of the Fire, " as character- 
istic songs expressing the despair of the 
younger race at seeing the hopes of Poland 
brought to naught, and reflecting the burning 
earnestness, the love of country, as a religion. 
"Wibicki's song, the expression of the bright 
hopes of the race, even after the blow of the 
third partition has fallen, is an extremely 
careless, merry song, the ballad of heroic 
thoughtlessness, joy to live, to sing, to fight. 
The first is a psalm, the second a march 
which approaches a mazurka. It ought to 
be borne in mind that in Polish music mel- 
ancholy never leads to despair. There is 
always something hopeful in the most intense 
sadness." 




HAT Polish taste and aptitude were 
visible only in the last century 
is disputed by Mme. Walaux. 
She insists that Poland's music is 
as old as her history. She goes back to 995 
and St. Adalbert. She names old canticles 
and Christmas songs. She speaks of com- 
posers flourishing from the 14th to the 16th 
century. The military music is not forgotten. 
Then there are the numberless folk-songs. 

The germ of the polonaise is found in the 
motive of an old Christmas song. The 
rhythm and the finale are recognized in the 
air of " Wzlobie lezy . ' ' There is a description 
of this dance, the mazurka, which is "the 
true national song of Poland, the embodiment 
of the national character," the Krakowiak, 
the dumy or dumkin. The royal patrons of 
music are named. There is a sketch of the 
national Polish opera. There is a digression 
about the romantic literature of Poland. 




OMEN are playing in the Pro- 
menade Season orchestra led by 
Sir Henry Wood in London. 
This is not a new thing in his 
orchestra for before the war 
some were among the strings for a season. 
Before that time women played in the or- 
chestra of George Shapiro in London. The 
list of the Colonne orchestra in Paris has 
contained for a good many years the names of 
women violinists. There are "female or- 



320 



THE NEW MUSIC REVIEW 



chestras " in this country ; women have played 
stringed and wind instruments with men in 
amateur orchestras; has any woman, not a 
harpist, played in the leading orchestras of 
this city, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia? 




HE death of Max Heinrich is 
mourned by many who have 
been deeply moved by his singing 
of German Lieder. Even those 
who found fault with certain vocal manner- 
isms admitted gladly his art as an emotional 
interpreter. Few singers ever sang with a 
more contagious gusto, with a finer enthusiasm. 
Nor was his interpretative art confined to the 
ful