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Full text of "New Piasa Chautauqua : the pioneer chautauqua of the Mississippi Valley : the twenty-ninth annual program"

SUMMER RESORT ^3 
TWO HOURS FROM ^S^= 

CT T rMIIC *t- 




Officers of NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



C. BEHNET, President 

St. l.o it is. Mo. 

D. W. CAUGHLAN, 2nd VIee-Pres. 

i-yixt st. i.ouis, in. 

M. EDWIN JOHNSON, General Manager. 



NELSON LEVIS, 1st VIee-Pres. * Trens. 
Alton, 111. 



XJ. N. ENGLISH, Sccy1 
Jerseyvllle, 111. / 



BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

C. Bernct St. Louis 

H. S. Bishop Alton 

L. N. Burns St. Louis 

J. A. Barnett Edward-sville 

W. E. Caulfleld St. Louis 

D. W. Caughlan East St. Louis 

J. N. English Jerseyville 

H. C. Grote St. Louis 

L C. Haynes E. St. Louis 

J. E. Kelsey Alton 

Nelson Levis Alton 

E. G. Meriwether Alton 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

C. Bernet, Chairman. 
Nelson Levis 

L. N. Burns 

D. W. Caughlan 
J. N. English. 

GROUNDS AND IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE. 

Nelson Levis, Chairman. 

D. W. Caughlan 

L. C. Haynes 

J. N. English 

J. E. Kelsey 

J. A. Barnett 



PROGRAM AND ADVERTISING COMMITTEE. 

L. N. Burns. Chairman. 

Nelson Levis 

M. Edwin Johnson 

M. H. Lichliter 

F. A. Behymer 

H. C. Grote 



REAL ESTATE COMMITTEE. 

Wm. E. Caulfiekl, Chairman. 
E. G. Meriwether 
S. S. Pingree 
J. E. Kelsey 
G. v. R. Mechin 



TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE. 

L. C. Haynes, Chairman. 

D. W. Caughlan 
Nelson Levis 

J. A. Barnett 
C. Bernet 

E. G. Meriwether. 



CONCESSIONS AND COMMISSIONS OOMMITTKE. 

M. Edwin Johnson, Chairman. 
Wm. E. Caulfield, 
H. C. Grote 
J. N. English 
J. S. Rudolph 



VALUATION AJTD ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE. 

Wm. E. Caulfleld, Chairman. 
J. S. Rudolph 
Isaac Johnson 



LIGHT AND WATER COMMITTEE. 

L. C. Haynes, Chairman. 
L. N. Burns 
Nelson Levis 
C. Bernet 
W. A. Fuller 



LADIES RECEPTION COMMITTEE. 

Mrs. Lucia I. Priest, Chairman. 

Miss Mathilda Melnhardt 

Mrs. H. A. Tunehurst 

Mrs. L. C. Haynes 

Mrs. S. S. Pingree 

Mrs. James G. Nugent 

Mrs. J. F. Woods 

Mrs. Manley G. Richmond 

Mrs. Nelson Levis , 

Mrs. Gus V. R. Mechin 

Mrs. M. Edwin Johnson 

Miss Mildred Haynes 

Miss Bertha I. Bishop 

Mrs. L. N. Burns ; 

Mrs. C. Bernet 

Mrs. Jos. A. Barnett 

Mrs. "W. E. Caulfleld 

Mrs. Wm. A. Fischer 



LADIES' CIVIC IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION. 

MISS MATHILDA MEINHARDT 

President St. Louis 

MRS. G. V. R. MECHIN 

Vice-President St. Louis 

MRS. NELSON LEVIS 

Treasurer Alton 

MISS BERTHA BISHOP 
Secretary Alton 



COMMITTEE ON DECORATION 

MRS. M. EDWIN JOHNSON East St. Louis 

COUNSEL 

N/E. G, MERIWETHER Alton V 

CUSTODIAN OP GROUNDS 

EMIL FISCHER Chautauqua 



For Procrnm and Other Particulars Address M. EDWIN JOHNSON, Mana- 
er; until June 1st, 5.TJ N. 10th St., E. St. Louis, 111.; after June 1st, address 
all mall and express matter to Chautauqna, III. 






NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 

THE PIONEER CHAUTAUQUA OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY 



The Twenty-Ninth 
Annual Program 

WILL BE HELD FROM JULY 13 
To AUGUST 4, 1912, INCLUSIVE 



An Ideal Summer Resort 

At CHAUTAUQUA, ILLINOIS 



38 Miles From Saint Louis On 
C. P. & ST. L. R. R. 
and Mississippi River 

Delightful Trip by Automobile. 



1912 SEASON 

June 1 to September 15 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA AS A SUMMER RESORT 



HOTEL ACCOMODATIONS 




PIASA SPRINGS HOTEL. 

HOTEL accommodations are ample, and the rates rea- 
sonable. The Piasa Springs Hotel is located near the 
center of the grounds, close to the famous Piasa Spring. It 
has been thoroughly overhauled, renovated, refurnished and 
put in first-class conditions throughout. 

Rates are $1.50 and $2.00 per day; reduced rates by the 
week. 




TENTING PRIVILEGES. 

RENTAL PRICE OF TENTS AND FLOORS. INCLUDING LOT 

RENTAL 

10x12x3 wall tent with floor, with 2 cots, with sheets 

and pillows, 30 days _ _ $15.00 

12x14x3% wall tent, with floor, with 2 cots, with sheets 

and pillows, 30 days _ _ 16.00 

14x16x4 wall tent, with floor, with 2 cots, with sheets 

and pillows, 30 days 18.50 

9%xl4x6 compartment tent, 2 rooms, with floor, with 

4 cots, sheets and pillows, 30 days 19.50 

12x16x6 compartment tent, 3 rooms, with floor, with 

4 cots, sheets and pillows, 30 days 20.50 

14x24x6 compartment tent, 5 rooms, with floor, with 

4 cots, sheets and pillows, 30 days 23.50 

Flies for wall tents at $2.00 each. 




THE INN, FROM THE STATION 



Steps will be built at 50 cents per step, three feet wide. 
Steps are not rented. Bring your own furniture for tent. 
Persons desiring to bring their own tents will be furnished 
space at reasonable rates. Unless specially instructed, we 
will build floors and pitch tents according to our judgement, 
but don't hesitate to write regarding this or any other matter. 

There are also numerous boarding houses in different 
parts of the grounds, where good accommodations can be 
had at satisfactory rates. 

For further particulars regarding rates, address Mr. M. 
Edwin Johnson, 532 N. Tenth Street, East St. Louis, until 
June 1st; after that date at Chautauqua, 111. 

The. Inn beautifully located, fronting the river, near the 
entrance and just outside the grounds, will be in charge of a 
competent manager with a first class chef. 

It is equipped with all the modern conveniences and is 
an ideal place to spend the summer vacation season. 
Will be opened June 1st. 

Bookings can be made by addressing THE INN, Chautau- 
qua, 111., after June 1st; before that time address THE DUD- 
LEY HOTEL, 4145 Lindell Boul., St. Louis, Missouri. 



Page Two 



NEW Pi AS A CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA AS A SUMMER RESORT 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA is a summer resort with an As- 
sembly season, conducted on broad lines, as outlined 
more fully on page 4. It is now in its 29th year, and has 
always observed the same broad, liberal policy which has 
been appreciated by all who have enjoyed their summers 
there. 




It may be interesting to some to know something about 
the origin of the word which is so dear to us all. According 
to legend, the Piasa was a large bird, or rather half bird, 
half beast, that made its home in a cave in the Piasa bluffs. 
At night it slept, but in the day time went forth to seek its 
human prey, but was finally killed by old Ouatoga, the Indian 
chieftain, who jeopardized his own life to save his people 
from extinction. 

We cannot vouch for the truth of the statements regard- 
ing the Piasa bird, but we can assure one and all that there 
is no longer any terror of this or any other kind at Piasa, 
but there are beautiful woods and groves surrounding this 
quiet, peaceful valley where the soft, refreshing breezes of 
summer and the glorious paintings of Nature all sing the 
song of rest and peace at Piasa Chautauqua. 




"The groves were God's first temples; ere man learned 

To hew the shaft and lay the architrave, 
And spread the roof above them, ere he framed 

The lofty vault, to gather and roll back 
The sound of anthems, in the darkling wood, 

Amidst the cool and silence, he knelt down ' 
And offeree to the Mightiest solemn thanks 

And supplication." W. C. Bryant. 



Twenty-eight years ago, several ministers of the Gospel 
and a few laymen decided to rescue from the ravages of dis- 
sipation the beautiful valley now known as Piasa Chautauqua. 
An organization was formed and a few tents placed, and what 
was known for many years in the surrounding neighborhood 
as "The Camp" was established. 

As the interest increased, improvements of a more per- 
manent nature took place, until at the present time, Piasa 
Chautauqua covers an area of 310 acres with 110 substantial 
residences, some of them quite elaborate and expensive, more 
being erected each season, an Assembly Period each year 
with high grade entertainment of a moral, spiritual and intel- 
lectual nature; and back of all this, that which insures its 
success and guarantees to the visitor everything strictly first 
class, is the body of Christian Gentlemen who form the Board 
of Directors, and who have devoted their time and money to 
the up-building of this splendid place. 

Piasa Chautauqua is located less than forty miles from 
St. Louis in a beautiful valley between high, massive bluffs, 
with the Mississippi at its front and an almost unexplored 
forest at its back, one of Nature's most picturesque spots 
and dear to all those who have enjoyed its beauties, its clear, 
pure air, delightfully cool nights and beautiful scenery. 




Piasa Chautauqua is located on the east bank of the Miss- 
issippi River, less than two hour's ride from St. Louis, with 
frequent trains and boats at low rates. It is accessible from 
all points and within the means of all who take a summer 
vacation. The business man can live at Chautauqua and be 
at his business during the day without loss of time or increase 
in living expenses. Furnished cottages can be rented at 
reasonable prices for the season or by the week or month. 
The hotel accommodations are first class and at very reason- 
able rates. 

Excursions rates are offered duiing the entire assembly 
period, by both railroads and steamboats. The man who can 
only take a day or two from business or possibly be away 
over Sunday only, does not wish to devote so much time and 
money to getting to and from his resting place, and he with 
the loger vacation may not care to spend all his entertain- 
ment fund in transportation. He can avoid this by coming 
to Piasa Chautauqua. 



Page Three 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA AS A SUMMMER RESORT 



WHAT PIASA CHAUTAUQUA STANDS FOR 

PIASA CHAUTAUQUA in the Summer Assembly season 
stands primarily for the simplicity and naturalness of 
Christian living. It is built on the faith that unaffected, 
straighforward religion makes a life neither sanctimonious 
nor fanatical, but simple, normal, vital, free and glad. 

Piasa Chautauqua aims, therefore, to realize such a com- 
munity as religion of that sort creates. In its independent 
environment it presents a concrete picture of social Christian- 
ity, applied not in any Utopian scheme, but in the everyday 
relations of neighbors dwelling wholesomely together on 
principles of Christian good will. 

In an atmosphere as unconstrained as the atmosphere 
of a good home, Piasa Chautauqua rejoices in all the spon- 
taneous joys of family and neighborhood life, enlarging the 
family sympathies to include the neighborhood and intensi- 
fying the neighborhood sense with much of common interest. 
Not as an addition to, but as an expression of the simple 
life it wishes to cultivate. 




THE "LOG CABIN" 
C. Bernet, Pres. of Piasa Chautauqua, St. Louis, Mo. 

Piasa Chautauqua gives large place for recreations amuse- 
ments downright fun. From the initial of religion Piasa 
Chautauqua reaches out for everything that is hearty, hale, 
whole and unpretentious, and finds itself still within the 
pale of religion interpreted by its own large ideals. 

Whoever loves this comprehensive wholeness of life and 
despises the tacked-on conventionalities of artificial social 
standards whoever prefers freedom and frankness will be 
welcome at Piasa Chautauqua, and having come, will be 
glad for Piasa Chautauqua. 

Come ye into the summer woods; 

There entereth no annoy; 
AH greenly wave the chestnut leaves, 

And the earth is full of joy. 

And far within that summer wood 

Among the leaves so green, 
There flows a little gurgling brook, 

The brightest e'er was seen. 

Mary Howitt. 




"KENTUCKY HOME." 
Rev. Edmond Barnes, Grafton, 111. 

THE COST OF LIVING. 

Expenses at Chautauqua are made as small as possible, 
thus placing an outing on the grounds within the reach of 
all. Besides the hotel there are many private boarding 
houses and cottages where guests can obtain rooms and 
board, or rooms and accommodations for light housekeeping. 

The store will be open throughout the season, and all 
kinds of groceries, fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, bread 
and cakes can be had at prices as low as those of a city. The 
gardeners have an abundant supply of fresh vegetables 
throughout the entire season. Fresh butter, milk and eggs 
are supplied by the farmers of the neighborhood at very 
reasonable prices. Two refreshment pavillions are open 
one at the main entrance, and the other near the auditorium 
where lunches, ice cream, fruit and confectionery are sold. 
A number of furnished cottages can be rented for all or a 
part of the season, at from $50 to $125 for the entire season, 
and fine lots and platforms for tenting can also be rented. 
In every way Chautauqua is an ideal place and accommoda- 
tions are obtainable at prices to suit all purses. Telephone 
and telegraph communication can be had with all parts of 
the country. Only licensed and trustworthy dealers are ad- 
mitted to the grounds. Mails are received and sent out 
three times a day, except Sunday. Have your mail addressed 
to Chautauqua, 111. 




"OUATOGA LODGE" 
Mrs. Gus. V. R. Mechin, St. Louis, Mo. Built in 1909 



Page Four 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA AS A SUMMER RESORT 




PIASA SPRING WATER. , 

THE Hotel, Cottages and Swimming Pool are all supplied 
with the great health-giving Piasa Spring Water, an 
analysis of which shows it to be almost identical with the 
famous Eureka Springs water. 

The water is clear, cool, soft, pleasant and palatable. 
Purity is its greatest quality. There is not the slightest 
taint of mineral or other foreign substance in its taste. 
Pure water is nature's greatest solvent; it is the principle 
factor in healthy digestion, assimilation and excretion. Un- 
adulterated with minerals or drugs of any kind, it is the 
greatest tonic of all waters. Pure natural spring water will 
kill germs which will live in distilled water. 

It is hard to realize that water which possesses only the 
innate quality of being pure, can perform the remarkable 
cures attributed to the spring water, but if you doubt it, 
the proofs are at hand. The theory is that the water, being 
so pure, cures by filtering through the tissues of the body 
and washing out impurities which clog the canals. 

The water of the Piasa Springs is supplied by the water 
system to all parts of the grounds, and to many of the cot- 
tages, at a nominal charge. 



V\ T HAT more attractive feature could be suggested for a 
** summer resort than the great Chautauqua bathing 
pool ? The pool is constructed of concrete, is about one hun- 
dred and seventy-five feet long, seventy feet wide and varies 
in depth from two feet at the entrance to eight feet at the 
opposite end. Depth at different points is plainly indicated 
by large figures, and the increase is so gradual that there 
is no danger for those who cannot swim, while the swimmer 
has room to enjoy as long a dash as is usually desired. An 
expert is in constant attendance to assist those who may 
wish to learn to swim. Watching the bathers is one of the 
favorite pastimes of those who do not desire to take a 
plunge in the pool. 

Steam pipes are run through the water and keep it at 
a comfortable temperature at all times. The pool is bril- 
liantly lighted with electric lights, and with the water 
heated, bathing will be enjoyable during the evening as well 
as the day. There are spring boards, tubs, ropes, etc., afford- 
ing a variety of water amusements. 

Private dressing rooms and bathing suits can be had at 
reasonable prices. 

A refreshment stand is operated in connection with the 
pool where ices, light refreshments and cooling drinks can 
be had. No intoxicants are sold. 




THE SIWIMMING POOD. 



YE POSTCARD SHOP. 

One of the most interesting places on the grounds is Mr. Behymer's postcard shop, where all styles of postcards, can be had: 
the sublime, the ridiculous, the sentimental, the serious; also books, periodicals, stationery, pencils, pen, ink, etc. 

THE POST OFFICE. 

Will be open after June 1st and will be fully equipped with all the necessaries, including postage stamps, postal cards and 
all other supplies. Have your mail addressed to Chautauqua, Illinois. 



Page Five 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA AS A SUMMMER RESORT 



THE CHILDREN AT CHAUTAUQUA 

The children always enjoy Chautauqua. Not only is it a 
place of pleasure for them, but it is one where they can profit 
both mentally and physically. The clubs and various sports 
will keep them interested, and the panorama of the river, 
with its passing boats, is always an attraction; the great 
swimming pool is of such depths that they can enter it 
without the least danger; swings, games, etc., will keep them 
busy, and the play ground will always interest them. 




WHEBE THE CHILDREN LIKE TO PLAY 
Fresh air and sunlight make the best citizens. Shakespeare's 
idea of "books in the running brooks" is akin to modern educa- 
tional methods. 

Besides this, there are special features for the children on 
the Chautauqua Assembly program. The boys and girls 
can depend on having a fine time when they go to Piasa 
Chautauqua this year. 

How often do you speak of some day's outing as having 
been a "red-letter day?" If you will arrange for a vacation 
at the Piasa Chautauqua, you will look back to the time with 
the feeling that every day was a "red-letter day." A splen- 
did program, elegant grounds, a grand swimming pool, 
excellent boating and fine hotel accommodations combine to 
make the outing one which will always be associated with 
pleasant memories. Arrange for the trip early and organize 
a party among your friends to spend the summer vacation 
at this delightful spot. The expenses are small, the returns 
in pleasure, profit and health are large. 

"The birds around me hopp'd and play'd; 

Their thoughts I cannot measure 
But the least motion which they made 

It seemed a thrill of pleasure. 
The budding twigs spread out their fan, 

To catch the breezy air: 
And I must think, do all I can, 

That there was pleasure there." 

William Wordsworth. 
Page Six 



SHORT TRIPS FROM CHAUTAUQUA 



Many beautiful and 
interesting spots can 
be reached by short 
trips from Chautauqua, 
which can be made on 
foot or by boat. 
Among these are the 
Jerseyville Road, with 
its wealth of wild 
flowers. Nugent's 
Bluff, Elsah, Portage 
des Sioux, Grafton, 
Grafton, Babb's Hol- 
low, Pern Valley, Illi- 
nois River, Alton, Jer- 
seyville, Lover's Leap, 
and the Indian Mounds. 
An outing among the 
Piasa Bluffs is one 
which will always be 
remembered with 
pleasure. Piasa Chau- 
tauqua is situated in 
the most picturesque 
part of the Mississippi 

Valley, filled with romance and folklore of long ago, and 
every spot is interesting. 



WEEK END TRIPS 




SUNSET HILL. 



Not every one can 
take a vacation. Some 
of us are chained to 
the desk, no matter 
how uncomfortable the 
weather. The only re- 
lief from the city, 
when the streets bs- 
come like hot Arizona 
canyons, and the nights 
forbid sleep is the 
Week End Trip from 
Saturday noon to Mon- 
day morning to find a 
spot near to nature's 
heart, to revel in the 
pure air of all out- 
doors and go back to 
work with a new lease 
of life, is the thing. 
The question of where 
"LOVER'S LEAP." +o go is solved by 

Piasa Chautauqua. Ninety minutes after leaving St. Louis, 
the office-tired man or woman finds perfect rest and simple 
pleasure and amusements, and a bed where blankets are 
always necessary, so cool are the nights at Piasa Chautauqua. 




NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



RELIGIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS. 




HILLSIDE SERVICE ON THE LAWN IN FRONT OF THE 
AUDITORIUM. 

BIBLE CONFERENCE. 

Daily in the Auditorium, July 21st to 28 inc., under the 
direction of 

DR. WM. J. WILLIAMSON, 

Pastor of the Third Baptist Church, 

St. Louis, Mo., 

This will be of great interest to Ministers, Sunday School 
workers, and others throughout the entire Mississippi Valey. 
(See the regular program ) 

DEVOTIONAL HOUR IN THE FORE NOON. 
Daily at the Auditorium, throughout the Assembly. We 
wish to begin each day in this delightful atmosphere with song 
and prayer. We rejoice in the deep spirit of devotion which 
has in former years permeated this department, and we trust 
and predict that the spirit of evangelism will this year be 
greatly intensified. 

ASSEMBLY SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

9:30 to 10:30 A. M. each Sunday in the Auditorium, under 
the direction of the Superintendent. 
Lessons helps and Sunday School lit- 
erature will be furnished and classes 
will be supplied with able and competent 
teachers. 



PREACHING SERVICES. 

11 to 12 A. M. each Sunday in the Auditorium, 
speakers will officiate. 



Leading 



HILLSIDE SERVICES. 

4:30 to 5 P. M. each Sunday on the lawn in front of the 
Auditorium. Prominent speakers in 
charge. 

SACRED CONCERTS. 

8 to 9 P. M. Sunday in the Auditorium, with soloists, chor- 
uses and instrumental music. This will 
be one of the prominent features of 
Chautauqua this year. 



BOATING. 

Boating privileges will be provided with ample equip- 
ments of row boats, launches, etc., at reasonable rates. There 
will be regular trips every day, in addition to any special 
trips that may be requested. Fishing tackle and bait at 
current prices. 

LAWN TENNIS. 

The Lawn Tennis Courts, will be improved and put in first 
class condition. The use of this is free to cottagers and 
visitors. Bring your racquets with you. The organization 
of clubs is encouraged. 

CROQUET. 

There will be two public croquet grounds, in first-class 
condition, with the necessary equipment.. The use of these 
grounds is free to cottagers and visitors. Croquet sets will 
be furnished free. 

BASEBALL. 

Baseball grounds have been improved and put in first- 
class condition. A competent director will have charge of 
baseball, and will make all engagements and assist in organ- 
izing teams and arranging games. 




Page Seven 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



BEFORE ASSEMBLY, PROGRAM 



SUNDAY, JUNE 2nd. 

9:30 A.M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superintendent 
Jerseyville, 111. 
"Hypocrisy and Sincerity" Matt. 6, 1 to 18. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. O. L. Markman, Jerseyville, 111., 
Pastor, First Methodist Episcopal Church. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 9th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"Hearing and Doing" Luke 6, 39 to 49. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev., A. B. Peck, Carlinville, 111., 
Pastor, First Methodist Episcopal Church. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 16th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"Christ's Witness to John the Baptist." Matt. 
11, 2 to 19. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. W. F. Aull, E. St. Louis, 111., 
Pastor, First Presbyterian Church. 

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA. 

Troops 5, 11, 25. 
Maple Avenue Battalion, Encampment June 17th, 27th. 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19th. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 22nd. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 23rd. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. Temperence Lesson, Eph. 5, 11 to 21. 
At this time, the Sunday School will be organized 
for the season. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. W. F. Kline, D. D., 
Alton, 111,, Pastor, First M. E. Church, 

TUESDAY, JUNE 25th. 

8:00 P. M. Entertainment, Auditorium by Boy Scouts. 
Prizes. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 27th. 
4:30 P. M. Farewell Reception to Boy Scouts. 



SUNDAY, JUNE 30th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 
Review, Matt. 5, 17. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. O. W. Trent, Kewanee, 111., Pas- 
tor First Baptist Church. 

SUNDAY, JULY 7th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 
"Malignant Unbelief" Mark 3, 20 to 35. 

11:30 A. M. Semon, Rev. J. W. Van Cleave, Decatur, 111. 
District Superintendent, Decatur District. 

8:OOP.M. Sacred Song Service, Assembly Talent. 

TUESDAY, JULY 9th. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10th. 
Dickens Day 

Charles Dickens was, in his time, the best interpreter of 
the common life. His writings are instinct with reality. 
The men, women and children of his novels are not creations 
of a fantastic imagination, they are transcripts from life. 
And there is always a touch of the universal. His message 
to the England of his day is vital for the age in which we 
live. It is a message sometimes of sunshine, sometimes of 
tears, but always hopeful in its outlook and supremely in- 
teresting. 

4:00 P. M. Reading "The Old Curiosity Shop" 

Mr. David A. Jones 
Reading. 

1. Scenes from "Seven Oaks," by John F. Hol- 
land. 

2. "The Tale of Two Cities" Chas. Dickens. 
Mr. S. Chester Landrum, of the Morse School 
of Expression. 

8:00 P. M. Character Sketch, "In Search of a Hero among 
Dickens' Characters," written by Evelyn Cur- 
rier, St. Louis. 

A presentation of Dickens' best known female 
characters by Assembly Talent, under the 
direction of Miss Abbie Lorie Flint, St. Louis. 

FRIDAY, JULY 12th 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



Page Eight 




ONE OF THE DAILY STEAMBOATS ARRIVING AT CHAUTAUQUA 



ASSEMBLY PERIOD 

OFFICIAL PROGRAM 

Saturday, July 13th, 1912 
OPENING DAY 



2:30 P. M. Concert Auditorium, 8:30 P. M. 

Schildkret's Hungarian Orchestra. 

Mr. Schildkret has a reputation for building 
programs that interest every class. He is 3.45 p jyj 

popular at every Chautauqua where he is 
known. We ask our people to show their ap- 
preciation by attending each of his concerts. 



OPENING EXERCISES 
Mr. M. Edwin Johnson Chairman. 

7:30 P. M. Prelude Arion 

Mr. Walter W. Goff. 



Kroeger, 



8:00 P. M. 
8:15 P. M. 



Hymn 
Prayer 

Selection 



Coronation, by Audience 

Rev. W. F. Kline, Alton 

Schildkret's Orchestra 



Address, "The Future Great Chautauqua" 
Mr. C. Bernet, President, St. Louis. 



Address, "Looking Backward Twenty Eight 
Years Over the Old Camp Ground." 

Mr. J. B. House, East St Louis. 
Concert Schildkret's Orchestra 

Mr. Goff is a graduate of the Kroeger School 
with several years experience, both as a teach- 
er and pianist. He is director of the school 
of music of the Sacred Heart Academy, St. 
Charles, Mo. His selections on our program 
are from both classical and modern composers. 
For the convenience of those spending the 
summer at Piasa, Mr. Goff has kindly consent- 
ed to open a summer school of music. Teachers 
will be supplied to teach all branches of the 
Art. Those who do not desire to have a piano 
in their cottages can arrange to secure prac- 
tice hours on a piano provided for this purpose. 



Page Nine 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



THE OPENING NIGHT 

H" 1 HE Twenty-ninth Annual Opening will be held Saturday, 
^ July 13th, an event of great interest to all those to 
whom Chautauqua is dear; and for this occasion we have 
selected what is, perhaps, one of the best features of the 
entire program. SCHILDKRET'S HUNGARIAN ORCHES- 
TRA, who will give their first concert at 2:30 Saturday 
afternoon. 

A few words at this time regarding this musical Or- 
ganization will not be amiss. 




Schildkret's Hungarian Orchestra was brought over from 
Hungary during the World's Fair year, and was especially 
engaged for concert work in Chicago at that time through 
Mrs. Potter Palmer, Chairman of the Ladies' Committee at 
the World's Fair, and played at many of the most important 
concerts and social affairs during that memorable year. They 
were also especially engaged for a season at Old Vienna and 
received the first grand gold medal for their work. Since 
that time they have played all through the East, returning 
to Chicago in time to play for Prince Henry on his tour 
through this country some years ago. While in Washington 
Mr. Schildkret played at Washington Park Club, attended 
by Miss Alice Roosevelt, so it is not surprising that he was 
summoned to Washington to play at her wedding. 

Mr. Schildkret is without a peer as a leader, has studied 
the wants of the lyceum people and knows what to give the 
public in the way of concert programs. The company in- 
cludes as soloists, a pianist, violinist and flutist, Mr. Schild- 
kret himself being one of the greatest flute soloists in the 
world. 





Dr. Lichliter has 
limited his Chautauqua 
work to only one or 
two engagements each 
season, although for a 
number of years he has 
been platform manager 
and morning lecturer 
at the Merum Chautau- 
qua, Ind., and formerly 
had charge of the 
young people's work at 
the original Chautau- 
qua on the lake in 
western New York. 

"Dr. Lichliter is a 
man of brilliant parts 
and of infinite resource. 
He is one of the most 
advanced thinkers in 
the Church." 

St. Louis Globe- 
Democrat 



MR. LICHLITER 



The Anitas present unique programmes of orchestral 
music, of choruses, of instrumental and vocal solos, of 
duets, trios, quartets and readings. 

No expense has been spared in the organization of this 
company in securing the right people and in costuming and 
coaching it for each individual number of the programme, 
and in preparing the whole organization in its work to meet 
the most critical audiences and popular demands. 

The Anitas are an organization of artistic, versatile 
women and have pleased wherever they have been presented. 




Page Ten 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SUNDAY, JULY 14th. 
Methodist Day , 

(Under the auspices of Maple Avenue M. E. Church,) 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Morning Service. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker Superinten- 
dent. 

"The Seed in the Four Kinds of Soil", Mark 4, 
1 to 20. 

Mr. Becker is President of the Jersey County 
Sunday School Association, and under his sup- 
erintendency we are assured of great success 
for our Chautauqua Sunday School. It is urged 
that everyone who possibly can be present, 
both old and young. 

11:00 A. M. Hymn Led by Quartet 

Apostles Creed, 

Prayer Rev. J. A. Scarritt 

Concluding with Lord's Prayer. 
Selection Mendelssohn Quartet 

New Testament Lesson Rev. Edmond Barnes 
Notices 
Offertory, Song without Words Mendelssohn 

Mr. Goff. 

Selection Mendelssohn Quartet 

Hymn Congregation 

Sermon, "The Lordship of Jesus." 

Mr. M. H. Lichliter, St Louis 
Pastor Maple Avenue M. E. Church 
Hymn Congregation 

Benediction 

Postlude, "Nearer My God To Thee," with 
variations Mr. Goff 

AFTERNOON. 
4:30 P. M. Hillside Service Address by Mr. Lichliter 

The Hillside services held under the lofty trees 
between the Auditorium and Hotel, will be in 
charge of talented speakers, and will be in- 
teresting and inspiring to all. 
Mr. Liehliter. the speaker on this date, is recog- 
nized as one of the great preachers of St. Louis, 
"Thoroughly modern in his outlook, indepen- 
dent in his thinking and courageous in his pub- 
lic advocacy of a more rational interpretation 
of religious truth a Minister with a message 
for today." 



8:00 P,M. Sacred Concert, Mendelssohn Quartette and 
Orchestra. 

The Sunday services throughout the summer 
will be complete in every detail; good speakers 
good music, and every feature provided for in 
a way to make our Sundays interesting and 
helpful. 



MONDAY, JULY 15th 

9:00 A. M. Devotional hour Auditorium. "Atmosphere." 
"In him we live and move." Acts 17 28. 

2:30 P. M. Concert Auditorium 

Mendelssohn Quartet and Orchestra. 

8:00 P. M. Concert Auditorium 

Mendelssohn Quartet and Orchestra. 

The Mendelssohn Co., is a quartet of male 
voices appearing in evening dress doing vocal 
work also performing on the Violin and Cello, 
an organization of Mr. Dunbar, therefore need- 
ing no further recommendation. 




"HERE COMES THE TRAIN" 



Page Eleven 



NEW Pi ASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 




COL. BAIX. 



Col. Bain is one of the most widely 
known and generally successful popular 
lecturers known. A short time ago one 
of his contemporaries who has traveled 
this country over and over, and has 
himself delivered more than five thou- 
sand lectures, said: "Col. Bain has done 
more good than any other man on the 
American platform." No audience ever 
felt the sway of his oratory without a 
vision of a great personality, matchless 
in character, masterful in brain, sym- 
pathetic in heart and sublime in purpose. 



Col. Bain is just in his prime, doing the best work of his 
life. He has a phenomenal Chautauqua record. The call 
exceeds the number of available dates from year to year. He 
has lectured for hundreds of Chautauquas, lyceums, schools, 
colleges and societies throughout the United States with 
never a dissatisfied audience. The universal report is "He 
pleased, instructed, and did us good. We want him again." 



THE MENDELSSOHN QUARTET COMPANY 

IV/IALE quartets have always been a popular style of 
^'^ entertainment. However, in the Mendelssohn Com- 
pany we present something entirely new; a quartet appear- 
ing in the latest form of evening dress, and in addition to 
vocal work, performing upon the violin and the cello, retain- 
ing the spirit of the historic minstrel entertainer. 





ROSS ORANE. 



Mr. Crane is a car- 
toonist, clay modeler, 
and all-around prince 
of entertainers ; for- 
merly cartoonist on a 
metropolitan news- 
paper, and his draw- 
ings have the bigness, 
swiftness and vitality 
which characterize the 
newspaper cartoons. He 
draws a multitude of 
pictures, in colors, on 
immense sheets of fine 
tinted paper, portraits, 
caricatures, Illustra- 
tions of character, land- 
scapes beautiful in the 
extreme, and marvel- 
ous transformation 
scenes, all drawn with 
surpassing speed and 
accuracy. 



MUD THROWING But No Hard Feelings. 
Perhaps the most fascinating of all the delightful features 
of the multifold program. Herein is seen Ross Crane's 
sure mastery of technic, gained through the artist's years 
of study from life. In the space of twenty minutes he pro- 
duces under the swift magic of his hands protraits of histori- 
cal characters and also of national types and humorous 
creations, all illustrating the various points of his lecture. 



In the days "When Knighthood was in Flower" there 
appeared the prototype of the modern minstrel. He was a 
unique character, refined, and artistic in temperament, a 
combination of poet and musician, who spent his days stroll- 
ing from village to village singing his songs and reciting 
his verses to all who appeared, from the lords and ladies of 
the court and castle to the humbler peasant folk and child- 
ren of the street; his great genius lying in his ability to 
adapt his verse and song to fit any occasion or any mood of 
his listeners. 




DR. RUSSELL. 



Page Twelve 



NEW -PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 




LEAVING THE STATION WE BEGIN OUR PROMENADE 
DOWN THE BEAUTIFUL RUSTIC BRIDGE. 



TUESDAY, JULY 16th 

9:00 A. M. Devotional hour Auditorium. "Sincerity." 

"That ye may be sincere." Phil. 1 10. 

10:00 A. M. Organization of Chautauqua Chorus, Auditor- 
ium. 

It is requested that particular attention be 
given to above notice. As the work of the 
Chautauqua Chorus will be an important 
feature of the assembly program. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital, Norwegian Bridal Procession, 
Grieg. Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Ross Crane Cartoonist 

Mr. Crane is the foremost artist in his line 
and a rich treat is promised for this evening. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17th 

W. C. T. U. Day. 
9:00 A. M. Devotional Hour, Auditorium. "Forgiveness." 

"I will not remember thy sins," Isa 43 25. 
10:00 A. M. Rehearsal. Chautauqua Chorus. 

10:30 A. M. Annual Meeting of Stock Holders and election 
of Officers of Piasa Chautauqua, Women's 
Christian Temperance Union, W. C. T. U. 
cottage. 



2:30 P. M. Concert at Auditorium, under auspices of the 
W. C. T. U. 

2:45 P. M. Grand Gold Medal Contest W. C. T. U., 
Auditorium. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital, Sonata, Beethoven op. 27 2. 
Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Lecture. Col. Geo. W. Bain. 

"Our Country, Our Homes and Our Duty. 

We consider it an honor to have Col. Bain, 
the silver tongued Kentuckian, with us for his 
great lecture. He is one of the best known 
in the country, having seen thirty eight years 
of active service on the platform. 

THURSDAY, JULY 18th. 

9:00 A. M. Devotional Hour, Auditorium. "Pardon." 

"He will abundantly pardon," Isa 55 7. 

10:00 A. M. Rehearsal Chautauqua Chorus. 

2:00 P. M. Concert. Apollo Concert Company. 

3:30 P. M. "W. C. T. U., in Public Schools," Miss Sara 
Hudson, Alton, 111. 

"Child Welfare," Martha W. Connell, Carroll- 
ton, 111. 

"Temperance Teaching in the Sunday School." 
Prof. L. W. Ragland, Greenfield, 111. 
Discussion led by Mrs. W. H. Cartwright, E. 
Alton, 111. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital, Elegy E. Nollet, op. 88. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Concert, Apollo Concert Company, Auditorium. 




THE OTHER END OP THE SAME BRIDGE 

Page Thirteen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



>:- 



TTHE Apollo Concert Company is a company of strictly high 
* class musicians and entertainers. A few words at this 
time would be appropriate concerning the individual mem- 
bers of this company. 

Mr. Arthur Wells is a cultured musician of the highest 
degree, a splendid banjo soloist, a saxaphone player, an ex- 
perienced teacher of banjo, mandolin and guitar, and has 
had ten years experience in concert work with the Swiss 
Bell Ringers, the Asetceam Trio, the Wells-Grenewalt Musi- 
cal Company, and others. Music has been his profession 
for 16 years, and he has entertained in almost every state 
in the Union and throughout Canada. 

Mr. G. E. Holmes has had many years of successful con- 
cert experience as cornet and flute soloist with various 
concert companies and bands. For three years he was 
teacher of cornet, trombone, flute, saxaphone and harmony; 
he is a well-known composer of band and orchestra music 
having up to the present time nearly 100 compositions 
published and on the market; among them 

"Prospecture March." 
"Queen of Flowers Waltz." 
"Little lone Waltzes." 
"Lights and Shadows Caprice." 
"Primrose Intermezzo." 

Mrs. Alta R. Wells is an accomplished pianist, a graduate 
of the Chicago Musical College with several years' experience 
in concert work. Her piano accompaniments are one of the 
strong features of the entertainment. She also performs an 
important part in the Saxaphone Quartet and Bell Ringing. 

Miss Margret Hucket; reader and soloist with a mezzo 
soprano voice, soft and musical, a fine entertainer; enjoyed 
everywhere she has been heard. 

Mr. Clay Smith began his musical career as guitar 
soloist at the World's Fair, Chicago, and since that date has 
been steadily engaged in concert work, having been con- 
nected with some of the best bands and orchestras in this 
country; he was connected with the 4th Regimental Band 
during the St. Louis Exposition. 

The Apollo Company is one of the strongest Concert Com- 
panies on the platform, and will be appreciated by one and 
all. 





MR. MILES. 



EDWIN BRUSH, MAGICIAN. 



FIFTEEN years ago, Robert Parker Miles, whom this in- 
troduces to the platform, passed the turnstile of Castle 
Garden, a penniless English lad. His ambition was without 
limit, because he had all to get. He strove under the lash 
which impels drowning men to attempt swimming. Yet in 
his early thirties, he has wrested from life fine academic train- 
ing. He has been the co-worker of Moody and Booth Tucker, 
the visitor of Gladstone and Pope Leo XIII. comrade of the 
leading American literati. As a star writer upon the New 
York Journal he has startled and moved a million readers 
into practical, religious thought and forced New York into 
humanity towards its working girls and its fallen; and while 
still a boy preacher he outstripped the wheels of justice and 
moved the vilest murderess of this century to confession, 
with burning and pathetic words. A success while in the 
eye of the nation and while the simple pastor of a village 
flock a marked man. A moralist, treating vice with that 
true sympathy which influences the vicious for good, a Bret 
Harte in sunny analysis of the good side of bad men and 
things. A natural dramatist, emotional, vivid, picturesque, 
he also tempers the sorrows of life with good wit and 
consoling, quaint humor. 

More than five hundred delighted audiences have con- 
firmed Robert Parker Miles' "title to lecture." Everywhere 
"Tallow Dips" has been received with enthusiasm and has 
been characterized as unique, original, dramatic, intensely 
interesting, with a helpful, inspiring message for everybody. 

In presenting Mr. Edwin Brush, there is very little that 
may be added to his already well earned popularity. He has 
for a number of years been tested by the most critical plat- 
form tests known to the advanced Lyceum and found to be 
a magician and entertainer par excellent, at the head of his 
profession in fact, in a class by himself. 

He performs Hindoo, Chinese, Japanese, European, and 
many original tricks in magic. He is a Manipulator, dis- 
playing the most marvelous digital dexterity an Illusionist, 
filling all with awe and wonder. 

His Comedy and Humorous Patters runs all through his 
program, at times convulsing his audience with laughter 
and giving them two entertainments in one. 

His unusually pleasing and magnetic personality, his con- 
summate mastery of his art, combined with the suave manner 
in which he perpetuates his clever and fascinating deceptions 
upon his audience, makes his performance the most unique 
of its kind and him a favorite with the young and old. 



Page Fourteen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 




ENTRANCE TO THE GROUNDS BETWEEN ROWS OP BfiAU- 
TIFUL. FLOWERS. 



FRIDAY, JULY 19th 
9:00 A. M. Devotional Hour, Auditorium. "Doubt." 

"If any man willeth to do his will. 
"Jno. 717 R. V. 

10:00 A. M. Rehearsal. Chautauqua Chorus. 

2:30 P. M. Concert, under auspices of the W. C. T. U. 

2:45 P. M. "The House We Live in or The Needs and Care 
of the Body," Miss Grace Enos, Jerseyville, 
111. 

"The Place of Alcohol in Medical Practice," 
Rev. M. M. Want, Greenfield, 111. 
"Science and Temperance in the Home." 
Mrs. E. F. Ford, Greenfield, III. 
"Flower Missions" Mrs. R. O. Trabeau, Jer- 
seyville, 111. 



7:45 P. M. Piano Recital. 

A. Scarf Dance. 

B. Humoresque. 



Mr. Goff 

Chaminade. 

Dvoark. 



Mr. Goff. 



8:00 P. M. Lecture, "Tallow Dips" Robt, Parker Miles. 

Mr. Miles, Lecturer, Traveler, Author has de- 
livered 500 lectures during the past four years 
in 14 different states. His lecture is an us- 
usual one. You must hear it; you will enjoy 
it. 




MR. HOL.TON. 

SATURDAY, JULY 20th 

9:00 A. M. Devotional Hour, Auditorium. 
"Christian Love." 
"Love never faileth," I Cor. 138 R. V. 

10:00 A. M. Rehearsal Chautauqua Chorus. 

2:30 P. M. Boat Race, Grafton to Chautauqua; Silver Cup. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital, Magic Fire. Wagner. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Brush, The World's greatest Magician. 
Entertainment in Two Parts. 
Reproducing his Wonderful feats of Prestidi- 
gitation Magic, The Hindoo's greatest illu- 
sion, etc. 
"If this be Magic, let it be an art." 




ONE OF THE AVENUES 



Page Fifteen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 




J>R. WILLIAMSON. 
He will have charge of the Bible Conference 

The Ideal Hymn and Song Book will be used during the 
Bible Conference; 500 Cloth bound copies will be on sale 
June 1st at 25 cents the copy. As this Hymn Book will be 
the official one during the entire season of 1912, everybody 
is urged to purchase a copy for their own use. 

Send your orders prior to June 1st to Mr. L. N. Burns, 
2600 N. Broadway, St. Louis, after June 1st apply to Mr. 
Johnson on the Grounds. Buy a copy and take part in the 
Grand Chorus led by Mr. E. O. Sellers, who is the composer 
of many of the Hymns. 






MiRS. DAGUE, 

Who will have charge of the 
Woman's Hour Bible Conference. 

THE truly successful Readers of America could be num- 
bered upon the fingers of one hand. Of these leaders 
in the speech arts, there are none more thoroughly delightful 
in their interpretations of the artistic phases of life than 
Mrs. Gates. Her mimetic appreciation is such that she 
intuitively adopts the actor's characteristic peculiarities of 
the personal of her selections. This results in a vivacity 
and realism which goes far toward assuring her success. 
Her ability however is much greater than that of a mere 
mimic. She is a thorough student of her art, and from the 
critic's point of view, her every effort is complete and satis- 
fying. A voice of remarkable strength and richness, together 
with an unlimited capacity for study and work, have aided 
a charming personality and made of her one of the Great 
Readers of today. 



MR. SELLERS, 
Leader of the Chorus 
We will sing the OLD SONGS and some of the new 




DR. STEEL 



Page Sixteen 



NEW Pi ASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



BIBLE CONFERENCE WEEK 



SUNDAY, JULY 21st 
Baptist Day 

(Under auspices of the Third Baptist 
Church, St. Louis, Mo.) 

Morning 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superin- 
tendent. The Growth of the Kingdom." 
Mark 4, 26 to 32. 



MONDAY, JULY 22nd 



Mr. Goff. 

Led by Mr. Sellers. 
Mr. Sellers. 



11:00 A. M. Morning Service. 
Prelude. 
Doxology. 
Invocation. 
Lords Prayer. 
Responsive Reading. 
Hymn, Congregation. 
Scripture Lesson. 
Selection. 
Prayer. 
Offering. 

Hymn, Congregation. Led by Mr. Sellers. 

Sermon: "The Message of Christ Church of 
today." 

Wm. J. Williamson, D. D., St. Louis. 

Pastor, Third Baptist Church. 
Prayer. 

Hymn, Congregation. Led by Mr. Sellers. 

Benediction. 

Postlude. "Angels of Paradise." 

Mr. Goff. 

Dr. Williamson preaches weekly to the largest 
Protestant congregation in St. Louis. He has 
a firm grip on the fundamentals of Christianity 
and is endowed with the rare ability to pre- 
sent his message in winning and attractive 
form. He is a man of fine social qualities, 
an incarnation of the brotherly spirit. He is 
regarded as one of the strongest and most ag- 
gressive ministers of his denomination in the 
United States. 

Afternoon. 

4:30 P. M. Hillside Service, address by Dr. Williamson. 
Evening. 

8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert, Chorus led by Prof. E. O. 
Sellers. 



9:00 A. M. Chorus. 



Directed by Mr. E. O. Sellers. 



Mr. Sellers is Assistant Director of Music in 
the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. He is 
prominent in the "Men and Religion Forward" 
Movement, in Y. M. C. A. work, and is a great 
leader of men. 

He organized the May Festival Chorus in Cleve- 
land, O., consisting of 1200 voices. He is an 
enthusiastic Sunday School man, and believes it 
to be the most efficient recruiting agency of 
the church. He is a teacher of a bible class 
with an average attendance of 292 in the 
Moody Church. He is a popular speaker, also 
contributor to the magazines and religious 
press on subjects with which he is familiar, 
and is known as a composer of gospel music. 
Mr. Sellers' energy, ability and good cheer will 
be highly appreciated by all who take part in 
the Bible Conference at Piasa Chautauqua. 

10:00 A. M. Bible Hour. Dr. Wm. J. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians. 
I. "The Philippian Church; Acts 16 

11:00 A. M. Round Table Conference; 

The Problems of the Spiritual Life. 

I. "The Lost Art of Meditation." 
President John F. Harmon, McKendree College 



12:00 M. 



Noon Recess. 



1:30 P. M. "The modern Sunday School," Mr. E. O. Sellers. 

I. "Organization." 

2:30 P. M. Woman's Hour: Mrs. Winifred Wirts Dague, 
Chicago. 

I. "Martha the Home Maker." 

Too much cannot be said in favor of Mrs. 
Dague, Gospel Singer, Choir Conductor, Bible 
Teacher, Lecturer, Writer for the Religious 
Press, a woman of delightful personality and 
of great power in the Evangelistic world. Her 
message is so interesting that the audience 
must listen, so plain that they cannot but un- 
derstand, so convincing that they will want to 
live it. 

3:30 P. M. Adjournment for Recreation. 

7:00 P. M. "Sunset Hour" at the Station, 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 



7:45 P. M. Musical Prelude, Au Martin. 
Mr. Goff. 



Godard. 



8:00 P. M. Lecture, "Men the Supreme need of the day." 
Dr. Harmon. 



Page Seventeen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



9:00 A. M. 
10:00 A. M. 



11:00 A. M. 

12:00 M. 
1:30 P. M. 

2:30 P. M. 

3:30 P. M. 
7:00 P. M. 

7:45 P. M. 
8:00 P. M. 



TUESDAY, JULY 23rd 

Chorus. Directed by Mr. Sellers. 

Bible Hour. Dr. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians: 

II. "The Christian Estimate of Life." 

Phil. 11 to 26. 
Round Table Conference; 
The Problems of the Spiritual Life: 
II. Evangelism; Rev. M. Edwin Johnson. 

Noon Recess. 

"The Modern Sunday School." Mr. Sellers. 

II. "The Teacher's Preparation." 

Woman's Hour. Mrs. Dague. 

II. "Lydia the Church Worker." 

Adjournment for Recreation. 

"Sunset Hour. At the Station. 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 



Liszt. 



Musical Prelude, Libestraum. 
Mr. Goff. 

Lecture, "Dixie before the War." 

Dr. S. A. Steel. 

"Dr. Steel is the only speaker I ever saw who 
held a Chautauqua Audience after the Chimes 
had rung," 

Bishop J. H. Vincent. 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 24th 
9:00 A. M. Chorus. Directed by Mr. Sellers. 

10:00 A. M. Bible Hour. Dr. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians: 
III." Jesus our Example," Phil. 127 to 211. 

11:00 A. M. Round Table Conference; 

The Problems of the Spiritual Life: 

III. "Temptation" Mrs. Dague. 

12:00 M. Noon Recess. 

1:30 P. M. "The Modern Sunday School," Mr. Sellers. 

III. "The Minister and the Sunday School," 

2:30 P. M. Woman's Hour. Mrs. Dague. 

III. "Miriam, the Woman in Literature." 

3:30 P. M. Adjournment for Recreation. 
7:00 P. M. "Sunset Hour," At the Station. 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 

7:45 P. M. Musical Prelude, Duet. Mendelssohn. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Lulu Tyler Gates, Reader. 

"Sky Pilot" and other Selection. 

THURSDAY, JULY 25th 
9:00 A. M. Chorus, Directed by Mr. Sellers. 

10:00 A. M. Bible Hour. Dr. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians; 

IV. "Working out our Salvation. 

Phil. 212 to 30. 

11:00 A. M. Round Table Conference; 

The Problems of the Spiritual Life. 
IV. "The Ministry of Suffering. 
Rev. Mahlon H. Day. 

12:00 M. Noon Recess. 



1:30 P. M. The Modern Sunday School," Mr. Sellers. 
IV. "The Teacher as a Shepherd." 

2:30 P. M. Woman's Hour. Mrs. Dague. 

IV. "Deborah the Militant." 

3:30 P. M. Adjournment for Recreation. 

7:00 P. M. "Sunset Hour," At the Station. 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 

7:45 P. M. Musical Prelude, Polonaise. Chopin. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Lecture Recital. Prof. Ernest R. Kroeger. 

"The Emotional and Picturesque in Music." 
Prof. Kroeger has won an international rep- 
utation as a musician and composer, and as a 
concert pianist he ranks with the best in the 
world. As a teacher of the piano, he is sec- 
ond to none. He plays over one thousand com- 
positions from memory, and has been known 
to produce an entire evening's program at the 
call of the audience. He is Honorary Pro- 
fessor in the French Academy of Music at Paris, 
France. His evening at Piasa will be a great 
treat to every one in attendance. 

FRIDAY, JULY 26th. 
9:00 A. M. Chorus. Directed by Mr. Sellers. 

10:00 A. M. Bible Hour. Dr. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians. 

V. "The Righteousness which is 
by Faith," Phil. 3. 

11:00 A. M. Round Table Conference: 

The Problems of the Spiritual Life. 

V. "The Sacrament of Service." 
Mr. Wm. V. Berg. 

12:00 M. Noon Recess. 

1:30 P. M. "The Modern Sunday School." Mr. Berg. 

V. "The Problem of the Boy." 
2:30 P. M. Woman's Hour; Mrs. Dague. 

V. "The Christian Woman in Society." 
3:30 P. M. Adjournment for Recreation. 
7:00 P. M. "Sunset Hour." At the Station. 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 
7:45 P. M. Musical Prelude. 

a. Spring Song. Mendelssohn. 

b. To the Spring. Greig. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Illustrated Lecture, "The New Japan," with 
Stereopticon Views. Dr. S. H. Wainwright. 
Dr. Wainwright spent many years of his life as 
a missionary in the island Empire of Japan. 
He is an accomplished Orientalist and no one 
can speak with greater authority concerning 
the modern problems in the Far East. He is 
an impressive and interesting speaker and will 
be heard with pleasure and real profit. 



Page Eighteen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SATURDAY, JULY 27th. 
9:00 A. M. Chorus. Directed by Mr. Sellers. 

10:00 A. M. Bible Hour. Dr. Williamson. 

The Epistle to the Philippians; 

"The Secret of True Happiness," Phil. 4. 

11:00 A. M. Round Table Conference; 

The Problems of the Spiritual Life. 

VI. "The Appreciation of the Bible" 
Mr. Howard G. Colwell. 

12 M. Noon Recess. 

1:30 P. M. "The Modern Sunday School," Mr. Colwell, 
VI. "The Problem of the Young Man." 

2:30 P. M. Woman's Hour; Mrs. Dague. 

VI. "Esther the Queen." 

3:30 P. M. Adjournment for Recreation. 
4:30 P. M. Baseball at the Ball Park. 

7:00 P. M. "Sunset Hour." At the Station. 

Dr. Williamson, leader. 

7:45 P. M. Musical Prelude, Widimung, Liszt-Schumann 
Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Concert. The Anitas, a Singing Orchestra. 
THIS COMPANY is the product of the work 
of Mr. Ralph Dunbar, which fact alone insures 
its success. The Anitas' repertoire is as var- 
ied as the versatility of the artists suggests. 
It includes songs of both Grand and Light 
Opera, classic and popular music, while the old 
time songs and hymns which appeal to the 
hearts and memories of men and women who 
make up the audience, are worked out into a 
splendid balance on every program. Special 
attention has been given to the preparation of 
of the Sacred Concert for July 28th. 





SUNDAY, JULY 28th. 
PRESBYTERIAN DAY. 

(Under the auspices of the West Presbyterian Church, 
"Looking unto Jesus the Author and Finisher of our Faith." 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"The Wheat and the Tares." 
Matt. 13, 24 to 30. 
36 to 43. 



11:00 A. M. 



Morning Service. 

Prelude. 

Lord's Prayer. 

Invocation. 

Doxology. 

Responsive Reading. 

Hymn, Congregation. 

Scripture Lesson. 

Selection. 

Prayer. 

Offering. 

Hymn, Congregation. 



Mr. Goff. 



Led by Mr. Sellers. 
The Anitas. 

Led by Mr. Sellers. 



Sermon, "The Word Written and Incarnate," 
Francis W. Russell, D. D., St. Louis, 

Pastor, West Presbyterian Church. 
Prayer. 

Hymn, Congregation. Led by Mr. Sellers. 
Benediction. 

Postlude, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." 
Mr. Goff. 

4:00 P. M. Hillside Service, Address by Dr. Russell. 



8:00 P. M. Sacred Concert, Auditorium. 



The Anitas. 



"GOOD-BY," THE BUSY BUSINESS MAN IS LEAVING 
THE MORNING SPECIAL FOR 
THE CITY. 



ON 



Dr. Russell is pastor of the largest Presbyter- 
ian Church in St. Louis, a man of great prom- 
ise and spiritual power, pastor of the West 
Presbyterian Church since 1904. Under his 
leadership, the spiritual and missionary power 
of the church has been greatly strengthened. 
His church has a membership of 700, with a 
Sunday School of nearly 1,000 people and sup- 
ports four American missionaries in .the for- 
eign field and three native workers. 



Page Nineteen 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



Zule&e 

Spencer 

fierce 




In selecting Mr. and Mrs. Pierce as one of our attractions 
for the coming year, we did so with the idea of presenting a 
program, or form of entertainment, that would please most. 
The program which most universally gratifies is the one 
affording splendid variety with every feature, whether class- 
ical or popular, artistically presented. 

The personality of the platfprmist has much to do with 
his or her reception by the audience. The Pierces have the 
most charming and winsome personality. They are popular 
both on and off the platform. This fact, combined with 
their clever impersonations has made them extremely pop- 
ular for Chautauqua work. 





It is safe to say that no two artists on the platform today 
are presenting a more effective program than Mr. and Mrs. 
Sprague. They satisfy the artistic taste of the most critical, 
while touching the hearts of every man, woman and child. 

"Esmeralda" is a play in which there is more pull upon 
the heart strings than any other that we know of. The 
play has been re-written for Mr. and Mrs. Sprague, so that 
the two persons, each playing several characters in costume, 
have the effect of that of a larger company. The play and 
inter-play of passions, interest and emotions in this great 
American comedy produced by Mr. and Mrs. Sprague is 
wonderful to a degree. 

During their second evening with us they will present 
Rip yan Winkle. This dreamy old legend clings to the 
American people more closely than any other written story. 
We know that he was as much a fancy of a great brain as 
were the gray-bearded ghosts of Hudson and his men; but 
Rip, the jolly vagabond, and Rip, the pathetic hero of a 
twenty years' sleep, are more real to us than Irving, whose 
hand penned the immortal picture. Since Joseph Jefferson 
passed from the stage of life, no actor in this Country has 
presented "Rip Van Winkle" as does Herbert Sprague. He 
is ably assisted by Mrs. Sprague, whose splendid work is a 
feature of this excellent program. 




MR. GOFF. 



PROF. KROEGER. 



Page Twenty 



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CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



CONTINUATION OF 
CHILDREN'S WEEK. 

(For Children of all ages.) 
In Charge of Miss Lida T. Brasher. 

In the work of Miss, Brasher, magnificent costumes of 
the respective countries are worn and many interesting curios 
are shown. Each day's work relates to some particular coun- 
try, and the feature days of the child will be brightened by 
the memory of some beautiful story, or other feature of this 
work. 



REGULAR PROGRAM 
8:00 P. M. Dramatic 




MISS BRASHER. 

MONDAY, JULY 29th. 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Half Hour, Auditorium. 

"Be Kind" 

"God is kind to the Unthankful," Luke 635. 
9:00 A. M. Indian Stories from Pueblo, Folk Lore, (In 



costume) 

10:00 A. M. Physical Culture. 
11:00 A. M. Manual Training. 

2:00 P. M. Rehearsal. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital. 

a. Traumerie. 

b. Hunting Song. 

Mr. Goff. 
8:00 P. M. Humorous and Comic Pictures in Motion. 



Miss Brasher. 
Drill and "Folk Dances." 

Chautauqua Chorus. 

Schumann. 
Mendelssohn. 



TUESDAY, JULY 30th. 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Half Hour, Auditorium. 
"Be Fair." 

"As ye would that men should do unto you do 
ye to them," Luke 6 31. 

9:00 A. M. Dutch Stories. Miss Brasher. 

These are peasant folk lore and historical 
sketches, in costume. 
10:00 A. M. Physical Culture Drill and Folk Dances. 

(Preparations will begin for the Saturday 
Party." 

11:00 A. M. Manual Training. 

2:00 P. M. Rehearsal. Chautauqua Chorus. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital. 

a. Cradle Song. Kjerulf. 

b. Lullaby. V. Weber. 

Mr. Goff. 



Entertainment, 
Harry Raymond Pierce, 
Zuletta Spencer Pierce. 
The Philosopher in the Apple Orchard, 
Anthony Hope. (Two Part Sketch in Costume) 
Character Studies of Famous Men. 
A Japanese Study, (In Costume,) John Luther 
Long. 

Captain January, (Dramatization from a very 
popular book, "Captain January." In Cos- 
tume.) 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 31st. 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Half Hour, Auditorium. 
"Be true." 

"Hereby shall I know that ye are true men," 
Gen 4233. 

9:00 A. M. Greek Stories, in costume. Miss Brasher. 

10:00 A. M. Physical Culture Drill and Folk Dances. 

11:00 A. M. Manual Training. 

2:00 P. M. Rehearsal. Chautauqua Chorus. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital. 

a. Swing Song. Kroeger. 

b. Imps at Play Paulsan. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Juvenile Pictures in Motion. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1st. 
National Congress of Mothers' Day. 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Half Hour, Auditorium. 
"Be Cheerful," 
"Be of good cheer." 

Acts 2725. 



9:00 P. M. Scotch Stories, in costume. 



Miss Brasher. 



10:00 A. M. Physical Culture Drill and Folk Dances. 
11:00 A. M. Manual Training. 

2:00 P. M. Dr. Ford Langworthy of Washington, D. C., 
Chief of Household Economics of Dr. Wiley's 
Pure Food Department. 
Topic, "Household Economics." 

8:00 P. M. Cantata. "The Merry Milkmaids," 

Chautauqua Chorus. 

The beautiful Cantata, "Merry Milkmaids" 
dealing with country life so fascinatingly ar- 
ranged by the popular musician and writer 
Charles H. Gabriel, which has been given at 
various Chautauqua's throughout the country, 
and in the leading cities of America, will be 

given out under the trees by the Chautauqua 
hprus and four leading soloists of St. Louis. 
This will be one of the greatest features of the 
entire Chautauqua Season. The work will be 
under the jurisdiction of a leading musical 
director and a first class orchestra will be em- 
ployed for the occasion. The trees, the flowers, 
the spring, the little brook, yes even the stars 
will be the accompaniment to the chorus of 
one hundred voices which will send the sweet- 
est music out far out, on the breezes through 
valley and along the Mississippi to gladden 
the multitude of Chautauqua's friends. 
The Cantata will be given in Costume. 



Page Twenty-one 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 2nd. 

8:30 A. M. Devotional Half Hour, Auditorium. 
"Be Brave." 

"Be Thou Strong and Very Courageous," 
Joshua 1 7. 

9:00 A. M. Japanese Stories, in Costume Miss Brasher. 
10:00 A. M. Physical Culture Drill and Folk Dances. 
11:00 A. M. Manual Training. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital. 

a. The Hen. Pessard. 

b. Nachstueck. Schumann. 

Mr. Goff. 
8:00 P. M. "Esmeralda" Costume Play, The Spragues. 

PERSONS IN THE PLAY. 

ESMERALDA A timid little North Carolina girl. 

Liddy Ann Rogers "Mother," discontented, ambitious. 

Old Man Rogers _ The dear, kindly old father. 

Dave Hardy Esmeralda's sweetheart. 

"I've been building a house for my wife" 

The Marquis De Montessen A cold-blooded Parisian 

adventurer. 
George Drew _ _ A New York speculator. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3rd. 
Children's Day. 

8:30 A. M. Closing Devotional Service. 

"The Bible," "What is it to you?" 

"I have found the book," 2 Kings 178. 

"Sir Walter Scott said" "Bring me the Book, 

there is only one Book." 

9:00 A. M. Bible Stories. Miss Brasher. 

10:00 A. M. Physical Culture. 

Rhythmical Exercises of the Nations. 
Wreath Drill, for the larger girls and boys. 
Flower Dance, for the small children. 
"Marusaki" Jap song for the girls. 

2:30 P. M. Party for the Children. Miss Brasher. 

7:45 P. M. Piano Recital, Egeria. Kroeger. 

Mr. Goff. 

8:00 P. M. Rip Van Winkle. The Spragues. 

PERSONS IN THE PLAY 

Rip Van Winkle Everybody's Friend 

Gretchen His Scolding Wife. 

Meenie Their Daughter. 

Derrick Von Beekman The Burgomaster 

Nick Vedder The Village Inn-keeper 

Katchen The Inn-keeper's Daughter after twenty years 

ACT. I. The Village Green at Falling Water Plot of Der- 
rick Von Beekman. 
ACT II. Rip's Kitchen on a Stormy Night "Gretchen, are 

you going to drive me away? 
ACT III. Summit of the Catskills Rip's Encounter with 

the Phantom Dwarfs. 

ACT IV. Village of Falling Water after twenty years. Re- 
turn of Rip Van Winkle. 

Intermission of 5 minutes after close of act III. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 4th. 
Last day of the Assembly. 

CONGREGATIONAL DAY. 

Under auspices of the First Congregational Church, St. Louis. 

Music under direction of the Wehrmann Quartette. 
9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"The Worth of the Kingdom." 

Matt. 13: 44 to 53. 

11:30 A. M. Organ Prelude. Mr. Goff. 

Doxology Invocation Lord's Prayer Gloria. 
Responsive Reading. 

Hymn. Congregation. 

Scripture Lesson. 
Selection. 
Prayer. 
Response. 
Announcements. 
Offertory. 
Selection. 
Sermon. Rev. Horace F. Holton, St. Louis. 

Pastor, First Congregational Church. 
Hymn. Congregation. 

Benediction. 

Postlude. "Abide With Me." Mr. Goff. 

4:00 P. M. Hillside Service. Address by Mr. Holton. 

Music. Wehrmann Quartette. 

CLOSING SERVICES. 



Wehrmann Quartette. 



Wehrmann Quartette. 



7:45 P. M. 
8:00 P. M. 



Sacred Recital. 
Sacred Concert. 

Reading. 



Mr. Goff. 

Chautauqua Chorus. 

Miss Mildred Haynes. 

Wehrmann Quartette. 

Miss Sarah Hazel Brand. 



Closing Hymn, "God be with you till we meet 

again." 

Benediction. 




Page Twenty-two 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



AFTER ASSEMBLY PROGRAM 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 6th. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 8th. 
8:00 P. M. Motion Pictures. 



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"The Death of John the Baptist." 
(Mark. 6, 14 to 29.) 



f SUNDAY, AUGUST, llth. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"A Troubled Sea and a Troubled Soul" 
(Mark 435 to 520.) 



11:00 A. M. Sermon 



Rev. John Wesley Cummings, 
East St. Louis, 111. 
Pastor First M. E. Church. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 18th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 
"The Ruler's Daughter," Mark 5, 21 to 43. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon Rev. W. S. Hicks, Alton, 111. 

Pastor First Baptist Church. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 25th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 
"The Visit to Nazareth," Luke 4, 16 to 30. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon Rev. John McCarty, St. Louis, 

Pastor Shaw Avenue M. E. Church South. 



11:00 A. M. Sermon Rev. C. H. Peterson, Marissa, 111. 

Pastor First M. E Church. 



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 

"The Mission of the Twelve." 
Matt. 935 to 1015. Matt. 10 40 to 111. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. Harry C. Leonard, St. Louis, 
Pastor Chouteau Place M. E. Church. 



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School, Mr. J. W. Becker, Superinten- 
dent. 
"Judgment and Mercy." Matt. 11, 20 to 30. 

11:00 A. M. Sermon, Rev. Samuel Thero, East St. Louis, 
Pastor Bond Avenue M. E. Church. 




THE "FI^ORA." 
Miss Mathilda Meinhardt, St. Louis. 



'SYCAMORE LODGE" 
Mrs. Geo. Caughlan, East St. Louis, 111. 



Page Twenty-three 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SUMMER HOMES AT CHAUTAUQUA 




SUMMHR HOME OF S. S. PING-REE, ST. LOUIS, BUILT IN 1911. 





"CARO" 
Mrs. Rose M. Mink, St. Louis, Mo. Built in 1909 



"AYRSHIRE." 
L. N. Burns, St. Louis, Mo. Built in 1D09. 



Page Twenty-four 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SUMMER HOMES AT CHAUTAUQUA 





"RIVER VIEW" 
Mr. D. W. Woods, St. Louis, Mo. 

TENNIS, 
CROQUET, 
QUOITS, 
BASEBALL. 

For those who enjoy these outdoor games, grounds are 
provided a first-class Tennis Court, two Croquet grounds 
and suitable places for Quoits. 

Bring your Tennis Racquets with you; Croquet sets will 
be provided. 

A Base Ball Grounds has been prepared at considerable 
expense, and matched teams are encouraged. 



The "ENGLISH COTTAGE" 
Mr. J. N. English, Jerseyvllle, 111. 



HOUSE PARTIES AT CHAUTAUQUA. 

'No finer place can be found anywhere for house parties 
than Piasa Chautauqua. Here nice cottages, completely fur- 
nished, can be rented by the week or month at reasonable 
rates by desirable parties, properly chaperoned. All applica- 
tions for cottages must be made in writing, to M. Edwin 
Johnson, Manager, 532 North Tenth street, East St. Louis, 
until June 1st, after that date address Chautauqua, 111. No 
intoxicants are allowed on the grounds. 





"BEE-AT-EZE." 
Mr. F. A. Behymer, Lebanon, 111. 



TRAMP INN. 

Mrs. Albert T. Flint, St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Twenty-five 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SUMMER HOMES AT CHAUTAUQUA 




THE "WYCKOFF" 
Mrs. D. A. Wyckoff, Upper Alton, 111. 

BOY SCOUTS AT CHAUTAUQUA 

NE of the greatest movements of the present Age is the 
"Boy Scouts of America." The Directors, appreciating 
the importance of this Movement, have offered free admis- 
sion to all Boys Scouts during encampment in order to 
encourage the various troops to hold their encampment at 
Chautauqua. There is plenty of space for encampments, 
and no more beautiful place can be found than at Piasa 
Chautauqua. We will also assist the Scout Masters in pre- 
paring their encampment and in every other way possible 
to make their encampment at Chautauqua most enjoyable. 




ROCKY HKND." 
Mr. L. W. Manning, St. Louis, Mo. 

Far away the City thunders, and Life surges like a stream: 

Here are afternoons of rapture, silence and a golden dream. 

I am coming when they call me Summer and my Summer 

maid, 

Oh the wonder of Chautauqua, full of shadows and of 
shade. 

With apologies to Chas. Hanson Towne. 



"OAKHUKST" 
Mrs. J. A. Corrington, Danville, 111. 



The foolish fears of what might happen, 

I cast them all away, 
Among the clover-scented grass, 

Among the new mown hay, 
Among the husking of the corn, 

Where drowsy poppies nod, 
Where ill thoughts die and good are born, 

Out in the fields with God. 

Elizabeth Barrett Browning. 




"SLEEPY HOLLOW." 
Dr. Yerkes, Upper Alton, 111. 



Page Twenty-six 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



SUMMER HOMES AT CHAUTAUQUA 




"DAD'S DEN" 
Mrs. E. G. Kupferle, St. Louis. 



BOATING AND FISHING 



The Mississippi River is over one mile wide at Chautauqua, 
affording excellent opportunities for boating. The fishing 
is also good. Launches, row boats, fishing tackle, etc., can 
be had at boat landing. There are also many enjoyable short 
excursions on the river, launches or larger boats making ex- 
cursion trips to Grafton, or short distances up the Illinois 
River or to the mouth of the Missouri River. 




"ALLE-QUir-PA LODGE" "WEE-TA-MOO LODGE" 

Mr. A. N. Lewis, SI. Louis, Mo. Mr. W. E. Caulfield, St. Louis, Mo. 
Built in 1910 




"BROEDER" 
Mr. Geo. H. Breeder, St. Louis. Built In 1911. 



FANCY NEEDLE WORK. 

The Smith Sisters, of Jacksonville, 111., will be located at 
Piasa Springs Hotel, with a complete line of the latest and 
most artistic styles of Pillows, Needlework, Embroidery, etc., 
and will instruct all purchasers, free of charge, in the art of 
Needlecraft. 




"Et&tHURST." 
Geo. H. Steen, St Louis. 



Page Twenty-seven 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



BEAUTIFY CHAUTAUQUA 
Prizes for Flower Gardens. 

I7OR the purpose of encouraging the planting of flowers 
* and beautifying the Grounds, the Board of Directors 
offer the following prizes for the best flower beds. 

First Prize $12.00 
Second, Prize 8.00 
Third Prize 5.00 




Rustic Tea Houses and Look-outs are very popular at 
the present time. Many of the beautiful summer homes of 
St. Louis have them, several have already been built at Chau- 
tauqua, and this feature is encouraged. We show herewith 
a design that will give those interested an idea. These 
Look-outs are inexpensive and are beautiful. 

A very complete catalogue of this work can be had by 
addressing the Rustic Construction Works, 33 Fulton St., 
New York City. 




A Bungalow with 5 rooms and screened, dining porch, bath, 
etc., that can be built for approximately $1,000. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THOSE WHO CONTEMPLATE 
BUILDING 

V\7HILE PIASA CHAUTAUQUA is a beautiful place, it 
** might be still more beautiful had more attention been 
given to the architectural designs of the cottages. The by- 
laws provide that plans be submitted to the Board for ap- 
proval, but in many cases this has not been done and 
particularly so in former years when buildings have been 
erected on the Grounds that were not suitable but which 
could have been much more attractive and been more in 
keeping with the beauty of the place without costing any 
more money had the proper ideas been carried out. For this 
purpose we are suggesting a few designs of inexpensive 
bungalows that are strictly proper for a summer resort and 
which will not cost very much, if any, more than the old 
style common frame house that has been built in the past. 




5 rooms, screened dining porch, bath, etc., approximately 

$1250.00 




6 rooms screened dining porch, attic, bath, etc., approximately 

$1500.00 

Further information regarding plans and specifications of 
strictly up-to-date bungalows can be had by applying to Mr. 
W. E. Caulfield on the Grounds, or by addressing E. W. Still- 
well & Co., Los Angeles, Calif. 



In painting your cottage, the Board requests that you conform to the Chautauqua colors, (Green and White) as closely as 
is consistent. 



Page Twenty-eight 



NEW Pi ASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL 



CONVENIENCES FOR VISITORS 

The Ladies' Civic Improvement Association is composed 
of 100 or more Chautauqua ladies. The object of the Associa- 
tion is to assist in beautifying the grounds, and providing 
features necessary for the comfort of ladies who visit 
Chautauqua; to welcome strangers and make them feel at 
home; to promote good fellowship among Chautauquans, 
etc. A splendid example of their work is the "House of 
Public Comfort." 




"HOUSE OF PUBLIC COMFORT." 

Situated in the center of the grounds, is a two-story 
structure with a spacious reception room and fire place on 
the first floor, supplied with usual furnishings. Adjoining 
are the toilet rooms. The entrance to the ladies' rooms is 
from the reception room, the entrance to the men's toilet 
is from the porch. Modern sanitary plumbing is the prime 
feature in the construction. 

The stairs lead from these to the bath rooms on the sec- 
ond floor. Hot water heaters are installed in each room, 
which will be especially appreciated. 

A porch with tables and chairs will add to the comfort. 
Here the garden is confined to flower boxes which will dec- 
orate the porch. This improvement has been made possible 
by the liberal donations of cottage owners and friends, who, 
as well as all visitors, will enjoy the comfort for which it 
was intended. All are welcome. There will be a sales booth, 
where bath shoes, sun hats and toilet articles can be pur- 
chased. The proceeds will go to the Ladies' Civic Improve- 
ment Association. 



WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. 

Wednesday, July 17th, Thursday, July 18th and Friday, 
July 19th, will be Woman's Christian Temperance Union's 
Days at Chautauqua. They will have charge of certain 
services during these days with a string of fine speakers, 
a gold medal contest, and other features that will be very 
interesting. 

(See program.) 




W. C. T. U. COTTAX3E, CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 

The many friends and patrons of the cottage belonging 
to the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, will be glad 
to know that the former Superintendent, Mrs. Jesse Hanan 
of Springfield, will again have charge. Address her at 
Chautauqua, 111., after June 1st. 

GROCERIES AND MEAT. 

Mr. I. P. Smith will operate the Grocery and Meat Shop, 
and carry a good assortment of groceries, fruits in season, 
fresh and dried meats. He has erected and filled a large 
ice-house and will make daily deliveries at reasonable prices. 
He asks the patronage of all and is entitled to it. 

NEW LAUNDRY AT CHAUTAUQUA 

Mr. Fred Smith of Alton will have charge of the Laundry 
at Chautauqua, during the entire season. Shirts, collars, 
cuffs, skirts, shirtwaists and fancy washing a specialty. 
Terms will be the same as at Alton. Mr. Smith is a reliable 
man and guarantees satisfactory service. 




Page Twenty-nine 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 




"SUMMER RiEST" 
Women's Christian Home Association, St. Louis, Mo. 

Summer Rest, the vacation resort for business women that 
has for many years been successfully conducted by the man- 
agers of the Women's Christian Home, of St. Louis, (the 
oldest branch of the St. Louis Women's Christian Associa- 
tion), is permanently located on one of the most attractive 
sites of the beautiful grounds of Piasa Chautauqua. One 
year ago the management purchased and improved a delight- 
ful cottage, to which it cordially invited business women who 
desired a pleasant, restful vacation at small expense. They 
accepted the invitation, were enthusiastic in their praise of 
the place, and sent their friends. The one summer convinced 
the ladies of the Board that they must enlarge their borders, 
and having the opportunity, they purchased the building for- 
merly known as Roades' Hotel, and now have abundant room 
for many guests. The building is located near the station 
and steamboat landing, near the swimming pool, the store, 
the Auditorium and the Spring. 

The Roades Hotel has always been a popular hostelry with 
good accommodations at reasonable rates. Even this good 
reputation will be improved under the present management, 
who greatly desire the patronage of those whom they wish to 
benefit. Any woman of good moral character, earning her 
living, and mother and sisters dependant upon her, are cor- 
dially invited to spend their vacation at Summer Rest. Board 
$3.00 per week; special terms when necessary. Mrs. A. L. 
Rider, the lady who so acceptably conducted the Rest last 
summer, will be in charge. 

Summer Rest will open June 1st. Until the industrial 
women occupy the entire hotel, friends of the Christian Home 
are invited to hold house-parties at a low rental. For such 
a purpose no more charming spot can be chosen. Full par- 
ticulars given at 

ST. LOUIS WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN HOME, 

1814 Washington Avenue, 

St. Louis, Mo., 
(After June 1st, Chautauqua, 111.) 



THE KINGS' DAUGHTERS' 
Conducted by the 

PIASA CHAUTAUQUA CIRCLE OF THE KING'S 
DAUGHTERS. 

Chautauqua, 111. 

AN OUTING FOR GIRLS CONDUCTED BY THE CHAU- 
TAUQUA CIRCLE OF THE KINGS' DAUGHTERS 
AND SONS. 

A ten-room cottage, where wage-earning women can get 
board at a nominal sum. Nonsectarian. Open July 1st to 
September 15th. 

All wage-earning young women eligible. For further in- 
formation write to Mrs. Pauline Collins, 1104 Henry Street, 
Alton, 111., before July 1st, or Mrs. A. T. Flint, 2620 Tennes- 
see Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. Bell Phone, Grand 1767-L. 

After June 1st, Chautauqua 111. 




THE KING' 



:KKS - SUM.MKK HOIIK. 



For those desiring photos, photo post cards, or anything 
in that line, we recommend Mr. Geo. M. A. Fries, who will be 
on the grounds the entire season and will photograph any 
subject in any way or style at any time or place to suit the 
purchaser. He will also have kodaks for rent, films for sale 
and will do finishing and enlarging. He will be found at the 
PHOTO-INN ever ready to serve you at reasonable rates. 



Page Thirty 



NEW Pi ASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



Cottage Owners at Chautauqua 



Name of Owner. 



Address 



Name of Cottage. 



Name of Owner. 



Address. 



Name of Cottage. 



Anderson. Mrs. Mary J., Carlinville, 111 Gram's Shelter 

Andrews, Mrs. Emma, et al., Brighton, 111 '.Trabue 

Barnes, Rev. Edmond, Graf ton, 111 Kentucky Home 

Beckwith, A. M., 611 N. 32d St., East St. Louis Takitazy 

Behymer, P. A., Lebanon, 111 Bee-at-eze 

Bell, Mrs. Hattle S., Medora, 111 Belleview 

Bernet, Christian, 5557 Gates Ave., St. Louis Log Cabin 

Bliss, Florence and Marie, 5400 Vernon Ave., St. Louis. . . . 

Wa-wo-naissa 

Bliss, Mrs. H. C., 5400 Vernon Ave., St. Louis 

Bliss With' Inn 

Borders, W. E., Marissa, 111 Summer Home 

Bringhurst, R. P., 1830 Locust St., St. Louis Bringhurst 

Broeder, Geo. H., 4644 Wagoner PI., St. Louis Breeder 

Brown, Mrs. Mary A., North Alton, 111 W. R. C. 

Buckley, Mrs. Mary B., 414 Leverett Ave., Upper Alton... 

Bide-a-Wee 

Burns, L. N., 5'541 Chamberlain Ave., St. Louis Ayrshire 

Burruss, H. D., and H. B. Nelson, Carrollton, 111 

Burruss, Miss Maria F., Carrollton, 111 Greenwood 

Catlin, Miss M. E., 513 W. State St., Jerseyville, 111 

, White Walnut 

Caughlan, I>. W., 609 N. llth St., East St. Louis, 111 

House of David 

Caughlan, Geo. S., 625 N. 33rd St., East St. Louis, 111 

Sycamore Lodge 

Caulfleld, W. E., 1399 Union Ave., St. Louis Wee-ta-moo 

Clark, Mrs. Kathleen, 1123 St. Clair Ave., East St. Louis, 

111 Inglewood 

Corrington, Mrs. Juliet A., 414 Harrison St., Danville, 111. 

Oakhurst 

Cross, Mrs. A. W., Jerseyville, 111 Cross Patch 

Durston, Mrs. John, Witt, 111 Woodland 

Eastman, Mrs. John N., Graf Ion, 111 Eastman 

English, J. N., Jerseyville, 111 English 

Emerson, T. G., i!36 Evergreen Ave., Upper Alton, 111 

The Pike 

Fischer, Wm. A., 5231 Kensington Ave., St. Louis 

Wethinkso Lodge 

Flint, A. T., 2620 Tennessee Ave., St. Louis Hustle-Not 

Flint, Mrs. A. T., 2620 Tennessee Ave., St. Louis. .. .Tramp Inn 

Fox, John (2), Jerseyville, 111 Fox Den 

French, Mrs. L. J. Brighton, 111 French 

Grange, State of Illinois Grange Hall 

Grundman, Dr. F. W., Jefferson Ave. and Wash St., St. 

Louis Grundman 

Haynes, L. C., 526 N. 10th St., East St. Louis, 111 Igloo 

Hickman, J. B., Delhi, 111 Imo 

llilliurd, G. W., Brighton, 111 Hillside 

Hockaday, W. A., 1112 College Ave., East St. Louis, 111. ... 

Idle Hours 

Johnson, Isaac, St. Louis Laffalot 

Jones, John, Brighton, 111 Jones 

Kelsey, J. E., 723 Alby St., Alton, 111 Kelsey 

Kennedy, Miss Charlotte B., 2924 Eads Ave., St. Louis.... 

The Colonial 

King's Daughters, The, St. Louis Summer Rest Home 

Kupferle, Mrs. Emma G., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis.... 

Kupferle 

Kupferle, Mrs. Emma G., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis.... 

Dad's Den 

Ladle's Civic Improvement League. .. .House of Public Comfort 

Lamb, Mrs. Ann., Jerseyville, 111 Lamb's Quarter 

Lamb, Mrs. E. J. Jerseyville, 111 Lamb's Fold 

Lehman, Geo. E., 6339 Clayton Road, St. Louis BlufEside 

Leverett, Mrs. Jennie (2) Upper Alton, 111 Leverett 



Levis, R. H., Trustee, Alton, 111 Bonnie Brae 

Levis, Nelson, Alton, 111 Seldom Inn 

Lewis A. N., 701 Chestnut St., St. Louis Alle-quip-pa, Lodge 

Manning, Lewis W., 5152 Morgan St., St. Louis Rocky Bend 

Marsh, Heirs, Jerseyville, 111 Hillcrest 

McAdams, Anna, Otterville, 111 Solid Comfort 

McArthur, Mrs. Sarah, St. Louis Palmer Rest 

McClure, Robert, Jerseyville. Ill McClure 

McDavid, J. K., Hillsboro, 111 Summer Rest 

Mechin, Gus V. R., 5088 Raymond Ave., St. Louis 

Ouatoga Lodge 

Meinhardt, Miss Mathilda, 7041 Florissant Ave., St. Louis 

., i. . Flora 

Meints, A. IE., 1-242 St. Louis Ave., East St. Louis. .. .Castle Inn 
Miller, David, 1020 Summit Ave., East St. Louis.... The Frolic 

Mink, Mrs. Rose M., 6404 Oa.kland Ave., St. Louis Caro 

Mott, Mrs. Louisa M., 2621 S. Compton Ave., St. Louis.... 

'Home, Sweet Home 

Noble, Mrs. Emma, 450 Leverett Ave., Upper Alton, 111. 

Kumonin 

Pace, Mrs. Anna L., Mt. Vernon, 111 Number Seven 

Palmer, F. W., 2808 Eads Ave., St. Louis Fernhurst 

Pavey, Mrs. C. W., Mt. Vernon, 111 The Shack 

Perrin, Mrs. M. A., 615 E. 12th St., Alton, 111 Shady Dell 

Pfefter, Mrs Wm. T., Morganford Road, St. Louis. .. .Brookside 

Pingree, S. S., 4228 W. Pine Blvd., St. Louis Pingree 

Priest, Mrs. Lucia I., 419 Henry St., Alton, 111 Club House 

Priest, Mrs. Lucia I., 419 Henry St., Alton, 111 Maple Hurst 

Rain, Mrs. Isabelle G.. 2601 State St., Alton, 111 

White Ribbon Rest 

Raithel, Geo. IE., 4343 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis.... 

Dew Drop Inn 

Roades, Nettie B., Chautauqua, III Restawhyle 

Roades, Nettie B., Chautauqua, 111 Bohannon 

Roberts, Mrs. Augusta, 3041 Easton Ave., St. Louis 

Buckeye Home 

Rodgers, A. F., (Box 59, College and Rogers Ave., Upper 

Alton, 111 The Lodge 

Rudolph, J. S., 4040 Page Ave., St. Louis Two Oakes 

Scarritt, Rev. J. A., 319 E. Fourth St., Alton, 111. . .Pioneer Home 

Scott, Wm. L, Jerseyville, 111 The Roost 

Simmons, |R. Jj Ni.xon 

Sisson, Cyrus A. and Jennie M., Jerseyville, XI! Mushroom 

Slayton, Mrs. John N., Graf ton, 111 Slay ton Inn 

Smith, Mrs. Hannah B., Shipman, 111 Linger Longer 

Smith, H. V., Bunker Hill, 111 Sun Set 

Smith, Jane C., Heirs, Waverly, 111 Smith 

Stewart, Byron, St. Louis The Shanty 

Steen, Geo. H., 5138 Kensington Ave., St. Louis Elmhurst 

Stilson, Annie S., et al., Greenfield, 111 Sans Souci 

Sprecher. Mrs. D. W., 538 N. 14th St., East St. Louis, . .Edgewood 

Talley, H. G., est., Piasa, 111 G. A. R. Inn 

Tunehorst, H. A., Jerseyville, 111 , . . . .Tunehorst Rest 

Van Treese, Rev. F. M., Carmi, 111 Van Lodge 

Watson, Harry, Mt. Vernon, 111 Watson 

Williams, C. T., 4256 Flad Av., St. Louis Williamsyde 

Woods, D. W., 3536 Victor St., St. Louis Rivervlew 

Woods, J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis Outing Inn 

Woods, J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis. .House That Jack Built 

Woods, Mrs. J. P., 5215 Lindell Ave., St. Louis Grandview 

White, Mrs. J. C., Manning St., Upper Alton, 111 Whitehall 

Woman's Christian Home, St. Louis Summer Rest 

Woman's Christians Temperance Union ~W. C. T. U. 

Woman's Relief Corps W. R. C. 

Wyckoff, Mrs. D. A., 150 Manning St., Upper Alton, 111... 

Wyckoff 

Yerkes, Dr. T. T., Upper Alton (Mrs. Pauline Collins in 

charge) Sleepy Hollow 

Yerkes Dr T. T., Upper Alton (Mrs. Pauline Collins in 

charge Twin Cottage 



Page Thirty-one 



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA 



CHAUTAUQUA, ILL. 



RATES OF ADMISSION. 

Piasa Chautauqua was not organized for the purpose of 
making money. Its revenue is derived from gate admissions, 
concessions, assessments against property holders, and gifts 
from friends. 

From June 1st to Sept. 15th, every person on the Piasa 
Chautauqua Grounds is required to have a ticket. No extra 
fee will be charged for the Bible Conference, the Conference 
being supported by contributions from friends. 

RATES OF 



THE TICKET SYSTEM. 

The ticket system of Piasa Chautauqua has been worked 
out in an effort to protect the interest of the Association, 
and do everybody justice. The expense of keeping up the 
Grounds is very heavy and the sale of tickets being the prin- 
cipal source of revenue it requires close attention to that 
feature. The holder of a ticket does not pay for entrance 
only, but for privileges provided. 

The Association is not responsible for lost tickets but will 
in every way possible assist in recovering the lost ticket. If 
the ticket is not recovered, the loser is expected to purchase 
a ticket covering the time of the original ticket. This is 
necessary for the reason that the ticket when found may 
be used by some other person. 

ADMISSION 



Price of Gate Tickets BO.I A ' 1 s ^' y VoTy"" 

Week EnJ 


Assembly 
1 Week 


Assembly 
23 D.y. 


Drib 

Exc-Iudms 
Assembly 


Week 
Excluding 
Assembly 


Season 
1912 


Adults .10 .25 .50 


$1.50 


$3.00 


.10 


.50 


$3.50 


Children (8 to 15) .10 .15 .25 


.75 


$1.50 


.10 


.25 


$1.75 


Clergymen (no rate below one week) 


.75 


$1.50 






$1.75 


Clergymen's Children (8 to 15) 


.40 


.75 








Bible Conference Tickets, Adults 


$1.50 










Bible Conference Tickets, Children 


.75 










Bible Conference, Tickets, Clergymen 


.75 










Bible Conference Tickets, Clergymen's Children 


.40 











Bible Conference Tickets are good for 8 days, July 21 to July 28 inclusive. 

Employees Season Tickets (including all employees, domestics and laundresses.) upon presentation of Certificate prop- 
erly filled out by Employer 

Good at Auditorium 
Not Good at Auditorium 



$1.75 



Boat tickets are good only during stay of boat. 

(Three-day tickets are good only for week-end trips, from 
Friday evening until six o'clock Monday evening.) 

Children under eight years free if accompanied by older 
persons on paid ticket. 

If season tickets are presented by any except the right- 
ful owner, they will be taken up. Holders of same, by com- 
plying with conditions covering their use, will be allowed to 
go in and out at pleasure from six o'clock in the morning 
until ten at night. 

Admission tickets will entitle the owner to admission to all 
entertainments of the day and evening, and expire at six a. 
m. the following morning after date. 

A ticket of less value may be exchanged for a ticket of 
greater value by the payment of the difference. 



SECTION 2 OF AN ACT FOR THE PROTECTION OF 
CHAUTAUQUA ASSOCIATIONS STATUTE 
OF ILLINOIS UNLAWFUL EN- 
TRANCE PENALTY. 

"That whoever, during the holding of any annual assembly 
of any Chautauqua Association, shall, with intent to defraud 
any such assembly, enter or shall attempt to enter, or shall, 
remain on the grounds or enclosure of any building within 
or upon which such assembly is being held, without having 
permission from the proper authorities thereof, or without 
having purchased and surrendered a ticket of admission which 
shall entitle him so to enter and remain, or without having 
complied with the published rules of such association in re- 
gard to entrance thereto, or remaining thereon, shall upon 
conviction be fined not less than two nor more than twenty 
dollars for each offense." 



Page Thirty-two 



PIASA CHAUTAUQUA TRAIN SERVICE 



JUNE 1st to AUG. 31st, 1912 



NORTH BOUND (Read Down) 

A M. A. M P M. P M P M p M 


SOUTH BOUND (Read Up) 

A. M. A. M. P. M. P. M 
Daily Daily Daily Daily 
Ex. Sun. Ex. Sun. 


Daily 
Ex. Sun. 


Daily 


Daily Ex. 
SaC.&Sun. 


Sit. Only 


Daily 
Ex. Sun. 


Daily 








8:05* 








Lv. 


St. Louis Union Sta. C. P. & St. L. 


Ar. 






7:12* 








1:45* 




5:26* 


9:00 Lv. 


St. Louis Union Sta., C. & A. 


Ar. 




12:30* 


7:35* 






6:41* 




1:15* 


5:45* 


Lv. 


St. Louis Union Sta., Big 4 


Ar. 


8:00* 








5:20 


7:20 


2:20 


12:20 


5:20 


8:20 Lv. 


St. Louis Eads Bridge, Electric 


Ar. 


8:25 


11:25 


7:25 


11:25 






2:03 




5:44 


Lv. 


E. St. Louis, C. & A. 


Ar. 




12:10 


7:15 






6:59 




1:33 




Lv. 


E. St. Louis, Big 4 


Ar. 










5:30 


7:30 


2:30 


12:30 


5:30 


8:30 Lv. 


E. St. Louis, Electric 


Ar. 


8:15 


11:15 


7:15 


11:15 




6:38 


1:38 


11:33 


4:38 


7:38 Lv. 


Belleville, Electric 


Ar. 


9:08 


12:08 


8:08 


12:08 


5:46 


7:46 


2:46 


12:46 


5:46 


8:46 Lv. 


Edwardsville, Electric 


Ar. 


8:00 


11:00 


7:00 


11:00 


7:00f 


9:06 


3:50 


2:15f 


6:50f 


10:00f Lv. 


Alton, C. P. & St. L. 


Ar. 


6:55f 


9:55 


5:40f 


10:00f 


7:40f 


9:47 


4:30 


2:55f 


7:30f 


10:40t Ar. 


Chautauqua 


Lv. 


6:18f 


9:15 


5:00f 


9:30f 



Trains Marked * Leave Washington Ave. Sta, 8 min. Later Trains Marked * Arrive at Wash. Ave. Sta. 8 min. Earlier 

Passengers Via. Electric Route from St. Louis take any car on Eads Bridge and Transfer to Alton Interurban at 3rd and 

Broadway, E St. Louis, 111. 
Trains Marked t Will Run Through Between Alton and Chautauqua Without Transfer or Delay at Lock Haven. 



HOW TO 

REACH 

CHAUTAUQUA 

By Automobile or 
Buggy. 

Presuming that all 
roads lead to Alton, we 
begin from that point 
and show by dotted 
line the best road to 
Chautauqua, via New- 
burn. 




CHAUTAUQUA 



STEAMBOAT LINES. 
Steamer "Alton," Passengers only. 

exc< i>t Monday, commencing June 10th. 

leaves St. Louis 9:30 A. M. 

Leaves Alton, 12:30 P. M. 

Arrives Chautauqua, 1:40 P. M. 

i ni Satmilay Leaves St. Louis 2:30 P. M. 

1,'MVcs Alton. 5:00 P. M. 

Arrives Chautauqua 6:15 P. M. 
Steamer "Grey Eagle," Passengers only. 

Paily, I'xri'pt Mondays and Saturdays, cornrienclng June 25th. 

leaves St. l.ouis 9:30 A. M. 

Leaves Alton, 12:30 P. M. 

Arrives Chautauqua, 2 o'clock. 

XOTK Both of above boats returning; arrive St. Louis 6:00 P. M. Saturdays, 10 P. M. 
Steamer "Bald Kacle." Passengers and Freight. 

\Yodnesdays and Saturdays, commencing Jun 1st. 

Leaves St. Louis, 3:00 P. M. 

Leaves Alton 7:00 P. M. 

Arrives Chautauqua 10:00 P. M. 

Subject to correction and changes.