(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "News notes of California libraries"

iSill^ life"''!; 
d Jill ll'r : 

■ill:;: 







D EDD7 DSMflDDfl 

California State Library 



^ 



California State Library 



News Notes 

OF 

California Libraries 



VOL 13 

NOS. 1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER, 1918 



CALIFORNIA STATE PEIXTING OFFICE 
SACKA5IENT0 

19 19 



(Index Supplement.) 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES: A SHORT REVIEW 
AND A LOOK AHEAD.* 

By Milton J. F'erguson^ Librarian, California State Library. 

In 1904 the world was invited to meet at St. Louis, to exhibit material 
and things which would show how far it had traveled on the road 
toward mechanical and intellectual perfection. The world responded in 
fair measure and the result was the St. Louis Exposition. Librarians 
who for some years had insisted upon their having arrived in a profes- 
sional sense were permitted or requested to exhibit the development 
which their enthusiasm and energy had brought about. This St. Louis 
fair came at a time when the traveling library was a popular thing — a 
sort of panacea which if it could not give library service to the inhabit- 
ant in the country, on the farm and in the mountains, offered him a 
substitute therefor. The State Library, accordingly, on behalf of the 
State of California and its libraries and librarians prepared an exhibit 
of three traveling libraries of 50 volumes each which were sent to 
St. Louis, together with a handbook entitled "Libraries of California." 
The showing made by California was a good one; in witness of which 
the State Library is now in possession of a diploma presented by the 
Exposition authorities. 

I take the year 1904 and the little booklet, "Libraries of California" 
simply as a convenient starting point. One might, it is true, go back to 
the days of the pioneers or even to the time of Mexican rule in this state 
to catch the first mention of libraries ; and the contrast with our present 
development would be all the greater. As I propose only a short review, 
such action on my part would be something of an imposition on your 
time and patience. 

A glance at the map which accompanied the brochure of 1904 telLs the 
whole story. "While San Diego Count}^ on the south could boast of having 
four public libraries and one of a miscellaneous character, and Siskiyou 
on the north had only one library which was listed as miscellaneous, Del 
Norte, Trinity, Mendocino, Lake, Sierra, Amador, Sutter, Calaveras, 
Alpine, Mono, Inyo, Merced and Mariposa had no libraries at all. 
]Modoc, Lassen and Glenn were only saved from being entered in the 
same class by their having collections from the recently inaugurated 
service known as the traveling libraries. I might go down the entire 
list and the results, from our point of view, would be disappointing. 

You may say that I have picked out all the sparsely settled counties, 
that even today Sierra, Alpine and Mono are without public libraries. 
Let us therefore look at one of the institutions, which at the time under 
consideration, was in the forefront : The San Jose Free Public Library. 
This Library dates from 1872 and became a public library in 1880; it 
had in 1901 been marked with Mr Carnegie's favor, had gathered a 
collection of 15,000 volumes, had an annual income of $5,000 and was 
under the management of an executive who is today one of our most 
efficient county librarians. Since 1904 the income of this Library has 

*Paper read at meeting of the First District, California Library Association, 
November 17, 1917. 

3.5857 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 



more than doubled, its volumes likewise; it now has nine branches of 
which three have reading rooms. While the population of the city 
was making less than a 50 per cent growth, the library was growing at 
the rate of more than 100 per cent. That, however, is as it should be; 
and if the next similar period can not show a development almost as 
startling, I shall be disappointed. 

At the time of the St. Louis fair the State Library had scarcely begun 
the activities which are now so essential a part of it. The first travefing 
libraries were sent out in the preceding December — and as an earnest 
of the good intentions of the borrowing club a $3.00 fee was required 
for each collection of 50 volumes. Study club libraries were promised ; 
but not yet had the organizers gone into the field to encourage the 
founding of libraries in towns and cities from one end of the state to 
the other, nor was any service being given the blind. But the State 
Library had not been standing still during the five years that its late 
lamented Chief had already been at its helm. Things had been made 
ship-shape within ; a course was chartered and the anchor, after much 
toil, was loosened from the bottom where for fifty years it had lain and 
the voyage was fairly begun. 

While the booklet which I have already mentioned several times 
speaks of the great development which had taken place between the 
year, 1899, and the date of its publication, the next few years were to 
see more marvelous things still. The State Library, pursuing the 
policy which it early adopted under the Gillis regime and which it 
continues steadfastly to hold to, that namely of displacing nothing of a 
library character, but of assisting, of supplementing, of complement- 
ing, sent its organizers abroad, to encourage the giving of better service, 
to help the librarian who had enthusiasm but little technical skill and 
above all to show the inhabitants without books how libraries could be 
builded. Study clubs throughout the state were given the best assist- 
ance possible at long distance and by correspondence. Traveling libra- 
ries were sent to every community which lacked book service and which 
could be induced to enter into the work; the $3.00 fee was soon 
abolished and the expenses to the readers were entirely done away with, 
even to the matter of express charges. Blind persons were sought out 
and an opportunity was given them to learn to read ; of recent years we 
have not been content with voluntary service in the interest of this class 
of readers and have employed teachers, first in Los Angeles and now in 
San Francisco, to give the intelligent advice and assistance which only 
the specialist can give. 

And then in 1909, and more particularly with the passage of the 
revised county free library act of 1911, began the service which literally 
and expositionally speaking was to put California on the map. Do 
not misunderstand that statement ; to me one class of library activity 
has no prestige over another. Work in the towns and cities is essential -. 
but reaching out to the people of the country has a primary importance 
because here libraries had hitherto been non-existant. So the develon- 
ment of our educational facilities, in the interest of the farmer and the 
miner, the stockman and the horticulturist — and his wife and family — ■ 
should be receved by all of us as a sign of better things. It was all. 
however, especially gratifying to the State Library authorities who were 



vol. 13, 110.1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES: A REVIEW. 3 

possessed of a great ambition to make libraries flourish, where hitherto 
none was found ; not I can assure for the sake of the library as an 
institution, but as a means to an end, as a factor in the development 
and enlightenment of a people and a state, that there might be a greater 
degree of intelligence, a higher mark attained in the scale of prosperity, 
a keener enjoj^ment of happiness and life. 

•This county library plan then is not to displace other instruments of 
book distribution ; but is first to cover territory which could not other- 
wise be touched, and secondly, where local conditions and local economies 
made it wise to bind together the disjointed forces which through sheer 
■^veakness were unable to accomplish their legitimate purposes. In this 
endeavor perhaps no other single phase of the work is so startling as 
that which has been accomplished with the public schools. California, 
following the rule of sister states, early provided a library fund for 
school districts ; for decades school libraries have been in process of 
formation, but todaj^ except in those instances when the county libraries 
or city libraries have offered their services elementary school libraries 
are worthy of little consideration. This accusation is no serious reflec- 
tion on teacher and trustee; book service to them was a matter to which 
they had not given first consideration nor for which they had had par- 
ticular training. School libraries eonseciuently, and unlike Topsy. did 
not grow. They lacked that encouraging supervision, that friendly 
cooperation which makes for progress, efficiency, growth. , 

On January 1, 1917, thirty-five county free libraries were operating 
and within this territory were 2611 elementary and high school districts, 
of which number 1009 were receiving service from the county free 
libraries. On July 1, 1917, with the same number of counties and the 
same number of school districts, 1097 districts had affiliated with the 
county free libraries. Since July 1st, two new counties, Tuolumne and 
Sutter, have entered the fold, and during the second half of the year 
it is confidently expected that the additions of school districts receiving 
this service will exceed those made during the first half. If you have 
ever attended an ordinary rural school, if you have ever taught therein, 
or if you have ever inspected such school with a librarian 's critical eye, 
you can realize the significance in the life of the children and the 
satisfaction to the teacher of having modern library facilities and atten- 
tion. If the county library system had no other value or purpose than 
the service which it gives in this one department — disregarding entirely 
its work in behalf of the adult population — its reason for existence is 
amply justified. In the place of the weakness which it found, it has 
been able to supply strength and tone. 

With all this development in the state and county and city libraries 
there has come a new consciousness of the requirements of the profes- 
sion. We are no longer content to leave our younger candidates to 
choose between the old fashioned and slower method of gaining knowl- 
edge by the apprentice or understudy plan — despite the fact that it 
has of course developed some of our strongest workers — and a forced 
sojourn in some eastern fount of library lore. California has three 
library schools in which the preliminary training for librarianship may 
be had, as well as the summer course at the University of California,, 
and perhaps local classes to meet local needs. 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 



This intenser instruction must inevitably create a class spirit of the 
right sort, a feeling of strength and of harmony in the ranks of our 
workers, to the greater glory of librarianship and always to the advan- 
tage of that personage, so often mentioned in our journals and our dis- 
cussions, who if not intelligently and zealously served by us our labor 
has been in vain — I mean of course, the General Public. 

We are rubbing elbows with the world these days, we are standing 
shoulder to shoulder with the forces of progress and life. "We have 
long since cast off the garments of retirement and seclusion so grace- 
fully worn by our old time craft, and have donned a newer and more 
practical garb of service unrestricted. Consequently we see the libra- 
rian in war time not retiring to his cell for meditation, but taking his 
X>lace as a factor of great psychological significance among the forces in 
the camp and in the field. I know I am only expressing the feeling and 
conviction of each one of you when I say personally I am heart and 
soul in this thing, that I welcome the opportunity which has come to 
serve our nation and our ideals of democracy and liberty, and that I 
look to the future of librarianship confident that these trials and labors 
broaden its possibilities and capabilities in the work of the new world 
when this storm shall have passed. 

In the future there must be more of that cooperation which the 
humorist picks upon as our cant word, our shibboleth. We must con- 
tinue to give that moral support which perhaps has frequently been 
made to serve for active cooperation, and must definitely and actually 
mark out lines of work to be undertaken by each library for the benefit 
of all. Let us not continue to build up many weak collections of books 
and other material, wherein strength and completeness are essential to 
scholarship and productivity, but parcel out the field more definitely 
and use our resources, not as separate and competing organizations, but 
as belonging to one great power having a clear objective and an 
adequate method. 

A practical example of the sort of thing I mean is excellently well 
illustrated in the case of the Sutro Branch of the State Library. Here 
the needs of the scholar and the special student are especially con- 
sidered. Strength has been aimed at, for example, by concentrating 
the interest of the genealogist and the astronomer by taking care of the 
collections of societies and organizations which make this work their 
special field. Here, too, an effort has been made to bring together in 
full harmony the makers of books and the librarians, through whose 
hands they largely reach the public, by offering to make a publishers' 
exhibit of books issued in or about California. The Sutro Branch as a 
scholar's and specialist's library is largely interested in unusual 
rather than usual book service; we believe in the follow-up system for 
persons having needs out of the ordinary to the end that the book and 
the individual may be brought together, not that we ourselves may have 
all the books, but that we may find them when occasion requires. And 
above all and at all times, the Sutro Branch and the State Library will 
be found working not in the field already well tilled, but in subduing 
and bringing to a state of productivity those which have remained 
imtouched or have lain fallow overlong. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORXIA LIBRARIES: A REVIEW. 5 

And certainly mucli remains to be done: the whole subject of music 
in this state should be given that intelligent consideration from the 
library point of view that one of the major arts deserves; the stere- 
opticon slide as an adjunct to public speaking and class-room instruction 
offers excellent possibilities ; the motion picture as an educational 
feature, and not as a means of collecting dimes and quarters, deserves 
a better trial than has yet been accorded it. We must at all times be 
alert to the possibilities of library service in conjunction with govern- 
mental and public affairs, with economic and trade requirements, as a 
means towards the saving of goods and materials as a factor in their 
readier and more economical production. All these activities are in 
certain quarters and to a greater or less degree being participated in : 
what we need is a greater coordination, a fuller cooperation. 

On this my first appearance before you as State Librarian. I desire 
to pay public tribute to the man to whom we all professionally and in a 
friendly sense, owe so much. He began his work at a time and under 
circumstances not at all conducive to originality or startling develop- 
ments. But with a clearness of vision, an unbounded energy and a 
singleness of purpose he labored ceaselessly ; and I think you will agree 
with me that to him more than to any other individual among us, 
librarianship and library service in this commonwealth are under per- 
petual obligation. As Librarian he was always eager to learn, always 
open to suggestion ; as friend he was that established rock whose firmness 
gave double assurance in stress and storm, unrivaled view point in fair 
weather and sunshine ; as chief, his support and encouragement made 
for joy in the work, for peace of soul. In my administration of the 
affairs of the State Library, your institution and the peoples, I do 
not hope or expect to be another James L. Gillis ; but I will be bitterly 
disappointed if, after ten years of association with him and with you, I 
cannot bring to this work an enthusiasm, an energy and a knowledge 
.sufficient for the needs of the service day by day ; if in cooperation with 
you we can not go forward, in the light of our own day, steadfastly 
maintaining the banner of California in the front ranks of the world's 
library forces. 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 



RESOLUTIONS: JAMES L. GILLIS. 

It is altogether natural that the bodies and organizations with which 
Mr Gillis served or which were in sympathy with his aims, personal and 
professional, should miss his stimulating presence and his ready counsel. 
Accordingly when they come together for conference several of such 
boards have taken thought of the man who is gone but whose spirit 
and example remain; and have given expression to their sentiments 
regarding him. The following resolutions and memorials have been 
received ; and, as it is no doubt the desire of those responsible for them 
that they be printed in News Notes of California Libraries, they are 
herein set out in full. 

BOARD OF STATE LIBRARY TRUSTEES. 

James L. Gillis died on July 27, 1917 ; and in his passing the State Library loses 
a head whose energy, perseverence and wisdom have placed this institution in the 
fore rank of the libraries of the world. When he became State Librarian, on April 1, 
1899, the department of government given into his charge was a collection of about 
100,000 volumes largely unused and for which no plan of general use was thought of ; 
when after eighteen years' service an account is rendered of his stewardship, we 
realize how intelligently and faithfully he has labored. From an institution whose 
influence could hardly be said to extend beyond the walls of the capitol building, he 
made it one whose power for good is not limited by the boundaries of California or 
even of America, for his example is being followed in the spreading of information 
and knowledge Id foreign lands. He began as the State Librarian of California but 
became a librarian of the world. In taking the isolated county library idea and 
developing it to serve the needs of a state or a nation he was the great inventor who 
used an incidental idea or device in the fabrication of an instrument of high impor- 
tance and of universal application. 

As a man James L. Gillis stood foursquare to the winds of the world. When he 
gave his hand to a cause, no bond was needed to keep his faith ; when he gave his 
heart to a friend, no journey was too long and no night too dark to prevent his 
bringing succor in time of need. He was impatient of subterfuge and sham and 
inefficiency : he sought to better conditions in the world not by destroying evil alone, 
but by substituting for it a satisfying good. To his work he brought open-minded- 
ness, energy, resourcefulness. He adopted a plan, developed it, held to it until a 
better one could be devised. His brain never grew old and fixed. Ill health did not 
dampen his ardor, disappointments did not leave him soured. He did not put off 
until the morrow the beginning of a worthy service which the day could not see com- 
pleted. He lived every day in its greatest possibilities. The hour of his death found 
him going straight forward in his duties. 

The Board of State Library Trustees deeply mourns the loss which it as a public 
body has suffered in the death of James L. Gillis ; and it offers its kindest sympathy 
especiallj' to his family and also to the library staff. The Board feels that the noble 
life of service and of friendship which James L. Gillis lived is a monument so 
beautiful that those who loved him may view it with growing pride and ever-increas- 
ing satisfaction. He is gone, but what he was will live. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
Executive Committee. 

In the death of James Louis Gillis, state librarian of California for the past 
eighteen years, the State has lost a valued servant and workers in the library field 
a respected ard efficient leader. Until Mr Gillis assumed charge of the State 
Library it had served only local needs, and had been of little value to the state at 



vol. 13, no. 1] JAMES L. GILLIS. 



large. Library development, outside of a few of the larger cities, was in a primi- 
tive stage. Mr Gillis gathered about him a staff of capable and enthusiastic assist- 
ants whose efforts under his wise direction soon brought the State Library to a 
foremost position among progressive institutions and gave a strong impulse to library 
activities throughout California. 

In 1906 Mr Gillis was elected president of the California Library Association, a 
position to which he was unanimously reelected seven times until at last the state 
of his health made inadvisable his longer continuance in the oflBce. To the conduct 
of the affairs of the Association he applied his characteristic foresight, persistence 
and energy. It was under his administration and largely through his efforts that 
much of the present strength and influence of the Association was attained. 

Mr Gillis' greatest achievement, however, was the establishment of the county 
library system. Without going into details, let it suffice to state that the entire 
system represented pioneer work, and its establishment an undertaking so huge that 
one less courageous would have shrunk from it appalled. The system once conceived 
could become operative only after securing necessary legislative enactments and 
after overcoming the inertia, if not antagonism, inevitable in certain districts. Every 
obstacle was gradually overcome and the county library system which has been 
evolved stands as a splendid achievement in constructive work which promises to be 
second only to the public school system in its enduring influence on public welfare. 

As fellow members in the California Library Association, we are glad to make 
this record of the very great indebtedness owed to Mr Gillis by the library interests 
of the State, and at the same time to express the high personal esteem in which he 
was held by his associates. His untimely death is lamented by us all. His memory 
will long be deeply cherished. 

RoBEET Rea, Chairman. 

Celia Gleason. 

George T. Clark. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
Second District. 

Resolved, That the Second District. California Library Association, at its first 
meeting after the sad event desires to place on record its profound sense of the loss 
the library profession at large no less than the State Library and the libraries of 
California have sustained in the death of James L. Gillis. The years of his library 
service have been those that have marked the advance of the library cause of 
California to a distinguished leadership throughout the country, and we recognize 
that very much of this advance has been due to the practical wisdom and the entire 
devotion of Mr Gillis to this work. 

Resolved further. That, as Mr Gillis would himself have wished, we pledge our- 
selves anew to the task he has laid down of making California libraries still more 
worthy of the great trust that has been confided to them by the public, and we 
promise to give to Mr Gillis' successor the support that will enable him also to lead 
us in the road on which the present progress has been won. The State Library 
must continue to be the center of our work, as in no other way can the library 
forces of the state be coordinated and made effective to the best results. 

Resolved, further. That these resolutions be spread on our minutes, printed in 
News Notes, and a copy be sent to Mrs Gillis, whose sorrow we sympathetically share. 

BOARD OF LIBRARY DIRECTORS OF THE LOS ANGELES 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

In the death of Mr James L. Gillis, State Librarian. California has lost one of 
its loved and honored citizens, and the library service of the State one of its 
splendid leaders. 

For twenty years our beloved State through its officers has approved the tireless 
energy and successful work of Mr Gillis as he spread through most of its counties 
the influence of the splendid library collection of which he was the custodian. As 



8 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail. 1918 

the State officers commended him for his splendid work, so, too, the citizens of 
the State, feeling the influence of his work, have praised him. 

The Board of Library Directors of the city of Los Angeles sharing in the 
sorrow caused by his death wish to share also in praising his splendid success in the 
library service of the State. 

To the Board of Directors of the State Library and to the family of Mr Gillis 
this Board with deep sympathy offers its simple tribute to the memory of him whose 
death they mourn. 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 

The death of Mr James L. Gillis, State Librarian, on July 27th brought deep 
sorrow to a large circle of friends and to all those who had been associated with 
him in the work which he had so much at heart. It was the great privilege of the 
members of the Board of County Library Examiners to assist him in an especially 
iimportant part of his work, which perhaps was nearer to his heart than any other, 
that of selecting the librarians who should go into the county library field. In this, 
as in all affairs, he showed himself a man of large vision, with a comprehensive 
knowledge of the library needs of the people of the state, and with a fine discrim- 
ination in choosing those who could most effectively respond to those needs. 

But more than all this, we wish to testify to our appreciation of him as a man, 
to those genial and lovable qualities which endeared him to everybody who knew 
him, and which make his death seem a personal loss. It is rare indeed to meet a 
man who combines such wonderful gifts of leadership with such unusual capacity for 
friendship. We deplore his sudden and untimely passing, and we extend our 
heartiest sympathy to his family and to the staff of the State Library. 

Everett R. Peery. 

Robert Rea. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

Resolved, That this Association express the sense of loss which its members feel 
in common with California librarians, in the death of Mr .Tames L. Gillis, librarian 
of the California State Library. We feel that the notable results achieved in perfect- 
ing so well the library organization of the state of California are due in large 
measure to his wise and devoted leadership and we wish thus to acknowledge our 
indebtedness to him for the standards set and for the inspiration which his accom- 
plishments have given. 

m. h. dougla.ss. 

Maey Lytle. 

Helex WI^,KI^-so^f. 



vol. 13, no. 1] LIBRARY WAR SERVICE. 9 

LIBRARY WAR SERVICE IN CALIFORNIA. 

By Milton J. Ferguson,. Librarian, California State I^ibrary. 
Fund Campaign. 

While some preliminary communications and notices had passed 
between Washington and the State Libraiy, the first definite step was 
taken in the campaign in California upon the arrival of Mr Bert Wells 
on August 27th. Mr Wells as field director and representative of the 
Library War Council explained to a small group of interested and infiu- 
ential citizens, the plan which had been outlined in order to make the 
work as easy as possible ; he also made certain recommendations looking 
towards the inauguration of the drive in this state. California, how- 
ever, was in the fortunate condition of having machinery in existence 
through which the work could be done Avithout the necessity of adopting 
the rather elaborate plan recommended by headciuarters. Mr Wells 
paid visits to several of the larger cities in the state — Oakland, San 
Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego— and conferred with local librarians 
and citizens about the campaign. Mv Everett R. Perry very generously 
volunteered his services in any capacity whatever, and was made 
director for southern California and Arizona, thereby relieving the 
divisional director of auj^ worry or work in his field. And the drive, 
so called, was on. 

As was intimated above it seemed a needless duplication of organiza- 
tion to create a new system to carry this movement forward. Conse- 
quently no central state committee was appointed. The plan thought 
most feasible was to consider each county, with few exceptions, a unit, 
to leave the local organizations to the ingenuity and business judgment 
of the local city and county librarians, educators and patriotic and 
willing citizens ; and to give advice and encouragement only where 
needed and called for. Of course circular and personal letters were 
written in rather large number; and visits were made in several 
instances where a personal word and consultation promised better 
results. It was found, however, that as in the case of the county free 
library, and indeed in practically all other county functions, that each 
unit is a law unto itself. No plan can therefore be said to be the 
general rule. 

In counties which have a large rural population and in which the 
county free library sj'stem is well developed, the county librarians 
assisted by their custodians, and citizens enlisted by them for the 
duration of the campaign, had no trouble in raising their quotas. In 
counties in which the population is for the most part gathered into cities 
and towns several more or less separate bodies took charge in their 
respective territories. And in other counties, largely rural in popula- 
tion and without county free library organizations, the schools led 
by their county superintendents entered into the work with a will and 
in many instances greatly exceeded their quotas. 

The undertaking was of course a library atfair and it is only reason- 
able to expect the librarians to throw themselves into its prosecution 
with unabated zeal. It must be recorded, however, and with pleasure, 



]0 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

that the schools, pupils, teachers and other officers took a wholesome 
interest in the work, that they did far more than their proverbial bit. 
Schools may always be expected to be awake to the larger interests of 
this nation. No doubt the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., Recreational and 
other campaigns have profited by the activity of the persons in our 
educational system. But the movement to give book service to the boys 
Avho are fighting and preparing to fight democracy's battles had a 
special appeal for the schools. While no doubt many of the books will 
be used primarily for recreational purposes, still many others will be 
truly educational. It meant that the school children were helping to 
continue the educational opportunities of their big brothers who have 
been called for a time to do a grim and serious duty. 

One other class of persons must be mentioned as especially active in 
this work; and that is the Avomen's clubs. In some places where it 
would otherwise have been very difficult to make a creditable showing 
the club members turned to Math a will and gathered in the funds. 

In the list which is appended hereto an effort has been made to credit 
the cities, counties, schools, libraries, and other organizations which 
raised or took the lead in raising the amounts set opposite thereto. As 
the funds were frequently however forwarded by a county treasurer 
without submitting a detailed list of the communities which contributed 
a portion it is true perhaps that the account given herewith is not as 
fully itemized as could be wished. Naturally it would be impracticable 
to attempt here to give a list of individual donors. In this statement 
the counties are given in alphabetical order, with credit to towns and 
cities therein whenever such information is available. Note should be 
made however that of the total southern California, including Imperial, 
Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, 
Santa Barbara and Ventura counties raised $23,507.22 and Arizona, 
which was included in this division, $2,257.85. These two sections 
were under the direction of Mr Perry. 

The quota of each municipal unit was arrived at by taking 2 per cent 
of the population of 1910 and striking off two places for cents. On this 
basis California's quota would be $47,550.98; while the amount actually 
raised amounts to $48,320.55. And even yet money continues to come 
in from places which have found it impossible to finish up their cam- 
paigns during the period scheduled. 

Alameda County — 

Alameda $900 78. 

Berkeley 1,321 00 

Centerville 58 00 

Hayward 200 00 

Livermore 12.5 00 

Newark 6 75 

Xiles 21 00 

Oaklard 3,824 78 

Pleasanton 54 97 

San Lorenzo 14 00 

Sunol 10 00 

.$6.-542 28 

Alpine County — 

Schools —1 6 00 

Amador County — 

Jackson, Women's Club of 10 00 



vol. 13. 110. 1] LIBRARY WAR SERVICE. 11 

Butte County — 

County Library 1 $180 (K) 

Calaveras County — 

Schools 261 60 

Colusa County — 

County Library and Schools 222 31 

Contra Costa County — 

County Library $549 61 

Richmond 151 07 

TOO 68 

Del Norte County — 

Schools 33 35 

El Dorado County 149 32 

Fresno County — ' 

Board of Supervisors $100 00 

County Library 867 95 

Coaliuga 242 53 

1.210 48 

Glenn County — 

County Library 377 Oo 

Imperial County 450 42 

Inyo County — 

County Library $117 27 

Federation of Women's Clubs 21 70 

138 97 

Kern (,'ounty — 

County Library $442 00 

Kerto Emplovee's Club 9 00 

Taft 102 CMI 

553 00 

Kings County — 

County Library $206 05 

Hanford 155 80 

Hanford Schools 81 70 

443 55 

Lassen County 49 55 

Los Angeles County — 

County Library $723 89 

Govina 7 50 

Glendora 57 81 

Long Beach 766 78 

Los Angeles 12,984 52 

Monrovia 25 00 

Pasadena 1,570 00 

Redondo Beach 47 14 

Santa Monica 400 00 

Tropico 12 00 

Venice 51 50 

Whittier _' 309 17 

— '- 16,955 31 

^ladera Countv — 

County Library $168 38 

Magazine subscriptions 50 00 

218 38 

Marin County — 

Schools __1 $502 00 

Mill Valley 6 00 

■ 508 00 



12 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jc'in. 1918" 

Mendocino County — 

Ukiah $8 15 

Schools $55 00 

■ ?63 15 

Merced County — 

County Library 405 00 

Modoc County — 

County Library 143 80 

Mono County — • 

Schools 45 00 

Monterey County — 

County Library $261 29 

Salinas 223 05 

Salinas Schools 60 71 

545 05 

Napa County — 

Napa $181 (X) 

St. Helena 25 00 

• 20*3 00 

Nevada County — 

Schools 345 14 

Orange County — 

Anaheim $250 00 

Fullerton 201 15 

Huntington Beach 74 56 

Orange 300 00 

Santa Ana 421 00 

1.246 71 

Placer Couutj- — 

Alta, Women's Club of $4 00 

Applegate 2 50 

Auburn 71 45 

Colfax IS 42 

Dutch Flat 21 00 

Newcastle. Delphian Club 25 00 

Rocklin, Women's Club of 20 00 

Sheridan, Women's Club of 5 00 

Towle 3 65 

171 02 

Riverside County 600 00 

Sacramento County — • 

County and City Library $32 05 

County Schools j 211 40 

Sacramento Schools 397 34 

Sacramento Consolidated Chamber of Commerce 500 00 

Sacramento Clearing House 100 00 

State Library 60 75 

Sacramento 23 OO 

1,324 54 

San Benito County — 

Schools ^ 80 21 

San Bernardino County — 

Ontario $115 60 

Redlands 374 87 

San Bernardino 283 87 

774 34 

San Diego County 1,770 62 

San Joaquin County 1,921 23 

San Luis Obispo County 320 00 



vol. 13, no. 1] LIBRARY WAR SERVICE. 13 

San Mateo Gountj^ — 

County Library $638 50 

Santa Barbara County 691 15 

Santa Clara County — 

County Library $223 40 

Mountain View 32 69 

San Jose 1,491 41 

Santa Clara 81 25 

Stanford University 57 50 

1,886 25 

Santa Cruz County — 

Watsonville 78 90 

Siskiyou County — 

County Library and Schools 646 16 

Solano County — / 

CountT Schools $214 55 

Benicia 50 00 

Cement 26 88 

Rio Vista 52 55 

Rio Vista High School 20 50 

Suisun 64 61 

Vacaville 47 60 

Vallejo 163 53 

Vallejo: Men at Mare Island Navy Yard 620 79 

1.261 01 

Sonoma County — ■ 

Petaluma. $375 80 

Supervisors, County Board of 125 00 

Fulton, Healdsburg, Santa Rosa, Sebastopol, Sonoma, 

Schools and Clubs 452 68 

953 48 

Stanislaus County — 

County Library $503 90 

Modesto 31 00 

Turlock 150 00 

684 90 

Sutter County — 

Schools 146 95 

Tehama County — • 

County Library and Schools 143 06 

Trinity County — ■ 

County Library 60 00 

Tulare County — ■ 

County Library ; 685 08 

Tuolumne County — 

County Library and Schools 214 85 

Ventura County — 

County Library $545 82 

Oxnard 152 85 

698 67 

Yolo County — 

County Library and Schools 873 55 

Yuba County — 

Schools 210 95 

Total for California $48,345 55 

Arizona 2,257 85 

$50,603 40 



14 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail. 1918 

Book Campaign. 

The fund campaign was scarcely out of the way when the book drive 
M^as inaugurated ; or to be exact the gathering of books was suspended 
until the money to buy books could be collected. In December word 
was received from the Washington headquarters that gift books were to 
be solicited for use in the camps, in order that the funds for book pur- 
chases might be conserved largely for the buying of technical and pro- 
fessional literature. Librarians throughout the state were accordingly 
circularized on this subject and they immediately set about the work. 
The plan adopted was for the local librarians to sort the books and to 
discard all volumes which because of poor print, shaken condition or 
uninteresting subject matter would be an encumbrance on the shelves, 
to process the remainder and to forward to the nearest camp — that is 
either Kearny or Fremont. Recent advice from Washington seems to 
contemplate a belated but considerably different plan ; but for the time 
being California librarians are requested to act upon original sugges- 
tions. Books are badl}^ needed; therefore energetic prosecution of this 
campaign is urged upon all librarians. 

Development, 

The article by Mr Quire in this number of News Notes of California 
Libraries explains in detail the progress which has been made at Camp 
Kearny. Library development at Camp Fremont, for reasons which 
have been given full publicity, was, with the primary objects of the 
cantonment itself, seriously retarded. When it became evident however 
that the camp was to be finished Washington was persistently urged to 
authorize the construction of the library building. It is true that Miss 
Patterson, Miss Bailey and other librarians in the vicinity of the Camp 
had furnished many books to the regulars who were first stationed there, 
but full librarj^ service was impossible through such voluntary effort. 
Finally word came that the contract could be let, and in the last days of 
1917 the workmen laid the foundation of a 40 x 93-foot structure. 

George W. Clark of Stanford University consented to act as library 
supervisor during the period of construction. But when the frame was 
up and the roof on, W. E. Henry of the State University of Washington 
came south to take up his duties as library organizer. In the middle of 
January, Mr Henry and the writer of this statement were personally 
conducted by Mr Clark to the most interesting spot — from a librarian 's 
point of view — on the grounds. We tried to visualize the structure in 
its completed form, and to imagine the boys in khaki thronging its 
reading room or coming from its door with volumes for study or recrea- 
tion. Fortunately camp buildings grow in a very few weeks and before 
these notes are in print Mr Henry and his staff will be giving library' 
service to the soldiers. 

Before- our Washington friend, whose stay I am sorry to say will be 
limited to two months, returns fo the enviable dampness of Seattle I 
hope to be able to induce him to write of the joys and sorrows of his 
California campaign. Personal narratives by home coming veterans are 
quite the thing and librarianship should in time have its ''over the top." 



vol. 13, no. 1] LIBRARY WAR SERVICE. 1,") 

There are several smaller posts in California which need library atten- 
tion and to which some books have been sent. The boys at Goat Island 
can use a certain amount of recreational reading but for the most part 
desire technical literature which will help them in their studies and their 
effort to advance themselves professionally. The same condition is 
found at Mare Island where larger numbers of men are engaged in 
shipbuilding and other nautical works. Headquarters at Washington 
have begun to send out some of the special books needed but the number 
received so far has had little appreciable effect upon the situation. 
Doubtless however better progress will soon be made. The State 
Library has been able to supply several hundred standard and recrea- 
tional volumes, not only to Mare Island and Camp Fremont, but also 
to one of the smaller vessels of the navy which was about to put to sea 
without any reading matter whatever. 

Present Needs. 

The foregoing is largely about the past. What of the future? 
Librarians have been accustomed to growth of a painstaking slowness ; 
their collections have been brought together as the labors of years; 
their buildings in time outgrown and inadequate have been replaced 
only after much effort and long lapse of time. War conditions do not 
brook delay; deeds must not be put over until the morro^v. Herein 
librarianship may well take a leaf from the book of experience of the 
Y. M. C. A. This organization is on the ground when the men arrive ; 
it meets their needs at once ; it looks out for the comfort of the first 
comers and is still on the job when the latest recruit comes in. Conse- 
quently when the Y. M. C. A. purse becomes empty thousands are ready 
to replenish it. The boys have been cared for, they have told the folks 
at home. The answer is easy. 

Librarians in America for the first time have been called for profes- 
sional war service. An appeal has been made for .$1,000,000 and the 
people have responded with almost $1,750,000. It is up to the profes- 
sion to show that it can, in the language of the street, deliver the goods. 
That it can do so I have no doubt ; but if all of us are willing to over- 
look the pre-war rule which may have been important in its time but 
is now as nothing in the face of world wide conflict ; if we answer each 
call to duty with that promptness so necessary on the part of the man 
in the trenches whose life depends upon instant obedience ; if we do our 
share always and then look about for ways to heap up the measure, the 
verdict of the men we are trjdng to serve today, will be unanimous and 
the record in history tomorrow will make us proud. 

Here are a few things to do. (1) When there is a soldier or a small 
body of soldiers in your neighborhood lend them books without for- 
mality. Uncle Sam's uniform is sufficient guarantee. (2) If your 
friends who have money can be enlisted in our work accept their 
donations in amounts from a dollar up. That million dollar fund will 
not last forever. (3) Be busy at the work of book collecting all the 
time. Book giving is a habit which may be made to become chronic 
with some of our citizens who can not shoulder a rifle or become a Red 



16 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

Cross nurse. (4) Lend your services to the preparation of books for 
camp use. If you are near a camp arrange with the librarian to do 
your turn each week. Unfortunately as yet women are not permitted 
to be on duty in the reading room, but they can catalog, etc., behind 
the scenes. I truly hope that the War Department may soon see fit to 
dispense with such a discriminatory rule. (5) If you are a man, are 
not subject to the draft and can possibly arrange your own affairs 
volunteer for duty at a camp library. If you can not serve without pay 
the American Library Association "War Service can perhaps pay you a 
living wage. At least make your conditions and willingness to serve 
known. Let us work at this library business as if it were the one con- 
tribution we can make towards winning the war. It will help win 
the war. 



EOLL OF HONOR.* 

Carleton B. Joeckel, Librarian, Berkeley Public Librai'y — 1st Lieutenant, Ameri- 
can Lake, Washington. 

Harold L. Leupp, Associate Librarian, University of California Library — 1st 
Lieutenant, American Lake, Washington. 

Albert Marty, Page, California State Library — Sei'geant, Aviation Service. 

Joseph H. Quire, Legislative Reference Librarian, California State Library — 
Camp Librarian, Camp Kearny, California. 

Eugene Ferry Smith, Trustee, San Diego Public Library — 1st Lieutenant, Waco, 
Texas. 

A. Law Voge, Reference Librarian, Mechanics-Mercantile Library, San Fran- 
cisco — Captain in Engineers Division. 



*The California State Library will appreciate information of any corrections or 
additions. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY SERVICE. 



17 



LIBRARY WAR SERVICE AT CAMP KEARNY. 

By Joseph H. Quire, Camr> Librarian. 

Camp Library Service is a legitimate war undertaking, desired and 
used by officers and men, and warranting the expenditure of money 
contributed by a generous American people and the expenditure of time 
specially contributed by libraries and librarians. 

This, at least, is the deduction from the six months' existence of the 
Gamp Kearny Library as a loose collection of books scattered strate- 
gically over several square miles of tented area and its one month 
existence as an entity with walls, a roof and more or less of the other 
conveniences associated with the word "library." Just enough news 
has filtered down this way to give assurance that in the stories of the 
other thirty- four American Library Association camp libraries this con- 
clusion will have plenty of supporting evidence. 

Camp Kearny's story must still be taken pretty much on faith. 
Statistics sprout slowly when little attention is given to their cultiva- 
tion. The time demands made by the construction of the new building 
forestalled any great regard for this detail. Not until the week ending 
January 27 has it therefore been possible to gather in a complete crop 
of circulation figures, for instance, for the whole camp. 




The Loading Platform — One day's shipment of gift magazines — 35 sacks. 

Figures and curves are not the standards for judging this form of 
library service. In one sense, they tell only a part of the story. With 
what accuracy can circulation figures be regarded when a man reports 
that each time he takes out a book, it is given a thorough reading by the 
seven other men in his tent before it returns to the shelves ? How much 
of the labor and expense expended by a library in preparing a shipment 
of gift books is reflected in a formal accession entry? 

Indeed, figures do not tell any story whatever. If not a single book 
circulated in a day, such a day would have been worth while if a private 



18 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 




vol. 13, no. 1] 



CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY SERVICE. 



19 



came to the desk with the remark, as he does come oftener than you 
would think: "By George, here's a book on gas engines I've been 
wanting to read for the past three years and now its the very thing to 
study up on for an ex. to transfer to the aviation service." 

Or if a corporal, as he turns in a copy of "Macbeth," asks: "What 
else have you got in of Shakespeare"? This is the first time I've had 
the chance to enjoy what he has written. ' ' 

Or if a captain comments: "This is the greatest place in the camp." 

Or if Major General Frederick S. Strong, Commanding Officer of the 
Fortieth Division, inquires: "Where's that dictionary? I want to look 
up a word." 

Such incidents can not be checked and tallied. They must be taken 
on faith or substantiated by a visit to the camp. Nevertheless, let the 
figures be marshalled. On January 28, the total number of volumes in 
the camp library and its branches was 12,355. These volumes had 
reached the camp in the following maimer : 

Prepared gift shipments collected by southern California libraries — 7.317 

Gifts directly to camp 2.010 

Loaned from San Diego County Free Library 1.047 

Purchased from A. L. A. war service fund 1,797 

U. S. War Department documents 1S4 

Total 12,355 

Of this number 1289 were awaiting preparation for circulation. The 
total number of books, therefore, in circulation was 11,066, divided into 
7155 fiction and 3911 non-fiction. 

These books Avere distributed over the camp in the following manner : 



Central 

Y. M. C. A. No. 1 
Y. M. C. A. No. 2 
Y. M. C. A. No. 3 
Y. M. C. A. No. 4. 
Y. M. C. A. No. 5 
Y. M. C. A. No. 6 
Y. M. C. A. No. 7 
K. of C. No. 1— 
K. of C. No. 2— 
Base Hospital _ 
Recruit Camp _ 
French Library 
Y. W. C. A 

Totals 



3,890 


1,751 


1,415 


782 


1.268 


789 


1,072 


937 


568 


568 


1,104 


1,042 


213 


213 


117 


48 


295 


157 


334 


282 


560 


500 


153 


79 


57 




20 


7 



2,139 
633 
479 
135 



62 



69 
138 
52 
60 
74 
57 
13 



11,066 



7,155 



3,911 



Circulation figures are not available in as complete form. The week 
ending January 27 was the first for which complete figures for the 
entire camp are available. The total for the week was 4483, distributed 
as follows: central, 1807; branches, 2676. 



20 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 




vol. 13, no. 1] CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY SERVICE. 21 

To date a separate circulation record for fiction and nonfiction lias 
been kept at the central building only. For the week ending on the 
dates given, the circulation has been as follows : 



Nonfletion 



December 30 152 

January 6 ] 626 

-January 13 



January 20 
January 27 



1,259 

1,807 



493 

521 

824 

1,253 



133 
267 
435 
554 



These figures at best are incomplete. Their chief use at present is to 
show general needs and tendencies. 

Attendance records at the central building were begun on January 24. 

These follow : 

January 24 348 

January 25 489 

January 26 829 

January 27 1,574 

The seating capacity of the reading room is 150. From 6 to 8.30 each 
evening even standing room is at a premium and on Saturday and 
Sunday afternoons, the same condition exists. The library is open 
from 8 a.m. to 9.45 p.m. There are always from ten to fifteen men 
awaiting the opening. 

Thirty-five daily newspapers from the states represented by men in 
the camp are being received. These are supplied through the courtesy 
of the management. The dail}^ edition of the New York Times and the 
Courier des Etats-Unis are supplied by the A. L. A. Thirty- five maga- 
zines are received regularly, twenty-nine by A. L. A. subscription and 
six by gift. 

These figures represent but a cross section in the development of war 
library service at Camp Kearny. Its beginnings go back into the sum- 
mer of 1917 when the San Diego Public Library and the San Diego 
County Free Library cooperated with the camp Y. M. C. A. in placing 
books on the grounds. These were the beginnings of the present 
branches of the A. L. A. Library. Additions were made to these collec- 
tions with gift books sent to the San Diego, Los Angeles, Eiverside, 
Pasadena and other southern California libraries and forwarded for 
use. When the camp librarian arrived on November 22, there were 
4936 volumes or approximately 1000 to each of the five Y. M. C. A. 
buildings. 

The response which the libraries and librarians of the territory from 
which the camp would logically draw for its reading needs made in 
these pioneer days can without question be counted as the most impor- 
tant single factor in the rapid organization and development of the 
A. L. A. war service program at Camp Kearny. The fact that it was 
made at all gave the men of the camp books far in advance of the 
arrival of an A. L. A. representative. The fact that it was made when 
it was, permitted the camp librarian to devote all thought that the re- 



22 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

erection of a camp library building, secure in the thought that the re- 
sources at hand would care temporarily for the needs of the present. 
Names aplenty of people knoM^ and unknown who participated in this 
work deserve to be mentioned ; it would be an injustice not to say that 
the energetic and resourceful labors at this time of Miss Althea H. 
Warren, librarian of the San Diego Public Library, have left their 
lasting impress on the work. 

The outstanding task when the camp librarian arrived in San Diego 
on November 22 was therefore to secure as rapidly as possible a library 
building from which the books in camp could be administered and 
where the men of the camp would find comfortable reading room 
accommodations. From this point I take the privilege of lapsing into 
personal narrative. 

First of all, my entry into the work with the solemnity almost of 
prayer. When Miss Warren, Miss Katharine Post Ferris, acting 
librarian of the San Diego County Free Library, Mr I. N. Lawson Jr., 
the acting camp librarian and newly-appointed assistant, and I 
gathered in Miss Warren 's office for the first meeting, there was on the 
office table a gift book containing a calendar of inspirational readings 
for each day of the year. It was natural for someone to turn to the 
selection for that date, and lo ! this was found, from Matthew 7:7, 
"Ask and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it 
shall be opened unto you." 

Two months have now passed since that time, and I desire to testify 
that texts do have their mission. 

Two disappointments and one surprise awaited at this meeting. One 
disappointment was that construction work on the building M^as being 
held in check pending the settlement of the question of making certain 
fundamental changes in the plans. The other was the news that the 
Ford truck which I presumed was in use was somewhere out in the 
Mississippi Valley elbowing its way west through the freight congestion. 

The surprise was Mr Lawson. "Aggressive young lawyer" he had 
been described in the official dispatches. Instead he was a recent 
engineering graduate, familiar with a Ford and its ailments and with 
a leaning to devising short cuts in system and making mathematical 
calculations valuable in the emergencies of the time. He had a car 
available for library service pending the arrival of the Ford and also 
possessed a long acquaintance with San Diego and vicinity. 

The first visit to the theatre of operations was made on the following 
day. Camp Kearny is located about fifteen miles due north of San 
Diego and about ten miles inland from the ocean. It is in the center 
of a broad, red-soiled plateau on ground rescued for use from the 
greasewood which thrives in the vicinity. This background gives a 
monotonous perfection to the khaki-brown color scheme of tents and 
uniforms. 

The central feature of the camp is the parade ground, running east 
and Avest, and two miles in length. On either side stretch the company 
tents and mess houses, in which the 25,000 men of the camp live. At 
the northwest corner of this rectangle and about half a mile distant is 
the base hospital. Due west about half a mile is the remount station. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY .SERVICE. 23 

The camp is divided in the middle by Center street. On or near 
Center street, at the northern rim of the camp, the community buildings 
are located. The library building is on Center street, between the 
division post exchange, or camp department store, and the post office. 
Its neighbors across the street are the Y. W. C. A. hostess house, the 
church federation building and a pool hall. 

(!)n this first daj^ however, the post office was the only completed 
building at hand. The hostess house was almost finished. The site of 
the library and other buildings was covered with what looked like 
permanently-rooted bunk houses. 

The first need was for a place to work, sleep and eat. The first two 
were made available immediately by the Y. M. C. A. Dr John R. Yoris, 
acting general camp secretary and since made general camp secretary, 
invited me to move my desk into the assembly room of the Y. M. C. A. 
administration building, located off Center street, but a step from the 
building .site, and my cot into the moving picture booth of Y. M. C. A. 
Iniilding No. 3, which was the only available space nearby. This hospi- 
tality was not only greatly appreciated at the time but is increasingly 
appreciated for the head start which it was possible to make. -The 
eating question was cared for at a handy quartermaster company's mess. 

The fir.st conference with the supervising contractor had its original 
features. It took place in the garret of the Y. W. C. A. hostess house 
on the afternoon of the formal opening of that building. Directly 
beneath us was a regimental band presenting such selections as "Poet 
and Peasant," and with all instruments pointed our way. Between 
band numbers, vocal solos were presented inside. Up in the garret two 
carpenters were pounding away on storage shelves — pounding except 
when one of the ladies of the reception committee Avould put her head 
through the hatchway and suggest that it might be well if at least the 
high notes of the singer could be heard. It was a good introduction to 
the fascinating commotion of camp life. Here, parth' by signs, and 
sometimes by the spoken word, all questions for which no certain 
answers were found in the plans and specifications were settled. 

Actual construction of the building began on December 1. Twenty 
working days later, on Christmas night, at 6.30 o'clock, to be exact, the 
building was opened and service begun. There were no doors, heat, 
water or sewer, but the lack of these details was immaterial to the utter 
convenience and satisfaction of finally being settled. On December 31, 
twenty-five days from the beginning of work, the contractor turned 
over the building. Only the rare good fortune that the library build- 
ing was the final job of the contractors who built the camp and were 
therefore efficiently organized for rapid work was responsible for this 
accomplishment. 

The building is 40 by 93, with a porch 10 feet wide extending across 
the front. Open shelving with a capacity of over 9000 volumes extends 
down either side of the reading room. In the center of the room is the 
charging desk and in back of this a space set apart for a workroom. 
Leading from the workroom is a small room intended as a packing room 
but converted into a magazine sorting room. A wide sliding door in 
this room opens out onto the loading platform. 



24 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

At the south end of the building a section has been set aside for living 
quarters. This includes two bed rooms, a shower room, ladies dressing 
room and a connecting hallway, in Avhich storage shelves and supply 
cupboards have been built. 

The interior is finished in a golden oak stain tempered with a dash of 
green. The ceiling is of white pine oiled in natural finish and a strip ot 
buff-tinted plaster board extends between the ceiling and the wainscot- 
ing. The exterior is a battleship grey, with frames in a bronze green 
and sashes in white. 

In the period of building construction were the "great days" of the 
work. Life was nothing but a series of complex uncertainties. In the 
natural collision of interests which was to be expected in the temporary 
office quarters, many amusing distractions would take place. In the 
midst of filling out a long inventory urgently wanted by headquarters, 
a quartet would appear to rehearse or the Swedish men enter for 
services. Telegrams went astray — the wire from Washington trans- 
mittin^g money for the Ford wandered about camp for four days ; phone 
messages and important letters never received or delivered weeks late. 
Even the quiet of the moving-picture booth bed chamber, made com- 
fortable on movie nights by the genial warmth of the machine, was not 
immune. Without warning, carpenters appeared early one morning to 
build a partition. One had climbed astride the bunk and was boring a 
hole through the roof before the descending sawdust caressed my face to 
announce that day, and lots more, was breaking. 

During this period little library activity was possible. However a 
branch was opened on December 13 in the newly completed Knights of 
Columbus building and another on December 17 in the recreation room 
for the enlisted men of the base hospital company. In both cases, 
typewriter and other equipment was moved bodily to the branch for the 
necessary work. Additions were also made to the established 
Y. M. C. A. branches which heretofore had had only small allotments. 

All during this trying period of operating with no permanent base 
very cordial assistance was given by the military authorities. The 
camp quartermaster in particular gave greatly needed aid in moving 
furniture and equipment from San Diego, moving books and otherwise 
assisting in work now handled by the Ford truck. 

No formal opening attended the induction of the building to use. 
The doors — borrowed from a nearby bunk-house — were simply opened. 
The Christmas spirit was observed, however. From the center of the 
charging desk rose a fifteen-foot tree, decorated with the balls and 
spangles of custom and illuminated with vari-colored electric lights. 
At the windows were red-ribboned wreaths. The staff and the two 
hundred men who came in were bundled in overcoats, but the scene 
warmed the spirit at least. On the shelves were a few hundred gift 
books. In the newspaper section about thirty newspapers were ready 
for business and the magazine shelves were camouflaged with three 
dollars worth of magazines rushed out from a San Diego newstand. 

With the opening of the building, work began in earnest. Over a 
thousand purchased books arrived from the East and several hundred 
gift books arrived unprepared. The staff of two was swamped and a 



vol. 13, no. 1] CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY SERVICE. 



25 




26 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

call for help sent to San Diego. The San Diego Public Library and the 
San Diego County Free Library willingly responded and four assist- 
ants made the thirty-mile round trip to the camp. Six times did the 
call go out and each time the response was the same. There should 
therefore be included in the camp library staff the following members 
who filled the breach: Miss Marie E. Maloney, Miss Irma Brink, Miss 
Madeline Marie Scanlan, Miss E. Louise Peck, Miss Helen Dysart, Miss 
Lena H. Hunzicker, Miss Esther Wrottenberg, Miss Elizabeth Bailey, 
]Mrs Emma G. Sprouse, Miss A. Clover Hall, and Miss Nellie Gish of 
the San Diego Public ; Miss Grace Taber and Miss Florence Webb, who 
served for three days, of the San Diego County Free Librarj^ 

Simplicity governs the system used in the library. The cataloging 
and charging systems suggested by the A. L. A. War Service Committee 
have been followed. One catalog card, which also serves as a shelf- 
list and routing card, and one charging card are typed for each book. 
The catalog card is so ruled that a record of branch shipments may 
be entered. The charging card has spaces ruled for stamping the date 
due and inserting the name, company and regiment of the borrower. 

No borrower's cards or pockets are kept at the main building. A 
man writes his name, company and regiment on the charging card of 
the book he draws. The charging cards are filed alphabetically by 
author under date due. One week is allowed on all books. The Browne 
system was placed in use in the Y. M. C. A. branches. This is still 
retained in some, but the majority of the branches are using the same 
system as prevails at the central building. 

Catalog cards for fiction are filed by author and for nonfiction by 
class and then by author. Library of Congress cards have been sup- 
plied by the A. L. A. for all purchased books. These will be used for 
subject and title entries when facilities are available for this work. 

A book pocket is placed on the inside of the back cover of the book. 
This is used as a dating slip. 

No accession record is kept other than the number of books received 
in each shipment of books and the name of the publisher or library 
sending the shipment. The aid which libraries preparing books for 
the camp are giving, in addition to care in selection is (1) to write on 
the inside of the back cover or type on the inside flap of the book 
pocket the author and title, (2) type one catalog card on plain 
manila stock, using author and title in simplest form, (3) type a 
charging card, (4) paste a plain book pocket on the inside of the back 
cover and insert the catalog and charging cards, where they will be 
handy for classification and shelf-listing. All nonfiction is classified 
at the library to secure uniformity. Except in only a few instances, 
only a three number classification is used. 

One perplexing problem which will not down is the gift magazine to 
which a penny stamp has been placed in response to the printed sug- 
gestion of the Postmaster-General. Since the opening of the library, 
154 sacks of the matter, or approximately 15,400 magazines, have been 
received from the postoffice. 

Much of this material is not usable. For instance, each week approxi- 
mately 6000 current Saturday Evening Posts pass into camp to regular 



vol. 13, no. 1] CAMP KEARNY LIBRARY SERVICE. 27 

subscribers. This reduces greatly the demand for Posts of 1912 and 
1913, of which a bountiful supply keep coming in. A great quantity of 
religious material is received which, in order to play no favorites, 
cannot be used. And again there is that great group of magazines, 
represented by " Needlecraf t, " Ladies World" and ^'Priscilla" which 
find no appreciative group of readers except at the telephone exchange 
and nurses' cjuarters. By agreement between the postoffice and library, 
all gift magazines are delivered to the library for sorting. The sorted 
magazines are sacked and labelled for each of the branches and delivered 
back to the postoffice, where mail orderlies see them to their destination. 
Libraries are therefore asked to go cautiously in sending gift magazines. 
They can perform a large service in seeing that more of the right kind, 
not received from the postoffice, arrive. 

There is always a field for the following : Popular ]\Iechanies, Popular 
Science, Illustrated World, Scientific American and Scientific American 
Supplement ; all technical magazines, such as Engineering News-Record, 
Electrical World, Power, American Machinist ; automobile magazines, 
such as Motor, the Automobile; New York Times Mid-Week Pictorial 
and similar publications, Life, Judge and Puck ; picture magazines, such 
as Country Life in America, Travel, National Geographic, House Beau- 
tiful, Architectural Record. 

On the negative side, it is urged that no library ship'ments of the 
Saturday Evening Post, Colliers or the Literary Digest be sent. 

''What kind of books do the men like to read?" ask the visitors. 
There is no way of knowing definitely but there are indications. 

The}' assuredly like the war books. Thirty-three copies of Empey's 
"Over the top" are listed but every copy is in constant use. Other 
personal narratives of the war are nearly as popular. The Camp 
Kearny men want western stories. This is probably true of the other 
camps, but here so many men have lived in the country in which the 
action of these stories takes place that their interest is two-fold. 
Therefore, the heavy runs on Zane G-rey, Rex Beach, Jack London, 
Stewart Edward White, Harold Bell Wright and Ralph Connor. In 
the 800 's, Shakespeare and Robert W. Service share honors as far as 
popularity goes. Single play editions of Shakespeare are very much in 
demand. Just why Kipling stays so much in the background I am 
unable to understand. Technical books, especially those on aeroplanes, 
gas engines, photography, telephones and telegraph, have a large circu- 
lation. Four bound volumes of "Life" will probably be the first books 
in the library to require rebinding. 

Need and space exist for about 8000 more books of the general type 
indicated above. Part of this number will be received from the New 
York distributing station of the A.L.A. War Service Committee. The 
greater number, however, must come by gift and principally at the 
solicitation of libraries. 

Although it is unwise to look the gift horse in the mouth, it would 
seem that the smaller libraries should have their inning on the second 
drive. The larger libraries of the south have carried the burden of 
placing books in the camp and making recpiired additions. Queries 



28 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

already received from several of the smaller libraries indicate that books 
are available in the smaller centers. These small quotas are now 
wanted. 

The range of usable material is too wide to permit of positive sug- 
gestions. There are three negative suggestions, intended not so much 
for librarians as for those who may have books to give. Here is the 
negative list: 

1. No oversize collected works of fiction; works of Charles Reade or 
Bulwer Lytton, for instance. Such editions are not only usually unat- 
tractive, but also inconvenient for the men to use. Most books are 
carried from the library in overcoat pockets or shirt-fronts. This does 
not apply, of course, to reference or technical books. 

2. No religious or semi-religious books. This is indefinite and subject 
to misinterpretation. One reason for the suggestion is that the various 
religious organizations are attending to placing books in the camp. 
Another is that there is a large class of literature such as was received 
recently when a whole sunday-school library arrived at the loading 
platform for which there is no possible need or use. 

3. No dilapidated, poorly printed, or poorly bound books of any kind. 
There is need for books, but there is no more reason for providing the 
men with shoddy reading material than giving them shoddy clothing. 
This is a point not grasped by a large group of donors. It is one to be 
continually and firmly made. The camp libraries are not a charity. 
They are a recognized element in the training and teaching of the men 
of the service, and deserve a support commensurate with the task which 
has been set for them. 

The work at hand is to bring the catalog into a more ordered condition 
and to make more flexible the movement of books to the branches. 
These are routine matters which have been postponed until more press- 
ing problems of quarters and equipment were settled. Then it will be 
felt that the work has been placed in order, but not finished. 

No matter what the duration of the war, of the life of the training 
camps or the resources at the command of the libraries, it will at least 
be a brave camp librarian who will say that he has exhausted the oppor- 
tunities for service and that his work is at an end. 



vol. 13. no. 1] CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER : C. E. WATKIXS. 29 



AN EARLY CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER: C. E. WATKINS. 

By Charles B. Turrill. 

Note. — The following account of the life and work of C E. "^^atkins was written 
to accompany a catalog of the TVatkins' stereoscopic views. It is printed here as it 
is believed that the work of Mr XS'atkins was a valuable one for California, and also 
that it is well to draw the attention of California libraries to the worth of these 
stereoscopic views, some of which every library may have. The State Library would 
be glad to complete its set and "«-ould like to hear from libraries having any of the 
"^'atkins or Hart stereoscopic views, which they would be willing to donate to, or 
deposit or exchange with the State Library. 

The accompaming catalog* of Watkins' stereoptic views is an accu- 
rate transcript made by me several years ago from Mr Watkins' nega- 
tive register. It is a complete copy of what is designated as ' ' Watkins ' 
New Series." Any other "Watkins' stereos, excepting the Hart stereos, 
to be referred to later, belonged to the earlier work of "Watkins. Those 
bearing smaller numbers are extremely rare. 

The series of "Watkins' stereoptic views in the State Library collection 
numbered, for instance, 9, 41, 73, 330, etc*, are a portion of what 
Watkins designated as the "Hart negatives." This series, numbering 
somewhat more than three hundred, was made by A. A. Hart, a Sacra- 
mento photographer, during the period of the construction of the 
Central Pacific Railroad. "Watkins purchased these negatives many 
years ago, and incorporated them in his series, printing for sale a 
portion of them. I have a complete catalog of these Hart negatives 
which I also copied from "Watkins' record, and which is annexed to this 
copy as a part thereof. It is questionable whether there are prints in 
existence of all these negatives. 'Sly collection lacks perhaps a dozen 
or so, and it is the largest collection of the Hart views in existence. 

The reason for calling these "Watkins' ^^ews "New Series" is that 
at one time advantage was taken of the gentleman's absence from the 
city and through the dishonorable treatment of a man who had 
advanced money to him a sale was made of his entire property at his 
studio, 26 Montgomery street. At that sale the negatives and photo- 
graphic equipment were purchased in the interest of I. "W. Taber. 
Prior to that time ^Mr Taber had been known as a portrait photographer, 
though in tho.se days the lines were not closely drawn between portrait 
and view men. "Watkins ' earlier work formed the basis and the greater 
part of the well kno^vn Taber collection of scenic negatives. After 
losing his property "Watkins started his photographic life anew, and 
■with the knowledge of what were the most salable subjects retook these 
on the various sizes of negatives which he used, giving to the new work 
the title of ' ' Watkins ' New Series. " 

Carleton E. Watkins was born in the State of New York and came to 
California as a young man. He was working as a clerk in a store on 
Montgomery street in 1854 when the Montgomery block was erected. 
He has told me of watching that construction, and it is an interesting 
fact to note his statement that the lot on which the Montgomery Block 
was erected was driven almost solid with piles. As the old gentleman 
expressed it, it was a "forest of piles." Being on made ground this 

*Not printed here. On file in State Library for reference. 



30 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

construction is undoubtedly the great reason for the safety of that 
building which has withstood every earthquake shock that San Fran- 
cisco has experienced since its erection. 

It was about this time that Watkins began his life career. He became 
acquainted with R. H. Vance, who had a gallery in San Jose, as well as 
in San Francisco. It chanced that the operator in the San Jose gallery 
suddenly quit his job and Vance asked the young man Watkins to go 
down and take charge of the gallerj^ until he got a new man. Those 
were the days of the daguerreotype. Watkins went by stage to San 
Jose, and the gallery was turned over to his care. He knew absolutely 
nothing in regard to photographic processes, and was simply for the 
first few days a care-taker of the place. In that town the great amount 
of business done in a photograph gallery — or as it was then called, a 
daguerreotjT^e gallery — was on Sunday. On Friday or Saturday Vance 
visited San Jose to see how the young man was getting along. He had 
not gotten a new operator, so he showed the young man how to coat 
the daguerreotype plate and how to make an exposure for a portrait. 
This instruction occupied only a few minutes, and naturally did not go 
into the minutiae of the profession. Vance told Watkins that when 
the visitors came in on Sunday he could make a bluff at making the 
exposures and take their money and that when they came back the fol- 
lowing week he would have an operator there to make over anything 
that had to be made over — it being the idea of both that the green 
young man would not succeed in his daguerreotype operations. As 
good fortune would have it, he did succeed, however, and no new opera- 
tor was ever sent from San Francisco to take the place his predecessor 
had resigned. He remained for a short period operating and entirely 
conducting the Vance gallery in San Jose. While I am not at the 
present time absolutely certain about the two daguerreotypes of 
Mission Santa Clara, (one of which exists, and the other of which we 
have a Watkins photographic copy) both were probably made by 
Watkins during this San Jose career. In the Vance gallery in San 
Jose he found a number of landscape daguerreotypes. A few of these 
he copied. One is that of a daguerreotype (destroyed in the 1906 fire) 
of Sutter's Mill at Coloma, with Marshall standing in the foreground. 
While I do not recall that Watkins ever told me that this was a Vance 
daguerreotj^pe. I have always considered that it was. That dagTier- 
reotype was made about 1850. Watkins had two other copies of the 
mining settlement at Mormon Island, which belonged to this same 
series of daguerreotypes. The daguerreotype of Mission San Jose now 
in the Golden Gate Park Memorial Museum was another of this old 
series. Watkins had made a photographic copy of this, probably at 
least thirty years ago. As a matter of verification, some three years 
ago, I also photographed the daguerreotj^pe in the Golden Gate Park 
Museum. The two photographs show distinctly that they were taken 
from but one daguerreotype. 

In 1856-7 Watkins visited New Idrea and the Almaden quicksilver 
mines. This was during the time of the celebrated litigation and his 
photographs were of value, undoubtedly, as evidence, and he received 
quite an incentive in his photographic career from the sale of pictures. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER: C. E. WATKINS. 31 

This may safely be called the beginning of his work as a photographer 
in contradistinction to a daguerreotypist. 

It may be mentioned here that his experience in lighting, posing, etc., 
gained in the gallery in San Jose led to his doing a vast amount of 
portrait work. The specimens of this portion of Watkins' career are 
extremely rare. The earlier ones will be found almost entirely in the 
old fashioned eard-de-viste. While on this point, I would state that 
one of the noted pieces of Watkins' portrait work was the celebrated 
portrait group showing William C. Ralston and the employees of the 
Bank of California, made in 1874. This large picture is remarkable 
for its system of construction. Each figure in the group was carefully 
posed (with the pre-arranged plan of its being placed in a large 
picture) as a portrait study in Watkins' studio, at 26 Montgomery 
street. Prints of these portraits were made and carefully trimmed 
around the margins and then mounted on a large sheet of Wathman 
drawing paper. Then Burgess, the writing and drawing teacher, care- 
fully drew, in india ink the entire background for these figures, repre- 
senting a room in the Bank. This large picture was afterward photo- 
graphically copied by Watkins ; but these copies are now extremely 
rare. 

Watkins returned to San Francisco during 1857 or 1858. He kept 
no definite record on his negatives as to when they were taken and it 
was difficult in his old age for him to state definitely when certain 
negatives were made. In his entire collection there are but one or 
two exceptions to this rule. These are the stereoscopic negatives made 
during the period of the Centennial celebration of 1876, which covered 
a period of three days, and one Southern California view. Very few 
of the old Watkins pictures from '57 to the latter 60 's have been found. 
I have probably either the originals or copies of nearly all that exist. 

It must be borne in mind that all these photographs were made on 
wet plates. Owing to the scarcity of glass, if it was found that the prints 
from the negatives proved unsalable or a commercial order had been 
fully executed, the glass was cleaned off and again coated for another 
exposure. Watkins had several extra prints of most of these. These 
Avere at his home and did not escape from him when he lost his nega- 
tives as above ; some were quickly made proofs and others imperfect 
prints. I copied all but about a dozen of these which were in Watkins' 
possession at the time of the 1906 fire, when everything in his g*allery 
was burned. A stereo of this period can be recognized by the fact that 
it is mounted on a plain stereo mount and the title (sometimes with a 
number and sometimes without) written in ink beneath the picture, 
or on one end of the mount. Usually Watkins wrote his name at the 
end of these mounts. What might be called the Second Series of 
Watkins' stereos which Taber secured, were always mounted on printed 
mounts, bearing serial numbers. Usually these mounts bore a copy- 
right notice and on the reverse was printed a reproduction of the medal 
awarded at the Paris Exposition, being the first medal, according to 
Watkins, ever awarded for view photographs. 

Watkins' earlier stereos were all taken by what was then known as a 
stereo camera. The Hart stereos were also taken in the same way. In 



32 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

the "new series" of stereos a different system was adopted. Watkins 
had constructed a camera which would work a plate 5^''xl4''. Thus 
he made at each exposure two negatives approximately 5^''x7''. From 
these ends of his stereoscope plate he made prints, approximately 5x7, 
which he published as his "Boudoir Series," using the same plates for 
stereoscopic views by employing mats, properly cut out. He printed a 
certain portion from each negative for a stereo. In the catalog of his 
"new" series in certain instances two or more serial numbers are 
given, connected by brackets, as, for instance, 3013 and 3014. The 
meaning of this is that, using one mat, the proper portions of the 
large stereo negative were used for a certain view, as, for instance, 
3013, and hy repeating the process with another mat the stereoptic view 
3014 was produced. In at least one instance, the interior of the 
dining room of the Baldwin Hotel, three of these stereoptic pictures 
Avere printed from one negative. In my research in regard to photo- 
graphs and photographic methods I believe that this system of "Watkins 
was never used by any one except himself. 

"We have seen that Watkins had returned to San Francisco some time 
in the latter part of 1857, or the early part of 1858. The New York 
country boy was gifted with a deep love for nature. The young man 
who had been forced through circumstances to make good, in his mature 
years did more to introduce to the world and to perpetuate the scenic 
beauties of California than any other man who has lived in our State. 
In 1858 or 1859, he visited the Mariposa Grove. He was the first man 
who photographed the "Grizzly Giant." A print from that negative 
showing Galen Clark standing by the side of the "Grizzly Giant" is 
our first photographic reproduction of the sequoia gigantia. These 
trees had been drawn previous to that time and had been illustrated in 
Hutchings California Magazine and on old letter sheets, but "Watkins is 
entitled to the credit of having been the first man to photograph any of 
them. In 1861 "Watkins first visited the Yosemite "Valley and made the 
first 18x22 landscape photographs in California, if not in the world. 
In our present day photographic methods, it is almost impossible to 
understand the difficulties of the task and the indomitable energy and 
courage of the man who produced those pictures. Watkins had had 
constructed in San Francisco a camera sufficiently large for this class 
of work. From the window of his studio (on the southeast corner of 
Clay and Kearny streets) he made a test plate. This is quite likely 
his view "Over the Plaza." The next morning he set out on his pil- 
grimage. At that time travel to the Yosemite Valley was difficult and 
the "N-^alley itself accessible only by very crude trails. At least twelve 
mules were required to pack the outfit of the indomitable photographer. 
It must be -borne in mind that large glass plates formed a very impor- 
tant part of his equipment. The tent used in coating and developing 
these plates was a load for one mule. This young man was compelled 
to take five mules in his train carrying camera, tent, etc., around the 
Valley with him, from point to point. As each picture was made the 
tent had to be set up, the plates coated and then immediately exposed 
and at once developed. Photographic processes were slow, as also the 
exposure, which must necessarily be prolonged. One of the most 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER : C. E. WATKINS. 33 

beautiful pictures in this early series — a view of Sentinel Rock — was 
taken in the earl}^ morning light, with an hour's exposure, before the 
sun had risen on that part of the valley. Only by this method was it 
possible to have stillness among the leaves of the trees. These pro- 
longed exposures will explain why there is no detail in the foam indi- 
cated in the waterfalls, as is shown by the rapid processes of today. 
When "Watkins had finished his work on the floor of the Valley and 
wished to reach Sentinel Dome he was compelled to retrace his course 
for a considerable distance, down through the gorge toward Coulter- 
ville, and then gradually make trails backward until he reached the 
southern wall of the Great Valley. These old photographs are now 
extremely rare. 

It was Watkins' practice to devote a large portion of the summer to 
photographic trips to different parts of the State, leaving his gallery 
and studio in San Francisco in the hands of an assistant. Incidentally 
it may be mentioned that during the early 80 's while he was at 422 
Montgomery street, on the upper floor of the Austin Building, where he 
lived with his wife and children, he had as a printer a most capable 
Chinaman. This man whom Watkins had trained for this particular 
line of work, was careful and efficient. He became an ^ adept in 
"Silvering" the old albumen paper and in the difficult chemical man- 
ipulations required in early day photography. He got out the nega- 
tives and did the printing, while Mrs Watkins and an assistant 
attended to the business part of the establishment. It was along 
about this time that Watkins opened an elaborate establishment in one 
of the stores on the New Montgomery street side of the Palace Hotel. 
This room was handsomely carpeted and fitted up with solid walnut 
show cases, tables and easels for the display of the superb large photo- 
graphs that Watkins had made. These were of the new series. About 
this time Watkins made a continuous exhibition of his 18x22 views, 
(entirely filling the wall space and with center structures covered with 
views) in the second story of the Aquarium Building at Woodward's 
Gardens. It was his habit along about this time to sell many of his 
photographs already framed. These were always framed in heavy 
black w^alunt frames, usually with a gilt band close to the picture, 
which was always matted. He also sold his larger views in portfolio 
form. For some of his earlier stereos issued during the 60 's and 
perhaps as late as the early 70 's, he used a sliding cloth-covered card 
board box holding respectively one or two dozen. Along about that 
time these pictures were sold for $5.00 per dozen. 

In 1868 Watkins made his first Oregon trip. The stereos, probably 
something over a hundred in number, made along the Columbia River, 
were the first photographic reproductions of its scenery. At least 
this is the statement which Watkins made to me many years ago. 
Later, while working up his new series, Watkins again visited the north- 
west. His stereo series for this trip commence with No. 5201. It 
may be noted that it was Watkins' rule in numbering his negatives, to 
begin a series with the first unit of a new hundred or a new thousand. 
The reason for this was to allow filling in with subsequent negatives 
should they be made, in order that those relating to a particular locality 

3—35857 



34 NEWS NOTES OP CALIPOKNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

should, an far as possible, be numbered eouseciitivel,y. There are few 
exceptions to this rule, where San Francisco views may have been 
inserted. In the case of his Mission stereos, those of Carmel are listed 
nnder two serial numbers — this being the only instance of such dupli- 
cation. 

On his second trip to the northwest, Watkins visited the Port 
Blakeley Lumber Mills, where he made a number of stereoscopic views 
and also several 18x22 negatives. The series of Victoria, B. C, stere- 
oscopic views made at this time is extremely valuable, as showing 
marked development in that city. It was probably at the time of 
this trip that Watkins extended his journey to Montana, where he 
made a magnificent collection of large views, 18x22, of the Anaconda 
and other properties. It is interesting to recall that a part of the 
8x10 photographic work on this trip, unfortunately, was a failure. 
Watkins visited the lower levels of the mines for the purpose of making 
8x10 flash lights of the workings. He spent an entire day on this 
work. Part of his negatives were ruined through the inquisitiveness 
of some unknown parties drawing the slide in his plateholders, which 
he had left in the superintendent's office while he went to dinner. 
Other interesting views shoAving the Avorkings proved failures, owing to 
a condensation of moisture on the lens. Nevertheless a vast amount of 
historical material relating to Butte was gathered in pictorial form. 

It was in 1880 that Watkins made his first trip through southern 
California along the line of the Southern Pacific Railroad (later he 
went to the "End of the Track" and as far as Tucson, Arizona). 
This series of stereos commences with No. 4301, "The Loop Tehachapi 
Pass, S. P. R. R. " This series historically is of extreme interest, inas- 
much as we find a large number of the earliest photographic views of 
San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Pasadena, San Diego and coast towns 
when those places were in their infancy. In the series are many views 
of the vinewards, orange orchards, etc., which have been swept away 
by the town lot activities of southern California. In this series also 
is the extremely valuable collection of photographs of the various 
missions. It may be remarked that in all of Watkins' tours, with the 
exception of his first into the Yosemite Valley, he traveled with a two- 
horse Avagon in which he carried his paraphernalia and developed his 
negatives. While traveling on long reaches of the railroad his wagon 
was conveyed on a flatcar. On his first southern California trip 
Watkins returned in his Avagon from San Diego, following the old 
overland stage road the greater part of the Avay, and visiting most of 
the Franciscan missions. Not only did he make his stereoscopic pictures 
of these, but also a collection of 18x22 negatives. From the latter he 
made prints of varying sizes. This collection of mission views is the 
earliest general photographic collection of California Missions made. 
They are extremely valuable in showing details of construction which 
the hand of time has swept away. It must not be supposed that all 
of the mission stereos were made during this trip, there being a few 
exceptions. For example, those of Carmelo were taken during a photo- 
graphic visit to Monterey county and the Hotel Del Monte. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER : C. E. WATKINS. 35 

As previously iiientioiied, this series of stereos was made ou a series 
of negatives 5^x14. Consequently there were printed boudoir views 
of a very large portion. This especially applies to views of the mis- 
sions. Also Watkins issued printed lists of his stereoscopic negatives 
of this southern trip, which I am quite positive is the only printed list 
of his work that was ever issued. 

It has already been noted that Watkins obtained from Alfred A. 
Hart his series of 364 stereoscopic negatives showing the construction 
of the Central Pacific Railroad. These were progress pictures, and it 
seems to have been Hart's plan to go each successive season to the then 
terminus of the road, photographing the work in that vicinity as well 
as in sections which had not been visited on previous trips, and also 
filling in views of structures which had not been begun at an earlier 
period. This explains the view of the round house at Rocklin, which 
chronologically is not in its proper place in the list. 

Watkins purchased from Louis Heller the extremelj^ valuable small 
series of stereoscopic negatives relating to the Modoc war, which there- 
upon became a part of the Watkins series. These probably went to 
Taber. Heller was a local photographer in the northern part of the 
state. Fort Jones, and made a series of IModoc war negatives, including 
the portraits of the captive Modoc chiefs which were certified to hy 
General Jefferson C. Davis, and became the official pictures of the war. 
These are the ones which later passed into the possession of Watkins. 
Some time after the Modoc war Heller gave up the photographic busi- 
ness and destroyed all of his remaining negatives. Beautifully 
executed large portraits of Captain Jack and Scar Face Charley in 
the Watkins gallery were from these Heller negatives. 

During the development work of the Kern County Land Company 
Watkins visited Bakersfield, where he made a series of some seven 
hundred views on the Haggin and Tevis property. These were all 
8x10 negatives and were dry plates. This was probably his last large 
commercial job and long country trip. It is a matter of regret that I 
did not make a copy of but a small portion of Watkins' catalog of his 
larger negatives. About the only ones of these which I noted were his 
11x14 and 16x20 historical views of San Francisco. Nearly all of 
these are preserved in my collection. 

Specimens of the magnificent collection of large Tosemite Big Trees, 
Del Monte, Virginia City, Railroad and jMission views are extremely 
rare. Watkins' last work in a photographic way was the making of a 
series of 16x20 transparencies from selected negatives of these large 
views. This superb collection of most valuable subjects was lost in 
the 1906 fire, together with all but a very few of Watkins' negatives, 
which at the time were in my possession. But one of his 18x22 nega- 
tives exists — his copy of the first Admission Day celebration in San 
Francisco. Two or three of his earliest stereoscopic negatives and 
possibly three or four dozen 8x10 originals and copies remain sole sur- 
vivors of thousands of negatives representing a life work of forty years. 

The last photographic work done by Watkins was for Mrs Phoebe A. 
Hearst at her Hacienda, at which time the old gentleman realized that 
his eyesight was rapidly failing. The work then undertaken was 
never completed. 



36 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. [Jan. 1918 

The life-long- friendship betwe('n Carlton E. Watkins and CoUis P. 
Huntington are bright spots in the life histories of both men. During 
his youth Watkins' father kept a hotel at some small town in the 
state of New York. During that period Collis P. Huntington w^as 
making his living as a "tin" peddler. It was his habit when in that 
particular section of the state to make his headquarters at the Watkins' 
hotel. A life-long friendship grew up between the two young men. 
Both came to California. Huntington's activities were of a broader 
nature than those of his friend. During the construction and the early 
days of the Central Pacific Railroad, Watkins did a large amount of 
photographic work for the company, though for some reason this did 
not begin until after the making of the Hart series before referred to. 
Watkins made photographic reproductions of a great many plans and 
drawings for the engineering department and for other departments 
of the road. Only one or two of these are preserved in prints. Owing 
to the close friendship between Watkins and Huntington the making of 
bills for this work was a secondary consideration. Much of the work 
done was purely on the grounds of friendship, and no bills were ever 
presented. Watkins always traveled, and his outfit was transported, 
free. During the entire time that Collis P. Huntington was connected 
with the road Watkins was the recipient of annual passes. This return 
from the railroad was only a small recompense for the expenditure of 
time and material on the part of the friendly photographer. An amus- 
ing circumstance and one showing the magnificent fidelity of Collis P. 
Huntington may be instanced: As is well known, Huntington's activi- 
ties in connection with the railroad required his residence in New York, 
with an annual visit to San Francisco. On the occasion of one of these 
visits he found that a clerk in the Passenger Department, a most 
accomplished amateur photographer, had been making photographic 
copies of documents for the company, and also doing certain other 
photographic work for the corporation. In order that this work might 
be done more expeditiously rooms on the top floor of the Fourth and 
Townsend Street building had been well fitted up for operating pur- 
poses. When the railroad magnate discovered the photographer's shop 
in the building he at once ordered it closed and the clerk discharged. 
Incidentally it may be remarked, that the clerk was simply put back on 
his other work ; and while the room was closed some necessary railroad 
photographing was carried on there. Later this clerk retired from 
his clerkship, opened up business for himself and has done magnificent 
service for photograph}'- and for the railroad company which he served 
Avith fidelity. Probably no one knew Huntington's reason for ordering 
that clerk discharged and the company's photographic activities ended. 
Even his friend Watkins did not knoAV of the circumstance until some 
years later; and never profited financially by it. 

Watkins was a man who was deeply loved by those w^ho were, through 
his reserve, permitted to become his close friends. I recall but two 
portraits of him, one in which he posed in one of his stereos, taking the 
picture himself, personating a miner using a rocker ; the other a print 
from an amateur's film, showing the old man being led in his blindness 
along Ninth street on the morning of April 18, 1906, after he had been 
ordered from his studio, which was also his home, by the United States 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA PHOTOGRAPHER: C. E. WATKINS. 37 

troops, and just prior to tlie time when the fire swept out of existence 
his negatives and thousands of prints. He was a man of strong likes 
and dislikes. He had been helped financially and socially by some 
of the most prominent people of San Francisco and California. 
Naturally, he made some enemies. For those he had no charity, and 
never forgave those who injured him, and of whom he spoke in the 
harshest terms. He was always generous to a fault, but more of an 
artist than a business man, which accounts for his lack of financial 
success. He made enormous amounts of money from his photographic 
work, but through friends lost it all. 

During one of his trips to California CoUis P. Huntington arranged 
to have a small ranch in the Capay Valley deeded to Watlrins by the 
Railroad Company, as a partial recompense for the man's fidelity and 
unpaid-for labors. The last few years prior to 1906 Watkins lived in 
his studio on the top floor of the building on the southeast corner of 
Ninth and Market streets. Part of the time his wife, daughter and son 
lived with him. The greater portion of the time, however, the wife 
and son or daughter were away, most of this time at the Capay Valley 
ranch. The son attempted to help his blind father in his photographic 
work by making prints from negatives but was not very successful. A 
photographer* in the city volunteered to make these prints and assist 
the old gentleman in many ways where possible, making sales of his 
wares and cataloging and arranging his stock. At the time of the 
great fire the entire Watkins family was living at the studio. The wife 
and daughter went to a refugee camp at the Presidio. The blind old 
gentleman was led by his son to the home of the photographer, who for 
a few years had been helping to keep the Watkins bark afloat. There 
he was left by the son, to be cared for by the photographer friend, who 
took care of him almost continuously until the following October. The 
old gentleman was suffering from very bad ulcers on his legs, making 
it almost impossible for him to walk. Dr E. M. Bixby kindly and 
without price, dressed these ulcers, and D. H. Wulzen, a druggist, 
without cost, supplied the necessary medicine and dressings. A small 
amount of money Avas given to Watkins from the relief fund sent by 
the American Photographers Society for the rehabilitation of San 
Francisco photographers. Watkins visited Governor Pardee in Sacra- 
mento and "svas financially helped by him personally. 

About two weeks after he had been left by his son at the horne of the 
photographer friend referred to, the son called to see how his father 
was getting along. He was informed that the old gentleman had been 
placed, after some difficulty, in St. Joseph's hospital, where he would 
undoubtedly have been allowed to remain indefinitely. The son, how- 
ever, procured his removal to the hospital at the Presidio., Later on, 
a stranger appeared at the door of the friendly photographer with 
Watkins, who said "I have come to stay with you." 

In Octolier a lease having expired on the Capay Valley ranch, the 
Watkins family decided to go there, and through help of the Red Cross 
the blind photographer also went to his country home. 

*The photograplier mentioned here and later in this article is Mr. Turrill himself. — 
Editor. 



38 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 



MISCELLANY. 

THE PACIFIC COAST CONFERENCE ON RURAL EDUCATION AND 

COUNTRY LIFE. 

By Mrs Mat Dexter Hetstshall, School Library Orsanizer, California State Library. 

The Pacific Coast Conference on Rural Education and Country Life 
conducted by the United States Bureau of Education held its meeting 
at the California State Normal School, Chico, December 3d to 6th. 

J. L. McBrien, School Extension Agent, United States Bureau of 
Education, presided. Pour years ago he held a Rural Life Conference 
at Chicago. A year later one was held at Nashville, followed by others 
in subsequent years. He had the daring to start a National Country 
Life drive at St. Paul in September and the courage to carry it through 
by sectioning off the United States and continuing the meetings at 
the Hot Springs of Arkansas, then on to Denver, following that with a 
conference at Butte and ending with a big one at Chico, California. 

Among those scheduled to take part upon the program from outside 
of California were the state superintendents of "Washing-ton, Oregon, 
Nevada and Arizona. Dr A. E. Winship, editor Journal of Education 
Boston, Mass., and presidents and instructors from normal schools of 
Oregon, Washington and North Dakota. 

The normal schools of California were well represented. President 
Allison "Ware (U. S. A.), State Normal School, Chico, who was home on 
leave of absence attended the convention. It was a never-to-be- 
forgotten sight to see the soldier-president in the peaceful halls of his 
normal school. The audience was deeply stirred by his address of 
welcome yet over it all there seemed to hover a sense of unreality. 

He said he awakened mornings in his tent with the bewildered feel- 
ing that he was leading a dual life and that he had difficulty in deter- 
mining whether he was a schoolmaster or a soldier. 

Not only were the California state normal schools well represented 
but also man}^ cooperative forces throughout the state all aiding in the 
work for better rural schools and the improvement of country life. 

Among these forces were the commissioners of elementary and of 
secondary schools and of industrial and vocational education, various 
departments of the University of California, the State Library, county 
school superintendents, county librarians, California Congress of 
Mothers and Parent-Teacher Association, the rural church, "Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union, Children's Agent of State Board of 
Control, University Farm at Davis, and California Federation of 
"Women's Clubs. 

It was a convention filled to the brim with interest and an evident 
desire to winnow the wheat from the chaff and then spread throughout 
the United States all worth-while propositions that are applicable under 
varying conditions. 

Of it Dr. Winshii) said in an editorial in the Journal of Education, 
"Never, anywhere, under any leadership, so far as we can learn, have 
there been assembled for three days such a body of men and women 



vol. 13, no. 1] MISCELLANY. 39 

representing every phase of civic, industrial, social, religious and edu- 
cational country life problems, who were attacking these problems at 
first hand. ' ' 

The California County Free Library plan met Avitli decided favor. 
The fine record of the Butte County Free Library-, with the County 
Librarian in attendance at the convention, made it possible to give firet 
hand information directly to those seeking it. 

The excellence of the Butte County Free Library service to the 
schools was cited as an example of what is being done in many counties 
of California. For the year ending June 30, 1917, the Butte County 
Free Library furnished sixty-seven school districts having ninety-three 
teachers and two thousand one hundred eighty-three pupils with a 
circulation of thirty-three thousand four hundred seventy-seven books, 
one hundred sixty new maps, four hundred seven pictures, one hundred 
two music records, with a pooled school library fund of two thousand 
eight hundred two dollars. 

Throughout the convention speaker after speaker, representing the 
various activities, spoke in terms of highest praise of the far-reaching 
help of the county free libraries of California. 

In addressing a large evening audience during the convention ]\Ir 
McBrien said, "My job is to go over this gTcat nation of ours, learn the 
best plans in operation for improvement of rural life, and then give 
them the widest publicity possible." He then mentioned three such 
plans in operation in California, one of which he designated as, "Your 
wonderful county free library system. ' ' 

At the close of the session resolutions, drafted by representatives of 
five states, were adopted favoring the nine propositions included in the 
program of the United States Bureau of Education for the improvement 
of rural schools. The comity free library plan was one of these nine 
propositions. 

In addition to this the resolution also urged such legislative and 
administrative changes as may be necessary to make the nine proposi- 
tions effective throughout our country. 

Before adjourning President Allison Ware was called upon for a 
parting message which he gave in soul-stirring language. 

J. L. McBrien, School Extension Agent, United States Bureau of 
Education, who had commenced on the Atlantic coast this nation-wide 
campaign for better rural schools and the improvement of country life 
ended the last session of the campaign by declaring the Pacific Coast 
Conference adjourned. 

THE FIRST PUBLIC LIBRARY IN CALIFORNIA. 

By J. C. RowELL, Librarian, L^niversity of California Library. 

Eev Samuel Hopkins Willey was the founder not only of the first 
college, but also the first library, in California. In his manuscript 
Diary (preserved in the University of California Library) under date 
of April 8, 1850 appears the statement "Sent for library for the 
'i\Ionterey Library Association' by the mail of the first of March." 

In one of Dr Willey 's letters to Rev E. W. Gilman, of Lockport, 
N. Y., dated Monterey, April 26, 1850, we read: "The situation of a 



40 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan. 1918 

minister in California is peculiar. It is impossible in my town at least 
to depend on other people mueli. Others will do what they think they 
can, and for the rest the minister must provide for it somehow. B. g. 
Our library which we have sent for, the plan of which I proposed, 
required a great deal of work, in getting up the list of books, collecting 
the money, transmitting it, etc., etc. * * * Now when the question 
of having or not having these things depends on one's self at last, who 
that appreciates their influence and importance can forbear exerting 
himself for procuring them. ' ' 

How long the Monterey Library Association remained a living force 
in the community is doubtful, as its founder left in the fall of 1850 to 
take up his permanent residence in San Francisco. 

Note. — In connection with the first library it is interesting to note an extract from 
a letter on file in the California State Library. The letter written from Monterey, 
Alta California, and dated, March 1, 1850, says, "The people here are about to order 
700 or SOO volumes of books for a public library. They have collected $1,200 for the 
purpose." 

This letter was written by Joseph A. Benton, who came to California in 1849 and 
lived here until his death in 1892. He was pastor of the Sacramento Congregational 
Church from 1849 to 1863. He was one of the founders of the College of California, 
was a professor in the Pacific Theological Seminary in Oakland from 186.3-1892 and 
edited the Congregational publication "The Pacific" during that period as well as 
durmg the earlier years of ISol—^S. Mr Benton is the author of that early and now 
rare California pamphlet "California — as she was, as she is and as she will be," 
which was a printed copy of his Thanksgiving address delivered November 30, 18.50. 
(This is believed to be the first pamphlet published in Sacramento.) 

The letter, from which the above extract regarding the Monterey library is quoted, 
was written while Mr Benton was on a trip to Monterey for his health. — Editor. 

A LETTER FROM ANOTHER TEXAS LIBRARIAN. 

By E. Sue Goree, LTniversity of Texas Library. 

I came to California with a receptive attitude toward the county 
library system. My own state had, during the last legislature, passed 
a law patterned after the California law, and after having read it, 
talked it, and worked for it a bit, it is keenly interesting to see it in 
operation. 

I have been fortunate enough to work for several months in the Kings 
County Free Library — one of the counties in which every school in the 
county has joined the library. It is quite worth the pain of sloughing off 
a few standardized ideas to go out to the one-room rural schools in the 
midst of dreary looking sand wastes and inspect the books from which 
Young America — often onl}^ a few years removed from Japan or Portu- 
gal or Mexico — is drinking in the ideals of the New World; or to go 
into a country home, or spend an hour in a rural community branch and 
see the pleasure and appreciation of the heads of families at having 
comparatively easy access to new books on grafting, or 3IendeUsm, or 
The War, as their tastes may direct. 

The value of this system as a follow-up agency for quickening 
reforms, or for conducting public campaigns has impressed me greatly 
in Kings County. As soon as the "Red Cross" drive, the "Food Con- 
servation" campaign, or the "Libraries for Soldiers" drive is 
announced the Library is ready to aid in the work of informing the 
Public and crystallizing sentiment. The entire system naturally lends 
itself to expeditious and thorough publicity work. The State Librarian 
sends out calls to the County Librarian ; the County Librarian in turn 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



MISCELLANY. 



41 



appeals to her custodians; the custodians are in direct contact with 
' ' the people from the forks of the creek ' ' — to quote Texas politicians. 

At a first glance the California system is a marvelously organized 
machine for book distribution, planned and set in motion by a remark- 
able personality. Otherwise, such progress could not have been made 
in eight short years. Other states instituting the county system have 
much to learn if they would begin at the point which California has 
reached now. This is true, particularly, in the mechanical operation 
of the library. The breadth of the county sj^stem demands greater 
individual and social understanding on the part of librarians. To 
extend one 's work to county and country limits demands a great degree 
of flexibility. In order to do it well it may be necessary to violate some 
of the A. L. A. Catalog Rules, or even to leave in peaceful obscurity 
the full name of authors who prefer to be known by one Christian 
name only. The county worker must fiud her personal and mental 
equipment vivified and enlarged daily, and even though her work is 
hard, it is a ^'big hardness." The idea of the county library is too 
broad to engender a spirit of drudgery. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION MEETING 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y. 

JULY 1-6, 1918 





CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 




and 




CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIES 




MEETING AT HOTEL DEL MONTE 




JUNE 18-22, 1918 



42 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA, SHOWING COUNTIES. 



\DCL Morrc } 



SISKIYOU ! MODOC 



O .' SHASTA 1 

^9 l_ / LASSEN 



V 



J V TEHAMA , ; 

: -' c PLUMAS ^ 

s y ^' v , 

5 \SLtNN. BUTTt's /'■-•-_ 

5 ; [ ~ ' '1. Ao'v^'nwil^' 

\_.,\YOLoV' ■' "^LOORMJO., 

'''(i-rZTz:^ j^ '\ /tuouji«ne\ 

«i FKAMCISCO O V '^.^' '1^ J '■*. ^^ .^"^^i 



MONO 



^%'\,' \^ /- 

t\Vv TRESNO ^.r""*" I INYO 

_"■<• €_ ;_ _ _ _ ! - - 

, KERN i 



ITABARBMtAi 



SAN BERNARDINO 



' ^^KC^owr 



■J!!^•^'»^^)$AN«El£S; 



SS'N. _ 



IMPERIAL 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



LIST OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



43 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



statistics of July 1, 1917. 



County 



Income, 
1916-1917* 



Books, 
etc. 



to '^c*-® 

« o "" 
9 P O. 

nC So" 



Alameda 

Butte 

Colusa 

Contra Costa .. 

Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoc 

Monterey 

Napa 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino 

San Diego 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara. 
Santa Clara .— 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 



Miss Mary Barmby 

Miss Essae M. Culver 

Miss Louise Jamme 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeek 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle... 

Miss Laura Robson 

Miss Ida M. Reagan 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman.— 

Miss Blanche Chalfant 

Mrs Julia G. Babeock 

Miss Katharine Post Ferris 
Miss Miriam J. Coleord-— 

Miss Celia Gleason 

Miss Mary E. Glock 

Miss Winifred H. Bigley.— 
Miss Anna L. Williams — 

Miss Anne Hadden 

Not started 

Miss Dorothy L. Clarke.-. 

Joseph F. Daniels 

Lauren W. Ripley 

Miss Caroline S. Waters... 

Miss Jennie Hernnan 

Miss Hattie M. Mann 

Not started 

Miss Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Miss Stella Huntington 

Miss Minerva H. Waterman 

Not started 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn. 

Miss Clara B. Dills 

Not started 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines.. 

Miss Margaret Hatch 

Miss Estella De Ford 

Miss Alice Anderson 

Mrs Bessie Herrman Twaddle 

Miss Edna Holroyd 

Miss Julia Steffa 

Miss Eleanor Hitt 



41 



37 



Sept. 


26 


1910 


Sept. 


3 


1913 


.June 


8 


1915 


July 


21 


1913 


Mar. 


12 


1912 


April 


8 


1914 


May 


12 


1914 


Feb. 


6 


1912 


Sept. 


15 


1913 


Nov. 


16 


1910 


Jime 


4 


1912 


Sept. 


7 


1915 


Sept. 


5 


1912 


May 


3 


1910 


June 


6 


1910 


July 


8 


1915 


Aug. 


6 


1912 


Feb. 


9 


1916 


Sept. 


7 


1915 


Nov. 


8 


1911 


Oct. 


1, 


1908 


July 


14, 


1913 


April 


5, 


1912 


Mar. 


7 


1910 


July 


6, 


1915 


Sept. 


5, 


1912 


Feb. 


IS, 


1910 


July 


20, 


1912 


Oct. 


13, 


1916 


May 


10, 


1917 


June 


7, 


1915 


April 


6, 


1914 


May 


11, 


1916 


Aug. 


14, 


1911 


May 


9, 


1917 


Aug. 


8, 


1916 


Sept. 


8, 


1916 


June 


10, 


1910 


July 


3, 


1917 


April 


9, 


1915 


July 


12, 


1910 



$25,443 99 
11,990 09 

6,154 46 
15,725 26 
31,887 02 

5,432 67 
12,120 82 

4,100 03 

6,389 69 
19,333 33 
13,713 82 

4,285 99 
70,417 85 

9,737 15 
13,076 88 

1,000 00 
10,625 65 



49,239 
17,469 

3,953 
32,814 
48,756 

7,709 
10,625 
15,884 

6,57.? 
40,430 
31,220 

4,572 
157,088 
22,028 
28,688 

13,298 



5,073 40 
6,910 CO 
16,932 83 
15,350 49 
16,947 36 
10,825 OO 



5,547 



65,246 

20,346 

29,046 





4,674 16 
10,678 00 
13,223 87 

1,870 95 



4,324 



18,906 





9,270 07 
10,229 96 



11,079 
12,836 



10.403 30 



15,9 



6,683 00 

3,134 42 

18,340 45 



3,544 
3,373 

32,870 



9,848 51 
17,185 96 



8,396 
29,409 



$449,016 43 



751,249 



50 
99 
27 
63 

115 
25 
39 
56 
2S 
73 
33 
50 

263 

52 

5i 



70 



43 
67 
344 
97 
82 
37 



106 
44 



2,441 



59 
81 
40 
62 
166 
42 

loe 

56 
26 

104 
43 
46 

203 
47 
71 
44 
92 
58 
31 
81 
8S 
90 

125 
92 
95 
39 
69 
92 
64 

107 
99 
57 

158 
68 
36 
67 
25 

142 
34 



*The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1916. 



44 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



For this issue, statistics for the County Teachers' Libraries have been 
completely revised, the information having been taken from reports on 
file in the office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Only 
those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. 
For complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 
1917. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, l.!)8,297 sq. miles. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 2,.377,.549. 

Assessed valuation, .$3,722,000,407. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 240,131. 
Assessed valuation, .$2.59,.500,935 (tax- 
able for county, $237,-549,114). 

Alameda Co. Pkee Library, Oakland. 
^liss Mary Barmby, Acting Lib'u. 

During the quarter branches were 
established in the following school dis- 
tricts : Green and Sunol. 

The office of the county library was 
moved across the street from the Oakland 
Library building where it had been for- 
merly, to the room which had been the 
newspaper room of the Oakland Library. 
The newspaper room was transferred back 
to the main building. The county library 
headquarters are much larger than the 
room occupied before and many advan- 
tages are enjoyed in the new office. 

A meeting of the county library 
attendants was held in the county office 
on December 14. Twenty-two of the 
attendants were present. Miss Foley of 
the State Library addressed the meeting 
and told in her usual interesting manner 
of what was being done for the blind peo- 
ple by the State Library. Mr Foss, one 
of the County Supervisors, attended the 
meeting and spoke to the attendants and 
met them personally after the meeting. 
"Food consin'vation" was the general topic 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
of discussion and ways and means for 
helping the cause were discussed. 

Mary Barmby, 
Acting Librarian. 

Alameda Co. Teachers' Library, 
Oakland. Geo. W. Frick. Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1910-17, .$414, from i 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't 
paid for books $122.10. Located in Hall 
of Records. Open Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. ; Sat. 9 a.m. to 12 m. 

Total vols. 2424. Teachers 1623 : elem. 
1220; high 403. School districts: elem. 
44 (inch 1 jt. ) ; high: city 12; union 3. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools 1916-17, $30,001.46: elem. 
books $8183.44, apparatus $7071.43 ; high 
books and apparatus $15,346.59. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 113,940; high 39,550. 

Alameda. 

§11 Alameda Free Public Library. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'u. 

The principal matter of interest in our 
work in Alameda during the past few 
months is our new Children's Room. It 
is certainly a success, being patronized 
more and more by the little folks. The 
young lady, Miss Schulte, who had charge 
of the work for a short time, has left and 
Miss Macnamee has been appointed in 
her place. Many new books have been 
added to our already excellent collection. 

Mr Courtney Monsen, at present under 
the employ of the State University, 
devotes Saturday afternoons to the chil- 
dren, entertaining them with stereopticon 
lectures and stories. He is also conduct- 
ing a class for seventh and eighth grade 
pupils in library work on Friday evenings 
in tlio children's room. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



45 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Alameda — Continued. 
The work iu tlie other departineuts is 
going ahead iu a most satisfactory man- 
ner. Our work with the schools is on the 
increase. 

Maecella H. Kbauth, 

Librarian. 

Green School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Livermore). 

Green School Dist. Branch, Ala- 
irEDA Co. Free Library, was established 
Nov. 15, 1917. 

Hayward. 

Hayward [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Alameda Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Elizabeth Creelman, Lib'n. 

Twenty-five additional specimens have 
been added to the collection of moths and 
butterflys found within a radius o* five 
miles of Hayward. A collection of colored 
photographs of the wild flowers of this 
section is also being made. 

We are expecting that 191S will find 
the basement of the library finished and 
ready to install two private pioneer col- 
lections we have been promised as a 
nucleus for our museum. 

Elizabeth Creelman, 

Librarian. 

Oakland. 

§|iOAKLAND Free [Public] Library. 
Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

On November 17 the library was repre- 
sented at the meeting of the Second Dis- 
trict at Redwood City by Miss Barmby of j 
the County Department, and Librarian 
Greene, who spoke on the War Service 
Books of the Libraries. At the meeting 
of the First District on the evening of 
November 17 the Oakland Library was 
represented by a considerable number of 
its staff, ten or more being present. 

On November 22 a meeting was called 
at the Oakland Free Library of the East 
Bay Library people to hear Miss Edith 
Guerier of the Library Department of the 
Food Administration. Miss Guerier ex- 
pressed herself as pleased at what she 
found had been done in this region and 
particularly asked to have a photogi'aph 
taken of the exhibit of Indian Foods in 
the Oakland Library. Photographs were 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
subsetjueutly taken and she has expressed 
satisfaction at receiving them. 

On November 27 the Board of Library 
Directors opened bids on the Alden and 
Golden Gate Carnegie branches, the last 
two of the four in the Carnegie gift. By 
the device of calling for bids on both 
branches as one contract a considerable 
saving was made, and so, in spite of the 
high prices prevailing, none of the alterna- 
tives cutting down were necessary with 
minor exceptions, and the board was able 
to replace in the 23d avenue building two 
items that had been cut out to bring it 
within the required .$35,000. The 23d 
avenue building is approaching completion 
and will probably be readj' to move in 
before the end of February. It is planned 
to have opening exercises with music 
under the auspices of the local improve- 
ment clubs. 

Mrs Potter, chief of the Catalog De- 
partment of the library, asked to be put 
on half-time for six mouths in order that 
she might give time to the patriotic service 
in the matter of writing and publishing 
articles on Food Conservation. She has 
taken large interest in the matter and 
has spoken at a number of the women's 
clubs on the subject. The liorarian has 
worked closely with her iu this service. 
Exhibits have been continuously made in 
the library both of printed material, 
books, pamphlets, and documents, by 
posters on large bulletin boards, and of 
actual foods in the museum case. Substi- 
tutes for white flour with muffins made of 
them by the Mills College Department of 
Domestic Economy, and war candy made 
by a local confectioner, were some of 
these. 

In January a Book Drive for i-ecreation 
books for the Camps is being extensively 
planned for and it has been arranged that 
the Mobilized Women, of Oakland will 
undertake the collection of books while 
the library staff accepts the responsibility 
of sorting, listing, cataloging, and pre- 
paring for circulation, and shipping of 
books so gathered. 

The staff meetings during the quarter 
have been successful under the charge of 
a committee of the staff which prepares 



46 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
the program and conducts the meeting-. 
At that of NoA'ember 29 Mr Ferguson 
gave an interesting talk on the work of 
the State Library. 

The Civ-1 Service Board advertised for 
an e'^aminatiou for assistant librarian to 
take the place made vacant by Mr Bam- 
ford's resignation, but only one person 
registered for the examination. The rules 
of the board require at least two to make 
the examination competitive, and so has 
postponed the examination again until 
March 21. Meanwhile Miss Fenton con- 
tinues as acting head of the Reference 
Department. 

A great deal of work has been done 
during the quarter at the Oakland Public 
Museum. President Hubbard of the Li- 
brary Directors is an enthusiast on 
museum work and in particular in the 
matter of the habitat groups of wild ani- 
mals. Mr John Rowley, Director of the 
Museum, is an acknowledged expert in 
mounting these groups of animals so that 
they are of great scientific as well as 
artistic value. Dui'ing the fall a trip to 
Nevada by an expedition sent out by the 
museum resulted in the colle tion of five 
fine specimens of elk necessary for a 
group representing that animal. Sketches 
were made on the scene of the proper 
background of the group and collection of 
the foreground accessories under the direc- 
tion of Mr Rowley. The local lodge of 
Elks has undertaken the staging in the 
City Auditorium of a Sportsmen's Show 
from January 16 to 19, the proceeds of 
which will be used to supply the $2000 
or more it will take to mount this group, 
and, it is hoped, supply a surplus to be 
used as a nucleus of a building fund for 
a proper building for the museum. Ma- 
terial is on hand for several more such 
groups, grizzly bear, kodiak bear, Rocky 
Mountain sheep, Rocky Mountain goat, 
and wild blac'i goat. 

Chas. S. Gkeene, 

Librarian. 

Sunol. 

SuNOL School Dist. Branch, Ala- 
meda Co. Free Library, was established 
November 22, 1917. 



ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifly-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 309. 
Assessed valuation .$707,196 (taxable 
for county .$618,506). 

Alpine Co. Teachers' Library, Mark- 
leeville. Josephine Vallem, Co. Supt. 
Income 1916-17, $3, from i of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Am't paid for 
books $40.83. Located in Courthouse. 

Total vols. 70. Teachers 3 : elem. 3 ; 
high 0. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools, 1916-17, $42.99: 
elem. books $42.99. Vols, in elem. schools 
1267. 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class). 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 9086. 
Assessed valuation $6,719,872 (taxable 
for county $6,105,032). 

Amador Co. Teachers' Library, Jack- 
son. Mrs Sabra Greenhalgh, Co. Supt. 
Income for 1916-17, $34, from i of »2 fee 
for teachers' certificates. Am't paid for 
books $72.95. 

Total vols. 1225. Teachers 77 : elem. 
63 ; high 13. School districts : elem. 39 
(incl. 1 jt. ) ; high: union 2, jt. union 1. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1916-17, $2327.94: elem. 
books $1536.17; apparatus $214.56; high 
books and apparatus $577.21. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 21,702; high 20(J6. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 27,301. 
Assessed valuation $22,469,515 (taxable 
for county $20,320,630) . 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Essae M. Culver, Lib'n. 

During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished at Stirling City School District. 

Mrs O. L. Terry is now custodian of 
West Liberty Branch instead of Mrs C. N. 
Ahlstrom. 

Essae Culver, 

L'brarian. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



47 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 

r.lTTK Co. TeAOUEKS" LlMBARY. OkO- 

\ILLE. Mrs W. F. Rutlierfonl. Co. Supl. 
Est. 1SS9. lucome lOltl-lT. $r.i, from * 
of .$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't 
l)aid for books $60.26. Books cared for by 
County Free Library since Nov. 1913. 
Open Mon. to Sat. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Total vols. 260. Teachers 207: elem. 
lO.'i ; high -12. School districts : elem. 76 ; 
high ; city 1 ; union 3. Total expended 
for books and appai'atus for schools, 
1916-17, .$7730.87 : elem. books $3949.04, 
apparatus $635.66 ; high books and appa- 
ratus $3146.17. Vols, in schools : elem. 
48,147; high 3930. 

Chico. 

State Normal School Libraey. Alli- 
son B. Ware, Pres. Miss Dorothea Smith, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Dorothea Smith, formerlj'^ of 
"Woodland Public Library, became libra- 
rian, October 1. — Chico Enterprise, O 1 

Gridley. 

Gridley [Free] Pitblic Library and 
Branch, Butte Co. Free Library. Mrs 
Emma Sligar, Lib'n. 

The library is well patronized by the 
public and we are adding new books every 
month. 

Emma Sligar, 

Librarian. 

Stirling City School Dist. 
Stirling City School Dist. Branch, 
Butte Co. Free Library, was re-estab- 
lished October 17, 1917. 

West Liberty (P. O. and exp. Gridley). 

West Liberty Branch, Butte Co. 
Free Library. 

Sec note under Butte Co. Free Library. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 999 sq. mi. Pop. 9171. 
Assessed valuation $7,941,910 (taxable 
for county $7,443,255). 

Calaveras Co. Teachers' Library, 
San Andreas. Teresa Rivara, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $35, from * 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't 
paid for books, $11.70. Open daily except 
when visiting schools. 



CALAVERAS CO.— Continued. 
Total \ol.s. 448. Teachei's 72: elem. 63; 
high 9. School districts: elem. 48 (incl. 2 
jt. ) ; high: 2 union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$1457.49: elem. books $1113.61, appa- 
ratus ; high books and apparatus 
$343.88. Vols, in schools: elem. 23,610; 
high 16.54. 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 

County seat, Colusa. 

Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 7732. 

Assessed valuation $15,.394,796 (taxable 
for county $15,201,960). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Miss Louise E. Jamme, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established at the following school dis- 
tricts : Cortina. Glen Valley, Moulton, 
Pierce. 

Louise E. Jamme, 

Libraiian. 

Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin became tem- 
porary assistant on December 2, 1917. — 
Colusa Herald, D 4 

Colusa Co. Teachers' Library, Co- 
lusa. Perle Sanderson. Co. Supt. Est. 
a. 1890. Income 1916-17, $29, from * of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't 
paid for books $4.20. 

Total vols. 454. Teachers 82 : elem. 57 ; 
high 25. School districts: elem. 36 (incl. 
1 jt.) ; high : 1 dist., 2 union, 2 jt. union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1916-17, $2450.77: elem. 
books $1765.25, apparatus $115.63 ; high 
books and apparatus $569.89. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 24,963 ; high 5349. 

Cortina School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Arbuckle). 
Cortina School Dist. Branch, Co- 
lusa Co. Free Library, was established 
November 12, 1917. 

Glen Valley School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Williams). 
Glen Valley School Dist. Branch, 
Colusa Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 15, 1917. 



48 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



COLUSA CO.— Continued. 
Moulton School Dist. (P. O. Piinceton; 
no exp. office). 
Moulton School Dist. Branch, Co- 
lusa Co. Fkee Library, was established 
October 25, 1917. 

Pierce School Dist. (P. O. College City; 
no exp. office). 
Pierce School Dist. Branch, Colusa 
Co. Free Library, was established No- 
\euiber 12, 1917. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

( Sixteenth class. ) 
Couiily seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 31,674. 
Assessed valuation .$56,122,790 (taxable 
for county .$54,019,035). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established at Clayton and in the follow- 
ing school districts : Morgan Territory, 
Mt. Diablo, Oak Grove. 

Miss Helen Doane assistant in Contra 
Costa County Library for the past year, 
has resigned her position and will attend 
the University of California. She has 
secured part time work in the University 
Library. 

Alice G. Whitbeck, 

Librarian. 

Contra Costa Co. Teachers' Library 
AND Branch, Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library, Martinez. W. H. Hanlon, Co. 
Supt. Branch est. Sept. 1916. Income 
1916-17, $85, from i of $2 fee for teachers' 
certificates. Am't paid for books 5>J-7.50. 
Open Mon. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ; Sat. 9 a.m. 
to 12 m. 5 periodicals (1 from Co.) rec'd 
regularlj'. 

Total vols. ISOO. 'Teachers 286 : elem. 
234 ; high 52. School districts : elem. 54 ; 
high : 7 union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools 1916-17, 
.$5616.63 : elem. books $3685.55, apparatus 
; high books and apparatus $1931.08. 
Vols, in schools: elem. 43,883; high 7012. 

Clayton (Exp. Concord). 
Clayton Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library, was established Novem- 
ber 1, 1917. 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 
Hercules. 

Hercules Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library. 

This branch has been rehabilitated and 
was opened November 1, 1917. 

Morgan Territory School Dist. (P. O. 

Clayton; exp. Concord). 
Morgan Territory School Dist. 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established in November, 1917. 

Mt. Diablo School Dist. (P. O. Clayton; 
exp. Concord). 
Mt. Diablo School Dist. Branch, 
Contra Costa Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1917. 

Oak Grove School Dist. (P. O. Concord, 
R. P. D. ; exp. Concord). 
Oak Grove School Dist. Branch, 
Contra Costa Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1917. 

Pinole. 

Pinole Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library. 

'This branch has been moved to a small 
building provided by the custodian, Mrs 
Brandt. 

Richmond. 

Richmond [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Nora McNeill, Lib'n. 

The Richmond Public Library was rep- 
resented at the meeting of the Second 
District, at Redwood City, by Miss Wilsey, 
Miss Pickett, Miss Pearce, and Miss 
Griffins. 

Miss Wilsey resigned the librarianship 
of the Richmond Public Library, Janu- 
ary 1, to be married to Mr James A. 
McVittie of Richmond. 

Miss Nora McNeill, a graduate of the 
Illinois University School of Library Sci- 
ence, has been selected to succeed Miss 
Wilsey. Miss McNeill has had a number 
of years experience in Illinois and Texas, 
and for the past two years has been in the 
Berkeley Public Library and the Univer- 
sity of California Library. She comes 
with higli recommendations and will un- 
doubtedly push the Richmond Library 
forward to further successes. 

Della Wilsey McVittie. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



49 



DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat Crescent City. 
Area, 154G sq.-mi. Pop. 2417. 
Assessed valuation $5,042,089 (taxable 
for county $4,997,3890. 

Del Norte Co. Teachers' Library, 
Crescent City. Jos. M. Hamilton, Co. 
Supt. Est. 1892. Income 1916-17, $4, 
from i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Am't spent for books $7.35. 

Total vols. 500. Teachers 28: elem. 
22 ; high 6. School districts : elem. 16 ; 
high : 1 county. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916—17, 
$1252.75 : elem. books $626.63, apparatus 
$2()7.27 ; high books and apparatus 
$358.85. ^'ols. in schools : elem. 7882 ; 
high 2350. 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

( Forty-fifth class. ) 
Coiiuly seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 7492. 
Assessed valuation $7,328,185 (taxable 
for county $7,011,9SO,) . 

El Dorado Co. Teachers' Library, 
Placerville. S. B. Wilson, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1880: Destroved bv fire May, 1910 ; 
re-esi. Income 191(j-17, $42, from i of $2 
fee for teachers' certificates. Am't paid 
for books $18.75. 

Total vols. 444. Teachers (iG : elem. 60 ; 
high (I. School districts: elem. 52 (inch 
2 jt. ) : high: 1 county. Total expended 
for liooks and apparatus for schools, 
1916-17, $977.51 : elem. books $624.68. 
apparatus $221.06; high books and appa- 
ratus $131.77. Vols, in schools : elem. 
25,1 N6: high 1451. 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5940 sq. mi. Pop. 75,657. 
Assessed valuation .$99,386,409 (taxable 
for county $93,342,023). 

Fresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
.Aliss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Alameda, Burrel, Cantua, Crescent, For- 
tuna, Fowler, Fresno Colony, Manning, 
Parlier. 

4—35857 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

lu Noveml;er the County Board of Edu- 
cation held district institutes and we were 
asked to speak to the teachers on the 
work of the County Library with the 
schools. We were very glad to avail our- 
selves of this opportunity and feel that 
much good was accomplished by the talks 
given at the eleven 'nstitutes attended. 
We now have ninety-one school districts 
co-operating with the County Library. 

The annual custodians' meeting was 
held at the central library on the eighth 
of November and was attended by twenty 
of the custodians. This meeting is looked 
forward to by the custodians as a place 
where their mutual problems may be dis- 
cussed. The meeting this year was espe- 
cially important as we are changing from 
the Browne to the Newark charging sys- 
tem throughout the county and it was 
possible to make explanations to all at 
once. 

A new work room has been fitted up in 
the basement of the central library and the 
school and branch departments have moved 
into 't. This room 's large and gives 
ample space in which to cari-y on the 
work. 

An archway has been cut between the 
children's room and a room formerly used 
for magazines, making a large, light room 
for the children. Additional tables and 
chairs have been placed in the new part 
and the children are enjoying their new 
quarters very much. 

Miss Dorotha Davis has resigned her 
position as assistant in the County Li- 
brary to become librarian of the Presno 
High School. She begins her new" work 
the first of .January. 

Sarah E. McCardle, 

Librarian. 

Fresno Co. Teachers' Library, 
Fresno. E. W. Lmdsav, Co. Supt. In- 
come 1916-17, $197, from | of .' ^ fee for 
teachers' certificates. Am't paid for 
books 0. Books in charge of Co. Free 
Library, 1868 vols, having been tumed 
over, Sept. 1915. Office open every week 
day. Located in Courthouse. 

Total vols. 3868. Teachers 724: elem. 
573 ; high 1.51. School districts : elem. 
1.54 (inch 8 jt.) ; high: 2 district, 8 
union, 4 jt. union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$20,980.75: elem. books $7328.-50, appa- 
ratus $2292.51 ; high books and apparatus 



50 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 
$]],on'.t.74. ^'()ls. in seliools : eleui. 
118,003; high 19,321. 

Alameda School Dist. (P. O. Sanger, 
R. B. ; exp. Sanger). 
Alameda School Dist. Beancii, 
Fresa'o Co. Free Library, was estal)- 
lished October 4, 1917. 

Burrel. 

BuRREL School Dist. Branch, Fresno 
Co. Feee Library, was established No- 
vember 20, 1918. 

Cantua School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Tranquillity). 

Cantua School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 17, 1917. 

Crescent School Dist. (P. O. Wheatville; 
exp. Riverdale). 
Crescent School Dist. Branch, 
P^RESNO Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 23, 1917. 

Fortuna School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Parlier). 
Fortuna School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 7, 1917. 

Fowler. 

Fowler School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 9, 1917. 

Fresno Colony School Dist. (P. O. and 
exp. Fresno). 
Fresno Colony School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 27, 1917. 

Manning School Dist. (P. O. Fresno, 
R. F. D.; exp. Fresno). 
Manning School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 6, 1917. 

Parlier. 

Parlier School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 5, 1917. 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1400 sq. mi. Pop. 7172. 
Assessed valuation $17,391,600 (taxable 
for county $17,034,772). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Miss Laura Robson, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established in the following school dis- 
tricts : Bayliss, Calumet, Chrome, C"trona 
Park, Grapevine, Hamilton City, Jacinto, 
Kanawha, Liberty, Mcintosh, Marion, 
Newville, Union, Walsh. 

Glenn County held its first county fair 
in October, and the library was repre- 
sented by a display in connection with the 
rest room. 

The County Librarian gave a talk on 
California authors at the Bayliss Domes- 
tic Science Association, and a book review 
at the Ord Bend Club in October. 

Mrs Henshall was in the county the 
first part of November to help explain to 
the schools the plan of county free library 
service. 

Laura Robson, 

Librarian. 

Glenn Co. Teachers' Library, Wil- 
lows. S. M. Chanev, Co. Supt. Est. 
1889. Income 1916-17, $31, from * of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't 
paid for books $40.88. 

Total vols. 932. Teachers 84 : elem. 
70 ; high 14. School districts : elem. 42 
(incl. 1 jt. ) ; high: 1 county, 1 jt. union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools. 1916-17, $2846.81: elem. 
books $1335.40, apparatus $300.55 ; high 
books and apparatus $1204.86. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 26,494; high 1905. 

Bayliss School Dist. (P. O. Glenn; 
exp. Willows). 

Bayliss School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 17, 1917. 

Calumet School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Orland). 
Calumet School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 24, 1917. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



51 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 
Chrome School Dist. (P. O. Millsaps; 
exp. Fruto). 
Chrome School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 1, 1917. 

Citrona Park School Dist, (P. O. and 
exp. Orland). 
Citrona Park School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library was estab- 
lished October 26, 1917. 

Grapevine School Dist. (P. O. Stony- 
ford; exp. "Willows). 
Grapevine School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 31, 1917. 

Hamilton City. 

Hamilton City School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 14, 1917. 

Jacinto School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
WiUows). 
Jacinto School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 31, 1917. 

Kanaw/ha School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Willows) . 
Kanawha School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 14, 1917. 

Liberty School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Willows). 
Liberty School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, Avas estab- 
lished November 10, 1917. 

Mcintosh School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Hamilton City). 
McIntosh School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 14, 1917. 

Marion School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Fruto). 
Marion School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 6, 1917. 

Newville School Dist. (Exp. Orland). 
Newville School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 21, 1917. 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 
Union School Dist. (P. O. Alton; 

exp. Willows). 
Union School Dist. Branch, Glenn 
Co. Free Library, was established No- 
vember 22, 1917. 

Walsh School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Hamilton City). 

Walsh School Dist. Branch, Glenn 
Co. Free Library, was established Octo- 
ber 31, 1917. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 33,857. 
Assessed valuation $32,940,942 ( taxable 
for county $.31,926,017). 

Humboldt Co. Free Library^. Miss 
Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

During- the quarter a branch- was 
established at Dyerville. 

On December 1 the Alton branch was 
moved to the home of Mrs Grant Clark, 
who is now custodian. 

G. C. Perkins has become custodian of 
the Holmes branch, which was moved to 
Mr Gobel's store, December 1. 

The store in which the Pepperwood 
branch was located was destroyed by fire 
on December 10 and 68 books were lost. 
Since then, however, the branch has been 
reopened . 

James Dougherty has taken the place 
of C. A. Look as custodian of Scotia 
branch. 

Mrs George Smith succeeded Theo. 
Vanderboort as custodian of Willow 
Creek branch, December 1. Branch was 
moved to hotel. 

Ida M. Reagan, 

Librarian. 

Humboldt Co. Teachers' Library. 
Eureka. Geo. LTnderwood, Co. Supt. 
Income 1916-17, $78, from * of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Am't paid for 
books, $67.62. 

Total vols. 878. Teachers 247 : elem. 
206 ; high 41. School districts : elem. 
107 ; high : 2 city, 1 dist, 2 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $7739.21: elem. books 
$3384.59, apparatus $331.98; high books 
and apparatus $4022.64. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 55,477; high 6852. 



52 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



HUMBOLDT CO.— Continued. 
Alton. 

Alton Branch, Humboldt Co. FIsee 
Library. 

aS'pc note under Humboldt Co. Free 
Tvibrary. 

Bull Creek (No exp. office). 
Bull Ckeek Branch, Humboldt Co. 
Free Library, was discontinued Dec. 17, 
1917. This territox-y is now served by the 
Dyerville Brancli. 

Dyerville (Exp. South Fork). 
Dyerville Branch, Humboldt Co. 
Free Library, was establislied Decem- 
hev 17, 1917. 

Holmes (No exp. office). 
Holmes Branch, Humboldt Co. Free 

I/TBRARY. 

See note under Humboldt Co. Free 
Lila-arj'. 

Pepperwood (Exp. Scotia). 

Pepperwood Branch, Humboldt Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Humboldt Co. Free 
1 library. 

Scotia. 

Scotia Branch, Humboldt Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Humboldt Co. Free 

Library. 

Willpw Creek (No exp. office). 

Willow Creek Branch, Humboldt 
Co. Free Library. 

aSVc note under Homboldt Co. Ffee 
hihvavy. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Thirtj'-sixth class.) 
County seat. El Centre. 
Area, 4140 sq. mi. Pop. 13,591. 

Assessed valuation .$.>0,09r),403 (taxable 
for county if27,9.S4,4O0 ) . 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

During- the quarter branches have been 
established at Camp John H. Beacon, 
Calipatria, and in the following school 
districts : Alamorio, Rose. 

A meeting of custodians was held De- 
cember 8, 1917. Six custodians attended. 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
'The morning- session was devoted to in- 
struction from the County Librarian on 
better branch work. The matter of bulle- 
tin exhibits on war time subjects was 
explained. Each custodian was given an 
allotment of scrap books to make for the 
soldiers. They were urged to continue the 
collecting of books for the soldiers' libra- 
ries. In the afternoon the Chairman of 
the Food Conservation spoke to them on 
the work of co-operating with the chair- 
man in each town in this work. The High 
School Domestic Science teachers also 
gave a talk on how they could help the 
librarians in this food conservation work. 

The County Library moved into new 
quarters in the El Centro High School 
in December. 

The library is planning window exhibits 
to aid in food conservation. Some of the 
exhibits will be wheat and bread ; gardens ; 
oils and fats ; meat substitutes ; garbage 
waste ; knitting ; and sugar. 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, 

Librarian. 

A new Carnegie building is being 
erected at Calexico branch and will be 
completed about February 1. — Calexico 

Chronicle, N 27 

Imperial Co. Teachers' Library, El 
Centro. A. P. Stibley. Co. Supt. Be- 
came part of Co. Free Library, June 30, 
1914. Income 1916-17, $93, from i of 
.$2 fee from teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books $58.14. Located in Im- 
perial Co. Free Library headquarters. 

Total vols. 350. Teachers 225: elem. 
1G7 ; high 58. School districts : elem. 51 ; 
high : 6 un'on. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, $5460.42 : elem. 
books, $2358.06, apparatus $174.35; high 
books and apparatus $2928.01. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 13.285; high 4145. 

Alamorio School Dist. (P. O. Brawley). 
Alamorio School Dist. Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was established 
January 1, 1918. 

Calexico. 

Calexico Branch, Imperial Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Imperial Co. Free 
Librarj^ 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



53 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
Calipatria. 

Calipatkia Bkanch, Imperial Co. 
Fkee Library. 

This bi'anc4i was reopened December 1, 
1U17. 

Camp John H. Beacon (P. O. and exp. 
Calexico). 
Camp John H. Beacon Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was established 
December 1, 1917. 

Rose School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Imperial). 

Rose School Dist. Branch, Imperial 
Co. Free Library, was established No- 
vember 14, 1917. 

INYO COUNTY. 

( Forty-seventh class. ) 
County seat. Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. G974. 
Assessed valuation .$10,797,2GG (taxable 
for county .$9,463,426). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independence. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Lib'n. 

Miss Minnie K. Brown who had been 
cataloging in Inyo for three months left 
the last of November to resume her 
former position in the public library at 
North Yakima, Washington. 

Blanche Chalfant, 

Librarian. 

Inyo Co. Teachers' Library and 
Branch, Inyo Co. Free Library, 
Bishop. Mrs M. A. Clarke, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Branch est. May 8, 1917. In- 
come 1916-17, .$22. from i of .$2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Am't paid for 
books 0. 

Total vols. 12.J. Teachers 50' : elem. 36 ; 
high 14. School districts : elem. 26 ; high : 
4 union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools .$1.536.24 : elem. 
books $620.85, apparatus .$3.75; high 
books and apparatus $911.64. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 6189 ; high 4145. 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 37 715. 
Assessed valuation $90,482,114 ( taxable 
for county $82,934,274). 



KERN CO.— Continued. 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield, 
Mrs .Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Branches have been established at the 
following school districts : Aztec, Bower- 
bank, Lerdo, Old Town, and Weldon. — 
Bakersfield Echo, O 9 

Branches have been established in the 
following school districts : Kernville, Lost 
Hills, and Rockpile. Rockpile will also 
be given community service. — Bakersfield 
Californian, O 17 

Other branches have been established at 
the following school districts : Blake, 
Granite, Rosedale. — Bakersfield Echo, 
N 18 

Branches have also been established in 
these school districts : Fairview, Poplar, 
and Rio Bravo. — Bakersfield Echo, D 4 

Kern Co. Teachers' Libr'ary, 
Bakersfield. L. E. Chenoweth, Co. 
Supt. Annual income 1916-17, $117. 
Amt. paid for books $84.36. 

Total vols. 735. Teachers 326 : elem. 
266 ; high 60. School districts : elem. lOO ; 
high : 2 district, 3 union ; 1 jt. union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1915-16, $6627.56: elem. 
books .$2823.70, apparatus $1708.79 ; high 
books and apparatus $2095.07. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 63,554 ; high 4186. 

Bakersfield. 

§Beale Memorial [Free Public] Li- 
brary. Miss Sarah E. Bedmger, Lib'n. 

The circulation from the Beale Library 
and the East Bakersfield branch for the 
quarter ending December 31, 1917, was 
22,810, and Ave have added about three 
thousand books. 

The Board of Library Trustees at their 
January meeting raised the salaries of all 
employees (except the librarian) 10 per 
cent of their present salary to date from 
January 1, 1918. 

Miss Elsie .Jaynes of East Bakersfield 
was appointed on the substitute list on 
half time and pay. 

Sarah E. Bedinger, 

Librarian. 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1257 sq. mi. Pop. 16,230. 
Assessed valuation $17,530,180 (taxable 
for county $16,928,595). 



54 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



KINGS CO.— Continued. 

Kings Co. Feee Libeaby, Hanfobd. 
Miss Katharine Post Ferris, Lib'n ; Miss 
Mabel Coulter, Acting Lib'n. 

Miss Katharine Post Ferris, the libra- 
rian, who has been acting librarian of San 
Diego County Free Library since June, 
will return February 1. Miss Coulter 
will continue as acting librarian of Kings 
County until that time. 

Miss E. S. Goree, formerly librarian of 
the Extension Department of the Uni- 
versity of Texas, who is making a study 
of the county library system of California 
with the expectation of doing county 
library work in Texas, came to Kings 
County Library as an assistant. Octo- 
ber 15. 

In addition to the regular work, various 
war activities have been undertaken this 
quarter. The acting librarian has served 
as chairman of Information and Library 
Service for the Women's Committee of 
the County Council of Defense, assisted 
in the Food Pledge Campaign, and in the 
collection of the $443.55 donated by 
Kings County to the Camp Library Fund. 

Custodians and teachers have made 187 
visits to the county office, and the acting 
librarian has made 21 visits to branches 
and schools. 

Mr Wallace Sullivan has been appointed 
Farm Advisor for Kings County. The 
County Library will work with Mr Sulli- 
van as soon as his plans are definitely 
outlined. 

IMabel Coulter. 
Acting Librarian. 

KiNGvS Co. Teacheks' Libkaey and 
Branch, Kings Co. Free Library, Han- 
ford. J. H. Meadows. Co. Supt. Est. 
1903. Became Branch Kings Co. Free 
Library, Nov. 26, 1915. Income 1916-17, 
$62, from i of $2 fee for teachers' certifi- 
cates. Amt. paid for books $75. 

Total vols. 141. Teachers 135 : elem. 
107 ; high 28. School districts : elem. 40 
(incl. 2 jt.) ; high: 3 union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $4271.89: elem. books 
$2576.11, apparatus $149.27; high books 
and apparatus $1546.51. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 11,240; high .5672. 

Hanford. 

§Hanford Free Public Library and 
Branch. Kings Co. Free Library. Miss 
Eunice D. Steele, Lib'n. 



KINGS CO.— Continued. 
H anf ord — Continued. 

The campaign for the War Library 
fund was very successful in Hanford, the 
amount collected being $237.50, which was 
about one hundred dollars more than the 
amount apportioned. Two shipments of 
162 gift books donated by patrons of the 
library have been sent to Camp Kearny 
within the past three months. Over a 
thousand magazines have been gathered 
and donated to the Red Cross. 

The librarian has arranged special col- 
lections on subjects of present interest 
during the war, and has paid particular 
attention to new and attractive juvenile 
books. Story-hours have been very suc- 
cessful, as many as 60 children attending, 
and a noticeable increase in the circula- 
tion of juvenile books has resulted. He- 
cent fiction and magazines are now being 
issued for one week instead of two. 
Eunice D. Steele, 

Librariao. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5526. 
Assessed valuation $4,963,849 (taxable 
for county $4,942,119). 

Lake Co. Teachers' Library, Lake- 
port. Minerva Fer^Tison, Co. Supt. In- 
come 1916-17. $19, from i of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for books 
$19.70. 

Total vols. 384. Teachers 56 : elem. 
45 ; high 11. School districts : elem. 36 ; 
high : 3 union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$836.15: elem. books $466, apparatus 
$.55.25 ; high books and apparatus 
.$314.90. Vols, in schools: elem. 16,179; 
high 1447. 

Lakeport. 

Lakeport [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Kate M. White, Lib'n. 

Mrs L. Sailor has contributed 43 books 
to the library recently, and a number of 
books belonging to the late Mrs N. A. 
French have also been received. — Lakeport 
Press, D 22 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



55 



LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 4802. 
Assessed valuation $8,189,314 (taxable 
foi- county $8,015,218). 

Lassen Co. Free Libraky, Susan- 
ville. • Miss Lenala A. Martin, Acting 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established at Edgemont and Milford. 

Two County Free Librarj^ signs Vv-ere 
phiced at branches. 

The librarian made two visits to- two 
branches. 

Westwood branch was moved from the 
telephone office to the Community Church 
with Rev. A. A. Green as custodian. The 
reading room will be open all day. 

Lenala A. Martin. 
Librarian. 

Lassen Co. Teachers' Library, 
Susanville. F. Brunhouse. Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Joined Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. Oct. 25, 1915. Income 1916-17, 
$35, from i of $2 fee for teachers' cer- 
tificates. Am't. paid for books 0. 

Total vols. 80. Teachers 65 : elem. 57 ; 
high 8. School districts : elem. 45 ; high : 
1 dist., 1 union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$1502.29: elem. books $1201.33, appa- 
ratus $39.99 ; high books and apparatus 
$320.97. Vols, in schools: elem. 15,438; 
high 1153. 

Edgemont (No exp. office). 
Edgemont Branch. Lassen Co. Free 
Library, was established November 12, 
1917. 

Milford (No exp. office). 
Milford Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library, was established October 15, 1917. 

Westwood. 
Westwood Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Lassen Co. Free Librarv. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 3957 sq. mi. Pop. 504,131. 
Assessed valuation $1,001,443,960 (tax- 
able for county $810,227,315. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

IjOS Angeles Co. Free Library. Los 
Angeles. Miss Celia Gleanson, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished at Antelope, Culver City, Domin- 
guez, and Manzana, and in the following 
school districts : Antelope, Fairmont, 
Fruitland, Honby, Hyde Park, Jefferson, 
Manzana. Norwalk, The Palms, San 
Marino, Somerset, and Wilsona. 

Celia Gleason, 

Librarian. 

Los Angeles Co. Teachers' Library 
AND Branch, Los Angeles Co. Free 
Library, Los Angeles. Mark Keppel, 
Co. Supt. ; Miss Mattie Fara:o, Lib'n. 
Est. 1889. Joined the Co. Free Library, 
May 0, 1914. Income 1916-17, $1825, 
from i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Amt. paid for books $1825. 

Total vols. 8662. Teachers 4613 ; elem. 
3083; high 1.530. School districts: elem. 
158 (incl. 1 jt.) ; high: 28 city, 4 dist., 
18 union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools, 1916-17, $73,- 
828.60: elem. books $29,261.22, apparatus 
$7027.27 ; high books and apparatus 
$37,540.11. Vols. in schools : elem. 
239,486; high 119,429. 

Alhambra. 

Aliiambra [Free] Public Library. 

Miss Agnes McMillan resigned her posi- 
tion as first assistant for an appointment 
in the office of the Quartermaster General 
at Washington, D, C. ; Miss Hazel Reeves, 
assistant, for a position in the Los Angeles 
Public Library. Miss Alice McWilliams, 
of the Riverside Library Training School, 
and Miss Irene Kent, of the Syracuse 
University Library Training School, have 
been appointed to fill the resulting vacan- 
cies. Mrs Mary P. Smith, librarian, has 
resigned to accept a position with the 
Oregon State Library Commission. 

Antelope. 

Antelope Branch, Los Angeles Co. 
Free Library, was established in October, 
1917. 

Antelope School Dist. Branch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in July, 1917. 

Culver City. 

Culver City Branch, Los Angeles 
Co. Free Library, was established in 
November, 1917. 



56 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Dominguez. 

DoMiNGUEz Branch, Los Angeles 
Co. Free Library, was establislied in 
July, 1917. 

Fairmont School Dist. 

Fairmont School Dist. Branch, 
liOS Angeles Co. Free Library, was 
established iu December, 1917. 

Fruitland School Dist. 

Fruitland School Dist. Branch, 
Los Angeles Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1917. 

Giendaie. 

Glendale Free Public Library. Mrs 
J. C. Danford, Lib'n. 

Oiu- recent improvement is in the nature 
of a branch. Tropico has been annexed 
and their library automatically became a 
branch of the Glendale Public Library. 
We hope to make extensive improvements. 
Alma J. DxInford, 

Librarian. 

Honby School Dist. 
IIoNBY School Dist. Branch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in November, 1917. 

Hyde Park. 

Hyue Park School Dist. Branch, 
Los Angeles Co. Free Library, was 
established in September, 1917. 

Jefferson School Dist. 

Jefferson School Dist. Branch, 
Los Angeles Co. Free Library, was 
established in December, 1917. 

Long Beach. 

§11 Long Beach [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Zaidee Brown, Lib'n. 

The library gave its annual exhibit in 
the children's room of juvenile books suit- 
able for Christmas gifts. Last year we 
found that the public had difficulty in find- 
ing the books in the stores, so this year 
we made early preparations to overcome, 
this difficulty. In the summer Miss Scales. 
the children's librarian, made out a list 
of books to be included in the exhibH. and 
showed it to each book dealer in town. 
Each man chose the books that he would 
carry in stock. The library made dupli- 
cate lists for distribution of the books 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued, 
carried by each store, with the name of 
the store at the top. Packages of these 
lists were hung near the exhibit in the 
children's room, and were also furnished 
to the dealers to give out at the stores. 
The exhib't was opened November 1, a 
month earlier than last year, and this 
'4ave time to order from a distance any 
books not carried by the local dealers. 

In October, one of the best exhibits we 
have had was shown in the art gallery. 
This was a collection of paintings by con- 
temporary American artists, loaned from 
the private collection of Mr and Mrs 
William Preston Ha'Tison, of Los Angeles. 
This was followed in November by the 
fall exhibit of the California Art Club. 
On November 27, Miss Alma May Cook, 
a member of the club, gave an interesting 
talk 'n the gallery on the artists repre- 
sented. 

Since December 8, frequenters of the 
gallery have been enjoying a fine collec- 
tion of Japanese prints loaned by the 
County Art Museum, and some beautiful 
water coloi-s by Carl Oscar Borg and 
Grace E. McKinstry. 

Friends of art in this city are rejoicing 
in the gift to the library of two paintings 
for the art gallery, the beginning we hope 
of a permanent collection. They were 
presented by Mr and Mrs William Preston 
Harrison, and formed part of the first ex- 
hibit noted above. One is a view of woods 
in winter, by Alfred Jansson ; and the 
other is a scene on the Atlantic coast, by 
Wilson Irvine. 

WAR libraries. 
The allotment assigned to this library, 
for the million-dollar fund for libraries for 
soldiers, was .$750. The amount raised 
w^as .$TGG.78, and later .$2.00 was brought 
iu, making the total $768.88. A number 
of books have also been given. 

Zaidee Brown, 

Librarian. 

. I'lans for an addition to the library 
building have been drawn up and sent to 
Andrew Carnegie. These are presented 
as the basis for the request that Carnegie 
donate funds for such a building. — Long 
Beach Telegram, D 8 



1 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



57 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles. 

.t§Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
braky. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The class of 1918 commenced work on 
October 1 with the best record of any class 
so far in educational and professional 
preparation. Eigiit members are college 
graduates ; six others have liad fx'om one 
to three years of college work ; seven come 
with a background of library exi^erieuce. 

The following students comprise the 
Class of 1918 : Amelia Babcock, B. A., 
Universitj'- of Kansas, Los Angeles. 
Dorothy Dobbings, 2 years Stanford Uni- 
versity, Soldiers' Home, Cal. Dorothy 
Dyar. B. A., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles. Florence Slarr 
Elsey, B. A., Stanford University, Palo 
Alto, Cal. Louise Wilbur Emmons, 1 
year Oregon Agricultural College, Los 
Angeles. Geraldine Graham, 1 year 
Colusa County Free Libi'ary, Colusa, Cal. 
Marion Louise Gregory, 2 years Pomona 
College, Whittier, Cal. Frank Helm Hout, 
1 year Oregon Agricultural College ; 3 
years Oregon Agricultural College Li- 
brary ; Corvallis, Oregon. Genevieve 
Kelly, B. A., University of California, San 
Diego, Cal. Gladys .Julia Kuowlton, B. A., 
Stanford University, Pasadena, Cal. 
Sidney Anne McClees, B. A., Pomona 
College, Los Angeles. Helen Camp Mc- 
Donald, B. A., Pomona College, Long 
Beach, Cal. Gertrude McLaughlin, 2 
years University of Southern California ; 
1 year UniA^ersity of Southern California 
Library, Los Angeles. Elza Miller, Los 
Angeles. Gabrielle Morton, 3 years 
Paducah Carnegie Public Library, Padu- 
cah, Kentucky. Isabelle Laugille Park, 
3 years Stanislaus County Free Library, 
Modesto, Cal. Lucia Railsback, 1 year 
Washington Agricultural College ; 1 year 
National Park Seminary .Junior College, 
JjOS Angeles. Mildred Elizabeth Schaer, 
B. A., Occidental College, West Alham- 
bra, Cal. Geraldine Shipley, 1 year Long 
Beach Public Library, Long Beach, Cal. 
Elizabeth Williams, 2 years Hollywood 
Junior College, Hollywood, Cal. 

The Board of Trustees of the Los 
Angeles Public Library has offered two 
prizes, one of .$25 and one of $1.5 for the 
two best theses on the place of the modern 
public library in the life of the commu- 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
nity. to be submitted by members of the 
class before the close of the school year. 
Edna Anderson, 1915, has resigned her 
position in the Branches Department of 
the I^os Angeles Public Library to take a 
position in the Long Beach Public 
Library. 

Elizabeth Walker, 1916, has resigned 
her position in the T^ong Beach Public 
Library to accept a position as assistant 
in the Northeast Branch of the Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Theodora 11. Brewitt, 
Principal, Jjibrary Training School. 

Manzana. 
Manzana Branch, Los Angeles Co. 
Free IjIbrary, was established in -Octo- 
ber, 1917. 

Manzana School Dist. Branch, IjOS 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in August, 1917. 

Norwalk School Dist. 
NoRWALK School Dist. Branch, T^os 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in November, 1917. 

The Palms School Dist. 

(P. O. Culver City). 
The Palms School Dist. Branch, 
liOS Angeles Co. Free IvIbrary, was 
established in October, 1917. 

Pasadena. 

§ Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Nellie M. Russ, Lib'n. 

The Pasadena Public Library is align- 
ing itself with all war activities. We have 
planned to handle all books collected by 
the Red Cross for our troops, pocket, list 
and ship them to their destination. We 
have recently taken about one hundred 
technical books from our shelves for 
immediate use in study classes at Camp 
Ivearny, the books having been selected 
by one of the officers from the Camp. 

We have purchased books at their re- 
quest for use in the Home Service De- 
partment of our local Red Cross, and have 
created a deposit station at their head- 
quarters for such books, so that they may 
be easily available. 

We are working with the Woman's 
Committee of the National and State 



58 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued. 
Council of Defense in preparing lists of 
books on practical food-saving, and 
arranging these books for free access on 
our shelves. 

Miss Leona Morgan of our staff has 
accepted the position of assistant libra- 
rian at Whittier, Cal. 

We have recently published the Decem- 
ber maga~ine. Through the summer 
mouths, book lists only were published. 
N. M. Russ, 
Librarian. 

Col. Charles O. Shepard has donated 
a book, "New York in the Revolution," 
which was compiled and edited by him. 
This is one of the most interesting and 
valuable of the many addifons recently 
made to the city library. — Pasadena Star- 
News, O 9 

A school library branch has been estab- 
lished at the Madison School. — Pasadena 
Star-News, N 9 

Pomona. 

§11 Pomona [Free] Public Libeaey. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

The Historical Department is collecting 
photographs of and information about all 
who have entered any arm of the service. 

The trophies won in the past by the 
now dissolved company of the National 
Guards of Pomona have been placed in 
the library as a sort of permanent loan. 
Veterans in the company have supplied a 
history of these trophies, *or the local 
history records. 

Members of the staff assisted in the 
campaign for the Liberty Bonds, making 
talks to clubs and neighborhood gatherings. 

A gas furnace has been installed, with 
some changes in the heating and ventilat- 
ing system to correspond. The results 
have been satisfactory. 

Displays have been made on food con- 
servation, on the events of the war and on 
other topics connected with the center of 
interest. 

The patronage at Tenth Street Branch 
has been such that it is now open two 
days a week instead of one. 

S. M. Jacobus, 

Librarian. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
San Marino School Dist. 

San Marino School Dist. Branch, 
Los Angeles Co. Free Library, was 
established in September, 1917. 

Santa Monica. 

§ Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

The lower floov of the main library was 
finished with an entrance from the street 
in October. In the new arrangement this 
floor is used for the children's room — gen- 
eral reading room — committee room ancj 
for late files of newspapers. With the 
upper floor free for books, we have an 
interesting working plan and it is a 
pleasure to say that the usefulness of the 
library has been enhanced. 

The branch library building, costing 
$12,.50O, given by the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion, is complete and will be open the first 
of February with a splendid collection of 
new books and a good list of current 
magazines. 

We have met with a generous response 
from our people in giving books for "Our 
Soldiers and Sailors." Boxes of books 
were forwarded in care of the San Diego 
Public Library, through the kindness of 
Miss Althea H. Warren, for Camp 
Kearny, and also in the care of the 
Knights of Columbus for this Camp. 

Total in library after discards, for the 
year, 25,769. 

Elfie Asenath Mosse, 

Librarian. 

Somerset Sclioo! Dist. 

Somerset School Dist. Branch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in October, 1917. 

Tropico. 

Tbopico [Free] Public Library. 
Charles H. Gushing, Lib'n. 

At an election held last November, 
Tropico voted to consolidate with the city 
of Glendale. This consolidation became 
effective Januaiy 9. This library will 
now be maintained as a branch of the 
Glendale library. 

The Tropico library took part in the 
campaign for Camp libraries and is co- 
operating as far as possible with the 
Food Admnistration. 

Charles H. Gushing, 

Librarian. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



59 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Wilsona School Dist. 

\YiLsoNA School Dist. Branch, Los 
AxGELES Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in September, 1917. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area. 2140 sq. mi. Fop. 8368. 
Assessed valuation $14,911,140 (taxable 
for county .$14,.341,355 ) . 

Madera Co. Free Library. IMadeba. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Lib'n. 

During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished at the Fresno School District and 
on November 12 the contract turning over 
the Madera County Law Library was 
signed by the Law Library trustees. 

On December 4 Miss Gladys Stevens 
resigned as assistant librarian and shortly 
afterward was married to Wm. A. Mickel, 
who is in the Navy and who is stationed 
at San Pedro at present. Miss Irene 
Glas, who has had a six months training 
course in the Madera County Free Li- 
brary, has been appointed to fill the 
vacancy. 

During December the equipment for the 
new building arrived and has been in- 
stalled. The auditorium in the basement 
is being used by the Red Cross workers 
as a supply room. The ladies of the town 
meet here on four or five afternoons of the 
week to knit and sew for the soldiers. 
Mart E. Glock, 

Librarian. 

Madera Co. Law Library, Madera. 
F. A. Fee, Lib'n. 

See note under Madera Co. Free 
Library. 

Madera Co. Teachers' Library, Ma- 
dera. Craig Cunningham, Co. Supt. Est. 
May, 1903. Income 1916-17, $3-5, from 
i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't. 
paid for books .$29.85. 

Total vols. 1200. Teachers 100: elem. 
86; high 14. School districts: elem. 48 
(incl. 1 jt. ) ; high: 3 union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools. 1916-17, .$25.53.16: elem. books 
$2277.39, apparatus 0; high books and 
apparatus $275.77. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 18,966; high 1300. 



MADERA CO.— Continued. 
Fresno School Dist. 
Fresno School Dist. Branch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 22, 1917. 

Manzanita School Dist. (P. O. Oak- 
hurst; no exp.). 
Manzanita School Dist. Branch, 
Madera Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished July 2, 1917. 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 25,114. 
Assessed valuation $22,602,145 (taxable 
for county .$21,889,230). 

Marin Co. Teachers' Library, San 
Pafael. Jas. B. Davidson, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $35, from i 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't. 
paid for books 0. 

Total vols. 482. Teachers 146: elem. 
113 ; high 33. School districts : elem. 45 
(incl. 3 jt.) ; high : 1 city, 2 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $3861.81: elem. books 
$1921.99, apparatus $832.24; high books 
and apparatus $1107.58. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 48,594 ; high 4582. 

Mill Valley. 

Mill Valley [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sybil Nye, Lib'n. 

The grammar school now uses library 
from 2 to 3 on Tuesday and Thursday 
afternoons. Eighth Grade is brought on 
Tuesday by class teacher, and Seventh 
Grade on Thursday. The idea is that 
children may get library habit. There is 
a chosen list of books and 100 points must 
be made by students in term. A book by 
Dickens gains 2.5 points ; others more 
easily read gain 20, 15, 10 or 5 points. 
Sybil Nye, 
Librarian. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty -fourth class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 3956. 
Assessed valuation $3,561,936 (taxable 
for county $3,539,366). 



60 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



MARIPOSA CO.— Continued. 

:\Iariposa Co. Teachers' Library, 
Mariposa. John L. Dexter. Co. Supt. 
Income 1916-17. .$12, from * of .$2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Am't. paid for books 
$42.80. 

Total vols. 700. Teachers 30 : elem. 28 ; 
high 2. School districts: elem. 32 (incl. 
2 jt. ) ; high : 1 county. Total expended 
for books and apparatus for schools, 
101(>-17, .$1108.76: elem. books .$760.88, 
apparatus 0' ; high books and apparatus 
$.347.88. Vols, in schools: elem. 12,220; 
high 280. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3460 sq. mi. Pop. 23,929. 
Assessed valuation $17,467,622 (taxable 
for county $16,661,823). 

Mendocino Co. Teachers" Library, 
T'kiah. Mrs Anna Porterfield. Co. Supt. 
Est. 1S89. Income 1916-17. $61. from i 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books $107. 

Total vols. 800. Teachers 205: elem. 
167 ; high 38. School districts : elem. 
12.J ; high : 8 union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$3458.97 : elem. books $2115.97, apparatus 
$423.28 ; high books and apparatus 
$919.72. Vols, in schools : elem. 63,044 ; 
high 6437. 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 15,148. 
Assessed valuation $24,216,165 (taxable 
for county $23,805,725). 

:Merced Co. Teachers' Library, Mer- 
ced. Miss Margaret Sheehy, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $65, from * 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't. 
paid for books $7.10. Books are now 
cared for by Merced Co. Free Library. 

Total vols. 463. Teachers 168: elem. 
128 ; high 40. School districts : elem. 65 
(incl. 6 jt.) ; high: 4 union; 2 jt. union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools $6054.04 : elem. books 
$3502.02, apparatus .$425.63 ; high books 
and apparatus $2126.39. Vols, in schools : 
elem. .52,6.54; high 10,626. 



MERCED CO.— Continued. 
Dos Palos (Exp. South Dos Palos). 

Dos Palos Branch, Merced Co. 
Free Library. 

A meeting of the citizens of the town 
has been held at which it was decided to 
ask the Carnegie Corporation for a $8000 
library building. — Dos Palos Star, D 14 



MODOC COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat. Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 6191. 
Assessed valuation $8,058,730 (taxable 
for county $7,978,515). 

tMoDOC Co. Free Library. Miss Anna 
L. Williams, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Alturas, Cedarville, Likely, and Red Star. 
Anna L. Williams, 

Librarian. 

The new Carnegie library building is 
well along toward completion. — Alturas 
New Era, O 5 

Modoc Co. Teachers' Library. Al- 
turas. Mrs Nettie B. Harris, Co. Supt. 
Income 1916-17, $9. from i of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books .$42.75. 

Total vols. 600. Teachers 70 : elem. 
55 ; high 15. School districts : elem. 44 ; 
high : 2 union ; 1 jt. union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $2,347.64: elem. books 
.$976.98, apparatus $775.34 ; high books 
and apparatus $.595.32. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 21,323 ; high 1860. 

Alturas. 
Alturas School Dist. Branch, Mo- 
doc Co. Free Library, was established 
during the quarter. 

Cedarville. 
Cedarville School Dist. Branch, 
Modoc Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Likely. 

Likely School Dist. Branch, Mo- 
doc Co. Free Library, was established 

during the quarter. 



vol. 13, UO. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



61 



MODOC CO. — Continued. 
Red Star School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Alturas.) 
Red Star School Dist. Braxcii. Mo- 
doc Co. Free Library, was established 
(luriug the quarter. 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
Countj- seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 1796 sq. mi. Pop. 2842. 
Assessed valuation .$2,704,190 (taxable 
for county $2,696,370). 

Mono Co. Teacher s' Library, 
Bridgeport. Mrs A. M. Hays, Co. Supt. 
Income 1916-17, $1 from * of $2 fee for 
teachers" certificates. Amt. paid for 
books, 0. 

Total vols. 227. Teachers 12 : elem. 
12. School districts : elem. 11. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $.387.17: elem. books 
•$387.17. Vols, in schools : elem. 6.548. 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 24,146. 
Assessed valuation $32,791,028 (taxable 
for county .$32,047,765). 

Monterey' Co. Free Library. Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'u. 

During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished at Metz school district. 

Mrs Ida M. Bailey, Custodian of the 
Greenfield Branch since its start as the 
first branch of the Monterey County Free 
Library, left Monterey county October 
first. On her departure the branch was 
closed, and all books called in until a 
suitable location was available, special 
request books being supplied through the 
school. On Dec. 5th the branch was 
reopened as a reading room in the new 
Page Hotel with Mrs W. W. Page in 
charge. 

The Lincoln Branch was temporarily 
closed from Nov. 1 to Dec. 19. advantage 
being taken of the Custodian having 
moved from the vicinity to see if the 
school branch was sufficient for the com- 
munity. The experiment was not satis- 
factory and the branch was reestablished 
with Mrs Emma Lambert in charge. The 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 

branch was placed in Mrs Lambert's home 
about half a mile from its former loca- 
tion. 

Miss Maude Randall, custodian of the 
Parkfield Branch, was married in Novem- 
ber and her mother-, Mrs Effie M. Randall. 
was appointed custodian. 

The branches at Soledad and Gonzales 
have moved into new quarters. 

Caiion School was suspended last term 
because there were not enough children, 
but it is to reopen in .January. 

Lewis School District, joint school dis- 
trict with San Benito County, has no 
Monterey county children this year and 
therefore has no Monterey county library 
fund. 

Miss Laura Steffens of the Sutro 
Branch, California State Library, visited 
the central office of the Monterey County 
Free Library on Wednesday, December 
12, 1917. 

The Salinas City Library has allowed 
the County Free Library about 14 square 
feet additional space and new shelving 
has been built and a stove put in. 

Anne Hadden, 

Librarian. 

Monterey Co. Teachers' Library, 
Salinas. Geo. Schultzberg, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Joined the Co. Free Library, 
May 10, 1915. Income 1916-17. $54. 
from i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Amt. transferred to Co. F. L., $54. 

Total vols. 2875. Teachers 185: elem. 
146 ; high .39. School districts : elem. 85 
(inch 3 jt.) ; high: 1 dist.: 4 union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1916-17, $5576.96; elem. 
books $2,588.16, apparatus $1010.93: high 
books and apparatus $1,590.70. Vols, in 
schools, elem. 84,196 : high 4748. 

Canon School Dist. (P. O. Chualar; no 
exp. ofRce). 

Canon School Dist. Branch. Mon- 
terey Co. Free Library. 

See note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Gonzales. 

Gonzales Branch, Mo> terey Co. 
Free Library'. 

See note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



62 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
Greenfield (No exp. office). 

Greenfield Bkancii, Montekey Co. 
Free Library. 

*S'ce note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
))rary. 

Lewis School Dist. (P. O. Lonoak; no 
exp. office). 

Lewis School Dist. Branch, Monte- 
rey Co. Free Library. 

(S'ee note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Lincoln (P. O. Corral de Tierra; no 
exp. office). 
Lincoln Branch, Monterey Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Metz School Dist. 
Metz School Dist. Branch, Mon- 
terey Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 14, 1917. 

Parkfield (P. O. Parkfield for packages, 
San Miguel for letters; no exp.). 

Parkfield Branch, Monterey Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Soiedad. 
SOLEDAD Branch, Monterey Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



NAPA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-six til class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Areo, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 19,800. 
Assessed valuation $18,236,314 (taxable 
for county $17,799,535). 

Napa Co. Teachers' Library, Napa. 
Lena A. Jackson, Co. Supt. Est. 1889. 
Income, 1916-17, $50, from i of $2 fee 
for teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books $53. 

Total vols. 1250. Teachers 112: elem. 
87 ; high 25. School districts : elem. 50 
(inch 3 jt.) ; high: 1 city; 1 union; 1 jt. 
union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools, 1916-17, $2718.50 : 
elem. books $1069.01, apparatus $696.85 ; 
high books and apparatus $952.64. Vols, 
in schools: elem. 29,588; high 4137. 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 
Caiistoga. 
Calistoga Free P'ublic Library. 
Mrs E. Wright, Lib'n. 

The one mill reduction in the appro- 
priation which was last reported met with 
such an active protest that the town trus- 
tees have made a special appropriation to 
the library. The salary of the librarian 
has also been raised by the library 
trustees. 

Mrs E. Wright, 

Librarian. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 958 sq. mi. Pop. 14,955. 
Assessed valuation $7,841,295 (taxable 
for county .$6,903,725). 

Nevada Co. Teachers' Library, Ne- 
vada City. R. J. Fitzgerald, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, .$36, from * 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books, $24.05. 

Total vols. 353. Teachers 97: elem. 
79 ; high 18. School districts : elem. 46 ; 
high : 1 city ; 1 district ; 1 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $2194.65: elem. books 
.$915.20; apparatus .$116.35; high books 
and apparatus $1163.10. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 33,611 ; high 1218. 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 34,436. 
Assessed valuation $66,140,655 (taxable 
for county $59,990,265). 

Orange Co. Teachers' Library, 
Santa Ana. R. P. Mitchell, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $55, from 1 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books $258.98. 

Total vols. 5095. Teachers 400: elem. 
282; high 118. School districts: elem. 
49 ; high : 1 city ; 4 union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $18,529.02; elem. books 
$3643.24, apparatus $4250; high books 
and apparatus $10,635.78. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 84,473 ; high 19,438. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



63 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Santa Ana. 
§ Santa Ana Free Public Liukaky, 
Miss Jeannette E. McFaddeu, Lib'u. 

The library will be open in the future 
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. — Santa Ana 
Register, O 1 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat. Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,237. 
Assessed valuation $12,459,481 (taxable 
for county $10,943,424)'. 

Placer Co. Teachers' Library, Au- 
burn. Irene Burns, Co. Supt. Income 
1910-17, $51 from * of $2 fee for teach- 
er's certificates. Amt. paid for books 
$45.37. 

Total vols. 876. Teachers 129 : elem. 
101 ; high 28. School districts : elem. 55 
( incl. 2 jt. ) ; high : 3 union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $2179.57: elem. books 
$1961.75, apparatus $25 ; high books and 
apparatus $191.52. Yols. in schools : 
elem. 44,380; high 3672. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5259. 
Assessed valuation $9,747,974 (taxable 
for county .$8,127,349). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Dorothy L. Clarke, Acting Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Crescent Mills and in Por- 
tola school district. 

The custodian of Clio Branch is now 
Miss Anna Potts and the books are kept 
in her home. 

Dorothy L. Clarke, 

Librarian. 

Plumas Co. Teachers' Library and 
Branch, Plumas Co. Free Library, 
Quincy. Mrs Kate L. Donnelley, Co. 
Supt. Est. 1889; joined Co. Free Li- 
brary Sept, 5, 1915. Income 1916-17, 
$10 from * of $2 fee for teachers' certifi- 
cates. Amt. paid for books $9. 

Total vols. 100. Teachers 40 : elem. 
30 ; high 4. School districts : elem. 32 ; 



PLUMAS CO.— Continued, 
high : 1 county. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools 1916-17, 
$3133.93 : elem. books $1455,60, apparatus 
$901.63 ; high books and apparatus 
$776.70. Vols, in schools : elem. 12,215 ; 
high 2212. 

Clio. 

Clio Branch, Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Crescent Mills (no exp. office). 
Crescent Mills Branch, Plumas 
Co. Free Library, was established De- 
cember 5, 1917. 

Portola. 
PoBTOLA School Dist Branch, Plu- 
mas Co. Free Library, was established 
October 2, 1917. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 34,696. 
Assessed valuation $31,201,920 (taxable 
for county $29,737,460). 

Riverside Co. Free Library. Joseph 
F. Daniels, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established at the Farm Bureau and at 
the Citrus Experiment Station in River- 
side, and in the following school dis- 
tricts : Cahuilla, East Vale and Elsinore. 
Coachella Valley Branch has been re- 
established. 

Joseph F. Daniels, 

Librarian. 

Riverside Co. Teachers' Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Raymond Cree, Co. Supt. Est. 1894. 
Income 1916-17, $119 from I of $2 fee 
for teachers' certificates. $135 paid for 
service from Co. F. L. 

Total vols. 750. Teachers 360: elem. 
251 ; high 109. School districts : elem. 
69 (incl. 1 jt.) ; high: 5 dist.; 6 union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools 1916-17, $13,318.81 : elem. 
books .$3435.40, apparatus .$281.50; high 
books and apparatus $9601.91. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 42,391; high 12,564. 750 
books turned over to Co. F. L. 



64 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIJPORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Cahuilla School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Aguanga) . 
Cahuilla School Dist. Braxch, 
Riverside Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 5, 1917. 

Citrus Experiment Station (P. O. and 
exp. Riverside). 
Citrus Experuient Station Bra^vch, 
Riverside Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in November.' 1917. 

Coachella Valley (P. O. and exp. 
Coachella). 

Coachella Valley Branch, River- 
side Co. Free Library. 

»S'ce note under Riverside Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Corona. 

Corona [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Miss Helen Coffin, Lib'n. 

We have shipped 14 boxes of books and 
magazines to Camp Kearny and have the 
fifteenth box nearlj- full. We are actively 
engaged in the Food Conservation cam- 
paign, taking up a different subject every 
week. Each week the cooking classes 
in the schools demonstrate the Library 
subject and the art classes make posters 
for it. All Library bulletin boards are 
given over to Food Conservation and each 
week as complete a collection of recipes 
as possible is gathered on the week's sub- 
ject ; local housekeepers test and endorse 
these recipes. 

Our circulation record for last month 
showed an interesting shift of reading 
preferences. The number of volumes cir- 
culated was about the same as for Decem- 
ber last year ; the number of reference 
questions exactly the same (G8) ; but the 
adult non-fiction circulation jumped amaz- 
ingly ; 868 this year, 743 last. The gains 
were in the lOO's (62 against 26), 
caused by the Interscholastic Debate on 
League of Peace ; in the 600's (113 against 
41) caused by Food Conservation Cam- 
paign and Recipe Collection ; and in the 
800's (129 against 62) almost all books 
about the war. December also broke two 
other records : Sunday attendance on Dec. 
23 was 138 ; largest previous record, 116 : 
and 9.5 children attended our Christmas 
party (stereopticon stories of "Night Be- 



R I VERS IDE CO.— Continued. 

Corona — Continu-ed. 

fore Christmas" and Dickens "Christmas 

Carol") ; last year the attendance was 34. 

Helen L. Coffin, 

Librarian. 

East Vale School Dist. (P. O. Corona 
R. D; exp. Corona). 
East Yale School Dist. Branch, 
Riverside Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 11, 1917. 

Elsinore. 
Elsinoee School Dist. Branch, Riv- 
erside Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished September .5, 1917. 

Hemet. 

Hemet [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Allison Aylesworth, Lib'n. 

The Library has been the active center 
of the Red Cross work in this locality, the 
basement being used as Red Cross head- 
quarters and distributing depot, with a 
bulletin in the Library reading-room for 
information. 

Mrs Samuel Ritchie presented wrought 
iron andirons and fireplace implements 
for the fireplace ; also gave a number of 
attractively illustrated books for the juve- 
nile department at Christmas time. 

A children's story hour for the little 
tots has been held on Saturday afternoons, 
and been well attended and appreciated. 
The story hour is in charge of Miss Ruth 
Ingersol, one of the attendants in train- 
ing in the Library. 

The librarian's salary has been made 
.$60.00 per month from .January 1st. 
Mrs a. Aylesworth, 

Librarian. 
Riverside. 

§|i Riverside [Free] Public Library. 
.Joseph F. Daniels, Lib'n. 

The Riverside Library Service School 
begins its winter short course on .Janu- 
ary 7. 

.Joseph F. Daniels, 

librarian. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat. Sacramento. 
Area. 1O07 sq. mi. Pop. 67.806. 
Assessed valuation .$96,824,026 (taxable 
for county .$86,9.36,436). 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



65 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

Sacramento Co. Teacuers" Library. 
Sacramento. Miss Carolyne M. Webb, 
Co. Supt. Est. 1889. Income lOlG-17, 
.^l.j-i from i of .$2 fee for teachers' 
certificates. Teachers' Librarj- now a 
part of the Co. Free Library. Amt. paid 
for books $175. 

Total vols. 1200. Teachers 51S : elem. 
41 o: high 103. School districts: elem. 
78 (incl. 2 jt. ) : high: 2 city; 3 union; 
1 jt. union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
.$10,438.93 : elem. books $7285.88. appara- 
tus $260.50 : high books and apparatus 
$2886.55. Vols, in schools : elem. 23.043 ; 
high 4030. 

Sacramento. 

t§SACRAMENTO FEEE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Lauren W. Ripley. Lib'n. 

The City Library building is in the final 
stages of construction. Interior decorat- 
ing and finishing will soon be started. — 
Sacramento Bcc. D 12 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area. 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8041. 
Assessed valuation $9,986,335 (taxable 
for county $9,565,210). 

Sax Benito Co. Teachers' Library. 
Hollister. W. J. Cagney, Co. Supt. 
Income 191(.i-17. $19 from * of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books $194.65. 

Total vols. 486. Teachers .55 : elem. 
47 : high 8. School districts : elem. 34 ; 
high : 1 county. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools 1916-17. 
$1182.64: elem. books $782.64. apparatus 
; high books and apparatus .$400. Vols, 
in schools : elem. 16.797 ; high 620. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
f'ounty seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. oCt.lOQ. 
Assessed valuation $51,275,300 (taxable 
for county .$44,197,1.55). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Walters, Lib'n. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
During the quarter branches have been 
established at Sunrise and in the follow- 
ing school districts : Cucamonga. Daggett, 
Sunrise, and Valley. 

Caroline S. Waters. 

Librarian. 

San Bernardino Co. Teachers' Li- 
brary'. San Bernardino. Mrs Grace C. 
Stanley, Co. Supt. Est. 18S9; joined 
County Free Library Jan. 7, 1915. In- 
come 1916-17. $114, from i of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. $114 transferred 
to Co. F. L. 

Total vols. 2736. Teachers 496: elem. 
375 : high 121. School districts : elem. 
82 : high : 1 city ; 4 dist. ; 3 union. T6tal 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools. 1916-17, $11,351.49: elem. books 
$6379.38. apparatus $2533.1.5 : high books 
and apparatus $2418.86. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 73,859 ; high 22.561. 

Colton. 

CoLTON [Free] Public Library. :\Irs 
Anna Enright Suragins, Lib'n. 

A great interest is being taken in the 
books on the Great War. and iu giving 
books for the soldiers in the training 
camps. 

Anna E. Spragins, 

Librarian. 

Cucamonga. 
Cucamonga School Dist. Branch. 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library, was 
established November 23. 1917. 

Daggett. 
Daggett School Dist. Branch. San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library, was 
established November 24, 1917. 

Needles. 

Needles High School Library. II. 
II. Wheelock, Prin. 

H. H. Wheelock has taken the place of 
C. B. Collins as principal of the Needles 
High School. 

Redlands. 

§A. K. Smiley [Free! Pt-blic Li- 
brary. Miss Artena M. Chapiu, Lih"n. 

Miss Florence Harmon resigned Novem- 
ber 1st to be married. 

Miss Winifred Woodworth who took 
the apprenticeship course in thf fall, was 



5—3.5857 



66 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Cuntinued. 

Red lands — Continued, 
made a regular memljer of the staff ou 
Xovember 1st. 

In spite of the fact that knitting, Red 
Cross work and other war denaands are 
making inroads on the library circulation 
in many places, this library is holding its 
own, and in December beat its past rec- 
ord for that month by more than 300. 

Scrapbooks have been given out to 
patrons and are being filled most artis- 
tically. These books will surely be wel- 
comed by the sick and wounded soldiers 
so far away from friends. 

A stamping outfit for marking classifi- 
cation numbers on the backs of books has 
been purchased and is being used success- 
fully. It improves the appearance of 
the books greatly. 

Artena M. ChapijS?, 

Librarian. 

Rialto. 

RiALTo Free Library and Branch, 
Pan Bernardino Co. Free Library. 
Miss Erna Robertson, Lib'n. 

Miss Erna Robertson has been chosen 
as permanent librarian to succeed Mrs 
Jennie Fadden. — Rialto Record, O 5 

Sunrise (P. O. Adelanto; exp. Victor- 
ville). 
Si'NEisE Branch, San Bernardino 
( 'o. Free Library, was established Novem- 
ber 27, 1917. 

Sunri.se School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library, was 
established November 27, 1917. 

Upland. 

I'PLAND [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free Li- 
brary. Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib'n. 

The things that we have done within 
Ihe last three months that may be of 
interest to other librarians are (1) that 
our library has been used as headquarters 
for the Upland Woman's Council of De- 
fense for all meetings and especially the 
Food Pledge Drive, in which the librarian 
took an active part. (2) Basement of li- 
brary used as headquarters for Red Cross 
Membership Drive when over 1200 mem- 
bers were taken in. (3) Eighty-four books 
were donated by friends to the library to 
be sent to the army camps. (4) The 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued, 

Upland — Continued. 
Board engaged Miss Mary Tweed of Up- 
land to take charge of the library on 
Sunday during opening hours. As Miss 
Tweed had two years of library training 
at Chaffey Union High School and one 
year as assistant there, it seems a move 
in the right direction, for often some one 
who knows the library is as necessary on 
Sunday as week days. 

Mrs F. H. Manker. 

Librarian. 

Valley School Dist. (P. O. Corona, 
Riverside Co.). 

Vaixey School Dist. Branch, San- 
Bernardino Co. Free Library, was 
established December 12, 1917. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

( Seventh class. ) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 61,605. 
Assessed valuation $78,207,032 (taxable 
for county $73,299,662). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Jennie Herrman, Lib'n. 

On October 12th Miss Ferris spoke be- 
fore the El Cajon Woman's Club upon the 
Library War Fund. 

The Normal Heights Parent-Teacher 
Association invited Miss Althea Warren 
and Miss Katharine Ferris to speak upon 
children's literature. Miss Warren's sub- 
ject was Twenty-five best books for boys 
and the twenty-five best books for girls. 
Miss Ferris spoke upon "First steps in 
children's reading." Lists were distrib- 
uted. 

Through the assistance of Miss Althea 
Warren, the library activities of San 
Diego city and county have been simpli- 
fied to give the best possible service to 
Camp Kearny. The Public Library gave 
work room and storage space. Members 
of the staff from both libraries gave time 
for the preparation of donated books. A 
day was spent at the Camp Kearny Li- 
brary cataloging the new books, and pre- 
paring for the opening Christmas night. 
Katharine Post Ferris, 

Acting Librarian. 

Miss Herrman returns to duty on Janu- 
ary 2, when Miss Ferris will return to 
Kings County. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



67 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 

San DiKtio Co. Teachers' Libuauy, 
San Diego. John F. West, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1SS9 ; became a part of San Diego 
Co. Free Library Marcli 3, 1915. Income 
191G-17, $1SS, from i of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books $139. 

Total vols. 199S. Teachers 662: elem. 
449, high 213. School districts : elem. 
117 (incl. 2 jt. ) ; high: 5 city; 6 union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1916-17, $11,953.92: elem. 
books $6944.68, apparatus $64.63 ; high 
books and apparatus $4944.61. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 91,572; high 18,860. 

Escondido. 

EscoNDiDO [Free] Public Library, 
and Branch, San Diego Co. Free Lihrarij. 
Everett Cooper, Lib'u. 

As a temporary experiment the board 
has decided to establish a pay shelf, to be 
made permanent is satisfactory. 

Everett Cooper, 

Librarian. 

Gantay (no exp. office). 
A branch of the San Diego Co. Free 

Library has been requested bj- Gantay. 

San Diego. 

t§SAN Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n. Emeritus ; 
Miss Althea H. Warren, Lib'n. 

The long felt demand for more room in 
the main library building has been tem- 
porarily supplied by renting an annex. 
Over a thousand square feet of space on 
the second floor of the Edmonds Building, 
next door to the library, has been leased 
for a large reading room. The current 
periodicals and newspaper, which hereto- 
fore have been in separate rooms, have 
been placed together in a large, bright, 
and well-ventilated space, which was 
formerly a dance hall, and which has been 
fitted with reading tables and seats for 
over a hundred people. An attendant is 
in charge daily, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
It is hoped that the soldiers and sailors 
will come in great numbers on Wednes- 
days and Saturdays, when they have 
leaves. 

The Children's Department which was 
opened on January 9th, has cream white 
walls, with a frieze of children, in lav- 
ender, blue and green tones, and the book 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
places and some of the furniture painted 
a light gray, with line decorations of the 
colors of the frieze. There is a low win- 
dow seat across the entire western side of 
the room, for story hours and reading. 
The room, under the charge of Miss Helen 
Dysart, Children's Librarian, is open 
daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Miss Elizabeth Bailey of the Regis- 
tration Department, was granted leave, 
with pay, to spend six weeks at the Port- 
land Public Library, where, through the 
courtesy of Miss Isom, she was given ex- 
perience in all the library departments. 
She returned the first of December, With 
helpful suggestions for every member of 
our staff. 

War times have made many changes in 
our staff. Miss Verna M. Evans, Wis- 
consin, 1912, who for the past year has 
been in charge of recataloging, was mar- 
ried in December to Mr Fred Clapp, of 
Ontario. She has been succeeded by Miss 
Madaline Scanlan, Wisconsin, 1916, who 
was already a member of our staff. Miss 
Ruth Keefe, librarian of the Marston 
Branch, was also married in December. 
Her place has been taken by Miss Elsie 
Speece. New members of the staff dur- 
ing the quarter are Miss Catherine C. 
Smith, librarian's secretary, Mrs Elsie 
Mary Wilson, librarian of the Ocean 
Beach Branch, Miss Elizabeth Callaway, 
desk attendant at the main library, and 
Mrs D. B. Hunt, librarian at the Park 
Branch. 

Our greatest library interest during the 
past three months has been, of course, the 
raising of funds for A. L. A. Camp Li- 
braries and the gathering and preparing 
of books for the nearest one, Camp 
Kearny, sixteen miles north of San Diego. 
San Diego County secured its quota, 
$1700, towards the A. L. A. fund, with 
$70 to spare. Members of the staffs of 
the County and City Libraries, with help 
from the .Kelsey-Jenney Commercial 
School, have prepared the book-pockets, 
book-cards and shelf-list record for nearly 
3000 donated books collected in this town 
and sent in by other libraries of the state. 
Even a greater number, having been col- 
lected and prepared by the Los Angeles 
Public Library, there were nearly 7000 



68 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 

San Diego — Continued. 

books ready for the soldiers when the 

A. L. A. Camp Library opened on Christ- 

raas evening. 

Althea H. Warren, 

Librarian. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 42 sq. mi. Pop. 416,912. 
Assessed valuation .$791,603,336 (tax- 
able for county .$554,456,505). 

j:§||[Free] Public Library of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

The foreign language division of the li- 
brary which has made steady and rapid 
growth has recently been enlarged by the 
acquisition of several collections. Chief 
among these is the French Family Li- 
brary, a gift of the French government. 
This consists for the most part of sets of 
standard authors and works of descrip- 
tion, history and travel. Many juvenile 
books are included, principally picture 
books and translations of children's clas- 
sics of all countries. The collection is 
distinguished by its fine bindings. 

The Spanish section has been strength- 
ened and increased by another donation 
from Mr J. C. Cebrian. Spanish liter- 
ature forms the major part of this collec- 
tion which supplements in great measure 
the earlier gifts made by Mr Cebrian. 
The Spanish division is now a very com- 
plete and important part of the library. 
Poetry, drama and music comprise this 
department for the most part, but all 
classes are well represented. 

The many requests for Swedish liter- 
ature have been met by the purchase of 
some two hundred books in that language. 
These fill a gap in the collection and are 
in constant use. 

Particular attention is being devoted to 
the foreign language division as the cos- 
mopolitan nature of the population of San 
Francisco makes it necessary to have 
books in many languages to meet all 
demands. 

In an effort to make the Newspaper 
Room one of the feature departments of 
the library, publications from all parts 
of the country are being placed on file 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

there. It is hoped in the near future to 
have every city of any importance repre- 
sented by at least one paper. 

The Music ^ Department of the San 
Francisco Public Library. 

The Music Department of the San 
Francisco Public Library since its estab- 
lishment in the new building and its 
allotment of a separate room is a depart- 
ment of vital interest to the music lovers 
of the city. In the temporary library 
built after the fire there was no provision 
for the music beyond that made for the 
entire collection, and the value of these 
books was not generally known. Since it 
has been housed in separate quarters 
with opportunity to develop this side of 
the library's activities the use of the col- 
lection has increased materially. 

The Music Room is a large, airy room 
situated on the third floor of the building. 
The music is on open shelves, easily ac- 
cessible to the public. Special cases are 
provided for the unbound sheet music. 
A sound-proof room adjoining the main 
section contains a piano which patrons 
may use to try over music before taking 
it home. 

The musical library now numbers about 
2180 volumes consisting of opera scores 
and librettos, sacred music, vocal, piano 
and violin selections. To these will be 
added the excellent violin collection of the 
late Mrs Isador Jacobs and a donation of 
orchestral music from the Rudolph Herald 
Library. An especial interest attaches to 
the latter as it contains many of the 
scores used in the first symphonies in the 
early days of San Francisco. Among 
notable additions should be mentioned the 
gifts of Mr J. C. Cebrian consisting of 
many volumes of Spanish music. 

In addition to the books enumerated 
above there are almost a thousand works 
on harmony, history of music, biographies 
of musicians and works on technique. 
The steady circulation of these books is 
an indication of the intelligent interest 
taken in music. During the entire year 
of 1916 the circulation was 741S, while 
that for the first half year of 1917 was 
5795. 

The department endeavors to keep in 
touch with all musical events and activi- 
ties in the city. Programs for concerts. 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



69 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

symphonies, etc., are obtained in advance, 
prepared for study and reference and 
liled. Musical magazines are indexed also 
and articles of interest to music lovers 
are clipped from the daily papers. 

Robert Rea, 
Librarian. 

San Fkancisco Co. Teachees' Li- 
BKARY. Alfred Roncovieri, City and Co. 
Supt. Income 1916-17, .$326, from i of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books, $181.17. 

Total vols. 2720. Teachers 1588: 
elem. 1347 ; high 241. School districts : 
elem. 1 ; high : 8 city. Total expended 
for books and apparatus for schools, 
1916-17, $88,696.28: elem. books $4600, 
apparatus $200; high books and appa- 
ratus $33,896.28. Vols, in schools : elem. 
104,074 ; high 7585. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 50,731. 
Assessed valuation .$68,865,843 (taxable 
for county, $63,735,443). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Libeaby, 
Stockton. Miss Hattie M. Mann, Lib'n. 
Miss Ida E. Condit in charge. 

W. F. Clowdsley, Librarian Emeritus 
and former Librarian, died November 17, 
1917. 

During the quarter twenty-three visits 
were made to the librarj' stations and 
forty-seven visits were made by the cus- 
todians to the County Library. 

Posters on food conservation were dis- 
tributed to the library stations with lists 
of books, pamphlets and magazine articles 
on the subject. 

A trip to the Pacific Sugar Corporation 
was made in order to make arrangements 
for ijlacing books in the factory for the 
use of the employees. The plan proved 
satisfactory to the manager and the fol- 
lowing day 246 books were shipped to 
the factory. 

During the months of October and No- 
vember Mrs Carrie Scillinger, custodian 
of the French Camp Library, gave a series 
of six very enjoj-able story hours for the 
children of her neighborhood. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

The following changes were made dur- 
ing the quarter ; A. St. John resigned 
as custodian of the Escalon Library sta- 
tion and the books were placed in the 
Escalon pharmacy. E. W. Bidwell. 
proprietor, was appointed custodian. 
Mrs Bertha Byers resigned as custodian 
of the Moorland Library station and the 
books were moved to the home of Mrs J. 
Jones, who was appointed custodian. At 
Youngstown A. Amenda retired from 
the firm and J. E. Turner was ap- 
pointed custodian. At Peters, "NV. S. 
Miller resigned as custodian and Miss 
Alice Moore, daughter of the new pro- 
prietor, will act as custodian. 

The San Joaquin County Library is co- 
operating with C. W. Goethe of Sac- 
ramento, representing the California 
Nature Study League, by sending copies 
of the Nature Study stories prepared by 
members of the League to each of the 
County Library deposit stations, with in- 
structions to the custodians to have the 
stories posted in a prominent place, also 
by releasing the stories to the local news- 
papers. 

Hattie M. ManN, 

Librarian. 

See also notes under Stockton Free 
Public Library. 

San Joaquin Co. Teachers' Library, 
Stockton. John W. Anderson, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $133, from 
i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Amt. paid for books, $40.59. 

Total vols. 1115. Teachers 359: elem. 
296 ; high 63. School districts : elem. 89 
(incl. 1 jt.) ; high: 2 district; 3 union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools, 1916-17. $4468.77: elem. 
books $3169.79, apparatus $639.81; high 
books and apparatus $6.59.17. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 66,512 ; high .5062. 

Escalon. 

Escalon Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San .Joaquin Co. Free 
Library. 

French Camp. 

French Camp Branch, San .Joaquin 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San .Joaquin Co. Free 
Library. 



70 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Lodi. 
LoDi [Free] Public Libbaey and 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Helen C. Bullock, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen C. Bullock, formerly as- 
sistant librarian in the New York City 
Library, has been appointed librarian of 
the Lodi Free Public Library to suc- 
ceed J. A. Swallow, who has resigned. — 
Lodi Sentinel, D 4 

Moorland (P. O. and exp. Middle River). 

Moorland Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin Co. Free 
Library. 

Peters. 

Peters Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin Co. Free 
Librarj'. 

Stockton, 

t§ Stockton Free Public Library. 
Miss Hattie M. Mann, Lib'n. 

With the view of co-operating with the 
U. S. Food Administration, the Stockton 
Free Public Library has maintained for 
some time a permanent exhibit of books 
and pamphlets as well as a poster ex- 
hibit on Consen^ation. This has been ac- 
complished by having a "current events" 
book shelf where are placed the books, 
along with a typed list and a poster call- 
ing attention to the subject. Whenever 
the books are changed a short notice is 
inserted in the daily newspapers calling 
attention to the new subject. An account 
of publicity work along these lines has 
been sent to Frances M. Carlton Harmon, 
the Library Publicity Director for Cali- 
fornia, also to the Chief of Library Sec- 
tion, Consei*vation Division, Washington, 
D. C. The posters sent to the library by 
the Food Consen'ation Committee have 
also been posted and have also been sent 
to the county deposit stations. 

During the period of war there is a fund 
of general information which the public 
is demanding. Aside from "war books" 
including personal experiences and mem- 
oirs of men and women who have been in 
touch with world affairs and have in 
some instances been "Over the top," the 
same interest calls for books of history 
both of the United States and of other 
leading countries at war. Under the 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued, 
heading "Emergency war lists" the ref- 
erence librarian, Lois E. Kej's, has been 
making exhibits of books on the follow- 
ing subjects : Foods and Cooking, Vege- 
table Gardening, Red Cross, Agriculture, 
History of the "Allies." 

During the last three months the pic- 
ture collection has been increased and re- 
cently an exhibit of war pictures for the 
current events bulletin board has been 
made by the Art Reference Librarian, 
Algie R. Beecher. These pictures were 
taken from the covers of Literary Digests 
and mounted on inexpensive card mounts. 
Each number illustrates some phase of 
war activitj' : an airship, a submarine, an 
anti-aircraft gun, an American ambulance 
at the front, etc. Many of the engrav- 
ings of cathedrals are being used by the 
instractor in the new High School course 
on "History of Art, comprising Archi- 
tecture, Sculpture and Painting." 

Hattie M. Mann, • 
Librarian. 

W. F. Clowdsley. 

There is a class of pioneers in Cali- 
fornia whom we often overlook when pay- 
ing tribute to those sturdy characters who 
built up the Golden State. Their work, 
which is as important a factor in Cali- 
fornia's development as that of the men 
who crossed the plains in the early days, 
has been performed quietly, but effectively. 
It is the foundation upon which rests the 
state's educational system. 

The writer has in mind the late W. F. 
Clowdsley, for thirty-five years librarian 
of the Stockton Free Public Library. 
Mr Clowdsley passed away July 6th last 
at the family home in Stockton, after a 
prolonged illness. 

Mr Clowdsley was born in Lexington. 
Missouri. 71 years ago, and as a lad of 17 
enlisted in the Confederate Army as a 
member of the famous Collins Battery in 
Shelby's brigade under General Sterling 
Price. And in connection with his record 
as a soldier it might be interesting to 
narrate an incident that occurred shortly 
after his death. His two sons, Charles 
and Upton, both sterling young men, were 
granted leave of absence, having enlisted 
in the service of Uncle Sam. After the 
funeral Mrs Clowdsley was informed that 



vol. 13, no. 1] C.VLIPORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



71 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued, 
tlie military authorities would certainly 
give one of her sons an honorable dis- 
charge in that she needed his support. 
But Mrs Clow'dsley would not listen to 
such a suggestion, stating that her late 
husband had done his bit for the cause 
and that she was willing that her sons 
should do their part. She declared Mr 
(-"lowdsley would certainly have desired 
that they remain with the service. 

It was in 1SS3 that Mr Clowdsley was 
appointed city librarian. The library 
then contained only 4678 volumes, with 
an annual circulation of 29,4ST. Since 
then it has grown under his supervision 
to one of the best municipal libraries in 
the state with SO.OOO volumes and an 
annual circulation of more than 200.000. 

Mr Clowdsley took a prominent part in 
the conventions of the state librarians. 
He extended the service of the Stockton 
library to the entire county by opening 
branch libraries in every section and at- 
tained remarkable success in this work. 

Highly esteemed by the entire com- 
munity, his death is a loss not only to 
Stockton and San .Joaquin County, but to 
the entire State of California. 

Dave S. Matthews. 

Stockton. 

Youngstown (P. O. Acampo;. 

YouiSfGSTOWN Bkaxcii. vSax Joaquik 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Sau Joaquin Co. Free 
Library. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

( 'J>i\-enty-seventh class.) 
County seat. San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3.500 sq. mi. Pop. 19,383. 
Assessed valuation .$30,390,.32.5 (taxable 
for county .$29,503,714). 

Sax Lns Obispo Co. Teachers' Li- 
brary, San Luis Obispo. W. S. Wight, 
Co. Supt. Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, 
.$60, from * of $2 fee for teachers' certifi- 
cates. Amt. paid for books .$76.97. 

Total vols. 772. Teachers 171 : elem. 
144 ; high 27. School districts : elem. 92 ; 
high : 1 city : 1 district ; 2 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, .$.34'19.29: elem. books 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 
$1664.-55, apparatus $.388.17: high books 
and apparatus .$1386.57. Vols, in schools : 
elem. .55,005; high 3748. 

San Luis Obispo. 

§Sax Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

The library has reflected all the ac- 
tivities of the town by joining in the 
various campaigns carried on. A suc- 
cessful food conservation campaign was 
waged — posters displayed, a large number 
of pledges signed, literature on the sub- 
ject given away, and material in the li- 
brary advertised and brought out where 
it would attract the notice of the public. 

Typewritten lists of available material 
have been furnished teachers, club mem- 
bers and individuals seeking information 
ou a wide range of subjects. 

Abbie S. Kellogg. 

Librarian. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat. Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 26,585. 
Assessed valuation .$35,818,165 (tax- 
able for county $34,744,010). 

San Mateo Co. Free Library. Red- 
wood City. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, 
Librarian. 

December 7th the Domestic Science de- 
partment of the Sequoia High School held 
an exhibit of the work for the term. 
The foods exhibited were all war foods, and 
the garments displayed were mainly those 
made for the Red Cross. The couuty 
library exhibitetl literature ou food con- 
servation, consisting of books, pamphlets 
and posters. Literature sent out by the 
Food Administration was shown and 
given away. This exhibit will be sent to 
the branches throughout the couuty. 

Camp Fremont. 

Camp Fremont has three active branches 
at the present time. One at the 8th In- 
fantry exchange, and the others in the 
Y. M. C. A. units. 

As Palo Alto is the nearest library all 
donated books are being sent there. 
Books are all put into shai>e for circula- 
tion before being sent to the camp, and 
in this work of preparation San ]\Iateo 



72 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued. 
County Library is helping. In No- 
\'ember ]Mr AVlieeler, in charge of the Red 
Cross Building at the Camp, offered half 
of the building for a library, but as the 
A. L. A. has granted a building for the 
camp, plans for that building were 
dropped although it will probably be 
needed later on as a branch. The camp 
library building has been started and it 
is hoped that library work from the camp 
center will soon be a reality. 

A campaign for books by means of 
dodgers and moving picture slides has 
resulted in a generous donation of books 
from citizens of Redwood City and vi- 
cinity. Branches throughout the county 
have been supplied wth the dodgers, but 
up to the present time only a few books 
have been turned in. 

During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished at Camp Fremont Y. M. C. A. 
Unit No. 2. 

Anne Bell Bailey, 

Librarian. 

San Mateo Co. Teachers' Library, 
Redwood City. Roy W. Cloud, Co. Supt. 
Est. in early 70s. Income 1916-17, .$46, 
from J of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Arat. paid for books .$54.12. 

Total vols. 2860. Teachers 195: elem. 
161, high 34. School districts: elem. 35; 
high : 1 district, 4 union. Total expended 
for booKs and apparatus for schools. 1916- 
17. $0261.34: elem. books .$2267.67, ap- 
paratus .$1323.18; high books and appara- 
tus $2670.49. Vols, in schools : elem. 
46.421; high 8622. 

Belmont. 

A branch of the San Mateo Co. Free 
Library is being arranged for at Belmont 
and will be started, it is hoped, early in 
1918. 

Camp Fremont, Y. M. C. A. Unit No. 2. 
Camp Fremont, Y. M. C. A. Unit No. 
2 Branch, San Mateo Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established December 18, 1918. 

Daly City (Exp. via Ocean View). 
Daly City Branch, San Mateo Co. 
Free Library. 

Free delivery was begun October 1, 
1917. 

La Honda (No exp. office). 
La Honda Branch, San Mateo Co. 
Free Lirrary, 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued. 
La Honda — Continued. 
This branch was discontinued Novem- 
ber 1, 1917. It may reopen during the 
summer season should the demand seem 
urgent. 

Runnymede. 
A branch of the San Mateo Co. Free 
Library has been requested by Runny- 
mede. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,738. 
Assessed valuation, $36,978,526 (tax- 
able for county $34,747,955). 

Santa Barbara Co. Free Library, 
Santa Barbara. Mrs Frances B. Linn, 
Lib'n. Miss Margaret Dold, in charge. 
During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished in La Mesa School Dist. 

Frances Burns Linn, 

Librarian. 

Santa Barbara Co. Teachers' Li- 
brary, Santa Barbara. Miss Mamie V. 
Lehner, Co. Supt. Est. 1895; joined the 
Santa Barbara Co. Free Library, Dec. 24, 
1914. Income 1916-17, $61, from i of $2 
fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. paid 
for books $61. 

Total vols. 200. Teachers 216: elem. 
165; high 51. School disti-icts : elem. &i; 
high : 1 city ; 4 union. Total expended 
for books and apparatus for schools 1916- 
17, $8280.67: elem. books $2065.22, ap- 
paratus ; high books and apparatus 
$6215.45. Vols, in schools : elem. 50,626 ; 
high 12,255. 

La Mesa School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Santa Barbara). 
La Mesa School Dist. Branch, 
Santa Barbara Co. Free Library, was 
established November 28, 1917. 

Santa Barbara. 

Santa Barbara Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs Frances Burns Linn, Lib'n. 

The exhibit of the Holy Family prints 
from the most famous oil paintings of the 
old masters, was an unqualified success. 
They showed well against the oak wains- 
coting and case-ends and added to the 
Christmas spirit in the library most 
happily. 

Frances Burns Linn, 

Librarian, 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



73 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. SS,539. 
Assessed valuation $87,243,295 (tax- 
able for county $79,944,300). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
Jose. Miss Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 

During tbe quarter branches were 
established at Shannon and Sunnyvale 
and in the following school districts : 
Mountain View and San Martin. 

As most of the schools were late in 
opening- this year this has been a very 
busy quarter. We have sent out 10,428 
books ; of these S84 were requests and 159 
from the State Library. Only 2182 
books were returned to the main library 
during the quarter. At present there 
are 20,460 books out at the branches. 
On January 1 there were 12,143 books 
from the County Library in the schools. 

The library has been and still is col- 
lecting books for the Camp Fremont Li- 
brary : 267 books have been donated and 
passed on to the Camp. The sheriff's 
office kindlj^ delivered the books, and a 
great many magazines, to the Camp for 
i:s, so we had no expense for delivery. 

The library staff has also been "doing 
their bit" by taking charge of the list of 
names of soldiers of Santa Clara County ; 
most of the work was done by others, 
but we have filed the cards and keep 
them at the library for reference and find 
them very useful. We hope to keep up 
the work and have a complete list of the 
men that have gone from Santa Clara 
County. 

Stella Huntington, 

Librarian. 

Santa Clara Co. Teachers' Library, 
San Jose. D. T. Bateman, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $165, from 
i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. Am't. 
paid for books .$59.56. 

Total vols. 3002. Teachers 546 : elem. 
407; high 139; School districts: elem. 
82 (inch 4 jt.) ; high: 3 city; 3 district; 
4 union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools 1910-17, $12,066.34 : 
elem. books $6726.65 ; apparatus $683.18 ; 
high books and apparatus .$4656.51. Vols, 
in schools : elem. 114,978 ; high 17,183. 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
Mountain View. 

Mountain View School D i s t. 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established November 1, 1917. 

San Martin. 
San Mabtin School Dist. Branch, 
Santa Clara Co. Free Library, was 
established December 24, 1917. 

Shannon (P. O. Los Gates, RFD A; no 
exp. office). 
Shannon Branch, Santa Clara Co. 
Free Library, was established Novem- 
ber 5, 1917. 

Sunnyvale. 

Sunnyvale Branch, Santa Clara 
Co. Free Library, was established De- 
cember 1, 1917. 

This branch is located in Sunnyvale 
Free Public Library. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,140. 
Assessed valuation $19,621,735 (taxable 
for county $18,491,380). 

Santa Cruz Co. Free Library. Miss 
Minerva H. Waterman, Lib'n. 

During the quarter a branch was estab- 
lished in the Santa Cruz School District. 
—Santa Cruz ,S'Hr/. D 14 

Three thousand dollars has been do- 
nated by Andrew Carnegie for the erec- 
tion of a branch library at Soquel avenue 
and Water street. — Santa Cruz Sentinel, 
D 2 

>Santa Cruz Co. Teachers' Library, 
Santa Cruz. Champ S. Price, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $36, from 
i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Am't. paid for books $11.29. 

Total vols. 2050. Teachers 190 : elem. 
150; high 40. School districts: elem. 52; 
high : 1 city, 1 district ; 1 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $4637.13: elem. books 
$2,370.71, apparatus .$477.65 ; high books 
and apparatus $1788.77. Vols, in schools : 
elem. .39,350 ; high 4249. 



74 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOKNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 18,020. 
Assessed valuation $16,704,140 (taxable 
for county $14,806,630). 

Shasta Co. Teachers' Library, Red- 
ding. Mrs Charlotte Cunningham, Co. 
Suyt. Income 1916-17, $60, from * of $2 
fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. paid 
for books, $83.77. 

Total vols. 930. Teachers 149 : elem. 
1 27 ; high 22. School districts : elem. 109 ; 
high : 2 union ; 1 jt. union. Total ex- 
pended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $2953.41: elem. books 
$1073.10; apparatus $3.51.52; high books 
and apparatus $1528.79. Vols in schools : 
clem. 49,146 ; high 3300. 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 910 sq. mi. Pop. 4098. 
Assessed valuation $2,351,980 (taxable 
for county $2,291,550). 

Sierra County Teachers' Library, 
Downieville. Miss Belle Alexander, Co. 
Supt. Income 1916-17, $14, from * of $2 
fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. paid 
for books 0. 

Total vols. 232. Teachers 22: elem. 
19 ; high 3. School districts : elem. 15 ; 
high : 1 jt. union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$720.14: books $471.78. apparatus 0; 
high $254.36. Vols in schools : elem. 
10..'^'04 ; high 814. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6078 sq. mi. Pop. 18.800. 
Assessed valuation $18,242,258 (taxable 
for county $17,331,868). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished at the County Jail, Edgewood, and 
Greuada. 

Miss Margaret Cirdner, assistant, re- 
signed Dec. 1, and she was succeeded by 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 
Miss Hazel Askey of the State Library 
staff. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, 

Librarian. 

Siskiyou Co. Teachers' Library, 
Yreka. W. H. Parker, Co. Supt. Est. 
1889 ; joined County Free Library Aug., 
1915. Income 1916-17, $60, from i of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates ; trans- 
ferred to Co. F. L. 

Total vols. 1040. Teachers 153 : elem. 
130 ; high 23. School districts : elem. 
94 ; high : 2 union ; 2 jt. union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools, 1916-17, $2900.60: elem. books 
.$946.48, apparatus o; high $19.54.12. 
Vols, in schools : elem. 51,648 ; high 1667. 

Edgewood. 

Edgewood Branch, Siskiyou Co. 
Free Library, was established December 
29, 1917. 

Grenada. 

Grenada Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library, was established October 25, 
1917. 

Yreka. 

Yreka Free Public Library and 
Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Nancy A. Sti-other, Lib'n. 

The library has received an increase in 
taxation amounting to about $400. This 
has enabled the board to purchase some 
new books for the reference department 
as well as some of the best of the new 
fiction. 

The records for 1917 show a surprising 
increase in library service, the circulation 
being more than double that of a year 
ago. 

The hour for closing has been changed 
from 10 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

N. A. Strother, 

Librarian. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 27,559. 
Assessed valuation $25,426,139 (taxable 
for county $24,639,429). 

Solano Co. Teachers' Library, Fair- 
field. Dan H. White, Co. Supt. Income 
1016-17, $61, from -J of $2 fee for teach- 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



I'O 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 
ers' certificates. Amt. paid for books 
.$49.60. 

Total vols. .520. Teachers 173 : elem. 
123; high 50. School districts: elem. 
.51 (iuci. 2 jt.) ; high: 2 district; 3 
union ; 1 jt. union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916- 
17, $3736.27: elem. books $2030.41, ap- 
paratus ; high books and apparatus 
$1705.86. Vols, in schools : elem. 37,514 ; 
high 7743. 

Vallejo. 

§Valle.jo [Free] Public Library and 
Brakch, Solano Co. Free Library. 
Miss L. Gertrude Doyle, Lib'n. 

Our main work is "War Work," cir- 
culating books for study among the en- 
listed men on Mare Island, borrowing 
books needed for examinations and draft 
work. Tlie help given the men by the 
Library in first draft was acknowledged 
by the Local Draft Board by appointing 
the librarian an associate member of the le- 
gal Advisory Board. This and the regular 
library work was done by regular force 
without added help. 

The Library since the first has been a 
"Bureau of Information" on the draft 
question, bringing many people into the 
library who now have become patrons. 

Improvements have been begun on mak- 
ing a large room out of the front base- 
ment, for use of enlisted men. Also a 
small room for Mechanical Books and a 
study room. 

L. Gertrude Doyle, 

Librarian. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 48,394. 
Assessed valuation $39,069,410 (taxable 
for county .$37,283,070). 

Sonoma Co. Teachers' Library, 
Santa Rosa. Mrs Florence M. Schief- 
fer, Co. Supt. Est. 1875. Income 1916- 
17, $85, from i of $2 fee for teachers' 
certificates. Amt. paid for books $17.10. 

Total vols. 2162. Teachers 351 : elem. 
288; high 63. School districts: elem. 
146 (incl. 1 jt.) ; high: 3 district; 4 
union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools, 1916-17, $8840.42 : 



SONOMA CO.— Continued, 
elem. books $3866.59, apparatus ; high 
books and apparatus $4973.83. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 166,478 ; high 8447. 

Cloverdale. 

Cloverdale Free Public Library. 
JMiss Bernice Butler, Lib'n. 

The Woman's Improvement Club 
cleared $206.15 from the recent annual 
masquerade ball. Most of this will be 
expended for the benefit of the library. — 
Cloverdale Reveille, N 9 

Petaluma. 

SPetalum.^ [FreeI Public Library. 
Miss Sara Frances Cassiday, Lib'n. , 

We are installing the free card system 
in our library and it will be a couple of 
months before we have it complete. 
Sara F. Cassiday, 

Librarian. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 22,522. 
Assessed valuation $31,886,850 (taxable 
for county $30,470,525). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, 'Slo- 
desto. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

During November-December, Mrs May 
Dexter Henshall, in company with the 
county librarian, visited the schools of 
the county, explaining the advantages of 
the affiliation of the schools with the 
county librai-y. Eleven schools have 
since joined, making the number of 
schools now being served by the county 
library, seventeen. 

During the quarter the county librarian 
delivered six addresses upon various sub- 
jects, before different clubs and organiza- 
tions. 

Cornelia D. Provines, 

Librarian. 

Stanislaus Co. Teachers' Library, 
Modesto. Frank Bacon, Co. Supt. Est. 
1889 ; turned over books to Stanislaus 
Co. Free Library, Nov. 2.5, 1914. Income 
1916-17, $115, frou^ * of .$2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books $91.13. 

Total vols. 1017. Teachers 272: elem. 
204 ; high 68. School districts : elem. 61 



76 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued, 
(incl. .3 jt ) ; high: 3 district; .5 union. 
Total expended for books and apparatus 
for schools 1916-17, $9078.06: elem. 
books .$1330.53, apparatus $611.64 ; high 
books and apparatus $4105.89. Vols, in 
schools : elem. 57,313 ; high 8455. 

Modesto. 

Modesto [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. Free Library. 
Miss Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

Mrs Vera Wilkins was granted a six 
months' leave of absence, beginning Jan. 
1, 1918. Her substitute has not yet 
been appointed. 

Miss Dorothy Norman was appointed 
to fill the vacancy caused by Miss Isa- 
belle Park's absence at the Los Angeles 
Library Training School, Miss Nor- 
man's appointment to expire July 1, 1918. 
Cornelia D. Provines, 

Librarian. 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 6328. 
Assessed valuation $12,406,429 (taxable 
for county $12,080,865). 

Sutter Co. Teachers' Library, Yuba 
City. Lizzie Vagedes. Co. Supt. Est. 
1880. Income 1916-17, $27, from i of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Amt. 
paid for books $7.49. 

Total vols. 2395. Teachers 64: elem. 
56 ; high 8. School districts : elem. 36 ; 
high : 1 union. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916- 
17, $1,566.26: elem. books $1192.20, ap- 
paratus $141.67 ; high books and ap- 
paratus $232.39. Vols, in schools : elem. 
26,622 ; high 950. 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 
County seat. Red BlufE. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 11,401. 
Assessed valuation $15,265,345 (taxable 
for county $14,5.53,305). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at the Agriculture Club in 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 
Corning, Flournoy, Henleyville, Paskenta, 
and in the following school districts : 
Cottonwood, Howell, Jelly's Ferry, Las- 
sen, Last Chance, Lincoln, Live Oak, 
Montgomery, Orchard Park, Saddle 
Camp, and South Fork. 

The Los Molinos Land Company has 
allowed the Los Molinos Branch another 
room, rent free, and tables, chairs and a 
new magazine rack have been supplied 
by the county library. This makes an 
attractive reading room in addition to 
the room which has been used for some 
time. 

C. E. Cowen who is connected with 
the Corning Union High School and 
who is Agriculture District Club Leader 
has taken a number of agriculture books 
and is circulating them from his machine 
as he visits the different farmers. This 
is to be known as the Agriculture Club 
Branch and we hope to reach a large 
number of people in this way that could 
not be served through an ordinary 
branch. 

Miss Margaret Livingston of the Los 
Angeles Library School began as as- 
sistant in the county library on Oct. S 
and will be here until the last of March. 
Estella De Ford, 

Librarian. 

Tehama Co. Teachers' Library, Red 
Bluff. Mamie B. Lang, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $48, from i 
of $2 fee for teachers' certificates ; trans- 
ferred to Co. F. L. Amt. paid for books 
$1.50. 

Total vols. 600. Teachers 128: elem. 
105 ; high 23. School districts : elem. 64 ; 
high : 3 union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$5910.28: elem. books $3803.77, ap- 
paratus ; high books and apparatus 
$2106.51. Vols, in schools : elem. 27,300 ; 
high 2264. 

Corning. 

Corning Free Public Library. Mrs 
Rachel W. Montgomery, Lib'n. 

Four thousand five hundred vols, val- 
ued at $5000, have been donated by Dr 
E. P. Case in memory of his late wife, 
Mrs Emily A. Case, one of the early 
founders of the Corning Library. 

Through Mrs Sarah Bartlett, an houor- 
arv member of the Luther Burbank 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



n 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

Corning — Continued. 

Society, three fine volumes of Burbank's 

methods and discoveries were donated us 

iu September, 1917. 

Rachel W. Montgomeky, 

Librarian. 

Ageicultuee Club Branch, Tehama 
Co. Feee Library, was established 
December 1, 1917. 

Cottonwood. 

Cottonwood School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Feee Library, was estab- 
lished October 13, 1917. 

Fiournoy (No exp. office). 
Flournoy Branch, Tehama Co. Free 
Library, was established November 24, 
1917. 

Henieyville (No exp. office). 
Henleyville Branch, Tehama Co. 
Free Library, was established Novem- 
ber 23, 1917. 

Jelly's Ferry School Dist. (No exp. 

office). 
Jelly's Ferry School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 3, 1917. 

Lassen School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Vina). 
Lassen School Dist. Branch, Te- 
hama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 7, 1917. 

Last Chance School Dist. (P. O. Red 

Bank; no exp. office). 
Last Chance School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 7, 1917. 

Lincoln School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Red Bluff). 
Lincoln School Dist. Branch, Te- 
hama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 28, 1917. 

Live Oak School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Chico). 
Live Oak School Dist. Branch, Te- 
hama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 9, 1917. 

Los Molinos. 

Narcissa Cox Vanderlip Free Li- 
brary AND Branch, Tehama Co. Free 
Library. Mrs Roy E. Ludlum, Lib'n. 

See note under Tehama Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

Montgomery School Dist. (P. O. and 
exp. Kirkwood). 
Montgomery School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 21, 1917. 

Orchard Park School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Red Bluff). 
Orchard Park School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 31, 1917. 

Paskenta (No exp. office). 
Paskenta Branch, Tehama Co. Free 
Library, was established November 28, 
1917. 

Saddle Camp School Dist. (P. O. Hun- 
ter; no exp. office). 
Saddle Camp School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 7, 1917. 

South Fork School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Red Bluff). 
South Fork School Dist. Branch, 
Tehama Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 27, 1917. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 3301. 
Assessed valuation $3,360,025 (taxable 
for county $3,288,930). 

Trinity Co. Free Library, Weaver- 
ville. Miss Alice Anderson, Acting Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were 
established at Island Mountain, Val Dor 
Dredge, and in the folloAving school dis- 
tricts : Grass Valley and Hoaglin. 

Dedrick Branch has been suspended 
for the winter. 

The headquarters of the Trinity County 
Free Library moved into a comfortable 
and commodious building in November. 
The Central library now has a well 
lighted and well equipped workroom and 
affords an attractive reading room for the 
patrons of Weaverville. 

Miss Mary Anderson resigned her 
position as first assistant in the Trinity 
County Free Library and was succeeded 
by Miss Margaret Cleaves of Weaver- 
ville on .January 1, 1918. 

Alice Anderson, 

Librarian. 



78 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



TRINITY CO.— Continued. 

Tkinity Co. Teachers' Libbx\et, 
Weavebville. Maude I. Schroter, Co. 
Supt. Est. 1889. Income 1916-17, $11, 
from i of $2 fee for teachers' certificates. 
Amt. paid for books .$19.8.5. 

Total vols. 400. Teachers 30: elem. 
2(> ; high 4. School districts : elem. 24 ; 
high : 1 county. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916- 
17, .$1443.48: elem. books $1044.83, ap- 
paratus $235.41 ; high books and appa- 
ratus $163.24. Vols, in schools : elem. 
7451 ; high 800. 

Dedrick (No exp. ofRce). 
Dedeick Branch, Trinity Co. Free 

IjIBRAEY. 

See note under Trinity Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Grass Valley School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Lewiston). 
Grass Vaixey School Dist. Branch, 
Trinity Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 29, 1917. 

Hoaglin School Dist (No exp. office). 
HoAGLiN School Dist. Branch, 
Trinity Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 3, 1917. 

Island Mountain. 

Island Mountain Branch, Trinity 
Co. Free Library, was established Octo- 
ber 25, 1917. 

Val Dor Dredge (P. O. Junction City; 
no exp. office.) 
Val Dor Dredge Branch, Trinity 
Co. Free Library, was established De- 
cember 10, 1917. 

TULARE COUNTY, 

(TVelfth class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4035 sq. mi. Pop. 35,440. 
Assessed valuation .$48,626,295 (taxable 
for county .$40,023,030). 

TuLAEE Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Mrs Bessie Plerman Twaddle, Lib'n. 
During the quarter branches have been 
established at Woodlake Grammar School 
and in the following school districts : 
Alta Vista, Lewis Creek, and Wheatland. 
Mrs Bessie Herbman Twaddle, 

Librarian. 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 

Tulare Co. Teachers' Library, A^i- 
SALiA. J. E. Buckman, Co. Supt. Est. 
1&89. Income 1910-17, $134, from i of 
$2 fee for teachers' certificates. Books 
turned over to Co. F. L. 

Total vols. 4600. Teachers 384: elem. 
291 ; high 93. School districts : elem. 
131 (incl. 4 jt.) ; high: 4 district; 5 
union. Total expended for books and ap- 
paratus for schools 1916-17, $11,.319.11 : 
elem. books $4530.-56, apparatus $792.20; 
high books and apparatus $5996.35. Vols. 
in schools 117,491 ; high 8343. 

Alta Vista School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Porterville). 
Alta Vista School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 18, 1917. 

Lewis Creek School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Lindsay). 
Lewis Creek School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 15, 1917. 

Wheatland School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Ducor). 
Wheatland School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 12, 1917. 

Woodlake. 

Woodlake Grammar School Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 17, 1917. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 9979. 
Assessed valuation $9,475,252 (taxable 
for county $8,047,988). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Columbia, Confidence, 
.lamestown, Quartz, Strawberry, Tuol- 
umne, and in the following school dis- 
tricts : American Patriot, Big Oak Flat, 
Deer Flat, Groveland, .Jacksonville, Mid- 
dle Camp, Rawhide, and Springfield. 

In the early part of October Mrs Hen- 
shall and the county librarian visited 
25 school districts. Eleven schools have 
joined the county library. Of these, all 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



79 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued, 
liiit one are conmiuiiily as ■well as school 
brauches. 

Extensive improvements have been made 
in the Sonora Public Library since it 
became a branch of the County Free Li- 
brary. The room has been enlarged and 
a skylight added, and a new floor laid. 
Walls and woodwork were freshly finished 
and plate glass windows put in. 

Some of the money for these improve- 
ments was raised by the Tuolumne County 
Welfare Club, and the rest expended from 
the city fund. The public library has 
had to spend almost no money for books, 
all new fiction, class and children's books 
being supplied by the county library. 
Eighteen monthly and weekly periodicals 
are furnished by the county library. 

The county library is assisting in the 
food conservation campaign. All bulle- 
tins, pamphlets and books bearing on the 
subject are kept on file at the central 
office and bulletins distributed with every 
shipment of books. 

A collection of material on forestry 
and kindred topics is being built up for 
the benefit of the rangers in Tuolumne 
Countj'. Requests for matter of this sort 
become more numerous month by month, 
as the county library becomes better 
known. 

Edna Holroyd, 

Librarian. 

Tuolumne Co. Teachers' Library, 
Sonora. G. P. Morgan, Co. Supt. In- 
come 191G-17, $11, from * of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books 0. 

Total vols. 52. Teachers 67 : elem. .54 ; 
high 13. School districts : elem. 32 ; high : 
2 union. Total expended for books and 
apparatus for schools, 1916-17, $1810.89 : 
elem. books $1048.54, apparatus 0: high 
l:)ooks and apparatus $762.35. Vols, in 
schools: elem. 15,964; high 4299. 

American Patriot School Dist. (P. O. 

and exp. Sonora). 
American Patriot School Dist. 
Branch, Tuolumne Co. Free Library, 
was established November 13, 1917. 

Big Oak Flat School Dist. (No exp. 
office). 

Big Oak Flat School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 30, 1917. 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued. 
Columbia (No exp. office). 
Columbia Branch, TLtolumne Co. 
Free Library, was established Decem- 
ber 11, 1917. 

Confidence (No exp. office). 
Confidence Branch, Tuolumne Co. 
Free Library, was established December 
17, 1917. 

Deer Flat School Dist. (P. O. Big Oak 

Flat; no exp. office). 
Deer Flat School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October .3, 1017. 

Groveland School Dist. (No exp. office). 
Groveland School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 3, 1917. 

Jacksonville School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Chinese Camp). 
Jacksonville School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 14, 1917. 

Jamestown. 

Jamestown Branch. Tuolumne Co. 
Free Library, was established November 
8, 1917. 

Middle Camp School Dist. (P. O. Center 
Camp; no exp. office). 
Middle Camp School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished December 1, 1917. 

Quartz (No exp. office). 

Quartz Branch, Tuolumne Co. Free 
Library, was established November 27, 
1917. 

Rawhide School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Jamestown). 

Rawhide School Dist. Branch, Tu- 
olumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 23, 1917. 

Sonora. 

Sonora [Free] Pltblic Library. Miss 
Esther E. Shaw, Lib'n. 

See note under Tuolumne Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Springfield School Dist. (P. O. Colum- 
bia; no exp. office). 
Springfield School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November 13, 1917. 



80 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued. 
Strawberry (P. O. Confidence; no exp. 
office). 
Stkawberky Branch, Tuoiatmne Co. 
Free Library, was established Decem- 
ber 13. 1917. 

Tuolumne. 
Tuolumne Branch, Tuolumne Co. 
Free Library, was established October 
2G, 1917. 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 18,347. 
Assessed valuation $30,599,968 (taxable 
for county $29,644,284). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ventura. 
Miss Julia Steffa, Lib'n. 

During- the quarter, branches have 
been established in the following school 
districts : Hueneme, Matilija, Nordhoff, 
Quiotal, and Simi. 

Miss Stella Smith is now custodian of 
Saticoy Branch. P. O. and exp. Saticoy. 
Julia Steffa, 

Librarian. 

Ventura Co. Teachers' Library, 
Ventura. James E. Reynolds, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1889 ; joined Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary, March 13, 1916. Income 1916-17, 
$65, from 4 of $2 fee for teachers' certifi- 
cates. Amt. paid for books $50 ; trans- 
ferred to Co. F. L. 

Total vols. 1700. Teachers 182: elem. 
136 ; high 46. School districts : elem. 
55 (inch 2 jt.) ; high: 5 union. Total 
expended for books and apparatus for 
schools 1916-17, $4083.00: elem. books 
$3162.92, apparatus $31.50; high books 
and apparatus $888.67. Vols, in schools : 
elem. 43,509; high 6890. 

Hueneme School Dist. (No exp. office). 
Hueneme School Dist. Branch, 
"\'entura Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in December, 1917. 

Matilija School Dist. (P. O and exp. 
Ojai). 
Matilija School Dist. Branch, 
Ventura Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in December, 1917. 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Nordhoff School Dist. (P. O and exp. 
Ojal). 
Nordhoff School Dist. Branch, 
Ventura Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in November, 1917. 

Quiotal School Dist. (P. O. Pattiway; 
no exp. office). 
Quiotal School Dist. Branch, Ven- 
tura Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in December, 1917. 

Santa Paula. 

§Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial 
[Free Public] Library. Miss Mabel 
Gertrude Wood, Lib'n. 

In regard to the food conservation 
campaign, we have distributed a great 
number of government pamphlets to the 
public. The interest was largely aroused 
in the matter through a lecture on the 
subject at one of the meetings of the Ebell 
Club, delivered by the librarian of this 
library. The domestic science teachers in 
the schools here have been asked to hand 
in well-tried recipes which may be further 
distributed to the public through the li- 
brary, helping still further the cause of 
food conservation. 

Mabel Gertrude Wood, 

Librarian. 

Saticoy. 
Saticoy Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

>Sfee note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Simi. 

Simi School Dist. Branch, Ven- 
tura Co. Free Library, was established 
in December, 1917. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 13,926. 
Assessed valuation $23,008,670 (taxable 
for county $22,196,655). 

Yolo Co. Free Library, Woodland. 
Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

The Yolo Co. Free Librai^y is 
clipping from the local papers all items 
that contain news of the activities of the 
countj^ or of individuals of the county in 
connection with the war. These clippings 



vol. 13, no. 1] CALIFORNIA "LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



81 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 

are to be pasted in loose leaf scrap books, 
indexed, and preserved as local history. 

Plans for the proposed Carnegie Branch 
Library building at Yolo are being drawn 
by W. H. Weeks of San Francisco. 

The people of Yolo raised three hun- 
dred dollars with which they bought a 
very desirable lot located in the center of 
the town. The lot was then deeded to 
the county and was formally accepted by 
the Board of Supervisors at the Decem- 
ber meeting. 

The Yolo County Library and the 
Woodland Public Library will work to- 
gether in the collection and preparation 
of books to be sent to the Camp Fre- 
mont Library. 

At the request of the local chapter of 
the Red Cross the County Library made 
an appeal for the donation of French 
text books which are said to be urgently 
needed, especially in the officers" training 
camps. These books were collected by 
the library and shipped to Red Cross 
headquarters for distribution. 

Eleanor Hitt, 

Librarian. 

Yolo Co. Teachers' Library. Wood- 
land. Miss Harriett S. Lee, Co. Supt. 
Est. 1S89 ; became a part of Yolo Co. 
Free Library July 21, l^ll. Income 
1916-17, $38L from * of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for books 
.?3S. 

Total vols. 2.500. Teachei-s 113: elem. 
SO : high 27. School districts : elem. 46 
duel. 3 jt. ) ; high: 1 district: 1 union, 
1 jt. union. Total expended for books 
and apparatus for schools, 1916—17, 
.$2140.78: elem. books .$1431.28. appa- 
ratus $112,29 ; high books and apparatus 



YOLO CO. — Continued. 
$.597.21. Vols, in schools: elem. 21,090: 
high 3S62. 

Woodland. 

Woodland Free [Pvblic] Llbkary 
AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
Miss Madeline B. Morgan, Lib'u. 

Miss L. Hildebrant substitutes dur- 
ing evening hours. 

There has been considerable increase 
in the general use of the library ; the 
juvenile circulation particularly increas- 
ing. It is hoped we will have better 
accommodations for the children in the 
near future. 

Madeline B. Morgan, 

Librarian. 

Yolo. 
Yolo Branch, Yolo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Sec note under Yolo Co. Free Library. 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area. 62.5 sq. mi. Pop. 10.042. 
Assessed valuation $10,588,800 (taxable 
for county $9,.549,760) . 

Yuba Co. Teachers' Library, Makys- 
\aLLE. Jennie Malaley, Co. Supt. In- 
come 1916^17, $41, from + of $2 fee for 
teachers' certificates. Amt. paid for 
books $75.11. 

Total vols. 404. Teachers 78: elem. 
62; high 16. School districts: elem. .39: 
high : 2 district. Total expended for 
books and apparatus for schools, 1916-17, 
$1,582.19 : elem. books $1032.35, apparatus 
$100: high books and apparatus $429.84. 
Vols, in schools : elem. 18,614 ; high 2040. 



82 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



Many public libraries waste a great 
deai of time and money before they find 
good places to get supplies. The plan is 
to give all libraries the benefit of the 
experience of the older libraries of the 
State by listing under different heads the 
houses that have been found to give sat- 
isfaction, the names and addresses being 
furnished by the older and larger libraries 
of Califoi'nia. In this way suggestions 
will be given as to where different sorts 
of books may be bought, where books may 
be rebound or periodicals bound, where 
library furniture may be bought, etc., 
both in California and in the East. 

If any information is needed about the 
firms listed below which can not be ob- 
tained from the firms themselves, the 
names of the libraries recommending the 
different ones will be sent to any library 
upon application to the State Library. 

SUPPLIES 
Amateur Plays. 

Acting Dramas for Amateurs. 

The Book Den, 464 Eighth st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

A. L. A. 

Booklist. 

78 E. Washington st., Chicago, 111. 
Catalog. 
1904 cd. $1. 

Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing OflSce, Washington, 
D. C. 
1904-11 ed. $1.50. 

A. L. A. Pub. Board, 78 E. Washington 
St., Chicago, III. 
Headquarters and Puelishing Board, 
78 E. Washington st, Chicago, 111. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Foster & Futernick Co., 560 Mission 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 51-65 First st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
H. J. Lawrence, Sacramento, R.F.D. 5, 

Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 10th floor, 

Metropolitan bldg., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbaekler, 42.S .T st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 



Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will b? 

furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau, 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 351 Beach st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Comigated paper cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and Fol- 
som sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 Front 
St., Sacramento, Calif. 
Book Plates. 

Alice A. Harrison, 2005 Green st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 
27th St., New York, N. Y. 

Times-Mirror Printing & Binding Co., 
lis S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Western Lithograph Co., 600-010 E. 
Second St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 51-65 First st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 104 Battery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furnitur- Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern CaUfornia Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 



vol. 13, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



83 



Book Stacks, Etc. — Continued. 
J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main St., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 

F, W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Books. 
Baker Taylor Co., 33-37 East Seven- 
teenth St., New York City. 
H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Emporium, 835-S65 Market St., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 

New York, N. Y. 
H. R. Huntting Co., Besse Place, 

Springfield, Ohio. 
Messrs. A. C. McClurg & Co., 218-24 

S. Wabash ave., Chicago, 111. 
John J. Newbegin, 149 Grant ave., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 

220 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st., Sacramento, 

Calif. 
B. A. Rogers & Co., 427 W. 7th st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, 5th ave. and 48th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Union Library Association, 225 Fifth 

ave., New York City. 
White House, Sutter bet. Grant ave. 

and Kearny St., San Francisco, Calif. 
English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co.. 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, W. C, London. 
Foreign Books and Publications in 

Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Lemcke & Buechner, 11 East Seven- 
teenth St., New York City. 



Books — Continued. 
French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & 
J. Lelabriandais, 324 Stockto- St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 
J. T'erquem, Paris, France. 
German. 

Messrs Mayer & Miiller, Berlin, Ger- 
many. 
Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 262 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez. Madrid, Spain. 
Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 
School Books. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch Co., 252 

S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Ginn & Co., 20 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
Messrs. A. C. McClurg & Co., 218-24 

S. Wabash ave., Chicago, 111. 
Milton Bradley Co., 20 Second st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant ave. 

and Post st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson Book Shop, 30 Church 

St., New York City. 
Henry Malkan, 18 Broadway, New 

York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New Ox- 
ford St., London, Eng. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq., 
London, England. 

Especially Californiana. 

Robert E. Cowan, 867 Treat ave., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Dawson's Book Shop, 518 S. Hill st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
De Witt & Snelliug, 1609 Telegraph 

ave., Oakland, Calif. 
Holmes Old Book Co., 70 Third st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 



84 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

W. F. Purnell, 915 K st., Sacramento, 
Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman and Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
716 Mission st., San Francisco, and 
627 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charts. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 88 First 
St., San Francisco, and 605 Jeffries 
Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 
Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 
See FuBNiTUKE and Supplies. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes Stassforth Co., 232-234 S. 

Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st, Sacramento, 

Calif. 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
716 Mission st, San Francisco, and 
627 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Filing cases for music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles. Calif. 

Globes. 

W. F. Purnell, 915 K st, Sacramento, 

Calif. 
Rand-McNally Co., 459 S. Olive st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
C. F. Weber & Co., 365-367 Market st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazines. 

See Peeiodicals. 

Maps. 

A. C. McKenzie, Russ Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

W. F. Purnell, 915 K St., Sacramento, 
Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 459 S. Olive st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365-367 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlets and Multi-Binders and 
Pamphlet Boxes. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st., New York, 
N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbebs. 

Boston Book Co., 83-91 Francis st., 

Fenway, Boston, Mass. 
De Witt & Snelling, 1609 Telegraph 
ave., Oakland, Calif. 



vol. 13, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



85 



Periodicals — Continued. 
International Magazine Co., 339 Bay 

Way North, Elizabeth, N. J. 
G. E. Stechert dc Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 

ave., New York City. 

SuBSCBiPTiON Agencies. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 

Square, New York City. 
Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 

zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st, Sacramento, 

Calif. 
San Francisco News Co., 747 Howard 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Western States Magazine Co., 405-406 

Maskey Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 

ave., New York City. 

Pictures. 

Berlin Photographic Co., 305 Madison 
ave., New York City. 

Braun & Co., 13 W. 46th St., New York 
City. 

Maison Ad Braun & Cie, 256 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y., and Paris, France. 

Curtis & Cameron, Copley square, Bos- 
ton Mass. 

Especially for repi'oduction of American art. 

Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 
Fairbanks-Morse & Co., G51 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Shelf Label-Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Signs. 

Droragold-Schroeder Co., 1033 S. Los 
Angeles st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Elite Sign Co., 108 Winston st, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Sam H. Harris, 113 W. 6th St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Tablet & Ticket Co., Ill New Mont-; 
gomery st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
Philip Brigandi (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 12.32 N. New Hampshire av., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Willis E. Case (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 1920 Cedar st, Berkeley, 

Calif. 
Underwood & Underwood, 12-14 W. 

34th St., New York, N. Y. 
W. F. Hyde (Agent Underwood & Un- 
derwood) Los Altos, Calif. 
Theo. F. Wambold, 1137 W. 11th st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Steel Stacks. 
See Book Stacks. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 432 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 276 Bush 
st, San Francisco, 637 S. Olive st., 
Los Angeles, and 1127 9th st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 319 S. . 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 508 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, and 611 J st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 



86 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

California State Library School. For 
full information write to the State Li- 
brarian, Sacramento, California. 

8ee also this publication, page 95. 

Los Angeles Public Library Training 
School. For full information, write to 
Librarian, Public Library, Los Angeles, 
California. 

See also this publication, page 57. 

Riverside Library Training School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, California. 

See also this publication, page 64. 

University of California Summer 
Course in Library Methods. For full 
information write to Librarian, Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley, Calif. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The nest conference of the American 
Library Association will be held at Sara- 
toga Springs. New York, July 1 to G, 
1918. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The annual meeting of the California 
Library Association will be held at Hotel 
Del Moute, June IS to 22, 1918. 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRA- 
RIANS. 

The California County Librarians' 
Convention will be held this year in con- 
junction with the meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association at Hotel Del 
Monte, June 18 to 22. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



87 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Vice-President, Robert Rea, Public 
Library, San Francisco. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Nell S t r o t h e r, 
Fresno County Free Library, Fresno. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Eugene Ferry Smith, Trustee 
Public Library, San Diego. 

Vice-President, Harry Shafer, Trustee 
Public Library, Hanford. 

Secretary, Miss Blanche Morse, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Berkeley. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer and 
Milton J. Ferguson, Celia Gleason, Eu- 
gene Ferry Smith, Everett R. Perry, 
George T. Clark, Mrs Elizabeth Madison. 

Nominating — The Past Presidents : 
Joseph C. Rowell, George T. Clark, 
Charles S. Greene, F. B. Graves, Joy 
Lichtenstein, L. W. Ripley, Harold L. 
Leupp, Everett R. Perry. 

District Nominators — Second district, 
Anne Bell Bailey. 

The Committee consists of the Past 
Presidents, together with one nominator 
from each district, to be chosen in accord- 
ance vs^ith the amendment to tlie constitu- 
tion adopted June 16, 1914. 

Publications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Eleanor 
Hitt, Jean Ross. 

Auditing — Althea H. Warren, Public 
Library, San Diego, chairman ; Frances 
D. Patterson. 

Resolutions — J. C. Rowell, University 
of California Library, Berkeley, chair- 
man ; Helen T. Kennedy, Caroline S. 
Waters. 

Legislative- — J. H. Quire, State Li- 
brary, Sacramento, chaii-man; Charles S. 
Greene, Charles F. Woods. 

Lilrary Schools — Mabel R. Gillis, 
State Library, Sacramento, chairman ; 
Sydney B. Mitchell, Mrs Theodora R. 
Brewitt, Charlotte M. Brown, George T. 
Clark, J. F. Daniels. 



Military Library Service — Milton J. 
Ferguson, State Library, Sacramento, 
chairman ; Bessie B. Silverthorn, Dor- 
othy L. Clarke, Ida M. Reagan, Clara B. 
Dills. Robert Rea, Anne Bell Bailey, 
Victor E. Marriott, Anne Hadden, Nellie 
M. Russ, Althea H. Warren, Katharine 
P. Ferris, Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Mrs 
Alice G. Whitbeck, Joseph F. Daniels. 

Work icith Prisons — Mary Barmby, 

Alameda County Free Library, Oakland, 

chairman ; Zaidee Brown, Mrs Alice G. 
Whitbeck. 

Certification — Everett R. Perry, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; Wini- 
fred H. Bigley, Charles S. Greene, Milton 
J. Fergiison, Althea H. Warren. 

Constitution — Eugene Ferry Smith, 
Public Library, San Diego, chairman ; 
Zaidee Brown, Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, 
Milton J. Ferguson, George T. Clark. 

Entertainment — Susan T. Smith, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Mar- 
garet Hatch, Eleanor Hitt, Cornelia D. 
Provines, Mary L. Jones. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND DIS- 
TRICTS. 
First District. 

President, Charles V. Park. University 
Library, Stanford University. 

Secretary, L. May Brooks, University 
Library, Stanford University. 

The iirst district consists of the fol- 
lowing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Anne Bell Bailey, San Ma- 
teo County Free Library, Redwood City. 

Secretary, Mrs Mary Gervais, Public 
Library, Burlingame. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda (excepting Ala- 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Third District. 

President, Clara B. Dills, Solano 
County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Secretary, Margaret Adelle Barnett, 
Public Library, Santa Rosa. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendocino, 
Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Kern 
County Free Library, Bakersfield. 

Secretary, Corina Kittelson, Kern 
County Free Library, Bakersfield. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, Hattie Mann, Public Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

Secretary, Ida Condit, Public Library, 
Stockton. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
EI Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Julia Steffa, Ventura County 
Free Library, Ventura. 

Secretary, Mrs Frances B. Linn, Pub- 
lic Library, Santa Barbara. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, H. A. Kendal, Public Li- 
brary, Eureka. 

Secretary, Florence Simpson, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

T'he seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Dorothy L. Clarke, Plumas 
County Free Library, Quincy. 

Secretary, Anna L. Williams, Public 
Library, Alturas. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 



Ninth District. 

President, Essae M. Culver, Butte 
County Free Library, Oroville. 

Secretary, Louise Jamme, Colusa 
County Free Library, Colusa. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the Association 
will be held at Hotel Del Monte, June 
18 to 22, 1918. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 
First District Meetings. 

A meeting of the First District of the 
California Library Association was held 
Saturday evening, November 17, 1917, in 
the Lane Library building, San Francisco. 
About fifty members were present as 
guests of the Lane Library and the Sutro 
Branch, State Library, and opportunity 
was given, before and after the formal 
program, to inspect the two libraries, which 
occupy the same building. The meeting 
was called to order at S.l^O' by C. V. 
Park, of Stanford University Library. He 
called first upon C. S. Greene of the 
Oakland Library, to bring up the matter 
of giving library publicitj' to food con- 
servation. Mr Greene told of the efforts 
of the Oakland Library to help in this 
work, especially of an exhibit of food con- 
servation posters and foods. He then re- 
ferred to a letter from Mrs F. M. Har- 
mon, trustee of the State Library, who 
desires that a meeting of delegates of the 
libraries of the district be held, in order 
that Miss Edith Guerrier, who is in 
charge of the national work of the libra- 
ries, may speak to them. Mr Greene 
moved : That a meeting of the district be 
held for this purpose on November 22, 
time and place to be announced by the 
Chair, later in the evening. (Announced 
for 4 o'clock at the Alameda County De- 
partment of the Oakland Library). 

The President then announced that 
plans for the year included at least one 
more formal meeting, probably with the 
Second District and some walking trips. 

He then introduced M. .7. Ferguson, 
State Librarian, who read a paper: 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



89 



*"Califoniia libraries : a short review aud 
a look ahead." 

After the meeting refreshments were 
served, and an opportunity given to see 
the libraries and to get acquainted. 
Minna Stillman. 
Secretary pro tern. 

Second District Meeting. 

The second district, California Librarj^ 
Association, held a meeting in Redwood 
City on November 17, 1917, with sixty 
in attendance. 

The morning session was held in the 
Sequoia Theatre, Miss Anne Bell Bailey 
presiding. 

Although the meeting was set for the 
middle of November, the hope for fair 
weather was fulfilled by the most perfect 
day California can boast. 

At eleven o'clock the meeting began 
with a most cordial offering of the city 
and its representative citizens for the 
entertainment of its visitors, by E. T. 
jNIcGettigan, secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce of Redwood City. 

While the meeting was most informal, 
the recommendations of the committee 
on the Constitution were taken up and 
discussed, but the members preferred to 
defer action as to their favor or dis- 
favor of the changes until the next meet- 
ing, when they feel that they may be 
better equipped to discuss the changes. 

Miss Bailey was selected as nominator 
for the second district. 

This being the first meeting since the 
loss of Mr J. L. Gillis, the members of 
the second district wished to give some 
expression of the sense of loss felt by 
everyone. fResolutions of sympathy were 
drawn up by C. S. Greene of the Oakland 
Free Library, upon the request of the 
chaii'man, and accepted by the members. 

The general topic for the day was 
"War Service" and Mrs A. G. Whitbeck 
opened the program with a most help- 
ful and instructive talk on "Help the 
libraries might give in the food conserva- 
tion," by exhibits, such as those suggested 
by the librarian of the Department of 
Agriculture and the librarian of the Food 
Administration. She told of an exhibit 
she had given along these lines, which 
was most helpful and no doubt will be 



*See this issue, page 1. 
tSee this issue, page 7. 



adopted by many of the librarians present 
who had not felt confident to go on 
without someone taking the first step. A 
general discussion followed Mrs .> hit- 
beck's talk, in which several librarians 
told what they had done in this work. 
Mr Greene of the Oakland Free Library 
showed a pamphlet which his library had 
issued and sent out, and Miss Barmby of 
Alameda County telling of a deposit of 
twenty books or pamphlets which has 
been sent from one branch to another. 

Miss Stella Huntington spoke of war 
work the Santa Clara County Free Li- 
brary is doing, along very different lines, 
than any that had been mentioned. Their 
library is making a card index record of 
all the men in service from Santa Clara 
County, so that anyone desiring informa- 
tion about any of the men will be able to 
secure the same by applying to the li- 
brary. Several librarians reported receiv- 
ing donations of books for the men in 
the camps. 

N. H. Jacks of the Y. M. C. A. gave 
a most interesting talk on the work of 
the association in the war, and how thor- 
oughly it was appreciated by the men. 
He mentioned the help the libraries are 
giving, but urged the librarians to use 
.iudgment in sending material to the 
camps. While intentions are often the 
kindest in the world, one sometimes for- 
gets that donating books to men of in- 
telligence does not mean dumping material 
no longer interesting or useful to oneself, 
on to the men in camp. He spoke of the 
type of books to send to the men, and 
mentioned that magazines containing con- 
tinued stories should be fastened together. 

Mr Greene followed with an outline of 
the plans of the American Library Asso- 
ciation as nearly as he could give them at 
this time. He assured the members that 
although matters seemed somewhat dis- 
jointed at present, things were slowly tak- 
ing shape and that all the camps would 
no doubt be well provided for. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librariau, 
who is the division director for the Western 
States was then asked to give further in- 
formation. He told of the splendid re- 
sponse California made to the call for 
money to conduct this huge war library 
plan. He then spoke most feelingly of 
his predecessor, Mr Gillis, and asked the 
same help and consideration that has 



90 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



been shown by all librarians in the past, 
to assist him along the way that lies 
before him. 

Miss Frances Patterson then read a 
most enlightening paper on the work that 
has been done at Camp Fremont. This 
aroused discussion as to the best service 
and Miss Etta Eckhart told of the way 
she tried to serve the men at the Presidio 
at Monterey. The Red Cross has been 
given the use of the basement of the li- 
brary building there. 

Two letters were read by Miss Bailey 
from librarians working with the camp 
at San Diego, and were so inspiring that 
every librarian present felt the call to do 
something for the nearest camp, at once. 

Prof. Joseph Smith of St. Matthews 
Church, San Mateo, gave an organ recital, 
which closed the morning session. 

Luncheon was served at the Sequoia 
Hotel, where the tables were decorated 
with suggestions of the military, flags, war 
vessels and even an aeroplane. 

Since the Chamber of Commerce had 
invited the members for a ride, Chaplain 
Brasted's talk was left until after lunch, 
so that his remarks would be fresh in 
the minds of the visitors when they vis- 
ited Camp Fremont. 

Chaplain Brasted was post chaplain in 
the Philippines for three years before the 
troops were sent to Camp Fremont, and 
he told of the method they followed in 
conducting their libraries there, and the 
probable similarity of the plan in the 
libraries that were being planned for Fre- 
mont. 



A library of some few hundred books 
has been started by the combined efforts 
of the librai-ies of two counties adjoining 
Camp Fremont, and this was shown the 
visitors during the trip to the camp. 
Chaplain Brasted spoke most feelingly 
of the influence that books have on the 
men, and his experience has shown that, 
given the books, the men will appre- 
ciate and use them. As he finished his 
talk, the members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce who had so kindly lent their ma- 
chines, arrived and announced that it was 
time to start. The trip was made in 
short time, and the 8th Infantry, 15th 
Cavalry and 13th Infantry were visited, 
also the T. M. C. A. building, just com- 
pleted. The class rooms, pool rooms and 
other attractions were of more interest 
to the librarians than the small corner 
devoted to books, but due respect was 
shown to the size of the collection when 
they were told that the books were being 
drawn out so rapidly that more were 
needed. 

At this point those of the librarians 
who had trains to catch returned to Red- 
wood City, while the others were driven 
through the Portola Valley, one of the 
many beautiful scenic drives in the county. 
Everybody expressed himself most heartily 
appreciative of the royal entertainment 
provided by the men who had planned 
this trip, and left with pleasant recol- 
lections of the town, the camp, and the 
county. 

Maky Geevais, 

Secretary. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



91 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Everett R. PeriT, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library, Secretary. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free li- 
brary law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 1911) 
read as follows : 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library . . . 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing, by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of county 
librarian unless prior to his appointment, 
he has received from the board of library 
examiners a certificate of qualification for 
the office. At the time of his appoint- 
ment, the county librarian need not be a 
resident of the county nor a citizen of the 
State of California. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Note. — Fii'st-grade certificates are valid 
for use throughout the state ; second grade, 
in counties of the twenty-first to the fifty- 
eightla (except twenty- fiftli and thirty- 
third) classes, inclusive. Tliird-grade 
certificates, formerly issued for use in 
counties of the forty-ninth to the fifty- 
eighth classes, inclusive, are no longer 
issued. 

First Grade. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. 
Barmby, Mary, Chief Alameda County 

Dept., Free Library, Oakland. 
Bigley, Winifred H., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Culver. Essae M., Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
Daniels, Joseph F., Ln. Riverside Public 

Library and Riverside County Free Li- 
brary, Riverside. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Evans, Helen, Asst. State Normal School 

Library, San Jose. 



Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Ferris, Katharine Post, Ln. Bangs County 

Free Library, Hanford. 
Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles County 

Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Herrman, Jennie, Ln. San Diego County 

Free Library, San Diego. 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. Tolo County Free 

Library, "Woodland. 
Huntington, Stella, Ln. Santa Clara 

County Free Librarj', San Jose. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa 

Barbara. 
McCardle, Sarah B., Ln. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Mast, Maude L., Asst. Fresno County Free 

Library, Fresno. 
Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 

Angeles. 
Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Stanislaus 

County Free Library, Modesto. 
Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
Ripley, Lauren W., Ln. Sacramento City 

Free Library and Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Robson, Anna Laura, Ln. Glenn County 

Free Library, TVillows. 
Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. Siskiyou County 

Free Library, Yreka. 
Smith, Susan T., Reference Ln. State Li- 

braiT. Sacramento. 
Steffa, Julia, Ln. Ventura County Free 

Library, Ventura. 
Steffens, Laura, Ln. Sutro Branch State 

Library, San Francisco. 
Thomas, Mabel W., Chief City Branch 

Dept., Free Library, Oalvland. 
Twaddle, Mrs Bessie (Herrman), Ln. 

Tulare County Free Library, Visalia. 
Vogleson, Helen E., 2d Asst. Ln. Los 
Angeles County Free Library, Los 
Angeles. 
Warren, Althea H., Ln. Public Library, 

San Diego. 
Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Public Li- 

brarj'-, Santa Cruz. 
Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 

County Free Library, San Bernardino. 
Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 

Second Grade. 

Anderson, Alice, Acting Ln. Trinity 
County Free Library, Weaverville. 

Baird, Jean D., Asst. Alameda County 
Dept., Free Library, Oakland. 

Baker, Mignon, Ln. Girls High School 
Branch, Public Library, Riverside. 



92 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Beeman, Mrs Anne (Madison), Mrs Thomas 

Beeman, Ln. Imperial County Free Li- 
brary, El Centro. 
Brewitt, Mrs Theodora R., Principal 

Training School, Public Library, Los 

Angeles. 
Brown, Jennie May, Box 282, Long Beach. 
Butterfield, Alice M., Asst. Public Library, 

Riverside. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Clarke, Dorothy L., Ln. Plumas County 

Free Library, Quincy. 
Clatworthy, Linda M., Ref. Ln. State Col- 
lege of Washington Library, Pullman, 
Wash. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Kings County Free 

Library, Hanford. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Dickson, Lillian L., Head Cataloger, 

Public Library, Riverside. 
Dold, Margaret E., In charge Santa Bar- 
bara County Dept., Free Public Li- 
brary, Santa Barbara. 
Clock, Mary E., Ln. Madera County Free 

Library, Madera. 
Goldman, Belle A., Superintendent of 

Branches and Stations, Public Library, 

San Francisco. 
Hatch, Margaret, Ln. Sutter County F. L., 

Tuba City. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. Tuolumne County 

Free Library, Sonora. 
Jamme, Louise E., Ln. Colusa County 

Free Library, Colusa. 
Laugenour, Nann C, Asst. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 
Mclntire, Persis C, Asst. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
McNeill, Norali, Ln. Public Library, Rich- 
mond. 
Maynard, Glyde, Asst. Chaffey Library, 

Ontario. 
Mumm, Beulah, In charge Library School, 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Northey, Delia F., Asst. Kern County Free 

Library, Bakersfield. 
Schumacher, Marion L., Asst. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 
Smith, Mrs Mary Pierce, care Oregon Li- 
brary Commission, Salem, Ore. 
Sutherland, Florence C, 872 Sutter st, 

San Francisco. 
Thompson, Laura E., Asst. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Third Grade. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Dehan, Mrs Anna (Weyand) Mrs Den- 
nis J. Dehan (2d grade). 

Ellis, Victoria (2d grade). 

Kennedy, Mrs Gladys (Brownson), Mrs 
Scott J. Kennedy (1st grade). 

McVittie, Mrs Delia (Wilsey), Mrs J. A. 
McVittie (2d grade). 

Post, Mrs Miriam (Colcord), Mrs Free- 
man Post (2d grade). 



COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library law 
and circular of information for applicants 
for certificates of qualification to hold 
office of county librarian in California" 



was published in News Notes of California 
Libraries, April, 1911, and later re- 
printed in painphlet form. The edition 
being exhausted, a revised edition of the 
circular was printed in News Notes of 
California Libraries, January, 1914. This 
has been reprinted as a pamphlet. Copies 
will be furnished by the State Librarian. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The Board of Library Examiners de- 
sires to call the attention of librarians to 
the examinations which will be held at 
Los Angeles on June 7-8 and at Sacra- 
mento on June 14-15 for those persons 
who want to qualify for the position of 
county librarian under the California 
County Free Library Act of 1911. The 
Board feels that the nature of the work, 
its importance in the development of the 
educational life and institutions of the 
state, its relationship to industrial and 
ec(fnomic conditions and the compensation 
offered successful candidates who receive 
appointments make this service worthy of 
the best efforts of the best material in 
library cii'cles. Of the work which has 
been done in California since the enact- 
ment of this law the examiners feel a 
justifiable pride ; and they are anxious 
that the new candidates who may present 
themselves may profit by the experiences 
of those who have been in the service, 
and may also bring to this work the best 
foundation upon which to build a success- 
ful career. If, therefore, a librarian who 
expects to take the examination will add 
to his general education and his technical 
training actual experience in a county 
free library, his chances of passing the 
examination with creditable showing will 
be enhanced. Naturally service in any 
sort of library, however, will give the 
candidate a certain vantage ' ground ; the 
wider the range of work, the better are the 
chances of passing the test with high 
grade. 

California counties have their peculiari- 
ties just as have the counties and peoples 
of other states. One who is unfamiliar 
with those conditions and peculiarities 
would in the beginning enter into the 
service with a certain handicap. The 
Board, however, wishes to assure libra- 
rians who live without the borders of 
California that they are not barred from 
taking the examinations. While the tests 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



93 



will only be given witliin tliis state and 
foi- the year 191S at the places and times 
mentioned above, the lists are open to 
all library workers who have educational 
and professional qualifications. 

To the younger members of the pro- 
fession particularly the Board would urge 
that they give the fullest possible con- 
sideration to the subjects usually covered 
in library work, and that they become as 
familiar as possible with the special laws 



and conditions under which they would 
serve should they pass the examinations 
and receive an appointment. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chair- 
man of the Board. For application blanks 
or further information address the Chair- 
man of the Board, M. J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



94 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California State 
Library was signed by Governor Peter H. 
Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Septem- 
ber 4. 1913. 

Annual income for 1917-1918, $130,000. 

Total accessions 200.620 (less 7.51 lost 
and missing = 199,869 ) , exclusive of 7414 
accessions in Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment, and of the Sutro Branch in San 
Francisco (estimated at about 70,000 
vols.). 

TRUSTEES. 

L. W. Ripley, Pres Sacramento 

Mrs Frances M. Harmon Los Angeles 

A. H. Hewitt Tuba City 

Max J. Kuhl San Francisco 

R. M. Richardson Sacramento 

Milton J. Ferguson, Sec'j/-, Sacramento 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Libra- 
rian and Head of Books for the Blind 
Department. 

Miss Laura Steffens, Librarian, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Harriet G. Eddy, County Library 
Organizer. 

Miss Eudora Garoutte, Head of Cali- 
fornia Department. 

Miss Alice J. Haines, Head of Docu- 
ments Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, School 
Library Organizer. 

Miss Annie Lowry, in charge of Period- 
icals and Binding. 

Miss Beulah Mumm, in charge of Li- 
brary School. 

Miss Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Joseph H. Quire, Legislative Reference 
Librarian. 

Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Acting Head, Order 
Department. 

Miss Susan T. Smith, Reference Libra- 
rian. 

Miss Theresa Bauer, Stenographer. 

Miss Ruth Beard, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Miss' Edna A. Bell, Assistant. 

Mrs Clara Murray Blood, Instructor in 
Library School. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, Assistant. 

Miss Elta A. Camper, Assistant. 

Miss Marjorie Chilberg, Assistant. 

^liss Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Miss Anna Creaner, Assistant. 

Miss Margaret Dennison, Assistant. 

Mrs Gerna R. Dickson, Assistant. 



Miss Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of 
the Blind. 2520 Maple ave.. Los Angeles. 

Miss Margaret Girdner. Assistant. 

Miss Bernice L. Goff, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Edna Hewitt, Assistant. 

jNIiss Alice Hillyer, Assistant. 

Miss Gladys M. Kidd, Stenographer. 

Miss Anita Knopf, Stenographer, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Shipping Clerk and 
Cameragraph Operator. 

Miss Winona McConnell. Assistant. 

Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Assistant. 

Miss Persis C. Mclntire. Assistant. 

Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Assistant, 
Sutro Branch. 

Miss D. Florence Montfort, Assistant. 

Miss Catharine J. Morrison, Home 
Teacher of the Blind, 306A South Bonnie 
Brae st., Los Angeles. 

i\Iiss Mary V. Provines, Assistant. 

Miss Helen M. Rowland, Assistant. 

Miss Marion L. Schumacher, Assistant. 

Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Lloyd Smith. Shelf Lister. 

Miss Lily Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Olive M. Treichler, Assistant. 

Elmer J. Walther, Assistant in Law 
Department. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Miss Emma F. de Merritt, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Miss Mae Sternsdorflf, Book Repairer. 

Wallace McBain, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Edmund Ackerman, Messenger. 

Ted Corson, Messenger. 

Joseph Cummins, Messenger, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Jack Harris, Messenger. 

Thomas Lenahan. Messenger. 

■John W. Ross, Messenger. 

John F. Driscoll, Assistant Janitor. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

Staff News Items. 
Miss Hazel Askey left on November 
30 to begin work December 1 as assistant 
in the Siskiyou County Free Library. 
On November 22, Ernest Greenwalt re- 
signed to enter the U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey. Miss Catherine M. Hartzell re- 
signed as stenographer at the Sutro 
Branch on October 29. Miss Anita Knopf 
Avas appointed in her place. Miss Mar- 
garet Hatch resigned October 6, to be- 
come librarian of the Sutter County Free 
Library. Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin is 
on leave of absence, having gone to the 
Colusa County Free Library as tempo- 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



95 



lixry assistant on December 1. Joseph E. 
Ryan left on December 10 to accept a 
position at Mare Island. Charles B. 
Turrill re-signed December 1. Willard 
Wooden, messenger, left October 6. 

Edmund Ackerman began as messenger 
on November 1. Miss Margaret Girdner, 
C. S. L. S., '17, who has been in the 
Siskiyou County Free Library, will begin 
as assistant January 2. John W. Ross 
began as messenger October 15. Miss 
Florence J. Wheaton began work Decem- 
ber 3. Robert Alexander began a few 
days' temporary work on December 27. 
Mrs Mary J. Brown began as temporary 
assistant on work with newspapers Octo- 
ber 24. Louis Nordbrook began as tem- 
l)orary assistant on December 10. 

Miss Clara Murray was married to Mr 
Charles Reader Blood, Lieutenant, United 
States Army Reserve Corps, on October 
27. Mrs Blood will continue as a mem- 
ber of the State Library staff. 

Joseph H. Quire has been assigned to 
duty at Camp Kearny as Camp Liljrarian. 
See article, this issue, p. 17. 

STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL. 

Miss Ruth Beard, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 

Francisco. 
Miss Edna A. Bell, Fairoaks, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Esther M. Bomgardner, San Diego, 
Cal 

'15. Ln. National City High School, 
National City. 
Miss Helen V. Briggs, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Agnes E. Brown, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Univ. Farm School L., Davis. 
Miss Helen M. Bruner, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Ruth E. Bullock, Redlands, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Catalog dept., Los Angeles 
Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Miss Katharine Cahoon, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Madera Co. F. L., Madera. 
Miss Elta L. Camper, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Bishop, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence. 
Miss Dorothy L. Clarke, Sacramento, Cal. 

15. Ln. Plumas Co. F. L., Quincy. 
Miss Virginia B. Clowe, Woodland, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Mabel Coulter, Salinas, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Kings Co. F. L., Hanford. 
Miss Dorotha Davis, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Fresno Higla School Library, 
Fresno. 
Miss Estella De Ford, National City, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Tehama Co. F. L., Red Bluff. 
Miss Margaret Dennison, Alameda, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Beatrice Y. Gawne, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 



Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Sacramento, 
Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Mary E. Clock, Madera, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Madera Co. F. L., Madera. 
Miss Bernice L. Goff, San Jose, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Vivian Gregory, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Sutter Co. F. L., Yuba City. 
Miss Cecilia Henderson, Santa Paula, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Edna S. Holroyd, Hanford, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Tuolumne Co. F. L., Sonera. 
Miss Louise E. Jamme, Hood River, Ore. 

'15. Ln. Colusa Co. F. L., Colusa. , 

Miss Amy G. Luke, Willows, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Winona McConnell, Elk Grove, Cal. 

'15. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Lamanda Park, 
Cal. 

'17. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Miss Anne Margrave, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Santa Barbara Co. F. L., 
Santa Barbara. 
Miss Lenala Martin, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Acting Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., 
Susanville. 
Miss Marion Morse, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Kings Co. F. L., Hanford. 
Mrs Miriam Coleord Post, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret L. Potter, Oakland, Cal. 

'16. Asst. Stanislaus Co. F. L., Modesto. 
Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Redwood City, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Marion L. Schumacher, Hanford, Cal. 

'15. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Lodi, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Eunice D. Steele, Berkeley, Cal. 

■16. Ln. P. L., Hanford. 
Miss Caroline Wenzel, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Josephine L. Whitbeck, Richmond, 
Cal. 

'16. Asst. Solano Co. F. L., Fairfield. 

Class of 1918. 

Rosamond J. Bradbury, Santa Barbara 

University of California 
Beatrice M. Brasefield, Palo Alto 

Stanford University 
Tillie de Bernardi, Santa Rosa 

University of California 
Edith Edinburg, Muroc 

Bethany College, Kansas 
Mildred Dorothy Kellogg, Salinas 

University of California 
Algeline M. Marlow, San Diego 

University of California 
Hazel Meddaugh, Stockton 

University of California 
Alice Moore, Los Gatos 

Stanford University 
Bess M. Ranton, Long Beach 

University of California 
Anne Belle Robinson, Claremont 

Pomona College 
Ruth Seymour, Mill Valley 

University of California 



96 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



School News Items. 

The following- graduates of the State 
Library School have received new ap- 
pointments : 

Miss Esther Bomgardner is now libra- 
I'ian of the National City High School. 
Miss Dorotha Davis is librarian of the 
Fresno High School. Miss Margaret 
Girdner resigned from the Siskiyou County 
Free Library on November 30 and will 
begin work in the State Liln-ary on .Janu- 
ary 2. 

Miss Miriam J. Colcord was married 
to Mr Freeman Post of Pittville, Lassen 
County, in December. 

On October 23 the Class of 1918 bought 
a Liberty Bond. 

Miss Constance Darrow left the Library 
School in December to take up secretarial 
work. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, '14, president. 

Miss Margaret L. Potter, '16, vice 
president. 

Miss Winona McConnell, '15, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Elmee J. Waltheb, Assistant, in charge. 

The Law Department is fully equipped 
with the latest reports, digests, encyclo- 
psedias and textbooks, and is entirely 
free to the public for reference purposes. 
State officers are entitled to borrow books, 
and private individuals are accorded the 
same privilege upon presentation of a re- 
quest signed by a Supreme, Appellate or 
Superior Judge, or other state oflBcer. 
Books may be kept three weeks, and will 
be renewed for two weeks or longer, de- 
pending on demand. All books are sub- 
ject to recall, if required by a state officer. 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Copies of 30 California state publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries : 



Agriculture Bd. Premium list, school con- 
test, 1917. 

Banks Supt. 8th ann. rept., 1917. 

Building and Loan Commr. Ann. rept., 
1917. 

Dairy Bur. Laws . . . dairy products. 
1917. 

Education Bd. Bull. 23. 

Engineering Dept. Program . . . compe- 
tition for architect state buildings, Sac- 
rainento. 1917. 

Equalization Bd. Bull. . . . taxes for 
state purposes. 1917. 

Fish & Game Comm. California fish and 
game v. 3, no 4. 

Horticulture Comm. Mo. bull. v. 6, nos. 
10-12 (in 2). 

Immigration & Housing Comm. Discus- 
sion of teaching English. 

Report on experiment for Ameri- 

canizatiori. 

State housing manual. 1917. 



Industrial Accident Comm. California 
safety news, v. 1, nos. 10-12. 

Compensation news bull. no. 5. 



Industrial Welfare Comm. Act. 1917. 

Regulation of canning Industry. 



1917. 

Insurance Commr. Insurance laws. 1917. 
Labor Statistics Bur. Labor laws. 1917. 
Mining Bur. Bull. 74. 

•Mines & mineral resources o<' Mon- 



terey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, 
Santa Barbara, "Ventura counties. 1917. 
Preliminary report no. 3. 



Motor Vehicle Dept. Motor vehicle Act. 

1917. 
Normal School, San Francisco, Course of 

study. 1917. 
Railroad Comm. General order no. 51. 
Letter of transmittal . . . ann. 



rept. 1917. 

Real Estate Commr. Real estate direct- 
ory-bull. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Social Insurance Comm. California's need 
of social health insurance. 

Selected List of California State 
Library Publications in Print. 

Biennial report, 1916. 

Books for the blind department. News 

Notes. Reprinted from News Notes of 

California Libraries. 

Reports of home teacher of the 



blind, July 1, 1914, to June 30, 1915, 
and July 1, 1915, to June 30, 1916. 1916. 

California county free libraries ; two ques- 
tions often asked. 9th ed. 1917. 

California county free library law. 2d ed. 
1913. 

California county free library service to 
schools, 6th ed. 1917. 

California laws of interest to women and 
children. 1917. 

California library service, economical, 
equal, complete. 1915. 

Circular and announcement of the Cali- 
fornia State Library School, 1918-1919. 
1917. 

Information compiled for the use of the 
members of the California Legislature, 
42d session; compiled under supervision 
of J. L. Gillis, State Librarian. 1917. 

Library laws of the state of California. 
Ed. 1913. 1913. 

Library laws of the state of California ; 
suppleinent. 1917. 

News notes of California libraries, v. 1. 
Mav, 1906-date. Monthly, May, 1906- 
Dec, 1906. Quarterly Jan. 1907-date. 
Vol. 13 current. 

Post cards, as follows : 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



97 



County libraries. 

Map showing county free libraries 
established. 

County free library sign. 
California department: Mining. 

James W. Marshall, the discoverer of 
gold in California. 

Sutter's Mill at Coloma, painted by 
Nahl. 

A prospector and his pack mules. 

A California miner, his cabin and 
mining implements. 

Placer mining. 

He believes that gold is found in 
quartz, but he would be satisfied to 
find it in pints, or even half-pints. 
Miner's Creed. 
California department: History, etc. 

State flag, tlie bear flag [facsimile]. 

State flower, the golden poppy {Esch- 
scholtzia Calif arnica) . 

The Californian, the first paper pub- 
lished in California [facsimile]. 

Joaquin Miller, the poet of the Sierras. 

Sibyl Sanderson as Thais, in the opera 
Thais. 

"Sunday in California in the olden 

days," painted by C. C. Nahl. 

The residence, at Monterey, of Gov- 
ernor Alvarado.. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Susan T. Smith, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of the 
librarian, and to any other educationa] 
institution on request of its official head 
or its librarian ; to individuals through the 
signature of a state officer, of the Li- 
brarian of the local library or of the 
official head of any other educational in- 
stitution or on receipt of a $5.00 deposit ; 
to a club or grange on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

The State Library pays the cost of 
transportation as follows : to any general 
branch of the county free library that 
requests books for general library service 
and is located in a part of the county 
supporting the county free library ; to any 
(elementary or high) school district branch 
of the county free library that has joined 
the county free library and is wholly in a 
part of the county supporting the county 
free library ; and, for school service only 
to_ any (elementary or high) school dis- 
trict branch of the county free library 
that has joined the county free library 
and is wholly or partly in a part of the 
county not supporting the county free 
library. In every other instance the 
charges both ways are paid by the bor- 
rower. All express companies grant a 
half-merchandise rate to the borrower on 
return shipments, and a half-merchandise 
rate both ways on shipments sent to 
libraries. 

Librarians are urged to collect bulletins 
and pamphlets of all kinds relating to 
war work — those issued by the various 
departments of the Government, federal 

7—35857 



and state, on food conservation, war sav- 
ings, etc., as well as those published by 
the Red Cross and other private organiza- 
tions. These will answer many requests 
that the State Library is now called upon 
to fill. ^ 

Service for high school debates is 
greatly curtailed because librarians ask 
for the specified references listed in the 
University of California bulletins, giving 
the State 'Library no opportunity of sub- 
stituting in case the articles are loaned 
or not in the State Librai'y. We have 
added many excellent references to thos^ 
listed and have had magazine articles 
cameragraphed, which are not being used 
because "exact book" is nearly always 
asked for. 

This also applies to requests other 
than for debates, on current topics to be 
found only in the magazines. The 
"exact reference" is often only a para- 
graph in a heavy bound volume, for which 
a far more comprehensive article might 
be substituted. In all cases where pos- 
sible, then, give the State Library an 
opportunity to substitute. If the sub- 
stitutes prove unsatisfactory we will wel- 
come criticism. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

The work of the Catalog Department 
is proceeding along two parallel lines : the 
cataloging of the regular additions of new 
books, and the recataloging of much ma- 
terial needing a fuller treatment than it 
has heretofore received. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 26S4 volumes were cataloged, adding 
16,438 cards to the catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDOBA Gaboutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of books 
on the history and description, resources 
and industries of the State, as well as the 
works of California authors in all de- 
partments of literature. These are made 
accessible by means of a card catalog. 
Full names and biographical sketches of 
California authors, artists, musicians, 
pioneers and early settlers are being se- 
cured, together with their photographs. 
The collection of bound i)eriodicals is 
quite large. The Department also con- 
tains about 6000 bound volumes of news- 
papers, a file of which is being indexed 
with reference to the history of the State. 
Students will be assisted in their work. 



98 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Among the many pioneer and early 
settler cards received are those of three 
pioneers who arrived in '49 or prior 
thereto. 

Mrs May C. Lassen has filled out a 
card for Peter Lassen in whose honor 
Mount Lassen and Lassen County were 
named. Peter Lassen arrived in 1840 
and from that time on until he met his 
death through the treachery of Indians, 
he was connected with many important 
events. Mrs Lassen states that he brought 
the first Masonic charter to California. 
This charter was issued May 10, 1848, as 
Western Star Lodge No. 98, with the 
seal of the Grand Lodge of Missouri at- 
tached. This lodge was located at Ben- 
ton City, Upper California. 

In April, 1846, General Fremont with 
fifty of his men enjoyed the hospitality 
of Peter Lassen for several weeks. Mrs 
Lassen also states that he took the first 
steamboat up the Sacramento River as 
far as Red Bluff and planted a large 
vineyard at what is now known as Vina. 
Peter Lassen was killed by Indians Feb- 
ruary 26, 1859. 

A very interesting card is that of Mrs 
Margaret Morffew, who has the follow- 
ing under "Miscellaneous notes" : "I have 
been a resident of San Francisco since 
December, 1849, and have followed its his- 
tory ever since, never having left the 
state for more than two months at a 
time. Have lived in my present home 
since July, 1869." 

Other cards received are as follows : 
Charles and William Ashley, Mrs Sarah 
Baldwin Dornin, Mr and Mrs George 
Kaiser, Giles Pease Kellogg, Mr and Mrs 
Mathew Simpson King, Mr and Mrs 
Jacob Lynn, Leander Ransome, Edward 
L. Reimer, John P. Smith, Ezra Snyder. 

California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of Ir^ews Notes 
of California Libraries: 

Bancroft, Grifflng' 

Newbegin, Mrs Anna (Bell) 
Mrs John J. Newbegin 
♦Pendleton, Robert Emmet 
*Reed, George 
*Rix, Harriet Hale 

Taylor, Justus Hurd 



♦Native Californians. 



California Musicians. 

The following musician cards have been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries : 
Breil, Joseph Carl 
Bretherton, Mrs Gloria (Fisk) 

Mrs George Kellogg Bretherton 
*Bridge, Mrs Adelaide Martin (Smith) 
Mrs Arthur Bridge 
Cadman, Charles Wakefield 
♦Little, (Caroline Halsted 
Lynn, Jacob Jr 
Meeker, Zenas Earl 
♦Pendleton, Robert Emmet 
Thorpe, Mrs Anna (Taw) 

Mrs Benjamin F. Thorpe 
von Hagel, George 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of California Libraries: 

♦Abbott, Marguerite Elizabeth 
♦Beach, Chester 

Keith, Mrs Elizabeth (Emerson) 
Mrs TVilliam Keith 

Montgomery, Alfred 

Magazine Index. 

The index, made by California libraries 

several years ago, covers the following 

California magazines : 

Californian, v. 1-6, 1889-1882. Complete. 
Californian illustrated magazine, v. 1-5, 

1891-1894. Complete. 
Hesperian, v. 1-8, 1858-1863. Complete. 
Hutching's California magazine, v. 1—5, 

1856-1861. Complete. 
Land of sunshine, v. 1-15, 1894-1901. 
Out west (formerly Land of sunshine), 

v. 16-31, 1902-1909. 
Overland monthly, v. 1-76, 1868-1910. 
Sunset magazine, v. 1-25, 1898-1910. 

The State Library School, classes of 
1915, 1916 and 1917 as practice work in 
indexing, added to this index the following : 
Argonaut, v. 1, March 25-June 2, 1877. 

v. 2, Jan. 12-March 23, 1878. 

v. 3, July 13-Aug. 31, 1878, 

California fruit grower, v. 41, Jan.-March, 

1910. 
California mail bag, v. 1, June-July, 1871, 
California mountaineer, v. 1, Jan.-July, 

1861. 
California outlook, v. 1, Nov. 27, 1908- 

April 16, 1909. 
California weekly, v. 1, April 16-May 14, 

1909. 
Commonwealth club transactions, v. 1- 

V. 2, no. 1, Nov. 1903-Jan. 1906. 
Grizzly bear, v. 1-v. 3, no. 5, p. 7, May, 

1907-Sept., 1908. 
Mariposa magazine, 1 v. [1898?]. 
Out west, V. 35-v. 38, no. 4, Dec. 1911- 

Sept. 1913. 
Overland, v. 77-89, Jan. 1911-Dec. 1916. 
Pacific coast musical review, v. 11, no. 

1-8, Oct. 5-Nov. 23, 1907. 
Pacific monthly, v. 10-11, June, 1863-Nov. 
1864 (Feb., June and Sept., 1864, miss- 
ing). 



♦Native Californians. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



99 



Pacific outlook, v. 10, Dec. 31, 1910-Feb. 

18, 1911. 
Pacific rural press, v. 79, Jan.-March, 

1910. 
Sunset, V. 26-v. 27, Jan. 1911-Dec. 1911. 
Wave, V. 6-7, Jan.-Sept. 5, 1891 ; v. 8, 

Jan. 2-Feb. 13, 1892. 
"West coast magazine, vol. 9, Oct. 1910- 

Feb. 1911. 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the following periods : 
August 15, 1846, to March, 1905, and 
January, 1913, to January 1, 1918. 

Catalog. 

Four hundred and ten cards have been 
added to the California catalog during 
October, November and December. 

Donations. 

A most valuable and interesting collec- 
tion of photographic reproductions of 
William Keith paintings has been pre- 
sented by the heirs of California's great 
artist. This collection consists of 85 
prints and will become more and more 
prized by the student and lover of art as 
the years go by. A picture of Mrs Eliza- 
beth Emerson Keith, who was herself an 
artist of ability, has been presented by her 
daughter, Mrs E. N. Harmon. This pic- 
ture was reproduced from an old daguer- 
reotype and has a quaint charm all its 
own. 

Collections of manuscripts and letters 
relating to the early days have been re- 
ceived from J. A. Fairchild, Mary B. 
Hall, T. W. Hubbard, William H. Mur- 
ray, Dr H. W. Yemans and Mrs E. L. 
Frisbee. 

John F. Ingle has furnished a sketch 
of Clark Ashton Smith, the young Cali- 
fornia poet. Mrs May C. Lassen has 
added to the biographical cards of Peter 
Lassen and Edward J. Reimer typed 
sketches and Mrs Mary Dornin Wilkinson 
has presented the manuscript reminis- 
cences of George D. Dornin. These rem- 
iniscences cover the period 1849—1879 and 
are exceedingly interesting. An unusually 
large number of programs, pictures and 
autographed books has been received. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND DEPART- 
MENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in iive different types 
are sent to any blind resident of Cali- 



fornia upon ai)plic;iliun. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. AVriting appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried be- 
fore they are ordered.. Addresses of firms 
supplying all articles loaned will be fur- 
nished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an insti- 
tution distributing embossed literature are 
carried free through the mails. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 995 blind borrow- 
ers, 30 borrowers having been added dur- 
ing October, November and December and 
17 borrowers lost by death during 1917. 
Total accessions are 7414, as follows : New 
York point books 1574 ; New Y^ork point 
music 150 ; American Braille books 1857 ; 
American Braille music 923 ; European 
Braille books 640 ; European Braille mu- 
sic 41 ; Moon books 1762 ; Moon music 3 ; 
Standard dot books 16 ; Line books 150 ; 
Line music 21 ; Ink print books 157 ; 
^-Appliances 54 ; *Games 35 ; Maps 31. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by F. B. 
Beans, Mabel Gibson, Mrs A. W. Joy, 
Miss B. M. Julian, Bessie A. Long, Wm. 
A. Miller, John O'Donuell, Mrs L. Sar- 
gent, Mrs Flora E. Wolfenden, Christian 
Record Publishing Co., Free Gospel Li- 
brary for the Blind, Michigan School for 
the Blind, New York Association for the 
Blind, Society for the Aid of the Sight- 
less, Xavier Free Publication Society for 
the Blind, Ziegler Publishing Co. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. See 
page 148. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 3024 books, etc., were loaned as fol- 
lows : New York point 574 ; American 
Braille 925 ; European Braille 245 ; Moon 
1251; Standard dot 0; Line 8; Ink 
print books 13 ; Appliances 4 ; Maps 2 ; 
Games 2. The loans were divided by class 
as follows : Philosophy and religion 283 ; 
sociology 24 ; language 21 ; primers 33 ; 
science 41 ; useful arts 37 ; fine arts 2 ; 
amusements 2 ; music 49 ; literature 101 ; 
fiction 1395 ; travel and history 267 ; bi- 
ography 20.5 ; periodicals 292. 



*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



100 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Home Teaching. 

Miss Foley, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Sutro Branch of the State Li- 
brary, Sacramento and Webster streets, 
San Francisco, every Thursday from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. She gives lessons regu- 
larly in Alameda, Berkeley, Decoto and 
Oakland. Miss Morrison, home teacher 
of the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, tenth floor, Hall of Rec- 
ords, on Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons from 1.30 until 5.30 o'clock and 
at the Long Beach Public Library every 
other Thursday afternoon. She gives 
lessons regularly every two weeks in 
Covina, Orange and Santa Ana. 

From October 1 to December 31 they 
gave 220 lessons in the homes of the blind 
and S5 lessons at the libraries on the 37 
afternoons they spent in them. Miss 
Foley and Miss Morrison have made 152 
visits and calls in connection w^ith the 
work for purposes other than giving les- 
sons, and received 41 visits in connection 
with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 192 hours on cor- 
respondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 218 letters and 82 postals and re- 
ceived 164 1-etters and 19 postals. They 
also answered and made 358 telephone 
calls. Their various other activities in 
connection with their work can not be 
easily tabulated. 

Persons who know of possible pupils 
anywhere in Orange or Los Angeles coun- 
ties are urged to communicate with Miss 
Catharine J. Morrison, 306A S. Bonnie 
Brae, Los Angeles, and anywhere around 
the bay with Miss Kate M. Foley, Sutro 
Branch, State Library, Sacramento and 
Webster streets, San Francisco (telephone 
West 3046). 

LIBRARY SCHOOL. 

The Library School was established in 
1913 for the purpose of helping to supply 
the demand for trained librarians in Cali- 
fornia. The year's course begins in Sep- 
tember and ends in June. It aims to 
cover the various branches of library 
science needed in all libraries, and at the 
same time places particular emphasis on 
the needs and conditions of California li- 
braries. 

College or university graduation is re- 
quired for admission. Applicants must 
be at least twenty years of age, and under 
thirty on the day of the beginning of 
school. There is no tuition charge, and 



all necessary supplies and textbooks are 
furnished by the Library. 

A copy of the Circular of Information 
may be obtained, upon request, from the 
State Librarian, Sacramento, California. 

On December 4 and 5 Mr B. B. Futer- 
nick, of Foster & Futernick, library book- 
binders of San Francisco, gave two lec- 
tures before the class on bookbinding for 
libraries. His talks were illustrated 
with samples of leather, and books in the 
various stages of binding. Each student 
was given a booklet of samples of the 
different kinds of cloth and leather used 
in bookbinding. 

A new course, started this y ^ar, is in 
high school library work. Miss Jean 
Ross, librarian of the Sacramento High 
School Library, will give five lectures on 
the principles of high school library 
work. Following these lectures each stu- 
dent will spend the afternoons of one week 
of the second term in actual practice work 
in the Sacramento High School Library, 
thus making the connection between the 
theoretical and the practical. 

In her lectures on school library ser- 
vice Mrs Henshall covers the relationship 
between county libraries and the schools. 
This course has been considerably en- 
larged, and aims to give the students a 
definite idea of the problems encountered 
by the county librarian doing work with 
the schools. 

To complete the course in library law 
given by Miss Eddy, a mock meeting of 
a board of supervisors in the act of 
establishing a county free library was 
presented by the members of the class. 
The characters taken by the students 
were the chairman of the Board of Su- 
pervisors and the four other members, the 
County Superintendent of Schools, the 
County Farm Adviser, the president of 
the woman's club of the county seat, a 
trustee of the local public library, the 
secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, 
the District Attorney and the County Li- 
brary Organizer from the State Library. 
The part of the objecting citizen was 
taken by Miss Eddy. Arguments for 
and against the county free library were 
offered and difficult points of the law 
explained. Needless to say, at the close 
of the meeting, the Board of Supervisors 
voted unanimously to establish a county 
free library in their suppositious county. 
So clear an idea was given of the work 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



101 



of the County Library Organizer and 
the method of establishing a county free 
library, that the mock meeting will be 
repeated in January at the regular 
monthly staff meeting. 

Just before the Christmas holidays the 
following subjects were chosen for the 
bibliographies which will be prepared dur- 
ing the second term to serve as gradua- 
tion theses : Compulsory health insurance ; 
Gary school system ; Modern short story 
writers ; Child welfare ; Life and works 
of Rodin ; New theater ; County libraries ; 
Life and works of Fabre ; Russia, its 
political and social aspects since the out- 
break of the war ; Red Cross ; President 
Wilson. 

The Circular of Information of the Li- 
brary School for 1918-1919 has been is- 
sued. A copy may be obtained by apply- 
ing to the State Librarian. 

At the January meeting of the State 
Board of Education a resolution was 
passed whereby the California State Li- 
brary School was accredited by the State 
Board of Education to recommend to 
county or city and county boards of edu- 
cation individuals for secondary special 
certificates in library craft, technique and 
use. According to an amendment passed 
by the 1917 legislature, a librarian em- 
ployed for more than two hours each day, 
in any high school, must hold a high 
school teachers' certificate or the special 
certificate mentioned above. Thus the ac- 
creditation of the California State Libi'ary 
School by the State Board of Education 
ensures for each graduate the credential 
which renders her eligible to a position 
as high school librarian. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

Laura Steffens, in charge. 

The Sutro Branch occupies the top floor 
of the Lane Medical Library Building, 
Sacramento and Webster streets, San 
Francisco, and is open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Octo- 
ber, November and December, 1917. 

The last number of the Quarterly Bul- 
letin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 



December, 190.5. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in the News Notes of 
California Lihraries. 

The last list of recent accessions ap- 
peared in the October, 1917, issue of this 
publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 

Atlantis. 

Modern Greek books published & im- 
ported by Atlantis (incorporated), 
New York. 1917 list for public 
libraries. 016.88 A88 

Autograph prices current, v. 1 for 1914. 
1916. 016.091 A93 

Bacoubt, Pierre de & Cuuliffe, John W. 
eds. 
French of today ; readings in French 
newspapers. 1917. 070 B12 

Bogakdus, Emory Stephen. 

Leading sociological books published in 

1916. [1917] (Studies in sociology, 
Sociological monographs.) 016.3 B67 

Boston athenaeum. 

Confederate literature. 1917. 

016.9737 B74 

Beewee, John Marks, & Kelly, Roy Will- 
marth. 
A selected critical bibliography of voca- 
tional guidance. cl917. (Harvard 
bulletins in education.) 016.174 B84 

Budlong, Mrs Minnie Franklin (Clarke). 
A plan of organization for .small libra- 
ries. 1917. x020 B92 

Dana, John Cotton. 

The pleasant art of getting your own 
library. cl916. 027.1 DIG 

Danielson, Henry. 

The first editions of the writings of 
Thomas Hardy and their values ; a 
bibliographical handbook. [1916] 

012 H27d 
De Puy, Henry F. 

A bibliography of the English colonial 
treaties with the American Indians, 
including a synopsis of each treaty. 

1917. 016.9701 D42 

Edinburgh. University. LUranj. 

A descriptive catalogue of the western 
mediaeval manuscripts in Edinburgh 
university library, by Catherine R. 
Borland. 1916. qOI 6.091 E2 



102 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Hassell, Mrs Susan (Whitcomb) comp. 
A hundred and sixty books by Washing- 
ton authors, some other writers who 
are contributors to periodical litera- 
ture, lines worth knowing by heart. 
cl916. 016.81 H35 

Henkels, Stanislaus Vincent. 

The confidential correspondence of Rob- 
ert Morris. (Catalog of auction sale.) 
qOI 6.9733 H5 



JuNGE, Carl Stephen. 
Book-plates. 1916. 



097 J 95 



Keoegee, Alice Bertha. 

Guide to the study and use of reference 

books. 3d ed., rev. throughout and 

much enl. by Isadore Gilbert Mudge. 

r016 K93g1 

New York university press. 

Select business books, n.d. 016.65 N56 

NiJHOFF, Martinus. 

Nijhoff's monthly list of the principal 
books on continental law. n.d. 

016.34 N69 

NORTHUP, Clark Sutherland. 

A bibliography of Thomas Gray. 1917. 
(Cornell studies in English.) 

012 G78n 

RiCHAEDSON, Ernest Gushing. 

Some old Egyptian librarians. 1911. 

020.9 R52s 

Ripley, Harriet Ernestine. 

Bibliography of the published writings 
of Henry Fairfield Osborn for the 
years 1877-1915. 2d ed. 1916. 

012 081r 

Rockwell, William Walker. 

Armenia ; a list of books and articles. 
[1916] 016.9566 R68 

Saxton, Eugene Francis, comp. 

The O. Henry index, n.d. 012 H52s 

Sayers, W. C. Berwick. 

The children's library : a practical 
manual for public, school, and home 
libraries. [1911] x020 S27 

Seitz, Don Carlos. 

Training for the newspaper trade. 
cl916. (Lippincott's training series.) 

070 S46 



Stockum, C. M. van. 

Sport. Attempt at a bibliography of 
books and periodicals published dur- 
ing 1890-1912 in Great Britain, the 
United States of America, France, 
Germany, Austria, Holland, Belgium 
and Switzerland. 1914. q016.79S8 

Webb, A. P. 

A bibliography of the works of Thomas 
Hardy, 1865-1915. 1916. 012 H27w 

Wight, Andrew. 

A catalogue of the entire library of 
Andrew Wight, of Philadelphia. 
Prepared by Joseph Sabin. 1864. 

018 W65 

Wise, Thomas James. 

A bibliography of the writings in prose 
and verse of William Wordsworth. 

1916. 012W92W 

Wyer, James Ingersoll. 

Pamphlets and minor library material. 

1917. (Preprint of Manual of library 
economy, chapter 25.) x025.1 W97 

The state library. 1915. 

X027.5 W97 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

American social hygiene association Bul- 
letin. V. 1-3 for 1914-16. 

q176.06 A5 

Ayer, Fred Carleton. 

The psychology of drawing, with special 
reference to laboratory teaching. 
1916. 136.7 A97 

[Blanchard, Mme'l 

Common sense, how to exercise it, by 

Yoritomo-Tashi. 1916. (Mental 

efficiency series.) 174 B63 

Influence, how to exert it, by Yoi-i- 

tomo-Tashi. 1916. (Mental effi- 
ciency series.) 174 B63i 

BoiRAC, fimile. 

Our hidden forces ("La psychologic in- 
conuue"). An experimental study of 
the psychic sciences, tr. and ed., 
with an introduction, by W. de Ker- 
lor. cl917. 134 B68 



Beeese, Burtis Burr. 
Psychology. [1917] 



150 883 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



103 



Charley, L. 

Opportunities, how to make the most 
of them. 1916. (Mental efficiency 
series.) 174 C47 

Drysdale, William. 

Helps for ambitious boys. cl899. 

174 D81 

DuRANT, William James. 

Philosophy and the social problem. 
1917. 104 D95 

Epictetus. 

Epictetus. The discourses and manual, 
together with fragments of his writ- 
ings. 1916. 2v. 188 E64dm 

F., M. 

Prostitution ; the moral bearings of the 
problem. 1917. 176 F11 

Frank, Henry. 

Psychic phenomena, science and im- 
mortality ; being a further excursion 
into unseen realms beyond the point 
previously explored in "Modern light 
on immortality," and a sequel to that 
previous record. 1911. 134 F82 

GAXyLiCHAN, Catherine Gasquoine 
(Hartley). 
Motherhood and the relationships of the 
sexes. 1917. 176G168 

Goldsmith, Robert. 

A league to enforce peace. 1917. 

172.4 G62 

Haddoce:, Frank Channing. 

Practical psychology. 1915. (The 
power-book library.) 150 H12 

Hagedorn, Hermann. 

Tou are the hope of the world ! An 
appeal to the girls and boys of 

America. 1917. 172.1 H14 

* 

Hale, Edward Everett. 

What career? Ten papers on the choice 
of a vocation and the use of time. 
1905. 174 H16 

Harris, Franklin Stewart. 

The young man and his vocation. cl916, 
(Present day problems series.) 

174 H31 
Harrison, Elizabeth. 

When children err ; a book for young 
mothers. cl917. 136.7 H31 



HoLLiNGWORTH, Harry Levi, and Poffen- 
berger, Albert Theodor. 

The sense of taste. 1917. (Our senses 

series.) 152 H 74 

Hughes, Matthew Simpson. 

Dancing and the public schools. cl917. 

175 H89 
Hull, William Isaac. 

The new peace movement. 1912. 

172.4 H91 
HusiK, Isaac. 

A history of mediaeval Jewish philoso- 
phy. 1916. 181.3 H96 

James, William. 

On vital reserves ; The energies of men ; 
The gospel of relaxation. cl911. 

131 J29a 
Kant, Immanuel. 

Eternal peace, and other international 
essays. 1914. 193 K16eh 

Kimball, William Wirt. 

Our question of questions, arm or dis- 
arm? 1917. 172.4 K49 

King, Henry Churchill. 

It's all in the day's work. 1916. 

171 K52 
KiTSON, Harry Dexter. 

The scientific study of the college stu- 
dent. [1917] (Psychological review 
publications. The psychological mon- 
ographs.) q150 K6 

Laurent, H. 

Personality, how to liuild it, tr. by 
Ptichard Duffy. 1916. (Mental effi- 
ciency series.) 174 L38 

League to enforce peace. American 

iranch. 

Enforced peace ; proceedings of the first 

annual national assemblage of the 

League to enforce peace, Washington, 

May 26-27, 1916. 172.4 L43e 

McCall, William Anderson. 

Correlation of some psychological and 
educational measurements, with spe- 
cial attention to the measurement of 
mental ability. 1916. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education.) 136.7 IVI12 

Marvin, Walter Taylor. 

The history of European philosophy ; 
an introductory book. 1917. 

109 M39 



104 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



The Master mind. v. 1-12. 1911-1917. 

C131.05 M42 

Melville, Norbert John. 

Standard method of testing juvenile 
mentality by the Binet-Simon scale, 
with the original questions, pictures, 
and drawings. cl917. 136.7 M53 

Mebton, Holmes Whittier. 

How to choose the right vocation ; voca- 
tional self-measurement based upon 
natural abilities. 1917. 174 IVI57 

MiLiTZ, Mrs Annie (Rix). 

Child unfoldment. 1916. c136.7 M64 
Gift of author, 

Primary lessons in Christian living 

and healing. 1915. c131 M64 

Gift of author. 

Prosperity through the knowledge 

and power of mind. 1916. 

c131 M64p 
Gift of author. 

The renewal of the body. 1914. 

c131 M64r 
Gift of author, 

The Sermon on the Mount ; an in- 
terpretation. 1904. c131 M64se 
Gift of author. 

Spiritual housekeeping. 1916. 

c131 M64s 

Gift of author. 

MOEITZEN, Julius. 

The peace movement of America. 1912. 

172.4 M 86 

MoxcEY, Mary Eliza. 

Girlhood and character. cl916. 



Patten, Simon Nelson. 
Culture and war. 1916. 



173 M93 



172.4 P31 



Peckham, George Williams. 

Logic of Bergson's philosophy. 1917. 

q194 B4zp 

Peeke, Hewson L. 

Americana ebrietatis ; the favorite tip- 
ple of our forefathers and the laws 
and customs relating thereto. 1917. 
v178 P37 

Pinter, Rudolf, and Paterson, Donald G. 
A scale of pei'formance tests. 1917. 

136.7 P65 



Prince, Walter Franklin. 

The Doris case of multiple personality. 
1915-1917. 3 V. (American society 
for psychical research. Proceedings, 
V. 9-11.) 132P957 

The Psychoanalytic review ; a journal 
devoted to an understanding of human 
conduct. V. 3 for 1916. q 150.5 P9 

Salter, William Mackintire. 

Nietzsche the thinker; a study. 1917. 
193 N67zsa 
Schwab, Charles M. 

Succeeding with what you have. 1917. 

174 S39 
Sellars, Roy Wood. 
The essentials of logic. cl917. 

160 S46 
Starke, D. 

Character, how to strengthen it, tr. by 
Lorenzo O'Rourke. 1916. (Mental 
efficiency series.) 174 S79 

Starr, Louis. 

The adolescent period, its features and 
management. cl915. 136.7 S79 

Veblen, Thorstein B. 

An inquiry into the nature of peace and 
the terms of its perpetuation. 1917. 
172.4 V39 
Wallin, John Edward Wallace. 

Psycho-motor norms for pi'actical diag- 
nosis ; a study of the Seguin form 
board. [1916] (Psychological re- 
view publications. The psychological 
monographs.) q136.7W2 

Williams, Cora Lenore. 

Creative involution. 1916. 

C113W72 

WooDROW, Herbert Hollingsworth. 

Children's association frequency tables. 
[1916] (Psychological review pub- 
lications. The psychological mono- 
graphs.) q136.7W8 

RELIGION. 

Archer, William. 

God and Mr Wells ; a critical examina- 
tion of "God the invisible king." 
1917. 201 A67 

Buotich, Cyril. 

Christian science, an apostasy from sci- 
ence and Christianity. cl916. 

C289.9 B94 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



105 



Caddell, Cecelia Mary. 
Blind Agnese. 



282 C12 



FoEBUSH, William Byron. 

The life of Jesus for young people. 
1917. 232 F69 

Gates, Herbert Wright. 

Recreation and the church. [1917] 
(The University of Chicago publica- 
tions in religious education. Princi- 
ples and methods of religious educa- 
tion.) 261 G25 

Groves, Ernest Rutherford. 

Using the resources of the country 
church. 1917. 261 G88 

Harris, James Rendel. 

The origin of the cult of Aphrodite. 
1916. q292 H3 

Hates, Doremus Almy. 

John and his vpritings. cl917. (Bib- 
lical introduction series.) 225.9 H41 

Husband, Richard Wellington. 

The prosecution of Jesus ; its date, his- 
tory and legality. 1916. 232 H96 



King, Henry Churchill. 
Fundamental questions. 



1917. 



230 K52f 



Leitba, James Henry. 

The belief in God and immortality. 
1916. 218 L65 



McDowell, Stewart A. 

Seven doubts of a biologist. 



1917. 
213 M13 



Manual of a mystic ; being a translation 
from the Pali and Sinhalese work 
entitled The Yogavachara's manual. 
1916. 294 M29 

Margolis, Max Leopold. 

The story of Bible translations. 1917. 

220.5 M32 

Montague, Margaret Prescott. 

Twenty minutes of reality ; an experi- 
ence, with some illuminating letters 
concerning it. cl917. 248 1V175 

Moore, Clifford Herschel. 

The religious thought of the Greeks, 
from Homer to the triumph of Chris- 
tianity. 1916. 292 M82 



Reischauer, August Karl. 

Studies in Japanese Buddhism. 1917. 

294 R37 
Sacher, Harry, ed. 

Zionism and the Jewish future, by vari- 
ous writers. 1917. 296 S12 

The Shield, ed. by Maxim Gorky [pseM(Z.]. 
Leonid Andreyev, and Fyodor Sologub 
[pseud.'] with a foreword by William 
English Walling ; tr. fi'om the Rus- 
sian by A. Yarmolinsky. 1917. 

296 S55 

SOCIOLOGY. 

Alexander, Magnus Washington. 

Some vital facts and considerations in 
respect to compulsory health insur- 
ance, March, 1917. [1917] 

368 A377 

American association for labor legislation. 
Proceedings of the lst-3d annual meet- 
ing, 1907-09. 1908-10. 338.9 A51 

American-Russian chamber of com- 
merce. Isleio York {City). 
Industrial America. [1917] q380 A51 
Text in Russian. 

Anderson Benjamin McAlester. 

The value of money. 1917. 332 A54 

B., W. 

Freedom. 1910. 323 B11 

Babson, Roger Ward, & May, Ralph. 
Commercial paper ; a text book for 
merchants, bankers and investors. 
2d ed. cl916. 332 B11 

Ballou, Sidney. 

Compulsory military training and ser- 
vice, n.d. 355 B19 

Beer, George Louis. 

The English-speaking peoples, their fu- 
ture relations and joint international 
obligations. 1917. 327 841 



Bercovici, Konrad. 

Crimes of charity. 



1917. 



361 848 



Beyer, H. Otley. 

Population of the Philippine Islands in 

1916. (1st ed.) 1917. q312.914 85 

Bigelow, John. 

Breaches of Anglo-American treaties. 

1917. 341.2 859 



106 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



BoGAET, Ernest Ludlow, & Thompson, 
Charles Manfred, eds. 
Readings in the economic history of the 
United States. 1916. 330.9 B67r 

BOYCE, Warren Scott. 

Economic and social history of Chowan 
County, North Carolina, 1880-1915. 
1917. (Studies in history, economics 
and public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia uni- 
versity.) 330.5 C72 

Bkown, John Calvin. 

Every American's business ; the tariff 
and the coming trade war. 191G. 

337 B87 

Brown, Philip Marshall. 

International realities. 1917. 341 B87 

Bryce, James Bryce, viscount. 

Neutral nations and the war. 1914. 

327 891 



BuxLAED, Arthur, 
Mobilizing America. 



1917. 



355 893 



Carnegie endowment for international 
peace. Division of international law. 
The controversy over neutral rights be- 
tween the United States and France, 
1797-1800. 1917. q327.73 C2 

Catt, Mrs Carrie (Lane) Chapman,' 
coivp. 
Woman suffrage by federal constitu- 
tional amendment. 1917. (National 
suffrage library.) 324.3 C36 

Cn-IL service chronicle. New York. 

Fire department promotion examination 
instruction for all ranks in the uni- 
formed force and all bureaus in the 
Fire department. 2d eul., ed. cl916. 
cl916. q351.3 C5f 

CoLViN, David Leigh. 

The bicameral principle in the New 
York legislature. 1913. 328.747 C72 

Convention year book. v. 1 for 1916. 

r368 C76 

CoxxLTON, George Gordon. 

Workers and war. 1914. q355 C8 

Cbew, Albert. 

Bribes and bribery in business. 1916. 

331 C92 



Cupples, Horace Greeley. 

Arcadian highway ; a plan to grubstake 
the unemployed to build a grand 
boulevard from the Great Lakes to 
the Gulf of Mexico. cl916. 

331 C974 

Curtis, Lionel. 

The problem of the commonwealth. 
1917. 325.3 C97 

ed. 

The commonwealth of nations ; an in- 
quiry into the nature of citizenship 
in the British empire, and into the 
mutual relations of the several com- 
munities tliereof. 1917. pt. 1. 

325 C97 

CusuMAN, Robert Eugene. 

Excess condemnation. 1917. (National 
municipal league series.) 347.2 C98 

Delbkidge, Charles Loma. 
The tragedy, the farce and the humbug 
of the courts. cl916. 364 D34 

Dennis, William Jefferson. 

The traveling post office ; history and 
incidents of the railway mail service. 
cl916. 383 D41 

DrcHESNE, A. E. 

Democracy and empire, "the applica- 
bility of the dictum that 'a democ- 
racy can not manage an empire' 
(Thucydides, book iii, ch. 37, Jow- 
ett's translation) to the present con- 
ditions and future problems of the 
British empire, especially the ques- 
tion of the future of India." 1916. 
(Royal colonial institute mono- 
graphs.) 325.342 D82 

Edgington, Thomas Benton. 
The Monroe doctrine. 1905. 

327.73 E23 

Ellwood, Charles Abram. 

An introduction to social psychology. 
1917. 301 E47i 

Faiechild, Henry Pratt. 

Outline of applied sociology. 1916. 

302 F165 



Farrow, Thomas. 

The coming trade war. 



1916. 



380 F246 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



107 



Fetter, Frank Albert. 

Economics. 1916-17. 2v. 



330 F42 



Fletcher, Charles Brunsdon. 

The new Pacific. 1917. 325.3 F61 

Gebhard, Hannes. 

Co-operation in Finland, ed. by Lionel 
Smith-Gordon. 1916. 334 G29 

Gephart, William Franklin. 

Principles of insurance. 1917. 2v. 

368 G35a 
Gibes, Winifred Stuart. 

The minimum cost of living ; a study 
of families of limited income in New 
York city. 1917. 338 G44 

GilbertsojST, Ileni-y Stimson. 

The county, the "dark continent" of 
American politics. 1917. 352 046 

[GoKHALE, Shankar Laxman.] 

The unemployment problem, cause and 
cure, by "Analyticus" [pseud.]. cl916. 
331.8 0616 
GooDNOW, Frank Johnson. 

The American conception of liberty and 
government. 1916. 320.4 065 

Guthrie, William Dameron. 
Magna carta, and other addresses. 1916. 

320.4 098 

Hamilton, Sir Ian Standish Monteith. 
Compulsory sei*vice ; a study of the 
question in the light of experience. 
2d ed. 1911. 355 H21 

IIauser, Henri. 

Germany's commercial grip on the 
world, her business methods, tr. by 
Manfred Emanuel. 1917. 

330.943 H37 
Hewes, Amy. 

Women as munition makers. 1917. 

331.8 H59 

HoAGLAND, Henry Elmer. 

Collective bargaining in the lithographic 
industry. 1917. 330.5 C72 

HoAE, Roger Sherman. 

Constitutional conventions, their nature, 
powers, and limitations. 1917. 

342.73 H67 
Horner, Warren Murdock. 

Training for a life insurance agent. 

[1917] (Lippincott's training series.) 

368.3 H81 



Hubbard, Elbert. 

The Standard oil company. 1910. 

338.7 H87 
Hudson, Richard. 

The land valuer's best assistant, n.d. 

333 H88 
Hutchinson, Robert H. 

The "socialism" of New Zealand. 1916. 

335 H97 

Introduction to the study of interna- 
tional relations. 1916. 327 161 

Jack, James Charles. 

The economic life of a Bengal district. 
1916. 330.954 J 12 

Jacks, Lawrence Pearsall. 

From the human end ; a collection of 
essays. 1916. 304 J 12 

James, Herman Gerlach. 

Municipal functions. 1917. (National 
municipal league series.) 352 J 27m 

Joseph Fels fund. 

Bulletin, v. 1-4 for 1913-16. 

q336.205 J8 
Kawakami, Kiyoshi Karl. 

Japan in world politics. 1917. 

327.52 K22 
Kelsey, Carl. 
The physical basis of society. 1916. 

301 K297 
Kleene, Gustav Adolph. 

Profit and wages ; a study in the distri- 
bution of income. 1916. 331 K63 

Kuenzli, Frederick Arnold. 

Right and duty ; or. Citizen and soldier ; 
Switzerland prepared and at peace, a 
model for the United States. cl916. 

335 K95 
Lewis, Burdette Gibson. 

The offender and his relations to law 
and society. [1917] (Harper's mod- 
em science series.) 364 L67 



Lodge, Plenry Cabot. 

War addresses, 1915-17. 1917. 



308 L82 



Lough, William Henry. 

Business finance, a practical study of 
financial management in private busi- 
ness concerns. 1917. 332 L88 

McClure, Archibald. 

Leadership of the new America, racial 
and religious. cl916. 325.73 Ml 2 



108 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



McCluee, Wallace Mitchell. 

State constitution-making, with especial 
reference to Tennessee. 1916. 

342.73 M128 
Maciver, Robert Morrison. 

Community, a sociological study. 1917. 

301 Ml 52 
Madsen, Arthur Wilhelm. 

The state as manufacturer and trader ; 
an examination based on the com- 
mercial, industrial and fiscal results 
obtained from government tobacco 
monopolies. 1916. 336.1 Ml 8 

Mabcosson, Isaac Frederick. 

The war after the war. 1917. 338 M32 
Contents : The coming war. — Eng- 
land awake. — American business in 
France. — The new France. — Saving 
for victory. — The price of glory. — The 
man Lloyd George. — From pedlar to 
premier [William Morris Hughes]. 

Mabshall, Edward. 

The United States as a world power ; an 
interview with Nicholas Murray 
Butler, 1915. 341 M36 

Mathews, John Mabry. 

Principles of American state adminis- 
tration. 1917. 353.9 M42 

Mayo, Katherine. 

Justice to all ; the story of the Penn- 
sylvania state police. 3d ed. 1917. 
353.9 M47 
Meyeb, Eduard. 

England ; its political organization and 
development and the war against 
Germany, tr. by Helene S. White. 

1916. 327.42 M61 

Miller, Mrs Alice (Duer). 

Are women people? A book of rhymes 
for suffrage times. cl915. 324.3 M64 

Montague, Gilbert Holland. 

Business competition and the law. 

1917. 338 M75 

Morris, Keith. 

The story of the Canadian Pacific rail- 
way. 1916. 385 M87 

MuiR, Ramsay. 

The expansion of Europe ; the culmi- 
nation of modern history. 1917. 

325.3 M95 
MUBPHY, H. M. 

Wages and prices in Australia, n.d. 

338.9 M97 



Myer, Balthasar Henry, ed. 

History of transportation in the United 
States before 1860. 1917. 385 M61h 

National council of public morals for 
Great and Greater Britain. Com- 
mission of inquiry into the declining 
iirthrate. 
The declining birthrate ; its causes and 
effects. 1917. 312 N27 

National society of the colonial dames 

of America. Massachusetts. 

Register of the Massachusetts society 

of the colonial dames of America, 

1893-1917. 1917. 369.123 N27m 

Newcomer, Mabel. 

Separation of state and local revenues 
in the United States. 1917. (Stud- 
ies in history, economics and public 
law, ed. by the Faculty of political 
science of Columbia university.) 

330.5 C72 

O'Brien, Charles. 

Food preparedness for the United 
States. 1917. 338 013 

Peterson, Arthur Everett. 

New York as an eighteenth century 
mimicipality prior to 1731. 1917. 
(Studies in history, economics and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia univer- 
sity.) 330.5 C72 

Pijillips, Chester Arthur. 

Readings in money and banking. 1916. 

332 P55 

PiiiLLiPSON, Coleman. 

Termination of war and treaties of 
peace. [1916] q341.2 P5 

Pickens, William. 

The new negro, his political, civil and 
mental status, and related essays. 
1916. 325.26 P594 

Poley, Arthur Pierre. 

The federal systems of the United 
States and the British empire ; their 
origin, nature, and development. 
1913. 321.8 P76 

Powell, Ellis Thomas. 

The evolution of the money market 
(1385-1915). 1916. 336.42 P88 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



109 



Pboud, Emily Dorothea. 

Welfare work, employers' experiments 
for improving working conditions in 

i: J ; •n\-i r* oo-l o r%nc 



factories. 1916. 



331.8 P96 



Putnam, George Ellsworth. 

The land credit problem. 1916. (Bul- 
letin of the University of Kansas. 
Humanistic studies. ) q332.7 P9 

RavIndranatha Thakuka, Sir. 

Nationalism. 1917. 304 R25 

Ray, Perley Orman. 

The convention that nominated Lincoln ; 
an address delivered before the Chi- 
cago historical society on May IS, 
1916, the fifty-sixth anniversary of 
Lincoln's nomination for the presi- 
dency. cl916. 329.6 R26 

Rhodes, James Edward. 

Workmen's compensation. 1917. 

368.4 R47 

Richmond, Mary Ellen. 

Social diagnosis. 1917. 361 R53s 

RiDDELL, Walter Alexander. 

The rise of ecclesiastical control in 
Quebec. 1916. (Studies in history, 
economics and public law, ed. by the 
Faculty of political science of Colum- 
bia university.) 330.5 C72 

Roman, Charles Victor. 

American civilization and the negro ; 
the Afro-American in relation to 
national progress. 1916. 

325,26 R75 

Root, Elihu. 

Addresses on government and citizen- 
ship. 1916. 308 R78 

The military and colonial policy of 

the United States. 1916. 355 R782 

Sanjean, John. 

How to become a citizen. cl917. 

323 S22 

Scott, William Rufus. 

The itching palm ; a study of the habit 
of tipping in America. 1916. 

331 S431 

Shukbi, Ahmed. 

Mohammedan law of marriage and di- 
vorce. 1917. 349 S56 



SiMKHOViTCH, Mary Kingsbury. 

The city worker's world in America. 
1917. (American social progress 
series.) 331.8 S58 

Sims, Newell Leroy. 

Ultimate democracy and its making. 
1917. 335.5 S61 

Single tax year book. 1917. 336.2 S61 

Smith, Sir Frederick Edwin. 

The destruction of merchant ships un- 
der international law. [1917] 

341.3S64 
Snelling, Walter Edward. 

Excess profits (including excess min- 
eral rights) duty and levies under 
the munitions of war acts, incorpo- 
rating the provisions of the income 
tax acts made applicable by statute 
and by regulation, also the regula- 
tions of the commissioners of inland 
revenue and of the minister of muni- 
tions. 2d ed. [1916] 336.42 S67 

Stemons, James Samuel. 

The key ; a tangible solution of the 
negro problem. 1916. 326 S82 

Stephenson, George Malcolm. 

The political history of the public 
lauds, from 1840 to 1862, from pre- 
emption to homestead. cl917. 

336.1 S83 

Stevens, William Harrison Spring. 

Unfair competition ; a study of certain 

practices and their relation to the 

trust problems in the United States. 

cl917. 338 S84 

Stourm, Rene. 
The budget, a translation from the 7th 
ed. of Le budget (Cours de finances), 
Paris, 1913. 1917. (Institute for 
government research. Studies in ad- 
ministration.) 351.7 S88 

Thorpe, George Cyrus. 

Pure logistics ; the science of war prep- 
aration. 1917. 355 T51 

Trever, Albert Augustus. 

A history of Greek economic thought. 
1916. q330.938 T8 

Vandebblue, Homer Bews. 

Railroad valuation. 1917. (Hart, Schaflf- 
ner & Marx prize essays. ) 385 V22 



110 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Van Kleeck, Mary. 

A seasonal industry ; a study of tlic 

millinery trade in New York. 1917. 

331.4 V25s 

Vermont. General assemily, 1781. 
Proceedings of the Grand committee of 
the legislature of the state of Ver- 
mont, at Charlestown, from the six- 
teenth to the nineteenth of October, 
1781. 1917. (Heartman's historical 
series no. 25.) vf 328.743 V5 

Waldo, Fullerton Leonard. 

Good housing that pays ; a study of the 
aims and the accomplishment of the 
Octavia Hill association, 1896-1917. 
1917. 331.83 W1 6 

Wallace, David Duncan. 

The government of England, national, 
local, and imperial. 1917. 

342.42 W1 8 

Walling, William English, & Laidler, 
Harry W. 
State socialism, pro and con. 1917. 

335.6 W21 

Ware, Edith Ellen. 

Political opinion in Mas.sachusetts dur- 
ing civil war and reconstruction. 
191G. 330.5 C72 

Weyl, Walter Edward. 

American world policies. 1917. 

327.73 W54 

White, Albert Beebe. 

The making of the English constitu- 
tion, 449-1485. 1908. 342.42 W58 

White, Andrew Dickson. 

The first Hague conference. 1912. 

341.1 W58 

Wolfe, Albert Benedict, ed. 

Readings in social problems. cl916. 
(Selections and documents in eco- 
nomics.) 304 W85 

Wolff, Henry William. 

Co-operative credit for the United 
States. 1917. 332 W85 



Wood, Leonard. 

National defense, n.d. 



355 W87n 



Wymond, Mark. 

Government partnership in railroads. 
1917. 385 W98g 



Young, Jeremiah Simeon. 

The state and government. 1917. (The 
national social science series.) 

320.1 Y73 

LAW. 

Alexander, John E. 

Commentaries on the law ofi wills. 
1917. V. 1. 

Anthon, John. 

American precedents of declarations. 
1848. 

Baker, Fred Abbott. 

Fundamental law of American consti- 
tutions. 1916. 3v. 

Bancroft, Hugh. 

Inheritance taxes for investors ; some 
practical notes on the inheritance tax 
laws of each of the states of the 
United States, with particular refer- 
ence to their application to non- 
resident investors. 2d ed., rev. to 
January 1, 1917. 1917. 

Beale, Joseph Henry. 

Cases on legal liability. 1915. 

Bowers, Renzo Dee. 

Treatise on the law of conversion. 
1917. 

BuRDiCK, Charles Kellogg. 

Cases on the law of public service. 
1916. 



BuRDiCK, Francis Marion. 

Law of sales of personal property, 
ed. Rev. and enl. 1913. 



3d 



Burnett, Daniel Frederick. 

Cases on the law of private corpora- 
tions, selected and supplemented with 
notes. 1917. 

Cohen, Julius Henry. 

The law ; business or ijrofession ? 1916. 

Davis, George Breckenridge. 

Elements of international law, with an 
account of its origin, sources, and 
historical development. 4th ed. 
cl916. 



De Becker, Joseph Ernest. 
Elements of Japanese law. 



1916. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



Ill 



Delawabe. Courts. 

Rules of the Superior court, Court of 

chancery, Orphans' court. Court of 
general sessions, and Supreme court 

of the state of Delaware. In effect 

on May 15, 1917. With approved 
forms. 1917. 

DosKEE, Nicholas Herman. 

Manual of compensation law, state and 
federal. 1917. 

EWAKT, John Skirving. 

Waiver distributed among the depart- 
ments, election, estoppel, contract, re- 
lease. 1917. 

Goldman, Mayer C. 

The public defender ; a necessary factor 
in the administration of justice. 
1917. 



Hughes, Thomas Welburn. 
Hughes' pocket digest 
cl917. 



of evidence. 



Maine. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Revised statutes of the state of Maine, 
passed September 29, 1916, and tak- 
ing effect January 1, 1917. [6th re- 
vision] 1916. 

Mills, Borden Hicks. 

United States commissioners' manual. 
1917. 



Nelson, Godfrey Nicholas. 
Income tax and accountius 



C1917. 



Nichols, Philip. 

Law of eminent domain ; a treatise on 
the principles which affect the taking 
of property for the public use. 1917. 
2v. 

NiMS, Harry Dwight. 

Law of unfair competition and trade- 
marks, with chapters on good-will, 
trade secrets, defamation of competi- 
tors and their goods, registration of 
trade-marks under the Federal trade- 
mark act, price cutting, etc. 2d ed. 
1917. 

Oklahoma state bar association. 

Proceedings of the 10th annual meeting 
of the Oklahoma state bar associa- 
tion, 1916. 1917. 



Scott, James Alexander. 

Law of interstate rendition, erroneously 
referred to as interstate extradition. 
1917. 

Shepaed's Maine citations. 2d ed. cl915. 

Shepard's New Hampshire citations. 2d 
ed. 1916. 

Shepard's Pennsylvania superior court 
and lower court citations. 1916. 

Shepaed's Utah citations. 1st ed. 1915. 

Thomas, Edward. 

Chemical patents and allied patent 
problems. 1917. 

TiLLYAED, Francis. 
Industrial law. 1916. 

TucKEE, Henry St. George. 

Limitations on the treaty-making power 
under the Constitution of the United 
States. 1915. 

Walkeb, William Slee. 

Walker's errors in civil proceedings. 
1917. 

Weil, Arthur William. 

American copyright law, with especial 
reference to the present United States 
copyright act, with appendices con- 
taining forms from adjudicated cases, 
and the copyright laws of England, 
Canada, Australia, Germany, and 
France. 1917. 

Woebneb, John Gabriel. 

Law of decedents' estates, including 
wills. 1913. 

MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE. 

Balck, William. 

Tactics. Tr. by Walter Krueger. 4th 
completely rev. ed. 1911-14. 

355 B17 

Bayonet training manual used by the 
British forces. 1917. 355 B361 

Bond, Paul Stanely. 

Technique of modern tactics. cl916. 

355 B71 

Ellis, Olin O, & Garey, Enoch Barton. 
The Plattsburg manual ; a handbook for 
federal training camps. 1917. 

355 E47 



112 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Guild, George Reudel, & Cotton, Robert C. 
Military field note book. 2d ed. 1917. 

355 G95 



— & Test, Frederick C. 
Militia field manual. cl915. 



355 G94 



HoLBBOOK, Lucius Roy. 

The mess officer's assistant. 2d ed. 
cl911. 355 H72 

Lawton, Frank Hall. 

Field quartermaster's handbook. cl917. 

355 L42 

McAethuk, John Campbell. 

What a company ofiicer should know. 
cl917. (Harvey military series.) 

355 Mil 
McLean, Ridley. 

The bluejacket's manual. United States 
navy, 1917. 359 M163 

Mahan, Alfred Thayer. 

Naval strategy compared and con- 
trasted with the principle^ and prac- 
tice of military operations on land ; 
lectures delivered at the U. S. Naval 
war college, Newport, R. I., between 
the years 18S7 and 1911. 1911. 

359 M21na 

Maeshall, Francis Cutler, & Simonds, 
George Sherwin. 
A military primer, including an outline 
of the duties and responsibilities of 
the military profession and an ele- 
mentary discussion of the principles 
and practice of the service of security 
and information. 4th ed. rev. 1916. 
355 IV136 

Massee, Edward Kingsley. 

Practical instruction in security and 
information of noncommissioned offi- 
cer of infantry. 1914. 355 M41 

Moss, James Alfred. 

Applied minor tactics (including map 
problems and the war game) map 
reading and map sketching. 2d ed. 
1917. 355 M91a 

Field service. 2d ed. 1912. 

355 M91f 

Officers' manual. 6th ed. (rev. May, 

1917). cl917. 355M910 

Trench warfare. cl917. 355 M91t 



Moss & Stewart, Merch Bradt. 
Military training for boys, intended to 
develop body, character and patriot- 
ism, prepared for the use of the 
National school camp association, inc. 
C1917. 355 IVI91mt 

cotnp. 

Noncommissioned officers' manual. 1917. 

355M91n 
Paekee, James. 

The mounted rifleman ; a method of gar- 
rison training and field instruction of 
cavalry, including tests and combat 
exercises, as used in the First cavalry 
brigade, U. S. Army. cl916. 

357 P24 
Paekee, Ralph Middleton. 

An officer's notes, comp. by Lieut. C. C. 
Griffith. [cl917] 355 P242 

RiCHAEDSON, Robert Charlwood. 

West Point. 1917. 355.07 R52 

RuBOTTOM, Holland. 

Questions on Field service regulations 
of the United States army. Rev. ed. 
1917. 355 R89 

Smith, Joseph Shuter. 

Trench warfare ; a manual for officers 
and men. cl917. 355 S65 

Stacey, Cromwell. 

Company training (infantry). cl916. 

355 S77 
Stirling, Yates. 

Fundamentals of naval service. cl917. 

359 S86 
SuTHEBLAND, Samuel James. 

The reserve officers' handbook. 1917. 

355 S96 

U. S. Army service schools, Fort Leaven- 

icorth. Department of military art. 

Problems in troop leading. 355 U58 

Bureau of navigation (Navy dept.) 

The recruit's handy book, United States 

navy. Originally prepared and now 
rev. by Captain W. F. Fullam, u. s. n. 
cl913. 359 U58bn 

Waldeon, William Henry. 

Company administration. cl917. (Har- 
vey military series.) 355 W16 



Scoutinj 



and patrolling. 1916. 

355 W16s 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



113 



Wright, Mrs Heleu Saunders (Smith). 

Our United States army. 1917. 

355.09 W94 

Contents : Lewis and Clark expedi- 
tion. — Explorations of Pike, Long and 
Bonneville. — Fremont and his adven- 
tures. — Domestic disturbances. — In- 
dian treaties and warfare. — Lieutenant 
T^^hipple's surveys and adventures. — 
Gold and the early days of California. 
— Trouble in Kansas and the Mormon 
problem. — Exploration of the Colorado 
River. — Building of the transcontinen- 
tal railroads. — The reconstruction of 
the South. — Alaska. — Cuba and the 
Philippines. — Eradication of disease 
by Army medical staff. — The Panama 
canal.. 



EDUCATION. 

Abbott, Edith, & Breckinridge, Sopho- 
nisba Preston. 
Truancy and non-attendance in the Cali- 
cago schools ; a study of the social 
aspects of the compulsory education 
and child labor legislation of Illinois. 
cl917. 371.5 A12 

Breweb's annual national directory of 
superintendents of schools, state nor- 
mal principals, state superintendents 
of public instruction . . . including 
cities with population of 2,000 and 
above, 1916. r371 B84 

Bridges, Robert. 

An address to the Swindon branch of 

the Workers" educational ass'n. 1916. 

370.4 B&4 

Chapman, James Crosby. 

The scientific measurement of classroom 
products. cl917. 371.2C46 

Dexter, Franklin Bowditch, ed. 

Documentary history of Yale university, 
under the original charter of the Col- 
legiate school of Connecticut, 1701- 
1745. 1916. q378.746YEdd 

Foster, William Trufant. 

Should students study? [1917] 

378 F75 

Gray, William Scott. 

Studies of elementai"y-school reading 
through standardized tests. cl917. 
( Supplementary educational mono- 
graphs, pub. in conjunction with the 
School review and the Elementary 
school journal. ) q372.4 G7 



Hall, Mary Leora, «& Palmer, Sarah 

Elizabeth. 

Story plays for little children, with 

music, finger plays, and rhythms, 

[1917] 372.2 H17 

Heathcote, Charles William. 

The essentials of religious education. 
1916. • 377 H43 

Heck, William Harry. 

Mental discipline and educational values. 
2d ed. 1911. 370 H44 

HoAG, Ernest Bryant. 

The health index of children. 1915. 

371.7 H67h 
HovRE, Fr. de. 

GeiTuan and English education ; a com- 
parative study. 1917. 370 H84 

KiRKPATRiCK, Marion Greenleaf. 

The rural school from within. cl917. 

379.1 K59 
McMnxEN, James Adelbert. 

The Gary system. 1917. 379.772 Ml 6 

MoRGEXSTEBN, Louise I. 

Lip-reading for class instruction. cl916. 

371.9 IVI85 

Pechsteijst, Louis Augustus. 

Whole vs. part methods in motor learn- 
ing. A comparative study. [1917] 
(Psychological review publications. 
The psychological monographs.) 

q370.1 P3 
Perry, Clarence Arthur. 

Community center activities. cl916. 
(Russell Sage foundation, New Tork. 
Dept. of recreation. Pamphlets.) 

379.1 P46c 

Rapeer, Louis Win, ed. 

Teaching elementary school subjects. 
cl917. 371 R21 

Sadoleto, Jacopo. 

Sadoleto on education. 1916. 

370.1 S12 

ScHJiiDT, William Anton. 

An experimental study in the psychol- 
ogy of reading. [1917] (Supple- 
mentary educational monographs pub. 
in conjunction with the School review 
and the Elementary school journal.) 
372.4 S35 



8—35857 



114 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Smith, Walter Robinson. 

An introduction to educational sociol- 
ogy. [cl917] (Riverside textbooks 
in education.) 370.1 S663 

Snedden, David Samuel. 

Problems of secondary education. cl917. 
(Riverside textbooks in education.) 

373 S67 
Struthers, Mrs Lina (Rogers). 

The school nurse. 1917. 371 .7 892 

Welton, James. 

What do we mean by education? 1914. 
370.1 W46w 

CUSTOMS AND FOLKLORE. 

Boas, Frank, ed. 

Folk-tales of Salishan and Sahaptin 
tribes. 1917. 398 B66, 

Bres, Rose Falls. 

The law and the woman. cl917. 

396 B84 
Calvert, Albert Frederick. 

Spani.sh arms and armour, being a his- 
torical and descriptive account of the 
Royal armoury of Madrid. 1907. 
(The Spanish series.) 399 C1 6 

Dean, Bashford. 

Notes on arms and armor. 1916. 

q399 D2 
Gamble, Eliza Burt. 

The sexes in science and history ; an 
inquiry into the dogma of woman's 
inferiority to man ; a rev. ed. of "The 
evolution of woman." 1916. 396 G19 

George, W. L. 

The intelligence of woman. 1916. 

396 G34i 

Contents : The intelligence of woman. 
— Feininist intentions. — ^Uniforms for 
women. — Woman and the paint pot. — 
The downfall of the home.^The 
break-up of the family. — Some notes 
on marriage. 

JuDSON, Katharine Berry, ed. 

Myths and legends of British North 
America. 1917. 398.2 J 93 

Malory, Sir Thomas. 

The boy's King Arthur ; being Sir 
Thomas Malory's history of King Ar- 
thur and his knights of the Round 
table ; ed. for boys with an introduc- 
tion by Sidney Lanier. Illustrated 
by N. C. Wyeth. 1917. 398.2 M25 



Price, Julius Mendes. 

Dame Fashion, Paris — Loudon (1786- 
1912). 1913. q391 P9 

LANGUAGE. 

Ball, James Dyer. 

An English-Cantouese pocket vocab- 
ulai-y. 1910. 495 B1 8 

Bondab, D., comp. 

Bondar's simplified Russian method, 
conversational and commercial. 1917. 
491.7 871 
Cross, Helene. 

Soldiers' spoken French, with correct 
phonetic pronunciation. cl917. 

448 C95 
Deroulede, Paul. 

Feuilles de route 1870. 1913. 448 D43 

ENGLiSH-Greek and Greek-English dic- 
tionary. cl907. 483 E58 

Gallichan, Walter M, comp. 

The soldiers' English and French con- 
versation book. 1917. 448 G1 6 

Hall, John Lesslie. 

English usage ; studies in the history 
and uses of English words and 
phrases. [1917] 423 H 17 

Jarintzoff, Madame N. 

The Russians and their language. 1916. 

491.7 J 37 
.Johnson, Edwin Lee. 

Historical grammar of the ancient Per- 
sian language. cl917. (The Vander- 
bilt oriental series.) 491.5 J66 

Macdonell, Arthur Anthony. 

A Vedic grammar for students. 1916. 

491.2 M13 
Marinoni, Antonio. 

An elementary grammar of the Italian 
language. cl911. 455 M33 

O'Shea, Michael Vincent. 

Linguistic development and education. 
1907. 407 082 

Segub, Sophie (Rostopchine) comtesse de. 

Les malheurs de Sophie, simplified by 

Dorothy M. Bement. cl915. 448 S45 

SCIENCE. 

Bamford, Mary Ellen. 

Up and down the brooks. 1898. 

595.7 819 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



115 



Bayley, William Sbirley. 

Descriptive mineralogy. 1917. 

549 B35 
Beach, William Dorrance. 

Military map-reading, field, outpost and 
road sketching. 7th. ed. 1912. 

526.9 B36 

BouTEOUX, Emile i. e. Etienne Emile 
Marie. 
Lectures delivered in connection with 
the dedication of the Graduate college 
of Princeton university in October, 
1913. 1914. 504 B78 

BuEDiCK, Arthur Jerome. 

Chemical tests for minerals. 1917. 

549.1 B95 

Cablock, Floyd D. 

Military topography and photography. 
cl916. 526.9 C28 

CiiAMBEELiN, Thomas Chrowder. 
The origin of the earth. [1916] 

(The University of Chicago science 
series.) 523 C44 

Cohen, Abraham. 

An elementary treatise on differential 
equations. 1906. 517 C67 

CooLiDGE, Julian Lovpell. 

A treatise on the circle and the sphere. 
1916. 513 C77 

Ceoss, Chai'les Frederick [and others]. 
Cellulose : an outline of the chemistry 
of the structural elements of plants, 
with reference to their natural his- 
tory and industrial uses. 1916. 

581.8 C95 
Dana, James Dwight. 

Dana's manual of mineralogy for the 
student of elementary mineralogy, the 
mining engineer, the geologist, the 
prospector, the collector. 13th ed. 
1912. 549 D16ma 

Dixon, Royal, and Fitch, Franklyn 
Everett. 
The human side of trees, wonders of 
the tree world. cl917. 582 D62 

Entomological news, and proceedings of 
the Entomological section of the 
Academy of natural sciences of 
Philadelphia, v. 27 for 1916. 

595.705 E61n 



Fadre, Jer.n Henri Ca.simir. 

The story-book of science, tr. from the 
19th French ed. by Florence Consta- 



ble Bicknell. 1917. 



SSU W9 



Findlay, Alexander. 

Chemistry in the service of man. 1917. 

540 F49 

GsiEVES, Loren Chester. 

Military sketching and map reading. 
1917. 526.9 G84 

Hendeeson, Lawrence Joseph. 

The order of nature. 1917. 501 H49. 



Hudson, William Henry. 
Birds and man. 1916. 



598.2 H88bi 



HUMPHEEY, Seth King. 

Mankind ; racial values and the racial 
prospect. 1917. 572 H 92 

.Jameson, Joseph Moore. 

Elementary practical mechanics. 1916. 

531 J31 

.Tones, Harry Clary. 

The nature of solution. 1917. 

542.6 J77n 

Kennedy, Philip Benjamin. 

Annotated list of the wild flowers of 
California. [cl917] c581.9794K36 

KiPPAX, John Robert. 

The call of the stars ; a popular intro- 
duction to a knowledge of the starry 
skies. 1914. 523 K57 

Lahee, Frederic Henry. 

Field geology. 1st ed. 1916. 550 LI 8 

Libby, Walter. 

An introduction to the history of 
science. cl917. 509 L69 

Licks, H. E. 

Recreations in mathematics. 1917. 

510 L71 

Lunge, Georg. 

Technical chemists' handbook. Tables 
and methods of analysis for manufac- 
turers of inorganic chemical products. 
2d ed., rev. 1916. 543 L96t 

Mathews, Albert Prescott. 

Physiological chemisti-y ; a textbook and 
manual for students. 2d ed. 1916. 
547.9 M42 



116 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Morgan, Thomas Hunt. 

A critique of the theory of evolution. 
1916. (Princeton university. The 
Louis Clark Vanuxem foundation 
lectures for 1915-1916.) 575 M 84c 

OSBOEN, Henry Fairfield. 

The origin and evolution of life, on the 
theory of action, reaction and inter- 
action of energy. 1917. (Hale lec- 
tures of the National academy of 
sciences.) 575 081 o 

Percival, John. 

Agricultural botany, theoretical and 
practical. 4th ed. 1913. 581.6 P42 

Powers, Earle, and Loker, Harold W. 
Practical exercises in rapid caluclation. 
el917. 511 P88 

Eastall, Robei-t Heron. 

Agricultural geology. 191G. (Cam- 
bridge geological series.) 551 R22 



Sharp, Dallas Lore. 

The face of the fields. 1911. 



504 S53f 



SwooPE, Coates Walton. 

Lessons in practical electricity, princi 
pies, experiments, and arithmetical 
problems ; an elementary text book. 
15th ed. 1917. 537 S97 

TiLDEN, Sir William Augustus. 

Chemical discovery and invention in the 
twentieth century. 1917. 540.9 T57 

Ulugh Beg ibn Shahrukh. 

Ulugh Beg's catalog of the stars. 1917. 

q523.8 U4 

Whetham, William Cecil Dampier. 

Science and the human mind. 1912. 
509 W568 

Wynne, Walter E., and Spraragen, W. 
Handbook of engineering mathematics. 
1916. 510 W98 

AERONAUTICS. 
Barber, H. 

The aeroplane speaks. 3d ed. [1917] 

q533.6 B2 

Barnwell, F. S., and Sayers, W. H. 
Aeroplane design, and A simple explana- 
tion of inherent stability. 1917. 

533.6 B26 



Burls, G. A. 

Aero engines : with a general introduc- 
tory account of the theory of the 
internal-combustion engine. 9th ed. 
1917. (Grifiin's aeronautical series.) 
533.6 B96 

Cavanagh, George Anthony. 

Model aeroplanes and their motors, a 

practical book for beginners. 1917. 

533.6 C37 



Collins, Archie Frederick. 
How to fly. 1917. 



533.6 C71 



Dixie, Albert Edward. 
Air navigation for flight ofiicers. [1917] 

533.6 D61 

Hayward, Charles Brian. 

Building and flying an aeroplane. 1917. 
533.6 H42b 
.Judge, Arthur William. 

Design of aeroplanes. 1917. (Manuals 
of aeronautics.) 533.6 J92d 

Properties of aerofoils and aero- 
dynamic bodies ; a textbook for aero- 
nautical engineers, draughtsmen, and 
students. 1917. (Manuals of aero- 
naut'cs.) 533.6 J92 

Kean, Francis .Tohn. 

Aeronautical engines. 1916. 533.6 K24 

Kennedy, Rankin. 

Flying machines : practice and design. 
Their principles, construction and 
working. 1909. 533.6 K36 

LANcnESTER, Frederic William. 

The flying-machine from an engineering 
standpoint, a reprint of the "James 
Forrest" lecture, 1914. 1916. 

533.6 L24f 
Matthews, R. Borlase. 

The aviation pocket-book for 1916. 

r533.6 M44 

Pierce, Robert Morris. 

Dictionary of aviation. [1914] 

r533.6 P61 
Talbot, Frederick A. 

Aeroplane.s and dirigibles of war. 1915. 

533.6 T1 3 

Walkden, S. L. 

Aeroplanes in gusts. Soaring flight and 
the stability of aeroplanes. 2d ed. 
1913. 533.6 W177 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CiVLIPORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



117 



Winchester, Clarence Arthur Charles. 
Flying men & their machines. 1916. 

533.6 W75 
TVooDHOUSE, Henry. 

Textbook of naval aeronautics. 1917. 

q533.6 W8 

USEFUL ARTS. 

AcHESON, Arthur. 

Trade-mark advertising an an invest- 
ment. 1917. 659 A17 

Aldis, Harry Gidney. 

The printed book. 1916. (Cambridge 
manuals of science and literature.) 

655 A36 

American wood preservers' association. 

I'roceedings of the thirteenth annual 

meeting. 1917. 691.106 A51 

Arnold, Sarah Louise. 

The story of the Sargent industrial 
school at Beacon, New York. 1917. 

607 A75 
Basford, Harry Miller. 

How to .sell printing. 1916. 655 B29 

Blake. Henry William, and Jackson. 
AA'alter. 
Electric railway transportation. 1917. 

656 B63 
Casterlin, Warren S. 

Steel working and tool dressing ; a 
manual of practical information for 
blacksmiths and all other workers in 
steel and iron. 1914. 682 C34 

Chebington, Paul Terry. 

The wool industry, commercial prob- 
lems of the American woolen and 
worsted manufacture. cl916. 

677 C52 
Collins, Archie Federick. 

The home handy book, a compendium of 
useful things to do around the aver- 
age house and how to keep it in 
repair. 1917. 680 C71 

Croy, Mae Savell. 

1000 shorter ways around the house. 
1916. 640 C95s 

Farrar, Gilbert Powderly. 

The topography of advertisements that 
pay ; how to choose and combine type 
face.s, engravings and all the other 
mechanical elements of modern ad- 
vertisement construction. 1917. 

659 F24 



Ferguson, William Burder. 

Estimating the cost of work ; with 
special reference to unstandardized 
operations, as in jobbing shops or 
repair work. 191-5. (Works man- 
agement library.) 657 F35 

Franks, 3Irs Thetta (Quay). 

The margin of happiness, llie reward 
of thrift. 1917. 640 F83m 

Gill, Anna A. 

Practical basketry. cl916. 689 G47 ■ 

Gill, Augustus Heraian. 

Gas and fuel analy.sis for engineers. 
Sth rev. ed. 1917. 665 G47g 

Green, Arthur George. 

A systematic survey of the organic 
colouring matters. 1908. q667.2 G7 

Green, Mrs Lilian (Bayliss). 
The effective small home. 1917. 

640 G79 

Greenougji, Mi-h Marietta (McPherson). 

Better meals for less money, by Mary 

Green [pisciul] 1917. 641 G82 

Guierson, Ronald. 

Some modfrn methods of ventilation. 
1916. 697.9 G84 

Handy, Amy Littlefield. 

War food ; practical and economical 
methods of keeping vegetables, fruits 
and meats. 1917. 664.8 H23 

Harbord, Frank William, and Hall, .T. W. 
The metallurgy of steel. 1916. 2 v. 

669.1 H25 

Harding, Louis Allen, and Willard, 
Arthur Cutts. 
Mechanical equipment of buildings. 
1st ed. 1916-17. 2 v. 690 H26 

Hiix. Mrs Janet (McKenzie). 

Cakes, pastry and dessert dishes. 1917. 

641 H64ca 

KiNNE. Helen, and Cooley. Anna Maria. 
The home and the family ; an elemen- 
tary textbook of home making. 1917. 
(The home-making series.) 

640 K55h 

Leeds, .John Bacon. 

The household budget. cl917. 640 L48 



118 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIPOENIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Leighou, Eobert Benjamin. 

Chemistry of materials of the machine 
and building industries. 1917. 

691 L52 
Lunge, Georg. 

Sulphuric and nitric acid. 1017. 
(Supplement to The manufacture of 
sulphuric acid and alkali, v. 1.) 

661.2 L96 

McCann, Alfred Watterson. 

Thirty cent bread ; how to escape a 
higher cost of living. cl917. 

641 M12 
Maddox, Harry A. 

Paper, its history, sources, and manu- 
facture. [1916] 

(Pitman's common commodities of 
commerce.) 676 Ml 7 

Mairet, Ethel M. 

A book on vegetable dj'cs. 1917. 

667.2 IVI22 

Martin, Geoffrey. 

Industrial and manufacturing chem- 
istry ; inorganic. 1917. 2 v. 

q660 MS 

The salt and alkali industry includ- 
ing potassium salts and the Stassfurt 
industry. 1916. 661 IV138 

Matteson, Emma B., and Newlands, 
Ethel M. 

A laboratory manual of foods and 

cookery. 1917. 641 M43 

Mayor, James. 

Government telephones ; the experience 
of Manitoba, Canada. 1916. 

654.6 IVI461 

Metcalf, Martha L. 

Student's manual in household arts ; 
food and cookery. 1915. 641 M58 

Miller, Samuel Wylie. 

Oxy-acetylene welding ; a comprehensive 
treatise on the practice of welding 
cast iron, malleable iron, steel, cop- 
per, brass, bronze, and aluminum by 
the oxy-acetylene method. 1916. 

671 M65 

MucKLOW, Walter. 

Real estate accounts ; treating of the 
proper classification, construction, 
and operation of accounts for the real 
estate business, including forms. 
1917. 657 M94 



Neil, Marion Harris. 

Candies and bonbons and how to make 
them. cl913. 642 N39 

Norwood press, Nonvood, Mass. 

Specimen book of the Norwood press, 
showing samples of hand and machine 
type equipment and presswork in 
black and colors ; with notes on the 
preparation of manuscript and proof 
reading. 1916. 655 N89 

Parsons, Carl Copeland. 

Office organization and management. 
1917. (Business administration . . . 
La Salle extension university.) 

658 P26 



Perry, L. Day. 
Seat weaving 



1917. 



645 P46 



Pitman, Benn, and Howard, Jerome B. 
The reporter's companion. Rev. ed. 

1916. 653 P68r 

Plomer, Henry Robert. 

A short history of English printing, 
1476-1900. [2d (popular) ed.] 1915. 
(Books about books.) 655.1 P72 

Prince, Jane. 

Letters to a young housekeeper. 1917. 

640 P95 

Ramsey, Albert R. J., and Weston, H. 
Claude. 
A manual on explosives. 1917. 

662 R18 

Rolfe-Martin, a. B. 

Wireless telegraphy ; a handbook on the 
fundamental principles and modern 
practice of radio-telegraphy. 1914. 

654 R74 
RoLPH, George Morrison. 

Something about sugar; its history, 
growth, manufacture and distribution. 

1917. 664.1 R75 

RoEER, Mrs Sarah Tyson (Heston). 
Hot weather dishes. clSSS. 641 R78h 



Sandwiches. cl912. 



641 R78s 



Sarin, Alvah Horton. 

The industrial and artistic technology 
of paint and varnish. 2 ed. 1917. 

667.6 SI la 
Schmidt, Walter Karl. 

Problems of the finishing room. cl916. 

698 S35 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFOENIA STATE LIBRARY, 



119 



Schwarzkopf, Ernst. 

Plain and ornamental forging. 1916. 

682 S41 
Scott, Rhea Clarke. 

Home labor saving devices. cl917. 

640 S42 
ScovELL, Clinton Homer. 

Cost accounting and burden application. 
1917. 657 S43 

Spencer, Guilford Lawson. 

A handbook for cane-sugar manufac- 
turers and their chemists. 6th ed. 
1917. 664.1 S74a 

Thompson, Arthur Beeby. 

Oil-field development and petroleum 
mining. 1916. 665.5 T46o 

Tryon, Rolla Milton. 

Household manufactures in the United 
States. 1917. 609 T87 

Wood, Grace, and Burbank, Emily. 

The art of interior decoration. 1916. 

645 W87 

Zenneck, Jonathan Adolf Wilhelm. 
Wireless telegraphy, tr. from the Ger- 
man by A. E. Seelig. 1915. 

654 Z54 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Adler, Alfred. 

The neurotic constitution. 1917. 

616.8 A23 

BiLiK, Samuel Ernest. 

Athletic training. cl917. 613.7 B59 

Bronnee, Augusta Fox. 

The psychology of special abilities and 
disabilities. 1917. 612.8 B86 

Cady, Mrs Bertha Louise (Chapman), 
and Cady, Vernon M. 
The way life begins, an introduction to 
sex education. [cl917] 612.6 C12 

Cermak, Josef. 

Club exercises. 1916. 613.7 C41 

CoNGDON, Leon Abel. 

Fight for food. cl916. 614.3 C74 

Craig, Robert Alexander. 

Common diseases of farm animals. 
. cl915. (Lippincott's farm manuals.) 

619 C88 



Ceowell, Frances Elisabeth. 

Tuberculosis dispensary method and 
procedure. [1916] 616.99 C95 

Donovan, William Lafayette. 

U. S. army physical exercises, revised 
for the use of the civilian. cl902. 

613.7 D68 

Eliason, Eldridge Lyon. 

First aid in emergencies. cl915. 

614.8 E42 

Fisher, George J., and Ben-y, Elmer. 
The physical effects of smoking. 1917. 

613.8 F53 

Feeud, Sigmuud. 
The history of the psychoanalytic move- 
ment, authorized English translation 
by A. A. Brill. 1917. (Nervous and 
mental disease monograph series.) 

q616.8F8 

Gardner, Mary Scwall. 

Public health nursing. 1916. 

610.73 G22 

Geeer, Edith. 

Food ; what it is and does. 



GuEBiN, William. 
Protecting your 
cl917. 



factory 



C191.5. 
613.2 G81f 



from fire. 
614.8 G93 



Heinee, Robert Graham. 

Physiology, first aid and naval hygiene ; 
a textbook for the Department of 
naval hygiene and physiology at the 
U. S. Naval academy, Annapolis, 
Maryland. 1916. 613.6 H46 

[Hereick, Mrs Christine (Terhune)]. 
Lose weight and be well ; the story of 
a stout woman now thin. [1917] 

613.2 H56 

HoLLiNGWORTH, Harry Levi, and Poffen- 
berger, A. T. 
Applied psychology. 1917. 612.8 H74 



Jones, George Ellis. 
Hygiene and war. 1917. 



613.6 J77 



Keefer, Frank R. 

A textbook of military hygiene and 
sanitation. 1917, 613.6 K26 

King, Dougall MacDougall. 

The battle with tuberculosis and how 
to win it. cl917. 616.99 K52 



120 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES, 



[Jan. 1918 



Lee, Robert James. 

Exercise and training; their effects 
upon health. 1873. 613.7 L47 

Lee, Roger Irving. 

Health and disease, their determining 
factors. 1917. 613 L47 

Lynch, Charles Frederick. 

Diseases of swine, with particular ref- 
erence to hog-cholera. 1914. 

619.4 L98 

Malchow, Charles William. 

The sexual life. 1915. 612.6 M24 

Mason, Charles Field. 

A complete handbook for the sanitary 
troops of the U. S. army and navy, 
and national guard and naval militia, 
by Charles Field Mason . . . 4th ed., 
rev. 1917. 614.8 M39a 

More, Adelyne. 

Uncontrolled breeding ; or, Fecundity 
versus civilization. 1917. 612 M83 

MuMFOED, James Gregory. 

A doctor's table talk. 1912. 

610.4 IVI96 

Contents : The doctor's habitat. — 
Doctor and patient. — Some doctors and 
their troubles. — Dr. Primrose on wo- 
men. — The doctor as a patient. — Dr. 
Primrose on socialism. — Reflections. — 
Ambrose Pare. — Hospital talk. — Rem- 
iniscenses. — A letter from Scriba to 
his son. 

Rank, Otto, and Sachs, Hanns. 

The significance of psychoanalysis for 
mental sciences. 191G. q616.8 R1 

Rittee, Sarah Margaret. 

The vertical-horizontal illusion ; an ex- 
perimental study of me.ridional dis- 
parities in the visual field. [1917] 
(Phychological review publications. 
The psychological monogi'aphs . . . 
vol. XXIII, no. 4; whole no. 101.) 

q612.84 R6 

Robie, Walter Franklin. 
Rational sex ethics. cl916. 

612.6 R66 

Safety engineering, v. 29-32 for 191.5-16. 

614.805 S12 

Slade, Charles Blount. 

Physical examination and diagnostic 
anatomy. 2 ed. 1916. 616.07 S63 



Tashieo, Shiro. 

A chemical sign of life. [1917] (Uni- 
versity of Chicago science series.) 

611.8 T19 
Thoendike, Edward Lee. 

Ventilation in relation to mental work. 

1916. 612.8 T49 

ENGINEERING. 

Alfoed, Leon Pratt, ed. 

Manufacture of artillery ammunition. 

1917. 623.4 A38 

Ameeican road builders' association. 
Proceedings of the 13th annual con- 
vention of the American road build- 
ers' association, 1916. 625.7 A51rb 

Attwood, Edward L. 

War-ships ; a textbook on the construc- 
tion, protection, stability, turning, 
etc., of war vessels. 6th ed. 1917. 

623.8 A88w 
Baeber, Herbert Lee. 

Story of the automobile, its history and 
development from 1760 to 1917. 
1917. 625.6 B23 

Battle, John Rome. 

Lubricating engineer's handbook ; a ref- 
erence book of data, tables and gen- 
eral information for the use of lubri- 
cating engineers, oil salesmen, oper- 
ating engineers, mill and power plant 
superintendents and machinery de- 
signers. cl916. 621.8B33 

Bishop, Han-y G. 

Elements of modem field artillery, U. S. 
service. 2d ed. cl917. 623.5 B62 

Bullard, William Hannum Grubb. 

Naval electricians' textbook. 3d ed. 
1915. 621.3 B93 

BuRB, William Hubert. 

Suspension bridges, arch ribs and canti- 
levers. 1913. 624 B96s 

Byrne, Austin Thomas. 

Modern road construction. 1917. 

625.7 B99m 
Cook, Arthur Leroy. 

Interior wiring and systems for electric 
light and power service ; a manual of 
practice for electrical workers, con- 
tractors, architects and schools. 1917. 
621.34 C77 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



121 



CcRTis. Thomas Stanley. 

High frequency apparatus ; its constnic- 
tion and practical application. cl916. 
621.3 C98 
Davis, Arthur Powell. 

Irrigation works constructed by the 
United States government. 1st ed. 
1917. 626.8 D26 

DiLWORTn, Edward Coe. 

Steel railway bi-idges, designs and 
weights. ■ 1916. 624 D58 

[DuBAND, William Frederick.] 

Practical marine engineering for marine 

engineers and students, with aids for 

applicants for marine engineers" 

licenses. 4th ed., rev. and enl. 1917. 

621.12 D94p 

Field entrenchments. American ed. 
Spadework for riflemen, hasty fire 
cover, fire trenches, communications, 
concealment, obstnictiou, shelters ; 
by an engineer ofiicer of the Imperial 
British general staff, ed. by Captain 
E. J. Solano. cl917. 623.1 F45 

Gerhard, William Paul. 

Control of plumbing work by water 
departments. [1916] 628.6 G36c 

GoETHAXS, George Washington. 

Government of the Canal Zone. 191.5. 
(Stafford Little lectures for 191-5.) 

626 G59 
Greene. Arthur Maurice. 

The elements of refrigeration ; a text- 
book for students, engineers and ware- 
housemen. 1916. 621.5 G79 

Greene, Carlton. 

"UTiarves and piers ; their design, con- 
struction, and equipment. 1st ed. 
1917. 627.3 G79 

Hammond, John S., and Olmstead, Daw- 
son. 
Instructions for gimners' examination 
in the field artillery. [1917] 

623.5 H22 
Hand, Louis Henry Byington. 

Pattern making and foundry practice. 
cl912. 621.7 H23 

Hyde, Arthur Penrhyn Stanley. 

Attack and defense of fortified harbors. 
2d ed. cl916. 623.3 H99 



Kapp, Gisbert. 

The principles of electrical engineering 
and their application. [1916] 

621.3 K17 

Kent, Robert Thurston. 

Power transmission by leather belting. 
1st ed. 1916. (Wiley engineering 
series.) 621.8 K37 

KoNiG, Paul. 

Voyage of the Deutschlaud. the first 
merchant submarine. 1917. 

623.9 K82 

Machine gun training. 1916. 623.5 M14 

McKellae, K. B. 

Machine gun practice and tactics for 
officers. N. c. o.'s and men. 1917. 

623.5 Ml 5 

Marks. Lionel Simeon. 

(xas and oil engine.s and gas-producei"s. 
1917. 621.4 M 34 

Mason, William Pitt. 

Water-supply (considered principally 
from a sanitary standpoint). 4th ed., 
rewritten. 1916. 628.1 M41a 

Megrew, Herbert Ashton. 

The flotation process. 1st ed. 1916. 

622.7 M49 

Miller, Warren Hastings. 

Rifles and shotguns ; the art of rifle and 
shotgun shooting for big game and 
feathered game, with special chapters 
on military rifle shooting. cl917. 

623.4 M65 

MoRETON. David Penn. 

Electric motors, direct and alternating. 
cl916. 621.31 M 84 



Moss, .James Alfred. 
cl917. 



How to shoot. 
623.4 M91 



Operation and tactical use of the Lewis 
automatic machine rifle, based on the 
experience of the European war. 
1917. 623.4 061 

Page. Victor Wilfred. 

Questions and answers relating to mod- 
ern automobile design, construction 
driving and repair . . . includes all 
latest 1917 developments. 1917 rev. 
and enl. ed. 1917. 625.6 P13q 



122 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Palen, Matthew A. 

Lessons in visual signaling. cl916. 

623.7 P15 

Pereigo, Charles Oscar Eugene. 

Lathe design, construction and opera- 
tion, with practical examples of lathe 
work . . . New rev. and enl. ed. 

1916. 621.94 P45 1 

Platt, William P. 

Coast artillery materiel, description, 
adjustment, and operation in drill and 
target practice. 4th ed. cl917. 

623.4 P71 

POLLAED, Hugh B. C. 

The book of the pistol and revolver. 

1917. \ 623.4 P77 

Potter, Audrey Abraham. 

Farm motors, steam and gas engines, 

hydraulic and electric motors, traction 

engines, automobiles, animal motors, 

windmills. 2d ed., rev. and enl. 1917. 

621.4P86 

Putnam, George Rockwell. 

Lighthouses and lightships of the United 
States. 1917. 627.9 P99 



RiTCHEY, James. 
Pattern makins 



1916. 



621.7 R59 



Skinner, Edmond Norton, and Plate, 
Horatio R. 
Mining costs of the world ; a compila- 
tion of cost and other important data 
on the world's principal mines. 1st 
ed. 1915. 622 S62 

Spaulding, Oliver Lyman. 

Notes on field artillery for officers of 
all arms. 3d ed. 1917. 623.5 S73 

Speague, Ernest Headly. 

The stability of arches. 1916. 624 S76 

Steele, J. E. 

Naval architecture. 1917. 623.8 S81 

Still, Alfred. 

Principles of electrical design ; d. c. and 
a. c. generators. 1916. 621.31 S85 

Streeter, Robert Leroy. 

Internal combustion engines, theory and 
design ; a textbook on gas- and oil- 
engines for engineers and students in 
engineering. 1st ed. 1915. 

621.4 S91 



Stronck, Hubert N., and Billyard, John R. 

The efficient purchase and utilization of 

mine supplies. 1917. 622 S92 

SuPLEE, Henry Harrison. 
The mechanical engineer's reference 
book ; a handbook of tables, formulas, 
and methods for engineers, students, 
and draftsmen. 4th ed., rev. and enl. 
cl913. r621 S95 

U. S. Armi/ service schools. ■ 

Notes on field fortification. 1916. 

623.1 U58 

Waddell, John Alexander Low. 

Bridge engineering. 1st ed., 1916. 2 v. 

624W11b 
Wegmann, Edward. 

The design and construction of dams, 
including masonry, earth, rock-fill, 
timber, and steel structures. 6th ed., 
rev. and enl. 1911. q 627.8 W4a 

AGRICULTURE. 

Allen, Walter Fox. 

English walnuts ; what you need to 
know about planting, cultivating and 
harvesting this most delicious of nuts. 
cl912. 634.5 A43 

American school of poultry husbandry. 
Breeds and varieties of poultry. cl916. 

636.5 A51s 

Aquatias, p. 

Intensive culture of vegetables on the 
Fi'ench system. With a concise 
monthly calendar of operations. 1913. 

635 A65 

Armsby, Henry Prentiss. 

Nutrition of farm animals. 1917. 

636 A73 

Bailey, Liberty Hyde. 

The pruning-manual, being the 18th 
ed., rev. and reset, of the Pruning- 
book which was first published in 
1898. 1916. (Rural manuals.) 

634 B15pl 

Boss, Andrew. 

Farm management. cl914. 630 B74 

Bruette, William Arthur. 

The Airedale ; a treatise on the history, 
breeding, care and treatment of these 
useful dogs. cl916. 636.7 B88 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



123 



Caeter, William Giles Harding. 

Horses, saddles and bridles. [3d ed.] 
1906, 636.1 C32 



Ceandaix, Lee Saunders. 
Pets ; their history and care. 



1917. 
636 C89 



Ckoy, Mae Savell. 

1000 hints on vegetable gardening. 
1917. 635 C95 



Dbyden, James. 
Poultry breeding 
1916. 



and management. 
636.5 D79 



Falconer, William. 

Mushrooms : how to grow them. A 
practical treatise on mushroom cul- 
ture for profit and pleasure. 1916. 
635.8 F1 8 

FtETCHER, Stevenson Whitcomb. 

Strawberry -growing. 1917. (Rural 
science series.) 634 F61 



Greinee, Tuisco. 

The new onion culture. 



1916. 



635 G82n 



Henry, William Arnon, and Morrison, 
Frank Barron. 
Feeds and feeding. 1916. 636 H52a 

Hesler, Lesemuel Ray, and Whetzel, 
Herbert Hice. 

Manual of fruit diseases. 1917. (Rural 

manuals.) 634 H 58 

Hunzikee, Otto Fred. 

Condensed milk and milk powder, pre- 
pared for the use of milk condenseries, 
dairy students and pure food depart- 
ments. 1914. 637 H 95 

Keitt, Thomas Ellison. 

The chemistry of farm practice. 1st ed. 
1917. (Wiley technical series.) 

630 K28 

Larson, Carl William. 

Milk production cost accounts. 1916. 

637.1 L33 

Lloyd, John William. 

Productive vegetable growing. cl914. 
(Lippincott's farm manuals.) 

635 L79 



LouNSBUEY, Fred Clark. 

Profit and pleasure in goat-keeping ; a 
practical conservative treatise pre- 
senting in concrete form the advan- 
tages of the modern milch goat, the 
various breeds, their care and man- 
agement. C191.5. 636.3 L88 

McCall, Arthur Gillett, 

Field and laboratory studies of crops ; 
an elementary manual for students 
of agriculture. 1st ed. 1916. 

630.7 Ml 2 
McMahon, John Robert. 

Success in the suburbs, how to locate, 

buy, and build ; garden and grow 

fruit ; keep fowls and animals. 1917. 

630 Ml 67 

Marshall, Francis Cutler. 

Elements of hippology. 1917. 

636.1 M36 
aiiLLEE, Charles C. 

A thousand answers to beekeeping ques- 
tions. 1917. 638 M64 

Myrick, Herbert. 

Agriculture and preparedness ; an ad- 
dress. 1917. 630 M99 

Plymouth rock squab company, Melrose 
Higlilands, Mass. 
HoAv to make money breeding Plymouth 
rock squabs. cl917. q636.5 P7 

POTTEE, Ermine Lawrence, ed. 

Western live-stock management. 1917. 

636 P86 
VoGT, Paul Leroy. 

Introduction to rural sociology. 1917. 

630 V88 
Webster, Angus Duncan. 

Ti'ee wounds and diseases ; their pre- 
vention and treatment. 1916. 

634.9 W377 
WiCKSON, Edward James. 

California vegetables in garden and 
field. 4th ed. 1917. c635 W63c2 

Woolsey, Theodore Salisbury. 

French forests and forestry ; Tunisia, 
Algeria, Corsica. 1st ed. 1917. 

634.9 W91 

FINE ARTS. 

Adam, H. Pearl. 

International cartoons of the war. 
1916. q741 A1 



124 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



American institute of architects. Com- 
mittee on town planning. 
City planning progress in tlie United 
States, 1917. q710A5 

Beals, Mrs Katharine (McMillan). 
Flower lore and legend. 1917. 

716.2 B36 

Benois, Aleksandr Nikolaevich. 

The Russian school of painting. 1916. 

q759.9 B4 
Bebenson, Bernhard. 

The study and criticism of Italian art. 

Third series. 1916. 759.5 B48 

Contents : Leonardo. — St. Justine of 
the Bagatti Valsecchi collection at 
Milan. — The four Bellinesque triptychs 
from the church of the Carita in Venice. 
— A madonna by Antonello da Messina. 
• — A madonna at Vienna and Anto- 
nello's S. Cassiano altar-piece. — The 
enigma of Carpaccio's "Glory of St. 
Ursula." — A Carpacciesque madonna 
in Berlin. — General index. — Index of 
places. 

Bertsch, Marguerite. 

How to write for moving pictures ; a 
manual of instruction and informa- 
tion. cl917. 778 855 

BOSANKO, W. 

Collecting old lustre ware. 1917. 

738 874 
Brigham, Gertrude Richardson. 

The study and enjoyment of pictures. 
1917. 759 885 

Brinton, Christian. 

Exhibition of paintings by Ignacio 
Zuloaga. 1916. 759.6 Z94b 

Camehl, Ada Walker. 

The blue-china book ; early American 
scenes and history pictured in the 
pottery of the time, with a supple- 
mentary chapter describing the cele- 
brated collection of presidential china 
in the White house at Washington, 
D. C, and a complete checking list 
of known examples of Anglo-Ameri- 
can pottery. cl916. 738 C1 8 

Clapp, Fredei-ick Mortimer. 

Jacopo Carucci da Pontormo, his life 
and work. 1916. q759.5 P81c 

Colour, v. 4, 5 for 1916-17. q705 C71 

Cox, Kenyon. 

Concerning painting ; considerations 
theoretical and historical, 1917. 

750 C87c 



FiLKiNS, Mrs Clarabel (Childs). 

The china painters A B C ; a primer for 
beginners, with many hints for the 
advanced student and teacher. cl91.5. 

738 F48 
Fletcher, F. Morley. 

Wood-block printing. 1916. (The art- 
istic crafts series of technical hand- 
books.) 761 F61 

Flitch, John Ernest Crawford. 

An idler in Spain ; the record of a 
Goya pilgrimage. 1914. 759.6 G72f 

Folwell, Amory Prescott. 

Municipal engineering practice. 1916. 

710 F67 
Fry, Horace Pugh. 

Notes on mechanical drawing. [5th ed] 
1916. 744 F94 

Gallatin, Albert Eugene. 

I'aul Manship ; a critical essay on his 
sculpture and an iconography. 1917. 
735 M287g 
Gibson, Charles Dana. 

Gibson new cartoons. 1916. q741 G4g 

Groliee club, Neio York. 

Catalogue of the engraved work of 
Asher B. Durand, exhibited at the 
Grolier club, April, 1895. cl895. 

q769 D94 
HoppiN, .Joseph Clark. 

Euthymides and his fellows. 1917. 

738 H79 
.Jekyll, Gertrude. 

Annuals & biennials. [1916] (Coun- 
try life library.) 716J47a 

Johnson, Robert. 

The art of retouching photographic 
negatives. 1915. 770 J68 

Johnson, Stanley Currie. 

The medals of our fighting men. 
[1916?] 737 J 69 

Kelly, Albanis Ashmun. 

The expert interior decorator ; a manual 
of reference for the expert decorator 
and instruction for the beginner in 
the art of painting and decorating the 
walls of private residences, public 
buildings, churches, halls, lodge 
rooms, etc. 1917. 747 K29 

Linton, John. 

The cross in modern art. [1916] 

755 L76 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



125 



LuTZ, Edwiu George. 

I'l'actical drawing ; a book for the stu- 
dent and the general reader. 1915. 
741 L97p 

Mtjnicipat, journal, 2Vew York. 

Practical street construction ; planning 
streets and designing and construct- 
ing the details of street surface, sub- 
surface and supersurface structures, 
reprinted from a series of articles 
which appeared in Municipal journal 
during the year 1916. 1916. 

710 M96 

MuNN, Mrs Margaret (Crosby) ed. 

The art of George Frederick Munn. 
cl916. 759.1 M966m 

Pabis, William Francklyn. 

Decorative elements in architecture ; 
random observations on the eternal 
fitness of things from a decorative 
point of view. 1917. 749 P23 

PoTTiEB, Edmund. 

Douris and the painters of Greek vases. 
1916. 738 D962p 



Robinson, William Heath. 
Hunlikely ! [1916] 



741 R66 



RoLFE, Amy Lucile. 

Interior decoration for the small home. 
1917. 747 R74 

ScHEViix, Ferdinand. 

Karl Bitter; a biography. [1917] 

q735 B62s 

SciiRAiDT, Feidinand Friederich Hans. 
Geometrical drawing ; a collection of 
plates for practical use in elementary 
mechanical drawing. 1915. 744 S37 

Seachbest, Efiie. 

Greek photoplays, illustrated with four 
plates in color by Edwin Ilowland 
Blashfield and two hundred twenty 
half tones from potographs taken by 
the author. cl916. 778 S43 

SiiEBBiLL, Charles Hitchcock. 

A stained glass tour in Italy. 191.3. 

748 S55 

Sieen, Osvald. 

A descriptive catalogue of the pictures 
in the Jarves collection belonging to 
Yale university. 1916. q708 S61 



TniiS, .Jens Peter. 

Leonardo da ^'^inci ; the Florentine 

years of Leonardo & Verrocehio. 

[1913] q759.5V7t 

Thueston, Carl Hammond Philander. 
The art of looking at pictures. 1917. 

759 T54 



ARCHITECTURE. 

Aveeage man's home. cl916. q728 A9 

Fifty small house designs selected, 
from drawings submitted in a nationa,l 
competition for the best $3000 dwelling. 

BtJHLMANN, Josef. 

Classic and renaissance architecture 
(with an English text translation). 
[1916] f722 B9 

Byne, Arthur, and Stapley, Mildred. 
Spanish architecture of the sixteenth 
century ; general view of the plater- 
esque and Herrera styles. 1917. 
(Publications of the Hispanic society 
of America. ) q720.946 B9 

Elderkin, George Wicker. 

Problems in Periclean buildings. 1912. 
(Princeton monographs in art and 
archaeology. ) 722.8 E3 

Embtjby, Ay mar. 
The livable house, its plan and design. 
1917. (Livable house series.) 

q728 E5I 
Innocent, Charles Frederick. 

The development of English building 
construction. 1916. (Cambridge 
technical series.) 728158 

National fire proofing company. 

The Natco double house, semi-detached. 
C1914. q728 N27f 



The Natco suburban house and 

garage. [1915] q728 N27fn 

Radfoed, William A., and Peker, Charles 
Godfrey. 
How to read plans and take off bills of 
material. cl917. q721 R1 



Robinson, L. Eugene. 
Domestic architecture. 



1917. 728 R66 



Van Pelt, John Vredenburgh. 

The essentials of composition as applied 
to art. 1913. 729 V27 



126 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Waugii, Frank Albert. 

Outdoor theatres ; the design, construc- 
tion and use of open-air auditoriums. 
cl917. 725.8 W35 

Whipple, Harvey Mixer, and Gilbert, 
Clyde Dee, eds. 
Concrete houses and how they were 
built. 1917. q728 W57 

MUSIC. 

Alchin, Carrie Adelaide. 

Applied harmony. cl917. 781 A35a 

Damrosch, Frank Heino. 

Some essentials in the teaching of music. 
cl916. 780.7 D16 

GoETSCHius, Percy. 

The homophonic forms of musical com- 
position, an exhaustive treatise on the 
structure and development of musical 
forms. 8th ed. 1915. 781 G59h 

IIoLBROOK, George C. 

A novel presentation of the useful in 
harmony, together with synopsis and 
derivations of scales, intervals, and 
chords. 1916. 781 H72 

Kbehbiel, Henry Edward. 

A second book of operas ; their histories, 

their plots, and their music. 1917. 

782 K92b 

Contents : Biblical operas. — Bible 
stories in opera and oratorio.- — -Rubin- 
stein and his "Geistliche oper." — 
"Samson et Dalila." — "Die konigin von 
Saba." — "Herodiade." — "Lakme." — 
"Pagliacci." — - "Cavalleria rusticana." 
The career of Mascagni. — "Iris." — 
"Madama Butterfly." — "Der rosenka- 
valiei'." — "Konigskinder." — "Boris 
Godounoff." — "Madame Sans-Gene" 
and other operas by Giordano. — Two 
operas by Wolf-Ferrari. 

LiNDO, Algernon H. 

The art of accompanying. cl916. 

786 L74 
Montagu-Nathan, M. 
Moussorgsky. 1916. (Masters of Rus- 
sian music.) 780.2 M987m 



- Rimsky-Korsakof. 
of Russian music.) 



1916. (Masters 
780.2 R577m 



MuNP>o, Harry. 

Voice : its origin and divine nature. 
1916. 784.9 M96 

National anthems of the allies, n.d. 
Musical score with words. q784.4 N2 



Olds, William Benjamin. 

Twenty-five bird songs for children ; 
words and music. cl916. q784 04 

The Oxford song book ; collected and 
arranged by Percy C. Buck. 1916. 

q784.4 09 
Peabce, Charles William. 

Modern academic counterpoint. [1914] 

781 P35m 
Rayson, Ethel. 

Polish music and Chopin, its laureate. 
[1916] 780.9 R27 

Sharp, Cecil James, ed. 
One hundred English folksongs. cl916. 
(Musicians library.) q784.4 S5 

SoNNECK, Oscar George Theodore. 

Suum cuique ; essays in music. cl916. 

780.4 S69 
TOBIN, J. Raymond. 

Mozart and the sonata form. n.d. 

786.4 M939t 
Van Vechten, Carl. 
Music and bad manners. 1916. 

780.4 V28m 
Contents : Music and bad manners. — 
Music for the movies. — Spain and 
music. — Shall we realize Wagner's 
ideals? — The bridge burners. — A new 
principle in music. — Leo Ornstein. 

WiER, Albert E., ed. 

Dance music the whole world plays. 
[cl917] 786.4 W64 

AMUSEMENTS. 

Oahn-Leighton official theatrical guide. 
V. 16 for 1912-13. 792 CI 3 

Cann, Wilfred E., and Hastings, Wm. W. 

Manual of wrestling, prepared especially 

for teachers. 1912. 796 C22 

Carter, Huntly. 

The new spirit in drama & art. [1912] 

q792 C3 
Clark, Barrett Harper. 

How to produce amateur plays. 1917. 

793 C5922 
[Cook, Carroll Blaine.] 
Lake and stream game fishing, by Dix-'e 
Carroll [pseud.]. 1917. 799.1 C771 

CuNNiNGTON, Edward Ernest. 

Lessons in pawn play. 1913. 794 C97I 



Elbiquet, pseud. 
A textbook of magic. 



[1914] 791 E37 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



127 



Foster, Robert Frederick. 

Pirate bridge, the latest development of 
auction bridge, with the full code of 
the official laws. 1917. 795 F75p 

Gunnison, Binney. 

New dialogues and plays for young 
people. [C189&-190O] 793 G97 



Hare, Walter Ben. 
The scout master. 



1916. 



793 H27 



Lamkin, Nina B. 

Dances, drills and story-plays for every 
day and holidays. cl916. 793.1 L23 

Leavitt, Michael Bennett. 

Fifty years in theatrical management. 
cl912. 792 L43 

MacKaye, Percy Wallace. 

Community drama. 1917. 792.7 Ml 5c 

Merington, Marguerite. 

Fairy tale plays. 1916. 793.2 M56f 

Contents : Red Riding Hood. — Cin- 
derella. — Bluebeard. 

Nettleton, George Henry, ed. 

The book of the Yale pageant, 21 Octo- 
ber 1916, in commemoration of the 
two hundredth anniversary of the 
removal of Tale college to New 
Haven. 1916. q792.7 N4 

PiNKERTON, Mrs Kathrcnc Sutherland 
( Gedney ) . Woodcraft for women. 
1916. (Outing handbooks.) 796 P65 

Plays in pinafores. 1916. 793.2 P72 

Plays with a punch. 1916. 793 P72 

Smith, Nora Archibald. 

Plays, pantomimes and tableaux for 
children. 1917. 793.2S65 

Stecher, William Albin, 

Games and dances, a selected collection 
of games, song-games and dances suit- 
able for schools, playgrounds, gym- 
nastic associations, boys' & girls' 
clubs, etc. 2d ed. — rev. and enl. 
cl916. 793.1 S81 

Van Cleve, Cecilia. 

Folk dances for young people. 1916. 

q793.1 V2 

Vereill, Alpheus Hyatt. 

The book of camping. 1917. 796 V55 



LITERATURE. 

Renton, Frank Weber. 

I ; being the autobiography of my own 
life, together with other stuff and 
pomes, by M. E. 1916. c817 B47 

[Blanchaed, Mme.'\ 
Speech, how to use it effectively, by 
Xanthes. 1916. (Mental efficiency 
series.) 808.5 B63 

Bonner, Geraldine. 

Treasure and trouble therewith ; a tale 
of California. 1917. cB716t 

Bowman, James Cloyd, ed. 

The promise of country life ; descrip- 
tions, narrations without plot, short 
stories. cl916. 808 878 

Brooks, Van Wyck. 
The world of H. G. Wells. 191.5. 

823 W45zbr 

Brownell, William Crary. 

Standards. 1917. 801 B88s 

Contents : Measures of value. — The 
public. — Taste. — Tlie individual. — The 
inner life. — "Modern art." — The cause 
of art and letters. 

Caesar, C. Julius. 
The Gallic war*, with an English trans- 
lation, by H. J. Edwards. 1917. 
(Loeb classical library.) 878C12ge 

Ciiadwick, Esther Alice. 
Mrs Gaskell. [1911] 828 G24zc 

[Clemens, Samuel Langhorne.] 
The mysterious stranger ; a romance by 
Mark Twain [pseud.} [1916] 

817 C62my 

CoAN, Clarence Arthur. 

The fragrant note book ; romance and 

legend of the flower garden and the 

bye-way. 1917. q818C6 

Colby, Frank Moore. 

Constrained attitudes. 1910. 814 C68 

Contents : Coram populo. — On the 
brink of politics. — Rusticity and con- 
templation. — The humdrum of revolt. 
— The usual thing. — Impatient "cul- 
ture" and the literal mind. — Literary 
class distinctions. — The art of dispar- 
agement. — Internationalimpressionism. 
— Quotation and allusion. — Occasional 
verse. 



CooLiDGE, Dane. 

Rimrock Jones. cl917. 



cC775r 



Crotch, W. Walter. 

The soul of Dickens. 1916. 

823 D54zcrs 



128 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



■Jan. 1918 



DosTOEVSKifi, Fedor Mikhailovich. 

Pages from the journal of an author, tr. 
by S. Koteliansky and J. Middleton 
Murry. 1916. 891.78 D72 



Fisher, Mary. 
The Treloars. 



C1917. 



FooTE, Mrs Mary (Hallock). 
Edith Bonham. 1917. 



cF535 



cF689e 



Francke, Kuno. 

Personality in German literature before 
Luther. 1916. 830.9 F82p 

Grabo, Carl Henry. 

The amateur philosopher. 1917. 

814 G72 

Gbimmelshause:^, Hans Jacob Christoffel 
von. 
The adventurous Simplicissimus, being 
the description of the life of a strange 
vagabond named Melchior Sternfels 
von Fuchshaim. 1912. 833 G86 

GuERAED, Albert L^on. 

Five masters of French romance ; Ana- 
tole France, Pierre Loti, Paul Bour- 
get, Maurice Barres, Romain Rolland. 
[1916] 843.09 G92 

Harbison, Lucy. 

A lover of books. The life and literary 
papers of Lucy Harrison, vpritten and 
arranged by Amy Greener. 1916. 

828 H319 
H:a.wabd, Lawrence. 

The effect of war upon art and litera- 
ture ; a lecture delivered at the Uni- 
versity of Manchester, February 28, 
1916. 1916. 824 H38 

Houghton, Harry Garfield. 

Elements of public speaking. [1916] 

808.5 H83 
HuNEKEB, James Gibbons. 

Unicorns. 1917. 814 H93u 

Contents : In praise of unicorns. — 
An American composer : the passing 
of Edward MacDowell. — Remy de 
Gourmont : liis ideas. The colour of 
his mind. — Artzibashef. — A note on 
Henry James. — George Sand. — The 
great American novel. — The case of 
Paul Cezanne. — Brahmsody. — The 
opinions of J.-K. Huysmans. — Style 
and rhythm in English prose. — The 
queerest yarn in the world. — On re- 
reading Mallock. — The lost master. — 
The grand manner in pianoforte play- 
ing. — James Joyce. — Creative involu- 
tion — Four dimensional vistas. — O. W. 
— A synthesis of the seven arts. — The 



classic Chopin. — Little mirrors of sin- 
cerity. — The reformation of George 
Moore. — Pillowland. — Cross-currents 
in modern French literature. — More 
about Richard Wagner. — My first 
musical adventure. — ■ Violinists now 
and yesterday. — Riding the whirlwind. 
— Prayers for the living. 

Husband, Margaret Fair Anderson. 

A dictionary of the characters in the 

Waverley novels of Sir Walter Scott. 

1910. 823 S43zh 

Leacock, Stephen Butler. 

Essays and literary studies. 1916. 

814 L43 

Further foolishness ; sketches and 

satires on the follies of the day. 1917. 

817 L43f 
London, Jack. 

The human drift. 1917. c818L84h 

Contents : The human drift. — Noth- 
ing that ever came to anything. — That 
dead men rise up never. — Small-boat 
sailing. — Four horses and a sailor. — 
A classic of the sea. — A wicked woman 
(curtain raiser.) — The birth mark 
(sketch). 

Long, William Joseph. 

Outlines of English and American liter- 
ature ; an introduction to the chief 
writers of England and America, to 
the books they wrote, and to the times 
in which they lived. cl917. 

820.9 L84 
McNetl, Everett. 

Fighting Avith Fremont. cl910. 

cM169f 
Mitchell, Edmund. 

The call of the bells. 1916. cM681c 
Morris, Lloyd R. 

The Celtic dawn. 1917. 820.9 M87 

eomp. 

The young idea ; an anthology of opinion 

concerning the spirit and aims of con- 

. temiiorary American literature. 1917. 

810.9 M87 

Pearson, William Winstanley. 

Shantiniketan, the Bolpur school of 

Rabindranath Tagore. 1916. 

891.4 P36 

Peckham, Harry Houston. 

Present-day American poetry, and other 

essays. cl917. (Studies in literature.) 

814 P368p 

Contents : Present-day American 
poetry. — The foremost poet of our day 
[Alfred Noyes] — Wanted: a new spirit 
in literary criticism. — The return of 
objectivism in poetry. — The new fem- 
inism in literature. — Madison Cawein. 
— Lopsided realism. — Is our literature 
still English? 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



129 



Potter. Murray Anthony. 

Four essays. 1917. (Harvard .studies 
in Romance languages.) 814 P868 

Contents : Petrarch the author. — 
Petrarch the man (Attitude towards 
solitude and nature, towards Dante, 
towards friends, towards Gloria and 
Laura ) . — Petrarch the critic and 
reader. — The horse as an epic char- 
acter. 

Raleigh. Sir Walter Alexander. 

Romance. 1910. (Princeton univer- 
sity. The Louis Clark Vanuxem 
foundation lectures for 1914-1915.) 
820.9 R16 

Ravixdra?s-atha Thakuka. »S'/r. 

Personality. 1917. 891.441 R25p 

Contents : What is art? — The world 
of personality. — The second birth. — 
My school. — Meditation. — Woman. 

Roberts. William Rhys. 

Patiuotic poetry. Greek and English : 
an address given on the .500th anni- 
versary of Agincourt. 191G. 

824 R64 

RoBESOX. F. E. 

A progressive course of precis writing. 
1917. 808 R65 



1910. 808.8 S27 



Sayle. Chai-les. 
The ages of man. 

Scott. Dixon. 

Men of letters. 2d ed. 1917. 

820.9 S42 

Contents: The innocence of Bernard 
Shaw. — The meekness of Mr Rudyard 
Kipling. — The ambitions of Sir James 
Barrie. bart. — Henrv James. — The 
artlessness of Mr H. G. Wells. — The 
commonsense of Mr Arnold Bennett. — 
Mr Granville Barker and an alibi. — • 
The real Stanley Houghton. — Beau 
Beerbohm. — The guilt of Mr Chester- 
ton. — The yellow patch, a chronicle of 
Mr John Masefleld. — Sir W. Robert- 
son Nicoll. — The art of :Mrs Meynell. 
— C. E. Montague. — Rupert Brooke. — 
Lionel Johnson's prose. — George Mei'e- 
dith's letters. — The homeliness of 
Browning. — The first Morris. 

Seneca. Lucius Annaeus. 

Ad Lucilium epistulae morales, with an 
English translation by Richard M. 
Gummere. 1917. (Loeb classical 
library.) 878 S47ag 

Spixgaex. Joel Elias. 

Creative criticism ; essays on the unity 
of genius and taste. 1917. 801 S75c 

Straight road : with illustrations by C. E. 
Chambers. cl917. cS896 



Tavexxer. Eugene. 

Studies in magic from Latin literature. 
1916. (Columbia university studies 
in classical philology. ) 870.9 T23 

TwoMBLY, Frances Doane. and Dana. 
.John Cotton. 
The romance of labor. 1910. 

810.8 T97 
Wat.sox. William. 

Pencraft : a plea for the older ways. 
1910. 804 W34 

Wilstach. Frank .Jenners. 

A dictionary of similes. 1917. 

808.8 W75 
WixTER, Irvah Lester. 

Public speaking ; principles and prac- 
tice. 1912. 808.5 W78 

Wyatt. Edith Franklin. 

Great companions. 1917. 814 W97 

Contents : The author of Robinson 
Crusoe. — Stephen Crane. — The dislike 
of human interest. — Vandover and the 
brute. — "True to life." — Once upon a 
time. — Henry James. — Some unpopu- 
lar parodies. — A national contribu- 
tion. — An appreciation. — With Walt 
Whitman in Camden. — Poetry ' and 
criticism. — James T\"hitcomta Riley. — 
Bronte poems. — Shelley in his letters. 
— Shelley's friendships with women. — 
Arms and industry. — Nonsense about 
women. — ■ The letters of a woman 
homesteader. — An autobiography of 
American farm women. — Seeing the 
country. — The training of a forester. — 
Henri Fabre. — Two woodsmen. 

POETRY AND DRAMA. 

AxDREEV. Leonid Nikolaevich. 
Love of one's neighbor. 1914. 

891.72 A55 1 
Anxuxzio, Gabriele d'. 

The daughter of .Jorio : a pastoral trag- 
edy. 1907. 852A61d 

Aemstroxg. Alta Florence. 

The pla.v of life, in seven acts. 1917. 
(American dramatists series.) 

812 A73 
Baker, Arthur E., cd. 

A concordance to the iwetical and dra- 
matic works of Alfred, lord Tenny- 
son. 1914. 821.81 Gba 

Baldwix, Dane Lewis. 

A concordance to the poems of John 
Keats. 1917. q821 K2zb 

Baxxister. Arthur Thomas. 
William Shakespeare. 1916. 

822.33 Dba 



130 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Barnett, Henry Green. 

The roof of the world, and other jioems. 
191G. 811 B26 



Barney, Danford. 
Dust of stars. 1916. 



811 B261 



Barrie. Hir James Matthew, hcn-t. 

The admirable Crichton. Illustrated by 
Hugh Thomson. [1914] vq822 B2a 

Bartholomew. Julia Hall. 

Two masques : America — The women of 
Shakespeare. cl916. (American 
dramatists series.) 812 828 

Benavente y Martinez, .Jacinto. 

Plays, tr. from the Spanish, with au 

introduction, by .John Garrett Undei'- 

hill. Authorized ed. 1917. 862 B45p 

Contents : His widow's husband. — 
The bonds of interest. — The evil doers 
of good. — La malquerida. 

Benet, William Rose. 

The great white wall, a poem. 1916. 

811 B46g 
BETT.S, Frank. 

Iron age. 1916. 821 B56 



Saga plays. 1917. 



822 B56 



BiDDLE, Livingston Ludlow. 

The understanding hills, and other 
poems. 1916. 811 B584 

BiERSTADT. Edward Hale. 

Dunsany the dramatist. 1917. 

822 D92zb 
BiNYON. Laurence. 

The cause, poems of the war. 1917. 

821 B61c 
Blackmoee. J«imou Augustine. 

A great soul in conflict : a critical study 
of Shakespeare's master-work. cl914. 
822.33 R8b 
Blair. Wilfrid. 

The death of Shakespeare. 1916. 

822 B63 
BoTTOMLEY, Gordon. 

King Lear's wife, play in one act. 

1916. 822 B751< 

Boyd. Ernest Augustus. 

The contemporary drama of Ireland. 

1917. 822.09 B78 

Brown, Alice. 

The road to Castaly. and later poems. 
1917. 811 B877a 



California and the opening of the gate- 
way between the Atlantic and the 
Pacittc. cl916. c811 C15o 

Cochran, Mrs Eve Owen. 

Wilderness rose ; a play in four acts 
especially adapted for the use of 
American historical societies and 
chapters of the D. A. R. cl916. 
(American dramatists series.) 

812 C66 
Coleridge, Stephen. 

Au evening in my librarj' among the 
English poets. 1916. 821.09 C69 

CoLLisoN-MoRLEY, Lacy. 

Shakespeare in Italy. 1916. 

822.33 Deo 1 1 
CoLUM, Padraic. 

Mogu, the wanderer ; or. The desert ; 
a fantastic comedy in three acts. 
1917. 822 C72 

Three play.s : The fiddler's house. 

The land. Thomas Muskerry. 1916. 

822 C72t 

cd. Poems of the Irish revolutionai*y 

brotherhood. 1916. 821 C726p 

('raniier-Byng, Launcelot Alfred, tr. 
A feast of lanterns. 1916. (The wis- 
dom of the Bast series.) 895.1 C89 

Creizenacii, Wilhelm Michael. 

The English drama in the age of 
Shakespeare. [1916] 822.09 C91 



Crocker, Bosworth. 
The last straw. 1911 



812 C93 



Crothers, Rachel. 

The three of us, a play in four acts. 
cl916. 812 C95 

CuMMiNGS, Hubertis Maurice. 

The indebtedness of Chaucer's works to 
the Italian works of Boccaccio. 
[1916] 821.17 Fc 

nas Augustine. 

811 D15c 

811 D15 

811 D15m 

811 D15s 

811 D21c 



Daly, Thomas Augustine. 
Canzoni. 1916. 

— — Carmina. 1909. 

— Madrigali. cl912. 

— — Songs of wedlock. 1916. 

Dargan, Mrs Olive Tilford. 
The cycle's rim. 1916. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAKY. 



131 



Daeio, Rubeu. 

Eleven poems. lOKi. 861 D21e 

Davies, William Henry. 

Collected poems. 191G. 821 D257 

De La Mare, Walter John. 

Peacock pie ; a book of rhymes. 1916. 

821 D33p 
Dickinson, Thomas Herbert. 

The contemporary drama of England. 
1917. (Contemporary drama series.) 
822.09 D55 
DoBLE, George D. 

The word. cl917. c811 D633 

Dowx, Oliphant. 

The maker of dreams ; a fantasy in one 
act. 1917. (Repertory plays.) 

822 D74 
Dudley, Anita. 

Valediction : sonnets to Kitchener. 
1916. 821 D84 



Duff, Esther Lilian. 
Bohemian glass. 1916. 



821 D85 



Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax 

Plunkett, 18th haron. 

Plays of gods and men. cl917. 

822 D92p 

Contents : The tents of the Arabs. — 
The laughter of the gods. — The queen's 
enemies. — A night at an inn. 

Dbum, Sidney. 

Six miles from a lemon ; a farce in 
three acts. 1916. 812 D79 

Earp, T. W. 

Contacts and other poems. 1916. 

821 E12 

EVERYJIAX. 

The play of Everyman, based on the 
old English morality play ; new ver- 
sion by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, set 
to blank verse by George Sterling in 
collaboration with Richard Ordynski. 
1917. c822 E93 



FuoTE, Ella Woodward. 
Poems. 1S98. 



c811 F688 



Forbes, James. 

The commuters ; a comedy in four acts. 
cl916. 812 F69 

Gogol', Nikolai Vasil'evich. 

The inspector-general ; a comedy in five 
acts, tr. by Thomas Seltzer. 1916. 
(The Borzoi plays.) 891.72 G61 

Grandgent, Charles Hall. 

The ladies of Dante's lyrics. 1917. , 

851.15 Dg 

Greene, Clay Meredith. 

The dispensation and other plays. 1914. 

c812 G79 

GriJiERA, Angel. 

La pecadora (Daniela) ; a play in 
three acts, tr. by Wallace Gillpatrick. 
1916. (Publications of the Hispanic 
society of America. ) 862 G96p 

Hazard, Caroline. 

The Yosemite, and other verse. 1917. 

c811 H42 
HAVEiiEYEB, Loomis. 

The drama of savage peoples. 1916. 

809.2 H38 
Holmes, Charles E. 

From court to court. 1905. 811 H749 

Inayat Khan, and Westb-ook, Jessie 
Duncan, eds. 
Songs of India. 1915. 891 135 



.Jaiies I. king of Scotland. 
The king's quair. 1911. 



821 J27 



FiCKE, Arthur Davison. 
An April elegy. 1917. 



811 F44 



Fitch, Clyde i. e. William Clyde. 

Beau Brummel ; a play in four acts, 
written for Richard Mansfield. 1908. 
812 F54be 
Foley, James William. 

The voices of song, a book of poems. 
1916. 811 F66v 



James, May F. 

Weighed in the balance ; a drama in 
four acts. cl916. (American dramat- 
ists series.) 822 J 28 

.Jefferson, Bernard Levi. 

Chaucer and the consolation of philos- 
ophy of Boethius. 1917. 821.17 Fj 

JocHUMSsoN, Matthias. 

An Icelandic poem. [1916] q839.61 J6 

Kellett, Florence. 

Oh Erin my home, and other poems. 
[cl916] c81 K29 

Kreymborg, Alfred. 

Mushrooms : a book of free forms. 1916. 

811 K92 



132 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Langnee, Lawrence. 

Another way out, a play in one act. 
1916. (Plays of the Washington 
square players.) 812 L28 

Ledoux, Louis Vernon. 

The story of Eleusis, a lyrical drama. 
1916. 812 L47s 

Leland Stanford junior university. Eng- 
lish chit. 
A Stanford book of verse, 1912-1916. 

1916. C811.08L53 

LiVESAY, Florence Randal, ed. and tr. 
Songs of Ukraiua, with Ruthenian 
poems. 1916. 891.7 L78 

Lowell, Amy. 

Tendencies in modern American poetry. 

1917. 811.09 L91 



MacGill, Patrick. 

Soldier songs. [1917] 



821 Ml 4s 



MacGuinness, Charles. 

Forty-five selections from the original 
descriptive, dramatic, patriotic, pa- 
thetic, humorous and dialect poems. 
cl911. 811 M 148 

Mackail, .John William. 

Shakespeare after three hundred years. 
1916. (British academy. The an- 
nual Shakespeare lecture, 1916.) 

q822.33 Dmac 

MacKaye, Percy Wallace. 

Sinbad, the sailor ; his adventvres with 
Beavty and the Peacock lady in the 
castle of the forty thieves, a lyric 
phantasy. cl917. 812 Ml 5s i 

MacNutt, Francis Augustus. 

Three plays : Balboa, Xilona, The vic- 
torious duchess. 1916. 812 Ml 69 

McQuilland, Louis J. 

A song of the open road, and other 
verses ; with a proem in verse by 
"G. K. C." [1916] 821 M173 

Mangus, Leonard Arthur, ed. and tr. 
The tale of the armament of Igor. 
1915. 891.7 M19 

Marks, Jeannette Augustus. 

Three Welsh plays : The merry merry 
cuckoo, The deacon's hat, Welsh 
honeymoon. 1917. 812 M34 



Masefield, John. 

Lollingdon Downs, and other poems. 
1917. 821 M39I 

Meeker, .James Edward. 

The life and poetry of James Thomson 
(b. v.) 1917. 821T484zm 

Mifflin, Lloyd. 

As twilight falls, poems. 1916. 

811 M63as 
Mills, William Hathorn. 

War-ballads and verses. 1917. 

c811 M657w 

Monroe, Harriet, and Henderson, Alice 
Corbin, eds. 
The new poetry ; an anthology. 1917. 
821.08 M75 
Moore, Edward. 

Studies in Dante. Fourth series : 
Textual criticism of the Convivio and 
miscellaneous essays. 1917. 

851.15 Emc 



MoRNiNGSiDE plays. 1917. 812 M86 

812 M99 



Mygatt, Tracy Dickinson. 
Watchfires. 1917. 



XoKTHRUP, John Wood. 

Songs of nature, love and life. cl916. 

c811 N87 
Oliver, Margaret Scott. 

Six one-act plays : The hand of the 
prophet — Children of Granada — The 
turtle dove — This youth-gentlemen — 
The striker — Murdering Selina. 
cl916. (American dramatists series.) 

812 048 
OsTROVSKii, Aleksandr Nikolaevich. 
Plays. 1917. 891.72 085 

Contents : A protegee of the mistress. 
— Poverty is no crime. — Sin and sor- 
row are common to all. — It's a family 
affair — we'll settle it ourselves. 

Oxenham, John. 

Bees in amber ; a little book of thought- 
ful verse. 1913. 821 098 

The King's high way, some more 

helpful verse. 1916. 821 098k 

Oxford. University. Bodleian lihrarij. 
A catalogue of the Shakespeare exhibi- 
tion held in the Bodleian library to 
commemorate the death of Shakes- 
peare, April 23, 1616. 1916. 

q822.33 Ao 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



133 



The Oxford book of Euglisli mystical 
verse, chosen by D. H. S. Nicliolsou 
and A. H. E. Lee. 1917. 

821.08 098b 
Peabody. Josephine Preston. 

The wings : a drama in one act. cl917. 

812 P35wi 
PE^'^■IirAX. .Josiah Harmar. 

The war of the theatres. 1S97. 

822.09 P41 

PiCKTHALL. Marjorie Lowry Christie. 
The lamp of poor souls, and other 
poems. 1910. 811 P59 

Poets of the future, a college anthology 
for 191.5-16. cl916. 811.08 P74 

Ransome. Cyril. 

Short studies of Shakespeare's plots. 
1911. 822.33 Hr 

RavIxdraxatha Tiiakura. .S'(V. 
The cycle of spring. 1917. 

891.442 R25cy 

Fruit-gathering. 1916. 

891.441 R25f 

Sacrifice, and other plays. 1917. 

891.442 R25s 

Contents : Sanyasi ; or, The ascetic. 
— Malini. — Sacrifice. — Tlie Iving and 
the queen. 

Rice. Cale Toung. 

Trails sunward. 1917. 811 R49t 

Sarojixi Nayadu. 

The broken wing : songs of love, death 
& destiny. 1917. 891.4 S24b 

ScHETFLEY. William H. 

Brieux and contemporaryFrench society. 
1917. 842 B85zs 

SciiNiTZLER, Arthur. 

Comedies of words, and other plays. 

Englished from the German by 

Pierre Loving. 1917. 832 S36c 

Contents : Comedies of words : Tlie 
hour of recognition. The big scene. 
The festival of Bacchus. — Otlier plays : 
Literature. His lielpmate. 

Sexeca. Lucius Annaeus. 

Seneca's Tragedies, with an English 

translation by Frank Justus Miller. 

1917. 2 y. (Loeb classical library.) 

872S47tml 

Shakespeare, William. 

Shakespeare in time of war. 1916. 

822.33 Hcolm 



Shakespeare, William. 

The sonnets of Shakespeare from the 
iiuarto of 1(>(X>. with variorum read- 
ings and commentary. 191tj. 

822.33 Y7a 
Shepherd. Eric. 

Pilgrimage. 1916. 821 S548p 

Sophocles. 

The Antigone of Sophocles, tr. into 
English verse by Joseph Edward 
Harry. 1911. 882 S71ah 

Stacpoole, Henry De Vere. 

Francois Villon, his life and times, 
1431-1463. 1916. 841 V75zs 



Sterlikg, George. 

Thirty-five sonnets. cl917. 



c811 S83t 



Sterling, Robert William. 

The poems of Robert W. Sterling. 

1916. 821 S838 

Stoddard. Charles Warren. 

Poems : collected by Ina Donna Cool- 
brith. 1917. c811 S86p 

SymojN'S. Arthur. 

Tristan and Iseult ; a play in four acts. 

1917. 822 S98 

Teasdale, Sara, comp. 

The answering voice ; one hundred love 
lyrics by women. 1917. 821.08T25 

TEREXTirs Afer, Publius. 

The Phormio of Terence, tr. into Eng- 
lish prose. 1903. 872T31pm 

TiiOiiA, Ludwig. 

"Moral" : a comedy in three acts. 1916. 
(Borzoi plays.) 832 T45m 

Thomas. Augustus. 

Mrs Leffingwell's boots, a farcial com- 
edy in three acts. cl916. 812T45m 

Oli'^'er Goldsmith, a comed.v in three 

acts. cl916. 812 T45o 

[Thojias. Mrs Blanche Marie Louise 
(Oelrichs).] 
iliscellaneous poems, by Michael 
Strange [;j.sc»f/.]. 811 T454 



Thomas. Calvin. 
Goethe. 1917. 



832.62 Bt 



Thomas. Edith Matilda. 

The white messenger. cl91.j. 81 1 T45w 



134 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Thompson, Elbert Nevius Sebring. 

John Milton, topical bibliography. 1916. 

821 .47 At 

ToLMAN, Albert Harris. 

Questions on Shakespeare. A mid- 
summer-night's dream. cl912. 

822.33 S8t 

Questions on Shakespeare. As you 

like it. cl912. 822.33 06t 

Questions on Shakespeare. Henry 

Fourth. cl912. 822.33 P8t 

Questions on Shakespeare. The 

merchant of Venice. cl912. 

822.33 S4t 

Questions on Shakespeare. Twelfth 

night. cl912. 822.33 V8t 

Underhill, Evelyn. 

Theophanies ; a book of verses. 1916. 

821 U55 
Wagner, Mrs Madge (Morris). 
The lure of the desert land. 1917. 

c811 W131 

Washington square plays : 1. The clod, 
by Lewis Beach. 2. Eugenically 
speaking, by Edward Goodman. 3. 
Overtones, by Alice Gerstenberg. 4. 
Helena's husband, by Philip Moeller. 
1917. 812.08 W31 

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION. 

GENERAL. 

Strabo. 

The geosraphy of Strabo. 1917. v. 1. 
(Loeb classical library.) 910S89gj 

EUROPE. 
Allen, Grant. 

Florence, rev. by .J. W. and A. M. 
Cruickshank. 1913. (Grant Allen's 
historical guides.) 

914.55 A42f 

Bailey. William Frederick. 

The Slavs of the war zone. 1917. 

914 B15 

Clark, Keith. 

The spell of Scotland. 1916. 

914.1 C59 



Cruickshank, J. W., and Cruickshank, 
Mrs A. M. 
Christian Rome. 2d ed. rev. [1911] 
(Grant Allen's historical guides.) 

914.56 C95 
Fulleylove, John, illus. 

Oxford water-colours. [1916] 

378.42 OEf 

Gallichan, Catherine Gasquoine (Hart- 
ley) "31 rs W. M. Gallichan." 
Things seen in Spain. 1912. 

914.6 G16t 



Graham, Stephen. 

Russia in 1916. 1917. 



914.7 G74r 



Lovell, Isabel. 

Stories in stone from the Roman 
Forum. 1914. 913.37 L89 

Machray, Robert. 

The night side of London. 1902. 

914.21 M15 



Monroe, Will Seymour. 
In viking land. cl90S. 



914.81 M75 



Till' spi^ll of Spain. 1914. 



914.6 C59 



Robinson, Cyril Edward. 

The days of Alkibiades. 1917. 

913.38 R65 

Shakespeare's England ; an account of 
the life & manner of his times. 1917. 
2 V. 914.2 S62 

Shelley. Henry Charles. 

Royal castles of England. 1913. 

914.2 S54r 
Smith, Adolphe. 

Monaco and Monte Carlo". 1912. 

q914.49 S6 
ToziER. .Josephine. 

Among English inns ; the story of a 
pilgrimage to characteristic spots of 
rural England. cl904. 914.2 T75 



Zangwill. Israel. 

Italian fantasies. 1910. 



914.5 Z29 



ASIA. 

Paton, David. 

Early Egyptian records of travel [in 
Western Asia]. 1915-16. 2 v. 

q911 P3 

AFRICA. 
Beatty, Kenneth James. 

Human leopards. 1915. 916.64 B36 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



135 



Calvert. Albert Frederick. 

Southwest Africa, during the German 
occupation, 1884-1914. 1915. 

916.8 C16 
Low, Sidney .James Mark. 

Egypt in trausition. J914. 916.2 L91 

Mackenzie, Jean Kenyon. 

Black sheep : adventures in West Africa. 
1916. 916.7 M15 

Powell. E. Alexander. 

The last frontier ; the white man's war 
for civilisation in Africa. 1916. 

916 P88 
RoBY. Marguerite. 

My adventures in the Congo. 1911. 

916.72 R66 

NORTH AMERICA. 
Browne, George Waldo. 

The St. Lawrence River, historical — 
legendary — picturesque. cl90.5. 

917.14 B88 

Carbaugh, Harvey Clarence, ed. 

Human welfare work in Chicago. 1917. 
917.731 C26 
Crawford, Mary Caroline. 

Among old New England inns. 1907. 

917.4 C89 
Hagar, George Jotham. 

Plain facts about Mexico. [1916] 

917.2 H14 

Hawthorne, Hildegarde. 

Old seaport towns of New England. 
1916. 917.4 H39 



Kennan, George. 
The Salton Sea. 



1917. c91 7.9499 K34 



New Vancouver journal on the discovery 
of Puget Sound. 191.5. q917.97N5 

Prieto. Guillermo. 

Viaje (\ los Estados-Unidos. 1877-78. 
3 V. 917.3 P949 

Rand-McNally indexed pocket map and 
shippers' guide of Ai'izona. cl917. 

917.91 R18 

Steele, David McConnell. 

Going abroad overland ; studies of 
places and people in the far West. 

1917. 917.8 S81 

The transfer and storage directory. 

1918. 1917. r917.3T77 



SOUTH AMERICA. 
Alcedo y Herrera. Dionisio de. 

Descripcion geografica de la real Audi- 
encia de Quito. 191.5. q918.6 A3 

Elliott, Lilian Elwyn. 

Brazil today and tomorrow. 1917. 

918.1 E46 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 

Craig, Austin, ed. 

The former Philippines through foreign 
eyes. 1917. 919.14 C88 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Clodd, Edward. 

Memories. 1916. 920 C64 

fCoDMAN, Ogden] comp. 

Gravestone inscriptions and records of 
tomb burials in the Central burying 
ground, Boston Common, and in- 
scriptions in the South burying 
ground, Boston. 1917. 929.5 C67 

Gloucester. Mass. 

Vital records of Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts, to the end of the year 1849. 
1917. V. 1. Birth-s. 929.3 G56 



Gribble, Francis Henry. 
Women in war. 1917 



920.7 084 



Hyamson. Albert Montefiore. 

A dictionai-j^ of universal biography of 
all ages and of all peoples. 1916. 

r920 H99 
Ii)E, Emily Katharine. 

The etiquette of the Stars and Stripes. 
cl917. 929.9 119 

MacFarlane, Charles. 

Reminiscences of a literary life. 1917. 

928 M 14 

McIntosii, Charles Fleming. 

Brief abstract of T^ower Norfolk County 

and Norfolk County wills, 16.57-1710. 

1914. 929.3 N83 



Parkman, Mary Rosetta. 
Heroes of today. 1917. 

Heroines of service. 1917. 



920 P25 



920.7 P25 

TwEEDiE, Ethel Brilliana (Harley) ".l/r.s 
Alec Tweedie." 
My table-cloths ; a few reminiscences. 
1917. 920 T97 



136 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Bancroft. Bancroft, George. 

Correspondeuce of George Bancroft and 
Jared Sparks. 1823-1832. [1917] 

B B2135C 

Birket. Birket, James. 

Some cursory remarks made by James 
Birket in his voyage to North Amer- 
ica. 1750-1751. 191G. (Yale histori- 
cal publications. Manuscripts and 
edited texts.) B B619 

Bodoni. Cleland, Thomas Maitland. 
Giambattista Bodoni of Parma. 1916. 

B B668c 

Bunijan. Weight, Clifford Kent. 
Bunyan as a man of letters. 1916. 

B B942w 

Biirroirs. Burrows, Montagu. 

Autoljiography, ed. by his son, Stephen 
Montagu Burrows, with a supple- 
mentary note l)y Professor Oman. 
1908. B B9722 

Daries. Davies, William Henry. 

The avtobiography of a svper-tramp. 
1917. B D257 

Draniian. Drannan. William F. 

Thirty-one years on the plains and in 
the mountains. cl90(). cB D764 

Franldin. Oswald, John Clj^de. 
Benjamin Franklin, printer. 1917. 

B F831o 

Clalsworihy. Kaye-Smith, Sheila. 

John Galsworthy.- n.d. (Writers of 
the day.) B G178k 

Gibson. Gibson, J. W. (Watt). 
Recollections of a pioneer. [1912] 

BG449 

Hinkson. HiNKSON, Katherine (Tynan) 
''Mrs H. A. Hinkson." 
The middle years. 1917. B H663m 

Jackson. Arnold. Thomas Jackson. 

Early life and letters of General 

Thomas J. Jackson, "Stonewall" 

Jackson, by his nephew, Thomas 

Jackson Arnold. cl916. B J 14a 

Janeicay. Clark, James Bayard. 

Some' personal recollections of Dr. Jane- 
way. 1917. B J 333c 



■fuhiison. Hall, Clifton Rumery. 

Andrew Johnson, military governor of 
Tennessee. 1916. B J66h 

Kitehcitcr. Protheroe, Ernest. 

Lord Kitchener. [1916] B K62p 

Lngcrlof. Maule, Harry Edward. 

Selma Lagerlof ; the woman, her work, 
her message, including liberal quota- 
tion from Dr. Lagerlof's own auto- 
biographical writings and from some 
of her critics. 1917. B L174ma 

Lincoln. Bissett, Clark Prescott. 
Abraham Lincoln, an address. 1916. 

B L736bis 

CARMicnAEL, Orton H. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg address. cl917. 

B L736ca 



— GoRDY, Wilbur Fisk. 
Abraham Lincoln. cl91'; 



B L736go 



McClcUan. McClellan, George Brinton. 

The Mexican war diary of George B. 

McClellan. 1917. B M126 

Matthews. Matthews, James Brander. 

These many years, recollections of a 

New Yorker. 1917. B M349 

Nelson. Nelson, William Rockhill. 

William Rockhill Nelson ; the story of 

a man, a newspaper and a city, by 

members of the staff of the Kansas 

City star. 1915. B N432k 

Foe. Ewers, Hanns Heinz. 

Edgar Allan Poe, tr. from the German 
by Adele Lewisohn. 1917. B P743e 

Rupert, jirince of Bohemia. Erskine, 
Beatrice, "Mrs Siteuart Erskine." 
A royal cavalier. 1910. B Ri945e 

i^lessor. Livingstone, William Pringle. 
Mary Slessor of Calabar, pioneer mis- 
sionary. 9th ed. 1917. B S632I 

Spalding. Melisit, John Howard. 

Franklin Spencer Spalding, man and 
bishop. 1917. B S734m 

Stoddart. Stoddart. James Henry. 
Recollections of a player. 1902. 

BS869 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



137 



tSiviiibiirnc. Swinburne, Algernon 
Charles. 
Algernon Charles Swinburne ; personal 
recollections by his cousin, Mrs Dis- 
ney Leith, with extracts from some 
of his private letters. 1917. B S978 

Thoreaii. Sanborn, Franklin Benjamin. 
. Life of Henry David Thoreau. 1917. 

B T488sa! 

Tolstoi. Tolstoi, Nikolaevich, graf. 
Journal, tr. from the Russian by Rose 
Strunsky. 1917. v. 1. B T654 

Winter. Winter, William. 

The William Winter testimonial, Cen- 
tury theatre, Tuesday afternoon, 
March fourteenth, nineteen hundred 
and sixteen. cl91G. qB W78 

Wood. Marcosson, Isaac Frederick. 
Leonard Wood, prophet of prepared- 
ness. 1917. BW876m 

HISTORY. 

GENERAL. 

Marvin, Francis Sydney, ed. 

Progress and history ; es.says. 1917. 

901 IVI39p 

Contents : The idea of progress, by 
P. S. Marvin. — Progress in prehistoric 
times, by R. R. Marett. — Progress and 
Hellenism, bj' F. M. Stawell. — Prog- 
ress in the middle ages, by A. J. 
Carlyle. — Progress in religion, by 
Baron Friedrieh von Hiigel. — ■ Moral 
progress, by L. P. Jacks. — Govern- 
ment, by A. E. Zimmern. — Industry, 
by A. E. Zimmern. — Art, by A. Glut- 
ton Brock. — Science, by P. S. Marvin. 
— Philosophy, by J. A. Smith. — Prog- 
ress as an ideal of action, by J. A. 
Smith. 

]\Iatiiews. Shailer. 

The spiritual interpretation of history. 
191(1. (William Belden Noble lec- 
tures.) 904 M 42 

EUROPE. 

ALEKsnvsKifi, Grigorii. 

Russia and P]urope. [1917] 947 A36 

Allen, .J. W. 

Germany and Europe. 191.5. 

940.9 A42 
Andrews, Mrs Marian. 

A great emperor, Charles v, 1.519-1.55S, 

by Christopher Hare [i)seiid.]. 1917. 

943.03 A56 



The Anzac book. 1910. 



q940.9 A6 



Askew. Mis Alice ,J.. and Askew. Claude 
A. C. 
The stricken land ; Servia as we saw it. 
191G. 940.9 A83 

Atherton, 3Irs Gertrude Franklin 
(Horn). 
The living present. cl917. c940.9 A86 

Bea\'Erbrook, William Maxwell Aitkeu, 

haroii. 

('anada in Flanders. 191t)-17. v. 1-2. 

(The official story of the Canadian 

expeditionary force.) 940.9 838 

Beazley, Charles Raymond. 

A note-book of mediaeval history a. d. 
32.3-A. D. 1453. 1917. 940.1 B38 

Beck, James Montgomery. 

The war and humanity ; a further dis- 
cussion of the ethics of the world war 
and the attitude and duty of the 
United States. 2d and rev. ed. 1917. 
940.9 B39w 

Boittroux, Emile /. e. Etienne Emile Marie. 
I'hilosophy & war. 1916. 940.9 B781 

Bowser. Thekla. 

Britain's civilian volunteers ; authorized 
story of British Voluntary aid detach- 
ment work in the great war. 1917. 
940.9 B78 
Bracq, .lean Charlemagne. 

The provocation of France : fifty years 
of German aggression. 1916. 

944.08 B79 
Brailsford, Henry Noel. 

The war of steel and gold : a study of 
the armed peace. 1914. 940.9 B81 

Burgess, .John William. 

America's relations to the great war. 
1916. 940.9 B955 

Chapin, Harold. 

Soldier and dramatist. 1917. 

940.9 C463 
Ciieradame, Andre. 

The pangerman plot unmasked. 1917. 

940.9 C52 
Cotterill, Henry Bernard. 

Medieval Italy during a thousand years 
(30.5-1.313), a brief historical narra- 
tive with chapters on great episodes 
and personalities and on subjects con- 
nected with religion, art and litera- 
ture. [1915] (Great nations.) 

945 C84 



138 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Dampieree, Jacques, marquis de. 

German imperialism and international 
law. 1917. 940.9 D16 

r)A\is, Muriel Orlidge. 

The political history of France, 1789^ 
1910. 1916. 944.04 D26 

Doty, Madeleine Zabriskie. 

Short rations ; an American woman in 
Germany, 1915 . . . 1916. 1917. 

940.9 D72 

Doyle, Arthur Conan. 

The British campaign in France and 
Flanders, 1914-1915. 1916-17. 
V. 1-2. 940.9 D75 

Fay, Sidney Brad.shaw. 

The Hchenzollern household and admin- 
istration in the sixteenth century. 
[1916] (Smith college studies in 
history.) 943 F282 

Fernau, Hermann. 

The coming democracy. cl917. 

943.08 F36 
Frank, Tenney. 

Roman imperialism. 1914. 937 F82 



FuGLiSTER, Emile. 




Louvain ville martyre. 


1916. 




940.9 F95 


Gallishaw, John. 




Trenching at Galliiwli. 


1916. 




940.9 G17 



Gerard, -James Watson. 

My four years in Germany. cl917. 

940.9 G356 
GiBBS. Philip. 

The battles of the Somme. cl917. 

940.9 G443 

Gleason, Arthur Huntington. 

Inside the British Isles. 1917. 

942.08 G55 

Contents : Democracy on the march. 
— Labor. — Women. — Ireland. — Social 
studies. — Lloyd-George. — Vale. — 
Appendix. 

Gordon, George Angier. 

The appeal of the nation ; five patriotic 
addresses. cl917. 940.9 G66 

Hammer. Simon Christian. 

William the Second a.s seen in contem- 
porary documents and judged on evi- 
dence of his own speeches. 1917. 

943.08 H22 



Hammond's large scale war map of the 
Western front. cl917. 940.9 H22 

Harvey, Harold. 

A soldier's sketches under fire. [1916] 

940.9 H34 
Hazen, Charles Downer. 

The French revolution and Napoleon. 
1917. 944.04 H42 



Irwin, William Henry. 
The Latin at war. 1917. 



940.9 1721 



Jones, Francis P. 

Plistory of the Sinn Fein movement and 
the Irish rebellion of 1916. 1917. 

941.5 J 76 
Joy, Maurice, ed. 

The Irish rebellion of 1916 and its mar- 
tyrs : Erin's tragic Easter. cl916. 

941.5 J 88 
Kellogg, Mrs Charlotte. 

Women of Belgium. 1917. 940.9 K29 

Keyes, Clinton Walker. 

The rise of the equites in the third 
centurj' of the Roman empire. 1915. 

937 K44 

Knowlton, Daniel C, & Howe, Samuel B. 

Essentials in modeni European history. 

1917. 940.8 K73 

Lange, Christian Louis. 

Russia, the revolution and the war ; an 
account of a visit to Petrograd and 
Helsingfors in March, 1917. 1917. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of intercourse 
and education. ) q947 L2 

Law, Ernest Philip Alphonse. 

England's first great war minister : how 

Wolsey made a new army and navy 

and organized the English expedition 

to Artois and Flanders in 1513. 1916. 

942.05 L41 

Letters from a French hospital. 1917. 

940.9 L65f 
IX)Ti, Pierre, pseud. 

War. tr. from the French by Marjorie 
Laurie. 1917. 940.9 L88w 

McClure, Samuel Sidney. 

Obstacles to peace. 1917. 940.9 Ml 28 

^Iackie. Robert Laird. 

Scotland. 1916. (Great nations.) 

941 M1581 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



139 



McLaren, A. D. 

Germanism from within. 1916. 

943.08 Ml 6 

IMoreton-Macdonald, John Ronald. 
A history of France. 1915. 3 v. 

944 M84 
Morris, John Edward. 

Europe in the XIX century (1S15- 
1878). 1916. 940.9 IVI876 

Murray, Gilbert. 

Faith, war, and policy ; addresses and 
essays on the European war. 1917. 

940.9 M982 
Nauman, Friedrich. 

Central Europe. 1917. 940.9 N29 

Nicolas, Rene. 

Campaign diary of a French officer. 
1917. 940.9 N63 

NOBBS, Gilbert. 

On the right of the British line. 1917. 

940.9 N74 

NoRTHCLiFFE. Alfred Charles William 
Harmsworth, 1st haron. 
At the war. 1916. 940.9 N87 



NoYES, Alfred. 

Open bcfats. cl917. 



940.9 N952 



Ollivant, Alfred. 

The broAvn mare, and other .studies of 
England under the cloud. [1916] 

940.9 049 
PiGOU, Arthur Cecil. 

The economy and finance of the war. 

1916. 940.9 P63 

Poland's case for independence, being a 
series of essays illustrating the con- 
tinuance of her national life. [1916] 
943.8 P76 

Pollaku. Albert Frederick. 

Factors in modern history. 1907. 

942 P77 

Powell, E. Alexander. 

Italy at war and the allies in the west. 

1917. 940.9 P882i 

Les prisonniers allemands an Maroc ; 
La campagne de diffamation alle- 
mande ; L« judgment porte par les 
neutres ; Le temoignage des prison- 
niers allemands. 1917. 940.9 P95 



Rockwell, William Walker. 

The pitiful plight of the Assyrian Chris- 
tians in Persia and Kurdistan. 1916. 
940.9 R68 

Russell, George William. 

The national being; some thoughts on 
an Irish polity. 1916. 941.5 R963 

Seven years in Vienna (August, 1907- 
August, 1914) a record of intrigue. 
1916. 943.6 S49 



Sheahan, Henry. 
A volunteer Poilu. 1916. 



940.9 S31 



Spiegel von und zu Peckelsheim, Edgar. 
freih err. 
The adventures of the U-20'2 ; an actual 
narrative, by Baron Spiegel von und 
zu Peckelsheim (captain-lieutenant, 
commander of the U-202). 1917. 

940.9 S75 

Stephens, Winifred, ed. 
The soul of Russia. 1916. 947 SS3 

"Theta," pseud. 

War flying, by a pilot : the letters of 
■'Theta" to his home people, written 
in training and in war. 1917. 

940.9 T41 

Toynbee, Arnold Joseph. 

The German terror in Belgium. 1917. 

940.9 T75g 
The new Europe. 1916. 

940.9 T75n 



Venizelos, Eleutherios. 
Greece in her true light. 



1916. 

949.5 V46 



Waddington, Mmo. Mary Alsop (King). 
My war diary. 1917. 940.9 W1 1 



Wallace. William Kay. 
Greater Italv. 1917. 



945 W19 



Waed, Mary Augusta (Arnold) "Mrs 
Humphry Ward." 
Towards the goal; a woman's letter[s] 
from the front. 1917. 940.9 W25t 

Washburn, Stanley. 

The Russian advance, being the third 
volume of Field notes from the Rus- 
sian front, embracing the period from 
.Tune .5th to September 1st, 1916. 
1917 940.9 W31r 



140 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Wells, Herbert George. 

Italy. France and Britain at war. 1017. 
940.9 W45i 

ASIA. 

I)a\'i.s, Frederick Hadland. 

Japan, from the age of the gods to the 
fall of Tsingtau. 191(3. 952 D26 

Gibbons, Mrs Helen Davenport (Brown). 

The red rugs of Tarsus ; a woman's 

record of the Armenian mas.sacre of 

1909. 1917. 956.4 G44 

Hyamson, Albert Montefiore. 

Palestine, the rebirth of an ancient 
people. 1917. 956.9 H99 

TjATOURETTE, Kenneth Scott. 

The development of China. 1917. 

935 L35 
Kawlinson, Hugh George. 

Intercourse between India and the 
western world from the earliest times 
to the fall of Rome. 191G. 934 R26 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Bandeliee, Adolph Francis Alphonse. 
The delight maiiers. cl916. 970.3 B21 

Batchelder, Roger. 

Watching and waiting on the border. 
1917. 973.9 B32 

Benavides, Alonso de. 

The memorial of Fray Alonso de Bena- 
vides, 1630. 1910. 978.9 B45 

Brooks, Eugene Clyde. 

Woodrow Wilson as president. cl916. 

973.9 B87 
Elliott, Mrs Ella Zerbey. 

Blue book of Schuylkill County ; who 

was who and why in interior eastern 

Pennsylvania, in colonial days. 1916. 

974.81 E46 

FooTE, Henry Stuart. 

Texas and the Texans ; or, Advance of 
the Anglo-Americans to the South- 
west. 1841. 2 V. 976.4 F68 

Iowa. »S'fafe historical society. 

Statute law-making in Iowa. 1916. 

977.7 164s 
Keith. Charles Penrose. 

Chronicles of Pennsylvania from the 
English revolution to the peace of 
Aix-la-Chapelle, 1688-1748. 1917. 2 v. 

974.8 K28 



Kennedy, J. M. 

Imperial America. 11914] 973 K35 

KiNGSLEY, Nelson. 

Diary of Nelson Kingsley. 1914. 

C979.4 K55 
McCain, James Ross. 

(4eorgia as a proprietary province. 
cl917. 975.8 M121 

Marine, William Matthew. 
The British invasion of Maryland, 1812- 
1815. 1913. 973.5 M33 

Nevada historical society. 
Papers, v. 1 for 191.3-1916. 1917. 

979.3 N49hp 
Newcomb, Rexford. 
The Franciscan mission architecture of 
Alta California. 1916. fc979.402 N5 

New Ha\'en. 

New Haven town records, 1649-1662, 

ed. by Franklin Bowditch Dexter. 

1917. (New Haven colony historical 

society. Ancient town records, v. 1.) 

974.68 N54 

Ohio valley historical association. 

Proceedings of the 10th annual meeting, 

1916. 977 037vp 
Peixotto, Ernest Clifford. 

A revolutionary pilgrimage ; being an 
account of a series of visits to battle- 
grounds & other places made mem- 
orable by the war of the revolution. 

1917. 973.3 P37 

Rhode Island historical society. Com- 
mittee on marking historical sites in 
Rhode Island. 
Report, 1913. 1914. 974.5 R47hc 

Roe, Alfred Seelye, and Nutt, Charles. 
History of the First regiment of heavy 
artillery, Massachusetts volunteers, 
formerly the Fourteenth regiment of 
infantry, 1861-1805. 1917. 

973.744 R69 
Smith, Ephraim Kirby. 

To Mexico with Scott. 1917. 

973.6 S64 
Vespucci, Amerigo. 

Lettera di Amerigo Vespucci delle isole 
nuovamente trovate in quattro suoi 
viaggi [1504] Reproduced in fac- 
simile from the McCormick-Hoe copy 
in the Princeton university library. 
1916. (Vespucci reprints, texts and 
studies.) 973.1 V58I 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



141 



^'espucci, Amerigo. 

Mundus novns. Letter to Lorenzo 

Pietro di Medici : tr. by George Tyler 

Xortliup. 1010. (Vespucci reprints, 

texts and studies.) 973.1 V58m 

Williams. Slierman. 

New York's part in history. 1915. 

974.7 W72 

SOUTH AMERICA. 
Bishop. Farnham. 

Panama, past and present. 1916. 

986 B62 
KOEBEL. William Henrj'. 
Paraguay, n.d. (Soutli American series.) 

989 K77p 
Zahm, John Augustine. 

The quest of El Dorado. 1917. 

980 Z19 
AUSTRALIA. 
Scott. Ernest. 

A short history of Australia. 1916. 

994 S42 

CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING OCTO- 
BER. NOVEMBER AND DECEM- 
BER, 1917.t 

Many of the administrative depaii:- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in 'News 
Notes of California Liiraries, as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Agricultuke. State Boaed of. Pre- 
mium li.st of public school industrial and 
vocational contest. California state fair. 
1918. 31 p. 

Baxks, Supebixtexde>"t or (San 
Francisco). Eighth annual report, show- 



tExcept when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
ofRce, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 

*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



ing the financial condition of state banks 
at the close of business, June 30. 1917. 
1917. 792 p. tables. 

Tabulated statement showing 

financial condition of the state banks of 
California at the close of business. August 
31, 1917. Sheet 8 by 34f in. 

Building and Tx)ax CoiiiiissiONEB 
(San Francisco). Annual report of the 
building and loan associations of the state 
of California [for the fiscal year ending , 
June 30, 1917]. August 13, 1917. 107 p. 

California School for the Deaf and 
THE Blind (Berkeley). The California 
News. vol. 33, nos. 2-4, October to Decem- 
ber, 1917. Berkeley, 1917. 4°. 

Charities and Corrections. State 
Board of (San Francisco). Bulletin no. 
167, October 31. 1917. Monthly census of 
inmates of state institutions. 

Same. no. 168, November 30, 1917. 

Same. no. 169, December 31, 1917. 

Mimeographed sheets. 

Controller. Values of property in, 
and indebtedness of, each county for the 
year 1917 and rate of taxation. ( No rate 
for state purposes this year. [1917] 
Sheet llj by 16 in. 

Dairy Bureau ( San Francisco ) . Laws 
of California relative to production and 
standard of dairy products. 1917. 51 p. 

Education. State Board of. Bulletin, 
no. 23. Vocational education, general 
regulations of the State Board of Educa- 
tion for the establishment and mainte- 
nance of Federal and State aided voca- 
tional education in California. October 
22, 1917. 26 p. 

California Ijlue bulletin, vol. 3, 

no. 3. September, 1917. 21 p. illus. 



1911 



Same, vol. 3. no. 4. December, 
32 p. illus. 



Proceedings of the state conven- 
tion of California high school principals 
at Riverside. California. December 27. 28, 
29. and 30, 1916. 1917. 165 p. 

Engineering, Department of. Pro- 
gram of condition.? and instructions to 
govern a competition to be held for the 



142 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



purpose of selecting an architect for the 
library and courts building and the office 
building for state of California to be 
erected in the city of Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia. [November 1, 1917.] [34 p.] 
illu.s. plans. 4°. 

Laws : State building bonas act ; 
Engineering- Department laws ; State 
building act ; Architecture law ; 
American institute of architects docu- 
ment no. 124, p. [33-4]. 

Equalization, State Boakd of. Bul- 
letin, provisions of Political Code govern- 
ing taxes for state purposes, in effect 
May 11, 1917. 1917. 41 p. 

Fish and Game Commission (San 
Francisco) . California fish and game, 
vol. 3, no. 4, October, 1917. p. 143-200. 
illus. 

Index to vol. 3, p. 189. 

Health, State Boabd of. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 13, no. 4. October, 1917. 
p. 143-92. illus. 

Quarantine of venereal diseases ; 
Birth registration. 

Hanie, vol. 13, no. 5. November, 

1917. p. 193-244. illus. 

Sanitation about military camps ; 
Health ofHcers' conference. 



1911 



»S'ff)«c, vol 13, no. G. 
p. 245-97. illus. 



December, 



The public health dollar ; Tubercu- 
losis control. 



Special bulletin, no. 24. Sj'philis 

and gonococcus infections, regulations for 
the prevention of syphiliig and gonococcus 
infections (adopted October 6, 1917), 
standards governing the approval of dis- 
pensaries and hospitals treating venereal 
diseases (adopted October 6, 1917). Octo- 
ber 15, 1917. 8 p. 

IIoeticultuke, State Commission of. 
Monthly bulletin, vol. 6, no. 10, October, 
1917. p. 379-414. illus. 

■ Same, vol. 6, nos. 11 and 12, 

November-December, 1917. p. 415-94. 
illus. 

Index to vol. 6, p. 485. 

Program of the 50th State Fruit 

Growers' convention, the Senate Chamber 
of the state Capitol, Sacramento, Novem- 
ber 21 to 23, 1917. [4 p.] illus. 



Immigration and Housing, Commis- 
sion OF (San Francisco). A discussion 
of methods of teaching English to adult 
foreigners, with a report on Los Angeles 
county. 1917. 40 p. 

Report on an experiment made in 

Los Angeles in the summer of 1917 for the 
Americanization of foreign-born Avomen. 
1917. 24 p. illus. 

State housing manual containing 

the state tenement house act, state hotel 
and lodging house act, state dwelling house 
act, annotated. 1917. 118 p. illus. 
plans. 

Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). California safety 
news, vol. 1, nos. 10-12, October-Decem- 
ber, 1917. illus. 

Compensation news bulletin, no. 

5, October, 1917. S p. folder. 

Reported decisions, vol. 4, bulle- 
tins, nos. 4-10. March to October, 1917. 
1917. 

Subscription $2.00 a year; single 
copies, 25 cents. 

Safety Department. Mining Divi- 
sion. Safety bear letter no. 9. December 
20, 1917. [4 p.] 4°. 

Industrial Welfare Commission 
(San Francisco). An act establishing an 
Industrial Welfare Commission and pro- 
viding for a minimum wage for women 
and minors. 1917. S p. 

The regulation of the fruit and 

vegetable canning industry of California. 
May, 1917. 176 p. illus. 

Insurance Commissioner (San Fran- 
cisco). Insurance laws of the state of 
California. 1917. 335 p. 

Labor Statistics, Bureau of (San 
Francisco). Labor laws of California. 
1917. 268 p. 16°. 

Legislative Counsel Bureau. Provi- 
sions of the constitution and statutes of 
California governing the submission of 
measures to the whole people by the initia- 
tive and referendum. [2d edition.] 1917. 
16 p. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



143 



Library, State. California couuty free 
library service to schools. Sixth edition. 
1017." 28 p. 32°. 

Circular of information of the 

California State Library School, 1918- 
laiO. 1917. 24 p. illus. 



fornia 



Library laws of the state of Cali- 
supplement. 1917. 15 p. 32°. 



News Notes of California Libra- 
ries, vol. 12, no. 4. October, 1017. p. -a-j-j— 
IMIO. illu.s. map. 

Annual statistics number. 

Books for the blind department. 

News Notes. Reprinted from News Notes 
of California Libraries, October, 1917. 
20 p. 32-. 

Mining Bureal^, State (San Fran- 
cisco) . Bulletin, no. 74. California min- 
eral production for 1916 with county 
maps. August, 1917. 179 p. illus. 
maps. 

Mines and mineral resources of 

the counties of Monterey, San Benito, 
San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ven- 
tura. 1917. 183 p. illus. map. 

Chapters of State Mineralogist's 
Report, 1915-16. 

Preliminary repoi't, no. 3. Man- 
ganese and chromium. September. 1917. 
31 p. 

Motor Vehicle Department. Cali- 
fornia motor vehicle act, passed 1915, 
chapter 188 : amended 1017, chapter 218. 
1017. 24 p. 

Table showing number and bore 

of cyclinders, horsepower and annual fee 
of various makes and models of automo- 
biles under California vehicle act of 1917. 
1017. Sheet 13f by 17 in. 

Normal School. State, San Francisco. 
Course of study and circular of infonna- 
tion of the elementary department of the 
San Francisco State Normal School. 
1917. .50 p. 12°. 

Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco). Decisions, vol. 12, December 1. 
1916. to March 31. 1917. 1917. 772 p. 
Cover title : Opinions and orders of 
the Railroad Commission of Cali- 
fornia. 



General order no. .51. Regulations 

governing the construction and iiling of 
tariffs containing rates, fares, classifica- 
tions, rules and regulations of trausporta- 
tiou companies as defined in chapter 213, 
laws of 1917. adopted November 6. 1917, 
effective January 1. 1918. 1917. 16 p. 

Letter of transmittal to accom- 
pany the annual report of the Railroad 
Commission. July 1, 1016, to June 30, 
1017. 1917. 56 p. 

Real Estate Commissioner. Cali- 
fornia real estate directory-bulletin of 
licensed real estate brokers and salesmen, 
issued quarterly beginning October 1, 
1017. October, 1917. 109 p. maps. 
Price $1.00 per annum. 

Secretary of State. Roster of state, 
county, city, and township ofiicials of the 
state of California ; also Federal ofiBcials 
for California. November 1, 1917. 144 p. 
illus. 

Social Insurance Commission. Cali- 
fornia's need of social health insurance. 
1917. 16 p. 

Surveyor General. Law governing 
the leasing of certain state lauds of the 
state of California and list of state lands 
subject to lease. September 1, 1917. 39 p. 

University of California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, third series, vol. 11, no. 3. Rules 
of the editorial committee with specifica- 
tions for style of printing. Berkeley, 
September. 1917. 31 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 11, no. 4. Home eco- 
nomics : information for teachers in the 
schools of California. Berkeley, October, 
1017. 20 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 11, no. 4, supplement. 

Berkeley. 1 p. 12°. 

Calendar, vol. XLVII, nos. 7-16, 

October 1 to December 3, 1917. 8 p. 

foldei"s. 

Published weekly during the acade- 
mic year and summer session. Con- 
tains current information concerning 
scholastic events. Price for regrular 
session, 5 cents per year; 35 cents 
per half year ; for summer session, 
25 cents postpaid. 

Publications. College of Agricul- 

Report of the College of Agricul- 



ture. 



144 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



ture and the Agricultural Experiment 
Station of the University of California 
from July 1, 1916, to June 30, 1917. 
Berkeley, 1917. 95 p. illus. 

Agricultural Experiment Sta- 



tion. Bulletin, no. 282. Trials with Cali- 
fornia silage crops for dairy cows, by 
F. W. Woll and E. C. Voorhies. Berkeley, 
August. 1917. p. 17-40. 

Same, no. 283. The olive 

insects of California, by E. O. Essig. 

Berkeley, September, 1917. p. 41-64. 
illus. 

Same, no. 284. Irrigation of 

alfalfa in Imperial Valley, by Walter E. 
Packard. Berkeley. September, 1917. p. 
65-84. illus. 

Same. no. 285. The milch 

goat in California, by Edwin C. Voorhies. 
Berkeley, September, 1917. p. 85-114. 
illus. 

Same. no. 286. Commercial 

fertilizers, by P. L. Hibbard. Berkeley, 
September, 1917. p. 115-166. 

Same, no. 287. Vinegar from 

waste fruits, by W. V. Cruess. Berkeley, 
October, 1917. p. 167-184. illus. 

— — - Same, no. 288. Potash from 

tule and the fertilizer value of certain 
marsh plants, by P. L. Hibbard. Bei'ke- 
ley. November, 1917. p. 185-92. 

Same, no. 289. Improve- 
ments in methods of pickling olives, by 
Frederic T. Bioletti and W. V. Cruess. 
Berkeley, December, 1917. p. 193-200. 
illus. 

Circular, no. 167. Feeding 

stuffs of minor importance, by F. W. 
Woll. Berkeley, August, 1917. 7 p. 

Same, no, 173. The con- 
struction of the wood-hoop silo, by J. B. 
Davidson and J. E. Stiles. Berkeley, 
September, 1917. 15 p. illus. 

■, Same, no. 174. Fann drain- 
age methods, by Walter W. Weir. Berke- 
ley, September, 1917. 31 p. illus. 

Same, no. 175. Progress 

report on the production and distribution 
of milk, by Edwood Mead. Berkeley, 
October, 1917. 16 p. 



University of California (Berkeley). 
Publications. Circular no. 176. Hog 
cholera prevention and the serum treat- 
ment, by P. T. Petersen. Berkeley, 
October, 1917. 15 p. illus. 

Same, no. 177. Grain sor- 
ghum seed, by Ernest B. Babcock. Berke- 
ley, October. 1917. 8 p. illus. 

Same. no. 178. The packing 

of apples in California, by Warren P. 
Tufts. Berkeley, October, 1917. 31 p. 

illus. 

Same, no. ISO. Selecting 

corn seed, by Ernest B. Babcock. Berke- 
ley, October, 1917. 7 p. illus. 

Same, no. 181. Control of 

the California ground squirrel, by Joseph 
Dixon. Berkeley, Novembei", 1917. 14 p. 
illus. 

Same, no. 182. Extending the 



area of irrigated wheat in California for 
1918, by Frank Adams. Berkeley, Novem- 
ber, 1917. 4 p. 

Same, no. 183. Infectious 

abortion in cows, by F. M. Hayes. Berke- 
ley, November, 1917. 4 p. 

Same, no. 184. A flock of 

sheep on the farm, by R. F. Miller. 
Berkeley, November, 1917. 7 p. 

Same, no. 185. Beekeeping 

for the fruit-grower and small rancher, or 
amateur, by Geo. A. Coleman. Berkeley, 
November. 1917. 11 p. illus. 

Same, no. 186. Poultry on 

the farm, by J. E. Dougherty. Berkeley, 
November, 1917. 4 p. 

■ Same, no. 187. Utilizing the 

sorghums, by Thomas Forsyth Hunt. 
Berkeley, December, 1917. 7 p. 

Same, no. 188. Lambing 

sheds, by R. F. Miller and G. F. Fei*mery. 
Berkeley, December, 1917. 16 p. illus. 

Cooking the tepary bean, by 

M. E. Jaffa. Berkeley, September, 1917. 
4 p. illus. 

Home pickling of ripe olives, 

by Frederic T. Bioletti. Berkeley, No- 
vember, 1917. 1 p. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFOENIA STATE LIBRARY. 



145 



University of California (Berkeley). 
Publications. The utilization of idle 
lands for wheat, by Chas. F. Shaw. 
Berkeley, November, 1917. 4 p. illus. 

Agricultural Sciences, A'ol. 3, 

no. 2. Optimum moisture conditions for 
young lemon trees on a loam soil, by L. W. 
Fowler and C. B. Lipman. Berkeley, 
September 29, 1917. p. 25-3G, plates 
9-11. roy. S°. 

Price 15 cents. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 3. Some 

abnormal water relations in citrus trees 
of the arid southwest and their possible 
significance, by Robert W. Hodgson. 
Berkeley, September 29, 1917. p. 37-54, 
plate 12. roy. S°. 

Price 20 cents. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 4. A new 

dendrometer, by Donald Bruce. Berkeley, 
November 27, 1917. p. 55-61, 3 text- 
figs, roy. 8°. 

Price 10 cents. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 5. Toxic 

and antagonistic effects of salts on wine 
yeast (Saccharomyces ellipsoidcus), by 
S. 'K. Mitra. ' Berkeley, November 30, 
1917. p. 63-102. 12 text-figs. roy. 8°. 
Price 45 cents. 

American Archaeology and 

Ethnology, vol. 14, no. 1. The language 
of the Salinan Indian.s, by J. Alden 
Mason. Berkeley, Jauuiu-y 10. 1918. p. 
1-154. roy. 8°. 

Price $1.75. 

Astronomy. Lick Observa- 
tory bulletin, no. 299. Parallax of the 
ring nebula in Lyra. Berkeley. October 
16, 1917. p. 100-7. 4°. 

Same. no. .300. Three novae 

in spiral nebulae. Berkeley, October 36, 
1917. p. 108-10. plate 3. 4°. 

Sa)ne, no. 301. Orbit and 

perturbations of (710) Berkelei/. Berke- 
ley, December 19, 1917. p. 111-4. 4°. 

— Same, no. 302. On the orbit 

of (71S) En 'la. Berkeley. December 19, 

1917. p. 115. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per vol. in advance. 
A^ol. 9 current ; copies mailed as 
issued. 

Classical Philology, vol. 4. 

Lucretius, edited liy William A. Merrill. 



Berkeley, November 28, 1917. p. 1-258 
roy. 8°. 

Price $2.50. 

Engineering, vol. 1, no. 12. 

A method for the measurement of self and 
mutual inductances, by Fred E. Pernot. 
Berkeley, December 6, 1917. p. 293-6, 
2 text-figs. roy. 8°. 
Price 5 cents. 

Entomology, vol. 2. Cata- 
logue of the Hemiptera of America north 
of Mexico excepting the Aphididae, Cocci-' 
dae and Aleurodidae, by Edward P. Van 
Duzee. Berkeley, November 30, 1917. 
p. i-xxiv, 1—902. roy. 8". 

Price, paper $5.00 ; bound in cloth 
$5.50. 

Extension Division. An- 
nouncement of courses in current events, 
prepared by Arthur I. Street. Berkeley, 

1917. 8 p. 12°. 

Bulletin, new series, vol. 3, 

no. 1. Announcement of courses 1917— 

1918. Berkeley, August, 1917. 44 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 2. The 

r.ews print situation, by Edgar F. Sulli- 
van . . . Berkeley. August, 1917. 24 p. 
12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 3. League 

to enforce peace, prepared by Laura 
Bethell. Berkeley, August, 1917. 11 p. 
12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 4. Provi- 
sional schedule of classes for August, 
1917. Berkeley, August, 1917. 8 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3. no. 7. Steps 

toward democracy in Europe : Turkey, 
Austria - Hungary, Russia, Belgium, 
France. Switzerland. Sjdlabus of a course 
of six illustrated lectures, by Jerome Hall 
Raymond. Berkeley, September, 1917. 
30 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 8. From 

North to South in Europe ; Iceland. Swe- 
den. Finland. Bohemia, Bulgaria. Serbia. 
Syllalius of a course of six illustrated 
lectures, by Jerome Hall Raymond. 
Berkeley. September, 1917. 36 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, uo. 10. Cur- 
rent events for September, prepared by 
Arlhur I. Street : Revelations of intrigue, 
Berkeley. October, 1917. 23 p. 12°. 



10—358.57 



146 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



University of California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, new series, vol. 3, no. 11. Con- 
stitution and rules and regulations, junior 
section luterscholastic Public Speaking- 
League of California. Berkeley, October, 

1917. 15 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 12. Courses 

in music. Berkeley, October, 1917. 7 p. 
12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 14, Judg- 
ing the debate. (Second edition.) Berke- 
ley, November, 1917. 9 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 15. Cor- 
respondence courses in astronomy, oral 
and dental hygiene, and zoology. Berke- 
ley, November, 1917. [2 p.] 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 16. Cur- 
rent events for Octobei', prepared by 
Arthur I. Street: After the war— What? 
Berkeley, November, 1917. 24 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 17. The 

single tax. prepared by Arthur N. Young. 
Bei'keley, December, 1917. 16 p. 12°. 
List of references, p. 14-6. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 20. Gov- 
ernment monopoly of the manufacture 
of the munitions of war, prepared by 
Marjorie Ward. Berkeley, January, 1918. 
8 p. 12°. 

List of references, p. 6-S. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 22. Provi- 
sional schedule of classes for January, 

1918. Berkeley, January, 1918. [6 p.] 
12°. 

Geology, vol. 10, no. 13. 

New fossil corals from the Pacific Coast, 
by Jorgen O. Nomlaud. Berkeley, Novem- 
ber 30. 1917. p. 185-90, plate 5. roy. 8°. 

Price 5 cents. 

• • Same, vol. 10, no. 18. 

Fauna of the Santa ^Margarita beds in 
the North Coalinga region of California, 
by Jorgen O. Nomland. Berkeley, No- 
vember 8, 1917. p. 293-326, 2 text-figs., 
pis. 14-20. roy. 8°. 

Price 40 cents. 

Same, vol. 10. no. 19. Min- 
erals associated with the crystalline lime- 
stone at Crestmore, Riverside County, 
California, by Arthur S. Eakle. Berkeley, 
October 17. 1917. p. 327-60, pis. 21-4. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 40 cents. 



University of California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, new series, vol. 10, no. 20. The 
geology and ore deposits of the Leona 
Rhyolite, by Clifton W. Clark. Berkeley, 
November 8, 1917. p. 361-82. 3 text-figs., 
pis. 2.5-7. roy. 8°. 
Price 30 cents. 

Same, vol. 10. no. 21. The 

breccias of the Mariposa formation in the 
vicinity of Colfax, California, by Clarence 
L. Moody. Berkeley, November 27, 1917. 
p. 383-420, 4 text-figs., pis. 28-33. roy. 8°. 
Price 45 cents. 

Same, vol. 10; no. 22. Rela- 
tionships of Pliocene mammalian faunas 
from the Pacific Coast and Great Basin 
provinces of North America, by John C. 
Merriam. Berkeley, November 16, 1917. 
p. 421^3, 1 text-fig. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

History, vol. 4, no. 4. Cali- 
fornia : the name, by Ruth Putnam with 
the collaboration of Herbert I. Priestley. 
Berkeley, December 19, 1917. p. 293- 
365. map. roy. 8°. 
Price 75 cents. 

Same, vol. 6. The forma- 
tion of the state of Oklahoma (1803- 
1906). by Roy Gittinger. Berkeley, 1917. 
xii, 2.56 p. 5 maps. roy. 8°. 

Price, paper cover, $1.75 ; cloth, 
$2.00. 

Modern Philology, vol. 5. 

Edmund Spenser, a critical study, by 
Herbert Ellsworth Cory- Berkeley, De- 
cember 24. 1917. p. 1-478. roy. 8°. 

Price, paper cover, $2.50 ; cloth, 
$3.50. 

Seismographic Stations, no. 

1.3. The registration of earthquakes at 
the Berkeley station and at the Lick 
Observatoi-y station from October 1, 1916, 
to March 31, 1917, by E. F. Davis. 
Berkeley, October 29, 1917. p. 272-95. 
roy. S°. 

Zoology, vol. 12, William 

Emerson Ritter and Charles Atwood 
Kofoid, editors. Title-page, contents, in- 
dex. Berkeley, 191^-1916. [4 p.] ; 
[545-58]. roy. 8°. 

Same, vol. 17, no 11. A 

study of the races of the white-fronted 
goose (Anser alhifrons) occurring in Cali- 
fornia, by H. S. Swarth and Ilarold C. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



147 



Bryant. Berkeley, October 19, 1917. p. 
209-22, 2 text-figs., plate 13. roy. 8°. 
Price 15 cents. 

Hame, vol. IS, no. 1. Mitosis 

in Giardia iiiicroti, liy William C. Boeck. 
Berkeley. October 1(3, 1917. p. 1-26, 
plate 1. roy. S°. 

Price 35 cents. 

Same, vol. IS, no. 2. An 

unusual extension of the distribution of 
the shipworm in San Francisco Bay, 
California, by Albert L. Barrows. 
Berkeley, December 12, 1917. p. 27-43. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 20 cents. 

Suiiie, vol. IS, no. 3. De- 
scription of some new species of Poly- 
noidae from the coast of California, by 
Christine Essenbei'g. Berkeley, October 
17, 1917. p. 4.3-60, pis. 2-3. roy. S°. 
Price 20 cents. 

Same, vol. IS, no. 4. New 

species of AmpJiinomidae from the Pacific 
Coast, by Christine Essenberg. Berkeley, 
October 17. 1917. p. 61-74, pis. 4-5. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 15 cents. 

Siimc, vol. IS, no. 5. Crithi- 

dia Eurtjopliilialmi, sp. nov., from the 
Hemipteran Bug, Euryoplitlialmiis con- 
vivus Stal. by Irene McCulloch. Ber- 
keley. December 29, 1917. p. 75-88, S5 
text-figs. roy. 8°. 

Price 15 cents. 

8a me, vol. 18, no. 6. On 

the orientation of Erythropsis. by Charles 
Atwocd Kofoid and Olive Swezy. Berke- 
ley, December 14. 1917. p. 89-102, 12 
text-figs. roy. 8°. 

Price 15 cents. 

Same, vol. 18, no. 7. The 

transmission of nervous impulses in rela- 
tion to locomotion in the earthworm, by 
.John F. Bovard. Bei'keley, January 7, 
191S. p. 103-34, 14 text-figs. roy. 8". 
Price 35 cents. 

Same, vol. 18, no. 8. The 

function of the giant fibers in earthworms, 
by John F. Bovard. Berkeley, January 
10. 191S. p. 13.5-144, 1 text-fig. roy. 8°. 
Price 10 cents. 

Same., vol. IS, no. 9. A 

rapid method for the detection of proto- 



zoan cysts in mammalian faeces, by Wil- 
liam C. Boeck. Berkeley. December 24, 
1917. p. 145-9. roy. S°. 
Price 5 cents. 

Weights and Measures, State De- 
partment OF. First biennial report, 
1915-1916. 1917. 69 p. illus. 

Whittier State .S:chool. The thir- 
teenth biennial report of the Board of 
Trustees and superintendent for the sixty- 
sixth and sixty-seventh fiscal years of the 
state of California, and twenty-fifth and' 
twenty-sixth of the school, ending June 
.30, 1910. Whittier, 1917. 245 p. illus. 

The Sentinel (new series), vol. 9, 

nos. 0-11, October 5 to December 28, 
1917. 

Publislied bi-weekly by the Whit- 
tier State School. Price $1.00 per 
year, 2 cents per copy. 

Department of Research. The 

journal of delinquency, vol. 2, no. 6, 
November, 1917. p. 314-75. 4°. 

Publislied bi-montlily. Subscription 
$1.25 per year; single copies SIT cents. 

CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING OCTOBER, 
NOVEMBERAND DECEMBER, 1917. 



Berkeley. Public library, 
report, 1910-17. 



Annual 



Bulletin, vol. 1, 

October-December, 1917. 



nos. 10-12, 



Los Angeles. Health department. 
Monthly bulletin, September-December, 
1917. 

-^ Public library. Twenty-ninth 

annual report, 1916-17. 

Monthly bulletin, vol. 12, 

nos. 3—6, September-December, 1917. 

Library school. Opportuni- 
ties to specialize. [1917] 
Announcement. 

Chamber of commerce. Bulletin, 

October-December, 1917. 

Municipal league. Bulletin, No- 
vember-December, 1917. 



Oakland. Auditor, 
annual report, 1916—17. 



Twenty-eighth 



148 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Oakland. Health department. Month- 
ly bulletin. August-Xovember, 1917. 

Chamber of commerce. Achieve- 
ment, October-November, 1917. 

Vernon Rockridge improvement 

club. Bulletin, November— December, 1917. 

Palo Alto. Eighth annual report, 
1916-17. 



Pasadeka, Auditor 
1916-17. 



Annual report, 

Municipal lighting works depart- 
ment. Tenth annual report, 191&-17. 

Water department. Fourth an- 
nual report. 1916-17. 

Richmond. Auditor. Annual report, 
1916-17. 

Public library. Book notes for 

boys and girls, vol. 2, nos. 9-11, October- 
December. 1917. 

Monthly bulletin, vol. 4, 

nos. 4-6, October— December, 1917. 



Picture collection. Novem- 



ber 5, 1917. 
List. 



Riverside. Auditor. Annual report, 
1916-17. 

Sacramento. Official gazette, October 
1-December 31, 1917. 

Health department. Statement of 

vital statistics, September-November, 
1917. 

San Diego. Health department. 
Monthly report, September-November, 
1917. 

San Francisco. Board of supervisors. 
Journal of proceedings, September 17- 
December 26, 1917. 

Municipal record, October 

4-December 27, 1917. 

Public library. Monthly bulletin, 

vol. 23, nos. 6-9, September-December, 
1917. 

Chamber of commerce. Chamber 

of commerce activities, October 4r-Decem- 
ber 27, 1917. 



San Francisco. Chamber of com- 
merce. Preliminary industrial survey. 
[1917] 

San Mateo. Annual statement, 1916-17. 

Stockton. Free public library. Quar- 
terly bulletin, vol. 6. no. 3, .July-Septem- 
ber, 1917. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER 
AND DECEMBER. 

In American Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with con- 
tractions. 

BOOKS. 

A Christmas experience and other selec- 
tions for class study. 

Contents : A Christmas experience, 
bv Elizabeth Price ; Tlie boat race ; 
How tiie La Rue stakes were lost, by 
Charles N. Hood ; The swan song, by 
Katharine R. Brooks ; The king's 
pardon, by Maud W. Goodwin ; The 
two home comings, by Annie H. Don- 
nell ; Ole Mistis, by John T. Moore ; 
Mary's night ride, by George W. 
Cable ; Aunt Melissy on boys, by 
J. T. Trowbridge; Not guilty (?); 
The kitchen clock, bj' John V. 
Cheney ; The railroad crossing, by 
Hezekiah Strong ; The Irish philoso- 
pher ; His mother's songs, by Mrs 
E. V. Wilson. 

Cyr, Allen M. The children's second 
reader. 

Franklin, Benjamin. Autobiography. 
2 vols. 

cGexfeis, William Elliot. Brave little 
Holland and what she taught us. 2 vols. 

cHiGGiNsoN, Mrs Sarah .Tane (Hat- 
field). -Java, the pearl of the East. 

2 vols. 

A description of the island, its peo- 
ple and resources, with a brief outline 
of its history. 

How Jamie came home and other pieces. 

3 vols. 

Contents : How Jamie came home, 
by Will M. Carlton ; Ode for Deco- 
ration Day, by Henry Peterson ; The 
pauper soldier ; The little Scotch 
martyrs ; The Christmas substitute, 
by Anna Sprague Packard ; Nicholas 
Nlckleby leaving the Yorkshire 
school, by Charles Dickens ; A picture 
of Southern life, by Harry Stillwell 
Edwards ; The last hymn ; Cuttings 
from "A singular life," bj^ Elizabeth 
Stuart Phelps ; Bird ornamentation, 
by Elizabeth Freeland ; The toys, by 
Coventry Patmore ; The toast ; 
Father Phil's collection, by Samuel 
Lover. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



149 



Law and work . . . articles republished 
from the Christian Science periodicals. 
2 vols. 

« Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs Emma 
F. Martin. 

LiNCOLT^, Abraham. Selections from the 
letters, speeches and state papers of 
Al)raham Lincoln ; edited by Ida M. 
Tarbell. 2 vols. 

cLoNGFEi-LOW, Henky Wads WORTH. Se- 
lected poems. 

Contevts: The builders; The two 
angels ; The old clock on the stairs ; 
Resig-nation : The light of the stars ; 
It is not always May ; The rainy day ; 
Flowers ; The goblet of life ; Maiden- 
hood ; A gleam of sunshine ; The chil- 
d'-en's hour : Sandalphon ; The legend 
of the beautiful ; The day is done. 

cMartiist, He^^ry Newell. The human 
body. .'')th ed. revised by George Wells 
Fitz. 3 vols. 

Mitchell, Silas Weir. Mr Kris Krin- 
gle. a Christmas tale. 

cMontgojiery. David Henry. The lead- 
ing facts of French history. 3 vols. 

cMueller. Sarah Savage. Peter. In- 
cludes The laughter of Leen, by Conrad 
Richter. 

Stories from the Outlook, February 
-23. 1916. Peter is the story of a 
caterpillar. The laughter of Leen is 
a war story. 

Page, Thoiias Nelson. A captured 

Santa Claus. 

A Confederate offlcer risks his life 
to bring presents to his babies be- 
tween the lines. 

Phillips. Stephen. Marpessa. 

Gift of Miss Kate M. Foley. 

cPutnam, George Haven. Prisoners of 
war. A soldier's narrative of life at 
Libby and Danville prisons. 

From the Outlook, March 25, 1911. 

The raggedy man and other pieces. 3 

vols. 

Contents : The raggedy man, by 
James 'Whitcomb Riley ; The happy 
little cripple, by James Whitcomb 
Riley ; On the sunny side, by James 
Whitcoinb Riley ; A sudden sliow<fr, 
by James "Whitcomb Riley ; She "dis- 
plains" it, by James Whitcomb Riley ; 
A laughing chorus ; The rock-a-by 
lady, by Eugene Field ; The duel, by 
Engene Field ; The doll's wooing, by 
Eugene Field ; The doll's funeral, by 
Will Allen Drumgoole ; Quite a singer, 
by M. Douglns : Meditations of Johnny, 
by S. E. Kiser ; A change about the 
place, by S. E. Kiser ; "When pa was a 



boy, by S. E. Kiser ; Very green ; 
Nathan Hale, by Sara King Wiley ; 
The minister comes to tea. Puck ; 
Old flag, by Hubbard Parker ; Wen 
ma's away, by John Tracy Jones ; 
Independence bell ; A signboard ; At 
set of sun ; Letting the old cat die ; 
The little boy that died, by J. D. 
Robinson; We deck your graves; 
Scatter the flowers ; A new memorial 
day ; Drinking a tear ; Art is pitiless, 
by Mary D. Brine ; Chicken talk ; 
Tom, by Constance Fenimore "Wool- 
son ; Little Rocket's Christmas, by 
Vandyke Brown ; Some time ; Papa's 
letters ; Two little rogues, by Mrs 
A. M. Diaz ; The night before Christ- 
mas, by C. C. Moore. ' 

cRaymond, Rossiter "Worthington. 
Selections from Raymond's stories. 

Contents : Up-stairs, down-stairs 
and in my lady's chamber ; Santa 
Claus in spite of himself : The Christ- 
mas angel; Povertv Peter; "X" a 
Christmas story ; Karl the fiddler ; 
Glorioso ; The idea that flew out of 
the fire ; The palace of the days ; 
How Katy opened the door ; Bronze 
and wax ; Jack's mind ; The antidote. 

cSelections for declamation. 2 vols. 

Contents : vol. 1, Patriotic ; vol. 2, 
Miscellaneous. 

A second-hand Christmas. 

Gift to Miss Kate M. Foley. 

Smith, Francis Hopkinson. Selections 

from Forty minutes late. 

Contents : Forty minutes late : The 
little lady in gray ; The man in high- 
water boots. 

Stevenson, Robert Louis. A child's 
garden of verses. 

cSwinton. "\\^iLLiAj\r. Outlines of the 
world's history. 5 vols. 

Wentworth, George Albert. Answers 
to Wentworth's School algebra. 

School algebra. 3 vols. 

Whittier^ John Greenleaf, ecd. A 

selection from Child life in poetry. 

Contents : All things beautiful ; The 
ballad of Baby Bell ; The barefoot 
boy ; Battle of Blenheim ; The blue- 
bird ; The brook ; Buttercups and 
daisies ; The captain's daughter ; Cas- 
tles in the air ; Child and mother ; 
The crow's children ; Fairies of the 
Caldon-Low ; Farm-yard song ; First 
snow-fall : Gladness of nature ; The 
gray swan ; Hiawatha's childhood ; 
"Hold fast what I give you," Jack 
Frost ; Jack in the pulpit ; John Gil- 
pin ; In school-days ; I remember, I 
remember ; Kitty ; Lady moon ; Little 
bell ; The little brother ; Little brown 
hands ; The little maiden and the little 
bird ; Lucky gray ; A masquerade ; 
Milking ; The mountain and the squir- 
rel ; A night with a wolf ; My good- 



150 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



for-nothing ; The new moon ; Over in 
the meadow ; The owl and the pussy- 
cat ; Philip, my king- ; Robert of Lin- 
coln ; The sand piper ; The school ; 
Seven times one ; Sing on, blithe bird ; 
Sleep, baby, sleep ; The spider and the 
fly ; Thanksgiving-Day ; The violet ; 
Visit from St. Nicholas ; We are 
seven ; Who stole the Bird's nest. 

cWiLSON, WooDBOW. A history of the 
Amex-ican people, vols. 4^12. 

Vols. 1, 2 and 3 were added previ- 
ously. 

MAGAZINES. 

cCatholic review for October, November 
and December. 

cChkistian record for October, November 
and December. 

cGosPEL trumpet for October, November 
and December. 

cMatilda Ziegler magazine for October, 
November and December. 

Messenger to the sightless for October, 
November and December. 

cMiCHiGAKT herald for September and 
October. 

Seaeculight for October. 

MUSIC. 

cMacy, James Cabtwbight. Young peo- 
ple's history of music, with biographies 
of famous musicians. 

Includes biographies of Bach, Beet- 
hoven, Chopin, Gluck, Gounod, Handel, 
Haydn, Liszt, Mozart, Meyerbeer, 
Mendelssohn, Rossini, Schubert, Schu- 
mann, Verdi, Weber, Wagner. 

In European Braille. 

BOOKS. 

Andersen, Hans Christian. Fairy 
tales for young people. 10 vols. 

Arabian nights. Selections from Ara- 
bian nights entertainments. 5 vols. 

Ballantyne, Robert Michael. The 
coral island. 3 vols. 

A tale of the South seas. 

Benson, Edward Frederic. The 
Osbornes. 2 vols. In Grade 3. 

The Osbornes are a delightfully un- 
grammatical. newly-rich family. 



Birkhead, Alice. Heroes of modern 

Europe. 5 vols. 

Includes Dante, Lorenzo the Mag- 
niflcant, Savonarola, Martin Ltrther, 
Charles V, William the Silent, Henry 
of Navarre, Richelieu, Louis XIV,' 
Peter the Great, Frederick the Great, 
Voltaire, Napoleon, Mazzini, Garibaldi, 
Napoleon III, Tolstoi. 

BooTHBY, Guy. Dr Nikola. 3 vols. 

Clemens, Samuei. Tanghorne ("Mark 

Twain," pseud.). The adventures of 

Tom Sawyer. 2 vols. 

A tale full of incident and fun ; 
partly reminiscences of the author's 
own boyhood at Hannibal, Missouri. 

Davis. Richard Harding. la the fog. 

Defoe, Daniel. Robinson Crusoe. 6 
vols. 

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The hound 
of the Baskervilles, an adventure of 
Sherlock Holmes. 2 vols. 

Round the red lamp. 2 vols. 

Stories of an exciting trend, some 
of them medical experiences. 

DuBaty, Raymond Ralliee. 1.^,000 
miles in a ketch. 2 vols. 

The true and vivid tale of a ven- 
turesome voyage in a little French 
fishing ketch. 



Freeman, Richard Austin. 
sequin. 



The blue 



A message from the deep sea. 

Both of these stories are from John 
Thorndyke's cases. They are detec- 
tive stories. 

Hichens, Robert Smythe. The woman 
with the fan. 3 vols. 

Smart society in London with its 
luxuries and frivolities is pictured. 

HoRNUNG, Ernest William. The chest 
of silver. 

From A thief in tlie night. 

Instructions for making string bags on 
a circular knitting frame. 

•Johnston, Mary. Sir Mortimer. 2 vols. 
A romance of the Spanish Main, 
introducing Queen Elizabeth, Drake, 
etc. — Baker. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Puck of Pock's Hill. 
4 vols. 

Two English children And Puck, the- 
immortal fairy, who tells them won- 
derful tales of the Stonemen, etc. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



151 



KiPLi>'G, Rl'dyard. The ship that found 
herself. 

Lang, Axdrew. Tales of Troy and 
Greece. 6 vote. 

Adventures of Greek heroes, Ulysses, 
Perseus and Theseus. — A. L. A. cat. 

Lyttox. Edwaed Bulwer. 1st haron. 
The last of the barons. S vols. 

The tragic story of Warwick the 
King-Maker and his strife witli Ed- 
ward IV. — Baker. 

Patterson. John Henry. The man- 
eaters of Tsavo and other E.ist African 
adventures. 2 vols. 

A vivid description of railway build- 
ins in Uganda and of adventures 
with man-eating lions. — A. L. A. cat. 

Peichard, Kate O'Brien Hesketh-, and 
He.sketh. "^'eenon HesivEth. The 
chronicles of Don Q. 3 vols. 

Selected patterns for crochet and knit- 
tins' reprinted from Progress. 

Sheridan. Richard Brinsley' Butler. 
The rivals. 

A comedy in five acts. 

Stevenson. Robert Loris. Treasure 
Island. -3 vols. 

A story of piracy and concealed 
treasure. — Baker. 

Stowe. Mis Haeeiet Elizabeth 
(Beechee). Uncle Tom"s cabin. 
vols. 

Story of slave life in the South 
before the Civil War. 

Stray leaves from various authors. 

Contents: The story of an old pine- 
board : A handful of claj^ by Henry 
Van Dyke : The husbandman by Rob- 
ert Louis Stevenson. 

Swift, .Jonathan. Gulliver's travels 
into several remote regions of the world. 
6 vols. 

"Twain. Mark." pseud. See Clejiens, 
Sajiuel Langhoene. 

Wells. Herbert George. The stolen 
bacillus and other incidents. 2 vols. 

Contents : The stolen bacillus ; The 
flowering of the strange orchid ; In the 
Avu observatory ; The triumphs of a 
taxidermist ; A deal in ostriches ; 
Through a window ; The temptation 
of Harriugay ; The flying man ; The 
diamond maker ; .Epyornis Island : 
The remarkable case of Davidson's 
eves : The lord of the dynamos ; The 
Hammerpond Park burglary ; A moth 
— ^"Genus novo" ; The treasure in the 
forest. 



Weyiian, Stanley John. A gentleman 
of France. 5 vols. 

A historical romance. 

magazint:s. 
Braille liter.u-y journal for September, 
October and November. 

Beaille musical magazine for September 
and October. 

Daily mail for September. October and 
November. 

Hamstead for October and November. 

HoRA jucunda for October, November and 
December. 

Light-bringer for October, November 
and December. 

Morning for September, October and 
November. 

Peogress for October, November and 
December. 

Santa LrciA for September, October and 
November. 

MUSIC. 
Braille musical magazine for September 
and October. 

In Line. 

BOOKS. 

Bible. New Testaiient. John. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs Lulu 
Trimble. 

Luke. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs Lulu 
Trimble. 

In Moon, 
BOOKS. 

Alden, Ray'mond Macdonald. Why the 
chimes rank. 

A Christmas story. 

Beith, Ian Hay ("Ian Hay." pseud.). 
The first hundred thousand being the 
unofficial chronicle of a unit of K (I). 
o vols. 

These are sketches of a typical Eng- 
lish regiment during its training and 
also its fighting in the trenches, told 
with humor. 

BoNAR, HoRATius. The resting place. 

Braiiah. .Joseph Bramah. 



152 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan. 1918 



Brown. A brief memoir of the late Mr 
Brown, the personal attendant of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty, the Queen. 

Brookes. .James H. Life through the 
living one. 2 vols. 

BuKYAN. The life of John Bunyan. 

Burns, Robert, The poetical works of 
Robert Burns with life and notes by 
William Wallace. 12 vols. 

Carey. William Carey, D r Adam 
Clarke, Polycarp, Cranmer. 

"Conner, Ralph," pseud. See Gordon, 
Charles William. 

Davis. .John Davis, the blind mason. 

Contains also William Eade, the 
bookbinder. Duplicate copy. Gift of 
Mrs Ellen D. Blair. 

Dawson, Grace. How to rest. 

Gordon, Charles William. ("Ralph 
Conner," pseud.). The sky pilot. 2 

vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of H. W. Mills. 

"Hay, Ian," pseud. See J^eith, Tan Hay. 

Mackay, W. p. Grace and truth under 
twelve aspects. .5 vols. 

Miller, .J. R. The human touch, etc. 

J'almer, Frederick. My year of the 
great war. 9 vols. 

Scenes of life in the trenches and 
back of them are pictured. Also the 
British Navy is described. 

magazines. 
Dawn, part 12.5. A quarterly magazine. 
Moon magazine for October, November 
and December. 

In New York Point. 
books. 
AuESRACii. Beethold. Brigitta, crzaeh- 
lung. .3 vols. 

German text. 

Bradley. Arthur Granville. Cansda. 
2 vols. 

Travels through Canada, with his- 
torical notes. 

CaRlyle, TiiOirAS. An essay on Burns. 
2 vols. 



Davison, Alvin. Health lessons. Book I. 

3 vols. 

Gooch, George Peabody. Histon- of our 
own time, 18S5-1911. 2 vols. 

Hunter, George William. Elements of 
biology, a practical textbook correlating 
botany, zoology and human physiology. 

4 vols. 

James, William. Psychology. .3 vols. 

"Little, Frances," pseud. See Macau- 
lay, Mrs I^'annie Caldwell. 

Lord, John. American founders. 2 vols. 
Contents: The American idea; 
Benjamin Franklin ; George Wash- 
ington ; Alexander Hamilton ; John 
Adams ; Thomas Jefferson ; John 
Marshall by John Bassett Moore. 

American leaders. 2 vols. 

Contents: Andrew Jackson; Henrv 
Clay ; Daniel Webster ; John C. Cal- 
houn ; Abraham Lincoln ; Robert E. 
Lee. 

European leaders. 2 vols. 

Contents : William IV ; Sir Robert 
Peel ; Davour ; Czar Nicholas ; Louis 
NarJer ; Prince Bismarck ; William 
Ewart Gladstone. 

European statesmen. 2 vols. 

Contents: Mirabeau ; Edmund 
Burke ; Napoleon Bonaparts ; Prince 
Mette'-nick ; Chateaubriand : George 
IV ; Louis Philippe. 

Macaulay, Mrs Fannie Caldwell. 

("Frances Little," pseud.). The lady 

of the Decoration. 2 a'oIs. 

Hand copied. Gift of Miss Estelle 
Miller. 

Macaulay. Thomas Babington Macau- 
lay, /-sf hfiroii. Essay on Addison, 
edited with notes by Ilerljert A. Smith. 
2 vols. 

Macgregor, David Hutchinson. The 
evolution of industry. 2 vols. 

Maret. Robert Ranulpii. Anthropology. 
2 vols. 

rtOMAN Catholic Church. A catechism 
of Christian doctrine. 

Duplicate copies. Gift of the Xavier 
Free Publication Society for the Blind. 

1\\RBELL, Horace Sumner. The AVerner 
grammar school geography. 2 vols. 



vol. 13, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAEY, 



153 



Wells, Webstek. Essentials of algebra 
for secondary schools. 2 vols. 

MAGAZINES. 

Catholic transcript for October, Novem- 
ber and December. 

Christian record for October and No- 
vember. 

Gospel trumpet for October, November 
and December. 

Lux vera, Catholic monthly, for October 
and November. 



Matilda Ziegler mag-azine for October, 
November and December. 

Sunday school monthly for November and 
December, 1917, and January, 1918. 

\\^EEKLY review for October, November 
and December. 

In Ink Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

The BEACON for October, November and 
December. 

The BLIND for October. 

The outlook for the blind for July. 



U— 35857 



i 



"BRINGING LIGHT TO THE BLIND."* 

By Pauline Jacobson. 

Miss Kate M. Foley is the State Librarj^ Home Teacher for the Blind. 
Her work is to teach raised systems of print to the blind in this state. 
The soul of her work, however, is teaching the blind how to take the bit 
in their teeth and convert their blindness into an asset. She does this, 
as she saj's, "not by shoving out the darkness but by shining it out." 

"You don't shove dai'kness out of a room, do youl" she queried., 
' ' You shine it out by bringing a light into the dark. ' ' 

Miss Foley's light is not a physical light. This she declares the 
poorest light in the whole world. Her's is what she calls a "mental 
light," brought to the mind of the blind through work. Its essence is 
courage. Reading is onl}^ a means to this end. Reading restores the 
confidence to the blind, where each then, unaided, ma}' pick up the 
broken threads and swing into the current of work the same as the 
seeing pei^son. 

In 1904. the State Library, as part of its extension work, opened a 
department of reading for the blind. Up to date it has about 6000 
volumes of raised print, to be had on apjplication, and delivered free, by 
parcel post, to any home in any part of the state. Notwithstanding 
this unusual advantage, it was soon discovered that in proportion to 
the number of blind listed, few were availing themselves of the opportu- 
nity. The fault lay partly in the fact that many persons stricken blind 
in adult life did not know how to read raised print. To overcome this 
obstacle, a department was instituted three years ago, in 1914, for the 
teaching of the blind. The state had not far to look for its teacher. 
Constant rec[uests throughout the past years for books coming from the 
blind in the southern part of the state had been accompanied by the 
statement that "Miss Foley taught me to read." 

For twenty years Miss Foley had been doing volunteer teaching in 
Los Angeles. Miss Foley is blind. She has been blind since childhood 
from preventable ophthalmia, an inflammation of the eye which easily 
could have been averted by a little precaution on the part of the 
physician. She is a graduate of the State Blind Institute of Berkeley. 
Proficient in many things, yet owing to the prejudice entertained by the 
public in entrusting anything to the blind, she was unable to obtain 
work with pay. Rather than remain idle she volunteered to teach read- 
ing to the poor and more unfortunate of the blind. 

In the past three years, since assuming her work for the state, she 
has taught 200 adults and 15 children how to read. Classes were held 
twice a week, and those too poor, too ner^^ous, or too old to come to her, 
she went herself to their homes. She not only teaches the blind, but as 
a matter of conser^^ation of the eyesight she teaches those of failing eye- 
sight who can not read the ordinary print. As part of her campaig-n 
for the Prevention of Blindness and the Conservation of Ej^esight, she 
lectures in hospitals, before women's clubs, improvement clubs, parents' 

*Reprinted by permission from the San Francisco Bulletin, January 5, 191S. 
2—37615 



156 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

and teachers' classes. She is a member of the National Committee for 
the Prevention of Blindness. She is fitting nurses to go to France to 
teach the blinded soldiers, and in connection with the Red Cross work, 
fitting nnrses to assist the blinded on their return to this country. 

She pursues, likewise, a Vigorous campaign of public enlightenment 
with a view to converting the public away from the old notions regard- 
ing the blind, to the modern demonstrable fact that the blind can do 
other things beside beg, and that they need not be set apart from the 
seeing people. Miss Foley's ultimate dream is to have in this city the 
blind taught together with the seeing children, as now is done in New 
York, Boston, Chicago, Milwaukee and Cleveland. And where they are 
so educated the blind usually outrank the seeing. Miss Foley attributes 
this to the greater obligations imposed upon the blind— the need of 
greater effort to encourage the blind who come after them ; the winning 
over the seeing people with a view to breaking down the barrier of 
separateness, and because of the severe training given the memory. 

"The blind are educated never to forget," said Miss Foley. "We 
can not resort to pad and pencil as the seeing. We must have every- 
thing where we can get at it readily. I never take a note. I never look 
up an address. I sent out seventy-five Christmas greetings to my old 
pupils and I did not look up an address once. I tell my pupils they 
must not forget, and they do not forget. I tell them that it can be done, 
that I do it ; and thej^ do it. They walk on my courage. 

' ' The greatest affliction the blind have to endure is this attitude of the 
public in thinking them apart. I have special classes to instruct the 
public in this. I instruct them when they buy a newspaper on the 
street from a blind person to act exactly as they would if he had his 
sight, not to buy a one-cent paper once a week and give him five cents, 
which is alms-giving ; but to buy a paper each day at one cent, which 
raises the selling to the dignity of work. Often a college bred man with 
a family to support is forced through blindness to selling newspapers on 
the street. 

"When people talk to us their voices choke with tears. We don't 
want tears. When they feel sorry for us they make us feel apart. They 
will ask my family in my presence questions that I am perfectly capable 
of answering myself. How long have I been blind? What caused my 
blindness? Do I dress myself and feed myself? Do I choose the colors 
of my gowns ? .Why we are taught combination of colors just as we are 
our geography. Or someone will rush in the room all excited about a 
gorgeous sunset she has just seen. Upon discovering my presence, she 
will check herself and say, 'Oh, I won^'t tell that now.' People never 
talk to us about sunsets, when that's what we are just crazy to hear 
about; nor of pictures. I have pictures all over my home. And they 
are always offering us armchairs. I just abominate armchairs, yet they 
are always offering me one. ' Come now, I will give you this nice arm- 
chair and place it right up close to the fire. ' 

"I have a pupil who was stricken blind a year ago. He was a great 
club man, but since his blindness he has shut himself away from all his 
friends. I found his family coddling him in armchairs. When the 
pupil is a man, the first thing I demand before teaching him to read is 
to walk by himself. Christmas he told me that he had walked four 



vol. 13, no. 2] BRINGING LIGHT TO THE BLIND. 



157 




158 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

times about the square by himself. I said, ' That is the finest Christmas 
present I have had.' He said, 'I did that for you. I was prone when 
you found me. I am on my knees now; do not leave me until I can 
stand on my feet.' I am teaching him now to read, and I have the 
telephone numbers of his club friends. I 'm going to ring them up and 
tell them to call. And there are going to be no women folks about to 
coddle him — just his men friends, as if nothing had ever happened. 

' ' I never let my pupils know that I am sorry for them. I never 
let on that I know they are crying, even when a man's tears are falling 
on my hand all the time I'm giving him the first lesson. That would 
never do. I don 't dare let them think their lives are hard. There were 
some little blind children being sent off to school. I was down at the 
train. They were crying, with the exception of a little Mexican girl of 
twelve. 

" 'Do you hear those children crying?' she said. 'I will not cry. 
Brave children never cry. ' 

" 'Who told you that?' I said. 

" 'You did,' she answered. 

"Yet I do not care for the constantly cheerful person. Nor do I 
believe in resignation. I believe with St. Paul in kicking against the 
pricks. Often when a man thinks he is resigned he is only consumed 
with self-pity. The resigned man is usually the overly sensitive man. 
The man who shuts himself away from his friends and his work usually 
is found to mope and grieve in silence. He is not the brave man. 
When a man is sorry for himself he is on the road to despair. The only 
successful blind man is the one who has attained complete self-mastery. 
Fight, I tell all my pupils ; fight to keep in the current of life ; lose if 
you must, win if you can, but fight. ' ' 

Miss Foley looks upon her blindness not as an affliction but only as a 
handicap, one which merely imposes greater effort and greater obliga- 
tions. In her present field she considers it her greatest asset. 

"Being blind," she says, "I can speak with authority. The public 
will listen to me. It is a tremendous argument, for instance, when 
lecturing on preventable blindness, to tell them I am blind from a pre- 
ventable cause. And the blind will listen to me when I tell them that I 
dress myself, and feed myself, and read and write and walk by myself. 
It takes someone who understands them to bring them out. Who better 
can understand my people — and the blind are my people — than one who 
is blind ? I can go to the depths of their experience as a seeing person 
could not. People say to me that I never look tired. That is because 
of my enthusiasm, for I have always the object in view to bring back 
confidence, so that they will keep in the current. To do this one must 
have enthusiam, all around, above, below, to all sides. Without tre- 
mendous energy and enthusiasm one couldn't otherwise build up the 
broken lives. They must have especial care and especial encouragement 
to get the best results. 

' ' Before you can teach reading you must adjust family troubles. You 
find the family out of patience. The rockers are all placed wrong and 
the doors are half open. I ask how they would like to stub their toes 
or fall. Or the family coddles too much. ' Oh, Miss Foley, ' my pupils 
say, 'if only you will tell my family to act natural; to go right along as 



vol. 13, no. 2] BRINGING LIGHT TO THE BLIND. 



159 




160 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

if nothing had happened.' Often you can avert a domestic crisis. I 
found a blind wife of a laboring man. She was sitting around melan- 
choly with nothing to do. I taught her easy things to cook, how to sew 
and tidy up. I am teaching her reading now. Her house is as neat as 
wax. Her home is happy. Had I not come there her husband would 
have left her. 

' ' One must have infinite patience, and a sense often of the ridiculous. 
They will say, ' "When I want you I will send for you. When I want the 
state to trouble about me I will let you know. I 'm not on charity yet. ' 
They are like hurt children who do not know what hurts them. They 
need you so badly and don't know it. 

''I found a woman across the bay who had been blind for eighteen 
years. She was doing her own housework, but did not know how to 
read. She tried to shut me out of the house when I came. I told her I 
had come a long distance and was tired, and wouldn't she let me rest a 
bit? She said she didn't think she ever could read, that it would be too 
much trouble to teach her, and besides, her hands from housework were 
ruined for reading. I took her hand and found it in splendid condi- 
tion. That was in November. She has learned to read two systems 
and to write. She rang me up the other day to tell me she had sat up 
till two o'clock at night reading the 'Sky Pilot.' She said she thought 
God had forgotten her, and that she had not been so happy in eighteen 
years. 

' ' I found a young man of twenty -six, who was blinded by a chemical 
experiment. He was a graduate of the Carnegie Technical School. He 
was fighting in the dark with his head down. He was disagreeable and 
wouldn't speak to anyone. He would go out of the house when he knew 
anyone was there. I got on the mother's side, and told her to manage to 
have him in the house when I was there. I found that he was wiring 
houses, and that it took him half as long as when he had his eyesight. I 
told him he was the most wonderful blind person I had ever met. 

" 'Are you on the level, or trying to kid me?' he asked. 

"I assured him that I had never heard of an electrician doing that 
before. 

" 'Oh,' he said, 'you don't think I'm a failure?' 

"So I taught him to read. He would hide the book, so as not to let 
anyone know T w^as teaching him, and he would never walk with me on 
the street. Now he walks Math me ; reads on the street cars, even. He 
does wiring on Saturdays and Sundays, and runs a drug store in 
between. He laughs, whistles and sings. 

"My oldest pupil was a man ninety ears of age. He had been a 
carpenter. He had been blind twenty years. I found his hands in 
terrible shape, crooked from rheumatism. His daughter didn't think 
he could learn. He was grouchy and would not receive me. I left a 
card in large type with instructions to leave it everywhere, on the bed, 
on the table, where he could feel it. In a few days she rang up. 'Oh, 
Miss Foley, father knows his letters. Come quick, but don't make too 
much of him ! ' 

" 'I suppose,' he said 'a part of your purpose was to have that card 
left everywhere. ' I had to teach him spelling. He had not read for so 
long he had forgotten. I 'd encourage him with one hand and pat him 



vol. 13, no. 2] BRINGING LIGHT TO THE BLIND. 161 

with the other. He has read now the New Testament, a part of the 
old, all about Lincoln (he is crazy about Lincoln) and any number of 
the histories. 

"Colored people love the Bible, especially St. John. I taught a 
colored man to read. I sent for St. Mark, for that is a small volume, 
while St. John is in two volumes. He rang me up. He was very 
excited. I thought his wife had died. 'They didn't send me St. 
Marks,' he said, 'They sent me St. John. I know. It starts, "In the 
beginning was the word, and the word was with God, and the word was 
God." I'm reading child, I'm reading.' 

"'Didn't I tell you,' said L 

" 'Yes,' said he, 'but I disbelieved you.' 

"He often told me that he walked on my faith like Peter did on the 
water. And they do walk on my faith. 

"When I can't reach the many other way I teach by correspondence. 
People often tell me, 'There is no getting away from iMiss Foley.' I 
taught the superintendent of a power plant by correspondence. He 
was thirty-seven years old when he was stricken blind, and he had a 
father to support. He was despondent. I taught him two systems of 
reading and how to write. He is now learning the typewriter. He 
makes out all his reports, and walks three miles to the different plants 
each day. Where he might have lost his position he now does as good 
work as he ever did. 

"If you can only keep them in the current of life they can all do as 
good work as before. Reading is only a means to this end. Reading 
restores their confidence. It makes them more self-reliant. When I 
tell them that blindness is not an affliction, but a handicap, all the fight- 
ing blood that is in them comes to the call. When I urge them to do 
things for themselves, to make the most of their lives, I tell them the 
things they do help those who come after them. Their success blazes 
the trail for some other discouraged person. And when once they get 
this mental light they radiate it to others, to the seeing, as well as to 
the blind." 

Since November ^liss Foley has been transferred to San Francisco, to 
organize the work here and in the cities about the bay, exactly along the 
lines of her work in the south. Her office is in the Sutro branch of the 
State Library at Sacramento and Webster streets, where on Thursday, 
from 9 to 4, she gives lessons to those who can come to the library and to 
give information concjerning the work. She invites the public. 



162 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



BIOGRAPHY OF A. SUNDAY. 

(By One Who Knew It Intimately.) 

It began like all other Sundays, at twelve o'clock Saturday night, but 
with a damp nose and tears in its eyes, like the Saturday and Friday 
before it. This continued gentle warm dampness was fast threatening 
total destruction to the snow on the Divide. That was why the organ- 
izer took eight-hour-old Sunday morning by the hand and started out on 
the logging train, for over the ''hump" was a strategic point .in the 
campaign. 

Logging trains are not provided with any ideas except to get logs out 
of the woods. Mortal passengers are merely tolerated. The tiny pro- 
testing engine starts suddenly like a shy colt, and you are thrown 
against the wooden backed seat, only to have the engine suddenly 
change its mind and stop, when you plunge madly forward across the 
seat ahead. After a bit, the engine leaves you altogether, while it 
disappears down a spur track, and its whistle • echoes and re-echoes 
through the dripping woods. Soon it comes gaily back with several 
cars of logs, and when it jams them against you to make the recoupling! 
zig zag lightning and your spine are in the same class for exemption 
from further service ! 

After two hours of such massage treatment, Sunday and I reached 
the stage which was to take us "over the top." We had been told that 
the stage had a ' ' dead X, ' ' but we didn 't know that death was so catch- 
ing and that everything would be dead. Do you remember the time 
you sat on one end of a "teeter" and the other person suddenly jumped 
off? That's a "dead X"! The ground came all the way up through 
your back and made your eyes sting. Four horses pulled us and the 
stage — called so only by courtesy as it was only an open wagon box set 
on the wheels and a board for seat, — through interminable seas of mud, 
while the deep ruts that were often struck made your teeter experience 
only a pleasant memory. 

This dragging, grinding, straining lasted till noon, when the driver 
pulled up under the trees beside a sled and told me that this was where 
we changed. The mud had been gradually giving place to snow and 
ice, and runners were needed to go farther. The change was welcome, 
but 303^ was short lived. The heavy mail and express were shifted, from 
stage to sled and piled so as to form supports for our backs, seats were 
made for the driver and myself from packs of papers, and we started. 
Sunday's weeping had done its worst, for the roadbed was a thing of 
the past. While the top would be tempting with seemingly solid snow, 
one step of the horses, and crash ! the teams would go through the 
eggshell surface to mud and swiftly running streams underneath. Or 
more often the horses on one side would break through while the two on 
the other side would stay on top, their hoofs about even with the backs 
of the others. The dizzy heights, then depths, to which my side of the 
sled continued to go can better be imagined than described. While I 
hung madly to the ropes that fastened on the mountain of baggage 
behind us, the driver frantically swung his cracking whip and urged 



vol. 13, no. 2] BIOGRAPHY OF A SUNDAY. 163 

Johnnie and Bill to pull harder, harder. In an interval of lull, the 
driver would tell me that he "tipped over three times yesterday" or 
"there is the snowbank where a lady threw her baby when we tipped 
over Friday." Every crash through the ice, every snort of the hor.ses, 
I confidently expected to be my last moment right side up. And 
Sunday kept on its gentle raining. 

After what seemed interminable years, the middle of the afternoon 
brought us to the end of the first half of our journe3^ Heaven seemed 
very near by contrast, as we pulled across the bridge and into the ranch 
barnyard. We tasted the joy of a returned Siberian exile when we 
went into the house and saw • a brisk fire and a set table. There ' 
we also met the other stage driver making the return trip, who warned 
us of hidden holes, of a shaky bridge, of a road gone out, so we must 
crouss the field. 

While I dried a bit, the driver again changed our cargo to a stage 
as we had reached the end of the snow. This time we were blessed with 
thoroughbraces — a sort of leather springs — a degree better than the 
dead X. The rest of the afternoon was uneventful. At seven we 
stopped at a ranch house just long enough to exchange our four wornout 
horses for two fresh ones. From then on trouble came thick and fast, 
for it was a four-horse sized job. 

About eight a whistle by the road stopped us and we picked up a 
young man passenger wanting to ride to the next town. Fate was kind 
to us, but not to him when she sent him to us. Before it was over I 'm 
sure he wished he had walked. In less than ten minutes the driver 
remarked, "There's a deep hole along here somewhere, I wonder 
where." But his wonder was at once over, for the right front wheel 
had found it ! Down it went with a crunching thud, and we were all 
but plunged out over the horses. In their effort to pull the wheel out 
quickly before it sucked completely into the mud, they lunged forward 
and snap went a strap ! 

It was a choice, then, between unloading so as to lighten the wagon, 
pull it out, and load up again ; or try to help the horses pull out as 
it was. 

The two men decided to try the latter. Fortunately, we were by a 
split rail fence. So the division of labor was as follows: the driver 
guided and urged the horses, which at times became so exhausted that 
they actually sat down in the mud; I threw my Aveight and what 
strength I could onto a rail that had been put under the hub like a 
lever; and while the horses pulled and I pried, the other passenger 
would run a rail under the wheel to keep it from slipping back. 
' ' Down and so many inches to gain ' ' was our signal for the next hour, 
for it took that long to get out of there ; and the stage lanterns were 
our only light. 

Nine o'clock — the time we had expected to arrive at our trip's end — 
saw us started again. The rain of the day had completely changed the 
road, so the driver was abroad in the uncharted sea of mud. At ten, 
the blurred lights of a little town across the valley came into sight, and 
the driver felt that midnight would see us through. Again his boast 
was no sooner made than ended. The center of the earth came to meet 
VIS, again we avalanched forward, again a horse careened and a strap 
broke. We had sucked down into another hole. 



164 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

Then all was stillness. A sculptor looking for a new subject to repre- 
sent "The end of the trail" would have found it there — the horses 
dropped motionless, the stage half upturned, the driver with his head 
dropped into his hands. For long seconds he sat thus. No one spoke. 
Then suddenly he jumped off into hip-high water, and fell to exam- 
ining the broken strap. A dull moon was beginning to lighten up the 
mist a little, but only showed water in all directions. The other pas- 
senger took the reins, and with the harness spliced, renewed energy 
was put to getting us out. But each time the harness snapped again, 
and we settled deeper. It was useless. 

With all hope abandoned of getting the stage out, the driver said he'd 
go to town after a buggy for me, but that plan did not appeal, and I 
asked to ride a horse. He was delighted to have me offer to do what he 
had hesitated to propose. How to get me out of the stage was the first 
problem, and how to find the attitude of the horse towards petticoats 
was the next one. The boys solved the first by making a "chair" of 
their hands and carrying me to a high mound where I could stand out 
of the water. The first horse that was tried settled the second question 
promptly by thrashing about when a lap robe was thrown over its back 
to ' ' camouflage ' ' a skirt. My heart sank. If the second should do the 
same, what was to become of me? 

But it didn't. It rose to the occasion and accepted me like the 
courtier it was. And then the procession began. First went the other 
passenger carrying one stage lantern and leading the un" cooperating" 
horse, loaded with the through mail ; then the stage driver carrying the 
other lantern and leading my horse. 

A long three miles they walked. The mist cleared, the moon came 
out, a warm breeze blew. The town was gone to bed, but continued 
knocks brought the hotel keeper to the door. Sunday and I went to 
sleep at the same time, cold and wet, Sunday at the end of its journey, 
but I still fifteen miles from the end of mine. 

But this is the biography of A. Sunday. 



vol. 13, no. 2] PROPOSITIONS to be voted on. 165 



MEASURES TO BE SUBMITTED AT THE 1918 ELECTION. 

By Joseph H. Quire^ Legislative Reference Librarian, California State Library. 

Twenty or more propositions will be voted upon at the coming general 
state election to be held on Tiiesda}-, November 5, 1918. Eighteen 
constitutional amendments passed at the 1917 session of the California 
Legislature, an act of the same legislature suspended by the referendum 
and one measure proposed b}'' the initiative are alreadj^ assured of a 
place upon the ballot. The way is open up to within ninety days of 
the election to file further initiative measures and, according to present 
indications, one or more propositions relating to the regulation of the 
liquor traffic will have secured the necessarj' number of signatures 
within the required time. 

The overshadowing interest in winning the Avar will leave little desire 
or opportunitj'' for the usual study and discussion of the propositions 
up for popular approval or disapproval. But were these normal ante- 
bellum days, it is doubtful if the questions presented by the 1918 amend- 
ments and propositions would provoke the same state-wide interest that 
prevailed in 1911, when such matters as w^oman suft'rage and the initia- 
tive, referendum and recall were presented for settlement, or in 1914, 
when, among the forty-eight measures on the ballot, were the prohibi- 
tion amendments, the blue sky law and the red light abatement act. 
Only a few of the forthcoming propositions present an opportunity for 
a close and spirited division of opinion. The remainder are either little 
more than formal changes in structure or are onlj^^ of local application. 

Chief interest will probably center about the following propositions : 

1. The initiative measure abolishing saloons and regulating the sale 
of strong alcoholic liquors, popularlj^ known as the Rominger bill, 
because of the advocacy of a similar measure in the 1917 legislature by 
Senator Joseph A. Rominger of Los Angeles. 

2. The "tax limitation law." placing a limit upon the amount of taxes 
which may be raised by a political subdivision, passed at the 1917 session 
of the legislature and suspended by the referendum. 

And the following constitutional amendments passed by the 1917 
legislature : 

3. The health insurance amendment, enabling the legislature to pro- 
vide for a system of health insurance. 

4. Absent voting amendment, permitting voters absent on eleciion 
day to vote within the state, or if in the military or naval service, out- 
side of the state. 

5. Excess condemnation amendment, permitting a political subdivi- 
sion to take for a public improvement more property than that actually 
needed for the improvement. 

6. State budget board amendment, creating a state budget board to 
present the state budget to the legislature and permitting one member 
to sit in the legislature during the debate. 

The Rominger bill raises the question of liquor regulation in the form 
of an initiative act instead of in the form of a constitutional amend- 
ment, as in 1914 and 1916. The act, which consists of sixteen lengthy 
sections, has been summarized by the attorney general as follows : 

"After July 1, 1919, prohibits keeping drinking saloons or similar 
places, regulates the traffic in and various acts relating to alcoholic 



166 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

liquors, prohibiting sales and various other dispositions thereof (except 
in specified cases or under specific conditions, some applying to vinous 
or malt liquors containing distilled liquors or more than certain per- 
centages of alcohol, and others to alcoholic liquors generally, or to other 
particular kinds thereof) limits number of municipal licenses for sale 
of vinous or malt liquors for consumption elsewhere than on premises 
where sold, permits further municipal regulations, and prescribes 
penalties." 

The measure is thus not so stringent as the two constitutional amend- 
ments voted down in 1914 and 1916. 

The tax limitation law (California Statutes 1917, chap. 729), sus- 
pended by referendum, limits the amount which a county may raise 
by taxation to an amount not in excess of 5 per cent of the total 
amount raised in the previous year. This percentage may be exceeded 
only with the approval of a state board of authorization, created to 
enforce the act, and consisting of the State Controller, chairman of 
the State Board of Control, chairman of the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion and two other i^ersons appointed by the governor, one of whom 
shall be a member of the State Board of Control. On the refusal of 
the board to permit a larger amount to be raised, the question may 
be submitted to the electors and is carried if a three-fifths affirmative 
vote is given. Any city, city and county or other political subdivision 
may become subject to the act by resolution of its governing body. 
Opposition to the law developed because of its threatened curtailment of 
school funds. 

The health insurance amendment (S. C. A. 26, res. chap 57) adds 
section 22 to Article XX. The amendment is one of the results of the 
studies of the Social Insurance Commission, created in 1915 by the 
legislature, and represents the first step toward the introduction of 
the principle of health insurance. The section commits the state to the 
policy of providing for the welfare and support during sickness of 
those whose incomes are not sufficient to meet the hazards of disability 
and authorizes the legislature to establish a health insurance system, 
supported either by voluntary or compulsory contributions. 

The absent voting amendment (A. C. A. 1, res. chap. .64) empowers 
the legislature to provide for the casting of ballots by duly registered 
citizens whose occupations require them to travel alDout the state or 
who are in the militaiy or naval service of the United States. The 
legislature may provide for the casting of such a vote either at a subse- 
quent date to election in the residence of the voter or in the city of the 
state in which the voter is on election day ; and in the case of persons 
in the militarj^ or naval service, at any point in the United States where 
not less than fifty soldiers or sailors are stationed. A similar law is 
now in effect in nineteen states and a law permitting persons in the 
military or naval service to vote is in effect in eleven states. 

The excess condemnation amendment (S. C. A. 16, res. chap. 49) 
revives a question which was presented at the elections of 1914 and 
1915 and failed to carry. The amendment permits the state, any 
county, city or county, or municipality to acquire by eminent domain 
property in excess of that actually needed for an improvement. The 
amendment is presented to further the city planning movement by 
making it possible for the city making the improvement to profit by 
the resulting values given adjoining property or to be prepared for 
future needs. 



vol. 13, no. 2] PROPOSITIONS to be voted on. 167 

The state budget board ameuduieut (S. C. A. 15, res. chap. 48) creates 
a state budget board of the three members of the State Board of 
Control, the State Controller, and the Lieutenant Grovernor, ex officio 
member, to ascertain for each biennial period the financial needs of state 
offices, departments and institutions and report to the legislature not 
later than the twentieth day of the session. The report is to be made in 
the form of two bills, the general appropriation bill and an omnibus 
appropriation bill, carrying special items for improvements and better- 
ments. The chairman or designated member of the board may sit in 
either house, in committee of the Avhole. during the debate on these two 
bills and may participate in the discussion. 

Of the other constitutional amendments, two propose important ' 
changes in the judicial branch of the state government. One amend- 
ment (A. C. A. 61, res. chap. 79) reduces practically all of Article VI, 
relating to the .judicial department to the status of a general law, amend- 
able bv the legislature instead of by constitutional amendment as at 
present. Such matters as the organization of the Supreme Court, the 
election and term of justices and the jurisdiction of the Supreme and 
Appellate courts Avould be affected. The amendment would leave in the 
constitution the provisions making the senate a court of impeachment 
and the section prohibiting judges from charging juries in respect to 
matters of fact. 

The other amendment relating to the judiciary (S. C. A. 45, res. 
chap. 63) would add to the Appellate courts of the first and second 
districts (San Francisco and Los Angeles) a second division of three 
justices each. Existing provisions are also modified by making the 
presence of only two appellate justices, instead of three, necessary for 
the transaction of business or the pronouncement of judgment ; permit- 
ting a Superior Judge to serve pro tempore on the supreme court, in 
case of a vacancy, by appointment of the other justices ; permitting 
other justices of the Appellate courts, instead of Supreme Court 
justices, to appoint a justice from another district or a Superior Judge 
to sit in case of the disqualification of a member; and providing that 
whenever a person is appointed to a term which expires on the firet of 
January following a general election, the person appointed continues to 
serve for the unexpired term, thereby making it unnecessary to elect a 
person only for the two months intervening. 

Several amendments are proposed changing Article XI, relating to 
the government of counties, cities and towns. The excess condemnation 
amendment has already been mentioned. A change in section 16^ 
(S. C. A. 34, res. chap. 62), relating to the deposit of public moneys, 
would permit the state, a county, city and county or municipality to 
deposit moneys in banks outside the state for the payment of the prin- 
cipal or interest on bonds. By the same amendment, the legislature, or 
the people acting through the initiative, may determine the conditions 
under which public moneys may be deposited. These conditions are 
now fixed by the Constitution. The provisions of Article XI relating 
to city and county charters are supplemented by section 7-|ff (S. C. A. 
13, res. chap. 46), which permits a county organized under general law 
and over 200,000 population to initiate proceedings for a consolidated 
city and county charter. The amendment is similar in its details to sec- 
tion 8| of the same article, which sets forth the procedure for the forma- 



168 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

tiou of a consolidated city and county on the initiative of a city or city 
and county. The provisions of section 8-| are modified (A. C. A. 2, res. 
chap. 38) to facilitate the San Francisco-San Mateo consolidation plan 
provided for in chapter 126 of the statutes of 1917. 

The remaining two amendments to Article XI are of local applica- 
tion. Section 18 is amended to permit the city of Venice to pay certain 
indebtedness otherwise prohibited by the constitution (A. C. A. 62, res. 
chap. 80). Section 18| is added to permit the county of Los Angeles 
to pay certain indebtedness (A. C. A. 67, res. chap. 81). 

Three amendments affect Article XIII, relating to revenue and taxa- 
tion. Two of these provide for further exemptions of property from 
taxation, one of all property belonging to the Y. M. C. A. or Y. W. C. A. 
(A. C. A. 35, res. chap. 77), and the other of cemeteries not conducted 
for profit (A. C. A. 10, res. chap. 67). The third amendment permits 
the legislature to reimburse cities for taxes lost because of property 
exempted under section If of Article XIII, which allows a $1,000 
exemption' to persons who have been in the military or naval service of 
the United States (A. C. A. 23, res. chap. 74). The amendment applies 
particularly to the city of Sawtelle, in which is located a branch of the 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. 

An extension of the principle of eminent domain is proposed in the 
amendment to section 14 of Article I (A. C. A. 31, res. chap. 76). By 
this amendment, the state or a county or municipal corporation, drain- 
age, irrigation, levee or reclamation district may, in an eminent domain 
proceedings, take immediate possession of the right of way desired by 
giving to the court reasonable security to pay adequate compensation 
for resulting damage. 

Modification of section 3 of Article XII to make the liability of a 
stockholder in a limited corporation determinable by the legislature is 
made in A. C. A. 37, res. chap. 78. 

Changes in section 9 of Article IX, relating to the government of 
the University of California, are proposed in S. C. A. 20, res. chap. 51. 
The amendment confers upon the Board of Regents full power of 
organization and government subject only to such legislative control as 
may be necessary to insure compliance with the terms of the endow- 
ments of the university and the security of its funds. The political 
code sections relating to the organization of the board are transferred to 
the constitution, with the change that the president of the alumni asso- 
ciation is made a member ex officio. 

Formal changes are proposed to the employers' liability amendment 
adopted in 1911 to bring the provision into conformity with the inter- 
pretation and administration of the present section (S. C. A. 30, res. 
chap. 60). 

A pamphlet containing the amendments and propositions to be sub- 
mitted at the November election, together with arguments for and 
against each measure, will be issued by the Secretary of State and 
mailed to each voter by the clerk of each county not more than twenty- 
five days nor less than fifteen days prior to the election. In addition 
to this aid, the State Library, as in former years, is prepared to answer 
questions and loan material relating to the measures proposed and will 
welcome the fullest use of this service for furnishing voters every 
opportunity for making intelligent decisions on the questions presented. 



vol. 13, no. 2] LIDEARY WAR WORK. 169 



LIBRARY WAR WORK.* 

As soon as war was declared by the United States every library in the 
country began to ask what was to be its share in this great war for 
democracy. Keeping the public informed as to the progress of events 
was important, but not enough. The library must take an active vital 
part in winning the war. But there was no precedent to fall back upon 
and so each library has had to dig its own trench and attack the enemy 
in the way best suited to the vicinity in which it is placed. Although 
local needs must always be considered, nevertheless there are broad 
lines along which we are all fighting and the work in one library may 
give some suggestions helpful to others. 

The Oakland Free Library received its first impetus at the time of the 
second food conservation campaign. We had placed food cards in the 
library during the first campaign, but this had proved a hopeless failure. 
Our readers took no interest in the matter and the big pile of cards 
remained practically untouched. 

' ' Why have our readers not signed '? ' ' the members of the staff asked 
one another. ' ' They represent our most loyal citizens and yet see how 
they have failed in this big work ! What can we do to make every 
person coming to the library realize the seriousness of the food situation 
and want to help ? ' ' 

Bach staff member had a different solution. 

"We must first let them know that the campaign is in progress and 
remind them of this fact over and over again." Suggestion one. 

"We must impress them with the importance of food conservation by 
giving facts and figures," said another. 

"And we must tell them how they can follow out the orders of the 
Food Administration," added a third. 

A committee on war work was appointed by the Librarian and went 
quietly around from member to member, collecting ideas, and when the 
second food conservation campaign was announced the Oakland Free 
Library was ready to do its ' ' bit. ' ' 

Bright colored posters lined the entrance hall; some picturing piles 
of luscious fruit called attention to the use of local food, and others 
presenting strings of fish, fresh from the water, and good looking game 
proclaimed the saving of the meat supply. Gayly colored cards called 
attention to the use of cornmeal and barley, instead of wheat and on the 
first landing of the stairway, so placed that no one entering the building 
could fail to see it, was the pictured figure of Liberty, holding out her 
arms and pleading for the signing of the food pledge. 

The big square upper hall afforded an opportunity for a still more 
telling display. Here tw^o large bulletin boards attractively presented 
information of interest to housekeepers. Not only were facts as to the 
need of food conservation posted, but practical suggestions such as uses 
of stale bread, and recipes for cornmeal muffins. Cakes without sugar 
were also displayed. On a table, in the middle of the hall; were placed 
various sam^ples of flours that could be substituted for wheat. Behind 

*This article was written by Mrs E. G. Potter, Chief Cataloguer of the Oakland 
Free Library, now probably "Somewhere in France" on Red Cross Civilian Relief 
Work. Slight modifications, with her consent, have been made in it. 



170 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

this sat a young woman in the food conservation uniform, ready to 
explain any question which might arise in the mind of the housewife 
and to furnish her with a food conservation pledge card. 

A poster fastened to the door of the Reference Room called attention 
to the food conservation table, where the latest books on home economics 
and food values had been placed, as well as a card catalog of helpful 
recipes. 

"Here's some of the best material in the library," said the head of 
the document department, holding out an armful of Farmer's Bulletins. 
"But I'm afraid it is useless to put them on the tables because no one 
will get beyond the dreary looking covers." 

"Let's dress them up." suggested one of the staff. "Look," she held 
up a pamphlet box. "We'll cover three or four of these with red, white 
and blue paper, paste pictures of honey cake and luscious cornbread on 
the outside, print the legend 'Suggestions from LTncle Sam,' and the 
curious housewife will not rest until she has peeped inside. ' ' 

So this is how we got our government documents before the Oakland 
public and how it has become known that the latest and most concise 
information for housewives is found tucked away in the bright-colored 
pamphlet boxes on the food conservation table. For of course the food 
conservation table has remained a permanent feature of the Oakland 
Library and the five hundred food conservation pledges secured during 
the week of the campaign was only the beginning of the library war 
work. 

Before the posters were taken from the walls a request came from a 
woman's club that it be allowed to use them for a food conservation 
meeting, and this suggested the plan of establishing a permanent collec- 
tion of war posters which might be borrowed as a whole or in part by 
any organization in the city. 

One of the members of the staff developed great talent in making 
artistic posters and another took the Red Cross course in dietetics so 
that she might be prepared to direct the poster and bulletin-board work. 
Gradually the poster collection of the Oakland Free Library began to 
be known and was in constant use, either at some club, school, or cooking 
demonstration. 

But while these posters were being displayed elsewhere new ones 
were constantly appearing on the two big bulletin boards, which had 
been retained in the library hall, and these were always supplemented 
by a food demonstration prepared by one of the domestic science 
departments of the public schools. One week would be "Save the 
AAHieat," and the posters would call for the use of rye and cornmeal, 
while the show case would display soy bean muffins, rye bread and corn- 
meal pan cakes ; and again our bulletin board would proclaim the saving 
of sugar and our show case would present samples of war candies made 
from honey, molasses and even potatoes and prunes. 

"But we must reach out beyond the walls of the library," we told 
ourselves; "We must make it known to those not frequenting the library 
that we have information on food conservation which is invaluable to 
the housewife." And so we sought the co-operation of the newspapers, 
and published lists of books dealing with home economics, and descrip- 
tions of the week's display of posters. But the spoken word is usually 



vol. 13, no. 2] LIBRARY WAR WORK. 171 

more effective than the written, so we established a lecture bureau and 
announced that any organization desiring information on food conserva- 
tion books need only to apply to the Librar3^ and not only would the 
room be hung with attractive posters and sample books displayed, but a 
speaker would be sent to tell them of the need of food conservation and 
the books which would prove most helpful to the housewife. 

Food conservation, however, is onl^y one phase of the war work which 
a library is called upon to do, and the Oakland Free Library has 
realized this keenly. At Christmas time the Red Cross Campaign was 
entered into with as much enthusiasm as the food conservation had 
been. A booth for subscription was placed in the hall and posters > 
pleading for new members for the Red Cross met the eye on all sides. 

Books for the soldiers was also taken up with much enthusiasm and a 
money campaign conducted which netted about six thousand dollars. 
Then came the call for the books themselves and within a few weeks 
thirty-three thousand books were collected, sorted, catalogued and 
twenty-seven thousand sent to camp libraries. The slogan for the cam- 
paign was furnished by a member of the library staff and resulted in a 
most unusual supply of good literature. 

"Old books and new books, 
But first of all good books. " 

This was the call that the library sent out. "Don't give the books 
that you like but the books that a soldier would like, ' ' was the key note 
that was sounded for the drive, with the result that the citizens selected 
the best books from their homes to send to our AVar libraries. 

Only the work of the main library has been described in detail, but 
each of the eleven city branches and the thirty -two county branches has 
been doing similar work to the limit of its opportunity. 

This has been but the beginning of the war work which the Oakland 
library expects to do. As a rule, other organizations touch only certain 
classes of citizens, but the library reaches out to all and the Council for 
Defense recognizing this calls upon the library as one of the first and 
most efficient organizations to present matters of national importance to 
the public. 



172 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

LIBRARY WAR PUBLICITY. 

By A. L. Co WELL.* 

I recently read in the Library Journal a discussion as to whether the 
Librarian's occupation should be regarded as a profession or just a job. 
Any doubt on this point must arise from failure to imderstand the scope 
of a real Librarian's work. 

There was a time when a public library was regarded as a charitable 
institution to furnish reading matter for those who were too poor or too 
stingy to buy it for themselves. Probably no librarian ever had that 
conception of the work, but now even those of us who may be denomin- 
ated rank outsiders are beginning to understand that the public library 
is an institution with twofold functions that vitally affect the whole 
social organism. In the first place, it is a part of our educational 
machinery, and, second, it is an important phase of our business 
machinery. 

In considering the library as an educational institution, it is impor- 
tant to remember that an educated person is not necessarily one who 
knows a lot, but one who knows how ; particularly, one who knows how 
to discern his needs, to find what he needs, and to apply what he finds 
to his needs. 

We have all probably forgotten most of what we learned at school, but 
that is not serious if we have retained the habit of mastering difficulties, 
which it is the chief purpose of schools to develop. Out of seven years 
study of Latin and eight years of Greek I still have a faint memory of 
the facts that "All Gaul is divided into three parts" and that, when a 
Greek of Pericles time became very angry and wanted to swear, he said 
"Pros ton Kynon," which means "by the dogs," and from which it 
appears that our "doggone it" has a classical origin. "While these 
memories may not have much practical value, I do not count the time 
spent on the classics as wasted. 

For those who have learned how to discern their needs and where to 
find what they need, the librarian has only to supply such material as 
may be called for, but the vast majority of us have learned the lesson 
imperfectly and therefore a great deal of effort is needed in order to 
bring to the attention of the public what the library contains and how 
it may be made of practical use to every person in the community. 

When considered as a part of the business machinery, the library 
seems naturally to demand publicity. Advertising is the life of busi- 
ness, and business men are so accustomed to judge of the importance of 
things by the degree of public attention they attract, that it is not 
strange if they overlook the possibilities of a library with an overmodest 
librarian. 

A great deal of the public's money is spent for the maintenance 
of libraries, and this expenditure can not be fully justified until every 
person to whom the library can render service has learned what it can 
do for him and has been induced to form the habit of using its facilities 
to the utmost. 

*Mr Cowell was formei-ly editor of the Stockton Mail, and is now an attorney in 
Stockton. 



vol. 13, UO. 2] LIBRARY WAR PUBLICITY. 173 

It was the vision of this possil)ility in library service for all the people 
that inspired ]\Ir James L. Gillis in his years of effort for a compre- 
hensive library system for California. 

The agencies of publicity are numerous. ]\Iost effective of all are 
undoubtedly the newspapers. Of great importance also are the activi- 
ties of the library itself. Are you sure that every person who comes to 
your library understands all that the library can do for him or her? 
If not, then, both by personal conversation and by printed slips 
inserted in books given out at the library, much valuable publicity may 
be given. ^Moreover, every patron has numerous friends who may be 
reached if the patron is interested. 

To secure proper co-operation with the schools is, of course, vital to 
the success of any library. The habit of using the library can best be 
developed in the child while at school, and if your teachers are not 
making the utmost practical use of your facilities you should find out 
why. 

Organizations are effective agencies of libraiy publicity. Every 
community has its churches, lodges, clubs, unions, botherhoods, sister- 
hoods, leagmes, guilds, alliances, associations and other social, business 
and professional organizations. All of them are interested in special 
problems. Some of them make good use of the library and others know 
little of its possibilities. Through letters to be read at their meetings 
and through news items in their special publications, effective publicity 
can be secured. 

Under various circumstances circular letters, book lists, charts, signs 
and special window displays will be found effective. 

We have read in the papers a great deal about "pitiless publicity." 
This is not the kind for which the Library should seek, but there are 
numerous adjectives in the same part of the dictionary which suggest 
methods of securing effective publicity. I suggest that library publicity 
be: Planned, Persistent, Pithy, Persuasive, Pat and Patriotic. 

In planning publicity, be sure to know the most effective agencies. 
Get personally acquainted with your newspaper men. Find out what 
kind of material they will publish and then try to give them all the real 
news of your work written in such style that it will be interesting to 
the readers of the papers. 

You are doubtless acciuainted with the school authorities in your 
territory, but perhaps you have not appreciated the importance of 
personal acquaintance with the officers of the various organizations 
represented in your community, particularity those of a business, indus- 
trial and professional nature, and yet this is of the utmost importance 
if you would make jowr librarv- effective as part of the business ma- 
chinery of your locality. 

Persistence in advertising is a cardinal virtue. If you do not get 
results as first, do not become discouraged, but studj' your methods to see 
whether the failure is in any measure your own fault or whether you are 
laboring to develop habits in the people, which must necessarily be a 
slow process. 

Pithy publicity is the only kind that counts in this busy age. If you 
have received a consignment of new books, do not give the newspapers 
a full list, which will be about as interesting to the average person as 



174 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 

the delinquent tax list, but pick out a few books and call attention to 
their striking features. 

Try to prepare your publicity so that it will appeal to the people. 
Every one is naturally interested in something and can be led from 
the object of his interest to something akin to it, whereas he might 
resent an attempt to lecture him. 

By ''Pat" I mean that the publicity should be adapted to the needs 
of the community and to the ability of the library to supply those needs. 
' ' Advertise what you have and have what you advertise " is a maxim of 
publicity. Incidentally, I might remark that you should boost the 
library and not the librarian. One of the most successful publicity 
experts known in history, the Apostle Paul, once remarked in explaining 
his methods, ' ' I magnify mine office. ' ' 

Having used up all my time in these introductory remarks, I come 
to the subject assigned to me, which is contained in the suggestion that 
your publicity should be Patriotic. 

Primarily, of course, the war service to be rendered by the libraries 
is in connection with the war work of the American Library Association. 
Unless peace comes soon, the funds which were raised a few months ago 
will be expended and more must be secured. The books which you are 
now collecting will be wornout and furthermore if our armies must be 
doubled, calls for more literature must be made. You have learned, in 
the campangns already undertaken, the fundamental lessons of success, 
and experience will teach you how to be even more efficient in the future. 

The movement for food conservation can receive special impetus 
through the libraries by the display of posters, by the distribution of 
circulars to your patrons and by calling attention to books and maga- 
zine articles on substitutes for foodstuffs that must be conserved and 
methods of drying and canning fruit and vegetables. 

We are about to enter upon a campaign to sell $3,000,000,000 in bonds 
of the Third Liberty Loan, and at all times the people have opportunity 
to invest in War Saving Stamps. Success in this financing depends 
upon arousing a general realization that the winning of the War is the 
business of every one of us. Of great value in making the War popular 
are such books as ''Over the Top" and "America's Case Against Ger- 
many" and magazine articles telling of the gigantic expenditures for 
which funds are needed. You can help wonderfully by giving the 
widest possible circulation to all such literature. 

I need not add that the best possible publicity for Liberty Bonds is to 
buy a bond and wear a button of the Third Liberty Loan. 



vol. 13, no. 2] HONOR roll. 175 



ROLL OF HONOR * 

Beals, Ralph A. — Santa Ana High School Library, Santa Ana. Librarian. 
Assistant Librarian, Camp Cody, New Mexico. 

Clarke, Alvan W. — Riverside Library Service School, 1915. Riverside. 
Employed by H. W. Wilson Co., New York, N. Y. Assistant Librarian, 
Camp Sevier, S. C. 

Davis, Lannes E. — Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Medical Department. 

Joeckel, Carlton B, — Berkeley Public Library, Berkeley. Librarian. First Lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. 

Leupp, Harold L. — University of California Library, Berkeley. Associate 
Librarian. First Lieutenant, Infantry. 

McAulay, Oscar — Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Medical Department. 

McCarthy, W. H. — Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Field Artillery. 

Marty, Albert — California State Library, Sacramento. Page. Sergeant, Avia- 
tion Section Signal Corps. 

Quire, Joseph H. — California State Library, Sacramento. Legislative Reference 
Librarian. Camp Librarian, Camp Kearny, California. 

Smeal, Miss Hilda — Riverside Library Service School, 1915, Riverside. Ambu- 
lance Driver. 

Smith, Eugene Ferry, San Diego Public Library, San Diego. Trustee. First 
Lieutenant, Aviation Section Signal Corps. 

Talbot, Sterling J. — Leland Stanford Junior University Library, Stanford 
University. Loan Desk Assistant. Assistant Librarian, Camp Fremont, 
California. 

Voge, A. Law — Mechanics-Mercantile Library, San Francisco. Reference 
Librarian. Captain, Engineers Division. 



*The California State Library will appreciate information of any corrections or 
additions. 



176 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA, SHOWING COUNTIES. 



3AN ntMCISCO 




33* N. « 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



LIST OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



177 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



statistics of July 1, 1917. 



Count; 



Income. 
1916-1917* 



Books, 
etc. 



3 hSo 
a pa 



Alameda 

Butte : 

Colusa 

Contra Costa — 

Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoc 

Monterey 

Napa 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino 

San Diego 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara. 
Santa Clara .— 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Tolo 



42 



Miss Mary Barmby 

Miss Essae M. Culver 

Miss Louise Jamme 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle— 

Miss Laura Robson 

Miss Ida M. Reagan 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman... 

Miss Blanche Chalfant 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock 

Miss Katharine Post Ferris 

Miss Lenala Martini 

Miss Celia Gleason 

Miss Mary E. Glock 

Miss Winifred H. Bigley.— 

Miss Anna L. Williams 

Miss Anne Hadden 

Not started 

Miss Dorothy L. Clarke..- 

Joseph P. Daniels 

Lauren W. Ripley 

Miss Mabel Coulterf 

Miss Caroline S. Waters. — 

Miss Jennie Herrman 

Miss Hattie M. Mann 

Not started 

Miss Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Miss Stella Huntington 

Miss Minerva H. Waterman 

Not started 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthom. 

Miss Clara B. Dills 

Not started 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines.. 

Miss Margaret Hatch 

Miss Estella De Ford 

Miss Alice Anderson 

Mrs Bessie Herrman Twaddle 

Miss Edna Holroyd 

Miss Julia Steffa 

Miss Eleanor Hitt 



Sept. 


26, 


Sept. 


3 


June 


8, 


July 


21, 


Mar. 


12, 


April 


8, 


May 


12, 


Feb. 


s, 


Sept. 


15, 


Nov. 


16, 


Jime 


4, 


Sept. 


7, 


Sept. 


5, 


May 


3, 


June 


6, 


July 


8, 


Aug. 


6, 


Feb. 


9, 


Sept. 


7, 


Nov. 


8, 


Oct. 


1, 


Feb. 


4, 


July 


14, 


April 


5, 


Mar. 


7, 


July 


6, 


Sept. 


5, 


Feb. 


16, 


July 


20, 


Oct. 


13, 


May 


10, 


June 


7, 


April 


6, 


May 


11, 


Aug. 


14, 


May 


9, 


Aug. 


8, 


Sept. 


8, 


June 10, 


July 


3, 


April 


9, 


July 


12, 



1910 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1917 
1915 
1914 
1916 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 



$25,443 99 
11,990 09 

6,154 46 
15,725 26 
31,887 02 

5,432 67 
12,120 82 

4,100 03 

8,389 69 
19,333 33 
13,713 82 

4,285 9S 
70,417 85 

9,737 15 
13,076 88 

1,000 00 
10,625 65 



49,233 
17,469 

3,953 
32,814 
48,756 

7,709 
10,625 
15,884 

6,573 
40,430 
31,220 

4,572 

157,088 

22,028 

28,688 



13,298 



50 
99 
27 
63 

115 
25 
39 
56 
28 
73 
53 
50 

263 
52 
54 

70 



5,073 40 
6,910 00 
16,932 83 



5,547 


65,246 



43 

67 

344 



15,350 49 
16,947 36 
10,825 00 



4,674 16 
10,678 00 
13,223 87 

1,870 95 



9,270 07 
10,229 93 



10,403 30 

6.683 00 

3,134 42 

18,340 45 



9,848 51 
17,185 96 



$449,016 43 



20,346 

29,046 





4,324 


18,908 




11,079 
12,836 



106 
44 



3,544 
3,373 

32,870 



8,396 
29,409 



58 
81 
40 
62 

166 
42 

109 
56 
26 

104 
43 
46 

203 
47 
71 
44 
92 
58 
31 
81 
8S 



90 
125 

92 
95 
39 
69 
92 
54 

107 
99 
57 

158 
68 
36 

67 
?5 
142 
34 



751,243 



2,441 



3,099 



*The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1916. 

tMiss Mabel Coulter began work on March 1. For branches, etc., see page 198. 

tMiss Lenala Martin began work on October 8, 1917. 



178 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 

Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1917. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. miles. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 2,377,549. 

Assessed valuation, $3,722,606,407. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 246,131. 
Assessed valuation, $259,500,935 (tax- 
able for county, .$237,549,114). 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Bai-mby, Acting Lib'n. 

A new branch was established at Ar- 
royo Sanatorium near Livennore. 

The branch at the County Inlivmary 
has been enlarged, made into two sections 
and is in much better working order. 

Two exhibits were held during March. 
One was for the Federation of Women's 
Clubs and its reason for being was to 
show what the libraries of California are 
doing to help win the war. 

The second, an exhibit at the County 
Teachers' convention, showing the Countj 
library work with county schools, was 
held in connection with the four High 
School libraries of Oakland. 

Work for food conservation and food 
production has been carried on quite ex- 
tensively through the county. The county 
librarians and attendants of the branches 
have been working in close relations with 
the District Food Chairman of each of 
the towns. 

Mary P«armby. 
Acting Librarian. 



Alameda Co. Infirmary 
AJjAmeda Co. Free Library, 

RENZO. 

See note under Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Alameda. 

§|| Alameda Free Public Library. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

INIrs Mary L. Marshall, Curator of the 
West End Reading Room died in the lat- 



Branch, 
San Lo- 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

Alameda — Continued, 
ter part of February of this year, and 
Mrs Mary C. Coughlin was elected to 
the position. The premises rented at the 
West End for library purposes and which 
are also used as a home by the incumbent 
are being put into repair. 

Miss Edna Schulte, formerly children's 
librarian, has been replaced by Miss Anna 
Macnamee, former substitute, and Miss 
Irene Thorns has been appointed substi- 
tute in her place. 

Marcella II. Krauth, 

Librarian. 

West End Branch, Alameda Public 
Library. 

See note under Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Berkeley. 

S±§ University of California Li- 
brary. Benj. Ide Wheeler, Pres. J. C. 
Rowell, Lib'n. 

Receipts for the last quarter include 
the private philosophical library of the 
late Professor George H. Howison (1235 
vols.) presented by Mrs Howison. In 
this collection are choice editions of 
philosophic authors, ancient and modern, 
and several incunabula. 

During the. semi-centenary in March a 
large display of photographs, portraits, 
and other material, to illustrate the his- 
tory of the University and the growth 
of the city of Berkeley, was shown at 
the library. 

J. C. Rowell, 

Librarian. 
Oakland. 

§j| Oakland Free [Public] Library. 
Chas. S. Green. Lib'n. 

The Twenty-third Avenue Carnegie 
Branch Library was opened on March 
14th with appropriate ceremonies under 
the control of the Garfield Civic Associ- 
ation. 

Mrs Potter, head of the Catalog Depart- 
ment, has been granted a seven months' 
leave of absence in order to spend six 
months in the Red Cross Civilian Relief 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



179 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
in Northern France. Sailing was slightly 
delayed but she will be doubtless "some- 
where in France" by the time this note 
is printed. 

The Book Drive for War Library 
Service was duly held in the week, Janu- 
ary 21 to 26. During that time the 
Women's Army, as it is called, gathered 
some thirty-three thousand books and 
many tons of magazines. These were 
gathered in six schoolhouses and a vacant 
store, and from there were brought in 
drays to the two vacant stores near the 
Library, the use of which was donated 
by the owners. From there all the month 
of February a stafP of workers sorted, 
classified, cataloged and pasted the books. 
As fast as ready they were shipped to 
Camp Fremont until twenty thousand had 
been sent. A thousand books each were 
also sent to Forts Miley, Baker and 
Barry, and to the Defenders' Club in 
Oakland, and to Sacramento for the Aero 
School, and smaller amounts to the 
Benicia Arsenal, and to the Benicia and 
Palo Alto Defenders' Clubs, and to the 
Radio Station at Loleta. 

The results have been salisfactory as 
shown by the following two paragraphs 
from Mr Henry, Librarian at Camp Fre- 
mont, dated February ISth : 

"I want to thank you and your staff 
and any one else who had a hand in send- 
ing us such quantities of books represent- 
ing the best the people in general are 
reading. I am curious to know when 
and how you got them. Our soldiers are 
enjoying supremely the opportunities the 
library affords." 

And from Mr Putnam, Librarian of 
Congress, dated February 22d : 

"Mr Henry has written me of the extra- 
ordinary aid that you and your staff have 
given in supplying books for the library 
at Camp Fremont. 

I hope you will believe our heartiest 
appreciation of this service — a service in- 
dispensable in a situation which we could 
not reach promptly nor effectively." 

On January 14th Mr Henri Richer of 
the French Artillery addressed the staff, 
and ]\Iarch .5th Mr Henry came up from 
Camp Fremont and talked interestingly 
about the work there. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 

From the IGth to 19th of January the 
local lodge of Elks held a Sportsmen's 
show in the Auditorium for money to 
mount the group of Elk for the Museum, 
and realized something over two thousand 
dollars for the expenses of the group. 

No examination for Assistant Librarian 
has yet been held because at no time 
could two persons be induced to apply 
for it. It is now set for May 23, 1918. 

The California Library Association's 
program committee held a meeting at the 
Librarian's house on March 25th and 
made large progress in planning out the 
events of the days from June ISth to 
22d. 

The Oakland Rotary Club has recog- 
nized the Library Profession by creating 
the classification in its membership, and 
has honored me by electing me to repre- 
sent the profession in the club. 

Chas. S. Greene. 

Librarian. 

||*MiLLS College, Margaret Carnegie 
LiDRARY. Aurelia IJenry Reinhardt, Pres. 
^liss Anna L. Sawyer, Lib'n. 

We have a War alcove now contain- 
ing books, pamphlets, files of the Official 
bulletin, of the War library bulletin, War 
work bulletin. Woman's war work division 
public information, and maps. 

Near by is a table containing pam- 
phlets on Food Conservation and recipes, 
and a glass case with an exhibit of flours, 
cereals, and "Honor rations" for a day 
or week. This exhibit is placed by Miss 
Vail, head of the Home Economics De- 
partment of Mills College. 

Anna L. Sawyer, 

Librarian. 

Oakland Technical High School 
Library. Philip M. Fisher, Prin. Miss 
Evelyn A. Steel, Lib'n. 

The libraiy has increased its usefulness 
this term by circulating books in the 
Continuation, School (afternoon and even- 
ing) which enrolls 5O0O students. By 
daily messenger service, a number of 
books are borrowed from the public li- 
brary to supplement the school collection 
which is not always adequate for adult 
requirements. The library room has be- 
come in some respects the social center 



180 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

Oakland— Continued, 
of the Evening School and the entrance 
of this new public adds many of the 
interesting functions of public library 
work to that of the regular school library. 
Evelyn A. Steel, 

Librarian. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 309. 
Assessed valuation $707, 19G (taxable 
for county $618,506). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class). 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 9086. 
Assessed valuation $6,719,872 (taxable 
for county $6,105,032). 



BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 27,301. 
Assessed valuation .$22,469,515 (taxable 
for county $20,320,630). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Essae M. Culver, Lib'n. 

On February 1, a branch was estab- 
lished in the Evansville School District. 

The fifth, eighth, and ninth library dis- 
tricts, comprising practically all of the 
counties of Superior California, held a 
joint meeting at Oroville, March 30. 
Essae M. Culver. 

Librarian. 

Chico. 

State Normal School Library. Al- 
lison B. Ware, Pres. Miss Dorothea L. 
Smith, Lib'n. 

A two hour course is beicg given by 
the Librarian, in Library Instruction. It 
is given in connection with one of the 
Education courses so that all students 
will receive the benefit of it. The aim of 
the course is to teach the students the use 
of the Normal Library, how to order and 
what to order for a school library, and 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 
Ch i CO — Continued, 
how to use the books when they have 
them. During the last quarter, Miss Cul- 
ver spoke to the students on the work of 
the County Library with the schools. 

The Training School Library is now 
under the direct supervision of the Li- 
brarian with two students assisting. It 
has been moved to a larger and sunnier 
room. Each class in the Training School 
spends one period a week in the library, 
reading and selecting books for home read- 
ing. 

Dorothea L. Smith, 

Librarian. 

Miss Smith will leave soon for France 
as index and filing secretary of the Stan- 
ford Women's Civilian Relief Unit. 

Evansville School Dist. (P. O. Hurle- 
ton; no exp. office.) 
Evansville School Dist. Branch, 
Butte Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 1, 1918. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 999 sq. mi. Pop. 9171. 
Assessed valuation $7,941,910 (taxable 
for county $7,443,255). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 7732. 
Assessed valuation $15,594,796 (taxable 
for county $15,201,960). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Miss Louise E. Jamme, Lib'n. 

On January 12, an entertainment was 
given by the people of Princeton to ob- 
tain money for the branch library there. 
An amount sufficient to cancel the entire 
indebtedness on the building was raised. — 
Willows Journal, Ja 16 

Princeton. 

Princeton Branch, Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

8ee note under Colusa Co. Free Library. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



181 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 31,674. 
Assessed valuation $56,122,790 (taxable 
for county $54,019,035). 

Contra Costa Co. Feee Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Wliitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at the Farm Buroau in Mar- 
tinez, at Moraga, Oakley, and in the fol- 
lowing school districts : Sycamore, and 
Vasco. 

The county library office has been once 
more enlarged by the addition of a mez- 
zanine floor. This additional space will 
be used for the picture collection filing 
case and for documents. 

During .January trips were made with 
the Food Demonstrator, Miss Eubank and 
the Farm Adviser, Mr Carl Nichols. 

On JMarch 16, the county office was open 
to visiting teachers working on the Ex- 
emption Board. Many took the oppor- 
tunity to drop in the office. ~ 

During February the following county 
library offices were visited : 

San Joaquin County ; Stanislaus County 
(visits being made to Oakdale and Tur- 
lock) ; Merced County (visits being made 
to the Atwater and Livingston branches) ; 
Fresno County (visits being made to 
Sanger, Selma and Fowler branches). 

During March a tour of the Alameda 
County branches was made with the 
County Librarian Miss Barmby aud Miss 
Dills of Solano County. 

Carl F. Adam has been appointed 
custodian of the Oleum Branch at Oleum. 

Mrs Ijillian Wightman is now custodian 
of Oakley Branch, succeeding Mrs C. J. 
Wood. 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

Librarian. 

Contra Costa Co. Farm Adviser 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established January 25, 1918. 
Moraga. 

Moraga Branch, Contra Costa Co. 

Free Library, was established .January 

7, 1918. 

Oakley. 

Oakley Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library. 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 
Oleum. 

Oleum Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library. 

*S'pe note under Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library. 

Sycamore School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Danville). 
Sycamore School Dist. Branch, 
Contra Costa Co. Free I^ibrary, was 
established in January, 1918. 

Vasco School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Byron). 
Vasco School Dist. Branch, Con- 
tra Costa Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fiftj'-sixth class.) 
County seat Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2417. 
Assessed valuation $5,042,089 (taxable 
for county $4,997,389). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 7492. 
Assessed valuation $7,328,185 (taxable 
for county $7,011,980). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5940 sq. mi. Pop. 75,657. 
Assessed valuation $99..386,409 (taxable 
for county $93,342,023). 

Fresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished at Ivirk, and in the following school 
districts : Central, Firebaugh, Kingsburg 
Joint Union, Mt. Campbell, Oakhurst, and 
Riverbend. 

On March ISth. we opened a new 
branch at the Fink-Smith playground and 
on March 21st, one at California Field 
playground. These branches are located 
in the playground club houses, and we 
have had bookcases, tables and chairs in- 
stalled. The children and grown people 
in the neighborhoods are gradually be- 



182 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



FRESNO CO.— Continued, 
coining acquainted with the branches and 
they are being used. Miss Emma Wienke 
is in charge of these playground branches. 

Two of our assistants have gone to 
Washington to work for the government. 
Aliss Maude Mast, who had charge of the 
school department, is a filing clerk in the 
Ordnance Department and Miss Jeannette 
Morgan, head cataloger, is helping with 
the War Insurance work. 

Miss Margaret Dold, recentlj^ of Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, now has 
charge of the cataloging and Miss Genevra 
Brock has taken Miss blast's place as head 
of the school department. 

Miss Lura Weems has resigned and 
Miss Dorothy Duncan has been appointed 
to her place. Miss June Curtis of Vi- 
salia and Miss Emma Wienke have been 
added to the staff. 

Miss McCardle attended the meeting of 
the Sixth District of the C. L. A. at Camp 
Keary on March 9th and the joint 
meeting of the Fifth, Eighth and Ninth 
Districts at Oroville, on March 30th. 
Sabah E. 2>IcCarule. 

Librarian. 

Central School Dist. (P. O. Selma, 
Route B, box 286; exp. Selma). 

Centeal School Dist. BRA^ic^^ 
Fkesno Co. Fkee Libeaey, was estab- 
lished March 30, 1918. 

Firebaugh Joint School Dist. 

Firebaugh Joi^t School Dist. 
Branch, Fresno Co. Free Libraey, was 
established January 4, 1918. 
Fresno. 

California Field Playground 
Branch, Fresno Co. Free Library, was 
established March 21, 1918. 

Fink-Smith Playground Beanch, 
Feesno Co. Free Libeaey, was estab- 
lished March IS, 1918. 

IIFeesno High ScirooL Libraey. 
P'rederick Liddeke, Prin. Miss Dorotha 
Davis, Lib'n. 

Miss Dorotha Davis. California State 
Library School. '17, became librarian on 
January 8, 1918. — Fresno RepuhJican, 
Ja 8 

Kingsburg Joint Union School Dist. 

KiNGSBURG Joint Union School 
Dist. Bbanch. Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established January .5, 1918. 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 
Kirk (P. O. and exp. Fresno, c/o Fresno 
Co. Free Library). 
KiEK Branch, Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established February 6, 1918. 

Mt. Campbell School Dist. (P. O. Reed- 
ley, Route B, box 307; exp. Reedley). 
Mt. Campbell School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 22, 1918. 

Oakhurst School Dist. (P. O. Sanger, 
Route B; exp. Sanger). 
Oakhurst School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 19, 1918. 

Riverbend School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Parlier). 
Riverbend School Dist. Branch, 
Fresno Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 19, 1918. 

GLENN COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1400 scj. mi. Pop. 7172. 
Assessed valuation -$17,391,600 (taxable 
for county .$17,034,772). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
]Miss Laura Robson, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Black Butte, and in the 
following school districts : Black Butte, 
Elk Creek Union, Emerald, Emigrant, 
Fairview, Hamilton Union High, and 
Oakdale. 

Jan. 8 — Entire community at Bayliss 
turns out to grade lot on which Carnegie 
branch building stands. There were fif- 
teen teams with scrapers and men with 
shovels who gave up the day and almost 
finished preparing the ground for the tree- 
planting a short time later. The women 
of the community served lunch to all the 
workers at the nearest home. 

Jan. 17 — Hamilton City branch moves 
back into the bank building from which 
it had moved after the fire of last fall. 

Feb. 28 — Mrs Rebecca Lambert, As- 
sistant County Librarian, gives talk be- 
fore Jacinto Domestic Science As.sociation 
on thrift stamps. 

March 16 — Tree-planting day at Bay- 
liss. Laura Robson, 

Librarian. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



183 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 
Bayliss (P. O. Glenn; exp. Willows). 
Bayliss Branch, Glenn Co. Free Li- 

IIKARY. 

See note under Glenn County Free Li- 
brary. 

Black Butte (P. O. and exp. Orland). 

Black Butte Branch, Glenn Co. 
I'kee Library, was established February 
4, 19iS. 

Black Butte School Dist. Branch. 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 4, 1918. 
Elk Creek Union School Dist. (Exp, 
Fruto). 

Elk Creek Union School Dist. 
Branch, Glenn Co. Free Library, was 
et.^tablished February 20, 1918. 
Emerald School Dist. (P. O. Elk Creek; 
exp. Fruto). 

EjiiiRALD School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 12, 1918. 
Emigrant School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Oiland). 

Emigrant School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, wa.s estab- 
lished February 1, 1918. 
Fairview School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Willows). 

Fairview School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 1, 1918. 

Hamilton City. 

Hamilton City Branch, Glenn Co. 
I REE Library. 

See note under Glenn County Free Li- 
brary. 

FIamilton Union High School Dist. 
Branch, Glenn Co. Free Library, was 
established February 6, 1918. 
Oakdale School Dist. (P. O. Elk Creek; 
exp. Fruto). 

Oakdale School Dist. Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 11, 1918. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 

County seat. Eureka. 

Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 33,857. 

Assessed valuation $32,940,942 ( taxable 
for county $31,926,017). 

Humboldt Co. Free Library. Miss 
Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 



HUMBOLDT CO. — Continued. 

On February 25, a branch was estab- 
lished in Trinity School District. 

Willow Creek Branch has been moved 
to the hotel. Theo Vandervoort resigned 
and Mrs George Smith is now in charge. 

Fieldbrook School District Branch is 
now conducted as both a school and com- 
munity branch. 

Mrs .John Holt resigned as custodian 
of Field's Landing Branch February first 
and Miss Genevieve Bovvman was ap- 
pointed custodian, the branch being moved 
to Miss Bowman's home. 

Mrs Clara Briggs, custodian of the 
Fortuna branch, has conducted a most 
successful story hour for the children of 
the lower grades during the winter mouths. 
One Friday afternoon is devoted to the 
children of the primary grades and on the 
alternate Friday the children of the sec- 
ond and third grades are given the time. 
Each Friday afternoon there are between 
thirty and forty children in attendance. 
Mrs Briggs finds with her other library 
duties that she has not the time for story 
telling for the children of the higher 
grades. 

During the week previous to March ISth 
the county librarian visited all the com- 
munities in which there were Women's 
Clubs and enlisted the club members in 
the campaign for books for the camp li- 
braries. In communities where there 
were no clubs, the custodian of the branch 
library conducted the work. Up to April 
first between fifteen hundred and two 
thousand books had been reported as hav- 
ing been collected in the territory outside 
of Eureka. Ida M. Reagan. 

County Librarian. 

Fieldbrook School Dist. (P. O. Field- 
brook; no exp. office). 

Fieldbrook School Dist. Branch, 
Humboldt Co. Free Library. 

See note under Humboldt County Free 
Library. 

Field's Landing (Exp. South Bay). 

Field's Landing Branch, Humboldt 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Flumboldt County Free 
Library. 

Fortuna. 

FofiTUNA Branch, Humboldt Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Humboldt County Free 
Library. 



184 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



HUMBOLDT CO.— Continued. 
Trinity School Dist. (P. O. Willow 
Creek; no exp. office). 
Trinity School Dist. Branch, Hum- 
boldt Co. Free Library, was established 
February 2.5, 1918. 

Willow Creek (No exp. office). 

Willow Creek Branch, Humbolddt 
Co. Free Library. 

*S'ee note under Humboldt County Free 
Library. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 
County seat. El Centro. 
Area, 4140 sq. mi. Pop. 13,591. 
Assessed valuation $30,096,403 (taxable 
for county $27,934,400). 

iMi'ERiAL Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
tro. Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established in Holtville High School, and 
in the following school districts : Alamitos. 
Alamorio, Imperial Grammar, Laguua, 
Magnolia, Mesquite Lake, and Verde. 

The custodian of Calipatria Branch is 
now Miss Audrey Patterson. 

A window exhibit was made in March 
to introduce the French relief work for 
the fatherless children of France. Head- 
ing was made of "War work for women." 
One poster was of a poverty-stricken look- 
ing child, saying "Help the fatherless 
children of France." The window was 
filled with baby clothes made from old 
clothes, and hats, etc. It was quite a re- 
markable display and aroused the interest 
of many people who want to adopt an 
orphan, and of women who have volun- 
teered to make the clothes for the babies 
and children. We are starting a section 
for that work here. 

Up to date we have received 1400 books 
for the soldiers. All branches and schools 
have not reported as yet. These are being 
pasted and written by High School girls. 

A war luncheon for all the committees 
engaged in war work and for all women 
of Imperial County was held in March. 
The County Librarian gave a talk on the 
War library work, and made a plea for 
donations of their best books. 

Mrs Thos. B. Beeman, 

Librarian. 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
Alamitos School Dist. (P. O. Holtville, 
Box 162; exp. Holtville). 
Alamitos School Dist. Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in January, 1918. 

Alamorio School Dist. (P. O. Brawley, 
Box 527; exp. Brawley). 
Alamorio School Dist. Branch, Im- 

i-erial Co. Fbee Library, was established 
in January, 1918. 

Calipatria. 

Calipatria Branch, Imperial Co. 
I'ree Library. 

(S'ee note under Imperial County Free 
Library. 

Holtville. 

Holtville Union High School 
Branch, Imperial Co. Free Library, 
was established in JSIarch, 1918. 

This High School joined on the basis of 
paying the County Library $25 annually 
and receiving debate service, English 
classics in sets, and any other books which 
they may need. 

Imperial Grammar School Dist. (P. O. 

and exp. c/o .J. J. Morgan, Imperial). 

Imperial Grammar School Dist. 
Branch, Ijiperial Co. Free Library, 
was established March 11, 1918. 

Laguna School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Potholes). 
Laguna School Dist. Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in February, 1918. 

Magnolia School Dist. (P. O. Brawley, 
R.F.D.) 
Magnolia School Dist. Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in January, 1918. 

Mesquite Lake School Dist. (P. O. Im- 
perial, R.F.D. 1; exp. Imperial). 
Mesquite Lake School Dist. 
Branch, Imperial Co. Free Library, 
was established in January, 1918. 

Verde School Dist. (P. O. Holtville, 
R.F.D. ; exp. Holtville). 
Verde School Dist. Branch, Im- 
perial Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in February, 1918. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



185 



INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seveuth class.) 
Countj' seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 6974. 
Assessed valuation $9,120,875 (taxable 
for county $7,857,570). 

Inyo Co. Free Libraey, Independ- 
ence. Miss Blanche Chalfant, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Manzanar and Tecopa. 

Blanche Chalfant, 

Librarian. 

Manzanar School Dist. (No exp. office). 
Manzanar School Dist. Branch, In- 
yo Co. Free Library, was established 
January IS, 1918. 

Tecopa. 

Tecopa School Dist. Branch, Inyo 
Co. Free Library, was established Feb- 
ruary 14, 1918. 



KERN COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 37,715. 
Assessed valuation $90,482,114 (taxable 
for county $82,934,274), 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield, 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Standard Pipe Line and in 
the following school districts : Belridge, 
Brundage, and McKittiick. 

Julia G. Babcock, 

Librarian. 

Miss Florence Wheaton has accepted 
a position as cataloger of the Kern Co. 
Free Library. — Bakersfield Californian, Ja 
14 

The proposed Delano Branch building 
will probably not be erected until after 
the July budget when more funds will be 
available. — Bakersfield Echo, Mr 7 

Bakersfield. 

§Beale Mejiorial [Free Public] Li- 
brary. Miss Sarah E. Bedinger, Lib'n. 

The circulation of the library continues 
to grow in spite of interest taken in War 
activities, the Red Cross and surgical 
dressing taking the time of even our 



KERN CO.— Continued. 
Bakersfield — Continued, 
youngest readers. The story hour in both 
branches iias been well attended, averag- 
ing about fifty to seventy-five at each 
place. 

Miss Nelle Sauford, cataloger of the 
Beale Memorial Library, was granted a 
six months leave of absence to go 'to 
Washington, D. C, as an ludexer in the 
War Insurance Department. The posi- 
tion here will not be filled until later. 

The drive for books for the soldiers 
resulted in about five hundred books. 
These have been labeled and cataloged 
by author and title and most of them 
shipped to Camp Kearny. We are con- 
tinuing to receive books and are in hopes 
of receiving many more. 

Sarah E. Bedinger, 

Librarian. 
Belridge School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
McKittrick). 

Belridge School Dist. Branch, Kern 
Co. Free Library, was established Feb- 
luary 4, 1918. 

Brundage School Dist. (P. O. R.F.D. 2, 
Bakersfield; exp. Bakersfield). 

Bkundagg School Dist. Branch, 
Kern Co. Free Library, was established 
Januiry 18, 1918. 

McKittrick. 

McKittrick School Dist. Branch, 
Kern Co. Free Ijbrary, was established 
January 22, 1918. 

Standard Pipe Line (P. O. and exp. 
Lost Hills). 

Standard Pipe Line Branch, Kern 
Co. Free Library, was established Janu- 
ary 9, 1918. 

Taft. 

Conley High School Library. Miles 
E. Valentine. Prin. 

Our library has been cataloged and our 
card index is being completed. Wi- have 
added since Jan. 1, Lodge's History of 
the Nations (25 vols.), Henley edition of 
Shakespeare (10 vols.), Eliot's Harvard 
Classics (51 vols.), and about 20 vols, to 
supplement history and civics, including 
Sutton's Civics of California. Our addi- 
tions for the year to date will number 
about 250 vols. 

Miles E. Valentine, 

Principal. 



186 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



KINGS COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 

County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1257 sq. mi. Pop. 16,230. 
Assessed valuation .$17,530,180 (taxable 
for county $16,928,595). 

Kings Co. Fkee LiBEARy, Ha?vford. 
Miss Katharine Post Ferris, Lib'n. 

On February 23, a branch was estab- 
lished in the County Farm Advisor's 
office. 

Miss Mabel Coulter, first assistant, left 
the seventh of February to become li- 
brarian of the San Benito County Free 
Library. Her faithful service had no 
small part in the upbuilding of the library. 
Miss Marion Morse was appointed first 
assistant to succeed Miss Coulter, and 
Miss Mary Webb received a temporary 
appointment as second assistant, begin- 
ning her duties March 7th. 

Miss Cornelia Provines. of vStanislaus 
County, visited the library February Sth, 
to study the service to the schools. Her 
stay was all too short, and delightful as 
well as helpful to us. 

As a result, of the recent book drive 
more than 350 books were received with 
many districts yet to be heard from. A 
large proportion of these were donated 
by the schools. 

Katharine Post Fekris, 

Librarian. 

Miss Ferris returned to Kings County 
on February 1. 

Kings Co. Fabm Advisor Branch, 
Kings Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 23, 1918. 

Hanford. 

Hanford Union High School Li- 
brary. Harry Shafer. Prin. Miss Leona 
M. Kreyenhagen, Lib'n. 

The school Service Flag and Junior 
Red Cross Charter are hung in the library. 

The students have contributed books to 
A. L. A. War camp collection through 
this library. 

All war posters have been posted in 
the library and a special war bulletin 
board is kept up to date by pupils. 
Leona M. Kreyenhagen, 

Librarian. 



LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5526. 
Assessed valuation $4,963,849 (taxable 
for county $4,942,119). 

Kelseyvilie. 

Kelseyville Free Library. Mrs R. 
T. W. Smith, Lib'n. 

Mrs R. T. W. Smith has succeeded Mrs 
Gladys Orcutt as librarian of Kelseyville 
Free Library. 

Mrs R. T. ^Y. Smith, 

Librarian. 

Lakeport. 

Lakeport [Free] Pubijc Library. 
Mrs Kate M. White, Lib'n. 

The new Carnegie Library Building 
was opened on February 18. — Lakeport 
Bee, F 20 



LASSEN COUNTY, 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 4802. 
Assessed valuation $8,189,314 (taxable 
for county $8,015,218). 

Las SEN" Co. Free Library, Susan'- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at the Lassen County Hos- 
pital and at Gibson. The Ravendale 
Branch has been temporarily discon- 
tinued. 

F. F. Woodmansee resigned as cus- 
todian of Bieber Branch and J. F. Sal- 
cido was appointed to take his place. 

Mrs Nellie H. Patten resigned as cus- 
todian of Doyle Branch and Mrs A. J. 
Hall was appointed as temporary custo- 
dian. 

Out of 42 schools served in Lassen 
County 27 are served as community 
branches, making 37 community branches 
and a total of 79 branches served by the 
County Library. 

Miss Florence Boggs resigned Febru- 
ary 28th to accept a position with the 
Hallowell Hardware Co. 

Lenala A. Martin, 

Librarian. 



"vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



187 



LASSEN CO.— Continued. 

Lassen Co. Hospital Bkanch, Las- 
sen Co. Free Libkaky, was established 
March 11, 1918. 

Lassen Co. Teaciieks' Libeaey, 
susanville. 

Mrs Julia Noi-wood has become Co. 
Supt. of Schools in place of F. Brunhouse, 
who died March 13. 

Bieber (No exp. office). 

Biebee Branch, Lassen Co. Feee Li- 
brary. 

See note under Lassen County Free Li- 
brary. 

Doyle. 

Doyle Branch, Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Lassen County Free Li- 
brary. 

Gibson (P. O. Litchfield). 

Gibson Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library, was established March 4, 1918. 

Ravendale. 

Ravendale Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Lassen County Free Li- 
brary. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 3957 sq. mi. Pop. 504,131. 
Assessed valuation $1,001,443,960 (tax- 
able for county $810,227,315. 

Los Angeles Co. Free Library, Los 
Angeles. Miss Celia Gleason, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Fairmont, Honby, and in 
Sterling School District. 

Celia Gleason, 

Librarian. 

Aihambra. 

Alhambra [Free] Public Libeary. 
Miss Irene Kent, Acting Lib'n. 

Miss Irene Kent, a graduate of the 
Syracuse University Library School, is 
DOW serving as acting librarian, succeed- 
ing Mrs Mary Smith, resigned. — Alham- 
bra Advocate, F 15 

Miss Vivian Mackenzie, a graduate of 
Western Reserve University Library 
School, became assistant on March 4. — 
Alhambra News, Mr 5 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Claremont. 

i§ Pomona College Library. James A. 
Blaisdell, Pres. Victor B. Marriott, 
Lib'n. 

The Library has recently received as a 
gift a bronze bust of Benjamin Franklin. 
The bust is a replica of the head of the 
large statue on the Chestnut street front 
of the U. S. Post Office in Philadelphia. 
There is a replica of the entire statue in 
the neighborhood of the Place Trocadero, 
Rue Franklin, Paris. 

A splendid purchase has been made for 
the Mason California Collection in the 
securing of a set of B. F. Steven's Fac- 
similes of Manuscripts in European 
Archives relating to America, 1773-1783. 
Beautifully printed on hand-made paper. 
Twenty-five vols., folio, new half morocco 
extra L. 1889. 

A drive for books was carried out in 
conjunction with the Branch of the 
County Free Library during the week 
March 18 to 25, in which over IGOO books 
were secured. As the population of Clare- 
mont can not be estimated at more than 
1500, it means that the average was 
something over one book for every person 
in Claremont. 

Victor E. Marriott, 

Librarian. 

Eagle Rock. 

Eagle Rock [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Blanche A. Gardiner, Lib'n. 

The Eagle Rock Public Library has 
installed a bulletin board iipon which are 
posted all economy recipes for the table. 
Some of these are tried recipes from local 
housewives and some are sent to us by 
various clubs, organizations and also from 
the government. Liberty Loan posters, 
Red Cross notices and posters from the 
U. S. Food Administration adorn the 
walls. Free pamphlets pertaining to the 
war may be had upon request. 

Blanche A. Gardiner, 

Librarian. 
Fairmont. 

Fairmont Branch, Los Angeles Co. 
Free Library, was established in Feb- 
ruary, 1918. 

Glendaie. 

Glendale Union High School Li- 
brary. George U. Moyse, Prin. Edith 
May Church, Lib'n. 



4—37615 



188 



NEWS NOTES OP CxiLIFORNlA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Glen dale — Continued. 

The most interesting event in connec- 
tion with the library was the book race, 
during the drive week, to get books for 
(lie soldier boys, the boys against the girls. 
They only had four days to collect the 
books. Six magazines of the same kind, 
constituted a volume. 

The whole school is divided into what 
are called consultation groups, girls and 
boys separate. There are about twenty- 
six of these groups. Each group col- 
lected its books and at a general assembly, 
reported the number of books and number 
of students. Three fast accountants kept 
score ; one from the faculty, and a boy 
and a girl to represent each side. 

The girls won by a majority of two 
hundred books. The total score was 1414 
volumes. The highest percentage in con- 
sultation groups was made by the girls. 

The boys were quite chagrined to be 
beaten by the girls, and are still bringing 
in books for the soldier boys. 

Edith M. Church, 

Librarian. 

Teopico Brakch, Glendale Free 
Public Library. Charles H. Gushing, 
Lib'n. 

The Tropico Library became automat- 
ically a branch of the Glendale Library in 
January and has since that time been 
under the supervision of Mrs Danford, 
the Glendale Librarian. 

As the consolidation of the two cities 
left the city clerk's ofBce vacant in the 
old Tropico City Hall, the lower floor of 
the building was remodeled and all con- 
verted to library uses. This more than 
doubles the floor space of the library, giv- 
ing us a commodious reading room on one 
side and circulating department on the 
other with charging desk in the center. 

A workroom has also been provided and 
the library hours increased. It is now 
open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. An assistant 
from the main library is in charge during 
the morning. 

Charles H. Gushing, 

Librarian. 

Glendora. 

Glendora [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Harriet Gifford, Lib'n. 

I have collected for the soldiers and 
sailors, eighty books of fiction. The 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Glendora — Continued, 
people are glad to do this little and I 
expect to get quite a few more. I am 
using government posters and posters of 
my own designing, in every way possible, 
to call the attention of the people to the 
needs of our boys and the work we must 
do at home. The middle of May the 
schools will display at the library, posters 
made by each grade on food conservation, 
and ways of helping to win the war. 
Harriet Gifford, 

Librarian. 

Honby. 
HoNBY Branch, Los Ange:les Co. 
Free Library, was established in Janu- 
ary, 1918. 

Long Beach. 

§!iLoNG Beach [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Zaidee Brown, Lib'n. 

Changes in the Staff. During the first 
quarter of the year, the library has lost 
(hree valuable members, who have gone to 
Washington to work for the War Depart- 
ment. Those leaving were Helen Court- 
right, assistant librarian ; Gladys Hanna, 
desk assistant ; and Marion Gwinn, as- 
sistant in the children's room. We miss 
them all, and our only consolation is that 
they are doing needed work for the gov- 
ernment. 

Miss Helen Donnan, formerly librarian 
of the Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids, 
la., and Miss Mary Goodfellow, a gradu- 
ate of the Riverside library school, have 
been added to the staff during the quarter. 
Miss Corina Kittelson, formerly of the 
Denver Public Library, and the Kern 
County Library, will join the staff in 
April. We are meeting the difiiculties 
caused by losing some of our workers, in 
part, by employing more high school boys 
as pages. They now do most of the 
putting away of books and shelf straight- 
ening. 

Art Gallery. In January, the Art Gal- 
lery showed a collection of water colors 
by Carl Oscar Borg, and a smaller collec- 
t-on by Miss Grace E. McKinstry. Fol- 
lowing this was an exhibit of reproduc- 
tions of famous European pictures, loaned 
by the Los Angeles Public Library. 

In March, the traveling exhibit of the 
California Art Club, and a collection of 
paintings by Max Wieczorek, were shown. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBE^VRIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



189 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued. 

Library Work for Food Conservation. 
The library has been most fortunate in 
securing Mrs C. C. Adams as a volunteer 
worker to take charge of the educational 
work on food conservation that the li- 
braries are asked to do by the government. 
Mrs Adams is thoroughly trained in 
domestic science, and has been chairman 
of the home economics section of the 
state federation of women's clubs. She 
has enlisted several other women to help 
her, and in the last two months much has 
been accomplished. 

First, the library has been advertised 
as headquarters for information on war 
food. A bulletin board, and a collection 
of books and pamphlets, are placed in a 
prominent place on the main floor. An 
information desk on food is near ; and a 
volunteer worker is here all the afternoon, 
and part of the morning, to answer ques- 
tions. Free recipes are kept here for 
distribution ; and a classified file of tested 
recipes, for reference. Samples of the 
new flours are also on exhibit, and help 
to attract the attention of the public. 

Realizing that many housewives never 
come to the library, but that all go to 
the grocery store, we have used the stores 
as aids in educating the women. The li- 
brai'y printed 150 large posters, reading 
as follows : 

''Help win our war ty feeding hungry 
Europe. Europe needs certain foods; tve 
can use suhstitutes. The Long Beach 
Public Library is headquarters for icar 
food information. Read the bulletin 
board. Ask for publications. A food ex- 
pert is at the library in the afternoons to 
ansiver questions. This grocery distrib- 
utes war food recipes furnished by the 
library. Ask for a recipe when you buy 
a new kind of flour." 

The library printed at the same time 
5000 copies each of five recipes for the 
new flours. These were supplied to the 
grocers for distribution to customers who 
wanted information on using the substi- 
tute flours they are now compelled to buy. 
The distribution of the posters and recipes 
to the 150 grocers of the city was done 
without cost or effort on the part of the 
library, through the countesy of Mr 
Steepleton, the secretary of the local 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued. 

Merchants' and Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion. The cost of printing posters and 
recipes was about $20. 

Mills College has published a little 
pamphlet of recipes, called "War breads 
and meat substitutes." We learned that 
if we would take 1000 of these, we could 
secure them for $16.00 ; though in smal- 
ler quantities they cost 10 cents each. 
The Chamber of Commerce advanced the 
money to buy 1000, and we have sold 
several hundred at the library for two 
cents each. They are to be on sale also 
at the Y. W. C. A. cafeteria, which will 
offer on its bill of fare some of the foods 
noted in the pamphlet. 

Through the co-operation of Mrs Adams 
and Miss Franklin, head of the art work 
in the grade schools, all the children from 
the fifth through the eighth grades were 
required to make posters on food con- 
servation. The results were surprisingly 
clever and interesting. About 300 of the 
best posters were exhibited for two weeks 
at the main library. One reason for re- 
quiring the posters was to impress the 
food rules on the minds of the children ; 
and through them to reach their parents. 

Special articles on our work for food 
conservation have been printed in the local 
papers, and Mrs Adams and her helpers 
have spoken before several women's or- 
ganizations. 

Books for Soldiers. Owing to the small 
number on our staff at this time, and 
other local conditions, this library did not 
make an intensive campaign for books 
during the week in March specified. The 
public was invited to bring books to the 
library, posters were placed about town, 
and notices put in the papers. Our plan 
is to start a steady stream of books, and 
keep up the collection indefinitely. About 
700 books have been received to date. 
Zaidke Brown, 

Librarian. 

A new branch library building has been 
opened at Burnett. — Long Beach Tele- 
gram, F 13 

Burnett Branch, Long Beach Pub- 
lic Library. 

See note under Long Beach Public Li- 
brary. 



190 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles. 

$§Los Angeles [Fkee] Public Li- 
braky. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The big event for us in the first quarter 
of 1918 was the book drive for the soldiers. 
\Ye have collected about 50,000 books. If 
we did not have much assistance from the 
outside we could not handle them, but 
fortunately a number of public-spirited 
women are giving generously of their 
lime. We have shipped nearly 10,000 to 
Camp Kearny, and in accordance (with in- 
structions from Washington plan to send 
10,000 more to Camp Cody in New Mex- 
ico, 1,000 to Camp Balboa, San Diego, 
1,500 to San Pedro, and 1,000 to Nogales. 
EvEBETT R. Perky, 

Librarian. 

A collection of rare autographs owned 
by Dr B. L. Riese of Chicago is now 
on exhibit at the library. — Los Angeles 
Herald, F 27. 

California Society Sons of the 
Revolution and California Society 
OF Colonial Wars Library. Pierson W. 
Banning, Sec. Willis M. Dixon, in charge 
of lib's. 

A Book Campaign was started to in- 
crease the library. The result is that it 
has developed from 1700 volumes to .5000 
or more. — Extract from The Liherty Bell, 
Ap 1918 

*District Court of Appeal, 2d Dist., 
Library. W. H. Morris, Lib'n. 

Seventy-five volumes have been added 
to the library. 

Wm. H. Morris, 

Librarian. 

Gardena Agricultural High School 
Library. John H. Whitely, Prin. Vir- 
ginia A. La Gue, Lib'n. Miss Jean 
Doan, Acting Lib'n. 

Miss Virginia A. La Gue, former li- 
brai'ian of Gardena High School, has 
taken a leave of absence for a year be- 
ginning Janxiary 14th, and Miss Jean 
Doan, assistant librarian of Los Angeles 
High School, was appointed to fill her 
place as librarian. 

This school was very successful in the 
recent book campaign for donations to the 
War Service Libraries. The quality of 
books given was very gratifying, as well 
as the quantity. 

Jean Doan, 
Acting Librarian. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

Lincoln High School Library and 
Deposit Station. Los Angeles Public 
Library. Miss Ethel P. Andrews, Prin. 
Ella S. Morgan, Lib'n. 

Nine hundred and fourteen books and 
bound magazines have been added to the 
library since school opened in September. 
Many pamphlets have also been added, 
largely agricultural in subject matter. 

The pupils and teachers contributed 
more than 5.50 books to the collection for 
the Soldiers and Sailors Camp Libraries. 

The change to one hour periods the 
term beginning February 1. has made 
"study periods" the exception rather than 
the rule as formerly, so -that many pupils 
come now to the library during the latter 
or study part of the recitation period, 
by permission of the recitation teacher. 
The librarian has thus an opportunity to 
instruct the pupils in the methods of find- 
ing the definite reference they have come 
for. Use of catalog, magazine indexes, 
etc., is therefore more easily remembered 
by the pupils, when they have been of 
actual personal use toward a definite end. 
This was the weak spot in much of the 
lecture work on use of books and li- 
braries — lack of personal curiosity at the 
time the instruction was given. Teach- 
ers often bring a class for the whole or 
part of the period, to direct them to 
certain reading or to see pictures. This 
is an ideal working out of the "supervised 
study" idea. 

Ella S. Morgan, 

Librarian. 

State Normal School Library. 
Ernest C. Moore, Pres. Miss Elizabeth 
H. Fargo, Lib'n. 

The most important work of the library 
during the last quarter was the collecting 
of books for the soldiers. Eight hundred 
and thirty- two volumes were donates by 
the students and their friends for the first 
book drive. During the Christmas vaca- 
tion these books were prepared for Camp 
Kearny Library by the staff and shipped 
early in January. Six hundred and forty- 
seven volumes have been collected thus 
far for the second drive and books are 
still coming in. These will be prepared 
for circulation by the students of the 
school. One afternoon each week will be 
given over to war service bv the entire 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



191 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
student body and all war activities will 
be in operation here under competent in- 
structors and supervisors for the re- 
mainder of the school year. 

Miss Charlotte Thomas of Claremont 
and Miss Daisy Lake of the Normal Li- 
brary staff spent their Easter vacation 
week at Camp Kearny assisting in the 
work of the library. 

Misses Fargo and Phillips attended the 
session of the California School Library 
Association at Riverside February 2, 
1918. All members of the library staff 
attended the Sixth District meeting of the 
California Library Association at Camp 
Kearny March 9, 1918. 

Elizabeth H. Fargo, 

Librarian. 

Pasadena. 

§ Pasadena [Fkee] Public Library. 
Miss Nellie M. Russ, Lib'n. 

Pasadena's Book Drive week has gone 
"over the top" beyond all expectations. 
It began with enthusiasm, and has not let 
go long enough for the librarian to en- 
umerate the volumes, while it bids fair to 
continue right on through the year. Many 
of the books given are copies of the very 
latest literature, purchased by tourists, 
read, and turned over to send on to the 
camps. The books given have been a 
source of gratification because of their 
high quality, and the earnest words of 
regard and interest which accompany 
them would inspire the pen of a Barrie 
to weave them into a story. 

Dr Daniel F. Fox, one of the Advisory 
Board of the library, was one of the rep- 
resentatives at the recent conference at 
Camp Kearny, which met to plan for 
vocational reading for the soldiers looking 
toward readiness for new occupation after 
the war. Through him the library is 
pledged to provide books for such reading. 

In library activities everything is being 
made secondary to war service. 

A new school library has just been 
formed, taking in all the juvenile books 
from the near-by Northeast Deposit Sta- 
tion, and the circulation for the first 
month shows a marked increase. 

Service has been discontinued at the 
Western Union and the Laundry because 
there was no further need for it at 
present. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued. 

The Library Magazine published a Red 
Cross number for January and February. 
The March— April issue contains a plea 
for the adoption of French orphans. 

Miss Olive Phillips, one of the staff, 
was married February 27th, to Mr Ben- 
jamin Demas Harrison, who is serving 
in the aviation work on North Island. 

A rental collection of current magazines 
established some time ago is proving a 
great success in relieving the congestion 
of demands on the regular circulating 
copies. 

A very fine collection of rare foreign 
photographs has just been received to be 
known as the Frances Wiswall Collection. 
More will be said about this later. 
Nellie M. Rrss. 

Librarian. 

A large photograph of the interior of 
St. Sophia, the magnificent mosque of the 
Turks at Constantinople, has been pre- 
sented to the librarj" by Miss Mary Wal- 
lace Wier. — Pasadena Star-News, Mr 9 

Royal Laundry Deposit Station, 
Pasadena Public Library. 

See note under Pasadena [Free] Pub- 
lic Library. 

Western Union Telegraph Co. De- 
posit Station, Pasadena Public Li- 
brary. 

•S'ee note under Pasadeua [Free] Pub- 
lic Library. 

Pomona. 

§11 Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

January 30-February 2 the library held 
a display on Food Conservation. Posters 
and samples of cooked foods, with recipes, 
and material for a "Scene in France" 
were contributed by the schools. Recipes 
and cooked foods were exhibited by house- 
keepers. Food dealers lent substitutes for 
foods to be conserved. Lectures were 
given daily by experts. Copies of the 
Santa Barbara Normal Conservation 
cookbook were on sale. The conventional 
display of literature was made by the 
library. 

The library has had translated into 
Spanish and printed for distribution some 
simple recipes for the use of cornmeal, 
oatmeal, and barley, and the U. S. Food 
Administration household card. These 



192 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued, 
have seemed to meet a genuine need 
among the Spanish-speaking population. 

The library is making a systematic ef- 
fort to prepare pictures for circulation. 
The response to this new activity is al- 
most embarrassing in its fervor. Tlie 
scheme adopted is that followed by the 
Los Angeles Public Library. 

S. M. Jacobus, 

Librarian. 

J. F. Spencer has recently presented to 
the library one of the oldest newspapers 
ever brought to the city, the Muskingum 
Messenger of February 3, 1813, published 
at Zanesville, Ohio. — Pomona Bulletin, 
Mr 14 

Santa Monica. 

§ Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
BRAET. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Twenty-five hundred books for soldiers 
and sailors have been received and more 
are coming in every day. 

Elfie A. Mosse, 

Librarian. 

The new branch library at Sand and 
Main streets has recently been opened. — 
Santa Monica Outlook, F 12 

Dr F. C. Clark recently presented to 
the public library a bas-relief of a pre- 
historic ape known as the Pithecanthro- 
pus Erectus. — Santa Monica Outlook. 
Mr 26 

Sterling School Dist. 

Sterling School Dist. Branch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in February, 1918. 

Tropico. 

Tropico [Free] Public Library. 
Charles H. Cashing, Lib'n. 

*S'ce Tropico Branch, Glendale Free 
Public Library. 

Watts. 

Watts [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Los Angeles Co. Free Li- 
brary. Mrs Margaret A. Gamble, Lib'n. 

Mrs Margaret A. Gamble is now li- 
brarian of Watts [Free] Public Library. 
—Watts ~!<[ews, F 7 

Whittier. 

University of California Patholog- 
ical Laboratory Library. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Whittier — Continued. 

This library was removed to the Citrus 
Experiment Station in Riverside in July, 
1!)17. 

May Hunt, Ass't Cataloger, 
Los Angeles Co. Free Library. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 8368. 
Assessed valuation $14,941,140 (taxable 
for county $14,341,3.55). 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Lib'n. 

Miss Lucille Ring has been appointed 
assistant librarian to take the place of 
Miss Genevra Brock, who resigned to ac- 
cept a position in the Fresno County Free 
Library. — Madera Mercury, J 10 



MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 25,114. 
Assessed valuation $22,002,145 (taxable 
for county $21,880,230). 

Mill Valley. 
Mill Valley [Free] Public Library. 

Miss Sybil Nye, Lib'n. 

There is now a grade making use of 
library every afternoon from 2 to .3. This 
movement is bringing in the children of 
foreign parents who, if left to themselves 
would make no use of the library. 
Eighty-seven new books have been added 
in 1918 and 126 duplicates have been 
taken from shelves and sent to camps for 
the soldiers. Seventy-five new patrons 
are making use of library. 

Sybil Nye, 
Librarian. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 3956. 
Assessed valuation $3,561,936 (taxable 
for county $3,539,366). 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



193 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty- fourth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3460 sq. mi. Pop. 23,929. 
Assessed valuation $17,467,622 (taxable 
for county $16,661,823). 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 15,148. 
Assessed valuation $24,216,165 (taxable 
for county $23,805,725). 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 6191. 
Assessed valuation $8,058,730 (taxable 
for county $7,978,515). 

Alturas. 
Modoc Union High School Library, 
Alturas. J. B. Sanders, Priu. Miss 
Augusta Caldwell, Lib'n. 

We received a fund of fifteen dollars 
from the Board of Trustees, which was 
expended for current magazines. These 
have proved to be a great benefit to the 
students both as a ready source of in- 
formation and means of enjoyment. 
Augusta Caldwell, 

Librarian. 

MONO COUNTY. 

( Fifty-seventh class. ) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 1796 sq. mi. Pop. 2842. 
Assessed valuation $2,704,190 (taxable 
for county $2,696,370). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 24,146. 
Assessed valuation $32,791,028 (taxable 
for county $32,047,765). 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 

During the quarter branches wei-e 
established in the following school dis- 
tricts : Elkhorn and Hames. 

(Jlianges in Custodians. — King City : 
Rev. Geo. A. Lowes, librarian, and his 
daughter Jean, assistant librarian, moved 
to Broderick, Yolo County, and Mrs Floyd 
Zoellin was appointed librarian, begin- 
ning work March 16, 1918. Spreckels : 
Miss Elizabeth Riley was appointed li- 
brarian to take Miss Anna Balauac's place. 
Miss Balanac moved away from Spreckels 
in January. Stone Canon : H. B. Jones, 
custodian in place of L. Reynolds, who 
resigned March 20, 1918. Washington : 
Miss Emma Robley in place of Miss Wini- 
fred Robley. 

The Junior Red Cross has been organ- 
ized in all the schools of Monterey County. 
The County Free Library is keeping in 
close touch with the work and helping 
whenever possible. The librarian at- 
tended and addressed two teachers' meet- 
ings during the quarter, one to discuss the 
Junior Red Cross work and the other to 
plan for the Joint Graduation to be held 
in Salinas on May 31st. 

Several trips to visit schools were made 
with the County Nurse during the quarter. 

Miss Winifred Robley of the Washing- 
ton Branch left for Washington, D. C, 
in March to take a position with the War 
Department. We miss Miss Robley very 
much as she also assisted in the Central 
Office. 

Bulletin boards have been made for 
each Community Branch to display food 
conservation material. 

The book drive for soldiers and sailors 
was actively carried on during Book Cam- 
paign Week. Several of the branches re- 
sponded very generously and books are 
still coming in. 

We had welcome visits from Miss Eddy 
and Mrs Henshall of the State Library 
during the quarter. A trip with Mrs 
Henshall to visit school districts was 
planned but had to be postponed on ac- 
count of bad weather and the condition 
of the roads. 

Signs were put up at all branches vis- 
ited which were not already displaying 
them. 

Anne Hadden, 

Librarian. 



194 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
Elkhorn School Dist. (P. O. Watson- 
ville, R.F.D. 2; no exp. office). 
Elkhorn School Dist. Branch, 
Monterey Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 4, 1918. 

Hames School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Bradley). 
Hames School Dist. Branch, Mon- 
terey Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 17, 1918. 

King City. 

King City [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Monterey Co. Free Li- 
brary. Mrs Floyd Zoellin, Lib'n. 

See note under Monterey County Free 
Library. 

Spreckels. 

Spreckels Branch, Monterey Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Monterey County Free 
Library. 

Spreckels Library Association Li- 
brary. Mrs George Scott, Sec. ; Miss 
Elizabeth Riley, Lib'n. 

See note under Monterey County Free 
Library. 

Stone Canon (No exp. office). 
Stone Canon Branch, Monterey Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Monterey County Free 
Library. 

Washington (P. O. Box 354, Monterey; 
exp. Monterey). 
Washington Branch, Monterey Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Monterey County Free 
Library. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 19,800. 
Assessed valuation $18,236,314 (taxable 
for county $17,799,535). 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 958 sq. mi. Pop. 14,955. 
Assessed valuation $7,841,295 (taxable 
for county $6,903,725). 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 34,436. 
Assessed valuation $66,140,655 (taxable 
for county $59,990,265). 

Fullerton. 

F'ULLERTON UNION HiGH SCHOOL AND 

Junior College Library. Edward W. 
Hauck, Prin. Miss Myra Hoge, Lib'n. 

Miss Mary Campbell, the assistant in 
the Public Library, has been secured for 
two hours per day to assist in recatalog- 
ing the library. 

A conservation program was given on 
March 13th, under the direction of the 
Domestic Science Department. On that 
day the library bulletin boards were de- 
voted to exhibition of conservation posters. 

The Sabine Latin charts prepared by 
Manual Arts High School of Los Angeles, 
were exhibited for ten days on the walls 
of the study hall, in which the library is 
housed. 

Myra Hoge, 
Librarian. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,237. 
Assessed valuation $12,459,481 (taxable 
for county $10,943,424). 

Loomis. 

The Blue Bird Library. Mrs O. W. 
Blemer, Lib'n. 

A circulating library, supported by sub- 
scription, was established at the Blue 
Bird Tea Room on February 23. — ^Loomis 
Recorder, F 22 

Roseville. 

Roseville [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Dolla M. Hayter, Lib'n. 

Miss Mabel Anderson, librarian, has 
tendered her resignation to take effect 
February 15, and Miss Dolla Hayter has 
been selected to fill the vacancy. — Rose- 
ville Trihiine, F 7 

Roseville Union High School Li- 
brary. A. G. Grant, Prin. 

The Roseville High School District 
purchased during the Fall months about 
nine hundred books, selected with great 



VI 1. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



195 



PLACER CO. — Continued. 
Roseville — Continued, 
care from the standard and modern 
authors. We have, therefore, a very 
happy choice and no unfortunately do- 
nated books of doubtful value. Besides 
a generous supply of booKs for the ^ci^nce 
classes, we have several shelves of excel- 
lent fiction, a shelf of biography, one of 
travel, one of music, one of handbooks of 
nature study and one of books for special 
reference. Our daily circulations average 
about twenty books. 

C. D. Weight. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5259. 
Assessed valuation $9,747,974 (taxable 
for county $8,127,349). 

Plumas Co. Feee Library, Quincy. 
Miss Dorothy L. Clarke, Acting Lib'u. 

Cedar Glen Branch was discontinued 
January 4, but will be reopened in the 
spring. 

The following branch custodians have 
been appointed : Miss Bertha Crabb of 
Beckwith School district; Miss Florence 
Short of Crescent school district ; Roy 
Coburn of Engel Mine ; Miss Hazel 
Bldredge of Genesee school district ; Mrs 
B. M. Bemiss of Keddie ; Miss Emma 
Patterson of La Porte ; L. A. Richards of 
Meadow Valley ; Mrs Blanche Folsom of 
Nelson Point school district ; Miss Helen 
Hofer of Quincy Primary School ; Miss 
Lillian Savercool of Seneca ; Mrs Nella 
Chapin of Sloat ; and V. A. Hart of 
Walker Mine. 

Miss Gertrude Marsh of Crescent Mills 
branch is holding a story hour for the 
children on Sunday afternoons. 

Dorothy L. Clarke, 

Librarian. 

Beckwith (Exp. via Amer. Exp. Co.). 

Beckwith School Dist. Branch, 
Plumas Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Cedar Glen. 

Cedar Glenn Branch, Plumas Co. 
Free Library. 

8ee note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 



PLUMAS CO.— Continued. 
Crescent Mills (No exp. office). 
Crescent Mills Branch, Plumas Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Crescent School Dist. Branch, 
Plumas Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Engel Mine (Exp. Keddie). 

Engel Mine Branch, Plumas Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Genesee (No exp. office). 

Genesee School Dist. Branch, 
Plumas Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Keddie. 

Keddie Branch, Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

La Porte (No exp. office). 

La Porte Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Meadow Valley (Exp. Quincy). 

Meadow Valley Branch, Plumas 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Nelson Point School Dist. (P. O. 

Quincy; exp. Quincy, via American 
Express Co.). 

Nelson Point School Dist. Branch, 
Plumas Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Quincy (Exp. via Amer. Exp. Co.). 

Qltincy Primary School Branch, 
Plumas Co. Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

Seneca (Exp. Keddie). 

Seneca Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 



196 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



PLUMAS CO.— Continued. 
Sloat. 

Si.oAT BrzVnch, Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Libraiy. 

Walker Mine (P. O. and exp. Portola). 

Walxver Mike Branch, Plumas Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Plumas County Free 
Library. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. S4,696. 
Assessed valuation $31,201,920 (.taxable 
for county $29,737,460). 

Ri^'erside Co. Fbee Library. Joseph 
F. Daniels, Lib'n. 

On February 27 a branch was estab- 
lished in Hamilton School district. 

Mrs A. L. Pearson is now custodian of 
Coachella Valley Branch. 

Joseph F. Daniels, 

Librarian. 

Miss Helen Louise Cunningham has 
been appointed to succeed Miss Martha 
Stone, resigned, at Perris Branch. — Fer- 
ris Progress, Mr 2S 

Coachella. 

Coachella Branch, Riverside Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Riverside County Free 
Library. 

Hamilton School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Babtiste). 
Hamilton School Dist. Branch, 
Riverside Co. Free Library, v/as estab- 
lished February 27, 1918. 

Perris. 

Perris Branch, Riverside Co. Free 
Library. 

See note uuder Riverside County Free 
Library. 

Riverside. 

§i|RivERSiDE [Free] Public Library. 
Joseph F. Daniels, Lib'n. 

Riverside Library Service School. — 
The Riverside library service school 
closed a very successful session March 2. 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued. 
The teachers and lecturers were as fol- 
lows : 

Dr Arthur E. Bostwick, St. Louis 
(Mo.) Public Library; Mrs Ida Menden- 
hall Beseler, formerly of New York State 
Normal School at Genesee, now of Ana- 
heim, Cal. ; Miss Alice M. Butterfield, 
Riverside Public Library ; E. P. Clarke, 
President, California State Board of Edu- 
cation ; Joseph F. Daniels, Riverside Pub- 
lic Library ; Miss Lillian L. Dickson, Riv- 
erside Public Library ; Lyman Evans, 
District Attorney, Riverside, Cal. ; Mrs 
Mabel Frances Faulkner, Riverside Pub- 
lic Library ; Miss Adelaide Hasse, Chief, 
Documents Division, New York Public Li- 
brary ; Miss Margaret Mann, Head Cata- 
loger, Carnegie Free Library, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. ; Lieutenant Geo. E. Price, Military 
Instructor, Polytechnic High School, Riv- 
erside, Cal. ; W. Elmo Reavis, Head of 
Pacific Library Binding Co., Los Angeles. 

Students receiving certificates were as 
follows : 

Caroline Hubbard Bailey, East Auburn, 
Cal. ; Mrs Nellie C. Bartlett, Pocatello, 
Idaho ; Nelle M. Bate, Mason City, Iowa ; 
Mrs J. E. Boyle, Chico, Cal. ; Helena P. 
Curtiss, La Verne, Cal. ; Dorothy Deming, 
East Auburn, Cal. ; Margaret Eastman, 
Sacramento, Cal. ; Jessie Eraser, Twin 
Falls, Idaho ; Joanna L. Gaylord, Los 
Angeles, Cal. ; Margaret D, Guthrie, Cor- 
sicana, Texas ; Jessie A. Harris, Whit- 
tier, Cal. ; Carolyn Alpha Henry, Santa 
Ana, Cal. ; Lucille Hood, Pocatello, Idaho ; 
Mildred H. Pike, Whiting, Iowa ; 
p]lizabeth M. Sheppard, Ontario, Cal. ; 
Betty Mary Smith, El Paso, Texas ; 
Grace M. Stoddard, Missoula, Montana. 

This is the smallest class in attendance 
ever held but we are at war and the 
whole western country feels it very much 
indeed. 

The Arnold reception is one of the 
events of the Riverside Library service 
school short course. Mr and Mrs Chas. 
C. Arnold on February 22 entertained at 
an evening reception at their home on 
Victoria Hill. The young women on the 
staff assisted Mrs Arnold. 

For winning the war the Riverside 
Public Library and the Riverside library 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRABIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



197 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued, 
service school have organized in the fol- 
lowing manner : 

The school and the staff have an asso- 
ciation known as the Riverside Library 
League which is also the War Savings 
Society. Miss Joanna Gaylord, Holly- 
wood, Cal., 1918 class, is the president, 
and Miss Nelle M. Bate, Mason City, 
Iowa, same class, is the secretary. This 
league has volunteered to do all the rec-. 
ord work for the Riverside War Relief 
Council. That council has charge of all 
the money raising campaigns and is or- 
ganized over both county and city. 

The Council is preparing a very thor- 
ough directory and record of all persons 
who contribute either money of services. 
The record goes into details and a part 
of the record will be useful for a survey 
of alien enemies. It will become also a 
source of genealogical and biographical 
reference in years to come. After the 
war has been won the whole record will 
be deposited in the Riverside Public Li- 
brary as in a department of archives. 
It will be carefully guarded with some 
measure of confidence and secrecy. 

At this time there has been given over 
for the use of the Council one section of 
the reading room (about 20 by 40 ft. of 
floor space) the whole of the map room 
and all of the bindery. During a cam- 
paign the Council has an organization of 
more than two hundred workers ; more 
than a dozen typewriters are in use and 
more will be added. 

The new aviation camp situated at 
Alessandro has been named March Field. 
It is nearly ten miles from the center of 
Riverside. The Library League is mak- 
ing plans for branch library service at 
March Field, another branch at the sol- 
diers' and sailors' club in the city of Riv- 
erside, and such other stations as may be 
needed for the enlisted men and civilian 
employees. 

The general entertainment committee of 
the Riverside War camp committee ser- 
vice will be assisted by the Library 
League and Miss Lillian Dickson, refer- 
ence librarian, is chairman of one of the 
committees having such matters in charge. 
It is planned to have our course in story- 
telling completed at an early date so that 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 

Riverside — Continued. 

a number of the 1938 class may be ready 

to tell stories to soldiers as a part of the 

entertainment plan. 

The Riverside Library service school 
will hold a summer session beginning 
June 24. Announcement will be made in 
a few days. The 1918 summer school 
will offer both elementary and advanced 
courses. Teachers from east and west 
are being employed and Miss Theresa 
Hitchler of Brooklyn Public Library will 
conduct the work in cataloging and classi- 
fication in both elementary and advanced 
courses. 

Miss Dorothea L. Smith, Riverside, 
1916, has resigned the librarianship of 
the State Normal School at Chico, Cali- 
fornia, and is going to France as index 
and filing secretary of the Stanford 
Women's Civilian Relief Unit. This is 
the second Riverside girl to go to France, 
the first being Miss Hilda M. Smeal, who 
is driving an ambulance. 

Several other Riverside graduates have 
gone to Washington or are on their way 
to enter civilian service ; among them are 
Lela Clapperton, Julia Clapperton, Nelle 
Sanford and Lilla B. Dailey. 

Miss Winifred Woods (1916-17 long 
course) has been employed as librarian at 
National City, Cal., public library. 

Miss Helen Mason (1916) is a mem- 
ber of the staff of the Riverside Public 
Library. 

Miss Elma Scho waiter (191G) is em- 
ployed in a physician's office in Los An- 
geles. 

Miss Rita C. Keane (1917) student at 
the University of California, is catalog- 
ing the University high school library. 

The Librarian is a member of the 
executive committee service which as- 
sumes the work assigned by the Fosdick 
commission. Meanwhile, library service 
to the community and the county is in 
operation as usual. 

The drive for books for soldiers will 
bring us about five thousand volumes by 
the middle of April. The American Li- 
brary Association is sending eighty vol- 
umes of choicest and latest books on avia- 
tion and we have now the problem of 
placing a man or woman or sufficient 
custodianship of some kind at the camp. 



198 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued. 
The Library stafE has also been very 
useful in the food conservation publicity, 
furnishing exhibits of all kinds and 
speakers for addressing the clubs and 
other gatherings. 

Joseph F. Daniels, 

Librarian. 

CiTi^us Experiment Station Branch, 
Riverside County Free Library. 

The University of California Pathologi- 
cal Laboratory Library, formerly in Whit- 
tier, was moved to this branch in July, 
1917. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 1007 sq. mi. Pop. 67,S0C. 
Assessed valuation $96,824,026 (taxable 
for county $86,936,436). 

Sacramento. 

|§Sacramento Free Public Library. 
Lauren W. Ripley, Lib'n. 

The books are being moved into the new 
library and it is planned to hold an in- 
formal reception for the people. — Sacra- 
mento Star, Mr 26 



SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8041. 
Assessed valuation $9,986,335 (taxable 
for county $9,565,210). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
LISEB. Miss Mabel Coulter, Lib'n. 

The San Benito County Free Library 
was established Feb. 4, 1918. Work be- 
gan March 1. 

The trustees of the Hollister Public 
Library invited the County Library to 
make its headquarters in the Public Li- 
brary building. Accordingly a large base- 
ment room has been equipped as an 
office and work room. 

The Teachers' Library has been made 
a part of the County Library, and trus- 
tees of all of the elementary schools, 34 
in number, have signed resolutions mak- 
ing their schools branches of the San 



SAN BENITO CO.— Continued. 
Benito County Free Library, as follows : 
Antelope, Anzar, Aromitas, Ausaymas, 
Bear Valley, Bitterwater, Cienega, Colum- 
bus, Cottonwood, Enterprise, Erie, Fair- 
view, Gabilan, Hollister, Jefferson, Live 
Oak, Lone Tree, New Idria, Olympia, 
Pacheco, Panoche, Peralta, Quien Sabe, 
San Benito, San Juan, San Justo, Santa 
Ana, Santa Anita, Tres Pinos, TuUy, 
Union, Vineyard, Willow Creek and Wil- 
low Grove. 

Books have been sent to 18 schools and 
are being prepared for the remaining 16. 

The fact that we begin work with all 
of the elementary schools a part of the 
County Library is due to the support 
given the Library by W. J. Cagney, 
County Superintendent of Schools. 

Mabel Coulter, 

Librarian. 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 56,706. 
Assessed valuation $51,275,300 (taxable 
for county $44,197,155). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Borosolvay and Yermo and 
in Central School district. 

San Bernardino County Free Library 
has published recently "A selected list of 
books in the teachers' collection of the 
San Bernardino County Free Library." 

The following branch custodians have 
been appointed : Miss Helen A. Turner 
of Apple Valley School district ; Mrs 
Katherine Day of Atolia ; Miss Mabel 
Lawrence of Bagdad ; Miss Florence E. 
Allen of Barstow ; Miss Marion James 
of Barton School district ; Miss Marjorie 
Curtis of Bell Mountain School district ; 
Mrs Harriet H. Barry of Big Bear Val- 
ley ; Henry N. Whitlock of Bloomington 
School district ; L. C. Watkeys of Boro- 
solvay ; Mrs Pearl S. Grabill of Cajon 
School district ; R. B. Huxtable of Chino 
Central School ; Miss Bettie Thomas of 
Chino, East Side ; Miss Minna E. Norris 
of Chino, George Junior Republic School ; 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



199 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Mrs J. B. Weber of Chino, Riverside 
Drive School ; Miss Elizabeth Polk of 
Chino, West Side School ; Miss Frances 
Erickson of Cima ; Mrs Edna Crockett 
of Cucamonga School district ; Mrs George 
Oxsen of Daggett ; Miss Nona Huff of 
Del Rosa; Miss Mazie E. Huff of Del 
Rosa School district ; Miss Kathryn Mac- 
Donald of El Mirage ; Miss Angela 
Dunphy of Fairview School district; Mrs 
A. T. Parker of Fontana Heights School 
district; Miss Ida M. Mundorff of Ford 
School district ; Miss Frances Mingo of 
Fremont ; Miss Grace Halsey of Goffs ; 
Mrs Lulu G. Chapman of Helen ; Miss 
Carrie Robb of Hinkley School district ; 
Miss Clara E. Blesener of Keenbrook; 
Mrs Carrie A. Conover of Kramer School 
district ; Miss Jessie Montgomery of Lan- 
fair ; Mrs Donlin Hubbard of Lucerne 
Valley, Miss Florence Colby of Ludlow ; 
G. W. Leek of Mission School district ; 
Mrs Mayme A. Hall of Mojave School 
district ; Miss Winifred T. Moore of 
Mountain View; Miss Jane Cowell of 
Needles Grammar School and also of 
Needles High School. Miss lone Wilkin- 
son of Oro Grande ; Mrs Etta Russell 
White of Oro Grande School district ; 
Mrs J. N. Baylis of Pinecrest ; Miss Ethel 
McMullen of Pioneer School district ; 
Miss Helen Leiber of Railroad School 
district ; Mrs Sarah L. Farnum of Roches- 
ter School district ; Miss Lyndell Mich- 
ener of Rodman School district ; Mrs Eva 
S. Rice of Summit ; J. M. Gray of Trona ; 
Miss Emma Barron of Trona School ; 
Miss Nellie F. Carr of Washington School 
district ; Miss Ruth D. Doty of Waterman 
School district; and Mrs C. W. Paul of 
Yermo. 

The name of Gray Mountain branch 
has been changed to El Mirage, and of 
Pine Knot to Big Bear Valley. 

The custodian at the County Jail 
branch changes about every two months 
as the position is filled by a prisoner act- 
ing as trusty. 

Caroline C. Waters, 

Librarian. 

San Bernardino Co. Jail Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Apple Valley School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Victorville). 

Apple Valley School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. E^ree Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Atolia. 

Atolia Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Bagdad. 

Bagdad School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Barstow. 

Barstow Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Barstow Union High School Li- 
brary AND Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. Harry B. Thomas, 
Prin. 

On February 2.5th, our High School 
buildings were destroyed by fire. At the 
time that the fire- was discovered in an 
adjoining building our students were as- 
sembled for chorus work, and no time 
Was lost after the danger was made 
known. The Library was the first de- 
partment to receive attention and practi- 
cally all of the books were safe out of 
doors before the fire reached it. This was 
true also of the greater part of our 
furniture and equipment. 

On March 29th, a bond issue of 
$30,000 was authorized by the voters of 
our district and plans are being made for 
fireproof buildings. Our Library is a 
branch of the San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

H. B. Thomas, 

Principal. 

Barton School Dist. (P. O. Redlands, 
R.F.D. No. 2, Box 73; exp. Red- 
lands). 

Bakton School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 



200 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Bell Mountain School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Victorville). 
Bell Mountain School Dist. 
Branch, San Beenardino Co. Feee 

LiBBAEY. 

»S*c'e note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Big Bear Valley (P. O. Pine Knot, Big 
Bear Valley; exp. via San Ber- 
nardino Mt. Stage Co.). 

Big Bear Valley Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

This was formerly Pine Knot Branch. 

aS'cg note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Bloomington. 

Bloomington School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Borosolvay (Exp. via Searles). 

BoROSOLVAY Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library, was established 
January 14, 1918. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Cajon School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Devore). 

Cajon School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Central School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Cucamonga). 
Central School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library, was 
established January 11, 1918. 

Chino, 

CiiiNO School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. Central 
Sclaool. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Chino School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. East 
Side School. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Chino School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. George 
Jr. Republic. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Chin o- — Continued. 

Chino School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. River- 
side Drive School. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Chino School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. West 
Side School. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Cima. 

CiMA School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Fkee Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Cucamonga. 

CucAMONGA School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Daggett. 

Daggett Branch, San Beenardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Del Rosa. 

Del Rosa Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

^'ee note under San Bernardino County 
Fi'ee Library. 

Del Rosa School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Feee Libeaey. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

El Mirage (P. O. Gray Mountain; exp. 
Victorville). 

El Mirage Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

This branch was formerly known as 
the Gray Mountain Branch. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Fairview School Dist. (P. O. Wagner; 
exp. Newberry). 

Fairview School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Libeaey. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Fontana (Exp. via Pacific Electric). 
FoNTANA Heights School Dist. 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free 

LiBEABY. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CxiLIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



201 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Fontana — Continued. 
See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Ford School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Lanfair). 

Ford School Dist. Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

«SVe note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Fremont (P. O. Pomona; exp. Ontario). 

Fremont Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino CounLy 
Free Library. 

Goffs. 

GoFFS School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Gray Mountain (Exp. Victorville.) 

Gray Mountain Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Helen (P. O. Judson; exp. Helen). 

Helen Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Hinkley. 

HiNKLEY School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Keenbrook (P. O. and exp. Devore). 

Keenbrook School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Kramer. 

Kramer School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Lanfair. 

Lanfair School Dist. Branch, San- 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Lucerne Valley (Exp. Victorville). 

Lucerne Valley Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Ludlow (P. O. Stagg-; exp. Ludlow). 

Ludlow Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Mission School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Bryn Mawr). 

Mission School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernanlino County 
Free Library. 

Mojave School Dist. (P. O. Judson; exp. 

Helen). 

Mojave School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Mountain View (P. O. and exp. 
Ontario). 

Mountain View Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Needles. 

Needles Grammar School Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Needles High School Library. H. 
H. Wbeeler, Prin. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Ontario. 
Ontario [Free] Public Library. 
Miss K. A. Monroe, Lib'n. 

Our library collected one thousand 
books for the soldiers during the book 
drive week and books are still coming in. 
K. A. Monroe, 
' Librarian. 

Oro Grande (P. O. Halbeck). 
Oro Grande Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Oro Grande School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino (bounty 
Free Library. 



202 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Pine Knot (P. O. Pine Knot, Big Bear 

Valley; exp. via San Bernardino 

Mt. Stage Co.). 

Pine Knot Branch, San Beenakdino 
Co. Fkee Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Pinecrest (Exp. Pineerest via San Ber- 
nardino Auto Stage Line). 

Pinecrest Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library, 

Pioneer School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Corona). 

Pioneer School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Railroad School Dist. (P. O. Redlands 
R.P.D. No. 2, Box 84; exp. Red- 
lands). 

Railroad School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Redlands. 

§A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Artena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Our patrons have continued to take a 
very keen interest in making scrapbooks 
for our sick and wounded soldiers and 
sailors. About 60O have been filled, sets 
of 50 having been sent to Camps Kearny, 
Lewis and Cody and 125 to the American 
Library Association for its distribution. 

Fully 50O0 very acceptable books were 
collected during the Intensive Book Cam- 
paign, March 18-25. As they were re- 
ceived they were stacked near the entrance 
where they proved to be an inspiring 
sight to all. The public schools gave 
generously and, in collecting, the Boy 
Scouts were of great assistance. For his- 
torical interest a photograph of the im- 
mense pile of books was taken. 

On April 1st Miss Chapin was given 
a leave of absence of a few weeks to 
organize the library at the Y. M. C. A. 
Naval Training Station at San Diego. 
This is one way the library feels it is 
doing patriotic service. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Redlands — Continued. 
Miss Chapin and Miss Janette Lever, 
reference librarian, attended the district 
library meeting at Camp Kearny. 

Mildred F. Parsons, 
First Ass't Librarian. 

Rochester School Dist. (P. O. Cuca- 
monga; exp. N. Cucamonga). 

Rochester School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Rodman School Dist. (P. O. Lucerne 
Valley; exp. Victorville). 

Rodman School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

San Bernardino. 

San Bernardino High School Li- 
brary. L. L. Beeman, Prin. Marguerite 
Moegan, Lib'n. 

We have begun a new catalog for our 
library. We are ordering cards from In- 
dexers, Chicago and Library of Congress. 
We are putting new labels on our books. 
We have ordered more magazines this year 
than ever before. The new ones include 
"Atlantic," "Century," "Current Opin- 
ion," "Scribners," "Harpers" and "World's 
Work." Through our bulletin boards and 
with the assistance of our art department 
we have tried to spread the gospel of 
present problems and our share in meet- 
ing them. This year we have a deposit 
of city library books which we are cir- 
culating along with our own. Many 
pupils are drawing books here who would 
not go to the City Library. 

M. MOGEAN, 

Librarian. 
Summit. 

Summit Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Fi-ee Library. 

Summit School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Trona (Exp. via Searles). 
Trona Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



203 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
T ro n a — Continued. 
See note under San Bernardino Countj' 
Free Library. 

Tkona School Branch, San Bek- 
NARDix\o Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernavdino County 
Free Library. 

Washington School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Colton). 

Washington School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

Waterman School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 

Barstow). 

Waterman School Dist. Branch, 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino County 

■ Free Librai'y. 

Yermo. 

Yeemo Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library, was established January 
21, 1918. 

See note under San Bernardino County 
Free Library. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 61,665. 
Assessed valuation $78,207,032 (taxable 
for county $73,299,662). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Jennie Herrman, Lib'n. 

Miss Katharine Post Ferris, acting li- 
brarian for six and one-half months in 
the county library, returned to Kings 
County, and Miss Herrman assumed 
charge January 2, 1918. Miss Herrman 
addressed the Normal Heights Welfare 
Club Friday evening, February 1, "On 
the progress of the county library." 

The Board of Supervisors granted an 
increase of salary to Miss Taber, Miss 
Kobler and Miss Kneeshaw, making a 
total of $85 a month each, beginning 
April 1. The Board of Supervisors 
voted unanimously, to lease the greater 
part of the fifth floor of the Soripps Build- 
ing, seven rooms and the hall, for county 
library purposes, and the library is to be 
adequately housed for the present. The 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
lease is for $80 a month and runs for five 
years. The library will be moved May 
first. 

East San Diego library building, a 
$10,000 Carnegie gift, is progressing nicely 
and will probably be ready June 15. 

Miss Herrman and Miss Tabor attended 
the Sixth District meeting held at Camp 
Kearnj^ 

Mr Ferguson visited the county library 
while he was south to attend the Sixth 
District meeting. 

The library had some gifts from the 
county branches of both books and money 
for the book drive beginning March 18. 
Jennie Herrman, 

Librarian. 

A branch of the San Diego County Free 
Library has recently been established on 
Palomar. — Escondido Times-Advocate, 
Mr 1 

National City, 

National City Free Public Library. 
Miss Winifred Wood, Lib'n. 

Miss Lilla B. Dailey resigned on 
March 4, to accept a position as filing 
clerk and cataloger in the Ordnance De- 
partment in Washington, D. C. She was 
succeeded by Miss Winifred Wood of 
Riverside. — National City News, Mr 9 

San Diego. 

tiSAN Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus ; 
Miss Althea H. Warren, Lib'n. 

Civil Service examinations, for the 
positions of junior and senior assistants 
in the Public Library, were held on the 
12th and 13th of February. Seventeen 
successful candidates passed the junior 
assistant examination, and twenty the ' 
senior examination. These lists will sup- 
ply all appointments for positions in the 
Library for the next two years, unless 
vacancies should occur in the principal 
assistant positions. 

The long-needed expansion in the main 
library building was made possible Janu- 
ary 1, 1918, when annex quarters were 
rented in an office block just back of the 
public library. Here over five thousand 
square feet of floor space have been se- 
cured for the reading-room and children's 
department. All current periodicals and 



5—37615 



204 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 

San Diego — Continued. 
newspai)ers have been placed in the read- 
ing-room, which is open during the same 
hours as the main library. 

The children's room has been attrac- 
tively furnished with cream-colored book- 
cases, and a nursery frieze in lavenders 
and blues. It is open from nine to six 
daily. Miss Helen Dysart, the children's 
librarian, commenced a series of story 
hours in January, which are to continue 
every Saturday morning, at ten o'clock, 
until the summer holidays begin next 
June. Since moving into the enlarged 
quarters the children's circulation and at- 
tendance have been greatly increased. 

In January the Common Council and 
the Mayor approved salary raises for the 
year 1918, which have increased by five 
or ten dollars a month the salaries of 
twenty people on the library staff. 

Miss Elizabeth Bailey, in charge of the 
registration department, left April first, 
to accept an appointment in the Ord- 
nance Department at Washington. Miss 
Bailey's position in the public library will 
now be occupied by Mrs Emma George 
Spruse, who entered the library as a 
junior assistant last July, and was among 
the first in the recent Civil Service ex- 
aminations for promotion to the position 
of senior assistant. 

Two new junior assistants who have 
been added to the staff of the public li- 
brary in March and April are Miss La- 
Reine Walton, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity at Lawrence, Kansas, and Miss 
Louise Carson, a graduate of the Illinois 
State Normal School. 

During the opening months of the year 
all surplus energies in the library have 
been devoted to patriotic interests. A 
War Savings Society has been formed 
among the library employees, which num- 
bers twenty members. One thousand dol- 
lars were subscribed for Liberty Loans 
during the third drive. A number of the 
staff have, out of library hours, clipped 
selected short stories from back numbers 
of magazines, and mounted them in paper 
covers, for hospital circulation in camps 
and abroad. The April book drive 
brought more than two thousand volumes 
for camp libraries from citizens of San 
Diego. These books are now being pre- 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
pared for camp circulation by volunteers 
from the staff, outside of library time. 
Althea H. Warren, 

Librarian. 

La Jolla Library Association Li- 
brary AND Branch, San Diego Public 
Library. Miss Nina T. Waddell, Lib'n. 

The La Jolla Library Association has 
sustained a serious loss in the passing 
away of Mrs Olivia Mudgett, a charter 
member of the association and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees from the 
date of its incorporation in 1899, until her 
death, January 17, 1918. During that 
time Mrs Mudgett held various offices and 
was at all times a faithful and interested 
worker for the institution. 

There has been no change of policy in 
the conduct of the library. Work with' 
the schools increases steadily, the teach- 
ers drawing without limit whatever is 
necessary as supplementary to the text- 
books. Collections of mounted pictures 
covering many subjects are much used by 
the teachers. 

A bulletin board in the reading room, 
bearing the legend "War Notes" is kept 
supplied with up-to-date items clipped 
from the daily and weekly papers — items 
which are of real interest and instruction, 
but which did not appear with glaring 
headlines and might be easily overlooked. 
Good cartoons and war poems are much 
appreciated. 

The librarian has already collected six 
hundred volumes for the A. L. A. Li- 
brary at Camp Kearny, and there will be 
more as people realize the growing needs 
of the service. 

Nina T. Waddell, 

Librarian. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 42 sq. mi. Pop. 416,912. 
Assessed valuation $791,603,336 (tax- 
able for county $554,456,505). 

,t§||[FREE] Public Library of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

The San Francisco Piiblic Lihrary Cluh. 
— The members of the San Francisco Pub- 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



205 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

lie Library have organized a club to be 
known as "The San Francisco Public Li- 
brary Club" and the purposes of which, 
as stated in the constitution, are "to 
promote social relations among the mem- 
bers of the association and to create pro- 
fessional interest in library activities." 

The following officers have been 
elected : President, Annette Wiudele ; 
Vice President, Mary L. Whitcher ; Sec- 
retary, Virginia B. Spencer ; Treasurer, 
Anita J. Murray. 

Committee on Library Activities : 
Chairman, Robert Rea ; Belle A. Gold- 
man, Irene Murray. 

Committee on Social Activities : Chair- 
man, Clara F. Mel ; Josephine Murray, 
Mary K. Gilhuly. 

The club will hold a regular monthly 
meeting at which matters of general li- 
brary interest will be discussed. These 
gatherings will be in the nature of staff 
meetings and will be a clearing house for 
ideas and suggestions. In addition, the 
Committee on Social Activities will plan 
for social gatherings at which a lecturer 
will address the staff, or for which some 
other form of entertainment will be ar- 
ranged. The preliminary meetings have 
been highly interesting and it is expected 
that the staff will derive both pleasure 
and benefit from the organization. 

Robert Rea, 
Librarian. 

The new Sunset Branch was dedicated 
jMarch 24. — San Francisco Chronicle, Mr 
25 

*San Fraxcisco Co. Medical Society 
Library. Rene Bine, Sec. Dr Leo El- 
oesser, Lib'n. 

The library has been moved to new 
quarters at 925 Hyde street. 

Leo Eloesser, 

Librarian. 

AsTROi^oMicAL Society of the Pa- 
cific Library. J. D. Galloway, Pres. 
L>. S-. Richardson, Sec. 

Deposited with Sutro Branch, Cali- 
fornia State Librax'y, and open to the 
public. 

Califorxia Gea'ealogical Society Li- 
brary. Henry Byron Phillips, Pres. ; 
Miss Sarah Louise Kimball, Corr. Sec. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

Deposited with Sutro Branch, Cali- 
fornia State Library, and open to the 
public. 

* First Huistgarian Society of San 
Francisco Library. Max Roth, in 
charge. 

The library has been moved to Eagles 
Hall, 273 Golden Gate ave. 

Max Roth, 
Librarian. 

The Henry Pierce Library. Miss 
Maude G. Peek, Lib'n. 

The library has been moved to the 
L'nitarian Church at Geary and Franklin 
streets. 

§¥Mechanics" Mekcantiee Library. 
Francis B. Graves, Lib'n. 

A, Law Voge, formerly reference libra- 
rian of the Mechanics' Institute, resigned 
and is now in France with the U. S. 
Reserve Engineer Corps. 

John A. Dean of the University of 
California Library has been appointed 
reference librarian in place of Mr Voge. 

The annual report for the year ending 
February 28, 1918, showed : number of 
volumes, 70,0.55; circulation, 118,159; 
membership, 3725. 

F. B. Graves, 

Librarian. 

Midday Rest Room Library. Harriet 
L. Hilton, Lib'n. 

This library, which is under the care 
of The Daughters of the King of the 
Episcopal Church, is located in the Mid- 
day Rest Room at 154 Sansome street, 
and is conducted for business girls and 
women. It is supported by donations and 
fines and consists of about 800 volumes of 
fiction including about 300 books in a 
Branch Rest Room on Brj-ant street. 
Harriet L. Hilton, 

Librarian. 

^Pacific Coast Gas Assocl\tion Li- 
brary. Henry Bostwick, Sec. Edward 
C. Jones, Lib'n. 

In the month of February the library 
of the Pacific Coast Gas Association was 
moved into more commodious quarters in 
room 728 at 445 Sutter street. San Fran- 
cisco. The new library room is light and 
well furnished with reading room and 
writing facilities for the members of the 



206 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

Pacific Coast Gas Association. While 
the library is small, it is probably the 
best technical library on the subject of 
gas and collateral subjects in the United 
States, and is extensively used as a ref- 
erence library. 

E. C. Jones, 
Librarian. 

San Francisco Art Association Li- 
brary. J. R. Martin, Asst. Sec. and 
Lib'n. 

See note under San Francisco Society 
of Artists Library. 

San Francisco Association for the 
Blind. Mrs Ruth Quinan Marks, Supt. 

In addition to the library, the blind, 
employed by the Association, manufacture 
reed and rattan furniture, baskets, nigs 
and brooms. Workmanship is guaranteed. 
Classes in Braille and typewriting are held 
Wednesday from 1 to 4.30, free of charge. 
Association is open daily from 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. except Sundays and legal holidays. 
Ruth Quinan Marks, 

Superintendent. 

San Francisco Society of Artists 
Library. 

This library was amalgamated with the 
San Francisco Art Association Library. 

SuTEO Branch California State Li- 
brary. Milton J. Ferguson, State Lib'n. 
Miss Laura Steffens, Branch Lib'n. 

On January 7, the original of the Com- 
mission issued by the San Francisco Vig- 
ilance Committee of 1856 to R. S. Lam- 
mot, was received as a gift. It came from 
Arthur La Motte of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, the son, through the interest of 
R. S'. La Motte of San Francisco, the 
nephew. 

Dr S. Roubin, who in 1895 compiled 
the manuscript catalogue of the Hebrew 
manuscripts in the Sutro Library, sent 
to the Sutro Branch as a loan on Febru- 
ary 4 his pamphlet on the Hebrew manu- 
script in the Sutro Library which he 
attributes to Maimonides. 

On February 16, Mr H. G. Hasegawa 
of San Francisco began assisting with 
the sorting and listing of the Japanese 
material in the Sutro Library. The sort- 
ing is entirely completed and doubtless 
the listing will be started very soon. Mr 
Hasegawa is generously giving his time 
and assistance in this matter in order that 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

students of Japanese may have the benefit 
immediately of material that is here. 

In March, manuscript material and one 
volume of an early Nevada newspaper, 
the Sutro Independent, 1876-1880, were 
received as a gift from F. B. Mercer, 
a friend of the late Adolph Sutro. 

During the quarter, gifts or deposits 
of duplicates, or inactive material im- 
portant on the history of various sub- 
jects, were received from the following 
libraries : Alameda Public Library, Stock- 
ton Public Library, Tehama County Free 
Library, Visalia Public Library. 

Laura Steffens, 
Branch Librarian. 

'^Trinity School Library. Leon H. 
Roger, Prin. 

This school has been closed until the 
war is over. 

Leon H. Rogers, 

Principal. 

University of California Medical 
School Library. Dr H. C. Moffit, Dean. 
Mrs Anne Keating Hurwitz, Lib'n. 

This library was formerly listed as 
University of California College of Med- 
icine Library. 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 50,731. 
Assessed valuation $68,865,843 (taxable 
for county, $63,735,443). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library, 
Stockton. Miss Hattie M. Mann, Lib'n. 
Miss Ida E. Condit in charge. 

The following branch custodians have 
been recently appointed : Miss Reta Bel- 
lows of Acampo ; Mrs L. C. Ladd of 
Lathrop ; Mrs J. E. Vandervoort of Man- 
teca ; Miss Aneth Morris of Fair Oaks 
Branch in Stockton ; and Mrs S. A. 
Wheelock of Youngstown. 

Hattie M. Mann, 

Librarian. 

Acampo. 

Acampo Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin County 
Free Liljrary. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



207 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Lathrop. 

Lathrop Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin County 
Free Library. 

Manteca. 

Manteca Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San .Joaquin County 
Free Library. 

Stockton. 

t§ Stockton Free Public Library. 
Miss Hattie M. Mann, Lib'n. 

Library War Service has been the 
greatest library interest during the past 
three months. About 1200 books have 
been donated by the citizens of Stockton 
and San Joaquin County for the soldiers 
and sailors. Food conservation has also 
been a feature of Library War Service. 
The Librarian has enlisted the services 
of the Art and Domestic Science teach- 
ers in the schools in preparing poster and 
food exhibits. These exhibits are becom- 
ing a feature of the Library. The posters 
that have been exhibited picture some 
phase of Food Conservation and are very 
timely, supplementing the posters fur- 
nished by the U. S. Food administration. 

iliss j\Iann and Miss Condit, president 
and secretary of the Fifth District of the 
C. L. A. attended the joint meeting al 
Oroville. 

Hattie M. Mann, 

Librarian. 

Fair Oaks Branch, San Joaquin Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin County 
Free Library. 

Youngstown (P. O. Acampo). 

YouNGSTOwN Branch, San Joaquin 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Joaquin County 
Free Library. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 350O sq. mi. Pop. 19,383. 
Assessed valuation .$30,390,325 (taxable 
for county $29,503,714). 

San Luis Obispo. 

§San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. JIrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 
San Luis Obispo — Continued. 
The circulation of books for home use 
during the month of March exceeded the 
previous high record by 302. 

The increasing interest in the quarterly 
Story Hour is very gratifying. The at- 
tendance has increased from an average 
of fifty to one hundred and twenty-five, 
and good results are shown in an in- 
creased juvenile patronage of the library. 
Abbie S. Kellogg, 

Librarian. 

California Polytechnic School Li- 
brary. R. W. Ryder, Director. L. I. 
Rumsey, Lib'n. 

The librarian combines with her library 
work a Students' Co-operative Store for 
the sale of books -and all other supplies 
regularly needed by the students. Ad- 
vertising and assistance has been rendered 
by the library in campaigns for a Junior 
Red Cross, the Belgian Relief Fund, col- 
lection of books for the soldiers, as well 
as for the sale of Thrift Stamps, W. S. S., 
and Liberty Bonds. 

L. I. Rumsey, 

Librarian. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat. Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 26,585. 
Assessed valuation $35,818,165 (tax- 
able for county $34,744,010). 

►San Mateo Co. Free Library, Red- 
wood City. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, 
Librarian. 

On March 8, a branch was established 
at the Patriotic League in Redwood City. 

The Y. M. C. A. and the 8th Infantry 
Branches at Camp Fremont have been 
discontinued, both now being served by 
the A. L. A. Camp Library. 

A joint meeting of the First and Sec- 
ond districts of the California Library 
Association will be held early in May, 
probably at Camp Fremont. 

Work with the Food Administration 
continues. A set of posters made of col- 
ored pictures from the Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal and the Delineator, accompanied by 
suitable recipes, and captions adopted 
from the Food Administration publica- 
tions, has been sent to all branches. 
There are thirteen posters, each one pro- 



208 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SAN MATEO CO. — Continued, 
vided with twelve address tags, stamped 
and dated a month apart — thereby cov- 
ering a whole year. This means that 
automatically each branch receives a new 
poster once a month, as it sends its old 
one out. The majority of the posters 
urge the use of corn, with attractive 
recipes to illustrate the possibilities of 
this commodity, but there are others on 
saving fats, sugar and meat. 

The posters sent out by the Food Ad- 
ministration have been distributed, and 
the exhibit of literature on Food Con- 
ation is being shown in the windows 
of the store, where the county library 
branch is kept. Next month this will be 
transferred to the Daly City Branch, 
which is a grocery store, and it is the 
plan of the custodian to combine her 
wares with the library exhibit to make 
her window attractive. 

The circulation of the main branch has 
increased considerably during the past 
quarter due to the activity of the high 
school pupils. The county library has 
gathered a collection of books unavailable 
at the public library or the high school 
library for the book reviews listed for the 
four classes. War books have been those 
for which there is most demand. 

Anne Bell Bailey, 

Librarian. 

Redwood City. 

Patriotic League Bbanch, San 
Mateo Co. Free Library, was established 
March 8, 1918. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 24.50 sq. mi. Pop. 27,738. 
Assessed valuation, $36,978,526 (tax- 
able for county $34,747,955). 

Santa Barbara Co. Free Library, 

Santa Barbara. Mrs Frances B. Linn, 

Lib'n. Miss Margaret Brown, in charge. 

In January Honda School Dist. 

Branch was reestablished. 

Frances B. Linn, 

Librarian. 

Miss Margaret Brown of Los Angeles 
is now in charge of the county depart- 
ment in place of Miss Dold, who resigned. 



SANTA BARBARA CO.— Continued. 

Honda School Dist, (P. O. Concepcion; 

no exp. offlce). 

Honda School Dist. Branch, Santa 
Barbara Co. Free Library. 

See note under Santa Barbara Co. Free 
Library. 

Santa Barbara. 

* Santa Barbara State Normal 
School of Manual Arts and Home 
Economics Library. Miss Nellie E. 
Scholes, Lib'n. 

Frank H. Ball resigned as principal 
February 1 and is now engaged in special 
government service with headquarters at 
Los Angeles Normal School. 

Mary H. Tracy, 

Dean. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 83,539. 
Assessed valuation $87,243,295 (tax- 
able for county $79,944,300). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
.TosE. Miss Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established, at Stanford University and in 
the following school districts : Morgan 
Hill, Pioneer, Rucker, and Sunnyvale. 

Mrs Ora M. Regnart, senior assistant, 
was called to Washington, D. C, by the 
War Department, and left March 3d to 
take up her duties as index and filing 
clerk in the Ordnance Department. 

Mrs M. D. Simons, substitute, is now 
engaged for full time, beginning March 
1st. 

Stella Huntington, 

Librarian. 

Camp Fremont. 

Camp Fremont Library, J. S. Rich- 
ards, Lib'n. 

Number of books in cnmp, about 
30,000; number ready for circulation, 
20,539 ; number ready for circulation at 
central, 14,945 ; number placed at branches 
and stations, 5594 ; circulation from cen- 
tral, 4461 ; circulation from branches, 
3653; total circulation, 8114. 

We have taken into our system all 
books sent to the camp before the library 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



209 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
Camp Fremont — Continued, 
was in operation witli tlie exception of 
books loaned by local libraries. 

We have established three branches out- 
side of the camp. Two of these are at 
Young- Women's Centers or clubs, which 
are near the camp and have been organ- 
ized largely because of it. We have also 
loaned the Palo Alto Public Lilbary books. 
This library is much patronized by the 
men of the camp and we believed that 
they should have some of our books for 
which they have a great call. 

We are building 100 carriers or shelves 
to hold books in as many company mess 
halls. The honor system will be used, 
allowing the men to charge the books out 
to themselves at any time. Eventually 
we expect to place these bocks in every 
mess hall in camp. 

We have had many calls for books on 
philosophy, psychology, new though^- and 
books on personal efficiency. The war 
books and manuals are in great demand, 
Grey, Chambers, Bowers, Beach and Lon- 
don are probably the most popular authoL-s 
of fiction. 

We have been interesting the chap- 
lains in the possibility of taking books 
with them when they leave Camp l!"'re- 
mout. One of the chaplains has signified 
his intention of taking 1400 books with 
him for a regimental library for use in 
France. It now seems possible for each 
man leaving here to take one book with 
him. These books may be renssembled on 
the other side as a regimental library if 
the chaplains so desire. 

In accordance with Mr Putnam's in- 
struction by telegram, the librarian at- 
tended the meeting of the Commission in 
San Francisco on March lu. The meet- 
ing was devoted almost entirely to short 
talks by the different representatives 
present, each telling what his organization 
represents and what it is trying to do. 
An excellent idea of the work of the Com- 
mission as a whole was recei-^'ed. 

Morgan Hill. 
Morgan Hill School Dist. Beanch, 
Santa Clara Co. Fkee Library, was 
established February 2, 1918. 

Palo Alto. 

Palo Alto [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
Palo Alto— Continued. 

Ail Library "sins of omissioa" this year 
at least can be laid to pressure of camp 
work. During the last quarter, as be- 
fore, the gathering of books for Camp 
Fremont men seems to have taken most 
of our time and interest. When W. E. 
Henry from University of Washington ar- 
rived in January, there were about 5000 
donated books which had been prepared 
for circulation and distributed among the 
Y. M. C. A. buildings. When books from 
Washington began coming arrangements 
were made with Stanford by which mem- 
bers of the staff helped in afternoons and 
evenings, working in the basement, mak- 
ing book cards, shelf list, classifying and 
filing. Books were sent in from other li- 
braries ; Oakland alone sending in 20,000 
books gathered from Bay cities. 

Later with the opening of the Camp 
Library, members of the library staff went 
over to the camp and helped arrange books 
on shelves. With the Camp Library in 
running order and in the hands of Mr 
Richards, there is less need for help, but 
we go over to help in filing and revising 
cards. 

During March it has been the gather- 
ing and preparing for circulation of books 
for the Palo Alto National Defender's 
Club. A most delightful, home-like, com- 
fortable room has been furnished by the 
women of Palo Alto as a club room for 
the soldiers, and has alreadj' proved its 
usefulness, having from 300 to 400 men 
an evening. The gathering of books for 
the club was handed over to the library. 
About 1000 books have been prepared 
for circulation and members of the library 
staff are on duty certain afternoons dur- 
ing the week. 

On April 1st, Miss Christal Fox re- 
signed in order to do government work 
at Washington, D. C. 

Frances Patterson, 

Librarian. 
Pioneer SchoolDist. (P. O. Los Gatos, 
R.F.D.; no exp. office). 

Pioneer School Dist. Branch, Santa 
Clara Co. Free Library, was established 
March 16, 1918. 

Rucker School Dist. (P. O. Gilroy, 
R.F.D.; exp. Gilroy). 

Rucker School Dist. Branch, Santa 
Clara Co. Free Library, was established 
January 7, 1918. 



210 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
San Jose. 

*CoLLEGE NoTRE' Dame LIBRARY. Sis- 
ter Mary Veronica, Prin. 

Several sets have been added to the li- 
brary by gift. 

Sister Inthany. 

Stanford University. 

4:§||Leland Stanford Junior Univer- 
sity Library. Dr Ray Lyman Wilbur, 
Pres. George T. Clark, Lib'n. 

The erection of the new Stanford Li- 
brary building is progressing satisfac- 
torily. The last carload of steel was re- 
ceived January 15, 1918, and the erection 
and riveting were completed March 28th. 
The concrete men, plumbers and elec- 
tricians are now on the job. Contracts 
for the steel stacks have been awarded to 
the Rudgear Merle Co. of San Francisco, 
while the Mullen Manufacturing Co. of 
the same place has the contract for the 
wood work, such as tables, desks and 
wall shelving. The card catalogue cabi- 
net consisting of over one thousand trays 
will be supplied by the Library Bureau. 

Mr Sterling J. Talbot from the library 
staff resigned February 1st, to become 
assistant librarian at Camp Fremont. 
George T. Clark, 

Librarian. 

Stanford Branch, Santa Clara Co. 
Free Library, was established February 
18, 1918. 

Sunnyvale. 

Sunnyvale School Dist. Branch, 
Santa Clara Co. Free Library, was 
established February 27, 1918. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,140. 
Assessed valuation .$19,621,735 (taxable 
for county $18,491,380). 

Watsonville. 

Pajaro Valley Orphan Asylum Li- 
brary. 

^ee Saint Francis School Library. 

Saint Francis School Library. 

This school was formerly the Pajaro 
Valley Orphan Asylum but the name was 
changed when it was moved to the new 
buildings, the institution being no longer 



SANTA CRUZ CO.— Continued. 
Watsonville — Continued, 
an orphanage. The libraries have been 
enlarged and there are now two, one for 
the boys with Roger Baudier as librarian 
and one for the faculty with Rev Felix 
Raab in charge. 

Roger Baudier. 



SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 18,920. 
Assessed valuation $16,704,140 (taxable 
for county $14,806,630). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 910 sq. mi. Pop. 4098. 
Assessed valuation $2,351,980' (taxable 
for county $2,291,550). 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6078 sq. mi. Pop. 18,800. 
Assessed valuation $18,242,258 (taxable 
for county $17,331,868). 

Etna (No exp. office). 
Etna Free [Public] Library and 
Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free Library. 
Miss Verna M. Barnum, Lib'n. 

The average circulation for the last 
three months was forty books a day. 
Eighty-five books were added to the li- 
brary during February. 

Verna M. Barnum, 

Librarian. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 27,559. 
■ Assessed valuation $25,426,139 (taxable 
for county $24,639,429). 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairi^ield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Good Templars Home and 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



211 



SOLANO CO.— Continued, 
in the following school districts : Can- 
right and Peaceful Glen. 

Clara B. Dills, 

Librarian. 

Canright School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Rio Vista). 
Canright School Dist. Branch, 
Solano Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished March 7, 191S. 

Good Templars Home (P. O. Vallejo). 
Good Templars Home Branch, 
Solano Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished February 19, 191S. 

Peaceful Glen School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Vacaville). 
Peaceful Glen School Dist. Branch, 
Solano Co. Free Library, was estab- 
February 1, 1918. 



SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 48,394. 
Assessed valuation $39,009,410 (taxable 
for county $37,283,070). 

Cloverdale. 

Cloveroale Free Public Library. 
Mrs Lillian Domine, Lib'n. 

Miss Bernice Butler has resigned as li- 
brarian and has accepted a position in 
San Francisco with the Southern Pacific. 
Mrs Lillian Domine has taken up the 
work. — Santa Rosa Reinillican, Ja 1.5 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 22,522. 
Assessed valuation $31,886,850 (taxable 
for county $30,470,525). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Mo- 
desto. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, Lib"n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Dry Creek, La Grange, 
Waterford, and in the following school 
districts: Horr's Ranch, Paradise, and 
River Road. 

On February 1st, the Thalheim Branch 
was moved into the Kerl Building. This 
is a small building costing but $500.00, 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

which was built for the hotising of the 
library, and is rented by the Count j^ Free 
Library. The one room is of adequate 
size, and artistic appearance, and the 
community is greatly pleased with the 
change. 

February Gth to 9th, the County 
Librarian made visits to the following 
county libraries, collecting and compar- 
ing data concerning the work with schools : 
Merced, Fresno, and Kings. The trip 
was both pleasant and profitable. 

During the quarter, the County Li- 
brarian has made 63 visits to schools and 
branches, and delivered nine addresses be- 
fore various clubs, organizations and 
schools upon literary and patriotic sub- 
jects. She has also assisted largely in 
organizing Junior Red Cross auxiliaries 
in the rural schools. 

The Book Drive of INIarch 18th to 25th, 
has resulted in the collection of a number 
of good books for the camp libraries, 
\-\'hich, owing to the lack of time, due to 
ii shortness on the staff, have not yet been 
prepared for shipment. 

Cornelia D. Provines, 

Librarian. 

Dry Creek (P. O. and exp. Modesto). 
Dry Creek Branch, Stanislaus Co. 
Free Library', was established January 
7, 1918. 

Horr's Ranch School Dist. (P. O. Oak- 
dale, R.F.D. ; exp. Oakdale). 
Horr's Ranch School Dist. Branch, 
Stanislaus Co. Free Library, was 
established March 18, 1918. 

La Grange School Dist. (No exp. office). 
La Grange School Dist. Branch, 
Stanislaus Co. Free Library, was 
established January 3, 1918. 

Modesto. 

Modesto [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. Free Library. 
Miss Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

The working space of the McHenry 
Public Library has been materially in- 
creased by the cutting of an archway 
between the office and a room previously 
used as a debating room. The debating 
material now being sent directly to the 
High School building, this room becomes 
available for staff use, and will add mate- 
rially to the convenience and comfort of 



212 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[April, 1918 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

Modesto — Continued. 

working conditions. A flagpole has been 

erected upon the building, and a number 

of minor additions and repairs made. 

COKNELIA D. PrOVINES, 

Librarian. 

Paradise School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Modesto). 
Paradise School Dist. Branch, 
Stanislaus Co. I"'ree Library, was estab- 
lished January 29, 1918. 
River Road School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Oakdale). 
River Road School Dist. Branch, 
Stanislaus Co. Free Library, was 
established January 9, 1918. 
Thalheim. 
Thalheim Branch, Stanislaus Co. 
Free Library. 

*S*ee note under Stanislaus Co. Free 
Library. 

Waterford. 
Waterford School Dist. Branch, 
Stanislaus Co. Free Library, was 
established January 4, 1918. 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, Gil sq. mi. Pop. 6328. 
Assessed valuation $12,406,429 (taxable 
for county $12,080,865). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba City. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Lib"n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at East Nicolaus, Eucinal, 
Live Oak, Meridian, Nicolaus, Penning- 
ton, Pleaf;ant Grove, Sutter City, Tudor, 
and in the following school districts : 
Browns, Cottonwood, Farmer, Knights, 
and Meridian. 

Margaret Hatch, 

Librarian. 

Miss Edna Hewitt, formerly of the 
State Libi'ary, has been appointed as- 
sistant librarian. — Yuba City- Farmer, 
Ja 18 

Browns School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
East Nicolaus). 
Browns School Dist. Branch, Sut- 
ter Co. Free Library, was established 
in January, 1918. 



SUTTER CO.— Continued. 
Cottonwood School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Pleasant Grove). 
Cottonwood School Dist. Branch, 
Sutter Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in January, 1918. 

East Nicolaus. 

Bast Nicolaus Branch, Sutter Co. 
Free Library, was established in Janu- 
ary, 1918. 

Encinal (P. O. Live Oak, R. No. 1; no 
exp. office). 

Encinal Branch, Sutter Co. Free 
Library, was established in January, 
1918. 

Farmer School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Meridian). 

Farmer School Dist. Branch, Sut- 
ter Co. Free Library, was established 
in .January, 1918. 

Knights School Dist. (P. O. Grafton, 
Yolo Co.; no exp. office). 

Knights School Dist. Branch, Sut- 
ter Co. Free Library, was established 
in January, 1918. 

Live Oak. 

Live Oak Branch, Sutter Co. Free 
Library, was established in January, 

1918. 

Meridian. 

Meridian Branch, Sutter Co. Free 
Library, was established in January, 
1918. 

Meridian School Dist. Branch, 
Sutter Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in January, 1918. 

Nicolaus (Exp. East Nicolaus). 

Nicolaus Branch, Sutter Co. Free 
Library, was established in January, 
1918. 

Pennington (P. O. Live Oak, Rural 
Motor Route; no exp. office). 

Pennington Branch, Sutter Co. Free 

Library, was established March 1.3, 

1918. 

Pleasant Grove. 

Pleasant Grove Branch, Sutter Co. 
Free Library, was established in Janu- 
ary, 1918. 

Sutter City. 
Sutter City Branch, Suiter Co. 
Free Library, was established in Janu- 
ary, 1918. 

Tudor. 

Tudor Branch, Sutter Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established yi January, 1918. 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



213 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 11,401. 
Assessed valuation $15,265,345 (taxable 
for county $14,553,305). 

Tehama Co. Feee Library, Eed 
Bluff. Miss Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Jelly's Ferry, Los Flores, 
and in the following school districts : 
Capay and Elkins. 

The supervisors have granted a six 
months extension of time to Miss Margaret 
Livingston, who has been first assistant 
in the library since last October. 

Mrs Max Muller, who has been in 
charge of the Tehama Branch, was un- 
willing to continue longer without pay, 
and the branch has been temporarily dis- 
continued. 

Estella Ue Ford, 

Librarian. 
Capay School Dist. (P. O. Kirkwood; 
no exp. office). 

Capay School Dist. Branch, Te- 
hama Co. Free Library, was established 
March 20, 1918. 

Corning. 

Corning Free Public Library. Mrs 
Rachel W. Montgomery, Lib'n. 

About .300 volumes have been sent to 
the soldiers and sailors. 

Rachel W. ^Iontgojiery, 

Librarian. 

Eikins School Dist. (P. O. Paskenta; 
no exp. office). 
Elkins School Dist. Branch. Te- 
hama Co. Free Library, was established 
February 20. 1918. 

Jelly's Ferry (No exp. office). 
.Jelly's Ferry Branch. Tehama Co. 
Free Library, was established Febru- 
ary 4. 1918. 

Los Flores (P. O. Proberta; no exp. 
office). 
Los Flores Branch, Tehama Co. 
Free Library, was established February 
27, 1918. 

Red Bluff. 
§li Herbert Kraft Free [Public] Li- 
brary. Miss Alice Gardner, Lib'n. 

A beautiful bronze plate has been 
placed in the library by Edward Kraft as 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 
Red Bluff — Continued, 
a memorial to his mother. Mrs Elizabeth 
Kraft.— Red Bluff Sentinel, F 2 

Tehama. 

Tehama Branch, Tehama Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tehama County Free 
Library. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 3301. 
Assessed valuation $3,360,025 (taxable 
for county $3,288,930). 

Trinity Co. Free Library, Weaaer- 
viLLE. Miss Alice Anderson, Acting Lib'n. 

On January 9, a branch was estab- 
lished at Indian Creek. 

The librarian addressed the high school 
pupils at the school on the use of the 
high school branch library and the read- 
ing room ; and held a session with the 
pupils at the central library to demon- 
strate the use of the catalog and refer- 
ence department. 

On March ISth the librarian addressed 
a meeting of the Forest Rangers of the 
Trinity National Forest Reserve, exhibit- 
ing books chiefly on agriculture, forestry 
and conseiwation, and speaking i^articu- 
larly of the co-operation thus far enjoyed 
between the Forest Service and the county 
library. 

Trinity County collected 350 accept- 
able volumes for the intensive Book Drive 
ending March 25th. 

Alice Anderson, 

Librarian. 

Indian Creek (P. O. Douglas City; no 
exp. office). 
Indian Creek Branch, Trinity Co. 
Free Library, was established January 
9, 1918. 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 

County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4935 sq. mi. Pop. 35,440. 
Assessed valuation .$48,626,295 (taxable 
for county $46,023,030). 

Tulare Co. Free Library. Visalia. 
Mrs Bessie Herrman Twaddle, Lib'n. 



214 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 

During the quarter brandies have been 
established at Lindcove, Olive, and in the 
following school districts : Alta liobles 
and Oakland Colony. 

The Red Cross meets in the base- 
ment of the Dinuba Branch, and in the 
reading-room of the Goshen Branch. 

Since February 1st the Farmersville 
Branch has been opened Mondays and 
Fridays. 

The following branch custodians have 
been appointed : Mrs Essie Hensell of 
Pixley ; Miss Minona Hotzell of Stone 
Corral ; J. H. Roeder of Terra Bella ; 
Miss Lela Johnson of Yettem School Dis- 
trict. 

Mountain Home School District Branch 
has been temporarily discontinued. The 
post office of Rocky Hill Branch has been 
changed to Exeter, of Stone Corral 
Branch to Seville, and of Woodville 
Branch to Tulare, Route C. 

Plans for the Carnegie Library at Orosi 
are now in the hands of the Carnegie 
Corporation. Three thousand dollars has 
been assured by that corporation and 
.$2000 has been donated by townpeople. 
The lots have been presents to the county 
by the Orosi Improvement Club. 

Ninety-six teachers from 50 schools vis- 
ited the main office during the quarter. 
Some teachers called several times, but 
this count is but one for each teacher. 

Custodians from 14 stations called at 
the main office this quarter. 

Bessie Herrman Twaddle, 

Librarian. 
Alta Robles School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Porterville). 

Alta Robles School Dist. Brancu, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 21, 1918. 
Dinuba. 

Dinuba Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Farmersville. 

Farmersville Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Goshen. 

Goshen Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
Lindcove (P. O. Exeter). 
Lindcove Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library, was established March 22, 1918. 

Mt. Home School Dist. 

Mt. Home School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Oakland Colony School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Tulare). 
Oakland Colony School Dist. 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library, was 
established January 25, 1918. 

Olive School Dist. (P O. and exp. 

Porterville). 
Olive School Dist. Branch, Tulare 
Co. Free Library, was established March 
22, 1918. 

Orosi (Exp. Cutler). 
Orosi Branch, Tulare Co. Free Li- 

liRARY. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Pixley. 

PixLEY Branch, Tulare Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Rocky Hill (P. O. Exeter; exp. 
Lindsay). 

Rocky Hill Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 
Stone Corral (P. O. and exp. Seville). 

Stone Corral Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Terra Bella. 

Terra Bella Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 

Tulare, 

Tulare Free Public Library and 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Rosa D. Reardon, Lib'n. 

It is cheering to note that, notwith- 
standing all the war work, our circulation 
continues to increase, and we ai'e issuing 
more history, biography and books on the 
war. 

The library is doing its "bit" by join- 
ing in all the campaigns to win the war — 



vol. 13, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



215 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
Tulare — Continued, 
for food conservation by having the food 
pledges signed in the library, distributing 
literature in all books issued, making bul- 
letins and having posters in prominent 
places in the business district, making lists 
of books and pamphlets and having them 
conveniently arranged to attract attention. 

The response of our people both to the 
"soldier's book fund" and request for 
books has been very generous ; we ex- 
ceeded our quota for the fund and have 
sent two hundred and fifty books to Camp 
Kearny. 

The library helped in the organization 
of a school for foreign-born men and 
women ; also provides books, pamphlets, 
etc. 

Soldier scrap books have been given to 
the "Camp-fire Girls" and twelve are 
ready for next shipment of books. 

Rosa D. Reardon, 

Librarian. 

Visalia. 

YiSALiA Fbee [Public] Library and 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library. 
Mrs M. J. McEwen, Lib'n. 

One shipment of two hundred and fifty 
books donated by patrons of the library 
have been sent to Camp Kearny. Many 
magazines were gathered and donated to 
the Red Cross. 

The stores, clubhouses. Red Cross rooms, 
hotels, theaters and restaurants have co- 
operated with the library in exhibiting 
posters on books for soldiers. 

The librai'y has maintained for some 
months an exhibit of war books and 
pamphlets, also posters on Food Conserva- 
tion. 

The war pictures received each week at 
the library create much interest for the 
readers. The school children are especi- 
ally interested and watch eagerly for each 
new picture as it comes out. 

The library loaned, through the Tulare 
County Free Library, six hundred and 
fifty books, mostly medical, to the Sutro 
Branch of the State Library. 

The Board of Trustees at their March 
meeting gave an increase in the salaries 
of the librarian and assistant librarian. 
The Board also voted to purchase a flag 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
V i sa I i a — Continued, 
for the librarj'. The purchase was made 
and the flag raised by Colonel G. W. 
Stewart, member of the Board of Library 
Trustees. 

Mrs M. J. McEwEN, 

Librarian. 

Woodville (P. O. Tulare, Route C; exp. 
stage from Tipton). 

Woodville Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free lA- 
brary. 

Yettem. 

Tettem School Dist. Branch, Tu- 
lare Co. Free Library. 

See note under Tulare County Free Li- 
brary. 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 9979. 
Assessed valuation $9,475,252 (taxable 
for county $8,047,988). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sono- 
EA. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches have been 
established at Center Camp and Curtis 
Creek School District. 

Edna Holroyd, 

Librarian. 

Tuolumne Co. Law Library, Sonora. 
G. W. Nicol, Superior Judge, in charge. 

There are now in the Tuolumne County 
Law Librai'y 1414 volumes. 

G. W. Nicol. 

Center Camp (P. O. Soulsbyville; no 
exp. office). 
Center Camp Branch, Tuolumne 
Co. Free Library, was established Janu- 
ary 8, 1918. 

Curtis Creek School Dist. (P. O. 
Standard City; exp. Sonora). 

Curtis Creek School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 18, 1918. 



216 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 18,347. 
Assessed valuation $30,599,968 (taxable 
for county $29,644,284). 

Santa Paula. 

§Dean Hobbs Blakchabd Memoeial 
[Feee Public] Library. Aliss Mabel 
Gertrude Wood, Lib'n. 

Owing to the splendid co-operation of 
the grammar and high schools, both in 
regard to the teachers and the pupils, we 
have been able to collect and prepare for 
shipment 1068 books to send to the sol- 
diers. In addition to books, we have nine 
Victrola records, two good musical instru- 
ments for them, besides $2.00 in cash. 

Up to date, since November 1st, we have 
distributed 2300 sheets of war recipes 
gleaned from various sources, each sheet 
containing at least five or sis well-tried 
recipes. Besides these, numerous Gov- 
ernment pamphlets pertaining to agricul- 
ture and home vegetable gardens have 
been distributed. 

On March 9th, Miss S. E. Blauchard, 
president of the Board of Trustees, and 
the librarian, attended the dedication of 
the camp library at Camp Kearny. 

The Librarian has just finished clas- 
sifying and largely assisted in the catalog- 
ing of the Grammar School Library of 
this city, a library of 1200 to 150O books. 
There is perfect co-operation between the 
schools and the library in Santa Paula. 
Mabel Gertrude Wood, 

Librarian. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 13,926. 
Assessed valuation $23,008,670 (taxable 
for county $22,196,655). 

Yolo Co. Free Libhary, Woodland. 
Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian and assistant, 
Miss Nann Laugenour, attended the meet- 
ing of the Fifth, Eighth and Ninth dis- 
tricts of the California Library Associa- 
tion at Oroville, March 31st. 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 
Miss Vivian Gregory has been granted 
leave of absence for ninety days, begin- 
ning April first. 

Friday evening, January 4th, the County 
Librarian read a paper on the subject of 
children's books and reading before the 
Parent-Teacher Association of Woodland. 
In February about two hundred books 
and a shipment of magazines were sent to 
Camp Fremont. 

Eleanor LIitt, 

Librarian. 

The plans for the proposed Carnegie Li- 
brary building at Yolo are now in the 
hands of the Carnegie Corporation in New 
York. — Woodland Democrat, Ja 23 

Davis. 

Davis Free Library. Miss Hattie 
Weber, Lib'n. 

The circulation for the last three 
months has been 1000 books and 53 maga- 
zines. 

Hattie Weber, 

Librarian. 

Yolo. 

Yolo Branch, Yolo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

*S'ce note under Yolo County Free Li- 
brary. 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,042. 
Assessed valuation $10,588,860 (taxable 
for county $9,549,760). 

Wheatland. 

Wheatland High School Library. 
Will Jessup, Prin. 

The Wheatland High School has added 
to its library the following books : his- 
tory, two books ; science, two books ; Eng- 
lish, three books ; also Harper's Dictionary 
of Classical Literature and Antiquities, 
and the five volume New Practical Ref- 
erence Library. A complete set of the 
Bancroft Histories, in library sheep bind- 
ing, was presented to the High School 
by the Hicks Estate. 

Will Jessup, 

Principal. 



vol. 13, no. 2] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



217 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



Many public libraries waste a great 
deal of time and money before they find 
Rood places to get supplies. The plan is 
to give all libraries the benefit of the 
experience of the older libraries of the 
State by listing under different heads the 
houses that have been found to give sat- 
isfaction, the names and addresses being 
furnished by the older and larger libraries 
of California. In this way suggestions 
will be given as to where different sorts 
of books may be bought, where books may 
be rebound or periodicals bound, where 
library furniture may be bought, etc., 
both in California and in the East. 

If any information is needed about the 
firms listed below which can not be ob- 
tained from the firms themselves, the 
names of the libraries recommending the 
diffei'ent ones will be sent to any library 
upon application to the State Library. 

SUPPLIES 
Amateur Plays. 

Acting Dramas for Amateurs. 

The Rook Den, 464 Eighth st, Oakland, 
Calif. 

A. L. A. 

Booklist. 

78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Catalog. 
1904 ed. $1. 

Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C. 
1904-11 ed. $1.50. 

A. L. A. Pub. Board, 78 E. Washington 
St., Chicago, 111. 
Headquarters and Publishing Board, 
78 E. Washington st., Chicago, HI. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Foster & Futernick Co., 560 Mission 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 51-65 First st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
H. J. Lawrence, Sacramento, R.F.D. 5, 

Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 10th floor, 

Metropolitan bldg., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoeubackler, 423 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 



Blind. 
Embossed books, etc. Addresses will be 
furnished by the State Library. 
Book Cases. 
McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau, 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 
Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 3.51 Beach st, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Corrugated paper cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and Fol- 
som sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Richardson-Gase Paper Co., 1021 Front 
St., Sacramento, Calif. 
Book Plates. 

Alice A. Harrison, 2005 Green st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 
27th St., New York, N. Y. 

Times-Mirror Printing & Binding Co., 
118 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 
Second St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 51-65 First st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 104 Battery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San B"'rancisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 



218 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Book Stacks, Etc. — Continued. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

P. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Books. 
Baker Taylor Co., 33-37 East Seven- 
teenth St., New York City. 
H. S. Crocker & Co., 5G5-571 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Emporium, 835-865 Market st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 

New York, N. Y. 
H. R. Huntting Co., Besse Place, 

Springfield, Ohio. 
Messrs. A. C. McClurg & Co., 218-24 

S. Wabash ave., Chicago, 111. 
McDevdtt- Wilson Book Shop, 30 Church 

st. New York City. 
John J. Newbegin, 149 Grant ave., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 

220 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st., Sacramento, 

Calif. 
B. A. Rogers & Co., 427 W. 7th st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, 5th ave. and 48th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Union Library Association, 225 Fifth 

ave.. New York City. 
White House, Sutter bet. Grant ave. 

and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 
English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, W. C, London. 
FoEEiGN Books and Publications in 

Vaeious Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 



Books — Continued. 
Lemcke & Buechner, 11 East Seven- 
teenth St., New York City. 
French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & 
J. Lelabriandais, 324 Stockto- st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, Paris, France. 
German. 

Messrs. Mayer & Miiller, Berlin, Ger- 
many. 
Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 262 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez. Madrid, Spain. 
Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st, 

Albany, N. Y. 
School Books. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch Co., 252 

S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Ginn & Co., 20 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
Messrs. A. C. McClurg & Co., 218-24 

S. Wabash ave., Chicago, 111. 
Milton Bradley Co., 20 Second st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
White House, Sutter St., bet. Grant ave. 

and Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson Book Shop, 30 Church 

St., New York City. 
Henry Malkan, 18 Broadway, New 

York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New Ox- 
ford St., London, Eng. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq., 
London, England. 

Pjspecially Californiana. 

Robert B. Cowan, 867 Treat ave., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Dawson's Book Shop, 518 S. Hill st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
De Witt & Snelling, 1609 Telegraph 

ave., Oakland, Calif. 
Holmes Old Book Co., 70 Third st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Cabinets. 
See FuENiTUEE and Supplies. 



vol. 13, no. 2] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



219 



Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors). 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

W. F. Purnell, 915 K St., Sacramento, 
Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 589 Market St.. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman and Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
716 Mission St., San Francisco, and 
627 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charts. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, SS First 
St., San Francisco, and 605 Jeffries 
Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 

TMcKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Bandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent. New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 
See E^UBNiTURE and Supplies. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes Stassforth Co., 232-234 S. 

Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
McKee & Hughes (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st., Sacramento, 

Calif. 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe jNIanufacturing Co., 
716 Mission st., San Francisco, and 
627 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Filing cases for music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st, Sacramento, 

Calif. 
Rand-McNally Co., 459 S. Olive st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
C. F. Weber & Co., 365-367 Market st.. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazines. 

See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

A. C. McKenzie, Russ Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

W. F. Purnell, 915 K St., Sacramento, 
Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 459 S. Olive st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365-367 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay «& Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st.. New York. 
N. Y. 

Pamphlets and Multi-Binders and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 130 Liberty St.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbers. 

Boston Book Co., 83-91 Francis st., 

Fenway, Boston, Mass. 
De Witt & Snelling, 1609 Telegraph 
ave., Oakland, Calif. 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LliBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Periodicals — Continued. 
International Magazine Co., 339 Bay 

Way North, Elizabeth, N. J. 
G. E. Stechert « Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 

ave., New York City. 

SuBSCKiPTioN Agencies. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 

Square, New York City. 
Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 

zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
W. F. Purnell, 915 K st., Sacramento, 

Calif. 
San Francisco News Co., 747 Howard 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
Western States Magazine Co., 40.5-406 

Maskey Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 

ave.. New York City. 

Pictures. 

Berlin Photographic Co., 305 Madison 
ave., New York City. 

Braun & Co., 13 W. 46th st, New York 
City. 

Maison Ad Braun & Cie, 256 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y., and Paris, France. 

Curtis & Cameron, Copley square, Bos- 
ton Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., 651 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label-Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Signs. 

Droragold-Schroeder Co., 1033 S. Los 

. Angeles st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Elite Sign Co., 108 Winston st, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Sam H. Harris, 113 W. 6th st, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 1212 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Tablet & Ticket Co., Ill New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
Philip Brigandi (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 1232 N. New Hampshire av., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Willis E. Case (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 1920 Cedar st, Berkeley, 

Calif. 
Underwood & Underwood, 12-14 W.. 

34th St., New York, N. Y. 
W. F. Hyde (Agent Underwood & Un- 
derwood) Los Altos, Calif. 
Theo. F. Wambold, 1137 W. 11th st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 432 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 276 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 637 S. Olive st., 
Los Angeles, and 1127 9th st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 319 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
st, San Francisco, 508 S. Hill St., 
Los Angeles, and 611 J st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

California State Library School. For 
full information write to the State Li- 
brarian, Sacramento, California. 

(S'ee also this publication, page 234. 

Los Angeles Public Library Training 
School. For full information, write to 



vol. 13, no. 2] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES^ ETC. 



221 



Librarian, Public Library, Los Angeles, 
California. 

Riverside Library Service Scbool. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, California. 

See also this publication, page 196. 

University of California Summer 
Course in Library Methods. For full 
information write to Librarian, Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The next conference of the American 
Library Association will be held at Sara- 
toga Springs, New York, July 1 to 6, 1918. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The annual meeting of the California 
Library Association will be held at Plotel 
Del Monte, June IS to 22, 1918. 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRA- 
RIANS. 

The California County Librarians' 
Convention will be held this year in con- 
junction with the meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association at Hotel Del 
Monte, June 18 to 22. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library Asso- 
ciation for 1918 are : 

President, Miss Mignou Baker, Girls' 
High School, Riverside. 

Vice President, Mrs Virginia C. Bacon, 
Humboldt State Normal School, Areata. 

Secretary-Treasurers : 

Southern Division, Miss Hope L. Pot- 
ter, Redlands High School. 

Northern Division, Miss Evelyn A. 
Steele, Oakland Technical High School. 



LIBRARIANS WITH THE COLORS. 

An Honor Roll. 

The American Library Association 
wants a card index of the name of every 
librarian who is in the military or naval 
service of the United States or Canada, 
or any of our Allies. 

May the Association have the help of 
all who read this announcement, and 
know of librarians who are serving with 
the Colors? 

Send the information, if convenient, on 
a white, punched 3 by 5 ordinary catalog- 
card. 

1. Name (inverted) of man in the service. 

(If hand-written be sure to write 
very legibly.) 

2. Name of library with which he was 

connected, town, and state or province 

3. Position he held in library ; e.g. libra- 

rian, cataloger, general assistant, etc. 

4. Military position now held (rank, arm 

of the service, etc., e.g. First Lieu- 
tenant, Infantry). 

Mail this card promptly to the Ameri- 
can Library Association, 78 East Wash- 
ington street, Chicago. 

We want a service flag at the Saratoga 
Springs Conference the first week in 
July, and we want every librarian in the 
service to be represented in that flag. 

But even more important, the A. L. A. 
wants to keep this Roll of Honor as a 
permanent and valued record, which in 
due time will doubtless be printed. 

American Libraey Association, 

George B. Utley, Secretary. 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

What is represented to be a new map 
of the State of California has recently 
been published. This map, called the 
Engineers Official Map of the State of 
California, is dated 1918, but a close ex- 
amination of the 8 shows that it is a 5 
made over into an 8. This seems to be 
the only change in the map. Librarians 
should be on the watch so as not to be 
deceived by false representations. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(Prom reiiorts of Countv Superintendents of Schools, 1916-17.) 
Total school districts- 
Elementary i 3,512 

High 308 

Total expended for elementary schools — 

Books $174136.39 

Apparatus $39,356.67 

Total expended for books and apparatus lor high sshools $202,557.57 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,793,909 

Total volumes in high schools 468,993 



222 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Vice-President, Robert Rea, Public 
Library, San Francisco. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Nell Strother, 
Fresno County Free Library, Fresno. 
Trustees Section. 

President, Eugene Ferry Smith, Trustee 
Public Library, San Diego. 

Vice-President, Harry Shafer, Trustee 
Public Library, Hanford. 

Secretary, Miss Blanche Morse, Ti-us- 
tee Public Library, Berkeley. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer and 
Milton J. Ferguson, Celia Gleason, Eu- 
gene Ferry Smith, Everett R. Perry, 
George T. Clark, Mrs Elizabeth Madison. 

nominating — The Past Presidents : 
Joseph C. Rowell, George T, Clark, 
Charles S. Greene, F. B. Graves, Joy 
Lichtenstein, L. W. Ripley, Harold L. 
Leupp, Everett R. Perry. 

The Committee consists of the Past 
Presidents, together with one nominator 
from each district, to be chosen in accord- 
ance with tlie amendment to the constitu- 
tion adopted June 16, 1914. 

District Nominators — »Second district, 
Anne B. Bailey ; Fourth district, Mrs Julia 
G. Babcock ; Fifth district. Hattie M. 
Mann ; Sixth district, Julia Steffa ; Eighth 
district, Dorothy L. Clarke ; Ninth dis- 
trict ; Essae M. Culver. 

Publications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Eleanor 
Hitt, Jean Ross. 

Auditing — Althea H. Warren, Public 
Library, San Diego, chairman ; Frances 
D. Patterson. 

Resolutions — J. C. Rowell, University 
of California Library, Berkeley, chair- 
man ; Helen T. Kennedy, Caroline S. 
Waters. 

Legislative — J. H. Quire, State Li- 
brary, Sacramento, chairman ; Charles S. 
Greene, Charles F. Woods. 

Liirary Schools — Mabel R. Gillis, 
State Library, Sacramento, chairman ; 



Sydney B. Mitchell, Mrs Theodora R. 
Brewitt, Charlotte M. Brown, George T. 
Clark, J. F. Daniels. 

Military Liirary Service — Milton J. 
Ferguson, State Library, Sacramento, 
chairman ; Bessie B. Silverthorn, Dor- 
othy L. Clarke, Ida M. Reagan, Clara B. 
Dills, Robert Rea, Anne Bell Bailey, 
Victor E. Marriott, Anne Hadden, Nellie 
M. Russ, Althea H. Warren, Katharine 
P. Ferris, Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Mrs 
Alice G. Whitbeck, Joseph F. Daniels. 

Work icith Prisons — Mary Barmby, 

Alameda County Free Library, Oakland, 

chairman ; Zaidee Brown, Mrs Alice G. 
Whitbeck. 

Certification — Everett R. Perry, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; Wini- 
fred H. Bigley, Charles S. Greene, Milton 
J. Ferguson, Althea H. Warren. 

Constitution — Eugene Ferry Smith, 
Public Library, San Diego, chairman ; 
Zaidee Brown, Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, 
Milton J. Ferguson, George T. Clark. 

Entertainment — Susan T. Smith, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Mar- 
garet Hatch, Eleanor Hitt, Cornelia D. 
Provines, Mary L. Jones. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND DIS- 
TRICTS. 
First District. 

President, Charles V. Park, University 
Librai-y, Stanford University. 

Secretary, L. May Brooks, University 
Library, Stanford University. 

The first district consists of the fol- 
lowing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Anne Bell Bailey, San Ma- 
teo County Free Library, Redwood City. 

Secretary, Mrs Mary Gervais, Public 
Library, Burlingame. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda (excepting Ala- 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



223 



meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 

Third District. 

President, Clara B. Dills, Solano 
County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Secretary, Margaret Adelle Barnett, 
Public Library, Santa Rosa. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendocino, 
Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Kern 
County Free Library, Bakersfield. 

Secretary, Corina Kittelson, Kern 
County Free Library, Bakersfield. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, Hattie Mann, Public Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

Secretary, Ida Condit, Public Library, 
Stockton. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Julia Steffa, Ventura County 
Free Library, Ventura. 

Secretary, Mrs Frances B. Linn, Pub- 
lic Library, Santa Barbara. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, H. A. Kendal, Public Li- 
brary, Eureka. 

Secretary, Florence Simpson, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Dorothy L. Clarke, Plumas 
County Free Library, Quincy. 



Secretary, Anna L. Williams, Public 
Library, Alturas. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Essae M. Culver, Butte 
County Free Library, Oroville. 

Secretary, Louise Jamme, Colusa 
County Free Library, Colusa. 

The niuth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Tuba. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the California 
Library Association will be held at Hotel 
Del Monte, June IS to 22, 1918. An in- 
teresting program is being arranged, apd 
the first meeting will be held on Tuesday 
afternoon, the ISth, at 2.30 o'clock. 

The following rates have been quoted 
at the Hotel Del Monte, and taking the 
high cost of living into consideration, 
thej- are very reasonable. 

For two people in room, with or with- 
out bath, .$4.00 per day for each per- 
son, separate beds, if so desired. 

For one person in room, with or with- 
out bath, .$4.50 per day. 

These rates are American plan, includ- 
ing room and board. The management 
has granted these rates to any who wish 
to stay over Sunday. 

It is hoped that as many as possible 
will stay at the hotel, as so much is to 
be gained by personal contact outside of 
the meetings. Entertainment is being 
planned for each evening. 

Sixth District IVIeeting. 

The sixth district of the California Li- 
brary Association -met in convention at 
11 o'clock, March 9, 1918, in the Ameri- 
can Library Association Camp Library at 
Camp Kearny, Miss .Julia Steffa, presi- 
dent, in the chair. 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle, president of 
the California Library Association, ex- 
tended greetings to the meeting. 

Everett R. Perry explained the history 
and purpose of proposed amendments to 
section 6 and section 12 of the constitu- 
tion of the California Library Associa- 
tion. 



224 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Because of the postponement of the di- 
vision review of the 40th Division to the 
afternoon of March 9, the program for the 
dedication of the American Library Asso- 
ciation Camp Library was merged with 
the morning program for the sixth dis- 
trict meeting. 

On the arrival of Major General Fred- 
erick S. Strong, Commanding Officer of 
the 40th Division, business was suspended 
for the informal dedication of'the Camp 
Library. 

M. J. Ferguson, State Librarian, and 
State Director of Library War Service, 
made the presentation of the building. 
He gave the assurance that librarians 
were anxious to do their generous share 
in aiding to win the war and said that 
camp libraries were one evidence of that 
desire. 

Major General Strong accepted the 
building on behalf of the men of the ser- 
vice. He voiced his appreciation of the 
work which the library was accomplish- 
ing in instructing the men in the history 
and aims of the war and expressed his 
gratitude to the American Library Asso- 
ciation and the librarians of the south for 
the library building and the opportunities 
which were placed before the men. 

The business session was then resumed. 
Nominations for district nominator for 
the California Library Association were 
called for. Miss Jennie Herrman placed 
in nomination Miss Julia Steffa and Miss 
Althea Warren seconded the nomination. 
The secretary took the chair. As there 
were no further nominations, the ques- 
tion was put and Miss Steffa was unani- 
mously elected. 

Mr Ferguson then spoke on "The libra- 
rian in war time." He said that Califor- 
nia was better equipped for war service 
than most states because of the com- 



prehensive library system. He outlined 
the growth of the system and told of the 
interest it was provoking in other states. 

Mrs Ethel Hueston Best, author of 
"Prudence of the Parsonage" and other 
recent popular books, spoke entertainingly 
of how she came to write the books and 
of the mission which she wished them to 
serve. 

Mrs Frances M. Carlton-Harmon, Li- 
brary Publicity Director for California 
for the United States Food Administra- 
tion, spoke on "War publicity through 
libraries," giving concrete suggestions for 
the extension and expansion of the work 
already being done by libraries. 

Chaplain Arthur W. T. Hicks, 1.59th 
Infantry, who had been unable to be pres- 
ent for the address of welcome, spoke 
briefly of the value of books and maga- 
zines in the camp. 

.J. H. Quire, Camp Librarian, spoke on 
"The Camp Kearny Library and its 
needs." He sketched briefly the history 
and organization of Camp Kearny and 
the development of library service in the 
camp. He estimated the needs of the 
camp to be 15,000 additional books, of 
which number he asked that 13,000 be 
sent by gift from individuals. Of these 
gift shipnients, he asked that about 10,000 
volumes be flction and the remainder non- 
fiction. 

The meeting adjourned at 1 o'clock to 
the mess hall of Company M, IGOth In- 
fantry, for luncheon. 

After luncheon, the members took seats 
on a special grandstand provided through 
the courtesy of the Y. M. C. A. and wit- 
nessed the review of the 40th Division. 
At the conclusion of the review, one party 
visited the Knights of Columbus building 
and Y. M. C. A. No. 3, and another party 
returned to inspect the camp library. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



ROARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



225 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Everett E. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library, Secretary. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free li- 
brary law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 1911) 
read as follows : 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library . . . 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing, by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of county 
librarian unless prior to his appointment, 
he has received from the board of library 
examiners a certificate of qualification for 
the office. At the time of his appoint- 
ment, the county librarian need not be a 
resident of the county nor a citizen of the 
State of California. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade certificates are valid 
for use throughout the state ; second grade, 
in counties of the twenty-first to the fifty- 
eightli (except twentj'-fiftli and thirty- 
third) classes, inclusive. Tliird- grade 
certificates, formerly issued for use in 
counties of the forty-ninth to the flfty- 
eiglith classes, inclusive, are no longer 
issued. 

First Grade. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., L.n. Kern Countv 

Free Library, Bakersfleld. 
Bailey, Anne Bell. Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. 
Barmby, Mary, Chief Alameda County 

Dept., Free Library, Oakland. 
Bigley, T^Hnifred H., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Culver. Essae M., Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
Daniels, Joseph F., Ln. Riverside Public 

Tabrary and Riverside County Free Li- 
brary, Riverside. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Evans, Helen, Asst. State Normal School 

Library, San Jose. 



Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 
Sacramento. 

Ferris, Katharine Post, Ln. Kings County 
Free Library, Hanford. 

Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Greene, Charles S., Ln. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 

Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 
Library, Salinas. 

Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 
State Library, Sacramento. 

Herrman, Jennie, Ln. San Diego County 
Free Library, San Diego. 

Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. Yolo County Free 
Librarj^ Woodland. 

Huntington, Stella, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, Santa 
Barbara. 

McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

Mast, Maude L., 731 Taylor st. N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Stanislaus 
County Free Library, Modesto. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. 

Ripley, Lauren W., Ln. Sacramento City 
Free Library and Sacramento County 
Free Library, Sacrarnento. 

Robson, Anna Laura, Ln. Glenn County 
Free Library, Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. Siskiyou County 
Free Library, Treka. 

Smith, Susan T., Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Steffa, Julia, Ln. Ventura County Free 
Library, "Ventura. 

Steffens, Laura, Ln. Sutro Branch State 
Litararv, San Francisco. 

Thomas, Mabel W., Chief City Branch 
Dept., Frpe Library, Oakland. 

Twaddle, Mrs Bessie (Herrman), Ln. 
Tulare County Free Library, Visalia. 

Vogleson, Helen E., 2d Asst. Ln. Los 
Angeles County Free Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Ln. Public Library, 
San Diego. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Public Li- 
brary, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County PYee Library, Martinez. 

Second Grade. 

Anderson, Alice, Acting Ln. Trinity 
County Free Library, Weaverville. 

Baird, Jean D., Asst. Alameda County 
Dept., Free Library, Oakland. 

Baker. Mignon, Ln. Girls High School 
Branch, Public Library, Riverside. 



226 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Beeman, Mrs Anne (Madison), Mrs Thomas 
Beeman, Ln. Imperial County Free Li- 
brary, El Centre. 

Brewitt, Mrs Theodora R., Principal 
Training School, Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Brown, Jennie May, Box 282, Long Beach. 

Butterfleld, Alice M., Asst. Public Library, 
Riverside. 

Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Inyo County Free 
Library, Independence. 

Clarke, Dorothy L., Ln. Plumas County 
Free Library, Quincy. 

Clatworthy, Linda M., Ref. Ln. State Col- 
lege of Washington Library, Pullman, 
Wash. 

Coulter, Mabel, Ln. San Benito County 
Free Library, Hollister. 

De Ford, Estella, Ln. Tehama County 
Free Library, Red Bluff. 

Dickson, Lillian L., Head Cataloger, 
Public Library, Riverside. 

Dold, Margaret E., Cataloger, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Glock, Mary B., Ln. Madera County Free 
Library, Madera. 

Goldman, Belle A., Superintendent of 
Branches and Stations, Public Library, 
San Francisco. 

Hatch. Margaret, Ln. Sutter County P. L., 
Tuba City. 

Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. Tuolumne County 
Free Library, Sonora. 

Jamme, Louise E., Ln. Colusa County 
Free Library. Colusa. 

Laugenour, Nann C, Asst. Yolo County 
Free Library, Woodland. 

Mclntire, Persis C, Asst. State Library, 
Sacramento. 

McNeill, Norah, Ln. Public Library, Rich- 
mond. 

Maynard, Glyde, Asst. Chaffey Library, 
Ontario. 

Mumm, Beulah, In charge Library School, 
State Library, Sacramento. 

Northey, Delia F., Asst. Kern County Free 
Library, Bakersfleld. 

Schumacher, Marion L., Asst. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Smith, Mrs Mary Pierce, care State Pur- 
chasing Dept., Sacramento. 

Thompson, Laura E., Asst. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Third Grade. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Dehan, Mrs Anna (Weyand) Mrs Den- 
nis J. Dehan (2d grade). 

Ellis, Victoria (2d grade). 

Kennedy, Mrs Gladys (Brownson), Mrs 
Scott J. Kennedy (1st grade). 

McVittie, Mrs Delia (Wilsey), Mrs J. A. 
McVittie (2d grade). 

Post, Mrs Miriam (Colcord), Mrs Free- 
man Post (2d grade). 

Sutherland, Florence C. (2d grade). 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library law 
and circular of information for applicants 
for certificates of Qualification to hold 
ofiioe of county librarian in California" 



was published in News Notes of California 
Libraries, April, 1911, and later re- 
printed in pamphlet form. The edition 
being exhausted, a revised edition of the 
circular was printed in News Notes of 
California Libraries, January, 1914. This 
has been reprinted as a pamphlet. Copies 
will be furnished by the State Librarian. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The Board of Library Examiners de- 
sires to call the attention of librarians to 
the examinations which will be held at 
Los Angeles on June 7-8 and at Sacra- 
mento on June 14-15 for those persons 
who want to qualify for the position of 
county librarian under the California 
County Free Library Act of 1911. The 
Board feels that the nature of the work, 
its importance in the development of the 
educational life and institutions of the 
state, its relationship to industrial and 
economic conditions and the compensation 
offered successful candidates who receive 
appointments make this service worthy of 
the best efforts of the best material in 
library circles. Of the work which has 
been done in California since the enact- 
ment of this law the examiners feel a 
justifiable pride ; and they are anxious 
that the new candidates who may present 
themselves may profit by the experiences 
of those who have been in the service, 
and may also bring to this work the best 
foundation upon which to build a success- 
ful career. If, therefore, a librarian who 
expects to take the examination will add 
to his general education and his technical 
training actual experience in a county 
free library, his chances of passing the 
examination with creditable showing will 
be enhanced. Naturally service in any 
sort of library, however, will give the 
candidate a certain vantage ground ; the 
wider the range of work, the better are the 
chances of passing the test with high 
grade. 

California counties have their peculiari- 
ties just as have the counties and peoples 
of other states. One who is unfamiliar 
with those conditions and peculiarities 
would in the beginning enter into the 
service with a certain liandicap. The 
Board, however, wishes to assure libra- 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



ROARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



227 



riaus who live without the borders of 
California that they are not barred from 
taking the examinations. While the tests 
will only be given within this state and 
for the year 191S at the places and times 
mentioned above, the lists are open to 
all library workers who have educational 
and professional qualifications. 

To the younger members of the pro- 
fession particularly the Board would urge 
that they give the fullest possible con- 
sideration to the subjects usually covered 
in library work, and that they become as 



familiar as possible with the .special laws 
and conditions under which they would 
serve should they pass the examinations 
and receive an appointment. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wnsh to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chair- 
man of the Board. For application blanks 
or further information address the Chair- 
man of the Board, M. J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian. Sacramento, California. 



228 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California State 
Library was signed by Governor Peter H. 
Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Septem- 
ber 4, 1913. 

Annual income for 1917-1918, $130,000'. 

Total accessions 200,496 (less 2532 
lost, missing and discarded = 197,964) , 
exclusive of 7804 accessions in Books for 
the Blind Department, and of the Sutro 
Branch in San Francisco (estimated at 
about 70,000 vols.). 

TRUSTEES. 

L. W. Ripley, Pres Sacramento 

Mrs Frances M. Harmon Los Angeles 

A. H. Hewitt Yuba City 

Max J. Kuhl San Francisco 

R. M. Richardson Sacramento 

Milton J. Ferguson, Sec'y Sacramento 

At the meeting of the Board of State 
Library Trustees, March 23, Lauren W. 
Ripley was reelected president of the 
Board for the coming year. 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Libra- 
rian and Head of Books for the Blind 
Department. 

Miss Laura Steffens, Librarian, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Harriet G. Eddy, County Library 
Organizer. 

Miss Eudora Garoutte, Head of Cali- 
fornia Department. 

Miss Alice J. Haines, Head of Docu- 
ments Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, School 
Library Organizer. 

Miss Annie Lowry, in charge of Period- 
icals and Binding. 

Miss Beulah Mumm, in charge of Li- 
brary School. 

Miss Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Joseph H. Quire, Legislative Reference 
Librarian. 

Miss Susan T. Smith, Reference Libra- 
rian. 

Miss Beryl Andrews, Assistant. 

Miss Theresa Bauer, Stenographer. 

Miss Ruth Beard, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Edna A. Bell, Assistant. 

Mrs Clara Murray Blood, Instructor in 
Library School. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, Assistant. 

Miss Elta L. Camper, Assistant. 



Miss Marjorie Chilberg, Assistant. 

Miss Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Miss Anna Creaner, Assistant. 

Miss Margaret Dennison, Assistant. 

Mrs Gerna R. Dickson, Assistant. 

Miss Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of 
the Blind, Sutro Branch, California 
State Library, San Francisco. 

Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Assistant. 

Miss Bernice L. Goff, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Vivian Gregory, Assistant. 

Miss Alice Hillyer, Assistant. 

Miss Gladys M. Kidd, Stenographer. 

Miss Anita Knopf, Stenographer, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Shipping Clerk and 
Cameragraph Operator. 

Wallace McBain, Assistant in Law 
Department. 

Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Assistant. 

Miss Persis C. Mclntire, Assistant. 

Miss Ruth McLaughlin, Assistant, 
Sutro Branch. 

JNIiss Laura Manhart, Assistant. 

Miss D. Florence Montfort, Assistant. 

Miss Catharine J. Morrison, Home 
Teacher of the Blind, 306A South Bonnie 
Brae st., Los Angeles. 

Miss Mary V. Provines, Assistant. 

Mips Helen M. Rowland, Assistant. 

Miss Marion L. Schumacher, Assistant. 

Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Lloyd Smith. Shelf Lister. 

Miss Lily Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Olive M. Treichler, Assistant. 

Elmer J. Walther, Assistant in Law 
Department. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Miss Emma F. de Merritt, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Miss Mae Sternsdorff. Book Repairer. 

Edmund Ackerman, Messengei". 

Joseph Cummins, Messenger, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Jack Harris, Messenger. 

Warren .Tones, Messenger. 

Carlton Penter, Messenger. 

.John W. Ross, Messenger. 

Kenneth Seaton, Mepsengev. 

John F. Driscoll, Assistant Janitor. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

Staff News Items. 

On January 11, Miss Florence Wheaton 
left to accept a position in Kern County 
Free Library, and on January 12, Miss 
Edna Hewitt resigned to be assistant in 
Sutter County Free Library. Mrs Mary 
Brown left on January 22 to take charge 
of the branch post office in the Capitol. 
Two messengers have resigned during the 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



229 



quarter : Ted Corson on March 10 and 
Thomas Lenahan on March 16. Robert 
Alexander, who was employed temporarily, 
left on January 5. 

Miss Margaret V. Girdner, who had 
been assistant in Siskiyou County Free 
Library, began work on .January 2. Miss 
Beryl Andrews and Miss Laura Manhart 
also have become assistants, the fonner on 
February 25, and the latter on March 1. 
Three new messengers have been employed, 
Warren Jones beginning February 25, 
Kenneth Seaton, March 12, and Carlton 
Penter, March 14. 

Miss Ruth McLaughlin of Sutro Branch 
is still on leave of absence, acting as as- 
sistant in Colusa County Free Library. 
Miss Vivian Gregory of Yolo County Free 
Library begins April 1 as temporary as- 
sistant in the State Library. Louis 
Nordbrook and Albert Walsh are working 
temporarily in the shipping department. 

On February 14 Miss Winona McCon- 
nell, 0. S. L. S., '15, resigned, and on 
February 27 was married to Dr John 
Elmer Kenned.y of Sacramento. 

For the past few months the employees 
of the California State Library have been 
holding monthly Staff meetings. At the 
first one in November Mr Ferguson gave 
a short talk and in December Miss Smith 
told of the work of the Reference Depart- 
ment. During this last quarter three 
meetings have been held. On January 15, 
Miss Eddy gave a demonstration of the 
work of the County Free Library Or- 
ganizer by means of a mock supervisors' 
meeting held by the students of the Cali- 
fornia State Library School. On Febru- 
ary 19, Miss Garoutte told of the work 
of the California Department and also of 
the earlier days of the Library- Mr 
Quire, who is librarian at Camp Kearny, 
was the speaker at the March meeting, 
held on the 26th. He told of the work 
at the camp which, of course, proved a 
very interesting subject to all members of 
the staff. The meetings are to be con- 
tinued each month. 

On March 30, a War Savings Society 
was formed at the library. 

On March 9th Mr Ferguson and Mr 
Quire attended the meeting of the Sixth 
District, California Library Association, 
at Camp Kearny. On March 30, the fol- 
lowing attended the joint meeting of the 
Fifth, Eighth and Ninth districts at Oro- 



ville : Mr Ferguson, Miss Eddy, Miss 
Garoutte, Miss Haines, Miss Mumm, Miss 
Mclntyre, Miss Girdner, Miss Montfort, 
Mr Quire. Also the following Library 
School students attended : Miss Brase- 
field, Miss Kellogg, Miss Marlow, Miss 
Moore, Miss Ranton, Miss Seymour. 

STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL. 

Miss Ruth Beard, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 

Francisco. 
Miss Edna A. Bell, Fairoaks, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Esther M. Bomgardner, San Diego, 
Cal. 

'15. Ln. National City High School, 
National City. 
Miss Helen V. Briggs, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Agnes E. Brown, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Univ. Farm School L., Davis. 
Miss Helen M. Bruner, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Ruth E. Bullock, Redlands, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Catalog dept., Los Angeles 
Co. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Miss Katharine Cahoon, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Madera Co. F. L., Madera. 
Miss Elta L. Camper, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Bishop, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence. 
Miss Dorothy L. Clarke, Sacramento, Cal. 

15. Ln. Plumas Co. F. L., Quincy. 
Miss Virginia B. Clowe, Woodland, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Mabel Coulter, Salinas, Cal. 

'14. Ln. San Benito Co. F. L., Hollister. 
Miss Dorotha Davis, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Fresno High School Library, 
Fresno. 
Miss Estella De Ford, National City, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Tehama Co. F. L., Red Bluff. 
Miss Margaret Dennison, Alameda, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Beatrice Y. Gawne, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Sacramento, 
Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Mary E. Clock, Madera, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Madera Co. F. L., Madera. 
Miss Bernice L. Goff, San Jose, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Vivian Gregory, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Sutter Co. F. L., Yuba City. 
Miss Cecilia Henderson, Santa Paula, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Edna S. Holroyd, Hanford, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Tuolumne Co. F. L., Sonora. 
Miss Louise E. Jamme, Hood River, Ore. 

'15. Ln. Colusa Co. F. L., Colusa. 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy, Elk 
Grove, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Amy G. Luke, Willows, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Winona McConnell, Elk Grove, Cal. 

'15. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 



230 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Lamanda Park, 
Cal. 

'17. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Miss Anne Margrave, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Santa Barbara Co. F. L., 
Santa Barbara. 
Miss Lenala Martin, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Acting Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., 
Susanville. 
Miss Marion Morse, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Kings Co. F. L., Hanford. 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret L. Potter, Oakland, Cal. 

'16. Asst. Stanislaus Co. F. L., Modesto. 
Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Redwood City, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Marion L. Schumacher, Hanford, Cal. 

'15. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Lodi, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Eunice D. Steele, Berkeley, Cal. 

'16. Ln. P. L., Hanford. 
Miss Caroline Wenzel, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Josephine L. Whitbeck, Richmond, 
Cal. 

'16. Asst. Solano Co. F. L., Fairfield. 

Class of 1918. 

Rosamond J. Bradbury, Santa Barbara 

University of California 
Beatrice M. Brasefleld, Palo Alto 

Stanford University 
Tillie de Bernardi, Santa Rosa 

University of California 
Edith Edinburg, Muroc 

Bethany College, Kansas 
Mildred Dorothy Kellogg, Salinas 

University of California 
Algeline M. Marlow, San Diego 

University of California 
Hazel Meddaugh, Stockton 

University of California 
Alice Moore, Los Gatos 

Stanford University 
Bess M. Ranton, Long Beach 

University of California 
Anne Belle Robinson, Claremont 

Pomona College 
Ruth Seymour, Mill Valley 

University of California 



SCHOOL NEWS ITEMS. 

The i-ollowing graduates of the Slate 
Library School have receised new ap- 
pointments _: 

Miss Mabel Coulter is now Librarian 
of San Benito County Free Library, hav- 
ing begun work March 1. Miss Mar- 
garet V. Girdner became assistant in the 
State Library, January 2. Miss Ruth 
McLaughlin is temporary assistant at 
Colusa County Fi"ee Library, and Miss 
Vivian Gregory is temporary assistant at 
the State Library. 

On February 27 Miss Winona McCon- 
nell was married to Dr John Elmer Ken- 
nedy of Sacramento. 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, '14, president. 

Miss Margaret L. Potter, '16, vice 
president. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, '14, secretary- 
treasurer. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Elmer J. Walthek, Assistant, in charge. 

The Law Department is fully equipped 
with the latest reports, digests, encyclo- 
psedias and textbooks, and is entirely 
free to the public for reference purposes. 
State officers are entitled to borrow books, 
and private individuals are accorded the 
same privilege upon presentation of a re- 
quest signed by a Supreme, Appellate or 
Superior Judge, or other state ofBcer. 
Books may be kept three weeks, and will 
be renewed for two weeks or longer, de- 
pending on demand. All books are sub- 
ject to recall, if required by a state officer. 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Copies of 29 California state publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries : 

Equalization Bd. Revenue laws. 1917. 
Fish & Game Comm. Cal. fish and game, 

vol. 4, no. 1. Jan. 1918. 
Health Bd. Register of nurses for 1915- 

1917. 
Horticulture Comm. Monthly bulletin, 

vol. 7, nos. 1-2. (in 1). Jan.-Feb. 

191S. 

California directory of nurserymen, 



1917-18. 
Industrial Accident Comm. Report. 1917. 

Bulletin no. 7. 

Cal. safety news, vol. 2, nos 1-2. 

Jan.-Feb. 1918. 

Information for employees regard- 



ing the workmen's compensation, insur- 
ance and safety act. Effective Jan. 1, 
1918. 

General construction safety orders. 



Effective Jan. 15, 1918. 1918. 
Market Comm. Market director report. 
1917. 

State F'ish exchange report, 1917. 



1918. 

Mining Bureau. Bull. 75, 77. 

Motor Vehicle Dept. Registered automo- 
biles. 1917. 7 vols. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



231 



Motor Vehicle Dept. Registered automo- 
biles, substitutions. Iv. 

Registered motorcycles. 1917. Iv. 

Normal School, Fresno. Circular of in- 
formation. Jan. 1918. 

Railroad Comm. Report. 1917. vols. 1-2. 

Real Estate Comm. Cal. real estate di- 
rectory-bulletin, Jan. 1918. 

Veterans Home. Report. 1917. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 
Susan T. Smith, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of the 
librarian, and to any other educational 
institution on request of its official head 
or its librarian ; to individuals through the 
signature of a state officer, of the Li- 
brarian of the local library or of the 
official head of any other educational in- 
stitution or on receipt of a $5.00 deposit ; 
to a club or grange on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

The State Library pays the cost of 
transportation as follows : to any general 
branch of the county free library that 
requests books for general library service 
and is located in a part of the county 
supporting the county free library ; to any 
(elementary or high) school district branch 
of the county free library that has joined 
the county free library and is wholly in a 
part of the county supporting the county 
free library; and. for school service only 
to any (elementary or high) school dis- 
trict branch of the county free library 
that has joined the county free library 
and is wholly or partly in a part of the 
county not supporting the county free 
library. In every other instance the 
charges both ways are paid by the bor- 
rower. All express companies grant a 
half-merchandise rate to the borrower on 
return shipments, and a half-merchandise 
rate both ways on shipments sent to 
libraries. 

From time to time the State Library is 
adding slides and stereographs for circu- 
lation. The following list gives some 
idea of the subjects covered by the col- 
lection : 

LANTERN SLIDES. 

50 colored bird slides. 

These consist of birds most com- 
monly known, as the blue bird, mock- 
ing bird, barn swallow, sparrows, 
blackbirds, etc. 

50 architectural slides. 

Includes The Taj Mahal in India; 
St. Paul's Cathedral, London ; Cologne 
Cathedral ; National Capitol ; Inde- 
pendence Hall, etc. 

50 masteiTjieces of sculpture. 

Includes the Winged Victory ; Colos- 
sal group of the Nile; Hermes; The 
Gladiator, etc. 

The above slides were published by 
the Keystone Co. Each set has a 
descriptive text. 



Forestr.v slides. 

The forestry slides which the library 
has had for some time have been 
revised by the State Forestry Depart- 
ment and divided into two sets, each 
containing sufficient slides for a lec- 
ture. Descriptive matter has been 
typed on cards. 

30 bookplates. 
34 on housing. 

19 Contra Costa County Free Library 

views. 
10 Humboldt County Free Libra I'y views. 

31 Los Angeles Countj' Free Library 

views. 
53 library buildings. 
25 horticultural subjects. 

STEREOGRAPHS. 
The following stereographs were pur- 
chased from the Keystone Co. : 
100 views of South America. 
01 views of China. 
50 views of Greece. 
39 views of Russia. 
50 views of California Missions. 
100 views of Panama-Pacific Exposition. 
72 views of Panama-California Exposi- 
tion. 

The stereographs issued by Underwood 
& LTnderwood which the State Library has 
had for some time are : 

79 views of California. 
123 views of cereals, lumber, etc. 
100 views of Egypt. 
100 views of England. 
109 views of fibres, fruits, sugar, etc. 
100 views of France. 
100 views of Germany. 
100 views of India. 
100 views of Italy. 
100 views of Japan. 
100 views of Palestine. 
100' views of Spain. 

IS views of Grand CaSon of Arizona. 

45 views of Panama Canal Zone. 
100 views of Ireland. 

39 views of life of Jesus. 



CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Mcnson, in charge. 

The work of the Catalog Department 
is proceeding along two parallel lines : the 
cataloging of the regular additions of new 
books, and the recataloging of much ma- 
terial needing a fuller treatment than it 
has heretofore received. 

During January, February and March, 
2905 volumes were cataloged, adding 
15,104 cards to the catalog. 



CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDOKA Gaeotjtte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of books 
on the history and description, resources 
and industries of the State, as well as the 
works of California authors in all de- 
partments of literature. These are made 



232 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



accessible by means of a card catalog. 
Full names and biographical sketches of 
California authors, artists, musicians, 
pioneers and early settlers are being se- 
cured, together with their photographs. 
The collection of bound periodicals is 
quite large. The Department also con- 
tains about 6000 bound volumes of news- 
papers, a file of which is being indexed 
with reference to the history of the State. 
Students will be assisted in their work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Alexander Williamson May, a pioneer 
of '49, is still living and has a lively 
recollection of many of the stirring events 
of the early days. His card, which is 
now on file, contains much interesting 
information. Mr May's home at the pres- 
ent time is in Oakland. 

Henry Custer, a native of Switzer- 
land, came to California in 1849. He 
was "a civil engineer of the highest rank 
and was employed by John A. Sutter to 
survey and locate the towns of Eliza 
and Butteville, also to make a map of 
Feather River from Yuba City to Nicho- 
las. Later Mr Custer was connected with 
the U. S. Coast Survey, also assisted in 
the Pacific railroad, northwest boundary 
and U. S. geological surveys. At the 
time of his death, which occurred in 
Switzerland, he was in the employ of the 
Swiss government. 

Samuel Bell was another pioneer of 
note. He served as State Controller in 
the early fifties. He also represented the 
county of Mariposa in the legislature of 
18.53. 

Other cards of interest received are as 
follows : Franklin Warner, Thomas S. 
Hawkins, Mrs Margaret Hostetter and 
Nathan Weston Blanchard. 

California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of (Jalifornia Libraries: 

*Andresen, Mrs Anna (Geil) 
Mrs J. H. Andresen 
Bachtell, Paul Bradshaw 
Bigelow, Mrs L Adda (Nichols) 
Mrs Levi Bigelow 
*Butters, Henry Augustus 
Coover, John Edgar 
Daley, Mrs Edith (Luce) 

Mrs Fred Hammond Daley 
Prank, Henry 
Howell, Alfred Brozier 
Hughes, Glenn Arthur 
*Lassen, Mrs May C (Reimer) 
Mrs Alexander C. Lassen 
*London, Mrs Charmian (Kittredge) 
Mrs Jack London 



*MezQuida, Mrs Anna (Blake) 

Mrs Mateo M Mezquida 
*Scripps, Robert Paine 
Stellmann, Mrs Edith (Kinney) 

Mrs Luis J. Stellmann 
*Stevens, Ashton [Price] 

California Musicians. 

The following musician cards have been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries: 

Goldthwaite, Mrs Ellen Beach (Yaw) 

Mrs Vere Goldthwaite 
Graham, Mrs Belle (Barnes) 
Mrs Edward L. Graham 
*Hecht, Elias Marcus 
*Jacobi, r'rederick 
Miller, Jaunita 
Natalie, Louise 

See Graham, Mrs Belle (Barnes) 
Newman, Anna 
Personne, N. 
Yaw, Ellen Beach 

See Goldthwaite, Mrs Ellen Beach 
(Yaw) 

California Artists. 

The following artist cai'ds have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of California Libraries: 

Bartlett, Dana 

Mayhew, Mrs Nell Brooker (Danely) 

Mrs Leonard Thomas Mayhew 
Melvill, Mrs Antonia (Miether) 

Mrs Charles Van Cortlandt Mel- 
will 
Rice, William Seltzer 

Magazine Index. 

The index, made by California libraries 
several years ago, covers the following 
California magazines : 

Californian, v. 1-6, 1889-1882. Complete. 
Californian illustrated magazine, v. 1-5, 

1891-1894. Complete. 
Hesperian, v. 1-8, 1858-1863. Complete. 
Hutching's California magazine, v. 1-5, 

1856-1861. Complete. 
Land of sunshine, v. 1-15, 1894-1901. 
Out west (formerly Land of sunshine), 

v. 16-31, 1902-1909. 
Overland monthly, v. 1-76, 1868-1910. 
Sunset magazine, v. 1-25, 1898-1910. 

The State Library School, classes of 
1915, 1916 and 1917 as practice work in 
indexing, added to this index the follow- 



Argonaut, v. 1, March 25-June 2, 1877. 

v. 2, Jan. 12-March 23, 1878, 

V. 3, July 13-Aug. 31, 1878. 

California fruit grower, v. 41, Jan.-March, 

1910. 
California mail bag, v. 1, June-July, 1871. 
(Tialifornia mountaineer, v. 1, Jan.-July, 

1861. 
California outlook, v. 1, Nov. 27, 1908- 

April 16, 1909. 
California weekly, v. 1, April 16-May 14, 

1909. 
Commonwealth club transactions, v. 1- 

v. 2, no. 1, Nov. 1903-Jan. 1906. 



''Native Californians. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



233 



Grizzly bear, v. 1-v. 3, no. 5, p. 7, May, 

1907-Sept., 1908. 
Mariposa magazine, 1 v. [1898?]. 
Out west, V. 35-v. 38, no. 4, Dec. 1911- 

Sept. 1913. 
Overland, v. 77-89, Jan. 1911-Dec. 1916. 
Pacific coast musical review, v. 11, no. 

1-8, Oct. 5-Nov. 23, 1907. 
Pacific monthly, v. 10-11, June, 1863-Nov. 
1864 (Feb., June and Sept., 1864, miss- 
ing). 
Pacific outlook, v. 10, Dec. 31, 1910-Feb. 

18, 1911. 
Pacific rural press, v. 79, Jan.-March, 

1910. 
Sunset, V. 26-v. 27, Jan. 1911-Dec. 1911. 
Wave, V. 6-7, Jan.-Sept. 5, 1891 ; v. 8, 

Jan. 2-Feta. 13, 1892. 
West coast magazine, vol. 9, Oct. 1910- 
Feb. 1911. 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the following periods : 
August 15, 1846, to March, 1905, and 
January, 1913, to date. 

Catalog. 

Three hundred and sixty-two cards have 
been added to the California catalog 
during January, February and March. 

Donations. 

Mrs A. A. Webber, of Oakland, has 
placed in the department some interesting 
items, among them manuscript reminis- 
cences of the first Masonic lodge in Oak- 
land. Other manuscripts are Resolutions 
regarding Franklin Warner by the Oak- 
land College School, Constitution and by- 
laws of the Oakland Philomathean Li- 
brary Association, and Constitution of 
the Foundation Milling Company. A 
number of early California books were 
also in the collection. 

A herbarium of California wild flowers 
has been presented by Miss Annie Lowry 
together with books, pamphlets and pic- 
tures. 

A very valuable donation is that of the 
Forest Theatre Society of Carmel. It 
consists of a large number of pictures and 
programs covering all plays produced 
since 1910. 

Miss Jaunita Miller has given us a num- 
ber of her musical compositions and other 
interesting items. 

Ellen Beach Yaw and Frederick Jacobi 
have also placed original compositions in 
our collection of California music. 

Pictures of the University of California 
campus and the campanile have been 
added by Miss Hazel Meddaugh. 



We are also indebted to Mrs Ella Ster- 
ling Mighels for a number of historical 
pictures. 

Antonia.Melvill, one of our artists, has 
added six photographic reproductions of 
her paintings to the art section. Mrs 
Nell Brooker Mayhew has also placed in 
this section a most beautiful colored 
etching. 

We are still desirous of completing our 
sets of eax'ly stereoscopic views. If you 
know of the location of these views kindly 
communicate with the State Library. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND DEPART- 
MENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in five different types 
are sent to any blind resident of Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried be- 
fore they are ordered. Addresses of firms 
supplying all articles loaned will be fur- 
nished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an insti- 
tution distributing embossed literature are 
carried free through the mails. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 1034 blind borrow- 
ers, 39 borrowers having been added dur- 
ing January, February and March. Total 
accessions are 7804, as follows : New 
York point books 1611 ; New York point 
music 155 ; American Braille books 1951 ; 
American Braille music 924 ; European 
Braille books 771 ; European Braille mu- 
sic 42 ; Moon books 1866 ; Moon music 3 ; 
Standard dot books 16 ; Line books 161 ; 
Line music 21 ; Ink print books 162 ; 
'■'Appliances 54 ; *Games 37 ; Maps 30'. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by J. R. 
Atkinson, F. B. Beans, Milton Champion, 
Mrs Susie Fancher, Miss B. M. Julian, 
Dr Thomas McMillan, Wm. A. Miller, 
.John O'Donnell, Mrs L. Sargent, Christian 
Record Publishing Co., Free Gospel Li- 
brary for the Blind, Michigan School for 
the Blind, New York Association for the 
Blind, Pennsylvania Institution for the 
Blind, Society for the Aid of the Sight- 
less, Western Pennsylvania Institution for 



♦Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



234 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



the Blind, Xavier Free PublicatioD So- 
ciety for the Blind, Ziegler Publishing Co. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. See 
page 26.5. 

During Januarj', February and March, 
.3399 books, etc., were loaned as follows : 
New York point 638 ; American Braille 
944; European Braille 372; Moon 1398; 
Standard dot 1 ; Line 13 ; Ink print 
books 9 ; Appliances 15 ; Maps 8 ; Games 
1. The loans were divided by class as 
follows : Philosophy and religion 328 ; so- 
ciology 33 ; language 45 ; primers 50 ; 
science 42 ; useful arts 52 ; fine arts ; 
amusements 1; music 30; literature 109; 
fiction 1024 ; travel and history 290 ; bi- 
ography 209 ; periodicals 520. 

Home Teaching. 

Miss Foley, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Sutro Branch of the State Li- 
brary, Sacramento and Webster streets, 
San Francisco, every Thursday from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. She gives lessons regu- 
larly in Alameda, Berkeley, Decoto and 
Oakland. Miss Morrison, home teacher 
of the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, tenth floor. Hall of Rec- 
ords, on Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons from 1.30 until 5.30 o'clock and 
at the Long Beach Public Library the 
second Thursday afternoon in each month. 
She gives lessons regularly in other nearby 
places. 

From .January 1 to March 31 they gave 
362 lessons in the homes of the blind 
and 211 lessons at the libraries and insti- 
tutions on the 03 afternoons they spent in 
them. Miss Foley and Miss Morrison 
have made 92 visits and calls in connec- 
tion with the work for purposes other 
than giving lessons, and received 38 visits 
in connection with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
]Miss ^lorrisoc spent 144 hours on cor- 
respondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 250 letters and 104 postals and re- 
ceived 199 letters and 13 postals. They 
also answered and made 435 telephone 
calls. Their various other activities in 
connection with their work can not be 
easily tabulated. 



Persons who know of possible pupils 
anywhere in Orange or Los Angeles coun- 
ties are urged to communicate with Miss 
Catharine J. Morrison, 306A S. Bonnie 
Brae, Los Angeles, and anywhere around 
the bay with Miss Kate M. Foley, Sutro 
Branch, State Library, Sacramento and 
Webster streets, San Francisco (telephone 
West 3046). 

LIBRARY SCHOOL. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Library School was established in 
1913 for the purpose of helping to supply 
the demand for trained librarians in Cali- 
fornia. The year's course begins in Sep- 
tember and ends in June. It aims to 
cover the various branches of library 
science needed in all libraries, and at the 
same time places particular emphasis on 
the needs and conditions of California li- 
braries. 

College or university graduation is re- 
quired for admission. Applicants must 
be at least twenty years of age, and under 
thirty on the day of the beginning of 
school. There is no tuition charge, and 
all necessary supplies and textbooks are 
furnished by the Library. 

A copy of the Circular of Information 
may be obtained, upon request, from the 
State Librarian, Sacramento, California. 
During the quarter several lectures have 
been given before the class by visiting 
librarians and others, on various topics 
relating to library work. On January 
23d, Mr Robert Rea, Librarian of the 
San Francisco Public Library, gave two 
lectures, one on book selection, and the 
other on the choice of editions. In Febru- 
ary, Miss Katharine Post Ferris, Libra- 
rian of the Kings County Free Library, 
spoke to the class, describing the work in 
Kings County. Later in the month Miss 
Lutie E. Stearns, of Milwaukee, Wis., 
who was making a tour of the West, gave 
two lectures, one on The rise and fall of 
the modern magazine, the other on The 
librarian, the library and education. 
Early in March Mr W. E. Henry, Libra- 
rian of the University of Washington Li- 
brary, who had been in charge of the 
Camp Fremont Library at Palo Alto, gave 
a very entertaining account of his work 
with the soldiers. On March 15th, Mr 
Charles A. Murdock, of San Francisco, 
gave some personal reminiscences of Bret 
Harte, whom he knew as a young man 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



235 



in Humboldt County. Mv James D. 
Blake, of Newbegins, San Francisco, 
spoke to the class on March 26tli, on 
"Selling books and giving service, versus 
giving books and selling service," bring- 
ing out the analogy between the book- 
selling business and library work. 

During his week's stay at the State Li- 
brary, March 25-29, Mr J. H. Quire, 
Camp Librarian of the Camp Kearny Li- 
brary, gave a series of three lectures on 
legislative reference work, and the final 
lecture in his course on public speaking. 

Soon after the lectures on book binding 
the class visited the State Printing Office, 
and was shown the various activities of 
that institution. 

March 30th, six members of the class 
with several of the State Library staff, 
attended the joint meeting of the Fifth, 
Eighth and Ninth districts of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association at Oroville. 



SUTRO BRANCH. 

Laura Stetfens, in charge. 

The Sutro Branch occupies the top floor 
of the Lane Medical Library Building, 
Sacramento and Webster streets, San 
Francisco, and is open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

See page 206. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Janu- 
ary, February and March, 1918. 

The last number of the Quarterly Bul- 
letin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in the News Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions ap- 
peared in the January, 191S, issue of this 
publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 

CouERlEB des Etats-unis ; S9e An. part. 
1 and 2, 1916. f054 C8 

Emery, John Whitehall. 

The library, the school and the child. 
1917. X021.3E53 



Heaetman, Charles Frederick. 

A bibliography of the writings of Hugh 
Lleury Brackenridge prior to 1825. 
1917. (Heartman's historical series. 
no. 29.) V012H43 

Herzbekg, Max John, comp. 

The world of books ... A guide to 
reading for young people. cl913. 

028 H58 
Lee, James Melvin. 

History of American journalism. 1917. 

071 L47 
SpejVCER, Matthew Lyle. 

News writing, the gathering, handling 
and writing of news stories. cl917. 

070 S74 

The Sphere ; an illustrated newspaper 
for the home. v. 64-69, 1916-1917. 

f052 S7 

Wisconsin. TJniversity. Library school. 
An apprentice course for small li- 
braries. 1917. qx020.7 W8 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Barrett, Sir William Fletcher. 

On the threshold of the unseen. 1917. 

133.9 B27 

Beyle. Marie Henri. 
On love. 1916. 



157 857 



BouLTiNG, William. 

Giordano Bruno, his life, thought, and 
martyrdom. [1916] 195 B89zb 

Bourne, Randolph Silliman. 

The war and the intellectuals. [1917] 

q 172.4 B7 

Beigham, Carl Campbell. 

Two studies in mental tests. I. vari- 
able factors in the Binet tests. 11. 
The diagnostic value of some mental 
tests. [1917] (Psychological re- 
view publications. The psychologi- 
cal monographs.) q 136.7 B8 

Bruce, Henry Addington Bayley. 
Handicaps of childhood. 1917. 

136.7 B88h 

Coovee, John Edgar. 

Experiments in psj'chical research at 
Leland Stanford junior university. 
1917. qc134 C7 

Gift of author. 



7—37615 



236 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Davis, Charles Henry Stanley. 

Greek and Roman stoicism and some 
of its disciples. 1903. 188 D26 

Dickinson, Goldsworthy Lowes. 
The choice before us. [1917] 

172.4 D55 

Dresser, Horatio Willis. 
Handbook of the new thought. 1917. 

131 D77h 

ed. The spirit of the new thought ; 



essays and addresses by representa- 
tive authors and leaders. cl917. 

131 D77 

Dunham, James Henry. 

Freedom and purpose ; an interpreta- 
tion of the psychology of Spinoza. 
[1916] (Psychological review pub- 
lications. Philosophical monographs. ) 
q193 S7zcl 

Figgis, John Neville. 

The will to freedom ; or, The Gospel of 
Nietzsche and the gospel of Christ. 
1917. 193 N67zf 

Francisco, Albert B. 

The philosophy of business. C1916. 

174 hSI 

Fkeud, Sigmund. 

Delusion and dream. 1917. 135 F88d 

Gosling, Harry. 

Peace : how to get and keep it. 

172.4 G67 
Healy, William. 

Mental conflicts and misconduct. 1917. 
136.76 H43 

Herschel, Sir William James, hart. 
The origin of finger-printing. 191G. 

133 H57 

Journal of experimental psychology. 
V. 1, 1916. 150.5 J 86 

The Lantern, v. 1-2, Mar. 1915-Mar. 
1917. c1 78.05 L29 

Lay, Wilfrid. 

Man's unconscious conflict. 1917. 

130 L42 

League to enforce peace. American 
hranch. 
A reference book for speakers. [1917] 
172.4 L43ear 



Marburg, Theodore. 

League of nations ; a chapter in the 
history of the movement. 1917. 

172.4 M31 

Monroe, Walter Scott and others. 

Educational tests and measurements. 
cl917. 136.7 M75 

riloORE, Harry Hascall. 

The youth and the nation. 1917. 

174 M82 

3iIooBE, Henry Thomas. 

Pain and pleasure. 1917. (Our senses 
series.) 152 M 82 

National educational association of the 
United States. 
Thrift. 1917. 174 N27 

Xicolle, R. 

Practicality, how to acquire it. 1910. 
(Mental efficiency series.) 170 N 64 

I'lTRiNTON, Edward Earle. 
Retain, the prepared. cl917. 170 P98 

Randall, Edward Caleb. 

The dead have never died. 1917. 

134 R18 

Sinclair, May. 

A defense of idealism ; some questions 
and conclusiouss. 1917. 141 S61 

Snow, William Freeman. 

Social hygiene and the war. 1917. 

176 S67 

Social hygiene, vol. 1-2, Dec-Sept. 
1914-15. q 176.05 S6 

Spindler, Frank Nicholas. 
The sense of sight. 1917. (Our senses 
series.) 152 S75 

Studies in psychology, contributed by 
colleagues and former students of Ed- 
ward Bradford Titchener. 1917. 

150 S93 

Vigilance. (Continuing the Philanthro- 
pist.) vol. 26-27, 1913-14. 

q176.05 V6 

Whetham, Mrs Catherine Durniug 
(Holt). 
The upbringing of daughters. 1917. 

173 W56 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



237 



RELIGION. 

BuBEOUGHS, Prince Emanuel. 

The present-day Sunday school. cl917. 

268 B972 

The Catholic encyclopedia and its mak- 
ers. cl917. qr282 C3e 

CoBEKN, Camden McCormack. 
The new archeological discoveries. 1917. 

225 C65 
Cook, Warren F. 

A working program for the local church. 
cl917. 260 C77 

DuBNOV, Semen Markovich. 

History of the Jews in Russia and 
Poland, from the earliest times until 
the present day. 1916. v. 1. 

296 D81 

Federal council of the churches of Christ 
in America. 
The churches of Christ in time of war, 
ed. by Charles S. Macfarland ... a 
handbook for the churches. cl917. 

260 F29cc 

Hall, Granville Stanley. 

Jesus, the Christ, in the light of psy- 
chology. 1917. 2v. 232 H 17 

Macfarland, Charles Stedman. 

The progress of church federation. 
1917. 260 M 143 



ed. The churches of the Federal 

council. cl916. 280 M 14 

The Question of the Sabbath ; Sunday 
or Saturday ? c263 Q5 

Rauschenbusch, Walter. 

A theology for the social gospel. 1917. 

230 R24 

Ritchie, Frank Herbert Thomas. 

Community work of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 1917. 

267.3 R59 
Scuddee, Vida Button. 

The church and the hour. cl917. 

261 S43 
Waddington, Samuel. 

Some views respecting a future life. 
1917. 218 W11 



Wells, Herbert George. 

God, the invisible king. 1917. 



201 W45 



louNG Men's Christian Associations. In- 
ternational committee. Industrial 
dept. 
Among industrial workers (ways and 
means) a hand book for Associations 
in industrial fields. cl916. 

267.3 Y68mi 

SOCIOLOGY. 

Allen, William Harvey. 

Universal training for citizenship and 
public service. 1917. 323 A43 

American academy of political and so- 
cial science, Philadelphia. 
Personnel and employment problems in 
industrial management. 1916. 

306 A51 

The Anglo & London Paris National 
bank, San Francisco. 
Monthly financial letter. 1913-16. 

qc332A5 
Baker, Orin Clarkson. 

Travelers' aid society in America. 1917. 

360 B16 
Bennet, Helen Marie. 

Women and work. 1917. 396 B47w 

Blanchard, Ralph Harrub. 

Liability and compensation insurance. 
1917. 368.4 363 

Bosanquet, Bernard. 

Social and international ideals ; being 
studies in patriotism. 1917. 

304 8741 
Buck, Winifred. 
The American girl. 1917. 396 892 

BuRBANK, Emily. 

Woman as decoration. 1917. 391 894 

Bustamante, Ramon. 

Cuba. "The pearl of the Antilles." 
cl916. 382 898 

Civil service chronicle, New York. 

Court attendant and court clerk ex- 
amination instruction for civil sei"vice 
candidates. cl917. q351.3C5c 

Collins, Charles Wallace. 

The national budget system. 1917. 

351.7 071 
Cooper, Lenna Frances. 

How to cut food costs. cl917. 

328 C77 



238 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIxV LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



CoRWiN, Edward Samuel. 

The President's control of foreign re- 
lations. 1917. 3o3 083 

Crennan, Charles Holloway. 

A survey of state executive organiza- 
tion and a plan of reorganization. 
1916. 353.9 C91 

Cumberland, William Wilson. 
Cooperative marketing. 1917. 

338.1 C96 
Davies, George Reginald. 

Social environment. 1917. (The na- 
tional social science series.) 301 D26 

Decker, D. O. and Harrison, Shelby M. 

City and county administration iu 

Springfield, 111. 1917. 352 D29c 

DorIjAnd, William Alexander Newman. 
The sum of feminine achievement ; a 
critical and analytical study of 
woman's contribution to the intel- 
lectual progress of the world. 1917. 
396 D711 
Ellis, Havelock. 

Essays in war-time. 1917. 304 E47e 

Elmer, Manuel Conrad. 

Technique of social surveys. 1917. 

309.1 E48 
FiNOT, Jean. 

The Anglo-French nation ; a study in 
interpenetration. 191 G. 327 F51 

Ford, Henry Jones. 

The natural history of the state : an 

introduction to political science. 1915. 

320.1 F69 

The Foundations of national pros- 
perity ; studies in the conservation of 
permanent national resources. 1917. 

338 F77 
Hart, Hastings Hornell. 

County jails. 1917. 365 H32 

Hecht, Solomon, ed. 

Probation and parole officer examination 
instruction. cl917. q351.3 H4p 

Hill, David Jayne. 

The rebuilding of Europe. 1917. 

327.40 H64r 
Hobson, John Atkinson. 

The evolution of modern capitalism. 
New ed. 1917. (Contemporary sci- 
ence series.) 331 H68a 



Howe, Frederic Clemson. 

The high cost of living. 1917. 

338 H85 
HoxiE, Robert Franklin. 

Trade unionism in the United States. 
1917. 331.88 H86 

Imperial year book for Dominion of 
Canada. 1917^18. 317.1 l34 

Kellogg, Vernon Lyman, and Taylor, 
Alonzo Englebert. 
The food problem. 1917. 338 K29 

Kemmerer, Edwin Walter. 

Postal savings ; an historical and criti- 
cal study of the postal savings bank 
system of the United States. 1917. 

332.2 K31 
KiTSON, Arthur. 

Trade fallacies. 1917. 330.942 K62 

Leeson, Cecil. 

The child and the war ; being notes on 
juvenile delinquency. 1917. 

364.1 L48 

Lennard, Reginald Vivian. 

Rural Northamptonshire under the com- 
monwealth, a study based principally 
upon the parliamentary surveys of 
the royal estates. (Oxford studies in 
social and legal history.) 330.5 098 

Levett, Ada Elizabeth. 

The black death on the estates of the 
see of Winchester, with a chapter on 
the manors of Witney, Brightwell, 
and Downton. (Oxford studies in so- 
cial and legal history.) 330.5 098 

McSpadden, Joseph Walker. 

The book of holidays. cl917. 

394 M17 
Merriman, Roger Bigelow. 

The Monroe doctrine. 327.73 M57 

Metcalfe. Agnes Edith. 
Woman's effort ; a chronicle of British 
women's fifty years' struggle for cit- 
izenship (1865-1914). 1917. 

324.3 M58 
Morrison, Alfred James. 

East by West, essays in transportation. 
1917. 380 M87 

National foreign trade council. 

European economic alliances. 1916. 

382 N27 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



239 



Osborne, William Hamilton. 
How to make your will. clOlT. 

347 081 
Page, Walter Hines. 

The union of two great peoples. 1917. 
327.73 P13 
Kabinowitz, Samuel. 

Labor and liberty, a model constitution, 
embodying- all the benefits of collect- 
ive industry without the loss of indi- 
^ddual liberty. 1917. 304 R1 1 

Rankin, Mary Theresa. 

Arbitration and conciliation in Austral- 
asia ; the legal wage in Victoria and 
New Zealand. [1916] 331.2 R21 

Red cross. Tj. S. American national 
Red Cross. War council. 
The work in Europe of the American 
Red cross. .[1917] 361 R31w 

Renault, Louis. 

The first violations of the law of na- 
tions by Germany. 1917. 341 R39 

Roper, Daniel Calhoun. 

The United States post office, its past 
record, present condition and poten- 
tial relation to the new world era. 
1917. 383 R78 

Russell, Bertrand Arthur William. 
Political ideals. 1917. 320.4 R96 

Satow, Sir Ernest Mason. 

A guide to diplomatic practice. 1917. 
2y. 341 S35 

Semmann, Oscar J. H., comi). 

Semmann's insurance cancellation ta- 
bles. cl916. 368.1 S47 

Talbot, Winthrop, comp. 

Americanization. 1917. (Handbook 
series.) 323 T14 

Treat, Payson Jackson. 

The early diplomatic relations between 
the United States and Japan, 18o3- 
1865. 1917. 327.73 T78 

Tufts, James Hayden. 

Our democracy, its origins and its 
tasks. 1917. 321.4 T91 



Waterways & 
1914-191G. 



commerce. 



vols. .5-7, 
q380.5 W3 

Woodbury, Robert Morse. 

Social insurance ; an economic analysis. 
1917. 368 W88 



LAW. 

Argentine Republic. 



etc. 



Laws, statutes, 
The Argentine civil code. 1917. 



Brumbaugh, Jesse Franklin. 

Legal reasoning and briefing. cl917. 

Byrne, John Elliott. 
Federal criminal procedure, with forms 
for the defense. 1916. 

Casement, Sir Roger. 

Trial of Sir Roger Casement. [1917] 
(Notable English trials series.) 

Chapin, H. Gerald. 
Law of torts. 1917. 

Farwell, Sir George. 

A concise treatise on powers ... 3d 
ed., by C. J. W. Farwell ... as- 
sisted by F. K. Archer. 1916. 

Francisco, de Vittoria. 

Francisci de Victoria De Indis et De 
ivre belli relectiones, ed. by Ernest 
Nys. 1917. (Classics of interna- 
tional law.) 

Frohlich, Louis D. & Schwartz, Charles. 
The law of motion pictures, including 
the law of the theatre. 1918. 

Holmes, George Edwin. 
Federal income tax. 1918. 

Hopkins, James Love. 

The new federal equity rules. 1918. 

Jones, Frederick Robertson. 

Essential factors of a good workmen's 
compensation act. [1916] 

.Joyce, Joseph Asbury. 

A treatise on the law of insurance of 
every kind ... 2d ed. . . . v. 1-3. 
1917. 

KiRCHWEY, Geoi-ge Washington. 

Kirchwey's cases on the law of mort- 
gage. 1917. 

Mississippi. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The annotated Mississippi code, show- 
ing the general statutes in force 
August 1, 1917, embracing the code 
of 1906 as amended and all perma- 
nent, general and public acts of the 
Legislature passed since the adop- 
tion of that code. cl917. 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Montgomery, Robert Hiester. 
Income tax procedure, 1918. 

New Yokk (State) Laws, statutes, etc. 
Supplement, 1913-1917, to Bliss' an- 
notated New York code. 

Pekkiks, Willis Barnes. 

Evidence by survivor ; the statutes and 
decisions of Michigan relating to mat- 
ters equally within the knowledge of 
the deceased. 1915. 

RiCHEY, Homer. 

Richey's federal Employers' liability, 
Safety appliance, and Hours of ser- 
vice acts. 2d ed., by Daunis Mc- 
Bride. 1916. 

ScHOULEE, James. 

Treatise on the law of personal prop- 
erty. 5th ed. 1918. 

Shepaed's New York miscellaneous cita- 
tions. 1917. 



Sheeman, Charles Phineas. 

Roman law in the modern world. 
3v. 



1917. 



Statham, Nicholas. 

Statham's Abridgment of the law, tr. 
by Margaret Center Klingelsmith. 
1915. 2v. 

Tayloe, Hannis. 

Due process of law and the equal pro- 
tection of the laws. 1917. 

Texas. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Supplement to Vernon's Texas civil and 
criminal statutes. 1918. 

U. S. SUPEEME COUET. 

Digest of decisions of the Supreme court 
of the U. S. 1917. 2v. 

Washington (State) Laws, statutes, etc. 
Remington's codes and statutes. 1916. 
2v. 

Wood, William Allen. 

Modern business corporations. 2d ed. 
cl917. 

MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE. 

Ainslie, Graham Montgomery, comp. 
Hand grenades. 1917. 355 A29 



Azan, Paul Jean Louis. 

The war of positions. 1917. 



355 A99 



Chicago. University. School of com- 
merce and administration. 
Quartermaster and ordnance supply. 
[1917] 355 C53 

Dickson, Harris. 

The unpopular history of the United 
States, by Harris Dickson. cl917. 

355 D55 
Falls, De Witt Clinton. 

Army and navy information. cl917. 

355 F19 



Fighting ships. 



19th issue ; 1916. 

359 F47 



Gaeey, Enoch Barton, & Ellis, O. O. 
The junior Plattsburg manual. 1917. 

355 G22 
Hopkins, Albert Allis, ed. 

Our army and how to know it. 1917. 

355 H79 



Our navy and how to know it. 

1917. 355 H79 

Moeetti, Ouorio. 

Notes on training, field artillery details, 
prepared under the direction of Cap- 
tain Robert M. Danford. 1917. 

623.5 M84 
JMuLLEE, Robert Enrique. 

The United States navy. cl917. 

359 M95 
Nasmyth, George William. 

Universal military service and democ- 
racy. [1916] 355 N25 

Needham, John Layland. 

The solution of tactical problems. 
1917. 355 N37 

Reeves, Ira Louis. 

A manual for aspirants for commis- 
sions in the United States army. 
1910. 355 R332 

Stewart, Merch Bradt. 

Handbook for noncommissioned ofBcers 
of infantry. [5th ed. rev. and enl.] 
cl916. 355 S85 



TAYT.OE, Charles Keen. 
The boys' camp manual. 



1917. 



355 T23 

Yane, Sir Francis Patrick Fletcher, iart. 
The principles of military art for offi- 
cers of all ranks. 1917. 355 V24 



The Westeen comrade. 



1913-1915. 
qc355.05 W5 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



241 



EDUCATION. 

Allen, William Harvey. 

Self-surveys by colleges and universi- 
ties. 1917. (Educational survey 
series.) 378.73 A43 



Self-surveys by teacher-training 

schools. 1917. (Educational survey 
series.) 371.1 A43 

California alumni fortnightly, vol. 9, 
1916. qc378.794 CTc 

Carnegie foundation for the advancement 
of teaching. 
Index of the first ten Annual reports. 
1916. q371.1 C2 

Ciiallman, Samuel Andrew. 

The rural school plant for rural teach- 
ers and school boards. cl917. 

379.1 C43 

EsENWEiN, Joseph Berg. 

Children's stories and how to tell them. 
cl917. 370.2 E75 

FoGHT, Harold Waldstein. 

The rural teacher and his work in com- 
munity leadership, in school adminis- 
tration, and in mastery of the school 
subjects. 1917. 379.73 F65r 

Freeman, Frank Nugent. 

How children learn. cl917. (River- 
side textbooks in education.) 

370.1 F85 



The teaching of handwriting. 

cl914. (Riverside educational mono- 
graphs.) 372.5 F85 

Hawthorne, Hildegarde. 

Rambles in old college towns. 1917. 

378 H39 

Kandel, Isaac Lean. 

Federal aid for vocational education. 
1917. (Carnegie foundation for the 
advancement of teaching. Bui. no. 
10.) q371.1 C2b 

Mead, Cyrus De Witt. 

An experiment in the fundamentals, 
giving the results of tests made in 
the Cincinnati schools with two kinds 
of practice material. 1917. (School 
efficiency monographs.) 372.7 M 47 

Montessori, Maria. 

• The advanced Montessori method. 
cl917. 2v. 372M78a 



NoREis, Edwin Mark. 

The story of Princeton. 1917. 

378.749 PEn 

OviATT, Edwin. 

The beginnings of Yalo (1701-1720). 

1916. 378.746 YEo 

Prevost, Marcel. 

Lettres a Frangoise maman. cl912. 

372 P94 

RuGG, Harold Ordway. 

Statistical methods applied to educa- 
tion ; a textbook for students of edu- 
cation in the quantitative study of 
school problems. cl917. (River*- 
side textbooks in education.) 

371.2 R92 

Smith, Henry Lester. 

A survey of a public school system. 

1917. (Teachers college, Columliia 
University, Contributions to educa- 
tion.) 379.772 S64 

Snedden, David Samuel. 

Educational sociology, a digest and syl- 
labus. cl917. 2v. 370.1 S67e 



Swain, George Fillmore. 
How to study. 1917. 



371.^397 



Types of schools for boys. [cl917] 

373 T99 

Woodley, Oscar Israel. 

The profession of teaching. [cl9171 

371 W89 



LANGUAGE. 

Axelkad, Philip. 

Dictionar complet englez-roman cu 
prouuntare. Complete English-Rou- 
manian dictionary with pronuncia- 
tion. cl917. 459.9 A96 

Carruth, William Herbert. 

Verse wi'iting ; a practical handbook for 
college classes and private guidance. 
1917. 426 031 

Frazer, Lilly (Grave) 

La maison aux panonceaux. 1915. 

448 F84 

PiCARD, Jean Alcide. 

Cortina French-English and English- 
French military dictionary. 1917. 

448 P58 



242 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Rapid-fiee Englisli : French : German, 
with pronunciation, for the use of 
soldiers and sailors and the men and 
women of the army and navy medical 
corps ; comp. by a committee of well- 
known teachers. 1917. 418 R21 

SoNNENSCHEiN, Edward Adolf. 

A new English grammar based on the 
recommendations of the Joint com- 
mittee on grammatical terminology. 
1916. 3v. 425 S69 

ViZETELLY, Francis Horace, ed. 

The soldier's service dictionary of Eng- 
lish and French terms. 1917. 

443 V86 

SCIENCE. 

Bonnier, Gaston Marie. 

Name this flower. 1917. 580 B71 

Carnegie institution of Washington. 
Dept. of terrestrial magnetism. 
Ocean magnetic observations, 1905- 

1916, and reports on special re- 
searches. 1917. q538.7 C2 

Clapham, Charles Blanchard. 

Arithmetic for engineers, including 
simple algebra, mensuration, log- 
arithms, graphs, and the slide rule. 
[1917] 510 C58 

Collins, Archie Frederick. 
The book of electricity. 1917. 

537 C71 

Crehoee, Albert Cushing. 

The mystery of matter and energy. 

1917. 530.1 C91 

Daugherty, Lewis Sylvester, & Daugh- 
erty, Millie Crum. 
Principles of economic zoology. 2d ed., 
rev. 1917. 591.6 023 



Fabre, Jean Henri Casimir. 
Insect adventures. 1917. 



595.7 F12i 



FuLMEE, John .Joshua. 

Military panoramic sketching. 1917. 

526.9 F97 

GuNTHER, Charles Godfrey. 

The examination of prospects ; a mining 
geology. 1912. 553 G97 



Hagee. Dorsey. 

Practical oil geology. 



2d ed. 1916. 

553.2 H14 



Heath, George Lincoln. 

The analysis of copper and its ores and 
alloys. 1916. 543.6 H43 

Hedin, Sven Anders. 

Scientific results of a journey in Cen- 
tral Asia 1899-1902. 1904-07. 6 
vols. q570.95 H4 

Hendeick, Ellwood. 

Everyman's chemistry ; the chemist's 
point of view and his recent work 
told for the layman. cl917. (Har- 
per's modern science series.) 540 H49 

Higbee, Frederick Goodson. 

The essentials of descriptive geometry. 
2d ed. 1917. 515 H 63 

HoMANS, James Edward. 

Homans' first principles of electricity. 
1916. 537 H76 



.Jacoby, Harold. 
Navigation. 1917. 



527 J17 



Knox, Alexander. 

The climate of the continent of Africa. 
1911. 551.56 K74 

Lowie, Robert H. 

Culture and ethnology. 1917. 572 L91 

McAdie, Alexander George. 

The principles of aerography. cl917. 
551.5 Mllp 

Means, Philip Ainsworth. 

History of the Spanish conquest of 
Yucatan and of the Itzas. 1917. 
(Papers of the Peabody museum of 
American archaeology and ethnology. 
Harvard university, vol vii. ) 

570.7 P35 

New York entomological society .Journal. 
24v. 1893-1916^ 595.705 N56 

NoECOCK, Lawrence & Wilson, Francis 
Stuart. 
Map reading ; a self-instructional man- 
ual. 1915. 526.9 N82 

OsTWALD, Carl Wilhelm Wolfgang. 

An introduction to theoretical and ap- 
plied colloid chemistry. 1917. 

541.1 085 

Pearson, Thomas Gilbert. 

The bird study book. 1917. 598.2 P36 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



Ci^LLIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



243 



Price, William Benliam, & Meade, Rich- 
ard Kidder. 
The technical analysis of brass, and the 
non-ferrous alloys. 2d ed. 1917. 

543.6 P94 

Psyche ; a journal of entomology, v. 1- 
21, 1874-1914. 595.705 P97 

Rock, Joseph Francis Charles. 

The indigenous trees of the HaAvaiiau 
Islands. 1913. q582 R6 

RoDEXHAiTSER, William. 

Electric furnaces in the iron and steel 
industry. 1917. 537.85 R68 

Saunders, Charles Francis. 
Western floA\'er guide. 1917. 

c580 S25w 
Scott, Wilfred Welday, ed. 

Standard methods of chemical analysis. 
1917. 545 S431 

Sedgwick, William Thompson, and Tyler, 
Harry Walter. 
A short history of science. 1917. 

509 S44 
Stecher, Lorle Ida. 

The effect of humidity ou nervousness 
and on general efficiency. [191(i] 
(ArchiTes of psychology.) q573.4 S8 

Webb, Walter Loring. 

Technic of survej'ing instruments and 
methods. 1917. 526.9 W36 

Wundt, Wilhelm Max. 

Elements of folk psychology. [1916] 

572 W96 

AERONAUTICS. 

DucHENE, Emile Auguste. 

The mechanics of the aeroplane, a study 
of the principles of flight, tr. from 
the French by John H. Ledeboer . . . 
and T. O'B. Hubbard. 1912. 

533.6 D82m 
Fales, Elisha Noel. 

Learning to fly in the U. S. Army. 
1st ed. 1917. 533.6 FIS 

RiACH, M. A. S. 

Air-screws : an introduction to the aero- 
foil theory of screw propulsion. 1916. 
533.6 R48 
Turner, Charles C. 

Aircraft of to-day ; a popular account 
of the conquest of the air. 1917. 

533.6 T94a 



USEFUL ARTS. 

Banks, Vincent. 

Vegetable bottling and fruit preserving 
without sugar. 664.8 B21 

Beaumont, Roberts. 

Woollen and worsted. 1915. 677 B37a 

Bet.den, a. W. 

Foundry-cupola gases and tempera- 
tures. 1913. 669.8 B42 

Boston woven hose & rubber company. 
The story of rubber. cl916. 678 874 

California redwood association, San 
Francisco. 
California redwood "nature's lumber 
masterpiece." cl916. c674 C15r 

Cambria steel company. 

Cambria steel ; a handbook of informa- 
tion relating to structural steel manu- 
factured by the Cambria steel co. 
[llth ed.] " 1917. 691.7 CI 7 

Cannold, Lester. 

Directions for the use of the rapid let- 
ter-centering chart for typists. cl917. 

652 C22 

Collins, Archie Frederick. 

Easy lessons in wireless. cl917. 

654C71e 

The Current business cyclopedia. Busi- 
ness digest. Y. 1-2 for 1917. 

qr658C9 

Eaton. Abijah H. 

The Eaton and Burnett revised and 
improved bookkeeping, corporation, 
voucher and cost accounting. 1917. 

657 E14 



Field, Clifton Coutard. 
Retail buying. [1917] 



658 F45 



Flemming, Louis Andrew. 

Practical tanning. 3d ed. 1916. 

675 F59a 



French, George. 

How to advertise. 1917. 



. 659 F87h 



Gordon, William Lewis. 

Where to sell manuscripts. cl917. 

655.5 G66 

Hart, Stanley Hewlett. 

Wool ; the raw materials of the woolen 
and worsted industries. 1917. 

677 H32 



244 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Henry, Frank Souder. 

Printing ; a textbook for printers' ap- 
prentices, continuation classes, and 
for general use in schools. 1917. 

655 H52 
Howe, Henry Marion. 

The metallography of steel and cast 
iron. 1916. q6D9.1 H8 

Jackson, Dugald Caleb. 

Street railway fares, their relation to 
length of haul and cost of service. 
1917. (Massachusetts institute of 
technology. Research division bulle- 
tin no. 14.) 656 J 123 

Kemble, William Fretz. 

Choosing employees by mental and 

Ijliysical tests. 1917. (Industrial 

management library.) 658 K31 

Klein, Joseph Jerome. 

Bookkeeping and accounting. 1917. 
(The College of the city of New York 
series in commerce, civics and tech- 
nology.) 657 K64b 

LiDDELL, Donald M., com p. 
The metallurgists and chemists' hand- 
book. 1916. 669 L71 

Maxwell, William Morey. 

If I were twenty-one. 1917. 658 M46i 

Megraw, Herbert Ashton. 

Details of cyanide practice. 1914. 

669.2 M49 
Millar, Andrew. 

Wheat and its products. [1916] (Pit- 
man's common commodities of com- 
merce.) 679 IV164 

Moldenke, Richard George Gottlob. 
The principles of iron founding. 1917. 

672 IVI71 
Moore, Herbert Fisher. 

Textbook of the materials of engineer- 
ing. 1917. 691 M 82 

100% ; the practical magazine of efficient 
management, vols. 6 & 7, 1916. 

658.05 058 
Peddie, Robert Alexander. 

An outline of the history of printing. 
1917. 655.1 P37 

Powell, Ola. 

Successful canning and pi'eserving. 
cl917. 664.8 P88 



Russell, Walter Marvin. 

Operation of gas works. 1917. 

665.7 R96 

Sauveur, Albert. 

The metallography and heat treatment 
of iron and steel. 2d ed. 1916. 

q669.1 S2 

Shepardson, George Defrees. 
Telephone apparatus. 1917. 654.6 S54 

Sleeper, Milton Blake. 

Electric bells ; a handbook to guide the 
practical worker in installing, opex'at- 
ing, and testing bell circuits, burglar 
alarms, thermostats and other ap- 
paratus used with electric bells. 1917. 
654.7 S63 

Snow, Charles Henry. 

Wood and other organic structural 
materials. 1917. 691.1 S67 

Stone, I. Frank. 

The aniline color, dyestuff and chemi- 
cal conditions from August 1st, 1914, 
to April 1st, 1917. 1917. 667.2 S87 

Towers, Walter Kellogg. 

Masters of space. Morse and the tele- 
graph ; Thompson and the cable ; 
Bell and the telephone ; Marconi and 
the wireless ; Carty and the wireless 
telephone. [1917] 654 T73 

VuLTE, Hermann Theodore. 

Household chemistry for the use of stu- 
dents in household arts. 1917. 

660 V99 

Wallis-Tayler, Alexander James. 

Sugar machinery ; a descriptive treatise 
devoted to the machinery and appa- 
ratus used in the manufacture of 
cane and beet sugars ... 2d ed. 
[1909?] 664.1 W21 

Weeks, Lyman Horace. 

A history of paper-manufacturing in 

the United States, 1690-1916. 1916. 

676 W39 

White, Charles Henry. 

Methods in metallurgical analysis. 1915. 

669 W58 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



245 



WiARD, Edward Saxon. 

The theory aud practice of ore dressing. 
1915. 622.7 W63 

WiGENT, W. D., Housel, Burton David 
William & Oilman, E. Harry. 
Modern filing. cl916. 651 W65 

Woods, Clinton Edgar. 

Unified accounting methods for indus- 
trials. 1917. 657 W89 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

AsHBUEN, Percy Moreau. 

The elements of military hygiene, espe- 
cially arranged for officers and men 
of the line. cl915. 613.6 A82a 

Beers, Clifford Whittingham. 

The mental hygiene movement. cl917. 
Part '5 of the author's "A mind that 
found relief." 616.84 B41m 

BiRGE. William Spoford. 

True food values and their lov^r costs. 
cl916. 613.2 B61 

Boomer, Rudolph J., ed. 

The world's greatest battle. cl916. 

q614.8 B6 

Bowers, Edwin Frederick. 

Bathing for health. cl917. 613.4 878 

Bruce, Edwin Morris. 

Detection of the common food adulter- 
ants. 3d ed. 1917. 614.3 888 

BuNDY, Elizabeth Roxana. 

Surgical nursing in war. cl917. 

610.73 894 

Campbell, WIrs Frances (Weed). 
The book of home nursing. 1917. 

610.73 CIS 
FiSK, Eugene Lyman. 

Alcohol ; its relation to human efficiency 
and longevity. 1917. 613.8 F538 

GuERiN, William. 

Making schools safe from fire. cl917. 
614.8 G93m 

Hancock, Harrie Irving. 

Physical training for business men. 
1917. 613.7 H23ptb 

Institut Pasteur, Paris. I 

XXV anniversaire de sa fondation. 
1913. 610.6 159 



Keen, William Williams. 

Medical research and human welfare ; a 
record of personal experiences and 
observations during a professional 
life of fifty-seven years. 1917. 
(Brown university. The Colver lec- 
tures, 1917.) 614.9 K26 

Pope, Amy Elizabeth. 

A practical dietary computer. 1917. 

613.2 P82 

Richards, Mrs Ellen Henrietta (Swal- 
low ) . 
The cost of food ; a study in dietaries. 
1917. 613.2 R51c 

Stiles, Percy Goldthwait. 

An adequate diet. 1916. (Harvard 
health talks.) 613.2 S85 

WiNSLOW, Kenelm. 

The home medical adviser. 1917. 

616 W77 

ENGINEERING. 

Christie, Clarence Victor. 
Electrical engineering, the theory and 
characteristics of electrical circuits 
and machinery. 2d ed. 1917. 

621.3 C55 

Cincinnati milling machine company. 
A treatise on milling and milling ma- 
chines. cl916. 621.9 C57 

Collins, Archie Frederick. 

The boys' book of submarines. cl917. 

623.9 C71 
Crane, Walter Richard. 

Ore mining methods. 1917. 622 C89 

Creager, William Pitcher. 

Engineering for masonry dams. 1917. 

627.8 C91 
Croft, Terrell Williams. 

Electrical machinery. 1917. 

621.31 C94e 
Davis, Charles Gerard. 

How sails are made and handled. 1917. 

q623.8 D2 
Del Mar, Algernon. 

Tube milling ; a treatise on the practi- 
cal application of the tube mill to 
metallurgical problems. 1917. 

622.7 D35t 

DuRYEA, Charles E. «fe Homans, James E. 
The automobile book. 1916. 625.6 D96 



246 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Dyke, Andrew Lee. 

Dyke's automobile and gasoline engine 
encyclopedia. 6th ed. cl917. 

625.6 D99da 

Engineering and mining journal. 
Details of practical mining. 1916. 

622 E57 

Handbook of milling details, comp. 



from the Engineering and mining 

journal by the editorial staff. 1914. 

622.7 E57 

Franklin, William S. 

Elements of electrical engineering. 19a7. 

621.3 F83 

V. 1 Direct and alternating current 
macliines and systems. 

FooTE, Charles Elmer. 

Practical road building. cl917. 

625.7 F68 
Gray. Alexander. 

Principles and practice of electrical en- 
gineering. 2d ed. 1917. 621.3 G77 

Hay, Marley Fotheriugham. 

Secrets of the submarine. 1917. 

623.9 H41 

Houston, Alexander Cruikshank. 

Rivers as sources of water supply, 
[pref. 1917.] q628 H8 

James, George Wharton. 

Reclaiming the arid West. 1917. 

C626.8 J27 
Johnson, Joseph Esrey. 

Blast-furnace construction in America. 
1917. 621.7 J67 

KiNDELAN, Joseph. 

The trackman's helper, a hand book for 
track foremen, supervisors and engi- 
neers. 1917. 625.1 K51 



Kuss, Robert H., ed. 
Steam boilers. 1917. 



621.18 K97 



Laws, Frank Arthur. 

Electrical measurements. 1917. (Elec- 
trical engineering texts.) 621.3 L42 

Leutwiler, Oscar Adolph. 

Elements of machine design. 1917. 

621 L65 
Manly, Harold Phillips. 

The Ford motor car and truck and 
tractor attachments. cl917. 

625.6 M27 



Martin, W. D. 

Hints to engineers for the Board of 
Trade examinations. 621.12 MSB 

Merriman, Mansfield, ed. 

American civil engineers' pocket book. 
3d ed., enl. 1916. 620.2 M57 

Meyer, Adolph Frederick. 

The elements of hydrology. 1917. 

628.1 M61 
I'age, Victor Wilfred. 

The model T Ford car. 1917. 

625.6 P13mo 
Rathbun, John B. 

Gas engine troubles and installation, 
with notes on Diesel oil engines. 3d 
rev. ed. 1917. 621.4 R23 

Rowland, Arthur John. 

Applied electricity for practical men. 
1916. 621.3 R88 

Sawyer, Charles Winthrop. 

United States single shot martial pis- 
tols. cl913. 623.4 S27u 

Steinmetz, Charles Proteus. 

Theory and calculation of electric cir- 
cuits. 1917. 621.3 S82t 

AGRICULTURE. 

Balls, William Lawrence. 

The cotton plant in Egypt, studies in 
physiology and genetics. 1912. 
(Macmillan's science monographs.) 

633 B19 

California poultry journal. Vol. 1, 
1915-16. qc636.505 CI 



Dietrich, William. 

Livestock on the farm. 1917. 



636 D56 



Harding, Arthur Robert. 

Wolf and coyote trapping. cl909. 

639.1 H26w 
Innes, William Thornton. 

Goldfish varieties and tropical aquarium 
fishes ; a complete guide to aquaria 
and related subjects. cl917. 639 158 

Jasper, Mme. 

The Flemish system of poultry rearing. 
[1916] 636.5 J39 

Rice, William Edward, & Cox, William 
E. 
Squabs for profit. 1916. 636.6 R49s 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



247 



Rockwell, Frederick Frye. 
The little pruning book. cl917. 

634 R68 

Stocking, William Alonzo. 

Manual of milk products. 1917. 
(Rural manuals.) 637 S86 



Teacy, William Warner. 
Tomato culture. 1916. 



635 T76 



WORTLEY, E. J. 

Poultrj^ diseases, causes, symptoms and 
treatment, with notes on post- 
mortem examinations. 1915. 

636.5 W93 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Abt, Isaac Arthur. 

The baby's food. 1917. 649 A1 6 

Braun, Emil. 

Secrets of bread making, and economy 
and system in the bakery. 4th ed. 
1917. 641 B82s 

BuciiANAN, Florence. 

Home crafts of today and yesterday. 
[1917] 640 B91 

Chan, Shiu Wong. 

The Chinese cook book. cl917. 

641 C45 

Coates, Lydia Trattles. 

American dressmaking step by step. 
cl917. 646 C65 

DoNHAM, S. Agnes. 

Marketing and housework manual. 
1917. 640 D68 

Farmer, Lissie C. 

A-B-C of home saving. cl916. 

640 F23 

Fish, Ada Z. 

American Red cross textbook on home 
dietetics. cl917. 641 F53 

The food question. cl917. 641 F68 

Guest, Mrs Flora (Dodge). 

Bread and fancy breads. 1917. 

641 G93 

Patriotism and plenty. 1917. 

641 G93p 

Nesbitt, Florence. 

Low cost cooking. 1917. 641 N45 



Peel, Dorothy C. (Bayliff) "il/rs C. S. 
Peel." 
The eat-less-meat book. 1917. 

641 P37 
Stern, Frances. 

Food for the worker. 1917. 641 S83 

FINE ARTS. 

Anderson, Paul Lewis. 

Pictorial photography ; its principles 
and practice. 1917. 770 A 548 p 

"As we see 'em" ; a volume of cartoons 
and caricatures of Los Angeles citi- 
zens, n.d. qc741 A7 

Bigelow, Francis Hill. 

Historic silver of the Colonies and its 
makers. 1917. 739 B59 

Bowers, R. S. 

Drawing and design for craftsmen. 
[1917] (Handcraft library.) 

745 B78 
Browne, Edgar. 

Phiz and Dickens as they appeared to 
Edgar Browne, with original illus- 
trations by Hablot K. Browne. 1913. 
q759.2 888 
Cladel, Judith, comp. 

Rodin ; the man and his art. 1917. 

q735 R6 
•'Colour." 

Allies in art. 1917. q759 C71 

Fedden, Romilly. 

Modern water-colour, including some 
chapters on current-day art. 1917. 

751 F29 
Frank, Ludwig. 

Essentials of mechanical drafting. 1917. 

q744 F8 

Government housing scheme ; Well Hall, 
Elthan, Kent. [1917] q710G7 

Holme, Charles, ed. 

Art of the British empire overseas. 
1917. (International studio. Spe- 
cial numbers.) q759.2 H7a 

Inness, George. 

Life, art, and letters of George Inness, 
by George Inness, jr. 1917. 

759.1 !58i 
Longman, W. 

Tokens of the eighteenth century con- 
nected with booksellers & bookmakers. 
1916. 737 L85 



248 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 191S 



Peabody, Robert Swain. 
Plospital sketches. 1916. 



741 P35 



Photo-Graphic art: vol. 1, nos. 2-7, 

1913-1915. vol. 2, nos. 1, 2, 1915. 

q770.5 P7 

Pittsburgh. Carnegie institute. Dept. 

of fine arts. 

Catalogue of an exhibition of early 

English portraits and landscapes lent 

by Mr John H. McFadden. cl917. 

708.1 P69 

RiCHTER, Mrs Luise Marie (Schwaab). 
Chantilly in history and art. 1914. 

q708.4 R5 

Rogers, William Snow. 

Garden planning. 1914. 710 R73 

Salaman, Malcolm Charles. 

The graphic arts of Great Britain. 
1917. (International studio. Spe- 
cial numbers.) q760S1g 

Stewart, Basil. 

On collecting Japanese colour-prints. 
1917. 761 S84 

Whitman, Alfred. 

Charles Turner. 1907. (Nineteenth 
century engravers.) q757 W6 

Yeomans, Alfred Beaver. 

City residential land development. 
[1916] q710 Y5 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Brunner, Edmund de Schweinitz. 

The new countiy church building. 1917. 

726 B89 
Caffin, Charles Henry. 

How to study architecture. 1917. 

720.9 C12 

Cram, Ralph Adams. 

The substance of Gothic. 1917. 

723.5 C88s 
Hall Willis Lincoln. 

Stanford memorial church. 1917. 

qc726 HI 

Jefferson, Thomas. 

Thomas Jefferson, architect. 1916. 

f720 J4 
Gift of C. A. Coolidge. 

KiNsiLA, Edward Bernard. 

Modern theatre construction. cl917. 

725.8 K56 



Millar, Donald. 

Measured drawings of some colonial 
and Georgian houses. 1916. 

f728 M64 
Watson, Walter Crum. 

Portuguese architecture. 1908. 

q720.946 W3 

Wright, William Joseph. 

Greenhouses ; their construction and 
equipment. 1917. 716 W954 

MUSIC. 

Bbower, Harriette Moore. 

Piano mastery, second series ; talks 
with master pianists and teachers, 
including conferences with Hofmann, 
Godowsky, Grainger, Powell, Novaes, 
Hutcheson and others ; also hints on 
Macdowell's teaching by Mrs Mac- 
dowell, and reminiscences of Joseffy. 
C1917. 786 B87p 2 

Colby, Franlv Plaiwey, cd. 

The Pacific coast musician. 1916. 

qc780.5 PIcm 
FiNCK, Henry Theophilus. 

Richard Strauss, the man and his 
works. 1917. 780.2 S912f 

HuTCHiNS, Charles Lewis, comp. 

Carols old and carols new for use at 
Christmas and other seasons of the 
Christian year. cl916. q783.6 H9 

MacKaye, Percy Wallace. 

The Canterbury pilgrims, an opera. 
[1916] q782.6M1 

Montagu-Nathan, M. 

Glinka. 1916. (Masters of Russian 
music.) 780.2 G561m 

Mouke, .Jean Gabriel Emile. 

The abuse of the singing and speaking 
voice. 1910. 784.9 IVI93 

Newmarch, 3irs Rosa Harriet (Jeaffre- 
son). 
Henry J. Wood. 1904. (Living mas- 
ters of music.) 780.2 W875n 



Skinner, Ernest M. 
The modern organ. cl917. 



q786.5 S6 



ToRGERSON, Helena Stone, comp. 

Harp music ; a digest classified alpha- 
betically and in grades according to 
degrees of difficulty. cl916. 

016.7875 T68 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



249 



Van Vechten, Carl. 

Interpreters and interpretations. 1917. 
780.4 V28i 

AVetterman, August. 

Journal of August Wetterman. 

qc780.2 W54 

Typewritten copy. 

ZuccA, Mana. 

A child's day in song. clOlG. q784 Z9 

AMUSEMENTS. 

Adams, Joseph Quincy. 

Shakespearean playhouses ; a history of 
English theatres from the beginnings 
to the restoration. cl917. 792 A214 

Burleigh, Louise. 

The community theatre in theory and 
practice. 1917. 792 B96 



Cheney, Sheldon. 

The art theatre. 1917. 



792 C51a 



Dickinson, Thomas Herbert. 

The insurgent theatre. 1917. 792 D55i 

Fiske, Mrs Minnie Maddern. 

Mrs Fiske, her views on actors, acting, 
and the problems of production. 1917. 

792 F54 

HiLLiARD, Evelyne. 

Amateur and educational dramatics. 
1917. 793 H65 

Mackay, Constance D'Arcy. 

The little theatre in the United States. 
1917. 792 M 1531 

Merington, Marguerite. 

More fairy tale plays. 1917. 

793.2 M56m 



Morris, Edwin Bateman. 
College comedies. 1911. 



793 M87 



Nathan, George Jean. 

Mr George Jean Nathan presents. 1917. 

792 N27m 

Walker, Alice Johnstone. 

Little plays from American history for 
young folks. 1914. 793.2 W17 

LITERATURE. 

Achilles Tatius. 

Achilles Tatius, with an English trans- 
lation by S. Gaselee. 1917. (Loeb 
classical library.) 888 A17g 



Adams, Eleanor Nathalie. 

Old English scholarship in England 
from 1566-lSOO. 1917. (Yale studies 
in English.) 820.9 A21 

Bennett, Arnold. 

Books and persons ; being comments on 
a past epoch, 1908-1911. 1917. 

824 B471 b 
Bradford, Gamaliel. 

A naturalist of souls ; studies in psy- 
chography. 1917. 809 B79 

The Cambridge history of American lit- 
erature, ed. by William Peterfield 
Trent, John Erskine, Stuart P. Sher- 
man and Carl Van Doren. vol. 1. 
1917. 810.9 C17 

Chalmers, Stephen. 

Enchanted cigarettes ; or, Stevenson 
stories that might have been. 1917. 
828 S84zc 
Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. 

What is man? and other essays. [1917] 
817C62wh 
DicKiNS, Bruce, ed. and tr. 

Runic and heroic poems. 1915. 

839.09 D55 
Dunn, Waldo Hilary. 

English biography. 1916. (Channels 
of English literature.) 820.9 D92 

Eaton, Walter Prichard. 

Green trails and upland pastures. 
1917. 814 E14 

Emerson, Willis George. 

A vendetta of the hills. 1917. cE53 

Freeman, John. 

The moderns ; essays in literary criti- 
cism. 1916. 820.9 F85 

Guthrie, Anna Lorraine. 

Russian literature. 1917. (Study out- 
line series.) 891.7 G98 

Hancock, John Leonard. 

Studies in stichomythia. [1917] 

808.2 H23 

Hanscom, Elizabeth Deering, ed. 
The heart of the Puritan. 1917. 

816 H24h 

Harvey, Alexander. 

William Dean Howells ; a study of the 

achievement of a literary artist. 1917. 

813 H34 



250 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Hearn, Lafcadio. 

Life and literature, selected and ed. 
with an introduction by John Ers- 
kine. 1917. 820.4 H43I 

Herfobd, Oliver, & Clay, John Cecil. 
Happy days. cl917. 808.8 H54 

HoEATius Flaccus, Quintus. 

On the Tibur road ; a freshman's Hor- 
ace, by George Meason Whicher and 
George Frisbie Whicher. 1911. 

874 H81tw 
Jacobsen, Jens Peter. 

Marie Grubbe. 1917. 839.83 J 17m 

Jaeintzoff, Madame N. 

Kussian i>oets and poems. 1917. 

891.7 J 37 
.Johnson, Burges. 

The well of English and the bucket. 
1917. 808 J 66 

Kennedy, Charles William, trans. 

The Caedmon poems. 1916. 829 K35 

Kleisee, Grenville. 

Fifteen thousand useful phrases. 1917. 

808 K64 
Kramee, Mary Eleanor. 

One thousand literary questions and 
answers. cl917. 807 K89 

London, Jack. 

Michael, brother of Jerry. 1917. 

cL847mi 
Maloey, Sir Thomas. 

The romance of King Arthur. 1917. 

398 M25r 
Mason, Benjamin F. 

The village mystery, and Through war 
to peace. cl910. cM398a 

Gift of Mrs B. R. Mason. 

Mencken, Henry Louis. 

A book of prefaces. 1917. 810.9 M53 

Monahan, Michael. 

New adventures. [1917] 814 IV173n 

MoREis, Mrs Elisabeth (Woodbridge). 
Days out, and other papers. 1917. 

814 M87d 
MosHER, Joseph Albert. 

The essentials of extempore speaking. 
1917. 808.5 IVi91e 

NANDIKEgVAEA. 

The mirror of gesture, being the Ab- 
hinaya darpana of NandikeSvara, tr. 
into English. 3917. 891.2 N17mc 



NoRRis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
The heart of Rachel. 191G. cN856h 

Older, Cora Miranda (Baggerly) "Mrs 
Fremont Older." 
Esther Damon. 1911. c044e 

O'Neill, .James Milton. 

Argumentation and debate. 1917. 

808.5 058 
Quivis, pseud. 

Interiora rerum ; or, The inside of 
things. 1917. 824 Q8 

Rankin, Thomas Ernest. 

The method and practice of exposition. 
1917. 808R211 

Sarolea, Charles. 

The French renascence. [1916] 

840.9 S24 
Scarborough, Dorothy. 

The supernatural in modern English 
fiction. 1917. 823.01 S28 

Sherman, Stuart Pratt. 

On contemporary literature. 1917. 

820.4 S55 
Sherwood, Margaret Pollock. 

Familiar ways. 1917. 814S554 

Shurter, Edwin Du Bois. 
How to debate. [1917] 

Smith, Logan Pearsall. 
Trivia. 1917. 



808.5 S56h 



824 S654t 



Tanner, William Maddux, ed. 

Essays and essay-writing, based on At- 
lantic monthly models. cl917. 

814 T16 
Taylor, Philip Meadows. 

Confessions of a thug. [1839] 

823 T24 
Turquet-Milnes, G. 

Some modern Belgian writers. 1916. 

840.9 T95 
Werner, Oscar Helmuth. 

The unmarried mother in German liter- 
ature, with special reference to the 
period 1770-1800. 1917. (Columbia 
university Germanic studies.) 

830.9 W494 
Williams, Blanche Colton. 

A handbook on story writing. 1917. 

808.3 W72 
Wood, Mary Morton. 

The spirit of protest in Old French 
literature. 1917. (Columbia uni- 
versity studies in Romance philology 
and literature.) 840.9 W87 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



251 



TsAYE, Lisa. 

The inn of disenchantment. 1917. 

814 Y91 

POETRY AND DRAMA. 

iESCHTLUS. 

The Oresteia of Jilschylus, translated 
into English prose by Lewis Camp- 
bell. 1893. 882 A25oc 

Alden, Raymond Macdonald. 

Alfred Tennyson, how to know him. 
cl917. 821.81 Da 



Allen, Grant. 

The lower slopes. 1S94. 



821 A42e 



Appleton, Everard Jack. 

With the colors, songs of the American 
service. 1917. 811 A649w 

Bachtell, Paul B. 

At Lucifer's portals, and other verses. 
1917. c811 B12 

Gift of the author. 

Barclay, 8ir Thomas. 

The sands of fate ; dramatised study of 
an imperial conscience, a phantasy. 
1917. 822 B24s 

Bigelow, Mrs L. Adda (Nichols). 

From sea to sea. 1914. c811 B59 

Gift of the author. 

Bjoenson, Bjornstjerne. 

Arnljot Gelline. 1917. (Scandinavian 
classics, v. 8.) 839,81 B62a 

Blake, William. 

The prophetic books of William Blake. 
Milton. 1907. q821 B6m 

Bosscheee, Jean de. 

The closed door, with a translation by 
F. S. Flint. 1917. 841 B745 



Beadfoed, Gamaliel. 

Unmade in heaven. 1917. 



812 B79u 



Beadle Y, William Aspenwall. 

Old Christmas, and other Kentucky 
tales in verse. 1917. 811 B8116 

Bkaithwaite, William Stanley Beau- 
mont. 
The poetic year for 1916, a critical 
anthology. cl917. 811.08 B81p 

Beooke, Henry Brian. 

Poems by Brian Brooke (Korongo). 
1917. 821 B872 

8—37615 



Beooks, Fred Emerson. 

Patriotic toasts. 1917. c811 B87pa 

BuDD, Charles, tr. 

Chinese poems. 1912. 895.1 B92 

BuEKE, Thomas. 

London lamps ; a book of songs. 1917. 

821 B95 
Bynnee, Witter. 

Grenstoue poems. cl917. 811 B99g 

CheA'EY, Annie Elizabeth. 

Dreams of Hellas. cl917. c811 C5182 
Gift of W. A. Cheney. 

Childe, Wilfrid Rowland. 

The escaped princess, and other poems. 

1916. ("Adventures all" series.) 

821 C536 
Chkistian, W. E. 

Rhymes of the rookies ; sunny side of 
soldier service. 1917. 811 C55r 

Claek, Charles Badger, jr. 

Grass-grown trails. cl917. 811 C592g 

Clarke, George Herbert, ed. 

A treasury of war poetry, British and 
American poems of the world war, 
1914-1917. 1917. 821.08 C59 

A COMPILATION of cradle-songs. 1907. 

C811.08C73 

Gift of Miss Annie Lowry. 

Ceockee, Bosworth. 

Pawns of war ; a play. 1918. 

812 C93p 
Ceockee, Charles Templeton. 

The land of happiness, a music drama. 
cl917. C812C93 

Dicey, Albert Venn. 

The statesmanship of Wordsworth. 

1917. 821 D546 

DiPPOLD, George Theodore. 

Richard Wagner's poem the Ring of 
the Nibelung. 1906. 831 W13zr 

Deinkwatee, John. 
Olton pools. 1916. 



821 D78 



Duff, James Duff, ed. 

Russian lyrics, with notes and vocabu- 
lary. 1917. 891.71 D85 

Feance, Anatole. 

The man who married a dumb wife ; a 
comedy in two acts, tr. for Mr Gran- 
ville Barker by Curtis Hidden Page. 
1915. 842F81m 



252 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Fbeedlandee, Joseph. 

The standard book of Jewish verse. 

1917. 892.41 F91 

Gaebisois^, Mrs Theodosia (Pickering). 
The dreamers, and other poems. r:1917. 

811 G24d 

Gkee^'wood, Sir Granville George. 

Sir Sidney Lee's new edition of A life 
of William Shakespeare. 1916. 

822.33 Bg 
Gbexieb, Edouard. 

The death of President Lincoln, a poem. 

1918. (Heartman's historical series, 
no. 30.) v841 G82 

Haslett, Harriet Holmes. 

Dolores of the Sierra, and other one 
act plays. cl917. c812 H35 

HoLMAN, Carrie Ellen, conip. 

In the day of battle ; poems of the 
great war. 1916. 821.08 H 74 



Hughes, Glenn. 

Souls and other poems. 1917. 

Gift of the author. 



c811 H89 



Hyde, Florence Elise. 

Captain of the host, The supreme test ; 
two plays. cl916. (American dra- 
matists' series.) 812 H 99c 

Jacob and .Joseph. 

Jacob and losep ; a middle English poem 
of the thirteenth century. 1916. 

821 J15 
Joxsox, Ben. 

The case is altered, with introduction, 
notes, and glossary, by William Ed- 
ward Selin. 1917. (Yale studies in 
English.) 822J81C 

Kameax, Guomundur. 

Hadda Padda ; a drama in four acts, 
tr. by Sadie Luise Peller. 1917. 
(Borzoi plays.) 839.6 K15 



Lassex, Mrs May C. 
More poems. cl914. 



c811 L43m 



Le Gea^std, Philippe E. 

The new Greek comedy. 1917. (The 
Loeb classical library.) 882 L51 

Letts, Winifred M. 

The spires of Oxford, and other poems. 
1917. 821 L65 



Lii!fDSAY, Nicholas Vachel. 

The Chinese nightingale and other 
poems. 1917. 811 L74ch 

McCeacken, Elizabeth, ed. 

To mother ; an anthology of mother 
verse, with an introduction by Kate 
Douglas Wiggin. cl917. 808.1 M13 

MacDoj^agh, Thomas. 

The poetical works. [1917?] 



MacKaye, Percy Wallace. 
The evergreen tree. 1917. 



821 Ml 35 
812M15e 



Massey, Edward. 

Plots and playwrights, a comedy. 1917. 

812M41p 
Mitchell, Dugald, ed. 

The book of Highland verse; an (Eng- 
lish ) anthology, consisting of 

(a) Translations from Gaelic. 

(b) English verse relating to the 
Highlands. 1912. 821.08 M68 

Mo>:cuR-SiME, A. H. 

Shakespeare : his music and song. 
[1917] (Music-1 over's library.) 

822.33 Dm on 

^Ionkhotjse, Allan. 

War plays. 1916. 822 IVI74w 

Contents: Shamed life. — Night 
watches. — The choice. 

Newbegix, Mrs Anna B. 

Poems of life from California. cl917. 

c811 N53 
Gift of J. J. Newbegin. 

O'DoiSTNELL, Charles Leo. 

The dead musician, and other poems. 
1916. 811 026 



Pendleton, Emmet. 

Thirty sonnets of passion. 



1913. 
c811 P39t 



Gift of the author. 
Poetey and drama. 2v. 



1913-1914. 

805 P745 



Pound, Ezra Loomis. 

Lustra, with earlier poems. 



1917. 
811 P87I 



Ravindeanath Thakura, Sir. 

Stray birds. 1916. 891.441 R25s 

Kendall, Elizabeth. 

Thursday's child. 1916. ("Adven- 
turers all" series.) 821 R39 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



253 



Rice, Grantland. 

Songs of the stalwart. cl917. 

811 R496 

Rookie rhymes, by the men of the 1st 
and 2d provisional training regiments, 
Plattsburg, Xew York, May 15-Au- 
gust 15, 1917. cl91T. 811.08 R77 

SCKIPPS, Robert Paine. 

Verses of an idle hour. [1917] 

c811 S434 

Gift of the author. 

Stebling, George. 

The binding of the beast. 1917. 

c811 S83bi 

Stevens, Ruth Davis, ed. 

American patriotic prose and verse. 
1917. 811.08S94 

SwiNBCBNE, Algernon Charles. 

Posthumous poems, ed. by Edmund 
Gosse and Thomas James Wise. 1917. 
821 S97pos 
Taylor. Edward Robeson. 

To arms. 1917. c811 T239t 



Teasdale, Sara. 
Love songs. 1911 



811 T25I 



Teeey, Howard Leslie. 

California, and other verse. 1917. 

c811 T32 

Gift of the author. 

Tobbexce, Frederic Ridgely. 

Granny Maumee, The rider of dreams. 
Simon the Cyrenian ; plays for a 
negro theater. 1917. 812T69g 

TUEQrET-MlLNES, G. 

The influence of Baudelaire in France 
and England. 1913. 841.09 T95 

Van Dyke, Henry. 

The red flower, poems written in war 
time. 1917. 811 V24r 

Vanzype. Gustave. 

Mother Nature ; Progress ; two Belgian 
plays. 1917. 842 V 28 

VePvHaeeen, fimile. 

The love poems, tr. by F. S. Flint. 
1917. 841V51I 



— The plays of Emile Verhaeren. 
The dawn: The cloister: Philip II: 
Helen of Sparta. 1916. 842 V51 p 

The sunlit hours, tr. by Charles 

R. Murphy. 1916. 841 V51s 



Veelaine, Paul Marie. 

Paul Verlaine, his absinthe-tinted song, 
a monograph on the poet, with selec- 
tions from his work, arranged and 
translated from the French, by Ber- 
gen Applegate. cl916. 841 V52pa 



Waekee Stuart. 
Portmanteau plays. 

Weeks, Raymond. 
Ode to France. 1911 



1917. 812W18p 



811 W39o 



Wheelee, William Reginald, ed. 

A book of verse of the great war. 1917. 
821.08 W56 
Wiees-Jenssen, Hans. 

Anne Petersdotter ; a drama in four 
acts ; English version by John Mase- 
field. 1917. 839.82 W64a 

Wilde, Percival. 

The unseen host, and other war plays : 
The unseen host. Mothers of men. 
Pawns, In the ravine, Valkyrie I 
1917. 812 W672u 

Wilkinson. Mrs Marguerite Ogden 
(Bigelow) comp. 
Golden songs of the Golden state. 1917. 
C811.08 W68 
WooDBEEBY, Georgc Edward. 
Ideal passion, sonnets. 1917. 

811 W88i 
Yeats, William Butler. 

Responsibilities, and other poems. 1916. 

821 Y41r 

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION. 
GENERAL. 

Fletchek, Alfred Charles Benson. 

From job to job around the world. 
1917. c910 F61 

Gaedinee, Alan Henderson, & Peet, T. 
Eric. 
The inscriptions of Sinai. 1917. 

q913.32 E3 
Hopkins, Tighe. 

The romance of escapes ; studies of 
some historic flights with a personal 
commentary. 1917. 910 H79 

EUROPE. 

Ceevesato, Arnaldo. 

The Roman campagna. [1913] 

q914.56 C4 
CnoLiiONDELEY, Alice. 

Christine. 1917. 914.3 C54 



254 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES. [April, 1918 



Edwaeds, George Wharton. 

Vanished halls and cathedrals of 
France. cl917. q914.4 E2 

Vanished towers and chimes of 

Flanders. 1916. q914.93 E2 

HowELLS, William Dean. 

Venetian life (Autograph ed.) 1907. 
2v. V914.53 H85a 

James, Norman G. Brett, comp. 

The charm of Switzerland. 1910. 

914.94 J28 
LoMAS, John. 

In Spain. 1908. 914.6 L83 



MiTTON, Geraldine Edith. 
Austria-Hungary. 1914. 



914.36 M68 



RuHL, Arthur Brown. 

White nights, and other Russian im- 
pressions. 1917. 914.7 R93 

ASIA. 
Adams, Isaac. 

Persia by a Persian, being personal ex- 
periences of manners, customs, habits, 
religious and social life in Persia. 
1906. 915.5 A21 

Gift of Rev Isaac Adams, Turlock, 
California. 



Bell, Archie. 

The spell of China. 1917. 



915.1 B43 



Champney, Mrs Elizabeth (Williams). 
Romance of old Japan. 1917. 

915.2 C45 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Chapin, Anna Alice. 

Greenwich Village. 1917. 917.471 C46 

Dale, Harrison Clifford. 

The Ashley-Smith explorations and the 
discovery of a route to the Pacific, 
1822-1829. 1918. 917.8 D 13 

Fleagle, Fred K. 

Social problems in Porto Rico. cl917. 
917.295 F59 
Henderson, Helen Weston. 

A loiterer in New York. cl917. 

917.471 H496 
James, George Wharton. 

Arizona, the wonderland. 1917. 

C917.91 J 27a 
Johnston, C. W. 

Along the Pacific by land and sea. 
1916. C917.9J723 



JoRDANES, 6th cent. 

The Gothic history of Jordanes in Eng- 
lish version. 1915'. 943.01 J82 

LiPPiNCOTT, Horace Mather. 

Early Philadelphia ; its people, life and 
progress. 1917. 917.481 L76 

Mills, Enos Abijah. 

Your national parks, with detailed in- 
formation for tourists. 1917. 

917.8 M65y 

NoRTHEND, Mary Harrod. 

Memories of old Salem. 1917. 

917.44 N87 

Packard, Winthrop. 

Literary pilgrimages of a naturalist. 
cl911. 917.4 P11 

Shackleton, Robert. 

The book of New York. 1917. 

917.471 S52 

Spence, Lewis. 
Mexico of the Mexicans. 1917. 

917.2 S74 

Stanaed, iirs Mary Mann Page (New- 
ton). 
Colonial Virginia, its people and cus- 
toms. 1917. 917.55 S78 

Veerill, Alpheus Hyatt. 

The book of the West Indies. 1917. 

917.29 V55 

OCEANICA AND POLAR REGIONS. 

CoRNEY, Peter. 

Voyages in the northern Pacific. 1896. 

919.6 C81 

Hall, Thomas F. 

Has the North pole been discovered. 
cl917. 919.8 HI 79 

MuiR, John. 

The cruise of the Corwin. 1917. 

C919.8 M95 

Peary, Robert Edwin. 

Secrets of polar travel. 1917. 

919.8 P36s 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Bartlett, Joseph Gardner. 

The English ancestry of Peter Talbot 
of Dorchester, Mass. 1917. 

929.2 T14b 
Gift of Mrs Cyrus Walker. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



255 



Barton, George. 

The world's greatest military spies and 
secret service agents. 1917. 923 B29 

Bates, Joseph Clement. 

History of the bench and bar. 1912. 
qc923.4 B3 

Blashfield, Evangeline (Wllbour) "3Irs 

E. H. Blashfield." 

Portraits and backgrounds : Hrotsvitha, 

Aphra Behn, Aisse, Rosalba Carriera. 

1917. 920.7 B644 

Bbannee, John Casper. 

Casper Branner of Virginia and his 
descendants. 1913. 929.2 B82b 

East Bkidgewateb, Mass. 
Vital records of East Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, to the year 1850. 
1917. (New England historic genea- 
logical society. Vital records of the 
towns of Massachusetts.) 929.3 E13 



JiPSON, Norton William. 

A history & genealogy 

ants of John Jepson. 

Gift, of Professor 



of the descend- 
cl917. 

929.2 J54j 
W. L. Jepson, 



University of California^ 

Llantilio Ceossenny, Eng. (Parish). 

Registra antiqua de Llantilio Crossenny 

et Penrhos in comitatu Monu- 

methensi. 1916. q929.3 L7 

New Haven. 

Vital records of New Haven, 1649- 
1850. 1917. (Vital records of Con- 
necticut.) 929.3 N 54 

Pakkeb, John, ed. 

Who's who in the theatre ; a biograph- 
ical record of the contemporary stage. 
3d ed., rev. and enl. 1916. 

r927.92 W62p1 

Society of Mayflower Descendants. Cali- 
fornia. 
Register of the Society of Mayflower 
descendants in the state of Cali- 
fornia ; a record of descent from pas- 
sengers on the good ship "Mayflower," 
A. D. 1620. V. 1. 1917. c929.1 S67 



Weekley, Ernest. 
Surnames. 1916. 



929.4 W39s 



BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Ahhott. Abbott, Carlisle Stewart. 
Recollections of a California pioneer. 
1917. cB A1312 

Arnold. Shebman, Stuart Pratt. 

Matthew Arnold, how to know him. 
cl917. B A757sh 

Auduhon. Hebbick, Francis Hobart. 
Audubon the naturalist ; a history of 
his life and time. 1917. 2v. 

B A916h 

Bairns father. Cabteb, Vivian. 

Bairnsfather ; a few fragments from 
his life. n.d. B B163c 

Bigelow. Bigelow, Mrs L. Adda (Nich- 
ols). 
Reminiscences. cl917. cB B592 

Gift of the author. 

Breshko-BreshJcovskaia. Bbeshko-Bbesh- 

KOVSKAiA, Ekaterina Konstantinovna 

(Verigo). 

The little grandmother of the Russian 

revolution ; reminiscences and letters. 

1917. B B842 

Butters. BxJTTEES, Henry Augustus. 
Harry Butters, R. F. A., "an Ameri- 
can citizen" : life and war letters. 

1918. cB B988 

Choate. Steong, Theron George. 

Joseph H. Choate, New Englander, 
New Yorker, lawyer, ambassador. 
1917. B C5455S 

Clark. Claek, Charles Edgar. 
My fifty years in the navy. 1917. 

BC592 

Clemens. [Clemens, Samuel Langhorne.] 

Mark Twain's letters, arranged with 

comment, by Albert Bigelow Paine. 

cl917. 2v. B C625 

Collyer. Holmes, John Haynes. 

The life and letters of Robert Collyer, 
1823-1912. 1917. 2v. B C715h 

Daly. Daly, Joseph Francis. 

The life of Augustin Daly. 1917. 

B D153 

Davis. Davis, Richard Harding. 
Adventures and letters, ed. by Charles 
Belmont Davis. 1917. B D263 



256 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



Diaz. Hannay, David. 

Diaz. 1917. (Makers of the nine- 
teenth century.) B D542h 

Franklin. Bbuce, William Cabell. 

Benjamin Franklin, self-revealed. 1917. 
2v. B F831br 



Garland. Gaeland, Hamlin. 
A son of the middle border. 



1917. 
BG2333 



Grant. Faiemount park art association, 
Philadelphia. 
Ceremonies incident to the unveiling 
of the bronze equestrian statue of 
General Ulysses S. Grant. 1899. 

qBG76f 

Grotius. Veeeland, Hamilton. 

Hugo Grotius, the father of the modern 
science of international law. 1917. 

BG881v 

Bale. Hale, Edv^ard Everett. 

The life and letters of Edward Everett 
Hale, by Edward E. Hale, jr. 1917. 
2v. B H161 

Haivkins. Hawkins, Thomas S. 

Some recollections of a busy life. [1913] 

cB H394 

Gift of the author. 

Holmes. Holmes, John, 1812-1899. 
Letters of John Holmes to James Rus- 
sell Lowell and others. 1917. 

B H751 

Li Hung Chang. Bland, John Otway 
Percy. 
Li Hung-Chang. 1917. (Makers of 
the nineteenth century.) B L693b 

Lincoln. Lincoln, Abraham, pres. U. 8. 

Uncollected letters of Abraham Lincoln, 

now first brought together by Gilbert 

A Tracy. 1917. B L736 

Lincoln. Rothschild, Alonzo. 

"Honest Abe." 1917. B L736ro 

McHenry. Steinee, Bernard Christian. 

The life and correspondence of James 

McHenry. 1907. B M149s 

Maxwell. Glazebeook, Richard Tetley. 
James Clerk Maxwell and modern 
physics. 1901. B IV1465g 

Miyatovic. Miyatovic, Chedomil. 

The memoirs of a Balkan diplomatist. 
1917. B M685 



Pieshkov. Pieshkov, Aleksiei Maksimo- 
vich. 
In the world. 1917. B P624i 

Ravlndranatha Thdkura. RAViNDEANA- 
tha Thaktjea, Sir. 
My reminiscences. 1917. B R256 

Shelley. Dowden, Edward. 

Letters about Shelley. 1917. B S545d 



Smuts. Levi, N. 
Jan Smuts. 1917. 



B S666I 



Spencer. Elliot, Hugh Samuel Roger. 

Herbert Spencer. 1917. (Makers of 

the nineteenth century.) B S745e 

Taylor. Tatloe, Justus Hurd. 

Joe Taylor, barnstormer, his travels, 
troubles and triumphs, during fifty 
years in footlight flashes. cl913. 

B T2433 

Thoreau. Emeeson, Edward Waldo. 
Henry Thoreau, as remembered by a 
young friend. 1917. B T488e 

Wilson. Haebis, H. Wilson. 

President Wilson, his problems and his 
policy. 1917. B W754har 

HISTORY. 

GENERAL. 

Altschul, Charles. 

The American revolution in our school 
textbooks. cl917. 907 A46 

Faiegeieve, James. 

Geography and world power. 1917. 

901 F16 
Maevin, Francis Sydney, ed. 

The unity of western civilization ; es- 
says. 1915. 901 M39 



Stephens, Kate. 
The Greek spirit. 



1914. 



938 S83 



Stevenson, George Edmund de St. Clair. 
A century of war (1815-1914) ; a pre- 
cis of the world's campaigns. 1916. 

902 S84 

Williams, Laurence Frederic Rushbrook. 
Four lectures on the handling of his- 
torical material. 1917. 907 W 72 



Zangwill, Israel. 

The principle of nationalities. 
(Conway memorial lecture.) 



1917. 



904 Z29 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAET. 



257 



EUROPE. 
Beown, Horatio Robert Forbes. 

Studies in the history of Venice. 1907. 
2v. 945.3 B87s 

Duff, James Duff, ed. 

Russian realities and problems. 1917. 

947 D85 

EvEBSLEY, George John Shaw-Lefevre, 1st 
iaron. 
The Turkish empire, its growth and 
decay. [1917] 949.6 E93 

FooKD, Edward A. 

The Byzantine empire ; the rearguard 
of European civilization. 1911. 

949.5 F68 
FoRTiEK, Alcee. 

Precis de I'histoire de France. 1913. 

944 F74 
Gibson, Hugh. 

A journal from our legation in Belgium. 
1917. 949.3 G44 

Hazen, Charles Downer. 

Alsace-Lorraine under German rule. 
1917. 943 H42 

Maecosson, Isaac Frederick. 
The rebirth of Russia. 1917. 

947 M32 
Marriott, John Arthur Ransome. 

The Eastern question ; an historical 

study in European diplomacy. 1917. 

949.6 M35 

National institute of arts and letters. 
Greetings to the new Russia ; addresses. 
1917. (Carnegie endowment for in- 
ternational peace. Division of inter- 
course and education. Publication 
no. 13.) 947.08 N27 

Olgin, Moissaye Joseph. 

The soul of the Russian revolution. 
1917. 947 045 

Peaks, Sir Edwin. 

Life of Abdul Hamid. 1917. (Mak- 
ers of the nineteenth century.) 

949.6 P36 

SCHIERBEAND, Wolf VOn. 

Austria-Hungary : the polyglot empire. 
cl917. 943.6 S33 

Sotjiny-Seydlitz, Leonie Ida Philipovna, 
iaroness. 
Russia of yesterday and to-morrow. 
1917. 947 S72 



Tayloe, a. H. E. 

The future of the southern Slavs. 1917, 

949.6 T23 
Wetteele, fimile. 

Alsace and Lorraine on the eve of 
deliverance. 1917. 943.4 W54 

EUROPEAN WAR. 
Aechee, William, comp. 

Gems (?) of German thought. 1917. 
940.9 A67g 
Austin, Oscar Phelps. 

Uncle Sam's boy at war. 1917. 

940.9 A93 
Baiknsfathee, Bruce. 

Bullets & billets. cl917. 940.9 B16 

[Beith, John Hay] 
All in it. "K (1)" carries on. 1917. 
940.9 B42a 
Brandes, Georg Morris Cohen. 

The world at war, tr. by Catherine D. 
Groth. 1917. 940.9 881 7 

Bbooks, Alden. 

The fighting men. 1917. 940.9 887 

Buti.er, Nicholas Murray. 

A world in ferment. 1917. 940.9 8986 

Cheeadame, Andre. 

The United States and Pangermania. 
1918. 940.9 C52u 

Cobb, Irvin Shrewsbury. 

Speaking of Prussians. cl917. 

940.9 C65s 
Coleman, Frederic Abernethy. 

With cavalry in the great war. 1917. 
940.9 C69w 
Coolidge, Archibald Cary. 

Origins of the Triple alliance. 1917. 

940.9 C77 

Dawson, Alec John. 

The message. [1907] 940.9 D27 

Dixon, William Macneille. 

The British navy at war. 1917. 

940.9 D62 
Gift of the author. 

The fleets behind the fleet. cl9l7. 

940.9 D62f 

Gift of the author. 

Eddy, George Sherwood. 

With our soldiers in France. 1917. 

940.9 E21 

Foe Feance. 1917. 940.9 F69 



258 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



FoESTNER, Georg Giinther. 

The journal of submarine commander 
Ton Forstner. 1917. 940.9 F734 

FoRTESCUE, Granville Roland. 
France bears the burden. 1917. 

940.9 F73f 

A German deserter's war experience. 
1917. 940.9 G37 

Gibbons, Herbert Adams. 

The reconstruction of Poland and the 
Near East ; problems of peace. 1917. 
940.9 G44r 
GoLTZ, Horst Yon der. 

My adventures as a German secret 
agent. 1917. 940.9 G62 

Gomez Carrillo, Enrique. 

In the heart of the tragedy. 1917. 

940.9 063 
Halsey, Francis Whiting, ed. 

Balfour, Viviani and Joffre ; their 
speeches and other public utterances 
in America, and those of Italian, 
Belgian and Russian commissioners 
during the great war. 1917. 

940.9 H 19 
Holmes, R. Derby. 

A Yankee in the trenches. 1918. 

940.9 H75 
McCarthy, Daniel Joseph. 

The prisoner of war in Germany. 1917. 

940.9 M123 

McCoEMiCK, Harold Fowler. 

Via pacis ; how terms of peace can be 

automatically prepared while the war 

is still going on. 1917. 940.9 M131 

RIacqtjarrie, Hector. 

How to live at the front ; tips for 
American soldiers. cl917. 

940.9 Ml 7 
Masefield, John. 

The old front line. 1917. 940.9 M39o 

Meeciee, cardinal. 

The voice of Belgium. [1917] 

940.9 M55 
MtJCKE, Hellmuth von. 

The "Ayesha," being the adventures of 
the landing squad of the '"Emden," tr. 
by Helene S. White. [1916] 

940.9 M94 

National security league. Committee on 
patriotism through education. 
Handbook of the war for public speak- 
ers. 1917. 940.9 N27 



Noel glorieux. 

q940.9 N7 

Gift of Envoi de la Maison de la 
Presse, Paris. 

Nyrop, Kristoffer. 

Is war civilization? [1917] 940.9 N 99 

Out of their own mouths ; utterances of 
German rulers, statesmen, savants, 
publicists, journalists, poets, business 
men. party leaders and soldiers. 
1917. 940.9 094 

Palmer, Frederick. 

With our faces in the light. 1917. 

940.9 P17w 
Passelecq, Fernand. 

Unemployment in Belgium during the 
German occupation. 1917. 

q940.9 P2 
Peat, Harold R. 

Private Peat. cl917. 940.9 P36 

Seegee, Alan. 

Letters and diary. 1917. 940.9 S451 

SiMONDS, Frank Herbert. 

History of the world war. v. 1. 1917. 

q940.9 S5 
Sullivan, Reginald Noel. 

Somewhere in France. 1917. 

C940.9 S95 
SwoPE, Herbert Bayard. 

Inside the German empire in the third 
year of the war. 1917. 940.9 S979 

Taet, William Howard. 

The menace of a premature peace. 

940.9 T12 

Theie crimes ; translated from the 
French. 1917. 940.9 TS77 

Gift of W. Macneile Dixon. 

Those "gentlemen" of Germany. 

940.9 T52 

U. S. President, 1913. {Wilson) 

Why we are at war ; messages to the 

Congress, January to April, 1917. 

[1917] 940.9 U58 

Van Dyke, Henry. 

Fighting for peace. 1917. 940.9 V24 

Veedavaine, Georges. 

Pictures of ruined Belgium. 1917. 
q940.9 V4 

Waltees, E. Walter. 

Heroic airmen and their exploits. 
[1917] 940.9 W23 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



259 



Wae and the spirit of youth. cl917. 

940.9 W253 

Wab of democracy, the allies' statement ; 
chapters on the fundamental signifi- 
cance of the struggle for a new 
Europe, prepared by Rt. Hon. Vis- 
count Bryce, O. M., Rt. Hon. D. 
Lloyd George [and others]. 1917. 

940.9 W253od 

Wab of liberation. 1917. 940.9 W253o 

Wabd, Herbert. 

Mr Poilu ; notes and sketches with the 
fighting French. 1916. q940.9 W2 

Why the war must go on. 1917. 

940.9 W62w 
ASIA. 
Weal?:, B. L. Putnam, [pseud.]. 

The fight for the republic in China. 
1917. 951 W36f 

AFRICA. 
Cajlvekt, Albert Frederick. 
The Cameroons. 1917. 967 CI 6 



NORTH AMERICA. 
Babbois', Clarence Walker. 
The Mexican problem. 1917 



972 B27 



Gabter, Charles Franklin. 

Stories of the old missions of Cali- 
fornia. 1917. C979.402 C32 

Chatfield-Tatlob, Hobart Ghatfield. 
Chicago. 1917. q977.31 C5c 

Claibob]S^e, William Charles Cole. 

Official letter books. 1917. 976 C58 

Fobbes, Harrie Rebecca Piper (Smith) 
''Mrs A. S. C. Forbes.'" 
California missions and landmarks, El 
Gamino real. 1915. c979.402 F69 

[Fbacanzako da Montaxboddo], comp. 
Paesi nouamente retrovati & Novo 
mondo da Alberico Vesputio Floren- 
tino intitulato [1508]. Reproduced 
in facsimile from the McCormick-Hoe 
copy in the Princeton university li- 
brary. 1916. (Vespucci reprints, 
texts and studies.) 973.1 V58p 

Sensuyt le Nouveau monde & navi- 
gations faictes par Emeric Vespuce 
Florentin. Dez pays & isles nouvelle- 
ment trouvez auparavant a nous in- 
conneuz tant en I'Ethiope que Arra- 



bie, Calichut et aultres plusiers 
regions estranges. Translate de ital- 
ien en langue frangoise par Mathurin 
du Redouer licencie es loix. [1515] 
Reproduced in facsimile from the Mc- 
Cormick-Hoe copy in the Princeton 
university library. 1916. (Ves- 
pucci reprints, texts and studies.) 

973.1 V58s 

Ftillee, George Newman. 

Economic and social beginnings of Mich- 
igan ; a study of the settlement of 
the lower peninsula during the terri- 
torial period, 1805-1837. 1916. 

977.4 F96 

HoucK, Louis. 

A history of Missouri from the earliest 
explorations and settlements until the 
admission of the state into the union. 
1908. 3v. 977.8 H83h 

Kelly, E. S. 

Condensed sketch of the early history 
of California, San Francisco and 
Oakland. 1879. c979.4 K297 

Gift of Mrs A. A. Webber. 

Lecky, William Edward Hartpole. 

The American revolution, 1763-1783. 
1917. 973.3 L46 

The Massachusetts magazine, devoted 
to Massachusetts history, genealogy, 
biography, v. 1-9, 1908-1916. 

974.405 IVI41 
MoBGAX, James Morris. 

Recollections of a Rebel reefer. 1917. 
973.75 M84 
Obeeholtzeb, Ellis Paxson. 

A history of the United States since 
the civil war. v. 1. 1917. 973.8 012 

O'Shaughnessy, Mrs Edith Louise 

(Coues) 

Diplomatic days. cl917. Letters from 

Mexico, May, 1911, to October, 1912. 

972 082d 

Otis, George B. 

Reminiscences of early days. [1911] 
C979.482 088 
Gift of Mrs A. A. Webber. 

Poast, Florence Maude. 

Indian names, facts and games for 

Camp fire girls. 2d ed. 1917. 

970.1 P73 
Rhodes, James Ford. 

History of the civil war, 1861-1865. 

1917. 973.7 R47h 



260 



NEWS NOTES 03^ CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



TiLGHMAN, Oswald, comp. 

History of Talbot County, Maryland, 
1661-1861. 1915. 2v. q975.21 T1t 

CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING JANU- 
ARY, FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 
1918.t 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in News 
Notes of California Libraries, as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Adjutant General. Circular no. 170 
(Registration and draft). List of state 
and federal officers conducting the opera- 
tion of the selective service law in the 
state of California, members of the dis- 
trict exemption boards, the counties over 
which these boards preside, members of 
the local exemption boards, the legal ad- 
visory boards, the medical advisory 
boards and examining surgeons, state of 
California. January 15, 1918. 1918. 
44 p. 

Aeciiitectuee, State Board of (San 
Francisco). List of architects holding 
certificates to practice in the state of Cali- 
fornia. Northern district, corrected to 
January 1, 1918. 1918. 16 p. 

California School for the Deaf and 
Blind (Berkeley). The California News, 
vol. 33, nos. 5-7, January to March, 1918. 
Berkeley, 1918. 4°. 



fExcept when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octave in size. 

*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



Capital Planning Commission, 
State. Second annual report of the state 
capital planning commission upon its in- 
vestigation of the planning of the capital 
of California. 1918. 23 p. illus. 

Charities and Corrections, State 
Board of. Bulletin no. 170, January 31, 
1918. Monthly census of inmates of state 
institutions. 

Same, no. 171, February 28, 1918. 



Same, no. 172, March 31, 1918. 

Mimeographed sheets. 

Council of Defense, State. The 
plague of Kaiserdom, by William V^ 
Cowan. February 15, 1918. 24 p. 16°. 

Education, State Board of. Bulle- 
tin no. 24, pt. 1, The war and America, 
introductory war citizenship lessons, Feb- 
ruary, 1918, 24 p.; pt. 2, The war and 
America, problems of finance, food and 
clothing, war citizenship lessons, March, 
191S. 24 p. 

Prepared under the direction of 
Pasadena High School. 

California blue bulletin, vol. 4, 

no. 1, March, 1918. 30 p. illus. 

Equalization, State Board of. Rev- 
enue laws of the state of California, in 
force January 1, 1918. 1917. 534 p. 

Fish and Game Commission (San 
Francisco). California fish and game, 
vol. 4, no. 1, January, 1918. p. 1-56. 
illus. 

[Harbor Commissioners, State Board 
of] (San Francisco). Rules and regu- 
lations concerning [waterfront] passes. 
1918. 6 p. 

Harbor Commissioners for the port 
OF Eureka, Board of State. Annual 
report showing the business done at the 
port of Eureka during the year ending 
December, 1917. Sheet 16| by 20i in. 

Health, State Board of. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 13, no. 7, January, 1918. 
p. 298-352. illus. 

Control of smallpox ; Correctible de- 
fects. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 8. February, 

1918. p. 353-400. illus. 

Sanitation of steamers ; Los Feliz 
Hospital. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAET. 



261 



Health, State Board of. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 13, no. 9. March, 1918. 
p. 390-446. illus. 

Seagulls as scavengers ; Sanitation 
in mines. 

Special bulletin, no. 8, 2d ed. 



Sewage disposal for isolated residences. 
February 1, 1918. 8 p. illus. 

Same, no. 15. Poliomyelitis. 



Regulations for the prevention of Poli- 
omyelitis (Infantile paralysis). August 
5, ime. 1918. 7 p. 

Same, no. 27. Contamination 



of well water supplies. December, 1917. 
7 p. 

Bureau of registration of nurses. 



Register of nurses for 1915-1916-1917. 
January 1, 1918. 42 p. 

HOBTICULTXJEE, StATE COMMISSION OF. 

California directory of nurserymen, 1917— 
1918. 1918. 24 p. 

Monthly bulletin, vol. 7, nos. 



1 & 2 (in 1), January-February, 1918. 

p. 1-110. illus. 

Proceedings of the Fiftieth State 
Fruit Growers' Convention, Novem- 
ber 21 to 23, 1917. 

Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). Report, July 1, 1916, 
to June 30, 1917. 1917. 158 p. illus. 

• Bulletin, no. 7. Relating to 



safeguards against injuiy in mines. March, 
1918. 1918. 48 p. illus. 

California safety news, vol. 2, 



nos. 1-3, January-March, 1918. illus. 
Amended tentative safety rules 



for gold dredges, March, 1918. 1918. 
68 p. 16°. 

Changes in the compensation 



law : what they are and why they were 
made, by A. J. Pillsbury, chairman. 
[1917] 31 p. 

Elevator safety orders, effective 



October 1, 1916, and, as revised, effective 
April 1, 1918. 1918. 48 p. 16°. 

General construction safety 

orders, effective January 15, 1918. 1917. 
32 p. 24°. 



Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). Information for em- 
ployees regarding the workmen's compen- 
sation, insurance and safety act, effective 
January 1, 1918. 4 p. 24° 

Reported decisions, vol. 4, bul- 



letins, nos. 11-12, October to December, 
1917. 1917. 

Subscription $2.00 a year; single 
copies, 25 cents. 

Special bulletin. Decisions of 



the United States Supreme Court involv- 
ing compensation law. 1917. 66 p. 
Price 50 cents. 

Library, State. California county free 
libraries : two questions often asked. 
Tenth edition. 1918. 16 p. 32°. 

California laws of interest to 



women and children. 1917. 1918. 272 p. 

News Notes of California Li- 
braries, vol. 13, no. 1. January, 1918. 
p. 1-153. illus. map. 

■ Books for the blind department. 



News Notes. Reprinted from News Notes 
of California Libraries, January, 1918. 
20 p., 32°. 

Market Commission, State. First 
annual report of the state iish exchange. 
1918. 52 p. 

State Pish Exchange act of Cali- 
fornia, p. 47. 

Market Director, State. Second an- 
nual report, for the year ending Decem- 
ber 1, 1917. 1918. 52 p. 

Mining Bureau, State (San Fran- 
cisco). Bulletin no. 75, September, 1917. 
Mining laws. United States and Cali- 
fornia. 1917. 115 p. 

Same, no. 77, December, 1917. 



Catalog of publications of the State min- 
ing bureau, 1880-1917. 1918. 44 p; 

Motor Vehicle Department. Regis- 
tered automobiles. 1917. 8 vols. 1917- 
18. 

Registered motorcycles, 1917. 



1917. 



Pharmacy, State Board of (San 
Francisco). [Laws regulating the prac- 
tice of pharmacy, sale of poisons, etc.] 
July 1, 1915. 1918. 39 p. 



262 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



State Peison (San Quentin). The 
bulletin, vol. 5, nos. 1-5, October to Feb- 
ruary, 1917-18. San Quentin, 1917-18. 
A monthly journal devoted to in- 
mate welfare. 

Real Estate Commissionee, State. 
California real estate directory — bulletin 
of licensed real estate brokers and sales- 
men, issued quarterly beginning October 1, 
1917. 2d quarter, January 1, 1918. 1918. 
128 p. 

E-AiLEOAD Commission (San Fran- 
cisco) . Report, July 1, 1916, to June 30, 
1917. 1917. 2v. 

Decisions, vol. 11, September 

1 to November 30, 1916. 1917. 1044 p. 

Cover title : Opinions and orders of 
the Railroad Commission of Cali- 
fornia. 

Univeesity of Califoenia (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, third series, vol. 11, no. 5. Reg- 
ister, 1916-17, with announcements for 
1917-18. Berkeley, November, 1917. 12°. 
In fifteen parts, each paged sep- 
arately. 

Same, vol. 11, no. 6. Annual 



report of the President of the University, 
1916-17. Berkeley, December, 1917. 
358 p. 

Same, vol. 11, no. 7. Sugges- 



tions on the preparation of manuscript. 
Berkeley, January, 1918. 20 p. 12°. 

Calendar, vol. XLVIII, nos. 1- 



12, January 14 to April 1, 1918. 8 p. 

folders. 

Published weekly during the aca- 
demic year and summer session. 
Price for regular session 50 cents per 
year ; 2 5 cents per half year ; for sum- 
mer session 25 cents, postpaid. 

Chronicle : an official record, vol. 



XIX, no. 4, October, 1917. Berkeley, 

1917. p. 347-510. 

Contents : Standardizing the dollar, 
Irving Fisher ; Lovers' meeting, trans- 
lated by Arthur W. Ryder ; Address, 
University meeting, September 14, 
Warren Gregory ; In praise of death, 
translated by S. G. Morley; The dedi- 
cation of the library of French 
thought ; Address, University meet- 
ing, August 31, William MacDonald; 
The Slavs, past and present, Ludwik 
Ehrlich ; In memory of Robert Hills 
Loughridge ; The utilization of patents 
for the promotion of research : a 
statement by T. Brailsf ord Robertson ; 
Rural institutions, Elwood Mead; To 
Henry Morse Stephens, Edward Robe- 
son Taylor ; University record, Victor 
H. Henderson. 



Same, vol. XX, no. 1, January, 

1918. p. 1-147. 

Contents: German idealism and its 
war critics, C. I. Lewis ; Recent war 
legislation, Stuart Daggett ; The dis- 
missal of the Grecian envoys; trans- 
lated and done into English verse by 
George Rapall Noyes and Ruth Earl 
Merrill ; University organization and 
training, Andrew C. Lawson ; Work of 
the Department of Chemistry in war 
time, Bdmond O'Neill ; The passion of 
our brother, the Poilu, translated by 
A. W. Ryder; The Military Bureau of 
the University of California, Leon J. 
Richardson ; The prophetic songs of 
Swinburne, J. Lowenberg; Commence- 
ment address, 1917, Benj. Ide Wheeler ; 
Cossack cradle song, translated by 
Dorothea Prall ; University record. 

Price per year $1.00 ; single copies 
25 cents. 

Publications Agricultural sci- 
ences, vol. 3, no. 6. Changes in the chem- 
ical composition of grapes during ripen- 
ing, by F. T. Bioletti, W. V. Cruess, and 
H. Davi. Berkeley, March 9, 1918. 
p. 103-130. roy 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 7. A 

new method of extracting the soil solution, 
by Chas. B. Lipman. Berkeley, March 
15, 1918. p. 131-134. roy 8°. 
Price 5 cents. 

College of Agriculture. 



Agricultural Experiment Station. Bulle- 
tin, no. 290. The June drop of Washing- 
ton navel oranges, a progress report, by 
J. Eliot Coit and Robert W. Hodgson. 
Berkeley, January, 1918. p. 201-212. 
illus. 

Same, no. 291. The 



common honey bee as an agent in prune 
pollination, second report, by A. H. Hen- 
drickson. Berkeley, January, 1918. 
p. 213-236, illus. 

Same, no. 292. Green 



manure crops in southern California, by 
W. M. Mertz. Berkeley, February, 1918. 
31 p. illus. 

— Circular, no. 179. Fac- 



tors of importance in producing milk of 
low bacterial count, by C. L. Roadhouse. 
Berkeley, October, 1917. 11 p. illus. 

Same, no. 189. Winter 



forage crops, by P. B. Kennedy. Berke- 
ley, January, 1918. 11 p. 

Same, no. 190. Agri- 



culture clubs in California, by B. H. 



vol. 13,110. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



263 



Crochoron. Berkeley, January, 1918. 
24 p. illus. 

.— Same, no. 191. Prun- 



ing the seedless grapes, by Frederic T. 
Bioletti. Berkeley, January, 1918. 12 p. 
illus. 

Same, no. 192. Cotton 



in the San Joaquin Valley, by John W. 
Gilmore. Berkeley, February, 1918. 8 p. 

Same, no. 193. A study 



of farm labor in California, by R. L. 
Adams and T. R. Kelley. Berkeley, 
March, 191S. 75 p. 

Same, no. 194. Inter- 



cropping of young irrigated orchards, by 
R. S. Vaile. Berkeley, February, 1918. 
lip. 

Same, no. 195. Revised 



compatibility chart of insecticides and 
fungicides, by George P. Gray. Berke- 
ley, March, 1918. 3 p. illus. 

Same, no. 196. Dairy 



calves for veal, by Gordon H. True and 
Clarence V. Castle. Berkeley, March, 
1918. 7 p. 

— The fumigation of stored 



grain, dried fruits and other products, by 
E. R. de Ong. Berkeley, December, 1917. 
7 p. 

Poultry I'aising, by E. J. 



Hauser. Berkeley, December, 1917. 3 p. 
illus. 

Spinach growing in Cali- 



fornia, by Stanley S. Rogers. Berkeley, 
February, 1918. 3 p. 

American Archaeology 



and Ethnology, vol. 13, no. 2. The Yana 
Indians, by T. T. Waterman. Berkeley, 
February 27, 1918. p. 35-102, plates 1- 
20. roy. 8°. 

Price 75 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 3. 



Yahi archery, by Saxton T. Pope. Berke- 
ley, March 6, 1918. p. 103-152, plates 21- 
37. roy. 8°. 

Price 75 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 4. 



Sapir. Berkeley, March 12, 1918. p. 
153-173. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 14, no. 2. 



Clans and moeties in southern California, 
by Edward Winslow Gifford. Berkeley, 
March 29, 1918. 1 text-fig. roy. 8°. 
Price 75 cents. 

Astronomy. Lick Ob- 



servatory bulletin, no. 303. The orbit of 
the spectrographic binary y Phanicis. 
Berkeley, January 14, 1918. p. 116-119. 
4°. 

Same, no. 304. A spec- 



trographic study of H Pegasi. Berkeley, 
January 15, 1918. p. 120-127. 4°. 

Same, no. 305. On finite 



velocity of gravitation as a possible fac- 
tor in stellar evolution. Berkeley, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1918. p. 128-131. 4°. 

Same, no. 306. One 



hundred new double stars, 24th list. 
Berkeley, March 5, 1918. p. 132-135. 

4°. 

Botany, vol. 5, no. 12. 



Abscission of flowers and fruits in the 
Solanaceae, with special reference to Nic- 
otiana, by .John N. Kendall. . Berkeley, 
March 6, 191S. p. 347-428, 10 text-figs, 
plates 49-53. roy. 8°. 
Price 85 cents. 

• Same, vol. 6, no. 15. An 



account of the mode of foliar abscission 
in Citrus, by Robert W. Hodgson. Berke- 
ley, February 1, 1918. p. 417-^28, 3 text- 
figs, roy. 8°. 

Price 10 cents. 

Classical Philology, vol.' 



3, no. 3. Parallels and coincidences in 
Lucretius and Virgil, by William A. Mer- 
rill. Berkeley, March 15, 1918. p. 135- 
247. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.25. 

Same, vol. 3, no. 4. 



Parallelisms and coincidences in Lucre- 
tius and Bnnius, by William A. Merrill. 
Berkeley, March 15, 1918. p. 249-264. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 20 cents. 

Same, vol. 5, no. 1. 



Yana terms of relationship, by Edward I Caesar's use of past tenses in cum-elauses, 



264 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



by H. C. Nutting. Berkeley, February 9, 
191S. p. 1-53. roy. 8°. 
Price 55 cents. 

Engineering, vol. 2, no. 

1. The possible treatment of manganese 
ores in California, by E. A. Hersam. 
Berkeley, March 26, 1918. p. 1-56. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 60 cents. 

Entomology, vol. 1, no. 

8. New genera and species of encyrtinae 
from California parasitic in mealybugs 
( Hymenoptera ) , by P. H. Timberlake. 
Berkeley, March 28, 1918. p. 347-367. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Geology, vol. 10, no. 23. 

Anticlines near Sunshine, Park County, 
Wyoming, by C. L. Moody and N. L. 
Taliaferro. Berkeley, January 31, 1918. 
p. 44.5-459, 1 test-fig. plates 34-38. 
roy. S°. 

Price 20 cents. 



Same, vol. 11, no. 1. 

The Franciscan sandstone, by E. F. Davis. 
Berkeley, March 20, 1918. p. 1-44, plates 
1-2. 6 text-figs. roy. 8°. 
Price 50 cents. 



Physiology, vol. 5, no. 3. 

The growth of normal and hypophysec- 
tomized tadpoles as influenced by en- 
docrine diets, by P. E. Smith. Berkeley, 
April 2, 1918. p. 11-22, 2 text-figs, 
roy. 8°.' 

Price 15 cents. 



Psychology, vol. 3, no. 1. 

An experimental study of abnormal chil- 
dren, Avith special reference to the prob- 
lems of dependency and delinquency, by 
Olga Bridgman. Berkeley, March 30, 
1918. p. 1-59. roy. 8°. 
Price 65 cents. 

Zoology, vol. 17, no. 12. 



A synopsis of the bats of California, by 
Hilda Wood Grinnell. Berkeley, Janu- 
ary 31, 1918. p. 223-404, 24 text-figs, 
plates 14-24. roy. 8°. 
Price ?2.00. 

Same, vol. 17, no. 13. 



The Pacific coast jays of the genus ApJiel- 
ocoma, by H. S. Swarth. Berkeley. Feb- 
ruary 23, 1918. p. 405-i22, 1 text-fig. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 2 cents. 



Same, vol. 18, no. 10. 

The musculature of Heptanclius macula- 
tus, by Pirie Davidson. Berkeley, March 
9, 1918. p. 151-170, 12 text-figures, roy. 
8°. 

Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 18, no. 11. 

The factors controlling the distribution of 
the Polynoidaj of the Pacific coast of 
North America, by Christine Essenberg. 
Berkeley, March 8, 1918. p. 171-238, 
plates 6-8, 2 text-figures, roy. 8°. 

Price 75 cents. 

Same, vol. 18, no. 12. 

Differentials in behavior of the two gen- 
erations of Salpa democratica relative to 
the temperature of the sea, by Ellis L. 
Michael. Berkeley, March 11, 1918. 
p. 239-298, plates 9-11, 1 text-figure, 
roy. S°. 

Price 65 cents. 

Yeteeans' Home of Caxifoenia (Vet- 
erans' Home). Annual report of the 
board of directors and officers, fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1917. 1918. 63 p. illus. 



Whittier State School. The Senti- 
nel (new series), vol. 9, nos. 12-13, Janu- 
ary 11-25, 1918 ; vol. 10, nos. 1-4, Febru- 
ary 8 to March 22, 1918. 

Publislied bi-weekly by tlie Whittier 
State School. Price 51.00 per year, 2 
cents per copy. 

Department of research. Bul- 



letin no. 6. Exceptional children in the 
schools of Santa Ana, California, a sur- 
vey by the research staff of Whittier 
State School, reported by J. Harold Wil- 
liams, Whittier State School, Depai-tment 
of printing instruction, January, 1918. 
40 p. 

Department of Research. The 



journal of delinquency, vol. 3, no. 1, .Jan- 
uary, 1918. p. 1-40. 4°. 

Published bi-monthly. Subscription 
?1.25 per year; single copies 30 cents. 

CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 1918. 

Beekelet. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 2, nos. 1-2, January-February, 1918. 

Los Angeles. Public library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 12, nos. 7-8, January-Feb- 
ruary, 1918. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



265 



Los A^'GELES Public Librakt. Books 
in the . . . library relating to the Euro- 
pean war. Xovember, 1917. 

Chamber of commerce. Bulle- 



tin. January-February, 191S. 



Municipal league. Bulletin, 

February-March, 191S. 

Oaklaxd. Free library. Books of in- 
terest to housekeepers. November, 1917. 



Health department. Monthly 

bulletin, December, 1917-February, 1918. 



Chamber of commerce. Achieve- 



ment, December, 1917-February, 191S. 
Vernon Rockridge improvement 



club. Bulletin, January 5-March 16, 

191S. 

Pasadena. Public library. Pasadena 
library and civic magazine, vol. 19, no. 12, 
December, 1917 : vol. 20, nos. 1-2, Janu- 
ary-February, 191S. 

Richmond. Health department. 
IMonthly report, January— March, 191S. 

Public librarv. Book notes for 



boys and girls, vol. 2, no. 12, .January, 
191S : vol. 3, no. 1, February, 191S. 

Monthly bulletin, vol. 4, nos. 7- 



S, January-February, 191S. 

Saceajiento. Official gazette, January 
7-:March 25, 1918. 

Health department. Statement 



of vital statistics, December, 1917-Feb- 
ruary, 1918. 

San Diego. Health d e p a r t m e.n t. 

Monthly report, December, 1917. 

Sax Feancisco. Board of supervisors. 
Municipal record. January 3-March 28, 
1918. 

Journal of proceedings. 



December 31, 1917-March 11, 1918. 

Public library. Report. 1917. 

Monthly bulletin, v. 24, 



nos. 1-2, January to February, 1918. 
Title page and contents, 



V. 2.3, January-December, 1917, 



Sax Feaxcisco. Chamber of commerce. 
Chamber of commerce activities, Janu- 
ary 3-March 28, 1918. 

Stocktox. Free public library. Bul- 
letin, vol. 6, no. 4, October— December, 
1917. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING JANUARY, FEBRUARY 
AND MARCH. 

In American Braille. 

Boolcs marked c are printed ■svith contrac- 
tions. 

BOOKS. 

cAlcott, Louisa Mat. Little women ; 
or, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy. 6 vols. 
Story of the childhood and home life 
of four girls, following their growth 
to womanhood. — Baker. 

Allex", Edwaed Ellis. Progress in edu- 
cation of the blind. 

Reprint from the Report of the 
Massachusetts Commissioner of Edu- 
cation for the vear ended June 30, 

1915. 

Axdeews, 21 is Maby Ratmoxd (Ship- 
iiAX). The three things: the forse in 
which the soul of a man was tested. 

Philip finds three things through the 
war — love, equality of men, and God. 

cBlackmoke, Richabd Doddeidge. Lorna 
Doone. a romance of Esmoor. 8 vols. 
A tale of the savage deeds of the 
outlaw Doones and of honest John 
Ridd. whose chance encounter with 
Lorna makes him a soldier and a 
knight. — A. L. A. 

cBuERiTT. Olix" H. New opportunities 
for blind children before entering school. 
Paper read before the First Inter- 
national Congress of Mothers on the 
Welfare of the Child, Washington, 
D. C, 1908. 

Eddy, Mrs Maey Mobse ( Bailee 1 Glo- 
ver. Rudimental divine science. 

Two copies. Gift of the Second 
Church of Christ, Scientist, Sacra- 
mento. 

JoHXSTOX, Eii]MA L. and Baexum, 
Madeline Demaeest. A book of 
plays for little actors. 2 vols. 

Simple plays designed for acting or 
reading. — A. L. A. 

Contents : Part 1, Pussy-cat : The 
lion and the mouse : The echo : A lit- 
tle cock sparrow ; Santa Claus ; The 
spider and the fly ; The little birds ; 
Abraham Lincoln and the little bird ; 
Mary and her lamb; Ladybird ; George 
V^'ashington and the cherry tree. 
Part 2, The fox and the crow ; Tom, 
the piper's son ; Mother Hubbard and 
her dog ; The first Thanksgiving day ; 
The sleeping beauty ; Arbor Day ; The 
F'ourth of July. 



266 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



cMoNTGOMEEY, David BDeney. The lead- 
ing facts of English history. 6 vols. 

Vol. 6 — General summary of En- 
glish constitutional history. 

OvEEBEOOK calendar for 1918. 

Gift of the Pennsylvania Institution 
for the Blind. 

cRoGEES, L. W. Four lectures in the- 
osophy. 

Contents : The life sublime ; Soul 
powers and possibilities ; Self develop- 
ment and the vs^ay to power ; The in- 
spired life. 

Hand copied. Gift of Mrs Lucia 
Stambaugh. 

cSmith, Hannah ("Hesba Stretton," 
pseud.) Carola. 2 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of Mrs Lucia 
Stambaugh. 

Stbetton, Hesba, pseud. See Smith, 
Hannah. 



MAGAZINES. 

cCatholic review for January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

cCheistian record for January. 

cGospEL trumpet for January, February 
and March. 

cThe Illuminator for December. 

cMatilda Zieglee magazine for January, 
February and March. 

Messengeb to the sightless for January, 
February and March. 

cMichigan herald for November, Decem- 
ber and January. 

cRed and white, January, April, July and 

October, 1917, and January, 1918. 

Published by the Alumni Associa- 
tion of The Pennsylvania School for 
the Blind. 

Searchlight for January. 

MUSIC. 
Beown, Geace a. Lessons in staif nota- 
tion. 

A manual of instruction for blind 
students and music teachers. 

In European Braille. 

BOOKS. 

Aenold, Matthew. Poems. 3 vols. 
Austen, Jane. Emma. 5 vols. 



Beith, Ian Hay ("Ian Hay," pseud.). 
The first hundred thousand being the 
unofficial chronicle of a unit of "K 
(1)". 2 vols. 

Benson, Edwaed Feederic. The Chal- 
loners. 3 vols. 

Ceppi, Marc, ed. Contes frangais an- 
ciens et modernes. 

Clemens, Samuel Langhosne ("Mark 
Twain," pseud.) The adventures of 
Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's com- 
rade ) . 4 vols. 

Crochet patterns selected from "Needle- 
craft." 

Dickens, Charles. The life and ad- 
ventures of Nicholas Nickleby. 12 vols. 

Fortescue, John William. Story of a 
red deer. 2 vols. 

In Grade 1 with slightly larger 
characters. 

Freeman, William. Celandine and a 
suitor or two. 



Graham, Geoege Faequhae. 
synonyms. 2 vols. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 



English 



"Gbay, Maxwell," pseud. See Tux- 
tiett, Maby Gleed. 

Geeen, John Richaed. Modern En- 
gland. 8 vols. 

From Green's History of the English 
people. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Hardy, Thomas. Far from the mad- 
ding crowd. 4 vols. 

A tale of country life in England. 

Jerome, Jeeome Klapka. The passing of 
the third fioor back, and other stories. 
Contents : The passing of the third 
floor back; The philosopher's joke; 
The soul of Nicholas Snyders ; or. The 
miser of Zandam ; Mrs Korner sins 
her mercies ; The cost of kindness ; 
The love of Ulrich Nebendahl. 

Johnston, J. Lloyd. Human physi- 
ology. 2 vols. 

Kipling, Rudyaed. Kim. 3 vols. 

Adventures of an Irish-Indian boy 
in Hindostan and pictures of Hindu 
life. 

Knitting patterns selected from "Needle- 
craft." 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRABT. 



267 



Lttton. Edward Bulwer — , 1st baron. 

The last days of Pompeii. 5 vols. 

The setting is tlie luxurious Roman 
society of tlie first century of the 
Christian era. 

Meredith, George. Diana of the cross- 
ways, a novel. 5 vols. 

Morier. Jaiies Je'Stixian. The story of 
the baked head. 

From tlie Adventures of Hajji Baba 
of Ispahan. A Persian story. 

Orczy, Emma, baroness. The scarlet 
pimpernel. 3 vols. 

Osgood, Mrs Irene. Servitude. 6 vols. 

Reade, Charles. The cloister and the 
hearth, a tale of the Middle Ages. 
9 vols. 

Historical narrative of life in the 
Middle Ages in Germany, France and 
Italy filled with rapid adventure, bril- 
liant and diversified scenes of life. — 
Baker. 

Roberts. Charles George Dougias. 
Red fox, the story of his adventurous 
career in the Ringwaak wilds and his 
final triumph over the enemies of his 
kind. 2 vols. 

The story of a fox of singular 
strength and intelligence who, cap- 
tured and brought to make holiday for 
a fashionable hunt club, escapes and 
flees to the mountains. — A. L. A. Bkl. 

Scott. Sir Walter. The heart of Mid- 
lothian. S vols. 

Tells of the misfortunes of a peas- 
ant girl, Effie Deans. — Baker. 

Old Mortality. 9 vols. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

The talisman, a tale of the Cru- 
sades. 9 vols. 

Presents an animated view of the 
crusaders in Palestine, 1189-92 — 
Baker. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Service, Robert William. Songs of a 
Sourdough. 

SwiNiBTJRNE, Algernok Chaeles. Po- 
etical works. 2 vols. 

TuTTiETT, Maby Gleed ("Maxwell 

Gray," pseud.) The silence of Dean 

Maitland. 5 vols. 

Story of concealed sin and life-long 
expiation. — A. L. A. 

"Twain, Mark," pseud. See Clemens, 
Samuel Langhobne. 



magazines. 
Braille literary journal for December, 
January and February. 

Braille musical magazine for January. 

Daily mail for December, January and 
February. 

Hora jucunda for January, February and 
March. 

LiGHTBRiNGEB for January and February. 

Morning for December, January and 
February. 

Progress for January and February. 

Santa Lucia for December, .January and 
February. 

MUSIC 

Braille musical magazine for January. 

in Line. 

BOOKS. 

Bible. New Testament. Mark. In- 
cludes Acts. Revised version. 
Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Cross, Mrs Marian (Evans) Lewes. 
Janet's repentance. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Miss Es- 
telle Miller. 

Silas Marner. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Miss Es- 
telle Miller. 

Dickens, Charles. Old curiosity shop. 
3 vols. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The scarlet 
letter. 2 vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Miss Es- 
telle Miller. 

Longfellow. Henry Wads worth. 
Evangeline. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Miss Es- 
telle Miller. 

Tyndall, John. Notes on light and 
electricity. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

In Moon, 

books. 

Shindler, Robert. The life and labors 

of Pastor C. H. Spurgeou. 2 vols. 



9—37615 



268 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1918 



MAGAZINES. 

Dawn, part 126. A quarterly magazine. 

Moon magazine for January, February 
and March. 

In New York Point, 

BOOKS. 

Bailey, Carolyn Sheewin. The sand- 
man story. 

Bible. Vols. 9, 10, 11. 

Vol. 9, Matthew-Luke; vol. 10, John- 
1 Corinthians; vol. 11, 2 Corinthians- 
Revelation. 

Gift of Ivan Cunningham. 

John. 



Gift of Miss Bstelle Miller. 

Bbotheeton, Alice Williams. The 
orchard path and other poems. 

Contents : Prelude ; The orchard 
path ; Crown o' the summer ; Under 
the beeches ; Unawares ; Never trouble 
trouble ; Haste not ; Compensation ; 
Wake-Robin ; The dandelion ; Novem- 
ber ; Cricket ; Midwinter ; Circum- 
stance ; Faith; In the gloaming; Re- 
pression; If they are roses; A sprig 
of thyme ; Outward bound ; The sin 
of omission ; The sailing of King Olaf ; 
Moly ; Malison ; Dorothy Vernon's 
flight ; Quatrains ; The saga of the 
Guern; Stories; The prayer of Sister 
Margaret ; The first Thanksgiving 
Day; A good old-fashioned Christmas; 
New Year's eve ; The moment for re- 
venge ; A new spring ; God knows ; 
Beyond the veil. 

Carter, Hazel. The thrilling story of a 
girl who went "over there" with the 
Pershing division. 

Gary, Alice and Phoebe. Poems. 

Contents : Our homestead ; Nobility ; 
Obedience. 

Ford, Paul Leicester. Wanted, a 
chaperone. 

Wanted, a match-maker. 



Grant, Robert. The bachelor's Christ- 
mas. 

Includes The Matrimonial Tontine 
Association. 

About fashionable society in Bos- 
ton. — Baker. 

Johnston, Mrs Annie (Fellows). 
Keeping tryst, a tale of King Arthur's 
time. 

KiNGSLEY, Mrs Florence (Morse). The 
transfiguration oj. Miss Philura. 



MoLifeRE, Jean Bai'tiste Poquelin. 
Le misanthrope. 
French text. 

Rice, Mrs Alice Caldwell (Hegan). 

Mrs Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch. 

Hand copied. Gift of Miss Bstelle 
Miller. 

Steele, Joel Dobman. A popular chem- 
istry. 2 vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Ivan Cun- 
ningham. 

TowNSEND, Mrs Frances (Hodgson) 
Burnett. The land of the blue flower. 

MAGAZINES. 

Catholic transcript for January and 
February. 

Christian record for December and 
January. 

Gospel trumpet for January, February 
and March. 

Lux vera, Catholic monthly, for Decem- 
ber, January and February. 

Matilda Ziegler for January, February 
and March. 

Sltnday school monthly for February and 
March. 

Weekly review for January, February 
and March. 

MUSIC. 

Bridge, Clara G. An outline of har- 
mony. 

PIANO. 
BURGMULLER, JOHANN FRIEDBICH. 

Twenty-five etudes, op. 100. 
Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

GiESE, Theodor. Opus 293. 

Contents: 1, Tarantella; 2, Chil- 
dren's feast; 3, Grandmother's song; 
4, The two fisher boys ; 5, Gavotte ; 
6, Funeral march. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Kohler, Christian Louis Heinrich. Easy 
instructive pieces, op. 190. 

Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 

Spindler, Fritz. May bells, songs with- 
out words, op. 44, nos. 1-12. 
Gift of Miss Estelle Miller. 



vol. 13, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



269 



Appliances. 

WRITING. 

PEN OR PENCIL SCRIPT. 

Writing board. 

Invented by and gift of Charles 
Tanron. 

Writing booK. 

Includes Simplex writing book, regu- 
lar letter size, and also book, pocket 
size. 

Invented by Charles Tanron. 



Games. 

A NUTTY game in New York point. 
A peintek's pie in New York point. 

In Ink Print. 

magazines. 
The beacon for January and February. 

TSe blind for January. 

The OUTLOOK for the blind for October, 
1917. 



I 



A FEW MEMORIES OF THE LATE ADOLPH SUTRO 

AS I RECALL THEM AT THIS LATE DAY. 

By Frank B. Mercer, Spokane, Washington. 

It was during the month of September, 1876, that I first met Mr 
Adolph Sntro. I had been told by a friend that he wanted a practical 
printer and newspaper man to publish a M'eekly newspaper in the town 
of Sutro, Nevada; that the town had about 350 inhabitants — too small 
a community to support a newspaper ; but that inasmuch as the news- 
paper was, in a way, an auxiliary of the Sutro Tunnel enterprise Mr 
Sutro would make a lil)eral cash allowance monthly towards its support, 
and would agree with the propej- man to pay that allowance for one 
3'ear out of his own pocket. 

It was with such information that I called upon Mr Sutro at the 
office of the Sutro Tunnel Company in San Francisco, and introduced 
myself. Fortunately I found him at his office, for he was a very busy 
man in those days, much of his business calling him to the East and to 
Europe. I found him very approachable and stated the nature of my 
call, 

"Are you a practical printer, can you run a Hoe cjdinder press, and 
have you had experience in gathering news and writing it for publica- 
tion?" he asked. 

I told him I was a practical printer, but as regards press work my 
experience had been limited ; I could better express mj^ ability as a 
pressman after trying out his Hoe cylinder. I had had some experience 
in reportorial work. 

"Well, I believe j^'ou are the very man I am looking for, "he remarked 
with an air of assurance. He informed me that the newspaper was at 
the time being published, but that, owing to certain happenings, some 
of which he related, he had decided to make a change of publishers. 
The compensation and agreement were about the same as I had been 
informed. 

"When can you move up to Sutro and go to work?" he asked. 

I named a day. It was satisfactory. Before leaving he very cordially 
shook hands with me and told me to look him up at Sutro when I got 
there. It was certainly a happy occasion for me, for I had a conscious- 
ness that I was about to be brought into close touch with a man promi- 
nent in doing big things on the Pacific Coast. 

I arranged matters so I could stop over for a day in Virginia City on 
my way to Sutro. A friend had given me a letter of introduction to 
Mr Conrad Wiegand, a prominent assayer and metallurgist on the Com- 
stock, who soon afterwards passed away. Mr Wiegand was glad to 
meet me, coming as I had from a very dear friend. He was much 
interested in knowing my business, and I told him of my engagement 
by Mr Sutro. After a while he said he did not like the idea, and 
thought I could do better. He was a conservative man and a passive 
friend of Mr Sutro and told me much of the feeling in Virginia City 
against Mr Sutro: he (Mr Sutro) was visionary and not responsible; 
he had presumed to oppose and even to fight men who controlled the 
big mines of the Comstock Lode and the interests of the California 

39636 



272 NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1918 

Bank; he had forged ahead with the work of the Sutro tunnel on his 
own individual prerogatives, and there was a strong doubt as to whether 
he would be able to complete the enterprise. 

This is only a part of what I was told. It was not given me with 
' ' relentless hostility, ' ' but in a calm and deliberate way. I afterwards 
learned Mr Wiegand's talk was a rather general view held on the Com- 
stoek against Mr Sutro, due, in a large measure, I could see, to antipathy 
shown him by prominent interests and the daily press of Virginia City. 

I was a young man — in my early twenties — and naturally was a bit 
disquieted. But I decided to go on to Sutro, and I did. 

After embarking on my new work and getting my bearings, I became 
better acquainted with Mr Sutro. He showed a decided interest in my 
work and in myself. I was invited to his home and presented to his 
family. Later on he would call at my office during early mornings of 
my easy days, and ask me to ride with him to Virginia City. He was 
a great lover of good horses, and it was a rare pleasure and satisfaction 
to ride behind the team of bays at his disposal. If the business of the 
trip was delayed until or after noon hour, that meant a good dinner at 
the French Rotissiere before our return home. There was nothing 
slow' about Mr Sutro when it came to eating. The best was none too 
good. And the distinguished service received, I saw, was due to liberal 
tips. I was fortunate in enjoying many of these trips and dinners. 

There was little going on in or about the Sutro tunnel when he was 
there that he did not see or know. Hardly a detail missed him. If the 
fuel supply or the supply of timbers for the tunnel were adequate in 
size he would look their characters over, and if they were not up to 
specifications there was "something doing." If the accommodations 
and conveniences of the miners going on or coming off work could be 
improved he was quick to see it and act. If the foreman of the tunnel 
accosted him with details of the work he was an apt listener and con- 
versed freely, and frequently had suggestions to make. And though 
the civil engineer approached him with data or information while thus 
engaged, his mind switched to the new work without an effort and with 
an unusual show of familiarity with the facts. Since those days I have 
met a number of men engaged in big work with many details, but I 
have never seen Mr Sutro 's equal in acquaintance with every branch. 
He was quick to see a fault. 

I can not recall a single instance when Mr Sutro was justly charged 
with mismanagement, waste of money, inattentiveness, or using his 
position to gain private ends. I remember a gift that was to be made 
to him. It was a large solid silver ice pitcher of a beautiful pattern 
and design, with elaborate engraving. Nothing, it seemed, was left 
undone to make it perfect. I can not recall M^ho instigated the gift, 
but I do recall that a large explosive powder concern with which the 
Tunnel Company dealt considerably donated a large sum toward its 
purchase. The gift was to come to him from his miners. Learning 
the facts of its purchase, and evidently thinking it might be regarded 
by some as a bribe, he refused it. The last time I saw the pitcher it 
was in possession of a saloon keeper in the town of Sutro. He was 
going to raffle it for a good cause. 

Once Mr Sutro came into my office on a cold day and asked: "Mr 
Mercer, where do you get your stove wood?" I answered: "Off" and 



vol. 13, no. 3] MEMORIES OF THE LATE ADOLPH SUTRO. 273 

from around the big woodpile." "Don't you know that woodpile 
belongs to the company, and that the company is not running this 
paper? What authority have you to use it?" I answered: "Prece- 
dent." "Precedent! Huh!" As he walked out he slammed the door. 

Home life was much to Mr Sutro. He certainly dearl}^ loved his 
children, and without an exception that I can recall, they loved him. 
Frequently he would invite a town friend or one or two of the young 
men about the works to spend an evening at his home. That usually 
meant a full attendance of his family. He was an excellent entertainer. 
There was seldom a lack of sociability, conversation and pleasure. On 
one occasion, I recall, he requested during the evening that each one 
present read a selection, recite a piece, sing a song, or tell a story. 
When it came to my turn I was somewhat embarrassed, but read a 
selection from Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." Each did his or her 
part. On another occasion, several young men friends being present, 
he requested that each of them tell what infiueneed him to come West. 
I frankly confessed my reading Mark Twain's "Roughing It" influ- 
enced me. On still another occasion he asked that each of the children 
tell a fairy story. I believe only the two youngest responded, so he 
himself told stories for the others. He loved home life and he loved to 
have his children hover about him. I sometimes believed they realized 
this fully, for occasionally one of them would take, what appeared to 
me, advantage of the occasion to exact a promise from him, which 
always meant, if made, fulfillment. 

During my several years in the town of Sutro "dabbling in 
mining stocks" was at times rampant. I really believe two-thirds of 
the people of the Comstock and contiguous country, say above the age 
of 18 years, participated in the "get rich quick" game. The quota- 
tions of Comstock mining shares were, to say the least, violent at times, 
often changing 25 to 40 per cent during a day. This applied to both 
rising and falling values. Pointers, in many cases alleged to originate 
from the inside, were frequently circulated, and the public "bit" freely. 
I verily believe that never before the Com^stock days nor since the rich 
discoveries made there has there been known such gambling and specu- 
lation. Many in very moderate circumstances were known to have 
become possessed of from $100,000 to $1,000,000. But, like most gam- 
bling, the ones who stayed with it, with comparatively a few exceptions, 
lost out in the end. It is a sure fact that out of perhaps one hundred 
people in Virginia City in those days who became possessed of such 
amounts as above mentioned, not ten emerged from the final collapse 
with even a small proportion of their gains. Mr Sutro was always 
violently opposed to this gambling, and often denounced "the methods 
employed, " as he termed it, ' ' to rob the working class. ' ' I have heard 
him sharply denounce the sanity of his best friend if he kncM^ he was 
buying and selling stocks, and was always quick to tell him where he 
would "get off" in the end. I was censured severely several times, so 
I know he never "minced" talk in expressing himself. 

Mr Sutro at all times had a sincere regard for his employees and 
those associated with him. In very many cases this regard amounted to 
an actual friendship and a fondness. This was evidenced by the many 
favors he is known to have bestowed on former employees years after 
he left the tunnel enterprise, by giving them practical assistance. An 



274 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1918 

illustration of his feelings along these lines is shown in a letter that he 
wrote to Mr H. H. Sheldon, assistant superintendent of the Sutro Tun- 
nel Company under him for several years. It was written in March, 
1880, shortly after Mr Sutro resigned as superintendent of the Sutro 
Tunnel Company. How the letter eame to be among my personal 
effects at this time I can not explain, unless it was handed me shortly 
after its receipt by Mr Sheldon for publication in the Sutro Inde- 
pendent, and I retained it. The reader will note that his friendly 
spirit went out not only to those associated with him in his great work, 
but also to the people of the town of Sutro. It is as folloM's : 

San Francisco, Cal., March 3, ISftO. 
H. H. Sheldon, Esq., 

My Dear Sir: loii are already informed thai hist week I handed in my resiiina- 
tion as snperinlcmlcnt of the Sutro Tnnnel Company, and bein.^' prevented from i>,iyin.!i' 
yon a personal visit just now, which [ had intended to make immediately aft(>r the 
election, I take this metiiod of sayin,;;' .ur.od-bye to y^u and all the Ijoys ^^•ho have 
so faithfully stood hy me during the many years of struggles in carrying on a work 
lo almost completion, ^\hi<•h will stand as a monument to the enterprise and perse- 
verance of all who assisted in its construction. 

Please tell all in my behalf, and especially those who have had charge of any 
of the departments, that they have my sincerest and heartfelt thanks for all the 
friendship, assistance and earnest good will they have ever shown in my behalf and 
in the interests of the company, and that although I am no longer superintendent 
I shall take as lively an interest as ever in the welfare of the inhabitants of Sutro 
and in the success of the work itself. 

I shall probably before long be able to pay you a visit, and in the meantime with 
many regards and kind wishes to all, I remain 
Very truly yours, 

Adolph Sutro. 

The term ' 'visionary " is generally applied to people opprobriously, 
but in Mr Sutro 's case it can not be so applied. The man certainly 
had remarkable insight. He could mentall}'- delve into the workings 
and perplexities of an undertaking and very often see his way through. 
To accomplish an end meant, perhaps, caution and energy of the strong- 
est type, but if with his vision he could see success, that meant action. 
I never knew him to "fall down" on any great work he undertook. 
It was thus with his conception of his great Sutro tunnel enterprise. 
With his mind's eye he saw clearly what the construction of the tunnel 
meant in the development of the great Comstock Lode. The work 
irjieant a vast outlay of money, and he was at the time a poor man, 
financially. It meant, also, among other things, hard and indomitable 
energy and work, and a high degree of optimism. He saw his way, 
formulated plans, and, knowing the close intimacy he would necessarily 
have with the Comstock Miners' Union — in those days a very strong 
organization — he approached them with the project and asked their 
assistance. This was granted him. The financial assistance given him 
by labor was meager, but it was wholesome. With so much gained 
he went East to seek a government title to his enterprise, and to get 
this he had to go to the Congress of the United States, and with em- 
phatic opposition to him in both Senate and House he in time forced an 
act through both houses that gave him the desired title, together with 
term^ of compensation for use of the tunnel Avhen completed l:»y the 



vol. l;j, no. 8] MEMORIES OE THE EATE ADOLPII SUTRO. 275 

many mining eompanie.s on the Comstock Lode. This act of Congress 
was signed by General TJ. S. Grant, then President of the United States. 
In later years General Grant and his party, returning home from a trip 
aronnd the M-orld, expressed a desire when in San Francisco to see the 
Sntro tunnel, and Mr Sutro made arrangements for the entire party 
to ride over the mountains in vehicles from Virginia City, have break- 
fast upon their arrival at the Sutro home near the mouth of the tunnel, 
and later to return through the tunnel in ore cars to where it intersects 
with the Savage shaft, then to be hoisted 1,640 feet to the surface in 
Virginia City. General Grant afterward spoke of the trip as one of the 
most pleasurable and satisfactory of his tour, due, in a measure, I sup- 
pose, to his participation in the construction of the great work. 

Mr Sutro 's great effort now was to get capital, which meant millions. 
He went to New York, but his enemies — mining men of great v\'ealth — had 
preceded him to disparage the enterprise. Undaunted, he went to Lon- 
don, England, and there succeeded. Then the great work commenced 
and continued until the enterprise, through years of great difficulties, 
reached the Comstock Lode, a distance of about five miles. In speaking 
of all this I do not do so in order to write the history of the great Sutro 
tunnel, but rather to recall the very remarkaljle nature of Mr Sutro, 
which was apparent to me many times, until I learned to regard him as a 
most wonderful man. I might add, parenthetically, that his chief dis- 
appointment, in prosecuting the work, was his failure to strike ore in 
paying quantities in the large tract of ground ceded his company by 
Congress. 

April 8, 1918. 



276 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1918 

TWO MEETINGS: A FEW IMPRESSIONS. 

By Milton J. Ferguson^ Librarian, California State Library. 

There has long been a feeling among certain librarians of California 
that the Del ]\Ionte Hotel would be an ideal place for an annual confer- 
ence of the C. L. A. The large rambling building, with its delightfully 
old fashioned disregard of space and its modern equipment, its art 
galleries, its location in the midst of a wonderful park, its nearness to 
the ocean and finally its neighborhood so significant in an historical, 
artistic and literary way — all made of it a place where an association 
could do its work uninterruptedly and then could play whole-heartedly. 
With such attractions Del Monte had in time to be the place of our 
conference ; and now that it is passed those who heard the Del Monte 
call feel their prophecies justified, and the doubters — if such ever were 
— are silent. Nothing could be more conducive to a successful meeting 
than having it under one roof; and certainly nothing more felicitous 
to the rencMdng of old friendships and the beginning of new. 

The Del Monte conference was in a way reminiscent of one or two 
that have gone before. The sessions opened with song as at Santa 
Barbara and Coronado ; and the singer again was ]Miss Hibberd, with 
a voice richer and fuller and sweeter. The stunts on the evening of our 
home talent affair were not the same as at Santa Barbara, it is true, 
but the ring master was the same. What would a C. L. A. dramatic 
seance be without Mr Greene as interlocutor and declaimer of Daly's 
dialect verses? 

On the other hand there were new features. For the first time a 
Avoman wielded the gavel which called the conference to order, delivered 
the presidential message in a manner anything but haltingly or untried ; 
and in fine ran the week's series of meetings in a business-like and 
effective way. There had of course to be a first woman president; but 
I can imagine that in the future they will be no novelty in California. 

When we met at Hollywood a year ago the war, for America, had 
scarcely begun. We had not then the thrill which comes when the news 
heads proclaim that "Pershing's crusaders feed the Prussian Guard 
cold steel" — and that the Germans do not relish .such fare. And as for 
a Library War Service uniform, in June, 1917, such a thing was unde- 
signed. Yet at Del Monte the two young library soldiers, one from 
Fremont and .the other from Kearny, wore their new garments with 
becoming pride, quite as though library service uniforms had been 
invented back in 1876 when Mr Dewey and his crusaders began their 
memorable advance. And it may also be recorded, in passing, that to 
the "female of the species" the Library War Service uniform has all 
the charm which soldier-garb has ever had — without some form of which 
a man these days has little chance. 

The A. L. A. — to get a .jump or two ahead of mj^ story — scheduled a 
patriotic song hour ; and I recall that I attended that meeting, in tune- 
ful mood, ready to "register" song even if I can not really produce it. 
But by common consent everybody forgot the program and nobody 
found it necessary to ' ' act ' ' the last three verses of the ' ' Star Spangled 
Banner." Now at Del Monte the printed program also announced a 



vol. 13, 110. 8] TWO MEETINGS: .\. FEW IMPRESSIONS. 2/7 

meeting devoted to patriotic song. And the thrilling thing about it 
was that the event really took place. It is true there was at first a 
certain bashful backwardness, like the parties of our youthful days 
before the ice got broken ; but in time the people began to desert the 
fringes of the room, gathered round the piang and gave themselves up 
to the singing of the new and the old from "The Long, Long Trail" to 
"Auld Lang Syne." 

The program of the C. L. A., from beginning to end. had sequence 
and orderly arrangement. It began with a consideration of reading in 
elementary education, continued with a presentation of library service 
in the high schools, carried the work on to the university stage in the 
students' development, and finally covered varied phases of after- 
college life, or better perhaps, the public at large in its needs and 
demands for book service. Dr. Frederic Burk raised many a laugh 
in his witty sallies at the whims and restrictions of the librarians of the 
past — those who were present were librarians of today and tomorrow, so 
they could afford to laugh — and cpiite won the approval of all by his 
generous surrender of the school system of the state into the hands of 
the library forces. It is not my purpose to give herein a summary of 
what the several speakers said. A better idea may be gained by reading 
the authors in the C. L. A. Handbook and by paying Dr. Burk a visit 
and getting the word from him direct. The reading I would have as 
optional, but the visit — if you were there — will. I am sure, insist upon 
having itself made. 

I spoke of the historical, literary and artistic atmosphere of the Mon- 
terey peninsula — something which was brought home to us in several 
ways. One of them was b}- means of a splendid talk by Mr ]\Iichael 
Williams on "The Inspiration of California to the Artists." There 
is no need to tell a Califoruian that inspiration lurks — no, looms large 
and alluring — in the mountains, the woods, the lakes and streams, the 
deserts and plains and ocean of this vast state; but to tell tbe thing in 
the language and the fine feeling of l\Ir Williams is another and vastly 
more significant matter. 

All librar}^ meetings have drives or rides or excursions into the open ; 
but Del I\Ionte can boast of a real historical pilgrimage. Under the 
leadership of Mrs Andresen we followed in the pathway of those early 
characters who have become such large figures in the canvasses of yester- 
day. War. it is true, permitted us librarians, who as a class claim a 
loyalty of 100 per cent purity, only a far off view of the Presidio and 
the hill whence Spain looked down on the Gringo invaders. But the 
customs house and its storied rooms were visited, and Colton Hall and 
the oldest wooden hou.se in California, and Robert Louis Stevenson's 
house. The oldest house looks the part; and R. L. S.'s IMonterey abode 
appears to be a dry husk from which the Scotch romancer had squeezed 
all the juices of life and adventure — a place quite as uninspiring now 
as the actor's stage when the footlights are out and sunshine is stream- 
ing through the windows. "The House of the Four Winds" as a 
stopping place in a pilgrim's journey has a refreshing meaning: an old 
Spanish house given a poetical name and used for various purposes and 
now by the women of Monterey made into a club house — thus does the 
loving intelligence of today preserve historical monuments of yesterday. 
And also be it renuembered these hostesses of the old town can not onlv 



llS NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Julv, 1U18 



keep adobe houses from tumbling do^vu, but they can also brew tea and 
make cakes as refreshing to us no doubt as were the cakes and ale to 
the pilgrims who in all ages have traveled and grown thirsty. 

The visit to the San Carlos Mission took ]\Irs Andresen's wayfarers 
more completely into the past than any other part of the journey. 
Fortunately this mission, despite attempts at restoration, still has many 
original features. Those old vestments, wonderfully bright and untar- 
nished by the century and a half that are past, embody in themselves 
much of the spirit which urged the mission fathers on to their noble 
work. The persons who sat within those old walls will not soon forget 
the earnest and convincing manner of Father Mestres who gave us not 
only new historic fact concerning the work and ideals of his order, but 
also a better and saner view of the methods which should be followed 
in preserving these monuments of those real pilgrims, Father Serra and 
his followers. 

Let it not be forgot that this C. L. A. conference was a war conference. 
And in war there are always at least two fronts : the one here at home 
and that other over there. It is necessary to hold both of them. And 
in their work with the schools and the farmers, the stockraisers and pro- 
fessions, the housewives and all the folk in town and country, the 
library forces are merely holding the trenches which are theirs to hold. 
It would be just as honorable for them to desert this task now in the 
hour of greatest need as it would be for a soldier in France to leave his 
post because he saw more alluring adventures or a better viewpoint over 
in Italy. 

Fortunately for us, perhaps, war is no longer a simple matter of food 
and men ; so all of us are given a chance. There are camp librarians 
and hospital librarians ; and a call for a Quire or a Richards to don a 
uniform, do good work in camp and then come and tell us his interest- 
ing story. Libraries can and do help in spreading food conservation 
information; and thus ^Irs Harmon as library publicity director, is 
given opportunity not only to serve, but also to present a wonderful 
and speaking array of facts and figures. Dr Rixford spoke on the 
Lane ]\Iedical Library — great in present attainment and greater still 
in potential possibilities. Miss Foley, on "Re-educating the Adult 
Blind," has the sort of inspiration which should hearten us all, even in 
the midst of war when inen do not come back, and when many who do 
are shut away from the light of day. And Dr Reinhardt gave a last 
finishing touch to the program when she spoke on "War Books." Of 
course Dr Reinhardt did not stick to the text at all times — that is one 
of her many virtues — and the address was masterly and fine and full 
of patriotic fervor. 

When jMr Rowell read the report of the Resolutions Committee 
expressing, in word and in feeling, thoughts and sentiments which were 
in the hearts of all, the last things had been said: the meeting was over. 
And it was a good conference ; one with a program and a purpose ; a 
meeting strong in unity, enriched by its past history and determined 
and confident in its future work and service. Not to have held it would 
have been a shortsighted mistake. 



Here we will imagine the curtain rung down, the passage of ten days 
and a shift of scene of 3,000 miles — from Del Monte and the C. L. A. 



vol. l;i, no. 3] TWO MEETINGS: A FEW IMPRESSIONS. 279 

to Saratoga Springs and the A. L. A. We are in the city of fast horses, 
gambling traditions and political conventions on the second day of the 
big show ; everybody is busy, the big tent is open and all the side shows 
are ready for business. As I have remarked before some time, or if I 
have not remarked I might have, the A. L. A. and its affiliations are 
quite the busiest aggregation of cultural industries this side of a Prus- 
sian host strategically retreating on the one hand and on the other mak- 
ing certain modifications in the French style of architecture, pruning 
the French orchards, etc., etc. And always with this difference, of 
couree : the A. L. A. is always welcome to pay a second visit. There 
is no doubt about it, this national library conference gives the visitor 
his money's worth, however far he maj^ have journeyed to attend. 

One could scarcely go to Saratoga without renewing, to a certain 
extent, his memory of some of those facts of our national history learned 
during one's early school days, and I fear too soon forgot. Near the 
town there now stands a tall monument, reminding us of a Revolution- 
ary battle which was fought by our little army and won. And closer 
at hand there are other reminders of later events in the history of New 
York state in particular: the Convention Hall, where the general ses- 
sions were held, and where for many years political conventions have 
found it expedient to conduct their deliberations; Canfield's house, 
where easy methods were once taught for the winning^and losing — of 
fortunes; the race track, where the breeding of fast horses is still en- 
couraged, and where I am told good judgment was once essential to 
one's being able to rem,ain in a comfortable suite at Saratoga's best 
hotel — the famous Grand Union. 

This hotel, the Grand Union, as the stage setting for this year's 
A. L. A. Conference, and no doubt for itself as a hostelry as well, 
deserves a special word. It runs around three sides of a big block. It 
is rambling enough to suit the most peculiar tastes in tavern architec- 
ture. It has a history going back to times, to a Californian, almost 
prehistoric. Its old signboard, now carefully displayed in a protected 
corner of one of its endless two-story verandas, showing Putnam pulling 
a wolf from his lair, looks like something made for tourists or found 
only in a book. Its elevators of exceeding great slowneSvS speak elo- 
ciuently of times before speed became a national ideal. Its elegant 
reception room with all the splendor that mid-nineteenth century could 
devise looked quite disgusted with the great display of library posters 
and exhibits, booksellers ' samples and headquarters long new pine table 
barricade. And the ball room with its great chandelier and its huge 
allegorical painting covering one wall, was in its day, I am sure, the 
very hight of aristocratic richness. But I wonder what that old ball 
room's opinion may be of the new dancing fioor in the inner court of 
the hotel — surrounded by little tallies and expectant colored waitei's — - 
and of the jazz band Avhich nightly produces the tunes for fox trotish 
devotees. And then the dining room a half mile long, presided over 
by a wonderful grenadier of a southern Negro, with a head of hair 
worth a fortune to a hair-restoring profiteer and a manner in keeping 
with the older traditions of the house, and his army of colored waiters — 
when I think of it and of them I only remember my long, long hours 
of waiting. 



280 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ Julj, 1918 

When I arrived the convention had been called to order, words of 
welcome had been spoken, the president had delivered his address and 
the informal reception was a thing of the past. Reports of officers and 
committees, and especially of the War Service Committee, were in 
printed form in the hands of members. These things had been of 
more than passing interest, I suppose ; but something else stood out 
very prominently as a dominating feature of the week — a group of camp 
librarians in soldier-like attire. If two men in khaki at Del Monte 
created a riot of interest, I leave to your imagination the impression 
made by the forty, more or less, who gathered at Saratoga Springs. 
Only one thing was lacking to make the scene complete : Dr Putnam in 
field marshal's uniform, gold braid, baton. 

What everybody said, I again direct you to read in the proceedings. 
But it is worthy of record that every organization was devoting its 
energies toward one end — the winning of the war. And these young- 
men and young women — all young in spirit, though some have lived 
long — who have seen service in camp, in dispatch office and in hos- 
pital — had a story to tell that merited and received an attentive hearing. 

Ever}^ gathering of special workers has its rebellious group, I am 
told — though generally the rebellion does not arrive at speaking strength. 
Saratoga was no exception. Some of the women librarians, incensed 
perhaps at the nattiness of the camp librarians' uniform and reflecting 
upon the military order which so far has prevented their appointment 
to camp librarianships, demanded an explanation. Whether the answer 
satisfied them, I know not ; but to me, at least, the War Service Com- 
mittee 's reply, and especially Dr Putnam's final statement just before 
adjournment sine die, were evidence sufficient. By a gradual letting 
down of the bars women are taking a more and more prominent and 
important place in the camp libraries and will in time be recognized as 
in every way capable of filling head positions. To have pushed the 
matter to an early decision might have resulted in a military order 
shutting women out of such places. Those who have handled this sit- 
uation with such diplomacy and tact are entitled to the thanks of the 
order, rather, I think, than the censure of the capable but impatient 
minority. 

One session of the Saratoga Conference contrasts itself very sharply 
in my mind with a somewhat similar occasion at Louisville. The Ken- 
tucky city gave us a literary feast at which poets and romancers poured 
forth their wares in bounteous plenty. The New York town, where the 
trunks came from or went to and a certain variety of chips originated I 
suppose, likewise produced a literary spread. Seeing that we are in the 
midst of war the dishes were fewer in number and the piece-de-resist- 
ance came from the windy city. It was on July 4th, the day of that 
silent "Conference sing" which I have already mentioned. Carl Sand- 
burg, Chicago's poet, lacks the traditional poetical graces so fittingly 
exemplified at Louisville by Cale Young Rice; but he has vigor of 
language and can put a pork chop sandwich and a V of gooseberry 
pie into verse — something Shakespeare didn't accomplish. I am going 
to read him — once any way. When the poet had finished, Dr Raney 
read a report of his adventures in England and France in extending 



vol. 18, no. 3] TWO meetings: a few impressions. 281 

library service to the boys over there and to men at sea. His story had 
the dramatic elements of a Saturday Evening Post thriller. Read it. 

The next financial campaign — which, by the way, will probably be 
held during November, and during which at least $3,500,000 will be 
asked for — was carefully considered on several occasions by Dr Hill, 
Mr Wamboldt, the new national campaign director, and the state direc- 
tors. Librarianship has learned many things during the past year; 
and among others the principles and means of conducting a successful 
money drive have not been overlooked. With wise general direction, 
with enthusiastic state activity, with every library and librarian a 
staunch rallying point, and above all, with the foundation of a year's 
essential library service in camp, hospital, on shipboard and overseas, 
the work of collecting funds for a continuation of the system will be 
easier than mo.st of us anticipate. The library forces can still learn, 
of course, and in one particular must learn — and that is to secure a 
volume of publicity ; not spasmodically, but continuously, every day 
and every Aveek, through newspaper, magazine and film news. 

The Saratoga Conference gave some of the newer recruits in the 
library army an opportunity to see and hear one of the great pioneers 
in the work : Dr Melvil Dewey. To some of our people the creator of 
the D. C. had no doubt taken on a cloak of antiquity, had been placed 
upon that pedestal reserved for Columbus and the other early voyagers. 
But Dr Dewey is very much alive ; he has been creating a tolerable 
paradise among his lakes and hills of the Adirondacks, and has found 
little oi3portunity during the past ten or twelve years to attend library 
conferences. But his mind is active and he has not been asleep to the 
problems which agitate his one time professional associates. His voice, 
as he addressed a very large gathering at one of the sectional meetings 
on the subject of "The Functions of the Library Conunission in Recon- 
structing the World After the War ' ' was in a way a voice out of the 
past, but it sounded very much like the same voice which, during my 
Albany days, not only frequently reconstructed the world, but at times 
did not hesitate to remodel the universe. It was good to see and hear 
him again. 

After the conference closed I had the pleasure, through the courtesy 
of a friend, of making the trip from Saratoga to New York by automo- 
bile. The beautiful green hills, the smell of the grass after the rain, 
the winding roads and good companionship made the journey delightful. 
That we ran out of New York state, cut off a corner of Vermont, and 
went clear across Massachusetts and Connecticut all in a day was a 
novelty to one accustomed to the long, long roads which stretch up and 
down California. 

New York city I found just as large and noisy, with streets as badly 
torn up and people in as nuich of a hurry as they have been on every 
visit I have paid to this melting pot of America. But to a librarian 
looking for books and prints it is a place of many delights. I had the 
unusual opportunity, too, of seeing New York in an abandon of feeling : 
the Mitchell funeral filled Fifth avenue with an endless throng, eager 
to pay tribute to a dead hero with whom a few months before it had been 
a case of thumbs down. 



282 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ Julv, 1918 

If I were going to advise librarians to take a trip during these times 
when Director-General McAdoo is offering positive discouragement to 
prospective tourists over his lines, I would recommend a visit to Library 
War Service Headquarters in the Library of Congress. Camp libra- 
ries, hospital libraries and dispatch offices tell their own thrilling stories, 
no doubt, but headquarters, from the director down to the 3^oungest 
typist, is a busy place, teeming with plans and capable of turning out 
a good day's work every day. It is an exemplification of how library 
work has become a big business — but with all its growth, has remained 
human and has a will for service. 

And then I came home again, left the green hills and the good friends 
in the East and was happy to be in California once more, with its 
brown hills and its good friends. Conventions are worth while ; and 
libraries and librarians are doing their share toward the winning of the 
war — a fact which should sutHce. 



vol. 13, no. 3] A CALL TO SERVICE. 283 

A CALL TO SERVICE. 

By William Warner Bishop, President Ameiican Library As.sociation. 

While the Saratoga Springs Conference is still fresh in our recollec- 
tion, and before the feeling and enthusiasm engendered there become 
dimmed, may I venture to urge on all librarians the imperative call of 
the present day to our best, our most devoted, our highest service ? 

The war has shown us two great lines of work, peculiarly our own, 
which can be done by no other agency so well as by libraries and libra- 
rians. These are our own library service at home in meeting the enor- 
moiLsly increased need for popular education and information, and our 
direct provision of books to the soldiers and sailors at home and over- 
seas. 

Never before have libraries had laid upon them such a 1)urden of 
duty as in the dissemination of sound and informing knowledge regard- 
ing the war, its aims, its conduct, the relation of the citizen thereto, and 
the whole array of problems arising from an unusual condition of 
society. Next to the public press, the one agency which can best supply 
such information to all classes of the community is the public library. 
If the library was vital before the war, it is tenfold more vital now. 
Our cities, towns and villages need the best in books and magazines, 
need the best effort of librarians as never before. The hour calls for 
definite, earnest, Avell-thought-out plans for the unifying and bettering 
of our daily service. And the times are not easy. Our libraries have 
already contributed to the military and civil branches of the government 
numbers of their best folk. On us who "stay bj^ the stuff" falls the 
increased burden. Our call is plain — no falling off in etficiency because 
of war ; rather a higher devotion and a greater service ! 

Further, and no less vital, is our Library War Service ; the provision 
of books in an effective (because organized) manner to our troops and 
our sailors. The American Library Association with splendid enthu- 
siasm promised its aid to the government at the Louisville Conference, 
hardly realizing, perhaps, the magnitude of its task. Last summer the 
Committee on War Service, through various agencies, planned a great 
campaign for money and for books. Largely through the efforts of 
librarians in every part of our land an imposing sum was gathered in 
the fall. The Librarian of Congress become General Director of the 
Library War Service. Library buildings were erected in the great 
camps, innumerable stations were set up in every "Y" hut and house, 
on the ships, in smaller camps. Slowly and with great difficulty in the 
midst of a nation-wide dislocation of energy, a splendid service has been 
developed by the hard and long labor of our devoted colleagues at 
headquarters and in the field. The dispatch of books to Europe and 
their supply to the troops there has been well begun. The attempt has 
proven the value of books in army life. It is no longer an experiment, 
Ijut an assured success. 

On us now rests the burden of carrying onward this work so admir- 
ably begun. There will be need of money, much monej". Prepare 
now to bring every effort to bear in your home towns to raise your 
share, yes, and more than your share. Let your people know what the 



284 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1918 

association is doing, get the papers to print accounts of the Library 
AVar Service. Inform yourself by visits and by letter. If our members 
actually KNOW what is being done, here and in France, the money 
will raise itself. 

There is need of personal service. Offer yourself, and like soldiers, 
obey orders. If you are called, for whatever work, that is your special 
call to duty. If you are not called at once, remember that the home 
service needs your every thought and action. The Library War Ser- 
vice MUST be a selected service, a choosing of men and women for 
special needs because of individual qualification. In war time men obey 
and do not growl. The work to be done is vast. It will require every 
one of us Avho can work in it, sooner or later. It will hearten every 
officer of the association, every camp and hospital librarian, to know 
that the volunteer list is embarrassingly large. 

These words, my fellow librarians, are not preaching. Some one 
must voice the needs of the hour, and you have called me to lead the 
association for a year in the time of our country's peril and mightiest 
effort. Therefore, I write this call to service, confident both in your 
response and in your welcome of the message. 



vol. 13, no. 3] ROLL OF HONOR. 2Sl 



ROLL OF HONOR.* 

MILITARY SERVICE. 

Davis, Lannes E. — Los Angeles Public Library. Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Medical Department. 

Greenwalt, Ernest. — California State Library, Sacramento. Assistant. Naval 
Reserve. 

Harris, Jack F. — California State Llbi-ary, Sacramento. Page. Navy. 

Joeckel, Carlton B. — Berkeley Public Library, Berkeley. Librarian. First Lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. 

Lenahan, Thomas. — California State Library, Sacramento. Page. Navy. 

Leupp, Harold L. — University of California Library, Berkeley. Associate 
Librarian. First Lieutenant, Infantry. 

McAulay, Oscar — Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Medical Department. 

McCarthy, W. H. — Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. Page. Private, 
Field Artillery. 

Marty, Albert. — California State Library, Sacramento. Page. Lieutenant, Avia- 
tion Section Signal Corps. 

Rogers, Walter. — Brockman Branch Lassen County Free Library. Custodian. 
Army. 

Ryan, Joseph E. — California State Librar\', Sacramento. Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. Naval Reserve. 

Smith, Eugene Ferry. San Diego Public Library, San Diego. Trustee. First 
Lieutenant, Aviation Section Signal Corps. 

Voge, A. Law — -Mechanics-Mercantile Library, San Francisco. Reference 
Librarian. Captain, Engineers Division. 

Wise, Roger. — San Diego Public Library, San Diego. Page. Army. 

BEHIND THE LINES. 

Bailey, Elizabeth. — San Diego Public Library. In charge of registration depart- 
ment. Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

Seals, Ralph A. — Santa Ana High School Library, Santa Ana. Librarian. 
Assistant Librarian, Camp Cody, New Mexico. 

Clarke, Alvan W. — Riverside Libi'ary Service School, 1915. Riverside. 
Employed by H. T\^. Wilson Co., New York, N. Y. Assistant Librarian, 
Camp Sevier, S. C. 

Coldren, Allice F. — Riverside Library Service School, 1914. Government work. 
Washington, D. C. 

Daily, Lilla B. — National City Public Library, National City. Librarian. Filing 
Clerk and Cataloger in Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

Dale, Mary. — Los Angeles County Hospital Branch, Los Angeles County Free 
Library. Custodian. In charge of Base Hospital Library, Camp Kearny, 
California. 

Fox, Christal. — Palo Alto Public Library, Palo Alto. Government work, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Gwinn, Marion. — Long Beach Public Library, Long Beach. Assistant in Chil- 
dren's Department. War Department, Washington, D. C. 



*This list has been compiled from various sources, and is doubtless incomplete. 
The California State Library will appreciate information of any corrections or 
additions. 



286 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1918 

Hall, A. Clover. — San Diego Public Library, San Diego. In cliarge of bindery 
boolts and library supplies. Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

Hanna, Gladys. — Long Beach Public Library. Desk Assistant. War Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Mary L. — Los Angeles County P'ree Library, Los Angeles. Assistant 
Librarian. Associate Librarian, Camp Kearnj-, California. 

McConnell, Mrs Inez G. — Oalcland Public Library. Division Accountant. Libra- 
rian, Letterman Base Hospital, Presidio, San Francisco, California. 

McMillan, Agnes. — Alhambra Public Library. First Assistant. In the office of 
the Quartermaster General, Washington, D. C. 

Margison, Pearl A. — Pasadena Public Library. Assistant. Government work. 
Washington, D. C. 

Mast, Maude. — Fresno County Free Library. Head of School Department. 
Filing Clerk in Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

Mulheron, Anna. — Los Ang.'?les Public Library. I-Iead of Book-order Depart- 
ment. In charge of Hostess House, Camp Cody, New Mexico. (Temporary 
position.) 

Potter, Mrs F. W. — Oakland Public Library. Head of Catalog Department. 
Red Cross Civilian Relief, Northern France. 

Quire, Joseph H. — California State Library, Sacramento. Legislative Reference 
Librarian. Camp Librarian, Camp Kearny, California. 

Regnart, Mrs Ora M.— ^anta Clara County Free Library, San Jose. Assistant 
Government work, Washington, D. C. 

Robley, Winifred. — Washington Branch Monterey County Free Library. War 
Department, Washington, D. C. 

Sanford, Nelle. — Beale Memorial Library, Bakersfleld. Cataloger. Indexer in 
War Insurance Department, Washington, D. C. 

Slaughter, Dell P. — Riverside Library Service School, 1917, Riverside. Index 
and Catalog Clerk, Washington, D. C. 

Smeal, Hilda. — Riverside Library Service School, 191o, Riverside. Ambulance 
driver in France. 

Talbot, Sterling J. — Leland Stanford Junior University Library, Stanford 
University. Loan Desk Assistant. Assistant Librarian, Camp Fremont, 
California. 

Walker, Elizabeth. — Los Angeles Library School, 1916. Index and Catalog Clerk 
in War Department, Washington, D. C. 



vol. 18, no. 3] REGISTEB CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



287 



REGISTER OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 

The following- list includes workers in California libraries on June 1, lOlS. In 
some cases where decided changes have lieen known to have taken place, the informa- 
tion has been brought up to .July 1. The list includes paid custodians of branches. 

I'. L. stands for Public Library, by which we indicate a municipal library sup- 
ported by taxation. F. L. means Free Library, one supported by subscriijtions, etc. 
Co. F. L. stands for County Free Librai-y. 



Aaron, Mabel, Asst. P. L., Stockton. 
Acker, . Mrs W. H., Custodian, Vista 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Adair, Ruth, Asst. P. L., Riclimond. 
Adam, C. F., Custodian, Oleum Branch, 

Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Adams, Mrs H. M., Custodian, Reese 

Branch. Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Aicher, John William Hilary, Page, Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 
Aicholtz, Mrs Sarah, Janitress, P. L. 

Covina. 
Ainslie, Mrs J. A., Custodian, Danville 

Branch. Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Aitken, Marion, As.st. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno. 
Aitken, Robert G., Ln. Lick Observatory 

L., Mount Hamilton. 
Alber, Blise, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Albert, Marion C, Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Alexander, Leona M., 1st Asst. Documents 

Dept P. L., Oakland. 
Allsebrook, Anna, Ln. P. L., Coronado. 
Almond. Nina, Cataloger, Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford University. 
Ambrose, W. B., Custodian, Lockeford 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Anderson, Alice, Acting Ln. Trinity Co. 

F. L., Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Ambrosia A., Custodian, 

Dinuba Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Anderson, Edna, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 
Anderson, Mrs G. B., Ln. P. L., St. Helena. 
Anderson, Ida M., Custodian, GrangevlUe 

Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 
Anderson, Jeannette C, Asst. P. L., Oak- 
land. 
Anderson, Mrs John, Custodian, Tokay 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Anderson, Loiing. Janitor, Contra Costa 

Co. F. L.. Martinez. 
Anderson, Mary, .Stenographer, P. L., 

Riverside. 
Anderson, Mildred N.. Substitute, P. L., 

Oakland. 
Andrew, Florence M., Custodian, Bl Monte 

Branch, Los Angeles Co. F. L. 
Andrews, Beryl L., Asst. California State 

L., Sacramento. 
Andrews, Jean, Custodian, Carpinteria 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Arkin, James Andrew, Custodian, Portola 

Branch, Plumas Co. F. L. 
Armstrong, Alice E., Custodian, North 

Oakland Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Armstrong, Mrs L. D., Keeper of Station, 

San Francisco P. L. 
Armstrong, Mrs R. F., Custodian, Lone 

Star Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

2 — 3 06. ",6 



Airies, Leo W., Custodian, East Branch, 

Pasadena P. L. 
Ashman, Elizabeth, Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno. 
Askey, Hazel Essington, Asst. Siskiyou Co. 

F. L., Yreka. 
Atkinson, Eunice, Asst. Ln. P. L., South 

Pasadena. 
Aylesworth, Mrs Jessie C, Ln. P. L., 

Hemet. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern Co. F. L., 

Bakersfield. 
Babcock, Mrs Lua E., Custodian, Laton 

Branch, Fresno Co. P. L. 
Bacon, Mrs Virginia C, Ln. Humboldt 

.State Normal School L., Areata. 
Bagot. Mrs E., Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 
Bahrman, Mabel A., Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. San Mateo Co. F. 

L., Redwood City. 
Bailey, Zita Grace, Custodian, North East 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Baines, E. R., Keeper of Station, San 

Francisco P. L. 
Baird. Jean D., 1st Asst. Alameda Co. F. 

L., Oakland. 
Baker, Ethel I., Custodian, Pleasant Grove 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Baker, Mrs S. O., Custodian, Big Sur 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Baldwin, Eileen, Custodian, McCreery 

Branch. San Francisco P. L. 
Ballard, Ellen, Ln. P. L., Sunnyvale. 
Ballard, Mrs Nora, Custodian, Waterford 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Balsley, Catherine, Asst. P. L., Santa 

Monica. 
Bamford, Mary E., Sub.stitute. P. L.. Oak- 
land. 
Barber, Josephine, Custodian, Oran.-?'- 

Cove Branch. Fresno Co. F. L. 
Barmby, Mary J., Ln. Alameda Co. F. L., 

Oakland. 
Barnard, Lloyd, Janitor, College of the 

Pacific L., San Jose. 
Barnes, Alice, Typist, Bancroft L., Berke- 
ley. 
Barnes, Mrs E. L., Custodian, Crows 

Landing Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Barnett, Margaret Adelle, Ln. P. L., Santa 

Rosa. 
Barnum, Mrs L. A., Custodian, Hetaer 

Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 
Earnum, Verna Meida, Ln. P. L., Etna. 
Barrington, Ruth, AssL P. L., Pasadena. 
Barth, O. F., Principal, Acting Ln. Union 

High School L., Geyserville. 
Bartlett, Mrs Annie, Custodian, Lemoore 

Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 



288 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Barton, G. Alice, Asst. Ln. P. L., Redwood 

City. 
Barton, Laura E., Ln. P. L., Redwood 

City. 
Bascom, Mrs D. S., Custodian, Nestor 

Brancli, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Bassett, Clara Aurilla, Custodian, East 

San Jose Branch, San Jose P. L. 
Batclielder, Mrs Mary A., Cataloser, P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Bates, Mrs G. W., Custodian, La Granarc 

Brancli, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Bates, Zoe E., Ln. P. L., Healdsburg. 
Bauer, Blanche H., Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Bauer, Theresa C, Stenogiliplier, Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 
Bean, Alice, Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 
Bean, Mary Ramona, 1st Asst. Art and 

Music Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Beattie, Emelyn, Substitute, Santa Clara 

Co. F. L., San Jose. 
Bechtel,. Mrs A. M., Custodian, Empire 

Brancli, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Becker, William, Caretaker, P. L., Sausa- 

lito. 
Bsdinger, Sarah E., Ln. Beale Memorial 

P. L., Bakersfleld. 
Beebe, Mrs Elizabeth. Sunday Asst. Alden 

Branch, Oakland P. 1>, 
Beecher. Algie E., Art Iteference Ln. and 

in charge of Periodicals, P. 1>., Stockton. 
Beeler, Cleo, Page, San Pedro Brancli. Los 

Angeles P. L. 
Beeman, Mrs Thomas B., Ln. Imperial Co. 

F. L., El Centro. 
Bell, Edna A., A.s.st. California State L., 

Sacramento. 
Bellows, Rita, Custodian, Acampo Branch, 

San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Bennett, Blanche, Asst. P. L., Santa 

Monica. 
Bennett, Gladys Mary, Page, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Bennett, John N., Custodian, Broderick 

Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 
Bennett, Mrs Mira Burnett, Asst. Ln. 

Margaret Carnegie L., Mills College, 

Oakland. 
Bennett, Stella, Senior Asst. LTniversity of 

California L., Berkeley. 
Bentson, Constance, Custodian, Oleander 

Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 
Bergen, Lucile, Junior Asst. Co. Dept. P. 

L., Santa Barbara. 
Bernardis, Cecil A., Page, P. L., San 

Diego. 
Bertolani, J., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Beskeen, Mrs J. E., Custodian, Branch L, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Best, Mrs Bessie Taylor, Custodian, Bishop 

Branch, Inyo Co. F. L. 
Bidwell, E. W., Custodian, Bscalon 

Branch, San Joaciuin Co. F. L. 
Bigger, Abby S., Secretary of Library 

Board and in charge on Sundays, P. L., 

Pacific Grove. 
Bigley, Winifred H., Ln. Merced Co. F. L., 

Merced. 
Birkbeck, Esther L., Asst. Ln. P. L., Han- 
ford. 
Bishop, Clara N., Asst. City Branch Dept. 

P. L., Oakland. 
Bishop, Ruth Lula, Head of Workroom, 

P. L., Pomona. 



Black, Mrs Maud, Asst. Ln., P. L., San 
Leandro. 

Bliss, Lucy S., Asst. Ln. P. L., Watson- 
ville. 

Blodgett, Naomi, Asst. Chico Normal 
School L., Chico. 

Blood, Mrs Clara Murray, Instructor in 
Library School, California State L., Sac- 
ramento. 

Bloomer, Margaret Dolores, Ln. ^Newman 
Hall L., Berkeley. 

Blount, Helen Esther, Page, P. L., Lod An- 
geles. 

Blundell, Pearl V., Asst. P. L., Stockton. 

Bobbitt, H., Page, P. L., San Fraucisro. 

Bogue, Mi's Viola Adam, Asst. Circuiaiion 
Dept., P. L., Los Angeles. 

Bohnet, Howard Frederick, Page. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 

Bohnett, Mrs G. E., Cu.stodian, Aromas 
Branch. Monterey Co. F. L. 

Boke, Williameena J., Asst. Goodman 1'. 
L., Napa. 

Bolla, Joseph, Janitor, P. L., Berkeley. 

Bolton, Mrs C. A., Custodian, Clay Branch, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Bolton. Herbert E., Acting Curator, Ban- 
croft L.. ITni\ersity of California, Berke- 
ley. 

Bolton, L. L., Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Bomgardner, Esther M., Ln. High School 
L., National City. 

Bonnell, Claire, Asst. University Brancli, 
Los Angeles P. L. 

Bordi, Florence, .lanitor, P. L., Mountain 
View. 

Boring, Rosalind, Asst. P. L., San Jose. 

Borland, Andrew M., Gardener, P. L., San 
Diego. 

Boss, Harriet B.,- Ln. College of the Pa- 
cific L., San Jose. 

Botts, Mrs Ayres, Custodian, Christian 
Colony Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Bouton, Mary Louise, Asst. P. Ij., Pomona. 

Bowen, Mrs W. T., Custodian, San Pas- 
qual Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Bowmen, Genevive, Custodian, Field's 
Landing Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Bowne, Emma L., Asst. Mechanics-Mer- 
cantile L., San Francisco. 

Boyd, Kate L., Custodian, Sycamore 
Branch. Colusa Co. F. L. 

Boyg, Bertha M., Ln. Mendocino Slate 
Hospital L., Ukiah. 

Boyle, Agnes, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 

Boyle, Mrs Callie E., A.sst. P. L., River- 
side. 

Boynton, Elizabeth Ives, Asst. 1'. Ij., Los 
Angles. 

Boynton, Mary, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Bradford, Mrs Belle, Custodian, Briice^ille 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Brandon, Lillian, Sunday Attendant, 1^. L.. 
Oakland. 

Brandon, May, Asst. Melrose Branch, P. 
L., Oakland. 

Brandt, Mrs Annette, Custodian, Pinole 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Brandt, Cora R., Senior Asst. University 
of California L., Berkeley. 

Brandt, Helen A., Clerical Asst. University 
of California L., Berkeley. 

Braun, Mrs E. E., Custodian, Bavd 
Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 



vol. 13, no. 3] REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



289 



Breneman, Mrs J. A., Custodian, E! Cei- 
rito Branch. Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Breniman, Marie, Asst. Ln., College of tl'ie 
Pacific L., San Jose. 

Breslin, J.. Page, P. L., San Francisco. 

Brewitt, Mrs Theodora, Ln. P. L., Al- 
hambra. 

Brewster, Helen H., Substitute, P. L., 
Oakland. 

Brichetto, J., Custodian, Banta Branch, 
San Joaciuin Co. F. L. 

Briggs, Mrs Clara, Custodian, Fortuna 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Bright, Dolly Gertrude, Asst. P. L,, Ox- 
nard. 

Brink, Irma, Senior Asst. P. L., San Diego. 

Brinton, Margaret, Asst. Lane Medical L., 
San Francisco. 

Britton, Jasmine, Principal, Cliiklren's 
Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Brock, Genevra, Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 
Fresno. 

Brock, Mrs M. C, Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Brommage, Mary B., Custodian, S-m Lo- 
renzo Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 

Brooks, L. May, Chief of Serial Dept. 
Stanford LTniversity L., Stanford Uni- 
versity. 

Brown, A. N., Custodian, McKialeyville 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Brown, Agnes E., Ln. University Farm 
School L., Davis. 

Blown, Belle C, Chairman Libraiy Board, 
Acting Ln. P. L., Larkspur. 

Brown, Charlotte M., Ln. University of 
Southern California L., Los Angeles. 

Brown, Mrs Florilla M., Custodian, Siege 
Branch, Richmond P. L. 

Brown, Fred, Page, Vermont Square 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Brown, Mrs G., Custodian, Berryessa 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Brown, Kathryn, Custodian, Arroyo Sana- 
torium Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 

Brown, Margaret, Head of Co. Dept. P. L., 
Santa Barbara. 

Brown, Mary, Ln. P. L., San Leandro. 

Brown, Mrs Saxon, .Custodian, Centr;:l 
Ave. Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Brown, Zaidee, Ln. P. L., Long Beach. 

Browne, E. K., Janitor, P. L., Upland. 

Browne, Florence E., Chief of Children's 
Dept, P. L., Oakland. 

Browne, Roberta M., Asst. P. L., Stockton. 

Browne, Ruth E., Asst. University of 
Southern California L., Los Angeles. 

Browning, Edna M., Junior Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 

Bruner, Helen Marcia, Asst. California 
State L., Sacramento. 

Brunker, W. T., Substitute at Museum, 
Oakland P. L. 

Brunson, Ella C, Registrar, Los Angeles 
Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Brush, Myrle, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 

Bryant, H. D.^ Custodian, Carroll Branch, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Buckley, Mrs Clara A., Custodian, Sara- 
toga Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Bugbee, James, Page, Hollywood Branch, 
Los Angeles P. L. 

Bukovits, William, Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 



Bullock, Helen C, Ln. P. L., Lodi. 
Bullock, Ruth, Asst. Cataloger, Los An- 
geles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Bumstead, Frank M., Acting Supt. of Cir- 
culation, University of California L., 

Berkeley. 
Bunce, Marie Louise, Asst. P. L., Oakland. 
Bunnell, Bessie, Custodian, Courtland 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Burbeck, Charles Leighton, Janitor, P. li.. 

Fort Bragg. 
Burbridge, C. C, Asst. Camp Fremont L., 

Camp Fremont. 
Burdic, Hope, Asst. Kern Co. F. L., 

Bakersfield. 
Burges, Edith A., Custodian, West Oak- 
land Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Burke, Agnes, Custodian, Farmersville 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Burke, Kathryn Edwina, Ln. P. L., Chula 

Vista. 
Burleigh, Mrs Amy, Book-repairer, P. L., 

San Diego. 
Burnett, Mrs Lillian, Custodian, Otay 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Burney, Mrs M. Nelson, 2d Asst., P. L., 

Redondo Beach. 
Burns, Agnes, Custodian, Sanger Branch, 

Fresno Co. F. L. 
Burola, I. M., Custodian, Betteravia 

Branch. Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Burrey, Mrs Mary L., Ln. P. L., LTkiah. 
Bun-ill. Elbert Fielding, Page, University 

of California L., Berkeley. 
Eurroni, E., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Burroughs, H. D.. Secretary, Lassen Co. 

Law L., Susanville. 
Buiroughs, Olive Cutting, Chief of Read- 
ers' Dept. P. L., Berkeley. 
Burt, Lillian, Ln. Pacific Unitarian School 

for the Ministry L., Berkeley. 
Burton, Ruth, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 
Butcher Mrs Janet, Custodian, Angiola 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Butterfleld, Alice M., Ln. Girls' High 

School L., Riverside. 
Euttner, Mary, Custodian, Sunol Branch, 

Alameda Co. F. L. 
Byles, Charles J., Ln. L. of Pacific Branch, 

Soldiers' Home. 
Byrne, Clara, Custodian, Santa Ynez 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Byrne, Henry L., Ln. Society of California 

Pioneers L., San Francisco. 
Byrne, Mary A., Reference Ln. P. Ij., San 

Francisco. 
Caddell, Dolores, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Cadmus, Laura, Asst. Cataloger, P. L.. 

Long Beach. 
Gaboon, Katharine, Asst. Madera Co. F. 

L., Madera. 
Cain, Mary M., Ln. Citrus Union Higli 

School L., Azusa. 
Caldwell, Augusta, Ln. Modoc LTnion High 

School L., Alturas. 
Calnon, J. Elizabeth, Ln. P. L., Anaheim. 
Calvert, Elizabeth A., Ln. Dist. L., Yorba 

Linda. 
Cameron, Lauretta Jane, Asst. Plumas Co. 

F. L., Quincy. 
Campbell, Mrs F. E., Custodian, Santee 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 



290 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



July, 1918 



Cumpliell, Mary L., Asst. Ln. P. L.. and 

Asst. Union High School L., I'ullertun. 
Camper, Elta Louise, As.st. Caliiorniu 

State L., Sacramento. 
Canady, James, Janitor, East Bakersfleld 

Branch, Beale Memorial L. 
Canny, E. C, Janitor, P. L., Corning. 
Cantrett, Roy Jerome, Ln. James Hugh 

Wise L., San Francisco. 
Carey, Katherine Agnes, Page, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Carlock, Harriet E., Ln. Kern Co. Law L., 

Bakersfield. 
Carroll, Ethel, Ln. P. L., Oxnard. 
Carson, Louise, Junior Asst. P. L., San 

Diego. 
Carter, Grace C, Custodian, College City 

Branch, Colusa Co. F. L. 
Carter, Mrs Homer, Custodian. Hardwick 

Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 
Carter, Oliver, Branch Librarj- Janitor, 

Berkeley P. L. 
Cartwright, Charles H.," Overseer, P. L., 

San Anselmo. 
Caruthers, Eleanor W., Principal, Art and 

Music Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Casey, Charlotte, Ln. City School L., Los 

Angeles. 
Casey, Evelyn, Substitute, P. L., Gilroy. 
Casey, Nellie A., Custodian, Mission 

Branch, San Francisco P. L. 
Castie, Mrs D. O. Custodian, Castle 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Caswell, Leona, Desk Asst, P. L., Pasa- 
dena. 
Catey, Emma E., Asst. Ln. P. L., Redondo 

Beach. 
Cavanaugh, Jessie L, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Chaffin, Mrs L., Custodian, Blverta 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., In- 
dependence. 
Chambers, Delia, Cataloger, P. L., Santa 

Barbara. 
Champion, Norman A., Janitor, Cahuenga 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Chapin, Artena Mary, Ln. A. K. Smiley 

P. L., Redlands. 
Chapman, Garnet, Asst. P. L., San- Ber- 
nardino. 
Chapman, Gordon K., Page, University of 

California L., Berkeley. 
Chappell, George L., Janitor, Fresno Co. 

F. L., Fresno. 
Cliarlesworth, Sarah Ann, Janitor, P. L., 

Coronado. 
Chase, Mrs R. G., Custodian, Carlsbad 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Chew, Mrs E. B., Custodian, Jamesburg 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Chilberg, Marjorie June, Asst. California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Christie. Mrs James, Custodian, Lassen 

Branch, Lassen Co. F. L. 
Church, Edith May, Ln. High School L., 

Glendale. 
Churchman, Mrs H. B., Ln. W. C. T. U. L.. 

Graton. 
Clark, A. Loretto, Cataloger, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Clark, Ella Augusta, Indexer, California 

State L., Sacramento. 



ClarK", Everett, Page, I'^rcsno Co. F. L., 
r'"resno. 

Clark, George Tliomas, Ln. Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford LTniversity. 

Clark, Mrs Grant, Custodian, Alton 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Clark, Henrietta F., Asst. Ln. P. L., San 
Rafael. 

Clark, Mrs Leli, Custodian, Dulzura 
Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Clark, Sarah Pareenia, Asst. Fresno Co. 
F. L., Fresno. 

Clark, Thomas G., Asst. LTniversity of 
California L., Berkeley. 

Clarke, Dorothy Louise, Ln. Plumas Co. 
F. L., Quinc5'. 

Clarke, :Margaret B., Substitute, P. L., 
Oakland. 

Clarke, W. H., Janitor, P. L., South Pasa- 
dena. 

Clegg, Lola A., Ln. P. L., Redondo Beach. 

Cleaves, Margaret Jane, Asst. Trinity Co. 
F. L., Weaverville. 

Close, Benjamin, Page, P. L., San Diego. 

Clotfelter. Myrtle, Custodian, Orosi Branch, 
Tulare Co. F. L. 

Clough, Frank, Page, P. L., San Diego. 

Clowe, Virginia, Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., 
Woodland. 

Coater, Ainsley, Asst. East Bakersfield 
Branch, Beale Memorial L. 

Coats, Arvillo Monroe, Janitor, Beale Me- 
morial L., Bakersfield. 

Cobb, Frances L., Clerk, in charge Santa 
Fe Hospital L., Los Angeles. 

Cobb, William G., Janitor, P. L., Whit- 
tier. 

Coburn, Lucy, Custodian, Capa>' Branch, 
Yolo Co. F. L. 

Coburn, Roy, Custodian, Engel Mine 
Branch, Plumas Co. F. L. 

Cochran, Mrs Hattie Evelyn, Asst. P. I.... 
Tulare. 

Cockerill. Olive, Custodian, Princeton 
Branch, Colusa Co. F. L. 

Coddington, May, Ln. P. L., San Bernar- 
dino. 

Coffey, Kate, Branch Janitress, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 

Coffin, Helen Lockwood, Ln. P. L., Corona. 

Coffinberry, Mrs J. B., Ln. P. L., South 
San Francisco. 

Coker, R. E., Janitor, Clovis Branch, 
Fresno Co. F. L. 

Colby, Mrs Inez F. Sachs, Senior Asst. 
LTniverstiy of California L., Berkeley. 

Cole, Agnes M., Senior Asst. LTniversity of 
California L., Berkeley. 

Cole, Franklin J., Chairman of Board of 
Trustees, Imperial Co. Law L., El 
Centro. 

Cole, Irma V., Head of School Dept., P. L., 
Sacramento. 

Coleman, Henry Russell, Custodian, Ar- 
mona Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 

Coleman, Shirley M., Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Collins, Harvey, Custodian, Esparto 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Collins, Helen M., Ln. Boys Polytechnic 
High School L., Riverside. 



Aol. VS. no. 3 1 REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



291 



Collins, Holdridge Ozro, Secretary, South- 
ern California Academy of Sciences L., 
Los Angeles. 

Collins. :\Iichael F., Janitor, Boyle Heights 
Branch. Los Ang-eles P. L. 

Collins. Miriam Sanxay, Junior Asst. P. L., 
San Diego. 

Collins, Rose E., Ln. Union High School 
L., Leraoore. 

Collum. W., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 

Colqulioun, Robert Dundas, Asst. Me- 
chanics-Mercantile L., San Francisco. 

Comfort. Sarah Satterthwaite, Page, I'. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Compton. Ruth Browning. Junior Asst. 
L'niversity of California L., Berkeley. 

Condit. Ida E.. Asst. Ln. and in charge of 
Co. Dept., P. L., Stockton. 

Cone. Vere LaB., Ln. City High School L., 
' Monrovia. 

Conkling, Arthur, Janitor and Gardener, 
P. L., San Rafael. 

Conner, L E., Custodian, Cardiff Branch, 
San Diego Co. F. L. 

Connelly, Marie, Asst. William Land 
Branch, Sacramento P. L. 

Connor, Elizabeth, Ln. Mount Wilson Solar 
Observatory L., Pasadena. 

Conrad, Mrs H., Custodian, Riverbank 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Convers. EfRe, Ln. Union High School L., 
Turlock. 

Cooksey, Clayborne D., Page, P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Cooley, Laura, Cataloger, Bancroft L., 
University of California, Berkeley. 

Coombs, Aileen May, Clerical Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 

Coombs, Evangeline, Substitute, P. L., 
Oakland. 

Coombs. Harriet G.. Asst. P. L., Sacra- 
mento. 

Cooper. Echo Audrey, Asst. Tulare Co. F. 
L., Visalla. 

Cooper, Everett, Ln. P. L.. Escondido. 

Cooper, May, Ln. P. L., San Rafael. 

Copeland, Edwin Robert, Page, P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Copeland. Mrs O.. Custodian, Los Altos 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Cordrey, Lucile H., Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Corless, Mrs Martha, Janitress, P. L., 
Lompoc. 

Corlett, Jessie, Substitute, Goodman P. L., 
Napa. 

Cory, Mabel W., Ln. High School L., San 
Pedro. 

Cosby. Mrs Mary O'N., Custodian, Clarks- 
burg Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Coughlin, Mary C, Custodian, W^est End 
Branch, Alameda P. L. 

Coulter. Edith Margaret, Reference Ln. 
Univei'sity of California L.. Beikeley. 

Coulter, Mabel, Ln. San Benito Co. F. L., 
San Benito. 

Cowan, Mrs Mary. Custodian, Brentwood 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Cowen, Mrs Anna E., Custodian. Briceland 
Branch. Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Cox, Charles, Janitor, Vernon Brancli, Los 
Angeles P. L. 



Cox, ;Mrs Cora B.. Ln. Ben Lomond L., 

Ben Lomond. 
Cox, Mrs G. H., Custodian, Bridgeville 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Cox, Grace M., Asst. P. L., San Jose. 
Craig. Agnes, Custodian, North Branch, 

Pasadena P. L. 
Craig, Anna M., Custodian, East Bakers- 
field Branch, Beale Memorial L. 
Craig. Mrs H^len, Ln. Kern Co. L'nion 

High School L.. Bakersfield. 
Cramer, Mrs C. Morey, Custodian, Strath- 
more Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Crane, Belle, Ln. P. L., Colusa. 
Crane, Imogene, In charge of Story Hour, 

P. L., Santa Monica. 
Crawford, Doris J., Asst. P. L., Oakland. 
Crawford, Inez M., Ln. P. L., San Mateo. 
Creaner, Anna, Asst. California State L., 

Sacramento. 
Creelman, Aimee, Asst. Ln. P. L., Hay- 
ward. 
Creelman, Elizabeth, Ln. P. L., Hayward. 
Creigli. Ethel Agnes, Junior Asst. P. L., 

San Diego. 
Crette. Marguerite, Custodian, San Lucas 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Crews, Anne L., Ln. P. L., Monrovia. 
Criswell, Lois, Senior Asst. University of 

California L., Berkeley. 
Critzer, Helena May, Asst. P. L., Berkeley. 
Crooks, Lois, Custodian, Easton Branch, 

Fresno Co. F. L. 
Crotty, Homer D., Page, University of 

California L., Berkeley. 
Crowe, Gladys Marion, Children's Ln. 

Boyle Heights Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Crowe, Mrs H. S., Custodian, Oakdale 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Crowhurst, Ella, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 
Crusoe, Katharine M., Ln. High School L.. 

Gilroy. 
Crutcher, Ruth Cary, Ln's Secretary, Stan- 
ford L'niversity L., Stanford L'niversity. 
Culver. Essae Martha, Ln. Butte Co. F. L., 

Oroville. 
Cummings. Mrs F J.. Custodian, Island 

Branch. Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Cummins. Neil X., A.sst. Ln. Chico State 

Normal School L., Chico. 
Cunningham, iirs C. M.. Asst. William 

Land Branch, Sacramento P. L. 
Curtis, Jane Isabel, Custodian, Elmhurst 

Branch. Oakland P. L. 
Curtis, June, Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno. 
Curtiss, Helena F.. Ln. P. L.. Azusa. 
Cushing. E. Z., As.st. Ln. Alameda Co. 

Law L.. Oakland. 
Cushing, Eloise B., Ln. Alameda Co. Law 

L., Oakland. 
Daingerfield, Charles L., Ln. Sugar Pine 

L., Sugar Pine. 
Dale, Mary, Hospital Ln. Camp Kearny 

L., Camp Kearny. 
Dalton. Rene. Substitute, P. L., Oakland. 
Dan ford. Alma, Ln. P. L., Glendale. 
Daniels, Joseph Francis, Ln. Riverside Co. 

F. L. and P. L., Riverside. 
Darlow, Gertrude Ellen, Head of Dept. of 

Literary Advancement, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 



292 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Davee, Mrs Belle, Custodian, Alviso 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Davidson, Grace G., Stenograplier, Fresno 
Co. F. L., Fresno. 

Davies, Emma P., Asst. Alden Branch, 
Oakland P. L. 

Davis, Dorotha, Ln. High School _L., 
Fresno. 

Davis, Elburta, Asst. Selma Branch 
Fresno Co. F. L. 

Davis, Mrs Rosie D., Custodian, Spa 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Davis, Theodore, Janitor, P. L., Long 
Beacli. 

Davison, Mrs Hannali P., Ln. Emeritus, 
P. L., San Diego. 

Davy, Rita, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 

Dawson, Helen J., Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Day, Floyd, Gardener and Asst. Janitor, 
P. L., Ukiah. 

Day, Mrs Katliarine, Custodian, Woodlake 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Day, Mrs Ruby, Custodian, Rivertaank 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Dean, John Alvin, Reference Ln. Me- 
chanics-Mercantile L., San Francisco. 

De Andreis, Ella, Ln's Secretarj', P. L., 
San Francisco. 

de Bade, P. G., Custodian, Voixlen 
Brancli, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

de Camp, Irene S., Teaclier-Ln. Union 
High Scliool L., Selma. 

Deering, Frederick Elmer, Page, P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Deering, James Henry, Ln. San Francisco 
Law L., San Francisco. 

DeFord, Estella, Ln. Tehama Co. F. L., 
Red Bluff. 

Defreese Emily, Custodian, B r a d 1 e y 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

de Freitas, J. M., Gardener, P. L., Hay- 
ward. 

Degenhart, Bessie C, Children's Ln. A. K. 
Smiley L., Redlands. 

de la Vau.x, Aimee, Janitress, P. L., San 
Anselmo. 

DeLeon, Minnie, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

De Martini, Mrs P. J., Custodian, Waterloo 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

deMerritt. Emma Frances, Book-marker 
and Repairer, California State L., Sac- 
ramento. 

De Motte, Mary, Reference Ln. P. L., 
Pasadena. 

Denneen, Mrs M., Janitress, Oakdale 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Dennis, Howard, Janitor,' Merced Co. F. 
L,, Merced. 

Dennison, Margai-et, Asst. California State 
L., Sacramento. 

Denny, Ida Augusta, Asst. Ln. Meta- 
physical L., San Francisco. 

DeSellen, Wesley H., Page, University of 
California L., Berkeley. 

de Silva, Clara Eca, Janitress, F. L., Or- 
land. 

Detrick, Margaret M., Principal Asst. P. 
L., San Diego. 

DeVeer, Mrs D. W., Asst. Curator of Mu- 
seum and Lecturer, P. L., Oakland. 

Devericks, O. B., Custodian, Woodville 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 



De Vries, Alice, Custodian, Alpaugh 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Diclv, Jane Maria, Playground Ln. P. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Dick, Jennie, Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Wootl- 
land. 

Dickerson, Mrs C. G., Asst. P. L., Sacra- 
mento. 

Dickson, Mrs Gerna Ruth, Asst. California 
State L., Sacramento. 

Dickson, Lillian L., Reference Ln. P. L., 
Riverside. 

Dietscli, H., Keeper of Station, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 

Digges, Marguerite, Asst. Meclianics-Mer- 
cantile L., San Francisco. 

Dillard, Mrs C. W., Custodian, Wilton 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano Co. F. L., Fair- 
field. 

Dinsmore, Edna M., Asst. Ln. P. L., Eu- 
reka. 

Dinzler, H. J., Janitor, P. L. and Yolo Co. 
F. L., Woodland. 

Disinger, Eva, Custodian, Imperial Beach 
Brancli, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Di.xon, Maude, Asst. P. L., Riverside. 

Dixon, Willis Milnor, Ln. California So- 
ciety Sons of the Revolution and Cali- 
fornia Society of Colonial Wars L., Los 
Angeles. 

Doan. Jean, Ln. Gardena Higli School L., 
Los Angeles. 

Dodge, Alice B., Substitute, P. L., Oakland. 

Dodge, Mrs Louise Mehan, Custodian, 
Figueroa Brancli, Los Angeles P. L. 

Dodge, Mrs W. R., Custodian, Lockwood 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Doeltz, Tillie E., 1st Asst. P. L., Santa 
Cruz. 

Dold, Margaret, Head of Catalog Dept., 
Fresno Co. F. L. 

Domine, Mrs Lillian. Ln. P. L., Cloverdale. 

Donahue, G., Custodian, Sylvan Branch, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Donanbauer, Joe, Janitor and Gardener, 
P. L., San Jose. 

Don Carlos, Florence, Page, P. L., Lo.s 
Angeles. 

Doom, Frances, Ln. P. L., Grass Valley. 

Dorman, Fannie Bonte, Custodian, Ca- 
huenga Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Dorn, Elizabeth Georgiana, 1st Asst. Ln. 
P. L., Alameda. 

Dornin, May, Clerical Asst. University of 
Califoi-nia L., Berkeley. 

Dotson, Mrs Louise L., Custodian, Allens- 
wortli Brancli, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Dougherty, C. E., Janitor, 2 ad Ave. 
Brancli, Oakland P. L. 

Dougherty, James, Custodian, Scotia 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Douglas, Laura, Custodian, Clovis Branch, 
Fresno Co. F. L. 

Doyle, Mary M., Newspaper Dept., P. L., 
San Francisco. 

Doyle, Mrs Nettie, Custodian, Standish 
Branch, Lassen Co. F. L. 

Drake, Jeannette M., Principal of Circula- 
tion Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Drake, Mabel Ruth, Page, P. L., Alhambra. 

Draper, William, Janitor, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 



vol. 13, no. 3 I REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



293 



Drewitz, Lsabelle O., Ln. Commonwealth 

Club of California L., San Francisco. 
Driscoll. J., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Driscoll, John 'W., Janitor, California State 

L., Saci'amento. 
PuBois, Mrs G. Packard. Editor Pasadena 

Library and Civic Magazine and Exten- 
sion Ln. P. L., Pasadena. 
DiiBois, Perle, Ln. Preston School L., 

lone. 
Duden, Ellsworth F. Jr., Ln. Sacramento 

Co. Law L., Sacramento. 
Dudley, Mary Electa, Shelf-lister, P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Due, Emmarene H., Custodian, Castro Hill 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Children's Ln. 

North-East Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Dugan, Ethel R., Ln. Union High School 

L., Inglewood. 
Dulin. Elizabeth, Ln. Union High School 

District L., Coalinga. 
Dulip, Lillian A., Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Dunbar, Mrs Frank, Custodian, Bonita 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Dunbar, John H., Branch L. Janitor, 

Berkeley P. L. 
Dunbar, Margaret, Supervisor of Branch 

Libraries, P. L., Berkeley. 
Duncan, Dorothy, Asst. Fresno Co. F. L.. 

Fresno. 
Duncan, Laura, Ln. Pacific Grove Museum 

L., Pacific Grove. 
Duncan, Mrs Nina, Custodian, Patterson 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Dunn, H., Office Boy, P. L., San Francisco. 
Dunn, Mabel S., Ln. Manual Arts High 

School L., Los Angeles. 
Dunn, Thomas Francis, Ln. Supreme Court 

L.. San Francisco. 
Duryll, Lawrence. Page, P. L., San Diego. 
Du.'Jing, Annette, Custodian, B o n s a 1 1 

Branch. San Diego Co. F. L. 
Duvall, Mi-s E., Keeper of Station, San 

Francisco P. L. 
Duvall, Pauline, Custodian, Venice Poly- 
technic Branch, Los Angeles Co. F. L. 
Eastman, Sara Carleton, Junior CJerk, P. 

L., Los Angeles. 
Eckes, Ida Louise, Asst. San Mateo Co. F. 

L., Redwood City. 
Eckhardt, Etta, Ln. P. L., Monterey. 
Eckis, Ellen Ir^ne, Senior Asst. P. L., San 

Diego. 
Eddie, lona Columba, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Eddy, Harriet G., Co. Library Organizer, 

California State L., Sacramento. 
Edeline, Mrs P. O., Custodian, Wadilington 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Edick, ,Tennie M., Ln. P. L., Placerville. 
Edrington, Floi-ene. Custodian, Hamcs 

Valley Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Edwards, D. M., Ln. Tulare Co. Law L., 

Visalia. 
Elder, Mrs Carrie, Custodian, Oak Park 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Eldredge, Alba W., Music Dept. P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Eliot, Mrs Bertha, Custodian, Linden 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Ellis, Mannie, Ln. Union High School L., 

Hemet. 



Ellis, Myrtle M., Head of Loan Desk, P. 
L., Pasadena. 

Ellis, Ruth, Ln. Union High School Dis- 
trict L., Banning. 

Ellis, Victoria, Custodian, Pico Ileighls 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Ellsworth, Elizabeth Kenncd.\', .\sst. P. I.i., 
Los Angeles. 

Ellsworth. John C, Janitor, Melrose 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Ely, Dorothy B., Sub-Branch Ln. Los An- 
geles P. L. 

Emory, W. V., Page, LTniversity of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley. 

Encell, James, Page, Co. Dept. P. L., 
Santa Barbara. 

English, Gladys, Head of School Dept. 
Fi-esno Co. F. L., Fresno. 

Eslinger. Cleona, 2d Asst. Tehama Co. . F. 
L., Red Bluff. 

Essenberg, Mrs Christine E., Ln. Scripps 
Institution for Biological Research of 
LTniversity of California, San Diego. 

Essex, Mrs Emma, Ln. Santa Fe Reading 
Room, Richmond. 

Estabrook, Winifred, Cataloger, State Nor- 
mal School L., San Jose. 

Estill, Helen F., Asst. Ln.. Manual Arts 
High School L., Los Angeles. 

Ettei-, Eileen, Custodian, Ettersburg 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Eustice, Mrs B., Janitress, Noith Oak- 
land Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Evans. Helen, Asst. Ln. State Normal 
School L., San Jose. 

Evans, Margaret, Custodian, East Sacra- 
mento Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Everett, Florence G., Asst. Alameda Co. F. 
L., Oakland. 

Evers, Nelda, Asst. P. L., Oakland. 

Ewing, Charles E., Page, Camp Kearny 
L., Camp Kearny. 

Ewing, Marion. Asst. Ln. Pomona College 
L., Claremont. 

ri'agir, Eva, Page, P. L., San Diego. 

Fagir, Mrs William, Janitress, P. L., San 
Diego. 

Fancett, Sarah E, Janiti-ess, P. L., Corona. 

F'argo, Elizabeth H., Ln. State Normal 
School L., Los Angeles. 

Fargo, Mattie Pauline, Head of Co. School 
Dept. Dos Angeles Co. F, L. 

Farrell, Anne M., Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Fari-ell, Irene, Substitute, P. L., Oakland 

Faulder, Mrs Henrietta M., Ln. P. L., Co- 
vina. 

Faulkner, Mrs Mabel Frances, In charge 
of cotmty records, P. L., Riverside. 

Fear, Christena Mary, 2d Asst. P. L., Co- 
rona. 

Fee, Jumes H., Janitor, Fresno Co. F. L., 
Fresno. 

Fenton, Jennie M. 1st Asst. Reference 
Dept. P. L., Oakland. 

P"'erguson, Milton J., Ln. California State 
L., Sacramento. 

Fernandes, Marie, Custodian, T e g n e r 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Ferris, Agnes Folger, Ln. P. L., El Centro. 

Ferris, Katharine Post, Ln. Kings Co. F. 
L., Han ford. 

Field, Anna C, Associate Ln. P. L., 
Orange. 



294 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Field, Clara C Ln. P. L., Orange. 
Fink, E. Leone, 1st Asst. P. L., Corona. 
Fisher, Clara, Asst. Ln. P. L., Chico. 
Fiske, Wilbur A., Ln. Cliaffey [Union Higli 

School] L., Ontario. 
Fitch, Caryl lone. Page, Moneta Branch. 

Los Angeles P. L. 
Fitch, Fern A., Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Fitch, Pansy, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Fitzell, Lincoln, Jr., Page, California State 

L.. Sacramento. 
Fleming, Mrs Eleanor T., Asst. P. L,, San 

Francisco. 
Fletcher, Maurice, Page, P. L., Santa Bar- 

taaia. 
Flickinger, Mrs J. B., Custodian, Raisin 

Cit.y Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 
Flint, E. G., Custodian, Poway Branch, 

San Diego Co. F. L. 
Flint, George B., Asst. Allendale Deposit 

Station, Oakland P. L. 
Flower, Gretchen Leonore, Acting Ln. 

State Normal School L., San Diego. 
Flugel, Hildegard, Cataloger, Stanford 

University L., Stanford University. 
Flynn, P., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
I'lynn, W. W., Elevator operator, P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Foley, Mrs Blanche. Custodian, Metropoli- 
tan Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Foley, Kate M., Home Teacher of the 

B'.ind, California State L. 
Foote, Frances R., Principal, Registration 

Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Forbes, Mrs A., Custodian, Rohnerville 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Foss, J. L., Janitor, California State L., 

Sacramento. 
Fowler, Edna, Asst. Cataloger, P. L., 

Stockton. 
Fowler, Laura E., Asst. Ventura Co. F. L., 

Ventura. 
Fowler, Mabel, Custodian, Newark Branch, 

Alameda Co. P. L. 
Fox. Christal F., Asst. P. L., Palo Alto. 
Foye, Betsey M., Asst. Vernon and Ver- 
mont Square Branches, Los Angeles 

P. Jv. 
Franz, Clara S., Substitute, P. L., Pasa- 
dena. 
Prazer, Mrs Hazel Beal, Asst. P. L., Long 

Beach. 
Frazier, Hubert, Asst. Los Angeles Co. P. 

L., Los Angeles. 
Frazier, Ruth, Custodian. Wynola Branch, 

San Diego Co. P. L. 
Frederiksen, Gerda, Junior Asst. Univer- 
sity of California L.. Berkeley. 
Fredrick, Mrs William, Custodian, O.iai 

Branch, Ventura Co. P. L. 
Fredricks, Jessie M., Music Dept. P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Freeman, Florence, Head Cataloger, P. L., 

Long Beach. 
Priant, Clarisse C, Asst. Ln., P. L., San 

Jose. 
Pritch, John, Janitor, Selma Branch, 

Fresno Co. P. L. 
Fueller, Elizabeth Emiah, Substitute, P. 

L., Whittier. 
Fuller, Mrs Melissa, Ln. P. L.. Nevada 

City. 
Gale, Ethel P., Asst. P, L., Palo Alto. 



Gale, Helen Avery, Asst. Stanford Uni- 
verity L., Stanford University. 

Gain, Stella, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 

Gallow, Mrs Annie L., Custodian, Owens- 
moulh Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Gamble, Mrs Carolyn, Custodian, Walnut 
Creek Brancli, Contra Costa Co. P. L. 

Gammon, Leroy, Page, Boyle Heights 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Gano, Satira Anne, Ln. P. L., Paso Robles. 

Gantz, Flo AUene, Head of Circulation 
Dept. P. L., Pomona. 

Gardiner, Mrs Blanche A., Ln. P. L.. Eagle 
Rock. 

Gardner, E., Janitor, P. L., El Centro. 

Garoutte, Mary Eudora, Head of Cali- 
fornia Dept. California State L., Sacra- 
mento. 

Garvey, Francis Harry, Page, P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Gates, P. H., Custodian, Sisquoc Branch, 
Santa Barbara Co. P. L. 

Gaw, Elizabeth, Ln. High School L., Fort 
Bragg. 

Gawne, Beatrice Young, Cataloger, Mon- 
terey Co. P. L., Salinas. 

Gaynor, Alethe, Substitute, P. L., Areata. 

Gaynor, Mrs May S., Ln. P. L., Areata. 

Gent, Fred, Custodian, Orleans Branch, 
Humboldt Co. F. L. 

Gentry, W. F., Janitor, P. L., Fullerton. 

George, Mrs Annie M., Custodian, Alviso 
Branch, Alameda Co. P. L. 

George, Arthur T., Asst. Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford University. 

Gervais, Mrs Mary, Ln. P. L., Burlingame. 

Giblin, Florence, Asst. P. L., Berkeley. ' 

Gifford, Harriet, Ln. P. L., Glendora. 

Gilhuly, Mary K., In charge of Circulation 
Dept., P. L., San Francisco. 

Gillies, C. C. A., Custodian, Clements 
Branch, San Joaciuin Co. P. L. 

Gillis, Mabel Ray, Asst. Ln. and Head of 
Books for Blind Dept., California State 
L.. Sacramento. 

Gillis, W. H., Custodian, Samoa Branch, 
Humboldt Co. P. L. 

Gillpatrick, Mrs Mary, Custodian. Ma7-- 
tinez Blanch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Gilstrap, Cosby Louise, Asst. P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Girdner, Margaret Virinda, Asst. Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

Gish, Nellie M., Senior Asst. P. L., San 
Diego. 

Glas. Irene, Asst. Madera Co. P. L., Ma- 
dera. 

Glashoff, Marie Margaret, Asst. Sokuio 
Co. P. L., Fairfield. 

Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles Co. P. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Glock, Mary Ella. Ln. Madera Co. P. L., 
Madera. 

Glotzback, V. A., Janitor, P. L.. Monterey. 

Goddard, O. A.. Janitor, Alden Branch, 
Oakland P. L. 

Goff, Bernice Leah, Asst. Sutro Branch, 
California State L., San Francisco. 

Goff, C. P., Custodian, Petrolia Branch, 
Humboldt Co. P. L. 

Gognon, Mrs Laura, Book-repairer, P. L., 
San Diego. 

Goldman, Belle A., Superintendent of 
Branches, P. L., San Francisco. 



vol. 13, no. 31 REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



295 



Goodfellow, Mary. Asst. P. L., Long 
Beach. 

Goodwin. Mrs Gertrude. Custodian, Ripon 
Branch. San Joaquin Co. F. L, 

Goold, Mrs John R., Custodian, Morgan 
Hill Branch. Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Gordon. Lillian. Desk Asst. A. K. Smiley 
P. L., Redlands. 

Gore, Helen. Junior Asst. Los Angeles Co. 
F. L., Los Angeles. 

Gottsch, Mrs Pauline, Custodian, San 
Ysidro Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Gowan, Mrs L. B., Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Graves, Francis Barnum, Ln. Mechanics- 
Mercantile L.. San Francisco. 

Gray. Thomas, Janitor, P. L., Chula Vista. 

Greathouse, Alice N.. Asst. P. L,. Rich- 
mond. 

Green, Gladys. Asst. Stanford L'niversity 
L.. Stanford University. 

Green, Mrs Louise H,, Custodian, Wau- 
kena Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Gieenamyer. Helen Loretta, Children's 
Ln. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Greene. Charles S., Ln. P. L., Oakland. 

Greene. Helen M.. Substitute. P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Greene, Rebecca T., Associate Principal, 
Union High School L., Palo Alto. 

Greene, Rosalind, 2d Asst. Vermont 
Square Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Greer, Lloyd L., Page, Camp Kearny L.. 
Camp Kearny. 

*Gregory, Vivian, Cataloger, Tolo Co. F. 
L., Woodland. 

Gresham, Violet M.. Ln. Polytechnic High 
School L., Long Beach. 

Griffin. Margaret. Asst. P. L., Oakland. 

Griffins. Ethel M.. Asst. P. L., Richmond. 

Grigsby. Maybelle, Custodian, Brawley 
Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 

Grimm. Harriet, Asst. Arlington Branch, 
Riverside P. L. 

Grimshaw. ;Mrs M., Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Grinnell, Dr Joseph, Ln. California Acad- 
emy of Sciences L., San Francisco. 

Guinasso, L., Branch Janitor, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 

Guinn. James M., Acting Ln. Historical 
Society of Southern California L., Los 
Angeles. 

Guiwits, Nettie M., 1st Asst. Arroyo Seco 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Gullickson. Minnie Florence. 1st Asst. 
Boyle Heights Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Gunthorp, Pauline, Head Cataloger, Uni- 
versity of California L.. Berkeley. 

Hadden. Elizabeth. Chief of Order Dept. 
Stanford University L., Stanford LTni- 
versity. 

Hadden. Maiy Anne. Ln. Monterey Co. F. 
L., Salinas. 

Haeuptle, Mrs Margaret. Custodian, Pirn 
Branch, Ventura Co. F. L. 

Haeussler. Mrs Grace. Custodian, Jacumba 
Branch. San Diego Co. F. L. 

Hafner, Bertha S., Periodical Dept. P. L., 
San Francisco. 

Hahn. Anais, Asst. P. L.. San Francisco. 

Haines. Alice J., Head of Documents 
Dept.. California State L., Sacramento. 



Haines, Elisabeth C, Asst. Fresno Co. F. 
L.. Fresno. 

Hale. Helen N.. Asst. Contra Costa Co. F. 
L,. Martinez. 

Hall. Margaret B., Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 

Hall, Margaret Popplein, 1st Asst. P. L., 
El Centro. 

Hall, Ruth. Asst. Ln. P. L.. Santa Rosa. 

Hallicy. Theresa. Asst. Ln. P. L., Hunt- 
ington Beach. 

Halverson, Josephine, Clerical Asst. Uni- 
verity of California L., Berkeley. 

Hamilton, Edith S., Custodian, Albany 
Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 

Hamilton. Rose, Custodian, Dublin Branch, 
Alameda Co. F. L. 

Hamilton, T. R., Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Hammer, Mrs Flora E., Asst. P. L., Sac- 
ramento. 

Hammond, Grace A., Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Hancock. C. Page. P. L., San Francisco. 

Handley, Winifred. Custodian, Alden 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Handlon, Mrs F. M., Custodian. Hickman 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Hanscom. LeRoy, Branch Library Janitor, 
Berkeley P. L. 

Hardy. Ernest. Custodian, Continental Salt 
Works Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 

Hargrave, Nina C, Ln. High School L.. 
Anaheim. 

Harlan. L. M., Custodian. Lucia Branch. 
Monterey Co. F. L. 

Harp, Myrtle, Ln. P. L., Livermore. 

Harris, Elizabeth Hai-mon, Publicity Dept. 
P. L., Pomona. 

Harris, Mrs George, Custodian, Pleyto 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Harris. Jack F., Page, California State L., 
Sacramento. 

Harris, Jessie A.. Ln. P. L.. Whittier. 

Harris, Lotta Harriett. Asst. Butte Co. F. 
L., Oroville. 

Harris. Mrs M. A.. Custodian. North Sac- 
ramento Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Harris, Mary W^., Chief of Branch Dept.. 
Fresno Co. F. L., Fresno. 

Harrison. Lyda J.. Custodian. Hamilton 
Branch. Glenn Co. F. L. 

Hart. Mary Gertrude. Custodian, Arroyo 
Seco Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Hart, Veva, Asst. Vermont Sciuare Branch, 
Los Angeles P. L. 

Hartzell, Robert R.. Principal. Acting Ln. 
L'nion High School L., Templeton. 

Hatch, Mrs Jessie Hoyt, Ln. P. L.. Im- 
perial. 

Hatch. Margaret, Ln. Sutter Co. F. L., 
Yuba City. 

Hatcher, Joybelle, Substitute and Sunda^■ 
Asst. A. K. Smiley P. L., Redlands. 

Hauck, F. P., Custodian, New Almaden 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Hauenstein. Genevieve, Asst. North-East 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Haven. Martha E., Cataloger, P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Hay. Florence Bertha. Ln. City High 
School L., Alhambra. ~ 

Hayden. ^Irs Bert, Custodian, Mt. View 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 



"On leave of absence to do library war service work at State Library. 



296 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Hayden, J. S.. Custodian, Campo Branch, 
San Diego Co. F. L. 

Hayes, Ramona Margaret, Page, Sutro 
Brancli, California State L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Ilaynes, Alonzo M., Secretary of Board of 
Trustees, Riverside Co. Law L., River- 
side. 

Hays, Alice New^man, Reference Ln., Stan- 
ford University L., Stanford University. 

Hays, Mabel L., Asst. P. L., Berkeley. 

Hays, Paul, AssL Los Angeles Co. F. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Hayter, Dolla M., Ln. P. L., Roseville. 

Hayward, Alfred, Janitor, P. L., Grass 
Valley. 

Hayward, Celia A., Acting Ln. P. L., 
Berkeley. 

Head, Mrs Grace W., Stenographer, San 
Diego Co. F. L., San Diego. 

Healy, Alice M., Chief Cataloger, P. L., 
San Francisco. 

Healy, Eileen, Cataloger, P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hedrick, Ellen A., Classifier, University of 
California L., Berkeley. 

Hcidorn, Mrs H. S., Custodian, Knightsen 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. P. L. 

Meiss, Mrs C. E., Custodian, Branch K, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Heitz, Frederick, Janitor, P. L., Healds- 
burg. 

Henderson, Inez Virginia, Ln. High School 
L., Stockton. 

Henderson, L. Ethel, Asst. State Normal 
School L., San Diego. 

Henriksen, Harry, Janitor, P. L., Mon- 
rovia. 

Jlenry, Carolyn Alpha, Asst. P. L., Santa 
Ana. 

Hensell, Mrs Essie, Custodian, Pixley 
Brancli, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Henshall, Mrs May Dexter, School Library 
Organizer, California State L., Sacra- 
inento. 

Herman, Mary, Custodian, Selby Branch, 
Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Herrick, Estelle, Custodian, California 
Girls Training Home Branch, Alameda, 
Alameda Co. F. L. 

Herring, F., Custodian, Rio Linda Branch, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Herrman, Jennie, Lh. San Diego Co. F. L., 
San Diego. 

Hersey, Mrs Olive M., Custodian, West- 
wood Branch, Lassen Co. F. L. 

Herzog, Blanche Margaret, Asst. P. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Herzog, George, Chief of Bookbinding 
Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Hess, Ethel Zenobia, Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Hewitt, Edna, Asst. Sutter Co. F. L., 
Yuba City. 

Heywood, Edith Adlington, Ln's Secre- 
tary, P. L., Berkeley. 

Hibberd, Edith A., Chief of Magazine 
Dept. P. L., Oakland. 

Hieber, Mary, Custodian, Vernon Branch, 
Los Angeles P. L. 

Higgins, Clyde R., Asst. San Mateo Co. F. 
L., Redwood City. 



Hildebrand, Clifton, Page, University of 
California L., Berkeley. 

Hildebrant, Loyola, Asst. P. L., Woodland. 

Hill, Charles A., Mechanic at Museum, P. 
L., Oakland. 

Hill, Mrs Harriett M., Custodian, Melrose 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Hill, Mrs Jessie, Ln. P. L., Rocklin. 

Hill, John Joseph, Desk Asst. Bancroft L., 
University of California, Berkeley. 

Hill, Mary L., Desk Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 

Hill, Reuben T., Substitute at Museum, P. 
L., Oakland. 

Hill, Virginia D., Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 

Hille, Helen, Asst. Ln. P. L., National 
City. 

Hillyer, Alice, Asst. California State L., 
Sacramento. 

Hilton, Helen I., Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hines, Buell, Janitor, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Hinkle, Mrs Caroline, Custodian, Pacific 
Beach Branch, San Diego P. L. 

Hinricks, Herbert, Shipping Clerk, Mon- 
terey Co. F. L., Salinas. 

Hironymous, Bernice, Custodian, Grafton 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Hitchcock, Mrs Lois, Custodian, Roberts 
Island Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Hite, Mrs E. J., Custodian, Pinal Oil Lease 
Brancli, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 

Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. Yolo Co. F. L., Wood- 
land. 

Hoagland, Bessie M., Ln. Union High 
School L., Gonzales. 

Hockett, Trilby, Custodian, Ducor Branch, 
Tulare Co. F. L. 

Hoeller, Hildegarde B., Stenographer, P. 
L., Los Angeles. 

Hoffman, John, Janitor, P. L., HoUister. 

Hogan, Ferdinand Walker, Janitor, Plu- 
mas Co. F. L., Quincy. 

Hogan, Mrs Irene, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hoge, Myra D., Ln. Union High School L., 
Fullerton. 

Ploldroyd, Amy Gertrude, 1st Asst. Beale 
Memorial L., Bakersfield. 

Holland, Alda, Asst. P. L., San Jose. 

Holland, J. R., Branch Janitor, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 

Hollingsworth, Daisy R., Asst. University 
of Southern California L., Los Angeles. 

Hollingsworth, Josephine Bacon, Asst. P. 
L., Los Angeles. 

Holman, Esther, Custodian, Hughson 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Holroyd, Edna Stowe, Ln. Tuolumne Co. 
F. L., Sonora. 

Holt. M., Custodian, Loleta Branch, Hum- 
boldt Co. P. L. 

Hooper, T. R., Custodian, Sultana Branch, 
Tulare Co. F. L. 

Hoots, Leona, Asst. P. L., Oakland. 

Hoover, J. B., Custodian, Lemon Grove 
Branch, San Diego Co. P. L. 

Hopkins, Georgianna, Senior Asst. P. L., 
San Diego. 

Hopkins, Marjorie Snow, Clerical Asst. 
University of California L., Berkeley. 

Hopping, Mrs Laura D., Custodian, Ka- 
weah Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 



vol. 13, no. 3] REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



297 



Horn, Gertrude Harriett, Clerical Asst. 
University of California L., Berkeley. 

Horn, Maude Helen, Clerical Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 

Horton, Marion, Instructor in Library 
School, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Houlahan, May I., Ln. P. L., Benicia. 

Housken, Mrs W. P., Custodian, Thornton 
Branch, San Joaciuin Co. F. L. 

Houston, Marion Edna, Clerical Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 

Hovey, Florence, Children's Ln. Arroyo 
Seco Brancli, Los Angeles P. L. 

Howery, May, Custodian, Kerman Branch, 
Fresno Co. F. L. 

Howland, Mrs Myrta El., Custodian, Melo- 
land Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 

Huff, Amatus T., Janitor, P. L., Tulare. 

Hughes, Bna M., Asst. P. L., Oakland. 

Hull, Alex, Janitor, Goodman P. L.. Napa. 

Hult, J. A., Branch Janitor, San Francisco 
P. L. 

Huneke, Mrs Mabel, Custodian, Lemon 
Cove Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Hunt, Gladdis May, Asst. Cataloger, Los 
Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Hunter, Paul. Page, Camp Kearny L.. 
Camp Kearny. 

Hunting, George Washington, Janitor, Mc- 
Henry P. L., Modesto. 

Huntington, Stella, Ln. Santa Clara Co. 
F. L., San Jose. 

Huntley, Mabel G., Cataloger, P. L., Sac- 
ramento. 

Hunzicker, Lena B., Reference Ln. P. L., 
San Diego. 

Hupp, Stella Gertrude, Asst. P. L., Santa 
Ana. 

Hurst, Florence Louise, Asst. in Play- 
ground Branches, Los Angeles P. L. 

Hurwitz, Mrs Anne Keatinge, Ln. L. of the 
University of California Medical School, 
San Francisco. 

Huse, Maud, Ln. High School L., Santa 
Barbara. 

Hutton, Mrs W. M., Custodian, Isleton 
Bi-anch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Ingham, Mrs Katherine, Ln. Barlow Medi- 
cal L., Los Angeles. 

Inghram, Henry, Janitor, P. L., San Ber- 
nardino. 

Ingi'um, Roberta, Asst. Ln. P. L., Visalia. 

Isakson, Lucille Ring, Asst. Madera Co. 
F. L., Madera. 

Iverson, Ora E., Acting Ln. California 
School of Mechanical Arts L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Jacks, Mrs Minnie, Custodian, Meadow 
Valley Branch, Plumas Co. F. L. 

Jackson, Mrs. Emilie, Principal of Period- 
ical Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Jacobus, Sarah Miranda, Ln. P. L., Po- 
mona. 

Jacoby, Mrs Maude, Custodian, Byron 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

James, Annie A., Asst. Ln. P. L., Nevada 
City. 

Jameson, R. L., Custodian, Dunnigan 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L,. 

Jamme, Louise Eleanore, Ln. Colusa Co. 
F. L., Colusa. 

Jaynes, Elsie M., Asst. Beale Memorial L., 
Bakersfield. 



Jenkins, Belle M., Ln. P. L., Watsonville. 

Jenkins, R. E., Ln. Veterans' Home L., 
Veterans' Home. 

Jenning, J., Keeper of Station, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 

Jennings, Ray H., Custodian, Gardena 
Brancli, Los Angeles P. L. 

Jennings, William, Janitor, P. L., Hollister. 

Jensen, Hilga, Asst. Ln. Washington 
Union High School L., Oleander. 

Jerome, Ethelbert, Asst. Alameda Co. F. 
L., Oakland. 

Joeckel, Carlton B., Ln. P. L., Berkeley. 
(At present on leave of absence with the 
U. S. Army.) 

Johansen, Mrs A., Branch Janitress, San 
Francisco. 

Johnson, Helen C, 2d Asst. P. L., El 
Centro. 

Johnson, Mary Agnes, Asst. P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Johnson, Mrs P. M., Custodian, Manzanar 
Branch, Inyo Co. F. L. 

Johnson, Roxana, Head Cataloger, Los 
Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Johnson, Sofia, Janitress, P. L., Pacific 
Grove. 

Johnstone, Lois Amelia, Reference Ln. San 
Bernardino Co. F. L., San Bernardino. 

JoUyman, Fanny, Custodian, Cupertino 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Jones, Ada Margaret, Ln. High School L., 
San Diego. 

Jones, Anna E., Asst. Ln. P. L., Pacific 
Grove. 

Jones, Catherine, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Jones, Charles Melancthon, Asst. Univer- 
sity of California L., Berkeley. 

Jones, Edward C, Ln. Pacific Coast Gas 
Association L., San Francisco. 

Jones. Eleanor Brodie, Custodian, Holly- 
wood Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Jones, Elizabeth D.. Cataloger, P. L., 
Pasadena. 

Jones, Elizabeth Shelton, Ln. P. L., Pacific 
Grove. 

Jones, H. D., Custodian, Stone Canyon 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Jones, Mrs J., Custodian, Moorland Branch, 
San Joaciuin Co. P. L. 

Jones, Katherine D.. 1st Asst. in Circula- 
tion Dept. P. L., Oakland. 

Jones, Mary L., 1st Asst. Los Angeles Co. 
F. L., Los Angeles. 

Jones, Olive, Evening Asst. P. L., Stock- 
ton. 

Jones, Mrs U. S., Custodian, Caruthers 
Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

Jordan, Grace, Asst. Ln. P. L., Santa Rosa. 

Jorgensen, Mrs J., Custodian, Woodbridge 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Jorgensen, Mrs L. O., Custodian, Fillmore 
Branch, Ventura Co. F. L. 

Juaregui, M. M., Custodian, Del Mar 
Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Katz, Louise Waldman, Cataloger, Lane 
Medical L., San Francisco. 

Keane, Rita, Asst. University High School 
L., Oakland. 

Keating, Kathleen, Asst. P. L., Berkeley. 

Keeler, Emma C, Asst. P. L., Palo Alto. 



298 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNL\ LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Keeney, Mrs Cora A. S., Asst. Ln. P. JL., 

Coronado. 
Kehoe, George P., Watchman at Museum, 

P. L., Oakland. 
Kelsting, Mrs Francis, Janitress, P. L., St. 

Helena. 
Keith, Helen G.; Asst. P. L., Berkeley. 
Keith, Mrs Nellie E., Ln. P. L., South 

Pasadena. 
Keller, E., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Kellogg, Mrs Abigail S., Ln. P. L., San 

Luis Obispo. 
Kelton, Marie, Printer, P. L., Oakland. 
Kemp, Linda A., Asst. P. L., Oakland. 
Kendal, Henry A., Ln. P. L., Eureka. 
Kennedy, Helen Theresa, Principal of 

Branches, Los Angeles P. L. 
Kenney, W. T., Keeper of Station, San 

Francisco P. L. 
Kern, George, Principal, Acting Ln. Union 

High School L., Gridley. 
Kettell, Gertrude Elizabeth, Asst. P. L., 

Santa Ana. 
Keyes, Mary Curtis, Ln. Mt. Diablo Union 

High School L., Concord. 
Keys, Lois E., Reference Ln. P. L., Stock- 
ton. 
Kidd, Gladys M., Stenographer, California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Kiernan, L., Page, P. L., Sacramento. 
Kilbourn, Katharine, Junior Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkele.y. 
King, Herbert, Custodian, Valley View 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Kirkman, Lavina B., Reference Ln. P. L., 

Pomona. 
Kirwin, Kate, Branch Janitress, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 
Kiser, Ruth, Custodian, Freeport Branch, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Kitching, Mrs Ethelene, Asst. P. L., Long 

Beach. 
Klassen, Bernard P., Page, Vernon Branch, 

Los Angeles P. L. 
Kleeberger, May H., Binder, Fresno Co. F. 

L., Fresno. 
Klench, Laura, Ln. San Joaquin Co. Law 

L., Stockton. 
Kneeshaw, Faye T., Principal Asst. San 

Diego Co. P. L., San Diego. 
Knopf, Anita, Stenographer. Sutro Branch, 

California State L.,San Francisco. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Principal Asst. San 

Diego Co. F. L., San Diego. 
Koehler, Cecile B., Custodian, Ord Branch, 

Glenn Co. F. L. 
Kohl, Mrs Anna, Custodian, Orange 

Blossom Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Korf, Mrs Myrtle A., Custodian. Gaviota 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Korpan, John, Janitor, Lane ^Medical L., 

San Francisco. 
Kramling, Alice E., Custodian, Riverbend 

Branch. Kings Co. F. L. 
Kratka, Florence, Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 
Krause, Florence M., Acting Principal of 

Industrial Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Krauth, Mrs Marcella H., Ln. P. L., Ala- 
meda. 
Krebs, Helen, Custodian, Farmington 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Kreyenhagen, Leona M., Ln. Union High 

School L., Hanford. 



Krunich, Milutin, Clerical Asst. University 

of California L., Berkeley. 
Kuntz, Olive, Ln. Union High School L., 

Hayward. 
Kyle. Eleanor, Senior Asst. Los Angeles 

Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Lackmann, E., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Lacombe, George A., Janitor, P. L., Ala- 
meda. 
Ladd, Mrs L. C, Custodian, Lathrop 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Lafferty, John L., Asst. Ln. Veterans' 

Home L., Veterans' Home. 
La Fond, Mrs Bertha, Custodian, Tipton 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Lake, Estelle Daisy, Asst. State Normal 

School L., Los Angeles. 
Lamb, Florence, Bookkeeper, California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Lambert, Mrs Emma, Custodian, Lincoln 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Lambert, Mrs Rebecca Terrill, Asst. Glenn 

Co. F. L., Willows. 
La Motte, Stinson, Custodian, Arlnickle 

Branch, Colusa Co. F. L. 
Landis, Mrs Bertha C, Ln. P. I.,., Lincoln. 
Landon, Betty Katherine, Asst. P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Landram, Lenna L., Children's Ln. Merced 

Co. F. L., Merced. 
Langberg, Mrs Jennie, Janitress, P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Large, Mrs James, Custodian, Moorpark 

Branch, Ventura Co. F. L. 
Larkin, Harry, Page, Camp Kearny L., 

Camp Kearny. 
Larkin, Julia, Book-repairer, P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Larmour, Ivy, Custodian, Branch 3, San 

Jose P. L. 
La Rue. Viva G., Sunday Asst. P. L., 

Hemet. 
Lasley, Marvin, Janitor, P. L., Los Gatos. 
Lassen, Mrs A., Janitress, P. L., Burlin- 

game. 
Lathrop, Helen, Chief of Documents Dept. 

P. L., Oakland. 
Laufenberg, Mrs Edith Ell, A.sst. P. L., 

San Bernardino. 
Laugenour, Nann C, Asst, Yolo Co. F. L.. 

Woodland. 
Laumeister, Ethel, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Lauppe, Mrs C. W., Custodian, Antelope 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Lavin, Pearl G., Ln. P. L., Gilroy. 
Lawrence. George H., Janitor, P. L., Sac- 
ramento. 
Lawrence, Grace M., Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Lawson, Ethel B., Ln. San Benito Co. High 

School L., Hollister. 
Lawson, I. N., Jr., Asst. Camp Kearny L., 

Camp Kearny. 
Lazurus, Francis, Custodian, Warm 

Springs Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Lea, Jessie, Cataloger, Contra Costa Co. 

F. L., Martinez. * 
Leach, W. E., Janitor, Dimond Branch, 

Oakland P. L. 
Leaf, Arnie McPherron, Asst. P. L.. Los 

Angeles. 



vol. 13, no. 3] , REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



299 



Lcanu'd. Aniialicl. Cataloger, San Bei- 
iianlinii ('o. F. L., San Bernardino. 

Leelert, Klsie W., As.st. P. L., Oakland. 

Lee, Mark, Custodian, Alameda Co. Farm 
Adviser Branch, Alameda Co. F. L., 
Hajward. 

Leech. Olive, Pa.?e, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Lefier, Grace, Cataloger, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Legge, Dorothy, Asst. Ln., P. L., San An- 
selino. 

Leighton, Edna, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 

Lemai', Mi-s Adelaide, Russian Translator 
and Cataloger, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Leupp, Harold L., Associate Ln. L^niversity 
of California L., Berkeley. (At present 
on leave of absence with the U. S. 
Army. ) 

Lever, Janette, Asst. A. K. Smilej' P. L., 
Redlands. 

Levitt, Floren, Typist. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Lewis, Anne, Asst. P. L., Santa Monica. 

Lewis, Atherton Cook, Janitor, Trinity Co. 
F. L., Weaver ville. 

Lewis, Herbert Clinton, Page, University 
of California L., Berkeley. 

Lewis, J. T., Custodian, Branch G, Sacra- 
mento Co. F. L. 

Lewis, Leslie E., Custodian, Poplar 
Brand!, Tulaie Co. F. L. 

Lewis, Mary S., Custodian, Campbell 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Libeu, J. J., Custodian, Los Olivos Branch, 
Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 

Lindsley, Luella P., Custodian, Gait 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa 
Barbara Co. F. L. and P. L., Santa 
Barbara. 

Lipscomb, Arthur F. B., Custodian, P. L., 
Porterville. 

Little, Laura, Page, Santa Monica Blvd. 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Littlejohn, Gertrude W., Asst. Cataloger, 
P. L., Berkeley. 

Littlejolm, Lulu Leah, Asst. P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Livingston, Margaret E., 1st Asst. Tehama 
Co. F. L., Red Bluff. 

Lloyd, Mrs B. P., Custodian, Rumsey 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Lockett, Mrs S. H., Custodian, Seeley 
Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 

Longmire, Mrs Clarence L., Custodian, 
Dome Oil Branch, Santa Barbara Co. 
F. L. 

Loprest, Nino, Page, University of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley. 

Louderback, Caroline K., Chief of Circula- 
tion Dept. P. L., Oakland. 

Lougliead, Mrs Natalie, Custodian, Agnew 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Loughrey, Maybelle, Custodian, Darwin 
Brancli, Inyo Co. F. L. 

Love, Mrs J. H., Ln. P. L., Turlock. 

Love, Lydia L., Asst. P. L., Berkeley. 

Loveland, E. Bernice, Asst. LTniversity of 
Soutliern California L., Los Angeles. 

Lowrey, Mrs Margaret, Janitor, P. L., 
Santa Monica. 

Lowry, Annie, In charge of Periodicals 
and Binding, California State L., Sacra- 
mento. 



liUce. Eloise, Asst. Higli School Branch, 
Santa Rosa P. L. 

Lugg, William Henry, Shipping Clerk, 
California State L., Sacramento. 

Luttig, H. J., Custodian, Franklin Branch, 
Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Lynn, Mary Alice, Ln. High School L., 
Modesto. 

Lyons, Emil, Janitor. P. L., Palo Alto. 

Lyons, William Griffith, Asst. Shipping- 
Clerk, California State L., Sacramento. 

Lyser, Alice Irene, Senior Asst. University 
of California L., Berkeley. 

McAdam, Ida, Ln. High School L., Wat- 
sonville. 

McArthur, Mrs Sarah, Substitute, P. L., 
Calistoga. 

McAulay, Malcolm, Janitor, P. L., Ana- 
heim. 

McAulay, M^illiam Beamont, Page, P. L., 
Los Angeles. 

McBain, Wallace, Asst. in Law Dept. Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

McCabe, T., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 

McCafferty, Theresa V., Asst. P. L., San 
Francisco. 

McCall. Mrs J. E., Custodian, Alamo 
Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 

McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno Co. F. L., 
Fresno. 

McCarthy. W. Harold, Page, Camp Kearny 
L., Camp Kearny. 

McClanahan, Homer, Janitor, P. L., Im- 
perial. 

McClaughry. Frances G., Asst. P. L., San 
Francisco. 

McCluhan, Elva, Head of Circulation and 
Branch Depts. P. L., Sacramento. 

McClure, Mary E., Asst. East Oakland 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

McConnell, Francis E., Custodian, Westley 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

McConnell, Mrs Inez G., Division Account- 
ant, P. L., Oakland. 

McCoy, Mary, Custodian, L o r d s b u r g 
Branch, Los Angeles Co. F. L. 

McCracken, Lucile S., Asst. P. L., San 
Francisco. 

McCray, Ella, Asst. San Benito Co. F. L., 
San Benito. 

McCright, Edith, Cataloger, P. L., River- 
side. 

McCullough, Narrola Ruth, Asst. Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

MacDonald, Alice Jane, Custodian, Boyle 
Heights Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

.VIcDonell, Kate I., Ln. P. L., Sonoma. 

McDonnald, Viola A., Custodian, Tracy 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

McDougall, Mrs H. R., Asst. P. L., San 
Francisco. 

McDowell, Mrs Ruth Beard, Asst. Sutro 
Branch, California State L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

McEwen, Mrs M. J., Ln. P. L., Visalia. 

McEwing, Archie, Janitor, P. L., Watson- 
ville. 

McFadden, Jeannette Ellen, Ln. P. L., 
Santa Ana. 

McGhee, Mrs R. C, Custodian, Concepcion 
Branch, Santa Bai'bara Co. F. L. 

McGinnis, Mrs Ethel B. Copland, Cata- 
loger, Tulare Co. F. L., Visalia. 



300 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



McGuire, Frank Joseph, Asst. Ln. San 

Francisco Law L., San Francisco. 
McGurk, Rose, Book-repairer, P. L., San 

Francisco. 
McHugii, Harriette Grace, Page, P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Maciel, Mary E., Custodian, Milpitas 

Brancli, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Mcllvried, Grace Ethel, Asst. P. L., Po- 
mona. 
Mclntire, Persis C, Asst. California State 

L., Sacramento. 
Mclver, Wanda, Custodian, Riverview 

Union High School Branch, San Diego 

Co. F. L. 
Mack, Martha, Custodian, Irvington 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Mackay, R., Page, P. L., San Franci-sco. 
McKee, Mary E., Page, Central Ave. 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Mackenzie, Vivien C, Senior Asst. P. L., 

San Diego. 
McKinley, Mary L., Ln. High School L., 

Santa Monica. 
McKinnon, Lillian, Custodian, Oakland 

College of Medicine Branch, Alameda 

Co. F. L. 
McLaughlin, Mary Ruth, Ass.t. Sutro 

Branch, California State L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
McLean, A. P., Janitor, P. L., Eureka. 
McLellan, Mary Ella, Asst. California 

Academy of Sciences L., San Francisco. 
Macloskey, Florence H., Asst. P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
McMains, Lewis A., Custodian, Keyes 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
McMeekin, Lillian, Asst. Merced Co. F. L., 

Merced. 
McMillan, Adella, Accession Clerk and 

Cataloger, P. L., Pasadena. 
McMillan, Agnes I., 1st Asst. P. L., Al- 

hambra. 
McMillan, James Kenneth, Janitor, P. L., 

San Luis Obispo. 
Macmurdo, Mrs Ellen O.,- Asst. Ln. Beale 

Memorial L., Bakersfield. 
McMurtie, Mrs Alfred, Custodian, Branch 

H, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
MacNair, Rebecca Sharon, Asst. Cataloger, 

Los Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Macnamee, Anna, Children's Ln. P. L., 

Alameda. 
McNeill, Norah, Ln. P. L., Richmond. 
McNiel, Marie, Custodian, Kingsburg 

Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 
McQuone, Mrs Edna, Custodian, EarHmart 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
McRae, Janet, Asst. Imperial Co. F. L., El 

Centre. 
McWilliams, Alice. Asst. P. L., Alhambra. 
Madison, Mrs Elizabeth Syle, Ln. High 

School L., Oakland. 
Magann, Alice, Custodian, North Berkeley 

Branch, Berkeley P. L. 
Mahoney, Margaret P., Asst. P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Maines, Harriett, Ln. Bonita Union High 

School L., Lordsburg. 
Maloney, Marie Elizabeth, Page, P. L., 

San Diego. 
Maltby, Ruth E., Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 



Manhart, Laura Mae, Asst. California 
State L., Sacramento. 

Manker, Mrs F. H., Ln. P. L., Upland. 

Mann, Hattie M., Ln. San Joaquin Co. F. 
L. and P. L., Stockton. 

Manning, Charlotte A., Asst. P. L., San 
Francisco. 

Manning, Grant, Janitor, Humljoldt Co. 
F. L., Eureka. 

Mansfield, Jasper, Custodian, G o r d a 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Mansfield, Walter Damon, Ln. California 
Genealogical Society L., San Francisco. 

Margison, Pearl A., Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 

Margrave, Anne, Senior Asst. P. L., Santa 
Barbara. 

Markham, Hildreth D., Asst. P. L., Pasa- 
dena. 

Marriott, Victor E., Ln. Pomona College 
L., Claremont. 

Marsh, Gertrude, Custodian, Crescent 
Mills Branch, Plumas Co. F. L. 

Martin, Atherton, Asst. P. L., Oakltind. 

Martin, Harriett E., Asst. P. L., Santa 
Monica. 

Martin, Hazelle H., Loan Desk Asst. Stan- 
ford University L., Stanford University. 

Martin, Lenala A., Acting Ln. Lassen Co. 
F. L., Susanville. 

Martin, Nella Jane, Senior Asst. and In- 
structor in Library School, University of 
California L., Berkeley. 

Martin, Susanna, Acting Ln. High School 
L., Lindsay. 

Martin, T., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 

Mary, Deaconess, Resident worker, Mrs 
Margaret Woodhouse Neighborhood L., 
Los Angeles. 

Masengill, Bernice, Asst. P. L., San Luis 
Obispo. 

Mason, Helen, P. L., Riverside. 

Masterson, Beulah, Asst. 23d Ave. Branch, 
Oakland P. L. 

Masterson, Mary, Custodian, Fruitvale 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Mathewson, Mrs Gertrude H., Head, High 
School L., Berkeley. 

Mathis, Frances W., Asst. Cataloger, Los 
Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Mau, Edith C, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 

Maxwell, Minnie, Ln. P. L., Fullerton. 

Mayes, Mrs J. A., Custodian, Keeler 
Brancli, Inyo Co. F. L. 

Mayes, Mrs Laura, Cleaner, Santa Monica 
Blvd. Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Maynard, Glyde, Asst. Ln. Chaffey [Union 
High School] L., Ontario. 

Mead, Mrs Frank, Custodian, Sutterville 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Meador, Bthelyn Faye, Asst. P. L., Han- 
ford. 

Meese, Edwin, Jr., Substitute, P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Mel, Clara F., Cataloger, P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Melogh, Erennio R., Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Meserve, Marjorie Esther, Senior Asst. P. 
L., San Diego. 

Messer, Robert Walcott, Asst. LTniversity 
of California L., Berkeley. 



vol. 13, no. 31 REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



301 



Metcalf, Trueman W., Janitoi-, Madera Co. 
P. L., Madera. 

Meyer, Theodore, Page, P. L., San Diego. 

Mickens, James C, Carpenter and Elec- 
trician, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Middleton, Maude, 1st Asst. Butte Co. F. 
L., Oroville. 

Miles, Mrs H. A., Ln. P. L., Ramona. 

Miles, Sara, Ln. Narcissa Cox "Vanderlip 
F. L., Los Molinos. 

Miller, Mrs A. L., Custodian, Summerland 
Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 

Miller, Mrs D. W., Custodian, Orchard 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. P. L. 

Miller, Edith M., Ln. High School L.. South 
Pasadena. 

Miller, Mrs Etta L., Custodian, Stratford 
Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 

Miller, Guy C, Custodian, Stanford 
Brancli, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Miller, Mrs Lucy M., Asst. Monterey Co. 
F. L., Salinas. 

Millman, Albert H., Janitor and Gardener, 
P. L., Hollywood. 

Mills, Evan C, Asst. Mechanics-Mex'cantile 
L., San Francisco. 

Millsaps, G. W., Custodian, Newville 
Branch, Glenn Co. F. L. 

Minahan, T. E., Custodian, Palk Branch, 
Humboldt Co. P. L. 

Minaker, Mrs Theresa, Custodian, Pitts- 
burg Brancli, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Mineher, Estella P., Custodian, Golden 
Gate Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Miner, J. P., Custodian, San Martin 
Brancli, Santa Clara Co. P. L. 

Minter, Gazelle Prances, Page, Pigueroa 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Minthorn, Ethan Heald, Page, North East 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Mintz, William Henry, Janitor, P. L., Sa- 
linas. 

Mitchell, Robert, Janitor, P. L., National 
City. 

Mitchell, Rose P., Cataloger, P. L.. Berke- 
ley. 

Mitchell, Sydney Bancroft, Acting Asso- 
ciate Ln. and Head of Accessions Dept. 
University of California L., Berkeley. 

Mogean, Marguerite, Ln. High School L., 
San Bernardino. 

Mohn, May, Acting Ln. Union High School 
L., Redondo. 

MoUer, Louise, Branch L. Janitor, Berke- 
ley P. L. 

Monroe, Daisy L., Ln. Union High School 
L., Fallbrook. 

Monroe, Kezzie Appleton, Ln. P. L., On- 
tario. 

Montfort, D. Florence, Asst. California 
State L., Sacramento. 

Montgomery, Rachel W., Ln. P. L., 
Corning. 

Moore, Alice, Custodian, Peters Branch, 
San Joaquin Co. P. L. 

Moore, Mary Isabelle, Asst. Santa Clara 
Co. P. L., San Jose. 

Moore, Ralph, Page, P. L., San Diego. 

Morehouse, Dora, Sunday Asst. P. L., San 
Leandro. 

Morgan, Leona E., Asst. Ln. P. L., Whit- 
tier. 

Morgan, Madeline Burleigh, Ln. P. L., 
Woodland. 



Morgan, Nettie V., Custodian, Piedmont 

Ave. Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Morgan, Susan D., Custodian, Richmond 

Branch, San Francisco P. L. 
Morken, Clara, Custodian, Bay Point 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. P. L. 
Morrill, Louise, Ln. Solano Co. Law L., 

Fairfield. 
Morris, Avis, Custodian, Fair Oaks 

Branch, San Joaquin Co. P. L. 
Morris, Clara, Senior Asst. P. L., Santa 

Barbara. 
Morris, Mrs Margaret, Custodian, El 

Sereno Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Morris, William H., Acting Ln. District 

Court of Appeals L., Los Angeles. 
Morrison, Catharine J., Home Teacher of 

tlie Blind, California State L. 
Morrison, Edith lone, Cataloger and 

Juvenile Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Morrison, Mrs Hattie B., Custodian, Pol- 

som Branch, Sacramento Co. P. L. 
Mors, Mrs E. E., Custodian, Shannon 

Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Morse, Marion, 1st Asst. Kings Co. F. L., 

Hanford. 
Morse, W. H. Jr., Custodian, Pala Branch, 

San Diego Co. P. L. 
Morse, Mrs W. M., Custodian, Orange vale 

Branch, Sacramento Co. P. L. 
Moses. Lillian E., Asst. Ln. San Francisco 

Co. Medical Society L., San Francisco. 
Mosse, Elfie Asenath, Ln. P. L., Santa 

Monica. 
Mott, Susie W., Asst. at Museum, P. L. 

Oakland. 
Mould, Mrs Hattie E., Substitute, P. L., 

Oakland. 
Mowl. Milan A., Janitor, P. L., Stockton. 
Moxley, Mrs, Janitress at Branch, Santa 

Monica P. L. 
Mulheron, Anne M., Principal of Order 

Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Mullin, George A., Secretary, P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Mumm, Beulah, In charge of Library 

School, California State L., Sacramento. 
Mundy, Helen M.. Ln. State Normal Train- 
ing School L., San Jose. 
Munson, Ida Gertrude, Head of Catalog 

Dept. California State L., Sacramento. 
Murch, George E., Page, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Murphy. Mary P., Cataloger, P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Murpliy, Rebecca C, Ln. P. L., Sebastopol. 
Murray, Anita J., Registration Dept. P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Murray, Josephine C, Custodian, Noe 

Valley Branch, San Francisco P. L. 
Myers. Payette S.. Page, University of 

California L., Berkeley. 
My rick, Mrs S.. Custodian, Clayton 

Branch. Contra Costa Co. P. L. 
Nagle, Albert John, Asst. Ln. San Fran- 
cisco Law L., San F'rancisco. 
Naismith, Mary N., Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Nanscawen, Mrs L. V., Custodian, Grimes 

Branch, Colusa Co. P. L. 
Napier, Mildred C, Custodian, Goleta 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. P. L. 
Napier, Mrs Nan, Custodian, Summer 

Home Brancli, San Joaquin Co. P. L. 



302 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Nnrbett, Martha, Asst. Contra Costa Co. 

V. L., Martinez. 
Naselli, Frank, Janitor and Gardener, P. 

L., San Mateo. 
Neales, Mrs Isabel M., 2d Asst. Chaff ey 

[L^nion Higli School] L., Ontario. 
Nelson, Archibald A., Janitor, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Nelson, Bessie E.. Asst. University of Cali- 
fornia L., Berkeley. 
Nelson, Mrs G. G., Custodian, Lakeside 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Nelson, Georgia, Custodian, P o t r e r o 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Nelson, Lynne, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 
Nelson, Ragna, Custodian, Ma.Kwell 

Branch, Colusa Co. F. L. 
Neukom, Norman W., Page, P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Newby, Ethel, Asst. Inyo Co. F. L., Inde- 
' pendence. 
Newcomb, Pearl, In charge of Statistics 

and Registration, San Bernardino Co. 

P. L., San Bernardino. 
Newman, Margaret Elizabeth, Asst. Cata- 

loger, Kern Co. F. L., Bakersfield. 
Newman, Mary, Substitute Janitress and 

Sunday Asst. Elmhuist Branch, Oakland 

P. L. 
Nicholas D. A., Custodian, Mission San 

Jose Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Nichols, Emma N., Custodian, Nlles 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Nichols, Jessie W., Ln. P. L., Mountain 

View. 
Nicol, G. W., In charge, Tuolumne Co. 

Law L., Sonora. 
Nielsen, Mrs Sadie Main, Children's Ln. 

Beale Memorial L., Bakersfield. 
Nisson, Mrs Anna McKindrey, 1st Asst. 

San Pedro Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Nolan, G. J., Special Asst. P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Nolle, Anna J., Ln. P. L., HoUlster. 
Nonhof, Irene Janette, Asst. High School 

L., Corona. 
Norman, Dorothy Laurene, Asst. McHenry 

P. L., Modesto. 
Normile, Mrs George, Custodian, Dyerville 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Norris, Albert, Custodian, Alva r ado 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Norris, J. J., Janitor, P. L., Santa Rosa. 
Norris, James G., Page, Camp Kearny L., 

Camp Kearny. 
Northey, Delia Frances, Asst. Kern Co. 

F. L., Bakersfield. 
*Nye, Lucie C, 1st Asst. City Branch 

Dept. P. L., Oakland. 
Nye, Sybil. Ln. P. L., Mill Valley. 
Nygren, Annie, Custodian, Russell Branch, 

Alameda Co. F. L. 
Obarr, Mrs Hattie, Custodian, Carlotta 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
O'Brien, Beatrice, Page, Exposition Park 

Playground Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
O'Connell, Nora, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Ogden, Mrs George W., 1st Asst. Union 

High School District L., Coalinga. 
Ogden, Mrs Lillian, Custodian, Montpellier 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 



Olscn, Mi-s Jennie, Custodian, Solvang 

Blanch. Santa Bai-bara Co. F. L. 
Ophiils, Louise, Medical Ln. Lane Medical 

L., San Francisco. 
Orendorff, Ida M., Children's Ln. P. L., 

Whittier. 
Orr, Angeline, Asst. Co. Dept. P. L., Stock- 
ton. 
Orr, Katherine, Asst. Ln. and Cataloger, 

P. L., Stockton. 
Osborn, Mrs F. P., Custodian, Fruitridge 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Osborne, Rutli Blagge, Cataloger, P. L., 

Pasadena. 
Osgood, Jack, Shipping Clerk, Kern Co. 

F. L., Bakersfield. 
Osmer, Marion, Custodian, Alma Branch, 

Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Oster, Levi Harvey, Bookkeeper, P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
O' Sullivan, J., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
O'Toole, Rose M., Substitute, Ashby 

Branch, Berkeley P. L. 
Ott, Frederick J.. Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Ott, Susana Clayton, Principal of Refer- 
ence Dept. P. L.. Los Angeles. 
Overstreet, Mrs Emily H., Custodian, 23d 

Ave. Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Owen, Mrs Mamie, Janitor, Union High 

School District L., Coalinga. 
Owens, Robert Clogher, Asst. Ln., San 

Francisco Law L., San Francisco. 
Page, Mrs W. W.. Custodian, Greenfield 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. * 

Palache, Hilda, Asst. Mechanics-Mercantile 

L.. San Francisco. 
Palmer, Flora M., Acting Ln. P. L., 

Orange. (June-August, 191S.) 
Panella, Antoinette, Asst. to Secretary, 

P. L., San Francisco. 
Park, Charles V., Asst. Ln. Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford University. 
Parke, Margaret Adelaide, Mail Clerk, P. 

L., Pomona. 
Parker, Martha P., Custodian, Hawthorne 

Branch, Berkeley P. L. 
Parker, Mrs W. J., Custodian, North Fork 

Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 
Parmelee, Ella Maria, Ln. Dist. L., High- 
land. 
Parrott, Retta, Reference Asst. P. L., Sac- 
ramento. 
Parsons, Mrs J. V., Custodian, Hydesville 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Parsons, Mildred Florence, 1st Asst. and 

Cataloger, A. K. Smiley P. L., Redlands. 
Pasciuale, Rose, Page, Hazard Playground 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Patery, Erna Eloise, Asst. High School L., 

Oakland. 
Patheal, Mrs Mollie, Janitress, Branch 2, 

San Jose P. L. 
Patten, Bagley Worth, Page, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Patterson, Audrey, Custodian, Calipatria 

Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 
Patterson, Emma. Custodian, La Porte 

Brancli, Plumas Co. F. L. 
Patterson, Frances D., Ln. P. L., Palo 

Alto. 
Patton, Elizabeth, Asst. P. L. and Ln. 

High School L., Santa Cruz. 



*Was made Chief, City Branch Dept., July 1, 191S. 



vol. 13, no. 3] REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



303 



Pawling-, Catlieriiie, Acting Ln. Union 

High Seliool L.. Anderson. 
Peabody, Edgar. Custodian, Springville 

Brancli, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Pearce, Myrtle, 1st Asst. P. L., Richmond. 
Pearson, Betli, Custodian, Los Alamos 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Pearson, Lulu Ma\', Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 
Peek, E. Louise, Principal Asst. P. L., San 

Diego. 
Peck, Mrs Mollie, Janitress, Elmhurst 

Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Pederson, C, Branch L. Janitoi', Berkelej^ 

P. L. 
Penfield. Clara M., Asst. P. L., Pasadena. 
Penter, Carlton W., Page, California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Percey, Helen Glad.ys, Asst. Hollywood 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Perine, Mrs L. E., Custodian, Greenyille 

Bi-anch, Plumas Co. F. L. 
Perkins, G. H., Custodian, Holmes Branch, 

Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Pt rriera, Selah, Asst. I'nion High School 

L., Turlock. 
Perrin, Ed A., Janitor, P. L., Oakland. 
Perry, Mrs A. T., Branch Janitress, San 

Francisco P. L. 
Perry, Elizabeth Wadsworth, .\sst. P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Perrj', Everett R., Ln. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Petterson, W., Page. P. L., San Francisco. 
Pettit, Madge Worth, Senior Asst. Los 

Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Pettitt, Mrs T. B., Custodian, Soledad 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Pfeiffer, Paul Henry, Page, P. L., Pomona. 
Phelan, ^Margaret, Cleaner, P. L.. Los An- 
geles. 
Phelps, Alice. Page at two Playground 

Branches, Los Angeles P. L. 
Phelps, Paul Power, Page, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Phillips, Elizabeth M., 1st Asst. State Nor- 
mal School L., Los Angeles. 
Pliillips. Eugenia, Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Phillips, J. C, Custodian, Alder Point 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Phipps, Gertrude Eleanor, Senior Asst. 

L^niversity of California L., Berkeley. 
Pickerill, E. F., Ln. Kings Co. Law L., 

Han ford. 
Pickett, Edith H., Children's Ln. P. L., 

Richmond. 
Pierce, E.sther G., 2d Asst. P. L., Glendale. 
Pierce, G. M., Custodian, San Marcos 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Pinkham, Mrs Charlotte, Custodian, Trini- 
dad Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Pipkin. J. L., Caretaker, P. L., Redwood 

City. 
Plaw. Marie Victoria, 1st Asst. Ventura 

Co. P. L., Ventura. 
Poling, Ruth, Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Polkinghorn, Tessa L., Page, P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
Porter, Mrs C. W., Custodian, Brancli B, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Porter, Mrs Ruby, Ln. Harriet Lee Ham- 
mond F. L., LTpper Lake. 
Porter, William Keyes, Senior Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 
Potter. Mrs F. W., Cataloger, P. L., Oak- 
land. 

3 — 39636 



Potter, Hope L., Ln. High School L., Red- 
lands. 
Potter, Margaret Louise, 1st Asst. and 

Cataloger, McHenry P. L., Modesto. 
Potter, Mrs Opal, Custodian, Stonyford 

Branch, Colusa Co. F. L. 
Powell, Archey A., Janitor, North-East 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Power, Florence, Custodian, Blue Lake 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Powers, Mrs Edith, Custodian, Crockett 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Powers, James P., Janitor, P. L., Yreka. 
Prantz, Charlie, Janitor, Union High 

School District L., Vacaville. 
Pratt, Anne Stokely, Senior Asst. Univer- 
sity of California L., Berkeley. • 
Pratt, Ethel L., Asst. Book-mender in 

Branches, Oakland P. L. 
Pratt, M. B., Book-mender in Branches, 

Oakland P. L. 
Preston, Shirley, Asst. P. L.. Oakland. • 
Price, Mrs Alice, Custodian, Julian 

Branch, San Diego Co. P. L. 
Price, Helen, Ln. LTniveisitj- Higli School 

L., Oakland. 
Priestley, Herbert Ingram. Asst. Curator, 

Bancroft L., L^niversity of California, 

Berkeley. 
Printz, Mrs R. A., Custodian, Simi Branch, 

Ventura Co. F. L. 
Proctor, Bertha D., Ln. P. L., Huntington 

Beach. 
Proctor, Mrs Martha C, Ln. P. L., Los 

Gatos. 
Provines, Cornelia Douglas, Ln. Stanislaus 

Co. F. L., and McHenry P. L., Modesto. 
Provines, Mary Virginia, Asst. California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Prowse, Mrs Estella H., Custodian, 

Knight's Ferry Branch, Stanislaus Co. 

F. L. 
Puckey, Henry, Janitor and caretaker of 

grounds. La Jolla Lilirarj- Association 

L., San Diego. 
Pura, Mrs J. M., Custodian, Mission 

Branch, Monterej' Co. F. L. 
Purcell, Rose Marie, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Purdum, Clara E., Children's Ln. P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Putney, Julia, Custodian, Elk Grove 

Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Pyne, Gertrude S., Asst. P. L., Santa 

Monica. 
Quereau, Mrs Bae B., Senior Asst. P. L., 

San Diego. 
Quire. Joseph H., Legislative Reference 

Ln. California State L., Sacramento. 

I^n. Camp Kearny L., Cainp Kearny, 

since November 22, 1917. 
Rader, Mrs Florence, Custodian, Bayside 

Blanch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Raine, Mrs M. E., Custodian, El Cajon 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Randall, Mrs Effle M., Custodian, Parkfield 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Randall, Ruby, Custodian, Twin Cities 

Colony Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Ransome, Grace G., Asst. P. L., Oakland. 
Rathyen, W., Custodian, Encinitas Braheli, 

San Diego Co. F. L. 
Rawlins, Zaida, Substitute, P. L., Oakland. 



304 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



July, 1918 



Ray, Mrs Anna, Custodian, Thalheim 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Rea, Addie F., Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Rea, Robert, Ln. P. L., San Francisco. 
Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt Co. F. L., 

Eureka. 
Reagan, William, Janitor, P. L., Riverside. 
Reardon, Mrs Rcsa Drummond, Ln. P. L., 

Tulare. 
Rector, Mary A., Asst. Ln. P. L., Lodi. 
Redden, Anne Many, Ln. University of 

Redlands L., Redlands. 
Redwine, Wendell Earle, Asst. Stanford 

L'niversity L., Stanford University. 
Reese, Myrtle I., Cu.stodian, Florin Branch, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Reese, Nannie Mary, Ln. Union High 

School District L., Vacaville. 
Reeves. Hazel, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Regnart, Mrs Ora Marie, Asst. Santa Clara 
. Co. F. L., San Jose. 
RegTJSci, Mrs Martini. Janitress, P. L., 

Sonoma. 



Robinson, Mrs Laura, Janitor. P. L., Tur- 
lock. 

Robison, Thelma Ruth, Asst. P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Robley, Emma, Custodian, Washington 
Branch, Monterej- Co. F. L. 

Robson, Laura, Ln. Glenn Co. P\ L., AVil- 
lows. (At present on leave of absense 
to do war work.) 

Roden, Walter, Custodian. Clnome Branch, 
Glenn Co. F. L. 

Rodgers, Marguerite E., Asst. P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Roeder, J. H., Custodian, Terra Bella 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Rogers, Lillian, Asst. Ln. P. L., Alameda. 

Rogne, Reuel F., Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 

Rooney, Margaret, Page, P. L., Santa Bar- 
bara. 

Rosasco, Genevieve, Asst. Tuolumne Co. 
F. L., Sonora. 

Roscoe, Mrs Ida, Custodian, Upper Mattole 
Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 



Remigins, Sister M., Ln. 

Academy L., Woodland. 
Reusser, Esther, Asst. Ln. 

School L., Chico. 



Holv Rosary ! Rose, James. Page, P. L., San Diego. 

j Rosenblueth, Alfi-ed L., Page, P. U. Los 
State Normal ; Angeles. 

Ross, Constance, As.st. P. L., San Fran- 



Rhine, Mrs Docia E., Asst. Tulare Co. F. Cisco. 

L Visalia. ! Ross, Mrs Elizabeth, Custodian, East Oak- 



Rhodes, Harry, Janitor, P. L., Sierra 

Madre. 
Rich, Samuel. Janitor, P. L., San Diego. 
Richards, John S., Ln. Camp Fremont L., 

Camp Fremont. 
Richardson, Daniel S., Ln. Astronomical 

Society of tlie Pacific L., San Francisco. 
Richaidson, Faith Harrington, Teaeher- 

Ln. L^nion High School L., Santa Paula. 
Richardson. Priscilla Mullins, Asst. P. L., 

O.xnard. 
Ridd, Ferol M.. Page, P. L-, Los Angeles. 
Riddell, Elizabeth C, Custodian, Vermont 

Square Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Righter. Leah Wilson, Ln. Central Union 

High School L., El Centro. 
Riley, Elizabeth Mather, Ln. Spreckels 

Library Association L.. Spreckels. 
Rimmer, Thomas, Janitor and Gardener, 

P. L., Pomona. 
Ripley, Lauren W., Ln. Sacramento Co. F. 

L. and P. L., Sacramento. 
Roberts, Bertha C, Marker and Repairer, 

L'niversity of California L., Berkeley. 
Roberts, E. J., Custodian, Mayfield 

Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Roberts, Howard. Janitor, P. L., Eagle 

Rock. 
Roberts, Laura Ellen, 1st Asst. P. L., 

Glendale. 
Roberts, Myrtle I., Ln's Secretary, Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 
Roberts, Mrs Theora May, Ln. P. L., Fort 

Roberrson, R. D.. Custodian, Farm Ad- 

\iser's Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Robinson, Anna, Custodian, Mount Eden 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Robinson, Bessa, Custodian, Big Pine 

Branch, Inyo Co. F. L. 
Robinson. Florence Elston, Asst. Fresno 

Co. F. L., Fresno. 
Robinson, Mrs Ida B., Custodian, Holtville 

Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 



land Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Ross, Ida May, Asst. Ln. P. L., Alameda. 

Ross, Jean F., Ln. High School L., Sacra- 
mento. 

Ross, John, Page, California State L., 
Sacramento. 

Rossell, Alma, Asst. McHenry P. L., Mo- 
desto. 

Roth, E. Fredrick, Asst. Lane Medical L., 
San Francisco. 

Rouse, Jane, Asst. Ln. Dean Hobbs 
Blanchard Memorial L., Santa Paula. 

Rowell, Clara Merwin, Asst. P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Rowell, Dorothy C, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Rowell, Mrs Eflie, Custodian, Glaus 
Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 

Rowell, Joseph Cummings, Ln. L'niversity 
of California L., Berkeley.* 

Rowland, Helen Marguerite, Asst. Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

Rowley, John, Curator at Museum, P. L., 
Oakland. 

Royce, Lena Merica, Custodian, San Pedro 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Royce, Ruth, Ln. State Normal School L., 
San Jose. 

Ruby, Mrs Don M., Custodian. Boulevard 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Rucker, Howard William, Janitor, Lemoore 
Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 

Ruhl, Myrtle. In charge of Order Dept. 
California State L., Sacramento. 

Rule, Naoni M., Asst. Co. Dept. P. L., 
Stockton. 

Rumsey, Lulu Irene, Ln. California Poly- 
technic School L., San Luis Oliispo. 

Runyon, L. E., Custodian, Venice Hill 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Rusche. Anna-Marie, 2d Asst. State Nor- 
mal School L., Los Angeles. 
Russ, Nellie M., Ln. P. L., Pasadena. 
Ru.ssell. Emily P., A.<^st. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 



vol. 13, no. 3] REGISl-ER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



305 



Russell, George W., Janitor, P. L.. Rich- 
mond. 

Russell, Vera, Custodian, Live Oak 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Ryan, Fannie, Substitute, P. L., Pasadena. 

Ryland, Rosamay, Young People's Loan 
Dept. P. L., Stockton. 

Sackett, Archie R.. Janitor, San Pedro 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Snge, Mrs Mary. Asst. Mechanics-Mercan- 
tile L., San Francisco. 

Sager, Mrs M. C, Custodian, Reedley 
Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

St. George, Frances, Custodian, Tollhouse 
Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

Salcido, J. P., Custodian, Bieber Branch, 
Lassen Co. F. L. 

Sallstrom, Ralph, Janitor, P. L., Glendale. 

Samuels, Charles D., Custodian, Marina 
Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Samuels, Mrs L. G., Keeper of Station, San 
Francisco P. L. 

Santen, Henry. Custodian, Conejo Branch, 
Fi-esno Co. F. L. 

Sarmento, Mrs J. L., Custodian, Gonzales 
Branch. Monterey Co. F. L. 

Saroie, Thomas, Janitor. P. L., Visalia. 

Sassenrath, Mrs Mabel, Ln. Sonoma State 
Home L., Eldridge. 

Satow, Shuigoro, Acting Ln. The Sturge 
L., San Francisco. 

Saunders, Mrs Mary L., Ln. P. L., Lompoc. 

Savefi, Jennie, Janitress, West Oakland 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Sawyer, Anna Laura, Ln. Margaret Car- 
negie L.. Mills College, Oakland. 

Sawyers, Laura A., Ln. P. L.. Chico. 

Saxton, Harriette A., Asst. Pico Heights 
Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 

Scales, Katherine, Childi'en's Ln. P. L., 
Long Beach. 

Scampini, Angelo, Janitor, P. L., South 
San Francisco. 

Scanlon, Madaline Marie. Senior Asst. P. 
L., San Diego. 

Schaufler, Elsie, Order Asst. P. L., Oak- 
land. 

Schautler, Louise A., Custodian, Dimond 
Branch, Oakland P. L. 

Scheck, Alice M., Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Scheuble, Alma Barbara, Cataloger, P. L., 
Los Angeles. 

Scheufler, Laura B., Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Schillinger, Mrs Carrie, Custodian, French 
Camp Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Scholes, Nellie Elizabeth. Ln. State Nor- 
mal School Manual Arts and Home Eco- 
nomics L., Santa Barbara. 

Schroeder, Anna K.. Acting Ln. John 
Swett L'nion High School L., Crockett. 

Schulze, Edith M., Ln. High School and 
Junior College L., Santa Ana. 

Schinnacher. Marion Louise, Asst. Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

Schurtz, Bessie Olof, Asst. Merced Co. F. 
L., Merced. 

Schwimley, Leslie C, Janitor, P. L., Lodi. 

Scott, Frank Theodore, Secretary, Southern 
Pacific R. R. Club L., Dimsmuir. 

Scott, William. Janitor, State Normal 
School L., Los Angeles. 

Sears, Mrs Nellie Christensen, Asst. P. L., 
Long Beach. 



Seaton, Kenneth Carter, Page, California 

Stale L., Sacramento. 
Secord, Mrs -A. R.. Custodian, Parlier 

Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 
Seeley. C. B., Ln. Goodman P. L., Napa. 
Semple, E. J., Page, 'P. L., San Francisco. 
Serl, Mrs G. L., Custodian, Altamount 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Shadle, Blanche L., Asst. California State 

L., Sacramento. 
Shambeau. Mrs J. P., Custodian, Ever- 
green Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Shannon, Monica, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Shapro, R., Keeper of Station, San Fran- 
cisco P. L. 
Sharpe, Mrs Margaret A.. Asst. In charge 

of Deposit Stations, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Shattuck, Leone M., Substitute, P. L., 

Glendale. 
Shelby. Mrs Clara M., Custodian, Valley 

Center Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Shelley, W. L., Asst. Janitor, P. L., Oak- 
land. 
Shields, Mrs S. A., Custodian. Blocksburg 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Shipley, Geraldine, Asst. P. L., Lonsf 

Beach. 
Shreve, Minnie C, Asst. P. L., Oakland. 
Shupe, Benjamin Albert, Janitor, Glenn 

Co. F. L., Willows. 
Shute, Jeannie, 1st Asst. Vernon Branch, 

Los Angeles P. L. 
Sibley, B. E., Custodian, laqua Branch, 

Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Sikes, Thelma Lelia. Asst. P. L.. Upland. 
Silacci, Mrs Mamie, Janitress, P. L., Gil- 

roy. 
Silverthorn, Bessie Babbitt, Ln. Siskiyou 

Co. F. L., Yreka. 
Simmons, Mrs John. Custodian, Oak Grove 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Simons, Mrs M. D., Asst. Santa Clara Co. 

F. L., San Jose. 
Simpson, Florence, Asst. Humboldt Co. 

F. L., Eureka. 
Skinner, Winifred Evel^-n, Ln. High School 

L., Pasadena. 
Sligar, Mrs Emma, Ln. P. L., Gridley. 
Slosson. Mrs Dorothy, Asst. P. L., San 

Francisco. 
Slosson. Glaydice, Asst. P. L.. Monrovia. 
Smart, Mary Ruth, Junior Asst. L'niversity 

of California L.. Berkeley. 
Smelzer. H. H., Custodian, Fallbrook 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
.Smith. A. O.. Asst. Janitor, State Normal 

School L., San Diego. 
Smith, C. R., Janitor, Camp Kearny L., 

Camp Kearny. 
Smith, Catherine Chapin. Ln"s Secretary. 

P. L., San Diego. 
Smith, Chester, Janitor, P. L., Paso 

Robles. 
Smith, Dorothea. Ln. State Normal School 

L., Chico. 
Smith. Earl. Custodian, Brooks Branch 

Yolo Co. F. L. 
Smith, Edwin W., Custodian, Guinda 

Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 
Smith, Evelyn, Asst. P. L., San Francisco. 
Smith, Mrs G. B., Custodian, Willow 

Creek Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
.Smith, Grace A., Asst. Ln. P. L., San 
Mateo. 



306 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Smith, Ida M., Loan Dept. P. L., Stockton. 
Smith, Jacob, Janitor, P. L., Ontario. 
Smith, Lenard J., Janitor, P. L., Roseville. 
Smitli, Lloyd Edwin, Slielf -lister, Cali- 
fornia State L. Sacramento. 
Smith, Margaret, Ln. High School L., 

Santa Clara. 
Smith, Margaret H., Sunday Asst. P. L., 

Corona. 
Smitli, Mr.s Marie, Custodian, Rodeo 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Smith, Mary, Custodian, Del Rey Branch, 

Fresno Co. F. L. 
Smith, Mrs Mary Pierce, Ln. Glenn Co. 

F. L., Willows. 
Smith, Mildred, Asst. Stanford University 

L., Stanford University. 
Smith, Mrs. R. T. W., Ln. P. L., Kelsey- 

ville. 
Smith, Robert Percy, Janitor and Gar- 
dener, Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial 

L., Santa Paula. 
Smith, Stella, Custodian, Saticoy Branch, 

Ventura Co. F. L. 
Smitli, Susan Teegarden, Reference Ln. 

California State L., Sacramento. 
Smitli, Van Tyne, Asst. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Snelson, Noro Edieth, Custodian, Butte 

City Branch, Glenn Co. F. L. 
Snodgrass, Mrs Elizabeth, Custodian, 

Winters Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 
Southwell, Charles D., Carpenter, P. L., 

Los Angeles. 
Southwick, Thomas S., Ln. Masonic Li- 
brary Association L., Los Angeles. 
Spaulding, Inez, Asst. State Normal School 

L., Chico. 
Speece, Elsie May, Senior Asst. P. L., San 

Diego. 
Spencer, Mrs G. A., Custodian, Jamacha 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Spencer, Louisa J., Ln. San Jose Law L., 

San Jose. 
Spencer, Virginia B., Statistician, P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Spilman, Minnie, Chief of Binderj' Dept., 

P. L., Oakland. 
Spining, Frances Halsey, Ln. Throop Col- 
lege of Technology L., Pasadena. 
Spotts, Helen Louise, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Spragins, Mrs Anna Enriglit, Ln. P. L., 

Colton. 
Spring, Mrs M. A.. Custodian, Montecito 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Spruse, Emma George, Senior Asst. P. L., 

San Diego. 
Stager, Freya, As.st. P. L., Los Angeles. 
Staley, Edith, Custodian, Selma Branch, 

Fresno Co. F. L. 
Stapp, Louise R., Custodian, Badger 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Starr, Mrs Mary A., Janitress, Golden 

Gate Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Stauffacher, Marguerite Clara, Cataloger, 

P. L., Glendale. 
Stearns, Mrs Minnie, Ln. P. L., Santa 

Maria. 
Stebtains, Mrs J. W., Custodian, Wood 

Colony Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L, 
Stecher, Mrs T. D., Matron, P. L., San 

Franci-sco. 



Stcdman, Annie B., Custodian, South 
Berkele^' Branch, Berkeley P. L. 

Steel. Evelyn Agnes, Ln. Technical High 
School L., Oakland. 

Steele, Eunice Dean, Ln. P. L., Hanford. 

Steffa, Julia, Ln. Ventura Co. F. L., Ven- 
tura. 

Steiner, John, Janitor, P. L., Auburn. 

Steines, .Mrs William, Custodian, Riverdale 
Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

Stephenson, Mrs Grace, Custodian, La 
Mesa Heights Branch, San Diego Co. 
F. L. 

Sterling, Aaron J., Janitor, P. L., Chico. 

Sterling, Clara I., Executive Secretary, 
Los Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Sternsdorff, Mae, Book-repairer, Cali- 
fornia State L., Sacramento. 

Stetson, Edith O., As.st. P. L., Oakland. 

Stevens, Elizabeth, Asst. Santa Clara Co. 
F. L., San Jose. 

Stewart, Alice C, Custodian, Fair Oaks 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Stickne>', .lefferson, Page, P. L., San 
Diego. 

Stiles, Mildred K., Asst. Ln. P. L., South 
Pasadena. 

Stillman, Minna, Cataloger, Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford University. 

Stillson, Grace E., Typist, Stanford Uni- 
versity L., Stanford University. 

Stockmon, Mina G., Asst. Ln. Goodman 
P. L., Napa. 

Stoddard, Minette Lee, Cataloger and 
Classifier, Merced Co. F. L., Merced. 

Stork, C, Page, P. L., San Francisco. 

Stott, Mrs Margaret, Custodian, Hercules 
Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 

Stow, Minnie E., Branch Custodian, Long 
Beach P. L. 

Stowe, F. G., Custodian, Branch F., Sac- 
ramento Co. P. L. 

Stratton, Hattie, Custodian, Fowler 
Branch, Fresno Co. F. L. 

Straub, Albert R., Custodian, Coyote 
Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 

Streichan. Paul H., Mai'ker, Lane Medical 
L., San Francisco. 

Striening, Mrs Carrie E., Ln. P. L., Sa- 
linas. 

Striening, Dorotliy Miller, In charge of 
School Work, Monterey Co. F. L. 

Strong, Ruth L., Custodian, Seabright and 
Garfield Brtinches, Santa Cruz P. L. 

Strother, Mrs Nancy A., Ln. P. L., Yreka. 

Strother, Nell, 1st Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 
Fresno. 

Sturges, Eleanor J., 1st Asst. Reference 
Dept. P. L., San Francisco. 

Sturges, Myrtle, Custodian, R h o a d s 
Branch, Sacramento Co. F. L. 

Subers, Mary Evelyn, Ln. P. L., Marys- 
ville. 

Suerstedt, Mrs Cecelia Reiter, Asst. Tech- 
nical High School L., Oakland. 

Suggett, Mrs Laura Steffens, Ln. Sutro 
Branch, California State L., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Sullivan, Mrs Florence, Custodian, Goshen 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 

Sutliff, Helen Binninger, Chief Cataloger, 
Stanford Uni\'ersity L., Stanford Uni- 
ver.sity. 



vol. 13, no. O I REGISTER CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



307 



Sweeney-, Luella, Asst. Lane Medical L., 

San Francisco. 
Sweetland. Reginald. Clerical Asst. Uni- 
versity of California L., Berkeley. 
Sweezey, C. G., Janitor, P. L., Orange. 
Swerdfeger, Florence N., Asst. Ln. P. L., 

Anaheim. 
Swisher, Sadie, Stenographer and Junior 

Asst. P. L., Santa Barbara. 
Sykes, Joseph S., Custodian. West Berke- 
ley Branch. Berkeley P. L. 

Taber, Grace May, Cataloger, San Diego 
Co. F. L., San Diego. 

Talbot. Sterling Jolm, Asst. Ln. Camp Fre- 
mont L., Camp Fremont. 

'falmage, Susan, Substitute, P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Tate, ^[rs Alice, Custodian, Lone Pine 
Branch. Inyo Co. F. L. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Custodian, Bayliss 
Branch, Glenn Co. F. L. 

Tayloi-, Mrs Charlotta. Substitute, P. L., 
Turlock. 

Taylor. Elizabeth Haydcn, Asst. P, L., On- 
tario. 

Taylor, Leroy, Asst. Ln. L. of Pacific 
Brancli, Soldiers Home. 

Tiiylor, Marie Elinor, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 

Taylor, Martin, Janitor, P. L., Colton. 

Taylor, Mary E., Classifier, P. L., Los 
Angeles. 

Templeton. Sarah Louise, Ln. P. L., Por- 
terville. 

Terrj', Margarita, Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 

Thacker, Mrs Effle E., Janitress, P. L., 
Mill Valley. 

Thomas. Ellla J., Custodian, New Monterey 
Branch, Monterey P. L. 

Thomas, Mrs J. P., Custodian, Garberville 
Brancli. Mumboldt Co. F. L. 

'■^Thomas. Mabel W., Cliief, City Branch 
Dppt. P. L., Oakland. 

Thomlinson. Mrs I.,. Custodian, Vernalis 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 

Tliompson, Delia. Cataloger, Mechanics- 
Mercantile L., San Francisco. 

Thompson, Laura E., Head of Branches, 
Los Angeles Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 

Thorns, Irene, Substitute, P. L., Alameda. 

Thomson, Anna Jean, Asst. Siskiyou Co. 
F. L., Yreka. 

Thornburg, Florence, Principal of Catalog 
Dept. P. L., Los Angeles. 

Thorndyke, Mrs Theodore, Janitress, P. L., 
Hayward. 

Thorne. Edna E., Asst. High School L., 
Watsonville. 

'I'hresher, Mrs T. A., Custodian, East San 
Uicgo Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 

Ticoulet, L., Elevator Operator, P. L., San 
Francisco. 

Tiffany, Angeline, Asst. Union High School 
District L., Coalinga. 

Tilden, Lily May, Asst. California State 
L., Sacramento. 

Tilly, Mrs M. J., Custodian, Madison 
Branch, Yolo Co. F. L. 

Tinker, Gwendolyn Maude, Cataloger, 
University of Redlands L., Redlands. 

Titus. Mrs Maggie, Custodian, Descanso 
Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 



Tobias, Hazel Naomi, Asst. P. L., Los An- 
geles. 
Todd. Carrie Douglass, Ln. P. L., Auburn. 
Todd, Hannah Lilian, Bindery Asst. Stan- 
ford University L., Stanford University. 
Tomkins, William, Secretarj', Chamber of 

Commerce Directory L., San Diego. 
Tomlinson, Anna Louise, Ln. Whittier 

College L., Whittier. 
Topping, Mrs Harriet M., Custodian, 

Denair Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Townsend, lone, Office Asst. Stanislaus Co. 

F. L., Modesto. 
Townsend, S. Y., Janitor, East Oakland 

Brancli, Oakland P. L. 
Tracy, A.. Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Tracy. George, Custodian, Palm City 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Trapani, Frank, Page, State Normal 

School L., Los Angeles. 
Trathen, Leonard, Page, Alameda Co. F. 

L., Oakland. 
Treichler, Mrs Olive M., Asst. California 

State L., Sacramento. 
Tiibble, Mrs J. G., Cu.stodian, Ulmar 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Trimble, Elise M., Ln. F. L., Orland. 
Trimmingham, Frank, Custodian, Cowell 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Tucker, lone. Children's Ln. P. L., Berke- 
ley. 
Tunison, Faye, Asst. P. L., Long Beach. 
Twaddle, Mrs Bessie Herrman, Ln. Tulare 

Co. F. L., Visalia. 
Tweed, Mary, Sunday Asst. P. L., Upland. 
Tyler, Martha T., Asst. Secretary, P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Tyler, Mignon R., Children's Ln. Vernon 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Tyson, Hazel. Stenograplier, Mechanics- 
Mercantile L., San Francisco. 
Tyson, William, Janitor, Piedmont Ave. 

Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Ulch, Mrs A. E., Custodian, Ceres Branch, 

Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Ulen, Estlier C, Cataloger, P. L., Lo.-i 

Angeles. 
Underwood, John, Janitor, A. K. Smiley 

P. L., Redlands. 
Ursula, Sister, Ln. Ursuline College L., 

Santa Rosa. 
Van Alstine, Mrs C. P. S., Custodian, Del 

Paso Heights Branch, Sacramento Co. 

P. L. 
Van de Carr, Mrs Edith, Custodian, Van 

Nuys Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Vandervoort, Mrs J. E., Custodian. Man- 

teca Branch, San Joaciuin Co. F. L. 
Van Duzee, Edward P., Asst. Ln. Cali- 
fornia Academy of Sciences L., San 

Francisco. 
Van Duzee, Mrs Helen, Asst. California 

Academy of Sciences L.. San Francisco. 
Van Meter. Mrs, Custodian, Lafayette 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Vaus, M^nfield C, Chauffeur, Los Angeles 

Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Vaux, Myrtle, Page, P. L., Los Angeles. 
Veazey. Mildred, Ln. Joint Union High 

Scliool L., Kingsburg. 
V^incent, Mrs Jennie S., Custodian, Lindsay 
Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 



*Was made A.ssistant Librarian, July 1,1918. 



308 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1918 



Vinton. Margaret Eugenia, Custodian, 

University Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Vogleson, Helen E.. 2d Asst. Los Angeles 

Co. F. L., Los Angeles. 
Vogt, Errica. Asst. San Bernardino Co. 

F. L., San Bernardino. 
Voisard, Emma, Custodian, Yolo Branch, 

Yolo Co. F. L. 
Vollwerth, Charles, Janitor, Arroyo Seco 

Branch. Los Angeles P. L. 
Von der Mehden, Hilda, Recorder, "Wil- 

merding School of Industrial Arts L., 

San Francisco. 
Voorhees, Mrs X. C, Custodian, Jamul 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Vosler, Emma, Alba, Office Asst. State 

Commission of Horticulture L., Sacra- 
mento. 
Voss, Alice, Mending Asst. P. L., Santa 

Barbara. 
Wack, Mathilde, Cataloger. University of 

Soutliern California L., Los Angeles. 
Waddell, Nina T., Custodian, La Jolla 

Branch, San Diego P. L. 
Wuechter, Clarence H., Janitor and Page, 

P. L., Hanford. 
Wagner, F. A., Principal, Union High 

School L., Ventura. 
Walker, Abby L., Custodian, Pleasanton 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Walker, Clara, Clerk-Ln. High School L., 

San Fernando. 
Walker. Dorothy, Page, University Branch, 

Los Angeles P. L. 
Walker, George, Page, P. L., Oakland. 
Walker, Mabel, Custodian, Sierra Branch, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
AValker, Veola, Substitute, P. L.. Oakland. 
Wallis, Gladys, Ln. High School L., Chino. 
T\''alsh, L., Page, P. L., San Francisco. 
Walther, Elmer J., Asst. in Law Dept. 

California State L., Sacramento. 
Ware, A. A., Janitor, P. L., Santa Ana. 
Waring, Ruth Ann, Asst. P. L,, Los An- 
geles. 
Warner, Harold, Page, University of Cali- 
fornia L.. Berkeley. 
Warner, M. L., Custodian, Pepperwood 

Branch, Humboldt Co. F. L. 
■\A''arren, Althea H., Ln. P. L.. San Diego. 
Warren, J. W., Custodian, Cutler Branch, 

Tulare Co. F. L. 
Warren, Louise, Custodian. La Mesa 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Warren, Mrs Zaidee M., Custodian, Cor- 
coran Branch, Kings Co. F. L. 
Warwick, Mrs Gertrude H., Substitute, 

P. L., Oakland. 
Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 

Co. F. L. and P. L., Santa Cruz. 
Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 

Co. F. L.. San Bernardino. 
Waters, Leil B.. Asst. Ln. and Cataloger, 

P. L., San Bernardino. 
AVeaver, N. H., Janitor, Santa Clara Co. 

F. L., San Jose. 
Webb. Mrs C. E., Custodian, Orcutt 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Webb, Florence S., Cataloger. Kings Co. 

F. L., Hanford. 
Webli, Marchia Vivian, Ln. P. L., Biggs. 



M^ebb, P. L., Custodian, Wrights Branch, 

Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Weber, Hattie, Ln. F. L., Davis. 
Weber, Static May, Ln. High School L., 

Hollywood. 
Weed, Ida B., Cataloger, P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Weems, Leta M., Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno. 
Weesner, Ethel Kathryn, Book-repairer, 

P. L., Los Angeles. 
Weigall, Mrs M., Custodian, Branch E, 

Sacramento Co. F. L. 
Welch. Frankie, Custodian, Three Rivers 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Welsh, Vi\ H., Asst. Janitor, P. L., Stock- 
ton. 
Wenrich, Mrs Bessie, Custodian, Normal 

Heights Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Wentworth. Mrs Maud, Custodian, Pacheco 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Wenzel, Caroline Ethel, Asst. California 

State L., Sacramento. 
West. Eva, Typist. Stanford University L., 

Sttmford L'niversity. 
West, Lucy Kirkwood, Asst. P. L., Los 

Angeles. 
West, Walter, Janitor, P. L., San Leandro. 
Westlake, Helen, Asst. P. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Westwater, Mrs Jessie, Custodian, Mt. 

Hamilton Branch, Santa Clara Co. F. L. 
Weyand, Ernest, Superior Judge and Act- 
ing Ln. Colusa Co. Law L., Colusa. 
Wlialey, Bruce, Page, P. L., San Diego. 
Whaley, C. Lillian, Senior Asst. P. L., San 

Diego. 
Wheatley. Florence B., Ln. P. L., Sierra 

Madre. 
Wheaton. Florence J., Cataloger, Kern Co. 

F. L.. Bakersfield. 
V.'heelock, Mrs S. A., Custodian, Youngs- 
town Branch, San Joaquin Co. F. L. 
Whelan, Jane, Asst. Ln. P. L., Grass 

Valley. 
Whelan, Katherine M., 1st Asst. P. L., 

Santa Monica. 
Whi.sler, Mrs Lillie, Custodian, San Pablo 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 

Co. F. L., Martinez. 
Wliitbeck, Josephine L., Asst. Solano Co. 

F. L., Fairfield. 
Whitcher, Mrs C. R., Custodian, Castroville 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
White, Mrs A., Branch Janitress, San 

Francisco P. L. 
White. Florence, Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
White, Grace, Asst. Ln., P. L., Burlingame. 
White, Grace Irene, Children's Ln. San 

Pedro Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
White, Grace M., Principal, Sociology Dept. 

P. L., Los Angeles. 
White, J., Chauffeur. P. L., San Francisco. 
WTaite, Jean, Custodian, Thousand Oaks 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
White, Mrs Kate M., Ln. P. L., Lakeport. 
"SAIiite, Louise B., Page, Arroyo Seco 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
White, Mrs Stella G., Asst. Ln. P. L., 

Lompoc. 



vol. 18, no. 31 KEGISTEH CALIFORNIA LIBRARY WORKERS. 



309 



Wk'hiowski, Mrs Thei'ese M., Substitute. 

P. L., Mill Valley. 
Wickes. Florence L.. Asst. L. of the Uni- 
versity of California Medical Scliool, San 
Francisco. 
Wieben, Margaret Elizabeth. Ln. L'nion 

Higli School L., Compton. 
Wienke, Emma, Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., 

Fresno. 
Wier, L. Louise, Ln's. Secretarj-, P. L., 

Pasadena. 
Wightman, Mrs Lillian, Custodian, Oakley 

Branch, Contra Costa Co. F. L. 
T\"ilber, Lawrence, Custodian. Alpine 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Wilcox, Agnes, Children's Ln. P. L., Pasa- 
dena. • 
Wild. Fred, Custodian, Blacks Branch, 

Yolo Co. F. L. 
Wilkins, Edith Amelia. Ln. Union High 

Scliool L., Tomales. 
AVilUinson, H. P.. Custodian, Niland 

Biancli. Imperial Co. F. L. 
Wilkinson, Isabel, Asst. P. L., San Ber- 
nardino. 
Will. W. A., Janitor and Gardener, P. L., 

Huntington Beach. 
Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc Co. F. L. 

and P. L., Alturas. 
Williams, Edith, Custodian. Newman 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
"Williams, Elizabeth, Custodian, Decoto 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Williams, Helen C, Asst. P. L., San Ber- 
nardino. 
Williams, Lillian T., Ln. High Scliool L., 

San Jose. 
Williams, Rlioda. Assst. Central Ave. 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. \ 

Williams. Wayne, Page. P. L., Los An- 
geles. I 
Williamson. Carrie, Custodian. Antioch ! 
Brancli, Contra Costa Co. F. L. I 
Williamson, Emelie L. Custodian, Clare- ' 
mont Branch, Berkeley P. L. I 
Williamson. Mrs H. Elise, Custodian, Con- ' 
cord Brancli, Contra Costa Co. F. L. j 
Williamson, Myrtle S.. Ln. Siskiyou Union i 
High School L., Yreka. ' 
Willson, Janet, Clerical Asst. University of 

California L., Berkeley. 
Wilson. Eloise, Ln. Metaphysical L., San 

Francisco. 
Wilson. Mrs Elsie Mary, Senior Asst. 

Ocean Beach Branch, San Diego P. L. 
Wilson, Mabel S.. Asst. P. L., Orange. 
Wilson, W. J., Substitute Janitor, P. L., 

Oakland. 
Winier, Faye Hazel, Ln. Nazarene Llni- 

versity L.. Pasadena. 
Winchell. Elizabeth, Ln. Union High 

School L.. King City. 
Windcle. Annette. Hea( 

P. L., San Francisco. 
Windele. Elizabeth, Asst 

Cisco. 
Windele, Margaret, Custodian 

Branch. San Francisco P. L. 
Winder, Wade J.. Head Janitor. P. L., Los 
Angeles. 



of Order Dept. 
P. L., San Fran- 
Pa rk 



Windrem, Harriet Holeoml>, Registration 

Clerk, P. L., Pomona. 
Winslow, Mrs Nellie Estelle, Ln. P. L., 

Ferndale. 
Winter, Edna H.. Asst. Lassen Co. F. L., 

Susanville. 
Wise. Bessie, Ln. P. L., San Anselnio. 
Witt, Bessie, Custodian, Salida Branch, 

Stani-slaus Co. F. L. 
Wofford, Mrs Bess, Custodian, Calexico 

Branch, Imperial Co. F. L. 
Wolf, Mrs Anna, Janitress, Fruitvale 

Branch, Oakland P. L. 
Wolf, Jack, Ln. Prison L.. San Quentin. 
Wolfe. W. E., Custodian, Guadalupe 

Branch, Santa Barbara Co. F. L. 
Wood, Mabel Gertrude, Ln. Dean Hobbs 

Blan chard ^lemorial L., Santa Paula. 
Woodman, Annie. Cu-stodian, North Beacli 

Branch, San Francisco P. L. 
^A^oods, Anna, Asst. P. L.. Sacramento. 
Woods. Charles F.. Ln. P. L., San Jose. 
Woods, L. N.. Custodian, Traver Branch, 

Tidare Co. F. L. 
Woods, Lois May, Cataloger, Stanford 

LTni versify L., Stanford University. 
Woods, Ruth, Ln. L'nion High School L., 

Maxwell. 
Woods. Winifred Florence. Ln. P. L., Na- 
tional Cit}-. 
Woodworth, Mrs Clara, Custodian, E.xeter 

Branch, Tulare Co. F. L. 
Woodworth. "SA'inifred Boren, Desk Asst. 

A. K. Smiley P. L., Redlands. 
Wosser. Bertha May, Ln. P. L., Sausalito. 
Wray. George, Janitor, P. L.. Lakeport. 
Wright, Alice, Acting Ln. Union High 

School L., Lodi. 
Wright. Elizabeth, Book-marker. P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Wright. Mrs Elizabeth Cyrus, Ln. P. L., 

Calistoga. 
AA'right. Mrs Nell Poabndy, Asst. Solano 

("(). h\ L., Fairfield. 
"VA'riglit, W. Murray. Custodian. Bostonia 

Branch, San Diego Co. F. L. 
Wrottenberg, Esther, Senior Asst. P. L., 

San Diego. 
Wyche. Mrs Elizabeth, Stenographer, P. 

L., Los Angeles. 
Wylie, James, Janitor, P. L., Heniet. 
Y'ard, Mrs Sydney, Custodian, Carmel 

Branch, Monterey Co. F. L. 
Yates, Mabel, Custodian, Centerville 

Branch, Alameda Co. F. L. 
Y''oung. Mrs A. E., Custodian, Taylorsville 
■ Branch, Plumas Co. F. L. 
Young, Genevieve, Children's Dept. P. L., 

San Francisco. 
Young, Mary Ellen. A.sst. Kern Co. F. L., 

Bakersfleld. 
Young. Robert. Ln. Mills Bldg. Law L., 

San Francisco. 
Yuill, Grayce, Custodian, Shively Branch, 

Humboldt Co. F. L. 
Ziegler, Corrie Valentine, Asst. Cahuenga 

Branch, Los Angeles P. L. 
Zinimer, Mrs EfRe, Custodian, Fairacres 

Branch, Stanislaus Co. F. L. 
Zwarg, Emile, Janitor, Sutter Co. F. L., 
Y'uba City. 



310 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ Julv, 1918 



SUMMARY OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARY WORK 
IN THE UNITED STATES. 

In 1914, the California State Library felt the need of having its 
information concerning the county free libraries of the United States 
brought up to date and verified. Accordingly, the laws of every state 
were searched for any provision they might contain for carrying on 
county free library work. Thi.s material was tabulated under the 
heading "Law:". Quotations from books, reports and magazines 
touching on coiuity library work were collected, and tabulated under 
the heading "Operation:". 

These compilations were then submitted to the library commissions 
or the state libraries of states reported to have county library provisions, 
with a request for verificati(m and amplification. In 1915, the state- 
ments were brought up to date and verified; and in 1918 the students 
of the California State Library School have brought the material up to 
date again, and it lias been submitted to the various states for veri- 
ficatioiL 

Following is the result of the investigation: (This summary does 
not concern itself with individual town libraries which are, in one 
place or another, reported as lending free to the county. Such an 
arrangement is more or less informal, and temporary. Only counties 
where formal or legal arrangements exist are included. If brief, the 
law is quoted. AVhen lengthy, an outline covering points made by law 
is given.) 

California. — Area 158,360 sq. mi. ; pop. 2,377,519 ; counties oS. 

Law: California Statutes 1911, Chap. 68. (First enacted 1909.) 
I. — Establishment by boards of supervisors, by resolutioD, after two 

weeks' publication of intention. (Sec. 2.) 

a. Ilcadquartei's at ( ounty seat. 

b. Municipalities and districts maintaining libraries are not in- 
cluded unless the board of municipal trustees or board of district 
library trustees notifies the supervisors that the municipality or 
the district wishes to be a part. 

c. Municipalities and districts maintaining libraries may contract 
with the county free library for service. 

d. One county may contract with another county for library service. 

e. County librarians must be certified by a. board of library exam- 
iners, composed of state librarian, librarian of the public library 
of the city and county of San Francisco, and the librarian of the 
Los Angeles public library. 

f . Boards of supervisors have power to make rules and regulations 
for conduct of library. 

g. County librarian has power to select books and library equipment 
purchased, to recommend location of branches, and persons to be 
employed and dismissed. 

h. County librarian must attend annual conventions of county libra- 
rians, and take part ; and make annual report to board of super- 
visors and state librarian. 



vol. 13, no. 3] SUMMARY OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARY WORK. 331 

i. Tax not to exceed one mill on the dollar must be levied for sup- 
port of county free library. Municipalities and districts main- 
taining libraries are exempt unless they have become a part. (Pol. 
Code, iSec. 4041, amended 1913, gives supervisors power to sup- 
port the county free library from the general fund.) 

j. County law libraries, district school libraries, and teacher.s' libra- 
ries may contract for service. 

k. County free library may be disestablished by supervisors, by reso- 
lution, after two weeks' publication of intention. 

II. — Instead of establishing a separate county free library, boards 
of supervisors may contract with the board of library trustees of any 
incorporated city or town to provide county free library service. 
(Sec. 16.) 

Operation: Forty-two counties have established a county free 
library — 37* under section 2, and 5 under section 16. For the carrying 
en of their work see "News Notes of California Libraries," latest issue. 

IndiaiKi. — Area 36,350 s(|. mi.; pop. 2,700,876; counties 92. 

Law: (Prior to J 917.) 

I. — Constitution of Indiana. (Adopted 1816.) Art. TX, Sec. 5 — 

Sec. 5. The General Assembly, at the time they lay oft" a new county, 
shall cause at least ten per cent to be reserved out of the proceeds of the 
sale of town lots in the seat of justice of such county, for the use of a 
public librar\' for such county, and at the same session they shall incor- 
porate a library company under such rules and regulations as will best 
secure its permanence and extend its benetits. 

II. — Burns' Annotated Indiana Statutes. Revision of 1914, sees. 
4857-4871, 4901, 4929-4941rt. (Originally enacted Dec, 17, 1816; re- 
vised and re-enacted 1852; and amended from time to time.) 

a. County lilu-ary to !)(• (^stablished and |)rovided for automatically 
with the establishment of a county seat. 

b. Ten per cent of net proceeds of the sale of all lots in town wliere 
county seat is. belonging to county, and 10 per cent of all dona- 
tions made to procure county seat to be reserved as county 
library fund. 

c. Many other provisions to regulate conduct of library. 

Operation: (Prior to 1917.) 

"After the adoption of the constitution, the first general assembly 
of the vstate assembled November 4, 1816, and on December 17 enacted 
a law providing for the organization and incorporation of public library 
associations. These associations were in the nature of private corpo- 
rations for the public benefit. This law, in its essential aspects, was 
re-enacted in 1852. 

"At the same session of the general assembly, on January 2, 1817, 
county libraries were authorized to be established in Pike, Daviess, Jen- 
nings and Sullivan counties, with power to receive the county money 
derived from the sources designated by the constitution. In 1831 the 
general assembly, by a general act approved February 9, authorized 
the incorporation of county libraries, and in addition to the 10 per cent, 
reserved from the .sale of town lots, as provided in the constitution, 

*July 1, 1918. 



312 NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1918 

also provided in addition thereto that 10 per cent of any bonn.s given 
for the location of the county seat should go to such library. This law 
was re-enacted February 17, 1838 . . . 

"The first act, providing for appropriation out of the public fund 
for libraries other than the state library, was passed in 1852, the act 
being approved June 18, 1852. This act provided that a sum not less 
than $20 nor more than .$75 might be appropriated annually out of the 
county treasury for the maintenance of county libraries . . . 

"In- 1899 the general assembly enacted a law providing that whenever 
there is established in a city or town, being the county seat of the county, 
having a population according to the census of 1890 exceeding 19,700 
and less than 20,000, in which there is or may be established a public 
library containing, for the use of the public, more than 3000 volumes, 
the directors or trustees thereof on certain conditions, could turn the 
same over to the common council or board of trustees of such city or 
town and it became the duty of such common council or board of trus- 
tees to levy a tax of not less than four-tenths of a mill on the dollar 
for the maintenance of such library. Upon the dissolution of such 
library association the property of such library should revert to the city 
or town, and that wherever there was established at the county seat 
of any county having a population of 19,700 and not exceeding 20,000 
according to the census of 1890, a public library opened on ecjual terms 
to all inhabitants of such county, the trustees of such county library 
should deposit said library with the trustees of such public library, 
which library should be opened to all the inhabitants of such county 
upon equal terms, and the board of commissioners should thereafter 
appropriate and pay to the trustees of said library annually a sum 
not less than $100." (Judge C. C. Hadley, library legislation in 
Indiana in Indiana Public Librarv Comm. 6th bien. Report, 1908-10, 
pp. 54-5, 58.) 

(The above is given thus fully, since it reports the first county 
library legislation found in the United States.) 

Present law: Stats. 1917, chap. -45. 

I. — Provision is made for the establishment of county libraries in : 

a. Counties in which there is now no public library : 

1. County commissioners may voluntarily levy from one-tenth 
mill to one mill on all taxable property in the county and 
establish a county library. They may be compelled to take 
this action by a petition signed by 25 resident freeholders 
of each township in the county. 

2. The library l)oard consists of two members appointed by the 
commissioners, two members appointed by the county super- 
intendent of schools, and three members appointed by the 
judge of the circuit court. 

b. Counties in which there is one or more public library : 

1. The library board of any public library in a county may file 
notice with the county commissioners that they are willing 
to serve the inhabitants of the country in return for a tax. 
The county commissioners may then levy a tax of one- 
tenth mill to one mill on all propert.y in the county not 
already taxed for library purposes, and shall levy such tax 
on the petition of twenty-five resident freeholders of each 
township not already taxed for library purposes. 



vol. 13, no. 3] SUMMARY OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARY WORK. 313 



II. — The board shall consist of four members additional to the library 
board of the city or town giving the service; two appointed by the 
county commissioners for a term of one year, one of whom shall be a 
woman, and two appointed by the county superintendent of schools for 
a term of two years, one of whom shall l3e a woman. These four mem- 
bers may vote only on the levying and expending of the county tax and 
on matters of library service outside of the city serving the county. 

III. — The county library board shall have the control and disburse- 
ment of all public funds for library use, and all other powers necessary 
to conduct the library. 

IV. — County aid to city libraries : 

If the city board gives to the county commissioners notice of 
willingness to allow their library to be freely used by residents of 
the county on the condition that the county aid in its support, 
the county commissioners upon petition of twenty-five residents 
of each township shall vote a tax of between one-tenth of one 
mill to one mill on the dollar, and turn the same into the city 
library fund, to be continued as long as ten per cent of the county 
inhabitants outside the city use the library, or otherwise at the 
discretion of the county commissioners. 
V. — Combination of city and county libraries: 

If both exist within the county, the city board with the consent 
of the county board may pay to the county fund its income, and 
thereupon the county library board shall maintain the city or 
town library as a I)ranch of the county library. Such library 
shall remain part of the county library as long as ten per cent 
of the inhabitants of the city shall be users of the county liljrary 
through such branch. 
VI. — Each county library board, after the first year of service, cer- 
tifies to the county connnissiouers the rate of tax levy needed between 
five-tenths mill and one mill on the dollar and the county commissioners 
must, under penalty, levy this tax. 
Operation : 

''The county library law which was passed 1\y the recent general 
assembly, went into effect Jul}' 1st. Before September 1st, four counties 
had taken advantage of the law and taken steps to organize their county 
libraries. Switzerland County, through the action of the board of the 
Vevay Public Library and the county commissioners, seems to have the 
distinction of being the first county to make use of the new county 
library law. The public library at Liberty was a close second in per- 
suading its county commissioners to levy a library tax. The other two 
counties to adopt the county system were both counties in which there 
has never been a free public library. Scott County has for some years