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Full text of "News notes of California libraries"

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EDD7 ISfiSMBD 

California State Library 



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;r!5TATrE Library. 

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SHELVE IN 
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California Stat ei Library 



N Ews Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



VOL 22 

NOS. 1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER, 1927 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO, 192 8 

57957 



(Index Supplement) 



Vol. 22, No. 1 JANUARY 1927 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER-SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



IMPORTANT GIFTS TO UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, POMONA COL- 
LEGE AND SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 

RADIO TALKS FROM HUMBOLDT COUNTY FREE AND SAN DIEGO 
PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 

CUSTODIANS' MEETINGS— FRESNO, INYO, MERCED AND SUTTER 
COUNTIES. 

CHAS. S. GREENE NOW LIBRARIAN EMERITUS OF OAKLAND FREE 
LIBRARY. 

ADDITIONS TO BUILDINGS— GLENDALE, PACIFIC GROVE, REDLANDS, 
VALLEJO. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 

CHARLES A. WHITMORE, State Printer 

SACRAMENTO, 1927 



49631 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

LIBRARY EXHIBITS AT COUNTY FAIRS 3 

STATE ADMINISTRATIVE REORGANIZATION 6 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 11 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 12 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 13 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 14 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 44 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 51 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 1 55 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 56 

BOARD OP LIBRARY EXAMINERS 59 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 61 

Staff, Etc. 61 

Departments 62 

Recent Accessions 67 

CAI.IFOENIA State Publications Received During October, November 

AND December, 1926 93 

California City Publications Received During October, November 

AND December, 1926 97 

Books for the Blind Added During October, November and December, 

1926 -_ 98 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the California 
State Library. ; , > , ; [ ; . . ' ; ' 

All communicationd should' be' avidressfcd to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California, ,.,.,.., 

Note. — Standing mattei?' is "seV solid aoid ncv matter leccied. 

Entered as second-claSs'mattet December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
V^alifornia, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
a03, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 




Kern County Free Library Exhibit at County Fair, 1926. 




Interior of Kern County Free Library Booth at County Fair, 1926. 



LIBRARY EXHIBITS AT COUNTY FAIRS. 



Some especially clever ideas wei-e 
used last fall by county librarians in 
their exhibits at county fairs. Pictures 
of three of the most unusual are shown 
here and pictures of several others are 
on file at the State Library, from which 
they may be borrowed. 

Kern County Free Library used the 
idea of the library as "The gateway to 



Inside the fence, the booth had a 
floor covering- of brown burlap and a 
large rug. On the rear wall is the Kern 
County Library map showing- the dis- 
tributing- points in the county. One of 
the glass door book cases contains 
books for boys and girls, the other 
books for adults. There are two library 
tables, numerous chairs, and on the 




Monterey County Free Library "Log" at County Fair, 1926.' 



knowledge." The space was 16 feet 
square. Pacific Board of a soft ecru 
color unpainted was used for three 
walls and the ceiling. The illustration 
shows the fence of white pickets, the 
archwaj' with the county library sign 
above the keystone, "The gateway to 
knowledge" painted on the arch, and 
the effective use of ivy and ferns. 



walls posters calling attention to recent 
books, "Business and technical," "Na- 
ture studies," "Animal life," et cetera. 
On the tables below the posters are the 
books themselves. A rack, containing 
the magazines recommended for chil- 
dren's use, completes the equipment. 

Monterey County Free Library used 
an exhibit of books comprising the 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail., 1927 



latest on home building and interior 
decoration, and the new children's 
books ; but the feature of the booth was 
the "log of the county library," repro- 
duced herewith. The Assistant Farm 
Adviser brought in a real log from the 
woods. The County Librarian and her 
assistants worked out and mounted on 
a circular board a graph representing a 
cross section of a tree with a ring for 



Stanislaus County Free Library used 
for its exhibit a little house 4 by 8 feet 
with a high pitched roof rising about 
14 feet from the ground. The outside 
walls were gaily plastered with bright 
paper book jackets and the roof shingled 
with discarded book covers. It was' set 
off by a lawn within a green fence, with 
bright flowers and sawdust walks. 

Through a window in each wall dis- 




Stanislaus County Free Library Exhibit at County Fair, 1926. 



each year of the library's life, showing 
the growth of the library from the 
beginning, giving the various statistics 
in circular form. The real log was 
placed across the end of a table with 
the graph leaning against it. A large 
magnifying glass was placed conveni- 
ently near. As a matter of fact, the 
glass itself aroused the first interest 
and drew the visitors in to examine 
the exhibit at close range. 



plays of books and other library mate- 
rial could be seen arranged on a floor 
a little below the level of the eyes. The 
groups of books bore such legends as 
'•Big books," "Little books," "Rare old 
books," "Local authors," "Farm books, ' 
"Business books," et cetera. In one 
window was shown a county map with 
branches marked. In another, books for 
the blind. There was no door in the 
house, and there was much speculation 



vol. 22, no. 1] LIBRARY EXHIBITS AT COUNTY FAIRS. 



as to how the books were put in. The 
familiar county library sign identified 
the building as well as a sign over the 
window facing the Plaza. 

The paper book covers were supplied 
through the kindness of several book 
stores, the book covers for the roof by 
a library binder. The house was con- 
structed by the library's substitute jani- 



tor and the decoration was the joint 
work of the members of the library staff. 

For descriptions of other exhibits, set 
Western Journal of Education, Octobei . 
1926, Library News, page 20. 

For other pictures and for information 
about exhibits that can be lent by OTie 
county to another, apply to the Stale 
Library. 



NEWS NOTES O" CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



STATE ADMINISTRATIVE REORGANIZATIOxX. 

Compiled by Law and Legislative Reference Department, California State Library. 

Civil administrative code, (in 



I. LAWS. 

California — (General provisions relating 
to state administrative departments, 
officers and employees.) (in Calif. 
Stats. 1921 :1022 ch. G02 ; Pol. Code 
seo. 348-3590.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of agriculture, (in Calif. 
Stats. 1921 :1036 ch. 606 ; Pol. Code 
sec. 361-361d.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of education, (in Calif. 
Stats. 1921 :1033 ch. 605 ; Pol. Code 
sec. 362-362e.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of finance, (in Calif. 
Stats. 1921 :1027 ch. 603 ; Pol. Code 
sec. 360-3605^; sec. 3606 amd. 1923: 
428 ch. 186; sec. 3606 amd. 1923: 
320 eh. 156.) 

An act . . . relating to the 

California highway commission, (in 
Calif. Stats. 1923:614 ch. 289; Pol. 
Code sec. 365-365c.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of institutions, (in Calif. 
Stats. 1921 :1047 ch. 610 ; Pol. Code 
sec. 366-366e; sec. 366 amd. 1923: 
285 ch. 139.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of labor and industrial 
relations. (in Calif. Stats. 1921: 
1031 ch. 604; Pol. Code sec. 364- 
364d.) 

An act . . . relating to the 

state department of public welfare 
... (in Calif. Stats. 1925:19 ch. 18; 
Pol. Code sec. 2330-2346.) 

An act . . . relating to a 

department of public Avorks. (in 
Calif. Stats. 1921 :1039 ch. 607 ; Pol. 
Code sec. 363-363/i; sec. 363, 363a, 
363e and 3637( amd. 1923:595 ch. 
286.) 

Idaho — An act in relation to the civil ad- 
ministration of the state ... (in 
Idaho Laws 1919:43 ch. 8.) 

Illinois — Civil administrative code. (in 
111. Laws 1917 :2 1919 :7 and 9 1921 : 
335 1925:574, 577, 580, 585, and 
600.) 



Callaghan's 111. Stats. Anno. 1924 2 : 
1659-86 ch. 24fl,- amdts. 1926 sup.: 
126-.34.) 

^Maryland — An act to organize in depart- 
ments the executive and administra- 
tive functions of the state government 
... (in Md. Laws 1922:39 ch. 29.) 

Massachusetts — Act to organize in de- 
partments the executive and adminis- 
trative functions of the common- 
wealth, (in Mass. Acts and Res. 
1919:384 ch. 350.) 

Act establishing the commis- 
sion on administration and finance, 
(in Mass. Acts and Res. 1922:695 
ch. .545.) 

ilichigan — An act ... to create a state 
administrative board ... (in Mich. 
Pub. Acts 1921:5 ch. 2.) 

Minnesota — Act in relation to the organi- 
zation of the state government, (in 
Minn. Laws. 1925:756 ch. 426.) 

Nebraska — Civil administrative code. ( in 
Xeb. Laws 1919:434 ch. 190.) 

New York (state) — . . . Proposed amend- 
ments to . . . the constitution, in 
relation to state officers and depart- 
ments ... (in N. Y. Laws 1925: 
1147.) 

(Acts reorganizing the ad- 
ministrative departments of the state 
government.) (in N. Y. Laws 1926 
chapters 343. 347. 348, 349, 350, 352, 
353, 354, 427, 437, 544, 546, 548, 553, 
584, 606. 614, 619. 646 and 651.) 

Ohio — An act to establish an administra- 
tive code for the state ... (in Ohio 
Laws 1921:105.) 

Pennsylvania — Act providing for and re- 
organizing the conduct of the execu- 
tive and administrative work of the 
commonwealth by the executive de- 
partment thereof and certain existing 
and certain new administrative de- 
partments, boards, commissions, and 
officers, (in Pa. Laws 1923:498 ch. 
274.) 



vol. 22, no. 1] STATE ADMINISTRATIVE REOKGAXIZATION. 



South Dakota — Civil administrative code, 
(in S. D. Laws 1925 :104 eh. 115.) 

Tennessee — Administrative reorganization 
bill, (in Tenn. Pub. Acts 1923 :8 ch. 
7 ; Dept. of education reorganized 
1925:313 ch. 115.) 

Vermont — An act to reorganize the civil 
administration of the state . . . (in 
Yt. Laws 1923:6 no. 7; 1923:18 

no. 8.) 

Washington ( state) — Administrative code 
(in Wa.sh. Laws 1921:12 ch. 7.) 

II. BIBLIOGRAPHIES. 

Edwards. Mrs S. S. Select list of i-efer- 
ences on reorganization of state ad- 
ministration, (in Haines. C. G. 
Movement for the reorganization of 
state administration. 1920.) 

Galbreath, C. B. Bibliography on effi- 
ciency and economy with special ref- 
erence to state government, (in Ohio. 
Gen. assembly. .Joint leg. com. on 
administrative reorganization. Re- 
port . . . Columbus. 1921 p. 648-59.) 
Contains comprehensive list of re- 
ports of investigating committees of 
the various states. 

Greer. Sarah. Bibliography of public ad- 
ministration. N. Y. Natl. inst. of 
pub. adm. 1926. 238 p. 

Holcombe. A. N. and Wells, R. H. xV 
selected list of references for the 
study of state government, (in their 
State government in the United 
States. 2d ed. 192b. p. 60.5-12.) 

Ogg. F. A. and Ray, P. O. References 
[on state administration] (in their 
Introduction to American govei'n- 
ernment. 2d ed. p. 718-19.) 

L'. S. Lib. of Congress. List of refer- 
ences on commission and similar 
forms of government for states. 6 p. 
(Mim.) Je 15 '22. 

List of references on state 

government in the United States (em- 
phasis has been placed on textbooks ) . 
17 p. (Typew.) N 2 '20. 

III. REPORTS OF COMMISSIONS, 
ETC. 

California. Com. on efficiency and eco- 
nomy. Report to Governor William 



D. Stephens and his message to the 
legislature in relation thereto, March 
12. 1919. Sacto. 1919. 105 p. tables. 

Delaware. Legis. Survey com. Report 
and I'ecommeudations. Dec 28 '20. 
95 p. 

Illinois. Legis. efficiency and economy 
eommittee. [Reports dealing with 
various oi'gans of state administra- 
tion. 1914-1915.] 

Indiana. Com. appointed to make a sur- 
vey of boards and commissions. Re- 
port . . . ludpls. Exec, office '2.5. 
.33 p. tables. 

Massachusetts. Gen. court. Report on 
state administration and expenditures 
submitted to the General court by 
the Commission on state administra- 
tion and expenditures. .January. 1922. 
(House no. 800.) 102 p. charts. 
Bos. 1922. 

Appendix to report of 

special commission on state adminis- 
tration and expenditures . . . Feb 
1922. (House no. 1301.) 110 p. 
Bos. 1922. 

Consists of bills embodying the rec- 
ommendations of the commission. 

New Jersey. .Joint legislative stirvey 
com. Reports . . . 1925. 442 p. tables. 

"Sec. 1, reducing the cost of gov- 
ernment ; Sec. 2. a plan of adminis- 
trative reorganization ; Sec. 3, finan- 
cial administration ; Sec. 4, purchasing 
procedure and related matters ; Sec. 
5, institutions and welfare agencies." 

Xew York (state) Gov. The reorganized 
Mtate government, including a sylla- 
bus of the Hughes report, the new 
state departments law with index, 
and provisions for further amend- 
ments : with an introductory state- 
ment by Governor Alfred E. Smith. 
Alb. 1926. chart. 104 p. 

Reconstruction comm. Re 

trenchment com. Report ... to 

(Governor Alfred E. Smith on 

retrenchment and reorganization in 

the state government, Oct 10 1919. X. 

Y. 1919. 419 p. tables charts. 

Very comprehensive and valuable 
report. Part III (p. 233-299) deals 
with administrative consolidation in 
other states. 

State reorganization comm. 

Report, F 26 '26. Alb. 1926. 70 p. 
(Legislative doc. [1926] no. 72.) 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Ohio. Gen. nssembly. .Joint leg. com. on 
administrative reorganization. Re- 
port . . . with survey of state admin- 
istrative agencies. Columbus, 1921. 
666 p. charts bibl. 

"Administrative reorganization in 
other states (than Ohio) ; by C. B. 
Galbreath ;" p. 575-647. "Bibliography 
on efficiency and economy with special 
reference to state government ; by C. 
B. Galbreath;" p. 64S-59. 

Pennsylvania state assn. Reorganization 
of the state government of Pennsyl- 
vania. Phila. [1922] 31 p. 

Virginia. Legis. comm. on simplification 
and economy of state and local gov- 
ernment. Report to the General As- 
sembly of Virginia, Jan 1924. Rich- 
mond, 1924. 233 p. tables. 

"Washington (state). Dept. of efficiency. 
Biennial reports, 1922 — Olympia. 
1922^ 

Note — See also the list of reports 
set forth in Galbreath's bibliography 
noted in Part II above. 

IV. BOOKS AND BULLETINS. 

Crennau. C. H. A survey of state exec- 
utive organization and a plan of i"e- 
organization. Menasha. Wis., 1916. 
.S7 p. (Thesis. Pli.D.. Princeton Univ. 
1!>1G. ) 

Haines. C. G. Movement for the reor- 
ganization of state administration [in 
the various states] (in Texas, Univ. 
Bui. no. 1848. Govt, research, ser. no. 
17. Ag. 25, '18 80 p., bibl., diags. 
Austin, 1918.) 

Holcombe A. N. and Wells, R. H. State 
government in the United States, 2d 
. ed. rev. and enl. N. Y. 1926, 629 p. 
bibl. 

"The State executive." ch. 10, p. 
289-336 ; "State administration," ch. 
11, p. 337-404; "The further reform 
of state government," ch. 16, p. 
523-558. 

Ivimball, Everett. State and municipal 

government in the United States. 

Bos. 1922, 581 p. 

"The state governor," ch. 7, p. 
131—148 ; "State administration," ch. 
8, p. 149-167 ; "Functions of state ad- 
ministration," ch. 9, p. 168-193. 

Mathews. J. M. American state govern- 
ment. N. T. 1924, 660 p., bibl., 
tables, diag. 



Mathews, J. M. Principles of American 
state administration. N. Y. 1917, 534 
p., bibl. 

Mathews, J. M. State administration, 
(in American year book 1918:2.34—6. 
1919:224-6.) 

Mathews, J. M. State administrative re- 
organization, (in American year 
book, 1925:167-9.) 

Maxey, C. C. State government in the 
United States, (in his The problem 
of government. 1925, p. 215-68.) 

Ogg, F. A. and Ray, P. O. State admin- 
istration, (in their Introduction to 
American government. 2d ed. 1925. p. 
701-719.) 

Gives an excellent resume of the 
administrative reorganization situa- 
tion up to 1925. 

Stewart, F. M. The reorganization of 
state administration in Texas, (in 
Texas, Univ. Bui. no. 2507, F 15 '25, 
129 p., bibl., chart. Austin, 1925.) 

Weber, Gustavus A. Organized efforts 
for the improvement of methods of 
administration in the United States. 
N. Y. 1919. 391 p. 

White, L. D. Introduction to the study 

of public administration. N. Y. 1926, 

495 p. 

"The reorganization of administra- 
tion," ch. 8, p. 190-205. 

Willoughby, W. F. The modern move- 
ment for efficiency in the administra- 
tion of public affairs, (in Weber, G. 
A. Organized efforts for the im- 
provement of methods of administra- 
tion in the U. S. p. 3-26. '19. 

V. ARTICLES IN PERIODICALS. 

Barnett, J. D. Reorganization of state 
government in Oregon, (in Am. Pol. 
Sci. Rev. 9:287-93. Ag '15.) 

Barrows, D. P. Reorganization of state 
administration in California. (in 
Calif . L. Rev. 3 :91-102. Ja '15.) 

Bates, F. G. New administrative agen- 
cies, (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 10: 
557-63. Ag '16.) 

Bates, F. G. Reorganization of state ad- 
ministration, (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 
9:317-22. My '15.) 



vol. 22, no. 1] STATE ADMINISTRATIVE REORGANIZATION. 



Bates, F. G. State officers, boards and 
commissions created and abolished in 
1913. (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 8: 
431-G. Ag '14.) 

Beard, C. A. Reconstructing state gov- 
ernment, (in New Republic v. 4 no. 
42 pt 2 p. 1-16. Ag 21, '15.) 

Blachly, F. F. Who should organize state 
administration? (in Southwestern 
Pol. and Soc. Sci. q. 4:95-109. 

S '23.) 

Blue, L. A. Recent tendencies in state 
administration, (in Ann. Am. Acad. 
18:434-45. N '01.) 

Boards and commissions : statement of 
their growth in numbers and expense. 
(in Calif. Taxpayers' J. v. 2 no. 2 p. 
9-13. ,Te '18.) 

Buck. A. E. Administrative consolida- 
tion in state governments, (in Nat. 
Munic. Rev. 8:637-67. N '19.) 

Buck, A. E. Administrative reorganiza- 
tion in Tennessee, (in Nat. Munic. 
Rev. 12:592-600. O '23.) 

Buck, A. E. Recent steps toward admin- 
istrative consolidation in state gov- 
ernments, (in Nat. Munic. Rev. 14: 
672-80. N '25.) 

Childs, R. S. New York state reorganizes, 
(in Nat. Munic. Rev. 15 : 265-9. My 

'26.) 

Coker, F. W. Dogmas of administrative 
reform as exemplified in the recent 
reorganization in Ohio, (in Am. Pol. 
Sci. Rev. 16:399-411. Ag '22.) 

Crawford, F. C. New York State reor- 
ganization, (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 
20:76-9. F '26.) 

Davis, D. AV. How administrative con- 
solidation is working in Idaho, (in 
Nat. Munic. Rev. 8 :615-20. N '19.) 

Davis. D. W. Idaho's new civil admini- 
strative code, (in Governor's confer- 
ence Proceeding.s. 1919:68-77.) 

Dawson. Edgar. The invisible govern- 
ment and administrative efficiency. 
(in Ann. Am. Acad. 64:11-30. Mr 
•16.) 



Debel, N. H. Administrative reorganiza- 
tion in Maryland, (in Am. Pol. Sci. 
Rev. 16:640-7. N '22.) 

Dodd, W. F. Reorganizing state govern- 
ment, (in Ann. Am. Acad. 113: 
161-72. My '24.) 

Dodd, W. F. State administrative reor- 
ganization, (in A B A Jour. 7: 
40G-14. Ag '21.) 

Dodd, W. F. State administrative reor- 
ganization in New York, (in A B A 
Jour. 12:455-7. Jl '26.) 

Douglas, J. R. Research activities of de- 
partments of the state government of 
California in relation to the move- 
ment for reorganization. (in Nat. 
research council bul., v. 2, pt. 5, no. 
13, p. 289-3.34. Je '21.) 

"Everybody's doing if ; a review of some 
overlaps and duplications in the state 
government, (in Calif, taxpayers' J. 
V. 2, no. 3, p. 2-5. O '18.) 

Fairlie, J. A, The executive in the model 
state constitution, (in Nat. Munic. 
Rev. 10:226-32. Ap '21.) 

Fairlie, J. A. Governmental reorganiza- 
tion of Illinois. (in Am. Pol. Sci. 
Rev. 9 :252-7. INIy '15. ) 

Fairlie, J. A. The state governor. ( in 
Mich. L. Rev. 10:370-83, 458-75. 
Mr-Ap '12.) 

Fischer, W. H. Reorganization of the 
[California] state government ; with 
discussion. (in Pac. Munic. 34: 
145-50. Ap ^20.) 

Ford, H. J. The reorganization of state 

government, (in Acad, of Pol. Sci. 

Proc. 3 :78-84. Ja '13.) 
Fox, L. P. Pennsylvania reorganizes. 

(in Nat. Munic. Rev. 12 :.526-8. S 

'23.) 

Gaus, J. M. New problem of administra- 
tion, (in Minn. L. Rev. 8:217-31. 
F '24.) 

The Governor and the efficiency report, 
(in Calif. Taxpayers' J. v. 3 no. 3, 
p. 2-3. Mr '19.) 

Hines, W. D. Our irresponsible state 
governments, (in Atlan. Mon. 115; 
637-47. My '15.) 



10 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



Jan., 1927 



Holcoinbe. A. N. The executive couucil 
with special reference to Massachu- 
setts, (in Am. PoL Sci. Rev. 9: 
304-8. Ag '15.) 

Horack, F. E. Administrative reorgani- 
zation in Iowa. (in Am. PoL Sci. 
Rev. 9:258-63. Ag '15.) 

James, H. G. The reorganization of state 
government, (in Am. PoL Sci. Rev. 
9:294-303. Ag '15.) 

Kelso, R. W. Tunctional public service ; 
how Massachusetts has consolidated 
her state departments, (in Survey v. 
42, pt. 2 :745-6. Ag 23 '19.) 

King, C. L., ed. Competency and economy 
in public expenditures. (in Ann. 
Am. Acad. 113:1-366. My '24.) 

King, C. L. Fiscal and administrative 
reorganization in Penns.ylvania. (in 
Am. PoL Sci. Rev. 17:597-608. N 
'23.) 

Lauchheimer. M. H. Goveriior under the 
constitution, (in Am. L. Rev. 50: 
707-29. S-0 'IG.) 

I.i0wden, F. O. Reorganization in Illinois 
and its results, (in Ann. Am. Acad. 
113:155-61. My '24.) 

Lowden, F. O. Reorganizing the admin- 
istration of a state [Illinois]. (in 
Nat. Munic. Rev. 15:8-13. Ja '26.) 

McKelvie, S. R. Responsible form of gov- 
ernment : a discussion of the civil ad- 
ministrative code, enacted by the 37th 
(1919) session of the Nebraska legis- 
lature, (in Governor's conference 
proceedings 1919:49-67.) 

Mathews, J. M. Administrative reorgani- 
zation in Illinois, (in Nat. Munic. 
Rev. 9:737-56. N '20.) 

Mathews, J. M. The new role of the gov- 
ernor, (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 6:216- 
28. My -12.) 

IMathews, J. M. State administration re- 
organization, (in Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 
16:387-98. Ag '22.) 

^Mathews. J. M. Work of efficiency and 
economy commissions, (in Am. Pol. 
Sci. Rev. 12:510-14. Ag '18.) 

Mower, E. C. Administrative reorgani- 
zation in Vermont. (in Am. Pol. 
ScL Rev. 18:96-102. F '24.) 

New York state bar assn. Report of com- 
mittee to make suggestions for the 
elimination of certain unnecessary 



administrative duties of the governor, 
(in N. Y. St. B. A. 1922:217-20.) 

O'Neil. Emmet. Reorganizing the state 
governments, (in Const. Rev. 2:199- 
212. O '18.) 

O'Neil, Emmet. Strengthening the power 
of the executive. (in Va. L. Rev. 
5:157-77. D '17.) 

Pollock, J. K. jr. Four years under the 
Ohio reorganization code, (in Nat. 
Munic. Rev. 14:554-64. S '25.) 

Reorganization of state government in 
California, (in Calif. Taxpayers' J. 
V. 3, no. 1, p. 1-39. Ja '19.) 

Ritchie, A. C. Reorganization of the 
state government of Maryland, (in 
Governors' conference proceedings 
1922:101-17.) 

Robinson. AV. A. The efficiency problem 
in state government. ( in A B A 
Jour. 11:787-9. D '25.) 

Senning. J. P. State administrative re- 
organization in Idaho and Nebraska, 
(in Am. PoL Sci. Rev. 13:634-40. 
N '19.) 

Stewart, F. M. The movement for the 
reorganization of state administra- 
tion in Texas. ( in Soutliwestern PoL 
and Soc. Sci. Q. 5:230-45. D "24.) 

Tax association plan of state reorganiza- 
tion, (in Calif. Taxpayers" J. v. 3, 
no. 3, p. 3-6. Mr '19.) 

Thomas, D. Y. Proposed plan for admin- 
istrative reorganization in Arkansas. 
( in Southwestern Pol. Sci. Q. 2 :40- 
50. Je '21.) 

Tucker. R. H. Virginia proposes simpli- 
fication and economy in government, 
(in Nat. Munic. Rev. 14:686-91. 
N •25.) 

Williams. Bruce. Reorganization of state 
administration, (in Va. L. Rev. 
8:409-25. Ap '22.) 

Young. J. S. Administrative reorganiza- 
tion in Iowa, (in Am. Pol. ScL Rev. 
9 :273-86. Ag '15. ) 

Young, J. S. Reorganization of adminis- 
trative branch of Minnesota govern- 
ment, (in Am. PoL Sci. Rev. 20: 
69-76. F '26.) 

Young, J. S. Reorganization of the ad- 
ministrative branch of the Minnesota 
government, (in Minn. L. Rev. 10: 
40-7, D '25.) 



vol. 22, no. 1] MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



11 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 




.DEL nokte; > ^ \ S 

SISKIYOU I MODOC 



,' SHASTA I 
TB.N.TY/ ^S^^ 



_J ' TEHAMA A '- 

_ .' I PLUMAS ^ 

^ GLENN! BUTTE^\/''-' *- 

•' ^-) ^, SIERW 

^ .- -\ YOLO ")>■*- - '' ^'- DO^^OO 









-„, -i *'^ I -./ _^ ,s^j MONO 

-fcNV- PRESNO ,.^ — 1 INYO 

"a_+1_ ; j._ 



i — ./ ^^ I 



. , B«1lA BARBAHA 



SAN BERNARDINO 



Jreimiiw, 



>,U)SANea£5! 



33* N. _ 
i-trr. Om-fttnn, SC. 



12 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail., 1927 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1926. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income 
1925-261 


Books, 
etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county^ 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sect. 26. 1910 


S53.689 52 
5;663 12 
18,241 70 
10,970 08 
55.^21 63 

150,040 56 
15.311 44 
27,728 85 
17,701 73 
9,316 30 
93,711 21 
26.977 34 
13,075 94 

300.897 41 
21,746 14 


126,651 

17,372 

68,112 

a46,877 

157,979 

393,417 

48,321 

99,100 

59,328 

28,496 

252,834 

114,794 

41,791 

536,698 

73,052 


91 
39 
88 
48 
98 

260 
61 

152 
79 
45 

196 
57 
76 

314 
70 


49 
31 
65 
33 
64 

172 
43 

111 
58 
31 

104 
39 
36 

159 
50 


38 


Amador 

Butte 


Bertha S. Taylor 

Blanche Chalfant 

Ella Packer 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck .. 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 

Ida M. Reagan 

Evalyn Boman 

Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock . . - 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Yogleson 

Blanche Galloway 


June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
Julv 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sect. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 4 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 5 
May 3 
Aug. 3 
Oct. 4 
June 6 
July 8 
Aug. 6 
Feb. 9 
Dec. 9 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 8 
Oct. 1 
Feb. 4 
July 14 
April 5 


1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 


26 

57 


Colusa 

Contra Costa 

Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 


29 
58 

152 
38 

101 
52 
29 


Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Marin' 


101 
38 
34 

117 
50 
















Merced 

Modoc 

Monterey.-- 


Minette L. Stoddard 

Anna L. Williams 

Anne Hadden 

Estella DeFord 

Margaret Li\-ingston 

Edith Gantt 

Chas. F. Woods 

Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters 

Eleanor Hitt 

- - - -. 


36,020 30 
3,989 73 
20,268 67 
11,212 06 

25.955 10 
10,323 16 

15.956 63 
40,326 66 

9.504 99 
37,722 13 
37,109 86 


114,448 
13,983 
83.640 
26,061 
66,436 
38,271 

72,206 
33,470 
98,296 
95.132 


82 
36 

140 
77 
63 
79 
80 

110 
76 

136 

145 


73 
44 
97 
48 
57 
29 
78 
83 
37 
73 
118 


64 
30 
88 
46 


Orange 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino - 

San Diego 

San Francisco' 


37 
29 
45 
64 
37 
61 
103 


San Joaquin 

S?n Luis Obis DO - 
Ssn Mateo---"--. 
Santa Barbara -. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Sierra 6 _ 


IdaE. Condit 

Flo A. Gantz 

Edna^Holroyd--- 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary - 
Minerva H. Waterman-.- 


Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 2 
June 7 
April 6 
Aug. 14 
Mav 9 
Aui. 8 
Sent. 8 
June 10 
July 3 
-Ipfil 9 
Julv 12 


1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 


32,076 68 
15,369 42 
21,974 03 
24,050 86 
28,276 51 
8,892 02 


6 
45,713 
a37,545 


112,461 




136 
96 
64 

106 
95 
87 


94 
93 
42 
68 
82 
54 


76 
82 
27 
58 
74 
52 


Siskiyou 

Solano 

Stanislaus 

Satter 


EllenB. Frink 

Clara B. Dills 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M. Burket 

Anne Bel! Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Muriel Wright 

Elizabeth P^. Topping 


18,473 73 
23,442 14 
2B,684 93 
14.6.34 44 
11,192 62 

5.038 43 
54.915 32 

9,374 23 
28,989 07 
30,099 69 


77,671 
71,987 
87,715 
38,929 
41, .528 
15,683 
121,285 
25.091 
77,103 
88,052 


156 
66 
71 

42 
87 
' 58 
127 
53 
93 
76 


92 
49 
68 
35 
54 
28 
131 
28 
55 
47 


89 
48 
45 
34 


Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


50 
28 
83 
25 
54 
45 










46 _. 




Ol.'0S-O4.'2fi 


11,422,366 38 


a3,547.528 


4.111 


2,802 


2.394 













' Th° income as given does not include balance in fund July 1 , 1925. 
- Includes elementary and high. 

s Muriel Wright was appointed librarian for Marin County early in January. The work will start soon. 
' Conducted by Merced County by contract according to Sjc. 5. County Free Library Law. 
= San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore coveres the entire count}'. For statis- 
tics see under "Public Libraries. Etc." next page. 

■Conducted by Plumas County by contract according to Sec. 5 County Free Library Law. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



PUBLIC LIBRxVRIES. 



13 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

El Centre 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino- 

San Diego 

San Francisco -_ 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica -- 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



Librarian 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth . 

Marian P. Greene 

Carleton B. Joeckel 

Agnes F. Ferris 

Mrs Alma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. K iser 

Ethel Carroll 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeannette M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F.Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden.. 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman... 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



Established 



1877 

1803 
1907 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 



'1896 
1882 



1907 
1879 
1857 



1874 



1886 
1869 



as F P 1879 

1906 

as F P 1895 
as F P 1909 
as F P 1907 
as FP 1601 
as F P 1891 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1878 

1906 

asFP If 02 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1902 
as F P 1894 
as F P 1909 
as FP 1907 
as F P 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as F P 1880 

1891 

1882 

as F P 1881 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1884 
as F P 1895 

1880 
as F P 1884 

1900 



Income 1925-26 



Books, etc. 



545,215 38 


28,192 21 


147,251 22 


15,362 86 


37,555 48 


91,963 73 


1,098,741 39 


15,038 35 


188,702 92 


8,512 66 


17,636 91 


107,106 42 


29,538 44 


27,752 77 


48,037 05 


41,659 29 


20,000 00 


111.171 14 


284,865 68 


20,231 33 


26,961 25 


115.582 60 


17,373 53 


25.f>45 70 


*8.756 41 


13,808 50 


57.535 .38 


15,389 88 


26,051 19 



75,402 
28,471 

122,785 
24,272 
39,361 
96,119 

776,877 
28,631 

318,115 
30.127 
21,875 

115,931 
82,288 
70,890 
76,766 

118,005 

117,501 
30,335 

153,032 

367,381 
30,791 
44,566 
92,682 
63,173 
46,161 
32.050 
26,966 

195.582 
24,732 
20,035 



Card- 
holders 



24,456 

13,515 

26,163 

3,050 

26,187 

43 029 

231,799 

8.464 

60,373 

4.008 

7,.- 06 

52,865 

10.715 

6,933 

9,538 

8,605 

20,586 

12,685 

09,942 

101,356 

11,452 

9,825 

19,079 

5,255 



9,223 



10.737 
6.411 
5,766 



*E!even months only. 

Note. — For public libraries of less than 20,000 books, etc. 
number of News Notes of California Libraries, October, 1926. 



■see Annual Statistics 



14 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., mil 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those Cjiliforuia librtu"ies are listed for which there were news items, 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1926. 



For 



CALIFORNIA. 

Ai-ea, 1.58,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,.336. 

Assessed valuation, $7,164,457,974. 

Xnmlier of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland, 
.^rea. 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,]27. 
Assessed valuation. $4.33.045.954 (tax- 
able for county $377,743,838) . 

Alaiieda Co. Free Library, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

The first of October the two Salt Works, 
the Continental and the California, were 
consolidnted under the name of the Cali- 
fornia Salt Works. The branch library 
at the Continental was moved to the 
plant of the ■ California and incorporated 
into the branch library there. On 
November first, the Redwood Branch of 
the county library was closed and the 
books lirought iu to the main office. 
This was a temporary branch established 
for the benefit of the men working on 
the dam in Redwood Canyon. This con- 
struction work was finished the end of 
October and the camp abandoned. 

Miss Mary Barmby, county librarian, 
returned in November from her trip east. 
Miss Rarmby attended the A. L. A. 
meeting, visited the southern states and 
returned by way of the Panama Canal. 
Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Carleton B. .Joeckel, Lib'n. 

The following changes have occurred 
in the personnel of the Board of Librai\v 
T)-ustees of the Berkeley Pid^lic Library : 
INIrs .James B. Hume, who has been a 
member of the Board for several years, 
has been appointed President of the 
Board to succeed the late Mr II. D. 
Irwin, and Mr Edward N. Anient has 
been appointed a member of the Board. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

Miss Lois Newman, .Junior Assistanr. 
who has been on a leave of absence for 
the past six months, returned to active 
seiwice on .January 1, 1927. 

An exchange of assistants between th.^ 
Library of Hawaii and this library has 
been effected, by means of which ^liss 
I-Jelena Critzer, Senior Assistant in 
charge of circulation, has gone to tlie 
Library of Hawaii for six months, and 
Miss Alice Burnham. Chief of the cir- 
culation department of the Library of 
Hawaii, has come to the Berkeley I'ub- 
lic Library for a similar period. 

Seven students from the School of Jji- 
brarianship of the University of Cali- 
fornia are doing practice work in this 
library during the holiday season. 

Children's Book Week was observed in 
the usual manner in November, 192(5. 
The interest shown by the general pub- 
lic seemed to be unusually great, and a 
total of 550 adults visited the exhibits 
of children's books held in the Children's 
Room. 

C. B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

*Anna Head School Library. Miss 
Mary Elizabeth Wilson, Prin. 

In September we were given the li- 
brary of Miss Adeline Mills, who died in 
Europe last year. It contained many 
volumes of unusual interest and many 
beautiful bindings. It numbers in al! 
about three hundred and fifty volumes. 
Miss Mills was a student of our school 
many years ago and we value the gift 
very highly. She was a daughter of 
Edgar Mills, one of the pioneers of our 
state. 

Mary E. Wilson. Prin. 

iJUxiVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. 

W. W. Campbell, Pres, .J. C. Rowell, 
Ijib'n Emeritus ; Harold Tj. Leupp, Jjib'n. 

The following changes have taken place 
in the staff of the University of California 
Library since October 1, 1926 : 



vol. 22, no. 1 



CALIFORNIA LIBRAKIEfci, 



ALAMEDA COU NTY.--Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

Ji('.si(/)i.<(l : (jertnido K. Phipps, Anita 
M. (*ii'lliii, iNIrs lUnilHli L. Kenyon. 

Ai)i)i>iiiinicnf>i : Emma Elizahetli Steph- 
enson. Rose M. Rotchy. 

The contract Inis been let for tlie 
erection of a new l>lock of stack in the 
library building to the Hine Desk and 
Furniture Company of Denver. Colorado. 
Work is to begin promptly. 

Harold L. Leupp, Lib'n. 

A .?100,00U private library, consisting of 
]."),()(J1) volumes, has been presented to the 
Tniversity of California by Mrs Alexan- 
der F. MoiTison, a graduate of the uni- 
versity, in memory of her husband, attor- 
ney and graduate of the university. The 
gift will take the form of a reading 
room, established in the Doe Libi'ary, to 
which all students will have access. Be- 
sides the gift of books, Mrs Morrison w^ill 
fi rnish the reading room. She has also 
set aside .$(iOO a year for the upkeep of the 
room and a similar sum for the purchase 
of additional books. The library contains 
books on nearly every subject. — Berkeley 
(Idzetie, O l.j 

University' of California, Law Li- 
brary. Rosamond Parma, Lib'n. 

Dr Rosamond Parma, librarian of Uni- 
versity of California Law Library and 
lecti'.rer in legal bibliography, has been 
elected to the executive committee of the 
American Association of Law Libraries. 
— Oakland Pofit E)iquire'i% D 4 

Oakland. 

JOakland Free [Public] Library. 

On December 31st Mr Charles S. 
Greene, for twenty-seven and a half years 
librarian of the Oakland Free Library, 
retired from the service on a half-pay 
pension. At a meeting of the Board of 
Library Directors on December 27th he 
was invested with the honorary title of 
librarian Emeritus. The staff held a 
reception in his honor on December 28th, 
to which were invited only former mem- 
bers of the staff and Library Board. The 
December number of the "Staff Bulletin" 
is dedicated to him, and expresses in many 
ways the aifection of his staff and our sor- 
row at the time of parting. Mr r4reene 
will reside in Berkeley. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 

.John Boynton Kaiser, librarian of the 
Uni\ersity of Iowa, and for ten years 
librarian of the Tacoma I'nblic Library, 
was appointed librarian at the meeting of 
the Beard of Library Directors held on 
December 27th, the appointment to take 
effect on February 1st. At the same 
meeting the salary of the librarian was 
increased to .$(),000 per year. Mr Kaiser 
has been prominent in legislative reference 
work, and is the author of the book, "Law, 
legislative and municipal reference libra- 
ries," published in 1014. 

The annual election of the Staff Associ- 
ation was held in December, and the fol- 
owing officers were chosen : 

Executive Committee : President — Miss 
Jeannette Anderson. 

Chief of Department — Miss Lucie Nye. 

Branch Representative — Miss Emma 
Davies. 

Assistant Representative — Mrs Adah 
Chidlaw. 

Substitute Representative — Mrs Laura 
Barkley. 

First Assistant — Miss Edith Hibberd. 

Book Mender — Miss Minnie Spilman. 

^Iabel W. Thomas, xissistant Lib'n. 

San Leandro. 

San Leandro Free Public Library 
AND Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. ]Miss Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

During Children's Book Week selected 
lists of books, attractively printed, were 
distributed to the children in the three 
grammar schools. The re.sult was an 
overwhelming demand that was very 
gratifying. 

The usual "Story Hour" was held dur- 
ing the fall mouths with an average 
attendance of thirty children. 

Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
As.sessed valuation .$899,722 (taxable 
for county .$723,086). 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1027 



AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, oG8 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,706,677 (taxable 
for county .$6,665,048) . 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Bertha S. Taylor, Lib'n. 

The Sutter Creek Branch has been 
moved from the upstairs room in the 
Galino building to a larger and well 
lighted ground floor room in the Tucker 
building. 

Bertha S. Taylor, Lib'n. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 

County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,321,472 (tax- 
able for county $36,499,275). 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty- ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 0183. 
Assessed valuation $8,898,065 (taxable 
for county $7,047,649). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,109,925 (tax- 
able for county $22,419,565). 

Colusa. 

Coi.usA Free Public Library and 
Branch, Colusa Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Nancy Hail Jordan, Lib'n. 

Miss Belle Crane, who was city li- 
brarian here for twenty-five years, passed 
away in December after an illness of a 
year. Mrs Nancy Hail Jordan has been 
appointed librarian in her place. 

Mrs Nancy Hail Jordan, Lib'n. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $103,040,954 (tax- 
able for county $90,438,530). 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 
Richmond. 

Richmond [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Norah McNeill, Lib'n. 

Construction of the new library build- 
ing in the Stege district has been started 
by P. M. Sanford, Richmond contractor. 
The building will be owned by Sanford 
and leased for library purposes. The 
building permit shows that the cost will 
be $1.500. — San Francisco Chronicle, O 7 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,303,575 (tax- 
able for county $10,220,875). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,073,804 (tax- 
able for county $10,402,480). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
Count.v seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $190,657,868 (tax- 
able for county $160,558,333). 

SFresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. .McCardle, Lib'n. 

The work of the School Department 
has been carried on this year in a 
slightly different manner than in the 
past. The usual custom of buying texts 
for the schools belonging to the county 
library during the summer vacation to 
be ready for the fall term was not fol- 
lowed out. Instead the buying was 
deferred until after the institutes which 
were held throughout the county the last 
week of September. 

These institutes were planned by the 
County Superintendent of Schools and 
members of his ofiice. The County Li- 
brarian and Head of the School Depart- 
ment were invited to attend these meet- 
ings in order to confer and advise with 
the teachers at that time. Each Supervisor 
from the county office outlined his work 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



17 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

for the coming- year making it clear to 
the teachers the texts to be used by the 
pupils and those to be in the hands- of 
the teachers. 

The three assistant Superiutendeuts of 
the county office are carrying on experi- 
ments in their respective districts with 
three different methods in silent reading. 
After visiting the schools and ascer- 
taining the method best adapted to a par- 
ticular school a list of books desired for 
their use is give to the county library. 
These books are then purchased and sent 
to the school. Purchase of books- has 
been on request only, this year. 

The annual Custodians' Meeting was 
held on October 27th. The morning ses- 
sion was held at the main library and 
was taken up with several talks by mem- 
bers of the staff, one on adult education 
and one on the use of the reference books 
which are to be found in even the small- 
est branch. Luncheon was served in one 
of the private dining rooms at the Blue 
Lantern, with fifty at the table. After 
luncheon the meeting was continued in 
one of the other rooms in the Y. W. C. A. 
building. The opening number was a 
resume of the most worthwhile books of 
the year by Mrs W. P. Miller. This 
was followed bj' a talk by one of the 
custodians on her work with her com- 
munity and one on children's books by 
Miss Hurlbut, Children's Librarian. 

A number of the branches have been 
undergoing repairs and general freshen- 
ing up. Among- these are the Sanger and 
Clovis buildings, both of which were 
closed for some time while the work was 
done. The building at Selma has been 
condemned and the Cit.v Trustees and 
Board of Supervisors are looking to hav- 
ing the old building torn down and build- 
ing a new one. The Mexican Mission 
branch has been closed, the building 
being wrecked to make room for another. 
For the present we will have no branch 
in that quarter. 

Sarah E. McCarple, Lib'n. 



FRESNO CO. — Continued. 
Easton. 

Washington Union High School 
Library. L. P. Linn, Piin. 

Seven students assist in the library dur- 
ing the day and the plan of having this 
help, though not entirely satisfactory, is 
the only way we can manage when we 
have no librarian who devotes all her 
time to it. 

We have some fine new covers for our 
magazines, which will help to keep them 
with a presentable appearance. 

Mrs Mary Edwards. 

GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
Count.y seat. Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,612,998 (tax- 
able for county .$23,489,071). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was obsen'ed in 
Glenn County by special exhibits of new 
books for children in the Branch Libraries 
and the Central Office. Mrs Martha .J. 
Coleman Heffner of Chico, formerly on 
the staff of the library, spent the week in 
the county. Story hours were held in 
the Orland and Bayliss Branch Libraries 
and in a number of the schools. The 
children all over the county were delighted 
with Mrs Heffner and her stories. 

Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat. Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation .$56,617,925 (tax- 
able for county $51,999,240) . 

Humboldt Co. Free Library, Eureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

In observance of Children's Book Week, 
which is being observed nationally from 
Nov. 7 to Nov. 14, Miss Ida M. Reagan, 
under the auspices of the Humboldt 
County Free Librar,y, will deliver a series 
of talks over the air via KFWH at 7.30 
p.m. on Nov. 9, 10, 11 and 12. The first 



2—49631 



18 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



HUMBOLDT CO.— Continued. 

talk will I»e explanatory of Children's 
Book Week, and the following broadcasts 
will review the latest publications for 
child reading. — Eureka HumhoJdt Times, 
N 7 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 
(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat, El Ceutro. 

Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 

Assessed valuation $53,747,610 (taxable 
for county $43,999,820). 

Ijipekial Co. Fkee Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib"n. 

A few changes have been made in the 
personnel of the library staff. At head- 
quarters. Miss Yelma Vaniman resigned 
Nov. 1 and ^Nliss Demice Parker was added 
to the staff to do clerical work. 

Mr Spencer, custodian of Seeley 
Branch, was transferred to Kern County. 
As yet no definite appointment has been 
made, bit Mrs Heatley is taking charge 
temporarily. 

Miss Fannie Douden was appointed 
librarian of Brawley Branch. She comes 
from the Los Angeles Public Library and 
is paid by the city and county. The 
library is now under the supervision of a 
trained librarian with the library open 
seven hours a day. 

Two essay contests were put on during 
Children's Book Week, one at Holtville 
and the other at Mulberr3^ Lists were 
made up by the librarian and prizes offered 
by different organizations. 

We took note of the interest shown in 
the little library branch at Ogilby. This 
is a section station on the railroad. The 
only people there are the ones who work 
for the Southern Pacific. Some have 
taken their families with them. Last 
year th?y used only a few books, but this 
year we have observed the tremendous 
growth in the circulation and a keen inter- 
est. 

EvALYX BoiiAx, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 
County seat. Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7081. 
Assessed valuation $18,760,737 (taxable 
for county $11,347,195. 



INYO CO. — Continued. 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

The most important event of the fall, 
in the eyes of the county lilirariau ;inil 
her loyal helpers, was the custodians' 
meeting held at Independence, Dec. 6. 
It v.as very successful in every respect 
except that of attendance. The librarian 
has come to the conclusion that Inyo 
County is not adapted by nature to carry 
out such meetings. When th*^ super- 
visors cheerfully accepted the task of 
bringing the custodians from the distant 
points', and when almost every custodian 
expressed an intention of being present, 
the chief diflSculty seemed to be overcome. 
But this was early ; when the actual date 
arrived, illness, extra duties, absence 
from the county, a resignation — all 
played havoc with the attendance, and 
we felt that we had induced Mr Fer- 
guson and Mrs Babcork to visit us under 
false pretenses. However, they came, 
and we greatly enjoyed them, Mrs Fer- 
guson was prevented by a very sore 
throat from taking much pleasure in 
travel, but we hope she too will com? 
again when our weather behaves better 
and it is open season on trout instead 
of on custodians. 

The plan of the meeting called for 
an introduction to the county library's 
central office and the methods of carry- 
ing on the work there : talks by the \is- 
iting librarians- and by two of the cus- 
todians, relieved by a visit to Mt. Whit- 
ney Trout Hatchery and by a social hour 
in the evening. The very small group 
assembled made it seem pleasanter just 
to talk over things informally ; we talked 
out what we had to say rather than 
made even informal speeches. This was 
both pleasant and helpful. 

Letters' from the custodians present. 
after the meeting, showed that they had 
both appreciated and been helped by it. 
They and the librarian heartily thank 
Mrs Babcock and Mr Ferguson for their 
help and the inspiration they brought. 
Please come again. 

Anne Margrave, Lili"n. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



19 



KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8150 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation .$201,069,76.3 (tax- 
able for county .$169,334,670). 

Kern Co. Free Libraey, Bakersfield. 
Mrs .Tulia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen Rhein of Berkeley has 
arrived from Oakland, where she was 
with the Oakland Public Library, to 
assist Mrs Jennie Engell of the East 
Bakersfield Branch. — Baksrfield Cali- 
fornian, D 3 

Arvin Branch of Kern County Free 
Librai*y will be reopened within the next 
week after having been closed for several 
months. Mrs A. S. Cook has been 
appointed custodian. The Ijranch will 
be located in a small bungalow across 
from the schoolhouse. The building has 
been leased from C. C. Stockton and 
will be used exclusively for library pur- 
poses. The main room will be the adult 
reading room, with the children's room 
adjoining. In the latter there is a win- 
dow seat, and low tables will be provided 
so the room will be comfortable and 
attractive. — Bakersfield Calif ornian, D 29 

With the departure of its custodian, 
Mrs Phebe S. Wells, Weed Patch Branch 
is beinsf discontinued. Mrs Wells has 
had the branch in her home since its 
establishment in 1912, with the record 
of no books lost. There have never been 
set hours for the branch, Mrs Wells' 
pui^pose being to serve the community 
whenever books were wanted. — Bakers- 
field Echo, N 5 

Delano. 

Delano Joint Union High School 
Library and Branch, Kern Co. Free 
Library. L. A. Baker, Prin. Mrs Lilian 
Howland, Lib'n. 

Mrs Lilian Howland, who has had 
charge of the Delano Branch of the 
Kern County Free Library for nearly 
ten years, has added to her labors this 
year by taking charge of the High School 
Library. She is on duty from eight 
thirty to ten thirty a.m. and is followed 
by Mrs Edith Carnahan, a graduate of 
Delano High with the 1925 class, who 
is in the library until four o'clock. 



KERN CO.— Continued. 
Delano — Continued. 

The library started work this year in 
the small room used formerly for a 
sewing room, but was soon moved to 
the large room originally intended for a 
library. Mrs Howland spent several 
weeks rearranging the catalog after the 
books were properly placed on the 
shelves. All catalog cards were dis- 
carded for which there were no books, 
and new ones written when needed. 

Two hundred seventy-three new books 
have been added to the library to date 
(.January) of which about one hundred 
twenty-five are fiction. Catalog cards 
are sent from headquarters at Bakers- 
field for all books sent in. 

Of two hundred seventy-nine pupils 
registered in school in January, two hun- 
dred thirty-five have cards in the library. 

New oilcloth has been put on the tops 
of the tables where forty can be seated, 
and nineteen student chairs are arranged 
for extra seating. 

The library is in no sense a study hall, 
being used for library purposes only, 
with the exception that students with 
low grades are sent in at specified periods 
to study. 

The teachers have the privilege of tak- 
ing out as many books as they desire for 
class use for the term and are personally 
responsible for all books so charged out. 
Mrs Lilian Howland, Lib'n. 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $29,373,765 (tax- 
able for county $24,436,402). 

Kings Co. Free Library. Hanford. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

For Children's Book Week, special col- 
lections of attractive juveniles were taken 
out to the five larger county branches, in 
addition to Hanford Public, and with post- 
ers and flowers, an attractive little exhibit 
was made at each branch. This was the 
first time that a special feature had been 
made of this week in the county branches, 
but it seemed to us that it was very suc- 
cessful indeed. 



20 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



KINGS CO. — Continued. 

Mrs Elizabeth Wilcox resigned from the 
position of Hardwick Branch custodian 
December 1, and Mrs Laura Prather was 
appointed her successor. 

The Adventist School Branch has been 

re-established, and is now known as the 

Armona Union School Branch. Mr H. A. 

Davis, the school principal, is in charge. 

Marion L. Gregory, Lib'u. 

Hanford. 
Hanford Free Public Library and 
Branch, Kings Co. Free Library. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

Miss Alice Hall was made cataloger for 
the Hanford Public Library November 1 ; 
Miss Nelly Baggley was added to the staff 
as general assistant. 

Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

Hanford Union High School Li- 
brary. Jacob L. Neighbor, Prin. Miss 
Edith M. Church, Lib'n. 

"Exit Miss Lizzie Cox," a one act play, 
was the feature of a special program 
which the library students prepared for 
an assembly November 10, 1926. This 
program was in observance of Book Week. 
The program was as follows : a vocal solo, 
"I Passed by Your Window," Frank Long, 
accompanied by Clell Hinkle ; the one act 
play, "Exit Miss Lizzie Cox" ; vocal solos 
by Orion Stenehjem, "Just a Cottage 
Small" and "Truly I Do," accompanied 
by Lurene Howe. 

On the afternoon of the same day the 
librarian and her class entertained, in a 
transformed libraiy, the faculty, who had 
previously received invitations, in book 
form, with a tea. The tables were pushed 
back and baskets and bowls of flowers 
changed the work-a-day atmosphere of the 
room to that of a private library. By 
candle light, a member of the class pre- 
sided over a prettily appointed tea table, 
the other members assisting. Later the 
guests were entertained by a humoi'ous 
reading by Miss Margaret Stewart and a 
play review by Mr A. E. White. 

Edith M. Church, Lib'n. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $8,685,845 (taxable 
for county $8,646,215). 



LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty- fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,548,438 (tax- 
able for county $14,194,094) . 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

The Librarian made a trip to Big Valley 
with the Home Demonstration Agent in 
December. She gave short talks on 
Children's books at the Adin and Bieber 
Home Demonstration meetings. Short 
talks also were given to the Adin and 
Bieber Farm Center meetings on The 
Service of Your Library. The following 
branches were visited.: Providence Branch 
and School, Bieber Branch and School, 
Pittville Branch. 

A short talk was given at the Doyle 
Home Demonstration meeting. The sub- 
ject was also Children's books. Talks on 
the same subject were given at the Susan- 
ville and Millwood Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciation meetings and the Monticola Club. 
Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area 3880 sq. mi. Pop. 9.36,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,047,487,407 (tax- 
able for county .$2,072,130,725). 

Los Angeles Co. Free Library, Los 
Angeles. Miss Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

During the quarter, the short term con- 
tracts with the Los Angeles Public 
Library for book service at Watts and 
Westland. annexed, have been terminated. 

Altadena, w^hich is not an incorporated 
city, carried a vote December 6, to estab- 
lish a library district in order to call 
a bond election later for the purpose of 
erecting a building. The Board of Super- 
visors appointed as members of the first 
library board, Mrs Zane Grey, Wm. D. 
Davies and J. H. Tumbach. At the sev- 
eral town meetings of the Altadena Citi- 
zens Association the intention to continue 
as a part of the county library system 
was expressed. 

The La Crescenta Branch was moved 
October 9 and new equipment was pro- 
vided. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



21 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

On November 19, Miss Mary L. Jones 
gave a delightful talk to the staff about 
her four months' trip abroad, giving 
interesting notes particularly about the 
libraries she visited, The British Mu- 
seum, the Bibliotecque Natiouale, The 
Bodleian and others. 

After the News Notes for September 
nad been reported, Captain Richard 
Wright, county librarian of Middlesex 
County, England, spent two days inspect- 
ing this system. We feel that We have 
much to learn from our English cousins 
in spirit of service. 

The librarian represented the Los 
Angeles County Free Library at the 50th 
anniversary meeting of the American 
Library Association, October 4 to 9, at 
Atlantic City and visited A. L. A. Head- 
quarters, and the libraries at Detroit, 
Cleveland and New York City. The 
return trip was made via the Panama 
Canal, an extended vacation having been 
granted by the Board of Supervisors. 
Helen E. Vogleson, Lib"n. 

Claremont. 

iPoMONA College Library. James 
A. Blaisdell, Pres. Willis H. Kerr, Lib'n. 

Miss Ellen B. Scripps, of La Jolla, 
has presented to Pomona College Library 
the second volume of the de luxe signed 
and numbered edition of Wild Flowers 
of North America, by Mary Vaux Wal- 
cott. The first volume was presented 
last year. The plates are in color, in 
portfolio, the typographic work being 
done by William E. Rudge, the eminent 
printer. The set is published by the 
Smithsonian Institution, of Washington. 

Mr .John Treanor, of Los Angeles, and 
his sons have presented a finelj'-preserved 
set of Mercator's Atlas, in two volumes, 
to Pomona College Library. It is the 
English translation, published in 1636 
by Houdius, the great map-maker of Hol- 
land. For this edition the engraved title 
pages of the French and Dutch editions 
were used, printed paper labels being 
pasted over the original titles. Many of 
the maps are in color. California is 
shown as an island, in the map of the 
world ; while a map of the western hemi- 
sphere shows California fairly correctlj\ 



LOS ANGELES CO Continued. 

Claremont — Continued. 

The set forms a valuable addition to the 
cartography section of the Mason Library. 
W. H. Kerb, Lib'n. 
Twenty art collections of books and 
prints with a total valuation of $100,000 
are now being received by a gi'oup of 
twenty American and Canadian colleges 
and universities, of which Pomona Col^ 
lege is one, from the Carnegie Corpor'a- 
tion of New York. The collection will 
be permanently housed at Pomona Col- 
lege for use in the teaching of art and 
represents one of the finest gifts to this 
department in several years. The col- 
lections consist of 1800 reproductions in 
photograph and color facsimiles of the 
greatest work in architecture, sculpture 
and painting ; fifty original prints rep- 
resenting different processes and schools 
from the sixteenth century to the present ; 
a set of textiles in thirty-five pieces dat- 
ing from antiquity to the present day 
and illustrating all kinds of materials 
and designs characteristic of different 
races ; and two hundred books on the art 
of every period and people. The books 
are in French and German as well as 
English. Many are rare and valuable, hav- 
ing reproductions in color of the great mas- 
terpieces. — Pomona College News, D 4 

Glendale. 

Glendale Free Public Libbaby. Mrs 
Alma J. Danford, Lib'n. 

Between 300 and 400 persons attended 
the formal opening of the new home of 
the Glendale Library the evening of Dec. 
30. Short talks were made by T. W. 
Preston, President of the Board of Li- 
brary Trustees, Mayor Harry MacBain, 
Mrs Alma J. Danford, Librarian, G. U. 
^Nloyse and Richardson D. White of the 
city schools. A delightful musical pro- 
gram was given during the evening by 
the Wilson trio. With the exception of 
the installation of additional new furni- 
ture in the juvenile department down- 
stairs and the work of replacing the old 
stone cornice on the outside, the building 
is completed. The main floor presents an 
entirely new appearance and arrange- 
ment, with a most noticeable homey 



2g 



>TeWs NDTlis OF ciLIFORNli LIBRARIES; [JeHI., i§27 



LOS ANGELES GO.— Continued. 
Glendaie — ^Continued. 

atmosphere lent by the three fireplaces, 
did furniture and shelves have been 
i-eHhiihed and everything appears new. — 
^iendaie Press, H 3i 

Laricaster. 

A .V T E L o p E Valley Union High 
School Libkaky and Bkanch, Los 
Angeles Co. Free Libraey. M. H. 
Rowell, Prin. Helen Ballantyne, Lib'n. 

Our library has made quite a stride for- 
ward during the past three months. We 
have organized a students' course in Li- 
brary Methods and interested a larger 
number of students in learning to use the 
library facilities which are on hand. We 
think this student interest is one of the 
most important steps in the progress of 
building a school library. 

We have subscribed to a number of new 
magazines and papers for I'efei'ence use. 
We also have ordered over two hundred 
ftad fifty new books fdr our shelves — 
agidfe fi'onl Sevei'ai n6w Sets of encyclo- 
pedias arid sets of reference books on art 
arid hietoi^J*'. 

We feel that oul' library is becoming a 
i*eal help to the community, as parents 
make use of our available books. 

The Ijos Angeles County Library is an 
invaluable aid to us in cataloging our 
books and buying them for us. 

Helen Ballantyne, Lib'n. 

Long Beach. 

Long Beach Polytechnic High 
School Library. David Burcham, Prin. 
Edna E. Andersen, Lib'n. 

We are receiving 18.5 magazines and 5 
newspapers. The total volumes in the 
library are 12,951. There are 113 teach- 
ers and 2806 pupils. 

A year ago our enrollment was larger 
and we had more teachers, but as we now 
have two high school districts in Long 
Beach this has been divided. The Wood- 
row Wilson High School was opened in 
Bast Long Beach last September and Miss 
Helen B. Courtright, who has been our 
librarian for the past six years, is now 
librarian for the new school. 

Edna E. Andersen, Lib'n. 

Miss Elizabeth Mattison was errone- 
ously listed in October 1926 number of 
Netrs Notes of California Libraries as 
librarian of Long Beach Polytechnic 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continiieci. 
Long Beach — Continued. 

High School Library; She is librarian of 
the Atlantic Avenue Grammar School in 
Long Beach; 

Los Angeles. 

I Los AngEle^, [FijEE] , PuBLiei Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The last three months tiave witnessed d 
rapid increase in the use of the tiew li- 
brary, a growing appreciation of the 
building, and the services it offers through 
its many departments — a natural reaction 
upon the part of the public to the in- 
creased effort of the library staff, to rend- 
der service worthy of the new home. 

November 27 recorded the largest circu- 
lation in the history of the library — -9941 
books checked out, and almost every one 
of the 1200 chaii's in the I'eading rooms 
occupied by students and readers. Octo- 
ber and November wei*e record months in 
registration, each with 8000 new borrow- 
ers recorded; 

Many city groups and classes from day 
and night schools have been taken on 
tour through the building and given an 
explanation of the features and Sendee 
offered. Among the distinguished visitors 
to the library during the quarter, was Dr 
Henry Guppy, President of the Library 
Association of England, and Librarian of 
.John Rylands Library of Manchester, who 
addressed the staff and the Library School 
in an inspiring talk on personality, and 
talked with the Library Board on inter- 
esting discoveries in rare books. 

The Lecture and Exhibit Room, in 
charge, since October 1, of Mrs Eleanor 
Brodie Jones, formerly Librarian of the 
Hollywood Branch, is proving a popular 
and interesting feature of service. Ex- 
hibits have brought many friends to the 
library, and lectures are helping to make 
the bock collection of public interest, 
especially the courses of book talks by 
Miss Helen Haines, recent book reviews 
by Miss Gertrrde Darlow, and a series on 
economics by Dr Frederick Roman. 

The Patents Room, in charge of Mr 
George Chase, under the Science and 
Industry Department, is proving of 
much benefit to patent attorneys, in- 
ventors, and investors who ai'e grateful 
for time saved in sending to Washington 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



23 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

for copies of specifications and patents. 
In one corner of tlie Patents Room is 
shelved a small collection of books for 
the blind, some of which are a loan from 
the State Library, and others gifts from 
local organizations. 

Branches Department reports twelve 
new branch buildings under construction, 
or in prospect, two of which have been 
completed this quarter. Alessandro Branch 
opened in its attractive little frame 
building on October 13, with Mrs Saidie 
King as Librarian, and the Washington 
Irving Bi'anch, a more pretentious brick 
and cement building in a thickly settled 
part of the city, opened on Decemljer 13. 
The staff at the new branch (a branch 
differing from the others in that it sprung 
to life in a building of its own) consists 
of Mrs Emilie Jackson, Mrs Caroline 
Johnston, formerly of the staff of the 
Los Angeles County Free Library, and 
Miss Frances Kenyon, formerly of Roch- 
ester Public Library. 

From the Work with Children Depart- 
ment comes the announcement of the resig- 
nation of Mrs Gladys Case, Principal of 
Work with Children, and her marriage to 
Dr Glenn Miller of Los Angeles, and the 
appointment on January 1 of Miss Eva 
G. Leslie, formerly of Cleveland and St. 
Louis Public Libraries, and at one time 
instructor in children's work in the West- 
ern Reserve University. Book Week 
plans developed by this department re- 
volved about the choosing of favorite 
"book chums" by children in elementary 
grades, and the making of lists resulting 
from the choice of chums, later to be 
printed and used as a basis of selection 
by schools, libraries, parents and book 
stores. 

The Ivanhoe Room for Boys and Girls, 
under Miss Rosemary Livsey, held a for- 
mal opening for the school children of Los 
Angeles, inviting representatives from two 
hundred city schools November 8. Chil- 
dren came in costume of their book chums 
and it was a gay procession of Heidis, 
Tom Sawyers. Little Women. Huckle- 
lierry Finns and Dr Dolittles, that trooped 
through the building and were made ac- 
quainted with the Boys' and Girls' own 
Ivfinhoe Room. 

Everett R. Perry. Lib'u. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

Free readings for the blind at the Pub- 
lic Library are announced by Librarian 
Everett R. Perry on Saturday afternoons 
at 2 o'clock. Through volunteer service 
in reading aloud these gatherings are held 
to afford blind people of Los Angeles 
an opportunity to enjoy readings from 
the library's current books and magazines 
which have not yet appeared in Braille. 
Meetings are held in the Patents Room, 
where a small collection of Braille books 
is kept for blind readers. — Los Angeles 
Examiney. N 26 

Baklow Medical Library. Dr George 
Dock, Pres. Mary E. Irish, Lib'n. 

The uutstandiug event in the history of 
this library since our last report in JYews 
^ijtes of California Lihraries is the rent- 
ing of a small building adjoining the li- 
brary for use in tiling duplicate books 
and especially journals. The building 
was made fire-proof as far as possible, 
and was supplied with shelves by a loan 
from the Public Library of material, 
which, fortunately for us. was left over 
when the city took possession of its beauti- 
ful new building. In our new building 
we have have now about 21,000 duplicate 
journals, unbound, besides about 2.30 books 
and bound volumes of journals not ac- 
cessioned. The task of moving these 
journals was most strenuous, as most of 
them were in an attic store room, where 
they filled not only the stacks and shelves 
but covered much of the floor as well. 
The shelves in the store room are again 
filled with little used journal files and 
reports, etc., and the main library has 
room to breathe. The duplicate journals 
are easily accessible in the annex, and it 
is our policy to issue these to members as 
loans, keeping the bound volumes in the 
library for reference use, as far as pos- 
sible. 

A number of new reference books have 
recently been placed upon the shelves by 
gift, purchase or loan, and eleven interest- 
ing old books ranging in date from 1538 
to 1834. 

The library is now open all week days 
and minor holidays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Opening the library on Saturday after- 
noons is an innovation which has proved 



24 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan, 1927 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

very popular, especially with the Univer- 
sity students. 

Mary E. Irish, Lib'n. 

Belmont High School Library. W. 
W. Tritt, Prin. Marjorie Van Deusen, 
Lib'n. 

The library i.s very fortunate in hav- 
ing Miss ^largaret Macgowan, Los 
Angeles Library School '2-5, as a second 
librarian. 

The completion of a new study hall in 
January has relieved the crowded con- 
dition of the library. 

Teachers, librarians, and students are 

, all working on the problem of the loss 

of books. We believe the trouble can 

be met only by enlightened public opinion. 

The Library Club has had a picnic 
this term and programs on St. Francis of 
Assisi. Selma Lagerlof, and Tolstoi. At 
the last meeting Miss Macgowan gave an 
interesting account of life iu Moscow 
during the war. 

The exhibit case has held exhibits of 
stamps, toy furniture, millinery, cathe- 
dral pictures, Christmas cards of espe- 
cial beauty or interest, and rare books, 
including a 17th century Odyssey, trans- 
lated by Ogilvy. 

The collection of pamphlets and clip- 
pings has been revised and checked with 
Newark list of subject headings for the 
information file. 

Mar.ioeie Van Deusen, Lib'n. 

California State Fisheries Lajjora- 
TORY' Library. Mrs Ruth Miller Thomp- 
son, Lib'n. 

Of particular interest is the recent 
acquisition (the early volumes are still 
on the way) of a practically complete 
set of "Biometrika" (Vol. 4, No. 4, only, 
is missing). If there is another set of 
this journal in southern California, we 
have yet to find it. Since access to this 
series is almost indispensable to persons 
engaged in every variety of statistical 
research, we will be glad to make our 
set generally available for consultation. 

Other recent accessions include a 
large series of publications on fishery 
investigations, kindly donated by the 
Dutch government. The generosity of 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Cojitinued. 

some of the foreign government depart- 
ments and marine stations is most grati- 
fying. We are frequently able to obtain 
from them valuable documents, which it 
would otherwise be almost impossible to 
secure, in quantities far exceeding what 
we are at present prepared to send in 
exchange. The "Foreign Exchange 
Agencies'' listed by the Smithsonian 
Institution in its annuaL "Report on the 
International Exchange Service,'' with 
many of which we have been correspond- 
ing, are very helpful. In addition, the 
U. S. S. R. Society for Cultural Rela- 
tions with Foreign Countries. 6 Malaya 
Nikitskaya, Moscow G9, U. S. S. R., 
has served us with such admirable effi- 
ciency, that we may unhesitatingly say 
that it is less trouble for us to get in 
touch with the organizations issuing 
marine biological publications in Russia 
than in any other European country. 
Even when we can furnish only the most 
meager data, such as the abbreviated 
name of a journal or institution, return 
mail often brings the publications them- 
selves. 

To find translators who combine zoo- 
logical training with the requisite linguis- 
tic knowledge, is very difficult for such 
languages as Japanese. Esthonian. Rus- 
sian, Dutch, and the Scandinavian 
tongues. 
Mrs Ruth Miller Thompson, Lib'n 

University of Southern California. 
College of Music Library. W. F. 
Skeele, Dean. Miss Constance J. Bethke, 
Lib'n. 

Constance J. Bethke is now librarian 
at the College of Music, University of 
Southern California. 19 magazines are 
now received regularly. 

Constance J. Bethke, Lib'n. 

Pasadena. 

Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

Interior finish work of the new public 
library will not be completed until some 
time in February as the result of part of 
the equipment being destroyed by fire 
about a month ago. The city officials 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



25 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued. 

gave the L. and E. Emanuel, Inc.. an 
extension of time until Jan. 24 with the 
understanding that the delayed equip- 
ment will be installed in February. — 
Pasadena Post, D 9 

A site for a public library in Lamanda 
Park was offered to the Pasadena Board 
of City Directors gratis today by .Tohn 
Hickmore, who proposed to donate prop- 
erty on South Roosevelt avenue, about 
300 feet south of Colorado street, for 
the purpose. The offer was taken under 
advisement. — r>os Angeles Times, D 9 

John Mttib Technical High School 
Library. Rufus Mead, Prin. Alice B. 
Fowler, Tiib'n. 

On July 1. 192G. the John Muir Junior 
High School ended its career in the old 
school plant on Walnut and Los Robles 
streets. In another part of the city the 
John Muir Technical High School began 
the first year of its existence. Most of 
the books that had served pupils at the 
Junior High School were assigned to the 
Elementary Schools Library with Miss 
Grace Dick in charge. Miss Alice B. 
Fowler, formerly librarian in the Voca- 
tional School of Pasadena, was appointed 
librarian of the new Technical High 
School. 

Alice B. Fowler. Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

The art collection has been enriched 
by the addition of four fine old Japanese 
prints. A special display of reproduc- 
tions of good pictures was made at the 
Ebell Club during December. These re- 
production.s were all from the Library, 
and with the .Japanese prints gave a very 
fair idea of the chief styles of painting. 

The Children's Room has insLalled a 
simple, inexpensive device to keep much- 
consulted shelves in order. In common 
with the rest of the library world, the 
shelves of "Potter books'' and of "Easy 
books" were our perpetual care. They 
now need very little attention, and pre- 
sent a delightfully tidy appearance. 

In October the Library secured the 
conviction of a youth who had been ab- 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued, 
stractiug library books from the building 
and conducting a small lending library 
on his own account with them. We 
think that some of the publicity given, 
this case bj' the newspapers has caused 
the appearance on our tables of a num- 
ber of books long missing. 

There has been no blanket increase of 
salaries this year, but four of the staff 
have received small increases for special 
reasons, such as taking shimmer library 
training, etc. 

The two junior high schools of Pomona 
have this fall employed school librarians. 
The reflex effect on the use of the Pnblif 
Library is already noticeable. 

S. M. .Jacobx's. Lib'n. 
Santa Monica. 

Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

The first of December a congenial and 
happy hour was spent at the main li- 
brary with four of the librarians of the 
school system. Miss Ross, librarian of 
the Santa Monica High School, arranged 
for the meeting. Every once in a while 
we hope to have an hour together, thus 
solving service problems. 

The collection of beautiful art books 
and books of costume has created much 
interest. Many artists who are inter- 
ested in work in Los Angeles and Holly- 
wood are finding these books a source of 
joy and practical help. 

Our library has shared in the movin.g 
picture world of Hollywood and it often 
makes the day brighter to receive words 
of praise for our library from the up 
to date worker and writer who comes 
from a distance to use the Santa Monica 
Library. Help has been given to our 
Community Theater interests and our 
oriental art reference has been used to 
stage the original Chinese plays given by 
S. MacDonald Wright and Tom Hopkins, 
artist and dramatist now residing in 
Santa Monica. 

We are collecting our first editions. 
During the last year or .so it has come 
as a surprise to find the value put on 
first editions and we are finding books 
valued from ten dollars to fifty. One 
of the things we dislike doing is to take 



k 



26 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



Jan.. 1927 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Santa Monica — Continued. 

the.se books from the oi>en shelves but 
it is not well to put too much tempta- 
tion iu the way of book collectors. 

Elfie a. Mosse, Lib'n. 
Plans drawn by E. J. Baume, Santa 
Monica architect, for remodeling the li- 
brary building were accepted this week 
by the city planning commission, which 
has recommended that the city approve 
the plans. Six other Los Angeles and 
Santa Monica architects submitted 
sketches for the library rebuilding. The 
approved plans provide a maximum of 
operating space and permit the library 
to function during alterations. Approxi- 
mately .$50,000 will be spent for this 
work. — Los Angeles Journal of Com- 
merce, N 4 

South Pasadena. 

*SoTJTH Pasadena High School Li- 
BBAKY. John E. Alman, Prin. Hope L. 
Potter. Lib'n. 

The library has ordered 44 magazines 
for the year 1927. We have added 211 
books to the library since Sept. 1. 

Hope L. Potier. Lib'n. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirtj'-seventh class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area. 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12.203. 
Assessed valuation $28,998,908 (tax- 
able for county $23,546,215). 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madeba. 
Miss Blanche Galloway. Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was celebrated 
by having "Mother Goose'" herself enter- 
tain the children with stories, nursery 
jingles, and songs each afternoon imme- 
diately after school, as they entered the 
children's room through the "Gateway 
to Bookland." 

A Ijook play with characters represent- 
ing favorite heroes and heroines of books 
was put on at our largest local school 
in response to a suggestion made by the 
library. 

With the beginning of the year, salary 
increases were granted to all assistants 
(including the janitor) who had been in 
the service over one year. 

Blanche Galloway. Lib'n. 



MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 2T,.342. 
Assessed valuation .$.30,341,578 (tax- 
able for county $26,497,200). 

Makin Co. Free Library, San Rafael. 

The Board of County Supervisors at its 
meeting January 3 appointed JNIiss Muriel 
Wright, County Librarian. Miss Wright 
has had experience in county library work 
in Kern County and in Tuolumne County, 
where she is now County Librarian. 

San Rafael. 

*DoiiiNicAN College L ib b a k y. 
Sister M. Raymond, Prin. Sister M. 
Edward, Lib'n. 

Through the generosity of his widow, 
the library of the late Dr Bond of Vallejo, 
consisting of one hundred volumes of his- 
torical and classical literature, has been 
donated to the Dominican College Library. 

At a meeting in November, the Asso- 
ciation of American L^niversities voted to 
place the Dominican College on its ap- 
proved list. We are justly proud of this 
highest official recognition an American 
college can get. 

Miss Alice Queen, a foruier student of 
our college and a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of California Library School, has en- 
tered the Dominican Convent and been 
added to the library staff. 

Sistee M. Edward, Lib'n. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1.580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation .$6,085,206 (taxable 
for county $4,683,384). 

Mariposa Co. Free Library. ^liss 
Minette Stoddard, Lib'n. 

The Yosemite Valley Branch of I\Iari- 
posa County Free Library was established 
in November in the museum building un- 
der the direction of Mrs Grace Ewing. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(TSventy-eighth class.) 
County seat. Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $30,920,640 (taxable 
for county $25,741,297). 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



27 



MERGED COUNTY, 

(Twenty-geveflth class.) 
C'ouflty seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,5T9. 
Assessed valiWtlofl $39,.336,433 (taxable 
for county $31,751,610). 

Meeced Co. Frek Library, MeUCed. 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

The third annual (Custodians' meeting 
was held at the Merced Coililty Library on 
October 7. All branches were represented 
exeept Athloue and visitors attended from 
M&dei'a and Stanislaus counties. The 
morning session was opened by the County 
Librarian, who welcomed custodians and 
guests and spoke of the accomplishments 
of the library during the past year, urging 
all custodians to make this a banner year. 
Three custodians gave brief talks on li- 
brary progress in their respective com- 
munities and Mrs C. D. Radcliffe spoke 
on the value of reading before starting 
abroad. A helpful discussion of library 
rules and problems concluded the morn- 
ing meeting. Luncheon was served at the 
Merced Women's Club House, after which 
all present responded to roll call. At the 
afternoon session Mrs O. A. Baker, presi- 
dent of the local Women's Club, talked on 
"Reflections from the Outside," and Mrs 
George Robinson, president of the County 
P. T. A., discussed the library from "The 
mothers' and children's standpoint." Miss 
Mabel Gillis, Assistant State Librarian, 
concluded the program with an extremely 
interesting talk on the history and scope 
of the State Library. 

Miss Rosalie Barksdale and Miss 
Esther Colahan have been added to the 
staff. 

Minnette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,311,280 (taxable 
for county $7,781,061). 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assesed valuation $5,909,729 (taxable 
for county $2,-927,055). 



MONTEREY COU^VV 

( Twenty-fourth class. )' 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $50,761,348 (taxable" 
for county $41,883,250). 

Monterey Co, Free Ligrary, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

Miss Dorothy M. Ellis, who has been in 
charge of the School and Juvenile De- 
partment, left December 31 to take a posi- 
tion in the Library of the Teachers Col- 
lege in San Francisco. Miss Ruth K. Por- 
ter, a graduate of the Carnegie Library 
School at Pittsburgh, is now in charge of 
the school work. Miss Catherine Raby 
left December 29. She iis to enter the 
Riverside Library School in January, 
Miss Helen Abel of Santa Rita has taken 
her place, and will work afternoons., 
attending High School in the mornings'. 

The branch at Castroville has been- 
moved to the post office, with Mrs Alice' 
MacNamee in charge. It reopened Octo- 
ber 20, having been closed for two months. 
The Rainbow Lodge Branch was closed 
October 1. Mrs Irene McConnell is the 
new custodian at Parkfield, having taken 
charge October 23. 

Anne Hadden, Lib'n. • 

Pacific Grove. 

Pacific Grove [Free] Public Li- 
braky. Miss Jessie W. Nichols, Lib'n. 

J. H. Clarke, Pacific Grove contractor, 
has started the $2500 addition being made 
to the Pacific Grove Public Library. The 
new addition will be frame, stuccoed, and 
in harmony with the remainder of the 
building. It is expected to be completed 
within sixty days. — Monterey Herald, O 5 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed valuation, .$26,362,248 (tax- 
able for county $22,136,195). 
St. Helena. 

St. Helena [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs G. B. Anderson, Lib'n. 

During the last quarter our library has 
suffered in the loss by death of the Presi- 
dent of our Board, Hon Bismarck Bruck. 
He was a St. Helenau by birth, grew 
to man's estate here. He will be greatly 



28 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan.. 1927 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 
St. Helena — Continued. 

Missed. Rev I. Baxter was appointed to 
succeed liim. 

We have put many books on our shelves, 
wome of travel, science, new fiction and 
many children's books. Certain changes 
were made in the shelving of books, in 
order to give much needed additional room 
for our fiction collection. 

The Women's Improvement Club has 
donated shrubs and plants and has agreed 
to take full care of our grounds. 

Mrs G. G. Anderson, Lib'n. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,683,613 (taxable 
for county $6,941,690). 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, ISO sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $177,730,314 (tax- 
able for county $152,611,450). 

Fullerton. 

F'ULLERTON [FrEE] PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Miss Gertrude De Gelder. Lib'n. 

Our new Boys' and Girls' Library is 
practically completed and we expect to 
occupy it about the first week in Feb- 
ruary. 

Miss Minnie Maxwell, librarian of the 
Fullerton Public Library, was married 
Dec. 27 to Mr S. W. Wiudle of Fullerton. 
Mr and Mrs Windle will reside in Ful- 
lerton. 

I assumed my duties as librarian here 
on Jan. 3, coming fi-om the Traveling 
Library Department of the St. Louis 
Public Library. I am a graduate of the 
Library School of the St. Louis Public 
Library in the class of 1911. My subse- 
quent experience has been in the Catalog 
Department of the St. Louis Public Li- 
brary and in the Crunden Branch Library. 
For the past six years I have been assist- 
ant in the Teachers' Room and in the 
Traveling Library Department. 

Miss May Campbell of the Fullerton 
Public Library will be Children's Libra- 
rian of the Boys' and Girls' Library. 

Geetrxjde De Geldee, Lib'n. 



ORANGE CO. — Continued. 
Huntington Beach. 

Huntington Beach [Free] Public 
Library. Mrs Bertha Proctor Reynolds, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Corrinne Nadeau and Mr Robert 
Vidal were married in October. Mrs 
Vidal, who has been an assistant in 
Huntington Beach Public Library for the 
past four years, Avill remain in the employ 
of the library. Miss Ruth Souer, of River- 
side, has taken the position of assistant 
librarian left vacant by the resignation of 
Miss Elsie Hunt, of Whittier, October 1. 
Mrs Stella Morgan has resigned as jani- 
tress on account of ill health. Mrs Ernes- 
tine Fowler has been appointed in her 
place. 

The city of Huntington Beach at a 
recent election was opened up for oil drill- 
ing. One well has been located within 
one block of the library. "To lease or not 
to lease, that is the question." Several 
oil companies are interested in the present 
site. No action will be taken until the 
outcome of the Ninth street well is known. 

Mrs S. A. Moore recently resigned as 
library trustee. Mrs Moore has been 
trustee for eight years and it is with 
regret that we accept her resignation. 
Mrs Mary S. Jackson has been appointed 
in her place. 

The salaries of the staff were raised 
$15 October 1. 
Mrs Bertha Proctor Reynolds, Lib'n. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class. ^ 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $25,415,588 (taxable 
for county $18,255,970). 

Auburn. 

Atjbuen Free Public Library. Mrs 
Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

Many new and good books have been 
added during 1926, and several new maga- 
zines for the Children's Department. The 
library shows a steady growth in circula- 
tion of books and magazines and in num- 
ber of visitors. The women's clubs and 
many business men use the library ex- 
tensively. 

Mrs M. Kriechbaum, Lib'n, 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



29 



PLACER CO.— Continued. 
Roseville. 

ROSEVILLE [FkEE] PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Mis.s (ieorgiana R. Willits, Lib'u. 

Iloseyille Public Library is making der 
cided growtli in patronage and in in- 
creased number of books. Beginning 
November 1, the hours were lengthened 
and the rooms are now open for the use 
of the public from 12 m. to 9 p.m. on week 
days and from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sundays, 
jMiss Rita Rowland is acting as assistant 
since June 14 and an amount of work 
which had been accumulating for some 
time previous is now completed. 

The following- figures will give an 
idea of the activities for the past six 
nioulhs: Book circulation 14,S9S ; maga- 
zine circulation 757 ; books rebound GOo ; 
books mended at library 1017 ; books 
purchased 717 ; books added by gift 144 ; 
no. of new readers added 291. The 
new shelf list gives 6614 as present num- 
ber of books. 

Geoegiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,034,720 (tax- 
able for county .H;i2,541.902). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Edith Gantt. Lib'n. 

Buck's Saddle Branch was established 
Jan. 14, with Mrs Joseph N. Schultz as 
custodian. A branch was established at 
Indian Falls Oct. 21; Mrs Eva M. 
Laughlin is custodian. Mrs E. A. Syvert- 
son is the new custodian at Mohawk 
Branch. 

The Plumas County Law Library 
joined the Plumas County Free Library 
Nov. 1, 1926. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 700S sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $65,666,943 (tax- 
able for county .$48,633,500). 

Hemet. 

He MET [Free] Plblio Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Miss Mabel Durrenberger, Lib'n. 



RIVERSIDE CO. — Continue'^ 
Hemet — Continued. 

^liss iMal)le A. Spencer, librarian of 
Hemet Public Library for the past year 
and a half, has resigned and Mi.ss Mab^l 
Durrenberger has been appointed to the 
position. Misfe' Spencer's resignation was 
effective Dec. 1. but Miss Durrenberger 
will not take up the work until Dec. 15, 
when she will have completed her course 
in the Riverside Library Service School. 
Miss Durrenberger is a local girl, a 
graduate of the Hemet Union High 
School. From Dec. 1 to Dec. 15 Mrs 
Jessie Ayleswoith and Mrs J. O. Perci- 
val, both former Hemet librarians, will 
be in charge and Avill undertake con&'Ider- 
able reorganization work. — -Hemet Hews, 
D 3 

Riverside. 

Riverside [Free] Public Library. 
Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

The "Fifty Books of the Year" and 
"Printing for Commerce" Exhibitions of 
The American Institute of Graphic Arts 
were shown in the lobby and reading 
rooms of the library for two weeks begin- 
ning December 27. The related lecture 
was delivered and slides shown to over 
two hundred people, among whom v\'ere 
the members of the Orange Belt Frank- 
lin Printers Association who came from 
the surrounding towns for their monthly 
meeting and to see the exhibits. 

Because of adverse action by the City 
Council on its budget petition, the entire 
Board of Directors resigned October S. 
The resignation of the librarian, pre- 
viously given to the former Board, was 
later tabled by the new Board appointed 
October 11. This Board has since organ- 
ized as follows : Loyal C. Kelley, Presi- 
dent ; Fred C. Hamblin, Secretary ; Mrs 
W. H. Ellis, Book Committee ; Dr John 
Gardner ; Mr J. E. Killian. 

Rirerside Libra I'l/ Heivice School. 
The Riverside Library Service School 
begins its 1927 year course with fourteen 
students, with a possible enrollment of 
sixteen. The library school building has 
been repainted and otherwise put into 
better condition and new tables provided 
for the students. 



30 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued. 
l)r Frank P. Hill, Chief Librarian of 
Brooklyn Public Library, will deliver a 
series of special li^otures on library ad- 
ministration to the Riverside Library 
Service School during January. 

CiiAS. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $1.58,086,066 (tax- 
able for county $129,416,920). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

Two changes were made in the loca- 
tions of branches during the quarter. On 
October 6, the Elverta Branch was moved 
from the store of Mr L. Chaffin, to the 
store of Anderson Brothers, as Mr 
Chaffin, who has given the County Li- 
brary such long service, was no longer 
in a position to care for the branch. The 
Sylvan Branch, which had been housed 
in the library room of the Sylvan School, 
had long outgrown its quarters, so the 
women of the Sylvan Mothers Club 
erected a suitable building upon a loca- 
tion adjacent to the school, the County 
Library supplied tasteful and substan- 
tial furnishings, all of the books from the 
old branch were returned and replaced 
by a new collection, and on November 16, 
a public opening was held, which was 
attended by many residents of the dis- 
trict, all of whom expressed themselves 
as greatly pleased with the larger scope 
and greater comfort and convenience of 
the new library room and its facilities. 
Mrs George A. Gilliam is custodian in 
charge of the branch, which is open for 
two hours a day, four days of the week. 

During the quarter, the County Li- 
brarian has spoken upon the following 
subjects : The drama of Eugene O'Neill, 
illustrated by a reading from the Em- 
peror Jones, Oct. 25, at Oroville Wom- 
an's' Club ; Ballads and balladry, illus- 
trated with ballads old and new, Nov. 3, 
at Ilocklin Woman's Club ; Children's 
Reading, illustrated by the telling of 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
stories for children, Nov. 19, Elder Creek 
Parent Teacher Association. 

CoRNEiJA D. Provines, Lib'n. 

Sacramento. 

JSacramento Free Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

The second series of art exhibits in the 
library began with paintings in oil 
by Mrs George Briggs, a local artist. Her 
work covered a variety of subjects — por- 
traits and landscapes. The latter were 
versatile in treatment. Two studies of 
eucalyptus trees attracted considerable 
attention. Sand dunes contrasted with 
a mountain trail in all the freshness of 
spring, while a fruit stand and building 
in the Chinese quarter added a gay note 
of color. 

This was followed by the annual exhibit 
of the Print Makers Association of Cali- 
fornia, which brought many visitors to the 
library. There were a number of ex- 
quisite block prints in color which, min- 
gled with the delicate etchings, made one 
of the most beautiful displays we have 
had. 

Two unique touches were given to 
Children's Book Week. Louise Tessin, 
who illustrated Bunny Bearskin, one of 
the fall publications, brought some of her 
original panels for the book, together with 
examples of color design done by her 
pupils, to place on display in the Chil- 
dren's Room. The Camp Fire girls made 
out of cardboard a miniature scene from 
the Sleeping Princess, that gave a touch 
of fairyland to the room. Tiny dolls, ex- 
quisitely dressed, lay sleeping on the 
throne. A small reproduction of the fatal 
spinning wheel was perfect. These two 
displays brought more parents and chil- 
dren to see the new books tlian anything 
we have done before and cost very little 
effort on our part. The pasteboard set 
fired the ambition of a little Portuguese 
boy who had always been the despair of 
his teachers and he made a small model 
of the huge engine No. 5000, recently 
manufactured for the Southern Pacific. 
He used odds and ends of wood — -cigar 
boxes and spools — painting the finished 
product black with silver for the steel. 
As it was the first time he has shown any 
interest of any kind, his teacher asked if 



vol. 2, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



31 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento — Continued. 

it might be shown in the Children's Room, 
where, of course, he would come to look at 
it and perhaps take home a book. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation .$15,272,399 (taxable 
for county .$13,546,440). 

San Benito Co. E^ee Libeaky, Hol- 
LISTEE. Miss Florence J. Wheaton, 
Lib'n. 

The County Library maintained a booth 
at the County Fair. The exhibit consisted 
of books and pictures and occupied a 
prominent place in the exhibit building. 

Miss Edith Norton of Kern County 
Free Library accepted a position as assist- 
ant and began her duties in November. 
Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
. Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Fop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation .$115,823,908 (tax- 
able for county $72,154,574). 

San Beenakdino Co. Fbee Libeaey, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

Miss Waters, County Librarian, spoke 
before the Parent Teacher Association of 
Etiwanda December 15 on Children's lit- 
erature, and on books especially helpful 
to parents on Child study. Miss Gladys 
Green, San Bernardino, who is a gradu- 
ate of Stanford University, late of New 
York Public Library, entered the County 
Free Library December 15 as temporary 
assistant until February 1. 1927. Miss 
Yelma Vaniman, graduate of the Riverside 
Library Service School, one year course, 
entered the County Free Library Decem- 
ber 8, as temporary assistant in the cata- 
loging room until February 1, 1927. Miss 
Dula Richardson, who has been book- 
keeper and in charge of statistics for sev- 
. eral years, resigned in December to be 
- married. Miss Evelyn Foster, typist and 
stenographer in the cataloging room, was 
advanced to take Miss Richardson's posi- 
tion. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

In the new Rialto City Hall, the build- 
ing of which is going to start soon, a room 
27 by 34 feet with a small storage room 
and lavatory has been included in the 
plans for housing the Rialto Branch. 

Mr Al Pruitt is the new custodian of 
the Camp Baldy Branch, having taken 
charge December 13. The new custodian 
at Ludlow Branch is Mrs L. C. Pearse, 
who began October 1. Mrs Ada E. Brown 
took charge of Osdick Branch November 
24. A community branch was established 
in the Lake Arrowhead School October 7, 
with Mrs Gladys L. Potter as custodian. 

Service to two junior high schools, 
Highland and Rialto. in the San Ber- 
nardino City High School District, is be- 
ing given under contract with San Ber- 
nardino City Board of Education for one 
school year. 

Declez School, ]Mrs Clara Payne teacher, 
began service November 22. This is a 
part of the Fontana School District, but 
is several miles away from the Fontana 
School, so is served as a separate unit. 
Kramer Hills Emergency School, Miss 
Carrie Higbee teacher, began service Oc- 
tober 23. Morongo School re-opened Oc- 
tober 26, 1926, after being discontinued ■ 
since September, 1923. 

Bryman School, which was a part of 
the Oro Grande School District, has been 
discontinued, as has also been Vidal Emer- 
gency School. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

Highland. 

Highland Library District Library. 

George M. Rattenbury has been awarded 
the contract to build the library and club- 
house for the Highland Public Library 
Board and the Highland Woman's Club, 
at the price of $28,032. The contract 
includes all work except painting, the 
architects announced. The building will 
be of frame and stucco construction with 
tile roof. — Los Angeles Journal of Com- 
merce, N 4 

Request has been made of the Board of 
Supervisors by the Highland Library 
District to sell the library property on 
Main street in Highland. Bids will prob- 
ably be opened for the property January 
3, 1927. This property has served the 
district for a number of years, but with 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Highland — Continued, 
the construction of the new Woman's 
('lub building in Highland, a section of 
which will be occupied by the library, the 
district wishes to dispose of its ])resent 
property. — San Bernardino Sun, D 19 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

The "Lyon Wing" of the Albert K. 
Smiley Public Library was formally 
thrown open to the public December 1, 
the dedication exercises taking place at 
three o'clock in the assembly room of the 
new wing. This splendid addition is a 
gift to the city of Redlands from Mr Eld- 
ridge jM. Lyon, a pioneer citizen of Red- 
lands and a member of the Library Board 
of Trustees. President Kirke H. Field, 
of the Library Board, was in general 
charge of the exercises. Mr Lyon spoke 
briefly, presenting the wing to the city, 
Mayor Wheaton accepting for the city. 
The assemblage was very happy to have 
Hon Daniel Smiley and Mrs Smiley 
present and to hear Mr Smiley speak. 
Other speakers were Dr V. C. Duke, 
President of the University of Redlands. 
H. G. Clement, Superintendent of the 
Redlands City Schools, and Miss Inness, 
the Librarian. After the program guests 
were invited to inspect the new wing, 
which is to be used mainly for adminis- 
trative purposes, and the other depart- 
njents of the library. The library was 
decorated throughout with beautiful bas- 
kets of flowers. 

Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

SAN DiEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $123,516,956 (tax- 
able for county $103,450,380). 

National City. 

National City Free Public Library. 
Miss Susie Moore, Lib'n. 

At the December meeting of the library 
board, the salary of the librarian was 
raised to $100 a month, to become effec- 
tive .January 1, 1927. Beginning at the 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
National City — Continued. 

same time, the assistant. Miss Ellen 
Fisher, is to receive $25 monthly instead 
of .$22.50.— National City News, D 10 

San Diego. 

JSan Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia Plaister, Lib'n. 

The San Diego Public Library is rejoic- 
ing over a 10 per cent increase in its 
general budget for 1927, and a $15,000 
grant for a branch library building for 
Logan Heights. This branch in 1926 
handled a circulation of 92,190 books in a 
small rented store building. 

A Reader's Aid Department has been 
established in the San Diego Public 
Library under the direction of Miss Mar- 
garet Collins. Help is given students and 
adult readers in locating books and mate- 
rial they wish, and in compiling reading 
lists for individual patrons. 

Animal stories are being told over a 
San Diego radio station by library em- 
ployees in conjunction with the hour re- 
served for the O'Rourke Zoological In- 
stitute. 

Miss Lena B. Hunzicker, who had been 
reference librarian in the San Diego 
Public Library for thirteen years, died 
October 23 at her home in San Diego. 
She had been ill for six months but we 
were hoping a rest and vacation would 
bring her back to us. Her loss is one 
which will be keenly felt not only by the 
library staff but by her many friends 
whom she had made in the library service. 
Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

La Jolla Library Association Li- 
brary ANO Branch of San Diego P. L. 
Miss Alice V. Carey, Lib'n. 

Miss Alice V. Carey, recently of the 
Cincinnati Public Library, began her 
duties as librarian of the La Jolla Library 
December 7. — La Jolla Journal, D 9 

State Teachers College Library'. 
Edward L. Hardy, Prin. Mrs Charlotte 
G. Robinson. Lib'n. 

The college now carries a full three 
years' course accredited at Stanford Uni- 
versity and at the University of Califor- 
nia, and for the four years" work in Edu- 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



33 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
cation grants a degree. The.se changes 
have necessarily determined largely the 
nature of the reference and circulating 
books added to the library shelves. The 
same is true regarding the periodical list. 
About $450 is spent there, including over 
ninety subscriptions. 

About 800 accessions have been made 
since we opened the middle of September, 
and these stressed particularly history 
and affairs of international importance. 

The faculty of the college has been 
increased by seven new members and the 
attendance (exclusive of the training 
school children) is over a thousand. The 
need for seats in the library, which is 
also the study room, has forced us to- 
equip even the hall with bookstacks and 
reading tables. 

Mrs Charlotte G. Robinson, the libra- 
rian, returned the first of January, after 
an absence of four months spent in and 
around New York City, during which 
time she attended the A. L. A. meeting 
at Atlantic City, visited the Sesqui- 
Centennial, and made a two-weeks' motor 
trip through New England, visiting many 
places of historic interest, museums, art 
galleries, scientific institutions, and libra- 
ries, with lectures, the opera, and the 
theaters included for good measure. Mrs 
Harriet B. Stovall filled Mrs Robinson's! 
place during her absence. 

Miss Genevieve Kelly, the cataloger,' 
made a brief change by teaching sociology, 
and working in the library at Flagstaff, 
Arizona, during the summer session, re- 
turning to us in September. 

Mrs Charlotte G. Robinson, Lib'n. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. .506,676. 
Assessed valuation $982,.560,022 (tax- 
able for county .$756,583,094). 

+ [FkEE] PcJBLIC LiBKAJBY OF THE 

City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

The San Francisco Public Library has 
opened two new branches within the year, 
one at Ligleside Terrace and the other at 
3—49631 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

Glen Park. In two months we shall opun 
a third in the Bayview district and within 
six months shall have another at Sau 
Bruno. 

.January 1 all staff salaries were in- 
creased by .$10 a month. However, the 
minimum for assistants is still $90. 

The total circulation of books from the 
library for the month of December, 1926, 
was 189,360. 

Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

The Max Kuhl collection of rare books, 
created by friends of the late Max Kuhl 
in tribute to his memory, will be formally 
opened to the public at the San Francisco 
Public Librai-3' at 10 a.m. October 6. The 
collection is composed of examples of the 
finest presses from the earliest days of 
printing art to the present time. In addi- 
tion to their typographical interest many 
of the books in the collection have beauti- 
ful bindings, made by such masters of the 
craft as Saugorski, Sutcliffe, Cobden-San- 
dersou, Belle McMurtrie and Riviere. 
The books are displayed in specially 
designed cases which permit them to be 
shown oi>en. The room will be open to 
A'isitors from 10 a.m. to noon and from 
2 to 4 p.m. — San Francisco Chronicle O 5 

The Hexry Pierce Library. Miss 
Elisabeth S. Benton, Lib'n. 

The library is now open from 9.30 a.m. 
to 4.30 p.m. daily except Saturday and 
Sunday. It contains about 13-39 volumes. 
Elisabeth S. Benton, Lib'n. 

The Library of the American Trltst 
CoxMPANY. Annette Windele, Lib'n. 

With the merger of the Mercantile 
Trust Company of California and the 
American Bank the name of this library 
will become The Library of the American 
Trust Company. 

Annette Windele, Lib'n. 

University of California. Medical 
School and Hospitals Library. Dr 
L. S. Schmitt, Acting Dean. Miss Eva 
West, Lib'n. 

I have to report the appointment, .July 
1, 1926, of Miss Edaue Frances Rowell 
as Assistant Librarian to succeed Miss 
Dorothy Deming. resigned. Miss Rowell 
is of the 1926 class in Library Science, 
University of California. 

Eva West, Lib'n. 



34 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



;jan., 1927 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area,- 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation .$ 121. 62.3. 70.'! (tax- 
able for county .i;l04.200,24.5). 

Sax JoAQuiA Co. Free Library, 
Stocktox. Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib"n. 

A drive on "The care of books" was 
conducted by the school department of 
the Stockton Public Library at the open- 
ing of the fall term 1920. with very gi'ati- 
fying results. 

As a means of teaching the right use of 
books and at the same time encouraging 
the readiiig, teachers were asked to require 
of each child an essay to be written on 
"The care of books." The best essays 
were selected and special prominence 
given them during Good Book Week, and 
to those schools producing the best essays 
choice selections of new books were sent 
by the librarian. By this means we have 
been able, through the cooperation of the 
Superintendent of Schools, to place on the 
child's monthly report card "The care of 
books" on which he is graded. 

As a means of establishing contact with 
children and stimulating interest in books, 
the school librarian has recently visited 
the schools and shown to the children pic- 
tures that represent prominent characters 
in books. The children were asked to give 
the title of the book which the picture 
represents. As a reward the librarian 
offered to send to the one guessing the 
highest number, any book that he would 
like most to read. 

During the quarter great interest has 
been shown in the weekly story-hours con- 
ducted at the M a n t e c a and Tracy 
Branches. At Manteca. Miss Mary Cola- 
lian gave the initial story-hour, and since 
Ihen tlie custodian in charge has arranged 
weekly programs. There are two weekly 
story-hours at Tracy. One is held at the 
Soutiiside School, where there is a mixed 
licpulation of children, and the other is 
lield at the West Park Scliool. Mrs R. A. 
Baumgarden i:f the Women's Cluli has 
charge and stories of history, myths, na- 
Iri'i' and advpntur(> are given to encour- 
nyi' the children to borrow books from 
tlipir l)raiK-li library. Teachers of the 
conuunnily coojjerate with the Women's 
Cluli of I'racy in this most excellent work. 
Ida E. Condit. Lib'n. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton. 

tSTOCKTOX P^REE PUBLlC LIBRARY. 

Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

The publicity given the "Heading With 
a I'urpose" series, published by the Ameri- 
can Library Association has caused quite 
an interest in the subjects presented. 
Prominent educational people in the com- 
munity have cooperated with us in writing 
special articles on the different booklets. 

The Roosevelt Circle of the G. A. R. 
presented two flags to the library, one of 
which was presented to the Juvenile De- 
partment and the other for the main read- 
ing room. Appropriate exercises were 
conducted at both presentations. 

During Good Book Week, .jOO lists of 
the children's liooks on display were 
given to the visitors of the .Juvenile De- 
partment. A prize essay contest was 
held previous to Good Book ATeek in 
which all the children of the city schools 
in the sixth grade wrote an essay on 
poetry. Twenty-.six honor badges were 
presented the Saturday of Good Book 
Week to the children who had written 
the l>esr and most original essaj'. Two 
films were shown for the story-honr of 
that week. The Pied IMper. and The 
Children's Hour. These piclures were 
later shown at the Municipal Baths 
Bi-anch I.,il)rary story-hour for Good Book 
Week at which over one hundred chil- 
dren attended. 

A most enjoyable half hour was spent 
by members of the staff at a meeting of 
unusual interest on Thursday, December 
23, at 8.15 a.m. Each member was 
requested to bring a "Woolworth gift." 
These were placed around the Christmas 
tree in the main reading room of the 
library. A lo^-ely fountain pen was pre- 
sented to ]\Iiss Condit by the library staff. 
The "gifts" wert^ then exchanged caus- 
ing much merriment, which only sali- 
sided on the stroke of nine. 

Ida E. Condit. Lib'n. 

Stockton High School L ib r a r y. 
W. F. Ellis. Priu. :Miss :\rildred Smith. 
Lib'n. 

At (he lieginning of tlu' school yt'iw. 
tluj Stockton High School library was 
moved from its old f(uarters in the cor- 
ner room, on the second floor of the 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



35 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued, 
main building-, to n central location on 
the first floor. ft was refurnished 
throughout with uuit shelving and light 
oak furnitui"e. The tables are linoleum 
topped. The equipment which incKules a 
charging desk and counter, periodical 
case, special display case and pamphlet 
file, is now quite complete. The I'oom 
in which we are now housed has seating 
space for one hundred readers. This is 
over double the space we formerly had, 
and the room has already been filled to 
its full capacity. A work room opens 
off the reading room, where there will 
be space for stacks, as the shelves 
become too crowded. Besides student 
lielp, a paid part-time assistant has been 
added to the library. Twelve new peri- 
odicals have been added, making thirty- 
five for use in the library, besides others 
used in departments. 

Due to a delay in the shipment of the 
furniture, the library reading room was 
not opened until the last of October. 
Books were loaned over a table through 
the door to the students for two months. 
The students as well as the librarian 
are enjoying the new surroundings. 

Mildred ^mith, Lib'n. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. i21,893. 
Assessed valuation $39,078,780 (tax- 
able for county .$33,733,457). 

San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

The Central Coast Counties Institute, 
which includes San Benito, Santa Cruz, 
Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties, 
was held in Monterey Dec. 13 to IG. 
The librarians in attendance wei"e ]Miss 
Florence J. Wheaton of San Benito 
County. Miss Anne Hadden and her 
school assistant. Miss Dorothy P^llis, of 
Monterey County, Miss Flo A. Gantz 
of San Luis Obispo County. 

Oceano Branch Library has been moved 
to its new quarters in the new Commun- 
ity Building. The town equips and cares 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued, 
for the housing of the branch and has a 
very attractive location. 

Custodians have been changed at I'ismo 
Beach and San ^Miguel. Mrs Henry 
Keeler replaces Mrs Ann Bolton at 
I'ismo Beach and Mrs Belle M. Parker 
is now custodian at San Miguel in place 
of her daughter Doris. 

We have been able to have a part time 
assistant since October 1. The work is 
being done by Miss Ruby M. Gantz. 

We are very happy over the reelection 
of Robert L. Bird, County Superintend- 
ent of Schools, as Mr Bird is a true 
friend of the County Free Library. 

Flo a. Gantz, Lib'n. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
braky. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was celebrated 
with excellent results. The librarian 
gave talks to the Monday Club and to 
the Parent Teacher Association. An 
exhibit of good books was held at the 
library and visited by old and young. 
At the request of the Librarian the book 
stores had very good window displays of 
books for children, and press notices were 
also used. As a result much interest has 
been displayed in good reading for chil- 
dren, and the Parent Teacher Associa- 
tion has asked for another talk on chil- 
dren's reading for the January meeting. 
Abbie S. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat. Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $48,109,329 (taxable 
for county .$43,940,885). 

San Mateo Co. Free Library, Red- 
wood City. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

A branch with a reading room will be 
opened at Woodside soon. A large, well- 
lighted room in the old school building 
has been equipped with book cases, tables 
and chairs supplied by the County Li- 
brary, and the walls of the room are to 
be freshly tinted and a new floor laid. 
Mrs Tregenza will be custodian. 

The Menlo Park Branch in the Kuck 
Hotel has new book cases, chairs and 



36 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



SAN MATEO CO. — Continued, 
tables. The circulation has increased 
greatly since the removal of this branch 
to the downtown location. 

Pilarcitos School. Half Moon Bay, 
joined the County Free Library Septem- 
ber 1. 1926. 

Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Inez M. Crawford, I^ib'n. 

Mrs Julia Peyton Johns, one of the 
board of trustees of San Mateo Public 
Library, died October 22. Our city coun- 
cil, November 15, appointed to fill the 
vacancy Mrs A. J. Green. Mrs Green is 
known as first "mother" to be elected by 
the Disabled Veterans, a spontaneous ges- 
ture of reward for unostentatious devo- 
tion to these aflHicted, ofttimes forgotten, 
men. Mrs Johns' term was to have ex- 
pired in 1929, so Mrs Green's will do so. 
Inez M. Crawford, Lib'n. 

South San Francisco. 

South San Francisco High School 
Library. Guy J. Roney, Prin. 

The library of the South San Francisco 
High School has now 1010 volumes in it, 
and we subscribe to twenty magazines. 
Edla E. Broman, Lib'n. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $74,627,787 (taxable 
for county $64,054,990). 

Santa Barbara. 

Santa Barbara Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs Frances Burns Linn, Lib'n. 

A colorful fountain of Hispano Mor- 
esque tile has been built in the patio of 
the library, the gift of a friend who sent 
a check to Mrs Linn "to add a bit of color 
to the court." The fountain is a rectan- 
gular plaque against an arch at the end 
of the court, composed of brilliant blues, 
greens, orange and white. To correspond 
with the fountain, the chairs have been 
painted bright green, and special iron 
tables on which the readers may place 
their books and magazines have been 
made having tops of tile in unique designs. 
— Santa Barbara Press, O 30 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $126,507,637 (tax- 
able for county $110,715,675 ) . 

Mountain View. 

Mountain View High School Li- 
brary. W. E. Hester, Prin. 

We have now about 1500 volumes, in- 
cluding fiction, and are subscribing to 31 
magazines for 1926-27. This high school 
is served by the Santa Clara County Free 
Library. 

M. MOLLE. 

San Jose. 

San Jose I^eee Public Library. Mrs 
Edith Daley, Lib'n. 

The November observance of Children's 
Book Week proved to be the most success- 
ful of all, not alone in number of beauti- 
ful new books, but in attendance and co- 
operation with schools and book stores. 
Decorations in poster-like orange and 
black were so unique and attractive that, 
in response to many requests they are still 
making gay and glad the big room which 
is the children's own. Bigger plans for 
next November are already under way. 

-4t the close of the fiscal year. Novem- 
ber 30, 1926, the figures showed a total 
circulation of 197,633, an increase over 
the previous year of 25,734. Non-fiction 
increase (adult) was 18 per cent; juve- 
nile 11 per cent. The very large fiction 
increase told the story of a satisfied 
public, library patrons having been 
granted the vacation privilege of taking 
fiction on non-fiction cards. The response 
to this offer was "immense." November, 
in the juvenile department, proved beyond 
a doubt that children can be led to read 
good books. With a circulation for the 
month of 3683, the non-fiction books 
totaled 1036. In this department all non- 
fiction volumes are called "Green Card 
Books," owing to their circulation on 
cards of that color, and the name is much 
less formidable than "non-fiction." 

The library purchased, and is now dis- 
tributing. 500 lists of the "100 Worth- 
while Books." The books listed are dis- 
played on a table near the main circula- 
tion desk ; lists are made easily available ; 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



37 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
San Jose — Continued, 
and publicity is getting results. Not many 
volumes are left on the table — even the 
weary-looking and worn old volumes doing 
one more circulation of their educational 
"bit." 

The Juvenile "Green Card Club" is 
organizing for another nine weeks' course 
of "Green Card Book" reading, actual 
start to be made February 1. One book 
each week, of a designated classification, 
must be read and a written review of the 
book handed to the librarian. This course 
is to be "Travel in Bookland with Stop- 
over in Fairyland." The "stop-over" may 
be made at any time during the nine 
weeks, and either Fairj'land or the Land 
of Folklore may be the pleasant place 
chosen — thus adding a tenth book. Regu- 
lar printed tickets are issued, to be 
"punched" for each book-stop. Each 
traveler must have a traveling companion, 
and a very special "something" is prom- 
ised to all w^ho journey to the end with 
the same companion. The juveniles are 
eagerly enrolling and taking great joy in 
seeing their names — with chosen compan- 
ions^appear on the big "Travel Bulletin 
Board." 

Librarian Edith Daley has been hon- 
ored by Edwun Markham in his "Book of 
Poetry," two of her poems having been 
included. They are "Miracles" and "The 
Little Words." 

The resignation of Alice King was ac- 
cepted by the Board, and Miss Leona 
Spitzer is substituting to fill the vacancy. 
Mrs King has left library work. 

Many periodicals have been added to 
the library's regular subscription list, 
and at this time an intensive effort is 
being made, by means of attractive dis- 
plays, to increase the circulation of peri- 
odical literature. One corner of the 
library is made to approximate a "news 
stand" — and with good results. 

Mrs Edith Daley, Lib'n. 

Santa Clara. 

Santa Clara Free Public Library. 
Miss Mary A. Mulhall, Lib'n. 

The Santa Clara Public Library has 
lately received a gift of nearly one hun- 
dred books presented by Delos Druffel Jr. 
Tlie books are nearly all juvenile and 
children's books by well known authors. — 
Santa Clara News, N 18 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 42.5 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $26,854,793 (taxable 
for county $22,905,840). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,.S11. 
Assessed valuation $25,222,656 (tax- 
able for county $15,208,650). 

Anderson. 

Anderson Union High School Li- 
brary. Roy E. Simpson, Prin. Miss 
Ruth L. Gill, Lib'n. 

In the fall the Anderson Union High 
School received a gift of about 85 books. 
These books have been examined and the 
very old and unsuitable ones discarded. 
The others, which were mostly fiction and 
textbooks, were accessioned, cataloged 
and put on the shelves ready for use. 

During the National Education Week 
our school gave a program and the 
buildings were open for inspection. The 
library class made suitable posters con- 
cerning library usage. We also cut out 
the pictures on the front covers of all of 
the Literary Digests. In most cases 
these are reproductions of paintings of 
old masters. These we pasted on heavy 
rey paper and drew black margins around 
them. We tacked them up for exhibition 
and now any department may use them 
upon request. 

Heretofore the textbook collection has 
been in charge of a different person every 
year or two. It has now definitely been 
made a part of the librarian's duties and 
it seems to be fitting in well with the 
regular routine of the school library. The 
library class can now be called on to 
repair used books and barco the new ones. 
RxJTH L. Gill, Lib'n. 

Redding. 

Redding [Free Public] Carnegie Li- 
brary. Mrs Lizzie B. Ross, Lib'n. 

Mrs Fabian Fisher has presented the 
City Library with twenty-four volumes 
of children's stories, and the donation 
makes a splendid addition to the juvenile 
list of books in the library stacks. — Red- 
ding Searchlight, O 2 



38 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



rjan., 1927 



SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
Couul.v seat. Downieville. 
Area, 957 stj. mi. Pop. 1783. 
Assessed valuation $3,202,043 (taxable 
for county $2,813,435). 

SiEKKA Co. Free Libkaky. Miss 
Edith (4antt, Lib'n. 

Mrs Rena Wright, custodian of the 
Downieville Branch Library, died Decem- 
ber 18, after a very brief illness. Her 
sister, Miss Josephine Tomola, our custo- 
dian at Alleghany, succeeds her as post- 
mistress and custodian of the branch 
library at Downieville. We have no cus- 
todian at Alleghany, as yet. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County neat. Yreka. 
Area, G079 sq. mi. Pop. lS,-545. 
Assessed valuation $30,004,501 (tax- 
able for county $21,456,025). 

SiSKFYOu Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

Miss Grace E. Paul, formerly of the 
Tehama County Free Library staff, suc- 
ceeded Miss Kathryn Simonds, who joined 
the Contra Costa County i'ree Library 
staff November 1. 

The Tule Lake School District (post 
office Malin, Oregon, but lying in Siski- 
you County) joined the County Library 
this quarter. 

Ellen B. Frink. Lib'n. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,002. 
Assessed valuation $38,100,855 (taxable 
for county .$30,990,900). 

Vacaville. 

Vacaville Union High School Li- 
brary DiST. Library' and Branch, 
Solano Co. Free Library. Mrs Pearl 
Moore, Lib'n. 

At a meeting of the library trustees 
held the evening of December 1, the resig- 
nation of Mrs John Morris (Nan Reese) 



SOLANO CO. — Continued. 
Vacaville — Continued, 
as librarian was accepted to take effect 
.January 1, and Mrs Pearl Moore was 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mrs Morris 
has held the position of librarian ever 
since the library was started, and her 
long and faithful service has been gen- 
erally appreciated by the patrons of the 
library .^ — Yacaville Reporier, D 3 

Vallejo. 

Vallejo [P"'ree] Public Library 
i*.ND Branch, Solano Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss L. Gertrude Doyle. Lib'n. 

A crowd estimated at 1500 streamed 
into the local library the afternoon and 
evening of December 6, following a period 
of three weeks in which the library was 
closed for repairs. Attaches of the 
library were kept busy and 705 books 
were taken out during the afternoon and 
evening. 

In the west side of the building a mez- 
zanine fioor was built, to be used for a 
reading room. Under the mezzanine floor 
the old cases were torn down and re- 
placed with oak-faced shelves. About 
$2,000 was expended on the improve- 
ments. Many new books have been 
added to the various departments of the 
library. — Vallejo Times-Herald, D 7 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $51,323,700 (tax- 
able for county $4.3,470. 110). 

Healdsburg. 
Healdsbltrct Carnegie [Free] Public 
Library. Miss Aubrey Butler, Lib'n. 

Miss Christal Fox tendered her resig- 
nation as Librarian of Healdsburg Pub- 
lic Library at a meeting of the trustees 
October 19. Miss Aubrey Butler has 
been appointed to fill the position. Miss 
Fox, who has ably filled the position 
here for six years, is leaving November 
1 to accept the position of assistant in 
the Palo Alto Public Library. — Healds- 
burs' T rib II DC, O 20 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



39 



STANISLAUS COUWTY. 

(Sixteenth clnss. ) 
County seat, JNIodesto. 
Area, I486 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $03,311,551 (tax- 
able for county $54,407,685). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Libkaky, Mo- 
PESTO. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

The week of October 18 an exhibit of 
etchings and prints from the California 
Print Makers Association was held at 
Patterson Branch. One da\- during the 
week the Patterson Study Chib met at 
the librai-y and the county librarian gave 
a talk on etching and etchers, using in 
additicju to the exhibit some rar,- old 
prints and some original wood blocks 
loaned by Mr .John .J. Xewbegin of San 
Francisco. Before returning the exhibit 
the prints v.-ere on view for a day at 
Mr Henry Library in Modesto. Another 
exhibit is being planned as this one gave 
so much pleasure. 

The county librarian. October 11. ad- 
dressed the John Muir Parent Teacher 
Association on "Some new professional 
reading for parents.'" with an exhibit of 
the books themselves. She also gave a 
review of some "Worthwhile new liooks 
about old times" before the Ceres W. C. 
T. T'. December 10. 

The Booklovers" Clul) of Patterson was 
addressed. December 8, by Prof Pobanz 
of ^lodesto Junior College on the subject 
of "Astronomy," illustrated with vei"j' 
fine slides. Following I'rof Pobanz's ad- 
diess the county librarian spoke of the 
many aids for astronomy enthusiasts in 
the library. The Booklovers' are holding 
their meetings in the library for their 
third year. 

Mrs Ruth Xankeville of the county 
school department gave a talk at a meet- 
ing of the Empire Parent Teacher Asso- 
ciation during Children's Book Week, 
illustrating it with some of the beautiful 
books for children. A few days later she 
acted as one of the judges of a poster 
contest sponsored by the Belpassi Parent 
Teacher Association. 

Miss Amy May of the school depart- 
ment became Mrs Leland Caya, October 
31. She will continue her work here. 
Miss Carol Cox of Modesto, a student 
in the University of California Library 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 
School, put in lier practice work in the 
city and county lii^rary during her Christ- 
mas vacation. 

The Claus Branch was discontinued 
as a separate branch October 13 and 
the service to its patrons given through 
the Empire. Oakdale. and McHenry 
Branches. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn. Lib'n. 

Modesto. 
McHenry [Free] Public Library 
and Branch. Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

Mrs Clemence I'arks, for the past two 
vears desk curator in McHenry Library 
took up new duties as supervisor of 
branches for the Muskegon, Michigan, 
Public Library. Miss Dorothy Deming. 
recently assistant librarian of the Uni- 
versity of California Medical School, San 
Francisco, is acting as desk curator until 
the arrival of Mrs Esther F. Brayden. 
svho takes iirs Parks' place. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn. Lib'n. 

The purchase by the city of Modesto 
of the property in the rear of the Mc- 
Henry IJbrary for the future extension 
of the building and the increase of library 
facilities was authorized by the city 
count il at a special meeting Octol)er 5. 
The property was purchased from IL R. 
Pei'shall of Los Angeles, the owner, at 
a cost of .$5000, The newly ac(iuirefl 
site faces on I street and is 43 feet by 
ICO feet in depth. It is of sufficient size 
to permit the erection of an annex or 
extension equal in proportions to the 
existing library. The money for the 
cost of the ])roperly will come out of 
the surplus in the library fund and not 
out of the city's general fund. — Modesto 
Netrs HeraJfJ. O H 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 

County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $22,813,548 (taxable 
for county $18,084,190). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba City. 
Miss Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was observed 
from November 4 to December 25. Talks 
were made by the county librarian before 



40 



iSTEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



SUTTER CO.— Continued. 
I he Marysville Art Club aud the Yuba 
City Woman's Club, on "Children's Books 
of Today." Another talk, on "The Value 
of the Reading Habit" was made before 
the Parent Teacher Association of Yuba 
City. "Children's Books as Christmas 
Gifts" was given before the Home Depart- 
ments at Rio Oso and Nuestro. Exhibits 
of the new books for children were shown 
at the various meetings. An exhibit of 
late editions was maintained in the main 
library and was most popular with the 
mothers. A. L. A. lists; of books were dis- 
tributed throughout the county. The par- 
ents have manifested such keen interest in 
better books for their children and the 
reports show that so many new and de- 
lightful books Avere added to the children's 
libraries in Sutter County homes, that we 
feo] that this was the best week we have 
ever "put over." 

The first meeting of the Sutter County 
c-i stodians was held at headquarters, No- 
vember 4. Although the attendance was 
small, the enthusiasm was splendid. Mat- 
ters pprtaijiing tu l)rauch work — with pub- 
licity as the main subject — were discussed. 
The work of the scliool department was 
explained by Miss Stevenson and a resume 
of the advancement of libraries over the 
past TiO years with plans for our own 
advancement during the coming year was 
given by the county librarian. The meet- 
ing adjourned to meet again in six months, 
the unanimous request of the custodians 
present. 

On December 24, a Christmas Fairy 
(Mi?s Brockman of the library staff) told 
Cbr'stmas stories to twenty-five enchanted 
tots. The school department was trans- 
formed into a fitting place for a fairy by 
the use of greenery and a Christmas tree 
and shaded lights. This was one of tht 
most successful story hours ever held here. 

The County Library was instrumental 
in obtaining Miss Victoria Powell tc 
sjieak before the Marysville Art Club and 
the Yuba City Woman's Club December 
V). This lecture was largely responsible 
for the interest taken in The Miracle and 
I he great numbers attending the drama 
from this section. A set of very fine photo- 
graphs of the play, sent from the San 
Francisco headquarters, has been circu- 
lated from this library to schools and 
'luiis. Fra?jces M. Bukket, Lib'n. 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation .$2.3',023,.556 (taxable 
for county $19,286,150). 

Tehama Co. Free Libkaby, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

The outstanding feature of the quarter 
was the joint meeting of the 8th and 9th 
.districts of the C. L. A, To add to a 
very attractive program prepared by the 
presidents of these districts the weather 
man ordered a fine day which enhanced 
the genial atmosphere that pervaded the 
whole meeting. Many of the visitors 
availed themselves of the opportunity to 
■ isit both the county and the city libraries, 
which kept open house, and all enjoyed 
the time for leisurely visiting and exchange 
of ideas so valuable in all gatherings. 

On October 16 the teachers of the 
county organized a "Reading Club," which 
is to meet about once in two months. 
iBooks of professional interest are dis- 
cussed and reviewed and these reviews 
form the basis of a bulletin sent out by 
;the county library once a month, listing 
'teachers' books as well as juvenile books 
of worth that teachers should be ac- 
<iuainted with. 

; During Children's Book Week the 
[schools used a story written by a member 
of the Milwaukee Public Library Staff, 
jn which were the hidden titles of 75 
;books. The reaction to this story is evi- 
dent even yet in the requests for the books 
named in the story. A display of books 
jabout children's books and lists of books 
for parents comprised the exhibit at the 
main office of the library. 

Manton Branch and School, Los Mo- 
linos Branch, Gerber Branch and School, 
Bend. El Camino, Coming Public Library, 
and Squawhill Branches were visited 
during the quarter. El Camino has 
changed twice during the quarter but is 
finally located in the home of Mrs A. 
Drendel, Proberta. Reeds Creek re- 
opened after several months of inactivity 
at the home of Mrs Austin Spencer, Reeds 
Creek Route, Red Bluff, and Squawhill 
Branch was moved from the home of Mrs 
Gurnea, who has had it ever since it was 
established, to that of Mrs E. A. Drake, 
Route 1, Corning. Since the new location 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



41 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued, 
is a little more central, great hopes are 
held for an increase in circulation the 
coming year. 

On October 2. the librarian was prin- 
cipal speaker at "Ladies' Night" of the 
Achaean Club, another of those "Business 
Men's Eating Clubs" so scorned by Sin- 
clair Lewis and others ; the subject chosen 
as fitting for the evening was "Some Hu- 
morous Lights on Matrimony." Later in 
October the librarian spoke at the Boy 
Scouts' "Mother and Son" banquet on 
"Your Boy and Scouting." On November 
12, during American Education Week, the 
subject "Know Tour School" was treated 
before the P. T. A. On November 17. 
"Thunder on the Left" was reviewed for 
the literary section of the Women's Im- 
provement Club of Red Bluff. And judg- 
ing from the response by the audience to 
excerpts from Stewart's "Perfect Behav- 
ior," chosen for the Thanksgiving Day 
program at the High School, the librarian 
was "well received" November 24. The 
oratorical career ended with a talk before 
the Corning Farm Center the evening of 
December 7. 

Anne Beix Bau^ey, Lib'n. 

Tehama Co. Law Library, Red Bluff. 
H. S. Cans, Superior Judge. 

A new law library committee has just 
been appointed, consisting of H. S. Gans, 
Judge ; Geo. A. Hoag, Chairman Board of 
Supervisors ; Curtis E. Wetter ; W. P. 
Johnson and James T. Matlock. The last 
three are attorneys. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, .3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,815,166 (taxable 
for county $3,384,235). 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $89,898,573 (taxable 
for county $68,353,985). 

TiL\Kf; Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
^liss Gr ichen Flowei", Lib'n. 

Earl W. Hastings has succeeded J. K. 
Macomber as supervisor, his term of office 



TULARE CO.— Continued, 
being .January, 1927, to January, 1931. 
F. M. Pfrimmer is now chairman of the 
board. 

Two schools have joined the County 
Free Library during the quarter — Spring- 
ville, November 8, and Venice, Novem- 
ber 1. Mrs B. C. Anderson is the teacher 
custodian at Venice School. At Terra 
Bella Branch Mrs James Swan is suc- 
ceeding Mrs Jennie Whitwell as custo- 
dian. .January 1, 1927. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Tulare. 

TuLAEE Free Public Library and 
Branch, Tulake Co. Free Ijibrary. 
Mrs Rosa D. Reardon, lab'u. 

Children's Book Week, November 7 to 
13, was observed with special interest tliis 
year in Tulare Public Library in coopera- 
tion with the public schools. Woman's 
Club, Parent-Teacher Association and 
Girl Scouts. The library had the usual 
display of beautifully illustrated books 
suitable for gifts, and on Wednesday after- 
noon as a special treat Mrs W. T. Dixon 
told stories to the children. The Girl 
Scouts had on display in the library dolls 
of many lands and others dressed to rep- 
resent favorite characters from books. 
The Central Grammar School students 
gave two plays on Monday afternoon en- 
titled "The library adventures of Bob and 
Elizabeth" and "In Bookland," following 
which there was a book parade to the 
library and then to the Woman's Club. 
The art classes of the schools had a 
very good display of book-plates in the 
library during the week. Prizes Avere 
given by the library, the Woman's Club, 
and the Parent-Teacher Association, for 
the best girl's costume and the best boy's 
costume representing characters from 
books, the best book plate, and the best 
dressed doll. 

R. D. Reardon, Lib'n. 

Visalia. 

Visalia High School and Junior 
College Library. Wm. M. Coman, Prin, 
M. Florenire Thompson, Lib'n. 

Perhaps the greatest item of interest in 
connection with the Visalia High School 
and Junior College Library is the fact 
that we just came into being about the 
twentieth of September, 192(). Until the 



42 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



TULARE CO. — Continued. 
Visalia — Continued. 

present school year the High School re- 
ceived some service from the County 
Library. This relationship was dissolved 
this year and as a result the library was 
completely reorganized with a trained 
librarian in charge. The library was 
greatly enlarged, thus making the library 
occupy one whole wing of the building. 
The room is now fairly large, with plenty 
of windows, light and air. Tlie library is 
by no means a study hall. The study 
hall itself is directly across the hall from 
the library. Each period books are 
checked out for study hall use. While we 
have tables and chairs in the library, these 
are for the use of the Junior College 
students and for reference work by the 
High School pupils. At the present time 
we have some 2000 books. This is not a 
bad beginning, but the demand is far 
greater than the supply. There are many 
things to be desired and many problems 
still to be solved, but we have three out- 
standing points to be grateful for, namely : 
trained librarian, full time ; separate 
study hall ; distribution of textbooks not 
in connection with the library. 

This is only a birds-eye view of what 
we are doing. There are a great many 
possibilities for the making of a fine li- 
brary. With the beginning of the Junior 
College and the rapidly increasing attend- 
ance of the High School, we are looking 
forward to a larger and better library in 
the future. 

M. Florence Thompson. Lib'n. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 

Conntj' seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $12,317,844 (taxable 
for county $8,791,604). 

Ttjolumx\e Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Miss Muriel Wright, Lib'n. 

The Tuolumne County Library Branch 
at Hetch Hetchy Junction has been so 
successful during the last several months 
that at the request of L. T. McAfee, con- 
struction engineer there, branches are to 
be established at Brown's Camp, at Camp 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued. 
Pedi'o and at Oakdale Portal on the first 
of the year. 

The Herring Creek and Camp Crandall 
Branches have closed for the season. Both 
camps were open for about six months, 
during which the Herring Creek Branch 
circulated about 300 books and Camp 
Crandall about half as many. — Stockton 
Record, D 22 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $76,888,752 ( taxable 
for county $66,571,418). 

Ventura Co. Free Lii!rary, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

During Children's Boolf Week, talks 
were given to several clubs, displays of 
children's books made, and lists dis- 
tributed. Lists and posters were sent to 
branches and schools where use could be 
made of them. 

The Apache and Santa Ynez Schools iu 
the northern part of the county and the 
Yerba Buena in the southern, all inac- 
cessible, but soon to be made many hours 
and even days nearer by the new roads, 
were visited. 

Several schools iu the county have 
more than doubled the school attendance 
this year. This is due to the oil. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ventura. 

Ventura [Free] Public Library 
AND Branch. Ventura Co. Free 
Library. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, 
Lib'n. 

Miss IMemon, Children's Librarian, vis- 
ited each room in the Plaza and May 
Henning Schools, distributed lists in each 
and gave a little talk on Children's Book 
Week. One of the book stores gave her a 
window during the week in which posters 
were placed. 

The Public Library has arranged a 
schedule of salaries similar to that in 
the CountJ^ The regular assistants, after 
a year of satisfactory work, upon recom- 
mendation of the librarian, are to have 
their salaries raised $5 a month for the 
second and third years of work. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 



vol. 22, no. i; 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



48 



YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat. Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation .$34,138,665 (taxable 
for county .$27,427,804). 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $20,214,480 (taxable 
for county $16,702,445). 

Marysville. 

Marysville City [Free Public] 
Library. Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch, Lib'n. 

Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch will, October 15, 
assume her duties as librarian at the 
I'ackard Library, succeeding Miss Clara 
Tietjen. Miss Tietjen resigned as city 
lilirarian some time ago, but the city 



YOLO CO. — Continued. 
Marysville — Continued. 

council refused to accept her resignation 
until a librarian competent to fill her 
place could be obtained. Mrs Hatch has 
long experience as a librarian, and comes 
here from Los Angeles. — Marysville Ap- 
peal, O 12 

Improvements in the Packard Library 
building provided for when the budget was 
arranged for this fiscal year are now to be 
commenced under direction of Councilman 
Walter Kynoch. The roof is to be re- 
paired and the interior repaired and 
painted where necessary. The children's 
room is to be given special attention. 

A fund of from $75 to $100 a month is 
to be devoted to the purchase of new 
books, and arrangements have been made 
whereby books of the State Library will 
be drawn upon as requested without 
expense to the patrons, the city paying 
the cost. — Marysville Democrat, O 16 



il 



NEWS NOTES OP^ CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY Sl^PPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any 
lime. 

SUPPLIES. 

A. L- A. 

Headquaetees. 

Sfi E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and Mending. 

RlNDINO. 

Cooperative Bindery Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futernick Co., 444 Bryant St., 

Snn Francisco. Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J St., 

Sacramento. Calif. 
Silvias and Schoenbackler, 423 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Menotng. 

Slix Co., San .Jose. 

Stix-Parchment mending tissue. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases and Shelving. 

McKee & Wentwortli (Library Bureau 
Pistributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St.. TiOs Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Iloesee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes. 

l*acific Box P'actory, 2fi00 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



COREUGATED PaPEE CaeTONS. 

Illinois-Pacific Glas's Co., 15th and 
Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 
Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 



Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 

West 27th St., New York, N. Y. 
Sequoyah Studio, 319 42d st., Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House. lis S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles. Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles', Calif. 



Book Pockets, 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second St., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 



Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Horn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 



vol. 22, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



45 



Book Supports, Bracket and Pedai for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
, Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus !>:., 

Stockton. Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5th ave., Ncav 

York City. 
Chivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 

St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

For books in Chivers binding. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Ilimebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oakland, 
and 152 Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Le\'inson's The Book Store, 1012 K st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st.. 
Now York City. 

Newbegir's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parkers Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St.. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pumell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235 Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Clias. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Technical Book Co.. 525 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Handles only technical books. 



Books — Continued. 
T'nion Library Association, 118-120 I-^. 

25th St., New York City, 
^'roman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 

llarr Wagner, 149 New Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant 
ave. and Kearny St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

ExGLisii Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. 0. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
E. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray st., New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westermann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J 

Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris 

France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Yictoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co.. 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 
149 New Montgomery st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 



46 



NEWS NOTES OP^ CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Books — Continued. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission st,, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Second-Han D Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st.. 

New York City. 
Aiudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
R. F. Stevens & Krown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square. London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th st., New 

York, N. Y. 

For used Action. 

Especially Calif orniana. 

Dawson's Kook Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M. De Witt, 020 14th st., Oakland. 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th st.. Oak 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 
See Furniture and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring St., Los .\ngeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Clippings. 
Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial st., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles. Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 
For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 
Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Films. 
For Rent. 

American Red Cross Films, distributed 

by University of California Library, 

Berkeley, Calif. 
Fox Film Corporation, New York, 

N. Y. 
National Producers Film Service, 111 

Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept., 985 Market st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, 1138 Elmwood ave., 
Columbus, Ohio. 



vol. 22, no. IJ DIREOTOKY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



47 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Gi-iraes-Stassforth Stationerj- Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

>rcKee & Wentworth (Librarj' Bureau 
J'>istnbutors), 30 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pui-nell Stationery Co., 915 K .st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Kucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Piirnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sae 
ramento. Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st.. 
Los Angeles, and 5.59 Mission st.. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st.. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st.. New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. .Johnston & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Magazines. 

See Periodicals. 

Maps. 
Denoyer-Geppert Co., 52.3.5-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 



Maps — Continued. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st., New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi-Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), .39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Paste. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior. 136 Liberty st.. New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 

Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis St., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg.. New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 
F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 

Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 



48 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jau., 1927 



Periodicals — Continued. 
Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 

Square, New York City. 
Moore-Cottrell Subbcription Agencies, 

North Cohoctcn, N. Y. 
^lutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 

zer B'ldg-., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pacific News Bureau, G4.3 S. Olive st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
San Francisco News Co., 657 Howard 

St., San Francisco, Calif, 
G. E. Stechert & Co.. 31-33 E. iOth 

St., New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 

Lo.s Angele.s, Calif. 

Pictures. 
Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 
Boston, Mass. 

Kspeeially for reproduction of American art. 

Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th sL. 

New l''ork, N. Y. 

(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Viekery. Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles. Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse «& Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts., San Francisco. Calif. 

Shelf Label-Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co.. Madison, Wis. 

ilcKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St.. San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los .\.ngeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



Signs. 
Sam 11. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 
Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 
•S'ee Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 

Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 

W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View- 
Co.), 8.32 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 
Calif. 

George E. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For CaUfornia wild flowers, marine life, his- 
toric- views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 420 S. Spring St., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los' Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and 611 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
i''or full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 

»S'ee, also, this publication, p. 29. 

University of California School of Li- 
brarianship. For full information write 
to Chairman, School of Librarianship, 
University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 



vol. 22, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



49 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The officers of the American Library 
Association for 1926-27 are as follows : 

Geo. H. Locke, Chief Librarian, 
Toronto Public Library, President. 

Joseph L. Wheeler, Librarian, Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, 1st Vice- 
President. 

Anne M. Mulheron, Librarian, Library 
Association, Portland, 2d Vice-President. 
Carl H. Milam, Chicago, Secretary. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

The oflScers of the National Associa- 
tion of State Libraries for 1926-27 are 
as follows : 

Harrison J. Conant, Librarian, Ver- 
mont State Library, Montpelier, Vt., 
President. 

H. R. Mcllwaine, Librarian, Virginia 
State Library, Richmond, Va., Vice- 
President. 

Irma A. Watts, Reference Librarian, 
Pennsylvania Legislative Reference Bu- 
reau, Harrisburg, Pa. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1926-27 are : 

John T. Fitzpatrick, Law Librarian. 
New York State Library," Albany, N. Y., 
President. 

J. J. Daley, Librarian, Law Society of 
Upper Canada Library, Toronto, Canada, 
Vice-President. 

Lucile Vernon, New York City Bar 
Association, Secretarj'-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

'The officers of the League of Library 
Commissions for 1927 are : 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian, Cali- 
fornia State Library, Sacramento, Calif., 
President. 

Edward D. Tweedell, Assistant Li- 
brarian, The John Crerar Librai^, Chi- 
cago, Treasurer. 

Clarence B. Lester, Sec. Wisconsin 
Library Commission, Madison, Wis., 1st 
Vice-President. 



Fannie C. Rawson, Sec. Kentucky 
Library Commission, Frankfort, Ky., 2d 
Vice-President. 

Clara F. Baldwin, Director of Li- 
brary Division, Minnesota State Depart- 
ment of Education, St. Paul, Minn., Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Pacific Northwest 
Library Association for 1926-27 are : 

Anne M. Mulheron, Library Associa- 
lion, Portland, President. 

Annabel Porter, Seattle, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Helen Johns, Longview, Secretary. 

Effie L. Chapman, Seattle, Treasurer. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library 
Association for 1927 are : 

Northern Section — Elizabeth Patton, 
Garfield Junior High School, Berkeley, 
Pre.sideut. 

Margaret Girdner, High School of 
Commerce, San Francisco, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Southern S e c t i o n — Mrs Ethelwyn 
Laurence, Los Angeles High School, 
President. 

Hope L. Potter, South Pasadena Pligh 
School, Secretary-Treasi^rer. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The officers of the Special Libraries 
Association of Southern California for 
192.5-26 are : 

B. E. Edwards, Standard Oil Co., El 
Segundo, President.' 

Mrs R. E. Creveling, San Diego Con. 
Gas and Electric Co., San Diego, Vic(3- 
President. 

Mildred E. Schaer, Southern California 
Telephone Co., Los Angeles, Secretary- 
Treasui'er. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1926-27 are: 
Bonnie E. Strong, Standard Oil Co , 
San Francisco, President. 



-49631 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1921 



C. H. Judson, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., San Francisco, Vice 
President. 

Margaret Hart. San Francisco Bulletin, 
San Francisco, Secretary-Treasiirpv. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officers. 

President Margaret Girdner 

Vice-President Helen E. Mackay 

Secretary Lois Newman 

Treasurer .Joy .Tackson 

Executive board of five consisting of 
the above and ex-president of the preced- 
ing executive board (Anita Crellin). 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
liranch of their work. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 



be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a library that fills a posi- 
tion for which it has asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Library at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento, California. 

U. S. CONGRESS— SENATE BILL 
No. 4973. 

Senate Bill No. 497.3. introduced in 
Congress by Senator Johnson, of Cali- 
fornia, on December 22, 1926, provides 
for college and university libraries to 
become depositories for U. S. documents. 
The college librarians will appreciate the 
assistance of any librarians of the state, 
who will write to their representatives 
in Congress urging the passage of this 
bill. 

WANTS. 

Can some library supply Madera 
County Free Library with a copy of Over- 
land Monthly. January. 192-5? 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1925-26) 

Total school districts 3524 

Elementary 3231 

High (456 schools) 293 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $727,154.40 

Total expended for books for high schools $865,354.29 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,697,322 

Total volumes in high schools 3.032,088 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIlbtRARY ASSOCIATION. 



51 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Library, Sacramento. 

Vice-President, Mrs. Frances Burns 
Linn, Public Library, Santa Barbara. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sacra- 
mento. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Mrs. J. Wells Smith, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs. Henry Goodcell, Trus- 
tee Public Library, San Bernardino. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 
President, Marian P. Greene, Public 
Library, Alhambra. 

Special Libraries Section. 

Chairman, Margaret Hatch, Standard 
Oil Company Library, San Francisco. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice - President, Secretary - Treasurer and 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Blanche Gallo- 
way, C. E. Graves, Carleton B. Joeckel, 
Susan T. Smith, Mrs Nancy B. Vaughan. 

Auditing — Henry A. Kendall, Public 
Library, Eureka, chairman ; Mabel W. 
Thomas. 

'Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 

Eighth District, Lenala A. Martin ; 
Ninth District, Ellen B. Frink. 

Publications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Charles 
S. Greene, Mrs Corinne R. Tracy. 

Resolutions — Althea H. Warren, Pub- 
lic Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; Mrs 
Alma J. Danford, Anne Hadden. 

Certification — Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman (1930) ; 
Eleanor Hitt (1927) ; Mrs Theodora R. 
Brewitt (1928), Mary Barmby (1929), 
Susan T. Smith (1931). 



Cooperation between the C. L. A. and. 
the California Congress of Parents and 
Teachers — Mrs Charlotte K. Bissell, 
Public Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; 
Marian P. Greene, Wilhelmina Harper, 
Eva Leslie, Mrs. Alice G. Whitbeck. 

J. L. Gillis Memorial — Milton J. 
Ferguson, State Library, Sacramento, 
chairman ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor Hitt. 

Legislative — Cornelia D. Provines, 
County Free Library, Sacramento, chair- 
man ; Herbert V. Clayton, Jeannette M. 
Drake, Marion L. Gregory, Mrs Abbie 
S. Kellogg. 

Library Schools — Sarah E. McCardle, 
County Free Library, Fresno, chairman ; 
John E. Goodwin, Alice N. Hays, El- 
eanor Hitt, Everett R. Perry, Robert 
Rea, Charles F. Woods. 

Membership — Sarah M. Jacobus, Pub- 
lic Library, Pomona, chairman ; 1st 
District, Mrs Marcella H. Krauth ; 2d 
District, Inez M. Crawford ; 3d District, 
Margaret Adelle Barnett ; 4th District, 
Minette L. Stoddard ; 5th District, Ida 
E. Condit ; 6th District, Agnes F. Ferris ; 
7th District, Edna D. Davis ; Sth District, 
Anna L. Williams; 9th District, Ella 
Packer. 

Radio Service — Norah McNeill, Pub- 
lie Library, Richmond, chairman ; Olive 
Burroughs, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

S alar ie s — Margaret E. Livingston, 
Orange County Free Library, Santa Ana, 
chairman ; Susan T. Smith, Helen E. 
Vogleson. 

Seamen's Library — Helen M. Bruner, 
Sutro Branch, State Library, Saii Fran- 
cisco, chairman ; Mary Barmby, Chap- 
lain F. K. Howard, Stella Huntington, 
Caroline Wenzel. 

Jinks — Samuel Levinson, Levinson's 
Book Store, Sacramento, chairman ; 
Marian P. Greene, Bessie B. Silverthorn. 



52 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First and Second Districts. 

President, Mary Barmby, Alameda 
County Free Library, Oakland. 

Vice-President, Edna Holroyd, S a n 
Mateo County Free Library, Redwood 
City. 

Secretary, Edith M. Coulter, Univer- 
sity of California Library, Berkeley. 

The first district coiislsts of the follow- 
ing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties: Alameda (excepting Ala 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity) , Santa Cruz. 

This year, exercising his prerogative to 
designate the territory over which district 
presidents shall preside, the President is 
trying the experiment of one president for 
the combined first and second districts. 

Third District. 

President, Clara B. Dills, Solano 
County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Secretary, Leta L. Hutchinson, Union 
High School District Library, Dixon. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Gretchen L. Flower, Tulare 
County F'ree Library, Visalia. 

Secretary Marion L. Gregory, Kings 
County Free Library, Hanford. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District 

President, Bertha M. Taylor, Amador 
County Free Library, Jackson. 

Secretary, Amy L. Boynton, Public 
Library, Lodi. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 



Sixth District. 

President, Willis H. Kerr, Pomona Col- 
lege Library, Claremont. 

Secretary, Marion J. Ewing, Pomona 
College Library, Claremont. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
^'entura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Ida M. Reagan, Humboldt 
County Free Library, Eureka. 

Secretary, Mrs Elizabeth Ripley, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
h:)wing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Lenala A. Martin, Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

Secretary, Edith Gantt, Plumas County 
Free Library, Quincy. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lovi'ing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Ellen Frink, Siskiyou Coun- 
ty Free Library, Yreka. 

Secretary, Nellie Dowling, Free Public 
Library, Yreka. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

DISTRICT MEETING. 

Eighth and Ninth Districts IVleeting. 

The Eighth and Ninth Districts of the 
California Library Association held a 
joint meeting at Red Bluff on October 23, 
1926. 

The meeting was called to order at two 
o'clock in the afternoon by Miss Lenala 
A. Martin, President of the Eighth Dis- 
trict. Members of the Nominating Com- 
mittee for the next annual meeting were 
elected : for the Ninth District, Miss 
Ellen B. Frink, Librarian Siskiyou 
County Free Library, with Miss Laura A. 
Sawyers, Librarian Chico Public Library, 
as alternate ; for the Eighth District, Miss 
Lenala A. Martin, Librarian Lassen 
County Free Library, with Miss Edith 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



53 



'Gaiitt, Librarian Plumas County Free 
Library, as alternate. A discussion of 
methods was led by Miss Blanche Chal- 
fant. Librarian Butte County Free 
Library. Mrs Alex McCullagh, of Oak 
Park District, Tehama County, reviewed 
some recent books and described a course 
of reading in her community Avhich finally 
covered the period of Jefferson and Ham- 
ilton in both England and America. Miss 
Edith Gantt told of the establishment of 
a county free library in Sierra County 
and of the organization of the work under 
the contract for service from Plumas 
County Free Library. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
told of the fiftieth anniversary meeting 
of the American Library Association in 
October, and announced plans for the 
joint meeting of the California Library 
Association and the Pacific Northwest 
Library Association at Gearhart, Oregon, 
next June. 

About forty members and their friends 
attended the dinner at the Tremont Hotel, 
and the evening session, Miss Ellen B. 
Frink, President of the Ninth District, 
presiding. Following some selections by 
the stringed trio of Red Bluff, County As- 
sessor Z. P. Dyer of Tehama County 
spoke on the Spanish land grants ; Profes- 
sor T. Francis Hunt told of the agricul- 
tural extension work of the University of 
California ; and Mrs Amy Steinhart Bra- 
den told of the organization and aims of 
the State Department of Public Welfare. 
Assistant Forest Supervisor George M. 
Gowen spoke on the United States Forest 
Service. 

Those responsible for the program wish 
to express their appreciation to all who 
gave so cordially of their time and effort 
either as speakers or in making local pre- 
parations which made pleasant the stay 
of the Association members. 

Ellen B. Fbink, Secretary, pro tern. 

THE 1927 MEETING. 
After years of consideration — as it were, 
crying of the banns — the California Li- 
brary Association goes to the Pacific 
Northwest, June 13-15, to meet with our 
professional — and personal — ^friends of 
that great section. On the recommenda- 
tion of President Anne M. Mixlheron and 
her board, Gearhart, Oregon, has been 



selected as the meeting place. In one of 
her letters she writes that "the hotel is 
most attractive and comfortable. The 
meals are good and the appointments are 
splendid." With a full appreciation of the 
ijifluence of good meals and splendid ap- 
pointments upon the life of a party of 
this kind we can go to Oregon Avith an 
easy conscience as to the joy and profit 
the convention will produce. The hotel 
rates are .$4.50 to .$6.00 per day. 

Perhaps you would know where Gear- 
hart is to be found. It is on the Pacific 
Ocean, about 120 miles from Portland at 
the mouth of the Columbia River. Appar- 
ently it is the easiest place to reach in 
the state. The wonderful Columbia River 
highway takes one to its door, four trains 
daily run the year round, fast boats on 
the Columbia River enable one to vary his 
journey, and the ocean steamers from 
California points to Astoria — a few miles 
away — offer the delights, et cetera, of 
travel upon the salty sea. 

Exact fares by rail are not at this 
moment available, but will be announced 
in a later Bulletin. They are, however, 
approximately one and a half times the 
one way rate for the round trip. Two 
steamship lines are available and will 
laud passengers very conveniently in point 
both of time and place for the meeting. 
The McCormick Steamship Company has 
a vessel leaving Los Angeles on June 9 at 

5 p.m., allowing a day in San Francisco, 
from which sailing is made June 11 at 

6 p.m., arriving in Astoria June 13 at 7 
a.m. The Pacific Steamship Company has 
a boat which puts in at Astoria on Sun- 
day the twelfth. The fare by steamer 
varies according to berth and line : from 
Los Angeles the round trip may be made 
from $60 to $68 ; from San Francisco, 
from $40 to $45. And finally, the high- 
ways are open ; and all Fords, given the 
customary daily ration of gas and oil, will 
make the grade on schedule time. 

The program is being worked upon with 
enthusiasm and confidence by the com- 
bined talent of the great Pacific Coast. 
AVe believe at this date we can with all 
assurance promise those interested that it 
will be compact of information and inspir- 
ation in palatable and digestible propor- 
tions. The human side of librarians will 



54 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



not be overlooked ; so there will be oppor- 
tunity for a reasonable amount of fun — 
a party on the beach, a round of golf, and 
a high jinks after or before the serious 
business of the day. Opportunity for 
better acquaintance and friendly converse 
among the members of the two associa- 
tions will not be forgotten. Sessions of 
the several sections devoted to special 
fields will, of course, be scheduled. Em- 
phasis upon the book from its inspira- 
tional viewpoint, it is hoped, may be made 
the theme of the conference. 

The meeting will close in ample time 
for those who plan to attend the A. L. A., 



to arrive in Toronto at the appointed 
hour. For those who do not intend to 
journey eastward, the Pacific Northwest 
offers many attractions ; and the people 
of that section will be greatly pleased to 
show us about. 

May I stress this one point? This con- 
vention is the big meeting of librarians 
of the West this year. It is highly im- 
portant that we go to Gearhart with a 
.rowd truly representative of California, 
both in variety of positions held and in 
numbers. Today is not too early to begin 
to make your plans to be there. 

^NIiLTON J. Ferguson, 
President, California Library Assn. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Miltou J. Ferguson, Ex-officio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano County. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS 
CONVENTION. 

The next County Librarians Conven- 
tion will be held at the same time and 
place as the joint meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association and the Pacific 
Northwest Library Association^ — Gear- 
hart, Oregon, .Tune 13-15, 1927. 

SOME NEW BLANKS. 

The San Bernardino County Free Li- 
brary has recently had two new blanks 
printed by the Library Bureau. They are 
similar to the former blanks for recording 
accessions of books and of other material, 



but some changes have been made both in 
ontent and in arrangement. Miss Waters 
had to buy more than she needed of the 
sheets for recording "size and growth of 
other material," and would be glad to 
dispo.'ie of some of them to other county 
librarians needing them. The State Li- 
brary has a sample it could lend or any- 
one interested could communicate with 
^liss Waters. 

A SUGGESTION FOR PUBLICITY. 

The Tulare County Free Library has 
found that most of the ministers in the 
-mailer communities receive syndicated 
material on small folders which they add 
ro and pass out each week. Miss Flower 
used this fact to good advantage before 
Children's Book Week when she supplied 
■'fillers" advertising the celebration. A 
minister in her county suggested that 
tiiousands throughout the state could be 
icachod if similar material were supplied 
I he Western Newspaper Union of San 
Francisco, which sends out this material 
to the many churches in the state. Even 
if nothing is done in a state-wide way, 
county librarians might make use of the 
idea in their own communities. 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
accounts of meetings of the various 
library clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 

ASSOCIATION, 

SOUTHERN SECTION. 

About fifty attended the October 23d 
meeting held at the South Pasadena High 
School. The program consisted of a round 
table discussion on "Senior course of in- 
struction in the high school" led by Miss 
Rosa Cage of the Riverside High School. 
Miss Hester of Pomona and Mrs Scott of 
Orange High School assisted Miss Cage 
in the discussion. Following this, Miss 
Berrier of the .Jefferson High School, Los 
Angeles, led a discussion on "Freshman- 
Sophomore instruction in the use of the 
library." The program closed with a very 
full and interesting report of the last 
meeting of the A. L. A. given by Miss 
Gwynn of the Fremont High School, Los 
Angeles. 

Following the program the librarians 
had luncheon. The luncheon speaker was 
Mrs .Joseph Probst on "Oriental drama." 
The program of the December 23 
meeting, held at the time of the insti- 
tute, was as follows : 

Afternoon Session, 1.30 p.m., at Mary 
T^ouise (West Ttli opposite West 
Lake). 
Business meeting. 
Discussion topic : 

How the library can best servc- 
the various departments. 
Speakers : 

Miss R. Boyd, Head of History 
Dept. Huntington Park Tnion 
H. S. 
Mrs M. P. Anderson, Head of 
English Dept. .John C. Fremont 
H. S. 
Miss Mable Pierson, Head of Bio- 
logical Science Dept. Pasadenn 
H. S. 
Miss Edna Gearhart, Art Dept. 
liOS Angeles H. S. 



Tea Session, 4 p.m., at Mary Louise. 
Speakers : 
Dr M. V. O'Shea, Univ. of Wisconsin. 
Dr Walter Dester, President of 
Whittier College. 
Each meeting counted as one session 
of Institute. This was the first attempt 
to hold a session at 4 p.m. and was 
done at the request of the members of 
the Association at the October meeting. 
It was a most successful meeting and 
many helpful suggestions were given by 
the speakers. 

Hope L. Potter, Secretary. 

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIANS' CONFERENCE OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

Tlie ninth meeting of the College and 
University Librarians' Conference of 
Southern California was held Saturday, 
November sixth, at the University of 
Southern California. Over sixty were 
present. The morning session was held 
in Parlor C of the Administration build- 
ing. Miss Charlotte M. Brown, president 
of the Conference, presiding. 

President R. B. von Klein Smid gave 
a delightful welcome to the members and 
guests, among whom were members of the 
Special Libraries Association of Los 
Angeles. Much interest was shown in 
the discussion of the proposed bill to be 
introduced at the next session of Congress 
in regard to a more liberal distribution 
of public documents. Mr .John Parke 
Young, of Occidental College, told of the 
progress of this bill and stated that Sen- 
ator Hiram Johnson of California had 
expressed his willingness to shape the 
bill and urge its passage. 

Mr W. Elmo Reavis, President of the 
Pacific Library Binding Company of Los 
Angeles, led an interesting and profitable 
discussion in regard to his classification 
of bindery material in relation to prices. 
The policy followed by his company in 
differentiating between public library 
binding and college binding was explained 
and he stated that this classification was 
necessary from the binder's view point. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



57 



A delectable luncheon was served at 
the Woman's Residence Hall. A slight 
innovation was made ,in regard to the 
afternoon meeting. A few short ad- 
dresses were given at the end of the 
luncheon instead of a regular afternoon 
session. 

Mrs Mary E. Irish. President of the 
Special Libraries Association, expressed 
the pleasure of the members present in 
being invited to the conference. Presi- 
dent von KleinSmid gave an inspiring 
short talk on the ideal library. Dr 
Owen C. Coy, Chairman of the Histori- 
cal Society Committee on the celebration 
in honor of the Jedediah Strong Smith 
centennial, gave an interesting account 
of this pioneer fur-trader's entry into 
California one hundred years ago this 
month. 

Mr Willis H. Kerr, Librarian of 
Pomona College, gave a brief report of 
the A. L. A. sessions which he attended 
at Atlantic City. He stated that his 
chief pleasure was greeting old friends 
who attended these conferences each year. 

At the close of the meeting the li- 
braries on the University Campus were 
visited. 

Charlotte M. Brown. 

PASADENA LIBRARY CLUB. 

The first meeting of the 1920-27 sea- 
son of the Pasadena Library Club w;-s 
an informal dinner held at the Vista di-1 
Arroyo Hotel on Wednesday, Novemb(>r 
17, 192(J. It was the occasion for one 
of the largest gatherings in tlie history 
of the club. Miss Lu Littlejohn. presi- 
dent, introduced the speakers. Mi^s 
Helen Vogles'on, librarian of the Los 
Angeles County Free Library, gave a 
brief resume of the activities of the 
A. L. A. Convention in Atlantic City, 
laying stress on the foreign delegates 
present. 

Alma Whitaker of the IjOs Angeles 
Times was tlie chief speaker of the 
evening, and she talked in a witty and 
entertaining fashion of her experiences 
in interviewing and her impres'sious of 
various celebrities in the literary world. 

Miss Littlejohn closed the meeting 
with a few brief remarks of a business 



nature and expressed the hope that the 
next meeting of the Club in February 
would be held in the beautiful new build- 
ing of the Pasadena Public Library. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The first meeting of the season, 1926- 
1927, was held in the new Public Library 
n September 10, at 7.30 p.m., jointly with 
the Sierra Club, by special arrangement. 

Addresses were made by Miss Althea 
Warren, Assistant Librarian ; Mrs Faith 
Holmes Hyers, Publicity Director, and Mr 
Julian Garnsey, who designed the interior 
decoration of the new building. 

These talks were extremely interesting 
and enlightening as to the plan and con- 
ception of the new library, a building 
totally original in design and construction 
and the explanation of the meaning of 
the decoration and ornament added 
greatly to our understanding and enjoy- 
ment of its architectural features. 

After the speeches, the Sierra Club 
members were escorted through the li- 
brary in small groups and the Special 
Libraries remained in the lecture room to 
hold their business session. 

The chief topic of the evening was the 
California number of "Special Libraries," 
which is out at last and proves to be a 
very satisfactory and worth-while issue. 

Mr Edwards read a letter from Mr 
Worthington, President of the San Fran- 
cisco Association of Special Libraries, ex- 
pressing his appreciation of the California 
number and the work our Association had 
put into it. 

Mr Edwards also made a motion that 
Mr Marion. Mr Vandergrift and the com- 
mittee who collected and organized the 
material for the number be given a special 
vote of thanks. 

Mr Marion brought up the question as 
to a permanent exhibit, and various ma- 
terial was pledged, but no definite plans 
were formulated. All discussion was hur- 
ried, as 10 o'clock was fast approaching 
and it was desired to make a short tour 
of the library before the lights went out. 
This tour of inspection ended in the cafe- 
teria, where a delicious and refreshing 
fruit punch was served. 

The whole evening was most interesting 
and enjoyable. 



f,fi 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail., 1927 



The second luonthly meeting was held 
at the Barlow Medical Library, 742 North 
Broadway, Los Angeles. 

Eleven members and four guests were 
present and gathex'ed round the festive 
board shortly after 6 o'clock. The cir- 
cular reading tables fairly groaned with 
the good "eats" provided by both hostesses 
and guests — salads, cakes, coffee, "Eskimo 
pies," sandwiches, nuts, fruit and other 
things, too numerous to mention. 

The programme was opened by Miss 
Hollingsworth, who discussed methods of 
bringing attention to magazine material 
before the general indexes arrive. Mrs 
Irish's famous "Black Books" were par- 
ticularly featured. The Barlow Medical 
Library makes it a practice to index the 
principal articles in all journals as soon 
as they arrive, in loose-leaf notebooks, un- 
der subjects. There is one book for miscel- 
laneous articles, one for drugs, one for 
poisons, etc. 

Mrs Irish then gave a brief report of 
the eight medical libraries visited last 
summer when she attended the conven- 
tion of medical librarians. Her talk gave 
further proof of how stimulating such 



experiences are, giving us a criterion of 
standards and opportunity for compari- 
son, occasionally permitting us to pat our- 
selves on the back 'when we discover that 
some pet scheme of our own works to bet- 
ter advantage than those devised by 
others. 

Then followed Mrs Townsend"s delight- 
ful paper on "Quacks and Nostrums," a 
most entertaining account of the credulity 
of mankind in the weird remedies devised 
for all our ills, from the time of 
Hippocrates down to Galen and to the 
present day. 

At the close of the programme a social 
half-hour was enjoyed and the library was 
visited in all its nooks and crannies, even 
to the attic. 

The November meeting of our Associa- 
tion was again a joint affair, being com- 
bined with the Conference of the Southern 
California College and University Li- 
brarians, at the University of Southern 
California, by special invitation. 

(For account of this meeting, see page 
56,) 

Leonore Greene. Secretary. 



vol. 22, no. 1] BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA 



59 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. G. a commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon tlie establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he ha.s received from the 
board of library examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

There has been no meeting of the Board 
this quarter. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Lila (Dobell), Ln. Trinity 

County Free Library, Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 

City. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfleld. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barrnby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, Bvalyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, El Centro. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Yuba City. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Contra Costa County 

Free Library, Martinez. (On leave of 

absence.) 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 



Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. . 

English, Gladys, Ln. A. L. A. Head- 
quarters, 86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 

111. 
Ferguson, K. Dorothy, Ln. Bank of Italy 

Library, San Francisco. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Frazier, Hubert B., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Frink, Ellen B., Ln. Siskiyou County Free 

Library, Yreka. 
Fuller, Mrs Melissa, Asst. Fresno County 

P'ree Library, Fresno. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

B'ree Library, Madera, 
(jantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo County 

B'ree Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 

Countj' Free Library, Martinez. 
Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 

Library and Kings County Free Library, 

Hanford. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Harris, Mary W., Asst. Louisiana Library 

Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. 
Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfleld. 
•Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Jose. 
Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 

Library, Los Angeles. 
Kitching, Mrs Ethelene M., Ln. Fullerton 

High School Library, Fullerton. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. ,, , ^ 
liaugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa 

Livingston', Margaret E., Ln. Orange 
County Free Library, Santa Ana. 

McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 
Library, Independence. 

Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 
Free Library, Susanville. 

Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. ^^. , ^ , , ^ . 

Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 



60 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Morse, Marion, Ln. Maui County Free 
Library, Wailuku, T. H. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Packer, Ella, Ln. Colusa County Free 
Library, Colusa. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. -• 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 

Rea, Ptobert, Ln. Public Library, San 
P'rancisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Stockebrand, Frances, Asst. Merced 
County Free Library, Merced. 

Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 
Free Library, Merced. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 
Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Asst. Ln. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Librarj', San Bernardino. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 
County Free Library, Hollister. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 
Free Library, Santa Ana. 

Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 
Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Wright, Muriel, Ln. Tuolumne County 
Free Library, Sonora. 

Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 



At Present Out of Library Work. 

Burrell, Mrs Marjorie (Chilberg), Mrs 

Elmer Edward Burrell. 
Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

B. Dalton. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita. 
Gleason, Celia. 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James W^hite Herrman. 
Huntington, Stella. 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Parkinson, H. O. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold office of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was puljlislied in News Notes of 
California Liiraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California 'Libraries, January, 1914. 
This has been reprinted as a pamphlet. 
The fifth edition was issued December. 
1921. (Circular of information only.) 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
192-'i. Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

No date has been set as yet for the 
next examination. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All Avho wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the Chairman 
of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



61 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1925-27, $253,490, 

Total accessions 268,031 (less 3448 
lost and discarded =264,583) exclusive of 
19,812 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

]\ri]ton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V. Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Eudora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .J. Haines. Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Hen&'hall, County 
Liiirary Organizer. 

Himmelsbach, Dora M., in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding (temporary). 

Annie Lowry, in charge of Periodicals 
and Binding (on leave of absence). 

\Vm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc.. Department. 

Beulah iNIumm, Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Cooper, Evelyn L., Assistant. 

Margaret Dennison, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite Walker Duggins, Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st., San Francisco. 

Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon, Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill, Assistant. 

Mrs Dorothy Puffer Isaacs, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb. Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look. Assistant. 

Anna G. McNamee, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Alicia W. Manning, Assistant. 

D. Florence Montfort. Assistant. 

Catharine J. Morrison. Home Teacher 
of the Blind, 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
Angeles. 

Irene E. Ryan, Assistant. 



Irma M. Schoepllin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Mrs Frances L. Smith, Stenographer.. 

Mrs Jeanette Cyr Stern, Assistant. 

Katherine Stites, Assistant. 

Lily M. Tildeu, Assistant. 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy, Assistant. 

June Vladyka, Assistant. 

Mrs Julia M. Waldron, Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel. Assistant. 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

Emma F. de Merritt. Book Repairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
ping Clerk. 

Lois liittle. Messenger. 

Vera Palermo, Messenger. 

Arthur Valine, Messenger. 

•J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Mrs Fanny Howley and Mildred L. 
Watson left on October 16, Mrs Howley to 
return to her position in the Seattle Pub- 
lic Library and Miss Watson to accept a 
position in the Contra Costa County Free ' 
Library. Katherine Stites began work in 
our Catalog Department on October 18. 
Mrs Frances L. Smith was employed as 
temporary stenographer from October 19 
until November IS, when she was ap- 
pointed to a permanent position on our 
staff. Mrs Mavis McCampbell Harrison, 
tjqiist, resigned November 10 to move to 
Stockton. Mrs Mildred Newton, book 
repairer, resigned December 11, as Mr 
Newton had been transferred to Rio Vista. 
Ruth Ferguson joined the staff December 
20 for two weeks' work during the Christ- 
mas holidays. 

Philip Keeney, a member of this year's 
class in the University of California 
School of Librarianship, did his practice 
work at the State Library during the 
Christmas holidays. 

Mr Ferguson attended the meeting of 
the American Library Association at At- 
lantic City October 4-11. On October 8 
he read a paper entitled "Ride and Tie" 
at one of the general sessions. On his 
way back to California he stopped in Mis- 
souri and made two talks at Maryville, 



62 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



one to the librarians and one to a joint 
session of teachers and librarians. 

Mr Ferguson six)ke at the joint meeting 
of the eighth and ninth districts, Califor- 
nia Library Association, at Red Bluff on 
October 23. On November 2-5 he spoke ai 
the luncheon meeting of the Special Li- 
braries Association of San Fi'ancisco. On 
December 6 he attended the meeting of the 
Inyo County Custodians and took part on 
the program. 

Mrs Henshall attended the meeting of 
the County Superintendents of Schools at 
Lake Tahoe October 4-7. Miss Gillis 
attended the meeting of the Merced County 
Custodians on October 7 and spoke at the 
afternoon session. On October 31 Miss 
Gillis represented Mr Ferguson at the 
reopening and dedication of the Sutter's 
Fort Museum. Mr Ferguson had been 
asked to speak on "Sacramento's Debt to 
General Sutter"' and Miss Gillis spoke 
briefly on that subject. 

A staff tea was held on October 11 at 
the Library as a farewell courtesy to Mrs 
Fanny Howley and Miss Mildred Watson. 
A staff meeting was held on October 25 at 
which Mr Ferguson gave an account of 
the A. L. A. meeting. 

The annual Christmas party was held 
December 20. The entei'tainment con- 
sisted of a pantomime, Bluebeard in three 
reels, all the characters being taken by 
the male members of the staff. This hi- 
larious i>erformance was followed by the 
distribution of ten cent Christmas pres- 
ents by an elegantly costumed Santa 
Glaus. The presents wex'e taken off a 
real Christmas tree, beautifully decorated. 
By a clever system the names of the 
donors of the presents were kept secret 
and many clever verses were read out 
under the veil of anonymity. Appropri- 
ate refreshments closed the festiWties. 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

Mr Henry Guppy, Librarian of the 
John Rylands I^ibrary, Manchester, Eng- 
land, and President of the British Library 
Association, was a visitor at the State 
Library Saturday, November 5. He re- 
mained over Sunday in Sacramento as the 
guest of Mr and Mrs Ferguson. 



LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days Q a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

As it has l)een found that Sunday 
afternoon is more popular with library 
users than the morning, the Sunday hours 
during the legislative session have been 
changed from the former ones — 10 a.m. 
to .3 p.m. — to from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the ITnited States, Great Britain, Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer, or if. 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to siiecial service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent acces-sions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp. 93 and 97. 

Copies of 52 Califox'uia State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during October, November 
and December, 1926. 
Adjutant General. Report, 1920-1926. 
Agriculture Dept. Special publications 
nos. 64, 66. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



Architecture Bd. Report, 1926. 

Athletic Comm. Report, 1926. 

Banks Superintendent. 17th annual re- 
port, 1926. 

Building & Loan Comm. Report, 1926. 

Chiropractic Examiner.?' Bd. Report, 
1925-1926. 

Civil Service Comm, Biennial rei>ort. 
1924-1926. 

Corporation Dept. Biennial report, 1924- 
1926. 

Criminal Identification. Bur. Report, 
1926. 

Criminal Procedure Comm. Report, 1927. 

Education Dept. Biennial Report, 1924- 
1926. 

Commis.sioner of Industrial & Vo- 
cational Educ. Report, 1924-1926. 

Equalization Bd. Report, 1925-1926. 

— Special report on utility values 

1926. 
Pish & Game Comm. California fish and 

game, vol. 12, no. 4. 

Pish bulletin no. 11. 

Grand Army of Republic, Calif. Dept. 

Journal of proceedings, 1926. 
Governor Richardson. Acts of executive 

clemencj^ 1927. 

Biennial message, 1927. 

Special message regarding Colo- 
rado River compact, 1926. 

Governor Young. Inaugural address, 1927. 
Harbor Comm. Biennial report, 1924- 
1926. 

The port of San Prancisco. 1926. 

Highway Comm. California highways, 

vol. 3, nos. 9-12. 
Immigration & Housing Comm. State 

housing act. 1926. 
Industrial Accident Comm. Report, 1925- 

1926. 
— California safety news, vol. 10. 

nos. 3—4. 

An exclusive state compensation 

insurance fund. 1926. 

Insurance Dept. Insurance brokers. 1926. 
Labor Statistics Bur. Biennial report, 

1925-1926. 
Legislature. Narcotic Committee. Report 

on drug addiction. 1926. 
Medical Examiners Bd. Supplement to 

1926 Directory. Oct., 1926. 
Mining Bur. Report on oil possibilities 

at Ventura School for Girls. 1926. 
Optometry Bd. Handbook, 1926. 
Printer, State. Report, 1926. 
Public Instruction Superintendent. Story 

of Jedediah Smith, 1926. 

Textbook Dept. Bulletin no. 1— A. 

Purchasing Dept. Report, 1924-1926. 
Railroad Comm. Letter of transmittal to 

annual report, 1926. 

Rules of procedure. Rev. to Jan. 

, 1, 1927. 

Auto Stage & Truck Dept. Report, 



1925-1926. 

Secretary of State. Statement of vote, 
IDrimary election. 1926. 

Statement of vote, general elec- 
tion. 1926. 

Treasurer. Biennial report, 1924—1926. 

Veterans' Home. Annual report, 1926. 

Veterans' Welfare Bd. Biennial report, 
1926. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on reque&t of 



the librarian, and to any other educa- 
tional institution on request of its official 
head or its librarian ; to individuals 
through the signature of a state officer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the official head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit; to a club on request of its presi- 
ident, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the cotinty free 
library. 

Frequent reque.sts are received for lists 
of books in the State Library in foreign 
languages. To prepare for such requests 
lists have been printed from time to time 
in News Notes of California Libraries 
and may be found as follows : 
Bohemian 

v. 11, p. 283- 6, January 1916 

Danish 

v. 10. p. 766- 9, July 1915 
V. 11. p. 282- 3, January 1916 

French 

v. 12, p. 894- 9, October 1917 

V. 14, p. 122-31, January 1919 

V. 14, p. Sol- 4, October 1919 

V. 15, p. 427-34, July 1920 

V. 1.5, p. 926- 7, October 1920 

V. 17. p. 229-34, April 1922 

German 

V. 11. p. 279-82, January 1916 

V. 12. p. 313- 5, January 1917 

V. 15, p. 927, October 1920 

V. 17, p. 341- 3. July 1922 

Greek, Modern 

V. 15, p. 928- 9. October 1920 

Hungarian 

V. 17, p. 134- 7. January 1922 

Italian 

V. 10, p. 769-72, July 1915 

V. 12, p. 900-01, October 1917 

V. 15, p. 927- 8. October 1920 

Latin 

V. 15, p. 929-30, October 1920 

Portuguese 

V. 8, p. 138-41, January 1913 

V. 12, p. 315- 7, January 1917 

V. 14, p. 247- 8, April 1919 

Russian 

V. 14, p. 250- 1. April 1919 



64 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA IJBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Spanish 

V. 10, p. 772- 5, July 1915 

V. 12. p. 317- S. January 1917 

V. 14. p. 24S-.-0, April 1919 

V. K). p. 434- r,. .Tuly 1920 

V. 1."). p. 928. Oetnl)Pr 1920 

V. ('.. p. 547-50. October 1911 

\-. U, p. 282- 3, January 1910 

V. 14, p. 250, April 1919 

Sinte 1922 the purchases in foreign 

languages have been scattering titles and 

not large lots. 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

;\1yrtle Ruul, in charge. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber, 2051 books, 1 map. 23 prints, 50 
photographs and 300 stereographs wer.' 
accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During October, November aud Decem- 
ber. 1120 books were cataloged and 7199 
cards were added to the file. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT, 

EuDORA Garoutte, in charge. 

'J"he California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and description, 

resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioueers and early settlers are 
l;eiu^' secured, together with their photo- 
graphs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about 10,000 bound volumes 
of newspapers, a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
tlieir work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Only two cards of 49ers have been 
received, both of whom were physicians. 
Dr Berryman Bryant arrived June 12, 
1849 bringing Avith him five trunks of 



medicine. He went to Sacramento and 
put up a canvas hospital with eighteen 
beds, a sign "Home for the Sick" was 
put in place and very quickly the hos- 
pital was full of patients. Later Dr 
Bryant moved to San Jose and was 
appointed a trustee of the Normal School. 
His death occurred in 1898. 

Dr E. A. Kunkler, a native of Swit- 
zerland, reached California, overland, in 
1849. He settled in Placerville where 
he remained until his death in 1881. A 
prominent physician of the present day 
writes of him as follows : "A persisting 
scholar on the Mother Lode. His writ- 
ings on medicine, philosophy and educa- 
tion from 1859 to 1880 appeared in 
the medical periodicals of that time. He 
was an unassimilated Swiss scholar, 
never having been naturalized." 

Another physician who arrived in 1852 
was Dr William E. Eichelroth, a note- 
worthy example of the trained European 
medical man who was quickly and thor- 
oughly assimilated on the Mother Lode. 
He became a staunch American, was a 
member of the Legislature and gained 
prominence in many waj's. After going 
from place to place he finally settled in 
Sonora where he became a leader. He 
died in Stockton in 1890. 

Robert Coombs Carter, probably the 
last survivor of the San Francisco Vigi- 
lance Committee at the time his card 
was filled out in December, passed on 
a short time thereafter. Mr Carter re- 
sided at Rio Vista from 1858 until the 
time of his death aud was a much honored 
citizen. 

Frank G. Edwards who died in 1900 
wa.s also a member of the Mgilance Com- 
mittee of 1856. Mr Edwards was a 
resident of San Francisco from 1852 
until his death. 

Other cards received are as follows : 
^Irs Lee Whipple-Haslam (Mrs Haslam 
has recently published a little book en- 
titled "Early Days in California") and 
Mr and Mrs .James A. Stafford. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries : 

Booth, Charles Gordon 
*Haywood, John Foster 
*Jacoby, Mrs Rosalie (Seligman) 

Mrs Grover I. Jacoby, Sr. 
*Marshall, Mrs Emma (Fleming) 
Mrs Rudolph Marshall 
Ritchie, Robert Welles 
Winfrey, Guy Lester. 

California Musicians. 

The following musician card has been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries: 

*McGettigan, Mrs Francisca Carrillo 
(Vallejo) 
Mrs Charles D. McGettigan 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 

received since the last issue of Newn 

Notes of California Libraries: 

Cooper, Colin Campbell 
Culbertson, Josephine M. 
Curtis, Leland 

Duncan, Mrs Geraldine Rose (Birch) 
Mrs William G. Duncan 
*Fraser, Douglass 
*Gleason, Duncan 
*Grifflth, Grace Allison 
Hamilton, Mrs Ruby V. (Plummer) 

Mrs William A. Hamilton 
Johnson, Frank Tenney 
Kinzer, Gordon Neale 
Malley, Frederic J. 
*Teagle, Mrs Katherine (Gridley) 

Mrs Benjamin A. Teagle 
*Thomsen, Mrs Myrtle (Hill) 

Mrs Carl B. Thomsen 
*Westfall, Mrs Gertrude (Bennett) 

Mrs Samuel Henry Westfall 
*Whelan, Blanche 
Widforss, Gunnar Mauritz 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

622 cards have been added to the Cali- 
fornia catalog during the last quarter. 

Exhibit. 

An interesting exhibit of early Cali- 
fornia material is still maintained in the 
rotunda of the Capitol. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 

* Native Californians. 
5 — 49631 



finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
rial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
York point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrov/ers wishing them for use 
in book selection. 

A new catalog of all books in Moon 
type in the Library up to October 1, 1926, 
has recently been printed. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 2485 blind bor- 
rowers, 44 borrowers having been added 
during October, November and December, 
and 39 borrowers lost by death during 
1926. Total accessions are 19,812 as fol- 
lows : New York point books 2647 ; New 
York point music 186 ; American Braille 
] books 3032 ; American Braille music 1287 ; 
jEuropean Braille books 3223; European 
'Braille music 230; Esperanto Braille 
.books 3 ; Moon books 4633 ; Moon music 
5; Revised Braille books 3591; Revised 
[ Braille music 128 ; Standard dot books 
[14 ; Line books 193 , Line music 21 ; Ink 
sprint books 453 ; *Appliances 84 ; *Games 
150 ; Maps 32. 

\ During October, November and Decem- 
|ber 7418 books, etc., were loaned as fol- 
lows : New York point 391 ; American 
jBraille 156 ; European Braile 845 ; Moon 
|3167 ; Revised Braille Grade li 2850 ; Ink 
sprint 4 ; Appliances 1 ; Games 4 ; Maps 
'O. The loans were divided by class as 
i follows : Philosophy and religion 423 
isociology 41 ; language 29 ; primers 30 
[science 46 ; useful ai'ts 5 ; fine arts 3 
■amusements 4 ; music 23 ; literature 117 
Ifiction -5369 ; travel and history 330 ; 
biography 215 ; periodicals 783. 
, Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by Mrs F. 
A. Bacher, F. B. Beans, Lucien Ayer, 
Mrs A. H. Clise, Anna Courtois, Kate M. 
Foley, F. W. Foster, Dr E. M. Gebhardt, 



* Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



()(i 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Maroii erite Graham, W. E. Felter, J. W. 
Hogsard. Ruby Holtz. J. R. Lewarton, 
Bessie Long-, Mrs Rose McComb, C. X. 
Miller. W. A. Miller. P^dward Mueller, 
Hattie 15. Newman. Mrs ]M. E. Phillips. 
Mis L. Sargent, (ieorge W. Shoemaker, 
John B. Walker. American Braille Press 
for War and Civilian Blind. Inc.. Ameri- 
can Printing House for the Blind, Cana- 
dian National Institute for the Blind, 
Christian Record Publishing Company, 
Christian Science Publishing Company, 
(iospel Trumpet Company, Michigan 
Schot>l for the Blind, National Institute 
for the Blind, San Diego Public Library. 
Society for Aid of the Sightless. Xavier 
Braille Publishing Company, Zieglei 
Publishing Company . 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
l)Ooks. etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. 
See p. 98. 

Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 
blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 14U 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to ~j p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine .J. Morrison, home teacher ol 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall ol 
Records. evex*y Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los An- 
geles. Her telephone number is Drexel 
•1339. She gives lessons regularly in Los 
Angeles and vicinity and makes occa- 
sional trips to San Diego. 

From October 1 to December 31, the 
home teachers gave COS lessons in thr 
hemes of the blind and 21 lessons at li- 
braries. They made 111 visits and calls 
in connection with the work for purposes- 
other than giving lessons, and have re- 
ceived IT visits in connection with the 
work. 

Durin;; the quarter iliss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 207 hours on corre- 
spondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote ofifi letters and l.">2 postals and 
received 260 letters and 31 postals. They 
also answered and made ."549 telephone 
calls. They made four addresses. Miss 



Foley teaches regularly in Oakland, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
14 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tal>ulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Sutro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Library, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner, '15 

Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles 
Thelma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J. 
Helen V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fah'view ave., Los Gatos 
.'^gnes E. Brown, '15 

Asst. San Diego High School L., San 

Diego 
Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Branch, State L., 

San Francisco 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buchan), '20 

1631 Cowper St., Palo Alto 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 

1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
Ruth E. Bullock, '15 

Ln. Belvedere Junior High School L., 

Los Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley 
Blanche Chalfant, '14 

Ln. Butte Co. F. L., Oroville 
Marguerite Chatfleld, '20 

349 East California st., Pasadena 
Nellie E. Christensen, '19 

Ln. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Asst. Contra Costa Co. F. L., Martinez. 

(On leave of absence.) Temporarily in 

Lange Library of Education, Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High School 

L., Watsonville 
Dorotha Davis, '17 

Ln. Fresno High School L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernard!, 'IS 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 
Estella De Ford, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Fran- 
cisco 
.Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregorv Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829J S. Normandie st., Los Angeles 
Ellen B. Frink, '19 

Ln. Siskiyou Co. F. L, Yreka 
Flo A. Gantz. '20 

Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., San 

Luis Obispo 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Saci-amento Co. F. L., Sacramento 



vol. 22, no. 1 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



67 



Margaret V. Girdner, '17 

Ln. High School of Commerce, San 
Francisco. 
Mary E. Glock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Bernice L. Goff, '14 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 
746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H. Hargis), '18 
725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Frank 
U. Harriss), '15 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Margaret Hatch, '15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner), '18 
1528 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd), '20 
Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 
1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Orton A. Kirschman), '19 
2 839 Forest ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Tver 
N. Lawson, Jr.), '18 
3231 Front st., San Diego 
Marjorie C. Learned, '20 

Asst. P. L, New York Citv 
Mrs*M. Ruth McLaughlin Lockwood (Mrs 
Ralnli L. Lockwood). '17 
1520 Greenwich St., San Francisco 
Amy G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
.Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea), '19 
3417 4 2d St., Sacramento 
N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy F. 
McDowell), '14 
914 nth St., Modesto 
MrG Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 
Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts., 
Washington, D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robert K. Meyers), '19 
Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L., 
Tula 76 
Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse, '17 

Ln. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku. T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton (Mrs James L 
Patton), '18 
Out of library work 
Mis I-Telen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 
4 8 Winthrop st., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mi's Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Frederic Percival), '15 
1633 3Sth St.. Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

157 East Seventh St., Claremont 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

Asst. Lane Medical L, San F'rancisco 
Mrs iLunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price), '16 
1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 



Mrs Beatrice Brasefleld Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 

Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio 
Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 

2005 22d St., Sacramento 
Anna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L., Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour, '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 

Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). '18 

McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith), '17 

1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '20 

3100 19th St., Bakersfield 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Ewart 
Burns Todd), '17 

1860 Green St., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 

Out of library work r-i 

Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L.. Sacramento • ' 

Josephine L. Whitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L.. Richmond 
Essie T. Wliite, '19 - 

Asst. Sacramento High School L., Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs Katharine Cahoon Wilson (Mrs Lloyd 
VI. Wilson), '17 

1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine Winham, '20 

Ln. State Teachers College L.,' Santa 

Barbara 
Mrs Doiothy Clarke Worden, '15 

Asst. Solano Co. F. L., Fairfield 
Mrs Bess Rantcn Yates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates), '18 

Asst. P. 1.1. Long Beach 

New Items. 

Mr and Mrs James R. Douglas have a 
daughter, Davida, born December 4. Mrs 
Douglas was Vivian Gregory, '14. 



RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Octo- 
ber, November and December, 1926. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Libr.iry 
which was issued was uo. 4 of vol. 4. 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the October, 1926, issue of 
this publication. 



(.8 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



GENERAL WORKS. 

American association of port authorities. 
Bibliographic notes on ports and har- 
bors, including lists by the Library 
of Congress. 1926. 016.627 A51 

The Commonweal; a weekly review of 
literature, the arts, and public 
affairs, v. 1. 1924. q051 C73 

Flores, Angel. 

Spanish literature in English transla- 
tion ; a bibliographical syllabus. 
1926. 016.86 F63 

International labor office, Geneva. 
Bibliographie d'hygifene industrielle. 
1923-1925. 016.6136 161 

MoTT, Frank Luther. 
Kewdrds of reading. cl926. 028 M921 

MuNK, Joseph Amasa. 

Features of an Arizona library. 1926. 
C016.9791 M96f 
Naumburg, Elsa H. 

The child's first books. 1925. 

028 N29 

Slosson, Edwin Emery. 

The physical sciences. 1926. (Read- 
ing with a purpose) 028 S63 

Thayer, Frank. 

Newspaper management. 1926. 

070 T36 
ViNER, George Heath. 

A descriptive catalogue of the book- 
plates designed and etched by George 
W. Eve, with a brief notice of his 
career as an artist. 1916. v097 V78 

Ward, Gilbert Oakley. 

The practical use of books and libraries. 
1926. (Useful reference series) 

x025 W25a2 

WiLLEY, Malcolm Macdonald. 

The country newspaper ; a study of 
socialization and newspaper content. 
1926. (The University of North 
Carolina. Social study series) 

070 W71 

Wilson, H. W., firm, publishers. 

Standard catalog for high school 
libraries. 1926 (Standard cat- 
alog series) qr028 W7s 



PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS 

Axson, Stockton. 

After the war— what? 1917. 

c172 A97 
Benrubi, Isaac. 

Contemporary thought of France, tr. by 
Ernest B. Dicker. 1926. (Library 
of contemporary thought) 194 B47 

Bernstein, Herman. 

The road to peace ; interviews with 

famous Americans and Europeans. 

1926. 172.4 B53 



Coster, Geraldine. 

I'sycho-analysis. 1926. 



130 C84 



Darwin, Leonard. 

The need for eiigenic reform. 1926. 

136 D22 
De Brath, Stanley. 

Psychical research, science and religion. 
[1925] 134 D28 

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conau. 

The history of spiritualism. [1926] 
; 2v. 133.9 D75h 

rFiSHER, Irving. 

Prohibition at its worst. 1926. 

178 F53 
Groves, Ernest Rutherford. 
; The drifting home. 1926. 173 G884 

jHaldane, Richard Burdon Haldane, 1st 
\ viscoimt. 

Human experience ; a study of its 
structure. cl926. 192 H15 

'Hyslop, Theophilus Bulkeley. 
The great abnormals. [1925] 

132 H99 
Laird, John. 

Our minds and their bodies. 1925. 
(The world's manuals) 130 L18 

Le'E, James Melvin. 

Business ethics ; a manual of modern 
morals. cl926. 174 L47 



Leverson, Montague Richard. 
Primer of morals. 1885. 



c177 LS6 



Lord, Everett William. 

The fundamentals of business ethics. 
cl926. 174 L86f 

Masson-Oxjrsel, Paul. 

Comparative philosophy, with an intro- 
duction by F. G. Crookshank. 1926. 
102 IVI42 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



69 



OsLER, Sir William, bart. 

A way of life. 1926. 170 082 

Plummek, Charles Griffin. 
Gun-grabbing Johnny. 1923. 

c 179.3 P73 

Schiller, Ferdinand Canning Scott. 
Eugenics & politics. 1926. 136 S33 

Wallas, Graham. 
The art of thought. [1926] 153 W19 

[Warner, Harry Sheldon] 

Why prohibition? Will it work? A 
syllabus to promote all around dis- 
cussion. cl925. 178 W28 

CHILD STUDY. 

Gale, Robert Joseph. 

Elements of child training. cl926. 

136.7 G15 
Gregory, Chester Arthur. 

Fundamentals of educational measure- 
ment with the elements of statistical 
method. 1924. 136.7 G82 

Koch, Helen Lois d Simmons, Rietta. 
A study of the test-performance of 
American, Mexican, and negro chil- 
dren. [1926] (Psychological review 
publications. Psychological mono- 
graphs) q 136.7 K7 

PiAGET, Jean. 

The language and thought of the child. 
1926. (International library of psy- 
chology, philosophy and scientific 
method) 136.7 P57 

Rue II, Giles Murrel. 

The improvement of the written exami- 
nation. cl924. 136.7 R89 

The influence of the factor of 

intelligence on the form of the learn- 
ing curve. 1925. (Psychological 
review publications. Psychological 
monographs) q 136.7 R8 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Amen, Elisabeth Wheeler. 

An experimental study of the self in 
psychology. (Psychological review 
publications. Psychological mono- 
graphs) q150 A5 



Perein, Fleming Allen Clay, d Klein, 
David Ballin. 
Psychology ; its methods and principles. 
cl926. 150 P45 

Robinson, Edward Stevens. 

Practical psychology, human nature in 

everyday life. 1926. (Textbooks in 

the social studies. Advanced series) 

150.R65p 

Troland, Leonard Thompson. 

The mystery of mind. 1926. (Library 
of modern sciences) 150 T85 

RELIGION. 

Barrett, Sir William Fletcher. 

Christian science ; an examination of 
the religion of health. [1925] 

289.9 B27 
Bible. 0. T. Job. English. 

The book of Job. fc223.1 B5 

The book of common prayer, and admin- 
istration of the sacraments, and other 
rites and ceremonies of the church. 
1737. v264 B72 

Booth, Bramwell. 

Echoes and memories. [1925] 

267.1 B725 

Brandes, Georg Morris Cohen. 

Jesus, a myth. 1926. 232 B81 

Browne, Lewis. 

This believing world ; a simple account 
of the great religions of mankind. 
1926. 290 B88 

Duchesne, Louis Marie Olivier. 

Early history of the Christian church, 
fi'om its foundation to the end of the 
fifth century. Rendered into English 
from the 4th ed. 1914-24. 270 D82 

Easton, Burton Scott. 

The Gospel according to St. Luke ; a 

critical and exegetical commentary. 

1926. 226.4 E13 

Ejihardt, William Chauncey, d Lamsa, 
George M. 
The oldest Christian people. 1926. 

281 E53 

Foakes-Jackson, Frederick John. 

The life of Saint Paul, the man and the 
apostle. 1926. 225.9 P32fo 



70 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



Hawaiian Mission children's society. 
.Tnbiloe celebration of the ari-ival of the 
missionary reinforcement of 1837. 
1887. 266 H389 

Heatwole, Lewis James, 1)2). 

Mennonite handbook of information. 

1925. 289.7 H44 

Inge, AVilliam Ralph. 

Science and ultimate truth ; Fison 
memorial lecture, 1926. 204 145 

Jones, Eli Stanley. 

The Christ of the Indian road. [1926] 

266 J76 
Murray, Robert Henry. 

The political consequences of the refor- 
mation. 1926. (Library of Euro- 
pean political thought) 270.6 M98 

Murky, John Middleton. 

Jesus, man of genius. 1926. 232 M98 

My religion, by Arnold Bennett. Hugh 

Walpole, Rebecca West, and others. 

[1925] 204 M99 

Newton. Joseph Fort, ed. 

My idea of God ; a symposium of faith. 

1926. 231 IV156 

Steffens, Joseph Lincoln. 

Moses in red. cl926. c220.9 S81 

Stein, Leonard Jacques. 

Zionism. 1925. 296 S81 

Wheless, Joseph. 

Is it God's word? An exposition of the 
fables and mythology of the Bible. 
cl926. 220.7 W56 

Wright, Cuthbert. 

The story of the Catholic church. 1926. 

282 W94 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

BoGAKDUS, Emory Stephen. 

The new social research. 1926. 

309.1 B67 

CocKRAN, William Bourke. 

In the name of liberty ; selected ad- 
dresses. 1925. 304 C66 



HocKiN-G. William Ernest. 
Man and the state. 1926. 



301 H685 



Williams, James Mickel. 

The expansion of rural life ; the social 
psychology of rural development. 
1926. 301 W72e 

STATISTICS. POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Blacker, Charles Paton. 

Birth control and the state ; a plea and 
a forecast. 1926. (To-day and to- 
morrow) 312 B62 

Conference on American relations with 
China, Baltimore, 1925. 
American relations with China. 1925. 
q327.73 C7 

DiTTMER, Clarence Gus. 

Introduction to social statistics. 1926. 

312 D61 
DowD, Jerome. 

The negro in American life. cl926. 

325.26 D74 
Elmer, Manuel Conrad. 

Social statistics ; statistical methods 
applied to sociology. 1926. 311 E48 

Leek. John Halvor. 

Legislative reference work. 1925. 

328 L48 
Mencken, Henry Louis. 

Notes on democracy. cl926. 

320.4 M53 
O'Neil, R. K., d- Estes, G. K. 

Naturalization made easy. 8th ed. 
1925. c325.1 058a 

Pollock, James Kerr. 

Party campaign funds. 1926. (Borzoi 
political science texts) 324.2 P77 

White, Leonard Dupee. 

Introduction to the study of public 
administration. 1926. 320.73 W585 

ECONOMICS. 

BiRDSEYE, Clarence Frank. 

Arbitration and business ethics. 1926. 

331.1 B61 
Chesterton, 2Jrs Ada E. 

In darkest London. [1926] 339 C52 

l>AwsoN. ^ir Philip. 

Germany's industrial revival. 1926. 

330.943 D272 
Eraser. Herbert Freeman. 

Foreign trade and world politics. 1926. 
(Borzoi political science texts) 

330 F84 



Yol. 22, no. 1 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



71 



Glotz, Gii.stave. 

Aucieut Greece at work. 1926. (The 

history of civilization. Pre-history 

and antiquity) 330.938 G56 

HiNKHOtrsE. Fred Junkin. 

The preliminaries of the American revo- 
lution as seen in the English press, 
1763-1775. 1926. (Studies in his- 
tory, economics and public law, ed. 
by the J^aculty of political science of 
Columbia university) 330.5 C72 

IsE. John. 

The United States oil policy. 1926. 
(Yale university William McKean 
Brown memorial publication fund) 

q 338.2 17 

Israel, Henry, d Landis, Benson Y., eds. 
Handbook of rural social resources. 
cl926. - 334.9 185h 

James, Gorton, <£ others. 

Profit sharing and stock ownership for 
employees. 1926. 331.2 J 27 

Kerwin, Jerome Gregory. 

Federal water-power legislation. 1926. 
(Studies in history, economics, and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia uni- 
versity) 330.5 C72 

LiA^DSAY, Alexander Dunlop. 

Karl Marx's Capital ; an introductory 

essay. 192.5. (The world's manuals) 

331 L74 

Mears, Eliot Grinnell, d Tobriner, 
Mathew Oscar. 

Principles and practices of cooperative 
marketing. cl926. 334.6 M48 

National industrial conference board. 
The cost of living in the United States, 
1911-1926. 1926. 338 N 2772a 



Wages in the United States. 

1926. 331.2 N27 

United States. cl926. (Its Special 

Weights and measures in the 

report) 331 N277s 

Reed, Ruth. 

Negro illegitimacy in New York citj'. 
1926. (Studies in history, economics, 
and public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia univer- 
sity) 330.5 C72 



BANKING. FINANCE. 
Axgell, James Waterhouse. 

The theory of international prices. 
1926. (Harvard economic studies) 

338.5 A58 

Barron's ; the national financial weekly. 
Investing for a widow. 1926. 

332.6 B27 
Djorcp, Christian. 

Foreign exchange accounting. 1926. 

332.45 D62 
Galstox, Ai'thur. 

Securities syndicate operations. cl92.5. 

332.6 017 
LowRY. Russell. 

History of the First national bank of 
Oakland, California. cl908. 

c332.1 L92 

LABOR. 

Conference on unemployment, London. 
Unemployment in its national and in- 
ternational aspects. 1924. (Interna- 
tional labor office, Geneva. Studies 
and reports, series C, Unemploy- 
ment) 331.8 1612c 

International labor conference. lih 
Genera. 
Conference internatiouale du travail. 
1925. 2 V. q331.06 16 

International labor office, Geneva. 
European housing problems since the 
war, 1914-192.3. 1924. (Studies and 
reports, series G, Housing and wel- 
fare) q331.83 161 

The housing situation in the 

United States. 1925. (Studies and 
reports, series G, Housing and wel- 
fare) q331.83 161 



— Unemployment, 1920-1923. 1924. 
(Studies and reports, series C, Un- 
employment) 331.8 1612c 

— Unemployment insurance. Study 



of comparative legislation. 1925. 
(Studies and reports, series C. Em- 
ployment and unemployment) 

331.8 1612c 
IjEWISOHN, Sam Adolph. 

The new leadership in industry. cl926. 
331.8 L67n 
ScnNEDLER, William A. 

How to get ahead financially. 1926. 

331.84 S35 



72 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



SuFFEEX. Arthur Elliott. 

The coal miners' struggle for industrial 
status. 1926. (The Institute of 
economics. Investigations in industry 
and labor) 331.8 S94 

^^'■oLFSON, Theresa. 

The woman worker and the trade 
unions. 1926. 331.88 W861 

LAW AND ADMINISTRATION. 
Beman, Lamar Taney, comp. 

Election versus appointment of judges. 
192G. (The reference shelf) 

347.9 B45 

Selected articles on states rights. 



1926. (The handbook series) 

342.73 B45 
Randall, James Garfield. 

Constitutional problems under Lincoln. 
1926. 342.73 R18 

KiCEU, Thomas Harrison, erf. 

Documents illustrative of American 
municipal government. 1926. 

352 R32d 
Sm:tk, Darrell Hevenor. 

The Bureau of naturalization ; its his- 
tory, activitie.s and organization. 
1926. (Institute for government re- 
search. Service monographs of the 
I'nited States government) 

353.8 S64n 
SzE, Tsung-1'u. 

China and the most-favored-nation 
clause. C192.5. 341.2 S99 

TcKKixGTON, Grace Alice. 

Hplps for the study of our Constitution. 
cl925. 342.73 T93 

Van Dorx. Harold Archer. 

Government owned corporations. 1926. 

351.8 V24 
"Webek. Gustavus Adolphus. 

The Hydrographic office ; its history, 
activities and organization. 1926. 
(Institute for government research. 
Service monographs of the United 
States government) 353.8 W37h 

MILITARY SCIENCE. 

("oudHLAX. Timothy M. 

M'lbilir'i.-ition in retrospect. 1926. 

c355 C85 



Leffeets, Charles MacKubin. 

Uniforms of the American, British, 
French, and German armies in the 
war of the American revolution, 
1775—1783. Painted and described by 
Charles M. Lefferts, edited by Alex- 
ander J. Wall. 1926. (The New 
York historical society. The John 
Divine Jones fund series of histories 
and memoirs) q355 L4 

Wllson, Herbert Wrigley. 
Battleships in action. 2 v. 

359.09 W74 

ASSOCIATIONS, INSTITUTIONS. 

BOLITHO, William. 

Murder for profit. 1926. 364 B38 

Dunham, Francis Lee. 

An approach to social medicine. 1925. 

361 091 
Hart, Hugh D. 

Life insurance as a life work. 1926. 
(International life underwriters li- 
brary) 368.3 H32 

He^ua', William. 

Delintiuents and criminals, their making 
and unmaking ; studies in two Amer- 
ican cities. 1926. (Judge Baker 
foundation) 364.1 H43d 

International committee for political 
prisoners. 
Letters from Russian prisons. 1925. 

365 1612 
Sheffield, Mrs Ada (Eliot). 

The social case history ; its construction 
and content. 1920. (Social work 
series) 361 S54 

Wulkop, Elsie. 

The social worker in a hospital ward, 
with comment by Richard C. Cabot. 
1926. 360 W96 

EDUCATION. 

Almack, John Conrad, cC- Bursch, James F. 

The administration of consolidated and 

village schools. cl925. (Riverside 

textbooks in education) 379.73 A44 

AvERiLL. Lawrence Augustus. 

Educational hygiene. cl926. (River- 
side textbooks in education) 

371.7 A95 



vol. 22, 110. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



73 



Bagley. AVilliam Chandler. 
The educative process. 1922. 

370.1 B14 

BOBBITT, John Franklin, d others. 

Curricnilum investigations. cl926. ( Sup- 
plementary educational monographs, 
pub. in conjunction with the School 
review and the E^lementary school 
journal) 375 B66cu 

Bbiggs, Le Baron Russell. 

To college girls, and other essays. 
[1914] (The Riverside literature 
series) 376 B85t 

Briggs. Thomas Henry. 

Curriculum problems. 1926. (The 
modern teachers' series) 375 B85 

BuswELL, Guy Thomas. 

Diagnostic studies in arithmetic. cl926. 
372.7 B98d 
Clippinger, Walter Gillan. 

Student relationships ; an orientation 
course for college freshmen and high 
school seniors. cl926. 378 C64 

E]aton. Theodore Hildreth. 

Education and vocations. 1926. ( Books 
on education) 370.01 E14 

General education board. 

Public education in Delaware. 1919. 

379.751 G32 
GWYNN, Aubrey Osborn. 

Roman education from Cicero to Quin- 
tilian. 1926. 370.937 G99 

Howertii, Ira Woods. 

The theory of education. cl926. (The 
Century education series) 370.1 H85 

Jones, Thomas Jesse. 

Four essentials of education. cl92G. 

371 J 793 
Kelly, Robert Lincoln. 

Tendencies in college administration. 
1926. 378 K292 

Kirkpatrick, John Ervin. 

The American college and its rulers. 
1926. 378 K59 

Mn,i,s ccllege. Oakland, California. 

Histoi'y <>.' the aluniuie of Mills semi- 
nary and college. 1865-1914. 

C378.794 MT 



Newcomb, Ralph S. 

Modern methods of teaching arithmetit'. 
cl926. (Riverside textbooks in edu- 
cation) 372.7 N53 

Ogden, Robert Morris. 

Psychology and education. cl926. 

370.1 034 
Oldroyd, ilfrs Ida (Shepard) 

The marine shells of the west coast of 
North America. 1924. (Stanford 
university publications. University 
series. Geological series) 

qc378.794 SMg 
Paulu, Emanuel Marion. 

Diagnostic testing and remedial teach- 
ing. cl924. 371.2 P33 

Phillips, Frank McGinley. 

Educational ranking of states by two 
methods. cl92.5. 379.73 P55 

Sullivan, Oscar M., <€ Snortum, Ken- 
neth O. 
Disabled persons, their education and 
rehabilitation. cl926. (The Cen- 
tury vocational series) 371.91 S95 

CUSTOMS. COSTUME. FOLKLORE. 

Collins. Joseph. 

The doctor looks at love and life. cl926. 

392 C71 
•Jacobs, Joseph, ed. 

The book of wonder voyages. 1896. 

q398 J1 
MacManus, Seumas. 

The Donegal wonder book. 1926. 

398 M16 

La Mode feminine de 1795 a 1900. 

391 M6?i 

Rives, Hallie Erminie, "il/rs Post 
Wheeler." 
The complete book of etiquette. cl926 

395 R62 

Sage, Elizabeth. 

A study of costume, from the days oi 
the Egyptians to modern times 
cl926. 391 S12 

WOMEN. 

Edye. Alfred. 

Mainly about women. 1926. 396 E26 

Leigh, Ruth. 

101 new ways for women to make 
money. cl926. 396.5 L?i'-> 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Leuck, Miriam Simons. 
Fields of work for women. 

Parsons, xVlice Beal. 

Woman's dilemma. cl926. 

Vincent. Junius, pseud. 
Ruth talks it over. 1926. 



1926. 
396.5 L65 

396 P267 
396 V77 



LAW. 

Bancroft-Whitney companj', iSan Fran- 
cisco. 
Code pleading in the western states. 
1926. 5 V. 

British Guiana. Latvs, statutes, etc. 
Ordinances. 1922, 1923, 1924. 

California. Laws, statutes, etc 

Acquisition and improvement act of 
1925. 

The Civil code of the state of 

California. Extra annotated ed. 
cl925. 

Clark, Harold B., ed. 

Digest of the decisions of the Supreme 
court of Idaho. 1926. 



Corpus juris. 

Quick search manual. 



1926. 



Encyclopaedia of the laws of Scotland. 
1926— 

Fisher, Frederick Charles. 

New encyclopedia of Philippine legal 
forms. 3d ed. 1926. 

Gatley, Clement. 

Law and practice of libel and slander 
in a civil action. 1924. 

Gerstenberg, Charles William 

Constitutional law ; a brief text with 
leading and illustrative cases. 1926. 

HoLCOMB, William Hartley, comp. 

If I should die tonight ; a vade mecum 
of information. With a summary of 
the law governing property interests 
and rights, and the succession of 
estates ; also the law regarding wills. 

Law notes, a monthly magazine for stu- 
dents and practitioners. 1882-1925. 
44 V. 

Lewis. Clarence Martin. 

Preparation and construction of wills, 
with forms and clauses. 1926. 



Lindley, Mark Frank. 

The acquisition and government of 
backward territory in international 
law ; being a treatise on the law and 
practice relating to colonial expan- 
sion. 1926. 

Locke, William James, com . 

Street improvement acts of California 
(including amendments of 1921) 
cl921. 

McClelland, Livingston Forsyth. 

Collection of legal forms with annota- 
tions from the Code of Georgia. 1926. 

Manitoba. Laws, statutes, etc. 
Statutes of Manitoba. 1924. 

Molloy, Charles. 

De jure maritimo et navali : or, A trea- 
tise of affairs maritime, and of com- 
merce. 3d ed., enl. 1682. 

NoRRis, Sherwood Jay. 

Marriage and divorce under California 
law. cl926. 

Northrup, Elliott Judd. 

An elementary treatise on the law of 
real property. 1919. 

Otto, Robert W., d Vandeventer, Will- 
iam L. eds. 
Indictments and informations in Mis- 
souri felonies. cl925. 

Instructions to juries in criminal 

cases. cl925. 

Pinkerton, Paul Whittier, d Millsaps, 
Jefferson Humphrey. 
Inheritance and estate taxes. 1926. 

Schneider, Philip J. 

Bills and notes (outline) 1926. 

Conflicts of laws (outline) 1926. 

Equity (outline) 1926. 

Evidence (outline) 1926. 



Private corporations (outline) 

1926. 

Sierra Leone (Colony). Reports. 
Law reports, 1912-24. 1925. 

SiiiTH, Albert R. 

Digest of the decisions of the Supreme 
court of Arizona. 1925. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



75 



SOMNER, William. 

A treatise of gavelkind, both name and 
thing. 1726. 

Stephens. J. E. R. 

Supreme court decisions of Jamaica & 
privy council decisions, from 1774- 
1923. 1924. 

Texas. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Revised civil statutes of the state of 
Texas. 1925. 2 v. 

TuTTLE, Edward William. 

A treatment of municipal courts in 
California. 1926. 

Williams, Joshua. 

Principles of the law of real property. 
24th ed. 1926. 

Yankwich, Leon Rene. 

A handbook of California pleading and 
procedure. 1926. 

LANGUAGE. 

Haile, Berard. 

A manual of Navaho grammar. 1926. 

497 H15 

Hawaiian phrase book. cl906. 499 H38 

Lee, Charles A. 
Aleutian Indian and English dictionary ; 
common words in the dialects of the 
Aleutian Indian language. 1896. 

497 L47 

Navarro Tomas, Tomas d Espinosa, Au- 
relio Macedonio. 
A primer of Spanish pronunciation. 
1926. (The Hispanic series) 

468 N32 

Rodee, Mrs Nona. 

Teaching beginners to speak English. 
cl923. 428 R68 

NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL 

Andrews, Roy Chapman. 

On the trail of ancient man. 1926. 

508.6 A56 
Redman, Leander A. 

The Einstein delusion and other essays. 
1926. 504 R31 

Science progress in the twentieth century ; 
V. 15-18. July, 1920-April, 1924. 4v. 

505 S41p 



Sharp, Dallas Lore. 

Sanctuary ! sanctuary ! 1926. 

504 S53ss 

Sullivan, John William Navin. 
Aspects of science ; second series. 1926. 

504 S94a 

MATHEMATICS. 
Dull, Raymond William. 

Mathematics for engineers. 1926. 

510 D88 
Larrett, Deuham. 

The story of mathematics. 1926. 
(Stories of science) 510.9 L33 

Reeve, William David. 

A diagnostic study of the teaching 
problems in high school mathematics. 
cl926. 510.7 R33 

ASTRONOMY. 

Adam, George. 

The solar system ; an astronomical unit. 
cl911. c523 A19 

Fath, Edward Arthur. 

The elements of astronomy ; a non- 
mathematical textbook. 1926. 

520 F25 
MoREUx, Theophile. 

Astronomy today. [1926] 520 M84 

Shapley, Harlow, <€ Payne, Cecilia H. 
eds. 
Radio talks from the Harvard observa- 
tory ; the universe of stars. 1926. 

523 S52r 

PHYSICS. 

Hart, Morris Daniel, d Smith, Walter 
Whately. 
Principles of sound signalling. 1925. 

534 H32 
Heyl, Paul Renno. 

The fundamental concepts of physics 
in the light of modern discovery. 
1926. 530 H61f 

HousTOUN, Robert Alexander. 

A treatise on light. 4th ed. 1925. 

535 H84t 
Payne, Cecilia H. 

Steller atmospheres. 1925. (Harvard 
observatory monographs) 534 PSA 

SHEARCROm', Walter Francis Fairfax. 
The story of electricity from Thales to 
Einstein. 1926. 537 S53 



7(; 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



AERONAUTICS. 

Aircraft power plants, by Edward T. 
Jones [and othets] cl926. 

533.6 A298 
Arnold, Henrj'^ H. 

Airmen and aircraft ; an introduction to 
aeronautics. cl926. (Ronald aero- 
nautic library) 533.6 A75 

Black. Archibald. 

Transport aviation. cl926. 533.6 B627 

Upson, Ralph Hazlett. 

Free and captive balloons. 1926. 

533.6 U69 
W^^jRNEE, Edward Pearson. 

Aerostatics. cl926. (Ronald aeronau- 
tic library) 533.6 W28 

CHEMISTRY. GEOLOGY. 
LooMis, Benjamin Franklin. 

Pictorial history of the Lassen volcano. 
cl926. C551.21 L86 

Sheabceoft, Walter Francis Fairfax. 
The story of the atom. 192.5. 

541.2 S53 
Waite, Arthur Edward. 

The secret tradition in alchemy. 1926. 
540.1 W14 

BIOLOGY. 
Baenakd, .J. E., d Welch, Frank V. 
Practical photo-micrography. 2d ed. 
1925. 578 325 

BrxTOX, Leonard Halford Dudley. 

The peoples of Asia. 1925. (The his- 
tory of civilization. [Historical 
ethnology]) 572 B99 

Chlldf, Yere Gordon. 

The Aryans ; a study of Indo-European 
origins. 1926. (The history of civi- 
lization. [Pre-history and antiquity] ) 
572 C53 

CowDEY, Edmund Vincent, ed. 

General cytology ; a textbook of cellular 
structure and function for students of 
biology and medicine. cl924. 

576 C87 
Hrdlicicv, Ales. 

The old Americans. 1925. 573.6 H87 

nr.\Ti.\(;TOX. Ellsworth. 

The pulse of progress, includiug a 
sketch of .JcwLsh history. 1926. 

573.4 H94pu 



Lucas, Alfred. 

Antiques, their restoration and preser- 
vation. 1924. 579 L93 

EVOLUTION. 

Cavliis^g, Yiggo. 
The collective spirit ; an idealistic theory 
of evolution. 1926. 575 C38 

Evolution in the light of modern knowl- 
edge ; a collective work. 1925. 

575 E932 
Randolph, Vance. 
The A B C of evolution. 1926. 575 R19 

Williams, J. E. 

In search of reality ; organic evolution. 

1925. 575 W72 

BOTANY. 

BosE, Sir Jagadis Chunder. 

The nervous mechanism of plants. 

1926. 581.1 B74 

CA^rpBELL, Douglas Houghton. 

An outline of plant geography. 1926. 

581.9 CIS 
Fui.TZ, Francis ^Marion. 

The elfin-forest of California. 1923. 

c582 F97 

ZOOLOGY. 

Beebe, Charles William. 

The Arcturus adventure. 1926. 

591.92 B41 

BssiG, Edward Oliver. 

Insects of western North America. 1926. 

595.7 E78 

Looms, Frederic Brewster. 
The evolution of the horse. 1926. ( The 
Amherst books. Second series) 

599.7 L86 

Reau:mur, Rene Antoine Ferchault de. 
The natural history of ants. Translated 
and annotated by William Morton 
Wheeler. 1926. 595.7 R28 

Thomson, Arthur Landsborough. 
Problems of bird-migration. 1926. 

598.2 T482 

YN'ei.luouse, AYalter Housley. 

How insects live; an elementary ento- 
mology. 1926. 595.7 W45 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



77 



USEFUL ARTS: GENERAL. 

LiKLEY, C. M. 

Practical advice to inventors and paten- 
tees. 1925. 608 L75 

Rush, Charles Everett. 

Modern Aladdins and their magic ; the 
science of things about us. 1926. 

604 R95 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Barker, L. F., d Cole, N. B. 

Rheumatism ; its meaning and its 
menace. 1926. 616.99 B255 

Conference on the International labour 
organization and industrial health, 
London, 1923. 
Industrial hygiene and safety and the 
International labour organisation. 
1923? (International labor office, 
Geneva. Studies and reports, series 
F, Industrial hygiene) 613.6 161 

Detroit. Henry Ford hospital. 

Collected papers by the stafi: of the 
Henry Ford hospital. 1st series, 
1915. 1926. 610.8 D48 



Geuber, Max von. 

Hygiene of sex. 1926. 



612.6 G88 



HOENIRKOOK, F. A. 

Physical fitness in middle life. 613 H81 

International labor office, Geneva. 

Automatic couplings and the safety of 

railway workers. 1924. (Studies 

and reports, series F, second section 

(Safety) _ 613.6 161a 

The protection of eyesight in in- 



dustry. 1923? (Studies and reports, 
series F, Industrial hygiene) 

613.6 161 
JMcAlpin, Edwin Augustus. 

Faith, health and common sense. cl926. 
(Doran's modern readers boolishelf) 
615.85 Mil 
McDouGALL, William. 

Outline of abnormal psychology. cl926. 
616.84 Ml 37 
Martin, Florent. 

Artificial limbs ; appliances for the dis- 
abled. 1924. (International labor 
office, Geneva. Studies and reports, 
series E (Disabled men) q617.5 16 



MoLER, Arthur B. 

The manual of beauty culture. [1920] 
613.4 M71 

Radiology, a monthly journal devoted to 
clinical radiology and allied sciences. 
V. 2-3. 1924. q610.5 R1 

Ramus, Carl. 

Outwitting middle age. cl926. 

612.6 R18 
ScHOU, Hans Jacob. 

Religion and morbid mental states, 
trans, from the Danish by W. 
Worster. cl926. 616.84 S37 

Short, Thomas. 

Discourses on tea, sugar, milk, made- 
wines, spirits, punch, tobacco, &c. : 
with plain and useful rules for gouty 
people. 1750. v613.2 S559 

The Western Osteopath. Dec, 1920- 
May. 1921. v. 15. noa. 7-12. 

C615.805 W52 

White, William Alanson. 

Mental mechanisms. 1911. (Nervous 

and mental disease monograph series ) 

q612.8 W5 

Williams, Edward Huntington. 

How we become personalities. cl926. - 

612 W72 

ENGINEERING. 

Beman, Lamar Taney, coinx). 

Outlawing the pistol. 1926. (The refer- 
ence shelf) . 623.4 B45 

CoLViN, Fred Herbert. • 

American machinists' handbook and 
dictionary of shop terms. 4th ed. 
1926. 621.7 C72a2 

Ford, Henry, d Crowther, Samuel. 
Today and tomorrow. 1926. 625.6 F69 

Gray, William M'Gill. 

Naval architecture ; a first course in 
ship calculations. [1923] 623.8 G78 



HovEY, Otis Ellis. 
Movable bridges. 



1926. 



Le Conte, Joseph Nisbet. 
Hydraulics. 1926. 



624.8 H84 



627 L46 



Pritsciiau, Ferdinand Arthur. 
The engineer's companion. 1924. 

620.2 P96 



TS 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail., 192' 



Slighter, Walter Irvine. 

Principles underlying the design of 
electrical machinery. 1926. 

621.3 S633 
TI!^^-KS. Willibald. 

Industrial furnaces. 2d ed. 1926. 

621.18 T83 
Weeks, Walter Scott. 

VentUation of mines. 1926. 622.4 W39 



AGRICULTURE. 

BuECHEL, Pi-ederick Anthony. 

The commerce of agriculture ; a survey 
of agricultural resources. 1926. (The 
Wiley agricultural series) 

630 B92S 
Fa\vcett, Howard Samuel. 

Citrus diseases and their control. 1926. 

(McGraw-Hill publications in the 

agi'icultural and botanical sciences ) 

634.3 F27 

(JiLES. Dorothy. 

The little kitchen garden. 1926. (The 
little garden series) 635 G47 

Hendby, George W., d Kelly, Margaret P. 

The plant content of adobe bricks. 1925. 

Gift. qc630 H4 

International institute of agriculture. 
Bureau of statistics. 

Documentary leaflets. lst-7th year ; 

July 1917-1923. q 630.5 16 

Voorhees, Edward Burnett. 

Fertilizers. 2d rev. ed. 1926. (The 
rural science series) 631 V95a 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

loNiDES, Basil. 

Colour and interior decoration. [1926] 

q645 16 
Lamb, Patrick. 

Royal cookery : or. The compleat court- 
cook. 1716. v641 L21 

Smith, Isabel Cotton. 

The blue book of cookery and manual 
of house management. 1926. 

641 S64 

Swift, Marjoiie, d Herrick, Mrs Christine 
( Terhune ) 
Feed the brute. 1926. 641 S97 



COMMERCE. COMMUNICATION. 

Chatterton, Edward Keble. 

The ship under sail. The splendour of 
the sailing ship thi'ough the ages. 
[1926] 656.8 C49sh 

Davis, Charles Gerard. 

Ship models, how to build them. 1925. 
(Marine research society, Salem, 
Mass. Publication) 656.8 D26 

Fuller, John Frederick Charles. 

Pegasus ; Problems of transportation. 
[1925] (To-day and to-morrow 
series) 656 F96 

Hafen, LeRoy R. 

The overland mail. 1926. c385.1 H13 



Holland, Rupert Sargent. 
Historic ships. cl926. 



656.8 H73 



Irwin, John R. 

Radio up to the minute. 1926. 

654 172 
MacElwee, Roy Samuel. 

Ports and terminal facilities. 2d ed. 
Enlarged and completely rewritten. 
1926. 656 Ml 4a 

Peabody, Robert Pjphraim. 

The log of the Grand Turks. 1926. 

656.8 P35 
Putnam, George Granville. 

Salem vessels and their voyages. 1925. 
3 V. 382 P99 

Remer, C. F. 

The foreign trade of China. 1926. 

380 R38 
Roux, Antoine. 

Ships and shipping ; _ a collection of 
pictures, including many American 
vessels. 1925. (Marine research 
society, Salem, Mass. Publication) 

q656.8 R8 

PRINTING. 

Koch, Theodore Wesley. 

The Florentine book fair. 1926. 

655 K76f 
Morison, Stanley. 

The art of the printer. 1926. 

q 655.2 M8 
Plantin, Christophe. 

Plantin's Index characterum of 1567. 
1924. vq655.2 P7 

Printer's ink ; a journal for advertisers. 
1888 659.05 P95 



vol. 22, no. IJ 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



79 



BUSINESS METHODS. 

BKiifeRE, Henry Jaromir, & Lazarus, 
Arthur. 
Applied budgeting. 1026. 658 B88 

Hayward. Walter Sumner. 

Sales administration. 1926. 658 H42s 

Knudson. Mrs Grace Powers (Thomas) 
<Jift and art shop merchandising. 1926. 

658 K743 
Larned, William Livingston. 

A sales manager's field letters to his 
men. 1926. 658 L32 



Pelz, Victor H. 

Selling at retail. 1926. 



658 P39 



White, Percival. 

Business management ; an introduction 
to business. cl926. (American busi- 
ness series) 658 W58b 

ADVERTISING. ACCOUNTING. 

AoNEW, Hugh Elmer. 

Cooperative advertising by competitors. 
1926. 659 A27 

HoTCHKiss, John T. 

Bookstore advertising publicity and 
window display. cl926. 655.5 H83 

Paccioli, Luca. 

An original translation of the treatise 
on double-entry bookkeeping. Tr. by 
Pietro Crivelli. 1924. 657 P11 

PowELSON, John Abrum. 

Introductory accounting. 1926. 

657 P88 
SiNsiiEiMER, Allen. 

Retail advertising of men's and boys' 
wear. 1926. 659 S61 

IVIANUFACTURES. 

Beveridge, James. 

The papermakers' pocket book. 3d ed. 
192.5. 676 857 

Percival, JNIacTver. 

The chintz book. [192.3] q677 P4 

Walker, John Bernard. 

The story of steel. 1926. 672 W18 

Worst, Edward Francis. 

How to weave linens. cl926. q677 W9 



CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 
BUILDING. 

Mijjgle, John Glenn. 

Draft and capacity of chimneys. 1925. 

697.8 M66 
SiE.M lENOWicz, Ka zimierz. 

The great art of Artillery of Casimir 
Simienowicz. 1729. q662 S5 

Turner, T. Henry, & Budgen, N. F. 
Metal spraying. 1926. (Griffin's tech- 
nological handbooks) 69L7 T95 

TuRRENTiNE, John William. 

Potash ; a review, estimate and forecast. 

1926. (The Wiley agricultural series "> 

66L3 T95 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

BiTERMEYER, Laurence. 

The esthetic experience. 1924. 

701 B92 
Gardner. Percy. 

New chapters in Greek art. 1926. 

709.38 G22n 
KoNODY, Paul George. 

The Louvre. 1925. q708 K8 

Mieras, J. P., tf- Yerbury, Francis Row- 
land, eds. 
Dutch architecture of the xxth century. 
1926. q709.492 M6 

Vexturi, Adolfo. 

A short history of Italian art, trans- 
lated by Edward Hutton. 1926. 

709.45 V46 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Browne, Edith A. 

Early Christian and Byzantine archi- 
tecture. 1912. ( Great buildings and 
how to enjoy them) 723.2 B88 

Gothic architecture. 1911. (Great 

buildings and how to enjoy them) 

723.5 B88 

Greek architecture. 1925. (Great 

buildings and how to enjoy them) 

722.8 B88 

Norman architecture. 1919. (Great 

buildings, and how to enjoy them) 

723.4 B88n 

Romanesque architecture. 1910. 

(Great buildings and how to enjoy 
them) 723.4 B88 



80 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Chamberlain, Samuel. 

Sketches of northern Svjauish archi- 
tectvre in pen, pencil and wash. 
el926. q720.946 C4 

Holly, Henry Hudson. 

Cluireh architecture. 1871. q726 H74 

Pacific ready-cut homes, incorporated. 
125 Pacific homes. cl923. qc728 P11 

Pacific's book of homes. cl925. 

qc728 P11p 
Peppin, .J. B. 

Oakland bungalow book. c728 P42a 

Rathbun, Seward Hume. 

A background to architecture. 1926. 

720.9 R23 

Sexton, Randolph Williams, ed. 

American apartment houses of today. 
cl926. q728 55 

Siren, Osvald. 

The imperial palaces of Peking. 1926. 

f722.1 S6 
Still well, Elmer W., d Co. 

AU-American homes. c728 S85al 

Little bungalows. 1926. 



c728 S85! 

The new colonials. 1926. 

c728 S85n 
Sullivan, Louis Henry. 

A system of architectural ornament ac- 
cording with a philosophy of man's 
powers. 1924. fv729 S94 

Tipping, Henry Avray. 

English homes, period vi. Late Geor- 
gian, 1760-1820. 1926. [Country 
life library] f728 T5e4 

Tralle, Henry Edward, <& Merrill, George 
Earnest. 
Building for religious education. cl926. 

726 T76b 
Weaver, Sir Lawrence. 

Cottages. [1926] 728 W36c 

SCULPTURE. POTTERY. 

EuMORFOPOULOS, George. 

The George Eumorfopoulos collection ; 
catalogue of the Chinese, Corean and 
Persian pottery and porcelain. 1925. 

vf738 E8 



Saunier, Charles. 

Louis Barye, translated by Wilfrid S. 
Jackson. 1926. (Masters of modern 
art) 735 B296s 

Spargo, John. 

Early American pottery and china. 
cl926. [Century library of American 
antiques] 738 S736 

DRAWING. DECORATION. 
DESIGN. 

Cole, Rex Vicat. 

The artistic anatomy of trees, their 
structure and treatment in painting. 
1916. (The new art library) 

741 C689 
Griset, Ernest. 

(xriset's grotesques ; or. Jokes drawn on 
wood. 1867. qv741 G86 

Hambiuge, .Jay. 

The elements of dynamic symmetry. 
cl926. 741 H19e 

Jacobs, Michel. 

The art of composition. 1926. 

q742 J1 
McMurtrie, Douglas Crawford. 

Alphabets ; a manual of letter design. 
cl926. 745 M16 

Oehler, Bernice Olivia. 

Figure sketching. cl926. 743 028 

Payne, Wyndham. 

Town and country. vq741 P3 

Petersson-Berg, Anna. 

Text book of Swedish home sloyd, typi- 
cal Swedish patterns of hole seam, 
fringe plaiting and knitting. cl925. 
746 P48 

PoLAK, S., £ Quilter, Harry Charles. 
The teaching of drawing ; its aims and 
methods. 740 P76 

The Poster. 

The essentials of poster design. cl925. 

q741 P8 
Salwey, Jasper Philip. 

Sketching in lead pencil for architects 
and others. 1926. 744 818 

Sprague, Elizabeth, d Sprague, Curtiss. 
How to design greeting cards. cl926. 

740 S76 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



81 



FURNITURE. 

Caekick, Alice Van Leer. 

Collector's luck in England. 1926. 

749 C316 

OsBUKN, Burl N., d Osburn, Bernice B. 
Measured drawings of early Amer- 
ican furniture. cl926. q749 08 

Pekcival, Maclver. 

The oak collector, a guide to the col- 
lection of old oak and simple cottage 
furniture. 1925. 749 P42 

Singleton, Esther. 

The collecting of antiques. 1926. 

q749 S6c 

PAINTING. 

BiNYON, Laurence. 

The followers of WiUiam Blake ; 
Edward Calvert, Samuel Palmer, 
George Richmond & their circle. 
1925. q759.2 B61 

Blackbuen, Henry, ed. 

English art in 1884. 1894. q759.2 B6 

Beay, Anna Eliza (Kempe) Stothard, 
"Mrs A. E. Bruy." 
Life of Thomas Stothard. 1851. 2 vol. 
V759.2 S88 
Colin, Paul. 

Van Gogh translated by Beatrice Mog- 
gridge. 1926. (Masters of modern 
art) 759.9 G61c 

Du Quesne-van Gogh, Elisabeth Hu- 
berta. 
Personal recollections of Vincent van 
Gogh. 1913. 759.9 061 d 

Lafabgue, Marc. 

Corot. 1926. (Masters of modern art) 
759.4 082 1 

Lyttelton, Hon Mrs Edith Sophy (Bal- 
four) . 
Florence Upton, painter. 1926. 

759.2 U71 
RUTTER, Frank Vane Phipson. 

Evolution in modern art, a study of 
modern painting 1870-1925. [1926] 
759 R89 
Stkange, Edward Fairbrother. 
The colour-prints of Hiroshige. 

q759.92 H6 
6 — 49631 



Symons, Arthur. 

Studies on modern painters. 1925. 

v750 ^8 

ENGRAVINO. 

[Bayeos, Franz von] 

[Illustrations to the Divine comedy] 

vq769 B3 

Blajipied, Edmund. 

Edmund Blampied. 1926. (Modern 
masters of etching) q767 B6 

Cole, Timothy. 

Considerations on engraving. 1921. 

v761 068 
Legros, Alphonse. 

Alphonse Legros. 1926. (Modern 
masters of etching) q767 L51 



Uettshibara, Yoshijiro. 
Ten woodcuts. 1924. 



vq761 U8 



PHOTOGRAPHY. MOVING 
PIOTURES. 

Bechdolt, John Ernest, 

How to make your own motion picture 
plays, including 12 scenarios for 
amateur actors. cl926. 778 B39I 

Nesbit, William. 

How to hunt with the camera ; a com- 
plete guide to all forms of outdoor 
photography. cl926. q778 N4 

Ramsaye, Terry. 

A million and one nights. 1926. 

778 R18 

MUSIC. 

AuBRY, Georges Jean. 

French music of today. 1919. (Li- 
brary of music and musicians) 

780.4 A89 
Behnke, Kate Emil. 

Singers' difficulties ; how to overcome 
them. 784.9 B419 

Blake, William. 

Seven poems from Blake's "Songs of 
innocence." q784.3 B6 

Blom, Eric. 

Stepchildren of music. [1925] 

780.4 B65 
Beower, Harriette Moore. 

Modern masters of the keyboard, with 
sixteen portraits. 1926. 786 B87p 



Sl! 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1927 



De KovEN, Anna (Farwell) "Mrs Regi- 
nald De Koven." 

A musician and his wife. 1926. 

780.2 D32 

Gra\^s, Charles Larcom. 

Hubert Parry, his life and works. 

1926. 2 V. 780.2 P26 



Handy, W. C. 

Blues ; an anthology. 



1926. 



q784.7 H2 



Mathews, William Smythe Babeock. 
A popular history of music from the 
earliest times until the present. 
cl926. 780.9 M42 

Parker, D. C. 

(jeoi'ges Bizet, his life and works. 1926. 
(Masters of music) 780.2 B625 

Whittaker, WUliam Gillies. 

Class-singing. 1925. (Oxford musical 
essays) 784.9 W62 

AVynoham, Henry Saxe. 

Arthur Seymour Sullivan. 1926. 
(Masters of music) 780.2 S949wy 

THEATER. AMATEUR 
THEATRICALS. 

ATcniA'SO.x, Frances Elizabeth. 

Story terrace. 1926. 793.2 A86 

Crafton, Allen. 

The process of play production ; a book 
for the nonprofessional theatre work- 
er. 1926. 792 C885 

Divine, Charles. 

Pirtle drums it in. 1926. (Appleton 
short plays) 793 D618p 

Nathan, George Jean. 

The house of Satan. 1926. 792 N27h 

Playground and recreation association 
of America. Community drama. 
cl926. 792 P72 

Sherwood, Robert Edmund. 

Here we are again ; recollections of an 
old circus clown. cl926. 791 S55 

Wllde, Percival. 

Kings in Nomania. 1926. 793.2 W67k 

YoxJNG, Stark. 

Theatre practice. cl926. 792 Y76t 



AMUSEMENTS. 

Cochran, Thomas C. 

Auction bridge handbook. 1926. 

795 C66 
Cunnington, Edward Ernest. 

Chess traps and stratagems. 794 C97c 

Elliot, Gabrielle d Forbush, Arthur Rex. 
Games for every day. 1926. (The 
Macmillan children's classics) 

793 E46 
Emery, Alfred. 

Chess sacrifices and traps, with a note 
on the "new ideas." 1924. 794 E53 

Ferguson, Wynne. 

Practical auction bridge. cl926. 

795 F35 
Lenz, Sidney S. 

Lenz on bridge. 1926. 795 L57 

Montgomery, Mrs Grace Greenwood 

(Chandler) 

Modern auction bridge, containing the 

revised laws of TL926. New rev. ed. 

1926. 795 M78m 

Wentworth, Corinne. 

Entertainment for all occasions. cl926. 

793 W47 
Work, Milton Cooper. 

Auction bridge complete. cl926. 

795 W92ab 

RECREATION. 

Brooke, Geoffrey Francis Heremon. 
Horse-sense and horsemanship of today. 
1926. 798 B87 

COLLETT, Glenna. 

(4olf for young players. 1926. 796 C69 



Elmer, Robert Potter. 
Archery. 1926. 



796 E48ar 



Grey, Zane. 

Tales of the angler's Eldorado, New 
Zealand. 1926. q799.1 G8t 

A Hand book on archery ; being a guide 
in the practice of archery. [2d ed.] 
cl926. 796 H236ar 

Hewitt, Edward Ringwood. 

Telling on the trout. 1926. 799.1 H61t 

Piter, Charles Vancouver, d Oakley, 
Russell Arthur. 
Turf for golf courses. 192.3. 796 P66 



Streeter, Daniel W. 

Denatured Africa. 1926. 



799 891 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



83 



SuRTEES, Robert Smith. 

Thoughts oil hunting and other matters. 

1925. 799 S962 

Travehs, Jerome Dunstan, <£ Crowell, 
James R. 
The fifth estate ; thirty years of golf. 

1926. 796 T77f 

Weyand, Alexander M. 
American football, its history and devel- 
opment. 1926. 797 W54 

WiGNALL, Trevor C. 

The sweet science. 1926. 796 W66 

LITERATURE. 

Anderson, Sherwood. 

The modern writer. 1925. c814 A54 



Sherwood Anderson's notebook. 



1926. 



814 A54 



Bachellee, Irving Addison. 

Opinions of a cheerful Yankee. cl926. 

814 B12 
Balmforth, Ramsden. 

The ethical and religious value of the 
drama. [1925] 808.2 B19 

Benson, Arthur Christopher. 
Rambles and reflections. [1926] 

824 B47r 

The Boston book. Being specimens of 
metropolitan literature, occasional 
and periodical. 1850. 818 874 

Braybrooke, Patrick. 

The genius of Bernard Shaw. [1925] 
822 S53zbr 
Cicero, Marcus TuUius. 

Letters of a Roman gentleman, selected 
from the correspondence of Cicero 
and translated by Arthur Patch 
McKinlay. 1926. 875 C56mc 

Clemenceau, Georges Eugene Benjamin. 

Demosthenes, translated by Charles 

Miner Thompson. 1926. 885 D38cl 

Clough, Edwin Howard. 

A nosegay of 'Yorick's' editorials, comp. 
by a student of The Theosophical 
university. 1923. c814 C64n 



Yorick's on the margin. 192.3. 

c814 C64 



DOBREE, Bonamy. 

Essays in biography, 1680-1726. 1925. 

824 D634 



Buncombe, John. 

Letters, by several eminent persons 
deceased. Including the correspond- 
ence of John Hughes, esq. 2d ed. 
1773. 3 V. 826 D91 



EiCHLEK, Lillian. 
Well-bred English. 



1926. 



808 E34 



Emerson, Ralph Waldo. 

The heart of Emerson's journals, edited 
by Bliss Perry. 1926. 814 E53h 

France, Anatole. 

Anatole France at home. Translated 

by Laura Riding Gottchalk. 1926. 

844 F81ah 

Under the rose. [1926] 

844 F81u 
[Graves, Richard] 
The spiritual Quixote : or. The sum- 
mer's ramble of Mr Geoffry Wild- 
goose. A comic romance. [A new 
edition corrected and improved] 
1792. 3 vols. v823 G77a 

Grey, Edward Grey, 1st discount. 

Fallodon papers. 1926. 824 G842f 

"H" 

The meditations of a profane man. 
[1926] 814 H11 



Halpine, Charles Graham. 
Baked meats of the funeral. 



1866. 
818 H19 



Harper's anthology, edited by Frederick 
A. Manchester, William F. Giese. 
1926. 2 V. 820.8 H29 

Hubbard, Elbert, comp. 

Elbert Hubbard's scrap book. cl923. ' 
q808.8 H87 

Intercollegiate literary magazine con- 
ference, ed. 
Young Pegasus ; prose and verse. 1926. 

810.8 161 
Johnson, Samuel. 

The critical opinions of Samuel John- 
son. 1926. 824 J 69c 

Legouis, fimile Hyacinthe, d Cazamain, 
Louis Francois. 
A history of English literature, v. 1. 
1926. 820.9 L51 



LiTTELL, Robert. 

Read America first. 1926. 



814 L7772 



84 



NEWS Notes of California libraries. [Jan., 1927 



Lucas, Frank Laurence. 

Authors dead & living. 1926. 

820.9 L93 
Lynd, Robert. 

The money-box. [1925] 824 L988m 

Meinhold, Wilhelm. 

' Sidonia, the sorceress. 1926. 

vq833 M5 

Mtrsky, Dmitry Svyatopolk-, prince. 
Contemporary Russian literature, 1881- 
1925. 1926. 891.7 M67c 

MoFFATT, James. 

The Bible in Scots literature. 



Moore, (ieorge. 
Avowals. 1926. 



820.9 M69 
801 M82 



MuiK, Edwin. 

Transition ; essays on contemporary 
literature. 1926. 824 M953t 

Palache, .John Garber. 

Four novelists of the old regime : Cre- 
billon, Laclos, Diderot, Restif de la 
Bretonne. 1926. 843.09 P15 

Phelps, William Lyon. 

As I like it ; third series. 1926. 

814 P54as2 
Plato. 

Crito ; a Socratic dialogue. Translated 
by Henry Gary. 1926. v888 P71 

Thirteen epistles of Plato- 1925. 

888 P71p 

RiDDELL, George Allardice Riddell, haron. 
- More things that matter. 1925. 

824 R54 
Seabury, Florence Guy. 

The delicatessen husband, and other 
essays. cl926. 814 S43 

Shafer, Robert, ed. 

American literature (Complete ed. ). 
1926. 810.8 S52 



Shepard, Odell, cd. 
Essays of 1925. 1926. 



814.08 S54 



Smith, Mrs Mary (Chapin). 

History's most famous words. cl926. 

828 S65 
Spicer-Simson, Theodore. 

Men of letters of the British Isles ; por- 
trait medallions from the life. 1924. 
vq820.9 S7 



Sprague, Arthur Colby. 

Beaumont and Fletcher on the restora- 
tion stage. 1926. 822.09 S76 

Untermeyer. liouis. 

Collected piirodies. cl926. 817 U61 

Wheelwright, John Tyler, & Stimson, 
Frederic Jesup. 
Rollo's journey to Cambridge. 1926. 

q817 W5 

POETRY. 

Allen, Hervey. 

Christmas epithalamium. 1925. 

v811 A426c 
Blackmore, Richard Doddridge. 

Fringilla. 1895. v821 B629a 

Bliss, Douglas Percy, eomp. 

Border ballads, selected & decorated 
with woodcuts. 1925. 821.08 B649 

Bridges, Robert Seymour. 

New verse written in 1921. 1925. 

821 B85n 

Brown, Abbie Farwell. 

The silver stair ; poems. 1926. 

811 B876s 
California writers club. 

AVest winds ; an anthology of verse. 

1925. C811.08 CI 54 

Carhart, George S., & McGhee, Paul A., 
coinps. 
Through magic casements. 1926. 

808.1 C27 

Carnegie library school association, 
comp. 
Arbor day in poetry. 1926. q820.8 C2 

Easter in poetry. 1926. 

q820.8 C2e 

Mother's day in poetry. 1926. 

q820.8 C2m 
Chaucer, Geoffrey. 

The book of Troilus and Criseyde. 

1926. 821.17 Ylr 

Clutton-Bkock, Arthur. 

The miracle of love and other poems. 
1926. v821 C649 

Conkling, Mrs Grace Walcott (Hazard). 
Flying fish ; a book of songs and son- 
nets. 1926. 811 C75f 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



85 



CoBELLi, Marie. 
Poems. 

CoRNFORD, Frances. 

Autumn midnight. 1923 



821 C79 



821 C81 
Spring morning. 1923. 821 C81s 



Derby, John Barton. 

Musings of a recluse. 1837. 



811 D42 



Dreiser, Theodore. 

Moods, cadenced and declaimed. 1926. 
v811 D771 
Duff, J. L. 

The Rubaiyat of Ohow Dryyam. 

. cl922. 811 D85 

FiCKE, Arthur Davison. 

Selected poems, with a preface on the 
nature of poetry. cl926. 811 F44se 

Garnett, il/rs Louise (Ayres). 
Eve walks in her garden. 1926. 

811 G235 

Geffen, Pauline Felix. 

The prince of wails. Illustrated by 
C. E. Millard. 1926. 811 G29 

Haskell, Thomas Nelson. 

Young Konkaput, the King of the Utes. 
1SS9. 811 H34 

Jenkins, Oliver. 

Opon shutters. 1922. v811J52 

Johns, OiTick. 

Wild plum ; lyrics. 1926. 811J65w 

Kemp, Harry. 

The sea and the dunes and other poems. 
cl926. 811 K32s 

Lindsay, Nicholas Vachel. 

The candle in the cabin. 1926. 

811 L74ca 
Milton, John. 

Comus: a mask. 1926. qv821.47 05 

Pegasgs, a magazine of verse. 1923-24. 

C811.05 P37 

Gift. 

Putnam, Mrs William Lowell. 

XXVIII sonnets. 1925. v811 P993 

Rendel, Romilda, comp. and trans. 

An anthology of Italian lyrics from the 
thirteenth century to the present day. 
[1925] 851.08 R39 



Rich, Harold Thompson. 

I come singing ; rhythms and songs. 
1926. 811 R498 

RiCKABAY, Franz Lee, comp. 

Ballads and songs of the shanty-boy. 
1926. 811.08 R539 

Sandburg, Carl. 

Selected poems of Carl Sandburg. 
cl926. 811 S21se 

Sherman, Frank Dempster. 
The poems of Frank Dempster Sherman. 
cl917. v811 S55 

Smith, Cicely Fox. 

Full sail ; more sea songs and ballads. 
1926. 821 S644f 

Spingarn, Mrs Amy (Einstein). 

Humility and pride. 1926. 811 S757 

Stephens, James. 

A poetry recital. 1925. 821 S83p 

SwARTZ, Roberta Teale. 

Lilliput. cl926. 811 S973 

Taylor, Edward Robeson. 

Chants with the soul. 1920. c811 T239 

Teasdale, Sara. 

Dark of the moon. 1926. 811T25d- 

Tennyson, Alfred Tennyson, 1st baron. 
The works of Alfred Lord Tennyson. 
1884-1893. 10 V. 821.81 J3 

TnoiiAS. Edith Matilda. 

Selected poems, edited with a memoir 
by Jessie B. Rittenhouse. 1926. 

811 T45s 

Welby, Thomas Earle, ed. 

The silver treasury of English lyrics. 
1925. 821.08 W43 

Wilkinson, Mrs Marguerite Ogden 
(Bigelow). 
Citadels. 1926. c811 W687c 

WoDHULL, Michael 

Poems. A rev. ed. 1804. q821 W8 

DRAMA. 

Aeschylus. 

The Eumenides (The furies) of 
Aeschylus, translated into rhyming 
verse by Gilbert Murray. [1925] 

882 A25em 



86 



NEWlri NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jail., 1927 



Boyd, Anne Morris. 

Exit Miss Lizzie Cox ; a bibliothera- 
peiitjc tragedy in one act. 1926. 

812 B78 
Bynner, Witter. 

Cake, an indulgence. 1926. 812 B99c 

CoLTON, John. 

The Shanghai gesture : a play. 1926. 

812 C72s 
Down, Oliphant. 

Three one-act plays : The dream-child, 
Bal masque, Tommy-by-the-way. 
1923. 822 D74t 

EvBEiNOV, Nikolai Nikolaevich. 

The chief thing ; a comedy for some, a 
- drama for others. 1926. (The Thea- 
tre guild library) 891.72 E93 

Garkick, David. 

Three plays. Printed from hitherto 
unpublished mss. with introduction 
and notes by Elizabeth P. Stein. 
1926. v822 G24 



Gbillpaezer, Franz. 
Sappho. 1855. 



832 G85a 



Kelly, George Edward. 

Craig's wife ; a drama. 1926. 

812 K29c 



Lawrence, David Herbert. 
David, a play. cl926. 



822 L41cl 



MiDDLETON, Thomas. 

Two new plays. Viz. More dissem- 
blers besides women. Women beware 
women. 1657. v822 M62 

Miller, Katherine Browning. 

The delinquents. cl926. c812 M648 



Help- yourself. cl926. 

c812 M 64811 
Milne, Alan Alexander. 

Success ; a play in three acts. 1926. 

812 M65 
Moore, Thomas Sturge. 

Roderigo of Bivar. 1925. v822 M82 

Nicholson, Kenyon, ed. 

Revues ; a book of short sketches. 
1926. 812.08 N62r 

Terentius Afer, Publius. 

The comedies of Terence. 1768. 2 v. 
872 T31a1 



Tjiomas, Augustus. 

Still waters ; a play in three acts. 
cl926. 812 T45s 



Van Druten, John. 
Youns Woudley. 1926. 



812 V246 



Weub, Kenneth. 

One of the family ; a comedy in three 
acts. 1926. 812 W36 

CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

BiGGERS, Earl Derr. 

The Chinese parrot. 1926. cB5924c 

('ENDRARS, Blaise. 

Sutter's gold. 1926. cC395 

DoBiE, Charles Caldwell. 

Less than kin. 1926. cD633l 

Ky^ne, Peter Bernard. 

The understanding heart. 1926. 

cK99u 

IjOughead, Mrs Flora (Haines) Apponyi. 
A crown of thorns. 1891. cL887c 

Merwin, Samuel. 

The entertaining angel. cl926. 

cM576 
IMiTCHELL, Ruth Comfort. 

The wishing carpet. 1926. cM682wi 

Ogden, George Washington. 

The valley of adventure ; a romance of 
California mission days. 1926. 

c034v 
V\^iLLiAMS, Edward Huntington. 

Larry of the North. cl926. cW722 

GENEALOGY. 

I'owERS, William Howard. 

Powers-Banks ancestry, traced in all 
lines to the remotest date obtainable. 
1921. 929.2 P88p 

Spalding, Samuel Jones. 

The Spalding memorial ; a genealogical 
history of Edward Spalding of Vir- 
ginia and Massachusetts Bay, and 
his descendants. Rev. & enl. by 
Charles Warren Spalding. 1897. 

929.2 S73 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Eddy, George Sherwood. 

Makers of freedom. 1926. 923.6 E21 



vol. 22, no. i; 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



87 



GUEDALLA, Philip. 

Fathers of the revolution. 1926. 

920 G92 

Howe, Mark Autouy De Wolfe. 

Cau.ses ami their champions. 1926. 

920.07 H85 

Hyue. Marietta A, cd. 

Modern biography. cl926. 920 H994 

Law. Frederick Houk. 

Modern great Americans. cl926. 

920.07 L41 

Conienis: Alexander Graham Bell. 
— Luther Burbank. — John Burroughs. 
— Andrew Carnegie. — Alexis Carrel. — 
Samuel Langhorne Clemens. — Thomas 
Alva Edison. — George Washington 
Goethals. — William Crawford Gorgas. 
— Albert Abraham Michelson. — Robert 
Andrews Millikan. — RoVjert Edwin 
Peary. — John Joseph Pershing. — 
Theodore William Richards. — Theo- 
dore Roosevelt. — -Elihu Root. — John 
Singer Sargent. — Henry Van Dyke. — 
Woodrow Wilson. — Wilbur and Or- 
ville Wright. 

Moke uncensored recollections, by the 
author of "Uncensored recollections." 
[1926] 920.04 U54m 

QuiNCY, Josiah. 

Figures of the past from the leaves of 

old journals. New ed. 1926. 

920 Q7 

Tallema.xt des Reaux, Gedeon. 

Miniature portraits. 192.5. q 920.044 T1 

"Translated by Hamish Miles from 
the Historiettes of Tallemant des 
Reaux." 

Who's who in Chicago ; the book of Chi- 
cagoans. 1926. r920.077 B72 



BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

"The great American ass," an autobiog- 
raphy (Anonymous). cl926. 

B G786 

Austin. Barker, Eugene Campbell. 
The life of Stephen F. Austin, founder 
of Texas, 1793-1836. 1925. 

B A937b 

Ai/rton. Sharp, Evelyn. 

Hertha Ayrton. 18.54—1923. a memoir. 
1926. B A986s 

Berliner. Wile, Frederic WiUiam. 

Bmile Berliner, maker of the micro- 
phone. cl926. B B515w 



Brown. Browa", William Montgomery, 
hp. 
My heresy ; the autobiography of an 
idea. 1926. B BBS 13 

Byron. <ioRDON, Armistead Churchill. 
Allegra ; the story of Byron and Miss 
Clairmont. 1926. B B996go 

Stowe, Mrs Harriet Elizabeth 



(Beecher) . 
Lady Byron vindicated ; a history of 
the Byron controversy. 1870. 

B B9962S 

Contreras. Coxtreeas, Alonso de. 

The life of Captain Alonso de Contreras 
(1582-3633). Translated from the 
Spanish by Catherine Alison Phil- 
lips. [1926] B C764 

Coo/icr. Malone, Dumas. 

The public life of Thomas Cooper. 
1783-1839. 1926. (Yale historical 
publications, iliscellany ) . 

B C7783m 
Con-ell. CowELL, .Jo.seph. 

Thirty years passed among the players 
in England and America. 1844. 

vB C8745 

Darwin. Bradford, Gamaliel. 

Darwin, 1926. B D228br 

iJostoccskii. DoSTOEVSKAiA, Anna 
<Trigor'evna (Snitkina). 
Dostoevsky portrayed by his wife. 
1926. B D724do 

Ellis. Goldberg, Isaac. 

Havelock Ellis ; a biographical and 
critical survey. 1926. B E479g 

llvatis. Evans, Mrs Rosalie (Caden). 
The Rosalie Evans letters from Mexico, 
arranged with comment by Daisy 
Caden Pettus. cl926. B E923 

Godwin. Browx, Ford Keeler. 

The life of William Godwin. 1926. 

B G5926b 

Gogol. Lavrin, Janko. 

Gogol. 1926. (The republic of letters) 

B G6131 

(I'ninf. Crafts, William Augustus. 
Life ol Ulysses S. Grant: his boyhood, 
campaigns, and services, military and 
civil. 1868. B G763cra. 



88 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Hodges. Hodges, Julia Shelley. 

George Hodges ; a biography. cl926. 

B H688h 
Horn. Horn. Tom. 

Life of Tom Horn, government scout 
and interpreter. [1904] B H813 

Lanfraiic. ^NIacdonald, Allan John 
Smith. 

T^anfranc, a study of his life, work & 
writing. 1926. B L268m 

Laicreuce. I^awrence, William, hp. 
Memories of a happy life. 1926. 

B L424m 
Lairso}!. Lawsox, Josephine. 

Reminiscences from a simple life. 
1920. cB L425 



Lenclos. Magne, Emile. 
Ninon de Lanclos. 



B L563m 



Leszynsky. Carpenter, Ford Ashman. 
A chivalrous Californian. [1926] 

cB L644c 

Gift of author. 

Lincoln. Lincoln, Abraham. 

An autobiography, consisting of the 
personal portions of his letters, 
speeches and conversations. cl926. 

B L736stel 

Sandbtjkg, Carl. 

Abraham Lincoln ; the prairie years. 
cl926. B L736sa 

Warren, Louis Austin. 



Lincoln's parentage & childhood. cl926. 
B L736war 

Magoffin. Maggoffin, Mrs Susan 
(Shelby). 
Down the Santa Fe trail and into 
Mexico. 1926. B M211 

Marlowe. Russell, Charles Edward. 
.Julia Marlowe, her life and art. 1926. 

B M3493r 

Marshall. Marshall, Thomas Riley. 
Recollections of Thomas R. Marshall. 
cl925. B M369 

Mercy- Argenieaxt. Merc y-Argenteatj, 
Marie Clotilde Elisabeth Louise (de 
Caraman-Chimay) comtesse de. 
The last love of an emperor. 1926. 

B M557m 

Mole. Mole, Louis Mathieu, comte. 

The life and memoirs of Count Mole 
(1781-18.55). 192.3. B IVI718n 



Mounts. [Mounts, Eli] 

Islands in the ocean of memory. [1901] 

B M928 
Nye. Nye, Edgar Wilson. 

Bill Nye, his own life story. cl926. 

B N994 
Pasteur. Valleey-Radot, Rene. 

The life of Pasteur. 1923. B P291va 

Phillips. Taylor, John Lord. 

A memoir of His Honor Samuel Phil- 
lips. 1856. B P563t 

Pilcher. Pilcher, Lewis Stephen. 

A surgical pilgrim's progress ; reminis- 
censes. 1925. B P637 

Poivys. Powys, Llewelyn. 

The verdict of Bridlegoose. cl926. 

B P8894V 

Pushkin. Miesky, Dmitry Svyatopolk, 
prince. 

Pushkin. 1926. (The republic of 

letters) B P9873m 

Ramakrishna. Mutkerji, Dhan Gopal. 
The face of silence. cl926. B R165m 

Roosevelt. Lang, Lincoln Alexander. 
Ranching with Roosevelt, by a com- 
panion rancher. 1926. B R781la 

Hill. Berkeley club, Oakland, Cal. 
A memorial of Edward Roland Sill, 
who died February 27th, 1887. 1887. 
cB S584b 

Swollett. Smollett, Tobias George. 
The letters of Tobias Smollett, collected 
and edited by Edward S. Noyes. 
1926. B S6665 

SniytJi. Smyth, Newman. 

Recollections and reflections. 1926. 

B S667 
Steger. Steger, Jane. 

Leaves from a secret journal. 1926. 

B S817 
Stelzle. Stelzle, Charles. 

A son of the Bowery ; the life story of 
an East side American. cl926. 

B S824 
Stevenson. Boodle, Adelaide A. 

R. L. S. and his sine qua non, flash- 
lights from Skerryvore, by the game- 
keeper. 1926. B S848bo 

Tarkington. Dickinson, Asa Don. 
Booth Tarkington, a sketch. 1926. 

B T187d 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



89 



Thiers. Allison, John M. S. 

Thiers and the French monarchy. 1926. 

B T438al 

Vaughan. Vaughan, Victor Clarence. 
A doctor's memories. cl926. B V369 

Walpole. Walpole, Horace, Jfth earl of 

Orford. 

A selection of the letters of Horace 

Walpole, edited by W. S. Lewis. 

1926. 2 V. B W218le 

Wanamaker. Gibbons, Herbert Adams. 
John Wanamaker. 1926. 2 v. 

B W244g 
Washington. Hughes, Rupert. 
George Washington, the human being & 
the hero, 1732-1762. 1926. 

B W318hu 

MooKE, Charles. 

The family life of George Washington. 
1926. B W318mo 

Wilson. Kekney, James. 

The political education of Woodrow 
Wilson. cl926. B W754ke 

Woodward. Woodward, Helen. 
Through many windows. 1926. 

B W899 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

Kelsey, Francis Willey. 

Excavations at Carthage, 1925. 1926. 

913.397 K29 

Macalisteb, Robert Alexander Stewart. 

A century of excavation in Palestine. 

[1925] 913.33 M11 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
GENERAL. 

Bailf.y, Hiram Percy- 
Shanghaied out of 'Frisco in the 'nine- 
ties. [1925] 910.4 B15 

Cl-EMENTS, Rex. 

A stately Southerner. 1926. 910 C62s 

Gebbault, Alain. 

The fight of the "Firecrest" ; the record 
of a lone-hand cruise from East to 
West, across the Atlantic. 1926. 

910 G36 
Hall, .James Norman. 

On the stream of travel. 1926. 

910.4 H17 



Hutchinson, Hubbard. 

Far harbors around the world. 1924. 

910.4 H97 
Tomlinson, H. M. 

Gifts of fortune and hints for those 
about to travel. 1926. 910 T65 

EUROPE. 

Brooks, Charles Stephen. 

Roundabout to Canterbury. cl926. 

914.2 B873r 
Collins, Frederick Lewis. 

Travelcharts and travel chats. cl926. 

914 C712 
Douglas, James. 

Travelling anecdotes through various 
parts of Europe. 1785. 914 D73 

Farson, Negley. 

Sailing across Europe. cl926. 914 F24 

Ford, Ford Madox. 

A mirror to France. cl926. 

914.4 F6992 
Gaunt, William. 

Rome, past and present. 1926. 

q914.56 G2 
Gibbons, Herbert Adams. 

Ports of France. cl926. 914.4 G441 

Hawkes, C. p. 

Mauresques ; with some Basque and ' 
Spanish cameos. 1926. 914.6 H39 

Hawthorne, Hildegarde. 

Corsica, the surprising island. 1926. 

914.59 H39 
Holland, Clive. 

Things seen in Paris, a description of 
the social life. 1926. 914.43 H73 

Morton, H. V. 

The spell of London. [1926] 

914.21 M88s 
Peers, Edgar Allison. 

Royal SevUle. 1926. 914.6 P375 

Richardson, Leslie. 

Motor cruising in France from Brittany 
to the Riviera. [1926] 914.4 R52 

Scott, Alexander McCallum. 

Beyond the Baltic. [1925] 

914.74 S42 
Shelley, Henry Charles. 

Majorca. [1926] 914.67 S54 

IBheridan, Mrs Clare Consuelo ( Frewen ) . 
A Turkish kaleidoscope. [1926] 

914.96 S55 



90 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 3927 



Spiller, Robert Ernest. 

The American in England during the 
first half century of independence. 
01026. 914.2 S75 

The Sweden year-book. Ed. and pub- 
lished with the assistance of public 
authorities. 1926. 914.85 S974 

WiCKHAM, Joseph Fi-ancis. 

Assisi of Saint Francis and other 
essays of Italy. 1926. 914.5 W63 

ASIA. 
Browx, George Eustace Riou Grant. 
Burma as I saw it, 1889-1917. [1925] 
915.92 B87 

[Callcott], Maria [(Dundas)] Graham, 
lady 
Journal of a residence in India. 1812. 

q915.4 C1 
Geil, William Edgar. 

The sacred 5 of China. 1926. 

915.1 G31s 

Habripo??, Edith (Ogden) "J/rs Carter 
H. Harrison." 
Lands of the sun ; impressions of a 
visit to tropical lands. 1925. 

915 H31 
Hebeb, a. Reeve. 

In Himalayan Tibet. 1926. 

915.15 H44 

EOEB, ILrs Sophie Irene ( Simon ) . 

Palestine awake. cl926. 915.69 L82 

MoBBiLL, Samuel. 

Lanterns, junks and jade. 1926. 

915.1 .M87 
XiCHOLS, Francis Henry. 

Through hidden Sheusi. 1902. 

915.1 N61 

YoiTXGHUSBAND, Sir Francis Edward. 
Peking to Lhasa. 1926. 915 Y78p 

AFRICA. SOUTH AMERICA. 

DoxxiTHORXE, Fred. A. 

Wonderful Africa. [1925] 916.8 D68 

Ketvnett, Austin. 

Bedouin justice ; laws and customs 
among the Egyptian Bedouin. 1925. 

916.2 K36 

Ossexdowski, Ferdynand Antoni. 

The fire of desert folk ; the account of 

a journey through Morocco. English 

text by Lewis Stanton Palen. cl926. 

916.4 084 



Vandercook, John W. 
"Tom-tom." 1926. 



918.8 V23 



NORTH AMERICA. 

Athearn. Clarence Royalty. 

Boston in seven days. 1926. 

917.44 B74a 
Beeb, Thomas. 

The mauve decade. 1926. 917.3 B415 

Branch, Douglas. 

The cowboy and his interpreters. 1926. 

917.8 881 
Bretherton, C. H. 

Midas; or, The LTnited States and the 
future. 1926. (To-day and t.j- 
morrow) 917.3 884 

I'.rodhead, Luke WUls. 

The Delaware Water Gap : its scenery, 
its legends and early history. 1870. 
917.48 886 
(.'lough, Edwin H. 

"Ramona's marriage place." 1910. 

c91 7.9498 C64 

Far IS, John Thomson. 

Old churches and meeting houses in 
and around Philadelphia. 1926. 

917.48 F22o 

Gerstacker, Friedrich Wilhelm Chris- 
tian. 
^^'ikl sports in the far West. 1860. 

917.8 G38w 

Kaxe, John Francis, ed. 

Picturesque America. 1925. 

q917.3 K1 

KiRKXAXD, Caroline, ed. 
Chicago yesterdays. 1919. 

917.731 K59 
I.EUPP. Francis Ellington. 

Walks about Washington. 1921. 

917.53 L65 

INIeeker, Ezra. 

Ventures and adventures of Ezra 
Meeker. 1909. c9 17.95 M49v 

Mexx, Alfred E. 

Texas as it is today. 1925. 

917.64 M54 

Morgan, Anna. 

My Chicago. cl918. 917.731 M84 

Page. Walter Hines. 

The rebuilding of old commonwealths. 
1905. 917.5 P133 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



91 



Seitz, Don Carlos. 

The great island. cl926. 



917.18 S46 



Terry, Thomas Philip. 

Terry's guide to Cuba, including the 
Isle of Pines. 1926. 917.291 T32 

Terry's guide to Mexico ; the new 



standard guidebook to the Mexican 
republic, with chapters on Cuba, the 
Bahama Islands, and the ocean 
routes to Mexico. 1925. 917.2 T32a 

Thojipson, Wallace. 

Rainbow countries of Central America. 
cl926. 917.28 T47 

Townshend, Richard Baxter. 

Last memories of a tenderfoot. [1926] 
917.8 T754 
The Ventura County Star. 

Classified directory of Ventura and 
vicinity. 1926. c91 7.9492 V46 

White, William Allen. 

Some cycles of Cathay. 1925. (The 
Weil lectures on American citizen- 
ship) 917.3 W58 

OCEANICA. POLAR REGIONS. 

BiNNEY, George. 

With seaplane and sledge in the Arctic. 
1926. 919.8 B61 

Taylor, Merlin Moore. 

The heart of black Papua. 1926. 

919.5 T24 
Wriston, Roscoe C. 

Hawaii today. 1926. 919.69 W95 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Jusserand, Jean Adrien Antoine Jules 
[d others']. 
The writing of history. cl926. 

907 J 96 
Moret, Alexandre, d Davy, G. 

From tribe to empire. 1926. (The 
history of civilization. [Pre-history 
and antiquity] ) 901 M844 

Pierce, Bessie Louise. 

Public opinion and the teaching of 
history in the United States. 1926. 
907 P61 
Strickland, Agnes. 

Stories from history. 1868. 900 S91 

Thoendike, Lynn. 

A short history of civilization. 1926. 

901 T49 



Toynbee, Arnold Joseph. 

Survey of international affairs. 1926. 

909 T75 

EUROPE. 

Asquith, Herbert Henry. 

Fifty years of British Pai-liament. 
1926. 2 V. 942.08 A84 

Belloc, Hilaire. 

Miniatures of French history. 1926. 

944 B44 
Brinton. Selwyn .John Curwen. 

The golden age of the Medici (Cosimo, 

Piero, Lorenzo de' Medici), 1434- 

1494. [1925] 945.5 B85 

Bullard, Robert Lee. 

Personalities and reminiscences of the 
war. 1925. 940.935 B93 

Coudenhove-Kalergi, Richard Nicolaus. 
Pan-Europe. 1926. 940.98 C85 

The Europa year-book ; an annual survey 
of European politics, art, and litera- 
ture ; a European who's who and 
directory, and a statistical review of 
Europe. [1st] 1926. r940.98 E89 

Flick, Alexander Clarence. 

Modern world history, 1776-1926. 
1926. (The Borzoi historical series) 
940.5 F62 
Home. Gordon Cochrane. 

Roman London, with a chronology, 
compiled by Edward Foord. New 
and rev. ed. 1926 942.1 H76 

Inge, William Ralph. 

England. 1926. (The Modern world. 
A survey of historical forces) 

942 145 

loRGA, Nicolae. 

A history of Roumania. Land, people, 
civilisation. 2d enl. ed. 1925. 

949.8 164 

Leslie, Shane. 

George the fourth. 1926. (Curiosities 
of politics) 942.07 L63 

MoTHEKSOLE, Jessie. 

Czechoslovakia : the land of an uncon- 
querable ideal. 1926. 943.7 M91 

Nogales, Rafael de. 

Four years beneath the crescent, trans 
lated from the Spanish by Muna Lee. 
1926. 940.932 N77 



92 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



O'Connor, Sir James. 

History of Ireland, 1798-1924. [1926] 
2 V. 941.5 0181 

Palen, Lewis Stanton. 

The white devil's mate. 1926. 

947 P15w 

Sainte-Marthe, Scevole de, d Sainte- 
Marthe, Lovis de. 
A genealogical history of the kings of 
Portugal. 1662. q946.9 S1 

Strickland, Agnes. 

Tales from English history. For chil- 
dren. 1868. 942 S91t 

Symonds, John Addington. 

A short history of the renaissance in 
Italy. [1926] 945 S98s 

Taylor, Rachel Annand. 

Aspects of the Italian renaissance. 
1923. . 945 T24 

Trevelyan, George Macaulay. 

History of England. 1926. 942 T81h 

Wallace, William Kay. 

Thirty years of modern history. 1926. 
940.5 W19 

ASIA. 

Rao, B. Shiva, d Pole, David Graham. 
The problem of India. 1926. 954 R21 

Scheker, James Augustin Brown. 

The ]'omance of .Japan through the 
agps. cl926. 952 S32 

Seton, Sir Malcolm Cotter Cariston. 
The India office. [1926] (The White- 
hall series) 954 S49 



Stein, Leonard Jacques. 
Syria. 1926. 



956.9 S81 



NORTH AMERICA. 

Bowers, Claude Gernade. 

Jefferson and Hamilton. 1925. 

973.4 B78 
Byrne, Patrick Edward. 

Soldiers of the plains. 1926. 

970.6 B99 
Crocker, Florence B. 

Who made Oakland? 1925. 

C979.466 093 



Farquhar, Francis P. 

Place names of the High Sierra. 1926. 
(Publications of the Sierra club) 

C979.4 F238 
Gift. 

Geer, Walter. 
' Campaigns of the civil war. 1926. 

973.73 G29 
Hawthorne, Julian. 

The story of Oregon. 1892. 2 v. 

979.5 H39 
Hill, J. L. 

The end of the cattle trail. 978 H64e 



— The passing 
Buffalo. 



of the Indian & 
978 H64 



Hunt, Marguerite. 

History of Solano county, California, 
and Napa county, California. 1926. 
2 V. qc979.452 H9 



Inman, Henry. 

Stories of the old 
1881. 



Santa Fe trail. 
978.9 157s 



Laut, Agnes Christina. 

The blazed trail of the old frontier. 
1926. 978 L38 

LippiNCOTT, Horace Mather. 

Philadelphia. cl926. 974.81 P54I 

Malin, James Claude. 
' An interpretation of recent American 
history. cl926. 973.8 M25 

Seitz, Don Carlos. 

The dreadful decade ; detailing some 
phases in the history of the United 
States from reconstruction to resump- 
tion, 1869-1879. cl926. 973.8 S46 

vShepherd, William Robert. 

The story of New Amsterdam. 1926. 

974.71 S54 
Sullivan, Mark. 

Our times ; the United States, 1900- 
1925. 1926. 973 S951 

AFRICA. OCEANICA. 

Hole, Hugh Marshall. 

The making of Rhodesia. 1926. 

968 H72 
Newell, Charles Martin. 

Kalani of Oahu. An historical 
romance of Hawaii. 1881. 

996.9 N54 
Palmer, Julius Auboineau. 

Again in Hawaii. 1895. 996.9 P174 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



93 



CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
OCTOBER, NOVEMBER AND 
DECEMBER, 1926.t 

Many of tlio admiuistrutive depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to 
the departments issuing them. The pub- 
lications of the University of California 
are offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the i^tate Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in Neios 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Adjutant General. Report, July 1, 
1920-June 30, 1926. 1926. 62 p. 

Agricultural Department. Special 
publication no. 64. Rules governing the 
inspection of meat and meat food products 
in California, under the provisions of the 
California meat inspection law of 1921. 
1926. 34 p. 

A reissue of Special publication 
no. 20. 

Same, no. 66. United States 

standards for grapes, 1926. 13 p. illus. 

Note: "Economic poisons (1925- 
1926)," listed in News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, October, 1926 is in- 
correctly numbered Special publication 
no. 66. It should be no. 67. 

Architecture, Board of (San Fran- 
cisco)*. Eighth report, the law, rules of 
the Board, and list of certificated archi 
tects. 1926. 29 p. 

Athletic Commission. Second annual 
report, 1926. 1926. 11 p. 

Banks, Superintendent op (San 
Francisco). Seventeenth annual report 
showing the financial condition of state 
banks at the close of business June 30, 
1926. 1926. 496 p. 



t Except when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 

* The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



Building and Loan Commissioner 
(San Francisco). Thirty-third annual 
report, 1926. 1926. 327 p. 

Chiropractic Examiners, Board of. 
Third annual report, 1925-1926. 1926. 
11 p. 

Civil Service Commission. Seventh 
biennial report, 1924-1926. 1926. 41 p. 

Control, Board of. Bureau of Child- 
ren's Aid. California laws relating to 
women and childi'en. 1926. 292 p. 

Corporation Department. Sixth bi- 
ennial report, 1926. 1926. 13 p. 

Criminal Identification and In- 
vestigation Bureau. Report for the 
biennial period ending June 30, 1926. 
1926. 12 p. 

Criminal. Procedl^re, Commission 
FOR the Reform of. Report to the Legis- 
lature, 1927. 1927. 43 p. 

Education, Board of. Seventh biennial 
report, 1924-1926. 1926. 173 p. illus. 

Report of the Commissioner of 

Industrial and Vocational Education for 
the biennial period ending June 30, 1926. 
1926. 127 p. illus. 

Education, Department of. Bulletin 
no. 8-B. Reading list for junior high 
schools. 1926. 35 p. 

Equalization Board. Report for 192.5- 
1926. 1926. 74 p. 

Special report to the Legislature 



under Chapter 1.54, Statutes of 1921, 
utility values as returned by companies. 
1926. 14 p. 

Fish and Game Commission. Califor- 
nia fish and game, vol. 12, no. 4, October, 
1926. p. 161-226. illus. 

Index to vol. 12, p. 217-226. 

Fish bulletin no. 11, The Cali- 



fornia sardine. 1926. 22 p. illus. 

Grand Army op the Republic, De- 
partment of California and Nevada. 
Journal of proceedings of the fifty-ninth 
annual encampment, held at Pasadena. 
California, May 16 to 22, 1926. 1926. 
198 p. illus. 



P4 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



GovERNOB. Message of Governor Friend 
Wm. Richardson regarding acts of execu- 
tive clemency. 1927. 19 p. 

Second biennial message of 



Governor Friend Wm. Richardson to the 
Legislatui'e of the state of California. 
1927. 2S p. 

Special message of Governor 



Friend Wm. Richardson regarding Colo- 
rado River Compact to the Legislature 
of the state of California in Extraordinary 
session. October 22. 1926. 1926. 14 p. 

Inaugural address of Governor 



C. C. Young, delivered before the Senate 
and Assembly of the state of California, 
January 4. 1927. 1927. 18 p. 

Harbor Commissioners, Board 07 
(San Francisco). Biennial report for the 
fiscal years commencing July 1, 1924, and 
ending June 30, 1926. 1926. 101 p. 
illus. maps. 

The Port of San Francisco and 



its recent progress. 1926. 16 p. illus. 

Health, State Board of. Weekly 
bulletin, vol. 5, nos. 33-46, October-De- 
cember, 1926. 

California commercial feeding 



stuffs act with rules and regulations, 
definitions of feeding stuffs. 1926. 21 p. 

Highway Commission. California 
highways, vol. 3, nos. 9-12, September- 
December, 1926. illus. maps. 

Immigration and Hottsing Commis- 
sion ( San Francisco). State housing act 
of California, effective August 17, 1923, 
Statutes of California of 1923. Chapter 
386 and amendments of 1925. 1926. 68 p. 

Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). Report from July 1. 
1925, to June 30, 1926. 1926. 43 p. 

California safety news, vol. 10, 



nos. 3--4, September-December, 1926. illus. 
An exclusive state compensa- 



tion insurance fund. 1926. 4 p. 

Reprint from Annual Report, 1925- 
1926. 



Insurance Department (San Fran- 
cisco). List of persons, partnerships and 
corporations licensed as insurance brokers 
and insuranc*e adjusters in California, 
term ending July 1, 1927, including 
licenses issued to August 15, 1926. 1926. 
67 p. 

Labor Statistics, Bureau of (San 
Francisco ) . Twenty-second biennial re- 
port. 1925-1926. 1926. 277 p. 

Legislature. Narcotic Committee. 
Report on drug addiction in California. 

1926. 41 p. 

Library, State. Handbook of informa- 
tion for the use of the members of the 
California Legislature, 47th Session 1927. 

1927. 50 p. map. 

News Notes of California 

Libraries, vol. 21, no. 4, October, 1926. 
p. 324-550. Map. 

Books for the blind department. 

News Notes. Reprinted from News Notes 
of California Libraries, October, 1926. 
22 p. 32°. 

Medical Examiners, Board of. Sup- 
plement to the 1926 directory of physicians 
and surgeons, drugless practitioners, 
naturopaths, chiropodists and midwives 
holding certificates issued under the Medi- 
cal Practice acts of California, October 1, 
1926. 1926. 24 p. 

Mining Bureau (San FrancLsco). 
Bulletin no. 97. California mineral pro- 
duction for 1925. 1926. 172 p. illus. 

Monthly chapter of report XXH 



of the State Mineralogist covering mining 
in California and the activities of the 
State Mining Bureau, vol. 22, no. 3, July, 
1926. illus. maps. p. 313-396. 

Summary of operations Cali- 



fornia oil fields, vol. 11 no. 12 June, 1926. 
illus. maps. 

Same, vol. 12, nos. 1-3, July- 



September, 1926. illus. maps. 

Report on oil possibilities under- 
lying state land at Ventura School for 
Girls. 1926. 10 p. illus. maps. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



95 



Optometry, Board of Examiners ik. 
(San Francisco). Handbook for 1926. 
containing law, rules and regulation.s, ex- 
amination reqiiisities, registered optome- 
trists listed, miscellaneous information. 
1926. 66 p. 

Printer. State. Annual report, sev- 
enty-seventh fiscal year ended June 30, 
1926. 1926. 48 p. illus. 

Public Instruction, Superintendent 
of. The story of Jedediah Smith wh<j 
blazed the Overland Trail to California, 
by Noel J. Breed. 1926. 8 p. 

Reprinted for use in the California 
schools through courtesy of the San 
Francisco Chronicle. 

Textbook Department. Bulletin 



no. 1-A. Information about California 
state textbooks, January. 1927. 1926. 
7 p. 

Purchasing Agent. vSixth report. 
July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926. 1926. 
16 p. 

Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco). Letter of transmittal, annual re- 
port from July 1, 1925, to June 30, 1926. 
1926. 16 p. 

Rules of procedure, revised to 



January 1, 1927. 1926. 29 p. 

Auto stage and truck depart- 
ment. Annual report from July 1. 1925. 
to June 30. 1926. 1926. 29 p. 

Secretary of State. Statement of 
vote at General Election held on Novem- 
ber 2, 1926 in the state of California. 
1926. 70 p. 

Statement of vote at Primary 

Election held on August 31, 1926, in the 
state of California. 1926. 66 p. 

Treasurer, State. Biennial report for 
the seventy-sixth and seventy-seventh 
fiscal years, July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926. 
1926. 44 p. 

University of California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, third series, vol. 20, no. 5. 
Catalogue of the publications of the Uni- 
versity of California Press, Berkeley, 
November, 1926. 12°. . 



tSaine, vol. 20, no. 7. Annual 

report of the President of the University, 
1924-1925 and 1925-1926. Berkeley, 
January, 1927. 615 p. 12°. 

Calendar, vol. LXV, nos. 8-16. 



October-Novemljer. 1926. 8 p. folder. 

A weekly bulletin of official Univer- 
sity announcements. 

Price 25 cents a half year, postpaid. 

Chronicle, vol. 28, no. 4, Octo- 



ber, 1926. p. 347^71. illus. roy. 8°. 

Price $2.00 per year ; single copies 
50 cents. 

Publications. College of Agri- 



culture. Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. Bulletin no. 414. Planting and 
thinning distances for deciduous fruit 
trees, [by] F. W. Alien. Berkeley, No- 
vember. 1926. 29 p. illns. 

Same, no. 415. The 



tractor on California farms, [by] L. J. 
Fletcher and C. D. Kinsman. Berkeley, 
December, 1926. 35 p. illus. 

American Archaeology 



and Ethnology, vol. 19, no. 2. Pomo folk- 
ways, by Edwin M. Loeb. Berkeley, 
September 29, 1926. p. 149-405, plates 
1-3. roy. 8°. 

Price $3.25. 

Same, vol. 23, no. 2. 



Historic aboriginal groups of the Cali- 
ornia Delta region, by W. Egbert Schenck. 
Berkeley, November 13, 1926. p. 123-146, 
2 figures in text, roy. 8°. 
Price 30 cents. 

Same, vol. 23, no. 3. 



The Emeryville shellmound, final report, 
by W. Egbert Schenck. Berkeley, Novem- 
ber 24, 1926. p. 147-282, plates 35-54, 8 
figures in text, 1 map. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.00. 

Botany, vol. 11, nos. 



3^. Inheritance in nicotiana tabacum 
YII. The monosomic character, "fluted" ; 
Interspecific hybridization in nicotiana 
III. The monosomic tabacum derivative, 
"corrugated," from the sylvestris-tabacum 
hybrid, by R. E. Clausen and T. H. Good- 
speed. Berkeley, October 14, 1926. p. 61- 
101, plates 1-.3, 6 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
In one cover. Price 65 cents. 



f)G 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



. ;— Same, vol. 11, no. 5. 

Interspecific hybridization in nicotiana lY. 
Some cytological features of the panicu- 
lata-ru.stica hybrid and its derivatives, by 
Thomas Harper Goodspeed, Roy Elwood 
ClaiVKen, Ruth Hayes Chipman. Berkeley, 
November 9. 1926. p. lO.S-115, 6 figures 
in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

— Same, vol. 1.3, no. 11. 



New rhodophyceae from the Pacific coast 
of North America. I., by Nathaniel Lyon 
Gardner. Berkeley, November 6, 1926. 
p. 205-226, plates 15-21. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 12. 



The location of the reduction divisions in 
a eharophyte, by Albert Henry Tuttle. 
Berkeley. December 10, 1926. p. 227-234, 
plates 22, 23, roy. 8°. 
I'rice 25 cents. 

Classical Philology, 



vol. 9, no. 2. The Italian manusci'ipts of 
Lucretius, part I, by William A. Merrill. 
Berkeley, October 29, 1926. p. 27-45. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Entomology, vol. 4, no. 



2. New coccid-inhabitiug parasites (en- 
cyrtidae, hymenoptera) from Japan and 
California, by Harold Compere. Berkeley, 
November 6, 1926. p. .33-50, 9 figures in 
text. roy. S°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 4, no. 3. 

The establishment in California of cocco- 
phagus modestus silv. (Aphelinidae. 
hymenoptera) with notes on its life- 
history, by Harry S. Smith and Harold 
Compere. Berkeley, November 6, 1926. 
p. 51-61, 2 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Extension Division. 

The Spokesman, vol. 4. no. 9, November, 
1926. 

Geography, vol. 2, no. 

4. Climates of California, by R. J. Rus- 
sell. Berkeley, October 22, 1926. p. 73- 
S4, 1 map. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



— Same, vol. 2, no. 5. 

The East Bolivian Andes, south of the 
Rio Grande or Guapay, by Oscar Schmie- 



der. Berkeley, November 10, 1926. p. 
85-210, plates 3-25, 12 figures in text, 1 
map. roy. 8°. 

Price $1.60. 

Geological Sciences, 



vol. 16, no. 5. The Domengine Horizon, 
Middle Eocene of California, Bruce L. 
Clark. Berkeley. November 4, 1926. p. 
99-118, 1 figure in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 16, no. 6. 

The geology of Point Sur Quadrangle, 
California, by Parker D. Trask. Berkeley, 
November 10, 1926. p. 119-186, plate 16, 
2 figures in text, 1 map. roy. 8°. 
Price 85 cents. 



Same, vol. 16, no. 7. 

Geology of the La Jolla Quadrangle, Cali- 
fornia, by Marcus A. Hanna. Berkeley, 
November 20, 1926. p. 187-246, plates 
17-23, 1 map. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.50. 

History, vol. 14, no. 3. 

David Hartley, M. P., an advocate of 
conciliation, 177-4-1783, by George Her- 
bert Guttridge. Berkeley, October 20, 
1926. p. 231-340, 2 plates, roy. 8°. 
Price $1.25. 



Modern Philology, vol. 

12, no. 4. Le Francais dans les relations 
liplomatiques, par Henriette Roumiguiere. 
Berkeley, December 23, 1926. p. 259-340. 
roy. 8°. 

Price $1.00. 

• Philosophy, vol. 6, no. 

2. A modernist view of national ideals, by 
Ralph Barton Perry. Berkeley, August 
19, 1926. p. 183-204. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 6, no. 3. 

The annual Howison lecture, 1926. The 
pragmatic element in knowledge, by Clar- 
ence Irving Lewis. Berkeley, December 
15, 1926. p. 205-227. 12°. 
Price 35 cents. 

Physiology, vol. 7, no. 



1. A study of the nutrition of an inverte- 
brate, planaria maculata. II. The effect 
of heating on certain foods, by Rosalind 
Wulzen. Berkeley, November 18, 1926. 
p. 1-7, 4 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



97 



Scripps Institution of 

Oceanography (La Jolla), Bulletin 12. 
Conference on the physical oceanography 
and marine meteorology of the northeast 
Pacific and the climate of the western 
part of the United States, November 6 
and 7, 192.5. Berkeley, September 4, 1926. 
85 p. illus. on cover ; figures in text. 

■ Zoology, vol. 29, no. 8. 

Excystment of couneilmania lafleuri Ko- 
foid and Swezy in culture in vitro, by Ena 
A. Allen. Berkeley, October 4, 1926. p. 
175-178, 28 figures in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 29, nos. 9- 

10. The cytology of tintinnopsis nucula 
(Fol) Laackmann, with an account of 
its neuromotor apparatus, division and a 
new intranuclear parasite and On tin- 
tinnus neriticus sp. nov., from San Fran- 
cisco Bay, by Arthur Shackleton Camp- 
bell. Berkeley, October 2.3, 1926. p. 179- 
2.39, plates 12-15, 8 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
In one cover. Price 75 cents. 



Same, vol. 29, no. 11. 

An experimental study of the effects of 
dyes, of dye mixtures, and of disinfectants 
upon endamoeba gingivalis (Gros) in 
vitro, by Dorothy Ann Koch. Berkeley, 
November 9, 1926. p. 241-266. roy. 8°. 

Price 30 cents. 

■ Same, vol. 29, no. 12. 

The sex ratio in infant mortality as an 
index of a selective death rate, by S. J. 
Holmes. Berkeley, December 10, 1926. 
p. 267-803. roy. 8°. 

Price 45 cents. 

Same, vol. 29, no. 17. 

The electrical conductivity of protoplasm 
and a new method of its determination, 
by Samuel Gelfan. Berkeley, January 5, 
1927. p. 453^65, 2 figures in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 30, no. 6. 

A systematic study of some pocket gophers 
from Western Nevada, by Joseph Grin- 
nell. Berkeley, December 10, 1926. p. 
177-188, plates 9-11. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Vetebans' HoiiE ( Yountville ) . Annual 
report of Board Directors and Officers 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1926. 1926 
24 p. 

7 — 49631 



Veteeaxs' Welfare Board. Report of 
June 30, 1926. 1926. 51 p. illus. 

AVhittier State School. Journal of 
Delinquency, vol. 10, nos. 3h1, May-July, 
1926. 

Price 11.25 per year. 

The Sentinel (new series), vol. 

23, nos. 9-10, September-October, 1926. 
Published monthly. Price $1.00 per 
year; 10 cents per copy. 



CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING OCTOBER, 
NOVEMBER AND . DECEMBER, 
1926. 

Berkeley. Public Library. Bulletin, 
vol. 10, nos. 10-12, October-December, 
1926. 

LoxG Beach. Public Library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 2, nos. 8-12, August-Decem- 
ber, 1926. 

Los Axgeles. Board of Education. 
Educational research bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 
1-3, October-December, 1926. 

Engineering Department. An- 



nual report, June 30, 1926. 



Chamber of Commerce. South- 
ern California business, vol. 5, nos. 8-9, 
September-October, 1926. 

Municipal League. Light on 

your city's aifairs. Bulletin, vol. 9, nos. 
■2-5, September-December, 1926. 

RiCHJioXD. Health Department. Month- 
ly report, September-December, 1926. 

Public Library. Biilletin, vol. 

3, nos. 1-5, July-November, 1926. 



Sacramexto. Health Department. Bul- 
letin, September-December, 1926. 

Sax Dh:go. Health Department. Month- 
ly bulletin, September-November, 1926. 

Sax Fbaxcisco. Board of Supervisors. 
Journal of proceedings, vol. 21, nos. 27- 
42, July-October, 1926. 

Bureau of Governmental Re- 



search. The City, vol. 6, nos. 10-13, 
October-December, 1926. 



98 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1927 



Chamber of Commerce. San 

Francisco business, vol. 13, nos. 12-24, 
October-December, 1926. 

Stockton. City manager. Official bul- 
letin, October-December, 1926. 



BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER 
AND DECEMBER, 1926. 

In European Braille. 
MAGAZINES. 

Le Braille magazine for September- 
October. 

Braille mail for October-December. 

Braille musical magazine for October- 
November. 

Bratt.le packet for September-November. 

Channels of blessing for October. 

Le Couerler musical et litteraire for 
October-November. 

HAiiPSTEAD for October-November. 

HoBA jocunda for September-November. 

Interallied Braille magazine for Octo- 
ber-November. 

Literary journal for October-December. 

Progress for October-December. 

Santa Lxjcia for October-November. 

Tribune for October-December. 

Music. 
Braille musical magazine for October- 
November. 

In Moon Type. 

BOOKS. 

AuRELius Antoninus, Marcus. Medi- 
tations of Marcus Aurelius. Trans- 
lated by George Long. 4 vols. 

IvAYE-SiiiTH, Sheila. The tramping 
Methodist. 5 vols. 
An 18th century love story. 

Macnaughtan, Sarah Broom. A lame 
dog's diary. 5 vols. 

A light and humorous tale of village 
life and love. 



TsiNE, Ralph W^ldo. In tune with the 
Infinite ; or Fullness of peace, power 
and plenty. 4 vols. 

magazines. 
Dawn, part 101. 

Moon magazine for October-December. 

The Moon, weekly newspaper, for Octo- 
ber-December. 

In New York Point. 
magazines. 
Catholic transcript for October-Decem- 
ber. 

Christian record for November-Decem- 
ber. 

Gospel trumpet for October-November. 

Lux vera. Catholic monthly, for October- 
December. 

Matilda Ziegler magazine for October- 
December. 

Sunday school monthly for October- 
December. 

Weekly review for October-December. 

In Revised Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with 
contractions. 

BOOKS. 

Alden, Raymond MacDonald. The 
knights of the silver shield. In 
Grade I. 

Why the chimes rang. In Grade I. 

Interpointed. 

Bianco, Margery Williams. The little 
wooden doll. In Grade I. 

cBeadford, Gamaliel. Damaged souls. 

4 vols. 

Contents : Vol. 1, Damaged souls ; 
Benedict Arnold ; Tliomas Paine. 
Vol. 2, Aaron Burr ; John Randolph 
of Roanoke. Vol. 3, John Brown ; 
Phineas Taj'lor Barnum. Vol. 4, 
Benjamin Franklin Butler. 

cBrooks, Phillips. Seeking life, and 
other sermons. 5 vols. 

cDavis, Roy & Lingham, Clarence H. 
Business English and correspondence. 

5 vols. 



vol. 22, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAEY. 



99 



cDepew, Ollie. a scientific course in 
typewriting. 

cElsner, EleAjS^or. Spanish sunshine. 

Hand-copied. Gift of Santa Bar- 
bara Chapter, American Red Cross. 

Gale, Elizabeth. How the animals 
came to the circus. In Grade I. 

cHakes, Adelaide B. Typewriting speed 
studies. 

cKnight, William Allen. The song 
of our Syrian guest. 
Interpointed. 

cLoFTiNG, Hugh. The story of Dr 
Doolittle. 2 vols. 

A delightful story about a doctor 
who devoted himself to curing the ills 
of animals. 

c The voyages of Dr. Doolittle. 4 



vols. 

cMacHaeg, Williaji Briggs & Balmer, 

Edwin. The Indian drum. 4 vols. 

An absorbing mystery, the scenes 

laid in Chicago and on the Great 

Lakes. 



cRiCHMOND, Mary Ellen. 
social case work. 3 vols. 



What is 



cRoBERTSON, GEORGIA. Efficiency in 
home-making and first aid to good 
cooking. 2 vols. 



cSears, Amelia. 
2 vols. 



The charity visitor. 



cShaw, Edward Richard. Big people 
and little people of other lands. 2 
vols. 

Introduces contractions gradually. 

cSiiELDON, Arthur Frederick, & Mc- 
DoAVELL, Gerald R. The art of 
selling. 4 vols. 



cStevenson, Robert Louis. 
garden of verses. 



A child's 



Taylor, Bayard. The little post boy. 
In Grade I. 
Interpointed. 

cWatson, Frank D., ed. Social work 
with families. 6 vols. 



cWnrrE, Nelia Gardner. Cupid and 
the pig and Separation. 

Hand-copied by and gift of Mrs 
Jennie Chicken. 

cWiLLiAMS, Fred V. City thrills. 2 vols. 
Short, vivid pen pictures of every- 
day life. 

Hand-copied by and gift of Mrs 
Louis Scheeline. 



More city thrills. 

Hand-copied by and gift of Mrs 
Louis Scheeline. 



MAGAZINES. 

cAmerican review for the blind for Sep- 
tember-November. 

cThe Beacon for October-November. 

Gift of the Michigan School for the 
Blind. 

Braille courier for October-December. 

cThe Braille mirror for October-Decem- 
ber. 

cCatholic review for October-December. 

cChristian record for October-December. 

cChristian science quarterly for October- 
December. 

cGosPEL trumpet for October-December. 

cMatilda Ziegler magazine for October- 
December. 

cMessenger to the sightless for October- 
December. 

cOuR OWN for October-December. 

Searchlight for December. 

Sunday school monthly for October- 
December. 

In Ink Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

The Beacon for October-November. 

Outlook for the blind for December. 

St. Dunstan's review for August-Novem- 
ber. 



49631 2-27 1400 



Vol. 22, No. 2 APRIL 1927 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER— SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



WILD FLOWER EXHIBITS— KERN COUNTY, DELANO AND TAFT 
BRANCHES; LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CLAREMONT BRANCH; HAN- 
FORD; MADERA COUNTY; SOLANO COUNTY. 

RARE BOOKS IN UNIVERSITY OF SANTA CLARA LIBRARY. 

DUPLICATE MATERIAL DEALT WITH AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
BRANCH OF COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, DAVIS. 

PLANS FOR A SURVEY OF OAKLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICB 

CHARLES A. WHITMORE, State Printer 

SACBAHENTO. 1927 



51527 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
THE SCHOOL LIBRARY SYSTEM OF A CITY 101 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 108 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 109 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 110 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS ^1 111 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 136 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 144 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS- 149 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 150 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 153 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 155 

Staff, Etc. 155 

Depaktments 156 

Recent Accessions 161 

California State Publications Received Dubing Janxxaet, Febkuaby 
AND Mabch, 1927 193 

Califoenia City Publications Received Duking January, February 
AND March, 1927 : 198 

Books fob the Blind Added During January, February and March, 
1927 199 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Califoenia 
State Libraey. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1918, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



THE SCHOOL LIBRARY SYSTEM OF A CITY. 

By Elizabeth Madison^ Director of School Libraries, Oalvland, Cal. 



"The school library system of a large 
city" is a fascinating theme upon which 
to write. I am so rejoiced that the re- 
quest came to write upon our "school 
library system," and not upon our "school 
library department," for the two things 
seem to make quite distinct and different 
implications. The school libraries in 
Oakland are in nowise a "department" 
unto themselves, but they do attempt to 
be a "system" in the same way that the 
veins on a leaf are a system, or a network 
of waterways for carrying to the outmost 
leaf-points the precious cargo of life- 
giving materials upon which the whole 
leaf develops. 

Libraries are never an end in them- 
selves. We should stop sometimes in 
our days of busy detail — should we not? 
— and remember this? Rich and fine liv- 
ing is an end in itself. To this end 
libraries justify themselves, and only to 
this end. Libraries are truly measured 
by the results seen in people. 

In school work especially this truth is 
brought home to us. It is the lives of 
the young people in the schools which 
matter. If libraries can help them, we 
are for libraries. If some change must 
be made in our libraries so that they may 
help the young people better, then we 
are for that change. Change is perhaps 
the most sacred thing in the world, for 
in it lies the possibility of growth. 

We began in 1912 to study our young 
people and their needs, and at that, time 
it seemed that their greatest need was 
book material in high schools. Oakland 
High School Librax-y was the largest in 
the system then, containing about 5,000 
volumes, catalogued and circulated by 
busy teachers in their after-school hours. 
When a professional librarian was ap- 
pointed to that school, the catalog pre- 
sented many surprises to her. And then, 
when she looked around at the splendid 
work accomplished for the yeoving peo- 
ple, that presented many surprises, too. 
We tried then to change the catalog to 
greater uniformity, and to change the 
professional librarian to greater breadth 
of view. I can speak feelingly, for I 
was the person who had both these 
changings to accomplish. My years in 
Oakland High School were rich in what 
they had to teach. 

At present there are seven high school 
libraries in Oakland, including a part- 
time high school, with- a total book ae- 
51527 



cession of 70,136. Between them, these 
libraries take 502 magazines for library 
use, and about half as many for class- 
room instruction, or textbook purposes. 
The combined daily circulation over a 
six-months' period was 153,129. Today 
the average daily reference use of the 
combined libraries is about 4,000 in ad- 
dition. 

Reading of high school students is 
on the increase. Five years ago the 
high school students, according to the 
circulation statistics, read about IG books 
per student in a year ; today they read 
approximately 234 books. It is interest- 
ing to speculate as to whether this in- 
crease is due to a general speeding up 
of the young people's facility in handling 
books, owing to long use of the libraries 
in the high schools, and the cumulative 
effect of library instruction ; or whether 
it depends upon our growing book col- 
lections ; or upon more teacher emphasis 
upon individual research in the library ; 
or upon our wiser selection of material 
more closely correlated with the courses 
of study. But whatever the cause, we 
note the change with some amazement, in 
face of the counter attractions of danc- 
ing, automobiling, radio, the theater, and 
the picture show which are so alluring to 
young people in a city the size of Oak- 
land. Also, it should be noted that these 
years of increased reading are also the 
years in which more and more children 
have come to high schools who were form- 
erly thought to belong to the "hand- 
minded" group. We have in our indus- 
trial city, also, large groups of young 
people whose parents were foreign bom, 
so that the increase of English reading in 
high schools under these conditions is 
doubly interesting. 

Each of the high school libraries, with 
the exception of part-time, has a pro- 
fessional librarian in charge, who is also 
a college graduate. 

Book selection and ordering is based 
upon the course of study. The day has 
gone past when the anxious high school 
librarian consulted all the other cities' 
library lists to ascertain just how many 
other libraries had ordered so-and-so. 
Each high school librarian, with the ap- 
proval of her principal and faculty, makes 
up her library budget, apportioning to 
each department in the school its allow- 
ance from the general library money 
assigned to that school. This allotment 



102 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 




vol. 22, no. 2] the school library system op a city. 



103 



takes into consideration first, the num- 
ber of students enrolled in the various 
subjects ; second the book demand or 
nonbook demand in that subject (for 
instance, mathematics is the antithesis 
of English in book demand) ; third, the 
wealthy or impoverished nature of the 
present book collection in that subject ; 
the relative cost of the material in that 
field ; the probable future strength of the 
subject in the course of study develop- 
ment. These apportionments are arrived 
at after very careful use of pencil, paper, 
tables, enrollments, cost analyses and 
brains. The resulting apportionment is 
often presented to the faculty as a whole 
at faculty meeting ; and is always pre- 
sented to the principal for approval. Aft- 
er it is accepted, each department abides 
by the division of moneys. The librarian 
distributes order slips to the department 
heads, who in turn consult with their 
teachers. The librarian receives the 
order slips back from the department 
heads, and adds her own portion of titles, 
sending the completed list to the purchas- 
ing department. In this way each de- 
partment fights out its own battles for 
preferential titles, and the order list, 
when submitted to the librarian, repre- 
sents the department as a whole, with 
the approval of the department head. 

The librarian anywhere along the line 
consults with the director of any special 
subject, or knows that the department 
head has done so, with the result that 
the completed book list is as securely 
married to the course of study as the 
canon and the law will allow. After 
the local requisitions are completed they 
pass over the desk of the director of the 
course of studying development in the 
central office, who consults with the direc- 
tor of libraries upon occasion. The plan 
is to enrich the work of the classroom 
by the best material of the book markets ; 
to allow for breadth and expansion of 
reading interests ; to furnish material 
that shall be suitable for the curiosities 
aroused by the teaching ; to function 
truly as the leaf veins carrying to each 
point the material demanded for growth. 

Later in our development, the teachers 
pi'ofessional library, instead of a high 
school library, became the office of the 
library director, and here a wonderful 
new field of vision developed. In the 
teachers library began to accumulate the 
questions, needs, and forward-looking 
plans of progressive teachers. The direct- 
ing librarian was privileged to know not 
only what the schools were demanding 
but also what the teachers were reading, 



and were hoping to accomplish. The 
teachers professional library serves also 
the chief school executives, so that the 
long sweep of the educational plan from 
kindergarten through high school, and 
up to the course of study committees 
and the executives' busy offices correlates 
more and more closely with the library's 
contribution. 

The junior high school development 
marked a new era for expansion of the 
school library system. In Oakland six- 
teen junior high schools made their ap- 
pearance within a few years. They had 
scarcely come into being before their 
book demand formed one of the x-eally 
weighty problems of administration. This 
is not to be wondered at when we re- 
member Dr Lewis Terman's warning in 
his book on Children's Reading, that the 
peak of the reading age is during the 
junior high school period. Any junior 
high school should receive along with 
its corner stone, an apportionment of 
$500 for each 1,000 pupils to be enrolled 
as a flat budget for mere reference ma- 
terial, and one dollar per pupil for its 
circulation needs. The equipment as set 
up in the C. C. Certain report is none 
too high, although, alas, few have been 
able to fully realize it. If retrenchment 
must be made somewhere, I would rather 
see it dealt out in reasonable measure 
along the equipment side, and the money 
saved for books, books, books and more' 
books, — all of them well chosen, related 
to the interests aroused by the teaching, 
beautiful as possible in printing and illus- 
trating, and well administered in the 
matter of cataloguing and circulating. 
The present Oakland program of a half- 
day library service in every junior high 
school is eagerly awaiting expansion to a 
full day program. 

In every high school and junior high 
school in California we have with us 
the problem of the textbook. These run 
about 17 for every high school student 
and 10 for every junior high school stu- 
dent, by actual circulation. In Oakland 
they are administered by textbook clerks 
in the high schools, who Avork under ^he 
direction of the librarians. This enables 
the librarians to supervise the compli- 
cated reports that close the term's work, 
and to make calculations as to the next 
year's demands of new titles. Some 
librarians say that the supervisorial 
knowledge which they gain of the pos- 
sibilities of the textbook room compen- 
sates for the extra labor of supervision. 

In the junior high schools the text- 
book situation should be considered very 



104 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. - [April, 1927 




The "study center" or library at Lafayette School contains a section devoted to 
real travel folders. Geography vitalized this way becomes a research problem 
for pupils according to Miss Emma Gelinas, teacher-librarian at Lafayette. 




At Lafayette School Library a study group using visual aid material has paused 
to consult the librarian on a knotty point in geography. Mr Leo Taylor is 
principal of this sixth-grade school. 



vol. 22, no. 2] the school library system of a city. 



105 



seriously. A good textbook clerk will 
solve the problem of overwork and over- 
expenditure of money in many cases. 
But to waste the precious time of a 
teacher-librarian upon checldng in and 
checking out great masses of textbooks 
without clerical help is a condition which 
distresses any good library administrator. 
A half-time book clerk and a half-time 
librarian is better than a full-time libra- 
rian trying to do true library guidance 
work, but overburdened with textbook 
service. A textbook clerk relieves all 
this and gives the librarian a chance to 
function in her real field. 

In junior high school the contribution 
of a true lover of children and of books 
finds a most rich and grateful reception. 
Sometimes this contribution is made by 
a splendid teacher who has taken over 
library work, and sometimes by a libra- 
rian who has the teaching heart, and 
teaching knowledge. It should not be 
attempted by a novice in either field. 

The junior high school libi*arian must 
know first : the child's purpose in the 
book request which he makes ; second : 
the alignment or nonalignment of his 
purpose with the purpose of the teacher 
and grade in which he is working ; third : 
the child's reading ability, which quite 
often varies widely from his chronological 
age, or his grade ; fourth : the child's 
social age, or the age of book which he 
thinks he needs ; fifth : where the ma- 
terial can be found that can fit the 
child's purpose, his teacher's purpose, 
the child's reading age, his interest, or 
social age ; and sixth : what use is the 
child making of the material given to 
him ; does he need further guidance ? 
Should that guidance be encouragement? 
Or stimulation of a more critical nature? 
In other words, is the right book func- 
tioning in right reactions on the part of 
the child? All of this is the junior 
high school librarian's job, and it is her 
job on each request that comes to her 
out of the 300 or so in the day. When 
she has accomplished this task, she is 
ready to begin on the problem of start- 
ing up new interests, what is sometimes 
called "original inspiration" work. 

Any junior high school librarian should 
be thoroughly familiar with the course of 
study, and with the teaching techniques 
in her school. The library is the supply 
system for accomplishing the work of 
that school. It is not a separate depart- 
ment. It is a supply system. It is the 
librarian's business to know and under- 
stand teachers. Their interests and aims 



become her interests and aims. Some- 
times she has the pleasure and privilege 
of enriching and widening their material 
and contributing to their outlook. But 
first of all she must grasp their purpose 
sympathetically, and combine it with the 
child's purpose, just as the good teacher 
makes the same combination. 

Among the books which the junior 
high school librarian should know with a 
sort of Biblical familiarity are Terman 
and Lima on Children's Reading ; Wash- 
burne and Vogel in Winnetka Graded 
Book List ; Huber, Bruner and Curry 
in Children's Interests in Poetry ; Huey 
in The Psychology and Pedagogy of 
Reading ; Judd, on Reading : Its Nature 
and Development, or a more recent book 
in an equivalent field ; Uhl in The 
Materials of Reading ; Department of 
Superintendence Fourth Yearbook (Na- 
tional Education Association) in the Na- 
tion at Work on the Public School Cur- 
riculum ; Terman's Intelligence of School 
Children ; Goddard's Human Efficiency 
and Levels of Intelligence ; and books 
like the three following : Freeland, Mod- 
ern Elementary School Practice ; Free- 
man, Psychology of the Common 
Branches ; Douglass, Secondary Educa- 
tion. A school librarian who has special- 
ized upon sources of book purchase, the 
names of illustrators and writers and 
methods of making subject cards, but has, 
not studied the children who are to read 
the books, nor the aims of the teaching 
system which is arousing their reading 
interests, is like a person who would be 
a physician, but knows only drug ma- 
terials, but not the people who are to be 
affected by them, nor the reasons nor 
conditions which should determine their 
application. 

In Oakland we are fortunate in hav- 
ing a group of teacher-librarians who 
have both this professional point of view, 
and the training to make it effective. In 
one of our junior high schools the libra- 
rian is working with the research depart- 
ment in a test of book materials for 
C- Section pupils. At the end of a year 
or two this piece of work will be a real 
contribution in a very puzzling field. 

Librarians of this type become study 
leaders in their schools. But such a 
position cannot be attained unless the 
librarian holds the same teaching creden- 
tial and pedagog background that assures 
the respect and following of the teachers. 

The elementary school libraries pre- 
sent the most alluring possibilities. Here 
are gathered the children in their early 



106 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1^27 



habit-forming period. Achievement tests 
in later grades, together with case study 
work, such as that conducted by Terman, 
shows the great value of early exposure 
of children to books that interest, stimu- 
late and familiarize the child with the 
technique of the printed and pictured 
page. Here again the librarian's duty 
is that of understanding different read- 
ing levels ; vocabulary suitability ; size 
of printing suitable for different ages ; 
individual differences in reading children ; 
teachers' purposes in assignments. 

In Oakland the elementary libraries 
are developing carefully, sometimes so 
carefully that we feel the word should 
be "slowly." They are taking form, how- 
ever. One sixth grade school has a 
library room about one hundred feet by 
fifty, with a half-time teacher-librarian 
in charge who teaches the rest of the 
day and is thoroughly familiar with the 
objectives of the school. 

The room is divided into -two parts 
by folding doors. In one end are the 
reading tables and most of the fiction, 
magazines and individual reading ma- 
terial. In the other end of the room 
are collected the stereopticon, with its 
screen always in place, and the collec- 
tion of pictures, slides, globes and maps 
that represent the visual instruction ma- 
terial of the school. In this room also 
are the reference books, so that the book, 
the picture and the actual objects of 
study, such as models, real cotton, real 
flowers, or other exhibit matei'ial, may 
be assembled for student use. Two large 
work tables covered with bright linoleum 
corresponding with the decorative color 
of the room, offer a work-space for stu- 
dents who wish to paste note books, cut 
pictures to size, work on small models 
or do any of the hundred and one tasks 
that make the project method of teaching 
a lovely snare for learning. 

Students in this room move freely to 
the picture files, the slide collection, the 
books, the tables, and wiU turn on the elec- 
tricity and try out slides which they wish 
to rehearse before giving some class demon- 
stration. The pupils of this school are 
so familiar with the group method of 
working, that they each go about their 
tasks quite undisturbed by the fact that 
some other group nearby is engaged upon 
quite' another matter. The pupils in 
the opposite end of the room read on 
quietly, without thinking of the activity 
in the adjacent and open room as dis- 
tracting at all. To attain a result like 
this it is necessary first of all to have 
the guiding librarian of the right calibre, 



thoroughly familiar with school object- 
ives and methods ; entirely capable of 
handling group work in quantity ; or- 
derly ; sympathetic ; controlful ; then the 
room must be large enough, well lighted, 
attractive and harmonious ; well equip- 
ped ; happiness, encouragement, success 
must be spelt in each visible activity. 

In elementary schools of course there 
are no free study periods like those in 
high school, so it is necessary to schedule 
each class to the library as often as 
possible, and to keep the schedule free 
from complications. The teacher usually 
comes to the library room (which, by 
the way, we like to call the "study ac- 
tivities room") with her class, and works 
with the librarian, giving and exchanging 
ideas about the work, and the available 
material. The fact that the librarian 
is a teacher, sympathetic with teachers' 
aims, is a gi'eat help here. 

The correlation between visual educa- 
tion material and book material becomes 
very obvious as we go along. Both these 
kinds of materials are merely ideas or 
tools in learning. They very naturally 
require the same kind of assembling, 
cataloging, distributing, collecting, and 
further, correlating with the courses of 
instruction. The visual aids material 
becomes naturally a part of the librarian's 
responsibilities. They are used by the 
same groups in preparing the same sub- 
jects, and are most useful when found in 
the same place. 

The new courses of study list the 
visual material available, or refer to 
it sufiiciently to furnish the needed sug- 
gestion for further investigation. The 
constant references to the school libra- 
ries in teachers' and directors' notices 
and courses is one of the most encourag- 
ing signs of the real affiliation of the 
libraries and the school rooms. 

Mr Gillis of the State Library used 
to remind us that "a library used to be 
a place to keep books in, but under the 
modem interpretation it is a place to 
keep books out." Many and many a time 
in school work have I remembered his 
wisdom in this saying. The school 
library, especially in an elementary 
school, should be the central pool, the 
big collecting and redistributing part of 
the irrigation system, but the class room 
itself should be the place where the 
material is finally carried. In judging 
the efiiciency of a school library system in 
any given school the library director 
comes to cast a quick eye over any school 
room she enters to see if the reading 



vol. 22, no. 2] the school library system of a city. 



107 



table and the beauty corner in the room 
are well supplied with books, magazines, 
pictures, small objects of interest or 
beauty, well selected from the central 
library collection in the school. If there 
is no local reading table, or if it is poorly 
furnished, something is wrong with the 
system, no matter how opulent and at- 
tractive the main school library may be. 
A main school library is a place to keep 
books out. Good books in the class 
rooms, interesting books, pictureful books, 
books properly suited in vocabulary, 
printing, illustration, subject content and 
general attractiveness to the grade and 
its pupils should be the best proof that 
the central collection is fulfilling its func- 
tion, and is lending freely, generously 
and wisely to each teacher according to 
her needs. When conditions like this 
are not evident the trouble is either with 
a misunderstanding of the out-spreading 
function of the central library, or there 
is poverty in the allotment of book 
money. This latter is the usual cause. 
More books, more material, more enrich- 
ment of tools is the need in the elemen- 
tary libraries, as in the junior high 
schools. 

The school library becomes a wonder- 
working place for teaching cooperation 
and socialization among students, helpful- 
ness among teachers, and social service 
of a high order. A whole chapter could 
be written upon library clubs and their 
contribution to school life. Methods for 
getting children to read spread out into 
home and social relationships that are 
amazing in their possibilities. Some of 
the accomplisments in securing student 
service and student planning furnish a 
sort of delightful fairy story to the 
enthusiastic librarian. In one of our six- 
year schools the large library on the first 
floor was considered delightful, but awe- 
inspiring, so the junior high division 



established a library in their class room, 
so that they could manage it themselves, 
and learn as they went. They have 
turned their class room over completely 
into a small library, and here all their 
work is accomplished. They borrow from 
the main school library, and report their 
reactions with delightful frankness, mak- 
ing a contribution which the directing 
librarian of the school treasures like a 
first edition. 

An interesting development is the class 
of thirty junior high and elementary 
school teacher-librarians who meet to dis- 
cuss their problems, and work out meth- 
ods. They are applying the same sys- 
tem of investigation to their work and 
its needs that any research department 
would do. 

In the elementary and junior high 
school fields lie the big promises for the 
young, well trained and enthusiastic 
workers. Here the ground has barely 
been planted, yet it springs into bud and 
blossom, almost over night. 

A guiding principle which appears 
again and again is the purpose to make 
the child happy and successful in his 
present needs and desires, and yet to 
make those present fulfilments contribute 
to his future (and as yet little com- 
prehended) objectives. In such a pur- 
pose must be united the child's wishes 
of today, and the teacher's knowledge ^ 
of tomorrow, and the union must be 
brought about in contentment and joy. 
Here is a real profession for a real 
librarian, a life contribution for a real 
person. Who can doubt that it will 
challenge the best types of people that 
our profession prepares? 

Note. — For another article on Cali- 
fornia school library service, see Library 
News Department, Western Journal of 
Education, March, 1927, page 15. — 
Editor. 



108 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



i^f of /feme 



lDCU NORTE ' 'O a I 

SISKIYOU I MODOC 



^\' /' SHASTA 

^ I trinity/ 




LASSEN 



_J '• TEHAMA A "- 

_ I ,.' / PLUMAS ^, 

\CLENN( EUTTE^v/'"-' - 

; <-) A SIERRA 

■-COLUSA/^ J.V / ^— 

'"^--0<5mTi»C»il. d^ i' '•^ /TUOLUMME^ ^ 

^, ,,;<-*«»<<■/&. VNnwBcisoi nXN.^--i J-^ J ^/ ^ y'^v! "°''*' -v 

r ■%i^\'- FRES* ,-J— 1 INYO 



^ \ KERN 



^. elrju*lfi 



(TA BARBMiAl 



SAN BERNARDINO 



jKHTUItt, 



',U)SAN6EUS 



V\,i RIVERSIDE 



33* N. _ 
Jtar 0iarf€tron, S<. 



IMPERIAL 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



LIST OF COUNTS FREE LIBRARIES. 



109 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1926. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income 
1925-26' 


Books, 
etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county- 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sept. 26, 1910 


S53,689 52 
5,663 12 
18,241 70 
10,970 08 
55,421 63 

150,040 56 
15,311 44 
27,728 85 
17,701 73 
9,316 30 
93,711 21 
26,977 34 
13,075 94 

300,897 41 
21,746 14 


126,651 

17,372 

68,112 

a46,877 

157,979 

393,417 

48,321 

99,100 

59,328 

28,496 

252,834 

114,794 

41,791 

536,698 

73,052 


91 
39 
88 
48 
98 

260 
61 

152 
79 
45 

196 
57 
76 

314 
70 


49 
31 
65 
33 
64 

172 
43 

111 
58 
31 

104 
39 
36 

159 
50 


38 


Amador 

Butte 


Bertha S. Taylor 

Blanche Chalfant 

Ella Packer 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck __ 

Sarah B. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 

Ida M. Reagan 


June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
Julv 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 4 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 5 
May 3 
Aug. 3 
Oct. 4 
June 6 
July 8 
Aug. 6 
Feb. 9 
Dec. 9 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 8 
Oct. 1 
Feb. 4 
July 14 
April 5 


1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 


26 
57 
29 


Contra Costa 

Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial ._ 


58 
152 

38 
101 

52 




Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock . _ _ 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Vogleson 

Blanche Galloway 

Muriel Wright 


29 


Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 


101 
38 
34 

117 
50 


Mariposa^ _ . 














Minette L. Stoddard 

Anna L. WilMams 

Anne Hadden 

Estella DeFord 

Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 

Chas. F.Woods. 

Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters 

Eleanor Hitt 


36,020 30 
3,989 73 
20,268 67 
11,212 06 

25.955 10 
10,323 16 

15.956 63 
40,326 66 

9,504 99 
37,722 13 
37,109 86 


114,448 
13,983 
83,640 
26,061 
66,436 
38,271 

72,206 
33,470 
98,296 
95,132 


82 
36 

140 
77 
63 
79 
80 

110 
76 

136 

145 


73 
44 
97 
48 
57 
29 
78 
83 
37 
73 
118 


64 


Modoc 

Monterey 

Napa 

Orange 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino _ 
San Diego 


30 
88 
46 
37 
29 
45 
64 
37 
61 
103 


San Joaqain 

San Luis Obispo _ 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara _ _ 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


IdaE. Condit 

FloA. Gantz 

Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary. 
Minerva H. Waterman. ._ 


Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 2 
June 7 
April 6 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8 
Sept. 8 
June 10 
Julv 3 
April 9 
July 12 


1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 


32,076 68 
15,369 42 
21,974 03 
24,050 86 
28,276 51 
8,892 02 




45,713 

a37,545 


112,461 




136 
96 
64 

106 
95 
87 


94 
93 
42 
68 
82 
54 


76 
82 
27 
58 
74 
52 


Siskiyou 


Ellen B.Frink 

Clara B. Dills 


18,473 73 
23,442 14 
2B,684 93 
14,634 44 
11,192 62 

5,038 43 
54,915 32 

9,374 23 
28,989 07 
30,099 69 


77,671 
71,987 
87,715 
38,929 
41,528 
15,683 
121,285 
25,091 
77,103 
88,052 


156 
66 
71 
42 
87 
58 

127 
53 
93 
76 


92 
49 
68 
35 
54 
28 
131 
28 
55 
47 


89 
48 


Stanislaus 

Sutter 


Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M . Burket 

Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs. Helen R. Dambacher 
Elizabeth R. Topping.... 
Nancy C. Laugenour 


45 
34 


Tehama 

Trinity 


50 
28 


Tulare 

Tuolumnef 

Ventura 

Yolo 


. 83 

25 
54 
45 


46-. . . 




01 '08-0 4 '2fi 


Sl,422,366 38 


a3,547,528 


4,111 


2,802 


2 394 













1 The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1925. 
- Includes elementary and high. 

' Conducted by Merced County by contract according to Sec. 5, County Free Library Law. 
' San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county, 
tics see under "Public Libraries, Etc." next page. 

° Conducted by Plumas County by contract according to Sec. 5. County Free Library Law. 
* Appointed January 3, 1927, began work February 14, 1927. 
t Appointed February 13, 1927. 



For statis- 



110 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Income 1925-26 



Books, etc 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

El Centre 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Modesto— 

Oakland-. 

Oxnard- 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco.. 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica.. 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth . 

Marian P. Greene 

Carleton B. Joeckel 

Agnes F. Ferris 

Mrs Alma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll.. 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeannette M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F.Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden.. 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877 

1893 
1907 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 
1868 

1896 
1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 



1874 



1868 
1886 
1869 

1889: 

1883: 



as F P 1879 

1906 

as F P 1895 
as F P 1909 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1901 
as FP 1891 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1878 

1906 

as F P 1902 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1902 
as F P 1894 
as F P 1909 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as F P 1880 

1891 

1882 

as F P 1881 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1884 
as F P 1895 

1880 
as F P 1884 

1900 



$45,215 38 

28,192 21 

147,251 22 

15,362 86 

37,555 48 

91,963 73 

,098,741 39 

15,038 35 

188,702 92 

8,512 66 

17,636 91 

107,106 42 

29,538 44 



27,752 77 
48,037 05 
41,659 29 
20,000 00 
111.171 14 
284,865 68 
20,231 33 
26,961 25 
115,582 60 
17,373 53 
25,645 70 
*8,756 41 
13,808 50 
57,535 38 
15,369 88 
26,051 19 



75,402 
28.471 

122,785 
24,272 
39,361 
96,119 

776,877 
28,631 

318,115 
30,127 
21,875 

115,931 
82,288 
70,890 
76,766 

118,005 

117,501 
30,335 

153,032 

367,381 
30,791 
44,566 
92,682 
63,173 
46,161 
32,050 
26,966 

195,582 
24,732 
20,035 



24,456 

13,515 

26,163 

3,050 

26,187 

43 029 

231,799 

8,464 

60,373 

4,008 

7,506 

52,865 

10.715 

6,933 

9,538 

8,605 

20,566 

12,685 

66,942 

101,396 

11,452 

9,825 

19,079 

5,255 



9,223 



10,737 
6 411 
5,766 



*EIeven months only. 

Note. — For i^ublic libraries of less than 20,000 books, etc., see Annual Statistics 
number of News Notes of California Ldbraries, October, 1926. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



Ill 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items, 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1926. 



For 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation, $7,164,457,974. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation, $433,045,954 (tax- 
able for county $377,743,838). 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

On January 15 a branch library was 
opened at Ashland, a small community not 
served directly by any other branch. 
.Highland Branch was opened in March. 

There was a meeting on March 18 of the 
county branch library attendants. Twenty- 
two attended and gave interesting items 
about their branches in answer to roll 
call. The books included in the Reading 
With a Purpose series had been sent out 
to the various branches a few days before. 
The publicity in connection with them 
was discussed. Each attendant was given 
material to make a poster pertinent to 
the group of books she had received. The 
poster will be displayed with the books. 
Each group of books will be changed the 
fifteenth of each month until every branch 
has had the entire list. Any of the books 
that are requested by a branch as a per- 
manent loan will be sent to that branch 
when the books have been the round of the 
branches. 

March 29, twenty-six members of the 
University of California library class and 
three from the MUls College library staff 
were taken on the annual trip through 
Alameda County to see the different types 
of library service. Miss Barmby, with 
three members of her staff and Miss Stella 
Huntington and Miss Ann Kennedy 
accompanied the party to act as hostesses 
and guides. 

The picture collection has been worked 
over and put into much more attractive 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued, 
shape. Many of the teachers have availed 
themselves of it since the first of the year. 
On March 31, Miss Barmby, with Miss 
Baird and Mrs Mitcheltree went to Sacra- 
mento to visit the State Library, the Sac- 
ramento County Library and the Sacra- 
mento City Library. 

Maky Baemby, Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

Berkeley [Free] Public Libbaey. 
Carleton B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

Librarian Joeckel announced Feb. 26 
that the new South Berkeley branch build- 
ing was practically completed. Furniture 
and shelving are now on the way from the 
East. The building includes two large 
reading rooms, a story-hour room and a 
clubroom. Each reading room has a seat- 
ing capacity of 100. — Oakland Times, 
F27 

*California School for the Blind 
(Embossed Book) Library. E,. S. 
French, Prin. 

The new school building will be occupied 
about the end of May and regular school 
work will be taken up in this building at 
the beginning of the new school year, 
August 29, 1927. Provision is made for 
one large stack room for embossed books 
with shelf space for about five thousand 
volumes. Purchases of the last three years 
make the library of the California School 
for the Blind one of the largest school 
libraries in the country. Practically all of 
the recent publications in Revised Braille, 
grade one and one-half, and a large pro- 
portion of publications in grade two, will 
be available for our readers in the new 
stack room. Of the more important works, 
a number of copies have been purchased, 
the ideal of the school being to have one 
copy available of each text or important 
reference work for each pupil of any 
given class. 

The assembly room immediately adjoin- 
ing the stack room will be used as a gen- 
eral reading room for students. Borrow- 
ing by readers outside of the school will 
not be encouraged except in extraordinary 
cases ; exchanges, however, will be possible 



112 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



ALAMEDA COUNTY.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

and close cooperation with other existing 
agencies supplying free reading matter 
to the blind is one of the policies of the 
school. 

U. S. Feench, Priu. 

Garfield Junior High School Li- 
brary. D. L. Hennessey, Prin. Eliza- 
beth I. Patton, Lib'n. 

Pages of literature, history, and fiction 
came to life on February 21 when the 
annual "Library Day" was observed by 
the Garfield Junior High School. Follow- 
ing a custom of six years standing, pupUs 
and teachers impersonated for the day, 
books and characters from history and 
literature. This was pronounced the most 
successful thus far, both from a literary 
and artistic standpoint. 

"The Vision of Young America," written 
and directed by Elizabeth Patton, the 
school librarian, was portrayed by two 
hundred children. "The Vision of Young 
America" is a play in which Billy, a boy 
who hates to go to school and doesn't care 
for books but longs to be a pirate, falls 
asleep and sees in his dream the various 
subjects taught in school dramatized before 
him. Mathematics, English, history, sci- 
ence, foreign languages, geography, art 
and library books appear before him in a 
colorful pageant dramatized by groups of 
boys and girls. So attractive is the pres- 
entation that Billy decides not to be a 
pirate, after all. Two programs were pre- 
sented, the auditorium being crowded with 
parents and friends. 

Following the afternoon progi'am the 
twelve hundred in costume paraded 
through the corridors and across the stage. 
The judges were Miss Mai*y Barmby, Ala- 
meda County librarian ; Mrs Alice Whit- 
beck, Contra Costa County librarian ; Miss 
Mabelle Wilson and Miss Horatio Ailing. 
From the great number of beautifully pre- 
sented books and characters, they selected 
the following : 

Class groups : First prize. Classic 
Myths. Second prize. United States His- 
toi-y. Third prize, "Characters from 
Dickens." Honorable mention, "Ben Hur." 

Smaller groups : First prize, "The 
Standard Bearer." Second prize, "East 
of the Sun and West of the Moon." Hon- 
orable mention, "Kim." 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

Couples : First prize, "Baucis and Phile- 
mon." Second prize, "Peter and Wendy." 
Honorable mention, "Snowshoes and 
Sledges." 

Individuals: 1. Most beautiful (a) 
"Solvig" (b) "Bedouin" (c) "Duchess," 
from "The Honeybee." 

2. Most original (a) "Bread" (b) 
"Music Book." 

3. Best sustained (a) "Caesar's Ghost." 
Miss Charlotte Brush, as the "Elegant 

Eighties" wore a hand made Parisian 
gown, once worn at an inaugural ball in 
Washington. Among the representations 
by other teachers were "Seven Keys to 
Baldpate," "Under Hawaiian Skies," 
'Portia," "So Big," "Cabbages and Kings," 
"Feast of Lanterns," "House That Jack 
BuHt," "Elizabeth and Her German Gar- 
den," "Labels," "Rose of the Alhambra," 
"Modern Art," "Mrs Fenwick," "Volga 
Boatman," Indian woman in the "Golden 
Days of '49" and many others. 

The success of this annual event is 
largely due to the hearty cooperation of 
teachers, parents and pupils, who enter 
into the spirit of the occasion with 
unstinted enthusiasm. 

Elizabeth I. Patton, Lib'n. 

Newman Club Library. W. H. Con- 
lin, Chairman Library Committee. 

In memory of her father, Stephen D. 
Hayne of the class of '85, Agnes M. Hayne 
has donated to the Newman Club of the 
University of California his library of 
more than 1000 volumes. — Berkeley Cali- 
fornia Monthly, Ja 

ifiUNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY. 

W. ■ W. Campbell, Pres. J. C. Rowell, 
Lib'n Emeritus ; Harold L. Leupp, Lib'n. 

The following changes have occurred on 
the stafl; of the University of California 
Library within the last three months : 
Resigned, Mrs Mildred de Ferrari Clapper, 
junior assistant; appointed, Mrs Blanche 
H. Dalton, junior assistant. 

Work has begun on the new stack, and 
also on the Morrison Memorial reading 
room. 

Harold L. Leupp, Lib'n. 

Livermore. 

LivERMOEE Free [Public] Library 
and Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Myrtle E. Harp, Lib'n. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



113 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

Livermore — Continued. 

The gift of the private library of D. M. 
Conner, an old-time Livermorean, now of 
Modesto, was accepted by the Livermore 
Library trustees at their meeting Jan. 31, 
and the books will be placed in a special 
section to be known as "The Judge D. M. 
Conner I. O. O. F. Library." Mr Con- 
ner has been an Odd Fellow for fifty years, 
and for this reason is giving the library 
in the name of that fraternity as well as 
making it a personal gift. He is also 
inspired in this by the fact that the local 
library was originally started through 
purchase of the Odd Fellows Library of 
Oakland. Included in the gift is Mr Con- 
ner's extensive law library. — Livermore 
Herald F 4 

Oakland. 

JOakland Feee [Pubiic] Library. 
John B. Kaiser, Lib'n ; Chas S. Greene, 
Lih'n Emeritus. 

Briefly, the chief items of news are : 

A new steam boiler here, in January. 

A new form of Civil Service application. 

The installation of a private branch 
telephone exchange. 

Office alterations providing an outer 
office for secretarial and clerical help and 
a private office for the librarian. 

The commissioning of our three janitors 
as special police, with jurisdiction on 
library property. 

The holding in February of two exhibits, 
one on City Planning and the other a Doll 
Show in connection with the Japanese 
Doll Festival. 

The receipt by the Board of Library 
Directors of four petitions for new branch 
libraries. 

The completion of plans for a survey of 
the Library by a committee composed of 
Dr A. E. Bostwick, librarian of the St. 
Louis Public Library ; Miss Isabella 
Cooper, formerly of the New York Public 
Library ; Dr Barton Warren Evermann, 
director of the museum of the California 
Academy of Sciences, and Fred Telford of 
the Bureau of Personnel Administration, 
Washington, D. C. 

And a cordial letter from the Civil Serv- 
ice Board inviting the Library Board to 
ask the Survey Committee what more the 
Civil Service Board can do here, in the 
way of rules and their application, to help 
improve library service in Oakland. 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 

Staff changes include the resignation of 
Olive Hartley, library assistant, January 
3 ; Linda Kemp, library assistant, March 
31 ; Mrs Cecilia Feeley, library assistant, 
March 31 ; and Miss Evelyn Keekner, tem- 
porary assistant, resigning to be married 
April 9 to Mr Henry Brown. 

No new pennanent appointments have 
been made, pending the results of the 
survey. Miss Tarnell has been appointed 
temporarily as secretary to the librarian, 
February 8. 

John B. Kaiser, Lib'n. 

San Leandro. 

San Leandro Free Public Library 
AND Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

The libi-arian attended the meeting of 
the First, Second and Third Districts of 
the California Library Association, held 
in San Francisco, Feb. 19. 

Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $899,722 (taxable 
for county $723,086). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,706,677 (taxable 
for county $6,665,048). 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

( Twenty-second class. ) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,321,472 (tax- 
able for county $36,499,275). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Lib'n. 

Miss Blanche Chalfant, on March 15, 
tendered her resignation as county libra- 
rian, to take effect June 1. The resigna- 
tion was accepted. — OroviUe Register, 
Mr 16 

Butte Co. Law Library, Oroville. 
Mrs Duncan C. McCallum, Lib'n. 



114 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 

Mrs Duncan C. McCallum was elected 
librai'ian of the County Law Library Jan. 
31 by the committee of the Bar Associa- 
tion in charge of the library. Mrs McCal- 
lum succeeds District Attorney J. A. 
McGregor. — Oroville Register, F 1 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation ,$8,898,065 (taxable 
for county $7,047,649). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Fop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,109,925 (tax- 
able for county $22,419,565). 

Colusa Co. Feee Library, Colusa. 
Miss Ella Packer, Lib'n. 

Mrs Elizabeth Cora Cramer, custodian 
of the Arbuckle Branch Library, passed 
away Feb. 16, 1927. Mrs Dorothea Bib 
was appointed Feb. 18, to fill the vacancy 
caused by Mrs Cramer's death. 

Ella Packer, Lib'n. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $103,040,954 (tax- 
able for county $90,438,530). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter, the County Libra- 
rian has spoken upon the following sub- 
jects : Children's books and reading on 
Jan. IS before the Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciation of Kensington Park ; Mental and 
Moral Training of Children on Feb. 15 
before the Parent-Teacher Association of 
Fairmont School; Good and Bad Fiction 
on March 29 before the Woman's Club of 
Walnut Creek, and reviewed books for 
the Progress Chib at three of its meetings. 

On February 1 and 2 Mrs Henshall 
paid a visit to the library and made a 
tour of ten branches. 

At the end of January the County 
Librarian of Contra Costa County visited 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 

the County Librarian of Stanislaus County 
and had a very enjoyable time — profitable 
in visiting branches and delightful in hos- 
pitality offered. 

On March 2 Mrs Whitbeck attended 
the luncheon of the Booksellers' Associa- 
tion at the Mark Hopkins Hotel and had 
a chance to visit the Book Fair. The 
meeting of the three districts held at 
Fairmont Hotel was attended by Mrs 
Whitbeck and several assistants. 

The March issue of the Library Link 
contained an account of the picture col- 
lection which now numbers about 7500 
pieces. The collection has been reclassi- 
fied and catalogued, is fully guided and 
ready for use. It contains mounts of all 
kinds, post-cards, posters, and framed 
pictures. 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'n. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,303,575 (tax- 
able for county $10,220,875). 

Crescent City. 

Crescent City [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Mildred Duffy, Lib'n. 

Miss Mildred Duffy was appointed to 
the position of City Librarian by the 
Library Board at a recent meeting. — 
Crescent City Triplicate, Ja 14 

At the meeting of the Crescent City 
Board of Trustees February 7, an ordi- 
nance raising the salary of the City Libra- 
rian from $35 to $50 a month was intro- 
duced. — Crescent City Courier, F 8 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,073,804 (tax- 
able for county $10,402,480). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 

County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $198,657,868 (tax- 
able for county $160,558,333). 

IFbesno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



115 



FRESNO CO. — Continued. 

The four Parent-Teacher Associations 
in the Sierra Vista tract, a suburb of 
Fresno, asked for a branch that would 
serve their district, as it is too far for the 
children to use the main library. On 
January 6 the branch was opened and has 
steadily grown until it will be necessary to 
open three days a week. As was foreseen, 
the patrons are largely children, though a 
number of adults are also using it. 

The custodian of the Auberry Branch 
had to resign on account of ill health and 
the branch was moved from her home up 
to New Auberry, several miles away, 
where there is a larger population. The 
move has proved to be a good one as the 
registi'ation and circulation have grown 
very much in the three months since the 
change. The Southern California Edison 
Company gave us the use of a small room 
in the general building and Mrs Mae 
Lodge was appointed custodian. 

In February the Chamber of Commerce 
of Sanger had a housewarming in the 
library so that the people of the town 
could see the improvements which had 
just been made in the building. An inter- 
esting program was given, consisting of 
music and addresses by the Mayor, the 
Chairman of the Board of Supervisors 
and the County Librarian. During the 
evening the Chamber of Commerce pre- 
sented the library with a very handsome 
painting of the General Grant big tree, 
which will be hung in the main reading 
room. 

Our staff meetings this winter have 
been in the hands of the staff themselves 
and they have arranged some very inter- 
esting meetings, with outside speakers. 
Two of these told us of their European 
experiences, one from the viewpoint of the 
tourist and the other from that of the 
student. The Home Demonstration Agent 
of Fresno County talked one day, telling 
of the work of her department. We have 
been glad to hear the experiences of people 
in other lines of work. 

Mrs Henshall paid us a visit in Febru- 
ary, spending a couple of days. She visited 
the town branches one day and that after- 
noon had tea with us and told the staff 
some of the interesting things other coun- 
ties are doing. On the second day she 
visited some of the branches out in the 
county and was kind enough to express 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

herself as well pleased with what she saw. 

We lost something over three hundred 
books in the snow slide which swept away 
so much of Camp 72 of the Southern Cali- 
fornia Edison Company. They were 
housed in the recreation building, one of 
the first to go. It is hardly possible that 
any will be recovered in usable shape, 
though a few which were in circulation 
will be returned. 

Miss Hurlbut, Children's Librarian, has 
been visiting the town and county schools, 
telling stories and interesting the children 
in the library. These visits always result 
in increased registration and circulation 
in the branches near the schools. 

Saeah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 

County seat. Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,612,998 (tax- 
able for county $23,489,071). 

Glenn Co. Feee Libraey, Willows. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

A meeting was held on February 2 for 
the custodians of Glenn County Library. ■ 
The morning session was held in the 
county library. The hour was spent in 
talking about Glenn County Library 
methods and with introduction of the 
custodians one to the other. Twelve cus- 
todians were present. Luncheon was 
served at the Barton Hotel with the 
library folks as guests of the Willows 
Kiwanis Club. Mr Ferguson was the inter- 
esting speaker of the hour. The custodians 
enjoyed the "fun stunt" of the men. The 
club was surprised to learn that so many 
people in Glenn County were doing library 
work. Miss N. C. Laugenour, of Yolo 
County Library, Mr Elbe and Mr Bon- 
durant of the Board of Supervisors and 
Mr Mapes, County Superintendent of 
Schools were also luncheon guests. 

Afternoon session was in the Monday 
Afternoon club rooms at the Public Li- 
rary. Miss Cornelia D. Provines delighted 
her audience with her talk on Ballads and 
Balladry. Mr Ferguson and Mr Levinson 
spoke. Tea was served by the staff from 
the County Library and the Willows Pub- 
lic giving an opportunity for aU Glenn 



116 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



GLENN CO.— Continued: 

County people to meet and greet our 
guests. 

All the custodians have expressed their 
enjoyment of the day and are asking for 
another meeting next year. 

Mbs Fate K. Russell, Lib'n. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat, Eureka. 
Area, ^507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $56,617,925 (tax- 
able for county $51,999,240). 

Humboldt Co. Free Libraet, Eureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

During this quarter a new branch was 
established in the Hoopa Valley Indian 
Reservation. Until very recently all the 
land in the valley was owned and con- 
trolled by the United States Government 
and was not subject to taxation for county 
purposes. Within the last few years the 
government has been giving titles to the 
residents there for the land they have 
occupied for many years. They are there- 
fore taxpayers in the county and privi- 
leged to ask for the benefits to be derived 
from such taxation. A library is one of 
the privileges they requested first and we 
started them off with a consignment of 
350 books. Miss Virginia Thoruhill, a 
teacher in the school, will have charge of 
the branch. 

At the March meeting of the Board of 
Supei-visors the salai-y of Miss Merz, cus- 
todian of the Fortuna Branch Library, 
was increased from $35 to $50 per month. 
Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Humboldt Co. Law Library, Eureka. 
Eugene S. Selvage, Sec. 

Judge Thomas H. Selvage was elected 
President of the Humboldt County Law 
Library Association and the undersigned 
was elected Secretary at the meeting of 
that association held during Februai'y. 
We are rearranging the law library. 

Eugene S. Selvage, Sec. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat. El Centre. 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,SSS. 
Assessed valuation $53,747,610 -'tfl^xable 
for county $43,999,820). 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

The past three months have been very 
busy ones for us. During this period the 
librarian and her first assistant have given 
talks on the development and the aims of 
the county library system in California. 
These talks were given along with show- 
ing the fifty slides which wei"e talken all 
over the state, clearly showing the dif- 
ferent departments and activities. The 
Farm Bureau Department loaned us their 
machine and it was at their largest center 
meetings that the talks were given. It 
made an ideal way of covering the county. 

In January Miss Douden, librarian at 
Brawley, held a doll day story hour. 
Nearly every girl brought a doll. She told 
one story and then the girls gave reviews 
of doll stories. "Memoirs of a London 
Doll," "Dolls of Many Lands" and "Story 
of the Little Wooden Doll" were all used. 
Another little girl recited "The Lost Doll" 
by Aldrich. Inexpensive prizes were given 
to the little girl with the prettiest doll and 
the most unique. There were forty-two 
[present and they all had lots of fun over it. 

Several librarians attended the Sixth 
District meeting held at Ontario. It was 
a fine meeting and it was good to be there. 

We are the proud possessors of a new 
typewriter which we are enjoying. 

Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

Calexico. 

Calexico Free Public Library and 
Branch, Imperial Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Bess Wofford, Lib'n. 

The Calexico Public Library will be 
opened to the public Januai"y 17 at 12 
o'clock. For some time it will remain 
open only in the afternoon from 12 to 5 
p.m. It has been closed to the reading 
public since January 1, following the 
earthquakes. The building has been 
inspected and the decision made that it is 
in such condition a-s to be perfectly safe 
for the use of the public for ordinary 
circulation purposes. — Calexico Chronicle, 
.Ja 5 

El Centre. 

El Centro [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Imperial Co. Free Li- 
p.rary. Miss Agnes F. Ferris, Lib'n. 

Miss Marjorie Meserve resigned March 
1 and is now out of library work. She is 
at her home in San Diego. Miss Dorothy 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



117 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 

El Centro — Continued. 
Jean Turgeon, of Los Angeles, who is a 
graduate of Chicago Library Training 
School, has been appointed to take Miss 
Meserve's place. Miss Helen Crosby, who 
has been with us three years, is resigning 
April 15 to accept a government position 
as Librarian of Haskell Institute, Kan- 
sas. Miss Adrienne Eisele, graduate of 
our local junior college and of Riverside 
Summer School will be added to our staff 
April 15. 

Agnes F. Ferbis, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $18,760,737 (taxable 
for county $11,347,195). 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $201,669,763 (tax- 
able for county $169,334,670). 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

The second wildflower show to be given 
in Delano proved as splendid a success as 
the iirst one several years ago. Mrs Lillian 
Howland, local librarian, sponsored the 
show, which was held at the Delano 
Branch Library. A small prize, offered 
to school children for the largest variety 
of wildflower specimens brought in, cre- 
ated enthusiasm among high school and 
grammar school students. Two girls tied 
for the pz-ize, each girl having 41 speci- 
mens of floral life from the mountain and 
valley districts in this vicinity. The 
exhibit contained fifty-one varieties of 
wild flowei-s, which did not include a num- 
ber of very common ones, which were not 
counted. — Delano Record, Mr 25 

Miss Sylvia Clark, librarian at the Taft 
Branch Library, has been engaged in 
arranging and displaying wild flowers, 
collected from the vicinity of the oil fields 
by school children and library patrons. 
For the first time since 1919, the West 
Side fields are covered with wild flowers, 
due to the heavy rains, and this is the 

2—51527 



KERN CO.— Continued. 

first opportunity in years for such a dis- 
play. — Fresno Republican, Mr 81 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $29,373,655 (tax- 
able for county $24,436,402). 

Hanford. 

Hanford Free Public Library and 
Branch, Kings Co. Free Library. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

More than twenty named varieties of 
California wild flowers are to be seen at 
the Hanford Free Library this week, an 
excellent collection of native flora having 
been arranged March 28 by Miss Marion 
Gregory, county and city librarian and 
Miss Maude Middleton, head of the school 
department. With the display of wild 
flowers the library is showing an interest- 
ing book of sketches and water colors of 
California wild flowers, the work of Mrs 
E. R. Goodrich, well known artist of this 
city. Some fifty water colors are con- 
tained in the portfolio. — Hanford Journal, 
Mr 29 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $8,685,845 (taxable 
for county $8,646,215). 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty- fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,548,138 (tax- 
able for county $14,194,094) . 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

Mrs Lota Mitcheltree left January 26 
to accept a position in the Alameda 
County Free Library February 1. 

The Librarian acted as one of the judges 
on essays read before the Monticola Club 
by high school pupils in February. 

The art classes gave the annual art pro- 
gram in January to the Monticola Club. 
The program consisted of talks on artists 



118 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



LASSEN CO.— Continued. 

and their work and on the composition of 
pietiires. This program was held in the 
.supervisors' room and every seat was 
taken. After the talks the meeting 
adjourned to the library to see the exhibit 
which consisted of Medici prints borrowed 
from the State Library and art prints 
borrowed from the Print Makers Society 
of California. 

In .January the Librarian took the print 
exhibit to Doyle, Milford, Janesville, Stan- 
dish and Johnston ville-Susanville Farm 
Centers where she gave a short talk on 
art printing processes. Mrs Mitcheltree 
also attended these meetings and gave a 
delightful reading which interested the 
adults as well as the children. 

Lenala a. Maetin, Lib'n. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 
(First class.) 

County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area 3SS0 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,047,487,407 (tax- 
able for county $2,672,130,725). 

Los Angeles Co. Free Library, Los 
Angeles. Miss Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

The Garden Club of Claremont, which 
last year had but a small show, this year, 
on March 28 and 29, had a fine and widely 
representative exhibition well worth any- 
one's going a long distance to see. There 
were wild flowers from desert and beach, 
from wash and mountain — plants from as 
far off as the San Joaquin Valley and all 
admirably arranged as to family, carefully 
labeled with habitat, noted so that folk 
might see the difference in color and habit 
of the same plant growing under different 
conditions. There wei'e lovely arrange- 
ments in basket and vase, charming little 
groups of a single species in exactly the 
right v-ase or jar or basket. Also there 
was information as to which could be 
domesticated easily. 

It is a delightful use of a library — this 
to which the little library at Claremont 
lends itself. And if the spirits of authors 
are ever about their books, how the poets 
would enjoy this occasion ! — Los Angeles 
Times, Ap 17 

Twelve members of the main office staff 
and eleven branch librarians attended the 
Sixth District meeting of the California 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

library Association held at the Chaffey 
Union High School, March 5. 

On January 12, Miss Mildred Berrier, 
assistant librarian of the Jefferson High 
School, Los Angeles, accompanied 30 stu- 
dents, who have elected the high school 
course in library work, on a visit to the 
Los Angeles County Library. 

The County Library has published the 
first and second numbers of a quarterly 
bulletin to be called "Books and Notes of 
the Los Angeles County Free Libx-ai-y." 
The October number contains the annual 
report for the year 1925-1926. An account 
of the Los Angeles County Free Library 
giving its history from the organization 
in 1912 up to the date of the first bulletin, 
will appear as a special feature of some 
future number. 

The purpose of the bulletin is to pro- 
vide for the use of patrons, a more acces- 
sible list of the books added to the library 
from time to time, also to make the work 
of the libi'aiT more generally known to 
the taxpayers of the county. Jeanne 
Johnson, Head Cataloger, is the editor. 
Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

Altadena. 

Altadena Library District Library. 

Altadena Library District Library was 
established Nov. 6, 1926. The trustees 
are : Mrs Zane Grey, President ; Joseph 
H. Tumbach ; Wm. D. Davies, Secretary. 

Los Angeles. 

$Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The annual report covering the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1926, is in print. The 
seven mill tax provided an income of 
$1,027,280. The volumes in the library 
number 643,977, and the total circulation 
for the year was 5,521,889. Library serv- 
ice was extended throughout the city by 
means of 43 branches and 86 stations. 
The total number of people holding cards 
was 231,799. 

A beautiful handbook has been printed — 
a dignified and fitting tribute to the new 
building and to all those whose time, 
thought and skill have brought to pass 
this tangible realization of the hopes of 
years. 

The new bookplate for use in all refer- 
ence books has been designed by Nonnan 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



119 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 
Kennedy and accepted by the Board of 
Library Commi.ssioner.s. 

Another department was found to be 
desirable and has been authorized by the 
board, that of Philosophy and Religion, 
to be organized for service in the fall. 

One hundred and fifty members of the 
staff have paid their annual dues to the 
California Library Association. 

Visitors during the past three months, 
whose talks were enjoyed by the staff, 
were Mr Melcher and Dr Hill. 

The Lecture and Exhibits Room has 
beeu in constant use for meetings, lectures 
and exhibits, some thirty organizations 
using the room regularly. Two chamber 
music concerts, sponsored by Mrs Eliza- 
beth Sprague Coolidge were much enjoyed. 

Changes in the staff include the coming 
of Miss Eva G. Leslie as Supervisor of 
Children's work, and the appointment of 
Miss Hollingsworth, Principal of the new 
Municipal Reference branch to be estab- 
lished in the new City Hall within a 
year, and Miss Livsey as Principal of the 
School and Teachers Department and the 
Juvenile Room in the Central Library. 

The work for the blind is a new 
development slowly and satisfactorily 
making itself known. Books for the blind 
are shelved in the Patents Room, and free 
reading sessions have been given here each 
Saturday afternoon, from two to five, 
when volunteer readers read aloud from 
current magazines and recent books. 

The occasion of the presentation to the 
library of a bust of Franklin by the 
Master Printers of Los Angeles on Janu- 
ai'y 26, was accompanied by a fine pro- 
gram, the keynote to which was a sincere 
appreciation of Benjamin Franklin's 
greatness. 

A junior attendant class of twenty-nine 
young women selected from one hundred 
fifty applicants of unusual worth began 
its two months course of study March 1. 

A "Guide to Periodicals," an alphabeti- 
cal list of all the periodicals and serials on 
file in the library was compiled by the 
Periodical Department. One hundred sets 
were printed and bound by the library 
staff so each department and larger branch 
might have a copy. 

An unusual and most acceptable gift 
was that of 2000 volumes of bound news- 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

papers which the Los Angeles Examiner 

had brought together from half a dozen 

larger cities of the United States. 

Because of the great need for more 
branch library buildings, the Board of 
Library Commissioners sent a letter to 
the City Council, asking that a bond issue 
of $1,000,000 be placed on the ballot for 
the spring election. 

New branches are being opened in such 
rapid succession that it is difiicult to keep 
up with them ! Out of the .$.500,000 bonds 
voted in June, 1925, the following new 
buildings were erected and furnished : 
Washington Irving Branch at Eighteenth 
and Arlington sts., formally opened to the 
public March 8 ; Robert Louis Stevenson 
Branch at Spence and Percy sts., Febm- 
ary 1 ; Van Nuys Branch, Sylvan Way 
and Vesper street in Van Nuys, March 1 ; 
Owensmouth Branch on Owensmouth ave. 
and Wyandotte st., March 3 ; Wilming- 
ton Branch at Fries and J sts., Wilming- 
ton, March 18. 

Out of the same funds an additional lot 
was purchased for the Angeles Mesa 
Branch, at 5305 Fifth avenue, and a lot on 
Hobart boulevard near Santa Barbara and 
Western, for a new branch to be called 
Henry David Thoreau. Two sites for 
ranches have been provided through other 
sources, one an acre of ground in Lanker- 
shim secured by voting bonds for a Li- 
rary Park, and the other a part of Memo- 
rial Park, belonging to Los Angeles High 
School, where the Ralph Waldo Emerson 
Branch will be built. 

Everett R. Peery. Lib'n. 

^University of Southern- Califor- 
nia, College of Liberal Arts Library. 
R. B. von Klein Smid, Pres. Miss 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Many important additions have been 
made to the School of Architecture Li- 
brary during the past three months. The 
Rapid Blue Print Company of Los An- 
geles presented 2-581 Alinari prints. These 
well selected subjects will be mounted. 
The McKim, Mead and White Mono- 
graphs, four volumes, were presented by 
Meyer and Holler Company. Among the 
)urchases were Speltz, Colored Ornament ; 
Pugin, Nonnandy ; Ricci, High and late 
Renaissance and Romanesque Architec- 
ture ; Medailles Cours, 6 vol. ; Byne, Span- 



120 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

ish Gardens and Patios; Concours d' Ar- 
chitecture de I'Bcole des Beaux Arts, 1906 
to date ; and Strack, Brick and Terra 
Cotta Work in Italy. 

Several special exhibits have been 
placed in the exhibition case in the refer- 
ence room. The first one to attract much 
attention was from the Belding Brothers 
Silk Company. The complete process of 
silk manufacture from the eggs of the sUk 
worm through the various stages to the 
finished product was shown. Other 
exhibits have been "Arts and Crafts of 
Mexico," "Specimens of Modem Book 
Binding," and "U. S. Stamp Collection 
of Commemorative issues." 

Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Warren G. Haeding High School 
Library. Mrs Anne M. Beeman, Lib'n. 

A new plan of library lessons for the 
students was followed this last semester : 
Social Science and all History classes 
were scheduled for different periods for 
the week for instruction in the library. 
The classes came to the library and 
received the regular 45 minute lecture. 
During the week one end of the library 
was reserved for display. Each table 
represented a grade and on the table were 
displayed the books of history, travel, 
geography, social science and industries 
useful to these students. Also we had a 
display of mounted pictures on all these 
subjects. So popular were these display 
tables that since that we have kept two 
tables near the entrance door for different 
displays which have increased our circu- 
lation as students see books displayed 
that they would not have looked for. 

"The whole week," as the history 
teachers expressed it, was "a revelation 
to them as well as to the students." We 
will follow this plan every year. 

The "Map of Adventure" has attracted 
a great deal of attention and is being 
used in connection with history classes. 
Mbs Anne M. Beeman, Lib'n. 

Pasadena. 

Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

On the morning of February 19, the 
first story hour to be enjoyed by the boys 
and girls of Pasadena in the beautiful 
new Public Library was given by Grace 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continuea. 

Pasadena — Continued, 
and Carl Moon, authors of Indian stories. 
The Lecture and Exhibit Hall of the 
library accommodates about 300 chairs 
and it was not only filled to this capacity 
but the floor had to serve as a substitute 
for seats when all the chairs were filled. 

Mrs Moon told how she met the real 
Chi-wee, the little Indian girl of whom 
her books by that name were written. She 
spoke, too, of her new book, "Nadita," 
which will be published in the summer by 
Doubleday, Page & Co. Mr Moon told 
Indian stories, giving some of his experi- 
ences among Indian children on the reser- 
vations. He read from the manuscripts 
some of his humorous poems written for 
children and told something of his new 
book, "The Flaming Arrow," which will 
be published by Frederick A. Stokes Co. 
in the fall. 

It could readily be seen, by the very 
close attention given to Mr and Mrs 
Moon, that the children were delighted 
with their talk. At the end of the story 
hour they gathered about the authors 
with recluests for autographs and ex- 
pressed their enjoyment of the books they 
have written. 

Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

With appropriate ceremony, the first of 
a civic group of buildings in Pasadena, the 
Municipal Librai-y, was thrown open 
February 12. Embracing unusual fea- 
tures, the new library has outdoor read- 
ing rooms, one for children, the other for 
adults. The building was completed 
within the budget, of $580,000 and has a 
main entrance hall thirty-three feet wide, 
forty-five feet high and two hundred four 
feet long, back of which is the stack and 
from which radiate the other departments 
of the building. It is a one-story build- 
ing. — Los Angeles Times, F 13 

Purchase of the southeast corner of 
Morningside street and Santa Anita 
avenue as the site of the Lamanda Park 
Branch of the Public Library was ordered 
by the City Directors, March 8. The board 
voted $11,000 for the purchase of the 
property and $1,500 for the foundation 
and cost of moving the Boys' and Girls' 
Library building from Memorial, formerly 
Library Park. The lot is 200 by 192 feet, 
which is approximately the size of the 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



121 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Pasadena — Continued. 
Enst Branch Library site. — Pasadena 
Star-News, Mr 8 

Pomona. 

PoMOKA [Free] Public L i b e a k y. 
Miss Sarah M. .Tacobus, Lib'n. 

The library is rejoicing in its possession 
of the Sears Song Index. It is proving to 
be useful, not only as a I'eference book 
but also as a buying list. 

Thi'ough February and March we have 
displayed handiwork of the Scouts, and 
ship models by the local yachting club. 
This is an organization of boys who make 
working models of all sorts of craft, and 
bold regattas weekly. This has been one 
of the most popular displays we have ever 
had. The art books and portfolios bought 
in the fall have also furnished material for 
exhibition. 

JNIrs Oscar Edinger resigned at the end 
of January, to devote herself to the care 
of her family. Miss Rebecca Burdorf, 
who has recently returned from a position 
in the schools at Mazatlan, Mexico, suc- 
ceeded Mrs Edinger. Miss Helen Schwindt 
is substituting during the leave of absence 
of Miss Carolyn Walker. 

Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Whittier, 

WniTTiER State School Library and 
Branch, Los Angeles Co. Free Li- 
brary. Fred C Nelles, Supt. Miss 
Fahey, Lib'n. 

. There is probably no branch of the Los 
Angeles County Free Library more appre- 
ciated than the Whittier State School 
Branch. Most of our boys are veritable 
book worms. We have a new library room 
and each teacher gives a 45-minute period 
of her free time on a certain day of each 
week to issuing library books. We also 
have some very able assistants among the 
boys. Miss Dale and Mr Bryant of the 
main office are among our most welcome 
visitors. 

Miss Fahey, Lib'n. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12.20.3. 
Assessed valuation $28,998,908 (tax- 
able for county $23,546,215). 



MADERA CO.— Continued. 

Madera Co. F^ee Library, Madera. 
Miss Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

An exhibit of wild flowers was held at 
the library March 28 to April 2. A wild 
flower book was given to the boy and girl 
bringing in the greatest variety of wild 
flowers. 

During the Lenten season the various 
churches of the community exhibited a 
collection of recent religious books on 
successive Sundays, and gave out the 
miniatures of the religious book week 
poster, with the list of recent religious 
books recommended by the ministerial 
union. A representative from the library 
was present to talk about the books after 
the service. 

A new branch was established March 
17, at South Fork, with Mrs Elizabeth 
Thornburg as custodian. Alamo Branch 
was discontinued and Ashview Branch, 
with Miss Isabelle Elfers as custodian, 
was established to sei-ve the larger com- 
munity February 25. 

Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,-342. 
Assessed valuation .$.30,341,578 (tax- 
able for county $26,497,200). 

San Quentin. 

San Quentin Prison Library. Frank 
J. Smith, Warden. Earle M. Stigers, 
Educational Director. 

The chief item of interest in our library 
is a donation of 575 books, by the 
Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco. 
E. M. Stigers, Educational Director. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $6,085,206 (taxable 
for county $4,6&3,3S4). 

Mariposa Co. Free Libeary. Miss 
Minette Stoddard, Lib'n. 

There are now branches established in 
Yosemite and Mariposa, deposit stations 
at Granite Ci-eek and Wawona, and 24 
schools in Mariposa County are being 
served. — ilerced Sun-Star, Ja 18 



122 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty -eighth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $30,920,640 (taxable 
for county $25,741,297). 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $39,336,433 (taxable 
for county $31,751,619). 

Merced Co. Free Libkaey, Merced. 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

On February 8 the staff greatly enjoyed 
Mrs May Dexter Henshall's visit to the 
library and were especially grateful for 
the inspiration she left behind her. 

Miss Stoddard attended the joint meet- 
ing of the First, Second, and Third Dis- 
tricts in San Francisco, Februax-y 19, and 
has been busy visiting in the county and 
talking about and displaying to clubs the 
book flowers in the spring library garden. 

We are enthusiastic over the enthusi- 
asm displayed in Mariposa County with 
the library service. Mariposa Branch 
opened January 17 in the old Red Cross 
room, with many happy children in atten- 
dance the first day. Branches have now 
been established in four communities, 24 
schools are being served, and mailing serv- 
ice has been supplied to some borrowers 
who do not as yet have access to branches. 

Miss Frances Stoekebrand has filled 
the vacancy in the Branch Department. 
Miss Rosalie Barksdale has become Mrs 
Clyde Puckett, but is still remaining on 
the staff. 

Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty -second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,311,280 (taxable 
for county $7,781,061). 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $5,909,729 (taxable 
for county $2,927,055). 



MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $50,761,348 (taxable 
for county .$41,883,250). 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

The greatest pleasures of the quarter 
were the two visits of Miss Jessie Gay 
■N'an Cleve, children's editor of the A.L.A. 
Booklist, Chicago, who had been lecturing 
at the University of California School of 
Librarianship. She visited the Monterey 
Peninsula and drove south as far as Sole- 
dad, with members of the library staff. 
One of the party on Miss Van Cleve's 
visit was Miss Ella Young, an Irish liter- 
ary vi'oman and Celtic scholar, whose new 
book, "The Wonder Smith and His Son," 
is just off the press. Miss Van Cleve was 
also entertained by Miss Emma Wald- 
vogel, whose studio is at Monterey, at her 
little new house, "So Big" near Asilomar. 
A visit was made to the Robley Ranch at 
Corral de Tierra. There is a branch of 
the County Library there and the hospi- 
tality of the Robley home is proverbial 
amongst the librai-y workers of this dis- 
trict. On Miss Van Cleve's second visit, 
she was guest of honor and gave a most 
interesting talk on children's books at the 
dinner meeting (March 7, 1927) of the 
Salinas Business and Professional Wom- 
en's Club. 

On January 10, 1927, word was received 
that the Lucia post office burned Decem- 
ber 12, 1926. In the post office at the 
time were books on the way to the County 
Library from the Redwood School, and 
these were lost. Lucia is on the coast 
beyond the roads, and before the Harlan 
home can be rebuilt a sawmill will have 
to be erected and lumber made. 

The Milpitas home deposit station has 
been closed. Mrs E. A. Plaskett at whose 
home the books were, has moved from Mil- 
pitas to the Bernabe District. 

The Pfeiffer School district was re- 
established by the Supervisors, December, 
1926, and school opened Febmary 7, 1927. 

The California Library Association 
district meeting in San Francisco was 
attended by Anne Hadden and Marjorie 
Frink. Miss Ruth Porter came for the 
evening session. 

Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 



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CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



128 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
King City. 

King City Union High School Li- 
brary. H. O. Williams, Prin. 

Next week an intensive drive to secure 
new books for the high school library will 
take place. Plans ai'e for a house-to- 
house campaign, supplemented by infonna- 
tion disseminated through the local papers, 
slides at the Reel Joy theatre, and printed 
dodgers.^King City King Hhvays, Ja 14 

In our library drive we received over 
600 acceptable books, many of which were 
real valuable. This drive is to be made 
an annual event in King City. 

H. O. Williams, Prin. 

Pacific Grove. 

Pacific Grove [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Jessie W. Nichols, Lib'n. 

The new wing of Paciiic Grove Public 
Librai-y is now complete and is used as the 
children's room, one of the main features 
of the room being the 600 volumes of 
children's books donated by George Kohler 
of Pacific Grove. Other features are the 
ocean view- from the windows, the library 
tables, small kiddie chairs, desks and the 
mottos and drawings which adorn the 
walls. — San Jose Mercury Herald, Mr 5 



NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed valuation, $26,362,248 (tax- 
able for county $22,136,195). 

Napa Co. Free Library, Napa. Miss 
Estella DeFord, Lib'n. 

Our efforts for Children's Book Week 
consumed so much energy that none was 
left with which to report the results in 
the last issue of Neivs Notes of California 
Libraries. Two windows were loaned, one 
in St. Helena and one in Napa, by mer- 
chants and these were made most atti-ac- 
tive with posters and children's books. In 
October the County Librarian and Mr 
H. O. Parkinson spoke before the St. 
Helena Rotary Club on the advantages of 
cooperation between libraries. 

During the past quarter visits were 
made to branches and schools in Monti- 
cello, Berryessa and Pope Valleys. A new 
branch was established at Bennet, a fai"m- 
ing district east of Calistoga with Miss 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 

Alta Lincoln in charge. The Browns Val- 
ley Branch was moved to the Farm Center 
hall at the request of patrons of the 
libraiy. An additional branch was opened 
n Wooden Valley with Mr Manuel Texeira 
as custodian. Additional service was begun 
for the St. Helena Grammar School. A 
large collection of children's books was 
taken to the school and Thursday is 
librai-y day. Miss Hartley, the teacher in 
charge, reports a ciix-ulation of about 300 
per month. 

Three bulletins, one on books for Sixth 
Grade pupils compiled from the Win- 
netka list, one on books of non-fiction and 
a third a letter from Polynesia, Doctor 
Dolittle's parrot, to the children of the 
rural schools, were sent out. The latter 
caused such a flood of letters from the 
children that it looked as if Polynesia 
would be in need of a secretary. 

A notice in the local newspapers that 
the library could supply books in foreign 
languages brought in an unexpected num- 
ber of requests, principally for novels in 
German. We would appreciate hearing 
from county libraries having books in 
foreign languages and will be glad to lend 
our recent German accessions. 

Miss Dills and Mrs Worden were vis- 
itors at the County Library. Miss Gillis- 
poke before the Business and Professional 
Women's Club at a dinner given at the 
Chamber of Commerce. About 70 people 
were present and the activities of the 
State LibraiT as set forth by Miss Gillis 
were a revelation to many present. The 
next day Miss Gillis visited two branches 
of the County Library. 

Estella DeFord, Lib'n. 

Napa. 

Goodman [Free Public] Library. 
Miss Minnie C. Shreve, Lib"n. 

This quarter shows our library as a 
growing institution, both as to patrons 
and circulation. Our story hours have 
brought out children, ranging in number 
from 31 to 104. Our storytellers have 
been Mr Winfrey, Miss Alice Scanlon, 
Mrs Houghton, Mrs Olds and Miss Ruth 
MuUer. On the morning of January 8, 
at Goodman Library, Mr Guy Winfrey 
told stories to a group of 104 children. 
The children showed their interest in the 
bear and ghost stories told and after each 



124 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 
Napa — Continued, 
were eager for more. Most of tlie boys 
and girls knew Mr Winfrey's "Bunny 
Bearskin" and some had heard a part of 
"Pussy Purrmew," now about to be pub- 
lished. 

On March 14, Miss Mabel Gillis visited 
Napa to make a talk at the Business and 
Professional Women's Club. She spoke 
on the history and scope of the State 
Library. Our people refer to the occasion 
as one at which they received pleasure 
and information. 

M. C. Shreve, Lib'n. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,683,613 (taxable 
for county .$6,941,690). 

Nevada City. 

Nevada City Free [Public] Li- 
brary. Mrs Iva Williamson, Lib'n. 

Our Assistant Librarian, Elizabeth M. 
Hughes, died Febniary 16, 1927, after an 
illness extending over several months. She 
had filled the position of Assistant Libra- 
rian for the last ten years. 

Mrs Iva Williamson, Lib'n. 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $177,730,314 (tax- 
able for county $152,611,450). 

Orange Co. Free Library, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

Wintersburg Branch of Orange County 
Free Librai-y was established February 
15, 1927, with Miss Juliene Blaylock as 
custodian. It will be open Monday and 
Thursday. 

Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

Huntington Beach. 

Huntington Beach Union High 
School Library. M. G. Jones, Prin. 
Edith J. Hubbart, Lib'n. 

In January the school was moved into 
our beautiful new building. The library, 
which is 90 feet long, seats 88 persons at 
present, though there is still room for 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Huntington Beach — Continued, 
additional tables. It is simply but har- 
moniously decorated and fully equipped 
with standard Library Bureau furniture. 
The work of organization, handicapped 
by lack of space in the old quarters, has 
been progressing rapidly, and we hope by 
the end of the year to have a catalog 
worthy of the name, and a pamphlet and 
picture collection started at least. Since 
the library is used as a study hall, the 
librarian's time is considerably divided, 
and work must proceed rather slowly. 
Edith J. Hubbart, Lib'n, 

Placentia. 

Placentia Library District Library. 
Mrs Olive Bailey, Lib'n. 

The formal opening of the new Placen- 
tia Public Library took place on Monday, 
March 7, the program commencing at 2 
p.m. The vai-ious members of the library 
board, the architect, the contractor and 
others, were introduced to the assembly. 
The main speaker of the day was State 
Librarian Milton J. Ferguson, who did 
Placentia the honor of being present on 
this occasion. Mr Ferguson spoke very 
strongly on what this beautiful library 
meant to the community and the ideals 
and needs it will care for. He spoke of 
the beauty and completeness of the struc- 
ture aud commended the efficient board 
who carried it to completion. 

The library is Spanish in construction 
with beautiful patio, and all furnishings 
are from Library Bureau. 

Mrs Olive Bailey, Lib'n. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat. Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $25,415,588 (taxable 
for county $18,255,970). 

Roseville. 

Roseville [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

Miss Georgiana Willits was injured in 
an automobile accident while on her way 
to the meeting of the Fifth District, Cali- 
fornia Library Association, at Lodi, March 
12. She is not yet able to return to her 
work. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



125 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,034,720 (tax- 
able for county $12,-541,902). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

Lauretta Cameron, library assistant 
under all of Plumas County Librarians 
except Miss Askey, died at Weimar Janu- 
ary 27 and was buried at Quincy, Sunday, 
January 30. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $65,666,943 (tax- 
able for county $48,633,-500). 

Riverside. 

Riverside [Free] Public Library. 
Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Books the size of a thumb naU with 
print so fine one must use a reading glass 
to decipher the words, make up aja inter- 
esting part of the exhibit of miniature 
books now on display in the lobby of 
Riverside Public Library. This collection 
of miniature books has been loaned for 
the occasion by many interested people of 
the community, and each small book is 
marked with the name of its owner. Small 
Bibles and dictionaries lead, both in the 
matter of smallness and in number. Other 
miniature objects which find place in the 
same case are a set of wee dominoes, and 
many small carved animals. Small pieces 
of pottery from Mexico and a group of 
small books of Spanish stories, both 
owned by Librarian C. F. Woods, occupy 
a corner of the glass case. — Riverside 
Press, F 22 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $1-58,086,066 (tax- 
able for county $129,416,920). 

Sacramento. 

jSacramento Free Public Library. 
Miss Suson T. Smith, Lib'n. 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento — Continued. 

The rapid increase in circulation, when 
on a number of days the mark reached 
1300 and 1400, wiped out our current 
iiction shelf. Our budget could not keep 
pace with the mounting cost of fiction and 
the increase in circulation. A statement 
presented to the City Council, favoring 
the establishment of a Duplicate Pay 
Collection, was adopted and $300 was 
allowed the library from the general fund 
as a loan. 

On January 15 the Duplicate Pay Col- 
lection was started with a charge of five 
cents a week and was an immediate suc- 
cess. As long as the books circulate they 
will be kept on the shelves to pay for 
themselves and add enough surplus to pay 
back the loan. The first report made to 
the City Manager on the venture at the 
end of March was as follows : 302 books 
purchased at an expenditure of $401.40; 
2410 books circulated; $120.50 collected. 

As borrowers are allowed to reserve the 
Duplicate Pay books, the plan has proved 
popular and to date not one objection has 
been registered against it at the Loan 
Desk. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $15,272,399 (taxable 
for county $13,546,440) . 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $115,823,908 (tax- 
able for county $72,154,574). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

Since February 14, 1927, the County 
Free Library has been occupying its new 
quarters in the new court house. These 
are located on the first floor on the east 
side of the building, and occupy a space 
89 feet long by 36 feet wide. They con- 
sist of a large main library room, with 
the different departments separated by 
low double bookcases ; a Teacher's Li- 



126 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

brary room ; shipping room ; storage 
room ; rest i-oom ; and the librarian's oiEce. 
Library Bureau furniture is installed 
throughout the main library room. The 
Board of Super\dsors has designated April 
30 as the official opening of the new court 
house. Each department of the court 
house, including the County Free Library, 
will keep open house for visitors on that 
day. 

The following six members of the 
County Free Library headquarters staff 
attended the meeting of the Sixth District 
Library Association meeting at Ontario, 
March' 5 : Mrs Gertmde Hopkins, the 
Misses Curtis, Green, Wallace, Anderson, 
Clements. Miss Myrtle Coleman, who has 
been the school assistant, resigned Febru- 
ary 28, to accept a position in the Library 
of Hawaii, Honolulu. Miss Lura Wallace, 
who was an assistant in the school work, 
and desk attendant, was appointed to take 
her place. Mrs Gertinide Hopkins, gradu- 
ate of the Los Angeles Public Library 
School, has been appointed cataloger and 
entered the library IMarch 2. Miss Gladys 
Green was appointed a regular assistant 
in the Community Branch department 
February 1. She had been previous to 
this a temporary assistant. Miss Myrtle 
Coleman spoke before the Rialto Woman's 
Club February 2 on children's reading, 
and some of the new children's books. She 
took with her some of the late new chil- 
dren's books as an exhibit. 

The lot and building that has housed 
the Highland Branch of the County Free 
Library has been sold to the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge of Highland, the highest 
bidders, with the understanding that the 
library shall remain in the building until 
the new Highland Library Distinct library 
is completed, for which $10,000 bonds 
were voted last year. 

On Saturday evening, March 5, at a 
I'epresentative meeting of the different 
organizations of Needles, at which the 
County Librarian was present, a library 
committee was fonned to undertake to 
raise enough money to add to au existing 
Memorial Fund to build a library build- 
ing to house the branch in Needles, which 
building is intended to be a memorial to 
the Needles' men and women who were 
active in the World War, and to those 
who lost their lives in it. Reverend Paul 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Lomax was appointed chairman of the 
committee. 

^Irs Jennie Curtis, custodian of the 
Bryn Mawr Branch, attended the meet- 
ing of the Sixth District Library Associa- 
tion meeting at Ontario, March 5, as did 
also Mrs Lena A. Lowe, custodian of the 
Chino Branch. 

Miss Vivien B. Befger, custodian of the 
Del Rosa Branch, was married January 
2.5 to Mr Henry H. Front. She is con- 
tinuing as custodian of the branch. Mrs 
Ray Ousley, who has been custodian of the 
Oro Grande Branch, resigned Januai*y 1, 
and Mrs Lloyd Cook was appointed to 
take her place. 

Nipton Emergency School, Miss Annie 
McKinnon, teacher, was started February 
21. The County Free Librai-y gives serv- 
ice to this school, although it is not an 
organized district school. The Twenty- 
nine Palms Emergency School has been 
discontinued. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

San Bernardino Co. Law Library, 
San Bernardino. Russell A. Wickizer, 
Lib'n. 

Russell A. Wickizer was appointed 
librarian of the County Law Libi'ary in 
the new court house March 1, by Superior 
Judges B. F. Warmer and C. L. Allison, 
acting for the County Bar Association. 
He succeeds District Attorney Jerome B. 
Kavanaugh. — San Bernardino Sun, Mr 2 

San Bernardino. 

San Bernardino Polytechnic High 
School and Junior College Library. 
Geo. R. Momyer, Prin. Miss Eleanore 
Kyle, Lib'n. 

With two-thirds of the school year over 
our statistics show some interesting 
figures. Home loans total 3797 and period 
loans 25,700. Both figures show gains 
over last year. 

Eighteen students enrolled in the librai-y 
class and with their help much of the 
routine work is carried on. Three stu- 
dents come in each period and these issue 
and check off all the period loans and send 
overdue notices for them so that we have 
lost hardly any books this year. 

An inventory was taken at the begin- 
ning of school in which we found some 400 
odd volumes on the library shelves which 
had never been added to the collection. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



127 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
San Bernardino — Continued. 
Work on these snags has occupied much 
of the librarian's time. 

Tlie condition of the old shelflist was 
such that it seemed simpler to make a new 
one than to revise the old one and this 
has now been completed. 

Some new shelving has been received 
and installed and the arrangement of 
reference material has been somewhat 
improved. We hope to add to this equip- 
ment next year. 

Eleanobe Kyle, Lib'n. 
Upland. 

Upland [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib-'n, 

See account of San Antonio Library 
Club meeting, under Library Clubs, etc. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $123,516,956 (tax- 
able for county $103,450,380). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

During the February floods the people 
of the back country showed remarkable 
appreciation of the books furnished by 
the County Library. In some neighbor- 
hoods where the roads were impassable 
and bridges out, borrowers came to the 
branch libraries on horseback to get books 
for themselves and the families near them. 
As we have made our rounds since the 
rains we have been greeted everywhei^e 
with expressions of gratitude for the books 
that helped pass the long rainy days and 
evenings and with reports of increased 
circulation. 

San Onofre Branch of the County Li- 
brary was established December 30, 1926. 
Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

San Diego. 

+San Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Librarian, 
and Miss Eleanor Barrows, Children's 
Librarian, will attend the meeting of the 
California Library Association at Geai'- 
hart, Oregon. 

Mrs Jennie Herrmann, fonnerly San 
Diego County Librarian, will have charge 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
of the Normal Heights Branch in the 
ab.sence of Miss Dorothy Bottiger, who 
has been gi-anted a two months' leave of 
absence. 

A new branch was opened recently in 
the Cabrillo School on Point Loma. There 
was an informal reception with short 
talks by Miss Plaister and members of 
the teaching staff. During the first month 
this branch had a circulation of 101 and 
much support from the community. 

Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

La Jolla Library Association Li- 
brary and Branch of San Diego P. L. 
Miss Alice V. Carey, Lib'n. 

We have been busy with a certain 
amount of readjustment and reorganiza- 
tion, due to changes in the staff. A new 
card system has been devised and is ready 
to be put into use. New equipment has 
been added to the work room and, in the 
form of new reading lamps and additional 
shelving, to the children's room. The 
jiivenile collection has been especially con- 
sidered in the matter of ordering fresh 
titles and of discarding old ones. 

Alice V. Carey, Lib'n. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation $982,-560,022 (tax- 
able for county $756,583,094). 

$[Fbee] Public Library of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

On April 4 we opened a new branch 
library, Bay View Branch, which is the 
thirteenth branch of our system. This 
makes the third branch opened within a 
year, the other two being Ingleside and 
Glen Park branches. 

Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

California Academy of Sciences 
Library. 

The library of the late William F. 
Herrin was left to the California Academy 
of Sciences. It is a collection of rare 
and fine books on botany and will fonn a 
very valuable addition to the botanical 
section of the Academy library. 



128 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

Accessions during 1926 numbered 2541 
items, of which about 1300 were pamph- 
lets, 131 were maps, and 1118 were com- 
plete volumes. These accessions cover 
subjects in the special field of natural 
history and therefore represent an impor- 
tant addition to the library resources of 
the state. 

Mr Edward P. Van Duzee, Assistant 
Librarian, in charge of the library since 
1916, resigned on account of other duties, 
and Mr Ignatius McGuire was appointed 
in his place. Mr McGuire has sei"ved in 
various capacities in the Academy library 
previous to his present appointment, and 
also in the Mechanics-Mercantile Library, 
San Francisco, the New York Public Li- 
brary, and the University of California 
Library. 

W. W. Sakgeant, Secretary. 

State Teacheks Coi>lege L.bbaky. 
Archibald Anderson, Pres. Miss Ruth 
Fleming, Librarian. 

There have been one or two changes in 
the staff recently. Miss Mildred Holman, 
for many years connected with the two li- 
braries in one capacity and another, some- 
times Children's librarian, sometimes the 
only librarian, was married in June to 
Mr Ernest C. Woods. As they are making 
their home in San Francisco, it was pos- 
sible for Mrs Woods to keep on with her 
work for some time, and her assistance 
was very much needed in the Children's 
Library, which had suffered from neglect 
and low funds. With the opening of the 
fall term, Mrs Woods was transferred to 
that librai-y, and was in charge until 
Christmas. With the opening of the new 
year, Miss Dorothy Ellis, formerly in the 
Monterey County Free Library, came to 
us to be Children's Librarian. 

Last July Miss Harriet Dunphy was 
added to the staff as a general assistant in 
the College Library. Miss Dunphy came 
to us from two years' experience in the 
circulation department in the Oregon Agri- 
cultural College Library. 

Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

United States Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, Forest Service, Library. S. B. 
Show, District Forester, in charge. Mrs 
Jeannette C. Stern, Acting Lib'n. 

Miss Alma I. Oviatt, who since 1924 
has been District Librarian, has taken a 
leave of absence for three months on 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

account of ill health. Mrs Jeannette C. 
Stem, formerly in the State Library, is 
taking her position. 

S. B. Show, District Forester. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $121,623,705 (tax- 
able for county $104,200,245). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library, 
Stockton. Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

During the quarter two very delightful 
story-hours were given at the Woods and 
Houston Schools. Miss Mary H. Colo- 
han gave the stoi-ies in her usual enter- 
taining manner, giving a varied program 
at each school. Miss Angeline Orr, head 
of the School Department, sponsored the 
programs. 

An initial story hour was held at the 
Methodist Church of Calla for the chil- 
dren of the Summer Home and CaUa 
Branches. Miss Tillie Prahser, branch 
department head, and Miss Ida E. Condit, 
librarian, assisted Miss Colohan in enter- 
taining the children. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Lodi. 

LoDi [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Amy L. Boynton, Lib'n. 

The Fifth District of the California Li- 
brary Association met in Lodi Saturday, 
March 12. The meeting was well attended 
and was apparently much enjoyed. Many 
visiting librarians, including Mr Milton 
J. Ferguson, State Librarian, called at 
the libraiT between sessions. Whether 
local publicity of this meeting was the 
cause or not we can not say, but for some 
reason circulation figures took a decided 
jump during the month of March and 
more books were circulated than ever 
before in any one month. 

Amy L. Boynton, Lib'n. 

Stockton. 

IStockton Free Public Library. 
Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

The annual convention of the Fifth 
District of the California Library Associa- 
ion, which was held at Lodi, was attended 
by the librarian and twelve members of 
the staff. Representatives from the Al- 



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CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



129 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Stockton — Continued, 
dine and Philomatliean Clubs motored out 
to attend the sessions. They were espe- 
cially interested in I'eports given by Miss 
Eudora Garoutte and others on the early 
landmarks of California. 

The weekly story hours in the Chil- 
dren's Department have been well attended. 
Special interest was shown in the story 
hour given by Miss Ella Henderson's 
pupUs, who gave a pi'ogram of recitations. 
Miss Ryland, children's librarian, con- 
ducted a story hour of unusual interest, in 
which she showed lantern pictures of 
Pinocchio. These pictures were illustra- 
tions taken from the Pinocchio books. 

Under Councilmanic Order of March 1, 
a slight increase in salary was effected for 
five members of the staff. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $39,078,780 (tax- 
able for county $33,733,457). 

San Lxjis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

Mrs Bertha E. Harpster, second assis- 
tant in the County Free Library was 
married February 28, 1927, at San Diego, 
to Mr Paul Franklin of San Luis Obispo. 
Mrs Franklin is continuing her work at 
the library. 

The Morro Bay Branch Library has 
moved into its new quarters in the new 
post office building. The custodian, Mrs 
Lillie A. Anderson, is also postmistress of 
Morro Bay. 

Mrs Mary Willhoit, custodian of the 
Templeton Branch, is recovering from a 
serious attack of pneumonia. During her 
illness, the library has been in charge of 
Mrs Loa Johnson. Miss Ethel Jatta, 
custodian of the Arroyo Grande Branch, 
is spending three months in the San Luis 
Sanitarium, recuperating from an opera- 
tion on her thigh, which was broken by 
a fall three years ago and did not heal 
straight. Mrs Clara B. Paulding is sub- 
stituting for her. 

Flo a. Gantz, Lib'n. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 

Paso Robles. 

Paso Robles [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Edith Allen Phelps, Lib'n. 

The Board of City Tnistees has raised 
the salary of the Paso Robles librarian, 
Miss Edith Phelps, to $135.— San Luis 
Telegram, Ja 5 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

At a Better Homes program of the 
Monday Club, a woman's club of more 
than 200 members, the librarian made a 
brief address and distributed lists of mate- 
rial on this subject available at the Public 
Library. The lists have bi'ought increased 
use of books on the art of home making. 

The month of March proved to be the 
best in the history of the library. Large 
increase in circulation along all lines, as 
well as unprecedented use of reading 
rooms and reference department demon- 
strated anew the need of a larger building 
and adequate equipment. 

Abbie S. Kellogg, Lib'n. 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $48,109,829 (taxable 
for county $43,940,885). 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo Junior College Library. 
W. L. Glascock, Prin. R. J. Hopkins, 
Dean. Katherine D. Steele, Lib'n. 

The library wUl be in new quarters for 
the school year, 1927-1928, and I, as 
librarian, hope to have them adapted as 
perfectly as possible to all the interests of 
the Junior College — faculty, students and 
library workers. Besides our regular staff 
of librarian and one assistant, who does 
not hold the state certificate, we have 
been fortunate in having had a special 
cataloger for the last four months, on 
temporary appointment. Because of this 
extra assistance, we will begin our service 
in our new library next year, with our 
collection of about 3000 volumes, almost 
completely cataloged with Library of Con- 
gress cards. 

Katherine D. Steele, Lib'n. 



130 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $74,627,787 (taxable 
for county $64,054,990). 

Santa Barbara. 

* State Teachers College Libraey. 
Clarence L. Phelps, Prin. Miss Katha- 
rine F. Ball, Lib'n. 

Miss Katharine F. Ball, Acting Libra- 
rian for the past year, has been appointed 
Librarian to take the place of Miss Aldine 
Winham who has x'esigned. 

Ground was broken Mai-ch 29 for the 
new $150,000 administration building, in 
which the College library is to be housed. 
Katharine F. Ball, Lib'n. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $126,507,637 (tax- 
able for county $110,715,675). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
Jose. Mrs Elizabeth Singletary, Lib'n. 

Work has started on the Saratoga 
Branch building. It is hoped it can be 
occupied by July. 

Palo Alto. 

Palo Alto [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

The Library School Class of the Uni- 
versity of California visited Palo Alto 
March 15. They spent the morning at the 
Public Library, lunching at the Stanford 
"Union, and the afternoon at the Stanford 
Library. The class this year seems to be 
an unusually enthusiastic and interested 
group. 

We have had two rather unique exhibits 
among the many which have been shown 
in our Art Room during the winter. One 
a collection of beautiful oriental rugs was 
supplemented with a lecture by an Arme- 
nian rug dealer. The other an exhibit of 
photography was the first to be shown in 
our exhibit room. Many excellent pieces 
of work were displayed, all original, done 
by members of our local Art Club. In 
connection a lecture was given by one of 
our photograph enthusiasts illustrated by 
motion pictures taken on a recent trip to 
Europe. This talk was repeated by popu- 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
Palo Alto — Continued, 
lar demand with an even larger atten- 
dance than on the first occasion. 

Librarians may be glad to know of a 
most interesting picture map of the Mon- 
terey Peninsula published by A. M. Rob- 
ertson, 222 Stockton street, San Francisco. 
Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

San Jose. 

San Jose High School Library. 
Raymond B. Leland, Prin. Miss Henri- 
ette G. Thomas, Lib'n. 

We are still trying the experiment of 
closed shelves that we began in the fall. 
Thirty-four student assistants work with 
the librarian. They are recruited from 
the student body and are students who 
can afford to give one study period a day 
from their regulaj.- school w&rk to help in 
every phase of the library's work. 

The librarian of one of our junior high 
schools was forced, because of sickness, to 
give up her position temporarily. We feel 
a great pride in the fact that one of our 
former library assistants was given the 
opportunity to take full charge from her 
graduation from the high school in Febru- 
ary until about two weeks ago. From 
several sources the news came that she 
was very satisfactory. She and another 
former assistant have about completed 
their apprenticeship for a place on the 
waiting list of the City Library. 

Henriette G. Thomas, Lib'n. 

Santa Clara. 

University of Santa Clara Library. 
Rev Z. J. Maker, S.J., Pres. Charles 
D. South, Lib'n. 

In its newly-formed division of rare 
volumes, the library of the University of 
Santa Clara exhibits a collection which 
includes a pigskin-bound three-volume first 
edition of the famous "Noticia de la Cali- 
ornia," by Father Juan Yenegas, a Jesuit, 
the histoi"y (written in 1739, thirty years 
before Junipero Serra trod the soil of 
California or Portola discovered San 
Francisco bay) having been printed in 
Madrid in 1757 ; a two-volume translation 
into English of the same work, first edi- 
tion, published in London in 1759 under 
the title, "A Natural and Civil History of 
California;" and a first edition three- 
volume translation into French of the 
same work, with the title, "Histoire Natu- 
relle et Civile de la Californie," printed 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



131 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
Santa Clara — Continued, 
iu Paris, in 1767 ; a first edition of W. 
Winterbothani's "Historical, Geographi- 
cal, Commercial and Philosophical View 
of the American United States," in four 
volumes, printed in London in 1795, dur- 
ing the second term of President George 
Washington and containing as a frontis- 
piece an etching of "The Father of his 
Country," showing him endowed with fea- 
tures nobler and stronger than he is 
pictured in most of our modern publica- 
tions ; a book of Latin and Spanish hymns 
used by the Padres in the Mission era, the 
cover being of bronze, of sixteenth-century 
Spanish manufacture, and the 132 folio 
leaves being of genuine parchment pre- 
, pared for writing under the supervision 
of the Padres. The beautifully hand- 
written music and words are in black and 
red ink, the indelibility of which has 
been fairly well demonstrated in the test 
of ages. 

Among other unique tomes in this col- 
lection may be mentioned a "Sacra Bib- 
lia" printed in Venice in 1481 "Per Leo- 
nardum Vvild de Ratisbona;" a "Com- 
mentarius in quatuor Libros Senten- 
tiarum," by Petri de Aquila, chapters with 
rubricated capitals, a quarto in original 
oaken boards covered with stamped leather 
(1481) ; and a huge pedagogical text-book 
in Latin by Duns Scotus, published at 
Venice, 1490, provided with an index, and 
adorned with illuminated capitals. 

Charles D. South, Lib'n. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $26,854,793 (taxable 
for county $22,905,840). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $25,222,656 (tax- 
able for county $15,208,650). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
. Area, 957 s-q. mi. Pop. 1788, 



SIERRA CO.— Continued. 

Assessed valuation $3,202,043 (taxable 
for county $2,813,435). 

SiEERA Co. Free Library. Miss 
Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

The new custodian at Alleghany Branch 
of the County Free Library is Mrs Ray 
Kingsman. The library will be in her 
home. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty- third class.) 
County seat, Trekji. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $30,004,501 (tax- 
able for county $21,456,025). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

Mrs J. G. Griggs followed Mrs M. B. 
Hemphill as custodian of the community 
branch at Edgewood, January 1. The 
branch is still situated in the hotel lobby 
giving opportunity for patrons to choose 
and examine the books at their leisure. 

■ With the resignation of Mrs Ethel 
Davis, who is moving to the southern part 
of the state, Macdoel Branch is without a 
permanent custodian ; Mrs E. C. Rein- 
hart has undertaken the work temporarily. 
Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi; Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $38,100,855 (taxable 
for county $30,990,900). 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

During the last quarter two small 
branches have been opened, one near Val- 
lejo, known as the Home Acres Branch, 
and the other in the Allendale School 
District near Dixon, called the McBur- 
ney Branch. Reports from the newly 
appointed custodians show that the cir- 
culation is surprisingly good and that the 
patrons are vei-y pleased to have this book 
service. 

The library staff employed substitutes 
to care for the headquarters library on 
the day the First, Second and Third Dis-- 
tricts held a joint meeting in San Fran- 
cisco, February 19. 



132 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 

Several dolls were loaned to the Napa 
County Free Library to be used in the 
wonderful display of dolls which that li- 
brary collected for the Napa County Wild 
Flower show. 

The Librarian and Airs Dorothy Wor- 
den attended the Marin County Federa- 
tion meeting recently when the women of 
that county so cordially welcomed the 
newly appointed County Librarian into 
their midst. Solano County was asked to 
show its collection of wild flower slides 
and exhibited the beaiatiful colored photo- 
graphs loaned it for a flower show in 
Solano County. 

The Solano County Library again par- 
ticipated in a wild flower show at home. 
Several tables of books and a beautiful 
picture display were part of its contri- 
bution, also the renting of a portion of 
the wild flowers as shown in the film made 
by Mr Pillsbury. This film was procured 
from the Pathe Exchange. The Japanese 
table with books pertaining to the sim- 
plicity and artistic arrangement of flowers 
by our Oriental neighbors caused some 
comment and drew attention to the face 
that a few blossoms well placed were 
more effective than masses of them poorly 
placed. 

Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

Vallejo. 

Vallejo [Free] Public Library 
AND Branch, Solano Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss L. Gertrude Doyle, Lib'n. 

A small club room for the use of the 
boys of the various schools has been 
opened at the Vallejo Public Library by 
Miss Doyle, with the permission of the 
library trustees. The room is open to the 
boys only in the evenings and provides a 
place where they may hold meetings and 
informal gatherings of any nature. The 
idea of the room developed following the 
closing of the Industrial Y. M. C. A., 
which left the boys with no place to hold 
their gatherings. — Vallejo Times-Herald, 
Mr 2 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $51,323,700 (tax- 
able for county $43,470,110) . 



STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $63,311,551 (tax- 
able for county $54,407,685). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Mo- 
ESTo. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 
During January a group of "Book- 
lovers" was formed at Newman Branch, 
which meets Tuesday afternoons, with an 
occasional evening meeting, for the infor- 
mal discussion of books. Members of the 
group volunteer as leaders for each 
meeting. 

The County Librarian was the speaker 
at the meeting of the Hughson Woman's 
Club, March 8, and on the ninth, she 
poke at the two assemblies of the Modesto 
High School. She gave a talk at the 
Newman Woman's Club, March 25, and 
addressed the Modesto Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Club, March 28. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $22,813,548 (taxable 
for county $18,084,190). 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 
County seat. Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $23,023,556 (taxable 
for county $19,286,150). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

The awakening of spring has inspired 
the County Librarian to visit all of the 
branches and schools of the county before 
the close of the school term in May. Heavy 
snows, deep mud or washed out roads have 
made visits somewhat precarious under- 
takings during the winter, so the wild 
flowers and budding trees are not the only 
incentive to trips into the mountain dis- 
tricts. 

El Camino Branch was changed March 
1 from the home of Mrs Drendel to that 
of Mrs E. W. Fuller, with the post office 
address of Proberta. Squawhill Branch 
has been temporarily transferred from 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



133 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

the home of Mrs E. A. Drake to that of 
Mrs L. Spiker, with the same post office 
address. In February the Librarian visited 
the County Librarian of Glenn County at 
which time a plan was agreed upon for 
combining the Capay branches of thi' twu 
counties. At present the two branches 
are but two miles apart, so for economy's 
sake it seems better to serve the people 
from one point. Tehama County Libriu'y 
will contribute certain material in ex- 
change for service from Glenn County. 
The Savercool Deposit Station is active 
once more. 

On March 1 the Librarian met with 
the Corning Farm Center to give a talk 
on the service to residents of the county 
immediately outside of incorporated towns. 

On March 21 a talk was given at the 
Proberta Farm Center on the "County 
Library Service" in general, for the people 
of this commmunity are new not only to 
the county but to the state. The meeting 
was a lively one, the questions and dis- 
cussion threatening to continue well into 
the night, but the smell of coffee dampened 
the agricultural and litex'ary ardor eaidy 
enough to enable the Farm Adviser and 
the Librarian to get away a little before 
midnight. Considerable merriment was 
enjoyed at the expense of the Farm Ad- 
viser who is notoriously absent minded. 
When he appeared early in the evening 
%yithout "the speaker of the evening" (the 
Librarian) he was dispatched in haste 
to rectify his mistake. In the meantime 
the Librarian, having previously experi- 
enced his forgetfulness, cranked her own 
car and traveled alone to the meeting, 
passing the anxious Adviser on the way. 
Upon his • return little opportunity was 
given him to forget his "forgetfulness." 

The goodwill and friendly spirit mani- 
fest in the Farm Center meeting is one 
that might well be emulated by other 
organizations. A Farm Center meeting 
or Home Department meeting in Tehama 
County is always one of wholesome enjoy- 
ment from beginning to end. 

Visits during the quarter have been 
made to the following schools and 
branches : Capay School, Capay Branch, 
Orchard Park School, Los Robles School, 
Hunter School, Lincoln School, Red Bank 
Branch and School, Montgomery School 
and Coming School. At the schools talks 
3—51527 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

were given to the children, resulting in a 
livelier demand for some of the books 
mentioned. 

Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2.551. 
Assessed valuation $3,815,166 (taxable 
for county $3,384,235). 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $89,898,573 (taxable 
for county $68,353,985). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Mrs James Smith has succeeded Mrs 
.Janet Butcher as custodian of the Angiola 
Branch of the County Librai-y- Mrs 
Butcher has sei*Yed the library since July, 
1915. Mrs Carl Baker has succeeded Mrs 
William Breitinger as custodian of the 
Tipton Branch. 

Since the County Library car must be 
in use so much of the time for inspection 
of school branches and in work with the 
children of the county through the read- 
ing room branches, the Board of Super- 
visors has granted the County Librarian 
a mileage of eight cents when it is neces- 
sary to use her own car on library 
business. 

March 23, the Supervisors gave their 
approval of the County Librarian's pro- 
posed attendance at the California Li- 
brary Association convention in Gearhart, 
Oregon, June 13 to 15, with the under- 
standing that her traveling expense 
should be paid provided such expense 
could, in the opinion of the District At- 
torney of the county, properly be borne 
by the county. The District Attorney 
expressed his opinion that such expense 
might be paid out of the County Library 
fund. 

Miss Hermine Henze in charge of the 
children's work of the county since Febni- 
ary 1, 1926, has resigned her position to 
accept a secretarial position with the 
Oakland Forum in Oakland. 



134 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 

The staff of the County Library passed 
a delightful afternoon February 22, in the 
foothill home of Monica Shannon, author 
of California Fairy Tales. It was decided 
that with the inspiration of glorious 
scenery added to proven ability we may 
expect Miss Shannon's forthcoming col- 
lection of tales to be even more delightful 
than those which the colorful sombrero is 
now advertising in our bookstores. 

A meeting of the custodians of the 
reading room branches of the County Li- 
brary was held at the County Library 
headquarters January 27. At that time 
a manual for the direction of branch cus- 
todians was disti'ibuted to those in atten- 
dance and became the basis of much of the 
discussion. Luncheon was served in the 
apartment of the County Librarian. 

JNIiss Flower attended the convention of 
the Sixth District at Ontario, March 5. 
Geetchen Flower, Lib'n. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $12,317,844 (taxable 
for county $8,791,604). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Mrs Helen R. Dambacher, Lib'n. 

The County Teachers' Library joined 
the County Free Library in January. 
Brown Adit Camp, Oakdale Portal Camp 
and Pedro Camp Branches were estab- 
lished January 14. All have the same 
post oflSce address, Hetch Hetchy Junction. 
Mrs Helen R. Dambacher, Lib'n. 

At the regular meeting of the Board 
of Supex'visors February 7 and 8, the 
resignation of Miss Muriel Wright as 
County Librarian was accepted and Mrs 
Helen Rowland Dambacher was appointed 
to take her place, the appointment to be 
effective February 13. Miss Wright is 
taking the position of County Librarian of 
Marin County. — Jamestown Magnet, F 9 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $76,888,752 (taxable 
for county $66,571,418). 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

A temporary branch library has been 
established on the edge of the oil fields 
near Foster Park. So successful has it 
been that it will probably become a per- 
manent one in the near future. 

Talks on "Magazines For the Home" 
were given to the Current Topics Club and 
the Wednesday Club. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ventura. 

Ventura [Free] Public Library 
and Branch. Ventura Co. Free 
Library. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, 
Lib'n. 

Mrs .T. Russell Walker gave an exhibi- 
tion of wild flowers. 

Dr S. L. Stuart and Mrs Lena G. 
Stuart pi-esented to the library "Sunset 
Glow, Mount Sliasta, California." Dr 
Stuart also presented as a memorial to his 
wife, "Birch Trees in Maine." These 
pictures are valued at $6500. They were 
painted by James Everett Stuart, a grand- 
son of Gilbex't Stuart. 

Miss Plemon, the Children's Librarian, 
has distributed to the various grades in 
the city, lists of books, for the reading of 
which certificates are granted. She keeps 
a chart in the children's room on which 
are posted the number of certificates 
granted each room. The children take an 
interest in the scores. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

YOLO COUNTY. 

( Thirty-fourth class. ) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $34,138,665 (taxable 
for county $27,427,804). 

Davis. 

*University of California Branch 
OF THE College of Agriculture Library 
AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
W. L. Howard, Director. Miss Nelle U. 
Branch, Lib'n. 

Miss Hyde has been working odd mo- 
ments during the year on our serial files. 
We thought the routine of her work might 
be of interest to others. Published in 
News Notes of California Libraries, the 
article might bring us some assistance in 
filling in our files. 

Nelle U. Branch, Lib'n. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



135 



YOLO CO. — Continued. 
Davis — Continued. 

Frequently we see references to the 
problem of duplicate experiment station 
material. What is to be done with publi- 
cations that are not needed and yet are 
too valuable to destroy? This library has 
spent a lot of time in arranging and weed- 
ing out such material and what we have 
done may be of interest to other libraries. 

For many years our library was main- 
tained under the open shelf system. Peri- 
odicals, U. S. Department of Agriculture 
and experiment station publications were 
left unbound. Consequently, when the 
need of the closed shelf system was realized 
and there was money available for binding 
this material, the files were found almost 
hopelessly incomplete. Many of the earlier 
volumes of the experiment station and U. 
S. Department of Agriculture bulletins 
were bound incomplete. Later, a notice 
was sent to each member of the faculty 
asking that any experiment station publi- 
cations not wanted be sent to the library 
instead of thrown into the waste basket. 
In this way a mass of material Avas 
accumulated, some of which proved most 
valuable in completing our files. Much of 
it, of course, was duplicate material which 
had to be stored until it was decided just 
what was to be done with it. 

In January of this year approximately 
12,000 duplicate publications were returned 
to the state experiment stations from 
which they were published. Before this 
was done the file was carefully checked for 
numbers missing from the main file and 
for numbers to make as complete a dupli- 
cate file as possible. A letter was then 
written to the Director of each station in 
an effort to obtain the still missing num- 
bers. Of 2137 publications requested only 
731 were received. This was probably due 
to the fact that our requests were largely 
for the early out of print u'.mbers. At 
the same time that these were requested, 



YOLO CO. — Continued. 

Davis — Continued. 

we offered to send in exchange, any dupli- 
cates we might have for completing their 
file of experiment station or of U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture material. We 
also stated that we had a number of dupli- 
cates of their own publications and asked 
if they would care to have them returned. 
Of the 49 stations addressed 27 replied, 
only 4 asked for exchanges and only 18 
expressed a desire to have the duplicate 
material returned to them. AH duplicates 
were returned, however. (1) Because we 
discovered that experiment station and U. 
S. Department of Agriculture material 
could be forwarded under our own station 
frank. The law is quoted in U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Circular 251, page 24, 
paragraph 4. (2) Because we were 
greatly in need of the space they were 
occupying and felt that they wei'e too 
valuable to destroy. (3) Because we feel 
that if all duplicate material were returned 
to the station from which it was pub- 
lished, libraries having incomplete files 
would be greatly aided in completing them. 
Merle Hyde, Asst. Lib'n. 



YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $20,214,480 (taxable 
for county $16,702,445). 

Marysville. 

Marysville City [Free Public] 
Library. Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch, Lib'n. 

The Marysville City Library has been 
newly equipped with an indirect lighting 
system which adds greatly to the appear- 
ance and attractiveness of the public read- 
ing room. New lighting fixtures have been 
installed and the old lights have been 
removed. — Marysville Appeal, Mr 27 



136 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 

A. L. A. 

Headquaktees. 

86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and Mending. 

Binding. 

Cooperative Bindery Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futernick Co., 444 Bryant St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington St., Los Angeles, . Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., 

Sacramento. Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord Brcs., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Booi< Cases and Shelving. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 
Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Corrugated Paper Cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 
Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 
Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 
Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 

West 27th St., New York, N. Y. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles', Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributoi-s), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Horn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio, 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 
Stockton, Calif. 



vol. 22, no. 2] directory for library supplies^ etc. 



137 



Book Supports, etc. — Continued. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 
Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5th ave., New 

York City. 
Chivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 
St., Brooklyn, N. T. 
For books in CMvers binding. 

Emporium, 83.5—865 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oakland, 
and 152 Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

H. E. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Levinson's The Book Store, 1012 K St., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church St., 
New York City. 

Newbegir's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parkers Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pumell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif, 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235 Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Technical Book Co., 525 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Handles only technical boots. 

Union Library Association, 118-120 E. 

25th St., New York City, 
^'roman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 



Books — Continued. 

Harr Wagner, 149 New Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant 
ave. and Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. 0. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
E. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray st., New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westermann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 

Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris. 

France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 
149 New Montgomery st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



138 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Books — Continued. 

Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church at. 

New Zork City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N, T. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th st.. New 

York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 

Especially Californiana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th st., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See FuRNiTUEE and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 

H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial st., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles. Calif. 



County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Bums Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies, 

Films. 
For Rent. 
American Red Cross Films, distributed 

by University of California Library, 

Berkeley, Calif. 
Fox Film Corporation, New York, 

N. Y. 
National Producers Film Service, 111 

Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept., 985 Market st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, 1138 Elmwood ave., 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Furniture and Supplies. 
Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 

739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



vol. 22, no. 2] directory for library supplies, etc. 



139 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing Gases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co.j 915 K st., Sae 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st., New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st, 

Stockton, Calif. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Magazines. 
See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 63-5, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth St., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st., New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi-Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
MeKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), .39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Paste. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior. 136 Liberty st.. New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 

Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg., New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave.. New York City, 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 
F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 

Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 
Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 

Square, New York City. 
Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 

North Cohoctcn, N. Y. 
Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 

zer Fldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pacific News Bureau, 643 S. Olive st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



140 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Periodicals — Continued. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 657 Howard 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Steehert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pictures. 
Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 

Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st., 

New York, N. Y. 

(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st, Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf "Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 759 S. Los Angeles 
■ St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Signs. 
Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-.369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 
See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View 

Co. ) , 832 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 

Calif. 
George E. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For California wild flowers, marine life, his- 
toric views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 420 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8th st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los' Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and 611 J st, 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 

University of California School of Li- 
brarianship. For full information write 
to Chairman, School of Librarianship, 
University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

For recent articles concerning library 
schools, see Western Journal of Educa- 
tion, Library News Department, for 
April and May, 1927. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The officers of the American Library 
Association for 1926-27 are as follows : 

Geo. H. Locke, Chief Librarian. 
Toronto Public Library, President. 



vol. 22, no. 2] directory for library supplies, etc. 



141 



Joseph L. Wheeler, Librarian, Enoch 
Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, 1st Vice- 
President. 

Anne M. Mulheron, Librarian, Library 
Association, Portland, 2d Vice-President. 

Carl H. Milam, Chicago, Secretary. 

Edward D. Tweedell, Assistant Li- 
brarian, The John Crerar Library, Chi- 
cago, Treasurer. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

The officei-s of the National Associa- 
tion of State Libraries for 1926-27 are 
as follows : 

Harrison J. Conant, Librarian, Ver- 
mont State Library, Montpelier, Vt., 
President. 

H. R. Mcllwaine, Librarian, Virginia 
State Library, Richmond, Va., Vice- 
President. 

Irma A. Watts, Reference Librarian, 
Pennsylvania Legislative Reference Bu- 
reau, Harrisburg, Pa. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1926-27 are : 

John T. Fitzpatrick, Law Librarian, 
New York State Library, Albany, N. T., 
President. 

J. J. Daley, Librarian, Law Society of 
Upper Canada Library, Toronto, Canada, 
Vice-President. 

Lucile Vernon, New York City Bar 
Association, Secretary-Treasurer. 



LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

The officers of the League of Library 

Commissions for 1927 are : 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian, Cali- 
fornia State Library, Sacramento, Calif., 
President. 

Clarence B. Lester, Sec. Wisconsin 
Library Commission, Madison, Wis., 1st 
Vice-President. 

Fannie C. Rawson, Sec. Kentucky 
Library Commission, Frankfort, Ky., 2d 
Vice-President. 

Clara F. Baldwin, Director of Li- 
brary Division, Minnesota State Depart- 
ment of Education, St. Paul, Minn., Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Pacific Northwest 

Library Association for 1926-27 are : 

Anne M. Mulheron, Library Associa- 
tion, Portland, President. 

Annabel Porter, Seattle, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Helen Johns, Longview, Secretary. 

Effie L. Chapman, Seattle, Treasurer. 



CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library 
Association for 1927 are : 

Northern Section — Elizabeth Patton, 
Garfield Junior High School, Berkeley, 
President. 

Margaret Girdner, High School of 
Commerce, San Francisco, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Southern S e c t i o n — Mrs Bthelwyu 
Laurence, Los Angeles High School, 
President. 

Hope L. Potter, South Pasadena High 
School, Secretary-Treasurer. 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The officers of the Special Libraries 
Association of Southern California for 
1926-27 are: 

Mrs Mary E. Irish, Barlow Medical 
Library, Los Angeles, President. 

.Josephine B. Hollingsworth, Science 
and Industry Department, Los Angeles 
Public Library, Los Angeles, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Lenore Greene, Los Angeles Museum, 
Los Angeles, Secretary-Treasurer. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1926-27 are: 

Bonnie E. Strong, Standard Oil Co., 
San Francisco, President. 

C. H. Judson, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., San Francisco, Vice 
President. 

Margaret Hart, San Francisco Bulletin, 
San Francisco, Secretary-Treasurer. 



142 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officeks. 

President Margaret Girdner 

Vice-President Helen E. Mackay 

Secretary Lois Newman 

Treasurer Joy Jaclison 

Executive board of five consisting of 
the above and ex-president of the preced- 
ing executive board (Anita Crellin). 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
branch of their work. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 
be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a library that fills a posi- 
tion for which it has asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Library at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento, California. 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE. 

Current History, vols. 3-12 inclusive. 
Outlook, vols. 67-79 inclusive. 
■ Review of Reviews, vols. 6-7 inclusive 
and 17-32 inclusive. 
World's Work. vols. 3-9 inclusive. 



Address Miss Margaret E. Livingston, 
Orange County Free Library, Santa Ana, 
Calif. 

FREE TO LIBRARIES. 

A survey of economic research and 
sources of data regarding California ; a 
reference catalog and index, published by 
the California Development Association, 
San Francisco. 

This catalog lists and indexes every 
source of economic statistics regarding 
California, helping to bridge the gap 
between seekers and sources of data. It is 
a summary of information now gathered 
and kept up to date by the Secretary of 
the California Economic Research Coun- 
cil in the Research Department of 
the California Development Association. 
Through the newly formed Council, this 
central oflice now functions as a clearing 
house for more than 150 fact finding or 
research agencies, which are the sources 
of economic statistics and closely allied 
scientific and engineering data regarding 
California. 

A NEW AND USEFUL PAMPHLET. 

The Los Angeles Public Library has 
issued a new pamphlet entitled "Public 
Library Service to Elementary Schools." 
This publication of seventy-two pages 
has very practical and useful information 
under sections such as the following : 
The appreciation hour ; Lessons on the 
use of books and. of libraries ; Enriched 
curricula suggestions ; Reading for cer- 
tificates ; Book Clubs. The price of the 
pamphlet is twenty-five cents. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1925-26) 

Total school districts 3524 

Elementary 3231 

High (456 schools) 293 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $727,154.40 

Total expended for books for high schools $865,354.29 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,697,322 

Total volumes in high schools 3,032,088 



vol. 22, no. 2] California library association. 



143 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Library, Sacramento. 

Vice-President, Mrs. Frances Burns 
Linn, Public Library, Santa Barbara. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sacra- 
mento. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Mrs. J. Wells Smith, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs. Henry Goodcell, Trus- 
tee Public Library, San Bernardino. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 
President, Marian P. Greene, Public 
Library, Alhambra. 

Special Libraries Section. 

Chairman, Margaret Hatch, Standard 
Oil Company Library, San Francisco. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice - President, Secretary - Treasurer and 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Blanche Gallo- 
way, C. E. Graves, Carleton B. Joeckel, 
Susan T. Smith, Mrs Nancy B. Vaughan. 



g — Henry A. Kendall, Public 
Library, Eureka, chairman ; Mabel W. 
Thomas. 

Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 

First District, Robert Rea ; Second 
District, Mrs Elizabeth S. Singletary ; 
Third District, Clara B. Dills; Fourth 
District, Mrs Julia G. Babcock ; Fifth 
District, Bertha S. Taylor; Sixth Dis- 
trict, ; Seventh 

District, C. E. Graves; Eighth District, 
Lenala A. Martin ; Ninth District, Ellen 
B. Frink. 

PuMications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Charles 
S. Greene, Mrs Corinne R. Tracy. 

Resolutions — ^Althea H. Warren, Pub- 
lic Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; Mrs 
Alma J. Danford, Anne Hadden. 



Certification — Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman (1930) ; 
Eleanor Hitt (1927) ; Mrs Theodora R. 
Brewitt (1928), Mary Barmby (1929), 
Susan T. Smith (1931). 

Cooperation ietween the C. L. A. and. 
the California Congress of Parents and 
Teachers — Mrs Charlotte K. Bissell, 
Public Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; 
Marian P. Greene, Wilhelmina Harper, 
Eva Leslie, Mrs. Alice G. Whitbeck. 

J. L. Gillis Memorial — Milton J. 
Ferguson, State Library, Sacramento, 
chairman ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor Hitt. 

Legislative — Cornelia D. Provines, 
County Free Library, Sacramento, chair- 
man ; Herbert V. Clayton, Jeannette M. 
Drake, Marion L. Gregory, Mrs Abbie 
S. Kellogg. 

Lilrary Schools — Sarah E. McCardle, 
County Free Library, Fresno, chairman ; 
John E. Goodwin, Alice N. Hays, El- 
eanor Hitt, Everett R. Perry, Robert 
Rea, Charles F. Woods. 

Membership — Sarah M. Jacobus, Pub- 
lic Library, Pomona, chairman ; 1st 
District, Mrs Marcella H. Krauth ; 2d 
District, Inez M. Crawford ; 3d District, 
Margaret Adelle Barnett ; 4th District, 
Minette L. Stoddard; 5th District, Ida 
E. Condit ; 6th District, Agnes F. Ferris ; 
7th District, Edna D. Davis ; 8th District, 
Anna L. Williams ; 9th District, Ella 
Packer. 

Radio Service — Norah McNeill, Pub- 
lic Library, Richmond, chairman ; Olive 
Burroughs, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

S al art e s — Margaret E. Livingston, 
Orange County Free Library, Santa Ana, 
chairman ; Susan T. Smith, Helen E. 
Vogleson. 

Seamen's Library — Helen M. Bruner, 
Sutro Branch, State Library, San Fran- 
cisco, chairman ; Mary Barmby, Chap- 
lain F. K. Howard, Stella Huntington, 
Caroline Wenzel. 

Jinks — Samuel Levinson, Levinson's 
Book Store, Sacramento, chairman ; 
Marian P. Greene, Bessie B. Silverthorn. 



144 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First and Second Districts. 

President, Mary Barmby, Alameda 
County Free Library, Oakland. 

Vice-President, Edna Holroyd, San 
Mateo County Free Library, Redwood 
City. 

Secretary, Edith M. Coulter, Univer- 
sity of California Library, Berkeley. 

The first district consists of the follow- 
ing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda ( excepting Ala 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity) , Santa Cruz. 

This year, exercising his prerogative to 
designate the territory over which district 
presidents shall preside, the President is 
trying the experiment of one president for 
the combined first and second districts. 

Third District. 

President, Clara B. Dills, Solano 
County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Secretary, Leta L. Hutchinson, Union 
High School District Library, Dixon. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Gretchen L. Flower, Tulare 
County Fi-ee Library, Visalia. 

Secretary Marion L. Gregory, Kings 
County Free Library, Hanford. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District 

President, Bertha S. Taylor, Amador 
County Free Library, Jackson. 

Secretary, Amy L. Boynton, Public 
Library, Lodi. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 



Sixth District. 

President, Willis H. Kerr, Pomona Col- 
lege Library, Claremont. 

Secretary, Marion J. Ewing, Pomona 
College Library, Claremont. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Ida M. Reagan, Humboldt 
County Free Library, Eureka. 

Secretary, Mrs Elizabeth Ripley, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Lenala A. Martin, Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

Secretary, Edith Gantt, Plumas County 
Free Library, Quincy. 

Tbe eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Ellen Frink, Siskiyou Coun- 
ty Free Library, Yreka. 

Secretary, Nellie Dowling, Free Public 
Library, Yreka. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 

First, Second and Third Districts 
Meeting. 

A joint meeting of the First, Second 
and Third Districts of the California 
Library Association was held at the Hotel 
Fairmont, San Francisco, February 19, 
1927. 

The business meeting was called to 
order at 11 :40 o'clock by Miss Mary 
Barmby, president of the First and 
Second Districts. Nominators were elected 
as follows: First District, Robert Rea, 
with Miss Edith M. Coulter as alternate ; 
Second District, Mrs Elizabeth Single^ 
tary, with Florence J. Wbeaton as alter- 
nate ; Third District, Miss Clara B. Dills, 
with Miss Muriel Wright as alternate. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORINIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



145 



Mrs Marcella H. Kranth, chairman of 
the Membership committee for the district, 
reported on the number of C. L. A. 
members in the First District, and urged 
a 100 per cent membership in all libraries. 
Milton J. Ferguson followed with a plea 
for a larger membership in the American 
Library Association. 

Miss Norah McNeill reported on the 
activities of the Radio Service Committee 
in its effort to broadcast book reviews 
from one of the large San Francisco sta- 
tions. She hoped that arrangement could 
yet be perfected. Announcement of the 
plans for a second joint meeting at 
Asiloniar in April was made by the 
chairman. The meeting then adjourned 
for luncheon, which was served in the 
court of the hotel. 

The afternoon session was called to 
order at 2 :30 o'clock by the chairman. 
Harold L. Leupp outlined the bills relat- 
ing to libraries that have been introduced 
at the present session of the California 
legislature. Miss Isabella M. Cooper, 
lecturer in the School of Librarianship, 
University of California, spoke on the 
plan and methods used in the compila- 
tion of the recent edition of the A. L. A. 
catalog, of which she was editor. She 
was followed by Miss Jessie G. Van 
Cleve, specialist in children's literature 
at the headquarters of the American 
Library Association. Miss Vaia Cleve 
spoke of the organization and personnel 
of the staff at headquarters. The asso- 
ciation was fortunate in having these two 
speakers who are identified with the 
national association. 

The evening session was addressed by 
Dr. Benjamin Lehman of the University 
of California on the subject of Instruction 
through books. Dr. Lehman gave a 
stimulatiug talk, suggesting a program for 
the encouragement of good reading. 

Edith M. Coulter, Secretary. 

Third District Meeting. 

The Third District of the California 
Library Association met with the First 
and Second Districts at the Fairmont 
Hotel, San Francisco, February 19, 1927. 
This is the first time that this district 
has officially convened with the Bay 
Districts, 



A fine representation from the Third 
District attended, as well as a number 
of visitors. Among them were Mrs 
Julia G. Babcock of Kern County Free 
Library, Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn of 
Stanislaus County Free Library, Miss 
Olive Ryder of the Public Library, Ames, 
Iowa. Miss Muriel Wright, newly 
appointed librarian of Marin County Free 
Library, was welcomed into the District. 

The members of the Third District 
wish to thank the First and Second Dis- 
tricts for inviting them to join in the 
meetings this year. 

Leta Hutchinson, Secretary. 

Fifth District Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Fifth Dis- 
trict of the California Librai"y Associa- 
tion was held Saturday, March 12, 1927, 
at the Woman's Club House in Lodi. 

The morning session was called to order 
at eleven o'clock by Miss Bertha S. 
Taylor, President of the Fifth District. 
W. H. Thompson, President of the Board 
of Trustees of the Lodi Public Library, 
was introduced and gave a brief address 
of welcome. 

Dr. Tully C. Knoles, President of the 
College of the Pacific, was the speaker of 
the morning, taking as his subject, 
"Whither Russia." He stated that Russia 
is a country of contradictions and 
illustrated his i)oint by many startling 
and interesting situations of which he 
learned first hand during his recent tour 
of Russia. There are thirteen times as 
many peasants as industrial workers in 
lussia, and although these peasants do not 
own the land, they bear the burden of 
taxation by paying high prices for the 
products of the industrial workers. Prices 
of exports and imports are fixed by the 
government, and eighty-nine per cent of 
the industries of the country are carried 
on by the government. In this way the 
government is able to fix the value of 
money and keep it at par. Russia is in 
a period of political transition and it is 
difficult to determine what the outcome 
may be. There are one hundred thirty 
million sons of peasants being taught to 
read and being given military training 
and, according to Dr Knoles, the future 
of Russia is largely in their hands. 



146 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



One o'clock luncheon was served at 
the Hotel Lodi. During the meal, music 
was furnished by an orchestra under the 
leadership of Mrs Helen A. Botts of the 
Lodi Public Library Staff. 

The afternoon meeting opened with a 
brief business session at which Miss Ber- 
tha S. Taylor, Librarian of Amador 
County Free Library, was unanimously 
elected to represent the Fifth District 
on the nominating committee of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association. Miss Amy L. 
Boynton, Librarian of Lodi Public 
Library, was elected alternate. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian 
and President of the California Library 
Association, called attention to the joint 
meeting of the California Library Associa- 
tion and the Pacific Northwest Library 
Association to be held at Gearhart, Ore- 
gon, in June. He said that the inspi- 
rational rather than the mechanical side 
of library work would be stressed at this 
meeting. The plan of the two organiza- 
tions is to meet in the Northwest this 
year and at some time in the near future 
hold another joint meeting somewhere in 
California. Mr Ferguson expressed a 
belief that we are entering a golden era 
of library work. Public appreciation is 
shown as never before by beautiful new 
buildings now being erected. 

Mi--3 Helen A. Botts, Assistant Libra- 
rian of the Lodi Public Library, sang a 
group of songs, "The Flower Song," 
"Trees," and "The Swallows." 

The remainder of the afternoon was 
devoted to the topic, "The Mother Lode," 
under the leadership of Miss Eudora 
Garoutte, head of the California Depart- 
ment of the State Library. Miss Garoutte 
sketched the early history of mining 
along the Mother Lode, showing the devel- 
opment from the first crude form of min- 
ing, each miner panning by himself, 
through the cradle and rocker stage, to 
sluice and flume mining. She showed 
how these changes had a direct bearing 
on the social development of the miner's 
life from a lonely existence, with occa- 
sional sprees at the neai'est settlement, to 
the formation of permanent camps with 
some semblance of law and order. She 
told of the wonderful friendships which 
grew up between "pardners" of those 
early days. At her request Miss Cor- 
nelia D. Provines read the poem, "My 



New Tear's Guest," by Rollin M. Dag- 
get, which carried the audience back to 
the atmosphere of the mining camp. 

Miss Garoutte completed her story by 
telling how more than fifty thousand 
miners swarmed over the Sierras, px'os- 
pecting here and there, resisting all hard- 
ships, until it was finally proved that the 
whole western slope of the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains was gold bearing. The quartz 
vein later named the Mother Lode was 
discovered in 1850. This quartz is to be 
found in an auriferous slate belt extend- 
ing from Mariposa to the northern bound- 
ary of Plumas County. The Mother 
Lode is about one hundred miles long 
and is not only rich in relics of the past, 
but has many natural wonders such as 
caves, natural bridges and big tree groves. 
In conclusion Miss Garoutte told in a 
very charming manner Bret Harte's 
story, "How Santa Claus Came to Simp- 
son's Bar." 

Mrs J. L. Sargent of Jackson, who is 
writing a history of Amador County, gave 
an interesting talk on place names of 
Amador and Calaveras Counties. She 
told how the town of Freezeout was 
renamed lone by a Bulwer-Lytton enthu- 
siast who was reading, "The Last Days 
of Pompeii." Calaveras, according to 
Mrs Sargent, means place of skulls, 
Amador means lover of gold, Lancha 
Plana — flat boat and Buena Vista — 
beautiful view. Pokerville was so named 
on account of numerous poker games 
played there, and Fiddletown derived its 
name from the many fiddlers from Mis- 
souri who settled there. The dogs of 
Dogtown gave it a name. Sutter Creek 
was named for Sutter ; Volcano for an 
extinct volcano in that vicinity ; Butte 
City for a mountain and Murphys after 
a member of the Donner party. Dry- 
town was so named because pay dirt had 
to be carried so far by pack mule before 
there was water enough to wash it. 

Hillard E. Welch, Grand President of 
the Native Sons of the Golden West, 
told of the inspiration of that organi- 
zation in July, 1875, and of its efforts 
to preserve the old traditions and early 
history of California. He tstressed the 
great need of an authentic California 
history covering the early mining activi- 
ties. He suggested as representatives of 



vol. 22, no. 2] califorinia library association. 



147 



California in Statuary Hall, Junipero 
SeiTa and Bret Harte. 

Mrs Henry Warrington of Sutter Creek 
told in an entertaining way the histories 
of some of the large quartz mines from 
which millions of dollars worth of gold 
has been taken. She sketched the history 
of the Lincoln Mine, telling how Leland 
Stanford reluctantly invested in the ven- 
ture which eventually made him a million- 
aire. The interesting story of the Central 
Eureka, or Hetty Green Mine, was also 
told and an amusing incident of how 
Madame Pantaloon saved her claim from 
claim jumpers with pistols and black 
pepper. 

At the close of the session maps of the 
Bret Harte Country showing the old 
place names and maps of the Mother Lode 
Highway were distributed. These were 
furnished by the Stockton Chamber of 
Commerce and the Jackson Chamber of 
Commerce respectively. 

An interesting display of relics of the 
early days of California was arranged in 
the foyer of the clubhouse and attracted 
much attention. 

Amy L. Boynton, Secretary. 

Sixth District Meeting. 

The Sixth District of the California 
Library Association held its annual meet- 
ing in the auditorium of Chaffey Union 
High School and Junior College, Ontario, 
March 5, 1927. Over 500 people were in 
the morning audience. 

The meeting was called to order by the 
President, "Willis H. Kerr, Librarian of 
Pomona College, Claremont. Miss Vinal 
Palmer, of the Chaffey Union High 
School faculty played an organ solo. This 
was followed by two songs by a student 
of the school. 

The President appointed the following 
Committee on resolutions : Mrs Mabel 
Faulkner, Mrs Minnie Maxwell Windle, 
Mrs Margaret Scott. Miss Jacobus spoke 
in behalf of membership in the C. L. A., 
and Miss Althea Warren presented mem- 
bership in the A. L. A. as probably the 
one and only opportunity of helping to 
spend four and one-half million dollars. 

Mr Kerr introduced Milton J. Fergu- 
son, State Librarian and President of the 
C. L. A., who expressed his appreciation 
of being able to attend this meeting and 
of hearing William Allen White speak. 



Mr Ferguson urged the members to save 
their money to go to the annual meeting 
of the Association to be held with the 
Pacific Northwest Library Association at 
Gearhart, Oregon, in June. 

Mrs F. H. Manker, Librarian Upland 
Public Library, introduced Mrs W. H. 
Kerr who talked delightfully on "The 
spirit of the fiftieth anniversary con- 
ference of the A. L. A." 

Mr Kerr introduced William Allen 
White by telling the story of the time 
when Mr White asked for an invitation 
for dinner through his Emporia paper, 
and how he was fortunate enough to get 
to the telephone first and so had the 
pleasure of having Mr White as his guest 
for dinner. 

Mr White in his talk "The librarian, 
a community engineer" spoke of the 
librarian's duty to be a directive force in 
his community. {See "Libraries," April, 
1927, p. 183-4, for a report of Mr White's 
address. ) 

The Resolutions Committee presented 
the ■ following which were unanimously 
adopted : 

We, the members of the Sixth District 
of the California Library Association 
assembled in convention in the city of 
Ontario, appreciating the fine hospitality 
and enthusiastic welcome prepared for us 
by the people of Ontario do hereby 
resolve : 

That an expression of our gratitude be 
extended to the faculty of Chaffey Union 
High School and Junior College for the 
use and accommodation of their spacious 
auditorium ; 

That we extend our thanks to the mem- 
bers of the San Antonio Library Club 
for their gracious hospitality and to Miss 
Lillian Graves of the Home Economics 
Department for the delicious and bounti- 
ful luncheon ; 

That we express our appreciation to 
the President of the Sixth District and 
his officers who were resiwnsible for the 
unusual and splendid program, to the 
State Librarian for his loyal cooperation 
and interest, and to those other mem- 
bers and guests who are contributing to 
the day's enjoyment and satisfaction. 
Especially do we wish to mention our 
illustrious guest, William Allen White, 
of Emporia, Kansas ; Leslie Hood of 
Pasadena who is responsible for giving 
us the opportunity to hear our visiting 
authors ; Earle B. Blakeslee, for arrang- 
ing the music ; and J. S. Armstrong of 
the Ontario Library B'Oard for beautiful 
flowers. 

The luncheon, served to 342 guests, was 
a most delightful affair. Mr Kerr, act- 



148 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



ing as toast-master, called upon Leslie 
Hood, of Yroman's Book Store in Pasa- 
dena, to introduce bis galaxy of authors. 
In a very witty speech, Earl Derr Big- 
gers, best known as author of "Seven 
Keys to Baldpate," in defense of mystery 
and detective stories referred to Shakes- 
peare and other classic writers who used 
murder and sudden death in their writ- 
ings. Mrs Grace Purdie Moon, author of 
"Chi Wee" and other stories for children, 
spoke in a charming manner of her belief 
in giving the children of today a better 
understanding and sympathy with the 
Indians and of the influence of books 
upon children. Carl Moon reminded his 
readers that such writers as Stevenson 
and Kipling had made their reputations 
on their books for juveniles. He recom- 
mended to librarians that they urge par- 
ents to read aloud to their children as the 
most effective method of weeding out and 
eliminating the unsuitable and medioci'e 
in children's books, as well as giving 
children the correct pronunciation of 
words. 

The four round-table discussions 
groups that gathered in the various rooms 
and buildings of Chaff ey Union High 
School were well attended and created 
much interest. The College and Refer- 
ence Section under the leadership of Miss 
Charlotte Brown, Librarian of University 



of Southern California, devoted its time 
to the subject of how, where and when 
to get reference material. The slogan, 
"Catch your history on the hoof" pre- 
sented by Miss Laura C. Cooley of the 
California Historical Department of the 
Los Angeles Public Library, and "One 
jump ahead of the public" as presented 
by Miss Irma Walker, Reference Libra- 
rian of the Long Beach Public Library, 
will be remembered gratefully by refer- 
ence librarians. 

Miss Minnie A. Lewis, Head of the 
Catalog Department of the Riverside 
Public Library, conducted the section 
on Catalog problems where methods of 
simplifying cataloging were discussed. 

Miss Fay Tunison, Head of the Circula- 
tion Department of the Long Beach Pub- 
lic Library, was the leader in the section 
on Circulation Department problems. The 
best methods of bringing the best reading 
material to the attention of the public 
were discussed and many helpful sugges- 
tions given. 

Under the leadership of Miss Eva 
Leslie, Head of the Department of Chil- 
dren's Work of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, school and children's librarians 
discussed the selection of children's books 
arid also the problems of school libraries. 

Marion J. Ewing, Secretary. 



vol. 22, no. 2] California county librarians. 



149 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Milton J. Ferguson, Ex-officio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano County. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS 
CONVENTION. 

The next County Librarians Conven- 
tion will be held at the same time and 
place as the joint meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association and the Pacific 
Northwest Library Association — Gear- 
hart, Oregon, June 13-15, 1927. 

The special county librai"y program 
will be given Monday night, June 13, 
when the California County Librarians 
will conduct the general session of the 
joint meeting. The program will be as 
follows : 

The California County Library system 
as exemplified in : 

1. A big county library 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Kern County 

2. A middle sized county library Miss 

Minette L. Stoddard, Merced County 

3. A small county library Miss 

Lenala A. Martin, Lassen County 

4. Binding the parts together Miss 

Eleanor Hitt, San Diego County 

A MANUAL FOR CUSTODIANS. 

The Tulare County Free Library has 
issued an interesting document — a manual 
for its branch custodians. It gives careful 
and definite instructions to meet all situ- 
ations. While the procedure would not 



be the same in all counties, this manual 
would be valuable to anyone wishing to 
compile a set of rules or suggestions to 
her own custodians. The copy on file at 
the State Library will be lent on appli- 
cation. 

LIBRARY REVIEW. 

Library Review, a popular magazine 
on libraries and literature, has just 
appeared in England. It is edited by 
Robert D. Macleod whose book. County 
rural libraries, issued in 1923, gives such 
a clear view of county library work in 
Great Britain. 

In his editorial notes Mr Macleod says, 
"It (Library Review) will view library 
work as social educational work of the 
highest importance and will endeavour 
to express its spirit and aims to all inter- 
ested in books and their message. Its 
concern will be with county libraries, 
which have some ten thousand centres, 
and with libraries working in coopera- 
tion with them. The field is a wide one." 

The first number contains the following 
special articles, besides book lists and 
brief notes of recent happenings : The , 
boy in the library, by George Blake; 
Blazing trails, by Milton J. Ferguson ; 
A national book pool, by Luxmoore 
Newcombe ; Interest at a local centre, by 
a country teacher ; The county library 
circle, by Alfred Ogilvie. 

I believe that this periodical, covering 
as it does county library work in many 
ways similar to our own, will be of inter- 
est and value to all California county 
libraries and many municipal libraries as 
well. 

Library Review will be issued quarterly 
and the annual subscription is 4s post 
free at home or abroad. The address is 
47 Pitcairn street, Brucefield, Dunferm- 
line, Scotland. 



4—51527 



150 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1527 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
accounts of meetings of the various 
library clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION, 

NORTHERN SECTION. 

The Northern Section of the Cali- 
fornia School Library Association met 
with the Library Section of the Cali- 
fornia Teachers' Association, Bay Sec- 
tion, December 14, 1926, in the attrac- 
tive new library of the San Francisco 
High School of Commerce, Miss Eliza- 
beth Patton presiding. 

The first part of the business meeting 
was devoted to finishing the details of 
the previous year's work. The amend- 
ments to the constitution as suggested by 
the Southern Section were discussed and 
a committee was appointed to consider the 
advisability of adopting these amend- 
ments. The following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year : Miss Elizabeth 
Patton, Garfield Junior High School, 
Berkeley, President, and Miss Margaret 
Girdner, tligh School of Commerce, San 
Francisco, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Following the business meeting, Mrs 
Elizabeth Madison, Director of School 
Libraries, Oakland, whose leadership 
has long been the inspiration for the 
work of the Northern Section, gave an 
interesting history of the Association and 
outlined possible avenues of usefulness for 
the future. 

Professor Willard Smith of Mills Col- 
lege, the speaker of the morning, deliv- 
ered a valuable and stimulating address 
on the "Old and the New in Recent 
Fiction." 

The group met at the Hotel Whitcomb 
for luncheon. The afternoon session 
was devoted to a round table discussion 
of "Problems the School Librarians must 
Solve," ably led by Miss Girdner. The 
aims as presented by Miss Gii"dner were 
adopted by vote of the membership for 
the program of the coming year. The fol- 
lowing committees were appointed : Com- 



mittee on Standards of library instruction. 
Professional Study committee, commit- 
tee on the Junior College, and a com- 
mittee "to study the aims and objectives 
of the school library in terms of the new 
pedagogy." These committees are to 
report on the progress of their work at 
the next meeting. 

The meeting adjourned after an enthu- 
siastic discussion of many problems with 
a vote to hold a meeting in the spring. 
Helen Hathaway White, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

ORANGE COUNTY LIBRARY CLUB. 

The Orange County Library Club met 
March 12, in the Ebell Club House, 
Santa Ana, with Miss Margaret Living- 
ston as hostess. The meeting was called 
to order by the President, Mrs Ethelene 
Kitching, who conducted a short business 
session. 

Miss Elizabeth Calnon, chairman of the 
Program Committee, took charge of the 
program, introducing the subject, "Chil- 
dren's Work and Vacation Reading 
Clubs." Speakers were Mrs Helen Nelson, 
Librarian of the Fullerton Elementary 
School, Miss Schell Morgan, Children's 
Librarian of the Whittier Public Library 
and Miss Mary Campbell, Children's* 
Librarian of the Fullerton Public Library. 
Mrs Carpenter led an interesting discus- 
sion on pictures, picture mounting, post- 
ers and visual education. Delightful 
music was furnished by Misses Bruner 
and Waltman of the Santa Ana High 
School. 

At 12.30 luncheon was served to thirty- 
five members and guests. 

Election of officers resulted in the 
choice of Miss Margaret Livingston for 
President and Mrs Helen Nelson for 
Secretary-Treasurer. . 

The next meeting will be in the Placen- 
tia Public Library in April. 

The previous meeting was held Decem- 
ber 4 in the Whittier High School Li- 
brary, with Miss Jessie Harris of the 
High School Library and Miss Ruth Ellis 
of the Public Library as hostesses. There 
was presented an interesting and helpful 
program, the subject being the eoopera- 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



LIBRARY CLUBSj ETC. 



151 



tion between the public librarian and 
the school librarian and between the pub- 
lic librarian and the teacher. 

Cabbie Sheppaed, Secretary. 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The program for the meeting of Decem- 
ber 10 consisted of a visit to the Hunting- 
ton Library, by the invitation of the 
Librarian, Mr Leslie Edgar Bliss. Our 
a'ssociation turned out in full force to 
get a glimpse of some of the treasures of 
this far-famed and most exclusive librai^y. 
Between 30 and 3.5 of us reached the 
Huntington estate promptly at 8 o'clock, 
the appointed hour, some of us after a 
little involuntary meandering through the 
grounds of other private residences in 
the neighborhood. After being kindly 
received by Mr Bliss and some of his 
staff, we were escorted through some of 
the book stacks, where we peered long- 
ingly through glass doors at the backs 
or cases of serried rows of treasures. 
Then, returning to the main hall or read- 
ing-room, we spent a fascinating and 
delightful hour examining the incunabula 
displayed in glass cases — the Gutenberg 
Bible, Caxton's earliest printed book and 
many others equally interesting, besides 
manuscripts and illuminations. There 
were also wonderful old globes and maps, 
historical American portraits and framed 
newspapers and broadsides of interesting 
Americans. The view from the ten-ace 
and the vista of the snoAV mountains 
through the broad avenue of trees as we 
left the building are also features of the 
visit long to be remembered. 

After a short ride in the dusk through 
various parts of Pasadena, 25 of us met 
for dinner at the Rose Tree Tea House, 
where we enjoyed a delicious meal in most 
attractive surroundings. When ice cream 
and coffee were finally disposed of, our 
President called us to order and a short 
business meeting was held. 

The advisability of paying dues to the 
national organization, instead of to our 
local association, and having them take 
care of our expenses was discussed. It 
was thought this might be done, provided 
they guaranteed us one dollar per mem- 
ber, thus equalling our present assets, 
but no definite conclusion was reached. 



Miss Carrick gave an interesting sketch 
of the work done by the bindery depart- 
ment of the Los Angeles Public Library 
and gave us a cordial invitation to visit 
it at any time. A letter was read from 
Mr Worthington of the Special Library 
Association of San Francisco asking 
many questions in regard to the Union 
List of Periodicals, in order to get useful 
information to help in the proposed Union 
List of San Francisco and vicinity. Mr 
Marion proposed that we plan for a 
future meeting with some of the local 
statistical organizations. 

On Friday, January 14, fifteen mem- 
bers of the Special Libraries Association 
of Southern California met at the 
Chateau Cafe at six o'clock for dinner, 
afterwards proceeding, by Miss Frey's 
invitation, to the offices of the Western 
Precipitation Co. for their regular meet- 
ing, where an exceptionally interesting 
evening was passed. 

The visit began with a tour of inspec- 
tion through the offices, workshops and 
laboratories which surround a charming 
little Japanese garden, with pools, shrub- 
bery and palms — a most delightful spot. 
The ateliers, with all their complicated 
apparatus, looked very mysterious to the 
eyes of the ignorant and uninitiated, but 
gave the first inkling of the importance 
and magnitude of the unusual work done 
by this interesting corporation. 

Next came our usual business meeting 
with about 20 members present. The 
topic for discussion was membership in 
the national Special Libraries Association. 
It was moved that we unite with the 
national body and a vote was taken 
approving this consolidation, "with reser- 
vations." 

A letter from Miss Vormelker, Secre- 
tary of the Special Libraries Association, 
asked that a member of our organization 
be appointed to their membership commit- 
tee and it was moved that our president 
make this appointment. 

These matters being settled, Mrs 
Thompson, Chairman of the Committee 
on Methods, introduced the subject of 
translations and translators in the local 
field. It was brought out that lists of 
translators with their specialties in lan- 
guages and 'Subjects were available in 
various departments of the Los Angeles 
Public Library and in the Chamber of 



152 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEAEIES. [April, 1927 



Commerce Research Department. It was 
suggested that it would be a useful piece 
of work to combine these various lists and 
Mr Marion and Miss Hollingsworth are 
to take action in the matter and see that 
the revised lists are made available in both 
places. 

Mr Vandegrift was instructed to send a 
telegram with Miss Greene's signature 
to Senator Johnson, regarding distribu- 
tion of public documents to libraries. 

Miss Frey then introduced Mr Schmidt 
of the Western Precipitation Co., who 
gave us a delightfully informal talk on 
the work they are doing, explaining the 
Cottrell Process and showing us photo- 
gx-aphs of the different apparatus and 
installations and exhibiting jars and tubes 
containing the precipitations obtained 
from smoke and dust — all sorts of ele- 
ments in vinbelievable quantities — ^lead, 
copper, acids, tons of which were lost 
in the smoke from mills and smelters, 
causing great economic loss and doing 
great injury to the surrounding country, 
before the perfecting of this wonderful 
process. 

Mr Vandegrift then gave us an inter- 
esting account of his recent visit to Phila- 
delphia and New York and the special 
libraries there, dwelling particularly on 
the methods employed by the National 
Industrial Conference Board in New 
York. 

Lenoee Greene, Secretary. 

SAN ANTONIO LITERARY CLUB. 

Upland Public Library was chosen as 
the meeting place of San Antonio Library 
Club in January, with Willis H. Kerr, 
Librarian of Pomona College Library, 
Claremont, in the chair. Dr F. H. 
Pritchard, of Colton, who owns a most 



wonderful private library, gave a most 
instructive talk on old books. He 
brought with him many valuable volumes 
which the club members were allowed to 
handle. Dr Pritchard is in reality a 
linguist, having taken up the study of 
languages in his young manhood while 
waiting for patients. He said there were 
no picture shows in the early days, no 
automobiles, or places of amusement, in 
which to kill time as there are now, and 
so in self defense he took up the study 
of languages. 

Prior to Dr Pritchard's talk, each 
librarian was given an opportunity to tell 
of any important happening, or thing, at 
her library. Splendid sets of books, or 
valuable single volumes, were told of ; 
the effort of Chaffey, Ontario and Upland 
Libraries, to work out a plan of coopera- 
tion, which was to have a copy of the 
shelf cards in each other's libraries ; a 
new building for Claremont Branch of 
Los Angeles County Free Library ; con- 
viction of a boy for stealing books in 
Pomona ; Athey shades at all windows, 
covering the floor with linoleum, metal 
book truck, and adjustable metal type- 
writer stand, at the Upland Public; 
Misses Thelma and Elma Clarke told of 
their first years' experience with the 
Pomona Junior High School Library ; 
Wolcott's second volume of flowers, recent- 
ly added to Pomona College Library and 
a map of California as an island. 

The coming Sixth District meeting of 
the California Library Association at 
Chaffey Library, Ontario, was the subject 
of discussion, as San Antonio Library 
Club will act as host at that meeting, 
the date having been set for March 5, 
at 10 o'clock. 

Mes F. H. Mankeb, Secretary. 



vol. 22, no. 2] board of library examiners^ California. 



153 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he has received from the 
board of library examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

There has been no meeting of the Board 
this quarter. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Lila (Dobell), Ln. Trinity 

County Free Library, Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 

City. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfleld. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, Bvalyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, El Centro. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Yuba City. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Lange Library of 

Education, Berkeley. 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

E. Dalton, Asst. University of California 

Library, Berkeley. 



Dambacher, Mrs Helen (Rowland), Mrs 

Gustav Dambacher, Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonora. 
Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
English, Gladys, Ln. A. L. A. Head- 
quarters, 86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 

111. 
Ferguson, K. Dorothy, Ln. Bank of Italy 

Library, San Francisco. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State" Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Frazier, Hubert B., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Frink, Ellen B., Ln. Siskiyou County Free 

Library, Yreka. 
Fuller, Mrs Melissa, Asst. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera. 
Gantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo County 

F'ree Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

E'ree Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 
Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 

Library and Kings County Free Library, 

Hanford. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Harris, Mary W., Asst. Louisiana Library 

Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. 
Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Jose. 
Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 

Library, Los Angeles. 
Kitching, Mrs Ethelene M., Ln. Fullerton 

High School Library, Fullerton. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 

Dara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa 

Barbara. 
Livingston, Margaret B., Ln. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 



154 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 
Library, Independence. 

Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 
Free Library, Susanville. 

Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 

Morse, Marion, Ln. Maui County Free 
Library, Wailuku, T. H. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Packer, Ella, Ln. Colusa County Free 
Library, Colusa. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, "Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Stockebrand, Frances, Asst. Merced 
County Free Library, Merced. 

Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 
Free Library, Merced. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 
Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Asst. Ln. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 
County Free Library, Hollister. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 
Free Library, Santa Ana. 

Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 
Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 

Wright, Muriel, Ln. Marin County Free 
Library, San Rafael. 

Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 



At Present Out of Library Work. 

Burrell, Mrs Marjorie (Chilberg), Mrs 

Elmer Edward Burrell. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita. . 
Gleason, Celia. 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James White Herrman. 
Huntington, Stella. 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Parkinson, H. O. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 



COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold office of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was published in News Notes of 
California Libraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California Libraries, January, 1914. 
This has been reprinted as a pamphlet. 
The fifth edition was issued December, 
1921. (Circular of information only.) 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
1925. Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The next examination will be held at 
the Public Library, Los Angeles, May 27, 
and at the State Library, Sacramento, 
June 8, 1927. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the Chairman 
of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



155 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1925-27, .$253,490. 

Total accessions 269.336 (less 3461 
lost and discarded = 265,875) exclusive of 
20,280 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton .1. Feri^ison, Librarian. 

Mabel H. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V. Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Budora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .J. Haines. Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Dora M. Himmelsbach, in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc.. Department. 

Beulah Mumm, Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Evelyn L. Cooper, Assistant. 

Dorothy Deming, Assistant. 

Margaret Dennison, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite "Walker Duggins, Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate M. Foley. Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st., San Francisco. 

Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon, Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill. Assistant, 

Mrs Alicia Manning Hook, Assistant. 

Mrs Dorothy Puffer Isaacs, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look, Assistant. 

Anna G, McNamee. Assistant. Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

D. Florence Moutfort, Assistant. 

Catharine J. Mor'rison. Home Teacher 
of the Blind, 951 S. Kenmore ave,, Los 
Angeles. 



Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, 
Assistant. 

Irene E. Ryan, Assistant. 

Irma M, Schoepflin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Mrs Frances L. Smith, Stenographer. 

Lily M. Tilden. Assistant, 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy, Assistant. 

June Vladyka, Assistant, 

Mrs .Julia M, Waldron, Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel, Assistant, 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

Emma F. de Merritt, Book Repairer, 

May H, Kleeberger, Book Repairer. 

Wm, G, Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk, 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
ping Clerk, 

.John Heinrich, Messenger (temporary). 

Lois Little, Messenger. 

Vera Palermo, Messenger. 

xlrthur Valine, Messenger. 

J. L, Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Harry A Simons, Elevator Operator, 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Miss Annie Lowry, who had been a 
member of the State Library staff since 
1904, completed a six-months' leave of 
absence in February and decided to- 
resign. Miss Lowry was an enthusiastic 
and loyal librarian whom we are very 
sorry to lose. She is living at 105 Palm 
avenue, San Francisco, Miss Dora M. 
Himmelsbach, who took Miss Lowry's 
place during her leave of absence, has 
been continued in that work. 

Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, 
California State Library School '15, 
joined the staff January 11, having been 
appointed to a position in the Catalog 
Department, Miss Katherine Stites 
resigned February 1.5 to accept a position 
as assistant in the County Library 
Department of the Public Library at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, Mrs Jeannette 
Cyr Stern resigned on March 1.5 to accept 
the position of Acting Librarian of the 
United States Forest Service Library in 
San Francisco. She was succeeded at the 
Loan Desk by Miss Dorothy Deming, 
University of California Library School, 
'21, who began work on March T. Mi?s 
May H. Kleeberger, formerly of the 
Fresno County Free Library, became a 



156 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



member of the Book Repair staff on 
January 5. Tevis Edwards, formerly an 
employee of the Library, is working 
evenings in our Law Department during 
the Legislature. John Heinrich began as 
temporary messenger on January 11, extra 
help being necessary during the Legisla- 
tive session. Ernest Millert was employed 
as temporary assistant to sort material 
stored in the new State Library building 
from January to February 11. 

Miss Alicia W. Manning was married 
on February 19 to Mr James Stanley 
Hook. Mrs Hook is continuing her work 
at the Library. 

Mr Ferguson attended the meeting of 
Custodians of Glenn County on February 
2. All those attending the meeting were 
entertained at luncheon by the Kiwanis 
Club of Willows. Mr Ferguson spoke at 
the luncheon session. On February 9 he 
spoke at the Sacramento Kiwanis Club 
on The growth and work of the library 
system of California. Mr Ferguson spoke 
at the joint meeting of the First, Second 
and Third Districts of the California 
Library Association at San Francisco 
February 19, and at the 20-30 Club of 
Sacramento on the Life of Washington on 
February 21. He went south for the Sixth 
District meeting at Ontario where he 
spoke on March 5, and on March 7 made 
the address at the dedication of the new 
library building at Placentia. 

Mr Ferguson and Miss Garoutte spoke 
at the meeting of the Fifth District, 
C. L. A., at Lodi on March 12. Miss 
Garoutte's subject was The Mother Lode. 
Other members of the staff who attended 
this meeting were Mrs Henshall, Miss 
Mumm, Miss Clark and Miss Look. 

Miss Haines attended the meeting of 
the First, Second and Third Districts 
of the C. L. A. at San Francisco Febru- 
ary 19. Miss Gillis spoke at the Napa 
Business and Professional Women's Club 
on March 14 on the State Library with 
special emphasis on the California 
Department. 

A son was born to Mr and Mrs Herbert 
Y. Clayton on March 27, 1927. 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

The students in the School of Libra- 
rianship, University of California, visited 
Sacramento March 22. They were con- 
ducted through the County Library, the 



City Library, the State Library and the 
new State Librai-y and Courts building. 
The Library issued as usual a "Hand- 
book of Information for the use of the 
Members of the California Legislature." 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the United States. Great Britain. Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer, or if. 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp. 193 and 198. 

Copies of 33 California State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during January, February and 
March, 1927. 

Agriculture Department. Monthly Bulle- 
tin, vol. 16, nos. 1-3. 

Controller. Biennial report, 1924-26. 

Corporation Department. Corporate 
securities act, 1925. 

Fish and Game Commission. Biennial 
report, 3924-26. 

California fish and game, vol. 13, 



no, 1, 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



157 



Governor. Budget message and sum- 
marization of budget. 1927. 

Health Board. Biennial report, 1924-26. 

Highway Comm. Biennial report, 1924- 
26. 

California highways, *u)]. 4, nos. 

1-3. 

Hydraulic Mining Comm. Report on 

resumption of hydraulic mining. 1927. 
Immigration and Housing Comm. Report, 

1927. 
Institutions Dept. Biennial report, 1924- 

26. 
Insurance Dept. Insurance brokers. 

1927. 
Judicial Council. Report, 1927. 
Legislative Counsel Bur. Legal notices. 

1926. 
Legislature. Report of Joint Committee 

for intensive study of water resources 

of California, 1927. 
Medical Examiners Bd. Report, 1927. 
Public Instruction. Biennial report, 

1924-26. 

Same. Section 1. 

Public Works Dept. Sacramento flood con- 
trol project. 1927. 

— Engineering and Irrigation Div. 

Bulletin nos. 11-12. 

Water Bights Div. Bulletin 



no. 5. 

Railroad Comm. Report, 1926. 

Surve.vor General. Biennial report, 1924- 
26. 

Teachers College, San Diego. Educa- 
tional quarterly bulletin, vol. 15, no. 1. 

Teachers College, San Francisco. Sum- 
mer session, 1927. 

Teachers College, San Jose. Bulletin 
vol. 6, no. 2. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of 
the librarian, and to any other educa- 
tional institution on request of its official 
head or its librarian ; to individuals 
through the signature of a state officer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the official head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit ; to a club on request of its presi- 
ident, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

Since the close of the legislative ses- 
sion has made magazines again available 
for circulation there are a few suggestions 
to be made in regard to requests/tt should 
be an unfailing practice when asking for 
a magazine to give the complete reference 
— author and title of the article, and 
volume number, date and paging of the 
magazine. 

There are several reasons for this rul- 
ing. Unfortunately one reason is that 



very frequently there is a mistake in some 
part of the reference. With the complete 
information given, the exact reference can 
be located through the periodical guides. 
Another reason is that the desired article 
may have been included in our camera- 
graph collection. Sometimes in case of a 
■series of articles, the exact matter has 
been published in book form. If the arti- 
cle is very short, a typed copy may be 
sent instead of the volume. 

It is needless to say that it is unde- 
sirable to send out a bound volume if the 
need can be filled another way. The 
volume might be needed here for a number 
of items ; transportation is hard on heavy 
volumes, and it is difficult to replace old 
magazines in case of loss. It is urged, 
therefore, that in addition to giving the 
full and exact reference, you allow us, 
whenever possible, to substitute other 
material. -^ 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge. 

During January, February and March, 
1305 books and 30 prints were acces- 
sioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During January, February and March, 
984 books were cataloged and 6018 cards 
were added to the file. 26,114 cards were 
filed in the Union Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDORA Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and description, 
resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioneers and early settlers are 
being secured, together with their photo- 
graphs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about 10,000 bound volumes 
of newspapers', a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
their work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Of the many cards received there is 
one that needs special mention, that of 



158 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



William Alexander Trubody, a pioneer 
who is still living. He came overland, 
reaching Sutter's Fort September 30, 
1S47. Mr Trubody is a resident of Napa 
and has served the county as supervisor 
and treasurer. 

We are again indebted to Mrs George 
Finkbohner of Stockton for the cards of a 
number of San Joaquin county pioneers 
and early settlers. They are as follows : 

Attwood, Elijah Whiting 1849 

Blossom, Andrew Clark 1849 

Croftou, John 1852 

Cutting, I-ewis Morrison 1852 

Davis, Stephen Henry 1850 

Dodge, Jonathan Holt 18-50 

Eckel, Henrv 1852 

Fairchild, William Heister 1847 

Fickett, Stillnaan Hardy 1849 

Firebaugh, Andrew Davidson 1849 

Fuller, Jerome Bonaparte 1850 

GaUup, Byron 1849 

Greenlaw. Alonzo Starret 1854 

Hale. Joseph 1850 

Howell, William Larken 1850 

Kerrick. James W 1853 

Ketcham, Thomas Edmund 1848 

Kile. Joseph 1849 

Locke, Dean Jewett 1849 

McPherson, Daniel Robert 1857 

Neumiller, Christian 1858 

Parker, Dominicus 1849 

Sedgwick. Thomas 1849 

Smith. George Falkenborough 1849 

Thresher, Minord Sprague 1849 

West, George 1850 

Wolf. Andrew 1849 

Wright. Arch Bishop 1853 

Yost, Frederick 1849 

Other cards received are as follows : 

Cullers. Annie Maria 1854 

Desmond, Felix P. 1854 

Giles. Jesse Howard 1849 

Heger. Dr Anthony 1,8.50 

Peters, Mary Virginia 1852 

Tavlor, Edward Fvffe 1855 

Tuchsen. Henrv H. 1849 

Witt. Mr and Mrs John Weslev_ 1859 



California Authors. 

The following author car'ds have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 

Bowen, William Alvin 
*Bnckley, Nancy 
Burnham, Fred Russell 
Neuhaus. Eugen 
Newman, Louis Israel 
Peterson, Mrs Alice (Onions) 

Mrs G. N. Peterson 
Rorty, James 
Silvers. Earl Reed 
Wing, Mrs Monica (Shannon) 
Mrs Elbert Wing 



California Musicians. 
The following musician card has been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries: 

Blake, Arthur Charles 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 

Copeland, William 
*Leovy, Mrs Katherine (Barbour) 
Mre Joseph Henry Leovy 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

528 cards have been added to the Cali- 
fornia catalog during the last quarter. 

Exhibit. 

An interesting exhibit of early Cali- 
fornia material is still maintained in the 
rotunda of the Capitol. 

DEPARTMENT. 
BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
rial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
Tork point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrowers wishing them for use 
In book selection. 

A catalog of all books in Moon 
type in the Library up to October 1, 1926, 
has been printed. 

The State' Library wiH be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 2538 blind bor- 
rowers, .53 borrowers having been added 
during January, February and March. 



* Native Californians. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALirORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



159 



Total accessions are 20,280, as follows : 
New York point books 2666 ; New York 
point music 186 ; American Braille books 
3034 ; American Braille music 1288 ; 
European Braille books 3335 ; European 
Braille music 237 ; Esperanto Braille 
books 3 ; Moon books 4775 ; Moon music 
5 ; Revised Braille books 3769 ; Revised 
Braille music 128 ; Standard dot books 
14 ; Line books 193 ; Line music 21 ; Ink 
print books 460 ; *Appliances 84 ; *Games 
50 ; Maps 32. 

During January, February and March 
8935 books, etc., were loaned as fol- 
lows : New York point 463 ; American 
Braille 134; European Braille 933; Moon 
3675; Revised Braille Grade U 3715; 
Ink print ; Appliances 13 ; Games 2 ; 
Maps 0. The loans were divided by class 
as follows : Philosophy and religion 528 
sociology 66 ; language 25 ; primers 75 
science 71 ; useful arts 24 ; fine arts 1 
amusements 7 ; music 19 ; literature 92 
fiction 6164 ; travel and history 385 
biography 276 ; periodicals 1202. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by Mrs F. 
A. Bacher, F. B. Beans, Mrs H. W. 
Bruning, Mrs A. H. Clise, Anna Courtois, 
Everett B. Deckard, Kate M. Foley, 
Dr E. M. Gebhardt, J. W. Hoggard, 
Ruby Holtz, .J. R. Lewarton, Bessie Long, 
Mrs Rose McComb, W. A. Miller, Mrs 
A. M. Moses, Hattie B. Newman, Mrs 
M. E. Phillips, Mrs L. Sargent, Erastus 
Savage, George W. Shoemaker, Mrs M. 
Springer, John B. Walker, Margaret 
Wherity, American Braille Press for 
War and Civilian Blind, Inc., Ameri- 
can Printing House for the Blind, Cana- 
dian National "Institute for the Blind, 
Christian Record Publishing Company, 
Christian Science Publishing Company, 
Gospel Trumpet Company, Michigan 
School for the Blind, National Institute 
for the Blind, New Y^ork Association for 
the Blind, Society for Aid of the Sightless, 
Western Pennsylvania School for the 
Blind, Xavier Braille Publishing Com- 
pany, Ziegler Publishing Company. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. 
See p. 199. 



♦Appliances and games are loaned as 
,sample§ to anyone wishing to try them, 



Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 
blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 146 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine J. Morrison, home teacher of 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall of 
Records, every Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los An- 
geles. Her telephone number is Drexel 
5339. She gives lessons regularly in Los 
Angeles and vicinity and makes occa- 
sional trips to San Diego. 

From January 1 to March 31, the 
home teachers gave 741 lessons in the 
homes of the blind and 27 lessons at li- 
braries. They made 108 visits and calls 
in connection with the work for purposes 
other than giving lessons, and have re- 
ceived 16 visits in connection with the 
work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 27.5 hours on corre- 
spondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 408 letters and 143 postals and, 
received 297 letters and 24 postals. They 
also answered and made 601 telephone 
calls. They made one address. Miss 
Foley teaches regularly in Oakland, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
15 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Sutro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Library, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner, '15 

Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles 
Thelma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J. 
Helen "V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fairview ave., Los Gatos 
Agnes B. Brown, '15 

Asst. San Diego High School L., Sg,n 

Diego 



160 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Branch, State L., 

San Francisco 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buchan), '20 

1631 Cowper St., Palo Alto 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 

1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
Ruth E. Bullock, '15 

Ln. Belvedere Junior High School L., 

L.OS Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. Of Cal. L., Berkeley- 
Blanche Chalfant, '14 

Ln. Butte Co. F. L., Oroville 
Marguerite Chatfleld, '20 

349 East California st., Pasadena 
Nellie E. Christensen, '19 

Ln. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Lange Library of Education, Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High School 

L., Watsonville 
Dorotha I>avis, '17 

Ln. Fresno High -School L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernardi, '18 

iSmith College, Northampton, Mass. 
Estella De Ford, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829 J S. Normandie st., Los Angeles 
Ellen B. Frink, '19 

Ln. Siskiyou Co. F. L., Yreka 
Flo A. Gantz, '20 

Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., San 

Luis Obispo 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sacramento 
Margaret V. Girdner, '17 

Ln. High School of Commerce, San 

Francisco. 
Mary E. Glock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Bernice L. Goff, '14 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 

746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H Hargis), '18 

725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Frank 
U. Harriss), '15 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Margaret Hatch, "15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner), '18 

152 8 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd), '20 

Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 

1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Or ton A. Kirschman). '19 

2839 Forest ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Iver 
N. Lawson, Jr.), '18 

3231 Front st., San Diego 



Marjorie C. Learned, '20 

Asst. P. L,, New York City 
Mrs M. Ruth McLaughlin Lockwood (Mrs 
Ralph L. Lockwood), '17 

1520 Greenwich st., San Francisco 
Amy G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea), '19 

3417 42d St., Sacramento 
N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy F. 
McDowell), '14 

914 nth St., Modesto 
Mrs Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 

Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts., 

Washington, D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. P. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robert K. Meyers), '19 

Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L., 

Tulare 
Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse, '17 

Ln. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. ; 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton <Mrs James L. 
Patton), 'IS 

Out of library work 
Mrs Helen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 

48 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Frederic Percival), '15 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

157 East Seventh St., Claremont 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

Asst. Lane Medical L., San Francisco 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price), '16 

1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefleld Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 

Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio 
Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 

2005 22d St., Sacramento 
Anna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L., Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour, '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 

Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). 'IS 

McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith), '17 

1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '2 

3100 19th St., Bakersfield 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Ewart 
Burns Todd), '17 

1860 Green St., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 

Out of library work 
Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Josephine L. Whitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L., Richmond 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFOENIA STATE LIBRARY. 



161 



Essie T. Wliite, '19 

Asst. Sacramento High Scliool L., Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs Katliarine Oalioon Wilson CMrs Lloyd 
R. Wilson), '17 
1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine Winham, '20 

Asst. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, '15 

Asst. Solano Co. F. L., Fairfield 
Mrs Bess Rantcn Yates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates), '18 
Asst. P. L. Long Beach 

New Items. 

Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, '15, 
consented to an appointment at the State 
Library during an emergency and has 
been a member of the staff since Janu- 
ary 11. 

Miss Aldine Winham, '20, who took a 
year's leave of absence from the State 
Teachers College Library, Santa Barbara, 
has now resigned and will continue as 
assistant in the Maui County Free 
Library, Wailuku, T. H. 

Mr and Mrs Robert W. McCrea 
(Bessie Heath, '19) have a son, Robert 
Heath McCrea, born April 6, 1927. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Jan- 
uary, February and iViarch, 1927. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4. 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
California Lihraries. 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the January, 1927, issue of 
this publication. 

GENERAL WORKS 

Alessios, Mrs Alison B. 

The Greek immigrant and his reading. 
1926. (Library work with the for- 
eign born) x021 A37 

American Library Association. 

Libraries and adult education. 1926. 

x021 A51I 



A survey of libraries in the United 

States. 1926. 2v. x020 A51 

Committee on library extension. 

Library extension ; a study of public 

library conditions and needs. 1926. 
x021 ASIIi 



American Review ; a bi-monthly, v. 3. 

1925. q051 A5r 

Cannons, Harry George Turner. 

Bibliography of library economy. 1927. 
X016.02 C22a 

Carnegie United Kingdom Trust. 

County libraries in Great Britain and 
Ireland. [1926] qx021 C2 

Gift. 

Crawford, Nelson Antrim, & Rogers, 
Charles Elkins. 
Agricultural journalism. 1926. 

070 C89ag 

Cbothees, Samuel McChord. 

The modem essay. 1926. (Reading 
with a purpose) 028 C95 

Davis, Hallam Walker. 

The column. 1926. (Borzoi hand- 
books of journalism) 070 D26 

The Golden Book magazine, v. 3. 1926. 

051 G61b 

The Golden galleon, v. 1-2, 1924-25. 

051 G61 

Hewins, Caroline Maria., 

A mid-century child and her books., 

1926. 028 H59m 

HiTCHLER, Theresa. 

Cataloging for small libraries. 3d enl. 
ed. 1926. X025.3 H67a1 

Johnson, Gerald White. 

What is news? A tentative outline. 
1926. (Borzoi handbooks of jour- 
nalism) 070 J 67 

Moore, Annie Carroll. 

Cross-roads to childhood. cl926. 

028 M821c 

Overton, Grant Martin. 

The golden years of childhood ; the 
story of Doran books for younger 
people. 1926. 028 0962 

Sears, Minnie Earl, ed. 

Song index. 1926. (Standard catalog 
series) qr0 16.784 S4 

The Virginia quarterly review ; a na- 
tional journal of discussion, v. 1. 
1925. 051 V81 



162 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



PHILOSOPHY. 

Chang, W. S. 

The development, significance and 
some limitations of Hegel's ethical 
teaching. 1925. 193 C45 

Ceespi, Angelo. 

Contemporary thought of Italy. 1926. 
(Library of contemporary thought) 
195 C92 
Epictetus. 

Epictetus ; the Discourses as reported 
by Arrian, the Manual, and frag- 
ments, with an English translation 
by W. A. Oldfather. 1926. v. 1. 
(The Loeb classical library. [Greek 
authors]) 188 E64do 

Elewelling, Ralph Tyler. 

Creative personality ; a study in philo- 
sophical reconciliation. 1926. 

126 F61 
Inge, William Ralph. 

The Platonic tradition in English re- 
ligious thought; the Hulsean lectures 
at Cambridge, 192.5-1926. 1926. 

184 145 

Palmes, George Herbert. 

The problem of freedom. 1911. 

123 P17 
Patterson, Charles Heni-y. 

Problems in logic. 1926. 160 P31 

Pebby, Ralph Barton. 

Philosophy of the recent past. cl926. 

109 P46 

Sellaes, Roy Wood. 

The principles and problems of philoso- 
phy. 1926. 102 S46p 

TUBNER, John Evan. 

Personality and reality ; a proof of the 
real existence of a supreme self in 
the universe. 1926. 126 T94 

MIND AND BODY. 

Adams, Evangeline Smith. 

The bowl of heaven. 1926. 133.5 A21 

Caencross, Horace Leedom. 

The escape from the primitive. 1926. 

130 C28 

Cabr-Saunders, Alexander Morris. 

Eugenics. cl926. (Home university 
library of modem knowledge) 

136 C31 



Jaquin, Noel. 

Scientific palmistry. [1925] 133.6 J36 

Summers, Montague. 

The history of witchcraft and demon- 
■ology. 1926. (The history of civili- 
zation. Subject histories) 133 S955 

CHILD STUDY AND MENTAL 
TESTS. 

BuETT, Harold Ernest. 

Principles of employment psychology. 
cl926. 136.7 B97 

Child study association of America, inc. 
Guidance of childhood and youth. 1926. 

136.7 C53 

Freeman, Frank Nugent. 

Mental tests ; their histoi-y, principles 
and applications. cl926. (River- 
side textbooks in education) 

136.7 F85 

Goodenough, Florence Laura. 

Measurement of intelligence by draw- 
ings. 1926. (Measurement and 
adjustment series) 136.7 G64 

Irion, Theophil William Henry. 

Comprehensive difliculties of ninth 
grade students in the study of liter- 
ature. 1925. (Teachers college, Co- 
lumbia university. Contributions to 
education) 136.7 168 

Meltzer, Hyman. 

Children's social concepts ; a study of 
their nature and development. 1925. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

136.7 M52 
Patri, Angelo. 

The problems of childhood, edited by 
Clinton B. Carpenter. 1926. 

136.7 P31p 

Rosen, Esther Katz. 

A comparison of the intellectual and 
educational status of neurotic and 
normal children in public schools. 
1925. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 136.76 R81 

Watson, Goodwin Barbour. 

The measurement of fair-mindedness. 
1925. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 136.7 W33 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



163 



Wylie, Andrew Tennant, 

The opposite test. 1925. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Contri- 
butions to education) 136.7 W98 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Cole, Lawrence Wooster. 

Factors of human psychology. 1926. 

150 C68 
Deaeden, Harold. 

Understanding ourselves ; the fine art 
of happiness. 1926. 150 D28 

Hazlitt, Victoria. 

Ability, a psychological study. 1926. 

150 H43 

Psychologies of 1925; Powell lectures 
jn psychological theory, by Madison 
Bentley [and othersj 1926. 

150 P974 

ETHICS. 

Achievement, how it is won ; articles by 
leaders in world affairs. cl926. 

174 A17 

Bridges, Horace James, ed. 

Aspects of ethical religion ; essays in 
honor of Felix Adler on the fiftieth 
anniversary of his founding of the 
Ethical movement, 1876. 1926. 

170.4 B851 

Cabot, Richard Clarke. 

Adventures on the borderlands of 
ethics. 1926. 174 C11 

CoLViN, David Leigh. 

Prohibition in the United States. 
cl926. 178 C72 

Concerning parents ; a symposium on 
present day parenthood. 1926. 

173 C74 
Johnsen, Julia E., conip. 
■ Selected articles on war — cause and 
cure. (The handbook series) 

172.4 J 65 

Keyseeling, Hermann Alexander, graf 
von, ed. 

The book of marriage ; a new inter- 
pretation by twenty-four leaders of 
contemporary thought. cl926. 

173 K443 

Leighton, Joseph Alexander. 

The individual and the social order. 
1926. 170 L52 



MowRER, Ernest Russell. 

Family disorganization. cl927. (The 
University of Chicago sociological 
series) 173 M936 

MuLHALL, Sara Graham. 

Opium, the demon flower. 1926. 

178.8 M95 
Nash, Arthur. 

The golden rule in business. cl923. 

174 N24 

Schaufflee, Henry Park. 

Adventures in habit-craft. 1926. 

170 S31 

Taeusch, Carl Frederick. 

Professional and business ethics. cl926. 

174 T123 

RELIGION. 

Barton, Bruce. 

The Book nobody knows. cl926. 

220 B29 

Bible. N. T. Apocryphal hooks. English. 
The apocryphal New Testament, being 
the apocryphal gospels, acts, epistles, 
and apocalypses, with other narra- 
tives and fragments. 1924. 

229 B58n 

Cadman, Samuel Parkes. 

Imagination and religion. 1926. (Cole 
lectures delivered before Vanderbilt 
university) 201 C12 

Chesterton, Gilbert Keith. 

The Catholic church and conversion. 
1926. (The Calvert series) 

282 C52 

Cheisman, Lewis Herbert. 

The English of the pulpit. cl926. 

251 055 

Church of England. Book of common 
prayer. 

The Book of common prayer. 1794. 
qv264 05 
Clutton-Brock, Arthur. 

Essays on religion. [1926] 204 064 

Darrow, Floyd Lavern. 

Miracles, a modern view. cl926. 

231 D22 

Dibble, Roy Floyd. 

Mohammed. 1926. 297 D54 

Douglass, Harlan Paul. 

1000 city churches. cl926. 261 D73 



164 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Eddy, George Sherwood. 

New challenges to faith ; what shall I 
believe in the light of psychology and 
the new science. cl926. 215 E21 

Edward, Kenneth. 

Religious experience : its nature and 
truth. 1926. 201 E25 

EusEBiTJS Pamphili, ip. of Caesarea. 
The ecclesiastical history, with an 
English translation by Kirsopp Lake. 
1926. V. 1 (The Loeb classical 
library. [Greek authors] ) 

270 E911 
FoSDiCK, Harry Emerson. 

Adventurous religion and other essays. 
1926. 230 F74ad 

Gibbon, Edward. 

History of Christianity. 1923. 

270 G43 
GooDSPEED, Edgar Johnson. 

The formation of the New Testament. 
cl926. 225 G65f 

Laou-Tsze. 

Taoist teachings. 1925. (The wisdom 
of the East series) 299 L29t 

Leach, William Herman. 

Church administration ; a survey of 
modern executive methods. cl926. 

260 L43 
Phelps, William Lyon. 

Adventures and confessions. 1926. 

204 P54 
Saileb, Thomas H. P. 

The Moslem faces the future. cl926. 

297 SI 3 

Sajotjs, Charles Euchariste de Medicis. 

Strength of religion as shown by 

science, facilitating also harmony 

within, and unity among, various 

faiths. cl926. 215 S15 

SooTHiLL, William Edward. 
The three religions of China ; lectures 
delivered at Oxford. 2d ed. 1923. 
299 S71 
Speee, Robert Elliott. 
The church and missions. cl926. 

266 S74 

The universal standard ; a monthly maga- 
zine. V. 1-3. 1921-24. c205 U58 

Whitehead, Alfred North. 

Religion in the making; Lowell lec- 
tures, 1926. 1926. 204 W592 



SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

Clapp, Raymond. 

Study of volume and cost of social 
work, 1924. Tabulation of income 
for nineteen cities. 1926. 

309.1 058 

Hopkins, Ernest Martin. 

Man and his fellows ; lectures on the 
Henry La Barre Jayne foundation, 
Academy of music, Philadelphia, 1925. 
1926. 304 H794 

Lacuna, Theodore de Leo de. 

The factors of social evolution. 1926. 

301 L18 

Ross, Edward Alsworth. 

Civic sociology ; a textbook in social 
and civic problems for young Ameri- 
cans. 1926. 300 R82 

Smyth, William Henry. 

Concerning Irascible Strong and Trixie- 
Cunning, and their sons. 1926. 

301 S66 

Taylor, Carl Cleveland, cC- Brown, Ben- 
jamin Franklin. 
Human relations ; a college textbook in 
citizenship. 1926. (Harper's social 
science series) 307 T23 



U. S. President, 1923 



(Coolidge) 



Foundations of the republic ; speeches 
and addresses. 1926. 308 C77f 



STATISTICS. POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Abbott, Edith. 

Historical aspects of the immigration 
problem. cl926. (The University 
of Chicago social service series, ed. 
by the faculty of the Graduate school 
of social service administration) 

325.73 A13h 

BEiiAN, Lamar Taney, comp. 

The direct primary. 1926. (The ref- 



erence shelf) 

CooLEY, Rossa Belle. 
Homes of the freed. 



1926. 



324 B455 



326.25 C77 



HoAG, Clarence GUbert, <& Hallett, George 
Hervey. 
Proportional representation. 1926. 

324.2 H67 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



165 



Klingbeeg, Frank Joseph. 

The auti-slavery movement in Eng- 
land ; a stud.y in English humani- 
tarianism. 1926. (Tale historical 
publications. Miscellany) 326 K65 

LrcE, Robert. 

Congress, an explanation. 1926. 

328.73 L93 

MoNTGOMEKY, Bo Gabriel. 

Issues of European statesmanship. 
[1926] 320.1 M78 

Moon, Parker Thomas. 

Imperialism and world politics. 1926. 

321 MSI 

Murray, Robert Henry. 

The history of political science from 
Plato to the present. 1926. 

320.9 M98 

Pollard, Albert Frederick. 

The evolution of Parliament. 2d ed. 
rev., with appendices, notes and illus- 
trations. 1926. 328.42 P77a 



Rogers, Lindsay. 

The American Senate. 



1926. 

328.73 R72 



Smith, Adam. 

Lectures on justice, police, revenue and 
arms, delivered in the University of 
Glasgow ; reported by a student in 
1763, and ed. by Edwin Cannan. 
1896. 320.4 S64 

Stephensox, George Malcolm. 

A history of American immigration, 
1820-1924. cl926. 325.73 S83 

Sweeney, James Shirley. 

The natural increase of mankind. 1926. 

312 S974 

Ul'ianov, Vladimir Il'ich. 

Imperialism ; the state and revolution. 
1926. 321 U39 

WooDDY, Carroll Hill. 

The Chicago primai-y of 1926 ; a study 
in election methods. cl926. 324 W88 

Woodson, Carter Godwin, ed. 

The mind of the negro as reflected in 
letters written during the crisis, 1800- 
1860. cl926. 326 W89 

5 — 51527 



ECONOMICS. 

Artman, Charles Enos. 

Food costs and city consumers. 1926. 
(Studies in history, economics, and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of po- 
litical science of Columbia univer- 
sity), 330.5 C72 

Austin, Bertram Herbert d Lloyd, Wil- 
liam Francis. 
The secret of high wages. 2d ed. [1926] 

331 A93 

Beman, Lamar Taney, comp. 

Farm relief. 1927. (The reference 
shelf) 338.1 B45 



The Blue anchor, v. 1-2. 

Burton, Ernest Richmond. 

Employee representation, 
man relations series) 



1924-25 
qc338.105 B6 



1926. (Hu- 
331 B97 



Clark, John Maurice. 

Social control of business. cl926. (Ma- 
terials for the study of business) 

330 C593 
Coombs, Whitney. 

The wages of unskilled labor in manu- 
facturing industries in the United 
States, 1S90-1924. 1926. (Studies 
in history, economics, and public law, 
ed. by the Faculty of political sci- 
ence of Columbia university) 

330.5 C72 

Fairchild, Fred Rogers, d others. 
Elementary economics. 1926. 

330 F165 

Frederick, Justus George. 

Modern industrial consolidation. 1926. 

338 F85 

GiLLiN, John Lewis. 

Poverty and dependency. Rev. ed. 
cl926. 339 G48a 

GooDEN, Orville Thrasher. 

The Missouri and North Arkansas rail- 
road strike. 1926. (Studies in his- 
tory, economics, and public law, ed. 
by the Faculty of political science of 
Columbia universitj') 330.5 C72 

Ibbott, Arthur Pearson. 

The economic illusion, by Arthur Ber- 
tram (pseud.) 330.942 112 



The Index. 1921-24. 



q330.5 \3 



166 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Keynes. John Maynard. 

Laissez-faire and 'commiTuism. 1926. 
330.1 K44 

Laidler, Harry Wellington, & Thomas, 
Norman Mattoon, eds. 
New tactics in social conflict. 1926. 

331 L18 
LiAUCK, William Jett. 

Political and industrial democracy, 
1776-1926. 1926. 331 L36 

liOTT, Merrill Rowe. 

Wage scales and joh evaluation ; scien- 
tific determination of wage rates on 
the basis of services rendered. cl926. 
(The Ronald manufacturing indus- 
tries library) 331.2 L88 

McGuiBE, Constantine Edward. 

Italy's international economic position. 
1926. (The Institute of economics. 
Investigations in international eco- 
nomic i-econsti-uction ) 330.945 M14 

Maevyn Scudder manual of extinct or 
obsolete companies, v. 1. 1926. 

r338.7 M39 
Nelson, Milton Nels, ed. 

Readings in corporation finance. cl926. 

338.7 N42 
Peachy, Frank, jr. 

Britain's economic plight. 1926. 

330.942 P69 
Shaw, Kinn Wei. 

Democracy and finance in China. 1926. 
(Studies in history, economics, and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia univer- 
sity) 330.5 C72 

SoDDY, Frederick. 

Wealth, virtual wealth and debt. The 
solution of the economic paradox. 
[1926] 330.1 S67 

Stewart, Irvin. 

Consular privileges and immunities. 
1926. (Studies in history, econom- 
ics, and public law, ed. by the 
Faculty of political science of Col- 
umbia university) 330.5 C72 

Thoep, Willard Long & Thoi*p, Hilde- 
garde E. 
Business annals. 1926. 330.1 T51 

WiLLiAiis, Thomas George 

The main currents of social and indus- 
trial change, 1870-1924. 1925. 

330.942 W72 



BANKING. FINANCE. 

The Chase economic bulletin. 1920-25. 
V. 1-5. 332.05 C48 

Hardy, Charles Oscar. 

Tax-exempt securities and the surtax. 
1920. (The Institute of economics. 
Investigations in finance) 336.2' H26 

Heer, Clarence. 

The post-war expansion of state ex- 
penditures ; an analysis of the in- 
crease between 1917 and 1923 in the 
cost of state government in New 
York. cl926. (National institute of 
public administration. Studies in 
public administration) 336.73 H45 

Knapp, George Griff Prather. 

How banks increase their business. 
cl926. 332.1 K67 

Labmer, Forrest Mabry. 

Financing the livestock industry. 1926. 
(The Institute of economics. Investi- 
gations in agricultural economics) 
332.7 L32 
Lehfeldt, Robert Alfred. 
Money. 1926. (The world's manuals) 

332 L522 
Lincoln, Edmond Earle. 

Testing before investing. 1926. 

332.6 L73 
Moody, John. 

Profitable investing; fundamentals of 
the science of investing. cl925. 

332.6 M81p 

MOTJLTON, Harold Glenn & Pasvolsky, 
Leo. 
World Avar debt settlements. 1926. 
(The Institute of economics. Inves- 
tigations in international economics 
reconstruction) 336 M92w 

Post, Louis Freeland. 

What is the single tax? 1926. 

336.2 P85w 

Stephenson, Gilbert Thomas. 

Living trusts. 1926. 332.1 S83 

LABOR. 
Benn, Sir Ernest John Pickstone, lart. 
If I were a laboiir leader. 1926. 

331.88 B46i 
Catlin, Warren Benjamin. 

The labor problem in the United States 
and Great Britain. 1926. 331.8 C36 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



167 



Cole. George Douglas Howard. 

A short history of the British working 
dass movement, 1789-1925. 1925-26. 
2v. 331.8 C68sh 

Dyche, John Alexander. 

Bolshevism in American labor unions ; 
a plea for constructive unionism. 
1926. 331.88 D99 

Labor age ; the national monthly. 

v. 12-14. 192.3-25. q331.05 Lla 

Lynch, James Mathew 

Epochal history of the International 
typographical union. 1925. 

331.88 L98 

Gift. 

COOPERATION. SOCIALISM. 

GOBDIN, Morris. 

Utopia in chains ; an American's ex- 
periences in red Russia. 1926. 

335 G66 

London, Jack. 

London's essays of revolt. 1926. 

c335 L84 

Sachs, A. Sh. 

Basic principles of scientific socialism. 
1925. 335 SI 2 

Seaes, Clara Endicott, comp. 

Bronson Alcott's Fruitlands. 1924. 

335.4 S43 
Shaw, George Bernard. 

The socialism of Shaw. 1926. 335 S53s 

Taylor, Carl Cleveland. 

Rural sociology ; a study of rural 
problems. 1926. (Harper's social 
science series) 334.9 T23 

Warne, Colston Estey. 

The consumers' cooperative movement 
in Illinois. cl926. (Materials for the 
study of business) 334 W27 

LAW. ADMINISTRATION. 

Albion, Robert Greenhalgh. 

Forests and sea power. 1926. (Harvard 
economic studies) 359 A33 

Beman, Lamar Taney, comp. 

Military training compulsory in schools 
and colleges. 1926. (The reference 
shelf) 355 B45 



Buck, Arthur Eugene. 
Municipal finance. 1926. 



352.1 B92 



Carter, John Franklin. 
Man is war. cl926. 



341 C32 



Clarke, John Joseph. 

Outlines of central government, includ- 
ing the judicial system of England. 
2d ed. rev. & enl. 1925. 354.42 C59 

Garner, James Wilford. 

Recent developments in international 
law. 1925. (Tagore law lectures) 

341 G23r 
Hanford, Alfred Chester. 

Problems in municipal government. 
1926. 352 H23 

Harley, John Eugene. 

Selected documents and material for 
the study of international law and 
relations. Rev. and enl. ed. 1926. 

341 H28 

Jackson, Orton Porter, d Evans, Frank 
Edgar. 
The new book of American ships. 1926. 

359 J1 

Krss. George J., tC- Shepperd, Fred- 
erick W. 
Questions and answers for battalion 
and deputy chief. cl926. 351.3 K97 

Questions and answers for lieu- 



tenant and captain. cl925. 351.3 K97q 

Marcosson, Isaac Frederick. 
Caravans of commerce. 1926. 353.8 M32 

MuNRO, William Bennett. 

The government of American cities. 
4th ed. 1926. 352 M96g1 

Pearson, Edmund Lester. 

Murder at Smutty Nose and other 
murders. 1926. 343 P36m 

Post, Melville Davisson. 

The man hunters. cl926. 352,2 P85 

Rucker, William Colby. 

Leadership ; a manual on conduct and 
administration. 353.8 R91 

Smith, Fred Dumont. 

The Constitution ; its story and battles. 
cl926. 342.73 S64a 

Upson, Lent Dayton. 

Practice of municipal administration. 
cl926. (The Century political science 
series) 352 U69 



168 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



WoELLNEB, Frederick Philip. 

How we govern. cl926. c353.9 W84 

ASSOCIATIONS. INSTITUTIONS. 
Davis, Michael Marks. 

Clinics, hospitals and health centers. 

1927. (Hai-per's public health series) 

362.1 D26c 

Knight, Charles Kelley. 

Advanced life insurance, with illustra- 
tions of the principles and practices 
of actuarial science. 1926. 

368.3 K69 

Metropolitan life insurance co., New 
York. 
Statistical bulletin, v. 1-6. 1920-25. 
368.305 M59 

Procter, Arthur W. d Schuck, Arthur A. 
The financing of social work. 1926. 

360 P96 

Robinson, Alexander Cochrane d Woods, 

Edward Augustus. 

Creating and conserving estates. 1926. 

(The international life underwriters 

library) 368 R65 

Slawson, John. 

The delinquent boy ; a socio-psycholog- 
ical study. cl926. 364.1 S63 

CRIME AND CRIMINALS. 
Bower, Lahman Forrest. 

The economic waste of sin. cl924. 

364 B78 

KiBBY, James Patrick, comp. 

Selected articles on criminal justice. 
1926. (The handbook series) 

364 K58 

Knapp, Andrew d Baldwin, William. 
The Newgate calendar ; comprising in- 
teresting memoirs of the most notori- 
ous characters who have been con- 
victed of outrages on the laws of 
England. 1926. 364 K67 

Moore, Frank. 

Off the beaten road ; a study of the 
character of the offender and soci- 
ety's duty toward him. cl926. 

364 M82 
Parsons, Philip Archibald. 

Crime and the criminal. 1926. 364 P26 



EDUCATION. 

AvENT, .Joseph Emory. 

Beginning teaching. 1926. 



371 A95 



Blake, Mabelle Babcock. 

Guidance for college women. 1926. 

376 B63 
Book, William Frederick. 

Learning how to study and work effec- 
tively ; a contribution to the psychol- 
ogy of personal efficiency. cl926. 

371.3 B72 

Boraas, Julius <£• Selke, George Albert. 
Rural school administration and super- 
vision. cl926. 379.73 872 

Breitwieser, .Joseph Valentine. 
Psychological education. 1926. 

370.1 B83 

Brewer, .John Marks d others. 

Case studies in educational and voca- 
tional guidance. cl926. 371 B847 

I-5RXJNER, Herbert Bascom. 

The junior high school at work. 3925. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

379.17 B89 

Buckingham, Burdette Ross. 

Research for teachers. cl926. 371 B92 

Corning, Hobart M. 

After testing — what? The practical 
use of test results in one school sys- 
tem. cl926. 371.2 C81 

Davis, Sheldon Emmor. 

Self-improvements ; a study of criti- 
cism for teachers. 1926. 371 D26s 

riNGELHABDT, Fred. 

Forecasting school population. 1925. 
(Columbia university. Teachers col- 
lege. Contributions to education) 
379.73 E57 
Fenton, Norman. 

Self-direction and adjustment. 1926. 
(Measurement and adjustment se- 
ries) 370.1 F34 

Friese, John Frank. 

Exploring the manual arts. el926. 
(The Century vocational series) 

371.4 F91 
Garrison, Charlotte Gano. 

Permanent play matei'ials for young 
children. cl926. (Series on child- 
hood education) 372.2 G24 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



169 



Ge.\eral federation news, v 1-6. 192(.>-26. 

q374 G3 
CtESELL, Arnold Lucius. 

The retarded child. 1925. 371.9 G38r 

Gist, Arthur Stanley. 

Elementary school supervision. cl926. 

371.2 G53 

Hall-Qitest, Alfred Lawrence. 

The university afield. 1926. (Studies 
in adult education) 378.1 H19 

Hansen, Allen Oscar. 

Liberalism and American education in 
the eighteenth century. 1926. 

370.973 H24 
Hanus, Paul Henry. 

Opportunity and accomplishment in 
secondary education. 1926. ( The 
Inglis lecture. 1926) 379.17 H25 

Headley, Leal Aubrey. 

How to study in college. cl926. 

371.3 H43 
HiNES, Harlan Cameron. 

Finding the right teaching position. 
cl926. 371 H66 

HoLLiNGWOBTH, Jirs Leta (Stetter) 
Gifted children, their nature and nur- 
ture. 1926. (Experimental educa- 
tion series) 371.9 H74 

Holmes. Henry Wyman, ed. 

The path of learning ; essays on educa- 
tion. 1926; 370.4 H75 

Horn, John Louis. 

The American public school ; an intro- 
duction to the field of tax-supported 
education in the United States. cl926. 
(The Century education series) 

. 379.73 H81 
.JoHXSEN, Julia E., comp. 

Federal department of education. 1926. 
(The reference shelf) 379.73 J 65 

Kilpatrick, William Heard. 

Education for a changing civilization. 
1926. (Rutgers university. New 
Brunswick. N. J. Luther Laflin Kel- 
logg foundation) 370.1 K48e 

Larson, Emil Leonard. 

One-room and consolidated schools of 
Connecticut ; a comparative study of 
teachers, costs and holding power. 
1925. (Teachers college. Columbia 
imiversity. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 379.746 L33 



LiNDEMAN, Eduard Christian. 

The meaning of adult education. 1926. 

370.1 L74 

LowTH. Frank J. 

Everyday problems of the country 
teacher. 1926. 379.73 L92 

Lyon, Leverett Samuel. 

Making a living ; the individual in so- 
ciety. 1926. 370.01 L99 

Marks, Percy. 

Which way Parnassus? cl926. 

378.73 M34 

Martin, Everett Dean. 

The meaning of a liberal education. 
cl926. (The People's institute. 

"Lectures-in-print" series) 370 M37 

Meyer, Harold Diedrich. 

A handbook of extra-curricula activi- 
ties in the high school ; especially 
adapted to the needs of the small 
high school. 1926. 371.8 M61 

MOEHLMAN, Arthur Bernard. 

Public education in Detroit. 1925. 

379.7743 M69 

Moore, Mark Egbert. 

Parent, teacher, and school. 1926. 

370.1 M82 

Morrison, Fred Wilson. 

Equalization of the financial burden of 
education among counties in North 
Carolina. 1925. (Teachers' coUege, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 379.756 M87 

Mueller, Alfred Don. 

Progressive trends in rural education. 
cl926. (The Century education se- 
ries) 379.73 M94 

NoFFSiNGER, John Samuel. 

Correspondence schools, lyceums, Chau- 
tauquas. 1926. (Studies in adult 
education) 374 N77 

Paterson, Donald Gildersleeve. 

Preparation and use of new-type exam- 
inations. 1926. 371.2 P29 

Peffer, Nathaniel. 

New schools for older students. 1926. 
(Studies in adult education) 

370.1 P37 



170 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Peiece, Cyrus c6 Lamsou, Mrs Mary 
(Swift) 
The first state normal school in Amer- 
ica ; the journals of Cyrus Peirce and 
Mary Swift. 1926. (Harvard docu- 
ments in the history of education) 

378.744 FE 

Philadelphia. South Philadelphia high 

school for girls. 

Educating for responsibility ; the Dal- 

ton laboratory plan in a secondary 

school. 1926. 371.3 P54 

Pyle, William Henry. 

The psychology of learning ; an advance 
text in educational psychology. 1925. 
370.1 P99 
Ross, Alfred E. 

Graded games for rural schools. 1926. 

371.7 R82 

Russell, Hon Bertrand Arthur William. 
Education and the good life. 1926. 

370.1 R96 
Singletotm, Gordon Grady. 

State responsibility for the support of 
education in Georgia. 1925. (Teach- 
ers' college, Columbia university. 
Contributions to education) 

379.758 S61 
Stowe, Ancel Roy Monroe. 

Modernizing the college. 1926. 

378 S89 
Stuart, Milo H. 

The organization of a comprehensive 
high school ; a presentation of plans 
and devices of the Arsenal technical 
schools, Indianapolis. 1926. 

379.772 S93 
Sullivan. Ellen F. 

Correlation in the work-study-play 
school (platoon). cl926 371.2 S94 

ThoejSTdike, Edward Lee. 

Educational psychology ; briefer course. 
1925. 370.1 T49ed 

TouTON, Frank Charles, d Struthers, 
Alice Ball. 
Junior-high-school procedure. cl926. 

379.17 T73 

The Vocational guidance magazine. 
V. 3-4. 1924-26. 370.5 V87 

Washburne, Carleton Wolsey, d 
Stearns, Myron Morris. 
New schools in the Old world. 1926. 
370.1 W31 



Wilds. Elmer Harrison. 

Extra-curricular activities. cl926. (The 
Century education series) 

371.8 W67 
Wilson, Guy Mitchell. 

What arithmetic shall we teach? cl926. 

(Riverside educational monographs) 

372.7 W74 

The World association for adult educa- 
tion. 

Bulletins, nos. 1-20. 1919-24. 

370.5 W92 
Yen. Yii-Chvien James. 

The mass education movement in China. 
1925. 370.951 Y45 

CUSTOMS. FOLK LORE. 

Clark, Marj' E., d Quigiey, Margery 
Closey. 
Etiquette, jr. 1926. 395 C59 

Dennys. Nicholas Belfield. 

The folk-lore of China, and its affinities 
with that of the Aryan and Semitic 
races. 1876. 398 D41 

Grinnell. George Bird. 

By Cheyenne campfires. 1926. 

398.2 G86b 
Maegold. Charles William. 

Sex freedom and social control. cl926. 

392 M32 
Popenoe. Paul Bowman. 

The conservation of the family. 1926. 

392 P82c 
Puckett. Newbell Niles. 

Folk beliefs of the southern negro. 
1926 398 P97 

Westermarck, Edvard Alexander. 

Ritual and belief in Morocco. 1926. 
2 V. 390 W52 

A short history of marriage. 1926. 

392.5 W52s 

WOMEN. 

Fal\st, Allen Klein. 

The new Japanese womanhood. cl926. 

396 F26 
Johnsen, .Julia E., comp. 

Special legislation for women. 1926. 
(The reference shelf) 396.2 J 65 

Kanter. Emanuel. 

The Amazons. cl926. 396.9 K16 

La Follette, Suzanne. 

Concerning women. 1926. 396 LI 6 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



171 



LAW. 

Alabaster, Ernest. 

Notes on Chinese law and practice pre- 
ceding revision. 1906. 

BiRDSEYE, Clarence Frank. 

Manual of substantive IsiW forms ; a 
scientific collection of common law 
and modern legal and business forms 
for students of the law. 192.5. 

BoLLAND, William Craddock. 

A manual of year book studies. 192.5. 
(Cambridge studies in English legal 
history). 

Book of Aicill. 

Gaelic law, the Berla laws ; or. The 
ancient Irish common laws. [1925] 

California. Constitution. 

Constitution of the state of California 
and summary of amendments. 1917. 

Constitution of the state 

of California and summary of amend- 
ments. 1922. 

Carney, William Austen. 

Promoter's assistant and improved sec- 
retary's manual. A compendium of 
forms, instructions and legal informa- 
tion for promoters, secretaries of 
corporations and others. 5th ed. 
1923. 

Cook, Walter Wheeler. 

Cases and other authorities on equity. 
1926. (American casebook series) 

Crow, William H. 

Corporation secretary's guide. 1926. 

Drummond, Isabel. 

Corporate resolutions. cl926. 

Ellingwood, Albert Russel, d Coombs, 
Whitney, eds. 
The government and labor. 1926. 

Fankhauser, William Charles. 

A financial history of California ; public 
revenues, debts, and expenditures. 
1913. (University of California pub- 
lications in economics) 

FoRTOUL, Albert E., ed. and tr. 

Mexican marriage and divorce laws, and 
a synopsis of the alien laud laws, 
including divorce laws of Hermosillo, 
Sonora, and Cuernavaca, Morelos. 
1926. 



Great Britaix. Parliament. House of 
lords. 
Proceedings before the committee for 
privileges. [1S3S-1912] 3 v. 

Hamel. Charles Dennis. 

The United States Board of tax ap- 
peals. 1926. 

Hawaiian Islands. Laivs, statutes, etc. 
The civil code of the Hawaiian Islands. 
1859. 

Holmes, George Edwin, d others. 

Holmes and Brewster's federal tax 
appeals. 1927. 

Horowitz, .Jacob Israel. 

Manual for law clerks and stenogra- 
phers. 1926. 

Hughes, Edward Wakefield. 

Hughes' American parliamentary guide 
(new rev. ed., 1924) ; the process of 
lawmaking. 1924. 

.Jones, Burr W. 

Commentaries on the law of evidence 
in civil cases. 1926. 6 v. 

Lineman, Mrs Mab Copland. 

Business and pi'otective law for women. 
cl926. 

Lobingier,' Charles Sumner, 

The evolution of the Roman law. 1923.' 

Lord, George de Forest d Sprague, George 
Clare. 
Cases on the law of admiralty. 1926. 
(American casebook series) 

Medina, Harold Raymond, ed. 

Cases on federal jurisdiction and pro- 
cedure. 1926. (American casebook 
series ) 

The North Carolina law review, v. 1-3. 
1923-25. 

O'Brien, Paul Peter. 

Manual of federal appellate procedure. 
cl926. 

Ogilvie, Mrs Katharine (Nairn), de- 
fen darit. 
Trial of Katharine Nairn. [1926] 
(Notable British trials) 

Pound, Roscoe. 

Readings in Roman law and the civil 
law and modern codes as develop- 
ments thereof ; an introduction to 
comparative law. 2d ed. 1914. pt. 1. 



172 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



PuTERBAUGH, Sabin Don. 

Puterbaiigh's common law pleading and 
practice ; a practical treatise on the 
forms of common law actions. 10th 
ed. 1926. 

Ralston, Jackson Harvey. 

The law and procedure of international 
tribunals. cl926. 

Sjiallbebg, Alfred J. 

Smallberg's California law review and 
quizzer, consisting of California stat- 
utes, decisions and questions based 
thereon. [1926] 

Smith, Young Berrj^man, & Dowling, 
Noel T., eds. 
Cases on the law of public utilities. 
1926. (American casebook series) 

Spelling, Thomas Carl & Lewis, James 
Hamilton. 
A treatise on the law governing injunc- 
tions. 1926. 

Street, Arthur Leonard Howell. 

Law for cleaners and dyers and laundry- 
owners. 1926. 



Sweet & Maxwell, ltd., London. 
A bibliography of English law. 
V. 1. 



1925, 



Thurston, Edward Sampson, ed. 
Cases in quasi contract. 1916. (Ameri- 
can casebook series) 

U. S. LaiDS, statutes, etc. 

The federal Judicial code and the 
judiciary. 3d ed. 1926. 

Warren, Charles. 

History of the Harvard law school and 
of early legal conditions in America. 
1908. 

Washington law review, v. 1. 1925-26. 

Weinstein, William. 

Immigration laws and rights of aliens. 
cl926. 

Wisconsin. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Wisconsin statutes, 1925 (8th ed.) 
[1925-26] 2 V. 

LANGUAGE. 

Clarke. Mary Virginia. 

Six Latin dialogues for junior high 
schools and Latin clubs. cl926. 

478 C59 



Fowler, Henry Watson. 

A dictionary of modern English usage. 
1926. r423 F78 

SlLSBY. J. A. 

Complete Shanghai syllabary ; with an 
index to Davis and Silsby's Shanghai 
vernacular dictionary and with the 
Mandarin pronunciation of each char- 
acter. 1907. 495 S58 

WooDRiNG, Maxie Nave. 

A study of the quality of English in 
Latin translations. 1925. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 470.7 W89 

NATURAL SCIENCE, GENERAL. 

Fabre, Jean Henri Casimir. 

Here and there in popular science. 
cl926. 500 F12 

Lewis, Gilbert Newton. 

The anatomy of science. 1926. (Yale 
university. Mrs Hepsa Ely Silliman 
memorial lectures) 504 L67 

Newman, Horatio Hackett [<£- others'], 
eds. 
The nature of the world and of man. 
cl926. 500 N55 

Riley. Isaac Woodbridge. 

From myth to reason ; the story of the 
march of mind in the interpretation 
of nature. 1926. 509 R57 

ScHLUTER, William Charles. 

Flow to do research work ; a manual 

of research procedure presenting a 

simple explanation of the principles 

underlying research methods. 1926. 

507 S34 

MATHEMATICS. ASTRONOMY. 

Hale, George Ellery. 

Beyond the milky way. 1926. 

522 H16 

KuHW, Harry Waldo, d Morris, Charles 
Clements. 
The mathematics of finance. cl926. 

510 K96 
LoviTT. William Yernon. 

The mathematics of business. 1926. 

510 L91 
Schxtltze, Arthur. 

The teaching of mathematics in second- 
ary schools. 1924. 510.7 S38 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



173 



Taylor. Jay Laird Burgess. 

The A B C of astronomy. 1926. 

520 T24 
Toner. James Y. 

Mathematics of finance. cl926. 

510 T66 
Turner. Plerbert Hall. 

A voyage in space. 2d ed. 192-5. 

520 T94v 

CHEMISTRY. 

Alexander. Jerome, comp. 

Colloid chemistry, theoretical and ap- 
plied. 1926. V. 1. 541.1 A37c 

Bragg. Sir William Henry. 

The crystalline state. The Romanes 
lecture. 1925. 1925. 548 B81 

British chemical abstracts. A. — Pure 
chemistry. 1926. q540.6 B8 

Carpenter, Weston William. 

Certain phases of the administration of 
high school chemistry. 1925. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 540.7 C29 

AERONAUTICS. 

Sherman, William Carrington. 
Air warfare. cl926. (Ronald aero- 
nautic library) 533.6 S55 

Spaight, James Molony. 

Aircraft and commerce in war. 1926. 

533.6 S73 

GEOLOGY. PALEONTOLOGY. 

Cline. Isaac Monroe. 

Tropical cyclones. 1926. 551.55 C64 



Daly, Reginald Aldworth. 
Our mobile earth. 1926. 



551 D15 



DiGBY, George Bassett. 

The mammoth and mammoth-hunting 
in northeast Siberia. 1926. 

569 D57 
Lee, Willis Thomas. 

Stories in stone : telling of some of the 
wonderlands of western America and 
some of the curious incidents in the 
history of geology. 1926. (Library 
of modern sciences) 557.8 L48 

Mills, Enos Abijah. 

Romance of geology. 1926. 550 M65 

Throvgh the ages, v. 1-3. 1923-26. 

q553.505 T5 



BIOLOGY. 

Hankins, Frank Hamilton. 

The racial basis of civilization ; a 

critique of the Nordic doctrine. 1926. 

572 H24 

Malinowski, Bronislaw. 

("rime and custom in savage society. 
1926. (International library of 
psychology, philosophy and scientific 
method) 572 M25 

Noble, Edmund. 

Purposive evolution ; the link between 
science and religion. cl926. 

575 N74 
Smuts, Jan Christiaan. 

Holism and evolution. 1926. 

575 S66 

BOTANY. 

Baker, Mary Francis. 

Florida wild flowers. 1926. 

581.9759 B16 

Blakeslee, Albert Francis, c6 Jarvis, 
Chester Deacon. 
Trees in winter ; their study, planting, 
care and identification. 1926. 

582 B63 

IIeald. Frederick De Forest. 

Manual of plant diseases. 1926. (Mc- 
Graw-Hill publications in the agricul- 
tural and botanical sciences) 

581.2 H43 

Lambert, JVr.s William J. 

[Prints of wild flowers. 1926.] 

C581.9794 L22 

Bobbins, Wilfred William. 

Principles of plant growth ; an elemen- 
tary botany. 1927. 581 R63 

Schorger, Arlie William. 

The chemistry of cellulose and wood. 
1926. 581.8 S37 

Spoehr, Herman Augustus. 

Photosynthesis. 1926. ' (American 

chemical society. Monograph series) 

581 S76 

ZOOLOGY. 

Huber. Francois. 

New observations upon bees. 1926. 

595.7 H87 
POE. Edgar Allan. 

T'lie conchologist's first book. 1.840. 

594 P74 



174 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



ScHAEFFER, Asa Arthur. 

Taxonomy of the amebas, with de- 
sci'iptions of thirty-nine new marine 
and fresh water species. 1926. (Car- 
negie institutition of Washington. 
Publication) q591.92 C2 

USEFUL ARTS: 
MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, 

Balyeat. Ray Morton. 

Hay fever and asthma ; a practical 
handbook for hay fever and asthma 
patients. 1926. 616.2 B198 

Crile, George Washington. 

The bipolar theory of living processes. 
1926. 612.014 C92 

Daxa. Charles Loomis. 

The peaks of medical history ; an out- 
line of the evolution of medicine for 
the use of medical students & prac- 
titioners. 1926. 610.9 D16 

De Blois, Lewis Amoi-y. 

Industrial safety organization for ex- 
ecutive and engineer. 192G. 

613.6 D28 

Gruenberg, Benjamin Charles, ed. 

Modern science and people's health. 
cl926. (The People's institute. 
"Lectures-in-print" series ) 

610.4 G88 

Hamilton, Gilbert Van Tassel. 

An introduction to objective psycho- 
pathology. 192.5. 0616.84 H21 

Heerick, Charles Judson. 

Brains of rats and men. cl926. 

612.8 H56b 
KoPELOFF, Nicholas. 

Whj' infections? in teeth, tousils and 
other organs. 1926. 616 K83 

Kretschmer, Ernst. 

Hysteria, authorized English transla- 
tion by Oswold H. Boltz. 1926. 
(Nervous and mental disease mono- 
graph series) 616.8 K92 

Los Angeles county medical association. 
The Bulletin, v. 51-55. 1921-1925. 

qc610.6 L8 

LrcKiEsn, Matthew, cC- Pacini, August 

John. 

Light and health ; a discussion of light 

and other radiations in relation to 

life and to health. 1920. 613.1 L94 



JIcCann, Alfred Watterson. 

The science of keeping young. cl926. 
613.2 M12sc 

McCoLLUM, Elmer Yerner, <f Simmonds, 
Nina. 
Food, nutrition and health. cl925. 

613.2 M129f 
Pearl. Raymond. 

Alcohol and longevity. 1926. 

613.8 P35 
Ross, Martin. 

Tour tonsils and adenoids : what they 
are and how to take care of them. 
1926. 616.3 R82 

SuDHOFF, Karl. 

Essays in the history of medicine. 
1926. (The library of medical his- 
tory) 610.9 S94 

Taylor, William Sentmau, ed. 

Readings in abnormal psychology and 
mental hygiene. 1926. 616.84 T24 

ENGINEERING. 

Bernewitz. Max Wilhelm von. 
Handbook for prospectors. 1926. 

622.1 B52 
Christensen, Anker L. 

Tool control, procurement, storage, 
issue, use, repairs and cost. cl926. 
(The Ronald manufacturing indus- 
tries library) 621.9 C55 

Forbes. Bertie Charles. & Foster, Orline D. 

Automotive giants of America ; men 

who are making our motor industry. 

cl926. • 625.6 F693 

Fuller. George Warren, & McClintock, 
James Robinson. 
Solving sewage problems. 1926. 

628.3 F96s 
.JoHNSEN, Julia E. comp. 

St. Lawrence River ship canal. 1926. 
(The reference shelf) 626 J 65a 

Light touches, v. 1-3. 1921-23. 

621.305 L72 
MoYER. .James Ambrose. 

Gasoline automobiles. 2d ed. 1926. 

625.6 M93a 
Olson, Reuel Leslie. 

The Colorado River compact. 1926. 

626.8 052 
Page, Victor Wilfred. 

The model T Ford car. including Ford- 
son farm tractor. 1926 revised & 
enl. ed. 1926. 625.6 P13mo2 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



175 



TouKiNG topics. V. IT. 1925. 

qc625.605 T7 
Teipp, Gny Eastman. 

Electric development as an aid to agri- 
culture. 1926. 621.3 T83 



AGRICULTURE. 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 

The American fertilizer, v. 64. 1926. 

q631 A5f 
Blass. Paul C. 

Great Danes, Dobermanns and schnau- 
zers (wire-haired pinschers). 192.5. 
( Popular dogs of the day ) 

636.7 B64 
Bradley, Cuthbert. 

The foxhound of the twentieth cen- 
tury. 1914. q636.7 B8 

CoLLiNGS, Gilbeart Hooper. 

The production of cotton. 1926. (The 
Wiley agricultural series) 633 C71 

GowEN, John Whittemore. 

Milk secretion ; the study of the physi- 
ology and inheritance of milk yield 
and butter-fat percentage in dairy 
cattle. 1924. 637.1 G72 

Hodge, Albert Ernest. 

Goldfish culture for amateurs. 

639 H68 

Masson.. Thomas Lansing,, ed. 
Dogs from "Life." Second litter. 1926. 
q636.7 M4a 

Mayberry, Amelia Jane. 

American canary bird culture. cl924. 
C636.6 M46 

Meredith, George William Lewin. 

Training horses for races ; a handbook 
for amateur beginners. 1926. 

636.1 M55 

National industrial conference board. 
The agricultural problem in the L^nited 
vStates. 1926. 630 N277 



WHALING. 

Ashley, Clifford Warren. 

The Yankee whaler. 1926. q639 AS 

MORLEY, Frank Vigor, d Hodgson, J. S. 
Whaling north and south. cl926. 

639 M86 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Bailey. Pearl La Verne. 

Foods, preparation and serving. 4th ed. 
1926. 641 B15 

Barrows, Anna, [<£• others]. 

An outline on the history of cookery. 

Rev. ed., 1925. 1925. (Technical 

education bulletin) 641 B270 

Boxjrjaily, Barbara Webb, d Gorman, 
Dorothy May. 
The mother's cook book : how to pre- 
pare food for children. 1926. 

649 B77 
Elliott, Ralph Nelson. 

Tea room and cafeteria management. 
1926. 641 E46 

Seal, Ethel Davis. 

The house of simplicity. cl926. 

645 843 h 

Tipton-, Mrs Edna (Sibley) 

Table service for the hostess. 1926. 

643 T59t 

Wright. Richardson Little, d McElroy, 
Margaret, eds. 
House & garden's second book of inte- 
riors. cl926. q645 W9a 

BUSINESS METHODS. 
Beckman, Theodore N. 

Wholesaling. cl926. 658 B39 

Bikgham, Walter Van Dyke d Freyd, 
Max. 
Procedures in employment psychology. 
1926. 658 B6133 



Business, v. .5-7. 192.3-26. 



q658.05 B9b 



David, Donald Kirk, d McNair, Malcolm 
Perrine. 
Problems in retailing. 1926. 

658 D24p 
Gutelius. .Tames P. 

High lights on auctioneering ; opening 
talks for auction sales. cl922. 

658 G98 

How to sell. v. 6-10. 1924-26. 

q658.05 H8 

Marshall. Leon Carroll, d Wiese, 
Mildred J. 

Modern business. 1926. (Textbooks 

in the social studies) 658 M36m 



176 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Metcalf, Henry Clayton, ed. 

Scientific foundations of business ad- 
ministration. 1926. (Human rela- 
tions series) 658 M58s 

Pitman, Benn & Howard. Jerome Bird. 

Tlie phonographic dictionary and 

phrase book. cl901. (The American 

system of shorthand) 653 P685p 

Taylor. Joseph Schimmel. 

Supervision and teaching of hand- 
writing. c-1926. 652 T24 

ADVERTISING. ACCOUNTING. 

The Certified public accountant, v. 4-6. 
1925-26. q657.05 C4 

KiTSO>", Harry Dexter. 

Scientific advertising. 1926. 659 K62 

Newlove, George Hillis. 

Consolidated balance sheets. cl926. 

657 N54c 
Stockwell. Herbert Grant. 

How to read a financial statement, 
adapted especially to needs of credit 
men, bankers and investors. cl925. 
657 S86 
White, Percival. 

Advertising research. 1927. 659 W58 

PRINTING. 

Impressions, published to create an in- 
terest in good printing. March 1922- 
August 1924. V. 1-3. c655.05 134 

Orcutt, William Dana. 

In quest of the perfect book ; remi- 
niscences and reflections of a book- 
man. 1926. 655 064 

COMMUNICATION. COMMERCE. 

Anderson, Romola, rf- Anderson, R. C. 
The sailing ship. [1926] , 656.8 A54 



Harlow, Alvin Fay. 
Old towpaths. 1926. 



656 H28 



Leeming, Joseph. 

Ships and cargoes ; the romance of 
ocean commerce. 1926. 387 L48 

Morse, Arthur Hyatt. 
Radio : beam and broadcast ; its story 
and patents. 192.j. 654.6 M88 

Stone. Elleiy Wheeler. 

Elements of radio communication. 3d 
ed. rev. and enl. 1926. 654 S87a 



Wilson, George Lloyd. 

Trafiic management. 1926. (Apple- 
ton's railway series) 656 W7482 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

American ceramic society. 

Journal, v. 9, pt. 1. 1926. 666.05 A51 

Clemen, Rudolf Alexander. 

The American live stock and meat in- 
dustry. 1923. 664.9 C62 

Farrell, Hugh. 

What price progress? The stake of the 
investor in the discoveries of science. 
1926. 660 F24 

Howe, Harrison Estell. 

Chemistry in the world's work. 1926. 
(Library of modern sciences) 

660 H85c 

The Lamp ; a magazine published in the 
interest of the employees of the 
Standard oil company (New Jersey). 
V. 2-7. 1919-25. q665.505 L2 

LiDDELL. Donald Macy, ed. 

Handbook of non-ferrous metallurgy. 
1926. 2v. 669 L71h 

AIoiR, .James, <f Stanley, George Hardy, 
cds. 
A textbook of Rand assay practice. 
1923. 669.9 M71 

MoNYPENNY, John Henry Gill. 
Stainless iron and steel. 1926. 

669.1 M81 

Phillips. Martha Jane. 

Modern home dyeing. 1922. 

667.2 P56 

Stoughton, Bradley, & Butts, Allison. 
Engineering metallurgy. 1926. (Met- 
allurgical texts) 669 S88 

MANUFACTURES. 
MECHANIC TRADES. 

American society for steel treating. 
Transactions, v. 1-8. 1920-25. 

672.06 A51 

Fox, Thomas W. 

The mechanism of weaving. 1922. 

677 F79 
HoBSON. Geoffrey Dudley. 

Maioli, Canevari and others. 1926. 
(Monographs on bookbinding) 

q686 H6 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



177 



India rubber world, v. 73-74. 1925-26. 

q678.0o 13 

Latheop, William Gilbert. 

The brass industry in the United 
States. Rev. ed. 1920. 673 L35 

Lawellin, S. J., d Evans, Newton C, 
comps. 
Milling chemistry. cl92ri. 679 L41 

BUILDING. 

Ericson, Emanuel E. 

Glass and glazing. cl92tl 698.5 E68 

Hawley, Lee Fred, & Wise, Louis Els- 
berg. 
The chemistry of wood. 1926. (Ameri- 
can chemical society. Monograph 
series) 691,1 H39 

Lowndes, William Shepherd. 

Painting and wood finishing. 1926. 

698 L91 

Sutherland, Hale, & Clifford, Walter 
W^oodbridge. 

Introduction to reinforced concrete 

design. 1926. 693.5 S96 

Young, Charles Louis. 

Wallpaper and wallpaper hanging. 
cl926. (The Century vocational 
series) 698.6 Y69 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

Ogden, Charles Kay i& others'] 

The foundations of aesthetics. 2d ed. 
1925. 701 034 

Parker, De Witt Henry. 
The analysis of art. 1926. 

701 P23an 

TOWN PLANNING. 
GARDENING. 

Cane, Percy S. 

Modern gardens, British and foreign. 
[1926] q716 C2 

Cummins, Julia PI. 

My garden comes of age. 1926. 

716 C97 
Fairbridge, Dorothea. 

Gardens of South Africa. [1924] 

716 F16 

The House beautiful gardening manual. 
C1926. q716 H8 



Hubbard, Samuel C. 
Roses and their culture. 1926. (Farm 
and garden library) 716.2 H87 

.James, Harleau. 

Land planning in the United States for 
the city, state and nation. 1926. 
(Land economics series) 710 J27 

Parsons, Samuel. 

Memories of Samuel Parsons. 1920. 

711 P27 

Stevens, Glendou A. ■ 

Roses in the little garden. 1926. (The 
little garden series) 716.2 S84 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Allen, Edward B. 

Early American wall paintings. 1710- 
1850. 1926. q729.4 A4 

Byne, Arthur, & Byne, Mildred (Stap- 
ley) 
Decorated wooden ceilings in Spain. 
1920. (Hispanic notes and mono- 
graphs ; essays, studies, and brief 
biographies issued by the Hispanic 
society of America. Peninsular se- 
ries) 721.7 B99 

Byne, Mrs Mildred (Stapley) 

Forgotten shrines of Spain. 1926. 

726 899 

Curtis, Mrs Elizabeth (Gibbon) 

Gateways and doorways of Charleston, 

South Carolina, in the eighteenth 

and the nineteenth centuries. cl926, 

q721.8 C9 

Major, Howard. 

The domestic architecture of the early 
American republic, the Greek re- 
vival. 1926. q728 IV12 

Stillwell, E. W., & CO., Los Angeles. 
Tlie fine homes book. cl926. 

c728 S85f 

SCULPTURE. POTTERY. 

Byne, Arthur, & Byne, Mrs Mildred 
(Stapley) 
Rejerfa of the Spanish renaissance. 
1914. (Hispanic society publica- 
tions) f739 89 

Spanish ironwork. 1915. (His- 



panic society publications) 739 899 



178 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



LUDOVici. Anthony Mario. 
Personal reminiscences 
Rodin. 192<J. 

NOETHEND, Mary Harrod. 
American alass. 1921). 



of Auguste 
735 R691u 



738 N87 



Spargo, John. 

The potters and iDotteries of Benning- 
ton. 1926. q738 S7 

DECORATION. DESIGN. 
FURNITURE. 

Best Maugard, Adolfo. 

A method for creative design, 1926. 

745 B56 

CoKNELius, Charles Over. 

Early American furniture. cl926. 

(Century library of American an- 
tiques) 749 C81 

HoixowAY, Edward Stratton. 

The practical book of learning decora- 
tion and furniture. 1926. 749 H74 



Jokes, Sydney Robert. 
Posters t(- publicity. 



1926. 



q741 J79p 

Landes, John. 

A book of patterns for hand-weaving, 
designs from the John Landes draw- 
ings in the Pennsylvania museum. 
C1925-26. 4 V. q745 L2 

McClelland, Nancy Vincent. 

The practical book of decorative wall- 
treatments. 1926. 747 M12 

PAINTING AND PAINTERS. 

CoQUiOT, Gustav*. 

Paul Cezanne. [1919] 759.4 C42c 

Ede, H. S. 

Florentine drawings of the quattro- 
cento. 1926. (Drawings of the great 
masters) q759.5 E2 

Famous paintings selected from the 
world's great galleries and reproduced 
in colour; with an introduction by 
G. K. Chesterton. 1914. f759 F1 

Gerwig, Henrietta. 

Fifty famous painters. cl926. 759 G38 

K. Akademie de Kiinste. Berlin. 

Masterpieces of American painting. 
[1910] f759.1 A3 



Lucas. Edward Verrall. 

Frans Hals. [1926] (Little books on 
great masters) 759.9 H191 

Giorgione. [1926] (Little 



books on great masters) 759.5 L4991 
Leonardo da Vinci. [1926] 



(Little books on great masters) 

759.5 V77I 

■ Van Dyck. [1926] (Little 

books on great masters) 759.9 D99I 



Velasquez. [1926] (Little books 

on great masters) 759.6 V43I 

Morgan, John Hill. 

Paintings by John Trumbull at Yale 
university of historic scenes and per- 
sonages prominent in the American 
revolution. 1926. q759.1 T86m 

Pariceb, K. T. 

DraAvings of the early German schools. 
1926. (Drawings of the great mas- 
ters) q759.3 P2 



Venturi, Adolfo. 
Botticelli. [1925] 



q759.5 B75v 



Williamson, George Charles. 

The art of the miniature painter. 1926. 
(Universal art series) 757 W72ar 

Zentner, L. 

Une collection choisie de paysages ; ou, 
Un echantillon de chaqu'un des meil- 
leurs anciens maitres. A select col- 
lection of landscapes, from the best 
old masters ... to which are a-dded, 
. portraits of the artists . . . 1791. 

q758 Z5 

ENGRAVING. MOVING PICTURES. 

Benson, Frank Weston. 

Frank W. Benson ; introduction by 
Malcolm C. Salaman. 1925. (Modem 
masters of etching) 767 B47 

Griggs, Frederick Landseer Maur.. 
F. L. Griggs. 1926. (Modern masters 
of etching) 767 G85 

Haden, Si7- Francis Seymour. 

Sir Francis Seymour Haden, 1926. 
(Modern masters of etching) 

767 H12 
Layard, George Somes. 

The headless horseman, Pierre Lom- 
bart's engraving. [1922] q760 L4 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



179 



Seabury, William Marston. 

The public and the motion picture in- 
dustry. 1926. 778 S432 



MUSIC. 

AuDSLEY, George Ashdown. 
The temple of tone. 1925. 



786.5 A91t 



Dickey, Fx-ances M. 

Melody writing and ear training. 

cl926. (The music students library.) 

781 D55 

Flood, William Henry Grattan. 

Early Tudor composers. 1925. (Ox- 
ford musical essays) 780.19 F63 

Fuller-Maitland, John Alexander. 
The spell of music ; an attempt to 
analyze the enjoyment of music. 
[1926] 780.4 F969 

Gardner, George Lawrence Harter & 
Nicholson, Sydney H., eds. 
A manual of English church music. 
1923. 783 G22 

Johnson, James Weldon. 

The second book of negro spirituals. 
1926. q784.6 J 6a 

Lahee, Heni-y Charles. 

The orchestra ; a brief outline of its 
development in Europe and America. 
cl925. 785 LI 8 

Morse, Constance. 

Music and music-makers. 1926. 

780.9 M88 

Odum, Howard Washington & Johnson, 

Guy Benton. 

Negro workaday songs. 1926. (The 

University of North Carolina. Social 

study series) 784.7 027n 

Osgood, Henry Osborne. 

So this is jazz. 1926. 785 082 

SoMERViLLE, Isabella M. 

Kreutzer and his studies. 1924. ("The 
Strad" library) 787.1 S69 

Spaeth, Sigmund Gottfried. 

Read 'em and weep ; the songs you for- 
got to remember. 1926. q784.8 S7 

Tree, Viola. 

Castles in the air ; a story of my sing- 
ing days. cl926. 780.2 T78 



Turner, Walter James. 

Orpheus ; or. The music of the future. 
[1926] (Today and tomorrow) 

780.1 T95 

U. S. Naval academy, Annapolis. The 
Trident society. 
The book of navy songs. 1926. 

q784.8 U5 
Van Stone, Mary R. 

Spanish folk songs of New Mexico. 
cl926. q784.4 V2 

THEATRE. AMATEUR 
THEATRICALS. 

BouciCAULT, Dion. 

The art of acting. 1926. (Publications 
of the Dramatic museum of Columbia 
university. 5th sei'ies. Papers on 
acting) 792 B75 

Dean, Alexander. 

Little theatre organization and man- 
agement for community, university 
and school, including a history of the 
amateur in drama. 1926. (The 
Drama league library of the theatre 
arts) 792 D28 

Hughes, Glenn. 

New plays for mummers ; a book of 
burlesques. cl926. 793 H892n 

Matthews, James Brander. 

Rip Van Winkle goes to the play, and 
other essays on plays and players. 
1926. 792 M43r 

MiNCHiN, Nydia E. 

The jester's purse, and other plays for 
boys and girls. cl926. (The book- 
shop play series) 793.2 M66 

Moses, Montrose Jonas, ed. 

Another treasury of plays for children ; 
with illustrations . by Tony Sarg. 
1926. 793.2 M91a 

Smith, Milton Myers. 

The book of play production for little 
theaters, schools and colleges. 1926. 
792 S655 
Vernon, Harry M. 

Four plays for male characters. cl926. 
(French's acting edition) 793 V54 

AMUSEMENTS. DANCING. 

Bowles, Mrs Ella Shannon. 

Practical parties. cl926. 793 B78 



180 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Collins, Archie Frederick. 

The amateur entertainer. 1926. 

791 C71am 

Denton, Mrs Clara Janetta (Fort) 
Denton's new program book. cl926. 
("A just right book") 793 D415d 

Elmore, Emily "Warren d Cams, Marie 
Louise. 
Educational story plays and school- 
room games. 1926. 790 E48e 

HiLLAS, Marjorie <& Knighton, Marian. 
Athletic dances and simple clogs. 1926. 
q793.1 H64 
HoFER, Mari Ruef. 

All the world a-dancing ; a collection of 
folk dances of various nationalities. 
cl925 q793.1 H6al 

Gift. 

Lee, Betty. 

Dancing, all the latest steps. cl926. 

793.1 L477 
Smith, Erroll A. 

The American checker player's hand- 
books. cl926. 794 S646am 

RECREATION. 

Anderson, Lou Eastwood. 

Tennis for women. 1926. (Athletics 
for women) 796 A54 

[Appeeley, Charles James] 
Nimrod's hunting tours. 1926. 



Beard, Daniel Carter. 
Wisdom of the woods, 
craft series) 



q799 A6 

1926. (Wood- 
796 B368w 



Graham, Stephen. 

The gentle art of tramping. 1926. 

796 G74 
Griffith, Coleman Roberts. 

Psychology of coaching ; a study of 
coaching methods from the point of 
view of psychology. 1926. 796 G85 

Griswold, Frank Gray. 

Fish facts and fancies. 1926. 

799.1 G87f 



Newsom, William Monypeny. 
Whitetailed deer. 1926. 



799 N55 



Simpson, Charles Walter. 

Leicestershire & its hunts : the Quorn, 

the Cottesmore, & the Belvoir. 1926. 

q799 S6 



White, Stewart Edward. 

Lions in the path ; a book of adventure 
on the high veldt. 1926. 799 W58 

LITERATURE. 

Aldington, Richard. 

French studies and reviews. [1926] 

840.9 A36 

American criticism. 1926. cl926. 

810.4 A51 

Aristoteles. Aristotle. 19 2 6. (The 
Loeb classical library) 888 A71af 

The Nicomachean ethics, with an 

English translation by H. Rackham. 
1926. (The Loeb classical library. 
[Greek authors]) 888 A71nr 

Ayscotjgh, Mrs Florence. 

The autobiography of a Chinese dog, 
edited by his missuss. 1926. 

823 A98 

Baldwin, Stanley. 

On England, and other addresses. 1926. 

824 B182 

Basilius, Saint, the Great, ahp. of 
Caesar ea. 
Saint Basil, the letters, with an En- 
glish translation by Roy J. Deferrari. 
1926. V. 1. (The Loeb classical li- 
brary. [Greek authors]) 886 B31d 

Belloc, Hilaire. 

Short talks with the dead and others. 
1926. 824 B44s 

Brandes, Georg Morris Cohen. 
Hellas ; travels in Greece. [1926] 

880.4 B81 
Beaybrooke, Patrick. 

Kipling and his soldiers. [1926] 

828 K57zb 

Chamberlain, Rudolph Wilson <& Bolton, 
Joseph Sheldon Gerry, eds. 
Progressive readings in prose. 1925. 

820.8 C443 

Chambers, Raymond Wilson. 

Widsith ; a study in Old English heroic 
legend. 1912. 829 C44 

Cicero, Marcus TuUius. 

Philippics, with an English transla- 
tion by Walter C. A. Ker. 1926. 
(The Loeb classical library. [Latin 
authors]) 875 C56pk 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



181 



Coats, Robert Hay. 
John Galsworthy as a dramatic artist. 
1926. 822 G17zc 



Colby, Frank Moore. 
The Colby essays. 1926. 



2v. 814 C68d 



CoPELAND, Charles Townsend, ed. 

The Copeland reader ; an anthology of 
English poetry and prose. 1926. 

820.8 C78 

Dejiosthenes. 

De corona and De falsa legatione. 
1926. (Loeb classical library) 

885 D38cv 

De Quincey, Thomas. 

Theory of Greek tragedy. 1893. 

C882.09 D42 

[DoDGSON, Charles Lutwidge] 
Further nonsense verse and pr«se. 
1926. q827 D6 

Edgar, Pelham. 
Henry James, man and author. 1927. 

823 J27ze 

Eliot, Charles William. 

Charles W. Eliot, the man and his 
beliefs ; edited with a biographical 
study by William Allan Neilson. 
1926. 2 V. 814 E42ch 

Faxon, Grace B., ed. 

Many a way for Memorial day ; a col- 
lection of recitations, quotations. 
1926. (The many-a-way series) 

820.8 F28 
Flxhs, Emil. 

Saunterings. 1926. 828 F95 

Gollancz, Sir Israel. 

The sources of Hamlet. 1926. (The 
Shakespeare classics) 822.33 P6go 

Geetton, Mary Sturge. 

The writings & life of George Meredith. 
1926. 823 M561zg 



Henderson, Archibald. 
European dramatists. 



1926. 



808.2 H49a 

Heydrick, Benjamin Alexander, ed. 
Types of the essay. cl921. 824 H615 



Hill, William Ely. 
Among us cats. 1926. 
6—51527 



817 H64 



Hoeatius Flaccus, Quintus. 

Satires, Epistles and Ars poetica, with 
an English translation by H. Rush- 
ton Fairclough. 1926. (The Loeb 
classical library. [Latin authors] ) 
874 H81sf 

Japikse, Cornelia G. H. 

The dramas of Alfred lord Tennyson. 
1926. 821.81 Dj 

Keith, Arthur Berriedale. 

The religion and philosophy of the 
Veda and Upanishads. 1925. (Har- 
vard oriental series) q891.2 K2r 

Kennedy, William Sloane. 

The fight of a book for the world ; a 
companion volume to Leaves of 
grass. 1926. 811 W61zk 



Lloyd, Ann Gladys. 
Graduation days. 



cl926. 808.8 L79 



Manly, John Matthews. 

Some new light on Chaucer ; lectures 
delivered at the Lowell institute. 
cl926. 821.17 Bm 

Masson, Thomas Lansing, ed. 

Laughs ; a sovereign remedy for bore- 
dom. 1926. 817 !V142la 

MiCIIELSON, H. 

The Jew in early English literature. 
1926. q820.9 M6 



Moore, George. 

Peronnik the fool. 1926. 



v823 M82p 



Moedell, Albert, ed. 

Notorious literary attacks. 1926. 

824 IVI83 
MuMFOED, Lewis. 

The golden day ; a study in American 
experience and culture. 1926. 

810.9 M962 

NOELiN, George. 

Integrity in education and other pa- 
pers. 1926. 804 N84 

Palache, John Garber. 

Gautier and the romantics. 1926. 

840.9 P15 
Rogers, Will. 

Letters of a self-made diplomat to his 
president. 1926. v. 1. 817 R73I 

Santatana, George. 

Winds of doctrine ; studies in contem- 
porary opinion. 1926. 814 S23w 



182 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Smith, Lewis Worthington, ed. 

Current reviews. cl926. 810.9 S65 

Steachey, Giles Lytton. 

Pope ; the Leslie Stephen lecture for 

1925. 1926. 821 P82zs 

Taekington, Booth. 

Looking forward, and others. 1926. 

814 T18 

Thorpe, Clarence De Witt. 

The mind of John Keats. 1926. 

821 K25zt 

Trend, John Brande. 
Alfonso the Sage and other Spanish 
essays. 1926. 860.4 T79 

Van Dyke, Henry. 

The spirit of Christmas. 1926. 

820.8 V24 

Warner, Frances Lester. 

Surprising the family, and other per- 
adventures. 1926. 814 W28s 

Welby, Thomas Earle. 

A study of Swinburne. cl926. 

821 S97zwe 

WlLi-iAMS, Blanche Colton. 

Studying the short story. el926. 

808.3 W72s 

Weight, Charles Henry Conrad. 

The background of modern French 
literature. cl926. 840.9 W948b 

POETRY. 

BarneIy, Danford. 

Sardonyx. 1926. 811 B261s 

Bryan, George Sands. 

The ghost in the attic, and other verses. 

1926. 811 B9152 

Oheistman, William Weaver. 
Songs of the Helderhills. 1926. 

811 C555 
Cooke, Edmund Vance. 

From the book of extenuations ; a sin- 
cere and clear-eyed interpretation of 
some Biblical characters, done in 
poetical form. cl926. 811 C772f 



COOLIDGE, Katharine. 
Voices [poems] 1899. 



811 C77 



Ceane, Nathalia Clara B,uth. 

The singing crow, and other poems. 
1926. 811 C892s 



Daly, Thomas Augustine. 

A little book of American humorous 
verse. cl926. 811.08 D15 



Dickinson, Kate Letitia. 
Flesh and spirit. 1926. 



811 D553 



Field, Rachel Lyman. 

Taxis and toadstools ; verses and dec- 
orations. 1926. 811 F4556 

Feothingham, Robert, comp. 

Songs of adventure ; an anthology. 
1926. 821.08 F94 

Gaecilaso de la Vega. 

Works ; a critical text with a bibliog- 
raphy. 1925. (Hispanic notes and 
monographs ; essays, studies, and 
brief biographies issued by the His- 
panic society of America. Peninsu- 
lar series) 861 G21w 

Giese, William Frederic. 

Victor Hugo, the man & the poet. 1926. 
841 H89zg 
Guiterman, Arthur. 

I sing the pioneer ; ballads of the mak- 
ing of the nation. cl926. 811 G96i 

Haywood, Foster. 

Songs and scenes of the High Sierras. 
1926. c811 H427 

Koenig, Eleanor C. 

Herb woman, and other poems. 1926. 

811 K78 
Lowell, Amy. 

East wind. cl926. 811 L914e 

MacDonald, Wilson. 

Out of the wilderness. 1926. 

821 M1352 
MacLeish, Archibald. 

Streets in the moon. 1926. 811 Ml 64s 



Neihaedt, John Gneisenau. 
Collected poems. 1926. 



811 N39c 



O'Brien, Edward Joseph Harrington. 
Hard sayings. 1926. 811 013h 

Paekee, Mrs Dorothy (Rothschild) 
Enough rope ; poems. 1926. 811 P23 

Ransom, John Crowe. 

Two gentlemen in bonds. 1927. 



811 R21 



Ravenel, Mrs Beatrice (Witte). 
The arrow of lightning. 1926. 



811 R25 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



183 



Rice. Cale Young. 

Selected plays and poems. 

RORTY, James. 

Children of the sun, and 
1926. 

Skow, Wilbert. 

The inner harbor, more 
poems. cl926. 



[19261 
v811 R49s 

other poems. 
811 R78 



Stephens, James. 
Collected poems. 



1926. 



Williams, Charles Richard. 
Hours in Arcady. cl926. 

Wood, Clement. 

Amy Lowell. 1926. 

DRAMA. 

[ASHTON, Winifred] 
Granite. 1926. 



Maine coast 
811 S67i 

821 S83c 
811 W722 

811 L914ZW 

822 A82g 



Baery, Philip. 

In a garden ; a comedy in three acts. 
[1926] 812 B281i 

Bena-vente y Martinez, Jacinto. 

Saturday night. 1926. 862 B45s 



Brig HOUSE, Harold. 
Open air plays. cl926. 
ing edition) 



(French's act- 
822 BP55op 



Beoadhurst. Thomas William. 

Evangeline ; a play in twelve tableaux, 

a prologue and an epilogue. cl926. 

(French's standard library edition) 

812 B863 

Marquis, Don. 

The old soak ; a comedy in three acts. 
cl926. (French's standard library 
edition) 812 IV135o 

Martinez Siekka, Gregorio. 

The romantic young lady (Sueno de 
una noche Agosto) Comedy in three 
acts. English version by Helen 
and Harley Granville-Barker. cl923. 
(French's standard library edition) 
812 M423 

Masters, Edgar Lee. 

Lee ; a dramatic poem. 1926. 

812 M423 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. 

Three plays. 1926. 812 M64th 



Pilgrimage to Parnassus. 

The pilgrimage to Parnassus with the 
two parts of The return from Par- 
nassus. Three comedies performed in 
St.. John's college, Cambridge, a. d. 
MDXCVii-MDCi. Ed. from mss. by the 
Rev W. D. Macray. 1886. 822 P63 

Pineeo, Sir Arthur Wing. 

The ''Mind the paint" girl. A comedy, 
in four acts. 191.3. 822 P65min 

Shaw, George Bernard. 

Translations and tomfooleries. 1926. 

822 S53tr 
Shay% Frank, ed. 

Plays for strolling mummers. 1926. 
808.2 S53p 
Wiers-Jenssen, Hans. 

The witch ; a drama in four acts, by 
John Masefield, from the Norwegian. 
1926. 839.82 W64a1 

CALIFORNIA FICTION, 

Brady', Loretta Ellen. 

Loyal and Mary Louise, their senior 
year. 1926. cB812 



Grey', Zane. 

Under the Tonto Rim. 1926. 



cG845u 



NoERis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
Hildegarde. 1926. cN856hi 

Springer, Thomas Grant. 

Coffee and conspiracy. 1926. cS769c 

Steele, .James William. 

The sons of the border. 1873. cS8142 

Tully, Jim. 

Jarnegan. 1926. cT923 

Vachell, Horace Annesley. 

A woman in exile. 1927. oV118w 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Adelman, Joseph Ferdinand Gottlieb. 
Famous women. cl926. 920.7 A22 

The American labor who's who. cl925. 

r920 A51 

[BEN.JAMIN, Lewis S.] 
Regency ladies. 1926. 



920.7 846 



Chubb, Edwin Watts. 

Stories of authors, British and Ameri- 
can. 1926. 928.2 C55s 



184 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Vespasiano da Bisticci, Fiorentino. 

The Vespasiano memoirs, lives of illus- 
trious men of the xvth century, 
translated into English by William 
George and Emily Waters. 1926. 

920.045 V57 

Who's who in American medicine. 1925. 

r926.1 W62 

GENEALOGY. 

Charles, Heinrich. 

The romance of the name America. 
cl926. 929.4 C47 

Sayi.es, Mrs Mary Dorr (Ames) 
Sayles and allied families. 1925. 

vq929.2 S27 

WiKOFF, Thomas Bentley, comp. 

Anneke Jans Bogardus and her New 
Amsterdam estate. 1924. 2v. 

929.2 B73 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL 

Anderson. Anderson, Sherwood. 
Tar ; a midwest childhood. 1926. 

B A549t 

Arilay. Arblay, Mine Frances (Bur- 
ney) d' 
Fanny Burney and her friends. Select 
passages from her diary and other 
writings ; ed. by L. B. Seeley. 4th 
ed. 1892. B A665s 



Arblay, Mme Frances (Burney) 



d' 



Fanny Burney and the Burneys. 
[1926] B A665J 

Ashnry. AsBUEY, Herbert. 

Up from Methodism. 1926. B A7993 

Baldwin. Baldwin, James Mark. 

Between two wars, 1861-1921 ; being 
memories, opinions and letters. 1926. 
2 V. B B1812 

Beaconsfield. Clarke, Sir Edward 
George. 
Benjamin Disraeli ; the romance of a 
great career, 1804-1881. 1926. 

B B365c 

Beardsley. Beardsley, Levi. 

Reminiscences ; personal and other in- 
cidents ; early settlement of Otsego 
County. 1852. B B368 



Black. Black, Jack. 
You can't win. 1926. 



B B6273 



Blake. Burdett, Osbert. 

William Blake. (English men of let- 
ters) B B636bu 

Bonney. Burns, Walter Noble. 
The saga of Billy the kid. 1926.' 

B B717b 

Burhank. Clampett, Frederick William. 
Luther Burbank, "our beloved infidel", 
his religion of humanity. 1926. 

cB B946cl 

Camp. PowEL, Harford Willing Hare. 
Walter Camp, the father of American 
football ; an authorized biography. 
1926. B C1864p 

Carli/le. Neff, Emery Edward. 

Carlyle and Mill ; an introduction to 

Victorian thought. 2d ed., rev. 1926. 

B C288nel 

Catnach. Hindley, Charles. 

The life and times of James Catnach, 
(late of Seven Dials), ballad monger. 
1878. B C3657h 

Caxton. AuRNER, Nellie Slayton. 

Caxton : mirrour of fifteenth-century 
letters. 1926. B C384a 

Cohden-Sanderson. Cobden-Sanderson,, 
Thomas .Tames. 
The journals of Thomas James Cobden- 
Sanderson, 1879-1922. 1926. 2 v. 

B C6553 

Cortes. Sedgwick, Henry Dwight. 

Cortes the conqueror, the exploits of the 

earliest and greatest of the gentlemen 

adventurers in the New world. cl926. 

B C828s 

Crawford. Hicks, Thomas. 

Eulogy on Thomas Crawford. 1865. 
(Local biographical series) 

B C899h 

Davis. Davis, Robert Hobart. 

Over my left shoulder ; a panorama of 
men and events. 1926. B D2634 

Edison. Bryan, George Sands. 

Edison, the man and his work. 1926. 

B E23b 

Edioard Albert, prince of Wales. Veeney, 
F. E. 
H. R. H. cl926. B E256v 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



185 



Emerson. Woodbeery, George Edward. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson. 1926. (Eug- 

lish men of letters) B E53w 

Fitzsimmons. Davis, Robert Hobart. 
"Ruby Robert" alias Bob Fitzsimmons. 
cl926. B F562d 

France. Boloni, Mme Georges. 

Rambles with Anatole France. 1926. 
B F8153bo 
FraiiAHn. Russell. Phillips. 

Benjamin Franklin, the first civilized 
American. 1926. B F831r 

Weems, Mason Locke. 

The life of Benjamin Franklin ; with 
many choice anecdotes and admirable 
sayings of this great man, never be- 
fore published by any of his biog- 
raphers. 1829. B F831w 

Greeley. Seitz, Don Carlos. 

Horace Greelej^ founder of the New 
York tribune. cl926. B G794s 

Gwinnett. .Jenkiks, Charles Francis. 
Button Gwinnett, signer of the Declara- 
tion of independence. 1926. 

B G994J 

Hellman. Heller, Edward Hellman [d 
others.} 
In memoriam : Isaias W. Hellman. 
1921. qcB H477h 

Gift. 
Herzen. Hebzej^, Aleksandr Ivanovich. 
My past and thoughts : translated from 
the Russian by Constance Garnett. 
1924-1926. 5 v. B H582 

Hickok. WnxsTACH, Frank Jenners. 
Wild Bill Hickok, the prince of 
pistoleers, 1926. B H629w 

Jiopper. Hopper, De Wolf. 

Once a clown, always a clown. 1927. 

B H798 
Hullard. Shay. Felix. 

Elbert Hubbard of East Aurora. 1926. 

B H875s 
Hunt. Hunt, A^iolet. 

I have this to say : the story of my 
flurried years. cl926. B H943 

Irving. IsviNG, Washington. 
Washington Irving diary, Spain 1828- 
1829, edited by Clara Louisa Penney. 
1926. (Hispanic notes & monographs; 
essays, studies, and brief biographies 
issued by the Hispanic society of 
America. Catalogue series) 

B I727p 



Jackson. Jackson, Andrew, pres. U. S. 
Correspondence of Andrew Jackson. 
1926. V. 1. (Carnegie institution of 
Washington. Publication no. 371. 
Papers of the Department of his- 
torical research) qB J12ba1 

Jeffers. Steeling, George. 

Robinson Jeffers ; the man and the 
artist. 1926. cB J 45s 

Jerome. Jerome, Jerome Klapka. 

My life and times. 1926. B J563 

Kearton. Keabton, Richard. 

A naturalist's pilgrimage. [1926] 

B K247 

Lamar. Lamar, Mrs Clarinda Hunting- 
ton ( Pendleton ) . 
The life of Joseph Rucker Lamar, 
1857-1916. 1926. B L2152I 

Lamnie. Lamme, Benjamin Garver. 
Benjamin Garver Lanmie, electrical 
engineer, an autobiography. 1926. 

B L232 

Longfelloio. Gorman, Herbert S. 

A Victorian American, Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow. cl926. B L853g 

Loyola. Van Dyke, Paul. 

Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the 
Jesuits. 1926. B L923v 

Maupassant. Boyd, Ernest Augustus. 
Guy de Maupassant. 1926. B M452b 

O'Neill. Clark, Barrett Harper. 

Eugene O'Neill. 1926. ' (Modern Ameri- 
can writers) B 058c 

Otis. Morison,, Samuel Eliot. 

The life and letters of Harrison Gray 
Otis, Federalist, 1765-1848. 1913. 
2 V. B 088m 

Palmerston. Guedalla, Philip. 

Palmerston, 1784-1865. 1927. 

B P178g 
Pepys. Pepys, Samuel. 

Everybody's Pepys. 1926. B P425mo 

Pizarro. Helps, Sir Arthur. 

The life of Pizarro, with some account 
of his associates in the conquest of 
Peru. 1911. [Bohn's standard 
library] B P695h 

Foe. Krutch, .Joseph Wood. 

Edgar Allan Poe ; a study in genius. 
1926. B P743kr 



186 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Poincare. PoiNCARfi, Raymond, 2}i'^s. 

France. 

The memoirs of Raymond Poincare, 

translated and adapted by Sir George 

Arthur. 1926. v. 1. B P751a 

Reid. Reid, Forrest. 

Apostate. [1920] B R355 

Rohinson. Redman, Ben Ray. 

Edwin Arlington Robinson. 1926. 
(Modern American writers) 

B R659r 

Roue. Dressler, Albert, ed. 

California's pioneer circus, Joseph 
Andrew Rowe, founder. cl926. 

cB R8783d 

Sanr/er. Sanger, George. 

Seventy years a showman. 1926. 

B S225 

Telle ng. Van Vobst, Bessie (McGinnis) 
"Mrs John Van Vorst." 
A girl from China (Soumay Tcheng). 
1926. B T251v 

Thayer. Thayek, William Roscoe. 

The letters of William Roscoe Thayer, 
edited by Charles Downer Hazen. 
1926. B T373h 

Towne. TowNE, Charles Hanson. 

Adventures in editing. 1926. B T744 

Turgenev. Yarmolinsky, Avrahm. 

Turgenev, the man — his art — and his 
age. cl926. B T936y 

Yoltaire. Chase, Cleveland B. 

The young Voltaire. 1926. B V935ch 

Washington. Woodward, William E. 
George Washington, the image and the 
man. 1926. B W318wo 

Watson. Watson, Thomas Augustus. 
Exploring life. 1926. B W342 

Wilson. Houston, David Franklin. 
Eight years with Wilson's cabinet, 
1913 to 1920; with a personal esti- 
mate of the President. 1926. 2 v. 

B W754ho 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

Calhoun, George Miller. 

The ancient Greeks and the evolution 
of standards in business. 1926. 
[Barbara Weinstock lectures on the 
morals of trade] 913.38 015 



Gbeniee, Albert. 

The .Roman spirit in religion, thought, 
and art. Translated by M. R. Dovie. 
1926. (The history of civilization. 
[Pre-history and antiquity]) 

913.37 G82 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
GENERAL. 

Blasco Ibauez, Vicente. 

A novelist's tour of the world. Author- 
ized translation by Leo Ougley and 
Arthur Livingston. cl926. 910 B64 

Curzon, George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st 
marquis. 
Leaves from a viceroy's note-book and 
other papers. 1926. 910,4 C98I 

Wagner, Henry Raup. 

Sir Francis Drake's voyage around the 
world ; its aims and achievements. 
1926. q910.4 W1 

Wells, Linton. 

Around the world in twenty-eight days. 
1926. 910 W45 

EUROPE. 
Bone, James. 

The perambulator in Edinburgh. 
[1926] q914.1 B7a 

Chancellor, Edwin Beresford. 

Lost London. 1926. q914.21 C4I 

CoLUM, Padraic. 

The road round Ireland. 1926. 

914.15 C72r 
Dark, Sidney. 

Paris. 1926. . q914.43 D2 

De Loi, Raimon. 

Trails of the troubadours. cl926. 

914.4 D36 

Dwight, Harry Griswold. 

Constantinople, settings and traits. 
1926. 914.96 D99a 

Gautier, Theophile. 

A romantic in Spain. 1926. (Blue jade 
library) 914.6 G27a1 

GoLDRiNG, Douglas. 

Northern lights and southern shade. 
1926. 914.85 G62 

Heathcote, Dudley. 

My wanderings in the Balkans. 

914.97 H43 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



187 



HoKNBY, Lester George. 

Balkan sketches ; an artisfs wanderings 

in the kingdom of the Serbs. 1927. 

q914.97 H8 

Italy America society. 

News bulletin of the Italy America 

society. 1920-2.5. 914.5 188 

Trade bulletin of the Italy Amer- 



ica society. 1920-2.5, nos. 2-39. 

914.5 I88t 
JuTA, Rene. 

Concerning Corsica. 1926. 914.59 J96 

EoBSON, Edgar Iliff. 

A wayfarer on the Loire. [1926] 

914.45 R66 

TowNROE, Bernard Stephen. 
A wayfarer in Alsace. [1926] 

914.34 T74 

Le Voyageub en France ; a monthly bul- 
letin of official information, concern- 
ing travel in France. vol. 1-3. 
1923-25. q914.4 V9 

AYiLSTACH, Paul. 

Islands of the Mediterranean ; a holi- 
day. cl926. 914 W75 

ASIA. 

Abraham, James Johnston. 

The surgeon's log ; being impressions of 
the Far East. 14th ed. 1926. 

915 A15 
Franck, Harry Alverson. 

East of Siam ; ramblings in the five 
divisions of French Indo-China. 
cl926. 915.9 F82 

HiGGiNBOTTOM, Mrs Ethel (Cody). 

Through teakwood windows ; close-up 
views of India's womanhood. cl926. 
915.4 H63 
Howard, Harvey James. 

Ten weeks with Chinese bandits. 1926. 

915.1 H84 
Kemp, Emily Georgiana. 

The face of China. 1909. 915.1 K32f 



Milne, Mrs Leslie. 
Shans at home. 1910. 



915.94 M65 



'Ollone, Henri Marie Gustave, vicomte d'. 
In forbidden China. The D'OUone mis- 
sion 1906-1909 ; China— Tibet— Mon- 
golia, tr. from the French of the 2d 
ed., by Bernard Miall. [1912] 

915.1 049 



Reinsch, Paul Samuel. 

Intellectual and political currents in 
the Far East. 1911. 915 R37 

Shebap, Paul. 
A Tibetan on Tibet. 1926. 915.15 S55 

Skrine, Clarmont Percival. 
Chinese Central Asia. 1926. 

915.16 S62 
Warner, Langdon. 

The long old road in China. 1926. 

q915.1 W2 

Waiters, Thomas. 

On Yuan Chwang's travels in India. 
1904-05. 2 V. (Oriental translation 
fund. New series) 915.4 W34 

Weston, Walter. 
A wayfarer in unfamiliar Japan. [1925] 
915.2 W53w 

YouNGHUSBAND, Sir Francis Edward. 
The epic of Mount Everest. 1926. 

915.4 Y78 

AFRICA. 

Bradley, Mrs Mary (Hastings) 
Caravans and cannibals. 1926. 

916.7 B81c 

Harris, Murray George. 

Egypt under the Egyptians. 1925. 

916.2 H31 

LoRiMEK, Norma Octavia. 

By the waters of Carthage. 1925. 

916.11 L87 

Quibell, Mrs Annie Abernethie. 
A wayfarer in Egypt. [1925] 

916.2 Q6 

Sutton, Richard Lightburn. 

An African holiday. 1924. 916.7 S96 

Terhorst. Bernd. 

With the Riff Kabyles. [1926] 

916.4 T31 

Wilson. Albert. 

Rambles in North Africa. [1926] 

916.1 W74 



NORTH AMERICA. 

Bell, Archie. 

The spell of the Caribbean Islands. 
cl926. (The Spell series) 

917.297 B43 



188 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



FiOERis, Mrs Benjamin G. 

The Mormons at home ; with some in- 
cidents of travel from Missouri to 
California, 1852-53. 1856. 

c917.8 F39 

Genthe, Arnold. 

Impressions of old New Orleans ; a 
book of pictures. cl926. 

q917.63 G3 

HiNES, Gustavus. 

A voyage 'round the world : with a 

history of the Oregon mission. 1S50. 

917.95 H66v 

Hudson, T. S. 

A scamper through America ; or, fif- 
teen thousand miles of ocean and 
continent in sixty days. 1882. 

917.3 H88 

Jackson, Joseph Francis Ambrose. 
America's most historic highway. Mar- 
ket street, Philadelphia. New ed. 
cl&26. 917.481 J13 

Lathrop, Elise L. 

Early American inns and taverns. 
1926. 917.3 L353 

LocKWOOD, Sarah M. 

New York, not so little and not so old. 
1926. q917.471 L8 

LiONGSTEETH, Thomas Morris. 

The Catskills. 1921. 917.47 L85c 

Merwin, Samuel. 

Old Concord, seen through western 
spectacles. 1926. 917.44 M57 

Pennell, Joseph. 

Joseph Pennell's pictures of Philadel- 
phia. 1926. q917.481 P4 

PuLLiNGEB, Herbert. 

Old German town. cl926. 917.481 P98 



RiTTENBERG, Caroline. 
Motor West. 1926. 



917.8 R61 



Sawyer, Lorenzo. 

Way sketches ; containing incidents of 
. travel across the plains from St. Jo- 
seph to California in 1850, with Let- 
ters describing life and conditions in 
the gold region. 1926. c917.8 S27 

Willis, Nathaniel Parker. 

A I'abri, or The tent pitch'd. 18.39. 

917.4777 W73 



SOUTH AMERICA. OCEANICA. 

Davis, John King. 

With the "x\urora" in the Antarctic, 
1911-1914. [1919] 919.9 D26 

MacCreagh, Gordon. 

'^^^lite waters and black. cl926. 

918.1 M13 
Silas, Ellis. 

A primitive Arcadia ; being the im- 
pressions of an artist in Papua. 
1926. 919.5 S58 

Verrill, Alpheus Hyatt. 

Panama of today. 1927. 918.6 V55p 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Happold, Frederick Crossfield. 

The adventure of man ; a brief his- 
tory of the world. cl926. 

909 H25 
Klapper, Paul. 
The teaching of history, with chapters 
on the teaching of civics. cl926. 

907 K63 
Robinson, James Harvey. 

The new history ; essays illustrating 
the modern historical outlook. 1922. 
904 R622 
Wells, Herbert George. 

Mr Belloc objects to "The outline of 

history." 1926. (The forum series) 

909 W54zb 

: — The outline of history ; being a 

plain history of life and mankind. 

New ed., rev. and rewritten. [1925] 

q909 W4a 

ANCIENT. 

Breasted, James Henry. 

The conquest of civilization. 1926. 

930 B82a 
JosEpnrs, Flavins. 

Josephus, with an English translation 
by H. St. J. Thackeray. 1926. v. 1. 
(The Loeb classical library. [Greek 
authors] ) 933 J83t 

[Strickland, Agnes] 
True stories from ancient history. 1868. 

930 S91 
Whitaker. John. 

The course of Hannibal over the Alps 
ascertained. 1794. 2 v. 

937.04 W57 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



189 



EUROPE. 

Ai>KiNS, Francis James. 
Europe's new map. [1925] 



940.9 A23 



Aemstrong, Hamilton Fish. 

The new Balkans. 1926. 949.7 A73 

Capek, Thomas. 

Origins of the Czechoslovak state. 
1926. 943.7 C23 

Davis, William Stearns. 

Europe since Waterloo ; a nontechnical 
history of Europe from the exile of 
Nalopeon to the Treaty of Versailles, 
1815-1919. cl926. 940.8 D26 

Febrero, Guglielmo. 

Words to the deaf ; an historian con- 
templates his age. 1926. 940.9 F38w 

Fkiedeich III, German emperor. 

The war diary of the emperor Freder- 
ick III, 1870-1871. 943.08 F91al 

Fry, Anna Ruth. 

A Quaker adventure, the story of nine 
years' relief and reconstruction. 
[1926] 940.937 F94 

GoDDEN, Gertrude M. 

Mussolini ; the birth of the new democ- 
racy. 1923. 945 G57 

Holmes, Thomas Rice Edward. 

Ancient Britain and the invasions of 
Julius Caesar. 1907. 942.01 H75 

Hume, David, d Smollett, Tobias George. 

The history of England. [18.52-54] 

8 V. q942 H9g 

Lapeade, William Thomas. 

British history for American students. 
1926. 942 L31 

Mathiez, Albert. 

The fall of Robespierre. 1927. 

944.04 M43 
Peeglee, Charles. 

America in the struggle for Czechoslo- 
vak independence. 1926. 943.7 P43 

Robertson, Sir William Robert, hart. 
Soldiers and statesmen, 1914^1918. 
1926. 2 V. 940.942 R65 

ScHAPiEO, Jacob Salwyn. 

Modern times in Europe. cl926. 

940.5 S29 



Toynbee, Arnold Joseph c6 Kirkwood, 
Kenneth P. 
Turkey. 1927. (The modern v.-orld. 
[A survey of historical forces] ) 

949.6 T75t 

WiLHELM, crown prince of the German 
empire and of Prussia. 
I seek the truth ; a book on responsibil- 
ity for the war. cl926. 

940.912 W67 

ASIA. 

Douglas, Sir Robert Kennaway. 

Europe and the Far East, 1506-1912, 
rev. and cor. with an additional 
chapter (1904-1912) 1913. (Cam- 
bridge historical series) 950 D73 

GooDNOW, Frank Johnson. 

China. 1926. 951 G65 

Ieelakd, Alleyne. 

The new Korea. cl926. 951.9 165 

Kent, Percy Horace Braund. 

The passing of the Manchus. 1912. 

951 K37 
Latourette, Kenneth Scott. 
The development of Japan. 2d ed. 1926. 

952 L35a 
TsuEUMi, Yusuke. 

Present day Japan. 1926. (Columbia' 
university lectures : Julius Beer 
foundation, 1924) '2»52 T8S 

WriYTE, Sir Alexander Frederick. 

Asia in the twentieth century. l926. 
(University of Virginia, Page-Bar- 
bour foundation) 950 W62 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Banks, Helen Ward. 

The story of Mexico, including '"The 
boys Prescott." 1926. 972 B218 

Berghold, Alexander. 

The Indians' revenge ; or, Days of hor- 
ror. Some appalling events in the 
history of the Sioux. 1891. 

970.1 B49 

Crashing Thunder, Winneiago Indian. 

Crashing Thunder; the" autobiography 

of an American Indian, edited by 

Paul Radin. 1926. 970.2 C89 

Creel, George. 

The people next door ; an interpretive 
history of Mexico & and the Mexi- 
cans. 1926. 972 C91 



190 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Ford, Tirey Lafayette. 

Dawn and the dons ; the romance of 
Monterey. 1926. c979.476 F71 



Grant, Blanche Chloe. 
Taos Indians. 1925. 



970.3 G76 



Hunt, Rockwell Dennis, ed. 

California and Californians. 1926. 5 v. 
qc979.4 H9 

LiNGLEY, Charles Ramsdell. 

Since the civil war. Rev. ed. cl926. 
973.8 L75a 
LiTTELL, William. 

Reprints of Littell's Political transac- 
tions in and concerning Kentucky 
and Letter of George Nicholas to his 
friend in Virginia, also General Wil- 
kinson's memorial. 1926. [Filson 
club publications] 976.9 F489 

Macaetney, Clarence Edward Noble. 
Highways and byways of the civil war. 
cl926. 973.73 M11 

Maurice, Sir Frederick Barton. 

Statesmen and soldiers of the civil war. 
1926. 973.7 M45 

MoTT, Mrs Gertrude. 

A handbook for Californiacs. 1926. 

C979.4 M92 
Palou, Francisco. 

Historical memoirs of New California. 
1926. 4 V. c979.4 P18 

Russell, Isaac K. 

Hidden heroes of the Rockies. 1925. 
(Pioneer life series) 978 R96 

Spargo, John. 

The Bennington battle monument. 
1925. 973.3 S736 

Vasconcelos, Jose. 

Aspects of Mexican civilization. cl926. 

972 V33 

Wertenbakee, Thomas Jefferson. 

The American people ; a history. 1926, 

973 W49 

AFRICA. OCEANICA. 

Kuykendall, Ralph S. 

A history of Hawaii. 1926. 

996.9 K97 

Pechkoff, Zinovi. 

The bugle sounds, life in the Foreign 
legion. 1926. 963 P36 



FRENCH. 
Aghion, Max. 

La theatre a Paris au XVIII^ siecle. 

q792 A2 
Alexander, Hartley Burr. 

L'art et la philosophie des Indiens de 
r Amerique du Nord. 1926. 

970.1 A37 
Bartsch, Adam von. 

Le peintre graveur. 1920. 21 v. 

760 B29 
Bernard, Emile. 

Souvenirs sur Paul Cezanne. 1926. 

759.4 C42b 
BoHN, Georges. 

La naissance de I'intelligence. 1909. 
(Bibliotheque de philosophie scien- 
tifique) 121 B67 

Gift. 

Boinet, E. 

Les doctrines medicales, leur evolution. 
1907. (Bibliotheque de philosophie 
scientifique) 610 B68 

Gift. 

Bordeaux, Henry. 

La Chartreuse du Reposoir. cl924. 

843 B72ch 
Gift of Dr. F. X. Voisard. 

BOREUX, Charles. 

L'art figyptien. 1926. (Bibliotheque 
d'histoire de l'art) q709.32 B7 

BoEJESON, Ingeborg d Grabhorn, R. 
Legons de reliure pour amateurs. 1926. 
• 686 B73 
Busset, Maurice. 

La technique moderne du bois grave. 
cl925. q761 B9 

Dacier, Emile. 

La gravure de genre et de moeurs. 
1925. (La gravure en France au 
XVIII« siecle) q769 D1 

Erasmus, Desiderius. 

Les coUoques. 1875-76. 3v 

244 E65od 
EsTAUNrf:, fidouard. 

L'appel de la route. cl926. 843 E79ap 

Exquemelin, Alexandre Olivier. 

Histoire des aventuriers flibustiers. 
1774. 4 V. 910.4 E96h 

France, Anatole. 

Anatole France en pantoufles. 1926. 

844 FSIan 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORXIA STATE LIBRARY. 



191 



La Vie en fleur. 1924. 843 F81v 



Gakxier, fidouard. 

Histoire de la verrerie et de reoiaille- 
rie. 1886. q748 G2 



Gaittiee, Leon. 

La chevalerie. [1895] 



q394.7 G2 



GurLLAtririN, fimile. 

La vie d'un, simple (Memoire.s d'un 
metayer) ouvrage couronne par 
I'Academie francaise. cl92G. 

843 G95 

Hakcourt, Raoul d' d Harcourt, M. d'. 
Les tissus indiens du vieux Perou. 
cl924. 677 H25 

International labor conference. 6th, 
Geneva, 1924. 
Conference Internationale du travail. 
International labour conference. 
Sixieme session. Sixth session. Ge- 
neve-Geneva, 1924. 2 V. 

q331.8 16 

Lackoix, Paul [d others'] 

Histoire de i'imprimerie et des arts et 
professions qui se rattachent h. la 
typographie, depuis leur fondation 
jusqu'a leur suppression en 1789. 
[1851] (Le livre d'or des metiers) 
q655 L14 

Langlois, Charles Victor. 

La vie en France au moyen age, de la 

fin du XII« au milieu du XIV« 

sifecle. 1926, '25. 2 v. 914.4 L28 

Las Cases, Philippe de. 

La Bretagne. [1926] (L'art rustique 
en France, III) q709.44 L3 

Levy, Edmond. 

Histoire de la peinture sur verre en 
Europe et particuliferement en Belgi- 
que. Avec planches par J.-B. Cap- 
ronnier. 1860. q748 L5 

Masson, Paul. 

Histoire du commerce francais dans le 
Levant au XVIII^ siecle. 1911. 

380 M42h 



Histoire du commerce frangais 

dans le Levant au XVII® si^de. 
1896. 380 M42 

MoNTELiTjs, Oscar. 

La civilisation primitive en Italie. 
1895-1910. 5 v. q913.45 M7 



Le musee d'art ; galerie des chefs-d'- 
oeuvre et precis de I'histoire de l'art. 
[1902-07] 2 V. q709 M9 



Olmer, Pierre. 

Le mobilier FranQais 
(1910-1925) 1926. 
et arts decoratifs) 



d'aujourd'hui 

(Architecture 

749 051 



PiCARD, Charles. 

La sculpture antique de Phidias a I'&re 

Byzantine. 1926. (Manuels d'his- 

toire de l'art) q732 P5 

PoLAiN, Louis. 

Marques des imprimeurs et libraires en 
France au XV® siecle. 1926. (Docu- 
ments typographiques du XV® siecle) 
q655.1 P76 

Re^tje des livres anciens. v. 1-2. 1917. 

q016.09 R4 

Roberts, Dorothea (Klumpke). 

Liste des nebuleuses et amas stellaires 
N. G. C. 1922. c523 R64 

Gift. 

Rostand, Edmond. 

Les musardises. fidition nouvelle, 1887- 
1893. 1911. 841 R83 

ScHLTTMBEEGER, Gustave Leou. 

L'epopee byzantine a la fin du dixiSme 
siecle. 1896-1905. 3 v. q949.5 S3 

Seive, a. 

Cours d'enseignement pacifiste. 1910. 

172.4 S49 
Gift of Dr E. B. Krehbiel. 

Tolstoi, Lev Nikolaevich, graf. 

Guerre et paix. 1922-26. (Oeuvres 
completes de Leon Tolstoi) 8 v. 

891.73 T65w2 

Tuetet, Alexandre. 

Repertoire general des sources manu- 
scrites de I'histoire de Paris pendant 
la revolution frangaise. 1890—1912. 
10 V. (Paris. Publications relatives 
k la revolution frangaise) 

qOI 6.944 T9 

VoRONOFF, Serge. 

Vivre. cl920. 612.6 V95v 

Gift of Dr F. X. Voisard. 

Webth, Leon. 

Puvis de Chavannes. [1926] (Peintres 
et sculpteurs) 759.4 P993w 



192 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Westlake. Jolm. 

Traite de droit international. Traduit 
sur la 2^ edition. 1924. (Publica- 
tions de la Dotation Carnegie pour la 
paix Internationale. Division de 
droit international) q341 W5 

ZaccOjVE, Pierre. 

Xouveau langage des fleurs. 1S71. 

716.2 Z14 
Zola, Emile. 

La Bete humaine. 1900. 843 Z86b 

Gift. 

La faute de I'Abbe Mouret. 1890. 

843 Z86f 

Gift. 

Germinal. 1895. 843 Z86g 

Gift. 

Nana. 1909. 



843 Z86n 



GERMAN. 

BASSEKMAXX-JoEDAisr. Ernst. 

Alte uhren und ibre meister. cl926. 

q681 B3 
BoEHX, Mas Ton. 

Die mode ; meuschen und moden im 
acbtzehnten jabrbuhdert, nacb bUdern 
und sticben der zeit, ausgewablt von 
Oskar Fiscbel. 1909. 391 B67 

Da>'zel, Tbeodor Wilbelm, ed. 

Mexiko. 1923. 3 v. (Kulturen der 
erde) q913.72 D1 

DoHjiE, Robert. 

Gescbicbte der deutscben baukunst. 
1887. q720.943 D6 

FiscHEL, Oskar 

Das moderne biibnenbild. [1923] 

q792 F5 
FoEKEE, Robert. 

Gescbicbte der europaiscben fliesen- 
keramik. 1901. q738 F72 

Feobel, Julius. 

Aus Amerika. 1857-58. 2 v. 

917.3 F92 
Geelach, Martin, ed. 

Allegorien, neue folge. 1900. 

q753 G3 
Geblixg, Reiubold. 

Der vollendete Menscb. Zweite, erwei- 
terte Auflage. 1906. 613 G37 

Gebstackee, Friedricb Wilbelm Chris- 
tian. 
Irrfabrten. humoristiscbe erzablung. 
1905. (Heatb's modem language 
series) 438 038 



Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendinicke. 
V. 1. 1925. qr016,093 G3 

Gogol, Nikolai Vasil'evich. 

Das Bildnis. 1920. 891.73 G61b 



Die nase. [1923] 



q891.73 06 



GciELixG. Adolpb. 

Stablsticb-sammlung der vorziiglicbsten 
Gemalde der Dresdener gallerie. 2 v. 
(Der kuustverein Neue serie) 

q708.3 06 

Haebler, Konrad. 
Handbuch der inkunabelkunde. 1925. 

093 H13 

Haxdbuch der patbogenen Mikroorganis- 
meu, unter Mitwirkung von Rudolf 
Abel. Herausgegeben von Dr W. 
Kolle und Dr A. von Wassermaun. 2 
vermehrte Aufl. 1912-1913. 

616.01 H2 

Heideich, Ernst. 

Die altdeutsche malerei. 1909. (Die 
kunst in bildem) q759.3 H46 

Alt-niederlandiscbe malerei. 1910. 



(Die kunst in bildern) q759.93 H4 

Hiebee, Hermann. 

Die miniaturen des friiben mittelalters. 
1912. (Klassiscbe illustratoren) 

q745 H6 

Homa:s'N'-Heeimbeeg, Emil. 

Die koblenversorgung in Osterreicb 
wfibrend des krieges. 1925. (Carnegie 
endowment for international peace. 
Division of economics and history) 

330.9436 H76 

Jonge, C. H., de 

Hollandiscbe Mobel und Raumkunst 
von 1650-1780. q749 J 7 

K. Akademle der Kiinste, Berlin. 

Ausstellung von werken franzosischer 

kunst des xviii. jabi-huuderts. 1910. 

f759.4 A3 

Kotzebue, Otto, von. 

Entdeckungsreise in die Siidsee und 
nach der Berings-strasse zur erfor- 
scbung einer nordostlicben durch- 
fabrt. 1825. 2 v. 910.4 K87e 

Ladewig, Paul. 

Die Bibliothek der gegenwart. cl923. 
x020 LI 5b 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



193 



Leibig, Karl. 

Die deiitsche volkswirtschaft in pro- 
duktion und verbrauch. Carnegie- 
stiftung fiir internationalen frieden, 
Abteilung fiir volkswirtschaft und 
geschichte. 1922. 330.943 L52 

LiND, Karl. 

Meisterwerke der kii'chlichen glasmal- 
erei. [1894-97] f748 L7 

LuDWiG, Emil. 

Bismarck. Neue erweiterte Ausg. 1917. 

B B622IU 



Manx, Thomas. 
Buddenbrooks, 
192.5. 2 V. 



verfall einer familie. 
833 M282 



Der zauberberg. 1926. 2 v. 

833 M282z 

MosER, Gustav von. 

Der bibliothekar. 1902. (Heath's 
modern language series) 

438 M89 

Gift of Miss Thelma Brackett. 

NlBELX-JVTGENLIED. 

Der Nibelunge not ; Kudrun ; heraus- 

gegeben von Eduard Sievers. 1922. 

831 N57si 

Pelka. Otto. 

Keramik der neuzeit. 1924. 

q738 P3 

Photographische gesellschaft. Berlin. 
Nach der natur. f770 P5 

Popovics, Alexander. 

Das geldwesen im kriege. 1925. (Car- 
negie endowment for international 
peace. Division of economics and his- 
tory) 336.436 P82 

RAYiiUND, Alexander. 

Alttiirkische Keramik in kleinasien und 
Konstantinopel. 1922. f738 R27 

Retzsch, Friedrich August Moritz. 

Gallerie zu Shakspeare's dramatisclien 
werken. 1860. 822.33 Hre 

ScHiMANK, Hans. 

Gesprach iiber die Einsteinsche 
Theorie ; versuch einer Einfiilirung 
in den Gedankenkreis. 1920. 

530 S33 

Schneider, Georg. 

Handbuch der bibliographie. 1923. 

010 S35 



Turgenev, Ivan Sergieevich. 

Das lied der triumphierenden liebe. 
[1923] q 89 1.73 T9 

Weil, Ernest. 

Die deutschen druckerzeichen des xv. 
jahrhunderts. 1924. [Die deutschen 
drucker- und buch-handlermarken] 
q655.1 W4 
Werfel, Franz V. 

Verdi ; roman der oper. 1925. 

833 M48 

ITALIAN. 

Ausonia; revista della Society italiana 
di archeologia e storia dell'arte. 
1906-21. 10 V. q913.05 A9 

Baratono, Pierangelo. 

Commenti al libro delle fate. 1920. 

853 B22 

Dedalo ; rassegna d'arte. v. 1-.3. 1920- 
22. q705 D2 



Deledda, Grazia. 

L'edera, romanzo. 1921. 



853 D34ed 



Faeixa, Salvatore. 

Si muore. L'ultima battaglia di prete 
Agostino. 2 ed. 1886. 853 F22s 

Prato. Giuseppe. 

II Piemonte e gli effetti della guerrd 
sulla sua vita economica e sociale. 
1925. (Carnegie endowment for 
international peace. Division of eco- 
nomics and history. Storia economica 
e sociale della guerra mondiale. 
Serie italiana) 330.945 P91 



Salgaki, Emilio. 

II re della montagna. 



q853 S1i 



Vijsrci, Leonardo da. 

I manoscritti di Leonardo da Vinci. 
[1925] 759.5 V77c 

CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
JANUARY, F E B R U A RY AND 
MARCH, 1927.t 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to 



tExeept when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
ofHce, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



194 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



the departments issuing them. The pub- 
lications of the University of California 
are offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are reqiiired 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in Neios 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Ageicultuee Depaetment. Monthly 

bulletin, vol. 16, nos. 1-3, January-March, 

1927. illus. 

No. 3. Proceedings of the Fifty- 
ninth convention of Fruit Growers 
and Farmers, Fullerton, California, 
November 9-10, 1926. 

CoNTEOLLEE. Biennial report for the 
seventy-sixth fiscal year, ending June 30, 
1925, and the seventy-seventh fiscal year, 
• ending June 30, 1926. 1927. 201 p. 

CoEPOEATiON Department. Corpor- 
ate securities act providing for the regu- 
lation and supervision of companies, 
brokers and agents and sales of securities. 
1927. 19 p. 

Educatiox, Depaetment of. Bulletin 
no. 2-G. Source material for conserva- 
tion, bird and arbor day. January 1, 
1927. 107 p. illus. 

Bibliographv in nature education, 
p. 104-107. 

Dedicated to Luther Burbank. 

Bulletin no. 10-Ext. University 



of California extension courses leading 
toward state teachers' credentials, series 
of 1927. 1927. 8 p. 

California exchange bulletin in 



rural education, vol. 1, no. 2, January, 
1927. 1927. 82 p. 

Fish and Game Commission. 
Twenty-ninth biennial report for the years 
1924-1926. 1927. 127 p. iUus. 

— — ■ — California fish and game, vol. 
13, no. 1, January, 1927. p. 1-75. illus. 

Interesting books on fish, fisheries 
and related subjects, p. 29-35. 

Educational films and lantern 
slides, p. 36-40. 

Goveenoe. Budget message and sum- 
marization of budget of proposed expendi- 
tures and estimated revenues of the State 



of California for the 79th and 80th fiscal 
years, July 1, 1927, to June 30, 1929. 
Submitted to the Senate and Assembly by 
C. C. Young, Governor. 1927. 23 p. 

Health, State Boaed op. Twenty- 
ninth biennial report for the fiscal years 
rom July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926. 1926. 
195 p. illus. maps. 

Special bulletin no. 20. Flies, 



their habits and control by William B. 
Herms. 1927. 28 p. illus. 

Special bulletin no. 42. Sani- 



tation of automobile camps. 1927. 39 p. 
illus. 

Weekly bulletin vol. 5, nos. 47— 



52. January-February ; vol. 6, nos. 1-7, 
February-March, 1927. 

Highway Commission. Fifth biennial 
report. November 1, 1926. 1926. 231 p. 
illus. maps. 

California highways, vol. 4, nos. 



1-3, January-March, 1927. illus. maps. 

Hydeaulic Mining Commission. Re- 
port upon the feasibility of the resumption 
of hydraulic mining in California : a re- 
port to the Legislature of 1927. 1927. 
85 p. illus. maps. 

Immigeation and Housing Commis- 
sion (San Francisco*)- Annual report, 
January, 1927. 1927. 36 p. 

Institutions, Depaetment of. Third 
biennial report for two years ending June 
30, 1926. 1926. 130 p. illus. 

Insueance Department (San Fran- 
cisco). List of persons, partnerships and 
corijorations licensed as insurance brokers 
and insurance adjusters in California, 
term ending July 1, 1927, including li- 
censes issued between August 15, 1926 
and December 31, 1926. 1927. 18 p. 

Judicial Council. First report to the 
Governor and the Legislatui'e. 1927. 
66 p. 

Legislative Counsel Bltkeau. Legal 
notices, a compilation of the statutes of 
California requiring the publication of 
notice and governing the time, place and 
manner of publication. 1926. 146 p. 



*The location of an ofRce or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. , 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



195 



Legislature. Report of the Joint Com- 
mittee of the Senate and Assembly for an 
intensive study of the water resources of 
California and the State Engineer's 
coordinated plan for their development. 
1927. 20 p. 

LiBRAEY, State. Biennial report for 
seventy-sixth and seventy-seventh fiscal 
years, July 1, 1924, t"o June 30 1926. 
1927. 20 p. 

News Notes of California Li- 



braries, vol. 22, no. 1, January, 1927. 99 
p. map. illus. 

Books for the blind department. 



News Notes. Reprinted from Neics Notes 
of California Libraries, January, 1927. 
12 p. 32°. 

Medical Examinees, Board of. 
Annual report, 1926. 1927. 39 p. 

Mining Bureau (San Francisco). 
Summary of operations California oil 
fields, vol. 12, no. 4, October, 1926. 
illus. maps. 

Prison Directors, State Board op 
(San Francisco). Biennial report, 
seventy-sixth and seventy-seventh fiscal 
years, 1925-1926. San Quentin. 234 p. 
illus. 

Public Instruction, Superintendent 
OF. Thirty-second biennial report for the 
school years ending June 30, 192-5, and 
June 30; 1926. 1927. 322 p. 

Same. Section I, 1927. 78 p. 



Public Works, Department of. 
Sacramento flood control project, revised 
plans, submitted to the Reclamation 
Board by W. F. McClure, State 
Engineer, February 10, 1925. 1927. 170 
p. illus. 

Maps and profiles in separate 
envelope. 

Division of Engineering and 

irrigation. Bulletin no. 11. Ground 
water resources of the Southern San 
Joaquin Valley. 1927. 146 p. charts, 
maps. 

Same, no. 12. Summary report 

on the water resources of California and 
a coordinated plan for their development, 
a report to the Legislature of 1927. 1927. 
49 p. illus. 



Division of Water Rights. Bul- 
letin no. 5. San Gabriel investigation, 
report for the period July 1, 1923, to 
September 30, 1926. 1927. 640 p. maps. 

Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco ) . Annual report from July 1, 1925, 
to .June 30, 1926. 1927. 985 p. 

Surveyor General. Biennial report 
for the term ending August 1, 1926. 

1926. 10 p. 

Teachers College, San Diego. The 
educational quarterly bulletin, vol. 15, 
no. 1. Announcement of courses, sum- 
mer session of 1927. March, 1927. 19 
p. illus. 

Teachers College, San Francisco. 
Summer session, June 27, to August 5, 

1927. 1927. 37 p. 12°. 

Teachers College, San Jose. Bul- 
letin, vol. 6, lio. 2. Summer school 
bulletin and circular of informatior^ of 
State Teachei-s College of San Jose. Cali- 
fornia. April, 1927. 39 p. 12°. 

University of California (Berkeley). 
Calendar, vol. LXVI, nos. 1-12, January- 
March, 1927. 8 p. folder. 

A weekly bulletin of official Uni- 
versity announcements. 

Price 2 5 cents a half year, postpaid. 

Chronicle, vol. 29, no. 1. 

January, 1927. 128 p. illus. roy. 8°. 

Price $2 per year ; single copies 
50 cents. 



Publications. American 

Archaeology and Ethnology, vol. 21, no. 
S. The Uhle collections from Nieveria, 
by A. H. Gayton. Berkeley, February 
28, 1927. p. 305-29, plates 91-7, 11 
figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 35 cents. 



Same, vol. 22, no. 3. 

Washo texts, by Grace Dangberg. 
Berkeley, February, 1927. p. 391-443. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 65 cents. 



Same, vol. 24, no. 1. 

The Uhle pottery collections from Nazca, 
by A. H. Gayton and A. L. Kroeber. 
Berkeley. Febi-uary 28, 1927. p. 1^6, 
plates 1-21, 12 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 60 cents. 



196 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Astronomy. Lick obser- 
vatory bulletin no. 382. Elements and 
ephemeris of comet / 1926 (Comas Sola) 
by Charles H. Smiley and Margaret K. 
Holbrook. Berkeley, January 15, 1927. 
p. 168-169. 4°. 

Same, no. 383. Eighty- 



five new double stars : twenty-fifth list, by 
Robert G. Aitken. Berkeley, January, 
1927. p. 170-182. 4°. 

Same, no. 384. A 



photometric study of the flash spectrum, 
by B. F. Carpenter. Berkeley, Decem- 
ber, 1926. p. 183-195. plates 9-10. 14 
figs, in text. 4°. 

Same, no. 385. The 



light-variations of the satellites of Jupi- 
ter and their application to measures of 
the solar constant, by Joel Stebbins. 
Berkeley, March 10, 1927. p. 1-11. 2 
figs, in text. 4°. 

Same, no. 386. The 



spectroscopic binary ^ Doradus, by 

Dorothy Applegate. Berkeley, March 14, 

1927. p. 12-18. 2 figs, in text. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per vol. in advance. 
Vol. 13 current. 

Botany, vol. 11, no. 6. 

Interspecific hybridization in Nicotiana. 
V. Cytological features of two Fj hybrids 
made with Nicotiana bigelovii as a par- 
ent, by T. H. Goodspeed and R. E. 
Clausen. Berkeley, March 17, 1927. p. 
117-25, 8 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 13, no. 13. 

New rhodophyceae from the Pacific Coast 
of North America. II, by Nathaniel 
Lyon Gardner. February 28, 1927. p. 
235-272, plates 24-35. roy. 8°. 
Price 50 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 14. 



New species of geldium on the Pacific 
Coast of North America, by Nathaniel 
Lyon Gardner. Berkeley, March 17, 
1927. p. 273-318, plates 36-54. roy. 8°. 
Price 60 cents. 
Same, vol. 13, no. 15. 



The occurrence of laticiferous vessels in 
the mature bark of hevea brasiliensis, by 
Eduardo Quisumbing. Berkeley, March 
22, 1927. p. 319-32, plates 55-58. roy. 

8°. 

Price 25 cents. 



Classical philology, vol. 

8, nos. 4 and 5. Note on the indefinite 
second person singular and some ten- 
dencies in post-Augustan Latin, by Her- 
bert C. Nutting. Berkeley, February 17, 
1927. p. 241-269. roy. 8°. 

In one cover. Price 40 cents. 



Same, vol. 8, no. 6. 

Thought relation and syntax, by Herbert 
C. Nutting. Berkeley, March 31, 1927. 
p. 271-88. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 9, no. 3. 



The Italian manuscripts of Lucretius. 
Part II. Variant readings, by William 
A. Merrill. Berkeley, March 31, 1927. 
p. 47-83. roy. 8°. 

Price 45 cents. 

Entomology, vol. 4, no. 



4. Notes on the life-history of two 
Oriental chalcidoid parasites of chrys- 
omphalus, by Harold Compere and Harry 

5. Smith. Berkeley, January 24, 1927. 
p. 63-73, 13 figures in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Geography, vol. 2, no. 



6. The cylindrical equal-area projection, 
by C. Warren Thornthwaite. Berkeley, 
March 23, 1927. p. 211-30, 8 figures in 
text, 1 map. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Geological sciences, vol. 



16, no. 8. An eocene invertebrate fauna 
from the La JoUa quadrangle, California, 
by Marcus A. Planna. Berkeley, March 
25, 1927. p. 247-398, plates 24-57. 
roy. 8°. 

Price ?1.90. 

Same, vol. 16, no. 9. 



Fossil cirripedia from the upper oligocene 
sooke formation of Vancouver Island, B. 
C, by Ira E. Cornwall. Berkeley, March 
17, 1927. p. 399-^08, plates 58, 59. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 16, no. 10. 



Skull and skeletal remains of a ruminant 
of the preptoceras-euceratherium group 
from the McKittrick pleistocene, Cali- 
fornia, by Chester Stock and E. L. Fur- 
long. Berkeley, January 25, 1927. p. 
409-34, plates 60-63, 5 figures in text. 
Price 40 cents. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



197 



Same. vol. 16, no. 11. 

Species of the mammalian subfamily 
bassarisciuae, by E. Raymond Hall. 
Berkeley, March 17, 1927. p. 435-48, 
plate 64, 2 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 16, no. 12. 

Marine oligocene of Oregon, by Hubert 
G. Scheuck. Berkeley, 1927. p. 449- 
60, 1 figure in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Mathematics, vol. 2, 

nos. 4 and 5. The rapid fitting of a cer- 
tain class of empirical formulaa by the 
method of least squares, by Edward Con- 
don. A rapid method for calculating the 
least squares solution of a polynomial 
of any degree, by Raymond T. Birge and 
John D. Shea. Berkeley, March 19, 
1927. p. 55-118. roy. 8°. 

In one cover. Price S5 cents. 

' Modern philology, vol. 

12, no. 5. Prevost's translations of 
Richardson's novels, by Frank Howard 
Wilcox. Berkeley, January 11, 1927. p. 
341^11. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.00. 

— Scripps Institution of 

Oceanography, La JoUa. Bulletin, Tech- 
nical series, vol. 1, no. 1. Effect of 
tidal changes on physical, chemical, and 
biological conditions in the sea water of 
the San Diego region, by Erik G. Moberg 
and Winfred Emory Allen. March 30, 
1927. p. 1-17, 4 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 1, nos. 2 

and 3. Quantitative studies on inshore 
marine diatoms and dinoflagellates of 
Southern California in 1921 and 1922, 
by Winfred Emory Allen. March 30, 
1927. p. 19-38, 3 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
In one cover. Price 25 cents.' 

Same, vol. 1, no. 4. 



Surface catches of marine diatoms and 
dinoflagellates made by U. S. S. "Pioneer" 
in Alaskan waters in 1923, by Winfred 
Emory Allen. Berkeley, March 30, 1927. 
p. 39—48, 2 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 



Same, vol. 1, 



no. 



Studies on marine diatoms and dinoflagel- 
lates caught with the Kofoid bucket in 
1923, by Henry P. Dorman. Berkeley, 

7—51527 



March 30, 1927. p. 49-61, 4 figures in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 1, no. 



Notes on cestodes and trematodes of 
marine fishes of Southern California, by 
George F. Sleggs. Berkeley, March 30, 
1927. p. 63-72, 14 figures in text, 
roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

• Same, vol. 1, nos. 7 and 



S. Quantitative studies on marine dia- 
toms and dinoflagellates at four inshore 
stations on the coast of California in 
1923. by Henry P. Dorman ; and Pelagic 
fish eggs off La JoUa, California, by ,P. 
S. Barnhart. Berkeley, March 30, 1927. 
p. 73-92, 6 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
In one cover. Price 2 5 cents. 

Same, vol. 1, no. 9. 



Marine phytoplankton in the region of 
La Jolla. California, during the summer 
of 1924. by George F. Sleggs. Berkeley, 
March 30, 1927. p. 93-117, 8 figures in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 30 cents. 

• Seismographic Stations. 



Bulletin, vol. 2, no. 10. The registration 
of earthquakes at the Berkeley station 
and at the Lick Observatory station from 
April 1, 1925, to September 30, 1925, T)y 
Peri-j^ Byerly. Berkeley, January 18, 
1927. p. 155-80. roy. 8°. 

Same, vol. 2, no. 11. 



The registration of earthquakes at the 
Berkeley station and at the Lick Observa- 
tory station from October 1, 1925, to 
March 31, 1926, by Perry Byerly^ 
Berkeley, January 18, 1927. p. 181-99. 
roy. 8°. 

: — - Same, vol. 2, no. 12. 



The registration of earthquakes at the 
Berkeley Station from April 1, 1926, to 
September 30, 1926, by Perry Byerly and 
Austin E. Jones. Berkeley, March 10, 
1927. p. 202-20. roy. 8°. 

Zoology, vol. 29, no. 13. 



The dorsal aortic plexus : A factor in the 
development of body wall drainage in the 
rabbit, by Leon H. Strong Berkeley, 
January 8, 1927. p. 305-19, 4 figures in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 2 5 cents. 



198 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Same, vol. 29, no. 14. 

Structural and functional changes pro- 
duced in the gastropod mollusk, Physa 
occidentalis, in the case of parasitism by 
the larvae of echinostoma revolutum, by 
Clarence T. Hurst. Berkeley, January 
24, 1927. p. 321^04, plates 16-19. roy. 
8°. 

Price $1.00. 

Same, vol. 29, no. 15. 

The neuromotor apparatus of Boveria 
teredinidi Nelson, a ciliate from the gills 
of teredo navalis, by Edith A. Pickard. 
Berkeley, January 15, 1927. p. 405-28, 
plate 20, roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 29, no. 16. 

Studies on the marine ciliate faveUa 
(Jorgensen), with special regard to the 
neuromotor apparatus and its role in the 
formation of the lorica, by Arthur 
Shackleton Campbell. Berkeley, Janu- 
ary 14, 1927. p. 429-52, plates 21, 22. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 30 cents. 

Same, vol. 29, no. 18. 

Kofoidia, a new flagellate from a Cali- 
fornia termite, by S. F. Light. Berkeley, 
March 2, 1927. p. 467-92, plates 23, 24, 
8 figures in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 35 cents. 

Same, vol. 30, no. 7. 

An outbreak of house mice in Kern 
County, California, by E. Raymond Hall. 
Berkeley, February 21, 1927. p. 189- 
203. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Whittiee State School, Journal of 
Delinquency, vol. 10, no. 5, September, 
1926. 

Price $1.25 per year. 

The Sentinel (new series), vol. 



23, nos. 11-12, November-December, 1926 ; 

vol. 24, nos. 1-3, January-March, 1927. 

Published monthly. Price $1.00 per 
year; 10 cents per copy. 

CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 1927. 

Berkeley. City Manager. Third 
annual report, 1925-^26. 

Public Library. Bulletin, vol. 



11, nos. 1-3, January-March, 1927. 



Long Beach. Public Library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 3, nos. 1-3, January-March, 
1927. 

Los Angeles. Board of Education. 
Educational research bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 
4-6, January-March, 1927. 

Fire Department. Fortieth an- 



nual report, 1926. 



Board of Public Service Com- 
missioners. Twenty-fourth annual report, 
1925. 

Municipal league. Light on 



your city's affairs. Bulletin, vol. 9, nos. 
6-8, January-March, 1927. 

Oakland. Auditor. Annual report, 
1926. 

Free library. Annual report, 



1925-26. 



Pasadena. Municipal Light and Power 
Department. 19th annual report, 1925- 
26. 

Water Department. Thirteenth 



annual report, 1925-26. 

POJIONA. Public Library. Annual re- 
port, 1926. 

Redlands. a. K. Smiley public li- 
brary. Annual report, 1925-26. 

Richmond. Auditor. Annual report, 
1926. 

Health Department. Monthly 



report, January-March, 1927. 

Public Library. Bulletin, vol. 



13, nos. 6-8, December, 1926, to January- 
February, 1927. 



Riverside. 
1926. 



Auditor. Annual report. 



Sacramento. Health Department. 
Bulletin, January-March, 1927. 

Chamber of Commerce. Capital 



business, January-March, 1927. 

San Diego. Health Department. 
Monthly bulletin, December, 1926, to 
January-March, 1927. 

San Francisco. Auditor. Annual 
report of financial transactions of the city 
and county of San Francisco, 1926. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



199 



. Board of Supervisors. Journal 

of proceedings, vol. 21, nos. 43-50, 
November-December, 1926. 



Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. The City, vol. 7, nos. 1-5, 



January-March, 1927. 



Chamber of Commerce. San 

Francisco business, vol. 14, nos. 1-8, 
January-March, 1927. 

Stocktox. City manager. Official 
bulletin, January-March, 1927. 



BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING JANUARY, FEBRUARY 
AND MARCH, 1927. 

In American Braille. 
MAGAZINES. 

cIlluminator, September, 1926. 

MUSIC. 
PIANO. 

Chopin, Fryderyk Franciszek. Pre- 
ludes, Op. 28, 24 nos. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs DoUie 
Franklin. 

In European Braille. 

BOOKS. 

Bennett. Enoch Arnold. The card ; 
a story of adventure in the Five Towns. 
. 3 vols. 

A delightfully humorous story. 

Buchan, John. The three hostages. 
4 vols. 

A well-told storj' of ingenuity and 
courage. 

Butler, Samuel. Erewhon, or Over the 
range. 3 vols. 

An account of a visit to an imagi- 
nary kingdom shut off from the rest 
of the world. 

Chappell, Jennie. Always happy, or 
The story of Helen Keller. 
Gift of Elmer E. Rhoads. 

Collins, Wilkie. The woman in white. 
8 vols. 

A mystery story. 

DowDALL, Hon. Mrs Mary Frances 
Harriet (Borthwick). Joking apart. 
2 vols. 



Farnol, Jeffery. The broad highway. 
5 vols. 

A young gentleman, starting out on 
foot to make his fortune to avoid 
complying with his uncle's erratic 
will, has many romantic adventures. 

Eraser, Cupt. Ian & Carpenter, Os- 
wald. Wireless for the blind. 
Reijrinted from Progress. 

Gaeoriau, Emile. Monsieur Lecoq. 4 

vols. 

The book is named for its principal 
character, a great detective. 

Haggard, Sir Henry Rider. People of 

the Mist. 5 vols. 

An adventure story. The hero 
rescues a beautiful girl from a 
detestable slave-dealer ; and after 
thrilling experiences goes in quest of 
the wondrous gems in the City of the 
People of the Mist. 

Hawkins, Anthony Hope. ("Anthony 

Hope," pseud.). The intrusions of 

Peggy. 4 vols. 

Peggy is an impulsive, self-reliant 
young lady who intrudes into divers 
sections of London life and plays a 
part in some complicated episodes. 

Johnston, Mary. By order of the com- 
pany. 4 vols. 

A story of Virginia in 1621. 
The American title of this book is ' 
"To have and to hold." 

Keats, John. Selections from his poeti- 
cal works, 1st and 2d series. 2 vols. 

Kipling, Rudyard. The record of 

Badalia Herodsfoot. 

Qontents: The record of Badalia 
Herodsfoot ; Judson and the empire ; 
The children of the Zodiac ; Envoy. 

Lucas, Edward Yerrall. Old lamps for 
new. 2 vols. 

Entertaining essays. 

Mac.^ulay, Rose. Told by an idiot. 3 

vols. 

Through the Garden family we 
watch the pageant of English life, 
see the passing of the mid-Victorians 
and the coming on of Edwardians and 
Georgians. 

Phillpotts, Eden. The grey room. 2 
vols. 

A mystery story. 

Purse, Ben. Some insurance problems 
and their solution. 



200 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



Rose, John Holland. The life of 
Nopoleon. 12 vols. 

Concerned mainly with his public 
career, and with governmental rather 
than military history. 

Scott, Hugh Stowell. ("Henry Seton 
Merriman," ijseud.). The vultures. 4 
vols. 

Love and political intrigue in War- 
saw immediately before tlie assassi- 
nation of Alexander II. 

SiiAW, Geokge Bernabd. Saint Joan. 
2 vols. 

A play giving a fine and moving 
interpretation of the Maid of Orleans. 

Smith, Hely. The frescoed chamber, or 
The new testament concealed in the 
old and the old revealed in the new. 
Gift of Elmer E). Rhoads. 

Wells, Herbert George. The history 
of Mr Polly. 2 vols. 

The story of a misfit career. 

French Text, 

Larousse, Pierre. Xouveau Larousse, 

adapte jl I'usage des aveugles par Geo. 

L. Raverat. Dictionnaire encyclo- 

pedique. Vol. 7. 

First 6 volumes previously received. 
Gift of American Braille Press, 
Inc. 

magazines. 
Current numbers of the following : 
Le Braille magazine. 
Braille mail. 
Braille musical magazine. 
Braille packet. 
Channels of blessing. 
Le Courrier musical et litteraire. 
Hampstead. 
HoRA jocunda. 

Interallied Braille magazine. 
Lightbringer. 
Literary journal. 
Progress. 
Santa Lucia. 
Tribune. 



MUSIC. 

B'RAILLe musical magazine. 

PIANO. 

*Bucalossi, p. Sweet violets. 

*DussEK, .JoHANN LuDwiG. La consola- 
tion. 

*Richards, Brinley. The echo of 
Lucerne. 

In Moon Type. 

BOOKS. 

fBiBLE. Old Testament. Isaiah, chaps. 
35 and 49. 

t Psalms. 3 vols. 

t Psalms 34, 8(5 and 96. 



■ yew Testa in e n t. Remans. 

chap. S. 

Sermon on the ilount. 



Galsworthy, John. The apple tree. 2 
vols. 

— Indian summer of a Forsyte. 2 



vols. 



The juryman. 



The three stories above are from 
his book called "Five tales." 

Hymns. Twenty-four hymns in loose 
sheets. 

Irving, Washington. Buckthorne and 
his friends. 

The Italian banditti. 2 vols. 

The money diggers. 2 vols. 

"Found among the papers of the 
late Diedrich Knickerbocker." 

Strange stories by a nervous 



gentleman. 

Kipling, Rudyard. Selected stories. 4 

vols. 

Contents: Vol. 1, Rikkl Tikki Tavi ; 
Wee Willie Winkle ; A matter of fact. 
Vol 2, William the Conqueror ; Moti 
Guj, mutineer. Vol. 3, Mowgli's 
brothers ; Tiger, Tiger ! The story of 
Muhammad Din. Vol. 4, The lost 
legion ; Namgay Doola ; A germ 
destroyer ; Tod's amendment ; The 
finances of the gods. 



*Gift of J. R. Lewarton. 

tDuplicate copy. Gift of Mrs G. W. 
Dickinson. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORXIA STATE LIBRARY. 



201 



Thundeestoems ; waterspouts. 

Volcanoes under water and The descent 
into a volcano. 



JIAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following: 
Dawn. 

Moon magazine. 

The ]Moon. weekly newspaper. 

In New York Point. 

BOOKS. 

HowELLS, WiLLiAii Dean. Literary 
friends and acquaintances ; a personal 
retrospect of American authorship. 2 
vols. 

Roosevelt, Theodoee. President's mes- 
sage to the two houses of Congress at 
the beginning of the first session of the 
fifty-seventh Congress. 

jiagazines. 
Current numbers of the following : 
Catholic transcript. 

Christian record. 
Gospel trumpet. 
Matilda Ziegler magazine. 
Sunday school monthly. 
Weekly review. 

In Revised Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with 
contractions. 

books. 

cBangs. .John Kendrick. A house-boat 
on the Styx. 2 vols. 

Being some account of the divers 
doings of the Associated Shades. 

cBeacii, Rex Ellingwood. Flowing gold. 
6 vols. 

Gift of U. S. Veterans Bureau. 

A story of the Texas oil fields 
after the war and the fortunes of the 
Briskow family when they struck oil. 

cBuTLER, Ellis Parker. Readings from 
the stories of Ellis Parker Butler, 



arranged by Lilian Holmes Strack. 2 

vols. 

Contents: Vol. 1, Billy Brad, con- 
vict ; Billy Brad and the forbidden 
fruit : Wings ; Billy and one in 
authority ; Billy and the big lie ; A 
jury of his peers. Vol. 2, The lady 
across the aisle ; A knight above 
reproach ; Hidden treasure ; The stolen 
Christmas tree ; The son and father 
movement. 

Hand copied b5^ and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cCady, H. Emilie. Lessons in truth, a 

course of twelve lessons in practical 

Christianity. 2 vols. 

Gift of Unity School of Chris- 
tianity. 

cChamberlain, George Agnew. Jarrad, 

last of the Pineys and Three black pills 

in a bottle. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cCoBB, Irvin Shrewsbury. ^Many laughs 
for many days ; another year's supply 
(.%5) of his favorite stories. 7 voLs. 

Gift of San Francisco Chapter, 
American Red Cross. 
Hand copied. 

cCohen, J/rs Alice Mary (Ross). The 
dear pretender. 2 vols. 

cCooPER, James Fenimore. The spy. 

8 vols. 

A story of the Revolution. The 
hero is a spy in the service of Wash- 
ington. 

cDeland, Mrs Margaret Wade (Camp- 
bell). An old Chester secret. 

Simple in plot, the story has the 
quality of suspense, never iDermitting 
the reader's interest to flag. 

Two side printing. 

Gift of Frederick T. Proctor. 

cDoubleday, Mrs Nellie Blanchax 

(De Graff). Birds, selected from the 

w^ritings of Xeltje Blanchan. S vols. 

Gift of American Brotherhood of 
Free Reading for the Blind. 

cDrummond, Henry. The greatest thing 
in the world. 

An appeal for the foundation of 
human intercourse and religious 
belief upon the great law of love. 

Two side printing. 

Gift of Mrs Sophia M. Crouse. 

cEddy, Mrs Mary Morse (Baker) 
Glover. Rudimental divine science. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of S. Rowan 
Cooley. 



202 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1927 



I ■ Science and health with key 

to the scriptures. 5 vols. 



*c The unity of good. 

cEggleston, Edward. The Hoosier 
schoolmaster. 3 vols. 

A story of backwoods life in 
Indiana. 

cEiGHTEEN articles from Popular Mechan- 
ics, by various authors. 

Contents: Auto tops make ferry 
boats; Buried Indian city found; 
Keeping anglers supplied with fish 
lures ; Radio prospector with loop 
aerial locates hidden ores ; Electric- 
lighted diving chamber permits work 
in deep water ; Wrapping twine from 
pine trees ; Around the world by 
wire ; Metal houses built in a day ; 
Romance of the pipe line ; Ships 
climb hills and cross forests in cen- 
tury-old canal ; Looking down on us ; 
Nature's cleverest mechanic ; Night 
watchmen of the sea ; Mystery city 
built before Babylon reveals origin 
of writing ; Girdling the earth by 
radio ; Radio photos sent five thou- 
sand miles ; Martyrs of science ; Doc- 
tors' pills from hot-houses. 

cFeltek, Will D. The Sweet family. 
A play. 

cFox, John, Jr. The trail of the Lone- 
some Pine. 3 vols. 

A Kentucky feud and an industrial 
boom furnish the background for an 
idyllic love story. 

cFranklin, Benjamin. Autobiography 
of Benjamin Franklin. 8 vols. 

cGale, Zona. The neighbors. 
•A play. 

cGellibrand. Emma. J. Cole. 
The story of a boy. 

cHalladay, Howard Virgil. Applied 
anatomy of the spine. 

cHastings, H. L. Bible truths made 
plain. 

Contains also: Blessed hope of the 
resurrection by F. A. Coffin ; The 
hope of the Redeemer by William A. 
Spicer. 

Gift of National Braille Tran- 
scribers Society. 

Hand copied. 

cHOOKER, Mrs FORRESTINE (CoOPER). 

Prince Jan, St. Bernard. 

How a dog from the land of snow 
made good in the land of no snow. 

cHovEY, Priscilla. The gift without the 
giver. 

A Christmas story. 



♦Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs G. W. 
Dickinson. 



cHuESTON, Ethel. Merry O ! 2 vol^. 

Merry O is a self-reliant Ameri- 
can girl, the support of her aged 
father and younger sisters. She takes 
to the road with her family in a 
Ford as a traveling book department. 

cKahn, Otto Hermann. Selections 
from "Of many things." 

Contents: Art and America ; An- 
tonio Scotti's jubilee ; Art and the 
Catholic Church ; Edward Henry 
Harriman; Reminiscences of conver- 
sations with Colonel Theodore Roose- 
velt. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
M. L. Brereton. 

cKimball, Edward A. Answers to ques- 
tions concerning Christian Science and 
Christian Science, its compassionate 
appeal. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of S. Rowan 
Cooley. 

cLagerlof, Selma. Christ legends. 3 
vols. 

Gift of Mrs Thomas R. Ptoctor. 

cLoring, Emilie. Here comes the sun. 
3 vols. 

cLuTZ, Mrs Grace (Livingston) Hill. 
The big blue soldier. 

cMacGrath, Harold. The princess 

elopes. 

The chief figures In this story of 
rapid action are the madcap Princess 
of Barscheit, her grumpy uncle intent 
upon a suitable marriage for her, 
and a young American medical stu- 
dent. 

cMadison, Mrs Lucy (Foster). Peggy 
Owen. 2 vols. 



Peggy Owen and liberty. 2 vols. 
Peggy Owen at Yorktown. 2 



vols. 



c Peggy Owen, patriot. 2 vols. 

The Peggy Owen stories are inter- 
esting to girls. 

cMarkey, Corinne Harris. Now if 
it only hadn't rained. 

cMayo, Margaret. Polly of the circus. 

Polly, the circus rider, falls from 
her horse and is taken to a young 
clergj^man's home where she is re- 
stored to health. 

cMiscELLANEOUS poems, compiled by Mrs 

Emma W. McBurney. 

Gift of National Braille Tran- 
scribers Society. 
Hand copied. 



vol. 22, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



203 



cMoNAHAN, Maud. The children's saint ; 
the story of Saint Madeleine Sophia. 

Gift of Kenwood Alumnae Braille 
Center. 

cRiGGS, Mrs Kate Douglas (Smith) 
"WiGGiN. A child's journey with 
Dickens. 

The story of a brief railway jour- 
ney which the author took with Dick- 
ens when she was a little girl and he 
was lecturing in this country. 
Two side printing. 
Gift of Mrs Sophia M. Grouse. 

c Mother Carey's chickens. 3 vols. 



Charming story of four children 
and their widowed mother in a little 
Maine village. 

cRocK, Joseph Francis Chaeles. 
Through the great river trenches of 
Asia. 

From National Geographic Maga- 
zine. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cSawyer, Ruth. Seven miles to Arden. 

2 vols. 

A delightful and not too absurd 
little romance. 

cSeawell, Molly Eliot. The sprightly 

romance of Marsac. 2 vols. 

A lively little story with a great 
deal of action and animated dialogue. 

cShoet articles, by various authors. 

Contents: Growing fur coats on 
farms ; The centenary of electricity ; 
Strange ways of earning a living ; 
Radio and movies ; Talking movies' 
success ; Life and work of Lee De 
Forest ; Building for eternity ; Elec- 
tric hens hatching chicks ; One man 
left of Shaker sect ; Making of a 
detective ; The sky curtain. 

From Popular Mechanics, July, 
1925, and Radio News, November, 
1925. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cA SMALL collection of standard hymns. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of E. F. Gary. 

cSnow, C, M. The seal of God and The 

second coming of Jesus. 

Gift of National Braille Tran- 
scribers Society. 
Hand copied. 

cStahl, Ferdinand A. In the land of 

the Incas. 2 vols. 

Gift of National Braille Tran- 
scribers Society. 
Hand copied. 

cStevenson, Robert Louis. Across the 

plains, with other memories and essays. 

2 vols. 

Two-side printing. 

Gift of Mrs Arthur Ryerson. 



cThompson, Vance. The pointed tower. 
3 vols. 

A detective story. 

*cTownsend, Mrs Frances (Hodgson) 
B'URNett. The dawn of a to-morrow. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs G. W. 
Dickinson. 

cWheeler, William Morton. Social life 
among the insects. G vols. 

Reproduced by the Garin process. 

*cWylie, Ida Alena Ross. Bluebeard's 
chamber. 3 vols. 

*c Grandmother Bernle learns her 



letters. 2 vols. 

magazines. 
Current numbers of the following : 

cAmerican review for the blind. 

cThe Beacon. 

cBraelle courier. 

cThe Braille mirror. 

cBeaille star theosophist 

cCatholic review. 

cChristian record. 

cChristian science quarterly. 

cChurch herald for the blind. 

oGospel trumpet. 

cMatilda Ziegler magazine. 

cMessenger to the sightless. 

cOur own. 

Searchlight. 

cSuNDAY school monthly. 

In Ink Print. 

magazines. 

Current numbers of the following: 

The Beacon. 
Outlook for the blind. 
St. Dunstan's review. 



*Hand copied by and gift of Mrs Carrie 
Hodge. 



51527 6-27 1520 



Vol. 22, No. 3 JULY 1927 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER— SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST 

BOND ISSUE CARRIES AT SAN MATEO. 

NAPA COUNTY FREE LIBRARY DOLL SHOW. 

NEW BUILDINGS FOR NILES, ALAMEDA CO.; OJAI, VENTURA CO. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



CALIFORNIA STATE PBINTINO OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO, 1927 



53133 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
"ON TO OREGON" — 205 

1927 LEGISLATION AFFECTING LIBRARIES- — 209 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 211 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 212 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 213 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 214 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 234 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 241 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 244 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 245 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 248 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 251 

Staff, Etc. 251 

Departments 252 

Recent Accessions 257 

Califobnia State Publications Received During April, Mat and 
June, 1927 287 



California City Publications Received During April, Mat and June, 

1927 "^^^ 

Books for the Blind Added During April, Mat and June, 1927 290 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the CALiFORNLi. 

State Librart. . 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 

Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-dass matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



"ON TO OREGON." 



By Edith GantTj Librarian, Plumas County Free Library, Quincy, California. 



The First Joint Meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association (32d annual 
conference), the California County Libra- 
rians' (ISth annual conference) and the 
Pacific Northwest Library Association 
(18th annual conference) was held at 
Gearhart-by-the-Sea, Oregon, June 13 to 
15, 1927. 

With Mr Ferguson and Miss Mulheron, 
graciously presiding and the two secre- 
tary-treasurers. Miss Gibson and Miss 
Johns recording, the meeting got under 
way promptly at 2 p.m. on Monday. The 
reports of committees of both Associations 
were read and necessary business trans- 
acted. Mr Ferguson read telegrams from 
Mayor Rolph, the Tourist Bureaus and 
the Chamber of Commerce of San Fran- 
cisco inviting the C. L. A. to hold 
their next annual conference in that 
city. To maintain a perfect balance, 
Mr Woods promptly issued an invita- 
tion in behalf of Riverside. Miss 
Overbury, the County Librarian of York- 
shire County, England, our visitor from 
farthest away, was introduced to the meet- 
ing by Miss Mulheron. Miss Overbury, 
in visiting California County Libraries 
had visited Miss Stoddard's joint counties, 
Merced and Mariposa. She was still 
marveling over the distances traveled for 
she had hesitated about going to a distant 
Yorkshire Branch Library, all of eight 
miles away. 

At this first session Miss Barker, in the 
name of the Astoria Chamber of Com- 
merce, invited the whole assemblage on a 
trip around historic Astoria. Then Miss 
Mulheron invited the C. L. A. to view the 
Rose Festival Parade from the Multnomah 
County Library lawn, followed by a tour 
of the library and tea in the Staff Room 
and to attend Rosaria, the beautiful Port- 
land Pageant of the Rose, as the guests 
of the P. N. L. A. The charming hospi- 
tality of Miss Mulheron and her P. N. 
L. A. throughout the whole meeting was a 
constant joy to their C. L. A. guests and 
assured the great success of the meeting 
from the start. Those who were fortunate 
enough to be able to stay over in Portland 
for the Rose Festival Parade and Rosaria, 
Thursday evening, felt that the exquisite 
beauty and colorfulness of it all was the 
perfect climax for the very enjoyable 
First Joint Meeting. 

Then at three o'clock began the thrice 
welcoming of the C. L. A. by the P. N. 
L. A. under Miss Mulheron's guidance. 
Miss Marvin felicitously surveyed the 
growth of the Northwest and California, 

53132 



the P. N. L. A. and the libraries. Her 
welcome was captivating and was cer- 
tainly most sincere to survive the rigor- 
ous censorship to which she touchingly 
referred. 

Mr Jennings, the second of the wel- 
coming triumvirate, spoke of the advan- 
tages of the western libraries where the 
collections might lack the old mss but 
they also lacked the old timber on the 
shelves. He spoke of the contributions 
of the western libraries to the library 
world. The county libraries of California 
are now recognized in literature, by the 
A. L. A., the Carnegie Corporation and 
the British Library Association through 
its invitation to Mr Ferguson, to address 
their convention this Fall. The P. N. 
L. A. has contributed the idea of the 
Subscription Book Committee, which the 
A. L. A. is now taking over and also the 
Committee for Work with the Blind 
which was a forerunner of the idea of 
regional libraries now advocated by the 
Library of Congress. 

Mr Ridington, to be sure that no one 
felt uncertain at this point, extended the 
welcome north to the Dominion of Can- 
ada, which by the way is celebrating its 
60th anniversary of confederation this 
year. Mr Ridington spoke of the need , 
and desire for mutual helpfulness and 
rejoiced in the accomplished fact of our 
First Joint Meeting. 

Mr Ferguson responded to all this wel- 
coming very appreciatively and the meet- 
ing then adjourned to have tea in the 
hotel lobby. 

Monday evening the California County 
Librarians held sway with Mr Ferguson 
presiding. A telegram from Miss Culver 
and Miss Harris brought greetings from 
Louisiana where they are still carrying 
on in spite of the flood. Miss Waters 
also wired her greetings and regret that 
she could not attend the meeting. 

Mrs Babcock with the third largest 
county spoke for the large county library. 
Her County of Kern with the area of 
Massachusetts, with its mountains and 
deserts and fertile fields, its mines and 
orchards, cities, towns and country, offers 
every variety of library problem. Mrs 
Babcock surveyed her whole field of work 
interestingly and with marvelous clarity. 
Her building program certainly thrilled 
envious listeners. Eight librai-y buildings 
outside of Bakersfield ! Mrs Babcock 
mentioned that the A. L. A. Survey gave 
two California County Libraries credit for 
doing reference work by mail. That is 



206 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



taken for granted in every county library. 
The problem of keeping m touch with the 
Custodians is solved in various ways, 
meetings, visits to branches, and in Con- 
tra Costa County, Mrs Whitbeck pub- 
lishes her "Library Link." From the 
staff, the budget and P. T. A. lists, Mrs 
Babcock proceeded to the need and now a 
possibility of having a new Headquarters 
Building for Kern County Free Library. 
We will indeed rejoice with her when it 
is an accomplished fact. 

Miss Minette Stoddard, of Merced and 
the newly annexed Yosemite, spoke for 
the middle sized county library. Her 
harrowing tale of a trip into Mariposa 
County, going up hill with just her 
emergency brake to rely upon, emerging 
into the midst of a band of sheep, running 
over a rattler and having a puncture all 
at the same time, commanded breathless 
attention. It was very interesting to hear 
about Mariposa County contracting for 
library service. The Parent Teachers' 
Association demanded library service for 
their childi'en so strongly that the Super- 
visors turned over their road implement 
fund to the library. Her schools were 
the first consideration and then the com- 
munity branches. 

Miss Lenala Martin, of Lassen Countj% 
spoke for the small county library. There 
are eleven in the state, out of a total of 
seventeen, which have to cope with heavy 
snow and cold. A branch that is S5 miles 
away by stage and train will be 125 or 
more in the winter. The small county 
has long distances to be covered but the 
scarcity of people makes it possible for 
the Librarian to know them well. The 
Librarian knows hardship) but also com- 
pensations. In many communities the 
library furnishes the only diversion. 
Groups are organized for art classes in 
one county and as friends of reading for 
book talks in another. 

Miss Eleanor Hitt, of San Diego 
County, came right up the state binding 
the parts together. She surveyed the 
types of County Libraries from sea-level 
to the Sierra Mts and down again to 
Death Valley, below sea-level, counties 
without a railroad like Trinity to those 
with a network of roads like Los Angeles 
Countj'. Regardless of these differences 
the counties are all bound together by the 
County Free Library Law. While Ihe 
Supervisors of a county appoint the 
Librarian, she must be au accredited 
County Librarian. The State Library 
calls the meeting of the County Libra- 
rians and the law makes it obligatory to 
attend. In fact the State Library 
begins where the law leaves off. The 



County Library Organizer from the State 
Library, who helps establish the county 
library makes the connection with the 
State Library in the minds of the people, 
at the very start. Then through the 
books and pictures borrowed for them, 
from the State Library, they never lose 
it. She spoke of the spirit of the County 
Librarians' Meetings as that of adventure, 
friendliness and enthusiasm. Indeed Mr 
Gillis, the kindly guide, philosopher and 
friend of the first county libraries and 
librarians, held the first meetings at a 
separate time and place to protect others 
from this enthusiasm. Altogether the 
California idea was most adequately pre- 
sented to our friends to the north. Mr 
Ferguson added that this was not given 
as a pattern, but simply to show how the 
California System worked. 

Tuesday morning there was a five- 
ringed circus of round tables, each with a 
splendid program and judging by the one 
attended and another looked in upon, 
they were full of pithy discussion and 
comment. In "Circulation" the meeting 
became almost hilarious when Miss Sue 
Smith undertook to reply to Professor 
Collins and explain just why she for one 
did not encourage greater cordiality be- 
hind the desk. In her library with some- 
thing like ten weddings among the staff 
and having to call in the police to fend 
off too attentive borrowers, the strain was 
great enough as it was on the Head 
Librarian. 

That afternoon Mr Ferguson, before 
opening the discussion, read a telegram 
from Leslie I. Hood and one from Mr 
Henry, the beloved first president of the 
P. N. L. A., now slowly recuperating from 
a long illness. There was real regret 
that Mr Henry could not be at this first 
joint meeting, which he would have en- 
joj-ed so much. 

Miss Lewis' paper on modern tendencies 
in humor was read by Miss Porter. 
Humor might well be put on the curricu- 
lum for library schools for librarians need 
an inexhaustible store of it. Mr Dooley 
on diplomacy and prayers for victory 
sounded like something that must be ac- 
quired at once. 

"To outline" by Miss Althea Warren be- 
came the tale of a fad that has swept the 
country like a prairie fire. Wells' immortal 
Outline held firet place as a non-fiction 
best seller for 23 months and is still 
among the six best sellers. Intelligence 
tests and the war are blamed for this 
sudden demand for all knowledge in brief. 
Miss Warren did not miss a single di- 
vision in the Dewey Decimal ; in fact, she 
had from one to several outlines on every 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



ON TO OREGON. 



207 



subject. Her paper in the Proceedings 
will be valuable for reference in case you 
have accidentally missed any. Did Miss 
Warren say that ,the outlines had started 
the adult education movement? At any 
rate the new tendency is shown plainly 
in the new A. L. A. Catalog, in the in- 
creased entries under informational 
reading. 

Mrs Virginia Bacon of Portland, dealt 
with modern fiction. There is a question 
in her mind whether the tendency is so 
modern when you compare Hamlet with 
Sous and Lovers, for example. The 
mother who did not want a novel for her 
young daughter, but rather a story with 
no physiology in it was reasonable enough, 
even though she meant psychology. Many 
modern novels must be written by special- 
ists, those men who know more and more 
about less and less, as Mrs Bacon defined 
them. 

In biography, Miss Blanche Galloway 
of Madera, very happily noted the changes 
from Plutarch, who wrote of man in his 
relation to his environment, to Bradford, 
who with his psychography, has the living 
man walk through the pages. Boswell's 
Johnson still remains, however, the most 
perfect picture of one man. One tendency 
today is toward the seamy side with 
characters like Anthony Comstock and 
John L. Sullivan for subject matter. 

An unexpected treat for which thanks 
are due Mr Friedman of Macmillan Com- 
pany was a talk by Mr Lewis Browne, 
author of This Believing World and 
Stranger than Fiction. Mr Browne is a 
most delightful speaker and a marvelous 
story teller as we discovered when he 
appeared as part of' the Jinks, in the 
evening. He felt it necessary to provide 
an alibi or rather several for having writ- 
ten a best-seller. As he said, Leonardo 
da Vinci knew everything of his time, 
but that is impossible for any human 
being today and so people crave a glimpse 
of everything. His comments on the 
rhythm, drama and movement of prose 
writings were most interesting, with 
Porgy as an excellent example. 

Jinks night is always splendid fun. 
Mrs Watch and Mrs Ward were certainly 
the ideal book committee for Boston. 
Very little escaped them but a little mil- 
linery like green hats, certainly not in- 
siduous Bolshevist propaganda like Little 
Red Riding Hood. Their costumes were 
so charmingly appropriate too. An ani- 
mated cartoon, or was it an illustrated 
monologue, was delightful and the chil- 
dren's story hour, made up of those 
lovely appreciative children, who make 
one feel that drowning is really too good 



for them. It was an all star cast, as 
were the people in "Six books in search 
of a Library." The audience called for 
Author and Mrs Virginia Bacon must 
needs make her bow. It was a matter for 
regret that Boston's Uplift group could 
not be there. Mr Lewis Browne enter- 
tained with stories that one longed to 
remember just so, long enough to try them 
out, regardless of the loss they would 
inevitably suifer. He is a rare raconteur. 

While the rest of the people went up- 
stairs to the dining-room, now converted 
into a dance hall, with a good orchestra, 
who had played for many dinner parties 
earlier in the evening, the County Li- 
brarians gathered in one of the small 
assembly rooms entirely devoid of furni- 
ture, for a little meeting. This was brief 
and held standing, both necessarily. The 
business which never takes long, com- 
pleted, Mr Bea gracefully complimented 
the group. Mr Ferguson paid a beautiful 
tribute to Miss Julia Steffa, who has 
passed away since our last meeting. 

Throughout the meeting there were 
pleasant luncheons and dinner parties, 
and the Library Schools had their usual 
get-together parties, all of which add so 
much to the pleasure of everyone. The 
management were so solicitous for the 
comfort and pleasure of the guests that it 
added much to the general cheer. The 
view from the dining-room windows out 
over the water would have helped any 
jaded appetite if there had been such. 

Jinks night, always noisy and jolly had 
balloon contests between the dances which 
added a good deal to the hilarity. 

Wednesday, the last day of the meeting 
began with a symposium on The Libra- 
rian and laer Reading, conducted by Mrs 
Linn, our charming in-coming president. 
Mr Peri'y read a clever paper called The 
Lost Librarian, by Miss Katherine Ken- 
dig, which opened the discussion and there 
were many intriguing book reviews. Mr 
Graves spoke of his exijeriment in the 
recreational reading of the students of 
Humboldt State Teachers' College and 
read two letters from child poets, Helen 
Douglas Adams, author of Elfin Pedler 
and other poems and Nathalie Crane of 
Red-headed Janitor boy fame. The charm- 
ing girlish letter of the English child and 
the rather sophisticated letter of the 
American city child gave excellent pictures 
of contra.sting environments. Mrs AVhit- 
beck spoke of a delightful hobby, that of 
extra illustrating books, adding water 
color to such books as the woodblock 
edition of The Shropshire Lad. This was 
followed by a talk on broadcasting book 
chats over the radio, by Mr Richard G. 



208 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Montgomery of the J. K. Gill Company 
of Portland. Mr Montgomery said that 
the book stores benefited and the public 
libraries as well, but he thought that it 
was a good advertising medium. 

That afternoon there was a short busi- 
ness session with the installing of the new 
officers, Mrs Frances B. Linn, of Santa 
Barbara, President of the C. L. A. , Miss 
Minette Stoddard, of Merced and Mari- 
posa counties, Vice President, and Miss 
Hazel Gibson, Secretary and Treasurer, 
amid smiles and speeches. The P. N. 
L. A. officers are Miss Sprague, of Salt 
Lake, President, Miss Rockwood, Vice 
President, and Miss Johns of Longview, 
Secretary-treasurer. Miss Sprague was 
unfortunately absent from the meeting 
and so could not be personally installed. 
P. N. L. A. was invited to hold its next 
meeting at Spokane. The reports of 
committees completed the session and 
everyone was off to visit Astoria as guests 
of the Astoria Chamber of Commerce. 
We were told of the frightfully disastrous 
fire of a very few years ago when the 
whole city was nearly wiped out. It 
has been splendidly rebuilt and in such 
a way that it is hoped another such dis- 
aster will be impossible. The country is 
very beautiful and the view from the hill 
of the monument is indeed wonderful. 
This monument, erected by Vincent Astor 
to the memory of John Jacob Astor and 
the Oregon pioneers, is a pictorial his- 
tory from the time of Lewis and Clark 
up toward modern time. Courage and 



hospitality seem to be well established 
traditions of Astoria that are ably car- 
ried on by the present generation. 

After more pleasant dinner parties in 
the Gearhart dining room with even a 
marvelous sunset over the water for full 
measure, everyone gathered in the lobby 
to enjoy the reading of The Chinese 
Nightingale and other poems by Vachel 
Lindsay. Typewritten copies of The 
Blacksmith's Serenade were given out so 
that everyone could chant the choruses 
with Mr Lindsay. Mr Ferguson and the 
front row, generally became quite profes- 
sional with "Do you hear me, Polly Ann, 
Polly Ann?" and other choruses. 

This was the last night of the conven- 
tion and people lingered long in the lobby 
for that last minute's talk, hating to say 
the inevitable Goodby for another year. 
The next morning was one of hurried 
early starts back to Portland. In the 
afternoon a fragment of the convention 
met at the Library to enjoy the Rose 
Festival Parade from chairs on the 
Library side lawn, then a tour of Miss 
Mulheron's splendid library ending with 
tea with our delightful Portland hostesses 
in their staff-room. That night the C. 
L. A. was reduced to scattered twos and 
threes who regretted the fact that the 
others were missing that beautiful pag- 
eant so ably staged in that great stadium 
with the dark sky sprinkled with stars, 
showing above the stage drops. So the 
First Joint Meeting came to an end. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 1927 legislation affecting libraries. 



209 



1927 LEGISLATION AFFECTING LIBRARIES. 



state Library. 

A. B. 500, chap. 142, the state budget 
bill, carries an appropriation of $302,350 
for the biennium beginning July 1, 1927. 
$5,000 of this is to be used for two 
statues to be placed in the Hall of Fame 
in Washington — a new commission (S. 
B. 652, chap. 681) composed of the State 
Librarian and four other members having 
been authorized by the Legislature to 
take charge of this matter. (The persons 
whose statues are to be placed in the 
Hall of Fame are designated in S. C. R. 
17, resolution chap. 62.) 

A. B. 1079. chap. 788, appropriates 
any unencumbered balance remaining in 
the State Library fund on June 30, 1927, 
"for use in the payment of expenses in 
connection with the removal of the State 
Library to new quarters, and for the 
repairs or remodeling of the new or old 
library quarters." The provision for a 
separate state library fund is repealed. 

A. B. 1207, chap. 579, makes the State 
Librai-y a division of libraries in the 
state department of education. The state 
librarian becomes an appointee of the 
governor. 

Among the measures adopted at the 
general election held Nov. 2, 1926, the 
one of special interest to librarians was 
Proposition No. 10 (adding section 4 to 
article 16 of the Constitution) which 
provided for the issuance of $8,500,000 
of state bonds, of which $1,250,000 wUl 
be used to complete the state library and 
courts building and the new state oflBce 
building. 

County Libraries. 

A. B. 1092, chap. 592, provides that 
"Whenever any of the territory being 
served by a county free library shall be 
annexed to, or otherwise included within 
any municipal corporation not served by 
such county free library, the board of 
supervisors of such county shall order the 
county free library to continue to serve 
such territory so annexed to, or otherwise 
included within said municipality, until 
the end of the fiscal year or years for 
which a tax has been levied upon the 
property of such annexed territory for the 
support of said county free library." 

A. B. 419, chap. 890, raises the salai-y 
of the County Librarian of Contra Costa 
County from $2400 to $2700. (Amend 
ment to sec. 9 of the county library law.) 

A. B. 1075, chap. 872, the Contra Costa 
County Government act, carries the same 
provision as the act above. 



A. B. 585, chap. 892, raises the salary 
of the County Librarian of Inyo County 
from $1500 to $1800. 

A. B. 716, chap. 780, raises the salary 
of the County Librarian of Kern County 
from $2400 to $3000. 

A. B. 287, chap. 1-59, raises the salary 
of the County Librarian of Orange 
County from $1800 to $2100. 

A. B. 253, chap. .549, raises the salai-y 
of the County Librarian of Plumas 
County from $1800 to $2100. 

A. B. 316, chap. .550, provides for the 
payment of custodians in' San Mateo 
County. 

County Law Libraries. 

A. B. 1033, chap. 54, provides for the 
establishment and maintenance of branch 
county law libraries. 

A. B. &44, chap. 231, provides for the 
filing of the annual reports of county law 
library boards in July instead of in 
December. 

School Libraries. 

A. B. 468, chap. 420, removes the 
maximum limit of eighty cents for school 
library funds in cities. (There has been 
no minimum.) The further provision is 
made that in each city and county com- 
prising a single district (San Francisco)' 
the amount shall not be less than forty 
cents for each pupil of average daily 
attendance nor more than one dollar. 

A. B. 921, chap. 728, amends the para- 
graph concerning high school librarians 
by inserting the word "valid" before high 
school certificate. 

General. 

S. B. 884, chap. 722, relates to the 
formation of corporations to establish 
libraries and to receive and administer 
bequests, gifts and donations for same. 

Other acts of interest to libraries, some 
indirectly affecting them, are the fol- 
lowing : 

A. B. 163, chap. ISO, amending the 
law regarding absence of county officers 
from the state to read : 

"A county or township officer shall not 
absent himself from the state for a peiiod 
exceeding five days without the consent of 
the board of supervisors of the county, 
except when on business for the state, 
county or township, and shall in no 
case absent himself from the state for 
a period of more than two months with- 
out the consent of the board of supervisors 
of the county, with the written approval 



210 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



of the governor of the state, and in no 
case shall such absence continue for a 
period exceeding six months in any one 
year." 

S. B. 298, chap. 435, provides that each 
county official shall file with the county 
auditor on or before the twentieth of July 
in each year, a detailed and itemized esti- 
mate showing all probable revenues from 
sources other than taxation that will 
accrue to his department during the en- 
suing fiscal year and all expenditures 
required for the same period. This act 
takes effect Jan. 1, 1928. 

A. B. 1230, chap. 581, empowers the 
state board of education to investigate 
the entire subject of supplementary books 
"which are now available for use in the 
public schools through the county library 
system and other sources which are a 
direct expense on the county govern- 
ments." The findings are to be reported 
to the state board of control on or before 
July 1, 1928. 

A. B. 819, chap. 219, provides for the 
cooperative purchase of standard school 
supplies and equipment. The county 
board of education "shall list as standard 
school supplies and equipment such sup- 
plies and equipment as can be advan- 
tageously purchased in quantity." 



A. B. 916, chap. 208, establishes a 
state curriculum commission for the 
public schools of the state. 

A. B. 169, chap. 157, makes some 
revisions in the act of 1917 providing for 
the adoption and publication of high 
school text books. 

A. B. 1120, chap. 453, and S. C. R. 
26, resolution chap. 61, deal with changes 
in the office of ithe superintendent of 
public instruction and the state board of 
education. These are of special interest, 
since the State Library is now a division 
of the department of education. 

A. B. 38, chap. 431, provides for a 
commission on pensions of state em- 
ployees. 

A. B. 206, chap. 354, provides for a 
1927 edition of the California Blue Book. 

S. B. 764, chap. 753, creates the Cali- 
fornia state historical association. Its 
control is vested in the state board of 
education as trustees. The title to all 
property, records, etc., held by the Cali- 
fornia historical survey commission is 
vested in the State of California to be 
administered through the state board of 
education. Ten thousand dollars are 
appropriated for the support of the asso- 
ciation for the biennium 1927-29. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA. 



211 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 






9 ^ 

,,' SISKIYOU I MOOOC 




H^ U 

S' ,' SHASTA I 

5 TEHAMA ,^ '' 

,.' / PUUMAS ^, 

J ^) ^1 SIERRA 

..COUISAI « aV y ^ — 



^. ,/,cAnnil,/, fl,. 5*N FliWClSCO 




i^. ^<3;w«6' 



33- N. _ 

i-at- Ourfttnn, S<. 



212 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1926. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income 
1925-261 


Books, 
etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county* 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sept. 26 1910 


853,689 52 
6,663 12 
18,241 70 
10,970 08 
55,421 63 

150,040 56 
15,311 44 
27,728 85 
17,701 73 
9,316 30 
93,711 21 
26,977 34 
13,075 94 

300,897 41 
21,746 14 


126,651 

17,372 

68,112 

a46,877 

157,979 

393,417 

48,321 

99,100 

59,328 

28.496 

252,834 

114,794 

41,791 

536,698 

73,052 


91 
39 
88 
48 
98 

260 
61 

152 
79 
45 

196 
57 
76 

314 
70 


49 
31 
65 
33 
64 

172 
43 

111 
58 
31 

104 
39 
36 

159 
50 


38 


Amador 

Butte - 


Bertha S. Taylor 


June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
Julv 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 4 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 5 
May 3 
Aug. 3 
Oct. 4 
June 6 
July 8 
Aug. 6 
Feb. 9 
Dee. 9 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 8 
Oct. 1 
Feb. 4 
July 14 
April 5 


1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 


26 
57 




Ella Packer 


29 


Contra Costa 


Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck . _ 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 


58 
152 




38 




101 






52 






29 




Mrs Julia G. Babcock . _ _ 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen B. Vogleson 

Blanche Galloway 


101 




38 




34 


Los Angeles 


117 

50 






















Minette L. Stoddard 

Anna L. Williams 


36,020 30 

3,989 73 

20,268 67 

11,212 06 

25.955 10 
10,323 16 

15.956 63 
40,326 66 

9,504 99 
37,722 13 
37,109 86 


114,448 
13,983 
83,640 
26,061 
66,436 
38,271 

72,206 
33,470 
98,296 
95,132 


82 
36 

140 
77 
63 
79 
80 

110 
76 

136 

145 


73 
44 
97 
48 
57 
29 
78 
83 
37 
73 
118 


64 




30 




88 




Estella DeFord- ..- 


46 


Orange 


Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 


37 
29 




Chas. F. Woods 


45 


Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino _ 


Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters .■ _ - 

Eleanor Hitt 


64 
37 
61 
103 










Ida E. Condit 


Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 2 
June 7 
April 6 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8 
Sept. 8 
June 10 
July 3 
April 9 
July 12 


1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 


32,076 68 
15,369 42 
21,974 03 
24,050 86 
28,276 51 
8,892 02 




45,713 
a37,545 


112,461 




136 

96 
64 
106 
95 
87 


94 
93 
42 
68 
82 
54 


76 




Flo A. Gantz 


82 






27 


Santa Barbara . _ 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary. 
Minerva H. Waterman... 


58 
74 
52 




EllenB. Frink 


18,473 73 
23,442 14 
26,684 93 
14,634 44 
11,192 62 

5,038 43 
54,915 32 

9,374 23 
28,989 07 
30,099 69 


77,671 
71,987 
87,715 
38,929 
41,528 
15,683 
121,285 
25,091 
77,103 
88,052 


156 

66 
71 

42 
87 
58 
127 
53 
93 
76 


92 
49 
68 
35 
54 
28 
131 
28 
55 
47 


89 




Clara B. Dills 


48 


Stanislaus 


Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M . Burket 

Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher 

Elizabeth R. Topping 

Nancy C. Laugenour 


45 
34 


Tehama 

Trinity 


50 
28 


Tulare . . - 


83 


Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


25 
54 
45 








46 




01, '08-0 4. '26 


$1,422,366 38 


a3,547,528 


4,111 


2,802 


2,394 













1 The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1925. 
' Includes elementary and high. 

' Conducted by Merced County by contract according to Sec. 5, County Free Library Law. 
* San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county, 
tics see under "Public Libraries, Etc." next page. 

' Conducted by Plumas County by contract according to Sec. 5, County Free Library Law, 



For statis- 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 



213 



te 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Established 



Income 1925-26 



Books, etc. 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

ElCentro 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco.. 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica.. 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



MrsMarcella H. Kxauth . 

Marian P. Greene 

Carleton B. Joeckel 

Agnes F. Ferris 

Mrs Ahna J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeannette M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F. Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia Plaister. 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden.. 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman... 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877; 

1893; 
1907; 
1906; 
1895; 
1872; 
1905; 
1868; 

1896; 
1882; 
1887; 
1893; 
1907; 
1879; 
1857; 



1868; 
1886; 



1889; 
1883: 



as F P 1879 

1906 

as F P 1895 
as F P 1909 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1901 
as F P 1891 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1878 

1906 

as F P 1902 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1902 
as F P 1894 
as F P 1909 
as F P 1907 
as F P 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as F P 1880 

1891 

1882 

as F P 1881 
as F P 1890 
as F P 1884 
as F P 1895 

1880 
as F P 1884 

1900 



$45,215 38 
28,192 21 

147,251 22 
15,362 86 
37,555 48 
91,963 73 

,098,741 39 
15,038 35 

188,702 92 
8,512 66 
17,636 91 

107,106 42 
29,538 44 



27,752 77 
48,037 05 
41,659 29 
20,000 00 
111.171 14 
284,865 68 
20,231 33 
26,961 25 
115,582 60 
17,373 53 
25,645 70 
*8,755 41 
13,808 50 
57,535 38 
15,369 88 
26,051 19 



75,402 
28,471 

122,785 
24,272 
39,361 
96,119 

776,877 
28,631 

318,115 
30,127 
21,875 

115,931 
82,288 
70,890 
76,766 

118,005 

117,501 
30,335 

153,032 

367,381 
30,791 
44,566 
92,682 
63,173 
46,161 
32,050 
26,966 

195,582 
24,732 
20,035 



24,456 

13,515 

26,163 

3,050 

26,187 

43 029 

231,799 

8,464 

60,373 

4.008 

7,506 

52,865 

10.715 

6,933 

9.538 

8,605 

20,566 

12,685 

66,942 

101,396 

11,452 

9,825 

19,079 

5,255 



9,223 



10,737 
6 411 
5,766 



*Eleveii months only. 

Note. — For public libraries of less than 20,000 books, etc., see Annual Statistics 
number of News Notes of California Libraries, October, 1926. 



r 



214 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1927 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items, 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1926. 



For 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation, $7,164,457,974. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation, $433,045,954 (tax- 
able for county $377,743,838). 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

The Alameda County Library arranged 
two exhibits for the National Congress of 
Parents and Teachers held in Oakland 
May 21 to 28. One of these exhibits was 
placed in the general exhibit room of 
the convention and children's work and 
rural work were stressed especially in it. 
The other one was arranged in the down- 
stairs corridor of the convention hall. 
California library work was emphasized 
in this exhibit. Librarians and book 
people of the district Avere most generous 
with their time and material in helping 
to make the exhibits of interest to the 
delegates. 

The Alameda County Board of Edu- 
cation has adopted the Beacon, Elson 
and Pathway to Reading as the method 
readers for the county schools. A teacher 
may select any one of these systems. 
Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

A $20,000 concrete building will re- 
place the old library structure in Niles 
and will be a gift to the community by 
W. H. Ford of that town. The present 
old wooden building has served the pub- 
lic for the past twenty-five years. Work 
on the new building, which is to be 75 
feet long and 25 feet wide, will begin 
immediately. — Oakland Times, Jl 1 

Berkeley. 

Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Carleton B. Joeckel, Lib'n (on leave of 
absence.) Olive Burroughs, Acting Lib'n. 



ALAMEDA COUNTY.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

The new South Berkeley Branch Li- 
brary, the third branch of the Berkeley 
Public Library system to be housed in 
its own building, was opened for service 
May 4, 1927. It is located on the corner 
of Grove and Woolsey streets. The build- 
ing is of Spanish type with stucco ex- 
terior and tile roof, and oak beams within. 
The book capacity is about 10,000 vol- 
umes, with space for extension. The 
seating capacity is 90. There is a story 
hour room for children and a club rooni 
for adults. These adjoining rooms may 
be combined into one auditorium when 
occasion requires. The branch combines 
in one central and attractive unit the two 
branches formerly known as the South 
Berkeley and the Ashby Branch libraries, 
both of which were in rented quarters. 

Mr Carleton B. Joeckel, Librarian, 
was granted a leave of absence for one 
year, effective July 1, 1927, for the pur- 
pose of accepting a position as Associate 
Professor of Library Science in the Li- 
brary School of the University of Michi- 
gan. Mr Joeckel left Berkeley to attend 
the American Library Association meet- 
ing at Toronto. He will then go to Ann 
Arbor, where he will attend the summer 
session at the University of Michigan 
before beginning his new work at the Li- 
brary School. Miss Olive Burroughs, 
Assistant Librarian, has been appointed 
Acting Librarian during the absence of 
Mr Joeckel. 

The Berkeley Public Library has re- 
cently changed the system of charging 
books, from the inverted Browne to the 
modified Newark system. The change 
was made May 9, 1927. Details were 
carefully studied and worked out before 
this date, and the new system is now in 
good running order and proving very satis- 
factory. The change necessitated a com- 
plete reregistration of all library borrow- 
ers, and all the borrowers' cards in effect 
on May 9th were surrendered. In the 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



215 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

six weeks the new charging system has 
been in force, 15,000 borrowers have been 
given new cards. The process of charg- 
ing has been simplified one step further 
by following the procedure used at Stock- 
ton Public Library, and not dating the 
book card. 

Olive Bukroughs, Acting Lib'n. 

San Leandro. 

San Leandro Free Public Library 
AND Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

During the quarter two new floor 
stacks and one unit for the catalog case 
have been added to the library. 

The librarian attended the C. L. A. 
Convention at Gearhart, Oregon, June 
13 to 15. 

Mary Brown, Lib'n. 



ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq, mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $899,722 (taxable 
for county $723,086). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,706,677 (taxable 
for county $6,665,048) . 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

( Twenty-second class. ) 
County seat, OroviUe. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,321,472 (tax- 
able for county $36,499,275). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 

Miss Blanche Chalfant, Librarian of 
Butte Comity Free Library since April 
6, 1922, has resigned her position and 
Avas married June 1, 1927, to Mr De 
Forest Nathaniel Wheeler. They expect 
to be traveling for the next three or four 
months throughout the United States but 
will be at home in San Jose after Oct. 15. 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 



Oroville. 



Library 
Library. 



has been 
17 years, 
Shanahan 



Oroville [Free] Public 
AND Branch, Butte Co. Free 
Mrs Edith Simons, Lib'n. 

Mrs Harriet Hendricks who 
an assistant in the library for 
was married to Mr John 
on June 1. 

Mrs Claire McKinsey has been ap- 
pointed as part-time assistant. 

Mrs Edith Simons, Lib'n. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8,898,065 (taxable 
for county $7,047,649). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,109,925 (tax- 
able for county $22,419,565). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Miss Ella Packer, Lib'n. 

Cachil Dehe, our only Indian School, 
burned to the ground May 11. Since 
school had already closed, most of the 
County Library books that had been used 
during the term had been returned. We 
filed a claim with the Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Co., with whom our books are 
insured, for the value of books which 
were still charged to the school. The 
company paid our claim in full without 
question. 

The Women's Clubs of Colusa County 
held a flower show in Colusa April 20. 
The Colusa County Free Library was 
assigned a booth, which we decorated 
with climbing roses and a few appro- 
priate posters, and in which we displayed 
a table of gardening books, part of which 
were borrowed from the State Library. 
Ella Packer, Lib'n. 

The engagement of Miss Ella Packer, 
County Librarian, and Guy Morse has 
been announced. The marriage will take 
place sometime i n August. — Colusa 
Herald, My 14 



216 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $103,040,954 (tax- 
able for county $90,438,530). 

CoNTEA Costa Co. Free L i b r a b y, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

The boys and girls reading room in 
connection with the Martinez Branch is 
to be opened sometime this month. The 
room is to be in charge of Mrs Mabel 
Prentiss Green. 

A branch has been opened at Bradford 
Island in charge of Mrs Alma E. Nichols. 
Associated Branch is now in charge of 
Mr Jack Bedell ; Orinda Park Branch of 
A. E. Dunphy and Clyde Branch of Mrs 
John T. Evans. 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'u. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,303,575 (tax- 
able for county $10,220,875). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,073,804 (tax- 
able for county $10,402,480). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $198,657,868 (tax- 
able for county $160,558,333). 

j:Fresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

The annual meeting of the Fourth Dis- 
trict of the California Library Associa- 
tion held in Visalia in May was well 
attended by the staff of the Fresno County 
Free Library, Miss McCardle and twenty 
assistants spending the day and thirteen 
going on to General Grant Park for the 
rest of the program. It was a very en- 
joyable meeting and one which will long 
be remembered by those who attended. 

Miss Julia Merrill of the Extension 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 
Department of the American Library 
Association spent a day in Fresno, visit- 
ing some of the representative branches of 
our library. In the afternoon she had 
tea with the staff and told us some of 
the interesting things in connection with 
her work at headquarters. 

Seamen's Book Week was observed as 
usual throughout the county and while 
not a great number of books were donated 
they were in very good condition and of 
a better type than are sometimes given 
by the public. 

The summer branches at Bretz Mill 
and Sierra Chautauqua have been opened. 
We will not have a branch at Huntington 
Lake this year as it was impossible to 
find a suitable location for it. The sum- 
mer school of the Fresno State Teachers 
College at Lakeshore has a large collec- 
tion of books from the main library but 
these are for the use of the students only. 

Miss Marie Channer, assistant at the 
Selma Branch was married in May to 
Mr Armon Hodge. She will continue her 
duties at the library, however. 

jSIiss McCardle, Miss Strother, Miss 
Manson, Miss Meredith and Miss Keller 
attended the joint meeting of the C. L. A. 
and the P. N. L. A. at Gearhart, Oregon, 
in June. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 

County seat. Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,612,998 (tax- 
able for county $23,489,071). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

During the quarter a tiny new commu- 
nity branch has been established in the 
Grindstone district Avith Mrs J., T. Ed- 
wards, custodian. 

On May 12 the county was honored by 
a visit from Mrs Henshall of the State 
Library. 

The Librarian talked to the Capay 
Woman's club on Children's Books, and 
to the Achaean Club of Willows on the 
work of the County and State Libraries. 

At the meeting of the Glenn County 
Board of Supervisors in May, the Libra- 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



217 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 

rian was appointed for another four-year 
term of office. 

Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 

County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $50,617,925 (tax- 
able for county $51,999,240). 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 
County seat, El Centre. 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,S83. 
Assessed valuation $53,747,610 (taxable 
for county $43,999,820). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

Several changes have been made in the 
staff at headquarters. Miss Paine re- 
signed her duties in May to take an ex- 
tended vacation and rest. Her place was 
taken temporarily by Miss Violet Maddux. 
Miss Parker left the first of July for Los 
Angeles, and will not return. 

We have had a number of different 
girls working on the school books, getting 
them in shape for the fall requisitions. 
We have also had Mr Wilson doing a 
great deal of rebinding at this time. 

Mrs Cooper has moved to Riverside, 
leaving her Mulberry Branch Library in 
the care of Mrs Knights. Seeley Branch 
is now under the efficient care of Mrs 
Noel, while Mr I. S. Elliott is in charge 
of Plaster City Branch. Mrs Everett is 
the present custodian of Calipatria 
Branch since Mrs Lucking moved to 
Colorado. 

The Librarian attended the joint library 
meeting at Gearhart, Oregon, last month, 
enjoying a good convention where hospi- 
tality was never lacking. 

This is a full month with reports, 
orders, vacations and heaps of new books. 
Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

El Centre. 

El Centro [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Imperial Co. Free Li- 
P.RARY. Miss Agnes F. Ferris, Lib'n. 

Miss Jean Turgeon, who was appointed 
March 1, resigned May 15 on account of 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
El Centro — Continued, 
ill health. Mrs Gladys Strickland was 
appointed an assistant May 15. 

Agnes F. Ferris, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 
County seat. Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $18,760,737 (taxable 
for county $11,347,195). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

Several changes have taken place 
among the branches. At Cartago, on the 
marriage of Miss Rosella Merrick to Mr 
John Marshall, Mrs A. B. Blackman took 
charge, and the branch has been moved 
to the community center. The continued 
illness of Mrs Garity compelled her resig- 
nation as custodian of Death Valley 
Branch, and Mrs A. B. Jones was ap- 
pointed, while at Tecopa the branch has 
"gone back home" to the house and heart 
of Mrs V. V. Davis. Although Mrs 
Davis lives at some distance from Tecopa, 
her home is such a real oasis in the desert 
that the people in general make it a 
center — her lawn an outdoor reading rooni 
in summer and her fireplace the focus of 
delightful winter evenings. Magazines of 
greatest interest to miners have been 
added to the branch. 

The Shoshone Branch, destroyed by 
fire last fall, was re-established late in 
March with Mrs Charles Brown again in 
charge. 

Leadfield Branch was discontinued in 
May, as this boom mining town was then 
practically deserted. A year previous, 
when the branch was established, about 
2500 inhabitants were claimed. During 
the year, with all this shifting population, 
and with four different persons in charge, 
not a book was lost, although instructions 
to custodians had been given only by 
letter. Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $201,669,763 (tax- 
able for county $169,334,670). 



218 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



KINGS COUNTY. 

( Twenty-ninth class. ) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area. 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $29,873,655 (tax- 
able for county .$24,436,402). 

Kings Co. Free Lebeaey, Hanfobd. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

The Board of Supervisors, at the meet- 
ing of May 16, allowed Miss Maude Mid- 
dleton, school assistant of the County Li- 
brary, two months' leave of absence. Miss 
Wilma Waite was appointed to fill her 
position at a salary of $100 a month. 
Misses Marian James and Grace Camp- 
bell were appointed to summer positions 
in the County Library from June 13 to 
August 15, at salaries of $50 a month. — 
Hanford Sentinel, My 17 

LAKE COUNTY. 
(Fifty-first class.) 

County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $8,685,845 (taxable 
for county $8,646,215). 

LASSEN COUNTY. 
(Forty-fourth class.) 

County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,548,138 (tax- 
able for county $14,194,094) . 

Lassen Co. Feee Libeaby, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

While on a trip with the Home Dem- 
onstration Agent the Librarian visited 
twelve branches and schools and gave two 
short talks at Farm Center meetings. 

In June Miss Haines and Miss Martin 
attended the meeting of the Plumas 
County custodians in Quincy, where Miss 
Martin gave a short talk. 

Miss Gantt of Plumas County and her 
mother spent a few days in Susanville, 
where Miss Gantt spoke at the Lassen 
County Chamber of Commerce dinner on 
Eastern and Western libraries. 

On June 1 Miss May Kleeberger began 
work in the County Library. Miss Klee- 
berger came from the State Library and 
had formerly been in the Fresno County 
Free Library. 

Lenala A. Maetin, Lib'n. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area 3880 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,047,487,407 (tax- 
able for county $2,672,130,725). 

Claremont. 

IPoMONA College Libraey. James 
A. Blaisdell, Pres. Willis H. Kerr, Lib'n. 

A valuable gift of 319 books from the 
fields of economics, sociology and history 
has been made to the Pomona College Li- 
brary by Dr George S. Sumner, Pomona 
College controller. The books will be 
placed on the shelves of the general 
library. — Pomona Bulletin, Ap 9 

Long Beach. 

Long. Beach [Feee] Public Libeaey. 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen E. Haines concluded in 
May a series of five monthly book talks, 
open to patrons of the library. Attrac- 
tive lists of books were distributed with 
each talk. These book lectures are a fea- 
ture of each winter season in the library. 

The first year of specialization in read- 
ing for boys and girls of high school age 
has proven the value of this work. The 
assistant in charge of intermediate work 
is on duty at the Readers' Aid desk, where 
she is available for consultation about 
books. A good many lists of books for 
high school age have been prepared for 
general distribution ; contacts have been 
made with the high school English depart- 
ment and with the Part-Time school. One 
of the most important activities of the 
assistant for intermediate work has been 
the preparation of a list of books for high 
school English leisure time reading. This 
list was prepared to supplement and bring 
up to date an older list. A number of 
group meetings were held to discuss the 
books selected and many books wei'e read 
and reported on. 

The library has recently conducted a 
book drive. This was somewhat in the 
nature of an experiment. Fiction in par- 
ticular was requested and a good deal of 
publicity was given to the library's need 
for books, emphasizing the tremendous 
fiction turnover and the consequent wear- 
ing out. The drive resulted in about 500 
usable novels, and good books have been 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



219 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued, 
coming in more frequently than before 
the drive. 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Lib'n. 

Los Angeles. 

$Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The gift of a site for a branch library 
building for Gardena was made by Mrs 
Lizzie K. Coltrin and accepted by the 
Board of Library Commissioners. The 
lot is on Palm Avenue, between Gardena 
and Main Street. 

The Chamber Music Concerts given in 
the Lecture Room, through the generosity 
of Mrs Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge on 
April 23, 24 and 25, were greatly enjoyed 
and appreciated by the music lovers of 
Los Angeles. 

Provision has been made for the pur- 
chase of books with which to provide ser- 
vice on and after July 1 to Barnes City 
and Mar Vista, two small communities 
which have voted themselves into the 
city. Plans also have been made for 
moving the Los Feliz Branch and the 
Lankershim Branch to better locations 
and changing Atwater from a station to a 
suburban branch. 

Work is proceeding on the sculpture 
designs of Lee Lawrie over the various 
entrance doors, the carving at the Fifth 
Street entrance and the entrance to the 
Boys and Girls Room being now practi- 
cally completed. 

Approximately 1500 books from the 
library of the late Dr Norman Bridge 
were bequeathed to the Public Library by 
Mrs Bridge. The gift is distinctive not 
only for its valuable sets but because 
every individual title will be useful. 

The Book Plate Association Interna- 
tional has presented the Library with a 
collection of 226 book plates which were 
on exhibit in the Lecture Room at one 
time during the year. 

During May and June, three new 
branch library buildings were completed 
and opened for public use — Richard Henry 
Dana, Malabar and John C. Fremont. 

A beautiful sepia copy of one of Gil- 
bert Stuart's famous portraits of George 
Washington, appropriately framed, has 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued, 
been presented to the Library by the 
Daughters of the American Colonists. 

The decorative scheme of Dean Corn- 
well for completing the walls of the ro- 
tunda was accepted by the Board of 
Library Commissioners. The decoration 
of the walls of the first floor lobby and 
the Hope Street entrance was awarded to 
Alfred Herter. The Cornwell plan por- 
trays the early history of California and 
will require some three years for execu- 
tion. 

Mrs Madelene Marshall, formerly of 
Detroit Public Library, has been ap- 
pointed librarian of Wilmington Branch. 
Miss Faith Smith, now of the Lange 
Library at Berkeley, will return to Los 
Angeles on the first of September to take 
charge of the new department of Philos- 
ophy and Religion, which will be ready 
for service October 1. 

Mr Orra E. Monnette, President of the 
Board of Library Commissioners, at- 
tended the meeting of the A. L. A. in 
Toronto, and addressed the Trustee sec- 
tion. Mr Read, head of the Order De- 
partment, was given time to visit libra- 
ries in the East before and after the 
A. L. A. meeting, and Miss Horton was 
granted time to attend the Graduate Li- 
brary Summer School at the University of 
Chicago. Miss Foye also attended the 
A. L. A. 

The Los Angeles Public Library was 
well represented at the joint meeting of 
the C. L. A. and the P. N. L. A., by the 
Librarian; Mrs Wells Smith, a member 
of the Board ; Miss Warren, First Assist- 
ant ; Miss Leslie, Miss McKown, Miss 
Scheuffler, Mrs Raymond and Mr Butler. 

Helen T. Kennedy, Second Asst. Libn. 

Calieobnia State Fisheries Labora- 
tory Library. Genevieve Corwin, Lib'n. 

Miss Genevieve Corwin is now librarian 
of the California State Fisheries Labora- 
tory Library,, succeeding Mrs Ruth 
Thompson. 

^University of Southern Califor- 
nia, College of Liberal Arts Library. 
R. B. von Klein Smid, Pres. Miss 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Miss Hilda F. Marsh, graduate of the 
University of Montana and the Los An- 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
geles Public Library Training School, 
and for the past two years assistant in 
the Oregon Agricultural College Library, 
was appointed Junior Assistant June 1. 
Miss Charlotte M. Brown, Librarian, 
has been appointed Librarian on the 
Second Annual Cruise of the Floating 
University which will sail September 20 
from New York on the S. S. Ryndam. 
Miss Brown has been granted a Sabbati- 
cal leave from the University and will 
return from the world tour May 4, 1928. 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

The Tenth Street Branch was discon- 
tinued in May. The Library had had the 
use of an unoccupied school room, but 
with time this became required for school 
purposes, and proper supervision and 
care of library property was impossible. 
Most of the library patrons have trans- 
ferred themselves to the main library. 

After much experimentation with var- 
ious kinds of guides for the slip tray, we 
have adopted lacquered zinc strips. These 
are thin, smooth, neat and durable, and 
less expensive than the commercial guides. 

Miss Ermine Groves has resigned, to 
take a position in the Whittier Public 
Library. Miss Rebecca Burdorf has re- 
signed on account of ill health. Mrs 
Howard Payne and Miss Helen Schwindt, 
former staff members, have returned to 
work in place of Misses Groves and Bur- 
dorf. 

Rev A. R. Liverett, member of the 
Library Board, has resigned on account 
of leaving the city. Rev J. H. Baird has 
been appointed to fill the vacancy. 

It gives me pleasure to say that on 
July 2 the Library Board voted an in- 
crease of $10 to each staff member who 
had had technical training, and of $5 to 
juniors of at least one year's service. 
Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Santa Monica. 

Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

We are in the thick of building and 
moving and are trying to carry on while 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Santa Monica — Continued, 
the additions are being built and the cen- 
ter of library building torn out. At 
present we are using the branch in Ocean 
Park for the book issue, sending over 
collections of books. In the main li- 
brary the books are now being moved into 
the new wings prepatory to tearing out 
the center of the building. 

Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Whittier. 

Whittier [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Ruth Ellis. Lib'n. 

Ai'chitects are completing plans for an 
addition costing approximately $35,000 to 
be built this fall. This addition is to 
consist of a Reference Room and Stack 
Room to house 40,000 volumes. 

Ruth Ellis, Lib'n. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi.- Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $28,998,908 (tax- 
able for county $23,546,215). 

Madera Co. Free Libeaey, Madeka. 
Miss Blanche Galloway, Lib"n. 

Miss Frances Scott, of our Children's 
Department, is taking the summer library 
course at Riverside. 

Miss Sarah McCardle gave a talk on 
Recent Books at the Madera Women's 
Improvement Club, on April 19. 

Mrs Mary P. Coulter was appointed to 
succeed Mrs Franklin as custodian at 
North Fork Branch. 

Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

MARIN COUNTY, 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,.342. 
Assessed valuation $30',341,578 (tax- 
able for county $26,497,200). 

Marin Co. Free Library, San Rafael. 
Miss Muriel Wright, Lib'n. 

Marin County Free Library now con- 
tains 4000 volumes, most of which are 
cataloged and on the shelves. Kentfield 
and Faii'fax are already using the system 
constantly, with a circulation of 223 books 
for the last three weeks of June for the 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



221 



MARIN CO.— Continued. 

former, and 397 for the latter. It has 
been promised that about the time school 
opens in August, branches will be pro- 
vided in Novato and in Tomales in con- 
nection with the union high school. 

The County Librarian was the speaker 
of the afternoon June 28 at the meeting 
of the Belvedere Improvement Club. 

In June a collection of fiction and out- 
of-door books was sent to the Camp Fire 
Girls at Camp Marin, Cazadero. 

MuEiEL Wright, Lib'n. 

Sausalito. 

Sausalito Free Ptjblic Libeart. Mrs 
R. W. Carter, Lib'n. 

At a special meeting called for the 
purpose of selecting a librarian to fiU the 
post vacated by Miss Caroline Fiedler, 
Mrs R. W. Cax'ter was chosen. Patrons 
of the Library deeply regret the resigna- 
tion of Miss Fiedler, who was one of the 
founders of the local library and for the 
past twenty years has been connected 
with it, either directly or indirectly. In 
resigning she accepts a position on the 
Board of Library Trustees. — Sausalito 
Neivs, Je 25 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1.580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $6,085,206 (taxable 
for county $4,683,384). 

Mariposa Co. Free Libeary. Miss 
Minette Stoddard, Lib'n. 

The new custodian at Yosemite Branch 
is Mrs Rose Wegner. 

Minette Stoddard, Lib'n. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $30,920,640 (taxable 
for county $25,741,297). 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $39,336,433 (taxable 
for county $31,751,619). 
2 — 53132 



MERCED CO.— Continued. 

Merced Co. Free Libraby, Merced. 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

An interesting visitor to the library 
during the quarter was Miss K. E. Over- 
bury, Librarian of West Riding, York- 
shire, England, who spent three days in 
Merced and Mariposa Counties visiting 
branches of the County Library. Miss 
Overbury enjoyed a trip to Yosemite 
Valley and was interested in the library 
service to the schools and communities 
in the mountains and especially in the 
branch at Yosemite. 

A new community branch has been es- 
tablished at Cressey. 

Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

Miss Minette Stoddard, Merced County 
Librarian, was elected to the vice-presi- 
dency of the California Library Associa- 
tion at its annual conference, held at 
Gearhart, Oregon. — Merced Suii-Star, 
.le 30 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
Couuty seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,311,280 (taxable 
for county $7,781,061). 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $5,909,729 (taxable 
for county $2,927,0-55). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation! $50,761,348 (taxable 
for county $41,883,250). 

Monterey Co. Free Library. Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

The Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution conducted an essay contest during 
April and May in the Salinas Grammar 
School. The subject was Monterey 
County history, and each pupil in the 
Seventh and Eighth grades was required 
to write an essay, and some excellent 
papers were handed in. The research 



222 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



MONTEREY CO.— Contimied. 

work was done under the direction of the 
County Library. 

Mr and Mrs Henry Foletta, in charge 
at San Ardo, sold out their business in 
April, and the branch has been tempor- 
arily suspended until a new location can 
be found. 

Parkfield Branch is now in operation 
again, having been closed about two 
months on account of the illness of the 
custodian. During this period books were 
mailed to individuals upon request. 

The branch at Asilomar reopened for 
the summer June 23. Rainbow Lodge 
Branch opened for the summer June 24. 

The Library had a welcome visit from 
Mrs M. D. Henshall of the State Library 
May 4. Miss Isabella Cooper, Editor of 
the A. L. A. Catalogue, spent several days 
in Monterey County the latter part of 
May, and we had the pleasure of taking 
her into the Big Sur country. 

The County Librarian attended the 
Conference of Boys and Girls Agricultural 
Clubs at Asilomar May 7 and 8, and went 
for a walk with the girls on Sunday 
morning. Five members of the staff of 
the Monterey County Free Library at- 
tended the joint meeting of the first, 
second and third districts of the C. L. A. 
at Asilomar April 23 and 24. The 
County Librarian attended the meeting of 
the P. N. L. A. and C. L. A. at Gearhart, 
Oregon, June 13 to 15. 

Miss Ruth K. Porter, in charge of the 
School Department since January 1, left 
June 18 to enter summer school and High 
School library work. 

Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed valuation, $26,362,248 (tax- 
able for county $22,136,195). 

Napa Co. Feee Libraey, Napa. Miss 
Estella DeFord, Lib'n. 

In connection with the Wild Flower 
show which is given each year by the 
Rural Teachers Club, the Napa County 
Library held its first doU show. Through 
Miss Silverthorn we secured the collection 
of Miss Sidney Walthall of 118 Sycamore 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 

Avenue, Modesto. We found many inter- 
esting old dolls here in Napa that people 
were glad to exhibit, the oldest being Abi- 
gail Windsor of Plymouth, a doll one 
hundred and twenty-five years old. Rosie, 
a belle of 1875, sporting a seal skin muff 
and stole has since burned with the home 
of her owner, Mrs D. L. Beard. We had 
expected to entertain the children, but 
found that men and women were equally 
interested, in fact a crowd two deep was 
around the table aU afternoon. The 
exhibit was also shown at the St. Helena 
grammar school to the delight of the 
children. The success was so much more 
than we hoped for that we have been 
gradually adding to our collection, friends 
who have been traveling abroad respond- 
ing to our demands generously, and we 
now have some twenty interesting speci- 
mens. We shall be very glad to lend our 
collection at any time to any librarj 
planning an exhibit. Miss Clara Dills of 
the Solano County Library was a visitor 
the day of the doll show. 

An exhibit of the Reading with a Pur- 
pose books was on display in the window 
of the First National Bank for one week. 
On one side was the Read with a Pur- 
pose poster, on the other Save with a 
Purpose. 

The County Librarian was the guest of 
Mr Pollard, Librarian of the Veterans 
Home Library, on April 20. Mr PoUard 
is brimful of ideas and seems to have no 
trouble in getting them carried out. His 
is a most attractive library. The whole 
library, including the new smoking room 
for "his boys," is equipped with library 
bureau furniture. The shelves are filled 
with a good selection of up-to-date books 
and all the good magazines. And the 
whole place fairly shines, it is so clean. 
Mr Pollard returned our caU but finds our 
quarters quite crowded when compared 
with his spacious rooms. On leaving this 
library the county librarian drove up onto 
Howell Mountain, where she spoke to the 
students of the Pacific Union College on 
the resources of the State Library and the 
California Library system. 

New shelving was installed at the Oak 
Knoll Branch and a complete check-up 
given the branch. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFOENIA LIBRAEIES. 



223 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 

The librarian attended the joint meet- 
ing of the C. L. A. and the P. N. L. A. 
at Gearhart, Oregon. 

EsTELLA De Fobd, Lib'n. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 9S2 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,683,613 (taxable 
for county $6,941,690). 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,37.5. 
Assessed valuation $177,730,314 (tax- 
able for county $152,611,450). 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 14S4 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $25,415,588 (taxable 
for county $18,255,970). 

Auburn. 

Auburn Feee Public Libeaby. Mrs 
Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

Mr W. B. Lardner, former State Sen- 
ator, and our valued Library Trustee, for 
the last twenty years, passed away Feb- 
ruary 14. He was instrumental in getting 
the Carnegie Library for Auburn. His 
loss is greatly felt. Mr Frank Stanley of 
Auburn has been appointed to fill his 
place. 

Many well chosen books have been 
placed on our shelves for vacation reading. 

Mrs Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,034,720 (tax- 
able for county $12,541,902). 

Plumas Co. Fre:e Library, Quincy. 
Miss Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

Mrs A. H. West has charge of the 
Twain Branch Library during the sum- 
mer. Mrs J. C. Knickrem is again custo- 
dian at Mohawk. 



PLUMAS CO.— Continued. 

The first meeting of Plumas and Sierra 
County custodians was held at Quincy 
June 4. The program may be of interest 
to other librarians : 

(A desk demonstration before the 
meeting, at the charging desk in the 
library.) 

10.30. Address of welcome by Judge J. 
O. Moncur. Roll call with reports of 
custodians. The routine of special re- 
quests. Mrs M. E. Dunn. How the 
teacher can stimulate children's reading. 
Introducing the classics to children 
through reading aloud. Mrs E. L. Rogers 
{i.e. Miss Williams, ed. of Irving's Al- 
hambra). 

12.00. Luncheon in the library. 

1.30. Library work with children. Miss 
Lenala Martin, Librarian of Lassen 
County Free Library. 

Round table discussion, Miss Edith 
Gantt. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 



RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat, Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $65,866,943 (tax- 
able for county $48,633,500). 

Elsinore. 

Elsinoee Free Public Libraey and 
Beanch, Riverside Co. Feee Libeary. 
Mrs Rita H. Fees, Lib'n. 

Mrs Fees, for the past four years City 
Librarian, presented her resignation June 
15 to the Library Board, and Miss 
Beatrice Clark was chosen to fill her 
place. Mrs Fees will care for the library 
until Miss Clark returns from a six weeks 
special training course at Riverside. — 
Elsinore Leader Press, Je 16 

Riverside. 

Riverside [Free] Public Libeary. 
Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Miss Alice M. GarUck, Riverside 1922, 
for four years Assistant Reference Libra- 
rian in our library, died suddenly June 
27. Miss Garlick was distinguished for 
painstaking and courteous performance of 
her duty and will be missed by the staff 
and many patrons of the library. 



224 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued. 
Mr Louis Montchal, scholar and savant, 
contemporary and friend of Emile Zola 
and other French writers of that period, 
one time librarian of the Societe de Lec- 
ture in Geneva, Switzerland, a friend of 
American libraries and literature, died in 
Riverside, June 22, aged 75 years. 

Riverside Lihrary Service School. 

The eight weeks summer session of the 
Riverside Library Service School opened 
June 27 with a registration of twenty- 
seven students for the entire course. With 
fourteen year-course students and several 
registered for special courses, the total 
attendance at the summer session is ex- 
pected to reach forty-five to fifty. 

Instructors from outside Riverside are : 
Miss Margaret Reynolds of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, for Business Libraries ; Mrs 
Frances Arnold Greenwood of Los Ange- 
les, for Music Appreciation ; Miss Glyde 
Maynard of Los Angeles, for School Li- 
braries, and Mrs Dessa M. Fultz, also of 
Los Angeles, for Children's Literature 
and Story-teUing. 

In addition to a full schedule of courses 
throughout the day for the eight weeks, 
the Riverside School now offers a series 
of special courses filling the mornings of 
the entire period. 

Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Riverside Junior College Library. 
Miss Alice Cooper, Lib'n. 

Miss Alice Cooper, newly appointed 
librarian of Riverside Junior College, re- 
cently arrived from Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina, where for the last eighteen months 
she has been librarian of the State Agri- 
cultural College Library. 

Miss Cooper took over her duties in the 
library May 16. Equipment has been 
secured for the room, the segregation of 
college books from the high school is help- 
ing to stock the shelves, and the $5,000 
appropriation means a completely equipped 
library for next year. — Riverside Press, 
My 18 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 9SS sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 



SACRAMENTO CO. — Continued. 

Assessed valuation $158,086,066 (tax- 
able for county $129,416,920). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

The closing quarter of the year was a 
busy one for the Sacramento County 
Free Library. 

On May 7 a very successful custodians' 
meeting was held at the Hotel Sacra- 
mento. During the morning session, 
various problems relating to the work of 
the branches were presented and dis- 
cussed. A luncheon was served in the 
private dining room adjoining the room in 
which the meeting was held and the after- 
noon session was devoted to the subject 
of Books and Reading. Mr Milton J. 
Ferguson, our State Librarian, gave a 
most interesting and illuminating talk 
upon the Inspiration of Literature, using 
as his theme a quotation from Eizabeth 
Robert's Time of Man, in which the long- 
ing of the child of the soil finds expx-es- 
sion in his wistful words — "Ther's more'n 
a million books in the world, an' I aint 
read ary one on 'em yit, but I aim to 
read 'em all 'fore I'm through." Mr 
Samuel Levinson, of Levinson's Book 
Store, gave a review of some of the later 
books of general literature, infusing into 
his talk his own keen literary apprecia- 
tion and sense of true values. Miss 
Provines spoke of some of the more 
notable amongst the new books of fiction. 

The quarter was especially notable for 
the expansion and improvement in branch 
facilities and equipment. During the 
month of April, the Del Paso Branch was 
moved into a much larger and pleasanter 
room in the same building in which it 
has been for so long. The North Sacra- 
mento Branch had so far outgrown its 
quarters that it became necessary to 
build an addition doubling both floor 
space and shelving facilities. The branch 
was completely refurnished, and the stock 
of books greatly increased. It now pre- 
sents a most attractive appearance, and 
was reopened May 14, having been closed 
for less than two weeks. The Fairoaks 
Library Association, owners of the build- 
ing which houses the Fairoaks Branch, 
had the interior of the building completely 
retinted and repainted, and added book 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



225 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

shelving and a magazine rack. The 
county completely refurnished the room, 
and added many new books. The Folsom 
Branch was also improved with new floor 
covering and window draperies, and the 
addition of new shelving to meet the de- 
mand for more books. 

On May 31, we were happy to receive 
a visit from Miss Overbury, of West 
Riding, Yorkshire, England, and had the 
pleasure of renewing our acquaintance 
with her at Hotel Gearhart, Oregon. 

On May 28, Granite School District 
canceled their contract with the Sacra- 
mento County Free Library, as they pre- 
fer to purchase their own books. On 
June 1, Sherman Island District joined 
the County Library for service during the 
coming school year. 

Miss C. D. Provines and Miss Hazel 
Gibson attended the joint meeting of the 
C. L. A. and the P. N. L. A. at Hotel 
Gearhart, Oregon, and following the meet- 
ing. Miss Provines and Miss Bessie B. 
Silverthorn made a trip to Skagway, 
Alaska, visiting en route at Tacoma, 
Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, B. C, 
besides viewing a part of the Floral 
Parade of the Rose Festival at Portland, 
Oregon. The trip was altogether wonder- 
ful and delightful, a happy ending to a 
splendid meeting. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

Sacramento. 

ISacramento Free Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

During the convention of the State 
Federation of Women's Clubs in Sacra- 
mento, the City Library with the coop- 
eration of the State Library and two 
local book stores (Levinson's and Pur- 
nell's) put in a very interesting book 
exhibit at the Municipal Auditorium. It 
supplemented a literary map of Cali- 
fornia prepared by the chaii-man of liter- 
ature and also called attention to child- 
ren's books, old and new, some of the 
best of the current publications and fine 
bindings. 

Donna Harris, children's librarian for 
four years, resigned April first to be 
assistant librarian of the Junior College. 
Margaret Chiles, librarian of McKinley 
Park Branch, left May first on a leave 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

Sacramento — Continued. 

of absence. It is rumored that matrimony 
will be her next venture. 

The librarian attended the joint li- 
brary convention in Gearhart early in 
June. 

The following notice in the local "Bee" 
proved effective for several weeks. 

Cross-Word Puzzle "Oaf" is Sought 
BY Librarian. 

A cross-word puzzle thief offered a new 
problem in crime for local police authori- 
ties to solve today. 

The hunt was launched on complaint 
of Susan Smith, city librarian. For more 
than a week the thief has slipped into the 
reading room daily and clipped the cross- 
word puzzle out of one of the newspapers 
on the file. 

Miss Smith has asked that a plain 
clothes man be stationed at the library to 
catch the thief. She figures him nothing 
short of an "oaf" and a "caitiff." 

City Manager Bottorff warned today 
that mutilation of city property is a jail 
offense and that no mercy will be shown 
the violator if he is caught. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

Sacramento Junior College Library. 
J. B. Lillard, Prin. Miss Margaret East- 
man, Lib'n. 

Miss Donna Harris was appointed 
assistant librarian April 1. For the 
coming year an appropriation has been 
made of $5,000 for books and an addi- 
tional appropriation of $1,000 for music 
and books about music. 

Margaret Eastman, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $15,272,399 (taxable 
for county $13,546,440). 

San Benito Co. Free Libraky, Hol- 
lister. Miss Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

Miss Edith Norton who came to us in 
November has been obliged to return east 
for family reasons. Her position has not 
yet been filled. 

During the last six months the librarian 
has supervised the cataloging of the high 



226 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1927 



SAN BENITO CO.— Continued. 

school library. The work is now finished 
and with the removal of the glass doors 
from the book cases and the proper ar- 
rangement of the books on the shelves, 
the usefulness of the library has been 
greatly increased. 

The County Superintendent of Schools 
each year awards library diplomas to the 
children of the county schools for having 
read eight books chosen from lists fur- 
nished by the county library. This year 
503 diplomas were awarded. 

Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73.401. 
Assessed valuation $115,823,908 (tax- 
able for county $72,154,574). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

As the new county court house was 
officially dedicated on Saturday, April 30, 
and open house kept by every department, 
the new quarters of the County Free Li- 
brary were kept open for inspection by 
visitors on that day, the entire library 
staff receiving the visitors from 9.00 a.m. 
to 5.00 p.m., with the exception of from 
2.00 to 4.00 p.m. when the building was 
closed for the official program that Avas 
being held in the front of the building. 
United States Senator Hiram W. John- 
son was the speaker of the day. 

One of the things in the library quar- 
ters in which all visitors seemed to be 
most interested was the display case, 
Avhich contained the original manuscript 
deed, dated February 15, 1858, to por- 
tions of the Rancho of San Bernardino, 
on which the new court house now stands, 
and an old abstract of title which gave 
an account of the deeding of this same 
land from the Lugos. Another noted 
manuscript was the bill presented before 
the Congress of the United States in 
about 1870 by Dr O. M. Wozencraft, the 
originator of the idea, for the reclamation 
of the Colorado desert lands, and by the 
side of it Senator Johnson's more recent 
bill on the Boulder Dam Project, for the 
same purpose. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

The County Librarian was invited by 
the Victor Valley Woman's Club to speak 
Tuesday evening, May 3, in Victorville 
at the Club's Open Forum night, when 
each public organization was represented 
in a short talk. The subject assigned to 
the County Librarian was "The Victor- 
v'Ue branch of the County Free Library 
ml what it means to the community ; how 
the community could obtain larger read- 
ing room facilities and the community's 
part in effecting this." 

Louise Anderson, charging and shipping 
clerk, and Irene Planten, desk assistant, 
were granted leave of absence to attend 
the Riverside Library Summer Service 
School from June 27 to August 19. 
During their absence M r s Charlotte 
Pell, who was before her marriage an 
assistant for three years in the library, 
and Miss Gertrude Buchenau, recently 
graduated from the San Bernardino High 
School, and a typist and stenographer, 
will substitute. Miss Ruth Cottrell, High 
School and Business College graduate, 
entered the library March 11, as tempor- 
ary assistant, and was appointed to the 
staff on May 1. 

The new Highland Community Build- 
ing, of which the Highland Library Dis- 
trict Library forms a part, was formally 
dedicated May 18. It is to be used for all 
community interests including the Wo- 
man's Club and Chamber of Commerce. 
The library consists of the main library 
room and a large committee room, and is 
divided from the rest of the building by a 
party wall and by open arches between 
the main community part of the building 
and the committee room. The library 
room is 27 by 34 feet, inside measurement. 

The branches at Bagdad, Goffs and 
Kelso schools which are always closed 
during summer school vacation will be 
kept open this summer. Mrs Jennie 
Shook will be in charge of the library at 
Bagdad, Mrs D. C. Houston at Goffs, 
and Mrs Glenn Brown at Kelso. Midway 
School and Community Branch and the 
Lucerne School and Community Branch 
have been consolidated for the summer 
vacation period, with Miss Mary Koehly 
in charge one day a week in the Midway 
school building. Mrs Laura B. Lentz 
resigned as custodian of Trona Branch 



\oi. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



227 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

May 1, and Miss Phyllis Granger was 
appointed to take her place. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public liiBRARY. 
Miss Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

The Board of Library Trustees re- 
ceived a gift June 4 of a check for $114 
from Mary and Walter Fackler, to es- 
tablish a memorial to their sister, the 
late Miss Ella Fackler. The interest 
is to be expended each year in the pur- 
chase of musical works. Miss Fackler 
having been one of the musicians and 
teachers of the city in her life time. — 
Redlands Facts, Je 4 

San Bernardino. 

San Bernardino Free Public Li- 
brary. Miss May Coddington, Lib'n. 

Owing to the growth in circulation 
during the past year it was thought 
necessary to increase the staff by two 
members. July 1 Mrs Fay Nicholson 
Engleman and Miss Mary Belle Kellogg 
were added to the staff. Miss Doris King- 
man, a member of the staff for five years 
was married to Mr Khaled Wallace June 
26. She will retain her position in the 
Library. The Librarian and Miss Ruth 
Peachey, Assistant, attended the conven- 
tion at Gearhart, Oregon. 

May Coddington, Lib'n. 

Upland. 

Upland [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib'n. 

Mrs F. H. Manker attended the com- 
bination California Library Association 
and Pacific Northwest Library Associa- 
tion meeting at Gearhart. While on the 
trip she, accompanied by Mrs J. C. Dan- 
ford of Glendale, made a flying trip to 
Seattle. 

Mrs L. H. Jorgensen, assistant libra- 
rian, left June 19 for Eugene, Oregon, 
where she will attend a six weeks' course 
in cataloging at the University of Oregon. 
During her leave of absence, Mrs Birdie 
Penley, of Pomona, is substituting for her. 

A gift of a $.50 check from a fellow 
townsman, R. R. Harrington, was grate- 
fully accepted in April and in June a gift 
of $100 was made the library by Miss 
Aurelia Harwood. | 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Upland — Continued. 

A box of books was donated the library 
by A. J. Hall and another by A. B. 
Whitney, and a third by Mrs Nelson. 
Many of these were copies that the library 
never had owned and some few were dup- 
licates. 

A gift of many small shrubs was made 
the library by the agricultural depart- 
ment of Chaffey Union High School and 
Junior College. The librarian, with the 
help of Mrs Helen Dougherty, plotted 
the grounds around the library and the 
Fire Hall, and planted the grounds with 
the help of the driver of the fire engine. 
The rose bushes which formerly were 
placed at intervals around the building, 
have all been moved to one location, mak- 
ing a rose garden. Given time, the li- 
brary building will be surrounded with 
a wall of living green, taking off that 
bare look. 

Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib'n. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $123,516,956 (tax- 
able for county $103,450,380) : 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

Dehesa Branch has been reestablished. 
The Lincoln Acres Branch was established 
May 16, 1927, with Mrs La Pointe as 
custodian. 

Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

Escondido. 

EscoNDiDo [Free] Public Libeaby. 
Miss Mary N. Adams, Lib'n. 

A pleasing program to advance the love 
and care of books among school children 
was given by a 7th grade teacher in 
our schools. A play from Child-Life was 
chosen. The children learned and gave 
the play, first to the grown folk at the 
Woman's Club House, then repeated it 
at the Grade School, where the audience 
was made up of school children only. In 
addition to the play, were talks on books 
by children. A child explained each part 
of a book, representing himself to be the 
cover, the body, the title page, etc. Book- 
marks were distributed, and the history 



228 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
Escondido — Continued. 
of book plates touched upon. The interest 
in books seemed to pervade the air. The 
program was closed by a song, the words 
of which were composed by two of the 
girls, and sung heartily by all, to the tune 
of Old Black Joe. 

Here is the song : 

Gone are my leaves, from the cover 

that was new ; 
Gone is my binding, and my title — 

that's gone too ; 
Now in the trash can in loneliness 

I sit. 
And the children do not seem to care 

One single bit. 

Chorus I. 
I'm going, I'm going. 
And I do not know just where, 
And all because you did not give me 
Proper care. 

Chobtts II. 
I'm go^ng, I'm going. 
For I'm coming all apart ; 
The children who have torn me 
Surely have no heart. 

Mary N. Adams, Lib'n. 



San Diego. 

ISan Diego [Feee] Public Libeaey. 
Mrs H. P. Davison. Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

A book club sponsored by the San Diego 
Public Library, held a dinner meeting 
on the evening of .Tune 4, 1927 at the 
Golden Lion Inn. More than eighty per- 
sons were present and listened to Miss 
Cornelia D. Plaister outline the plans 
of the new organization whose member- 
ship is to be open to all who "care for 
books." Mr Julius Wagenheim then 
showed some rare and beautiful books 
from his noteworthy collection and ex- 
plained many interesting details of the 
book-maker's art as well as discussing 
the amenities of book collecting. The 
next meeting will be held early in October. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. .506,676. 
Assessed valuation $982,-560,022 (tax- 
able for county .$756,583,094). 

State Teachers College Libraey. 
Miss Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

The College mourns the loss of its 
president, Mr A. B. Anderson, who died 
June 9 after an illness of several months. 
Mr Anderson had long been connected 
with the College, having been dean for 
many years under the presidency of Dr 
Frederic Burk. Mr Anderson took a 
keen personal interest in all the activities 
of the College and the Training School. 
In fact, he allowed himself to become so 
absorbed that his health suffered in con- 
sequence, and his illness was the result. 
He gave much of himself to this school. 
Indeed, he gave all. 

An event in the Library was the open- 
ing, at the beginning of the summer ses- 
sion, of an additional room on the floor 
below, with access from the main floor 
by way of an outside, closed-in stairway, 
built on. Viewed from the outside, the 
stairway makes another wart on our 
funny old building ; but from the inside 
it has all the aspects of a perfectly good 
stairway, with landings and everything. 
The room added was formerly the kinder- 
garten room, and was released, to be made 
ready for its new use, when the kinder- 
garten-primary building was occupied last 
fall. Many suggestions were made by vari- 
ous faculty members to Mr Anderson, 
as to how the space might be utilized ; but 
he realized how much the library needed 
additional room, and kept it for us in 
spite of all the covetous ones. Shelved 
on all sides, with new lighting fixtures 
and new radiators, and study tables made 
to order, it makes a very welcome new 
addition, with seats for about forty 
students. 

Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

University of St. Ignatius Libraey. 
Rev. Pius L. Moore, S.J., Prin. H. A. 
Gabriel, S.J., Lib'n. 

The work of cataloging our library 
which we undertook some four months 
ago is proceeding satisfactorily. We fol- 
low the Dewey Decimal System. 

H. A. Gabriel, S. J., Lib'n. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



229 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $121,623,705 (tax- 
able for county .$104,200,245). 

San .Toaqitin Co. Free L i b e a e y, 
Stockton. Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Miss Kate M. Foley, teacher of the 
blind, visited our library during the 
quarter, and made many calls on both 
city and county patrons. 

A story-hour was given for the children 
of the Calla and Summer Home dis- 
tricts, June 29, at the home of the cus- 
todian, Mrs E. E. Vest. This was the 
second story-hour to be held in this dis- 
trict during the year. Many children 
and their parents attended, and Miss 
Mary Colahan delightfully entertained 
the audience with a variety of stories. 
Ida B. Condit, Lib'n. 

Stockton. 

tSTOCKTON Free Public Libeaey. 
Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Many new books were added during 
the quarter, special attention being given 
to triavel books which were attractively 
displayed, gaining a wide circulation. 
Vacation privileges were stressed and 
many availed themselves of the oppor- 
tunity thus afforded. 

The work in the Reference Department 
has been unusually active owing to the 
summer session of the College of the 
Pacific. 

The Children's Department received a 
selection of new books especially adapted 
for summer reading, which have proven 
attractive to both the older and younger 
children. In order to enlist their interest 
in the non-fiction books, the members of 
the Reading Club were asked to submit a 
list of ten books which they considered 
most interesting, from which a list will 
be compiled and posted in the Juvenile 
Room. 

The Children's Reading Club of the 
Public Library held its annual picnic 
June 23, under the trees at Oak Park. 
Officers were elected and presented with 
their oflScial badges, and special interest 
was shown in a "Book Questions" con- 
test, the winners being awarded attrac- 
tive prizes of books. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Stockton — Continued. 

A small marionette show, depicting 
various characters from Bookland, was 
presented at the Municipal Baths Library, 
as a feature of the first meeting of the 
Municipal Baths Library's reading club. 
Thirty children signified their desire to 
join the new reading club, and definite 
plans were laid for a busy summer for 
the organization. 

Miss Ida E. Condit, the librarian, at- 
tended the joint meeting of the P. N. L. A. 
and C. L. A. at Gearhart, Oregon. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $39,078,780 (tax- 
able for county .$.33,733,457). 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat. Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $48,109,329 (taxable 
for county $43,940,885). 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo [Free] Public Libeaey. 
Miss Inez M. Crawford, Lib'n. 

A $50,000 bond issue for improvements 
to the San Mateo Public Library carried 
.June 16 by a vote of 545 against 87. 
Passage of the issue which will provide 
funds to more than double the capacity 
of the library and supply additional fur- 
nishings, is credited to the work of city 
ofiicials and others prominent in civic 
affairs, including members of the library 
board of trustees, members of the parent- 
teacher associations and improvement 
clubs. The library property provides 
ample room for the expansion, a feature 
of which is to be special rooms for stu- 
dents and enlarged reading rooms for 
visitors. — San Mateo Times, Je 17 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $74,627,787 (taxable 
for county $64,054,990). 



230 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIPOENIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



SANTA BARBARA CO.— Continued. 
Santa Barbara. 

Santa Barbara Free Public Library. 
Mrs Frances Burns Linn, Lib'n. 

Mrs Frances B. Linn, Librarian of 
Santa Barbara Public Library, was 
elected president of the California Li- 
brary Association June 15 at Gearhart, 
Oregon.— Santa Barbara Press, Je 16 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop, 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $126,507,637 (tax- 
able for county $110,715,675). 

San Jose. 

San Jose High School Library. 
Raymond B. Leland, Prin. Miss Henri- 
ette G. Thomas, Lib'n. 

One of our former library assistants 
has finished her apprentice work at the 
San Jose Public Library and is substitut- 
ing there for the regular assistants, as 
they take their summer vacations. 

Henriette Thomas, Lib'n. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $26,854,793 (taxable 
for county $22,905,840). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $25,222,656 (tax- 
able for county $15,208,650). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 1788. 
Assessed valuation $3,202,043 (taxable 
for county $2,813,435). 

Sierra Co. Free Library. Miss 
Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

Pike City Branch was established May 
20, with Mrs H. H. Chatfield as cus- 
todian. The branch at Loyalton was 
moved from the church parlors to Mr 
Dory's ice cream parlor and grocery store 



SIERRA CO. — Continued. 

June 28. Mrs Ellen Gardner is the new 
custodian. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(TTiirty-third class.) 
County .-^eat, Trekji. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,.545. 
Assessed valuation $30,004,501 (tax- 
able for county $21,456,025). 

SisKiYOTT Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

Due to illness, Mrs J. G. Griggs has 
found it necessary to give up both hotel 
and branch library at Edgewood ; her 
place in both activities has been taken by 
Mrs W. R. Williams. 

Macdoel Branch is in charge of Mrs 
Glenn Grafe, who undertook the work 
when Mrs E. C. Reinhart moved to Fort 
Jones. 

Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $38,100,855 (taxable 
for county $30,990,900). 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. .51,990. 
Assessed valuation $51,323,760 (tax- 
able for county $43,470,110). 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 14S6 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $63,311,551 (tax- 
able for county $54,407,685). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

Better Homes Week was observed in 
Modesto April 24 to 30. An exhibit of 
books in one of the model homes was 
made by the library, and on the evening 
of April 29, the coimty librarian gave a 
talk on "Book budgets for the home li- 
brary" illustrated by books and maga- 
zines in the exhibit. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



231 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

Mrs Amy May Caya resigned her posi- 
tion as assistant in the school department 
May 1 in order to join her husband in 
San Francisco. Miss Bessie Chastain, 
part-time assistant, has been helping Mrs 
Nankeville in her place. 

Miss Blanche Galloway, county li- 
brarian of Madera County, was a guest 
of the library May 5, and gave a talk at 
the Patterson Study Club, her topic being 
"Laces." She used the lovely laces which 
she collected abroad while on war service, 
as illustration, and the members were 
delighted. 

Miss Ida M. Huntington and Miss lone 
Townsend attended the district meeting 
in Visalia and Giant Forest, May 20 and 
21. 

The county librarian was the speaker 
at the closing meeting June 1 of the 
Current Events Club which meets at 
Newman Library every Tuesday during 
the winter. It was an evening meeting 
and her subject was "New books and new 
ways of distributing them." 

The county librarian atended the joint 
meeting of the C. L. A. and the P. N. L. 
A. at Gearhart, June 13 to 15, and after- 
ward enjoyed a trip through the "Inside 
Passage" to Bennett, Alaska, via Skag- 
way, in company with Miss C. D. Pro- 
vines, of Sacramento County. En route 
they visited a number of libraries, and 
were guests at an informal reception at 
the Skagway Public Library, where the 
librarian and board of library trustees 
were eager to hear about the meeting at 
Gearhart and about the new and good 
books of interest to readers in "the states." 

Miss Carol Cox, recently graduated 
from the University of California Library 
School, takes the place of Miss Ruth 
Doxsee as cataloger, who resigned May 15 
to take a similar position in the Uni- 
versity at Ames, Iowa. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

Modesto. 

McHenry [Free] Public Library 
ATs^D Branch, Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

The Modesto City Council has acted 
favorably on the recommendation of the 
Board of Library Trustees that an addi- 
tion to the library be built as soon as 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

Modesto — Continued, 
possible to relieve the congested condition 
of the present building. 

Plans are being perfected in the City 
Engineer's office and it is estimated that 
the addition will cost approximately 
$25,000 which will be cared for by the 
city. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

SETTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $22,813,548 (taxable 
for county $18,084,190). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba City. 
Miss Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Robbins Branch Library was estab- 
lished April 5 with headquarters in the 
mercantile store at Robbins and with 
I. Rowan as custodian. Robbins is the 
town which has been founded in the 
Sutter Basin. — Marysville Appeal, Ap 6 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 

County seat. Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $23,023,556 (taxable 
for county $19,286,150). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

Variety is verily the spice of the li- 
brarian's life and she has plenty of it. 
Monotony is a word unknown in the vo- 
cabulary of a county librarian. Variety 
in help seems to be the strongest bit of 
spice in most librarians' lives and Tehama 
County has its share. On June 15 Miss 
Neva Reno, first assistant, left the staff 
to become librarian of the Herbert Kraft 
Memorial Library of Red Bluff and on 
July 1 Miss Idella Mendenhall slipped 
away to Redding and surprised us all 
by being married. The vacancies have 
been filled since by two high school girls. 
Miss Helen Beeding and Miss Katharine 
Ebenhack. 

In May Tehama County enjoyed 
another of those brief and inspiriting visits 
from Mrs Henshall, at which time visits 
were made to several of the branches. The 
librarian accompanied Mrs Henshall to 



232 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

Treka over the week-end and enjoyed a 
visit with Miss Frink which demonstrated 
again what benefit one derives from fre- 
quent contact with one's colleagues. 

The library was visited by several of 
the travelers on their way to and from 
Gearhart. 

Gerber Branch Library was suspended 
in April until such time as some satis- 
factory arrangement can be made for a 
room to be used exclusively for the library 
and with a paid librarian ill charge. A 
committee from the Chamber of Com- 
merce was appointed to look into the 
matter and it is hoped that something 
may develop during 1927-28. On June 
30 Capay Branch was closed and the 
borrowers directed to use Capay Branch 
of the Glenn County Library, an agree- 
ment having been made between the two 
libraries for a joint service. 

235 library certificates were issued to 
the children in the schools this year for 
reading five or more books. This is a 
gratifying increase over last year's record, 
due in part to the interest of the Rural 
Supervisor and to stimulation through 
talks by the county librarian on her visits 
to the schools. 

Camp Forward, the children's summer 
camp maintained by the American Tuber- 
culosis Association, opened in June at 
which time a shipment of 200 books was 
sent from the county library. The li- 
brary is a very important part of the 
camp activities. Books are issued each 
morning and checked in each night. This 
year one of the little boys spent a morn- 
ing in the library rooms and "Oh Boy !" 
(to use his expression) he was allowed to 
pick out all the books he wanted to read, 
to be sent to the camp. As a result there 
is probably a predominance of books for 
boys of ten in that two hundred, but the 
enthusiasm of our missionary will doubt- 
less cause most of them to be read by 
the rest of the boys in camp. 

Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

A new branch of Tehama County Free 
Library has been established at Hunter, 
in the Hunter post office, under the 
supervision of Mrs Helen McCausland. 
A collection of 200 miscellaneous books 
has been installed. — Red Bluff Neios, 
Je 8 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 
Red Bluff. 

Herbert Kraft Free [Public] Li- 
brary. Mrs James Feeley, Lib'n. 

Miss Neva Reno, assistant librarian in 
Tehama County Free Library for several 
years, was elected city librarian at a 
meeting of the library board June 2, and 
will take charge of the library June 15. 
Miss Reno will succeed Mrs Georgia Fee- 
ley, who has planned to move from Red 
Bluff. Mi's Feeley's resignation which 
was accepted with regret, is effective June 
15. She was granted a two-weeks' vaca- 
tion and, until Miss Reno takes charge, 
the library will be in charge of Mrs Ella 
M. South, assistant librarian. — Red Bluff 
Sentinel, Je 3 



TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 8276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
xVssessed valuation $3,815,166 (taxable 
for county $3,384,235). 



TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $89,898,573 (taxable 
for county $68,353,985). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

B. A. Ruth was appointed custodian of 
Cutler Branch May 15 at a salary of $10 
a month to succeed Mr Collins. Hanby 
School joined the County Library June 
28. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Tulare. 

Tulare Free Public Library and 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Rosa D. Reardon, Lib'n. 

Mrs W. J. Bryant, Assistant Librarian 
who has been away on leave of absence 
for the past six weeks, has resigned owing 
to ill health. She has been Assistant Li- 
brarian for fifteen years, and has been a 
very faithful and competent employee. — 
Tulare Advance-Register, Ap 23 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



233 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Sonora. 
x^r'ea. 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 776S. 
Assessed valuation $12,317,844 (taxable 
for county $8,791,604). 



VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 18.50 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $76,888,752 (taxable 
for county $66,571,418). 

Yentuea Co. Free Libraey, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The money and the land are now avail- 
able for a new library at Ojai. The pre- 
liminary plans have been made by Mr 
Carleton Monroe Winslow. They will be 
in conformity with the general archi- 
tectural scheme of Ojai which is Spanish. 

Certificates for reading were given out 
to pupils in all parts of the county from 
the third through the eighth grades. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ojai. 

George Thatcher. Memorial Fbee 
Library and Ojai Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Ventura. 

Ventura [Free] Public Library 
AND Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, 
Lib'n. 

The average gain in circulation for the 
city has been 1500 each month over the 
same month of a year before. This counts 
the circulation of both city and county 
books over the city desk, but does not 
include the service in the city schools. 
Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $34,138,665 (taxable 
for county $27,427,804). 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 

Davis. 

*Univeksity of California Branch 
of the College of Agriculture Library 
and Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
W. L. Howard, Director. Miss Nelle U. 
Branch, Lib'n. 

Miss Nelle Branch, Librarian at the 
College of Agriculture, has been granted a 
six months' leave of absence, which she 
will spend with a party on a tour of the 
orient. Her leave starts August 1. — 
Woodland Democrat, My 4 

Miss Virginia E. Sexton, a graduate of 
the University of California School of Li- 
brarianship, has been appointed to the 
position of assistant in the library at 
the college at Davis. She began work 
June 11. — Woodland Democrat, Je 15 

Woodland. 

Woodland Free [Public] Library 
AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Irma C. Bruton, Lib'n. 

Mr J. D. Musgrove was recently ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of Li- 
brary Trustees. He succeeds Mr G. P. 
Hurst, who resigned .Tune 1. Mr Hurst 
was an interested member of the Board 
for twelve years and the Board passed 
a resolution of appreciation and regret at 
his resignation. 

Mrs Irma C. Burton, Lib'n. 



YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marys ville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $20,214,480 (taxable 
for county $16,702,445). 

Marysville. 

Marys VILLE City [Free Public] 
Library. Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch, Lib'n. 

INIiss Mary Subers suffered a stroke of 
paralysis April 5. She recently retired 
after twentj^-five years' service as City 
Librarian of Marysville. — Marysville Ap- 
peal, Ap 7 



234 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 

A. L. A. 

Headquaetebs. 

86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and iVIending. 

Binding. 
Cooperative Bindery Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futemick Co., 444 Bryant St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st, San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbtndery, 309 J St., 

Sacramento. Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Matebials. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases and Shelving. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 
Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Cobkugated Papeb Caetons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 

Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 

West 27th St., New York, N. T. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House, lis S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome St., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 
Stockton, Calif. 



vol. 22, no. 3] directory for library supplies, etc. 



235 



Book Supports, etc. — Continued. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5th ave., New 

York City. 
Chivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 

St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

For books in Chivers binding. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oakland, 
and 152 Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Levinson's, The Book Store, 1012 K st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st, 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parkers Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pumell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235 Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave.. 

New York, N. Y. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Technical Book Co., 525 Market St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Handles only technical books. 

Union Library Association, 118-120 E. 

25th St., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 



Books — Continued. 

Harr Wagner, 149 New Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant 
ave. and Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 B. 10th 

st. New York, N. Y. 
B. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray St., New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westermann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 

Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 

France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 
Bancroft-Whitney Co.. 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 
149 New Montgomery st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



236 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Books — Continued. 

Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st, 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 

Especially Californiana, 

Dawson's Book Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M. De Witt, 020 14th St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th st., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 
Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial st., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles. Calif. 



County Free Library Signs. 
For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gayloi'd Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge i&.Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Films. 
For Rent. 

American Red Cross Films, distributed 
by University of California Library, 
Berkeley, Calif. 

Fox Film Corporation, New York, 
N. Y. 

National Producers Film Service, 111 
Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 
Dept., 985 Market st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

United States Forest Sei'vice, Ferry 
bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 

University of California, Extension 
Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, 1138 Elmwood ave., 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



vol. 22, no. 3] directory for library supplies, etc. 



237 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st., New York, N. T. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth ( Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Magazines. 

See Peeiodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 
3 — 53132 



Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi-Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Mc-Kee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), .39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Paste. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st, 

Stockton, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st., New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, III. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbees, 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg.. New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave.. New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 
F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st, 

Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 
Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 

Square, New York City. 
Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 

North Cohocton, N. Y. 
Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 

zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pacific News Bureau, 643 S. Olive st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



238 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jiily, 1927 



Periodicals — Continued. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 657 Howard 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co.. 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles. Calif. 

Pictures. 
Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 
Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th St., 

New York, N. Y. 

(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 

Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

L-os Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co.. 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 
Fairbanks-Morse & Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts.. San Francisco. Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St.. Los Angeles. Calif. 

Signs. 
Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-.369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & 'Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Slides. 
Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 832 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 

Calif. 
George E. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For California wild flowers, marine life, his- 
toric views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco. 420 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los* Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and 611 J St., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California, 

Riverside Library Service School. 

For full information write to Librarian, 

Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 
See, also, this publication, p. 224. 

University of California School of Li- 

brarianship. For full information write 

to Chairman. School of Librarianship, 

University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The ofBcers of the American Library 
Association for 192(j-27 are : 

President, Carl B, Roden, Librarian 
Public Library, Chicago, 111, 

1st Vice President, Charles H. Comp- 
ton, Asst. Librarian, Public Library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 



vol. 22, no. 3] directory p^or library supplies, etc. 



239 



2d Vice President, Charles E. Rush, 
Librarian, Public Library, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Secretary, Carl H. Milam, Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library 
Association for 1927 are : 

Northern Section — Elizabeth Patton, 
Garfield Junior High School, Berkeley, 
President. 

Margaret Girdner, High School of 
Commerce, San Francisco, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Southern S e c t i o n — Mrs Ethelwyn 
Laurence, Los Angeles High School, 
President. 

Hope L. Potter, South Pasadena High 
School, Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

The officers of the League of Library 
Commissions for 1927-29 are : 

President, Clarence B. Lester, Sec. 
Wisconsin Library Commission, Madison, 
Wis. 

1st Vice President, Mrs Lillian B. 
Griggs, Secretary and Director, North 
Carolina Library Commission, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

2d Vice President, Herbert Kjllam, Sec- 
retary British Columbia Public Library 
Commission, Victoria, British Columbia. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Clara F. Baldwin, 
Director of Library Division, Minnesota 
State Department of Education, St. Paul, 
Minnesota. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Pacific Northwest 
Library Association for 1926-27 are : 

President, Joanna H. Sprague, Li- 
brarian Public Library, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

1st Vice President, Jacqueline Noel, Li- 
brarian Public Library, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

2d Vice President, E. Ruth Rockwood, 
Library Association of Portland, Port- 
land, Oi'egon. 



Seci-etary, Helen Johns, Librarian Pub- 
lic Library, Longview, Washington. 

Treasurer, Ora L. Maxwell, Public 
Library, Spokane, Washington. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1926-27 are: 

Bonnie E. Strong, Standard Oil Co., 
San Francisco, President. 

C. H. Judson, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., San Francisco, Vice 
President. 

Margaret Hart, San Francisco Bulletin, 
San Francisco, Secretary- Treasurer. 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The officers of the Special Libraries 
Association of Southern California for 
1926-27 are: 

President, Josephine B. Hollingsworth, 
Science and Industry Department, Los 
Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Vice President, Rose M. P u r c e 11, 
Southern California Edison Company, 
Los Angeles. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs Helen D. 
Townsend, Barlow Medical Library, Los 
Angeles. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officers. 

President Margaret Girdner 

Vice-President Helen B. Mackay 

Secretary Lois Newman 

Treasurer Joy .Jackson 

Executive board of five consisting of 
the above and ex-president of the preced- 
ing executive board (Anita Crellin). 

At the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion at Gearhart, Oregon, June 15, 1927, 
the following officers were nominated : 
For president, Helen E. Mackay, Pasa- 
dena ; vice president, Dorotha Davis, 
Fresno ; secretary. May Domin, Uni- 
versity of California ; treasurer, Lillian 
Hyde, San Francisco. These officers will 
be voted on by mail. 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Librai-y registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
branch of their work. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 



be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a library that fills a posi- 
tion for which it has asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Library at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento. California. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1925-26) 

Totgil school districts ' 3524 

Elementary 3231 

High (456 schools) 293 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $727,154.40 

Total expended for books for high schools .$8(55,354.29 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,697,322 

Total volumes in high schools 3,032,088 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



241 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Mrs Frances Burns Linn, 
Public Library, Santa Barbara. 

Vice President, Minette L. Stoddard, 
Merced County Free Library, Merced. 

Secretary-Treasurer. Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. >» 

COMMITTEES. 

Committees and other officers will be 
announced in the October issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

For account of the annual meeting see 
this publication, p. 205. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 

First, Second and Third Districts 
Meeting. 

A joint meeting of the First, Second 
and Third Districts of the California Li- 
brary Association was held at Asilomar, 
April 22-24, 1927. It was planned to 
combine a week-end of recreation with the 
informal discussion of library problems. 
Accordingly a series of round tables was 
arranged. 

Miss Mary Barmby, president of the 
First and Second Districts, called the 
conference together at 9.30 Saturday 
morning. Miss Stanton, director of Asilo- 
mar, welcomed the guests and spoke of 
the history and purpose of the resort. 

Mrs Elizabeth S. Madison, supervisor 
of school libraries, Oakland, presided at 
the round table on school libraries. She 
presented as an introduction to the sub- 
ject the "relation of new methods in 
education to school libraries." Miss Pat- 
ton, librarian of the Garfield Junior High 
School, Berkeley, spoke of the organiza- 
tion of the school librarians of Northern 
California. Miss Margaret V. Girdner, li- 
brarian of the High School of Commerce, 
San Francisco, outlined a program of 
study and investigation undertaken by 
the school librarians of this section. Miss 
Faith E. Smith called attention to the 
data on high school libraries that is being 



compiled from the returns of question- 
naires sent out from the ofiice of the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion. 

The second round table on "'personnel 
problems" was led by Miss Edith M. 
Coulter, who reviewed the report on the 
"Proposed Classification and Compensa- 
tion Plans for Library Positions." Miss 
Mabel R. Gillis, Miss Mabel Thomas, 
Miss Margaret Greene, Miss Florence M. 
Craig and Mrs E. S. Singletary partici- 
pated in the discussion. 

Two round tables were held simul- 
taneously in the afternoon. Miss Frances 
Patterson, of Palo Alto Public Library 
was chairman of the circulation work 
section, at which Miss Susan T. Smith, 
of Sacramento Public Library led the 
discussion. At the round table on library 
service to schools Miss Jean D. Baird of 
Alameda County Free Library was chair- 
man and the speakers were Miss Greene, 
Miss Florence J. Wheaton of San Benito 
County, Mrs L. R. Frisby of Santa Clara 
County, and Miss Ruth Porter of Mon- 
terey County. 

Mrs Amy Stafford, music supervisor 
at the Monterey High School, sang several 
children's wild flower songs in a delight- 
ful manner. 

A costume party featuring the librar- 
ian of the "gay nineties," was held 
Saturday evening in the Social Hall. 
Sunday morning Dr Harold Heath of 
Hopkins Marine Station spoke informally 
on the many interesting scientific facts 
connected with the Monterey Bay region. 
Edith M. Coulter, Secretary. 

Fourth District Meeting. 

The convention of tlie Fourth District 
of the California Library Association was 
called to order by the President, Miss 
Gretchen Flower, at 10.4.5 o'clock on the 
morning of May 20, 1927, in the Munici- 
pal Auditoi-ium at Visalia. There were 
81 present. 

Miss Flower made a cordial speech of 
welcome and introduced F. M. Pfrimner, 
Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, 
wlio welcomed members of the conven- 



242 



XEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



tion as comity represeutative. He was 
followed by E. F. Lambert, • Mayor of 
Tisalia, who extended greetings from the 
city, and took the opportunity of stress- 
ing the vital importance of libraries to 
progressive communities. 

The business part of the meeting was 
disposed of after these speeches. Mrs 
Julia G. Babcock, Librarian of Kern 
County Free Library was unanimously 
elected nominator for this district at the 
California Library Association conven- 
tion, since Miss Flower was unable to 
serve, and Miss Blanche Galloway of 
Madera County Free Librarj' was made 
alternate. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
was next on the program, and gave im- 
portant points about the developing li- 
brary system in Louisiana, and the splen- 
did work which Miss Culver, and her 
assistant, Miss Harris, are doing there. 
In spite of damage and loss occasioned 
by the flood, the work is going forward, 
and an intensive library program is being 
put through in the Jefferson Davis 
Parish. 

Mr Ferguson ui-ged that all who pos- 
sibly could attend the joint convention 
at Gearhart, Oregon, and mentioned the 
fact that California may be the choice 
for the American Library Association in 
1929. As a closing word Mr Ferguson 
brought the assurance that California li- 
brary work is being recognized, even inter- 
nationally, and spoke of the invitation 
which he had received to speak at the 
meeting of the British Library Associa- 
tion in Edinbui'gh. in September, 1927, 
his subject to be Rural Libraries. 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock made a brief 
speech, urging members to join the Ameri- 
can Library Association, reminding us 
that this was the central national organi- 
zation, and constantly working for better 
salaries, better buildings, better equip- 
ment, and the general advance of the li- 
brary profession. 

Miss Sarah F. McCardle, Librarian of 
the Fre.sno County Free Library, made an 
announcement concerning the adult edu- 
cation courses at Mills College, to be 
given there in August. This is a project 
which is receiving the support of the 
California Library Association. 

The convention was then addressed by 



^Monica Shannon (Mrs Elbert Wing) 
who gave some practical and illuminating 
suggestions about library publicity 
through the newspapers, and then told 
her interested audience about her experi- 
ences when her book, California Fairy 
Tales Avas accepted for publication. Miss 
Shannon very generously read one of her 
unpublished fairy tales, a surprise for 
which we were all most grateful, and 
which brought enthusiastic applause. 

The morning program ended with the 
g!nging of three fine songs by Mr Josephs 
of Visalia. 

Luncheon was served at the Hotel 
Johnson, with round table discussions for 
those engaged in the various branches 
of library work. 

The first number on the afternoon pro- 
gram was a reading of "The Jazz Singer" 
by Professor G. H. Hunting of the Fresno 
State Teachers' College. Professor Hunt- 
ing gave a memorable reading of this very 
dramatic and striking modern play. 

This was followed by three songs 
sung by Reverend H. S. Cushing, which 
were very much enjoyed. 

The closing address of the day was 
made by Col. George W. Stewart, and his 
subject was the "Indians of the San 
Joaquin Valley." Col. Stewart's stories 
from Indian folklore, his explanation of 
their use of the sign language, and his 
description of their primitive customs and 
methods of living were most interesting 
to us, who are living here now. 

At the close of this program, more than 
35 members who had planned to take 
advantage of Miss Flower's thoughtful 
arrangements for a trip to Giant Forest, 
left for that resort. Miss Flower had 
scheduled a most attractive evening pro- 
gram, and a splendid outing was assured 
them. 

Makiox L. Gregoet, Secretary. 

Seventh District Meeting. 

A meeting of the Seventh District of 
the California Library Association was 
held in Eureka, Saturday, April 30, 1927. 
A luncheon served at the Eureka Inn, 
preceded the meeting, twenty-eight being 
present. 

Mrs R. W. Swetman, of the Areata 
Reading Club, gave a talk, telling of the 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRAKY ASSOCIATION. 



243 



aims of their club and also gave short 
reviews of the books the club had studied 
during the winter. 

Mr C. Edward Graves of the Humboldt 
State Teachers College spoke about his 
course in Recreational Reading and also 
of his experiment in sending out "Liter- 
ary Merit" and "Personal Enjoyment" 
ballots to various library staffs. "The 
object of this experiment is to find out 
whether there is a Central 'tendency' 
in estimating the degree of personal en- 



joyment and literary merit obtained from 
the reading of any given book." 

For the first time since the organiza- 
tion of the Seventh District, Del Norte 
County was represented, Miss Mildred 
Duffy, the Librarian at Crescent City 
and Miss McLaughlin, being present. 

At the business meeting, Mr C. Edward 
Graves was elected member of the Nomi- 
nation Committee from the Seventh Dis- 
trict and Miss Ida M. Reagan was elected 
Alternate. 

Mrs Elizabeth Ripley, Secretary. 



244 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. [July, 1927 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Milton J. Ferguson, Ex-officio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano Countj'. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS 
CONVENTION. 

For an account of the County Li- 
brarians' Convention, see p. 205. 

A MANUAL FOR CUSTODIANS. 

Lagt quarter we reported a Manual 
for Custodians sent in by the Tulare 
County Free Library. This quarter v?e 
have received another — this time from 
the Los Angeles County Free Library. 
This is also clear and detailed and out- 
lines the practices in a very large county 
library. 

SOME PUBLICATIONS. 

The Los Angeles County Free Library 
is issuing a quarterly, "Books and Notes." 
The first number, dated October, 1926, 
gives a general statement regarding the 
publication and the county library, a de- 
scription of the departments at head- 
quarters and lists the recent accessions. 
The next number is devoted mainly to 
service to teachers and schools, and the 
April issue to books for boys and girls. 
The quarterly is attractive in make-up 
and appearance, being illusti-ated and 
well printed. 

There are several other county library 
publications, although the Quarterly Bul- 
letin, issued by the Kern County Free 
Library, is the only other printed bulletin. 
This has completed its fourth volume. It 
gives only recent accessions, with the 
exception of an occasional addition of 
statistics or the annual report. 

The Plumas County Free Library has 
issued for several years past a Monthly 



Letter to Custodians and irregular ones 
to teachers. These are mimeographed 
and contain suggestions, news items, etc. 
The Contra Costa County Free Library 
has its Library Link, a mimeographed 
folder with the county library sign on 
the outside. Sutter County Free Li- 
brary recently started County Library 
Chat, a mimeographed sheet. Tehama 
County has issued thi-ee numbers of The 
Slate, "upon which is recorded, now and 
then, suggestions for teachers' profes- 
sional reading and occasionally books to 
be recommended to the children." Napa 
County has a gay yellow mimeographed 
Library Bulletin, issued irregularly. 
Fresno County has sent out some num- 
bers of typed or mimeographed County 
Library Notes, as has Inyo County. The 
latter is called Inyo Library Workers. 

There may be other county library 
bulletins but these are the only ones on 
file in the State Library. Some of 
these are somewhat difficult to check 
because not dated. The date will add to 
the value of any publication, no matter 
how infoi-mal. 

All library bulletins of this sort should 
be sent regularly to the State Library. 
You are asked to put the State Library 
on your mailing list NOW. 

EXHIBIT FOR 

CONGRESS OF PARENTS AND 

TEACHERS. 

For an account of this exhibit con- 
ducted by the Alameda County Free Li- 
brary, see p. 214. 

REQUEST FROM A. L. A. 

Julia Wright Merrill, Executive Assist- 
ant, Committee on Library Extension, 
asks that county libraries send to head- 
quartex's for her use county library 
material of all kinds — mimeographed or 
printed bulletins, instructions to cus- 
todians, publicity material, pictures, 
maps, etc. Evei-ything issued -is of in- 
terest and may be of use to this com- 
mittee. 



vol. 22. no. 3] 



LIBRAEY CLUBS, ETC. 



245 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
accounts of meetings of the various 
library clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIANS' CONFERENCE OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The spring meeting of the College and 
University Library Conference was held 
at the University of California at Los 
Angeles, AprU 23, 1927. 

The President, Miss Charlotte Brown, 
Librarian of the University of SouLhern 
California, conducted a short informil 
discussion in the forenoon, followed by a 
most interesting and delightfully informal 
talk by Mr Arthur M. Ellis, President 
of the Historical Society of Southern 
California, who spoke of the colorful and 
significant early history of California, and 
the possibility of still gathering important 
material and data in our immediate vicin- 
ity. He told of the possibility of certain 
fascinating fields for investigation, such 
as the early intimate histories of the li- 
braries, and the drifting back to the 
Spanish regime after the early American 
occupation. He touched also upon the 
analogy between the early events in Cali- 
fornia history and the basic principles of 
development in the national government, 
speaking of the independent states which 
were established. His talk was rich in 
historical allusion and interest. 

After a pleasant luncheon hour, the 
President turned the meeting over to Mr 
Goodwin, Librarian of the University of 
California at Los Angeles, who intro- 
duced Dr Malcolm W. Graham, assist- 
ant professor of Political Science of the 
University, who addressed us on "Some 
Aspects of International Organization."' 
Dr Graham was a member of the profes- 
sional commission sent to Europe last 
year under the Carnegie Foundation for 
International Peace, for the purpose of 
making a clinical study of international 
and constitutional law. The liberal con- 
ditions, or rather the lack of restrictions 
imposed upon them enabled them to ol)- 



serve independently, and allowed them un- 
precedented opportunities of seeing ch" 
actual making of international affnirs 
as they are conducted by the govern- 
ments. 

The entire commission was admitted to 
the Library of the French Foreign office, 
where the click of a typewriter is never 
heard. In the archival room they were 
shown the original treaty of the recogni- 
tion by France of the new American na- 
tion, and the original Treaty of Versailles. 

Throughout his address Dr Graham 
emphasized the part which libraries 
play in national and international affairs. 
The collection of material so that the 
whole mass of facts may be obtained is 
of inestimable value, and the modern 
nethods now being inaugurated are chang- 
ing the medieval idea of mere collecting 
to . availability. The Library Training 
School at Paris is increasingly signifi- 
cant, as other countries are sending rep- 
resentatives to the school, and the 
American library practice is being spread 
over Europe. 

Dr Graham spoke specifically of The 
Hague, the work of the Permanent Court 
of Arbitration and of the Permanent 
Court of International Justice, and also 
of the minor courts, of which we hear 
nothing. He mentioned the friendship 
and understanding existing between the 
judges. 

Geneva is the Mecca for travelers, for 
there the Commission found the geniality 
and liberality of atmosphere conducive 
to the work of the League of Nations, 
which is becoming a center for all inter- 
national affairs, over two hundred organi- 
zations already having their headquarters 
there. 

The.v found the Internatiojial Labor 
Office housed in a fine building, the most 
dynamic organization at Geneva. They 
are scientifically and skilfully trying to 
prevent the, economic causes of wjir. Dr 
Graham stressed the work of Florence 
Wilson, the Librarian of the International 
Labor Library, in her ambition to m.ake 
the library a kind of super-Congressional 
library. 



246 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Julj, 1927 



The impression of Geneva stnleanien 
given was that they were not there for 
oratory but for a quiet, patient getting 
at facts in order that the nations of the 
world may understand each other and 
live in peace. 

After Dr Graham's address, Mr Good- 
win spoke of the prospective library bniid- 
ing, soon to be erected on the new campus, 
showing the preliminary plans. This 
closed a most delightful day. 

Winifred E. Skin-ner, Secretary. 

Miss Frances H. Spining, Librarian 
of the California Institute of Technology, 
Pasadena, was elected president and Mrs 
Ethelene Kitching, Librarian of Fuller- 
ton Junior College, Secretary for the en- 
suing year. — Los Angeles Times, Ap 24 

ORANGE COUNTY LIBRARY CLUB. 

The Orange County Library Club met 
Saturday, May 14, with Mrs Olive Bailey 
in the delightful new library at Placentia. 

The meeting was called to order at 
10.30 by the newly elected President, Miss 
Margaret Livingston. Attention was 
called to the fact that the nominating 
committee had not completed its work at 
the last meeting, so had carried over the 
business of nominating a vice president. 
They were now ready with their report 
and nominated Mrs Frank Dowling for 
the office of vice president. She was 
accordingly voted into office. 

Miss Livingston spoke of the California 
Library Association meeting to be held 
at Gearhart, Oregon, in June, and urged 
all librarians to attend, if possible. 

Mrs Margaret Scott, chairman of the 
program committee, then took charge of 
the meeting and introduced Mr Richard 
Warner Borst, of the FuUerton Junior 
College. Mr Borst gave a most interest- 
ing review of Arnold Bennett's "Old 
Wives Tales." Next on the program was 
a question box. Discussions were given 
on library floor coverings and how to 
interest business people in the technical 
books to be found in public libraries. 

The meeting then adjourned for the 
summer. 

A tasty luncheon was spread at the 
Round Table Club. It was followed by a 
vote of thanks to Mrs Bailey and to the 
ones who prepared the feast. Miss 
Livingston then suggested that Mr Borst 



and Mrs Borst become associate members 
of the club. This was moved and sec- 
onded, and the vote was carried, for the 
O. C. L. C. wants to hear more of Mr 
Borst's splendid reviews. 

Dr Frank Dowling was called upon 
for an after-dinner speech, which was 
given in his usual droll manner. 

No definite plans have been made as 
yet for the next meeting, which will be 
held sometime in September. 

Helen G. Nelson, Secretary. 

SAN ANTONIO LIBRARY CLUB. 

At a meeting held May 21 at the home 
of Mr and Mrs Willis H. Kerr, Pomona, 
the following officers were elected : Presi- 
dent, Mrs Birdie Penley, Pomona Public 
Library ; Secretary-Treasui-er, Mrs Anna 
Robinson, Claremont. The next meeting 
will be held in October. — Upland Netvs, 
My 24 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The Special Libraries Association of 
Southern California held its April meet- 
ing in Riverside Saturday, April 9, as 
guests of Miss Bernice Loveland, Li- 
brarian of the Southern Sierras Power 
Company. 

Twenty-five members of the associa- 
tion came to the city from Los Angeles 
and vicinity, meeting at the Mission Inn 
for luncheon. After luncheon and a tour 
of the Inn, the company adjourned to 
the library of the Southern Sierras Power 
Company Avhere a short and informal 
meeting was held. Herbert Dewes wel- 
comed the guests in the name of the 
power company and Miss Loveland gave 
a short talk on the work of her library 
and some of the special problems of the 
technical library. Later the party was 
taken for a drive through the orange 
groves, making a stop at the Library of 
the Citrus Experiment Station, where 
Miss Poteet, librarian, explained some of 
the interesting features of this type of 
special library. She also showed some 
very interesting old books on citrus cul- 
ture. The visiting librarians expressed 
themselves as charmed with Riverside 
and delighted at the opportunity to enjoy 
a day here when the flowers are at their 
loveliest. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



247 



The June meeting, the last of the sea- 
son, was held in the library of the 
Southern California Edison Company, 
June 7, at Miss Purcell's invitation. 
About 15 members were present. 

Mrs Irish called the meeting to order 
promptly and requested the seci-etary to 
read the minutes of the last meeting and 
the annual report, which were accepted as 
read. This was followed by the reports 
of the chairman of the Program Com- 
mittee, the Directory Committee and the 
Custodian of the Union List. 

Mrs Irish then brought up for discus- 
sion the rules of our constitution x-egard- 
ing the procedure to be followed after the 
annual election of officers, and the con- 
trary practice which has hitherto been 
observed. A motion was made to have 
the constitution revised, in order to have 
it in conformity with present practices 
and conditions, since our amalgamation 
with the national association. Miss Frey, 
Mrs Townsend and Miss Greene were ap- 
pointed a committee to revise the constitu- 
tion. 

We then proceeded to the election of 
officers for the coming season. Nomina- 



tions were made from the floor and a vote 
was taken. Miss Josephine B. HoUings- 
worth. Science and Industry Department, 
Los Angeles Public Library was elected 
president by unanimous vote. 

Miss Rose Marie Purcell, of the South- 
ern California Edison Company and Miss 
E. Ruth Jones of the Security Trust and 
Savings Bank were nominated for Vice 
President, and the former was elected. 

The nominations for Secretary-Trea- 
surer were Mrs Helen D. Townsend of the 
Barlow Medical Library, Miss Anna F. 
Frey of the Western Precipitation Co. and 
Miss Gladys M. Crowe of the Moneta 
Branch Library. Mrs Townsend was 
elected. 

Miss Lenore Greene of the Los Angeles 
Museum was elected a member of the 
Executive Board. 

Mr Marion, Chairman of the Publicity 
Committee, arrived somewhat late and 
proceeded to read his report, making vari- 
ous recommendations and suggestions. 

The general consensus of opinion was 
that the past season has been one of good 
progress and great enjoyment. 

Lenore Greene, Secretary, 



248 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



July, 1927 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he has received from the 
board of library examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

The Board of Library Examiners held 
an examination at the Public Library, 
Los Angeles, May 27, and at the State 
Library, Sacramento, June 8, 192 7. 
There were seven candidates. Six certifi- 
cates were issued to those who passed : 
Mrs Arline Davis Beardsley, Mrs Helen 
Rowland Dambacher, Mrs Henrietta G. 
Eudey, Louise E. Jones, Susan T. Smith, 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden. 

The life of certificates expiring during 
1927 was extended to the end of the year. 

Renewals were granted to the following 
without examination : Anne Bell Bailey, 
Ellen B. Frink, Blanche Galloway, Anne 
Hadden, Ella Packer, Everett R. Perry, 
Mrs Faye Kneeshaw Russell, Bessie B. 
Silverthoru, Mrs Elizabeth S. Singletai-y, 
Minerva H. Waterman, Caroline S. 
Waters, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

Applications for life certificates were 
considered for the first time. Life certifi- 



cates were granted to the following : Mrs 
Julia G. Babcock, Mary Barmby, Celia 
Gleason, Mrs Jennie Herrman, Edna S. 
Holroyd, Stella Huntington, Sarah E. 
McCardle, Lenala A. Martin. Conielia D. 
Provines, Ida M. Reagan. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Liila (Dobell), L.n. Trinity 

County Free Library, Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 

City. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Teliama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. (Life certificate.) 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, Evalyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, EI Centre. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Tuba City. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Lange Library of 

Education, Berkeley. 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

E. Dalton, Asst. University of California 

Library, Berkeley. 
Dambacher, Mrs Helen (Rowland), Mrs 

Gustav Dambacher, Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonora. 
Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
English, Gladys, Ln. A. L. A. Head- 
quarters, 86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 

111. 
Eudey, Mrs Henrietta G., Mrs Fred Eudey, 

Asst. Amador County Free Library, 

Jackson. 
Ferguson, K. Dorothy, Ln. Bank of Italj" 

Library, San Francisco. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Prazier, Hubert B., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Frink, Ellen B., Ln. Siskiyou County Free 

Library, Yreka. 
Fuller, Mrs Melissa, Asst. Fresno County- 
Free Library, Fresno. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera. 
Gantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo County 

E'ree Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

I'ree Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 



vol. 22. no. 3] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



249 



Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 

Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 
Library and Kings County Free Library, 
Hanford. 

Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 
Library, Salinas. 

Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 
State Library, Sacramento. 

Harris, Mary W., Asst. Louisiana Library 
Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 

Hitt, E)leanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 
Library, San Diego. 

Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 
Free Library, Redwood City. (Life 
certificate.) 

Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 
Free Library, Bakersfield. 

Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 
College Library, San Jose. 

Jones, Louise E., Asst. Public Library, 
Los Angeles. 

Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 
Library, Los Angeles. 

Kitching, Mrs Ethelene M., Ln. FuUerton 
High School Library, Fullerton. 

Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 
County Free Library, San Diego. 

Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. 

Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Tolo County 
Free Library, Woodland. 

Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
oara Free Public Library and Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 
County Free Library, Santa Ana. 

McCardle, Sarah B., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 
Library, Independence. 

Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 
Free Librarv, Susanville. (Life certifi- 
cate. ) 

Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 

Morse, Marion, Ln. Honolulu Academy 
of Arts, Honolulu T. H. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Packer, Ella, Ln. Colusa County Free 
Library, Colusa. 

Parkinson, H. O., Asst. Public Library, 
New York. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 
(Life certificate.) 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library. Eureka. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 



Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Stockebrand, Frances, Asst. Merced 

County Free Library, Merced. 
Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 

Free Library, Jackson. 
Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 

Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 
Vogleson, Helen E., Ln. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Warren, Althea H., Asst. Ln. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 
Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 

Public Library and Santa Cruz County 

Free Library, Santa Cruz. 
Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 

County Free Library, San Bernardino. 
Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 

County Free Library, HoUister. 
Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 
Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 

Free Library, Alturas. 
Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 

Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 

Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 
Wright, Muriel, Ln. Marin County Free 

Library, San Rafael. 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 

Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Burrell, Mrs Marjorie (Chilberg), Mrs 

Elmer Edward Burrell. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita. 
Gleason, Celia. (Life certificate.) 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James WThite Herrman. (Life certi- 
ficate.) 
Huntington, Stella. (Life certificate.) 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 
Wheeler, Mrs Blanche (Chalfant), Mrs 

De Forest N. Wheeler. 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold office of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was published in Isiews Notes of 
California Libraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California 'Libraries, January, 1914. 
This has been reprinted as a pamphlet. 
The fifth edition was issued December, 
1921. (Circular of information only.) 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
1925. Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 



250 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The dates for the next examination 
liave not yet been set. 



APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the Chairman 
of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



251 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1927-29, $302,350. 

Total accessions 271,111 (less 3495 
lost and discarded^267,616) exclusive of 
20,588 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 
Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V. Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Eudora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .J. Haines, Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. (On leave of ab- 
sence.) 

Dora M. Himmelsbach, in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc.. Department. 

Beulah Mumm, Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Gladys M. Bowles, Assistant. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark. Indexer. 

Evelyn L. Cooper, Assistant. 

Dorothy Deming, Assistant. 

Margaret Dennison. Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite Walker Duggins, Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st., San Francisco. 

Grace Frost, Assistant (temporary). 

Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon. Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill, Assistant. 

Mrs Alicia Manning Hook, Assistant. 

Mrs Dorothy Puffer Isaacs, Assistant. 

Marion Knotts, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb. Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look. Assistant. 

Anna G. McNamee. Assistant. Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

D. Florence Moutfort. Assistant. 



Catharine J. Morrison. Home Teacher 
of the Blind, 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
Angeles. 

Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, 
Assistant. 

Irene E. Ryan. Assistant. 

Irma M. Schoepflin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle. Assistant. 

Mrs Fi'ances L. Smith, Stenographer. 

Lily M. Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy, Assistant. 

June Vladyka, Assistant. 

Mrs Julia M. Waldron. Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Gladys N. Richards, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
ping Clerk. 

John Heinrich, Messenger. 

Lois Little. Messenger. 

Vera Palermo, Messenger. 

Arthur Valine, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Jacob Misfelt, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer, began a leave of ab- 
sence on June 18 to have a much needed 
change and rest. Miss Grace Frost be- 
gan work as temporary assistant in the 
California Department on May 1. Miss 
Gladys M. Bowles, recently of the Plu- 
mas County Free Library, joined the 
staif on June 1. 

Miss Emma de Merritt, after fourteen 
years' service in the Book Repair De- 
partment, resigned on June 30 to move 
to the southern part of the state. Miss 
May H. Kleeberger, also of the Repair 
Department, resigned on May 31 to go 
to the Lassen County Free Library. Her 
place was taken by Mrs Gladys N. Rich- 
ards on June 13. Miss Marion Knotts 
began work as mail assistant on May 
5, Miss Evelyn Cooper having been trans- 
ferred to the Order Department. Miss 
Ruth Ferguson was temporary assistant 
from June 13 to 29. 

Jacob Misfelt has been employed as 
janitor, beginning work on May 3. Jack 
K. Hansen was employed May 9 to do 



252 



NEWS NOTES OF CALiIPORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



some further sorting of material stored 
in the new State Library building. The 
work is still going on. 

Mr Ferguson went to Louisiana on April 
21 to attend a meeting of the Louisiana 
Library Association at Alexandria and 
to inspect the work being done by the 
Louisiana Library Commission. He was 
in the state during the flood period and 
on his return spoke in behalf of the 
California relief fund before the follow- 
ing organizations : Rotary Club, May 5 
(over $500 was raised at the meeting) ; 
Ad Club, May 9; Altrurians, May 10. 

Mr Ferguson attended the meeting of 
the Fourth District, California Library 
Association, at Visalia and the Giant 
Forest on May 20. He was one of the 
speakers on the afternoon program. 

Mr Ferguson, Miss Gillis and Miss 
Haines attended the joint meeting of the 
California Library Association and the 
Pacific Northwest Library Association at 
Gearhart, Oregon, June 13-15. Mr Fer- 
guson, as President of the California Li- 
brary Association, gave the response to 
the addresses of welcome and presided at 
several of the sessions. From Gearhart 
he went to the American Library Asso- 
ciation meeting at Toronto where he ap- 
peared on the programs of three of the 
section meetings. 

Miss Gillis attended the meeting of the 
First, Second and Third Districts, Cali- 
fornia Library Association, at Asilomar, 
April 22-24. On April 6 Miss Garoutte 
spoke at the luncheon meeting of the 
Pals Club, an organization of the wives 
of members of the Legislature. She gave 
an account of the work of the California 
Department, in which some of the mem- 
bers of the club had become greatly in- 
terested. 

Miss Wenzel was Sacramento County 
Chairman for Seamen's Book Week, April 
19-26. 

In April Miss June Vladyka announced 
her engagement to Mr Eugene McCaffery. 
hearing Julia Wright Merrill, executive 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

There have been three staff meetings 
this quarter. The first was on May 3, 
when Mr Ferguson told of his trip to 
Louisiana and of library legislation passed 
by the recent California Legislature. On 
May 13 the staff had the pleasure of 



assistant of the A. L. A. Committee on 
Library Extension, tell of the work of 
that committee. Miss Merrill was in 
California to attend the Congress of 
Parents and Teachers held in Oakland, 
May 21-27. On June 23 Miss Gillis gave 
the staff a resume of the joint meeting of 
the California Library Association and 
the Pacific Northwest Library Associa- 
tion at Gearhart, Oregon, the week before. 

On June 9 the annual State Library 
picnic was held at Del Paso Park. After 
a delicious supper, games, music and for- 
tune telling were enjoyed. 

The State Library assisted the City 
Library in installing and maintaining an 
exhibit at the meeting of the California 
Federation of Women's Clubs at the new 
auditorium in Sacramento, May 2-7. 

The State Library had the pleasure of 
visits from two English librarians re- 
cently. Miss K. B. Overbury, county 
librarian of the West Riding, Yorkshire, 
spent May 30-31 in Sacramento and 
then went on to visit Merced, Mariposa 
and Alameda counties. Dr E. E. Lowe, 
Director of the Museum and Libraries, 
Leicester, England, spent June 8 at the 
State Library. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative sessioii : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

The library is closed at noon on Satur- 
days during July and August. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the United States, Great Britain. Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer, or if. 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



253 



the laws of California aucl other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 

This department is now engaged in 
side-noting and indexing the 1927 stat- 
utes. 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp. 287 and 290. 

Copies of 23 California State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during April, May and June, 
1927. 

Agriculture Department. Monthly bul- 
letin vol. 16, nos. 4-5. 

Special publications nos. 69, 70, 

71, 73. 

Controller. Financial transactions 
.... report, 1926. 

Corporation Dept. Corporate securi- 
ties act. 1925. 

Fish and Game Comm. California fish 
and game. vol. 13,. no. 2. 

Grand Army of Republic. Official roll 
call, 1927. 

Highway Comm. California Highways, 
vol. 4, nos. 4-5. 

Industrial Welfare Comm. Report, 
1922-26. 

■ What California has done to 

protect the women workers. 

Osteopathic Examiners Bd. Directory, 
March, 1927. 

Pharmacy Bd. [Laws regulating the 
practice of pharmacy.] 1927. 

Public Welfare Comm. Biennial re- 
port, 1924-20. 

Public Works Department. Report of 
Division of Water Rights, 1926. 

Real Estate Bd. Directory bulletin, 
vol. 8, no. 1. 

Teachers College, Fresno. Circular of 
information. 1927. 

Teachers College, Humboldt. Circular 
of information, 1927. 

Teachers College, San Diego. Bulle- 
tin, vol. 15, no. 2. 

Surveyor General. Laws governing the 
sale of school lands. 1927. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of 
the librarian, and to any other educa- 
tional institution on request of its official 
4 — 53132 



head or its librarian: to individuals 
through the signature of a state officer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the official head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit ; to a club on request of its presi- 
ident, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

The State Library Appropriation has 
been increased again by the legislature 
this session and we are accordingly en- 
abled to take over some of the cost of 
book transportation. 

Beginning July 1, the State Library 
will pay transportation on all shipments 
of books, et cetera, from this library to 
all city and county libraries and their 
branches. Shipments must still be re- 
turned to the State Library with trans- 
portation prepaid. 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge. 

During April, May and June, 1775 
books, 25 prints, 73 photographs and 87 
stereographs were accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During April, May and June, 1128 
books were cataloged and 7874 cards were 
added to the file. 12,089 cards were 
filed in the Union Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDORA Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and description, 
resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioneers and early settlers are 
being secured, together with their photo- 
graphs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about lO.OOO bound volumes 
of newspapers', a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
Iheir work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Cards of three very early pioneers have 
been received. Henry Clay Smith arrived 
in the fall of 1845. He made the trip 



254 



XEWS XOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



on horseback with a party of ten men. 
He was a lawyer by profession and held 
several public ofBces. He was an alcalde 
in 1S46-47, surveyor for U. S. govern- 
ment and also served in the State Legis- 
lature in 1S53. Mr Smith died at Liver- 
more in 1S76. 

Samuel Catts was a member of Col. 
Stevenson's regiment of New York Volun- 
teers and made the trip around Cape 
Horn in the '"Thomas H. Perkins" which 
arrived March 6, 1847. At the close of 
the Mexican War he settled in Stockton 
where he was a respected citizen until 
his death which occurred in 1895. 

Mr and Mrs George C. Dean arrived on 
the Susan Drew, March, 1847. Mr Dean 
was a member of Stevenson's regiment 
and brought his wife and three small 
children with him. Mr and Mrs Dean 
reared a family of nine children. They 
had the real pioneer spirit and were 
honored citizens of California for many 
years. 

The following is a list of those who 
arrived in 1S49 and later : 

Brov,:n, Mr and Mrs James Aldrich 1852 
Brown, Mr and Mrs Wilbur Kelley 1854 

Chorpenning, George 1851 

Mansfield, Mr and Mrs Amos Wells 1852 

Mercer, Oney L lSo3 

Montgomery, Chandler RadclifE 1850 

Musser, Christian 1849 

Peterson, Henry Da\'is 185- 

Plaskett, Mr and Mrs William 

Lucas 1849 

Rich. Mr and Mrs George Thomas 1849 

Rich, Mr and Mrs Samuel-- 1849 

Smith, James C 1852 

Spear, Willis Bradford 1849 

TVakefield, Lorenzo D 1852 



California Authors. 
The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Lilraries: 

Baird, Adam. 
Fox, Edith Kirk. 
Goss, Mary Lathrop. 
McDaniel, Bruce William. 
Spivey, Thomas Sawyer, 
"^^'ilson, Mrs Leila (Weekes). 
Mrs Charles Elverett T\^ilson. 

California Musicians. 

The following musician card has been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries: 

*Gridley, Daniel Fred. 



♦Native Californians. 



California Artists. 

The following artist card has been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 

Howard, Lillian Augusta. 

Newspaper Index. 

The i u d e X covers the period from 
August l.j, 1S46. to date. 

Catalog. 

811 cards have been added to the Cali- 
fornia catalog during the last quarter. 

Exhibit. 

An interesting exhibit of early Cali- 
fornia material is still maintained in the 
rotunda of the Capitol. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
rial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
York point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrowers wishing them for use 
in book selection. 

A catalog of all books in Moon 
type in the Library up to October 1, 1926, 
has been printed. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
190.5. There are now 2592 blind bor- 
rowers, 54 borrowers having been added 
during April, May and June. Total 
accessions are 20,588, as follows : New 
York point books 2677 ; New York point 
music 186 ; American Braille books 3036 ; 
American Braille music 1288 ; European 
Braille books 3364 ; European Braille 
music 239 : Esperanto Braille books 3 ; 
Moon books 4833 ; Moon music 5 ; Re- 
vised Braille books 3968 ; Revised Braille 



\ol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



255 



music 128 ; Standard dot books 14 ; Line 
books 193 ; Line music 21 : Ink print 
books 467 ; *Appliances 84 ; *Games 50 ; 
Maps 32. 

During April, May and June 8812 
books, etc., were loaned as follows : New 
York point 326 ; American Braille 151 ; 
European Braille 899; Moon 3673; Re- 
vised Braille 3755 ; Line 2 ; Ink Print ; 
Appliances 4 ; Games 2 ; Maps 0. The 
loans were dirided by class as follows : 
Philosophy and religion 436 ; sociology 68 ; 
language 40 ; primers 63 ; science 40 ; 
useful arts 12 ; fine arts ; amusements 
29 ; music 33 ; literature 108 ; fiction 
6284 ; travel and history 325 ; biography 
281 ; periodicals 1093. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by Mrs F. 

i A. Bacher, Mrs C. E. Barker, F. B. 

' Beans, Mrs C. W. Brett, Mrs H. W. 
Bruning, Mrs A. H. Clise, Anna Courtois, 
Kate M. Foley, F. W. Foster, D. C. Had- 
dock, Ruby Holtz, Mrs May Ingalls, J. R. 
Lewarton, Bessie Long, Mrs Rose Mc- 

b Comb, W. A. Miller, Hattie B. Newman, 

F Johanna Ridderhoff, E. C. Robbins, Nellie 
Rogers, Mrs L. Sargent, Erastus Savage, 
George W. Shoemaker, Mrs M. Springer, 
Donald Wheaton, American Braille Press 
for War and Civilian Blind, Inc., Ameri- 
can Printing House for the Blind, Cana- 
dian National Institute for the Blind, 
Christian Record Publishing Company, 
Christian Science Publishing Company, 
Department of Missions of Protestant 
Episcopal Church, Gospel Trumpet Com- 
pany, Michigan School for the Blind, 
National Institute for the Blind, New 
York Association for the Blind, Society 
for Aid of the Sightless, Theosophical 
Book Association for the Blind, Western 
Pennsylvania School for the Blind, Xavier 
Braille Publishing Company, Ziegler Pub- 
lishing Company. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. 
See p. 290. 

Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 
blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 146 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 

*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine J. Morrison, home teacher of 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall of 
Records, every Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los An- 
geles. Her telephone number is Drexel 
5339. She gives lessons regularly in Los 
Angeles and vicinity and makes occa- 
sional trips to San Diego. 

From April 1 to June 30, the home 
teachers gave 642 lessons in the homes of 
the blind and 40 lessons at libraries. 
They made 120 visits and calls in con- 
nection with the work for purposes other 
than giving lessons, and have received 
30 visits in connection with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 260 hours on corre- 
spondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 404 letters and 128 postals and 
received 307 letters and 33 postals. They 
also answered and made 516 telephone 
calls. TTiey made one address. Miss 
Foley teaches regularly in Oakland, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
14 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Sutro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Liljrary, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner, '15 

Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles 

Thelma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J 

Helen V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fairview ave., Los Gates 

Agnes E. Brown, '15 

1167 Eleventh st., San Diego 

Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Brancli, State L., 
San Francisco 

Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buchan), '20 
1631 Cowper St., Palo Alto 

Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 
1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
bara 



256 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Ruth B. Bullock, '15 

Ln. Belvedere Junior High School L., 

Los Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley 
Marguerite Chatfleld, '20 

349 East California St., Pasadena 
Nellie E. Christensen, '19 

Ln. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Lange Library of Education, Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High School 

L., Watsonville 
Dorotha Davis, '17 

Ln. FVesno High -School L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernardi, '18 

-Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 
Estella De OFord, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. P. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Pran- 

Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829 J S. Normandie St., Los Angeles 
Ellen ~B. Prink, '19 

Ln. Siskiyou Co. P. L., Treka 
Flo A. Gantz, '20 

Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. P. L., San 

Luis Obispo 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Sacramento Co. P. L., Sacramento 
Margaret V. Girdner, '17 

Ln. High School of Commerce, San 

Francisco. 
Marv E. Glock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Bei-nice L. Goff, '14 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 

746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H. Hargis), '18 

725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Frank 
U. Harriss), '15 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Margaret Hatch, '15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L.. San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner), '18 

1528 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd), '20 

Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 

1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Orton A. Kirschman), '19 

2839 Forest ave., Berkeley " 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Iver 
N. Lawson, Jr.), '18 

3231 Front st, San Diego 
Marjorie C. Learned, '2 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs M. Ruth McLaughlin Lockwood (Mrs 
Ralnh L. l.,ockwood), '17 

1520 Greenwich st., San Francisco 
Amy G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea). '19 

3417 42d St., Sacramento 
N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court. Chicago, 111. 



Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy F. 
McDowell). '14 
914 nth St., Modesto 
Mrs Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 
Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts., 
Washington, D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. P. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. P. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robert K. Meyers), '19 
Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L., 
Tulare 
Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse, '17 

Ln. Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hono- 
lulu, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton (Mrs James L. 
Patton). '18 
Out of library work 
Mrs Helen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 
48 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. T. 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Prederic Percival), '15 
Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

157 East Seventh St., Claremont 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

Asst. Lane Medical L., San Francisco 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price), '16 
1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefleld Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 
Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio 
Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 
2005 22d St., Sacramento 
Anna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L., Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour, '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 
Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). '18 
McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith), '17 
1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '20 
3100 19th St., Bakersfleld 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Ewart 
Burns Todd), '17 
1860 Green st., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 
Out of library work 
Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Blanche Chalfant Wheeler (Mrs De 
Forest Nathaniel Wheeler), '14 
Box 865, San Jose 
Josephine L. W^hitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L., Richmond 
Essie T. Wliite, '19 

Asst. Sacramento High School L., Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs Katharine Cahoon Wilson (Mrs Lloyd 
R. Wilson), '17 
1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine '^^''inham, '20 

Asst. Maui Co. P. L., Wailuku, T. H. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



257 



Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, '15 
Asst. Solano Co. F. L., Fairfield 

Mrs Bess Rantcn Tates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates). '18 
Asst. P. L. Long Beach 

News Items. 

Blanche Chalfant, '14, was married on 
June 1 to Mr De Forest Nathaniel 
Wheeler. After a four months' trip 
through the east, they can be reached at 
Box 865, San Jose, until their home near 
Belmont is completed. 

Agnes Brown '15, has resigned her 
position in the San Diego High School 
Library. 

Marion Morse '17, has written as fol- 
lows about her new position — librarian 
of the Honolulu Academy of Art : 

"This is a great change from county 
library work. We have here a very valu- 
able collection of books on art. The em- 
phasis is on oriental art, which is quite 
natural considering our position. Al- 
together we have some six hundred vol- 
umes in all different languages. I had to 
have assistance with the Chinese and 
Japanese. We also have all the leading 
art magazines of the world. I have the 
books all cataloged and am now trying 
to catch up with indexing the magazines. 

Besides this the collection of loan 
pictures is in my care. This collection 
was begun by the Honolulu Art Society 
and consists of about two thousand 
mounted pictures, and a hundred or more 
framed pictures. My summer work is to 
catalog these so they will be ready for 
use when school begins. The Academy 
employs Mrs Schenck to give classes in 
art appreciation in the schools so the 
pictures are really used. This summer 
they have sent her on a museum trip to 
Europe. 

The staff here is not large. Mrs Cox 
is the director and has charge of the 
Oriental wing. Mrs Poole has charge of 
the Occidental wing, Mrs Schenck does 
the school work, someone is to come soon 
to help with other outside activities, and 
then there is the stenographer and the 
librarian. When Mrs Cox is busy I have 
to help, taking the school classes through 
the Oriental side. I may end up by 
becoming an expert in Oriental art, but 
the hope is slight. 

I have received my notice of the joint 
meeting of the C. L. A. and the P. N. 



L. A., but it will be impossible for me 
to attend, much as I would enjoy it. 
In spite of my long absence I still have 
a great aloha for California and would 
love to see you all again." 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During April, 

May and June, 1927. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in Neivs Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the April, 1927, issue of this 
publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 

Allen, Joseph Dana d others, comps. 
200 interesting books for boys. 

028 A42 

Ameeican library in Paris, inc. Refer- 
ence service on international affairs. 
Official publications of European gov- 
ernments. [192G] xq016.94 A5 

Association of special libraries and 
information bureaux 
Report of proceedings, v. 1-3. 1924-26. 

x026 A84 

AuNGERViLLE, Richard, knoivn as Richard 
de Bury, bp. of Durham 
Philobiblon, [1925] qc028 A6 

Bailey, Henry Turner. 

Pleasure from pictures. 1926. (Read- 
ing v/ith a purpose) 028 B15 

Bastian, George C. 

Graded exercises in news editing. 1926. 

q070 B3 
Bell, Herbert Clifford. 

Guide to British West Indian archive 
materials, in London and in the 
islands. 1926. (Carnegie institu- 
tion of Washington. Papers of the 
Dept. of historical research) 

q016.973 B4 
Bleyer, Willard Grosvenor. 

Main currents in the history of Ameri- 
can journalism. cl927. 071 364 



258 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Julv, 1927 



Clark, Barrett Harper. 

The modern drama. 1927. (Reading 
with a purpose) 028 C59 

CtoRDiER, Henri. 

Bibliotheca sinica. 1904-08. 4v. 

q016.951 C7 
Gibbons, Herbert Adams. 

The Europe of our day. 1927. ( Read- 
ing with a purpose) 028 G44 



Howe, Harriet Emma. 
The catalog. 1927. 



X025.3 H85a 



Kennedy, William Dorsey & Gordon, 
Margaret, eds. 

The free-lance writer's handbook. 

cl926. 029 K36 

League of library commissions. 

Rural public library service ; a hand- 
book for rural leaders. [1927] 

x021 L43 
Orcutt, William Dana. 

The desk reference book for office, home, 
and library. 1926. 029 064d 

OuE world weekly, v. 2-3. 1925. 

q051 09w 
Pearl, Raymond. 

To begin with ; being prophylaxis 
against pedantry. 1927. 028 P35 

Pollard, Alfred William, comp. 

A short-title catalogue of books printed 
in England, Scotland, & Ireland and 
of English books printed abroad, 
1475-1640. 1926. (Bibliographical 
society, London. Publications) 

rq015.42 P7 

Stonehill, Charles A. d others. 
Anonyma and pseudonyma. 1926. v. 1, 
V. 3. r014 S88 

Thomas-Stanford, Charles. 

Early editions of Euclid's Elements. 
1926. (Illustrated monographs) 

q016.513 E8 
Utley, George Burwell. 

Fifty years of the American library 
association. 1926. x020.6 U91 

ViTZ, Carl Peter Paul. 

Circulation work. 1927. (Manual of 
library economy) x025.6 V85al 

[Wagner, Henry Raup.] 

Irish economics : 1700-1783. 1907. 

q016.9415 W1 



WiNTERiCH, John T. 

A primer of book collecting 



1927. 
010 W78 



PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Best, Nolan Rice. 

Yes, "It's the law" and it's a good law. 
cl926. 178 B56 

Brinkmann. Carl. 

Recent theories of citizenship in its 
relation to government. 1927. (Yale 
lectures on the responsibilities of 
citizenship) 172 B85 

BruIire, Mrs Martha S. (Bensley) 
Does prohibition work? 1927. 

178 B88 
Durant, William James. 

The story of philosophy ; the lives and 
opinions of the greater philosophers. 
1926. 109 D95 

Harnly, Andrew Hoerner. 

The problem of the home. cl926. 

173 H29 
Herrick. Charles Judson. 

Fatalism or freedom ; a biologist's 
answer. el926. (The new science 
series! 159 H56 

Mid-west conference on parent education, 
Chicago. 
Intelligent parenthood. cl926. 

173 M62 
Miller, Emanuel. 

Types of mind and body. cl927. (The 
new science series) 150 IVI647 

Smith, Henry Bradford. 

How the mind falls into error ; a brief 
treatment of fallacies. cl923. 

160 S649h 
Wells, Herbert George. 

The discovery of the future. 1914. 

104 W45 
Wild, John Daniel. 

Pseudo-humanism. 1914. 191 W66 

METAPHYSICS. 

Brownell, Baker. 



The new universe. 1926. 



113 B88 



Haldane, Richard Burdon Haldane, 1st 
viscount. 
The pathway to reaUty. [1926] (Gif- 
ford lectures, 1902-1904) 

110 H15a 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



259 



Perry, Ralph Barton. 

General theory of value. 1926. 

RiCHTER, Conrad. 

Human vibration. 1926. 



121 P46 



111 R53 



Saurat, Denis. 

The three conventions : metaphysical 
dialogues, principia metaphysica, and 
commentary. 1926. 110 S25 

WooDBRiDGE, Frederick James Eugene. 
The realm of mind. 1926. 110 W88 

CHILD STUDY. MENTAL TESTS. 
Haggard, Howard Wilcox. 

'Tisn't what you know but are you 
intelligent? 1927. 136.7 H14 

MOSHER, Raymond Mylan. 

A study of the group method of meas- 
urement of sight-singing. 1925. 
(Teachers college. Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

136.7 M91 

Neill, Alexander Sutherland. 

The problem child. 1927. 136.76 N41 

Pechstein, Louis Augustus <& Jenkins, 

Frances. 

Psychology of the kindergarten-primary 

child. cl927. (Riverside textbooks 

in education) 136.7 P36 

Peterson, Harvey Andrew. 

Experiments and exercises in educa- 
tional psychology. 1925. q 136.7 P4 

White, William Allen. 

Boys — then and now. 1926. 

■ 136.7 W589 

OCCULTISM. SPIRITUALISM. 

Campbell, Charles Macfie. 

Delusion and belief. 1926. 131 CIS 

Gaston, Wilber. 

First principles of astrology. cl927. 

133.5 G25 
Summers, Montague. 

The geography of witchcraft. 1927. 
(The history of civilization [Subject 
histories]) 133 S955g 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Collins, Mary d Drever, James. 
Experimental psychology. [1926] 

150 C712 



DoRSBY, George Amos. 

The nature of man. 1927. (Things-to- 
know series) 150 D71 

Hollingworth, Harry Levi. 

Mental growth and decline ; a survey of 
developmental psychology. 1927. 

150 H74 
SiDis, Boris. 

The psychology of laughter. 1923. 

157 S56 
Warden, Carl John. 

A short outline of comparative psy- 
chology. cl927. (The new science 
series) 150 W26 

RELIGION. 

Bible. New Testament. Matthew. 
The sermon on the mount. qv226.2 B5 

Brewster, Edwin Tenney. 

Creation ; a history of non-evolutionary 
theories. cl927. 213 B84 

Brown, Charles Reynolds. 

The making of a minister. cl927. 

250 B87 
Deissmann, Gustav Adolf. 

Paul ; a study in social and religious 
history. [1926] 225.9 D32 

Ferrier, WUliam Warren. 

The first fifty years of the First Con- 
gregational church of Berkeley, Calif. 
1925. C285.8 F39 

Gift of the author. 

Gore, Charles. 

Can we then believe? 1926. 239 G66 

Grant, Frederick Clifton. 

The economic background of the Gos- 
pels. 1926. 225 G76 

Grenfell, Wilfred Thomason. 
What Christ means to be. 1927. 

230 G82 

HowLAND, Louis. 

Case and comment ; meditations of a 

layman on the Christian year. cl927. 

204 H86 

Kallen, Horace Meyer. 

Why religion. 1927. 201 K14 

LuccocK, Halford Edward d Hutchinson, 
Paul. 
The story of Methodism. cl926. 

287 L93 



260 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Malixowski, Bronislaw. 

Myth in primitive psychology. cl926. 
(The new science series) 291 M25 

Makshall, Mary. 

The rise and progress of the serpent 
from the garden of Eden. 1847. 

289.8 M36 

MoEHLMAN. Conrad Henry. 

The unknown Bible. cl926. 220 M69 

Remey, Charles Mason. 

A series of twelve articles introductory 
to the study of the Baha'i teachings. 
[1925] 299 R38s 

Gift. 

Smith. Henry Preserved. 

The heretic's defense ; a footnote to his- 
tory. 1926. 230 S649 

Snowden, James Henry. 

The truth about Mormonism. [1926] 

298 S67 

Stbeeteu, Burnett Hillman. 

Reality ; a new correlation of science 
andreUgion. 1926. 201 S915 

Thomas, Edward J. 

The life of Buddha as legend and his- 
tory. 1927. (The history of civili- 
zation. [Pre-history and antiquity] ) 

294 T45 

TH01IPS0^', George Washington. 

The trial of Jesus ; a judicial review of 
the law and facts of the world's most 
tragic court room trial. cl927. 

232 T471 
Webb, AquUla. 

1001 illustrations for pulpit and plat- 
form. el926. 251 W36 

WrLBY, Thomas William. 

What is Christian science? 1927. 

289.9 W66 
JEWS. 

Moore, George Foot, 

Judaism in the first centuries of the 

Christian era, the age of the tan- 

naim. 1927. 2 v. 296 M822 

Newman, H. ed. 

The real Jew ; some aspects of the 

Jewish contribution to civilization. 

1925. 296 N55 



Samuel, Maurice. 
I. the Jew. C192'; 



296 S193i 



SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

All colors, a study outline on woman's 
part in race relations. 1926. 

325 A41 
Chesterton, Gilbert Keith. 
The outline of sanity. [1926] 

304 C52 
CuRLE, James Herbert. 

To-day and to-morrow. [1926] 

301 C97 
Dexter. Robert Cloutman. 

Social adjustment. 1927. 301 D52 

JoHNSEN, Julia E. comp. 

Questions of the hour. 1927. (The 
reference shelf) 302 J 65 

Lennes. Nels Johann. 

Whither democracy? 1927. 301 L56 

RusKJN. John. 

Ruskiu's views of social justice ; edited 
and introduction by James Fuchs. 
1926. 304 R95 

Sumner, William Graham & Keller, 
Albert Galloway. 
The science of society. 1927. 2 v. 

301 S95 
Tracy, Henry Chester. 

Towards the open ; a preface to scien- 
tific humanism. cl927. 301 T761 

Weatherly, Ulysses Grant, 

Social progress ; studies in the dynam- 
ics of change. cl926. i Lippincott 
sociological series) 301 W36 

Wilson, Woodrow, pres. U. 8. 

The public, papers of Woodrow Wilson. 
cl925-cl927. 3 v. 308 W75pp1 

STATiSTICS. POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Bbunner, Edmund de Schweinitz c6 
others. 
American agricultural villages. cl927. 
(■Institute of social and religious re- 
search. American village studies) 

312 B89 
Calhoun, Arthur Wallace. 
The worker looks at government. cl927. 
320.73 C15 

Colombia yearbook. 1925-26, 1926. 

r318.6 C71 
Cook, William Wilson. 

American institutions and their preser- 
vation. cl927. 320.73 C77 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



261 



FiDDES, Sir George Vandeleur. 

The Dominions and Colonial offices. 
[1926] (The Whitehall series) 

325.342 F44 

The Interpreter, v. 2^. 1923-25. 

323.605 161 

Kanzaki, Kiichi. 

California and the Japanese. [1921] 
C325.252 K16 

LATANfi, John HoUaday. 

A history of American foreign policy. 
1927. 327.73 L35h 

Phelps, Edith M. ed. 

Civil liberty. 1927. (The reference 
shelf) 323 P53 

Sait, Edward McChesney. 

American parties and elections. cl927. 

(The Century political science series) 

329 S15 

SCHNEE, Heinrich. 

German colonization, past and future. 
[1926] 325.343 S35 

Wood, Charles Wesley. 

The myth of the individual. 1927. 

323.4 W87 



NEGROES. 

Cattrall, Mrs Helen Honor (Tunni- 
cliff), ed. 
Judicial cases concerning American 
slavery and the negro. 1926. (Car- 
negie institution of Washington. 
Papers of the Dept. of historical 
research) q326 C3 

Reuter, Edward Byron. 

The American race problem ; a study of 
the negro. cl927. (Crowell's social 
science series) 325.26 R44am 

Wesley, Charles Harris. 

Negi-o labor in the United States, 1850- 
1925. 1927. 325.26 W51 

ECONOMICS. 

Black, John Donald. 

Introduction to production economics. 
cl926. 330 B62 

Bukhabin, Nikolai Ivanovich, 
The economic theory of the leisure class. 
cl927. 331 B93 



Fontaine, Arthur. 

French industry during the war. 1926. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history) 330.944 F67 

Foster, William Trufant <£• Catchings, 
Waddill. 
Business without a buyer. 1927. (Pub- 
lications of the PoUak foundation for 
economic research) 331 F75b 

Foster and Kleiser company. 

The Pacific coast as a market for com- 
modities. cl926. C330.979 F75 



The Guaranty survey. 



1921-1924. 

q330.5 G9 



Kuznets, Simon Smith. 

Cyclical fluctuations ; retail and whole- 
sale trade, United States, 1919-1925. 
1926. 330.973 K97 

McBride, George McKutchen. 

The land systems of Mexico. 1923. 
(American geographical society. Re- 
search series) 333 Mil 

Marshall, Alfred. 

Memorials of Alfred Marshall. 1925. 

330.8 M36 

National industrial conference board. 
Bulletin no. 16. 1916. 330.5 N277 



The cost of living in New York 

city, 1926. 1926. 331 N277c 

Paish, Sir George. 

The road to prosperity. 1927. 

330.94 P14 

Patterson, Samuel Howard d Scholz, 
Karl William Henry. 
Economic problems of modern life. 
1927. 330 P31 

Patton, Francis Lester. 

Diminishing returns in agriculture. 
1926. (Studies in history, economics 
and public law, ed. by the faculty of 
political science of Columbia uni- 
versity) 330.5 C72 

Rural Scotland during the war. 1926. 
Carnegie endowment for international 
peace. Division of economics and 
history. 330.941 R94 



262 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



See, Henri Eugfene 

Economic and social conditions in 
France during the eighteenth century. 
Tr. by Edwin H. Zeydel. 1927. 

330.944 S45 
Snyder, Carl. 

Business cycles and business measure- 
ments ; studies in quantitative eco- 
nomics. 1927. 331 S675 

Stewart, Bryce Morrison. 

Canadian labor laws and the treaty. 
1926. (Studies in history, economics 
and public law, ed. by the faculty of 
political science of Columbia uni- 
versity) 330.5 C72 

Walsh, Correa Moylan. 

The four kinds of economic value. 1926. 
330.1 W22 



BANKING. 

Dice, Charles Amos. 
The stock market. 



FINANCE. 



1926. 



332.6 D54 



Eliot, Clara. 

The farmer's campaign for credit. 
1927. 332.7 E42 

Grimes, William A. 

Financing automobile sales by the time- 
payment plan. 1926. 332.7 G86 

HmsT, Francis Wrigley d Allen, John 
Ernest. 
British war budgets. 1926. (Carnegie 
endowment for international peace. 
Division of economics and history) 

336.42 H66 

The Investor. [Published nearly every 
month in the interest of the Lincoln 
trust company ; Lincoln safe deposit 
company ; Safe deposit insurance 
agency. Charles Q. de France, ed.l 
June 1922-December 1925. 

q332.605 i6n 

Jenks, Leland Hamilton. 

The migration of British capital to 
1875. 1927. 336.42 J 53 

Leaf, Walter. 

Banking. cl927. (Home university 
library of modern knowledge) 

332.1 L43 

National association of mutual savings 
banks. 
A critical analysis of state debts. 
[1927] q336.1 N2 



Page, Richard Gregory d Gates, Payson 
Grier. 
The work of corporate trust depart- 
ments. 1926. 332.1 P13 

Ripley, William Zebina. 

Main street and Wall street. 1927. 

332.6 R59 
ScHvnjLST, Earl Bryan. 

Extension of bank credit. 1927. (Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx prize essays) 

332.7 S41 
SCHULTZ, William John. 

The taxation of inheritance. 1926. 
(Hart, Schaffner & Marx prize es- 
says) 336.2 S56 

Sloan, Laurence Henry. 

Security speculation, the dazzling 
adventure. 1926. 332.6 S634 

Wells Fargo bank and Union trust co. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
The business outlook. 1920-1925. 

qc332.05 W4 

PRODUCTION. MANUFACTURE. 
PRICES. 

Barnett, George Ernest. 

Chapters on machinery and labor. 1926. 

338.4 B26 

Commons, John Rogers d Andrews, John 
Bertram. 
Principles of labor legislation. cl927. 
338.9 C73a1 
Dewing, Arthur Stone. 

The financial policy of corporations. 
Rev. ed. cl926. 338.7 D52a 



MOHR, Anton. 

The on war. cl926. 



338.2 M69 



Pipkin, Charles Wooten. 

The idea of social justice. 1927. 

338.9 P66 

LABOR. WAGES. 

American statistical association. Com- 
mittee on governmental labor sta- 
tistics. 
Employment statistics for the United 
States. 1926. 331.8 A51 

Cox, Jacob Dolson. 

The economic basis of fair wages. 
cl926. (The Ronald manufacturing 
industries library) 331.2 C87 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



263 



MuLLiNS, George William. 

Unemployment ; the gateway to a new 
life. 1926. 331.8 M95 

National industrial conference board. 
Clerical salaries in the United States, 
1926. 1926. 331.2 N277c 

Neaking, Scott. 

The British general strike. 1926. 

331.89 N35 

Walling, William English. 

American labor and American democ- 
racy. 1926. 331.8 W21 

COOPERATION. SOCIALISM. 

Francis, Gerald McFadden. 

Financial management of farmers' ele- 
vators. 1926. 334.6 F81 

Hawthorn, Horace Boies. 

The sociology of rural life. cl926. 

334.9 H39 
Irwin, WUliam Henry. 

How red is America? cl927. 335 172 

Wells, Herbert George. 

Wells' social anticipations. 1927. 

335 W45w 
Work, John McClelland. 

What's so and what isn't. 1927. 

335 W92 

Workers monthly, v. 4r-5. 1924^26. 

q335.05 W9 

LAW. ADMINISTRATION. 

Allied and associated powers (1914- ) 
Treaties, etc. 
The treaties of peace, 1919-1923. 1924. 
2 V. . 341.2 A43 

Declareuil, Joseph. 

Rome the law-giver. 1927. (The his- 
tory of civilization. [Pre-history and 
antiquity]) 349 D29 

DiLNOT, George. 

The story of Scotland yard. 1927. 

352.2 D57 

Hague. Permanent court of international 
justice. Annual report. No. 1. 
1922-25. 341.1 H14 

Hertslet, Sir Edward, comp. 

Hertslet's China treaties. 1908. 2 v. 
341.2 H575 



Hill, David Jayne. 

The problem of a world court ; the story 
of an unrealized American idea. 
1927. 341.1 H64p 

Johnson, Allen d Robinson, William 
Alexander, eds. 
Readings in recent American constitu- 
tional history, 1876-1926. cl927. 

342.73 J 66a 

Leland, Waldo Gifford £ Mereness, New- 
ton Dennison, comps. 
Introduction to the American official 
sources for the economic and social 
history of the world war. 1926. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history) 353.8 LBS 

PowEXL, Fred Wilbur. 

The Bureau of animal industry ; its 
history, activities and organization. 
1927. (Institute for government 
research. Service monographs of the 
United States government) 

353.8 P88an 

Roberts, Penfield. 

An introduction to American politics. 

1926. 342.73 R64 

Smith, Darrell Hevenor. 

The Panama canal ; its history, activi- 
ties and organization. 1927. (Insti- 
tute for government research. Ser- 
vice monographs of the United States 
government) 353.8 S64p 

ToBEY, James Alner. 

The medical department of the army. 

1927. (Institute for government 
research. Service monographs of the 
United States government) 

353.8 T62m 

UNiTEa) States. Constitutional Conven- 
tion. 
The records of the Federal convention 
of 1787. 1911. 3 V. q342.73 U58r 



CRIME AND CRIMINALS. 

Bramer, John Philip. 

A treatise giving the history, organiza- 
tion and administration of parole. 
cl926. 364 B81 



264 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



; July, 1927 



Brtjner, Earle D. 

A laboratory study in democracy ; the 
agitator and other types. 1927. 

364.1 B89 



Paery, Edward Abbott. 
Vagabonds all. 1926. 



364 P264 



Thrasher, Frederic M, 

The gang. cl927. (The University of 

Chicago studies in urban sociology) 

364 T52 

CUSTOMS. FOLK LORE. 

Caine, William Ralph Hall. 

Annals of the Magic Isle. [1926] 

398 013 

Groves, Ernest Rutherford. 

Social problems of the family. cl927. 
(Lippincott's family life series) 

392 G88 



Keller, Gottfried. 

Seven legends. 1911. 
sei'ies ) 



( The Caviare 
398.2 K29 



Pedersen, Victor Cox. 

The woman a man marries ; an analysis 
of her double standard. cl927. 

392 P37 

PuCKLE, Bertram S. 

Funeral customs ; their origin and 
development. 1926. 393 P97 

Shannon, Monica. 

California fairy tales. 1926. 

c398 S52 

Winfrey, Guy. 

Bunny Bearskin. cl926. c398 W76 

EDUCATION. 

Anderson, Lewis Flint. 

History of manual and industrial school 
education. cl926. 371.4 A54 

Barker, John Marshall. 

Colleges in America. 1894. 378 B255 

Barr, Arvil S. d Burton, William Henry. 

The supervision of instruction. cl926. 

(Appleton series in supervision and 

teaching) 371.2 B26 

Bernays, Edward L. ed. 

An outline of careers ; a practical guide 
to achievement by thirty-eight emi- 
nent Americans. 1927. 370.01 B52 



Boone, Richard Gause. 

A history of educational organization 
in California. [1926] c370.6 B72 

Cook, William Adelbert. 
Federal and state school administration. 
cl927. 371.2 C771 

Cox, Philip Wescott Lawrence. 

Creative school control. cl927. (Lip- 
pincott's educational guides) 

370.1 C87 
CuLTEE, Horace M. 

Elementary school methods. cl927. 
(Lippincott's educational guides) 

371.3 C96 
Dearborn, Ned Harland. 

The Oswego movement in American 
education. 1925. (Columbia uni- 
versity. Teachers college. Contribu- 
tions to education) 370.73 D28 

Evans, Owen David. 

Educational opportunities for young 
w^orkers. 1926. (Studies in adult 
education) 374 E92 

Gates, Clarence Ray. 

The management of smaller schools, 
cl923. (Riverside educational mon- 
ographs) 371.2 025 

Hart, Joseph Kinmont. 

Adult education. cl927. (Crowell's 
social science series) 370.1 H325 

Light from the North; the 



Danish folk highschools, their 
meanings for America. cl927. 

370.948 H32 
JuDD, Charles Hubbard. 

Psychological analysis of the funda- 
mentals of arithmetic. cl927. (Sup- 
plementary educational monograph) 
372.7 J92 

Pratt, Caroline d Stanton, Jessie. 

Before books. cl926. 371 P91b 

Schmalhausen, Samuel Daniel. 

Humanizing education (a preface to a 
realistic education). 1926. 370.1 S34 

Skinner, Charles Edward d others, eds. 

Readings in educational psychology. 

cl926. 370.1 S628 

Snedden, David Samuel. 

What's wrong with American educa- 
tion? cl927. 370.973 867 



M-il. 22. no. 3] C-VLIFORNL\ STATE LIBRARY. 265 


The Southern campus. 1923. 


Hope, George W. com p. 


qc378.794 CusQ 


Manual of California land title law. 


Van Wageneic. Marvin James. 


C1926. 


Educational diagnosis and the meas- 


Hughes, Edward Wakefield. 


urement of school achievement. 1926. 


Hughes' American parliamentary guide 


371.2 V28 


(Rev. ed., 1926-27) technique of law- 


"Wood, Thomas Denison. 


making. 1926. 


Health supervision and medical in- 


Isaac, Max. 


spection of schools. 1927. 


Facts 'about bankruptcy you ought to 


371.7 W87h 


know. 1927. 


LAW. 

AiiERiCAN digest. 

Current digest, v. 1. 1927. 


Lapp, John Augustus cG Ketcham, Dor- 
othy. 
Hospital law. cl926. 



AjiEBiCAN law institute. 

Proceedings, vols. 2 and 3. 1924-1925. 

Archer, Gleason Leonard. 
Wills and probate. 1925. 

Atlantic reporter blue book. 1926. (Na- 
tional reporter system) 

Ballantine. Henry Winthrop, ed. 
Problems in law for law school and bar 
examination review. 1927. 

Brothers, Elmer DeWitt. 

Dental jurisprudence ; an epitome of the 
law of dentistry and dental surgery. 
1922. 

Brown, M. Ralph. 

Legal psychology ; psychology applied 
to the trial of cases, to crime and its 
treatment, and to mental states and 
processes. cl926. 

BuRDiCK. Francis Marion. 

The law of torts ; a concise treatise on 
civil liability for actionable wrongs 
to person and property. 4th ed. 
1920. 

Ellis, T. P. 

Welsh tribal law and custom in the 
middle ages. 1926. 2 v. 

Federal digest covering decisions of the 
United States courts. 1927. 2 v. 

Freeman, William P. 
Joint tenancies. [1918] 

Gift. 

Hill, Frederick Trevor. 
The care of estates. 1922. 



LrvY, Milton Ives. 

Wills ; how to make and break them. 

McCarty, Dwight Gaylord. 
Law oflBce management. 1926. 

Macinnes, Roy Mayne cC- Milne, John 
Jamieson. 
A treatise on the attornment clause 
and the license to distrain. 1924. 

McKiNNEY, Frank Cowen. 

Trust investments ; general principles, 
statutes and decisions of the various 
states. 2d ed., rev. and enl. cl927. 



McNitt. Rollin L. 
The law of zonins 



[1926] 



Malina, Arthur. 

Sales of real estate as affected by the 
income tax. 1926. 

Mason, Alpheus Thomas. 

Organized labor and the law, with 
especial reference to the Sherman and 
Clayton acts. 1925. (Duke univer- 
sity publications) 

Massachusetts. Laios, statutes, etc. 
Massachusetts cumulative statutes, 
1927. 1926. 

[Missouri association for criminal jus- 
tice] Sui'vey committee. 
The Missouri crime survey. 1926. 

Morawetz, Victor. 

An essay on the elements of a contract 
and a statement of principles gov- 
erning its formation. 1926. 

New York (State) Laivs, statutes, etc. 
New York civil practice. 3d ed., 1926. 



266 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



New Tokk practice notes, v. 1. 1927. 

New Yobk supplement blue book. 1926. 
2 V. (National reporter system) 

NoETHEASTERN reporter blue book. 1925. 
(National reporter system) 

Northwestern reporter blue book. 1926. 
(National reporter system) 

Oakes, Edwin Stacey. 

The law of organized labor and indus- 
trial conflicts. 1927. 

Pacific reporter blue book. 1926. (Na- 
tional reporter system) 

Remick, Raymond Moore, ed. 

Guide to administrators, executors, 
guardians and trustees, with forms. 
1923. 

St. Christophek <£• Nevis. Laws, stat- 
utes, etc. 
Index to ordinances. 1922-1926. 

Southeastern reporter blue book. 1926. 
(National reporter system) 

Southern reporter blue book. 1927. 
(National reporter system) 

Southwestern reporter blue book. 1926. 
(National reporter system) 

United States. Laws, statutes, etc. 
Mason's United States code annotated, 
1926. cl927. 3 v. 



tated. 



United States Code anno- 

1927. Titles 1-9, 12, 17. 



Supreme court. 

Rules of practice. United States dis- 
trict court. Northern and Southern 
districts of California. 1926. 

Whetham, John D., ed. 

The standard conveyancer. 1925. 

Wood, Harvey E. 

Public utility law, state and federal. 
1926. cl926. 

LANGUAGE. 

KxAJPPER, Paul. 

Teaching English in elementary and 
junior high schools, a manual of 
method. cl925. 420.7 K63 



Palmer, Harold E. & others. 

A dictionary of English pronunciation 
with American variants. 1926. 

421 P17 
Thorndike, Edward Lee. 

The teacher's word book. 2d ed. 1927. 

423 T49 
Yates, Kyle Monroe. 

Beginner's grammar of the Hebrew Old 
Testament. cl927. 492.4 Y32 



NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL. 

Anderson, Frank Marion. 

Fauna and stratigraphic relations of 
the Tejon Eocene at the type locality 
in Kern County, California. 1925. 
(Occasional papers of the California 
academy of sciences ) c506 C15«> 

Ayres, Clarence Edwin. 

Science, the false Messiah. cl927. 

504 A98 
MiLLiKAN, Robert Andrews. 

Evolution in science and religion. 1927. 
(The Terry lectures) 504 M654e 



ScoviLLE, Samuel. 
Runaway days. cl921 



504 S43 



PHYSICS. CHEMISTRY. 
Bligh, Neville Melton. 

The evolution and development of the 
quantum theory. 1926. 530 B64 

Bragg, William Henry. 

X rays and crystal structure. 5th ed. 
1925. 548 B81x 

Carnegie institution of Washington. 
Dept. of terrestrial magnetism. 
Ocean magnetic and electric observa- 
tions, 1915-1921. 1926. (Researches 
of the Department of terrestrial mag- 
netism) q538.7 C2 

Caven, Robert Martin. 

Gas and gases. cl927. (Home univer- 
sity library of modern knowledge) 

533 C37 

Foster, William. 

The romance of chemistry. cl927. 

540 F75 

Harrow, Benjamin. 

The romance of the atom. 1927. 

541.2 H32 



\ol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



267 



Lodge, Sir Oliver Joseph. 

Relativity ; a very elementary exposi- 
tion. cl926. 530 L82 

National research council. Division of 
chemistry and chemical technology. 
A survey of American chemistry, v. 1. 
1925-26. cl927. 540.5 N27 

Sagerblom, Wilhelm. 

Properties of inorganic substances, a 
second revision and enlargement of 
Tables of properties of over fifteen 
hundred common inorganic sub- 
stances. 1927. 544 S45 

Teepp, Newell R. 

The A B C of chemistry. 1927. 

540 T83 
Waksman, Selman Abraham. 

Enzymes. 1926. 541.3 W14 

GEOLOGY. PALEONTOLOGY. 

Haedy, Allison. 

The A B C of geology. [1927] 



Heilmann, Gerhard. 

The origin of birds. 1926. 



550 H26 



q568 H46 



[Mereiam, John Campbell] 
Papers concerning the palaeontology of 
the Pleistocene of California and the 
Pliocene of Oregon. 1925. (Contri- 
butions to palaeontology from the 
Carnegie institution of Washington) 
q560 M5 
Miller, William John. 

An introduction to historical geology, 
with special reference to North 
America. 1926. 550 M652 

Wade, Frank Bertram. 

Diamonds ; a study of the factors that 
govern their value. 1916. 

553.8 W11d 

BIOLOGY. 

Bakeh, John R. 

Sex in man and animals. 1926. 

577.8 B16 
BoLSCHE, Wilhelm. 

Love-life in nature. 1926. 2 v. 

575.9 869 
Castle, William Ernest. 

Contributions to a knowledge of inherit- 
ance in mammals. 1926. (Carne- 
gie institution of Washington. Pub- 
lication) q575.1 C3c 



Huxley, Julian Sorell. 

Essays in popular science. 1927. 

570.5 H986e 



Massingham, Harold .John. 
Downland man. 



573 M41 



OSBOEN, Henry Fairfield. 

Evolution and religion in education. 
1926. 575 081ev 



Randolph, Vance. 

The A B C of biology. 1927. 



570 R19 



IJEXKiJLL, Jakob J. taron von. 

Theoretical biology. 1926. (Interna- 
tional library of psychologj-, philos- 
ophy and scientific method) 

570.1 U22 

ETHNOLOGY. ANTHROPOLOGY. 

Hohepa Te Rake. 

Maori symbolism. 1926. 572 H71 

Levy-Bruhl, Lucien. 

How natives think. [1925] 

572 L66h 
Malinowski, Bronislaw. 

The father in primitive psychology. 
cl927. (The new science series) 

572 M25f 
Muret, Maurice. 

The twilight of the white races. 1926. 

572 M97 
PiTTAED, Eugene. 

Race and history. 1926. (The history 
of civilization. [Pre-history and an- 
tiquity]) 572 P68 

Rivers, William Halse Rivers. 

Psychology and ethnology. 1926. (In- 
ternational library of psychology, 
philosophy, and scientific method) 

572 R62 

R6heim, Geza. 

Social anthropology. 1926. 

572 R73 

Schmidt, Max. 

The primitive races of mankind, a study 
in ethnology, translated by Alexan- 
der K. Dallas. 1926. 572 S35 

BOTANY. ZOOLOGY. 

Beebe, Charles William. 

Pheasants, their lives and homes. 1926. 
2 V. q598.2 B4 



268 



NEWS NOTES OF CAI.IFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



CojiSTOCK, John Adams. 
Butterflies of California. 



BwEKS, Hanns Heinz. 
The ant people. 1927. 

LoA'GYEAK. Burton Orange. 
Trees and shrubs of the 
tnin region. 1927. 



1927. 
qc595.7 C7 

595.7 E94 



Rocky Moun- 
582 L85 



Macdougal, Daniel Trembly. 

Growth in trees and massive organs of 
plants. 1924. (Carnegie institution 
of Washington) q582 M1g 



— The hydrostatic system of trees. 
1926. C Carnegie institution of Wash- 
ington I q582 M1h 



Melletv, Ida M. 

Fishes in the home. 



1927. 



597 M52 



Rehder. Alfred. 

Manual of cultivated trees and shrubs 
hardy in North America, exclusive of 
the subtropical and warmer temper- 
ate regions. 1927. 582 R34 

Rittee, William Emerson. 

The natural history of our conduct. 
cl927. 591.5 R61 

Rogers. Charles Gardner. 

Textbook of comparative physiology. 
1927. (McGraw-Hill publications in 
the zoological sciences) 591 R72 

Smith. Charles Piper. 
A distributional catalogue of the lupines 
of Oregon. 1927. (Contributions 
from the Dudley herbarium of Stan- 
ford university) qc378.794 SMd 



USEFUL ARTS': GENERAL. 

Beagg, Sir William Henry. 

Old trades and new knowledge. 1926. 

609 B81 

CoLLlisS, Archie Frederick. 

A bird's eye view of invention. cl926. 

608 C71 

WiLKixs, Harold Tom. 

^.larvels of modern mechanics : the 

mastery of land, sea and air. cl927. 

608 W68 



MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Ameeican society for the control of can- 
cer, New York. 
The American society for the control of 
cancer. [1925] 616.99 A51 

Benedict, Francis Gano. 

The metabolism of the fasting steer. 
1927. (Carnegie institution of Wash- 
ington) q612.3 B4met 

Caepenter, Thome Martin. 

Human metabolism with enemata of 

alcohol, dextrose, and levulose. 1925. 

(Carnegie institution of Washington) 

q612.3 C2 

CoENEE, George Washington. 
Anatomical texts of the earlier middle 
ages. 1927. (Carnegie institution 
of Washington) q611 C8 



DoHEETY, Edward Joseph. 
The saint of paralytics. 



1923. 

C616.8 D65 



Fielding, William John. 

Sex and the love-life. 1927. 

06I2.6 F45 

FiSHBEiN, Morris. 

The new ' medical follies ; an encyclo- 
pedia of cultism and quackery in 
these United States. 1927. 

610 F53 

JosLiN, Elliott Proctor. 

Diabetic metabolism with high and low 
diets. 1923. (Carnegie institution 
of Washington) q612.3 J8 

Kempf, Edward John. 

The autonomic functions and the per- 
sonality. 191S. (Nervous and men- 
tal disease monograph series) 

q616.8 K3 

La Wall, Charles Herbert. 

Four thousand years of pharmacy. 
cl927. 615 L41 

Leyel, Hilda, "Mrs C. F. Ley el."' 

The magic of herbs ; a modern book of 
secrets. [1926] 610.9 L68 

NoHL, Johannes. 

The black death ; a chronicle of the 
plague. [1926] 616.92 N77 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



269 



PiERON, Henri. 

Thought and the brain. 1927. (Inter- 
national library of psychology, phi- 
losophy and scientific method) 

612.8 P61 
Randolph, Vance. 

The A B C of physiology. 1927. 

612 R19 
Remondino. Peter Charles. 

The relations of state boards of medi- 
cal examiners and medical practice 
acts to medical education, medical 
colleges, medical students and the 
profession. 1908. c610 R38 

Stern, Bernhard J. 

Should we be vaccinated? A survey of 
the controversy in its historical and 
scientific aspects. 1927. 614.47 S83 

Stopes, Marie Charlotte Carmichael. 
The human body. 1926. 612 S88 

Waite, John Herbert. 

Saving eyesight after mid-life. 1927. 
(Harvard health talks) 617.7 W14 

ENGINEERING. 

Agg, Thomas Radford d- Brindley, John 
Edwin. Highway administration and 
finance. 1927. 625.7 A26h 



Barrows, Harold Kilbrith. 
Water power engineering. 



1927. 

627 B27 



Creager, William Pitcher d Justin, Joel 
De Witt. 
Hydro-electric handbook. 1927. 

621.34 C91 
Daniels, George William. 

Refrigeration in the chemical industry. 
1926. 621.5 D18 



Dependable highways. 
1924. 



no. 1-44. 1921- 
q625.05 D4 



Jones, David Louis. 

Diesel engines — marine 
stationary. 1926. 



-locomotive — 
621.43 J76 



KiRBY, Richard Shelton. 

A study of motor vehicle accidents in 
the stato of Connecticut for the years 
1924 and 1925. 1926. 625.6 K58 



Morrow, Lester William Wallace. 
Electric power stations. 1927. 
621.31 
5 — 53132 



M88 



Pannell, Ernest Vincent. 

High tension line practice, materials 
and methods. 1926. 621.34 P19 

AGRICULTURE. 

Brown, Harry Bates. 

Cotton. 1927. (McGraw-Hill publica- 
tions in the agricultural and botani- 
cal sciences) 633 B878 

Davenport, Eugene. 

The farm. 1927. (The rural science 
series) 630 D24 

Davis, Kary Cadmus. 

Farm projects and problems. cl927. 

630.7 D262f 
Johnson, William Henry. 

Cotton and its production. 1926. 

633 J71 
Macself, Albert James. 

The fruit garden. [1926] 634 M17 

[Pack, Charles Lathrop] 
The forestry primer. [1926] 

634.9 P119f 
Rice, Victor Arthur. 

Breeding and improvement of farm ani- 
mals. 1926. (McGraw-Hill publi- 
cations in the agricultural and botani- 
cal sciences) 636 R49 



Spillman, William Jasper. 
Farm management. 192^ 



530 S75 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Allen, Mrs Ida Cogswell (Bailey). 
Vital vegetables, with analyses, menus, 
and recipes. 1927. 641 A42v 

BuTTERiCK publishing company, limited. 
The new Butterick dressmaker. cl927. 

646 B988 
Clute, Eugene. 

The treatment of interiors. 1926. (The 
Pencil points library) q645 C64 

Dahl, Joseph Oliver. 

Restaurant management, principles and 
practice. 1927. 640 D13 

GiLBRETH, Mrs Lillian Evelyn (Moller). 
The home-maker and her job. 1927. 

640 G46 

Reilly, Mrs Estelle (Mulqueen). 

How to cook for children ; a cook book 
for mothers. 1927. 649 R36 



270 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Robinson. Mrs Henrietta Durfee. 

The oare of the home. 1927. (Har- 
per's home management series) 

648 R66 



Seham. Max d Seham, Grete. 
The tired child. cl926. 



649 S45 



Tipton. Mrs Edna (Sibley). 

Menus for every occasion. 1927. 

641 T59m 

Teilling, Mabel Barbara d Williams, 
Florence Marion. 
A girl's problems in home economics. 
C1926. (Liippincott's home econo- 
mics texts) 640 T82 

Wilkes. Edward Theodore. 

Baby"s daily exercises. 1927. 649 W68 

PRINTING. PUBLISHING. 

American institute of graphic arts, New 
York. 
Fifty books, exhibited by the institute, 
1926. 1927. q655.2 A51 

Printing for commerce. 1927. 

q 655.2 A51p 
BuLi.EN. Henry Lewis. 

Nicolas Jensou, printer of Venice. 1926. 
fc655.1 B9 
De Vinne, Theodore Low. 
Aldvs Pivs Manvtivs. 1924. 

qc655.1 D4 
MoEisoN, Stanley. 

Type designs of the past and present. 
1926. 655.2 M86 



Unwin, Stanley. 

The truth about publishing 



1927. 
655.5 U62 



COMMUNICATION. COMMERCE. 

Bloomfield, Daniel, ed. 

Selected articles on commercial arbi- 
tration. 1927. (The handbook series) 
380 8655 
Dodge, Grenville Mellen. 

How we built the Union Pacific rail- 
way. [1910?] c385 D64 

GooDE, John Paul. 

The geographic background of Chicago. 
cl926. 380 G64 

McCann, Ernest Armitage. 

Ship model making. 1926. 2 v. 

656.8 M12 



MoYER, James Ambrose d Wostrel, 
John F. 
Practical radio construction and repair- 
ing. 1927. 654.6 M93p 

Pound, Arthur. 

The telephone idea ; fifty years after. 

1926. 654.6 P87 

Quick. Herbert d Quick, Edward C. 
Mississippi steamboatin'. cl926. 

656.9 Q6m 

Roberts. Walter van Braam. 

How radio receivers work. cl925. 
(Radio broadcast booklet) q654.6 R6 

Verrill, Alpheus Hyatt d Verrill, E. E. 
The home radio up to date. 1927. 

654 V55ho 

ADVERTISING. ACCOUNTING. 

Baily, Warren G. 

Accounting procedures for public utili- 
ties. 1926. (Public utility texts) 

657 815 

Gossop. R. P. 

Advertisement design. 1927. (Univer- 
sal art series) 659 G68 

Greeley, Harold Dudley. 

Estate accounting. cl924. (Rono- 
graph library) 657 G794 

Hatfield, Henry Rand. 

Accounting, its principles and prob- 
lems. 1927. 657 H36ac 

HoTCHKiss, George Burton d Franken, 
Richard Benjamin. 
The measurement of advertising effects. 

1927. 659 H832m 

Kerman, Frederick R. d Griffin, Bry- 
ant W. 
New business for banks. 1926. 

659 K39 

McCarty, Wesley James d Amidon, Lucy 
Earle Cleveland. 
Survey course in accounting. 1926. 

657 M12s 

May'. Irville Augustus. 

Motor bus accounting practice. cl926. 
657 M46m 



vol. 22. no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



271 



BUSINESS METHODS. 

BoRSODi. Ralph. 

The distribution age ; a study of the 
economy of modern distribution. 1927. 
658 B73 
Feknald. Charles Henry. 

Salesmanship. 1926. 658 F362 

Forbes magazine, v. 6-8. 1920-21. 

q658.05 F6 

Mazur. Paul Meyer. 

Principles of organization applied to 
modern retailing. 1927. 658 M476 

Snyder. Blake S Roby, Ralph West. 
Fundamentals in real estate. 1927. 

658 S67f 

Thobley. Robert F. d Stickney, Wil- 
liam H. 
Real estate forms. 1926. 658 T49 

White. Percival. 

Scientific marketing management, its 
principles and methods. 1927. 

658 W58s 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

Monro, William L. 

Window glass in the making. 1926. 

666.1 M75 

Searle. Alfred Broadhead. 

Cement, concrete and bricks. 2d ed. 
1926. (Outlines of industrial chem- 
istry; 666.9 S43 

ToDOROFF, Alexander. 

What is what in groceries. cl926. 

664 T63 

MANUFACTURERS. MECHANIC 
TRADES. BUILDING. 

AvRAM, Mois Herban. 

The rayon industry. 1927. 677 A96 

Bablzk, Heinz. 

Galvanizing ; a theoretical and practi- 
cal treatise on the subject for the use 
of works managers, students and 
others. 1926. 671 B11 

DuTTON, Meiric Keeler. 

Historical sketch of bookbinding as an 
art. 1920. 686 D98 

HooL, George Albert <& Pulver, Harry E. 
Concrete practice. 1926. 693.5 H78cp 



Johns, Milton. 

California redwood and its distribution. 
cl925. c674 J65 

Wood, Thomas Denison d Hendriksen, 
Ethel M. 
Ventilation and health. 1927. 

697.9 W87 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

Blum, Andre. 

A short history of art from prehistoric 
times to the present day. [1926] 

709 B65 
Flaccus, Louis William. 

The spirit and substance of art. 1926. 

701 F56 

Hagen. Oscar Frank Leonard. 

Art epochs and their leaders ; a survey 
of the genesis of modern art. cl927. 
709 H14 
Mason, Daniel Gregory. 

Artistic ideals. cl927. 701 M39 

Walters, Henry Beauchamp. 

The art of the Greeks. 2d ed. rev. 
[1922] q709.38 W23 

GARDENS AND GARDENING. 

All wood, Montagu Charles. 

Carnations for every garden and green- 
house. [1926] 716.2 A44 

Cloud, Katharine Mallet Prevost. 
The cultivation of shrubs. 1927. 

715 C64 
Du Cane, Florence. 

The flowers & gardens of Madeira. 
1926. 716 D82f 

King, Louisa (Teomans) "Mrs Francis 
King." 
The beginner's garden. 1927. 

716 K53b 

McLean, Forman Taylor d others. 
The gladiolus book. 1927. 716.2 M16 



Weathers, John. 

My garden book. 1924. 



716 W36m 



WiSTER, John C. 

The iris ; a treatise on the history, 
development and culture of the iris 
for the amateur gardener. 1927. 
(Farm and garden library) 716 W81 



272 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORXIA LIBRARIES. 



Jiily, 1927 



ARCHITECTURE. 

AiTKEX. Robert IngersoU d others. 
Arnold W. Brumier and his work. 
1920. q720.19 B8 

BAX"ix. Dwight James. 

The work of Dwight James Baum^ 
architect. 1927. f728 B3 

Blmpus, Thomas Francis. 

The cathedrals and churches of Italy. 
1926. q726 B94 

Eberleix. Harold Donaldson. 

Small manor houses and farmsteads in 
France. 1926. q728 E1s 

Foster, William Dewey. 

Cottages, manoirs and other minor 
buildings of Normandy and Brittany. 
1926. q728 F7 

French. Leigh, jr. d- Eberlein, Harold 

Donaldson. 

The smaller houses and gardens of 

Versailles. 1926. (The Pencil points 

library) q728 F8s 

KiLHAii, Walter H. 

Mexican architecture of the vice-regal 
period. 1927. 720.972 K48 

Mead. Marcia. 

Homes of character. 1926. 

728 M47 

Sextox, Randolph Williams. 

Spanish influence on American archi- 
tecture and decoration. cl927. 

q728 S5s 

Strater, George Drayton d- Englehardt, 
Xickolaus Louis. 
Standards for high school buildings. 
1924. 727 S91 

TippIjN'g, Henry Avray. 

English homes, period iv. v. 1. 1920. 
(Country life library) f728 T5e2 

English homes, period v. v. 1. 

Early Georgian, 1714r-1760. 1921. 
( Country life library ) f 728 T5e3 

Terbury, Francis Rowland. 

Georgian details of domestic architec- 
ture. 1926. q728 Y4 



PORCELAIN. SILVER. 

King, William. 

Chelsea porcelain. 1922. q738 K5 

Watts, William Whitehead. 

Old English silver. 1924. q739 W3 

DRAWING. DECORATION. 
DESIGN. 
Bowles. Mrs Ella Shannon. 

Handmade rugs. 1927. 745 B787 

Btne. 2Irs Mildred (Stapley). 

Popular weaving and embroidery in 
Spain. cl924. q746 B9 

CtTLTER, Richard Y. 

The gay nineties ; a book of drawings. 
1927. q741 C96 

Field museum of natural history. School 
of the art institute. 
Research design in nature. cl926. 

q741 F4 
Jourdain, M. 

English decorative plasterwork of the 
renaissance. [1926] q747 J8e 

LiNTOX. William Evans. 

The drawing and construction of ani- 
mals. 1926. 741 L76 

Lynch. John Gilbert Bohun. 
A history of caricature. 1927. 

q741 L9 
PoPHAir, Arthur Ewart. 

Drawings of the early Flemish school. 
1926. (Drawings of the great mas- 
ters) q741 P82 

Robie, Virginia Huntington. 

The quest of the quaint. New and 
rev. ed. 1927. 749 R65q 

Shackleton, Robert d Shackleton, 3Irs 
Elizabeth (Fleming). 
The charm of the antique. 1926. 

749 S52c 
Tell. A rude book. 1926. q741 T2 

Wolff, Eugene. 

Anatomy for artists, being an explana- 
tion of surface form. 1925. 

743 W85 



PAINTING AND PAINTERS. 
Cooper. Anice Page. 

About artists. cl926. 759.1 C77 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



273 



Laurie. Arthur Pillaiis. 

The painter's methods «& materials. The 
handling of pigments in oil, tempera, 
water-folour & in mural painting. 
1926. (The new art library) 

751 L38pa 
LuDOVici, Albert. 

An artist's life in London and Paris, 
1870-1925. 1926. 759.5 L94 

Mabillier. Henry Currie. 

"Christie's" 1760 to 1925. 1926. 

q750 M3 
Mather. Frank Jewett. 

Modern painting ; a study of tendencies. 
cl927. (Lowell institute lectures, 
1916) 750 IVI42 

MucHALL-ViEBROOK, Thomas W. 

Flemish drawings of the seventeenth 
century. 1926. (Drawings of the 
great masters) q759.9 M9 

[SiTWELL, Osbert]. 

C. R. W. Nevinson. 1925. (Contem- 
porary British artists) q759.2 N5 

Solomon. Solomon Joseph. 

The practice of oil painting and of 
drawing as associated with it. 1924. 
(The new art library) 750 S68 

Wehle, Harry B. 
American miniatures, 173(}-1850. 1927. 

q757 W4 

ENGRAVING. MOVING PICTURES. 

American institute of graphic arts, Neio 
York. 
Fifty prints exhibited by the Institute, 
1926. 1927. q769 A5 

Chatterton. Edward Keble. 

Chats on naval prints. [1926] (Books 
for collectors) 760 C49 

Durer. Albrecht. 

Albrecht Diirer. 1926. (Tlie masters 
of engraving aud etching) 

q769 D95d 
LuTZ, Edwin George. 

The motion-picture cameraman. 1927. 

778 L97m 

MUSIC. 

Barthou, Louis. 

The prodigious lover. 1927. 

780.2 W13ba 



Beethoven, Ludwig van. 

[Sonata appassionata (f minor, opus 
57)] V786.4 B41 

FiNCK, Henry Theophilus. 

My adventures in the golden age of 
music. 1926. 780.2 F49 

Godwin, A. H. 

Gilbert and Sullivan. 1926. 780.19 G59 

Greene, Harry Plunket. 

Interpretation in song. (The musi- 
cian's library) 1924. 784.9 G79 

Grew, Sydney. 

Masters of music. [1924] 780.19 G84 

Marchesi, Blanche. 

Singer's pilgrimage. 1923. 780.2 M31 

MusoRGSKii, Modest Petrovich. 

Boris Godounov. [1872] q782.1 M9 

Newman, Ernest. 

The unconscious Beethoven, an essay in 
musical psychology. 1927. 

780.2 B41ne 

Newton, Ernest Richard. 

How to compose a song. 1925. 

781 N56 



Niles, .John Jacob. 

Singing soldiers. 1927. 



784.8 N69 



PouRTALES, Guy de, comte. 

Polonaise ; the life of Chopin. cl927. 
780.2 C54po 

Spaeth, Sigmund Gottfried. 

Words & music, a book of burlesques. 
1926. 784 S73 

Steele, Edward L. G. jr. 

Rameses ; an Egyptian comic opera in 
two acts. cl903. c782.6 S81 

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour. 

Gilbert & Sullivan at home, containing 
the complete stories and most popu- 
lar songs. cl927. ('"Whole world" 
series) 782.6 S95 

THEATRE. AMATEUR THEATRI- 
CALS. 

Bos worth, Halliam. 

Techni(iue in dramatic art. 1926. 

792 B74 



274 



iN'EWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Dukes, Ashley. 

Drama. cl927. (Home university 
library of modern knowledge) 

792 D87 

Feank. Mrs Florence (Kiper) 

Three plays for a children's theatre. 
1926. 793.2 F82 

Goldberg, Isaac. 

The theatre of George Jean Nathan ; 
chapters and documents toward a 
history of the new American drama. 

1926. 792 G61 

Olcott, Virginia. 

Industrial plays for young people. 

1927. 793.2 043in 

Sabcey, Francisque. 

A company of actors (The Comedie 
fi-angaise) 1926. ( [Publications of 
the Dramatic museum of Columbia 
university. 5th series] Papers on 
acting. IV) 792 S24 

Wood, Peggy d- Wood, Eugene. 

The flying prince. 1927. (Appleton 
short plays) 793 W87 

AMUSEMENTS. 

Adams, Franklin Pierce t£- others, comps. 
The book of diversion. 1925. 793 A21 

BuET, Emily Rose. 

Planning your party. 1927. 793 B97p 

Collins, Archie Frederick. 

The boys' book of amusements. 1927. 

793 C71 
Foster, Robert Frederick. 

Foster's contract bridge, including may- 
onnaise, goulash and dummy up. 
1927. 795 F75co 



Irwin, Florence. 

Contract bridge. 1927. 



795 l72co 



Powell. Herbert Preston. 

The world's best book of minstrelsy. 

1926. 793 P883 

Sparkman, Colley Fredward. 
Games for Spanish clubs. 1926. 

793 S73 

Warren, Emily Stanley, "Mrs Prescott 
Warren." 
Auction and contract bridge condensed. 

1927. 795 W28 



RECREATION. 

Beckford, Peter. 

Thoughts on hunting. (The Abbey 
classics) 799 B39 

Chaenley, Mitchell V. ed. 

Secrets of baseball told by big league 
players. 1927. 797 C483 

Gill, Emlyn Metcalf. 

Practical dry-fly fishing. 1913. 

799.1 G47 
Shaw, Frederick George. 

The science of fly fishing for trout. 
1925. 799.1 S53 

LITERATURE. 

Adaie, Ward William. 

Vital messages in modern books. 1926. 

804 A19 
Bagley, Louie. 

Elocution do's and don'ts. 808.5 B14 

Beers, Henry Augustin. 

A history of English romanticism in the 
eighteenth century. [1926] 

820.9 B41h 
Benchley, Robert Charles. 

The early worm. cl927. 817 B45e 

Benet, William Rose. 

Wild goslings ; a selection of fugitive 
pieces. cl927. 818 B46 

Booth, George Gough. 

The pleasures of planting and other 
thoughts. 1902. v814 B72 

Borden, Richard Carman «.t Busse, 
Alvin C. 

How to win an argument. cl026. 

808.5 B72 
Bowman, James Cloyd, cd. 

Contemporary American criticism. 

cl926. 810.4 B78 

Brooks, Van Wyck. 

Emerson and others. cl927. 814 B873e 

Burroughs, John. 

The summit of the years. [1922] 

818 B972s 
Calverton, v. F. 

Sex expression in literature. 1926. 

820.9 CI 6 
Canfield, Mary Cass. 

Grotesques and other reflections. 1927. 

814 C22 



vol. 22. no. 3] 



CALIFORXIA STATE TJBRARY 



Cestre. Charles. 

The poetry of Amy Lowell. [1926] 

811 L914ZC 

CocTEAU, Jean. 

A call to order. [1923] 844 C66 

Cruse, Amy. 

Famous English books and their stories. 

[1926] ("Told through the ages") 

820.9 C95 

CuNLiFFE, John William. 

Modern English playwrights ; a short 
history of the English drama from 
1825. 1927. . (Plays and play- 
wrights series) 822.09 C97m 

Darlington, William Aubrey. 

Literature in the theatre, and other 
essays. 822.09 D22 

Dickinson, Thomas Herbert. 

An ioutline of contemporary drama. 
cl927. 808.2 D55o 



Fernandez, Ramon. 
Messages. cl927. 



804 F36 



Garrod, Heathcote William. 

Keats. 1926. 821 K25zg 

Gaw, Allison. 

The origin and development of 1 Henry 
VI. 1926. (University of Southern 
California. Studies) c822.33 Q3g 

[Gibbon, Christine Este.] 

Our generation, by one of us. cl927. 

818 G43 

Gibran, Kahlil. 

Sand and foam ; a book of aphorisms. 
1926. 818 G44 

Harrison. George Bagshawe. 

The genius of Shakespeare. 1927. 
( Thiugs-to-know series) 

822.33 Dharr 

Haute, Bret. 

Sketches of the sixties. 1926. 

c818 H32 

Hazard, Mrs Lucy Lockwood 

The frontier in American literature. 
cl927. 810.9 H42 

JosAPHABE, Lionel. 

The world of suckers. 1909. 

c814 J83 



Kemp, Harry. 

More miles, an autobiographical novel. 
cl926. 818 K32m 

Lewis, Edwin Herbert. 

William Vaughn Moody. 1014. (Club 
papers. Chicago literary club) 

812 MSIzl 
LoTi, Pierre, pseud. 

Tahiti (The marriage of Loti) [1925] 

843 L88a 

Marguerite d'Angouleme, queen of Na- 
varre. 

The Heptameron. 1925. (The Borzoi 

classics) 843 M33ha 

Marquis, Don. 

The almost perfect state. 1927. 

814 M35al 
Mencken, Henry Louis. 

Prejudices : fifth series. cl926. 

814 M53a3 

Molnar, Ferenc. 

The play's the thing. cl927. 

894.52 M72p 
MuBASAKi shikibu. 

A wreath of cloud. 1927. 895 IVI97w 

Myers, Walter Lawrence. 

The later realism. cl927. 823.01 M99. 

Nixon, Paul. 

Martial and the modern epigram. 1927. 
(Our debt to Greece and Rome) 

828 N73 
Norton, Charles Eliot. 

The poet Gray as a naturalist. 1903. 

v821 G78zn 

Paebington, Vernon Louis. 

Main currents in American thought ; 
an interpretation of American litera- 
ture from the beginnings to 1920. 
[1927] 810.9 P26 

Retneb, Beth A. 

The tired trolley car. 1926. 818 R43 

Robinson, Monroe Douglas. 

A little boy's friends. 1926. 814 R663 

Rynee, Jayne Hans. 

The ingenious hidalgo. cl927. 

863 C41zr 
Sargent, George Henry. 
Amy Lowell ; a mosaic. 1926. 

v811 L914zs 



276 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



Sheppard, Jolm Tresidder. 

Aeschylus & Sophocles, their work and 
influence. 1927. (Our debt to Greece 
and Rome) 882 A25sh 

Stokoe, Frank Woodyer. 

German influence in the English 
romantic period, 1788-1818. 1926. 
820.9 S87 
Taylor, Alfred Edward. 

Plato, the man and his work. 1927. 

888 P71zta 
Terhune, Albert Payson. 

Bumps. 1927. 814 T318b 

Thompson, James Westfall. 

The last pagan. 1917. (Club papers 
. . . Chicago literary club) 814. T47 

TURQUET-MlLNES, G. 

From Pascal to Proust, studies in the 
genealogy of a philosophy. 1926. 

801 T95 
Valery, Paul. 

Variety. cl927. 844 V16 

Waters, Frank. 

Eight bells, Sailors' snug harbor yarns 
and ballads. 1927. 818W32 

Wild, Payson Sibley. 

An early literary club. 1916. (Club 
papers . . . Chicago literary club) 

806 W66 

The valley and villa of Horace. 



1915. ( Club papers . . . Chicago lit- 
erary club) 874 H81zw 

The Writer's monthly, v. 20. 1922. 

805 W95 

POETRY. 

Aldis, Dorothy. 

Everything and anything. 1927. 

811 A3634 

Angell, Ruth. 

Jewels of happiness. [1921] 

c811 A58 

Bartlett, Mrs Helen (Birch). 

Capricious winds. 1927. 811 B289 

BULLARD, Frank Dearborn. 

The apistophilon. 1899. c811 B93 

Burr, Amelia Josephine. 

Selected lyrics. cl927. 811 B968se 



Cheney. John Vance. 

My hearthside. cl922. c811 C51m 

Gift. 

Damon, Samuel Foster. 

Astrolabe. 1927. 811 D16 

DAvmsoN, John. 

The ballad of a nun. 1905. (Flowers 
of Parnassus) 821 D25ba 

Davison, Francis. 

Davison's poetical rhapsody, ed. by A. 
H. Bullen. 1890. 2 v. v821 D26 



Drinkwater, John. 
Persephone. [1926] 



qv821 D7 



Duncan, Edmonstoune. 

Lyrics from the old song books. 1927. 
821.08 D91 
Eliot, Thomas Stearns. 

Poems. 1927. 811 E42p 



Farquhar, Franklin Smith. 
The wayside school. cl926. 

Hazard, Caroline. 

Songs in the sun. 1927. 

HERBE21T, Alan Patrick. 
She-shanties. [1926] 

HousMAN, Laurence. 
Puss-in-boots. 1926. 



c811 F23w 
811 H428 

821 H536s 

821 H842p 



Howard, Katharine. 

The book of the serpent. 1912. 

c811 H849b 

The little god. 1916. c811 H849 



Hughes, Langston. 

Fine clothes to the Jew. 1927. 

811 H893f 
Jacoby, Rosalie S. 

Kaleidoscope. cl926. c811 J17 

Kennedy, Mrs Annie (de Lartigue) 
Poems. 1920. c811 K35 

Knox, Edmund George Valpy. 

Poems of impudence, by Evoe. [1926] 
821 K741p 
Lewis, Caroline. 

Unsung songs. c811 L67 

Lowes, John Livingston. 

The road to Xanadu ; a study in the 
Ways of the imagination. 1927. 

821 L91zl 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



277 



Madeleva Sistet- Mary. 

Penelope and other poems. 1927. 

811 MIS 

MiDDLETOiv. Scudder. 

Upper night. cl927. 811 M62u 

MiTCHisoN, Mrs Naomi (Haldane). 
The laburnum branch, poems. 821 M68 



Mounts lER. Mabel; ed. 
Singing- youth. 1927. 



811.08 IVI92 



Nesbit, Wilbur Dick. 

The paths of long ago. cl926. 

811 N45 
OJi^iH Khayyam. 

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. 1926. 

qc891.5 05 

O'Neil, George. 

The white rooster, and other poems. 
1927. 811 0582 



Petersox. Alice Onions. 
Sif tings. cl926. 



c811 P48 



POTJND, Ezra Loomis. 

Personte. the collected poems of Ezra 
Pound. 1926. 811 P87pe 



QuENNELL. Peter. 
Masques and poems. 



[1922] v821 Q3 



Reed, John. 

The day in Bohemia ; or, Life among 
the artists. 1913. 811 R32 

Rollins, Hyder Edward, ed. 

The pack of Autolycus. 1927. 821 R75 

Saltl'S, Edgar Evertson. 

Poppies and mandragora. 1926. 

811 S17 

Saegent, John. 

The mine : a dramatic poem. 1788. 

821 S24 

Sassoon, Siegfried Lorraine. 

Satirical poems. 1926. 821 S25s 

Smith, 2Irs Sarah Hathaway (Bixby). 
My sagebrush garden. cl924. c811 S65 

Pasear ; a second book of Califor- 
nia verse. 1926. c811 S65p 

Spenser, Edmund. 

The Faerie queene. 1909. 2 v. 

qv821.31 Os 
Stuart, Muriel. 

New poems and old. 1926. 821 S93 



Tainter, Mrs Lila R. (Munro). 

A caravel of dreams. 1914. c811 T13 

Taylor, Edward Robeson. 

Moods, and other verses. 1899. 

c811 T23 

Thorley, Wilfred Charles, ed. and irans. 
A bouquet from France. 841 T49 



Underwood, John Curtis. 
Trail's end. 1921. 



c811 U56 



Untermeyer, Louis, ed. 

Yesterday and today. cl927. 

821.08 U61y 

Van Doren, Mark. 

7 p. M. & other poems. 1926. 

811 V246 

Vestel, Stanley. 

Fandango ; ballads of the old West. 
1927. 811 V58 

Whitten, Mary Street & Street, Julian 
Leonard. 
Lyrics for lads and lasses. 1927. 

811 W624 

Wild, Payson Sibley. 

On the Hades golf club portico. 1919. 
(Club papers . . . Chicago literary 
club) 811 W668 



Wolfe, Humbert. 
Humoresque. 1926. 



821 W855 



DRAMA. 

Anderson, Maxwell <£ Stallings, Lau- 
rence. 
Three American plays. cl926. 

812 A54 

Barry, Philip. 

White Avings ; a play. 1927. 

812 B281w 

Behrman, Samuel Nathaniel. 

The second man ; a comedy in three 
acts. 1927. (The Theatre guild 
library) 812 B421 



BouRDET, fedouard. 
The captive. 1926. 



842 B76 



Canadian plays from Hart house theatre. 
V. 1. 1926. 822.08 C21 

Cohen, Helen Louise, ed. 

More one-act plays by modern authors. 
cl927. 808.2 C67m 



278 



XEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



CoPEAU, Jacques d- Croue, Jean. 

The brothers Karamazov. 1927. (The 
Theatre guild library) 842 C782b 

Coward, Noel Pierce. 

"This was a man"' ; a comedy in three 

acts. 1926. (Harper's modern plays) 

822 C87t 

Dkydeiv, John. 

John Dryden ; ed.. with introduction 
and notes, by George Saintsbury. v. 2. 
[1904?] (The mermaid series) 

822 D79s 

Dukes, Ashley. 

The song of drums ; a heroic comedy in 
a prologue and three acts. cl926. 

822 D87s 

Dtjnsany. Edward John Moreton Drax 
Plunkett, 18th haron. 
Alexander, & three small plays. 1926. 

822 D92al 

Fahagoh, Francis Edwards. 

Pinwheel ; a play. 1927. (The neigh- 
borhood playhouse plays) 812 F21 



Fisher, Daisy. 
Lavender ladies, 
acts. [1925] 



comedy in three 
822 F533 



Goodrich. Arthur Frederick d Palmer, 
Rose Amelia Oaponsacchi. 1927. 

812 G654 

Hankin, St. John Emile Clavering. 
Dramatic sequels. 1926. (The New 
Adelphi library, v. 13) 822 H24d 



Howard, Sidney Coe. 
Ned McCobb's daughter. 



1926. 
c812 H852n 



The silver cord : a comedy in 

three acts. 1927. (The Theatre 
guild library) c812 H852s 

Kelly, George Edward. 

Daisy Mayme ; a comedy. 1927. 

812 K29d 

Levy, Ben TV. 

This woman business, a play in three 
acts. 1927. 822 L66 

Marks, Jeannette Augustus. 

The merry merry cuckoo, and other 
Welsh plays. 1927. 812 M34a 



Marquis, Don. 

Out of the sea ; a play in four acts. 
1927. 812 M35ou 

MiLLAY', Edna St. Vincent. 

The king's henchman ; a play in three 
acts. 1927. 812 IVI64k 

in three acts. 
822 M98 

(Thompson) c6 
c812 N856 



Murray, Thomas C. 
Autumn fire, a play 
[1925] 

NoRRis, Mrs Kathleen 
Totheroh, Dan. 
The Kelly kid. cl926. 



Twelve one-act plays, with an introduc- 
tion by Walter Prichard Eaton. 1926. 
812.08 T97 

Van Wyck, William. 

Savonarola, a biography in dramatic 
episodes. [1926] 812 V28 

Watkins, Maurine. 

Chicago. 1927. (The theatre of today) 

812 W33 



Werfex, Franz V. 

Juarez and INIaximilian. 



192G 



832 W48j 



BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Abbott, Lawrence Eraser. 

Twelve great modernists : Herodotus, 
St. Francis, Erasmus, Voltaire, Thom- 
as Jefferson, John Marshall, Fran- 
cois Millet, George Stephenson, 
Beethoven, Emerson, Darwin, Pas- 
teur. 1927. 920 A13 

Bemis, Samuel Flagg d Jameson. John 
Franklin, eds. 
The American secretaries of state and 
their diplomacy. [1927] 2 v. 

923.2 B45 

CoLMAN, Mrs Edna Mary (Hercher). 
White House gossip, from Andrew 
.Johnson to Calvin Coolidge. 1927. 

923.2 C716w 

Creei., George. 

Sons of the eagle ; soaring figures from 
America's past. cl927. 920.07 C91 



Dtehl, Charles. 

Byzantine portraits. 



1921 



920.0495 D55 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CAIilFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



279 



[Frank, Waldo David] 
Time exposures by Search-light [pseud.]. 
1926. 920.07 F82 

Gardiner. Alfred George. 

Portraits and portents. 1926. 

920 G22g 
Gilbert, Oscar Paul. 

Men in women's guise. [1926] 

920.8 G46 

Odum. Howard Washington, ed. 

American masters of social science. 
cl927. (American social science 
series) 923 027 

Recorder printing and publishing com- 
pany. 
Historical and contemporary review of 
bench and bar in California. 1926. 
qc923.4 R3 

Sergeant, Elizabeth Shepley. 

Fire under the Andes ; a group of North 
American portraits. 1927. 

920.07 S48 

Sixteen authors ; brief histories, together 
with lists of their respective works. 
1926. 928 S62 

Gift. 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

The whispering gallery ; being leaves 
from the diary of an ex-diplomat. 
1926. B W576 

Angela Merici. Monica, Sister M. 

Angela Merici and her teaching idea 
<1474-1540> 1927. B A581m 

Antin. Antin, Benjamin. 

The gentleman from the 22nd, an auto- 
biography. 1927. B A6312 

Ashurij. AsBURY, Herbert. 

A Methodist saint ; the life of Bishop 
Asbury. 1927. B A799a 

Baird. Baird, Adam. 

Autobiography of Adam Baird. 

cB B1634 

Benson. Benson, Arthur Christopher. 
The diary of Arthur Christopher Ben- 
son, ed. by Percy Lubbock. 

B B4741 

Boufpers. Webster, Mrs Nesta H. 

The Chevalier de Boufflers, a romance 
of the Fx-ench revolution. 1926. 

B B757w 



Buriank. Burbank, Luther cf- Hall, 
Wilbur. 
The harvest of the years. 1927. 

cB B946 
Byron. Brecknock, Albert. 

Byron ; a study of the poet in the light 
of new discoveries. [1926] 

B B996bre 
Clark. Bodley, Temple. 

George Rogers Clark, his life and public 
services. 1926. B C593b 

Coleridge. Fausset, Hugh I'An.sou. 
Samuel Taylor Coleridge. B C693f 

Gomstock. Broun, Heywood Campbell 
d Leech, Margaret. 
Anthony Comstock, roundsman of the 
Lord. 1927. B C739b 

Conrad. Conrad, Mrs Jessie (George) 
Joseph Conrad as I knew him. [1926] 

B C754c 
Cook. Glaspell, Susan. 

The road to the temple. 1927. 

B C7713g 
Cortesi. CoRTESi, Salvatore. 

My thirty years of friendships. 1927. 

B C8283 

Darwin. Dorsey, George Amos. 

The evolution of Charles Darwin. 1927. 
(Benefactors of mankind) B D228do 

Daij. Day, Frank Parker. 

The autobiography of a fisherman. 
1927. B D273 



Duse. Symons, Arthur. 
Eleonora Duse. 1927. 



B D972s 



Eliot. Cotton, Edward Howe. 

The life of Charles W. Eliot. cl926. 

B E423c 
Field. Thompson, Slason. 

Life of Eugene Field, the poet of child- 
hood. 1927. B F453tl 

Figner. Figner, Viera Nikolaevna. 
Memoirs of a revolutionist. cl927. 

B F472 

Flint. Kirkpatrick, John Ervin. 

Timothy Flint, pioneer, missionary, 
author, editor, 1780-1840. 1911. 

B F6253k 

Ford. Hamilton, Joseph Gregoire de 
Roulhac. 
Henry Ford, the man, the worker, the 
citizen. cl927. B F699h 



280 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



France. Cerf, Barry. 

Anatole France, the degeneratiou of a 
great artist. 192G. B F8153c 

Good. [Good, Edward] 

Visions and jewels ; an autobiography. 
[1926] B G646 

Guesi. Edgar A. Guest : some apprecia- 
tions of the man and his work. 1926. 

B G936 

Haggnrd. Haggard, Sir Henry Rider. 
The days of my life, an autobiography. 
1926. 2 V. B H145 

Harrison. Goebel, il/r.s Dorothy (Burne). 
William Henry Harrison ; a political 
biography. 1926. (Indiana histori- 
cal collections. Biographical series) 
B H323g 

Harrison. Harrison, Austin. 

Frederic Harrison ; thoughts and mem- 
ories. [1926] B H319h 

Hawtiionie. Morris, Lloyd R. 

The rebellious Puritan : portrait of Mr. 
Hawthorne. 1927. B H399m 

Hellman. Hellman, George Sidney. 
Lanes of memory. 1927. B H4772 

Hopkinson. Hastings, George Everett. 
The life and works of Francis Hopkin- 
son. cl926. B H797h 

Hudson. Hudson, William Henry. 

Men, books and birds, with notes, some 
letters, and an introduction, by Mor- 
ley Roberts. [1925] B H886r1 

Hunt. Hunt, if rs Una Atherton (Clarke). 
Young in the "nineties." 1927. 

B H9432 

Lificoln. Bates, David Homer. 

Lincoln stories told by him in the Mili- 
tary office in the War department 
during the Civil war, recorded by one 
of the listeners. 1926. vB L736b 

Loti. D'AuvERGNE, Edmund Basil Francis, 

Pierre Loti, the romance of a great 

writer. 1926. B L883d 

Mackenzie. Mackenzie, Frederick. 
A British fusilier in revolutionary Bos- 
ton. 1926. B M1563 



Maupassant. Sherard, Robert Hai-- 

borough. 

The life, work and evil fate of Guy de 

Maupassant (gentilhomme de let- 

tres) 1926. B M452s 

Morton. Morton, Leah, pseud. 

I am a woman — and a Jew, cl926. 

B M889 
Napoleon. Ludwig, Emil. 

Napoleon. 1926. B N216lud 

Oslaldeston. Osbaldeston, George. 
Squire Osbaldeston : his autobiography ; 
edited, with commentary, by E, D. 
Cuming, [1926] qB 0812 

Pasteur. Holmes, Samuel Jackson. 
Louis Pasteur. cl924. B P291h 

Pirandello. Starkie, Walter Fitzwilliam. 
Luigi Pirandello. 1926. B P667s 

Poe. Phillips, Mary Elizabeth. 

Edgar Allan Poe, the man. 1926. 2 v. 

B P743p 

BavlndranatJia Tliakura. Thompson, Ed- 
ward John. 
Rabindranath Tagore, poet & dramatist. 

1926. B R256th 

Redpatli. Horner, Charles Francis. 
The life of James Redpath and the 
development of the modern lyceum. 
cl926. B R321h 

Rohinson. Robinson, Mrs Josephine (De 
Mott) 
The circus lady. cl926. B R662 

Roosevelt. Amos, James E. 

Theodore Roosevelt : hero to his valet. 

1927, B R781am 



Wood, Frederick S. 

Roosevelt as we knew him ; the per- 
sonal recollections of one hundred 
and fifty of his friends and asso- 
ciates. cl927. B R781wo 

Stackpole. Stackpole, Edward James. 
Behind the scenes with a newspaper 
man ; fifty years in the life of an 
editor. 1927. B S775 

Stirling. Stirling, Mrs Anna Maria 
Diana Wilhelmina (Pickering). 
Life's little day, some tales and other 
reminiscences. [1925] B S8613 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



281 



Sweeney. Sweeney, Ed. 

Poorhoiise Sweeney ; life in a county 
poorhouse. 1927. B S9742 

Sweet. Smith, Albert William. 

John Edson Sweet, a story of achieve- 
ment in engineering and of influence 
upon men. 1925. B S9743s 

Tolstoi. Maude, Aylmer, ed. and trans. 
Family views of Tolstoy. [1926] 

B T654m1 

Valentino. Ullman, S. George. 
Valentino as I knew him. [1927] 

B V161u 

Wateis. Waters, Wallscourt Hely 
Hutchinson. 
"Secret and confidential," the experi- 
ences of a military attache. 1926. 

B W331 

Wells. Doughty, F. H. 

H. G. WeUs : educationist. [1926] 

B W454d 

Wesley. Fitchett, William Henry. 
Wesley and his century. 1920. 

B W513fi 

Whitman. Holloway, Emory. 

Whitman ; an interpretation in narra- 
tive. 1926. B W6155h 

Woodforde. Woodforde, James. 

The diary of a country parson. 1926. 
2 V. B W887b 



CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

Atherton, Mrs Gertrude Franklin 
(Horn) 
The immortal marriage. 1927. 

cA868i 

Cornell, Hughes. 

Marketing Deb. cl926. cC814m 

Mitchell, Ruth Comfort. 

Call of the house. cl927.- cM682ca 

Author's a,utograph on title page. 

NoRRis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
The sea gull. 1927. cN856se 

Roe, Vingie Eve. 

Monsieur of the rainbows. 1926. 

cR699m 
Small, Sidney Herschel. 

Sword and candle. cl927. cS635s 



ToTHEROH, Dan. 
Wild orchard. 



cl927. 



cT717 



ARCHAEOLOGY. 

GuLicK, Charles Burton. 

Modern traits in old Greek life. 1927. 
(Our debt to Greece and Rome) 

913.38 G97m 

JocHELSON, Vladimir H'ich. 

Archaeological investigations in the 
Aleutian Islands. 1925. (Carnegie 
institution of Washington) 

q913.798 J6 
Poland, Franz, <& others. 

The culture of ancient Greece and 
Rome. 1926. 913.38 P76 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
GENERAL. 

Appel, Joseph Herbert. 

A world cruise log. 1926. 910.4 A64 

Cermeno, Sebastian Rodriguez. 

The voyage to California of Sebastian 
Rodriguez Cermeno in 1595. 1924. 

qc910 C4 
Franck, Harry Alverson. 

All about going abroad, with maps and 
a handy travel diary. cl927. 

910 F82 
Gosling, Cecil. 

Travel and adventure in many lands. 
cl926. 910 G67 

Huxley, Aldous Leonard. 

Jesting Pilate ; an intellectual holiday. 
cl926. 910 H98 

Miller, Warren Hastings. 

All around the Mediterranean. 1926. 

910.4 IVI65 

Spedding, Charles Thomas. 

Reminiscences of transatlantic trav- 
ellers. [1926] 910 S74 

Wells, Frederick De Witt. 

The last cruise of the Shanghai ; being 
the story of the teakwood boat over 
the Viking trail. 1925. 910 W453 

EUROPE. 

Chatfield-Taylor, Hobart Chatfield. 
Tawny Spain. 1927. (The Park street 
library) 914.6 C49t 



282 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. 



[July, 1927 



DucROS. Louis. 

French society in the eighteenth cen- 
tury. 1926. 914.4 D84 

DuRYEA, Mrs Nina Larrey (Smith). 
Mallorca the magnificent. cl927. 

914.67 D96 

Edwards, George Wharton. 

Spain. cl926. q914.6 E2 



Fox, Frank. 

Finland to-day. 1926. 



914.71 F79 



Gordon, Jan cC- Gordon, Cora Josephine. 

Two vagabonds in Sweden and Lapland. 

[1926] 914.85 G66 

Hamer. Sam Hield. 

A wayfarer in the Dolomites, hitherto 
called "The Dolomites." [1926] 

914.36 H21 
Harper, Charles George. 

A literary man's London. [1926] 

914.21 H29li 

Herring, Robert. 

The president's hat. 1926. 914.4 H56 

Holland. Clive. 

Things seen in Normandy and Brit- 
tany. 1925. 914.4 H73 



HuTTON, Edward. 

Cities of Cicily. 1926. 



914.58 H98 



Lucas, Edward Verrall. 

A wanderer in Rome. [1926] 

914.56 L93 
MoRLEY, Frank Vigor. 

River Thames. [1926] 914.2 IVI86r 

Morton, Henry Canova VoUam. 

London. [1926] (The little guides) 
914.21 IVI88I 

Muirhead, Findlay cC- Monmarche, Mar- 
cel, ecis. 
North-western France. 1926. (The 
blue guides) 914.4 M95n 



Southern France. 1926. (The 

blue guides) 914.4 iV195s 

Muirhead, James FuUarton. 

A wayfarer in Switzerland. [1926] 

914.94 IVI953 

Nicholson, Mrs Asenath (Hatch) 
The Bible in Ireland. 1927. 

914.15 N62b 



Oppenheim, Edward Phillips. 

The quest for winter sunshine. 1927. 

914 062 

Parker, Mrs Cornelia (Stratton) 

More ports, more happy places ; further 
adventures of an American mother 
and her children in Europe. 1926. 

914 P23m 

Peel, Dorothy Constance (Bayliff) "3Irs 

C. S. Peel." 

A hundred wonderful years : social and 

domestic life of a century, 1820-1920. 

1927. 914.2 P37 



RiGGS, Arthur Stanley. 
Vistas in Sicily. 1925. 



914.58 R56 



RoBSON, Edgar Iliff. 

A wayfarer in Provence. [1926] 

914.49 R66 

Saillakd, Maurice Edmond d Rouff, 
Marcel. 
Paris ; the environs of Paris and Nor- 
mandy. [1926] (The yellow guides 
for epicures) 914.43 S13 

Waters, Helena L. 

The French & Italian Rivieras. [1924] 
914.5 W32 

Whyte, Frederic. 

A wayfarer in Sweden. [1926] 

914.85 W62 

ASIA. 

Beebe, Charles William. 

Pheasant jungles. 1927. 915 B41 

Cheesman, Robert Ernest. 

In unknown Arabia. 1926. q915.3 C5 

David-Neel, Mme Alexandra. 

My journey to Lhasa ; the personal 
story of the only white woman who 
succeeded in entering the forbidden 
city. 1927. 915.15 D24 



Dos Passos, John. 
Orient express. 1927. 



915 D72 



Ellis, WiUiam Thomas. 

Bible lands to-day. 1927. 915.69 E47 

Ferriman, Z. Duckett. 

East and west of Hellespont, memories 
of fifty years. [1926] 915.6 F39 



vol. 22. no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



283 



GoMPEKTZ, Martin Louis Alan. 

The road to Lanialand ; impressions of 

a journey to western Thibet. [1926] 

915.15 G63 

Hall. Josef Washington. 

The revolt of Asia ; the end of the white 
man's world dominance, by Upton 
Close. 1927. 915 H17 

King, Rin-ehen Lha-mo, "Mrs Louis 
King."' 
We Tibetans. 1926. 915.15 K54 

KiKTLAND, Lucian Swift. 

Finding the worth while in the Orient. 
1926. 915 K61 

MORLEY, Felix. 

Our Far Eastern assignment. 1926. 

915 M86 

Roosevelt. Theodore d Roosevelt, Kermit. 
East of the sun and west of the moon. 

1926. 915.8 R78 

Singer, Caroline d Baldridge, Cyrus Le 
Roy. 
Turn to the East. 1926. vq915 S6 

Spender, John Alfred. 

The changing East. [1926] 

915.6 S74 

WiMSATT, Genevieve. 

A griflBn in China ; fact and legend in 
the everyday life of the great republic. 

1927. 915.1 W75 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Atxdubon, John James. 

Delineations of American scenery and 
character. 1926. 917.3 A91 

Reals, Carleton. 

Brimstone and chili ; a book of personal 
experiences in the Southwest and in 
Mexico. 1927. 917.8 B366 

California. Development "board. 

Agricultural and soil survey of San 
Diego County, California. [1918] 

c9 17.9498 C15 
Erskine, John. 

Prohibition and Christianity. cl927. 

917.3 E73 
Freeman, Lewis Ransome. 

By waterways to Gotham; the account 
of a two thousand mile voyage by 



skiff and outboard motor from Mil- 
waukee to New York. 1926. 

917.7 F85 

Holder, Charles Frederick. 

An isle of summer, Santa Catalina 
Island. C917.9493 H72i 

JOAD, Cyril Edwin Mitchinson. 

The Babbitt warren. 1926. 917.3 J62 

Mirrors of the year. 1926-27. 1927. 

917.3 M67 

Mitchell, Langdon Elwyn. 

Understanding America. cl927. 

917.3 M681 

[Reynolds, Stephen Allen] 
Carmel, its poets and peasants, by 
"Sar" [pseud.] cl925. 

C917.9476 R46 

Gift of author. 

Rezanov, Nikolai Petrovich. 

The Rezanov voyage to Nueva Califor- 
nia in 1806. 1926. [The Russell 
California reprints] qc917.94 R4 

Sarg, Tony. 

Tony Sarg's New York. 1926. 

q917.471 S2 

Sherlock, Chesla Clella. 

Homes of famous Americans. cl926. 
2 V. 917.3 S5524 



SiRiNGO, Charles A. 
Riata and spurs. 1927. 



917.8 S61 



Strachey, John St. Loe. 

American soundings ; being castings of 
the lead in the shore-waters of Amer- 
ica, social, literary and philosophical. 
1926. 917.3 S89 

Thew, Susan. 

Sequoia national park and the expan- 
sion area. cl926. qc917.94 T4s 

Van de Water, Frederic Franklyn. 
The family flivvers to Frisco. 1927. 

917.3 V244 

Wilson, Mrs Leila Weekes. 

Santa Barbara, California. 1919. 

c91 7.9461 W74 

Woodruff, Douglas. 

Plato's American republic. 1926. [To- 
day and to-morrow] 917.3 W89 



284 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



! Jiily, 1927 



Wright, Richardson Little. 

Hawkers & walkers in early America. 
1927. 917.3 W953 



AFRICA. SOUTH AMERICA. 

Anderson, Mrs Isabel Weld (Perkins). 
From Corsair to Riffian. 1927. 

916.1 A54 

Barrows, David Prescott. 

Berbers and blacks. cl927. 916.4 B27 

Haywood, Austin Hubert Wightwick. 
Sport & service in Africa. 916 H42 

Hull, 3Irs Edith Maude. 

Camping in the Sahara. [1926] 

916.61 H91 

Karsten, Rafael. 

The civilization of the South American 
Indians. 1926. (History of civili- 
zation. [Historical ethnology]") 

918 K18 

McLaxjrin, Hamish. 

What about North Africa? Travel in 

Moi-occo. Algeria, and Tunisia. 1927. 

916.1 M16 

Powell, Edward Alexander. 

In Barbary ; Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco 
and the Sahara. cl926. 916.1 P88 



Reid, C. Lestock. 

An amateur in Africa. 



[1925] 



916 R35 



OCEANICA. POLAR REGIONS. 

Dahl, Knut. 

In savage Australia ; an account of a 
hunting and collecting expedition to 
Arnhem Land and Dampier Land. 
1927. 919.4 D13 



Humphrey, Seth King. 

Loaiing through the Pacific. 



1927. 
919 H92 



Krohn, William Otterbein. 

In Borneo jungles, among the Dyak 
headhunters. cl927. 919.11 K93 

Rasmussen, Knud Johan Victor. 

Across Arctic America ; narrative of 
the Fifth Thule expedition. 1927. 

919.8 R22ac 



HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Black, John Bennett. 

The art of history ; a study of four 
great historians of the eighteenth cen- 
tury. [1926] 907 B62 

Knowlton, Daniel Chauncey. 

History and the other social studies in 
the junior high school. cl926. 

907 K73 
Turner, Tell Arminius. 

Causes of war and The new revolution. 
cl927. 909 T95 

HISTORY: ANCIENT. 

Bazkie, James. 

The Amarna age ; a study of the crisis 
of the ancient world. 1926. 

932 B15am 
Homo, Leon Pol. 

Primitive Italy and the beginnings of 
Roman imperialism. 1927. (The 
history of civilization. [Pre-history 
and antiquity]) 937 H76 

Jarde, Auguste Frangois Victor. 

The formation of the Greek people. 
1926. (The history of civilization. 
[Pre-history and antiquity] ) 938 J37 

Lh)dell Hart, Basil Henry. 

A greater than Napoleon, Scipio Afri- 
canus. 1926. 937.04 L71 

RosTOVTSEV, Mikhail Ivauovich. 

The social & economic history of the 
Roman empire. 1926. q937.06 R8 

EUROPE. 

Allen, Henry Tureman. 

The Rhinelaud occupation. cl927. 

940.98 A42h 
Bausman, Frederick. 

Facing Europe. cl926. 940.98 835 

Beasley, Pierce. 

Michael Collins and the making of a 
new Ireland. 1926. 2 v. 941.5 B36 



Belloc, HUaire. 

Paris. 5th ed. 1923. 



944.3 B44 



Clark, Charles Upson. 

Bessarabia, Russia and Roumania on 
the Black Sea. 1927. 947 C592 

Coolibge, Archibald Cary. 

Ten years of war and peace. 1927. 

940.98 C77 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



285 



Crump, Charles George d Jacob, Ernest 
Fraser, eds. 
The legacy of the middle ages. 1924. 

940.1 C95 

Daggett, Mrs Mabel (Potter). 

Marie of Roumania ; the intimate story 
of the radiant queen. cl926. 

949.8 D12 
DELTEHi, Joseph. 

The poUus. 1927. 940.944 D36 

DiCKMAN, Joseph Theodore. 

The great crusade ; a narrative of the 
world war. 1927. 940.973 D55 

Deinkwateb, John. 

Mr Charles, king of England. cl926. 
942.06 D781 
Fabee-Ltjce, Alfred. 

The limitations of victory. 1926. 

940.912 F12 
Feancke, Kuno. 

German after-war problems. 1927. 

943 F82 
Hall, Hubert. 

British archives and the sources for the 
history of the world war. 1925. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history.) 

q940.91 HI 
Hausee, Henri. 

Le probleme du regionalisme. 1924. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history) q944.08 H3 

Heidenstam, Oscar Gustaf von, ed. 
The letters of Marie Antoinette, Fersen 
and Barnave. 944.04 H46 

Jeeeold, Walter Copeland. 

Henry viii and his wives. [1926] 

942.05 J 56 
Kessel, J. d Iswolsky, H. 

Blinded kings. 1926. 947.08 K42 

Laweetstce, Thomas Edward. 
Revolt in the desert. 1927. 

940.932 L42 
LuDwiG, Emil. 

Wilhelm Hohenzollern, the last of the 
kaisers. By Ethel Colburn Mayne. 
1927. 943.08 L94 

NosEK, Vladimir. 

The spirit of Bohemia ; a survey of 
Czechoslovak history, music, and lit- 
erature. [1926] 943.7 N89s 

6 — 53132 



Robinson, James Harvey. 

The ordeal of civilization. 1926. 

940 R66or 

Sttjezo, Luigi. 

Italy and fascismo. [1926] 945 S93 

Taedieu, Andre Pierre Gabriel Amed^e. 

France and America ; some experiences 

in cooperation. 1927. 944 T18 

TouLMiN, Harry Aubrey. 

Air service, American expeditionary 
force, 1918. 1927. 940.933 T72 

Watt, Francis. 

The book of Edinburgh anecdote. 1913. 
941.4 W34 

Wilhelm ii, German emperor. 

My early life. cl926. 943.08 W67m 

Young, Francis Brett. 

Marching on Tanga (with General 
Smuts in East Africa) . [1927] 

940.935 Y71 

NORTH AMERICA. 

The battle of La Mesa, 1847. 1926. 

C979.4 B33 

Gift. 

Beard, Charles Austin. 

The rise of American civilization. 1927. 
2 V. 973 B36r 

Browning, OrvUle Hickman. 

The diary of Orville Hickman Brown- 
ing. 1925. (Collections of the Illi- 
nois state historical library. Lincoln 
series) 977.3 129 

Denis, Alberta Johnston. 

Spanish Alta California. 1927. 

C979.4 D39 

De Veee, Daisy Williamson. 

The story of Rancho San Antonio, 
1924. C979.465 D48 

Faeis, John Thomson. 

The romance of the boundaries. 1926. 

973 F22r 

Hallenbeck, Cleve. 

Spanish missions of the old Southwest. 
1926. qc979.402 H18 

Hyde Paek historical record, v. 1-v. 2, 
no. 3. 1891-92. 974.41 H99 



286 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



975.8 


J67 


)26. 
973.7 


K73 



Johnson, Gerald W. 
The undefeated. 1927. 

Knowles, David. 

The American civil war. 



McMaster, John Bach. 

A history of the people of the United 
States during Lincoln's administra- 
tion. 1927. 973.7 M16 

McSpadden, Joseph Walker. 

California ; a romantic story for young 
people. cl926. (Romantic stories of 
the states) c979.4 M17 

Marshall, Charles. 

An aide-de-camp of Lee. 1927. 

973.73 M36 

Mather, Frank Jewett tC- others. 

The American spirit in art. v. 12. 
1927. qr973 P1 

Ogg, Frederick Austin. 

Builders of the Republic. 1927. (The 
pageant of America) qr973 P1 

RiED, Hugo. 

The Indians of Los Angeles county. 
1926. c970.4 R55i 

Saenz, Moises d Priestley, Herbert I. 
Some Mexican problems < lectures on 
the Harris foundation 1926> cl926. 

972 S12 

ScHULTZ, James Willard. 

My life as an Indian. cl907. 

970.2 S38m 

Society of Indiana pioneers. Year book. 
1926. 977.2 S67 

Tuomey, Honoria. 

History of Sonoma County, California. 
1926. 2 V. qc979.418 T9 

Vebrill, Alpheus Hyatt. 
The American Indian, North, South and 
Central America. 1927. 970.1 V55 

Vespucci, Amerigo. 

The letter of Amerigo Vespucci. 1926. 
qc973.1 V5 

Wilson, Henry Lane. 

Diplomatic episodes in Mexico, Belgium 
and Chile. 1927. 972 W74 



Wilson, Mrs Leila Weekes. 

Monograph on the old Franciscan mis- 
sion, Santa Barbara, California. 
1913. C979.402 W74 

Gift of author. 



ASIA. . 

Du Jarric, Pierre. 

Akbar and the .Jesuits. 
Broadway travellers) 



1926. (The 
954 D87 



Gilbert, Rodney Tonkers. 

What's wrong with China. [1926] 

951 G46 
HsiJ Shuhsi. 

China and her political entity. 1926. 

951 H873 
Wang, Tsi Chang. 

The youth movement in China. 1927. 

951 W24 

WooDHEAD, Henry George Wandesforde. 

Occidental interpretations of the Far 

Eastern problem. cl926. 950 W88 

AFRICA. OCEANICA. 

Aage, prince. 

A royal adventurer in the Foreign 
legion. 1927. 694 All 

Burnham, Frederick Russell. 

Scouting on two continents. 1926. 

968 B96 
Roosevelt. Nicholas. 

The Philippines ; a treasure and a 
problem. cl926. 991.4 R78 

FRENCH. 

Aftalion, Albert. 

L'industrie textile en France pendant 
la guerre. [1924?] (Carnegie en- 
dowment for international peace. 
Division of economics and history) 

q330.944 A2 
Blanchard, Raoul. 

Les forces hydro-electriques pendant la 
guerre. [1924?] (Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history) 

q621.34 B6 
Bloch, Camille. 

Bibliographie methodique de I'histoire 
economique et sociale de la France 
pendant la guerre. [1925] (Car- 
negie endowment for international 
peace. Division of economics and 
history) qOI 6.944 B6 



\ol. 22,no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



287 



Broderies ; Rosses 

meniennes. 



Broderies Hindoues. 



Tartares, Ar- 
f746 B864 

f746 B86 



DucHABTRE, PieiTC Louis. 

L'imagerie populaire. [1925] 

q760 D8 
Duval. Frederic Victor. 

De la paix de Dieii 3. la paix de fer. 
cl923. (Gesta pacis. Etudes histori- 
ques siir la question de la paix) 

q 172.4 D9 



Etoffes de soie du Japon. 



f677 E8 



ro>rTAiNE, Arthur. 

L'industrie francaise pendant la guerre. 
[1924?] (Carnegie endowment for 
international peace. Division of eco- 
nomics and history) q330.944 F6 

Henry, Albert. 

Le ravitaillement de la Belgique pen- 
dant I'occupatiou allemande. 1924. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history) q949.3 H5 

Herriot, fidouard. 

Lyon pendant la guerre. [1924?] 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 
tional peace. Division of economics 
and history) q940.944 H5 

HoiJER, Olof. 

La solution pacifiques des litiges inter- 
uationaux. 1925. q341 H7 

Lacroix, Paul. 

Directoire, consulat et empire. 1885. 

q914.4 Lid 
Lavallee Poussix. 

Cahiers d' Arabesques, propres a la deco- 
ration des appartements. q745 L3 

Malherbe. Frangois de. 

Oeuvres. 1862-69. 6 v. (Les grands 
ecrivains de la France) 848 M24 

PrLLEMENT, Jean. 

Fleur.s. oiseaux et fantaisies. [1924] 

g745 P6 
SxTE, Eugene. 

Les mysteres de Paris. 1843. 10 v. in 3. 
843 S94m3 

Tapissebies et etoffes coptes. f746 T17 

A''andebpol, Alfred. 

La doctrine scolastique du droit de 
guerre. 1919. q341.3 V2 



CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
APRIL, MAY AND JUNE, 1927.t 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to 
the departments issuing them. The publi- 
cations of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in Neics 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Agriculture Department. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 16, nos. 4r-5, April-May, 
1927. illus. 

Special publication no. 69. 



Commercial fertilizers ; Agricultural min- 
erals (1926). 1927. 54 p. 

Same, no. 70. Directory of 



California nurserymen [1926-1927], 1927. 
45 p. 

Same, no. 71. Statistical re- 



port of California dairy products 1926, 
and list of California dairy products 
plants. 1927. 46 p. 

Same, no. 73. Proceedings of 



the Eighth Annual Conference Western 
Plant Quarantine Board, June 9-11, 

1926, Olympia, Washington. 1927. 103 p. 

Controller. Annual report of finan- 
cial transactions of municipalities and 
counties of California for the year 1926. 

1927. 219 p. 

Corporation Department. Corporate 

securities act providing for the regTilation 

and supervision of companies, brokers and 

gents and sales of securities. 1927. 19 p. 

Education, Department of. Bulletin 
no. 10-Ad. Regulations governing the 



fExcept when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



288 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



granting of special credentials and certi- 
ficates in (a) school administration, (6) 
school supei'vision, series of 1925. Re- 
vised January. 1925. 1927. 7 p. 

Bulletin no. 10-J.H. Regula- 
tions governing the granting of general 
Junior High School credentials and certi- 
ficates, series of 1925. Revised January, 
1925. 1927. 5 p. 

BuUetin no. 14. The state 



teachers colleges : organization and admin- 
istration, calendars for 1927-1928, admis- 
sion requirements, courses of study, stand- 
ards of graduation, including rules adopted 
by the State Board of Education, 1927- 
1928. 13 p. 

— California exchange bulletin in 



rural education, vol. 1, nos. 3-4, March- 
May, 1927. 

Fish and Game Commission. Cali- 
fornia fish and game, vol. 13, no. 2, April, 
1927. p. 76-162. illus. 

Health, State Board of. Special 
bulletin no. 3. Rabies, regulations for 
the enforcement of an Act to prevent the 
introduction and spread of rabies. Re- 
vised 1925. 1927. 10 p. 

Special bulletin no. 5. Diphthe- 
ria, regulations for the prevention and 
control of diphtheria. Revised June 14, 
1924. 1927. 10 p. 

Weekly bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 8- 



20, April- June, 1927. 

Bureau of Child Hygiene. 

Biennial report for the period July 1, 1924 
to June 30. 1926. 1927. 14 p. 

Highway Commission. California 
highways, vol. 4, nos. 4^5, April-May, 
1927. iUus. maps. 

iNorsTEiAL Welfare Commission 
(San Francisco).* Fifth report for the 
biennial periods July 1, 1922 to June 30, 
1924. and July 1, 1924 to June 30, 1926. 
1927. 143 p, 

What California has done to 



protect the women workers. May, 1927. 
27 p. 

*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



Legislature. Forty-seventh session. 
Final calendar of legislative business, his- 
tory and index of all Senate and Assembly 
Bills, Constitutional Amendments, Joint 
and Concurrent Resolutions introduced, 
also list of officers and members, standing 
committees and attaches of the Senate 
and Assembly. 1927. 

Senate final history, 388 p. ; 
Assembly final history, 506 p. 

List of Senate and Assembly 



bills approved and vetoed by Governor to 
and including May 27, 1927. 55 p. 

Same, May 29, 1927. 1927. 20 p. 



Same, June 3, 1927. 1927. 59 p. 

Library, State. News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, vol. 22, no. 2, April, 
1927. p. 101-203. illus. map. 

Books for the blind department. 



News Notes. Reprinted from Neios Notes 
of California Libraries, April, 1927. 
23 p. 32°. 

Mining Bureau (San Francisco). 
Monthly chapter of report xxii of the 
State Mineralogist covering mining in 
California and the activities of the State 
Mining Bureau, vol. 22, no. 4, October, 
1926. illus. maps. p. 397-610. 

The Minarets District, Madera 
county, p. 5 39. 

Summary of operations Califor- 
nia oil fields, vol. 12, nos. 5-7, November, 
1926, to January, 1927. illus. maps. 

Osteopathic Examiners, Board of. 
Directory of graduates of osteopathic 
schools holding physician and surgeon 
licenses, osteopathic licenses, drugless 
practitioner licenses, March 3, 1927. 1927. 
92 p. 

Pharmacy, State Board of (San 
Francisco). [Laws regulating the prac- 
tice of pharmacy, sale of poisons, etc.] 
Effective January 1, 1928. 1927. 12 p. 

Public Welfare, Department of. 
Biennial report from July 1, 1924, to 
June 30, 1926, with additional data from 
July 1, 1922, to June 30, 1924. maps. 
198 p. 

Pltblic Works, Department of. Divi- 
sion of Water Rights. Biennial report, 
November 1, 1926. 1927. 157 p. iUus. 
maps. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



289 



Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco) . Decisions, vol. 28, April 9, 1926, 
to December 2. 1926. 1927. 996 p. 

Cover title : Opinions and orders 
of the Railroad Commission of 
California. 

Reax Estate Depaetment. California 
real estate directory-bulletin, vol. 8, no. 1, 
February 15. 1927. 786 p. 

Surveyor General. Laws governing 
the sale of school lands, and the leasing of 
lands of the State of California, together 
with rules, regulations and information 
concerning same and list of the vacant 
school lands on June 1, 1927. 1927. 53 p. 

Teachers Colleg.e, Fresno. Circular 
of information. March, 1927. 141 p. 12° 

Teachers College, Humboldt. Circu- 
lar of information summer session 1927 ; 
CoUege year 1927-1928. AprU, 1927. 
illus. 85 p. 

Teachers College, San Diego. Edu- 
cational quarterly bulletin, vol. 15, no. 2. 
Announcement of courses of instruction 
offered in education, teacher training, arts, 
literature, science, commerce, social ser- 
vice, 1927-1928. June, 1927. 52 p. 

University OF California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, third series, vol. 20, no. 11. An- 
nouncement of the non-degree curriculum 
branch of the College of Agriculture at 
Davis, California, 1927-1928. Berkeley, 
April, 1927. 33 p. iUus. 12°. 

i!(ime. vol. 20, no. 13. Pros- 
pectus of the College of Agriculture 1927- 
1928. Berkeley, May, 1967. 107 p. 
illus. 12°. 

Calendar, vol. lxvi, nos. 13-16, 

April 4-25, 1927. 8 p. folder. 

A weekly bulletin of official Uni- 
versity announcements. 

Price 25 cents a half year, post- 
paid. 

Chronicle, vol. 29, no. 2, April, 

1927. p. 129-229. illus. roy. 8°. 

Price $2.00 per year; single 
copies 50 cents. 

Publications Agricultural sci- 
ences, vol. 5, no. 3. The growth of citrus 
seedlings as influenced by environmental 
factors, by Raymond E. Girton. Berkeley, 
April 15, 1927. p. 83-117, 8 figs, in text. 
roy. 8°. 

Price 45 cents. 



College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Bulle- 
tin no. 416. Culture of the oriental per- 
simmon in California, by Knowles Ryer- 
son. Berkeley. .January, 1927. 63 p. 
illus. 

Same, no. 417. Poultry 

feeding : principles and practice, by Wal- 
ther F. Hoist and Wilson E. Newlon. 
Berkeley, February, 1927. 48 p. 



Same, no. 418. A study 

of various rations for finishing range 
calves as baby beeves, by H. R. Guilbert. 
Berkeley. February, 1927. illus. 

Same, no. 419. Eco- 



nomic aspects of the cantaloupe industry, 
by E. Rauchenstein. Berkeley, February, 
1927. 45 p. 9 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 420. Rice 

and rice by-products as feeds for fatten- 
ing swine, by E. H. Hughes. Berkeley, 
March, 1927. 24 p. illus. 



Same, no. 421. Beef 

cattle feeding trials 1921-24, by C. E. 
Howell. 12 p. illus. 

Same, no. 422. Cost of 

producing almonds in California, a pro- 
gress report, by R. L. Adams. Berkeley, 
April, 1927. 52 p. illus. 

Same, no. 424. The re- 



lation of rate of maturity to egg produc- 
tion, by Melvin W. duster. Berkeley, 
May, 1927. 21 p. 6 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 425. Apple 



growing in California, by F. W. Allen. 
Berkeley, May, 1927. 54 p. illus. 

Same, no. 426. Apple 



pollination studies in California, by E. L. 
Overholser. Berkeley, May, 1927. 17 p. 

American Archaeology 



and Ethnology, vol. 23, no. 4. Arrow re- 
lease distributions, by A. L. Kroeber. 
Berkeley, April 16, 1927. p. 283-296, 1 
map. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 
Astronomy. Lick ob- 
servatory bulletin no. 387. Observations 
of Mars at the opposition of 1924, by 
Robert J. Trumpler. Berkeley, April 26, 
1927. p. 19^5, plates 1-5, 3 figs, in 
text. 4°. 



290 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



July, 1927 



Same, no. 388. 



Ele- 



ments and ephemeris of comet d 1927 

(Stearns), by H. Thiele. Berkeley, April 

26, 1927. p. 46-49. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per vol. in advance. 
Vol. 13 current. 



Extension Division. The 

Spokesman, vol. 5, nos. 1-3, January- 
May, 1927. 



History, vol. 16. Cali- 
fornia and the nation, 1850-1869 : a study 
of the relations of a frontier community 
with the federal government, by Joseph 
Ellison. Berkeley, April 11, 1927. 258 p. 
roy. 8°. 

Price $3.50. 

Physiology, vol. 7, no. 2. 



Studies on the formation and ionization 
of the compounds of casein with alkali. 
VI. The effect of temperature and con- 
centration on the transport numbers of 
alkali caseinate solutions, by David M. 
Greenberg. Berkeley, April 15, 1927. p. 
2-24, 1 fig. in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Scripps Institution of 



Oceanography. [Report] [Reprint from 
the Annual Report of the President of the 
University, 1924-25 and 1925-26]. Berke- 
ley, n.d. 

Zoology, vol. 31, no. 1. 



The relations and nature of the cutaneous 
vessels in selachian fishes, by J. Frank 
Daniel and Edith Stoker. Berkeley, June 
30, 1927. p. 1-6, 4 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Whittier State School. Journal of 
Delinquency, vol. 10, no. 6, November, 
1926 ; vol. 11, no. 1, March, 1927. 

Price $1.25 per year. 

• The Sentinel (new series), vol. 



24, nos. 4-5, April-May, 1927. 

Publislied montlily. Price $1.00 
per year ; 10 cents per copy. 



CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING APRIL, 
MAY AND JUNE, 1927. 

Berkeley. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 11, nos. ^^^5, April-May, 1927. 

Long Beach. Public library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 3, nos. 4-5, April-May, 1927. 



Los Angeles. Board of Education. 
Educational research bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 
7-8, April-May, 1927. 

Municipal league. Light on 



your city's affairs. Bulletin, vol. 9, nos. 
9-11, April-June, 1927. 

Richmond. Health Department. 
Monthly report, April-May, 1927. 

Public Library. Bulletin, vol. 



13, nos. 9-11, March-May, 1927. 

Riverside. Public library. Bulletin 
no. 189, February, 1927. 

Sacramento. Health Department. Bul- 
letin, April- June, 1927. 

Chamber of Commerce. Capi- 



tal business, April- June, 1927. 

San Diego. Health Department. 
Monthly bulletin, April-May, 1927. 

San Francisco. Board of Supervisors. 
Journal of proceedings, vol. 21, nos. 51— 
52, December, 1926; vol. 22, nos. 1-5, 
January, 1927. 

Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. The City, vol. 7, nos. 6-8, March- 
June, 1927. 



• ■ Chamber of Commerce. San 

Francisco business, vol. 14, nos. 9-24, 
March-June, 1927. 

Stockton. City manager. Official 
bulletin, April-June, 1927. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING APRIL, MAY AND 
JUNE, 1927. 

In American Braille. 

magazines. 

Current numbers of the following : 

cIlluminatoe. 

In European Braiile. 

BOOKS. 

French Text. 

Larousse, Pierre. Nouveau Larousse, 
adapte a I'usage des aveugles par 



\ol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



291 



Geo. L. Raverat. Dictionnaire en- 

cyclopedique. Vols. 8 and 9. 

First 7 volumes previously received. 
Gift of American Braille Press, 
Inc. 

German Text. 
ScHMiD, Cheistoph voii. Die Ostereier. 
(Grade I.) 

The story of a noble lady who re- 
covered her husband lost in war 
through an Easter festival she had 
arranged for the forest people who 
had given her shelter. 

Gift of Mrs H. W. Bruning. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the folUowing : 
Le Braille magazine. 
Braille mail. 
Braille musical magazine. 
Braille packet. 
Channels of blessing. 
Le Courriee musical et litteraire. 
Hampstead. 
Hoba jocunda. 
Interallied Braille magazine. 

LiGHTBEINGER. 

Literary journal. 
Progress. 
Santa Lucia. 
Tribune. 

music. 
Braille musical magazine. 

In Moon Type. 

BOOKS. 

Locke, William John. The glory of 
Clementina Wing. 8 vols. 

Scott, Hugh Stowell ("Henry Seton 
Merriman," pseud.). In Kedar's 
tents. 5 vols. 

Adventures of an Irishman in the 
Spanish service, and the inner history 
of a desperate plot to kill the Queen 
Regent (1838-40). 

Stevenson, Robert Louis. Virginibus 
puerisque. and other essays. 4 vols. 



magazines. 
Current numbers of the following 
Dawn. 

Moon magazine. 
The Moon, weekly newspaper. 

in New York Point. 

magazines. 
Current numbers of the following 
Catholic transcript. 
Christian record. 
Gospel trumpet. 
Matilda Ziegler magazine. 
Sunday school monthly. 
Weekly review. 



In Revised Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with con- 
tractions. 

BOOKS. 

cBedell, Mrs Mary Crehoke. Modern 
gypsies. 3 vols. 

The story of a three thousand-mile 
motor camping trip, encircling the 
United States. 

Gift of San Francisco Chapter, 
American Red Cross. 

Hand copied. 

cBiggees, Earl Derk. The Chinese 
parrot. 7 vols. 

A good mystery story rich in 
humor. Scene laid in California. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cB E o w N, Royal. The prodigal 
daughter. Includes The sending of 
Danny O'Day — of young love and 
business, of cats and institutions 
and other things, by Frank Parker 
Stockbridge. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Kate H. Chalmers. 

cBeovtne, Thomas Alexandee. ("Rolf 
Boldrewood," pseud. ) . Robbery un- 
der arms. 17 vols. 

A story of life and adventure in 
the Bush and in the goldfields of 
Australia. 

Gift of American Red Cross. 

Hand copied. 



292 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1927 



cByed, Richard Evelyn, Jr. The first 
flight to the North Pole. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Hazel B. De Silva. 

cCameeon, Margaret. Four monologues. 

Contents : Unexpected guests ; The 
P. A. I. L. W. R. ; In a Street Car ; 
A patron of art. 

Hand copied by and g'ift of "Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

*cCoHEN, OcTAVUS RoT. The case ace. 
Includes Abe's card, by Benjamin 
F. Sherr. 

*cCoNUNDBUMS, A book of. 

cDeland, Mrs Margaret Wade (Camp- 
bell). The promises of Dorothea. 
From "Old Chester Tales." 
Gift of Juniors of New Jersey State 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

cDey, Frederick van Rensselaer 
("Varick Vanardy," pseud.). Some- 
thing doing. 3 vols. 

A good detective story. 
Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Louis Scheeline. 

cFouR short stories. 

Contents : The dream rug, by Helen 
St. Bernard ; Snowflakes and rose 
leaves, by Harriet Whitney Durbin ; 
Carondelet, by Robert W. Chambers ; 
Cogged dice, by Hugh Johnson. 

Hand copied by and gitt of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cGbant, Ultsses Simpson. Personal 
memoirs of U. S. Grant. Part I, 7 
vols. Part II, 7 vols. 

Gift of U. S. Veterans Bureau. 

cGeey, Zane. The rainbow trail, a ro- 
mance. 9 vols. 

Gift of San Francisco Chapter, 
American Red Cross. 

Hand copied. 

cHallet, Richard Matthews. Husband 

in the dark. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Kate H. Chalmers. 

cIngraham, Joseph Holt. The prince 
of the house of David. 7 vols. 

A series of letters of Adina, a 
Jewess of Alexandria, relating as if 
by an eye witness, all the scenes and 
wonderful incidents in the life of 
Jesus of Nazareth. 

Gift of Frederick Bode. 

cInteeesting articles from various news- 
papers. 

Contents: Finding earliest man's 
image in savage pigmies ; Murderer's 
Island ; "Shooting fish with a cam- 



*Hand copied by and gift of a 
volunteer, San Francisco. 



era" ; How a billion dollars is made 
in a single year ; Burial barge of a 
Viking queen. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

List of publications in Braille, January, 

1927. 

Gift of publisher, American Print- 
ing House for the Blind. 

cMoEGAN, James. Our presidents (selec- 
tions.) 

Contents: George Washington; 
Abraham Lincoln ; Woodrow Wilson. 

Hand copied by and gifc of Mrs 
M. L. Brereton. 

cMuNDY, Talbot. Om ; the secret of 
Ahbor Valley. 10 vols. 

A story of the Indian Secret 
Service. 

Gift of San Francisco Chapter, 
American Red Cross. 

Hand copied. 

cNewton, Joseph Fort. What is a 
religious man? Includes The chal- 
lenge, by L. Adams Beck. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Kate H. Chalmers. 

cNiNE articles from "Popular Mechanics." 
Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cParker, Sir Horatio Gilbert. The 
power and the glory ; a romance of 
the great La Salle. 5 vols. 
Gift of U. S. Veterans Bureau. 

cPaxson, Frederic Logan. History of 
the American frontier, 1763-1893. 
13 vols. 

Gift of U. S. Veterans Bureau. 

cPowELL, Edward Alexander. Beyond 
the utmost purple rim : Abyssinia, 
Somaliland, Kenya Colony, Zanzibaf, 
The Comoros, Madagascar. 7 vols. 

Gift of San Francisco Chapter, 
American Red Cross. 

Hand copied. 

cRinehart, Mrs Mary (Roberts). The 
surgeon explodes a bomb. 

Hand copied by and gift of a 
volunteer, San Francisco. 

cScott, Reginald Thomas Maitland. 
The crushed pearl, a mystery story. 
Gift of American Red Cross. 
Hand copied. 

cSoME Western stories. 

Contents: The topland; The unwill- 
ing meddler ; Let the liar beware. 

From "West" and "Frontier" mag- 
azines. 

Two-side printing. 



vol. 22, no. 3] 



CALIFORXIA STATE LIBRARY. 



293 



cTbain, Akthue Cheney. The Viking's 
daughter. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cWhite, Nelia Gaednek. Doc Deaver. 
Includes Nancy goes romance hunt- 
ing, by Fannie Kilbourne. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Jennie M. Chicken. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
cAmebican review for the blind. 
cThe Beacon. 
cBeaille courier. 
cThe Braille mirror. 
cBeaille star theosophist. 
cCatholic review. 
cChbistian record. 



cChkistian science quarterly. 
cChuech herald for the blind. 
cGospel trumpet. 
cMatilda Ziegler magazine. 
cMessengee to the sightless. 

COUE OWN. 

Seaechlight. 

cSuNDAY school monthly. 

In Ink Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following ; 
The Beacon. 
Outlook for the blind. 
St. Dunstan's review. 



7 — 53132 8-27 1400 



Vol. 22, No. 4 



OCTOBER 



1927 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



ANNUAL STATISTICS NUMBER 



California State Library 



CAIiIFOBNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO, 192 T 



55112 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 295 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 296 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 297 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— ANNUAL STATISTICS AND QUARTERLY 

NEWS ITEMS ^^^ 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST ^^^ 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 473 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 476 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC ^^^ 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 477 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 479 

479 
Staff, Etc. 

^ 480 

Depabtments 

488 
Recent Accessions 

CxVLiFOBNiA State Publications Received Dueing July, August and 

Septembeb, 1927 ^^^ 

Califobnia City Publications Received Dubing July, August and 

Septembeb, 1927 ^^^ 

Books fob the Blind Added Dubing July, August and Septembeb, 

1927 ^ ^^^ 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Califobnia 
State Libeaby. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103 Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 







T^F 



SISKIYOU I MODOC 



„ . ,- SHASTA I 

_' TEHAMA -' "" 
, , ,' / PLUMAS * 

\CLENN< BUTrt^s/'"-' - 

"i ] \ ' ' '!■ '•'v-'^ ' tMaiJM" 

\LAKe'\ >-i ^--yl£,f<^^« I 

P ^'l^ , -\ YOLO "l^"*- - -*' tL DORADO _^J^ 

X '>«»«;-- - \ ; li^ffi'ljj^ \ 

>-Xj<»im»cii ,5^ fs /TUOLUMNE^, 

\^( ,-\^-"-' iv 

V+\^ V ,/ J — =» 

-fe\%', FRESNO ,.r- 



INYO 



V 






\U)SANSEL£S! 

; 



SAN BERNARDINO 



RIVERSIDE 



as* N. _ 

t^r Oiarftsnn, SC. 



IMPERIAL 



55112 



296 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1927. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income, 
1926-271 


Books, etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county^ 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sept. 26, 1910 
June 2, 1919 
Sept. 3, 1913 
June 8, 1915 
July 21, 1913 
Mar. 12, 1910 
April 8, 1914 
May 12, 1914 
Feb. 6, 1912 
Sept. 15, 1913 
Nov. 16, 1910 
June 4, 1912 
Sept. 7, 1915 
Sept. 5, 1912 
May 3, 1910 
Aug. 3, 1926 
Oct. 4, 1926 
June 6, 1910 
July 8, 1915 
Aug. 6, 1912 
Feb. 9, 1916 
Dec. 9, 1919 
Sept. 7, 1915 
Nov. 8, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1908 
Feb. 4, 1918 
July 14, 1913 
April 5, 1912 


858,034 00 

5,508 20 

17,888 79 

12,093 64 

55,210 57 

156,650 93 

16,672 07 

2e,942 12 

18,631 24 

9,620 50 

83,923 01 

26,689 37 

13,591 71 

305,637 40 

25,326 27 

6,484 02 

4,254 73 

36,368 52 

3,847 04 

20,664 91 

11,417 68 

26,002 81 

10,271 24 

16,065 80 

41,287 62 

10,127 62 

41,629 51 

35,264 20 


136,506 
19,963 
67,129 
50,909 

171,713 

418,785 
53,675 

103.582 
62,533 
30,094 

267,631 

119,912 
46,872 

536,788 

89,932 

2,569 

1,512 

124,227 
15,361 
87,710 
29,104 
78,199 
42,073 

83,758 
37,382 

108,415 

101,385 


92 
40 
87 
49 

109 

257 
62 

152 
80 
42 

186 
57 
71 

318 
74 
2 
28 
84 
35 

138 
80 
60 
82 
86 

111 
78 

137 

160 


51 
29 
65 
32 
64 

161 
41 

109 
56 
31 

103 
41 
37 

157 
51 
44 
27 
71 
42 
96 
48 
56 
29 
78 
84 
37 
74 

116 


38 


Amador 

Butte .- 


Bertha S. Taylor 


27 
57 




Mrs Ella P. Morse 

Mrs Alice G.Whitbeck.. 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 


29 


Contra Costa.. _ 


58 
155 


(tIp.titi 


39 




99 


Imperial 




50 




29 


Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 


Mrs Julia G. Babcock 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Vogleson 

Blanche Galloway 


100 
38 
35 

115 
50 



Mariposa 

Merced 


Minette L. Stoddard 

MinetteL. Stoddard 

AnnaL. Williams 


23 
63 
29 




88 


Napa 


Estella De Ford 

Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 

Chas. F.Woods 

Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. \STieaton 

Caroline S. Waters 

Eleanor Hitt 


46 


Orange 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 
San Diego 


36 
29 
46 
65 
37 
64 
101 


San Joaquin 


IdaE. Condit 

Flo A. Gantz ... 


Mar. 7, 1910 
July 6, 1915 
Sept. 5, 1912 
Feb. 16, 1910 
July 20, 1912 
Oct. 13, 1916 
Aug. 2, 1926 
June 7, 1915 
April 6, 1914 
Aug. 14, 1911 
May 9, 1917 
Aug. 8, 1916 
Sept. 8, 1916 
June 10, 1910 
July 3, 1917 
April 9, 1915 
July 12, 1910 


31,335 00 
16,830 74 
23,202 22 
29,319 98 
27,375 66 

8,847 83 

1,110 07 
18,752 51 
25,187 08 
31,946 49 
15,746 73 
10,619 43 

5,873 48 
48,609 70 

9,716 28 
34,756 68 
28,856 13 




50,186 

192,173 



123,176 





80,556 

84,243 

96,289 

44,162 

43,466 

19,764 

138,546 

a. 27,377 

89,870 

99,297 


140 
96 
65 

105 
97 
88 
14 

153 
68 
71 
44 
99 
54 

130 
57 
95 
72 


93 
93 

41 
67 
81 
54 
12 
91 
53 
64 
36 
53 
25 
127 
28 
56 
44 


78 

82 


San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary 
Minerva H. Waterman... 

Edith Gantt 

Ellen B.Frink 

Clara B. Dills 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M. Burket 

Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher 

Elizabeth R. Topping 

Nancy C. Laugenour 


28 
60 
75 
52 

4 


Siskiyou 

Solano . 


88 
47 


Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


46 
35 
50 
25 
86 
25 
54 
42 


46- 




31, '08-04, '26 


Sl,464,191 53 


a. 3,976,824 


4,195 


2,848 


2,423 









' The income as given does not iaclude balance in fund, July 1, 1926. 

2 Includes elementary and high. 

3 San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county. For statistics 
see under "Public Libraries, etc." next page. 

*Appointed July 15, 1927. 



vol. 22, no. 4] list of larger public libraries. 



297 



V 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Established 



Income, 
1926-27 



, etc. 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

El Centre 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Red lands.- 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco -- 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica. . 

Santa Paula 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth.. 

Marian P. Greene 

^Carleton B. Joeckel 

Agnes F. Ferris 

Gertrude De Gelder 

Mrs .Uma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeanette M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F. Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia D. Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden.., 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Mary Bojrnton 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877 

1893 
1907 
1906 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 



1896 
1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 



1868 
1886 



1883 



as F. P. 1879 

1906 
as F. P. 1895 
as F. P. 1909 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1901 
as F. P. 1891 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1878 

1906 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1890 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1894 
as F. P. 1909 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as P.P. 1880 

1891 

1882 
as F. P. 1881 
as F. P. 1890 

1907 
as F. P. 1884 
as F. P. 1895 

1880 
as F. P. 1884 

1900 



338,883 87 
29,090 39 

161,455 78 
12,845 06 
18,522 72 
69,830 00 

132,480 00 

1,194,161 65 

18,053 96 

191,632 05 

9,179 21 

22,494 48 

159,824 35 
29,545 06 
27,881 73 
28,342 73 
45,673 86 
47,223 60 
22,000 00 

109,751 44 

287,388 13 
20,230 45 
31,178 71 
64,195 69 
17,685 54 
38,771 90 
11,762 08 
9,695 72 
16,063 00 
47,824 07 
15,540 00 
28,903 83 



80,143 
30,553 

132,191 
26,004 
21,496 
45,760 

104,698 

889,971 
29,266 

329,802 
33,835 
26,113 

124,061 
87,768 
74,134 
80,543 

126,154 

122,425 
31,994 

162,443 

385,655 
32,300 
47,271 

101.298 
69,551 
49,217 
20,335 
32,538 
28,686 

202,525 
26,248 
22,101 



25,242 
14,869 
15,771 

3,987 

6,560 

30,919 

44,725 

255,006 

8,126 
61.622 

4,276 

8,796 
57,691 
11,235 

7,758 
10,215 

9,526 
23,625 
15,059 
50,659 
107,879 
11,944 
10,513 
20,848 

5,287 



3,595 
5,644 



11,412 
6,093 
5,921 



*0n year's leave of absence; GUve Burroughs Acting Librarian. 



298 



KEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— ANNUAL STATISTICS AND 
QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



In June annual report blanks were sent to all California libraries 
listed. Statistics from these annual reports are printed in this issue. 
Except when otherwise noted, statistics are for the period from July 1, 
1926, to June 30, 1927. 

Branch library statistics are omitted under the names of the various 
branches. They are included, however, in the general figures given 
under the main library. , On account of the above, high school, public 
and other libraries, which are affiliated with a county free library, 
show, as a rule, statistics for their own books only and not for county 
service. 

The annual statistics are followed by quarterly news items covering 
the period July to October, 1927. News items from the annual reports 
are given at the end of the statistics, except those that have already 
been given in quarterly issues. 

In order to keep statistics given herein consistent with figures given 
by the State Department of Education, we have counted all districts 
in a union district as separate districts in "number of active school 
districts that have joined county libraries." 



All libraries are listed except elemen- 
tary public school and church libraries 
and those which belong to private indi- 
viduals. They are arranged alphabetically 
by place under counties and counties are 
arranged alphabetically. To determine 
the county in which any place is located 
see list following these introductory para- 
graphs. This list includes locations of 
branch libraries, although the branches 
are listed only under the main library. 

Those libraries are marked with an 
asterisk (*) which are not free to the 
public for either loan or reference pur- 
poses. 

Libraries marked with $ are United 
States depository libraries ; those marked 
with # are Library of Congress card 
depositories. This information was re- 
vised in October, 1926. 

When a branch has a reading room, it 
is indicated by r. r. in the list of branches 
under county free library. 

The months after newspaper clippings 
are abbreviated as follows : 



January Ja 
February F 
March Mr 
April Ap 
May My 
June Je 



July Jl 
August Ag 
September S 
October O 
November N 
December D 



In order that the figures for circulation 
may be uniform, current magazines are 
included in the total whether reported 
that way or not. 

An effort is made to have the statistics 
uniform in reference to number of 
branches. Any distributing point through 
which service is given directly from 
headquarters is counted as a branch. 
For example, in a school with several 
cla.ssrooms, if service is given directly to 
each classroom separately, each room 
served is counted as a branch. If a 
school district has joined and both school 
and community service are given from one 
location, such service is counted as two 
branches. 

There are in California 46 county fi"ee 
libraries ; 5 library district libraries ; 4 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — annual statistics, etc. 



299 



uuion high school district libraries ; 13G 
libraries suppor;ted by city taxatiou ; 57 
towns or districts with free public libra- 
ries that are included in county free 
library service (30 under Sec. 3, 3 under 
Sec. 4, 12 under Sec. 16, 12 under Pol. C, 
Sec. 4041) ; 68 law libraries, of which 56 
are county law libraries ; 58 county 
teachers' libraries ;. 394 libraries in edu- 
cational institutions, of which 6 are uni- 
versities. 7 colleges, 7 state teachers col- 
leges, 317 public high schools and junior 
colleges, 57 private schools and other 
institutions ; 73 miscellaneous institution 
libraries ; .54 association or society libra- 
ries and 21 subscription libraries. In 
connection with the above libraries are 
4589 branches and deposit stations. 

There are 278 library buildings, of 
which 176 were gifts, and of these gifts 
144 are from Andrew Carnegie. 

As the libraries are listed under coun- 
ties, the following alphabetical list by 
place, giving county, is printed. List 
includes places mentioned under County 
Free Libraries as having branches. 

Abbott, Santa Barbara co. 

Aberdeen, Inyo co. 

Acacia, Imperial co. 

Acampo, San Joaquin co. 

Acton, Los Angeles co. 

Adams School District, Santa Clara co. 

Adelanto, San Bernardino co. 

Adin, Modoc co. 

Adventist School, Kern co. 

Aetna, Napa co. 

Agnew, Santa Clara co. 

Agricola, Santa Barbara co. 

Agua Caliente School District, Kern co. 

Agua Dulce, Los Angeles co. 

Agua Puerca, Santa Cruz co. 

Aguas Frias School District, Glenn co. 

Ahwahnee, Madera co. 

Air Point School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Alameda, Alameda co. 

Alameda, Los Angeles co. 

Alameda School District, Fresno co. 

Alamitos, Orange co. 

Alamitos School District, Imperial co. 

Alamo, Contra Costa co. 

Alamo, Imperial co. 

Alamo School District, Madera co. 

Alamo School District, San Luis Obispo 

CO. 

Alamos School District, Riverside co. 
Albany, Alameda co. 
Alberhill School District, Riverside co. 
Alder Point, Humboldt co. 



Alder Springs, Glenn co. 

Algerine, Tuolumne co. 

Alhambra, Los Angeles co. 

Alisal School District, Monterey co. 

Aliso School District, San Diego co. 

Alleghany, Sierra co. 

Allendale School District, Solano co. 

Allensworth, Tulare co. 

Alliance School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Allison-Spring Valley School District, 
San Diego co. 

Alma, Santa Clara co. 

Almondale, Los Angeles co. 

Alpaugh, Tulare co. 

Alpha School District, Madera co. 

Alpine, San Diego co. 

Alpine, San Mateo co. 

Alpine School District, Modoc co. 

Alpine School District, San Joaquin co. 

Alpine School District, Sierra co. 

Alta Loma, San Bernardino co. 

Alta Mesa, Sacramento co. 

Alta Robles School District, Tulare co. 

Alta School District, Fresno co. 

Alta School District, San Diego co. 

Alta Vista School District, Fresno co. 

Alta Vista School District, Tulare co. 

Altadena, Los Angeles co. 

Altamont. Alameda co. 

Alton, Humboldt co. 

Alturas, Modoc co. 

Alvarado, Alameda co. 

Alvina School District, Fresno co. 

Alviso, Alameda co. 

Alviso, Santa Clara co. 

Amador City, Amador co. 

Amboy, San Bernardino co. 

Ambrose School District. Contra Costa 
CO. 

Amedee School District, Lassen co. 

American Basin School District, Sac- 
ramento CO. 

American Can Company, Los Angeles 
CO. 

American Canyon School District, Napa 
CO. 

American Colony School District, 
Fresno co. 

Amesti School District, Sauta Cruz co. 

Amsterdam, Merced co. 

Anaheim, Orange co. 

Anahuac School District, San Diego co. 

Anderson, Shasta co. 

Andrade, Imperial co. 

Andrew .Jackson, Los Angeles co. 

Angels Camp, Calaveras co. 



300 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Augiola, Tulare co. 
Angwin, Napa co. 
Annette, Kern co. 
Antelope, Colusa co. 
Antelope, Los Angeles co. 
Antelope, Sacramento co. 
Antelope, San Benito co. 
Antelope, Tehama co. 
Antioch, Contra Costa co. 
Antone School District, Alameda co. 
Anzar, San Benito co. 
Apache School District, Ventura co. 
Apple Valley School District, San Ber- 
nardino CO. 
Applegate School District, Merced co. 
Appling School District, Merced co. 
Apricot School District, Yolo co. 
Aptos, Santa Cruz co. 
Aqueduct School District, Kern co. 
Arastraville, Tuolumne co. 
Arbuckle, Colusa co. 
Arcade, Sacramento co. 
Arcadia, Los Angeles co. 
Areata, Humboldt co. 
Areola School District, Madera co. 
Arden School District, Sacramento co. 
Arena School District, Merced co. 
Arlight, Santa Barbara co. 
Arlington School District, Modoc co. 
Armona, Kings co. 
Armona Union School, Kings co. 
Arnaz School District, Ventura co. 
Arno School District, Sacramento co. 
Aromas, Monterey co. 
Aromas School District, San Benito co. 
Aromitas, San Benito co. 
Arroyo, Alameda co. 
Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo co. 
Arroyo Seco, Monterey co. 
Artesia. Los Angeles co. 
Artesia School District, Santa Barbara 

CO. 

Artois, Glenn co. 

Arundel School District, Merced co. 
Arvin, Kern co. 

Ascencion School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Ash View, Madera co. 
Asilomar, Monterey co. 
Associated, Contra Costa co. 
Associated Midway Club, Kern co. 
Atascadero, San Luis Obispo co. 
Athearn School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Athlone, Merced co. 



Atkins School District, Butte co. 
Atlanta School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Atlas, Napa co. 

Atlas Peak School District, Napa co. 

Atolia, San Bernardino co. 

Atwater, Merced co. 

Atwood, Orange co. 

Auberry, Fresno co. 

Auburn, Placer co. 

August School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Aurora School District, Tulare co. 

Ausaym^ San Benito co. 

Austin Corners, Santa Clara co. 

Austin School District, Santa Clara co. 

Auto Rest, Trinity co. 

Avalon, Los Angeles co. 

Avenue School District, Ventura co. 

Avila, San Luis Obispo co. 

Avon School District, Contra Costa co. 

Azalea School District, Siskiyou co. 

Aztec School District, Kern co. 

Azusa, Los Angeles co. 

B Gardens, Los Angeles co. 

Badger, Tulare co. 

Bagby School District, Mariposa co. 

Bagdad, San Bernai'dino co. 

Bailey Flats, Madera co. 

Bakersfield, Kern co. 

Balch Camp Emergency School, Fresno 

CO. 

Bald Hills Emergency School, Hum- 
boldt CO. 

Bald Mountain, Humboldt co. 

Bald Mountain, Santa Cruz co. 

Baldwin Park, Los Angeles co. 

Ball, Siskiyou co. 

Ballard, Santa Barbara co. 

Ballena School District, San Diego co. 

Ballico, Merced co. 

Bangor, Butte co. 

Banner School District, Humboldt co. 

Banner School District, San Diego co. 

Banning, Riverside co. 

Banning School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Banta, San Joaquin co. 

Bard, Imperial co. 

Bardsdale School District, Ventura co. 

Barfield School District, Merced co. 

Barrett, San Diego co. 

Barry Union School District, Sutter co. 

Barstow, Fresno co. 

Barstow, San Bernardino co. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — ^annual statistics, etc. 



301 



Bass Lake School District, Madera co. 

Bassett, Los Angeles co. 

Bay, Monterey co. 

Bay City School District, Orange co. 

Bay Point, Contra Costa co. 

Bay School District, Humboldt co. 

Bay Terrace, Solano co. 

Bayliss, Glenn co. 

Bayside, Humboldt oo. 

Bear Creek School District, Mariposa 

CO. 

Bear River, Humboldt co. 

Bear River, Sutter co. 

Bear Valley, San Benito co. 

Bear Valley School District, San Diego 

CO. 

Beardsley School District, Kern co. 

Beaumont, Riverside co. 

Beaver Union School District, Sacra- 
mento CO. 

Beckwith, Plumas co. 

Bee Gum, Tehama co. 

Bee Rock School Distric*:, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Bee School District, Los Angeles co. 

Beech School District, Imperial co. 

Beldeu, Plumas co. 

Bell, Los Angeles co. 

Bell, San Mateo co. 

Belleview, Los Angeles co. 

Bellevue School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Bellflower, Los Angeles co. 

Bellview, Tuolumne co. 

Belmont, San Mateo co. 

Belpassi School District, Stanislaus co 

Belridge School District, Kern co. 

Belvedere, Los Angeles co. 

Ben Lomond, Santa Cruz co. 

Bend, Tehama co. 

Bender School District, Fresno co. 

Benicia, Solano co. 

Bennett, Napa co. 

Berenda, Madera co. 

Berkeley, Alameda co. 

Bernabe, Monterey co. 

Berry Creek, Butte co. 

Berryessa, Santa Clara co. 

Bethel, Fresno co. 

Bethel School District, Madera co. 

Bethel School District, San Luis Obis- 
po CO. 

Betteravia, Santa Barbara co. 

Beverly Hills, Los Angeles co. 

Bicknell, Santa Barbara co. 



Bidwell School District, Butte co. 

Bieber, Lassen co. 

Big Bar School District, Butte co. 

Big Bear Valley, San Bernardino co. 

Big Bend School District, Butte co. 

Big Creek, Fresno co. 

Big Creek No. 2, Fresno co. 

Big Oak Flat, Tuolumne co. 

Big Pine, Inyo co. 

Big Sandy School District, Fresno co. 

Big Springs, Siskiyou co. 

Big Sur, Monterey co. 

Biggs, Butte CO. 

Biola, Fresno co. 

Bird Flat School District, Lassen co. 

Bishop, Inyo co. 

Bitterwater, San Benito co. 

Bitterwater-Tully Union School Dis- 
trict, San Benito co. 

Black Butte School District, Glenn co. 

Black Mountain, Colusa co. 

Blacks, Yolo co. 

Blairsden, Plumas co. 

Blake School District, Kern co. 

Blanco, Monterey co. 

Blochman School District, Santa Bar- 
bara CO. 

Blocksburg, Humboldt co. 

Bloomfield, Los Angeles co. 

Bloomington, San Bernardino co. 

Blue Lake, Humboldt co. 

Blue Mountain School District, Napa 

CO. 

Blue Mountain School District, Solano 

CO. 

Bluff Prairie School District, Hum- 
boldt CO. 

Blythe, River.side co. 

Boggs School District, Colusa co. 

Bogus, Siskiyou co. 

Bolsa School District, Orange co. 

Boney Mountain, Ventura co. 

Bonita, Santa Barbara co. 

Bonita School District, Stanislaus co. 

Bonsall, San Diego co. 

Booker School District, Santa Clara co. 

Boonville, Mendocino co. 

Borego Valley School District, San 
Diego CO. 

Borel Club, Kern co. 

Bostonia, San Diego co. 

Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz co. 

Bouldin Island School District, San 
.Joaquin co. 

Boulevard, San Diego co. 



302 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Bovverbank School District, Kern co. 
Bowles, Fresno co. 
Bowman, Tehama co. 
Boy Scout Camp, Orange co. 
Boy Scout Club, Kern co. 
Boy Scouts Camp, Napa co. 
Boy Scouts Camp, San Bernardino co. 
Boy Scouts Camp, Tulare co. 
Bradford Island, Contra Costa co. 
Bradley, Monterey co. 
Braly School District, Santa Clara co. 
Branch School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Brawley, Imperial co. 

Brea, Orange co. 

Brentwood, Contra Costa co. 

Bretz, Fresno co. 

Briceland, Humboldt co. 

Bridgeport, Mono co. 

Bridgeport School District, Amador co. 

Bridgeport School District, Colusa co. 

Bridgeport School District, Lassen co. 

Bridgeville, Humboldt co. 

Briggs School District, Ventura co. 

Briones School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Brittan School District, Sutter co. 

Broadmoor, Alameda co. 

Broderick, Yolo co. 

Brooks, Yolo co. 

Brown, Sacramento co. 

Brown Adit, Tuolumne co. 

Brown School District, Santa Cruz co. 

Browns School District, Sutter co. 

Browns Valley, Napa co. 

Browns Valley School District, Solano 

CO. 

Bruella School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Brundage School District, Kern co. 

Bryn Mawr, San Bernardino co. 

Buck Meadows School District, Mari- 
posa CO. 

Buck Mountain School District, Hum- 
boldt CO. 

Buckeye School District, Yolo co. 

Buckhorn School District, Ventura co. 

Buck's Saddle, Plumas co. 

Bucksport School District, Humboldt co. 

Buellton, Santa Barbara co. 

Buena Park, Orange co. 

Buena Vista, Monterey co. 

Buena Vista School District, Kern co. 

Buena Vista School District, Tulare co. 

Buhach School District, Merced co. 



Bull Creek School District, Humboldt 
J. 

Bull Creek School District, Mariposa 

3. 

Bullard School District, Fresno co. 
Bunker Hill School District, Humboldt 

3. 

Buntingville, Lassen co. 
Burbank, Los Angeles co. 
Burbank, Santa Clara co. 
Burlingame, San Mateo co. 
Burnett Island, Sacramento co. 
Burnett School District, Santa Clara 



Burnt Mill, San Bernardino co. 

Burnt Ranch, Trinity co. 

Burr Creek School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Burr Valley, Tehama co. 

Burrel School District, Fresno co. 

Burrell School District, Santa Clara co. 

Burton, Napa co. 

Burton School District, Tulare co. 

Burwood School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Butte City, Glenn co. 
Butte Creek, Colusa co. 
Butte School District, Butte co. 
Butte School District, Lassen co. 
Butte School District, Plumas co. 
Buttonwillow School District, Kern co. 
Byron, Contra Costa co. 
Byron Hot Springs, Contra Costa co. 
Cabazon School District, Riverside co. 
Cache Creek School District, Yolo cp, 
Cacheville School District, Yolo co. 
Cachil Dehe School District, Colusa co. 
Cadenasso School District, Yolo co. 
Cajon Valley Union School District, 
San Diego co. 
Calabasas, Los Angeles co. 
Calabasas, Santa Cruz co. 
Calaveras School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Calexico, Imperial co. 
Caliente, Kern co. 

California George Junior Republic, San 
Bernardino co. 

California Redwood Park, Santa Cruz co. 

California Salt Works, Alameda co. 

Calipatria, Imperial co. 

Calistoga, Napa co. 

Calla, San Joaquin co. 

Callahan, Siskiyou co. 

Calor, Siskiyou co. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — annual statistics, etc. 



303 



Calpioe, Sierra co. 

Calumet School District, Glenn co. 

Calwa, Fresno co. 

Calwa City, Fresno co. 

Camarillo, Ventura co. 

Cambria, San Luis Obispo co. 

Cambrian School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Cameron School District, Kern co. 

Camp Baldy, San Bernardino co. 

Camp Cold Brook, Los Angeles co. 

Camp Meeker, Sonoma co. 

Camp Nelson, Tulare co. 

Camp No. 5, Fresno co. 

Camp No. 7, Fresno co. 

Camp No. 72, Fresno co. 

Camp No. 73, Fresno co. 

Camp Rodgers, Plumas co. 

Campbell, Santa Clara co. 

Campo, San Diego co. 

Canal School District, Fresno co. 

Canal School District, Humboldt co. 

Canal School District, Merced co. 

Canon School District, Yolo co. 

Cantua School District, Fresno co. 

Canyon Creek, Butte co. 

Canyon School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Canyon School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Capay, Tehama co. 

Capay, Yolo co. 

Capay Rancho, Glenn co. 

Capell, Napa co. 

Capetown School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Capitola, Santa Cruz co. 

Carbondale School District, Amador co. 

Cardiif, San Diego co. 

Careaga, Santa Barbara co. 

Caribou, Plumas co. 

Carlotta, Humboldt co. 

Carlsbad, San Diego co. 

Carlton School District, Santa Cruz co. 

Carmel, Monterey co. 

Carmelo, Monterey co. 

Carmenita, Los Angeles co. 

Carmichael, Sacramento co. 

Carneros, Monterey co. 

Carneros, Napa co. 

Carpinteria, Santa Barbara co. 

Carquinez School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Carroll School District, Sacramento co. 
Carrolton, Monterey co. 



Carson School District, Glenn co. 

Cartago, Inyo co. 

Caruthers, Fresno co. 

Casitas Creek Ranch, Ventura co. 

Casmalia, Santa Barbara co. 

Casserly School District, Santa Cruz 

CO. 

Castaic, Los Angeles co. 

Castle Peak School District, Madera co. 

Castle School District, San Joaquin co. 

Castro Hill, Alameda co. 

Castro Valley School District, Alameda 

CO. 

Castroville, Monterey co. 
Cathedral Oaks, Santa Barbara co. 
Cathey's Valley School District, Mari- 
posa CO. 

Cayucos, San Luis Obispo co. 

Cedar Park School District, Siskiyou 

CO. 

Cedar Pines Park Emergency School, 
San Bernardino co. 

Cedarville, Modoc co. 

Celite, Santa Barbara co. 

Cement, Solano co. 

Center Joint School District, Sacra- 
mento CO. 

Center School District, Lassen co. 

Center School District, Merced co. 

Center School District, Solano co. 

Center School District, Ventura co. 

Centerville, Alameda co. 

Centerville, Fresno co. 

Centeryille School District, Butte co. 

Centerville School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Central, Colusa co. 

Central House, Butte co. 

Central School District, Fresno co. 

Central School District, Imperial co. 

Central School District, Los Angeles co. 

Central School District, Madera co. 

Central School District, San Bernar- 
dino CO. 

Central School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Central School District, Santa Cruz co. 

Central School District, Stanislaus co. 

Central School District, Tulare co. 

Central-Gaither Union School District, 
Sutter CO. 

Centralia School District, Orange co. 

Ceres, Stanislaus co. 

Challenge, Yuba co. 

Charleston School District, Amador co. 



304 



NE\VS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Charleston School District, Merced co. 


Clyde, Contra Costa co. 


Charter Oak, Los Angeles co. 


Coachella, Riverside co. 


Chartville School District, San Joaquin 


Coalinga, Fresno co. 


CO. 


Coarse Gold, Madera co. 


Chatham School District, Tulare co. 


Coburn, Monterey co. 


Chawanakee School District, Fresno co. 


Codora, Glenn co. 


Cherokee School District, Glenn co. 


Coffee Creek School District. Humboldt 


Chico, Butte co. 


CO. 


Chico Yecino, Butte co. 


Cohasset School District, Butte co. 


Chiles Valley, Napa co. 


Cold Spring School District, Santa 


Chinese Camp, Tuolumne co. 


Barbara co. 


Chino, San Bernardino co. 


Cole Creek School District, Fresno co. 


Choice Valley School District, San 


Cole School District, Stanislaus co. 


Luis Obispo co. 


College City, Colusa co. 


Cholame School District, San Luis 


College School District, Santa Barbara 


Obispo CO. 


CO. 


Chowchilla, Madera co. 


Collegeville, San Joaquin co. 


Chowchilla School District, Mariposa 


Collinsville, Solano co. 


CO. 


Colma, San Mateo co. 


Christian Colony, San Joaquin co. 


Colonia School District, Ventura co. 


Chrome, Glenn co. 


Colonial Heights, Sacramento co. 


Chualar, Monterey co. 


Colony School District, Sacramento co. 


Chula Vista, San Diego co. 


Colorado School District, Imperial co. 


Cienega, San Benito co. 


Colton, San Bernardino co. 


Cima, San Bernardino co. 


Columbia, Tuolumne co. 


Citrona School District, Glenn co. 


Columbine School District, Tulare co. 


City Creek School District, San Ber- 


Columbus School District, Napa co. 


nardino CO. 


Colusa, Colusa co. 


Cla-Mar School District, San Diego co. 


Compton, Los Angeles co. 


Claremont, Los Angeles co. 


Concepcion, Santa Barbara co. 


Clark School District, Humboldt co. 


Concord, Contra Costa co. 


Clarksburg, Yolo co. 


Concow School District, Butte co. 


Clay, Sacramento co. 


Cone No. 1, Tehama co. 


Clay School District, Fresno co. 


Cone No. 2. Tehama co. 


Clay School District, Merced co. 


Cone School District, Tehama co. 


Clayton, Contra Costa co. 


Conejo, Fresno co. 


Clear Creek, Siskiyou co. 


Conejo School District, Ventura co. 


Clear Creek School District, Butte co. 


Confidence, Tuolumne co. 


Clearinghouse School District, Mari- 


Conn Valley, Napa co. 


posa CO. 


Constantia School District, Lassen co. 


Clear-svater, Los Angeles co. 


Coombs, Napa co. 


Clements, San Joaquin co. 


Cooper School District, Solano co. 


Cleveland School District, Kern co. 


Copco, Siskiyou co. 


Clio, Plumas co. 


Corcoran, Kings co. 


Clipper Mills, Butte co. 


Cordelia, Solano co. 


Clover Flats School District, San Diego 


Cornell, Los Angeles co. 


CO. 


Corner, Tuolumne co. 


Clover School District, Yolo co. 


Corning, Tehama co. 


Clover Valley Lumber Co. Camp No. 


Corona, Riverside co. 


10, Plumas CO. 


Coronado, San Diego co. 


Clover Valley Lumber Co. Camp No. 


Corral de Piedra School District, San 


11, Plumas CO, 


Luis Obispo co. 


Cloverdale, Sonoma co. 


Corralitos, Santa Cruz co. 


Cloverswale School District, Modoc co. 


Cortina, Colusa co. 


Clovis, Fresno co. 


Costa Mesa, Orange co. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — ^annual statistics, etc. 



305 



Cotati, Sonoma co. 

Cotton Camp School District, Merced 
). 

Cottonwood, San Benito co. 

Cottonwood School District, Modoc co.. 

Cottonwood School District, San Diego 
). 

Cottonwood School District, Tehama co. 

Cottonwood School District, Yolo co. 

Courtland, Sacramento co. 

Covelo, Mendocino co. 

Covina, Los Angeles co. 

Cowell, Contra Costa co. 

Cox's Bar, Trinity co. 

Coyote, Santa Clara co. 

Cram School District, San Bernardino 
). 

Cranmore, Sutter co. 

Crannell, Humboldt co. 

Crescent, Kings co. 

Crescent City, Del Norte co. 

Crescent Emergency School, Fresno co. 

Crescent Island School District, Solano 

3. 

Crescent Mills, Plumas co. 
Crescent School District, Fresno co. 
Crescenta School District, Los Angeles 

3. 

Cressey, Merced co. 
Cresta Blanca, Alameda co. 
Crestline, San Bernardino co. 
Creston, San Luis Obispo co. 
Crockett, Contra Costa co. 
Cromberg, Plumas co. 
Crook School District, Modoc co. 
Cross Creek School District, Kings co. 
Crows Landing, Stanislaus co. 
Crystal School District, Solano co. 
Crystal Springs School District, Napa 

0. 

Cucamonga, San Bernardino co. 
Cuddeback School District, Humboldt 

0. 

Culver City, Los Angeles co. 
Cummings Valley School District, Kern 

0. 

Cunningham School District, Madera 

0. 

Cupertino, Santa Clara co. 
Currey School District, Solano co. 
Curtis Creek School District, Tuolumne 

0. 

Cutler, Tulare co. 

Cutten School District, Humboldt co. 

Cuyama, Santa Barbara co. 



Cuyama School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Cypress, Orange co. 

Daggett, San Bernardino co. 

Dairyland School District, Madera co. 

Dakota School District, Fresno co. 

Dallas School District, Kings co. 

Daly City, San Mateo co. 

Danville, Contra Costa co. 

Darwin, Inyo co. 

David Bixler School District, San 
.Joaquin co. 

Davis, Siskiyou co. 

Davis, Yolo co. 

Davis Creek School District, Modoc co. 

Davis School District, San Joaquin co. 

Dayton School District, Butte co. 

Death Valley, Inyo co. 

Decker, Los Angeles co. 

Declez School District, San Bernar- 
dino CO. 

Decoto, Alameda co. 

Dedrick, Trinity co. 

Deep Creek School District, Tulare co. 

Deep Well School District, Madera co. 

Deer Creek School District, Tulare co. 

Dehesa, San Diego co. 

Delano, Kern co. 

Delhi, Merced co. 

Delleker, Plumas co. 

Del Mar, San Diego co. 

Del Monte School District, Monterey 

CO. 

Delmorma School District, Modoc co. 
Del Norte School District, Ventura co. 
Del Paso Heights, Sacramento co. 
Delphi School District, San Joaquin co. 
Delphic School District, Siskiyou co. 
Del Rey, Fresno co. 
Del Rosa, San Bernardino co. 
Del Sur, Los Angeles co. 
Delta View School District, Kings co. 
De Luz, San Diego co. 
Del Valle, Alameda co. 
Den, Santa Barbara co. 
Denair, Stanislaus co. 
Dennis School District, Madera co. 
Denny, Trinity co. 
De Sabla, Butte co. 
Descanso, San Diego co. 
Desert Center School District, River- 
side CO. 

Desert School District, Riverside co. 
Devore, San Bernardino co. 
Dewitt, Lassen co. 



306 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



De Wolf School District, Fresno co. 
Diamond, Orange co. 
Diamond Mountain School District, 
Xapa CO. 

Dickinson School District, Merced co. 

Dillard School District, Sacramento co. 

Dillon, Siskiyou co. 

Dinuba, Tulare co. 

Dixie Valley School District. Lassen co. 

Dixieland School District, Imperial co. 

Dixieland School District, Madera co. 

Dixon, Solano co. 

Dobbyn, Humboldt co. 

Doheny School District, Santa Barbara 

CO. 

Dome, Santa Barbara co. 
Dominguez, Los Angeles co. 
Domino, Kern co. 
Don Pedro, Stanislaus co. 
Dorris, Siskiyou co. 
Dos Palos, Fresno co. 
Dos Palos, Merced co. 
Dos Palos Town School District, Mer- 
ced CO. 

Douglas, Siskiyou co. 

Douglas City, Trinity co. 

Douglass School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Downey, Los Angeles co. 

Downieville, Sierra co. 

Dows Prairie School District, Hum- 
boldt CO. 

Doyle, Lassen co. 

Dry Creek, Fresno co. 

Dry Creek Joint School District, Sac- 
ramento CO. 

Dry Creek School District, Stanislaus 

CO. 

Dry Creek School District, Tehama co. 

Dry Valley, Lassen co. 

Drytown, Amador co. 

Duarte, Los Angeles co. 

Dublin, Alameda co. 

Ducor, Tulare co. 

Duke School District, Fresno co. 

Dulzura, San Diego co. 

Dunkard School District, Fresno co. 

Dunlap, Fresno co. 

Dunnigan, Yolo co. 

Dunsmuir, Siskiyou co. 

Durham, Butte co. 

Dwinnell, Siskiyou co. 

Dyerville School District, Humboldt co. 

Eagle Lake School District, Lassen co. 

Eagle School District, San Luis Obispo 

CO. 

Eagleville, Modoc co. 



Earlimart, Tulare co. 

Easterby, Fresno co. 

East Fork, Siskiyou co. 

East Fork Emergency, Siskiyou co. 

East Gridley, Butte co. 

Eastin School District, Madera co. 

East Lynne School District, Tulare co. 

East Nicolaus, Sutter co. 

Easton, Fresno co. 

East Orosi School District, Tulare co. 

East Santa Fe School District, San 
Luis Obispo co. 

Eastside, Imperial co. 

East Vale School District, Riverside co. 

East Whittier, Los Angeles co. 

Eden School District, Merced co. 

Eden School District, Riverside co. 

Eden Vale School District, Alameda co. 

Edendale School District, Tulare co. 

Edgemont, Lassen co. 

Edgemore Farm, San Diego co. 

Edgewood School District, Siskiyou co. 

Edison, Glenn co. 

Edison School District, Kern co. 

Edom, Riverside co. 

Edward Kelly School District, Sacra- 
mento CO. 

Eel River School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Eel Rock School District, Humboldt co. 

Elbow Creek School District, Tulare co. 

El Cajon, San Diego co. 

EI Camino, Tehama co. 

El Capitan School District, Merced co. 

El Centro, Imperial co. 

El Cerrito, Contra Costa co. 

Elda School District, Tulare co. 

Elder Creek School District, Sacra- 
mento CO. 

El Dorado School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Eldridge, Sonoma co. 

Electra, Amador co. 

EI Granada, San Mateo co. 

Elim Union School District, Merced co. 

Elinor School District, Humboldt co. 

Eliseo School District, Ventura co. 

Elizabeth Lake, Los Angeles co. 

Elk Bayou School District, Tulare co. 

Elk Creek, Glenn co. 

Elk Grove, Sacramento co. 

Elk Hills, Kern co. 

Elk River School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Elkhorn, Monterey co. 

Elkhorn School District, Fresno co. 

Elkhorn School District, San Joaquin 



vol, 22, no. 4] California libraries — annual statistics, etc. 



307 



Elkins School District, Tehama co. 

Elliott No. 1, San Joaquin co. 

Elliott No. 2, San Joaquin co. 

Ellis, Monterey co. 

Elm, Imperial co. 

Elmira, Solano co. 

El Modeno School District, Orange co. 

El Monte, Los Angeles co. 

Elmwood School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

El Nido, Merced co. 
El Retiro, Los Angeles co. 
Ell Sausal School District, Monterey co. 
El Segundo, Los Angeles co. 
Elsinore, Riverside co. 
El Toro School District, Orange co. 
Elverta, Sacramento co. 
Emeryville, Alameda co. 
Emigrant, Glenn co. 
Emmet, San Benito co. 
Empire, Stanislaus co. 
Elmpire School District, Fresno co. 
Empire School District, Kings co. 
Encinal School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Encinal School District, Santa Clara co. 
Encinal School District, Sutter co. 
Encinitas, San Diego co. 
Engel Mine, Plumas co. 
Ensign School District, Riverside co. 
Enterprise, Los Angeles co. 
Enterprise School District, Amador co. 
Enterprise School District, Napa co. 
Enterprise School District, Sacramento 

CO 

Enterprise School District, San Benito 

CO. 

Enterprise School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Enterprise School District, Tulare co. 
Enterprise School District, Yolo co. 
Erie, San Benito co. 
Escalon, San Joaquin oo. 
Eschscholtzia School District, Merced 

CO. 

Escondido, San Diego co. 

Eshom Valley School District, Tulare 

CO. 

Esparto, Yolo co. 
Esperanza, Los Angeles co. 
Estrella School District, San Lui^ 
Obispo CO. 

Ethanac School District, Riverside co. 
Etiwanda, San Bernardino co. 
Etna Mills, Siskiyou co. 
Ettersburg, Humboldt co. 
Eucalyptus, Imperial co. 
Eucalyptus School District, Kings co. 



Eureka, Humboldt co. 

Eureka, Santa Cruz co. 

Eureka, Yolo co. 

Eureka School District, Kings co. 

Evergreen, Santa Clara co. , 

Evergreen, Tehama co. 

Excelsior, Siskiyou co. 

Excelsior School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Excelsior School District, Humboldt co. 
Excelsior School District, Kings co. 
Excelsior School District, Sacramento 

CO. 

Exchequer School District, Mariposa 

CO. 

Exeter, Tnlare co. 
Fair View, Monterey co. 
Fair View School Disti'ict, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Fairacres School District, Stanislaus 

CO. 

Fairchild School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Fairfax, Marin co. 

Fairfax School District, Kern co. 

Fairfield, Solano co. 

Fairfield, Yolo co. 

Fairhaven School District, San Benito 

CO. 

Fairmead, Madera co. 
Fairmont, Los Angeles co. 
Fairoaks, Sacramento co. 
Fairview, Los Angeles co. 
Fairview, San Benito co. 
Fairview, Yolo co. 
Fairview on Kern, Tulare co. 
Fairview School District, Fresno co. 
Fairview School District, Glenn co. 
Fairview School District, Kern co. 
Fairview School District, Lassen co. 
Fairview School District, Merced co. 
Fairview School District, San Bernar- 
dino CO. 

Fairview School District, Stanislaus co. 

Fairview School District, Ventura co 

Faith Home, Stanislaus co. 

Falk, Humboldt co. 

Fall Creek, Siskiyou co. 

Fallbrook, San Diego co. 

Falls School District, Solano co. 

Farmdale School District, Merced co. 

Farmersville, Tulare co. 

Farmington, San Joaquin co. 

Farquhar School District, Tehama co. 

Fawnskin, San Bernardino co. 

Fellows, Kern co. 

Felton School District, Santa Cruz co. 



308 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Ferndale, Humboldt co. 

Ferndale School District, Santa Cruz 

CO. 

Field School District, Humboldt co. 

Fieldbrook, Humboldt co. 

Fields Landing, Humboldt co. 

Figarden School District, Fresno co. 

Fillmore, Ventura co. 

Fillmore, Yolo co. 

Finley Camp, Siskiyou co. 

Firebaugh, Fresno co. 

Firebaugh Emergency School, Fresno 

CO. 

Fish Camp School District, Mariposa 

CO. 

Floral School District, Butte co. 

Florence, Los Angeles co. 

Florence School District, Humboldt co. 

Flores, Tehama co. 

Florin, Sacramento co. 

Flosden School District, Solano co. 

I'louruoy, Tehama co. 

Floyd, Glenn co. 

Floyd Joint School District, Tehama 

(O. 

Flume School District, Madera co. 
Folsom, Sacramento co. 
Fontana, San Bernardino co. 
Foothill, Siskiyou co. 
Forbestown School District, Butte co. 
Forest, Sierra co. 
Forest, Trinity co. 
Forest Lodge, Plumas co. 
Forest School District, Butte co. 
Forest School District, Humboldt co. 
Forks, Siskiyou co. 
Fort Bragg, Mendocino co. 
Fort Jones, Siskiyou co. 
Fort Seward, Humboldt co. 
Fort Washington, Fresno co. 
Fortuna, Humboldt co. 
Fortuna School District, Fresno co. 
Forty-nine School District, Modoc co. 
Foss Valley, Napa co. 
Foster, San Diego co. 
Foster Park, Ventura co. 
Fountain Valley, Orange co. 
Four Tree School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Fowler, Fresno co. 
Franklin, Sacramento co. 
Franklin, Sauta Barbara co. 
Franklin School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Franklin School District, Fresno co. 
Franklin School District, Merced co. 



Franklin School District, Napa co. 
Franklin School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Franklin School District, Sutter co. 
Frankwood School District, Fresno co. 
Frazer School District, Kings co. 
Frazier ^Mountain, Ventura co. 
Freeport, Sacramento co. 
Fremont School District, Yolo co. 
French Camp, San Joaquin co. 
Freshwater, Colusa co. 
Freshwater School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Fresno, Fresno co. 

Fresno Colony School District, Fresno 

CO. 

Fresno Flats, Madera co. 

Fresno School District, Madera co. 

Friant, Fresno co. 

Fruit Growers, Lassen co. 

Fruitland School District, Merced co. 

Fruitland School District, Tehama co. 

Fruitridge School District, Sacramento 

CO. 

Fruitvale School District, Butte co. 

Fruitvale School District, Fresno co. 

Fruitvale School District, Kern Co. 

Fruitvale School District, Santa Cruz 

CO. 

Fruto, Glenn co. 

Fullerton, Orange co. 

Gabilan, San Benito co. 

Gallatin, Los Angeles co. 

Gait, Sacramento co. 

Gambetta School District, Madera co. 

Garberville, Humboldt co. 

Garden Farms, San Luis Obispo co. 

Garden Grove, Orange co. 

Garden School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Garey, Santa Barbara co. 

Garfield, Fresno co. 

Garfield, Humboldt co. 

Garlock School District, Kern co. 

Garvey School District, Los Angeles co. 

Gaviota, Santa Barbara co. 

Gazelle, Siskiyou co. 

General, Napa co. 

General Grant National Park, Tulare 
CO. 

General Petroleum, Kern co. 

General Petroleum Lebec, Keni co. 

Genesee, Plumas co. 

Geneseo School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — annual statistics, etc. 



309 



Georgeson School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Gerber, Tehama co. 

German School District, Glenn co. 

Gertrude School District, Madera co. 

Geyserville, Sonoma co. 

Giant, Contra, Costa co. 

Giant Club, Fresno co. 

Giant Forest, Tulare co. 

Gibson, Lassen co. 

Gilroy, Santa Clara co. 

Gilroy Hot Springs, Santa Clara co. 

Glade, Lassen co. 

Glamis School District, Imperial co. 

Glen Ellen, Sonoma co. 

Glen Valley, Colusa co. 

Glenavon School District, Riverside co. 

Glendale, Los Angeles co. 

Glendale School District, Humboldt co. 

Glendora, Fresno co. 

Glendora, Los Angeles co. 

Glenn, Glenn co. 

Glennville, Kern co. 

Glenwood, Santa Cruz co. 

Glenwood School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Goffs, San Bernardino co. 

Golden West School District, San 
Joaquin co. 

Goleta, Santa Barbara co. 

Gomer School District, Solano co. 

Gonzales, Monterey co. 

Goodyear Bar, Sierra co. 

Gorda, Monterey co. 

Gordon School District, Yolo co. 

Gordon Valley, Napa co. 

Gorman, Los Angeles co. 

Goshen, Tulare co. 

Graeagle, Plumas co. 

Grafton, Yolo co. 

Graham, Los Angeles co. 

Grand Island Union School District, 
Colusa CO. 

Grand View Heights School District, 
Tulare co. 

Grand View School District, Tulare co. 

Grangeville, Kings co. 

Granite School District, Kern co. 

Granite School District, Sacramento co. 

Granite Springs, Mariposa co. 

Grant, Los Angeles co. 

Grant, Solano co. 

Grant School District, Fresno co. 

Grant School District, San Joaquin co. 



Grant Union School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Grantville School District, San Diego 

CO. 

Granville School District, Fresno co. 

Grapevine, Glenn co. 

Grapevine School District, Kern co. 

Grass Valley, Nevada co. 

Grass Valley, Trinity co. 

Graton, Sonoma co. 

Gratton School District, Stanislaus co. 

Gray Colony School District, Fresno co. 

Grayson School District, Stanislaus co. 

Great Western School District. Fresno 

CO. 

Greeley School District, Kern co. 
Greeley School District, Mariposa co. 
Green Mountain School District, Mari- 
posa CO. 

Green Point School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Green School District, Alameda co. 
Green School District, Madera co. 
Green Springs, Tuolumne co. 
Green Valley, San Diego co. 
Green Valley, Santa Cruz co. 
Green Valley School District, Contra 
Costa CO. 

Green Valley School District, Solano 

CO. 

Greenfield, Monterey co. 

Greenfield School District, Kern co. 

Greenhorn School District, Kern co. 

Greenhorn School District, Siskiyou co. 

Greenleaf School District, San Bernar- 
dino CO. 

Greenview, Siskiyou co. 

Greenville, Plumas co. 

Greenville School District, Orange co. 

Greenwood School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Greersburg School District, San Mateo 

CO. 

Grenada, Siskiyou co. 

Gridley, Butte co. 

Grimes, Colusa co. 

Grindstone, Glenn co. 

Grizzly Bluff School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Grizzly Island, Solano co. 
Grossmont, San Diego co. 
Groveland, Tuolumne co. 
Guadalupe, Santa Barbara co. 
Guadalupe School, Kern co. 
Guadalupe School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Guasti, San Bernardino co. 



310 



NEWS NOTP^S OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Guatay, San Diego co. 

Guernsej% Kings co. 

Guinda, Yolo co. 

Gustine, Merced co. 

Hacienda School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

IIai\yee, Inyo co. 

Halcyon, San Luis Obispo co. 

Half Moon Bay, San Mateo co. 

Hall, Monterey co. 

Hall's Valley School District, Santa 
Clara co. 

Hamburg, Siskiyou co. 

Hames School District, Monterey co. 

Hamilton City, Glenn co. 

Hamilton School District, Riverside co. 

Hamlin School District, Kern co. 

Hammel, Los Angeles co. 

Hammond, Tulare co. 

Hanby School District, Tulare co. 

Hanford, Kings co. 

Hanover School District, Madera co. 

Happy Camp, Siskiyou co. 

Happy Valley, Santa Cruz co. 

Happy Valley, Tehama co. 

Hardin, Napa co. 

Hardwick, Kings co. 

Harmony, Colusa co. 

Harmony Grove School District, San 
Joaquin co. 

Harmony School District, Napa co. 

Harmony School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Harney School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Harper Lake, San Bernardino co. 
Harris, Humboldt co. 
Hart School District, Stanislaus co. 
Hawkeye School District, Fresno co. 
Hawkins School District, Fresno co. 
Hawkins School District, Madera co. 
Hawkinsville School District, Siskiyou 

CO. 

Hawthorne, Los Angeles co. 
Hay Lease. Kern co. 
Hayfork, Trinity co. 
Hayward, Alameda co. 
Hayward Heath, Alameda co. 
Hazel Dell, Santa Cruz co. 
Healdsburg, Sonoma co. 
Heber, Imperial co. 
Heber School District, Imperial co. 
Hedger School District, Sutter co. 
Helendale, San Bernardino co. 
Helm, Fresno co. 
Hemet, Riverside co. 
Hemet Valley Union School District, 
Riverside co. 



Henderson School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Henleyville, Tehama co. 

Herald, Sacramento co. 

Hercules, Contra Costa co. 

Hermosa Beach. Los Angeles co. 

Herndon School District, Fresno co. 

Hesperia, iMonterey co. 

Hesperia, San Bernardino co. 

Hester Creek, Santa Cruz co. 

Hetch Hetchy, Tuolumne co. 

Hetten Valley, Trinity co. 

Hewes Park, Orange co. 

Hickman, Stanislaus co. 

Iliggius, San Mateo co. 

Highgrove, Riverside co. 

Highland, San Bernardino co. 

Highland Emergency, Siskiyou co. 

Highland School District, Fresno co. 

Highland School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Highland School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Highland School District, Santa Cruz 

CO. 

Highland Valley, San Diego co. 

Highline School District, Imperial co. 

Hill, Santa Cruz co. 

Hillsborough, San Mateo co. 

Hilmar School District, Merced co. 

Hilts, Siskiyou co. 

Hinkley, San Bernardino co. 

Hipass, San Diego co. 

Hoaglin, Trinity co. 

Hodge School District, San Bernardino 

CO. 

Hollister, San Benito co. 

Holmes, Humboldt co. 

Holt School District, San .Joaquin co. 

Holtville, Imperial co. 

Home Acres, Solano co. 

Home Gardens, Los Angeles co. 

Home School District, San Luis Obispo 

CO. 

Honby, Los Angeles co. 

Honcut, Butte co. 

Honda, Santa Barbara co. 

Honey Dew School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Honey Lake School District, Lassen co. 

Honolulu, Siskiyou co. 

Hooker, Tehama co. 

Hoopa, Humboldt co. 

Hope. Santa Barbara co. 

Hope School District, San Luis Obispo 

CO. 

Hope School District, Tulare co. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — ^annual statistics, etc. 311 



Hopetou School District, Merced co. 
Hopetown, Los Angeles co. 
Hopewell School District, Modoc co. 
Hopland, Mendocino co. 
Horace Mann School District, Fresno 

CO. 

Hornbrook, Siskiyou co. 

Hornitos School District, Mariposa co. 

Horrs Ranch School District, Stanis- 
laus CO. 

Horse Creek, Siskiyou co. 

Hot Springs, Tulare co. 

Hot Springs School District, Contra 
Costa CO. 

Hot Springs School District, Plumas co. 

Houghton School District, Fresno co. 

Houston School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Howard School District, Madera co. 
Howard School District, Sacramento co. 
Howell Mountain School District, Napa 

CO. 

Howell School District, Tehama co. 
Huasna School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Hudson School District, Los Angeles 

CO. 

Hueneme School District, Ventura co. 
Huer Huero School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 
Hughson, Stanislaus co. 
Humboldt Road, Butte co. 
Hunter, Tehama co. 
Huntington, Fresno co. 
Huntington Beach, Orange co. 
Huntington Park, Los Angeles co. 
Hurleton, Butte co. 
Huron School District, Fresno co. 
Hutsou School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Huyck School District, Santa Clara co. 
Hyampom, Trinity co. 
Hyatt School District, Riverside co. 
Hydesville, Humboldt co. 
laqua, Humboldt co. 
Idyllwild, Riverside co. 
Imperial, Imperial co. 
Imperial Beach, San Diego co. 
Independence, Inyo co. 
Independence School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Independent No. 2, Tehama co. 
Independent School District, Alameda 

CO. 

2—55112 



Independent School District, San .Toa- 
quin CO. 

Independent School District, Tehama 

CO. 

Indian Creek, Siskiyou co. 

Indian Creek, Trinity co. 

Indian Falls, Plumas co. 

Indian Valley, Monterey co. 

Indian Valley School District, Colusa 

CO. 

Indian Wells Valley Union School Dis- 
trict, Kern co. 

Indio, Riverside co. 

Industrial, Alameda co. 

Inglewood, Los Angeles co. 

Inglewood Acres, Los Angeles co. 

Inman School District, Alameda co. 

Inj'okern, Kern co. 

lone, Amador co. 

Iowa School District, Fresno co. 

Irish Hills School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Iron House School District, Contra 
Costa CO. 

Iron Springs School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Irving, Siskiyou co. 

Irvington, Alameda co. 

Irwin, Merced co. 

Irwindale, Los Angeles co. 

Isabella, Kern co. 

Island, Kings co. 

Island Mountain School District, Trin- 
ity CO. 

Island School District, Humboldt co. 

Island School District, Plumas co. 

Isleton, Sacramento co. 

Ivanhoe, Tulare co. 

Jackson, Amador co. 

Jackson School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Jackson School District, Stanislaus co. 
Jackson Valley School District, Amador 

CO. 

Jacksonville, Tuolumne co. 
Jacobs School District, Kings co. 
Jacoby Creek School District, Hum- 
boldt CO. 
Jacumba, San Diego co. 
Jalama School District, Santa Barbara 

CO. 

Jamacha, San Diego co. 
Jamesburg, Monterey co. 
Jamestown, Tuolumne co. 
Jamul, San Diego co. 



312 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBBAEIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Janes School District, Humboldt eo. 

Janesville, Lassen co. 

Japatul, San Diego co. 

Jasmine School District, Kern co. 

Jasper, Imperial co. 

Jefferson, Los Angeles co. 

Jefferson, Santa Cruz co. 

Jefferson School District, Fresno co. 

Jefferson School District, Lassen co. 

Jefferson School District, Sacramento 

CO. 

Jefferson School District, San Benito 

CO. 

Jefferson School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Jelly's Ferry School District, Tehama 

CO. 

Jennings School District, Stanislaus co. 

Jersey, Contra Costa co. 

Jess Valley School District, Modoc co. 

Johannesburg, Kern co. 

Johns School District, Colusa co. 

Johnson Joint School District, Merced 

CO. 

Johnston, Tehama co. 

Johnston's Deposit Station, Tehama co. 

Johnstonville School District, Lassen 

CO. 

Johnsville, Plumas co. 

Jolon, Monterey co. 

Jonata School District, Santa Barbara 

CO. 

Jones Prairie School District, Hum- 
boldt CO. 

Jones School District, Stanislaus co. 

Jordan School District, Merced co. 

Josephine School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Julian, San Diego co. 

Julian School District, Amador co. 

Junction, Siskiyou co. 

Junction City, Trinity co. 

Junction School District, Sacramento 

CO. 

Juniper, Lassen co. 

Jurupa Heights, Riverside co. 

Justice School District, San Joaquin co. 

Kahtabe, Humboldt co. 

Kanawha School District, Glenn co. 

Karlo, Lassen co. 

Katella School District, Orange co. 

Kaweah, Tulare co. 

Kearney, Fresno co. 

Keddie, Plumas eo. 

Keeler School District, Inyo co. 



Keen Camp, Riverside co. 

Keene, Kern co. 

Kelseyville, Lake co. 

Kelso, San Bernardino co. 

Kennedy School District, Tulare co. 

Kensington Park, Contra Costa co. 

Kensington Park, San Diego co. 

Kentfield, Marin co. 

Keppel Union School District, Los 
Angeles co. 

Kerckhoff, Fresno co. 

Kerckhoft' Emergency School, Fresno co. 

Kerman, Fresno co. 

Kern River No. 1, Kern co. 

Kern River No. 3, Kern co. 

Kemville, Kern co. 

Keye.s, Stanislaus co. 

Kiddie Camp, Orange co. 

Kiddies' Camp, Kern co. 

Kilowatt, Kern co. 

Kimberlena Pumping Station, Kern co. 

King City, Monterey co. 

King School District, Kings co. 

Kings River, Fresno co. 

Kings River School District, Kings co. 

Kings River School District, Tulare co. 

Kings School District, Butte co. 

Kingsburg, Fresno co. 

Kingston School District, San Bernar- 
dino CO. 

Kingston School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Kinney School District, Sacramento co. 
Klamath City, Siskiyou co. 
Klamath School District, Humboldt co. 
Klamath School District, Siskiyou co. 
Kneeland, Humboldt co. 
Knight School District, Sutter co. 
Knights Ferry, Stanislaus co. 
Knightsen, Contra Costa co. 
Knowles, Madera co. 
Korbel, Humboldt co. 
Kramer, San Bernardino co. 
Kramer Hills Emergency School, San 
Bernardino co. 

Kutuer School District, Fresno co. 

La Ballona, Los Angeles co. 

La Canada, Los Angeles co. 

La Orescenta, Los Angeles co. 

Ladoga, Colusa co. 

Lafayette, Contra Costa co. 

Lafayette, San Joaquin co. 

Lafayette School District, Stanislaus co. 

La Fever Emergency School, Fresno co. 

La Grange, Stanislaus co. 

Laguna, Los Angeles co. 



vol. 22, no. 4] California libraries — annual statistics, etc. 



313 



Laguna, Sauta Barbara co. 
Laguna, Santa Cruz co. 
Laguna Beach, Orange co. 
Laguna Mountain, San Diego co. 
Laguna School District, Fresno co. 
Laguna School District, Imperial co. 
Laguna School District, Sacramento co. 
Laguna School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Laguna School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Lagunita, Monterey co. 

La Habra, Orange co. 

La Honda, San Mateo co. 

Laingland School District, Butte co. 

Laird School District, Stanislaus co. 

Lake, Glenn co. 

Lake, Monterey co. 

Lake Arrowhead School District, San 
Bez'nardino co. 

Lake City, Modoc co. 

Lake Hughes, Los Angeles co. 

Lake Mountain, Trinity co. 

Lake Yiew School District, Santa Bar- 
bara CO. 

Lakeport, Lake co. 

Lakeside, San Diego co. 

Lakeside School District, Kings co. 

Lakeside School District, Modoc co. 

Lakeside School District, Santa Clara 

CO. 

Lakeview School District, Riverside co. 
La Lake, Siskiyou co. 
La Mesa, San Diego co. 
La Mesa Heights, San Diego co. 
La Mir'ada, Los Angeles co. 
Lammersville School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Lanare School District, Fresno co. 

Lancaster, Los Angeles co. 

Lancha Plana School District, Amador 

CO. 

Landers School District, Kern co. 
Lane's Valley School District, Tehama 

CO. 

Lanfair, San Bernardino eo. 

Langley, Monterey co. 
Lantana School District, Imperial co. 
La Panza School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

La Patera, Santa Barbara co. 

La Porte, Plumas co. 

Larkin Valley, Santa Cruz co. 

Larkspur, Marin co. 

Las Amigas School District, Napa co. 

Las Deltas School District, Fresno co. 



Las Flores School District, San Diego 

CO. 

Las Lomitas. San Mateo co. 

Las Manzanitas School District, Santa 
Clara co. 

Las Plumas, Butte co. 

Las Posas School District, Ventura co. 

Las Virgines, Los Angeles co. 

Lathrop, San Joaquin co. 

Laton, Fresno co. 

Laugenour School District, Yolo co. 

Laural School District, Orange co. 

Laurel, Santa Cruz co. 

Laurel School District, Tularin co. 

La Verne, Los Angeles co. 

La Verne Heights, Los Angeles co. 

La Verne School District, Imperial co. 

La Vina, Los Angeles co. 

La Vina School District, Madera co. 

Lawndale, Los Angeles co. 

Leadfield School District, Inj'o co. 

Lebec School District, Kern co. 

Lee School District, Sacramento co. 

Lee School District, Sutter co. 

Leesville, Colusa co. 

Leffingwell, Los Angeles co. 

Le Grand, Merced co. 

Lemon Cove, Tulare co. 

Lemon Grove, San Diego co. 

Lemon Home School District, Glenn co. 

Lemoore, Kings co. 

Leona, Los Angeles co. 

Lerdo School District, Kern co. 

Lerona, Fresno co. 

Lethent, Fresno co. 

Lewis, Monterey co. 

Lewis School District, Mariposa co. 

Lewis School District, San Benito co. 

Lewiston, Trinity co. 

Lewiston Dredge, Trinity co. 

Lexington School District, Santa Clara 
CO. 

Libby School District, San Diego co. 

Liberal, Tehama co. 

Liberty, Los Angeles co. 

Liberty Farms School District, Solane 

CO. 

Liberty School District, Contra Costa 

CO. 

Liberty School District, Glenn co. 
Liberty School District, Napa co. 
Liberty School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Liberty School District, Tulare co. 
Likely, Modoc co. 



314 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Oct., 1927 



Lilac, San Diego co. 
Limoneira, Ventura co. 
Lincoln. Monterey co. 
Lincoln, Placer co. 
Lincoln, Plumas co. 
Lincoln, Tehama co. 
Lincoln Acres, San Diego co. 
Lincoln School District, Alameda co. 
Lincoln School District, Fresno co. 
Lincoln School District, Glenn co. 
Lincoln School District, Sacramento co. 
Lincoln School District, San Joaquin 

CO. 

Lincoln School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Lincoln School District, Sutter co. 

Lindcove School District, Tulare co. 

Linden, San Joaquin co. 

Linder School District, Tulare co. 

Lindsay, Tulare co. 

Lindsay School District, Fresno co. 

Linne School District, San Luis 
Obispo CO. 

Linn's Valley School District, Kern co. 

Linwood School District, Tulare co. 

Lisbon School District, Sacramento co. 

Little Hot Spring School District, 
Modoc CO. 

Little Lake, Los Angeles co. 

Little River School Distx-ict, Humboldt 

CO. 

Little Shasta School District, Siskiyou 

CO. 

Little Stony School District, Colusa co. 

Little Valley, Lassen co. 

Littlerock, Los Angeles co. 

Live Oak, Los Angeles co. 

Live Oak, San Benito co. 

Live Oak, San Joaquin co. 

Live Oak, Sutter co. 

Live Oak School District, Santa Cruz 

CO. 

Live Oak School District, Tehama co. 

Livermore, Alameda co. 

Livingston, Merced co. 

Llagas School District, Santa Clara co. 

Llewellyn, Los Angeles co. 

Loara School District, Orange co. 

Locan, Fresno co. 

Lock Padden. Solano co. 

Lockeford, San Joaquin co. 

Lockwood, Monterey co. 

Locust Grove School District, Tulare 

CO. 

Lodi, Napa co. 



Lodi, San Joaquin co. 

Lofberg, Fresno co. 

Lokoya, Napa co. 

Loleta, Humboldt co. 

Lomita, Los Angeles co. 

Lomita Park, San Mateo co. 

Lompoc, Santa Barbara co. 

Lone Pine, Inyo co. 

Lone Star School District, Humboldt 

CO. 

Lone Star School District, Modoc co. 

Lone Star School District, Siskiyou co. 

Lone Tree, San Benito co. 

Lone Tree School District, Butte co. 

Lone Tree School District, Contra 
Costa CO. 

Lone Tree School District, Merced co. 

Lone Tree School District, San Joa- 
quin CO. 

Long Beach, Los Angeles co. 

Long Point School Dis