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Full text of "News notes of California libraries"

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California State Library 

^TATE l^IBRARY. 

Reference Dcpt. 



49562 1-27 



SHELVE IN 
ROOM 21^ 



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in 2011 with funding from 

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California State Library 



N Ews Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



VOL 23 

NOS. 1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER, 1928 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO, 1929 



66004 



(Index Supplement) 



Vol. 23, No. 1 JANUARY 1928 



NewsNotes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN this number-some of the items of interest. 



BUILDING activities— SAN MATEO, OJAI, POMONA^ WOODLAND, 
SANTA MONICA, NILES, CLAREMONT, LOS ANGELES. 

CUSTODIANS' MEETINGS— ALAMEDA, FRESNO, MERCED AND SOLANO 
COUNTIES. 

EXHIBIT OF BOOKS FOR ADULTS AT PASADENA PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

SAN DIEGO'S PENSION SYSTEM. 

OLD EDITIONS AT MOUNT WILSON SOLAR OBSERVATORY, PASADENA. 

LONG BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY'S BOOK FAIR. 

MIDWINTER COUNTY LIBRARIANS' CONFERENCE, p. 44. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



CAIiIFOENIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 
SACBAMENTO, 192 8 



56955 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

BOOKS OVER THERE 1 

STANDARDS REACHED BY THE SMALLER COLLEGE LIBRARIES 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 4 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 7 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 8 

LIST OP LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 9 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 10 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 35 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 42 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 44 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 46 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 47 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 49 

Staff, Etc. 49 

Departments 50 

Recent Accessions 55 

Caifobnia State Publications Received During October, November 

AND Decembbe, 1927 99 

California City Publications Recei\'ed During October, November 

AND December, 1927 103 

Books fob the Blind Added During October, November and December, 

1927 104 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Caxifobnia 
State Library. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



BOOKS OVER THERE. 

By Mii-ToN J. PERGUSoisr, L,ibraiian, California State Library. 



It is the flream of every book lover, and 
I am sure of every librarian charged with 
the duty of forming a good working collec- 
tion of things printed, to visit the shops 
of the European continent. But if one 
were required to limit his field in a geo- 
graphical sense there is no doubt that 
quite unhesitatingly the British Isles 
would be chosen. There is a certain 
novelty, a sort of rare fillip to the thought 
of hunting incunabula in Germany where 
printing began, or in Italy where in the 
early days the art was so consummately 
practiced. Rich rewards are probably 
still to be had for the searcher who digs 
into the shops of France with their books 
charmingly illustrated in the French man- 
ner. No doubt, too, the persistent pawer 
over the stuff in the stalls along the quays 
of the Seine will be able, like the sour- 
dough in the diggings at more or less 
rare intervals, to turn up nuggets enough 
to keep him hopeful if not altogether 
happy. But for those of us whose lin- 
guistic powers are more or less limited, 
who, despite the supposition to the con- 
trary, do "read for the story," book hunt- 
ing in English and Scotch coverts promises 
the better sport. 

The bibliographical journals, both here 
and abroad, would at times have us believe 
that England is becoming, in a bookish 
sense, another old Mother Hubbard's cup- 
board ; and not infrequently certain rum- 
blings were heard which were perhaps 
mistaken for deep noted protests on the 
part of the British bulldog over the con- 
dition of his larder. Now it may be true 
that Shakespeare quartos and folios do 
not grow on every bush — they never did ; 
and it is true that many copies of these 
treasures of our common language have 
been uprooted from their indigenous soil 
and have been transplanted to a newer 
land where they feel comfortably at home, 
and what is more important give inspira- 
tion to a kindred people. Caxtons, too, 
have taken wing and demonstrated the 
power of a book to reverse Colonel Lind- 
bergh's feat. Even Dr Sam Johnson's 
dictionary and his other works may be 
less plentiful in the London where he 
arbitrated, now that A. Edward Newton 
and his disciples have given a new push 
56955 



to tlio growing snowball of the old lexi- 
cographer's popularity. Dove's Press items 
are not so cheap or so often come upon as 
they were before America grew very rich 
and began to exchange gold for that which 
maketh a man wise. But do not believe 
too implicitly the story that the little 
Island is no longer the bookman's game 
preserve where hunting is good. 

The rarer items were always scarce. 
Gutenberg Bibles when they were fresh 
from the press would not have supplied a 
small Sunday school with texts. Time, 
accident, fire, war and pure ignorance 
have destroyed good books in all ages ; 
and probably our own era on that score 
does not have a lily white record. But 
economic conditions have changed, often 
to be sure to the discomfiture of indi- 
viduals and families. England has found 
the after world war struggle bitter. 
Great estates have been broken up, and 
institutions which seemed to our over- 
seas kinsmen so essential a part of their 
scheme of things have been greatly modi- 
fied. Books and other possessions which 
formed such a pleasing background to the 
life of a people have come into the market, 
and let us believe have more clearly dem- 
onstrated their commercial as well as their 
intellectual value. And there can be no 
doubt that in the change of ownership, 
often from private to public hands, the 
printed Avord is fulfilling its destiny, is 
making richer and wiser, let us hope 
better, the multitude which in the ages to 
come will press on to higher planes. It 
is clear, however, that the rarities hastily 
named in the foregoing sentences, together 
with their myriad fellows, are not for the 
librarians on a budget ; they are the 
"preserved" pheasants of long pursed 
hunters like the late Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, or Mr William A. Clark, .Jr.. happily 
strong and active. 

So in my own seeking for bookish 
trophies to decorate my personal shelves 
and especially to enrich the State Library 
it was unnecessary for me to elevate my 
sights for distant and seldom seen game. 
A volume of Thomas Hardy in first edi- 
tion, a book bearing the literary stamp 
of Masefield, Tomlinson, Thomas Burke. 
Whistler, Henley or De la Mare, .some- 



iSTEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



thing charmingl.y illustrated by Rack- 
ham, Shepard, or Hugh Thomson, or 
printed by Daniel, Dent or Whittingham, 
filled me with bibliographical joy and 
emptied my personal purse all too speedily. 
The library, fortunately, was in better 
position to compete in a bullish market ; 
and the vicarious joy of acquisition under 
such circumstances becomes almost a 
personal thrill. 

In America if one would find a book 
shop, old or new, he were wise to consult 
the city directory and closely note streets 
and numbers. London it seemed to me is 
the true bookman's paradise : whatever 
way j'ou go there in your path at more or 
less frequent intervals you encounter win- 
dows alluringly inviting you to stop, read 
and enter. The Franciscan fathers who 
planted the missions the length of Cali- 
fornia spaced them a day's journey apart, 
thus assuring the traveler of hospitable 
table whereat to refresh inner man and 
bed whereon to stretch weary body. The 
dealers in books in the world's largest 
city made it almost possible for librarian 
or collector to run his course sustained 
by deep breaths taken nowhere but within 
the fragrant dens of piled up volumes. 
No need there to suffer on smoke-ladened, 
fog-impregnated atmosphere ; just take a 
deep inhalation of the perfume of old 
books and move on to the next sanctuary. 

If you are satisfied to have some one 
else do your looking — and in a field so 
vast the task is endless indeed — if your 
purse be long and your time short, then 
you must perforce seek out the old masters 
of the art of book collecting. Maggs. 
Sothern, Tregaskis, Quaritch, Pickering 
and Chatto — their name is legion — are 
pretty likely to have what you want and 
much more you did not know you wanted 
but which with much ado you resist — or 
do not ; all in perfect condition, with the 
proper typographic errors and peculiari- 
ties, half titles and illustrations. At one 
of these places I chanced upon a spotless 
copy of Dr Johnson's Dictionary, wide 
and clean margins, first edition, which 
thereupon was ticketed for California 
where it will be an exhibit item in the 
new building, and a source study for some 
budding lexicographer. From a conven- 
ient shelf was plucked a nice example of 
a fore edge painting by J. Clayton Clark 
and another by Miss Currie which may 



satisfy the curiosity of the casual visitor, 
and inspire and instruct the handicrafts- 
man eager to express himself more tell- 
ingly. Our old friends at 4 Trafalgar 
Square made many hours flit too speedily ; 
but those conferences left permanent evi- 
dence in book and print. Who can say 
what value in the state upon the Pacific 
Coast may yet come of that original 
Rackham there acquired, destined to quit 
forever the fogs of the Thames and to 
emerge in all its brilliance into the sun- 
shine of California. But these lines were 
not begun with the thought of cataloging 
the gleanings of a librarian nibbling his 
way along New Bond street, or Pic- 
cadilly, pasturing in Kingsway or the 
Soho. 

Saturday afternoon is the time to see 
the man in the street, set loose from his 
weekly task, foraging in the lesser lanes 
where books little in price may be found. 
It is fun to wander down Charing Cross 
to see the native loitering by sidewalk 
bins and shelves, searching for something 
to read, hoping perhaps to chance upon a 
bargain, finding satisfaction apparently 
in the very act of glancing at a title page, 
sipping a few honeyed words here and 
there, or taking in the charm of a well 
done illustration. Do Londoners, I won- 
der, buy more books than other folk, or 
are their total numbers so great that 
they seem, when book loving individuals 
are thus segregated, to be a nation devoted 
to print? Whether the drama I saw 
enacted were real or just another moving 
picture I might perhaps have been in 
doubt but for the fact that shops do not 
remain open indefinitely for cinemato- 
graphic piirposes. 

But I would not have the "gentle" 
reader believe that traffic in books is 
confined to the city of Dick Whittington 
and his cat. In England apparently 
shops of this kind are as thickly and as 
generally distributed as service stations 
in America. A week in Oxford would not 
exhaust Basil Blackwell's offerings; and 
his Shakespeare Head Press in Stratford 
on Avon made an old printer's devil's 
fingers itch to stick type again, but in 
more glorious fashion. Holmes in Glas- 
gow, Brown, and Thin, and Grant in 
Edinburgh were a few more links of the 
bookish chain which binds that land 
together. Would that time and opportu- 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



BOOKS OVER THERE. 



iiit.\ luid i)eM-niitte(l the seeking out of 
many others in cities untouched, whose 
names and wares have long been known 
througli the medium of catalogs. 

There is, too, another way in which the 
Britisher and his book differ from Ameri- 
can practice. Not alone are there stores 
offering new and old in generous quantity, 
and not alone are there libraries rich in 
manuscript and print, but the Islander 
has made iise of a medium of book dis- 
tribution little stressed by us. I refer, of 
course, to the circulating library : Mudie, 
The Times Book Club, Smith and Sons, 
Boots — what others I know not. For a 
small sum annually they pour out among 
their subscribers a flood of books of almost 
unbelievable variety and number. Nor 
does this institution seem to militate 
jigainst the growth of the free library ; 
for in the British Isles the county library 
is making a new demonstration of its 
power. No, I should say that books in 
one respect resemble that which is denied 
us under a certain national interdict : the 
more you have the more you want — 
therein the comparison endeth. The cir- 
culating libraries in Britain are some- 
what like the banking systems over there 
— and one could find a financial organiza- 
tion for purposes of comparison here in 
California — they are comparatively few 
in number but their branches are scattered 
throughout the land. Whoever travels 
finds books easily to be had as he steps 
upon the station platform ; and when you 
enter a British drug store — in local par- 
lance a chemist's shop — you are in a way 
invited to become a subscriber to a book 
service. 

It was my privilege, in company with 
an English county librarian, to visit the 
headquarters of one of the large business 
houses which as a sort of side line con- 
ducts a circulating library through the 
medium of its 300 local stores. The 
great stock room with 200 employees and 
books numbering upwards of half a 



million was a revelation of how business 
conducts the thing we call library service. 
No reference work was attempted ; and 
no readers were on the premises. But 
requests for this book and that coming 
from all corners of the country were being 
expeditiously filled ; new books were being 
checked up, ordered and received, fre- 
quently in astounding numbers. And 
books no longer greatly in demand were 
being listed and disposed of at prices 
unbelievably moderate. 

My guide on that occasion, the county 
librarian, had in a very few years built 
up a collection numbering almost 100,000 
volumes. It was modern, in excellent 
condition, and of fine quality. Knowing 
as I did the modest sum which this 
executive had had at his command I 
marveled at his ability to make his funds 
go so far. One convincing reason why I 
learned on the day we visited the head- 
quarters where the circulating library 
branches are supplied with their stock. 
I can not help but feel that American 
libraries could very advantageously pur- 
chase from such sources certain kinds and 
classes of books of permanent value. 

When one turns over a few choice items 
acquired over there, he is apt to yearn 
more ardently for the treasures left behind 
than he is to glory in the book in hand. 
The other side of the pasture fence has 
ever offered tempting nibbling. And while 
I shall seek early opportunity to visit the 
Kings Library in the British Museum, 
and many others of its enchanting divi- 
sions, and shall look forward to chats 
with librarians north and south, over 
pipe and a glass of soda water, still there 
is something altogether fascinating in the 
prospect of longer time and longer credit 
for use in the British marts of the book. 
I am thankful that the stocks therein still 
appear plentiful even if perhaps a bit 
dearer in price. What more desirable and 
satisfying can we librarians buy? 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



STANDARDS REACHED BY THE SMALLER COLLEGE 
LIBRARIES OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

By Flora B. Ludington, The Library, Mills College. 



On the Pacific Coast we have that 
great maker of standards, Mr Willis Kerr, 
whose famous measuring sticks are well 
known to all school and college librarians. 
His influence, great as it has been, has 
not been sufiicient to raise the standards 
of all our libraries to a point where they 
can all be viewed with pride. For 
instance, not one of the small colleges 
that I included in my survey managed to 
come up to the initial book stock standard 
set by Mr Kerr in his article "What makes 
a college library?" (Library Journal, 
Feb. 15, 1926, 51:171-3). In his opinion 
50,000 volumes is a fair minimum for a 
college with a student body of 300-500 
students. This failure of ours is no 
doubt due to the fact that most of our 
colleges in the west are small and scat- 
tered ; many of them are young and strug- 
gling. A survey of the actual book stock 
might reveal the fact that we have a 
larger proportion of the more recent 
books and fewer of the older ones than 
would be the case in the older libraries 
of the central and eastern states. Many 
of our colleges had their beginnings as 
denominational institutions and a large 
proportion remain so. Our state institu- 
tions grew, with the aftermath of the 
war and the awakened desire of youth to 
gain the precious degree stamp of an 
education. We all realize that far too 
many students are attending college. 
This creates a problem for the college 
librarians just as it does for the teaching 
staff proper. The junior college may be 
a possible solution. In aU events, the 
junior college seems to be here to stay 
and should soon attract the attention of 
thinking librarians. 

In sending out my letters of inquiry 
regarding the actual standards of the 
college libraries of the Pacific Coast, I 
first eliminated the large institutions that 
have so frequently been included in other 
surveys. I set an arbitrary limit and 
included only those colleges that had less 
than 2000 students. The Bureau of Edu- 
cation Bulletin of 1926 listing Accredited 



Higher Institutions was the basis of my 
list. I found 32 colleges, within the size 
limit, that met the accrediting require- 
ment of some association. These colleges 
were located in the states of Washington, 
Oregon, California, Arizona, New Mexico, 
Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Montana. Replies 
were made by 23. The colleges were 
divided into three groups, (1) those with 
less than 500 students, (2) 500 to 1000 
students, (3) 1000 to 2000 students. 

The libraries of 10 colleges were found 
to be housed in separate buildings, 13 
shared their building with some other 
department. 11 declared themselves as 
being adequately housed, 12 inadequately. 
The good fairy that builds libraries is just 
as greatly needed in the West as in the 
East. 

As I mentioned before, not any of the 
colleges in the group of less than 500 
students met the standard of Mr Kerr of 
50,000 volumes, and 3 failed to meet the 
very low standard set by the American 
Council on Education which says (U. S. 
Bureau of Education Bulletin, 1926, No. 
10, p. 6) "A college should have a live, 
well-distributed, professionally adminis- 
tered library of at least 8000 volumes, 
exclusive of public documents. . ." The 
actual book stock varies in the different 
groups as follows : Group 1 (to 500 stu- 
dents) 52.79 books per student; Group 2 
(500 to 1000 students) 39.74 books per 
student; Group 3 (1000 to 2000 students) 
53.21. This gives a general average for 
the entire group of colleges of 47.88 books 
per student. This is considerably under 
the average reported by Miss Pritchett in 
the Library Journal of Feb. 1, 1926, for 
a group of central states libraries, of 61 
books per student. 

The accession records for the academic 
year 1926-7 show the following : 

Group 1 (to 500 students) 3.43 books 
added per student enrolled. 

Group 2 (500-1000 students) 3.25 
books added per student enrolled. 

Group 3 (1000-2000 students) 3.04 
books added per student enrolled. 



* Paper read at Midwinter Program of A. L. A. at joint session of College Libra- 
rians of Middle "West and University and Reference Librarians, Dec. 30, 1927. 



vol. 23, no. 1] STANDARDS REACHED BY SMALLER COLLEGE LIBRARIES. 5 



The general average for the entire 
group reporting this item (22) was 3.21. 
I judge this to be a fair average and to 
indicate reasonable growth. 

Three colleges failed to report a definite 
annual book budget, but in every case the 
accessions for the past year show that 
some provision for the purchase of books 
has been made. There was of course 
great variance in the actual budgets. 
This was greatest in the group of small 
colleges where the book budgets varied 
from $1.00 per student to $16.03. The 
average book budget, i.e., for books and 
periodicals, for : 
10 colleges with less than 500 students 

was $6.66 per student and $69.99 per 

faculty member ; 
6 colleges with 500-1000 students was 

$6.43 per student and $61.13 per 

faculty member; 
4 colleges with 1000-2000 students was 

$8.03 per student and $97.78 per 

faculty member. 
The general average for the book budget 

was $7.17 per student and $75.60 per 

faculty member. 

This more than doubles the figure 
reported by Miss Pritchett two years ago 
($3.35) but is considerably less than that 
of Mr Lewis for the New England College 
Libraries (L. J. 51:576. Je 15, 1926) 
of $9.39. 

Even closer to our hearts than book 
budgets are the provisions for the library 
staff and salaries. The smaller colleges 
reported one staff member to each 131 
students (this includes student help — 
figured as 40 hours per week equalling 
one full-time staff member ) . The second 
group had one staff member to each 153 
students and the remaining group re- 
ported 95 students to each staff member. 
The average of 129 is very close to that 
of 130 found by Mr W. E. Henry and 
reported in the Survey (v. 1, p. 273). 
The actual budget for salaries varied as 
follows : 

Group 1 (to 500 students) $7.37 per 
student. 

Group 2 (to 1000 students) $9.36 per 
student. 

Group 3 (to 2000 students) $13.07 per 
student. 

The average budget for salaries was 
found to be $9.80 per student. 



An additional item that interested me 
and which I included was the matter of 
instruction in the use of the library. I 
am not sure whether I consider this 
instruction essential or not, but I was 
interested in knowing the general prac- 
tice. Every college that reported over 
500 students reported some instruction in 
the use of the library. Among the col- 
leges with less than 500 students the 
result was a tie. This can no doubt be 
explained by the obvious truth that in 
the small college the close contact with 
the individual student lessens the need of 
group instruction. 

This makes a convenient point of 
departure to discuss briefly the problem 
of the junior college library. California 
has been so outstanding as a sponsor of 
junior colleges that I decided to include 
a short survey of junior college libraries 
and to consider their relation to the 
college library proper. Out of 22 junior 
college libraries only 2 reported orienta- 
tion courses that included some instruc- 
tion in the use of the library. We will 
soon begin to receive more and more 
graduates of junior colleges in our univer- 
sities. Many students will not continue 
their education beyond the junior college, 
but those who do come on to us may 
create a new problem. My experience in 
a California college for six years has been 
that the junior college student entering 
into the academic work of the college 
proper in her junior year works in the 
library at a decided disadvantage. She 
is not only handicapped by the fact that 
she has a strange library to use, but her 
professors expect her to use reference 
tools that she has never seen before. The 
problem of orienting an advanced student 
in the use of the library is a different 
one from starting out the freshman who 
learns gradually to apply the library 
information we give her. I feel per- 
sonally that the academic life of these 
transfer students is difficult and they may 
need special assistance from the librarians. 

Seven junior colleges were found that 
operated their libraries exclusively for 
their own students ; 12 operated with the 
high school library, only one of which 
made special provision for the junior 
college students; one operated with a 
public library. In the matter of book 
stock alone the ratio seems a low one. 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



Jan., 1928 



The junior colleges with separate libraries 
reported an initial stock of 10 books per 
student and accessions of 2.6 books per 
student last year. Considering their very 
small collections, I think that a more 
rapid increase in the book stock is essen- 
tial. One peculiar feature of the junior 
college library is that since the college is 
attended by students living at home and 
not in residence, the libraries do not keep 
open in the evenings. Only two out of 
18 junior college libraries keep open in 
the evening and one of those v^as for only 
one evening a v^eek. When you realize 
the crowded curriculum of the freshman 
and sophomore year you can not help but 
ask when do the students study. If the 
library is not available for use in the 
evening, either textbooks, so out of vogue 
at present, will be necessary or the library 
will have to provide itself with many 
duplicates for circulation and reserve. 
The .shorter the library hours the more 
books will be needed. This difficulty of 
book supply would not be so serious if all 
instructors should take the stand of Presi- 
dent Evans of Ripon College, who declares 
that "In my own classes of undergradu- 
ates, in the interest of efficiency which 
my experience has very well proven, I do 
not wish my students grazing in wide 
pastures of the vast library. I prefer to 
put on the reserve shelf ten or fifteen 
books, with duplicates, which are very 
expressly the effective library for the 
purpose of my class at that time. I can 
do little with pupils in the stupor of 
bibliographical dyspepsia. . . The pro- 
fessor must often create the thirst and 
lead the students to the book trough." 
(Assn. Amer. Colleges 13 :109. April. 
1927.) This may be true, but I believe 
in the student being subjected to a slight 
attack of bibliographical dyspepsia in the 
early college years, so that he will estab- 
lish an immunity that will prevent him 
from being drowned, as it were, when he 
is required to do a little independent 
work. Until the book stock of junior 
college libraries is enlarged this immunity 
will not be possible. 

Not any of the junior college libraries 
reported even a fair sized book stock. 
At first glance the average book budget 



of $S.9G per student and $144.72 per 
faculty appears to be liberal, but when 
you consider the size of the junior college 
libraries you realize that rapid growth 
and plenty of money for books are essen- 
tial. 

I welcomed the suggestion of Mr Sever- 
ance in his paper read at The American 
Librai-y Institute : that the junior college 
library would make a fitting library 
research problem. Junior college libraries 
are mentioned so casually in the books on 
the junior college. A typical statement 
is that of President Wilbur of Stanford 
University, who says, "The facilities 
required for the junior college are practi- 
cally those of a good high school, with 
some extension of libraries and laboratory 
equipment and with a better trained 
teaching staff." (Introduction to Proctor, 
W. M., ed. The junior college ; its organ- 
ization and administration. Stanford. 
University press, 1927, p. x). I am not 
ready to admit that the first two college 
years demand only a slight expansion of 
library equipment. In these two years 
the student learns how to stud.y and how 
to use the library ; he should have a 
generous book supply, ample reference 
books and an extensive periodical collec- 
tion to experiment with. 

Standards should be made with great 
care. They must not be so high that 
only a few can aspire to reach them, yet 
clear statements must be made to provide 
for the college that has reached the stand- 
ard of support but is still in great need 
of books. The measuring stick must not 
be an arbitrary thing but should provide 
for the "ifs" : If the library is well estab- 
lished, if the books are plentiful, up-to- 
date, well selected, if the building permits 
economical supervision, if the catalog is 
well made and not in need of revision, if 
the student enrollment and faculty mem- 
bers are fairly uniform fi-om year to year, 
if the curi'iculum is not subject to radical 
changes, if you do not have to provide 
research material in new fields, then and 
only then are standards justly applicable 
and truly measuring sticks. In practical 
library administration, as in most fields, 
standards set are guide posts, not paths 
to be literally followed. 



vol. 23, no. 1] MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



^f- "/■ >B.m« \ DEL NOBTE 



.,fAir«7o//6. 5*N FBNlClSai 




33' N. _ 
i-aT (fiarftsnn, SC. 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1927. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income, 
1926-27' 


Books, etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county^ 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sept. 26 1910 


858,034 00 

5,508 20 

17,888 79 

12,093 64 

55,210 57 

166,650 93 

16,672 07 

26,942 12 

18,631 24 

9,620 50 

83,923 01 

26,689 37 

13,591 71 

305,637 40 

25,326 27 

6,484 02 

4,254 73 

36,368 52 

3,847 04 

20,664 91 

11,417 68 

26,002 81 

10,271 24 

16,065 80 

41,287 62 

10,127 62 

41,629 51 

35,264 20 


136,506 
19,963 
67,129 
50,909 

171,713 

418,785 
53,675 

103.582 
62,533 
30,094 

267,631 

119,912 
46,872 

536,788 

89,932 

2,569 

1,512 

124,227 
15,361 
87,710 
29,104 
78,199 
42,073 

83,758 
37,382 

108,415 

101,385 


92 
40 
87 
49 

109 

257 
62 

152 
80 
42 

186 
57 
71 

318 
74 
2 
28 
84 
35 

138 
80 
60 
82 
86 

111 
78 

137 

150 


51 
29 
65 
32 
64 

161 
41 

109 
56 
31 

103 
41 
37 

157 
51 
44 
27 
71 
42 
96 
48 
56 
29 
78 
84 
37 
74 

116 


38 


Amador 

Butte 


Bertha S. Taylor 


June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
July 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 4 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 5 
May 3 
Aug. 3 
Oct. 4 
June 6 
July 8 
Aug. 6 
Feb. 9 
Dec. 9 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 8 
Oct. 1 
Feb. 4 
July 14 
April 5 


1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 


27 
57 




Mrs Ella P. Morse 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. . 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 


29 


Contra Costa. _. 


58 
155 




39 


Humboldt 


99 


Imperial 


EvalynBoman 


50 
29 




Mrs Julia G. Babcock 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Vogleson 

Blanche Galloway 


100 


Kings 


38 
35 


Los Angeles 

Madera 


115 
50 



Mariposa 

Merced 


Minette L. Stoddard 

Minette L. Stoddard 

Anna L. Williams 


23 
63 
29 




88 




Estella De Ford 


46 


Orange 


Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 


36 
29 




Chas. F. Woods 


46 


Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 
San Diego .. .. 


Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters 

Eleanor Hitt 


65 
37 
64 
101 










IdaE. Condit 


Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 2 
June 7 
April 6 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8 
Sept. 8 
June 10 
July 3 
April 9 
July 12 


1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
i9in 


31,335 00 
16,830 74 
23,202 22 
29,319 98 
27,375 66 

8,847 83 

1,110 07 
18,752 51 
25,187 08 
31,946 49 
15,746 73 
10,619 43 

5,873 48 
48,609 70 

9,716 28 
34,756 68 
28,856 13 




50,186 

192,173 



123,176 





80,556 

84,243 

96,289 

44,162 

43,466 

19,764 

138,546 

a. 27,377 

89,870 

99,297 


140 
96 
65 

105 
97 
88 
14 

153 
68 
71 
44 
99 
54 

130 
57 
95 
72 


93 
93 
41 
67 
81 
54 
12 
91 
53 
64 
36 
53 
25 
127 
28 
56 
44 


78 




Flo A. Gantz 


82 


San Mateo 


Edna Holroyd 


28 


Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary 
Minerva H. Waterman... 
Edith Gantt 


60 
75 
52 
4 


Siskiyou 


*Frances Stookebrand 

Clara B. Dills .. 


88 
47 


Stanislaus 

Sutter 


Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M. Burket 

Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher 

Elizabeth R. Topping 

Nancy C. Laugenour 


46 
35 


Tehama.. - 

Trinity 

Tulare 


50 
25 
86 


Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


25 
54 
42 








46 




1, '08-O 4 '2fi 


$1,464,191 53 


a. 3,976,824 


4,195 


2,848 


2,423 













» The income as given does not include balance in fund, July 1, 1926. 
' Includes elementary and high. 

s San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county. For statistics 
see under "Public Libraries, etc." next page. 
*Appointed Nov. 15, 1927. 



vol. 23, no. i; 



LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Established 



Income, 
1926-27 



Books, etc. 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

ElCentro 

FuUerton 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona.-- 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego - 

San Francisco.. 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara. . 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica.. 

Santa Paula 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth-. 

Marian P. Greene 

'Carleton B. Joeckel 

Agnes F. Ferris 

Gertrude De Gelder 

Mrs Alma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

JohnB. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeannette M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F. Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia D. Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. MoFadden-- 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman. -- 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Mary Bojmton 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877 

1893 
1907 
1906 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 



1896: 
1882 
1887: 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 



1874 



1868 
1886 



as F. P. 1879 

1906 
as F. P. 1895 
as F. P. 1909 
as F.- P. 1907 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1901 
as F. P. 1891 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1878 

1906 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1890 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1894 
as F. P. 1909 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
asF. P. 1880 

1891 

1882 
as F. P. 1881 
as F. P. 1890 

1907 
as F. P. 1884 
as F. P. 1895 

1880 
as F. P. 1884 

1900 



S38,883 87 
29,090 39 

161,455 78 
12,845 06 
18,522 72 
69,830 00 

132,480 00 

1,194,161 65 

18,053 96 

191,632 05 

9,179 21 

22,494 48 

159,824 35 
29,545 06 
27,881 73 
28,342 73 
45,673 86 
47,223 60 
22,000 00 

109,751 44 

287,388 13 
20,230 45 
31,178 71 
64,195 69 
17,685 54 
38,771 90 
11,762 08 
9,695 72 
16,063 00 
47,824 07 
15,540 00 
28,903 83 



80,143 
30,553 

132,191 
26,004 
21,496 
45,760 

104,698 

889,971 
29,266 

329,802 
33,835 
26,113 

124,061 
87,768 
74,134 
80,543 

126,154 

122,425 
31,994 

162,443 

385,655 
32,300 
47,271 

101,298 
69,551 
49,217 
20,335 
32,538 
28,686 

202,525 
26,248 
22,101 



25,242 
14,869 
15,771 

3,987 

6,560 

30,919 

44,725 

255,006 

8,126 
61,622 

4,276 

8,796 
57,691 
11,235 

7,758 
10,215 

9,526 
23,625 
15,059 
50,659 
107,879 
11,944 
10,513 
20,848 

5,287 



3,595 

5,644 



11,412 
6,093 
5,921 



*0n year's leave of absence; Olive Burroughs Acting Librarian. 



10 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. 

complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1927. 



For 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation $7,647,025,607. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation $469,981,274 (tax- 
able for county $408,746,588). 

Alameda Co. Free Libkaet, Oakxand. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

A meeting of the local librarians of the 
branches of the Alameda County Library 
was held in the supervisors room at the 
Hall of Records, Oakland, October 21. 
Twenty-nine attended besides the staff 
from headquarters. As the "Ask Me 
Another" seems to be so popular these 
days, a questionnaire was made out that 
would bring to the librarian of even the 
smallest branch the idea of the valuable 
reference material that can be found 
in Webster's International Dictionary, 
World Almanac, New International En- 
cyclopedia, etc. In place of the usual roll 
call. Miss Barmby, County Librarian, 
asked a question and called upon a per- 
son to answer it. Those from the larger 
branches were asked questions, the 
answers to which would be found in the 
larger collection of reference books sent 
to these branches, while those from the 
smaller branches were asked questions 
that could be answered from a smaller 
collection. 

After the meeting the opinion, very 
enthusiastically expressed, was that the 
meeting had been very profitable and not 
the ordeal that many might have expected 
had they known beforehand that they 
were to be questioned. There may be 
times when our local librarians could 
answer reference questions asked them, 
by referring to their own collections, that 
without a knowledge of their reference 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

books they think must be referred to 
headquarters. 

The Civil Service examination for as- 
sistant in the school department was held 
in October. Mrs Lota Mitcheltree quali- 
fied for the position and received the ap- 
pointment. Mrs Mitcheltree was form- 
erly in the Lassen County Free Library. 

The name of the Alameda Co. Infirmary 
Nurses Branch has been changed to 
Fairmont Branch, with postofiice and ex- 
press address in care of Fairmont Hos- 
pital, San Leandro. 

Maet Babmby, Lib'n. 

Saturday, Jan. 14, is the date set for 
the dedication of the new Niles Memorial 
Library. The new structure is of Spanish 
type of architecture, with massive red 
tiled roof and warm cream colored plas- 
tering on the interior. On the exterior 
there is an ornamental frieze at the top 
of the side walls and similar ornamenta- 
tion is being built into the archway above 
the main entrance. The stone arch piece 
over the dooi*way is inscribed with the 
name of Jane R. Clough to whose memoiy 
the building is to be dedicated. Mr and 
Mrs Ford, the donors of the building, 
have made arrangements with the 
Masonic Grand Lodge of San Francisco 
to take charge of the dedicatory exercises. 
— Niles Register, D 15 

Alameda. 

Alameda Feee Public Libeaey. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

The Children's Book Week was the 
special item of interest during the last 
three months, and the book review con- 
test the principal event of the week. 

Recapitulation of book review data sub- 
mitted by the school department included 
the period following the opening of the 
schools after the summer vacation. The 
report was from four schools, as follows : 
Number of reviews submitted, 1325 ; num- 
ber of books read, 18,596 ; average read 
per pupil, 40. Three book prizes were 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



11 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Alameda — Continued, 
awarded : eighth grade, Synge, Book of 
Discovery ; seventh grade, De La Mare, 
Come Hither; sixth grade, MacGregor, 
Story of Rome. 

The increase in circulation during the 
past three months as compared with that 
of the corresponding months of 1926 has 
been most gratifying. In 1926, the average 
number of books circulated per day was 
966. In 1927 it was 1074. 

Marcella H. Kraxjth, Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

Caxifornia School for the Deaf Li- 
brary. Geo. W. Berry, Acting Prin. Mrs 
Chas. S. Perry, Lib'n. 

Of late there have been no changes and 
few acquisitions in the way of worth 
while books. Since the private fund for 
books is limited there has been an ar- 
rangement made whereby the three older 
classes are to draw books from one of the 
branch libraries nearby. "We hope now 
that books for the younger pupils may be 
bought with the money thus saved, instead 
of having to depend on donations which 
are seldom just what are needed or de- 
sired for these children but are better 
than nothing. 

This library is conducted more along 
the lines of a reading club. 

Mrs Chas. S. Perry, Lib'n. 

Oakland. 

± Oakland Free [Public] Library. 
John B. Kaiser, Lib'n ; Chas. S. Greene, 
Lib'n Emeritus. 

Mrs Barbara Cowles, University of 
Chicago A.B. 1917, Cleveland Public Li- 
brary Training Class 1921, has been ap- 
pointed Chief of the Circulation Depart- 
ment of the Oakland Free Library 
beginning January 1, 1928. Mrs Cowles 
was first in the recent Civil Service 
examinations held for this position and 
comes to her new work after a number of 
years in the library systems of Cleveland 
and Los Angeles. 

Miss Mary E. McQuaid, University of 
Wisconsin Library School 1920, Librarian 
of the Fairbury, Nebraska, Public Li- 
brai-y for the past fourteen years, has 
been appointed Branch Librarian at the 
Allendale Branch of the Oakland Free 
Library, beginning Januai*y 5. Miss 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 
McQuaid served for a time on the staff of 
the Iowa Library Commission and the 
Public Library at Chisholm, Minnesota. 
The appointment follows a recent Civil 
Service examination held for this position. 

Miss Elsie Schaufler, for many years 
secretary to the Librarian and Order As- 
sistant in the Oakland Free Library and 
for the past year Acting Head of the Cir- 
culation Department, has been appointed 
Chief of the library's new Order Depart- 
ment, beginning January 1. 

J. B. Kaiser, Lib'n. 

The Oakland Public Library has re- 
ceived a gift of several hundred books and 
a collection of several dozen Indian bas- 
kets from Mrs P. E. Bowles. Officials 
state that the basketry will be put on 
display at the museum. — Oakland Times, 
OlO 

San Leandro. 

San Leandro Free Public Library 
AND Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

This city will soon need another library 
building if the growth made during the 
past few months is continued. There is 
hardly enough room now for new books. 
During the four months ending Nov. -30, 
some 1.3,42.3 books were circulated. The 
opening of the San Leandro Junior High 
School several blocks away has caused a 
large demand for books. 

Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $899,144 (taxable 
for county $722,508). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,971,803 (taxable 
for county $6,902,670). 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Bertha S. Taylor, Lib'n. 

A branch of the County Free Library 
has been established at Salt Springs 



12 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



AMADOR CO. — Continued. 

Camp, with Albert Lawrence as custo- 
dian. 

Jackson. 

Jackson Joint Union High School 
LiBRAEY. R. Colthart, Prin. 

The books in our library are to be 
classified according to the Dewey system. 
Our County Librarian has consented to 
help the students catalog the books now 
in the library. 

The students are allowed to check out 
books each period of the day, and they 
must be returned at the end of the period 
or a five cents fine is charged. The school 
has a very good selection of some twenty- 
four magazines which can also be used 
by the students during the day or taken 
home for overnight. 

The English teacher, Mrs Colthart, has 
full charge of the library. At the begin- 
ning of the school term, she appointed 
nine students to help her during periods 
that she was not able to be in the library. 
This plan has worked very well and has 
given many students training in library 
woi'k. 

Books may be taken out overnight, but 
must be returned before eight thirty the 
next morning. If books are needed for a 
longer period of time, the student signs 
a permanent card. A list of overdue 
books is posted every morning on the bul- 
letin boai'd. Five cents is also charged 
for late books. 

At the end of every two weeks report 
period, the magazine readings are checked. 
The following list shows the increase in 
magazine reading since the first report 
period : first two weeks period, 170 ; sec- 
ond two weeks period, 283 ; third two 
weeks period, 442. 

Cynthia Bonnefay, Asst. Lib'n. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

■( Twenty -second class. ) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,748,791 (tax- 
able for county $36,848,667). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

The county library exhibit at the 
Orange and Olive Exposition in Oroville 
in November was rewarded with a spe- 
cial gold award. The exhibit consisted of 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 

a large map of the county on which were 
placed miniature settlements representing 
the various industries in the county, the 
whole being linked with county library 
headquarters in Oroville and with a shelf 
of books of information on the industries 
represented. A poster lettered "Develop- 
ment Through Books" was conspicuously 
displayed to show how the development 
of the county could be furthered by use 
of the resources of the county library. 

The County Librarian attended a meet- 
ing of the Count.v Committee of the Home 
Demonstration Department in Oroville 
October 26. She also attended the spe- 
cial meeting of county librarians in Sac- 
ramento in December. 

Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

Chico. 

State Teachers College Library. 
C. M. Osenbaugh, Pres. Alice Anderson, 
Lib'n. 

The Main Library of Chico State 
Teachers College is temporarily housed 
in the central school building. The new 
collection begun in October numbers 
about 1200 volumes. 

A new collection of professional educa- 
tional books and teaching aids is now 
being developed within the Training 
School, thus serving the student teachers 
more conveniently than they could be 
served in the main library. There are 
about 150 volumes in the nucleus of this 
collection. 

Children's Book Week was celebrated in 
November by the addition of 600 new and 
attractive books to the Children's Library 
in the Training SchooL 

Alice Anderson, Lib'n. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Fortj'-ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8,835,647 (taxable 
for county $6,922,025). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,254,483 (tax- 
able for county $22,397,410). 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



13 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $107,212,849 (tax- 
able for county $95,299,690). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Ldb'n. 

The annual Book Week was carried 
over into December to accommodate places 
that could not arrange for dates in No- 
vember. These were Kensington Park 
Branch, Concord School P. T. A. and 
Brentwood School P. T. A. 

Mrs Whitbeck and five of her staff at- 
tended the County Library meeting in 
Sacramento Dec. 16. 

The Christmas party of the library 
staff was held Dec. 23 and took the form 
of an informal lunch with gifts from the 
well known Woolworth store. 

We were blessed with a short call from 
Mrs Linn and Miss Topping on their 
way to the Sacramento meeting. Also, 
Miss Muriel Wright and Miss Goodfellow 
spent a day with us. In the afternoon 
a trip was made to several branches. 

Mr Julius Wangenheim of San Diego, 
President of the Collegiate Alumni and 
Regent of the University of California, 
visited the County Library December 28. 
After thoroughly going into the County 
Library work, a trip was made to several 
of the larger branches. 

The branches are being urged to make 
use of the very extensive collection of 
pictures in the County Library by having 
exhibits. The history of California is 
now out and requests for histoi-y of cos- 
tumes, wild flowers and art are now in 
and will be distributed shortly. 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'n. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat. Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,391,395 (tax- 
able for county $10,317,531). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,384,098 (tax- 
able for county $10,651,060). 



FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $205,198,111 (tax- 
able for county $163,663,173). 

?Fresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

The annual meeting of the custodians 
was held on the 29th of November with 
twenty-six custodians in attendance. The 
morning session was held in the Chil- 
dren's Room at the main library and most 
of the time was taken up with a talk by 
Miss Evelyn Ross, Children's Librarian, 
on "Children's work in Fresno County'" 
and an infonnal discussion of the subject 
which followed. Luncheon was served at 
one of the churches and the afternoon 
session held in one of the rooms there. 
There were several songs and then Mrs 
T. M. Robinson told of her walking trip 
through France last summer. The last 
numbers on the program were given by 
two of the branch staff. Miss Doris Gates 
of Sanger giving "The impressions of a 
new custodian" and Mrs Armon Hodge of 
Selma those of a new assistant. 

Book Week was observed at the main 
library and at some of the branches by 
displays of interesting editions of chil- 
dren's books, with posters, lists, story 
hours, etc., all tending to interest the 
children and parents in the best books 
for children to read. Miss Ross gave a 
number of talks during the week to the 
schools and to Parent-Teacher associa- 
tions. 

More than a year ago the people of 
Sanger asked for a trained assistant and 
twelve-hour service for their branch. We 
tried all during that time to find some 
one for the position but failed. Finally 
we decided to offer the place to one of our 
own staff and Miss Doris Gates, a recent 
graduate, accepted and took charge the 
first of November. She is intensely inter- 
ested in her new work and the people and 
schools are cooperating with her nicely. 
At the main library the improvement in 
the branch is very noticeable, proving 
what we have all always felt, that trained 
assistants in the branches would make 
for more efficient sei^vice. We now have 
three branches open twelve hours a day, 
Selma, Sanger and Reedley. 

Sarah E. McCabdle, Lib'n. 



14 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,665,826 (tax- 
able for county $23,462,601). 

Glenn Co. Feee Libeary, Willows. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

During the month of November the 
Glenn County Library exhibited a col- 
lection of etchings loaned by the Cali- 
fornia Px'int Makers Association. The 
pictures were taken to the Women's Clubs 
of the county and short talks given on 
the art of etching. In Orland some of 
the high school classes were sent to the 
library to study the etchings. 

Children's Book Week was observed by 
the sending of new books for children to 
many branch libraries and schools. Mrs 
M'artha Coleman Heffner was with us and 
d( lighted the children of the county with 
s^oi'ies from the land of books. 

November 1 the Hamilton City Branch 
I^ibrary was completely destroyed by fire. 
The library is now temporarily housed in 
a tiny room opening off the lobby of the 
Moving Picture Theatre. 

Mrs Fa ye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $56,735,465 (tax- 
able for county $51,761,892). 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 
County seat. El Centre. 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 
Assessed valuation $54,776,203 (tax- 
able for county $45,070,867). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

For the observance of "Children's Book 
Week" in November, several of the 
libraries in the county put on special pro- 
grams suitable to the occasion. Two 
libraries held essay contests with a prize 
of a book for the best essay on "My 
Favorite Character," taken from a list of 
books furnished by the Librarian. One 
librai-y had some of the school children 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued, 
dress to represent diiferent book char- 
acters, and the other children guessed who 
they were. There was a prize offered by 
the Women's Club for the best characteri- 
zation, while the library offered a prize 
for the best paper giving the name of the 
characters presented. In one library 
classes were held for the upper grades, 
on the use of the library and good books. 
In still another library the Librarian 
worked with the teachex-s in getting every 
boy and girl to read and report on at least 
one book taken from a selected list, dur- 
ing the week. Special story hours were 
held in other places. 

Miss Douden held her second annual 
Doll Party at the Brawley Public Library 
Saturday, December 31. All the children 
brought their dolls and a program of doll 
stories by several different children, and 
one by Miss Douden, was given. Prizes 
were offered for the prettiest doll and the 
cutest, while one girl won the third prize 
with her twin dolls. Last year forty-five 
children came, but this year there were 
eighty. 

The Librarian gave a short talk at the 
teachers institute on "Our County Li- 
brary," calling attention to the available 
material for the teachers aside from text 
books. 

The Bard Branch was moved from Mrs 
Reynolds' home to the school house with 
Mrs Ruth Flood in charge. 

Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

Brawley. 

Brawley Public Library and 
Branch, Imperial Co. Free Library. 
Miss Fonnie V. Douden, Lib'n. 

Expenditure of $250 for new reference 
books and fiction besides $50 for needed 
equipment and catalogs was authorized 
by the Brawley Library trustees at a 
meeting Nov. 29. Additional books will 
be added as the appropriation from the 
citj' bec-omes available. According to the 
city budget, $1500 was provided for the 
Librarian's salary and $1000 for books 
and supplies. — Brawley News, D 1 

See, also, notes under Imperial Co. Free 
Library. 

El Centre. 

Central Union High School and 
Junior College Library. J. L. House, 
Prin. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIPOfiNIA LIBRARIES. 



15 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
EI Centro — Continued. 

The library of Central Union High 
School and Junior College has added 406 
new books since September and subscribes 
to thirty-eight periodicals. The Librarian 
gave a talk before the English and His- 
tory section of the Imperial County 
Teachers' Institute on the High School 
Library. All Freshman English classes 
have had a lesson on the arrangement 
and classification of books and the card 
catalog. Other lessons on reference books 
and Readers' Guide will be given. 

Maegaket I. Lee, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $19,105,244 (tax- 
able for county $11,564,316). 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, -8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $205,141,512 (tax- 
able for county $169,014,225). 

Keen Co. Free Libeaey, Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Following twelve years of local service, 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock was reappointed 
Librarian of the Kern County Free Li- 
brary for another four year term, at a 
meeting of the board of supervisors Dec. 
5.— Bakersfield Eclio, D 6 

The work of California's system of 
county libraries is well told in an article 
written by Mrs Julia G. Babcock, County 
Librarian of Kern County, for the Sep- 
tember issue of The American County, a 
periodical devoted to county government. 
There are various good illustrations of 
Kern County juibrary branches, both ex- 
terior and interior views. — Red Bluff 
News, O 6 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $30,306,310 (tax- 
able for county $25,086,635). 



LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $9,170,675 (taxable 
for county $9,093,600). 

Kelseyville. 

Kelseyville Free Library. iNIrs 
J. P. Brotherson, Lib'n. 

Our little library in Kelseyville is 
sponsored by the Kelseyville Woman's 
Club. We make our money by giving 
the suppers once a month to a social 
dance club of married folks. We have 
about a thousand books on our shelves 
and are adding new books each month. 
Last month we checked out 788 books. 
We are open Tuesdays and Saturdays 
from 2 until 4 p.m. We have no paid 
librarian. Members of the club take care 
of the library. I have been chairman the 
last two years. 

Mrs Frank J. Norton, 
Chairman of Library Board. 



LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,697,383 (tax- 
able for county $14,190,654). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
VILLE. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

During the last quarter talks were 
given by the County Librarian on Chil- 
dren's Books at the Susanville Parent 
Teacher Association and the Monticola 
Club. Talks on the work of the County 
Library were given at the following Farm 
Center meetings : Milford, Doyle, Johns- 
tonville, Janesville, Adin and Bieber. 

The following branch libraries were 
visited : Standish, Ravendale, Red Rock, 
Madeline, Providence, Pittville, Bieber, 
Tenno, Westwood, Stacy, Wendel, Mil- 
ford, Lucerne and Doyle. School branches 
visited were Honey Lake, Ravendale, 
Bieber, Soldier Bridge and Westwood. 

The County Library observed Children's 
Book Week by having an exhibit of chil- 
dren's books in the County Librai-y office. 
Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 



IG 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 4100 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,o36,940,015 (tax- 
able for county $2,954,909,955). 

Los Angeles Co. Free Libeaby, Los 
Angeles. Miss Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

Miss Olive Ryder, graduate of Pratt 
Library School, was appointed Reference 
Librarian, December 23, 1927. 

A class of thirty-eight took the exam- 
ination in September for position of page, 
and in November seventeen candidates 
took the cataloger's examination. The 
latter examination will be called again as 
not enough persons were secured to fill 
the higher positions open. 

Miss Louise Ladd of the reference divi- 
sion, photostat department of the New 
York Public Library, has recently joined 
our reference department. Miss Ladd is 
devoting her time to organization of docu- 
ments and pamphlets. 

The library enjoyed a visit fi'om Mrs 
May Dexter Henshall, County Library 
Organizer, October 14. Mrs Henshall 
gave an inspiring talk to the staff. 

In December the staff also had the 
pleasure of hearing an account of State 
Librarian Ferguson's travels in Europe 
and his attendance at the British Library 
Association meeting in Edinbiirgh in Sep- 
tember. 

Another distinguished visitor called 
upon us while attending the Teachers' 
Institute of California, Southern Coun- 
ties — Mr A. E. Winship, editor of the 
Journal of Education. Mr Winship said 
this was his sixty-third round trip to 
California. 

A staff book review meeting was inaug- 
urated in September under the guidance 
of the assistant librarian. One hour is 
given semi-monthly to the program, con- 
sisting of reviews and discussion. Some 
of the siibjects have been as follows :' 
L'nusual men ; What makes a book im- 
moral ; Child authors of today ; Modern 
trend of literary criticism ; Some well 
known Christmas stories ; "The play's 
the thing"' ; California in history and 
fiction. 

Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

Working plans and specifications are 
being prepared by Architects Marston and 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Maybury of Pasadena for a .$25,000 frame 
and stucco library building to be erected 
in Claremont. The building will have a 
tile roof, wood floors, reading room, chil- 
dren's reading room, staff" room, lavatories 
and office space for city engineer of Clare- 
mont. — Los Angeles Journal of Com- 
merce, D 15 

The October number of "Books and 
Notes of the Los Angeles County Free 
Library,"' which is being issued quarterly, 
contains the history of the librai-y from 
its beginning in 1912 to 1927. In addi- 
tion to the histoi-y of the general system, 
history notes of the branches are in- 
cluded. There are also the reports for 
1926-27 from the various departments of 
the library. 

Alhambra. 

Alhambea [Fbee] Public Libkaby. 
Miss Marian P. Greene, Lib'n. 

Immediately following Children's Book 
Week, the library had its second Christ- 
mas exhibit of books for adults. It proved 
unusually successful this year, and the 
tables were constantly surrounded by in- 
terested would-be buyers of books for 
Christmas gifts. Only new books were 
used, and. through the courtesy of A. C. 
Yroman, Inc., of Pasadena, we were able 
to have on the tables even some books 
that we knew we coidd not purchase. The 
greater part of the exhibit was non-fiction, 
but a dozen or more fiction titles were 
included, with an attempt to choose those 
that were worth buying. Reserves were 
taken, on the non-fiction, and several 
books had as many as eight or nine re- 
quests. If nothing on the tables appeai'ed 
to suit the desires of the would-be pur- 
chasers, advice and suggestions were 
gladly given to suit special needs. The 
prices of the books were listed on a card 
and similar titles, less expensive, were 
suggested if the price of the chosen book 
seemed too high. One amusing feature of 
the display was the fact that the new edi- 
tion of Clifford's Further Side of Silence 
had five resei^ves on it, while the old copy 
sat quietly on our shelves waiting in vain 
for a reader. 

^Iaeian P. Geeene, Lib'n. 



Arcadia. 

Abcadla Feee Public Libeaey. 
Jesse Treen, Lib'n. 



Mrs 



vol. 23, no. i; 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



17 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Arcadia — Continued. 

The report of the Librarian for the 
year shows books loaned 22,308, maga- 
zines 4717. 

The librarj' is housed in three small 
rooms and further growth will be limited 
imtil larger quarters are obtained. Plans 
are in the making for a new library build- 
ing. The library was organized in 1920 
and serves a population of 5000. It 
sponsored a program for the Arcadia 
Woman's Club November 2, at which Mrs 
Mary Nichol Kerr of Pomona College was 
the principal speaker. The object of the 
program was to widen the scope of the 
library in the community. 

The files of the library are kept new 
and up to date. 

Emma D. Meade, Secretary of Library 
Board. 

Long Beach. 

Long Beach [Free] Public Libeaey. 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Lib'n. 

The Long Beach Public Library ob- 
served Book Week this year by holding a 
"Book Fair." The park around the main 
library was used for this purpose. Num- 
bers of booths were erected, in some of 
which there were book exhibits and in 
others book plays acted by children in 
costume. The fair was opened with a 
parade around the park of children in 
costume representing book characters. 
Bach branch library had a booth and the 
exhibits or stunts given were first pre- 
sented before neighborhood groups at the 
branch librai*y. The finish of the after- 
noon was a story hour held in the main 
children's room where Monica Shannon 
told stories from her "California Fairy 
Tales." A large number of children par- 
ticipated and many parents attended. 
Much publicity was given to the book fair 
in the newspapers and the undertaking 
was felt to be a decided success. 

An experiment in adult education is 
being tried in the form of the organiza- 
tion of a book discussion group based on 
the Reading With a Purpose courses. The 
course selected, which was a combination 
of the English and American literature, 
was chosen on the basis of the number of 
registrations, although it was felt that 
literature would not lend itself so well to 
discussion as some of the other reading 
2 — 56955 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued, 
courses. The night school has furnished 
a leader who merely directs the discus- 
sion. The distinction between a discus- 
sion group and a class is emphasized. The 
attendance averages fifteen at each meet- 
ing and so much interest is being shown 
by those who come that it has been de- 
cided to continue the meetings for a longer 
period than was originally planned. 

The library's book review talks have 
been increased in number this year. Thir- 
teen are scheduled, most of these being 
given by Miss Helen E. Haines of Pasa- 
dena but a few local people are also in- 
cluded. The attendance varies from fifty 
to one hundred and fifty. 

A brief course of training for junior 
(clerical) assistants has been instituted 
this fall under the direction of the head 
of the circulation department. This was 
made necessai-y by the employment of a 
number of clerical workers at the same 
time. It is probable that from now on 
this training of clerical workers will be 
a necessary activity of the library. 

Mes Theodoea R. Beewitt, Lib'n. 

Los Angeles. 

xLos Angeles [Feee] Public Libeaey. 
Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

An interesting development is that of 
publicity work through special display 
cases placed in the recesses of the walls of 
the first floor lobby. These cases are each 
seven by seven feet, electric lighted ; fitted 
with glass shelves and doors, and provided 
with black velvet background. Each de- 
partment in turn prepares an exhibit that 
is both colorful and attractive, and which 
lures the observer on to the reading of 
books. The December exhibits included 
exquisite Japanese dolls, a gift of the 
Japanese school children to the school 
children of America, lent for one day 
only ; suggestions for Christmas gifts for 
children ; Spanish-Mexican handici*afts ; 
types of book gifts accepted by the Los 
Angeles Library in past years, and auto- 
graphs and photographs of famous 
authors. 

The thirty-three students of the Li- 
brai-y School have chosen their electives, 
one-third of the students choosing special 
library problems, one-third electing story 
telling, and one-third electing branch ad- 



18 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

ministration and making surveys of 
branch communities. 

For the sound-proof music room a new 
Steinway piano was purchased when the 
Birkel Music Company decided to with- 
draw all pianos heretofore lent to various 
organizations. An average of two hun- 
dred forty patrons per month sign up in 
advance for the use of the piano room. 

Series of lectures in foreign languages, 
French, German and Spanish, and a 
series on modern philosophers, both given 
by professors in local colleges and uni- 
versities under the auspices of the library, 
have been well attended. 

In accordance with the policy of the 
Board of Library Commissioners of using 
names of authors for branch libraries, 
"Boyle Heights" has now become "Ben- 
jamin Franklin" Branch. The name of 
"Mark Twain" was adopted for a new 
subbranch at liOth street, which com- 
bined service hitherto given by two sta- 
tions in that neighborhood. The Atwater 
Station developed into a subbranch No- 
vember 16, under the name of "Henry 
Adams."' The one new branch library 
building completed and occupied at the 
close of the year is that at Gardena, 
planned by Edward Cray and Ellis Wing 
Taylor. 

The delightful Christmas party which 

has grown to be a custom in this library, 

brought together some four hundred 

present and former members of the staff. 

Helen T. Kexnedy, Second Asst. Lib'n. 

Cahfoeiyia State Fisheries Labo- 
EATOKY LiBEABY. Genevieve Corwin, 
Lib'n. 

In February, 1927, Mrs Ruth Thomp- 
son resigned from the position of Libra- 
rian of the California State Fisheries 
Laboi'atory. On September 15, the posi- 
tion was filled by Miss Genevieve Corwin, 
who had been teaching in the San Ber- 
nardino High School and had just re- 
turned from a summer spent motoring 
through England. 

Gene\t:e%'e Coewin, Lib'n. 

G E N E E A L PeTEOLEUM CoEPOEATION 

Engineeeing Libeaey. Albei-t Althoff, 
Lib'n. 

Mr Albert Althoff has been made Libra- 
rian of the General Petroleum Corpora- 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

tion of California vice Nelle McKenzie, 
resigned. Mr Althoff was for a number 
of years connected with the technical de- 
partment of the United Gas Improvement 
Co. of Philadelphia. He came to Cali- 
fornia about five years ago, where he 
joined the engineering staff of the General 
Petroleum Corporation. He was made 
Librarian upon the resignation of Miss 
McKenzie as of November 1, 1927. 
G. F. Olsen, 
Manager Process Laboratories. 

liUIACULATE HEAET COIXEGE LiEEAEY. 

Mother M. Redempta, Prin. 

Sister Mary Agatha is our trained 
librarian. We have since last report 
added 250 volumes to our library. These 
volumes have been added to the depart- 
ments of philosophy (14), religion (40), 
social science (36), physical science (50), 
literature (65), biography (20), and his- 
tory (25). 

Fourteen stacks of books are resei'ved 
for students' reference. 

The circulation of books has been 420. 
Sister Maey Agatha, Lib'n. 

Secueity Tbust and Savings Bank 
Refeeence Libeaby, Debt, of Reseaech 
AND Seevice. Miss E. Ruth Jones, Lib'n. 

The Reference Library, Security Trust 
and Savings Bank, announces the appoint- 
ment of Miss Ida Olmstead to the position 
of Assistant Librarian to succeed Mrs 
Agnes T. Lokken who has resigned. Miss 
Olmstead was formerly an assistant in 
the Foreign Department of the Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

E. Ruth Jones, Lib'n. 

Univeesity of Southeen Califobnia. 
College of Music Libeaey. W. F. 
Skeele, Dean. Mrs Ruth S. Spight, Lib'n. 

Mrs Constance Bethke Rasmussen, 
former librarian, has resigned and Mrs 
Ruth S. Spight has taken her place. 

Mes Ruth S. Spight, Lib'n. 

Venice Union Polytechnic High 
School Libeaey. Edward W. Clark, 
Prin. Dorothy M. Drake, Lib'n. 

Not until now have we had any items 
of particular interest. We have been sav- 
ing our ideas and plans until we are 
moved, which we hope will be soon. We 
are still in the same room as the Study 
Hall, but by the first of the year we shall 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



19 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

have a library to ourselves, a beautiful 

reading room, furuished with exquisite 

pictures. 

One plan we have adopted this fall is 
to subscribe to a Book-of-the-Month Club 
for the teachers. This is proving very 
popular and beneficial. 

Dorothy M. Deake, Lib"n. 

Pasadena. 

Pasadena [Fkee] Public Lebraey. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

A most unusual gift of over 1600 books 
from the Susan Stickney estate has been 
rec-eived by the Pasadena Public Library. 
Most of these are beautifully bound and 
printed editions of the standard novels. 
Many will be used in the Browsing cor- 
ner of the main libraiy. Other gifts of 
popular fiction and one of Dutch books 
have been received this month. — Pasadena 
Morninfj Sun, O 19 

Miss Nellie Russ, who was head libra- 
rian of Pasadena Public Libx-ary for 
twenty-one years, died October 31 after a 
ten months illness. Miss Russ joined the 
local librai-y staff in 1898, when it con- 
sisted of but three members. When she 
resigned from ofiice in 1919, the force had 
been increased to twenty-two, with cor- 
responding development in the library 
itself and the part it played in the life of 
the city. Miss Russ started the library's 
present large collection of California 
literature and historical matter. — Los An- 
geles Times, N 2 

Mount Wilson Solar Observatory 
Library. George E. Hale, Director of 
Observatory. Elizabeth Connor, Lib'n. 

The Mount Wilson Obsei-vatory Li- 
brary is very slowly and gradually build- 
ing up a small but interesting collection 
of old editions of important early astro- 
nomical works ; no attempt is being made 
to obtain first editions or very valuable 
copies of these works, but merely to build 
up a carefully selected and representative 
collection. Within the last few months 
we have acquired what is perhaps our 
most interesting possession — a little 
volume entitled A Discourse of Local 
Motion, by A. M., which belonged origi- 
nally in the library of Sir Isaac Newton 
and has an extremely interesting history, 
involving, as it does, one of the tragedies 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued, 
of the world of old books — that within 
the last few years a part of this old 
library, so valuable for its associations 
and for the part it had in making modern 
science, was sent to the pulp mill. 

Elizabeth Connor, l^ib"n. 

Pomona. 

Pomona [Free] Putblic Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Those familiar with this library will 
remember that the building is U-shaped. 
In November we began work on a long 
projected alteration, that is, filling in the 
hollow in the U. The workroom space 
will be more than doubled. Adequate 
space to store supplies will for the first 
time be ours. Book capacity to care for 
the acquisitions of two years is also pro- 
vided. Minor alterations in the basement 
will facilitate work in the reference de- 
partment. 

In October the building was literally 
lined with foreign railway posters, the 
gift of the American agencies for the 
roads. They were much studied and ad- 
mired, and are deemed well worth the 
eifort of reinforcing and hanging. 

S. M. .Jacobus. Lib'n. 

Santa Monica. 

Santa ^Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

The remade and new library was 
formally opened November 18. Mr Her- 
man Michel, Mayor of Santa Monica and 
President of the Library Directors, opened 
the program, giving a word of praise to 
those who worked so diligently for the 
completion of the building. 

The architect, Mr Eugene Baume, Mr 
John A. Morton, Library Director, and 
Charles S. Warren, manager of our local 
paper, The Outlook, also assisted in the 
program, and Judge Arthur A. Weber 
gave the address which was able and full 
of inspiration. 

The music was given by the Realty 
Board Glee Club, which is always a treat. 
This Glee Club is voted by all to be the 
finest in Southern California. Punch was 
served, and every available space was 
filled with interested and happy people. 

The art gallery has had an art exhibit 
from the Wilshire and Standahl Galleries 
under the management of Paul Lauritz. 



20 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Santa Monica — Continued. 
One painting of Paul Lauritz was sold 
for $600. The library is to have the per 
cent of future sales and it will be reserved 
for an art fund. Merrill Gage, sculptor 
and resident of Santa Monica, will have 
the month of February with models of 
his sculpture and will give several talks 
during the month. 

As the gallery in the Public Library is 
the first for Santa Monica we are get- 
ting a lot of pleasure and interest from 
this activity. 

About four thousand five hundred pat- 
rons so far have registered under the new 
organization. Although last year was a 
record breaker we are finding that since 
the opening the circulation has steadily 
increased. Our resident university stu- 
dents are having more service and a 
greater demand is constantly coming in 
for reference work from the surrounding 
country. Many who are employed in 
Hollywood and Los Angeles and commute 
are making an interesting demand from 
the industries. 

The Librarian was given a testimonial 
at the opening and told to take a trip to 
Honolulu ; nearly $600 was gathered by 
friends and is now in the bank to her 
credit. 

Elfie a. Mosse. Lib'n. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty -seventh class.) 
County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $29,593,891 (tax- 
able for coimty $24,018,670). 

Madeea Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

Chowchilla Branch has been enlarged, 
giving space for a reading room and 
double the amount of shelving. 

Children's Book Week was observed by 
every school in the county. Talks were 
given by members of the library staff be- 
fore each Woman's Club in the county. 
Monica Shannon Wing gave some delight- 
ful interpretations of her own California 
Fairy Tales before the Madera Women's 
Improvement Club. 

A table of religious gift books was dis- 
played at one of the churches as Christ- 
mas suggestions. 



MADERA CO.— Continued. 
As a result of the interest shown in 
the story hours during Children's Book 
Week, they have become a regular institu- 
tion, being conducted each Saturday a.m. 
to an audience ranging from twenty to 
fifty in number. 

Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

Miss Blanche Galloway was reap- 
pointed County Librarian for a four-year 
term at Board of Supervisors' meeting 
Oct. 3. — Madera Tribune, O 4 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,342. 
Assessed valuation $31,603,503 (tax- 
able for county $27,635,115). 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty -third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $5,831,196 (taxable 
for county $4,718,315). 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

( Twenty -eighth class. ) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $31,066,896 (tax- 
able for county $25,814,140). 

Ukiah. 

Ukiah Free Public Library. Mrs 
Mary L. Burrey, Lib'n. 

During the quarter the Librarian has 
been seriously ill and her work has been 
undertaken by the assistant, Miss White, 
aided by a lady who has assisted at other 
times. 

Mrs Burrey has so far recovered as to 
be in the Library for a few hours each 
day and hopes soon to have entirely re- 
covered. 

A new unit for the catalog case has 
been added to the library. Last month 
our attendance amounted to 2733, show- 
ing there is no falling off owing to the 
Christmas season. The furnace has to 
be overhauled and the roof has shown 
signs of needing repairs. 

Schools are now in working order and 
both librarians are kept busy. 

Mary L. Burrey, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CxVLIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



21 



MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $41,449,581 (tax- 
able for county $33,770,930). 

Merced Co. Free Library, Merceh). 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

The gathering of librarians from Mer- 
ced, Madera and Mariposa counties at 
the county library building in Merced Oct. 
6, marked the fifth annual meeting of the 
custodians of Merced county and the first 
meeting in which Mariposa and Madera 
have participated. The meeting convened 
at 10.30 a.m. Lunch was served at the 
Women's Clubhouse under the direction 
of the Merced Women's Club. The speak- 
ers of the day were Samuel Levinson of 
The Book Store, Sacramento, Miss Gallo- 
way of Madera County Free Library and 
Dr J. S. Stubblefield of Merced. — Merced 
Sun-Star, O 6 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,507,533 (tax- 
able for county $7,954,330). 

MONO COUNTY. 

( Fifty -seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 279G sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $6,524,017 (taxable 
for county $3,508,925). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

( Twenty -fourth class. ) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $54,101,624 (taxable 
for county $44,941,580). 

MOKTEREY Co. FREE LIBRARY, SALINAS. 

Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

The Gonzales Branch was reopened 
with a reception and program on the 
evening of October 5th. Under the pat- 
ronage of the P. T. A. the Odd Fellows 
have provided a room free of charge. Mrs 
B. H. Bianchi is custodian assisted by 
Mrs M'. De T. Voss. Three members of 
the County Library staff took part in the 
program. Helen Thurlby sang a group 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued, 
of songs, Dorothy Thurlby gave a reading 
and the Librarian spoke on the history 
and use of the County Librai-y in general 
and the Monterey County Free Library in 
particular. Music was furnished also by 
Gonzales residents. Candy was passed 
and the evening ended with registration 
of borrowers and the issuing of books. 

The County Librarian spoke at the 
Monterey County section of the Central 
Coast Counties Teachers' Institute at 
Santa Cruz, December 12, and went from 
there to Sacramento to the County Li- 
brary Conference on December 15. 

The Carmel Branch was temporarily 
closed on December first, awaiting com- 
pletion of the Harrison Memorial build- 
ing. Urgent special requests are still 
supplied. 

Constance Vasquez of the headquarters 
staff was married December 31 to J. 
Ward McClellan of Salinas. She will 
continue in the library. Miss Marjorie 
Frink left December 24 to enter the Cali- 
fornia School of Arts and Crafts in Oak- 
land. 

Miss Ellen B. Frink. formerly first 
assistant in Monterey County Free Li- 
brary and for almost the last three years 
librarian of Siskiyou County Free Li- 
brary, is to return to Monterey County as 
first assistant Jan. 1. 

Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

Carmel. 
Carmel Free Lirbaey and Branch, 
Monterey Co. Free Library. Miss 
Roberta Wasson, Lib'n. 

The Carmel Library has given to the 
Ralph Chandler Hari-ison Memorial Li- 
brary, of Carmel, all of its books, con- 
siderable of its equipment, and given its 
building and remaining equipment to the 
Girl Scouts organization of this city. 
WiNSOR Josselyn, 
Sec. of Library Board. 

Pacific Grove. 

Pacific Grove [Free! Public Li- 
brary. Miss Jessie W. Nichols, Lib'n. 

Mr George M. Kohler has just added 
thirty-nine new books to his memorial 
collection in the Children's Room of the 
Pacific Grove Public Library. Some es- 
pecially beautiful editions of old favorites 
are included. — Pacific Grove Review, N 23 



22 



NEWS NOTES Oi^ CALlFOftNlA LIBKARiBg. 



[Jan., 1928 



NAPA CbUNTYi 

(Thirty-first class.) 
Couiity sedt, NdpR; 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed vduatioh .$26,629,480 (tax- 
able for eounty $22,S87,31i)> 

Napa Co. Free Library. Napa. INIiss 
Estelhi De Ford. Lib'il. 

The pa.st qiiarter has beeu devoted to 
two things : changing from invoices, wliich 
Were given with branch and school sliip- 
meiits, to a card system whereby a card 
is now given with each book ; and to the 
installing of these card files in branches 
and schools. We estimate that over 
twenty thousand cards were typed and 
to date inventory has been taken in four- 
teen schools and thirteen branches and 
the card file started. It will be probably 
the end of the fiscal year before every 
branch and school is completely checked. 
This has been a large piece of work but 
we feel that it has been worth the effort. 
It meant that we had to omit all effort 
for Children's Book Week this year, as' 
the first assistant was ill at this time and 
the school and branch work has been 
unusually heavy. 

Last year we made a resolution that 
each week would see something in the 
four county newspapers from the County 
Library and that if Ave had no news item 
to offer we would run a review of a book 
of non-fiction. We feel that this has 
netted results and find that a review of 
one book is better than a list. Often 
patrons appear with the clipping in hand. 

The doll collection which has grown to 
over 35 specimens was loaned to the Ful- 
lerton Public Library and from there 
went to the Riverside Public Library and 
on its return was exhibited by Miss Dills 
at Rio Vista. 

The County Librarian attended the 
meeting of county librarians in Sacra- 
mento in December. 

EsTELLA De Ford, Lib'n. 



NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty -ninth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,632,988 (tax- 
able for county $6,858,690). 



©ranqe eeuNTV. 

(Teiith class ;) 
County seat, gantd Aiia. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $190,247,000 (tax- 
able for county $168,298,000). 

Orange Co, Free Library, SanTa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'il, 

Plans for the new Laguna Beach library 
building to be located on the lot of the 
Library Association on First Street, ap- 
proved by the board at its meeting of 
Dec. 5. call for two rooms in a building 
14 by 22 feet with stucco finish, divided 
into a reading room and a stack room, 
and with space to house books for at 
least five years at the present rate of 
growth. The building, donated by N. E. 
West of the Yoch Estate, and which has 
been moved to the lot is to be incorporated 
in the new building. Mr West's estimate 
of the complete cost of the new building 
is $700. The lot owned by the associa- 
tion has a 65-foot front and runs back 
to a point. 

The necessity of having more money 
with which to meet building and operat- 
ing costs was stressed. The Hundred 
Club Library Fund, which is being raised 
by subscriptions of $5 each with the goal 
set at 100, is increasing steadily. — Santa 
Ana Soiifh Coast Xews, D 9 

Anaheim. 

AxAHEiM [Free] Public Library. J. 
Elizabeth Calnon, Lib'n. 

Repair work at the Anaheim Public 
Library during the past seven weeks has 
included the water proofing and reinforc- 
ing of the building's walls, the renovation 
of the children's "story hour room" and 
providing an outside entrance from this 
room to the main walk in front of the 
building. After the walls were reinforced 
they were retinted on the inside. 

The story hours which have been dis- 
continued since the opening of the fall 
term of school are to be resumed Dec. 24. 
— Anaheim Bulletin, D 14 

Fullerton. 

Fullerton [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Gertrude De Gelder, Lib'n. 

Fifty dolls are on display at the Fuller- 
ton Public Library this week. They are 
included in the Sydney Walthall collec- 
tion frona Modesto and the Napa County 



vol. 23, no. 1" 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



23 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Fullerton — Continued, 
collection of dolls from many lands, 
loaned to Miss Mary Campbell, Child- 
ren's Librarian. All are plainly marked 
with a brief comment concerning each. 
The costumes are authentic in all details, 
the collectors having devoted much time 
and study to their choice. — Fullerton 
News-Tribune, N 16 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $27,988,880 (tax- 
able for county $20,119,525). 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,945,820 (tax- 
able for county $12,721,055). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

The La Porte Mines, Inc., Branch of 
the county free library was established 
October 17, 1927, with John N. Sobrero 
as custodian. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $68,653,643 (tax- 
able for county $51,052,030). 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $171,546,769 (tax- 
able for county $138,287,205). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

On the first of October, an important 
change took place in our staff, as Miss 
Mary Virginia Provines, our cataloger, 
left us to become the head of the Catalog 
Department of Fresno County Free Li- 
brary. Her successor is Miss Mary 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

Esther Bentz, a graduate of the Li- 
brary School of the University of Cali- 
fornia, class of 1924. Miss Bentz had 
recently served in the Branch Depart- 
ment of the Berkeley Public Library, and 
before that, as cataloger in the Butte 
County Free Library. So she is well 
acquainted with county work. 

Beginning November 14, a staff meet- 
ing for the discussion of books was estab- 
lished, to be held on the morning of the 
second Monday of the month, at 8.30 
o'clock. Two meetings have been held 
during the quarter, in which each member 
of the staff has participated, and they 
have proved to be of much interest, as 
well as of value to us aU. 

A branch was established November 3, 
at the County Detention Home for the 
use of the children detained there. The 
branch was requested by the Assistant 
Probation Officer, who stated that some 
of the old discarded books which we had 
been sending to the County Hospital had 
found their way to the Home, and had 
proven of such value in affording both 
interest and occupation to the children, 
that the authorities were petitioning for 
a separate and established branch of their 
own, for the special use of the children 
in the Home. The branch was very 
gladly established, with a hundred books 
ranging in age interest from six to six- 
teen. It will be cared for and added to, 
as conditions and necessities suggest. 

The County Horticultural Commis- 
sioner at the same time, asked that he 
might have a branch for his department, 
separate from that of the Farm Adviser, 
with which it had been combined. Not 
only had the ofiices of the two been sepa- 
rated, but his own work had so increased 
in scope and volume that he required the 
branch for his personal use and refer- 
ence. His request was acceded to, and 
the branch was established in his oflBce 
upon the same day. 

The County Librarian was asked to 
address the members of the Executive 
Council of the Northern Section of the 
State P. T. A. at Williams, October 4, 
upon the subject of Children's Reading. 
Although the trip occupied the whole 
of the day, the librarian felt that it had 
been well worth while, aside from her 



24 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued, 
personal pleasure in meeting the mem- 
bers of the council and in becoming more 
informed concerning their plans and 
ambitions for the schools and the children 
of the state. 

During Book Week, the County Libra- 
rian was invited by various organizations 
to speak before them upon the subject of 
Children's Reading, but in the case of 
the Woman's Club of North Sacramento, 
she pleaded to be allowed instead to speak 
upon some of the recent books for adults, 
and spent an hour in presenting and 
discussing some of the recent books, both 
tiction and non-fiction. Later she was 
asked by the Rio Linda P. T. A. to 
present the same subject before their 
evening session of both men and women, 
which she did, varying somewhat the 
books presented. 

Through the winter months, the County 
Librarian has consented to give a Book 
Talk on the first Wednesday evening of 
each month, in the rooms of the Philo- 
sophical Library. The first talk was 
given December 7 and covered four books 
— Hart's Inside Experience, Overstreet's 
Influencing Human Behavior*, Pupin's 
New Reformation and Busson's story of 
The man who was born again. The 
talks are entirely informal and are open 
to any who may care to attend. The 
talk for the evening of Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 4, will be a reading of Edna St. Vin- 
cent Millay's poetic drama, The King's 
Henchman. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

Represa. 

*FoLSOM State Prison Library and 
Branch, Sacrajiento Co. Free Li- 
brary. Court Smith, Warden. A. 
Masich, Educational Director. 

Our libr-ary is progressing nicely at 
the present time, although we are very 
much in need of new books and reading 
matter. We would be more than glad to 
receive any discarded books of any kind 
from the different libraries, as we find it 
quite a task to keep reading matter for 
the men here. 

A. Masich, Educational Director. 

Sacramento. 

$ Sacramento Free Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

In compiling the circulation statistics 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento — Continued, 
for 1927, the success of a rental collec- 
tion of fiction has been demonstrated. 
In less than a year, with a nucleus of 
.$300, we have purchased about 670 books 
and circulated nearly 17,000. The books 
in the collection may be reserved, a privi- 
lege that is greatly appreciated. One 
non-reserve copy of each best seller 
pleases the browsers who do not wish 
to wait for the reserve copies. It has 
proved a happy solution of the fiction 
problem in our library. 

Three attractive exhibits have occupied 
the wall space during the fall. The Bret 
Harte series, in a striking collection sent 
by Mr Franz Gerits of Los Angeles, 
attracted marked attention. The exhibit 
of the Print Makers' Society of California 
was the most satisfactory we have had, 
both as to variety of work and the 
progress shown by the makers. This was 
supplemented by an interesting display 
from the Graphic Arts Department of 
the Smithsonian Institution which is 
being sponsored by the California State 
Library. It shows how prints are made. 

Charlotte Stewart has been added to 
the Circulation Department of the li- 
brary. Vacancies have been filled by 
promotions from the staff. Grace Taylor 
is now Reference Librarian and Lilian 
Sargent, Head of the Circulation Depart- 
ment. 

Just before the holidays, a very suc- 
cessful Christmas party Avas given by the 
entire staff, the Librarian being dis- 
guised as Santa Clans. The joke presents 
brought forth shouts of appreciative joy 
and furnished the head of the institution 
with some intimate inside history. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $15,739,267 (tax- 
able for county $13,955,175). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
lister. Miss Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was the occasion 
for an exhibit of children's books and 
pictures. This display was kept up all 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES. 



25 



SAN BENITO CO.— Continued, 
during December as a help to those who 
wished suggestions for Christmas books. 

The Librarian spoke before the San 
Benito County section of the Teachers' 
Institute held in Santa Cruz in December. 

Miss Flo Gantz, Librarian of San Luis 
Obispo County Free Library, accom- 
panied the Librarian to Sacramento to 
attend the meeting of the County Libra- 
rians held there December 15. 

Floeence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $119,886,794 (tax- 
able for county $75,902,180). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Libeaby, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
"Waters, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian attended the 
institute held for desert teachers at Bar- 
stow November 21 to 23, and that held 
for the valley teachers in San Bernar- 
dino December 19. 

Miss Lura B. Wallace, school assistant, 
attended the institute for the valley 
teachers held at Ontario December 19 and 
in San Bernardino December 20. Dur- 
ing the institute the library had three 
exhibits in the library : of books and other 
material on nature study ; Remedial read- 
ing ; and attractive editions of the 
classics. A mimeographed list of recent 
additions to the teachers' professional li- 
brary was also made and distributed at 
the institute and also at the library. 

The Cucamonga Branch was moved 
October 8 from the Cucamonga Drug 
Store to larger quarters in the Cuca- 
monga Building & Loan Association 
building with Miss Alice Hawker in 
charge. The move resulted in the 
doubling of the b*ok capacity and much 
better service facilities. The hours are 
2 t» 5 p.m., Monday to Friday inclusive. 

The Victorville Branch was moved 
from the telephone exchange December 
28 to a three room house that had been 
fitted up especially for the County Free 
Library. A partition was taken out of 
the front of the house making a room 12 
by 24 feet. One-half of this room is used 
for the charging desk, the adult fiction, 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

and the other for the children's depart- 
ment and periodicals. The middle room 
back of this room is used for class books 
and for reference. Back of this is the 
third room which is used for storage of 
supplies, shipping material, etc. A large 
closet which can be used for files of 
back magazine numbers is in each room. 
New shelving and equipment were added 
and the book capacity greatly increased. 
Mrs Delia Spinner was appointed custo- 
dian to take the place of Mrs Cora Riche 
who resigned. The hours, beginning 
January 1, are 2 to 5.30 and 7 to 9 p.m. 
daily except Sunday. 

There was a change in the custodian- 
ship at the County Hospital Branch, Mrs 
Margaret Barney taking charge on Octo- 
ber 20, in the place of Mrs D. B. Davis, 
who resigned. 

Mrs Lloyd Cook resigned as custodian 
of the Oro Grande Branch October 1 and 
Mrs Paul Peters who had been for sev- 
eral years in the Pomona Public Library 
was appointed to take her place. 

Running Springs Park Emergency 
School, Running Springs Park, Mrs 
Mina Burks, teacher, started service 
October 3. This school is located in the 
San Bernardino Mountains. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Library. 
INIiss Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

According to the wiU of Miss Olivia 
Eggleston Phelps Stokes who died Decem- 
ber 14, 1927, in Washington D. C, the 
Smiley Library will receive $5000 for its 
Endowment Fund. Miss Stokes, a winter 
resident of Redlands, had made a number 
of gifts to the library, as well as many 
other institutions of the city during her 
residence in Redlands. 

One hundred and fifty children dressed 
in costume to represent their favorite 
book character attended the party given 
the last Saturday of Book Week, at the 
Municipal Bowl. Between 400 and 500 
children were present and had a happy 
time guessing the many book characters 
represented and listening to the program 
of music and recitations and seeing the 
children's dances. 

Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 



26 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIEORNL^ LIBKARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $132,684,307 (tax- 
able for county $118,458,831). 

National City. 

National City Free Public Library. 
Miss Susie Moore, Lib'n. 

The basement of the library building is 
being remodeled for a children's room. 
This will relieve the noise and confusion 
upstairs and will give much needed room. 
— National City News, D 2 

Oceanside. 

OcEANSiDE [Free] Public Library. 
Edith A. Whiting, Lib'n. 

As soon as arrangements can be com- 
pleted, the Oceanside Public Library is 
to be open two evenings a week. At a 
meeting of the library board a few days 
ago it was voted to adopt this addition to 
the library hours, which are now 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. — Oceanside Blade, N 8 

San Diego. 

tSan Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

The budget for the San Diego Public 
Library was increased $9500 for the year 
1928. This increase represents primarily 
increased salaries for all assistants re- 
ceiving less than $120 per month. $15,000 
was granted for a new building for the 
Ocean Beach Branch at the same time. 

All employees of the San Diego Public 
Library appointed after January 1, 1928, 
must become members of the city pension 
system. To those appointed before that 
date the matter is optional, but a goodly 
number have joined the system, especially 
those with many years of prior service. A 
portion of the salary, detennined by age, 
is withheld each month for those joining 
the system. Should an assistant sever 
her connection with the library before the 
age of 62 this money is refunded with 
4 per cent interest. She may retire with 
a pension proportionate to her years of 
sei^vice, and sht must retire at 72 years. 
Should she die before the total amount 
is returned to her it becomes a part of her 
estate. 

Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation $1,025,317,945 (tax- 
able for county $783,620,603). 

Bank of Italy Library. Miss K. 
Dorothy Ferguson, Lib'n. 

A branch library was organized for the 
Los Angeles division of the Bank of Italy 
in November and given in charge of Miss 
Marjdrie Robertson, who had been for 
two years assistant librarian at the Head 
OflSce Library. 

The Head OflBce Library has been asked 
to take over the law library and conse- 
quently will move in about ten days to 
the third floor of the present building 
and to more spacious quarters. 

K. Dorothy Ferguson, Lib'n. 

* Bohemian Club Library. Thomas 
S. Dabagh, Organizing Lib'n. 

The Library Committee, Mr Fred L. 
Berry, Chairman, has engaged the present 
Librarian to reorganize the collection, 
which now consists of about 7000 volumes 
of cultural interest. The dictionary cata- 
log and the shelf list will be completely 
overhauled and brought up to date, and 
the D. C. will be restored as the classi- 
fication. 

Thos. S. Dabagh, Lib'n. 

High School of Commerce Library-. 
C. W. White, Prin. Miss Grace Dixon, 
Lib'n. 

The High School of Commerce Library, 
the first school library in San Francisco, 
opened in January, 1927. The library 
now has 2750 volumes and receives 36 
magazines and 3 newspapers regularly. 

The school with a faculty of 87 teachers 
and a student body of 2800 pupUs, offers 
excellent opportunities for the develop- 
ment of a really interesting school library. 
Grace Dixon, Lib'n. 

Letterman General Hospital Li- 
brary. Mrs Jeannette C. Stern, Lib'n. 

Mrs Jeannette Cyr Stem has taken the 
place of Mrs Inez G. McConnell as 
Librarian of Letterman General Hospital 
Librai-y- 

State Teachers College Library. 
Alexander C. Roberts, Pres. Miss Ruth 
Fleming, Lib'n. 

The college has taken on new ambitions 
and new life since the coming, on Sep- 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



27 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued, 
tember 1, of Dr Alexander Ci'ippen 
Roberts as president. Dr Roberts came 
to us from the University of Washington, 
where he was professor of education, di- 
rector of extension, and dean of the sum- 
mer school. Previous to his experience 
there he had filled the positions of prin- 
cipal, superintendent of schools, and vari- 
ous other administrative positions, and 
helped to establish the Normal School at 
Cheney, Washington, after a long and 
extensive survey of teachers' colleges, and 
normal schools. 

The library has keenly felt the coming 
of Dr Roberts through the activities of 
the faculty library committee, which was 
one of his first appointments. Many meet- 
ings have been held, and many problems 
discussed, if not threshed out. The 
questionnaire received by other teachers 
college libraries in this state was the 
work of one of the subcommittees of the 
library committee. (Don't blame the 
Libi'arian entirely for that. You see she's 
"passing the buck." But she shouldn't, 
as she is one of the members of the sub- 
committee in question. If we get good 
results, we promise to pass them along, 
as requested by one or two librarians.) 

Cupid has been busy in the Children's 
Library again. At the holiday season we 
lose Miss Dorothy Ellis, who has given 
such efficient service. Miss Elizabeth 
Wauzer comes in January to take her 
place. Miss Wanzer is from Smith Col- 
lege and Carnegie Library School. 

Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

United States Dept. of Agricultitre, 
Forest Service, Library. S. B. Show, 
District Forester, in charge. Miss Alma 
I. Oviatt, Lib'n. 

Miss Alma I. Oviatt, District Librarian 
since 1924, has been on leave since Octo- 
ber on account of ill health. Mrs Amy 
M. Caya is taking her place until she is 
able to return. 

S. B. Show, District Forester. 

University of California. Medicai, 
School and Hospitals Library. Dr 
Langley Porter, Dean. Miss Eva West, 
Lib'n. 

Langley Porter, M.D., has been ap- 
pointed Dean of the Medical School of 
the University of California. 

Eva West, Lib'n! 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $122,919,943 (tax- 
able for county $105,660,845). 

San Joaqltin Co. Free Libraky„ 
Stockton. Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

The library prepared a very compre- 
hensive list of books and magazine articles', 
on gardening in California for the use of 
the State Chairman of Gardens of the 
Federation of Women's Clubs. These 
lists she has used extensively in her talks 
before the various garden clubs of the 
state, and has distributed them through- 
out the state. 

The eighth annual observance of Good 
Book Week was ushered in with many 
novel activities throughout the citj^" and 
county. Many enjoyable story hours were 
given in which the interest of the com- 
munity was shown by the cooperation of 
the Parent-Teacher Association and the 
County and City Librarians. Motion 
picture slides were shown at the different 
theaters during the week and many at- 
tractive posters were made by members of 
the staff and widely distributed to the 
thirty-six branches of the county. A 
selection of new books together with 
mimeograph copies of the A.L.A. Recent 
Books for Children were also distributed 
to the county branches. 

The Escalon Grammar School gave an 
entertainment in which the pupils depicted 
some of the characters from favorite 
children's stories selected from books sent 
from the school department of the library. 
Miss Colahan, the story teller from the 
Stockton Public Library, entertained 
with a well selected program. 

The Parent-Teacher Association of the 
Calaveras, Madison, Tokay and Moore 
School Districts aided the Librarians in 
presenting a story hour at the Waterloo 
Community Hall. Thanksgiving stories 
were told by Miss Colahan, and Miss 
Emily Dodge led the community singing. 
Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Stockton. 

I Stockton Free Public Library. Miss 
Ida B. Condit, Lib'n. 

The Children's Room of the Stockton 
Free Public Librai*y held a book exhibit 



28 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockto n — Continued, 
in which sixty new books were shown. 
The display tables were attractively 
covered with orange paper, and orange 
formed the theme color for the decora- 
tion of the entire room. Book lists were 
prepared for the visitors, and members of 
the Children's Reading Club aided the 
Librarian in distributing these. Six hun- 
dred and fifty lists were given out during 
the week. 

For the purpose of arousing the interest 
of the city in Good Book Week, the 
Children's Librarian visited the gram- 
mar schools announcing a "Book Mark" 
contest for the fourth grades and an essay 
contest for the fifth and sixth. To the 
children having the best essays and for 
those making the most original book mark 
on the care of books, miniature pictures 
of famous paintings were presented. 

The featured story hour of the week 
consisted of a program of American 
stories, and the motion picture "Paul Re- 
vere" was presented. "The Great Stone 
Face" and "Hiawatha" were told the 
children by a member of the story telling 
class of the College of Pacific. On the 
following Saturday the exhibited books 
were allowed to be loaned and a circula- 
tion of 531 books for the day resulted. 

A puppet show entitled "The Dream 
Fairy and the Spider" and the presenta- 
tion of the moving picture "Paul Re- 
vere," were the features of Good Book 
Week at the Municipal Baths Branch 
Library. During the week work was 
commenced by the Reading Club on the 
play "Snow White and Rose Red" which 
was presented at a later date. 

Members of the library staff held their 
second annual Christmas jinx at the 
library on the morning of December 23. 
Joke gifts created much merriment and 
many remembrances were received. Miss 
Ida E. Condit, Librarian, was presented 
with a desk clock by the staff members. 
Christmas carols were played on a Vic- 
trola donated for the occasion. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 

Assessed valuation $37,236,293 (tax- 
able for county $31,722,501). 

San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

A branch of the San Luis Obispo 
County Free Library was established at 
the Oak Park School in October. This 
was the last rural school not sensed. 

Flo a. Gantz, Lib'n. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

Book Week was celebrated with much 
success, and it is felt that each year better 
results are obtained, especially in the 
number of requests fx'om parents for 
advice concerning suitable books for 
Christmas gifts. The local book stores 
cooperated by having excellent exhibits of 
good books for boys and girls. Talks by 
the Librarian to clubs and Parent-Teacher 
Associations, notices in the newspapers, 
an exhibit in the library of the best new 
books, as well as of the always desirable 
older ones, all contributed to a successful 
Book Week. 

In addition to Book Week talks, the 
Librarian gave a talk on new books to the 
Parent-Teacher Association of the Emer- 
son School ; during Education Week ad- 
dressed the seventh and eighth grades and 
the Parent-Teacher Association of the 
Court School on The Home and the 
School, and told Christmas stories at the 
assembly of the Fremont School. 

A visit from Mrs Frances Linn of 
Santa Barbara and Miss Elizabeth Top- 
ping of Ventura was much enjoyed. 

Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat. Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $50,201,488 (tax- 
able for county $45,625,565). 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Inez M. Crawford, Lib'n. 

Bids for construction of extensive ad- 
ditions to San Mateo's Public Library are 
to be opened December 5, under action 
taken by the city council November 7 



vol. 2S, no. 1] 



6ALiF0RNtA LiBRARIES. 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued. 
San Mateo — Continued, 
following a conference with Architect 
Thomas W. Edwards. Five and perhaps 
a greater number of alternate specifica- 
tions for various construction items will 
be submitted to bidders on the $50,000 
addition to the present building. 

Furnishings are to be decided upon by 
library trustees and bids will also be 
asked on these items. — San Mateo Times, 
N 8 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $79,007,741 (tax- 
able for county $68,555,360). 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $129,813,207 (tax- 
able for county $115,532,020). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Libbaky, San 
Jose. Mrs Elizabeth Singletary, Lib'n. 

The new heating system at the County 
Library has been installed and the read- 
ing room is again open after having been 
forced to close down for three weeks for 
the necessarj' work in installing the 
system. — San .Jose Mercury Herald, D 28 

Stanford University. 

JLeland Stanford Junior Univer- 
sity Library. Dr Ray Lyman Wilbur, 
Pres. Nathan Van Patten, Director of 
the University Libraries. 

Nathan Van Patten succeeds George T. 
Clark as Director of Stanford University 
Libraries, January 1. James E. Brenner 
succeeded Frances Sheldon as Law Li- 
brarian, September 1. Charles V. Park, 
Assistant Librarian, was elected to the 
Council of the American Library Asso- 
ciation at the Toronto Conference. Ruth 
I. Spaulding is now head of the Serial 
Department of the Reference Division, 
succeeding Helen Gale (Mrs C. R. Betts), 
resigned. 

The Stanford Library Club tendered a 
dinner to the retiring director, Mr George 
T. Clark, at Stanford Union, December 
20. Sixty guests were present including 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

Stanford University — Continued, 
several former members of the staff. Mr 
Clark was presented with a reading lamp 
as a mark of esteem. Miss Sutliff, Chief 
Cataloger, presided. 

Nathan Van Patten, Director. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

( Twenty-sixth class. ) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $27,848,035 (taxable 
for county $23,942,650). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $25,325,-370 (tax- 
able for county $15,188,140). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 1783. 
Assessed valuation $3,339,760 (taxable 
for county $2,939,395). 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County seat, Treka. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $31,4.54,257 (tax- 
able for county $21,821,885). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Tre:ka. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Lib'n. 

Miss Frances Stockebrand of the staff 
of the Merced County Free Library was 
appointed by the supervisors at a special 
meeting November 1.5 as Siskiyou County 
Librarian to fill the vacancy made by the 
resignation of Miss Ellen Frink. Miss 
Frink is to go to Monterey County Free 
Library to be first assistant there. — Yreka 
Journal, N 16 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $39,720,415 (tax- 
able for county $32,396,184) . 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 



30 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 

During the quarter the library held a 
meeting of Solano County Library work- 
ers at Fairfield November 8. This gath- 
ering included people from the public 
libraries of Dixon and Vallejo, a trustee 
from the Vallejo Public, a number of the 
custodians from the branch libraries and 
the Solano County Library staff. In all 
fourteen people were present. The day 
was given over to examining the records 
in the County Library office, planning for 
Book Week, and exchanging ideas about 
local problems. The visitors first were 
escorted through the Court House, visit- 
ing the County Clerk's office, the Law 
Library, the Farm Adviser and the 
County Superintendent's rooms in order 
to see how the various business and edu- 
cational offices cooperate with the County 
Library for increasing the service. 

The Lions Club of Suisun invited the 
visitors to have luncheon with them, the 
gaiety and the speaker adding much to 
the day. Mr Harry Peterson, the 
luncheon guest, made a very fine talk on 
Sutter's Fort of the early days, describ- 
ing the building and the life in and around 
it in those hectic adventurous times. 

The afternoon was given over to the 
discussion of better service and the ways 
of getting the public to read. The map 
used by the Solano County Library at the 
state fair this year was studied to see the 
places where service was being given and 
the places still needing it. Miss Anna 
Kyle, Music Supervisor of this county, 
also came in to tell of the cooperation 
between the County Library and her de- 
partment. Miss Katherine Bennitt also 
dropped in to the meeting to mention the 
ways libraries might aid the Farm Home 
Departments, also saying that she and 
Miss Kyle carried the message of good 
books and the places they were available 
to all of the meetings they attended. A 
heavy storm kept many away, but those 
present hoped this would be the begin- 
ning of having such groups meet often in 
the fiiture. 

During the month of December the 
library took a Christmas program to the 
Rio Vista Woman's Improvement Club, 
using nativity scenes and Madonna pic- 
tures while carols were sung. 

A very interesting book play written 
by Miss May Jean Davis, the music by 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 
Miss Lois Woods of the County Library 
staff, was being rehearsed for Book Week, 
but just as it was ready for producing 
scarlet fever broke out among a cast of 52 
little actors so it was of necessity post- 
poned indefinitely. 

Mr and Mrs Charles S. Gi-eene called 
at the library during the holidays. Mr 
Greene was formerly Librarian of the 
Oakland Public Library. 

Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $54,248,243 (tax- 
able for county $46,000,490). 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $64,976,157, tax- 
able for county $56,096,955). 

Stanislaus Co. Feee Libkaby, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthom, Lib'n. 

Book week was observed by the usual 
exhibits at main library and branches. 
At Patterson Branch a story hour was 
held two afternoons during the week, 
when the young folks heard stories told 
by Miss Cecil Knox, a skilled story-teller 
and child impersonator. Talks were given 
by the county librarian or an assistant at 
various clubs in the county. 

The county and city library distributed 
the Girls and Boys Book Shelf as usual, 
and more inquiries from interested par- 
ents were received than in previous years. 

The library sent out suggestions for 
school "projects" for Book Week to all 
schools as an issue of its new "Library 
Log" publication. 

Bessie B. Silveethorn, Lib'n. 

Denair. 

Denair High School Library. C. S. 
Fry, Prin. 

During the fall semester of 1927 the 
Denair Union High School Library has 
been entirely reorganized and reclassified 
according to the Dewey Decimal Classifi- 
cation System. This work was done 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



31 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 
Denair — Continued, 
under the supervision of the school libra- 
rian, Miss Beauel M. Gibbins, by students 
interested in library practice. Having 
learned the system to be instituted, these 
students did most of the classifying, cata- 
loging, and placing the books on the 
shelves. 

The classification completed, a system 
of student librarianship was inaugurated, 
one student having charge, and one stu- 
dent assisting each period of the day. 
Students entering into the work will re- 
ceive some scholastic credit at the end 
of the school year. 

At first -the system appeared awkward 
and useless to the majority of the student 
body, since the library and school are 
small, but after a short period of use, its 
efficiency and service have been proved. 
The library is being enjoyed by pupils, as 
well as by teachers. 

During the semester, several donations 
of worthwhile volumes have been received, 
and every opportunity is taken to enlarge 
our material. 

Beauel M. Gibbins, Lib'n. 

Modesto. 

McHenry [Fkeie] Public Libraby 
AND Branch, Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

In Modesto a Book "Week Committee 
composed of leadei's in different clubs and 
activities arranged a series of book talks 
for the public at the Elks Club assembly 
room, which were attended by rather 
small but appreciative audiences. Another 
year it is hoped that these meetings may 
be held in the library assembly room soon 
to be available for such meetings. A fine 
nucleus of booklovers was formed at these 
talks, and greater interest is anticipated 
another year. 

The addition to the McHenry Library 
is nearly completed and it is hoped will 
be open to the public by Feb. 1. 

Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell, who has 
been acting as part time cataloger, Avill 
begin full time Jan. 1. Mrs Lenna John- 
son, for many years a member of the 
Merced County Free Library staff, joined 
the main library staff as general assistant 
at the loan desk in December, and will 
be put on full time Jan. 1. 

Bessie B. Silveethoen, Lib'n. 



SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $23,443,897 (tax- 
able for county $18,465,365). 

Sutter Co. Free Library. Tuba City. 
Miss Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Miss Frances Burket, County Libra- 
rian, was reappointed Dec. 6 by the Board 
of Supervisors for a four-year term. — 
Marysville Appeal-Democrat, D 7 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

( Thirty-sixth class. ) 
County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $23,088,343 (tax- 
able for county $19,290,345). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

The long felt need of a library room 
with a full time custodian in charge was 
realized at Gerber on the opening of the 
branch in November. The building was 
formally thrown open to the public in the 
evening of November 4th and the custo- 
dian with the members of the staff from 
the main oflace of the County Library met 
the visitors who dropped in. The library 
is a small building 18 by 24 feet, erected 
for the use of the library and meetings 
of civic bodies. In order to make the 
reading room available to the public at all 
times a partition divided the book room 
from the reading room. The library is 
open for exchange of books on Monday 
and Thursday evening, Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Friday afternoons. The reading 
room is open every day. The people have 
shown their appreciation by an active 
response with a lively increase in busi- 
ness from day to day that will justify in 
a short while those who persisted in the 
long struggle to obtain these library 
facilities. Mrs Mildred Wightman, who 
has lived in Gerber many years and been 
identified with the public affairs of the 
town, is custodian and to her enthusiasm 
and acquaintance with the people may 
be attributed much of the success of this 
venture. At present there are a little 
over a thousand volumes in the library. 

Children's Book Week was stretched 
through the month of November in this 
county. 



S2 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued. 

During the week, proper, a splendid 
exhibit of books (loaned by Levinson's 
Book Store of Sacramento) was on view 
at the main office of the library,, and on 
the dates listed below the collection was 
carried to the centers named, where the 
librarian talked on "Children's Books" 
and the people were given an opportunity 
to look the books over. The program was 
enlivened by some delightful children's 
songs rendered by Miss Josephine Mur- 
ray, supervisor of Rural Music, who also 
officiated as chauffeur and general trans- 
fer man. Nov. 3 we were at Red Bank 
Branch; 18, Bend and Jelly; 21, Pro- 
berta; 22, Lassen View; 25, Gerber (P. 
T. A.) ; 26, Bowman; 28, Richfield. At 
all of these meetings the librarian met 
with cordial response to her talks and 
interest in the books displayed, but at 
Gerber the meeting was truly inspira- 
tional, showing the genuine interest in 
reading held by the people there, who 
have been without adequate book service 
for so long. 

On December 12 the librarian and the 
supervisor of music visited the Johnson- 
Reeds Creek Farm Center, where the 
subject of "Books In the Home" was 
discussed and some charming little songs 
by Miss Murray immediately won her a 
place in the hearts of her audience. 

At Los Robles the next day the libra- 
rian again talked on "Books In the 
Home" before the Los Robles Women's 
Club and on the 14th of December a talk 
was given before the Women's Improve- 
ment Club of Red Bluff on "Rare Books." 

The Tehama Grammar School, a land- 
mark of Tehama County, was burned on 
the morning of December 6th. A high 
wind was blowing, so little time remained 
after the fire was discovered to save any- 
thing, but out of 463 books 193 were 
saved. 

Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty -fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,837,869 (taxable 
for county $3,402,048). 

Trinity Co. Free Library, Weaver- 
ville. Mrs Lila G. Adams, Lib'n. 



TRINITY CO.— Continued. 
A letter like this was sent to each 
school in the county before Children's 
Book Week : 

"Dear Boys and Girls : 

This week, Nov. 13-19, is Book Week. 
It is a special week for us to spend 
thinking about books, the ones we have 
read and enjoyed, the ones we would like 
to read, and especially the ones we would 
like to have for our very own. 

Will you write me a letter telling me 
which book you like best? Tell me why. 
Then make a list of other books you have 
read which you think other girls and 
boys would enjoy reading. After you 
have made these lists, then make a list 
of the books you have heax'd about and 
think you would like to read. When this 
is finished, please tell me what book you 
would like to add to your own library. 
While you are thinking about this book 
see if you can think of some way to earn 
the money to buy this book. When you 
have told me which book you would like 
to have, I will tell you which edition is 
best to buy and how much it will cost. 
We can buy these fine books in different 
bindings, some costing more than others, 
so if we have only a little money we ought 
to find one which costs just what we 
want it to. 

Wouldn't it be nice to have a pretty 
book all your own? What would you do 
if some one with sticky or dirty fingers 
picked it up or if some one turned the 
corners of the pages down or left it in the 
rain or where the pup could chew it? 
Suppose some one opened it and laid it 
face down on the table so the back would 
break and the pages come out. I am sure 
I do not want my books treated that 
way, and I do not think you would like 
it either. All of the books in the County 
Library belong partly to you, for they 
are paid for by money your parents pay 
for taxes. Do you think it would be nice 
to help keep the library books clean and 
whole? The books Avill wear out after 
they have been read lots of times, but if 
we all be very careful and read only 
when our hands are clean, the books will 
last lots longer. This means school books 
as well as story books. 

Now I have written you a long letter, 
and I hope each one of you will wi'ite to 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



33 



TRINITY CO.— Continued, 
me, and give your letter to your teacher 
to send to me. When the lists have all 
been sent to me, then the best list will 
be printetl in the newspaper, so be sure to 
put your name, age, grade and school on 
your list. 

Write me this letter and make these 
lists during Book Week, if you can, but 
if you do not have time to do it then, 
send them in during the next week for 
sure." 

I made a couple of trips, visiting eight 
schools and the two rooms of the gram- 
mar school in Weaverville, and talked to 
the youngsters. They were all greatly 
interested. 

The tables in the library were filled 
with exhibits, all named, and the window 
space had the poster from the Bookseller;; 
and books which fitted in with the poster. 
The P. T. A. meeting in November was 
devoted to children's reading. An article 
in the newspaper written as a letter to 
the children from "The White Rabbit" 
told of some of the new editions and 
some new books for the children. 

Mrs Lila G. Adams, Lib'n. 



TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4S63 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $92,276,982 (tax- 
able for county $69,323,397). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

The Cottonwood School joined Tularo 
County Free Library Oct. 28, 1927, and 
the White River School joined Nov. 5. 
Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Porterville. 

POETERVn.LE FREE PUBLIC LlBRAKY 

AND Branch, Tulare Cx). Free Li- 
BEABY. Miss Sarah Louise Templeton, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Marjorie Homer of Woodlake has 
accepted a position as assistant librarian 
in the Porterville Library. The library 
is now being kept open from 9 a.m. to 
9 p.m. and on Sunday afternoons.— 
Fresno Repuilican, N 18 
3—56955 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $12,683,940 (tax- 
able for county $8,909,190). 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

( Twenty- third class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $94,751,159 (tax- 
able for county $84,138,598). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The County Library and Ventura City 
Library cooperated with the booksellers 
during Book Week by means of book lists 
and exhibits. One store requested us 
to make out a first purchase list of 
children's books which we did, and this 
store made its first purchase almost 
entirely from this list. A talk was given 
at Santa Paula on Book Week and a 
joint exhibit was held by the Santa 
Paula Library and the County Library. 
Lists were distributed freely. Announce- 
ments were made at various clubs at 
which exhibits of books were made. 

The ground for the library which will 
be turned over to the Ojai Branch was 
broken and the building has begun. The 
Supervisors have accepted the use of it. 
The county will pay rent to the library 
board and in return will receive light, 
heat, and janitor service. 

A talk was given by the Librarian 
at the annual dinner of the Mound Club. 
Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ojai. 

George Thacher Memorial Free 
Library and OjjU Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library. Miss Zaidee E. 
Soule, Custodian. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

( Thirty-fourth class. ) 
County seat. Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. ml. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $34,393,244 (tax- 
able for county $27,504,533). 



NEWS NOTES OE CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 
Woodland. 

Woodland Free [Public] Librahy 
AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Irma C. Bruton, Lib'n. 

The trustees of the Woodland Library 
let a contract November 7 to Jack 
Witzelberger, lowest bidder of sis, for 
the construction of a $9000 wing to the 
present City Library. According to the 
plans of the architect the annex will 
provide a childi-en's room to be segre- 



YOLO CO. — Continued. 

Woodland — Continued, 
gated by glass walls, a stack room and 
rest room. — Sacramento Bee, N 8 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
Couiity seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $21,091,893 (tax- 
able for county $17,130,640). 



vol. 23, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES,, ETC. 



35 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any- 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 
A. L. A. 
Headquarters. 

86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Cooperative Binding Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futernick Co., 444 Bryant st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J St., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J St., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases and Shelving. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif, 

Book Packing Bags. 
Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes — Continued. 
Corrugated Paper Cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 
Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th St., New York, N. Y. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co. 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome St., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second St., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



36 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Book Supports, Etc. — Continued. 
Moise-Klinkuer Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 
Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5tli ave., New 

York city. 
Cliivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 

St., Brooklyn, N. T. 
For books in CMvers binding. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Levinson's, The Book Store, 1012 K st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church St., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pumell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235' Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave.. 
New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York. N. Y. 

Technical Book Co., 525 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Handles only technical books. 

Union Library Association, 118-120 E. 

25th St., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 149 New Montgomery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter St., bet. Grant 
ave. and Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 



Books — Continued. 
English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 

Vakious Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
E. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray st.. New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westei-mann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 
Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 149 
New Montgomery st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 



vol. 23, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



37 



Books — Continued. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. lOtli 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th st., New 
■ York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 
Espeoially Galiforniana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th st., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 
See FuENiTUEE and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madi.son, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial St., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 

For infoi-mation, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 



Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. — 

Continued. 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 
Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See FuENiTXjEE and Supplies. 

Films. 

For Rent. 

American Red Cross Films, distributed 

by University of California Library, 

Berkeley, Calif. 
Fox Film Corporation, New York, N. Y". 
National Producers Film Service, 111 

Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept., 985 Market st., San- Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, 1138 Elmwood ave., 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco,' Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



38 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635. Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNaUy Co., 125 E. Sixth St., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco. Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison. Wis. 
Elbe FUe and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene St., New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Librai-y Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St.. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Magazines. 

See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 685, Arcade 
Station. Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co.. 915 K st.. Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth St., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco. Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d sts.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi- Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second St., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



Paste. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st.. New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 

Back Volumes and Nujibees. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg., New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co.. 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

SuBSCK.iPTio>f Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis St.. 
Back Bay. Boston. Mass. 

Franklin Square Agency. Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

INIutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pacific News Bureau, 643 S. Olive st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co.. 657 Howard 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St.. New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles. Calif. 

Pictures. 
Brauii & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 
Boston, Mass. 
Especially for reproduction of American art. 



vol. 23, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



39 



Pictures — Continued. 
Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st., 

New York, N. T. 

(Formerlj^ Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Tori-ey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morise & Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label-Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second St., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Signs. 

Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Movie Slides. 

Victor Animatograph Co., Davenport, 
Iowa. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

8ee Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 832 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 

Calif. 



Stereoscopic Views — Continued. 
George E. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For California wild flowers, marine life, historic 
views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L; & M. Alexander, 444 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 420 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8tli st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San FrancLsco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and 611 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

See, also, this publication, p. 17. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 

University of California School of Li- 
brarianship. For full information write 
to Chairman, School of Librarianship, 
University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, Carl B. Roden, Librarian, 
Public Library, Chicago, 111. 

1st Vice President, Charles H. Comp- 
ton, Asst. Librarian, Public Library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

2d Vice President, Charles E. Rush, 
Librarian, Public Library, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Secretary, Carl H. Milam, Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, .John T. Fitzpatrick, Law Li- 
brarian, New York State Library, Albany, 
N. Y. 

1st Vice President, John .T. Daley, 
Librarian. Law Society of Upper Canada 
Library, Toronto, Canada. 

2d Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Librarian, Louisiana State Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lucile Vernon, 
Association of the Bar, 42 W. 44th st., 
New Yorli City. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1928 are : 

Northern Section — Dorothy M. Clark, 
John C. Fremont High School, Oakland, 
President. 

Gladys English, Piedmont High School, 
Secretary -Treasurer. 

Southern Section — Hoi>e L. Potter, 
South Pasadena High School, President. 

Katherine Folger, Lincoln High School, 
Los Angeles, Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

Officers for 1927-29 are: 

President, Clarence B. Lester, Secre- 
tary, Wisconsin Library Commission, 
JMadison, Wis. 

1st Vice President, Mrs Lillian B. 
Griggs, Secretary and Director, North 
Carolina Library Commission, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

2d Vice President, Herbert Killam, Sec- 
retary British Columbia Public Libi'ary 
Commission, Victoria, British Columbia. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Clara F. Baldwin, 
Director of Library Division, Minnesota 
State Department of Education, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, Henry E. Dunnack, Libra- 
rian, Maine State Library, Augusta, 
Maine. 

1st Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 
Librarian, Louisiana State Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

2d Vice President, Mrs Mary E. Frank- 
hauser, Librarian, Michigan State Li- 
brary, Lansing, Mich. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Irma A. Watts, 
Reference Librarian, Pennsylvania Legis- 
lative Reference Bureau, Hari'isburg, Pa. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, Joanna H. Sprague, Li- 



brarian, Public Library, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

1st Vice President, Jacqueline Noel, Li- 
brai'ian. Public Library, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

2d Vice President, E. Ruth Rockwood, 
Library Association of Portland, Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Secretary, Helen Johns, Librarian, Pub- 
lic Library, Longview, Washington. 

Treasurer, Ora L. Maxwell, Public 
Library, Spokane, Washington. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1926-27 are: 

Bonnie E. Strong, Standard Oil Co., 
San Francisco, President. 

C. H. Judson, Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., San Francisco, Vice 
President. 

Margaret Hart, San Francisco Bulletin, 
San Francisco, Secretary-Treasui'er. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, Josephine B. Hollingsworth, 
Municipal Department, Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library, Los Angeles. 

Vice President, Rose M. P u r c e 1 1, 
Southern Califoraia Edison Company, 
Los Angeles. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs Helen D. 
Townsend, Barlow Medical Library, Los 
Angeles. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 
President, Helen E. Mackay, Pasadena. 
Vice President, Dorotha Davis, Fresno. 
Secretary, May Dornin, University of 
California, Berkeley. 

Treasurer, Lillian Hyde, San Francisco. 

MOVIE SLIDES. 

The Victor Animatograph Co., Daven- 
port, Iowa, will make colored slides using 
any picture and any wording sent to 
them. The picture may be of any size as 
thej^ reduce it. The slides cost approxi- 
mately one dollar each. Miss Plaister of 
the San Diego Public Library has found 
them attractive and very satisfactory. 



vol. 23, no. 1] DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



41 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
branch of their work. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 
be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a library that fills a posi- 
tion for which it has asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Library at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento, California. 

WANTS. 

The American Library in Paris, 10 Rue 
de L' Elysee, has sent out a list of period- 
icals wanted to complete its files. Any 
of the following magazines that can be 
spared may be sent direct by parcel post, 
if the parcel is small ; but larger ship- 
ments should be made to the Bureau of 
International Exchange, Smithsonian In- 
stitution, Washington, D. C, either by 
prepaid express or freight, with an inner 
wrapper addressed to this library. All 
expenditures for transportation charges 
will be refunded by The American Library 
in Paris. 

American Architect, v. 117-122, 125-130. 
American Journal of Psychology, v. 31—36. 
American Journal of Public Health, v. 

10-13. 
American Magazine of Art, v. 11—14. 
American Political Science Review, v. 14— 

17, 20. 
American Review of Reviews, v. 23, 

37, 44. 



Architectural Record, v. 47, 48, 53. 

Asia, V. 21, 22. 

Atlantic Monthly, v. 70-72, 74. 

Bird Lore, v. 22-26. 

Bookman, v. 62. 

Century, v. 64, 65, 67, 6^71, 73-80. 

Country Life, v. 38-50. 

Current History, v. 15, 23, 24. 

Dial, V. 67, 74. 

English Review, v. 30, 31, 33, 35, 36. 

Fortnightly Review, v. 97, 111, 112. 

Forum, v. 63-73. 

Harper's, v. 90, 92, 94, 98, 100-102, 110. 

Independent, v. 100, 106, 107, 110, 112. 

International Studio, v. 68, 69, 72-76, 

78-87. 
Journal of Political Economy, v. 29, 30. 
Journal of Social Hygiene, v. 5, 6, 9. 
Literary Digest, v. 57, 90. 
Living Age, v. 305-307. 
Nation, v. 102. 
Nation and Athenaeum, v. 23, 26—30, 32, 

33, 35-39. 
Nature, v. 1-6. 
New Republic, v. 23, 41^5. 
North American Review, v. 221, 222. 
Physical Review, v. 15-24. 
Poetry, v. 16-22, 24. 

Political Science Quarterly, v. 34—36, 41. 
Popular Mechanics, v. 33-42. 
Radio Broadcast, v. 1-8. 
Round Table, v. 10-12, 15, 16. 
School and Society, v. 11-22. 
Science, v. 51-62. 
Scientific American, v. 117. 
Scribner's, v. 28, 31-33, 35, 37, 39, 42, 50. 

LONDON TIMES. 

A file of the London Times, covering the 
war period, is available to any library 
wishing to pay transportation charges. 

Address Miss Anne Hadden, Monterey 
County Free Library, Salinas. 



42 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Mrs Frances Burns Linn, 
Public Library, Santa Barbara. 

Vice President, Minette L. Stoddard, 
Merced County Free Library, Merced. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Mrs J. Wells Smith, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Henry Goodcell, Trus- 
tee Public Library, San Bernardino. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 

President, Marian P. Greene, Public 
Library, Alhambra. 

Secretary, Feme E. McCleery, Public 
Library, Alhambra. 

Special Libraries Section. 

Chairman, Lenore Greene, Los Angeles 
Museum, Exposition Park, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Mary E. Irish, Barlow 
Medical Library, Los Angeles. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice President, Secretary- Treasurer and 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Milton J. Fergu- 
son, Eleanor Hitt, Sydney B. Mitchell, 
Mrs Elizabeth G. Potter, Althea Warren. 

Auditing — Elizabeth R. Topping, Ven- 
tura County Free Library, Ventura, 
chairman ; Anne Hadden. 

'Nominating — The Constitution pro- 
vides for a "Nominating Committee con- 
sisting of representatives selected by the 
respective districts at their district meet- 
ings." 

Puhlications — Cornelia D. Provines, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sacra- 
mento, chairman ; Sarah M. Jacobus, 
Willis H. Kerr. 

Resolutions — Robert Rea, Public Li- 
brary, San Francisco, chairman ; Jean- 
nette M. Drake, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

Certification — Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman (1930) ; 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt (1928), Mary 



Barmby (1929), Susan T. Smith (1931), 
Eleanor Hitt (1932). 

Committee for conference with State 
Board of Education aiout the Scrap 
Book Method of Project Teaching — Susan 
T. Smith, City Library, Sacramento, 
chairman ; Lulah Myers, Lucie C. Nye. 

Cooperation hetween the C. L. A. and 
the California Congress of Parents and 
Teachers — Mrs Charlotte K. Bissell, 
Public Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; 
Marian P. Greene, Wilhelmina Harper, 
Eva G. Leslie, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. 

J. L. Gillis Memorial — Milton J. Fer- 
guson, State Library, Sacramento, chair- 
man ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor Hitt. 

Legislative — Herbert V. Clayton, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Ida E. 
Condit, Charles V. Park, Bessie B. Silver- 
thorn, Marjorie Van Deusen. 

Library Schools — John E. Goodwin, 
University of California at Los Angeles 
Library, chairman ; Alice N. Hays, 
Eleanor Hitt, Sarah E. McCardle, Sydney 
B. Mitchell, Everett R. Perry, Robert 
Rea, Charles F. Woods. 

Membership — Mrs Julia G. Babcock, 
Kei-n County Free Library, Bakersfield, 
chairman ; 1st District, Alice M. Healy ; 
2d District, Florence J. Wheaton ; 3d 
District, Mrs Dorothy L. Worden ; 4th 
District, Bessie B. Silverthorn ; 5th Dis- 
trict, Ida M. Condit ; 6th District, Helen 
T. Kennedy ; 7th District, Ida M. Reagan ; 
8th District, Elisabeth C. Haines; 9th 
District, Ellen B. Frink. 

S al ar ie s — Margaret E. Livingston, 
Orange County Free Library, Santa Ana, 
chairman ; Mary Barmby, Olive Bur- 
roughs. 

Seamen's Library — W. A. Worthington, 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company Li- 
brary, San Francisco, chairman ; Helen 
M. Bruner, Charles S. Greene, Chaplain 
F. K. Howard, John S. Richards. 

Jinks — Katharine D. Kendig, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, chairman ; Clara 
B. Dills, Leslie Hood, Minnie A. Lewis, 
Frances C. Richardson. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



43 



DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First District. 

President, John B. Kaiser, Free Li- 
brary, Oakland. 

Secretary, Flora B. Ludington, The 
Library, Mills College. 

The first district consists of the follow- 
ing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Mrs Elizabeth S. Singletary, 
Santa Clara County Free Library, San 
Jose. 

Secretary, Joyce Backus, State Teach- 
ers College Library, San Jose. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties: Alameda (excepting Ala- 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 

Third District. 

President, Muriel Wright, Marin 
County Free Library, San Rafael. 

Secretary, Mrs Dorothy L. Worden, 
Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Secretary, Mina E. Keller, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, Nancy C. Laugenour, Yolo 
County Free Library, Woodland. 

Secretary, Mrs Grant Bruton, Public 
Library, Woodland. 



The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Mabel Inness, A. K. Smiley 
Public Library, Redlands. 

Secretary, Myrtle Danielson, A. K. 
Smiley Public Library, Redlands. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Henry A. Kendal, Public Li- 
brary, Eureka. 

Secretary, Georgia Davis, Humboldt 
County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Edith Gantt, Plumas County 
Free Library, Quincy. 

Secretary, Lenala A. Martin, Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Frances M. Burket, Sutter 
County Free Library, Yuba City. 

Secretary, Mrs Mary Rolls Hatch, Pub- 
lic Library, Marysville. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The 33d annual meeting will be held at 
the Mission Inn, Riverside, April 3 to 5, 
1927. 

The County Librarians will meet at 
the same time and place, beginning their 
session on April 2. 



44 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Milton J. Ferguson, Ex-officio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano County. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange 
County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 

Midwinter County Librarians' 
Conference. 

The California County Librarians were 
called to the State Library, Sacramento, 
for an informal conference on December 
15, 1927. Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, and Ex-officio Chairman of the 
County Librarians, presided. The meet- 
ing convened at 10 a.m. in the Librarian's 
office of the new State Library building. 
Although the building is not yet furnished, 
the office was temporarily fitted up with 
folding chairs and made an ideal setting 
for a. small gathering. 

Problems particularly affecting county 
library work were discussed both morning 
and afternoon, the morning session being 
rounded out by a trip through the new 
building and the afternoon session closing 
with a talk by Mr Ferguson on his recent 
trip abroad and his attendance at the 
British Library Association meeting. 

In the late afternoon Mr and Mrs 
Ferguson entertained the County Libra- 
rians and the State Library staff at tea 
at their home. A county library dinner 
at the Hotel Senator closed the confer- 
ence. 

This is the first time the county libra- 
rians have met in Sacramento since 1919, 
the custom in late years having been to 
call the county librarians' convention at 
the same time and place as the California 
Library Association meeting. The wish 
was generally expressed that a midwinter 
meeting at Sacramento might become an 
annual event. 

County librarians attending the confer- 
ence were Mary Barmby, Alameda 
County ; Bertha Taylor, Amador County ; 



Carmelita Duff, Butte County ; Mrs Alice 
G. Whitbeck, Contra Costa County ; 
Sarah McCardle, Fresno County; Mrs 
Faye K. Russell, Glenn County ; Mrs 
Julia G. Babcock, Kern County; Marion 
L. Gregory, Kings County ; Helen E. 
Vogleson, Los Angeles County ; Blanche 
Galloway, Madera County ; Muriel 
Wright, Marin County ; Minette L. 
Stoddard, Merced County ; Anna L. Wil- 
liams, Modoc County ; Anne Hadden, 
Monterey County ; Estella DeFord, Napa 
County ; Margaret E. Livingston, Orange 
County ; Edith Gantt, Plumas County ; 
Charles F. Woods, Riverside County; 
Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County ; Florence J. Wheaton, San 
Benito County ; Caroline S. Waters, San 
Bernardino County ; Eleanor Hitt, San 
Diego County ; Ida E. Condit, San 
Joaquin County ; Flo A. Gantz, San 
Luis Obispo County ; Mrs Frances Burns 
Linn, Santa Barbara County ; Mi*s Eliza- 
beth Singletary, Santa Clara County ; 
Frances Stockebrand, Siskiyou County ; 
Clara B. Dills, Solano County ; Frances 
M. Burket, Sutter County ; Anne Bell 
Bailey, Tehama County ; Gretchen L. 
Flower, Tulare County ; Elizabeth R. 
Topping, Ventura County ; Nancy C. 
Laugenour, Yolo County. 

County Librarians' Annual IVIeeting. 

The next County Librarians' Annual 
Meeting will be held at Mission Inn, 
Riverside, April 2-5, 1928. April 2 will 
be a special county library day. The 
other three days of the convention will be 
held in connection with the California 
Library Association. 

THE LIBRARY LOG. 

The first number of The Library Log, 
publication of the Stanislaus County Free 
Library, was issued October, 1927. It is 
a mimeographed sheet on colored paper 
with an attractive ship heading. It is to 
be published monthly "or oftener." The 
October number contained circulation 
statistics and other news items from the 
branches. The November issue featured 
suggestions for a Christmas reference 
shelf. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFOBNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



45 



AN ENDORSEMENT. 

The Home and Community Depart- 
ment, American Farm Bureau Federation, 
meeting in Chicago during December, 
passed the following resolution : "Whereas, 
there is need for better educational facili- 
ties among rural people, we do hereby 



endorse the county lil)rary plan of making 
books available to rural people." 

A county library exhibit was main- 
tained and literature distributed by the 
executive assistant. Library Extension 
Committee, A. L. A. 



•46 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
accounts of meetings of the various 
library clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIANS' CONFERENCE OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

The midwinter meeting of the College 
and University Librarians' Conference 
was held in Sumner Hall, Pomona Col- 
lege, December 10, 1927. 

iliss Spining, Librarian of the Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology, who had 
been elected president at the spring meet- 
ing, not being present and having since 
declined the position. Miss Charlotte 
Kii.wn, Librarian of the University of 
Southern California and former president 
of the conference, opened the meeting. 
After the minutes were read and approved, 
the chairman asked for nominations for a 
new president. Mr Kerr, Librarian of 
Pomona College Library, was nominated 
and elected by acclamation, and took 
charge of the meeting. 

After the business meeting and discus- 
sions of technical subjects, Mr Kerr intro- 
duced the president of the Library Com- 
mission, whose hobby and subject was 
"Economics." Opening a small leather 
bag, he began taking out first one and 
then another ancient volume and with 
interest told how it had been found in 
this or that corner of Europe. The audi- 
ence was then allowed to pass these 
treasures from hand to hand as his 
charming talk went on. 

During luncheon in the same building 
there was a surprise in stoi'e for all. 
Mr Hartley Burr Alexander told of the 
interesting making of the book of poems — 
"God's drum, and other cycles from 
Indian lore" (Dutton, 1927). He ex- 
plained the meaning of the different 
forms of verse as used bj^ him in it and 



the romantic development of its illustra- 
tions by Anders John Haugseth. 

After luncheon there were visits to the 
various buildings on the campus, including 
Bridges Hall of Music, Pomona College 
Library, Scripps College Library, and 
Scripps College for Women with its 
lovely Balch Browsing Library. 

The last is on the second floor of the 
just completed Scripps College for 
Women and is reached by a flight of 
steps in keeping in architecture with the 
general plan of the whole charming 
Spanish structure. The room itself looks 
toward a huge window overlooking what 
will be rolling lawn to a distant view of 
old live oaks and back of and just beyond 
these, the — just then — snow covered 
mountains. To another side of the room 
there are French windows leading on to 
a small balcony, which overlooks a small 
patio, round which the building is 
planned. The room itself was lovely in 
detail, with a marble floor centex-ed by a 
beautiful soft rug. The ceiling and fire- 
place would each warrant a long descrip- 
tion. Shelves are set at odd intervals 
about the i*oom and broken into by 
irregular and varied pieces of furniture — 
a beautiful chair here, an odd table 
there. Some shelves have buUt-in read- 
ing benches beneath them. The books 
are all new and unlettered. They are 
arranged alphabetically by author, irre- 
spective of classification, and look most 
inviting. The chairs are overstuffed and 
there are several reading lamps about, so 
that it looks like a lovely living room 
furnished with every comfort. A student 
sat curled up in a large chair, comfort in 
every line, reading under a table lamp. 
She was one of the fifty fortunate girls 
who are now housemates at lovely, 
inspirational Scripps College for Women. 
Mrs Ethelene M. Kitching, 

Secretary. 



vol. 23, no. 1] BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS^ CALIFORNIA. 



47 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he has received from the 
board of librarj' examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

No meeting of the board has been held 
this quarter. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Lila (Dobell), Ln. Trinity 

County Free Library, "Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 

City. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. (Life certificate.) 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, F]valyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, El (Dentro. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Yuba City. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Lange Library of 

Education, Berkeley. 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

E. Dalton, Asst. University of California 

Library, Berkeley. 
Dambacher, Mrs Helen (Rowland), Mrs 

Gustav Dambacher, Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonora. 



Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Butte 

County Free Library, Oroville. 
Eudey, iilrs Henrietta G., Mrs Fred Eudey, 

Asst. Amador County Free Library, 

Jackson. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 

Free Library, Salinas. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera. 
Gantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo County 

Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 
Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 

Library and Kings County Free Library, 

Hanford. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Harris, Mary W., Asst. Louisiana Library 

Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James White Herrman, Substitute San 

Diego Public Library. (Life certificate.) 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. (Life 

certificate.) 
Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Jose. 
Jones, Louise E., Asst. Public Library, 

Dos Angeles. 
Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 

Library, Los Angeles. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
oara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa 

Barbara. 
Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 
Free Library, Susanville. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Public Library, 
Seattle, Wn. 



48 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 

Morse, Mrs Ella (Packer), Mrs Guy 
Morse, Ln. Colusa County Free Library, 
Colusa. 

Morse, Marion, Ln. Honolulu Academy 
of arts, Honolulu, T. H. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Parkinson, H. O., Asst. Public Library, 
New York. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 
(Life certificate.) 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Stockebrand, Frances, Ln. Siskiyou 
County Free Library, Yreka. 

Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 
Free Library, Merced. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 
Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Asst. Ln. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
Clounty Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 
County Free Library, Hollister. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc Countj- 
Free Library, Alturas. 

Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 
Free Library, Santa Ana. 

Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 
Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 



Wright, Muriel, Ln. Marin County Free 

Library, San Rafael. 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 

Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Gleason, Cella. (Life certificate.) 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Huntington, Stella. (Life certificate.) 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 
Wheeler, Mrs Blanche (Chalfant), Mrs 

De Forest N. Wheeler. 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold ofiice of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was published in News Notes of 
California Libraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California 'Libraries, January, 191-1. 
This has been reprinted as a pamphlet. 
The fifth edition was issued December, 
1921. (Circular of information only.) 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
1925. Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The dates for the next examination 
have not yet been set. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the (Chairman 
of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



49 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1927-29, $302,350. 

Total accessions 275,761 (less 3540 
lost and discarded = 272,221) exclusive of 
21,341 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and 94,979 volumes in the 
Sutro Branch in San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V. Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Eudora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .J. Haines, Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Dora M. Himmelsbach, in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc., Department. 

Beulah Mumm, Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Gladys M. Bowles, Assistant. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark. Indexer. 

Helen Cornell, Assistant. 

Mrs Lenore W. Davidson, Assistant. 

Dorothy Deming, Assistant. 

Margaret Dennisou. Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite Walker Duggins, Ste- 
nosrapher. 

Dorothy Earl, Assistant. 

Kate M. Foley. Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st., San Francisco. 

Zilla Grant. Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon, Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill, Assistant. 

Mrs Alicia Manning Hook, Assistant. 

Marion Knotts, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb. Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look, Assistant, 

Mrs June Vladyka McCaffery, Assistant. 

Anna G. McNamee. Assistant. Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

D. Florence Montfort. Assistant. 

Catharine J. Morrison. Home Teacher 
4 — 56955 



of the Blind, 951 S. Kenraore ave., Los 
Anseles. 

Vera Palermo, Assistant. 

Irene E. Ryan. Assistant. 

Irma M. Schoepflin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle. Assistant. 

Mrs Frances L. Smith, Stenographer. 

Lily M. Tilden. Assistant. 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy, Assistant. 

Mrs .Tulia M. Waldron, Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel. Assistant. 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Gladys N. Richards, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
ping Clerk. 

Nancy Anderson, Messenger. 

John Heinrich, Messenger. 

Elyse Schultz, Messenger. 

Arthur Valine, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Jacob Misfelt, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Mr Ferguson returned to Sacramento 
October 31 after an enjoyable three 
months' trip abroad. On November 12 
he attended the California School Library 
Association meeting at Fresno and made 
a talk during the evening session. Ou 
November 30 he was present at a meeting 
of the Executive Committee of the C. L. A. 
at Santa Barbara, going from there as 
far south as San Diego, visiting libraries 
there and in Los Angeles and vicinity. 
State Teacher College libraries were 
inspected at Fresno on November 12 and 
at Santa Barbara and San Diego during 
the southern trip. 

Mr Ferguson made the following talks 
during the quarter : At the Sacramento 
Society Sons of the Revolution on 
" I m m i g r a t i o n," November 16 ; Los 
Angeles County Library Staff meeting 
December 2 ; at the Sacramento Rotary 
Club on his trip abroad, December 8 ; 
and before the art class of the Sacramento 
High School on the work of Roi Partridge, 
December 9. 

Miss Helen Cornell, a graduate of the 
New York State Library School, with 
recent experience in the Minnesota 



50 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Library Division, St. Paul, joined the 
staff of our Catalog Department on 
October 17. Miss Dorothy Earl, a gradu- 
ate of the Wisconsin Library School, 
with experience in the San Diego Public 
Library, began work in the Order 
Department October 26. 

Mrs Mae Moore, who resigned from the 
Repair Department four years ago, 
rejoined the staff on November 1. Mrs 
Dorothy Puffer Isaacs of the Periodicals 
Department resigned November 30 to 
move to San Francisco. Her place has 
been taken by Mrs Lenore Davidson, who 
began work on November 21. Miss Nancy 
Anderson began as messenger on Novem- 
ber 23, succeeding in that position Miss 
Vera Palermo, who has been transferred 
to the Loan Desk. 

Miss June Vladyka was married on 
November 17 to Mr Eugene McCaffery. 
She will continue her work in the State 
Library. 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

At staff meetings on November 4 and 
16, Mr Ferguson told about his European 
trip. 

On December 16 Mr and Mrs Ferguson 
entertained at tea, the guests being the 
County Librarians who were having a 
conference in Sacramento that day, and 
the staff of the State Library. 

December 21 was the day of the annual 
Christmas party. One large beautifully 
decorated table in the form of a U wel- 
comed the staff with delicious refresh- 
m.ents. A program followed, ending in 
the distribution of gifts from an attractive 
Christmas tree. Each gift was accom- 
panied by an original jingle, which was 
read Avith much spirit by a very effective 
Santa Claus. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

The libi'ary closes at noon on Satur- 
days during July and August. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Hebbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 



textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the United States, Great Britain, Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other_ foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer, or if, 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information ou 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California's State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp.. 99 and 103. 

Copies of 39 California State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during October, November 
and December, 1927. 

Agriculture Dept. Monthly bulletin, vol. 
16, nos. 9-11. 

Special publications nos 78—79. 

Banking Dept. Report. 1927. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, nos. 1-3. 

Building and Loan Comm. Report, 1927. 
Chiropractic Examiners Bd. Report, 

1926-27. 
Cosmetology Bd. Law governing practice 

of cosmetologj'. 1927. 
Disabled American Veterans of the World 

War, Dept. of Cal. Report of sixth 

annual state convention, 1927. 
Fish and Game Comm. California fish 

and game, vol. 13, no. 4. 
Health Dept. Mental training of young 

child. 1927. 
Highway Comm. California highways, 

vol. 4, no. 9. 
Immigration and Housing Comm. State 

housing act. 1927. 
Industrial Accident Comm. California 

safety news, vol. 11, nos. 3^. 

• Electrical safety orders. 1927. 

Logging and sawmill safety orders. 



1927. 

Tentative air pressure tank safety 

orders. 1927. 

Workmen's compensation, insur- 
ance and safety laws. 1927. 
Insurance Dept. Report, 1926, vol. 3. 

Insurance laws. 1927. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



51 



List of insurance brokers, August, 

1927; November, 1927. 

Labor Statistics Bur. Labor laws. 1927. 

Legislative Counsel Biu-. Laws on publi- 
cation of legal notices. 1927. 

Medical Examiners Bd. Supplement to 
1927 directory of physicians and sur- 
geons. . . 

Public School Teachers Retirement Salary 
Fund Bd. Circular of information. . . 
1927. 

Public Works Dept. California highways 
and public works, vol. 4, nos. 11-12. 

Architecture Div. Report, 1926. 

Engineering & Irrigation Div. 

Bulletin No. 18. 

Highway Div. Light asphaltic 

oil road surfaces. 1927. 

Important statutes. . . 1927. 

Real Estate Dept. Directory-bulletin, 

vol. 8, no. 2. 
Teachers College, San Francisco. An- 
nouncement of courses. 1927-28. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of 
the librarian, and to any other educa- 
tional institution on request of its ofEcia] 
head or its librarian ; to individuals 
through the signature of a state ofEcer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the ofBcial head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit ; to a club on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

Two reference books of recent publica- 
tion are worth the attention of every 
librarian. Both are ptiblished by the 
H. W. Wilson Comjjany and are further 
evidence of the invaluable service offered 
to libraries by this company. 

The first is the Song index ; edited by 
Minnie Earl Sears ; an index to more than 
12,000 songs in 177 song collections com- 
prising 262 volumes. While no attempt 
was made to include all existing song 
collections, those were included which 
have been found most useful in medium 
sized libraries, with the restdt that it 
makes an excellent tool for any libi'ary. 
The entries are under title, composer, 
and author of words, with references from 
first line to title. There has been no 
attempt at classification, but the title 
entries serve surprisingly well as a sub- 
ject guide : for example, there are about 
seventy-five entries beginning with the 
word Christmas. Under Shakespeare's 
name ai"e found all Shakespeare songs. 



There is a classified list of collections 
indexed at the beginning of the book, 
which is helpful. The book is, of course, 
a wonderful help in looking for songs, 
but it is also of value in a search for 
poems in general, for poems which have 
been set to music, and for foreign poems 
not included in Granger. While the 
volume is not inexpensive, it is well worth 
the price. 

The second book is Business books : 
1920-1926, an analytical catalog of 2600 
titles by the Business branch of the 
Newark Public Library. This is of more 
limited use than the Song index, and of 
value probably to the larger libraries, but 
is an excellent piece of work. The anno- 
tations are cai-efully made, tables of con- 
tents are frequently given and many 
analytic entries are brought out with a 
splendid .system of subject headings and 
cross references. For a library doing 
reference work with business people this 
is a not-to-be-neglected tool, however 
small the collection of books. 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge. 

During October, November and Dec-em- 
ber 2693 books, 16 prints and 2 maps 
were accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Mu^'SOiV, in charge. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 1696 books were cataloged and 11,254 
cards were added to the file. 21,055 cards 
were filed in the L^nion Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDOKA Gaboutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and description, 
resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioneers and early settlers are 
being secured, together with their photo- 
graphs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about 10,000 bound volumes 
of newspapers', a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
their work. 



52 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

We have the cards of William Jackson 
Smith and his wife, Eliza Coleman Smith, 
Oregon pioneers of 1847, coming on to 
California a little later. Mr Smith was 
one of the party who returned to Dr 
Whitman's mission immediately after the 
massacre to help in the rescue. On 
arriving in Sacramento Mr Smith went 
into business and died there December 20, 
1849. Mrs Smith returned to the states 
with her six children, carrying enough 
gold dust with her to educate all of them, 
so the card states. 

Anthony P. Smith arrived in 1849 and 
was the proprietor of "Smith's Gardens," 
comprising 50 acres on the bank of the 
American River. These gardens were 
famous in the early days of Sacramento. 
Mr Smith was a horticulturist of ability. 
Sidney Smith came to Sacramento in 
1853 to assist his brother in the manage- 
ment of the gardens, and at one time 
conducted a store in the city for the sale 
of nursery stock. 

Other cards received are as follows: 
Charles M. Fitzgerald, Mr and Mrs 
Andrew Lake Slack, Barton Park 
Spencer, Thomas Larkin Thompson. 

California Authors. 

The following author car'ds have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Liiraries: 

Bash, Mrs Bertha (Runkle) 

Mrs Louis H. Bash 
Brig-g-s, Wallace Alvin 
*C'halfln, Mattie Mabel 
Graves, Jackson Alpheus 
Meredith, Mrs Grace Elizabeth 
(Swerdfeger) 
Mrs Lewis C. Meredith 
Miller, Mrs Alice (Davis) 

Mrs Clement Harvey Miller 
Nunan, Thomas 
Perkins, Charles Elliott 
Taylor, Mrs Katherine (Ames) 
Mrs Frank J. Taylor 

California iVIusicians. 

The following musician cards have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of California Liiraries: 

Kelsey, Verne 
Rice, Leon Louis 
Silva, Giulio 

California Artists. 

The following artist card has been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 
Geritz, Franz 



* Native Californians. 



Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Exhibit, 
An interesting exhibit of early Cali- 
fornia material is still maintained in the 
rotunda of the Capitol. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabesl R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaiied as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried before 
they are ordered. Addresses of firms 
supplying all articles loaned will be fur- 
nished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
rial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
York point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrowers wishing them for use 
in book selection. 

A catalog of all books in Moon type in 
the Library up to October 1, 1926, will 
be sent to anyone requesting it. 

A catalog of books in Braille up to 
April 1, 1927, has been issued during the 
last year. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13,' 
1905. There are now 2628 blind bor- 
rowers, 37 borrowers having been added 
during October, November and December, 
and 38 borrowers having been lost by 
death during 1927. Total accessions are 
21,341, as follows : New York point 
books, 2700 ; New York point music 186 ; 
American Braille books 3037 ; American 
Braille music 1289 ; European Braille 
books 3505 ; European Braille music 244 ; 
Esperanto BraUle books 3 ; Moon books 
5040 ; Moon music 5 ; Revised Braille 
books 4332; Revised Braille music 128; 
Standard dot books 14 ; Line books 193 ; 
Line music 21 ; Ink print books 479 ; 
*Appliances 83 ; *Games 50 ; Maps 32. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 7894 books, etc., were loaned as 
follows : New York point 279 ; American 



*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



53 



Braille 140 ; European Braille 746 ; Moon 
3123 ; Revised Braille 3600 ; Line ; Ink 
Print 2 ; Appliances 2 ; Games 1 ; Maps 1. 
The loans were divided by class as follows ; 
Philosophy and religion 428 ; sociology 30 ; 
language 29 ; primers 49 ; science 72 ; 
useful arts 28 ; fine arts 2 ; amusements 
13 ; music 37 ; literature 102 ; fiction 
5608 ; travel and history 410 ; biography 
274 ; periodicals 812. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by F. B. 
Beans, Mrs Marion Beebe, Joseph Block, 
Mrs C. W. Brett, Mrs H. W. Bruning, 
Mrs H. O. Buker, Anna Courtois, E. M. 
Gebhardt, W. M. Harper, Ruby Holtz, 
Mrs H. D. Jones, J. R. Lewarton, Bessie 
Long, Mrs Rose McComb, Joseph Mc- 
Glannon, W. A. Miller, Hattie B. New- 
man, Mrs M. E. Phillips, Emma Redeman, 
Dan Riley, Mrs Alvin Rutky, Mrs 
Georgia Sandifer, Mrs L. Sargent, George 
W. Shoemaker, American Braille Press 
for War and Civilian Blind, Inc., 
American Printing House for the Blind, 
Canadian National Institute for the 
Blind, Christian Record Publishing Com- 
pany, Christian Science Publishing Com- 
pany, Department of Missions of 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Gospel 
Trumpet Company, Michigan School for 
the Blind, National Institute for the 
Blind, New York Association for the 
Blind, Society for Aid of the Sightless, 
Theosophical Book Association for the 
Blind, Western Pennsylvania School for 
the Blind, Xavier Braille Publishing 
Company, Ziegler Publishing Company. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. 
See p. 104. 

Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 
blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 146 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine J. Morrison, home teacher of 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall of 
Records, every Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 



Angeles. Her telephone number is Drexel 
5339. She gives lessons regularly in Los 
Angeles and vicinity and makes occa- 
sional trips to San Diego. 

From October 1 to December 31, the 
home teachers gave 602 lessons in the 
homes of the blind and 60 lessons at 
libraries. They made 160 visits and calls 
in connection with the work for purposes 
other than giving lessons, and have 
received 26 visits in connection with the 
work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 299 hours on corres- 
pondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 401 letters and 166 postals and 
received 293 letters and 29 postals. They 
also answered and made 555 telephone 
calls. They made 4 addresses. Miss 
Foley teaches regularly in Oakland, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
10 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Sutro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Library, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner. '15 

Ln. Torrance High School Li., Torrance 
Thelma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J 
Helen V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fairview ave., Los Gatos 
Agnes E. Brown. '15 

Asst. San Benito Co. F. L., Hollister 
Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Branch, State L., 

San Francisco 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buchan), '20 

1631 Cowper St., Palo Alto 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 

1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
Ruth E. Bullock, '15 

Ln., Belvedere Junior High School L., 

Los Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley 
Marguerite Chatfield, '20 

Asst. P. L., Pasadena 
Nellie E. Christensen, '19 

Ln. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Lange Library of Education, Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High School 

L., Watsonville 



54 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARlEg. 



[Jan., 1928 



Dorotha Davis, '17 

Ln. Fresno High School L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernardi, '18 

The Finch School for Girls, 61 E. 77th 

St., New York City 
Estella De Ford, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829J S. Normandie st., Los Angeles 
Ellen B. Frink, '19 

Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Flo A. Gantz, '20 

Ln. .San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., San 

Luis Obispo 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sacramento 
Margaret V. Girdner. '17 

Ln. Galileo High School, San Francisco 
Marv E. Clock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Bernice L. GofE, '14 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 

746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H. Hargis), '18 

725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Frank 
U. Harriss), '15 

23 3 Larkin st., San Francisco 
Margaret Hatch, '15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L.. San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner), 'IS 

1528 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. D., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd), '20 

Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 

1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Orton A. Kirschman). '19 

2839 Forest ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Iver 
N. Lawson,. Jr.), '18 

3231 Front st, San Diego 
Marjorie C. Learned, '20 

As.=;t. P. L,, New York City 
Mrs M. Ruth McLaughlin Ldckwood (Mrs 
Ralnh L. Lockwood), '17 

1520 Greenwich st., San Francisco 
Amy G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea). '19 

49 41 8th ave., Sacramento 
N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy F. 
McDowein. '14 

Asst. Stanislaus Co. F. L., Modesto 
Mrs Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 

Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts,, 

Washington, D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robert K. Meyers), '19 

Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L., 

Tulare 



Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse, '17 

Ln. Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hono- 
lulu, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton (Mrs James L. 
Patton). '18 

416 S. Hoover st., Los Angeles 
Mrs Helen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 

4 8 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Frederic Percival), '15 

1633 38th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

Ln. Pomona High School and Junior 

College L., Pomona 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

Asst. Lane Medical L., San Francisco 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price), '16 

1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefleld Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 

Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio 
Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 

724 Santa Ynez Way, Sacramento 
.A_nna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L., Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour, '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 

Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). '18 

McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith), '17 

1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '20 

3100 19th St., Bakersfield 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Ewart 
Burns Todd), '17 

1860 Green St., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 

Out of librars' work 
Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Blanche Chalfant Wheeler (Mrs De 
Forest Nathaniel Wheeler), '14 

Box 865, San Jose 
Josephine L. Whitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L.. Richmond 
Essie T. "V^^iite, '19 

Ln. Sacramento High School L., Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs Katharine Cahoon Wilson (Mrs Lloyd 
R. Wilson), '17 

1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine "Winham, '20 

Asst. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, '15 

Asst. Solano Co. F. L.. Fairfield 
Mrs Bess Rantcn Yates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates). '18 

Asst. P. L. Long Beach 

News Items. 

Thelma Brackett, '20, spent some time 
around the holidays with relatives in 
Arizona and then paid a very hasty visit 
to California. As she was in Sacramento 
only for a short time on a Sunday, she 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



55 



did not see many of her State Library 
friends — to their great regret. 

Ellen B. Frink, '19, resigned from the 
Siskiyou County Free Library and 
returned to Monterey County, where she 
will be assistant librarian. 

Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss, '15, is again 
in California, living at 2330 Larkin street, 
San Francisco. 

Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell, '14, who 
has been doing part-time work at the 
Stanislaus County Free Library at vari- 
ous times, is now to be a full-time 
assistant. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Octo- 
ber, November and December, 1927. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the October, 1927, issue of 
this publication. 

I GENERAL WORKS. 

Becker, Mrs May (Lamberton). 
Adventures in reading. 1927. 

028 B39ad 
Bent, Silas. 

Ballyhoo ; the voice of the press. 1927. 

071 B47 
Bowers, Claude Gernade. 

The founders of the republic. 1927. 
(Reading with a purpose) 028 B78 

Brazelton, Mrs Ethel Maude (Colson). 
Writing and editing for women. 1927. 

070 882 
Brebner, John Bartlet, ed. 

Classics of the Western world. 1927. 

028 882 

Bureau of public personnel administra- 
tion. 
Proposed classification and compensa- 
tion plans for library positions. 1927. 
x023 895 
Eaton, Walter Pritchard. 

A study of English drama on the stage. 
1927. (Reading with a purpose) 

028 E14 



Evans, Mary, camp. 

Garden books, old and new. 1926. 

016.71 E92 

Flexneb, Jennie Maas. 

Circulation work in public libraries. 
1927. (Library curriculum studies) 
x024 F61 
Graves, WiUiam Whites. 

Making money with a country news- 
paper. cl926. 070 G77 

Harwood, Dix. 

Getting and writing news. cl927. 

070 H34 

"The Librarian," international directory 
of booksellers, publishers, binders, 
paper makers, printers, agents, etc. 
1927. rOlO L69 

Mowrer, Paul Scott. 

The foreign relations of the United 
States. 1927. (Reading with a 
purpose) 028 iVI93 

New York Herald tribune books, v. 2-3. 
1925-27. f016 N5h 

Phelps, William Lyon. 

Twentieth century American novels. 
1927. 028 P54 

Quarterly cumulative index medicus. 
V. 1. Jan. 1927. rq016.61 Q1 

The West Coast leader, v. 14. 1926. 

f051 W5 
WooLLEY, Edward Mott. 

Free-lancing for forty magazines. cl927. 

070 W91 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Burrow, Trigant. 

The social basis of consciousness. 1927. 
(International library of psychology, 
philosophy and scientific method) 

126 897 

Darrow, Clarence Seward, d Durant, 
William James. 
Debate : Is man a machine ? 1927. 

110 D22 
Gibson, Jessie Edith. 

On being a girl. . 1927. 173 G44 

Grossman, Mordecai. 

The philosophy of Helvetius, with 
special emphasis on the educational 
implications of sensationalism. 1926. 



56 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

194 G87 
Haet, Joseph Kinmont. 

Inside experience ; a naturalistic phi- 
losophy of life and the modern world. 
1927. 191 H32 

Love, Mary C. 

Human conduct and the law. cl925. 

170 L89 
MoDouGALL, WUliam. 

Character and the conduct of life ; 
practical psychology for everyman. 
1927. 170 M137 

• Janus : the conquest of war ; a 

psychological inquiry. cl927. (To- 
day and to-morrow) 172.4 Ml 37 



Phelps, WUliam Lyon. 
Happiness. cl927. 



171.4 P54 



PowiCKE, Frederick James. 
The Cambridge Platonists. 1926. 

184 P88 

Radha-Krishnan, Sarvepalli. 

Indian philosophy. [1923] (Library 
of philosophy) 181 R12 



Rogers, Arthur Kenyon. 
Morals in review. 1927. 



170.9 R72 



Santayana, George. 

Platonism and the spiritual life. 1927. 

184 P71s 
Thomas, Evan Edward. 

The ethical basis of reality. 1927. 

110 T45 
TsucHUJA, Kyoson. 

Contemporary thought of Japan and 
China. 1927. (Library of contem- 
porary thought) 199 T88 



Tzu-ssxJ. 

The Chung-yung. 1927. 



181.1 T99 



Waite, Arthur Edward. 

Lamps of western mysticism ; essays on 
the life of the soul in God. 1923. 

149.3 W14I 
Ward, James. 

Essays in philosophy. 1927. 104 W25 

MIND AND BODY. 

Baker, Albert Edward. 

P.sychoanalysis explained & criticised. 
1926. 130 B16 



BouSFiELD, Edward George Paul, d 
Bousfield, William Robert. 
The mind and its mechanism. 1927. 

130 B77m 

Cutting, Mary Stewart, jr 

What dreaming means to you. 1927. 

135 C99 
La Rue, Daniel Wolford. 

Mental hygiene. 1927. 131 L336 



Steles, Percy Goldthwait. 
Dreams. 1927. 



135 S85 



CHILD STUDY. MENTAL TESTS. 

Baker, Harry Jay. 

Characteristic differences in bright and 
dull pupils ; an intei*pretation of 
mental differences, with special refer- 
ence to teaching procedures. cl927. 
136.7 B167 
Brown, Andrew Wilson. 

The unevenness of the abilities of dull 
and bright children. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. 
Contributions to education) 

136.7 B877 

Bruce, Henry Addington Bayley. 

Your growing child ; a book of talks to 
parents on life's needs. 1927. 

136.7 B88y 

Daily, Benjamin WiUiam. 

The ability of high school pupUs to 
select essential data in solving prob- 
lems. 1925. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 136.7 D13 



Forest, Use. 

Preschool education ; a 
critical study. 1927. 



historical and 
136.7 F71 



Holmes, Mossie D. 

Handbook of suggestions and course of 

study for subnormal children. 1926. 

(National education handbook series) 

136.76 H75 

Jones, Vernon Augustus. 

Effect of age and experience on tests of 
intelligence. 1926. (Teachers col- 
lege, Columbia university. Contribu- 
tions to education) 136.7 J79 

Kbnnon, Laura Hall Vere. 

Tests of literary vocabulary for teach- 
ers of English. 1926. (Teachers 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



57 



college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 136.7 K36 

McHale, Kathryn. 

Comparative psychology and hygiene of 
the overweight child. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. 
Contributions to education) 

136.7 M14 

NooNAN, Margaret Eleanor. 

Influence of the summer vacation on 
the abilities of fifth and sixth grade 
children. 1926. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 136.7 N81 

Orleans, Jacob Samuel. 

A study of the nature of difficulty. 
1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
University. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 136.7 071 

Sachs, Bernard. 

The normal child and how to keep it 
normal in mind & morals. 1926. 

136.7 S12 

ScHWEisiNGEK, Gladys ClotUde. 
The social-ethical significance of vocab- 
ulary. 1926. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 136.7 S41 

Swift, Edgar James. 
The psychology of youth ; a new edi- 
tion of "Youth and the race." 1927. 
136.7 S97a 

Thom, Douglas Armour. 

Everyday problems of the everyday 
child. 1927. 136.7 T45 

TiLTON, John Warren. 

The relation between association and 
the higher mental processes. 1926. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

136.7 T58 

Wallin, John Edward Wallace. 

Clinical and abnormal psychology. 
cl927. (Riverside textbooks in edu- 
cation) 136.7 W21 

Woodyaed, Ella. 

The effect of time upon variability. 
1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 136.7 W912 



OCCULTISM. 

DuPOTET DE Sennevoy, Jean, haron. 
Magnetism and magic. [1927] 

134 D93 
Old, Walter Gorn. 

Directional astrology. 1921. 

133.5 044d 



Primary directions made easy. 

133.5 044p 
Simmonite, W. J. 

Complete arcana of astral philosophy. 

133.5 S59 
Stbaiton, Emma Valentia. 

The celestial ship of the north. 1927. 
2 V. 133.5 S89 

Wilde, George. 

Chaldean astrology. 1909. 133.5 W67c 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

AvELiNG, Francis. 

Directing mental energy. 1927. 

150 A94 
Cablill, H. F. 

Socrates ; or, The emancipation of man- 
kind. 1927. (To-day and to- 
morrow) 150 C28 

Coleman, Loyd Ring, d Commins, Saxe. 
Psychology, a simplification. 1927. 

150 C69 
Jascalevich, Alejandro A. 

Three conceptions of mind, their bear- 
ing on the denaturali^iation of the 
mind in history. 1926. 151 J39 



JoKDAN, David Starr. 
The higher foolishness. 



cl927. 



c151 J82 



Kline, Linus Ward, & Kline, Frances 
Littleton. 
Psychology by experiment. cl927. 

150 K65 
Leaey, Daniel Bell. 

That mind of yours ; a psychological 
analysis. 1927. 150 L43 

Loeand, Arnold. 

Defective memory, absentmindedness 
and their treatment. 1927. 154 L86 

Randolph, Vance. 

The A B C of psychology. [1927] 

150 R19 
RoBACK, Abraham Aaron. 

The psychology of character, with a 
survey of temperament. 1927. (In- 



58 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



ternational library of psychology, 
philosophy and scientific method) 

150 R62p 
Roche, Arthur Somers. 

What I know about you. cl927. 

150 R67 
Ward, James. 

Psychology applied to education. 1926: 
(The Cambridge psychological 
library) 370.1 W25 

RELIGION. 

Armstrong, Robert Cornell. 

Buddhism and Buddhists in Japan. 
1927. (The world's living religions) 
294 A73 
Blatj, Joel. 

The wonder of life. 1926. 242 B64 



BuRBANK, Luther. 
My beliefs. 



c241 B94 



Carpenter, Joseph Estlin. 

The Johannine writings, a study of the 
Apocalypse and the Fourth gospel. 
1927. 228 C29 

Davis, Jerome, ed. 

Christianity and social adventuring. 
cl927. 261 D26 

DiEFFENBACH, Albert Charles. 

Religious liberty ; the great American 
illusion. 1927. 277.3 D55 

Douglass, Harlan Paul. 

The church in the changing city. cl927. 

260 D73c 
Ferrier, William Warren. 

Pioneer church beginning and educa- 
tional movements in California. 1927. 
c260 F39 

GtriGNEBERT, Charles Alfred Honore. 
Christianity, past and present. 1927. 

270 G95 
HowLAND, Louis. 

Autobiography of a cathedral. cl927. 
204 H86au 
Jacobs, Thornwell. 

The new science and the old religion. 
cl927. 215 J17 

Keller, Helen Adams. 

My religion ; illustrations from photo- 
graphs. 1927. 241 K29 

Kent, Charles Foster. 

The life and teachings of Jesus, accord- 



ing to the earliest records. 1913. 
(The historical Bible) 232 K371 

Laou-Tsze. 

Laotzu's Tao and Wu wei. cl919. 

299 L29g 
McCoMB, Samuel. 

Preaching in theory and practice. 1926. 

251 M12 
Maycock, Alan Lawson. 

The Inquisition from its establishment 
to the great schism. [1926] 

272 M46 
MuiR, Sir William. 

The life of Mohammad from original 
sources. A new and rev. ed. by T. H. 
Weir. 1923. 297 M953 

NicOLL, Sir William Robertson. 

The seen and the unseen. [1926] 

204 N64 
Osborne, Hubert. 

The Song of Solomon. 1927. 223.9 081 

Prati, Carlo. 

Popes & cardinals in modem Rome. 
[1926] 282 P91 

Rall, Harris Franklin, d Cohon, Sam- 
uel S. 

. Christianity and Judaism compare 
notes. 1927. 239 R16 

ROBBINS, Howard Chandler. 

Cathedral sermons preached in the 
Cathedral of St. John the Divine. 
1927. 252 R63 

Russell, Henry Norris. 

Fate and freedom. 1927. (The Terry 
lectures) 215 R96 

Sclater, John Robert Paterson. 

The public worship of God. cl927. 
(The Lyman Beecher lectures on 
practical theology at Yale, 1927) 

240 S41 
SECHfi, Alphonse. 

The radiant story of Jesus. 1927. 

232 S44 
Spinka, Matthew. 

The church and the Russian revolution. 
1927. 274.7 S75 

Spivey, Thomas Sawyer. 

Ecclesiastical vocabulary and apocry- 
phal code. cl927. 220.3 S76 
Gift. 

VoGT, Von Ogden. 

Modern worship. 1927. 249 V88 



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



59 



Waldsteikt, Abraham Solomon. 

Modern Palestine, Jewish life and prob- 
lems. 1927. 296 W16 

Warschauer, Joseph. 

The historical life of Christ. [1927] 

232 W29 
Webber, Frederick Roth. 

Church symbolism. 1927. q246 W3 

WiEMAN, Henry Nelson. 

The wrestle of religion with truth. 
1927. 204 W64 

"Wilson, Wai-ren Hugh. 

Rural religion and the country church. 
cl927. 260 W75 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

Rolling, John Randolph, comp. 

Chronology of Woodrow Wilson, to- 
gether with his most notable ad- 
dresses, a brief description of the 
League of nations, and the League of 
n;ations Covenant. 1927. 308 W75b 

Chisholm, Archibald. 

The healing of the nations ; studies in 
some international aspects of social 
problems. 1925. 301 C54 

Hart, Hornell Norris. 

The science of social relations ; an in- 
troduction to sociology. cl927. 
(American social science series) 

301 H32 

Jacks, Lawrence Pearsall. 

The heroes of Smokeover. [1926] 

304 J12h 

Lasalle, Ferdinand Johann Gottlieb. 
Speeches of Ferdinand Lasalle, with a 
biographical sketch. cl927. (Voices 
of revolt) 304 L34 

Leibknecht, Karl Paul August Fried- 
rich. 
Speeches, with a biographical sketch. 
cl927. (Voices of revolt) 304 L71 

Marat, Jean Paul. 

Writings of Jean Paul Marat, with a 
biographical sketch. cl927. (Voices 
of revolt) 304 M311 

Odum, Howard Washington. 

Man's quest for social guidance ; the 
study of social problems. cl927. 
(American social science series) 

301 027 



Robespierre, Maximilien Marie Isidore 

de. 

Speeches of Maximilien Robespierre, 

with a biographical sketch. cl927. 

(Voices of revolt) 304 R65 

Russell, Hon Bertrand Arthur William. 

Selected papers of Bertrand Russell. 

cl927. (The Modern library of the 

world's best books) 304 R96 

STATISTICS. POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Bruce, Harold Rozelle. 

American parties and politics. cl927. 
(American political science series) 

329 B886 

Burgess, Robert Wilbur. 

Introduction to the mathematics of 
statistics. 1927. 311 B95 

Cleveland, Frederick Albert. 

American citizenship as distinguished 
from alien status. cl927. 323.6 C63 

Dressler, Albert. 

California Chinese chatter. 1927 

C325.251 D77 

Englemann, Geza. 

Political philosophy from Plato to 
Jeremy Bentham. 1927. 320.9 E57 

Fairchild, Henry Pratt, ed. 

Immigrant backgrounds. 1927. (Wiley 
social science series) 325 F16 



Garis, Roy Lawrence. 
Immigration restriction. 



1927. 
325.73 G23 



GoSNELL, Harold Foote. 

Getting out the vote ; an experiment in 
the stimulation of voting. cl927. 
(The University of Chicago studies 
in social science) 324 G67 

Hasbrouck, Paul De Witt. 

Party government in the House of rep- 
resentatives. 1927. 328.73 H34 

Haworth, Paul Leland. 

The Hayes-Tilden election. cl927. 

324.73 H39 

HiBBEN, John Grier. 

Self-legislated obligations. 1927. 

323. H 62 

Hill, Howard Copeland. 

Roosevelt and the Caribbean. cl927. 

327 H64 



60 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES. [Jan., 1928 



Jefferson, Mark Sylvester William. 
Peopling the Argentine Pampa. 1926. 
(American geographical society. Re- 
search series) 325.82 J45 

LowiE, Robert Harry. 

The origin of the state. cl927. 

320.1 L91 
Pollock, James Kerr. 

Readings in American government. 
cl927. 320.73 P77 

Shannon, Alexander Harvey. 
The racial integrity of the American 
negro. cl925. 325.26 S52r 

Gift. 

Smith, Thomas Vernor. 
The American philosophy of equality. 
[1927] 323 S66 

WiLLSON, Beckles. 

The Paris embassy ; a narrative of 
Franco-British diplomatic relations 
1814-1920. 1927. 327 W74 

Woodson, Carter Godvpin. 

Ten years of collecting and publishing 
the records of the negro. [1925] 

q325.26 W8t 

Gift. 

Young, Benjamin Franklin. 

Statistics as applied in business. cl925. 

311 Y68 

ECONOMICS. 

Bkokaw, Warren Edwin. 

Equitable society and hovs^ to create it. 
[1927] 331 B867 

Butler, Eliza Marian. 

The Saint-Simonian religion in Ger- 
many ; a study of the Young German 
movement. 1926. 335 B98 

Comer, John Preston. 

Legislative functions of national ad- 
ministrative authorities. 19 2 7. 
(Studies in history, economics and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia uni- 
versity) 330.5 C72 

Cooper, Clayton Sedgwick. 

Latin America — men and mai-kets. 
cl927. 330.98 C77 

CouLTON, Geoi-ge Gordon. 

The medieval village. 1926. (Cam- 
bridge studies in medieval life and 
thought. 333 C85 



Crompton, George. 

The tariff ; an interpretation of a be- 
wildering problem. 1927. 337 C94 



Edge, William. 
The main stem. 



cl927. 



339 E23 



Florence, Philip Sargant. 

Economics and human behavior, a re- 
joinder to social psychologists. 1927. 
(The new science series) 330 F63 

Forman, Samuel Eagle. 

The rise of American commerce and 
industry. cl927. 330.973 F72 

Grady, Henry Francis. 

British war finance, 1914-1918. 1927. 
(Studies in history, economics and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of po- 
litical science of Columbia university) 
330.5 C72 

Hardy, Charles Oscar, & Cox, Garfield 
Vestal. 
Forcasting business conditions. 1927. 

331 H26 

Harrison, Charles William Francis, 
comp. 
The trade, industries, products & re- 
sources of South Africa and adjacent 
territories. 1926. 330.96 H31 

Jerome, Harry. 

Migration and business cycles. 1926. 
(Publications of the National bureau 
of economic research, incorporated) 

331 J56 
Knight, Melvin Moses. 

Economic history of Europe to the end 
of the middle ages. cl926. 

330.94 K71 

Kropotkin, Petr Aleksieevich, kniaz. 
Kropotkin's revolutionary pamphlets. 
1927. 335 K93 

KuczYNSKi, Robert Rene. 

American loans to Germany. 1927. 
(The Institute of economics. Inves- 
tigations in international economic 
reconstruction) 330.943 K95 

Laski, Harold Joseph. 

Communism. cl927. (Home univer- 
sity library of modem knowledge) 

335.4 L34 
Lippincott, Isaac. 

Economic development of the United 
States. 2d ed. 1927. 330.973 L76e1 



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McCowN, Ada Chenoweth. 

The congressional Conference commit- 
tee. 1927. (Studies in histoiT, eco- 
nomics and public law, ed. by the 
Faculty of political science of Colum- 
bia university) 330.5 C72 

NoxJBSE, Edwin Griswold. 

The legal status of agricultural co- 
operation. 1927. (The Institute of 
economics. Investigations in agri- 
cultural economics) 334.6 N93 

Post, Louis Freeland. 

The basic facts of economics. 1927. 

330 P85 
PoTWiN, Marjorie Adella. 

Cotton mill people of the Piedmont. 
1927. (Studies in history, economics 
and public law, ed. by the Faculty 
of political science of Columbia uni- 
versity) 330.5 C72 

Rtxfe^'Er, Louis August. 

Principles of economics. el927. 

330 R92 
Thompson, Donna Fay. 

Professional solidarity among the teach- 
ers of England. 1927. (Studies in 
history, economics, and public law, 
ed. by the Faculty of political science 
of Columbia university) 

330.5. C72 
TuGWELL, Rexford Guy. 

Industry's coming of age. cl927. 

330.973 T91i 

Weld, William Ernest, d Tostlebe, Alvin 
Samuel. 
A case book for economics. cl927. 

330 W44 

WiESEE, Friedrich, freiherr von-. 

Social economics. cl927 (Adelphi 
economic series) 330 W65s 

Young, AUyn Abbott. 

Economic problems, new and old. 1927. 

330 Y68 
LABOR. 
Appleton, William Archibald. 

Trade unions, their past, present, and 
future. [1925] (The Westminster 
library) 331.88 A65 

Brown, Sara A. 

Children working in the sugar beet 
fields of certain districts of the South 
Platte Valley, Colorado. 1925. (Na- 
tional child labor committee. Publi- 
cations) 331.3 B87 



Dunn, Robert Williams. 

The Americanization of labor; the em- 
ployers' offensive against trade 
unions. cl927. 331.8 D923 

Company unions, employers' "in- 
dustrial democracy." cl927. 

331.88 D92 

National industrial conference board. 
Minimum wage legislation in Massa- 
chusetts. 1927. 331.2 N277m 

Night work in industry. 1927. 

331.8 N2772 
Selekman, Ben Morris. 

Postponing strikes ; a study of the In- 
dustrial disputes investigation act of 
Canada. 1927. 331.89 S46 

Young women's Christian associations. 
U. S. National hoard. Education 
and research division. 
Women in industry in the Orient. 

1926. 331.4 Y78 

BANKING. FINANCE. 

Andrew, Abram Piatt, d- Burton, Theo- 
dore Elijah. 
The war debts, status quo or revision? 

1927. 336.4 A56 



BiRCK, Laurits Vilhelm. 
The public debt. 1927. 

Garret, Philip Lord. 
The art of speculation. 



336.4 B61 



1927. 

332.6 C31 
Chapman, John Martin. 

Problems in banking, money and credit. 
cl927. 332.1 C466 

CONANT, Charles Arthur. 

A histoi-y of modern banks of issue. 
1927. 332.1 C74h1 

Guest, Harold Walter. 

Public expenditure ; the present ills and 
the proposed remedies. 1927. 

336.73 G93 
Hawtrey, Ralph George. 

The gold standard in theory and prac- 
tice. 1927. 332 H39g 

Miller, Harry Edward. 

Banking theories in the United States 
before 1860. 1927. (Harvard eco- 
nomic studies) 332.1 M64 

National industrial conference board. 
The fiscal problem in Illinois. 1927. 

336.77 N27 



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NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



National tax association. 

Digest and index, 1907^1925. 1927. 

336.2 N2772 
Woodward, Walter H. 

Profits in bank stocks. 1927. 

332.1 W91 

PRODUCTION. PRICES. 

Chase, Stuart, c€ Schlink, Frederick 
John. 
Your money's worth. 1927. 338 C48 

HiCHBOEN, Franklin. 

Why the corporations win before the 
State railroad commission. 1926. 

c338.8 H62 
Kramer, Stella. 

The English craft guilds. 1927. 

338.6 K89 

LuBiN, Isador, & Everett, Helen. 
The British coal dilemma. 1927. (The 
institute of economics. Investiga- 
tions in industry and labor.) 

338.2 L92 

National industrial conference board. 
The cost of living in foreign countries. 
1927. 338 N2772cf 

PiEXOTTO, Jessica Blanche. 

Getting and spending at the professional 

standard of living; a study of the 

costs of living an academic life. 1927. 

338 P37 

Plumb, Charles Sumner. 

Marketing farm animals. cl927. 

338.1 P73 
SCHUEREN, Arnold C 
Meat retaUing. 1927. 338.1 S38 

LAW. ADMINISTRATION. 

Abbott, Frank Frost, & Johnson, Allan 
Chester. 
Municipal administration in the Roman 
empire. 1926. 352 A13 

Archer, Gleason Leonard. 
The impossible task. 1926. 340.7 A67i 

Beman, Lamar Taney, comp. 

Selected articles on old age pensions. 
1927. (The handbook series) 

351.5 B45 

Conference committee on the merit sys- 
tem. 
The merit system in government. cl926. 

351.1 C74 



McBain, Howard Lee. 

The living Constitution : a consideration 

of the realities and legends of our 

fundamental law. 192 7. (The 

Workers bookshelf) 342.73 Mil 

Marriott, Sir John Arthur Ransome. 
The mechanism of the modern state ; a 
treatise on the science and art of 
government. 1927. 2 v. 342.42 M35 

Martin, Charles Emanuel, <f- George, 
William H. 
American government and citizenship. 
1927. 342,73 M37am 

Moran, Thomas Francis. 

The theory and practice of the English 
government. New ed. 1908. 

342.42 M82 
Morey, Lloyd. 

Manual of municipal accounting. 1927. 
(The Wiley accounting series) 

352.1 M84 
Powell, Fred Wilbur. 

The bureau of plant industry ; its his- 
tory, activities and organization. 
1927. (Institute for government re- 
search. Service monographs of the 
United States government) 

353.8 P88p 

Sheriffs and police officers association of 
America. 
Guide and directory. 1927. q352.2 S5 

Smith, Darrell Hevenor. 

The General accounting office, its his- 
tory, activities and organization. 
192T. (Institute for government re- 
search. Service monographs of the 
United States government) 

353.8 S64g 
Sutton, John Richard. 

The government of California. 1927. 
c353.9 S96g 
Tobet, James Alner. 

The national government and public 
health. 1926. (The Institute for 
government research. Studies in ad- 
ministration) 353.8 T62n 

White, Leonard Dupee. 

The city manager. 1927. (Social sci- 
ence studies, directed by the Local 
community research committee of the 
University of Chicago) 352 W58 



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



63 



WiLLOUGHBY, William Franklin. 

The legal status and functions of the 
General accounting office of the na- 
tional government. 1927. (Institute 
for government research. Studies in 
administration) 353.8 W73I 

The national budget system, with 



suggestions for its improvement. 1927. 
(Institute for government research. 
Studies in administration) 

353.8 W73 

MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE. 

Bywatee, Hector Charles. 
Navies and nations. 1927. 359.09 B99n 

Clakk, George Ramsey, <& others. 

A short history of the United States 
navy. cl927. 359.09 C59 

Heebmann, Ernest Edward. 
Exterior ballistics, 1926. 1926. 

q358 H5 

Meeciee, Henry James, d Gallop, WU- 
liam. 
Life in a man-of-war. 1927. 

vq359 M5 

ASSOCIATIONS. INSTITUTIONS. 

Cooley, Edwin J. 

Probation and delinquency. cl927. 

364 C77 
Debs, Eugene Victor. 

Walls and bars. cl927. 365 D28 

Job, Leonard Bliss. 

Business management of institutional 
homes for children. 1926. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 362.7 J 62 

MuECHisoN, Carl AUanmore. 

Criminal intelligence. 1926. 364 M97 

Stillman, Charles C. 

Social work publicity, its message and 
its method. cl927. (The social 
workers' library) 360 S85 

INSURANCE. 

HuEBNEE, Solomon S. 

The economics of life insurance. 1927. 
( Life insurance : its economic and 
social relations) 368.3 H88e 



HUTTINGEE, E. Paul. 

The law of salesmanship. 1927. (Life 
insurajice : its economic and social 
relations) 368.3 H98 

LoMAN, Harry James. 

Taxation. 1927. ( Life insurance : its 
economic and social relations) 

368.3 L83 
LuNT, Edward Clark. 

Surety agents' guide. cl927. 

368 L96s 

National industrial conference board. 
Industrial group insurance. 1927. 

368 N2772 
Reddall, Arthur H. 

Publicity methods for life underwriters. 
1927. (The international life under- 
writers library) 368.3 R31 

EDUCATION. 

Anthony, Katheiine Miner. 

A manual for observation and teach- 
ing in the elementai-y grades. 1926. 
q371 A6 
Ayeb, Adelaide May. 

Some difficulties in elementary school 
history. 1926. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 372.8 A97 

Bagley, William Chandler, d K y t e, 
George Cleveland. 
The California curriculum study. 1926. 

c375 B14 
Baldwin, Robert Dodge. 

Financing rural education ; a critical 
study of provisions and practices in 
the several states. cl927. (Rural 
education series) 379.73 B13 

Baetlett, Lester WUliam. 

State control of private incorporated 
institutions of higher education as 
defined in decisions of the United 
States Supreme court. 1926. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

379.1 B29 
Begteup, Holger. 

The folk high schools of Denmark and 
the development of a farming com- 
munity. [1926] 379.489 B41 

Btjtteeweck, Joseph Seibert. 

The problem of teaching high school 
pupils how to study. 1926. (Teach- 



64 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



ers college, Columbia university. Con- 
tfibutions to erlueation) 371.3 B98 

Cook, Huldah Florence, tC Walker, Edith 
May. 
Adult elementary education. cl927. 

370.1 C771 
Counts, George Sylvester. 

The social composition of boards of 
education. cl927. ( Supplementary 
educational monographs, pub. in con- 
junction with the School review and 
the Elementary school journal) 

379.1 C85 
CuKOE, Philip R. V. 

Educational attitudes and policies of 
organized labor in the United States. 
1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 371.9 C97 

Davis, Calvin Olin. 

Our evolving high school curriculum. 
cl927. 375 D26 

Dawson, Edgar. 

Teaching the social studies. 1927. 
(Teachers' professional library) 

371.3 D27 
Drew, LiUian Curtis. 

Adapted group gymnastics. 1927. 

371.7 D776 

DuGGAN, Stephen Pierce Hayden. 

A student's textbook in the history of 
education. cl927. 370.9 D86 

Edmonson, James Bartlett. 

The legal and constitutional basis of a 
state school system. 1926. 

379.1 E243 
FiNUEY, Charles William. 

Biology in secondary schools and the 
training of biology teachers. 1926. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

371.1 F51 
FoKD, Willard Stanley. 

Some administrative problems of the 
high school cafeteria. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 371.7 F71 

Graneud, John Edward. 

The organization and objectives of state 
teachers' associations. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 370.6 G75 



Gray, Arthur. 

Cambridge university, an episodical his- 
tory. 1926. q378.42 CEg 

Helseth, Inga OUa. 

Children's thinking. 1926. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 372.8 H48 

Hebtzberg, Oscar Edward. 

A comparative study of different meth- 
ods used in teaching beginners to 
write. 1926. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 372.5 H57 

JoHNSEN, Julia E., comp. 

Selected articles on a federal depart- 
ment of education. 1927. (The 
handbook series) 379.73 J 65s 

Jones. Walter Benton. 

Job analysis and curriculum construc- 
tion in the metal trades industry. 
1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 370.01 J 79 

JuDD, Charles Hubbard. 

Psychology of secondary education. 
cl927. 370.1 J92ps 

Rural school survey of New York 

state ; administration and supervi- 
sion. 1923. 371.2 J92r 

Keppel, Frederick Paul. 

Education for adults and other essays. 
1926. 370.4 K38 

Knox, Rose B. 

School activities and equipment. cl927. 
371.6 K74 
Koos, Leonard Vincent. 

The junior high school. cl927. En- 
larged edition. 379.17 K82a 

Lebkigo, Marion Olive. 

Health problem sources. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 371.7 L62 

McKowN, Harry Charles. 

Extracurricular activities. 1927. 

371.8 M15 
Maeeaeo, Howard Rosario. 

Nationalism in Italian education. 1927. 
370.945 M35 
Milleb, Harry Lloyd. 

Creative learning and teaching. cl927. 
371.3 M64 



1 



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^roAEOE, Walter Scott. 

Directing learning in the high school. 
1027. (Teacher training series) 

371 M75 

Natiojn'al league of compulsory education 
officials. 
Proceedings. . . . 1926. 370.6 N2772 

Oi.SEN, Hans Christian. 

The work of boards of education. 1926. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

371.2 052 

OsBOEN, Henry Fairfield. 

Creative education in school, college, 
university, and museum. 1927. 

370.4 081 

Proctoe, William Martin, ed. 

The junior college, its organization and 
administration. 1927. 378 P96 

Reed, Mrs Anna (Yeomans). 

Human waste in education. cl927. 
(The Century education series) 

370 R32 

RuGG, Harold Ordway. 

A syllabus of the course in the psy- 
chology of the elementary school sub- 
jects. cl926. 370.1 R92 

Ryan, Heber Hinds. 

Ability grouping in the junior high 
schools. 1927. 371.2 R98 

Saxman, Ethel Julia. 

Students' use in leisure time of activi- 
ties learned in physical education in 
state teachers colleges. 1926. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. 
Contributions to education) 

371.8 S27 

Sheeve, Francis. 

Supervised study plan of teaching. 
cl927. (Johnson education series) 

371.3 S56 

Smith, Harry Pearse. 

The business administration of a city 
school system. 1925. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) 371.2 S64 

Snedden, David Samuel, cC- Warner, Wil- 
liam Everett. 
Reconstruction of industrial arts 
courses. 1927. 371.4 S67 

5—56955 



Stott, LeUa. 

Adventuring with twelve year olds. 
cl927. (Experimental practice in 
the City and country school) 

371 S88 

Steang, Ruth May. 

Subject matter in health education. 
1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 371.7 S89 

STBATEiiEYEE, Florence B., d Bruner, 
Herbert Bascom. 
Rating elementary school courses of 
study. 1926. (Studies of the Bu- 
reau of curriculum research of 
Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. BuUetin) 375 S89 

Steong, Edward Kellogg. 

Introductory psychology for teachers. 
Revised. 1922. 370.1 S92 

Sullivan, Ellen B. 

Attitude in relation to learning. 
[1927] (Psychological review publi- 
cations. Psychological monographs) 
q370.1 S9 
Taft, Henry Waters. 

An essay on conversation. 1927. 

374.1 T12 
Taylor, Katherine Ames. 

The romance of Stanford. 1927. 

qc378.794 SEt 
Gift. 

Tayloe, Robert Bums. 

Principles of school supply manage- 
ment. 1926. (Teachers colloge, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 371.6 T24 

Uhl, Willis Lemon. 

Secondary school curricula. 1927. 

375 U31 
Waples, Douglas. 

Problems in classroom method. 1927. 

371 W25 

Wasjibubne, Carleton Wolsey, cC- others. 
Rpsidts of practical experiments in fit- 
ting schools to individuals. 1926. 
( Supplementary educational mono- 
graph. Journal of educational re- 
search) 379.773 W31 

Weidemann, Charles Conrad. 

How to construct the true-false exam- 
ination. 1926. (Teachers college, 



66 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



Jan., 1928 



Columbia university, 
to education) 



Contributions 
371.2 W41 



Western reserve university. Centennial 
conference. 
Problems in education. 1927. 

370.1 W52 
Whit.max. Arthur Dudley. 

The value of the examinations of the 
College entrance examination board 
as predictions of success in college. 
1926. 371.2 W61 

AVuxiajUS, Lester Alouzo, <& Rice, George 
Arthur. 
Principles of secondary education. 
cl92T. 379.17 W72 

COMMERCE. COMMUNICATION. 

American arbitration association. 

Year book on commercial arbitration in 
the United States, 1927. 380 A512 

BOGEN, Jules Irwin. 

The anthracite railroads ; a study in 
American railroad enterprise. cl927. 
385 B67 
Champion, Richard. 

Consideration on the present situation 
of Great Britain and the United 
States of America, with a view to 
their future commercial connexions. 
2d ed. 1784. 382 C45 

Curtis, Nell C. 

Boats ; adventures in boat making, by 
third grade children. cl927. 

656.8 C97 
Holland, Rupert Sargent. 

Historic railroads. cl927. 385 H73 

Howe, Octavius Thorndike, d Mathews. 

Frederick C. 

American clipper ships, 183.3—1858. 

1926- 2 V. (Marine research 

society. Salem, Mass.) q656.8 H8 

ROOKBACH, George Byron. 

Import purchasing. principles and 
problems. 1927. 382 R77 

Stevens, Frank Walker. 

The beginnings of the New York central 
railroad. 1926. 385 S84 

Taussig, Frank William. 

International trade. 1927. 382 T22 

Van Metre, Thurman William. 
Trains, tracks and travel. cl926. 

656 V26 



CUSTOMS. FOLKLORE. 

Bureau of vocational information. New 
York. 
Marriage and careers. cl926. 396 B95 

Chase, Ernest Dudley. 

The romance of greeting cards ; an 
historical account of the origin, evo- 
lution, and development of the Christ- 
mas card, valentine, and other forms 
of engraved or printed greetings, from 
the earliest days to the present time. 
1926. 394 C48 



Crawley. Alfred Ernest. 

The mystic rose. 1927. 2 v. 



392 C91 



FLt'GEL, John Carl. 

The psycho-analytic study of the family. 
1921. (The International psycho- 



analytical library) 

Huntington, Ellsworth, 
Jjcon F. 
The builders of America. 



392 F64 

d Whitney, 



1927. 



392 H94 



LooMis, Roger Sherman. 

Celtic myth and Arthurian romance. 
1927. 398 L863 

Malinowski, Bronislaw. 

Sex and repression in savage society. 
1927. (International library of 
psychology, philosophy and scientific 
method) 392 M25 

LAW. 

California. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The Civil code of the state of Cali- 
fornia. cl927. 



— The Code of civil pro- 
cedure of the state of California. 
cl927. 

Railroad commission. 



Public utility regulation by the Cali- 
fornia railroad commission. 1927. 

Cuba. Laws, statutes, etc. 

.Turisprudencia del Tribunal supremo 
en materia civil. 1907. 1916-17. 
V. 35-38. 

Davis, Herbert L. 

Legal accounting and court auditing. 
1927. 

Felstead, Sidney Theodore. 

Famous criminals and their trials, inti- 
mate revelations compiled from the 



vol. 23, no. 1 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



67 



papers of Sir Richard Muir, late 
senior counsel to the British Treas- 
ury. [1926] 

FiSHKK, Frederick Charles. 

A mouograph of marriage and divorce 
in the Philippines. cl926. 

Frankfurter, Felix. 

The business of the Supreme court ; a 
study in the federal judicial system. 

1927. 

The case of Sacco and Vauzetti. 



1927. 

GoDLEY, Leon Grant. 
Outline of equity. 



1926. 



Haring, Fred Benson. 

A manual of procedure. The law of 
conditional sales. 3d ed., 1927. 

Jessup, Philip Caryl. 

The law of territorial waters and mari- 
time jurisdiction. 1927. 

Lyons, Eugene. 

The life and death of Sacco and Van- 
zetti. 1927. 

Mackenzie, Frederick Arthur. 
Twentieth century crimes. 1927. 

McMaster, James Smith. 

McMaster's irregular and regular com- 
mercial paper. 1920. 

Minnesota. Latvs, statutes, etc. 

General statutes of Minnesota, 1923. 
1924. 

New Jr:RSEY. Reports. Various courts. 
New Jersey miscellaneous reports. 
1924-26. 3 V. 

Pennsylvania. Reports. Various 
courts, fiomerset. 
Somerset legal joxirnal. [1923]-[1926] 
2 V. 

Santos, Ambrosio. 

A treatise on obligations and contracts. 
1926. 

Schneider, George August. 

California real estate principles and 
practices. 1927. 

She^pabd, The Frank, company. 

A table of federal acts to March 4, 
1927, which have been designated by 
popular names. cl927. 



Smith. Sydney Alfred. 

Forensic medicine ; a text-book for 
students and practitioners. 1925. 

Southwestern lumbermen's association. 
Lumbermen's law. 1926. 

Spain. Luivs, statutes, etc. 

The Code of commerce of Spain, with 
amendatory laws of the Philippine 
Islands. 3d ed., 1927. 

Street, Arthur Leonard Howell. 

The miller and the law ; a handbook of 
legal decisions specially affecting 
flour milling and allied industries. 
C1926. 

Summers, Walter Lee. 

A treatise on the law of oil and gas. 
1927. 

Tennessee. Court of appeals. 

Rejjorts of cases argued and determined 
in the Court of appeals of Tennessee. 
cl927. 

Thompson, Seymour Dwight. 

Commentaries on the law of corpora- 
tions. 1927. S V. 

U. S. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The bankruptcy act of 1898. 1926. 

White, Edward Joseph. 

Legal traditions and other papers. 
1927. 

Wisconsin law review, v. 2, 3. 1924r- 
1926. 

WOYWOD, Stanislaus. 

A practical commentary on the Code of 
canon law. 1926. 2 v. 

Wyndham, Horace. 

Crimes in high life. 1927. 

LANGUAGE. 

Grandgent, Charles Hall. 

From Latin to Italian ; an historical 
outline of the phonology and morphol- 
ogy of the Italian language. 1927. 

455 G75 
HuGON, Paul Desdemaines. 

Morrow's word-finder; a living guide to 
modern usage. 1927. 424 H89 

Krapp, George Philip. 

A comprehensive guide to good English. 
cl927. 423 K89 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



The knowledge of English. cl927. 

420 K89 
Price, Isaac. 

The direct method of teaching English 
to foreigners. cl926. 428 P94 

NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL. 

Clabke, Beverly Leonidas. 

The romance of reality ; the beauties 
and mysteries of modern science. 
1927. 500 C59 



Dyeb, Walter Alden. 
Country cousins. 1927. 



504 D99 



Haldane, John Burdon Sanderson. 

The last judgment ; a scientist's vision 
of the future of man. 1927. (Things- 
to-know series) 504 H151 

StTLLiVAN, John William Navin. 

Gallio; or, The tyranny of science. 
[1927] (To-day and to-morrow) 

504 S94g 
Ward, Charles Henshaw. 

Exploring the universe. cl927. 

504 W25 

ASTRONOMY. 

Button, Benjamin. 

Navigation and nautical astronomy. 
1926. q527 D9 

Eddington, Arthur Stanley. 

The internal constitution of the stars. 
1926. q523.8 E2 

Stars and atoms. 1927. 523 E21 



Macpherson, Hector Copland. 

Modern astronomy, its rise and prog- 
ress. 1926. 520.9 M17 

Proctor, Mary. 

Romance of the sun. 1927. 523.7 P964 

PHYSICS. 

Judge, Arthur William. 

Stereoscopic photography, its applica- 
tion to science, industry and educa- 
tion. 1926. q535.8 J9 

IVLicMiLLAN, William Duncan. 

Statics and the dynamics of a particle. 
1927. 531 M16 

PuPiN, Michael Idvorsky. 

The new reformation ; from physical to 
spiritual realities. 1927. 530.9 P98 



Russell, Hon Bertrand Arthur William. 
The analysis of matter. 1927. (Inter- 
national library of psychology, phi- 
losophy and scientific method) 

530.1 R96 
Si\ow, Adolph Judah. 

Matter & gravity in Newton's physical 
philosophy. 1926. 530.1 S674 

ToLMAN, Richard Chace. 

Statistical mechanics with applications 
to physics and chemistry. 1927. 
(American chemical society. Mono- 
graph series) 531 T652 

AERONAUTICS. 

Angle, Glenn Dale. 

Engine dynamics and crankshaft 
design. cl925. (Airplane engine 
design series) 533.6 A58 

Barber, Horatio. 

The aeroplane speaks. 1927. 

q533.6 B2a 
Burgess, Charles Paine. 

Airship design. cl927. (Ronald aero- 
nautic library) 533.6 B95 

Feaseb, Chelsea Curtis. 

Heroes of the air. Rev. ed. [1927] 

533.6 F84 
Glauert, Hermann. 

The elements of aerofoil and airscrew 
theory. 1926. 533.6 G55 

Neon, pseud. 

The great delusion. 1927. 629.13 N43 

Pritchard, John Laurence. 

The book of the aeroplane. 1926. 

629.13 P96 

Thomson, Christopher Birdwood Thom- 
son, haron. 
Air facts and problems. [1927] 

533.6 T482 

CHEMISTRY. 

Andrade, Edward Neville da Costa. 
What is the atom? 1927. (Things-to- 
know series) 541.2 A55 

Darrow, Floyd Lavem. 

The story of chemistry. cl927. 

540 D22 
Erb, Russell C. 

Chemical tests ; a manual for chemists 
and physicians. 1927. 540 D65 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



69 



Hawk, Philip Bovier. 

Practical physiological chemistry. cl926. 

547.9 H39a 

Lodge, Sir Oliver Joseph. 

Science of to-day. 1927. (Things-to- 

know series) 541.2 L82s 

National symposium on colloid chemis- 
try. 
Colloid symposium monograph, v. 1^. 
1923-1926. 541.1 N27 

GEOLOGY. PALEONTOLOGY. 

Daneker, Jerome G. 
Il: The romance of Georgia marble. cl927. 
* 553.5 D17 

Davison, Charles. 

The founders of seismology. 1927. 

551.22 D26f 
Hatch, Frederick Henry. 

The petrology of the igneous rocks. 
[1926] (Text-book of petrology) 

552 H36p 
II ay, Oliver Perry. 

The Pleistocene of the western region 
of North America and its vertebrated 
animals. 1927. (Carnegie institu- 
tion of Washington) q560 H4pw 

HuMPHEETS, William .Jackson. 

Fogs and clouds. 1926. 551.57 H92 



I 



Rain making and Other weather 

vagaries. 1926. 551.5 H92r 

Price, George McCready. 

Evolutionary geology, and the new ca- 
tastrophism. cl926. 550 P945e 

BIOLOGY. 

Bjokkman, Edwin August. 

The search for Atlantis ; excursions by 
a layman among old legends and new 
discoveries. 1927. 572.4 B62 

Fbazer, Si7- James George. 

Man, God and immortality. 1927. 

572 F84 
Hambly, Wildrid Dyson. 

Origins of education among primitive 
peoples. 1926. 572 H 19 

Holmes, Samuel Jackson. 

An introduction to general biology, life 
and evolution. cl926. 570 H75 

Marett, Robert Ranulph. 

The diffusion of culture. 1927. (The 
Frazer lecture in social anthropol- 
ogy) 572 M32d 



Radin, Paul. 

Primitive man as philosopher. 1927. 

572 R12 
Spence, Lewis. 

The history of Atlantis. 572.4 S74h 

EVOLUTION. 

East, Edward Murray. 

Heredity and human affairs. 1927. 

575.1 El 3 
JuDD, John Wesley. 

The coming of evolution. 1925. (The 
Cambridge manuals of science and 
literature) 575 J92 

Smith, Grafton Elliot. 
The evolution of man. 1927. 575 S64a 

Zellers, George Andrew. 

Reason and evolution. cl927. 575 Z51 

ZOOLOGY. 

Grey, Edward Grey, 1st viscount. 
The charm of birds. 1927. 598.2 G84 

Hoffmann, Ralph. 

Birds of the Pacific states. 1927. 

C598.2 H71 

Johnson, Myrtle Elizabeth, tG Snook, 
Harry James. 
Seashore animals of the Pacific coast. 
1927. C591.92 J68 

Maeterlinck, Maurice. 

The life of the white ant. 1927. 

595.7 M18I 
Pitt, Frances. 

Animal mind. [1927] 591.5 P68 

Thomson, Arthur Landsborough. 

Birds ; an introduction to ornithology. 
cl927. (Home university library of 
modern knowledge) 598.2 T482b 

USEFUL ARTS: MEDICINE AND 
HYGIENE. 

Alsaker, Rasmus Larssen. 

Outwitting old age. 1927. 612.6 A46 

Bauer, Bernhard A. 

Woman and love. 1927. 2v. 

06I2.6 B34 
Collins, Joseph. 

A doctor looks at doctors. 1927. 
(Things-to-know series) 610 071 

Cromie, William James. 

Pyramid building. el926. (Spalding 
"red cover" series of athletic hand- 
books) 613.7 C94p 



70 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



: Jan., 1928 



Deavek. George G. 

I'hysical examination, text for use by 
ph.vsical directors. 1027. 

616.07 D285 
FiSHBEiN. Morris, ed. 

Your weight and how to control it. 
cl927. 613.2 F532 

Funk. John Clarence. 

How to live longer. cl927. 613 F98 

Gamble, Sidney Gompertz. 

A practical treatise on outbreaks of 
fire. 1926. 614.8 G19 

Hall, Winfield Scott. 

The intimate life of the individual, the 
family, society and the race. cl926. 
612.6 H18i 
Hartman, Leroy Leo. 

The teeth and the mouth. 1927. (Ap- 
pleton popular health series) 

617.6 H33 
Hayhurst, Emery Roe. 

Personal health. 1927. 613.7 H41 



Heaton, Trevoi". 

The human body. [1927] 



611 H44 



Hemmeter, .Tohn Conrad. 

Master minds in medicine. 1927. [The 
Library of medical history] 

610.9 H48 

International s.vmposium on cancer con- 
trol. Lake Mohonl: N. Y., 1926. 
Cancer control. 1927. q616.99 16 

Leigh, Robert D. 

Federal health administration in the 
United States. cl927. (Harper's 
public health series) 614 L529 

LovELL, Philip M. 

Diet for health by natural methods, to- 
gether with health menus and 
recipes. 1927. 613.2 L91 

McCaw, Emma J. 

The dental assistant. 1927. 617.6 M 12 

Macfadden, Bernarr Adolphus. 

Foot troubles. 1926. 611.9 M14 

Macfie, Ronald Campbell. 

Sunshine and health. cl927. (Homo 
university library of modern knowl- 
edge) ^ 613.1 M14 

Meyer, Max Friedrich. 

Abnormal psychology, "when the other- 
one astonishes us." 1927. 

616.84 M61 



Moore. Harry Ha.scall. 

American medicine and the people's 
health. 1927. 610 M82 

Mo.siiER, Clelia Duel. 

Personal hygiene for women. 1927. 

613.7 M91 
PoPENOE, Paul Bowman. 

Problems of human reproduction. 1926. 

612.6 P82 
RoBBiNS, Samuel Dowse. 

Stammering and its treatment. 1926. 

612.7 R63 

Rose. Mrs Mary Da vies (Swartz). 
The foundations of nutrition. 1927. 

613.2 R79f 
Sanger, Mrs Margaret H. 

What every boy and girl should know. 
1927. 612.6 S22wh 

SuiiPTiON, Dorothy. 

Fundamental Danish gymnastics for 
women. 1927. (Athletics for women) 
613.7 S95 
[Wool). George Bacon] 

The dispensatoi"y of the United States 
of America, 21st ed., thoroughly rev. 
cl926. qr615.1 U5 

Wood. Thomas Denison. cG Cassidy, Rosa- 
lind Frances. 
The new physical education. 1927. 

613.7 W87n 

ENGINEERING. 

Annett, Fred Anzley. 

Electric elevators, their design, con- 
struction, opei'ation and maintenance. 
1927. 621.87 A61 

Barritt, .John W. 

The care and operation of machine 

tools. 1927. (The Wiley trade series) 

621.9 B27 

Carey. Alfred Edward, tt Oliver, Francis 
Wall. 
Tidal lands, a study of shore problems. 
1918. 627.5 C27 

Croft, Terrell Williams. 

Signal wiring. 1926. 621.34 C94s 



DiNSDALE, Alfred. 
Television. 1926. 



621.38 D58 



Forbes-Lindsay, Charles Harcourt Ains- 
lie, cC Winter, Nevin Otto. 
Panama and the canal to-day ; an his- 
torical account of the canal. cl926. 
626 F69p 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



71 



Goodman, Jolm. 

Mecliaiiics applied to engineering. 9th 
ed. 1926. 621 G65a1 

IIakkison, John Leman. 

Management and methods in concrete 
highway construction. 1927. 

625.7 H319 

Ibbetsok, Willie Waite Skirrow. 
Accumulator charging, maintenance and 
repair. 1926. 621.35 112 

KuNS, Ray F. 

Automotive electrical practice. cl926. 
625.6 K96au 
Mills. Hiram Francis. 

Flow of water in pipes. [1923] 

q627 M6 
Mitchell, James. 

Shipbuilding and the shipbuilding in- 
dustry. [1926] (Pitman's common 
commodities and industries) 

623.8 M68s 
Packer, Alfred Herbert. 

Electrical trouble shooting on the mo- 
tor car. [cl926] 625.6 P11 

POLLAKD, Hugh B. C. 

A history of fireamis. 1927. 

q623.4 P7 
Reed, Emerson G. 

The essentials of transfomier practice, 
theory, design and operation. 2d ed., 
rev. and enl. 1927. 621.31 R32 

Schodee, Ernest William, cC- Dawson, 
Francis MuiTay. 
Hydraulics. 1927. 627 S36 

Young, George Joseph. 

The working of uustratified mineral de- 
posits. 1927. 622 Y72w 

AGRICULTURE. 

American country life association. 
Farm income and farm life. 1927. 

630 A51c 

Cox, Joseph Frank, d- Starr, George B. 
Seed production and marketing. 1927. 
(Wiley farm series) 630 C87s 

Dies, Edward .Jerome. 

Solving the farm riddle. cl926. 

630 D56 
Eastman, Edward Roe. 

These changing times ; a story of farm 
progress during the first quarter of 
the twentieth century. 1927. 

630 El 3 



Engberg. Russell C. 

Industrial prosperity and the farmer. 
1927. (The Institute of economics. 
Investigation in agricultural econ- 
nomics) 630 E57 

Hardenburg, Earle Volcart. 

Bean culture. 1927. (The rural 
science series) 633 H25 

Kains, Maurice Grenville. 

Culinary herbs ; their cultivation, har- 
vesting, curing and uses. 1920. 

635 K13c 

LovELL, John Harvey. 

Honey plants of North America (north 
of Mexico) a guide to the best lo- 
cations for beekeeping. 1926. 

638 L8g 

Record, Samuel James, tG Mell, Clayton 
Dissinger. 
Timbers of tropical America. 1924. 

q634.9 R3 

Reynolds. Philip Keep. 

The banana ; its history, cultivation 

and place among staple foods. 1927. 

634.7 R46 

Schmidt, Gustavus Adolphus, cG others. 

Teaching farm shop work and fann 

mechanics. cl927. (The Century 

vocational series) 630.7 S35t 

Weaver, John Ernest, tG Bruner, William 
Edward. 
Root development of vegetable crops. 
1927. (McGraw-Hill publications in 
the agricultural and botanical sci- 
ences) s 635 W36 

Work, Paul. 

Tomato production. 1926. (Farm 
and garden library) 635 W92 

Worthen, Edmund Louis. 

Farm soils. 1927. (Wiley farm series) 

631 W93 

DAIRYING. 

Burke, Arthur Devries. 

Practical dairy tests. cl926. 637 B95 

Farrington, Edward Holyoke. 

A guide to quality in dairy products. 
1927. 637 F24 

Maughan, Merrill O. 

Milk and how to sell it. cl926. 

637 M44 



72 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Xewlanber, John Alvin. 

Testing dairy products. cl926. 

637 N54 
PlRTi-E. Thomas Ross. 

History of the daii-y industry, c-1926. 

637 P67 

Ross, Harold Ellis. 

The care and handling of milk. 1927. 

637 R82 

THOMSOif, George Sutherland. 

Grading dairy produce (milk, cream, 
butter, cheese). 1925. (Lockwood's 
manuals) • 637 T48 

ANIMALS. 
Allen, Joseph Alexander, d McLure, W. 
Chester S. 
Theory and practice of fox ranching. 
1926. 636.9 A42 

Ash, Edward Cecil. 

Dogs : their history and development. 
[1925] 2 V. q636.7 A8 

BuBKETT, Dorothy Louise. 

Canary birds ; a complete guide for 
their breeding, rearing and trea.tment 
in health and disease. 1926. 

636.6 B95 

Celty, Ellen V., d Ray, Anna. 

Feeding and care of the domestic and 
long-haired cat. 636.8 C39 

D ALLEY, E. J. 

Practical muskrat raising. cl927. 

636.9 D13 
HoRLACHER, Levi Jackson. 

Sheep production. 1927. (McGraw- 
Hill publications in the agricultural 
and botanical sciences) 636.3 H81 

KUECHLEB, Otto. 

Practical fur ranching. 1927. 

636.9 K95 
RousucK, Emanuel Jay. 

Tbe Boston terrier. 1926. 636.7 R86 

SiJiMONDS, Walter Edward. 
The complete bulldog. 1926. 

636.7 S59 
Smith, Carl E. 

Training the rabbit hound ; a book on 
bassets and beagles. cl926. 

636.7 S644 
Stahl, Edward Herman. 

Chinchilla rabbits, standard, heavy- 
weight and giant. cl926. 636.9 S78c 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Aldrich, Charles Anderson. 

Cultivating the child's appetite. 1927. 

649 A36 
Brown, Clara M. 

Clothing construction. cl927. 

646 B877 
.Johnson, George Henry. 

Textile fabrics ; their selection and care 
from the standpoint of use, wear, and 
launderability. 1927. 646.1 J67 

Jordan, M7-s Louise Estella (Bulger). 
Clothing : fundamental problems. 1927. 

646 J82 
Lloyd, Elwood. 

How to finance home life. [1927] 

640 L79 

Macdonald, Elizabeth, d Macdonald, 
Forrester. 
Homemaking, a profession for men and 
women. cl927. 640 M13 

Richardson, Frank Howard. 

Rebuilding the child ; a study in mal- 
nutrition. 1927. 649 R522r 

Southworth, May E. 

Let me fix it ; a handbook of brief, clear 

directions for saving time, money 

and nerves in housekeeping. 1927. 

640 S728 

PRINTING. PUBLISHING. 

Briggs, Morris Henry. 

Buying & selling rare books. 1927. 

655.5 B85 
Davenport, Cyril James H. 

Byways among English books. 1927. 

655 D24b 
Goodyear, Frederick. 

Printing & book crafts for schools. 
1926. 655.3 G65 

Heath, firm, publishers, Boston. (1925. 
D. C. Heath d co.) 
Forty years of service, published in 
commemoration of the fortieth anni- 
versary of D. C. Heath and Com- 
pany. cl925. 655.4 H43 

HiGHTON, Albert H. 

Practical proofreading. 1926. ( Stand- 
ard textbooks on printing) 

655.2 H63 
Knights, Charles C. 

The business man's guide to printing. 
[1927] 655.3 K71 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



73 



McMuRTRiE, Douglas Crawford. 

The fii'st printers of Chicago. 1927. 

vq655.1 Ml 
Oecutt, William Dana. 

The kingdom of books. 1927. 

655 064k 
Polk, Ralph W. 

The practice of printing. cl926. 

655.3 P76p 
Rogers, John Raphael. 

Linotype instruction book. 192.5. 

655.2 1V155 

BUSINESS METHODS. 

CuSHMAN, Frank. 

Foremanship and supervision ; a prac- 
tical handbook. 1927. 658.5 C98 

Elbouene, Edward Tregaskiss. 

The marketing problem, how it is be- 
ing tackled in U. S. A. 1926. 

658 E37m 
Harris, W. Carleton. 

Practical real estate. 1927. 658 H317 

HousER, J. David. 

AVhat the employer thinks ; executives' 

attitudes toward employees. 1927. 

( Wertheim fellowship publications ) 

658.5 H84 

IIULVERSON, George R. 

Personnel. cl927. (Business adminis- 
tration series) 658.5 H91 

LowRY, Stewart M., c£- others. 

Time and motion study and formulas 
for wage incentives. 1927. 658 L92 

j\IacDonaxd, John Haskell. 

Office management. 1927. 658 M13 

^Maynabd, Harold Howard, d others. 
Principles of marketing. cl927. 

658 M47p 

Mitchell, William Norman. 

Purchasing. el927. (Business admin- 
istration series) 658.8 M68 

Naethee, Carl Albert. 

Problems in business correspondence. 
1927. 658.7 N14p 

Seligman, Edwin Robert Anderson. 
The economics of instalment selling. 
1927. 2 V. 658.8 S46 



TiMMiNS, Clark. 

Selling real estate. 1927. 



658.3 T58 



Whitehead, Harold. 

Problems of the executive. cl927. 

658 W59 

ADVERTISING. ACCOUNTING. 

Cruji, William Leonard. 

Advertising fluctuations, seasonal and 
cyclical. 1927. 659 C95 

Hopkins, Claude C. 

My life in advertising. 1927. 

659 H79 
Lewis, Cleona. 

The international accounts. 1927. 
(The Institute of economics. In- 
vestigations of international economic 
reconstruction) 657 L67 

Lewis, Norman, d Kane, Robert Emmet. 

How to become an advertising man. 

cl927. 659 L675 

Long, John Dietrich, d Farwell, John 
Eden. 
Fundamentals of financial advertising 
for banks, trust companies, invest- 
ment banks, building and loan associ- 
ations and other financial institu- 
tions. 1927. 659 L848 

Russell, Gilbert. 

Nuntius ; advertising and its future. 
1926. (To-day and to-morrow) 

659 R963 
Stockwell, Herbert Grant. 

How to read a profit and loss state- 
ment, adapted especially to needs of 
credit men, bankers and investors. 
el927. 657 S86h 

Thompson, William Rodney. 

Accounting systems, their design and 
installation. 1927. 657 T47 

Vaile, Roland S. 

Economics of advertising. cl927. 

659 V12 

RADIO. 

Balbi, Charles Mackenzie R. 

Loud speakers, their construction, per- 
formance and maintenance. 1926. 

654.6 B17 
Claekson, Ralph Preston. 

The hysterical background of radio. 
cl927. 654.6 061 

Dtjnlap, On-in Elmer. 

The story of radio. 1927. 654.6 D92s 



74 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Hectok, Luther Grant. 

Principles of modern radio receiving. 
1927. 654.6 H45 

Institute of radio engineers, inc. 
Proceedings, v. 1.3, 1925. 654.6 159 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

American oil burner association. 

Handbook of domestic oil burning. Ten- 
tative ed. cl926. 662.6 A51 



Crump, Norman E. 
Copper. 1925. 



669.3 C95 



Edwards, Junius David. 

Aluminum bronze powder and alumi- 
num paint. 1927. 669.7 E26 

Hadfield, Sir Robert Abbott, hart. 
Metallurgy and its influence on modem 
progress, with a survey of education 
and research. 1925. 669 H 12 

Howe. Hamson Estell, c6 Turner, Fran- 
cis Mills. 
Chemistry and the home. cl927. 

660 H85ch 
MuLLiN, Charles Earl. 

Acetate silk and its dyes. 1927. 

667.2 M95 

Oil, paint and drug reporter; the market 
authority since 1871. v. 109-110. 
1926. f660.5 03 

Tague, Edgar Lemuel. 

Casein, its preparation, chemistry and 
technical utilization. 1926. 668 T12 

Thompson, Charles John Samuel. 

The mystery and lure of perfume. 
[1927] 668.5 T46 

Yan Gelder, Arthur Pine, t£- Schlatter, 
Hugo. 
History of the explosives industry in 
America. 1927. 662 V25 

MANUFACTURES. MECHANIC 
TRADES. BUILDING. 

Bennett, Thomas Penberthy. 

Architectural design in concrete. 1927. 

q693.5 B4 
Butter, Francis J. 

Locks and lockmaking. [1926] (Pit- 
man's common commodities and in- 
dustries) 683 898 



Caplin, Jessie F. 

Knitting, its products and processes. 
1927. 677 C24 

Harrison, T. 

The bookbinding craft and industry. 
[1926] (Pitman's common commodi- 
ties and industries) 686 H32 

Hunter, J. A. 

Cloths and the cloth trade. [1926] 
(Pitman's common commodities and 
industries) 677 H94 

Jackson, Emily, "Mrs F. Nevill Jack- 
son." 
Toys of other days. 1908. (The 
"Country life" library) q680 J1 



Klein, Paul E. 

Shoe repairing. cl926. 



685 K64 



Pattou, Albert Brace. 

Furniture, furniture finishing, decora- 
tion and patching. cl927. 684 P32 

Selvidge, Robert Washington. 

Blacksmithing ; a manual for use in 
school and shop. cl925. (The Sel- 
vidge series of instruction manuals) 
682 846 
Wright, Harry Bernard. 

Toys every child can make. [1927] 

680 W94 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

Ball, Katherine M. 

Decorative motives of oriental art. 
[1927] q709.5 81 

Blackie, John Haldane. 

The A B C of art. cl927. 701 862 

Isaacs, Walter F. 

The painter looks at nature. 1927. 
(University of Washington chap- 
books) 701 173 

IsHAM, Samuel. 

The history of American painting. 
1927. q709.73 17 

Ledoux, Louis Vernon. 

The art of Japan. 1927. 709.52 L47 

McCoLViN, Lionel Roy. 

Euterpe ; or, The future of art. [1925] 
(To-day and to-moiTow) 701 M12 

PiJOAN Y Soteras, Jose. 

History of art. Translated by Ralph 
L. Roys. 1927. 2 v. q709 P6 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



75 



Stein, Leo. 

The A-B-C of aesthetics. 



1927. 

701 S81 



GARDENS AND GARDENING. 

Bush-Brown, J/rs Louise (Carter). 
Flowers for every garden. 1927. 

716.2 B97 
Child, Stephen. 

Landscape architecture. 1927. 

q710 C5 

Cox. Euan HiUhouse Methven. 

The modern English garden. q710 C8 

McCoRMiCK, Mrs Harriet (Hammond). 
Landscape art, past and present. 1923. 

q710 Ml 

Rockwell, Frederick Frye. 

Gladiolus. 1927. (The home garden 
handbooks) 716 R68g 



— Shrubs. 1927. 
den handbooks) 



(The home gar- 
715 R68 



Saunders, Charles Francis. 

The wild gardens of old California. 
1927. c716 S25 

SUDELL, R. 

The town gardening handbook. [1927] 

716 S94 
Unwin, Charles W. J. 

Sweet peas ; their history, development, 
culture. 1926. 716 U62 

Waugh, Frank Albert. 

Formal design in landscape architecture. 
1927. 710 W35f 

Wilder, Mrs Louise (Beebe). 

My garden. 1927. 716 W67m 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Butler. Arthur Stanley George. 

The substance of architecture. 1926. 

720 B98 
Byne, Mildred Stapley. 

The sculptured capital in Spain. 1926. 

729 B99 
Dickinson, Page L. 

An outline history of architecture of the 
British Isles. [1926] 720.942 D55 

Hammett, Ralph Warner. 

The Romanesqve architectvre of west- 
ern Evrope. 1927. q723.4 H2 

Mixer, Knowlton. 

Old houses of New England. 1927. 

728 M685 



Sale, Mrs Edith Dabney (Tunis). 

Interiors of Virginia houses of colonial 
times. 1927. q728 SI 

Sexton, Randolph Williams. 

American theatres of today. cl927. 

q725.8 S5 

Interior architecture ; the design 



of interiors of modern American 
houses. cl927. q728 S5i 

Strayer, George Drayton, d Engelhardt, 
N. L. 
School building problems. 1927. 

727 S91s 

SCULPTURE. 

BfiNEiDiTE, Leonce. 

Rodin ; translated by Wilfrid Jackson. 
1926. (Masters of modern art) 

735 R69b 
Coquiot, Gustave. 

Rodin a I'hotel de Biron et a Meudon. 
1917. q735 R6c 

Kronquist, Emil Fritjoff. 

Metalcraft and jewelry. cl926. 

739 K93 
Sanford, Edward Field. 

Architectural sculpture. 1926. 11 
plates. fc730 S2 

Toft, Albert. 

Modelling and sculpture. 1924. 

731 T64 
Varnum, William Harrison. 

Pewter design and construction. cl926. 

q739 V3 

DRAWING. DECORATION. 
DESIGN. 

CovARRUBiAS, Miguel. 

Negro drawings. 1927. q741 C87 

Danvers, Verney L. 

Training in commercial art. 1926. 

q741 D1 
Glass, Frederick J. 

Sketching from nature, a practical 
treatise on the principles of pictorial 
composition. [1926] 741 G54 

Halstead, Frank. 

Architectural details. 1927. q744 H1 

The orders of architecture. 1927. 

q744 H10 
Halsted, Jesse Newton. 

Modern ornament and design. cl927. 

745 H19 



76 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



Repley, Mary Churchill. 

The Chinese rug book. 1927. 745 R59 



RoBEiBTSON, Jean K. 
A book of lettering. 



1926. 



745 R65 



ScHMiTZ, Hermann, ed. 
The encyclopaedia of furniture. [1926] 

q749 S35 

Sherbill, Charles Hitchcock. 

Stained glass tours in Germany, Aus- 
tria and the Rhine lands. [1927] 

748 S55sg 
Tabbeix, Harlan E. 

Chalk talk stunts. cl926. 741 T17c 

TxJEis'EB, William Wirt. 

Essentials of mechanical drawing. 

1926. 744 T95 

Wagneb, Charles L. H. 

Wagner's blue print text book of sign 
and show card lettering. cl926. 

q745 W1 

PAINTING AND PAINTERS. 

Abendschexn, Albert. 

The secret of the old masters. 1916. 

751 A14 
Bates, Walter. 

The art of decorative painting. 1927. 
(Universal art series) 750 B35 

Baufobt, Thomas Richard. 

Pictures & how to clean them, to which 
are added notes on things useful in 
restoration work. [1926] 750 B37 

Fontainas, Andre. 

Constable ; trans, by Wilfrid Jackson. 

1927. (Masters of modern art) 

759.2 C756f 



Gallatin, Albert Eugene. 
Charles Demuth. 1927. 



vq759.1 D3 



Hackney, Louise Wallace. 

Guide-posts to Chinese painting. 1927. 
q759.91 HI 
Kahn, Gustave. 

Fantin-Latour. Trans, by Wilfrid 
Jackson. 1927. (Masters of modern 
art) 759.4 F21k 



London, Hannah R. 
Portraits of Jews. 



1927. vq757 L8 



Offneb, Richard. 

Italian primitives at Yale university, 
comments & revisions. 1927. (Pub- 



lications of the Associates in fine arts 
at Yale) q759.5 03 

Sargent, Frederick Leroy. 
A working system of color for students 
of art and nature. cl927. q752 S2 

Smith, Solomon Charles Kaines. 
Cotman. [1926] (British artists) 

759.2 C844s 
Wethebed, Newton. 

From Giotto to John, the development 
of painting. [1926] 750 W53 

ENGRAVING. PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Charles, David. 

Commercial photography. 1927. 

770 C47 

Heintzelman, Arthur William. 

Arthur William Heintzelman ; foreword 
and critical notes by John Taylor 
Arms. cl927. (Modern American 
etchers) q767 H4 

Nutting, Wallace. 
Photographic art secrets, with a general 
discussion of processes. 1927. 

q770 N9 

Polk, Ralph W. 

Essentials of linoleum-block printing. 
cl927. 760 P76 

Roe, Frederic Gordon. 

Sporting prints of the eighteenth and 
early nineteenth centuries. [1927] 

q760 R6 

MUSIC. 

Annesley, Charles, pseud, of Charles and 

Anna Tittmann. 

The standard operaglass ; detailed plots 

of the celebrated operas. Rev. ed. 

1927. 782 A61a1 

Beethoven, Ludwig van. 

Beethoven letters in America. cl927. 

q780.2 B4 

Beethoven ; impressions of contempo- 
raries. cl926. 780.2 B41so 



BiDOtJ, Henry. 

Chopin, trans, by 
Phillips. 1927. 



Catherine Alison 
780.2 C54b 



Cadman, Charles Wakefield. 
A witch of Salem. cl926. 



qc782.1 CI 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



77 



Dett, Robert Nathaniel, ed. 

Religion.'! folk-songs of the negro. 1927. 

784.7 D48 
Eames, Emma. 

Some memories and reflections. 1927. 

780.2 E12 

Federation of young Judaea of Canada, 
pub. 
.Jewish folk songs. 784.4 F29 

Gkac'E, Harvey. 

Ludwig van Beethoven. 1927. (Mas- 
ters of music) 780.2 B41gr 

Hevesy, Andre de. 

Beethoven, the man; tr. F. S. Flint. 
[1927] 780.2 B41h 

LocKWOOD, Samuel Pierson. 

Elementary orchestration. cl926. 

785 L81 
Mason, Daniel Gregory. 

From Grieg to Brahms ; studies of 
some modern composers and their 
art. New and enl. ed. 1927. 

780.19 IV139a 

Pabkhurst, Howard Elmore. 

The beginnings of the world's music. 
1915. 780.9 P24 

Shaliapin, Fedor Ivanovich. 

Pages from my life ; an autobiography 
by Feodor Ivanovitch Chaliapine. 
1927. 780.2 S52 

Shay, Frank, comp. 

My pious friends and drunken com- 
panions, songs and ballads of con- 
viviality. cl927. 784.4 S53 



Simon, Robert A. 

Bronx ballads. 1927. 



784.4 S59 



SoNNECK, Oscar George Theodore. 

The riddle of the Immortal beloved ; a 
supplement to Thayer's "Life of 
Beethoven." cl927. 780.2 B41son 

Staton, Mrs Kate Elony (Baker), comp. 
Old southern songs of the period of the 
confederacy : the Dixie trophy col- 
lection. cl926. 784.8 S79 

Trend, John Brande. 

The music of Spanish history to 1600. 
1926. (Hispanic notes & mono- 
graphs ; essays, studies, and brief 
biographies issued by the Hispanic 
society of America) 780.9 T79 



Waxlace, William. 

Liszt, Wagner and the Princess. 1927. 
780.2 L77w 
Welch, Roy Dickinson. 

The appreciation of music. 1927. 

780.4 W44 
WiSMAR, Walter, comp. 

Sounding joy. 1926. 783.6 W81 

THEATER. AMATEUR 
THEATRICALS. 

Benton, Rita. 

The elf of discontent, and other plays. 
cl927. 793.2 B47e 

Conway, Kerry. 

The march of words. 1926. (French's 
international copyrighted . . . edition 
of the works of the best authors) 

793.2 C76 
Drama league of America. 

Dickon goes to the fair, and other 
plays, el 927. (The Drama league 
junior play series) 793.2 D76 

Gibson, Emily M. 

English-class plays for new Americans. 
cl927. 793 G44 



Hammond, Percy. 

But— is it art. 1927. 



792 H227 



HoFER, Mari Ruef. 

Festival and civic plays from Greek 
and Roman tales. el926. (Educa- 
tional play-book series) 793.2 H69 

Joseph, Mrs Helen (Haiman) 

Ali Baba, and other plays for young 

people or puppets. cl927. 793.2 J 83 

Contents : Ali Baba and the forty 
thieves. — Beauty and the beast. — The 
coat of many colors. 

Kemble, Frances Anne. 

On the stage. 1926. ( [Publications of 
the Dramatic museum of Columbia 
university. 5th series] Papers on 
acting) 792 K31 

Kennedy, Charles Rann. 

A repertory of plays for a company of 
three players : The chastening. The 
admiral, The salutation. cl927. ^ 

793 K352 
Overton, Grace Sloan. 

Dramatic activities for young people. 
cl927. 793.2 096 



Raine, James Watt. 

Bible dramatics. cl927. 



793.2 R15 



78 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



: Jan., 1928 



Wilde, Percival. 

Alias Santa Claus; a play for children. 
1927. 793.2 W67a 

Woods. Marjorie. 

Why we celebrate ; holiday plays for 
young people. cl927. 793.2 W89 

Young, Stark. 

The theater. cl927. (Doran's modern 
readers' bookshelf) 792 Y76th 



AMUSEMENTS. 

Chalif, Louis Hai'vy. 

Folk dances of different nations. cl926. 
3 V. q793.1 C4 

Clark, Imogen. 

Suppose we do something else ; a collec- 
tion of indoor and outdoor games for 
y(;ung and old. el927. 793 C593s 

(" ;llins, Archie Frederick. 

The boy's book of experiments. cl927. 

790 C71 
(JiHSON, Walter B. 

The world's best book of magic. 1927. 

791 G45 

IIattersley, Lelia. 

Auction and contract bridge clarified. 
1927. 795 H36 

Verbill, Alpheus Hyatt. 

The boy collector's handbook. 1927. 

790 V55 
W^ELLS, Carolyn. 

A book of charades. cl927. 793 W45b 



RECREATION. 

Andeksen, Leonora. 

An athletic program for elementary 

schools, arranged according to 

seasons. 1927. 796 A544 

Aston, Sir George Grey. 

Letters to young fly-fishei's. [1926] 

799.1 A85I 

Curtis, Paul Allen. 

American game shooting. cl927. 

799 C98am. 

Greenaway, Kate. 

Kate Greenaway's book of games. 

796 G798 

Grey, Zane. 

Tales of swoi-dfish and tuna. 1927. 

q799.1 G8ta 



Hammett, Charles Edward. 

Major sport fundamentals. 1927. 

796 H224m 
Johnston, Alexander. 

Ten — and out ! The complete story of 
the prize ring in America. 1927. 

796 J 72 

■Jones, Robert Tyre, cG Keeler, Oscar 
Bane. 
Down the fairway. 1927. 796 J78 

Roosevelt, Mrs P^dith Kermit (Carow), 
tC- others. 
Cleared for strange ports. 1927. 

799 R7812 
Roper, William Winston. 

Football, today and tomoiTOw. 1927. 

797 R78f 

Ruby, James Craig, d- Lipe, Cordon 
Clyde. 
How to coach and play basketball. 
cl926. 797 R89 

Stagg. Amos Alozno. 

Touchdown! 1927. 797 S77 

Streeter, Daniel Willard. 

Camels! 1927. 799 S91c 

Thomas, George Clifford. 

Golf architecture in America, its strat- 
egy and construction. 1927. 

796 Y456 
Whelen, Townsend. 

Wilderness hunting and wildcraft, with 
notes on the habits and life histories 
of big game animals. 1927. 799 W56 

White, Gerald T. 

The sailboat manual ; a book of prac- 
tical information in reference to sail- 
boats. cl925. (Rudder on series) 

797 W58 

LITERATURE. 

Abercbombie, Lascelles. 



Romanticism. 1927. 



824 A14 



The American caravan, a yearbook of 
American literature. cl927. 

810.8 A51 
Anderson, Shei-wood. 

A new testament. 1927. 818 A54 

Asquith, Mrs Margot (Tennant). 

Lay sermons. [1927] 824 A843 

Bailey, Cyril, erf. 

The mind of Rome. 1926. 870.8 B15 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



79 



Baldwin, Thomas Whitfield. 

The oi'ganization and personnel of the 
Shakespearean company. 1927. 

822.33 DAba 

Basile, Giovanni Battista. 

II Pentamerone ; or, The tale of tales, 

being a translation by Sir Richard 

Burton. cl92T. 853 B31 

Bkach, Joseph Warren. 

The outlook for Ameidcan prose. cl926. 

810.4 B36 

Bellinger, Mrs Martha Idell (Fletcher). 
A short history of the drama. cl927. 

809.2 B44 

Brigance, William Norwood. 

The spoken word. 1927. 808.5 885 

Clark, Barrett Harper. 

CEdipus or Pollyanna, with a note on 
dramatic censorship. 1927. (Uni- 
versity of Washington chapbooks) 

809.2 C59o 

Clark, Barrett Hai*per, comp. 

Great short novels of the world. 1927. 

808.3 C592 

Coblentz, Stanton A. 

The literary revolution. 1927. 

820.9 C65 

Collins, George Rowland, d Morris, 
John Seybold. 
Persuasion and debate. 1927. 

808.5 C71p 

Cook, Albert Stanburrough, & Tinker, 
Chauncey Brewster, eds. 
Select translations from old English 
prose. cl908. 829 C77s 

Craig, Asa HoUister, & Edgerton, Mrs 
Alice ( Craig ) . 

Both sides of 30 public questions. 
cl926. 808.5 C88b 

Criticism in America, its functions 
and status ; essays by Irving Bab- 
bitt Laud others]. cl924. 801 C93 



Davis, Elmer Holmes. 
Show window. 1927. 



814 D26 



De Vane, William Clyde. 

Browning's parleyings. 1927. 821.83 Dd 

Drinkwater, John. 

A book for bookmen. 1926. 820.9 D78 



Elliott, Mrs Maud (Howe). 

Lord Byron's helmet. 1927. 821 B99ze 

Fay. Bernard. 

Since Victor Hugo ; French literature 
of to-day, translated by Paul Rice 
Doolin. 1927. 840.9 F28 

Field, Louise Frances (Story) ''Mrs E. 
M. Field." 
The child and liis book. Second cd. 
[1S9.5] 820.9 F45 

Forster, Edward Morgan. 
Aspects of the novel. cl927. 

823.01 F733 

Fulcher, Paul Milton, ed. 

Foundations of English style. 1927. 

808 F96 
Gard, Wayne. 

Book reviewing. 1927. (Borzoi hand- 
books of journalism) 801 G21 



Garrod, Heathcote William 
Wordsworth. 1927. 



824 G24 



Grant, Elliott Mansfield. 

French poetry and modern industrj% 
1830-1870. 1927. (Harvard studies 
in Romance languages) 841.09 G76 

Gunn, Sidney. 

The story of literature. cl927. 

809 G97 

Harper's literary museum. 1927. 

Early American writings. 810.8 H29 

Harris, Corra May (White), "Mrs L. H. 
Harris." 
The happy pilgrimage. 1927. 

c818 H31 

Harrison, Joseph Barlow. 

A short view of Menckenism in Menck- 
enese. 1927. (University of Wash- 
ington chapbooks) 814 H319 

Hearn, Lafcadio. 

Talks to writers. 1927. 814 H43t 

.Jenkins, MacGregor. 

Puttering round. 1927. 814 J52p 

Larrotjy, Maurice. 

The undying race. [1914] 843 L33 



Lewishohn, Ludwig. 
Cities and men. 1927. 



801 L67ci 



80 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNLV LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



LoCKWOOU, Helen Drusilla. 

Tools and tlio man : a <(imparativ(' 
study of the French workiugman and 
English chartists in the literature of 
1830-1848. 1927. (Columbia uni- 
versity studies in English aud com- 
parative literature) 809 L81 

Lucas, Edward Verrall. 

Eveuts and embroideries. [1926] 

824 L93e 
^I.\CHEX. Arthur. 

Dreads and drolls. 824 M14dr 

Martin, Edward Sandford. 

What's ahead & meanwhile. 1927. 

814 M37w 
Mencken, Henry Louis. 

Prejudices : sixth series. cl927. 

814 M53a4 



Selected prejudices. 



1927. 

814 M53s 



MiRSKY, Dmitry Svyatopolk, prince. 
A histoi'y of Russian literature from 
the earliest times to the death of 
Dostoyevsky (1881). 1927. 

891.7 M67h 

Morrow's almanack for the year of Our 
Lord 1928. cl927. 817 M88 

Nathan, George Jean. 

Land of the pilgrims' pride. 1927. 

814 N27I 

Nethercot, Arthur Hobart. ed. 

A book of long stories. 1927. 

808.3 N46 

Contents : The Bedford-row con- 
spiracy, by W. M. Thackeray. — The 
murders in the Rue Morgue, by E. A. 
Poe. — A Christmas carol, by C. 
Dickens. — Rappaccini's daughter, by 
N. Hawthorne. — The sad fortunes of 
the Reverend Amos Barton, by George 
Eliot. — The case of General Ople and 
Lady Camper, by G. Meredith. — The 
merry men, by R. Li. Stevenson. — The 
withered arm. by T. Hardy. — The man 
who would be king, by R. Kipling. — 
A Tillyloss scandal, by Sir J. M. Bar- 
rie. — The figure in the carpet, by H. 
James. — Youth, by J. Conrad. — The 
last asset, by Edith "Wharton. — The 
first and the last, by J. GalsworthJ^ — 
Free, by T. Dreiser. 

NICOLL. Allardyce. 

A history of late eighteenth century 
drama, 1750-1800. 1927. 

822.09 N64hi 

Oliphant, Ernest Henry Clark. 

The plays of Beaumont and Fletcher. 
1927! 822.09 047 



O.M.VK Khayyam. 

Omar Khayyam Hie poet. 192H. (Tlie 
wisdom of the East series) 891.5 054we 



Palmek, Arnold. 

Straphangers. [1927] 



824 P17 



Palmer, John Leslie. 

Studies in the contemporary theatre. 
1927. 842 P17 

Pattee, Fred Lewis, ed. 

Century readings in the American 
short story. cl927. 813 P31 

Payne, Edward F. 

Dickens days in Boston ; a record of 
daily events. 1927. 828 D54zp 

Phillips, Le Roy, ed. 

Types of modern dramatic composition. 
cl927. 808.2 P56 

Plowman, Max. 

An introduction to the study of Blake. 
1927. 821 B63zp 

Porter, Mrs Gene (Strattou). 

Let us highly resolve. 1927. 814 P84 

Prescott, Frederick Clarke. 

Poetry & myth. cl927. 808.1 P92po 

Priestley, John Boynton. 

Open house ; a book of essays. 1927. 

824 P94o 
Railo, Eino. 

The haunted castle. 1927. q820.9 R1 

Raleigh, Sir Walter Alexander. 

On writing and writers. 1926. 

824 R16o 
Ralli, Augustus John. 

Critiques. 1927. 820.9 R163 

Reeder, Ward Glen. 

How to write a thesis. cl925. 

808 R32 

Russell. Mrs Frances Theresa (Peet). 
One Avord more on Browning. cl927. 

821.83 Br 
Sanford. a. p., cd. 

Armistice day ; an anthology of the 
best prose and verse on patriotism, 
the great war. the armistice — its his- 
tory, observance, spirit and signifi- 
cance. 1927. (Our American holi- 
days) 820.8 S22 

SiifRTER, Edwin Du Bois, c6 Taylor, Carl 
Cleveland. 
Both sides of 100 public questions 
briefly debated. cl925. 808.5 S56b1 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



81 



Solve, Melvin T. 

Shelley ; liis tlicorj- of pool ry. cl927. 
821 S54zso 

Spittelek, Carl. 

Laughing truths, translated by .Tames 
F. Muirhead. 1927. 834 S76 

Stoll, Elmer Edgar. 

Shakespeare studies, historical and 
comparative in method. 1927. 

822.33 Dsts 

Taylor, Warner, comp. 

Essays of the past and present. 1927. 

808.4 T24 

Thokeau, Henry David. 

The heart of Thoreau's journals, edited 
by Odell Shepard. 1927. 818 T48h 

Turner, Walter .James, ed. 

Great names, being an anthology of 

English & American literature from 

Chancer to Francis Thompson. 1926. 

q820.8 T9 

"Unamuno y Jugo, Miguel de. 
• The life of Don Quixote and Sancho. 
1927. 863 C41zu 

WhitmajS", William. 

Dog Corner papers, reprinted from 
'The Piper.' 1927. 814 W61 

WuxiAM.s, Orlo. 

Some great English novels ; studies in 
the art of fiction. 1926. 823.01 W725 

Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. 

Heavenly discourse. cl927. 817 W87 

POETRY. 

Alexander, Hartley Burr. 

God's drum and other cycles from In- 
dian lore ; poems. cl927. vq897.1 A3 

Allen, Gardner Weld. 

Naval songs and ballads. 1926. 

q808.1 A4 

Bacon, Leonard. 

Guinea-fowl and other poultry. 1927. 
811 B128g 
Batho, Edith Clara. 

The Bttrick shepherd. 1927. 

821 H71zb 
Benet, William Rose. 

Man possessed. cl927. 811 B46ma 

Bibescu, Elizabeth (Asquith), prinoi- 
pesa. 
Poems. 1927. 821 B58 

6 — 56955 



Bland, Henry Meade, ed. 

A day in the hills. 1926. c811.08 B64 
Gift. 

The Book of Bodley head verse. [1926] 

821.08 B72 



Brant, Allan. 
Poems. 1907. 



c811 B82 



Briggs, Wallace Alvin, comp. 

Immortelles. 1927. c808.1 B85 

Cook, Albert Stanburrough, d Tinker, 
Chauncey Brewster, eds. 
Select translations from Old English 
poetry. Rev. ed. cl926. 829 C77 

CtjLLEN, Countee, ed. 

Caroling dusk ; an anthology of verse 
by negro poets. 1927. 811.08 C96 



Davidson, Donald. 
The taU men. 1927. 



811 D252t 



De La Maee, Walter John. 

Stuff and nonsense and so on. 1927. 

821 D33s 
Deuxsch, Babette, ed. and tr. 

Russian poetry ; an anthology. cl927. 
891.71 D48r 

Finger, Charles Joseph, comp. 

Frontier ballads. 1927. 811.08 F49 

Gay, Robert Malcolm, comp. 

The Riverside book of verse, 1250-1925. 
1927. 808.1 G28 

Goodwin, Gwendoline, ed. 

Anthology of modem Indian poetry. 
1927. (Wisdom of the East) 

891.1 G65 
Grant, Robert. 

Occasional verses, 1873-1923. 1927. 

811 G76 
Grover, Edwin Osgood, ed. 

The nature lover's knapsack. cl927. 
808.1 G883 
Guiney, Louise Imogen. 

Happy ending. New ed. 1927. 

811 G964 
Guiterman, Arthur. 

Wildwood fables. cl927. 811 G96w 

Hinkle, Marion Ethel (Hamilton). 
The ultimate lover and other poems. 
1927. c811 H66 

Gfit. 

JoLAS, Eugene. 

Cinema ; poems. 1926. 



811 J75 



82 



NEWS NOTES OIP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



KoESON, George Gershon, comp. 

Songs and ballads of the anthracite 
miner. cl927. 811.08 K84 

Lowell, Amy. 

BaUads for sale. 1927. 811 L914b 

MiLLA^', Kathleen. 

The evergreen tree. cl927. 811 M64 

Milne, Alan Alexander. 

Now we are six. cl927. 821 M6592n 

NoYES, Alfred. 

Dick Turpin's ride, and other poems. 



1927. 

Phillips, Stephen. 
Harold. [1927] 

Putnam, Howard Phelps. 
Trine. cl927. 

Reese, Lizette Woodworth. 
Little Henrietta. cl927. 

Rice, Gale Young. 

Stygian freight. cl927. 



821 N95d 
821 P56h 
811 P99i 

811 R329I 

811 R49st 
'Mrs Waldo 



Richards, Gertrude Moore 
Richards." comp. 
Love's high way ; poems of love and of 
love's living faith and aspiration by 
old and new poets. 1927. 

808.1 R51I 

Rittenhoxjse, Jessie Belle, ed. 

The third book of modern verse ; a 
selection from the work of contem- 
poraneous American poets. 1927. 

811.08 R61t 

Sanders, Ruth Manning. 

The city. 1927. 811 S215 

Storey, Violet Alleyn. 

Green of the year. 1927. 811 S884 

Tree, Iris. 

The traveller, and other poems. 1927. 

821 T78 
TxJKNEB, Nancy Byrd. 

Magpie lane; poems. cl927. 811 T94 

Untermeyer, Mrs Jean (Starr). 

Steep ascent. 1927. 811 U613s 

Van Roosbeoeck, Gustave Leopold. 
An anthology of modern French poetry. 
1927. 841.08 V27 



Waddell, Helen Jane. 
The wandering scholars. 

Walsh, Thomas. 

The Catholic anthology. 

Wolfe, Humbert. 
Kensington gardens. 

News of the devil. 



Requiem. cl927. 

Zeitlin, Jake. 

For whispers & chants. 



DRAMA. 

Archer, William. 
Three plays. [1927] 



1927. 

871 W11 

1927. 
808.1 W22 

821 W855k 

1926. 
821 W855n 

821 W855r 

1927. 

qc811 Z4 



822 A67t 



[Beith, John Hay] 
The happy ending ; a play in three 
acts, by Ian Hay [pseud.']. cl927. 
(French's acting edition) 

822 B42h 

Brenner, Clarence Dietz, d Goodyear, 
Nolan A., eds. 
Eighteenth-century French plays. 
cl927 842.08 B83 

Carpenter, Edward ChHds. 

When your ship comes in ; a play in 
four acts. cl927. (French's stand- 
and library edition) 812 C29w 

Cohen, Octavus Roy. 

Come seven ; a negro farce-comedy in 
three acts. 1927. (Longman's play 
series) 812 C678 

Craven, Frank. 

Too many cooks ; a comedy in three 
acts. cl927. (French's standard li- 
brary edition) 812 C89t 

Dukes, Ashley. 

One more river; a modern comedy in 
three acts. cl927. 822 D87o 

Fagan, James Bernard. 

"And so to bed" ; a comedy in three 
acts. cl926. 822 F15an 

GjULSWorthy, John. 
Escape : an episodic play in a prologue 
and two parts. [1926] 822 G17es 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



83 



Heywakd, Mrs Dorothy Hartzell 
(Kuhns), d Hey ward, Du Bose. 
Porgy. 1927. (The Theatre guHd li- 
brary) 812 H62 

Lazabovich-Heebelianovich, Eleanor 
Hulda ( Calhoun ) princess. 
The way, a study in play form of the 
bearings of scientific discovery on the 
interpretation of Christ. cl926. 

812 L43 

Locke, Alain Le Roy, d Montgomery, 
Gregory, eds. 
Plays of negro life ; a source-book of 
native American drama. 1927. 

812.08 L81 

Macmillan, Mary Louise. 

Her doll; a play in one act. cl927. 
(French's international copyrighted 
. . . edition of the works of the best 
authors) 812 M16h 

Nicholson, Kenyon, ed. 

The Appleton book of short plays 
(second series). 1927. 812.08 N 62a 

OsTROVSKii, Aleksandr Nikolaevich. 
The forest. cl926. (The world's best 
plays, by celebrated European auth- 
ors) 891.72 085f 

The thunderstorm. cl927. (The 



world's best plays, by celebrated 
European authors) 891.72 085t 

Peabody, Josephine Preston. 

The chameleon ; a comedy in three acts. 
cl917. (French's standard library 
edition) 812 P35c 

Pence, Raymond Woodbui-y, ed. 
'. Dramas by present-day writers. cl927. 
J^. 808.2 P39 

PiNfcRO, Sir Arthur Wing. 
• The enchanted cottage ; a fable in three 
acts. 1921. 822 P65e 

RavTndbanatha, Thakura, Sir. 

Red oleanders; a drama in one act. 
1925. 891.442 R25r 

Rubinstein, Harold Frederick. 

Isabel's eleven ; a comedy in four acts. 
1927. (Contemporary British dram- 
atists) 822 R89i 

^AN Dyke, Henry. 

:. The other wise man. 1927. 812 V24c 



CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

BoNNEK, Geraldine. 

Taken at the flood. cl927. 

cB716ta 

[Hankins, Arthur Preston] 
The limping sheriff. cl926. cH241l 



NoKEis, Charles Oilman. 
Zelda Marsh. 1927. 



cN854z 



NOEKIS, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
Barberry bush. 1927. cN856ba 



Ritchie, Robert Welles 
Deep furrows. cl927. 



cR611d 



Simpson, Lola Jean. 
Back fire ; a California story. 1927. 

CS6136 
White, Stewart Edward. 

The story of California. 1927. 

cW588st 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Baumann, Arthur Anthony. 
The last Victorians. 1927. 

920.042 834 
Braybrooke, Patrick. 

Some goddesses of the pen. [1927] 

928.2 882 
GoLLOMB, Joseph. 

Master highwaymen. cl927. 

923.41 G62 
Harris, Frank. 

Latest contemporary portraits. cl927. 

928 H31I 
Harrow, Benjamin. 

Eminent chemists of our time. 2d ed. 
enl. cl927. 925 H32a 

Hayward, Arthur Lawrence, ed. 

Lives of the most remarkable criminals. 
1927. q 923.41 H4 

Johnston, James Chapman. 

Biography : the literature of person- 
ality. cl927. 920 J 72 



Ldppmann, Walter. 
Men of destiny. 1927. 



920.07 L76 



MiNNiGERODE, Meade. 

Certain rich men : Stephen Girard — 
John Jacob Astor — Jay Cooke — 
Daniel Drew — Cornelius Vanderbilt 
—Jay Gould— Jim Fisk. 1927. 

920.07 M66c 



u 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Nichols, Beverly. 

Are they the same at home? cl927. 

920 N61 

OviNGTON, Mary White. 
Portraits in color. 1927. 

920.07 096 

Stoddard, Heni-y Luther. 

As I knew them ; presidents and poli- 
tics from Grant to Coolidge. 1927. 

923.1 S86 

Watt, Hugh. 

Representative churchmen of twenty 
centuries. [1927] ("The living 
church" series) 922 W34 

Who's v^ho in colored America, v. 1. 
1927. rq920.07 W6 

WlLSTACH, Paul. 

Patriots off their pedestals. cl927. 

923.2 W75 

Contents : The idea. — Georg-e TVash- 
ington. — Benjamin Franklin.— Patrick 
Henry. — ^Alexander Hamilton. — John 
Adams. — T h o m a s Jefferson. — John 
Marshall. — James Madison. 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Adams. Adams, John, pres. U. 8. 
Statesman and friend. 1927. 

B A214f 

Arliss. Abliss, George. 

Up the years from Bloomsbury ; an 
autobiography. . . . 1927. 

B A7243 

Barnum. Root, Harvey Woods. 
The unknown Barnum. 1927. 

B B263r 

Beeclier. Hibben, Pa:ston. 

Henry Ward Beecher : an American 
portrait. cl927. B B414hi 

Birkenhead. ■ Ephesian, pseud. 

Lord Birkenhead ; being an account of 
the life of F. E. Smith, first earl of 
Birkenhead. 3d ed. [1927] 

B B6192e 

Bonney. Gabkett, Pat F. 

Pat F. Garrett's authentic life of 
Billy the kid. 1927. B B717g 

Byron. Byeon, George Gordon Noel By- 
ron, 6th iaron. 
Lord Byron in his letters ; selections 
from his letters and journals. 1927. 
B B996co 



Cannon. Busbey, L. White. 

Uncle .Toe Cannon. cl927. B C226b 

Carlyle. Hamilton, Mrs Mary Agnes 
(Adamson) . 
Thomas Carlyle. [1926] (The Road- 
maker series) B C2865h 

Carson. Caeson, Christopher. 

Kit Carson's own story of his life. 
1926. cB C321 

Collinson. Beett- James, Norman G. 
The life of Peter Collinson. [1926] 

B C7132b 

Cunimings. Hellyae, Richmond H. 
W. N. P. BarbeUion. [1926] 

B C9712h 

Daly. Goldsmith, Berthold Henry. 
Arnold Daly. cl927. B D1531g 

Darwin. Ward, Charles Henshaw. 

Charles Darwin ; the man and his war- 
fare. cl927. B D228w 

Dickens. Amebongen, J. B. van. 

The actor in Dickens, a study of the 

histrionic and dramatic elements in 

the novelist's life and works. 1927. 

B D548am 



Dole. Dole, Charles Fletcher. 
My eighty years. el927. 



B D6632 



Drake. Benson, Edward Frederic. 

Sir Francis Drake. [1927] (The 
Golden hind series) B D761be 

Erasmus. Allen, Percy Stafford. 

The age of Erasmus. 1914. B E56al 

Evans. Evans, Benjamin Ifor. 

Encounters with all sorts of people 
including myself. [1926] B E922 

Francesco d'Assisi. Van Santvooed, 
Seymour. 
Saint Francis, the Christian exemplar. 
cl927. B F815v 

Franklin. Feanklin, Benjamin. 

"My dear girl." 1927. B F831my 

Fremont. Bashfoed, Herbert. 

A man unafraid. cl927. cB F8723ba 

Frost. MuNSON, Gorham B. 

Robert Frost; a study in sensibility 
and good sense. 1927. B F939m 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



85 



Gish. Wagenknecht, Edward. 

Lillian Gish ; an interpretation. 1927. 
(University of Washington chap- 
books) B G532w 

Glasgow. Mann, Dorothea Lawrence. 
Ellen Glasgow, with critical essays and 
a bibliography. 1927. B G548m 

HumUton. NicoLAY, Helen. 

The boy's life of Alexander Hamilton. 
cl927. B H217n 

Horn. Horn, Alfred Aloysius, pseud. 
Trader Horn. 1927. B H8132 

Horton. HoBTON, EmUy McGowen. 

My scrapbook. 1927. qcB H82 

•Jackson. Johnson, Gerald W. 

Andrew Jackson, an epic in homespun. 
1927. B J12j 

Johnson. Johnson, James Weldon. 
The autobiography of an ex-coloured 
man. 1927. (Blue jade library) 

B J 673 

Jones. Russell, Phillips. 

John Paul Jones : man of action. 1927. 

B J78r 

Jonson. Steel, Byron. 

O rare Ben Jonson. 1927. B JSIst 

Lawrence. Aldington, Richard. 

D. H. Lawrence ; an indiscretion. 1927. 
(University of Washington chap- 
books) B L4194al 

Lawrence. Thomas, Lowell Jackson. 
The boys' life of Colonel Lawrence. 
cl927. B L423t 

Leonard. Leonaed, William Ellery. 
The locomotive-god. cl927. B L581 

Jjewis. Parbington, Vernon Louis. 
Sinclair Lewis, our own Diogenes. 
1927. (University of Washington 
chapbooks) B L676p 

Lincoln. Hebtz, Emanuel, ed. 

The Abraham Lincoln, the tribute of 
the synagogue. 1927. B L736he 



Reep, Thomas P. 

Lincoln at New Salem. 



cl927. 

cB L736r 



Starr, John William. 

Lincoln & the railroads ; a biographical 
study. 1927. B L736sta1 



Luther. Jacobs, Henry Eyster. 

Martin Luther, the hero of the reforma- 
tion ; 1483-1546. 1898. (Heroes of 
the reformation) B L973J 

I^yon. Hayes, Mrs Clara (Lyon). 

William Penn Lyon. 1926. qB L99h 

Mansfield. Mansfield, Katherine. 
Journal of Katherine Mansfield. 1927. 

B M2874 

Marat. Gottschalk, Louis Reichenthal. 
Jean Paul Marat ; a study in radical- 
ism. cl927. B M311g 

Montaigne. Willis, Irene Cooper. 

Montaigne. 1927. B IVl761w 

Moody. Bbadpobd, Gamaliel. 

D. L. Moody, a worker in souls. cl927. 

B M817b 

Napoleon. Andebson, Robert Gordon. 
Those quarrelsome Bonapartes. cl927. 
B N216and 

Balmain, Aleksandr Antonovich, 

graf. 
Napoleon in captivity, translated and 
edited with introduction and notes by 
Julian Park. cl927. B N216bal 



Geee, Walter. 



Napoleon and his family ; 
Corsican elan. 1927. 



the story of a 
B N216gf 



Northumierland. North um b eel a n d, 
Elizabeth (Seymour) Percy, duchess 
of. 
The diaries of a duchess. Extracts from 
the diaries of the first Duchess of 
Northumberland (1716-1776). [1927] 

B N878 

Oakley. Cooper, Courtney Ryley. 

Annie Oakley, woman at arms. 1927. 

B 011c 



Pascal. Duclatjx, Mme 
Frances ( Robinson ) . 
Portrait of Pascal, 1927. 



Agnes Mary 



B P278d 



Paulding. Heeold, Amos Lee. 

James Kirke Paulding, versatile Ameri- 
can. 1926. (Columbia university 
studies in English and comparative 
literature) B P3253h 

Peacock. Priestley, John Boynton 
Thomas Love Peacock. 1927. (English 
men of letters) B P356p 



S6 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Piozzi. Piozzi, Mrs Hester Lynch 
(Salusbury) Thrale. 
The letters of Mrs Thrale, selected with 
an introduction by R. Brimley John- 
son. [1926] B P663J 

Porter. Mende, Mrs Elsie (Porter). 
An American soldier and diplomat ; 
Horace Porter. 1927. B P8452m 

Sand. ScHERMEKHOBN, Elizabeth W. 
Seven strings of the lyre. 1927. 

B S213s 

Scaliger. Scaligee, Joseph Juste. 

Autobiography. 1927. (Harvard trans- 
lations) B S282 

Scriitier. Scribner, Grace. 

An American pilgrimage. [1927] 

B S4342C 

Sewall. Sewall, Samuel. 

Samuel Sewall's diary, edited by Mark 
Van Doren. 1927. (An American 
bookshelf) B S513 

Sherman. Sherman, William Tecumseh. 
General W. T. Sherman as college pres- 
ident. 1912. B S5535fl 

Smith. Pringle, Henry Fowles. 

Alfred E. Smith ; a critical study. 1927. 

B S6421p 

Smollett. [Benjamin, Lewis S.] 

The life and letters of Tobias Smollett 
(1721-1771) by Lewis Melville 
[pseud.] [1926] B S6665b 

Solon. Freeman, Kathleen. 

The work and life of Solon, with a 
translation of his poems. 1926. 

B S689f 

Spender: Spender, John Alfred. 
Life, journalism and politics. 2 v. 

B S7463 

Stuart. Stuart, Lady Louisa. 

The letters of Lady Louisa Stuart. 
[1926] B S931 

Sulla. Baker, G. P. 

Sulla the fortunate. [1927] B S9491b 

Talleyrand. Dodd, Mrs Anna Bowman 
(Blake). 
Talleyrand ; the training of a states- 
man, 1754-18.38. 1927. B T148d 



Tiles ton. Tileston, John Boies. 

Letters of John Boies Tileston. 1922. 

B T572 

Tooke. Yarbobough, Minnie Clare. 
John Home Tooke. 1926. (Columbia 
university studies in English and 
comparative literature) B T6692y 

Tremouille. Oruttwell, Maud. 
The Princess des Ux'sins. cl927. 

B T8313C 

Trollope. Sadleir, Michael. 
Trollope, a commentary. 1927. 



Tully. TuLLY, Jim. 
Circus parade. 1927. 



B T847s 



B T923c 



Villon. Cargo, Francis. 

The romance of Villon, translated by 
Hamish MUes. 1927. B V1759ca 

Vrangel. Vrangel, Nikolai Bgorovich, 
haron. 
From serfdom to bolshevism. 1927. 

B V978 

Walpole. Stuart, Dorothy Margaret. 
Horace Walpole. 1927. (English men 
of letters) B W218st 

Washington. Washington, George, pres. 
U. S. 
George Washington, colonial traveller, 
1732-1775. cl927. B W318fi1 

Wilson. Callwell, Sir Charles Edward. 

Field-Marshal Sir Henry Wilson. 1927. 

B W7482C 

Wyclife. Workman, Herbert Brook. 
John Wyclif, a study of the English 
medieval church. 1926. 2 v. 

B W977w 

GENEALOGY. 

Dillon, Arthur Orison. 

The ancestors of Arthur Orison Dillon 
and his poems. cl927. c929.2 D57 

Gift. 

Groton, Mass. 

Vital records of Groton, Massachusetts, 
to the end of the year 1849. 1926-27. 
2 V. 929.3 G88 

New Salem, Mass. 

Vital records of New Salem, Massachu- 
setts, to the end of the year 1849. 
1927. 929.3 N55 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



87 



Speaker, Mrs Ella Hazel (Atterbury). 
The Boone family ; a genealogical his- 
tory. 1922. q929.2 B72 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

AsHBY, Thomas. 

The Roman Campagna in classical 
times. 1927. 913.37 A82 

Edgak, Morton. 

The Great pyramid. 1924. 913.32 E23 

Rose, Herbert Jennings. 

Primitive culture in Italy. [1926] 

913.37 R79 

VOYAGES AND TRAVEL. 

Amundsen, Roald Engelbregt Gravning, 
Roald Amundsen — my life as an ex- 
plorer. 1927. 910.4 A52 

Close, Etta. 

Excursions and some adventures. 1927. 

910 C64 
Hajkluyt, Richard. 

The principal navigations, voyages, 
traffiques & discoveries of the English 
nation. 1927, 8 v. 910.8 H15a 

Halliburton, Richard. 

The glorious adventure. cl927. 

910.4 HIS 
Howe, Edgar Watson. 

Daily notes of a trip around the world. 
1927. 910.4 H85 

Leys, James Farquharson. 
After you, Magellan ! cl927. 

910.4 L68 
LuDY, Robert Borneman. 

Historic hotels of the world, past and 
present. 1927. 910 L94 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
EUROPE. 

Baedeker, Karl, fi7-m, jiWblishers, Leipzig. 

Great Britain ; handbook for travellers. 

8th ed. rev. 1927. 914.2 B13a 



Balderston, Marion. 
Here is England. 1927. 



9142 B176 



Black, William Harman. 

The real Europe pocket guide book 
(from official sources) (number 12 of 
the pocket guides known as "Black's 
blue books"). 1927. 914 B627 



Brown, Ashley. 

Greece old and new. 



[1927] 

914.95 B87 



Chancellor, Edwin Beresford. 

Life in regency and early Victorian 
times. [1927] 914.21 C45li 

Chester, Georgia Grant. 

Travel in Europe made easy. 1927. 

914 C52 

Cox-McCormack, Mrs Nancy. 
Pleasant days in Spain. cl927. 

914.6 C87 



Cunjvtingham, George H. 
London. 1927. 



914.21 C97 



Dexter, Walter. 

Mr Pickwick's pilgrimages. 1927. 

914.2 D52m 
Edmonds, Paul. 

To the land of the eagle ; travels in 
Montenegro and Albania. 1927. 

914.97 E24 

Elnett, Mrs Elaine (Pasvolsky). 

Historic origin and social development 
of family life in Russia. 1926. 

914.7 E48 
Faure, Gabriel. 

Rome. [1926] (The picture guides) 
914.56 F26r 

Freeston, Charles Lincoln. 

France for the motorist. [1927] 

914.4 F85 

Gos, Francois Marc Eugene. 
Rambles in High Savoy. 1927. 

914.44 G67 
GwYNN, Stephen. 

Ireland. [1927] (The Kitbag travel 
books) 914.15 G99ir 

Hammer, Simon Christian. 

Things seen in Norway ; a description 
of the scenery of the country. 1927. 
914.91 H22 
Holland, Clive. 

Things seen in Shakespeare's country. 
[1927] 914.24 H73t 

Hooker, Mrs Katharine (Putnam). 
Through the heel of Italy. 1927. 

914.5 H78t 

HoPPfi, Emil Otto. 

Picturesque Great Britain. cl926. 

q914.2 H7 



88 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



HORTON, George. 

Recollections grave and gay ; the story 

of a Mediterranean consul. cl927. 

914.95 H82r 

Laughlin, Clai-a Elizabeth. 

So yoirre going to France ! 1927. 

914.4 L37 

MACKINNON, Albert Glenthorn. 
Things seen in Rome. 1927. 

914.56 IV115 

ilABDEN, Philip Sanford. 

A wayfarer in Portugal. 1927. 

914.69 IV132 
Metcaxf, Jesse. 
Wandering among forgotten isles. cl927. 
914.67 M58 

Morton, Henry Canova Vollam. 
When you go to London. 1927. 

914.21 M88w 
Newman, E. M. 

Seeing Italy. 1927. (Newman travel- 
talks) 914.5 N55 

Oakley, Mrs Amy ( Ewing ) . 
Cloud-lands of France. 1927. 

914.4 Oil 

Palmer, William Thomas. 

Things seen on the English lakes. 1926. 
914.28 P17t 

Rosenberg, James Naumburg. 

On the steppes ; a Russian diary. 1927. 

914.7 R81 

Slaltghter, Jlrs. Gertrude Elizabeth 
(Taylor). 
Heirs of old Venice. 1927. 914.53 S63 

Williams, Emile Francis. 

Undiscovered France ; an eight-weeks 
automobile trip in the provinces with 
special reference to the architecture, 
archaeology, history, and scenery. 
1927. 914.4 W722 

Wilson, Mary Lena. 

Ladies third ; six weeks in Europe for 
six hundred dollars. 1927. 

914 W751 

Young, Geoffrey Winthrop. 

On high hills ; memories of the Alps. 
2d ed. [1927] 914.49 Y72 



ASIA. 

Bergman, Sten. 

Through Kamchatka by dog-sled & skis. 
1927. 915.7 B49 

Browne, Edward Granville. 

A year amongst the Persians. Impres- 
sions as to the life, character, & 
thought of the people of Persia. 1927. 
915.5 B88 
Cooper, Mrs Elizabeth. 

My lady of the Indian purdah. 1927. 

915.4 C77 
Hebvey, Harry. 
King Cobra ; an autobiography of travel 
in French Indo-China. 1927. 

915.9 H57 
King, Louis Magrath. 

China in turmoil. 1927. 915.1 K53 

Le May, Reginald Stuart. 

An Asian Arcady ; the land and peoples 
of northern Siam. 1927. q9 15.93 L5 

Morden, William James. 

Across Asia's snows and deserts. 1927. 

915 M83 
Noel, John Baptist Lucius. 

The story of Everest. 1927. 

915.4 N76 
Randall, James A. 

Guidebook to the ports of Asia with 
notes on shopping. 1926. 915 R18 

Sackville-West, Hon Victoria Mary. 
Passenger to Teheran. 1926. 

915.5 S12 
W^VRD, Francis Kingdon. 

The riddle of the Tsangpo gorges. 1926. 
915.15 W25r 
Wildes, Harry Emerson. 

Social currents in Japan, with special 
reference to the press. cl927. 

915.2 W67 
XiMENEZ, Saturnino. 

Asia Minor in ruins. [1925] 

915.6 X6 

AFRICA. SOUTH AMERICA 

Baum, James Edwin. 

Savage Abyssinia. cl927. 916.3 B34 

Bodley, R. V. C. 

Algeria from within. cl927. 

916.5 866 

Bradley, ilfrs Mary (Hastings). 
Alice in Jungleland. 1927. 

916.7 BSIal 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



89 



BuLKELEY, John, d Cummins, John. 
A voyage to the South Seas. 1927. 
(The Argonaut series) 918.2 B93 

DoMViLLE-FiFE, Charles William. 

Savage life in the black Sudan. 1927. 
916.26 D67 

Ebskine, Beatrice, "Mrs S t e u a r t 
Erskine." 
Vanished cities of Northern Africa. 
1927. 916.1 E73 



Hapsa, pseud. 

Desert winds. cl927. 



916.5 H13 



Massam, J. A. 

The clifE dwellers of Kenya. 1927. 

916.7 M41 

MiGEOD, Frederick WUliam Hugh. 
A view of Sierra Leone. 1926. 

916.64 M63 

Mills, Lady Dorothy Rachel Melissa 
(Walpole). 
Through Liberia. [1926] 916.66 M65 

Shan AH AN, Edward William. 

South America, an economic and re- 
gional geography with an historical 
chapter. [1927] (Methuen's geo- 
graphical series) 918 S52 

NORTH AMERICA. 
Bartlett, W. p. 

Happenings. 1927. c9 17.94 B29 

Gift of author. 

BiSBEE, Frederick Adelbert. 

A California pilgrimage. 1915. 

C917.94 B62 
Paris, John Thomson. 

Old trails and roads in Penn's land. 
1927. 917.48 F22oI 

The romance of the rivers. 1927. 

917.3 F22ro 

Fenger, Frederic Abildgaard. 
Alone in the Caribbean. cl917. 

917.29 F33 

Freeman, Lewis Ransome. 

Waterways of westward wandering. 
1927. 917.3 F85 

[Halibxjrton, Thomas Chandler] 

The Americans at home; or, Byeways, 

: backwoods, and prairies. Ed. by the 

author of "Sam Slick." 1854. 3 v. 

917.3 H172 



Irwin, William Henry. 

Highlights of Manhattan. 1927. 

917.471 172 



James, Will. 

Cow country. 1927. 



917.8 J 29c 



Kluckhohn, Clyde. 

To the foot of the rainbow. cl927. 

917.8 K66 

[Long WORTH, Maria Theresa] 
Teresina in America. 1875. 

917.3 L85 

Marryat, Frederick. 

A diary in America, with remarks on 
its institutions. 1833. 3 v. 

917.3 M362 

A diary in America, with remarks 



on its institutions. Part second. 
1839. 3 V. 917.3 M362a 

Neihardt, John Gneisenau. 

The river and I. 1927. 917.8 N39r 

Rawson, Marion NichoU. 

Candle days ; the story of early Amer- 
ican arts and implements. cl927. 

917.3 R26 

Ray, Joseph Edward. 

Things seen in Canada ; a description 

of life in town & country. [1927] 

917.1 R26 

Read, George Willis. 

A pioneer of 1850, George Willis Read, 
1819-1880. C917.8 R28 

Russell, Charles Marion. 

Trails plowed under. 1927. q917.8 R9 

Siegfried, Andre. 

America comes of age. cl927. 

917.3 S57 

Smith, Elinor Shane. 

Po-ho-no and the legends of the Yo- 
semite. 1927. c9 17.9447 S64 

Speakman, Harold. 

Mostly Mississippi. 1927. 917.7 S74 

Sutton, Fred Ellsworth. 

Hands up ! Stories of the six-gun 

fighters of the old wild West. cl927. 

917.8 S96 

Taylor, Katherine Ames. 

Lights and shadows of Yosemite. cl926. 
c9 17.9447 T24 



90 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



Trollope, Mrs Frances (Milton). 

Domestic manners of the Americans. 
[1927] (The English Library) 

917.3 T84a 

Wentworth, Ruth Starbuck. 

Older America. cl921. c917.4 W47 

OCEANICA. POLAR REGIONS. 

Burden, William Douglas. 

Dragon lizards of Komodo ; an expedi- 
tion to the lost world of the Dutch 
East Indies. 1927. 919.1 B94 

CoLLiKSON, Clifford W. 

Life and laughter 'midst the cannibals. 
[1926] 919.35 C71 

Foster, Harry La Tourette. 

A vagabond in Fiji. 1927. 919.6 F75 

MacMillan, Donald Baxter. 

Etah and beyond ; or. Life within 
twelve degrees of the Pole. 1927. 

919.8 M167e 

[Wiehe, Mrs Evelyn M. (Clowes)] 
The further venture book, by Elinor 
Mordaunt [pseud.'\ [1927] 

919.1 W64 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Anderson, Robert E. 

The stoiy of extinct civilizations of the 
East and of the West. 1927. 

901 A54 
Belloc, HUaire. 

A companion to Mr. Wells's "Outline 
of history." q909 W4zb 

Cheyney, Edward Potts. 

Law in history and other essays. 1927. 

904 C53 

CoLLUM, Vera Christina Chute. 

The dance of Qiya ; life's unity and 
rhythm. 1927. (To-day and to- 
morrow) 901 C71 

Green, Fitzhugh, d Frost, Holloway Hal- 
stead. 
Some famous sea fights. 1927. 

904 G79 
Hwuy-Ung. 

A Chinaman's opinion of us. 1927. 

901 H99 

Thomas, Harrison Cook, d Harom, Wil- 
liam Albert. 



The foundations of modern civilization. 
cl927. (The A B C of history) 

901 T45 

Winnington-Ingram, Arthur Foley, hp. 
of London. 
Some world problems. 1927. 909 W77 

Wood, Clement. 

The outline of man's knowledge ; the 
story of history, science, literatiire, 
art, religion, philosophy. 1927. 

901 W87 

HISTORY: ANCIENT. 

Bertholet, Alfred. 

A history of Hebrew civilization. 1926. 

933 B54 

Budge, Sir Ernest Alfred Thompson 
Wallis. 
Babylonian life and history. 2d ed. re- 
written throughout and enl. [1925] 
935.4 B92 

Handcock, Percy Stuart Peache. 

Mesopotamian archaeology ; an intro- 
duction to the archaeology of Baby- 
lonia and Assyria. 1912. 

935.8 H23 

RosTOVTSEV, MikhaU Ivanovich. 

A history of the ancient world. 1926. 

q930 R8 
White, Edward Lucas. 

Why Rome feU. 1927. 937 W58 

EUROPE. 

Andrassy, Gyula, grof. 

Bismarck, Andrassy and their succes- 
sors. 1927. q940.9 A5 

Bradby, Godfrey Fox. 

The great days of Versailles. 1927. 

944.03 379 
Brandenburg, Erich. 

From Bismarck to the world war. 1927. 
943.08 881 
Daek, Sidney. 

Queen Elizabeth. (Hodder and Stough- 
ton's people's library) 942.05 D21 

Delaisi, Francis. 

Political myths and economic realities. 
1927. 940.9 D33 

Fay, Bernard. 

The revolutionary spirit in France and 
America. cl927. 944.04 F28 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



91 



Feiling, Keith Grahame. 

England under the Tudors and Stuarts. 
cl927. (Home university library of 
modern knowledge) 942 F29 

Forester, C. S. 

Victor Emmanuel II and the union of 
Italy. 1927. 945 F71 

Funck-BbeiJtano, Frantz. 

The earliest times. 1927. (The na- 
tional history of France) 

944.01 F97 

Graham, Malbone Watson. 

New governments of eastern Europe. 
cl927. (American political science 
series) 947.08 G741 

Gbant, Arthur James & Temperley, 
Harold. 
Europe in the nineteenth century 
(1789-1914). 1927. 940.9 G761 

Headlam, Cecil. 

The story of Naples. 1927. (Mediaeval 
towns) 945.7 H43 

Home, Gordon Cochrane d Foord, 
Edward A. 
Mediaeval London. [1927] 

942.1 H76m 

Kerenskii, Aleksandr Fedorovich. 

The catastrophe ; Kerensky's own story 
of the Russian revolution. 1927. 

947.08 K39c 

Lasswell, Harold D. 

Propaganda technique in the world 
war. 1927. 940.939 L34 

Lawton, Lancelot. 

The Russian revolution (1917-1926). 
1927. 947.08 L42 

Liman von Sanders, Otto Viktor Karl. 
Five years in Turkey. 1927. 

940.932 L73 

Lucas-Dubeeton, Jean. 

Louis XVIII, translated by F. H. 
Lyon. 1927. 944.06 L93 

Ltjckner, Felix, graf von. 

Count Luckner, the Sea Devil. 1927. 
940.934 L94 

Meech, Thomas Cox. 

This generation ; a history of Great 
Britain and Ireland from 1900 to 
1926. 1927. 842.08 M49 



Napoleon III, emperor of the French. 
The second empire and its downfall. 
944.07 N21 
Poliakoff, v. 

The tragic bride ; the story of the 

Empress Alexandra of Russia. 1927. 

947.08 P76t 

Putnam, Ruth. 

William the Silent, prince of Orange 
< 1533-1584 > and the revolt of the 
Netherlands. 1911. (Heroes of the 
nations) 949.2 P99 

Ranlett, Louis Felix. 

Let's go ! The story of A. S. no. 
2448602. 1927. 940.935 R21 

Schiller, Ferdinand Canning Scott. 
Cassandra ; or. The future of the 
British Empire. [1926] (Today and 
tomorrow) 942 S33 

Seignobos, Charles. 

The feudal regime. cl902-26. 

940.3 S45 

Seton-Watson, Robert William. 

Sarajevo, a study in the origins of the 
great war. [1926] 940,912 S49 

The Two battles of the Marne. 1927. 

940.932 T97 

Woodward, Kathleen. 

Queen Mary of England, a life and 
intimate study. 942.08 W91 



ASIA. AFRICA. 

Harris, Norman Dwight. 

Europe and Africa, being a revised 
edition of Intervention and coloni- 
zation in Africa. cl927. 

960 H31e 

Harris, Walter Burton. 

France, Spain and the Rif. 1927. 

964 H31f 

Hutchinson, Paul. 

What and why in China. 1927. 

951 H97 

Sheean, Vincent. 

The new Persia. cl927. 955 S54 

Thomas, Elbert Duncan. 

Chinese political thought. 1927. 

951 T45 



92 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Wang, Chao-Ming. 

China and the nations ; being the di'aft 
of the report on international prob- 
lems prepared for the International 
problems committee of the People's 
conference of delegates at Peking in 
April, 1925. 1927. 951 W246 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Amador county history. 1927. 

qc979.442 A4 

Balch, EmUy Greene, ed. 

Occupied Haiti ; being the report of a 
committee of six disinterested Ameri- 
cans representing organizations ex- 
clusively American. 1927. 

972.94 B17 

Curtis, Edward Ely. 

The organization of the British army 
in the American revolution. 1926. 
(Tale historical publications. Mis- 
cellany) 973.3 C97 

Densmore, Frances. 

The American Indians and their 
music. cl926. 970.1 D41 

Fox, Edith Kirk. 

In old California. 1927. 

C979.4 F79 

Griswold, Bert Joseph, ed. 

Fort Wayne, Gateway of the West, 
1802-1813. 1927. (Indiana his- 
torical collections) 

977.21 G87 

History of Contra Costa county, Cali- 
fornia. 1926. qc979.463 H67 

Kennedy, Elijah Robinson. 

The contest for California in 1861. 
1912. C979.4 K35 

LoNGSTBETH, Thomas Morris. 

The sUent force, scenes from the life of 
the mounted police of Canada. 
cl927. 971.2 L85 

Meredith, Mrs Grace D. 

Girl captives of the Cheyennes. 1927. 
C970.3 M55 
OuTCALT, John. 

History of Merced County, California. 
1925. qc979.458 09 



PiNKERTON, Allan. 

The spy of the rebellion ; being a true 
history of the spy system of the 
United States army during the late 
rebellion. 1883. 973.7 P65 

Rawson, Jonathan Ansel. 

1776 ; a day-by-day story. 1927. 

973.3 R26 
Shellenberger, John K. 

The battle of Franklin, Tennessee, 
November 30, 1864. 1916. 

973.73 S54b 

The battle of Spring Hill, 



Tennessee, November 29, 1864. 1913. 
973.73 S54 
Smith, Edward Conrad. 

The borderland in the civil war. 1927. 

973.7 S64 
Webster, Hutton. 

History of Latin America. cl924. 

972 W37 

Whitaker, Arthur Preston. 

The Spanish-American frontier, 1783- 
1795. 1927. 976 W57 

SOUTH AMERICA. OCEANICA. 

Ball, Eleanor, comp. 

Independence for the Philippines. 
1927. (The reference shelf) 

991.4 B18 
Barclay, William Singer. 

The land of Magellan. [1926] 

982 B24 

Cleven, Nels Andrew Nelson, ed. 

Readings in Hispanic American his- 
tory. cl927. 980 C63 

Evans, Henry Clay, jr. 

Chile and its relations with the United 
States. 1927. (Duke university pub- 
lications) 983 E92 

Goebel, Julius Ludwig. 

The struggle for the Falkland Islands, 
a study in legal and diplomatic his- 
tory. 1927. 997 G59 

PiERSON, William Whatley. 

Hispanic-American history : a syllabus. 
Rev. and enl. 1926. 980 P62 

FRENCH. 

AcHAKD, Marcel. 

Je ne vous aime pas. La femme sUen- 
cieuse. cl926. 842 A17 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



^3 



AxLEMAN, Jeanne. 

La vigno et la niaison ; roman. 1922. 

843 A42 
Akcos, Rene. 

Autrui. 1926. . 843 A675 



Arennes, J. Ad. 

L'herbe entre les pierres. 1922. 



Arnac, Marcel. 

Le brelan de joie. 1924. 

Arnoux, Alexandre. 

Le chiffre, roman. 1926. 



843 A68 
843 A74 

843 A76 



Arnoux, Jacques d'. 

Paroles d'un revenant. cl925. 

940.935 A76 
Athenaeus. 

Le chapitre treize d'Athenee. 1924. 

888 A86c 
Aubieb, Fernand. 

Le galant gynecologue. 1925. 

843 A893 
AuDiN, Marius. 

Le livre, son illustration, sa decoration. 
1926. 741 A91 

Atjdoux, Marguerite. 

De la ville au moulin. 1926. 843 A24 

Aveline, Claude. 

Steinlen, 1' homme & 1' oeuvre. cl926. 
759.4 S82a 
Barbusse, Henri. 

Les bourreaux. [1926] 949.7 B24 

Clarte; roman. [1919] 

843 B24c 

Les enchalnements, roman. 1925. 

2 V. 843 B24e 

843 B24n 



Nous autres. 1918. 



Trois films : Force — L'au-delld — 

Le crieur. cl926. 843 B24t 

[Babgone, Charles] 
Une jeune fille voyagea. cl925. 

843 B25j 
Barres, Maurice. 

Une enquete aux pays du Levant. 
cl923. 915.6 B27 



- — Le myst&re en pleine lumifere. 
cl926. 844 B27 



— Pour la haute intelligence fran- 
caise. [1925] 370.944 B27 



Baulu, Marguerite. 
Boulle et sa fiUe. 1925. 



843 B346 



Baumann, :6mile. 

L'anneau d'or des grands mystiques de 
saint Augustin a Catherine Em- 
merich. 1924. 149.3 B34 



L'immole. 1925. 



843 B347i 



Job le predestine. 1922. 

843 B347 
Bazalgette, Leon. 

George Grosz, I'homme & I'ouvre. 
[1926] 759.4 G87b 

Bazin, Rene. 

Baltus le Lorrain. 1926. 843 B36bl 



Le conte du triloet. 1924. 

843 B36co 



— II etait quatre petits enfants. 

1923. 843 B36il 

Beau, Louis. 

La petite ville joyeuse. 1919. 843 B37 

Beaunier, Andre. 

Une ame de femme. cl924. 843 B38 



Benda, Julien. 

Lettres k Melisande. 1925. 



194 B45 



Benjamin, Rene. 

La farce de la Sorbonne. cl921. 

378.44 B46 
Benoit, Pierre. 

Alberte. [1926] 843 B47al 

La chatelaine du Liban. [1924] 

843 B47c 



Koenigsmark. cl918. 843 B47k 

Le Roi lepreux. [1927] 

843 B47r 



Bebaud, Henri. 

Au capucin gourmand. cl925. 

843 B48c 

Le bois du templier pendu. 1926. 

843 B48 

Ce que j'ai vu a Berlin. 1926. 

914.3 B48ce 

Ce que j'ai vu a Moscou. cl925. 

914.7 B848 



Lazare. cl924. 



843 B48I 



lie martyre de I'ob&se. cl922. 

843 B48m 



94 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



I.e vitriol de lune. cl921. 

843 B48y 
Bernanos, Georges. 

Sous le soleU de Satan. cl926. 

843 B517 
Bernstein, Henry. 

La galerie des glaces. cl926. 

842 B531g 
Beccler, Andrg. 

La ville anonyme. cl925. 843 B566 

Beuque, Emile. 

Dictionnaire des poingons officiels fran- 
gais & etrangers, anciens & modernes 
de leur creation (xiv® sifecle) h nos 
jours. 1924. q739 B5 

Bibesco, Marthe Lucie (Lahovary) 
"princesse G. V. Bibesco." 
Le perroquet vert. 1924. 843 B58 

Bizet, Ren6. 

Anne en sabots. [1926] 843 B62 

Le sang des rois. 843 B62s 

Bordeaux, Henry. 

Le camet d'un stagiaire, scenes de la 
vie judiciaire. cl926. 843 B72ca 

Les jeux dangereux. cl926. 

843 B72j 

Voyageurs d' Orient. 1926. 

915.6 B72 
BoRDEU, Charles de. 

Un cadet de Beam. [1925] 843 B728 

BosT, Pierre. 

Crise de croissance. [1926] 843 B74 

Homicide par imprudence. cl925. 

843 B74h 



BOTJRDET, fidouard. 

La prisonnifere, piece en trois actes. 
1926. 842 B76 

BouRGES, filemir. 

Les oiseaux s'envolent et les fleurs 
tombent. 843 B772 

BouRGET, Paul Charles Joseph. 
Le danseur mondain. cl926. 

843B77da 

BouRGET, Paul Charles Joseph [d other s'\. 
Micheline et I'amour. cl926. 

843 B77mi 



Le roman des quatre. cl923. 

843 B77ro 



BoYLESVE, Rene. 

Le carrosse aux deux lezards verts. 
1921. 843 B79c 



— Le dangereux jeune homme. 
cl921. • 843 B79d 



Les deux romanciers. cl926. 

843 B79de 



— La legon d'amour dans un pare. 
cl920. 843 B791 



Le parfum des iles Borromees. 

1925. 843 B79p 

Brion, Vincent. 

Une petite de Montmartre, cl925. 

843 B85 
Bylandt, Henri, comte de. 

Les races de chiens, leurs points, 
description, types, qualities, apti- 
tudes et dgfauts. [1924] 2 v. 

q636.7 B9 
Cendrars, Blaise, 

L'or. 1925. cC395a 

Chateaubriant, Alphonse de. 

La Brifere. 1923. 843 C492b 

CHi^RAU, Gaston. 

Monseigneur voyage. cl927. 843 C522 

Le vent du destin. cl926. 

843 C522v 



Claudin, Anatole. 

Histoire de I'imprimerie en France au 
xv« et au xvi" si6cle. 1900-1914. 
4 v. vf655 C6 

Cocteatj, Jean. 

Le grand 6cart. 1923. 843 C66g 

Le Potomak, 1913-1914. 1924. 

847 C66 

— — — Le rappel a I'ordre. cl926. 

847 C66r 

Thomas I'imposteur. cl923. 

843 C66 
CuYPERS, Firmin. 

James Ensor, 1' homme & 1' oeuvre. 
[1925] 759.4 E59c 

Daudet, Alfonso. 

Ditta Fromont e Risler. [1921] 

843 D23fl 
Daumier, Honors. 

Les cent Robert Macaire. [1926] 

741 D24 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



95 



Davidson, Frederic. 

Du vieux vin dans des boutilles neuves. 

843 D25 
Debekly, Henri. 

L'ennemi des siens. cl925. 843 D28e 



Le supplice de Phfedre. [1926] 

843 D28 



Dekobea, Maurice, 

La gondole aux chimferes, cl926. 

843 D32 

Delaeue-Maedeus, Mme Lucie. 
A cote de I'amour. cl925. 843 D339c 



Graine au vent. cl926. 

843 D339g 



Delhaye de Maenyhac, Mme Th. 

Printemps perdu. cl926. 843 D35 

La roue du moulin. 1923. 

843 D35r 
Delteil, Joseph. 
Cholera. 1923. 



Jeanne d'Arc. 1925. 



843 D366 
B J43del 



Deeeme, Tristan. 

L'enl&vement sans clair de lune. 1925. 

844 D43 
Debennes, Charles. 

Le bestiaire sentimental iii. cl924. 

591.5 D43 

Vie de grillon. cl920. 595.7 D43 



Deutsch, Leon. 

J'ai achetS cette femme. 1925. 

843 D48 
DiMiEE, Louis. 

Douze crayons de Frangois Quesnel. 
1927. q757 D5a 



Dominique, Pierre. 

Les mercenaires. 1925. 



843 D67m 



Notre-Dame de la sagesse. 1924. 

843 D67 

La proie de Venus. 1925. 

843 D67p 
DoNNAY, Maurice Charles. 

Autour du Chat Noir. 1926. 841 D68 

DoRGELfes, Roland. 

Partir. cl926. 843 D69p 

Saint Magloire. cl922. 843 D69 



Deieu La Rochelle, Pierre. 

Mesure de la France. 1922. 944 D77 



Ducot:^, fidouard. 

Monsieur de Cancaval. 1923. 843 D83 

Duhamel, Georges. 

Confession de minuit. 1925. 843 D86c 

Deux hommes. 1924. 843 D86d 



Les hommes abandonnes. 1921. 

843 D86h 

— La journee des aveux, com^die en 
trois actes, suivie de Quand vous 
voudrez, comedie en un acte. 1924. 

842 D86j 



Lettres au patagon. 1926. 

844 D86I 



La pierre d'Horeb. 1926. 

843 D86p 

Le prince Jaffar. 1924. 

843 D86pr 

Vie des martyrs, 1914-1916. 1925. 
940.91 D86a 



DuHOURCAU, Francois. 
La demi-morte. 1925. 



843 D87d 



TJn homme k la mer. cl923. 

843 D87 

La revolte des morts. 1924. 

843 D87r 
DUMUE, Louis. 

La croix rouge et la croix blanche. 
cl925. 843 D89 

Dupuy-Mazuel, Henry. 

Le joueur d'echecs. [1926] 843 D945 



Le miracle des loups. cl924. 

843 D945m 



DtrssAP, Mme Jeanne (Violet). 

La passagere. 1921. 843 D97 

Escholiee, Raymond. 

Quand on conspire. 1925. 843 E74 



ESTAUNIE, £d0UAED. 

L'empreinte. 1927. 



843 E79e 



- — L'infirme aux mains de lumiere. 
1923. 843 E79i 

— Le labyrinthe. 1924. 843 E79I 



Tels qu'ils furent. 1927. 

843 E79t 



96 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



[BSTKADE, C] 

Toiles imprimees de la Perse & de 
rindie d'apies les documents rocueil- 
lis par Oberkampf. 1925? 

f745 E8 
Faxjbe, Gabriel. 
Le bel ete. 1926. 



Fort, Paul. 

Ballades francaises. 

FouENiEK, Alain. 
Le grand Meaulnes. 



844 F265 

C1922-1925. 4 v. 
841 F73b 



cl913. 843 F77 



Franck, Henri. 

Lettres a quelques amis. 



Galzy, Jeanne. 

Les allonges. 



el923. 



1926. 

844 F82 

843 G18al 



Le retour dans la vie. 1926. 

843 G18 
Gatjment, Jean, d Oe, Camille. 

Le fils Maublanc. 1926. 843 G271 



Gauvain, Victor. 

Le mort de men ami. 



1925. 



Genevoix, Maurice. 
La boite k peche 



Raboliot. 



1926. 
1925. 



Geealdy, Paul. 
Le prelude. 1923. 



Robert et Marianne. 



843 02772 

799.1 032 
843 032 

8430354p 

cl925. 
842 035 



GiDE, Andre Paul Guillaume. 
Les faux-monnayeurs. cl925. 

843 045f 

Incidences. 1924. 844 045i 

Morceaux choisis. 1924. 844 045 



Le Promethee 



cl925. 



mal enchaine. 
843 045p 



— Le retour de I'enfant prodigue. 
[1924] 848 045 



GiLLE, Pernette. 
Les captives. 1914. 



843 047 



Gieard, Georges Antoine Marie. 

Les vainqueurs. 1924. 843 051 



Gieaudoux, Jean. 
Bella. 1926. 



843 0522 



Juliette au pays des hommes. 

1924. 843 0522J 



Simon Ic pathetiquc. 1926. 

843 0522s 

Gobineau, Joseph Arthur, comte de. 

Le prisonnier clianceux. 1924. 

843 057p 
Gramain, Henri. 

Fanna la nomade. cl926. 843 074 

Geavigny, Jean. 

Montmartre en 1925. cl924. 

914.43 077 

La GueriniI;be, Francois de. 

Le grand d'Espagne. 1922. 843 L18 



Hamilton, Louis. 
Le Canada. cl926. 



q917.1 H2 



Hamp, Pierre. 

La peine des hommes. Le lin. cl924. 

843 H22 

La peine des hommes. Une nou- 

843 H22n 

843 H51 

1925. 
944.2 H56 



velle fortune. cl926. 

Henroit, £)mile. 

Aricie Brun. cl924. 

Herriot, Edouard. 

Dans la foret Normande. 



HuzABD, Mme Antoinette (de Bergevin). 

Vous serez comme des dieux. 1922. 

843 H989v 
Imann, Georges. 

Le fils Ch&bre. 1924. 843 131 



Les nocturnes. 1921. 843 131 n 
843 187 



ISTRATi, Panait. 
Codine. 1926, 



Jade, Marie. 

Le masque du genie. 843 J21 

Javal, Lily Jean. 

La quenouille du bonheur. 1920. 

483 J41 
Joseph, Gaston. 

Koffi, roman vrai d'un noir. 1922. 

843 J 83 
Jouve, Pierre Jean. 

Le monde desert. [1927] 843 J86m 

Paulina, 1880. cl925. 843 J86 



JouvENEL, Mine Gabrielle (Colette) de. 
L'envers du music-hall. [1925] 

844 J86 

La fin de Cheri. cl926. 843 J864 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



97 



Kessel, J. 

Les captifs. cl926. 



843 K42 



Keun, Odette. 

Une femme moderne. cl921. 843 K43 

Ketser. Edouard de. 

Le compagnon de route. cl921. 

843 K44 
Lacretelle, Jacques de. 

Silbermann. 1922. 843 L14 



La vie inquiete de Jean Hermelin. 

1920. 843 L14v 

Laoroix, Paul. 

XVII"^ siecle ; institutions, usages et 
costumes, France 1590-1700. 1880. 
q914.4 L1di 
Lapaquelleree, Tvon. 

Amoret. 1922. 843 L299 

Larbaud, Valery. 

Amants, heureux amants. cl923. 

843 L31 
Lavedan, Henri Leon fimile. 

Madame Lesoir. cl925. 843 L39m 

Leblanc, Maurice. 

Dorothee, danseuse de corde. cl923. 

843 L44d 
Le Breton, Andre Victor. 

Le tourment du passe. 192.3. 844 L452 

Lecuyer, Mme Andree (Husson). 

La belle et la bete. cl926. 843 L47b 



Lefevre, Frederic. 
Une heure avec. 



3 serie. 1925. 

840.9 L49 



• Une heure avec. . . 4 serie. 1927. 

840.9 L49 
Le Goffic, Charles. 

L'abbesse de Guerande. cl921. 

483 L516ab 



L'illustre Bobinet. [1922] 

843 L516 



Lekeux, Martial. 

Mes cloitres dans la tempete. 1922. 

940.935 L53 
Leon-Martin, Louis. 

Jean Denis. 1917. 843 L57 

Lichtenberger, Andre. 

Le coeur de Lolotte. cl927. 843 L69co 

Loti, Pierre. 

Journal intime, 1878-1881. 1925. 

B L883v1 

7 — 56955 



Maeterlinck, Maurice. 
La vie des termites. 1926. 

Mallarme, Stephane. 
Poesies. [1926] 



595.7 M18vi 
841 M25p 



Margueritte, Victor. 
Le compagnon. cl924. 

Le couple. cl924. 



Marliani, Anna. 
Resonance. 1920. 



843 M3316CO 
843 M 336 1c 

844 M34 



Martel, Tancrede. 

Ce que coiltent les reves. 1921. 

843 IVi376c 
Mauriac, Francois. 

Genitrix. 1923. 843 M454g 

Therese Desqueyroux. 1927. 

843 M454t 
Maurois, Andre. 

Ariel; ou, La vie de Shelley. 1923. 

B S545mal 



Dialogues sur le commandement. 
844 M457a 



1924. 
— Meipe. 1926. 



Mayran, Camile. 
L'epreuve du fils. 

Menabb, Armand. 
Une riche nature. 



[1920] 
1924. 



843 M457m 



843 M47e 



843 M535 



MiCHATJD, Regis. 

Le roman americain d'aujourd'hui. 
cl926. 813.01 IV162 



Mille, Pierre. 
Christine et lui. 



cl926. 



843 M64ch 



La detresse des Hai-pagon. cl923. 
843 IV164d 

La femme et I'homme nu. 1924. 
843 M64f 



MiOMANDRE, Francis de. 
L'ombre et I'amour. cl925. 



843 M66o 



MoNTFORT, Eugene. 

La maitresse americaine. 

MoNTHERLANT, Henry de. 
Les bestiaires. 1926. 

Le songe. 1922. 



MOBAND, Paul. 

Ferme la nuit. 1923. 



1925. 

843 IVI78m 

843 M789b 
843 IV1789 

843 M82 



98 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Lewis et Irene. 1924. 843 M82I 

Ouvert la miit. 1922. 843 M82o 

Rien que la tei-re. 1926. 

915 M82 
Nadaud, Marcel. 

Ma p'tite femme. cl917. 843 N13m 

Nesson, Piei-re de. 

Pierre de Nesson et ses oeuvres. 1925 

q841 N4 

NOAILLES, Anna Elizabeth (de Bianco- 
van), comtesse de. 
La domination. 843 N74 

La Pabfumeeie frangaise et I'art dans la 
presentation. [192.5] q668.5 P22 

Peeochon, Ernest. 

Les hommes frenetiques. cl925. 

843 P453h 
PiEKEEFEU, Jean de. 

L'anti-Phitarque. [1925] 940.91 P62a 



PouLAiLLE, Henry. 

lis etaient qnatre. 1925. 



843 P87 



PouKEAT, Henri. 

Le mauvais gargon. [1926] 843 P877 

Radiguet, Raymond. 

Le diable au corps. 1923. 843 R12 

Les joues en feu. 1925. 841 R12 



Rameau, Jean. 

L'amour merveilleux. cl921. 

843 R17am 



L'inoubliable. cl923. 



843 R17 



Ramuz, Charles Ferdinand. 
L'amour du monde. [1925] 



843 R18am 



La grande peur dans la montagne. 

1926. 843 R18 



La guerison des maladies. 1924. 
843 R18g 



Raucat. Thoma.s. 

L'honorable partie de campagne. cl924. 

915.2 R23 
Reboux, Paul. 

La vie amoureusc de Madame Du 
Barry. el925. B D813r 



Regis, Regina. 

L'amour veut etre libre. 1917. 

843 R337 

Regnieb, Henri Francois Joseph de. 
L'eseapade. 1926. 843 R34e 

Regniee, Jfme Marie Louise Antoinette 
(de Heredia) de. 
L'inconstante. 843 R342 

Rivet, Paul. 

Bibliographie americaniste. 1926. 

qOI 6.973' R9 
RoLLAND, Romain. 

L'ame enchantee. 1926-27. 3 v. 

843 R74 

Paques fleuries. cl926. 



842 R74p 

Pierre et Luce. [1925] 843 R74p 

RoMAiNS, Jules. 

Theatre de Jules Romains. cl924-26. 
4 V. 842 R75 

RoMiEE, Lucien. 

Explication de notre temps. 1925. 

944 R76e 

L'homme bless6. 1926. 843 R76 



RosNY, J. H. aine, pseud. 

Une jeune fille a la page. cl926. 

843 R82j 

RosNY, J. H., jne., pseud, of S. J. F. 
Boex. 
La courtisane passionnee. cl924. 

843 R822c 
Rostand, Edmond. 

La derniere nuit de Don Juan. 1921. 

842 R83d 
Sandee, Thierry. 

Le chevrefeuille. cl924. 



Mienne. 1923. 
Mousseline. 1924. 
Panouille. cl926. 



843 S219c 

843 S219 

843 S219m 

843 S219p 



Rediee, Antoine. 
Leone. 1920. 



843 R31 



Saemeat, Jean. 

La couronne de carton. 1926. 

842 S246c 



-Je suis trop grand pour moi. 1924. 
842 S246 



— - Lettres a Corysande et quelques 
billets en retour. cl925. 843 S246 



vol. 23, uo. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBKAKY. 



99 



Madelon. 1926. 



842 S246ma 



Le manage d'Hamlet. 1923. 

842 S246m 

Le pecheur d'oinbres. 1926. 

842 S246p 



Les plus beaux yeux du* monde. 

1926. 842 S246pl 

Savignon, Andre. 

La dame de la "Sainte-Alice"'. 1926. 

843 S26d 
ScHOPFEB, Jean. 
Ariane, jeune fille russe. 1924. 

843 S37ar 

La fin d'un monde. 1925. 



843 S37 

Quand la terre trembla. 1921. 

843 S37q 

La rive d'Asie. 1927. 843 S37r 



SiLVESTBE, Charles. 

Prodige du coeur. cl926. 843 S58 

Tailhade, Laurent. 

Le paillasson, moeurs de province. 1924. 

843 T13 

Tharaud, Jerome d Tharaud, Jean. 

La bataille a Scutari. [1926] 

843 T36b 
TnEKrvE, Andre. 

Le plus grand peche. 1924. 843 T39p 



Valery, Paul. 

Eupalinos. cl924. 842 V16 

Variete. cl924. 843 V16 

Vallotton, Benjamin. 

Sur le roc. 1924. 843 V19s 

Vaudoyee, Jean Louis. 

Beautes de la Provence. 1926. 

914.4 V35 
Vautel, Clement. 

Les folies bourgeoises ; roman. 1921. 

843 V38 

Je suis un affreux bourgeois ; 

roman. 1926. 843 V38j 

^'ILDRAC, Charles. 

Decouvertes. 1923. 843 V69 

Vioux, Marcelle. 

Une enlisee. 1920. 843 V79e 

Fleur d'amour. 1927. 843 V79 



La revanche. 1925. 



843 T39 



TiNAYKE, Mme Marcelle. 

Le bouclier d' Alexandre. 1922. 

843 T58b 



Les lampes voilees ; Laurence- 
Valentine. 1921. 843 T58I 



ToucHAKD, Albert. 
L'abordage. 1926. 



843 T72 



Trautmann, Rene Frederic Alexandre. 
Au pays de "Batouala". 1922. 

916 T77 
Traz, Robert de. 

Le depaysement oriental. 1926. 

916.2 T78 

L^NION syndicale et federation des syn- 

dicats des maitres imprimeurs de 

France. 

Les trois premiers siecles de I'impri- 

merie en France. [1926] q655.1 U5 



Marie-du-peuple ; roman. 1925. 

843 V79m 
WiENEK, Francis. 

La feerie cinghalaise. 1926. 

915.48 W64 
Zamacois, Miguel. 

La dame au rendez-vous. cl920. 

843 Z23 
Zola, Emile. 

La curee. 1925. 843 Z86c 

Pot-bouille. 1926. 2 V. 

843 Z86po 

CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
OCTOBER, NOVEMBER AND 
DECEMBER, 1927.t 
Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considei*able interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 



tExcept v^^hen otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
ofHce, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



100 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in News 
Notes of California Lihraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Ageicultuee Depaetment. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 16, nos. 9-11, September- 
November, 1927. illus. 

Special publication no. 78. 



Dairy laws of California with regulations 
for their enforcement. Revised to Octo- 
ber 1, 1927. 1927. 69 p. 

Same, no. 79. Tolerances and 



specifications applying to liquid measuring 
devices for the state of California. 1927. 
13 p. 

Banks, Supeeintendent of. Eight- 
eenth annual report showing the financial 
condition of state banks at the close of 
business June 30, 1927. 1927. 529 p. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, nos. 1-8, Octo- 



ber-December, 1927. 

Buiij)iNG AND Loan Commissionee 
(San Francisco).* Thirty-fourth annual 
report, 1927. 1927. 290 p. 

Chieopeactic Examinees, Boaed of. 
Fourth annual report, 1926-1927. 1927. 
15 p. 

Cosmetology, Boaed of (San Fran- 
cisco). Law governing the practice of 
cosmetology in California iQ'''7 o± t^ 
24°. 



1927. 24 p. 



Disabled Ameeican Vetekans of 
THE WoPvLD Wae, Depaetment of Cali- 
foenia. Report of the sixth annual state 
convention. Long Beach, May 23-27, 
1927. 1927. 116 p. 

Education Department, Dh'ision of 
City Secondary Schools. Bulletin no. 
C-1. The California plan of vocational 
education. Vocational education and the 
secondary school. 1927. 20 p. 

Same, no. C-2. The 

California plan of vocational education. 
Home-making instruction in Federal and 
state-aided classes. 1927. 12 p. 



Same, no. C-3. The 

California plan of vocational education. 

*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



Trade and industrial instruction in Fed- 
eral and state-aided classes, regulations 
governing : Evening schools, part-time 
and all-day schools. 1927. 35 p. 

Fish and Game Commission. California 
fish and game, vol. 13, no. 4, October, 
1927. ,p. 233-315. Ulus. 

Index to vol. 13, p. 306-315. 

Health, Department of Public. 
Weekly bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 34r-46, Octo- 
ber-December, 1927. 

Bureau of Child Hygiene. 

Mental training of the young child, by 
Olga L. Bridgman. 1927. 7 p. 

Highway Commission. California 
highways, vol. 4, no. 9, September-Octo- 
ber, 1927. illus. maps. 

Immigeation and Housing Commis- 
sion. State housing act of California. 
Effective August 17, 1923, with amend- 
ments of 1925. 1927. 68 p. 

Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). California safety news, 
vol. 11, nos. 3-4, September-December, 
1927. illus. 

Electrical safety orders, effective 

September 1, 1925. 1927. 213 p. 16°. 

— Logging and sawmill safety 

orders, effective March 15, 1917. 1927. 
37 p. illus. 

— Tentative revised air pressure 

tank safety orders. 1927. 72 p. illus. 
12°. 

Workmen's compensation, in- 



surance and safety laws of the state of 
California. Effective July 29, 1927. 1927. 
92 p. 

Insueance Commissioner (San Fran- 
cisco) . Fifty-ninth annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1926. 1927. 

Vol. 3. Casualty and miscellaneous. 

■ ■ Insurance laws of the state of 



California. 1927. 376 p. 

List of persons, partnerships 



and corporations licensed as insurance 
brokers and insurance adjusters in Cali- 
fornia, term ending July 1, 1928, includ- 
ing licenses issued to August 15, 1927. 
1927. 91 p. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



101 



Same. Term ending July 1, 

1928, including licenses issued between 
August 15, 1927, and November 15, 1927. 
1927. 18 p. 

Laboe Statistics and Law Enfobce- 
MENT Division. Labor laws of the state 
of California, 1927. 1927. 350 p. 16°. 

Legislative Counsel Btteeau. Laws 
on publication of legal notices ; a compila- 
tion of the statutes of California requiring 
the publication of notices ; and governing 
the time, place and manner of publication, 
revised to 1927. 1927. 168 p. 

LEeiSLATUEE. Forty-seventh session. 
Journal of the Assembly during the 47th 
session of the Legislature of the State of 
California, 1927. 1927. 2814 p. 

.Journal of the Senate during 

the 47th session of the Legislature of the 
State of California, 1927. 1927. 2448 p. 



Appendix to the Journals of the 

Senate and Assembly of the 47th session 
of the Legislature of the State of Cali- 
fornia. 1927. 5 vols. 

Statutes of California, constitu- 



tion of 1879 as amended, resolutions 
adopted at extra session of forty-sixth 
Legislature, 1926, measures submitted to 
vote of electors 1926; general laws, 
amendments to codes, resolutions, consti- 
tutional amendments passed at the regu- 
lar session of forty-seventh Legislature, 
1927. 1927. ci, 2525 p. 

LiBBAEY, State. News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, vol. 22, no. 4, October, 
1927. p. 295-528. 



Books for the blind department. 

News Notes. Reprinted from News Notes 
of California Libraries, October, 1927, 30 
p. 32°. 

Medical Examinees Boaed. Supple- 
ment to the 1927 Directory of physicians 
and surgeons, drugless practitioners, 
naturopaths, chiropodists and midwives 
holding certificates issued under the Medi- 
cal practice acts of California. October 
1, 1927. 1927. 24 p. 

Mining Bueeau (San Francisco). 
Monthly chapter of report XXIII of the 
State Mineralogist covering mining in 



California and the activities of the State 
Mining Bureau, vol. 23, no. 3, July, 1927. 
illus. maps. p. 235-371. 



— — — - Summary of operations Cali- 
fornia oil fields, vol. 12, nos. 10-12, April- 
June, 1927. illus. maps. 

Public School Teachees' Retibe- 
MENT Sal A BY Fund Boaed. Circular of 
information regarding teachers' retire- 
ment salary law, 1927 edition. 1927. 13 p. 

Public Woeks Depaetment. Cali- 
fornia highways and public works, vol. 4, 
nos. 11-12, November-December, 1927. 
illus. maps. 

Foi-merlj' issued by the California 
Highway Commission as California 

Jlishways. 

Division of Architecture. Bi- 



ennial report, December 1, 1926. 1927. 

37 p. illus. 

Division of Engineering and 



Irrigation. Bulletin no. 18. California 
irrigation district laws, 1927. 1927. 
230 p. 

Division of Highways. Im- 



portant statutes relating to the Depart- 
ment of Public Works, Division of High- 
ways and the California Highway Com- 
mission, July, 1927. 1927. 162 p. 

Light asphaltic oil road surfaces, 



a progress report of a cooperative investi- 
gation of intermediate road types con- 
ducted by the Division of Highways and 
the Bureau of Public Roads, United 
States Department of Agriculture. 1927. 
98 p. iUus. 

Railboad Commission. General order 
no. 79. Rules and regiilations to govern 
the construction and filing of passenger 
tariffs issued by passenger stage corpora- 
tions. Adopted November 12, 1927. Ef- 
fective December 1, 1927. 1927. 19 p. 

Same, no. 80. Rules and regu- 
lations to govern the construction and 
filing of freight and express tariffs and 
classifications issued by automobile truck 
transportation companies. Adopted No- 
vember 12, 1927. Effective December 1, 
1927. 1927. 18 p. 

Real Estate Depaetment. California 
real estate directory-bulletin, vol. 8, no. 2, 
September 15, 1927. 464 p. 



102 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Teachebs College, San Fbancisco. 
Announcement of courses, kindergarten- 
primary, regulai' elementary, junior high 
school, 1927-1928. 1927. 80 p. 

Uni\'eesity of Callfoenia (Berke- 
ley). Calendar, vol. LXVII, nos. 8-16, 
October-November, 1927. 8 p. folder. 

A weekly bulletin of official Uni- 
versity announcements. 

Price 25 cents a half year, postpaid. 

Chronicle, vol. 29, no. 4, Octo- 



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Price $2.00 per year; single copies 
50 cents. 

Publications. Agricultural sci- 



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relation to the soil solution, by Wilbur 
L. Powers. Berkeley, December 5, 1927. 
p. 119-166. 13 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 60 cents. 

College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Bul- 
letin no. 430. Range grasses of Cali- 
fornia, by Arthur W. Sampson and Agnes 
Chase. Berkeley, September, 1927. 94 p. 
illus. 

Same, no. 431. Raisin 



by-products and bean screenings as feeds 
for fattening lambs, by Robert F. MiUer. 
Berkeley, September, 1927. 16 p. illus. 

Same, no. 432. Some 



economic problems involved in the pooling 
of fruit, by H. E. Erdman and H, R. 
Wellman. Berkeley, September, 1927. 
46 p. 

Same, no. 433. Power 



requirements of electrically driven dairy 
manufacturing equipment, by A. W. Far- 
rail. Berkeley, September, 1927. 20 p. 
8 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 434. Investi- 



gations on the use of fruits in ice cream 
and ices, by G. D. Tumbow and W. V. 
Cruess. Berkeley, September, 1927. 38 p. 
4 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 435. The 



problem of securing closer relationship 
between agricultural development and ir- 
rigation construction, by David Weeks 
and Charles H. West in cooperation with 
The Federal Land Bank of Berkeley. 
Berkeley, September, 1927. 99 p. 24 figs, 
in text. 



• Same, no. 436. I. The 

kadota fig, by Ira J. Condit; II. Kadota 
fig products, by W. V. Cruess. Berkeley, 
October, 1927. 45 p. 12 figs, in text. 

HHgardia, vol. 3, no. 2, 



October, 1927. p. 27-^0. 

Astronomy. Lick Ob- 
servatory bulletin no. 390. The space dis- 
tribution of the stars of different spectral 
classes as determined from studies in the 
Cygnus region of the milky way, by Allan 
D. MaxweU. Berkeley, July 11, 1927. p. 
68-91, plate, 11 figs, in text. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per volume in advance. 
Vol. 13 current. 

— Botany, vol. 11, no. 7. 

Interspecific hybridization in Nicotiana. 
VI. Cytological features of Sylvestris- 
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and R. E. Clausen. Berkeley, October 4, 
1927. p. 127-140, 9 figs, in text. roy. 8°, 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 18. 

New rhodophyceae from the Pacific Coast 
of North America. IV, by Nathaniel 
Lyon Gardner. Berkeley, September 27, 
1927. p. 373-402, plates 73-83. roy. 8°. 

Price 35 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 19. 

New rhodophyceae from the Pacific Coast 
of North America. V, by Nathaniel Lyon 
Gardner. Berkeley, September 27, 1927. 
p. 403-434, plates 84-93. roy. 8°. 

Price 40 cents. 

Same, vol. 14, no. 1. On 

a collection of myxophyceae from Fukien 
Province, China, by Nathaniel Lyon 
Gardner. Berkeley, September 27, 1927. 
p. 1-20, plates 1-5. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

■ Same, v. 14, no. 3. The 

pleistocene flora of Rancho La Brea, by 
Frederick H. Frost. Berkeley, November 
30, 1927. p. 73-98, plates 15-19. roy 8°. 

Price 35 cents. 

Same, vol. 14, no. 4. 

New rhodophyceae from the Pacific Coast 
of North America. VI, by Nathaniel Lyon 
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p. 99-138, plates 20-36. roy. 8°. 

Price 65 cents. 

Classical philology, vol. 

8, no. 8. On the syntax of fretus, by Her- 
bert C. Nutting. Berkeley, November 19, 
1927. p. 305-330. roy. 8°. 

Price 30 cents. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



103 



— Entomology, vol. 4, no. 

6. A comparative study of the structural 
characters used in the classification of the 
genus macrosiphum of the family aphi- 
didae, with special reference to the species 
found in California, by Labib Boutros 
Soliman. Berkeley, November 25, 1927. 
p. 89-158, 77 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 85 cents. 

Same, vol. 4, no. 7. 

Studies of the anatomy and histology of 
stenopelmatus fuscus Hald., by Alonzo 
Clayton Davis. Berkeley, December 22, 
1927. p. 159-208, plates 1-5, 7 figs, in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 60 cents. 

Extension Division. The 



Spokesman, vol. 5, no. 6, November, 1927. 
Geological sciences, vol. 



17, nos. 2-3. No. 2, The geology and pale- 
ontology of the type section of the mega- 
nos formation (lower middle eocene) of 
California by Bruce L. Clark and A. O. 
Woodford ; No. 3, A new species of eocene 
coral, archohelia clarki, from California, 
by Thomas Wayland Vaughan. Berkeley, 
December 31, 1927. p. 63-144, plates 
14r-23, 1 map. roy. 8°. 

In one cover. Price $1.00. 

Same, vol. 17, no. 4. 



The occurrence and phylogenetic status of 
merycodus from the Mohave Desert ter- 
tiary, by E. L. Furlong. Berkeley, No- 
vember 22, 1927. p. 145-186, plates 24- 
28, 28 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 55 cents. 

Physiology, vol. 7, no. 



3. The site of action of veratrine on the 
cold-blooded heart, by R. W. Watson and 
H. F. Blum. Berkeley, December 24, 
1927. p. 25-28. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

— Scripps Institution of 



Oceanography, La Jolla. Bulletin, Tech- 
nical series, vol. 1, no. 11. Surface catches 
of marine diatoms and dinoflagellates off 
the coast of Oregon by U.S.S. "Guide" 
in 1924, by Ralph Lewis. Berkeley, No- 
vember 2, 1927. p. 189-196, 3 figs, in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 1, no. 12. 



Surface catches of marine diatoms and 
dinoflagellates from Pacific high seas in 



1925 and 1926, by Winfred Emory AUen 
and Ralph Lewis. Berkeley. November 
2, 1927. p. 197-200. roy. S° . 
Price 25 cents. 

— Semitic philology, vol. 



9, no. 1. Neo-Babylonian administrative 
documents from Erech, parts I and II, by 
Henry Frederick Lutz. Berkeley, Decem- 
ber 15, 1927. p. 1-115. roy. 8°. 
Price $2.50. 

■ • Zoology, vol. 31, no. 6. 



Studies on the permeability of living cells, 
IX. Does methylene blue itself pene- 
trate?, by Matilda Moldenhauer Brooks. 
Berkeley, December 20, 1927. p. 79-92, 
3 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Whittiek State School. Journal of 
Delinquency, vol. 11, no. 3, September, 
1927. 

Price $3.00 per year. 

The Sentinel (new series) vol. 



24, nos. 9-12, September-December, 1927. 
Published monthly, Price $1.00 per 
year ; 10 cents per copy. 

CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING OCTOBER, 
NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 
1927. 

Berkeley. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 11, nos. 10-12, October-December, 
1927. 

Long Beach. Public library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 3, nos. 10-12, October-De- 
cember, 1927. 

Los Angeles. Board of Education. 
Educational research bulletin, vol. 7, nos. 
1-4, September-December, 1927. 

Engineering Department. An- 
nual report July 1, 1926 to June 30, 1927. 
1927. 



— — — Board of Water and Power 
Commissioners. Twenty-fifth annual re- 
port for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1926. 1926. 

Chamber of Commerce. South- 



ern California business, vol. 6, nos. 9-11, 
October-December, 1927. 

Municipal league. Light on 

your city's affairs. Bulletin, vol. 5, nos. 
3-5, October-December, 1927. 



104 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[Jan., 1928 



Oakland. Auditor. Thirty-eighth an- 
nual report for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1927. 1927. 

Richmond. Health Department. Month- 
ly report, October-November, 1927. 

Public library. Bulletin, vol. 



14, nos. 4-6, October-December, 1927. 

Sacramento. Health Department. 
Bulletin, October-November, 1927. 

Chamber of Commerce. Capital 



business, October-December, 1927. 

San Diego. Department of Public 
Health. Annual i-eport for the year 1926. 
1926. 

Monthly report, October-No- 



vember, 1927. 

San Feancisco. Board of Supervisors. 
Journal of proceedings, vol. 22, nos. 40- 
49, October-December, 1927. 

Bureau of Governmental Re- 



search. The City, vol. 7, nos. 11-14, Oc- 
tober-December, 1927. 

Chamber of Commerce, San 



Francisco business, vol. 15, nos. 13-24, 
October-December, 1927. 

Santa Babbaba. Free Public library. 
Annual report, 1926-27. 



Booklist, June, 1927. 

Stockton. Auditor. Fourth annual 
report for the fiscal year ending December 
31, 1926. 1926. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER 
AND DECEMBER, 1927. 

Books marked c are printed with contractions. 

In American Braille. 

MAGAZINES. 
Current numbers of the following : 

CiLLTJMINATOR. 

In European Braille. 
BOOKS. 

Beeesfoed, John Davys. The criminal. 

Contains also : Perez, by W. L. 
George ; Mrs Adis, by Sheila Kaye- 

Smith. 

BtTCHAN, John. Prester John. 2 vols. 

A tale of adventure in a land of 
ancient mystery near the Transvaal. 



Collins, H. P. Modem poetry. 2 vols. 

Collins, Wilkie. The dead secret. 4 vols. 
An absorbing mystery. 

DuMAS, Alexandee. Twenty years after. 

10 vols. 

The further adventures of D'Artag- 
nan and the "Three Musketeers" in 
France and in England. 

*Ferreeo, Guglielmo. The women of 
the Caesars. 2 vols. 

A dramatically vivid picture of cer- 
tain aspects of social life in ancient 
Rome. 

Feeeman, Richard Austin. A message 
from the deep sea. 
Duplicate copy. Gift of C. H. Miller. 

GiBBS, Sir Philip Hamilton. The middle 

of the road. 5 vols. 

A novel revealing after-the-war 
social and economic conditions. 

Grey, Edward Geey, 1st viscount. Twen- 
ty-five years, 1892-1916. 8 vols. 

An illuminating book on the origins 
and outbreak of the Great War. The 
author was Foreign Secretary when 
the war began. 

*Heidenstam, Veener von. The tree of 

the Folkungs. Translated from the 

Swedish by Arthur G. Chater. 4 vols. 

Here is traced the rise and fall of 
the mighty line of the Folkungs, which 
at its height in the 13th century, 
brought Sweden into a position of 
prominence and power in mediaeval 
Europe. 

Joseph, Michael. Journalism for profit. 
2 vols. 

Joseph, Michael. Short story writing 
for profit. 2 vols. 

*Larsen, J. Anker. The philosopher's 

stone. Translated from the Danish 

by Arthur G. Chater. 4 vols. 

Tlie author begins with a picture of 
a dozen Danish children at play in 
the school yard and proceeds to show 
what in the course of years life makes 
of them all. 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. King 

Robert of Sicily, and The saga of 

King Olaf. 

Two of the "Tales of a Wayside 
Inn."" 

McGovERN, William Montgomery. To 
Lhasa in disguise. 4 vols. 

Going on a secret mission to Tibet, 
a country fiercely jealous of intrud- 



'■Gift of American Braille Press. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



105 



ers, the author was forced to disguise 
himself as a coolie. The journey was 
made at cost of terrible hardships. 

^Masters, David. The wonders of sal- 
vage. 2 vols. 

An account of the wonderful feats 
of salvors and wreckers, beginning 
with the early hunts for Spanish Ar- 
mada and pirate treasure. 

Melville, Hebman. Typee. 4 vols. 

A narrative of a four months resi- 
dence among the natives of a valley 
of the Marquesas Islands. 

RosEBERY, Archibald Philip Primrose, 
5th earl of. Oliver Cromwell, a 
eulogy and an appreciation. 

*ToRDAY, Emil. On the traU of the 
Bushongo. 2 vols. 

The Bushongo are a tribe in Central 
Africa. The account of this trip made 
several years ago is lightened by nar- 
ratives of personal adventures and 
experiences. 

*Weigall, Arthur Edward Pearse 
Brome. Life and times of Cleopatra. 
4 vols. 

Wells, Herbert George. The first men 
in the moon. 2 vols. 

One of the best of Wells' early fan- 
tastic rornances. Two men journey to 
the moon in a sphere, and their ad- 
ventures amongst the Selenites are 
thrilling in the extreme. 

Wentworth, Patricia. The red lacquer 

ckse. 2 vols. 

A story of mystery, of thrills, of 
love — with an amazing ending. 

French Text. 

*Babgone, Charles. Un combat et une 
bataille (Coronel-Falkland) par 
Claude Farrere (pseud.) et Paul 
Chack. 

*Barthou, Louis. La vie amoureuse de 
Richard Wagner. 

*Bergson, Henri Louis. Matere et 
memoire ; essai sur la relation du 
corps a I'esprit. 2 vols. 

*DuBOis, Theodore. Realisations des 
basses et des chants du traite d'har- 
mohie. (Realisations de I'auteur) 

*DuB0is, Theodore. Traite d'harmonie 
theorique et pratique. 2 vols. 



*Fouch£, M. 
vols. 



Les merveilles du ciel. 2 



^Gift of American Braille Press. 
8—56955 



*Jequier, Gustave. Histoire de la civili- 
sation egyptienne. 3 vols. 

*Larousse, Pierre. Nouveau Larousse, 

adapte a 1' usage des aveugles par 

Geo. L. Raverat. Dictionnaire en- 

cyclopedique. Vol. 10. 

First 9 volumes previously received. 

*Pouktales, Guy de, comte. La vie de 
Franz Liszt. 2 vols. 



*ZoLA, Smilie. Le reve. 3 vols. 

Les rougon-macquart. Histoire nat- 
urelle et sociale d'une famille sous le 
second empire. 



German Text. 
Habing, Wilhelm. Die Hosen des 
Herrn von Bredow, Vaterlandischen 
roman, von Wilibald Alexis (pseud.). 
3 vols. 

Gift of Mrs H. W. Bruning. 

Schiller, Johann Chbistoph Fried- 
rich von. Maria Stuart, ein trauer- 
spiel in fiinf aufziigen. 

Gift of Mrs H. W. Bruning. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
Braille mail. 
Braille musical magazine. 
Braille packet. 
Channels of blessing. 
Hampstead. 
HoRA jocunda. 

Interallied Braille magazine. 
Lightbringer. 
Literary journal. 
Progress. 
Santa Lucia. 
Tribune. 

music. 
Braille musical magazine. 

*Gift of American Braille Press. 



106 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1928 



Green pastures. 



In Moon Type. 
BOOKS. 

Bible. 'New Testament. I Corinthians, 

chap. 15. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of W. M. 
McCully. 

Matthew, 2 vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of P. S. Dunlvle. 

iNSTBtJCTiONS for reading the Moon 
system. 

A Key to Braille in Moon. 

Kipling, Rudtard. Poems. 

Contents : The native born ; The 
flowers ; Municipal ; The coastwise 
lights; The English flag; England's 
answer ; The overland mail ; In spring- 
time. 

SrLBEREAD, UnA LtJCY 

6 vols. 

A novel which breathes the atmos- 
phere of chivalry and courtesy. 

Weyman, Stanley John. The traveller 
in the fur cloak. 7 vols. 

An absorbing romance, the adven- 
tures of two British diplomats in Ger- 
many during the thrilling j^ears when 
Napoleon's shadow lay darkly across 
Europe. 

Whiting, Lilian. The world beautiful. 
3 vols. 

Extra Large Size Type. 
Bible. New Testament. John, chap. 1. 

John, chap. 2. 

John, chap. 3. 

magazines. 
Current numbers of the following : 

Dawn. 

Moon magazine. 

The Moon, weekly newspaper. 

In New York Point. 

books. 

Bacon, Fbancis, viscount St. Alhans. 

Essays, civil and moral. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of William 
Harper. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
Catholic transcript. 



Christian record. 

Gospel trumpet. 

Lux vera. 

Matilda Ziegler magazine. 

Sunday school monthly. 

Weekly review. 

In Revised Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with contractions. 
BOOKS. 

cAndrews, Mrs Mary Raymond (Ship- 
man ) . The better treasure. Includes 
The little mixer, by Lilian Nicholson 
Shearon. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, Calif. 

Two Christmas stories. 

cBaeley, Temple. The blue window. 
8 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of San Francisco 
Chapter, American Red Cross. 

The story moves smoothly and 
entertainingly. 

cBiggers, Earl Derr. The house with- 
out a key. 7 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of San Francisco 
Chapter, American Red Cross. 

The scene of this mystery sLory is 
set in the Hawaiian Islands. 

cBrown, Alice. The flying Teuton. 
Includes The price, by Donal Hamil- 
ton Haines. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Catharine 
J. Morrison. 

cCather, Willa Sibert. O pioneers. 
2 vols. 

Gift of Junior Woman's Club of 
Paterson, N. J. 

This story of Nebraska opens in the 
period of some thirty years ago when 
the prairies were still untamed. The 
characters of the story are of the two 
races, Bohemian and Swede, who were 
then attempting to subdue the wild 
land. 

cConnell, Richard Edward. The ruling 
passion, and Evidence. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, Calif. 

cDey, Frederic Van Rensselaer 
("Vaeick Vanaedy," pseud.). 
Watch your step. 2 vols. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Louis Scheeline. 

A good mj'stery story. 

cDoRRANCE, James French. The long 
arm of the mounted. 6 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of San Francisco 
Chapter, American Red Cross. 



vol. 23, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



107 



cDuMAS, AxEXANDBE. The count of 
Monte Cristo. 21 vols. 

Gift of American Braille Press. 
Two side printing. 

cFoLEY, James William. The mellow 
year ; a man's songs of friendship. 

Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
Carrie L. Hodge. 

cGoBGAS, Mrs Marie Cook (Doughty), 
& Hendbick, Bueton Jesse. Wil- 
liam Crawford Gorgas — his life and 
work. 6 vols. 

An admirable and interesting biog- 
raphy of the distinguished American 
army surgeon who made possible the 
building of the Panama canal by 
removing the chief obstacle to its 
success — yellow fever. 

Reproduced by the Garin process. 



Osgood. The book of 
little book of brave 



cGbovee, Edwin 
courage ; a 
thoughts. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, Calif. 



cHeindel, Max. 
death. 



The riddle of life and 



Hand copied. Gift of Lida E. West. 
Lecture 1. Rosicrucian Christianity. 



c Where are the dead? 

Hand copied. Gift of Lida E. West. 
Lecture 2. Rosicrucian Christianity. 

cIbving, Washingomn. The Alhambra ; 
tales and sketches of the Moors and 
Spaniards. 7 vols. 

cMiLNE, Alan Alexander. When we 
were very young. 

Charming poems written for a child 
but with an appeal for many grown- 
ups. 

cPaeker, Mrs Cornelia (Stbatton). 
An American idyll. 3 vols. 

The life of Carleton Hubbell Parker, 
professor of economics at the Univer- 
sity of Washington and investigator 
and mediator in labor problems. His 
promising career was cut short by 
death in his fortieth year. The book 
is a record of an unusually rich family 
life. 

cRicHMOND, Mrs Grace LotnsE (Smith). 
Red of the Redfields. 3 vols. 



cWilliams, Valentine. 
vols. 



Mr Ramosi. 7 



Hand copied. Gift of San Francisco 
Chapter, American Red Cross. 

Mr Ramosi was the head of an 
international group of swindlers, who 
carried on a huge trade in antiques 
stolen from Egypt. This is a tale of 
dark secrets, adventure and romance. 



cWiLLiAMSON, Charles Norris, & Wil- 
liamson, Alice Mubiel (Living- 
ston). The motor maid. 3 vols. 

A pleasantly diverting tale of a 
motor trip through France. 

cWoRK, Milton Cooper. Auction bridge, 
including The new official laws of 
auction bridge, and The laws of 
duplicate bridge. 7 vols. 

Gift of Pittsburgh Chapter, Ameri- 
can Red Cross. 

cWren, Percival Christopher. Beau 
Geste. 4 vols. 

One copy gift of Daughters of Ohio 
in New York through Matilda Ziegler 
Magazine for the Blind. 

Deals in a most interesting way 
with the French Foreign Legion in 
Northern Africa. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
cAmerican review for the blind. 
cThe Beacon. 
cBeaille courier. 
cThe Braille mirror. 
cBbaille star theosophist. 
cCatholic review. 
cCheistian record. 
cCheistian .science quarterly. 
cChtjrch herald for the blind. 
cGospel trumpet. 
cMatilda Ziegler magazine. 
cMessengee to the sightless. 
cOuE own. 
Seaechlight. 
cSuNDAY school monthly. 

In Ink Print. 
MAGAZINES. 
Current numbers of the following : 

The Beacon. 
Outlook for the blind. 

St. Dunstan's review. 



56955 1-28 1400 



Vol. 23, No. 2 APRIL 1928 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER-SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



OLD THEATER PROGRAMS AT SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

BUILDING ACTIVITIES— LOS ANGELES, MODESTO, WHITTIER, LODI, 
NAPA COUNTY, OJAI, NILES, CARMEL, LAGUNA BEACH— ORANGE 
COUNTY. 

CHINESE ART AT LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM LIBRARY. 

FIFTY MILE TRIP OF MADERA COUNTY SCHOOL. 

EXHIBIT OF SACRAMENTO CLUB OF PRINTING HOUSE CRAFTSMEN. 

LINCOLN COLLECTION AT SANTA BARBARA STATE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



CALIFOBNIA STATE PBINTING OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO. 192 S 



58783 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
BOOKS 109 

COOPERATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY IN THE FIRST DISTRICT OF THE 

C. L. A 115 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 119 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 120 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 121 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 122 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 152 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 159 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 166 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 167 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 168 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 170 

Staff, Etc. 170 

Depaetments 171 

Recent Accessions 177 

Caxifoenia State Pdblications Received Dubing January, Febbuaby 
AND March, 1928 212 

Califoenia City Publications Received Dubing Januaby, Febbuaby 

AND Mabch, 1928 217 

Books fob the Blind Added Dubing January, Febbuaby and Mabch, 
1928 217 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Oalifobnia 
State Libeaey. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post oflBce at Sacramento, 
California under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



* BOOKS. 



By Samuel Levinson, Sacramento. 



It is surmised that in the beginning, 
along about 50,000 or so years ago, some 
eccentric cave-dweller happened to scratch 
on the wall of his cave the rude outline 
of a tiger. Surprised and elated at his 
achievement, he called to his companion 
ground-apes, who gaped, marveled, and 
then proceeded to copy and elaborate on 
his discovery. After some experimenting 
and practice they found they could con- 
vey different meanings to one another 
by variations in their scratchings. It 
was from this beginning that sign writ- 
ing developed. 

Then, because earliest man thought he 
was quite a splendid fellow, and was 
willing to be remembered by his sons 
and his sons' sons as a mighty warrior 
and great hunter, he carved symbols and 
hieroglyphics of his brave exploits on 
tombs, in passages, on mummy cases, and 
more generally upon stone slabs. In that 
age books were few, and hunger for them 
was not over-keen because the writings 
were rather awkward to circulate. You 
see, it would have required a long freight 
train for example to deliver the equiva- 
lent of a modern bedtime story book, 
and freight trains weren't then running 
on regular schedule. The librarian's 
badge of office in those days was probably 
— a derrick. And a bookseller had to be 
a pretty husky chap, I imagine. I've 
often wondered how many copies of the 
Ten Commandments I would have heaved 
over the counter in a day were I in busi- 
ness in the days of my illustrious fore- 
father, Moses. 

Not far from Egypt, where Moses 
published a work that has enjoyed a 
good general circulation during the past 
5000 years, up the eastern coast of the 
Mediterranean, were the Phoenicians. 
These Phoenicians were in a sense 
responsible for this gathering here in 
Marysville, today, because it was they 
who invented the alphabet — the letter to 
take the place of the Egyptian picture- 
sign. Practically every letter we now 
use, after centuries of modification and 
development, owes its shape to the Phoe- 
nicians. 



Then the discovery was made that 
papyrus, an Egyptian plant from which 
the pith could be taken, cut into strips, 
arranged crosswise in two or three layers, 
soaked in water and then pressed flat, 
made a smooth surface on which to wiite. 
An improvement on papyrus was parch- 
ment. We are told it was the Jews who 
first used parchment. This originally 
was the skin of a lamb, sheep, goat, 
young calf or other animal, specially 
prepared for writing on. 

The Old Testament was written on 
parchment ; and today, this being the 
Jewish Sabbath, at this very moment, 
there are being unrolled in synagogues 
throughout the world the rolls or scrolls 
of parchment on which are inscribed the 
Holy Scriptures. 

Then followed the introduction of 
paper-making from China, or as it was 
known at the time, Cathay. This knowl- 
edge was passed over the Caravan Route 
of Marco Polo, through Tibet, Persia and 
Arabia ; and by the 14th century paper 
is said to have been in use throughout 
Europe. But because the process of 
manufacture was then slow and laborious 
it was not very plentiful. So it was used 
with economy. Scholars used goose-quill 
pens because they found more could be 
written with a pointed feather than with 
any other appliance they then knew. 
The word pen means quill or feather. 

The art of printing probably origi- 
nated with designs pressed on cloth from 
carved blocks of wood dipped in dye. 
This is said to have been done by the 
Chinese many hundreds of years ago. 
Next separate letters were arranged to 
form words. Then in the 15th century 
came Gutenberg's discovery of a method 
of casting movable types, which could be 
arranged in rows to form lines and pages. 
Printing presses, constantly improved, 
type-casting and type-setting machines, 
materials and processes marvelous to 
behold, have been steadily developed until 
today we have good reason to believe 
that mechanically the facilities for the 
production of books are just about 
perfect. 



* Paper read at meeting 
Marysville, March 3, 192S. 
1—58783 



of Ninth District of California Library Association in 



110 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. ' [April, 1928 



But the mechanical processes which 
have been so marvelously perfected to 
intervene between an author's mind and 
a reader's mind form merely the utensils 
or vessels which we call books. And in 
themselves, as mere fabrications of paper, 
ink, cloth, thread and glue, books are 
worthless as any empty utensil. We 
know they differ from one another in 
value and in interest precisely as a bas- 
ket of finiit for example differs from a 
basket of coals, or a basket of flowers 
from a basket of rubbish — which is the 
difference of their contents and that only. 

Let us now consider how a book is 
brought into being and what as a rule 
happens to it on its often swift journey 
to the oblivion which you will agree it 
so often, richly merits. I speak of the 
average novel. In the first place someone 
writes _ a story. There's no law against 
that, though I'm not so sure there 
shouldn't be. The author is usually most 
sincere in the belief that if it be properly 
appreciated and handled by the pub- 
lisher, recognized and treated without 
bias by the jealous reviewers, we libra- 
rians and booksellers will be greatly 
honored by the privilege of circulating 
it reverently and in large numbers. Very 
well. The manusciipt is sent to a pub- 
lisher. It is usually in fairly good Fmg- 
lish, though often such details as punctu- 
ation, capitalization and even spelling are 
startlingly original. 

Upon arrival at the publishing office 
its receipt is acknowledged on a printed 
form, courteously worded, and the manu- 
script is turned over to a professional 
reader. The reader, like the professional 
reviewer, is often a literai-y person who 
has not quite succeeded in ever having 
anything of his or her own published. 
But in most instances the reader is 
really very capable and conscientious ; 
always eager for a "find" and truly 
exultant when something holding forth 
real promise has been siibmitted. His is 
then the thrill and pride of discovery ! 

If the first reader's report shows a ray 
of hope the manuscript is passed on to 
another and perhaps to a third reader for 
further reports. Then, after two or three 
professional readers have reported favor- 
ably, the manuscript is, as a rule, read 
by a member of the firm ; especially if it 
be the work of a new writer. Perhaps 



tlie one great weakness in our publishing 
routine is right at this point, in the edi- 
torial department. The professional 
reader and the experienced publisher are 
of course in position to give an author 
expert advice, but the instances where 
such advice is offered are very rare. A 
manuscript which, with a few changes in 
structure, may have great possibilities is 
often either summarily rejected or pub- 
lished without improvements having been 
suggested. 

After a manuscript has been accepted 
and a contract made with the author, 
the format of the boolv is planned. Even 
those of us who have no technical knowl- 
edge are often influenced, unconsciously 
perhaps, by a good or poor selection of 
body types and page headings ; by good 
or bad make-ready ; by correct or inac- 
curate register; by green or seasoned 
bindings ; by good or bad design on title- 
page or cover ; by excellence or its oppo- 
site in all the numerous details in the 
building and dress of a volume. We may 
not know what a headband is but we do 
know whether a book opens well and 
feels strong or not. 

The book having been planned physi- 
cally, the manuscript is put into type, 
usually on the linotype or monotype 
machine ; from this type solid plates are 
made by the marvelous process of elec- 
trotyping ; the paper is estimated, chosen 
and ordered delivered to the pressroom ; 
the sheets are printed and sent to the 
bindery, where they are gathered in page 
sequence, sewed and trimmed ; next the 
cloth covers are attached ; the completed 
books stacked and kept under pressure 
a few days, and then made ready for 
shipment to booksellers and libraries 
throughout the country. 

In the meantime the publisher's pub- 
licity department has prepared and sent 
out advance literary notices ; has had 
paper jackets designed, blurbed and 
printed ; free review copies and ready- 
made reviews sent to book reviewers; 
trade journal, magazine and newspaper 
advertising arranged ; posters and circu- 
lars produced and distributed ; and vari- 
ous other publicity stunts evolved and 
put into operation. 

The publisher's traveler calls on the 
trade and on the libraries with a dummy ; 
that is, a few printed specimen pages in 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



BOOKS. 



Ill 



a cover, bulked out with blank paper, 
and we booksellers place an advance order 
for 2, 5, 10, 25, or 100 copies — sometimes 
even more, according to our judgment, 
which often, alas, leads us sadly astray. 
Being so far away from the sources of 
supply, we must order well in advance 
of publication. We have to take the 
traveler's word for the merits of the 
book, and, taking also into consideration 
the standing of the publisher and the 
promotion work promised, the only 
tangible thing we have to guide us is past 
performance of the author — past per- 
formance, same as the race track gambler. 
And we take similar chances with none 
of the thrill. If we believe a book to be 
worth while we display it prominently in 
our show windows, spend money on local 
advertising, write letters to selected lists 
of names, and use every means we know 
in bringing it to the attention of our 
customers and the general public. There 
is great pleasure and satisfaction in 
helping a good book reach a wide public, 
aside from all thought of financial profit. 

Favorable reviews and the publisher's 
advertising are calculated to give the 
new-born child a good start on its journey 
to glory. But really, when we get right 
down to facts, if those who read the book 
like it well enough to enthuse over it 
and recommend it to their friends, it 
"goes over," and there's the whole story. 
All the painstaking preparation and 
costly advertising won't make the book 
successful. They may help bring it to 
notice, but the book itself must have 
heart and pith in it. It must have the 
substance and appeal that strikes home. 
If we but knew what that something is 
and how to focus it, what wonderful and 
speedy friendships we would soon make 
in the eager publishing world ! 

The reward of most of us who are in 
any way connected with this fascinating 
business of producing and circulating 
books is, with very few exceptions, 
chiefly the satisfaction of service. There 
are perhaps 30 or 40 American novelists 
who have large incomes from their work. 
Authors' royalties are based on the retail 
selling price and range from 10 to 20 
per cent. Contracts with new authors 
usually call for 10 per cent royalty, 
sometimes with the first thousand copies 
exempt ; often with a sliding scale of 



increase — for example, 15 per cent after 
5000 copies have been sold and 20 per 
cent after the sales pass 10,000. This is 
a fair arrangement. After the publisher 
has retrieved hi^ initial cost he can 
afford to share profits with the author. 

But very few first novels attain a sale 
of even 5000 copies. Popular authors 
like Zane Grey, Louis Bromfield, the 
Norrises, Peter B. Kyne, Edna Ferber 
and writers in their class are at the 
present time reasonably sure of a quick 
sale of from 50,000 to 100,000 or more 
copies of almost any novel they may 
write. As they are accustomed to receiv- 
ing no less than 20 per cent royalty — 40 
cents to 50 cents for every book sold — 
their first income from each effort figures 
$20,000 up to $75,000 or more. Then 
there are additional revenues from maga- 
zine and newspaper serialization, foreign 
editions, dramatic production, motion 
picture rights and the reprint editions. 
A few perhaps are vastly overpaid but 
there are many, many thousands who go 
pitifully unrewarded. 

I have traced rather sketchily the 
physical progress of the book, and given 
you a brief peek behind the scenes. 
While of course very much more can be 
told of the various steps in the physical 
development and commercial aspects, it is 
rather the quality of the contents of the 
book, and how we can best equip our- 
selves to judge that quality, with which 
we here are concerned and which I shall 
try to emphasize. 

By what standards are we to judge 
quality in a book? There is no such 
thing as an exact science of criticism. 
It would be veiy uninteresting if there 
were. No method is infallible. Only 
time and the collective taste of all classes 
of people — "the winnowed taste of the 
ages," as someone has aptly put it — can 
sift out the works of what we call genius 
with any degree of certainty. Tour best 
book may not be my best book. We 
each have that essential right of personal 
choice which is the very foundation of 
all thrilling interest in literature. Again, 
at different periods in our own lives we 
may react differently toward former 
favorite books. 

Literature in its widest sense has been 
defined as the record or reflection of the 
life of a people; the expression or mani- 



112 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



festation of their thought and ideals by 
means of alphabetic symbols called let- 
ters ; in a restricted and ustially preferred 
sense the term is applied only to writing 
which has claim to consideration on the 
ground of beauty of form or emotional 
effect. Coleridge defined prose as words 
in their best order, and poetry as the 
best words in their best order. 

All books making any pretensions to 
be valued as literature may be divided 
roughly into two classes — those which 
are read by almost evei-ybody for a little 
while and then die and are forgotten, 
and those which are read by somebody 
through the ages. We can easily agree 
that the long-lived books are of a higher 
order than the others. It is noteworthy, 
too, that when we read the popular novel 
of the hour we soon forget its characters 
and scenes, while the characters and 
scenes of the high-grade novels that have 
stood the test of time live in our memoi-y, 
as familiar friends, for a lifetime. Here 
is one general rule by which literary 
greatness can perhaps be measured : The 
greatest books are those which leave 
lasting impressions and give' the most 
lasting pleasure to the largest number 
of people. Or, the greatest books are 
those which leave lasting, wholesome and 
fine feelings in the minds of those who 
read them. 

Let us consider our own immediate 
responsibilities and opportunities in the 
circulation of books. Our stock in trade 
is the thought of the ages conserved on 
the printed page. We deal in the distilled 
and concentrated essence of human expe- 
rience — the discoveries of science immor- 
talized in type. If all our engineers and 
doctors and legislators and teachers and 
preachers and artists and editors were to 
die off today, and all their works except 
those vyritten were to perish with them, 
coming generations would, from their 
books, learn the secrets of their arts. 

Books being our stock in trade, our 
immediate responsibility is to rouse and 
feed an appetite for them in minds not 
naturally hungry for learning or poetry 
or the thinking of other men and women ; 
to let as many persons as we can reach 
know what books are, what they offer, and 
that they're missing a lot if they don't 
read more and read more wisely. 

In order to do this convincingly, we our- 



selves must read widely to acquire literary 
background. We must, by constant, earn- 
est searching and study equip ourselves to 
recognize and recommend only those books 
which we find to be full of beauty, of 
nobility and of wisdom, and so perhaps 
hasten the day when the large knowledge, 
the wise thinking, the fine feeling, the 
amplitude of spirit that are in the greater 
literatures will have passed into the 
vast majority of minds. The majority of 
our fellow beings, particularly our boys 
and girls, are unquestionably of the stuff 
and temper out of which anything fine in 
soul and strong in intellect can be made, 
if not in one generation, then in two, or 
three, or ten, by the continual play upon 
them of influences from the finer souls 
and greater minds of our own times and 
of the past. 

To compass our large field we will need 
to learn to read wisely. In order that we 
may learn to read wisely, amply, and at 
the same time as well as possible, there 
are one or two points worth considering 
from the book reviewer's method, both 
from his careful, thoughtful perusal of 
certain heavy works and the swift skim- 
ming of lighter ones. In delving into a 
book for a first-hand impression it is wise 
at the start to omit all side lights, even 
the "blurb" printed on the jacket. From 
fiction to philosophy, from the simple to 
the abstruse, the inquiry will require a 
varying amount of concentration. In the 
case of fiction, essays, books of travel 
and the like, the first hundred or so 
pages cai'efuUy read, and the rest 
scanned, will provide the desired idea of 
scope and content, of form and structure, 
and, if a novel, of characterization, plot, 
setting and dramatic power. It will also 
give a fair opportunity to evaluate the 
intere.st of a book and its possible appeal. 
At first the reading may proceed slowly, 
but with practice one can speed up. 
With practice, also, good judgment may 
be trained. One learns with practice 
what books are "to be tasted," what "to 
be swallowed" and what "to be chewed 
and digested." 

We can test our ability to crystallize 
our own judgment by a few self-applied 
questions. For example, does this book 
we have just read present a time por- 
trayal of life and are its theme and treat- 
ment such as to make it interesting? Is 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



BOOKS. 



113 



there special merit in its content, scope, 
timeliness, treatment, plot, characteriza- 
tion, style or structure? Would we re- 
read it with pleasure and with benefit? 

The reading of librarians and book- 
sellers differs from that of professional 
people in other fields. They each have a 
definite specialized field to cover, while 
we, in order to compass our specialized 
field need to include familiarity with 
everything that has been produced of 
general interest. 

To help equip ourselves better to fit 
books to readers, to guide an eager read- 
ing public through the wilderness of 
books, there are a few volumes available 
which, if studied, should go far toward 
making us competent. A book by Jesse 
Lee Bennett, called Culture and a Liberal 
Education, points out the value of books ; 
how they help the student understand life 
and himself and how they may be used 
as a means of self-education. Another, 
a later book by the same author, called 
What Books Can Do for You, is a two- 
part essay with an inspirational chapter 
on culture, and practical advice on find- 
ing one's way through the maze of books 
to those worth while. Both of Mr Ben- 
nett's volumes are important for their 
selected lists of books in all fields of 
human knowledge. 

For our background study an historical 
foundation is essential. A panorama of 
civilization showing the spread of man 
over the earth, the growth of nations, 
and the forces which have prevailed to 
advance the world to its present develop- 
ment is offered in such works as H. G. 
Wells' Outline of History and in Breasted 
& Robinson's Ordeal of Civilization and 
Conquest of Civilization. And to localize. 
Beard <& Beard's The Rise of American 
Civilization is most decidedly worth while. 

Just as these works furnish the social 
and political contributions of nations to 
the progress of civilization, so John 
Drinkwater's Outline of Literature pro- 
vides the summary of work that has been 
accomplished by creative minds in the 
field of letters. Mr Drinkwater's three- 
volume work extends from 4000 B. C. to 
the present. Its value to us lies in the 
simple way it helps us to get our bear- 
ings in the vast field of literature ; the 
brief appreciation of writers and books 
of all nations and of all times, the notable 



illustrations, and the predominating, uni- 
fying idea that the spirit of writers 
through countless manifestations has 
been one and the same. It gives a basic 
knowledge of how letters were bom and 
have grown. 

A text-book which has long been a 
favorite is Robinson & Owen's Literature 
of the World. This is a study of the 
literature of the major nations, from 
3400 B. C. to the present. Each chapter 
gives the historical background and racial 
characteristics of the nation under con- 
sideration. Extracts from authors' 
works clarify the text. It is valuable 
not only as a guide to information and 
improvement, but also for each Chapter's 
reading list of the best works in history, 
literature and criticism bearing upon that 
chapter's content. 

From a survey of world literature we 
naturally pass to a more intensive study 
of the literature of our own language. 
In English literature, if I were to recom- 
mend only one book it would be that old 
stand-by Moody «& Lovett's History of 
English Literature. Other favorite texts 
are R. P. Halleck's New English Litera- 
ture, A. T. Strong's Short History of 
English Literature and A. G. Newcomer's 
English Literature. Moody & Lovett is 
especially recommended because it ex- 
tends from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 
present, and adopts a scheme simple 
enough to be readUy understood, while it 
is accurate and substantial enough to 
serve as a pennanent basis for study, 
however far you may choose to pursue 
the subject. It contains a working bib- 
liography to seiTe as a guide to a first- 
hand acquaintance with the authors 
treated in the book and to critical litera- 
ture concerning them. 

In the field of American literature, 
there are four splendid short courses — 
B r a n d e r Matthews' Introduction to 
American Literature, R. P. Halleck's 
History of American Literature, H. D. 
Pancoast's Introduction to American 
Literature and F. L. Pattee's History of 
American Literature Since 1870. Mr 
jNIatthews shows how American authors 
from 1607, when Capt. John Smith 
recorded how he was made captive by 
the Indians, to the end of the 19th cen- 
tury, influenced their time and were 
influenced by it ; and how they were 



114 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



related to one another personally and 
artistically. 

Mr Halleck deals less with personali- 
ties, and places the emphasis upon liter- 
ary movements and schools of thought. 
Mr Pancoast's study is valuable for its 
clear classification of periods, vivid treat- 
ment of authors, its study lists, with sug- 
gestions for reading, and biographical 
references. Mr Pattee has written an 
exceptionally readable book, steering 
between a too learned and an over- 
popular treatment. Beginning as it does 
with 1870, it supplements the other his- 
tories of American literature. 

.From the many volumes available on 
the choice of books and on literary criti- 
cism, there are two we might well begin 
with. They are Frederic Harrison's The 
Choice of Books and F. H. Pritchard's 
Training in Literary Appreciation. Mr 
Harrison's volume is important as a 
guide to the formation of taste for the 
right kind of books — to the "best, the 
eternal, the indispensable books." Mr 
Pritchard's book starts with the state- 
ment that in order to meet the author 
half way the reader must cultivate a 
literary taste, and he tells how to do it. 
It is important for the exposition of what 
literary criticism should be and the 
points to watch for in criticising. 

The chief service of librarians, custo- 
dians and booksellers is dependable 
expert advice ; the advice which intelli- 
gently and with discrimination serves an 



intelligent and discriminating public. 
This sort of discernment is not easily 
picked up. It is only the result of sus- 
tained effort. It is the outgrowth of 
methodical study and training in the 
content, technique and style of books. 
It is facility of thought acquired through 
critical familiarity with the true past of 
literature. Some knowledge of the 
world's literature is fundamental to our 
fullest success, not alone for its educa- 
tional value but also for its value in 
training and orienting book judgment. 
Too much stress can not be placed on 
the desirability of acquiring sound book 
judgment. And this can only be achieved 
through what may be termed background 
study. The books mentioned, I believe, 
would prove most helpful for the purpose 
with the least waste of energy. They 
can aid us in fulfilling our responsibility 
and making the most of our opportunities 
for service. While we can not force the 
best literature on our public, we can 
always recommend the best with a tact- 
ful insisting urgency that will prevail in 
the end. 

When I began this paper, I wanted it 
to be entertaining. But as thoughts 
developed, my reverence for the nobility 
and grandeur of literature, and my esteem 
for all who are in any way connected 
with books, directed the words in a more 
earnest — a more serious vein. I hope 
not too much so. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



COOPERATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY. 



115 



COOPERATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY IN THE FIRST DISTRICT 
OF THE CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

By Mabel W. Thomas, Assistant Librarian, Oakland Free Library. 



"Much can be done through cooperation. 
It is not visionary to see the day when 
San Francisco Bay may as truly be a 
center of libraries as Boston Bay. We 
shall have collections like those of Boston 
Public Library and Harvard University. 
These libraries can be coordinated as 
they grow, so as to multiply their useful- 
ness to learning. Each library can 
develop its special lines. There can be 
unity through cooperation and the wise 
distribution of resources. Some day we 
shall have cooperative indexes and cata- 
logs, bringing all our collections into 
practical oneness. Through coi'dial inter- 
change and assistance among the libra- 
ries, each will supplement the others, 
and all together will attain the highest 
degree of efficient sei-vice." These words, 
quoted from a paper read by Professor 
A. B. Show of Stanford University at a 
meeting of the Library Association of 
Central California on Januai-y 10, 1S96, 
may still serve us as a working program, 
although the prophecy contained in them 
has already so largely been fulfilled. 

As a preliminai-y to plans for further 
cooperation among the libraries of the 
San Francisco Bay region, the following 
survey of accomplishment in the way of 
printed catalogs, union lists, special 
indexes, etc., was made for the meeting 
of the First District held on March 24, 
1928, in Oakland. 

On December 22, 1852, the Mercantile 
Library Association of San Francisco 
established what was the oldest public 
library in the district. It was merged 
with the library of the Mechanics' Insti- 
tute only a few months before the 
destruction of both collections in the fire 
of April, 1906. The first library publica- 
tion in the district was the Catalog of 
the Mercantile Library in 1854. It was 
the era of the printed catalog, and the 
establishment of each new library was 
followed, as a matter of course, by the 
appearance of a catalog. A list of the 
printed catalogs of a general nature 
belonging to this period follows. 



PRINTED CATALOGS. 

INIercantile Library of San Francisco. 
1854; 1861; 1874 & supplement, 
1874-1S75. 

The last is a dictionary catalog of 
over 3C,000 volumes, representing a 
large amount of careful bibliograDhic 
work on the part of its compilers. 
There is an extensive list of dramas 
by title, including Lacy's Plays, and 
the items under California and Rare 
books are especiallj' worthy of study. 

Mechanics' Institute Library of San 
Francisco. 1867. 

The Catalog was supplemented by a 
Library Bulletin, v. 1-6, 1897 to 1902, 
and by an annual list of books added, 
1914-1927. 

San Francisco Public Library. 

(Notes describing these and other pub- 
lications of the San Francisco Public 
Library were supplied by the Chief Cata- 
loger, Miss Alice M. Healy.) 

Catalogs no. 2-4, 1880-1884. (No. 1 
not printed, "done with electric pen.") 

"iShort-title dictionary catalogs, use- 
ful in the study of Californiana and 
San Franciscana." 

Supplementary catalog of books added 
since May, 1884. 1888. 391 p. (Cata- 
log no. 5) 

"Full names of authors, dates and 
places of publication. Extensive notes 
for sets and series. Many analyticals. 
Useful for Californiana." 

Classified English prose fiction, includ- 
ing translations and juvenile works, with 
notes and index to subject references. 
1891. (Catalog no. 6) 

"An excellent catalog of fiction, 
arranged by author, title and subject, 
and including poetry and drama when 
these are illustrative of a given his- 
torical period. Extensive bio-biblio- 
graphical notes under author entries. 
P.entiful contents notes. Based on the 
6th edition of the Boston Public Li- 
brary Catalog of fiction, 1877, with 
considerable e.xtension." 

Finding list of the juvenile department. 
1896. 63 p. 

"A short-title author and title list 
of children's fiction, followed by a list 
of non-fiction divided into broad sub- 
jects. The Elsie books and stories by 
Alger, Castlemon and Oliver Optic 
apijear in full, in serried ranks, uncen- 
sored. The Rollo books ai'e all lined 
up in numerical (as well as psj'cholo- 
gical) order, tracing Rollo's progress 
towards a safe and sane education." 



116 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Supplemental catalog [to juvenile find- 
ing list]. 1896-1900. 

"Gives series and sequels, but Elsie. 
Alger, et al. are missing. Times and 
tastes had begun to change during 
that four-year period." 

English prose fiction, including trans- 
latious. 1897. 

—Supplement, 1897-1903. 

Catalog of foreign literature. July, 

1898. 104 p. 

"Short-title entries. Particularly 
noteworthv for contents of long sets 
of novels." 

Periodicals, newspapers and other 

serial publications, and books in the 

Reference room. 1911. 63 p. 

"Current periodicals arranged by 
subjects, current nev^'spapers by citv. 
Alphabetical list of bound periodicals, 
with inclusive dates and \olumes to 
1910. Reference books arranged under 
broad subjects, with an author index." 

Finding list of English fiction, includ- 
ing translations. 1912. 81 p. 

— Supplement. March, 1912, to April, 
1913. 18 p. 

University of California Library. 
Contents-index, v. 1, 1889-90. 

No more printed. A subject index 
to the contents of the library. Includes 
many analytics and references to arti- 
cles in periodicals. 

Oakland Free Library. 

Catalog. 1879. 68 p. 

Catalog, comp. Charles L. Miel, April, 
1885. 208 p. 

Finding list, March, 1902. 237 p. 

Alameda Public Library. 

Catalog. 1886. 

Catalog, comp. Mary C. Hurbaugh. 
1889. 247 p. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS. 

Cooperative list of periodical literature 

in California libraries. 1880. (Univ. 

of Calif. Library Bulletin no. 1) 

Revised editions were issued in 1892 
and 1902. The latter is still useful, 
in spite of the fact that a number of 
the eighteen contributing libraries 
lost their files in the fire o! ]90y. 
As the new Gregory list of serials in 
the libraries of tlie United States and 
Canada includes only the two univer- 
sity libraries in our local group, there 
is still need for a new union list of 
the tjeriodicals in libi-aries of the 
district. 

University of California Library. 
List of serials. 1913. 



Stanford University Library. 

List of serials. 1916. 

List of serials currently received. 1922. 

Serials in the Lane Medical Library 
are included in both lists. 

San Francisco Public Library. 

Periodicals, newspapers and other 
serial publications. 1911. 

Current periodicals and sei-ials. 1916. 

Newsnapers and documents are not 
included. 

CATALOGS OF SPECIAL COLLEC- 
TIONS AND LISTS ON SPECIAL 
SUBJECTS. 

University of California Library. 

The following titles are selected from 
the list of the eighteen library bulletins 
included in the Catalog of the publica- 
tions of the University of California 
press : 

Catalog of the librai*y presented by 
Henry D. Bacon. 1882. 

Catalog of the theological library xJi'e- 
sented by Andrew S. Hallidie. 1886. 

Stoddard. References for students of 
miracle plays and mysteries, with table 
of extant English mystery plays. 1887. 

List of printed maps of California. 
1887. 

Gayley and Scott. A guide to the 
literature of sesthetics. 1890. 

List of first editions and other rare 
books in the Weinhold library. 

More recently compiled by members of 
the library staff are a City planning 
bibliography of material in the Univer- 
sity of Califoruia and the Oakland and 
Berkeley public libraries, by Ella K. 
Walker, 1914, and a Guide to historical 
bibliographies, by Edith M. Coulter, 
published in 1927. 

Stanford University Library. 
Broughton, Frederick. Catalog of a 
collection of book.s on railway legislation, 
management, &c, belonging to Mr Fred- 
erick Broughton. London. Ontario, 1883. 
Collection acquired by the library. 

Australiana in Ijeland Stanford Junior 
University Library. The gift of Thomas 
Welton Stanford. [1901?] Compiled by 
H. C. Nash. 

A catalog of Paris peace conference 
delegation propaganda in the Hoover war 
library. 1926. (Hoover war library. 
Bibliographical series 1) 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



COOPERATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY. 



117 



Finely printed books presented to the 
library of Stanford university. A cata- 
log. 1927. 

"A collection made possible through 
the generosity of Mr Albert M. Bender 
and his friends." 

]Mechanics"-iIercantile Library, San 
Francisco. 

Literature available in the library on 
petroleum, with some references on 
asphaltum. 1903. 

Literature available in the library on 
forestry, lumbering, timber and trees. 
1908. 

List of books on aeronautics and mili- 
tary and naval engineering. 1918. 

List of books on architecture. 1913. 

List of books on building and building 
materials. 1913. 

List of books on electrical engineering. 
1916. 

List of books on Hawaiian Islands. 
1919. 

List of books on petroleum. 1917. 
San Francisco Public Library. 

Catalog of books in the classes of 
natural science and useful arts. 1899. 

Finding list of music and the literature 
of music. 1912. 

Pt. 1, Music scores, contains list o' 
composers, followed by an arrange- 
ment acording to the instrument. 
There is a title-list of operas. 

DEPOSITORY CATALOGS AND 
SPECIAL INDEXES ON CARDS. 

On each side of the bay is a group of 
libraries linked together by cheap tele- 
phone seiwice, affording a means of biblio- 
graphic cooperation which as yet has been 
only slightly developed. The special card 
indexes to be found in many of these 
libraries are treasuries of information 
which could be made available to all in 
this way, to say nothing of the many 
special libraries to be found in our 
district. 

Of first importance are the depositories 
of Library of Congress catalog cards in 
the libraries of the two universities. The 
one at Berkeley is in the form of a union 
catalog, in which are combined cards 
from the Library of Congress, from the 
British Museum, from the Newberry and 
John Crerar libraries, and from a num- 
ber of university libraries. 

Stanford reports the following catalogs 
of special collections on cards : 



Approximate number 
of cards 

Bibliography file 14.720 

Book plates 1,440 

Earthquake collection 1,980 

Jarboe collection 3,355 

Stanford collection 15,580 

Theses file 4,140 

The San Francisco Public Library 
specializes in music and drama, with a 
separate music catalog of about 150,000 
cards, in which each piece of sheet music 
is cataloged. All collections of plays are 
analyzed except children's plays, each 
play having a title entry and also a card 
under the form heading, Drama. Single 
plai/s. Plays in foreign languages and 
one-act plays are included. 

The Berkeley Public Library has an 
author and title index to collections of 
one-act plays in the librai-y. It also has 
about 2600 cards indexing articles about 
the West in western magazines, most of 
them entries not to be found in the 
Readers' Guide. 

In the Mechanics'-Mercantile library 
is a list of over 400 reports of James D. 
Schuyler, Consulting Hydraulic Engi- 
neer, on proposed engineering projects in 
California and other western states and 
the Hawaiian Islands and Brazil during 
the years 1889-1910. 

The Oakland Free Library indexes 
collections of modem" poetry, collections 
of plays, and short biographical and 
critical notices in books. The poetry 
index now has over 13,000 titles, while 
the biography file contains some 5000 
?ards with from one to ten or fifteen 
references on each. An index to pic- 
tures in books in the art collection has 
been begun by making cards under the 
names of artists. This is to be expanded 
to include subjects as well. 



DIRECTORIES OF LIBRARIES IN 
THE BAY REGION. 

Libraries of California in 1899. (Pub- 
lications of Library association of Cali- 
fornia, no. 3) 

Interesting for its historical data, 
notices of special collections, and lists 
of publications. 

California. State Library. Descrip- 
tive list of the libraries of California. 
1904. 



118 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



News notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries. California libraries — 
annual statistics, etc. 

Appears annually in October num- 
ber. A comprehensive list, with 
alphabetical arrangement under name 
of place. 

Special libraries. California number, 
June, 1926. 

Useful classifled list of special 
libraries. 



Special libraries association of South- 
ern California and Special libraries asso- 
ciation of San Francisco and vicinity. 
Directory of Special libraries of California, 
1927. 

Alphabetically under name of place. 



vol. 23, no. 2] map of California showing counties. 



119 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



^f- of /Time I OCL NOKTE i 



,SLENN( BUTTE N/ ■-■ 

^ >. ) A SIERRA 

V - '^- ^OLO "'>■'- _/' <^l- DORADO 
V-l^lJ^^^i^^^^iii »"f^ '\'' /TUOLUMNE^-, 




33* N. _ 
t-ot. ^cr/istut, SC. 



120 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1927. 



County 


Librarian 


Established 


Income, 
1926-271 


Books, etc. 


Branches 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county^ 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 






Sept. 26, 1910 
June 2, 1919 
Sept. 3, 1913 
June 8, 1915 
July 21, 1913 
Mar. 12, 1910 
April 8, 1914 
May 12, 1914 
Feb. 6, 1912 
Sept 15, 1913 
Nov. 16, 1910 
June 4, 1912 
Sept. 7, 1915 
Sept. 5, 1912 
May 3, 1910 
Aug. 3, 1926 
Oct. 4, 1926 
June 6, 1910 
July 8, 1915 
Aug. 6, 1912 
Feb. 9, 1916 
Dec. 9, 1919 
Sept. 7,1915 
Nov. 8,1911 
Oct. 1, 1908 
Feb. 4, 1918 
July 14, 1913 
April 5,1912 


§58,034 00 

5,508 20 

17,888 79 

12,093 64 

55,210 57 

156,650 93 

16,672 07 

26,942 12 

18,631 24 

9,620 50 

83,923 01 

20,689 37 

13.591 71 

305,637 40 

25,326 27 

6,484 02 

4,254 73 

36,368 52 

3,847 04 

20,664 91 

11,417 68 

26,002 81 

10,271 24 

• 16,065 80 

41,287 62 

10,127 62 

41,629 51 

35,264 20 


136,506 
19,963 
67,129 
50.909 

171,713 

418,785 
53,675 

103.582 
62,533 
30,094 

267,631 

119,912 
46,872 

536,788 

89,932 

2,569 

1,512 

124,227 
15,361 
87,710 
29,104 
78,199 
42,073 

83,758 
37,382 

108,415 

101,385 


92 
40 
87 
49 

109 

257 
62 

152 
80 
42 

186 
57 
71 

318 
74 
2 
28 
84 
35 

138 
80 
60 
82 
86 

111 
78 

137 

150 


51 
29 
65 
32 
64 

161 
41 

109 
56 
31 

103 
41 
37 

157 
51 
44 
27 
71 
42 
96 
48 
56 
29 
78 
84 
37 
74 

116 


38 


Amador 

Butte 


Bertha S. Taylor 


27 
57 




Mrs Ella P. Morse 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. . 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 


29 


Contra Costa.. . 


58 
155 


Glenn 


39 




99 






50 






29 


Kern 


Mrs Julia G. Babcoek 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Vogleson 

Blanche Gal loway 


100 




38 




35 


Los Angeles 

Madera 


115 
50 




Mariposa 

Merced 


Mine tte L. Stoddard 

Minette L. Stoddard 

AnnaL. Williams 


23 
63 
29 




88 




Bstella DeFord.-- _ ... 


46 


Orange 


Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 


36 

29 




Chas F. Woods 


46 


Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino - 


Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters 


65 
37 
64 
101 










IdaE. Condit 


Mar. 7, 1910 
July 6, 1915 
Sept. 5, 1912 
Feb. 16, 1910 
July 20, 1912 
Oct. 13, 1916 
Aug. 2,1926 
June 7,1915 
April 6, 1914 
Aug. 14, 1911 
May 9, 1917 
Aug. 8, 1916 
Sept. 8, 1916 
June 10, 1910 
July 3, 1917 
April 9,1915 
July 12, 1910 


31,335 00 

16,830 74 
23,202 22 
29,319 98 
27,375 66 

8,847 83 

1,110 07 
18,752 51 
25,187 08 
31,946 49 
15,746 73 
10,619 43 

5,873 48 
48,609 70 

9,716 28 
34,756 68 
28,856 13 




- 50,186 

192,173 



123,176 





80,556 

84,243 

96,289 

44,162 

43,466 

19,764 

138,546 

a. 27,377 

89,870 

99,297 


140 
96 
65 

105 
97 
88 
14 

153 
68 
71 
44 
99 
54 

130 
57 
95 
72 


93 
93 
41 
67 
81 
54 
12 
91 
53 
64 
36 
53 
25 
127 
28 
56 
44 


78 




Flo A. Gantz 


82 


San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary 
Minerva H. Waterman... 
Edith Gantt 


28 
60 
75 
52 
4 


Siskiyou 


Frances Stockebrand 

Clara B. Dills . 


88 
47 


Stanislaus 

Sutter 


Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M . Burket 

Anne BellBailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher 

Elizabeth R. Topping 

Nancy C. Laugenour 


46 
35 


Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare.- 


50 
25 
86 


Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo ... 


25 
54 
42 


46 




1, '08-O 4, '26 


$1,464,191 53 


a. 3,976,824 


4,195 


2,848 


2,423 









' The income as given does not include balance in fund, July 1, 1926. 
' Includes elementary and high. 

' San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county. For statistics 
see under "Public Libraries, etc." next page. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 



121 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Established 



IncoiEe, 
1926-27 



Books, etc. 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley*-- 
El Centre--. 

FuUerton 

Glendale 

Long Beach. 
Los Angeles. 
Modesto 



Oxnard 

Palo Alto.. 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands... 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco... 

San Jose. 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica... 
Santa Paula 



South Pasadena - 

Stockton.. 

Vallejo... 

Whittier 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth. 
Marian P. Greene 



Agnes F. Ferris 

Gertrude De Gelder 

Mrs Alma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt. 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll : 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeannette M . Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F.Woods 

Susan T. Smith.. 

May Coddington 

Cornelia D. Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden... 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Mary Boynton 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877: 

1893: 
1907 
1906 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 



1896 
1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 



1886 
1869 



as F. P. 1879 

1906 
as F. P. 1895 
as F. P. 1909 
asF. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1901 
as F. P. 1891 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1878 

1906 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1890 
as F. P. 1902 
as F. P. 1894 
as F. P. 1909 
as F. P. 1907 
; as F. P. 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as F. P. 1880 

1891 

1882 . 
as F. P. 1881 
; as F. P. 1890 

1907 
; as F. P. 1884 
; as F. P. 1895 

1880 
; as F. P. 1884 

1900 



$38,883 87 
29,090 39 

161,455 78 
12,845 06 
18,522 72 
69,830 00 

132,480 00 

1,194,161 65 

18,053 96 

191,632 05 

9,179 21 

22,494 48 

159,824 35 
29,545 06 
27,881 73 
28,342 73 
45,673 86 
47,223 60 
22,000 00 

109,751 44 

287,388 13 
20,230 45 
31,178 71 
64,195 69 
17,685 54 
38,771 90 
11,762 08 
9,695 72 
16,063 00 
47,824 07 
15,540 00 
28,903 83 



80,143 
30,553 

132,191 
26,004 
21,496 
45,760 

104,698 

889,971 
29,266 

329,802 
33,835 
26,113 

124,061 
87,768 
74,134 
80,543 

126,154 

122,425 
31,994 

162,443 

385,655 
32,300 
47,271 

101,298 
69,551 
49,217 
20,335 
32,538 
28,686 

202,525 
26,248 
22,101 



25,242 
14,869 
15,771 

3,987 

6,560 
30,919 
44,725 
255,006 

8,126 
61,622 

4,276 

8,796 
67,691 
11,235 

7,758 
10,215 

9,526 
23,625 
15,059 
50,659 
107,879 
11,944 
10,513 
20,848 

5,287 



3,595 

5,644 



11,412 
6,093 
5,921 



* Olive Burroughs, Acting Librarian. 



122 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1927. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,420,.536. 

Assessed valuation $7,647,025,607. 

Number of counties, 5S. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. .344,127. 
Assessed valuation $469,981,274 (tax- 
able for county $408,746,588). 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

One of the most significant occasions 
in the history of Niles was the dedica- 
tion of the Jane R. Clough Memorial 
Library which took place Saturday after- 
noon, Jan. 14. Although it had rained 
intermittently through the day, about one 
thousand people gathered around the new 
building to witness the impressive dedi- 
cation ceremony, which was conducted by 
members of the Masonic Grand Lodge. 
Chas. R. Wallenberg, Senior Grand 
Warden, was master of ceremonies and 
District Attorney Earl Warren was the 
grand orator. The various organizations 
of the community united in participation 
in the program. Scoutmaster J. F. 
Goldner and the local boy scout troop 
took charge of and raised the national 
colors on the flag pole of the new build- 
ing for the first time. This beautiful flag 
was also a gift from Mr and Mrs Ford. 

With Mrs Ford standing beside him, 
Mr Ford, in a brief and appropriate 
address, very graciously made the formal 
presentation of the new building to the 
library association, to be held in trust 
for the community until such time as the 
town of Niles shall become incorporated. 
Mr Ford also gave a short biography of 
Mrs Clough, Mrs Ford's mother, com- 
menting upon her aJfection for this com- 
munity. J. C. Shinn, president of the 
board, formally accepted the gift. Other 
speakers included County Supervisor 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 

Ralph Richmond, Miss Mary Barmby, 
County Librarian, F. V. Jones of the 
Niles Chamber of Commerce. Moving 
pictures of the speakers and crowd were 
taken. 

Following the program, hundreds of 
people inspected the new library. Beau- 
tiful cut flowers, supplied by Mr and 
Mrs Ford, decorated the interior. — Niles 
Register, Ja 19 

Berkeley. 

Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Olive Burroughs, Acting Lib'n. 

The resignation of Mr Carleton B. 
Joeckel was accepted with keen regret at 
a special meeting of the Board of Library 
Trustees February 16, 1928. Mr Joeckel 
came to the library in December, 1914, 
and was in charge from that time until 
July, 1927, except for the time during 
which he served in France in the World 
War. During his administration, the 
circulation of the library tripled, three 
new branch buildings were erected, and a 
building fund was established for a new 
main library building. In June, 1927, 
Mr Joeckel was granted a leave of 
absence to become Associate Professor at 
the School of Library Science at the 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for 
the college year 1927-1928. It was to 
continue his work in this field that he 
resigned in Februai-y. Mr Joeckel took 
a live interest in civic affairs. His deci- 
sion not to return to Berkeley is a mat- 
ter of regret not alone to those associated 
with him in the library, but to a wide 
circle of friends and associates in 
Berkeley. 

Miss Frances Mitchel, librarian at the 
West Berkeley Branch Library, was 
granted a year's leave of absence, begin- 
ning January 1, 1928. She will spend 
the year at her home in Illinois, and has 
accepted a temporary position as Head 
of the Loan Department in the Public 
Library at Bloomington, Illinois. Miss 
Anna Gertrude Hall, formerly librarian 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



123 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued, 
of the Umatilla County Library, Oregon, 
substituted as branch librarian at the 
West Berkeley Branch for two months. 
During this time she made a beginning 
at a survey of the relation of the branch 
to the schools, to the foreign element in 
the community, and to the homes of the 
community whether of native or foreign 
born. ]Miss Kathleen Keating is con- 
ducting the course in Bibliography and 
Reference Work at the School of Libra- 
rianship, University of California, during 
the absence of Miss Coulter this semester. 
Irene Smith, Chief of the Catalog Depart- 
ment, is conducting a University Exten- 
sion course in cataloging and classifica- 
tion in San Francisco, January to April, 
1928. 

Thornton Wilder, author of "The 
Bridge of San Luis Rey," while never 
actually on the staff of the library, was 
formerly a frequent reader both in the 
Children's Room at the Main Library 
and at the North Berkeley Branch 
Library. 

Olive Buerotjghs, Acting Lib'n. 

JjUniversity of California Libeaey. 
W. W. Campbell, Pres. J. C. RoweU, 
Lib'n Emeritus ; Harold L. Leupp, Lib'n. 

Changes on the staff of the University 
of California Library since January 1 
are as follows : Assistants in the Morri- 
son Library, Eleanor Karbach and I^eora 
Sims ; junior assistant in the Catalog 
Department, Katharine Kilbourn. Miss 
Eleanor A. McAllister, junior assistant 
in Catalog Department, has resigned to 
accept the librarianship of Newman Hall, 
Berkeley. 

The A. F. Morrison Memorial Library 
was dedicated February 5, 1928, in the 
presence of about four hundred friends 
of the Morrison family, regents and 
members of the University. The Morri- 
son Library consists of about 15,000 
volumes comprising the private library 
of the late Alexander F. Morrison of the 
class of 1878. It was presented to the 
University of California by Mrs Morri- 
son, formerly May Benton Treat, of the 
same class. The purpose of the gift was 
to establish a browsing room for students 
■which they might use for recreational 
reading without formality or the intro- 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 
duction of administrative machinery. To 
this end INIrs Morrison fitted up in the 
most handsome and comfortable manner 
a large room on the ground floor of the 
building. The remodelling and decora- 
tion of the room were planned by and 
carried out under the direction of Walter 
H. Ratcliff, Jr., '03, the architect of 
several of the buildings at Mills College 
and of the new plant of the Pacific School 
of Religion in Berkeley. The room re- 
sembles a handsome, even luxurious, 
private library. Mrs Morrison has 
endowed her gift with a sum sufficient to 
permit the acquisition of a considerable 
number of new books annually. 

Haeold L. Letxpp, Lib'n. 

Oakland. 

+ Oakland Free [Public] Library. 
John B. Kaiser, Lib'n ; Chas. S. Greene, 
Lib'n Emeritus. 

In addition to the appointments 
announced in the January News Notes of 
California Liiraries, Miss Ruth E. Weeks 
has been appointed assistant in the Cir- 
culation Department, and Mrs Marjorie 
Hansen to the West Oakland Branch. 

The library was shocked to hear of the 
sudden death of Miss Katherine D. Jones 
on February 4th in New York City. 
Miss Jones had just returned from a 
six months' tour of Europe, and was to 
have returned to the library on Febru- 
ary 16th to her position as First Assist- 
ant in the Circulation Department. Miss 
.Jones had been associated with the 
library for over twenty years and her 
passing is keenly felt by those who have 
been her friends and co-workers. Reso- 
lutions by the Staff Association lament- 
ing her death were sent to her relatives 
and adopted by the Board of Library 
Directors. An examination to fill her 
position will be called by the Civil 
Service Board soon. 

The librarian was chairman of the 
committee on arrangements for the 
Maude Royden lecture, given in Oakland, 
under the auspices of the Oakland Forum, 
on March 17th. In this connection the 
library issued a "Reading List" contain- 
ing books, magazine articles and pam- 
phlets by and about Miss Royden. 

The Oakland Forum is also co-operat- 



124 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 
lug with the library board by .spousoring 
a series of art talks twice a month on 
behalf of the Oakland Art Gallery, which 
is under the jurisdiction of the library 
board. 

The library also prepared a "Reading 
List" for the Chicago Civic Opera Com- 
pany, which gave four perfonnances in 
Oakland. The list was distributed to 
all purchasers of tickets, as well as to 
library patrons, and was reprinted in 
the programs for the operas. In addi- 
tion to the "Reading List," exhibits, 
advertising the opera, were on display 
in the Main Library and several of the 
branches. The library feels that it 
gained much in the publicity secured by 
these lists and events. 

The Californiana collection of the 
library has been enriched by the gift of 
Palou's "New California" and Langs- 
dorff's "Narrative of the Rezanov Voy- 
age," presented by Mr Lawrence Moore. 

Mr G. B. Hegardt, Port Commissioner 
of Oakland, has presented the library 
with a file of thirty-two volumes of the 
"Engineering News," and Mr C. W. 
Gibson, who has done so much for the 
library in the past, has again shown his 
generosity by the gift of the "World 
Book" to the Elmhurst Branch, and by 
several other books to three or four of 
the branches and the Main Library. 

The Children's Department is co- 
operating closely with the Boy Scoiits, 
maintaining a special bulletin board for 
Scout News and a special shelf for Boy 
Scout books. 

Miss Morgan, Children's Librarian, is 
to represent the library on the "Com- 
mittee on World Friendship" which has 
begun a project on goodwill toward 
Mexico corresponding to that on friend- 
ship with Japan which expressed itself 
last year in sending dolls to that country. 

The second annual Doll Show was 
held in the Children's Room from March 
19 to 24. 

Certain changes have been made in the 
Circulation and Reference Departments. 
The glass around the charging desk has 
been removed, giving the desk .a more 
friendly and spacious appearance. Books, 
both fiction and class, are now stamped 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
in the Upper Hall. This saves the time 
of the Reference Room attendant and 
enables us to keep closer watch on the 
books. It is to be hoped that this 
arrangement will materially lessen the 
loss of books by theft. 

Stack cases and some new lights have 
been added to both Delivery and Refer- 
ence rooms, and the Delivery Room now 
houses the biography and foreign books, 
as well as the fiction collection. Nearly 
all of the books of the adult collection 
have been shifted during the past two 
months, under the supei'vision of the 
Reference Department. 

The Staff Association elected the fol- 
lowing oiEcers to serve for the calendar 
year 1928 : 

Chairman, Katharine I. Gray. 
Department Representatives : 

Chiefs, Nettie V. Morgan ; 

First Assistants, Alice M. Gauge ; 

Assistants, Harriette E. Hannon ; 

Branch Lib'ns, Jeanette Anderson ; 

Substitutes, Mildred Taylor; 

Book Menders, Minnie Spilman. 

In response to a staff questionnaire, the 
Staff Bulletin is being issued quarterly 
instead of monthly. 

The staff contributed to the Commu- 
nity Chest of Oakland campaign, over- 
subscribing their quota of $400 by $32.25. 

The staff membei'ship in the C L. A. 
is one hundred per cent, fifty-four being 
enrolled as members in a professional 
staff of fifty or fifty-two. 

John B. Kaiser, Lib'n. 

John B. Kaiser, librarian of Oakland 
Free Library, has been nominated for a 
place on the council of the American 
Library Association. — Oakland Tribune, 
F 27 

Oakland Public School Library. 
Mrs Elizabeth S. Madison, SupeiTisor. 

Six elementary school libraries and five 
junior high school libraries have been 
completed in the work of the year just 
closed in the Oakland Public Schools 
program for school library development. 
In addition, six elementary school libra- 
ries and one high school library have 
been partially completed, and will be 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



125 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
finished during the current year. A 
program of commensurate size is con- 
templated for the coming year. The 
elementary schools with completed libra- 
ries, including shelving, standard tables 
and chairs, and administrative furniture, 
are Bella Vista, Santa Fe, Lincoln, 
Franklin, Horace Mann, and Lafayette. 
The junior high schools are Prescott, 
Friek, Lockwood, Woodrow Wilson, and 
San Leandro. Schools partially equipped 
include Fruitvale, Lazear, Piedmont 
Avenue, Allendale, Webster, and Haw- 
thorne, with the Part-Time High School, 
Merritt High. The libraries are used as 
problem project centers for the entire 
school, and also as centers for recrea- 
tional and cultural reading. 

Twenty-four teacher-librarians have 
just completed a course in School Library 
Management, given by the Director, and 
are taking up a second course with the 
same instructor, on Classification and 
Cataloging. Each of the teachers who 
completed the work is in actual library 
work. 

Mrs Elizabeth S. Madison, 

Supervisor. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $899,144 (taxable 
for county $722,508). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,971,803 (taxable 
for county $6,902,670.) 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Bertha S. Taylor, Lib'n. 

Mrs Henrietta G. Eudey returned to 
work February 14 after an absence of 
two months, due to illness in her family. 
Her place had been filled during this 
time by Mrs William Peters of Jackson. 

The branch at Salt Springs Camp of 

the P. G. & E. which was established in 

December is now in operation, housed in 

a cabin built for the purpose by the 

2— 5S783 



AMADOR CO. — Continued. 

company. This is our most remote 
branch, being 50 miles from headquarters 
on the upper waters of the Mokelumne 
River at an elevation of 3550 feet. 

Bertha S. Taylor, Lib'n. 

Jackson. 

Jackson Joint Union High School 
Library. R. Colthart, Prin. 

The books in our library are now 
being classified by the county librarian. 
Miss Taylor. Since the classifying of 
the books, the work of the librarians is 
much easier. We appreciate the fine 
spirit of cooperation between the County 
Library and our own. 

Since our last report there have been 
several new books added to our library. 
Mr Colthart, our principal, donated a 
set of thirty volumes of the New Werner 
Encyclopaedia Britanniea to the school. 
The school has also purchased the fol- 
lowing books : The three new supple- 
mentary volumes of the Encyclopjedia 
Britanniea, three volumes of The Birds 
of" California, also Who's Who Among 
North American Authors 1927-1928, 
and the Book of Opportunities by 
Putnam. 

Our reports show an increase of 42 
per cent in the number of magazines 
which have been checked out per student 
during the past two months. 

Our principal changed the location of 
the library. It is now next to the Read- 
ing Room where the students study. 
When checking out books we allow only 
two students in the library at one time ; 
in this way we save much confusion, and 
it is easier for the librarian and pupils. 
Cathie Davies, Asst. Lib'n. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 
County seat, OrovUle. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,748,791 (tax-- 
able for county $36,848,667). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

The Board of Supervisors voted, 
March 14, in favor of allowing the county 
librarian. Miss Carmelita Duff, to exceed 
her budget by $100. The money will be 
used to install new shelves in the library 



126 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 

building on Hiintuon street and to im- 
prove the lighting. — Oroville Mercury- 
Register. Mr 15 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8,835,647 (taxable 
for county $6,922,025). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

( Forty-second class. ) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,254,483 (tax- 
able for county $22,397,410). 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Maiidnez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $107,212,849 (tax- 
able for county $95,299,690). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library. 
ilARTiNEZ. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

Two branches have been enlarged since 
the first of the year. El Cerrito has had 
two rooms added to it and Kensington 
Park has had its shelving capacity 
doubled. 

On February 11, Miss Mildred Watson, 
assistant in the branch department, was 
married to Leo Lynch of Danville. 

February 14 Mrs Whitbeck presided 
as president of the Contra Costa Wel- 
fare Council at a dinner in Crockett in 
honor of Dr Church, the new full-time 
health officer of the county. 

A custodians' meeting was held Feb- 
ruary 22. The county office was deco- 
rated with lovely spring blossoms and 
was "housecleaned" for the occasion. 
After a roll call, in which each custodian 
spoke of the past, present and future 
prospects of her branch, Mrs Whitbeck 
talked of some of the problems of interest 
to all. Tea and sandwiches were sem'ed 
and a genuinely social time held. Miss 
Clara B. Dills of Solano County Avas a 
guest. 

The Contra Costans, Associated, held 
a meeting on the 28th. Mrs Whitbeck 
was one of the speakers. 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 

Book reviews in the Creative Reading 
course have been given befox'e the ladies 
in Crockett and the Delphian Club in 
Martinez. About twenty-six books have 
been reviewed. A radio talk over KFRC 
was given March 27. 

:Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'n. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat. Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,391,395 (tax- 
able for county $10,317,531). 

Crescent City. 

Crescent City [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Mildred Duffy, Lib'n. 

The Crescent City Public Library is 
to have spacious new quarters in the 
McLaughlin building at the comer of 
Second and H streets, and will be open 
in the new location March 28. The for- 
mer quarters wei'e fast becoming inade- 
quate to care for the rapidly increasing 
patronage. In addition to providing 
more room, the new location is much 
better lighted and will afford better venti- 
lation. — Crescent City Courier, Mr 27 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, PlacervUle. 
Area. 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,384,098 (tax- 
able for county $10,651,060). 

El Dorado Co. High School Li- 
brary, Placerville. Leland S. ^lartin, 
Piin. 

Due to cramped conditions, we have 
not had a library room during this year. 
Each department in the school has had 
charge of its own books and attended to 
the circulation of them. We hope next 
year in our new school to have an ade- 
quate reference room where an efficient 
library system will be in operation. 

Mary L. Walker. 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $205,198,111 (tax- 
able for county $163,663-173). 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



127 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

JFresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

We had the pleasure of a brief visit 
from Miss Essae Culver when she was 
in California in January. We were glad 
to hear of her most interesting work in 
Louisiana and also to have news of Miss 
Mary Harris. 

In Februai-y we had a luncheon for the 
High School Principals and Librarians. 
This is the , second one we have had and 
we find them advantageous to both the 
school people and to ourselves, as they 
give us each a better understanding of 
the others' problems. Talks were made 
by several of the librarians and princi- 
pals and the county librarian, followed 
by informal discussions. 

We endeavor to take inventory at each 
branch every three years and the Branch 
Department has been busy during the 
last three months going over as many of 
those scheduled for this year as possible 
before warm weather. 

The county librarian has spoken a 
number of times during the quarter to 
study clubs, high schools and luncheon 
clubs. These talks make a point of con- 
tact between the library and the public, 
for no matter what the subject, the 
librai-y is always spoken of. 

The annual meeting of the Fourth 
District was held in Fresno on the 21st 
of Mlarch, the county librarian as presi- 
dent, presiding. The meeting was well 
attended and the program was most 
interesting. The speakers included Mr 
W. A. Collins, chaii-man of the Board of 
Supervisors, who made the address of 
welcome ; Mr Ferguson, State Librai-ian ; 
Dr Phillips of the Fresno State College, 
Miss Silverthorn of Stanislaus County, 
Mr Hooker of Kern County, and Mr 
Osbom, editor of the Fresno Republican. 
There was also a group of songs sung by 
Mr Trojan and a skit put on by the 
staff of the Fresno County Free Library, 
every member of the staff having some 
part. At the close of the afternoon 
session tea was served. 

Miss Hazel Manson, Head of the 
Branch Department, has been granted 
a leave of absence and sails April 11 for 
Europe. Miss Mina Keller, Senior 
Assistant in the department, will be in 
charge during Miss Manson's absence. 



FRESNO CO. — Continued. 

Fresno City Branch is trying out a 
duplicate pay collection and the public 
is responding with a good deal of enthu- 
siasm. We have long felt the need of 
some means of competing with the circu- 
lating libraries in the stores, as many 
patrons want a book when it first comes 
out and would rather pay for the privi- 
lege of getting it then than waiting until 
a request can be filled in the ordinary 
way. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

The Selma City Council, at its meeting 
of Mai'ch 19, awarded the contract for 
repairing the Selma Library to Hari-y 
Moore, local contractor, for $563.10. 
ilr Moore's bid to repair the library is 
in accordance with specifications drawn 
up by Ross & Sutherland, the city engi- 
neers. The dangerously heavy tile roof 
is to be replaced by hexagon slate com- 
position shingles, and tension rods are 
to be used between the rafters to relieve 
the strain on the side walls of the 
building. — Selma Enterprise, Mr 22 

Fresno Co. Law Library, Fresno. 
S. P. McCormick, Lib'n. 

The resignation of Mr Terrance Magee, 
for the past two years in charge of the 
Fresno County Law Library, was 
accepted Dec. 31 at a special meeting of 
the library trustees. It is effective Jan. 
15. Mr Magee is to enter the University 
of California at Los Angeles. — Fresno 
Bee, Ja 1 

S. P. McCormick has been appointed 
Fresno County Law Librarian. 

GLENN COUNTY. 

( Thirty -eighth class.) 
County seat. Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,665,826 (tax- 
able for county $23,462,601). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Mrs Paye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

On March the third, the Glenn County 
Board of Supervisors accepted the deed 
for a lot of land in Hamilton City, given 
by the Hamilton Land Co. A small 
branch library building is to be built. 
Plans have been made by Chester Cole, 
architect of Chico, and have been passed 
on by the board. Sealed bids will be 



128 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 

opened April 10. The building is to be 
completed within .sixty days. 

The Glenn County Teacher's Librai-y 
became a part of the Glenn County Li- 
brary, March 3, 1928. 

Glenn County was represented by the 
following custodians and staff members 
at the Ninth District meeting at Marys- 
ville, March 3: Mrs W. W. Koehler, 
Ord Custodian ; Mrs Marsh Miller, Butte 
City Custodian ; Miss Helen LaValley, 
Willows Public Library ; Miss Flora A. 
Hodge, Mrs Elizabeth Edwards and Mrs 
Russell of the Glenn County Library. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $56,735,465 (tax- 
able for county $51,761,892). 

Humboldt Co. Free Library, E ureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Endangering a collection of books 
valued at many thousand dollars, fire 
broke out in the County Library building 
at Fifth and J streets the evening of 
Jan. 17 and caused damage amounting to 
several hundred dollars before it was 
extinguished. The blaze started in a 
stove on the second floor of the building 
and confined itself to the upper part of 
the structure. The collection of books 
was saved, as were all of the librarian's 
records. The second floor of the building 
and the walls were damaged badly, how- 
ever. — Eureka Times, Ja 18 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 
County seat, El Centro. 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 
Assessed valuation $54,776,203 (tax- 
able for county $45,070,867). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
tro. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

In January Miss Violet Maddux was 
added to the staff for half-day clerical 
work. The rush of the mid-year semester 
made it necessary to add reinforcements 
to the staff. 

On the 18th of March members of the 
county library staff were hostesses at a 
St. Patrick's party given in the home of 



IMPERIAL CO. — Continued. 

the county librarian. The city library 
staff, JNIiss Lee, the high school librarian, 
and Miss Douden, from Brawley, were 
the guests, making ten in all. 

Miss Ferris, El Centro Public Libra- 
rian, and Miss Boman, County Librarian, 
gave professional talks to the Girl Re- 
serves, ti-ying to stimulate interest in 
library work as a prospective profession. 
Much enthusiasm and interest were 
shown by several girls who expect to go 
into library work. 

The Calipatria Branch Library was 
moved from an old church building to 
the Women's Club Rooms down town. 
This is a great improvement over the 
old location and will mean a better circu- 
lation now that the library is more 
accessible. 

The county librarian attended the 
Sixth District meeting February 25 at 
Redlands, where she visited the beautiful 
Smiley Library for the first time. 

Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 
County seat. Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $19,105,244 (tax- 
able for county $11,564,316). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

The Haiwee Branch, discontinued last 
summer because of disruption of the force 
at the power plant there, was re-estab- 
lished January 3, at the urgent request 
of practically all the men, women and 
children of the tiny place. In asking for 
the branch, they all sent in lists of books 
desired, and to the surprise of the libra- 
rian, who has not often had such an 
experience, on collecting the books, the 
large majority proved to be non-fiction. 
Mrs A. E. Enlow was appointed custo- 
dian, serving without salary, and the 
branch will be placed in her home. 

Miss Wilma Bibbey has been appointed 
custodian at Olancha, Mr J. N. Springer 
at Cartago, and Mrs Anna Scott at 
Darwin. At the two latter places, the 
branch was moved into the school build- 
ing. Mr N. E. Ross has again taken 
charge of the branch at Ryan. 

Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



129 



KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakei'sfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $205,141,512 (tax- 
able for county $169,014,225). 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Mrs Jennie C. Engell, librarian in 
charge of East Bakersfield Branch, has 
been appointed head of the Cataloging 
Department at library headquarters, suc- 
ceeding Miss Aimee Peters. Miss Peters 
is to leave soon to be cataloger at Palo 
Alto Public Library. 

Another new appointment is that of 
Miss Frances Goree of Los Angeles as 
assistant librarian at Taft Branch. 
Miss Goree received her training at 
Riverside Library Service School. — 
Bakersfield Californian, F 8 

The first move in formulating plans for 
a Kern County Library building has been 
taken by the Board of Supervisors in 
commissioning Charles H. Biggar, Bakers- 
field architect, to begin his study of 
specific needs to be served in the pro- 
posed building and in the preparation of 
plans for the structure. — Fresno Repub- 
lican, Mr 28 

Miss Sylvia Clark, who has been libra- 
rian at Taft Branch for the past eighteen 
months, has resigned this position to 
accept the post of state library organizer 
in Maine. Miss Clark came here from 
Hanover, Mass., where she was also 
engaged in library work. — Bakersfield 
Californian, Mr 20 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $30,306,310 (tax- 
able for county $25,086,635). 

Kings Co. Free Library. Hanford. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

Mrs Myssie Forbes resigned from the 
position of custodian of Mussel Slough 
Branch, and on January 5 Mrs G. H. 
Rollins was appointed her successor. 

Mrs Annie Bartlett, custodian of 
Lemoore Branch, was granted a four 
months' leave of absence, beginning Jan- 
uary 15. During this time, her daughter, 



KINGS COUNTY— Continued. 

Mrs E. G. Henley, will be in charge of 
the branch. 

Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

Hanford. 

Hanford Free Public Library and 
Branch, Kings Co. Free Library. 
Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

Since the first of the year, new cork 
carpet has been laid in the Hanford 
Public Library, most of the furniture 
refinished, and the larger windows in the 
reading rooms curtained. These changes 
and additions have added much to the 
satisfaction of both the public and the 
staff. 

Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $9,170,675 (taxable 
for county $9,093,600). 

Lower Lake. 

Lower Lake Union High School Li- 
brary. F. M. Williams, Prin. 

We have acquired many new books in 
the last three months, not only by pur- 
chase but by gift. We were presented 
20 books by a patron. They were of 
modem fiction and as our library is more 
or less of scholastic type, we appre- 
ciated this very much. 

We have begun to use the abridged 
decimal classification for our library and 
find it very suitable and helpful. The 
selection of books for a small library is 
vei-y good and we are very proud of the 
library. 

Grace Wilson. 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,697,383 (tax- 
able for county $14,190,654). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

During this quarter the librarian gave 
a talk on children's books at the Milwood 
Parent Teachers Association. 

The annual art program was given in 
January to the Monticola Club by the 



130 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



LASSEN CO. — Continued. 

art classes at the Coui'thouse in the 
supervisors' room. The talks were on 
the Barbizon painters and tapestries and 
pottery. Slides of the greatest artists 
of all countries were shown. 

Lenala a. Martin, Lib'n. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 4100 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,336,940,015 (tax- 
able for county $2,954,909,955). 

Los Angeles Co. Free Library, Los 
Angeles. Miss Helen E. Vogleson, 
Lib'n. 

This library must count among those 
lost in the St. Francis Dam disaster 
many patrons of our branch libraries 
located in the flooded district. Among 
these were a few who used to go to the 
Newhall Branch for their books, others 
who went to Saugus and whole families 
who used the little libraries located in 
the club house at Power Plant No. 2, 
and in the " San Francisquito School. 
The loss of many children is grievous, 
thirty-five of whom were enrolled in the 
schools at Bee, San Francisquito and 
Saugus. Two teach ers were also 
drowned, Mrs Ida Marie Parker of the 
Bee District School and Mrs Cecelia A. 
Small, the teacher at San Francisquito, 
whom evei-ybody in the canyon loved. 
Our school department had a happy con- 
tact with both of these women and sup- 
plied them with material for class work 
and many little entertainments. The 
two libraries completely swept away 
were at the Club House and the San 
Francisquito School. The book material 
lost numbers about eight hundred vol- 
umes, seventeen maps and several globes. 

Since July 1 the following branches 
have been moved into new buildings: 
Dominguez, San Antonio and Woodcrest. 
A new branch was established at Mont- 
rose in January. Other branches moved 
into larger quai-ters were Avalon, Flor- 
ence, Sunny slope, Monterey Park, Home 
Gardens and La Crescenta. The build- 
ing occupied by Moneta Branch has had 
its floor space doubled by an addition. 
The branch, located in a bungalow of the 
Savannah School District barely escaped 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

being burned out in January. The 
books were saved and luckily more ; 
attractive new quarters were in prepara- 
tion and were occupied soon after the 
fire. The town of Rosemead has grown 
up around the school and so the name of 
this branch has been changed to Rose- 
mead Library. 

During the month of Febi-uary there 
was considerable coming of visitors, and 
some going of our own staff. Fourteen 
members of the staff attended the Sixth 
District Meeting held at Redlands, Feb- 
ruary 25. 

On February 17 Miss Mabel GUlis, 
Assistant State Librarian, paid us a 
pleasant call. 

The student class of the Riverside 
Library Service School visited the County 
Library in two groups, one on Febru- 
ary 29 and the second on March 22. 

The Library School of the Los Angeles 
Public Library, consisting of thirty 
members, inspected the County Library 
on March 14. 

Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. : 

Los Angeles Co. Museum Library, I 
Los Angeles. Lenore Greene, Lib'n. 

The Munthe collection of Chinese Art i 
now on exhibition at the Museum has 
created a demand for books on all phases i 
of art in China. The library has en- i 
deavored to meet this desire for accurate 
knowledge by adding to its shelves some 
of the most authoritative works on the 
subject. Among these additions the fol- 
lowing are outstanding. Ashton : Intro- 
duction to the Study of Chinese Sculp- 
ture. Binyon : Flight of the Dragon. 
Bushell : Chinese Art. Fry and others : 
Chinese Art. Giles : Introduction to His- 
tory of Chinese Pictorial Art. Gowen & 
Hall : Outline History of China. Hob- 
son : Later Ceramic Wares of China. 
Hobson & Hetherington : Art of the 
Chinese Potter. Koop : Early Chinese 
Bronzes. Laufer : Beginnings of Porce- 
lain in China. Laufer : Chinese clay 
figures. Laufer : J a de . Petrucci : 
Chinese painters. Pope-Hennessey : Early 
Chinese Jades. Siren : Chinese Sculp- 
ture. Waley : Chinese Painting. Fergu- 
son : Chinese Painting. 

Although the library's resources are 
necessarily limited, it has at present the 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



131 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

most comprehensive collection of books 
on Chinese Art in any Los Angeles 
library. Most persons possess a limited 
conception of the actual age and extent 
of Chinese Art. It is nearly always a 
surprise to be told that China was old 
before Rome existed. 

A gift of rare books was recently 
received from Mr E. H. Furman — 
Gavard's "Galeries historiques de Ver- 
sailles." published in Paris in 18.38, in 9 
volumes. The set is profusely illustrated 
with beautiful engravings. 

Of great interest is a bound volume of 
the San Francisco Chronicle covering the 
entire earthquake and fire period of 1906. 
Lenoke Greene, Lib'n. 

Alhambra. 

Alhajibra [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Marian P. Greene, Lib'n. 

The great event of 1928. so far. was 
the third annual Story Hour for dolls, 
which took place .January 7. Old dolls, 
new dolls, baby dolls, twin dolls all 
flocked to the library, some in doll-car- 
riages, some in automobiles and many 
in their mother's arms. Over fifty young 
mothers brought their babies, and, of 
course, these were given the places of 
honor at the stoi-y hour, dolless people 
being relegated to back seats. The hostess 
for the occasion was Enid, the librarian's 
doll, now thirty-six years old, but per- 
ennially young in appearance. A wax 
doll, sixty years old, attracted much at- 
tention, for she wore long baby clothes, 
and was wrapped in a patch-work calico 
quilt of the same period. Next in interest 
was a doll twenty-nine years old, whose 
dress of black silk was made from the 
wedding-gown of her great grandmother. 
The v/ell-boned basque front, long, full 
skirt with train, and fetching round hat 
with a sweeping feather in it showed that 
this young lady was extremely fashion- 
able, in her day. One doll came from 
England, and was fat and smiling, dre.ssed 
for cold weather in crocheted gaiters that 
reached clear to the waist. Many Christ- 
mas babies were proudly brought in, and 
three sets of twins sat together, to be- 
come acquainted. 

A doll's bookshelf was maintained 
during the week in the Children's room, 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Alhambra — Continued, 
featuring the Adventures of a London 
Doll, the Little Wooden Doll. Pretty 
Polly Perkins, Racketty-Packetty House 
and other stories of interest to Dolldom. 
Marian P. Greene, Lib'n. 

Long Beach. 

Long Beach [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt. Lib'n. 

Miss Minnie Adeline Stow, former li- 
brarian of Alamitos Branch of Long 
Beach Public Library, passed away Feb. 
29 at her home here. Her illness had 
compelled her to give up her library work 
some time ago. Miss Stow was a native 
of Ohio and a graduate of Oberlin Col- 
lege. She taught school for a number of 
years in Berea, Ohio, but had resided in 
Long Beach for the past twenty-five 
years. Miss Stow, as librarian at Ala- 
mitos Branch, had watched it grow from 
humble beginnings to the point where it 
is to be housed in a new building. — 
Long Beach 8uri, Mr 2 

Los Angeles. 

JLos Angeles [Free] Public Library. 
Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

Two new branch buildings. Gardena 
and Echo Park, were completed in .Janu- 
ary and a new branch, Mark Twain, 
started in a rented store at 110th and 
Main streets. The latter takes the place 
of a station in a real e.state office. In 
the first 20 days of service as a branch 
it circulated 1900 volumes. Gardena 
Branch, located in the flat lands of an 
old Spanish rancho, follows the pattern 
of a Spanish ranch house. It was 
designed by Ellis Wing and Edward C. 
Taylor. The Echo Park Branch was 
planned by Pierpont Davis, architect of 
St. John's Church, winner of the medal 
for the best building erected in T^os 
Angeles in 1927. The lighting of Echo 
Park Branch is unique and most effec- 
tive : the lights are concealed in the sills 
of the windows, and no fixtures break 
the contour of the groined ceiling. 

Miss Dorothy Pinneo came from the 
Newark Public Library to take charge of 
Malabar Branch on January 21. 

The advanced English Americaniza- 
tion classes have held meetings in several 
branches. At one of these, six success- 



132 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
ful foreign born citizens told liow tliey 
had achieved success. 

Six mural paintings by Alfred Herter 
adorn the tunnel at the lower Hope street 
entrance to the library. These picture 
the landing of Cabrillo, the building of a 
mission, a mission fiesta, the arrival of 
the relief ship at San Diego, the finding 
of gold and the raising of the flag at 
Monterey. 

Lectures on philosophy and on con- 
tinental literature given in French, 
German, and Spanish by professors in 
local universities have been arranged by 
the Philosophy and Foreign book depart- 
ments. Through the courtesy of Mrs 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge two concerts 
were given in the Lecture Room, one 
by the Kneisel String Quartette, and one 
by the Smallman A Capella Choir. 

Hamlin Garland spoke to the staff 
February 2.3, and autographed copies of 
his books for his delighted audience. 

Radio talks over KHJ are given each 
Wednesday from 2..30 to 3 by different 
members of the staff. The response from 
the unseen audience has been immediate 
and enthusiastic and all doubt of the 
popularity of a serious half hour of book 
reviews or library publicity has been dis- 
pelled. 

The exhibits of the Fifty books chosen 
by the American Institute of Graphic 
Arts and of commercial printing have 
attracted much attention from printers 
and book-lovers. 

Japanese Doll Day was celebrated 
March 2. A large audience enjoyed the 
songs and dances of gaily kimonoed girls 
from the Boyd Street School. For three 
weeks an exhibit of dolls, the emperor 
and empress, their courtiers, musicians, 
warriors and all the necessary doll fur- 
niture made a colorful picture in one of 
the exhibit cases on the first floor lobby. 
Other exhibits showed California birds, 
the desert, Hopi Indians, and pictures 
and theater programs from the Dobinson 
collection. 

Miss Mabel Gillis, assistant librarian 
of the State Library, spent three days in 
FebruaiT in visiting the library and 
branches. 

EvEEETT R. Perry. Lib'n. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 

California Society, Sons of the 
Revolution ( Repository of the South- 
west), California Society of Colonial 
Waes, and California Society of the 
Order of Founders and Patriots of 
America Library. Dr Edward M. 
Pallette. Pres. Willis Milnor Dixon, Lib"n. 

The Society, Sons of the Revolution 
for the State of California, moved into 
its new Library Building, at 437 South 
Hope street, Los Angeles, the middle of 
January. The opening reception was 
given Saturday afternoon, March 17 and 
the public is now admitted from nine to 
twelve daily, except Sundays and holi- 
days. The new building is directly north 
of the Fifth street entrance of the Public 
Library and is a concrete and brick, fire- 
proof building owned by the Society. 

Past President Arthur Burnett Benton 
gave to the Library just prior to his 
death, two sets of books, one "Chronicles 
of America," 50 volumes, and "The writ- 
ings of Thomas Jefferson," 10 volumes. 
Willis M. Dixon, Lib'n. 

California State Fisheries Labo- 
ratory Library. Genevieve Coi'win, 
Lib'n. 

Two series of importance that have 
been acquired recently are "Annates Biol- 
ogie Lacustre" (Brussels), Volumes 
1-13, and "Metron" (Padua), Volumes 
1-6 and forthcoming issues. The former 
is devoted to fresh water biology and the 
latter to biological statistics. Among the 
recently acquired books is one that is of 
interest to libraries near the coast: 
"Seashore Animals of the Pacific Coast," 
by Johnson and Snook (Macmillan). 
Another publication of a more technical 
nature of interest for the same reason as 
the above is the second volume on "The 
Marine Shells of the West Coast of 
North America," by Oldroyd (Stanford 
University Publications). "The Wealth 
of the Sea," by Tressler (Century), who 
is the author of "The Marine Products 
•)f Commerce" is a good general refer- 
ence written in an interesting style. 

Genevieve Corwin, Lib'n. 

Fairfax High School Library. Miss 
Helen F. EstUl, Lib'n. 

The rapid growth of the school is 
reflected in the library, especially in the 
fact that a second librarian has been 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



133 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

added to its staff. Miss Mason, recently 

of Polytechnic and Manual Arts High 

ychools, is the new member. 

Helen F. Estill, Lib'n. 

Immaculate Heaet College Libeaey. 
Mother M. Redempta, Prin. Sr Mary 
Agatha, Lib'n. 

During the past three months we have 
added 130 books in the following depart- 
ments : Literature and Philology, 28 ; 
Religion and Sociology, 14 ; Science and 
Useful Arts, 26; History and Geography, 
52 ; Encyclopedia, 10. 

SiSTEE Maey Agatha, Lib'n. 

Southwest Museum, Munk Libeaey 
w Abizoniana. Dr Jas. A. B. Scherer, 
Director. Miss Meta A. Spaulding, Act- 
ing Lib'n. 

The Munk Librai-y of Arizoniana, The 
Grant Jackson Library of Californiana, 
and The Hector Alliot Librai*y of Archae- 
ology are all located in the Southwest 
Museum, Highland Park, Los Angeles. 

They are in constant use by student 
and research workers and at present are 
in charge of Meta A. Spaulding. 

Meta A. Spaulding, Acting Lib'n. 

LTniveesity of Califoenia at Los 
Angeles Libeaey. W. W. Campbell, 
Pres. Dr E. C. Moore, Director. John 
Edward Goodwin, Lib'n. 

William G. Kerckhoff, eminent philolo- 
gist, has donated to the University of 
California at Los Angeles the famous 
Friedrich Kluge library, composed of 
11,000 volumes. The writings include 
400 volumes of dictionaries and glossaries, 
500 volumes of dialects and 150 volumes 
of secret language lore. — Los Angeles 
Illustrated Daily News, Ja 17 

*Univeesity of Southeen Califoe- 
nia, College of Liberal Aets Libeaey. 
R. B. von Klein Smid, Pres. Miss 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Two important gifts were received dur- 
ing the past month. Mr Lucian Bruns- 
wig presented the library with 800 
volumes of French literature. These 
books were selected by Mr Brunswig in 
France and consist of standard authoi's 
and criticisms. All are in uniform 
French bindings. Mr George I. Cochran 
added 600 volumes to the Cochran 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 
Memorial Library, which now numbers 
several thousand. 

A collection of more than 5000 vol- 
umes, the library of the late Dr Chas. 
Francis Hubbard, was secured this 
month. The collection consists of rare 
books in literature, philology, Latin, 
Greek, French, German, Anglo-Saxon, 
Sanskrit, Swedish and other foreign lan- 
guages. An unique and interesting 
collection of dictionaries included a 
Johnson, 1814 ; Richardson, 1836 ; John 
Walker, 1797; Fallows, 1885; and a 
Webster, 1828. 

The students raised over $150,000 in 
a three-day campaign toward the new 
library building which will be built on 
the campus. The Alumni will complete 
the required sum of one million dollars 
for the library and endowment. 

Chaelotte M. Beown, Lib'n. 

Venice Union Polytechnic High 
School Libeaey. Edward W. Clark, 
Pi-in. Dorothy M. Drake, Lib'n. 

Our most interesting item is the fact 
that we are in a new library. Formerly 
we were housed with the study hall, 
never a pleasant arrangement at its 
best. But since the Christmas holidays 
we have moved into a library all our 
own, a beautiful light, sunshiny reading 
room, and a large, pleasant office. Much 
new equipment, more room for arranging 
what we did have more attractively, a 
statue or two and six beautiful large 
paintings of California missions make us 
feel and look quite festive. A tea for 
the faculty marked our "Grand Opening." 
We accepted as our best compliment the 
remark that came from nearly evei-yone, 
"Why it just feels like a library." 

Doeothy M. Deake, Lib'n. 

Montebello. 

Montebello High School Libeaey. 
Mark R. .Jacobs, Prin. Marion G. Ren- 
shaw, Lib'n. 

On January 16, Miss Ruby Carver, 
who organized this library, passed away. 
She had served in the capacity of libra- 
rian for years and is greatly missed by 
friends here. 

After a few weeks under the supervi- 
sion of a substitute, the library was 



134 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Montebel lo — ^Continued. 

l)laced under the direction of Miss Marion 
(}. Renshaw. 

Marion G. Renshaw, Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

Pomona [I'bee] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Our possessions have been so shifted 
that now we have a generous space, well- 
lighted and ventilated, for the prepara- 
tion of books for the bindery. By careful 
management sufficient binding funds have 
been saved so that we have been enabled 
to bind some files of government publica- 
tions and some periodicals hitherto 
unbound. 

We are feeling very rich on account of 
the acquisition of a file of "Notes and 
Queries," and of "Yale Review." Neither 
set is common in our locality, and so 
both will be of great service. 

The Reference Department has woiked 
out a simple plan for locating bound 
periodicals which have been laid aside 
for temporary use. 

The Circulation Department has dis- 
covered that small tea-wagons, well 
lacquered, take the place of book trucks 
for many workroom uses. They are 
cheaper and take up less room than 
book trucks, and for quite a range of 
purposes answer equally well. 

S. M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Santa Monica. 

Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Mr Merrill Gage, sculptor, had the 
art gallery through the month of Feb- 
ruary. Mr Gage gave two talks on 
sculpture and on modeling the head of 
Lincoln. The bust of Lincoln exhibited 
in the gallery was purchased by the 
Junior Lincoln High School. In Feb- 
ruary we also had Mrs Bertha Coler, 
interior decorator of the $125,000 Times 
Demonstration home being built in the 
Miramar Estates. The drapes to be 
used in this building were shown and 
created much interest. 

Through the month of March an ex- 
hibit of paintings has been presented by 
the Wilshire Gallery. 

Every second Tuesday of each month 
we have Miss Gertrude Daiiow with us 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Santa Monica — Continued. 

for a talk on cui-rent books. This is a 

treat we have long looked forward to 

having, and is an inspiration to all. 

Under the leadership of Miss Unter- 
kircher at the Sixth District meeting in 
Redlands, "The loan desk, its construc- 
tion, location and its effect upon the 
workers and borrowers" was discussed. 
The librarian of Santa Monica Public 
Library had prepared a plan of the new 
charging desk in its remodeled library. 

We are most happy with our new desk, 
having gleaned the idea from Pasadena 
Library and suggestions given us at the 
University Branch of the Los Angeles 
Library. We are duly graeful for these 
kind suggestions and will take pleasure 
in passing on this fine working scheme. 
The full desk is given over to the service 
of the borrower which creates a freedom 
enjoyed by the staff, the discharging 
desk and membership filing cabinet being 
separate and situated directly back of 
the charging desk. 

Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Whittier. 

Whittier [Free] Public Library". 
Miss Ruth Ellis, Lib'n." 

The new home of the Whittier Public 
Library, including the entirely redeco- 
rated main building and the $25,000 addi- 
tion, was crowded the afternoon and 
evening of March 10 when it was for- 
mally thrown open to the public for 
inspection. — Whittier News, Mr 12 

Whittier State School Library and 
Branch, Los Angeles Co. Free Li- 
brary. K. J. Scudder, Supt. F. C. 
Delmot, Prin. Irene McLeod, Lib'n. 

An interesting progress has been shown 
by the boys at the State School in their 
reading. An average of a thousand books 
a month is circulated among the 310 
boys. Beginning April 1, a regular libra- 
rian is to be employed by the school to 
suggest and direct the choice of books. 
Many new books were brought to the 
school this month by Miss McWright, 
the supei-visor of institutional libraries. 
An inventory was completed March 1 by 
the County Free Library, of which this 
library is a branch. 

* Irene McLeod. Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



135 



MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 

County seatj Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $29,593,891 (tax- 
able for county $24,018,670). 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

On February 15 Miss Margaret Keith, 
Riverside Library School, 1926, took over 
the position of cataloger in this librai"y, 
to replace Mrs George Smalley who was 
gi'anted a six months' leave of absence. 

The County Librarian gave talks 
before each of the three high schools of 
the county and the local Lions Club. 

A series of book reviews by local 
people of prominence in the community 
is appearing twice a week, and attract- 
ing considerable attention and comment 
upon worthwhile books. 

On March 5 our local branch reached 
the highest peak of circulation, 432 
books having been loaned on that day. 
On the previous Saturday fifty-four 
children attending the regular story hour 
made a record attendance for that group. 

Miss Frances Scott has also told 
stories at the local school and for the 
Kiddie Club at the National Theatre. 

On March 16 the teacher and pupils 
from Gertrude School came fifty miles 
from the mountains to visit the County 
Library. After a trip around the build- 
ing, a special story hour was held for 
them, after which lunch was served in 
the park. Other county offices were 
visited in the afternoon. A tired but 
happy group said their good-byes, and 
the teacher seemed repaid for all of the 
extra effort which it had taken to 
arrange for the expedition. 

Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27.342. 
Assessed valuation $31,603,503 (tax- 
able for county $27,635,115). 

Marin Co. Free Library, San 
Rafael. Miss Muriel Wright, Lib'n. 

Tomales Branch of Marin County Free 
Library was opened March 2 in the com- 
munity room of Tomales Union High 



MARIN CO.— Continued. 

School. The manual training class made 
the shelving. Other branches already 
established are Corte Madera, Fairfax. 
Kentfield, Lomita Park and Novate. 

Twenty-nine school districts have 
joined the County Library, and have 
already received service, both textbooks 
and classroom libraries. Of these dis- 
tricts one, Mill VaUey, has four schools, 
and another, San Anselmo, has three. 
Muriel Wright, Lib'n. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $5,831,196 (taxable 
for county $4,718,315). 

]Mariposa Co. Free Libeaey. Miss 
Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

Coulteiwille Branch of Mariposa County 
P''ree Librarj' was established Febru- 
ary 7. This makes the eighth branch in 
Mariposa County. — Stockton Record, F 7 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $31,066,896 (tax- 
able for county $25,814,140). 

Ukiah. 

Ukiah Free Public Library'. Miss 
Ester F. White, Lib'n. 

Perhaps the one item we can offer 
that may interest some readers of News 
Notes of California Libraries is the I'e- 
tirement of Mrs Mary L. Burrey as 
librarian after fourteen years of most 
efficient service. Mrs Burrey's health 
had been failing for several months and 
on March 1 she tendered her resignation. 
She is well known to many librarians of 
the state. Miss Ester White, who has 
acted as assistant for several years and 
who is well qualified to carry on the 
work, was appointed to succeed Mrs 
Burrey. She is assisted in the evening 
service by Mrs Ida Brown. The library 
continues to prosper under the new 
management. 

New books — as many as funds will 
permit — are added each month, and 
many donations are received. A waiting 



136 



NEWS NOTES OF CATjIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



MENDOCINO CO.— Continued. 
Ukiah — Continued. 

list has been instituted that is proving 
very popular. 

Some needed improvements and repairs 
have been made. Most pretentious is a 
covering over the entrance way which 
protects the doors and adds much to the 
appearance of the building. 

Carrie Garsey, Sec. Library Board. 

MERCED COUNTY. 

( Twenty-seventh class. ) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $41,449,581 (tax- 
able for county $33,770,930). 

Merced Co. Free Library. Merced. 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

New branches have been established at 
Coultei-ville and Homitos, in Mariposa 
County. 

Seven members of the staff attended 
the Fourth District meeting of The 
C. L. A., held in Fresno, March 21. 

The Gracey Memorial Fund has been 
established to purchase children's books 
for Merced Library. Mr Gracey was a 
former teacher in Merced City and left 
a sum of money to be spent for library 
purposes here. 

Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,507,533 (tax- 
able for county $7,954,330). 

MONO COUNTY. 

( Fifty-seventh class. ) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $6,524,017 (taxable 
for county $3,508,925). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $54,101,624 (tax- 
able for county $44,941,580). 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
Carmel. 

Carmel City Public Library and 
Branch, Monterey Co. Free Library. 
Miss M. Ethel Goodfellow, Lib'n. 

The Carmel Library which was organ- 
ized some twenty years ago, and main- 
tained by subscriptions, under the able 
management of Mts J. Frederic Dutton 
and her board of directors, has passed 
out of existence. Its books have been 
donated to the new City Library, its 
real estate and building to the Girl 
Scout organization, and its financial 
balance to the Boy Scouts. 
■ The late Mrs Ralph Chandler Harri- 
son left as a memorial to her husband. 
Judge Harrison, property and money to 
build a city library. Her bequest also 
included, among other books, a valuable 
Browning collection and many original 
etchings. 

The new City Library building, which 
has just been completed and will soon be 
open to the public, is of pure Spanish 
type and was designed by the well known 
architect, Bernard Maybeck of San 
Francisco. 

Miss M. Ethel Goodfellow has been 
appointed Librarian, and Miss G. R. 
Wasson, Assistant Librarian. 

J. B. Adams, Pres. Library Board. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed valuation $26,629,480 (tax- 
able for county $22,387,311). 

Napa Co. Free Library, Napa. Miss 
Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

Last quarter we failed to record the 
establishment of County Library service 
in the County Jail. We had made many 
previous unsuccessful efforts in this 
direction when a Mr Remington, pseud., 
came to dwell in our jail, and through 
his requests for books for himself and 
others the new under-sheriff's attention 
was called to a need of books and our 
problem was solved. Mr Remington was 
what is known in jail parlance as a 
"paper-hanger" — that is, he forged checks. 
He wrote us elegant and appreciative 
letters asking for everything from 
Trevelyan's "England imder the Stuarts" 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



137 



NAPA CO. — Continued, 
to "Vanity Fair." With a pleasant "pour 
[jrendre conge" he left for the Alameda 
County .Jail trying (according to the 
Sheriff) to take one of our books with 
him. We feel sure that Miss Barmby is 
giving Mr Remington good service, and, 
as he is going to many other county jails, 
we feel that he should be asked to write 
on "County Library service from the 
inside." 

It was suddenly decided by the County 
Supervisors to solve the problem of more 
space for the County Library by taking 
in some hall space and almost over night 
or so it seemed the contract was let and 
the carpenters began tearing down our 
walls and covering everything with a foot 
of plaster. We had hoped to reopen in 
ten days but were closed more than a 
month. But State Library requests 
wei'e taken care of and some routine 
work handled from our small shipping 
room. We gained about 160 square feet 
of floor space, besides much new paint 
and tint. And once more the County Jail 
figured, for we borrowed "Ernest" who 
had gone joy riding in a Ford that did 
not belong to him, and, thanks to 
"Ernest," we suiwived the trying time of 
cleaning up after plasterers and car- 
penters. 

During the time the Library was 
closed, the County Librarian called at 
the Marin County Library and visited 
some branches with Miss Wright and 
the Napa County Library staff visited 
the Solano County Library and its Suisun 
Branch. The County Librarian attended 
the district meeting at Woodland. 

March the 13th was Art Day at the 
Napa New Century Club and Miss Clara 
Dills assisted Miss De Ford in displaying 
a collection of etchings and by giving a 
talk illustrated by slides. The slides 
and etchings were secured through the 
Lassen and Solano County Libraries. 
Mr Wilkie of Berkeley was invited by 
Miss De Ford to speak on the art of 
etching. 

Our doll collection boasts the addition 
of a very handsome soldier of a crack 
Greek regiment, dressed in white cotton 
kilts and braided jacket. Through the 
efforts of Miss d'Esterre Hughes, custo- 
dian of our Watt Branch, this doll was 



NAPA CO.— Continued, 
sent us by her friend Madame Veneselos, 
wife of the ex prime minister of Greece. 
EsTELLA De Ford, Lib'n. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth Class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,6.32,988 (taxable 
for county .$6,858,090). 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Fop. 61,375. ' 
Assessed valuation $190,247,009 (tax- 
able for county $168,293,000) . 

Orange Co. Feee Library, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

Acting on instructions given by the 
Library Association of Laguna Beach at 
its recent meeting. Roy Ropp has started 
work on the addition to the library build- 
ing on First street. Forms for the 
foundation were laid early in the week. 
The room to be added will be placed in 
front of the one which has been used for 
several weeks, the whole to be given a 
coat of stucco. — Laguna Beach South 
Coast News, Mr 23 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $27,988,880 (tax- 
able for county $20,119,525). 

Auburn. 

Auburn Free Public Library. Mrs 
Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

Our circulation is steadily increasing. 
and shows a constant demand for better 
books, more non-fiction. I have tried 
placing books of travel, history, biography 
and other good reading, among the fic- 
tion ; many have been taken out and 
read, and the readers have asked for 
something more by the same authors. We 
have nearly 10,000 volumes in our library 
now, and our five women's clubs find most 
of their material, of course with the aid 
of our wonderful State Library. We 
want a county library in Placer, as we 



138 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



PLACER CO. — Continued. 

Auburn — Continued. 

are compelled to refuse books to people 

every day. 

Mrs Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

Roseville. 

RosEviLLE [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Georgiaua R. Willits, Lib'n. 

I am happy to be able to report that 
I am back on the job since January 15, 
after a long, tedious experience following 
the auto mishap of a year ago. During 
this time weeks were spent in Los Angeles 
and Pasadena and as soon as I was able 
to do so, hours and hours were spent at 
Pasadena Library, which were not only 
helpful but very enjoyable. 

Library activities were cai-ried on here 
at Roseville, during my absence, by my 
very able assistant, Rita Rowland, with 
the aid of a helper, Mrs Prouty, greatly 
to the satisfaction of the public as well 
as to my own. 

Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area. 2.361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation ' .$21,945,820 (tax- 
able for county $12,721,055.) 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

I was reappointed County Librarian of 
Plumas County for another four-year 
term at the meeting of the Board of 
Supervisors March 5. 

Edith Gantt, Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $68,653,643 (tax- 
able for county $51,052,030). 

Riverside Co. Free Library, Rwer- 
SIDE. Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

A new branch of Riverside County Free 
Library was opened February 2 at Indio, 
an initial installment of 500 volumes 
being sent there. The project is the re- 
sult of efforts made by the Exchange 
Club, the Woman's Club and the Parent 
Teacher Association of Indio. These 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 

carried out a "tagday" to raise the funds 
to finance the library for a year. The 
branch is located in the frame building 
opposite the new Indio Hotel, is in charge 
of Mrs J. S. Sammis and is to be open 
daily from 2 to 6 p.m. — Indio Date Palm, 
F 3 

Elsinore. 

Elsinore Free Public Library and 
Branch. Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Miss Beatrice Clark, Lib'n. 

During the past quarter many Cali- 
fornia books have been supplied to the 
History and Landmark Section of the 
Woman's Club for their study class on 
California history. Much assistance has 
been given in reference work, especially 
to grammar and high school students. 
The reading tables have been used a 
great deal. 

We have acquired 31 new books. 

Beatrice Clark, Lib'n. 

Riverside. 

RwERSiDE [Free] Public Library. 
Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Mayor Edward M. Dighton, on his in- 
stallation, served notice of removal from 
office on three members of the Library 
Board, Directors Loyal C. Kelley, Fred 
L. Hamblin and Jonas E. Killian, "in 
order to better carry out the policies of 
the administration." Messrs J. S. Yakey 
and Frank D. Troth and Mrs Florence 
Lorbeer were appointed to fill the vacan- 
cies so created. At this writing it 
appears likely that the action of the 
Mayor will be contested at law. The 
Mayor further appointed Director Gard- 
ner to succeed himself and Mr O. K. 
Morton to succeed Mrs Belle H. Ellis, 
whose term had expired. 

Riveiside Lihrary Service School. 

The Riverside Library Service School 
opened its year course January 3d with 
its maximum enrollment of twenty-five 
students from four states. This is ten 
more than any previous enrollment in 
this course. 

Dr. Frank P. Hill. Chief Librarian of 
the Brooklyn Public Library, delivered a 
course of eleven lectui-es on library ad- 
ministration during February. 

The usual eight weeks summer session 
of the school will open June 25. Twenty- 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



139 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
R iverside — Continued, 
eight students will be received for this 
session, in which Avill be offered the usual 
group of fundamental subjects, together 
with a number of special courses. 

Chas F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Mrs Margaret Kyle Stone passed away 
March 19 after several years of failing 
health. Mrs Stone was formerly head 
of the Riverside Public Library, being 
librarian when the move Avas made into 
the present Carnegie building, and being 
largely responsible for establishing the 
Arlington Branch. She resigned as li- 
brarian about seventeen years ago. Mrs 
Stone was one of the first women to be 
graduated from Dennison University. — 
Riverside Enterprise, Mr 20 

Professor Edmund C. Jaeger of the 
Riverside Junior College has arranged the 
collection of desert plants and flowers on 
display at the Public Library. The col- 
lection includes wall flower, Mojave blue 
sage, tidy tips, white phacelia, prickly 
lupine, woolly thistle, windmill pink, pop- 
corn flower and many others. — Riverside 
Enterprise. Mr 21 

Labeled "Common Wild Flowers of the 
Mesas" a collection of sixteen specimens 
of blossoms arranged and presented to 
the Riverside Public Library by Fred 
Reed has succeeded the collection of 
desert flowers, arranged by Professor 
Jaeger, as a center of interest. Inchzded 
are specimens of the wild hyacinth, bird 
foot fern, California poppy, wild buck- 
wheat, purple larkspur, white and black 
sage, silky lupin, "chia" and goldfields. — 
Riverside Enterprise Mr 27 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $171,546,769 (tax- 
able for county $138,287,205). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Provines was unanimously reap- 
pointed January 9 to the position of 
County Librarian for another four-year 
term by the Board of Supervisors. — 
Sacramento Bee, Ja 9 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento. 

t Sacramento P'ree Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

A Avorth while contact was made in 
February with the Sacramento Club of 
Printing House Craftsmen, recently or- 
ganized in the city. At the monthly 
dinner, the City Librarian extended an 
invitation to the Club to place an ex- 
hibit of their work in the lobby of the 
library, that the public might gain an 
appreciation of fine printing. They were 
also asked to view the exhibit of fine bind- 
ings loaned by the State Library. 

The results have been far reaching. 
A number of craftsmen have visited the 
librai*y and two brought books for the 
exhibit cases, one a copy of the scarce 
and beautiful edition of Achievement, 
published by the Photo Engravers' Asso- 
ciation and another a Danish Bible, pub- 
lished in 1787, which had been used in 
the family of Signor Sivertson for over 
one hundred years. These books stimu- 
lated a borrower to bring in Spotteswood's 
History of the Church of Scotland, pub- 
lished in 1637, given to her great great 
grandmother as a wedding gift in 1790. 
Her own father read a chapter every day 
until his death, as the worn pages mutely 
testify. 

The Craftsmen are not only interested 
in exhibiting examples of their work but 
are compiling a list of books on printing 
and the allied arts, that are to be found 
in the State Library and City Library 
collections, for the use of their membei's. 
Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $15,739,267 (tax- 
able for county $13,955,175). 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $119,886,794 (tax- 
able for county $75,902,180) . 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 



140 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

jNIr Charles F. Woods, Librarian of 
the Riverside Public Library, and five 
students of the Riverside Library Service 
School visited the library on the after- 
noon of Februai'y 27. They were shown 
all the methods of the San Bernardino 
County Free Library, and each depart- 
ment's work was explained to them. 

Atolia Branch was moved from the 
home of Mrs Katherine Day to the new 
post office and store building with Mrs 
C, W. Piatt as custodian, February IG. 
The library is open store hours. Chino 
Branch was moved February 3 from the 
City Hall to a store room 22 by 65 feet 
a few doors below the City Hall. This 
gives larger quarters for the branch, and 
as the store room has two large front 
windows, permits of window book display 
and publicity. 

Mrs Eric Pell, who before her marriage 
was in the headquarters library for three 
years, took charge of Del Rosa Branch 
February 1, in place of Mx's H. H. Prout. 
Mrs Paul Peters, custodian of Oro 
Grande Branch, resigned ; her place was 
filled by Mrs Stella McKenzie March 1. 
Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

Ontario! 

Ontario [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Helen G. Nelson, Lib'n. 

Announcement was made February S 
by the Ontario Public Library Board 
that Mrs Helen G. Nelson, library super- 
visor of Anaheim city schools, had been 
chosen to succeed Miss K. A. Monroe as 
Librarian of Ontario Public Library. The 
appointment is effective March 1. 

Miss Monroe has been librarian for 
twenty-eight years, and through untiring 
effort has raised the library to its present 
high standard. On account of ill health 
she tendered her resignation several 
months ago, but was asked to continue 
to hold office until a satisfactory suc- 
cessor could be found. — Ontario Report, 
F 8 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

A generous gift of money from Clar- 
ence G. White of this city to the A. K. 
Smiley Library was announced at the 
meeting of the library board March 5. 
Mr White specified that this fund be used 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Redlands — Continued, 
during the current year for the purchase 
of good books, and asked that it be spent 
in addition to the sum usually expended 
by the board for books. 

Another gift was a collection of valu- 
able books from the private library of 
Kirke H. Field, president of the board. 
Still another gift comes from the children 
of the late Mi-s Anna E. Hotchkiss — a 
beautiful bronze statue "Cupid and 
Flora," which has been placed in the 
music reference room and is attracting 
much admiration. — Redlands Facts, Mr 

Mi*s I. C. Goff has presented the A. K. 
Smiley Library with a copy of the famous 
Venus of the Vatican, done in purest 
white marble and set on a base of dull 
green marble. The statue, personally 
selected by the Goifs during one of their 
sojourns in Italy, stands six or seven feet 
high. It has been placed in the little 
lobby that connects the main room with 
the new Lyon wing, and here it meets 
the eye of every one who enters. — Red- 
lands Facts, F 11 

Upland. 

Upland [Free] Public Library. 
M'rs F. H. Manker, Lib'n (on leave 
of absence). Mrs Lavina B. Penley, 
Acting Lib'n. 

Beginning with January 3 the library 
has been open to the public one hour 
more each day — not closing from 6 to 7 
as formerly. Mrs Penley and Mrs Jor- 
gensen attended the meeting of the San 
Antonio Library Club at Chaffey Union 
High School Library January 28, and 
the meeting of the Sixth District of C. L. 
A. at Redlands. 

New books belonging to the library and 
a splendid group loaned by Vroman's, 
formed a display of books for Children's 
Book Week. Miss Edith Hagin, of the 
Sierra Vista School, brought her class of 
Mexican girls one afternoon during the 
week, to look at the books and pictures 
and listen to the stories by Miss M. Gum- 
precht. Miss Gumprecht's familiarity 
with books as well as her ability to talk 
to the children in both English and Span- 
ish, assured her of an appreciative audi- 
ence. Mr Victor Anderson, from the 
same school, brought a large group of 
Mexican boys, who showed keen appre- 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



141 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Upland — Continued. 
(■iati()u of the illustrated books and 
frequently commented on stories they had 
read having the same characters as shown 
in the books. Mr Lucas, scout executive 
of the Old Baldy Council, planned a 
reading contest for two of the local troops. 
A special scout card was issued to each 
boy, and the terms of the contest ex- 
plained to the boys on the occasion of 
their library visit. Thirty-three titles 
chosen from a list recommended by the 
Boy Scouts of America were printed on 
the backs of the cards, each title being 
checked off as read. At the end of the 
contest two prizes were offered, one by 
the district organization, the other by the 
library. Parents and teachers visited the 
library during the week and took notes 
about the books. Several children have 
reported that Christmas brought them 
books "like those which were on the 
table." After the display the children 
were waiting at the door to secure a 
favorite book. 
Mrs Lavixa B. Penley, Acting Lib'n. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $132,684,307 (tax- 
able for county $118,458,831). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

Miss Corinne Metz of Ohio has visited 
the county library and a number of its 
branches during the past month. Miss 
Metz has been in charge of various county 
libraries in Ohio, Indiana and Oregon 
and we have found her a most responsive 
and stimulating guest. 

In February the county library en- 
joyed a brief visit from Miss Gillis, 
Assistant State Librarian. Miss Gillis 
had not been in San Diego for a number 
of years and we found her visit all too 
short. 

The librarian and three members of 
the county library staff attended the meet- 
ing of the 6th district of the California 
Library Association held at Redlands 
February 25. 

Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 
3—58783 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
Julian. 

.Julian Union High School Library 
AND Branch, San Diego Co. Free Li- 
brary. E. E. York, Prin. 

I am glad to report that our library 
will soon be up to date with all our books 
properly cataloged and ready for use in 
the fall. 

We have purchased a number of new 
books and plan to get many more before 
the school year is over. 

Our new equipment — shelves, desk and 
other library necessities — will also be in- 
stalled before very long. 

Mrs Eva R. McKinney, Lib'n. 

National City. 

Sweetwater Union High School 
Library. Guy Hudgins, Prin. Ruth J. 
Peirce, Lib'n. 

The Library Club of Sweetwater Union 
High School recently presented as its part 
in a series of progi-ams given in assembly 
by the prominent clubs of the school the 
play, "The library and the Jones's." The 
play "went over big" with the student 
body much to the gratification of the 
amateur participants. 

At the regular meeting on March 15, 
the club was honored by having as its 
speaker guest. Miss Cornelia Plaister of 
the San Diego Public Library, who spoke 
on the opportunities of the public libra- 
rian. The mothers of the club members 
and the libi'arians of the district were 
invited to share the privilege of hearing 
Miss Plaister. As usual the serious part 
of the hour was followed by a social time 
and the seiwing of refreshments. 

Ruth J. Peirce, Lib'n. 

San Diego. 

JSan Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

The city council of San Diego has 
passed an ordinance making it a mis- 
demeanor to retain library books or maga- 
zines longer than two weeks, and fixing 
a penalty for so doing. Hereafter, the 
San Diego Public Library will send a 
first notice (after seven days) in a 
window envelope instead of on a postal. 
After one month a registered letter is 
sent, asking for a return receipt. The 
letter quotes the ordinance and gives a 
statement of the borrower's account to 



■ 



142 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
date, /. c, cost of book if not returned, 
fines to date including registry fee. One 
month after the registered letter lias been 
sent the names of the borrowers will be 
turned over to the city attorney. He 
sends a form letter summoning them to 
court if a report is not made to him im- 
mediately. The system is too new to 
report on its success, but it is the belief 
of the Librarian that the books will be 
returned without summons. Previous to 
this the City Charter of San Diego had 
contained an enabling act only. 

Cornelia D. Plaisteb, Lib'n. 
The library board this week bought 
the Congregational Church site, one hun- 
dred by one hundred forty feet, on the 
southwest corner of Santa Monica avenue 
and Sunset Cliffs boulevard, for the Ocean 
Beach Branch. It is stated that con- 
struction of the new $15,000 library 
building will be begun in about thirty 
days. The site was secured for $2700. — 
Ocean Beach News, F 25 

San Diego Medical Library Associa- 
tion Library. W. S. Keyes, M.D., Pi-es. 
Willard H. Newman, M.D., Sec. Mrs 
Mildred S. Farrow, Lib'n. 

The Medical Library has moved into 
its new quarters in the Medico-Dental 
Building where on the 14th floor it opens 
upon roof promenades presenting a 
beautiful view of the entire horizon. In 
fact, we feel that we have one of the most 
attractive libraries on the coast. Its win- 
dows faciiig east, west and south preseiit 
a perfect panoramic view of the city, 
mountains, bay and ocean. Medical vis- 
itors and their friends, are invited to 
make this their rendezvous when visiting 
San Diego. Having always been a public 
library it is used frequently by the college 
and high school students and we feel that 
this is a good opportunity for the proper 
direction of the younger generation on 
subjects such as hygiene, sanitation, etc. 

At the annual election held in Decem- 
ber, 1927, the following directors were 
elected for the year 1928 : 

Drs Robert Pollock, W. G. Geistweit. 
Jr., C. R. Lounsberry, H. G. Lazelle, 
Frank Emery, E. B. Porter, W. S. Keyes, 
W. E. Walsh, O. K. Bullark, C. E. 
Howard, E. F. Hoover and E. J. Farrow. 
Mrs Mildred S. Farrow, Lib'n. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation $1,025,317,945 (tax- 
able for county $783,620,603). 

t [Free] Public Library of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

A collection of thousands of old theater 
programs from all parts of the world has 
been presented to the San Francisco 
Public Library by August F. Schlaicher 
and is being assembled for exhibition and 
i-eference. One volume in particular is 
expected to be of especial interest to San 
Franciscans, as it contains the programs 
of many of the city's forgotten theaters 
and many stage luminaries long ago 
passed into history. — San Francisco Ex- 
aminer, F 20 

The musical talent of Mrs Anita M. 
Baldwin, native daughter of San Fran- 
cisco but now a resident of southern 
California, was made available to the 
public March 10 when she donated a col- 
lection of her compositions, comprising 
some thirty pieces, to the San Francisco 
Public Library. Heretofore Mrs Bald- 
win's numbers have been printed only for 
private distribution among her friends, 
but the collection contributed to the Pub- 
lic Librai'y here includes all of her pub- 
lished music, with the exception of that 
comi^osed for Richard Walton Tully's 
new play, "His Blossom Bride." — San 
Francisco Examiner, Mr 11 

California Development Associa- 
tion IjIBrary. R. B. Hale, Pres. Norman 
H. Sloane, Gen. Mgr. 

Mrs Amy M. Caya is now Research 
Librai'ian in the California Development 
Association Library. 

Commonwealth Club of California 
Library. E. T. Thurston, Pres. E. 
Clarence Holmes, Sec. Mrs Lois H. 
^McVeigh, Lib'n. 

The work of recataloging the library 
is progressing satisfactorily and will 
probably be completed early this year. 
It is estimated that the library contains 
around 4500 books, 10,000 pamphlets, and 
receives 200 periodicals. For the purpose 
of advertising new material to club mem- 
bers, a large bulletin board has recently 
been acquired. 

Lois H. McVeigh, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



143 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

High School of Cojimekce Library. 
C. W. White, Priu. Miss Grace Dixon, 
Lib'u. 

Tlie High School of Commerce Library 
which opened for the use of faculty and 
students in January, 1927, is showing a 
rapid growth and is beginning to estab- 
lish itself as a center of activity in the 
school. The March, 1928, statistics were 
as follows : Total attendance 7512 ; total 
circulation 3924. 

In August, 1927, Miss Ruth Thomas, 
a graduate of the University of California 
with the class of 1926, was appointed as 
librarian to take the place of Miss Mar- 
garet Girdner who was transferred to 
the Galileo High School. 

Several attractive gifts have been pre- 
sented to the library by the student body, 
the outstanding gift being a plaster relief 
of the Parthenon, which hangs on the 
eastern wall and adds greatly to the 
beauty of the room. 

Grace Dixon, Lib'n. 

Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company Library. C. H. Judson, Lib'n. 

The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company's Library on January 1, had 
1414 books, 660 pamphlets and 22 maps, 
besides many files of reports, technical 
papers issued by government agencies and 
the like. We take 133 periodicals and 
receive published bulletins from a num- 
ber of research agencies toward the main- 
tenance of which we contribute. 

C. H. Judson, Lib'n. 

University of St. Ignatius Library. 
Rev Edward J. Whelan, S.J., Prin. Rev 
F. Gabriel, S.J., Lib'n. L. C. Zaehert, 
Asst. Lib'n. 

During the last quarter fully six hun- 
dred additional volumes were cataloged 
and shelved. The Law Section was en- 
riched by a donation of a complete set 
of Corpus Juris and Cyclopedias of Law 
and Procedure. A number of Booklovers 
Literary Maps were also contributed. 

The library has a daily attendance of 
over one hundred students. 

L. C. Zachert, Asst. Lib'n. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Assessed valuation .$122,919,943 (tax- 
able for county $105,660,845 I . 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library. 
Stockton. Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Mt. Carmel School District has recently 
joined the County Library. Miss Angeline 
Orr, head of the School Department, is 
recovering from a severe illness. Due to 
the recent changes in the system of read- 
ing in the county schools a larger number 
of teachers called at the Library in March 
than in September which has usually 
been the busiest month. 

Miss Mary Colahan, who tells stories 
so delightfully at the Library story hours, 
has given two radio hours over KWG 
for the Library. Her stories were as 
enthusiastically received by "shut ins" 
as by the children. The county custo- 
dians were notified of the story hours and 
there were many neighborhood gatherings 
to listen in. 

A county branch was started at the 
San Joaquin General Hospital and Train- 
ing School for Nurses. The books, which 
are issued every day, are greatly appre- 
ciated by the nurses, one of whom acts as 
librarian. 

Great interest is being taken in the 
library by the residents of Tracy. The 
circulation has doubled and larger quar- 
ter will soon be needed. Individuals are 
donating books and subscribing to news- 
papers and magazines for the library. 
A Junior Reading Club has been organ- 
ized to stimulate reading among the 
children. 

Children's magazines are being saved 
from the collections of the branch 
libraries to be sent to the Bret Harte 
Sanitarium at Murphys. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Lodi. 

LoDi [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Amy L. Boynton, Lib'n. 

A contract has been entered into by 
the City Council with O. A. Schroeder 
for the purchase for $5(100 of the lot 
adjoining the Lodi Public Library prop- 
erty on the north for the pui-pose of erect- 
ing an addition to the library later. The 
lot has a frontage of one hundred feet 



144 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[April, 1928 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Lodi — Continued, 
on Pleasant Avenue and is fifty feet deep. 
— Stockton Record, F 4 

Tentative plans for the addition to 
the Lodi Public Library building were 
adopted at a joint meeting of the city 
council and library trustees the evening 
of February 16. Architect Satterlee of 
the firm of Davis-Pearce Co. of Stockton 
was instructed to proceed with the draw- 
ing of permanent plans and specifications. 
The proposed new addition calls for a 
one story building and basement, approxi- 
mately sixty feet square, to cost about 
$23,000. A feature of the basement room 
will be a small auditorium and stage for 
story hours and other library activities. 
— Lodi Sentinel, F 18 

Stockton. 

t Stockton Free Public Libeaby. 
Miss Ida B. Condit, Lib'n. 

In the Young People's Department 
there has been a gain of 393 books in 
circulation in March, 1928, over that of 
March, 1927. 

There have been some very interesting 
story hours this year. Stories of many 
lands have been given. China was the 
first of the series with pictures to illus- 
trate the stories. The children learned 
to make Chinese bows. Indian legends, 
with the story tellers in Indian costume, 
were next in the series. A lady who had 
lived in' India gave a travelogue illus- 
trated with photographs. The Swedish 
story hours were illustrated with views 
of Sweden given with the balopticon. 

A Colonial play was given by high 
school girls in costume and with Colonial 
utensils such as candle molds, etc. The 
Reading Club told stories one afternoon. 
One boy told of his personal acquaintance 
with Thornton W. Burgess of bedtime 
story fame. A Campfire gi'oup of Jenny 
Wren Bluebirds entertained with talks 
on campfire and a play "The Little Pine 
Tree." 

The Municipal Baths Junior Reading 
Club also gave a play entitled "Snow 
White and Rose Red." 

The largest attendance at the story 
hours was 197, the smallest 40. 

Miss Condit attended the meeting of 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Stockton — Continued, 
the Third and Fifth Districts of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

College of the Pacific Library. 
TuUy C. Knoles, Pres. Miss Harriet E. 
Boss, Lib'n. 

During the quarter we added 225 books, 
of which 35 were newly bound magazines, 
and nearly all the rest were new by pur- 
chase, sixteen of them being foreign pub- 
lications. Two of my student help are 
giving practically all their time in keep- 
ing up "with the college scrap-book — there 
is so much publicity in connection with 
our financial drive. We found that it 
took so long to make out the index for 
the first two or three volumes that we are 
trying a new scheme in using loose sheets, 
classifying as we proceed in the follow- 
ing groups — Alumni, athletics, college as 
a whole, college groups other than those 
specifically mentioned, conservatory, de- 
bating, fraternities and sororities, faculty, 
little theater, president, students, sum- 
mer school and floating college, weddings 
and betrothals. By Christmas time we 
had enough to bind regardless of athletics. 

The report that went out that we were 
to have a $250,000 library building was 
entirely premature. We are simply work- 
ing on tentative plans with the hope of 
interesting somebody in giving such a 
building to us. 

Harriet E. Boss, Lib'n. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $37,236,293 (tax- 
able for county $31,722,501). 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

The last three months have been char- 
acterized by large circulations, the pre- 
vious high record having been exceeded by 
more than six hundred. More than the 
usual amount of reference work has been 
done, and clubs have been especially 
active. A program and bibliography for 
an evening of Italian litei*ature met with 
marked success. 

Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 



vol. 2.3, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



145 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36.781. 
Assessed valuation $50,201,488 (tax- 
able for county $45,625,565). 

Sa:nj INIateo Co. Fkee Libeaey, Red- 
wood City. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

A branch of the San Mateo County 
Free Library has been reopened at the 
telephone exchange in Pescadero. About 
500 books are now available, and the 
collection will be renewed as frequently 
as desired. The hours are 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. — Half Moon Bay Review, Mr 15 

South San Francisco. 

South San Francisco Free Public 
Library and Branch, San Mateo Co. 
Free Library. Mrs Gertha Lane Mc- 
Kinney, Lib'n. 

Miss Gertha Lane, Librarian, has 
become Mrs Gertha Lane McKinney. 
Miss Mabel Bash has been appointed 
assistant. 

Because the library attendance is in- 
creasing so rapidly, a search was made 
for more room — which ended (for the 
present) in ordering a new section of 
shelves. The attendance and circulation 
have almost doubled since last year. 
Because of this a new card system was 
found advisable. 

The library has added much in the last 
month or two in the line of furniture, 
pictures, plants, etc. 

A very recent adventure was taking 
over a section of the town newspaper and 
publishing the news, reports and reviews 
of the library. 

Mrs G. Lane McKinnet, Lib'n. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $79,007,741 (tax- 
able for county $68,555,-360) . 

Santa Barbara. 

* State Teachers College Library. 
Clarence L. Phelps, Prin. Miss Kathar- 
ine F. Ball, Lib'n. 

The completion of the new administra- 
tion building and libraiy at the college 
has made the Lincoln collection, which 
was started about a year ago, available 



SANTA BARBARA CO. — Continuea. 

Santa Barbara — Continued, 
to public inspection and student use. A 
special room off the main library was 
constructed to hold the Lincoln books 
exclusively. It was built around a large 
engraving of Lincoln which is one of two 
copies in existence that bear the signa- 
ture of the artist, John H. Littlefield. 

Approximately 400 volumes covering 
a wide field of Lincoln literature are 
included in the library. Old and new, 
fiction and non-fiction, adult and juvenile 
books are represented. Some of the 
books have been autographed by the 
authors especially for the college. — 
Santa Barbara News, F 12 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $129,813,207 (tax- 
able for county $115,532,020). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
Jose. Mrs Elizabeth Singletary, Lib'n. 

The Redwood Estates Branch of the 
Santa Clara County Library opened 
March 19. The temporary quarters are 
in the main office near the pavilion and 
will be open every Monday and Thurs- 
day afternoon. — S an Jose Mercury 
Herald, Mr 22 

The new custodian of Burbank Branch 
is Mrs D. Jacobs. 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary^, Lib'n. 

Palo Alto. 

Palo Alto [Free] Public Library'. 
Miss Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

Miss Aimee Peters, formerly of Elmira, 
N. Y., has assumed charge of the cata- 
loging department of Palo Alto Public 
Library. She is a graduate of Syracuse 
University Library School, was assistant 
at the Syracuse Library, Johns Hopkins 
University Library, Smithsonian Insti- 
tute and was head cataloger for the Air 
Service Librai-y at Washington, D. C, 
for three years. .Just before coming here 
she was with the Kern County Free 
Library at Bakersfield. — Palo Alto Times, 
Mr 12 

The City Council, on the evening of 
March 26, made pi'ovision for the neces- 
sary funds for the Mayfield Branch 



146 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

Palo Alto — Continued. 

Library budget, so tbat it may be kept 
open two evenings each week for the 
benefit of men and boys in this com- 
munity. — Palo Alto May field News, 
]Mr 29 

San Jose. 

San Jose Free Public Libkaky. Mrs 
Edith Daley, Lib'n. 

Fifty-five juvenile patrons have signed 
up for the spring reading course : eight 
weeks, with one non-fiction book to be 
read and a written review of it filed 
each week. Names are entered on a big 
green-and-gold decorated bulletin board 
and a red star appears for each week's 
work well done. The board begins to 
look like a map of star constellations. 

On May first the Newark system will 
be installed. The preparatory work is 
being done by Edith Daley, Librarian, 
Clarisse C. Friant, Assistant Librarian 
and cataloger, Grace Cox, assistant 
cataloger, and Dorothy Donovan, branch 
custodian, with Helen C. Bullock of the 
State Teachers College giving efficient 
"first aid." 

During the March "birthday of Camp- 
fire" the various groups of Camp Fire 
girls, under the direction of Mrs Louis 
Shelley, executive, arranged an exhibit 
of their work — nature craft and hand 
craft — in the juvenile department, the 
interesting display attracting many 
visitors. 

Mrs Edith Daly, Lib'n. 

San Jose High School Library. 
Raymond B. Leland, Prin. Miss Henri- 
ette Thomas, Lib'n. 

The big outstanding thing that has 
happened to us this year is the appoint- 
ment of an all-time assistant. Miss 
Helen Zimmerman, a graduate of our 
school and a girl who helped in the 
school library for almost all the time 
she attended school received the appoint- 
ment. Before accepting the position, 
she had completed her apprenticeship at 
the San Jose Public Library and had 
substituted in both of our junior high 
school libraries. 

Two of the high school societies are 
taking such an interest in the library 
that they are giving gifts. The Mask 
and Scroll, the dramatic society, is 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

San Jose — Continued. 

giving books of drama and books about 
the drama, and the Librai*y Club has 
given and will give some books of fiction. 
From time to time some of the teachers 
have given gifts also. 

Of late part of the fine money has been 
diverted to buying books of fiction, and 
books from the English reading list. 
Later we will buy some non-fiction that 
could not be bought from the library 
fund. Our library fund is not able to 
support adequately the demand made 
upon it for reference books. Therefore 
we have not been able) to spare money 
from it to buy books that would be of 
wide interest to the students. The fine 
money is now the foundation for a collec- 
tion of this kind. While the accumula- 
tion is gradual, it will be a good begin- 
ning. 

Heneiette Thomas, Lib'n. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $27,848,035 (tax- 
able for county $23,942,650). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $25,325,370 r tax- 
able for county $15,188,140). 

Anderson. 

Anderson Union High School Li- 
brary. Jackson Price, Piin. Miss Ruth 
L. Gill, Lib'n. 

The Library of the Anderson Union 
High School has just in the last two 
years been put in a room by itself. 
Before that time it was in the front of 
the study hall. 

"Library" is taught one period a day. 
Miss Ruth Gill has supervision of the 
Library and also teaches the Library 
Class. There is one definite assignment 
for the class each week, and after that is 
finished the rest of the time is spent in 
mending books. 

A student librai'ian is in charge of the 
Library every period of the day. It is 
his duty to see that the Library is kept 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



147 



SHASTA CO.— Continued. 

Anderson — Continued. 

in order and he is responsible for every 
book that is charged in or out at that 
time. Special effort is made by each 
librarian to. see that the Library is kept 
in order. 

At the County Fair held in Anderson 
last fall, the Library Class placed on 
exhibition the material and methods 
used in mending books. This proved 
very interesting. 

Redding. 

Redding [Free Public] Carnegie Li- 
brary. Mrs Lizzie B. Ross, Lib'n. 

Miss Ida M. Southern, member of a 
pioneer family of Shasta County and 
former librarian of Redding Public Li- 
brary, passed away suddenly February 
14.— Chico Record, F 15 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 178-3. 
Assessed valuation $.3,339,760 (taxable 
for county $2,939,395). 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18.545. 
Assessed valuation $31,454,257 (tax- 
able for county $21,821,885). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Frances Stockebrand, Lib'n. 

The county librarian has been busy 
the past week superintending the mov- 
ing of the library books from the pres- 
ent quarters in the court house, where 
it has been since it was established about 
12 years ago, into the new library build- 
ing across the sti-eet, formerly the old 
Forest Service building, remodeled and 
refinished. — Yreka Journal, F 15 

Yreka. 

Siskiyou Union High Sciiooe Li- 
iiRARY. H. R. Spiess, Piin. Esther 
^NlcStay, Lib'n. 

During the past year a resident of 
Yreka died and left her books, numbering 
about five hundred volumes, to the high 
school. We feel especially grateful to 
Mrs J. F. Magoffey for her thought of 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 

Yreka — Continued. 

us, for among the collection are sets of 
Dickens' novels, Scott's novels, works by 
Dumas, Victor Hugo, Kipling, Haw- 
thorne, Bulwer-Lytton, Washington Iiw- 
ing, Simms and others, besides encyclo- 
pedias of history, both U. S. and England, 
books of travel, etc. The books are a 
splendid addition to our library. 

Our students and librarian have been 
working very hard and the books are 
almost all cataloged. We use the Dewey 
decimal system. 

Esther McStay, Lib'n. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

( Nineteenth class. ) 

County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,002. 
Assessed valuation $39,720,415 (tax- 
able for county $32,390,184). 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

Thi'ee members of the Solano County 
Library StafiE recently attended the Third 
District meeting of the California Library 
Association held at Woodland, this being 
a joint gathering with the Fifth District. 

During the last three months much 
time has been given to the supplying of 
ai-t material for some clubs of the county 
that are studying art. An astonishing 
amount of reading and studying has been 
accomplished and books used that have 
not found readers for some time. These 
clubs have been most grateful for the 
magnificent service the State Library has 
afforded them in i*are books and beautiful 
colored pictures. 

The Print Makers' Society loaned this 
libraiir a collection of thirty prints, in- 
cluding etchings in dry point, soft 
ground, aquatints, mezzotints and block 
prints. These were shown to the clubs 
of Napa, Suisun, Benicia and Vacaville. 
Explanations of the processes employed 
in the making of them made the displays 
more interesting, so the library was in- 
formed. Talks have also been made in 
Benicia and Rio Vista by staff members 
on art and school decoration. 

The librarian attended the custodians' 
meeting held February 22 at Martinez by 
the Contra Costa County Library. The 



148 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. [April, 1928 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 

custodians' reports and the librarian's re- 
marks were most inspiring. 

Mr Tesuji Ono of Japan, a visiting 
librarian who is making a study of li- 
braries the world over, called at this 
institution and made an investigation of 
the methods used in county library dis- 
tribution. He was much interested in 
rural service. 

Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

Dixon. 

Dixon Union High School Dist. 
Library and Branch, Solano Co. Free 
Library. Miss Barbara Kirby, Lib'n. 

Miss Barbara Kirby has been engaged 
by the high school board as librarian to 
take the place in February of Miss Leta 
Hutchinson. Miss Kirby has been doing 
clerical work at LTniversity Farm for sev- 
eral months. — Dixon Tribune, Ja 18 

Miss Leta Hutchinson, until recently 
librarian of Dixon Union High School 
District Library, was married to James 
Fulmer of Dixon February 25. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $54,248,243 (tax- 
able for county $46,000,490) . 

Healdsburg. 

Healdsburg High School Library. 
Edwin Kent, Jr., Prin. Gertrude Bon- 
ham, Lib'n. 

We have purchased an information file, 
three oak drawers, Library Bureau furni- 
ture. We are to use it for pamphlets, 
clippings, pictures, etc. 

We are slowly bringing our card cata- 
log up to date. 

Gertrude Bonham, Lib'n. 

Petaluma. 

Petaluma [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sara Frances Cassiday, Lib'n. 

At the meeting of the Petaluma Li- 
brary Board of March 13, Miss Edna 
Bovett, a recent graduate of Petaluma 
High School, was appointed an assistant 
librarian. The services of a third li- 
bi-arian are necessary owing to the in- 
creased patronage. — Paso Robles Press, 
Mr 15 



STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation .$64,976,157 (tax- 
able for county $56,096,955). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

The county librarian was the speaker 
of the afternoon at Tegner Woman's 
Club, February 2, her subject being 
"Books to lure you North." She ad- 
dressed the John Muir P. T. A. Febniary 
13 on the subject of "Professional Read- 
ing for Parents and Teachers." In addi- 
tion she conducted some pencil games of 
a literary character much to the surprise, 
consternation, and finally the amusement, 
of the members. 

After being closed several months until 
quarters could be found for it, the Tegner 
Branch is now open in an attractive little 
building on the grounds of the custodian's 
home. Mrs Mary Ramsey, who has been 
in charge of the branch for a number of 
years, continues her duties. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Supervisors 
January 10 to serve as County Librarian 
for the next four years. — Modesto News 
Herald, Ja 11 

Denair. 

Denair High School Library. C. G. 
Fry, Prin. 

The regular High School Libi'ary fine 
system has been instituted in the Denair 
Union High School Library since the last 
number of Ne-ws Notes of California Li- 
braries was issued. A class in magazine 
binding and book repairing has been 
started in the last three months. This 
class is under the direction of Miss 
Beauel Gibbins, the head of the Library 
Department. A number of new books 
has been added, among them "Birds of 
California" by Dawson. A set of "Jour- 
neys through Bookland," by Sylvester has 
been purchased recently ; these are fine 
additions to the library. Also a number 
of volumes of the best one-act plays and 
short stories has been added to our 
shelves. 

Beauel M. Gibbins, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



149 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 
Modesto. 

McHenry [Free] Public Library 
AND Bkancii, Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
BKAEY. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, 
Lib'n. 

The addition to the library was for- 
mally opened to the public the evening of 
March 5. The library was beautifully 
decorated by the Modesto Garden Club 
and Mrs Frank Smith, florist. While 
the guests were assembling, selections 
were played by the Modesto High School 
Orchestra, directed by Mr Frank Man- 
cini. Addresses followed by Mr Frank 
Rossi, city engineer, under whose super- 
vision the addition was planned and 
built, and by Mayor Sol Elias, who gave 
the keys of the building to the president 
of the Board of Library Trustees, Mrs 
W. H. Langdon. She in turn gave them 
into the custody of the librarian. 

Mr M. J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
and Mrs Ferguson were present, and Mr 
Ferguson made an address, congratulat- 
ing the community on the beautiful addi- 
tion to the library and defining true 
library service. 

The rooms open to inspection at this 
time were the reading and reference room, 
the catalog and county branches depart- 
ment, and the librarian's office. In a 
few months the children's room and the 
school department will be completed and 
used. 

Mrs Elizabeth Thompson, a former stu- 
dent of the Riverside Library Service 
School, was added to the staff of the 
library Mai'ch 1, and will assist in the 
reference department. William McMur- 
ray was added as part-time page March 
1, and Miss Eleanor Dennett was added 
as full-time page for the next six months. 
Mr jNIcMurray, who is a Modesto College 
student, will be on duty evenings and 
Sundays. Miss Dennett will assist in the 
catalog and branch departments. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 



SUTTER COUNTY. 

( Forty-lirst class. ) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, Gil sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $23,443,897 (tax- 
able for county $18,465,365). 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $23,088,343 (tax- 
able for county $19,290,345). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

The new custodian of Manton Branch 
is Mrs Henry Buszdieker; she took 
charge January 14. Mrs C. C. Pollock 
is now custodian of Squawhill Branch. 
Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, AVeaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,837,869 (taxable 
for county .$3,402,048). 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $92,276,982 (tax- 
able for county $69,323,397). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

LaMotte School District Branch was 
established March 27. Its address is 
Porterville. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $12,683,940 (tax- 
able for county $8,909,190) . 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

( Twenty-third class. ) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $94,751,159 (tax- 
able for county $84,138,598). 

Ventltra Co. Free Library, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The people of Simi have presented Ven- 
tui-a County with a lot for the purpose 
of building a branch of the Ventura 
County Free Library upon it. This gift 
came unsolicited. 



I 



150 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA- LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

The library has opened a branch in the 
Saticoy Community Church under the 
same custodian as that of Saticoy Branch. 
The highway between the regular branch 
library and the church is too busy for 
small children to cross with safety, also 
the distances are so great that the people 
requested this dividing of the branch. 

The Somis Branch has been moved 
from the post office to the Woman's Club 
because there is no longer anyone to care 
for it at the fonner place. 

Miss Arvella Vorbeck from the St. 
Louis Public Library is working half 
time in the Ventura City Library at the 
circulation desk and half time in the 
county as assistant in cataloging. 

The new library at Thacher School, 
Ojai, was formally opened January 29. 
The books were cataloged by two Ven- 
tura County Library girls out of library 
hours. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ojai. 

Thacher School Libkaey. Sherman 
D. Thacher. Prin. 

A very beautiful building has just been 
erected, adjoining the schoolhouse, of 
hollow tile and reinforced concrete, at a 
cost of about $18,000, through the gener- 
ous contributions to a fund raised by the 
parents of two fonner school boys and 
other contributors. 

Mr Carleton M. Winslow of Los An- 
geles is the architect. The building con- 
sists of one large room 44 by 24 feet, 
with a smaller room adjoining for special 
study 24 by 14 feet, a tiled patio and an 
arched corridor connecting it with the 
main school building. It is heated by 
electricity and fireplaces. The number of 
books, according to the cataloger's list, 
is about 2500. A feature of the large 
room is a tall, arched window, clear glass, 
looking out on the view of the valley and 
mountains. 

S. D. Thachee, Prin. 

Ventura. 

Ventura [Free] Public Library 
AND Branch, Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, 
Lib'n. 

The Ventura City Library is now open 
from nine in the morning until nine at 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 
Ventura — Continued, 
night. The library is no longer closing 
on all holidays, but only on those univer- 
sally observed. Assistants working holi- 
days may add the time to their vacation 
time. 

A branch of the city library has been 
opened in the East End under the cus- 
todianship of Mrs Carrie Given. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat. Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $34,393,244 (tax- 
able for county $27,504,533). 

Yolo Co. Free Library, Woodland. 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 

A joint meeting of the "ftiird and Fifth 
Districts of the California Library Asso- 
ciation was held in the just completed 
children's room of Woodland Public Li- 
brary March 10. Miss Laugenour, presi- 
dent of the Fifth District and Miss 
Wright, president of the Third District, 
presided. State Librarian Milton J. Fer- 
guson, E. C. Stowe of the Woodland Mail, 
Sydney H. Small, writer of juvenile 
books, Miss Dills, County Librarian of 
Solano County, and Mrs Gertrude Free- 
man, ninety year old pioneer of Wood- 
land, were speakers. Musical numbers 
by Woodland school students trained 
under the direction of Professor F. C. 
McReynolds were enjoyed. 

Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 

Davis. 

*University of California Branch 
OF THE College of Agriculture Li- 
brary AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free 
Library. W. L. Howard, Director. 
Miss Nelle U. Branch, Lib'n. 

Miss Jane A. Craig, Acting Librarian 
August, 1927, to February, 1928, is spend- 
ing a few months in southei-n California. 
She will return to her home in Cham- 
paign, Illinois, about April 15. 

^Nliss Nelle U. Branch, Librarian, re- 
turned February 1 from a tour of several 
months in the Orient. Though libraries 
were not on the schedule, many interest- 
ing books, book stores and libraries hap- 
pened to be found. After the close of the 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



151 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 
Davis — Continued. 
Oriental tour, a visit was made to tlie 
following agricultural libraries : The In- 
ternational Institute of Agriculture in 
Rome ; the Boyce Thompson Institute of 
Plant Research, Yonkers, N. Y. ; the 
Library of the United States Department 
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. ; and 
the Agricultural Library of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 

Nelle U. Branch, Lib'n. 

Woodland. 

Woodland Free [Public] Library 
AND Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Irma C. Bruton, Lib'n. 

The first activity held in our new an- 
nex was the joint meeting of the Third 
and Fifth Districts, C. L. A., March 10. 

On March 21 a group of club women 
sponsored a benefit cai'd party in the new 
rooms which netted fifty dollars to be 
used for additional books for the chil- 
dren's collection. 

During April we are to have an exhibit 
of etchings, block prints and lithographs 
from the Print Makers Society of Cali- 
fornia. 

Mrs Irma C. Bruton, Lib'n. 

Woodland High School Library. 
Raymond H. Butzbach, Prin. 

We have no regular librarian at Wood- 
land High School Library. One of our 
history teachers is in charge, assisted by 
student attendants, one of whom remains 
on duty each period. 



"YOLO CO.— Continued. 

Woodland — Continued. 

Our library opens from the study hall 
so is easy of access for those with a study 
period. Also the study leader can dis- 
cipline both rooms. The library is large, 
light and furnished with four oak tables 
accommodating thirty-two. 

In the four years since the fire we have 
acquired two thousand volumes of stand- 
ard reference and about two hundred 
volumes of fiction. 

Our newest addition has been a maga- 
zine rack for displaying the latest copy 
of each of the twenty magazines which 
we receive. 

Mrs Elamae L. Proctor, Vice-Prin. 



YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $21,091,893 (tax- 
able for county $17,130,640) . 

Marysville. 

Marysville City [Free Public] 
Library. Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch, Lib'n. 

Miss Mary E. Subers for many years 
Marysville Librarian and widely known 
for her kindly manner in her service, died 
March 10 after a long period of ill health. 
Miss Subers retired as librarian more 
than two years ago. — Marysville Appeal 
Democrat, Mr 10 



152 



NEWS NOTES OF CxVLIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 
A. L. A. 
Headquarters. 

86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Cooperative Binding Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futernick Co., 444 Bryant st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases and Shelving. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 
Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes — Continued. 
Corrugated Paper Cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 
Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th St., New York, N. Y. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co. 600-610 E. 

Second St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome St., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
Democrat Printing Co., IMadisou, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif, 



vol. 23, no. 2] directory for library supplies, etc. 



153 



Book Supports, Etc. — Continued. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 
Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5th ave.. New 

York City. 
Chivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 

St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

For books in Chivers binding. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave.. 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Levinson's, The Book Store, 1012 K st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235 Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave.. 
New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York. N. Y. 

Technical Book Co., 525 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Handles only technical books. 
Union Library Association, 118-120 E. 

25th St., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 149 New Montgomery 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant 
avp. and Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 



Books — Continued. 
Ea'glish Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. lOtli 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown. 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 

Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. lOth 

St., New York, N. Y. 
E. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray st.. New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westermann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 

Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 

France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

8 punish . 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew Bender & Co., 109 State st., 

Albany, N. Y. 

vScHOOL Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 5.54 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 149 
New Montgomery st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 



154 



NEWS NOTES OF CALTFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Books — Continued. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Browu, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th st.. New 

York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 
Especially Calif orniana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M.-De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th st., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second St., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial St., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
McKee &. Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 



Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. — 

Continued. 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Bandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York. N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Films. 

For Rent. 

American Red Cross Films, distributed 

by University of California Library, 

Berkeley, Calif. 
Fox Film Corporation, New York, N. Y. 
National Producers Film Service, 111 

Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non- Theatrical 

Dept., 985 Market st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. • 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, c/o Akron Public 
Librai-y, Akron, Ohio. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Distributors), 39 Second st., San 
Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter St., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



vol. 23, no. 2] directory for library supplies, etc. 



155 



Globes. 

Deiio.ver-(Teppert Co., 5235—7 Raveus- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st.. New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los- Angeles, Calif. 

iVIagazines. 

See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 B. 43d st.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi- Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



I 



Paste. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st.. New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg.. New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave.. New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pacific News Bureau, 643 S. Olive st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 657 Howard 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 
Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pictures, 
Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France., 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 
Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 



156 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Pictures — Continued. 
Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st.. 

New York, N. Y. 

(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Cliipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus St., 

Stockton, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Distributors), 39 Second 'st., San 

Francisco, and 757 S. Los Angeles 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Signs. 

Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 
Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Movie Slides. 

Victor Animatograph Co., Davenport, 
Iowa. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 
See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 832 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 

Calif. 



Stereoscopic Views — Continued. 
George E. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For California wild flowers, marine life, iiistoric 
views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 420 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and Oil J St., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 

See, also, this publication, p. 138. 

University of California School of Li- 
brarianship. For full information write 
to Chairman, School of Librarianship, 
University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, Carl B. Roden, Librarian, 
Public Library, Chicago, 111. 

1st Vice President, Charles H. Comp- 
ton, Asst. Librarian, Public Library, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

2d Vice President, Charles E. Rush, 
Librarian, Public Library, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Secretary, Carl H. Milam, Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, John T. Fitzpatrick, Law Li- 
brarian, New York State Library, Albany, 
N. Y. 

1st Vice President, John J. Daley, 
Librarian, Law Society of Upper Canada 
Library, Toronto, Canada. 

2d Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 



vol. 23, no. 2] directory for library supplies, etc. 



157 



Librarian, Louisiana Sta*:e Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lucile Vernon, 
Association of the Bar, 42 W. 44th st., 
New York City. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1928 are : 

Northern Section — Dorothy M. Clark, 
John C. Fremont High School, Oakland, 
President. 

Gladys English, Piedmont High School. 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

Southern Section — Hope L. Potter, 
South Pasadena High School, President. 

Katherine Folger, Lincoln High School, 
Los Angeles, Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

Officers for 1927-29 are: 

President, Clarence B. Lester, Secre- 
tary, Wisconsin Library Commission, 
iMadison, Wis. 

1st Vice President, Mrs Lillian B. 
Griggs, Secretary and Director, North 
Carolina Library Commission, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

2d Vice President, Herbert Killam, Sec- 
retary British Columbia Public Library 
Commission, Victoria, British Columbia. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Clara F. Baldwin, 
Director of Library Division, Minnesota 
S*ate Department of Education, St. Paul, 
Minn . 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, Henry E. Dunnack, Libra- 
rian, Maine State Library, Augusta, 
Maine. 

1st Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 
Librarian, Louisiana State Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

2d Vice President, Mrs Mary E. Frank- 
hauser, Librarian, Michigan State Li- 
brary, Lansing, Mich. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Irma A. Watts, 
Reference Librarian, Pennsylvania Legis- 
lative Reference Bureau, Harrisburg, Pa. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, Joanna H. Sprague, Li- 

4— 5S7S:J 



brarian. Public Library, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

1st Vice President, .Jacqueline Noel, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

2d Vice President, E. Ruth Rockwood, 
Library Association of Portland, Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Secretary, Helen Johns, Librarian, Pub- 
lic Library, Longview, Washington. 

Treasurer, Ora L. Maxwell, Public 
Library, Spokane, Washington. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, Francis E. Cady, Research 
Library, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Rose L. Vormel- 
ker, Librarian, White Motor Co., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are : 

President, C. H. Judson, Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. 

Vice President, O. W. Wyatt, Cali- 
fornia-Havs-aiian Sugar Refining Co. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs Agnes Rei- 
nero, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, .Josephine B. Hollingsworth, 
Municipal Department, Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library, Los Angeles. 

Vice President, Rose M. P u r c e 1 1. 
Southern California Edison Company. 
Los Angeles. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs Helen D. 
Townsend, Barlow Medical Ijibrary, Los 
Angeles. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 
President, Helen E. Mackay, Pasadena. 
Vice President, Dorotha Davis, Fresno. 
Secretary, May Dornin, University of 
California, Berkeley. 

Treasurer, Lillian Hyde, San Francisco. 



158 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
branch of their work. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 
be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a library that fills a posi- 
tion for which it lias asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Library at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento, California. 



FOR SALE. 

U. S. Surgeon-General's office. 

Index catalogue of the library of the 
Surgeon-General's ofiice, U. S. army ; 
authors and subjects. Wash., Govt, 
print, office, 1880-1922. 

First series: vol. 1-16 (1880-95). 

Second series: vol. 1-21 (1896-1916). 

Third series: vol. 1-3 (1918, 20, 22). 

The volumes are all in good condition 
and the price is open, depending upon 
what the purchaser thinks they are 
worth. 

Address JNIrs Lois H. McVeigh, Com- 
monwealth Club of California, 345 Sutter 
St., San Francisco. 



vol. 23, no. 2; 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



159 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento. 

Vice President, Eleanor Hitt, San 
Diego County Free Library, San Diego. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Mrs J. Wells Smith, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Miss E. Kate Rea, Trustee 
Public Library, Anaheim. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 

President, Cornelia D. Plaister, Public 
Library, San Diego. 

A. L. A. Representative. 

Charles F. Woods, Riverside. 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Bakersfield, 
Alternate. 

COiVlMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice President, Secretary-Treasurer and 
Gretchen Flower, Margaret Girdner, 
Mrs Frances Bums Linn, Everett R. 
Peri-y, Robert Rea, Susan T. Smith. 

Committee to Prepare Exhibit for 
Pacific Southivest Exposition — Mrs The- 
odora R. Brewitt, Public Library, Long 
Beach, chairman ; Jean D. Baird, Mrs 
Faith Holmes Hyers, WUlis H. Kerr. 

The remaining committees and officers 
for 1928-29 M^ill be announced in the 
July issue of Netos Notes of California 
Libraries. 

Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 

First District, Nathan Van Patten ; 
Second District, Edna Holroyd ; Third 
District, Muriel Wright ; Fourth District, 
Sarah E. McCardle ; Fifth District, 
Nancy Laugenour; Sixth District, Mabel 
Inness ; Seventh District, Ida M. Reagan ; 
Eighth District, Edith Gantt; Ninth 
District, Frances Burket. 

(These vsrere the nominators selected 
to act at the annual meeting of 1928. 
As all of them were elected since the last 
issue of News Notes of California Libra- 
ries, they are given here as a matter of 
record. ) 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

An account of the Annual Meeting will 
be printed in this publication for .July, 
1928. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 
First District Meeting. 

The 1928 meeting of the First District 
of the California Library Association was 
held Saturday, Mai'ch 24, at the Athens 
Athletic Club, Oakland, John B. Kaiser, 
District President, presiding. 

The morning session was devoted to a 
discussion of "Further professional edu- 
cation of employed staff members." Boyd 
Rakestraw, Assistant Director of the Ex- 
tension Division of the University of 
California, opened the meeting with a 
description of the plan of organization 
of the extension division. Announcement 
was made of the course now being offered 
in San Francisco of "Cataloging and 
classification" and in Oakland on the 
"History of printing." The Extension 
Division plans to offer additional courses 
in the future. Professor Sydney B. 
Mitchell, Director of the School of Li- 
brarianship at the LTniversity of Cali- 
fornia, explained the organization of the 
school. Beginning in August, 1928, the 
school plans to offer second year work 
leading to a Master of Arts degree. 
Courses offered for second year work 
may be elected by part-time students- 
Advanced courses will be offered in the 
summer beginning in 1929. The School 
of Librarianship will cooperate with the 
extension division in planning courses. 
Mrs Elizabeth Madison, Director of 
School Libraries of Oakland, emphasized 
the need of the librarian to be well in- 
formed regarding new movements in 
thought and science. She encouraged the 
"second timer" going back to study again 
to investigate particularly the social ad- 
vances made since her college or library 
school days. 

Dr William G. Eggleston, President 
of the Board of Library Directors, pre- 
sented the point of view of the library 
trustee in regard to training. He empha- 
sized the importance of having an edu- 



160 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIEORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



cated, well-trained staff. Dr Eggleston 
advocates a policy of leaves-of-absence 
for study. 

Charles C. DeWolf, Secretary of tlie 
Oakland Civil Service Board, spoke of 
the Oakland ruling in regard to leaves- 
of-absence for special study or travel. 
These are provided for without pay for 
a period not exceeding one year. Leaves 
are granted upon the written request of 
the employee, approved by the library 
and the civil service boards. 

Robert Rea, Librarian of the San Fran- 
cisco Public Library, outlined the civil 
service plan used by the San Francisco 
Public Library. After the candidates 
are carefully selected they are given pro- 
bationary appointments for the period of 
one year. During this time they are 
under close observation and an attempt 
is made to train them in the work of the 
various departments. At the end of the 
year about one-third of these "proba- 
tioners" are dropped. Mr Rea feels that 
the University extension will be of great 
value. 

Miss Mary F. Murphy, of the staff of 
the San Francisco Public Library, spoke 
from the point of view of a library assist- 
ant desiring additional training. The 
Extension division course now offered has 
been made available first to the older 
members of the staff. The enrollment 
has been limited to twenty-five. Miss 
Murphy reports that other coui'ses, par- 
ticularly in reference work, are desirable. 
The organization of the library is such 
that the assistant is not able to be fa- 
miliar with the duties of other depart- 
ments than her own. Miss Grace 
Ransome of the Oakland Free Library 
staff mentioned the fact that i-egular li- 
brary school was out of the question for 
many, not only because of the financial 
element but because many assistants are 
not college graduates. University ex- 
tension will partially fulfill the need. 

Miss Susan T. Smith of Sacramento 
spoke as a representative of the C. L. A. 
certification committee. The importance 
of correlation between certification and 
placement is realized by the committee. 
The library certificate is of distinct value 
in securing a position, or a person to fill 
a position. 

Morning session adjourned. 



Luncheon was served at the Athens 
Athletic Club to 124 guests. The Presi- 
dent of the distiict presided. He intro- 
duced Dr Frederick Hunter, Superintend- 
ent of Schools of Oakland and President- 
elect of the University of Denver. Dr 
Hunter spoke briefly of the valuable edu- 
cational service of librai*ies. The guest 
of honor, Dr Katharine Newell Adams, 
President of the Constantinople College 
for Women, told of social and economic 
conditions in the New Turkey. 

The afternoon session was opened with 
a fine paper by Miss Mabel W. Thomas, 
Assistant Librarian, Oakland Free Li- 
brary, giving an "Historical survey of 
local bibliographical work." Miss Thomas 
told of printed and manuscript bibliog- 
raphies of the holdings of Bay District 
libraries and cooperative check lists of 
serials that have been proposed but not 
yet compiled. 

Miss Nella J. Martin of the University 
of California Library proposed a survey 
of special collections in the various 
libraries. She too suggested a cooperative 
serial check list. The need for a list of 
available municipal publications was men- 
tioned by Miss Martin and also by Miss 
Alice Hays, Reference Librarian of Stan- 
ford University, who was the next 
speaker. This speaker also suggested that 
the Hasse bibliography of Economic Mate- 
rial in Documents of the States of the 
United States should be brought up to 
date. She, too, proposed a serial check 
list, using serial in its widest sense to 
include newspapers and annuals. 

John Howell of San Francisco told of 
California bibliographies that have been 
compiled. The Wagner and Cowan bib- 
liographies are out of print and new 
enlarged editions are needed. Mr Howell 
showed facsimiles of pages from his own 
fine collection of Bibles. 

Sydney B. Mitchell believes that the 
second year students of the School of 
Librarianship may be able to compile 
bibliographies that will partially meet the 
needs of the Bay District. 

Milton J. Ferguson concluded the pro- 
gram with an address in which he told of 
his trip to Europe last summer. He told 
how the mysteries of the British Museum 
stacks were unfolded to him. His ac- 
count of his entrance and exit from the 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



161 



Bibliotheque Nationale revealed library 
practices in France. 

At the business meeting Nathan Van 
Patten was elected Nominator, with Miss 
Jane Isabel Curtis as Alternate. Miss 
Alice M. Healy reported for the C. L. A. 
Membership Committee. 

The following- motions were carried : 

That the First District urge the com- 
pilation of a bibliography of the writings 
of Miss Ina Coolbrith and of the articles 
about her. (The Nominator was asked 
to carry this suggestion to the C. L. A. 
meeting.) 

That a committee be appointed to con- 
sider the question of further professional 
training of employed staff members. 
(Committee to be named later.) 

That a committee be appointed to con- 
sider bibliographic needs of the Bay 
Region. 

Floea B. Ludington, Secretary. 

Second District Meeting. 

The Second District meeting of the 
California Library Association was held 
at the State Teachers College in San 
Jose on February 18, 1928, under the 
direction of Mrs Elizabeth Singletary, 
president, and Miss Joyce Backus, secre- 
tary. The meeting was opened with a 
short business meeting at which Miss 
Edna Holroyd was elected the nominator 
for the Second District and Mrs Single- 
tary the alternate. 

John Brokenshire, city editor of the 
San Jose Mercury, the speaker at the 
morning session, called attention to the 
striking similarity in the function of the 
newspaper and the library. Both, he 
said, could be adequately described with 
the same words, seiTing as a medium for 
information, education, entertainment 
and inspiration. He discussed the origin 
and development of newspaper practice 
and outlined newspaper ethics. In con- 
nection with newspaper practices he in- 
dicated how librarians might cooperate 
with newspapers in the matter of pub- 
licity. Although holding indefensible the 
practice sometimes resorted to of "playing 
up" beyond all proportion to their value 
as news, sordid details of sensational 
news happenings, Mr Brokenshire made 
it clear that it is part of the newspaper's 
obligation to present to its subscribers a 
complete record of the happenings of the 



day, a record which necessarily had its 
unpleasant as well as pleasant incidents. 
In this connection he quoted Herbert B. 
Swope, executive editor of the New York 
World, who in a recent address described 
the newspaper as a "reflection of life in 
ink." "The important thing is not to 
ask 'is the reflection a pretty one?' but 
rather 'is it a true one?' " 

After luncheon, served by the home 
making department of the college, Dr 
T. W. MacQuarrie, president of the 
Teachers College was the first speaker. 
He spoke of the cooperation between 
schools and libraries and of the work of 
the school librarian. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
transported his hearers to England and 
the continent with him while he reviewed 
his recent trip there. The first library 
visit was in Paris at the Bibliotheque 
Nationale and the American Library, 
under the directorship of Dr Stevenson. 
Visits to the British Museum and other 
libraries of England were described. The 
library tour was concluded with a bus 
trip to Edinburgh and numerous recep- 
tions, all conducted with military pre- 
cision under the supervision of Col. 
Mitchell. 

Miss Hess, local book woman, gave in- 
teresting reviews of a group of new books 
and Miss Winifred Estabrook, librarian 
of Theodore Roosevelt Junior High 
School, delighted her audience with a 
group of songs. 

At the close of the meeting tea was 
served by local librarians. 

Joyce Backus, Secretary. 

Third and Fifth Districts Meeting. 

A joint meeting of the Third and 
Fifth districts of the California Library 
Association was held Saturday, March 10, 
1928, at Woodland in the new annex of 
the Woodland Public Library. 

The meeting was opened with a wel- 
come by Miss Nancy Laugenour, presi- 
dent of the Fifth District, who occupied 
the chair during the morning session. 
The minutes of the last meeting were 
read and approved. Miss Nancy Lauge- 
nour was appointed nominator for the 
Fifth District, with Miss Beulah Mumm 
as alternate. Miss Muriel Wright was 
appointed nominator for the Third Dis- 
trict, with Miss Clara Dills as alternate. 



162 



XEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



E. C. Stowe of the Woodland Mail 
read a paper. "What is news," and an 
iuforjnal discussion of the subject fol- 
lowed. Miss Cornelia Provines gave an 
entertaining demonstration of a new 
book strap. 

The meeting then adjourned until two 
o'clock, at which time Miss Muriel 
Wright, president of the Third District, 
presided. 

A luncheon was served to the libra- 
rians at the Methodist church. Mrs 
Freeman, "ninety years yo\ing" and the 
pioneer of library work in Woodland, 
gave a delightful talk to the group. 

At the opening of the afternoon meet- 
ing, a musical program by pupils of the 
Woodland grammar and high schools was 
much enjoyed. 

Milton J. Ferguson. State Librarian, 
his subject "Books to Bum," spoke on 
the futility of burning books to bury 
their ideas, and touched on some of the 
instances of the matter. He stressed the 
growing cooperation between the libra- 
ries and the bookstores, and recalled 
some of his experiences in England delv- 
ing into their many interesting book- 
stalls. 

A most interesting talk by Sydney 
Herschell Small, Marin County author, 
on "Reading and Juvenile Delinquency," 
brought out the direct connection be- 
tween the reading of the delinquent and 
his life. He also gave a resume of the 
pre-delinquency work being done by 
Pi-ofessor Terman, which was of great 
interest to the listeners. 

Miss Clara Dills spoke on club work, 
and how it gave much publicity to the 
county libraiT and furthered the develop- 
ment of reading in the county through 
specified courses of study. 

Mrs Lydia Lawhead, president of the 
Northern District of Women's Clubs, also 
spoke briefly on the clubs and how much 
they were interested in librai-y work. 

An invitation to tea at the home of 
Mrs A. W. MorrLs was extended to the 
group which adjourned to gather there 
for an infonnal hour. 

Mbs Irma Bktjton, 

Secretary Fifth District. 

Mbs Doeothy L. Wobden, 
"' ~ Secretary Third District. 



Fourth District Meeting. 

The Fourth District Meeting of the 
California Library Association was 
called to order at 10 :30 o'clock on 
March 21, 1928, by Miss Sarah E. 
McCardle, in the auditorium of the 
Parlor Lecture Club of Fresno. W. A. 
Collins, chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors, gave an address of welcome to the 
114 members of the Fourth District who 
were present. After Miss McCardle had 
added her cordial welcome to that of 
Mr Collins, the business of the meeting 
was taken up. The minutes of the pre- 
ceding meeting at Visalia were read and 
approved. Miss McCardle was unani- 
mously elected nominator for this dis- 
trict, and Miss Bessie Silverthom was 
made alternate. 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Librarian of 
Kern County Free Library, urged every- 
one to join the California Library Asso- 
ciation. Miss McCardle supported her 
request and explained how it happens 
that Fresno County Free Library boasts 
of a 100 per cent membership to this 
organization. She also made a plea for 
a larger membership to the American 
LibraiT Association. 

Dr Hubert Phillips, Dean of Liberal 
Arts at the Fresno State College, then 
gave a very thought-provoking talk on 
"Censorship and the scholar." After 
pointing out some of the absurdities of 
censorship, he stressed the fact that the 
worship of the printed page is unfortu- 
nate, for the fact that a statement 
appears in a book does not necessarily 
make it true. He doubted that there is 
such a thing as an "expert" opinion on 
a book, for the opinions of individuals 
differ so greatly. 

Luncheon was served shortly after 
twelve o'clock in the Parlor Lecture Club 
dining room to 116 guests. 

After luncheon the guests of the Fresno 
County Free Library were entertained 
by the entire staff. "Manchon and Farco 
Library Ideas" was presented. Every 
department of the library was repre- 
sented. The order of their appearance, 
the lines spoken by the pages who 
announced the arrival of each group, as 
well as the original words to several 
popular song hits, appeared in the libret- 
tos which had been distributed among 
the audience. It was a performance 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



163 



which baffles description in a few words. 
The unique feature, however, was that 
every part, even to the musicians and 
the directors, was filled by a member of 
the Fresno staff. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
then gave us a "Little libraiy talk" 
touching upon the system of county libra- 
ries as he found it on his visit to Edin- 
burgh last year ; also upon some of the 
things which he saw that impressed him, 
and some of the people that he met. Mr 
Ferguson stated that he would not be 
happy until we had covered the remain- 
ing twelve counties of California which 
do not have county libraries. He ex- 
pressed his belief in the fact that every- 
one should at some time make some con- 
tribution to the profession of which he is 
a part. He mentioned his anticipated 
trip to South Africa, concluding with the 
statement that he hoped we would all be 
glad to welcome him home after his 
sojourn. 

D. Ashley Hooker, Reference librarian 
of Kern County Free Library, then gave 
an excellent paper on the topic, "Not by 
Zane Grey alone," which concerned itself 
with some of the most important refer- 
ence books. 

Miss Bessie Silverthorn, County Libra- 
rian of Stanislaus County, read us some 
quaint selections from "Mrs Child's Cook 
Book" when she discussed the subject, 
"When flaming youth was young, Mag- 
gie." This cook book contains not only 
a delicious recipe for roast pig, but also 
bits of philosophy, discussions of the 
customs of the times, the "flaming youth" 
of the period, the foolishness of travel for 
people of moderate means, etc. In short, 
although the book was published 92 years 
ago, the problems taken up are for the 
most part very modem. 

Reverend Richard H. Trojan, pastor 
of the First Lutheran Church of Fresno, 
sang a group of songs which were greatly 
enjoyed. 

The last speaker on the program was 
George A. Osborn, editor of the Fresno 
Morning Repuhlican, who spoke on "The 
librai-y and the newspaper." He gave 
some timely and useful suggestions for 
library advertising, mentioning his policy 
in dealing with the various types of news 
that come to his attention. 

Harrison Leussler, representing Hough- 



ton Mifflin Company, asked the president 
permission to make an announcement at 
this time. He announced that a series 
of book talks would be broadcast from 
station KPO beginning in May. They 
will be given on every Wednesday from 
7 to 7 :15 o'clock in the evening. 

The Fourth District Meeting was then 
adjourned, and tea was served by some 
of the Fresno County Free Library staff. 
MiNA E. Keller, Secretary. 

Sixth District Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Sixth Dis- 
trict of the California Librai-y Associa- 
tion was held at the Contemporary 
Club House, Redlands, on February 25, 
1928. Miss Mabel Inness, president of 
the Sixth District and Librarian of the 
A. K. Smiley Public Library, presided. 

Kirke H. Field, president of the board 
of trustees of the A. K. Smiley Public 
Library, welcomed the visitors and spoke 
briefly on "What the librarian can do 
for the community." He stressed the 
importance of librarians as educators in 
the community. In speaking of their 
responsibilities, he urged the librarians 
to guide the public in their reading 
tastes. 

Mrs Frances B. Linn, of Santa Bar- 
bara, president of the California Library 
Association, gave a brief talk and re- 
minded the members of the annual meet- 
ing to be held in Riverside, April 3—5, 
1928. 

Two vocal solos were given by Prof. 
W. B. Olds, of the University of Red- 
lauds, both being his own compositions. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
in speaking infonnally on "The Edin- 
burgh Conference," told many interesting 
experiences of the convention. He made 
special mention of his visit to the Biblio- 
theque Nationale in Paris and the Brit- 
ish Museum in London. 

Reminiscences of "Early Days" was 
given by Dr Frank P. Hill, Librarian of 
the Brooklyn Public Library, who has 
been in the library profession for so. 
many years. He mentioned the first 
Amei'ican Library Association meeting he 
attended at Buffalo in 1883 where only 
72 members were present, and the 1926 
meeting at Philadelphia, which was the 
largest conference of the American Li- 
brary Association. Dr Hill also gave 



164 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



some interesting comments on the Edin- 
burgh Conference. 

Dr Hartley Burr Alexander, professor 
of philosophy at Scripps College, Clare- 
mont, was the final speaker at the morn- 
ing session. He gave some very interest- 
ing views on the organization of books 
in a library which he thought would be 
ideal for students. He suggested collect- 
ing all the works of one writer after his 
death and placing them together instead 
of arranging them by classifications. 
Another ideal arrangement, according to 
Dr Alexander, would be to group books 
on the shelves by periods of culture. 
Mention was made of the great interest 
in philosophy in southern California. A 
number of good books on the subject were 
recommended by him, but he advised the 
beginner to read Franklin, Emerson and 
James before attempting the works of 
professional philosophers. Imagination 
is necessary in the study of philosophy 
to derive any good from it. It is a sub- 
ject which touches every field of knowl- 
edge. 

During the luncheon hour short talks 
were given by visiting writers. Leslie 
Hood of Pasadena acted as toastmaster 
and introduced the following speakers : 
Pauline Stiles, Charles S. Brooks, Bruce 
McDaniel, Earl D. Biggers, Maj George 
W. Kirkman. and Anne Shannon Monroe. 

A short business meeting was held 
following the luncheon. Miss Mabel 
Inness. Librarian of the A. K. Smiley 
Public Library, was unanimously chosen 
as nominator for the Sixth District, and 
Miss Margaret E. Livingston of Orange 
County Free Library, was named 
alternate. 

Miss Jasmine Britton of Los Angeles, 
membership chainnan, made an appeal 
for new members to the California 
Library Association and the American 
Library Association. 

The afternoon session was devoted to 
round table discussions. The leader of 
the circulation discussion group was 
Blanch L. Unterkircher of Los Angeles 
Public LibraiT. Mary Oxley, of the 
Pasadena Public Library, led the school 
and children's librarians round table. 
Frances R. Foote, Los Angeles Public 
Library, was the leader of the discussion 
of cataloging problems. The college and 
reference round table was led by Willis 



H. Kerr, of Pomona CoUege Librai-y. 
Dr Constantine M. Panunzio, professor of 
social economics, Whittier College, spoke 
on "The Trend of college teaching and 
the library implications thereof." 

During the day many librarians took 
the opportunity to visit the A. K. Smiley 
Public Library. 

Myktle L. Danielson, Secretary. 

Seventh District Meeting. 

The Seventh District of the California 
Library Association held its annual meet- 
ing after a delightful dinner at the Hotel 
Vance, Eureka, March 9, 1928. 

The District President, Henry A. Ken- 
dall followed out the idea suggested by 
Mrs Linn to make "Publicity" the sub- 
ject of our program. 'SVe were very for- 
tunate in having Maurice Hicklin, head 
of Departments of English and Journal- 
ism at the Humboldt State Teachers Col- 
lege, who has had six years practical 
journalistic experience, as our principal 
speaker. In addition we had a represen- 
tative from each of our local newspapers, 
J. M. Tadloek, news editor of the Hum- 
boldt Times, and Miss Ru-Flo Harijer, 
society reporter for the Humboldt Stand- 
ard. These talks were followed by a 
round table discussion, many questions 
were asked by members of the association 
and the answers will prove very instruc- 
tive for future library publicity. 

At the close of the general meeting a 
short executive session was held. Miss 
Ida M. Reagan was elected nominator to 
represent the Seventh District at the an- 
nual meeting of the Association, and Miss 
Edna D. Davis was elected alternate. 

Georgia A. Davis, Secretary. 

Ninth District Meeting. 

The Ninth District of the California 
Library Association met at Marysville 
City Library, Saturday, March 3, 1928. 

The meeting was opened with a wel- 
coming address by Miss Frances Burket, 
President of the District, followed by dis- 
cussions on "Better books for the 'teen 
age," Mrs Ira Jones, custodian Los 
Molinos Branch, Tehama County Free 
Library ; "Evei-ything and anything," 
Mrs Norah Locey, custodian Durham 
Branch, Butte County Free Library ; 
"Building the circulation," Mrs W. W. 
Koehler, custodian Ord Branch, Glenn 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSO'GIATION. 



165 



County Free Library ; "Work with the 
Clubs," Mrs Alice Reische, custodian, 
Meridian Branch, Sutter County Free 
Library. 

A short business meeting concluded the 
morning session. Miss Frances Burket, 
Sutter County Free Library, was elected 
uorninator for the Ninth District ; Mrs 
Edith Simons, Oroville Public Library, 
alternate. 

A luncheon was served at the Hotel 
Marysville for sixty-two representatives. 
Dorothy Gallatin played several selections 
on the piano ; Mayor Kynoch greeted the 
visiting librarians and guests. 

INIiss Burket opened the afternoon ses- 
sion by presenting A. A. MacMullen of 



the Sutter Independent who gave an in- 
formal talk on the "Value of publicity 
and the library." Samuel Levinson of 
Sacramento, read an excellent paper on 
the history of books from the "Stone age" 
to modern method of printing, book bind- 
ing, book selling and book buying. Milton 
J. Ferguson, State Librarian, concluded 
the program with an entertaining, profit- 
able address which covered a wide range 
from humorous experiences during his 
European trip, to practical suggestions 
for library work. Tea was served in the 
California room by the Executive Boai*d 
of the Marysville Art Club. 

Mary Rolls-Hatch, Secretary. 



I 



166 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Milton J. Ferguson, Ex-ofEcio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano County. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange 
County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 



COUNTY LIBRARIANS' ANNUAL 
MEETING. 

An account of the annual meeting will 
be printed in the next number of this 
publication. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS SECTION, 
A. L. A. 

Sarah E. McCardle is a member of the 
committee that is arranging the program 
for the County Librarians section of the 
A. L. A. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



167 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
accounts of meetings of the various 
library clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

EAST BAY LIBRARY COUNCIL. 

The Ea.st Bay Librai-y Council was 
formed in the fall of 1920. It is' a lunch- 
eon gathering held once a month and its 
membership is made up of the library 
people of the East Bay District. Any 
librarian who is in the East Bay at the 
time of meeting which is the second 
Wednesday of each month is always cor- 
dially welcome to attend. The luncheons 
this year are being held at the Athens 
Athletic Club of Oakland and the officers 
are : President, Mary Barmby and Secre- 
tary. Jean D. Baird. 

The "raison d'etre" is promoting socia- 
bility among people of the profession. 
There is always a good speaker so the 
meetings are profitable as well as social. 
Mary Barmby, President. 

SCHOOL AND LIBRARY COUNCIL. 

A new organization developed in Oak- 
land is the School and Library Council 
which meets twice a month to discuss 
problems in the relationship of the Public 
Library and the Public School Library. 
Mr W. P. Ewing, Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Schools in Oakland is Chair- 
man, and Mr John B. Kaiser of the Oak- 
land Free Library, Secretary. Mrs 
Madison, Oakland School Library Direc- 
tor, Mr George Mortensen, Chairman 
of the Oakland School Principa;ls Group, 
INIiss ]Mary Barmby, Alameda County Li- 
brarian, Miss L. Nye, Head of Branches, 
Oakland Public Library, and Miss N. 



JNIorgan, Head of the Children's Depart- 
ment, compose the membership. An at- 
tempt has been made to arrive at some 
plan for disposition of objectives between 
the Public Libraries and the Public 
School Libraries ; common understanding 
of financial resources ; the study of chil- 
dren's needs. Methods used in other 
cities such as Detroit, Cleveland and 
Denver have been brought up for obser- 
vation. This group endeavor is extremely 
interesting and profitable, and I think it 
marks the path of future advance in our 
work. 

Elizabeth Madison, 
Director of School Libraries. 

ORANGE COUNTY LIBRARY CLUB. 

The regular quarterly meeting of the 
Orange County Library Club was held 
Friday afternoon, March 16, in the Chil- 
dren's Room of the FuUerton Library. 
The program was in charge of the various 
library assistants and took the form of 
an original playlet, setting forth in 
humorous form many phases of their 
work. The meeting closed with a dinner 
at the Mission Inn. — Placentia Courier, 
Mr 22 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION. 

The Special Libraries Association of 
Southern California is compiling correc- 
tions and additions to the "Union List 
of Periodicals in Southern California" for 
possible publication in the near future. 
Public and other libraries in Southern 
California are invited to cooperate in 
making the list as complete as possible. 



168 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. G. a commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be knowu as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and couniy of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he has received from the 
board of library examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

No meeting of the board has been held 
this quarter. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Lila (Dobell), Ln. Trinity 

County Free Library, Weaverville. 
Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 

City. 
Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfleld. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. (Life certificate.) 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, Evalyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, El (jentro. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Tuba City. 
Coulter, Mabel, Ln. Lange Library of 

Education, Berkeley. 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Clommission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

E. Dalton, Asst. University of California 

Library, Berkeley. 
Dambacher, Mrs Helen (Rowland), Mrs 

Gustav Dambacher, Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonora. 



Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Butte 

County Free Library, Oroville. 
Eudey, Mrs Henrietta G., Mrs Fred Eudey, 

Asst. Amador County Free Library, 

Jackson. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 

Free Library, Salinas. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera. 
Gantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo County 

Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 
Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 

Library and Kings County Free Library, 

Hanford. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Harris, Mary W., Asst. Louisiana Library 

Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James White Herrman, Asst. San Diego 

Public Library. (Life certificate.) 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. (Life 

certificate.) 
Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Jose. 
Jones, Louise E., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 

Library, Los Angeles. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 

oara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa. 

Barbara. 
Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 

Free Library, Susanville. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 
Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Public Library, 

Seattle, Wn. 



vol. 23, no. 2] board op library examiners, California. 



169 



Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 

Morse, Mrs Ella (Packer), Mrs Guy 
Morse, Ln. Colusa County Free Library, 
Colusa. 

Morse, Marion, Ln. Honolulu Academy 
of Arts, Honolulu, T. H. 

Mumra, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Parkinson, H. O., Asst. Public Library, 
New York. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Pro vines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 
(Life certificate.) 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Stockebrand, Frances, Ln. Siskiyou 
County Free Library, Yreka. 

Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 
Free Library, Merced. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 
Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen B., Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., First Asst. Ln. Public 
Library, Los Angeles. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 
County Free Library, Hollister. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 
Free Library, Santa Ana. 

Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 
Solano County FYee Library, Fairfield. 

Wright, Muriel, Ln. Marin County Free 
Library, San Rafael. 



Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Glea.son, Celia. (Life certificate.) 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Huntington, Stella. (Life certificate.) 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 
Wheeler, Mrs Blanche (Chalfant), Mrs 

De Forest N. Wheeler. 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold office of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was published in News Notes of 
California Libraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being' exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California 'Libraries, January, 1914. 
This has been reprinted as a pamplilet. 
The fifth edition was issued December. 
1921. (Circular of information only.; 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
1G2.J. Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The next examination will be held at 
the Public Library, Los Angeles, May 18, 
and at the State Library, Sacramento, 
May 21, 1928. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the CJliairman 
of the Board. iSIilton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



170 



^fEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School waa 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1927-29, $302,350. 

Total accessions 278,086 (less 3560 
lost and discarded = 274,526) exclusive of 
21.683 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and 94.986 volumes in the 
Sutro Branch in San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Boolcs for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V. Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Eudora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .L Haines. Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Dora M. Himmelsbach, in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc.. Department. 

Beulah Mnmm. Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Margaret Bennett, Typist (temporary). 

Gladys M. Bowles, Assistant. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark. Indexer. 

Helen Cornell, Assistant. 

Mrs Lenore W. Davidson, Assistant. 

Dorothy Deming, Assistant. 

Margaret Dennison, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite Walker Duggins, Ste- 
nosrapher. 

Dorothy I]arl, Assistant. 

Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st., San Francisco. 

Zilla Grant. Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon, Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill, Assistant. 

i\Irs Alicia Manning Hook, Assistant. 

Marion Knotts, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb. Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look, Assistant. 

Mrs June Vladyka McCaffery, Assistant. 

Anna G. McNamee. Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

D. Florence Montfort. Assistant. 



Catharine J. Morrison. Home Teacher 
of the Blind, 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
.\n^eles. 

Vera Palermo, Assistant. 

Irene E. Ryan. Assistant. 

Irma M. Schoepflin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Mrs Frances L. Smith, Stenographer. 

Lily M. Tilden. Assistant. 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy. As.«istant. 

Mrs .Julia M. Waldron. Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel. Assistant. 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

INIrs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Gladys N. Richards, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
pins Clerk. 

Nancy Anderson, Messenger. 

John Heinrich, Messenger. 

Elyse Schultz, Messenger. 

Arthur Valine, INIessenger. 

.J. L. Foss. Janitor. 

G. A. Klees. Janitor. 

Jacob Misfelt, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Mr Ferguson attended the following 
district meetings of the California Library 
Association during the quarter, making 
talks at all of them : Second District 
at San Jose, February 18 ; sixth at Red- 
lands, February 25 ; ninth at Marysville, 
March 3 ; thii'd and fifth joint meeting 
at Woodland, March 10 ; fourth at 
Fresno, March 21 ; first at Oakland, 
March 24. He also gave talks at clubs 
as follows : at the Sacramento Chapter 
of the National Association of Life 
Underwriters on Cooperation, January 9 ; 
North Sacramento Rotary Club on his 
trip abroad, January 11 ; Lincoln Rotary 
Club on the same subject, January 20 ; 
Sacramento Open Forum on library serv- 
ice, January 23 ; Sacramento Optimist 
Club on his trip abroad, January 26. 

Mr Ferguson attended two meetings of 
the Commission for erecting statues in 
National Statuary Hall, Washington, D. 
C, of which he is an ex-ofBcio member, 
in San Francisco, January 12 and Feb- 
ruary 3. He was also present at the 
ceremonies dedicating the new addition 



vol. 23. no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA State library. 



171 



to the Modesto Public Library building, 
March H, and made a speech there. 

The Carnegie Corporation has chosen a 
British Ijibrarian, S. A. Pitt of Glasgow, 
and an American Librarian, Mr Fer- 
guson, to make a surve.v of South African 
libraries and to suggest a library system 
for that country. Mr Ferguson will leave 
California on this project about the mid- 
dle of July and has been granted a year's 
leave of absence in which to complete 
the work. 

Miss Mumm attended the Second Dis- 
trict, C. L. A. meeting at San Jose Feb- 
ruary 18. Miss Cornell, Miss Gillis, 
Miss Lamb, Miss Mumm and Miss Shadle 
attended the joint meeting of the third 
and fifth districts at Woodland, March 
10. Miss Gillis gave book x-eviews at 
the meetings of the Loomis Women's 
Club on JNIarch 23. Mrs Henshall is 
state chairman of the American Library 
Association Publicity Committee. 

Miss Beatrice Beckley served as tem- 
porary assistant at the loan desk from 
January 30 to March 19. Miss Margaret 
Bennett began as temporary typist on 
January 30 and is still employed in that 
capacity. 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

A staif meeting was held on January 4 
at which the speakers were Dr Frank P. 
Hill, librarian of the Brooklyn Public 
Library, Essae M. Culver, Secretary of 
the Louisiana Librarj' Commission and 
Mr Ferguson, who spoke briefly on the 
South African project. 

Dr Hill spent only one day in Sacra- 
mento. Miss Culver arrived on January 
3 and remained in Sacramento until 
January 7, visiting library friends and 
conferring in regard to the work in 
Louisiana. 

Two visitors from abroad during the 
quarter were Tetsuji Ono, Professor and 
Librarian at Wakayama Higher Com- 
mercial School, and Lecturer at Kyoto 
and Taihoku Imperial L^niversities, 
Japan, and Miss Blin Kardell, Librarian, 
Jemtland Bibliotek, Ostersund, Sweden. 
Mr Ono is being sent by his government 
on a trip around the world to study li- 
braries and schools. Miss Kardell is on 
a year's leave of absence and is attending 
the lectures at the School of Librarian- 
ship, University of California. She came 



direct from Sweden to California, but 
will return by way of the eastern states 
where she will also visit libraries. 

A new edition of Circular of Informa- 
tion for Applicants for Certificates of 
Qualification to hold the oifice of County 
Librarian in California was issued in 
February. 

Through the courtesy of the Don Lee 
Company of San Francisco, radio talks 
on the State Library and the library 
system of California have been given 
weekly, beginning January 18. Talks 
have been written by members of the 
State Library staff and other librarians. 
They are being given by the regular radio 
announcer at the Don Lee station KFp.C. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative session : 



Week days 

Sundays 



._ 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
-_ 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 



The library closes at noon on Satur- 
days during July and August. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER. 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The I.,aw and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the I'nited States. Great Britain. Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
\iduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supi-eme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if reipiired by a state officer, or if. 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent aeces.'--ions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 



172 



XEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Recent accessions of California's State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp. 212 and 217. 

Copies of 35 California State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during January, February 
and March, 1928. 

Adjutant General. Special regulations 

no. 3. 
Agriculture Dept. Monthly bulletin, 

vol. 17, nos. 1—3. 

Special publication, no. 77. 

Agricultural statutes. 1927. 

— 500 ways to cook sea food. 1927. 

Athletic Comm. 3d annual report, 1927. 
Banking Dept. Bulletin, vol. 2, nos. 1-3. 
Chiropractic Examiners Bd. Act regu- 
lating practice. 1927. 

Controllei'. Inheritance tax act. 1927. 
Pvducation Dept. Directory of sec-ondary 

schools, 1927. 
Embalmers Bd. Laws, rules, etc. 1927. 
Health Dept. Laws governing sale of 

eggs. 1927. 
Industrial Accident Comm. Report, 1927. 

Air pressure tank safety orders. 

1928. 

California safety news, vol. 11, 

no. 4 ; vol. 12, no. 1. 

Medical Examiners Bd. Report, 1927. 
Natural Resources Dept. Fish and 

(xame. Div. California Fish and Game, 

vc)]. 14. no. 1. 

Teachers' bulletin no. 9. 

Foresti-y Div. Bulletin no. 7. 

Parks Div. Report on tourist 

travel. 1928. 

Optometry Bd. Report, 1927. 

Public Instruction Supt. School law, 1927. 

Public Works Dept. California high- 
ways and public works, vol. 5, nos. 1—3. 

Engineering & Irrig. Div. Bul- 
letin no. 13. 

Water Rights Div. Shasta River 



adjudication proceedings. 1928. 

Secretary of State. Roster, December 1, 
1927. 

United Spanish War Veterans. Pro- 
ceedings, 1927. 

Veterans" Home. Report, 1927. 

Rules and regulations, 1928. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

PiELLAii Muiiii, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books 10 public libraries on request of 
the librarian, and to any other educa- 
tional institution on request of its official 
head or its librarian ; to individuals 
through the signature of a state officer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the official head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit; to a chib on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 



ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

.Myrti-E RuiiL. in charge. 

During January, February and March 
2325 books, 170 prints and 5 maps were 

accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Muksojs^, in chai-ge. 

During January, February and March 
1455 books were cataloged and 11,056 
cards were added to the file. 24,253 cards 
were iiled in the Union Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

KuuoRA Gaeoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and descriptiou, 
resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioneers and early settlers are 
!:eiu,u- secured, together with their photo- 
^raiihs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about 10,000 bound volumes 
of newspapers, a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
I heir work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Palmer Baker Hewlett was an officer 
in Stevenson's Regiment and arrived on 
the "Susan Drew" in 1847. Later he 
became Brigadier General in the Cali- 
fornia National Guard. By profession he 
was a banker and farmer and a promi- 
nent citizen of the state. His death 
occurred in San Francisco, January 1, 
1896. 

Horace Clark Nutting arrived in 1850 
and became a farmer. He followed this 
occupation practically all of his life. He 
died near Anderson in 1908. 

Other cards received are as follows : 
Charles Stokes, 1849; Mrs Rebecca Nut- 
ting Woodson, 1850; Mr and Mrs John 
Francis Cross, 1852, 1854. 

California Authors. 
The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 
Anderson, Garland 
*Frost, Robert 
*Hestwood, Harold Keith 
Jernegan, Prescott Ford 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



173 



Johnson, James Sydney 
Kilner, William H. B. 
Loomis, Benjamin Franklin 
Russell, Carl Parcher 
Wiley, John L. 
"\^'ilson, Bingham Thoburn 

California Musicians. 
The following musician cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Xotes of California Libraries: 

* Baldwin, Anita 
Smith, Maurice K. 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 
received since the last issue of Neivs 
Notes of California Libraries: 

Cadorin, Ettore 

Randolph, Lee F. 

Rogers, Margaret Esther 

Simpson, Marian 

* Wallace, Mrs Jessie Newcomb (Bell) 

(Mrs Del Wallace) 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

4.58 cards have been added to the Cali- 
fornia catalog din"ing the last quarter. 

Exhibit. 
An interesting exhibit of early Cali- 
fornia material is still maintained in the 
rotunda of the Capitol. 

The Murals in the State Capitol. 
So many inquiries are received con- 
cerning the murals in the rotunda of the 
Capitol that we are printing here a some- 
what abridged copy of a pamphlet issued 
some years ago and now out of print : 

THE STORY OF CALIFORNIA IN 
MURAL PAINTINGS. 

The Legislature of 1913 provided for 
the decoi'ation of the Capitol rotunda 
with mural paintings "depicting histor- 
ical epoch periods" of the State. Arthur 
F. Mathews, of San Francisco, was en- 
gaged for the task. 

To each period the artist has devoted 
a triptych, representing, in order : The 
coming of the ""White Gods," as the 
white men were regarded by the abo- 
rigines; the Spanish occupation and the 
building of the missions ; the inpour of 
civilization following the discovery of 
gold, and the swift industrial develop- 



k 



Native Californians. 
5—58783 



ment of the State; and finally, the 
achievements of civilization in (Jalifornia 
in the present day, and what is to be in 
the future. 

* Definiteness of epochal periods has not 
been maintained, the circle of walls giv- 
ing rare opportunity for a continuity in 
which the painter could the more freely 
develop his theme. The peaceful con- 
quest of the favored land and the tirge 
of worthy endeavor are therefore carried 
forward in a procession of symbolism 
from the first panel to the last. 

In the first panel of the southeast 
(luarter of the rotunda is depicted "The 
Landing of the Gods." The natives, in 
consternation, are holding up their hands 
in attitudes of peace. A more frightened 
Indian, in his uncertainty, has sought 
refuge behind a rock. 

In the second panel comes the Spirit 
of Adventure, in the Knight Errant 
vainly seeking the Fleece, or one of the 
Hospitaller bearing the sword of justice. 
The Angel of Light is carrying the secrets 
of life. The primitive woman with her 
boy but half understands the sympathetic 
touch of the Christian monk behind her. 
She perhaps feels the glamor of the pro- 
cession lieedlessly passing ; she feels but 
does not know. The angel passes silently, 
like a will o' the wisp — still the native 
mother does not know ; nor does she know 
or see the heavily laden bearer who 
swiftly but stoically follows "The Light," 
abrea.st the knight. 

In the third panel is the discovery of 
San Francisco Bay. A handful of Span- 
ish pioneers, soldiers and friars — worn 
by travel and ill with scurvy — discover 
the inland sea. They barely count in 
Inilk with the open country ; still they 
are laying the foundation of a great state 
and its teeming multitudes. 

The next triptych, devoted to the Span- 
ish period, begins with the time when the 
Spanish-Mexican is using California 
chiefly as a grazing land. 

The center panel shows in the back- 
ground the California mission — composite 
of three mission structures — expressive 
(/f the spirit of the Franciscans. In the 
garden in the fore, natives are working 
the soil under the guidance of one of the 
brothers. It is foreordained that both 
may labor as sincerely and arduouslv as 



174 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



they will, but the earth shall soon go back 
to the sere and yellow under their hands, 
for the native is not equal to the task 
set by destiny. The work they do is not 
to be lasting ; it is to pass to others to 
accomplish. 

The Spanish period concludes with the 
giving over of the country to "That 
Other Spirit." The crowd, standing on 
the shore of Monterey Bay and by the 
Spanish custom house, awaits the landing 
of Commodore Sloat and a change of 
nationalization. The Mexican flag is to 
give way to that of the United States of 
America. Native and priest stand some- 
what isolated, for already they have been 
pushed to one side. 

Triptych three is truly, perhaps, the 
head of the procession of the civilizing 
of California. Fortune, whom all men 
pursue, swings in her flight past the abo- 
rigine, who stands, a majestic figure, in 
contemplation of the wild inrush of the 
gold-seekers. The shadow side of the ball 
is toward him ; the swifter, more virile 
race presses close. 

The diseovei*y of gold in the state, pic- 
tured in the left leaf of this triptych, has 
done its work in hastening the inevitable 
— the substitution of one of nature's 
creatures for another in the scheme of 
things, and finally the creation or erection 
of a modern civilization in California, 
typified in the third panel by the modern 
American city and all it means in success 
and failure of our culture, science and 
mechanics. This symbol of a people's 
work is a coarser, a more inchoate prod- 
uct, but is a step toward the Dream City 
of Beauty and Justice which dominates 
the concluding triptych. 

This may, then, in other words, be 
described as representing the consum- 
mate labor of humanity — the end toward 
which the civilization of California is. 
in common with all civilization, striving. 
The first panel, with its cax'efree, joyous 
festival spirit, contrasts with the third 
leaf, which is expressive of achievement 
— of the matured works of old age. In 
the center panel, the city bordering the 
sea forms a setting for the colossal statue 
of Contemplation, at which the worker 
is still laboring — for we are never quite 
sure that a work is accomplished — and 



is the embodiment through the arts of 
human desires. 

The final panel — the Dream City of 
Beauty and Justice, or the goal toward 
which Endeavor is driven by the urge in 
the white man — holds a wealth of sym- 
bolism. The four columns, standing alone 
and strewn about with fragments and 
"improvised" houses or sheds, might be 
the beginning of a new pile, to be created 
for the glorification of a renewed spirit 
of humanity ; or they may be interpreted 
as the remains of a past cult. This panel 
might, therefore, be regarded as both the 
beginning and the end of the story or ring 
of mural paintings. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

P^mbossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
rial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
York point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrowers wishing them for use 
in book selection. 

A catalog of all books in Moon type in 
the Library up to October 1, 1926, and 
one including all books in Braille up to 
April 1, 1927, will be sent to anyone 
requesting it. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 2675 blind bor- 
rowers, 47 borrowers having been added 
during January, February and March. 
Total accessions are 21,683, as follows : 
New York point books, 2712; New York 
point music 186 ; American Braille books 
3040 ; American Braille music 1289 ; 
European Braille books 3537; European 
Braille music 247 ; Esperanto Braille 
books 3 ; Moon books 5122 ; Moon music 
5 ; Revised Braille books 4534 ; Revised 
Braille music 128 ; Standard dot books 
14 ; Line books 193 ; Line music 21 ; Ink 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



175 



print books 487 ; *Appliances 83 ; *Games 
50; Maps 32. 

During January, February and March 
8619 books, etc., were loaned as follows: 
New York point 178; American Braille 
82; European Braille 871; Moon 3377; 
Revised Braille 4102 ; Line ; Ink Print 
; Appliances 2 ; Games 5 ; Maps 2. 
The loans were divided by class as fol- 
lows : Philosophy and religion 529 
sociology 22 ; language 17 ; primers 48 
science 57 ; useful arts 39 ; fine arts 
amusements 10; music 45; literature 89 
fiction 6199; travel and history 283 
biography 368 ; periodicals 913. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by F. B. 
Beans, Mrs Marion Beebe, Joseph Block, 
Mrs C. W. Brett, Mrs H. W. Bruning, 
Mrs H. O. Buker, Anna Courtois, Mrs 
Susie Fancher, Frank Forester, E. M. 
Gebhardt, Mrs V. S. Glafcke, W. M. 
Harper, Ruby Holtz, Mrs H. D. Jones, 
J. R. Lewarton, Manuel Licon, Bessie 
T^ong, Mrs Rose McComb, Joseph Mc- 
Glannon, Mrs Mary Malloy, W. A. Miller, 
Hattie B. Newman, Mrs M. E. Phillips, 
W. J. Ripplinger, Dan Riley, Mrs Alvin 
Rutky, Mrs Georgia Sandifer, Mrs L. 
Sargent, Erastus Savage, George W. 
Shoemaker, J. E. Woodbury, A. P. 
Worrell, American Braille Press for War 
and Civilian Blind, Inc., American Print- 
ing House for the Blind, Board of Mis- 
sions to Deaf Mutes of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio and 
other states, Canadian National Institute 
for the Blind, Christian Record Publish- 
ing Company, Christian Science Publish- 
ing Company, Department of Missions of 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Gospel 
Trumpet Company, Michigan School for 
the Blind, National Institute for the 
Blind, New York Association for the 
Blind, Society for Aid of the Sightless, 
Theosophical Book Association for the 
Blind, Western Pennsylvania School for 
the Blind, Xavier Braille Publishing 
Company, Ziegler Publishing Company. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to 
the library during the last three months. 
See p. 217. 

Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 



♦Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 146 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine J. Morrison, home teacher of 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall of 
Records, every Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
Angeles. Her telephone number is 
Drexel 5339. She gives lessons regularly 
in Los Angeles and vicinity and makes 
occasional trips to San Diego. 

From January 1 to March 31, the 
home teachers gave 693 lessons in the 
homes of the blind and 54 lessons at 
libraries. They made 131 visits and calls 
in connection with the work for purposes 
other than giving lessons, and have 
received 23 visits in connection with the 
work. 

During the quarter . Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 301 hours on corre- 
spondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 464 letters and 186 postals and 
received 358 letters and 34 postals. They 
also answered and made 633 telephone 
calls. They made 4 addresses. Miss 
Foley teaches regularly in Oakland, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
19 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Sutro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Library, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner. '15 

Ln. Torrance High School L., Torrance 
Thelma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J 
Helen V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fairview ave., Los Gatos 
Agnes E. Brown. '15 

Asst. San Mateo High School L., San 

Mateo 
Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Branch, State L., 

San Francisco 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buohan), '20 

1631 Cowper st., Palo Alto 



176 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 

1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
Ruth E. Bullock, '15 

Ln. Belvedere Junior High School L., 

Los Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley 
Marguerite Chatfleld, '20 

Asst. P. Li., Pasadena 
Nellie E. Christensen, '19 

L.n. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Ln. Lange Library of Education, 

Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High Scliool 

L., Watsonville 
Dorotha Davis, '17 

Ln. Fresno High iSchool L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernardi, '18 

The Finch School for Girls, 61 E. 77th 

St., New York City 
Estella De Ford, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829i S. Normandie St., Los Angeles 
Ellen B. Frink, '19 

Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Flo A. Gantz, '20 . 

Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., San 

Luis Obispo 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sacramento 
Margaret V. Girdner. '17 

Ln. Galileo High School, San Francisco 
Mary E. Glock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 

746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H. Hargis), '18 

725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Frank 
U. Harriss), '15 

2330 Larkin St., San Francisco 
Margaret Hatch, '15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner). '18 

1528 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd). '20 

Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 

1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Orton A. Kirschman), '19 

2839 Forest ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Tver 
N. Lawson, Jr.), '18 

3231 Front st., San Diego 
Marjorie C. Learned, '20 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs M. Ruth McLaughlin Lockwood (Mrs 
Ralph L. Lockwood), '17 

1520 Greenwich st., San Francisco 
Amy G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea). '19 

4941 8th ave., Sacramento 



N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy F. 
McDowell). '14 

A.sst. Stanislaus Co. F. L,, Modesto 
Mrs Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 

Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts., 

WaslTington. D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robert K. Meyers), '19 

Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L., 

Tulai'e 
Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse. '17 

Ln. Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hono- 
lulu, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton (Mrs James L. 
Patton), '18 

416 S. Hoover st., Los Angeles 
.Mrs Helen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 

4 8 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. T. 
Mis Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Frederic Percival), '15 

1633 38th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

Ln. Pomona High School and Junior 

College L., Pomona 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

.'Xsst. Lane Medical L., San Francisco 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price). '16 

1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefield Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 

Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohio 
Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 

724 Santa Ynez Way, Sacramento 
Anna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L.. Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour. '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 

Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L.. Sacramento 
Mrs Bernice Goff Simpson (Mrs John R. 
Simpson), '14 

Asst. John Crerar L., Chicago 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). 'IS 

McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith). '17 

1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '20 

3100 19th St., Bakersfield 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Ewart 
Burns Todd), '17 

1860 Green st., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 

Out of librarj'' work 
Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L., Sacramento 
Mrs Blanche Chalfant Wheeler (Mrs De 
Forest Nathaniel Wheeler), '14 

Box 865, San Jose 
Josephine L. Whitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L.. Richmond 
Essie T. MHiite, '19 

Ln. Sacramento High School L., Sac- 
ramento 



vol. 23. no. 2: 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



177 



Mrs Katharine Cahoon "Wilson CMrs Lloyd 
R. Wilson). '17 

1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine Winham, '20 

Asst. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, '15 

Asst. Solano Co. F. L.. Fairfield 
Mrs Bess Rantcn Tates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates), '18 

Asst. P. L. Long Beach 

News Items. 

Miss Mabel Coulter, "14, will leave 
California in April for a three months' 
trip to Europe. She will be accompanied 
by her sister, Miss Edith Coulter of the 
University of California Library. 

^Ir and Mrs Fred Percival (Marion 
Schumacher. '15) have a daughter bom 
March 2. 

Bernice Goff, '14. was married in Chi- 
cago on March 5 to John R. Simpson. 
Mr Simpson is with the Peerless Scales 
Company. Mrs Simpson will begin work 
;it the John Crerar Library about April 1. 
Mr and Mrs Simpson are living at the 
r>oyola Arms Hotel, 1235 Loyola avenue, 
Chicago. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Janu- 
ary, February and March, 1928. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
C al ifo mi a Libra ries . 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the January, 1928, issue of 
this publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 

Adams, Samuel Hopkins. 

Fade-outs of history. [1924] 

X025.7 A21 

AiiEBiCAN library association. 

The trustee and his library. 1927. 

x023 A51 

Beckman. Frederick William. 

Technical writing of farm and home. 
1927. 070 B39 

Cambridge. University. Lihrary. 

Ivules for the catalogues of pnnted 
boolvs, maps & music. 1927. 

x025.3 C17 



CiiUBB, Thomas. 

The printed maps in the atlases of 

Great Britain and Ireland. [1927] 

q016.91 C5 

Dawson's book shop. 

Three outstanding rarities of California 
interest. 1928. c016.09 D27 

Garland. Hamlin. 

The westward march of American set- 
tlement. 1927. (Reading with a pur- 
pose) 028 G23 

Hart, Albert Bushnell. 

George Washington. 1927. (Reading 
with a purpose) 028 H32 

Latimer, Louise Payson. 

Illu.strators, a finding list. 1927. (Bul- 
letin of bibliography pamphlets) 

016.74 L35 

LoGASA, Hannah, comp. 

Historical fiction suitable for junior 
and senior high schools. 1927. (Pub- 
lications of the National council for 
the social studies) 016.8 L83 

Mawson, Christopher Orlando Sylvester. 

Professional book editing. cl926. (The 

ilawson editorial course) 029 M46 

Merrill, Ray March. 

American doctoral dissertations in the 
Romance field, 1876-1926. 1927. 
(Institut des etudes francaises. Pub- 
lications) 016.8 M57 

Newark, N. ,J. Free public library. 
Business books : 1920-1926. 1927. 

r016.658 N53a1 

Ontario library association. 

The Ontaiio library association. A 
historical sketch 1900-1925. 1926. 
X020.6 059 

Gift. 

RoBACK, Abraham Aaron. 

A bibliography of character and per- 
sonality. 1927. 016.12 R62 

RosENBACH, Abraham S. Wolf. 

Books and bidders ; the adventures of 
a bibliophile. 1927. 027.1 R81 

Sanderson, Charles Rupert. 

LibraiT law. 1925. x021.8 S21 

Union list of serials in librai'ies of the 
United States and Canada. 1927. 

rq016.05 U5 



178 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Walpole, Hugh. 

Reading ; being one of a series of essays 
edited by J. B. Priestley and entitled : 
These diversions. 1926. 028 W21 

Wyee, James Ingersoll. 

Reference work. 1927. (Library cur- 
riculum studies prepared under the 
direction of W. W. Charters) 

qx020.7 W9 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Arhedats'anda, swdtni. 

Yedanta philosophy ; three lectures on 
spiritual unfoldment. [1901] 

181 A14 

AvEY, Albert Edwin. 

The function and forms of thought. 
cl927. 160 A95 

Barey', Frederick. 

The scientific habit of thought. 1927. 

153 B27 

Benson, Elizabeth. 

The younger generation. cl927. 

173 B47 

BoGAEDUS, Emoi-y Stephen. 

The city boy and his problems. cl926. 

c173 B67 

BosANQUET, Bernard. 

The principle of individuality and 
value; the Gifford lectures for 1911. 
1912. 126 874 



Science and philosophy. [1927] 

104 874 



Brown, Brian, ed. 

The story of Confucius, his life and 
sayings. cl927. 181.1 887 

Christian ethics; the George Dana 
Boardman lectures, 1927. 171 C55 

Ellis, Havelock. 

A study of British genius. New ed., 
rev. and enl. 1926. 151 E47a 



Gavit, John Palmer. 
"Opium." 1927. 



178.8 G28 



Haeeis, Charles Reginald Schiller. 

Duns Scotus. 1927. 2 v. 189 D92h 

Keyserling, Hermann Alexander, graf 
von. 
The world in the making <Die neuent- 
stehende welt>, translated by Mau- 
rice Samuel. cl927. 193 K44w 



LooMis, Benjamin Franklin. 

Spiritual science of the inner life of 
the macrocosm and the microcosm. 
cl925. c113 L86 

McAdoo, William. 

.When the court takes a recess. cl924. 

178 M11 
Moore, Jared Sparks. 

Rifts in the universe. 1927. 111 M82 

Robinson, Daniel Sommer. 

Illustrations of the methods of reason- 
ing. 1927. 160 R65i 

Russell, Hon Bertand Arthur William. 
Philosophy. cl927. 102 R96p 

Smith, Henry Bradford. 

Symbolic logic, method and develop- 
ment. 1927. 160 S649s 

Vetterling, Herman. 

The illuminate of Gorlitz ; or, Jakob 
Bohme's (1575-1624) life and phi- 
losophy. 1923. q193 B5zv 

INTERNATIONAL ETHICS. 

Kentwoethy', Ron Joseph Montague. 
Peace or war? 1927. 172.4 K37 

Morrison, Charles Clayton. 

The outlawry of war; a constructive 
policy for world peace. 1927. 

172.4 M878 
Price, Burr. 

The world talks it over. 1927. 

172.4 P94 
Shastid, Thomas Hall. 

Give the people their own war power. 
1927. 172.4 S53 

MIND AND BODY. 

Adajis, Evangeline Smith. 

Astrology, your place in the sun. 1028. 
133.5 A21as 

Chesterton, Gilbert Keith. 

Eugenics and other evils. 1922. 

136 C52 
Freud, Sigmund. 

The problem of lay-analyses. 1927. 

130 F88p 
Leonard, John Calvert. 

The higher spiritualism. cl927. 

133.9 L58 
Walsh, James Joseph. 

Laughter and health. 1928. (Apple- 
ton popular health series) 131 W22 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



179 



Zancig, Julius. 

"The unseen world." 



1926. 



133 227 



CHILD STUDY. MENTAL TESTS. 

Foster, Mrs Josephine ( Curtis ) , d 
Anderson, John E. 
The young child and his parents. 1927. 
(University of Minnesota. The in- 
stitute of child welfare. Monograph 
series) 136.7 F75 

Lehman, Harvey C, d Witty, Paul A. 
The psychology of play activities. 1927. 

136.7 L52 

Lincoln, Edward Andrews. 

Sex differences in the growth of Ameri- 
can school children. 1927. 

136.7 L73s 

Richardson, Frank Howard. 

The nervous child and his parents. 
1928. 136.7 R522n 

Thorndike, Edward Lee [d others]. 
The measurement of intelligence. 1927. 

136.7 T49 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Courtney, Robert. 

Beyond behaviorism ; the future of 
psychology. 1927. 150 C86 

Downey, June Etta. 

The kingdom of the mind. 1927. (The 
young people's shelf of science) 

150 D74 

McDowALL, Robert John Stewart, ed. 
The mind. 1927. 150 Ml 38 

OvERSTEEET, Harry Allen. 

About ourselves ; psychology for normal 
people. cl927. 150 096ab 

Parsons, Sir John Herbert. 

An introduction to the theory of percep- 
tion. 1927. (The Cambridge psycho- 
logical library) 150 P26 

PROHIBITION. 

Darrow, Clarence Seward. 
The prohibition mania. 1927. 

178 D22p 
Feldman, Herman. 

Prohibition ; its economic and industrial 
aspects. 1927. 178 F31 

Franklin, Fabian. 

The A B C of prohibition. cl927. 

178 F83ab 



Johnson, Frederick Ernest, d Warner, 
Harry Sheldon. 
Prohibition in outline. cl927. 178 J66 



RELIGION. 

Babbtjsse, Henri. 
Jesus. cl927. 



232 B24 



Barrett, Edward John Boyd. 

The Jesuit enigma. 1927. 271.5 B27 

Barton, Bruce. 

What can a man believe? cl927. 

239 B29 
Bible. 0. T. English. 

The Old Testament ; an American trans- 
lation. cl927. 221 B58g 

Bible. N. T. Hawaiian and English. 
The New Testament of Our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ. 1859. 

225.59 B58 
Brown, Brian, ed. 

The story of Buddha and Buddhism ; 
his life and sayings. cl927. 

294 B87 

Case, Shirley Jackson. 

The historicity of Jesus. cl912. 

232 C33 

Jesus, a new biography. [1927] 

232 C33j 

Chainey, George. 

The book of Ruth. 1901. 222.3 C43 

Gift. 

The ten commandments. [1900] 

222.1 C43 

Gift. 

The unsealed Bible, vol. 1, Gene- 
sis, or, the book of beginnings. 1902. 

222.11 C43 

Gift. 



The unsealed Bible, v. 30, Reve- 
lation. 1902. 228 C43 

Gift. 

Councilor, Homer J. 

The junior church. cl928. 260 C85 

Eddy, George Sherwood. 

Religion and social justice. cl927. 

261 E21 

Faebridge, Maurice Harry. 

Judaism and the Modem mind. 1927. 

296 F21 

Harrison, Jane Ellen. 

Themis. 1927. 292 H31t 



180 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Heckeb, Julius Friedrich. 

Religion under the Soviets. [1927] 
(Vanguard studies of soviet Russia) 
281.9 H44 
Herold, a. Ferdinand. 

The life of Buddha according to the 
legends of ancient India. Translated 
from the French by Paul C. Blum. 
1927. 294 H56 

Hughes, Thomas Aloysius. 

The plurality of vs^orlds and other 
essays. 1927. 204 H89 

Inge, WiUiam Ralph. 

The church in the world, collected 
essays. 1927. 204 145c 



Jebnegan, Prescott Ford. 
Man and his God. cl927. 



c231 J 55 



Kent, Charles Foster. 

The heroes and crises of early Hebrew 
histoi-y from the creation to the death 
of Moses. 1908. (The Historical 
Bible) 221.9 K37h 



The work and teachings of the 

apostles. cl916. (The Historical 
Bible) 225.9 K37 

Macfarland, Charles Stedman. 

International Christian movements. 
cl924. 260 M143i 

Gift. 

More, Paul Elmer. 

Christ the Word. 1927. (The Greek 
tradition) 232 M83c 

MouLTON, James Hope. 

Early Zoroastrianism. 1926. (The 
Hibbert lectures. 2d ser. [1912]) 
295 M92e 
Munch, Peter Andreas. 

Norse mythology, legends of gods and 
heroes. 1926. ( Scandinavian classics) 
293 M96 
Otto, Rudolf. 

The idea of the holy. 1926. 201 091 

Pabrish, Herbert. 

A new God for America. cl928. 

204 P26 
RoHRBAUGH, Lewis Guy. 

The science of religion. cl927. 

201 R73 
Shuster, George Nauman. 

The Catholic spirit in America. 1927. 

282 S56 



Silver, Abba Hillel. 

A history of Messianic speculation in 
Israel from the first through the 
seventeenth centuries. 1927. 

232 S58 

Sperby, Willard Learoyd. 

Reality in worship; a study of public 
worship and private religion. 1925. 
264 S75 
Tawney, Richard Henry. 

Religion and the rise of capitalism, a 
historical study.. 1926. (Holland 
memorial lectures, 1922) 261 T23 

Whitehead, Alfred North. 

Symbolism, its meaning and effect. 1927. 
( Barbour'Page lectures, University of 
Virginia) 246 W59 

Wieman, Henry Nelson. 

Religious experience and scientific 
method. 1926. 215 W64 

WiSHART, John Elliott. 

The fact of prayer. cl927. c264 W81 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

[Begbie, Harold] 
The howling mob, an indictment of 
democracy. 1927. 304 B41h 

BossARD, James Herbert Siward. 

Problems of social well-being. 1927. 
(Harper's social science series) 

304 B745 

CiiOATE, Joseph Hodges. 

Arguments and addresses. 1926. 

308 C54 

Ellwood, Charles Abram. 

Cultural evolution ; a study of social 
origins and development. cl927. ( The 
Centurj' social science series) 

301 E47c 

Ogburn, William Fielding, eg Golden- 
weiser, Alexander A., eds. 
The social sciences and their interrela- 
tions. cl927. 301 034s 

SOBOKIN, Pitirim Aleksaudrovich. 

Contemporary sociological theories. 
1928. (Harper's social science 
series) 301 S71 

Storck, John. 

Man and civilization ; an inquiry into 
the bases of contemporai'y life. 3d 
rev. ed. cl927. 301 S884 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIxV STATE LIBRi\ RY, 



181 



SuMNE^p. William Graham. 

Selected essays of William Graham 
Sumuer. 1924. 304 S95s 

Turner, Ralph E. 

All introduction to the social sciences. 
1927. 302 T95 

STATISTICS. POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Bakiimetev, Boris Aleksandrovich. 
The legacy of war — peace. 1927. 

320 B16 
Barker, Ernest. 

National character and the factors in 
its formation. [1927] 320.1 B25n 

CoMMONWEAXTH club of California. 
The alien land law. 1920. 

C325.252 C73 

Dennett, Mrs Mary (Ware). 

Birth control laws. 1926. 312 D39 

Dennis, Alfred Lewis Pinnes. 

Adventures in American diplomacy, 
1896-1906. cl928. 327.73 D41 



Italy America society. 
Year book. 1925. 



325.245 188 



» 



McElroy, Robert McNutt. 

The pathway of peace ; an interpreta- 
tion of some British-American crises. 
1927. 327 M14 

Munro, William Bennett. 

The invisible government. 1928. 

320.73 M96i 

Panunzio, Constantine Maria. 
Immigration crossroads. 1927. 

325.73 PI 9 
Peb^fer, Nathaniel. 

The white man's dilemma ; climax of 
the age of imperialism. 1927. 

321 P37 
RiGG, John. 

How to take the chair. 328.1 R56 



Ross, Edward Alsworth. 
» Standing room only? cl927. 312 R82 

Stimson, Henry Lewis. 

American policy in Nicaragua. 1927. 
327.73 S85 

Whyte, Sh- xilexander Frederick. 
'" China and foreign powers. 1927. 

327.51 W62 

JLiAMSON, .James Alexander. 
A short history of British expansion. 
1927. 325.342 W73 




NEGROES. 

Bullock, Ralph \^'. 

In spite of handicaps ; brief biographi- 
cal sketches ... of outstanding 
negroes now living. 1927. 

920.07 B93 

Haskin, Sara Estelle. 

The upward climb; a course in negro 
achievement. cl927. 920.07 H35 

Herskovits, Melville Jean. 
The American negro. 1928. 

325.26 H57 

ECONOMICS. 

AcHiNSTEiN, Asher. 

Buying power of labor and post-war 
cycles. 1927. (Studies in history, 
economics, and public law, ed. by the 
Faculty of political science of Colum- 
bia university) 330.5 C72 

American trade union delegation to the 
Soviet union. 
Russia after ten years. cl927. 

330.947 A51 
AuLD, George Percival. 

The Dawes plan and the new economics. 
1927. 330.94 A92 

Barker, J. Ellis. 

America's secret ; the causes of her 
economic success. [1927] 

330.973 825 
BoBER, Mandell Morton. 

Karl Marx's interpretation of history. 

1927. (Harvard economic studies) 

331 866 
Brebner. John Bartlet. 

New England's outpost, Acadia before 
the conquest of Canada. 1927. 
(Studies in history, economics and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia univer- 
sity) 330.5 C72 

Eastman, Max. 

Marx, Jjenin and the science of revolu- 
tion. [1926] 331 El 3 

Faulkner, Harold Underwood. 

Economic history of the United States. 

1928. (The world today bookshelf) 

330.973 F26e 

Foster, William Trufant, d Catchings, 
Waddill. 
The road to plenty. 1928. (Publica- 
tions of the Pollak foundation for 
economic research) 331 F75r 



182 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



GoLDEB, Frank Alfred, & Hutchinson, 
Lincoln. 
On the trail of the Russian famine. 
1927. 330.947 G61 

Hirst, Francis Wrigley. 

Safeguarding and protection in Great 
Britain and the United States. 1927. 
337 H66s 
HoBSON, John Atkinson. 

The conditions of industrial peace. 
[1927] 331 H68c 

HoMAN, Paul Thomas. 

Contemporary economic thought. 1928. 
330.9 H76 
MiTCHEix, Wesley Clair. 

Business cycles, the problem and its 
setting. 1927. (Publications of the 
National bureau of economic research, 
incorporated) 331 M68 

Mltie, Ramsay. 

America the golden ; an Englishman's 
notes and comparisons. 1927. 

330.973 M95 

National industrial conference board. 
Industrial progress and regulatory 
legislation in New York. 1927. 

331.9747 N27 

Neabing, Scott, & Hardy, Jack. 

The economic organization of the Soviet 
union. [1927] (Vanguard studies 
of soviet Russia) 330.947 N35 

The New England economic situation ; 
contributors : Guernsey Camp, jr., 
Carrol J. Hoffman, David N. Klar- 
feld . . . [and others]. 1927. (Har- 
vard undergraduate economic studies) 

330.974 N54 
Page, Kirby. 

Dollars and world peace. cl927. 

330.973 P13 
Sabgent, Arthur John. 

The economic policy of Colbert. 1899. 
(Studies in economics and political 
science, v. 5) 330.944 S24 

Yinacke, Harold Monk. 

Problems of industrial development in 
China. 1926. 330.951 V76 

LABOR. CAPITAL. 

BiMBA, Anthony. 

The history of the American working 
class. cl927. 331.8 B61 



Dana, Richard Turner, & Ackeraian, 
Arthur Pope. 
The human machine in industry. 1927. 

331.8 D16 
Hexter, Maurice Beck. 

Juvenile employment and labor mobility 
in the business cycle. cl927. 

331.3 H61 

National committee on prisons and 
prison labor. Committee on the care 
and training of delinquent women and 
girls. 
Industries for correctional institutions 
for women. 1927. 331.4 N27 

National industrial conference board. 
Supplemental bonuses for wage earners, 
supervisors and executives. 1927. 

331.2 N277s 
Newfang, Oscar. 

Harmony between labor and capital; 
an essay on the welfare of nations. 
1927. 331 N54 

BOLSHEVISM. 

FtJLOP-MiLLEB, Rene. 

The mind and face of bolshevism ; trans- 
lated from the German by F. S. Flint 
and D. F. Tait. 1928. 335 F97 

Nitte, Francesco Saverio. 

Bolshevism, fascism and democracy. 
1927. 335 N73 

BANKING. FINANCE. 

BuEGESS, Warren Randolph. 

The resei-ve banks and the money mar- 
ket. 1927. 332.1 B95 

Burns, Arthur Robert. 

Money and monetary policy in early 
times. 1927. (The history of civil- 
ization. [Pre-history and antiquity] ) 
332 B96 
DiSBROW, Charles Wesley. 

Fundamentals of banking, finance, and 
economics. 1927. 331 D61 

Federal council of the churches of Christ 
in America. Dept. of research and 
education. Social aspects of agricul- 
tural credit. [1927] (Bulletin, 
no. 6) 332.7 F29 

Ji:zE, Gaston Paul Amedee, d Truchy, 
Henri. 
The war finance of France. 1927. 
(Carnegie endowment for interna- 



vol. 23. no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRABY. 



183 



tional peace. Division of economics 
and history. Economic and social 
history of the world war. Translated 
and abridged series) 336.44 J 59 

National industrial conference board. 
Cost of government in the United States 
1925-1926. 1927. 336.73 N277c 

Proposals for changes in the fed- 



eral internal revenue system. 1927. 
336.2 N277p 

Proudhon, Pierre Joseph. 

Proudhon's Solution of the social prob- 
lem. [1927] 332.1 P96 

RiEGEL, Robert, d Doubmen, John 
Russell. 
The building-and-loan association. 1927. 

334.1 R55 

Young, Edward Hilton, d Young, Nonnan 
Egerton. 
The system of national finance. [1924] 
336.42 Y71 

PRODUCTION. PRICES. 

CusHiNG, Harry Alonzo. 

Voting trusts. 1927. 338.7 C98a 

Gottlieb, Abraham. 

Fur truths, the story of furs and the 
fur business. 1927. 338.1 G68 

Smith, James Gerald. 

The development of trust companies in 
the United States. cl928. (Ameri- 
can business series) 338.8 S65 

Tresslee, Donald Kiteley. 

The wealth of the sea. [1927] 

338.3 T79 
Watkins, Myron Webster. 

Industrial combinations and public 
policy. cl927. 338.8 W33 

LAW. ADMINISTRATION. 

Arneson, Ben Albert. 

Elements of constitutional law. 1928. 
342.73 A74 
Baldwin, James Fosdick. 

The king's councU in England during 
the middle ages. 1913. 342.42 B18 

Calvert, E. Roy. 

Capital punishment in the twentieth 
century. [1927] 343 C16 

Gollomb, Joseph. 

Mfister man hunters. cl926. 

352.2 G62 



Griffith, Ernest Stacey. 

The modem development of city gov- 
ernment. 1927. 2 V. 352 G85 

Institute of international relations. 
Proceedings. 1927. qc341.106 15 

Nash, Jay B. 

The organization and administration of 
playgrounds and recreation. 1927. 

352.9 N25 

ScHMECKEBiEB, Laurence Frederick. 
The Office of Indian affairs ; its history, 
activities and organization. 1927. 
(Institute for government research. 
Service monographs of the United 
States government) 353.8 S34o 

WiCKEBSHAM, George Woodward. 

The world court ; how it began, how it 

works, what it has done. 1927. 

(Workers' education pamphlet series) 

341.1 W63 

ASSOCIATIONS. INSTITUTIONS. 

Barnes, Harry Elmer. 

The evolution of penology in Pennsyl- 
vania. cl927. 365 B26e 

Beeley, Arthur Lawton. 

The bail system in Chicago. cl927. 
( Social service monograph ) 364 B41 

Clark, Charles L. 

Lockstep and corridor. cl927. (Cin- 
cinnati. University. Department of 
sociology. Publications) 365 C59 

Dickenson, Clarence F. 

Construction in action (Masonry) 
[1928] 366.1 D54 

HuRLiN, Ralph G. 

Social work salaries. 1926. (Russell 
Sage foundation, New York. Dept. 
of statistics) 360 H96 

Klotz, Walter C. 
Group clinics. 1927. 



362 K66 



Newton, Joseph Fort. 

The religion of masonry ; an interpreta- 
tion. 1927. 366.1 N56r 

Richardson, Anna Mann. 

Health services in clinics. 1927. 

362 R52 
INSURANCE. 
Madden, James L. 

Wnis, trusts and estates. 1927. (Life 
insurance : its economic and social 
relations) 368.3 M17 



184 



NEWS NOTES OV CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Sanborn, Ralph. 

Business life insurance. 1927. (The 
International life underwriters 
library) 368.3 S19 

Stevenson, John Alford. 

Education and philanthropy. 1927. 
(Life insurance: its economic and 
social relations) 368.3 S84e 



EDUCATION. 

Adams, Sir John. 
Errors in school 



370.1 A21e 



Anderson. Earl William. 

The teachers contract and other legal 
phases of teacher status. 1927. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

371.1 A54 

Barranco, Manuel. 

Mexico ; its educational problems — sug- 
gestions for their solution. 1915. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contx'ibutions to education) 

q379.72 B2 
Boston imiversity. 

Inauguration of Daniel L. Marsh, as 
fourth president of Boston university. 
May 15, 1926. 378.744 BoK 

Gift. 

Bruhn, Martha Emma. 

Elementary lessons in lip reading, the 

Miiller-Walle method (Bruhn lip 

reading system) 1927. 371.9 B89e 

Buffalo educational council. 

Adult education in a community. [1926] 
370.1 B929 

Cameron, Edward Herbert. 

Educational psychology. cl927. (The 
Century education series) 370.1 C18e 

Columbia university. Teachers college. 
Lincoln school. 

Curriculum making in an elementary 

school. cl927. 375 C72 

CoMENius, Johann Amos. 

Comenius' School of infancy. 1901. 

372 C73c 

CuBBERLEY, EUwood Patterson. 

The school textbook problem. cl927. 

370.1 C96s 

Engelhardt, Fred, d Von Borgersrode, 
Fred. 



Accounting procedure for school sys- 
tems. 1927. (School administration 
series) 379.1 E57 

Fisher, Mrs Dorothea Frances (Canfield) . 
Why stop learning? cl927. 370.1 F53 

Gates, Arthur Irving. 

The improvement of reading. 1927. 

372.4 G25 

Gay, p. H., d Morteux, O. 

French elementary schools. 1926. 
( Studies of the International insti- 
tute of Teachers college, Columbia 
university) 370.944 G28 

Hamilton, Otto Templar. 

The courts and the curriculum. 1927. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

379.1 H21 

Hatch, Roy Winthrop, d- StuU, De Forest. 
The social studies in the Horace Mann 
junior high school. 1926. 

371.3 H361 
Hawkes. Herbert Edwin. 

College— what's the use? 1927. 

378 H392 

Hull, Osman Ranson, d Ford, Willard 
Stanley. 
School housing survey for the Monrovia 
union high school district. 1927. 
(University of Southern California. 
Studies) C378.794 UM 

Jones, Arthur Julius. 

Education and the individual ; princi- 
ples of education from the psychologi- 
cal standpoint. cl926. (The Cen- 
tury education series) 370.1 J76 

KiRKPATRiCK, John Ervin. 

The rise of non-resident government in 
Harvard university and How Har- 
vard is governed. 1925. 

378.944 HEk 



Lange, Alexis Frederick. 
The Lange book. cl927. 



370.4 L27 



Leach, Arthur Francis. 
The schools of medieval England. [1916] 
(The antiquary's books) 

370.942 L43 
LoOMis, Arthur Kirkwood. 

School equipment costs ; a method of 
estimating. 1926. (School adminis- 
tration series) 371.6 L86 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE IJBRARY. 



185 



McMlTLLEN. Lynn Banks. 

The service load in teacher training 
institutions of the United States. 
1927. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 371 Ml 68 

Malcolm, David Johnston. 

The letters of a country school super- 
intendent to his daughtei'. 1927. 

371.2 M24 

Masso, Gildo. 

Education in Utopias. 1927. (Teach- 
ers college, Columbia university. 
Contributions to education) 

370.1 M41 

MoRPHET, Edgar Leroy. 

The measurement and interpretation of 
school building utilization. 1927. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

371.6 M87 

Myers, George Edmund. 

The problem of vocational guidance. 
1927. 370.01 M99 

Pennsylvania. University. School of 
education. 
Annual schoolmen's week proceedings. 
1927. 378.748 PeJ 

Platt, Kutherford Hayes, d Famham, 
Rebecca T., eds. 
The book of opportunities. 1927. 

r370.01 P71 
Powers, J. Orin. 

The junior high school. 1927. 

379.17 P88 
Reisner, Edward Hartman. 

Historical foundations of modern edu- 
cation. 1927. 370.9 R37h 

Rosenbebger, Jesse Leonard. 

Rochester, the making of a university. 
; 1927. 378.747 RoEr 

Rural school survey of New York state : 
The teaching personnel. 1923. 

379.747 R94 
Spence, Ralph Beckett. 

The improvement of college marking 
systems. 1927. (Teachers college, 
Columbia university. Contributions 
to education) 371.2 S74 

Willing, Matthew H. 

Valid diagnosis in high school compo- 
sition. 1926. (Teachers college. 



Columbia nniversit.v. Contributions 
to education I 371.2 W73 

COMMUNICATION. COMMERCE. 

Chatterton, Edward Keble. 

The romance of the ship ; the story of 
her origin and evolution. 1925. 

656.8 C49r 

Glaeser, Martin Gustav. 

Outlines of public utility economics. 
1927. (Social science text-books) 

380 G54 

Robison, Samuel Shelburne. 

Robison's manual of radio telegraphy 
and telephony. 1927. q654 R6 

CUSTOMS. COSTUME. 
FOLK LORE. 

Anthony, Edward, d Anthony, Joseph. 
The fairies up-to-date. 1923. 398 A62 

BosscHJiRE, Jean de. 

The city curious, illustrated by the 
author and retold in English by F. 
Tennyson Jesse. 1920. 398 B74 



Cendrars, Blaise, conip. 
The African saga. 1927. 



398 C39 



Chalmers, Helena. 

Clothes, on and off the stage ; a histoi*y 
of dress from the earliest times to the 
present day. 1928. 391 C438 

Groves, Ernest Rutherford, d Groves, 
Gladys Hoagland. 
Wholesome marriage. 1927. 

392 G88w 

LiNDSEY, Benjamin Barr. 

The companionate marriage. 1927. 

392 L75 

Palencia, Isabel de. 

The regional costumes of Spain. [1926] 

391 P15 

Post, Mrs Emily (Price). 

Etiquette ; "The blue book of social 
usage." New and enl. ed. 1928. 

395 P85a 

Richardson, Mrs Anna Steese (Sausser). 
Etiquette at a glance. 1927. 

395 R52e 

Robinson, Sara Featherstone. 

Hina-Malama, moon-goddess of the 
Polynesian Islands. 1926. c398 R66 



186 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



WOMEN- 
GIBSON, Mary S., comp. 

A record of twenty-five years of The 
California federation of women's 
clubs, 1900-1925. 1927. 

C396.01 G44 

NoBBis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
The fun of being a mother. 1927. 

c396 N85 

Okmsbee, Hazel Grant. 

The young employed girl. cl927. 

396.5 073 

WiNTEB, Mrs Alice (Ames). 
The heritage of women. 1927. 

396 W78h 

ZwBMEE, Samuel Marinus, d Zwemer, 
Mrs Amy E. (Wilkes). 
Moslem women. cl926. 396 Z97 

LAW. 

Bancbopt-Whitney company, San Fran- 
cisco. 
(■ode practice and remedies in courts of 
I'ecord in civil cases in the western 
states. 1927. 4 v. 

Beale, Joseph Henry. 

A selection of cases and other authori- 
ties upon criminal law. 2d ed. 1907. 



BowEBS, Renzo Dee. 

Civil process and its service. 



1927. 



BuENETT, Richard C. 

Community property law in contact 
with federal estate taxation. cl927. 

Cambridge legal essays written in honour 
of and presented to Doctor Bond, 
Professor Buckland and Professor 
Kenny. 1926. 

Clephane, Walter Collins. 

Handbook of the law of equity pleading 
and practice. 1926. (The Hornbook 

series) 

CONYNGTON, Thomas, d Bennett, Robert 
Joseph. 
Corporation procedure. Rev. ed. cl927. 

CosTiGAN, George Purcell. 

The performance of contracts. 2d ed. 
1927. 

Davis, Stephen Brooks. 

The law of radio communication. 1927. 



Dickinson, John. 

Administrative justice and the suprem- 
acy of law in the United States. 
1927. (Harvard studies in adminis- 
trative law) 

Dobie, Armistead Mason. 

Handbook of federal jurisdiction and 
procedure. 1928. (Hornbook series) 

Fenn, Percy Thomas, jr. 

The oi-igin of the right of fishery in 
territorial waters. 1926. 



FixEL, Rowland W. 
The law of aviation. 



1927. 



Fbicke, Charles Williams. 

California criminal law. cl927. 

GooDBiCH, Herbert Funk. 

Handbook on the conflict of laws. 
( Hornbook series ) 



1927. 



Geay, John Chipman. 

Select cases and other authorities on 
the law of property. 2d ed. v. 1, 2. 
1906. 

Gift. 

HiEB, Frank. 

Review outline of wills. 1926. 



HiEB, Frank J. 
Outline on torts. 



1926. 



HiLLYEE, Curtis. 

Hillyer's corporate management 
by-laws, with forms. 1927. 



and 



Hopkins, James Love. 

The new Federal Penal code, annotated 
— with foi-ms. 1927. 

Jones, Eliot, d Vanderblue, Homer Bews, 
eds. 
Railroads ; cases and selections. 1925. 

Kocoubek, Albert. 

Jural relations. cl927. 

Lincoln, Walter Gould. 

The notary ; complete instructions for 
the notary public. cl927. 

Longeneckee, RoUa Rudolph. 

Some hints on the trial of a lawsuit. 
1927. 

McBaine, James Patterson. 

Cases on trial practice in civil actions, 
selected from decisions of English 
and American courts. 1927. ( Ameri- 
can casebook series) 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



187 



Macfie, Robert Andrew, co7np. 

Recent discussions on the abolition of 
patents. 1869. 



:Magill, Roswell Foster. 
Cases on civil procedure, 
can casebook series) 



1927. (Ameri- 



ISIoRGAN, Edmund MoiTis, d others. 
The law of evidence. 1927. 

Peace, Chax-les Frederick, defendant. 
Trials of Charles Frederick Peace. 
[1926] (Notable British trials) 



Radin, Max. 

Handbook of Roman law. 
(Hornbook series) 



1927. 



vSacco-Vanzetti defense committee. 

The story of the Sacco-Vanzetti case, 
including an analysis of the trial. 

.Sainee, Abraham Lawrence. 

The substantive and adjective law. 
3d ed. cl927. 

Saybe, Francis Bowes. 
A selection of cases on criminal law. 
1927. 



SCHNEIDEE, Philip John. 
Code pleading (outline). 



1926. 



Supreme court reporter. 

Supreme court and Federal reporter 
blue book. 1926. 



Truslee, Harry Raymond. 
Essentials of school law. 



cl927. 



Wickersham, Cornelius Wendell. 

A treatise on stock without par value 
of ordinary business corporations. 
1927. 

WiLLiSTON, Samuel. 

A selection of cases on the law of sales 
of personal property. 1905. 



Wilson, George Grafton. 

Handbook of international law. 
1927. (Hornbook series) 



2d ed. 



Wyndham, Horace. 
Famous trials re-told. 



[1925] 



ZoLLMANN, Carl Frederick Gustav. 
Law of the air. cl927. 



LANGUAGE, 

Broavn, Sherman W. 

Estudios gi-amaticos espaiioles. 1927. 
(The Borzoi Spanish texts) 468 B87 

Bush, Stephen Hayes, d Young, Charles 

Edmund, eds. 

Sixteenth century French anthology. 

1927. (Heath's modern language 

series) 448 B97 

Craigie, William Alexander. 

The study of American English. 1927. 
(Stociety foi-] p[Ui'e] B[nglish]) 

427 C88 
Howard, J. P. 

Spanish syntax and composition. 1927. 

465 H84 

Marcial Dorado, Carolina. 

Chispitas, short Spanish plays. cl927. 

468 IV131C 

Pankhuest, Estelle Sylvia. 

Delphos ; the future of international 
language. [1927] [To-day and to- 
morrow] 408.9 PI 9 

Rota, A. 

Hossfeld's new practical method for 
learning the Italian language. New 
ed. 458 R84 

Wood, Benjamin De Kalbe. 

New York experiments with new-type 
modern language tests. 1927. (Pub- 
lications of the American and Cana- 
dian committees on modem languages ) 
q407 W8 

NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL. 

Collenette, C. L. 

Sea-girt jungles ; the experiences of a 
naturalist with the "St. George" 
expedition. [1926] 508.96 C69 

Fabre, Jean Henri Casimir. 
Curiosities of science. cl927. 



Kare, Jean Baptiste Alphonse. 
A tour I'ound my garden. 



500 F12c 



504 K18 



MATHEMATICS. 

FoRDER, Henry George. 

The foundations of Euclidean geometry. 
1927. 513 F71 



FoRSY'TH, Andrew Russell. 
Calculus of variations. 1927. 



q517 F7 



188 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Jones. David Caradog, d Daniels, Geoi-ge 
William. 
Elements of matliematics for students 
of economies & statistics. 1926. 

510 J76 

Sanford, Vera. 

The history and significance of certain 
standard problems in algebra. 1927. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

512 S22 

Smith, David Eugene, d Reeve, William 
David. 
The teaching of junior high school 
mathematics. cl927. 510.7 S64t 

Whitehead, Alfred North, d Russell, 
Hon Bertrand Arthur William. 
Priucipia mathematica. 2d ed. 1925. 3 v. 

q510 W5 

ASTRONOMY. 

Barnard, Edvs^ard Emerson. 

A photographic atlas of selected regions 

of the Milky way. 1927. 2 v. 

(Carnegie institute of Washington) 

q522.6 B2 

Weir, John Wallace. 

Comets and the sun ; new theories 
regarding their structure. 1927. 

q523.6 W4 

PHYSICS. CHEMISTRY. 

Andrade, Edward Neville da Costa. 
The structure of the atom. 3d ed., rev. 
and enl. 1927. 541.2 A55s 

Barus, Carl. 

Acoustic experiments with a pin-hole 
probe and the interferometer u-gage. 
1927. (Carnegie institution of Wash- 
ington. Publication) q534 B2 

Carnegie institution of Washington. 
Dept. of terrestrial magnetism. 
Land magnetic and electiic observa- 
tions, 1918-1926. 1927. (Researches 
of the Dept. of terrestrial magnetism, 
v. 6) q538.7 C2 

Mathews, Albert Presc-ott. 

The nature of matter, gravitation, and 
light. 1927. 530.1 M42 



Wood. William Piatt, & Cork, James 
.Murle. 
Pyrometry. 1927. 536.5 W88 

AERONAUTICS. 

Bedell. Fi-ederick. 

The airplane, a practical discussion of 

the principles of airplane flight. 1924. 

533.6 B41ai 

The Bulletin. San Francisco. 

The flying schoolma'am and the Dole 
birds. [1927] c533.6 B93 



Page, Victor Wilfred. 
Modern aircraft. 1927. 



533.6 P13m 



Wall, Thomas Frederick. 
Applied magnetism. 1927. 



538 W18 



Warner, Edward Pearson. 

Airplane design ; aerodynamics. 1927. 
533.6 W28ai 

GEOLOGY. 

Benson, Allan Louis. 

The story of geology. 1927. 550 B47 

Berkey, Charles Peter, d Morris, Fred- 
erick Kuhne. 
Geology of Mongolia. 1927. (Central 
Asiatic expeditions of the American 
museum of natural histox-y. Natural 
history of Central Asia) q550 B5 

Farrington, Oliver Cummings, d Laufer, 
Berthold. 
Agate. 1927. 553.8 F24 

Schuchert, Charles, d Le Vene, Clara 
Mae. 
The earth and its rhythms. 1927. 

550 S38 

Soley, John Codman. 

Source.s of volcanic energy. 1924. 

551.2 S68 

Tyrrell, George Walter. 

The principles of petrology. [1926] 

552 T99 

BIOLOGY. 

Huntington, Ellsworth. 

The human habitat. cl927. 

573.4 H94h 

LuDOVici, Anthony Mario. 

Man : an indictment. 1927. 575.7 L94 

Peake, Harold John Edward, d Fleure, 
Herbert John. 
Apes & men. 1927. (The corridors of 
time) 571 P35 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



189 



— Hunters & artist.?, 
corridors of time) 



1927. (The 
571 P35h 



Pearl, Raymoud. 

The rate of living, being an account of 
some experimental studies on the 
biology of life duration. 1928. 

570 P35 

Rattray, Robert Sutherland. 

Religion & art in Ashanti. 1927. 

572 R23r 

Williams, William Ashbury. 

The evolution of man scientifically dis- 
proved. 1928. 575 W728 

Worrell, William Hoyt. 

A study of races in the ancient Near 
East. 1927. 572 W92 

BOTANY. 

BosE, Jagadis Chunder. 

Plant response as a means of physiolog- 
ical investigation. 1906. 581 B74p 

Brenchley, Winifred Elsie. 

Inorganic plant poisons and stimulants. 
2d ed. 1927. (Cambridge agricul- 
tural monographs) 581 B83 



[1927] 
qc582 F2 



Farquhae, Francis P. 
Vagaries of the Big Trees. 

Gift. 
Skene, Macgregor. 

Trees. [1927] ( Home university library 
of modern knowledge) 582 S62 

TuLASNE, Louis Rene, d Tulasne, Charles. 
New notes upon the tremellineous fungi 
and their analogues. [1870] 

589.2 T91 

ZOOLOGY. 

Alverdes, Friedrich. 

Social life in the animal world. 1927. 
(International library of psychology, 
philosophy and scientific method) 

591.5 A47 
Balfoue-Browne, Frank. 

Insects. cl928. (Home university 
library of modern knowledge) 

595.7 B185i 
Casserly, Gordon. 

Dwellers in the jungle. 1927. 

590.4 C34 

Frohawk, Frederick William. 

Natural history of British butterflies. 
[1914] 2 V. f595.7 F9 

i 6— 5S783 



Gardiner, John Stanley, ed. 

The fauna and geography of the Maldive 
and Laccadive archipelagoes. 1903-06. 
2 V. q590 G2 

Kingston, Richard William George. 
A naturalist in Hindustan. 1923. 

595 H66 

Knottnerus-Meyer, Theodor Christian 
Bernhard. 
Birds and beasts of the Roman zoo. 
cl928. 591.5 K72 

Laufer, Berthold. 

Insect-musicians and cricket champions 
of China. 1927. ( [Field museum of 
natural histoi-y] Anthropology leaf- 
let) 595.7 L37 

Rutledge, Archibald Hamilton. 

Children of swamp and wood. 1927. 

591.5 R98 

Seebohm, Heni-y. 

A monograph of the Turdidae. Or 
family of thrushes. 1902. 2 v. 

f598.2 S4 

Taylor, William Randolph. 

The marine Algae of Florida, with 
special reference to the Di*y Tortugas. 
1928. ( Carnegie institution of Wash- 
ington. Publication) q591.92 02 

USEFUL ARTS: 
MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Bilhuber, Gertrude. 

Outlines in health education for women. 
1927. 613 B59 



Clendening, Logan. 
The human body. 



1927. 



612 062 



De Schweinitz, Karl. 

Growing up ; the story of how we 
become alive, are born and grow up. 
1928. 612.6 D44 

Dodge, Raymond. 

Elementary conditions of human varia- 
bility. 1927. q612.8 D6 

Ford, William Webber. 

Text-book of bacteriology. 1927. 

616.01 F71 



Hartzog, Henry Simms. 
Triumph of medicine. 



1927. 



610.9 H33 



190 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Henderson, Yandell, d Haggard, Howard 

Wilcox. 

Noxious gases. 1927. (American 

chemical society. Monograph series) 

615.9 H49 

Hill, Archibald Vivian. 

Living machinery ; eight lectures deliv- 
ered at the Lowell institute. cl927. 
612 H645 

KiBBEY, C. H. 

The principles of sanitation ; a practi- 
cal handbook for public health work- 
ers. 1927. 614 K46 

PusEY, William Allen. 

The importance of being histoidcally 
minded. 1927. 610.4 P98i 

ScHiLDEE, Paul, <& Kauders, Otto. 
Hypnosis. 1927. (Nervous and mental 
disease monograph series) 

615.85 S33 
ScHKXJMPF-PiEREON, Pierre. 

Tobacco & physical efficiency. 1927. 

613.8 S38 
Seashore, Carl Emil. 
Elementary experiments in psychology. 
cl908. 612.8 S43 

Staley, Seward Charle. 

Calisthenics, modem methods of free- 
exercise instruction. 1926. 

613.7 S782 



Thompson, John Arthur. 
Towards health. [1927] 



613 T48 



Williams, Jesse Feiring. 

The principles of physical education. 
1927. 613.7 W724 

Woodbury, Robert Morse. 

Workers' health and safety : a statisti- 
cal program. 1927. (Institute of 
economics. Investigations in indus- 
try and labor) 613.6 W88 

ENGINEERING. 

American society of civil engineers. 
Yearbook. 1916. 1917. 620.6 A51 

Brown, Richard Edmund. 

Alternating-current machinery. 1927. 
621.31 B87 
Duncan, Herbert Osbaldeston. 
The world on wheels. [1926] 

q625.6 D91 
Flettner, Anton. 

The story of the rotor. 1926. 

623.8 F61 



Gibson, Charles Robert. 

The motor car & its story. 1927. 

625.6 G44 
Greenwood, Ernest. 

Aladdin, U. S. A., 1928. 621.3 G81 

Klemgard, Edwin Neal. 

Lubricating greases. 1927. 621.89 K64 

LocKHART, Luther Bynum. 

American lubricants from the stand- 
point of the consumer. 3d ed. 1927. 
621.89 L81a1 

McMechen, Edgar Carlisle. 

The Moffat tunnel of Colorado ; an epic 
of empire. cl927. 2 v. q 625.1 M1 

Middle West utilities company. 

Ice, water treatment and purification, 
natural ice, manufacture of ice, his- 
toi-y and romance of the ice industry, 
transportation of fruits and vegeta- 
bles. 1927. q621.5 M6 

Palmateer, Theron Josiah. 

Machine work ; a shop manual and ref- 
erence book. 1927. 621.7 P17 

Paul, Charles Howard, d Bennett, Charles 
Stuart. 
Methods and plant for excavation and 
embankment. 1927. 624.1 P32 

Refrigerating engineering, v. 12-13. 
1925-27. q621.505 R3 

Sylvester, Cyril, d Ritchie, Thomas 
Edward. 
Modern electrical illumination. 1927. 
621.32 S98 
Wyeb, Samuel S. 

Study of Boulder dam project. 1928. 

C626.8 W97 

AGRICULTURE. 

Bailey, Liberty Hyde. 

The harvest of the year to the tUler of 
the soil. 1927. (The background 
books) 630 B15ha 

Cheney, Ralph Holt. 

Coffee ; a monograph of the economic 

species of the genus Goffea L. 1925. 

633 C51 

Conference on Christian politics, eco- 
nomics and citizenship. Continuation 
committee. 
Rural life. 1927. 630 C74 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



191 



JoHNSEN, Julia E., comp. 

Agriculture and the tariff. 1927. (The 
reference shelf) 630 J 65 

Perold, Abraham Izak. 

A treatise on viticulture. 1927. 

634.1 P45 
Reynolds, Harris A. 

Town forests, their recreational and 
economic value and how to establish 
and maintain them. [1925] 

634.9 R46 

Seebohm, Mrs Mabel Elizabeth (Christie). 
The evolution of the English farm. 1927. 

630.9 S45 
SuNKiST growers. 
The stoi-y of California oranges and 
lemons. c634.3 S95 

Ukers, William Harrison. 

Coffee merchandising, a handbook to 
the coffee business giving elementary 
and essential facts pertaining to the 
history, cultivation, preparation, and 
marketing of coffee. 1924. 633 U34 

DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 
Bunt, James. 

Rabbit diseases ; cause, prevention, 
treatment and cure. 1926. 

636.9 B94 

Dixon, William Scarth. 

The influence of racing and the thor- 
oughbred horse on light-horse breed- 
ing. [1925] 636.1 D62 

Judy, William Lewis. 

Kennel building and plans. cl927. 

636.7 J93 

Live stock journal ; studs, herds & flocks 

illustrated, v. 99-105. 1924-1927. 

q636.05 L78 

RiNE, Josephine Z. 

Feeding your dog. 1927. 636.7 R57 

Smith, William Wesley. 
The elements of live stock judging. 
el927. 636 S66 

BEES. 

Smith, Jay. 

Queen rearing simplified. 1923. 

638 S65 

Watson, Lloyd Raymond. 

Controlled mating of queenbees. 1927. 

638 W33 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Barnes, Mrs Mary Frances (Hartley). 
Feeding the child from two to six. 
1928. 649 B26 

Congressional club, Washington, D. G. 

The Congressional club cook book. 

Popular ed. 1927. 641 C749 

Gottfried, Ruth Appleton Jeremiah. 
The questing cook ; a bundle of good 
recipes from foreign kitchens. 1927. 
641 G685 

Harris, Jessie W., d Lacey, Elisabeth 
Van Devanter. 
Everyday foods. el927. 640 H31 

Hartley, Olga, d Leyel, Hilda. 

LuouUus ; the food of the future. [1926] 
[To-day and to-morrow] 641 H33 

Leland Stanford junior university. 
Food research institute. 
Wheat studies of the Food research 
institute, v. 1-2. 1924-26. 

qc641 L5 

National association of ice cream manu- 
facturers. 
Freezing ice cream in an atmosphere 
of carbon dioxide. 1922. 641 N27 

Gift. 

Wells, Margery. 

Clothes economy for well dressed 
women. 1927. 646 W45 

BUSINESS METHODS. 

Borden, Neil Hopper, d Glover, Charles 
Arthur. 
Suggestions on report writing. cl925. 

658.7 B72 
FABii and fireside. 

Making your own market. 1927. 

658 F233 
Haring, Harry Albert. 

Warehousing ; trade customs and prac- 
tices. cl925. 658.8 H28 

Hoopingarnee, Newman Leander. 

Business personality and its develop- 
ment. V. 1. 1927. q658.2 H7 

Meyer, Herman F. 

How to market butter. cl924. 

658 M61 
Truesdale, John R. 

Credit bureau management. 1927. 

658.8 T86 



192 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



ADVERTISING, ACCOUNTING. 

Collins, Clem Wetzell. 



C. P. A. review. 1927. 



657 C71 



GooDE, Kenneth M., d Powel, Harford 
Willing Hare. 
What about advertising? 1927. 

659 G647 

GuNDLACH, Ernest Theodore. 

Old Sox on trumpeting. 1927. 659 G97 

Hedland, Edward W. 

Newspaper cost accounting. cl926. 

657 H45 
Percy, Carl. 

Window display advertising. el928. 

659 P43 

PRINTING. PUBLISHING. 

Ars typographica. v. 2. 1925-26. 

q655.05 A7 
Farrar. Frederick M. 

Fred Farrar's type book. cl927. 

655.2 F24 

(Jarnett, Porter. 

A documentary account of the begin- 
nings of the Laboratoi-y press, Car- 
negie institute of technology. 1927. 
vq655.4 G2 

Stokes, Frederick A., company, publish- 
ers, 'New York. 
The house of Stokes 1881-1926. 1926. 

655.4 S87 

Gift. 

Tapley, Harriet Silvester. 

Salem imprints, 1768-1825. 1927. 

655.1 T17 

Taylor, Henry Huntly. 

A plan of printing instruction for pub- 
lic schools. 1927. 655.3 T24 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

Butler, Frank Hedges. 

Wine and the wine lands of the world. 
1927. 663.2 B985 

Cannizzaro, Stanislao. 

An examination as to the reliability of 
certain tests for determining the 
purity of olive oil. [1891] 

665.3 C22 

Darrah, Juanita Elizabeth. 
^Modern baking powder. 1927. 

664.6 D22 



Garland. Herbert, d Bannister. Charles 
Olden. 
Ancient Egyptian metallurgy. 1927. 

669 G23 

HoRSFALL, Ronald S., d Lawrie, Leslie 
Gordon. 
Dyeing of textile fibres. 1927. 

667.2 H81 
McNaie, James B. 

Sugar and sugar-making. 1927. 

664.1 M16 

Richardson, William D. 

The current significance of the word 
alum. 1927. 661 R526 

Gift. 

Wilson, Hewitt. 

Ceramics ; clay technology. 1927. 

666.3 W74 

MANUFACTURES. 
Clouzot, Henri. 

Painted and printed fabrics. 1927. 

q677 C6 
NiSBET, Harry. 

Grammar of textile design. 1927. 

677 N72a 

Sheet steel trade extension committee. 
.5000 sheet steel products and who make 
them. 1927. q672 S5 

MECHANIC TRADES. BUILDING. 

GoNNERJiAN, Harrison Fi-ederiek. 

Studies of curing concrete in a semi- 
arid climate. 1925. (Structural 
materials research laboratory, Lewis 
institute, Chicago) 691.3 S92 

Moore, Herbert Fisher, d Kommers, 

Jesse Benjamin. 

The fatigue of metals, with chapters on 

the fatigues of wood and of concrete. 

1927. 691 M82f 

Palmer, Elbridge Woodman. 

A course in bookbinding for vocational 
training. 1927. 686 P17 

RoEHL, Louis Michael. 

Household carpentry. 1927. (Practi- 
cal crafts series) 694 R71h 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

Dow, George Francis. 

The arts & crafts in New England, 
1704-1775. 1927. q709.74 D7 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



193 



Heywood, Florence. 

The important pictures of the Louvre. 
1927. 708.4 H62 

Phillips, Duncan. 

A collection in the making ; a survey of 
the problems involved in collecting 
pictures, together with brief estimates 
of the painters in the Phillips memo- 
rial galleiT. cl926. (The Phillips 
publications) q708 P5 

liiCHARDS, Charles Russell. 

Industrial art and the museum. 1927. 

708 R51 

WiLENSKi, Reginald Howard. 

The modern movement in art. [1927] 

709 W67 



I 



GARDENS AND GARDENING. 

Caltheop, Dion Clayton. 

The chann of gardens. 1910. 

716 C16c 



A diary of an eighteenth-century 

garden. 716 C16 

Heineich, .Julius J. 

The window flower garden. 1880. 

716 H46 
KiFT, Jane Leslie. 

The woman's flower garden, indoor and 
outdoor. 1927. 716 K47 

SCUDDER, Ml'S S. O. 

Iris, the eldest flower in history. [1927] 

c716 S43 
White, Edward Albert. 

American orchid culture. 1927. 

716.2 W58 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Allen, .John Gordon. 

The smaller house of to-day. [1926] 

728 A427s 

Anderson, William James, d Spiers, 
Richard Phene. 
The architecture of ancient Greece. 
[1927] 722.8 A55ar 



The architecture of ancient Rome. 

Rev. and rewritten by Thomas Ashby. 
[1927] 722.7 A 55 

Barman, Christian Augustus. 

Balbus ; or. The future of architecture. 
[1926] [To-day and to-morrow] 

720 B25 



Briggs, Martin Shaw. 

The architect in history. 1927. 

720.9 B85 
Cram, Ralph Adams. 

The ruined abbeys of Great Britain. 
cl927. 726 C88r 

Haebeson, John Frederick. 

The study of architectural design, with 

special reference to the program of 

the Beaux-arts institute of design. 

1927. (The Pencil points library) 

q729 H2 

King, Georgiana Goddard. 

Mudejar. 1927. (Bryn Mawr notes 
and monographs) 720.946 K52 

Price, Charles Matlack. 

The A B C of architecture. cl927. 

720 P94ab 
Reagan, Oliver, ed. 

American architecture of the twentieth 
century. cl927. f724.9 R2 

Remey, Charles Mason. 

A nonagonal temple in the Indian style 
of architecture. 1927. q726 R3no 

Gift. 

Wren, Sir Christopher. 

Hampton court palace, 1689-1702. 
1927. V. 4. (The Wren society. 
[Publications]) q729 W9 

SCULPTURE. POTTERY. 

Belden, Bauman Lowe. 

Indian peace medalsi issued in the 
United States. 1927. q737 B4 



Bloom, James Harvey. 
English seals. 1906. 
books) 



(The antiquary's 
737 B65 



Hayden, Arthur. 

Spode & his successors ; a history of the 
pottery Stoke-on-Trent, 1765-1865. 
[1925] 738 H41s 

Knittle, Rhea Mansfield. 

Early American glass. cl927. (Cen- 
tury library of American antiques) 

738 K71 
Walston, Sir Charles. 

Alcamenes and the establishment of the 
classical type in Greek art. 1926. 

q733 W22 

DRAWING. DECORATION. DESIGN. 

Blake, Vernon. 

The art and craft of drawing. 1927. 

741 B636ar 



194 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Desaint, a. 

Ideas & studies in stencilling & deco- 
rating. [1927] q747 D4 

Fifty figure drawings, a selected group 
of the best figure drawings submitted 
to the Fifty best drawing jury. 
[1927] 743 F46 

HoAVE-NuRSE, Wilfrid. 

Berkshire vale. 1927. vf741 A3 

Redington, Bemice Orpha. 

Old-time quilts. cl927. 745 R317 

Renggli, Edward. 

How to draw the head in light & shade. 
cl927. q743 R4 

Sprague, Elizabeth, <£• Sprague, Curtiss. 
How to design monograms. cl927. 

745 S76 

Wolfe, Mrs Ffrida A., d Wolfe, A. T. 
How to identify oriental rugs. 1927. 

q745 W8 

PAINTING AND PAINTERS. 

Abbott, Edith R. 

The great painters in relation to the 
European tradition. cl927. 750 A12 

Bell, Clive. 

Landmarks in nineteenth-century paint- 
ing. 1927. 750 B433 

Berenson, Bernhard. 

Three essays in method. 1927. 

q759.5 B4t 
Bernstein, M. 

Colour in art and daily life. 1928. 

752 B53 
Flint, Ralph. 

Albert Sterner, his life and his art. 
1927. q759.2 S8 

FuRST, Herbert Ernest Augustus. 

The art of still-life painting. 1927. 
(Universal art series) 750 F99 

HOTJSSER, F. B. 

A Canadian art movement, the story of 
the Group of seven. 1926. 759.1 H84 

JoYANT, Maurice. 

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. 1927. 

q759.4 L38 
Lambotte, Paul. 

Flemish painting before the eighteenth 
century. 1927. q759.9 L2 



LiTTLEJOHNS, John. 

How to enjoy pictures. 1927. q750 L7 

RuTTER, Frank Vane Phipson. 

The old masters. (Hodder and Stough- 
ton's people's library) 750 R98 

Stirling, Mrs Anna Maria Diana Wil- 
helmina (Pickering). 
The Richmond papers from the corre- 
spondence and manuscripts of George 
Richmond . . . and his son, Sir 
William Richmond. [1926] 

759.2 R53s 

ENGRAVING. 

Bellows, George Wesley. 

George W. Bellows : his lithographs. 
1927. q763 B4 

Bennett, Richard. 

England and Ireland, twelve woodcuts. 
1927. (University of Washington 
chapbooks) q761 B4 



Chatteeton, Edward Keble. 
Old ship prints. [1927] 



q760 C49 



Landaxter, Bella C. 

Early American trade cards from the 
collection of Bella C. Landauer. 
1927. vq760 L2 

Priestly, Anna Freeborn. 

How to know Japanese colour prints. 
1927. q760 P9 

Smith, Charles William. 

Linoleum block printing. cl925. 

760 S64 
Stewart, Basil. 

Subjects portrayed in Japanese colour- 
prints. 1922. f760 S84 

Walcot, WiUiam. 

William Walcot. 1927. (Modern mas- 
ters of etching) 767 W15 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 
MOVING PICTURES. 

Baker, Thomas Thorne. 

Wireless pictures and television. 1926. 

778 B16 
Robinson, Henry Peach. 

Letters on landscape photography. 
1888. (Scovill's photographic series) 
770 R66I 
Talmey, AUene. 

Doug and Maiy, and others. 1927. 

c778 T15 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



195 



MUSIC AND MUSICIANS. 

Antrim, Doron K. 

Teaching music and making it pay. 
cl927. 780.7 A63 

Balfe, Michael William. 

The Bohemian girl; an opera in three 
acts. cl902. q782.5 B1 

Baltzell, Winton James. 

Noted names in music, with concise 
biographical data. cl927. (The 
pocket music student) r780.19 B19 

Bond, Mrs Carrie (Jacobs). 
The roads of melody. 1927. c780.2 B71 

CowEN, 8ir Frederick Hymen. 

Songs for my little ones, from "Punch." 
cl927. q784.4 C8 

Emekson, Luther Orlando. 

The Harp of Judah. [1863] 784.8 E53 

FiELDEN, Thomas. 

The science of pianoforte technique. 
1927. 786 F45 

Hamilton, Clarence Grant. 

Epochs in musical progress. cl926. 

780.9 H21e 
Harbin, E. O. 

Parodology. 1927. 784.4 H25 

Hull, Arthur Eaglefield. 

Music, classical, romantic & modem. 
1927. (Dent's international library 
of books on music) 780.9 H913 

Lehmeb, Derrick Norman. 

Seven Indian songs from the Yosemite 
Valley. cl924. qc784.4 L5 

Mursell, James L. 

Principles of musical education. ' 1927. 
(Experimental education series) 

780.7 M98 
Pound, Ezra Loomis. 

Antheil and the Treatise on harmony. 
1927. 781 P87 

PULVER, Jeffrey. 

A biographical dictionary of old Eng- 
lish music. 1927. r780.3 P98b 



— Johannes Brahms, 
ters of music) 



1926. (Mas- 
780.2 881 p 



Richardson, Mrs Ethel (Park), comp. 
American mountain songs. cl927. 

q784.8 R5 



Sabaeev, Leonaid Leonidovich. 

Modern Russian composers. cl927. 

780.19 S11 
Sandburg, Carl, ed. 

The American songbag. cl927. 

q784.8 S3 
Scott, Charles Kennedy. 

The Chelsea song book. q784.4 S422 

Smith, Cicely Fox, ed. 

A book of shanties. [1927] 784.4 S64 

Spaeth, Sigmund Gottfried. 

Weep some more, my lady. 1927. 

q784.8 S7w 

Sullivan, Herbert, c§ Flower, Walter 
Newman. 
Sir Arthur Sullivan, his life, letters & 
diaries. cl927. 780.2 S949s 

Szalatnay, Rafael D. 

Bohemian Christmas music for chil- 
dren. cl927. 786 S99 

Thompson, Herbert. 

Wagner & Wagenseil ; a source of Wag- 
ner's opera 'Die meistersinger.' 1927. 
782.2 T47 
Vernon, Grenville, comp. 

Yankee doodle-doo ; a collection of songs 
of the early American stage. cl927. 
q784.4 V5 
WiER, Albert E. 

The child's own music book. cl918. 

q784.8 W6 

THEATRE. 
AMATEUR THEATRICALS. 

Agate, James Evershed. 

Playgoing. 1927. 792 A26p 

Chambers, Edmund Kerchever. 

The Elizabethan stage. 1923. 4 v. 

792 C44e 
Curtis, Agnes. 

Christmas comedies ; a collection of 
one-act Christmas plays for teen-age 
young people. cl927. 793.2 C978 

Dix, Beulah Marie. 

A legend of Saint Nicholas and other 
plays. cl927. 793,2 D61 

Isaacs, Edith J. R., ed. 

Theatre, essays on the arts of the 
theatre. 1927. 792 173 

Kaser, Arthur Leroy. 

Talking acts for two. cl927. 793 K23t 



196 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Lawrence, William John. 


Foster, Robert Frederick. 




Pre-restoration stage studies. 1927. 


Foster's bridge for beginners. cl927. 


792 L424pr 




795 F75br 


La^vton, V. B. 


Lasker, Emanuel. 




Ballads for acting. [1927] 793 L425 


Lasker's manual of chess. 


cl927. 

794 L34I 


Mackay, Constance D'Arcy. 


Stbingek, Charles H. 




Children's theatres and plays. 1927. 


Ten secrets of modern mag 


ic. 1927. 


(The Drama league library of the 




791 S91 


theatre arts) 793.2 M153c 


RECREATION. 




Mills, J/?-s Winifred H., d Dunn, Mrs 


Browne, Moses. 




Louise M. 


Angling sports. 1773. 


799.1 B88 


Marionettes, masks and shadows. 


Curry, Manfred. 




1927. 792 M65 


Yacht racing. 1927. 


797 C97 



OULD, Hermon. 

Joan the maid, a legend of Joan of 
Arc; play in one act. cl925. 
( French's international copyrighted 
. . . edition of the works of the best 
authors) 793 093 

Sheriwgham, George. 
Design in the theater. 1927. q792 S5 

PAGEANTS. DANCING. 

Frost, Helen. 

Oriental and character dances. 1927. 

q793.1 F9o 

"Good morning" ; after a sleep of twenty- 
five years, old-fashioned dancing is 
being revived by Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Ford . 1926. 793.1 G64 

Hanley, Elizabeth Hines. 

The perfect gift. 792.7 H24 

Shafter, Mary Severance. 

American Indian and other folk dances 
for schools, pageants and play- 
grounds. 1927. q793.1 S52am 

Sutton, Vida Ravenscroft. 

A pageant of women of the sixteenth 
century. cl927. 792.7 S96 

AMUSEMENTS. 
Elsom, James Claude, d Trilling, 
Blanche Mathilde. 
Social games and group dances. cl927. 

796 E49 

FoBBUSU, William Byron, d Allen, 
Harry R. 
The book of games for home, school, 
and playground. cl927. 796 F69 



HoFER, Mari Ruef. 

Camp recreations and pageants. 1927. 
796.54 H69 
Jones, Sheridan R. 

Black bass and bass craft ; the life 
habits of the two bass. 1924. 

799.1 J79 
LowMAN, Guy Sumner. 

Practical football, and how to teach it. 
1927. 797 L91 

Martin, Harry Brownlow. 

Pictorial golf. cl928. 796.35 M38 

Slocum, Eugene E. 

Ye gods & little fishes. 1927. 

799.1 S63 

[Thompson, John Baptiste de Macklot] 

Modern bait and fiy casting, by Ozai'k 

Ripley [pseud.] 1928. 799.1 T47 

LITERATURE. 

Adams, Franklin Pierce. 

Half a loaf. 1927. 818 A21 

Apuleius Madaueensis. 

The most pleasant and delectable tale 
of the marriage of Cupid and Psyche. 
1926. c878 A65 



ASQUITH, Herbert Henry, 
Speeches. 1927. 



825 A84s 



Athenaeus. 

The Deipnosophists, with an English 
translation by Charles Burton Gulick. 
1927. (The Loeb classical library. 
[Gi-eek authors]) 888 A86dg 

Ball, James Dyer. 

Rhythms and rhymes in Chinese 
climes : a lecture on Chinese poetry 
and poets. 1907. 895.1 B18 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



197 



BoK, Edward William. 
Perhaps I am. 1928. 



818 B68 



Boyd, Ernest Augustus. 

Literary blasphemies. 1927. 

820.9 B78I 
BoYNTON, Percy Holmes. 

iNIore contemporary Americans. cl927. 
810.9 B79m 
Cicero, Marcus Tullius. 

The letters to his friends, with an 
English translation by W. Glynn 
Williams. 1927. (The Loeb classi- 
cal library. [Latin authors] ) 

875 C56wil 

Cl.IFFORD, W. G. 

Books in bottles, the curious in litera- 
ture. [1926] 824 C63 

CooLEY, Charles Horton. 

Life and the student. 1927. 814 C774 



Cowling, George Herbert. 
Chaucer. [1927] 



821.17 Bco 



Dickens, Charles. 

Some rogues and vagabonds of Dickens. 
[1927] 828 D54zd 

Dillingham, Louise Bulkley. 

The creative imagination of Theophile 
Gautier, a study in literary psychol- 
ogy. [1927] ( Psychologcal review 
publications. Psychological mono- 
graphs) q843 G2zd 

DiNSMOEE, E. F. 

The false philosophy in Mr. Markham's 
poem. c814 D58 

Ernle, Rowland Edmund Prothero, iaron. 

The light reading of our ancestors : 

chapters in the growth of the English 

novel. 823.01 E71 

Fagin, Nathan Bryllion. 

The phenomenon of Sherwood Ander- 
son ; a study in American life & 
letters. 1927. 810.9 F15 

Fielding, Henry. 

The Shakespeare Head edition of Field- 
ing's novels. 1926. 10 v. 828 F45s 

French, Robert Dudley. 

A Chaucer handbook. 1927. 821.17 Df 

Galsworthy, John. 

Castles in Spain and other screeds. 
1927. 824 G17c 



Gardner, Edmund Garratt. 

The story of Italian literature. 1927. 
(Things-to-know series) 850.9 G22 

Gellius, Aulus. 

The Attic nights of Aulus Gellius, witli 
an English translation by John C. 
Rolfe. 3 V. (The Loeb classical 
library. [Latin authors] ) 878 031 

Gordon, George Stuart. 

Companionable books. 1927. 

820.9 G66 
Harper's monthly magazine. 

Harper essays. 1927. 814.08 H29 

Hastings, William Thomson, ed. 

Contemporary essays. cl928. 824 H35 

Hauff, Wilhelm. 

The wine-ghosts of Bremen. 1889. 

833 H36w 
Hazlitt, William. 

New writings : second series, collected 
by P. P. Howe. 1927. 824 H43n1 

Head, Franklin Harvey. 

Shakespeare's insomnia and the causes 
thereof. 1887. 822.33 Dhea 

HuBBELL, Jay Broadus, d Beaty, John 
Owen, comps. 
An introduction to drama. 1927. 

808.2 H87 
Hughes, Glenn, trans. 

Three women poets of modern Japan. 
1927. (University of Washington 
chapbooks) 895.1 H89 

Is^us. 

Isseus, with an English translation by 
Edward Seymour Forster. 1927. 
(The Loeb classical library. [Greek 
authors]) 885 I74f 

.Teffebson, Bernard Levi, d Peckham, 
Han-y Houston. 
Creative prose writing. 1927. 

808.3 J45 
King, Joseph Leonard, jr. 

Dr. George William Bagby ; a study of 

Virginian literature, 1850-1880. 1927. 

810.9 K53 

LiEBEB, Maxim, <£ Williams, Blanche 
Colton, eds. 
(ireat stories of all nations. 1927. 

823 L71 
Megroz, R. L. 

Francis Thompson : the poet of earth in 
heaven. [1927] 821 T47zm 



198 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Mencken, Henry Louis. 

James Branch Cabell. 1927. 

810.9 M53j 

Menckeniana, a schimpflexikon. 1928. 

814 IVI53Z 
INIuRBAY, Gilbert. 

The classical tradition in poetry. 1927. 
808.1 M98 

QuiNN, Arthur Hobson. 

A history of the American drama from 
the civil war to the present day. 
1927. 2 V. 812.09 Q7h 

RiCHET, Charles Robert. 

The natural history of a savant, trans- 
lated from the French by Sir Oliver 
Lodge. 1927. 848 R52 



SiNCLAiE, Upton Beall. 
Money writes! 1927. 



810.9 S61 



Smollett, Tobias George. 

The Shakespeare Head edition of Smol- 
lett's novels. 1925-26. 11 v. 

828 S666 
Sterne, Laurence. 

The Shakespeare Head edition of the 
works of Laurence Sterne. 1926-27. 
7 V. 828 S83 

Wells, Henry Willis. 

The realm of literature. 1927. 

801 W45 

Wilkinson, Mrs Marguerite Ogden 
(Biglow). 
New voices ; new ed. rev. and enl. 1928. 
821.09 W68a 

WoOLBERT, Charles Henry. 

The fundamentals of speech ; a text 
book of delivery. Rev. ed. 1927. 

808.5 W91a 
WooLF, Leonard Sidney. 

Essays on literature, history, politics, 
etc. 1927. 824 W913 

Wright, WUlard Huntington, ed. 

The great detective stories ; a chronol- 
ogical anthology. 1927. 808.3 W95 

POETRY. 

Anthologia graeca. Selections. English. 
Others abide, by Humbert Wolfe. 1927. 
881 A62wo 
Blake, William. 

The marriage of heaven and hell. 1927. 
q821 B6ma 



Songs of experience. 1927. 

vq821 B6 

Songs of innocence. 1926. 

vq821 B6s 

BouRDiLLON, Francis William. 
Ailes d'alouette. 1892. 821 B76ai 

Gift. 

Cabot, Mrs Elise (Pumpelly). 

Balloon moon. cl927. 811 C1 16 

The Cambridge book of lesser poets. 
1927. 821.08 C17 

Caswell, Edward Samuel, ed. 

Canadian singers and their songs; a 

collection of portraits, autograph 

poems and brief biographies. cl925. 

821.08 C356 

Chalfin, Mattie Mabel. 

Fine and fussy feathers. el925. 

c811 C43 
[Cnltr Tsz-YUNG] 
Cantonese love-songs. 1904. 2 v. 

q895.1 C5 
CoLUM, Padraic. 

Creatures, with drawings by Boris 
Artzybashefe. 1927. 821 C726c 

De Jean, Louis Leon. 

Winged trails. cl927. c811 D326w 

Delpit, Louise, ed. 

Representative contemporary French 
lyrics, 1885-1925. cl927. (Inter- 
national modem language series) 

841.08 D36 

EcKSTOBM, Mrs Fannie (Hardy), <6 
Smyth, Mai-y Winslow. 
Ministrelsy of Maine. 1927. 

811.08 El 9 
Edwards, Richard. 

The paradise of dainty devices. 1927. 
q821 E265 
Freeman, Robert. 

The land I live in. 1928. c811 F85 

Gaige, Grace, comp. 

Recitations for younger children. 1927. 
808.8 G13r 
Gessler, Clifford. 

Kanaka moon. 1927. 811 G39 



GiBBS, Arthur Hamilton. 
Bluebottles. 1928. 



821 G44 



GoTTSCHALK, Laura Riding. 

The close ehaplet. 821 068 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



199 



Herbert, George. 

The works of George Herbert in prose 
and verse. 821 H53w 

Heredia, Jose Maria de. 

The trophies ; sonnets . . . tr. by F. 
Sewall. 1900. 841 H54t 

HooLEY, Arthur, ed. 

The Spirit of St. Louis ; one hundred 
poems, edited by Charles Vale 
[pseud.l. cl927. 808.1 H78 

Howard, Esme Joseph Henry Sigismondo, 
comp. 
Music in the poets, an anthology. 
[1927] 821.08 H84 

Inman, Arthur Crew. 

The night express. cl927. 811 I57n 



IviNS, Edward Gordon. 
This way out. cl927. 



811 195 



Jeffers, John Robinson. 

The women at Point Sur. 1927. 

c811 J45w 
Kemp, Harry, ed. 

The bronze treasury ; an anthology of 
81 obscure English poets together 
with their biographical portraits. 
1927. 821.08 K32 

Laidlaw, Alexander Hamilton. 

Soldier songs and love songs. [1898] 

811 L18 
Lasky, Jesse L., jr. 

Listening to silence. 1927. c811 L341 

LIPPMANN, Arthur L. 

Gay matter ; good-natured verse. 1927. 

811 L766 
Mann, Cameron, ip., comp. 

A concordance to the English poems of 
George Herbert. 1927. r821 H53zm 

The Oxford book of American verse, 
chosen & edited by Bliss Carman. 
1927, 811.08 098 

Peabody, Josephine Preston. 

Collected poems. 1927. 811 P35c 

Pinckney, Josephine. 

Sea-drinking cities. 1927. 811 P64 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington. 

Tristram. 1927. 811 R65t 

Rogers, Samuel. 

The pleasures of memory. (The choice 
series) 821 R72pl 



Romanes, Alva. 

The great awakening. 1927. c81 1 R75 

Speyee, Mrs Leonora (von Stosch). 
American poets. cl923. 811.08 S75 

Stoddart, Thomas Tod. 

The death-wake ; or, Lunacy. 1895. 

821 S86 

Weaver, John Van Alstyne. 

To youth. 1928. 811 W363t 

Wheelock, John Hall. 

The bright doom ; a book of poems. 
1927. 811 W56br 

DRAMA. 

Anderson, Maxwell. 

Saturday's children ; a comedy in three 
acts. 1927. 812 A54s 

[AsHTON, Winifred] 
Mariners, by Clemen ce Dane [pseud.] 
1927. 822 A82m 

Bolton, Guy Reginald, d Middleton, 
George. 

Adam and Eva. cl923. (French's 

standard library edition) 812 B69ad 

Brandon, Dorothy. 

The outsider; a play in three acts. 
cl926. (French's acting edition) 

822 B819 
Bbighouse, Harold. 

The little liberty ; a comedy in one act. 
cl927. (French's acting edition) 

' 822 B855li 

The night of "Mr. H." ; a Charles 

Lamb pastiche. cl927. (French's 
acting edition) 822 B855n 

When did they meet again ? a play 



in one act. cl927. (French's acting 
edition) 822 B855w 

Brooks, George S., & Lister, Walter B. 
Spread eagle ; a drama and a fiction for 
patriots. 1927. 812 B873 

Chamberlain, Beulah. 

Treasure Island, a dramatization in five 

acts. cl926. (Sergei's acting drama) 

822 C443 

Chikamatsu. 

Masterpieces of Chikamatsu, the Jap- 
anese Shakespeare, translated by 
Asataro Miyamori. 1926. 895.2 C53 



200 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Cohan, George Michael. 

A prince there was ; a comedy in three 
acts. cl927. (French's standard 
library edition) 812 C67p 

Connors, Barry. 

"The Patsy" ; a comedy in three acts. 
cl927. (French's standard library 
edition) 812 C75 



CuMMiNGS, Edward Estlin. 
Him. 1927. 



812 C9712 



CusHiNG, Tom. 

The devil in the cheese ; a fantastic 
comedy in three acts. 1927. 

812 C985 

Drinkwater, John. 

Bird in hand ; a play in three acts. 
1927. 822 D78b 

Frank, Bruno. 

Twelve thousand ; a play in three acts, 
translated from the German by Wil- 
liam A. Drake. (The theatre of 
today) 832 F82 

Hamilton, Cosmo, d Reilly, Frank C. 
"Pickwick" ; a play in three acts. 
1927. 822 H217p 

Kaser, Arthur Leroy. 

Right over the footlights ; a book of 
monologues for vaudeville and gen- 
eral entertainment purposes. cl927. 
812 K193 

Katzin, Winifred. 

Eight European plays. 1927. 

Lawson, John Howard. 
Loud speaker; a farce. 



808.2 K19 

cl927. 

812 L425I 



Lescarbot, Marc. 

Neptune's theatre ; the first existing 
play written and produced in North 
America, 1606 ; translated from the 
French by Edna B. Holman. cl927. 
(French's international copyrighted 
. . . edition of the works of the best 
authors) 842 L62n 

Ltjdwig, Emil. 

Bismarck ; the trilogy of a fighter ; 
three plays. 1927. 832 L94 



Machiavelli, NiccolS. 
Mandragola. cl927. 



MacMillan, Mary Louise. 

Plenty of time ; a comedy in one act. 
1928. (Appleton short plays) 

812 M16pl 

Maugham, William Somerset. 

The letter, a play in three acts. 1927. 
822 M44le 

O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone. 

Lazarus laughed (1925-26), a play for 
an imaginative theatre. 1927. 

812 0581 
Phillpotts, Eden. 

The blue comet ; a comedy in three acts. 
cl927. (French's standard library 
edition) 822 P565b 

Phillpotts, Eden, d Phillpotts, Adelaide 
Eden. 
Yellow sand ; a comedy in three acts. 

1926. (French's standard library 
edition) 822 P565y 

Rose, Edward Everett. 

Rose of the Ghetto ; comedy drama in 
four acts. cl927. (French's stand- 
ard library edition) 812 R79r 

Shay, Frank, ed. 

Fifty more contemporai*y one-act plays. 
1928. 808.2 S53f 

SiFTON, Paul. 

The belt ; a New playwright's theatre 
production. cl927. 812 S57 

Strong, Austin. 

Seventh heaven ; a play in three acts. 
cl922. (French's standard library 
edition) 812 S92s 

Tompkins, Juliet Wilbor. 

Once there was a princess ; a comedy in 
three acts and a prologue. cl927. 
(French's standard library edition) 

812 T662 
Wilde, Percival. 

Three-minute plays : Innocentia, Musi- 
calia, Immoralia. cl927. 812 W672t 

CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

Curtis, Christine Turnei-. 

Amarilis. 1927. cC978 

DoBiE, Charles Caldwell. 

The arrested moment & other stories. 

1927. cD633ar 



852 M14 



FiGUEROA RamIrez, Medardo. 
The valley of Josaphat. cl927. 



cF475 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



201 



Kauffman, Reginald Wright. 

The overland trail. 1927. cK21 



Kyne, Peter Bernard. 
They also serve. 1927. 



cK99t 



Murray, William Henry Harrison. 

Daylight land. 1888. cM984 



Perkins, Charles EUiott. 
The pinto horse. 1927. 



qcP448 



Perkins, Mrs Lucy (Fitch). 

The pioneer twins. 1927. cP449 

TuTTLE, Wilbur C. 

Thicker than water. 1927. cT967 

Wiley, Hugh. 

Manehu blood. 1927. cW676 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

Osten, Hans Henning von der. 

Explorations in Hittite Asia Minor. 
[1927] (Oriental institute commu- 
nications) q913.35 08 

RoDD, Sir James Rennell. 

Homer's Ithaca, a vindication of tradi- 
tion. 1927. 913.83 R68 

GENEALOGY. HERALDRY. 

Bolton, Charles Knowles. 

Bolton's American armoi-y. 1927. 
(Useful reference series) 929.8 B69 

Clemens, William Montgomery, ed. 
North and South Carolina marriage 
records, from the earliest colonial 
days to the civil war. cl927. 

q929.3 C6n 

KxVSTON, Pa. First reformed church. 
Some of the first settlers of "the forks 
■ of the Delawai-e" and their descend- 



ants. 1902. 



929.3 E135 



Henry, Margaret Birdenia, d MUler, 
Mrs Mattie May (Henry). 
The histoiT of the Henry family of 
"Flower Hill," Ireland. 1926. 

929.2 H523 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Vital records of Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts, to the end of the year 1849. 
1926. (Essex institute, Salem, Mass. 
Vital records of the towns of Massa- 
chusetts) 929.3 L42 



BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Balch, William Balston. 

The life and public services of James 
G. Blaine, with the stoi"y of John A. 
Logan's career. cl884. 923.2 317 

Cecil, Algernon. 

British foreign secretaries, 1807-1916. 
1927. 923.2 C38 



Cooper, Anice Page. 

Authors and others. 1927. 



928 C776 



Ferris, Helen Josephine, d Moore, Vir- 
ginia. 
Girls who did. el927. 920.7 F39 



Finger, Charles Joseph. 
Romantic rascals. 1927. 

Gleichen -RUSSWURM, 
freiherr von. 
The world's lure. 1927. 



923.41 F49r 
Alexander, 

920.7 G55 



Griggs, Edward Howard. 

American statesmen ; an interpretation 
of our history and heritage. 1927. 

923.2 G85 

Howe, Mark Antony De Wolfe, ed. 

Later years of the Saturday club, 
1870-1920. 1927. 928.1 H85 



LuDWiG, Emil. 

Genius and character. 



cl927. 



920 L94 

Peabody, Francis Greenwood. 

Reminiscences of present-day saints. 

1927. 922 P35 

Contents : Ephraim P e a b o d y. — 
Andrew Preston Peabody. — Jam-es 
Freeman Clarke. — Friedrich AugTist 
Gottreu Tholuck. — Edward Everett 
Hale. — Charles Carroll Everett. — 
Alfred Tredway White. — P h i 11 i p s 
Brooks. — S a m u e 1 Chapman Arm- 
strong. — H e n r y Drummond. — C a r 1 
Hilty. — Louisa and Georgina Schuyler. 
— Frederic Illsley Phillips. — Charles 
William Eliot. 

Sergeant, Philip Walsingham. 
Rogues and scoundrels. 1924. 

923.41 S48 

Waldron, WiUiam Watson, ed. 

Washington Irving and contemporaries, 
in thirty life sketches. [1863] 

928.1 W16 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Alcott Morrow, Mrs Honore (McCue) 
Willsie. 
The father of Little women. 1927. 

B A3551m 



202 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Andersen. Andeesen, Hans Christian, 
The true story of my life. 1926. 
(Scandinavian classics) B A544a 

Anderson. Chase, Cleveland B. 

Sherwood Anderson. 1927. (Modem 
American writers) B A549c 

Andrews. Andbews, Mrs Marietta 
(Minnigerode). 
Memoirs of a poor relation ; being the 
story of a post-war southern girl and 
her battle with destiny, cl927. 

B A568 

Apperley. Appebley, Charles James. 
My life and times, by Nimrod. 1927, 

B A646 

Arlilay. Masefield, Mrs Muriel Agnes 
(Bussell), 
The story of Fanny Burney, being an 
introduction to the Diary & letters 
of Madame d'Arblay. 1927. 

B A665ma 

Baudelaire. Baudelaiee, Charles Pierre, 

The letters of Baudelaire, translated by 

Arthur Symons. 1927. B B338 

Beaconsfield. Maueois, Andre. 

Disraeli ; a picture of the Victorian age. 
1928. B B365ma 

Birkenhead. Biekenhead, Frederick 
Edwin Smith, 1st earl of. 
Law, life and letters. [1927] 2 v. 

B B6192 

Bwgoyne. HtTDLESTON, Francis Josiah. 
Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne, cl927. 

B Bg575h 
Burnett. BuENETT, Vivian, 
The romantick lady (Frances Hodgson 
Burnett), 1927, B B9643b 

Carlyle. Wilson, David Alec. 

Carlyle at his zenith (1848-53). 1927. 
B C2865w3 

Cavendish. Cavendish, Lucy Caroline 
( Ly ttelton ) lady. 
The diary of Lady Frederick Cavendish, 
edited by John Bailey. [1927] 2 v. 

B C381 

Gavour. Pal:£ologue, Georges Maurice. 
Cavour. 1927. B C383p 

Goates. Reed, Mrs Laura (Coates), ed. 

In memoriam, Sarah Walter Chandler 

Coates. 1898. B C652r 



Golden. Dawson, WiUiam Harbutt. 
Richard Cobden and foreign policy. 
[1926] B C655d 

CoBur. Kebb, Albert Boardman. 

Jacques Coeur, merchant prince of the 
middle ages. 1927. B C673k 

Conrad. Aubby, Georges Jean. 

Joseph Conrad in the Congo. 1926. 

vB C754aub 
CONEAD, Joseph. 



Joseph Conrad, life and letters. 1927. 
2 V. B C754au 

Crane. Ceane, William H. 
Footprints and echoes. cl927. 

B C8913 

Cranmer. Deane, Anthony Charles. 
The life of Thomas Cranmer, archbishop 
of Canterbury. 1927. (Great Eng- 
lish churchmen series) B C8918d 

Groce. Cboce, Benedetto. 
An autobiography, translated from the 
Italian by R. G. Collingwood. 1927. 

B C937 

Cromwell. Dbinkwateb, John. 

Cromwell, a character study, (Hodder 
and Stoughton's people's libi'ary) 

B C946d 

Davis. Rowland, Eron Opha (Moore). 

Varina HoweU, wife of Jefferson Davis, 

1927. B D264r 



Drake. Rogees, Cameron. 
Drake's quest. 1927. 



B D761r 



Drew. Wood, Peggy. 

A splendid gypsy : John Drew. 1928. 
B D7761W 

Duncan. Duncan, Isadora. 

My life. 1927. B D9113 

Durant. Dueant, William James. 

Transition ; a sentimental story of one 
mind and one era. 1927. B D9515 

Foy. FoY, Eddie, d Harlow, Alvin Fay. 
Clowning through life. cl928. 

B F796 

Prance. Stewabt, Herbert Leslie. 
Anatole France, the Parisian. 1927. 

B F8153st 



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203 



Frick. Hakvey, George Brinton 
McOleUan. 
Henry Clay Frick, the man. 1928. 

B F8972h 

Froehel. Fboebel, Friedrich Wilhelm 

August. 

Autobiography. Tr. and annotated by 

Bmilie Michaelis . . . and H. Keatley 

Moore . . . [12th ed. 1915] B F925 

Gary. [United States steel corporation] 
Elbert Henry Gary ; a memorial. 1927. 

B G244u 

Geil. Wilson, Philip WhitweU. 

An explorer of changing horizons. 
cl927. B G3123W 

Gladstone. Knaplund, Paul. 

Gladstone and Britain's imperial policy. 
[1927] B G543k 

Graham. Maxtone-Geaham, Mrs Mar- 
garet Ethel ( Kington Blair Oliphant) . 
The beautiful Mrs Graham and the 
Cathcart circle. 1927. B M4649 

Greely. Gkeely, Adolphus Washington. 
Reminiscences of adventure and service ; 
a record of sixty-five years. 1927. 

B G7946 

Heckman. Heckman, Helen Elizabeth. 
My life transformed. 1928. B H4493 

Heine. Beowne, Lewis, d Weihl, Elsa. 
That man Heine. 1927. 831.75 Bb 

Hudson. PowYS, Llewelyn. 

Henry Hudson. 1928. (The Golden 
hind series) B H885p 

Hiigel. Hugel, Friedrich, freiherr von. 
Selected letters, 1896-1924, edited with 
a memoir by Bernard Holland. 1928. 

B H891 

Johnson. Delaplaine, Edward Schley. 
The life of Thomas Johnson, member of 
the Continental congress. 1927. 

B J698cl 
Lee. Lee, Richard Henry. 

The letters of Richard Henry Lee. 
1911-14. 2 V. B L4793 

Letts. Kilnee, William H. B. 
Arthur Letts, 1862-1923. 1927. 

cB L6513k 

Lincoln. Baeeett, Joseph Hartwell. 
Life of Abraham Lincoln, presenting his 



early history, political career, and 
speeches in and out of Congress. 
1888. B L736barrl 

— Baeton, William Eleazar. 



The women Lincoln loved. cl927. 

B L736barto 

Lincoln, Abraham. 



Lincoln letters, hitherto unpublished, in 
the library of Brown university and 
other Providence libraries. 1927. 

B L736CUS 

Mathews, Stella Tyler. 



The life of Abraham Lincoln, in verse. 
cl923. B L736mat 

Livingstone. Finger, Charles Joseph. 
David Livingstone. 1927. (Benefactors 
of mankind) B L788f 

MacKaye. MacKaye, Percy. 

Epoch; the life of Steele MacKaye. 
cl927. 2 V. B M153m 

Maxim. Maxim, Hudson. 

The rise of an American inventor. 
1927. B M4642J 

Napoleon. Wilson, Robert McNair. 
Napoleon : the man. cl928. B N216wi 

Norton. Dkesslee, Albert. 

Emperor Norton. 1927. cB N 8853d 

Parks. Paeks, Leighton. 

Turnpikes and dirt roads. 1927. 

B P252 
Place. Wallas, Graham. 

The life of Francis Place (1771-1854). 
4th ed. [1925] B P697w 

Pole. Gasquet, Francis Aidan, cardinal. 

Cardinal Pole and his early friends. 

1927. B P763g 

Raousset-Boulbon. Soulie, Maurice. 
The wolf cub. cl927. cB R215s 

Rasputin. IUstjpov, Feliks Feliksovieh, 
kniaz. 
Rasputin. 1927. B R227i 

Saniorn. Hoye, James. 

A few pages in appreciation of and in 
memory of William Edward Sanborn. 
1927. cB S1987h 

Gift. 

Sand. Howe, Mrs Marie (Jenney). 
George Sand : the search for loVe. 1927. 

B S213ho 



204 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



SJipIIp!/. Peck. Walter Edwiu. 

Shpllpy. his life and work. 1927. 2 v. 

B S545pe 
Sitwell. Megeoz, R. L. 

The three Sitwells, a biographical and 
critical study. 1927. B S623m 

Smith. Hapgood, Nonnan, d Moskowitz, 
Henry. 
Up from the city streets : Alfred E. 
Smith. cl927. B S6421h 

SinWi. Chattekton, Edward Keble. 
Captain John Smith. 1927. ( The 
Golden hind series) B S652c 

Stanford. Dxjnlap, Boutwell. 

Some facts concerning Leland Stanford 
and his contemporaries in Placer 
county. 1923. qcB S78d 

Stillinan. Buer, Mrs Anna Robeson 
(Brown) . 
The portrait of a banker : James Still- 
man. 1927. B S8573b 

Swift. Swift, Louis Franklin, d Van 
yiissingen, Arthur. 
The Yankee of the Yards. 1927. 

B S9773s 

Gift. 

Thoreau. Atkinson, Justin Brooks. 
Henry Thoreau, the cosmic Yankee. 
1927. B T488at 

Ticeed. Lynch, Denis Tilden. 

"Boss" Tweed ; the story of a grim 
generation. 1927. B T9715I 

Vdllejo. Schwabacheb-Fkey stationery 
company. 
Yallejo. 1927. qcB V18s 

Vanderiilt. Smith, Arthur Douglas 
Howden. 
Commodore Vanderbilt ; an epic of 
American achievement. 1927. 

B V2282S 

Ward. Ward, Samuel Ringgold. 

Autobiography of a fugitive negro. 
1855. B W263 

Washington. Glass, Francis. 

A life of George Washington, in Latin 
prose. 1835. B W318gl 



Pkussing, Eugene Ernst. 



The estate of George Washington, 
deceased. 1927. B W318pr1 



Weems. Kellock, Harold. 

Parson Weems of the cherry-tree. 
[1928] B W397k 

WeUlnffton. Wellington, Ar-thur Wel- 
lesley, 1st duke of. 
A great man's friendship ; letters of the 
Duke of Wellington to Mary, mar- 
chioness of Salisbury, 1850-1852. 
1927. B W452b 

Wendte. Wendte, Charles William. 
The wider fellowship : memories, friend- 
ships, and endeavors for religious 
unity, 1844-1927. 1927. v. 1. 

cB W473 

VOYAGES AND TRAVEL. 

Adams, Henry Cadwallader. 

Ti'avellers' tales ; a book of marvels. 
1927. 910 A21 

KiRKHAM, Stanton Davis. 

Cruising around the world and the 
seven seas. 1927. 910 K59 

McClxjee, Herbert Reginald. 

Land-travel and seafaring. cl925. 

910 M12 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
EUROPE. 

Borders, Karl. 

Village life under the Soviets. [1927] 
(Vanguard studies of soviet Russia) 
914.7 B72 
Bkiggs, Martin Shaw. 

Rusticus, or, The future of the country- 
side. [1927] (To-day and to-morrow) 
914.2 B85 

Chambeelin, Frederick Carleton. 

The Balearics and their peoples. 1927. 
914.67 C44 

Gordon, Jan, d Gordon, Cora Josephine. 

Two vagabonds in Albania. [1927] 

914.96 G66 
GwYNN, Stephen Lucius. 

In praise of France. [1927] 914.4 G99 

Haerigan, Mildred H. 

Traveling light ; how to see Great 
Britain, France, Belgium and Hol- 
land economically, independently and 
enjoyably. cl927. 914 H29 

Jones, Sydney Robert. 

Touring England by road and byway. 
1927. 914.2 J 79 



I 



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205 



Lytton, Hon Neville Stephen. 
The English country gentleman. [1925] 

914.2 L99 
McBbide, Robert MediU. 

Towns and people of modern Germany. 
1927. 914.3 Mil 

Mato, Abigail (De Hart). 

An American lady in Paris, 1828-1829. 
1927. 914.43 M47 

Rawlings, Gertrude Burford. 

Old London. [1926] q914.21 R2 

Richardson, Leslie. 

Brittany and the Loire. [1927] 

914.41 R52 
Thomas, Lowell Jackson. 

European skyways ; the story of a tour 
of Europe by airplane. 1927. 

914 T45 
Tudor, Thomas L. 

The High Peak to Sherwood ; the hills 
and dales of old Mercia. [1926] 

914.2 T91 

Vincent, Eric Reginald Pearce. 
The Italy of the Italians. [1927] 

914.5 V76 
Ware, John N. 

How to find old Paris. 1927. 

914.43 W26 
ASIA. 
Candee, Helen Churchill. 

New journeys in old Asia ; Indo-China, 
Siam, Java, Bali. 1927. 915 C21 

Dubois, Jean Antoine. 

Hindu manners, customs and cere- 
monies. 1924. 915.4 D81 

Featherstone, Belford Kinchant. 

An unexplored pass ; a narrative of a 
,; thousand-mile journey to the Kara- 

P koram Himalayas. [1926] 

915.42 F28 
FosDiCK, Harry Emerson. 

A pilgrimage to Palestine. 1927. 

915.69 F74 
Johnson, Emory Richard. 

Interpretations. 1928. 915.1 J66 

AFRICA. SOUTH AMERICA. 

Cripps, Arthur Shearly. 

An Africa for Africans. 1927. 

916.7 C93 

Haardt, Georges Marie, £ Audouin- 
Dubreuil, Louis. 
The black journey. 1927. 916.7 H11 

7— 5S783 



Hall, Leland. 

Timbuctoo. 1927. 



916.62 H17 



Haring, Clarence Henry. 

South America looks at the United 
States. 1928. 918 H28 

Ossendowski, Ferdynand Antoni. 

Oasis and simoon. cl927. 916.5 084 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Banning, George Hugh. 

In Mexican waters. 1925. 917.22 B21 

Brownell, William Crary. 

Democratic distinction in America. 
1927. 917.3 B884 

Carpenter, Frederic V. 

A sketch book of New York. cl927. 

917.471 C29 
CocKBURN, John, mariner. 

The unfortunate Englishmen. 1817. 

917.28 C66u 
CoMSTOCK, Sarah. 

Roads to the revolution, with here and 
there a byway to colonial days. 1928. 
917.4 C73 
Fish, Carl Russell. 

The rise of the common man. 1927. 
(A history of American life, vol. Vi) 
917.3 H67 
Ford, Ford Madox. 

New Tork is not America, being a 
mirror to the states. 1927. 

917.3 F69 
Foreman, Grant. 

Early trails through Oklahoma. 1925. 
qc917.66 F7 
Graham, Stephen. 

New York nights. cl927. 917.471 G74 

King, Ed^yard. 

The Southern states of North America. 
1875. q917.5 K5 

Lathrop, Elise L. 

Historic houses of early America. 

1927. • q917.3 L3 

National automobile club. 

California motor guide and gazetteer. 

1928. C917.94 N27 

Nutting, Wallace. 

New York beautiful. 1927. (States 
beautiful series) q9 17.47 N9 

I'ooLE, Caroline. 

A modem prairie schooner on the trans- 
continental trail. 1919. qc917.8 P8 



206 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



RoBEKTSON, William Joseph. 

The changing South. 1927. 917.5 R65 

Saxon, Lyle. 

Father IVIississippi. cl927. 917.7 S27 

Werten BAKER, Thomas Jefferson. 

The first Americans, 1607-1690. 1927. 

(A histoi-y of American life, vol. n) 

917.3 H67 

OCEANICA. POLAR REGIONS. 

Hkown, John Macmillan. 

Peoples & problems of the Pacific. 
1927. 2 V. q919.6 B8p 

Brown, Robert Neal Rudmose. 

The polar regions, a physical and eco- 
nomic geography of the Arctic and 
Antarctic. [1927] 919.8 B87p 

Grey, J. R., d Grey, Mrs Beatrice Buck- 
land (Taylor). 
South Sea settlers. 919.6 G84 

HISTORY: EUROPE. 

Arnot, Robert Page. 
Soviet Russia and her neighbors. [1927] 
(Vanguard studies of soviet Russia) 
947.08 A76 

Bagger, Eugene Szekeres. 

Francis Joseph, emperor of Austria — 
king of Hungary. 1927. 943.6 B14 

Brailsford, Henry Noel. 

How the Soviets work. [1927] (Van- 
guard studies of soviet Russia) 

947.08 B81 
Christie, Octavius Francis. 

The transition from aristocracy, 1832- 
1867. 1928. 942 C55 

Esiier, Reginald Baliol Brett, 2d viscount. 

Cloud-capp'd towers. 1927. 

942.08 E75c 
Fox, 8i7- Frank. 

Italy to-day. [1927] 945 F79 

Gade, John Allyne. 

Christian xv, king of Denmark and 
Norway. 1928. 948.04 G12 

Gay, Harry Nelson. 

Strenuous Italy, solving a perilous 
problem. 1927. 945 G28 

George hi, kmg of Great Britain. 

The correspondence of King George the 
Third from 1760 to December, 1783. 
1927. 2 V. 942.07 G34c 



Greville, Charles Cavendish Fulke. 
The Greville diary, including passages 
hitherto withheld from publication. 
1927. 2 v. 942.07 G83d 

Hall, Walter Phelps. 

Empire to commonwealth, thirty years 
of British imperial history. cl928. 

942 H18 

HoRTENSE, queen consort of Louis, king 
of Holland. 
The memoirs of Queen Hortense. 1927. 
2 V. 944.05 H82 

Hume, Martin Andi'ew Sharp. 

The court of Philip IV. 946 H92c 



Karlgren, Anton. 

Bolshevist Russia. 1927. 



947.8 K18 



Landtjcci, Luca. 

A Florentine diary from 1450 to 1516. 
1927. 945.5 L26 

Masaryk, Tomas Garrigue, pres. Czecho- 
slovak Republic. 
The making of a state. 1927. 

943.7 M39 
Palm, Franklin Charles. 

Polities and religion in sixteenth- 
century France. cl927. 944.03 P17 

Plunkbt, lerne Arthur Lifford, d Mowat, 

Robert Balmain. 

A history of Europe. The middle ages 

. . . Europe and the modem world, 

1492 to 1914. 1927. 940.1 P73h 

Robinson, James Howard. 

A history of Great Britain. cl927. 

942 R66h 

Rodzianko, Mikhail Vladimirovich. 
The reign of Rasputin. 1927. 

947.08 R69 
Roughead, William. 

The rebel earl, and other studies. 1926. 

941 R85 
Salmon, Mary. 

A source-book of Welsh history. 1927. 

942.9 817 
Williams, Hugh Noel. 

Last loves of Henri of Navarre. 2d ed. 
944.03 W72I 

ASIA. AFRICA. 

Bryan, John Thomas Ingram. 

The civilization of Japan. cl928. 
(Home university library of modern 
knowledge) 952 891 



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



207 



CowEN, Herbert Henry. 

An outline history of Japan. 1927. 

952 G72 

Griffis, William Elliot. 

Some of Japan's contributions to civili- 
zation. 1926. 952 G85s 

JoHNSEN, Julia E., comp. 

Selected articles on China yesterday 
and today. 1928. (The handbook 
series) 951 J 65 

Johnston, Sir Hari-y Hamilton. 

Britain across the seas : Africa ; a his- 
tory and description of the British 
Empire in Africa. [1910] 960 J72b 



T'ang Leang-li. 

China in revolt. [1927] 



951 T16 



Waley, Adolf Simon. 

A pageant of India. 1927. 954 W17 

NORTH AMERICA, 

Adams, Randolph Greenfield. 

The gateway to American history. 
1927. 793 A216 

Allen, Gardner Weld. 

Massachusetts privateers of the revolu- 
tion. 1927. (Massachusetts histori- 
cal society . . . Collections) 

974.4 W41c 

Bolton, Herbert Eugene. 

Fray Juan Crespi, missionary explorer 
on the Pacific coast, 1769-1774. 

C979.4 C92 
Britton, Wiley. 

The aftermath of the civil war, based 
on investigation of Tvar claims. 
cl924. 973.7 B86af 

BuKGESS, Louis Alexander. 

Virginia soldiers of 1776. 1927. 2 v, 
973.3 B955 
BuRGOYNE, John. 

A letter from Lieut. Gen. Burgoyne to 
his constituents, upon his late resig- 
nation. The 6th ed. 1779. 

973.3 B95I 
Burns, Walter Noble. 

Tombstone, an Iliad of the Southwest. 
1927. 979.1 B96 

Carr, John Foster. 

The Declaration of independence ; its 
story and its message. 1926. 

973.3 C31 



Chalfant, Willie Arthur. 

Outposts of civilization. 1928. 

c979.4 C43 

Jesuits. Letters from missions. {North 
America) 
The Indians of North America. cl927. 
2 V. 970.1 J58 

Keir, Robert Malcolm. 

The march of commerce. 1927. (The 
pageant of America) rq973 PI 

Keleher, Leroy. 

The soul of the American Indian. 1927. 

970.3 K29 

King, William Lyon Mackenzie. 

The message of the Carillon and other 
addresses. 1927. 971 K54 

Laut, Agnes Christina. 

The conquest of our western empire. 
1927. 979 L38c 

La Verendrye, Pierre Gautier de Var- 
ennes, sieur de. 
.Journals and letters of Pierre Gautier 
de Varennes de La Verendrye and his 
sons. 1927. (The publications of 
the Champlain society) 971 L39 

LuMMis, Charles Fletcher. 

Los Angeles and her makers. 1909. 

qc979.493 L9 

Muzzey, David SaviUe. 

The American adventure. 1927. 2 v. 
973 M99aa 

Nelson, William Hamilton. 

Alluring Arizona. 1927. c979.1 N43 

Russell, C. P. 

Bodie, dead city of Mono. 1927. 

C979.448 R96 

Skinner, .John Rezin. 

History of the Fourth Illinois volun- 
teers in their relation to the Spanish- 
American war. [1899] 973.89 S62 
Gift. 



Van IjOON, Hendrik Willem. 
America. 1927. 

Violette, Eugene Morrow. 
A history of Missouri. cl918. 



973 V26 



977.8 V79 



Walling, William English. . 
The Mexican question. cl927. 



972 W21 



208 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOENIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



[Weston, David] 
Among the wounded. 1864. 

973.77 W53 

Wiley, John L. 

History of Monrovia. 1927. 

C979.493 W67 

EUROPEAN WAR. 

Bancroft, Edgar Addison. 

The mission of America and other war- 
time speeches. 1927. 940.91 B21 

[Beith, John Hay] 
The ship of remembrance, Gallipoli — 
Salonika. [1926] 940.938 B42 

BoGiCEVic, Milosh. 

Causes of the war, an examination into 
the causes of the European war, with 
special reference to Russia and Ser- 
bia. 1920. 940.912 B67 

Brailsfobd, Henry Noel. 

Olives of endless age, being a study of 
this distracted world and its need of 
unity. 1928. 940.98 881 

The cannoneers have hairy ears ; a diary 

of the front lines. Anonymous. cl927. 

940.935 C22 

Ebeay, Alcide. 

A Frenchman looks at the peace. 1927. 
940.98 E16 

Fisher, Herbert Wescott. 

Alias Uncle Shylock, a tragi-comedy of 

the two Dromios, fear, avarice. 1927. 

940.912 F53 

Frothingham, Thomas Goddard. 

The American reinforcement in the 
world war. 1927. 940.973 F94 

King, David Wooster. 

"L. M. 8046" ; an intimate story of the 
Foreign legion. 1927. 940.944 K52 

Sheldon-Williams, Ralf Frederic Lardy. 

The Canadian front in France and 

Flanders. 1920. 940.942 S54 

Thompson, P. A. 

Lions led by donkeys. 1927. 

940.91 T47 

ITALIAN. 

Albeetazzi, Adolfo. 

II Kucchetto rosso e storie d' altri 
Golori. [1920] 853 A33 



Annunzio, Gabriele d'. 
II fuoco. [1925] 



653 A61f 



AzEGLio, Massimo Tapparelli marchese d'. 

I miei recordi. Bdizione per le scuole, 

a cura del Prof Averardo Pippi. 

1924. 945 A99 



Baccini, Manfredo. 
Capino d' oro. [1925] 



853 81 17c 



Bachi, Riccardo. 

I'alimentazione e la politica annonaria 
in Italia, con una appendice su "II 
rifornimento dei viveri dell' esercito 
italiano." 1926. (Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history) 

330.945 812 
Bandello, Matteo. 

Le quattro parti de la Novelle del 
Bandello, riprodotte sulle antiche 
stampe di Lucca (1554) e di Lione 
(1573) a cura di Gustavo Balsamo- 
Crivelli. 1924. 853 821 

Barrili, Antonio Giulio. 

Tizio Caio Sempronio. [1919] 

853 827t 

Bencivenni, Ildebrando. 

Le meraviglie del corpo umano. [1904] 

611 845 

Berta, E. Augusto. 

Le sette imprese della nuvola bianca. 

853 8536 

Bkocchi, VirgUio. 

II destino in pugno. cl924. 853 B86d 

La Gironda. [1921] 853 886g 



Caccianiga, Antonio. 

II dolce far niente. [1920] 914.5 C4:J 



La famiglia Bonifazio. 1915. 

853 C11f 



Oalleri, Rosalia. 

Uccelli di bosco, racconto per la gio- 
ventil. 853 C15 

Caprancia, Luigi. 

Giovanni delle bande nere, recconto 

storico del secolo XVI. [1921] 2 v. 

853 C251g 

Casa, Giovanni della, alp. 

II Galateo. 395 C33 

Castelnuovo, Enrico. 

I coniugi Varedo. 1913. 853 C34c 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



209 



Causa, Cesare. 

Stornelli amnrosi e rispet.ti Toscani. 
cl916. 851 C374 

Cervantes Saavedba, Miguel de. 

Vita e gesta dell' ingegnoso Cavalierc 
Don Chisciotte della Mancia. 

863 C41a6 

Dante Alighieei. 

La comedia di Dante Alighieri annotata 
nelle sue bellezze e compendiata del 
racconto dell' intero poema da Guido 
Mazzoni. [1924] 851.15 P5m 



Deledda, Grazia. 

La fuga in Egitto. 1926. 



853 D34f 



EiNAUDi, Luigi. 

La guerra e 11 sistema tributario itali- 
ano. 1927. (Carnegie endowment 
for international peace. Division of 
economics and history) 336.45 E35 

Fava, Onorato. 

Trezzadoro. [1924] 853 F27 

Ferreeo, Guglielmo. 

Fra i due mondi. 1913. 901 P38f 

Gentile, Anna Vertua. 

Nora. 1920. 853 G33 

L' odio di Rita. 1919. 853 G33o 



Gnecchi, Francesco. 

I medaglioni romani. 1912. 3 v. 

q737 G5 
Gobi, Pietro. 

II canzoniere nazionale 1814^1870. 
[1912] 851 G66 

Romanze d' amore e canti Toscani 

con un cenno sulla poesia popolare. 
[1915] 851 G66r 



GovoNi, Corrado. 

II volo d' amore. cl926. 



853 G72v 



Lemoigne, a. 

L'igiene dei contadini considerati nei 
loro rapporti col bestiame. 1886. 

614.9 L55 
Mantegazza, Paolo. 

Un giorno a Madera. [1920] 853 M291 

Mario, Signora Jessie ( White ) . 

Vita di Giuseppe Garibaldi. 1S93. 
[1920] 2 V. in 1. B G232m 



Montaldo Moeando, AttUia. 
II libro deir Omino Grigio. 



853 M76 



Per voi, piccini ! 



853 M76p 



Montano, Gioganni Battista. 

A rchitettui-a con diversi omamenti 
cavati dall' antico. 1636. f729 M7 

ftloEAis, Mario. 

II regalo delle fate. [1925] 853 M82 



Moeetti, Marino. 
Mia madre. [1926] 



853 M84m 



NOVELLI, Augusto. 

Casa mia, casa mia ; Le . . . Sue 
prigioni ; Dopo ; Acqua passata. 
cl920. 852 N93c 

Palau, Albertina. 

Nel mondo delle fate. [1925] 853 P15 



Panzini, Alfredo. 
Signorine. cl921. 



853 PI 9s 



Papini, Giovanni. 

Pane e vino con un soliloquio sulla 
poesia. cl926. 85t P21 

Pecoei, RaffaeUo. 

La cultura dell' olivo in Italia. 1889. 

q634.6 P3 
Peeodi, Emma. 

La bacchetta fatata. [1924] 853 P45 

Pieandello, Luigi. 

Uno, nessuno e centomila. 1926. 

853 P66ne 



La vita nuda. cl926. (Novelle 

per un anno) 853 P66n 

Radius, Anna (Zuccari). 

La sottana del diavolo. 1912. 

853 R12s 

Reinhabd, John Revell, d De FUippis, 
Michael, eds. 
Novelle italiane moderne, Civinini, 
Serao, Pirandello, Zilccoli, Panzini. 
cl927. (The Century modern lan- 
guage series) 853 R36 

Ricci, Corrado. 

Beatrice Cenci. 1923. 2 v. B C395rl 



RiTis, Andrea de. 
Pinocchio a Roma. 



863 R61 



RoTONDi, Pietro. 

Vita di Benjamino Franklin. 1924. 

B F831ro 
RovETTA, Gerolamo. 

La moglie di sua eccellenza. 1919. 

853 R87m 



210 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Salani, Adriano, comp. 

Nei castelli fatati. [1925] 853 S161 

Stefani, Alberto de'. 

La legislazione economica della guerra. 
1926. (Carnegie endowment for 
international peace. Division of 
economics and history) 330.945 S81 

Treves, Virginia (Tedeschi). 
II castello di barbanera. [1921] 

853 T81c 
ZtrccoLi, Luciano. 

Le cose pift grandi di lui. 1925. 

853 Z94c 
SPANISH. 
Alonso, I. Martinez. 

Confesiones. 1927. 868 A45 

AntologIa de cuentos Mexicanos, selec- 
cion y prologo de Bernardo Ortiz de 
Montellano. cl926. 863 A63 

Ballester, Rafael. 

Curso de historia de Espana. 1924. 

946 B19 
Babja, Cesar. 

Libros y autores clasicos. 1923. 

860 B25I 



Libros y autores modemos. 

cl924. 860 B25 

Baeoja y Nessi, Pio. 

Los amores tardios. [1926] 

863 B26am 

Las ciudades C^sar o nada. 

863 B26c 



— Entretenimientos (dos sainetes y 
una conferencia). 862 B26 



Las figuras de cera. [1924] 

863 B26f 



— -El gran torbellino del mundo. 
[1926] 863 B26g 



— Las inquietudes de Shanti Andia. 
1927. 863 B26i 



La sensualidad pervertida. 1927. 

863 B26s 

Benavente y Martinez, Jacinto. 

La malquerida. 1924. 862 B45m 

Bebuete y Moret, Aureliano de. 

Historia de la pintura espafiola en el 
sigio XIX. 1926. q759.6 B5h 



Bible. N. T. Spanish. 

El Nuevo Testament© de nuestro 

Senor y Salvador Jesu Oristo. 1891. 

225.58 B58 

Gift. 

Blanco-Fombona, Rufino. 

Por los caminos del mundo. cl926. 

914 B641 

Blasco iBii^EZ, Vicente. 

A los pies de Venus (los Borgia) 
novela. cl926. 863 B64p 

Cabal, C. 

La mitologia Asturiana : los dioses de 
la muerte. 1925. 299 C11 

Cancela, Arturo. 

El Burro de "Maruf," La fllosofia del 
Hombre que Camina y que Tropieza 
y otros ensayos. 1925. 864 C21 

— — — - Tres relatos portenos de Arturo 



Cancela: El cocobacilo de Herrlin, 
Una semana de Holgorio, El culto 
de los heroes. 1923. 868 C21 

Cansinos Assens, Rafa;el. 

La nueva literatura (1898-1900-1916) 
[1917] 2 V. in 1 860 C22 

Capdevila, Arturo. 

El tiempo que se fue (versos). 1926. 

861 C23 

Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. 
El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la 
Mancha. 1876. 863 C41a5 

Diaz de Escoveb, Narcisco, d Lasso de 
la Vega, Francisco de Paula. 
Historia del teatro espanol. cl924. 

862.09 D54 



Dumas, Alexandre. 
Veinte anos despues. 
grandes novelas) 



( Biblioteca de 
843 D88tw5 



El vizconde de Bragelonnc. 



(Biblioteca de grandes novelas) ' ' 
2 V. 843 D88v4 

Fernandez-Fl6rez, Wenceslao. 
Las siete columnas. cl926. 

863 F3634 

Fernandez y Garcia, Eugenio & others, 
eds. 
El libro de Puerto Rico. The book of 
Porto Rico. 1923. q917.295 F3 



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



211 



FiLisoLA. Vicente. 

Memorias para la historia de la guerra 
de Tejas. 1849. 976.4 F48 

Franco, Luis L. 

Coplas de pueblo (1920-1926). 1927. 

861 F82 

Garcia Mekcadal, Jose. 

EspaSa vista por los extranjeros. 
[1918] 3 V. 914.6 G21 

Gerchunoff, Alberto. 

Historias y proezas de amor. 1926. 

863 G36 



— El hombre que hablo en la Sor- 
bona. 1926. 864 G36 



La jofaina maravillosa. 1927. 

863 C4l2g 

Gomez de la Seen a, Ramon. 

El torero Caracho. cl926. 863 063 

Heras, Antonio. 
La sombra de la ciudad. [1925] 

863 H53 

HoMENAJE ofrecido a Menendez Pidal. 

1925. 3 V. q860 H7 

HxjETADO Y Jimenez de la Seena, Juan, 
d Gonzalez Palencia, Angel. 
Antologia de la literatura espanola. 

1926. 860 H967 

Iguiniz, Juan B. 

Bibliografia de novelistas mexicanos, 
ensayo biografico, bibliografico y 
critico. 1926. (Monografias biblio- 
graficas mexicanas) 016.86 124 

Jovellanos, Gaspar Melchor de. 

El delincuente honrado. 1927. (The 
Century modern language series) 

862 J86 

Leon, Ricardo. 

El hombre nuevo. 863 L57 

Lopez, Enrique. 

Espana y Portugal. 1924. 914.6 L86 

LuGONES, Leopoldo. 

Las fuerzas extranas. 1926. 864 L95 

— ■ — ■ — • Lunario sentimental. 1926. 

861 L95 

Madariaga, Salvador de. 

Semblanzas literarias contemporaneas. 
1924. 860 M 17 I 



Malaret, Augusto. 

Diceionario de Americanismos. 1925. 

rq463 M2 

[Martinez Ruiz, Jos6] 
Brandy, mucho brandy, sainete senti- 
mental en tres aetos. 1927. 

862 M385 



Don Juan. 1927. 



863 M38do 



Dona Ines. cl926. 863 IV138d 



Menendez Pidal, Ramon. 

Origenes del espanol. 1926. 460 IV154 

Nelson, Ernesto. 

Las bibliotecas en los Estados Unidos. 

1927. (Biblioteca interamericana) 

x027 N42 

Olascoaga, Laurentino. 

La leyenda del castillo de Skokloster. 
1926. 863 042 

Palencia, Isabel de. 

El traje regional de Espana. 1926. 

914.6 P15 

Real academia espanola. 

Diceionario de la lengua espanola. 
1925. q463 R2 

RoDRfGUEZ Mabin, Francisco. 

Mas de 21,000 refranes castellanos, no 
contenidos en la eopiosa coleccion 
del maestro Gonzalo Correas, alle- 
golos de la tradicion oral y de sus 
lecturas durante mas de medio siglo 
(1871-1926). 1926. 868 R69 

Saenz Hates, Ricardo. 

Los amigos dilectos. 1927. 864 S12 

Salcedo y Tuiz, Angel. 

La epoca de Goya. 1924. q946 SI 

Sanchez, Florencio. 

II teatro del uruguayo. 1926. 

862 S21 

Santadlia. Jose Manuel. 

Pedro Santacilia su vida y sus versos 
discurso pronunciado en la inaugur- 
acion del curso aeademico de 1924- 
1925. 1924. (Academia nacional 
de artes y letras) qB S231 

Gift. 

Sarmiento. Saemiento, Domingo Faus- 
tino. 
Vida de Dominguito. 1927. B S246 



212 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
JANUARY. FEBRUARY ANp 
MARCH, 1928.t 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in News 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Librai-y. 

Adjutant Genekai,. Special regula- 
tions no. 3. Employment of troops of 
the California National Guard in disas- 
ter. 1928. 23 p. 

Agbictjltuee Department. Monthly 

bulletin, vol. 17, nos. 1-3, Januai-y-March, 

1928. illus. 

Vol. 17, no. 2 : Proceedings of the 
Sixtieth Convention of Fruit Growers 
and Farmers. . . . 1927. 



Special publication no. 77. 

Report of Stallion Registration for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1927. 1927. 
23 p. 

Agricultural Statutes of the 



State of California, corrected to August 
3, 1927. 1928. 380 p. 12°. 

State Fish Exchange. Five 



hundred ways to cook California sea food. 
1927. 119 p. illus. 

Athletic Commission. Third annual 
report for the period commencing Decem- 
ber 1, 1926, to November 30, 1927. 1928. 
8 p. 

Banking Department. Bulletin, 
vol. 2, nos. 1-3, January-March, 1928. 

Chieopkactic Examinees Board. An 
act regulating the practice of chiropractic 



t Except when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



in the State of California, also rules and 
method of procedure. 1927. 15 p. 

Contbollee. Inheritance tax act of 
California in effect August 2, 1921, and 
as amended by statutes 1923, 1925 and 
1927. 1928. 25 p. 

Education Department, Director of 
Education. Bulletin no. G-2. California 
State Department of Education. 1928. 
24 p. 

G-3. The Junior 
1928. 48 p. 



Same, no. 

College in Califox'nia, 



Division of Publications and 

Textbooks. Bulletin no. M-1. Specifi- 
cations for textbooks in writing, adopted 
January, 1928. 4 p. 

Division of Research and Sta- 
tistics. Bulletin no. J-1. Directory of 
California secondary schools as of Octo- 
ber 1, 1927. 1928. 36 p. 

Embalmees, Boaed op (Oakland).* 
Laws, rules and regulations. Burial reg- 
ulations and transportation rules. [1927] 
23 p. 24°. 

Health, Department of Public. 
Laws and regulations governing the sale 
of eggs in California. Revised December, 
1927. 1927. 10 p. 

Weekly bulletin, vol. 6, nos. 47- 

52, December, 1927-February, 1928; 
vol. 7, nos. 1-8, February-March, 1928. 

Industeial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). Report from July 1, 
1926, to June 30, 1927. 1928. 136 p. 
illus. 

Report of decisions for the 



year 1926, vol. 13. 1927. 302 p. 

Air pressure tank safety orders. 

Revised. Effective January 1, 1928. 
Supersede orders effective January 1, 
1917. 1927. 72 p. iUus. 12°. 

California safety news, vol. 11, 



no. 4, December, 1927; vol. 12, no. 1, 
March, 1928. 

LiBBAEY, State. News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, vol. 23, no. 1, Januai-y, 
1928. p. 1-107. 



* The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



213 



Books for the blind department. 

News Notes. Reprinted from Neics Notes 
of California Libraries, January, 1928, 
19 p. 82°. 

Medical Examiners Board. Annual 
report, 1927. 1928. 40 p. 

Natural RESOuiiCES Department. 
Division of Fish and Game. CaKfornia 
fish and game, vol. 14, no. 1, January, 
1928. 105 p. iUus. 

Teachers' bulletin no. 9. 



Bird study for California schools. April 
3, 1928. 80 p. 

Division of Forestry. Bulletin 



no. 7. Insect enemies of California pines 
and their control. 1928. 113 p. illus. 

Division of Mines and Mining 

(San Francisco). Chapter of report 
XXIII of the State Mineralogist cover- 
ing mining in California and the activi- 
ties of the Division of Mines and Mining, 
vol. 23, no. 4, October, 1927. illus. 
maps. p. 372-456. 

Index, v. 23, p. 429-56. 

Bulletin no. 100. Cali- 



fornia mineral production for 1926. 1927. 
175 p. illus. maps. 

Summary of operations 



California oil fields, vol. 13, nos. 1-5, 
July-November, 1927. illus. maps. 

Division of Parks. A report 



upon the effect of excessive tourist travel 
on the California Redwood Parks. 1928. 
20 p. 

Optometry, Board of Examiners in. 
Twenty-fourth annual report, 1927. 1927. 
13 p. 

Public Instruction, Superintend- 
ent OF. School law of California, 1927. 
1927. 455 p. 

Public Works Department. Cali- 
fornia highways and public works, vol. 5, 
nos. 1-3, January-March, 1928. illus. 
maps. 

Division of Engineering and 



Irrigation. Bulletin no. 13. The devel- 
opment of the upper Sacramento River, 
by Paul Bailey ; an appendix to the 
Summary report to the Legislature of 
1927 on the Water resources of Cali- 



fornia and a coordinated plan for their 
development. Containing Cooperative 
report with U. S. Bureau of Reclamation 
on Iron Canyon Project by Walker R, 
Young. 1928. 209 p. illus, plans, maps. 

Division of Water Rights. 



Shasta River adjudication proceedings. 
Order determining and establishing the 
several rights by appropriation to the use 
of the waters of Shasta River and its 
tributaries, Siskiyou County, California. 
1928. 236 p. 

Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco). Annual report from July 1, 
1926, to June 30, 1927. 1927. 1019 p. 

— • Decisions, vol. 30, June 9, 1927, 



to December 23, 1927. 1019 p. 

Cover title : Opinions and orders of 
the Railroad Commission of California. 

Secretary of State. Roster of state, 
county, city and township officials, State 
of California, also federal officials for 
California, December 1, 1927. 1927. 
173 p. illus. 

Social Welfare Department. Bul- 
letin, vol. 1, no. 1, December, 1927. 
4 p. 4°. 

Teachers College, San Jose. Bulle- 
tin, vol. 7, no. 1. Summer school bulletin 
and circular of information, summer ses- 
sion of 1928, June 25 to August 3. Jan- 
uary, 1928. 31 p. 

United Spanish War Veterans, De- 
partment of California. Proceedings 
of the twenty-fourth annual encampment 
held at Santa Cruz, California, May 8, 
9, 10 and 11, 1927. 1928. 107 p. 

University of California (Berkeley). 
Bulletin, third series, vol. 21, no. 5. 
Register 1926-1927, with announcements 
for 1927-1928, in two volumes. Berke- 
ley, November, 1927. 12°. 

Same, vol. 21, no. 8. An- 
nouncement of surveying camp, 1928. 
Berkeley, February, 1928. 15 p. 12°. 

Same, vol. 21, no. 9. Graduate 

work in dentistry, 1928-1929, fourth ses- 
sion, July, 1928. Berkeley, March, 1928. 
29 p. 12°. 



214 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



— Calendar, vol. LXVIII, nos. 

1-12, January-Marcb, 1928. 8 p. folder. 

A weekly bulletin of official Univer- 
sity announcements. 

Price 25 cents a half year, postpaid. 

Chronicle, vol. 30, no. 1, Jan- 



uary, 1928. p. 1-120. roy. 8' 

Price $2.00 per year ; single copies 
50 cents. 

Publications. Agricultural sci- 
ences, vol. 2, no. 12. Chromosomal 
chimeras in Crepis, by Lillian Hollings- 
head. Berkeley, March 26, 1928. p. 343- 
354, plates 54-55, 2 figs, in text, roy 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

— College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Bulle- 
tin no. 437. Series on California crops 
and prices : Economic aspects of the dairy 
industry, by Edwin C. Voorhies. Berke- 
ley, October, 1927. 192 p. 44 figs, in 
text. 



• • Same, no. 438. Graft- 
ing affinities with special reference to 
plums, by Myer J. Heppner and Roy D. 
McCallum. Berkeley, November, 1927. 
20 p. 7 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 439. The 



digestibility of certain fruit by-products 
as determined for ruminants, part II. 
Dried pineapple pulp, dried lemon pulp, 
and dried olive pulp, by S. W. Mead and 
H. R. Guilbert. Berkeley, November, 
1927. 11 p. 

■ Same, no. 440. The 



feeding value of raisins and dairy by- 
products for growing and fattening swine, 
by E. H. Hughes. Berkeley, November, 
1927. 12 p. 2 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 441. The 



electric brooder, by B. D. Moses and 
T. A. Wood. Berkeley, November, 1927. 
39 p. 21 figs, in text. 

■ — Same, no. 442. Labora- 



tory tests of orchard heaters, by A. H. 
Hoffman. Berkeley, November, 1927. 
37 p. 15 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 443. Stand- 



ardization and improvement of California 
butter, by Fred H. Abbott. Berkeley, 
November, 1927. 27 p. 5 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 444. Series 



on California crops and prices : Beans, 



by H. R. Wellman and E. W. Braun. 

Berkeley, December, 1927. 62 p. 17 
figs, in text. 

Same, no. 445. Eco- 



nomic aspects of the apple industry, by 
Emil Rauchenstein. Berkeley, December, 
1927. 76 p. 17 figs, in text. 

— Same, no. 446. The 



asparagus industry in California, by 
H. A. Jones and W. W. Bobbins. Berke- 
ley, JanuaiT, 1928. 105 p. 43 figs, in 
text. 

Same, no. 447. A 

method of determining the clean weights 
of individual fleeces of wool, by J. F. 
Wilson. Berkeley, January, 1928. 21 p. 
8 figs, in text. 



— — — Same, no. 448. Farm- 
ers' purchase agreement for deep well 
pumps, by B. D. Moses and L. S. Wing. 
Berkeley, January, 1928. 46 p. 3 figs, 
in text. 

■ ■ — Same, no. 449. Eco- 
nomic aspects of the watermelon indus- 
try, by Emil Rauchenstein. Berkeley, 
March, 1928. 26 p. 7 figs, in text. 

Circular no. 308. Can- 
taloupe production in California, by J. T. 
Rosa and E. L. Garthwaite. Berkeley, 
October, 1926. 48 p. 29 figs, in text. 

— Same, no. 309. Fruit 

tree and orchard judging, by Willis P. 
Duruz. Berkeley, February, 1927. 27 p. 
3 figs, in text. 



Same, no. 310. The 

operation of the bacteriological laboratory 
for dairy plants, by C. S. Mudge. Berke- 
ley, November, 1927. 28 p. 9 figs, in 
text. 



Same, no. 311. The 

improvement of quality in figs, by Ralph 
E. Smith and H. N. Hansen. Berkeley, 
December, 1927. 23 p. 16 figs, in text. 

Same, no. 312. Princi- 



ples governing the choice, operation and 
care of small irrigation pumping plants, 
by C. N. Johnston. Berkeley, March, 
1928. 28 p. 11 figs, in text. 

Hilgardia, vol. 3, nos. 

3-5, December, 1927-March, 1928. p. 
41-152. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



215 



Agricultural Extension 

Service. Circular no. 12. Wool produc- 
tion in California, by J. F. Wilson. 
Berkeley, April, 1927. 42 p. 10 figs, in 
text. 



Same, no. Ic 



The 



nxanufacture of Monterey cheese, by C. A. 
Phillips. Berkeley, September, 1927. 
20 p. 8 figs, in text. 

— ■ • Same, no. 14. Selec- 



tion and care of electrical equipment used 
in dairy manufacturing, by A. W. Far- 
rail. Berkeley, September, 1927. 26 p. 
16 figs, in text. 



Same, no. 15. Pork 

production in California, by E. H. 
Hughes and L. W. Feldmiller. Berkeley, 
March, 1928. 45 p. 16 figs, in text. 

American Archaeology 



and Ethnology, vol. 23, no. 5. Achomawi 
geography, Fred B. Kniffen. Berkeley, 
January 14, 1928. p. 297-332, 1 fig. in 
text, 2 maps. roy. 8°. 
Price 45 cents. 

Same, vol. 23, no. 6. 



Pitch accent in Hupa, by Pliny Earle 
Goddard. Berkeley, January 28, 1928. 
p. 333-338. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Astronomy. Lick ob- 



servatory bulletin no. 392. Meridian 
circle observations of Eros stars, second 
list, by R. H. Tucker. Berkeley, Janu- 
ary 14, 1928. p. 104-111. 4°. 

■ Same, no. 393. On the 



radial velocity curve of S Sagittae, by 
T. S. Jacobsen. Berkeley, January 21, 
1928. p. 112-116, 1 fig. in text. 4°. 

• Same, no. 394. Ele- 



ments and ephemeris of comet j 1927 
(Schvs^assmann-Wachmann), by L. Ber- 
man and F. L. Whipple. Berkeley, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1928. p. 117-119. 4°. 

Same, no. 395. Ele- 



ments and ephemeris of comet k 1927 
(Skjellerup), by N. U. MayaH, H. G. 
Miles, and F. L. Whipple. Berkeley, 
March 16, 1928. p. 120-122. 4°. 

Same, no. 396. The 



spectra of the carbon stars, by C. D. 
Shane. Berkeley, Marh 28, 1928. p. 
123-129. 4 figs, in text, pi. XI. 4°. 



Same, no. 397. Obser- 
vations made with a pair of five-foot 
cameras on the light-defiections in the 
sun's gravitational field at the total solar 
eclipse of September 21, 1922, by W. W. 
Campbell and R. J. Trumpler. Berkeley, 
March 27, 1928. p. 130-160. 6 figs, in 
text. 4°. 



— Same, no. 398. ^Motion 

of matter in the tail of comet 1908 III 

(Morehouse), by N. T. Bobrovnikoff. 

Berkeley, March 28, 1928. p. 161-172. 

2 figs, in text. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per volume in advance, 
vol. 13 current. 



Lick Observatory publi- 
cations, vol. 16. Stellar radial velocities. 
Berkeley, 1928. 399 p., plates 1-6, 2 figs. 
in text. 4°. 



• Botany, vol. 14, no. 5. 

A revision of the genera chantransia, 
rhodochorton, and acrochaetium, with 
descriptions of the marine species of 
rhodochorton (Naeg.) gen. emend, on the 
Pacific Coast of North America, by 
Kathleen M. Drew. Berkeley, February 
4,1928. p. 139-224, plates 37-48. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.10. 

• \ Same, vol. 14, no. 6. 



The life-history of the brown alga, Egre- 
gia Menziesii, by Margret E. Myers. 
Berkeley, Februai-y 11, 1928. p. 225- 
246, plates 49-52. roy. 8°. 

Price 2'5 cents. 

Same, vol. 14, no. 7. 



The botany of ephedra in relation to the 
yield of physiologically active substances, 
by G. Weidman Groff and Guy W. Clark. 
Berkeley, February 18, 1928. p. 247- 
282, 6 charts in text. roy. 8°, 
Price 45 cents. 

■ ■ Same, vol. 14, no. 8. 



A working hypothesis for segmental inter- 
change between homologous chromosomes 
in fiowering plants, by John Belling. 
Berkeley, February 21, 1928. p. 283- 
291, 1 fig. in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 2'5 cents. 

Classical philology, vol. 



9, no. 4. The Italian manuscripts of 
Lucretius, part II (continued), by Wil- 
liam A. Merrill. Berkeley, March 15, 
1928. p. 85-126. roy. 8°. 
Price 50 cents. 



216 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



Economics, vol. 5, no. 1. 

The dependent aged in San Francisco, 
prepared under the Heller Committee for 
reseaj'ch in social economics of the Uni- 
versity of California, in collaboration 
with the Coordination Committee of the 
San Francisco Community Chest. 
Berkeley, February 17, 1928. p. 1-127. 
roy. 8°. 

Price $1.80. 

Egyptian archaeology, 

vol. 4. Egyptian tomb steles and offering 
stones of the Museum of anthropology 
and ethnology of the University of Cali- 
fornia, by Henry Frederick Lutz. Leip- 
zig, 1927. 22 p. illus. 49 plates (2 
col.). 4°. 

For sale by J. C. Hinrichs Verlag, 
Leipzig, Germany. 

Entomology, vol. 4, no. 8. 

New coccid-inhabiting chalcidoid para- 
sites from Africa and California, by 
Harold Compere. Berkeley, January 17, 
1928. p. 209-230, plates 7-8. roy. 8°. 
Price 3 cents. 

Same, vol. 4, no. 9. 

A preliminary report on the insect para- 
sites of the black scale Saissetia oleae 
(Bernard), by Harry S. Smith and 
Harold Compere. Berkeley, March 9, 
1928, p. 231-334, 63 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.30. 

Same, vol. 4, no. 10. 



Description of a new Species of Japys 
(Thysanura) from Potter Creek Cave, 
Shasta County, California, by F. Sil- 
vestri. Berkeley, March 16, 1928. p. 335- 
340, 3 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 25 cents. 

Same, vol. 4, no. 11. 



The biology of the eriophyidae with spe- 
cial reference to Eriophyes tristriatus 
(Nalepa), by Ahmed S. Hassan. Berke- 
ley, March 22, 1928. p. 241-294, 14 figs, 
in text. roy. 8°. 

Price 70 cents. 

— Extension Division. 



The Spokesman, vol. 6, nos. 1-2, January, 
March, 1928. 

Geological sciences, vol. 



17, no. 5. Northwestern continuation of 
the San Onofre Breccia, by A. O. Wood- 
ford and T. L. Bailey. Berkeley, March 
9,1928. p. 187-191, 1 fig. in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 2'5 cents. 



Philosophy, vol. 6, no. 4. 
The annual H o w i s o n lecture, 1927 ; 
Times, new and old, by Evander Bradley 
McGilvary, University of Wisconsin. 
Berkeley, February 24, 1928. p. 229- 
264. roy. 8°. 

Price 45 cents. 

Scripps Institution of 



Oceanography, La Jolla. Bulletin 13 
( non-technical ) . Pressing needs in the 
field of biological oceanography, by W. E. 
Allen. Berkeley, October 29, 1927. 15 p. 

Same, 14 (non-techni- 



cal). Dynamical oceanography and cer- 
tain elements of hydrodynamics upon 
which it is based, by George Francis 
McEwen. Berkeley, October 29, 1927. 
20 p. 

Bulletin, Technical 

series, vol. 1, no. 13. Catches of marine 
diatoms and dinofiagellates taken by boat 
in Southern California waters in 1926, 
by Winf red Emory Allen. Berkeley, 
January 31, 1928. p. 201-246. roy. 8°. 
Price 55 cents. 

Same, vol. 1, no. 14. 



The periodic occurrence of copepoda in 
the marine plankton of two successive 
years at La Jolla, California, by C. O. 
Esterly. Berkeley, March 30, 1928. p. 
247-.345, 18 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price $1.25. 

Zoology, vol. 30, no. 9. 



Variation within a brood of Pacific gar- 
ter snakes, by Edna M. Fisher. Berkeley, 
February 17, 1928. p. 221-229, 1 fig. in 
text. roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

— - — ■ — Same, vol. 30, nos. 



10-11. A new race of black bear from 
Vancouver Island, British Columbia, with 
remarks on other Northwest Coast forms 
of euarctos, and Records of supernumer- 
ary teeth in bears, by E. Raymond Hall. 
Berkeley, March 2, 1928. p. 231-242, 
plates 12, 13; p. 243-350, plates 14, 15, 
1 fig. in text. roy. 8°.- 

In one cover. Price 2 5 cents. 

Same, vol. 31, no. 7. 



The segmental arteries in Squalus sucklii, 
by Esther M. Coles. Berkeley, February 
3, 1928. p. 93-110, 10 figs, in text, 
roy. 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



217 



Same, vol. 31, no. 8. 

The derivatives of the hypobranchial 
arteries in Hexanchus corinus, by Ancel 
B. Keys. Berkeley, January 28, 1928. 
p. 111-130, plates 5-8, 5 figs, in text. 
roy 8°. 

Price 25 cents. 

■ Same, vol. 31, no. 9. 

Length of life of Drosophila melanogaster 
under aseptic conditions, by Helen Mc- 
Donald Steinfeld. Berkeley, February 
24, 1928. p. 131-178, 8 figs, in text, 
roy. 8°. 

Price 60 cents. 

Same, vol. 31, no. 10. 

On the morphology of pyrsonympha vrith 
a description of three new species from 
Reticulitermes hesperus Banks, by Wil- 
liam Nottingham Powell. Berkeley, 
March 2, 1928. p. 179-200, plates 9-11, 
4 figs, in text. roy. 8°. 
Price 30 cents. 

Vetebans' Home (Yountville). An- 
nual report of Board of Directors and 
officers, fiscal year ended June 30, 1927. 
23 p. 

Rules and regulations and state 

laws governing the Veterans' Home. 1928. 
20 p. 

Whittiek State School. Journal of 
Delinquency, vol. 11, no. 4, December, 
1927. 

Price $3.00 per year. 

The Sentinel (new series). 



vol. 25, nos. 1-2, January-February, 1928. 

Published monthly. Price $1.00 per 
year; 10 cents per copy. 

CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 1928. 

Berkeley. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 12, nos. 1-3, January-March, 1928. 

Long Beach. Public library. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 4, nog. 1-3, January-March, 
1928. 

Los Angeles. Board of Education. 
Educational research bulletin, vol. 7, 
nos. 5-6, January-February, 1928. 

Chamber of Commerce. South- 



Municipal league. Light on 

your city's affairs. Bulletin, vol. 5, nos. 
6-7, January-February, 1928. 

Richmond. Health Department. 
Monthly report, December, 1927-Febru- 
ary, 1928. 

Public library. Bulletin, vol. 

14, nos. 7-8, January-February, 1928. 

Sacbamento. Health Department. 
Bulletin, December, 1927-March, 1928. 

— Chamber of Commerce. Capi- 



ern California business, vol. .6, no. 12- 
vol. 7, no. 2; January-March, 1928. 



tal business, January-February, 1928. 

San Diego. Health Department. 
Monthly report, December, 1927-Febru- 
ary, 1928. 

San Francisco. Board of Super- 
visors. Journal of proceedings, vol. 22, 
nos. 50-52, December, 1927; vol. 23, 
nos. 1-12, January-March, 1928. 

Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. The City, vol. 8, nos. 1-3, 
January-March, 1928. 

Chamber of Commerce. San 

Francisco business, vol. 16, nos. 1-13, 
January-March, 1928. 

Stockton. City Manager. Official 
bulletin, October, 1927-March, 1928. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING JANUARY, FEBRUARY 
AND MARCH, 1928. 

Books marked c are printed with contractions. 

In American Braille. 
BOOKS. 

Leadbeatteb, Chables Webster.. An 

outline of theosophy. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Dr W. R. 
Groshell. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
cIlluminatoe. 

In European Braille. 

BOOKS. 

Allen, C. R. The brown smock. 2 vols. 
Braille Spanish alphabet sheets. 
BuCHAN, John. The dancing floor. 3 
vols. 

A story of adventure, 



218 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



BxjTLEB, Samuel. The way of all flesh. 
5 vols. 

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The white 
compauy. 5 vols. 

Fletchee, Joseph Smith. The stolen 
budget. 2 vols. 

HtnoDLESTON, SiSLEY. France and the 

French. 4 vols. 

A popular handbook on France and 
its people complete within its modest 
scope. 

Johnston, Maby E. The great valley. 
3 vols. 

A story about a sturdy family of 
pioneers who came to Virginia and 
settled beyond the Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains, in the Shenandoah Vallejr. 

Masefield, John. Sard Harker, a 

novel. 4 vols. 

A series of adventures and mishaps 
which have come to one indomitable 
man in his wanderings. 

Walpole, Hugh Seymoue. Fortitude, 
a romance. 6 vols. 

French Text. 

Labousse, Pieeee. Nouveau Larousse, 

adapte a I'usage des aveugles par Geo. 

L. Raverat. Dictionnaire encyclope- 

dique. Vol. 11. 

First 10 volumes previously received. 
Gift of American Braille Press. 

German Text. 
Aemknecht, Otto. Zionsstrahlen. 3 
vols. 

Gift of Emma Redeman. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
Bratlle mail. 
Braille musical magazine. 
Beaillb packet. 
Channels of blessing. 
Hampstead. 
HoRA .iocunda. 

Interallied Braille magazine. 
Lightbringee. 
Litebary journal. 
Peogress. 
Santa Lucia. 
Tribune. 



music. 
Braille musical magazine. 

In Moon Type. 

books. 
Barbie, James Matthew. The little 
minister. 8 vols. 

Bible. New Testament. 15 vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Geo. H. 
Clarke. 

Buchan, John. Midwinter; certain 
travellers in Old England. 7 vols. 

Hannay, James Owen ("Geobge A. 
Bibmingham," pseud.). Spanish gold. 
6 vols. 



Wells, Hebbeet Geoege. 
of Mr Polly. 5 vols. 



The history 



magazines. 
Current numbers of the following : 
Dawn. 

Moon magazine. 
The Moon, weekly newspaper. 

In New York Point. 
books. 
*Haet, Rev Samuel, comp. A manual 
of short daily prayers for families. 

*LuTHEE, Martin. Luther's small cate- 
chism, stereotyped and printed for the 
LTnited Norwegian Lutheran Church 
of America. 

*RoMAN Catholic Church. A short 
catechism of the Catholic religion, 
published for the use of the blind, with 
the approbation of the Rt Rev Geo. 
McClosky, D.D. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
Catholic transcript. 
Christian record. 
Gospel trumpet. 
INIatilda Ziegler magazine. 
Sunday' school monthly. 
Weekly review. 



♦Gift of William Harper. 



vol. 23, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



219 



In Revised Braille. 

Books maiked c are printed with contractions. 

BOOKS. 

cArticles ou the Arctic by various 
authors. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland. 

Contents : "My friend Kakoot" : a 
true story by Capt Thierry Mallet. 
From Atlantic Monthly, Sept. 1927. 
"Venturesome Dane" who kings it 
over blond Eskimos, by Nadia Lavrove. 
From the S. F. Examiner, Sept. 11, 
1927. "Cliff dwellers of the Arctic" 
by Knud Rasmussen. From Across 
Arctic America. 

^cBiBLE. Old Testament. Complete. 
King James Vei'sion. 16 vols. 

*c New Testament. Complete. 



King James Version. 5 vols. 

cBoOK of prayer for the Jewish Blind. 

cBeaille publications not included in 
the list issued by the American Print- 
ing House, March, 1928. 

Gift of American Foundation for 
the Blind. 

cGabnegie, a n b e w. Autobiography. 
6 vols. 

Gift of Mrs Andrew Carnegie. 

cChubchill, Winston. The crossing. 
10 vols. 

cCoudenhouse, Hans. My African 
neighbors : man, bird and beast in 
Nyasaland. 5 vols. 

cDavis, Mrs Maey Wkight, comp. 
Selections from The book of Lincoln. 
2 vols. 

cDay, Holman Francis. Squared. 

, Hand copied. Gift of Los Angeles 
Chapter, American Red Cross. 

cFiSHEB, Mrs Dorothea Frances Can- 
field. The bent twig. 10 vols. 

cHammond, John Hays, d J e n k s, 
Jeremiah Whipple. Great American 
issues, political, social, economic. 

cHaekeb, Mrs Lizzie Allen. The 

bridge across. 3 vols. 

Tlie bridge across is the bridge of 
understanding between youth and 
middle age, which Ijoth may help tn 
build. 

cHoLLis, Gertrude. Our wonderful 
church. 

Gift of Department of Missions, 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 



Gift of Braille Bible 



*Duplicate copy. 
Society, Inc. 



cKeller, Helen. My religion. 2 vols. 

cKeyhoe, Lieut Donald F. Seeing 
Americii with Lindbergh. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland. 

cKimball, Edward Ancel. Answers to 
questions concerning Christian Science 
and Christian Science ; its compassion- 
ate appeal. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of Mrs Muliel 
A. Donaldson. 

cKing, William Benjamin Basil. The 
happy isles. 11 vols. 

A story of a child of Vv'ecilth,\' 
parents, who was stolen from liis )):Ll)y 
carriage in Central Park. 

cKyne, Peter Bebnaed. T li e star 
spangled manner^ 

From The world's one hundred best 
short stories. Funk & Wagnalls Co., 
publishers. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland. 

cLytton, Edward Bulwer, 1st harun. 
The last days of Pompeii. S vols. 

cMacGrath, Harold. The sporting 
spinster. 

A story in which a great deal of 
common sense on the bringing up of 
children is mixed with fun and heart- 
breaks. 

cMarshall, Edison. The far call. 6 
vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of Mrs Carrie 
L. Hodge. 

cNoRRis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
Sisters. 9 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of San Fran- 
cisco Chapter, American Red Cross. 

cPoEMS of the sun-lit heights, by many 

poets old and new. 

Taken from "Little sun-books," 
published by Elizabeth Towne Co., 
Holyoke, Mass. 

cPoRTER, BIrs Gene (Stratton). The 
keeper of the bees. 6 vols. 

The story of a war veteran who 
slips away from a reconstruction 
hospital where he is not making sat- 
isfactory progress rather than go to 
a tubercular camp. 

cPutnam, David Binney. David goes 

voyaging. 

An account of >-oung David Put- 
nam's trip with A^'illiam Beebe on the 
"Arcturus." 

cRoGERS, Julia Ellen. Trees. (The 
nature library) Vols. 1 and 2 only. 
Gift of Catharine J. MorrisOH. 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [April, 1928 



cStevenson, Robert Louis. The ebb- 
tide ; a trio and a quartette. 2 vols. 

Gift of The Lions Club of Hollis, 
Long Island, N. T. 

cStbibling, Thomas Sigismund. Fom- 
bombo. 8 vols. 

Hand copied. Gift of San Fran- 
cisco Cliapter, American Red Cross. 

C'Tarbeli,, Ida Minebva. Lincoln and 
the soldiers and Lincoln kissed him. 
Hand copied by and gift of Mrs 
M. C. Brereton, San Francisco. 

cTutJKSTON, Rogers Clark Baxlard. 
The origin and evolution of the United 
States flag. (Illustrations) 

Gift of R. C. Ballard Thurston. 

cWanamakeb, John. Prayers of John 
Wanamaker, with an introduction by 
A. Gordon McLennon, D.D., Pastor of 
Bethany Presbyterian Church, Phila- 
delphia. 

Gift of Rodman Wanamaker. 

cThe Wanamaker primer on Abraham 
Lincoln. 

Gift of Rodman Wanamaker. 

cWarner, Langdon. The long old road 
in China. 3 vols. 

cWendling, George Retxben. The man 
of GalUee; a new enquiry. 

A revision and enlargement of the 
author's lecture entitled "The man of 
Galilee." 

Gift of Kate M. Foley. 

MAGAZINES. 
Current numbers of the following : 

cAmerican review for the blind. 



cThe Beacon. 

cBraille courier. 

cThe Braille mirror. 

cBrallle star theosophist. 

cCatholic review. 

cChbistian record. 

cChristian science quarterly. 

cChurch herald for the blind. 

cGosPEL tnimpet. 

cLutheran messenger for the blind. 

This is being donated by the Board 
of Missions to Deaf Mutes of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Mis- 
souri, Ohio and Other States. 

CLUX VERA. 

cMatllda Ziegler magazine. 
cMessenger to the sightless. 

COUR OWN. 

Searchlight. 

cSuNDAY school monthly. 

In Ink Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current numbers of the following : 
The Beacon. 
Outlook for the blind. 
8t. Dunstan's review. 



58783 5-28 1400 



Vol. 23, No. 3 JULY 1928 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER-SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



BOND ISSUES— PALOS VERDES, REDONDO BEACH. 

SACRAIVTENTO COUNTY BRANCH NEWS AND CUSTODIANS' SALARY 
INCREASES. 

SOME BUILDTNG ACTtVITIES— OCEAN BEACH BRANCH OF SAN DIEGO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, LONE PINE BRANCH OF INYO COUNTY LfBRARY. 

ART EXHIBITS— PASADENA, SANTA MONICA. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY— SURVEY OF LIBRARY SERVICE TO RURAL 
SCHOOLS. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS. 



California State Library 



C.\LIFOIlNIA STATE PBINTINa OFFICE 

SACBAMENTO, 1928 



6«773 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
HOME AGAIN 221 

A NEW VENTURE 224 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 226 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 227 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 228 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 229 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 252 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 259 

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 261 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 263, 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 265 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 267 

Staff, Etc. 267 

Departments 268 

Recent Accessions 272 

CAI.IFOBNIA State Publications Received Dueing April, Mat and 

June, 1928 303 

California City Publications Received During April, Mat and 

June, 1928 306 

Books for the Blind Added During April, May and June, 1928 306 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the California 
State Library. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



HOME AGAIN. 

By Blanche Galloway, Librarian, Madera County Free Library, Madera, California. 



April 2-5, 1928, will long be remem- 
bered in the California library world as 
a happy reunion in an ideal place, under 
the most favorable circumstances. Per- 
haps it was because we went visiting last 
year that made us more glad to see some 
of the home folks whom we missed on 
that trip, but I should rather guess that 
it was because our president and her 
assistants had worked out every detail 
to add to our pleasure and comfort during 
the conference period. 

To start a convention with a delightful 
ride through the orange groves, along 
beautiful highways in wild flower time ! 
Who ever heard of such a thing? The 
objective being San Bernardino's new 
library quarters, we were brought back 
into the professional atmosphere in a 
most pleasurable way, for it was a delight 
to see the modern devices and methods 
being used in that most attractively 
arranged library. The friendly pausies 
and the refreshing punch attested to the 
hospitality of Miss Waters and her 
gracious staff. 

At two p.m. we met in formal session 
to hear the auditor of Los Angeles 
County, H. A. Payne, tell us in a most 
helpful way what we could and could not 
do under the new budget law. 

The state's educational program was 
outlined by William John Cooper, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
In his usual elucidating manner, Mr 
Cooper told how the aim of the depart- 
ment is to fit the schools to meet the 
needs of the times. The fact that Adult 
Education is increasing more rapidly 
than any other department links the 
library very definitely with this new 
problem in the educational world. 

The dinner hour afforded an oppor- 
tunity for friendly chats as the county 
librarians were grouped about the table. 

The evening meeting took on a most 

informal air as intimate problems were 

] discussed in the family circle. 

," On Tuesday morning, with Mrs Frances 

: Burns Linn presiding, the group took on 

'l the proportions of a real convention. 

The reports of the secretary-treasurer, 

Hazel Gibson, and of the officers of the 

60773 



nine districts brought to a focus the 
extensive work done by the librarians 
over the state during the past year. 

That our modem history aims to give 
"the most knowledge in the most enter- 
taining way," and that there is a strong 
tendency to take the middle road between 
the old hero-worship of the past and the 
debunking method of today was presented 
very ably by Professor Louis K. Koontz 
of University of California in the main 
speech of the morning. 

Frederick Faulkner emphasized the 
importance which the human element 
plays in library publicity while speaking 
on the • subject of news writing on the 
afternoon program. 

The drive about beautiful Riverside, 
so generously provided by the chamber of 
commerce, was a most enjoyable affair. 

The demonstration of library publicity 
through public speaking was most enter- 
taining and proved to be one of the most 
practical helps of the entire convention. 
Much credit was due to Miss Smith, Mrs 
Whitbeck and Mr M'onnette for the part 
they took in presenting our pi'oblems for 
consideration of a lay jury. Professor 
Scott, in criticizing the talks, praised the 
direct and clear arguments presented, but 
deplored the negative psychology used in 
some instances. His one admonition was 
to give a graphic picture rather than to 
present statistics. 

Quite in setting with Mission Inn was 
the Spanish dinner with the musicians 
and dancers in costume, who entertained 
us so gayly. It seemed quite fitting that 
Leslie Hood, a book dealer, should intro- 
duce authors and librarians, and it was 
with much pleasure that we listened to 
Carl Moon read some of his own poems, 
and sympathized with Sam Hinds when 
he assured us that he preferred to talk 
to one girl a thousand times rather than 
a thousand girls at one time. Grace 
Moon told us of her high ideals in regard 
to children's books in such an enticing 
way that we were anxious to read again 
some of her charming tales of Indian 
children. Anne Shannon Monroe related 
some of her experiences as a budding 
author, which were much more amusing 



222 



News notes of calieoknia libraries. 



[July, 1928 



to look back upon than to experience. 
As the books of these authors go and 
come over our library desks they will 
bring happy memories of this occasion. 

The play by Laura C. Cooley, presented 
by the "Library Players" under the direc- 
tion of Frances C. Richardson, was an 
artistic and pleasing production, which 
would have given credit to professionals, 
and made a happy ending to the evening's 
entertainment. 

Adult Education was the key note of 
the Wednesday morning session. Dorothy 
Newton gave some practical suggestions 
concerning linking up old books with the 
new on the same subjects. 

Mr Martyn Johnson told, in a delight- 
fully informal manner, of some of his 
experiences in helping the reading public 
to determine what they want at his book 
store in Hollywood. His keen sense of 
humor was a delight to his audience. 

Because Mrs Ethel Richardson Allen 
had spoken before C. L. A. a few years 
ago, we were all most eager to hear of the 
more recent developments in the depart- 
ment of Adult Education which she is 
directing so successfully. The accom- 
plishments in the past few years have 
been so startling that a real challenge has 
been made to the libraries to keep up with 
the movement. 

K. Dorothy Ferguson stressed the 
mutual help that public libraries and 
special libraries could be to each other, 
and urged a closer cooperation between 
the two. 

The C. L. A. always feels fortunate 
when it can secure a representative from 
the A. L. A. for its program. We felt 
particularly favored this year in having 
Mr Carl B. Roden, President of A. L. A., 
compare the work of the two organizations 
and bring us in closer touch with the 
larger group. We were especially grati- 
fied by the tribute paid to Mr Ferguson 
because of the recognition he has so 
deservedly received from the Carnegie 
Corporation. 

The afternoon program centered around 
the subject of modem fiction. Professor 
B. H. Lehman said that the fiction of 
today which will endure is that which 
combines the current trends of psychology 
and environmental influence and delves 
deeply into the fundamental values of 
life. He paid tribute to Ring Lardner 



for his short story "Haircut," which he 
says accomplishes as much in twenty 
pages as Sinclair Lewis seeks to tell in 
five hundred pages. 

Mx's J. Wells Smith, trustee of the Los 
Angeles Public Library, followed Pro- 
fessor Lehman and emphasized the fact 
that the modern novel was having such 
an important influence upon the lives of 
the people. 

It is a delight to any group of libra- 
rians to hear Helen Haines give her 
clearcut opinions on books. In speaking 
of foreign fiction, she urged us to put 
aside our prejudices because of foreign 
names and unfamiliar backgrounds, and 
come to a better understanding of other 
peoples through reading their books. 
She, in characteristic manner, had pre- 
pared lists of outstanding foreign books 
which she captioned "World vistas in 
foreign fiction." 

The reception in the Spanish Room of 
the Inn, which followed the aftero.oon 
program, was delightfully informal and 
gave opportunity for fi-iendly chats with 
many of the authors who were guests of 
the convention for the day. 

The atmosphere of the pioneer West 
pervaded the evening meeting as Harri- 
son Leussler presented six western 
authors who have lived the life of which 
they write. Mr Knibbs.read two of his 
verses, and W. C. Tuttle told amusing 
incidents of his life. Col Breakenridge 
related stories which showed the utter 
carelessness of the cattle rustlers of the 
early day, and William S. Hart, intro- 
duced not as the "two-gun" man of the 
movies, but as an author, demonstrated 
the use of the sign language. His 
address in the Sioux language was inter- 
preted by his friend. Chief Standing 
Bear. 

Chief Standing Bear told of his early 
life and of his education at the Carlisle 
school, where he was the first pupil. He 
closed his interesting talk with a plea for 
the granting of citizenship to Indians. 

Since the children's work in most 
libraries presents such an unsolved prob- 
lem, it was a real opportunity to hear 
the very latest word on the subject as 
presented by Mrs Hot Johnson, a mother ; 
Eloise Ramsey, a teacher; Eva Leslie, a 
librarian ; Mrs Lucy Fitch Perkins, an 
author and illustrator ; Virginia Kirkus, a 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



HOME AGAIN. 



223 



publisher ; Gladys English, a school libra- 
rian. The talk on the place of the fairy 
in the child's life by Ella Toung, who has 
had experience with real Irish fairies and 
has written charming tales about them, 
made a fitting close to the morning's most 
enjoyable program. 

Reports of the auditing committee and 
of the resolutions committee brought the 
business of the convention to a close. 
Expressions of appreciation to Mrs Linn 
and her helpers, who had done so much 
to see that every detail of the convention 
plans were worked out so meticulously, 



and to Mr Woods for his part as host 
were heartily endorsed by evei-y one 
attending the convention. 

Mr Ferguson was assured of the good 
wUl and best wishes of the association in 
his approaching visit to South Africa. 

Leaving the problems of the association 
for the coming year in the hands of Miss 
Gillis, our new president, we reluctantly 
left the beautiful Mission Inn, where we 
had been entertained so perfectly, know- 
ing that another year would bring us 
more splendid things to feast upon. 



224 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



A NEW VENTURE. 



By WlLHELMINA HARPER. 



The need of specialized service in chil- 
dren's work, on the part of libraiies 
without trained children's librarians, has 
been a subject of much discussion 
throughout the country for a number of 
years. With the constant increase of 
juvenile library patrons, this problem 
has reached seiious proportions and is 
in need of a definite and practical solu- 
tion. And the constant increase in the 
output of juvenile books adds to the 
problem rather than lessens it. 

It is entirely as essential to have chil- 
dren's book specialists choosing the 
children's out-of-school reading as it is 
to have trained specialists choosing their 
text-book reading in schools. Those of 
us who have long studied the situation 
realize that a library without a thor- 
oughly trained children's librarian, or at 
least a measure of her service, suffers as 
great a handicap as would the schools if 
conducted without thoroughly trained 
teachers. It is contrary to law to operate 
a school of no more than a half dozen 
pupils without the services of a trained 
teacher. Must the smaller libraries go 
on forever without the services of the 
trained children's librarian? 

There should be ways of meeting this 
serious problem. And the sooner they 
are in operation the better, in the inter- 
ests of education. Through the books we 
provide in libraries, "Young America" is 
forming his character and ideals. In the 
interests of future America, these must be 
of the right kind without question. Our 
United States Commissioner of Educa- 
tion, in discussing some shocking social 
conditions as proven by statistics, has 
said, "Even illiteracy has its compensa- 
tions in that it protects the youth from 
the polluted printed matter of the age." 

Of course we know that there are not 
enough children's librarians available, 
even where funds permit their employ- 
ment. And we know that librarians are 
doing their best, under handicap, where 
the children's specialist is not procurable. 

In the June, 1928, A. L. A. Bulletin, 
the committee on library work with chil- 
dren gives its annual report. A record 
has been kept for a year of the calls for 



information of various kinds, which sev- 
eral heads of children's departments have 
received from different parts of the 
country, outside of their own immediate 
districts. It was found that the common- 
est requests concern hooks, i. e., hook lists 
graded, or by subject — subject specified, 
the evaluation of similar books, books for 
first pui'chase, etc. 

One of the conclusions the committee 
has drawn from this study is that "there 
are numbers of people engaged in library 
work with children who feel themselves 
inadequate through lack of training or 
experience, to cari-y on the work as their 
ideals tell them it should be done." It is 
these people, wilh their true visions of 
service, who should be able to have some 
of the help needed and desired, even 
though it is not possible to have a chil- 
dren's librarian on the immediate staff. 
We know that no one person can solve 
this great problem, but why should not 
some one make a small beginning, in a 
very direct way, to help those who really 
desire it? 

During my several years' service as 
Supervisor of Children's Work in the 
Kern County Free Library, California, 
I have had so many requests from libra- 
rians over the country for helpful sugges- 
tions concerning juvenile book collections 
and problems arising therefrom that I 
have decided to devote my entire time to 
this bigger service, in order that I may be 
able to help those desiring it to build the 
best children's departments possible. 

I . am now available as Consulting 
Children's Librarian in an independent 
capacity and with the endorsement of our 
State Librarian, Mr Milton J. Ferguson. 
My personal sei-vice is offered in any 
capacity pertaining to the development 
of children's work, such as juvenile book 
selection ; furnishing graded reading lists, 
and other lists for special occasions ; 
weeding out undesirable books from collec- 
tions ; book talks ; story telling, etc. 

Since library service to children is 
measured by the type of book given, I 
am offering a very specialized service in 
connection with the juvenile book selec- 
tion. I will keep libraries informed of 



i 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



A NEW VENTURE. 



225 



the best children's books of each month 
from the press of all the leading pub- 
lishers. These will be printed on cards 
with publisher and price given, annotated 
and gi'aded, and arranged for filing. 

In connection with this book selection, 
I offer an additional sei-vice of value. 
For those desiring it, the cards will come 
giving the Dewey decimal classification 
number for each book, with indication of 
the additional entries to be made. This 
work will be done by a highly trained 
cataloger. 



I also offer to make up standard collec- 
tions of children's books, which will be 
carefully selected in accordance with par- 
ticular needs. Suggestions will be made 
concerning replacements ; and entire 
annual juvenile book orders will be made 
up if so desired. 

Aside from this I shall be glad to 
cooperate with librarians at any time 
concerning any problems which may arise 
in their work with children. Communica- 
tions may be addressed to 850 Hamilton 
Avenue, Palo Alto, Calif. 



226 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



SISKIYOU I MOOOC 



/i^. ffxAnMu/. K,. SMIFRMCISCO 







3S-N. _ 
jtar. (farlttfcn, fC. 



\ol. 23, no. 3] 



LIST OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



227 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 
Statistics of July 1, 1927. 



Librarian 



Established 



Income, 
1926-27' 



Books, etfi. 



Branches 



Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county^ 



Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 



Mary Barmby 

Bertha S. Taylor 

Carmelita Duff 

Mrs Ella P. Morse 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeok. 

Sarah E. McCardle 

Mrs Faye K. Russell 

Ida M. Reagan 

Evalyn Soman 

Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock. _ . 

Marion L. Gregory 

Lenala A. Martin 

Helen E. Vogleson 

Blanche Galloway 

Muriel Wright 

Minette L. Stoddard 

Minette L. Stoddard 

Anna L. Williams 

Anne Hadden 

Estella De Ford 

Margaret Livingston 

Edith Gantt 

Chas. F.Woods 

Cornelia D. Provines 

Florence J. Wheaton 

Caroline S. Waters 

Eleanor Hitt 



IdaE. Condit 

t Lilian Sabin 

Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Mrs Elizabeth Singletary 
Minerva H. Waterman... 

Edith Gantt 

'Mary Harris 

Clara B. Dills 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Frances M. Burket 

Anne Bell Bailey 

Mrs Lila D. Adams 

Gretchen Flower 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher 

Elizabeth R. Topping 

Nancy C. Laugenour 



Sept. 26, 
June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8, 
July 21 
Mar. 12, 
April 8, 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16, 
June 4, 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 5 
May 3 
Aug. 3 
Oct. 4 
June 6 
July 8 
Aug. 6 
Feb. 9 
Dec. 9 
Sept. 7 
Nov. 8 
Oct. 1 
Feb. 4 
July 14 
April 5 



Mar. 7 
July 6, 
Sept. 5, 
Feb. 16 
July 20, 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 2 
June 7, 
April 6, 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8, 
Sept. 8, 
June 10, 
July 3 
April 9 
July 12 



1910 
1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 



1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 



158,034 00 

5,508 20 

17,888 79 

12,093 64 

55,210 57 

156,650 93 

16,672 07 

2e,942 12 

18,631 24 

9,620 50 

83,923 01 

26,689 37 

13,591 71 

305,637 40 

25,326 27 

6,484 02 

4,254 73 

36,368 52 

3,847 04 

20,664 91 

11,417 68 

26,002 81 

10,271 24 

16,065 80 

41,287 62 

10,127 62 

41,629 51 

35,264 20 



31,335 00 
16,830 74 
23,202 22 
29,319 98 
27,375 66 

8,847 83 

1,110 07 
18,752 51 
25,187 08 
31,946 49 
15,746 73 
10,619 43 

5,873 48 
48,609 70 

9,716 28 
34,756 68 
28,856 13 



136,506 
19,963 
67,129 
50,909 

171,713 

418,785 
53,675 

103.582 
62,533 
30,094 

267,631 

119,912 
46,872 

536,788 

89,932 

2,569 

1,512 

124,227 
15,361 
87,710 
29,104 
78,199 
42,073 

83,758 
37,382 

108,415 

101,385 





50,186 

192,173 



123,176 





80,556 

84,243 

96,289 

44,162 

43,466 

19,764 

138,546 

t. 27,377 

89,870 

99,297 



92 
40 
87 
49 

109 

257 
62 

152 
80 
42 

186 
57 
71 

318 
74 
2 
28 
84 
35 

138 
80 
60 
82 
86 

111 
78 

137 

150 



65 
105 
97 
88 
14 
153 
68 
71 
44 
99 
54 
130 
57 
95 
72 



51 
29 
65 
32 
64 

161 
41 

109 
56 
31 

103 
41 
37 

157 
61 
44 
27 
71 
42 
96 
48 
56 
29 
78 
84 
37 
74 

116 



93 
93 
41 
67 
81 
54 
12 
91 
53 
64 
36 
53 
25 
127 
28 
56 
44 



38 
27 
57 
29 
58 

155 
39 
99 
50 
29 

100 
38 
35 

115 
50 

23 
63 
29 
88 
46 
36 
29 
46 
65 
37 
64 

101 



78 
82 
28 
60 
75 
52 
4 
88 
47 
46 
35 
50 
25 
86 
25 
54 
42 



1, '08-O 4, '26 



Sl,464,191 53 



a. 3,976,824 



4,195 



2,848 



' The income as given does not include balance in fund, July 1, 1926. 
' Includes elementary and high. 

3 San Francisco city and county are coterminous. The city library therefore covers the entire county. For statistics 
see under "Public Libraries, etc." next page. 
tAppointed July 7, 1928; began work July 16. 
♦Appointed May 7, 1928; began work July 16. 



228 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES OF 20,000 BOOKS, ETC., AND OVER. 



City 



Librarian 



Established 



Income, 
1926-27 



Boolcs, etc. 



Card- 
holders 



Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley* 

El Centre 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Long Beach 

Lob Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino- 

San Diego 

San Francisco... 

San Jose... 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara. . 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica... 

Santa Paula 

Santa Rosa 

South Pasadena. 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 



Mrs Marcella H. Krauth. 
Marian P. Greene 



Agnes F. Ferris 

Gertrude De Gelder 

Mrs Alma J. Danford 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt. 

Everett R. Perry 

Bessie B. Silverthorn 

John B. Kaiser 

Ethel Carroll 

Frances D. Patterson 

Jeanne tte M. Drake 

Sarah M. Jacobus 

Mabel Inness 

Norah McNeill 

Chas. F. Woods 

Susan T. Smith 

May Coddington 

Cornelia D. Plaister 

Robert Rea 

Mrs Edith Daley 

Jeannette E. McFadden... 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Minerva H. Waterman 

Elfie A. Mosse 

Mary Boynton 

Margaret A. Barnett 

Mrs Nellie E. Keith 

IdaE. Condit 

L. Gertrude Doyle 

Ruth Ellis 



1877: 

1893; 
1907: 
1906 
1906 
1895: 
1872 
1905 
1868 

1896 
1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 



1874 



1868 
1886 



1869 



as F. P. 1879 

1906 
as F. P. 1895 
as F. P. 1909 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1907 
as F. P. 1901 
as F. P. 1891 
as F. P. 1907 
: as F. P. 1878 

1906 
; as F. P. 1902 
; as F. P. 1890 
; as F. P. 1902 
; as F. P. 1894 
; as F. P. 1909 
; as F. P. 1907 
; as F. P. 1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
; as F. P. 1880 

1891 

1882 
; as F. P. 1881 
; as F. P. 1890 

1907 
; as F. P. 1884 
; as F. P. 1895 

1880 
as F. P. 1884 

1900 



S38,883 87 
29,090 39 

161,455 78 
12,845 06 
18,522 72 
69,830 00 

132,480 GO 

1,194,161 65 

18,053 96 

191,632 05 
9,179 21 
22,494 48 

159,824 35 
29,545 06 
27,881 73 
28,342 73 
45,673 86 
47,223 60 
22,000 00 

109,751 44 

287,388 13 
20,230 45 
31,178 71 
64,195 69 
17,685 54 
38,771 90 
11,762 08 
9,695 72 
16,063 00 
47,824 07 
15,540 00 
28,903 83 



80,143 
30,553 

132,191 
26,004 
21,496 
45,760 

104,698 

889,971 
29,266 

329,802 
33,835 
26,113 

124,061 
87,768 
74,134 
80,543 

126,154 

122,425 
31,994 

162,443 

385,655 
32,300 
47,271 

101,298 
69,551 
49,217 
20,335 
32;538 
28,686 

202,525 
26,248 
22,101 



25,242 
14,869 
15,771 

3,987 

6,560 

30,919 

44,725 

255,006 

8,126 
61,622 

4,276 

8,796 
57,691 
11,235 

7,758 
10,215 

9,526 
23,625 
15,059 
50,659 
107,879 
11,944 
10,513 
20,848 

5,287 



3,595 
5,644 



11,412 
6,093 
6,921 



' Olive Burroughs, Acting Librarian. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



229 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 

complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1927. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. mi. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,.536. 

Assessed valuation $7,647,025,607. 

Number of counties, .58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation $469,981,274 (tax- 
able for county $408,746,588). 

Alaiieda Co. Free Libeaky, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

During the spring inventories have 
been taken by the staif at the main 
library of a number of the county library 
branches. 

A shipment of about 125 books was 
sent during June to the Oakland Camp 
Fire Girls' summer camp near Nevada 
City. 

Before the graduation of the seniors 
of the San Francisco State Teachers 
College, Miss Barmby gave a talk on the 
County Library. 

Miss Barmby and Miss Baird attended 
the meeting of the California Library 
Association at Riverside the first of 
April. 

Maey Baemby, Lib'n. 

All librarians of county branch libraries 
assembled in Oakland AprU 19 at a meet- 
ing where library affairs were discussed. 
— Centei*ville News, Ap 21 

Berkeley. 

Beekeley [Free] Public Libeaey. 
Olive Burroughs, Acting Lib'n. 

Staff changes include the resignations 
of jNIiss Frances Mitchel and of Miss 
Doris Spinks, to be married ; Miss Alice 
E. Burnham to return to her position at 
the Library of Hawaii, Honolulu ; of 
Catherine Preftokis and of Mary Chrislip 
to be married. Appointments have been 
made as follows : Margaret Mount, grad- 
uate of the School of Librarianship, Uni- 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

Berkeley — Continued. 

versity of California, 1928, as Branch 
Librarian ; Ida HUbers, graduate of the 
School of Librarianship, University of 
Califoi-nia, 1928, as assistant at a branch 
library ; Frances Rosenblum, as clerical 
assistant. 

The children of the West Berkeley 
Branch Library are rejoicing in a gener- 
ous addition of attractive new volumes. 
The purchase of these books was made 
possible by a gift of $50 from the Parent- 
Teachers' Association of the Burbank 
School. 

Olive Bxjeeoughs, Acting Lib'n. . 

G. T. Douglas, Berkeley banker and a 
director of the Berkeley Chamber of Com- 
merce, was named May 22 to fill the 
vacancy on the Board of Library Trus- 
tees, caused by the recent death of Mrs 
James Hume, president of the board. — 
San Francisco Chronicle, My 23 

Gaufield Junioe High School Li- 
brary. D. L. Hennessey, Prin. Eliza- 
beth I. Patton, Lib'n. 

The newly organized "Book-Lovers' 
Club" has done excellent work during the 
past semester. This consists of a limited 
number of enthusiastic pupils, sponsored 
by the librarian. They issued "The 
Winged-Foot Mercury," a bulletin, con- 
taining interesting articles about the 
school library. This work has not only 
shown the individuality of the members 
of the club but the material gathered by 
the pupils has created a greater interest 
in the library by the faculty and student 
body. 

The graduating classes presented the 
library with the colorful picture "Castles 
in Spain" and a number of volumes of 
the best illustrated classics. 

Elizabeth I. Patton, Lib'n. 

Newman Club Libeaey. 
Miss Eleanor McAllister is now libra- 
rian of Newman Club Library. 



230 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1928 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland. 

^Oakland Free [Public] Library. 
John B. Kaiser, Lib'n ; Chas. S. Greene, 
Lib'n Emeritus. 

Anticipating the need for more pub- 
licity in regard to the proposed library 
program for 1928-29, the Board of Li- 
brai-y Directors has issued a pamphlet on 
"Budget Needs and Other Facts." It 
briefly summarizes the need of a larger 
library appropriation, with a request for 
$362,848, as against $175,956, available 
last year. 

The Civil Service Board has modified 
its rule in regard to the employment of 
married women. It recommends that, 
except in cases of economic necessity, no 
married women be appointed when single 
women of equal merit are eligible. 

The annual count of books was made 
on June 13, with a recorded total of 
147,532 volumes in the library and 
branches. 

Mr F. M. Smith has presented the 
Oakland Museum with a landau and two 
sets of silver-mounted harness, which 
were used by President McKinley in 1901, 
and by President Roosevelt in 1903, when 
on visits to Oakland. 

The ' librai-y has been the recipient of 
several vei-y interesting gifts of books, a 
set of Graetz' "History of the Jews," by 
Mr A. S. Lavenson ; a folio volume enti- 
tled "South Slav Monuments, vol. 1, 
Serbian Orthodox Church," by Prof 
Michael I. Pupin ; and an unbound set of 
the "Historic Russian Church Litigation 
Documents," by Miss Eleanor Silverman. 
Mr C. W. Gibson has presented the Rock- 
ridge Branch Library with a 27 voiume 
set of the "Historian's History of the 
World." 

Miss Ford gave the Snow Museum a 
ship model. 

Two appointments have been made 
recently, Mrs Adah Chidlaw to the posi- 
tion of first assistant in the Circulation 
Department, and Miss Catherine Ruby, 
assistant in the Branch Department. 

In memoi-y of Miss Katherine D. Jones, 
to whose place Mrs Chidlaw has been 
appointed, the library staff purchased a 
beautiful copper jardiniere inscribed with 
her name, which will be kept in the Cir- 
culation Department. 

The University of California Extension 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 
Division is planning a course in library 
classification and cataloging for this fall, 
to be followed later with other courses 
on librai-y work. It is hoped that this 
will lead to the establishment of a defi- 
nite course of study by the Extension 
Division, covering the work given in a 
one-year library school. 

A report on Better Use of Visual Aids 
has been made by a committee of Oakland 
teachers and approved by the Superin- 
tendent's Council, March 28, 1928. It 
takes up the question of book mutilation 
in connection with the maintaining of 
project note books and is definitely con- 
structive in the remedies proposed. Mr 
.J. R. Sutton, principal of the San 
Leandro High School, was chairman of 
the committee. 

The past year a committee from the 
Oakland Free Library and the Oakland 
schools has been at work on a program 
for cooperation in the interests of better 
library sei-vice to the teachers and pupUs 
of the Oakland school system. 

The report has been received and 
accepted as a report of progress by both 
the Superintendent's Council and the 
Board of Library Directors. It is to be 
duplicated for distribution to school prin- 
cipals with a view to further discussion 
in the fall. 

An "Intennediate Collection" of 444 
volumes has been started, featuring in 
particular the books of interest to high 
school students between the ages of 12 
and 16. An additional list of 243 titles 
is ready to be ordered. 

At the request of the Christian Science 
Church, the books in the library compris- 
ing the authorized and unauthorized liter- 
ature of the church have been reclassified 
with other religions. The work of recata- 
loging the books has been done by Miss 
jNIildred Wine, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of California School of Librarian- 
ship. 

The Reference Department compiled a 
bibliography on International Good-wUl, 
which was used in the programs given 
over the radio by Mills College. 

Much regret has been felt by the 
library over the retirement of Dr Fred 
Hunter, superintendent of schools, who 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



231 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
has left to assume his duties as chancellor 
of the University of Denver. Mr Willard 
E. Givens, of San Diego and formerly of 
Oakland, has been elected to succeed Dr 
Hunter. The Library Board has sent 
a resolution of welcome and an offer of 
cooperation to Mr Givens. 

Miss Mable W. Thomas, associate libra- 
rian, attended the conference of the 
A. L. A. at West Baden, Illinois. On her 
way home she visited libraries in several 
of the large cities. 

A leave has been granted Miss Jeanette 
Anderson, librarian of Melrose Branch, 
for an extended trip to Europe. Miss 
Green and Miss Howell have also been 
granted extended leaves. 

John B. Kaisee, Lib'n. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $899,144 (taxable 
for county $722,508). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $7,971,803 (taxable 
for county $6,902,670.) 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $45,748,791 (tax- 
able for county $36,848,667). 

Oroville. 

Oroville [F k e e] Public Lebeaey 
AND Branch, Butte Co. Free Libkaby. 
Mrs Edith Simons, Lib'n. 

The woodwork of the Oroville Public 
Library is being painted, a light gray 
color being used. This matches well with 
the gray stucco exterior of the building. 
The date for the meetings of the library 
trustees has been changed from the first 
Tuesday to the first Wednesday of the 
month. 

Mrs Edith Simons, Lib'n. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty -ninth class.) 

County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8,835,647 (taxable 
for county $6,922,025). 

Angels Camp. 

Angels Camp Free Library. 

A meeting was held in the social hall 
of the Congregational Church at Angels 
Camp the evening of June 18, at which 
time an organization was fonned to take 
charge of the newly established library, 
initiated by B,ev Cookman of the Congre- 
gational Church. It is sponsored by the 
Angels Boosters' Club and the Calaveras 
Woman's Club. C. T. Mills was elected 
president of the organization and Mrs 
Frank Crespi secretary. — Stockton Rec- 
ord, Je 20 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $27,254,483 (tax- 
able for county $22,397,410). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Mrs Ella Packer Morse, Lib'n. 

Mrs Gertrude Boyd has been appointed 
custodian, of Menzie Branch Library to 
take the place of Miss Virginia Holsapple, 
who has moved away. 

On June 19 we had the pleasure of a 
visit from Mrs May Henshall of the State 
Library staff. 

Mrs Ella P. Morse, Lib'n. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $107,212,849 (tax- 
able for county $95,299,690). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

Mrs Whitbeck and Miss Greene, head 
of school work in the County Library, 
attended the annual meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Librai*y Association at Riverside, 
April 2-5. 

Mrs Whitbeck attended the P. T. A. 
convention in .^ameda, April 20, and 



232 



ISTEWS notes op CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued, 
talked on Children's Book Week pro- 
grams ; gave a talk before the Walnut 
Creek Women's Club, April 24 ; attended 
Conference of Social Agencies at Tosemite 
Valley, May 21 ; and June 25 was the 
guest speaker at the Soroptomist Club of 
Oakland, talking on County Library 
Work in California. 

The Oakley Branch is being enlarged 
by another room and more shelving added. 
Its capacity is doubled, and the hours of 
service to the public are to be lengthened. 
Mrs Bertha Heidorn is novr custodian of 
Knightsen Branch, replacing Mrs White. 
Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'n. 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat. Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $10,391,395 (tax- 
able for county $10,317,531). 

Crescent City. 

Crescent City [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Mildred Duffy, Lib'n. 

The vi^eekly story hour at the Crescent 
City Public Libi'ary has been changed 
from Saturday to Thursday afternoon. 
This schedule v^ill remain in effect during 
the summer months, but in all probability 
will be changed back to Saturday again 
with the opening of school. 

Mrs Ellen E. Estes was the story 
teller on Thursday afternoon. The 
attendance is increasing with each week 
and it has been necessary for some time 
to divide the period into two sections, the 
younger children in the first half hour, 
the older children in the second. — Crescent 
City Triplicate, Je 22 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $13,384,098 (tax- 
able for county $10,651,060). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $205,198,111 (tax- 
able for county $163,663,173). 

JFresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

There have been several changes in 
custodians duinng the quarter. Mrs 
Edith Sandell, for years custodian at 
Kennan, has moved away and Mrs Maude 
Streeter has taken over her duties both 
as custodian and telephone operator, the 
branch being located in the telephone 
office. Mrs Carl Thomsen of Tranquillity 
has also moved away and Miss Marjorie 
Bray has been appointed to fill the 
position. 

The branch at Lerona has been closed 
at the request of the custodian. The 
patronage here has fallen off until she 
feels there is no longer any need of a 
branch. This branch has been located in 
the custodian's home in a very thinly 
settled pai-t of the foothills. The Cole 
Creek School District has lapsed, owing 
to the fact that there are not enough 
children in the district, nor people eligi- 
ble to be trustees. This school was 
originally opened to care for the children 
of people working in a saw mill. The 
summer branch at Bretz was opened 
June 1. 

We have had a number of visitors dur- 
ing the quarter. Miss Mary Barmby and 
her sister, Dr Barmby, and Miss Susan 
Smith stopped on their way home from 
the meeting at Riverside, as did Miss 
Estella DeFord. Miss Jean Baird was 
with us long enough for us to have a 
staff tea in her honor and for the assist- 
ants to meet her. Miss Baird was for- 
merly County Librarian of this county. 
Several of our one-time assistants have 
visited us in June : Miss Roberta . Mere- 
dith, Miss Clara Larson, Miss Frances 
Mathis, and Miss Mary Harris. We are 
happy to have Miss Harris back in Cali- 
fornia, even though she will be in Siski- 
you. 

In March Fresno City Branch insti- 
tuted a duplicate pay collection with the 
hope that it would help to solve the prob- 
lem of new fiction and popular non- 
fiction for the readers who desire nothing 
else. It met with immediate response 
from this class of patrons and is now an 
assured success. We have 138 books in 
the collection, fifteen having paid for 
themselves and been turned into the 
general collection, thus helping to stock 
the free shelves with new books. 

Sarah E. McCaedle, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



233 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $28,665,826 (tax- 
able for county $23,462,601). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Mrs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

Mrs Elizabeth Edwards, school assist- 
ant, resigned June 1. Miss Edith Knee- 
shaw of San Diego was appointed to fill 
the vacancy during the summer. 

The branch library building at Hamil- 
ton City was completed June 11 and 
accepted by the Board of Supervisors. 
The librax-y has been moved into the 
building. The women of the community 
have raised money for the furniture, 
which they hope to install in the near 
future. 

Mbs Faye K. Russell, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 
County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $56,735,465 (tax- 
able for county $51,761,892). 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat, El Centre. 
. Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 

Assessed valuation $54,776,203 (tax- 
able for county $45,070,867). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
TRO. Miss Evalyn Boman, Lib'n. 

Miss Roman was reappointed County- 
Librarian, May 21, 1928, for a four-year 
tenn. 

INYO COUNTY. 
( Forty-seventh class. ) 

County seat, Independence. 

Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 

Assessed valuation $19,105,244 (tax- 
able for county $11,564,316). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

On July 3, the supervisors accepted the 
bid of George A. Probasco for the con- 
i struction of a justice court room, jail and 
branch library building for Lone Pine, 
and ordered a contract to be drawn. The 
contract price is $11,526.14. The library 



INYO CO.— Continued. 

will occupy one-half of the building, and 
will have its opening on the side street, 
less than a block from the main street ; 
the court room will open on the other 
street, while the jail will occupy the rear 
corner, secluded from both streets. The 
building will be of concrete, very plain in 
design, and pleasing in appearance. It 
will be large enough to allow of consider- 
able growth in the use of the library. 

Miss Nellie Reynolds, custodian of the 
branch at Lone Pine, has completed the 
course in book selection offered by the 
American Correspondence School of Li- 
brarianship. Her work was very satis- 
factory, although she labored under the 
disadvantage of having access to a very 
small collection of books. Mrs Bessie T. 
Best, custodian at Bishop, has enrolled 
for the course in cataloging. 

The Ryan Branch has closed for the 
summer, as Ryan is now a winter resort 
and closed May 15. 

•Josephine Owen has been appointed 
custodian at Darwin, and Mrs Nellie 
Lydston at Manzanar. 

Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $205,141,512 (tax- 
able for county $169,014,225). 

Kern Co. Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Miss Wilhelmina Harper, who has been 
children's librarian here for the past 
seven years, has resigned this post to 
embark upon an original career of her 
own in librai*y work, that of a consulting 
children's librarian. Her field of con- 
sultation will be the Pacific coast, and 
her headquarters will be at Palo Alto. 
Miss Harper's resignation will take effect 
May 1. — Bakersfield Galifornian, Ap 17 

Louis B. Nourse has been appointed 
chief librarian of East Bakersfield 
Branch. He is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Rochester, and also of the School 
of Librarianship at the University of 
California with this year's class. Mr 
Nourse was an assistant in library work 
three years in Rochester, and was for a 
year in the circulation department of the 



234 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNLl LIBRARIES 



[July, 1928 



KERN CO.— Continued. 

local library. — Bakersfield Californian, 
My 18 

After being away a month, Mrs Bab- 
cock, Kem County Librarian, returned 
home June 18. She spent a week in ses- 
sions of the American Library Association 
at West Baden, Indiana, where she pre- 
sented a paper on the Kem County 
Library System. During the remainder 
of the time, Mrs Babcock visited more 
than 25 libraries in the east and middle 
west. — Bakersfield Californian, Je 19 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty -ninth class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $30,306,310 (tax- 
able for county $25,086,635). 

K NGS Co. Free Libbaey, Hanfoed. 
]Miss Marion L. Gregory, Lib'n. 

In a brief business meeting. May 5, 
the Kings County Supei*visors accepted 
the resignation of Mrs Bartlett as libra- 
lian at Lemoore Branch and named Mrs 
E. G. Henley to succeed her at a salary 
of $55 a month. — Fresno Republican, 
My 6 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $9,170,675 (taxable 
for county $9,093,600). 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $18,697,383 (tax- 
able for county $14,190,654). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

The librarian gave talks at three meet- 
ings on the necessity of a maximum fund 
for elementary schools for 1928—29. 
These talks were given at the County 
Elementary Trustees meeting in Susan- 
ville, the meeting of Elementary Trustees 
and teachers in Bieber, and at a luncheon 
of the Honey Lake Valley teachers in 
Susanville. 

The College of the Pacific was in- 



LASSEN CO.— Continued, 
eluded in Mr Fairfield's will and was 
given, among other things, his library. 
The college very generously and thought- 
fully felt that Mr Fairfield's library 
shoidd remain in Lassen County and so 
gave this collection of some 600 books to 
the Lassen County Library. 

Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 4100 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $3,336,940,015 (tax- 
able for county $2,954,909,955). 

Los Angeles Co. Free Library, Los 
Angeles. Miss Helen E. Vogleson, 
Lib'n. 

Several members of the central library 
staff attended sessions of the County 
Librarians' Convention and Annual Meet- 
ing of the California Library Association 
held at Riverside, April 2-5. Branch 
librarians also attending were : Miss 
Eleanor Hamilton, County General Hos- 
pital ; Mrs Lenore Forker, Inglewood ; 
Miss Helen Rees, San Dimas ; Mrs Anna 
M. Robinson, Claremont ; Mrs Golda 
Clinton, Wilmar ; Mrs Winifred Mac- 
Laughlin, San Gabriel ; and Miss Edith 
Bonesteel, librarian at Olive View Sana- 
torium. 

The third group of branch librarian 
meetings held within a year, met at the 
central library, June 6. Fifty-one libra- 
rians of branches and seven assistants 
attended the two-session program. Miss 
Stephens, Assistant Librarian, conducted 
a discussion of common problems ; Miss 
Vogleson, County Librarian, gave a talk 
on "My responsibility as a branch libra- 
rian," and Miss Ryder, Reference Libra- 
rian, carried on an instnictive demonstra- 
tion of the use of the quarterly bulletin 
"Books and Notes," as a practical refer- 
ence tool in branch library service. The 
last number on the program was a talk 
by George Wycherley Kirkman on "Cali- 
fornia Historical Research." Mr Kirk- 
man is author of "Buccaneers of the 
Pacific" and he helped all realize that 
the period of California history covered 
by this book is as romantic and colorful 
as the more well known period of the 
missions. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



235 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Construction of the new library build- 
ing at Claremont has been in progress 
since March, but it will probably not be 
ready for occupancy until August. An 
attractive bungalow building for the 
branch library at La Verne was occupied 
the latter part of June. 

Books given for the "Men who go down 
to the sea in ships" have been coming into 
mauj' of our branches. The County Li- 
brarian, who acted as county chairman 
for the territory served by the County 
Library, has been ably assisted by the 
branch librarians as local chairmen in 
each community where there is a branch 
library. 

The library enjoyed recently the calls 
of two charming foreign library visitors, 
both of whom were interested in the 
operation of a county libi-ary : Mile 
Yvonne Oddom, a graduate of the Paris 
Libraiy School, and Miss Elin Kardell, 
Librarian of Jamtlands Bibliotek, Oster- 
sunds, Sweden. 

Helen E. Vogleson, Lib'n. 

Arcadia. 

Arcadia Fbee Public Libeary. Mrs 
F. W. Treen, Lib'n. 

Miss Annie E. Ellison, Assistant City 
Librarian at Arcadia, passed away June 
22. She was bom in New Hampshire, 
and for the past twelve years had lived 
in Arcadia. — Arcadia Neios, Je 29 

Claremont. 

Clabemont Colleges. Sceipps Col- 
lege LiBEAEY. Dr Ernest J. Jaqua, Pres. 

Scripps College for Women, the newest 
of the group of colleges assembled under 
the Claremont Colleges plan at Clare- 
mont, has announced the appointment of 
Miss Margaret Withington as librarian 
for the institution. Miss Withington's 
experience at Simmons College, first as 
Librarian in the Social Service Library, 
and later as Dean of the School of Social 
Work, makes her exceptionally fitted for 
her new post. She will assume her duties 
in September. She has been a director of 
the Simmons College Alumnae Association 
and president of the Special Libraries 
Association of Boston. 

Scripps College is the second of a group 
of colleges at Claremont, banded together 
under the common headship of Claremont 



LOS ANGELES CO. — Continued. 
Claremont — Continued. 
Colleges. Pomona College, founded in 
1887, is the original member of this 
association of colleges. It is the funda- 
mental principle of the group that the 
values of a small college are too great to 
forsake for mere size and prestige. In 
order to supply the greater facilities of a 
larger institution, a group of small col- 
leges is being formed. Pomona has re- 
stricted its attendance to but 800 students 
since 1915. It is planned that Scripps 
will never have more than 250 students 
at any one time. They admit but fifty 
freshmen each year. 

It is possible that in the future other 
colleges will be created to take their part 
in the growing colony of institutions of 
higher learning that is growing up 
around the mother institution, Pomona 
College. 

W. H. Kerr has been appointed Direc- 
tor of Libraries of Claremont Colleges. 
He continues as librarian of Pomona 
College also. 

Glendale. 

Glendale Feee Public Libeaey. Mrs 
Alma J. Danford, Lib'n. 

Grandview Branch of Glendale Public 
Library was the scene on the afternoon 
of April 7 of an Easter party, presided 
over by Miss Helen Hart wig. Librarian, 
and Miss Jean Ingram, in charge of the 
juvenile department of the branch. More 
than 250 children attended. Entertain- 
ment was provided by the California 
string quartet. One of the features was 
playing by the quartet of numbers called 
for by the children. More than 600 
colorful Easter eggs were the favors 
received by the young guests at the affair. 
Mrs Danford, Librarian of Glendale Pub- 
lic Library, was among the adults who 
shared the pleasure of the affair with the 
children. — Glendale Neios Press, Ap 9 

Long Beach. 

Long Beach [Feee] Public Libbaby. 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Lib'n. 

Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt of the Long 
Beach Public Library has been appointed 
chairman of a committee which will plan 
and have charge of the California Li- 
brary Association's exhibit at the Pacific 
Southwest Exposition at Long Beach this 



236 



NEWS NOTES OF Cx\LIFOENIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Long Beach — Continued, 
summer. The C. L. A. passed a resolution 
calling for participation in the exposition 
at its annual convention at Riverside, 
April 2 to 5. — Los Angeles Record, Ap 11 

Los Angeles. 

tLos Angeles [Free] Public Libraby. 
Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The Municipal Reference Department 
of the library opened for seiTice in the 
new City Hall, April 16, and has already 
proved itself of value to city officers and 
employees. In addition to much refer- 
ence work for various city departments, 
there has been a circulation of 1771 
volumes. There are 433 card holders 
registered. 

The library took part in the dedication 
of the new City Hall, April 26, being 
represented in the parade by a beautiful 
and dignified float symbolizing "The Book 
— The Record of Civilization." 

A most attractive pamphlet beautifully 
printed and illustrated is the "Handbook 
of Branch Libraries," edited by Mrs Faith 
Holmes Hyers, containing numerous floor 
plans and photographs of various types of 
buildings. 

A model set of "Standard Specifications 
for Branch Library Construction" and 
another of "Standard Specifications for 
Branch Library Furniture" have been 
compiled by the Superintendent of Build- 
ings as models for future use. 

The library will hereafter direct the 
activities of the Lecture and Exhibits 
Room, limiting the use of the auditorium 
to lectures and discussion of subjects 
closely related to the work of the various 
departments of the library. 

Mrs J. Wells Smith, member of the 
Board of Library Commissioners; Miss 
Gladys Caldwell, head of the Art and 
Music Department and chairman of the 
Art Reference Round Table of the A. L. 
A. ; Miss Golda Thompson, and Miss 
Margaret Domers, attended the confer- 
ence of the American Librai-y Association. 

The decoration of the ceiling of the 
room on the first floor occupied by the 
Department of Philosophy and Religion 
has been completed. 

The total number of registered card 
holders at the close of the fiscal year is 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

279,749; the total number of volumes 
866,906, and the total circulation exceeds 
7,620,000, a gain of 1,000,000 over last 
year. 

Helen T. Kennedy, 

Second Asst. Lib'n. 

*Univebsity of Southern Califor- 
nia, College of Liberal Arts Library. 
R. B. von Klein Smid, Pres. Miss 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

The library of Rev Charles Francis 
Hubbard, consisting of over 5000 volumes, 
has been purchased. The collection con- 
sisted of 1000 volumes of religion, 2000 
literature and philology. The remainder 
contained several hundred each of French, 
German, Latin and Greek literature, and 
many volumes of Swedish, Hebrew and 
Sanskrit. One of the most valuable sets 
was a first edition of Joseph Priestly in 
twenty-six volumes. The Shakespeare 
collection contained many rare editions. 

Mr Charles F. Woods, Librarian of the 
Riverside Public Library, visited the 
campus on two occasions with five mem- 
bers of the Riverside Training School. 
They were shown the organization and 
functioning of a large and busy university 
library and its seven departmental libra- 
ries. Each party was entertained for 
lunch at the Women's Residence Hall. 
Charlotte M. Brown, Lib'n. 

Palos Verdes Estates. 

Palos Verdes Library District Li- 
brary. 

Voters of Palos Verdes Estates on June 
28 approved a $90,000 bond issue for a 
new library, art gallery and lecture hall, 
to be known as Palos Verdes Library. 
The vote was 68 to 7. 

The Board of Supei"visors declared the 
library district established, February 6, 
1928, after canvassing the results of the 
election of January 31, which authorized 
formation of the entire Palos Verdes 
Ranch into a local library district. 

W. M. Sutherland is chairman of the 
board of trustees. The other members 
are Mrs Famham B. Martin and Charles 
H. Cheney. — Los Angeles Times, Je 29 

Pasadena. 
Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



237 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued. 
Miss Agnes S. Craig, for many years a 
valued member of the staff of the Pasa- 
dena Public Library, passed away June 
12 after a brief illness. Miss Craig was 
a native of Canada, and a graduate of 
the University of Minnesota. She had 
been connected with the Pasadena Library 
for twenty-one years, and had been in 
charge of the Northside Branch ever since 
it was established. Through her efforts 
the branch developed until its circulation 
of books is equal to that of many libraries 
in good sized cities. — Pasadena Star-News, 
Je 13 

There has been assembled in the lecture 
room of Pasadena Public Library a new 
art exhibit, consisting of prints and water 
colors by the California Printmakers' 
Society. The works fonn a pleasing and 
colorful aggregation. They will be shown 
for the next two months. — Pasadena Star- 
Neios, Je 5 

Two art exhibits of an interesting char- 
acter are on display in the lecture hall of 
Pasadena Public Library. An exhibit of 
Chinese toys, loaned by the authorities of 
the Southwest Museum, and a display of 
prints and color blocks by members of the 
California Printmakers' Society and oth- 
ers, constitute the exhibits. The Chinese 
toys are of exceptional interest, the col- 
lection being drawn from the Herbert E. 
House collection in the Southwest 
Musuem. They were made of colored 
rice flour by a Chinese artisan. — Pasa- 
dena Star-Neivs, My 8 

Pasadena took first place among libra- 
ries of the state in connection with 
collecting books for seamen, the total sent 
from the city being 1962. — Pasadena Star- 
News, Je 18 

Mount Wilson Solab OssEEVATOEt 
LiBEARY. Walter S. Adams, Director of 
Observatoi-y ; George E. Hale, Honorary 
Director. Elizabeth Connor, Lib'n. 

Probably the event of greatest interest 
in connection with the Mount Wilson 
Observatory Library during the past few 
months was the post-conference trip of 
the California Librai-y Association to 
Mount Wilson on April 5-6. Arrange- 
ments were made for about 65 visitors, 
who reached the top of the mountain 
about seven p.m. on April 5 and remained 
2 — 60773 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued, 
until ten o'clock the next morning. 
Through the kindness of the director of 
the observatory, Dr W. S. Adams, who 
was himself on the mountain for the 
evening, special opportunities were given 
to look through the 60-inch reflector and 
to visit the 100-inch Hooker telescope, 
and the next morning, to visit the 60-foot 
and 150-foot tower telescopes, where solar 
observations are made. In the evening, 
before the visit to the domes, Mr W. P. 
Hoge, of the observatory staff, gave a 
lecture, illustrated with slides, on the 
work of the observatory. Our regret is 
that it was not possible to arrange for 
our visitors to visit the buildings of the 
observatory in Pasadena, where all the 
work of the organization except the 
observing is done, and to see the library 
itself. 

Elizabeth Connoe, Lib'n. 

Pasadena High School and Junioe 
College Libeaey. John Harbeson, Prin. 
Miss Winifred Skinner, Lib'n. 

Soon after the close of the school year 
Miss Winifred E. Skinner, Librarian of 
Pasadena High School and Junior College, 
will leave for Europe to visit old world 
libraries. A group of librarians, repre- 
senting schools and colleges in various 
parts of the United States, will make the 
tour, which will be directed by Dr Theo- 
dore W. Koch, Librarian of Northwestern 

University, Chicago. — Pasadena Morning 
Sun, Je 4 

Pomona. 

Pomona [Feee] Public Libeaey. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

The building has been painted inside 
and out, with incidental repairs. Cham- 
berlin weather stripping has been alExed 
to all openings. 

After trying it out, the library has 
bought a Pathfinder Midget Posting Tray, 
to use for the preliminai*y sorting of 
mounted pictures, before filing them into 
the picture cabinets. We have found that, 
although the use of the tray does not 
much cut down the time required for 
sorting, it materially reduces the fatigue 
of the worker, and the wear on the 
mounts. 

Rev. J. H. Baird has resigned from 
the Libi'ary Board, on account of removal 



238 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Pomona — Continued. 

from Pomona. In his place has been 

appointed Emmett Clark, Superintendent 

of Schools. 

Mrs Caroline Walvoord has resigned 
from the staff to go east. Miss Onna F. 
Langworthy has been appointed in her 
place. 

Arley Price has been added to the staff 
as full-time page. 

Sab AH M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Redondo Beach. 

Redondo Beach [Fbee] Public Li- 
BBAKY. Miss Emma E. Catey, Lib'n. 

By a substantial majority the $50,000 
bond issue to be used for erection of a 
new library building was voted by the 
city of Redondo Beach at a special elec- 
tion April 9. There were 1385 affirmative 
and 608 negative votes. — Los Angeles 
Journal of Commerce, Ap 11 

Santa Monica. 

Santa Monica [Fbee] Public Li- 
BBARY. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

A fine collection of books was added 
during the month of June. 

The Art Gallei-y has been devoted for 
the last four months to local exhibitions. 
The art work from the Lincoln Junior 
High School, under the supervision of 
Miss Mary Whelan, was a surprise and 
joy to all. The work of the young chil- 
dren was interesting and extremely cred- 
itable. Following this exhibition came 
the High School Art Department under 
the supervision of Mrs Josephine Roberts. 
The newer type of art prevailed and one 
had a glimpse of what the future holds 
for us along art lines; in many of the 
studies much originality and talent were 
shown. The Camera Club held the gal- 
lei-y during the month of June. This 
showing also was the higher type of 
photography and was keenly enjoyed. 
The newly formed Art Association will 
hold July. The opening night was a 
great success and it is the hope to arouse 
a larger appreciation of art in Santa 
Monica. 

The Aeronautical Association, fonned 
for the purpose of endowing schools of 
aviation, aeronautical design and technic, 
has created a branch association from the 
men who are interested in Clover Field, 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Santa Monica — Continued. 
Santa Monica. Their class is to meet in 
the committee room each week and a 
collection of books on up-to-date aviation 
will be placed in our library. Duplicate 
copies will be supplied, one kept for ref- 
erence. 

The Santa Monica Aeronautical Asso- 
ciation has presented the librarian and 
the first assistant, Miss Katherine 
Whelan, each a life certificate of member- 
ship and says that when the ships which 
are being built for the trip flying from 
Clover Field to British Columbia are 
ready for travel we will receive an invita- 
tion to fly. 

Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Miss Katherine A. Donohoe of Santa 
Clara has given the Ocean Park Branch 
of Santa Monica Public Library a set of 
the Catholic Encyclopedia in 16 volumes. 
The gift was made in memory of James 
and Rose Donohoe, parents of the donor. 
— Santa Monica Outlook, My 18 

MADERA COUNTY. 

( Thirty-seventh class. ) 

County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $29,593,891 (tax- 
able for county $24,018,670). 

Madera Co. Free Libbaby, Madeea. 
Miss Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

Robina Thompson of the School De- 
partment is attending the Summer Li- 
brary School at Riverside. 

About 300 books for seamen were 
collected by this library. 

Blanche Galloway, Lib'n. 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,342. 
Assessed valuation $31,603,503 (tax- 
able for county $27,635,115). 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $5,831,196 (taxable 
for county $4,718,315). 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



239 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $31,066,896 (tax- 
able for county $25,814,140), 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $41,449,581 (tax- 
able for county $33,770,930). 

JNIerced Co. Free Libkaey, Meeced. 
Miss Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

On the afternoon of May 29, eighteen 
people gathered at the library for a 
round-table discussion of library prob- 
lems. This was the first semiannual 
meeting of custodians held here and 
supplements the annual meeting held in 
October. Discussion was led by various 
members of the staff. 

Miss Bess Vaughan, assistant in the 
School Department, has returned to her 
home in Louisiana for the summer 
months and is extending her vacation 
period in order to assist Miss Culver, 
who haai charge of the library work in 
that state. 

Mrs Isobel De Witt is substituting in 
the Branch Department for Mrs Viola 
Shaffer, who is on leave of absence this 
summer. 

Minette L. Stoddard, Lib'n. 

Mrs F. W. Henderson of Merced has 
presented to Atwater Branch of Merced 
County Free Library a set of Bancroft's 
History, comprising thirty-nine volumes, 
in memory of her father, the late Marshall 
D. Atwater, for whom the town of 
Atwater was named. — Atwater Signal, 
Ap 27 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,507,533 (tax- 
able for county $7,954,330). 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 



MONO CO. — Continued. 

Assessed valuation $6,524,017 (taxable 
for county $3,508,925). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth dass.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $54,101,624 (tax- 
able for county $44,941,580). 

Carmel. 

Carmel City Public Library and 
Branch, Monterey Co. Free Libraey. 
Miss M. Ethel Goodfellow, Lib'n. 

The library was opened to the public at 
2.30 on the afternoon of April 2. The 
evening of March 31 a reception was 
given to the public. Speeches were made 
praising the donor, the late Mrs Ella 
Reid Harrison, and the man to whom it 
was dedicated, Judge Ralph Chandler 
Harrison, her husband. Trustees, archi- 
tects and" builder received their share of 
mention. 

After work of cataloging the books is 
complete, the library will be open all 
day, but until then in the afternoon only. 
— San Jose Mercury Herald, Ap 4 

On the evening of May 14 the library 
was open for the first time at night. It 
is to be open Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday nights. — Carmel Pine Gone, My 18 

Monterey. 

Monterey Free Public Libeary. 
Miss Etta Eckhardt, Lib'n. 

Mrs Reuben SeiTano, one of the lead- 
ing music patrons on the peninsula, has 
given to the Monterey Public Library one 
of the finest collections of opera scores 
and librettos in this part of the country. 
Some twenty-three numbers are included 
in the donation. — Monterey Herald, Ap 25 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty -first class.) 

County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,678. 
Assessed valuation $26,629,480 (tax- 
able for county $22,387,311). 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth Class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,632,988 (taxable 
for county $6,858,690). 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALrPORNL\ LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $190,247,009 (tax- 
able for county $168,293,000). 

Oeange Co. Free Library, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

Serving light refreshments donated by 
business iiims, the special reception com- 
mittee of the Laguna Beach Library 
Building Association took the general 
public on a tour of inspection of its 
recently completed building, May 17. 
This was the formal opening date, though 
the building has been in use for several 
weeks. A large number of visitors was 
present. Additional equipment given to 
the library consisted of a long reading 
table, six chairs, round tables and four 
chairs for children and a bench given by 
the Board of Supervisors through the 
County Library — Laguna Beach South 
Coast Neics, My 18 

Arrangements for the opening of a 
branch library at San Olemente have been 
completed. For the present the library 
will be located in the Co.mmunity Club- 
house and will be open Tuesday and 
Saturday from 3 to 5 p.m. About two 
hundred books are ready for borrowei's.— 
San Clemente Herald, Je 22 

Buena Park. 

BuENA Park: Library District Li- 
brary. Mrs Katharine S. Berkey, Lib'n. 

Looking forward to the need of addi- 
tional room for the public library, the 
Library Board this week purchased a 39- 
foot frontage on Grand avenue, adjoining 
the present libraiy site. The additional 
frontage gives the library 114 feet on 
Grand avenue. — Buena Park News, Ap 27 

Huntington Beach. 

Huntington Beach [Free] Public 
Library. Mrs Bertha Proctor Reynolds, 
Lib'n. 

The establishment of a reading room, 
where smoking is permissible, as a branch 
of the Huntington Beach Library, at 205 
Main street, has been authorized by the 
Library Board. The room is to be sup- 
plied with magazines, newspapers and a 
variety of technical reference books, espe- 



ORANGE CO. — Continued. 

Huntington Beach — Continued, 
cially for oil men. A large amount of the 
equipment for the room has been donated. 

Mrs Bertha P. Reynolds, Lib'n. 

Yorba Linda. 

ToRBA Linda Library District Li- 
brary. Miss Clara Janeway, Lib'n. 

At the meeting of the Yorba Linda 
Librai-y Board, April 18, the resignation 
of Miss Margaret McFadden, who has 
been librarian for the past three years, 
was accepted. Miss Clara Janeway has 
accepted the position and will assume her 
duties May 1.— Yorba Linda Star, Ap 20 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18.584. 
Assessed valuation $27,988,880 (tax- 
able for county $20,119,525). 

Roseville. 

RosEviLLE [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

Miss Rita Rowland, assistant at the 
Roseville Public Library, is leaving June 
25 to take the summer course at the 
Riverside Library Service School. Dur- 
ing the absence of Miss Rowland, Miss 
Willits will have as her assistant' Miss 
Una Rowland, sister of Miss Rita. — 
Roseville Tribune, Je 20 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,945,820 (tax- 
able for county $12,721,055.) 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat. Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $68,653,643 (tax- 
able for county $51,052,030). 

BIythe. 

Blythe Free Public Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Mrs ^Myrtle Busby, Librarian. 

Since the library moved into its down- 
town location at the rear of the First 
National Bank, on June 1, business has 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



241 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
BIythe — Continued, 
increased to three or four times as much 
as in the old location. The library is 
now equipped with a complete set of cane 
furniture, purchased this week by the 
Library Board. — BIythe Palo Verde Val- 
ley Times, Je 28 

Elsinore. 

Elsinore Free Public Library and 
Branch, Riverside Co. Free Library. 
Miss Beatrice Clark, Lib'n. 

Ten new books have been added to our 
shelves the past quarter. The pay shelf 
has added eight books to its list. The 
pay shelf has some of the latest fiction 
and is proving very popular with the 
transient people in our city. 

The Reading Section is in constant use 
and since the close of school the Chil- 
dren's Section is occupied evei*y hour of 
the day. Every effort is being made to 
increase their interest in the better and 
worthwhile reading. 

Library items are being furnished the 
Elsinore Leader Press each week. This 
we find is bringing results in increased 
interest. 

Beatrice Clark, Lib'n. 

Riverside. 

Rr'erside [Free] Public Libraey. 
Chas. F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Arlington Branch of Riverside Public 
Library will be formally opened at a 
public reception Tuesday evening, June 12. 
The library building has been completely 
remodeled, new foundations put in, new 
walls, newly finished outside, the interior 
newly decorated and new lighting fixtures 
designed particularly for public libraries 
installed. All the books and library 
equipment have been moved into the 
library building from the temporary 
rented quarters. — Riverside Press, Je 9 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $171,546,769 (tax- 
able for county $138,287,205). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

In April, the Del Paso Branch of the 
Sacramento County Library was com- 
pletely refurnished, with new curtains, 
shades, furniture and floor covering, as 
well as new shelving built for the accom- 
modation of the increased number of 
books rendered necessary by the growing 
circulation of the branch. The room now 
presents a very neat and attractive 
appearance. 

■ The third annual meeting of the custo- 
dians of the County Library was held on 
May 4, at the Hotel Senator. The morn- 
ing session was devoted to a discussion 
of the business and special problems of 
the branches, and Miss Alice Stewart, 
custodian of Fairoaks Branch, gave a 
very interesting outline of the method 
which she had used in gaining information 
concerning the special tastes and interests 
of the patrons of her branch. If funds 
allow, her innovation will be extended to 
other branches during the coming year. 
Luncheon was served in a private dining 
room of the hotel, with 45 persons gath- 
ered about the long table, which was 
beautifully decorated with roses and 
yellow broom. The afternoon program 
was opened with an address by Mr How- 
ard K. Johnson, Chairman of the Board 
of Supervisors, who paid a high tribute 
to the work of the County Library in 
Sacramento County, and to the custodians 
as workers in the library service. We 
were very happy to be honored by the 
presence of Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Presi- 
dent of the California Library Associa- 
tion, who spoke to us in her own direct 
and vivid way of the recent meeting of 
the C. L. A. at Riverside, bringing to the 
stay-at-homes a very distinct realization 
of both the charm and the interest of the 
meeting. She also spoke briefly of the 
plans of the- C. L. A. for the current 
year, and, upon request, outlined the 
reasons for, and the purposes of, the 
trip to South Africa, soon to be made 
by Mr Milton J. Ferguson, State Li- 
brarian. Mr Samuel Levinson, of Lev- 
inson's Book Store, presented, in an all- 
too-short address, an outline and brief 
review of "A Selected List of Books by 
European Writers Prominent During the 
Past Quarter Century." The list of 
books presented was considered of such 
worth that it was mimeographed by the 



242 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

County Library and copies distributed to 
those present. Also, a copy is kept on 
file at the County Librai-y for future ref- 
erence and use. Then for an hour, Mr 
John Lawrence Seymour, Head of the 
Drama Department of the Sacramento 
Junior College, held his audience spell- 
bound by his reading and interpretation of 
John Colton's play, "The Shanghai Ges- 
ture." His audience dispersed, feeling 
that they had not been listening to a play, 
but that they had been sharing in the 
birth-agony of a soul. 

Among the guests whom we were happy 
to welcome to the luncheon and to the 
meeting, were Miss Susan T. Smith, 
Librarian of the Sacramento Public Li- 
brary ; Miss Clara B. Dills, Librarian of 
the Solano County Free Library ; Miss 
Frances Burkett, Librarian of the Sutter 
County Free Library, and several of the 
younger members of their respective staffs. 

At the meeting of June 4 of the Board 
of Supervisors, much business was trans- 
acted which was of interest to the County 
Library. The salaries of all of the custo- 
dians were increased, to become effective 
July 1. This marks several important 
changes in the classification of certain 
branches. Rio Linda and Colonial 
Heights branches will be established as 
full-time branches, with salaries ranking 
with others of this type of branch. The 
Elverta Branch will have increased book 
capacity, and the North Sacramento, 
Orangevale and Sylvan branches will have 
increased hours of service. Two new 
branches were established, to become 
effective July 1. One is at Mills, in the 
Rose Garden Refreshment Room, with 
Miss Helen Studarus as custodian, and 
one at Robla, in the home of Mrs George 
Howard, who will act as custodian. Also, 
the Isleton Union Grammar School, a 
twelve-teacher school, was accepted by 
the Board of Supervisors in affiliation 
with the County Library. The rent of the 
Gait Branch was increased, giving for 
our use a much needed rear room, and 
providing for the re-papering, re-painting 
and enlargement of the library room 
proper, as well as some minor improve- 
ments. The allowance for janitor service 
for the larger branches was increased 
as well. 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

On AprU 16, the County Librarian 
addressed the Woodland Choral Club 
ui>on the subject of the "Negro as Poet 
and Musician," as the club was making a 
study of negro music. During the three 
days of the Better Homes tour of the 
county, the County Librarian joined the 
itinerary, speaking at the Antelope 
Grange, upon the first day of the tour, on 
the subject of "Better Brain Power." The 
trips about the county, in company with 
the Farm Advisor and the Home Demon- 
stration Agent, were most interesting and 
instructive, and offered opportunity for 
meeting many people and for forming new 
acquaintances, and she felt that the time 
so taken was used to good advantage. 
On May 2, the last Book Talk of the 
season was given, somewhat regretfully, 
as they have been pleasant occasions of 
the winter, despite the time required for 
preparation. On May 22, the County 
Librarian made the commencement ad- 
dress of the Pleasant Grove School, and 
on June 23 she spoke before the Annual 
Convocation of the Baptist Church, Col- 
ored, of Woodland, upon the subject of 
"Some Recent Contributions of the Negro 
to American Literature," dividing the 
subject into Drama, Prose (fiction and 
nonfiction) and Poetry. 

In April, the Farm Bureau invited the 
County Librarian to contribute a series 
of articles to the Sacramento Countj^ 
Farm Bureau Monthly, upon the subject 
of the County Library System. This 
invitation was gladly, although diffidently, 
accepted, and a series of short articles 
will appear monthly in the Farm Bureau 
publication, covering such divisions of the 
subject as. The Reason for Libraries and 
the Growth of the Library System ; An 
Outline of the Library System of the 
State of California, including the State 
Library Service and the County Library 
System of the State ; A brief history of 
the Sacramento County Free Library, 
with a further presentation of its organi- 
zation, scope of work, methods of opera- 
tion, what it is trying to do, what it has 
accomplished and any further information 
that may suggest itself in the course of 
the writing. Two articles have already 
appeared, and it is believed that these 
short articles will reach the people who 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



243 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

are most interested in the work and the 
financial support of the library. 

Cornelia D. Peovines, Llb'n. 

Sacramento. 

J Sacramento Free Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

Our display cases in the lobby of the 
Main Libraiy have brought many inter- 
ested obsei'vers, a few of whom were 
eager to lend their treasures. A map of 
the United States printed in 1853, show- 
ing a vast unknown territory west of the 
Mississippi and population statistics that 
seem incredible in these days of rapid 
growth, was the most popular offering. 
Men, especially, pored over it by the hour 
and held animated discussions later in the 
City Plaza. The same lender brought 
some Lincoln ballots and unusual pictures 
of Lincoln and his family. 

Chief Luther Standing Bear, in full 
regalia, was a guest of the library while 
on a visit to Sacramento. The pupils of 
the McKinley School were invited to meet 
him and were an eager and enthusiastic 
audience. The library received consider- 
able publicity from the event, as the 
photographer of the Sacramento Bee 
took a flash of the chief standing near the 
rows of book shelves in the Children's 
Room, facing a group of fascinated 
listeners. 

The first installment for the exhibit of 
Printing House Craftsmen has been 
received. The various types of printing 
already displayed are causing much dis- 
cussion and interest. 

The librarian and cataloger, Mrs Ger- 
trude Ingerson, attended the annual 
meeting of the California Library Asso- 
ciation at Riverside. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, HoUister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $15,739,267 (tax- 
able for county $13,955,175). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
LiSTER. Miss Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

Mrs Harriet Snyder Davids, formerly 
of the Santa Cruz Public Library, has 
accepted a position on our staff. She 
began work the middle of April. 



SAN BENITO CO.— Continued. 

The librarian has been busy the last 
few weeks presenting library diplomas to 
the school children who did the required 
reading during the year. Every school in 
the county, with two exceptions, qualified. 
In all 596 diplomas were issued. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, of the State 
Library, was a welcome visitor the last 
week of June. 

Florence J. Wheaton, Lib'n. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $119,886,794 (tax- 
able for county $75,902,180) . 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

The library has received recently two 
gifts for the endowment fund, the interest 
of which is spent for the purchase of 
books. Mrs Helen L. Lyon of Redlands 
gave $1000. This is the second gift 
which Mrs Lyon has made to this fund. 
Mr John W. Dickenson of Scarsdale, New 
York, a winter resident of Redlands, gave 
two gifts, one of $1000 and one of $100. 
This is the fourth year that Mr Dickenson 
has made a gift to the library. 

The annual Easter egg hunt, the gift of 
Mr Kirke H. Field, president of the Li- 
brary Board, was held in the library 
park. The children had a happy and 
exciting time hunting for the five hundred 
brightly colored eggs. 

Mabel Inness, Lib'n. 

San Bernardino. 

San Bernardino Valley Junior Col- 
lege Library. Geo. H. Jantzen, Prin. 
Edna Storr, Lib'n. 

Students of San Bernardino Valley 
Junior College this week occupied for the 
first time the new library building erected 
at a cost of more than $50,000. Complete 
and up-to-date equipment has been in- 
stalled. Mezzanine floors in each end of 
the building will be used for additional 
study room when conditions require. 
Rooms eventually to be used for depart- 
mental study halls are beneath the mez- 
zanine floors. — San Bernardino Telegram, 
My 12 



244 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $132,684,307 (tax- 
able for county $118,458,831). 

Coronado. 

CoBONADO Beach [Free] Pxjblic Li- 
brary. Miss Gabrielle Morton, Lib'n. 

Miss Lucille Richards has been ap- 
pointed assistant in charge of the work 
with children at the Coronado Library. 
Miss Richards is a graduate of the Los 
Angeles Library School and specialized in 
children's and school work In Honolulu 
and Long Beach. 

Gabrielle Morton, Lib'n. 

San Diego. 

$San Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus. 
Miss Cornelia D. Plaister, Lib'n. 

Thomas H. Thornton was awarded the 
contract on June 18 for the construction 
of the new branch library at Ocean Beach, 
His contract is for $11,186. The original 
appropriation for the library was $15,000. 
The balance of about $4000 will be used 
for equipment. — San Diego Union, Je 19 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation $1,025,317,945 (tax- 
able for county $783,620,603). 

San Francisco Law Library. Robert 
Owens, Lib'n. 

After twenty-five years as librarian of 
the San Francisco Law Library, James H. 
Deering has resigned to take an extended 
vacation and tour of the world. He was 
responsible for the rebuilding of the 
library after the fire of 1906, and is the 
author of several textbooks and one of 
the annotators of the California Code. 
Robert Owens, a graduate of Hastings 
College of Law and for several years 
assistant to Mr Deering, succeeds him as 
librarian. — Oakland Tribune, My 14 

Galileo High School Library. J. P. 
Nourse, Prin. Margaret V. Girdner, Lib'n. 

The Galileo High School Library opened 
on February 27, 1928. Preceding the day 
of opening, two weeks were spent in intro- 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

ducing the students to the library. All 
the English classes were brought into the 
library for an introductory visit and a 
short talk by the librarian upon "How 
To Use Books," and the school paper, 
"The Pendulum," published a special 
supplement which thus put into the hands 
of the students the rules, and some infor- 
mation about future plans. 

Margaret V. Girdner, Lib'n. 

The Henry Pierce Library. Miss 
Elisabeth S. Benton, Lib'n. 

Since the death of Mr Charles A. Mur- 
dock, the sole sui-viving trustee of the 
Henry Pierce Library Fund, early in the 
year, the funds of the library have been 
awaiting court action to release them. 
This has now been effected and the Board 
of Trustees of the First Unitarian Church, 
where the library is housed, will admin- 
ister them under a library committee, 
Miss Ethel Beaver, chairman. 

The library will be reopened August 1, 
in freshly renovated quarters and with a 
new quota of books to serve its special 
public. 

Elisabeth S. Benton, Lib'n. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 
County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $122,919,943 (tax- 
able for county $105,660,845). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library. 
Stockton. Miss Ida B. Condit, Lib'n. 

The following changes have occurred 
in the personnel of the county custodians. 
Due to the resignation of Mrs Lange, 
custodian of the Lafayette Branch, the 
library has been installed in the home of 
Mrs Wirtz, where a glass enclosed porch 
has been furnished for a reading room 
for the community. Mrs Thomlinson, for 
many years custodian of the Vemalis 
Branch, resigned during the month of 
May. A new location for the library has 
been found in the home of Mrs Taylor. 

A pleasant program was given for 
Open House Day at the Tokay Colony 
School. Miss Colohan contributed many 
interesting stories during the afternoon. 

Visits have been made to all the county 
branches during the year ending June 30. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



245 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Many improvements were noted and cir- 
culation records show a material increase. 
Since the closing of the county schools 
and the returning of the school books, the 
School Department's quarters have become 
so overcrowded that it will be necessary 
to make other arrangements. Through 
the cooperation of the city manager, nego- 
tiations are pending for quarters directly 
across the street from the library for this 
department. 

Ida E. Oondit, Lib'n. 

Lodi. 

LoDi [Feee] Public . Library and 
Branch, San Joaquin Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Amy L. Boynton, Lib'n. 

Work on the new addition to the library 
was started June 11. It is estimated to 
cost about $25,000 and is to be completed 
in ninety working days. The old building 
will be remodeled and used for reading 
rooms. The new part will provide stack 
room, reference department, children's 
room, and offices on the main floor, with 
storage room for newspaper and periodi- 
cal files, a small auditorium, unpacking 
and supply rooms in the basement. The 
entire building will be electrically heated. 
The contract for furniture and equipment 
has been let to McKee & Wentworth, 
Library Bui'eau distributors. 

No bond issue or tax levy was neces- 
sary as the building and equipment are 
to be paid for from the proceeds from the 
municipally owned water and light plant. 
Amy L. Boynton, Lib'n. 

Lodi Union High School Library. 
Wm. Inch, Prin. Jessie E. Boyd, Lib'n. 

Miss Boyd and her two library classes 
took a most enjoyable trip to Sacramento, 
Saturday, April 28. They visited the 
State Library, where they were much 
interested in the work of the various 
departments ; the Sacramento Public Li- 
brary, and Levinson's Book Store. They 
were also taken through the new building 
which is soon to house the State Library. 
— Lodi Union High School The Flame, 
Je 1. 

Stockton. 

t Stockton Free Public Library. 
Miss Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 

Many new books were purchased during 
the past quarter, special attention being 
given to the special requests. Among the 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Stockto n — Continued. 

new books placed on the shelves were a 
number of French and Spanish books. 
In addition orders for German and Italian 
books have been made which will greatly 
replenish our foreign section. Catholic 
books were recently purchased from the 
J. D. Peter's Fund, which is used exclu- 
sively for the purchase of theological 
books. The books were suggested by the 
assistant rector of St. Mary's Church of 
Stockton, who also reviewed them for the 
daily papers. 

Many of the teachers of the public 
schools have visited the library with their 
classes in order that the children may 
learn the use and value of the library. 
One class in particular was composed of 
nine different nationalities, all of whom 
had library cards. Letters from the 
teachers have been received expressing 
their appreciation for the courtesy ex- 
tended by the entire staff in instructing 
the classes in the use of the library. 

Radio story-hours have been given over 
KWG by Miss Mary H. Colohan every 
Saturday between 6.30 and 7 p.m. Many 
letters have been received from "listeners- 
in" showing their gratitude of this service 
which is being sponsored by the library. 

As a closing event of the story-hour 
season, the children's librarian. Miss 
Rosamay Ryland, delightfully entertained 
members of the Library Beading Club at 
her home. Story-hours will again be 
resumed in October. 

At the invitation of Miss Cams, city 
teachers' advisor. Miss Ryland gave a 
talk on "Library Reading Clubs" before 
a gathering of fourth grade teachers of 
the city schools. 

During the drive for the Seamen's 
library service many books were collected 
and forwarded to headquarters in San 
Francisco. 

Miss Ida E. Condit, librarian, gave a 
short talk before the members of the 
Literary Club of the Stockton High 
School on the use of the reference books 
at the library. 

At the Municipal Baths Branch of the 
library during the past months the activi- 
ties have centered chiefly on the Junior 
Reading Club. This organization for 
children presented the play, "The Happy 



246 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIPORNLV LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 
Beggar," for the public in the library 
room. They also acted as host to the 
reading club of the Main Library. Circu- 
lation at this branch has been attaining 
an average of 600 books a month. New 
shipments of adult and juvenile fiction 
have been received for the vacation 
months. 

Ida E. Condit, Lib'n. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $37,236,293 (tax- 
able for county $31,722,501). 

San Luis Obispo Co. Fbee Libeabt, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Lilian Sabin, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Flo A. Gantz resigned the position 
of County Librarian of San Luis Obispo 
County, and was man*ied June 27 to 
Maurice F. Dyer of Salinas. Miss Lilian 
Sabin, head of the School Department of 
Los Angeles County Free Library, was 
appointed in her place, July 7, and is to 
begin work July 16. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Fbee Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

All hands at the library are using every 
spare moment in preparation for a change 
of charging system from the old Brown 
to the "Drake." It is hoped to have the 
new system in full swing by the first of 
July. 

Mrs E. L. Keixogg, Lib'n. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $50,201,488 (tax- 
able for county $45,625,565). 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Inez M. Crawford, Lib'n. 

The new $50,000 annex to the San 
Mateo Public Library will be opened 
within a few weeks. A feature of the 
new annex will be a music and assembly 
room with a music circulation depart- 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued. 

San Mateo — Continued. 

ment. One point of special interest is the 
large reading room for men. There is 
also a mezzanine floor. — San Mateo 
Times, Je 12 



SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $79,007,741 (tax- 
able for county $68,555,360). 

Santa Barbara. 

* State Teachers College Library. 
Clarence L. Phelps, Prin. Miss Katha- 
rine F. Ball, Lib'n. 

The College Library was moved into its 
commodious quarters in the new Admin- 
istration Building during the Christmas 
vacation. There is a large reading room, 
an out-door study porch, a room housing 
the Lincoln Librai-y, librarian's office and 
a work room. 

Katharine F. Ball, Lib'n. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $129,813,207 (tax- 
able for county $115,532,020). 

San Jose. 

San Jose Free Public Library. Mrs 
Edith Daley, Lib'n. 

Mrs Bertha O. Phillips, University of 
California and Library School graduate, 
previously employed in one of the Stand- 
ard Oil Company's libraries, has been 
made a member of the San Jose Free 
Public Library's staff. Miss Jessie 
Mooney, previously a teacher of history, 
English and Latin, is filling the position 
of substitute during the summer vacation 
mouths. Miss Margaret Saunders- has 
resigned, as she is leaving library work. 

At the end of the eight weeks' Green 
Card Club reading course, it was discov- 
ered that thirty-five out of forty-two 
juveniles who signed up to do this required 
reading, had completed their work. Not 
one of the number had missed a week's 
reading or failed to place on file at the 
library a written review of the book read. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBEARIES. 



247 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 
San Jose — Continued, 
liliss Donovan, Branch Custodian, and 
]\Iiss Spitzer, Juvenile Librarian, gave the 
winning juveniles a party, spreading the 
big table under the group of redwoods on 
the library lawn. A program and an 
almost inexhaustible supply of cake and 
ice cream made the occasion memorable. 

Edith Daley, Librarian, is editing a 
newspaper column entitled "In the Li- 
brary." It is a column of book and 
library comment, and appears each Sat- 
urday on the editorial page of the San 
Jose Evening Neios, the newspaper for 
which Mrs Daley handled a special 
feature column for five years before 
taking up the duties of City Librarian. 

Mrs Selma B. Olinder, principal of the 
Hawthorne School, has just been re- 
appointed by the City Manager for a four- 
year term on the Board of Library 
Trustees. 

Mrs Edith Daley, Lib'n. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,269. 
Assessed valuation $27,848,035 (tax- 
able for county $23,942,650). 

Ben Lomond. 

Ben Lomond Library and Branch, 
Santa Cruz Co. Free Library. Miss 
Scotford, Lib'n. 

After more than eight years of service 
in charge of the Ben Lomond Public Li- 
brary, Mrs W. L. Walker has resigned, 
to take effect May 31. Miss Scotford of 
Ben Lomond is the new appointee. — Santa 
Cruz Sentinel, Ap 17 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat. Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $25,325,370 C tax- 
able for county $1.5,188,140). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 1783. 
Assessed valuation $3,339,760 (taxable 
for county $2,939,.395) . 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

( Thirty-third class. ) 
County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $31,454,257 (tax- 
able for county $21,821,885). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Mary Harris, Lib'n. 

Miss Frances Stockebrand resigned as 
County Librarian of Siskiyou County, 
May 7, the resignation to be effective 
May 31. Miss Mary Harris was ap- 
pointed Siskiyou County Librarian at the 
Supervisors' May 7 meeting, and is to 
begin work July 16. 

Miss Stockebrand and Herbert G. Helm 
of Concord were married June 2 and have 
gone on a trip to the Orient. 

Miss Harris was formerly in the 
Fresno County Free Library, but has 
recently been assisting Miss Culver in the 
library work in Louisiana. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 
County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $39,720,415 (tax- 
able for county $32,396,184). 

Solano Co. Free Library, Faiefield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

Several changes have taken place on 
the staff of the Solano County Free Li- 
brary during the last quarter. Miss Lois 
Woods, in charge of school work, left to 
take over the organizing of the cataloging 
department in the schools of San Fran- 
cisco, a very fine position, and this staif 
will miss her. As yet the vacancy caused 
has not been filled, but Mrs Fern Kelleher 
of Martinez, fonnerly on the Contra Costa 
County Free Libraiy staff, is substituting, 
this through the courtesy of Mrs Whit- 
beck. IMrs Dorothy L. Worden has been 
in the Woodland Sanitarium recently, and 
is now recovering from an operation. 

For fourteen years the County Library 
headquarters have been located in the 
Armijo High School. From now on a 
charge of $75 rent will be required of the 
library. 

Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

Vallejo. 

Vallejo [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, Solano Co. Free Library. 
Miss L. Gertrude Doyle, Lib'n. 



248 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 
V a 1 1 e j o — C ontinu ed. 
In order that a better and more sympa- 
thetic understanding may be created be- 
tween the Americans and Filipinos of 
this locality, eight books relating to Jose 
Rizal, national hero of the Philippines, 
have been presented to the Vallejo Public 
Library by the Filipino community organ- 
ization of Vallejo for distribution. — Val- 
lejo Times Herald, My 9 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $54,248,243 (tax- 
able for county $46,000,490) . 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1486 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $64,976,157 (tax- 
able for county $56,096,955). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Libraey, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthom, Lib'n. 

A Booklovers Club was organized at 
Newman Branch, April 18, under the 
auspices of the County Library, and Mr 
Halley of the Patterson High School gave 
reviews of a number of books about the 
South. Miss Gravestock volunteered to 
take charge of the May 16 meeting, and 
read a play by J. M. Barrie, "The Twelve 
Pound Look," assisted by members of the 
Newman High School faculty. Mrs 
Bunker of Gustine volunteered for the 
June meeting. 

The County Librarian was a speaker 
at the Twentieth Anniversary Celebration 
of the Newman Woman's Improvement 
Club, April 23. 

The County Library had exhibits at 
the two demonstration homes during Bet- 
ter Homes Week in April. 

At the June meeting of the Dry Creek 
Club, the County Librarian read from 
several modern poets and spoke of vaca- 
tion reading for the club members, who 
are ranchers, and their families in this 
district. 

A branch of the County Library was 
established in June at the home of the 
Lochamines, eight miles from Modesto 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

on the Paradise road, with Miss Jennie 
Locharnine in charge. A name for this 
branch is to be selected later. 

Stanislaus County is administering the 
Ahwahnee Hospital Library this year, 
and the County Librarian was a visitor 
there in May. The patients are good 
readers and there were many requests 
for such books as Ludwig's Napoleon, 
Gertrude Bell's Letters, while the chil- 
dren called for more books by David 
Putnam. 

Bessie B. SIL^^E.THORN, Lib'n. 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 
County seat, Tuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $23,443,897 (tax- 
able for county $18,465,365). 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 
County seat. Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $23,088,343 (tax- 
able for county $19,290,345). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

The monotony of routine has been 
broken this quarter by calls for service 
from the Highway Camp, the Home Dem- 
onstration outing "Camp Fun" and Camp 
Forward, the camp for undernourished 
children. 

Service to the Highway Camp has been 
interesting from the standpoint of mate- 
rial requested, which is vastly superior to 
that called for by the average citizen. 
Probably it would improve all of us intel- 
lectually if we were forced to spend 
several years within a limited area as 
these borrowers are. 

Camp Fun is held on the campsite of 
Camp Forward a week or two before the 
children go to the mountains. The farm 
women from all over the county enjoy a 
week of needed relaxation, and this year 
the books were widely used. Heretofore 
the week has been one of strenuous excit- 
ing jinks, but this year more hours were 
spent in actual rest, and the demand for 
books correspondingly increased. 

Los Molinos Branch had a spring house- 
cleaning this year, the first time in so 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



249 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued, 
many years that it would reflect upon 
this county were the length of time 
revealed. In May, Mrs Mary R. Runyan 
presented this branch library with a set 
of 31 volumes of Bancroft beside over a 
hundred miscellaneous books of varying 
interest and worth. In April, the libra- 
rian met a committee of the Los Molinos 
Woman's Club, the sponsor of the original 
library from which the branch library 
grew, and it was agreed that the books 
belonging to the Narcissa Cox Vanderlip 
Library be turned over to the County 
Library and in the future the branch will 
be known as the Narcissa Cox Vanderlip 
Branch of the County Library. Many 
books of real value in that collection have 
been of little use to the public heretofore 
because they have never been cataloged, 
but the work was begun in April and it is 
hoped that the public hereafter will make 
the use of the books that they deserve. 

The children of Vina are reading "vig- 
orously" this summer. Under the super- 
vision of the Farm Bureau, there is to be 
a prize awarded to the child who has read 
the most books (irrespective of school 
grade ) . The prize of $5 is offered by a 
member of the Fann Center and great 
interest has been evinced since the open- 
ing, June 13, of the Vina Vacation Branch 
in the school building. The branch is in 
the care of Mrs Robert Ramsey, whose 
interest in the children's reading is such 
that she travels three miles to be on duty 
each week. Rumor has it that she is the 
author of some poems that are soon to be 
published. Interest on the part of the 
children reawakened the interest of the 
adults when once the library was opened, 
so books were sent down for the grown- 
ups in time for the second library day of 
this branch. 

The library joined the committee on 
"Better Homes" this year and sponsored 
a contest for the best list of books for a 
home library. To say that the interest 
was keen would be a slight exaggeration 
since only one list was submitted. How- 
ever, there are compensations in all 
things, and this left the judges with little 
doubt as to the prize winner. She, by the 
way, proved her genuine interest in bet- 
tering the home in her choice of a prize. 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued, 
which was a dictionary donated by one of 
the local service clubs. 

Cupid's dart lodged in our midst again 
when Miss Helen Seeding, who has been 
in the library since July, slipped away to 
Medford, Oregon, to be married to 
Charles Noble. Mrs Noble will remain 
with us until July 1. 

In February, the Gerber Branch Li- 
brary was honored with a visit from the 
supervisors of Glenn County and their 
librarian for the purpose of taking items 
for their branch at Hamilton City. It 
was whispered later that the most valu- 
able suggestion they gained was that an 
architect is necessary to plan a building 
properly. 

The librarian attended the meeting of 
the California Library Association, April 
2 to 5, at Riverside. 

Anne Bell Bailey, Lib'n. 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,837,869 (taxable 
for county $3,402,048). 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $92,276,982 (tax- 
able for county $69,323,397). 

Tulare Co. Feee Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Mrs Emily H. Eldridge has been ap- 
pointed custodian of Ducor Branch at a 
salary of $50. The appointment was 
effective May 11. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Porterville. 

PORTERVILLE FrEE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

AND Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library. 
Miss Sarah Louise Templeton, Lib'n. 

Miss Bertha Guthrie has taken up her 
duties as library assistant in the Porter- 
vUle Public Library. She came here from 
the California Institute of Technology 
Library in Pasadena, and previous to that 
had been in the Periodicals Department of 
the Los Angeles Public Library. — -Porter- 
ville Recorder, My 4 



250 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $12,683,940 (tax- 
able for county $8,909,190) . 

Tuolumne Co. Feee Libraey, Sonora. 
Mrs Helen R. Dambacher, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen Heffeman, Chief of the 
Division of Rural Education, and Mrs 
Henshall, County Library Organizer, vis- 
ited Tuolumne County, May 18 and 19, to 
make a survey of the library service to 
district schools. This was in accordance 
with Miss Heffeman's plan to survey the 
school district libraries of two counties 
of similar wealth and condition, one with 
a County Library and the other without. 
Calaveras and Tuolumne were the coun- 
ties selected. The survey of Calaveras 
County occupied their time from May 14 
to 17, while Tuolumne County conditions 
could be thoroughly investigated in a 
shorter time, due to the centralization of 
records and data in the County Library 
office. Eight schools were visited by 
Miss Heffernan, Mrs Henshall, Mr Mor- 
gan, the Superintendent of Schools, and 
the librarian. Both teachers and pupils 
were questioned and the school library 
shelves and supplementary texts in- 
spected. Miss Heffernan's report, not yet 
published, will be of interest to all county 
librarians and school superintendents, as 
this particular contrast has not before 
been brought out definitely in a survey.* 

The Board of Trustees of Tuolumne 
School District voted to join the County 
Library April 30, 1928. This makes the 
county a unit of service to the twenty-five 
district schools, with the exception of one 
school. 

Miss Guila Stagg has been appointed 
custodian of Tuolumne Branch to take 
the place of Mrs Mina James who has 
resigned. 

Mrs Eileen Burgson, Assistant County 
Librarian, conducted two story-hours for 
the children of Sonora at the Sonora 
Branch Library during the month of 
April. It is hoped that this service can 
be extended to the other branches and also 
to the district schools throughout the 



* See, also. Library News Department, 
Western Journal of Education, June, 1928, 
p. 15. 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued. 

county next year. During the summer 
months the story-hour will be held out- 
doors on the lawn in the Court House 
park. 

Mrs Helen R. Dambacher, Lib'n. 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $94,751,159 (tax- 
able for county $84,138,598). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ven- 
tura. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The Ojai Public Library, a branch of 
the Ventura County Free Library, moved 
into the building erected for its use and 
had a fonnal opening, April 15, 1928. 
Mr Sherman Thacher, as president of the 
Library Board, acted as chairman. He 
gave an informal talk in which he told 
the history of the library from the begin- 
ning to the present time. The boys of the 
Thacher School provided the music. The 
architect, Mr Carleton Monroe Winslow 
spoke after Mr Thacher and gave high 
praise to his builder, Mr Sam Hudiburg. 
The County Librarian then explained 
briefly the service of the County Library 
to the branch. 

The building is an adobe of Spanish 
style. It harmonizes with the other 
buildings in Ojai. The setting is beauti- 
ful among the oaks. The building inside 
is as lovely as outside and was decorated 
with flowers from the Libbey home and 
the People's Lumber Co. 

The history of the library is rather 
unusual. The greater part of the collec- 
tion of books was given by the Thacher 
famUy as well as the old building and 
grounds. A public library board was 
established, which is not a public library 
board except in that it very unselfishly 
gives a great deal of public service ; other- 
wise it is not connected with the town in 
any official way. This board received the 
present site of the library, worth about 
$10,000, and about $16,000 in gifts. Mr 
Charles C. Pratt gave $1000 of this and 
the Miner estate $500. I'he board then 
erected the present building which it 
rents to the County Library for $40 a 
month. The board maintains the grounds 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



251 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 



The 



and building out of this rental, 
county pays all other expenses. 

The first story-hour at the Ojai Branch 
was conducted by Mrs Gudrun Thorne 
Thomsen. She has organized a group of 
women to tell stories under her direction. 

Five members of the stafP of Ventura 
County Free Library attended sessions of 
the California Library Association at 
Riverside, April 2 to 5. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Ojai. 

George Thacheb Memorial Free 
Library and Ojai Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library. Miss Zaidee E. 
Soule, Custodian. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free 
Libraiy. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, .Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $34,393,244 (tax- 
able for county $27,504,533). 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 
Woodland. 

Woodland Free [Public] Library 
and Branch, Yolo Co. Free Library. 
Mrs Irma C. Brutou, Lib'n. 

A doll show, from May 19 to 23, 
attracted much attention, and more inter- 
est was shown than in almost any activity 
we have sponsored. The exhibit was made 
possible through Miss DeFord's kindness 
in allowing us to borrow her collection. 
Active interest was shown by girls and 
women, boys and men. 

Mrs Irma C. Bruton, Lib'n. 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Foi-tieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $21,091,893 (tax- 
able for county $17,130,640). 

Marysville. 

Marysville City [Free Public] 
Library. Mrs Mary Rolls-Hatch, Lib'n. 

The Marysville City Library will be 
closed during the month of July. Some 
alterations and repairs will be made. — 
Marysville Appeal Democrat, Je 28 



252 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1928 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



The following directory is based on 
recommendations received from the libra- 
ries of California. New recommendations 
and corrections will be welcomed at any 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 
A. L. A. 
Headquarters. 

86 E. Randolph st., Chicago, 111. 

All A. L. A. publications sold from 
headquarters except 1904 Catalog which 
can be purchased for $1 from Superin- 
tendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Cooperative Binding Co., 330 Jackson 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Foster & Futernick Co., 444 Bryant St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Herring & Robinson, 1927 Howard St., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J St., 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord Bros.. 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Bool< Cases and Shelving. 
Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 
Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Book Packing Boxes — Continued. 
Corrugated Paper Cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 
Front St., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th St., New York, N. Y. 
Times-Mirror Printing and Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co. 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 1045 Sansome st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second St., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second St., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Van Dorn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second St., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 



vol. 23, no. 3] directory for library supplies, etc. 



253 



Book Supports, Etc. — Continued. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Varnish. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 55 5th ave.. New 

York City. 
Chivers Book Binding Co., 126 Nassau 

St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
For books in CMvera binding. 

Paul Elder & Co., 239 Post st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Levinson's, The Book Store, 1012 K st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 80 Church st., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
520 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather Gate Bookshop, 2235 Telegraph 
ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 597 5th ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York. N. Y. 

Technical Book Co., 525 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Technical Publishing Co., 124 W. 4th 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Handles only technical books. 

Union Library Association, 118-120 E. 

25th St., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 329 E. Colorado 

St., Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 609 Mission st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors 
3 — 60773 



Books — Continued. 
White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant 
ave. and Kearny st., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
Foreign Books and Publications in 

Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
E. Steiger & Co., 49 Murray st.. New 

York, N. Y. 
B. Westermann Co., Inc., 19 W. 46th 

St., New York, N. Y. 

Fr-ench. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 
Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 
Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew Bender & Co., 109 State st., 
Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

Milton Bradley Co., 554 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

California School Book Depository, 149 
New Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 45 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 333 E. Ontario st., Chicago, 111. 

Owen Publishing Co., 554 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st.. 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New 

Oxford St., London, Eng. 
Charles T. Powner Co., 542 S. Spring 

St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



254 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Books — Continued. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W; C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 21 W. 45th st.. New 

York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 

Especially Californiana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 627 S. Grand 
ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes Book Co., 274 14th St., Oak- 
land, and 152 Kearny st., San Fi'an- 
cisco, Calif. 

John Howell, 328 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See FUENITTJEE AND SUPPLIES. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H. S. Crocker Co., 565-571 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 255 
Commercial St., San Francisco, and 
626 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

County Free Library Stickers. 

Gajdord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 



Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 
Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Films. 

For Rent. 

American Red Cross Films, distributed 
by University of California Library, 
Berkeley, Calif. 

Pox Film Corporation, New York, N. Y. 

National Producers Film Service, 111 
Golden Gate ave., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 
Dept., 985 Market st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

United States Forest Service, Ferry 
bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 

University of California, Extension 
Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Fine Computer and Circulating Library 
Calculator. 
H. S. Hirshberg, c/o Akron Public 
Library, Akron, Ohio. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 



vol. 23, no. 3] directory for library supplies, etc. 



255 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 
Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 
Greene st., New York, N. Y. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 
New York. 

Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Magazines. 
See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., 5235-7 Ravens- 
wood ave., Chicago, 111. (Local 
agent : A. B. Maine, Box 635, Arcade 
Station, Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st.. New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlet and Multi-Binders, and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 



Pamphlet Binders, Etc. — Continued. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Service, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Paste. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 

Stockton, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pasting Machines. 

A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st.. New 
York, N. Y. 

Perforating Stamps. 

B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbees. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 620 14th st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific Library Binding Co., 770 E. 
Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Universal Library Service, 2189 Wool- 
worth bldg.. New York City. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st.. 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pacific News Bureau, 643 S. Olive st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 657 Howard 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 31-33 E. 10th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

For foreign periodicals only. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 
South West Bldg., 130 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



256 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Pictures. 
Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 
Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st., 

New York, N. Y. 

(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J St., Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., Spear and 
Harrison sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., 44 N. Stanislaus st., 
Stockton, Calif. 

Library Bureau Division, Remington 
Rand Business Sei^ice, Inc., 39 
Second st., San Francisco, and 1200 
S. Grand ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Signs. 

Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 
Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Movie Slides. 

Victor Animatograph Co., Davenport, 
Iowa. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 



Stereoscopic Views. 
Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 
W. O. Wright (Agent Keystone View 

Co.), 832 Indian Rock ave., Berkeley, 

Calif. 

George B. Stone, Carmel, Calif. 

For CaUfornia vrild flowers, marine life, historic 
views. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
St., San Francisco, 420 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 913 8th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
St., San Francisco, 430 S. Broad- 
way, Los Angeles, and 611 J St., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, Calif. 

University of California School of Li- 
brarianship. For full information write 
to Chairman, School of Librarianship. 
University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Officers for 1928-29 are : 

President, Linda A. Eastman, Libra- 
rian, Public Library, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1st Vice President, Malcolm G. W^yer, 
Librarian, Public Library, Denver, Colo. 

2d Vice President, Harriet A. Wood, 
State Assistant Director and Supervisor 
School Libraries, Library Division, Min- 
nesota Department of Education, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Secretary, Carl H. Milam, Chicago, 111. 

Treasurer, Matthew S. Dudgeon, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1928-29 are : 

President, Frederick W. Schenk, Law 
Librarian, University of Chicago, Chicago, 
111. 



vol. 23, no. 3] directory for library supplies, etc. 



257 



1st Vice President, Percy A. Hogan, 
Law Librarian, University of Missouri, 
Columbia, Mo. 

2cl Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 
Librarian, Louisiana State Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lucile Vernon, 
Association of the Bar, 42 W. 44th St., 
New York City. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1928 are : 

Northern Section — Dorothy M. Clark, 
John C. Fremont High School, Oakland, 
President. 

Gladys English, Piedmont High School. 
Secretary -Treasurer. 

Southern Section — Hope L. Potter, 
South Pasadena High School, President. 

Katherine Folger, Lincoln High School, 
Los Angeles, Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE OF LIBRARY COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

Officers for 1928-29 are : 

President, Clarence B. Lester, Secre- 
tary, Wisconsin Library Commission, 
Madison, Wis. 

1st Vice President, Mrs Lillian B. 
Griggs, Secretary and Director, North 
Carolina Library Commission, Raleigh, 
N. C. 

2d Vice President, Leora J. Lewis, 
Field Librarian, South Dakota Library 
Commission, Pierre, S. D. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Jane Morey, Sec- 
retary, Missouri Library Commission, 
Jefferson City, Mo. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

Officers for 1928-29 are : 

President, Henry E. Dunnaek, Libra- 
rian, Maine State Library, Augusta, 
Maine. 

1st Vice President, Alice M. Magee, 
Librarian, Louisiana State Library, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

2d Vice President, Mrs Mary E. Frank- 
hauser. Librarian, Michigan State Li- 
brary, Lansing, Mich. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Irma A. Watts, 
Reference Librarian, Pennsylvania Legis- 
lative Reference Bureau, Harrisburg, Pa. 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, Joanna H. Sprague, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

1st Vice President, Jacqueline Noel, Li- 
brarian, Public Library, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

2d Vice President, E. Ruth Rockwood, 
Library Association of Portland, Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Secretary, Helen Johns, Librarian, Pub- 
lic Library, Longview, Washington. 

Treasurer, Ora L. Maxwell, Public 
Library, Spokane, Washington. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1928-29 are : 

President, Francis E. Cady, Research 
Library, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Secretary, Marion J. Reynolds, Libra- 
rian, Swift & Co. Library, Chicago, 111. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER, NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 1928 are : 

President, C. H. Judson, Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. 

Vice President, O. W. Wyatt, Cali- 
fornia-Hawaiian Sugar Refining Co. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs Agnes Rei- 
uero. Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION. 

Officers for 192S-29 are : 

President, Anna F. Frey, Western 
Precipitation Co., Los Angeles. 

Vice President, E. Ruth Jones, Secu- 
rity Bank, Los Angeles. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Ralph M. Whiting, 
Municipal Reference Department, Los 
Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AND STATE LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Officers for 1927-28 are: 

President, Helen E. Mackay, Pasadena. 

Vice President, Dorotha Davis, Fresno, 



258 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Secretary, May Dornin, University of 
California, Berkeley. 
Treasurer, Lillian Hyde, San Francisco. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library registers all 
library workers in California who are 
looking for positions and all from outside 
the state who wish to come here. Also 
it will be glad to know of libraries that 
want head librarians or assistants in any 
branch of their Avork. In writing for 
recommendations, libraries are urged to 
be as specific as possible, especially in 
regard to time position must be filled and 
salary offered. A librarian who wishes 
to be dropped from the Employment 
Bureau list and a librai-y that fills a posi- 
tion for which it has asked a recom- 
mendation will help the work greatly by 
notifying the State Librai"y at once. For 
further information, write to the State 
Library, Sacramento, California. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 
PUBLICATIONS. 

The Los Angeles Public Library has 
put out an extremely interesting "Hand- 
book of the Branch Libraries." There 
are many, and good, illustrations of vari- 
ous branch buildings, some exterior and 
some interior views, as well as floor 
plans. Any other city, or county, library 
at all interested in a program of building 
should find it very helpful. It is also 
exceedingly interesting from the point of 
view of library history in Los Angeles. 
It is printed on excellent paper, and sells 
for 50 cents. 

Two other rather special but useful 
, publications recently issued are "Specifi- 
cations for Branch Library Buildings," 
which can be bought for $2 a copy, and 
"Specifications for Branch Library Equip- 
ment," 50 cents a copy. 



vol. 23, no. 3] California library association. 



259 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento. 

Vice President, Eleanor Hitt, San 
Diego County Free Library, San Diego. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel G. Gibson, 
Sacramento County Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Trustees Section. 

President, Mrs J. Wells Smith, Trus- 
tee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Miss E. Kate Rea, Trustee 
Public Library, Anaheim. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 

President, Cornelia D. Plaister, Public 
Library, San Diego. 

Secretary, Gabrielle Morton, Public 
Library, Coronado. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES SECTION. 

President, Margaret Hart, San Fran- 
cisco Bulletin Library, San Francisco. 

Secretary, Bonnie Strong, Standard Oil 
Company Library, San Francisco. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice President, Secretary- Treasurer and 
Gretchen Flower, Margaret Girdner, 
Mrs Frances Burns Linn, Everett R. 
PeriT, Robert Rea, Susan T. Smith. 

Auditing — Amy L. Boynton, Public 
Library, Lodi, chairman ; Emma Voisard. 

Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 

Publications — Alice M. Healy, Public 
Library, San Francisco, chairman ; Mar- 
garet Dennison, Jane M. Fenton. 

Resolutions — M i n e 1 1 e L. Stoddard, 
Merced County Free Library, Merced, 
chairman ; Stella Huntington. 

Committee to Prepare Exhilit for 
Pacific Southwest Exposition — Mrs The- 
odora R. Brewitt, Public Library, Long 
Beach, chairman ; Jean D. Baird, Mrs 
Faith Holmes Hyers, Willis H. Kerr. 

Certification — Mabel R. Gillis, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman (1930) ; 



Mary Barmby (1929), Susan T. Smith 
(1931), Eleanor Hitt (1932), Mrs Theo- 
dora R. Brewitt (1933). 

Cooperation Betioeen the C. L. A. and 
the California Congress of Parents and 
Teachers — Bessie B. Silverthom, Stanis- 
laus County Free Library, Modesto, chair- 
man ; Mrs Charlotte K. Bissell, Edith 
Gantt, Margaret Livingston, Mabel 
Thomas. 

J. L. Gillis Memorial — Milton J. Fer- 
guson, State Library, Sacramento, chair- 
man ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor Hitt. 

Legislative — Mrs May Dexter Henshall, 
State Librai-y, Sacramento, chairman ; 
Alice Anderson, Jeannette M. Drake, Mrs 
Ethelwyn Laurence, Sarah E. McCardle. 

Library Schools — Beulah Mumm, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Joyce 
Backus, Marion Horton, John B. Kaiser, 
DeUa J. Sisler, Charles F. Woods. 

Membership — Eleanor Hitt, San Diego 
County Free Library, San Diego, chair- 
man ; 1st District, Kathleen Keating ; 2d 
District, Mrs Edith Daley; 3d District, 
L. Gertrude Doyle ; 4th District, Marion 
L. Gregory ; 5th District, Roberta In- 
grum ; 6th District, Evalyn Boman ; 7th 
District, C. E. Graves; 8th District, 
Elisabeth Haines ; 9th District, Anne 
Bell Bailey. 

Salaries — Helen E. Vogleson, Los An- 
geles County Free Library, chairman ; 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Blanche Galloway, 
Frances D. Patterson. 

Seamen^s Library — W. A. Worthington, 
Pacific Gas & Electric Company Library, 
chairman ; Mary Barmby, Helen M. 
Bruner, Margaret Dunbar, Charles S. 
Greene, Chaplain F. K. Howard, Rev 
H. H. Kelley, Mary F. Mui-phy. 

Jinks — Clara B. Dills, Solano County 
Free Library, chairman ; Ethel A. Creigh, 
Samuel Levinson, Mary Virginia Provines, 
Grace Taylor. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First District. 

President, Nathan van Patten, Stan- 
ford University Libraries, Stanford Uni- 
versity. 



260 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Secretary, Flora B. Ludington, The 
Library, Mills College. 

The first district consists of the follow- 
ing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Contra Costa County Free Library, 
Martinez. 

Secretary, Miss Norah McNeill, Rich- 
mond Public Library, Richmond. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda ( excepting Ala- 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 

Third District. 

President, Ruth Seymour, Tamalpais 
Union High School, Sausalito. 

Secretary, Muriel Wright, Marin 
County Free Library, San Rafael. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Mrs Helen R. Dambacher, 
Tuolumne County Free Library, Sonora. 

Secretai-y, Ida M. Huntington, Stanis- 
laus County Free Library, Modesto. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanis- 
laus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, Nelle U. Branch, University 
Farm Library, Davis. 

Secretai-y, Dora M. Himmelsbach, Cali- 
fornia State Library, Sacramento. 



The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties: Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Althea H. Warren, Los An- 
geles Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Eleanor S. Stephens, Los 
Angeles County Free Library, Los 
Angeles. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
.Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Edna D. Davis, Humboldt 
.County Free Library, Eureka. 

Secretax-y, Grace M. Burton, Humboldt 
State Teachers College Library, Areata. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Anna L. Williams, Modoc 
County Free Library, Alturas. 

Secretary, Lenala A. Martin, Lassen 
■County Free Library, Susanville. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Carmelita Duff, Butte County 
Free Library, Oroville. 

Secretary, Mrs Edith S. Simons, Public 
Library, Oroville. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, 
Yuba. 

ANNUAL iVIEETING. 

For account of the annual meeting, see 
this publication, p. 221. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



261 



CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS. 



Milton J. Ferguson, Ex-ofEcio Chair- 
man. 

Advisory Committee. 

Stella Huntington, 1707 Fremont Way, 
Oakland, Chairman. 

Clara B. Dills, Solano County. 

Margaret E. Livingston, Orange 
County. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno County. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, Treasurer. 

Special Committee Relating to State 
Library. 
Cornelia D. Provines, Sacramento 
County, chairman ; Mrs Julia G. Babcock, 
Kem County ; Mary Barmby, Alameda 
County. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS' ANNUAL 
MEETING. 

An account of the annual meeting will 
be found on p. 221. 

COUNTY LIBRARIANS SECTION, 
A. L. A. 

^Irs Julia G. Babcock read a paper at 
the County Librarians section of the 
A. L. A. 

SOME COUNTY LIBRARY 
PUBLICITY. 

The Independence Independent of 
April 14 carried a story of an Inyo 
County Library trip to Death Valley 
branches. The same paper printed an 
editorial inspired by this item. Because 
of the interest surrounding the section 
visited and the fact that library vp^ork so 
seldom calls forth editoi^ial comment, it 
seemed worth while to reprint both arti- 
cles here. 

Miners Appreciate County Library 
Service. 

Mrs Jessie Roper, Assistant County 
Librarian, has returned from an inspec- 
tion trip to the four branch libraries in 
Death Valley : Ryan, Shoshone, Tecopa 
and Death Valley Junction. She found 
the books all in good order at these 
branches and other details of the work 



equally satisfactory. The work of these 
branches is of much more importance 
than might be imagined, bringing as they 
do the last word in science, music, drama 
and fiction to many who would otherwise 
find their isolation in those wide desert 
spaces considerably more tedious. The 
school work done by the branches is espe- 
cially interesting. This is particularly 
true of the branch in charge of Mrs 
Charles Brown at the Shoshone School, 
whez-e the patronage is very largely made 
up of pupils of the school. Mrs Cornelius 
Collins is custodian at Ryan and Mrs A. 
B. Jones conducts the branch at Death 
Valley Junction. The most interesting 
branch is the one at Tecopa, or rather 
three miles north of Tecopa, where Mrs 
V. V. Davis is custodian, and has estab- 
lished what is practically a miners club- 
house. Mr Davis is a cattle man and it 
is in the large ranch house located on the 
only green space for miles around that 
Mrs Davis is doing her wonderful work 
for the lonely men of that district. The 
big, comfoi'table living room, with its 
large fireplace, bright lights and offering 
of books and magazines is a room 18 by 
25 feet in size and is a Mecca for miners 
and others for miles around. The warm- 
est kind of hospitality is accorded them 
all and it is truly appreciated. Mrs Davis 
has resided there nine years. Accompany- 
ing Mrs Roper on this trip were Miss 
Goudy and Mrs Ruth Leete, County 
Superintendent of Schools. 

[Editorial.] 
In another column of the Independent 
will be found a story relating to a recent 
inspection of the Death Valley branches 
of the Inyo County Library by the Assist- 
ant County Librarian, and incidentally 
telling of the work being done by a woman 
in one of these branches. The accom- 
plishment of this woman is of so marked 
a nature it seems impossible to pass it 
over without some tribute of appreciation. 
Away out there, in that mysterious region 
of desert sands and silent purple sky 
lines, where the only green thing in sight 
is in the immediate foreground of a 
great cattle ranch, is a woman whose 



262 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFOKNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



daily life is the outward exemplification 
of a richness of imagination and idealism 
worth more to its fortunate possessor than 
all the world-envied wealth of a million- 
aire. To the ordinary person what has 
such a life to offer? But to this woman 
it was not a question of what she was to 
get but what she had to give, and she has 
given freely and generously of what she 
had in the house. And in return her cup 



is full and running over with a richness 
of experience the value of which can not 
be estimated. It is interesting to con- 
trast such a woman's life with that of 
others whose environment amidst the 
pleasures and desirable advantages of the 
larger communities are through the lack 
of the inner flame of understanding, living 
in veritable deserts of discontent and 
unfruitfulness. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



263 



LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC. 



Under this heading will be given 
nccounts of meetings of the various 
librar.y clubs and similar organizations 
throughout the state. News items of 
the various clubs are solicited. 

PASADENA LIBRARY CLUB. 

The spring meeting of the Pasadena 
Library Club was held in the Lecture 
Hall of the Pasadena Public Library, on 
Friday evening. May 18, 1928. Follow- 
ing a buffet supper, Mr Roy Vernon 
Sowers, of the Henry E. Huntington 
Library and Art Gallery, instructed and 
entertained those present with a lecture 
on "The Art of the Poster." The address 
was illustrated with specimens from Mr 
Sowers' own collection, which were on 
view on the walls of the Lecture Hall. 
Another interesting feature of this meet- 
ing consisted of a number of short talks 
by members of the club on books of inter- 
est which they had recently read. Miss 
Helen Haines, in her brilliant manner, 
led this part of the meeting. 

At the close a short business session 
was held when Mrs Saxon Brown and 
Mrs Patricia O. Dutcher were elected to 
the offices of President and Secretary- 
Treasurer, respectively. 

Mrs Pateicia O. Dutchee, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

SAN ANTONIO LIBRARY CLUB. 

The San Antonio Library Club met at 
the Upland Public Librai^^, Saturday 
morning. May 26, 1928. Special mention 
was made of the organization of the club 
ten years before. Mrs Robinson read the 
minutes of the first meeting, and Mrs 
Manker outlined the purpose of its organ- 
ization and gave a resume of the pro- 
grams during the ten years. Mr Emmett 
Clark, Superintendent of the Pomona 
City Schools, was the principal speaker, 
outlining the plan of vocational guidance 
in the California schools, as applied in 
the Pomona schools. Others spoke of its 
application to library work and training, 
Miss Jacobus and Mr Wood leading in the 
discussion. Miss Cleve of the Scripps 
College Library and Mrs Nelson of the 
Ontario Public Library were introduced. 



Officers for the coming year are Miss 
Glyde Maynard, President ; Miss Adeline 
Nyberg, Secretary-Treasurer; Miss Ruth 
Welch, Mrs Helen Nelson and Mrs Goetz, 
members of the Executive Committee. 
The next meeting of the club will be at 
the Claremont Branch of the Los Angeles 
County Library. 

Mes Lavina B. K. Penley. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 

ASSOCIATION, 

NORTHERN SECTION. 

The Northern Section of the California 
School Library Association held its spring 
meeting at Stanford Union, Palo Alto, on 
Saturday, May 19, Dorothy Clark pre- 
siding. 

The morning session opened with a 
short business meeting. Elizabeth Patton, 
chairman of the Publicity Committee, 
outlined plans for publicity. 

Following the plan of publishing a 
California School Library Year Book, as 
adopted at the C. S. L. A. state meeting 
in Fresno in November, Mrs Elizabeth 
Madison, Director of School Libraries, 
Oakland, Editor of the Year Book, re- 
ported on the progress of the work. Lists 
of the Year Book committees were given 
out and an enthusiastic discussion of this 
work followed. Miss Marian Gwinn and 
Miss Katherine Folger of the C. S. L. A. 
Southern Section are associate editors. 

Joy Belle Jackson, San Jose State 
Teachers College Library, gave an inter- 
esting report of the C. L. A. meeting at 
Riverside, and Katherine D. Steele, San 
Mateo Junior College Library, reported 
briefly on the Junior College Library 
luncheon at Riverside. 

The recently adopted membership cards 
were given out. 

Following the morning session, luncheon 
was served, Mrs Leslie Connor Williams 
from the Castilleja School, Palo Alto, and 
Mr William G. Carr, Research Director 
of the C. T. A., being the luncheon guests. 
Mrs Williams delightfully reviewed sev- 
eral of the new books and discussed adult 
education for small groups. 

At the afternoon session Joyce Backus, 
Librarian of the San Jose State Teachers 



264 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



College, outlined the courses to be in- 
cluded in their new department of Library 
Science for 1928-1929. She also spoke 
of the Summer Courses offered this sum- 
mer. A general discussion of this impor- 



tant topic and of many others of interest 
to school librarians followed, after which 
the meeting adjourned. 

Elizabeth Patton, 
Chairman Publicity Committee. 



vol. 23,110. 3] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



265 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Librarj% Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free 
library law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 
1911) read as follows: 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold ofiBce for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of 
county librarian unless, prior to his 
appointment, he has received from the 
board of library examiners a certificate 
of qualification for the office. At the 
time of his appointment, the county 
librarian need not be a resident of the 
county nor a citizen of the State of 
California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

The Board of Library Examiners held 

Ian examination at the State Library, 
Sacramento, May 21, 1928. There were 
four candidates. Certificates were granted 
to the two who passed : Dorothy Deming, 
Lilian Sabin. 

The life of certificates expiring in 1928 
was extended to the end of the year. 

Renewals were granted to the following 
without examination : Edith Gantt, Anne 
Margrave. 

Life certificates were granted to the 
following applicants : Estella DeFord, 
Clara B. DiUs, Anne Hadden, Margaret 
B. Livingston, Bessie B. Silverthom, Mrs 
Alice G. Whitbeck. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Adams, Mrs Lila (Dobell), L.n. Trinity 
County Free Library, "Weaverville. 

Anderson, Mrs Rachel (Rhoads), Asst. 
Kansas City Public Library, Kansas 
City. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 
Free Library, Bakersfield. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 



Bailey, Anne Bell, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. (Life certificate.) 
Beardsley, Mrs Arline Davis, Asst. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Boman, Evalyn, Ln. Imperial County Free 

Library, El Centro. 
Burket, Prances M., Ln. Sutter County 

Free Library, Tuba City. 
Coulter, Mabel, Ln. Lange Library of 

Education, Berkeley. 
Culver, Essae M., Exec. Sec. Louisiana 

Library Commission, Baton Rouge, La. 
Dambacher, Mrs Helen (Rowland), Mrs 

Gustav Dambacher, Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonera. 
Davis, Edna D., Asst. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. (Life certificate.) 
Deming, Dorothy, Asst. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. (Life certificate.) 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Butte 

County Free Library, Oroville. 
Eudey, Mrs Henrietta G., Mrs Fred Eudey, 

Asst. Amador County Free Library, 

Jackson. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 

Free Library, Salinas. 
Galloway, Blanche, Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera. 
Gantt, Edith, Ln. Plumas County Free 

Library, Quincy. 
Gibson, Hazel G., Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Emeritus Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Greene, Margaret, Asst. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 
Gregory, Marion L., Ln. Hanford Public 

Library and Kings County Free Library, 

Hanford. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. (Life certificate.) 
Harris, Mary W., Ln. SIsKiyou County 

Free Library, Yreka. 
Herrman, Mrs Jennie (Herrman), Mrs 

James White Herrman, Asst. San Diego 

Public Library. (Life certificate.) 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo County 

Free Library, Redwood City. (Life 

certificate.) 
Hooker, D. Ashley, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Jackson, Joy Belle, Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Jose. 
Jones, Louise E., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Kennedy, Helen T., 2d Asst. Ln. Public 

Library, Los Angeles. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. San Bernardino Poly- 
technic High School Library, San Ber- 
nardino. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 



266 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Linn, Mrs Prances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
oara Free Public Library and Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 
County Free Library, Santa Ana. (Life 
certificate.) 

McCardle, Sarah B., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

McCright, Edith C, Asst. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 
Library, Independence. 

Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 
Free Library, Susanville. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

Meredith, Roberta, Asst. Public Library, 
Seattle, Wn. 

Miller, Mabel V., Asst. High School Li- 
brary, Huntington Park. 

Morse, Mrs Ella (Packer), Mrs Guy 
Morse, Ln. Colusa County Free Library, 
Colusa. 

Morse. Marion, Ln. Honolulu Academy 
of Arts, Honolulu, T. H. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Parkinson, H. C, Asst. Public Library, 
New York. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

I'rovines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County liYee Library, Sacramento. 
( I^if e certificate.) 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
1 ree Library, Eureka. (Life certifi- 
cate.) 

Russell, Mrs Faye (Kneeshaw), Mrs Ralph 
H. Russell, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Sabin, Lilian, Ln. San Luis Obispo County 
Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. McHenry Pub- 
lic Library and Stanislaus County Free 
Library, Modesto. (Life certificate.) 

Singletary, Mrs Elizabeth (Stevens), Mrs 
Harry H. Singletary, Ln. Santa Clara 
County Free Library, San Jose. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Stephens, Eleanor S., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Stoddard, Minette L., Ln. Merced County 
Free Library, Merced. 

Taylor, Bertha S., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura Public 
Library and Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., First Asst. Ln. Public 
Library, Los Angeles. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S., Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Ln. San Benito 

County Free Library, Hollister. 
. Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. (Life 
certificate.) 



Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 

Free Library, Alturas. 
Woods, Katherine R., Asst. Orange County 

Free Library, Santa Ana. 
Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Asst. 

Solano County Free Library, Fairfield. 
Wright, Muriel, Ln. Marin County Free 

I^ibrary, San Rafael. 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 

Yates, Asst. Public Library, Long Beach. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Dalton, Mrs Blanche (Harris), Mrs John 

E. Dalton. 
Dyer, Mrs Flo (Gantz), Mrs Maurice 

Foster Dyer. 
Gleason, Celia. (Life certificate.) 
Hatfield, Mrs Margaret (Smith), Mrs John 

Glover Hatfield. 
Heffner, Mrs Martha June (Coleman), 

Mrs Harold V. Heffner. 
Helm. Mrs Frances (Stockebrand), Mrs 

Herbert G. Helm. 
Huntington, Stella. (Life certificate.) 
McDonald, Mrs Ora Regnart, Mrs Charles 

E. McDonald. 
Price, Mrs Melba (Burden), Mrs Louis B. 

Price. 
Wheeler, Mrs Blanche (Chalfant), Mrs 

De Forest N. Wheeler. 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library 
law and circular of information for 
applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold oifice of county librarian in Cali- 
fornia" was published in News Notes of 
California Libraries, April, 1911, and 
later reprinted in pamphlet form. The 
edition being exhausted, a revised edition 
of the circular was printed in News Notes 
of California 'Libraries, January, 1914. 
This has been reprinted as a pamphlet. 
The fifth edition was issued December, 
1921. (Circular of information only.) 
The fifth edition of the County free 
library law was issued in September, 
192."). Copies of both of above pamphlets 
will be furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

No date has been set for the next 
examination. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chairman 
of the Board. For application blanks or 
further information address the (IHiairman 
of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



267 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Sep- 
tember 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Biennial income for 1927-29, $302,350. 

Total accessions 279,584 (less 3583 
lost and discarded =276,001) exclusive of 
22,187 accessions in Books for Blind 
Department and 94,992 volumes in the 
Sutro Branch in San Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Librarian 
and Head of Books for the Blind Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert V, Clayton, Law and Legisla- 
tive Reference Librarian. 

Eudora Garoutte, Head of California 
Department. 

Alice .J. Haines. Head of Documents 
Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Dora M. Himmelsbach, in charge of 
Periodicals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc., Department. 

Beulah Mumm. Reference Librarian. 

Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Margaret Bennett, Typist (temporary). 

Gladys M. Bowles, Assistant. 

Helen M. Bruner, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Sarah Carder, Assistant. 

Ella A. Clark. Indexer. 

Helen Cornell, Assistant. 

Mrs Lenore W. Davidson, Assistant. 

Dorothy Deming, Assistant. 

Margaret Dennison, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

Mrs Marguerite Walker Duggins, Ste- 
noarapher. 

Dorothy Earl, Assistant. 

Kate M. Foley. Home Teacher of the 
Blind, 146 McAllister st, San Francisco. 

Zilla Grant. Assistant. 

Ena Harmon, Assistant. 

Lyndall Harmon, Assistant. 

Dorothy Hill. Assistant. 

Mrs Alicia Manning Hook, Assistant. 

Marion Knotts, Assistant. 

Florence Lamb. Bookkeeper. 

Rachel Look, Assistant. 

Mrs June Vladyka McCafPery, Assistant. 

Anna G. McNamee. Assistant. Sutro 
Branch. San Francisco. 

D. Florence Montfort. Assistant. 



Catharine J. Morrison. Home Teacher 
of the Blind, 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
Angeles. 

Vera Palermo, Assistant. 

Irene E. K.yan. Assistant. 

Irma M. Schoepflin, Assistant. 

Blanche L. Shadle. Assistant. 

Mrs Frances L. Smith, Stenographer. 

Lily M. Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Corinne R. Tracy, Assistant. 

iMrs .Tulia M. Waldron, Assistant. 

Caroline Wenzel. Assistant. 

Mrs Ina Brosseau, Book Repairer. 

j\Irs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Gladys N. Richards, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Addalbert Morris, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Stanley Schlademan, Assistant Ship- 
ping Clerk. 

Nancy Anderson, Messenger. 

John Heinrich, Messenger. 

George J. Miller, Messenger. 

Elyse Schultz, Messenger. 

William T. Simmons, Messenger. 

Arthur Valine, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees. .Janitor. 

Jacob Misfelt, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

Representatives of the State Library 
at the annual meeting of the County Libra- 
rians and the California Library Associa- 
tion at Riverside, April 2 to 5, were Mr 
Ferguson, Miss Bruner, Miss Gillis, Miss 
Haines and Mrs Henshall. Miss Gillis 
was elected president of the California 
Librai-y Association for 1928-29. 

From Riverside Mr Ferguson went 
direct to Louisiana to make a quick sur- 
vey of the work of the Library Commis- 
sion, which is being carried on under his 
supervision. In May, Mr Ferguson paid 
a visit to the Humboldt State Teachers 
College at Areata to inspect the library 
and advise about library problems. This 
trip completed his investigation of the 
State Teachers College libraries. 

Mr Ferguson gave the commencement 
address at the Keeney School, Sacra- 
mento, on the evening of June 2, and 
made a talk at the Auburn Rotary Club 
on June 12. 

Miss Gillis wa-s one of the speakers at 
the Sacramento County Custodians' meet- 



268 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



ing on May 4. She spoke also at the 
staff meeting of the Sacramento City 
Library on April 13 and at the State 
Library staff meeting on April 17, taking 
as her subject the recent meeting of the 
California Library Association. 

Miss Foley spent May 17 in Sacra- 
mento giving lessons to prospective blind 
readers and conferring on Blind Depart- 
ment matters. 

George J. Miller and William T. Sim- 
mons were added to the messenger staff 
on June 7. 

QUARTERLY NOTES. 

The State Library picnic was held at 
Del Paso Park on June 15, with sixty in 
attendance. After the exceedingly good 
supper a short skit depicting a scene in 
South Africa was presented. Representa- 
tives of various tribes came to the hut of 
the librarian from California to put in 
their pleas for library service. Only 
second in interest to their appearance was 
the letter from home reciting much library 
news — some of which we hope was not 
prophetic ! 

The major part of our attention re- 
cently has been put on preparations for 
the move to the new State Library Build- 
ing. The move will probably be completed 
early in July. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

The library closes at noon on Satur- 
days during July and August. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert V. Clayton, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, 
the United States. Great Britain. Can- 
ada, Australia and certain other foreign 
countries, and briefs of counsel in cases 
decided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once, renewed 



for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer, or if, 
in the opinion of the Librarian, a recall 
is fair and expedient. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pp. 303 and 306. 

Copies of 22 California State publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during April, May and June, 
1928. 
Agriculture Dept. Monthly bulletin, 

vol. 17, nos. 4-5. 

Special publication no. 83. 



Banking dept. Bulletin, vol. 2, nos. 4-6. 
Controller. Financial transactions . . . 

annual report. 1927. 
Health Dept. Pure foods & drugs acts. 

1928. 
Judicial Council. Rules adopted regulat- 
ing business of Superior Court. 1928. 
Medical Examiners Bd. Directory of 

physicians. 1928. 
Natural Resources Dept. Fish and Game 

Div. California fish and game, vol. 14, 

no. 2. 
Osteopathic Examiners Bd. Directory of 

graduates of osteopathic schools. 

March 3, 1928. 
Public Works Dept. California highways 

and public works, vol. 5, nos. 4-6. 

Water Rights Div. Rules and 



i-egulations governing appropriations of 

water in California. 1928. 
Railroad Comm. Rules of procedure. 

1928. 
Real Estate Dept. California real estate 

directory-bulletin, vol. 9, no. 1. 
Reclamation Bd. Sacramento and San 

Joaquin drainage district refunding act. 

1928. 
St. Francis Dam Comm. Report • . _ ■ 

causes leading to failure of St. Francis 

Dam. 1928. 
Secretary of State. Direct primary law. 

1928. 

Statement of vote, presidential 



primary election. May, 1928. 
Teachers College, San Francisco. Cata- 
logue, 1928-1929. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



269 



REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of 
the librarian, and to any other educa^ 
tional institution on request of its oflBcial 
head or its librarian ; to individuals 
through the signature of a state officer, 
of the Librarian of the local library or 
of the official head of any other educa- 
tional institution or on receipt of a $5.00 
deposit ; to a club on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

JNlYRTLE RuiiL, in charge. 

During April, May and June 1498 
books, 51 prints and 6 maps were acces- 
sioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During April, May and June 1080 
books were cataloged and 9719 cards 
were added to the file. 34,410 cards were 
filed in the Union Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

EuDORA Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of 
books on the history and description, 
resources and industries of the State, as 
well as the works of California authors 
in all departments of literature. These 
are made accessible by means of a card 
catalog. Full names and biographical 
sketches of California authors, artists, 
musicians, pioneers and early settlers are 
being secured, together with their photo- 
graphs. The collection of bound peri- 
odicals is quite large. The Department 
also contains about 10,000 bound volumes 
of newspapers', a file of which is being 
indexed with reference to the history of 
the State. Students will be assisted in 
their work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

We wish to acknowledge the splendid 
cooperation of the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West of San Bernardino in 
securing the following Pioneer records for 
the State Library files : 

Alexander, Annie, 1857 
Brown. John, Jr., 1849 
Cox, Silas Cadman, 1850 
Dodson, Elizabeth A., 1854 
Helms, Mrs Elizabeth, 1857 
Helms, Houston Perry, 1857 
4—60773 



Helms, James Harker, 1857 
Janney, Mrs Lucy Ernestine, 1859 
Rawlin, Francis, 1854 
Rawlin, Mrs Hannah Stapley, 1854 
Smithson, Mrs Jane, 1855 
Southern, Simeon Fisher, 1850 
Van Leuven, Anson, 1852 
Van Leuven, Mrs Elizabeth Robin- 
son, 1858 
Wixon, Mrs Mary A., 1857 

Cards received from other sources : 
Covington, Blam, 1855 
Covington, Mrs Laura M. (Inskeep), 

1851 
Lindley, William Purdy, 1849 
May, William Byrd, 1850 
May, Mrs Mary Ellen (Perry), 1851 
Wadsworth, Capt. Eden, 1848 
Wilson, John, 1849 

California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 

received since the last issue of News 

Notes of California Libraries: 

*Allen, Ben S. 

*Arnstein, Mrs Flora (Jacobi) (Mrs 

Lawrence Arnstein) 
*Berg, Mrs Elizabeth Allison (How- 
ard) (Mrs Mont Berg) 

Gudde, Erwin Gustav 

Hart, Franklin W. 

Hill, Joseph John 

Hill, Laurance L. 

Kellogg, Mary Francis 

Lyman, George Dunlap 

Marmur, Jacland 

Moon, Mrs Grace (Purdie) (Mrs 
Carl Moon) 
*Nakagawa, Karl S. 
* Pease, Howard 

Ryan, Don 

Wiseman, Mrs Ada (Potter) (Mrs 
W. Edwin Wiseman) 

Zeitlin, Jake 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 

received since the last issue of News 

Notes of California Libraries: 

Meiere, Hildreth 
Norton, Elizabeth 

Newspaper Index. 
The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

573 cards have been added to the Cali- 
fornia catalog during the last quarter. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 



'■Native Californians. 



270 



NEWS NOTES OF CA-LIFOENIA IJBRARIES. 



I July, 1928 



that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free thx'ough the mails. 

Embossed catalogs of the earlier mate- 
I'ial in American Braille, Moon, and New 
York point are available. They will be 
loaned to borrowers wishing them for use 
in book selection. 

A catalog of all books in Moon type in 
the Library up to October 1, 1926, and 
one including all books in Braille up to 
April 1, 1927, will be sent to anyone 
requesting it. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 2731 blind bor- 
rowers, 56 borrowers having been added 
during April, May and June. Total acces- 
sions are 22,187, as follows : New York 
point books, 2724 ; New York point music 
186 ; American Braille books 3041 ; 
American Braille music 1289 ; European 
Braille books 3608 ; European Braille 
music 250 ; Esperanto Braille books 3 ; 
Moon books 5233 ; Moon music 5 ; Revised 
Braille books 4811 ; Revised Braille music 
151 ; Standard dot books 14 ; Line books 
193 ; Line music 21 ; Ink print books 493 ; 
*Appliances 83 ; *Games 50 ; Maps 32. 

During April, May and June 8885 
books, etc., were loaned as follows : New 
'York point 117; American Braille 93; 
European Braille 989; Moon 3461; Re- 
vised Braille 4216 ; Line ; Ink Print 3 ; 
Appliances 4 ; Games 2 ; Maps 0. The 
loans were divided by class as follows : 
Philosophy and religion 562; sociology 
36 ; language 38 ; primers 38 ; science 53 ; 
useful arts 33 ; fine arts ; amusements 
12 ; music 41 ; literature 149 ; fiction 
6246 ; travel and history 233 ; biography 
236 ; periodicals 1208. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by Mrs F. A. 
Bacher, F. B. Beans, Mrs Marion Beebe, 
Joseph Block, Mrs C. W. Brett, Mrs 
H. W. Bruning, Mrs H. O. Buker, Anna 
Courtois, Mrs Susie Fancher, H. M. 
Ferren, Mrs Myrtle Foss, Ruby Holtz, 
Mrs H. D. Jones, Wm. Lewis, Bessie 
Long, Mrs Rose McComb, Jas. McGlan- 
non, W. A. Miller, Hattie B. Newman, 



♦Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



Mrs M. E. Phillips, Hazel Piper, W. J. 
Ripplinger, Nellie Rogers, Mrs L. Sargent, 
George W. Shoemaker, J. E. Woodbury, 
American Braille Press for War and 
Civilian Blind, Inc., American Printing 
House for the Blind, Board of Missions 
to Deaf Mutes of the Evangelical Luth- 
eran Synod of Missouri, Ohio and other 
states, Canadian National Institute for 
the Blind, Christian Record Publishing 
Company, Christian Science Publishing 
Company, Department of Missions of 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Gospel 
Trumpet Company, Michigan School for 
the Blind, National Institute for the 
Blind, New York Association for the 
Blind, Society for Aid of the Sightless, 
Theosophical Book Association for the 
Blind, Western Pennsylvania School for 
the Blind, Xavier Braille Publishing 
Company, Ziegler Publishing Company. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. 
See p. 306. 

Home Teaching. 

Kate M. Foley, home teacher of the 
blind, is at the Argyle Apartments, 146 
McAllister street, San Francisco, every 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her 
telephone number is Market 690. She 
gives lessons regularly in the bay region 
/and the Santa Clara Valley, with occa- 
sional trips to other parts of the state. 
Catharine J. Morrison, home teacher of 
the blind, is at the Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Broadway Annex, Hall of 
Records, every Wednesday. Her home 
address is 951 S. Kenmore ave., Los 
Angeles. Her telephone number is 
Drexel 5339. She gives lessons regularly 
in Los Angeles and vicinity and makes 
occasional trips to San Diego. 

From April 1 to June 30, the home 
teachers gave 648 lessons in the homes of 
the blind and 41 lessons at libraries. 
They made 171 visits and calls in connec- 
jtion with the work for purposes other 
than giving lessons, and have received 52 
visits in connection with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 298 hours on corre- 
spondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 442 letters and 185 postals and 
received 330 letters and 39 postals. They 
also answered and made 614 telephone 
calls. They made 5 addresses. Miss 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



271 



Foley teaches regularly in Oailand, in 
Alameda and in San Francisco classes of 
seeing people to write Braille. She spent 
15 hours in proofreading hand-copied 
books. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

The Siitro Branch occupies space in the 
Public Library, Civic Center, San Fran- 
cisco, and is open every day, except Sun- 
day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Esther M. Bomgardner. '15 

Ln. Torrance High School L., Torrance 
Thnlma Brackett, '20 

Ln. Newark Museum, Newark, N. J 
Helen V. Briggs, '14 

46 Fairview ave., Los Gatos 
Agnes E. Brown. '15 

Asst. San Mateo High School L., San 

Mateo 
Helen M. Bruner, '14 

Asst. in charge, Sutro Branch, State L., 

San Francisco 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan (Mrs Dean W. 
Buchan), '20 

1631 Cowper St., Palo Alto 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis (Mrs James 
S. Bullis), '17 

1314 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Bar- 
Ruth E. Bullock, '15 

Ln. Belvedere Junior High School L., 

Los Angeles 
Elta L. Camper, '17 

Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley 
Marguerite Chatfield. '20 

Asst. P. L., Pasadena 
Nellie B. Christensen, '19 

Ln. Selma High School L., Selma 
Mabel Coulter, '14 

Ln. Lange Library of Education, 

Berkeley 
Helen Esther Crawford, '20 

Teacher-Ln. Watsonville High School 

L.. Watsonville 
Dorotha Davis, '17 

Ln. Fresno High School L., Fresno 
Tillie de Bernardi, '18 

The Pinch School for Girls, 61 E. 77th 

St., New York City 
Estella De Ford, '15 

Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa 
Margaret Dennison, '17 

Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie Doughty, '20 

Ln. Garfield High School L., Los Angeles 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Douglas (Mrs James 
R. Douglas), '14 

829J S. Normandie st., Los Angeles 
Mrs Flo Gantz Dyer (Mrs Maurice Foster 
Dyer), '20 

Salinas 
Ellen B. Frink, '19 

Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Hazel G. Gibson, '19 

Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sacramento 
Margaret V. Girdner, '17 

Ln. Galileo High School L., San Fran- 



Mary E. Glock, '15 

Died, March 6, 1922 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould (Mrs J. A. 
Gould), '14 
746 Elm St., Woodland 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis (Mrs William 
H. Hargis), '18 
725 Coe ave., San Jose 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss (Mrs Prank 
U. Harriss). '15 
23 3 Larkin st., San Francisco 
Margaret Hatch, '15 

Ln. Standard Oil Co. L.. San Francisco 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner (Mrs Roy 
J. Heffner), '18 
1528 Channing way, Berkeley 
Cecilia Henderson, '14 

Santa Paula 
Edna S. Holroyd, '15 

Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood City 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd (Mrs Wilber 
Judd), '20 
Out of library work 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy (Mrs 
John Elmer Kennedy), '15 
1320 39th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Marguerite Ryan Kirschman (Mrs 
Orton .A_. Kirschman). '19 
4642 Utah St., San Diego 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson (Mrs Iver 
N. Lawson, Jr.), '18 
3231 Front st., San Diego 
Marjorie C. Learned, '2 

Asst. P. L., New York City 
Mrs M. Ruth McLaughlin Lockwood (Mrs 
Ralph L. Lockwood), '17 
1520 Greenwich st., San Pranclsco 
.A.my G. Luke, '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs Bessie Heath McCrea (Mrs Robert 
W. McCrea), '19 
4941 8th ave., Sacramento 
N. Ruth McCullough, '17 

2716 Hampton Court, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell (Mrs Roy P. 
McDowell), '14 
Asst. Stanislaus Co. F. L., Modesto 
Mrs Everett McCullough McMillin (Mrs 
James M. McMillin), '19 
Potomac Park Apts., 21st & C sts.. 
Washington, D. C. 
Anne Margrave, '14 

Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence 
Lenala Martin, '14 

Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville 
Mrs Georgia Pearl Seeker Meyers (Mrs 
Robei-t K. Meyers), '19 
Ln. Tulare Joint Union High School L.. 
Tulare 
Vera V. Mitchell, '19 

Ln. Biggs High School L., Biggs 
Marion Morse. '17 

Ln. Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hono- 
lulu, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton (Mrs James L. 
Patton), '18 
416 S. Hoover st., Los Angeles 
Mrs Helen Katherine Kellogg Peabody 
(Mrs Roger Peabody), '19 
4 8 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival (Mrs 
H. Frederic Percival). '15 
1633 38th St., Sacramento 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14 

Ln. Pomona High School and Junior 
College L., Pomona 
Margaret L. Potter, '16 

Asst. Lane Medical L., San Francisco 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price (Mrs Jay H. 
Price), '16 
1054 Cragmont ave., Berkeley 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefield Rakestraw (Mrs 
Norris W. Rakestraw), '18 
Asst. Oberlin College L., Oberlin, Ohic 



272 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIEORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Esther L. Ramont, '20 

Ln. Modesto High School L., Modesto 
Mrs Frances Haub Raymond (Mrs George 
J. Raymond), '20 
724 Santa Ynez Way, Sacramento 
Anna Belle Robinson, '18 

Died, June 22, 1920 
Myrtle Ruhl, '14 

Head of Order Dept., State L... Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth Seymour, '18 

Ln. Tamalpais Union High School L., 
Mill Valley 
Blanche L. Shadle, '17 

Asst. State L... Sacramento 
Mrs Bernice Goff Simpson (Mrs John R. 
Simpson), '14 
Asst. John Crerar L., Chicago 
Mrs Edith Bdenborg Smalley (Mrs Carl 
J. Smalley). '18 
McPherson, Kan. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith (Mrs William A. 
Smith). '17 
1225 42d St., Sacramento 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith (Mrs Joseph 
K. Smith), '20 
3100 19th St., Bakersfleld 
Mrs Beatrice Gawne Todd (Mrs Bwart 
Burns Todd), '17 
1860 Green St., San Francisco 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman (Mrs 
Joseph de L. Waithman), '18 
Out of library work 
Caroline Wenzel, '14 

Asst. State L.., Sacramento 
Mrs Blanche Chalfant Wheeler (Mrs De 
Forest Nathaniel Wheeler), '14 
Box 865, San Jose 
Josephine L. Whitbeck, '16 

Asst. P. L., Richmond 
Essie T. White, '19 

Ln. Sacramento High School L., Sac- 
ramento. 
Mrs Katharine Cahoon Wilson (Mrs Lloyd 
R. Wilson), '17 
1125 Grand ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Aldine Winham, '20 

Asst. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, '15 

Asst. Solano Co. F. L.. Fairfield 
Mrs Bess Rantcn Tates (Mrs John DeWitt 
Yates), '18 
Asst. P. L. Long Beach 

News Items. 

Flo A. Gantz, '20, resigned as librarian 
of the San Luis Obispo County Free 
Library, in June, and was married, June 
27, to Maurice Foster Dyer. Mr and 
Mrs Dyer will live in Salinas. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During April, 

May and June, 1928. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions 
appeared in the April, 1928, issue of 
this publication. 



GENERAL WORKS. 

American library association. 

Books for everybody. 028 A51b 

Board of education for Uirarian- 



Standards and curricula in school libra- 
rianship. 1927. xq020.7 A5b 

Gift. 

Education committee. School 

library yearbook, nos. 1-2. 1927-28. 
x027.8 A51e 



Bennett, James O'Donnell. 
Much loved books. 1927. 



028 B47I 



Bostwick, Arthur Elmore. 

Pivotal figures of science. 1928. ( Read- 
ing with a purpose) 028 B74p 

Caknegie United Kingdom trust. 

Some impressions of the public library 
system of the United States of 
America. 1927. qx027 C2s 

Dickinson, Asa Don, comp. 

The best books of our time, 1901-1925. 
1928. 010 D55b 

Emeeson, Edwin. 

Incunabulum incunabulorum. The Gut- 
enberg Bible on vellum in the Voll- 
behr collection. cl928. 093 E53 

lEsCHER, Hermann. 

Stellung und aufgabe der bibliothek in 
den Vereinigten Staaten von Amer- 
ika. [1922?] x027 E74 

GoLDSCHMiDT, Emst Philip. 

Gothic & renaissance bookbindings, ex- 
emplified and illustrated from the 
author's collection. 1928. q095 G6 

Goldsmith, Henry. 

Memorabilia of the presidents. [1925] 
016.09 G62 

Hind, Charles Lewis. 

One hundred best books. 1927. 

028 H66 

Koos, Frank Hermann. 

State participation in public school 
librai"y service. 1927. (Teachers 
college, Columbia university. Con- 
tributions to education) x027.8 K82 

London. University. 

The students' guide to the libraries of 
London. 1927. x027 L84a 



vol. 23, no. -S] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



273 



Meyers, Charles Lee, conip. 

Bibliography of colonial costume. cl92.3. 
016.391 M99 

Mitchell, Sydney Bancroft. 

Adventures in flower gardening. 1928. 
(Reading with a purpose) 028 M68 

MoLEY, Raymond. 

The px-actice of politics. 1927. (Read- 
ing with a purpose) 028 M71 

National child labor committee, New 
York. 
Child labor selected bibliography 1920- 
1927. 1927. 016.3313 N27 

OcKHAM, David. 

Stentor ; or. The press of to-day and 

to-morrow. [1927] (To-day and 

to-morrow) 070 016 

Pacific Northwest library association. 
Proceedings. lst-18th, 1909-1927. 2 v. 
X020.6 P11 

Pearson, firm, booksellers, London. 
First editions of one hundred books 
famous in the world's literature. 

016.09 P362 
Recoed, Samuel James. 

Bibliography of the woods of the world 
(exclusive of the temperate region of 
North America) with emphasis on 
tropical woods. 2d ed., rev. and enl. 
1923. 016.582 R13 

Russell Sage foundation, New York. 
Dept. of recreation. 
Sources of information on play and 
recreation. 1927. (Russell Sage 
foundation, New York. Dept. of 
recreation. Pamphlets) 016.79 R96 

Sturgis, Cony. 

The Spanish world in English fiction, 
a bibliography. 1927. (Useful ref- 
erence series) 016.86 S93 

Williams, lolo Aneurin. 

The elements of book-collecting. 1927. 

010 W72 

Wilson, H. W., firm, publishers. 

Standard catalog : biography section. 
1927. (Standard catalog series) 

qr016.92 W7a 



Standard catalog : social sciences 

section. 2d ed. rev. and enl. 1927. 
(Standard catf^log series) 

r016.3 W7a 



Works, George Alan. 

College and university library problems. 
1927. x027.8 W92 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Babnett, Lionel David. 

Brahma-knowledge. 1911. (The wis- 
dom of the East) 181 B26 

Bradford, Gamaliel. 

Life and I, an autobiography of human- 
ity. 1928. Ill B79 

CoiT, Stanton, comp. 

The message of man ; a book of ethical 
scriptures. [1923] 170 C68 



Dickenson, Clarence F. 
Flowers and jewels. 
Gift. 

A garden in Allah. 



149 D54f 



149 D54g 



Gift. 



Dresser, Horatio Willis. 

A history of modern philosophy. cl928. 

190 D77 
GooDSELL, Willystine. 

Problems of the family. cl928. (The 
Century social science series) 

173 G65p 
Hamilton, Albert Edward. 

This smoking world. cl927. 178.7 H21 

Kenneth, John Henry. 

An experimental study of affects and 
associations due to certain odors. 
[1927] (Psychological review publi- 
cations. Psychological monographs) 
q152 K3 
KiRKHAM, Stanton Davis. 

Where dwells the soul serene. cl907. 
c170 K59w 
Gift. 

Lewis, Wyndham. 

Time and western man. cl928. 

115 L67 
McAdoo, William Gibbs. 

The challenge; liquor and lawlessness 
versus constitutional government. 
cl928. 178 Mile 

Neumann, Henry. 

Modem youth and marriage. 1928. 

173 N49 
Robinson, Henry Mauris. 

Relativity in business morals. 1928. 
(Barbara Weinstock lectures on the 
morals of trade) 174 R66 



274 



NEWS NOTES OF CALrPORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



RoSToVTSEv, Mikhail Ivanovich. 

Mystic Italy. cl927. (Brown univer- 
sity. The Colver lectures, 1927) 

149.3 R83 
Shabp, Frank Chapman. 
Ethics. cl928. (The Century philos- 
ophy series) 170 S53 

Spaulding, Edward Gleason. 

What am I? 1928. 191 S73 

Stefansson, Vilhjalmur. 

The standardization of error. cl927. 
(The new science series) 177 S81 

Van Waters, Miriam. 

Parents on probation. 1927. 173 V28 

MIND AND BODY. 

Drtesch, Hans Adolf Eduard. 

Mind and body. 1927. 130 D77 

Fishbein, Morris, d White, William 
Alanson, eds. 
Why men fail. cl928. 131 F53 

The Unconscious, a symposium [by] 
C. M. Child, Kurt Koffka, John E. 
Anderson [d others], 1927. 

130 U54 

CHILD STUDY. MENTAL TESTS. 

Brewer, John Marks. 

Mental measurement in educational and 
vocational guidance. 1924. (Harvard 
bulletins in education) 136.7 B84 

Griffitts, Charles Hurlbut. 

Individual differences in imagery. 
[1927] (Psychological review pub- 
lications. Psychological monographs) 
q155 G8 
Seabury, David. 

Growing into life ; a magna charta of 
youth. cl928. 136.7 S43 

Walters, Frederick Charles. 

A statistical study of certain aspects of 
the time factor in intelligence. 1927. 
(Teachers college, Columbia univer- 
sity. Contributions to education) 

136.7 W23 

OCCULTISM. SPIRITUALISM. 

Bennett, Ernest Nathaniel. 

ApoUonius ; or. The present and future 
of psychical research. cl927. 

134 B47 



Chainey, George. 

Times garland of grace. cl918. 

133 C43 

Croysdale, Agnes, d Wilde, George. 
Your destiny and the stars. 1915. 

133.5 C95 
Geley, Gustave. 

Clairvoyance and materialisation. 1927. 

q134 G3 
Heindel, Max. 

Simplified scientific astrology. cl919. 
133.5 H46s 
Kirk, Beckwith. 

Palmistry for everyone. 1925. 

133.6 K59 
Taylor, William Sentman. 

Morton Prince and abnormal psychol- 
ogy. 1928. 135 T24 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Adler, Alfred. 

Understanding human nature. cl927. 

150 A23 
Griffith, Coleman Roberts. 

Psychology and athletics, a general 
survey for athletes and coaches. 
1928. 796 G85p 

HoLLiNGSWOBTH, Harry Levi. 

Psychology, its facts and principles. 
1928. 150 H74p 

Smith, Elliott Dunlap. 

Psychology for executives, a study of 
human natui'e in industry. 1928. 

658 S64 
Weld, Harry Porter. 

Psychology as science, its problems and 
points of view. cl928. 150 W44 

WiCKHAM, Harvey. 

The misbehaviorists : pseudo-science and 
the modem temper. 1928. 150 W63 

RELIGION. 

Bacon, Benjamin Wisner. 

The story of Jesus and the beginnings 
of the church. cl927. 225 B12s 

Bate, Herbert Newell. 

History of the Church to A. D. 325. 
1905. (Oxford church text books) 

270.1 B32 

Bevan, Edwyn Robert, d Singer, Charles 
.Joseph, eds. 
The legacy of Israel. 1927. 296 B57 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CAXiIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



275 



Bible. Selections. English. 

The living Bible, being the whole Bible 
in its fewest words, edited by Bolton 
Hall. 1928. 220 B58h 

N. T. English. 



The twentieth century New Testament ; 

a translation into modem English 

made from the original Greek. cl904. 

225.52 B58we 



N. T. Portuguese and English. 

The New Testament. 1869. 225 B58 
Gift. 

Beown, William Adams. 

Beliefs that matter; a theology for lay- 
men. 1928. 239 B881 

Chalmers, Thomas. 

The works of Thomas Chalmers. 1833. 

252 C43 

Gift. 

Galarza, Ernest. 

The Roman Catholic church as a factor 
in the political and social history of 
Mexico. 1928. 282 G14 

Leonard, William EUery Channing. 
The poet of Galilee. 1909. 232 L58 

Macgowan, John. 

Infernal conference ; or. Dialogues of 
devils. 1916. 235 M14 

[Magnus, Laurie] 
Apella ; or, The future of the Jews, by 
a Quarterly reviewer. [1927] (To- 
day and to-morrow) 296 M199 

Mainage, Theodore. 

Principles of theosophy. [1927] 

212 M22 
Maegoliouth, David Samuel. 

Mohammedanism. [1911] (Home uni- 
versity library of modem knowledge) 
297 M32m 
Marshall, Charles Clinton. 

The Roman Catholic church in the 
modern state. 1928. 282 M36 



Neale, Ei'skine. 

The closing scene. 1850. 



211 N34 



Niebuhr, Reinhold. 

Does civilization need religion? 1927. 

201 N66 

Presbyterian church in the United 
States. 
The shorter catechism of the West- 
minster Assembly. cl852. 238 P92 



Reichelt, Karl Ludvig. 

Truth and tradition in Chinese Bud- 
dhism. 1927. 294 R34 

They believe, as told by Otis Skinner, 
Herbert Adams Gibbons, [& others}. 
cl928. 230 T42 

WiCHER, Edward Arthur. 

The Presbyterian church in California, 
1849-1927. c285.1 W63 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

Burke, Edmund. 

Conciliation with the colonies. In the 
reporting style of phonography. 1906. 
308 B95c 
Elliott, Harrison Sacket. 

The process of group thinking. 1928. 

301 E46 
Hamilton, Alexander. 

Hamiltonian principles. 1928. 

308 H21hp 
Hayne, Robert Young. 

Speech of Robert Y. Hayne. 1908. 

308 H42 
Jefferson, Thomas, pres. U. 8. 
Jeffersonian principles. 1928. 

308 J45j 
Ul'ianov, Vladimir H'ich. 
Materialism and empirio-criticism. 
cl927. 308 U39 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Becker, Carl Lotus. 

Our great experiment in democracy. 
[1927] 321.8 B39a 

Belmont, Perry. 

Political equality. 1927. 



322 B45 



Bbman, Lamar Taney, camp. 

Selected articles on intervention in 
Latin America. 1928. (The hand- 
book sei-ies) 327.73 B45 

Chatee, Zechariah. 

The inquiring mind. cl928. 323 C43 

Crawford, Finla Goff. 

Readings in American government. 
1927. 320.73 C89 

Edwards, Lyford Paterson. 

The natural history of revolution. 
cl927. (The University of Chicago 
sociological series) 323 E26 

[Gratacap, Louis Pope] 
Why the Democrats must go. 1914. 

320.73 G77 



276 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Kent, Frank Richardson. 

The Democratic party, a history. cl928. 

329.3 K37 
Lewis, Edward Rieman. 

America, nation or confusion ; a study 

of our immigration problems. 1928. 

325.73 L67 

Mtobbay, Gilbert. 

The foreign policy of Sir Edward Grey, 
1906-1915. 1915. 327.42 M982 

Myers, WUliam Starr. 

The Republican party, a history. cl928. 
329.6 M99 

Peeu. 

Arbitration between Peru and Chile. 
1925. 327.83 P47 

Ram, Vangala Shiva. 

Comparative colonial policy. 1926. 

325.3 R16 

Russell, John Andrew. 

The Germanic influence in the making 
of Michigan. 1927. 325.73 R96 

Swift, Lucius B. 

How we got our liberties. cl928. 

320 S97 
Underwood, Oscar Wilder. 

Drifting sands of party politics. cl928. 
320.73 U56 
Woods, Maurice Henry. 

A history of the Tory party in the sev- 
enteenth and eighteenth centuries, 
with a sketch of its development in 
the nineteenth century. [1924] 

329.9 W89 
WooFTEB, Thomas Jackson. 

Negro problems in cities. cl928. 

325.26 W91 

ECONOMICS. 

Amtorg trading corporation. 

Economic statistics of the Soviet union. 
1928. 330.947 A52 

Bush, Irving T. 

Working with the world. 1928. 

330.973 B97 

Chiu, Chang- Wei. 

The speaker of the House of repre- 
sentatives since 1896. 1828. ( Stud- 
ies in history, economics and public 
law, ed. by the Faculty of political 
science of Columbia university) 

330.5 C72 



Fisher, Ii-ving. 

A statistical method for measuring 

"marginal utility" and testing the 

justice of a progressive income tax. 

1927. 331 F53s 

Gift. 

George, Henry. 

Significant paragraphs from Henry 

George's Progress and poverty. 1928. 

330 G34si 

The home dressing of furs. cl922. 

338.1 H76 
Jones, Hugh. 

Modem Denmark, its social, economic 
and agricultural life. 1927. 

330,9489 J77 
Man, Henry de. 

The psychology of socialism. cl927. 

335 M26 
Mazur, Paul Myer. 

American prosperity, its causes and 
consequences. 1928. 

330.973 M47 

National industrial conference board. 
Employee stock purchase plans in the 
United States. 1928. (Studies in 
industrial relations) 331.1 N277 

Neaeing, Scott. 

Whither China ? An economic interpre- 
tation of recent events in the Far 
East. cl927. 330.951 N35 

PoLLAK prize essays. 

Criticisms of Profits, a book, by Wil- 
liam Trufant Foster and Waddill 
Catchings. Essays, by R. W. Souter, 
Frederick Law Olmsted [d others'}. 
1927. 331 P77 

Reynolds, George Greenwood. 

The distribution of power to regulate 
interstate carriers between the nation 
and the states. 1928. (Studies in 
history, economics and public law, 
ed. by the Faculty of political science 
of Columbia university) 330.5 C72 

Thorp, WHlard Long. 

Economic institutions. 1928. (The 
World today bookshelf) 330.973 T51 

TuAN, Mao-Lan. 

Simonde de Sismondi as an economist. 
1927. (Studies in history, eco- 
nomics, and public law, ed. by the 
Faculty of political science of Colum- 
bia university) 330.5 C72 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



277 



Weight, Philip Green. 

The tariff on animal and vegetable oils. 
1928. (The Institute of economics. 
Investigations in international com- 
mercial policies) 337 W95 

YtT, Tsune-Chi. 

The interpretation of treaties. 1927. 
( Studies in history, economics and 
public law, ed. by the Faculty of 
political science of Columbia univer- 
sity) 330.5 C72 

LABOR. 

Beman, Lamar Taney, comp. 

Five day week. 1928. (The reference 
shelf) 331.81 B45 

Gibbons, Charles E., <& Tuttle, Harvey N. 
School or work in Indiana? 1927. 

331.3 G44s 
H0TJGHTEI.ING, Leila. 

The income and standard of living of 
unskilled laborers in Chicago. cl927. 
(Social science studies, directed by 
the Local community research com- 
mittee of the University of Chicago) 
331.8 H83 

International labor conference, 9th, 

Geneva. 

Conference Internationale du travaU. 

International labour conference. 1926. 

q331.06 18 

Little, Esther Louise. 

Budgets of families and individuals of 
Kensington, Philadelphia. 1920. 

331.8 L778 
Sinclair, Uptorf. 

Letters to Judd, an American working- 
man. 331.1 S61 

BANKING. FINANCE. 

Cross, Ira Brown. 

Financing an empire ; history of bank- 
ing in California. 1927. 4 v. 

qc332.1 C9 
Davis, Andrew McFarland. 

Curious features of some of the early 
notes or bUls used as a circulating 
medium in Massachusetts. 1905. 

q332.5 D2 

Gekould, James Thayer, c§ Tumbull, 

Laura Shearer, comps. 

Selected articles on interallied debts 

and revision of the debt settlements. 

1928. (Handbook series) 336.4 G37 



Grayson, Theodore Julius. 

Investment trusts, their origin, develop- 
ment, and operation. 1928. 

332.6 G78 



LAW. ADMINISTRATION. 

Baxter, Garrett. 



Governmental administration. 



1927. 
353 835 



Burgess, John WUliam. 

The sanctity of law, wherein does it 
consist? cl927. 340 B955 

Grotitjs, Hugo. 

The most excellent Hugo Grotius, his 
three books treating of the rights of 
war & peace. 1682. vq341.3 G8 

Hughes, Charles Evans. 

The Supreme court of the United 
States; its foundation, methods and 
achievements. 1928. ( Columbia uni- 
versity lectures. George Blumenthal 
foundation) 347.99 H89 

JoHNSEN, Julia E., comp. 

Jury system. 1928. (The reference 
shelf) 340.4 J 65 

Lauterpacht, Hersh. 

Private law sources and analogies of 
international law (with special ref- 
erence to international arbitration). 
1927. (Contributions to interna- 
tional law and diplomacy) 341 L38 

U. S. Constitution. 

Constitution of the United States of 
America and amendments. 1922. 

342.73 U583 
Text in Spanish and English. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE. 

AzoY, A. C. M. 

The reserve officers' handbook. 1928. 

355 A996 

Ballard, George Alexander. 

Rulers of the Indian Ocean. 1928. 

359.09 818 

Doty, Bennett Jeffries. 

The legion of the damned. [1928] 

355 D72 

James, George Francis. 

Seven years of the C M T C. 1927. 

q355 J2 



278 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRAEIES. 



[July, 1928 



ASSOCIATIONS. INSTITUTIONS. 

Joint committee on negro child study in 
New York city. 
A study of delinquent and neglected 
negro children before the New York 
city Children's court. 1925. 

364.1 J74 
Lapp, John Augustus. 

Justice first. cl928. 361 L31 

La Sizeranne, Maurice de. 

The blind as seen through blind eyes. 
Authorized translation from the 2d 
French ed. by Park Lewis. 1893. 

362.4 L34 
McLean, Francis Herbert. 

The central council of social agencies. 
1920. 361 M16c 

Maxfield, Kathryn Erroll. 

The blind child and his reading. 1928. 

362.4 M46 

Mutual life insurance company of New 
York. 
Educational leaflets. Rev. December, 
1915. [1916] 368.3 M99 

Gift. 

National civic federation. Woman's 

dept. 

Study of a group of almshouses in 

Connecticut, New Jersey, New Y''ork 

and Pennsylvania. 1927. 362.5 N27 

RotJTZAHN, Mrs Mary Brayton (Swain), 
d Routzahn, Evart Grant. 
Publicity for social work. 1928. 

360 R88 

CRIME AND CRIMINALS. 

American prison association. Committee 
on lock-ups, municipal and county 
jails. 
United States prisoners in county jails. 
1926. (Russell Sage foundation, 
New York. Dept. of delinquency 
and penology) 365 A51 

ASHTON-WOLFE, H. 

Warped in the making ; crimes of love 
and hate. 1928. 364 A82 

Brasol, Boris Leo. 

The elements of crime (psycho-social 
interpretation). 1927. 364 B82 

Johnson, Fred Robert. 

Probation for juveniles and adults. 
el928. (The social workers' library) 

364 J 66 



Kavanagh, Marcus A. 

The criminal and his allies. cl928. 

364 K21 
^IcAdoo, William. 

The procession to Tybum. 1927. 

364 M113 
Stevens, C. L. McCluer. 

From clue to dock. 364 S84f 

Thompson, George. 

Prison life and reflections ; or, A nar- 
rative of the arrest, trial, conviction, 
imprisonment, treatment, observa- 
tions, reflections, and deliverance of 
Work, Burr, and Thompson. 1851. 

365 T47 
Gift. 

EDUCATION. 

Angell, Robert Cooley. 

The campus, a study of contemporary 
undergraduate life in the American 
university. 1928. 378 A58 

Briggs, Le Baron Russell. 

College life ; essays reprinted from 
"School, college, and character" and 
"Routine and ideals." cl904. 

378 B85 

Cleveland conference for educational 
cooperation. 
Report of the Committee on adult edu- 
cation. cl928. 370.1 C63 

Gift. 

Cobb, Stanwood. 

The new leaven ; progressive education 
and its effect upon the child and 
society. 1928. 370.1 C65 



Crawford, Nelson Antrim. 
A man of learning. 1928. 
A satire. 



378 C89 



DuNLAP, Boutwell. 

Sources of the history of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. 1922. c371.8 D92 

Gift. 

Engelhardt, Nickolaus Louis, d Engel- 
hardt, Fred. 
Public school business administration. 
1927. 371.2 E57 

Franklin institute, Philadelphia. 

Modern views of physical science. 1925. 
378.748 F Em 

Halle, Mrs Rita (Sulzbacher). 

Which college? 1928. 378 H18 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



279 



HoAG, Frank Victor. 

The church's unique opportunity in 
week-day religious education. 1927. 
(Hale memorial sermon) 377 H67 

Kelley, Ti-uman Lee. 

Interpretation of educational measure- 
ments. cl927. (Measurement and 
adjustment series) 371.2 K292 

LippMANN, Walter. 

American inquisitors ; a commentary on 
Dayton and Chicago. 1928. (Bar- 
bour-Page lectures, University of 
Virginia. 1928) 378.121 L76 

NOFFSINGEE, J. S. 

Home study blue book. 1928. 

374 N77h 

Gift. 

Roberts, Sydney Castle. 

The charm of Cambridge. 1927. 

q378.42 CEr 

Robertson, David Allan, ed. 

American universities and colleges. 
1928. 378.73 R64 



Rodger, Esca G. 
Careers. 1928. 



370.01 R69 



Spaxjlding, Francis Trow. 

The small junior high school ; a study 
of its possibilities and limitations. 
1927. (Harvard studies in educa- 
tion) 379,17 S73 

Steele, Robert McCurdy. 

A study of teacher training in Vermont. 

1926. (Teachers college, Columbia 
university. Contributions to educa- 
tion) 371.1 S81 

Symonds, Percival Mallon. 

Measurement in secondary education. 

1927. 371.2 S98 

T'ao Chih-hsing d Ch'eng Chi'i-pao. 
Education in China. 1925. 379.51 T17 

Thwing, Charles Franklin. 

The American and the German univer- 
sity ; one hundred years of history. 

1928. 378 T54am 

Worst, Edward Francis. * 

Coping saw work for elementary manual 
training. cl927. 371.4 W93c 

COMMUNICATION. 

Economic geography. 3 v. 1925-1927. 

q380.5 El 



Kennelly, Arthur Edwin. 

Vestiges of pre-meti-ic weights and 
measures persisting in metric-system 
Europe, 1926-1927. 1928. 389 K36 

Murray, Sir George Evelyn Pemberton. 
The Post office. [1927] (The White- 
hall series) 383 M98 

ToMLiNSON, Henry Major. 

The foreshore of England ; or, Under 
the red ensign. 387 T65 

Wilson, George Lloyd. 

Motor traffic management. 1928. (Ap- 
pleton's transportation series) 

388 W74 

CUSTOMS. FOLK LORE. WOMEN. 

Bader, Clarisse. 

Women in ancient India. 1925. (Trub- 
ner's oriental series) 396 B13 

Brace, A. J. 

Five hundred proverbs commonly used 
in West China. [1923] 398.9 B79 

Hathaway, Helen. 

Manners, American etiquette. cl928. 

395 H36 
Langdon-Davies, John. 

A short history of women. 1927. 

396 L27 

Whitney, Annie Weston, d Bullock, Aro- 

line Canfield, comps. 

Folk-lore from Maryland. 1925. 

(Memoirs of the American folk-lore 

society) q398 A5 v.18 

LAW. 

American digest. 

1926. Third decennial edition of the 
American digest. 1928. 3 v. 

Antigua. Laios, statutes, etc. 

The new edition of the statutes of the 
presidency of Antigua (Leeward 
Islands). 1921. 

Arnot, Hugo. 

A collection and abridgement of cele- 
brated cx*iminal trials in Scotland, 
from A. D. 1536, to 1784. 1785. 

B amber, p. Gordon. 

Report of mining cases decided by the 
Railway and canal commission court 
under the Mines (working facilities 
and support) Act, 1923. 1925. 



280 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Bab association of St. Louis. 

Walter Henry Sanborn ; a testimonial 
volume. 1927. 
Gift. 

Baetlett, Mrs Adelaide Blanche (de la 
Tremoille ) , defendant. 
Trial of Adelaide Bartlett. [1927] 

Bermuda Islands. Laws, statutes, etc. 
Acts of the legislature of the islands of 
Bermuda, 1690 to 1923. 1923. 2 v. 

Chronological table of 

Bermuda acts from 1690 to 1923. 
1923. 

Bermuda acts and re- 



solves. 1927. 

BiEKENHEAD, Frederick Edwin Smith, 
1st earl of. 
Famous trials of history. cl926. (The 
star series) 



BoNNEE, Robert Johnson. 
Lawyers and litigants 
Athens. cl927. 



in ancient 



Beyan, Robert T. 

An outline of Chinese civil law. 1927. 

BtTLLiTT, William Marshall. 
"Accidental means." 1927. 

Gift. 

California. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The code of civil procedure of the state 
of California, adopted March 11th, 
1872. 

Supplement to the Codes 



and General laws of the state of Cali- 
fornia of 1923, showing the changes 
affecting the Codes and the General 
laws by the legislatures of 1925 and 
1927. 

- — Railroad commission. 



Digest of decisions, vols. 1 to 29, 1912- 
1927. 

Calisse, Carlo. 

A history of Italian law. 1928. (The 
Continental legal history series) 

Campbell, John Campbell, 1st "baron. 
Atrocious judges. 1856. 
Gift. 

Canada. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The revised statutes of Canada, 1927. 
4 V. 



Cloutman, Brett Mackay. 

The law relating to authors and pub- 
lishers. 1927. 

Commercial law league journal, v. 32. 
1927. 

Connecticut bar journal, v. 1. 1927. 

Cuban society of international law. 
Statements and documents relative to 
the Isle of Pines treaty between the 
United States and Cuba. 1925. 

Dominion law reports. Annotations. 
Annotations consolidated from Dominion 
law reports. 1928. 2 v. 

Emden, Cecil Stuart. 

Principles of British constitutional law. 
[1925] 

Evans, William T. 

Rights of way across public land and 
reservations of the United States and 
Alaska. [cl926] 

Forensic fables, by O. 1926. 

Feicke, Charles Williams. 

Outlines of California criminal pro- 
cedure. 1926 & 1927 Supplement. 



Goitein, Hugh. 

The law as to c. 1. f. 



contracts. 1926. 



Gold Coast (Colony). Reports. 

Judgments of the FuU courts, 1920-25. 

Gt. Beit. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The laws of the kings of England from 
Edmund to Henry I, edited and 
translated by A. J. Robertson. 1925. 



Gbeen, Leon. 

Rationale of proximate cause. 



1927. 



Hawaiian Islands. Laws, 
Laws of the provisional j 
the Hawaiian Islands. 
Gift. 



statutes, etc. 
lovemment of 
1894. 



Hawaii. 


1895. 








Gift. 










Hewitson, T 










Suretyship, 


its origin 


and 


history 


in 


outline. 


1927. 









Hocking. William Ernest. 

Present status of the philosophy of law 
and of rights. 1926. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRAET. 



281 



Holds WORTH, William Searle. 

Some lessons from our legal history. 
1928. 



Sources and literature of English 

law. 1925. 

Iowa. Laws, statutes, etc. 
Code of Iowa, 1927. 

Irish Free States. Laws, statutes, etc. 
The public general acts passed by the 
Oireachtas of Saorstat Eireann. 
1922-26. 5 V. 

The Irish reports. 1923-27. 5 v. 

Japan. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The Japanese income-tax law. 1926. 

Kentucky. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Carroll's Civil and Criminal codes of 
practice of Kentucky. cl927. 

Laurel, Jose Paeiano. 

Local government in the Philippine 
. Islands. 1926. 

Lectures on legal topics, 1922-1923. 

1928. 

Leeward Islands. Laws, statutes, etc. 
The acts and ordinances of the colony 
of the Leeward Islands. 1927. 



Lineman, Mrs Mab Copland. 
Business and protective law. 



cl927. 



The law of common things in 

California. cl927. 

McKendrick, Archibald. 
Medico-legal injuries. 1927. 



McQuiLLiN, Eugene. 

The law of municipal corporations, 
ed. V. 1-2. 1928. 



2d 



Malay States, Federated. Laws, stat- 
utes, etc. 
The laws of the Federated Malay 
States, 1877-1920. 1921. 3 v. 

— Effect of enactments passed in 



1921-25 upon the Laws of the Fed- 
erated Malay States, 1877-1920. 
1922? 

Mississippi. Laws, statutes, etc. 

Annotated Missippi code, containing all 
general statutes of Mississippi in 
force January 1, 1927. 2 v. 



Montseerat. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The new edition of the statutes of the 
Presidency of Montserrat (Leeward 
Islands). 1921. 

Needham, Raymond Walter. 

Annual summary of tax cases. 1925- 
26. 3 V. 

New York (State). Laws, statutes, etc. 
Criminal law and practice of the state 
of New York. 11th ed. 1928. 

North, Nelson Luther, & Van Buren, De 
Witt. 
Real estate titles and conveyancing. 
1927. 

North Carolina. Laws, statutes, etc. 
The North Carolina code of 1927. 1928. 



Ontario. Laws, statutes, etc. 
The revised statutes of Ontario. 
3 V. 



1927. 



Otter, R. E., d McClure, G. B. 

The criminal justice act, 1925. 1926. 

Patterson, Edwin Wilhite. 

The insurance commissioner in the 
United States ; a study in adminis- 
trative law and practice. 1927. 
(Harvard studies in administrative 
law) 



Payler, Frederick. 

Law courts, lawyers 
[1926] 



and litigants. 



Robinson, Gleeson Edward. 

Public authorities and legal liabUity. 
1925. 

Rudolph, George Rupert. 

The York-Antwerp rules, their histoi-y 
and development, with comments on 
the rules of 1924. 

St. Lucia. Laws, statutes, etc. 

The revised ordinances of Saint Lucia, 
1916. 2 V. 

Salmond, Sir John William. 

Principles of the law of contracts. 
1927. 

Schechter, Frank Isaac. 

The historical foundations of the law 
relating to trade-marks. 1925. (Co- 
lumbia legal studies, edited by the 
Faculty of law of Columbia univer- 
sity) 



282 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Sen Gupta, Nares Chandra. 
The evolution of law. 1925. 

Shaw, Thomas Shaw, taron. 

The law of the kinsmen. [1923] 

Shuey, Joseph. 

The California law of conditional sales 
for the business man. 1927. 

Skidmobe, Walter A. 

The revised statutes of the United 
States relating to mineral lands and 
mining resources. 1875. 

Tbinidad and Tobago. Laws, statutes, 
etc. 
The laws of Trinidad and Tobago, con- 
taining the ordinances of the Colony 
in force on the 30th day of June, 
1925. rev. ed. 1925. 5 v. 

■ Ordinances passed by the 

Legislative council of Trinidad and 
Tobago. 1925-27. 3 v. 



Proclamations, orders ' in 

council, regulations, etc. 1926-27. 
2 V. 

WiLTSiE, Charles Hastings. 

A treatise on the law and practice of 
mortgage foreclosure on real prop- 
erty. 4th ed., rev. and enl. 1927. 
2 V. 

Wisconsin. Laws, statutes, etc. 
Wisconsin statutes, 1927 (9th ed.). 

Zane, John Maxcy. 

The story of law. 1928. 

Zanzibar. Courts. 

Law reiJorts containing cases deter- 
mined in the British consular court. 
1919. 

LANGUAGE. 

CosENZA. Mario Emilio. 

The study of Italian in the United 
States. 1924. 450.7 CSS 

De Selincouet, Basil. 

Pomona ; or. The future of English. 
cl928. (To-day and to-morrow 
series) 420.9 D45 

Francois, Victor Emmanuel. 

Advanced French prose composition. 
[1902] 44S FS2ad 

Gift. 



Harrison, Earl Stanley. 

An elementary Spanish reader. cl912. 

468 H31e 
Gift. 

Koren, WUliam. 

Exercises in French composition, for 
schools and colleges. 1909. 448 KS4 

Loiseaux, Louis Marie Auguste. 

An elementary grammar of the Spanish 
language. [1900] (The SUver series 
. of modern language text-books) 

465 L83 

Ramsey, Marathon Montrose. 

An elementary Spanish reader. 1900. 

468 R18 



A Spanish grammar, with exer- 
cises. 1902. 465 R1S 

NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL. 

American philosophical society, Phila- 
del;Jiia. 
Proceedings. 1894-1898. 3 v. 

506 A5123 

DOWSETT, J. F. 

Advanced constnictive geometry. 1927. 

515 N75 
Du ToiT, Alexander Logie. 

A geological comparison of South 
America with South Africa. 1927. 
(Carnegie institution of Washington. 
Publication) q558 D9 

Kellogg, Remington d others. 

Additions to the palaeontology of the 
Pacific coast and Great Basin regions 
of North America. 1927. (Con- 
tributions to palaeontology from the 
Carnegie institution of Washington) 
q560 K2p 
King, Edward Skinner. 

The pathfinder star maps. cl926. 

q523.8 K5 
Mitchell, Samuel Alfred. 

The recent total eclipse of the sun. 
1926. 523.7 M6Sr 

Slgsson, Edwin Emery. 

Snapshots of science. [1928] 504 S6Ss 

CHEMISTRY. PHYSICS. 

Armstrong, Heni-y Edward. 

Essays on the art and principles of 
chemistry. 1927. 540 A735 



Bray. Frederick. 
Light. [1927] 



535 B82 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



283 



Gerlach, Walther. 

Matter, electricity, energy ; the prin- 
ciples of modern atomistics and 
experimental results of atomic inves- 
tigation, translated from the 2d Ger- 
man ed. by Francis J. Fuchs. 1928. 
541.2 G37 
Rice, Francis Owen. 

The mechanism of homogeneous organic 
reactions from the physical-chemical 
standpoint. 1928. (American chem- 
ical society. Monograph series) 

547 R49 

AERONAUTICS. 

Brown, Cecil Leonard Morley. 

The conquest of the air; an historical 
survey. 1927. (The world's 
manuals) 533.6 B87 

Chambeblin, Clarence Duncan. 

Record flights. cl928. 533.6 C44 

Jacobs, Anne Marguerite. 

Knights of the wing. cl928. 533.6 J 17 

BIOLOGY. 

AXTENBTJEG, Edgar. 

How we inherit. cl928. 575.1 A46 

Btjechell, J. P. T., & Moir, J. Reid. 
The early Mousterian implements of 
Sligo, Ireland. 1928. q571 89 

Donne, Thomas Edward. 

The Maori past and present ; an 
account of a highly attractive, intel- 
ligent people. 1927. 572 D68 

LuTHEE BuRBANK society. 

Human plant improvement series, no. 
1-8. 1914-1915. C575.1 L97 



Murphy, John. 
Primitive man. 



1927. 



572 IVI978 



Peake, Harold John Edward, & Fleure, 
Herbert John. 
Peasants & potters. 1927. (The cor- 
ridors of time) 571 P35p 

Taylor, Thomas Griffith. 

Environment and race. 1927. 

572 T246 

BOTANY. ZOOLOGY. 

The Bonanist's manual, and woodland 
companion. 1843. 580 B74 



Gwynne-Vaughan, Dame Helen Char- 
lotte Isabella (Fraser), & Barnes, 
Bertie Frank. 
The structure & development of the 
Fungi. 1927. 589.2 G99 

Hodge, Albert Ernest. 

Tropical aquarium-fishes ; how to breed 
and rear them. 1927. 590.7 H68 

Hutchinson's animals of all countries. 
4 v. q590 H9 

Laufer, Berthold. 

The giraffe in history and art. 1928. 
(Field museum of natural history. 
Anthropology leaflet) 599 L37 

National geographic society, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
The book of wHd flowers. 1924. 

q581.973 N2 

ViSGER, Mrs Jean Allan (Pinder) Owen. 

The wild-fowl and sea-fowl of Great 

Britain. cl895. 598.2 V82 

Wheeler, William Morton. 

Foibles of insects and men. 1928. 

595.7 W56f 

USEFUL ARTS: GENERAL. 

Douglas, George Bruce. 

Ship model book. cl926. q623.8 D7 

Mays, Arthur Beverly. 

The problem of industrial education. 
cl927. (The Century education 
series) 607 M47 

The Rudder. 

How to design and construct a power 
boat. cl917. q623.8 R9h 

Wars how, Herman Thomas, ed. 

Representative industries in the United 
States. cl928. (American business 
series) 609 W29 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

American engineering councU. 
Safety and production. 1928. 

613.6 A512 
Cocks, Dorothy. 

The etiquette of beauty. cl927. 

613.4 C86 
HiscocK, Ira Vaughan. 

Community health organization. cl927. 
(American health congress series) 

614 H67 



284 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Kennedy, Foster, d Stevenson, Lewis 
Dunbar. 
Tour nerves and their control. 1928. 
(Appleton popular health series) 

616.8 K35 

Leeds, Lois, d Kaji, Hilda M. 

Beauty and health. 1927. 613.4 L48 

Montague, Joseph Franklin. 

Troubles we don't talk about! cl927. 

616.3 M75 
Mossell, Sadie Tanner. 

A study of the negro tuberculosis prob- 
lem in Philadelphia. 1923. 

q616.99 M9 
Nessleb, Charles. 

The story of hair; its purposes & its 
preservation. 1928. 613.4 N46 

Newsholme, Sir Arthur. 

Evolution of preventive medicine. 1927. 

614.4 N55 
SoiLAND, Albert. 

Cancer; a professional responsibility 
and a public liability. 1928. (Ap- 
pleton popular health series) 

616.99 S68 

Sullivan, William Charles. 

Crime and insanity. 1924. 616.84 S95 

Whitmoee, Eugene Rudolph. 

Keeping young after forty. 1928. 

613 W61 

ENGINEERING. 

Ehlebs, Victor Marcus. 

Municipal and rural sanitation. 1927. 

628 E33 

Gould, George Glen, d Gould, Mrs Flor- 
ence ( Holden ) . 
Period lighting fixtures. 1928. 

621.32 G69 
Highway research board. 

Proceedings of the . . . annual meetings. 
1925-26. 2 V. q625.7 H6 



KuNS, Ray F. 

Automotive essentials. 



cl928. 
625.6 K96aut 



Nicaragua canal construction company. 

The inter-oceanic canal of Nicaragua. 

1892. 626 N58 

Penman, David. 

The principles and practice of mine 
ventilation. 1927. 622.4 P41 



AGRICULTURE. 

Abercrombie, John. 

Every man his own gardener. 1813. 

635 A14 
Gift. 

Boyle, James Ernest. 

Fai-m relief; a brief on the McNary- 
Haugen plan. 1928. 630 B79f 

Business men's commission on agricul- 
ture. 
The condition of agriculture in the 
United States and measures for its 
improvement. 1927. 630 B97 

Dickson, Howard Knox. 

Practical horticulture for the Pacific 
slope. cl927. c634 D55 

3rnle, Rowland Edmund Prothero, baron. 
The land and its people. [1925] 

630.9 E71 
HuRD, Louis Merwin. 
Practical poultry-farming. 1928. (The 
rural science series) 636.5 H95 

International harvester company of 

America. Agricultural extension 

department Bulletins. 1916-1919. 

3 V. 630.7 1612 

Lawson, William. 

A new orchard & garden. 1927. 

v634 L42 
Mason, Albert Freeman. 

Spraying, dusting, and fumigating of 

plants. 1928. ( The rural manuals ) 

632 IV139 

FORESTRY. 

Forestry quarterly, v. 1-14 ; Oct. 1902- 



Dec. 1916. 
Gift. 



634.905 F71 



Society of American foresters, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Proceedings of the Society of American 
foresters. 1905-12. v. 1-7. 

634.906 S67 
Gift. 

ANIMALS. 

AsHBROOK, Frank Getz. 

Fur-farming for profit. 1928. (The 
rural science series) 636.9 A81 

Carter, William Giles Harding. 
The horses of the world. 1928. 

636.1 C32h 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



285 



Gates, 2Irs Georgina Ida (Stickland). 
The modern cat: her mind & manners. 
1928. 636.8 G25 



Geeenbueg, Grayce. 
The dachshund. 1927. 



636.7 G79 



Judy, William Lewis. 

Training the dog. 1927. 636.7 J93t 

Kleinheinz, Frank. 

Sheep management, breeds and judging. 
6th ed. 1927. 636.3 K64al 

Whitfoed, Caleb Bailey. 

Training the bird dog. cl928. 

636,7 W59 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Aldeidge, Nellie. 

The Nellie Aldridge National orange 
show cook book. 1928. c641 A36 

Barton, Mrs Florence Gibson. 

The California orange cook book. 1928. 

c641 B29 
Gold, MoUie. 

The book of green vegetables. 1928. 

641 G61 

GuNN, Mrs LUian Miranda. 

Table service and decoration. cl928. 
(Lippincott's unit texts) 643 G97 

Hawcock, Emory. 

Salads and sandwiches and specialty 
dishes for restaurants and tea rooms. 
1928. 641 H38 

NoETHWEST conference on child health 
and parent education, 1st, Minneap- 
olis, 1927. Parent education. cl927. 
649 N87 

PRINTING. PUBLISHING. 

Book club of California. 

The Book club of California : its pur- 
poses, membership and list of publi- 
cations. 1928. qc655.06 87 

Gift. 

McMuETEiE, Douglas Crawford. 

The golden book ; the story of fine books 
and bookmaking— past & present. 
1927. 655.1 M16 

Rollins, Carl Purington. 

B. R., America's typographic playboy. 
1927. V655.4 R75 

5 — 60773 



BUSINESS METHODS. 

Baxter, William J. 

Chain store distribution and manage- 
ment. 1928. 658 B35 

Beenaed, Alfred Duncan. 

Some principles and problems of real 
estate valuation. cl913. 658 B51 

(Beittain, W. G. 

Typewriting, a practical manual based 
upon the principles of rhythm and 
touch. 1925. 652 B86 

Dickinson, Howard Williams. 

Primer of promotion. 1928. 659 D55 

How to systematize the day's work. 

9th rev. ed. 1911. 658 H84tsy 



TIPPEE, Harry, d ot 

The principles of advertising. cl925. 

659 T59a 
Weight, Harold Emerson. 

The financing of automobile installment 
sales. 1927. 658.8 W94 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

Barey, T. Hedley, d others. 

The chemistry of the natural & syn- 
thetic resias. 1926. (OH & colour 
chemistry monographs) 668.4 B28 

Butlee, Joseph Green. 

Fifty years of iron and steel. 1922. 

669.1 B98 
Clemen, Rudolf Alexander. 

By-products in the packing industry. 
[1927] 664.9 C62b 

Elsdon, George Davidson. 

The chemistry and examination of edi- 
ble oils and fats, their substitutes and 
adulterants. 1926. 665 E49 

International institute of agriculture. 
Bureau of statistics. 
Oleaginous products and vegetable oils. 
1923. 665.3 161 

Smith, Ernest Ellsworth. 

Aluminum compounds in food. 1928. 

664.6 S64 

MANUFACTURES. 

Knowlton, Jay F. 

Knives, how to make them in the 
school forge shop. (Industrial-arts 
brochures) 672 K73 

Gift. 



286 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Todd, John Alton, ed. 

The cotton world ; a survey of the 
world's cotton supplies and consump- 
tion. 1927. 677 T63 



WooDHOUSE, Thomas. 
Artificial silk, its 
uses. 1927. 



manufacture and 
677 W88ar 



FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

American federation of arts. 

Art in our country, handbook. [1927] 
r709.73 A512 

BossEBT, Helmuth Theodor. 
Peasant art in Europe. 1927. 

f709.4 B7 

CoMMEBCiAX art. (New series) 1926-27. 
3 V. q705 C73 

Van Dyke, John Charles. 

Florence, critical notes on the galleries 
of the Uffizi, the Pitti, and the 
Academy. 1927. (New guides to 
old masters) 708.5 V24f 

GARDENING. 

Bailey, Liberty Hyde. 

The garden lover. 1928. (The Back- 
ground books) 716 B15gl 

Ely, Helena Rutherfurd. 

The practical flower garden. cl928. 

716 E52p 

Fox, Mrs Helen (Morgenthau). 

Garden Cinderellas. 1928. 716 F79 

McIlvaine, Frances Edge. 

Spring in the little garden. 1928. 
(The little garden series) 716 Ml 52 

VoLZ, Emil Conrad. 

Home flower-growing. 1928. (The 
rural science series) 716 V94 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Atkinson, Robert. 

Theory and elements of architecture. 
[1926] q720 A8 

Byne, Arthur, d Byne, Mrs Mildred 
(Stapley). 
Majorcan hovses and gardens. 1928. 

f720.946 B9m 

Edgell, George Harold. 

The American architecture of to-day. 
1928. 720.973 E23 



Keyser, Charles Edward. 

A list of Norman tympana and lintels 
with figure or symbolical sculpture 
still or till recently existing in the 
churches of Great Britain. 1927. 

q721.8 K4 
Kimball, Sidney Fiske. 

American architecture. cl928. 

720.973 K49 
Tallmadge, Thomas Eddy. 

The stoi*y of architecture in America. 
cl927. 720.973 T14 

DRAWING. DECORATION. DESIGN. 

Dennison manufacturing co. 

How to decorate halls, booths and auto- 
mobiles. 2d ed. cl927. 740 D41 

Lowndes, William Shepherd. 

Builders' blueprints, how to read them. 
1924. 744 L919 

LuTZ, Edwin George. 

Practical pen drawing. 1928. 

741 L97pp 
JNIoRRis, William. 

Some hints on pattern-designing. 1899. 

v745 M87 

FURNITURE. 

Eberlein, Harold Donaldson, d Ramsdell, 
Roger Weame. 
The practical book of Italian, Spanish, 
and Portuguese furniture. 1927. 
( Lippincott's practical books for the 
enrichment of home life) 749 E16p 

Guild, Lurelle Van Arsdale. 

The geography of American antiques, 
text and illustrations. 1927. 

q749 G9 

Modern furniture designs, adapted from 
the English periods. 1922. 

q749 M68 
Percival, Maclver. 

The walnut collector. 1927. 749 P42w 

PAINTING AND PAINTERS. 

Bodkin, Thomas. 

The approach to painting. [1927] 

750 866 

Borenius, Tancred, d Tristram, E. W. 

English medieval painting. cl927. 

q759.2 873 
Ferguson, John Calvin. 

Chinese painting. cl927. q759.91 F3 



vol. 23, no. 3 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



287 



Galerien Thannhauser. 
Claude Monet. [192S] 
Gift. 



Olcott, Virginia. 
759.4 M74g Household plays for young people. 
1928. 793.2 043ho 



KiTTON, Frederick George. 

John Leech, artist and humourist : a 
biographical sketch. 1883. 

759.2 L48 

Gift. 

PoLUNiN, Vladimir. 

The continental method of scene paint- 
ing. 1927. q759 P7 

Russell, Archibald George Blomefield. 
Drawings by Guercino. 1923. 

q759.5 B2 

Vollaed, Ambroise. 

Degas, an intimate portrait. cl927. 

759.4 D31 

ENGRAVING. 

Russell, Charles E. 

English mezzotint portraits and their 
states from the invention of mezzo- 
tinting until the early part of the 
19th century. 1926. 2 v. f766 R9 

Van Dyke. John Charles. 

The Rembrandt drawings and etchings. 
1927. q769 R38v 

Wilkinson, C. A. 

Plain and coloured, a book of wood- 
cuts. [1923] vq769 W6 

THEATRE. AMATEUR 
THEATRICALS. 

Cheney, Sheldon. 

Stage decoration. 1928. 792 C51s 

Cuddy, Mrs Lucy A., d others. 

Columbus. 1927. (The land of make- 
believe series of plays for children) 

793.2 C96 

Joseph, Leon Edward. 

The widow of Naphtali. 1927. (French's 
international copyrighted edition of 
the works of the best authors) 

793 J 832 

Maekham, Harold. 

The amateur theatrical handbook ; a 
guide to the amateur production of 
plays. 1927. 793 M34 

NicoLL, AUardyce. 

The development of the theater, a study 
of theatrical art. 1927. q792 N6 



Stoddaed, Anne. 

A book of marionette plays. cl927. 

792 S86 

MUSIC AND MUSICIANS. 

[BoBiLLiEE, Marie] 
Haydn. 1926. 780.2 H415b 

Caruso, Mrs Dorothy (Benjamin). 
Wings of song. 1928. 780.2 C32c 

Chaepentiee, Gustave. 

Louise ; musical romance in four acts 
and seven scenes. cl907. 

q782.4 C4a 
Debussy, Achille Claude. 

Monsieur Croche the dilettante hater. 
[1927] 780.4 D28 

Dibdin, Charles. 

The sea songs of Charles Dibdin. 1823. 

q784.8 D5 
Dbessee, Paul. 

The songs of Paul Dresser. 1927. 

q784.4 D7 
Grove, Sir George, ed. 

Grove's dictionary of music and musi- 
cians. 3d ed., edited by H. G. Colles. 
1927-28. 5 V. r780.3 G88c 

Hudson, Octavia. 

Down the line of centuries. cl918. 

q780.9 H8 
Isaacson, Charles David. 

The simple story of music. 1928. 

780.4 173 

Meilhac, Henri, d Gille, PhUippe fimUe 
Frangois. 
Manon. q782.4 M5 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. 

The king's henchman, lyric drama in 
three acts. [1927] q782.1 T2 

Russell, Charles Edward. 

The American orchestra and Theodore 
Thomas. 1927. 785 R96 

Schumann, Eugenie. 

The Schumanns and Johannes Brahms. 
1927. 780.2 S3922 

SousA, John Philip. 

Marching along; recollections of men, 
women and music. 1928. 780.2 S72 



288 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Stanley-Beown, Katharine. 

The song book of the American spirit. 
1927. 784.8 S78 

Steaxjss, Richard. 

Correspondence between Richard 
Strauss and Hugo von Hofmannsthal, 
1907-1918. 1927. 780.2 S912 

Sullivan, John William Navin. 

Beethoven ; his spiritual development. 
[1927] 780.2 B41su 

Turner, Walter James. 

Beethoven ; the search for reality. 
1927. 780.2 B41tu 



Wette, Mrs Adelheid. 

Hansel and Gretel. 1905. 



q782.3 W5 



AMUSEMENTS. 

Alekhin, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich. 
My best games of chess, 1908-1923. 
[1927] 794 A36 



Caerington, Hereward. 
Magic for every one. 1927. 



791 C31m 



Collins, Archie Frederick. 

Boys' and girls' book of indoor games. 
1928. 793 C71b 

Dennison manufacturing company. 
Patriotic decorations and suggestions. 

793 D41p 
MoTT- Smith, Geoffrey. 

Contract bridge and advanced auction 
bidding. 1927. 795 M92 

Reith, George. 

The art of successful bidding ; a com- 
plete analysis of auction bridge bid- 
ding strategy. 1928. 795 R37 

Whitehead, Wilbur Cherrier. 

Whitehead's auction bridge for begin- 
ners. 1928. 795 W59wa 

RECREATION. 

Hyslop, Theophilus Bulkeley. 
Mental handicaps in golf. 1927. 

796.35 H99 
Martin, John William. 

My fishing days and fishing V7ays. 
[1906] 799.1 M38 

Roosevelt, Theodore. 

Hunting adventures in the West. 1927. 

799 R78hu 

"Reissue of 'Hunting- trips of a 
ranchman,' 'The wilderness hunter.' " 



Sheringham, Hugh Tempert. 
Coarse fishing. 1912. 

Wheeley, Charles H. 
Coarse fish. 1897. 
library) 



799.1 S55 

(The anglers' 
799.1 W56 



Wills, Helen. 
Tennis. 1928. 



C796.34 W74 



LITERATURE. 

Adams, Edward C. L. 

Congaree sketches. 1927. 818 A211 

Andrews, William. 

Literary byways. 1898. 820.9 A57 

Armstrong, Martin Donisthorpe. 
Laughing ; an essay. 1928. (The pleas- 
ures of life series) 824 A73 

AusLANDER, Joseph, d Hill, Frank 
Ernest. 
The winged horse. 1927. 809.1 A93 



Baird, Henry. 
Letters & poems. 



1902. 



821 B16 



Bekker, Willem Gerard. 

An historical and critical review of 

Samuel Butler's literary works. 1925 ? 

827 B982b 

Bevan, Edwyn Robert, comp. 

Later Greek religion. 1927. (The 
library of Greek thought) 888 B57 



Booth, George Gough. 
Cranbrook tales. 1902. 



v813 B72 



Boufflers, Stanislas Jean de, marquis. 
The queen of Golconda, and other tales. 

1926. (XVin Century French 
romances) v843 B75 

Bradford, Gamaliel. 

The haunted biographer; diaglogues of 
the dead. 1928. (University of 
Washington chapbooks) 814 B79 

Burke, Thomas, ed. 

The book of the inn, being two hundred 
pictures of the English inn from the 
earliest times to the coming of the 
railway hotel. 1927. 820.8 B95 

Chesterton, Gilbert Keith. 

Robert Louis Stevenson. [1927] 

828 S84zch 
Cruse, Amy. 

The shaping of English literature. 

1927. 820.9 C95s 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



289 



Davis, Sir John Francis, 1st hart. 

Chinese novels. 1822. 895 D26 

Davison, Edward Lewis. 

Some modem poets and other critical 
essays. 1928. 821.09 D26 

Diderot, Denis. 

Rameau's nephew and other works. 
1926. (XVIII Century French 
romances) v843 D55 

DowDEN, Edward. 
Shakespeare. 1878. 
primers ) 
Gift. 

Dudley, Louise. 

The study of literature 



(Literature 
822.33 Ddal 



cl928. 



801 D84 

Firkins, Ina Ten Eyck, comp. 

Index to plays, 1800-1926. 1927. 

rq808.21 F5 
France, Anatole. 

Prefaces, introductions, and other un- 
collected papers, translated by J. 
Lewis May. [1927] 844 F81p 

Frank, Tenney. 

Catullus and Horace ; two poets in their 
environment. cl928. 874 F82 

Fromaget, Nicolas. 

The prophet's cousin (Le cousin de 
mahomet). 1926. (XVIII Century 
French romances) v843 F931 

Geijerstam, Gustaf af. 

Woman power. 1927. (Scandinavian 
classics) 839.73 G31w 

Giles, Herbert Allen, tr. 

Gems of Chinese literature. 1923. 2 v. 

895 G47g 

• — — — Quips from a Chinese jest-book. 
1925. 895 G47q 

Gosse, Sir Edmund William. 

Leaves and fruit. 1927. 824 G67 

Guerin, Georges Maurice de. 

The centaur, The bacchante. [1899] 

v843 G932 
Harper, George McLean. 

Spirit of delight. cl928. 804 H29s 
Contents : Coleridge's conversation 
poems. — Eugenie de Guerin and Dor- 
othy Wordsworth. — Did Wordsworth 
defy the guillotine? — Hardy, Hudson, 
Houseman. — Matthew Arnold and the 
Zeitgeist. — MycenEe. — Mars' Hill and 
the Parthenon. — Vino di Orvieto. — 
Two old fogies in Holland. — If Dante 
were alive. — A lesson from Dante. 



Hope, Edward. 

Alice in the Delighted States. 1928. 

817 H79 
HuTTON, Maurice. 

Many minds. [1927] 824 H985 

Huxley, Aldous Leonard. 

Proper studies. 1927. 824 H9861p 

James, Henry. 

Essays in London and elsewhere. 1893. 

824 J27e 
Johnson, James Sydney. 

Studies in sombre. 1928. c814 J67 



Landauer, Bella C, comp. 
Printers' mottoes. 1926. 



vq828 L25 



Larsen, Hanna Astrup, ed. 

Told in Norway. 1927. ( Scandinavian 
classics) 839.83 L334 

Logan, John Daniel, dc French, Donald 
Graham. 
Highways of Canadian literature. 
[1928] 820.9 L83 

Macdonell, Arthur Anthony. 

India's past ; a survey of her literatures, 
religions, languages and antiquities. 
1927. 891.2 M13i 

]\Iackenzie, Agnes Mure. 

The playgoer's handbook to the English 
renaissance drama. [1927] 

822.09 Ml 5 

Maclean, Catharine Macdonald. 

Dorothy and William Wordsworth. 
1927. 821 W92zma 

Masson, Thomas Lansing. 

In tune with the finite. cl928. 

814 M421i 

MiCHAUD, Regis. 

The American novel to-day ; a social 
and psychological study. 1928. 

813.01 M62a 

Michel, Gustav. 

Aeh Michel ; dumb waiter's ostracism 
and horoscope. c817 M62 

Gift. 

Nathan, George Jean. 
Art of the night. 1928. 



814 N27ar 



NicoLSON, Hon Harold George. 

Some people. [1927] 824 N65 



Phillpotts, Eden. 

The girl and the faun. cl917. 



vq823 P5 



290 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Plato. 

Plato's symposium ; or, Supper, newly 
translated by Francis Birrell & Shane 
Leslie. v888 P71sb 

Plutaechus d Basilius, Saint, the Great. 
Essays on the study and use of poetry. 
1902. (Yale studies in English) 

808.1 P73 
Gift. 

PoNSONBY, Arthur Augustus William 
Harry. 
More English diaries. [1927] 

820.9 P79m 

Scottish and Irish diaries from 



the sixteenth to the nineteenth cen- 
tury. [1927] 820.9 P79s 

[Pye, Henry James] 
The Democrat ; or. Intrigues and ad- 
ventures of Jean le Noir. 1795. 

823 P995 
Robertson, John George. 

Goethe. 1927. (The republic of let- 
ters) 832.62 Br 

ScnwABZ, Henry Stanley. 

Alexandre Dumas, fils, dramatist. 1927. 
842 D88zs 
Shakespeare, William. 

The works of William Shakespeare. 
1857. 822.33 Js2 

Gift. 

Shepard, OdeU, d HiUyer, Robert Silli- 
man, eds. 
Essays of today (192&-1927). cl928. 
814.08 S54a 

Shillaber, Benjamin Penhallow. 

Life and sayings of Mrs Partington. 
1854. 817 S55 

Smith, Paul Jordan. 

A key to the Ulysses of James Joyce. 
1927. 823 J89zs 



Teollope, Anthony. 

London tradesmen. 1927. 



v824 T84 



Wendell, Barrett. 

English composition, eight lectures 
given at the Lowell institute. 1891. 
808 W46 
Whlpple, Thomas King. 

Spokesmen, modern writers and Ameri- 
can life. 1928. 810.9 W57 



WooLLCOTT, Alexander. 
Going to pieces. 1928. 



POETRY. 

Arnstein, Flora J. 

A legacy of hours. 1927. 



c811 A76 



Bartlett, Mrs Ruth Fitch, ed. 

Anthology of Junior league poetry. 

1927. 811.08 B29 

Bland, Henry Meade. 

California ; a song of the ultimate West. 
cl926. c811 B64c 

;Bodenheim, Maxwell. 

The king of Spain ; a book of poems. 

1928. 811 B66k 

Briggs, Wallace Alvin, comp. 

Great poems of the English language. 
1927. C808.1 B85a 

Byron, George Gordon Noel Byron. 
The works of Lord Byron : embracing 
his suppressed poems, and a sketch 
of his life. New ed. 1857. 

821 B99w1 
Gift. 

Calkins, Clinch. 

Poems. 1928. 811 C15 

Campion, Thomas. 

Fifty songs. [1896] v821 C19 

[Chapman, Mrs Maria (Weston)], comp. 
Songs of the free, and hymns of Chris- 
tian freedom. 1836. 811.08 C46 



814 W91 



Davies, Mary Carolyn. 
Penny show. cl927. 



811 D256p 



Dozier, Orion Theophilus. 

Poems and prose of Orion T. Dozier. 
5th ed. 1927. 811 D755 

Gift. 

Evans, Abbie Huston. 

Outcrop. 1928. 811 E923 



Frost, Robert. 

North of Boston. [1914] 



c811 F93 



Fugitives, an anthology of verse. cl928. 

811.08 F95 
Gabvin, John William, ed. 
Canadian poets. cl926. 

821.08 G24a 
GuE, Belle Willey. 

Songs and sonnets of the sea. cl927. 

c811 G92s 

Hemans, Mrs Felicia Dorothea (Browne). 

The poetical works. Complete in one 

volume. With a memoir, by Mrs 

L. H. Sigoumey. 1857. 821 H48p2 

Gift. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



291 



HiGGINS, F. R. 

The dark breed. 



1927. 



HiLLYEK, Robert Silliman. 
The seventh hill. 1928. 



821 H636 



811 H655s 



HoFFEN STEIN, Samuel. 

Poems in praise of practically nothing. 
cl928. 811 H69 

HOMEKUS. 

The Iliad of Homer. 1928. vq883 H7ih 

-ToHNSON, James Sydney. 

The centaur, Everue, and other poems. 

1927. c811 J67 

Jones, "Tad." 

When the Santa Clara ran red. 

c811 J79 
Kipling, Rudyard. 

Rudyard Kipling's verse. Inclusive ed., 
1885-1926. 1927. 821 K57r1 

Markham, Edwin. 

The book of poetry, collected from the 
whole field of British and American 
poetry. 1927. 811.08 M34 

Maevell, Andrew. 

The poems & letters, ed. by H. M. Mar- 
goliouth. 1927. 2 v. 821 M391 

Maynard, Theodore. 

Exile, and other poems. 1928. 

821 M47 
Miller, Mary Britton. 

Songs of infancy, and other poems. 

1928. 811 M6491 



O'Sheel, Shaemas. 

Jealous of dead leaves. 



1928. 



811 0824 



Ott, Maud (Brown), "Mrs Christian 
Ott." 
The hermit of Echo Lake. cl927. 

c811 089 

Rhys, Mrs Grace (Little). 
A Celtic anthology. [1927] 

821.08 R479c 

Ritter, Margaret Tod. 

Wind out of Betelgeuse. 1928. 

811 R615w 
Rose, Milton S. 

Poems. 1928. 811 R79 

Sackville-West, Hon Victoria Mary. 
The land. 1927. 821 S1213 



Scott, Sir Walter, iart. 

Ballads and lyrical pieces. 1806. 

v821 S43 
Shelley, Percy Bysshe. 

The poetical works of Percy Bysshe 
Shelley. 1895. 3 v. v821 S54p 

SiTWELL, Sacheverell. 

The cyder feast and other poems. 1927. 

821 S623c 
Smith, Alexander. 

Poems. 1854. 821 S64p 

Gift. 

Stevenson, Henry V. 

Purple stains. 1928. 811 S84 

Underwood, EIrs Edna (Worthley), tr. 

Three Chinese masterpieces. 1927. 

895.1 U56 
Untermeyee, Louis. 

Burning bush. 1928. 811 U61b 

Vaughan, Henry. 

Vaughan's Sacred poems, being a selec- 
tion. [1897] v821 V36 

Wells, John Daniel. 

Swazy folks and others ; poems. [1908] 

811 W454 
Wilson, Bingham Thoburn. 

The hypocrite. cl907. c811 W74 

Wiseman, Ada Potter. 

The call of the woods. 1927. 

c811 W814 

DRAMA. 

Basshe, Emanuel Jo. 

Earth ; a play in seven scenes. cl927. 

812 B31 

Bennett, Arnold, d Knoblock, Edward. 
Mr Prohack ; a comedy in three acts. 
1928. 822 B471m 

Campbell, Kane. 

The enchanted April ; a comedy in a 
prologue and three acts, adapted from 
Elizabeth's novel of the same name. 
cl927. (French's standard library 
edition) 812 C18 

Chesterton, Gilbert Keith. 

The judgement of Dr Johnson ; a 
comedy in three acts. [1927] (The 
reader's theatre) 822 C52j 

Cohen, Lester. 

Oscar Wilde ; a play. 1928. 

812 C6782 



292 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Connelly, Marcus Cook. 

The wisdom tooth ; a fantastic comedy 
in three acts. cl927. (French's 
standard library edition) 812 C752 

Copy, 1928. Four full length plays, 
selected by Hatcher Hughes, [<& 
others}. 810.8 C78 

Green, Paul. 

In the valley, and other Carolina plays. 
1928. 812 G797i 

GuE, Belle WiUey. 

Washington, the statesman. 1928. 

c812 G92w 

Jonson, Ben. 

Ben Jonson's Volpone. 1928. 

822 J81v1 

Keith, Robert. 

The tightwad ; a comedy in three acts. 
1927. (Longman's play series) 

812 K28 

Kelly, George Edward. 
Behold, the bridegroom. 



1928. 



812 K29b 

KuRATA, Hyakuzo. 

The priest and his disciples, a play. 
1927. 895.2 K96 

Peabody. Josephine Preston. 

The collected plays of Josephine Preston 
Peabody. 1927. 812 P35co 

Pier, Garrett Chatfield. 
The jeweled tree ; an Egyptian dramatic 
phantasy. 1927. 812 P61 

Royde-Smith, Naomi Gwladys. 

A balcony, a play in three acts. 1928. 
(Contemporary British dramatists) 

822 R88 

Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Butler. 
The duenna. 1925. vq822 S5d 

CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

Atkins, Elizabeth Howard. 

The treasure chest of the Medranos. 
1927. cA873 

Gregory. Jackson. 

Emerald trails. 1928. cG822em 

Kellogg, Mary Frances. 

Trails of adventure. cl927. cK293 

Marmur, Jacland. 

Ecola! 1928. cM352 



Moon, Mrs Grace Purdie. 

Chi-Wee and Loki of the desert. 1926. 

cM818 
Gift. 

Nakagawa, Karl S. 

The rendezvous of mysteries. cl928. 

cN163 
Gift. 

Ryan, Don. 

Angel's flight. 1927. cR988 

Gift. 

Satjber, Halbert H. 

Adventures of a tenderfoot. 1899. 

cS255 
Small, Sidney Herschel. 

The splendid Califomians. cl928. 

cS635sp 
TuTTLE, Wilbur C. 

Tlie Morgan trail. 1928. cT967m 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

AiKMAN, Duncan. 

Calamity Jane and the lady wildcats. 
cl927. 920.7 A29 

Carswell, Donald. 

Brother Scots. 1927. 920.041 C32 

Contents : Henry Drummond : a 
mystery. — "Smith o' Aiberdeen." — 
John Stuart Blackie. — Keir Hardie. — ■ 
Lord Overtoun. — "Claudius Clear" 
[Sir William Robertson Nicoll]. 

Gibson, Charles Robert. 

Heroes of the scientific world. 1921. 

925 G44 
Gilpin, William. 

The lives of John Wiclilf, and of the 
most eminent of his disciples. 1914. 
922 G48 
Gift. 

Lanman, Charles. 

Biographical annals of the civil govern- 
ment of the United States. 2d ed. 
Rev., enl. 1887. q920.07 L2a 

LiDDELL Hart, Basil Henry. 

Great captains unveiled. 1928. 

923.5 L71 

Contents : Jeng-hiz Khan and Sabu- 
tai. — Marechal de Saxe — m i 1 i t a r y 
prophet. — Gustavus Adolphus — 
founder of modern war. — Wallenstein 
— the enigma of history. — General 
Wolfe — g randsire of the United 
States. 1727-1927. 

— Reputations, ten years after. 1928. 

923.5 L71r 
Contents : Marshal Joffre. — Erich 
von Falkenhayn. — Marshal Gallieni. — 
Haig of Bemersyde. — Ferdinand Foch. 
— Erich Ludendorff. — Petain. — Alien- 
by of Megiddo. — Hunter Liggett. — 
"Black Jack" Pershing. 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



293 



Livingston, John. 

Portraits of eminent Americans now 
living. 1854. 920.07 L78 

Maguiee, Yvonne. 

The women of the Medici. 1927. 

920.7 M21 
Martin, Hugh. ed. 

Christian social reformers of the nine- 
teenth century. 1927. 923.6 M38 

Overton, Grant Martin. 

The women who make our novels. Rev. 
ed. 1928. 928.1 096a 

Parton, James. 

Triumphs of enteiTrise, ingenuity, and 
public spirit. 1871. 920.07 P27t 

Gift. 
Rogers, Cameron. 

Gallant ladies. cl928. 920.7 R72 

Seitz, Don Carlos. 

The "also rans" ; gi'eat men who missed 

making the presidential goal? cl928. 

923.2 S46 

Shaw, Charles Green. 

The low-down. cl928. 920.07 S53 

TiiOiiAS, Harvey. 

The signers of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, [pref. 1923] 923.2 T45 

.. Who's who in occultism, new thought, 
H psychism and spiritualism. cl927. 
K r 920.9 W62 

P BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 
Alger. Mayes, Herbert R. 

Alger; a biography without a hero. 
1928. B A395m 

Banks. Banks, Elizabeth L. 

The remaking of an American. 1928. 

B B2183 
Barrie. Moult, Thomas. 

Barrie. 1928. B B2755m 

Baynes. Gorges, Raymond. 

Ernest Harold Baynes, naturalist and 
ei-usader. 1928. B B3613g 

Bronte. Dimnet, Ernest. 

The Bronte sisters. [1927] B B869d 

Chekhov. Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich. 
Anton Tchekhov, literary and theatrical 
reminiscences. 1927. B C5152k1 

Dickens. Dickens, Charles. 

The unpublished letters of Charles 
Dickens to Mark Lemon, ed. by 
Walter Dexter. 1927. vqB D548 



Du Barry. [Lamothe-Langon, fitienne 
Leon, haron de] 
Memoirs of the Comtesse Du BaiTy, 
with minute details of her entire 
career as favorite of Louis XV. 
[1903] B D813I 

Fallotvs. Fallows, Alice Katharine. 
Everybody's bishop, being the life and 
times of the Right Reverend Samual 
Fallows. cl927. B F1963f 

Fletcher. Fletcher, Daniel Cooledge. 
Reminiscences of California and the 
civU war. 1894. cB F612 

Francesco d' Assisi, Saint. Salvatoeelli, 
Luigi. 
The life of St. Francis of Assisi, trans- 
lated from the Italian by Eric Sutton. 
1928. B F815sa 

Fremont. Nevins, Allan. 

Fremont, the West's greatest adven- 
turer. 1928. cB F8723n 

Garrison. 

Proceedings at the public breakfast held 
in honor of William Lloyd Garrison. 
1868. B G2426p 

Godwin. Godwin, William. 

Memoirs of Mary Wollstonecraft. 1927. 

B G592g 

Gould. Waeshow, Robert Irving. 

Jay Gould; the story of a fortune. 
el928. B G697w 



Ranks. Hanks, N. C. 
Up from the hiUs. cl921. 



B H2413 



Hearst. Jones, William Carey. 

Mrs Phoebe Apperson Hearst. 1899. 

qcB H436J 
Hill. Sullivan, Oscar M. 

The empire-builder; a biographical 
novel of the life of James J. Hill. 
[1928] B H646s 

Hone. Hone, Philip. 

The diary of PhHip Hone, 1828-1851. 

1927. 2 V. B H772n 

Hoover. Irwin, William Henry. 

Herbert Hoover, a reminiscent biog- 
raphy. 1928. cB H789i 

Houston. Creel, George. 

Sam Houston, colossus in buckskin. 

1928. B H843c 



294 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Jackson. Tate, Allen. 

Stonewall Jackson, the good soldier. 
1928. B J14t 

Jeanne d'Arc, Saint. MoNAHAN, Michael. 

My Jeanne d'Arc; her wonderful storj' 

in the light of recent researches. 

cl928. B J43m 

Johnson. Winston, Robert Watson. 
Andrew Johnson, plebian and patriot. 
cl928. B J66w 

King. Hubbard, Elbert. 

Little journeys to the homes of eminent 
orators; King. 1903. cB K543h 

Lafayette. Deltell, Joseph. 

Lafayette, translated by Jacques Le 
Clercq. 1928. B L161d 



Sedgwick, Henry Dwight. 

La Fayette. cl928. B L161se 

Leirun. Lebbun, Mme. Marie Louise 
f:lisabeth (Vigee). 
Memoirs. 1927. B L454s 

Leverhulme. [Leverhulme, William 
Hulme Lever, 2d viscount'] 
Viscount Leverhulme, by his son. [1927] 

B L6613I 

Lincoln. Barton, WiUiam Eleazar. 
Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman. 
cl928. B L736baw5 

Locke d Clarke. LoCKE, John, & Clarke, 
Edward. 
The correspondence of John Locke and 
Edward Clarke. 1927. B L814 

Machiavelli. Pbezzolini, Giuseppe. 
Nicolo Machiavelli, the Florentine. 1928. 
B M1498p 

Markham. Majbkham, M. E., & Mark- 
ham, Florence A. 
The life of Sir Albert Hastings Mark- 
ham. 1927. B M 3451m 

Mawson. Mawson, Thomas Hayton. 
The life & work of an English land- 
scape architect. An autobiography. 
[1927] B M462 

Merimee. Johnstone, George Harcourt. 

Prosper Merimee ; a mask and a face. 

[1926] B IVI561J 

Mitchell. The Clubwoman, & others. 
Biographical notices and articles on 
Ruth Comfort MitcheU. 1927. 

qcB M682c 



Montagu. Barry, Iris. 

Portrait of Lady Mary Wortley Mon- 
tagu. [1928] B M7585ba 

Mussolini. Bordeux, Vahdah Jeanne. 
Benito Mussolini — the man. [1927] 

B M98g4b 

■ FiORi, Vittorio E. de. 

Mussolini, the man of destiny. cl928. 

B M9894f 

Napoleon I. Aretz. Fran Gertrude 
( Kuntze-Dolton ) . 
Napoleon and his women friends. 1927. 

B N216ar 

Nieriker. Ticknor, Caroline. 
May Alcott; a memoir. 1928. 

B N675t 

NorthcUffe. Wilson, Robert McNair. 
Lord NorthcUffe, a study. 1927. 

B N873w 

Page. Hendrick, Burton Jesse. 

The training of an American ; the 
earlier life and letters of Walter H. 
Page. 1928. B P1331h1 

Piozzi. Merritt, Edward Percival. 

The ti'ue story of the so-called love 
letters of Mrs Piozzi, "in defence of 
an elderly lady." 1927. B P663m 

Prudden. 

Biographical sketches and letters of T. 
Mitchell Prudden. 1927. B P971 

Rodman. Rodman, Hugh. 

Yarns of a Kentucky admiral. cl928. 

B R693 

Rosslyn. Rosslyn, James Francis Harry 
St. Clair-Erskine, 5th earl of. 
My gamble with life. cl928. B R836 

Scott. Scott, Hugh Lenox. 

Some memories of a soldier. 1928. 

B S426 
Sedley. Pinto, Vivian de Sola. 

Sir Charles Sedley, 1639-1701 ; a study 
in the life and literature of the resto- 
ration. 1927. B S449p 

Sheridan. Sheridan, Mrs Clare Consuelo 
( Frewen ) . 
Naked truth. 1928. B S5521 

Sinnoza. [Lucas, Jean Maximilien] 
The oldest biography of Spinoza. [1927] 

B S758I 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



295 



Sterne. Sterne, Laurence. 

The letters of Laurence Sterne. [1927] 

B S839 

Stevens. Tuknbull, Archibald Douglas. 

John Stevens, an American record. 

cl928. B S8444t 

Urianov. Fulop-Millee, Rene. 
Lenin and Gandhi. cl927. B U39f 

Wallett. Waixett, William Frederick. 
The public life of W. F. Wallett. 1870. 

cB W198 
Walpole. DoBSON, Austin. 

Horace Walpole, a memoir, with an 
appendix of books printed at the 
Strawberry hill press. 4th ed., rev. 
and enl. 1927. B W218d1 

Washington. Washington, George, pres. 
U. S. 
Washington speaks for himself. 1927. 
B W318os 

Welster. Lanman, Charles. 

The private life of Daniel Webster. 
1852. B W378la 

Wesley. Eayes, George. 
John Wesley, Christian philosopher and 
church founder. [1926] B W51le 

Wilson. Baker, Ray Stannard. 

Woodrow Wilson ; life and letters, v. 1. 
1927. B W754b1 

Young. TouNG, Samuel Hall. 

Hall Young of Alaska, "The mushing 
parson." cl927. B Y76 

ARCHAEOLOGY. 

Baikie, James. 

The glamour of Near East excavation. 
1927. 913 B15 

Davidson, D., d Aldersmith, Herbert. 
The Great pyramid, its divine message. 
V. 1- 1927. q913.32 D2 

Spinden, Herbert Joseph. 
Ancient civilizations of Mexico and Cen- 
tral America. 1922. (American 
museum of natural history. Hand- 
book series no. 3 (2d and rev. ed.) ) 
913.72 S75 

VOYAGES AND TRAVEL. 

[BoRLASE, William Copeland] 

Sunways : a record of rambles in many 
lands. 1878. 910 B73 



COBHAM, Sir Alan John. 

My flight to the Cape and back. 1926. 

910 C65 

Darwin, Sir Francis Sacheverell. 

Travels in Spain and the East, 1808- 
1810. 1927. 910 D22 

FoLLETT, Barbara Newhall. 

The voyage of the Norman D., as told 
by the cabin-boy. 1928. 910 F66 

Johnson, Capt. Charles. 

A general history of the robberies and 
murders of the most notorious pirates 
from their first rise and settlement in 
the island of Providence to the pres- 
ent year. 1926. q910.4 J6 

Sceibner's magazine. 

Scribner's magazine handbook of travel. 

910 S43 

Wycherley, George. 

Buccaneers of the Pacific. cl928. 

910.4 W97 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
EUROPE, 

Belloc, Hilaire. 

Towns of destiny, illustrated by Ed- 
mond L. Warre. 1927. 914 B44t 

Cargo, Francis. 

The last Bohemia. 1928, 914,43 C26 

Cox, Samuel Sullivan. 

Diversions of a diplomat in Turkey. 
1887. 914.96 C87 

Gift. 

Danton, George Henry. 

Germany ten years after. 1928. 

914,3 D19 

Desmond, Shaw. 

London nights in the gay nineties. 
1928. 914.21 D46 

Frantzius, Friedrich Wilhelm von. 
The book of truth and facts. German 
culture, English culture, American 
culture. 5th ed. enl. 1916. 

914.3 F83b 

Graham, Stephen. 

London nights (a series of studies and 

sketches of London at night) [1925] 

914.21 G74 



Great western railway. 
Holiday haunts. 1924. 



914.2 G78 



296 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Hopkins, Robert Thurston. 

Old English mills and inns. [1927] 

914.2 H7950 

Jones, Henry Festing. 

Mount Eryx and other diversions of 
travel. [1921] 914.5 J77 

Laughlin, Clara Elizabeth. 

So you're going to Rome ! 1928. 

914.5 L37s 

Lynch, John GUbert Bohun. 

The Italian Riviera ; its scenei*y, cus- 
toms and food. [1927] (The kitbag 
travel books) 914.5 L98 

Mansfield, Milburg Francisco. 

The spell of Brittany, by Francis Mil- 
toun Ipseud.] [1927] (The speU 
series) 914.41 M28 

[Maeston, Edward] 
Dove Dale revisited with other holiday 
sketches. 1920. 914.2 M37 

MiCHAXJD, Regis, c6 Mariaoni, Antonio. 
France ; tableau de civilisation fran- 
eaise. 1928. 914.4 M622 

Nevill, Ralph Henry. 

Days and nights in Montmartre and the 
Latin quarter. [1927] 914.43 N52 

Nevinson, Henry Woodd, <£• Carmichael. 
Montgomery. 
Sketches on the old road through 
France to Florence. 1927. 914 N52 

Newbigin, Alice M. S. 

A wayfarer in Spain. [1926] 

914.6 N53 



Peers, Edgar Allison. 
Santander. 1928. 



914.6 P375s 



Rayner, Robert Macey. 

Nineteenth century England, a political 
and social history. 1927. 914.2 R27 

Shelley, Heni-y Charles. 

The spell of old Paris. [1927] (The 
spell series) 914.43 S54a 

Ware, John N. 

The familiar guide to Paris. 1928. 

914.43 W26f 

Way, Thomas Robert. 

Ancient royal palaces in and near Lon- 
don. 1902. q914.21 W3 



ASIA. 

DiGBY, George Bassett. 

Tigers, gold, and witch-doctors. cl928. 

915.7 D57 

Elliott, Richard Maurice. 

The sunny side of Asia. [1928] 

915 E46 

Harrison, Mrs Marguerite Elton 
(Baker). 
Asia reborn. 1928. 915 H321 

MiLLABD, Thomas Franklin Fairfax. 
China, where it is today and why. 
cl928. 915.1 M64 

MOBAND, Paul. 

Nothing but the earth. 1927. 

915 M82a 

MuKEBJi, Dhan Gopal. 

A son of Mother India answers. 1928. 
915.4 M95 

PiCKTHALL, Marmaduke William. 

Oriental encounters, Palestine & Syria, 
1894-1896. 1927. 915.69 P59 

Ranga Iyek, C. S. 

Father India ; a reply to Mother India. 
[1928] 915.4 R19 

Rihani, Ameen. 

Maker of modern Arabia. 1928. 

915.3 R57 

Seabrook, William Buehler. 

Adventures in Arabia among the 
Bedouins, Druses, whirling dei*\'ishes, 
& Yezidee devil worshipers. cl927. 

915.3 S43 

Sitwell, Mrs Constance. 

Flowers and elephants. [1927] 

915.4 S623 

Wood, Junius Boyd. 

Incredible Siberia. 1928. 915.7 W87 

AFRICA. SOUTH AMERICA. 

Buell, Raymond Leslie. 

The native problem in Africa. 1928. 

916 B92 

Cardinal, Allan Wolsey. 

In Ashanti & beyond. 1927. 916.6 C26 

Foster, Harry La Tourette. 

If you go to South America. 1928. 

918 F75i 

Jenkins, James Francis. 

Tambo. 1928. 918.5 J52 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



297 



Johnson, Mai-tin Elmer. 

Safari ; a saga of the African blue. 
1928. 916.7 J68s 

Vernon, Madeleine. 

Sands, palms and minarets. [1927] 

916.5 V54 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Alfonso, Manuel F., c6 Valera Mar- 
tinez, T. 
Cuba before the world. 1915. 

917.291 A38 
Black, William Harman. 

The real North America pocket guide 

book. 1926. ("Black's blue books") 

917 B62 

Beown, Henry Collins. 

In the golden nineties. 1928. (Valen- 
tine's manual, 1928) 917.471 V15 

Burpee, Lawrence Johnstone. 

On the old Athabaska trail. [1927] 

917.12 B96 

GUEDALLA, Philip. 

Conquistador, American fantasia. 1928. 

917.3 G92 
Jenness, Diamond. 

The people of the twilight. 1928. 

917.12 J54 

.Jones, Howard Mumford. 

America and French culture, 1750- 
1848. 1927. 917.3 J773 

Meez, Charles. 
The great American band wagon. 1928. 
917.3 M577 
Nevins, Allan. 

The emergence of modem America, 
1865-1878. 1927. (A history of 
American life) 917.3 H67 

O'Kane, Walter Collins. 

Trails and summits of the Adirondacks. 
1928. (The Riverside outdoor hand- 
books) 917.47 041 

Parkman, Francis. 

The California and Oregon trail. 1849. 
C917.8 P24a 
Shaep, Dallas Lore. 
. The better country. 1928. 917.3 S531 

Smith, Jedediah Strong. 
Letter from Jedediah Smith to Gen. 
Wm. Clark, July 12, 1827. 1927. 

C917.8 S65 



OCEANICA. POLAR REGIONS. 

Ban NEE, Hubert Stewart. 

Romantic Java as it was & is. 1927. 

919.22 B21 
Hall, James Norman. 

Mid-Pacific. 1928. 919.6 H17m 

POORTENAAR, Jan. 

An artist in the tropics. q919.2 P8 

Voyage of H. M. S. Blonde to the Sand- 
wich Islands in the years 1824-1825. 
1926. q919.69 V9 

WoESLEY, Frank Arthur. 

Under sail in the frozen North. [1927] 
919.8 W93 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Adams, Henry. 

The tendency of history. 1928. 

904 A213 
Belloc, Hilaire. 

Mr Belloc still objects to Mr Well's 
"Outline of history." 1926. 

909 W45zb1 
Dixon, Roland Burrage. 

The building of cultures. 1928. 

901 D62 
OsBOEN, Edward Bolland. 

The middle ages. 1928. (Doran's 
modem readers' bookshelf) 901 081 

Paesons, Geoffrey. 

The stream of history. 1928. 909 P26 

Sanderson, Edgar [<£ others]. 

The world's history and its makers. 
1901-02. 10 V. 909 S21 

Gift. 

Smith, Grafton Elliot [<£ others]. 

Culture, the diffusion controversy. 1927. 
(The new science series) 901 S64c 

ANCIENT. 

[AiMERY DE Pieeeeboueg, Marguerite 
(Thomas-Galline), taronne] 
The life and death of Cleopatra. 1924. 

932 A29 
Glovee, Terrot Reaveley. 

Democracy in the ancient world. 1927. 

930 G56 
Hendeeson, Bernard William. 
Five Roman emperors. 1927. 

937.06 H49f 
Taen, William Woodthorpe. 

Hellenistic civilisation. 1927. 938 T18 



298 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Thaddeus, Victor. 

Julius Caesar & the grandeur that was 
Rome. 1927. 937 T36 

EUROPE. 

Balasheva, Mania Grigor'evna (Kanta- 
kuzen ) . 
The transplanting, a narrative from the 
letters of Marie Balascheff, a Russian 
refugee in France, edited by Martha 
Genung Stearns. 1928. 944 B17 

The Crusades and other historical essays, 
edited by Louis J. Paetow. 1928. 

940.4 C95 
Fisher, Harold Henry. 

America and the new Poland. 1928. 

943.8 F53 
FiTZPATBiCK, Benedict. 

Ireland and the foundations of Europe. 
1927. 941.5 F55i 

Franz Joseph I, emperor of Austria. 
Franz Joseph as revealed by his letters. 
[1927] 943.6 F83 

Keroubec, Yvonne, marquise de, pseud. 
The memoirs of the Marquise de Kerou- 
bec ( 1785-1858 ) , being extracts from 
her diaries. [1926] 944.04 K39 

Latude, Jean Henri Masers de, d Lin- 

guet, Simon Nicolas Henri. 

Memoirs of the BastiUe. 1927. (The 

Broadway library of XVIII century 

French literature) 944.03 L36 

Lee, Ivy Ledbetter. 

Present-day Russia. 1928. 947.08 L47 

Mattct.atr, Camille. 
Florence. 1927. 

Miller, William. 
Greece. 1928. 



945.5 M44 



949.5 M65g 

Paliei, Ol'ga Valerianovna (Karnovich) 
kniaginia. 
Memories of Russia, 1916-1919. 1924. 
947.08 P16 
Quisley, Hugh. 

The land of the Rhone, Lyons and 
Provence. [1927] 944.9 Q6 

Walsh, Edmund Aloysius. 

The fall of the Russian empire. 1928. 
947.08 W22 

Weigall, Arthur Edwai'd Pearse Brome. 

Wanderings in Anglo-Saxon Britain. 

[1927] 942.01 W41 



WiEL, Hon Alethea Jane (Lawley). 

Two doges of Venice; being a slight 

sketch of the lives and times of 

Tomaso Mocenigo and Francesco 

Foscari. 1891. 945.3 W64t 

NORTH AMERICA. 
BucKNALL, Mary E. 

Early days. c979.4 B92 

Clark, George Rogers. 

The capture of old Vincennes. cl927. 

973.3 C59 
CoRTi, Egon Caesar, conte. 

Maximilian and Charlotte of Mexico. 
1928. 972 C829 

Davis, H. P. 

Black democracy ; the story of Haiti. 
1928. 972.94 D26 

Gray, John Chipman. 

War letters, 1862^1865. 1927. 

973.78 G77 
Hitchcock, Henry. 

Marching with Sherman. 1927. 

973.78 H67 
Long, James Thomas. 

Gettysbui'g : how the battle was fought. 
1891. 973.73 L84 

Macy", William Francis. 

The story of old Nantucket. 1928. 

974.41 Ml 7 
Massey, Vincent. 

The making of a nation. 1928. 

971 M41 
Masters, R. S. 

An historical review of the East Bay 
exchange. 1927. c979.465 M42 

jNIinnigerode, Meade. 

Presidential years, 1787-1860. 1928. 

973 M66 
NiCKERSON, Hoffman. 

The turning point of the revolution. 
1928. 973.3 N63 

NoGALES Y Mendez, Rafael de. 
The looting of Nicaragua. 1928. 

972.85 N77 
Stark, Charles Rathbone. 
Groton, Conn., 1705. 1922. 

974.65 G88s 
Thompson, J. Eric. 

The civilization of the Mayas. 1927. 
( [Field museum of natural history] 
Anthropology leaflet) 972 T47 



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299 



Vandercook, John Womack. 

Black majesty, the life of Christophe, 
king of Haiti. 1928. 972.94 V23 

INDIANS. 

FiNLEY, James Bradley. 

Life among the Indians. 1857. 

970.1 F51 

Lefoege, Thomas H. 

Memoirs of a white Crow Indian. 
[1928] 970.2 L49 

Radin, Paul. 

The story of the American Indian. 
cl927. 970.1 R12 

Watson, Heni-y Clay. 

Nights in a block-house ; or, Sketches 
of border life. 1852. 970.1 W33 

ASIA. AFRICA. 

Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand. 
Young India, 1924-1926. 1927. 

954 G19a 

O'Leaby, De Lacy Evans. 

Arabia before Muhammad. 1927. 
(Trubner's oriental series) 953 045 

Walker, Eric Anderson. 

A history of South Africa. 1928. 

968 W17 

Weatherhead, H. T. C. 

Short chapters of African history. 
[1927] 960 W36 

Young, George. 

Egypt. 1927. (The modem world. 
[A survey of historical forces] ) 

962 Y72 

YouNGHUSBAND, Sir Francis Edward. ' 

The light of experience ; a review of 

some men and events of my time. 

1927. 954 Y78I 

SOUTH AMERICA. OCEANICA. 

Kinney, W. A. 

Hawaii's capacity for self-government 
all but destroyed. cl927. 996.9 K55 

Marais, Johannes Stephanus. 

The colonisation of New Zealand. 1927. 
993.1 M29 

WiLGTJS, Alva Curtis. 

An outline of Hispanic American his- 
tory. 1927. 980 W67 



EUROPEAN WAR. 

Allen, Herbert Warner. 

Our Italian front. 1920. 940.945 A42 

Bergmann, Karl. 

The history of reparations. 1927. 

q940.98 B4 
Gibbons, Floyd Phillips. 

The Red knight of Germany ; the story 
of Baron von Richthofen, Gennany's 
great war bird. 1927. 940.933 G44 

Graves, Robert. 

Lawrence and the Arabian adventure. 
1928. 940.953 G77 

Jacks, Leo Vincent. 

Service record, by an artilleryman. 
1928. 940.935 J 12 

LiCHTENBERGER, Henri. 

Relations between France and Ger- 
many. 1923. (Publications of the 
Carnegie endowment for international 
peace. Division of intercourse and 
education) 940.98 L69 

Pen pictures of British battles, painted 
by author and artist. 1917. 

940.942 P39 
[PoLiAKOPF, Vladimir] 
Peace in Europe. [1927] 940.98 P76 

Powell, Edward Alexander. 

Embattled borders; eastern Europe 
from the Balkans to the Baltic. 
[1928] 940.98 P88 

Rooseivelt, Theodore. 

Rank and file ; true stories of the great 
war. 1928. 940.935 R78r 

Russia (1918- (R. S. F. S. R.) ) Nar- 
odmyi komissariat po inostrannym 
delam. 
How the war began in 1914, being the 
diary of the Russian Foreign office 
from the 3d to the 20th (old style) 
of July, 1914. [1925] 940.92 R969 

Van Every, Dale. 

The A. E. F. in battle. 1928. 

940.973 V25 
GERMAN. 

Aereboe, Friedrich. 

Der einfluss des krieges auf die land- 
wirtschaftliche produktion in Deutch- 
land. 1927. ([Carnegie endowment 
for international peace. Division of 
economics and history] Wirtschafts- 
und sozialgeschichte des weltkrieges. 
Deutsche serie) 330.943 A25 



300 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. 



[July, 1928 



Barsch, Rudolf Hans. 
Historchen. 1926. 



833 B29h 



Baujigaeten, Otto [c6 others]. 

Geistige und sittliche wirkungen des 
krieges in Deutschland. 1927. ([Car- 
negie endowment for international 
peace. Division of economics and 
history] Wirtschafts- und sozialge- 
schiehte des weltkrieges. Deutsche 
serie) 940.943 B34 

Bergnek, Heinrich. 

Handbuch der kirchlichen kunstalter- 
tiimer in Deutschland. 1905. 

q246 B4 
Bible. German. 

Biblia, das ist : die ganze Heilige 
Schrift, Alten und Neuen Testaments. 
1877. q220.53 85 

Bible. N. T. German and English. 
Das Neue Testament Unsers Herm und 
Heilandes Jesu Christi. 1868. 

225.58 B58a 
Bode, Rudolf. 
Ausdrucksgymnastik. 1922. q613.7 B6 

BoHATTA, Hanns. 

Einfiihrung in die buchkunde. [1927] 

010 B67 
Brockhaus, Heinrich. 

Die kunst in den Athos-klostem. 1924. 
q709.495 B8 
Bltrgkiiaie, Hans. 

Hans Burgkmair des jiingeren Tumier- 
buch von 1529. 1910. f394.7 B9 



DosiiNiK, Hans. 
. Atlantis. cl925. 



833 D67 



Einstein, Carl. 

Die Kunst des 20. Jahrhunderts. 1926. 

q709 E3 
Fechteb, Paul. 

Der ruck im fahrstuhl. 1927. 833 F29 

Fedebeb, Heinrich. 

Papst und Kaiser im Dorf. 1924. 

833 F293 

Haas, Rudolf. 

Die drei Kuppelpelze, des Kriminal- 
rates. 1927. 833 H11 



Hadina, Emil. 

Madame Lucifer. 1926. 



833 H12 



Hauptmann, Gerhart Johann Robert. 
Rose Bemd ; Schauspiel in fiinf akten. 
1903. 832 H37r 



Schluck und Jau. 1900. 

832 H37sc 
Herzog, Rudolf. 

Das fahnlein der versprengten. 3926. 

833 H58f 



Hesse, Herman. 

Der steppenwolf. cl927. 



833 H587s 



Hohlbaum, Robert. 

Die Pfingsten von Weimar. 1926. 

833 H71 
John, Eugenie. 

Das Haideprinzesschen. 1878. 

833 J 65 
LoTZ, Walther. 

Die Deutsche Staatsfinanzwirtschaft im 
Kriege. 1927. ( [Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history] 
Wirtschafts- und sozialgeschichte des 
weltkrieges. Deutsche serie) 

336.43 L88 

HuNDERT jahre bilder aus der geschichte 
der Stadt Ziirich in der zeit von, 
1814^-1914 . . . 1914-1915. 2 v. 

q949.4 H9 

Moleschott, Jacob. 

Der kreislauf des lebens. 1852. 

Renkeb, Gustav Friedrich. 
Der see. 1926. 

Schaffneb, Jakob. 

Das grosse erlebnis. cl9 

ScHNiTZLER, Arthur. 
Spiel im Morgengrauen. 

ScHOLZ, Wilhelm von. 
- Perpetua. 1927. 

Seidel, Willy. 

Schattenpuppen, ein roman aus Java. 
1927. 833 S458 

Seler, Eduard. 

Gesammelte abhandlungen zur ameri- 
kanischen sprachund alterthums- 
kunde. 1902-23. 5 v. q9 13.72 S4 

Skalweit, August Karl Friedrich. 
Die deutsche kriegemahrungswirtschaft. 
1927. ( [Carnegie endowment for in- 
ternational peace. Division of eco- 
nomics and history] Wirtschafts- 
und sozialgeschichte des weltkrieges. 
Deutsche serie) 330.943 S62 



540 


M71 


833 


R41 


26. 833 


S29 


cl927. 




833 


S36s 


833 


S368 



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301 



Die staatsverwaltung der besetzten 
gebiete. 1927. ( [Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history] 
Wirtschafts- und sozialgeschichte des 
weltkrieges. Deutsche serie) 

330.943 S77 

Uebelhob, Max. 

Die tanzerin von Es-Scham. 1927. 

833 U22 

Ulbich Zwingli. Zum gedachtnis der 
Zurcher reformation 1519-1919. 1919. 
q270.6 U4 
Umbeeit, Paul. 

Der krieg und die arbeitsverhaltnisse, 
die deutschen gewerkschaften im 
kriege. 1928. ( [Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history] 
Wirtschafts- und sozialgeschichte des 
weltkrieges. Deutsche serie) 

330.943 U49 

FRENCH. 

L'Art et les artistes. 1905-1914. t. 1-18. 

q705 A78ar 
Balzac, Honore de. 

La muse du departement. 1924. (Le 
livre de lettrg) 843 B19mu 



Baudelaire, Charles Pierre. 
Les fleurs du mal. 1920. 



qv841 B3 



CoQUiOT, Gustave. 

Vagabondages a travers la peinture et 
les paysages,,les betes et les hommes. 
cl921. v844 C78 

Daemon, J. E. 

Dictionnaire des peintres miniaturistes 
sur velin, parchemin, ivoire et 
ecaille. 757 D22 

Derennes, Charles. 

Le bestiaire sentimental : La chauve- 
souris. cl922. 599.4 D43a 

Dietterlin, Wendel. 

Le livre de I'architecture. 1862. 

f729.3 D5 
Dimier, Louis. 

Histoire de la peinture francaise des 
origines au retour de Vouet, 1300 k 
1627. 1925. q759.4 D58 

Histoire de la peinture francaise 

du retour de Vouet a la mort de 
Lebrun, 1627-1690. 1926. 2 v. 

q759.4 D58a 
Du Bellay, Joachim. 

Oeuvres choisies de Joachim Du Bellay. 
1894. q841 D8 

DuPUis, Ai-istide. 

Plantes agricoles et foresti§res. 2 v. 

q581.6 D9 

Dupuis, Aristide, d Herincq, Francois. 
Vegetaux d'omement. 2 v. q716 D9 

Eschelier, Raymond. 

Delacroix, peintre, graveur, ecrivain. 
1926-27. 2 V. q759.4 D3e 



France, Anatole. 
Thais. cl923. 



843 F81t 



Blondeau, Nicolas. 

Dictionnaire erotique latin-franc ais. 
1885. v176 B65 

Blum, Andre. 

Les origines de la gravure en France. 
V. 1. 1927. q760 B65 

Briere-Misme, Clotilde. 

La peinture hoUandaise. 1927. (Bib- 
lioth&que d'histoire de I'art) 

q759.9 B85 

Chaumeton, Francois Pierre, d others. 

Flore medicale. 1814-1820. 8 v. 

581 C49 
Chenu, Jean Charles. 

Recueil de coquilles. 1841. f594 C5r 

Clouzot, Henri. 

Dictionnaire des miniaturistes sur 

email. cl924. (Archives de I'ama- 

teur) 757 C64 

Colas, Rene. Hsi Yuen. 

Le style gothique en France. 1926. Galerie des femmes vertueuses de la 

q723.5 eel Chine. 1924. 920.7 H873 

6 — 60773 



Grillet, Laurent. 

Les ancestres du violon et du violon- 
celle. 1901. q787 G8 

GuiBERT, Joseph. 

Le Cabinet des estampes de la Biblio- 
th§que nationale. 1926. q769 G9 

Hariot, Paul. 

Le livre d'or des roses. [1903] 

q716.2 H2 
HOIJER, Olof. 

Le trafic de I'opium et d'autres stupefi- 
ants. 1925. q 178.8 H7 



302 



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[July, 1928 



Inteenational geological congress. 13th, 

Brussels. 

Comptes rendus de la XIII^ session, en 

Belgique, 1922. fasc. 1-3. 1924-26. 

q550.3 16 

Jacobus de Varagine, aip. of Genoa. 
Les plus belles fleurs de la legende 
doree. 1920. 922.1 J17p 

Johnson, Daniel, pseud.l 

La comedie politique en Europe. 1880. 
940.9 J 662 
JoLY, Charles. 

Note sur les orangeries et les irriga- 
tions de Blidah. 1887. 634.3 J75 

KJEECHOVE DE Denteeghem, Charles, 
eomte de. 
L'industrie beige pendant I'occupation 
allemande, 1914r-1918. [1927] ([Car- 
negie endowment for international 
peace. Division of economics and 
history] Histoire economique & 
sociale de la guerre mondiale . . . 
Serie beige) q330.9493 K3 

La Fayette, Marie Madeleine (Pioche de 
La Vergne), comtesse de. 
La princesse de Cleves. 1927. ( Oxford 
university press, 1927) 843 L161 

Langenhove, Femand van. 

L' action du gouvemement beige en 
matiere economique pendant la 
guerre. [1927] ([Carnegie endow- 
ment for international peace. Divi- 
sion of economics and history] His- 
toire economique & sociale de la 
guerre mondiale . . . Serie beige) 

q949.3 L2 

Lasteybie du Satllant, Robert Charles, 
comte de. 
L'architecture religieuse en France a 
I'epoque gothique. 1926. q726 L3 

LiBUBE, J. 

La gravure dans le livre et Tomement. 
1927. (La gravure en France au 
XVI^ sigde) q760 L7 

Le livre francais des origines a la fin du 
second empire. 1924. q655.53 L7 

RLalotet, a. 

La dentelle a valenciennes. 1927. 

q746 M2 
Maserell, Frans. 

Idee, sa naissance, sa vie, sa mort. 
1920. 761 M39 



Munich. Pinatothek, Alte. 

Catalogue des tableaux de la Pina- 
cotheque royale a Munich. 1864. 

708.3 M96 
Papin, Henri. 

Les etapes de la chanson, v. 1. 1898. 

809.1 P21 

Peaey, Mrs Josephine (Diebitsch). 
La snow baby. 1927. 919.8 P362s 

PiTON, Camille. 

Le costume civil en France du XIII^ 
au XIX^ siecle. 1926. q391 P68 

Raunie, fimile, ed. 

Chansonnier historique du XVIII® 
siecle, pub. avec introduction, com- 
mentaire, notes et index. 1879-84. 
10 V. 841.08 R24 

Reau, Louis. 

Histoire de la peinture franSaise au 
XVIII'= siecle. 1925-26. 2 v. 

q759.4 R2 
Renan, Ernest. 

Les apotres. cl866. 225.9 R39a 

Vie de Jesus. [1892] 232 R39a 



La Revue du droit. 1923-1925/26. 4 v. 

Law 

RocHEBLAVE, Samucl. 

Charies-Nicholas Cochin. 1927. (L'art 
fransais au dix-huitieme siecle) 

q760 C6 
Ron SARD, Pierre de. 

Ronsard lyrique & amoureux. cl922. 

841 R77e 
Rosenthal, Leon. 
Manet, aquafortiste et lithographe. 1925. 
759.4 M275r 
Rosenthal, Leonard. 

Au jardin des gemmes. [1924] 

q736 R8 
Sand, George, pseud. 

Elle et lui. [1926] (Oeuvres de 
George Sand) 843 S21e 



Sue, Eugene. 

Le juif errant. 2 v. 



q843 S9a 



Tallemant des R:fiAUX, Gideon. 

Les belles dames de Paris. 1924. (Le 
livre du lettre) 920.7 T14 

Voltaiee, Francois Marie Arouet de. 
Micromegas. 1923. (Le livre du 
lettre) 843 V93m 



vol. 23, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



303 



CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING 
APRIL, MAY AND JUNE, 1928.t 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to time 
publishing reports, bulletins, etc., which 
are of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the ex- 
ception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in News 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 

Agbicultube Department. Monthly 
bulletin, vol. 17, nos. -1-5, April-May, 
. 1928. 

Special publication no. 83. 

Statistical report of California dairy 
products, 1927, and list of California 
daii-y products plants. 1928. 46 p. 

Banking Depabtment. Bulletin, 
vol. 2, nos. 4-6, April-June, 1928. 

Controller. Annual report of finan- 
cial transactions of municipalities and 
counties of California for the year 1927. 
1928. 219 p. 

Education Department, Division of 
Rural Education. California exchange 
bulletin in rural education, vol. 2, no. 1, 
October, 1927. 1927. 55 p. 

Health, Department of Public. 
California pure foods and drugs acts, sani- 
tary bakery law, cold storage act. Rules 
and regulations and standards of purity 
and decisions rendered by U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Supplement. 1928. 
25 p. 

Weekly bulletin, vol. 7, nos. 

9-20, April-June, 1928. 

Judicial Council. Rules adopted by 
the Judicial Council of California regu- 



lating the business of the Superior Court, 
effective August 1, 1928. 1928. 16 p. 

Library, State. News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, vol. 23, no. 2, April, 
1928. p. 108-220. map. 



The story of California 

in mural paintings. Reprinted from News 
Notes of California Libraries, April, 
1928. 1928. 5 p. 32°. 

Books for the blind 



department. Books for the blind in 
Braille type, April 1, 1927. 1927. 
243 p. 32°. 

News Notes. Reprinted 



t Except when otherwise noted, publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



from News Notes of California Libraries, 
April, 1928. 16 p. 32°. 

Medical Examinees Board. Direc- 
tory of physicians and surgeons, naturo- 
paths, drugless practitioners, chiropodists, 
midwives holding certificates issued under 
the Medical Practice Acts of the state of 
California, including licentiates in the 
government service March 3, 1928. 1928. 
385 p. 

Annual report, 1927, p. 309-85. 

Natural Resources Department. 
Division of Fish and Game. California 
fish and game, vol. 14, no. 2, AprU, 1928. 
p. 107-191. illus. 

Division of Mines and Mining. 

Chapter of report XXIY of the State 
Mineralogist covering mining in Cali- 
fornia and the activities of the Division 
of Mines and Mining, vol. 24, nos. 1-2, 
January-April, 1928. 



Bulletin no. 99. The 

clay resources and the ceramic industry 
of California. 1928. 383 p. illus. 



Summary of operations 

California oil fields, vol. 13, nos. 6-7, 
December, 1927-January, 1928. illus. 
maps. 

Osteopathic Examiners Board. 

Directory of graduates of osteopathic 

schools holding physician and ' surgeon 

licenses, osteopathic licenses, drugless 

practitioner licenses, March 3, 1928. 

1928. 96 p. 

Osteopathic act, p. 63; State medi- 
cal practice act, p. 67. 



304 



n:ews notes of California libraries. 



[July, 1928 



Public Woeks Depaetment. Cali- 
fornia highways and public works, vol. 5, 
nos. 4-6, AprU-June, 1928. illus. maps. 

Division of Water Rights. 

Rules and regulations governing the 
appropriation of water in California in 
accordance with the Water Commission 
Act (Chapter 586, Statutes of 1913) and 
amendments thereto, and some general 
information appertaining to appropriation 
of water. 1928. 31 p. 

Raileoad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco).* Rules of procedure of the Rail- 
road Commission of the state of Cali- 
fornia. Revised to April 30, 1928. 1928. 
29 p. 

Real Estate Department. California 
real estate directory-bulletin, vol. 9, no. 1, 
March 1, 1928. 811 p. 

Reclamation Board. Sacramento and 
San Joaquin Drainage District I'efunding 
act. Reclamation Board act and Reclama- 
tion Board bond act of the state of Cali- 
fornia as in effect on and after July 29, 
1927, with all amendments to and includ- 
ing those of 1927. Legislation bearing 
upon or affecting the Reclamation Board 
and the Sacramento and San Joaquin 
Drainage District. 1928. 123 p. 

St. Fbancis Dam Commission. Report 
of the Commission appointed by Governor 
C. C. Young to investigate the causes 
leading to the failure of the St. Francis 
Dam, near Saugus, California. 1928. 
79 p. maps, illus. 

Seceetaey of State. Election ofBcers 
digest, prepared by the Secretary of State 
and Attorney General. 1928. 51 p. 24°. 

Forms provided for by the 



Univeesity of Califoenia (Berkeley). 
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GiBBS, Sir Philip Hamilton. The street 

of adventure. 10 vols. 

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chancery. (From "The Forsyte 

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N. Y. 



308 



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[July, 1928 



cGabnett, David. Lady into fox. 

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cGuPPY, Estella L. Stories of California 
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Contents : The cypress of Monterey. 
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*cKellee, Helen Adams. My key of 
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*c ■ Out of the dark. 2 vols. 

*c — The world I live in. 



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*cLlNDBERGH, OhARLES AUGUSTUS. 

"We," together with a little of what 
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Two stories interesting to men. 

cRiGGS, Mrs Kate Douglas (Smith) 
WiGGiN. My garden of memory. 9 
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cSandburg, Carl. Abraham Lincoln, 
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cSelected short stories, by Rose Klain 
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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



309 



*cStockton, Feancis Richard. The 
widow's cruise and The lady of Lyons, 
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Both sea yarns. 

cSucKOW, Ruth. Midwestern primitive. 
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cSynon, Maky. Amy Brooks. 

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♦cTerhune, Albert Payson. Catty. 
*c The talisman. 



cTerrill, Lucy Stone. Youth shows but 
half. 

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*cTrain, Arthur Cheyney. The roU of 
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cTyler, Anna Cogswell, comp. Ameri- 
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eWooD, Frances Gilchrist. And hear 
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cWooDWARD, William E. George Wash- 
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The story presumes that the poet 
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cZwilgmeyer, Dikken. Johnny Blossom, 

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meyer, translated by Emilie Poulsson. 

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PIANO. 

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cBlack, Kate Gilmore. Gay mid In 
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cBrockway, Howard. March. Opus 26. 
Suite of small pieces for pianoforte. 

cBrown, Mary Helen. The swans. 

Characteristic piece for pianoforte. 

cChadwick, G. W. Le crepuscule (The 
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Five pieces for pianoforte. 

VOCAL. 

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Lyric by Jack Tellen. 

cBerlin, Irving. Because I love you. 

cBlack, Ben. Moonlight and roses, by 
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cDavis, Benny. Oh, how I miss you 
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cEndor, Chick. Who takes care of the 
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cFall, Richard. O Katharina. 
A one step song. 

cFriml, Rudolph. Rose-Marie. 

Lyrics by Otto Harbach and Oscar 
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cGensler, Lewis E. Cross your heart. 

cGoodman, Lillian Rosedale. Cherie, 
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cHenderson, Ray. Alabamy bound. 

Words by Budd De Sylva and Bud 
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cPiANTADOSi, Al. Pal of my cradle days. 
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cRosoFF, Charles. When you and I 
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Words by Gus Kahn. 

cWarren, Harry. I'm lonely without 
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cWhiting, Richard A. Ukulele lady. 

cWooD, Haydn. Roses of Picardy. 
Words by Fred B. Weatherby. 



310 NEWS NOTES OF CALIEORNIA LIBRARIES. [ July, 1928 


MAGAZINES. 


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J0773 8-28 1400 



Vol. 23, No. 4 



OCTOBER 



1928 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



ANNUAL STATISTICS NUMBER 



California State Library 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO, 1928 



62864 



CONTENTS. 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the CalifobnI 
State Libeaby. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Librarj 
Sacramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacrament 
■California under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Secti( 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



Pi 
MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 31 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 31 

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 3J 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— ANNUAL STATISTICS AND QUARTERLY 

NEWS ITEMS 31 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 41 

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CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 48 

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 4i 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 48 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

Staff, Etc. 49 

Depaetmejmts 49 

Recent Accessions 50 

CAI.IFORNIA State Publications Received Dtjbing Jm,Y, August anp 
Septembeb, 1928 52 

Camfoenia City Publications Received Dubing July, August and 
September, 1928 51 

Books foe the Blind Added During Jxn:,Y, August and SEPiEMBiat, 
1928 : 53i 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA, SHOWING COUNTIES. 



'A' N